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Highland neighborhood plan, 1986

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Title:
Highland neighborhood plan, 1986
Creator:
Community Planning and Development, City and County of Denver
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
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City and County of Denver
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English

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City planning
Community planning
Neighborhood plans
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Denver -- Highland

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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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HIGHLAND
NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
DENVER PLANNING AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT
1986
APRIL


PROPOSED HIGHLAND NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
AS APPROVED BY THE DENVER PLANNING BOARD
December 11, 1985
FOR PRESENTATION TO CITY COUNCIL
April 28, 1986
Prepared by the Denver Planning Office
Betty "B.J." Brooks, Associate City Planner
Mary Avgerinos, Intern
with the assistance of the Highland Steering Committee
Neighborhood Technical Team:
Mary Helen Sandoval, Highland, Neighborhood Housing Services
Kee Warner, Highland, Neighborhood Housing Services
Martin Saiz, North Denver Workshop
Chris Guss, North Denver Workshop
Sal Carpio, Councilman, District 9
Debbie Ortega, Council Aide, District 9
Rick McNeal, Jefferson-Highland-Sunnyside
Rich Kowalsky, Jefferson-Highland-Sunnyside
Eleanor J. Jefferson, Jefferson-Highland-Sunnyside
Tim Boers, Highland, Neighborhood Housing Services
Joe Navarro, Highland, Neighborhood Housing Services
Gloria McCormick, Pecos Plaza Neighbors
Jose V.B. Abeyta, Pecos Plaza Neighbors
Martha Roberts, Pecos Plaza Neighbors
Pete Ablanczy, Century Bank North
Ed Vigil, w. 38th Avenue Merchants Association
Dan Stramiello, Westbrook Partnership
Marvin Kelly, Del Norte Housing Development
Don Bottom, Investment Manager, Colorado Farm Bureau Mutual
Insurance Company
Anthony Capillupo, Mount Carmel
Father Pat, Marilyn Duran, Our Lady of Guadalupe
Bob Patterson, Highland Christian
Maria Crespin, Northside Community Center
Ed Bobian, Businessman
West 38th Avenue Technical Team:
Tim Archuleta, President, W. 38th Avenue Merchants Assc.
"Billie" A. Bramhall, Bramhall and Associates
Ron Abo, Abo Architects and Associates
Don Dethlefs, Chairman, A.I.A. Design Committee
william Lamont, Jr., Director of Planning and Development
The Honorable Federico Pena, MAYOR


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HIGHLAND
Neighborhood Plan
Table of Contents
April, 1986
Introduction.......................................
. Neighborhood Planning ...........................
. Use of the Plan .................................
. Neighborhood Planning Process....................
An Overview .......................................
History ......................................
. Neighborhood Vision..............................
Priority Action Summary.......................
. Summary of Issues .............................
. Summary of Goals ................................
General Recommendation for Highland................
Zoning .......................................
Housing.......................................
. Economic Development...........................
. Traffic and Transportation ......................
Community Facilities .........................
. City Services .................................
Sub-Area Policies and Recommendations .............
. Scottish Village/Bluf,fs Sub-Areas l-ll........
. West 32nd Avenue-North Sub-Areas 12-14.........
Appendices.........................................
. Population
. Land Use and Zoning
. Environment
. Historic Preservation
. Streets and Highways
Community Facilities Inventory
Parks and Open Space
Northside Community Center
Ashland Recreation Center
Schools
Library
La Casa de Salute
Senior Citizen Residences
West 38th Avenue Merchants Association
Highland Neighborhood Housing Services
North Denver Workshop
Del Norte Housing Development Corporation
Day Care Centers
Fire/Police Protection/Crime
Proposed Zone Districts
. City Services Contact List
Guidelines: Highland Block
. Public Right-of-Way Maintenance Location


MARCH, 1986
I. INTRODUCTION
NEIGHBORHOOD PLANNING
Neighborhood Planning is a collaborative process between the
City, citizens, and property owners of a particular area
which actively solicits participation in the formulation of
a plan for a neighborhood. The process helps to enunciate
goals, places issues on the table, generates and tests
alternative ways to achieve the desired ends, proposes a
plan for the area, and spells out policy changes and
investments which should be implemented to help realize that
future. It is a forum in which people initiate rather than
react to change, and in which the various interest groups
within a neighborhood, who may have different goals, work
out their differences to arrive at a mutually satisfactory
plan. The private-public partnership is essential to the
ultimate success of the venture.
USE OF THE PLAN
The neighborhood plan which results is an advisory document
for directing and managing change. It serves as an official
guide for decision makers, including the Denver Planning
Office, the Mayor, various city departments, and upon
adoption by the City Council, also guides that body's
deliberations. It plays the same role for the private
sector, advising residents, businessmen and investors as to
expectations and direction for the neighborhood. The plan
is not an official zone map and, as a guide, does not imply
or deny any implicit rights to a particular zone. Zone
changes, which may be proposed in the plan, must be
initiated under a separate procedure established under the
City and County of Denver Municipal Code.
This plan is intended to promote patterns of land use, urban
design, circulation and services which encourage and
contribute to the economic, social, and physical health,
safety and welfare of the people who live and work in the
neighborhood. The neighborhood plan addresses issues and
opportunities at a scale which is more refined and more
responsive to needs that can be attained under the broad
outlines of the city's Comprehensive Plan. The neighborhood
plan serves as a component of that document.
1




NEIGHBORHOOD PLANNING PROCESS
In May of 1984, the Denver Planning Office became partners
in a community based planning process to update the Highland
Neighborhood Plan of 1976 and to suggest alternatives for
development. Highland is located one half mile north within
walking distance of Denver's Central Business District. The
neighborhood is bounded by Federal Boulevard on the west,
the Valley Highway and Inca Street on the east, West 38th
Avenue on the north, and Speer Boulevard on the south. The
neighborhood's major access and gateways from the south are
provided by the 19th Street bridge, 15th, 16th, and 20th
Street viaducts, and Speer Boulevard at Zuni Street. Major
west access into Highland is provided by W. 32nd and 33rd
Avenues, major north access points are located along 38th
Avenue at Clay, Zuni, Tejon, and Pecos Streets.
This plan was created in cooperation with residents of
Highland and the Denver Planning Office. A technical team
of staff persons from the Highland Neighborhood Housing
Services, North Denver Workshop and Planning Office along
with a steering committee made up of neighborhood
associations, merchants, developers, landowners, and
churches helped to structure and guide the entire process.
Representatives from Council District 9 and various planning
groups also participated. Names of the Highland
Neighborhood Technical Team and Steering Committee members
may be found in the Appendix.
The Highland Neighborhood Housing Services, Inc. directed
and sponsored the neighborhood planning efforts for the
Scottish Village/Bluffs area plan. Concurrently, Pecos
Plaza Neighbors and Glenn Court representatives prepared
small area plans for the eastern! and Bluffs part of the
neighborhood. These plans were integrated into the overall
neighborhood plan for Highland. The overall plan included
updating the area north of 32nd Avenue in terms of land use,
zoning, housing, commercial, traffic issues, public
facilities, general services, open space, and capital
improvements. Alternatives for development were prepared by
dividing the neighborhood into 14 sub-areas. Specific sub-
area policies and recommendations are presented later in the
plan. Since the fall and spring the Steering Committee
developed a "Neighborhood Vision" for the entire area.
Just as neighborhood revitalization itself is a partnership
effort, so this plan was created through team effort.
2


II. AN OVERVIEW
HISTORY
Highland, on the bluffs overlooking Denver, was bounded on
the south by Lake Avenue (later called West Lake Place and
now Speer Boulevard) which had been a 25 foot-deep gully; on
the west by Homer Boulevard, now Lowell Boulevard; on the
north by Prospect Avenue (now West 38th Avenue), and on the
south by Ashland Avenue (now West 29th) and east Gallop
Avenue (now Zuni). In 1887 the Highland Park Company
relinquished its claim to the western part of the area,
losing some of its streets, but other streets such as
Argyle, Dunkeld, Caithness, Firth, Fife and Douglas remain.
In 1875, the village of Highland was incorporated and was
intended to be an elite residential community. The
residents of Highland were proud of their pure artesian
water, beautiful homes and gardens, their churches, their
schools, their trees, their pure morals, and clean air that
was untarnished by smelter or factory smoke. Highlanders
especially proud of their pure morals did not permit
gambling or prostitution at the time when Denver was wide
open and its red light district was known from coast tp
coast.
During the mid 1800's several wealthy men built homes in
Highland. Home building in Highland was spotty with some
estates occupying a whole block, other blocks fully built up
and nearby ones vacant. During the 1800's and 1890's, some
developers had built rows of five to six Victorian one and
two story houses in a block and left the rest vacant. These
first were built on narow twenty-five foot lots allowed at
that time. For this reason any block in Highland today may
contain houses representing the architecture of the 1890's,
1920's, 1940's, and 1950's.
The curving Scottish Village streets of Highland encompassed
a town within a town, where Anglo and German residents
lived. Some who resided there were doctors, lawyers,
plumbers, pharmacists, and grocers. However, the largest
influx of residents occured when the Irish, German, English,
and Italians immigrated to the area in the 1890's. As a
result many churches were built to satisfy the diversity of
its parishioners, e.g., Saint Patricks-Irish Church and
Mount Carmel-Italian Church.
Federal Boulevard was known officially as "the Boulevard,
to elite street of Highlands. When the streets were
alphabetized around 1904 it became Boulevard F and in 1912
Federal Boulevard. Many of the fine homes of Highland
either faced upon the Boulevard or were clustered nearby.
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In July 1890, Highland City Hall was dedicated; it was the
geographic center of the town. The dedication of City Hall
angered the Mayor of Denver, Wolfe Londoner, who many times
attempted to annex Highland but was voted down by the
residents. It was not until 1896 that the town of Highlands
was finally annexed to Denver. The annexation was a result
of the Mayor of Denver's threat to deny Highland access by
viaducts to Denver if the final vote were defeated.
Highland's annexation along with the merging of Denver City
and Auraria in 1861 formed Denver.
Through the course of time the well-to-do who had built in
north Denver moved away. Many of the Irish felt pushed out
by the Italians. The Italians, after being a close
community began to lose its cohesiveness as young families
moved further west to the suburbs. They felt they were
driven out of north Denver, as the Irish did by a new wave
of immigrants.
The new people migrating to north Denver since 1930 called
themselves Mexican American or Spanish American later to be
identified as Chicano or Hispanic. A good percentage of
this bronze race came from southern Colorado and Mexico
speaking Spanish as a first language. Although not
geographically concentrated, the Spanish-sumamed residents
formed a cultural community, building their own catholic
church, Our Lady of Guadalupe in the late 1940's.
It was during the late 1950's early sixties when Highland
began to experience a tremendous transition in its
population. A great number of Chicano/Hispanic families
moved into the low cost housing as a result of the flight to
the suburbs by many young Italians. The change during this
era was rapidly creating a vacuum affect and a time of
social unrest. This explosion in history left a number of
older Italians in economic and political power with a great
majority of voters being of Hispanic backgrounds.
As the 1970's approached the political structures began to
reflect the constituents of the neighborhood. The Partido
La Raza Unida developed an outlet for political direction
where by a number of Spanish-sumamed individuals took
leadership. The mid seventies realized a change of hands
relative to the economy, culture, and politics.
It wasn't until the early eighties that stabilization began
to occur and the rebuilding of the areas physical fabric
began to go on the upswing. Today Highland can be
classified as one of the more stable, yet redeveloping,
older neighborhoods in the city with the well-to-do and the
three waves of new settlers responsible for building the
legacy of Highland.
4


History exr rpts: Rediscovering Northwest Denver- Ruth
Eloise Wiberg, 1976.
NEIGHBORHOOD VISION
The vision for Highland embodied in this plan is an attempt
to capitalize and build upon the tremendous energy already
evident in the neighborhood. Specifically the plan
recognizes that conditions in the neighborhood are changing
for the better, thanks to the work of the Jefferson-
Highland-Sunnyside Neighborhood Association, Highland
Neighborhood Housing Services, Del Norte Housing Development
Corporation, pecos Plaza Neighbors, the North Denver
Workshop, W. 32nd and W. 38th Merchants Association's,
developers, and other community participants of all
neighborhoods in Denver.
Public and private dollars have recently been invested in
Highland and the results have been impressive. These
efforts have helped to turn around decline in the
neighborhood, making it into an area that is increasingly
more stable. But more must be done in terms of effort and
money to help reinforce that trend to the point where the
neighborhood can be viewed as stable.
The overall vision for Highland is to create a stable low
density residential neighborhood which offers a variety of
housing opportunities for low, moderate and middle income
residents. Housing would be available in a balanced mix of
types and costs which would enhance the existing socio-
economic mix of people living in the neighborhood.
Creating a strong residential base is dependent upon zoning
consistent with one's aims. Therefore, the current zoning
must be changed to match and encourage compatible land uses.
Just as a change in zoning is tied into the above vision, so
are change in traffic patterns. One-way streets should be
studied for conversion to two-ways, linkages in and out of
the neighborhood must be established and better traffic
controls need to be realized.
To support the needs of Highland residents, it is envisioned
that there be strong commercial areas that provide
neighborhood shopping and services and create employment for
local residents. New retailers will be encouraged to locate
in the neighborhood and existing commercial establishments
fixed up to strengthen Highland's economic base.
In many sub-areas of the neighborhood, housing co-exists
with commercial uses. A positive relationship between the
two is contingent upon providing appropriate buffering where
residential and commercial uses abut, landscaping of parking
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lots, strong code enforcement and overall sensitivity toward
existing neighbors.
Consistent alley and sidewalk maintenance and improvements,
upkeep of public right-of-ways, removal of junk cars, weeds,
and debris from the neighborhood needs to occur in order to
enhance neighborhood pride and image. Therefore, a clean
environment is desired for Highland.
The "Vision would be incomplete if the neighborhood were
not supported by adequate school and day care facilities,
sufficient community and recreation centers, new parks, and
bike and pedestrian paths throughout the neighborhood with
strong connections to the Downtown and Central Platte
Valley.
PRIORITY ACTION SUMMARY
The following priority action summary defines nine major
issues and identifies their priority and geographic area.
These issues as summarized are meant to be used as a tool to
help the residents of Highland select projects in accord
with what is desired by a majority of people in the
neighborhood.
Implementation of this plan will be a joint effort between
neighborhood associations, developers, non-profit groups-
agencies, and various city, state, and federal departments.
6


Fund off-site Improvements related to rehab, or new
housing.
Provide new affordable housing on vacant lots.
Provide more housing rehab, funds.
Improve condition and supply of low cost housing.
Encourage development of coop and senior citizens
housing.
Preserve historic structures and ensure that new
development Is of a compatible scale and character.
Continue "5 eost wanted strategy to ieprove the
condition of vacant and abandoned buildings.
Create a balance of ownar/ranter housing
opportunities.
Mininize displacement by providing counselling and
assistance tor hone purchases.
Encourage eixed use projects.
Second Priorities:
Create historic districts.
O'
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3. Economic Developnent and Employment
First Priorities:
Support the W. 38th Avenue N.B.R. district plans.
Upgrade deteriorated retail areas.
Eliminate certain uses In commercial areas i.a.
billboards, problem bars, etc.
Promote infill development In vacant land or abandoned
structures.
Strengthen neighborhood businesses by targeting state
and local rehab, dollars.
Encourage development of lou-oidrise offices (4-6
stories)
Second Priorities:
Encourage new neighborhood serving businesses.
Increase neighborhood employment opportunities
Neighborhood-wide
Scattered sites
Neighborhoodwide
Neighborhoodwide
Where possible
Sub-area 9,12, and the Highland Block
Neighborhoodwide
Neighborhoodwide
Neighborhoodwide especially in subarea 13
Sub-areas 8, 10, and 11
Sub-area 6, Potter Highlands (sub-area 12) expand Stoneman's
Row (sub-area 9)
W. 38th Avenue Federal Boulevard to Inca Street
W. 38th Avenue, Tejon Street (W. 32nd to W. 33rd), W. 32nd
Avenue and Zunl, Highland Block, and Zuni Street (south of
W. 32nd)
Speer Boulevard, W. 32nd Avenue, 20th Street viaduct, sub-
area 5 and 13.
Sub-areas 8, 10, 11 and scattered sites
W. 38th Avenue, Tejon Street, Zuni Plaza, (sub-area 5)
Sub-area 4, 8, 10, 11 and south of W. 29th along Zuni.
W. 38th Avenue, Zuni Plaza (sub-area 5) and W. 32nd Avenue
(sub-area 1)
Neighbor hood-wide


HIGHLAND NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
PRIORITY ACTION SUMMARY
O'
(U
1. Zoning and Land Oaa
First Priorities:
Change the B- toning to eliminate new industrial,
adult and automobile uses.
Encourage autoaoblle oriented uses along Speer and W.
36th Avenue between Osage and Kalanath.
Rezone areas where predoainant land use is low,
aoderate density residential but current zoning allows
aore permissive density and/or uses.
Deal with non-compatible land uses: In B-4 where
industrial uses are non-coapatible take the following
actions:
elialnate these uses as they become obsolete
landscape and buffer existing industrial from
residential uses.
. discourage tonig changes which allow new
industrial to locate in the B-4
. enforce existing codes.
- Encourage development of the Colorado Farm Bureau lands
through a P.U.D.
Strengthen code enforcement
- Enforce law requiring absentee landlords to continue
upkeep of properties.
Second Priorities:
- Develop vacant land
Reuse vacant buildings.
Third Priority:
Deal with non conforming land uses by:
encourage periodic review of non-conforming
structures
. encourage use of PUD'S for plans that exceed
permitted densities and which are compatible to
neighborhood goals.
GEOGRAPHIC__h BIJ
Sub-areas 10, yi, 13, and along W. 38th Avenue.
Subareas 4 and 13
Subareas 3, 6, and parts of 1.
Sub-areas 1, 10, 11 and 13.
Dog House Tavern
Sub-areas 10, 11, 13 and 14.
Sub-areas 4, 5, 7, 10, 11, 13, 14 and along H. 38th Avenue
Neighborhood-wide
Sub-area B
Ne ighborhoodw ide
Neighborhoodwide
Sub-areas 8, 19, 11 and scatters sites. There are 42
parcels vacant according to a 1985 CDA inventory.
There are 34 abandoned buildings according to a 1985 CDA
inventory.
Neighborhoodwide
Colorado Farm Bureau H. 29th and Umatilla Highland Block.
IV. 29th Ave.8 Wyandot (Sub area 8 and 11)
2. Housing Maintenance and Development
First Priorities:
- Increase home ownership and publicize housing programs. Neighborhoodwide
Continue to improve deteriorated housing. Neighborhoodwide


4. Traffic and Transportation
First Priorities:
Conduct Traffic Study
- Study the convarslon of one-way streets, Pecos/Osage
and 3 3 rd/33 th.
Install better school crossing signage on W. 29th
\ Avenue.
y Improve 16th Street bridge and 19th/20th Street
bridges.
Improve parking availability and better access.
Second priorities:
Install RTD bus shelters
Install traffic diverters and enforce traffic
Hire school crossing guards.
Third Priorities:
Lessen traffic impacts due to future development.
cn
O - Check re-timing of lights on Clay
Develop pedestrian and bike paths.
5. Public Facilities and Social Service Heads
First Priorities:
Resolve the overcrowded school problem.
Upgrade the Northside Community Center (build a new
center or rehab, old)
Upgrade the Call to Action building and grounds.
Interior office renovation
exterior facade improvements
basketball court and parking access
Second Priorities:
Investigate the possibility of building a new swimming
pool extension of Ashland Recreation Center.
Neighborhoodwide
Sub-areas 12 and 13
South of Valdez Elementary School
Downtown connections
Sub-area 6 and along W. 38th Avenue
W. 32nd and W. 38th/Tejon and 16th and Boulder
Dunkeld Place (sub-area 2)
Dunkeld Place (sub-area 2)
Sub-area 8, 10, and 11
Clay Street (north of W. 32nd Avenue)
Sub-areas 8 and 9
Valdez and Bryant-Webster Elementary schools (sub-areas 3
and 13)
W. 35th Avenue and Pecos (sub-area 13)
H. 34th Avenue and Pecos (sub-area 13)
Sub-area 2


Create and promote more day care programs.
6. Parks and Open Space
First Prioritlaai
Create aora park apace.
Fund La Raza/Coluabus Park improvements.
Create more and encourage local ownership of coaaunlty
gardens.
Improve maintenance and lighting in Hirshorn Park.
7. Urban Design and Image
First Priorities)
Improve the appearance of neighborhood gateways by
landscaping public properties.
Condemn and ra-hab abandoned buildings.
Establish dssign guidelines for commercial, industrial
and residential uses or areas.
Create historic trail system and pedestrian/bike paths.
Encourage lighting of significant Church steeples.
Strengthen connections to downtown.
Second Priorities)
Haintain and improve public land between 1-25 and
neighborhood.
Landscape existing and new parking lots in commercial
and residential areas.
Strengthen residential and commercial right-of-ways.
Preserve view from Asbury Church to downtown.
B. city/State Services
First Priorities:
Encourage better police protection and crime prevention
programs.
Neighborhoodwide
Rockmont Park Central Platte Valley, linear park along
Inca Street, W. 37th Avenue and Decatur, carriage lots at w.
34th and Quivas, W. 37th and Wyandot and others.
W. 38th Avenue and Osage Street
Neighborhoodwide, especially at W. 33rd and Shoshone
Sub-area 10
West 38th Avenue and Inca, Zuni and Speer Boulevard. 15th
and Central and the 20th Street viaduct.
Ne ighborhoodw ids
Sub-areas 10 and 11
Sub-areas 8 and 9
All historic churches
15th, 16th, 20th Street bridges
Along the eastern and southern edge of the neighborhood.
Heighborhoodwide
W. 38th Avenue, Zuni Street (south of W. 32nd Avenue), w.
32nd Avenue, W. 30th Avenue at Wyandot, Central Street (20th
Street viaduct to Kalamath)
Sub-area 6 south to the downtown.
Neighborhoodwide


Encourage sort code enforcement
Develop contract with Public Works to maintain
City/Stata owned property.
Encourage better street cleaning and alley maintenance.
9. Other Capital Improvements
First Priorities*
Rebuild storm sewers, and improve 18th Avenue
underpass.
Continue sidewalk repair
Second Priorities*
o\ - Fund alley paving
ft
Continue to maintain street and alley lighting
programs.
Neighborhoodwide
Primarily along the edges of the neighborhood, carriage
and city owned properties.
Neighborhoodwide
N.B.R. district
Neighborhoodwide
East of Fife Court between Caithness and Argyle
W. 34th, 35th, Eliot and Decatur
W. 32nd and Quivas mid-Block
W. 35th, 36th, Zuni and Alcott
W. 35th, 36th, Wyandot and Zuni
W. 34th, 35th, Vallejo and Tejon
Neighborhood-wide
Lots


SUMMARY OF ISSUES
Highland's central location and proximity to the Platte
River Greenway, excellent 1-25 highway access, solid
affordable housing, and good views of downtown and mountains
are a few reasons why people enjoy living in the
neighborhood. The neighborhood is resourceful in that its
residents are strong in spirit, will, and determination.
Highland offers an environment for living that celebrates
its diverse ethnicity, social interaction, and economic mix.
The area has created a sense of "neighborhood by nurturing
its locations and providing for cooperative relations with
people for a stronger community.
The neighborhood has welded a strong political base which
has helped protect it from further deterioration.
Commercial and residential redevelopment has occurred in
various parts of the neighborhood. To continue this
positive trend the following issues must be resolved and
goals attained.
1. Zoning and Land Use Conflicts
Highland is an older neighborhood with low density
housing1 it's northern section is more stable than its
southern half. Residential impacts are caused by the
permissive zoning south of W. 32nd Avenue and along the
eastern edge which allows for intense commercial
development while existing land uses are developed at a
significantly lower density.
Non-compatible land uses that are industrial or
automobile related have had negative impacts on
adjacent residential areas. These impacts have been
aggravated due to the lack of code enforcement and
problems with absentee landlords. These problems can
be found primarily south of W. 32nd Avenue and along
the eastern edges of the neighborhood.
2. Housing Maintenance and Development
Nearly 60% of the housing in Highland is renter
occupied with a balanced mix of single and multi-family
structures reflecting several generations of housing.
The majority of the housing stock was built prior to
1939. There has been some housing deterioration but
housing rehabilitation and infill development have been
taking place in the last seven years. Nonetheless,
housing sale prices are lower than the city's average
selling price.
Preservation of historic structures is a critical
factor for the neighborhood in that it helps maintain
the area's image and pride. Because Highland is one of
7


Denver's oldest areas the housing stock needs continued
improvements and maintenance.
3. City/State Services
When doing a comparison a noticeable difference in
terms of the level of care and maintenance is found in
the more stable neighborhoods than in Highland. Code
enforcement and more city services are sorely needed in
Highland to correct the adverse image created by the
lack of street/alley and sidewalk cleaning, the need
for dumpsters, proliferation of junk cars and debris,
and lack of upkeep of city/state owned property,
especially public right-of-ways. The neighborhood also
feels the need for improved crime prevention programs
and police protection.
4. Urban Design, Image, and Capital Improvements
There is a lack of attention paid to gateways,
landscaping of parking lots, abandoned buildings and
the lack of sidewalk and alley improvement and alley
paving. Efforts are currently underway to better the
image of the neighborhood through identification of
alleys and sidewalks that need repair, by programming
flands to upgrade the storm sewer at the W. 38 th Avenue
underpass, and coordinating with the Department of
Public Works regarding right-of-way maintenance. As a
tool for assisting developers with future projects the
neighborhood and Steering Committee have prepared
development guidelines for the "Highland Bock" at 15th
and Boulder/Central, design guidelines for W. 38th
Avenue Neighborhood Business Revitalization District,
and have suggested specific goals for each sub-area of
the neighborhood.
5. Open Space and Public Facilities
Paries and recreational facilities are extremely limited
in the Highland area occupying only 10 acres of the
neighborhood's 417 net acres (which exclude streets).
Although neighborhood residents have access to the
Platte River Greenway and Confluence Park, Columbus/La
Raza Park, Viking Park, and Highland Park none of these
open space areas are located within the neighborhood's
boundaries. The problem of lack of open space and
facilities such as a swimming pool and ball fields
becomes critical when a comparison is made between
Highland's 34 percent youth population figure and the
significantly lower 26% figure of Denver. Particularly
there is a lack of play areas for organized activities
and needed public refuge space for residents who lack
front and backyard play space. Recommendations for
8


improving this problem are found in the Priority Action
Summary.
In addition to the number of youth, the 1980 U.S.
Census shows an increase of senior citizens in Highland
from 11% in 1970 to 13%. These two segments of the
population need access to all kinds of community
facilities including community and recreation centers,
day care centers, and schools.
Additional issues equally important as the above are
1) the overcrowding of public schools( currently
Bryant-Webster elementary school is renting space from
the Northside Community Center due to overcrowding
derived from improper student enrollment projections),
2) the lack of day care and extended day care
facilities to meet the needs of a growing female labor
force with children under 6 years of age, 3) the
deterioration of the Northside Community Center, and 4)
the lack of adequate swimming pool facilities.
6. Economic Development and Employment
The Steering Committee conducted a survey of Highlands
commercial districts and found that there were several
common characteristics. These common elements were:
A. commercial areas contained a mix of residential,
retail and office uses;
B. the areas are generally old and deteriorating with
vacant retail and office space e.g. Tejon Street,
W. 32nd Avenue, Zuni Street (south of W. 32nd
Avenue) and W. 38th Avenue (especially east of
Tejon) ;
C. the businesses lack landscaped parking and had
limited or no buffers to the residential uses;
D. The intensity of development permitted by zoning
often exceeds actual land use;
E. there are districts where commercial is
unsuccessful that have potential as residential
areas;
F. a great number of commercial areas are
predominantly neighborhood serving, and
G. there are certain neighborhood retail uses desired
by the residents which are not being met within
the area.
9


It has been suggested that commercial areas identified
and prioritized in this plan be upgraded through the
use of public/private funds and neighborhood businesses
should be encouraged to employ local people. The
Neighborhood Revitalization District along W. 38th
Avenue is an example of a strategy to achieve the
commercial goals of this plan.
7. Traffic/Transportation
It has been identified both in the 1976 Highland Plan and
through the current 1985 discussion that one-way streets
have tended to divide Highland and break up the residential
character of the neighborhood. Other traffic concerns
identified have related to pedestrian safety, access to the
Central Platte Valley, and the need for new bike, bus and
pedestrian routes. These concerns and others will be
addressed in a future study to be coordinated by the Denver
Planning Office.
SUMMARY OF GOALS
General goals as well as objectives were developed for the
neighborhood which are identified below. These goals
resulted from many months of discussion, debate, and
collaboration among people in the community. Specific
recommendations and/or actions are also detailed in the sub-
area section of this plan.
Goal One: Neighborhood Pride
Heighten the sense of neighborhood pride by fostering and
enhancing the historical, cultural, and aesthetic richness
of Highland.
* design guidelines have been prepared for two vital
areas of Highland, West 38th Avenue and the Highland
Block at 15th and Central.
* enforce city codes regarding housing conditions, and
the sanitary conditions of yards, streets, and alleys.
Goal Two: Residential Character
Maintain and stabilize the residential character of the
neighborhood by preserving and improving the conditions of
the existing housing, creating more housing opportunities,
and increasing home ownership.
* The City should continue to work in cooperation with
non-profit housing corporations, including Highland
Neighborhood Housing Services and Del Norte Housing
Development Corporation on programs such as
10


rehabilitation assistance, land acquisition funds,
loans and matching grants, and assistance with off-site
improvements that would improve the overall urban
design of a project.
* utilize the Highland Neighborhood Housing Services
Exterior Rehabilitation Program for the Scottish
Village/Bluffs area.
* promote compatible residential development on vacant
land through the area.
t improve the conditions of absentee-owned housing
through code enforcement.
* ensure that equal access to decent rental housing
opportunities is accomplished by enforcing the City's
absentee landlord registered agent requirement.
* encourage more home-ownership, cooperatives, rental and
senior citizen housing as part of new developments on a
project-by-project basis to stabilize the area.
* fund more housing rehabilitation assistance.
* continue publicizing problem properties through the "5
most wanted" list strategy and support other similar
endeavors.
Goal Three: Housing Choice
Minimize displacement of long-time residents of Highland and
provide a balanced mix of housing types and costs for new
and existing residents.
* encourage home-ownership, cooperatives, rental and
senior citizen housing that is affordable for lower
income people.
* encourage a mixture of residential types and costs as a
part of new development.
Goal Four: Business
Promote the improvement of existing desirable businesses and
encourage new businesses to locate in Highland.
* work with the Economic Development Agency to get money
allocated for development projects in Highland.
* require landscaping of new developments and encourage
existing businesses to improve landscaping.
n


* encourage businesses to conduct joint advertising that
promotes both their business and the surrounding
Highlands area.
* promote the hiring of neighborhood residents by local
merchants.
* promote development efforts in Highland.
Goal Five: Neighborhood Participation
Pursue neighborhood participation and involvement in
development efforts to ensure new projects compatibility and
benefit to the character of Highland.
* promote ongoing dialogue between neighborhood
residents, landowners, and developers regarding
potential and current development projects through
Jefferson-Highland-Sunnyside Neighborhood Association.
W. 38th Avenue Merchants Association and Highland
N.H.S. committees.
* promote public and/or non-profit participation in
projects which further the goals of the neighborhood.
* make developers aware that the neighborhood is
available for consultation on potential projects and
provide them with guidelines for appropriate
development.
Goal Six: Zoning
Lessen future neighborhood development impacts and promote
zoning changes which are consistent with neighborhood goals.
* support the revamping and changing of the present
zoning ordinance, especially as it relates to the B-4
zone district and as it relates to the specific
recommendations in the plan.
* encourage neighborhood associations to continue
commenting on zone map amendments received by the
Zoning Administration.
12


III. General Recommendations for Highland
A. Zoning
The plan recommends that a number of areas be rezoned to
bring zoning in conformance with existing land uses. This
would create some nonconforming uses; several
recommendations were developed and are described below to
deal with non-conforming uses. All such zoning changes need
to be fully debated in City Council and would have to have
that body's approval before any map changes could be made.
New zone districts which would apply to individual sub-areas
were prepared and are intended to address problems
identified in each sub-area. These zone districts suggest
that certain uses be eliminated as a use by right in the
B-4. In all, three variations of the B-4 are recommended;
each proposes to waive specific uses and add conditions as
they relate to specific areas.
Additionally a moderate density residential zone is proposed
to replace the existing R-3 zoning south of W. 32nd Avenue,
again to bring zoning in conformance with land use and help
to stabilize the residential areas. The proposed zone
districts may be found in the Appendix.
A recommendation is made to install landscaped buffers to
separate commercial uses from residential uses where such
properties adjoin each other. Finally, height limits are
suggested for various sub-areas of the neighborhood.
Recommendations:
Non-Conforming Uses:
Upon change of ownership or use it is recommended to
institute a procedure which would allow review of any
commercial use that is now or becomes nonconforming, by the
Board of Adjustment Zoning. This review should occur every
3 years to ensure compatibility with surrounding residential
uses. If property remains vacant for more than 6 months it
is recommended that it should lose it's legal nonconforming
status. Neighborhood input to the Board of Adjustment-
Zoning is encouraged to ensure the use is allowed by zoning
regulations when a nonconforming use changes to another
nonconforming use.
Infill developments that may require a slightly higher
density than what is allowed in the R-2 should be
required to use the P.U.D. process. This process is
encouraged for commercial home occupations that are
outside the home but are on the same parcel of land.
The following guidelines are proposed:
13


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1. proposed uses should be compatible in character
and materials and provide appropriate buffering to
the surrounding properties.
2. proposed uses should be low traffic generators.
3. proposed uses should not create parking, noise, or
pollution problems.
4. Examples of acceptable uses are senior citizen
housing, mom and pop shops, and low density multi-
family housing.
It is proposed that development guidelines be
established for key parcels of land similar to those
already developed for the Highland Block and the
Colorado Farm Bureau land. These guidelines would
encourage developer(s) to plan structures that are in
harmony with the surrounding area.
B. Housing
Highland is a neighborhood that is redeveloping at a minor
to moderate rate according to the Neighborhood
Classification Preliminary Report, Denver Planning Office,
July 1984. The criteria used to classify the neighborhoods
included information on housing trends, compatibility
between land use and zoning, and a survey of general
conditions.
According to the Denver Planning Office 1984 Housing Detail
Report, Highland had 3,803 housing units of which 1,639 were
single-family units, 1,966 multi-family units, 165 mixed
residential units and 33 condominium and public scattered
sites. Of the total housing units, 43% are single family
and 57% are multi-family dwellings.
Highland's housing reflects many generations of existence.
Approximately 60% of the homes were built prior to 1939.
During the early 40's through the late 50's 922 units were
built. Approximately 84% of the housing in Highland was
built by 1960.
When comparing Highland's age of housing to Denver's, 1980
census statistics reveal that housing in Denver is by far
younger than the housing stock of Highland's. Nearly 71% of
Denver's housing was built after 1940 while 65% of the
housing units in Highland were built prior to 1939.
The neighborhood lost 302 dwelling units from 1970 to 1980.
This loss is directly related to the age and poor condition
of housing. According to the 1980 census, 8% of Highland's
rental units lack complete plumbing compared to 2% in
Denver.
U


Housing deterioration is evident in northeast Highland and
is the most severe on the eastern edge near 1-25. However,
rehabilitation is evident in the Scottish Village area.
This change in housing conditions is directly attributed to
the efforts of Highland Neighborhood Housing Services. Over
the last 10 years, grants and loans totalling $1,033,790
have been provided by Denver's Community Development Agency
and D.U.R.A. for rehabilitation of 160 units of housing in
Highland.
The Denver Planning Office Land Use file indicates that the
average selling price for a single family home in Highland
has been lower than the city's average selling price. 1983
figures show an average selling price for a single family
home in Highland was $54,866, compared to a Denver average
of $79,798. The figure is considerably lower in census
tract 11.02 (east of Tejon) where average price for single
family homes was $41,400. Average selling prices for homes
in census tract 4.02 (west of Tejon) were $61,960. In 1983,
93 homes were sold in the neighborhood.
In 1984, the Housing Detail Report indicated that Highland's
owner occupancy was approximately 35%. This figure equals
the general Denver percentage. There were 18 vacant and
abandoned buildings in Highland as reported by the Building
Department on January, 1984.
Recommendations:
- Improve and stabilize the condition of housing in
Highland.
. upgrade absentee owned housing;
. inform landlords about rehabilitation programs
i.e. Highland N.H.S. Exterior Rehab. Program and
Multi-family Rehab. Program;
. provide more housing rehabilitation funds;
. encourage private rehabilitation;
. increase code enforcement;
enforce law requiring landlords to have an agent
in the City to assure equal rights to decent
rental housing;
. continue the 5 most wanted" strategy through
Highland N.H.S., and encourage other similar
endeavors.
15


Create a better balance between owner occupied and
rental homes and minimize displacement.
. increase home ownership opportunities;
. provide low interest loans to renters for home
purchase;
. encourage purchase of rented single family houses;
. provide counseling for home purchase;
. promote a mixture of low and moderate income
housing on vacant land;
. encourage communication between developers of
infill housing and surround neighbors.
. encourage a variety of residential mixed use
proj ects;
. create more housing opportunities;
. develop more senior citizen housing;

. promote coop-housing.
Target local and state rehabilitation funding for
Highland. Examples of resources are:
. Colorado Housing Finance Authority funds
. Community Development Block Grant funds
. Skyline Housing funds
Designate the following as historic districts:
. Potter Highlands
. Stoneman's Row extension to the northside of W.
28th Avenue
. Sub-area 6 (Bluffs residential area)
Preserve historic structures
Improve the condition of residential parking lots
. require parking lots to be landscaped
. encourage better maintenance
16


c.
Economic Development
Business development and redevelopment are needed in the
neighborhood to upgrade deteriorated retail areas, attract
new businesses, increase employment opportunities, provide
income for resident and improve the quality of community
life. H-i'-1-' vtail businesses have declined due to
p- lie relatively low level of expendable
i / The residents of Highland wish to
e. / for more neighborhood shopping and
s / destination shopping for areawide
re
A Highland's commercial districts was
coi _ing Committee. The following five
con .acricts were identified as priority
revitalization areas: 1) West 38th Avenue from Federal
Boulevard to Inca Street, 2) West 32nd to West 33rd Avenue
and Tejon Street, 3) West 32nd Avenue and Zuni Street, 4)
Fifteenth Street-Boulder to Central, and 5) Zuni Street-
south from Caithness Place to Speer Boulevard.
Additionally, eight secondary revitalization areas were
identified. Both primary and secondary areas are described
separately but not necessarily in ranked order.
Primary Revitalization Areas
1. West 38th Avenue Federal Boulevard to Inca Street
During the course of developing this plan, the West 38th
Avenue Merchants Association was incorporated to focus on
revitalizing the West 38th Avenue corridor. The idea to
develop the Association came from the J.H.S. Neighborhood
Association's Board of Directors and general membership.
The Merchant's Association recruited a technical team to
conduct a series of activities to determine the potentials
and opportunities for the Avenue.
The research gathered was used to apply for a Neighborhood
Revitalization District which was granted in May, 1985. The
N.B.R. district is a joint venture between the City's
Economic Development Agency, and local merchants. Technical
Team members names can be found in the Appendix.
The corridor is described in four sections a) Federal
Boulevard to Alcott Street, b) Alcott Street to Tejon
Street, c) Tejon Street to Lipan, and d) Lipan Street to
Inca Street. General characteristics and recommendations
for the entire corridor are defined as are specific
recommendations for each section.
General Characteristics of the Corridor: West 38th Avenue
is an urban street that connects two neighborhoods,
Sunnyside and Highland. The nature of the street is unique
17


in that is contains both commercial and residential
properties. Residents feel that this unique characteristics
should be maintained. To satisfy the goals of the N.B.R.
district and preserve the mixed use character the following
recommendations are suggested.
Recommendations:
Housing should be maintained and improved where
appropriate. Deferred maintenance may not be used as a
justification for a rezoning.
Housing units lost as a result of commercial
development should be replaced somewhere in the
Sunnyside and Highland neighborhoods. There should be
a covenant made between the developer(s) and
neighborhood organization to do so.
Commercial revitalization should adhere to the N.B.R.
design guidelines.
Consideration should be given to rezoning selected B-4
parcels along the avenue to a modified B-4 zone
district descrit n the appendix.
a. Federal B
Char act *
Reconmen.
Imprc
Emphas.
Mcott Street:
idential and retail area.
; is B-2 and R-2.
\
^ades and expand T.J's Food store.
/ Intersection.
Streetscape residential and commercial right-of-ways.
Improve parking ingress and egress at the W. 38th
Avenue and Eliot Street shopette.
Continue providing retail services to the neighborhood
and broader community.
Encourage the management at the 7-11 store to better
maintenance of their grounds.
b. Alcott Street to Tejon Street:
Character: Primarily single family and low density
residential with retail and parking at the
north and southwest corners of Tejon.
Current zoning is B-2 and R-2.
18


Recommendations:
- Preserve and improve all residential units.
- Encourage streetscaping on both sides of the street.
- Discourage commercial encroachment.
c. Tejon Street to Lipan street:
Character: Mixed use residential and commercial with
parking, open space, and industrial uses.
Current zoning is primarily R-2 with B-2 and
P-1 on Tejon Street and B-4 between Osage and
Lipan Street. Generally the buildings are in
fair condition. As you move further east
from pecos Street the buildings begin to show
signs of deterioration.
Recommendations:
Landscape and improve commercial facades along both
sides of the street between Quivas and Lipan Street.
Encourage the parking lot at Osage Street to be
landscaped.
Encourage landscaped medians, where possible.
Study the parking and traffic patterns.
d. Lipan street to Inca street:
Character: Predominately retail and light industrial
uses. The area is severely deteriorated with
several vacant structures. Current zoning is
B-4, 1-0, and l-i.
Recommendations:
Support ethnic restaurants and food store.
- Provide appropriate buffering between residential and
commercial uses.
Upgrade the underpass and monitor the progress of the
storm sewer design and construction being conducted by
the Public Works Department.
2. Tejon Street West 32nd to W.33rd Avenue:
Character: Mixed use neighborhood retail and office.
Current zoning is B-4.
19


Recommendations :
Replace deteriorated commercial uses with mixed use
residential and office projects.
Encourage new businesses to locate into vacant
buildings.
Encourage sreetscape and facade improvements.
- Consideration and support should be given to rezoning
the B-4 to the modified B-4 zone district described in
the Appendix.
3. West 32nd Avenue and Zuni Street:
Character: Mixed use neighborhood retail, office, and
residential. Current zoning is B-4.
In February, 1985 Highland N.H.S. received $150,000 from the
Community Development Agency for land acquisition. Seven
moderate income housing units will be developed on the
northeast comer.
There is a strong concern in the neighborhood regarding
crime problems in this area related to the Mohagony Bar
Solutions to the problem should continue to be explored and
actions carried out by the community residents, Liquor
Board, and police department.
Recommendations:
Provide rehabilitation funds for the wier Building.
- Encourage unified signage and streetscape.
- Discuss anti-crime solutions with bar owners.
*Note: Refer to Scottish Village/Bluffs Subarea 5 for
additional information.
4. Fifteenth Street Boulder to Central Street:
Character: Fifteenth Street and Central, better known as
the "Highland Block" is one of the most
significant blocks in the neighborhood. This
parcel of land is located on the fringe of
the lower Bluffs with easy highway access and
good views which makes it extremely
attractive to developers. The area is a
gateway which links downtown with Highland
and when developed can set a precedent for
trends in the neighborhood.
20


The site has two historic buildings virtually unoccupied
with approximately 90% of the block vacant. Current zoning
is R-3, B-3, and B-4 with 40' height waivers on the western
half of the block. Development guidelines were prepared for
this parcel by the Highland Coalition (a united front of
neighborhood associations) and can be found in the appendix.
Recommendations:
- Encourage unified development through the P.U.D.
process.
- Encourage a mixed use office, retail, and residential
development.
- Encourage a higher percentage of residential as part of
the development.
*Note: Refer to Scottish Village/Bluffs Subarea 11 for
further details.
5. Zuni Street Caithness south to Speer Boulevard:
Character: Neighborhood retail with mixed use
residential, services, and vacant land.
Current zoning is B-4.
Zuni Street is a main thoroughfare and gateway into
Highland. Area revitalization should be promoted by
coordinating redevelopment of the Tallmadge,Romeo and the
old North Denver Bank buildings including the Zuni Plaza.
The area should remain mixed use.
Recommendations:
*Note Refer to Scottish Village/Bluffs Subarea 5 for
details.
21


Secondary Revitalization Areas
1. West 32nd Avenue and Clay Street:
Character: Neighborhood retail with ethnic restaurants
of combined Latin cultures.
Recommendations:
Economic development resources and technical assistance
should be made available to businesses.
Encourage continued maintenance of streetscape through
the W.32 Avenue Businessmen's Association.
Encourage new business to fill vacant storefronts.
2. West 30th Avenue and Wyandot Street:
Character: Neighborhood retail and office. The area is
people oriented with signs of revitalization.
Recommendations:
- Continue to improve building facades.
- Encourage streetscaping.
- Encourage compatible office uses and recruit new
businesses.
3. Tejon Street West 33rd to West 37th Avenue:
Character: Mixed use residential and retail area.
Business structures are generally in good
condition. The condition of residential
varies from fair to good but are adversely
affected by commercial encroachment. Current
zoning is primarily B-3.
Recommendations:
- Encourage unified facade, signage, and streetscape
improvements on Tejon Street.
Support any efforts to rezone the B-3 along the east
side of Tejon Street between W.33rd and W35th Avenue
(north of the Draperies) to R-2 or R-2-A.
- Encourage housing infill on vacant land at West 34th
Avenue including Maroon Bells retail site.
22


4. Tejon Street and W. 38th Avenue:
Character: Mixed use commercial, retail, and
residential. Current zonie is B-2.
Recommendation:
- encourage merchants and residents to participate in the
streetscpae, lighting, and facade programs of the
N.B.R. district.
This business zone is in fairly good condition. There are
no vacancies or infill possibilities although landscaping,
lighting, and unified facade improvements would help to
strengthen the node.
5. West 34th Avenue Osage to Mariposa Street:
Character: There are a number of bars in this area, with
the exception of Little Pepinas, the area is
brought down because of unsightly conditions
of the bars and lack of landscaping.
Recommendations:
- Encourage strict code enforcement.
- Control the number of liquor licenses allowed in the
area.
Encourage landscaping, upkeep, and police security.
6. 3300 Osage Street and W. 37th Avenue and Navajo Street:
Character: Ethnic retail specialty area. Current zoning
is B-4.
Recommendations:
- Support any effort to rezone the B-4 to modified B-4
zone district described in the appendix.
Improve landscaping and parking near Mancinelli's and
redevelop the northeast and west corners.
- Reinforce and strengthen the W. 37th and Navajo retail
area.
- Encourage new compatible uses.
23


7. Central Street between 20th Street viaduct and Kalamath
Street:
*Note: Refer to West 32nd Avenue-North Subarea 14 for
details.
8. Speer Boulevard:
*Note: Refer to Scottish Village/Bluffs Subarea 4 for
details.
D. Traffic and Transportation
Highland is served by a variety of forms of transportation
facilities including bikepaths, local streets, and major
freeways. The major east-west traffic routes in and around
the neighborhood are W. 29th, W. 32nd, W. 33rd, W. 35th, and
W. 38th Avenues. The major north-south traffic routes are
provided by Speer and Federal Boulevards, Osage, Pecos,
Tejon, Zuni, and Clay Streets. Traffic counts for 1981 in
general reflect a reduction of automobile movement when
compared to 1975 with the exception of W. 38th Avenue, and
Federal Boulevard which showed an increase in traffic.
Updated traffic counts will be reflected in the future
traffic study for Highland.
To create a strong residential neighborhood various traffic
strategies need to be implemented. Traffic concerns and
recommendations identified below should be used as a
premise to help guide discussion and test alternatives for
resolving traffic problems.
Street and Highways
1. One Way-Streets
It is the opinion of the Neighborhood that the residential
character of the neighborhood is being hindered by the major
one-way streets in Highland. Traffic volumes reported by
the Department of Public Works indicated that Osage Street
traffic volume slightly decreased from 5,350 in 1975 to
5,300 in 1981 as well as Pecos Street decreasing from 3,400
cars in 1975 to 3,100 in 1981. The traffic volumes on W.
33rd and W. 35th Avenues both showed a decrease from 2,650
(W. 33rd) and 2,350 (W. 35th) in 1975 compared to both
streets carrying the same amount of traffic (2,100 cars) in
1981.
The relatively low traffic volumes carried by both one-way
paired streets (W. 33rd and W. 35th Avenues and Pecos and
Osage Streets) coupled with the low density residential
nature of adjacent land uses indicate that these streets may
not need to function as one-ways in the future. An
interesting feature to note is that the Pecos and Osage one-
24


ways both convert to two-way streets at West 38th Avenue
north and south at the 20th Street viaduct. The one-way
streets at Umatilla, W. Argyle Place, and W. Caithness Place
carry a significantly less amount of traffic because of the
width of the streets. These streets should remain
functioning as one-ways.
Recommendations:
study the potentials of converting W. 33rd and W. 35th
Avenues to two-way streets.
study the potentials of converting Pecos and Osage
streets to two-way streets, and change street
classification from arterial to collector.
study both conversions as they relate to parking.
2. Dunkeld
Recommendations:
install traffic diverters
- . hire school crossing guards
- enforcement at stop signs to slow traffic down
enforce speed limit
3. Clay Street
Clay is a local street flanked by single family and multi-
family low density residential. The lack of traffic
management devises to slow traffic takes away from the
residential character.
Recommendations:
update traffic counts.
investigate present traffic signal progression to see
if changes can be made to reduce speeds.
4. W. 29th Avenue
Traffic on W. 29th Avenue has created concern for the safety
of Valdez Elementary School children. If traffic volumes
increase on W. 29th, the street could act as a barrier to
communication in the southern part of Highland. Land uses
are mixed residential and business on both sides of the
Avenue. Though traffic has decreased along the Avenue since
1975 the concern is yet to be addressed.
25


Recommendations:
install flashing yellow warning signals,
post additional school crossing signage,
explore possibility of a cross bridge.
- Through traffic should be focused on Speer Boulevard to
reduce east bound traffic on w. 29th Avenue near the
school.
W. 29th Avenue should be integrated with the
comprehensive traffic study (developments south of w.
29th Avenue and east of Zuni Street may increase
traffic movement).
5. Collector-Distributor Concept/Interstate-25
The 1-25 CBD Access study conducted by the State Highway
department in 1984 proposed the development of a c/d road
system from 19th and 20th Street south to Colfax Avenue.
Though residents are not apposed to exploring methods to
reduce traffic congestion on 1-25, general consensus is that
a c/d road would create negative impacts on the
neighborhood. The residents don't favor the c/d concept
prefer that the road system be located on the Platte River
Valley side of the highway.
6. Bridge/Viaduct Connections
Access from the neighborhood to the Central Platte Valley
and downtown for automobiles and buses is provided primarily
by 15th, 16th, and 20th Street viaducts and 19th Street
bridge. These viaducts are in poor to fair condition.
Coordination with the Central Platte Valley Plan is
essential because of the proximity of Highlands to its
southern neighbors (C.P.V. and Downtown). There is
neighborhood support for pedestrianizing the 16th Street
viaduct and converting it to a neighborhood transit route
along with a major walkway and bike route. Overall, the
neighborhood residents want better connections into Downtown
and the Central Platte Valley to minimize the barrier
created by 1-25.
Recommendations:
- emphasize gateways into the neighborhood at each
entrance.
strengthen the connections to the Central Platte Valley
and downtown with new bridge/viaduct designs
26


provide good access to the proposed Rockmont Park in
the Central Platte Valley.
7. Bus Routes and Shelters
Residents are served by bus routes along the 15th, 16th and
20th Street viaducts, north and south along Federal
Boulevard and east and west along W. 32nd Avenue and W. 38th
Avenue. Bus shelters exist at W. 32nd Avenue and Federal
and W. 32nd Avenue and Decatur. Access by bus to key
employment centers is a problem for neighborhood residents.
Recommendations:
Have RTD Install bus shelters at the following locations:
encourage RTD to evaluate bus services throughout
Highland.
install bus shetlers at the following locations:
. northeast corner of Tejon Street and W. 38th
Avenue,
. southwest corner of Tejon Street and W. 38th
Avenue,
. southwest comer of W. 32nd Avenue and Tejon
Street,
. south corner of 16th and Boulder Street, and
. 20th Street viaduct on both sides of the bridge.
8. Bike and Pedestrian Linkages
Existing bike routes run along Clay Street between W. 38th
and W. 32nd Avenues, W. 33rd and W. 35th Avenues, and along
the 16th Street and 20th Street viaducts. The existing
bike routes appear to be used frequently yet there seems to
be a demand for alternative pedestrian and bike paths.
Recommendations:
- develop a new bike route along 15th Street north to w.
29th Avenue and along Speer Boulevard.
- develop a new pedestrian and bike path from Zuni Street
along W. 27th Avenue (south of the Colorado Farm
Bureau) behind Stoneman's row connecting to the 15th
and 16th Street bridges.
develop an historic trail linking each landmark with
historic markers at each point of interest.
27


E. Community Facilities
1. Parks and Open Space
Due to the lack of open space and neighborhood oriented
paries the following suggestions were made to help create
additional open space areas for the neighborhood.
Recommendations:
support the creation of additional park space at
Rockmont Central Platte Valley.
- support the creation of the Central Platte Valley new
park along the eastern edge of Highland (east of Inca
Street) with pedestrian connections to Highland.
- Fund design improvements to La Raza/Columbus Park.
- Create community gardens and encourage local ownership
and/or leasing, especially on W. 33rd Avenue and
Shoshone.
improve carriage lots as mini parks, one or two
carriage lots can be selected as demonstrative
proj ects.
- Provide access to North High swimming pool for
neighborhood use.
2. Northside Community Center 3555 Pecos Street
The critical problem facing the City and community center
staff is the deteriorated condition of the main facility.
The concerns over safety and ability to continue with the
current programs is directly related to the negative
conditions of various parts of the center. The staff and
various city agencies are exploring various possibilities
for redesigning and redevelopment of the site.
Recommendations:
support the building of a new center or rehabilitate
the existing structure.
retain the amount of contiguous open space and upgrade
the quality of open space. Recommendations in the plan
related to the center and/or open space should be used
as a guide for redevelopment of the site.improve the
condition of the ballfield including lights, dugouts,
etc.
28


support fundraising efforts for the center's
maintenance and activities.
encourage support, from the city for operating cost.
3. Ashland Recreation Center 2950 Fife Court
The recreation center has been a focal point for a number of
community meetings and neighborhood fundraising activities.
The idea of constructing a new swimming pool facility at
Ashland has been a topic of discussion among community
residents, councilmanic District 9, and the center's
director.
Recommendations:
investigate the possibility of constructing a new
swimming pool.
- continue support from the city for operating cost.
- support the center's fundraising activities.
4. Schools
Incorrect enrollment projections have created severe
overcrowding problems for Bryant-Webster and Valdez
Elementary schools. This has forced the administration to
find additional classroom space outside the facility to
accommodate the situation. A long range solution needs to
be sought to correct this problem.
Recommendations:
expand present or build new facilities to accommodate
increasing number of students in neighborhood.
- encourage the Denver Public Schools Planning Division
to conduct accurate population projections for the
area.
- encourage Denver Public Schools to develop a better
monitoring system.
- encourage Denver Public Schools to keep in touch with
the neighborhood associations as a means of monitoring
public opinion, staying aware of changing conditions
and establishing better lines of communication. Note:
similar recommendation was made between Jefferson-
Highland-Sunny side Neighborhood Association and School
Board 1983.
29


5.
Call to Action
The "Call to Action Building" at W. 34th Avenue and Pecos
Street houses a number of non-profit community groups who
provide services to the north Denver area. The building was
once a school and is presently owned by Saint Patricks
Church. The condition of the structure is fair and
structurally sound with interior and exterior rehabilitation
needed.
Recommendations:
improve the basketball court.
provide better auto access into the parking lot.
- paint up/fix up the buildings exterior.
- rehabilitate the interior office spaces.
P. City Services
1. Code Enforcement
Image building, environmental cleanliness, and overall
neighborhood pride are all derivatives of adequate
maintenance and improvements to the neighborhood fabric.
During our discussions of general conditions of the
neighborhood several issues came forth about the unbalanced
and inconsistency of services that the city provides. Lack
of code enforcement related to junk cars, weeds, trash, and
sidewalk and public right-of-way maintenance were stated as
major problems. The following suggestions were made to help
remedy the above adverse conditions. (refer to agency
contact list).
Recommendations:
- develop and implement a maintenance agreement for all
publicly owned vacant land between Highland N.H.S. and
Public Works.
a schedule of alley, street and carriage lot cleaning
should be made available and evaluated periodically for
consistency.
- increase resources for code enforcement,
enforce landlord registered agent requirement,
continue Supercan program
encourage the maintenance of residential property
30


install additional dumpsters east of Zuni Street.
continue and build on success of the "5 most wanted"
campaign for problem properties.
2. Day Care
There is a lack of day care facilities in the neighborhood.
The number of females 16 years and older in' the labor force
with children under 6 years of age has increased from 208 in
1970 to 668 in 1980. These statistics have impacted the day
care facilities and have created a greater need for day care
centers and facilities that offer extended day care with
before and after working hours to accommodate working
parents.
A critical problem that confronts low income working parents
whose children are in need of child care is the fact that
many parents are slightly over the income guidelines and do
not receive assistance from social services. This situation
creates a financial burden on single parents who spend a
great amount of their income on child care services.
Recommendations:
- encourage additional licensed home care.
- involve parents in home care shared services.
- discuss income guidelines concerns with the Department
of Social Services.
- encourage the involvement of senior citizens in day
care opportunities.
- encourage the development of a neighborhood child
care/home care directory.
3. Fire/Police Protection/Crime
In July, 1983 the Denver Anti-Crime Council reported that
over the past 10 years in Highland the total number of
criminal offenses reported each year fluctuated from a low
of 1,490 to a high of 1,873 incidents in 1980. Highland
ranked 18th our of 68 neighborhoods in 1982 with 176
offenses. Violent crimes such as homicide, rape, robbery,
and aggravated assault, account for 10% of total offenses.
Burglary (31%), and theft (30%), are the two most
significant crime types in the area, while vandalism (14%),
auto theft (8%), and all other offenses (7%) account for the
remaining offenses. The map is an excerpt from the 1983
Anti-crime Council report showing locations where most
crimes are committed.
31


It is interesting to note that most crimes were committed
near commercial areas with the least crimes occurring in the
northwest quadrant of the neighborhood.
Recommendations:
encourage better police protection and crime
prevention, and
encourage better police/community relations
encourage new Neighborhood Crime Watch Programs
increase night time patrol especially where the highest
incidents are reported.
investigate the possibility of separating the downtown
police patrol from the neighborhood police patrol as a
means of improving police protection.
32


IV. SUB-AREA POLICIES AND RECOMMENDATIONS
The specific sub-areas of the Scottish Village/Bluffs, south
of 32nd Avenue, have a markedly different character than the
area north of W. 32nd Avenue. The area south of W. 32nd
Avenue is in transition unlike north of W. 32nd Avenue which
is primarily an established stable residential area. The
residential stability to the north of W. 32nd Avenue between
Shoshone and Pecos Street is severely impacted due to the
pressures caused by incompatible land uses permitted in the
current B-4 zone district, currently this area is
predominately residential. These areas are described in
depth as are goals and objectives to be accomplished,
building heights, densities desired, and suggested land use
to be attained for Highland.
A. Scottish Village/Bluffs Sub-Areas l ll
(South of West 32nd Avenue)
In this area there is a particularly high concentration of
absentee owned properties. Housing conditions throughout
can be improved and can take advantage of Highland N.H.S.
exterior rehab, program.
Sub-Area I
Location: Includes both sides of W. 32nd Avenue from Federal
Boulevard east to the Valley Highway.
Character: Homes are interspersed with small retail
districts and scattered offices. The
residential units are in good condition but
some commercial uses are deteriorating
creating a negative image for the area.
There are some large tracts of vacant land
east of Tejon. The current zoning is mixed
B-2, B-3, B-4, R-2, and R-3.
Goal: Improve and preserve the existing
residential, build new housing on vacant
land, improve the small business districts
and eliminate the undesirable uses on W. 32nd
Avenue.
Recommendations/Actions:
- Eliminate incompatible uses in the commercial areas
including billboards, and problem bars. The car lot on
W. 32nd Avenue and Zuni Street has been eliminated as
part of this planning process.
. buy out incompatible uses with assistance from the
city.
33


SUBAREAS

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Encourage the preservation of the two residential
structures south of W. 32nd Avenue along Federal to
emphasize the historic significance of the area.
. support residential conversion to office use.
. discourage automobile related uses.
Suggested Density: various densities should be allowed
according to suggested land use types
below.
Suggested Land Use:
1. R-3 between Clay and Wyandot should be
rezoned to a density similar to the current
R-2 .
2) the R-3 between Federal Boulevard and
Clay Street should remain.
Sub-Area 2
Location:
Character:
Goal:
Scottish Village Historic District includes
the residential area along W. Argyle, W.
Caithness, and W. Dunkeld Place.
Primarily low-moderate residential with a
number of rehabilitated units. The current
zoning is R-3 which allows for high density
apartment development. The R-3 zoning is
incompatible with existing land uses.
Improve and preserve the housing and provide
access to facilities that can meet
neighborhood needs e.g. North high School
swimming pool and campus.
Recommendations:
Improve housing conditions, particularly of absentee-
owned units.
. continue residential rehabilitation programs,
including Higland N.H.S. Exterior Rehab. Program.
. redevelop 2-3 lot apartment buildings as senior
citizen housing.
. provide home ownership and cooperative housing
opportunities.
34


. enforce the maintenance of vacant land and public
rights-of-way by owners.
. enforce the city's housing codes.
Protect residential uses and the historic
character of Scottish Village.
. support any effort to rezone the area to reflect
the existing density north of Caithness. (Single
family and low density multi-family).
Improve vacant land across from Ashland Recreation
Center as an expansion of the center.
. The preferred use is 75 meter pool attached to
Ashland Recreation Center. (tot pool can be
included).
. An optional use is a paved and landscaped parking
lot.
Suggested Heights: 25-30 feet
Suggested Density: 14.5 21 dwelling units per acre- residential
Suggested Land Use: moderate density residential
Sub-Area 3
Location: Includes North High School, Valdez Elementary and Metropolitan Youth Center.
Character: Institutional uses, and recreational open space. The current zoning is R-
Goal: Recommendations: Improve appearance and increase neigborhood access.
- Negotiate for improved landscaping and maintenance of
the facilities to create a park-like atmosphere.
- ~ Coordinate resources to improve the campus.
- Support any effort to rezone institutions to R-5.
Suggested Height: remain as is, 20 30 feet
Suggested Density: remain as is
35


Suggested Land Use: institutional
Sub-Area 4
Location:
Character:
Goal:
The area bounded by W. 29th Avenue and
Speer Boulevard, from Zuni Street to
Clay Street.
Predominantly office and retail area
with some light industrial uses. All
commercial buildings lack appropriate
setbacks according to Denver's parkway
ordinance. In some cases this is due to
previous widenings of Speer Boulevard.
The physical condition of some of the
building is deteriorating. On both
sides of the boulevard the current
zoning is B-4 which allows for strip
commercial, business services, and
retail establishments.
Though the area is designated as a
parkway in the Comprehensive Plan of
Denver, it has never been developed as
such.
As much as is practical without further
widenings of Speer Boulevard, develop
Speer as a parkway with mixed use
office, retail and commercial uses
allowed. Establish as a major gateway
into the Highland neighborhood.
Recommendations:
- encourage office and retail uses
discourage any new industrial uses, and encourage the
rehabilitation or razing of deteriorated industrial use
structures.
there should be no further widenings of Speer
Boulevard.
site plan review(s) only as currently required by code.
- a minimum five (5) foot landscaped setback required
from any arterial street (Speer Boulebard, Zuni Street
and W. 29th Avenue only) for any new developments,
waive the following as a use-by-right in B-4 zone along
Speer Boulevard, Zuni Street and W. 29th Avenue:
* blood plasma collection centers not connected or
attached to medical facilities or offices.
* "head-shops" (tobacco shops that allow the sale of
paraphernalia)
36


* commercial parking as a use-by-right, when such
parking facility is not auxiliary to a permitted
use in the zone.
the storage of junk cars or trucks, except those to be
considered antique or collector-type vehicles this
prohibition is to include junk cars stored for future
sale or rebuilding for resale, when stored in the open
for extended periods of time.
Suggested Heights; as currently allowed in the B-4 zoning
regulations.
Suggested Density: remain as is F.A.R. 2:1
Suggested Land Use: office and retail area
Sub-Area 5
Location:
Character:
Goals:
Includes both sides of Zuni Street from
Speer Boulevard north to W. 32nd Avenue.
Mixed use residential, office and retail
area. There is some vacant land near
Speer Boulevard and some vacant,
deteriorating historic buildings on both
sides of Zuni. The current zoning is B-
4.
Maintain as a mixed use area including
office, residential and retail, and
improve as a major gateway into the
Highland area. Emphasize the
rehabilitation of historic structures to
preserve the character of the area.
Encourage new office development.
Recommendations:
North of W. 29th Avenue:
encourage historic preservation of Tallmadge Building
and Old North Denver Bank Building.
encourage the redevelopment of the Zuni Plaza site into
a mixed use retail/residential/commercial project
(encourage landscaping and treescaping of parking
area).
encourage retail attractions such as hardware store,
toy shop, beauty/barber shop, donut shop and
restaurants.
37


South of W. 29th Avenue:
develop for office and retail uses.
encourage retail infill of Zuni and W. 28th Street
comer lot.
redevelop the landscaping/treescaping at the
intersection of Speer Boulevard and Zuni Street to
create a more attractive gateway to Highland -
including the area both direction son both arterials.
site plan review(s) only as currently required by code.
- a minimum five (5) foot landscaped setback required on
frontage along Zuni Street, on any new development.
Suggested Haight: from Speer Boulevard north on Zuni to W.
29th Avenue as is currently allowed in
B-4 and R-3 Zoning regulations.
north of W. 29th Avenue including the
Zuni Plaza 35-45 feet.
Suggested Density: F.A.R. remain as is 2:1
Suggested Land Use: mixed use residential, retail, and
office area.
Sub-Area 6
Location: Bluffs area bounded by W. 32nd Avenue,
W. 29th Avenue, Zuni Street to Umatilla
Street.
Character: The area is predominately residential
with some vacant and public and quasi-
public sites. Some of the housing is
deteriorating with poor environemntal
conditions. There are some parking
problems near W. 32nd Avenue. The
retail node at W. 30th Avenue is
primarily neighborhood serving. The
area along Umatilla Street from West
29th Avenue to West 32nd Avenue is
somewhat a transition zone suitable for
higher density residential development.
The current zoning is R-3 though the
area is developed primarily as low-
moderate density.
38


Goal: Protect the residential character
improve housing conditions and halt
future commercial development from
encroaching.
Recommendations:
Preserve area as an historic residential area.
. encourage residential rehabilitation of both
single and multi family dwellings.
. oppose commercial enroachment.
. encourage more home ownership and cooperatives.
. promote infill housing which is compatible with
existing low-moderate density and scale.
Preserve W. 30th Avenue and Wyandot Street as a low-
profile neighborhood retail area. (3 stories maximum).
- Protect views from Asbury Methodist Church to Downtown.
. encourage better upkeep and maintenance of the
church as an historic structure.
Develop the northwest corner of W. 29th Avenue and
Wyandot as a residential/office or retail mixed-use
project.
Redevelop the northwest corner of Umatilla and w. 29th
Avenue.
Support any rezoning to a zone district which would be
consistent with present land use and desireable
development.
Address parking problem, particularly in regards to any
new development.
. conduct a parking survey to identify specific
problem areas.
. encourage new developments to share parking with
community residents.
Suggested Height: as allowed in the existing R-2-A zone
district
Suggested Density: 21 29 dwelling units per acre resid
ential (medium density townhomes),except
for Umatilla corridor which should be
35-40 dwelling units per acre.
39


Suggested Land Use:
Moderate density residential
P.U.D. northwest corner of Umatilla
Street and W. 29th Avenue.
Transition area along Umatilla, and
Tejon Streets residential
P.U.D. northwest corner of W. 29th
Avenue and Wyandot Street.
Sub-Area 7
Location:
Character:
Goal:
Area along W. 29th Avenue between
Umatilla and Zuni Streets.
Mixture of office, semi industrial,
retail, and residential uses. Building
structures are in good condition. The
current zoning is B-4.
Develop area primarily for office,
retail, and services.
Recommendations:
- Create design linkages with neaby historic areas on
15th Street, Stonemen's Row, and along Zuni Street by
emphasizing the historic character and creating
pedestrian connections. Some important features are:
. streetscaping
. sidewalk lighting
. seating
. storefront windows designs
. bike/pedestrian path from Zuni Street along W.
27th Avenue (south of Colorado Farm Bureau) behind
Stonemen's Row to 15th and 16th Street.
Suggested Height: as allowed in the current B-2 zoned
district
Suggested Density: F.A.R. 2:1
Suggested Land Use: Office, retail, and residential area
40


Sub-Area 8
Location:
Character:
Goal:
Recommendat i ons
The lower Bluffs area between W. 29th
Avenue and W. 27th Avenue from Vallejo
Street to the alley between Zuni and
Wyandot Streets.
Mostly vacant containing the Colorado
Farm Bureau offices, a few apartment
buildings, parking and, several older
residential buildings. The current
zoning is R-3 with less than an acre of
R-4 which the Colorado Farm Bureau is
currently occupying.
Develop as a mixed use area including
office, retail, and residential uses.
Land uses and location preferred:
. focus office and retail uses along the western 2/3
of the area.
. focus residential that supports the character of
Stonemen's Row if not the density of Stoneman's
Row along the eastern 1/3 of the area.
New use should not create additional parking problems
and existing parking lots should be landscaped.
. above-ground parking structures should not be
allowed unless they have an exterior face of
retail.
Encourage new developments to use appropriate materials
(brick and wood) and incorporate designs whose
proportions, scale and rhythm of openings are in
harmony with existing structures.
Historic buildings should be preserved or moved into
vacant land in the Stonemen's Row area.
Suggested Height: Maximum 60 feet. New
developments should take advantage of
elevation and topography but should be
sensitive to preserving views from the
north of W. 29th Avenue.
Suggested Densities: Negotiated through the P.U.D. process.
41


Suggested Land Use: P.U.D. process is suggested
mixed use residential, office, and
retail area.
Sub-Area 9
Character: This area includes the historic
residential area of Stonemen's Row.
Vacant land in this area should be
developed for housing at a density
and scale which enhances the
historic character.
Recommendation:
- All new development should be residential, and at the
same scale as existing housing which are two story
townhomes. The design, setbacks, and materials should
be compatible with existing historic character.
. all parking lots should be landscaped.
. parking should not be allowed as an exclusive use
by-right.
The total area should be considered a preservation area and
protected through the expansion of the Stonemen's Row
Historic District.
Suggested Height: as allowed in the existing R-2 zone
district
Suggested Density: Overall density should not exceed
14.5 units per acre.
Suggested Land Use: low density residential
Sub-Area 10
Location: The Bluffs bounded by Boulder Street, W.
32nd Avenue and Tejon Street.
Character: Contains a mixture of single family and
multi-family residential, office, some
industrial, and vacant land. There are
some signs of commercial rehabilitation
along Boulder Street Because of the
land use mixture, often times industrial
uses are in conflict with residential.
The office uses are more compatible to
the residential. The current zoning is
B-4.


Goal:
Preserve residential uses and encourage
mixed use residential, office, and
retail development with, emphasis on
residential. Mixed use retail and
office should be focused toward Boulder
Street and be sensitive to their
residential neighbors in terms of
providing landscaping and buffering
between the two uses.
Recommendations:
Support any efforts to rezoning the triangular block
bounded by W. 32nd Avenue, Boulder and 18th Street from
existing B-4 to reflect existing residential density.
- Reduce existing industrial uses such as manufacturing,
storage, construction warehouses, and auto repair, and
disallow these uses in the future.
. encourage businesses to relocate into other
industrial areas of the City.
. uses which are incompatible with residential and
existing business should be eliminated
particularly industrial uses and "adult uses."
Significantly improve the maintenance and lighting in
Hirshorn Park.
Encourage residential infill south of W. 32nd Avenue by
requiring any new development that replaces residential
to contain residential uses in at least 50% of the
project's floor area.
Suggested Height: Buildings should not block the view
corridors from Hirshom Park to the
Central Business District.
Suggested Density: mixed residential uses (townhomes etc.)
moderate density
F.A.R. 2:1
Suggested Land Use: primarily residential and office use
area
Sub-Area 11
Location: The area between Boulder and Central
Streets from 15th Street to Pecos
Street.
43


Character:
Predominately office, industrial and
vacant land with some scattered single
family and low density residential.
There are some new residential and
commercial developments on 16th Street,
Kensing Court and 17th Avenue. The
current zoning is mixed B-2, B-3, B-4,
and R-3.
Goal: Develop as mixed use commercial, retail
and residential area. The "Highland
Blcok" on 15th and 16th Street between
Boulder and Central Street should be
developed in a way which preserves its
historical significance and creates a
major gateway to the neighborhood.
Recommendations:
- Encourage unified development of the Highland Block.
. the block should continue to act as an activity
area and focal point for the neighborhood.
. develop as a mixed use residential, retail and
office project.
*Note: Refer to development guidelines established by the
"Highland Coalition" in the appendix.
- Encourage residential as a part of mixed-use projects.
Any new development that replaces residential should be
required to contain residential use in at least 50% of
the projects floor area.
Discourage industrial and auto uses.
Uses which are incompatible with residential and
existing business should be eliminated.
Emphasize the southern edge of the neighborhood by
establishing treescape, grass, etc. along Central
Street.
Incentives: Building height up to 8 stories or 80
feet should be considered when 2/3's of
total square footage on the project is
planned for residential uses.
40 feet building heights as measured
from Boulder Street. View corridors from
Hirshorn Park to the Central Business
District must be maintained.
Suggested Height:


Suggested Density: F.A.R. 2:1
Suggested Land Use: Residential office, and retail use area
The westside of the block between 16th
and 17th, Central to Boulder Street
should remain as is (B-2 and R-3)
P.U.D. Process is suggested for the
Highland Block 15th to 16th
Street between Central to Boulder
Street, (development guidelines can
be found in appendix)
B. West 32nd Avenue North
Sub-Area 12
Location: Between Tejon Street and Federal
Boulevard north of West 32nd Avenue to
West 38th Avenue. (census tract 4.02)
Character: Predominately single family and low-
moderate density residential with some
public and quasi- public buildings in
good condition. Housing is generally in
fair to good condition with very little
vacant land to be developed. There is a
mix of low-moderate density residential
and retail on the periphery of the sub-
area boundaries. Although Federal
Boulevard is a major arterial its
character is predominately residential.
The owner occupancy housing figure in
1980 was slightly higher at 56% when
compared to 44% renter occupancy.
Current zoning is R-2 which is
compatible with existing land use.
Goal: Improve and preserve the residential
character of the area and encourage new
housing development on vacant land.
Recommendations:
- Target local and state rehabilitation resources for the
whole area.
- Increase home ownership opportunities for renters.
Create a better balance of owner occupied and rental
homes.
. offer residential rehabilitation programs.
45


Encourage housing infill on vacant land.
Maintain existing residential zoning along Federal
Boulevard.
Encourage home owners to purchase vacant land adjoining
their property.
Suggested Height: remain as is two to three stories
Suggested Density: remain as is single family, low
density.
Suggested Land Use: remain low density residential
*Note Commercial areas along W. 32nd Avenue, W. 38th Avenue,
and Tejon Street are described in the Economics section
of the plan.
Between Tejon Street east to the Valley
Highway north of W. 32nd Avenue to W.
38th Avenue. (census tract 11.02).
The area is predominately single family
and low-moderate density residential.
There are some public and quasi public
buildings scattered throughout the area
with industrial uses along Inca Street,
Central Street, West 32nd and W. 38th
Avenue.
The housing between Tejon and Osage streets is in fair to
good condition but begins to deteriorate as you move further
east of Osage Street to the Valley Highway. The existing B-
3 zoning along Tejon between W. 33rd and W. 35th and the B-
4 along W. 32nd Avenue are conflicting with the current
residential land use. In both instances the zoning exceeds
land use. There are signs of rehabilitation along Inca
Street. The owner occupancy housing figure in 1980 was
significantly lower at 38% when compared to 62% renter
occupancy for this area. A factor adversely affecting
housing in the area is the industrial encroachment into the
residential area. The current zoning is mostly R-2 with B-4
along Kalamath with some 1-0 and 1-1 near the eastern
boundary of the neighborhood.
Goal: Improve and stabilize the residential
areas by preserving the existing housing
stock and encourage home ownership, and
eliminate the industrial uses.
Sub-Area 13
Location:
Character:
46


Recommendations:
Support any efforts to downzone B-4 to the north of W.
32nd Avenue from the alley west of Shoshone east to
Pecos Street to R-2 or R-2-A. Residential land use in
this area should be joined with the surrounding R-2.
Improve the housing condition of both single family and
multi-family units.
. target both city, state and federal rehabilitation
resources for the whole area, especially from
Osage Street to Inca Street.
Create a better balance between owner occupied and
rental homes and minimize displacement.
Support any efforts to downzone B-3 between W. 33rd and
35th Avenue along Tejon to R-2 or R-2-A. NOTE: also
referred to on page 19 recommendation number three -
Tejon Street.
Encourage reuse of vacant or abandoned commercial
structures.
Work with owners of industrial businesses north of w.
36th Avenue and east of Lipan Street to encourage them
to relocate to a more appropriately zoned area in the
city.
Encourage those property owners who own industrial
businesses and wish to remain to be more sensitive
toward their residential neighbors.
. screen and buffer the area adjoining their
property.
. arrange lighting away from residential windows.
. control truck delivery and pick up hours.
Rezone vacated industrial parcels back to residential
for redevelopment when relocation occurs.
Discourage further industrial and commercial
encroachment.
Encourage senior citizen housing.
Encourage and assist the following public facilities
with rehabilitation and/or new construction funds.
. Northside Community Center


. Call to Action Building
Suggested Heights: Maintain building heights allowed in the
R-2 zone district.
Suggested Density: Single family and low-moderate density
residential (14.5 dwelling units per
acre). New developments that are in
harmony with neighborhood plan goals
needing higher densities should go
thruough the P.U.D. process.
Suggested Land Use: low density residential
Sub-Area 14
Location:
Character:
Goal:
The area along Central Street between
the 20th Street viaduct and Kalamath
Street.
Primarily industrial, secondarily
commercial with some scattered housing
units. Current zoning includes B-4, i-o
and R-2. New construction has been
primarily industrial (Restaurant,
Equipment Supply Company) with housing
units in fair to good condition, but are
experiencing development pressures due
to the lack of appropriate buffering.
Continue to develop as a mixed use area
encouraging a better balance of land
uses and encourage buffering between
residential and commercial uses,
especially to the north and west of
commercial and industrial developments.
Recommendations:
Attract a combination of new businesses which would be
compatible with the area, preferably those that might
employ and train neighborhood residents.
- Utilize a full range of urban design technics for the
commercial and industrial areas.
. streetscape along Central Street
. encourage rehabilitation of existing structures.
. encourage appropriate screening and buffering of
adjacent residential structures.
48


encourage new construction to orient toward
Central Street.
. redesign landscape noise barrier to the north
along 1-25.
discourage new industrial uses.
Suggested Height: maximum 35' with a variety of building
heights.
Suggested Density: F.A.R. 2:1
Suggested Land Use: mixed use residential, office and indoor
49


V. APPENDICES
Population
The Highland neighborhood is divided into two census tracts,
4.02 (west of Tejon) and 11.02 (east of Tejon). According
to the 1980 census, there were 9,803 people residing in the
Highlands.
The 1980 population figure has decreased by 1,779 (18%) when
compared to the 1970 U.S. census count. Though there has
been a decrease in population, the percent of Hispanics in
the total population rose from 20% in 1960, to 47% in 1970
to 62% in 1980.
The median age in 1980 for Highland was 27.3 years compared
to 30.3 years citywide. The 1980 population distribution
(table below) of Highland reveals a concentration of pre-
school children and youth (ages 5-19 years) at one end of
the spectrum and older citizens at the opposite end. The
two groups make up 47% of Highland's total population. The
19 and under age group of Highland is 34% of the
neighborhood's total population, which is significantly
higher than Denver's 26% figure for individuals 19 and
under. Age composition of individuals 65 and over are
similar when comparing Highlands to Denver. The senior
citizen population has increased from 11% in 1970 to 13% in
1980.
Age Distribution, Highland and Denver, 1980
Highland Denver
Less than 5 years 10% 7%
5-9 years 8% 6%
10 14 years 7% 6%
15 19 years 9% 7%
20 24 years 11% 11%
25 34 years 18% 22%
35-44 years 8% 10%
45-54 years 8% 4%
55-64 years 8% 10%
65 74 years 7% 7%
75 years and over 6% 5%
Source: U.S. census of population, 1980
The 1980 median household income for Highland was $10,344,
which is significantly lower than the city's $15,506 median
income figure, The median education levels reveals that the
number of school years completed by residents of Highland in
1980 was 10.8, lower than the city's average of 12.8 years.
Denver Public Schools report that in 1984-85 drop out rate
for North High School was 12.8% compared to 10.3% in Denver
and 6.1% in Colorado. Hispanic student drop out rate of
14.8 at North High School was much higher than both Denver
and the State. Roughly 70% of the labor force of Highland
50


are employed in laborer, administrative support, and service
occupations. Unemployment for Highland in 1980 was the same
as Denver's 5% rate.
Land Use and Zoning
General
The Denver Planning Office Land Use Information system shows
that the primary land use in Highland is residential. This
is augmented by a fair amount of public and quasi public
land (52 ac.) and 31 acres of industrial land. All land
uses and acreages are categorized by zone districts in the
1984 Net Land Use chart below. The land use in the
neighborhood is distributed as follows: 60% residential, 6%
commercial, 7% industrial, 12% public-semi public, 2%
transportation, communications, and utilities, 4% services,
2% open 3 ace, anD 6% vAcant. Highland's net acreage totals
417. Zone district classifications for Highland reveal that
73% of the neighborhood is zoned for residential use.
Additionally, 22% is zoned for business use (B-2, B-3, B-4),
4% is zoned for indusprial qs( ith the remaining 1% zoned
for parking and P.U.D.'s
Residential Land Uses:
Generally, residential zoning is consistent with land use
for the area north of 32nd Avenue. The industrial zones
near the northeastern edge from Kalamath Street to Inca
Street and the B-4 commercial zone from Pecos t Quivas
between W. 32nd and W. 33rd have created negative impacts on
the surrounding residential. The non-compatible uses these
zone districts allow and because of the lack of appropriate
residential are direct causes of these impacts. The area
south of W. 32nd Avenue known as Scottish Village/Bluffs
presents a more critical problem facing the neighborhood.
The Scottish Village/Bluffs area is the southern edge of the
Highland neighborhood. It can be described as the area
south of west 32nd Avenue within the boundary formed by
Federal Boulevard, Speer Boulevard and the Valley Highway.
The area actually contains two districts, Scottish Village
and the Bluffs. Scottish Village, the area west of Zuni
Street, was originally platted in the late 1800's as a
residential area of small lots on curvilinear streets.
Large parts of the Village have been replaced by public uses
such as North High School and its athletic fields, Valdez
Elementary School, Metropolitan Youth Center and
commercial/retail uses along Speer and Zuni streets.
The Bluffs area, east of Zuni Street was platted on the grid
pattern and was developed at a lower density than the
Village with the exception of 15th and Boulder Streets which
51


were always major commercial thoroughfares. The Bluffs has
evolved to a mixed-use area containing single family
residences, apartment buildings, retail stores and business
services.
Zoning in Scottish Village (the area west of Zuni Street) is
largely R-3 (high density residential) with B-4 along Zuni
Street (commercial services), including Zuni Plaza; the B-4
continues to fan out along the cross streets. The area from
West 29th Avenue south to Speer Boulevard is also B-4.
Approximately 50% of Scottish Village remains residential
with the balance in commercial, services (32%), vacant (7%),
Public and Quasi Public (2%), and industrial land uses (9%).
The upper Bluffs area from Zuni to Umatilla Street is
primarily R-3 with B-4 along the major streets (Zuni,
Umatilla, and West 29th Avenue). East of Umatilla, the area
is dominated by business use (largely B-4 with B-3 along
15th Street) with small pockets of R-3 and B-2 zoning.
Roughly 39% of the Bluffs is zoned for high density
residential use (R-3) and 53% is zoned B-4. Though the
Bluffs residential area is zoned R-3, approximately 36% is
used for single family and 40% low to moderate density
multi-family dwellings.
The Scottish Village/Bluffs area is one of the oldest
residential neighborhood areas in Denver. In recent years,
the residential character of the area has suffered from
business encroachment and land speculation. Future downtown
and Central Platte Valley development along with the
relatively low land values in Scottish Village/Bluffs have
created development pressures on the area. A 1984 market
analysis prepared by Hammer, Siler, George Economic and
Development consultants revealed that retail space serving
residential needs in the Scottish Village/Bluffs area have
declined with over 40 percent of the retail space vacant.
Non-retail space, including offices, business services and
industrial uses, are now major land uses in the area. A
number of land uses permitted in the B-4 zone district are
automobile related and the amount of this zoning negatively
impacts the residential units that abut the commercial
areas. Some of these impacts have been identified as zone
code violations by the Zoning Administration and can be
mitigated but automobile and other uses not compatible to
the residential area will continue to plague the
neighborhood.
Highland neighborhood, unlike other neighborhoods, has small
unique pockets of land tucked away in the interior of its
residential city blocks, known as carriage lots (all located
north of 32nd Avenue). A survey conducted by Jefferson
Highland Sunnyside Neighborhood Association (JHSNA) in 1984,
helped to identify a number of carriage lots that need
attention.
52


Additionally, Denver Planning Office expanded the carriage
lot study and prepared a slide show with handouts indicating
ownership, size, zone, and description of each lot. This
inventory, along with the survey results were shared with
the Department of Health and Hospital's environmental
section and the Zoning Department. The adverse condition of
the carriage lots prompted both departments to begin a joint
effort clean up campaign. Of the 72 carriage lots
inventoried, 35 were identified as having the potential to
be developed for parking, open space, or residential use if
conditions were improved and financial support secured.
Inventory results and carriage lot map are available at the
Denver Planning Office.
Commercial Land Uses:
Commercial land uses are located primarily along W. 38th
Avenue from Inca Street to Federal Boulevard, w. 32nd
Avenue, Tejon, Zuni, and 15th Streets, and along Speer
Boulevard. Business nodes are located at W. 37th and Navajo
Street, W. 30th and Wyandot Street, and W. 33rd Avenue and
Osage.
A number of these businesses are neighborhood serving and
provide a mixture of services including office, restaurant,
and specialty retailing. A common characteristic of
Highland's business districts is that they contain
residential dwellings as part of the business area. Though
a number of businesses do serve residents of Highland, the
Hammer, Siler, George market study indicated that within the
trade area of North Denver (Colfax Avenue on the south to
1-70 on the north and from the Valley Highway on the east to
Sheridan Boulevard on the west) there is an unmet need
regarding business such as a discount store, small hardware
store, specialty shops, a drug store, and supermarket.
There has been a moderate amount of commercial development
and redevelopment in Highland's business areas. Examples of
this activity are:
* The Inverness Building located at 2536-56 15th Street:
rehabilitated into specialty shops and professional
office space.
* Cousins Auto Parts located on West 38th Avenue and
Federal Boulevard: major rehabilitation and new
construction.
* West 32nd Avenue and Clay Street: neighborhood business
district was revitalized with streetscape and new
signage,
53


* Century Bank North located on Speer Boulevard:
presently constructing a new banking facility.
* Residence Inn at 2777 Zuni Street: completed
construction in 1982 of 161 motel suites.
* Wheeler Block Building at 2150 W. 29th Avenue:
rehabilitated from a school building into office space.
* Belong-Rogers building at 2323 W. 30th Avenue:
rehabilitated for commercial office use.
* Tony's Restaurant and Equipment Company located at
Kalamath and Central Street: new construction with
assistance from Community Development Agency.
* A1 Cohen construction company located at 18th and
Central Street: new commercial office.
* Colorado Farm Bureau addition, 1985 2211 w. 27th
Avenue.
* 3748 Osage Street, renovation of building facade and
office, 1985.
Currently there are three major projects being planned in
the neighborhood. First, the Colorado Farm Bureau proposes
to construct a mixed use commercial/residential development
on the 2700-2800 block between Wyandot and Vallejo. Second,
the "Highland Block" located on 15th Street between Boulder
and Central Street, is being proposed for a mixed use -
retail-office-residential development. Third, West 38th
Avenue between Inca and Federal has been designated for
redevelopment as a result of application approval for a
Neighborhood Business Revitalization (NBR) district.
Environment
Highlands is located on a Bluff that overlooks the Central
Business District and Platte River Valley. It has a healthy
variety of trees and plants that help to create a pleasant
environment.
The majority of sidewalks have been repaired in the Scottish
Village historic district, but several blocks of sidewalk
repairs are needed north of 32nd Avenue. The overall
Highland area shows nominal needs for street lights and
alley paving, though several areas were identified in
Scottish Village for alley paving by residents who
approached the City in 1984 for CDBG funds to help correct
the problem.
54


Storm sewers are in reasonably good condition with the
exception of the West 38th Avenue viaduct. Approximately
1.4 million dollars of 1982 Storm Drainage Bond Funds have
been allocated to correct the existing problem by the year
1986. According to Wastewater Management, the Highland area
water mains, particularly south of West 32nd Avenue, can
support new development. Wastewater Management doesn't
anticipate any need to reconstruct the system that is
presently in place.
Several environmental considerations can be grouped together
under the title of "Needed City Services. These elements
alone are detrimental to the image and environmental quality
of the neighborhood. The problems of deteriorated
sidewalks, weeds, trash, and junk cars along with the lack
of maintenance of both public and private lands (alleys,
streets, and R.O.W.'s), snow removal and the visually
obtrusive billboards are code enforcement issues that can't
go unmentioned and need additional resources to be enforced.
Air pollution is a major metropolitan problem and
particularly affects Highlands due to its location.
Additional use of public transportation, shared rides, and
participation in the volunteer "Better Air program can help
improve the overall situation.
A number of Highland residents are responsible for the
success of the neighborhood's community gardens. Saint
Patrick's church and 33rd and Shoshone are locations where a
couple of community gardens exist. Several private gardens
can be found in the neighborhood.
The neighborhood, while served only by Hirshom and Franco
Parks, has access to the Platte River Greenway south of
Highland in the Central Platte Valley. The Greenway is a
systul of pares, picnic areas,'qua rdcreational facilities
and pedestrian/bike paths. Confluence Park provides an
outdoor amphitheater, a water front plaza and direct
connection to the newly developed Children's Museum.
In general, Highland neighborhood is pleasant, with a unique
topography that enhances the views which creates the
character of a truly ideal space for living.
Historic Preservation
The Denver Landmark Preservation Ordinance, Section 30-1 of
the Revised Municipal Code, was enacted by the Denver City
Council in 1967. The ordinance created the Denver Landmark
Preservation Commission to identify structures and districts
of historic, architectural or geographic significance.
55


The Denver Landmark Commission's report of August, 1984
listed the following designated landmark districts in
Highland: Potter Highlands district located between West
32rd and West 38th between Federal Blvd. and Zuni Street
(currently being considered as an historic preservation
area), Stonemen's Row district located on West 28th Avenue
between Umatilla Street and Vallejo, and the Old Highland
Business District on 15th Street between Central and Boulder
Streets.
In addition to the designated districts the following
structures are listed on the National Register:
*A11 Saints Episcopal Church at 2222 w. 32nd Avenue, 1978
listing.
Saint Elizabeth's Retreat Chapel at 2825 West 32nd Avenue,
1976 listing.
*Saint Patrick's Mission Church at 3325 Pecos Street, 1979
listing.
Tallmadge & Boyer Block 2926-42 Zuni Street, 1982 listing.
Hugh Mackay House at 3359 Alcott Street.
*Mount Carmel Church at 3549 Navajo Street
Cerrone's Grocery at 3611-15 and 3617 Osage Street
Wheeler Block Building at 2150 W. 29th Avenue
*Asbury M.E. Church at 2205 W. 30th Avenue
Henri Foster House at 2533 West 32nd Avenue, and
Henry Lee House at 2653 West 32nd Avenue
The newest addition to the National Register in 1985 was
Highland Park Scottish Village Historic District bounded
by Zuni Street on the east, Clay Street on the west, West
32nd Avenue on the north, and Dunkeld Place on the south.
Historic Denver and the Jefferson/Highland/Sunnyside
Neighborhood Association are working on a joint steeple
lighting project and have identified the churches above with
asterisks along with Our Lady of Guadalupe Church to be part
of_the program.
Streets and Highways
The Comprehensive Plan of Denver uses four catagories to
describe and plan streets and highways. The street
classifications are based on function, access, width, volume
of traffic, adjacent land use, etc.:
56


These street catagories exist in Highlands and are described
as the following:
o Local Streets have the function of providing direct
access to adjacent properties and of carrying low
volumes of traffic (less than 2,000 vehicles per day)
with an origin or destination within the neighborhood
(e.g. W. 34th Avenue, Bryant and Mariposa Streets.)
o Collector Streets have the function of collecting and
distributing traffic having an origin or destination
between arterial and local streets within the community
and linking neighborhood residential areas, local and
community shopping facilities, and other major
community land use elements. Collectors have an
average capacity of 5,000 to 12,000 vehicles per day
(e.g. Zuni Street and West 29th Avenue).
o Arterial Streets have the function of permitting
rapid and relatively unimpeded traffic movement
throughout the City and serving as the primary link
between communities.
o Freeways have the function of permitting traffic flow
rapidly and unimpeded through and around the
metropolitan area (e.g. Interstate 25).
Community Facilities Inventory
Parks and Open Space
Parks and open space areas are extremely limited in the
neighborhood. Hirshorn Park located at Tejon and Erie
Streets, and Franco Park located at 37th and Lipan Streets
occupy 3.3 acres of land in the Highlands. Pecos Park
Plaza, a new "mini1* park was created by the Pecos Plaza
Neighbors and is located at the corner of W. 33rd Avenue and
Pecos Street.
Hirshorn Park is designated as a neighborhood park and was
acquired in 1946 for multi-purpose use. The park is
equipped with a playground and a junior football field.
Franco Park was acquired and designated as a mini park in
1969. A playground and picnic tables are the park's only
features. None of the parks have swimming pool facilities.
Highland residents have access to Confluence Park and open
space along the Platte River Greenway to the south,
Columbus/La Raza Park to the north, and Highland Park to the
west. Viking Park at Speer and Federal Boulevard was
developed by the city in 1980, and contains 5.4 acres of
land. Project costs including land acquisition were 1.4
57


million dollars. These parks, although they aren't within
the neighborhood boundaries, serve the community.
A community gardens are an' important aspect of open space
for the neighborhood. The Mayor's Garden Program was
established over ten years ago and was initiated to
encourage urban gardening as a self-help channel for people
to raise food and to turn vacant lot eyesores into
attractive green open space. This program has grown in
popularity as the years pass. The City's urban community
gardens program and Denver urban gardens are working jointly
to establish more gardens throughout the City.
Gardens cam be found at the following locations:
W. 33rd Avenue and Shoshone Street
W. 33rd Avenue and Pecos
1604 W. 36th Avenue
- W. 37th Avenue and Eliot, and
- W. 36th Avenue and Vallejo Street
Northside Community Center 3555 Pecos Street
The Northside Community Center is a non-profit organization
serving the North Denver area from 1-25 on the east, Federal
Boulevard on the west, Speer Boulevard on the south, and
52nd Avenue on the north. The center serves all citizens
inside its boundaries with a major emphasis on the low to
moderate income individuals. Community services have been
provided by the center since 1957 on a sliding fee scale
and/or free of charge. The Center offers to the community
summer day camp, organized recreation, social clubs, senior
citizen recreation, child care, sewing and aerobic classes,
and distributes butter and cheese to social service
recipients. Both private and public money was utilized for
the construction of the child care and senior citizens
center located on the site. Both centers were built in 1975
and are in excellent condition.
Ashland Recreation Center 2950 Fife Court
Ashland Recreation Center, like Northside Community Center,
provides the community with well organized recreation and
neighborhood access. The facility is owned by the City and
operated by the Paries and Recreation Department. The Center
occupies .62 acres and houses a gym, game room, kitchen,
library and offices.
53


Schools
There are two elementary schools, one high school, one
alternative school, and one private school located in the
neighborhood.
Bryant Webster Elementary School at 3635 Quivas Street was
built in 1930 and occupies 2.93 acres of land with a
capacity of 475 students. Student enrollment has increased
from 431 in 1976 to 592 in 1984 according to the Public
Facilities Inventory, Denver Planning Office and Denver
Public Schools. The Northside Community Center is currently
housing the early childhood education (5th grade classes) as
a result of school overcrowding.
Valdez Elementary School at 2475 W. 29th Avenue, built in
1975, covers roughly five acres of land with a student
capacity of 755. In 1984, student enrollment had increased
to 740 compared to 568 in 1976. The school is currently
holding classes in mobile units (protable classrooms) as a
result of school overcrowding.
North High School located at 2960 North Speer Boulevard
occupies 27.93 acres of land and has a capacity of 2,100
students. Enrollment figures for 1984 decreased to 1,897
compared to 2,199 in 1976. Structural improvements were
made in 1955 and 1983-84. Improvements included the
construction of a new auditorium with the capacity of 840, a
football field, and baseball diamond, tennis courts, and
additional parking. The North High School site was unified
with Valdez Elementary School to provide open space, park
land, and a campus area.
Metropolitan Youth Education Center is located at 2417 w.
29th Avenue. The center is one of three Denver Public
School facilities for pupils under 21 years of age, who are
not high school graduates, and are not attending Denver
Public High School. Enrollment figures since 1981 have
remained fairly stable with approximately 220-300 students
attending per academic year. Statistics reveal a dramatic
decrease from 751 to 261 when 1980 figures are compared to
1985 due to the elimination of nite school.
The "Jesus Center" at 3600 Zuni Street is the only private
school in the neighborhood. It is non denominational
serving kindergarten through grade 12. The school occupies
approximately one acre of land. School enrollment slightly
increased from 328 in 1975 to 347 in 1980 with the 1984-85
figure comparable to both years at 335 students.
Both Bryant Webster and Valdez elementary chools further
reveal the growing number of young people in the
neighborhood showing a steady enrollment increase.
59


Library
The Woodbury branch library located at 3265 Federal
Boulevard in the West Highland neighborhood was constructed
in 1913 with additions in 1966. The building has 10,098
square feet of space and contains 55,070 volumes. The
library serves an area within a one mile radius, covering
most of Jefferson Park, West Highland, Sunnyside, Sloan
Lake, and Highland neighborhoods. Highland residents feel
that the facility adequately serves their needs.
La Casa De Salute
La Casa de Salute Health Station at 3605 Pecos Street funded
by the Department of Health and Hospitals, occupies
approximately one half acre of land. The health station is
a family practition clinic and did not report any major
problems.
Senior Citizen Residences and/or Centers
There are several retirement and nursing homes in Highlands
and the surrounding area. Though these homes exist there is
still a need for additional senior citizen housing to serve
the rapid growing population of elderly in North Denver.
The following facilities serve the area:
. Casa Loma at 38th and Alcott Street, owned by Denver
Housing Authority.
. St. Elizabeth Center 2825 W. 32nd Avenue.
. Ivy Manor Nursing Home 2205 W. 29th Avenue.
. Regency Health Care 2741 Federal Boulevard.
. Lennox elderly homes W. 33rd and Eliot.
. W. 32nd and Federal Boulevard.
West 38th Avenue Merchants Association
West 38th Avenue Merchants Association at 3740 Shoshone
is a newly developed office for economic development
open to all merchants and developers. Members of the
merchants group are dedicated to enhancing the
commercial relationship with the local community and
providing convenience shopping on the Avenue. Low
interest loans facilitated by the Neighborhood Business
Revitalization endeavors can be used for storefront and
interior renovations, landscaping and street lighting,
new construction, land acquisition, and merchandising.
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Highland Neighborhood Housing Services
Highland Neighborhood Housing Service, Inc., a non-profit,
non-governmental corporation, is a working partnership of
neighbors, business leaders, and city representatives
committed to maintaining and enhancing the cultural, ethnic,
and socio-economic mix of the Highland Community by
promoting safe, sound, and desirable housing and
surroundings for all. The Housing Services is located at
1800 w. 33rd Avenue.
North Denver Workshop
North Denver Workshop is a community based organization that
provides technical assistance to the community by
integrating students, residents and planning/architectural
expertise in the area of community development and planning.
The Workshop is located at 3401 Pecos Street and is part of
the University of Colorado at Denver-Design Center.
Del Norte Housing Development Corporation
Del Norte Housing Development Corporation is a non-profit
housing groups who's goal is to help create affordable
housing for low-moderate income people and to assist with
the economic growth and development concerns of small
businesses. It is a partnership between governmental and
private organizations. Del Norte office is located at 3401
Pecos Street.
Day Care
1. Chapel Day Care Center, operated by All Saints Church.
3130 Wyandot Street
2. Mile High Child Care Association
Northside Child Development Center 3551 Pecos
3. Head Start Centers:
- 3410 Tejon Street
- 4373 Tejon Street
- 2450 Clay Street
- 3555 Pecos Street
4. Bryant-Webster pre-school program for four year old
"children.
5. Highland Early Learning Center 2949 Federal
Boulevard.
6. Northside Community Center 3555 Pecos Street
7. Asbury Methodist Church 2205 W. 30th Avenue
61


Fire and Police Protection/Crime
Fire station number 7 at 2195 West 38th Avenue was built in
1975 and serves the neighborhood. Fire protection is
adequate for the area.
Police District Substation #1, located at 2195 Decatur
Street built in 1967 provides service to Highland and
surrounding area.
The boundaries for police services are approximately 52nd on
the north, 6th Avenue on the south, approximately the Platte
River on the east, and Sheridan Boulevard on the west.


Description and. location Highland Neighborhood Proposed Zone
Districts
1. Suggested B-4 Zone overlay
Location
The area along West 38th Avenue between Osage and Kalamath
Streets.
New Requirement:
All development project that are 15,000 (approximately 6-8
lots or more) square feet of lot size ormore would require
site plan review by the Denver Planning Office.
Waive the following uses from the B-4 zone district in the
current Zoning Ordinance:
* Blood Plasma Service
* Head Shops (tabacco shops that allow the sale of
paraphernalia)
* Parking as use by right
* Veterinarian without closed kennel
* Adult Bookstore and eating place with adultamusement
other uses that are automatically excluded from the
existing B-4 zone district because of the 500 feet
separation requirement, e.g., adult uses and tattoo
studios.
Conditions:
Structures should adhere to Section 4(b), 5, and Section 59-
410 permitted used related to front and side setback
requirements in the existing 1-0 zone district and should
include landscaping in the side setback requirements.
2. Suggested B-4 Commercial Zone Overlay
Locations:
A. The area along Central Street between 20th Street
viaduct and Kalamath Street. (Sub-area 14)
B. West 37th Avenue and Navajo Street, (exist B-4 zone
district)
C. Speer and Federal Boulevard, north to Douglas Place and
east to North High School, (corner of Speer and Federal
Blvd.)
63


New Requirement:
All new development projects that are 15,000 (approximately
6-8 lots or more) square feet of lot size or more would
require site plan review by the Denver Planning Office.
Waive the following uses from the B-4 zone district in the
current Zoning Ordinance.
* Blood Plasma Service
* Head Shops (tobacco shops that allow the sale of
paraphernalia)
* Sales of automobiles, trailers, R.V.'s, and light
trucks. Sales and warehousing of automobile and truck
parts and accessories.
* Sales and warehousing of motorcycles
* Car wash
* Automobile repair garage
* Other uses that are automatically excluded from the
existing B-4 zone district because of the 500 feet
separation requirement eg., adult uses and tattoo
studios.
* parking as a use by right.
Conditions:
. Site A maximum 50' building heights.
. Site B, maximum 30' building heights
. Site C, height of any new development should be
comparable to existing building.
. The same 1-0 requirements as B-4 zone overlay.
3. Suggested B-4 Residential/Commercial Zone Overlay
Locations:
A. The area along Zuni Street between West 29th Avenue and
W. 32nd Avenue (norther part of sub-area 5)
B. The area bounded by Umatilla and 16th Street to the
west, 20th Street viaduct to the east, Central Street
to the south, and approximately W. 32nd Avenue to the
north, (sub-area 10 & 11)
New Requirement:
All new development projects that are 15,000 (approximately
6-8 lots or mroe) square feet of lot size or more would
require site plan review by the Denver Planning Office.
64


Waive the following uses from the B-4 zone district in the
current Zone Code Ordinance:
* Blood Plasma Service
* Head Shops (tobacco shop that allow the sale of
paraphernalia)
* Sales of automobiles, trailers, R.V.'s, and light
trucks.
* Sales and warehousing of automobile and truck parts and
accessories.
* Sales and warehousing of motorcycles.
* Car Wash
* Automobile repair garage
* All industrial uses
* Other uses that are automatically excluded from the
existing B-4 zone code because of the required 500 feet
separation requirement e.g., adult uses and tattoo
studios.
* Parking as a use by right.
Conditions:
Site A, maximum 35' building height; site B, maximum 40'
building height.
The same 1-0 requirement as B-4 zone overlay.
4. Suggested Moderate Density Residential zone
Locations:
A. The Scottish Village Historic District bounded by Zuni
Street, West 32nd Avenue and Dunkeld Place, (sub-area
2)
B. The area bounded by West 32nd Avenue, Zuni Street, West
29th Avenue to Umatilla Street, excluding the southeast
and west comer lots. (W. 29th and Wyandot and
Umatilla), (sub-area 6)
New zone district in which existing housing densities would
be maintained. The new zone would be similar to the
existing R-2-A (22 dwelling units per acre or 29 dwelling
units per acre with a Planned Building Group) but would take
into account the existing setbacks and depth of frontages.
5. Suggested B-2 and B-3 Zone Districts Overlay:
Current B-2 and B-3 zone districts would remain the same in
terms of densities allowed but would waive the same uses in
the proposed B-4 Commercial Zone Overlay unless otherwise
stated in the plan.
65


6.
P.U.D.
New developments or significant redevelopments should go
through the existing Planned Unit Development process and be
evaluated according to the goals established in the plan.
Locations:
A. The "Highland Block", 15th Street between Boulder and
Central Streets.
B. The lower Bluffs area bounded by West 29th Avenue on
the north, west 27th Avenue on the south, Vallejo
Street on the east, and the alley east of Wyandot on
the west.
C. The northwest corner of west 29th Avenue and Umatilla.
D. Northwest corner of W. 29th Avenue and Wyandot.
66


Development Guidelines: Highland Block
Neighborhood Coalition Development of Highland Block
The Highland Coalition includes leadership from
Jefferson/Highland/Sunnyside, Del Norte Neighborhood
Development Corporation, and Highland Neighborhood Housing
Services. For nearly half a decade since the Highland Block
assembly began, these organizations have recognized the
impact its redevelopment would have on their neighborhoods.
Within the framework of community development and social
program in their neighborhoods, they have focused on this
block in 1) studying the impact of development on the larger
neighborhood, 2) research and planning, 3) reviewing
developers' plans, 4) advising city officials and developers
as to neighborhood needs and concerns, and 5) disseminating
information to neighborhood residents.
A. Redevelopment Goals
The Coalition has defined a number of goals for
redevelopment of the Highland Block and propose that:
1. Affordable housing be made available to neighborhood
residents with an overall provision of 20% of the units
available to residents with low and moderate incomes.
2. Revisions for business opportunities and locations for
neighborhood/minority business persons be explored.
Specifically, it is recommended that 15% of the retail
space will be reserved for such tenants.
3. Neighborhood-serving types of commercial activities
should be part of the project, i.e., day care center.
4. Jobs with assurance that 20% will be available both in
construction and operation to neighborhood residents.
5. The full utilization of federal, state, city and
private charitable resources be investigated to make
the above goals possible.
6. Design and density of the project be compatible with
planning goals of the neighborhood.
7. An equity participation by the coalition and
neighborhood should be explored.
67


Services
The Coalition expects to provide the following services to
the developer:
1. Assistance in meeting the design (height, open space,
density, parking, circulation and ingress/egress,
materials, amenities, unit and retail mix, landscaping,
preservation, etc.) and other neighborhood objectives
related to approval of a Planned Unit Development,
other rezoning or a Planned Building Group and
facilitating the process.
2. Serve as an employment and training resource in
ensuring neighborhood resident employment in all
aspects of construction, marketing, management,
maintenance and operation. The Coalition will receive
periodic reports to assist in in monitoring the
achievement of goals.
3. Serving as a resource in recruiting and relocating
neighborhood/minority businesses in the project and
arranging for some of the following types of assistance
to them: budgeting and meeting capital needs, hiring,
negotiating leases and other aspects of business
operation. The Coalition can also assist in attracting
the types of neighborhood-serving commercial which are
designated. Monthly marketing reports will be used in
monitoring achievement.
4. Marketing to neighborhood residents including
development of eligibility criteria, preparation of
marketing materials and programs, resident selection,
allocation and utilization of subsidies, etc.
5. Generating public and private resources through
excellent relationships with government officials and
program staffs and with private charitable
organizations. Some of the potential sources of funds
might include: UDAG, CD, tax-exempt bonds, housing
development grants, CHFA, DURA, etc.
6. Attracting loan and investment capital through long-
standing contacts in the banking and development
communities.
7. " Potential for Coalition to invest in the project at
market rates of return, including in higher risk start-
up expenses, at levels proportionate to its interest in
the project.
68


Equity Role
The Coalition is prepared to negotiate an equity position in
the project based upon investments in the following areas:
1) general neighborhood revitalization and social efforts
which complement the project, 2) the above described
services provided by the Coalition or an approved assignee
with comparable or greater skills, 3) the potential for a
cash investment. Return on this investment would be re-
invested in neighborhood community development activities.
69


Highland Neighborhood Public Right-Of-Way Maintenance
locations
Central Street from Umatilla to 20th Street (includes
all gate way entrances)
20th Street and Osage node.
Speer interchange
Fox interchange
City owned carriage lots
. Wyandot and Vallejo W. 37th/38th Avenue
. Vallejo and Tejon W. 34th/35th Avenue
Quivas and Pecos W. 34th/35th Avenue
. Bryant and Alcott W. 36th/37th Avenue
Speer Boulevard at W. 29th, W. 28th to the south
Northside Community Center grounds
- W. 38th Avenue, Federal Boulevard to Inca Street
including the underpass.
70


Full Text

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HIGHLAND NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN DENVER PLANNING AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT APRIL 1986

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PROPOSED HIGHLAND NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN AS APPROVED BY TRE DENVER PLANNING BOARD December 11, 1985 FOR PRESENTATION TO CITY COUNCIL April 28, 1986 Prepared by the Denver Planning Office Betty "B.J." Brooks, Associate City Planner Mary Avgerinos, Intern With the assistance of the Highland Steering Committee Neighborhood Technical Team: Mary Helen Sandoval, Highland, Neighborhood Housing Services Kee Warner, Highland, Neighborhood Housing Services Martin Saiz, North Denver Workshop Chris Guss, North Denver Workshop Sal carpio, Councilman, District 9 Debbie Ortega, Council Aide, District 9 Rick McNeal, Jefferson-Highland-Sunnyside Rich Kowalsky, Jefferson-Highland-sunnyside Eleanor J. Jefferson, Jefferson-Highland-Sunnyside Tim Boers, Highland, Neighborhood Housing Services Joe Navarro, Highland, Neighborhood Housing Services Gloria McCormick, Pecos Plaza Neighbors Jose V.B. Abeyta, Pecos Plaza Neighbors Martha Roberts, Pecos Plaza Neighbors Pete Ablanczy, Century Bank North Ed Vigil, w. 38th Avenue Merchants Association Dan Stramiello, Westbrook Partnership Marvin Kelly, Del Norte Housing Development Don Bottom, Investment Manager, Colorado Farm Bureau Mutual Insurance Company Anthony Capillupo, Mount Carmel Father Pat, Marilyn Duran, our Lady of Guadalupe Bob Patterson, Highland Christian Maria Crespin, Northside community Center Ed Bobian, Businessman West 38th Avenue Technical Team: Tim Archuleta, President, w. 38th Avenue Merchants Assc. "Billie" A. Bramhall, Bramhall and Associates Ron Abo, Abo Architects and Associates Don Dethlefs, Chairman, A.I.A. Design Committee William Lamont, Jr., Director of Planning and Development The Honorable Federico Pena, M A Y o R

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I. II. III. IV. v. H I G H L A N D Neighborhood Plan Table of Contents April, 1986 Introduction ... Neighborhood Planning Use of the Plan Neighborhood Planning Process An Overview .. .. History ................ Neighborhood Vision ........................ Priority Action summary ......................... Summary of Issues ................... Summary of Goals ................... General Recommendation for Highland .... Zoning ............................... Housinq. ................................... Economic Development ......................... Traffic and Transportation .............. Community Facilities ........................ City Services .................................. Sub-Area Policies and Recommendations .............. Scottish -Sub-Areas 1-11 ...... West 32nd Avenue-North -Sub-Areas 12-14 ...... : Appendices .. Population Land Use and Zoning Environment Historic Preservation Streets and Highways Community Facilities Inventory Parks and Open Space Northside Community Center Ashland Recreation Center Schools Library La Casa de Salute Senior Citizen Residences West 38th Avenue Merchants Association Highland Neighborhood Housing Services North Denver Workshop Del Norte Housing Development Corporation Day Care Centers Fire;Police Protection/Crime Proposed Zone Districts City Services Contact List Guidelines: Highland Block Public Right-of-Way Maintenance Location Page 1 1 1 2 3 3 5 6 7 1 0 1 3 1 3 14 17 24 28 30 33 33 45 50

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t

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MARCH, 1986 I. INTRODUCTION NEIGHBORHOOD PLANNING Neighborhood Planning is a collaborative process between the City, citizens, and property owners of a particular area which actively solicits participation in the formulation of a plan for a neighborhood. The process helps to enunciate goals, places issues on the table, generates and tests alternative ways to achieve the desired ends, proposes a plan for the area, and spells out policy changes and investments which should be implemented to help realize that future. It is a forum in which people initiate rather than react to change, and in which the various interest groups within a neighborhood, who may have different goals, work out their differences to arrive at a mutually satisfactory plan. The private-public partnership is essential to the ultimate success of the venture. USE OF THE PLAN The neighborhood plan which results is an advisory document for directing and managing change. It serves as an official guide for decision makers, including the Denver Planning Office, the Mayor, various city departments, and upon adoption by the City Council, also guides that body's deliberations. It plays the same role for the private sector, advising residents, businessmen and investors as to expectations and direction for the neighborhood. The plan is not an official zone map and, as a guide, does not imply or deny any implicit rights to a particular zone. Zone changes, which may be proposed in the plan, must be initiated under a separate procedure established under the City and County of Denver Municipal Code. This plan is intended to promote patterns of land use, urban design, circulation and services which encourage and contribute to the economic, social, and physical health, safety and welfare of the people who live and work in the neighborhood. The neighborhood plan addresses issues and opportunities at a scale which is more refined and more responsive to needs that can be attained under the broad outlines of the city's Comprehensive Plan. The neighborhood plan serves as a component of that document.

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/

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--....... Wf:ST HIGHlN'O _,., wur, CI.AYTOIO ,. tllf/1-+----, ,,..... I ", I '-1 I I I I I I I I I I I BEL CAitO -..-------I I .:! IDGillAND NEIGHBORHOOD LOCATION MAP la

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NEIGHBORHOOD PLANNING PROCESS In May of 1984, the Denver Planning Office became partners in a community based planning process to update the Highland Neighborhood Plan of 1976 and to suggest alternatives for development. Highland is located one half mile north within walking distance of Denver's Central Business District. The neighborhood is bounded by Federal Boulevard on the west, the Valley Highway and Inca Street on the east, West 38th Avenue on the north, and Speer Boulevard on the south. The neighborhood's major access and gateways from the south are provided by the 19th Street bridge, 15th, 16th, and 20th Street viaducts, and Speer Boulevard at Zuni Street. Major west access into Highland is provided by W. 32nd and 33rd Avenues, major north access points are located along 38th Avenue at Clay, Zuni, Tejon, and Pecos Streets. This plan was created in cooperation with residents of Highland and tha Denver Planning Office. A technical team of staff persons from the Highland Neighborhood Housing Services, North Denver Workshop and Planning Office along with a steering committee made up of neighborhood associations, merchants, developers, landowners, and churches helped to structure and guide the entire process. Representatives from Council District 9 and various planning groups also participated. Names of the Highland Neighborhood Technical Team and Steering Committee members may be found in the The Highland Neighborhood Housing Services, Inc. directed and sponsored the neighborhood planning efforts for the Scottish Village/Bluffs area plan. Concurrently, Pecos Plaza Neighbors and Glenn Court representatives prepared small area plans for the eastern and Bluffs part of the neighborhood. These plans were integrated into the overall neighborhood plan for Highland. The overall plan included updating the area north of 32nd Avenue in terms of land use, zoning, housing, commercial, traffic issues, public facilities, general services, open space, and capital improvements. Alternatives for development were prepared by dividing the neighborhood into 14 sub-areas. Specific subarea policies and recommendations are presented later in the plan. Since the fall and spring the Steering Committee developed a "Neighborhood Vision" for the entire area. Just as neighborhood revitalization itself is a partnership effort, so this plan was created through team effort. 2

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II. AN OVERVIEW HIS'I'ORY Highland, on the bluffs overlooking Denver, was bounded on the south by Lake Avenue (later called West Lake Place and now Speer Boulevard) which had been a 25 foot-deep gully; on the west by Homer Boulevard, now Lowell Boulevard; on the north by Prospect Avenue (now West 38th Avenue), and on the south by Ashland Avenue (now West 29th) and east Gallop Avenue (now Zuni). In 1887 the Highland Park Company relinquished its claim to the western part of the area, losing some of its streets, but other streets such as Argyle, Dunkeld, Caithness, Firth, Fife and Douglas remain. In 1875, the village of Highland was incorporated and was intended to be an elite residential community. The residents of Highland were proud of their pure artesian water, beautiful homes and gardens, their churches, their schools, their trees, their pure morals, and clean air that was untarnished by smelter or factory smoke. Highlanders especially proud of their pure morals did not permit gambling or prostitution at the time when Denver was wide open and its red light district was known from coast coast. During the mid 1800's several wealthy men built homes in Highland. Home building in Highland was spotty with some estates occupying a whole block, other blocks fully built up and nearby ones vacant. During the 1800's and 1890's, some developers had built rows of five to six Victorian one and two story houses in a block and left the rest vacant. These first were built on narow twenty-five foot lots allowed at that time. For this reason any block in Highland today may contain houses representing the architecture of the 1890's, 1920's, 1940's, and 1950's. The curving Scottish Village streets of Highland encompassed a town within a town, where Anglo and German residents lived. Some who resided there were doctors, lawyers, plumbers, pharmacists, and grocers. However, the largest influx of residents occured when the Irish, German, English, and Italians immigrated to the area in the 1890's. As a result many churches were built to satisfy the diversity of its parishioners, e.g., Saint Patricks-Irish Church and Mount carmel-Italian Church. Federal Boulevard was known officially as "the Boulevard", to elite street of Highlands. When the streets were alphabetized around 1904 it became Boulevard F and in 1912 Federal Boulevard. Many of the fine homes of Highland either faced upon the Boulevard or were clustered nearby. 3

PAGE 13

In July 1890, Highland City Hall was dedicated; it was the geographic center of the town. The dedication of City Hall angered the Mayor of Denver, Wolfe Londoner, who many times attempted to annex Highland but was voted down by the residents. It was not until 1896 that the town of Highlands was finally annexed to Denver. The annexation was a result of the Mayor of Denver's threat to deny Highland access by viaducts to Denver if the final vote were defeated. Highland's annexation along with the merging of Denver City and Auraria in 1861 formed Denver. Through the course of time the well-to-do who had built in north Denver moved away. Many of the Irish felt pushed out by the Italians. The Italians, after being a close community began to lose its cohesiveness as young families moved further west to the suburbs. They felt they were driven out of north Denver, as the Irish did by a new wave of immigrants. The new people migrating to north Denver since 1930 called themselves Mexican American or Spanish American later to be identified as Chicano or Hispanic. A good percentage of this bronze race came from southern Colorado and Mexico speaking Spanish as a first language. Although not geographically concentrated, the Spanish-surnamed residents formed a cultural community, building their own catholic church, Our Lady of Guadalupe in the late l940's. It was during the late 1950's early sixties when Highland began to experience a tremendous transition in its population. A great number of Chicano/Hispanic families moved into the low cost housing as a result of the flight to the suburbs by many young Italians. The change during this era was rapidly creating a vacuum affect and a time of social unrest. This explosion in history left a number of older Italians in economic and political power with a great majority of voters being of Hispanic backgrounds. As the 1970's approached the political structures began to reflect the constituents of the neighborhood. The Partido La Raza Unida developed an outlet for political direction where by a number of Spanish-surnamed individuals took leadership. The mid seventies realized a change of hands relative to the economy, culture, and politics. It wasn't until the early eighties that stabilization began to occur and the rebuilding of the areas physical fabric began to go on the upswing. Today Highland can be classified as one of the more stable, yet redeveloping, older neighborhoods in the city with the well-to-do and the three waves of new settlers responsible for building the legacy of Highland. 4

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History exr =Pts: Rediscovering Northwest Denver-Ruth Eloise 1976. NEIGHBORHOOD VISION The vision for Highland embodied in this plan is an attempt to capitalize and build upon the tremendous enerqy already evident in the neighborhood. Specifically the plan recognizes that conditions in the neighborhood are changing for the better, thanks to the work of the JeffersonHighland-Sunnyside Neighborhood Association, Highland Neighborhood Housing Services, Del Norte Housing Development corporation, pecos Plaza Neighbors, the North Denver Workshop, w. 32nd and w. 38th Merchants Association's, developers, and other community participants of all neighborhoods in Denver. Public and private dollars have recently been invested in Highland and the results have been impressive. These efforts have helped to turn around decline in the neighborhood, making it into an area that is increasingly more stable. But more must be done in terms of effort and money to help reinforce that trend to the point where the neighborhood can be viewed as stable. The overall vision for Highland is to create a stable low density residential neighborhood which offers a variety of housing opportunities for low, moderate and middle income residents. Housing would be available in a balanced mix of types and costs which would enhance the existing socioeconomic mix of people living in the neighborhood. Creating a strong residential base is dependent upon zoning consistent with one's aims. Therefore, the current zoning must be changed to match and encourage compatible land uses. Just as a change in zoning is tied into the above vision, so are change in traffic patterns. one-way streets should be studied for conversion to two-ways, linkages in and out of the neighborhood must be established and better traffic controls need to be realized. To support the needs of Highland residents, it is envisioned that there be strong commercial areas that provide neighborhood shopping and services and create employment for local residents. New retailers will be encouraged to locate in the neighborhood and existing commercial establishments fixed up to strengthen Highland's economic base. In many sub-areas of the neighborhood, housing co-exists with commercial uses. A positive relationship between the two is contingent upon providing appropriate buffering where residential and commercial uses abut, landscaping of parking 5

PAGE 16

lots, strong code enforcement and overall sensitivity toward existing neighbors. consistent alley and sidewalk maintenance and improvements, upkeep of public right-of-ways, removal of junk cars, weeds, and debris from the neighborhood needs to occur in order to enhance neighborhood pride and image. Therefore, a clean environment is desired for Highland. The "Vision" would be incomplete if the neighborhood were not supported by adequate school and day care facilities, sufficient community and recreation centers, new parks, and bike and pedestrian paths throughout the neighborhood with strong connections to the Downtown and Central Platte Valley. PRIORITY ACTION SUMMARY The following priority action summary defines nine major issues and identifies their priority and geographic area. These issues as summarized are meant to be used as a tool to help the residents of Highland select projects in accord with what is desired by a majority of people in the neighborhood. Implementation of this plan will be a joint effort between neighborhood associations, developers, non-profit groupsagencies, and various city, state, and federal departments. 6

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()\ CJ Fund ott-site improvements related to rehab. or new housing. Provide new affordable housing on vacant lots. Provide mora housing rehab. funds. Improve condition and supply of low cost housing. Encourage development of coop and senior citizens housing. Preserve historic structures and ensure that new development ie ot a compatible scala and character. Continue aost wanted" strategy to improve the condition ot vacant and abandoned buildings. create a balance ot owner;renter housing opportunities. Minimize displacemant by providing counselling and assistance tor home purchases. Encourage aixed use projects. Second Priorities: create historic districts. 3. Economic Development and Employment First Priorities: Support theW. l8th Avenue H.B.R. district plans. Upgrade deteriorated retail areas. Eliminate certain uses in commercial areas i.e. billboards, problem bars, etc. Promote intill development ln vacant land or abandoned structures. Strengthen neighborhood businesses by targeting and local rehab. dollars. Encourage development ot low-midrise offices (4-6 stories) Sacond Priorities: Encourage new neighborhood serving businesses. Increase neighborhood employment opportunities Neighborhood-wide Scattered sites Neighborhoodwide Heighborhoodwide Where possible Sub-area 9,12, and the Highland Block Heighborhoodwide Neighborhoodwide Heighborhoodwide especially in subarea 13 Sub-areas 8, 10, and 11 Sub-area 6, Potter Highlands (sub-area lA) expand Stoneman's Row (sub-area 9) W. 38th Avenue -Federal Boulevard to Inca Street W. 38th Avenue, Tejon Street (W. 32nd toW. llrd), W. l2nd Avenue and Zuni, Highland Block, and Zuni Street (south of w. l2nd) Speer Boulevard, W. l2nd Avenue, 20th Street viaduct, sub area 5 and ll. Sub-areas 8, 10, 11 and scattered sites w. 38th Avenue, Tejon Street, Zuni Plaza, (sub-area 5) Sub-area 4, 8, 10, ll and south of W. 29th along Zuni. W. 38th Avenue, Zuni Plaza (sub-area 5) and W. 32nd Avenue (sub-area 1) Neighborhood-wide

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0\ Ill HIGHLAND NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN PRIORITY ACTION SUMMARY l'BOJJICTI 1. Zoning ana Lana Uaa First Prioritiass Change the 8-4 zoning to eliainate new industrial, adult and autoaobile uses. Encourage autoaobile oriented uses along Speer and W. 38th Avenue between Osage and Rezone areas where predoainant land use is low, aoderate density residential but currant zoning allows aora permissive density and/or uses. Deal with non-coapatlble land uses: In 8-4 where industrial usee are non-coapatlble take the following actions: ellalnate these uses as they bscoaa obsolete landscape and butter existing industrial troa residential uses. discourage zonig changes which allow new industrial to locate in the B-4 enforce existing codas. Encourage developaent ot the Colorado rara Bureau lands through a P.U.D. Strengthen code enforceaent Enforce law requiring absentee landlords to continue upkeep ot properties. second Prioritleas Develop vacant land Reuse vacant buildings. Third Priority: Deal with non conforming land uses by: encourage periodic review ot non-conforming structures encourage use ot PUD's tor plans that exceed peraltted densities and which are compatible to neighborhood goals. 2. Housing Maintenance and Davelopaant First Priorities: Increase home ownership and housing programs. Continue to improve deteriorated housing. G E 0 G R A P H I C A B E_A Sub-areas 10, )'I, ll, ?(and along W. 38th Avenue. Subareas 4 and 13 Subareas 2, 6, and parts ot 1. Sub-areas 1, 10, 11 and 13. Dog House Tavern Sub-areas 10, 11, ll and 14. Sub-areas 4, 5, 7, 10, 11, 13, 14 and along w. 38th Avenue. Neighborhood-wide Sub-area 8 Neighborhoodwide Neighborhoodwide Sub-areas 8, 19, 11 and scatters sites. There are 42 parcels vacant according to a 1985 CDA inventory. There are 34 abandoned buildings according to a 1985 CDA Neighborhoodwide Colorado Farm Bureau W. 29th and Uaatilla Highland Block. \Y. 29th Ave.t; Wyandot (Sub area 8 and 11) Neighborhoodwide Neighborhoodwide

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0\ () 4. Trattic an4 Transportation First Priorities: Conduct Tratfic Study Study the conversion ot one-way streets, Pecos;osage and 33rd/l5th. Install better school crossing signage on W. 29th Avenue. \, v16th Street bridge and 19th/20th Street bridges. /\ ..... j Improve parking availability and better access. second Priorities: Install RTD bus shelters Install tratric diverters and enforce trarric Hire school crossing guards. Third Priorities: Lessen trattic impacts due to tuture Check or lights on Clay Develop pedestrian and bike paths. 5. Public Facilities and Social Service Needs First Priorities: Resolve the overcrowded school problea. Upgrade the Northside Community Center (build a new center or rehab. old) Upgrade the Call to Action building and grounds. interior office renovation exterior tacade basketball court and parking access Second Priorities: Investigate the possibility at building a new swimming pool extension of Ashland Recreation Center. Neighborhoodwide Sub-areas 12 and ll South ot Valdez Elementary School Downtown connections Sub-area 6 and along W. 38th Avenue w. 32nd and W. lBthjTejon and 16th and Boulder Ounkeld Place (sub-area 2) ounkeld Placs (sub-area 2) Sub-area 8, 10, and 11 Clay Street (north ot W. 32nd Avenue) Sub-areas 8 and 9 Valdez and Bryant-Webster schools (sub-areas J and 13) w. 35th Avenue and Pecos (sub-area 13) W. 34th Avenue and Pecos (sub-area 13) Sub-area 2

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0' 0. Create and proaota aora day care prograas. 6. Parka and Open lpaca First Priorities! create aore park apace. Fund La Raza/Coluabus Park iaproveaanta. Create aore and encourage local ownership of co .. unity gardens. Improve aaintanance and lighting in Hirshorn Park. 7. Orban Design an4 Iaaga First Prioritieas Improve the appearance of neighborhood gateways by landscaping public properties. Condemn and re-hab abandoned buildings. Establish design guidelines for coaaercial, industrial and residential uses or areas. Create historic trail syataa and pedestrian/bike paths. Encourage lighting of significant Church steeples. Strengthen connections to downtown. Secon4 Priorities! Maintain and iaprove public land between I-25 and neighborhood. Landscape existing and new parking lots in coaaercial and residential areas. Strengthen residential and commercial right-of-ways. Preserve view troa Asbury Church to downtown. B. city;state Services First Priorities: Encourage better pollee protection and crime prevention programs. Heighborhoodwide Rockaont Park -Central Platte Valley, linear park along Inca Street, W. 37th Avenue and Decatur, carriage lots at w. 34th and Quivas, w. 37th and wyandot and others. w. 38th Avenue and Osage Street Heighborhoodwida, especially at W. llrd and Shoshone Sub-area 10 West 38th Avenue and Inca, Zuni and Speer Boulevard, lSth and central and the 20th Street viaduct. Heighborhoodwide Sub-areas 10 and 11 Sub-areas a and 9 All historic churches 15th, 16th, 20th Street bridges Along the eastern and southern edge of the neighborhood. Heighborhoodwide W. 38th Avenue, Zuni Street (south or W. 32nd Avenue), W. 32nd Avenue, w. lOth Avenue at Wyandot, Central Street (20th Street viaduct to Kalamath) Sub-area 6 south to the downtown. Heighborhoodwide .,

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0'> ro Encourage acre code enforcement Develop contract with Public Works to aaintain city/State owned property. Encourage better atreet cleaning and alley aaintenance. 9. Other Capital Iaprovemants First Priorities! Rebuild stora aewers, and improve 38th Avenue underpass. Continue sidewalk repair Second Priorities! Fund alley paving Continue to maintain street and alley lighting programs. Helghborhoodwide Primarily along the edges of the neighborhood, carriage lots and city owned properties. Heighborhoodwlde N.B.R. district Heighborhoodwide East ot Fite Court between caithness and Argyle W. 34th, 35th, Eliot and Decatur W. 32nd and Quivas -mid-Block W. 35th, 36th, Zuni and Alcott W. 35th, 36th, Wyandot and Zuni W. 34th, 35th, Vallejo and Tejon Neighborhood-wide

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SUMMARY OF ISSUES Highland's central location and proximity to the Platte River Greenway, excellent I-25 highway access, solid affordable housing, and good views of downtown and mountains are a few reasons why people enjoy living in the neighborhood. The neighborhood is resourceful in that its residents are strong in spirit, will, and determination. Highland offers an environment for living that celebrates its diverse ethnicity, social interaction, and economic mix. The area has created a sense of "neighborhood" by nurturing its locations and providing for cooperative relations with people for a stronger community. The neighborhood has welded a strong political base which has helped protect it from further deterioration. Commercial and residential redevelopment has occurred in various parts of the neighborhood. To continue this positive trend the following issues must be resolved and goals attained. 1. Zoning and Land Use Conflicts Highland is an older neighborhood with low density housing\ it's northern section is more stable than its southern half. Residential impacts are caused by the permissive zoning south of w. 32nd Avenue and along the eastern edge which allows for intense commercial development while existing land uses are developed at a significantly lower density. Non-compatible land uses that are industrial or automobile related have had negative impacts on adjacent residential areas. These impacts have been aggravated due to the lack of code enforcement and problems with absentee landlords. These problems can be found primarily south of w. 32nd Avenue and along the eastern edges of the neighborhood. 2. Housing Maintenance and Development Nearly 60% of the housing in Highland is renter occupied with a balanced mix of single and multi-family structures reflecting several generations of housing. The majority of the housing stock was built prior to 1939. There has been some housing deterioration but housing rehabilitation and infill development have been taking place in the last seven years. Nonetheless, housing sale prices are lower than the city's average selling price. Preservation of historic structures is a critical factor for the neighborhood in that it helps maintain the area's image and pride. Because Highland is one of 7

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Denver's oldest areas the housing stock needs continued improvements and maintenance. 3. City/State Services When doing a comparison a noticeable difference in terms of the level of care and maintenance is found in the more stable neighborhoods than in Highland. Code enforcement and more city services are sorely needed in Highland to correct the adverse image created by the lack of streetjalley and sidewalk cleaning, the need for dumpsters, proliferation of junk cars and debris, and lack of upkeep of city/state owned property, especially public right-of-ways. The neighborhood also feels the need for improved crime prevention programs and police protection. 4. Urban Design, Image, and Capital Improvements There is a lack of attention paid to gateways, landscaping of parking lots, abandoned buildings and the lack of sidewalk and alley improvement and alley paving. Efforts are currently underway to better the image of the neighborhood through identification of alleys and sidewalks that need repair, by programming funds to upgrade the storm sewer at the W. 38th Avenue underpass, and coordinating with the Department of Public Works regarding right-of-way maintenance. As a tool for assisting developers with future projects the neighborhood and Steering Committee have prepared development guidelines for the "Highland Bock" at 15th and Boulder/Central, design guidelines for w. 38th Avenue Neighborhood Business Revitalization District, and have suggested specific goals for each sub-area of the neighborhood. s. Open Space and Public Facilities Parks and recreational facilities are extremely limited in the Highland area occupying only 10 acres of the neighborhood's 417 net acres (which exclude streets). Although neighborhood residents have access to the Platte River Greenway and Confluence Park, Columbus;La Raza Park, Viking Park, and Highland Park none of these open space areas are located within the neighborhood's boundaries. The problem of lack of open space and facilities such as a swimming pool and ball fields becomes critical when a comparison is made between Highland's 34 percent youth population figure and the significantly lower 26% figure of Denver. Particularly there is a lack of play areas for organized activities and needed public refuge space for residents who lack front and backyard play space. Recommendations for 8

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improving this problem are found in the Priority Action Summary. In addition to the number of youth, the 1980 u.s. census shows an increase of senior citizens in Highland from 11% in 1970 to 13%. These two segments of the population need access to all kinds of community facilities including community and recreation centers, day care centers, and schools. Additional issues equally important as the above are l) the overcrowding of public schools( currently Bryant-Webster elementary school is renting space from the Northside Community Center due to overcrowding derived from improper student enrollment projections), 2) the lack of day care and extended day care facilities to meet the needs of a growing female labor force with children under 6 years of age, 3) the deterioration of the Northside Community Center, and 4) the lack of adequate swimming pool facilities. 6. Economic Development and Employment The Steering Committee conducted a survey of Highlands commercial districts and found that there were several common characteristics. These common elements were: A. commercial areas contained a mix of residential, retail and office uses; B. the areas are generally old and deteriorating with vacant retail and office space e.g. Tejon Street, w. 32nd Avenue, Zuni Street (south of w. 32nd Avenue) and W. 38th Avenue (especially east of Tejon) ; c. the businesses lack landscaped parking and had limited or no buffers to the residential uses; D. The intensity of development permitted by zoning often exceeds actual land use; E. there are districts where commercial is unsuccessful that have potential as residential areas; F. a great number of commercial areas are predominantly neighborhood serving, and G. there are certain neighborhood retail uses desired by the residents which are not being met within the area. 9

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It has been suggested that commercial areas identified and prioritized in this plan be upgraded through the use of funds and neighborhood businesses should be encouraged to employ local people. The Neighborhood Revitalization District along w. 38th Avenue is an example of a strategy to achieve the commercial goals of this plan. 7. Traffic/Transportation It has been identified both in the 1976 Highland Plan and through the current 1985 discussion that one-way streets have tended to divide Highland and break up the residential character of the neighborhood. Other traffic concerns identified have related to pedestrian safety, access to the Central Platte Valley, and the need for new bike, bus and pedestrian routes. These concerns and others will be addressed in a future study to be coordinated by the Denver Planning Office. S'OMMARY OF GOALS General goals as well as objectives were developed for the neighborhood which are identified below. These goals resulted from many months of discussion, debate, and collaboration among people in the community. Specific recommendations andjor actions are also detailed in the subarea section of this plan. Goal one: Neighborhood Pride Heighten the sense of neighborhood pride by fostering and enhancing the tistorical, cultural, and aesthetic richness of Highland. design guidelines have been prepared for two vital areas of Highland, West 38th Avenue and the Highland Block at 15th and Central. enforce city codes regarding housing conditions, and the sanitary conditions of yards, streets, and alleys. Goal Two: Residential Character Maintain and stabilize the residential character of the neighborhood by preserving and improving the conditions of the existing housing, creating more housing opportunities, and increasing home ownership. The City should continue to work in cooperation with non-profit housing corporations, including Highland Neighborhood Housing Services and Del Norte Housing Development Corporation on programs such as 10

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rehabilitation assistance, land acquisition funds, loans and matching grants, and assistance with off-site improvements that would improve overall urban design of a project. utilize the Highland Neighborhood Housing Services Exterior Rehabilitation Program for the Scottish Village/Bluffs area. promote compatible residential development on vacant land through the area. improve the conditions of absentee-owned housing through code enforcement. ensure that equal access to decent rental housing opportunities is accomplished by enforcing the City's absentee landlord registered agent requirement. encourage more home-ownership, cooperatives, rental and senior citizen housing as part of new developments on a project-by-project basis to stabilize the area. fund more housing rehabilitation assistance. continue publicizing problem properties through the "5 most wanted" list strategy and support other similar endeavors. Goal Three: Housinq Choice Minimize displacement of lonq-time residents of Highland and provide a balanced mix of housing types and costs for new and existing residents. encourage home-ownership, cooperatives, rental and senior citizen housinq that is affordable for lower income people. encourage a mixture of residential types and costs as a part of new development. Goal Four: Business Promote the improvement of existing desirable businesses and encourage new businesses to locate in Highland. work with the Economic Development Agency to get money allocated for development projects in Highland. require landscaping of new developments and encourage existing businesses to improve landscaping. 11

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* encourage businesses to conduct joint advertising that promotes both their business and the surrounding Highlands area. promote the hiring of neighborhood residents by local merchants. promote development efforts in Highland. Goal Five: Neiqhborhood Participation Pursue neighborhood participation and involvement in development efforts to ensure new projects compatibility and benefit to the character of Highland. promote ongoing dialogue between neighborhood residents, landowners, and developers regarding potential and current development projects through Jefferson-Highland-Sunnyside Neighborhood Association. w. 38th Avenue Merchants Association and Highland N.H.S. committees. promote public and/or non-profit participation in projects which further the goals of the neighborhood. make developers aware that the neighborhood is available for consultation on potential projects and provide them with guidelines for appropriate development. Goal six: zoninq Lessen future neighborhood development impacts and promote zoning changes which are consistent with neighborhood goals. support the revamping and changing of the present zoning ordinance, especially as it relates to the B-4 zone district and as it relates to the specific recommendations in the plan. encourage neighborhood associations to continue commenting on zone map amendments received by the Zoning Administration. 12

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III. General Recommendations for Highland A. Zoning The plan recommends that a number of areas be rezoned to bring zoning in conformance with existing land uses. This would create some nonconforming uses; several recommendations were developed and are described below to deal with non-conforming uses. All such zoning changes need to be fully debated in City council and would have to have that body's approval before any map changes could be made. New zone districts which would apply to individual sub-areas were prepared and are intended to address problems identified in each sub-area. These zone districts suggest that certain uses be eliminated as a use by right in the B-4. In all, three variations of the B-4 are recommended; each proposes to waive specific uses and add conditions as they relate to specific areas. Additionally a moderate density residential zone is proposed to replace the existing R-3 zoning south of w. 32nd Avenue, again to bring zoning in conformance with land use and help to stabilize the residential areas. The proposed zone districts may be found in the Appendix. A recommendation is made to install landscaped buffers to separate commercial uses from residential uses where such properties adjoin each other. Finally, height limits are suggested for various sub-areas of the neighborhood. Recommendations: Non-conforming uses: Upon change of ownership or use it is recommended to institute a procedure which would allow review of any commercial use that is now or becomes nonconforming, by the Board of Adjustment Zoning. This review should occur every 3 years to ensure compatibility with surrounding residential uses. If property remains vacant for more than 6 months it is recommended that it should lose it's legal nonconforming status. Neighborhood input to the Board of AdjustmentZoning is encouraged to ensure the use is allowed by zoning regulations when a nonconforming use changes to another nonconforming use. Infill developments that may require a slightly higher density than what is allowed in the R-2 should be required to use the P.U.D. process. This process is encouraged for commercial home occupations that are outside the home but are on the same parcel of land. The following guidelines are proposed: 13

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( .) tu ti ;;; .. -w w ...J (I) ..... 0 c 2 Ui "' "' > 3 i i ,,, w '"" '" ITIJ [SJ rnJ [Jf] fl[]l[]]g]lli][Ji]J W 32nd A,,. Aa allowed In B4,R3 Aa allowed In 82 Ui "' "' 0 d w J2no S1 J( t-v. A a allowed In R2 .. Except when project meets neighborhood goal N EB PROPOSED HEIGHT /DENSITY LIMITS W JUII1 Av e W .llll1 Avo;

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l.-J 0" -. .. ... (/) ci) -F (/) ., cii ;j (J) ii) 2. c c .i () >-8 c ... w i r'l > w "'" [[] [[! LliJI : tfu Q;J Elill ITO fJ] 00 [!:] 00 I ve. nm rrn rm rm []] ml.-----v-tJr=i-r--""1 w J41h Ave LCJ Ltu L:=i gr] [[] L_. J U) realdentlal / commerclal zone overlay EB ZONING AND PROPOSED OVERLAY ZONES

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, a: 0 w :E <( a: LL z en w c z < cc :)

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1. proposed uses should be compatible in character and materials and provide appropriate buffering to the surrounding properties. 2. proposed uses should be low traffic generators. 3. proposed uses should not create parking, noise, or pollution problems. 4. Examples of acceptable uses are senior citizen housing, mom and pop shops, and low density multifamily housing. It is proposed that development guidelines be established for key parcels of land similar to those already developed for the Highland Block and the Colorado Farm Bureau land. These guidelines would encourage developer(s) to plan structures that are in harmony with the surrounding area. B. Housing Highland is a neighborhood that is redeveloping at a minor to moderate rate according to the Neighborhood Classification Preliminary Report, Denver Planning Office, July 1984. The criteria used to classify the neighborhoods included information on housing trends, compatibility between land use and zoning, and a survey of general conditions. According to the Denver Planning Office 1984 Housing Detail Report, Highland had 3,803 housing units of which 1,639 were single-family units, 1,966 multi-family units, 165 mixed residential units and 33 condominium and public scattered sites. Of the total housing units, 43% are single family and 57% are multi-family dwellings. Highland's housing reflects many generations of existence. Approximately 60% of the homes were built prior to 1939. During the early 40's through the late 50's 922 units were built. Approximately 84% of the housing in Highland was built by 1960. When comparing Highland's age of housing to Denver's, 1980 census statistics reveal that housing in Denver is by far younger than the housing stock of Highland's. Nearly 71% of Denver's housing was built after 1940 while 65% of the housing units in Highland were built prior to 1939. The neighborhood lost 302 dwelling units from 1970 to 1980. This loss is directly related to the age and poor condition of housing. According to the 1980 census, 8% of Highland's rental units lack complete plumbing compared to 2% in Denver. 14

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Housing deterioration is evident in northeast Highland and is the most severe on the eastern edge near I-25. However, rehabilitation is evident in the Scottish Village area. This change in housing conditions is directly attributed to the efforts of Highland Neighborhood Housing Services. Over the last 10 years, grants and loans totalling $1,033,790 have been provided by Denver's Community Development Agency and D.U.R.A. for rehabilitation of 160 units of housing in Highland. The Denver Planning Office Land Use file indicates that the average selling price for a single family home in Highland has been lower than the City's average selling price. 1983 figures show an average selling price for a single family home in Highland was $54,866, compared to a Denver average of $79,798. The figure is considerably lower in census tract 11.02 (east of Tejon) where average price for single family homes was $41,400. Average selling prices for homes in census tract 4.02 (west of Tejon) were $61,960. In 1983, 93 homes were sold in the neighborhood. In 1984, the Housing Detail Report indicated that Highland's owner occupancy was approximately 35%. This figure equals the general Denver percentage. There were 18 vacant and abandoned buildings in Highland as reported by the Building Department on January, 1984. Recommendations: Improve and stabilize the condition of housing in Highland. upqrade absentee owned housing; inform landlords about rehabilitation programs i.e. Highland N.H.S. Exterior Rehab. Program and Multi-family Rehab. Program; provide more housing rehabilitation funds; encourage private rehabilitation; increase code enforcement; enforce law requiring landlords to have an agent in the City to assure equal rights to decent rental housing; continue the "5 most wanted" strategy through Highland N.H.S., and encourage other similar endeavors. 15

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Create a better balance between owner occupied and rental homes and minimize displacement. increase home ownership opportunities; provide low interest loans to renters for home purchase; encourage purchase of rented single family houses; provide counseling for home purchase; promote a mixture of low and moderate income housing on vacant land; encourage communication between developers of infill housing and surround neighbors. encourage a variety of residential mixed use projects; create more housing opportunities; develop more senior citizen housing; promote coop-housing. Target local and state rehabilitation funding for Highland. Examples of resources are: Colorado Housing Finance Authority funds Community Development Block Grant funds Skyline Housing funds Designate the following as historic districts: Potter Highlands Stoneman's Row extension to the northside of w. 28th Avenue Sub-area 6 (Bluffs residential area) Preserve historic structures Improve the condition of residential parking lots require parking lots to be landscaped encourage better maintenance 1 6

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c. Economic Development Business development a.nd redevelopment are needed in the neighborhood to upgrade deteriorated retail areas, attract new businesses, increase employment opportunities, provide income for and improve the quality of community life. ltail businesses have declined due to F-relatively low level of expendable i J. The residents of Highland wish to e. for more neighborhood shopping and s destination shopping for areawide re A Highland's commercial districts was co1 _lng Committee. The following five con were identified as priority areas: l) West 38th Avenue from Federal Boulevard to Inca Street, 2) West 32nd to West 33rd Avenue and Tejon Street, 3) West 32nd Avenue and Zuni Street, 4) Fifteenth Street-Boulder to Central, and 5) Zuni Street south from Caithness Place to Speer Boulevard. Additionally, eight secondary revitalization areas were identified. Both primary and secondary areas are described separately but not necessarily in ranked order Primary Revitalization Areas l. West 38th Avenue -Federal Boulevard to Inca Street During the course of developing this plan, the West 38th Avenue Merchants Association was incorporated to focus on revitalizing the West 38th Avenue corridor. The idea to develop the Association came from the J.H.S. Neighborhood Association's Board of Directors and general membership. The Merchant's Association recruited a technical team to conduct a series of activities to determine the potentials and opportunities for the Avenue. The research gathered was used to apply for a Neighborhood Revitalization District which was granted in May, 1985. The N.B.R. district is a joint venture between the City's Economic Development Agency, and local merchants. Technical Team members names can be found in the Appendix. The corridor is described in four sections a) Federal Boulevard to Alcott Street, b) Alcott Street to Tejon Street, c) Tejon Street to Lipan, and d) Lipan Street to Inca Street. General characteristics and recommendations for the entire corridor are defined as are specific recommendations for each section. General Characteristics of the corridor: West 38th Avenue is an urban street that connects two neighborhoods, Sunnyside and Highland. The nature of the street is unique 17

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in that is contains both commercial and residential properties. Residents feel that this unique characteristics should be maintained. To satisfy the goals of the N.B.R. district and preserve the mixed use character the following recommendations are suggested. Recommendations: a. Housing should be maintained and improved where appropriate. Deferred maintenance may not be used as a justification for a rezoning. Housing units lost as a result of commercial development should be replaced somewhere in the Sunnyside and Highland neighborhoods. There should be a covenant made between the developer(s) and neighborhood organization to do so. Commercial revitalization should adhere to the N.B.R. design guidelines. Consideration should be given to rezoning selected B-4 parcels along the to a modified B-4 zone district 'n the appendix. Federal lJ' Ucott Street: idential and retail area. ; is B-2 and R-2. Racomman, Imprc Emphas;. \ and expand T.J's Food store. .,t Intersection. Streetscape residential and commercial right-of-ways. Improve parking ingress and egress at the w. 38th Avenue and Eliot Street shopette. Continue providing retail services to the neighborhood and broader community. Encourage the management at the 7-ll store to better maintenance of their grounds. b. Alcott Street to Tejon street: Character: Primarily single family and low density residential with retail and parking at the north and southwest corners of Tejon. current zoning is B-2 and R-2. 18

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Recommendations: Preserve and improve all residential units. Encourage streetscaping on both sides of the street. Discourage commercial encroachment. e. Tejon street to Lipan street: Character: Mixed use residential and commercial with parking, open space, and industrial uses. current zoning is primarily R-2 with B-2 and P-l on Tejon Street and B-4 between Osage and Lipan Street. Generally the buildings are in fair condition. As you move further east from pecos Street the buildings begin to show signs of deterioration. Recommendations: Landscape and improve commercial facades along both sides of the street between Quivas and Lipan street. Encourage the parking lot at Osage Street to be landscaped. Encourage landscaped medians, where possible. Study the parking and traffic patterns. d. Lipan Street to Inea Street: Character: Predominately retail and light industrial uses. The area is severely deteriorated with several vacant structures. current zoning is B-4, I-0, and I-l. Recommendations: Support ethnic restaurants and food store. Provide appropriate buffering between residential and commercial uses. Upgrade the underpass and monitor the progress of the storm sewer design and construction being conducted by the PUblic Works Department. 2. Tejon street West 32nd to W.33rd Avenue: Character: Mixed use neighborhood retail and office. CUrrent zoning is B-4. 19

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Recommendations Replace deteriorated commercial uses with mixed use residential and office projects. Encourage new businesses to locate into vacant buildings. Encourage sreetscape and facade improvements. Consideration and support should be given to rezoning the B-4 to the modified B-4 zone district described in the Appendix. 3. West 32nd Avenue and Zuni Street: Character: Mixed use neighborhood retail, office, and residential. Current zoning is B-4. In February, 1985 Highland N.H.S. received $150,000 from the Community Development Agency for land acquisition. Seven moderate income housing units will be developed on the northeast corner. There is a strong concern in the neighborhood regarding crime problems in this area related to the Mohagony Bar Solutions to the problem should continue to be explored and actions carried out by the community residents, Liquor Board, and police department. Recommendations: Provide rehabilitation funds for the Wier Building. Encourage unified signage and streetscape. Discuss anti-crime solutions with bar owners. *Note: Refer to Scottish Village/Bluffs Subarea 5 for additional information. 4. Fifteenth street -Boulder to Central Street: Character: Fifteenth Street and Central, better known as the "Highland Block" is one of the most significant blocks in the neighborhood. This parcel of land is located on the fringe of the lower Bluffs with easy highway access and good views which makes it extremely attractive to developers. The area is a gateway which links downtown with Highland and when developed can set a precedent for trends in the neighborhood. 20

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The site has two historic buildings virtually unoccupied with approximately 90% of the block vacant. current zoning is R-3, B-3, and B-4 with 40' height waivers on the western half of the block. Development guidelines were prepared for this parcel by the Highland Coalition (a united front of neighborhood associations) and can be found in the appendix. Recommendations: Encourage unified development through the P.U.D. process. Encourage a mixed use office, retail, and residential development. Encourage a higher percentage of residential as part of the development. *Note: Refer to Scottish Village/Bluffs Subarea 11 for further details. s. Zuni Street -Caithness south to Speer Boulevard: Character: Neighborhood retail with mixed use residential, services, and vacant land. CUrrent zoning is B-4. Zuni Street is a main thoroughfare and gateway into Highland. Area revitalization should be promoted by coordinating redevelopment of the Tallmadge,Romeo and the old North Denver Bank buildings including the Zuni Plaza. The area should remain mixed use. Recommendations: *Note Refer to Scottish Village/Bluffs Subarea 5 for details. 21

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secondary Revitalization Areas 1. West 32nd Avenue and Clay street: Character: Neighborhood retail with ethnic restaurants of combined Latin cultures. Recommendations: Economic development resources and technical assistance should be made available to businesses. Encourage continued maintenance of streetscape through the W.32 Avenue Businessmen's Association. Encourage new business to fill vacant storefronts. 2. West 30th Avenue and Wyandot Street: Character: Neighborhood retail and office. The area is people oriented with signs of revitalization. Recommendations: Continue to improve building facades. Encourage streetscaping. Encourage compatible office uses and recruit new businesses. 3. Tejon Street -West 33rd to West 37th Avenue: Character: Mixed use residential and retail area. Business structures are generally in good condition. The condition of residential varies from fair to good but are adversely affected by commercial encroachment. Current zoning is primarily B-3. Recommendations: Encourage unified facade, signage, and streetscape improvements on Tejon Street. Support any efforts to rezone the B-3 along the east side of Tejon Street between W.33rd and W35th Avenue (north of the Draperies) to R-2 or R-2-A. Encourage housing infill on vacant land at West 34th Avenue including Maroon Bells retail site. 22

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4. Tejon Street and w. 38th Avenue: Character: Recommendation: Mixed use commercial, retail, and residential. current zonie is B-2. encourage merchants and residents to participate in the streetscpae, lighting, and facade programs of the N.B.R. district. This business zone is in fairly good condition. There are no vacancies or infill possibilities although landscaping, lighting, and unified facade improvements would help to strengthen the node. 5. West 34th Avenue Osage to Mariposa street: Character: There are a number of bars in this area. With the exception of Little Pepinas, the area is brought down because of unsightly conditions of the bars and lack of landscaping. Recommendations: Encourage strict code enforcement. Control the number of liquor licenses allowed in the area. Encourage landscaping, upkeep, and police security. 6. 3300 osage street and w. 37th Avenue and Navajo street: Character: Ethnic retail specialty area. current zoning is B-4. Recommendations: Support any effort to rezone the B-4 to modified B-4 zone district described in the appendix. Improve landscaping and parking near Mancinelli's and redevelop the northeast and west corners. Reinforce and strengthen the w. 37th and Navajo retail area. Encourage new compatible uses. 23

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7. central Street between 20th Street viaduct and Kalamath street: *Note: Refer to West 32nd Avenue-North Subarea 14 for details. a. Speer Boulevard: *Note: Refer to Scottish Village/Bluffs Subarea 4 for details. D. Traffic and Transportation Highland is served by a variety of forms of transportation facilities including bikepaths, local streets, and major freeways. The major east-west traffic routes in and around the neighborhood are W. 29th, W. 32nd, w. 33rd, w. 35th, and w. 38th Avenues. The major north-south traffic routes are provided by Speer and Federal Boulevards, osage, Pecos, Tejon, Zuni, and Clay Streets. Traffic counts for 1981 in general reflect a reduction of automobile movement when compared to 1975 with the exception of W. 38th Avenue, and Federal Boulevard which showed an increase in traffic. Updated traffic counts will be reflected in the future traffic study for Highland. To create a strong residential neighborhood various traffic strategies need to be implemented. Traffic concerns and recommendations identified below should be used as a premise to help guide discussion and test alternatives for resolving traffic problems. street and Highways l. one way-streets It is the opinion of the Neighborhood that the residential character of the neighborhood is being hindered by the major one-way streets in Highland. Traffic volumes reported by the Department of Public Works indicated that Osage Street traffic volume slightly decreased from 5,350 in 1975 to 5,300 in 1981 as well as Pecos Street decreasing from 3,400 cars in 1975 to 3,100 in 1981. The traffic volumes on w. 33rd and W. 35th Avenues both showed a decrease from 2,650 (W. 33rd) and 2,350 (W. 35th) in 1975 compared to both streets carrying the same amount of traffic (2,100 cars) in 1981. The relatively low traffic volumes carried by both one-way paired streets (W. 33rd and W. 35th Avenues and Pecos and Osage Streets} coupled with the low density residential nature of adjacent land uses indicate that these streets may not need to function as one-ways in the future. An interesting feature to note is that the Pecos and Osage one-24

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ways both convert to two-way streets at West 38th Avenue north and south at the 20th Street viaduct. The one-way streets at Umatilla, w. Argyle Place, and w. Caithness Place carry a significantly less amount of traffic because of the width of the streets. These streets should remain functioning as one-ways. Recommendations: study the potentials of converting w. 33rd and w. 35th Avenues to two-way streets. study the potentials of converting Pecos and Osage streets to two-way streets, and change street classification from arterial to collector. study both conversions as they relate to parking. 2. Dunkeld Recommendations: install traffic diverters hire school crossing guards enforcement at stop signs to slow traffic down enforce speed limit 3. Clay Street Clay is a local street flanked by single family and multifamily low density residential. The lack of traffic management devises to slow traffic takes away from the residential character. Recommendations: update traffic counts. investigate present traffic signal progression to see if changes can be made to reduce speeds. 4. w. 29th Avenue Traffic on W. 29th Avenue has created concern for the safety of Valdez Elementary School children. If traffic volumes increase on w. 29th, the street could act as a barrier to communication in the southern part of Highland. Land uses are mixed residential and business on both sides of the Avenue. Though traffic has decreased along the Avenue since 1975 the concern is yet to be addressed. 25

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Recommendations: install flashing yellow warning signals. post additional school crossing signage. explore possibility of a cross bridge. Through traffic should be focused on Speer Boulevard to reduce east bound traffic on w. 29th Avenue near the school. w. 29th Avenue should be integrated with the comprehensive traffic study (developments south of w. 29th Avenue and east of Zuni Street may increase traffic movement) s. Collector-Distributor Concept/Interstate-25 The I-25 CBO Access study conducted by the state Highway department in 1984 proposed the development of a c/d road system from 19th and 20th Street south to Colfax Avenue. Though residents are not apposed to exploring methods to reduce traffic congestion on I-25, general consensus is that a c/d road would create negative impacts on the neighborhood. The residents don't favor the c/d concept prefer that the road system be located on the Platte River Valley side of the highway. 6. Bridge/Viaduct Connections Access from the neighborhood to the Central Platte Valley and downtown for automobiles and buses is provided primarily by 15th, 16th, and 20th Street viaducts and 19th Street bridge. These viaducts are in poor to fair condition. Coordination with the Central Platte Valley Plan is essential because of the proximity of Highlands to its southern neighbors (C.P.V. and Downtown). There is neighborhood support for pedestrianizing the 16th Street viaduct and converting it to a neighborhood transit route along with a major walkway and bike route. overall, the neighborhood residents want better connections into Downtown and the Central Platte Valley to minimize the barrier created by I-25. Recommendations: emphasize gateways into the neighborhood at each entrance. strengthen the connections to the Central Platte Valley and downtown with new bridge/viaduct designs 26

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provide good access to the proposed Rockmont Park in the Central Platte Valley. 1. Bus Routes and Shelters Residents are served by bus routes along the 15th, 16th and 20th Street viaducts, north and south along Federal Boulevard and east and west along w. 32nd Avenue and w. 38th Avenue. Bus shelters exist at w. 32nd Avenue and Federal and w. 32nd Avenue and Decatur. Access by bus to key employment centers is a problem for neighborhood residents. Recommendations: Have RTD Install bus shelters at the following locations: encourage RTD to evaluate bus services throughout Highland. install bus shetlers at the following locations: northeast corner of Tejon Street and W. 38th Avenue, southwest corner of Tejon Street and w. 38th Avenue, southwest corner of w. 32nd Avenue and Tejon Street, south corner of 16th and Boulder Street, and 20th Street viaduct on both sides of the bridge. a. Bike and Pedestrian Linkaqes Existing bike routes run along Clay Street between w. 38th and w. 32nd Avenues, w. JJrd and w. 35th Avenues, and along the 16th Street and 20th Street viaducts. The existing bike routes appear to be used frequently yet there seems to be a demand for alternative pedestrian and bike paths. Recommendations: develop a new bike route along 15th Street north to w. 29th Avenue and along Speer Boulevard. develop a new pedestrian and bike path from Zuni Street along w. 27th Avenue (south of the Colorado Farm Bureau) behind Stoneman's row connecting to the 15th and 16th Street bridges. develop an historic trail linking each landmark with historic markers at each point of interest. 27

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E. Community Facilities l. Parks and Open space Due to the lack of open space and neighborhood oriented parks the following suggestions were made to help create additional open space areas for the neighborhood. Recommendations: support the creation of additional park space at Rockmont -central Platte Valley. support the creation of the Central Platte Valley new park along the eastern edge of Highland (east of Inca Street) with pedestrian connections to Highland. Fund design improvements to La Raza;columbus Park. Create community gardens and encourage local ownership and;or leasing, especially on w. 33rd Avenue and Shoshone. improve carriage lots as mini parks, one or two carriage lots can be selected as demonstrative projects. Provide access to North High swimming pool for neighborhood use. 2. Northside Community Center 3555 Pecos street The critical problem facing the City and community center staff is the deteriorated condition of the main facility. The concerns over safety and ability to continue with the current programs is directly related to the negative conditions of various parts of the center. The staff and various city agencies are exploring various possibilities for redesigning and redevelopment of the site. Recommendations: support the building of a new center or rehabilitate the existing structure. retain the amount of contiguous open space and upgrade the quality of open space. Recommendations in the plan related to the center and/or open space should be used as a guide for redevelopment of the site.improve the condition of the ballfield including lights, dugouts, etc. 28

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support fundraising efforts for the center's maintenance and activities. encourage support from the city for operating cost. 3. Ashland Recreation Center 2950 Fife Court The recreation center has been a focal point for a number of community meetings and neighborhood fundraising activities. The idea of constructing a new swimming pool facility at Ashland has been a topic of discussion among community residents, councilmanic District 9, and the center's director. Recommendations: investigate the possibility of constructing a new swimming pool. continue support from the city for operating cost. support the center's fundraising activities. 4. Schools Incorrect enrollment projections have created severe overcrowding problems for Bryant-Webster and Valdez Elementary schools. This has forced the administration to find additional classroom space outside the facility to accommodate the situation. A long range solution needs to be sought to correct this problem. Recommendations: expand present or build new facilities to accommodate increasing number of students in neighborhood. encourage the Denver PUblic Schools Planning Division to conduct accurate population projections for the area. encourage Denver Public Schools to develop a better monitoring system. encourage Denver Public Schools to keep in touch with the neighborhood associations as a means of monitoring public opinion, staying aware of changing conditions and establishing better lines of communication. Note: similar recommendation was made between JeffersonHighland-Sunnyside Neighborhood Association and School Board -1983. 29

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5. Call to Action The "Call to Action Building" at W. 34th Avenue and Pecos Street houses a number of non-profit community groups who provide services to the north Denver area. The building was once a school and is presently owned by Saint Patricks Church. The condition of the structure is fair and structurally sound with interior and exterior rehabilitation needed. Recommendations: improve the basketball court. provide better auto access into the parking lot. paint up/fix up the buildings exterior. rehabilitate the interior office spaces. F. City services l. Code Enforcement Image building, environmental cleanliness, and overall neighborhood pride are all derivatives of adequate maintenance and improvements to the neighborhood fabric. During our discussions of general conditions of the neighborhood several issues came forth about the unbalanced and inconsistency of services that the city provides. Lack of code enforcement related to junk cars, weeds, trash, and sidewalk and public right-of-way maintenance were stated as major problems. The following suggestions were made to help remedy the above adverse conditions. (refer to agency contact list) Recommendations: develop and implement a maintenance agreement for all publicly owned vacant land between Highland N.H.S. and Public Works. a schedule of alley, street and carriage lot cleaning should be made available and evaluated periodically for consistency. increase resources for code enforcement. enforce landlord registered agent requirement. continue Supercan program encourage the maintenance of residential property 30

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install additional dumpsters east of Zuni Street. con-tinue and build on success of the "5 most wanted" campaign for problem properties. 2. Day care There is a lack of day care facilities in the neighborhood. The number of females 16 years and older in the labor force with children under 6 years of age has increased from 208 in 1970 to 668 in 1980. These statistics have impacted the day care facilities and have created a greater need for day care centers and facilities that offer extended day care with before and after working hours to accommodate working parents. A critical problem that confronts low income working parents whose children are in need of child care is the fact that many parents are slightly over the income guidelines and do not receive assistance from social services. This situation creates a financial burden on single parents who spend a great amount of their income on child care services. Recommendations: encourage additional licensed home care. involve parents in home care shared services. discuss income guidelines concerns with the Department of Social services. encourage the involvement of senior citizens in day care opportunities. encourage the development of a neighborhood child carejhome care directory. 3. Fire/Police Protection/Crime In July, 1983 the Denver Anti-Crime council reported that over the past 10 years in Highland the total number of criminal offenses reported each year fluctuated from a low of 1,490 to a high of 1,873 incidents in 1980. Highland ranked 18th our of 68 neighborhoods in 1982 with 176 offenses. Violent crimes such as homicide, rape, robbery, and aggravated assault, account for 10% of total offenses. Burglary (31%), and theft (30%), are the two most significant crime types in the area, while vandalism (14%), auto theft (8%), and all other offenses (7%) account for the remaining offenses. The map is an excerpt from the 1983 Anti-crime council report showing locations where most crimes are committed. 31

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It is interesting to note that most crimes were committed near commercial areas with the least crimes occurring in the northwest quadrant of the neighborhood. Recommendations: encourage better police protection and crime prevention, and encourage better police/community relations encourage new Neighborhood Crime Watch Programs increase night time patrol especially where the highest incidents are reported. investigate the possibility of separating the downtown police patrol from the neighborhood police patrol as a means of improving police protection. 32

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IV. SUB-AREA POLICIES AND RECOMMENDATIONS The specific sub-areas of the Scottish Village/Bluffs, south of 32nd Avenue, have a markedly different character than the area north of w. 32nd Avenue. The area south of W. 32nd Avenue is in transition unlike north of w. 32nd Avenue which is primarily an established stable residential area. The residential stability to the north of w. 32nd Avenue between Shoshone and Pecos Street is severely impacted due to the pressures caused by incompatible land uses permitted in the current B-4 zone district, currently this area is predominately residential. These areas are described in depth as are goals and objectives to be accomplished, building heights, densities desired, and suggested land use to be attained for Highland. A. Scottish Village/Bluffs Sub-Areas l -ll (South of West 32na Avenue) In this area there is a particularly high concentration of absentee owned properties. Housing conditions throughout can be improved and can take advantage of Highland N.H.S. exterior rehab. program. Sub-Area I Location: Includes both sides of W. 32nd Avenue from Federal Boulevard east to the Valley Highway. Character: Homes are interspersed with small retail districts and scattered offices. The residential units are in good condition but some commercial uses are deteriorating creating a negative image for the area. There are some large tracts of vacant land east of Tejon. The current zoning is mixed B-2, B-3, B-4, R-2, and R-3. Goal: Improve and preserve the existing residential, build new housing on vacant land, improve the small business districts and eliminate the undesirable uses on w. 32nd Avenue. Recommendations/Actions: Eliminate incompatible uses in the commercial areas including billboards, and problem bars. The car lot on w. 32nd Avenue and Zuni Street has been eliminated as part of this planning process. buy out incompatible uses with assistance from the city. 33

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Encourage the preservation of the two residential structures south of w. 32nd Avenue along Federal to emphasize the historic significance of the area. support residential conversion to office use. discourage automobile related uses. suggested Density: various densities should be allowed according to suggested land use types below. Suggested Land Use: Sub-Area 2 Location: Character: Goal: 1. R-3 between Clay and Wyandot should be rezoned to a density similar to the current R-2. 2) the R-3 between Federal Boulevard and Clay Street should remain. Scottish Village Historic District includes the residential area along w. Argyle, w. Caithness, and W. Dunkeld Place. Primarily low-moderate residential with a number of rehabilitated units. The current zoning is R-3 which allows for high density apartment development. The R-3 zoning is incompatible with existing land uses. Improve and preserve the housing and provide access to facilities that can meet neighborhood needs e.g. North high School swimming pool and campus. Recommendations: Improve housing conditions, particularly of absenteeowned units. continue residential rehabilitation programs, including Higland N.H.S. Exterior Rehab. Program. redevelop 2 3 lot apartment buildings as senior citizen housing. provide home ownership and cooperative housing opportunities. 34

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enforce the maintenance of vacant land and public rights-of-way by owners. enforce the city's housing codes. Protect residential uses and the historic character of Scottish Village. support any effort to rezone the area to reflect the existing density north of Caithness. (Single family and low density multi-family). Improve vacant land across from Ashland Recreation Center as an expansion of the center. The preferred use is 75 meter pool attached to Ashland Recreation Center. (tot pool can be included) An optional use is a paved and landscaped parking lot. suggested Heights: 25-30 feet suggested Density: 14.5 21 dwelling units per acreresidential suggested Land Use: moderate density residential Sub-Area 3 Location: Character: Goal: Recommendations: Includes North High School, Valdez Elementary and Metropolitan Youth Center. Institutional uses, and recreational -open space. The current zoning is R-3. Improve appearance and increase neigborhood access. Negotiate for improved landscaping and maintenance of the facilities to create a park-like atmosphere. -coordinate resources to improve the campus. Support any effort to rezone institutions to R-5. suggested Height: remain as is, 20 30 feet suggested Density: remain as is 35

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Suggested Land Use: institutional Sub-Area 4 Location: The area bounded by w. 29th Avenue and Speer Boulevard, from Zuni street to Clay Street. Character: Predominantly office and retail area with some light industrial uses. All commercial buildings lack appropriate setbacks according to Denver's parkway ordinance. In some cases this is due to previous widenings of Speer Boulevard. The physical condition of some of the building is deteriorating. On both sides of the boulevard the current zoning is B-4 which allows for strip commercial, business services, and retail establishments. Goal: Though the area is designated as a parkway in the Comprehensive Plan of Denver, it has never been developed as such. As much as is practical without further widenings of Speer Boulevard, develop Speer as a parkway with mixed use office, retail and commercial uses allowed. Establish as a major gateway into the Highland neighborhood. Recommendations: encourage office and retail uses discourage any new industrial uses, and encourage the rehabilitation or razing of deteriorated industrial use structures. there should be no further widenings of Speer Boulevard. site plan review(s) only as currently required by code. a minimum five (5) foot landscaped setback required from any arterial street (Speer Boulebard, Zuni Street and w. 29th Avenue only) for any new developments. waive the following as a use-by-right in B-4 zone along Speer Boulevard, Zuni Street and w. 29th Avenue: blood plasma collection centers not connected or attached to medical facilities or offices. "head-shops" (tobacco shops that allow the sale of paraphernalia) 36

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* commercial parking as a use-by-right, when such parking facility is not auxillary to a permitted use in the zone. the storage of junk cars or trucks, except those to be considered antique or collector-type vehicles -this prohibition is to include junk cars stored for future sale or rebuilding for resale, when stored in the open for extended periods of time. suggested Heights: as currently allowed in the B-4 zoning regulations. suggested Density: remain as is F.A.R. 2:1 suggested Land Use: office and retail area Sub-Area s Location: Character: Goals: Recommendations: Includes both sides of Zuni Street from Speer Boulevard north to w. 32nd Avenue. Mixed use residential, office and retail area. There is some vacant land near Speer Boulevard and some vacant, deteriorating historic buildings on both sides of Zuni. The current zoning is B-4. Maintain as a mixed use area including office, residential and retail, and improve as a major gateway into the Highland area. Emphasize the rehabilitation of historic structures to preserve the character of the area. Encourage new office development. North of w. 29th Avenue: encourage historic preservation of Tallmadge Building and Old North Denver Bank Building. encourage the redevelopment of the Zuni Plaza site into a mixed use retail/residential/commercial project (encourage landscaping and treescaping of parking area}. encourage retail attractions such as hardware store, toy shop, beauty/barber shop, donut shop and restaurants. 37

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south of w. 29th Avenue: develop for office and retail uses. encourage retail infill of Zuni and w. 28th Street corner lot. redevelop the landscapingjtreescaping at the intersection of Speer Boulevard and Zuni Street to create a more attractive gateway to Highland -including the area both direction son both arterials. site plan review(s) only as currently required by code. a minimum five (5) foot landscaped setback required on frontage along Zuni Street, on any new development. suggested Height: from Speer Boulevard north on Zuni to w. 29th Avenue as is currently allowed in B-4 and R-3 Zoning regulations. north of w. 29th Avenue including the Zuni Plaza s 35-45 feet. suggested Density: F.A.R. remain as is 2:1 suggested Land Use: mixed use residential, retail, and office area. Sub-Area 6 Location: Character: Bluffs area bounded by w. 32nd Avenue, w. 29th Avenue, Zuni Street to Umatilla Street. The area is predominately residential with some vacant and public and quasipublic sites. Some of the housing is deteriorating with poor environemntal conditions. There are some parking problems near w. 32nd Avenue. The retail node at W. 30th Avenue is primarily neighborhood serving. The area along Umatilla street from West 29th Avenue to West 32nd Avenue is somewhat a transition zone suitable for higher density residential development. The current zoning is R-3 though the area is developed primarily as lowmoderate density. 38

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Goal: Protect the residential character improve housing conditions and halt future commercial development from encroaching. Recommendations: Preserve area as an historic residential area. encourage residential rehabilitation of both single and multi family dwellings. oppose commercial enroachment. encourage more home ownership and cooperatives. promote infill housing which is compatible with existing low-moderate density and scale. Preserve w. 30th Avenue and Wyandot Street as a lowprofile neighborhood retail area. (3 stories maximum) Protect views from Asbury Methodist Church to Downtown. encourage better upkeep and maintenance of the church as an historic structure. Develop the northwest corner of w. 29th Avenue and Wyandot as a residential/office or retail mixed-use project. Redevelop the northwest corner of Umatilla and w. 29th Avenue. Support any rezoning to a zone district which would be consistent with present land use and desireable development. Address parking problem, particularly in regards to any new development. conduct a parking survey to identify specific problem areas. encourage new developments to share parking with community residents. suggested Height: as allowed in the existing R-2-A zone district suggested Density: 21 29 dwelling units per acre -resid ential (medium density townhomes) ,except for Umatilla corridor which should be 35-40 dwelling units per acre. 39

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suggested Land Use: -Moderate density residential P.U.D. northwest corner of Umatilla Street and W. 29th Avenue. Transition area along Umatilla, and Tejon Streets -residential P.U.D. northwest corner of W. 29th Avenue and Wyandot street. Sub-Area 7 Location: Area along W. 29th Avenue between Umatilla and Zuni Streets. Character: Mixture of office, semi industrial, retail, and residential uses. Building structures are in good condition. The current zoning is B-4. Goal: Develop area primarily for office, retail, and services. Recommendations: Create design linkaqes with neaby historic areas on lSth Street, Stoneman's Row, and along Zuni Street by emphasizing the historic character and creating pedestrian connections. some important features are: streetscaping sidewalk lighting seating storefront windows designs bike/pedestrian path from Zuni Street along w. 27th Avenue (south of Colorado Farm Bureau) behind Stoneman's Row to 15th and 16th Street. suggested Height: as allowed in the current B-2 zoned district suggested Density: F.A.R. 2:1 Suggested Land Use: Office, retail, and residential area 40

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Sub-Area a Location: The lower Bluffs area between W. 29th Avenue and w. 27th Avenue from Vallejo Street to the alley between Zuni and Wyandot Streets. Character: Mostly vacant containing the Colorado Farm Bureau offices, a few apartment buildings, parking and, several older residential buildings. The current zoning is R-3 with less than an acre of R-4 which the Colorado Farm Bureau is currently occupying. Goal: Develop as a mixed use area including office, retail, and residential uses. Recommendations: Land uses and location preferred: focus office and retail uses along the western 2/3 of the area. focus residential that supports the character of Stoneman's Row if not the density of Stoneman's Row along the eastern 1/3 of the area. New use should not create additional parking problems and existing parking lots should be landscaped. above-ground parking structures should not be allowed unless they have an exterior face of retail. Encourage new developments to use appropriate materials (brick and wood) and incorporate designs whose proportions, scale and rhythm of openings are in harmony with existing structures. Historic buildings should be preserved or moved into vacant land in the Stoneman's Row area. suggested Height: Maximum 60 feet. New developments should take advantage of elevation and topography but should be sensitive to preserving views from the north of W. 29th Avenue. Suggested Densities: Negotiated through the P.U.D. process. 41

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suggested Land Use: Sub-Area 9 Character: Recommendation: P.U.D. process is suggested mixed use residential, office, and retail area. This area includes the historic residential area of Stoneman's Row. Vacant land in this area should be developed for housing at a density and scale which enhances the historic character. All new development should be residential, and at the same scale as existing housing which are two story townhomes. The design, setbacks, and materials should be compatible with existing historic character. all parking lots should be landscaped. parking should not be allowed as an exclusive useby-right. The total area should be considered a preservation area and protected through the expansion of the Stoneman's Row Historic District. Suggested Height: as allowed in the existing R-2 zone district suggested Density: overall density should not exceed 14.5 units per acre. suggested Land Ose: low density residential Sub-Area Location: Character: The Bluffs bounded by Boulder Street, w. 32nd Avenue and Tejon Street. Contains a mixture of single family and multi-family residential, office, some industrial, and vacant land. There are some signs of commercial rehabilitation along Boulder Street Because of the land use mixture, often times industrial uses are in conflict with residential. The office uses are more compatible to the residential. The current zoning is B-4. 42

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Goal: Preserve residential uses and encourage mixed use residential, office, and retail development with emphasis on residential. Mixed use retail and office should be focused toward Boulder Street and be sensitive to their residential neighbors in terms of providing landscaping and buffering between the two uses. Recommendations: support any efforts to rezoning the triangular block bounded by w. 32nd Avenue, Boulder and 18th Street from existing B-4 to reflect existing residential density. Reduce existing industrial uses such as manufacturing, storage, construction warehouses, and auto repair, and disallow these uses in the future. encourage businesses to relocate into other industrial areas of the City. uses which are incompatible with residential and existing business should be eliminated particularly industrial uses and "adult uses." Significantly improve the maintenance and lighting in Hirshorn Park. Encourage residential infill south of w. 32nd Avenue by requiring any new development that replaces residential to contain residential uses in at least 50% of the project's floor area. suggested Height: Buildings should not block the view corridors from Hirshorn Park to the Central Business District. suggested Density: mixed residential uses (townhomes etc.) moderate density F.A.R. 2:1 suggested Land Use: primarily residential and office use area SUb-Area ll Location: The area between Boulder and Central Streets from 15th Street to Pecos Street. 43

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Character: Predominately office, industrial and vacant land with some scattered single family and low density residential. There are some new residential and commercial developments on 16th Street, Kensing court and 17th Avenue. The current zoning is mixed B-2, B-3, B-4, and R-3. Goal: Develop as mixed use commercial, retail and residential area. The "Highland Blcok" on 15th and 16th Street between Boulder and Central Street should be developed in a way which preserves its historical significance and creates a major gateway to the neighborhood. Recommendations: Encourage unified development of the Highland Block. the block should continue to act as an activity area and focal point for the neighborhood. develop as a mixed use residential, retail and office project. *Note: Refer to development guidelines established by the "Highland Coalition" in the appendix. Encourage residential as a part of mixed-use projects. Any new development that replaces residential should be required to contain residential use in at least 50% of the projects floor area. Discourage industrial and auto uses. Uses which are incompatible with residential and existing business should be eliminated. Emphasize the southern edge of the neighborhood by establishing treescape, grass, etc. along Central Street. Incentives: suggested Height: Building height up to 8 stories or 80 feet should be considered when 2/3's of total square footage on the project is planned for residential uses. 40 feet building heights as measured from Boulder Street. View corridors from Hirshorn Park to the Central Business District must be maintained. 44

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suggested Density: F.A.R. 2:1 suggested Land Use: Residential office, and retail use area The westside of the block between 16th and 17th, Central to Boulder street should remain as is (B-2 and R-3) P.U.O. Process is suggested for the Highland Block -15th to 16th Street between Central to Boulder Street. (development guidelines can be found in appendix) B. west 32nd Avenue -North Sub-Area 12 Location: Between Tejon Street and Federal Boulevard north of West 32nd Avenue to West 38th Avenue. (census tract 4.02) Character: Predominately single family and lowmoderate density residential with some public and quasi-public buildings in good condition. Housing is generally in fair to good condition with very little vacant land to be developed. There is a mix of low-moderate density residential and retail on the periphery of the subarea boundaries. Although Federal Boulevard is a major arterial its character is predominately residential. The owner occupancy housing figure in 1980 was slightly higher at 56% when compared to 44% renter occupancy. current zoning is R-2 which is compatible with existing land use. Goal: Improve and preserve the residential character of the area and encourage new housing development on vacant land. Recommendations: Target local and state rehabilitation resources for the whole area. Increase home ownership opportunities for renters. Create a better balance of owner occupied and rental homes. offer residential rehabilitation programs. 45

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Encourage housing infill on vacant land. Maintain existing residential zoning along Federal Boulevard. Encourage home owners to purchase vacant land adjoining their property. suggested Height: remain as is -two to three stories suggested Density: remain as is -single family, low density. suggested Land Use: remain low density residential *Note Commercial areas along w. 32nd Avenue, W. 38th Avenue, and Tejon Street are described in the Economics section of the plan. Sub-Area l3 Location: Character: Between Tejon Street east to the Valley Highway north of w. 32nd Avenue to w. 38th Avenue. (census tract 11.02). The area is predominately single family and low-moderate density residential. There are some public and quasi public buildings scattered throughout the area with industrial uses along Inca Street, Central Street, West 32nd and w. 38th Avenue. The housing between Tejon and Osage streets is in fair to good condition but begins to deteriorate as you move further east of Osage Street to the Valley Highway. The existing B3 zoning along Tejon between w. 33rd and w. 35th and the B4 along W. 32nd Avenue are conflicting with the current residential land use. In both instances the zoning exceeds land use. There are signs of rehabilitation along Inca Street. The owner occupancy housing figure in 1980 was significantly lower at 38% when compared to 62% renter occupancy for this area. A factor adversely affecting housing in the area is the industrial encroachment into the residential area. The current zoning is mostly R-2 with B-4 along Kalamath with some I-0 and I-1 near the eastern boundary of the neighborhood. Goal: Improve and stabilize the residential areas by preserving the existing housing stock and encourage home ownership, and eliminate the industrial uses. 46

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Recommendations: support any efforts to downzone B-4 to the north of w. 32nd Avenue from the alley west of Shoshone east to Pecos Street to R-2 or R-2-A. Residential land use in this area should be joined with the surrounding R-2. Improve the housing condition of both single family and multi-family units. target both city, state and federal rehabilitation resources for the whole area, especially from Osage Street to Inca Street. Create a better balance between owner occupied and rental homes and minimize displacement. Support any efforts to downzone B-3 between w. 33rd and 35th Avenue along Tejon to R-2 or R-2-A. NOTE: also referred to on page 19 recommendation number three -Tejon Street. Encourage reuse of vacant or abandoned commercial structures. Work with owners of industrial businesses north of w. 36th Avenue and east of Lipan Street to encourage them to relocate to a more appropriately zoned area in the city. Encourage those property owners who own industrial businesses and wish to remain to be more sensitive toward their residential neighbors. screen and buffer the area adjoining their property. arrange lighting away from residential windows. control truck delivery and pick up hours. Rezone vacated industrial parcels back to residential for redevelopment when relocation occurs. Discourage further industrial and commercial encroachment. Encourage senior citizen housing. Encourage and assist the following public facilities with rehabilitation andjor new construction funds. Northside Community Center 47

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Call to Action Building suggested Heights: Maintain building heights allowed in the R-2 zone district. suggested Density: Single family and low-moderate density residential (14.5 dwelling units per acre) New developments that are in harmony with neighborhood plan goals needing higher densities should go thruough the P.U.D. process. suggested Land Use: low density residential Sub-Area 14 Location: The area along Central Street between the 20th Street viaduct and Kalamath Street. Character: Primarily industrial, secondarily commercial with some scattered housing units. current zoning includes B-4, r-o and R-2. New construction has been primarily industrial (Restaurant, Equipment Supply Company) with housing units in fair to good condition, but are experiencing development pressures due to the lack of appropriate buffering. Goal: Continue to develop as a mixed use area encouraging a better balance of land uses and encourage buffering between residential and commercial uses, especially to the north and west of commercial and industrial developments. Recommendations: Attract a combination of new businesses which would be compatible with the area, preferably those that might employ and train neighborhood residents. Utilize a full range of urban design technics for the commercial and industrial areas. streetscape along Central Street encourage rehabilitation of existing structures. encourage appropriate screening and buffering of adjacent residential structures. 48

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encourage new construction to orient toward Central Street. redesign landscape noise barrier to the north along I-25. discourage new industrial uses. suggested Height: maximum 35' with a variety of building heights. suggested Density: F.A.R. 2:1 suggested Land Use: mixed use residential, office and indoor 49

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V. APPENDICES Population The Highland neighborhood is divided into two census tracts, 4.02 (west of Tejon) and 11.02 (east of Tejon). According to the 1980 census, there were 9,803 people residing in the Highlands. The 1980 population figure has decreased by 1,779 (18%) when compared to the 1970 u.s. census count. Though there has been a decrease in population, the percent of Hispanics in the total population rose from 20% in 1960, to 47% in 1970 to 62% in 1980. The median age in 1980 for Highland was 27.3 years compared to 30.3 years citywide. The 1980 population distribution (table below) of Highland reveals a concentration of preschool children and youth (ages 5 19 years) at one end of the spectrum and older citizens at the opposite end. The two groups make up 47% of Highland's total population. The 19 and under age group of Highland is 34% of the neighborhood's total population, which is significantly higher than Denver's 26% figure for individuals 19 and under. Age composition of individuals 65 and over are similar when comparing Highlands to Denver. The senior citizen population has increased from 11% in 1970 to 13% in 1980. Age Distribution, Highland and Denver, 1980 Highland Denver Less than 5 years 10% 7% 5 -9 years 8% 6% 10 14 years 7% 6% 15 19 years 9% 7% 20 24 years ll% 11% 25 34 years 18% 22% 35 44 years 8% 10% 45 54 years 8% 4% 55 64 years 8% 10% 65 74 years 7% 7% 75 years and over 6% 5% *Source: u.s. census of population, 1980 The 1980 median household income for.Highland was $10,344, which is significantly lower than the city's $15,506 median income figure, The median education levels reveals that the number of school years completed by residents of Highland in 1980 was 10.8, lower than the city's average of 12.8 years. Denver Public Schools report that in 1984-85 drop out rate for North High School was 12.8% compared to 10.3% in Denver and 6.1% in Colorado. Hispanic student drop out rate of 14.8 at North High School was much higher than both Denver and the State. Roughly 70% of the labor force of Highland so

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are employed in laborer, administrative support, and service occupations. Unemployment for Highland in 1980 was the same as Denver's 5% rate. Land Use and Zoning General The Denver Planning Office Land Use Information system shows that the primary land use in Highland is residential. This is augmented by a fair amount of public and quasi public land (52 ac.) and 31 acres of industrial land. All land uses and acreages are categorized by zone districts in the 1984 Net Land Use chart below. The land use in the neighborhood is distributed as follows: 60% residential, 6% commercial, 7% industrial, 12% public-semi public, 2% transportation, communications, and utilities, 4% services, 2% open 3-ace, anD 6% vAcant. Highland's net acreage totals 417. Zone district classifications for Highland reveal that 73% of the neighborhood is zoned for residential use. Additionally, 22% is zoned for business use (B-2, B-3, B-4), 4% is zoned for indusprial qs( ith the remaining 1% zoned for parking and P.U.D.'s Residential Land Uses: Generally, residential zoning is consistent with land use for the area north of 32nd Avenue. The industrial zones near the northeastern edge from Kalamath Street to Inca Street and the B-4 commercial zone from Pecos t Quivas between w. 32nd and W. 33rd have created negative impacts on the surrounding residential. The non-compatible uses these zone districts allow and because of the lack of appropriate residential are direct causes of these impacts. The area south of W. 32nd Avenue known as Scottish Village/Bluffs presents a more critical problem facing the neighborhood. The Scottish Village/Bluffs area is the southern edge of the Highland neighborhood. It can be described as the area south of west 32nd Avenue within the boundary formed by Federal Boulevard, Speer Boulevard and the Valley Highway. The area actually contains two districts, Scottish Village and the Bluffs. Scottish Village, the area west of Zuni Street, was originally platted in the late 1800's as a residential area of small lots on curvilinear streets. Large parts of the Village have been replaced by public uses such as North High School and its athletic fields, Valdez Elementary School, Metropolitan Youth Center and commercial/retail uses along Speer and Zuni streets. The Bluffs area, east of Zuni Street was platted on the grid pattern and was developed at a lower density than the Village with the exception of 15th and Boulder Streets which 51

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were always major commercial thoroughfares. The Bluffs has evolved to a mixed-use area containing single family residences, apartment buildings, retail stores and business services. Zoning in scottish Village (the area west of Zuni Street) is largely R-3 (high density residential) with B-4 along Zuni Street (commercial services), including Zuni Plaza; the B-4 continues to fan out along the cross streets. The area from West 29th Avenue south to Speer Boulevard is also B-4. Approximately SO% of Scottish Village remains residential with the balance in commercial, services (32%), vacant (7%), Public and Quasi Public (2%), and industrial land uses (9%). The upper Bluffs area from Zuni to Umatilla Street is primarily R-3 with B-4 along the major streets (Zuni, Umatilla, and West 29th Avenue). East of Umatilla, the area is dominated by business use (largely B-4 with B-3 along 15th Street) with small pockets of R-3 and B-2 zoning. Roughly 39% of the Bluffs is zoned for high density residential use (R-3) and 53% is zoned B-4. Though the Bluffs residential area is zoned R-3, approximately 36% is used for single family and 40% low to moderate density multi-family dwellings. The Scottish Village/Bluffs area is one of the oldest residential neighborhood areas in Denver. In recent years, the residential character of the area has suffered from business encroachment and land speculation. Future downtown and Central Platte Valley development along with the relatively low land values in Scottish Village/Bluffs have created development pressures on the area. A 1984 market analysis prepared by Hammer, Siler, George Economic and Development consultants revealed that retail space serving residential needs in the Scottish Village/Bluffs area have declined with over 40 percent of the retail space vacant. Non-retail space, including offices, business services and industrial uses, are now major land uses in the area. A number of land uses permitted in the B-4 zone district are automobile related and the amount of this zoning negatively impacts the residential units that abut the commercial areas. Some of these impacts have been identified as zone code violations by the Zoning Administration and can be mitigated but automobile and other uses not compatible to the residential area will continue to plague the neighborhood. Highland neighborhood, unlike other neighborhoods, has small unique pockets of land tucked away in the interior of its residential city blocks, known as carriage lots (all located north of 32nd Avenue) A survey conducted by Jefferson Highland Sunnyside Neighborhood Association (JHSNA) in 1984, helped to identify a number of carriage lots that need attention. 52

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Additionally, Denver Planning Office expanded the carriage lot study and prepared a slide show with handouts indicating ownership, size, zone, and description of each lot. This inventory, along with the survey results were shared with the Department of Health and Hospital's environmental section and the Zoning Department. The adverse condition of the carriage lots prompted both departments to begin a joint effort clean up campaign. Of the 72 carriage lots inventoried, 35 were identified as having the potential to be developed for parking, open space, or residential use if conditions were improved and financial support secured. Inventory results and carriage lot map are available at the Denver Planning Office. Commercial Land Uses: Commercial land uses are located primarily along w. 38th Avenue from Inca Street to Federal Boulevard, w. 32nd Avenue, Tejon, Zuni, and 15th Streets, and along Speer Boulevard. Business nodes are located at w. 37th and Navajo Street, w. 30th and Wyandot Street, and w. 33rd Avenue and Osage. A number of these businesses are neighborhood serving and provide a mixture of services including office, restaurant, and specialty retailing. A common characteristic of Highland's business districts is that they contain residential dwellings as part of the business area. Though a number of businesses do serve residents of Highland, the Hammer, Siler, George market study indicated that within the trade area of North Denver (Colfax Avenue on the south to I-70 on the north and from the Valley Highway on the east to Sheridan Boulevard on the west) there is an unmet need regarding business such as a discount store, small hardware store, specialty shops, a drug store, and supermarket. There has been a moderate amount of commercial development and redevelopment in Highland's business areas. Examples of this activity are: The Inverness Building located at 2536-56 15th Street: rehabilitated into specialty shops and professional office space. Cousins Auto Parts located on West 38th Avenue and Federal Boulevard: major rehabilitation and new construction. West 32nd Avenue and Clay Street: neighborhood business district was revitalized with streetscape and new signage, 53

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* century Bank North located on Speer Boulevard: presently constructing a new banking facility. Residence Inn at 2777 Zuni Street: completed construction in 1982 of 161 motel suites. Wheeler Block Building at 2150 w. 29th Avenue: rehabilitated from a school building into office space. Belong-Rogers building at 2323 w. 30th Avenue: rehabilitated for commercial office use. Tony's Restaurant and Equipment Company located at Kalamath and central Street: new construction with assistance from Community Development Agency. Al Cohen construction company located at 18th and Central Street: new commercial office. Colorado Farm Bureau addition, 1985 2211 w. 27th Avenue. 3748 Osage Street, renovation of building facade and office, 1985. currently there are three major projects being planned in the neighborhood. First, the Colorado Farm Bureau proposes to construct a mixed use commercial/residential development on the 2700-2800 block between Wyandot and Vallejo. Second, the "Highland Block" located on 15th Street between Boulder and Central Street, is being proposed for a mixed use -retail-office-residential development. Third, West 38th Avenue between Inca and Federal has been designated for redevelopment as a result of application approval for a Neighborhood Business Revitalization (NBR) district. Environment Highlands is located on a Bluff that overlooks the Central Business District and Platte River Valley. It has a healthy variety of trees and plants that help to create a pleasant environment. The majority of sidewalks have been repaired in the Scottish Village historic district, but several blocks of sidewalk repairs are needed north of 32nd Avenue. The overall Highland area shows nominal needs for street lights and alley paving, though several areas were identified in Scottish Village for alley paving by residents who approached the City in 1984 for CDBG funds to help correct the problem. 54

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Storm sewers are in reasonably good condition with the exception of the West 38th Avenue viaduct. Approximately 1.4 million dollars of 1982 Storm Drainage Bond Funds have been allocated to correct the .:xisting problem by the year 1986. According to Wastewater Management, the Highland area water mains, particularly south of West 32nd Avenue, can support new development. Wastewater Management doesn't anticipate any need to reconstruct the system that is presently in place. Several environmental considerations can be grouped together under the title of "Needed City services." These elements alone are detrimental to the image and environmental quality of the neighborhood. The problems of deteriorated sidewalks, weeds, trash, and junk cars along with the lack of maintenance of both public and private lands (alleys, streets, and R.o.w. 's), snow removal and the visually obtrusive billboards are code enforcement issues that can't go unmentioned and need additional resources to be enforced. Air pollution is a major metropolitan problem and particularly affects Highlands due to its location. Additional use of public transportation, shared rides, and participation in the volunteer "Better Air" program can help improve the overall situation. A number of Highland residents are responsible for the success of the neighborhood's community gardens. Saint Patrick's church and 33rd and Shoshone are locations where a couple of community gardens exist. Several private gardens can be found in the neighborhood. The neighborhood, while served only by Hirshorn and Franco Parks, has access to the Platte River Greenway south of Highland in the Central Platte Valley. The Greenway is a systul of pares, picnic areas,'qua rdcreational facilities and pedestrian/bike paths. Confluence Park provides an outdoor amphitheater, a water front plaza and direct connection to the newly developed Children's Museum. In general, Highland neighborhood is pleasant, with a unique topography that enhances the views which creates the character of a truly ideal space for living. Historic Preservation The Denver Landmark Preservation Ordinance, Section 30-1 of the Revised Municipal Code, was enacted by the Denver City Council in 1967. The ordinance created the Denver Landmark Preservation Commission to identify structures and districts of historic, architectural or geographic significance. 55

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The Denver Landmark Commission's report of August, 1984 listed the following designated landmark districts in Highland: Potter Highlands district located between West 32rd and West 38th -between Federal Blvd. and Zuni Street (currently being considered as an historic preservation area), Stoneman's Row district located on West 28th Avenue between Umatilla Street and Vallejo, and the Old Highland Business District on 15th Street between Central and Boulder Streets. In addition to the designated districts the following structures are listed on the National Register: *All Saints Episcopal Church at 2222 w. 32nd Avenue, 1978 listing. Saint Elizabeth's Retreat Chapel at 2825 West 32nd Avenue, 1976 listing. *Saint Patrick's Mission Church at 3325 Pecos street, 1979 listing. Tallmadge & Boyer Block 2926-42 Zuni Street, 1982 listing. Hugh Mackay House at 3359 Alcott Street. *Mount Carmel Church at 3549 Navajo Street Cerrone's Grocery at 3611-15 and 3617 osage Street Wheeler Block Building at 2150 w. 29th Avenue *Asbury M.E. Church at 2205 W. 30th Avenue Henri Foster House at 2533 West 32nd Avenue, and Henry Lee House at 2653 West 32nd Avenue The newest addition to the National Register in 1985 was Highland Park Scottish Village Historic District bounded by Zuni Street on the east, Clay Street on the west, West 32nd Avenue on the north, and Dunkeld Place on the south. Historic Denver and the Jefferson/Highland/Sunnyside Neighborhood Association are working on a joint steeple lighting project and have identified the churches above with asterisks along with our Lady of Guadalupe Church to be part of_the program. streets and Highways The Comprehensive Plan of Denver uses four catagories to describe and plan streets and highways. The street classifications are based on function, access, width, volume of traffic, adjacent land use, etc.: 56

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These street catagories exist in Highlands and are described as the following: o Local Streets -have the function of providing direct access to adjacent properties and of carrying low volumes of traffic (less than 2,000 vehicles per day) with an origin or destination within the neighborhood (e.g. w. 34th Avenue, Bryant and Mariposa Streets.) o Collector streets -have the function of collecting and distributing traffic having an origin or destination between arterial and local streets within the community and linking neighborhood residential areas, local and community shopping facilities, and other major community land use elements. Collectors have an average capacity of 5,000 to 12,000 vehicles per day (e.g. Zuni Street and West 29th Avenue). o Arterial Streets -have the function of permitting rapid and relatively unimpeded traffic movement throughout the City and serving as the primary link between communities. o Freeways -have the function of permitting traffic flow rapidly and unimpeded through and around the metropolitan area (e.g. Interstate 25). Community Facilities Inventory Parks and Open space Parks and open space areas are extremely limited in the neighborhood. Hirshorn Park located at Tejon and Erie Streets, and Franco Park located at 37th and Lipan Streets occupy 3.3 acres of land in the Highlands. Pecos Park Plaza, a new "mini" park was created by the Pecos Plaza Neighbors and is located at the corner of w. 33rd Avenue and Pecos Street. Hirshorn Park is designated as a neighborhood park and was acquired in 1946 for multi-purpose use. The park is equipped with a playground and a junior football field. Franco Park was acquired and designated as a mini park in 1969. A playground and picnic tables are the park's only features. None of the parks have swimming pool facilities. Highland residents have access to Confluence Park and open space along the Platte River Greenway to the south, ColumbusjLa Raza Park to the north, and Highland Park to the west. Viking Park at Speer and Federal Boulevard was developed by the city in 1980, and contains 5.4 acres of land. Project costs including land acquisition were 1.4 57

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million dollars. These parks, although they aren't within the neighborhood boundaries, serve the community. A community gardens are an important aspect of open space for the neighborhood. The Mayor's Garden Program was established over ten years ago and was initiated to encourage urban gardening as a self-help channel for people to raise food and to turn vacant lot eyesores into attractive green open space. This program has grown in popularity as the years pass. The City's urban community gardens program and Denver urban gardens are working jointly to establish more gardens throughout the City. Gardens can be found at the following locations: w. 33rd Avenue and Shoshone Street w. 33rd Avenue and Pecos 1604 w. 36th Avenue W. 37th Avenue and Eliot, and w. 36th Avenue and Vallejo Street Northside community Canter -3555 Pecos Street The Northside Community Center is a non-profit organization serving the North Denver area from I-25 on the east, Federal Boulevard on the west, Speer Boulevard on the south, and 52nd Avenue on the north. The center serves all citizens inside its boundaries with a major emphasis on the low to moderate income individuals. Community services have been provided by the center since 1957 on a sliding fee scale and/or free of charge. Center offers to the community summer day camp, organized recreation, social clubs, senior citizen recreation, child care, sewing and aerobic classes, and distributes butter and cheese to social service recipients. Both private and public money was utilized for the construction of the child care and senior citizens center located on the site. Both centers were built in 1975 and are in excellent condition. Ashland Recreation center 2950 Fife court Ashland Recreation Center, like Northside Community Center, provides the community with well organized recreation and neighborhood access. The facility is owned by the City and operated by the Parks and Recreation Department. The Center occupies .62 acres and houses a qym, game room, kitchen, library and offices. 58

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Schools There are two elementary schools, one high school, one alternative school, and one private school located in the neighborhood. Bryant -Webster Elementary School at 3635 Quivas street was built in 1930 and occupies 2.93 acres of land with a capacity of 475 students. student enrollment has increased from 431 in 1976 to 592 in 1984 according to the Public Facilities Inventory, Denver Planning Office and Denver Public Schools. The Northside community Center is currently housing the early childhood education (5th grade classes) as a result of school overcrowding. Valdez Elementary School at 2475 w. 29th Avenue, built in 1975, covers roughly five acres of land with a student capacity of 755. In 1984, student enrollment had increased to 740 compared to 568 in 1976. The school is currently holding classes in mobile units (protable classrooms) as a result of school overcrowding. North High School located at 2960 North Speer Boulevard occupies 27.93 acres of land and has a capacity of 2,100 students. Enrollment figures for 1984 decreased to 1,897 compared to 2,199 in 1976. Structural improvements were made in 1955 and 1983-84. Improvements included the construction of a new auditorium with the capacity of 840, a football field, and baseball diamond, tennis courts, and additional parking. The North High School site was unified with Valdez Elementary School to provide open space, park land, and a campus area. Metropolitan Youth Education Center is located at 2417 w. 29th Avenue. The center is one of three Denver Public School facilities for pupils under 21 years of age, who are not high school graduates, and are not attending Denver PUblic High School. Enrollment fiqures since 1981 have remained fairly stable with approximately 220-300 students attending per academic year. Statistics reveal a dramatic decrease from 751 to 261 when 1980 figures are compared to 1985 due to the elimination of nite school. The "Jesus Center" at 3600 Zuni Street is the only private school in the neighborhood. It is non denominational serving kindergarten through grade 12. The school occupies approximately one acre of land. School enrollment slightly increased from 328 in 1975 to 347 in 1980 with the 1984-85 figure comparable to both years at 335 students. Both Bryant -Webster and Valdez elementary further reveal the growing number of young people ir. the neighborhood showing a steady enrollment increase. 59

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Library The Woodbury branch library located at 3265 Federal Boulevard in the West Highland neighborhood was constructed in 1913 with additions in 1966. The building has 10,098 square feet of space and contains 55,070 volumes. The library serves an area within a one mile radius, covering most of Jefferson Park, West Highland, sunnyside, Sloan Lake, and Highland neighborhoods. Highland residents feel that the facility adequately serves their needs. La Casa De Salute La Casa de Salute Health Station at 3605 Pecos Street funded by the Department of Health and Hospitals, occupies approximately one half acre of land. The health station is a family practition clinic and did not report any major problems. senior Citizen Residences and/or Centers There are several retirement and nursing homes in Highlands and the surrounding area. Though these homes exist there is still a need for additional senior citizen housing to serve the rapid growing population of elderly in North Denver. The following facilities serve the area: Casa Lema at 38th and Alcott Street, owned by Denver Housing Authority. St. Elizabeth Center 2825 w. 32nd Avenue. Ivy Manor Nursing Home 2205 w. 29th Avenue. Regency Health care 2741 Federal Boulevard. Lennox elderly homes -w. 33rd and Eliot. W. 32nd and Federal Boulevard. West 38th Avenue Merchants Association West 38th Avenue Merchants Association at 3740 Shoshone is a newly developed office for economic development open to all merchants and developers. Members of the merchants group are dedicated to enhancing the commercial relationship with the local community and providing convenience shopping on the Avenue. Low interest loans facilitated by the Neighborhood Business Revitalization endeavors can be used for storefront and interior renovations, landscaping and street lighting, new construction, land acquisition, and merchandising. 60

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Highland Neighborhood Housing Services Highland Neighborhood Housing service, Inc., a non-profit, non-governmental corporation, is a working partnership of neighbors, business leaders, and city representatives committed to maintaining and enhancing the cultural, ethnic, and socio-economic mix of the Highland Community by promoting safe, sound, and desirable housing and surroundings for all. The Housing Services is located at 1800 w. 33rd Avenue. North Denver workshop North Denver Workshop is a community based organization that provides technical assistance to the community by integrating students, residents and planning/architectural expertise in the area of community development and planning. The Workshop is located at 3401 Pecos Street and is part of the University of Colorado at Denver-Design Center. Del Norte Housing Development Corporation Del Norte Housing Development Corporation is a non-profit housing groups who's goal is to help create affordable housing for low-moderate income people and to assist with the economic growth and development concerns of small businesses. It is a partnership between governmental and private organizations. Del Norte office is located at 3401 Pecos Street. Day Care 1. Chapel Day Care Center, operated by All Saints Church. 3130 Wyandot Street 2. Mile High Child Care Association Northside Child Development Center 3551 Pecos 3. Head Start Centers: 3410 Tejon Street 4373 Tejon Street 2450 Clay Street 3555 Pecos Street 4. Bryant-Webster pre-school program for four year old 5. Highland Early Learning Center 2949 Federal Boulevard. 6. Northside Community Center 3555 Pecos Street 7. Asbury Methodist Church2205 w. 30th Avenue 61

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Fire and Police Protection/Crime Fire station number 7 at 2195 West 38th Avenue was built in 1975 and serves the neighborhood. Fire protection is adequate for the area. Police District Substation #1, located at 2195 Decatur Street built in 1967 provides service to Highland and surrounding area. The boundaries for police services are approximately 52nd on the north, 6th Avenue on the south, approximately the Platte River on the east, and Sheridan Boulevard on the west.

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Description and location Highland Neighborhood Proposed Zone Districts 1. suggested B-4 Zone overlay Location The area along West 38th Avenue between Osage and Kalamath Streets. New Requirement: All development project that are 15,000 (approximately 6-8 lots or more) square feet of lot size ormore would require site plan review by the Denver Planning Office. Waive the following uses from the B-4 zone district in the current Zoning Ordinance: Blood Plasma service Head Shops (tabacco shops that allowthe sale of paraphernalia) Parking as use by right Veterinarian without closed kennel Adult Bookstore and eating place with adultamusement other uses that are automatically excluded from the existing B-4 zone district because of the 500 feet separation requirement. e.g., adult uses and tattoo studios. Conditions: Structures should adhere to Section 4(b), 5, and Section 59410 permitted used related to front and side setback requirements in the existing I-0 zone district and should include landscaping in the side setback requirements. 2. suggested B-4 commercial Zone overlay Locations: A. The area along Central Street between 20th Street viaduct and Kalamath Street. (Sub-area 14) B. West 37th Avenue and Navajo Street. (exist B-4 zone district) c. Speer and Federal Boulevard, north to Douglas Place and east to North High School. (corner of Speer and Federal Blvd.) 63

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New Requirement: All new development projects that are 15,000 (approximately 6-8 lots or more) square feet of lot size or more would require site plan review by the Denver Planning Office. Waive the following uses from the B-4 zone district in the current Zoning Ordinance. Blood Plasma Service Head Shops (tobacco shops that allow the sale of paraphernalia) Sales of automobiles, trailers, R.V. 's, and light trucks. Sales and warehousing of automobile and truck parts and accessories. Sales and warehousing of motorcycles Car wash Automobile repair garage Other uses that are automatically excluded from the existing B-4 zone district because of the soc feet separation requirement eg., adult uses and tattoo studios. parking as a use by right. Conditions: Site A maximum 50' building heights. Site B, maximum 30' building heights Site C, height of any new development should be comparable to existing building. The same I-0 requirements as B-4 zone overlay. 3. suggested Residential/Commercial zone overlay Locations: A. The area along Zuni Street between West 29th Avenue and w. 32nd Avenue (norther part of sub-area 5) B. The area bounded by Umatilla and 16th Street to the west, 20th Street viaduct to the east, Central Street to the south, and approximately W. 32nd Avenue to the north. (sub-area 10 & 11) New Requirement: All new development projects that are 15,000 (approximately 6-8 lots or mroe) square feet of lot size or more would require site plan review by the Denver Planning Office. 64

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Waive the following uses from the B-4 zone district in the current Zone Code Ordinance: Blood Plasma Service Head Shops (tobacco shop that allow the sale of paraphernalia) Sales of automobiles, trailers, R.V.'s, and light trucks. Sales and warehousing of automobile and truck parts and accessories. Sales and warehousing of motorcycles. car Wash Automobile repair garage All industrial uses Other uses that are automatically excluded from the existing B-4 zone code because of the required 500 feet separation requirement e.g., adult uses and tattoo studios. Parking as a use by right. conditions: Site A, maximum 35' building height; site B, maximum 40' building height. The same I-0 requirement as B-4 zone overlay. 4. suggested Moderate pensity Residential zone Locations: A. The Scottish Village Historic District bounded by Zuni Street, West 32nd Avenue and Dunkeld Place. (sub-area 2) B. The area bounded by West 32nd Avenue, Zuni Street, West 29th Avenue to Umatilla Street, excluding the southeast and west corner lots. (W. 29th and Wyandot and Umatilla), (sub-area 6) New zone district in which existing housing densities would be maintained. The new zone would be similar to the existing R-2-A (22 dwelling units per acre or 29 dwelling units per acre with a Planned Building Group) but would take into account the existing setbacks and depth of frontages. s. suggested B-2 and B-3 Zone pistricts overlay: current B-2 and B-3 zone districts would remain the same in terms of densities allowed but would waive the same uses in the proposed B-4 Commercial Zone Overlay unless otherwise stated in the plan. 65

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6. P.U.D. New developments or significant redevelopments should go through the existing Planned Unit Development process and be evaluated according to the goals established in the plan. Locations: A. The "Highland Block", 15th Street between Boulder and Central Streets. B. The lower Bluffs area bounded by West 29th Avenue on the north, west 27th Avenue on the south, Vallejo Street on the east, and the alley east of Wyandot on the west. c. The northwest corner of west 29th Avenue and Umatilla. D. Northwest corner of w. 29th Avenue and Wyandot. 66

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Development Guidelines: Highland Block Neighborhood Coalition Development of Highland Block The Highland Coalition includes leadership from Jefferson/Highland/Sunnyside, Del Norte Neighborhood Development Corporation, and Highland Neighborhood Housing services. For nearly half a decade since the Highland Block assembly began, these organizations have recognized the impact its redevelopment would have on their neighborhoods. Within the framework of community development and social program in their neighborhoods, they have focused on this block in l) studying the impact of development on the larger neighborhood, 2) research and planning, 3) reviewing developers' plans, 4) advising city officials and developers as to neighborhood needs and concerns, and 5) disseminating information to neighborhood residents. A. Redevelopment Goals The Coalition has defined a number of goals for redevelopment of the Highland Block and propose that: 1. Affordable housing be made available to neighborhood residents with an overall provision of 20% of the units available to residents with low and moderate incomes. 2. Revisions for business opportunities and locations for neighborhood/minority business persons be explored. Specifically, it is recommended that 15% of the retail space will be reserved for such tenants. 3. Neighborhood-serving types of commercial activities should be part of the project, i.e., day care center. 4. Jobs with assurance that 20% will be available both in construction and operation to neighborhood residents. 5. The full utilization of federal, state, city and private charitable resources be investigated to make the above goals possible. 6. Design and density of the project be compatible with planning goals of the neighborhood. 7. An equity participation by the coalition and neighborhood should be explored. 6i

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services The coalition expects to provide the following services to the developer: 1. Assistance in meeting the design (height, open space, density, parking, circulation and ingress/egress, materials, amenities, unit and retail mix, landscaping, preservation, etc.) and other neighborhood objectives related to approval of a Planned Unit Development, other rezoning or a Planned Building Group and facilitating the process. 2. Serve as an employment and training resource in ensuring neighborhood resident employment in all aspects of construction, marketing, management, maintenance and operation. The Coalition will receive periodic reports to assist in in monitoring the achievement of goals. 3. Serving as a resource in recruiting and relocating neighborhood/minority businesses in the project and arranging for some of the following types of assistance to them: budgeting and meeting capital needs, hiring, negotiating leases and other aspects of business operation. The Coalition can also assist in attracting the types of neighborhood-serving commercial which are designated. Monthly marketing reports will be used in monitoring achievement. 4. Marketing to neighborhood residents including development of eligibility criteria, preparation of marketing materials and programs, resident selection, allocation and utilization of subsidies, etc. 5. Generating public and private resources through excellent relationships with government officials and program staffs and with private charitable organizations. Some of the potential sources of funds might include: UOAG, CD, tax-exempt bonds, housing development grants, CHFA, DURA, etc. 6. Attracting loan and investment capital through longstanding contacts in the banking and development communities. 7. Potential for Coalition to invest in the project at market rates of return, including in higher risk startup expenses, at levels proportionate to its interest in the project. 68

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Equity Role The Coalition is prepared to negotiate an equity position in the project based upon investments in the following areas: l) general neighborhood revitalization and social efforts which the project, 2) the above described services provided by the Coalition or an approved assignee with comparable or greater skills, 3) the potential for a cash investment. Return on this investment would be reinvested in neighborhood community development activities. 69

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Highland Neighborhood Public Right-Of-Way Maintenance locations Central Street from Umatilla to 20th Street (includes all gate way entrances) 20th Street and Osage node. Speer interchange Fox interchange City owned carriage lots Wyandot and Vallejo -w. 37th/38th Avenue Vallejo and Tejon -w. 34th/35th Avenue Quivas and Pecos -w. 34th/35th Avenue Bryant and Alcott -w. 36th/37th Avenue Speer Boulevard at w. 29th, W. 28th to the south Northside Community Center grounds W. 38th Avenue, Federal Boulevard to Inca Street including the underpass. 70