Citation
Barnum / Barnum West neighborhood plan

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Title:
Barnum / Barnum West neighborhood plan
Creator:
Community Planning and Development, City and County of Denver
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
City and County of Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English

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Subjects / Keywords:
Neighborhood plans
Community planning
Spatial Coverage:
Denver -- Barnum

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Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Full Text
BARNUM/BARNUM WEST
NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN


BARNUM/BARNUM WEST NEIGHBORHOOD FLAN
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY.......................................1
Concerns:
Land Use and Zoning .................................1
Community Facilities.................................2
Transportation/Circulation...........................2
Inf rastructure/Services.............................2
Recommendations:
Land Use and Zoning..................................3
Community Facilities.................................3
Transportation/Circulation...........................3
Inf rastructure/Services.............................4
INTRODUCTION............................................4
Neighborhood Planning.................................4
Planning Process......................................5
A. Identification of Participants....................5
B. Review of Existing Conditions and Planning Data..5
C. Collection of Facts/Development of Goals..........5
D. Development of Concepts...........................6
E. Implementation ...............................6
Use of the Plan..................................... 6
OVERALL NEIGHBORHOOD OVERVIEW...........................7
Existing Conditions.................................. 7
History...............................................9
Neighborhood Plan.................................. 10
OVERALL NEIGHBORHOOD APPROACH..........................11
Land Use and Zoning..................................11
Problems/Issues....................................11
Objectives/Goals...................................11
Policies/Recommendations...........................13


H
Page
Community Facilities.................................14
Problems/Issues....................................14
Ob j ecti ves/Goals................................14
Policies/Recommendations...........................15
Transportation/ Circulation..........................17
Problems/Issues...................................-17
Ob j ectives / Goals............................... 17
Policies/Recommendations..............-.. .....18
Infrastructure/Services.......................... .19
Problems/Issues....................................19
Ob j ecti ves/Goals................................19
Policies/Recommendations...........................21
SPECIAL STUDY AREAS....................................23
Sheridan Boulevard..................................23
West Alameda Avenue.................................23
West 1st Avenue.....................................24
Federal Boulevard...................................24
West 6th Avenue.....................................25
Weir Gulch..........................................25



BARNUM/ BARNUM WEST
NEIGHBORHOOD
LOCATION MAP


BARNUM/BARNUM WEST NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
The neighborhood plan for the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood has been
organized into four general categories.
A. Land Use and Zoning
B. Community Facilities
C. Transpor ta tion/C ir cula tion
D. In frastr uc tur e/Services
As in all neighborhoods, a number of unique areas exist which form the fabric
of the community. The Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood consists areas as follows: of six such
1. Alameda Study Area
2. Weir Gulch Study Area
3. First Avenue Study Area
4. Sheridan Boulevard Study Area
5. Sixth Avenue Study Area
6. Federal Boulevard Study Area
The issues contained in the four (4) general planning categories and the six
(6) study areas were addressed directly by the residents through a series of
neighborhood work sessions. The concerns, goals and recommendations within
each of these planning elements then become the body of this neighborhood
plan.
The major assets of the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood include:
o Low density residential character,
o Good housing stock,
o Uniform zoning patterns,
o Good transportation access,
o Close proximity to regional centers,
o Good community facilities.
The major neighborhood concerns relative to the four (4) general planning
categories are as follows:
LAND USE AND ZONING CONCERNS
o Inappropriate businesses located in the neighborhood,
o Non-conforming uses.
1


o Poor location of commercial development,
o Absentee landowners.
o Inappropriate zoning in residential areas and along arterials.
o Poor maintenance of housing,
o Lack of building code enforcement,
o Declining business areas,
o Lack of new housing.
o High housing turnover/neighborhood instability.
COMMUNITY FACILITIES CONCERNS
o Incomplete development of Alameda,
o Poor condition of Weir Gulch,
o Lack of child-oriented play areas,
o Poor park security/lighting.
o Poor maintenance of parks,
o Inefficient management of existing facilities,
o Need for the development of bus shelters.
TRANSPORTATION/CIRCULATION CONCERNS
o Unwanted traffic through the neighborhood,
o Incomplete pedestrian/bike linkages,
o Inadequate signalization within the neighborhood,
o Inadequate bus facilities,
o Lack of school crossings,
o Lack of sidewalks, curbs and gutters,
o Unpaved alleys,
o Lack of pedestrian crosswalks,
o High speed traffic.
INFRASTRUCTURE/SERVICES CONCERNS
o Poor condition of housing and properties,
o Fear of crime,
o City services.
. Trash pick up.
. Park maintenance.
. Street repair and cleaning.
o Unpaved alleys,
o Inadequate storm drainage,
o Lack of youth activities and employment,
o Stray dogs.
The residents than established a series of goals directed at each of the
concerns presented. As in most problem-solving situations, a series of
alternative recommendations were discussed for each goal that was formulated.
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The selected recommendations contained in the plan has become the heart of
this neighborhood plan. The following recommendations within each category
are presented in brief format and establish the framework for expected change
and preservation of neighborhood elements:
LAND USE AND ZONING RECOMMENDATIONS
o Establish development parameters for property located along Sheridan
Boulevard.
o Maintain residential zoning along West Alameda.
o Develop setback and landscaping policies for new developments within
neighborhood business zones.
o Rezone an area along Alameda from Knox Court to Grove Street from a B-4
zone to a B-2 zone.
o Confine business along 1st Avenue to existing business zones.
o Rejuvenate the existing neighborhood business area located along 1st
Avenue.
o Encourage new business to locate in areas already zoned for business
use.
o Widen and provide stop signs along the 6th Avenue Frontage Road.
o Maintain residential zoning areas which currently exist.
o Develop owner-occupied infill housing.
COMMUNITY FACILITIES RECOMMENDATIONS
o Develop major roadway improvements to Alameda from Federal to Sheridan.
o Develop joint-use play areas at existing public schools.
o Develop and maintain Weir Gulch from Alameda to Barnum Park.
o Develop a major bike/pedestrian crossing at the intersection of Weir
Gulch and Alameda.
o Irrigate and maintain Zone 1 of Weir Gulch and develop additional
children's play areas.
o Develop group activity areas within Zone 2 of Weir Gulch.
o Within Zone 3 of Weir Gulch, cover existing concrete culverts and
develop new pedestrian walkways.
o Irrigate and landscape Zone 4 of Weir Gulch into team sport areas and
children's play areas.
o Develop unpaved roadways in Zone 5 of Weir Gulch into an irrigated and
landscaped pedestrian parkway.
o Develop a stronger linkage from Weir Gulch into Barnum Park.
TRANSPORTATION/CIRCULATION RECOMMENDATIONS
o Locate stop signs along the length of the 6th Avenue Frontage Road,
o Develop more landscaping along the 6th Avenue Freeway as it passes by
the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood,
o City should attempt to relieve traffic congestion at the intersection of
Federal and Alameda, and Sheridan and Alameda,
o Reduce the speed limit along Alameda and 1st Avenue.
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o Place four-way stops in the Southwest and Southeast quadrant to prevent
the short circuiting of traffic through the neighborhood,
o Develop landscaped median strips along Alameda designed to limit turns
into the neighborhood at preselected streets,
o Develop more bus stops, shelters and pull-out lanes,
o Pave all unpaved alleys.
o Develop crosswalks at Newlon Elementary, Barnum Elementary, Barnum
Recreation Center, Ross Barnum Library, 2nd Avenue and Knox Court, and
at the intersection of Weir Gulch and Alameda.
INFRASTRUCTURE/SERVICES RECOMMENDATIONS
o Create a neighborhood housing service to focus private and city
resources in providing and rehabilitating housing,
o Develop a crime prevention program for the neighborhood through the
Denver Police Department.
o Provide security lighting at Barnum Park, Barnum Recreation Center and
along Weir Gulch.
o Provide better trash collection, dumpster repair, park maintenance,
street and sidewalk repair and traffic signalization.
o Pave all unpaved alleys.
o Develop Summer youth employment programs.
The above information provides the reader a short synopsis of the contents of
the plan. For more detailed information, please refer to the appropriate
general category or study area.
INTRODUCTION
In June of 1979, the Denver Planning Office completed a Neighborhood Planning
Analysis for the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood. This study had as its
primary goal, the documentation of existing conditions within the
neighborhood, and the identification of the assets and liabilities contained
within the neighborhood area.
The purpose of the present neighborhood plan has as its goal, to update and
complete the planning process. The plan consists of the establishment of
goals for the neighborhood, the discussion of issues important to the
residents, the generation of alternative solutions to neighborhood problems,
generating concepts to address these problems, establishing neighborhood
policies and methods to effectuate the recommendations and policies.
NEIGHBORHOOD PLANNING
Neighborhood planning is a collaborative process between the City, citizens
and property owners of a particular area which actively solicits
participation in the formulation of a plan for a neighborhood. The process
helps to enunciate goals, places issues on the table, generates and tests
alternative ways to achieve the desired ends, proposes a plan for the area,
4



and spells out policy changes and investments which should be implemented to
help realize that future. It is a forum in which people initiate rather than
react to change, and in which the various interest groups within a
neighborhood, who may have different goals, work out their differences to
arrive at a mutually satisfactory plan. The private-public partnership is
essential to the ultimate success of the venture.
PLANNING PROCESS
The Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood Plan began in November of 1984. For a
period of ten months, the residents of the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood
have worked diligently to identify neighborhood liabilities, assets and
opportunities. The participation of the residents has been the single most
important factor in establishing a comprehensive planning framework designed
to optimize the neighborhood's ability to guide the preservation of its
assets and to initiate and direct neighborhood change for the betterment of
its residents. The planning process used to accomplish the plan can be
divided into five major planning phases.
A. IDENTIFICATION OF PARTICIPANTS.
A meaningful planning process must begin-with the identification of the
participants which will contribute to the content of the overall plan.
Newspaper announcements, door-to-door distributions of announcements and
telephone contacts were initially used to begin developing interest in the
plan. With the assistance of Councilman Sam Sandos, neighborhood
associations such as the Concerned Citizens of Barnum, Neighbors of Barnum,
the St. Anthony Metropolitan Organization of People and the American
Association of Retired Persons were contacted to participate in the process.
A directory of individuals attending meetings was kept and became the primary
source of contacts within the neighborhood.
B. REVIEW OF EXISTING CONDITIONS AND PLANNING DATA.
The planning analysis data collected in 1979 was distributed for discussion
at public meetings. At these initial series of meetings, the following three
major tasks were accomplished:
1. A discussion of anticipated planning tasks.
2. A presentation of the previous planning analysis.
3. A discussion of existing neighborhood concerns.
C. COLLECT FACTS/DEVELOP GOALS.
Rather than pursuing a reactive planning process which establishes a planning
response to incremental problems, the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood
planning process utilized a goal setting process. Through a series of
5


neighborhood planning meetings, problems were identified and prioritized
under four major categories:
1. Land Use and Zoning.
2. Community Facilities.
3. Transportation/Circulation.
4. Other Neighborhood Concerns.
Within this larger context, it was then more appropriate to ask the
question: What does the neighborhood want to achieve? Within this planning
framework, the neighborhood participants identified planning sub-areas which
exist within the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood and identified their vision
of what these areas should be like.
D. DEVELOP CONCEPTS.
With the identification of neighborhood concerns, problems, planning
sub-areas and the goals to be achieved, the neighborhood plan then
concentrated on the development of planning concepts within neighborhood
sub-areas. The basic question being asked at this stage of the plan was:
How does the neighborhood want to achieve the planning goals? The
neighborhood plan then is based on a series of planning sub-areas which face
an array of identified problems. The future of each of these sub-areas is
than presented through a series of development concepts.
E. IMPLEMENTATION.
The final element of the neighborhood plan is the presentation of development
and policy recommendations both within the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood
sub-areas and within the context of the neighborhood as a whole. In addition
to identifying planning recommendations, the neighborhood plan seeks to
identify resources to accomplish the neighborhood plan.
USE OF THE PLAN
The neighborhood plan is a planning document for directing and managing
change and investment. It serves as an official document for decision
makers, including the Denver Planning Office, the Mayor, various city
departments, and upon adoption by the City Council, also assists that body's
deliberations, including the implementation of the City's capital improvement
program. It plays the same role for the private sector, directing residents,
businessmen and investors as to expectations for the neighborhood. The plan
is not an official zone map and does not imply any implicit rights to a
particular zone or to the land uses permitted within.
The plan is intended to promote patterns of land use, urban design,
circulation and services which encourage and contribute to the economic,
social and physical health, safety, welfare of the people who live and work
within a particular neighborhood. The neighborhood plan addresses issues and
6


opportunities at a scale which is more refined and more responsive to needs
than can be attained under the broad outlines of the city's Comprehensive
Plan. The neighborhood plan serves as a component of that document.
BARNUM/BARNUM WEST NEIGHBORHOOD OVERVIEW
The Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood is bounded by Sheridan Boulevard on the
West, Federal Boulevard on the East, the West 6th Avenue Freeway to the
North, and West Alameda Avenue on the South. The neighborhood encompasses
953 acres of rolling terrain bisected diagonally by Weir Gulch. The majority
of the residents can be identified as moderate income families residing in
predominately single family homes. The Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood is
one of a few naturally integrated neighborhood communities which lies at the
perimeter of the City and County of Denver.
Major assets of the neighborhood include:
o Low density residential character
o Good housing stock
o Uniform zoning patterns
o Good transportation access
o Close proximity to regional centers
o Good community facilities
Major liabilities of the neighborhood include:
o Rapid turnover/instability
o Selected areas of housing disrepair
o Low expendable incomes
o Declining business areas
o Rezoning of residential property to business use along major arterials
o Inadequate traffic control
o Unkept recreational areas
o Lack of community linkages
o Need of infrastructure repair
EXISTING CONDITIONS
The Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood has followed the trend established by
some inner city neighborhoods with a loss in population in recent years.
Although the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood jointly form a homogenous
planning area, historically, Perry Street serves as a boundary line between
the Barnum Area and the Barnum West Area. It can be noted that the 953 acres
which make up the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood, excluding all streets and
alleys, 627 acres comprises the net zoned property. Approximately 76% of the
neighborhood is utilized for single family housing, while less than 4% of the
land is used as multi-family. These numbers should be compared to the actual
property zoned as single family which is less than 56% of the net acreage and
approximately 32% which is zoned as multi-family housing. This shows that
7


although multi-family zoning exists, the market trend remains to be single
family residential units.
Approximately 6% of the neighborhood is zoned for business, while less than
3% of the net property within the neighborhood is used for business purposes.
The housing stock within the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood is in generally
good condition taking into consideration the average age of structures which
exceeds 40 years.
There are 11 vacant residential sites located in the Barnum/Barnum West
Neighborhood which would support approximately 54 new housing units.
(Reference: District 3 Infill Housing Study)
Commercial business strips occur along the western, southern and eastern
edges of the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood, with an additional neighborhood
business zone occurring along 1st Avenue.
Sheridan Boulevard which defines the western edge of the Barnum/Barnum West
neighborhood contains three business strips. The first business area begins
at West Alameda and ends at Bayaud Avenue. This B-l and B-3 area contains a
small shoppette, residential units and office space. The second business
strip begins at West Ellsworth, crosses West 1st Avenue and ends at West 2nd
Avenue. This strip contains an auto repair shop, neighborhood businesses, a
restaurant, a business college and a light industrial sales office. The
third business strip begins four lots south of West 5th Avenue and ends at
West 6th Avenue. This area contains residential, an abandoned gas station
and an office building.
West Alameda Avenue forms the southern boundary of the Barnum/Barnum West
Neighborhood. The majority of Alameda on the Barnum/Barnum West side is
zoned R-l and R-2. Two business zones are exceptions. One zone occurs
between Sheridan Boulevard and South Zenobia Street. This area contains a
small shoppette consisting of nine businesses which can be categorized as
neighborhood businesses. The remaining B-4 zone begins midway between King
Street and Knox Court and continues to Federal Boulevard. Within the
seventeen businesses contained in this B-4 zone, only three could be
considered local business, the remainder would be considered as marketing to
a regional clientele.
The eastern edge of the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood is defined by Federal
Boulevard. This edge is zoned B-4 from Alameda to 5th Avenue adjacent to
Barnum Park. The majority of these businesses have regional rather than
neighborhood markets.
A major neighborhood business zone exists close to the center of the
Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood. This is a B-2 neighborhood business zone
that runs along West 1st Avenue beginning at the centerline of the alley west
of Meade Street and continuing to the centerline of the alley to the east of
Knox Court. Out of the eighteen businesses, approximately half can be
considered neighborhood oriented, with four businesses related to automotive
uses.
8


HISTORY
The majority of the area was annexed to the City in September, 1896.
Boundaries of what might be termed Old Barnum' were Lakewood Gulch, Alameda
Avenue, the Platte River and Tennyson Street. The neighborhoods of Barnum,
Barnum West, Villa Park and Valverde generally make up the Old Barnum. The
remainder of the neighborhood of Barnum West became a part of Denver under
the Session Laws of Colorado in 1901. The construction of West 6th Avenue
freeway in the 1950s physically separated Villa Park from the rest of Old
Barnum. Federal Boulevard further divided Valverde from the other areas.
Prior to annexation, the first claim for land in the district was granted to
Daniel Witter in 1865. After several transfers of ownership, P. T. Barnum of
the Barnum and Bailey Circus became interested in the area as a winter
location for his show between performing seasons. In 1882, Barnum purchased
760 acres and platted the first subdivision. However, before any major
development occurred the property underwent additional transfers of
ownership. Not until after the turn of the century was the land again
subdivided. Winding driveways were laid out on practical lines, evidently to
attract the middle class. These are no longer evident in Barnum, but can
still be seen in the Valverde neighborhood.
Churches have played a leading role in the history of the neighborhoods.
Barnum's first house of worship was a small Dunkard church on Irving, just
south of Ninth Avenue. When its mission was finished, it moved farther up
the hill and became a dwelling.
Several buildings that were built in the late 1800s are still standing today
and can be seen mostly in the Barnum neighborhoods. A community building was
built at 6th and Knox Court, with a jail underneath and firehouse in this
building. The store building at 1st and Hooker was built in the 1890's. The
store and post office adjoined the building that was used for a dance hall.
In 1892, the "Greenhouses" which were located at Ellsworth and Lowell were
built and served the community until 1978 when they were closed down and
demolished in 1982. The Bowman House was built in 1910, and still stands
today on the hill at King Street and 4th Avenue.
Mr. Bowman was an architect and designed East High School, Masonic Temples
and the Cosmopolitan Hotel. He lost his fortune in 1929, and the house was
used until 1966 as a nursing home. It was acquired as a home for troubled
boys, and is still used today for that purpose. Many of the streets in the
Barnum Subdivision were originally named after famous people by P. T. Barnum.
Emerson was 1st Avenue, Beeler was 2nd Avenue, Holmes was Ellsworth, and
Jumbo was Hazel Court.
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/
BARNUM/BARNUM WEST NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
Until the 1950's, neighborhood areas located within the City and County of
Denver relied heavily on the Denver Central Business District for much of its
services. This relationship existed primarily because the Central Business
District was the only area where certain types of activities would logically
choose to locate. With an accelerated reliance on automobile transportation
and telephone communication and the widespread suburbanization of the
population, people are now able to live, shop, work, or do business in
scattered and diverse locations. These demographic changes have mandated
business establishments to seek locations outside of the Central Business
District. The revolution in communication and transportation has allowed a
greater degree of flexibility in the choice of neighborhoods to live in.
While residential neighborhoods no longer enjoy an exclusive locational
status, they can and do compete for status based on an array of criteria
including proximity to regional activities, recreational provisions,
accessibility and neighborhood identity. For these reasons, it has become
necessary for individual neighborhoods to take stock in themselves. Planned
growth and the maintenance of their assets allow neighborhoods to integrate
their plans and their aspirations into the entire scheme of the Denver
metropolitan area.
This document will discuss neighborhood concerns within the confines of four
major areas basic to the integrity of the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood.
The plan is organized to present the problems/issues, objectives/goals and
policies/recommendations associated with:
1. Land Use and Zoning.
2. Community Facilities.
3. Transportation/Circulation.
4. Intrastructure/Services.
These four categories will be addressed within the larger perspective of the
total neighborhood as well as within the context of sub-areas located within
the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood.
The sub-areas contained within this plan consist of the following study
areas:
o Alameda Study Area
o Weir Gulch Study Area
o First Avenue Study Area
o Sheridan Boulevard Study Area
o Sixth Avenue Study Area
o Federal Study Area
10


0 100*200' 400* 600


1
Street Classifications


m
OVERALL NEIGHBORHOOD APPROACH LAND USE AND ZONING
The planning process, in part, rests upon the understanding of how the
current neighborhood land is utilized relative to the intended use of the
property under current zoning regulations.
The majority of the neighborhood is zoned residential with single family R-l
zones in the northwest and southwest quadrants, and multi-family R-2 zones in
the northeast and southeast quadrants. Business zones are located along
Sheridan Boulevard (at 6th Avenue, 1st Avenue and Alameda), Alameda Avenue
(at Sheridan Boulevard and at the eastern edge), Federal Boulevard (from 6th
Avenue to Alameda) and along 1st Avenue (between Meade Street and Knox
Court).
Barnum Park, located in the northeast corner of the Barnum/Barnum West
Neighborhood is zoned 0-1 (open space) and contains 39 acres of recreational
use including an eight-acre lake. Weir Gulch, which serves as a combination
recreation/flood control device, bisects the neighborhood along a
northeast/southwest diagonal and exists in both R-l and R-2 zones.
PROBLEMS/ISSUES
Through a series of neighborhood meetings, a refined list of issues within
the category of Land Use and Zoning was compiled. The issues are as follows:
o Inappropriate businesses located in the neighborhood,
o Non-conforming uses within the neighborhood,
o Poor location of commercial development,
o Absentee land owners.
o Inappropriate zoning in residential areas and along arterials.
o Need for maintenance of low density housing,
o Need for better building code enforcement,
o Deteriorating condition of housing,
o Declining business areas,
o Lack of new housing.
o High housing turnover/neighborhood instability.
OBJECTIVES/GOALS
Although the zoning pattern contained within the Barnum/Barnum West
Neighborhood is uniform in character, it should be noted that a substantial
number of non-conforming uses exist within residentially zoned property.
A series of neighborhood meetings dealt with the formulation of neighborhood
goals and objectives. As a whole, the following is a list of identified
neighborhood goals which are related to Land Use and Zoning.
Goals: What does the neighborhood want to achieve?
11


1. It is a goal of the neighborhood to increase the number of appropriate
neighborhood businesses located in the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood.
Appropriate businesses would be those businesses which would provide
residents with the availability of goods and services which are a
necessity or an obvious convenience to residents. It would be desirous
to gradually eliminate business which contribute to a negative
environment within the neighborhood, such as adult theaters, adult
bookstores, bars, liquor stores, automotive repair facilities and
equipment storage areas, etc.
2. It is the goal of the neighborhood to encourage commercial development
within existing business zones located in the Barnum/Barnum West
Neighborhood. The use of the P.U.D. process should not be used
indiscriminately, and should only be considered when a clear benefit to
the neighborhood has been demonstrated to the residents' satisfaction.
3. It is a goal of the neighborhood to encourage the appropriate land uses
within designated zones. It is desirous that legal non-conforming uses
which presently exist should eventually revert to the appropriate zoning
which surrounds the use in question. All exceptions may be allowed to
exist only with the consent of the residents and should be reviewed on a
case by case basis.
4. It is the goal of the neighborhood to stabilize, or upgrade where
necessary, the present housing stock. Absentee landowners shall be held
accountable for any infractions of the building code or city regulations
applicable to the upkeep of property. It is a goal to encourage an
increase in owner-occupied housing within the neighborhood.
5. It is the goal of the neighborhood to maintain, upgrade and promote
existing business zones contained in the Barnum/Barnum West
Neighborhood.
6. It is a goal of the neighborhood to discourage the rezoning of property
which does not offer a clear advantage to the neighborhood. Land use
within the neighborhood should follow existing zoning. Additionally, it
shall be a goal to discourage the rezoning of residential property for
the purpose of developing business uses.
7. It is the goal of the neighborhood to maintain its present low density
residential character.
8. It is a goal to maintain or upgrade the quality of low density
residential property within the neighborhood.
9. It is a goal of the neighborhood to encourage the construction of new
low density housing within the neighborhood.
10. It is the goal of the neighborhood to provide a stable neighborhood
setting through the maintenance and provision of neighborhood amenities.
12


m
J
11. It shall be a goal to encourage the appropriate responsible city
officials to enforce city regulations which promote a high standard of
safety and appearance for the neighborhood.
POLICIES/RECOMMENDATIONS
o It is a recommendation that property zoned R-l located along the eastern
edge of Sheridan Boulevard between Alameda and 6th Avenue should only be
developed subject to the provision of adequate front and rear setbacks
and associated landscaping acting as buffer zones both from Sheridan
Boulevard and the adjacent residential units located to the east.
o It is a recommendation to maintain residential zoning along West
Alameda.
o It is a recommendation to rezone the area along Alameda from Knox Court
to Grove Street from a city-wide business zone (B-4) to a neighborhood
business zone (B-2). The new developments within neighborhood business
zones (B-2) should be developed with ample front and rear setbacks and
landscaping. The use of parking zones (P-1) should not be allowed to be
placed into existing residential zones.
o Along West 1st Avenue, it is a recommendation to confine business uses
within existing B-2 zones and to maintain the existing residential
zoning on the remainder of the street.
o It is a recommendation that the business zone located along West 1st
Avenue between South Newton and South Julian be rejuvenated as the
neighborhood's primary shopping area.
o It is a recommendation that residential uses occurring in business zones
located along Federal Boulevard be developed into business uses prior to
the conversion of residential zones into business zones within the
neighborhood. The development of these sites should require adequate
front and rear setbacks and landscaping. The use of parking zones (P-1)
should not be allowed to be placed into existing residential zones.
o It is a recommendation that the 6th Avenue Frontage Road should be
widened, properly signed and landscaped.
o It is a recommendation to maintain major R-l and R-2 area designations
as presently exists in the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood. Existing
building codes should be enforced to prevent the illegal conversions of
single family units into multi-family units.
o It is a recommendation to develop owner-occupied infill housing as
presented in the District 3 Infill Housing Study.
13


OVERALL NEIGHBORHOOD APPROACH COMMUNITY FACILITIES
The Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood is fortunate to have the 39-acre Barnum
Park, including an eight-acre lake, and the 25-acre Weir Gulch which
stretches diagonally across the entire neighborhood. Although the quantity
of available park land in the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood is high, the
neighborhood plan must address the maintenance and development of existing
areas.
PROBLEMS/ISSUES
Through a series of neighborhood meetings, a refined list of issues within
the category of community facilities was compiled. The issues are as
follows:
o The development of Alameda as a landscaped roadway,
o Poor condition of Weir Gulch,
o Lack of children-oriented play areas,
o Poor park security/lighting.
o Poor maintenance of parks,
o Poor management of existing facilities.
o Need for the development of bus shelters and a cover for the swimming
pool located in Barnum Park.
OBJECTIVES/GOALS
A series of neighborhood meetings dealt specifically with the formulation of
neighborhood goals and objectives. As a whole, the following are overall
neighborhood goals which are related to Community Facilities.
o It is the goal of the neighborhood to encourage the development of
Alameda from Knox Court to Sheridan Boulevard in such a manner as to
provide edge landscaping, a landscaped median strip, curb and gutter,
and a pedestrian walkway. The design of Alameda Avenue should also
accommodate the park linkage of Weir Gulch across Alameda Avenue both at
grade and via the pedestrian/bicycle underpass.
o It is the goal of the neighborhood to complete the development of Weir
Gulch as a major unique park linkage from Barnum Park through the
Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood and into adjacent neighborhoods.
o It is a goal of the neighborhood to develop more children-oriented play
areas within the neighborhood.
o It is a goal of the neighborhood to provide and to maintain security for
its community facilities system. It is a goal of the neighborhood to
provide adequate security lighting at the Barnum Park, along 1st Avenue,
and within the entire length of Weir Gulch.
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o It is the goal of the neighborhood to maintain the upkeep and appearance
of the neighborhood park system.
o It is a goal of the neighborhood to encourage the use of community
services and to manage and promote year-around events within the
neighborhood.
o It is a goal of the neighborhood to provide additional community
facilities as demand within the neighborhood requires.
POLICIES/RECOMMENDATIONS
o It is a recommendation that Alameda, from Federal Boulevard to Sheridan,
should be developed completely to provide the following amenities:
. Curb and gutters.
. Sidewalks/bikeways.
. Perimeter landscaping.
. Median landscaping.
. Signalized and striped crosswalks.
. New bus stops and pull-out lanes.
Additional right-of-way should be purchased to create larger landscaped
perimeter buffer areas than what is possible utilizing the existing
right-of-way. Negotiations with adjacent landowners to jointly develop
landscaping improvements should be explored. Irrigation of the
landscaping should be installed in order to insure the best health and
appearance of the plantings and grass.
o It is a recommendation to complete the development of Weir Gulch from
Alameda to Barnum Park.
o It is a recommendation to develop joint use play areas between the
Denver Public School System, the Community, and the City and County of
Denver at Newlon Elementary School and Barnum Elementary School.
o It is a recommendation to develop and maintain the entire Weir Gulch
from Alameda to Barnum Park. Additional recommendations occur within
the six zones along Weir Gulch as follows:
ZONE 1 WEIR GULCH
o It is a recommendation that a major bike/pedestrian crossing be
developed both at grade with Alameda and under Alameda. The
at-grade crossing shall be signalized and shall be uniquely visible
to automobile traffic through the use of special surface treatment
such as a stamped concrete brick pattern, special landscaping and
highly visible graphics.
15


o It is a recommendation that Zone 1 should be irrigated and
maintained as a highly manicured park setting. Maintenance should
be kept at a high level, as it is the most visible position of the
gulch with the neighborhood. The children's play areas located
within Weir Gulch should be maintained as a high priority item.
ZONE 2 WEIR GULCH
o It is a recommendation to develop and irrigate select areas within
Zone 2. These level select areas lend themselves to group
activities such as basketball and soccer for older children, or
play areas for younger children. Maintenance and upkeep in Zone 2
is moderate at best and must be improved.
ZONE 3 WEIR GULCH
o It is a recommendation to cover all open concrete culverts which
channelize Weir Gulch. This would then remove a major physical
barrier which presently exists. The resulting pedestrian/bikeway
linkage would offer many opportunities for a variety of landscaping
treatments. Zone 3 should be developed into a more visible gateway
element as it crosses 1st Avenue.
ZONE 4 WEIR GULCH
o It is a recommendation that Zone 4 be irrigated and landscaped into
a major pedestrian/bikeway strip with the integration of children's
play areas and team sport treatments. The area is presently poorly
maintained and deserves a higher priority than it presently
receives. It is also desirous to link Zone 4 to the 1st Avenue
business area via graphics and landscaping treatment.
Opportunities to open vistas to 1st Avenue exist. There is a long
range possibility of extending the 1st Avenue B-2 Zone at a select
location to the Weir Gulch parkway.
ZONE 5 WEIR GULCH
o It is a recommendation to develop the 2nd Avenue dirt streets
within Zone 5 into an extension of Zone 4. This area should be
irrigated and landscaped. As Zone 5 meets Knox Court, crosswalks
and directional graphics should serve to make the transition of
Weir Gulch across Knox Court and into Zone 6. The presence of Weir
Gulch at Knox Court must be through the design of a major gateway
into the park system.
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ZONE 6 WEIR GULCH
o It is a recommendation that a stronger linkage be designed into the
junction of Zone 6 and Barnum Park and that a crosswalk linkage be
established at this point.
OVERALL NEIGHBORHOOD APPROACH TRANSPORTATION/CIRCULATION
A circulation system performs several functions:
o It provides access to individual properties,
o It accommodates many through trips.
o It provides the varying kinds and degrees of movement and accessibility
required by different activity groups and thereby influences their
distribution.
o Through the size and configuration of spaces devoted to rights-of-ways,
it provides light, air and a setting for structures on abutting
properties.
o It can be employed to identify or emphasize areas of importance and help
people orient themselves to their neighborhood.
The Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood is served by a circulation system
comprised of local streets, collector streets, arterial streets, freeways,
streetside sidewalks, pedestrian pathways, bikeways and a system -of bus
routes.
PROBLEMS/ISSUES
Through a series of neighborhood meetings, a refined list of issues within
the category of Transportation/Circulation was compiled. The issues
presented are as follows:
o Unwanted cross traffic through the neighborhood,
o Incomplete pedestrian/bike linkages,
o Inadequate signalization within the neighborhood,
o Inadequate bus facilities,
o Lack of school crossings,
o Lack of sidewalks, curbs and gutters,
o Unpaved alleys,
o Lack of pedestrian crosswalks,
o High speed traffic.
OBJECTIVES/GOALS
A series of neighborhood meetings dealt specifically with the formulation of
neighborhood goals and objectives. As a whole, the following are overall
neighborhood goals which are related to Transportation/Circulation issues.
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o It is a neighborhood goal to discourage the routing of commuter traffic
onto local streets as a means of avoiding congestion along collector and
arterial traffic ways.
o It is a goal of the neighborhood to develop completely, pedestrian
linkages within the neighborhood as a means of accessing all the
amenities of the neighborhood. These linkages should also extend into
adjacent neighborhoods in order to develop neighborhood-wide
accessibility to City amenities.
o It is the goal of the neighborhood to provide a well-thought out and
comprehensive system of traffic signage in order to establish
understandable set of commands which will promote safety for both the
pedestrian and vehicle movements within the Barnum/Barnum West
Neighborhood.
o It is a goal of the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood to offer its
residents the availability of high quality public transportation,
including the convenient location of support facilities.
o It is a goal of the neighborhood to route traffic through and around the
neighborhood onto appropriately designed streets.
o It is the goal of the neighborhood to develop highly visible and safe
crosswalks located at all schools, community facilities and major
traffieways.
o It is the goal of the neighborhood to develop a well-maintained
neighborhood roadway system, including service alleys.
POLICIES/RECOMMENDATIONS
o It is a recommendation that the 6th Avenue Frontage Road should have
located along its length a series of stop signs in order to discourage
its use as a high speed alternative to a congested 6th Avenue.
o It is a recommendation that a greater degree of landscaping treatment
should occur along the 6th Avenue Freeway in order to create and
reinforce a positive image of adjacent neighborhoods.
o It is a recommendation that the City Traffic Department should take
measures to relieve traffic congestion at the intersection of Alameda
and Federal, and Alameda and Sheridan.
o It is a recommendation that the speed limit should be reduced along
Alameda from Sheridan to Knox Court and that the 30 m.p.h. speed limit
be enforced along 1st Avenue from Sheridan to Federal.
o It iy a recommendation that 4-way stops be placed in the southwest
quadrant and the southeast quadrant of the Barnum/Barnum West
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Neighborhood to discourage short circuiting through the neighborhood
from Alameda to Sheridan and from Federal to Alameda.
o It is a recommendation that landscaped median strips should occur in the
new design of Alameda and that by design, only preselected lefthand
turns into the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood will occur from eastbound
traffic along Alameda.
o It is a recommendation to develop bus shelters adjacent to exclusive bus
turn-in lanes at major pedestrian/automobile interfaces, such as the
intersection of Weir Gulch and Alameda Avenue.
o It is a recommendation to pave all unpaved alleys within the
Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood.
o It is a recommendation to develop highly visible crosswalks at Newlon
Elementary School, at Barnum Elementary School, at the Barnum Recreation
Center, at the Ross Barnum Library, 2nd Avenue and Knox Court, and at
the intersection of Weir Gulch and Alameda.
OVERALL NEIGHBORHOOD APPROACH INFRASTRUCTURE/SERVICES
PROBLEMS/ISSUES
Through a series of neighborhood meetings, a refined list of issues within
the category of Infrastructure/Services was compiled. The issues presented
are as follows:
o Poor condition of housing and properties,
o Fear of crime,
o Lack of City services:
. Trash pick up.
. Park maintenance.
. Street repair and cleaning.
o Pavement of alleys,
o Inadequate storm drainage,
o Lack of youth activities and employment,
o Stray dogs,
o Repair of sidewalks,
o Mid-block lighting.
OBJECTIVES/GOALS
The following are overall neighborhood goals which are related to
Infrastructure/Service issues.
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o It is the goal of the neighborhood to upgrade the appearance of
residential structures and properties located in the Barnum/Barnum West
Neighborhood.
o It is a goal of the neighborhood to provide more lighting in Barnum Park
along 1st Avenue and along the entire length of Weir Gulch.
o It is a goal of the neighborhood to develop housing assistance programs
to help finance residential improvements and to provide financial
assistance necessary to promote more owner-occupied housing within the
neighborhood.
o It is the goal of the neighborhood to offer affordable housing located
within the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood. It should be noted that the
Barnum/Barnum West area has developed more than its fair share of
low-income subsidized housing and that the neighborhood should not be
asked to absorb more of this housing type.
o It is the goal of the neighborhood to promote the safe use of
neighborhood streets, parks and public facilities without fear of crime
or injury.
o It is the goal of the neighborhood to insure that the Barnum/Barnum West
Neighborhood receives the full services offered by Public Agencies.
These include:
. Trash pick-up.
. Park maintenance.
. Street repair.
. Sidewalk repair.
. Code enforcement.
. Bus service.
. Traffic control.
. Flood control.
. Animal control.
. Adequate street and park lighting.
o It is the goal of the neighborhood to complete the paving of all streets
and alleys in the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood.
o It is the goal of the neighborhood to insure that the street systems
within the neighborhood have been designed to properly drain storm
runoff.
o It is the goal of the neighborhood to provide neighborhood services
designed to involve and utilize the resources of young adults located in
the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood.
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POLICIES/ RECOMM END ATIONS
o It is a recommendation that a neighborhood Housing service be located in
the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood in order to focus private and city
resources on the problem of providing and rehabilitating housing. This
service could provide the following:
. Seek sources of housing funds for infill and rehabilitation.
. Develop incentives with the City to promote housing.
. Remove City impediments to housing.
. Develop rehabilitative and emergency home repair programs.
. Establish rental rehabilitative programs.
. Establish a code enforcement program.
. Market the area.
. Develop bond programs to enable renters to buy.
. Provide assistance to non-profit corporations.
. Prepare guidelines for housing.
o It is a recommendation to upgrade the appearance of 1st Avenue from
Sheridan to Federal through the use of landscaping, specifically the
planting of trees in landscaping strips located between the sidewalks
and the street curbs.
o It is a recommendation to establish a neighborhood watch program in the
Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood with bi-monthly meetings with the police
department to review crime statistics in the neighborhood, to develop
crime prevention techniques and to address problem areas with the
neighborhood.
o It is a recommendation to provide additional security lighting along the
perimeter and within Barnum Park, at the Barnum Recreation Center and
along Weir Gulch, especially in Zone 2 and in Zone 6.
o It is a recommendation that the City and County of Denver should
implement a total assessment of City services and present to the
neighborhood the following studies:
1. Trash Collection. The City should provide more dumpsters per block
to conform to the standard of one dumpster per four households.
Additionally, the existing dumpsters should be better maintained
and cleaned more often.
2. Park Maintenance. The City Parks and Recreation Department and the
Urban Drainage and Flood Control District should develop a regular
schedule for the removal of debris and mowing of the grass within
the Weir Gulch Park. This schedule should call for the mowing of
lawn areas three times per year and trash removal at least every
two months.
3. Street/Sidewalk Repair. The Public Works Department contains a
Sidewalk Inspection Section and the Street Repair Section. The
21


entire neighborhood has already been surveyed by the City in order
to locate curb and gutter problems, broken sidewalks and streets in
disrepair. The City should complete the work outlined under this
survey. The City should also observe the present street drainage
during a period of high runoff in order to document less than
desirable drainage conditions within the neighborhood. The
five-year drainage plan undertaken by the Wastewater Department
should be implemented.
4. Traffic Engineering. The Traffic Operations Section of the Public
Works Department should do a complete traffic analysis of the
Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood with traffic counts and the
location of all traffic signalization, including stop signs and
crosswalks. This study should be presented and reviewed with the
neighborhood with recommended changes. The City Traffic Department
should make recommendations designed to downgrade Bayaud Avenue and
Irving Street from collector streets to local streets.
o It is a recommendation that all unpaved alleys in the Barnum/Barnum West
Neighborhood be paved. In the interim, existing dirt alleys should be
graded flat to prevent unnecessary drainage onto adjacent properties.
o It is a recommendation to employ young adults from within the
neighborhood during Summer months to maintain the existing park system
located in the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood.
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SPECIAL STUDY AREAS
SHERIDAN BOULEVARD STUDY AREA
Sheridan Boulevard maintains its position as a major arterial and has been
developed as a strip commercial along the Lakewood edge. Due to the
intensity of its use, the residential properties which exist on the
Barnum/Barnum West portion of Sheridan Boulevard are currently experiencing
pressure to become business zones. The majority of the existing business are
B-l and B-2 zones. Neighborhood groups interested in the development of
residential property along Sheridan Boulevard are concerned with the lack of
landscaping and setbacks at existing developments within B-l and B-2 zones.
It is a recommendation that property zoned R-l located along the eastern edge
of Sheridan Boulevard between Alameda and 6th Avenue should only be developed
subject to adequate front and rear setbacks and associated landscaping acting
as buffer zones both from Sheridan Boulevard and the adjacent residential
units located to the east. Parking for any development shall meet the
requirements of the B-l or B-2 zone accordingly with no overflow P-1 zones to
be allowed to exist with residential areas.
WEST ALAMEDA AVENUE STUDY AREA
West Alameda Avenue functions as a major arterial. A B-3 business zone
exists on the corner of Sheridan and Alameda, while a B-4 zone exists along
West Alameda Avenue from Knox Court to Federal Boulevard. The remainder of
Alameda within the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood is zoned R-l or R-2. Much
of the land located along Alameda from South Vrain Street to South Meade
Street has been developed by churches or remains vacant land. A similar
pattern is occurring along the Westwood edge of West Alameda Avenue.
It shall be the recommendation to maintain the residential zoning along West
Alameda Avenue and to selectively review any proposed developments which
might be advantageous to neighborhood interests through the Planned Unit
Development approach. The P.U.D. process should not be used to upzone or
increase density. This approach gives both City agencies and neighborhood
residents considerable involvement in determining the characteristics of the
development and provides maximum assurance that what is proposed will be
developed as such.
The General Business District (B-4) Zone which dominates West Alameda east of
Federal to 1-25, penetrates into the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood from
Federal Boulevard to Knox Court. This pattern then turns into the Westwood
Neighborhood via Morrison Road. The inundation into the residential
neighborhood is compounded by the use of P-1 (Off Street Parking Districts)
and B-l (Limited Office District) zones. Along Hooker Street, this condition
falls two lots short of hitting West Cedar Avenue. On the northern edge of
Alameda, this area includes such businesses as an adult movie house, two auto
repair shops, a thrift store and a Goodwill store. The southern edge of
23


Alameda within this area contains such businesses as an adult book store, two
vacant commercial buildings and two auto accessory stores.
It is a recommendation to encourage more businesses which provide commodities
and personal services which satisfy the needs of the residents surrounding
this business zone. This plan would recommend the rezoning of the area from
Knox Court to Grove Street from a B-4 zone to a B-2 zone. Through this
selective down zoning, a greater linkage between the Westwood Neighborhood
and Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood could be reached.
WEST 1ST AVENUE STUDY AREA (IMPROVE R.O.W.)
West 1st Avenue is a collector street and contains business zones at the
extreme western edge and eastern edge of the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood.
Additionally, a neighborhood business district exists between South Newton
Street and South Julian Street. The remainder of West 1st Avenue is zoned
R-l or R-2 (Residential). There has been some influence from the B-2 zone
located at the 1st Avenue/Sheridan corner as it stretches to Young Court.
Approximately six non-residential uses are located within R-l and R-2 zones.
It is a recommendation to confine business uses to areas along West 1st
Avenue which are already zoned B-2. A further recommendation is to encourage
non-conforming businesses to revert to their original zoned use. It is a
recommendation that the business zone located along West 1st Avenue between
South Newton Street and South Julian Street be reinforced as a viable
neighborhood business district. Recent economic events has contributed to a
demise of this district in general, therefore, a special effort by the City
and the neighborhood as well as business community should attempt to
strengthen its existence as a pivotal business hub within the community. The
appearance of 1st Avenue from Sheridan to Federal should be upgraded through
the use of streetscaping.
FEDERAL BOULEVARD STUDY AREA
Federal Boulevard is a major arterial street and is currently zoned as a
General Business District (B-4). A general assumption has been that the
businesses located along Federal Boulevard have very little spillover effect
into the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood. There is, however, some concern
that off street parking and ancillary uses of residential sites adjacent to
the B-4 zones occur. There are also a number of residential properties
located along Federal Boulevard that could be utilized as business sites.
It is the recommendation of the Neighborhood Plan to maximize the B-4
potential along Federal Boulevard in order to satisfy the demand for business
location within the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood without jeopardizing the
use of residentially zoned property. Further, it is the recommendation to
preserve the residential integrity of residentially zoned property which abut
business zones.
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WEST 6TH AVENUE STUDY AREA
West 6th Avenue is a freeway which forms the northern boundary of the
Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood. The majority of the property located to the
south is zoned R-l up through King Street where there is a half block B-2
zone. The remainder of the property from Julian Street to Federal Boulevard
consists of Barnum Park which is zoned 0-1 (Open Use District).
It is the objective of this Neighborhood Plan to maintain the residential
integrity of the areas south of the West 6th Avenue Freeway. The
neighborhood plan recommends that the 6th Avenue Frontage Road should be
widened, properly signed and landscaped.
WEIR GULCH STUDY AREA
Although Weir Gulch provides a continuous pedestrian spine through the
Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood, the length of Weir Gulch has been maintained
in various degrees. For discussion purposes, the Weir Gulch has been
presented in six zones. The first zone begins at the intersection of West
Alameda and South Weir Drive. Zone 1 runs parallel to South Weir Drive and
ends at West Bayaud Avenue. Zone 2 begins at the intersection of West Bayaud
Avenue and South Utica and ends at the intersection of West 1st Avenue and
South Quitman Street. Zone 3 begins at the intersection of 1st Avenue and
South Quitman and ends at the intersection of Osceola and 2nd Avenue. Zone 4
begins at the intersection of Osceola and 2nd Avenue and ends at the
intersection of South Lowell Street and West 2nd Avenue. Zone 5 begins at
the intersection of West 2nd Avenue and South Lowell and ends at the
intersection of West 3rd Avenue and South Julian Street. Zone 6 begins at
the intersection of West 3rd Avenue and South Julian Street and ends at the
intersection of South Hooker Street and West 3rd Avenue.
Zone 1. Zone 1 is the most visible portion of Weir Gulch both from the
surrounding residential areas and from West Alameda Avenue. Zone 1 is the
only portion of Weir Gulch located in the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood
which is separated from residential units by local streets. The majority of
Zone 1 is 100 feet wide or less with the widest area (375 feet) existing at
West Alameda Avenue. Zone 1 contains relatively steep slopes adjacent to
West Alameda Avenue which begin to level out as it approaches West Bayaud
Avenue. Zone 1 contains a series of children's play areas and a
well-maintained bicycle/pedestrian path.
Zone 2. Zone 2 represents a portion of Weir Gulch which has as its outer
boundaries, residential property. This zone is characterized by relatively
steep embankments which culminate at a small channel to the west of the
bikeway/pathway. At least three areas should be considered in future
detailed design studies as representing possible recreational facilities
lending themselves to team sport activities. Zone 2 is landscaped fairly
well but requires more maintenance than it is presently afforded, while areas
difficult to access are left unattended. The lack of an irrigation system
makes it difficult to maintain a uniform landscaped appearance. This area
affords a pleasant walking environment during the day, yet it is a fairly
25


intimidating area to walk at night. The initiation of a lighted walkway
would help alleviate the lack of visual monitoring by residential units out
of range of the bikeway/pathway.
Zone 3. Zone 3 is an area where residential property suffers the greatest
impact by the presence of Weir Gulch as a flood control/drainage device.
Throughout Zone 3, the channel flow associated with Weir Gulch is enclosed in
an open concrete channel surrounded by chain link fence. The concrete walls
have become a source of graffitti for the neighborhood youth and encourage
the use of the concrete culvert as a dangerous playground. Although
sidewalks are located adjacent to the concrete culvert, the effectiveness of
Weir Gulch as a major pedestrian linkage through the Barnum Neighborhood and
into Barnum Park has been diminished considerably by the existing
configuration of Zone 3. A preferential treatment of Weir Gulch as it moves
into, through and out of Zone 3 is the enclosure of the concrete culvert.
This would eliminate the need for the chain link fence, it would eliminate
the use of the concrete culvert as a play area and would remove the unsightly
graffitti from the culvert walls. The resulting covered culvert would also
remove the clutter of individual fences which abruptly end at the edge of the
present sidewalk location. A generous bike way/walk way could be selectively
landscaped to strengthen this important neighborhood linkage.
Zone 4. Zone 4 is an example of a covered concrete culvert system which runs
through a residential area. Zone 4 is characterized by a wide strip of level
open space adjacent to residential units. Trees and shrubs occur mostly at
the edges of Zone 4 with the use of marginal grass planted throughout the
remainder of the area. The lack of irrigation makes this area difficult to
maintain as a well-kept parkway. This zone lends itself to the development
of areas dedicated to team sports or the development of a meaningful
landscaped and lighted pedestrian parkway highlighted with seating areas or
children's play areas. NOTE: Zone 4 could be linked to the neighborhood
business area located at 1st Avenue.
Zone 5. Zone 5 represents a major break in the bikeway/pathway parkway
linkage. All hints of a bikeway/pathway system end as South Lowell Boulevard
is crossed. The area typically dedicated as the bikeway/pathway system is
abandoned up through South Knox Court and is replaced by two blocks of
unimproved dirt roadways. As the intersection of 2nd Avenue and South Knox
Court is approached, it becomes apparent that the bikeway/pathway linkage to
Barnum Park has been lost. Only by crossing South Knox Court and traveling
northward can one reestablish a weak remnant of the parkway again. Zone 5
should be abandoned as a traveled roadway and developed into a landscaped
linkage between Zone 4 and Zone 6, thereby continuing the necessary linkage
to Barnum Park. A strong linkage across South Knox Court should be developed
to maintain the continuity of the entire Weir parkway. NOTE: Zone 5 could
be linked to the neighborhood business area.
Zone 6. Zone 6 has characteristics similar to Zone 2. Zone 6 has relatively
steep embankments with fairly well maintained grassed areas, trees and
shrubs. The lack of irrigation makes it difficult to establish a uniform
level of care within Zone 6. Within Zone 6, the area bounded by South Knox
and South Julian requires the most work. This area should be landscaped and
26


maintained to a greater degree which exists presently. A clear linkage
between Zone 5 and Zone 6 must be made apparent if the Weir parkway is to be
continuous.
27


Full Text

PAGE 1

BARNUM/BARNUM WEST NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN DENVER PLANNING AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DECEMBER 1986

PAGE 3

BARNUM/BARNUM WEST NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN TABLE OF CONTENTS Page EXECUTI'VE S'UMMAR,Y ....................................... 1 Concerns: Land Use and Zoning ...... Community Facilities ...... Transportation/Circulation .. Infrastructure/Services. Recommendations: Land Use and Zoning ....... Community Facilities ...... Transportation/Circulation. Infrastructure/Services. .1 2 .2 2 3 3 3 4 INTR.ODUCTION 4 Neighborhood Planninq. . . . . 4 Planning Process ..... 5 A. B. c. D. E. Identification of Participants ................ Review of Existing Conditions and Planning Data Collection of Facts/Development of Goals .. Development of Concepts .......... Implementation ...... 5 5 5 6 6 Use of the Pla!l ............................ ........ 6 OVERALL NEIGHBORHOOD OVERVIEW. Existing Conditions .. History.................. Neighborhood Plan 7 .7 9 ... 10 OVERALL NEIGHBORHOOD APPROACH ..................... 11 Land Use and Zoning .. Problems/Issues .. Objectives/Goals .. Policies/Recommendations. ..11 ... 11 ..11 ..13

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Community Facilities. Problems/Issues ... r Objectives/Goals ... Policies/Recommendations .. Transportation/Circulation Problems/Issues .... Objectives/Goals ........ Policies/Recommendations. Infrastructure/Services. Problems/Issues ..... Objectives/Goals ..... Policies/Recommendations SPECIAL STUDY AREAS .... Sheridan Boulevard ......... West Alameda Avenue ....... West 1st Avenue ............... Federal Boulevard .. West 6th Avenue. Weir Gulch .... Page .14 .. 14 .. 14 15 .. 17 .17 .17 .18 19 ....... 19 19 21 23 ..23 23 2 4 24 .25 ... 25 ..,

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8[RK[L[Y SUNNYSIDE ... ..__ 1 I I WST HIGHLAND 1 I I I _.., _____ ;: ""'olj._ I I JEFFERSON I I I ...... I I I I I AI.AfvB)A AVE. J WSTWOOO :t :. I I I ATHMAR PARK : <:! : 6 I MARL[[ I I I I I BARNUM/ BARNUM WEST NEIGHBORHOOD LOCATION MAP -CLAYTON SKYlAND CONGIIUS ,,., CHERRY CAE _..L ,_.... : ',, : __ I \ I : I I I I I I : ') BELCARO 1 I .. :t I I \ \ CORY-MERRIL

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BARNUM/BARNUM WEST NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The neighborhood plan for the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood has been organized into four general categories. A. Land Use and Zoning B. Community Facilities C. Transportation/Circulation D. Infrastructure/Services As in all neighborhoods, a number of unique areas exist which form the fabric of the community. The Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood consists of six such areas as follows: 1. Alameda Study Area 2. Weir Gulch Study Area 3. First Avenue Study Area 4. Sheridan Boulevard Study Area 5. Sixth Avenue Study Area 6. Federal Boulevard Study Area The issues contained in the four (4) general planning categories and the six (6) study areas were addressed directly by the residents through a series of neighborhood work sessions. The concerns, goals and recommendations within each of these planning elements then become the body of this neighborhood plan. The major assets of the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood include: 0 0 0 0 0 0 Low density residential character. Good housing stock. Uniform zoning patterns. Good transportation access. Close proximity to regional centers. Good community facilities. The major neighborhood concerns relative to the four (4) general planning categories are as follows: LAND USE AND ZONING CONCERNS o Inappropriate businesses located in the neighborhood. o Non-conforming uses. 1 ....

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0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Poor location of commercial development. Absentee landowners. Inappropriate zoning in residential areas and along arterials. Poor maintenance of housing. Lack of building code enforcement. Declining business areas. Lack of new housing. High housing turnover/neighborhood instability. COMMUNITY FACILITIES CONCERNS o Incomplete development of Alameda. o Poor condition of Weir Gulch. o Lack of child-oriented play areas. o Poor park security/lighting. o Poor maintenance of parks. o Inefficient management of existing facilities. o Need for the development of bus shelters. TRANSPORTATION/CIRCULATION CONCERNS 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Unwanted traffic through the neighborhood. Incomplete pedestrian/bike linkages. Inadequate signalization within the neighborhood. Inadequate bus facilities. Lack of school crossings. Lack of sidewalks, curbs and gutters. Unpaved alleys. Lack of pedestrian crosswalks. High speed traffic. INFRASTRUCTURE/SERVICES CONCERNS o Poor condition of housing and properties. o Fear of crime. o City services. Trash pick up. Park maintenance. Street repair and cleaning. o Unpaved alleys. o Inadequate storm drainage. o Lack of youth activities and employment. o Stray dogs. The residents than established a series of goals directed at each of the concerns presented. As in most problem-solving situations, a series of alternative recommendations were discussed for each goal that was formulated. 2 -

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The selected recommendations contained in the plan has become the heart of this neighborhood plan. The following recommendations within each category are presented in brief format and establish the framework for expected change and preservation of neighborhood elements: LAND USE AND ZONING RECOMMENDATIONS o Establish development parameters for property located along Sheridan Boulevard. o Maintain residential zoning along West Alameda. o Develop setback and landscaping policies for new developments within neighborhood business zones. o Rezone an area along Alameda from Knox Court to Grove Street from a B-4 zone to a B-2 zone. o Confine business along 1st Avenue to existing business zones. o Rejuvenate the existing neighborhood business area located along 1st Avenue. o Encourage new business to locate in areas already zoned for business use. o Widen and provide stop signs along the 6th Avenue Frontage Road. o Maintain residential zoning areas which currently exist. o Develop owner-occupied infill housing. COMMUNITY FACILITIES -RECOMMENDATIONS o Develop major roadway improvements to Alameda from Federal to Sheridan. o Develop joint-use play areas at existing public schools. o Develop and maintain Weir Gulch from Alameda to Barnum Park. o Develop a major bike/pedestrian crossing at the intersection of Weir Gulch and Alameda. o Irrigate and maintain Zone 1 of Weir Gulch and develop additional children's play areas. o Develop group activity areas within Zone 2 of Weir Gulch. o Within Zone 3 of Weir Gulch, cover existing concrete culverts and develop new pedestrian walkways. o Irrigate and landscape Zone 4 of Weir Gulch into team sport areas and children's play areas. o Develop unpaved roadways in Zone 5 of Weir Gulch into an irrigated and landscaped pedestrian parkway. o Develop a stronger linkage from Weir Gulch into Barnum Park. TRANSPORTATION/CIRCULATION RECOMMENDATIONS o Locate stop signs along the length of the 6th Avenue Frontage Road. o Develop more landscaping along the 6th Avenue Freeway as it passes by the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood. o City should attempt to relieve traffic congestion at the intersection of Federal and Alameda, and Sheridan and Alameda. o Reduce the speed limit along Alameda and 1st Avenue. 3

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o Place four-way stops in the Southwest and Southeast quadrant to prevent the short circuiting of traffic through the neighborhood. o Develop landscaped median strips along Alameda designed to limit turns into the neighborhood at preselected streets. o Develop more bus stops, shelters and pull-out lanes. o Pave all unpaved alleys. o Develop crosswalks at Newlon Elementary, Barnum Elementary, Barnum Recreation Center, Ross Barnum Library, 2nd Avenue and Knox Court, and at the intersection of Weir Gulch and Alameda. INFRASTRUCTURE/SERVICES -RECOMMENDATIONS o Create a neighborhood housing service to focus private and city resources in providing and rehabilitating housing. o Develop a crime prevention program for the neighborhood through the Denver Police Department. o Provide security lighting at Barnum Park, Barnum Recreation Center and along Weir Gulch. o Provide better trash collection, dumpster repair, park maintenance, street and sidewalk repair and traffic signalization. o Pave all unpaved alleys. o Develop Summer youth employment programs. The above information provides the reader a short synopsis of the contents of the plan. For more detailed information, please refer to the appropriate general category or study area. INTRODUCTION In June of 1979, the Denver Planning Office completed a Neighborhood Planning Analysis for the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood. This study had as its primary goal, the documentation of existing conditions within the neighborhood, and the identification of the assets and liabilities contained within the neighborhood area. The purpose of the present neighborhood plan has as its goal, to update and complete the planning process. The plan consists of the establishment of goals for the neighborhood, the discussion of issues important to the residents, the generation of alternative solutions to neighborhood problems, generating concepts to address these problems, establishing neighborhood policies and methods to effectuate the recommendations and policies. NEIGHBORHOOD PLANNING Neighborhood planning is a collaborative process between the City, citizens and property owners of a particular area which actively solicits participation in the formulation of a plan for a neighborhood. The process helps to enunciate goals, places issues on the table, generates and tests alternative ways to achieve the desired ends, proposes a plan for the area, 4 ..,

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and spells out policy changes and investments which should be implemented to help realize that future. It is a forum in which people initiate rather than react to change, and in which the various interest groups within a neighborhood, who may have different goals, work out their differences to arrive at a mutually satisfactory plan. The private-public partnership is essential to the ultimate success of the venture. PLANNING PROCESS The Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood Plan began in November of 1984. For a period of ten months, the residents of the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood have worked diligently to identify neighborhood liabilities, assets and opportunities. The participation of the residents has been the single most important factor in establishing a comprehensive planning framework designed to optimize the neighborhood's ability to guid.e the preservation of its assets and to initiate and direct neighborhood change for the betterment of its residents. The planning process used to accomplish the plan can be divided into five major planning phases. A. IDENTIFICATION OF PARTICIPANTS. A meaningful planning process must begin .with the identification of the participants which will contribute to the content of the overall plan. Newspaper announcements, door-to-door distributions of announcements and telephone contacts were initially used to begin developing interest in the plan. With the assistance of Councilman Sam Sandos, neighborhood associations such as the Concerned Citizens of Barnum, Neighbors of Barnum, the St. Anthony Metropolitan Organization of People and the American Association of Retired Persons were contacted to participate in the process. A directory of individuals attending meetings was kept and became the primary source of contacts within the neighborhood. B. REVIEW OF EXISTING CONDITIONS AND PLANNING DATA. The planning analysis data collected in 1979 was distributed for discussion at public meetings. At these initial series of meetings, the following three major tasks were accomplished: 1. A discussion of anticipated planning tasks. 2. A presentation of the previous planning analysis. 3. A discussion of existing neighborhood concerns. C. COLLECT FACTS/DEVELOP GOALS. Rather than pursuing a reactive planning process which establishes a planning response to incremental problems, the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood planning process utilized a goal setting process. Through a series of 5

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neighborhood planning meetings, problems were identified and prioritized under four major categories: 1. Land Use and Zoning. 2. Community Facilities. 3. Transportation/Circulation. 4. Other Neighborhood Concerns. Within this larger context, it was then more appropriate to ask the question: What does the neighborhood want to achieve? Within this planning framework, the neighborhood participants identified planning sub-areas which exist within the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood and identified their vision of what these areas should be like. D. DEVELOP CONCEPTS With the identification of neighborhood concerns, problems, planning sub-areas and the goals to be achieved, the neighborhood plan then concentrated on the development of planning concepts within neighborhood sub-areas. The basic question being asked at this stage of the plan was: Haw does the neighborhood want to achieve the planning goals? The neighborhood plan then is based on a series of planning sub-areas which face an array of identified problems. The future of each of these sub-areas is than presented through a series of development concepts. E. IMPLEMENTATION. The final element of the neighborhood plan is the presentation of development and policy recommendations both within the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood sub-areas and within the context of the neighborhood as a whole. In addition to identifying planning recommendations, the neighborhood plan seeks to identify resources to accomplish the neighborhood plan. USE OF THE PLAN The neighborhood plan is a planning document for directing and managing change and investment. It serves as an official document for decision makers, including the Denver Planning Office, the Mayor, various city departments, and upon adoption by the City Council, also assists that body's deliberations, including the implementation of the City's capital improvement program. It plays the same role for the private sector, directing residents, businessmen and investors as to expectations for the neighborhood. The plan is not an official zone map and does not imply any implicit rights to a particular zone or to the land uses permitted within. The plan is intended to promote patterns of land use, urban design, circulation and services which encourage and contribute to the economic, social and physical health, safety, welfare of the people who live and work within a particular neighborhood. The neighborhood plan addresses issues and 6 -

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-opportunities at a scale which is more refined and more responsive to needs than can be attained under the broad outlines of the city's Comprehensive Plan. The neighborhood plan serves as a component of that document. BARNUM/BARNUM WEST NEIGHBORHOOD -OVERVIEW The Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood is bounded by Sheridan Boulevard on the West, Federal Boulevard on the East, the West 6th Avenue Freeway to the North, and West Alameda Avenue on the South. The neighborhood encompasses 953 acres of rolling terrain bisected diagonally by Weir Gulch. The majority of the residents can be identified as moderate income families residing in predominately single family homes. The Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood is one of a few naturally integrated neighborhood communities which lies at the perimeter of the City and County of Denver. Major assets of the neighborhood include: o Low density residential character o Good housing stock o Uniform zoning patterns o Good transportation access o Close proximity to regional centers o Good community facilities Major liabilities of the neighborhood include: 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Rapid turnover/instability Selected areas of housing disrepair Low expendable incomes Declining business areas Rezoning of residential property to business use along major arterials Inadequate traffic control Unkept recreational areas Lack of community linkages Need of infrastructure repair EXISTING CONDITIONS The Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood has followed the trend established by some inner city neighborhoods with a loss in population in recent years. Although the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood jointly form a homogenous planning area, historically, Perry Street serves as a boundary line between the Barnum Area and the Barnum West Area. It can be noted that the 953 acres which make up the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood, excluding all streets and alleys, 627 acres comprises the net zoned property. Approximately 76% of the neighborhood is utilized for single family housing, while less than 4% of the land is used as multi family. These numbers should be compared to the actual property zoned as single family which is less than 56% of the net acreage and approximately 32% which is zoned as multi-family housing. This shows that 7

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although multi-family zoning exists, the market trend remains to be single family residential units. Approximately 6% of the neighborhood is zoned for business, while less than 3% of the net property within the neighborhood is used for business purposes. The housing stock within the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood is in generally good condition taking into consideration the average age of structures which exceeds 40 years. There are 11 vacant residential sites located in the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood which would support approximately 54 new housing units. (Reference: District 3 Infill Housing Study) Commercial business strips occur along the western, southern and eastern edges of the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood, with an additional neighborhood business zone occurring along 1st A venue. Sheridan Boulevard which defines the western edge of the Barnum/Barnum West neighborhood contains three business strips. The first business area begins at West Alameda and ends at Bayaud Avenue. This B-1 and B-3 area contains a small shoppette, residential units and office space. The second business strip begins at West Ellsworth, crosses West 1st Avenue and ends at West 2nd Avenue. This strip contains an auto repair shop, neighborhood businesses, a restaurant, a business college and a light industrial sales office. The third business strip begins four lots south of West 5th Avenue and ends at West 6th Avenue. This area contains residential, an abandoned gas station and an office building. West Alameda Avenue forms the southern boundary of the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood. The majority of Alameda on the Barnum/Barnum West side is zoned R-1 and R-2. Two business zones are exceptions. One zone occurs between Sheridan Boulevard and South Zenobia Street. This area contains a small shoppette consisting of nine businesses which can be categorized as neighborhood businesses. The remaining B-4 zone begins midway between King Street and Knox Court and continues to Federal Boulevard. Within the seventeen businesses contained in this B-4 zone, only three could be considered local business, the remainder would be considered as marketing to a regional clientele. The eastern edge of the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood is defined by Federal Boulevard. This edge is zoned B-4 from Alameda to 5th Avenue adjacent to Barnum Park. The majority of these businesses have regional rather than neighborhood markets. A major neighborhood business zone exists close to the center of the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood. This is a B-2 neighborhood business zone that runs along West 1st Avenue beginning at the centerline of the alley west of Meade Street and continuing to the centerline of the alley to the east of Knox Court. Out of the eighteen businesses, approximately half can be considered neighborhood oriented, with four businesses related to automotive uses. 8

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HISTORY The majority of the area was annexed to the City in September, 1896. Boundaries of what might be termed 'Old Barnum' were Lakewood Gulch, Alameda Avenue, the Platte River and Tennyson Street. The neighborhoods of Barnum, Barnum West, Villa Park and Valverde generally make up the Old Barnum. The remainder of the neighborhood of Barnum West became a part of Denver under the Session Laws of Colorado in 1901. The construction of West 6th Avenue freeway in the 1950's physically separated Villa Park from the rest of Old Barnum. Federal Boulevard further divided Valverde from the other areas. Prior to annexation, the first claim for land in the district was granted to Daniel Witter in 1865. After several transfers of ownership, P. T. Barnum of the Barnum and Bailey Circus became interested in the area as a winter location for his show between performing seasons. In 1882, Barnum purchased 760 acres and platted the first subdivision. However, before any major development occurred the property underwent additional transfers of ownership. Not until after the turn of the century was the land again subdivided. Winding driveways were laid out on practical lines, evidently to attract the middle class. These are no longer evident in Barnum, but can still be seen in the Valverde neighborhood. Churches have played a leading role in the history of the neighborhoods. Barnum's first house of worship was a small Dunkard church on Irving, just south of Ninth Avenue. When its mission was finished, it moved farther up the hill and became a dwelling. Several buildings that were built in the late 1800's are still standing today and can be seen mostly in the Barnum neighborhoods. A community building was built at 6th and Knox Court, with a jail underneath and firehouse in this building. The store building at 1st and Hooker was built in the 1890's. The store and post office adjoined the building that was used for a dance hall. In 1892, the "Greenhouses" which were located at Ellsworth and Lowell were built and served the community until 1978 when they were closed down and demolished in 1982. The Bowman House was built in 1910, and still stands today on the hill at King Street and 4th Avenue. Mr. Bowman was an architect and designed East High School, Masonic Temples and the Cosmopolitan Hotel. He lost his fortune in 1929, and the house was used until 1966 as a nursing home. It was acquired as a home for troubled boys, and is still used today for that purpose. Many of the streets in the Barnum Subdivision were originally named after famous people by P. T. Barnum. Emerson was 1st Avenue, Beeler was 2nd Avenue, Holmes was Ellsworth, and Jumbo was Hazel Court. 9

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7 BARNUM/BARNUM WEST NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Until the 1950's, neighborhood areas located within the City and County of Denver relied heavily on the Denver Central Business District for much of its services. This relationship existed primarily because the Central Business District was the only area where certain types of activities would logically choose to locate. With an accelerated reliance on automobile transportation and telephone communication and the widespread suburbanization of the population, people are now able to live, shop, work, or do business in scattered and diverse locations. These demographic changes have mandated business establishments to seek locations outside of the Central Business District. The revolution in communication and transportation has allowed a greater degree of flexibility in the choice of neighborhoods to live in. While residential neighborhoods no longer enjoy an exclusive locational status, they can and do compete for status based on an array of criteria including proximity to regional activities, recreational provisions, accessibility and neighborhood identity. For these reasons, it has become necessary for individual neighborhoods to take stock in themselves. Planned growth and the maintenance of their assets allow neighborhoods to integrate their plans and their aspirations into the entire scheme of the Denver metropolitan area. This document will discuss neighborhood concerns within the confines of four major areas basic to the integrity of the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood. The plan is organized to present the problems/issues, objectives/goals and policies/recommendations associated with: 1. Land Use and Zoning. 2. Community Facilities. 3. Transportation/Circulation. 4. Intrastructure/Services. These four categories will be addressed within the larger perspective of the total neighborhood as well as within the context of sub-areas located within the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood. The sub-areas contained within this plan consist of the following study areas: 0 Alameda Study Area 0 Weir Gulch Study Area 0 First Avenue Study Area 0 Sheridan Boulevard Study Area 0 Sixth Avenue Study Area 0 Federal Study Area 10 -

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.. OVERALL NEIGHBORHOOD APPROACH LAND USE AND ZONING The planning process, in part, rests upon the understanding of how the current neighborhood land is utilized relative to the intended use of the property under current zoning regulations. The majority of the neighborhood is zoned residential with single family R-1 zones in the northwest and southwest quadrants, and multi-family R-2 zones in the northeast and southeast quadrants. Business zones are located along Sheridan Boulevard (at 6th Avenue, 1st Avenue and Alameda), Alameda Avenue (at Sheridan Boulevard and at the eastern edge), Federal Boulevard (from 6th Avenue to Alameda) and along 1st Avenue (between Meade Street and Knox Court). Barnum Park, located in the northeast corner of the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood is zoned 0-1 (open space) and contains 39 acres of recreational use including an eight-acre lake. Weir Gulch, which serves as a combination recreation/flood control device, bisects the neighborhood along a northeast/southwest diagonal and exists in both R-1 and R-2 zones. PROBLEMS/ISSUES Through a series of meetings, a refined list of issues within the category of Land Use and Zoning was compiled. The issues are as follows: o Inappropriate businesses located in the neighborhood. o Non-conforming uses within the neighborhood. o Poor location of commercial development. o Absentee land owners. o Inappropriate zoning in residential areas and along arterials. o Need for maintenance of low density housing. o Need for better building code enforcement. o Deteriorating condition of housing. o Declining business areas. o Lack of new housing. o High housing turnover/neighborhood instability. OBJECTIVES/GOALS Although the zoning pattern contained within the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood is uniform in character, it should be noted that a substantial number of non-conforming uses exist within residentially zoned property. A series of neighborhood meetings dealt with the formulation of neighborhood goals and objectives. As a whole, the following is a list of identified neighborhood goals which are related to Land Use and Zoning. Goals: What does the neighborhood want to achieve? 11

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1. It is a goal of the neighborhood to increase the number of appropriate neighborhood businesses located in the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood. Appropriate businesses would be those businesses which would provide residents with the availability of goods and services which are a necessity or an obvious convenience to residents. It would be desirous to gradually eliminate business which contribute to a negative environment within the neighborhood, such as adult theaters, adult bookstores, bars, liquor stores, automotive repair facilities and equipment storage areas, etc. 2. It is the goal of the neighborhood to encourage commercial development within existing business zones located in the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood. The use of the P.U.D. process should not be used indiscriminately, and should only be considered when a clear benefit to the neighborhood has been demonstrated to the residents' satisfaction. 3. It is a goal of the neighborhood to encourage the appropriate land uses within designated zones. It is desirous that legal non-conforming uses which presently exist should eventually revert to the appropriate zoning which surrounds the use in question. All exceptions may be allowed to exist only with the consent of the residents and should be reviewed on a case by case basis. 4. It is the goal of the neighborhood to stabilize, or upgrade where necessary, the present housing stock. Absentee landowners shall be held accountable for any infractions of the building code or city regulations applicable to the upkeep of property. It is a goal to encourage an increase in owner-occupied housing within the neighborhood. 5. It is the goal of the neighborhood to maintain, upgrade and promote existing business zones contained in the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood. 6. It is a goal of the neighborhood to discourage the rezoning of property which does not offer a clear advantage to the neighborhood. Land use within the neighborhood should follow existing zoning. Additionally, it shall be a goal to discourage the rezoning of residential property for the purpose of developing business uses. 7. It is the goal of the neighborhood to maintain its present low density residential character. 8. It is a goal to maintain or upgrade the quality of low density residential property within the neighborhood. 9. It is a goal of the neighborhood to encourage the construction of new low density housing within the neighborhood. 10. It is the goal of the neighborhood to provide a stable neighborhood setting through the maintenance and provision of neighborhood amenities. 12 -

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11. It shall be a goal to encourage the appropriate responsible city officials to enforce city regulations which promote a high standard of safety and appearance for the neighborhood. POLICIES/RECOMMENDATIONS o It is a recommendation that property zoned R-1 located along the eastern edge of Sheridan Boulevard between Alameda and 6th Avenue should only be developed subject to the provision of adequate front and rear setbacks and associated landscaping acting as buffer zones both from Sheridan Boulevard and the adjacent residential units located to the east. o It is a recommendation to maintain residential zoning along West Alameda. o It is a recommendation to rezone the area along Alameda from Knox Court to Grove Street from a city-wide business zone (B-4) to a neighborhood business zone (B-2). The new developments within neighborhood business zones (B-2) should be developed with ample front and rear setbacks and landscaping. The use of parking zones (P-1) should not be allowed to be placed into existing residential zones. o Along West 1st Avenue, it is a recommendation to confine business uses within existing B-2 zones and to maintain the existing residential zoning on the remainder of the street. o It is a recommendation that the business zone located along West 1st Avenue between South Newton and South Julian be rejuvenated as the neighborhood's primary shopping area. o It is a recommendation that residential uses occurring in business zones located along Federal Boulevard be developed into business uses prior to the conversion of residential zones into business zones within the neighborhood. The development of these sites should require adequate front and rear setbacks and landscaping. The use of parking zones (P-1) should not be allowed to be placed into existing residential zones. o It is a recommendation that the 6th Avenue Frontage Road should be widened, properly signed and landscaped. o It is a recommendation to maintain major R-1 and R-2 area designations as presently exists in the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood. Existing building codes should be enforced to prevent the illegal conversions of single family units into multi-family units. o It is a recommendation to develop owner-occupied infill housing as presented in the District 3 Infill Housing Study. 13

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OVERALL NEIGHBORHOOD APPROACH COMMUNITY FACILITIES The Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood is fortunate to have the 39-acre Barnum Park, including an eight-acre lake, and the 25-acre Weir Gulch which stretches diagonally across the entire neighborhood. Although the quantity of available park land in the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood is high, the neighborhood plan must address the maintenance and development of existing areas. PROBLEMS/ISSUES Through a series of neighborhood meetings, a refined list of issues within the category of community facilities was compiled. The issues are as follows: o The development of Alameda as a landscaped roadway. o Poor condition of Weir Gulch. o Lack of children-oriented play areas. o Poor park security/lighting. o Poor maintenance of parks. o Poor management of existing facilities. o Need for the development of bus shelters and a cover for the swimming pool located in Barnum Park. OBJECTIVES/GOALS A series of neighborhood meetings dealt specifically with the formulation of neighborhood goals and objectives. As a whole, the following are overall neighborhood goals which are related to Community Facilities. o It is the goal of the neighborhood to encourage the development of Alameda from Knox Court to Sheridan Boulevard in such a manner as to provide edge landscaping, a landscaped median strip, curb and gutter, and a pedestrian walkway. The design of Alameda Avenue should also accommodate the park linkage of Weir Gulch across Alameda Avenue both at grade and via the pedestrian/bicycle underpass. o It is the goal of the neighborhood to complete the development of Weir Gulch as a major unique park linkage from Barnum Park through the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood and into adjacent neighborhoods. o It is a goal of the neighborhood to develop more children-oriented play areas within the neighborhood. o It is a goal of the neighborhood to provide and to maintain security for its community facilities system. It is a goal of the neighborhood to provide adequate security lighting at the Barnum Park, along 1st Avenue, and within the entire length of Weir Gulch. 14 ..

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.. l j o It is the goal of the neighborhood to maintain the upkeep and appearance of the neighborhood park system. o It is a goal of the neighborhood to encourage the use of community services and to manage and promote year-around events within the neighborhood. o It is a goal of the neighborhood to provide additional community facilities as demand within the neighborhood requires. POLICIES/RECOMMENDATIONS o It is a recommendation that Alameda, from Federal Boulevard to Sheridan, should be developed completely to provide the following amenities: Curb and gutters. Sidewalks/bikeways. Perimeter landscaping. Median landscaping. Signalized and striped crosswalks. New bus stops and pull-out lanes. Additional right-of-way should be purchased to create larger landscaped perimeter buffer areas than what is possible utilizing the existing right-of-way. Negotiations with adjacent landowners to jointly develop landscaping improvements should be explored. Irrigation of the landscaping should be installed in order to insure the best health and appearance of the plantings and grass. o It is a recommendation to complete the development of Weir Gulch from Alameda to Barnum Park. o It is a recommendation to develop joint use play areas between the Denver Public School System, the Community, and the City and County of Denver at Newlon Elementary School and Barnum Elementary School. o It is a recommendation to develop and maintain the entire Weir Gulch from Alameda to Barnum Park. Additional recommendations occur within the six zones along Weir Gulch as follows: ZONE 1 WEIR GULCH o It is a recommendation that a major bike/pedestrian crossing be developed both at grade with Alameda and under Alameda. The at-grade crossing shall be signalized and shall be uniquely visible to automobile traffic through the use of special surface treatment such as a stamped concrete brick pattern, special landscaping and highly visible graphics. 15

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o It is a recommendation that Zone 1 should be irrigated and maintained as a highly manicured park setting. Maintenance should be kept at a high level, as it is the most visible position of the gulch with the neighborhood. The children's play areas located within Weir Gulch should be maintained as a high priority item. ZONE 2 WEIR GULCH o It is a recommendation to develop and irrigate select areas within Zone 2. These level select areas lend themselves to group activities such as basketball and soccer for older children, or play areas for younger children. Maintenance and upkeep in Zone 2 is moderate at best and must be improved. ZONE 3 WEIR GULCH o It is a recommendation to cover all open concrete culverts which channelize Weir Gulch. This would then remove a major physical barrier which presently exists. The resulting pedestrian/bikeway linkage would offer many opportunities for a variety of landscaping treatments. Zone 3 should be developed into a more visible gateway element as it crosses 1st Avenue. ZONE 4 WEIR GULCH o It is a recommendation that Zone 4 be irrigated and landscaped into a major pedestrian/bikeway strip with the integration of children's play areas and team sport treatments. The area is presently poorly maintained and deserves a higher priority than it presently receives. It is also desirous to link Zone 4 to the 1st A venue business area via graphics and landscaping treatment. Opportunities to open vistas to 1st Avenue exist. There is a long range possibility of extending the 1st Avenue B-2 Zone at a select location to the Weir Gulch parkway. ZONE 5 WEIR GULCH o It is a recommendation to develop the 2nd Avenue dirt streets within Zone 5 into an extension of Zone 4. This area should be irrigated and landscaped. As Zone 5 meets Knox Court, crosswalks and directional graphics should serve to make the transition of Weir Gulch across Knox Court and into Zone 6. The presence of Weir Gulch at Knox Court must be through the design of a major gateway into the park system. 16

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] ZONE 6 WEIR GULCH o It is a recommendation that a stronger linkage be designed into the junction of Zone 6 and Barnum Park and that a crosswalk linkage be established at this point. OVERALL NEIGHBORHOOD APPROACH TRANSPORTATION/CIRCULATION A circulation system performs several functions: o It provides access to individual properties. o It accom mods tes many through trips. o It provides the varying kinds and degrees of movement and accessibility required by different activity groups and thereby influences their distribution. o Through the size and configuration of spaces devoted to rights-of-ways, it provides light, air and a setting for structures on abutting properties. o It can be employed to identify or emphasize areas of importance and help people orient themselves to their neighborhood. The Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood is served by a circulation system comprised of local streets, collector streets, arterial streets, freeways, streetside sidewalks, pedestrian pathways, bikeways and a system bus routes. PROBLEMS/ISSUES Through a series of neighborhood meetings, a refined list of issues within the category of Transportation/Circulation was compiled. The issues presented are as follows: o Unwanted cross traffic through the neighborhood. o Incomplete pedestrian/bike linkages. o Inadequate signalization within the neighborhood. o Inadequate bus facilities. o Lack of school crossings. o Lack of sidewalks, curbs and gutters. o Unpaved alleys. o Lack of pedestrian crosswalks. o High speed traffic. OBJECTIVES/GOALS A series of neighborhood meetings dealt specifically with the formulation of neighborhood goals and objectives. As a whole, the following are overall neighborbood goals which are related to Transportation/Circulation issues. 17

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o It is a neighborhood goal to discourage the routing of commuter traffic onto local streets as a means of avoiding congestion along collector and arterial traffic ways. o It is a goal of the neighborhood to develop completely, pedestrian linkages within the neighborhood as a means of accessing all the amenities of the neighborhood. These linkages should also extend into adjacent neighborhoods in order to develop neighborhood-wide accessibility to City amenities. o It is the goal of the neighborhood to provide a well-thought out and comprehensive system of traffic signage in order to establish understandable set of commands which will promote safety for both the pedestrian and vehicle movements within the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood. o It is a goal of the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood to offer its residents the availability of high quality public transportation, including the convenient location of support facilities. o It is a goal of the neighborhood to route traffic through and around the neighborhood onto appropriately designed streets. o It is the goal of the neighborhood to develop highly visible and safe crosswalks located at all schools, community facftities and major traffic ways. o It is the goal of the neighborhood to develop a well-maintained neighborhood roadway system, including service alleys. POLICIES/RECOMMENDATIONS o It is a recommendation that the 6th Avenue Frontage Road should have located along its length a series of stop signs in order to discourage its use as a high speed alternative to a congested 6th Avenue. o It is a recommendation that a greater degree of landscaping treatment should occur along the 6th Avenue Freeway in order to create and reinforce a positive image of adjacent neighborhoods. o It is a recommendation that the City Traffic Department should take measures to relieve traffic congestion at the intersection of Alameda and Federal, and Alameda and Sheridan. o It is a recommendation that the speed limit should be reduced along Alameda from Sheridan to Knox Court and that the 30 m.p.h. speed limit be enforced along 1st Avenue from Sheridan to Federal. o It isa recommendation that 4 way stops be placed in the southwest quadrant and the southeast quadrant of the Barnum/Barnum West 18

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-Neighborhood to discourage short circuiting through the neighborhood from Alameda to Sheridan and from Federal to Alameda. o It is a recommendation that landscaped median strips should occur in the new design of Alameda and that by design, only preselected lefthand turns into the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood will occur from eastbound traffic along Alameda. o It is a recommendation to develop bus shelters adjacent to exclusive bus turn-in lanes at major pedestrian/automobile interfaces, such as the intersection of Weir Gulch and Alameda Avenue. o It is a recommendation to pave all unpaved alleys within the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood. o It is a recommendation to develop highly visible crosswalks at Newlon Elementary School, at Barnum Elementary School, at the Barnum Recreation Center, at the Ross Barnum Library, 2nd Avenue and Knox Court, and at the intersection of Weir Gulch and Alameda. OVERALL NEIGHBORHOOD APPROACH INFRASTRUCTURE/SERVICES PROBLEMS/ISSUES Through a series of neighborhood meetings, a refined list of issues within the category of Infrastructure/Services was compiled. The issues presented are as follows: o Poor condition of housing and properties. o Fear of crime. o Lack of City services: Trash pick up. Park maintenance. Street repair and cleaning. o Pavement of alleys. o Inadequate storm drainage. o Lack of youth activities and employment. o Stray dogs. o Repair of sidewalks. o Mid-block lighting. OBJECTIVES/GOALS The following are overall neighborhood goals which are related to Infrastructure/Service issues. 19

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o It is the goal of the neighborhood to upgrade the appearance of residential structures and properties located in the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood. o It is a goal of the neighborhood to provide more lighting in Barnum Park along 1st Avenue and along the entire length of Weir Gulch. o It is a goal of the neighborhood to develop housing assistance programs to help finance residential improvements and to provide financial assistance necessary to promote more owner-occupied housing within the neighborhood. o It is the goal of the neighborhood to offer affordable housing located within the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood. It should be noted that the Barnum/Barnum West area has developed more than its fair share of low-income subsidized housing and that the neighborhood should not be asked to absorb more of this housing type. o It is the goal of the neighborhood to promote the safe use of neighborhood streets, parks and public facilities without fear of crime or injury. o It is the goal of the neighborhood to insure that the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood receives the full services offered by Public Agencies. These include: Trash pick-up. Park maintenance. Street repair. Sidewalk repair. Code enforcement. Bus service. Traffic control. Flood control. Animal control. Adequate street and park lighting. o It is the goal of the neighborhood to complete the paving of all streets and alleys in the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood. o It is the goal of the neighborhood to insure that the street systems within the neighborhood have been designed to properly drain storm runoff. o It is the goal of the neighborhood to provide neighborhood services designed to involve and utilize the resources of young adults located in the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood. 20 -

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POLICIES/RECOMMENDATIONS o It is a recommendation that a neighborhood Housing service be located in the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood in order to focus private and city resources on the problem of providing and rehabilitating housing. This service could provide the following: Seek sources of housing funds for infill and rehabilitation. Develop incentives with the City to promote housing. Remove City impediments to housing. Develop rehabilitative and emergency home repair programs. Establish rental rehabilitative programs. Establish a code enforcement program. Market the area. Develop bond programs to enable renters to buy. Provide assistance to non-profit corporations. Prepare guidelines for housing. o It is a recommendation to upgrade the appearance of 1st Avenue from Sheridan to Federal through the use of landscaping, specifically the planting of trees in landscaping strips located between the sidewalks and the street curbs. o It is a recommendation to establish a neighborhood watch program in the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood with bi-monthly meetings with the police department to review crime statistics in the neighborhood, to develop crime prevention techniques and to address problem areas with the neighborhood. o It is a recommendation to provide additional security lighting along the perimeter and within Barnum Park, at the Barnum Recreation Center and along Weir Gulch, especially in Zone 2 and in Zone 6. o It is a recommendation that the City and County of Denver should implement a total assessment of City services and present to the neighborhood the following studies: 1. Trash Collect ion. The City should provide more dumpsters per block to conform to the standard of one dumpster per four households. Additionally, the existing dumpsters should be better maintained and cleaned more often. 2. Park Maintenance. The City Parks and Recreation Department and the Urban Drainage and Flood Control District should develop a regular schedule for the removal of debris and mowing of the grass within the Weir Gulch Park. This schedule should call for the mowing of lawn areas three times per year and trash removal at least every two months. 3. Street/Sidewalk Repair. The Public Works Department contains a Sidewalk Inspection Section and the Street Repair Section. The 21

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entire neighborhood has already been surveyed by the City in order to locate curb and gutter problems, broken sidewalks and streets in disrepair. The City should complete the work outlined under this survey. The City should also observe the present street drainage during a period of high runoff in order to document less than desirable drainage conditions within the neighborhood. The five-year drainage plan undertaken by the Wastewater Department should be implemented. 4. Traffic Engineering. The Traffic Operations Section of the Public Works Department should do a complete traffic analysis of the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood with traffic counts and the location of all traffic signalization, including stop signs and crosswalks. This study should be presented and reviewed with the neighborhood with recommended changes. The City Traffic Department should make recommendations designed to downgrade Bayaud Avenue and Irving Street from collector streets to local streets. o It is a recommendation that all unpaved alleys in the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood be paved. In the interim, existing dirt alleys should be graded fiat to prevent unnecessary drainage onto adjacent properties. o It is a recommendation to employ young adults from within the neighborhood during Summer months to maintain the existing park system located in the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood. 22

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SPECIAL STUDY AREAS SHERIDAN BOULEVARD STUDY AREA Sheridan Boulevard maintains its position as a major arterial and has been developed as a strip commercial along the Lakewood edge. Due to the intensity of its use, the residential properties which exist on the Barnum/Barnum West portion of Sheridan Boulevard are currently experiencing pressure to become business zones. The majority of the existing business are B-1 and B-2 zones. Neighborhood groups interested in the development of residential property along Sheridan Boulevard are concerned with the lack of landscaping and setbacks at existing developments within B-1 and B-2 zones. It is a recommendation that property zoned R-1 located along the eastern edge of Sheridan Boulevard between Alameda and 6th A venue should only be developed subject to adequate front and rear setbacks and associated landscaping acting as buffer zones both from Sheridan Boulevard and the adjacent residential units located to the east. Parking for any development shall meet the requirements of the B-1 or B-2 zone accordingly with no overflow P-1 zones to be allowed to exist with residential areas. WEST ALAMEDA AVENUE STUDY AREA West Alameda Avenue functions as a major arterial. A B-3 business zone exists on the corner of Sheridan and Alameda, while a B-4 zone exists along West Alameda Avenue from Knox Court to Federal Boulevard. The remainder of Alameda within the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood is zoned R-1 or R-2. Much of the land located along Alameda from South Vrain Street to South Meade Street has been developed by churches or remains vacant land. A similar pattern is occurring along the Westwood edge of West Alameda Avenue. It shall be the recommendation to maintain the residential zoning along West Alameda Avenue and to selectively review any proposed developments which might be advantageous to neighborhood interests through the Planned Unit Development approach. The P.U.D. process should not be used to upzone or increase density. This approach gives both City agencies and neighborhood residents considerable involvement in determining the characteristics of the development and provides maximum assurance that what is proposed will be developed as such. The General Business District (B-4) Zone which dominates West Alameda east of Federal to 1-25, penetrates into the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood from Federal Boulevard to Knox Court. This pattern then turns into the Westwood Neighborhood via Morrison Road. The inundation into the residential neighborhood is compounded by the use of P-1 (Off Street Parking Districts) and B-1 (Limited Office District) zones. Along Hooker Street, this condition falls two lots short of hitting West Cedar Avenue. On the northern edge of Alameda, this area includes such businesses as an adult movie house, two auto repair shops, a thrift store and a Goodwill store. The southern edge of 23

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Alameda within this area contains such businesses as an adult book store, two vacant commercial buildings and two auto accessory stores. It is a recommendation to encourage more businesses which provide commodities and personal services which satisfy the needs of the residents surrounding this business zone. This plan would recommend the rezoning of the area from Knox Court to Grove Street from a B-4 zone to a B-2 zone. Through this selective down zoning, a greater linkage between the Westwood Neighborhood and Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood could be reached. WEST 1ST AVENUE STUDY AREA (IMPROVE R.O.W.) West 1st Avenue is a collector street and contains business zones at the extreme western edge and eastern edge of the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood. Additionally, a neighborhood business district exists between South Newton Street and South Julian Street. The remainder of West 1st Avenue is zoned R-1 or R-2 (Residential). There has been some influence from the B-2 zone located at the 1st Avenue/Sheridan corner as it stretches to Young Court. Approximately six non-residential uses are located within R-1 and R-2 zones. It is a recommendation to confine business uses to areas along West 1st Avenue which are already zoned B-2. A further recommendation is to encourage non-conforming businesses to revert to their original zoned use. It is a recommendation that the business zone located along West 1st Avenue between South Newton Street and South Julian Street be reinforced as a viable neighborhood business district. Recent economic events has contributed to a demise of this district in general, therefore, a special effort by the City and the neighborhood as well as business community should attempt to strengthen its existence as a pivotal business hub within the community. The appearance of 1st Avenue from Sheridan to Federal should be upgraded through the use of streetscaping. FEDERAL BOULEVARD STUDY AREA Federal Boulevard is a major arterial street and is currently zoned as a General Business District (B-4). A general assumption has been that the businesses located along Federal Boulevard have very little spillover effect into the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood. There is, however, some concern that off street parking and ancillary uses of residential sites adjacent to the B-4 zones occur. There are also a number of residential properties located along Federal Boulevard that could be utilized as business sites. It is the recommendation of the Neighborhood Plan to maximize the B-4 potential along Federal Boulevard in order to satisfy the demand for business location within the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood without jeopardizing the use of residentially zoned property. Further, it is the recommendation to preserve the residential integrity of residentially zoned property which abut business zones. 24 -

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WEST 6TH AVENUE STUDY AREA West 6th Avenue is a freeway which forms the northern boundary of the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood. The majority of the property located to the south is zoned R-1 up through King Street where there is a half block B-2 zone. The remainder of the property from Julian Street to Federal Boulevard consists of Barnum Park which is zoned 0-1 (Open Use District). It is the objective of this Neighborhood Plan to maintain the residential integrity of the areas south of the West 6th Avenue Freeway. The neighborhood plan recommends that the 6th Avenue Frontage Road should be widened, properly signed and landscaped. WEIR GULCH STUDY AREA Although Weir Gulch provides a continuous pedestrian spine through the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood, the length of Weir Gulch has been maintained in various degrees. For discussion purposes, the Weir Gulch has been presented in six zones. The first zone begins at the intersection of West Alameda and South Weir Drive. Zone 1 runs parallel to South Weir Drive and ends at West Bayaud Avenue. Zone 2 begins at the intersection of West Bayaud Avenue and South Utica and ends at the intersection of West 1st Avenue and South Quitman Street. Zone 3 begins at the intersection of 1st Avenue and South Quitman and ends at the intersection of Osceola and 2nd A venue. Zone 4 begins at the intersection of Osceola and 2nd Avenue and ends at the intersection of South Lowell Street and West 2nd Avenue. Zone 5 begins at the intersection of West 2nd Avenue and South Lowell and ends at the intersection of West 3rd Avenue and South Julian Street. Zone 6 begins at the intersection of West 3rd Avenue and South Julian Street and ends at the intersection of South Hooker Street and West 3rd Avenue. Zone 1. Zone 1 is the most visible portion of Weir Gulch both from the surrounding residential areas and from West Alameda Avenue. Zone 1 is the only portion of Weir Gulch located in the Barnum/Barnum West Neighborhood which is separated from residential units by local streets. The majority of Zone 1 is 100 feet wide or less with the widest area (375 feet) existing at West Alameda Avenue. Zone 1 contains relatively steep slopes adjacent to West Alameda Avenue which begin to level out as it approaches West Bayaud A venue. Zone 1 contains a series of children's play areas and a well-maintained bicycle/pedestrian path. Zone 2. Zone 2 represents a portion of Weir Gulch which has as its outer boundaries, residential property. This zone is characterized by relatively steep embankments which culminate at a small channel to the west of the bikeway/pathway. At least three areas should be considered in future detailed design studies as representing possible recreational facilities lending themselves to team sport activities. Zone 2 is landscaped fairly well but requires more maintenance than it is presently afforded, while areas difficult to access are left unattended. The lack of an irrigation system makes it difficult to maintain a uniform landscaped appearance. This area affords a pleasant walking environment during the day, yet it is a fairly 25

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intimidating area to walk at night. The initiation of a lighted walkway would help alleviate the lack of visual monitoring by residential units out of range of the bikeway/pathway. Zone 3. Zone 3 is an area where residential property suffers the greatest impact by the presence of Weir Gulch as a flood control/drainage device. Throughout Zone 3, the channel flow associated with Weir Gulch is enclosed in an open concrete channel surrounded by chain link fence. The concrete walls have become a source of graffitti for the neighborhood youth and encourage the use of the concrete culvert as a dangerous playground. Although sidewalks are located adjacent to the concrete culvert, the effectiveness of Weir Gulch as a major pedestrian linkage through the Barnum Neighborhood and into Barnum Park has been diminished considerably by the existing configuration of Zone 3. A preferential treatment of Weir Gulch as it moves into, through and out of Zone 3 is the enclosure of the concrete culvert. This would eliminate the need for the chain link fence, it would eliminate the use of the concrete culvert as a play area and would remove the unsightly graffitti from the culvert walls. The resulting covered culvert would also remove the clutter of individual fences which abruptly end at the edge of the present sidewalk location. A generous bikeway/walkway could be selectively landscaped to strengthen this important neighborhood linkage. Zone 4. Zone 4 is an example of a covered concrete culvert system which runs through a residential area. Zone 4 is characterized by a wide strip of level open space adjacent to residential units. Trees and shrubs occur mostly at the edges of Zone 4 with the use of marginal grass planted throughout the remainder of the area. The lack of irrigation makes this area difficult to maintain as a well-kept parkway. This zone lends itself to the development of areas dedicated to team sports or the development of a meaningful landscaped and lighted pedestrian parkway highlighted with seating areas or children's play areas. NOTE: Zone 4 could be linked to the neighborhood business area located at 1st Avenue. Zone 5. Zone 5 represents a major break in the bikeway/pathway parkway linkage. All hints of a bikeway/pathway system end as South Lowell Boulevard is crossed. The area typically dedicated as the bikeway/pathway system is abandoned up through South Knox Court and is replaced by two blocks of unimproved dirt roadways. As the intersection of 2nd Avenue and South Knox Court is approached, it becomes apparent that the bikeway/pathway linkage to Barnum Park has been lost. Only by crossing South Knox Court and traveling northward can one reestablish a weak remnant of the parkway again. Zone 5 should be abandoned as a traveled roadway and developed into a landscaped linkage between Zone 4 and Zone 6, thereby continuing the necessary linkage to Barnum Park. A strong linkage across South Knox Court should be developed to maintain the continuity of the entire Weir parkway. NOTE: Zone 5 could be linked to the neighborhood business area. Zone 6. Zone 6 has characteristics similar to Zone 2. Zone 6 has relatively steep embankments with fairly well maintained grassed areas, trees and shrubs. The lack of irrigation makes it difficult to establish a uniform level of care within Zone 6. Within Zone 6, the area bounded by South Knox and South Julian requires the most work. This area should be landscaped and 26

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.. maintained to a greater degree which exists presently. A clear linkage between Zone 5 and Zone 6 must be made apparent if the Weir parkway is to be continuous. 27

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