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Alameda station area plan

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Alameda station area plan
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Community Planning and Development, City and County of Denver
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Denver, CO
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City and County of Denver
Publication Date:
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English

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Auraria Library
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Table of Contents
Acknowledgements V
Introduction 1
Vision 7
Land Use and Urban Design 11
Mobility 19
Infrastructure 27
Economic Opportunity 33
Implementation 37
The Community 43
Relevant Plans
51


IV


Alameda Station Area Plan Acknowledgements
v


Alameda Station Area Plan Acknowledgements
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
Mayor John W Hickenlooper
Denver City Council
District 1 Rick Garcia
District 2 Jeanne Faatz
District 3 Paul D. Lopez
District 4 Peggy Lehmann
District 5 Marcia Johnson
District 6 Charlie Brown
District 7 Chris Nevitt
District 8 Carla Madison
District 9 Judy Montero
District 10 Jeanne Robb President
District 11 Michael Hancock
At-Large Carol Boigon
At-Large Doug Linkhart
Community Planning & Development
Peter J. Park, AICP, Manager
Steve Gordon, Comprehensive Planning Manager
Caryn Wenzara, AICP, Principal City Planner,
Project Manager
Eric McClelland
Carolyne Janssen
Jim Ottenstein
Denver Planning Board
Brad Buchanan, Chairman
Laura E. Aldrete
Richard Delanoy
William H. Hornby
Anna Jones
Judith Martinez
Sharon Nunnally
Bruce ODonnell
Karen Perez
Jeffrey Walker
Dave Webster
Parks & Recreation
Kevin Patterson, Manager
Gordon Robertson
Devon Buckels
Other Agencies
Regional Transportation District
Denver Urban Renewal Authority
Consultant Team
Crandall Arambula Land Use & Urban Design
Fehr and Peers Mobility
Hartwig and Associates Infrastructure
Basile Bauman Probst Market
Public Works
Guillerme Vidal, Manager
Robert Kochaver
Crissy Fanganello
Office of Economic Development
Andre Pettigrew, Executive Director
Cec Ortiz, Deputy Director
Will Kralovec, TOD Specialist
Michael Meira
Richard Warren
Special Thanks to Community Stakeholders
Councilman Chris Nevitt, District 7
Patrick Ayres Athmar Park Neighborhood Association
Steve Harley Baker Historic Neighborhood Association
Doug Pimple Baker Historic Neighborhood Association
Charlie Busch, West Washington Park Neighborhood Association
Jim Jones, West Washington park Neighborhood Association
Gertie Grant, West Washington Park Neighborhood Association
Tony Gengaro, Metropolitan Denver Local Development Corporation
Ken Schmidt, Property Owner
Tom Wooten, Property Owner
Jo Frank, Property Owner
Jim Frank, Property Owner
Warren Cohen, Property Owner
Approved by Planning Board: March 18, 2009
Adopted by City Council:
VI


Alameda Station Area Plan Introduction
1


Alameda Station Area Plan Introduction
Introduction
The planning, design, construction and opening of the
expanded FasTracks transit corridors are a source of pride and
excitement for neighborhoods and businesses in Denver. Op-
portunities for changes to land use, design and mobility exist
at each new station in Denver.
The Alameda Station Plan provides a sound policy basis for
citywide decision-making and guiding positive changes to the
built environment. This document outlines the key compo-
nents of the planning process, establishes a foundation of
essential objectives and provides strategies on how to realize
the vision.
Plan Process
Over a course of approximately eighteen months, com-
munity members worked together with city staff and the
planning team to articulate opportunities, develop a vision
and craft strategies to achieve the vision. With the strong
foundation of Denvers adopted plans, stakeholders fo-
cused on immediate, emerging market opportunities at the
Alameda Station. These community members represented
businesses, property owners and residents in the area. In ad-
dition, the process involved collaboration between the City
and County of Denvers Community Planning and Devel-
opment Department and Public Works Department, with
support from the Department of Parks and Recreation and
Office of Economic Development.
Regular public meetings and stakeholder work sessions
shaped plan contents. Briefings with City Council, Denver
Planning Board and inter-agency city staff were also crucial.
The following is a brief outline of the planning process:
1. Collect and analyze background information
2. Identify opportunities and constraints
3. Draft vision and objectives
4. Public Workshop #1
5. Develop Land Use, Urban Design and
Mobility Concepts
6. Public Workshop #2
7. Prepare draft plan
8. Public Workshop #3
9. Plan Adoption
Denver formed a unique partnership with a major land-
owner. This evolved into a General Development Plan
(GDP) application. A GDP is a more detailed analysis of a
geographic area that identifies redevelopment guidance for a
large portion of the station planning area. The Implementa-
tion section of this plan provides additional details on this
application.
Context
Planning Area: The entire Alameda Station planning area
consists of a 1/2 mile radius surrounding the Alameda Sta-
tion located at approximately Cherokee Street and Alaska
Place. The planning area is within Council District #7 and
#9 and includes the statistical neighborhoods of Athmar
Park, Baker, Speer and Washington Park West.
The Core Station Area is defined as sites closest to the station
that are likely to see the most change and redevelopment
within the planning time frame (see Picture 1.1). The Core
Station Area is currently an auto-dominated area with major
auto corridors including Alameda Ave, S. Broadway/Lincoln,
Santa Fe/Kalamath and Interstate 25. The predominant
land uses are commercial, office and industrial. This station
plan considers the entire 1/2 mile radius but has some more
specific recommendations for the Core Station Area. The 60-
acre Denver Design District is the largest single-owner prop-
erty in the Core Station Area. Other larger sites in the Core
Station Area include the Bus Barn site west of the Alameda
Station and RTDs parking lot and bus drop-off.
The outlying areas are those of stability and have neighbor-
hood plans and Blueprint Denver as a guide. East and north
of the Core Station Area, the land uses are predominantly
residential with neighborhood-serving commercial. This
plan ensures that reinvestment in the Core Station Area offers
a respectful transition into these areas. West of the Core Sta-
tion Area is predominantly industrial. These areas are zoned,
used and planned for industrial and are important to the
employment and manufacturing base of the citys economy.
While the success and desirability of the planning area will
certainly bring new investment, land use and infrastructure
will remain very similar. South of the Core Station Area is
the Broadway Light Rail Station and the Gates Redevelop-
ment site. This area is already planned and zoned for a large
transit-oriented, mixed-use neighborhood.
Beyond the Planning Area: While the planning area is the
1/2 mile radius of the Alameda Station, it is important to
understand the land use and transportation pattern beyond
that boundary. Beyond the Planning Area, in all directions,
2


Alameda Station Area Plan Introduction
Picture 1.1 Aerial photograph of existing conditions
3


Alameda Station Area Plan Introduction
is predominantly residential. While these neighborhoods
are served by convenient bus routes, many residents use the
Alameda Station and several frequent the shopping center
in the Core Station Area. Therefore, access to the Planning
Area for these neighborhoods is important to consider. A
planning consideration addressed in this document is the
physical barriers within the Planning Area and beyond the
Planning Area. Specifically, there is the South Platte River,
Santa Fe/Kalamath, 1-25, heavy rail line and a light rail line.
Transit System: With the Denver region currently serving
as home to 2.6 million people and another 1 million ex-
pected to move to the metro area by 2030, improvements in
transportation infrastructure are critical to maintaining the
excellent quality of life that attracts so many to this area. In
the past 10 years alone, RTD ridership has increased more
than 28 percent. The existing light rail system is a total of
35 miles, 6 lines and 34 stations. By 2007 ridership was an
average of 63,000 boardings per weekday.
The RTD FasTracks program is an integration of several tran-
sit modes and other programs into a comprehensive region-
wide system. FasTracks will improve accessibility, quality of
life and commuting times. It will be a symbol of the Denver
regions progressiveness. Several transit technologies will be
used as determined through the environmental process on
each corridor. RTD has already been using buses and light
rail to meet the Denver metro areas transit needs. As part of
FasTracks, three new technologies commuter rail, bus rapid
transit and streetcars may be introduced to the region. In
addition to the new rail corridors, extensions and bus rapid
transit, FasTracks includes new park-n-Rides, a new com-
muter rail maintenance facility, expanded bus service called
FastConnects and the redevelopment of Denver Union Sta-
tion. This unprecedented transit investment will include:
122 miles of new rail
6 new rail corridors (light rail and commuter rail)
Expand 3 existing corridors
4


Alameda Station Area Plan Introduction
18 miles of Bus Rapid Transit (BRT)
31 new park-n-Rides 21,000 spaces
Enhanced Bus Network & Transit Hubs (FastConnects)
Alameda Station: The Alameda Station is located on RTDs
Central Corridor light rail alignment. It is located just
outside of downtown before the transit lines divide into the
Southeast and Southwest Corridors. The station is located
at-grade. The most direct access to the Alameda Station is
currently from Alameda Avenue on Cherokee Street or from
Broadway on Alaska Place. As defined in Denvers Transit-
Oriented Development Strategic Plan, the typology of the
station is Major Urban Center. It functions as a major trans-
fer point for the existing transit system and three bus lines.
There is also a well-used park-n-Ride surface lot.
Planning Context: Denvers adopted plans provided the ba-
sis for the Alameda Station Plan and represent official policy
adopted by elected representatives with public input. It is
essential to ensure consistency with the goals, objectives and
recommendations of these plans. An overview of all docu-
ments considered during this planning process is found in
The Community chapter. The over-riding principles of these
plans are:
Promote urban infill and compact, mixed-use
development patterns that use resources more
efficiently
Offer housing choices for Denvers diverse household
types
Create multi-modal streets that facilitate transportation
choice
Provide parks, schools and other civic uses that are safely
accessible
Market Context: To identify, leverage, and maximize TOD
opportunities, the city commissioned a TOD Economic
Analysis and Market Study. The primary goal of the TOD
Economic Analysis and Market Study was to provide the city
with an assessment ofTOD potential at the regional, cor-
ridor, and station area levels through analysis of short- and
long-term demand (e.g. demand in 2015 and 2030). Con-
ducted in coordination with station area planning efforts, the
market study helped to better align station plans with market
realities and dynamics. The overall objectives of the TOD
Economic Analysis and Market Study were to forge a better
understanding of the economic context in which the city
may plan for TOD, and to develop specific recommenda-
tions regarding the amount, type, mix, and intensity of uses
appropriate for selected station areas. The study established a
few key projections and findings which provide a framework
for economic opportunities in Denver:
The build-out of FasTracks will create a comprehensive
transit system and should place the region in a better
competitive position to attract new growth compared to
other regions without full transit-systems
The region should experience relatively high rates of
household and employment growth in the next 20 years
There is a demonstrated market interest in higher-
intensity development
The City and County of Denver has taken a proactive
role in planning for transit and other transit-supportive
public policies
Current development activity near existing transit stations
in the region far exceeds DRCOG growth projections
Station areas are attracting (capturing) new development
at a rate of 25%-40% depending on the development
type (residential, retail, or office)
5


Alameda Station Area Plan Introduction
Purpose of the Plan
Property owners, elected officials, neighborhood organiza-
tions and city departments will use the Alameda Station Plan
for many purposes over its lifespan.
The following is a description of the primary uses of the
plan ranging from city planning and policy expectations to
implementation.
Data Resource: The plan offers a collection of existing con-
ditions data about the planning area in an easy-to-reference
document.
Reinvestment Guidance: The plan guides public and private
decision-making and investment in the coming years as it
relates to land use, urban design, mobility and infrastructure
within the Planning Area. The plan will evolve and adapt to
changing demographics and market demands.
Zoning Amendments: The plan establishes the desired form,
use and context of the Core Station Area in order to inform
changes to the zoning code and existing zoning of sites.
Capital Improvements: A plan can provide the justification
or the prioritization and allocation of funding from the citys
capital improvement budget and other sources. Projects
should meet plan objective and recommendations such as
increasing access and removing physical barriers.
Funding and Partnership Opportunities: Implementation
of plans require a collaborative effort between neighbor-
hoods, businesses, elected officials and city departments. This
plan identifies and supports these partnerships and resource
leveraging efforts.
Picture 1.3 Alameda Station Platform Looking North
6


Alameda Station Area Plan Vision
Vision

7


Alameda Station Area Plan Vision
Vision
The City and County of Denver is poised to take a significant
leadership role in implementing the new transit lines and
focusing growth into areas near almost 40 transit stations.
This section begins with the established TOD principles for
the city of Denver. The unique qualities of the Alameda
Station area substantially contribute to this effort. Realizing
this vision will depend on the ability to overcome distinct
challenges and capitalize on strengths and opportunities
described in this section. This section establishes the specific
vision for the Alameda Station.
Foundation of TOD Principles
Developing a vision begins with establishing the underlying
principles of transit-oriented development. Transit-oriented
development is a mix of uses at various densities within a
half-mile radius, or walking distance, of a transit stop. The
purpose ofTOD is to create specific areas that integrate tran-
sit into neighborhoods and help support lively and vital com-
munities. The TOD Strategic Plan defines TOD in Denver
and establishes strategies for implementation. In order to
succeed, TOD should address these five guiding principles.
Place-making: Create safe, pleasant, varied and attractive
station areas with a distinct identity.
Rich Mix of Choices: Provide housing, employment,
transportation and shopping choices for people of all ages,
household types, incomes and lifestyles.
Location Efficiency: Place homes, jobs, shopping, enter-
tainment, parks and other amenities close to the station to
promote walking, biking and transit use.
Value Capture: Encourage all stakeholders residents, busi-
ness owners, RTD and the city to take full economic advan-
tage of the amenities associated with enhanced transit services.
Portal to the Region: Understand and maximize the stations
role as an entry point to the regional transit network and as a
safe, pleasant and private place to live.
Strengths, Opportunities and Challenges
To successfully accomplish the TOD principles and adopted
city policies, we must have a full understanding of the
strengths, opportunities and challenges of the Alameda Sta-
tion area.
Existing strengths, or assets, within the station area set the
stage for the plans vision and add value to the station area.
These are the primary strengths of the Alameda Station area:
Surrounding neighborhoods of Athmar Park, Baker,
Speer and Washington Park West are stable, vital
neighborhoods
Existing environmental and recreation amenities of the
South Platte River, South Platte River Trail and adjoin-
ing park and greenway system
Strength and success of South Broadway businesses
offer an established attraction and organized business
associations
Established employment base from existing retail, office
and industrial uses
Unique employment market for education and design
services provided by the Denver Design Center
High levels of light rail and bus ridership
Emerging opportunities, as listed below, create energy and
excitement for the station area and present unprecedented
resources and potential partnerships to evolve the built
environment.
Extension of the street grid west of South Broadway and
south of Alameda to improve connectivity to the station
Connection to Gates redevelopment site and the
Broadway Station
Potential partnership with landowners interested in
redevelopment of key sites: former Bus Barn site,
Broadway Market Place, Denver Design Center and
northwest corner of Cherokee and Alameda
Create diverse housing options within the Core Station
Area supported by a strong market for residential devel-
opment along transit lines
Improved connections to the South Platte River, South
Platte River Trail and adjoining parking and greenway
system
Extension and connections to the citys bike route system
Creating a destination place for surrounding neighbor-
hoods rather than just a commuting park-n-ride
Partnership opportunities with existing business
organizations
8


Alameda Station Area Plan Vision
Despite a strong foundation of significant strengths and op-
portunities, challenges remain. The Alameda Station Plan
objectives and recommendations seek to overcome these
obstacles.
Substantial infrastructure investment in terms of street
improvements and utilities
Significant physical barriers (South Platte River, Santa
Fe/Kalamath, 1-25, heavy rail lines and light rail lines)
disconnecting the west side of the station area
Lack of street grid in the Core Station Area severely
limits accessibility to the station and results in less
benefit for residents, visitors and workers and creates
pressure on existing streets due to limited route choices
Auto-dominant development and expansive surface park-
ing lots in the Core Station Area creates a poor pedes-
trian environment for moving through the area and to
the station
Single use development pattern inhibits location
efficiency and further perpetuates need for the car
Lack of placemaking elements that promote gathering
of people
Close proximity of stable neighborhoods will require
development in the Core Station Area that is compatible
as well as transition zones and special edge treatments
that promote unity
Limited incentives for affordable housing
Continued traffic volume increases due to background
development and new station area development
Existing B-4 and Industrial zoning does not allow a mix
of transit-supportive uses or promote development forms
that are predictable and pedestrian-oriented
Alameda Station Plan Objectives
To achieve a vibrant, economically healthy, growing and vital
station area, a sustained effort in each of the following ele-
ments is essential:
Place-Making
Redefine the stations nature into a destination place
Enhance the pedestrian experience along and crossing
physical barriers of Alameda, Broadway/Lincoln, Santa
Fe/Kalamath, 1-25 and the South Platte River
Maintain unique urban design elements such as the main
street character of South Broadway, the historic laundry
stacks and public art
Create distinct entry points to the Core Station Area
Develop strong visual connections to the station
Create a consistent and predictable form within the
station area
Enhance existing recreational opportunities and offer
new types of open space for passive and active recreation
Rich Mix of Choices
Provide new opportunities for housing (mix of types and
affordability)
Offer safe, convenient and pleasant pedestrian, bicycle
and vehicular access choices to the station from all
directions
Offer a mix of recreation choices such as plazas and
greenspace for neighborhood events and gathering and
active recreation opportunities such as bike trails and
athletic fields
Establish area as an employment center with a diversity
of business types
Interweave transit and pedestrian oriented uses (residen-
tial, small scale shops, restaurants, etc.)
Support main street environment with buildings and
pedestrian entrances oriented towards the street
Location Efficiency
Consider reinvestment opportunities in the Core Station
Area and accessibility improvements within the entire
1/2 mile radius
Orient density closest to the Alameda Station and
Broadway Station
Integrate the station into the street and land use pattern
Improve accessibility and consolidate parking locations
for transit riders and businesses
Improve infrastructure connections between east-west
geographical barriers
9


Alameda Station Area Plan Vision
Value Capture
Ensure both public and private investments add value to
existing neighborhoods and businesses
Consider existing neighborhood plans and other local
planning efforts (e.g. Baker Plan, West Washington
Park Neighborhood Plan, Valley Highway Environ-
mental Impact Statement, Broadway NEPA)
Examine capacity of infrastructure to accommodate new
development (water, sewer, traffic, etc.)
Explore opportunities to access regional recreation
system such as the South Platte Greenway, Ruby Hill
Park, Daley Park, Vanderbilt Park, Habitat Park and
Washington Park
Portal to the Region
Address existing east-west barriers between neighbor-
hoods (South Platte River, Sante Fe/Kalamath, heavy rail
line, light rail line and 1-25)
Emphasize alternative transportation modes in the
planning area
Enhance experience along and crossing major streets
Create a new street hierarchy and extend the street grid
in the Core Station Area
10


Alameda Station Area Plan Land Use & Urban Design
Land Use and
Urban Design
11


Alameda Station Area Plan Land Use & Urban Design
Land Use and Urban Design
Considering Land Use and Urban Design recommendations
together creates a thorough description of the desired devel-
opment pattern for the station area. This approach assumes
that while land use types are important, the placement and
form of those uses is equally important to the built environ-
ment. The principles ofTOD provide a solid foundation for
the recommendations in this chapter, however, the charac-
teristics of the station area and the plan objectives unique
to Alameda Station truly guide the specific details of these
recommendations.
Land Use Recommendations
Successful station areas thrive on a rich mix of land uses and
efficient placement of those uses. This creates a diversity of
people, choices and opportunities. Attracting jobs, residents,
amenities and visitors is essential to a vital station area, neigh-
borhood and transportation system. The Land Use Concept
illustrates types and locations of transit-supportive uses on
parcels within the Core Station Area.
To create land use choices in the Alameda Station area and
reduce or redefine the auto-oriented development pattern,
the Land Use Concept recommends a collection of residen-
tial, office, employment, education and open space uses.
This range will allow a balanced level of activity throughout
the day and week and can accommodate market demands
and fluctuations over a long period of time. While the entire
Core Station Area should be mixed use, the Land Use Con-
cept is an illustration of the predominant land use pattern
of the station area. For example, the Ground Floor Land
Use Concept illustrates suggested concentrations of retail
and commercial. The land uses illustrated also try to reflect
existing development plans. The following are the detailed
land use recommendations for the Alameda Station area.
Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 1
Residential Opportunities
As described in the Introduction, there are multiple desir-
able residential areas within and beyond the Planning Area.
These established neighborhoods are an important com-
ponent of Denvers success and add significant value to the
community. Blueprint Denver provides guidance for these
Areas of Stability to promote their valued attributes includ-
ing detached walks, street trees, prominent front porches and
alleys. Within the Core Station, the Alameda Station Plan
recommends new housing opportunities. The residential land
use category includes a mixture of housing choices including
townhouse, mid-rise multiple family and high-rise multiple
family. The placement of residential close to the station will
greatly improve access to the station, and the region for resi-
dents of the station area.
The need for a broad range of housing is important to the
quality of life for Denver, blousing types that meet the needs
of each particular stage in life enables a resident to age within
a neighborhood. Affordable housing also can mean modest-
wage workers living closer to their jobs, decreasing transpor-
tation expenses.
Given the significant amount of development planned in
the Core Station area, there should be a comprehensive
approach to ensure there is mixed-income housing options.
This includes eliminating regulatory barriers and pursuing
funding and partnership opportunities.
Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 2
Office/Employment Destination
Increase the amount of offices in the station area to create an
employment center and diversify business types. North and
south of Exposition Avenue is an ideal location for office uses
to build upon the established employment base of existing
larger scale office uses and proximity to the Broadway Sta-
tion. Directly at the Alameda Station platform is also a loca-
tion for office uses. Consider family-wage jobs and nontradi-
tional employment opportunities to accommodate a greater
range in the work force.
Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 3
Education Resources
Build upon established educational facilities in and around
the Denver Design Center and thereby provide a unique
market niche for the Alameda Station. Concentrate new and
enhanced educational and design facilities north and south
of Center Avenue. The existing Denver Design Center can
anchor these new uses. Educational space could be a range
of classrooms, training facilities or supportive uses such as
student housing.
Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 4
Industrial
The west side of the Planning Area is an important indus-
trial/ employment area in the city. This area should continue
to offer light manufacturing, warehousing, office and other
employment base. With redevelopment and reinvestment,
special attention to design, screening and buffering is neces-
sary due to the close proximity of residential and high vis-
ibility of the sites.
12


Alameda Station Area Plan Land Use & Urban Design
ELLSWORTH AVE.
KENTUCKY AVE.
Picture 3.1 Land Use Concept
13


Alameda Station Area Plan Land Use & Urban Design
Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 5
Comprehensive Recreation and Open Space System
A comprehensive recreation and open space system can
achieve many objectives. Enhancing access to the citys
recreation system is extremely important in offering active
recreation, such as athletic fields and bike trails. In the Core
Station Area, open space creates a sense of arrival and creates
strong visual connections to destinations such as the station
and shopping. Investment in quality recreation and open
space adds value and sustainability to neighborhoods and
business districts and can meet some recreation demands.
Core Station Area: Proposed open spaces/plazas in the Core
Station Area serve as amenities and organizing features for
new development and existing neighborhoods and business-
es. The open space system is more urban in character and
includes more opportunities for plazas and gathering space
rather than always offering traditional, green park space. As
these new amenities are designed and constructed, developers
should apply best practices for sustainability. The specific
design and placement of open space is part of a detailed
evaluation process. Additional open space such as rooftop
gardens and courtyards are encouraged. The following is the
preferred open space concept:
Station Open Space: Offer a gathering place for transit
riders that provides information about the public trans-
portation system such as arrival and departure times and
route information. Located at the platform west of
Cherokee Street and south of Dakota Avenue.
Central Plaza: Provide an organizing space near the inter
section of the two retail/commercial main streets that
offer shoppers a place to rest and can be programmed
for special events such as outdoor concerts. Located
east of Bannock Street between Dakota Avenue and
Alaska Place.
Neighborhood Park: Potential for green space, passive
recreation and/or a playground oriented towards the
residential area of the Core Station Area. Located south
of Virginia Avenue and west of Bannock Street.
Campus Quad: Offers open space concentrated near the
employment center to create a campus environment and
outdoor space for lunchtime gathering. Located between
Center and Exposition Avenues on Bannock Street.
Beyond the Core Station Area: As the population increases
in the station area so will demand for recreation. Open space
within the Core Station Area will meet more passive recre-
ation needs. Therefore, it is important that existing public
parks within and near the station area address active recre-
ation needs:
South Platte River Greenway/Bikeway: Seek opportuni-
ties for connections to this system from the station area.
Consider ways to enhance or expand the greenway along
the river bank as a means to increase use and enjoyment.
Existing Parks: Improve connectivity to existing parks
including Vanderbilt Park, Habitat Park, Ruby Hill Park,
Daley Park and Washington Park. Consider opportuni-
ties to enhance the under utilized parks in a manner
that will increase their use and more evenly balance
public park use.
Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 6
Retail
Retail uses are part of the established development pattern
of the station area. They are active uses because of the longer
hours of operation, high turnover and shoppers tendency
to visit multiple stores. This steady flow of activity greatly
contributes to the energy of a station area. Additional retail
uses are proposed east of Santa Fe Drive on the Bus Barn
site and the Gates redevelopment site to the south. At the
Alameda Station, retail is recommended near the platform
for convenience to transit riders. See the Ground-Floor Land
Use Concept for additional guidance on retail uses.
Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 7
Commercial
Commercial uses are businesses that engage in the sale of
services. They are less active than retail but are crucial to
serving residents and workers in the station area, surrounding
neighborhoods and in some cases the region. Existing and
planned commercial services are along South Broadway and
Gates Redevelopment sites. New commercial services are sug-
gested at the ground floor along Alameda Avenue from South
Broadway to Lipan Street and further west. The intersection
of Lipan Street and Alameda Avenue is an opportunity for re-
development and serves to link development on both sides of
the River and 1-25. See the Ground Floor Land Use Concept
for additional guidance on commercial uses.
14


Alameda Station Area Plan Land Use & Urban Design
Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 8
Shared Parking
Parking in a station area is important in adding value to
investments and meet capacity demands of future develop-
ment. An organized approach of parking management,
consolidation and design is necessary to ensure a successful
parking system. To meet market demands, provide shared
structured parking structures below grade or above grade
within a ground-floor podium. Above grade parking struc-
tures should be wrapped with active uses. When the Core
Station Area redevelops, parking management will be impor-
tant to minimize overflow into the adjoining neighborhoods.
This may include specific management strategies such as a
residential parking permit program.
If redevelopment and shared RTD parking opportunities
arise consider dispersing the parking to both sides of the
platform. This would allow more convenient access to park-
ing on the east and west sides of the station. The Land Use
Concept identifies potential locations, finalized as part of a
development proposal.
Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 9
Ground Floor Retail
Retail uses are businesses that engage in the sale of merchan-
dise. Ground-floor retail uses are an essential component of
an active and vital station area. Retail uses provide goods and
services to local residents, employees, students and light-rail
passengers. Given the market conditions and existing retail
uses in the station area, Ground Floor Retail will be a range
of sizes. There is demand for small-scale shops, cafes and
restaurants to serve transit riders, residents and employees.
There is also demand for larger format retailers drawing from
a regional market. Examples of large format retailers that
would be successful in the Core Station Area include a gro-
cery store, furniture store and a home goods store. Identify-
ing locations for Ground Floor Retail is a crucial component
to land use placement and location efficiency. Retail uses
create activity at the station platform and along designated
main streets. The configuration of ground-floor retail in-
cludes continuous edge-to-edge retail storefronts with no
interruptions by other land uses, including commercial uses.
Limit primary permitted uses to merchandise sales and eating
and drinking establishments.
Dakota Avenue should serve as the primary retail street
within the study area between South Broadway and the
Alameda Station, and along streets fronting the Central
Plaza.
Two large-floor plate retail anchor sites are recom-
mended near Dakota Avenue where they can be lined
with small scale retail uses along the street front.
Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 10
Ground Floor Commercial
Commercial uses are businesses that engage in the sale of
services. Commercial uses may be interspersed with office,
housing or retail uses, including lobbies to access upper-floor
residential and office/employment uses. Live/sell or live/work
home occupation uses are also appropriate along commercial
frontages. Ground-floor commercial uses are an essential
component of an active and vital station area because they
contribute to the land use mixture and offers services for
residents, visitors and workers. Limit primary permitted uses
to financial services, real estate services, insurance services
and lodging. Bannock Street (south of Alameda) and S.
Broadway are very important commercial streets within the
Core Station Area that relate directly to the retail main street
of Dakota Avenue.
15


Alameda Station Area Plan Land Use & Urban Design
Urban Design Recommendations
Each station area must emerge as a destination with its own
sense of place and identity. This plan provides strategies for
making the Alameda Station Area a distinctive neighbor-
hood while respecting surrounding conditions. Urban design
recommendations are an additional layer to the land use
concept that ensures placemaking for the station area. Urban
design encompasses fundamental elements such as active
edges, build-to lines and building heights. All assist in shap-
ing the scale and form of the built environment of the station
area. They also ensure appropriate pedestrian-oriented scale
while still maximizing transit oriented development opportu-
nities. Defining these elements in this plan will create a pre-
dictable and consistent form that can easily be implemented
over time.
Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 11
Active Edges Concept
Active edges are building frontages with direct sidewalk en-
tries and a high degree of transparency. This increases visual
and physical interaction between people inside and outside of
the buildings, creating a safe and vibrant pedestrian environ-
ment. This eyes on the street environment will promote
safety and activity. At key gateways to the station area, such
as along Cherokee and Dakota, active edges will create a
sense of arrival and guide people to their destinations.
Active edge locations should be along important streets
within the station area and surrounding open spaces:
Alameda
Cherokee
Bannock
Dakota
Virginia
S. Broadway
Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 12
Design of Active Edges
Ground-Floor Retail and Commercial actives edges must pos-
sess certain qualities to ensure interaction and a safe environ-
ment. All active edges should have a minimum of 70 percent
transparent glass or screens along ground-floor facades. This
will ensure that activities inside and outside of a business are
visible. Active edges should not have frosted, tinted, reflective
glass or other types of glass that diminish transparency. Pri-
mary entrances should be at the street so pedestrians are given
priority access. Buildings placed at the intersection of Alameda
and South Broadway are especially important to have active
edges becuase the intersection is an important gateway for the
Core Station Area and neighborhoods.
For all other uses located along active edges, orient primary
entrances toward the street. Quasi-public terraces, stoops
or porches are appropriate, but not essential. In these cases,
a lower transparency percentage may be acceptable. Place art
walls, news stands or other activating uses throughout.
Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 13
Build-To Lines Concept
The build-to lines concept identifies locations where ground-
floor building facades must be built to the property line. A
build-to line can also be described as a zero-foot building
setback from the property line where the sidewalk is built
directly up to the facade. Build-to lines establish a continu-
ous street wall that defines the edge of the sidewalk and
frames streets and open spaces. They can have a similar effect
as Active Edges in that they bring land use activity up to
the sidewalk and define the public realm.
16


Alameda Station Area Plan Land Use & Urban Design
The concept recommends building frontages for build-to line
treatments. Other building frontages may include these treat-
ments; but, it is not crucial. Locate build-to line locations
along important streets within the station area and sur-
rounding proposed open spaces. Determine exact locations
as part of a detailed site analysis but recommended locations
include:
Alameda
S. Broadway
Dakota Avenue
Bannock Street
Street surrounding key open space locations such as the
Station Open Space, Central Plaza, Neighborhood Park
and the Campus Quad
Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 14
Design of Build-to Lines
Build-to Lines must possess certain qualities to ensure they
define the public realm and creates the consistent street wall.
There should be a maximum setback for the building (such as
5-10 feet) that allows for some flexibility but does not create
too much variation. This setback should also accommodate
recessed ground-floor entrances, windows and architectural
elements that engage the build-to line. Build-to lines should
extend along the entire block length and interrupted only for
access points to courtyards or other private spaces.
Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 15
Building Height Concept
The building heights concept indicates a range of minimum
to maximum building height recommendations. The build-
ing height concept orients the greatest density at the Alameda
and Broadway Stations. The height transitions to a lower
scale and blends with surrounding neighborhoods. The con-
cept also identifies key intersections where taller structures
can effectively enclose wider streets and create more dramatic
entries into the station area. When heights exceed five sto-
ries, there should be consideration of a building step back to
minimize the building scale at the street level. Overall, the
Building Height Concept creates variability within the Core
Station Area, adding architectural interest and a compatible
transition. These building heights must comply with the
Washington Park Viewplane Ordinance.
17


Alameda Station Area Plan Land Use & Urban Design
archeRtl.*-
2-5\ 2-5
Floors ^|oors
?r^\.
LEGEND:
Light Rail Station
* Light Rail Alignment J B Mr*
^ (RTD) RTD Parking Structure
| | | Retail
[ Residential
Office/Employment
*! \
Educational
Commercial
Industrial/Employment
| | Parking Structure
Open Space/Plaza
s Existing Building
| | Existing Parcel
Picture 3.5 Building Heights Concept In no case shall builcings exceed the Washington Park View Plane Ordinance
18


Alameda Station Area Plan Mobility
19


Alameda Station Area Plan Mobility
Mobility
Mobility choices are a key ingredient to a livable station envi-
ronment because it increases access to jobs, conserves energy,
relieves congestion, supports public safety and encourages
social and economic activity Additionally, people at various
stages of life share these benefits. Mobility recommenda-
tions improves circulation between the station, surrounding
proposed residential, office/employment and educational
uses and existing nearby residential neighborhoods. Choices
minimize the impact of new development on major regional
mobility corridors such as Alameda, Santa Fe/Kalamath and
Broadway/Lincoln. Enhanced pedestrian and bicycle routes
are an important component that provide safe, direct, conve-
nient and attractive connections.
Street Circulation Recommendations
Much of the Core Station Area is deficient in offering a pub-
lic street grid. To the extent possible, the New and Enhanced
Streets Concept extends the existing street grid and ensures
improved mobility for all modes of travel. The grid is the
foundation for the mobility recommendations. In addition,
this grid creates development blocks and street hierarchy
that define the scale, massing and character of new buildings
and open spaces. These recommendations are conceptual
in nature and require detailed analysis and design by traffic
* engineers. For example, all intersections must be 90 degrees,
there must be proper offset spacing and dead-end street must
be avoided as the grid is phased in.
Mobility Recommendation 1
New Streets
\ The New Street Concept extends existing public streets west
\ of South Broadway and south of Alameda Avenue. The
' Concept also provides for additional street connections that
j create smaller blocks. This network creates multiple access
'I points to the station area and offers urban design benefits.
/. This concept will improve east-west and north-south con-
j nectivity within the station area. Realistically, east-west street
connectivity is severely limited due to the presence of the
South Platte River, 1-25 and the rail lines. There will still be
heavy reliance on major arterials such as Alameda Avenue to
travel east-west.
Access to the station will allow existing and future residents,
visitors and workers enjoyment of this important neighbor-
hood amenity and improve access to the region for jobs,
shopping and other purposes. Finally, extending the street
grid will decrease pressure on existing streets because there
are more choices for circulation. Potential New Streets are
not as crucial to the street grid but may be built during a
later phase in the planning process and may occur as part of a
longer-range plan.
Mobility Recommendation 2
Enhanced Streets
Enhanced Streets are a combination of existing and new
streets that warrant a higher level of design due to their vis-
ibility and higher level of use by people. Providing a frame-
work for Enhanced Streets establishes a street hierarchy and is
indicated on the diagram in orange. Enhanced streets require
additional enhancements that provide a desirable pedestrian
environment that will enhance walking along the street and
crossing intersections. Creating this environment for pedes-
trians increases the likelihood of walking instead of driving
and also extends visits to shopping areas and other destina-
tions. Specific details may include the following:
Sidewalk curb extensions or bulb-outs where possible
to minimize pedestrian street-crossing distances
Wider sidewalks
20


Alameda Station Area Plan Mobility
Special paving or painting patterns at cross walks of
major intersections to alert drivers and pedestrians
the crosswalk presence
Pedestrian crossing signals (these improvements are
recommended at signalized intersections, not mid-block
or un-signalized intersections)
On-street parking
Pedestrian-scaled lighting
Benches
Bus stop shelters
All public sidewalk enhancements must be ADA compliant
Pedestrian and Bicycle Recommendations
All streets must accommodate pedestrians and bicycles to
facilitate multiple transportation choices within the station
area. Offering transportation choices and connectivity will
increase accessibility to jobs, housing, recreation, shopping
and other important destinations. Successful pedestrian and
bicycle routes provide a choice that is cost effective, better for
the environment than cars and alleviates congestion. This
section highlights primary pedestrian and bicycle routes.
Recommended enhancements improve the enjoyment and
experience and increase the likelihood of walking and biking
within the station area.
Mobility Recommendation 3
Enhanced Sidewalk Routes
Enhanced sidewalk routes offer safe, convenient and pleasant
routes between the outlying neighborhoods and destinations
such as the station, open spaces, employment and shopping.
The primary pedestrian routes run north-south and east-
west to ensure balanced connectivity within the station area.
These routes are:
South Broadway: This maintains the historic main street
character of the corridor and signifies that South Broadway
continues as a front door for the neighborhoods. As a
primary route, signalized and enhanced intersection crossings
are essential.
Bannock Street: This north-south route links the Baker
neighborhood to the Alameda Station area and the Broad-
way Station area further south. Along the route the plan
recommends active retail and commercial uses and open
space areas.
Cherokee Street: Cherokee Street is also a north-south con-
nection for Baker but is a more direct route to the light rail
station platform and also connects with shared bicycle and
pedestrian facilities that offer regional connections.
Bayaud Avenue: Bayaud Avenue is an east-west route that
links Baker, Speer and Washington Park West neighborhoods
to routes running south into the station area and to a pro-
posed bridge crossing over the railroad lines, the Platte River
and 1-25. This bridge crossing links users to recreation such
as parks and the South Platte River Greenway.
Dakota Avenue: Dakota Avenue is an important, active retail
street that should serve as a gateway into the station area
from the east. It provides a direct link to the station plat-
form and north-south routes. Once at the station a bike/ped
bridge can offer a link to the west side of the railroad line.
Virginia Avenue: Virginia Avenue provides an alternative
east-west connection that is more oriented to station access,
the employment uses planned in the southern area and con-
nections to north-south routes. Once constructed, the bike/
ped bridges over the railroad, 1-25 and the River will offer
access between Athmar Park and the station area.
21


Alameda Station Area Plan Mobility
Exposition Avenue: Exposition Avenue offers an east-west
connection for the southern area of the Washington Park
West neighborhood. Use of this route provides enhanced
access to Bannock and S. Broadway along with a convenient
connection to the Broadway Station.
Santa Fe Drive/Virginia: Once redevelopment on the west
side of the platform occurs, there will be a stronger demand
for an improved pedestrian connection to Alameda Av-
enue. This route can create that connection and limit the
pedestrian travel time along the busy corridor. Additionally,
overtime a bike/bridge to Viriginia west of the river is desired
to create another connection with Athmar Park.
Mobility Recommendation 4
Enhanced Sidewalk Route Improvements
Ensure these designated routes are pleasant and functional
through enhancements such as:
Pedestrian-scaled lighting
Wider sidewalks than standard requirements
Street trees
Contrasting paving or striping at crosswalks
Sidewalks with curb extensions, where possible
ADA ramps
Mobility Recommendation 5
On-Street Bicycle Lanes
Streets with on-street bicycle lanes provide cyclists with a
bicycle travel lane separated from the auto travel lanes. The
separation is typically provided through striping and signage.
On -street bicycle lanes are designated along busier streets
where bike traffic is particularly popular. On-street bicycle
lanes should be at least five feet wide for one-directional travel
Sharrows remind drivers to share the road
and clearly identified with roadway striping. These should
not be offered at the expense of on-street parking. On-street
bicycle lanes are recommended on the following streets:
Cherokee Street(west of rail line)
Bannock
Exposition
Mobility Recommendation 6
Enhanced Bike Routes
Enhanced bike routes are where cars and bicycles share the
roadway. Bicycle treatments calm traffic, encourage bicycling
and improve pedestrian safety. These routes are most success-
ful on low-traffic volume streets. Enhanced routes should
include signs that clearly indicate shared and equal use of
travel lanes for both cyclists and motor vehicles. Surface
treatments, such as sharrows, that indicate the presence of
bicycles in the roadway should be included along the route
and at major intersections. Recommended routes include S.
Jason Street, Virginia Avenue(west of 1-25 and east of South
Broadway), Bayaud Avenue, Bannock, Dakota, Exposition
and Cherokee (west of rail lines).
Mobility Recommendation 7
General Bicycle Facilities
Offering special facilities for bikes will improve ease of use
and increase the likelihood people would choose this travel
mode. Examples of these special facilities include:
Install bike racks throughout the station area
Construct a bicycle facility with storage racks, lockers/
showers and possibly rentals/ sales at the station
Evaluate the feasibility of cycle-activated crossing signals
at main intersections
Mobility Recommendation 8
Separated Pedestrian and Bicycle Routes
Separated pedestrian and bicycle routes provide paths for
pedestrians and bicyclists that run parallel and adjacent to
roadways. Bicyclists, pedestrians and autos should be physi-
cally separated from each other. These are very important to
the mobility system because they offer a better route than
following the street. Separated bicycle and pedestrian routes
are recommended in the following locations:
Alameda Avenue, between Cherokee and Lipan streets,
connecting the Alameda Station to the bicycle route
along the S. Platte River greenway and the Athmar Park
neighborhood
22


Alameda Station Area Plan Mobility
Galapago Street, north of Dakota Avenue, connecting
the Alameda Station to the planned bicycle route along
Bayaud Avenue and the Baker neighborhood
Mobility Recommendation 9
Off-Street Pedestrian and Bicycle Routes
An off-street pedestrian and bicycle route provides a parallel
path for pedestrians and bicyclists that are not typically adja-
cent to a roadway The recommended off street routes includes
the existing South Platte River Greenway and the pathway
running parallel to the light rail alignment between the Alam-
eda Station and the Broadway Station. More detailed design is
necessary to determine the exact alignment and cross-section.
Mobility Recommendation 10
Pedestrian and Bicycle Bridges
Improving east-west connectivity is an extremely important
objective for the Alameda Station Area Plan. Promoting new
development and multi-modal improvements along Alameda
Avenue will create activity and interest along the corridor.
However, there is the only existing east-west vehicle connec-
tion wtihin the planning area. Street extensions and bridges
for vehicles are extremely expensive. Therefore, strategic
investment in bicycle/pedestrian bridges is a more efficient
method to improve connectivity without the high cost and
impacts of new streets. Shared bicycle and pedestrian bridges
should be in the following locations:
Alameda Station over the Consolidated Main
Line alignment
Bayaud Avenue over S. Platte River (recommended as
part of the Valley Highway EIS)
Broadway Station over the LRT alignment (proposed as
part of the Gates redevelopment project)
Santa Fe to Jason Street/Virginia Avenue (considered a
long-range improvement)
Public Transportation Recommendations
Public transportation is an essential component to the
mobility framework. This includes bus and light rail recom-
mendations to identify essential improvements to protect and
enhance regional mobility
Mobility Recommendation 11
Park-n-Ride and Platform
Currently there are 287 spaces owned by RTD and 221
leased by RTD at the Alameda Station. At the end of the first
quarter in 2008, utilization was 93%. Parking, while conve-
niently located right at the platform, is a barrier to pedestri-
ans and visual connectivity between development. If oppor-
tunities for partnership with RTD arise, decrease emphasis
on parking right at the station. Collaborate with RTD to
re-locate parking to a place that is still convenient to transit
riders but not directly placed at the platform. The platform
should offer some plaza space for gathering and information
and sufficient lighting for safety.
Mobility Recommendation 12
Bus Circulation
Existing bus routes serve as feeder routes that provide
access to the Alameda Station for those outside of walking
or cycling distance. Existing routes are illustrated on the
diagram and follow Alameda and Cherokee. The existing
bus drop-off area must be re-configured to achieve the plans
build-out but route changes are not necessary. Re-design and
re-location of bus bays from on-site to on-street will be nec-
essary. This should balance the need for an active and inviting
platform area with convenient, visible access to bus transfers.
Long term, additional consideration should be given to
enhanced transit service along the South Broadway/Lincoln
couplet. While there is frequent bus service, future develop-
23


Alameda Station Area Plan Mobility
Picture 4.4 Auto and Bus Circulation Concept
ment could create demand for a higher level of service. The
city, RTD, property owners, business owners and residents
should consider the feasbility of enhanced transit service such
as Bus Rapid Transit, streetcar or some combination to meet
demands and reduce auto reliance on the corridor.
Parking Recommendations
The economic success of station areas require sufficient
parking since most trips to Denvers stations will not involve
transit. But just as too little parking will create economic
problems, so will too many spaces. Denvers TOD Principles
seek to maximize development potential, create placemaking
and add value to neighborhoods. Therefore, it is important
to ensure parking does not consume too much of the build-
able square footage in TOD projects. The following are spe-
cific strategies relevant to the Alameda Station Area. When
evaluating and implementing these recommendations there
are important factors to consider:
Walkable design and wayfinding of parking areas
for pedestrians
Proper balance of off-street parking regulations and on-
street parking management
Promoting demand reduction techniques for long term
success of both on and off street parking systems
Mobility Recommendation 13
Parking Design Controls
To ensure that parking does not damage the walkability of
station areas, good design is important. Care should be taken
to ensure that parking does not diminish the attractiveness of
other modes. Key tools include:
Establish building build-to lines and parking setbacks.
Wrap parking with active uses to optimize personal
security and the attractiveness of station areas and so
doors and windows face the street, rather than the blank
facades of parking structures and garage doors
Minimize negative impacts of driveways. Parking lots
and garages should be accessed primarily from the
side and rear of buildings, with driveways and curb
cuts strongly discouraged or banned from main
pedestrian ways.
Encourage alleys and require parking access from the alley.
Minimize driveway width.
Discourage or prohibit surface parking lots. However,
surface parking can be seen as a land bank for future
development and is a necessary temporary use as TODs
gain momentum. If necessary, surface parking lots
should be provided only at the rear of buildings and
protected by strong landscape setback requirements.
Require that parking be screened from sidewalks with
low walls and landscaping. Where pedestrians are
expected to walk across a parking lot to get from one
destination to another, align drive aisles in parallel with
primary pedestrian movements, and where pos-
sible provide sidewalks in parking lots alongside what
will be future streets.
Mobility Recommendation 14
Parking Requirements
Consider parking in a station area as a system serving dif-
ferent parking needs. Operating and treating parking in this
efficient and comprehensive manner can eliminate over-park-
ing; reduce construction costs and facilitate better design in-
vestments. The following are ways to better calibrate parking
requirements to strike the correct balance of parking supply:
24


Alameda Station Area Plan Mobility
Consider reducing minimum parking ratios due to
efficiencies of mixed use and multi-modal access
Increase ways to meet parking requirements such as
tandom spaces
Consider different ratios and requirements for reserved
or un-bundled parking, such as no minimums
Implement on-street parking management programs,
as needed, to minimize parking overflow in adjoining
neighborhoods
Mobility Recommendation 15
Effective Public Information and Wayfinding Program
To improve parking access and information in station areas,
consider electronic wayfinding and guidance systems that
uses variable messaging signs to direct visitors and commut-
ers to specific parking areas with available parking and to
access routes. Another system used effectively in some new
parking structures is an electronic space count system, which
can sense individual space availability and direct users to
open spaces.
A Web-based parking information and reservation system is
another option. This could be a website that shows drivers
where there are available spaces in surface lots and garages.
Sensors at entry and exit points in every lot and structure
send information to a server in the citys parking office,
which updates the website every five seconds.
Other wayfinding policies include designing a universal logo
and rate structure for all short-term public parking, establish-
ing signage ordinances to encourage private participation in
parking management and offering participation in the station
area wayfinding system as an incentive to private owners
and managers. A combination of these systems can serve to
greatly extend the perceived availability and actual utilization
of parking in todays market where construction costs have
greatly increased.
Mobility Recommendation 16
Demand Reduction
Reducing vehicle use will meet several plan objectives and
inherently assuage neighborhood concerns of traffic and
parking impacts. Multi-modal improvements will offer
choices but demand reduction incentives and programs are
also effective.
Universal Transit Pass: In Metro Denver and nationally,
these programs are a highly effective tool for reducing park-
ing demand and increasing transit ridership. The principle
of employee or residential transit passes is similar to that of
insurancetransit agencies can offer lower rates on passes on
the basis that not all those offered the pass will actually use
them regularly. The universal passes are beneficial to every-
one involved:
For transit agencies, universal transit passes provide a
stable source of income, while helping them meet their
ridership goals
Employers reduce the demand for parking on-site and
are able to provide an additional benefit that helps
recruit and retain employees.
For commuters, the transit pass reduces the cost of
getting to work and affords a hassle-free level of transit
mobility.
Transportation Management Associations: Many park-
ing management tools could be efficiently administered
through a Transportation Management Association (TMA),
a member-controlled organization that encourages efficient
use of transportation and parking resources in a finite area,
such as around Union Station. TMAs provide a central-
ized framework to support Traffic Demand Management
(TDM) strategies.
Car-Share Programs: Car-sharing is a service that provides
members with access to a fleet of vehicles on an hourly basis.
One of the newest additions to the transportation toolbox,
car-sharing has the potential to change peoples relationship
to the car. At the home, car-sharing can substitute for car
ownership. At the workplace, it provides access to a vehicle
for business use and personal errands during the day, allow-
ing employees to avoid driving to work. Members can use
transit, cycling and walking for most of their daily trips, but
have access to a car when required. In Denver, members can
use car-sharing for a range of needs from trips to the moun-
tains to trips to the grocery store. Given the planned densi-
ties and large-scale development of the Alameda and Broad-
way Station areas, car-sharing could be very successful.
25


Alameda Station Area Plan Mobility
26


Alameda Station Area Plan Infrastructure
Infrastructure
27


Alameda Station Area Plan Infrastructure
Infrastructure
This chapter identifies essential infrastructure investments needed to ensure a successful station area. These projects provide a
balance that leverages private investment, ensures infrastructure capacity and enhances the character of the station area. Given
that connectivity is a primary challenge for the Alameda Station Area, street construction and pedestrian and bicycle improve-
ments are the focus of these infrastructure recommendations.
arc h Elm..-
KENTUCKY AVE.
Picture 5.1 Neighborhood Street Concept
28


Alameda Station Area Plan Infrastructure
Neighborhood Street Design
Recommendations
Extension of the established street grid is a key recommenda-
tion of the mobility chapter. This is a significant infrastruc-
ture investment and is necessary to improve connectivity
within the station area. The majority of these streets are
classified as neighborhood streets. Neighborhood streets
accommodate lower vehicular traffic volumes than arte-
rial or collector streets and provide opportunities for public
interaction. These streets should complement adjacent land
uses and accommodate pedestrians, bicycles and motorized
vehicles without compromising safety or function. The fol-
lowing are recommendations on the basic cross section and
design elements of neighborhood streets. They are generally
consistent with national and local street standards.
Infrastructure Recommendation 1
Typical Neighborhood Streets
Typical Neighborhood Streets should include the following
minimum elements. These elements accommodate multiple
travel modes in an enhanced environment.
13-5-foot sidewalks or a combination of 8-foot
sidewalks, 1-foot curbs and a 5-foot landscaped areas
with street trees, turf and ground cover between the
sidewalks and the curbs on each side of the street.
Wider sidewalks would be necessary if the street is an
Enhanced Pedestrian Route
Two 10-foot two-directional travel lanes and two 8-foot
parallel parking lanes
Landscaped curb extensions at each street corner and
crosswalks aligned with the sidewalk
Additional special emphasis such as a bicycle boulevard
or other enhancements
Parking
Picture 5.2 Typical Neighborhood Street Cross Section
Picture 5.3 Typical Neighborhood Street Plan View
Infrastructure Recommendation 2
Sustainable Street Design
Strive to achieve sustainable streets in the station area. Sustain-
able streets (1) apply widely accepted sustainable design prin-
ciples, including stormwater infiltration and permeable surface
treatments (2) promote least-polluting ways to connect people
and goods to their destinations, and (3) make transportation
facilities and services part of livable communities.
29


Alameda Station Area Plan Infrastructure
Key Street Design Recommendations
The South Platte River, 1-25, Santa Fe/ Kalamath, heavy rail
line and light rail line are significant barriers within the Al-
ameda Station area that impede connectivity. The Mobility
chapter identifies enhanced sidewalk and bicycle routes for
moving higher volumes of people to and through the station
area. Consistent with Plan Objectives, these routes efficiently
accommodate multiple travel choices. In order to create
these routes, these Key Streets require significant investment
and improvement. Beyond the Typical Street design, the
following is a description of the Key Street Design Recom-
mendations for each of these streets.
Picture 5.4 Virginia Avenue Cross Section
Infrastructure Recommendation 3
Virginia Avenue
Virginia Avenue enhancements will improve local auto and
pedestrian access and serve as a primary east-west bicycle
connection to and from the Alameda Station. Virginia Av-
enue should accommodate the following minimum elements
within a 75-foot right-of-way between Broadway and Chero-
kee Streets. Cherokee Street between Alameda and Alaska
Place should have a similar cross section.
Two 11-foot, two-directional travel lanes
Two 5-foot on-street bike lanes
Two 8-foot curbside parking lanes
Two 13-5-foot sidewalks including an 8.5-foot
pedestrian zone, 4-foot planters for street trees and a
1-foot curb
Consider wider sidewalks widths (2 feet) either
through wider right-of-way or through a private amenity
zone easement
Picture 5.5 Cherokee Street Cross Section between Alaska Place and 1-25
Infrastructure Recommendation 4
Cherokee Street
Cherokee Street serves as a primary north-south station
access street from the neighborhoods north of Alameda
Avenue. Enhancements to Cherokee Street will maintain
service for autos and buses and improve access for pedestri-
ans and bicycles.
Cherokee Street should accommodate the following mini-
mum elements within a 75-foot right-of-way between Alam-
eda Avenue and Alaska Place. These are the same improve-
ments recommended for Virginia Avenue:
Two 11-foot, two-directional travel lanes
30


Alameda Station Area Plan Infrastructure
Two 5-foot on-street bike lanes
Two 8-foot curbside parking lanes
Two 13-5-foot sidewalks including an 8.5-foot
pedestrian zone, 4-foot planters for street trees and a
1-foot curb
Consider wider sidewalks widths (2 feet) either through
wider right-of-way or through private easements
Cherokee Street should accommodate the following mini-
mum elements within a 65-5-foot right-of-way from Alaska
Place to the south:
A 20-foot shared bicycle/pedestrian route, including two
5-foot planters with street trees and one 10-foot bicycle/
pedestrian path
Extend the bicycle/pedestrian path from the Alameda
Station platform to the new Exposition alignment as part
of the Broadway NEPA improvements
A 32-foot roadway, including one 13-foot southbound
travel lane, one 11-foot northbound travel lane and one
8-foot curbside parking lane
A 13-5-foot sidewalk including an 8.5-foot pedestrian
zone, 4-foot planters with street trees and a 1 foot curb
Infrastructure Recommendation 5
Galapago Bicycle/Pedestrian Path and Elati Bridge
Reclamation
The intersection of Cherokee Street and Alameda Avenue is a
prime gateway into the station area and the Baker Neighbor-
hood. Every attempt should be made to maintain pedestrian
comfort and access at this intersection. North
of the station is the Atlantis Community Center which
provides valuable services and activities for people with
disabilities. This generates a greater need for sensitivity to
barrier-free access across Alameda Avenue and leading to
the station. There is an opportunity for an alternative route
that creates access but also can function as part of a regional
recreation route that links the Baker neighborhood, Alameda
Station Area, Broadway Station Area, the South Platte Gre-
enway and other destinations along the route. The following
improvements capitalize on this opportunity:
Construct a multi-use bicycle/pedestrian path along the
west edge of Galapago Street between Bayaud Avenue
and the Alameda Station platform
Reconstruct the Elati bridge to accommodate the
bicycle/pedestrian path
Link this route to Cherokee Street north of Alameda for
neighborhood access
Link this route to the bicycle/pedestrian path recom-
mended along Cherokee Street
Sidewalks
Bicycle
Track
/
91+r-

Picture 5.6 Alameda Avenue Cross Section
Infrastructure Recommendation 6
Alameda Avenue
Alameda Avenue serves as a key east-west connection to and
from the Alameda Station to the neighborhoods west of the
alignment. Enhancements to Alameda Avenue will maintain
auto access while improving pedestrian and bicycle access. Al-
ameda Avenue should accommodate the following minimum
elements within its varying right-of-way:
Existing curb-to-curb dimensions and travel lanes
(existing curb-to-curb dimensions and number of
lanes vary)
Two 5-foot landscape zones to separate pedestrians and
bikes from travel lanes; includes a 4- foot planter with
street trees and a 1-foot curb
One 10-foot, two-directional bicycle track
One 4-foot planter with street trees to separate
pedestrians from the bicycle track
One 8-foot pedestrian path
This cross section will have to vary at the railroad under-
pass. However, improvements are needed to accommodate
31


Alameda Station Area Plan Infrastructure
travel lanes and a wider sidewalk for bikes and pedestrians.
Specifically:
Remove/repair concrete from the underpass wall and
cover the entire exposed surface with architectural shot
crete or other durable and aesthetic material
Raise the sidewalk section of the north side of the
underpass to improve the accessibility of the grade and
improve the comfort and separation from traffic
Infrastructure Recommendation 7
South Broadway
South Broadway serves as a key north-south connection to
and from the Alameda Station study area. Enhancements
to South Broadway are intended to maintain existing traf-
fic flow while improving the pedestrian environment. South
Broadway should accommodate the following minimum
elements within its proposed right-of-way:
Two 20-foot sidewalks, including 15-foot pedestrian
zones, 4-foot planters for street trees and 1-foot curbs
Two 8-foot parallel parking lanes
Five 11-foot southbound travel lanes
/ iiv /
Picture 5.7 South Broadway Cross Section
Infrastructure Recommendation 8
Storm Water
To the greatest extent possible use best management practices
for on-site stormwater detention and water quality.
32


Alameda Station Area Plan Ecomonic Opportunity
Economic
Opportunity
33


Alameda Station Area Plan Ecomonic Opportunity
Economic Opportunity
FasTracks promises to bring the Denver region an unprece-
dented opportunity to promote and facilitate transit-oriented
higher density, mixed-use residential and commercial devel-
opment. While the amount, type and mix of uses within the
transit station area and corridor influences market potential,
the presence of undeveloped and under utilized land can be
a source of the greatest economic opportunity Generally
speaking, prospects for redevelopment are stronger when sta-
tion areas features:
Relatively high levels of undeveloped and under
utilized land
Fewer landowners such that land is concentrated in
fewer hands
Under utilized land consolidated into fewer parcels,
therefore requiring less land assembly to facilitate
redevelopment
Residential, Office and Retail Market
Alameda Station contains 138 acres of under utilized land.
This is the highest amount of land capacity when compared
to other Denver stations. It also has one of the lowest amounts
of parcels which means there are fewer landowners and greater
potential for larger scale development. This statistical finding is
supported by the recent development plans for the Broadway
Marketplace and Denver Design Center in the form of the
Denver Design District General Development Plan.
Trends indicate demand for new residential, office and retail
development near transit through 2030. The TOD Market
Analysis provides three potential long term (over the next
20 years) development scenarios for the 138 under utilized
acres. The following is a breakdown of the three development
scenarios for Alameda:
Market Modest Moderate Large Scale Capacity
Residential 1,040 units 1,390 units 6,110 units
Office 240,000 sq ft 430,000 sq ft 1,530,000 sq ft
Retail 229,000 sq ft 342,242 sq ft 1,020,000 square feet
Economic Strategies
The realization of TOD will require a combination of near
and long term efforts and the use of best practices and inno-
vative strategies. The city should continue to use all available
resources and contacts in the TOD field at the national level
to identify solutions to challenges as they emerge.
An ongoing regional dialogue is critical to address chal-
lenges faced by multiple jurisdictions and the challenges
inherent in implementation where station areas straddle
jurisdictional boundaries. The City should continue its
communication with regional entities (e.g. Denver Regional
Council of Governments, Urban Land Institute, RTD) and
surrounding jurisdictions to investigate regional approaches
to shared obstacles.
Implementation will be most effective if carried out under a
broad framework that establishes strategies to advance TOD
at the system level. These system-wide strategies will in turn
support individual efforts undertaken at the corridor and
station area levels. Participating actors in the implementa-
tion of TOD include transit agencies, local jurisdictions,
and developers.
The City & County of Denver presently offers a broad array
of programs that could be used to effectuate transit-support-
ive development. Rather than providing an exhaustive list of
programs already available in Denver, the following are key
existing programs that could be focused or expanded as well
as innovative strategies not currently used in Denver that
could help facilitate positive reinvestment in the Alameda
Station area.
Regulations, guidelines and development Memoran-
dums of Understanding: Formalizing standards for
transit-oriented development whether through
local regulations and ordinances, guidelines, or memo-
randum of understanding is a key first step in
facilitating the type of development that will support
transit service
Direct and indirect financial incentives: In addition to
direct financial incentives to facilitate transit-oriented
development, regulations can provide a number of
indirect financial incentives. Indirect incentives often
used to facilitate development include flexible zoning
provisions and density bonuses, while direct incentives
include reduced development fees, expedited develop-
ment review, and team inspections to streamline and
reduce the total costs of the review and permitting process.
34


Alameda Station Area Plan Ecomonic Opportunity
Financing/Funding methods: Transit-oriented
development often occurs as infill development in
established areas or through redevelopment of
sometimes contaminated sites. In these types of
developments, the level of infrastructure required may
include extensive reconstruction of the street network (or
introduction of new streets), installation of structured
parking, addition of pedestrian enhancements and public
plazas, and stormwater infrastructure. Obtaining financ-
ing and/or funding for these critical infrastructure
enhancements can be a key challenge in effectuating
transit-oriented development.
Small Business and Technical Assistance: Community
members in many of the selected Denver station areas
have cited a desire for local entrepreneurship opportuni-
ties and jobs within their station areas. Small businesses
can be encouraged through multiple methods, including
the Main Street Program approach, business incubation,
and small business support programs (including loans
and technical assistance).
Phasing Strategies
Many communities have used phasing strategies to address
the lag time that often occurs between transit service intro-
duction and transit oriented development realization. Such
strategies can help establish supportive conditions in the
near-term to set the stage for future development that is sup-
portive of transit at the Alameda Station.
Land Banking & Assembly Methods: Realization of
transit-oriented development often requires assembly of
various properties owned by different property owners
and/or banking of land until transit service becomes
operable or market conditions support the level of
desired mixed-use development. Several models for land
banking and assembly were presented above, including:
transit authority/local government acquisition, the equity
investment approach (a public-private partnership
model), and special legislation.
Zoning: Regulations play an important role in determin-
ing what uses will be allowed within station areas. Once
market conditions support TOD, zoning may be amend-
ed to provide for the full density desired within
station areas. Consider incentives and eliminate barriers
to the recommendations of this plan such as affordable
housing.
Infrastructure Improvements, Special Assessments &
Tax Incentives: As a pre-development phase, public enti-
ties working alone or in partnership with developers may
undertake infrastructure improvement projects such as
parking facilities, parks, streetscapes, pedestrian and
bicycle enhancements, road reconstruction and exten-
sion, park beautification and signage. The purpose of
such projects are to set the stage for and encourage
transit-supportive development. These activities can also
provide early marketing of the station areas identity to
future prospective residents, employees and visitors. To
fund infrastructure investments, a special assessment
district may be formed (either through a charter district
or statutory district in Denvers case) in the pre-develop-
ment phase. Alternatively, tax incentive programs
such as tax increment financing, tax abatements, or
payment in lieu of taxes may be used to bolster develop-
ers resources for funding infrastructure.
Joint Development, Revenue Sharing & Cost Sharing:
In station areas where joint development is an option,
the landowner (often the transit authority) can enter into
revenue or cost sharing arrangements with the private
sector in order to either secure a source of revenue for
improvements or divide the cost of infrastructure
construction and maintenance. Types of revenue sharing
arrangements include land leases, air rights development,
and special assessment districts. Cost sharing arrange-
ments can include sharing of construction expenses and
density bonuses offered in exchange for infrastructure
construction.
35


Alameda Station Area Plan Ecomonic Opportunity
36


Alameda Station Area Plan Implementation
Implementation
37


Alameda Station Area Plan Implementation
Implementation
The Implementation Chapter identifies the essential action
items necessary to accomplish Alameda Station Plan Objec-
tives and Recommendations. The chapter is divided into
two sections. The first is a discussion of the Denver Design
District project. This is a significant redevelopment of the
existing auto-oriented shopping center and professional of-
fice complex located on the east side of the station area. The
second is a list of action items for city staff and community
organizations to consider in the next 10-20 years.
Denver Design District Implementation
The Denver Design District is a private redevelopment proj-
ect for the area south of Alameda Avenue, west of S. Broad-
way and east of the Consolidated Mainline. The Alameda
Station Plan provides the foundation and vision for redevel-
oping this area. Due to the scale of this project, further study
and analysis is necessary before zoning changes, development
plan approvals or infrastructure improvements.
Phase 1 General Development Plan
The city and the majority landowner are in the process of
preparing a General Development Plan (GDP). A GDP is a
planning document that offers a higher level of analysis than
a small area plan. This analysis will offer a better under-
standing of the opportunities, constraints and improvements
of redeveloping this larger area. Specifically, the applicant
prepares a development concept in conjunction with studies
of traffic impacts, storm water management, sanitary sewer
capacity, water capacity and market conditions. The results
of this detailed analysis will yield a development concept
that is more realistic and tailored to the results of the nu-
merous studies. This will result in a better understanding of
the improvements necessary in order to mitigate impacts.
Ultimately there is a greater level of confidence in the devel-
opment concept and allows the city and community organi-
zations to move forward to the second phase of implementa-
tion such as zoning.
GDP Components: The components of the Denver Design
District GDP are listed below. The details of these compo-
nents will be more refined than the Alameda Station Plan
because it will have the benefit of the additional analysis.
While the details may not be exact, the GDP must meet the
spirit and intent of the Station Plan Objectives and Recom-
mendations.
Development Concept (land use types, land use
arrangement and building height)
Urban Design Standards and Guidelines
Open Space Concept
Circulation Concept (car, bus, pedestrian and bicycle)
Utility Plans (storm water, sanitary and water)
GDP Must-Haves: The GDP must respect all of the ob-
jectives and recommendations of this plan. More specifically,
there are key elements that are important to the success of
this new neighborhood.
Partnership with city, neighborhood organizations and
business organizations
Transit supportive land uses
Predictable form and scale
Main Streets: Dakota, Bannock and S. Broadway
Open space system that is publicly usable and offer
multiple benefits including recreation and urban design
Multi-modal circulation and accessibility improvements
( e.g. public street grid, traffic mitigation, bike lanes and
sidewalks)
Consideration of mixed income housing strategy as a
part of GDP or separate effort
Phase 2 Zoning
Based on the results of the GDP process, the applicant will
pursue zoning changes that will implement the development
concept. The GDP area is currently zoned B-4 and 1-1. These
districts will not easily allow the desired land use mix and
arrangement of the GDP. In addition, it will not create a
predictable form and scale consistent with plan recommen-
dations. Consider zoning changes to one district or a few
districts that effectively implement the GDP.
Phase 3 Infrastructure and Development
Development of the Denver Design District will occur in
multiple phases over a long time frame. Ideally, development
will begin closest to the station to allow for much needed
improvements to the platform and the surrounding environ-
ment. However, market factors and the reality of existing
businesses and long-term leases may not accommodate this
recommendation. Consistent collaboration and communica-
tion between the developers, the city and community organi-
zations will be essential as this project evolves over the years.
38


Alameda Station Area Plan Implementation
Station Area Implementation
The following are Implementation Strategies for the Sta-
tion Area outside of the Denver Design District GDP
boundary. The table is organized by Regulatory Tools,
Public Infrastructure Tools and Partnership Tools. Each
Implementation Strategy includes reference to the num-
bered Plan Recommendation(s) it implements, a general
time frame and key responsibility. The Plan Recommen-
dations are abbreviated for each section: 1) LU = Land
Use and Urban Design; 2) MO = Mobility; and 3) IN
= Infrastructure. While all strategies are important, the
reality of market conditions, infrastructure constraints
and funding require assigning time frames by short-term
(1-5 years) or long-term (5-10 years). This table does not
require these time frames if opportunities arise sooner
than predicted.
A team approach is crucial to implementation. There are
many parties involved including city departments, elected
and appointed officials, neighborhood organizations and
business organizations. The table identifies Key Responsi-
bility so it is clear who will take the lead on the effort.
Regulatory Tools
Recommendations Implementation Strategy Time- frame Key Responsibility
Land Use Mixture and Affordable Housing LU-1 thru 10 Current zoning is primarily B-4 and Industrial. Evaluate alternative zoning districts that allow the recommended mix of land uses. Coordinate with the New Zoning Code to ensure there is a menu of zoning districts that promote this mixture. Eliminate barriers to affordable housing such as an improved review process, parking reductions, form-based regulations rather than use-based. Short Community Planning & Development (CPD)
Ground Floor Uses LU-9 thru 10 Existing mixed use districts do not offer incentives or mandates for mixing uses or required ground floor commercial or retail. Concen- trating and allocating commercial and retail within the station area is essential to creating a vibrant successful station. Coordinate with the New Zoning Code to create incentives. Short CPD
Parking Ratios LU-8 MO-13 thru 16 Coordinate with the New Zoning Code to incorporate different techniques for regulating and designing parking facilities. Short CPD
Active Edges, Build-To Lines and Building Heights LU-11 thru 15 Coordinate with the New Zoning Code to develop form-based regulations that mandate a predictable scale and form. For example, the form standards should require active edges along main streets that promote active uses and frontage types. Build-to lines create a defined street wall.Transition in heights with 1 -3 stories on edges and the greatest height of 14 stories closest to the Alameda and Broadway Stations. Short CPD
Sustainability LU-16 Eliminate regulatory barriers int the New Code to sustainable practices. Short CPD
Complete Streets MO-1 thru 6 IN 1-8 Work with PWon new Right-of-way cross sections that are specific to station areas in accordance with adopted plansand accomodate vehicle, bike, pedestrian and bus mobility. Long Public Works (PW)
39


Alameda Station Area Plan Implementation
Investment Tools
Recommendations Implementation Strategy Time- frame Key Responsibility
Galapago Bicycle/ Pedestrian Path and Elati Bridge MO-8; IN-5 PublicWorks and Community Planning and Development should collaborate to obtain funding for this bicycle/pedestrian improvement. It is a short term priority because it is essential to station connectivity and accomplished relatively independently of future development projects. Short PW/CPD
Cherokee Street Off-Street Bike/ Pedestrian Path MO-9 and 10; IN-4 PW and CPD should collaborate with property owners to obtain funding for this off-street bicycle/pedestrian improvement. It is a short term priority because it is essential to station connectivity and accomplished inde- pendently of future development projects. Short PW/CPD
Enhanced Bicycle Routes MO-6 On-street bicycle route recommendations are consistent with the Bicycle Master Plan. Therefore, there is additional reinforcement and support for these improvements. Pursue funding opportunities to provide enhanced bicycle routes on designated streets. Long PW
General Bicycle Facilities MO-7 As the station area redevelops there will be a need for bicycle facilities. As funding becomes available, provide additional bike racks and storage lockers at the station. Upon full build-out consider whether there is demand and funding for bike services such as rentals and locker rooms. Long PW
Alameda Avenue MO-8 IN-6 Alameda has a varied cross section and implementation of the desired section will occur in phases. The priority recommendation is the separated bike/ped route as Alameda Avenue is improved. Long PW
South Broadway IN-7 The recommended cross-section for S. Broadway is not a dramatic change from the current section. As new development is proposed or if there are street improvements, there should be gradual implementation. Long PW/ Private
Bayaud Bridge MO-10 The bicycle/pedestrian bridge is a recommendation of the Valley Highway Environmental Impact Statement (VHEIS).Therefore, there is additional reinforcement and support for this improvement. Pursue funding in conjunction with VHEIS improvements. Long PW
Santa Fe to Jason Bridge MO-10 Consider long-term opportunities and funding Long PW
40


Alameda Station Area Plan Implementation
Partnership Tools
Recommendations Implementation Time- Key
Strategy frame Responsibility
Business As the station area redevelops there are existing industrial uses that are not Short OED/CPD
Recruitment, consistent with the plan's land use recommendations. Office of Economic
Retention & Development (OED) can play a pro-active role in assisting these businesses in
Relocation relocating to a more desirable site within the city. Additionally, OED should play
LU-1 thru 10 an active role in recruiting and retaining businesses consistent with this plan.
Affordable Housing LU-1 Partner with OED to seek funding opportunities for affordable housing. Short OED/CPD
Alameda Station This bike/ped bridge will be installed and funded by the developer of the Short CPD/
Bridge "Bus Barn Site."CPD needs to collaborate with the developer to ensure that Private
MO-10 placement of the bridge optimizes access to the station and future develop- ment near the platform.
Parks Department Many of the mobility recommendations and recreation/open space recommend- Short
LU-5 ations offer parkand recreation benefits. For example, the off-street pathway CPD/
MO-8 thru 10 along Cherokee will enable access to the South Platte River Greenway and the Parks/
park system along the greenway. As these recommendations move forward, the Parks Department must be involved in the early stages to maximize benefits. It is also important to collaborate with Parks on ways to ensure existing parks can meet demands. PW
Parking Inform the Strategic Parking Plan with the parking strategies identified in Short CPD/
MO-13 thru 16 this plan. PW
Sustainability Collaborate with Greenprint Denver office on opportunities for Long CPD/Greenprint
LU-16 sustainable practices at the station Denver
RTD There are some recommendations thatare underthe authority of the Long CPD/
MO-11&12 Regional Transportation District (RTD), not the City and County of Denver. In PW/
those cases it is important to be an active partner with RTD and work to- gether to achieve the plan recommendations as feasible. Specifically, this includes recommendations on the park-N-ride, platform open space,and bus circulation changes at the time of redevelopment. RTD
Business Historically, along S. Broadway, business marketing, recruitment and streetcape Long CPD/
Associations improvements have been primarily implemented by business organizations. PW/
These groups will continue to play an active role and should continue to collaborate as new development occurs. Private
Fire Department As projects move forward, collaboration with the Fire Department is necessary Long CPD/
IN-1 thru 7 to ensure fire safety regulations are met. In some cases the basic minimum PW/
requirements should be re-evaluated in order to reflect the urban context of the Alameda Station area. Fire
Stormwater Collaborate with developers, PW & Greenprint Denver Short CPD/PW
IN-8 Greenprint Denver
41


Alameda Station Area Plan Implementation
42


Alameda Station Area Plan The Community
43


Alameda Station Area Plan The Community
The Community
Study Area Location and Overview
The Alameda Station is one of 57 new and existing transit
stations creating the Denver Metro area fixed rail system.
Alameda is part of the Central Corridor beginning at 1-25
and Broadway continues into the heart of downtown and
then continues to Welton Street. The half mile station area
extends from Bayaud Avenue to the north, Grant Street to
the east, the Broadway station/Ohio Avenue to the south and
Lipan Street to the west. The Alameda Station is an Urban
Center station type by the Denver Transit-Oriented Devel-
opment Strategic Plan, which accommodate the greatest
concentrations of employment and housing opportunities
throughout the system. Due to the employment and housing
densities existing and planned the Alameda Station also offers
an important transportation enter of light rail and bus routes.
The rail line runs along the Consolidate Main Line to the
west of the platform. RTD parking for the station is on the
east side of the platform.
The Alamedda Station Area
44


Alameda Station Area Plan The Community
Population and Housing Characteristics
The total estimated population of the station area is 2,410
people with 1,158 housing units. This yields an average of
2.24 people per household. The station area includes por-
tions of four Denver statistical neighborhoods: Washington
Park West, Speer, Baker and Athmar Park. While Athmar
experiences significant growth in the 1960s, all neighbor-
hoods declined in the 1980s and early 1990s. All three are
seeing health growth between 2000 and 2007. The housing
stock has remained relatively stable through the past 40 years.
Continued growth and reinvestment in these neighborhoods
are expected given the public investment in transit.
Total Housing Units (1950 2007)
Athmar Park, Baker, Speer and Washington Park West
Neighborhoods
Source: U.S. Census (1950-2000};DenverCPD (2007j
Total Population (1950 2007)
Athmar Park, Baker, Speer and Washington Park West
Neighborhoods
Year
Source: US. Census (1950 2000): Denver CPD (2007)
45


Alameda Station Area Plan The Community
Alameda Station Land Use and Zoning
Land Use: The majority land use is the Alameda Station Area
is surface parking, right-of-way and vacant land. Active land
uses include retail, industrial and some residential. While
there is a presence of active uses and established residential
areas, approximately 50% of the land area within the station
area has redevelopment potential. There is a foundation of
community assets such as 3.48% public-quasi public uses,
7.87% parks and 12% housing.
Zoning: There are currently 14 zone districts in the Alameda
Station Area. 50.7% of the station area is industrial zoning.
Much of this located immediately adjacent to the station plat-
form. Only about 27.2 percent of the 1/2 mile station area is
commercial or mixed-use zoning concentrated closest to the
Alameda and Broadway stations and along S. Broadway.
The next predominant zoning category is 19.2% residential
districts found within the three adjoining neighborhoods
Washington Park West, Speer, Baker and Athmar Park. These
zone districts all allow a mixture of single-unit and multi-
unit dwellings.
The current residential land use in the Alameda Station Area
is a mixture of single-family and low-rise multi-family resi-
dential with some higher-density apartment buildings.
Alameda Station Area
Land Use Distribution (2008)
35%'
30%
T3
C
10
_l
v*-
0
01
to
*-*
c
u
L_
Q.
25%'
20%
15%-
10%-
5%-
105.98
acres
101.9
acres
58.38
acres
44.89
acres
42.74
acres
38.31
acres
22.2
acres
0%
18.69
acres
I I
I I I I I
Surface ROW Industrial Vacant Retail Single Multi- Comm-
Parking Family Family ercial
Low
Rise
-5b87-
4.25
acres
3.89
acres
3.48
acres
1.03
acres
Parks, Office Mixed Public/ Unknown
Open
Space
Use
Quasi-
Public
Land Use
46


Alameda Station Area Plan The Community
Distribution of Denver Zoning Districts
Alameda Station Area (2008)
Zoning District Acres Percent
B-l 7.30 1.5%
B-2 0.05 0.0%
B-4 99.36 19.8%
1-0 8.02 1.6%
1-1 197.42 39.3%
1-2 49.12 9.8%
O-l 13.97 2.8%
P-1 0.39 0.1%
PUD 0.72 0.1%
R-l 0.28 0.1%
R-2 36.78 7.3%
R-2-A 38.78 7.7%
R-3 20.36 4.1%
T-MU-30 28.77 5.9%
Total acres 5023
B-l Limited Office District: This district provides office space
for services related to dental and medical care and for office-
type services, often for residents of nearby residential areas. The
district has a low volume of direct daily customer contact. This
district is characteristically small in size and is situated near
major hospitals or residential areas. The district regulations
establish standards comparable to those of the low density resi-
dential districts, resulting in similar building bulk and retain-
ing the low concentration of pedestrian and vehicular traffic.
B-2 Neighborhood Business District: This district provides
for the retailing of commodities classified as convenience
goods and the furnishing of certain personal services to satisfy
the daily and weekly household or personal needs of residents
of surrounding residential neighborhoods. This district is lo-
cated on collector streets, characteristically is small in size, usu-
ally is entirely surrounded by residential districts and is located
at a convenient walking distance from the residential districts it
is designed to serve.
B-4 General Business District: This district is intended to
provide for and encourage appropriate commercial uses adja-
cent to arterial streets, which are normally transit routes. Uses
include a wide variety of consumer and business services and
retail establishments that serve other business activities, and
local transit-dependent residents within the district as well as
residents throughout the city. The regulations generally allow
a moderate intensity of use and concentration for the purpose
of achieving compatibility between the wide variety of uses
permitted in the district. Building height is not controlled by
bulk standards unless there is a property line to property line
abutment with a residential use. Building floor area cannot
exceed twice the site area.
T-MU-30 Transit Mixed-Use District: The T-MU-30 district
provides for urban development proximate to a mass transit
railway system station to promote a mix, arrangement, and
intensity of uses that support transit ridership and use of other
transit modes. The district allows the broadest range of uses
and most development intensity of the mixed use districts.
The district is for use at station areas with adequate land area
to create a viable transit oriented development (TOD) and to
transition to the surrounding community. Specific additional
criteria to the T-MU-30 district are approval of a general devel-
opment plan and site improvements, which reinforce both the
relationship of structures to the transit station and the pedes-
trian connections and linkages throughout the TOD. Basic
maximum gross floor area is equal to five (5) times the area of
the zone lot.
P-1 Off-Street Parking District: Allows parking lots and
structures. Bulk and setback regulations apply to structures.
This zone is intended to provide needed business parking with-
out the expansion of the business zone; e.g. a buffer between
business and residential uses. Requires visual barriers adjacent
to residential uses.
R-l Single-Unit Detached Dwellings, Low Density: Same as
R-0 except that other additional home occupations and room-
renting to one or two persons are allowed upon application
and issuance of a permit. Density = 7.3 dwelling units/acre.
R-2 Multi-Unit Dwellings, Low Density: Typically duplexes
and triplexes. Home occupations are allowed by permit. Mini-
mum of 6,000 square feet of land required for each duplex
structure with an additional 3,000 square feet required for
every unit over 2.
R-2-A Multi-Unit Dwellings, Medium Density: 2,000
square feet of land required for each dwelling unit unless site
plan is submitted under planned building group (PBG) provi-
sions, in which case 1,500 square feet of land is required for
each unit. Home occupations are allowed by permit.
47


Alameda Station Area Plan The Community
R-3 Multi-Unit Dwellings, High Density: Building size
is controlled by bulk standards, off-street parking and open
space requirements. Building floor area cannot exceed three
times the site area.
0- 1 Open Space District: Allows airports, recreation uses,
parks, cemeteries, reservoirs, community correctional facilities,
and other public and semi-public uses housed in buildings.
Setback requirements apply to the location of structures.
1- 0 Light Industrial/Office District: This district is intend-
ed to be an employment area containing offices, and light
industrial uses which are generally compatible with residen-
tial uses. 1-0 zoned areas are designed to serve as a buffer
between residential areas and more intensive industrial areas.
Bulk plane, setback and landscaping standards apply in this
district. Building floor area cannot exceed 50% of the site
area; however, office floor area may equal site area. Some uses
are conditional uses.
1-1 General Industrial District: This district is intended
to be an employment area containing industrial uses which
are generally more intensive than those permitted in the 1-0
zone. Bulk plane, setback and landscape standards apply in
this district. Building floor area cannot exceed twice the site
area. Some uses are conditional uses.
1-2 Heavy Industrial District: This district is intended to
be an employment area containing uses which are generally
more intensive than that permitted in either of the other two
industrial zones. Bulk plane, setback and landscape standards
apply in this district. Building area cannot exceed twice the
site area. Some uses are conditional uses.
PUD Planned Unit Development District: The PUD
district is an alternative to conventional land use regulations,
combining use, density and site plan considerations into a
single process. The PUD district is specifically intended to
encourage diversification in the use of land and flexibility in
site design with respect to spacing, heights and setbacks of
buildings, densities, open space and circulation elements; in-
novation in residential development that results in the avail-
ability of adequate housing opportunities for varying income
levels; more efficient use of land and energy through smaller
utility and circulation networks; pedestrian considerations;
and development patterns in harmony with nearby areas and
with the goals and objectives of the comprehensive plan for
the city.
Alameda Station Blueprint Denver Land Uses
Blueprint Denver identifies the majority of the station area
as Area of Change. The Core Station Area is planned for
Transit Oriented Development and Town Center. However,
due to close proximity to the station, it should contain many
transit-supportive uses and design elements. There is also a
mixture of Industrial, Employment and Mixed Use within
the station area.
The adjoining residential areas are Areas of Stability recom-
mended for Single Family Residential and Single Family/
Duplex to preserve the predominantly residential character of
the neighborhoods. As an Area of Stability, it is important to
promote the valued attributes and ensure that adjoining Ar-
eas of Change are planned in a manned that offers a respect-
ful and complementary transition.
For Areas of Change, Blueprint Denver identifies several
goals for the areas surrounding rail transit stations. These
goals include:
A balanced mix of uses.
Compact mid- to high-density development.
Reduced emphasis on auto parking.
Attractive multi-story buildings.
A variety of housing types and prices.
Access to open space and recreation amenities.
A high degree of connectivity between the station area
and surrounding neighborhoods.
Transportation
Alameda Avenue and the Broadway/Lincoln Couplet domi-
nate the station area. Signalized intersections along Broad-
way/Lincoln include Alameda, Virginia and Center. Broad-
way NEPA anticipate some changes as part of implementing
that study. The remaining streets north of Alameda and east
of Broadway/Lincoln built on the Denver grid system. How-
ever, within the Broadway Marketplace and Denver Design
Center, the public grid breaks down. While the grid network
is generally intact, none of these drives are public streets and
therefore not officially part of the Denver public street grid.
Alleys provide vehicle and loading access to most residential
and commercial properties. There are three bus routes that
serve the station. There is a mixture of comfortable pedes-
trian and bicycle conditions.
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Alameda Station Area Plan The Community
0 500 1,000
Feet
.z 1
Alameda Station Area Blueprint Denver Land Use
49


Alameda Station Area Plan The Community
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Alameda Station Area Plan Relevant Plans
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Alameda Station Area Plan Relevant Plans
Relevant Plans
The Alameda Station Area Plan builds upon a solid founda-
tion of existing documents and guiding principles. This section
provides a review of the applicable content of adopted citywide
plans. The Alameda Station Area Plan provides specific recom-
mendations for the planning area that, in case of conflict,
supersede general recommendations from existing plans.
Comprehensive Plan, 2000
The City Council adopted Denver Comprehensive Plan in
2000. Plan 2000 provides the planning and policy frame-
work for development of Denvers human and physical en-
vironment. The key subjects of Plan 2000 that relate to this
Station Plan are land use, mobility, legacies, and housing.
Land Use: Land use recommendations promote new invest-
ment that accommodates new residents, improves economic
vitality and enhances the Citys aesthetics and livability. In
addition, Plan 2000 supports sustainable development pat-
terns by promoting walking, biking and transit use.
Mobility: Plan 2000 emphasizes planning for multiple
modes of transportation walking, biking, transit and cars.
Key concepts include expanding mobility choices for com-
muters and regional cooperation in transit system planning.
Plan 2000 also promotes compact, mixed-use development
in transit rich places (like station areas).
Legacies: Plan 2000 prioritizes planning for park, open
space and recreation systems. Historic building preserva-
tion and respect for traditional patterns of development in
established areas are also key tenets of Plan 2000. To this
end, Plan 2000 places a high value on maintenance of streets,
trails, and parkways that link destinations within the com-
munity. Ensuring that new buildings, infrastructure and
open spaces create attractive, beautiful places is the founda-
tion of the legacies chapter.
Housing: Plan 2000 recognizes that access to housing is a
basic need for Denver citizens. Thus, Plan 2000 emphasizes
preservation and maintenance of the existing housing stock
and expanding housing options. Providing a variety of unit
types and costs, in addition to housing development in transit
rich places are fundamental tenets of Plan 2000. This ensures
a sustainable balance of jobs and housing as the city matures.
Blueprint Denver: An Integrated Land Use and
Transportation Plan, 2002
Plan 2000 recommended that the city create a plan to
integrate land use and transportation planning. Blueprint
Denver is the implementation plan that recognizes this rela-
tionship and describes the building blocks and tools neces-
sary to achieve the vision outlined in Plan 2000.
Areas of Change and Stability: Blueprint Denver divides
the city into areas of change and areas of stability. Over
time, all areas of the city will fluctuate between change and
stability. The goal for areas of stability is to identify and
maintain the character of an area while accommodating
new development and redevelopment. The goal for areas of
change is to channel growth where it will be beneficial and
can best improve access to jobs, housing and services. Blue-
print Denver describes two types of areas of stability: com-
mitted areas and reinvestment areas. Committed areas are
stable neighborhoods that may benefit from the stabilizing
effects of small, individual lot infill development rather than
large-scale land assembly and redevelopment. Reinvestment
areas are neighborhoods with a character that is desirable to
maintain but would benefit from reinvestment and modest
infill. This reinvestment, however, is more limited in com-
parison to that of areas of change.
Transportation: The transportation component of Blue-
print Denver provides transportation building blocks and
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Alameda Station Area Plan Relevant Plans
tools that promote multimodal and inter-modal connections.
Elements of connection include the street system, bus transit
system, bicycle system, and pedestrian system. These compo-
nents must work together to realize the guiding principles of
Blueprint Denver.
New Zoning Code (in development)
Denver citizens called for reform of the Citys Zoning Code
in the 1989 Comprehensive Plan and again in the Denver
Comprehensive Plan 2000. Blueprint Denver (2002) pro-
vided the vision and initial strategy to begin this effort.
Adopted in the 1950s, the current zoning code assumes an
automobile oriented land use development pattern. It also
implies that what existed at the time needed to be replaced
regardless of it value or context. Further, the complexity
of the current zoning code is not predictable or clear for
property owners. That complexity can make doing quality
development more difficult and raises the cost of doing busi-
ness in Denver by requiring lengthy study of our unique and
cumbersome zoning code.
The updated zoning code will incorporate a context-based
and form-based approach. This approach will better reflect
the vision of Blueprint Denver by promoting proper devel-
opment in areas of change while enhancing neighborhood
character in areas of stability.
Transit Oriented Development Strategic Plan, 2006
The Transit Oriented Development (TOD) Strategic Plan
prioritizes the citys planning and implementation efforts
related to the transit system and station area development.
TOD Defined: The TOD Strategic Plan defines TOD as
development near transit that creates beautiful, vital, walk-
able neighborhoods; provides housing, shopping, and trans-
portation choices; generates lasting value; and provides access
to the region via transit.
TOD Typologies: The TOD Strategic Plan establishes
TOD typologies for every transit station in the city. Typolo-
gies establish a framework to distinguish the types of places
linked by the transit system. The typologies frame expecta-
tions about the land use mix and intensity of development at
each of the stations.
Station Area Planning: While providing an important
planning framework, the TOD Strategic Plan calls for more
detailed station area plans. Such plans offer specific direction
for appropriate development, needed infrastructure invest-
ments and economic development strategies.
Bicycle Master Plan, 2002
In 2002 in response to Plan 2000, the Bicycle Master Plan
(2002) provides a framework for an interconnected bicycle
system. The primary objectives of the Bicycle Master Plan are:
Develop new neighborhood routes that create
connections between the existing bicycle route system
and nearby facilities not currently on a bicycle route.
Close the gaps in the existing bicycle routes to complete
the bicycle grid route system.
Improve access with bike route and trail signage around
light rail stations to make bicycling and transit work in a
seamless manner.
Support education, enforcement and public policy for
the bicycle system.
Greenprint Denver, 2006
Greenprint Denver is an effort to integrate sustainability as
a core value and operating principle in Denver city govern-
ment. The Greenprint Denver Action Agenda for 2006
charts the citys course over the next five years. Included in
Greenprint Denver Action Agenda are specific actions that
relate directly to the Citys ambitious station area planning
effort. For example, this plan directs the City to decrease reli-
ance on automobiles through public transit use and access,
and promote transit-oriented development, as well as bike
and pedestrian enhancements, and increase by 20% the new
development located within Vi mile of existing transit sta-
tions by 2011.
Parks and Recreation Game Plan, 2002
The Game Plan is a master plan for the citys park, open
space and recreation system. A primary principle is to create
The Transit Oriented Development Strategic Plan and the
Denver Bicycle Master Plan
53


Alameda Station Area Plan Relevant Plans
greener neighborhoods. Game Plan establishes a street tree
and tree canopy goal of 15-18 percent for the entire city. The
plan also establishes a parkland acreage target of 8-10 acres
per 1,000 residents. Tools to accomplish these goals include
promoting green streets and parkways, which indicate routes
that require greater emphasis and additions to the landscape.
Strategic Transportation Plan, 2006
Denver Public Works drafted the Strategic Transportation
Plan (STP). The STP will be a primary implementation tool
for Blueprint Denver and Plan 2000. The objective of the
STP is to determine needed transportation investments. The
STP process will (1) provide education concerning options
for transportation alternatives; (2) reach consensus on trans-
portation strategies along transportation corridors through a
collaborative process; and (3) build stakeholder support.
The STP represents a new approach to transportation plan-
ning in Denver. Instead of forecasting future auto travel on
Denver streets, the STP will forecast person-trips to evaluate
the magnitude of transportation impacts caused by all types
of travel. This person-trip data provides the ability to plan for
bikes, pedestrians, transit, and street improvements. The STP
is the first step in identifying the needs for every major travel
City and County of Denver
XftU*
iiiiniiiiiiiii
PEDESTRIAN
MASTERPLAN
August 2004
52 URS
corridor in the city. The STP will create concepts for how to
meet transportation needs, including a prioritization of cor-
ridor improvements.
Storm Drainage Master Plan (2005) and Sanitary
Sewer Master Plan, 2006
The Storm Drainage Master Plan and the Sanitary Sewer
Master Plan evaluates adequacy of the existing systems as-
suming the future land uses identified in Blueprint Denver.
The Storm Drainage Master Plan determines the amount
of imperviousness resulting from future land development
and the subsequent runoff. The Sanitary Sewer Master Plan
identifies needed sanitary sewer improvements to respond to
the forecasted development.
Pedestrian Master Plan, 2004
The Pedestrian Master Plan was written to address the mobil-
ity goals of the Comprehensive Plan and Blueprint Denver.
Specifically, the plan calls for a pedestrian environment that
is: safe from automobiles; encourages barrier free pedestrian
mobility; enables pedestrians to move safely and comfort-
ably between places and destinations; attractive, human scale
and encourages walking; and promotes the role of walking in
maintaining health and preventing disease. To achieve these
goals, the plan calls for land use changes to encourage walking
through mixed-use development patterns. The plan identifies
a minimum 13 foot pedestrian zone on all streets including an
8 foot tree lawn and a 5 foot sidewalk and a minimum 16 foot
pedestrian zone on most arterial streets.
West Washington Park Neighborhood Plan 1991
In collaboration with the city, the West Washington Park
neighborhood prepared a neighborhood plan. The plan
promotes patterns of land use, urban design, circulation and
services that contribute to the economic, social, and physical
health, safety and welfare of the people living and working in
the neighborhood. The vision is to preserve and enhance the
positive qualities of the neighborhood. This includes a diver-
sity of people, historic buildings, mature landscape, human-
scale land use, urban character, convenient transportation
access and the high level of energy and interaction among
residents and business people.
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Alameda Station Area Plan Relevant Plans
Baker Neighborhood Plan 2003
The Baker Neighborhood Plan is a supplement to the Den-
ver Comprehensive Plan. It addresses and provides guidance
that is more refined and specific than can be done at a citywide
level. The Plan focuses on neighborhood issues related to land
use, design and transportation for the entire neighborhood.
The plan provides a vision and goals for the neighborhood over
the next 20 years. Some major elements include:
Logical approach to land use to protect the integrity of
the residential areas
Reinforce traditional commercial and housing mix on
the major corridors
Supporting increased density and development at the
light rail stations
Prioritize infrastructure investments
Athmar Park Perimeter Plan 2000
The Athmar Park Perimeter Plan is a supplement to the
Denver Comprhensive Plan. It addresses and provides guid-
ance that is more refined and specific to the Athmar Park
neighborhood issues and opportunities. The plan provides a
vision and goals for the neighborhood over the next 20 years.
Some major elements include:
Promote neighborhood stability
Encourage business growth and revitalization
Develop interaction and communication strategies
betweeen residents, businesses and the city
Develop an effective implementation strategy
Expand transportation choices
Create new opportunities for open space and parks
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Alameda Station Area Plan Relevant Plans
56


Table of Contents
Acknowledgements iv
Introduction 1
Vision 7
Land Use and Urban Design 11
Mobility 19
Infrastructure 27
Economic Opportunity 33
Implementation 37
The Community 43
Relevant Plans
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Full Text

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AlamedaStation Area Plan Community Planning & DevelopmentApril 20, 2009

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Alameda Station Area Plan Mobility ii

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Alameda Station Area Plan MobilityiiiTable of ContentsAcknowledgements v Introduction 1 Vision 7 Land Use and Urban Design 11 Mobility 19 Infrastructure 27 Economic Opportunity 33 Implementation 37 The Community 43 Relevant Plans 51

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Alameda Station Area Plan Mobility iv

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Alameda Station Area Plan Acknowledgementsv Acknowledgements

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Alameda Station Area Plan Acknowledgements viACKNOWLEDGEMENTSMayor John W. Hickenlooper Denver City Council District 1 Rick Garcia District 2 Jeanne Faatz District 3 Paul D. Lpez District 4 Peggy Lehmann District 5 Marcia Johnson District 6 Charlie Brown District 7 Chris Nevitt District 8 Carla Madison District 9 Judy Montero District 10 Jeanne Robb President District 11 Michael Hancock At-Large Carol Boigon At-Large Doug Linkhart Community Planning & Development Peter J. Park, AICP, Manager Steve Gordon, Comprehensive Planning Manager Caryn Wenzara, AICP, Principal City Planner, Project Manager Eric McClelland Carolyne Janssen Jim Ottenstein Public Works Guillerme Vidal, Manager Robert Kochaver Crissy Fanganello O ce of Economic Development Andre Pettigrew, Executive Director Cec Ortiz, Deputy Director Will Kralovec, TOD Specialist Michael Meira Richard Warren Denver Planning Board Brad Buchanan, Chairman Laura E. Aldrete Richard Delanoy William H. Hornby Anna Jones Judith Martinez Sharon Nunnally Bruce ODonnell Karen Perez Je rey Walker Dave Webster Parks & Recreation Kevin Patterson, Manager Gordon Robertson Devon Buckels Other Agencies Regional Transportation District Denver Urban Renewal Authority Consultant Team Crandall Arambula Land Use & Urban Design Fehr and Peers Mobility Hartwig and Associates Infrastructure Basile Bauman Probst Market Special anks to Community Stakeholders Councilman Chris Nevitt, District 7 Patrick Ayres Athmar Park Neighborhood Association Steve Harley Baker Historic Neighborhood Association Doug Pimple Baker Historic Neighborhood Association Charlie Busch, West Washington Park Neighborhood Association Jim Jones, West Washington park Neighborhood Association Gertie Grant, West Washington Park Neighborhood Association Tony Gengaro, Metropolitan Denver Local Development Corporation Ken Schmidt, Property Owner Tom Wooten, Property Owner Jo Frank, Property Owner Jim Frank, Property Owner Warren Cohen, Property Owner Approved by Planning Board: March 18, 2009 Adopted by City Council:

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Alameda Station Area Plan Introduction1 Introduction

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Alameda Station Area Plan Introduction 2Introduction e planning, design, construction and opening of the expanded FasTracks transit corridors are a source of pride and excitement for neighborhoods and businesses in Denver. Opportunities for changes to land use, design and mobility exist at each new station in Denver. e Alameda Station Plan provides a sound policy basis for citywide decision-making and guiding positive changes to the built environment. is document outlines the key components of the planning process, establishes a foundation of essential objectives and provides strategies on how to realize the vision. Plan Process Over a course of approximately eighteen months, community members worked together with city sta and the planning team to articulate opportunities, develop a vision and craft strategies to achieve the vision. With the strong foundation of Denvers adopted plans, stakeholders focused on immediate, emerging market opportunities at the Alameda Station. ese community members represented businesses, property owners and residents in the area. In addition, the process involved collaboration between the City and County of Denvers Community Planning and Development Department and Public Works Department, with support from the Department of Parks and Recreation and O ce of Economic Development. Regular public meetings and stakeholder work sessions shaped plan contents. Brie ngs with City Council, Denver Planning Board and inter-agency city sta were also crucial. e following is a brief outline of the planning process: 1. Collect and analyze background information 2. Identify opportunities and constraints 3. Draft vision and objectives 4. Public Workshop #1 5. Develop Land Use, Urban Design and Mobility Concepts 6. Public Workshop #2 7. Prepare draft plan 8. Public Workshop #3 9. Plan Adoption Denver formed a unique partnership with a major landowner. is evolved into a General Development Plan (GDP) application. A GDP is a more detailed analysis of a geographic area that identi es redevelopment guidance for a large portion of the station planning area. e Implementation section of this plan provides additional details on this application. Context Planning Area: e entire Alameda Station planning area consists of a 1/2 mile radius surrounding the Alameda Station located at approximately Cherokee Street and Alaska Place. e planning area is within Council District #7 and #9 and includes the statistical neighborhoods of Athmar Park, Baker, Speer and Washington Park West. e Core Station Area is de ned as sites closest to the station that are likely to see the most change and redevelopment within the planning time frame (see Picture 1.1). e Core Station Area is currently an auto-dominated area with major auto corridors including Alameda Ave, S. Broadway/Lincoln, Santa Fe/Kalamath and Interstate 25. e predominant land uses are commercial, o ce and industrial. is station plan considers the entire 1/2 mile radius but has some more speci c recommendations for the Core Station Area. e 60acre Denver Design District is the largest single-owner property in the Core Station Area.Other larger sites in the Core Station Area include the Bus Barn site west of the Alameda Station and RTDs parking lot and bus drop-o e outlying areas are those of stability and have neighborhood plans and Blueprint Denver as a guide. East and north of the Core Station Area, the land uses are predominantly residential with neighborhood-serving commercial. is plan ensures that reinvestment in the Core Station Area o ers a respectful transition into these areas. West of the Core Station Area is predominantly industrial. ese areas are zoned, used and planned for industrial and are important to the employment and manufacturing base of the citys economy. While the success and desirability of the planning area will certainly bring new investment, land use and infrastructure will remain very similar. South of the Core Station Area is the Broadway Light Rail Station and the Gates Redevelopment site. is area is already planned and zoned for a large transit-oriented, mixed-use neighborhood. Beyond the Planning Area: While the planning area is the 1/2 mile radius of the Alameda Station, it is important to understand the land use and transportation pattern beyond that boundary. Beyond the Planning Area, in all directions,

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Alameda Station Area Plan Introduction3 VPD Light Rail Alignment RTD Parking Lot Core Station Area Light Rail Station LEGEND: RTD RTD 1/4Mile1/2Mile ALAMEDA AVE. VIRGINIA AVE. CEDAR AVE. BYERS AVE. MAPLE AVE. BAYAUD AVE. ARCHER PL. ELLSWORTH AVE.S. BROADWAY ST. BANNOCK ST. S. SHERMAN ST. S. GRANT ST. S. JASON ST. S. LIPAN ST. S. LINCOLN ST.INTERSTATE 25DAKOTA AVE. VIRGINIA AVE. CENTER AVE. EXPOSITION AVE. OHIO AVE.EXPOSITION AVE.SANTA FE DR. CHEROKEE ST. KALAMATH ST.PLATTE RIVER DR .TS NORUHVanderbilt ParkCHERKOKEE ST. ELATI ST. FOX ST. GALAPAGO ST.Habitat ParkSouth Platte River SANTA FE DR. Picture 1.1 Aerial photograph of existing conditions

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Alameda Station Area Plan Introduction 4 is predominantly residential. While these neighborhoods ar e ser v ed by convenient bus routes, many residents use the Alameda Station and several frequent the shopping center in the Core Station Area. erefore, access to the Planning Area for these neighborhoods is important to consider. A planning consideration addressed in this document is the physical barriers within the Planning Area and beyond the Planning Area. Speci cally, there is the South Platte River, Santa Fe/Kalamath, I-25, heavy rail line and a light rail line. Transit System: With the Denver region currently serving as home to 2.6 million people and another million expected to move to the metro area by 2030, improvements in transportation infrastructure are critical to maintaining the excellent quality of life that attracts so many to this area. In the past 10 years alone, RTD ridership has increasedmore than 28 percent. e existing light rail system is a total of 35 miles, 6 lines and 34 stations. By 2007 ridership was an average of 63,000 boardings per weekday. e RTD FasTracks program is an integration of several transit modes and other programs into a comprehensive regionwide system. FasTracks will improve accessibility, quality of life and commuting times. It will be a symbol of the Denver regions progressiveness. Several transit technologies will be used as determined through the environmental process on each corridor. RTD has already been using buses and light rail to meet the Denver metro areas transit needs. As part of FasTracks, three new technologies commuter rail, bus rapid transit and streetcars may be introduced to the region. In addition to the new rail corridors, extensions andbus rapid transit, FasTracks includes new park-n-Rides, a new commuter rail maintenance facility,expanded bus service called FastConnects and the redevelopment of Denver Union Station. is unprecedented transit investment will include: 1 22 miles of new rail 6 new rail corridors (light rail and commuter rail) Expand 3 existing corridors Alamed a Picture 1.2 Alameda Station in Context of City Boundaries

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Alameda Station Area Plan Introduction5 18 miles of Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) 31 new park-n-Rides 21,000 spaces Enhanced Bus Network & Transit Hubs (FastConnects) Alameda Station: e Alameda Station is located on RTDs Central Corridor light rail alignment. It is located just outside of downtown before the transit lines divide into the Southeast and Southwest Corridors. e station is located at-grade. e most direct access to the Alameda Station is currently from Alameda Avenue on Cherokee Street or from Broadway on Alaska Place. As de ned in Denvers TransitOriented Development Strategic Plan, the typology of the station is Major Urban Center. It functions as a major transfer point for the existing transit system and three bus lines. ere is also a well-used park-n-Ride surface lot. Planning Context: Denvers adopted plans provided the basis for the Alameda Station Plan and represent o cial policy adopted by elected representatives with public input. It is essential to ensure consistency with the goals, objectives and recommendations of these plans. An overview of all documents considered during this planning process is found in e Community chapter. e over-riding principles of these plans are: Promote urban in ll and compact, mixed-use development patterns that use resources more e ciently O er housing choices for Denvers diverse household types Create multi-modal streets that facilitate transportation choice Provide parks, schools and other civic uses that are safely accessible Market Context: To identify, leverage, and maximize TOD opportunities, the city commissioned a TOD Economic Analysis and Market Study. e primary goal of the TOD Economic Analysis and Market Study was to provide the city with an assessment of TOD potential at the regional, corridor, and station area levels through analysis of shortand long-term demand (e.g. demand in 2015 and 2030). Conducted in coordination with station area planning e orts, the market study helped to better align station plans with market realities and dynamics. e overall objectives of the TOD Economic Analysis and Market Study were to forge a better understanding of the economic context in which the city may plan for TOD, and to develop speci c recommendations regarding the amount, type, mix, and intensity of uses appropriate for selected station areas. e study established a few key projections and ndings which provide a framework for economic opportunities in Denver: e build-out of FasTracks will create a comprehensive transit system and should place the region in a better competitive position to attract new growth compared to other regions without full transit-systems e region should experience relatively high rates of household and employment growth in the next 20 years ere is a demonstrated market interest in higherintensity development e City and County of Denver has taken a proactive role in planning for transit and other transit-supportive public policies Current development activity near existing transit stations in the region far exceeds DRCOG growth projections Station areas are attracting (capturing) new development at a rate of 25%-40% depending on the development type (residential, retail, or o ce)

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Alameda Station Area Plan Introduction 6 Purpose of the Plan Property owners, elected o cials, neighborhood organizations and city departments will use the Alameda Station Plan for many purposes over its lifespan. e following is a description of the primary uses of the plan ranging from city planning and policy expectations to implementation. Data Resource: e plan o ers a collection of existing conditions data about the planning area in an easy-to-reference document. Reinvestment Guidance : e plan guides public and private decision-making and investment in the coming years as it relates to land use, urban design, mobility and infrastructure within the Planning Area. e plan will evolve and adapt to changing demographics and market demands. Zoning Amendments: e plan establishes the desired form, use and context of the Core Station Area in order to inform changes to the zoning code and existing zoning of sites. Capital Improvements : A plan can provide the justi cation or the prioritization and allocation of funding from the citys capital improvement budget and other sources. Projects should meet plan objective and recommendations such as increasing access and removing physical barriers Funding and Partnership Opportunities: Implementation of plans require a collaborative e ort between neighborhoods, businesses, elected o cials and city departments. is plan identi es and supports these partnerships and resource leveraging e orts. Reference for Larger City Wide Plans: e station area plan may include analysis that can inform other larger citywide plans. For example, as parking is a major issue that is addressed in this station area plan, the analysis and recommendations included here should be considered in the future development of any larger city wide strategic parking plan. Picture 1.3 Alameda Station Platform Looking North

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Alameda Station Area Plan Vision7 Vision

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Alameda Station Area Plan Vision 8 Vision e City and County of Denver is poised to take a signi cant leadership role in implementing the new transit lines and focusing growth into areas near almost 40 transit stations. is section begins with the established TOD principles for the city of Denver. e unique qualities of the Alameda Station area substantially contribute to this e ort. Realizing this vision will depend on the ability to overcome distinct challenges and capitalize on strengths and opportunities described in this section. is section establishes the speci c vision for the Alameda Station. Foundation of TOD Principles Developing a vision begins with establishing the underlying principles of transit-oriented development. Transit-oriented development is a mix of uses at various densities within a half-mile radius, or walking distance, of a transit stop. e purpose of TOD is to create speci c areas that integrate transit into neighborhoods and help support lively and vital communities. e TOD Strategic Plan de nes TOD in Denver and establishes strategies for implementation. In order to succeed, TOD should address these ve guiding principles. Place-making: Create safe, pleasant, varied and attractive station areas with a distinct identity. Rich Mix of Choices: Provide housing, employment, transportation and shopping choices for people of all ages, household types, incomes and lifestyles. Location E ciency: Place homes, jobs, shopping, entertainment, parks and other amenities close to the station to promote walking, biking and transit use. Value Capture : Encourage all stakeholders residents, business owners, RTD and the city to take full economic advantage of the amenities associated with enhanced transit services. Portal to the Region: Understand and maximize the stations role as an entry point to the regional transit network and as a safe, pleasant and private place to live. Strengths, Opportunities and Challenges To successfully accomplish the TOD principles and adopted city policies, we must have a full understanding of the strengths, opportunities and challenges of the Alameda Station area. Existing strengths, or assets, within the station area set the stage for the plans vision and add value to the station area. ese are the primary strengths of the Alameda Station area: Surrounding neighborhoods of Athmar Park, Baker, Speer and Washington Park West are stable, vital neighborhoods Existing environmental and recreation amenities of the South Platte River, South Platte River Trail and adjoining park and greenway system Strength and success of South Broadway businesses o er an established attraction and organized business associations Established employment base from existing retail, o ce and industrial uses Unique employment market for education and design services provided by the Denver Design Center High levels of light rail and bus ridership Emerging opportunities as listed below, create energy and excitement for the station area and present unprecedented resources and potential partnerships to evolve the built environment. Extension of the street grid west of South Broadway and south of Alameda to improve connectivity to the station Connection to Gates redevelopment site and the Broadway Station Potential partnership with landowners interested in redevelopment of key sites: former Bus Barn site, Broadway Market Place, Denver Design Center and northwest corner of Cherokee and Alameda Create diverse housing options within the Core Station Area supported by a strong market for residential development along transit lines Improved connections to the South Platte River, South Platte River Trail and adjoining parking and greenway system Extension and connections to the citys bike route system Creating a destination place for surrounding neighborhoods rather than just a commuting park-n-ride Partnership opportunities with existing business organizations

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Alameda Station Area Plan Vision9 Despite a strong foundation of signi cant strengths and opportunities, challenges remain. e Alameda Station Plan objectives and recommendations seek to overcome these obstacles. Substantial infrastructure investment in terms of street improvements and utilities Signi cant physical barriers (South Platte River, Santa Fe/Kalamath, I-25, heavy rail lines and light rail lines) disconnecting the west side of the station area Lack of street grid in the Core Station Area severely limits accessibility to the station and results in less bene t for residents, visitors and workers and creates pressure on existing streets due to limited route choices Auto-dominant development and expansive surface parking lots in the Core Station Area creates a poor pedestrian environment for moving through the area and to the station Single use development pattern inhibits location e ciency and further perpetuates need for the car Lack of placemaking elements that promote gathering of people Close proximity of stable neighborhoods will require development in the Core Station Area that is compatible as well as transition zones and special edge treatments that promote unity Limited incentives for a ordable housing Continued tra c volume increases due to background development and new station area development Existing B-4 and Industrial zoning does not allow a mix of transit-supportive uses or promote development forms that are predictable and pedestrian-oriented Alameda Station Plan Objectives To achieve a vibrant, economically healthy, growing and vital station area, a sustained e ort in each of the following elements is essential: Place-Making Rede ne the stations nature into a destination place Enhance the pedestrian experience along and crossing physical barriers of Alameda, Broadway/Lincoln Santa Fe/Kalamath, I-25 and the South Platte River Maintain unique urban design elements such as the main street character of South Broadway the historic laundry stacks and public art Create distinct entry points to the Core Station Area Develop strong visual connections to the station Create a consistent and predictable form within the station area Enhance existing recreational opportunities and o er new types of open space for passive and active recreation Rich Mix of Choices Provide new opportunities for housing (mix of types and a ordability) O er safe, convenient and pleasant pedestrian, bicycle and vehicular access choices to the station from all directions O er a mix of recreation choices such as plazas and greenspace for neighborhood events and gathering and active recreation opportunities such as bike trails and athletic elds Establish area as an employment center with a diversity of business types Interweave transit and pedestrian oriented uses (residential, small scale shops, restaurants, etc.) Support main street environment with buildings and pedestrian entrances oriented towards the street Location E ciency Consider reinvestment opportunities in the Core Station Area and accessibility improvements within the entire 1/2 mile radius Orient density closest to the Alameda Station and Broadway Station Integrate the station into the street and land use pattern Improve accessibility and consolidate parking locations for transit riders and businesses Improve infrastructure connections between east-west geographical barriers

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Alameda Station Area Plan Vision 10 Value C aptur e Ensure both public and private investments add value to existing neighborhoods and businesses Consider existing neighborhood plans and other local planning e orts (e.g. Baker Plan, West Washington Park Neighborhood Plan, Valley Highway Environmental Impact Statement, Broadway NEPA) Examine capacity of infrastructure to accommodate new development (water, sewer, tra c, etc.) Explore opportunities to access regional recreation system such as the South Platte Greenway, Ruby Hill Park, Daley Park, Vanderbilt Park, Habitat Park and Washington Park Portal to the Region Address existing east-west barriers between neighborhoods (South Platte River, Sante Fe/Kalamath, heavy rail line, light rail line and I-25) Emphasize alternative transportation modes in the planning area Enhance experience along and crossing major streets Create a new street hierarchy and extend the street grid in the Core Station Area

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Alameda Station Area Plan Land Use & Urban Design11 Land Use and Urban Design

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Alameda Station Area Plan Land Use & Urban Design 12Land Use and Urban Design Considering Land Use and Urban Design recommendations together creates a thorough description of the desired development pattern for the station area. is approach assumes that while land use types are important, the placement and form of those uses is equally important to the built environment. e principles of TOD provide a solid foundation for the recommendations in this chapter, however, the characteristics of the station area and the plan objectives unique to Alameda Station truly guide the speci c details of these recommendations. Land Use Recommendations Successful station areas thrive on a rich mix of land uses and e cient placement of those uses. is creates a diversity of people, choices and opportunities. Attracting jobs, residents, amenities and visitors is essential to a vital station area, neighborhood and transportation system. e Land Use Concept illustrates types and locations of transit-supportive uses on parcels within the Core Station Area. To create land use choices in the Alameda Station area and reduce or rede ne the auto-oriented development pattern, the Land Use Concept recommends a collection of residential, o ce, employment, education and open space uses. is range will allow a balanced level of activity throughout the day and week and can accommodate market demands and uctuations over a long period of time. While the entire Core Station Area should be mixed use, the Land Use Concept is an illustration of the predominant land use pattern of the station area. For example, the Ground Floor Land Use Concept illustrates suggested concentrations of retail and commercial. e land uses illustrated also try to re ect existing development plans. e following are the detailed land use recommendations for the Alameda Station area. Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 1 Residential Opportunities As described in the Introduction, there are multiple desirable residential areas within and beyond the Planning Area. ese established neighborhoods are an important component of Denvers success and add signi cant value to the community. Blueprint Denver provides guidance for these Areas of Stability to promote their valued attributes including detached walks, street trees, prominent front porches and alleys. Within the Core Station, the Alameda Station Plan recommends new housing opportunities. e residential land use category includes a mixture of housing choices including townhouse, mid-rise multiple family and high-rise multiple family. e placement of residential close to the station will greatly improve access to the station, and the region for residents of the station area. e need for a broad range of housing is important to the quality of life for Denver. Housing types that meet the needs of each particular stage in life enables a resident to age within a neighborhood. A ordable housing also can mean modestwage workers living closer to their jobs, decreasing transportation expenses. Given the signi cant amount of development planned in the Core Station area, there should be a comprehensive approach to ensure there is mixed-income housing options. is includes eliminating regulatory barriers and pursuing funding and partnership opportunities. Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 2 O ce/Employment Destination Increase the amount of o ces in the station area to create an employment center and diversify business types. North and south of Exposition Avenue is an ideal location for o ce uses to build upon the established employment base of existing larger scale o ce uses and proximity to the Broadway Station. Directly at the Alameda Station platform is also a location for o ce uses. Consider family-wage jobs and nontraditional employment opportunities to accommodate a greater range in the work force. Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 3 Education Resources Build upon established educational facilities in and around the Denver Design Center and thereby provide a unique market niche for the Alameda Station. Concentrate new and enhanced educational and design facilities north and south of Center Avenue. e existing Denver Design Center can anchor these new uses. Educational space could be a range of classrooms, training facilities or supportive uses such as student housing. Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 4 Industrial e west side of the Planning Area is an important industrial/employment area in the city. is area should continue to o er light manufacturing, warehousing, o ce and other employment base. With redevelopment and reinvestment, special attention to design, screening and bu ering is necessary due to the close proximity of residential and high visibility of the sites.

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Alameda Station Area Plan Land Use & Urban Design13 RTD RTDVIRGINIA AVE. CEDAR AVE. BYERS AVE. MAPLE AVE. BAYAUD AVE. ARCHER PL. ELLSWORTH AVE.S. BROADWAY ST.ALASKA PL.BANNOCK ST. S. SHERMAN ST. S. GRANT ST. S. JASON ST. S. LIPAN ST. S. LINCOLN ST.DAKOTA AVE. VIRGINIA AVE. CENTER AVE. EXPOSITION AVE. OHIO AVE. KENTUCKY AVE.EXPOSITION AVE.SANTA FE DR. CHEROKEE ST. SANTA FE DR. KALAMATH ST..TS NORUHVanderbilt ParkCHERKOKEE ST. ELATI ST. FOX ST. GALAPAGO ST.Habitat ParkSouth Platte RiverPLATTE RIVER DR.INTERSTATE 25ALAMEDA AVE. Retail Residential Office/Employment Parking Structure Open Space/Plaza Existing Parcel Existing Building Educational Commercial Industrial/Employment Light Rail Alignment RTD Parking Structure Light Rail Station RTDLEGEND:1/4Mile1/2MileAlameda Station Broadway Station Picture 3.1 Land Use Concept

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Alameda Station Area Plan Land Use & Urban Design 14 Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 5 C omprehensive Recreation and Open Space System A comprehensive recreation and open space system can achieve many objectives. Enhancing access to the citys recreation system is extremely important in o ering active recreation, such as athletic elds and bike trails. In the Core Station Area, open space creates a sense of arrival and creates strong visual connections to destinations such as the station and shopping. Investment in quality recreation and open space adds value and sustainability to neighborhoods and business districts and can meet some recreation demands. Core Station Area: Proposed open spaces/plazas in the Core Station Area serve as amenities and organizing features for new development and existing neighborhoods and businesses. e open space system is more urban in character and includes more opportunities for plazas and gathering space rather than always o ering traditional, green park space. As these new amenities are designed and constructed, developers should apply best practices for sustainability. e speci c design and placement of open space is part of a detailed evaluation process. Additional open space such as rooftop gardens and courtyards are encouraged. e following is the preferred open space concept: Station Open Space: O er a gathering place for transit riders that provides information about the public transportation system such as arrival and departure times and route information. Located at the platform west of Cherokee Street and south of Dakota Avenue. Central Plaza: Provide an organizing space near the inter section of the two retail/commercial main streets that o er shoppers a place to rest and can be programmed for special events such as outdoor concerts. Located east of Bannock Street between Dakota Avenue and Alaska Place. Neighborhood Park: Potential for green space, passive recreation and/or a playground oriented towards the residential area of the Core Station Area. Located south of Virginia Avenue and west of Bannock Street. Campus Quad: O ers open space concentrated near the employment center to create a campus environment and outdoor space for lunchtime gathering. Located between Center and Exposition Avenues on Bannock Street. Beyond the Core Station Area: As the population increases in the station area so will demand for recreation. Open space within the Core Station Area will meet more passive recreation needs. erefore, it is important that existing public parks within and near the station area address active recreation needs: South Platte River Greenway/Bikeway: Seek opportuni ties for connections to this system from the station area. Consider ways to enhance or expand the greenway along the river bank as a means to increase use and enjoyment. Existing Parks: Improve connectivity to existing parks including Vanderbilt Park, Habitat Park, Ruby Hill Park, Daley Park and Washington Park. Consider opportunities to enhance the under utilized parks in a manner that will increase their use and more evenly balance public park use. Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 6 Retail Retail uses are part of the established development pattern of the station area. ey are active uses because of the longer hours of operation, high turnover and shoppers tendency to visit multiple stores. is steady ow of activity greatly contributes to the energy of a station area. Additional retail uses are proposed east of Santa Fe Drive on the Bus Barn site and the Gates redevelopment site to the south. At the Alameda Station, retail is recommended near the platform for convenience to transit riders.See the Ground-Floor Land Use Concept for additional guidance on retail uses. Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 7 Commercial Commercial uses are businesses that engage in the sale of services. ey are less active than retail but are crucial to serving residents and workers in the station area, surrounding neighborhoods and in some cases the region. Existing and planned commercial services are along South Broadway and Gates Redevelopment sites. New commercial services are suggested at the ground oor along Alameda Avenue from South Broadway to Lipan Street and further west. e intersection of Lipan Street and Alameda Avenue is an opportunity for redevelopment and serves to link development on both sides of the River and I-25. See the Ground Floor Land Use Concept for additional guidance on commercial uses.

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Alameda Station Area Plan Land Use & Urban Design15 ALAMEDA AVE. VIRGINIA AVE. CEDAR AVE. BYERS AVE. MAPLE AVE. BAYAUD AVE. ARCHER PL. ELLSWORTH AVE.S. BROADWAY ST. BANNOCK ST. S. SHERMAN ST. S. GRANT ST. S. JASON ST. S. LIPAN ST. S. LINCOLN ST.DAKOTA AVE. VIRGINIA AVE. CENTER AVE. EXPOSITION AVE. OHIO AVE. KENTUCKY AVE.EXPOSITION AVE.SANTA FE DR. CHEROKEE ST. KALAMATH ST..TS NORUHVanderbilt ParkCHERKOKEE ST. ELATI ST. FOX ST. GALAPAGO ST.Habitat ParkSouth Platte RiverSANTA FE DR. PLATTE RIVER DR.INTERSTATE 25ALASKA PL. Existing Parcel Existing Building Ground Floor Commercial Ground Floor Retail Light Rail Alignment LEGEND:Light Rail Station Redevelopment Parcel Open Space/Plaza 1/4Mile1/2MileAlameda Station Broadway Station Picture 3.2 Ground Floor Land Use Concept Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 8 Shared Parking Parking in a station area is important in adding value to investments and meet capacity demands of future development. An organized approach of parking management, consolidation and design is necessary to ensure a successful parking system. To meet market demands, provide shared structured parking structures below grade or above grade within a groundoor podium. Above grade parking structures should be wrapped with active uses. When the Core Station Area redevelops, parking management will be important to minimize over ow into the adjoining neighborhoods. is may include speci c management strategies such as a residential parking permit program. If redevelopment and shared RTD parking opportunities arise consider dispersing the parking to both sides of the platform. is would allow more convenient access to parking on the east and west sides of the station. e Land Use Concept identi es potential locations, nalized as part of a development proposal. Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 9 Ground Floor Retail Retail uses are businesses that engage in the sale of merchandise. Groundoor retail uses are an essential component of an active and vital station area. Retail uses provide goods and services to local residents, employees, students and light-rail passengers. Given the market conditions and existing retail uses in the station area, Ground Floor Retail will be a range of sizes. ere is demand for small-scale shops, cafes and restaurants to serve transit riders, residents and employees. ere is also demand for larger format retailers drawing from a regional market. Examples of large format retailers that would be successful in the Core Station Area include a grocery store, furniture store and a home goods store. Identifying locations for Ground Floor Retail is a crucial component to land use placement and location e ciency. Retail uses create activity at the station platform and along designated main streets. e con guration of groundoor retailincludes continuous edge-to-edge retail storefronts with no interruptions by other land uses, including commercial uses. Limit primary permitted uses to merchandise sales and eating and drinking establishments. Dakota Avenue should serve as the primary retail street within the study area between South Broadway and the Alameda Station, and along streets fronting the Central Plaza. Two largeoor plate retail anchor sites are recommended near Dakota Avenue where they can be lined with small scale retail uses along the street front. Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 10 Ground Floor Commercial Commercial uses are businesses that engage in the sale of services. Commercial uses may be interspersed with o ce, housing or retail uses, including lobbies to access upperoor residential and o ce/employment uses. Live/sell or live/work home occupation uses are also appropriate along commercial frontages. Groundoor commercial uses are an essential component of an active and vital station area because they contribute to the land use mixture and o ers services for residents, visitors and workers. Limit primary permitted uses to nancial services, real estate services, insurance services and lodging. Bannock Street (south of Alameda) and S. Broadway are very important commercial streets within the Core Station Area that relate directly to the retail main street of Dakota Avenue.

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Alameda Station Area Plan Land Use & Urban Design 16Urban Design Recommendations Each station area must emerge as a destination with its own sense of place and identity. is plan provides strategies for making the Alameda Station Area a distinctive neighborhood while respecting surrounding conditions. Urban design recommendations are an additional layer to the land use concept that ensures placemaking for the station area.Urban design encompasses fundamental elements such as active edges, build-to lines and building heights.All assist in shaping the scale and form of the built environment of the station area. ey also ensure appropriate pedestrian-oriented scale while still maximizing transit oriented development opportunities.De ning these elements in this plan will create a predictable and consistent form that can easily be implemented over time. Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 11 Active Edges Concept Active edges are building frontages with direct sidewalk entries and a high degree of transparency. is increases visual and physical interaction between people inside and outside of the buildings, creating a safe and vibrant pedestrian environment. is eyes on the street environment will promote safety and activity. At key gateways to the station area, such as along Cherokee and Dakota, active edges will create a sense of arrival and guide people to their destinations. Active edge locations should be along important streets within the station area and surrounding open spaces: Alameda Cherokee Bannock Dakota Virginia S. Broadway Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 12 Design of Active Edges Ground-Floor Retail and Commercial actives edges must possess certain qualities to ensure interaction and a safe environment.All active edges should have a minimum of 70 percent transparent glass or screens along groundoor facades. is will ensure that activities inside and outside of a business are visible. Active edges should not have frosted, tinted, re ective glass or other types of glass that diminish transparency. Primary entrances should be at the street so pedestrians are given priority access. Buildings placed at the intersection of Alameda and South Broadway are especially important to have active edges becuase the intersection is an important gateway for the Core Station Area and neighborhoods. For all other uses located along active edges, orient primary entrances toward the street. Quasi-public terraces, stoops or porches are appropriate, but not essential. In these cases, a lower transparency percentage may be acceptable.Place art walls, news stands or other activating uses throughout. Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 13 Build-To Lines Concept e build-to lines concept identi es locations where groundoor building facades must be built to the property line. A build-to line can also be described as a zero-foot building setback from the property line where the sidewalk is built directly up to the facade. Build-to lines establish a continuous street wall that de nes the edge of the sidewalk and frames streets and open spaces. ey can have a similar e ect as Active Edges in that they bring land use activity up to the sidewalk and de ne the public realm. ALAMEDA AVE. VIRGINIA AVE. CEDAR AVE. BYERS AVE. MAPLE AVE. BAYAUD AVE. ARCHER PL. ELLSWORTH AVE.S. BROADWAY ST.ALASKA PL.BANNOCK ST. S. SHERMAN ST. S. GRANT ST. S. JASON ST. S. LIPAN ST. S. LINCOLN ST.DAKOTA AVE. VIRGINIA AVE. CENTER AVE. EXPOSITION AVE. OHIO AVE. KENTUCKY AVE.EXPOSITION AVE.SANTA FE DR. CHEROKEE ST. KALAMATH ST..TS NORUHVanderbilt ParkCHERKOKEE ST. ELATI ST. FOX ST. GALAPAGO ST.Habitat ParkSouth Platte RiverSANTA FE DR. PLATTE RIVER DR.INTERSTATE 25 Existing Parcel Existing Building Active Edges Light Rail Alignment LEGEND:Light Rail Station Redevelopment Parcel Open Space/Plaza 1/4Mile1/2MileAlameda Station Broadway Station Picture 3.3 Active Edges Concept

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Alameda Station Area Plan Land Use & Urban Design17 e concept recommends building frontages for build-to line treatments. Other building frontages may include these treatments; but, it is not crucial. Locate build-to line locations along important streets within the station area and surrounding proposed open spaces. Determine exact locations as part of a detailed site analysis but recommended locations include: Alameda S. Broadway Dakota Avenue Bannock Street Street surrounding key open space locations such as the Station Open Space, Central Plaza, Neighborhood Park and the Campus Quad Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 14 Design of Build-to Lines Build-to Lines must possess certain qualities to ensure they de ne the public realm and creates the consistent street wall. ere should be a maximum setback for the building (such as 5-10 feet) that allows for some exibility but does not create too much variation. is setback should also accommodate recessed groundoor entrances, windows and architectural elements that engage the build-to line. Build-to lines should extend along the entire block length and interrupted only for access points to courtyards or other private spaces. Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 15 Building Height Concept e building heights concept indicates a range of minimum to maximum building height recommendations. e building height concept orients the greatest density at the Alameda and Broadway Stations. e height transitions to a lower scale and blends with surrounding neighborhoods. e concept also identi es key intersections where taller structures can e ectively enclose wider streets and create more dramatic entries into the station area. When heights exceed ve stories, there should be consideration of a building step back to minimize the building scale at the street level. Overall, the Building Height Concept creates variability within the Core Station Area, adding architectural interest and a compatible transition. ese building heights must comply with the Washington Park Viewplane Ordinance. ALAMEDA AVE. VIRGINIA AVE. CEDAR AVE. BYERS AVE. MAPLE AVE. BAYAUD AVE. ARCHER PL. ELLSWORTH AVE.S. BROADWAY ST. BANNOCK ST. S. SHERMAN ST. S. GRANT ST. S. JASON ST. S. LIPAN ST. S. LINCOLN ST.DAKOTA AVE. ALASKA PL. VIRGINIA AVE. CENTER AVE. EXPOSITION AVE. OHIO AVE. KENTUCKY AVE.EXPOSITION AVE.SANTA FE DR. CHEROKEE ST. KALAMATH ST.PLATTE RIVER DR..TS NORUHVanderbilt ParkCHERKOKEE ST. ELATI ST. FOX ST. GALAPAGO ST.Habitat ParkSouth Platte RiverSANTA FE DR. INTERSTATE 25 Existing Parcel Existing Building Build-to Line Light Rail Alignment LEGEND:Light Rail Station Redevelopment Parcel Open Space/Plaza 1/4Mile1/2MileAlameda Station Broadway Station Picture 3.4 Build-to Lines Concept

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Alameda Station Area Plan Land Use & Urban Design 18 5-14 Floors 5-14 Floors 5-14 Floors 5-14 Floors 5-14 Floors 5-14 Floors 5-14 Floors 5-14 Floors 5-14 Floors 5-14 Floors 5-14 Floors 2-5 Floors 2-5 Floors 2-5 Floors 2-5 Floors 2-5 Floors 2-5 Floors 2-5 Floors 2-8 Floors 1-3 1-3 Floors 2-5 Floors Floors 1-3 Floors 1-3 Floors 2-5 Floors 1-3 Floors 1-3 Floors 1-3 Floors 1-3 Floors 2-5 Floors 5-14 Floors 5-14 Floors 5-14 Floors 5-14 Floors RTD RTD5-14 Floors 5-14 Floors 5-14 Floors 5-14 Floors 5-14 Floors 2-6 Floors 2-6 Floors 2-6 Floors 2-8 Floors 1-3 Floors 1-3 Floors 1-3 Floors 1-3 Floors Floors 1-3 Floors 1-3 Floors 1-3 Floors 1-3 Floors 2-5 2-5 Floors 2-5 Floors 1-4 Floors 1-4 Floors 1-4 Floors 1-4 Floors 1-4 Floors 1-4 Floors 1-4 Floors 1-4 Floors 5-14 Floors 5-14 Floors 1 Floor 5-14 Floors 5-14 Floors 2-5 FloorsVIRGINIA AVE. CEDAR AVE. BYERS AVE. MAPLE AVE. BAYAUD AVE. ARCHER PL.S. BROADWAY ST.ALASKA PL.BANNOCK ST. S. SHERMAN ST. S. GRANT ST. S. JASON ST. S. LIPAN ST. S. LINCOLN ST.DAKOTA AVE. VIRGINIA AVE. CENTER AVE. EXPOSITION AVE. OHIO AVE. KENTUCKY AVE.EXPOSITION AVE.SANTA FE DR. CHEROKEE ST. SANTA FE DR. KALAMATH ST..TS NORUHVanderbilt ParkCHERKOKEE ST. ELATI FOX S T GALAPAGO STHabitat ParkSouth Platte RiverPLATTE RIVER DR.INTERSTATE 25ALAMEDA AVE. Retail Residential Office/Employment Parking Structure Open Space/Plaza Existing Parcel Existing Building Educational Commercial Industrial/Employment Light Rail Alignment RTD Parking Structure Light Rail Station RTDLEGEND:1/4Mile1/2MileAlameda Station Broadway Station Picture 3.5 Building Heights Concept In no case shall builcings exceed the Washington Park View Plane Ordinance

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Alameda Station Area Plan Mobility19 Mobility

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Alameda Station Area Plan Mobility 20Mobility Mobility choices are a key ingredient to a livable station environment because it increases access to jobs, conserves energy, relieves congestion, supports public safety and encourages social and economic activity. Additionally, people at various stages of life share these bene ts. Mobility recommendations improves circulation between the station, surrounding proposed residential, o ce/employment and educational uses and existing nearby residential neighborhoods. Choices minimize the impact of new development on major regional mobility corridors such as Alameda, Santa Fe/Kalamath and Broadway/Lincoln. Enhanced pedestrian and bicycle routes are an important component that provide safe, direct, convenient and attractive connections. Street Circulation Recommendations Much of the Core Station Area is de cient in o ering a public street grid. To the extent possible, the New and Enhanced Streets Concept extends the existing street grid and ensures improved mobility for all modes of travel. e grid is the foundation for the mobility recommendations. In addition, this grid creates development blocks and street hierarchy that de ne the scale, massing and character of new buildings and open spaces. ese recommendations are conceptual in nature and require detailed analysis and design b y tra c engineers. For example, all intersections must be 90 degrees, there must be proper o set spacing and dead-end street must be avoided as the grid is phased in. Mobility Recommendation 1 New Streets e New Street Concept extends existing public streets west of South Broadway and south of Alameda Avenue. e Concept also provides for additional street connections that create smaller blocks. is network creates multiple access points to the station area and o ers urban design bene ts. is concept will improve east-west and north-south connectivity within the station area. Realistically, east-west street connectivity is severely limited due to the presence of the South Platte River, I-25 and the rail lines. ere will still be heavy reliance on major arterials such as Alameda Avenue to travel east-west. Access to the station will allow existing and future residents, visitors and workers enjoyment of this important neighborhood amenity and improve access to the region for jobs, shopping and other purposes. Finally, extending the street grid will decrease pressure on existing streets because there are more choices for circulation. Potential New Streets are not as crucial to the street grid but may be built during a later phase in the planning process and may occur as part of a longer-range plan. Mobility Recommendation 2 Enhanced Streets Enhanced Streets are a combination of existing and new streets that warrant a higher level of design due to their visibility and higher level of use by people. Providing a framework for Enhanced Streets establishes a street hierarchy and is indicated on the diagram in orange. Enhanced streets require additional enhancements that provide a desirable pedestrian environment that will enhance walking along the street and crossing intersections. Creating this environment for pedestrians increases the likelihood of walking instead of driving and also extends visits to shopping areas and other destinations. Speci c details may include the following: Sidewalk curb extensions or bulb-outs where possible to minimize pedestrian street-crossing distances Wider sidewalks RTD RTD ALAMEDA AVE. VIRGINIA AVE. CEDAR AVE. BYERS AVE. MAPLE AVE. BAYAUD AVE. ARCHER PL. ELLSWORTH AVE.S. BROADWAY ST. BANNOCK ST. S. SHERMAN ST. S. GRANT ST. S. JASON ST. S. LIPAN ST. S. LINCOLN ST.INTERSTATE 25DAKOTA AVE. NEVADA PL. EXPOSITION AVE. OHIO AVE. KENTUCKY AVE.EXPOSITION AVE.SANTA FE DR. CHEROKEE ST. KALAMATH ST..TS NORUHVanderbilt ParkCHERKOKEE ST. BA B B B ELATI ST. MAP MA FOX ST. GALAPAGO ST.Habitat ParkSouth Platte RiverSANTA FE DR. PLATTE RIVER DR.ALASKA PL. Existing Parcel Existing Building New Streets Possible New Streets Enhanced Streets Light Rail Alignment LEGEND:Light Rail Station Redevelopment Parcel Open Space/Plaza 1/4Mile1/2MileAlameda Station Broadway Station VIRGINIA AVE. CENTER AVE. Picture 4.1 New and Enhanced Streets Concept

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Alameda Station Area Plan Mobility21 ALAMEDA AVE. ALAMEDA AVE. VIRGINIA AVE. CEDAR AVE. BYERS AVE. MAPLE AVE. BAYAUD AVE. ARCHER PL. ELLSWORTH AVE.S. BROADWAY ST. BANNOCK ST. S. SHERMAN ST. S. GRANT ST. S. JASON ST. S. LIPAN ST. S. LINCOLN ST.ALASKA PL. DAKOTA AVE. VIRGINIA AVE. CENTER AVE. EXPOSITION AVE. OHIO AVE. KENTUCKY AVE.EXPOSITION AVE.SANTA FE DR. CHEROKEE ST. KALAMATH ST.INTERSTATE 25SANTA FE DR. .TS NORUHVanderbilt ParkCHERKOKEE ST. ELATI ST. FOX ST.GALAPAGO ST.Habitat ParkSouth Platte RiverSANTA FE DR. PLATTE RIVER DR. Pedestrian Bridge Light Rail Alignment LEGEND:Light Rail Station Redevelopment Parcel Existing Parcel Open Space/Plaza Existing Building Enhanced Sidewalks Multi-Purpose Path Separated Bike and Ped Lanes 1/4Mile1/2MileAlameda Station Broadway Station Picture 4.2 Primary Pedestrian Circulation Concept Special paving or painting patterns at cross walks of major intersections to alert drivers and pedestrians the crosswalk presence Pedestrian crossing signals (these improvements are recommended at signalized intersections, not mid-block or un-signalized intersections) On-street parking Pedestrian-scaled lighting Benches Bus stop shelters All public sidewalk enhancements must be ADA compliant Pedestrian and Bicycle Recommendations All streets must accommodate pedestrians and bicycles to facilitate multiple transportation choices within the station area. O ering transportation choices and connectivity will increase accessibility to jobs, housing, recreation, shopping and other important destinations. Successful pedestrian and bicycle routes provide a choice that is cost e ective, better for the environment than cars and alleviates congestion. is section highlights primary pedestrian and bicycle routes. Recommended enhancements improve the enjoyment and experience and increase the likelihood of walking and biking within the station area. Mobility Recommendation 3 Enhanced Sidewalk Routes Enhanced sidewalk routes o er safe, convenient and pleasant routes between the outlying neighborhoods and destinations such as the station, open spaces, employment and shopping. e primary pedestrian routes run north-south and eastwest to ensure balanced connectivity within the station area. ese routes are: South Broadway: is maintains the historic main street character of the corridor and signi es that South Broadway continues as a front door for the neighborhoods. As a primary route, signalized and enhanced intersection crossings are essential. Bannock Street: is north-south route links the Baker neighborhood to the Alameda Station area and the Broadway Station area further south. Along the route the plan recommends active retail and commercial uses and open space areas. Cherokee Street: Cherokee Street is also a north-south connection for Baker but is a more direct route to the light rail station platform and also connects with shared bicycle and pedestrian facilities that o er regional connections. Bayaud Avenue : Bayaud Avenue is an east-west route that links Baker, Speer and Washington Park West neighborhoods to routes running south into the station area and to a proposed bridge crossing over the railroad lines, the Platte River and I-25. is bridge crossing links users to recreation such as parks and the South Platte River Greenway. Dakota Avenue : Dakota Avenue is an important, active retail street that should serve as a gateway into the station area from the east. It provides a direct link to the station platform and north-south routes. Once at the station a bike/ped bridge can o er a link to the west side of the railroad line. Virginia Avenue : Virginia Avenue provides an alternative east-west connection that is more oriented to station access, the employment uses planned in the southern area and connections to north-south routes. Once constructed, the bike/ ped bridges over the railroad, I-25 and the River will o er access between Athmar Park and the station area.

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Alameda Station Area Plan Mobility 22 Exposition Avenue: Exposition A v enue o ers an east-west connection for the southern area of the Washington Park West neighborhood. Use of this route provides enhanced access to Bannock and S. Broadway along with a convenient connection to the Broadway Station. Santa Fe Drive/Virginia: Once redevelopment on the west side of the platform occurs, there will be a stronger demand for an improved pedestrian connection to Alameda Avenue. is route can create that connection and limit the pedestrian travel time along the busy corridor. Additionally, overtime a bike/bridge to Viriginia west of the river is desired to create another connection with Athmar Park. Mobility Recommendation 4 Enhanced Sidewalk Route Improvements Ensure these designated routes are pleasant and functional through enhancements such as: Pedestrian-scaled lighting Wider sidewalks than standard requirements Street trees Contrasting paving or striping at crosswalks Sidewalks with curb extensions, where possible ADA ramps Mobility Recommendation 5 On-Street Bicycle Lanes Streets with on-street bicycle lanes provide cyclists with a bicycle travel lane separated from the auto travel lanes. e separation is typically provided through striping and signage. On-street bicycle lanes are designated along busier streets where bike tra c is particularly popular. On-street bicycle lanes should be at least ve feet wide for one-directional travel and clearly identi ed with roadway striping. ese should not be o ered at the expense of on-street parking. On-street bicycle lanes are recommended on the following streets: Cherokee Street(west of rail line) Bannock ExpositionMobility Recommendation 6 Enhanced Bike Routes Enhanced bike routes are where cars and bicycles share the roadway. Bicycle treatments calm tra c, encourage bicycling and improve pedestrian safety. ese routes are most successful on low-tra c volume streets. Enhanced routes should include signs that clearly indicate shared and equal use of travel lanes for both cyclists and motor vehicles. Surface treatments, such as sharrows, that indicate the presence of bicycles in the roadway should be included along the route and at major intersections.Recommended routes include S. Jason Street, Virginia Avenue(west of I-25 and east of South Broadway), Bayaud Avenue, Bannock, Dakota, Exposition and Cherokee (west of rail lines). Mobility Recommendation 7 General Bicycle Facilities O ering special facilities for bikes will improve ease of use and increase the likelihood people would choose this travel mode. Examples of these special facilities include: Install bike racks throughout the station area Construct a bicycle facility with storage racks, lockers/ showers and possibly rentals/ sales at the station Evaluate the feasibility of cycle-activated crossing signals at main intersections Mobility Recommendation 8 Separated Pedestrian and Bicycle Routes Separated pedestrian and bicycle routes provide paths for pedestrians and bicyclists that run parallel and adjacent to roadways. Bicyclists, pedestrians and autos should be physically separated from each other. ese are very important to the mobility system because they o er a better route than following the street. Separated bicycle and pedestrian routes are recommended in the following locations: Alameda Avenue, between Cherokee and Lipan streets, connecting the Alameda Station to the bicycle route along the S. Platte River greenway and the Athmar Park neighborhood Sharrows remind drivers to share the road

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Alameda Station Area Plan Mobility23 Galapago Street, north of Dakota Avenue, connecting the Alameda Station to the planned bicycle route along Bayaud Avenue and the Baker neighborhood Mobility Recommendation 9 O -Street Pedestrian and Bicycle Routes An o -street pedestrian and bicycle route provides a parallel path for pedestrians and bicyclists that are not typically adjacent to a roadway. e recommended o street routes includes the existing South Platte River Greenway and the pathway running parallel to the light rail alignment between the Alameda Station and the Broadway Station. More detailed design is necessary to determine the exact alignment and cross-section. Mobility Recommendation 10 Pedestrian and Bicycle Bridges Improving east-west connectivity is an extremely important objective for the Alameda Station Area Plan. Promoting new development and multi-modal improvements along Alameda Avenue will create activity and interest along the corridor. However, there is the only existing east-west vehicle connection wtihin the planning area. Street extensions and bridges for vehicles are extremely expensive. erefore, strategic investment in bicycle/pedestrian bridges is a more e cient method to improve connectivity without the high cost and impacts of new streets. Shared bicycle and pedestrian bridges should be in the following locations: Alameda Station over the Consolidated Main Line alignment Bayaud Avenue over S. Platte River (recommended as part of the Valley Highway EIS) Broadway Station over the LRT alignment (proposed as part of the Gates redevelopment project) Santa Fe to Jason Street/Virginia Avenue (considered a long-range improvement) Public Transportation Recommendations Public transportation is an essential component to the mobility framework. is includes bus and light rail recommendations to identify essential improvements to protect and enhance regional mobility Mobility Recommendation 11 Park-n-Ride and Platform Currently there are 287 spaces owned by RTD and 221 leased by RTD at the Alameda Station. At the end of the rst quarter in 2008, utilization was 93%. Parking, while conveniently located right at the platform, is a barrier to pedestrians and visual connectivity between development.If opportunities for partnership with RTD arise, decrease emphasis on parking right at the station. Collaborate with RTD to re-locate parking to a place that is still convenient to transit riders but not directly placed at the platform. e platform should o er some plaza space for gathering and information and su cient lighting for safety. Mobility Recommendation 12 Bus Circulation Existing bus routes serve as feeder routes that provide access to the Alameda Station for those outside of walking or cycling distance.Existing routes are illustrated on the diagram and follow Alameda and Cherokee. e existing bus drop-o area must be re-con gured to achieve the plans build-out but route changes are not necessary. Re-design and re-location of bus bays from on-site to on-street will be necessary. is should balance the need for an active and inviting platform area with convenient, visible access to bus transfers. Long term, additional consideration should be given to enhanced transit service along the South Broadway/Lincoln couplet. While there is frequent bus service, future developALAMEDA AVE.VIRGINIA AVE. CEDAR AVE. BYERS AVE. MAPLE AVE. BAYAUD AVE. ARCHER PL. ELLSWORTH AVE.S. BROADWAY ST. BANNOCK ST. S. SHERMAN ST. S. GRANT ST. S. JASON ST. S. LIPAN ST. S. LINCOLN ST.DAKOTA AVE. VIRGINIA AVE. CENTER AVE. EXPOSITION AVE. OHIO AVE. KENTUCKY AVE.EXPOSITION AVE.SANTA FE DR. CHEROKEE ST. KALAMATH ST.PLATTE RIVER DR..TS NORUHVanderbilt ParkCHERKOKEE ST.ELATI ST. FOX ST.GALAPAGO ST.Habitat ParkSouth Platte RiverSANTA FE DR. ALASKA PL.INTERSTATE 25 Light Rail Alignment LEGEND:Light Rail Station Multi-Purpose Path Redevelopment Parcel Existing Parcel Open Space/Plaza Existing Building Bicycle Bridge Separated Bike and Ped Lanes On-Street Bike Lanes Enhanced Bike Route 1/4Mile1/2MileAlameda Station Broadway Station Picture 4.3 Primary Bicycle Circulation Concept

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Alameda Station Area Plan Mobility 24 ment could create demand for a higher level of service. e city, R TD, pr operty owners, business owners and residents should consider the feasbility of enhanced transit service such as Bus Rapid Transit, streetcar or some combination to meet demands and reduce auto reliance on the corridor. Parking Recommendations e economic success of station areas require su cient parking since most trips to Denvers stations will not involve transit. But just as too little parking will create economic problems, so will too many spaces. Denvers TOD Principles seek to maximize development potential, create placemaking and add value to neighborhoods. erefore, it is important to ensure parking does not consume too much of the buildable square footage in TOD projects. e following are speci c strategies relevant to the Alameda Station Area. When evaluating and implementing these recommendations there are important factors to consider: Walkable design and way nding of parking areas for pedestrians Proper balance of o -street parking regulations and onstreet parking management Promoting demand reduction techniques for long term success of both on and o street parking systems Mobility Recommendation 13 Parking Design Controls To ensure that parking does not damage the walkability of station areas, good design is important. Care should be taken to ensure that parking does not diminish the attractiveness of other modes. Key tools include: Establish building build-to lines and parking setbacks. Wrap parking with active uses to optimize personal security and the attractiveness of station areas and so doors and windows face the street, rather than the blank facades of parking structures and garage doors Minimize negative impacts of driveways. Parking lots and garages should be accessed primarily from the side and rear of buildings, with driveways and curb cuts strongly discouraged or banned from main pedestrian ways. Encourage alleys and require parking access from the alley. Minimize driveway width. Discourage or prohibit surface parking lots. However, surface parking can be seen as a land bank for future development and is a necessary temporary use as TODs gain momentum. If necessary, surface parking lots should be provided only at the rear of buildings and protected by strong landscape setback requirements. Require that parking be screened from sidewalks with low walls and landscaping. Where pedestrians are expected to walk across a parking lot to get from one destination to another, align drive aisles in parallel with primary pedestrian movements, and where possible provide sidewalks in parking lots alongside what will be future streets. Mobility Recommendation 14 Parking Requirements Consider parking in a station area as a system serving different parking needs. Operating and treating parking in this e cient and comprehensive manner can eliminate over-parking; reduce construction costs and facilitate better design investments. e following are ways to better calibrate parking requirements to strike the correct balance of parking supply: ALAMEDA STATION BUS TRANSFERS 3-52-79 34 52 3 O EV P O 119X OL 6 ALAMEDA AVE. VIRGINIA AVE. CEDAR AVE. BYERS AVE. MAPLE AVE. BAYAUD AVE. ARCHER PL. ELLSWORTH AVE.S. BROADWAY ST. BANNOCK ST. S. SHERMAN ST. S. JASON ST. S. LIPAN ST. S. LINCOLN ST.INTERSTATE 25DAKOTA AVE. VIRGINIA AVE. CENTER AVE. EXPOSITION A OHIO A V KENTUCK Y EXPOSITION AVE.SANTA FE DR. CHEROKEE ST. KALAMATH ST.HURON ST.Vanderbilt ParkCHERKOKEE ST. ELATI ST. FOX ST. GALAPAGO ST.Habitat ParkSouth Platte RiverSANTA FE DR. PLATTE RIVER DR. Light Rail Alignment LEGEND:Light Rail Station Primary Auto Circulation Existing Bus Circulation RTDRedevelopment Parcel Existing Parcel Open Space/Plaza Existing Building RTDProposed RTD Parking RTD RTD1/4Mile1/2MileAlameda Station Broadway Station Picture 4.4 Auto and Bus Circulation Concept

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Alameda Station Area Plan Mobility25 Consider reducing minimum parking ratios due to e ciencies of mixed use and multi-modal access Increase ways to meet parking requirements such as tandom spaces Consider di erent ratios and requirements for reserved or un-bundled parking, such as no minimums Implement on-street parking management programs, as needed, to minimize parking over ow in adjoining neighborhoods Mobility Recommendation 15 E ective Public Information and Way nding Program To improve parking access and information in station areas, consider electronic way nding and guidance systems that uses variable messaging signs to direct visitors and commuters to speci c parking areas with available parking and to access routes. Another system used e ectively in some new parking structures is an electronic space count system, which can sense individual space availability and direct users to open spaces. A Web-based parking information and reservation system is another option. is could be a website that shows drivers where there are available spaces in surface lots and garages. Sensors at entry and exit points in every lot and structure send information to a server in the citys parking o ce, which updates the website every ve seconds. Other way nding policies include designing a universal logo and rate structure for all short-term public parking, establishing signage ordinances to encourage private participation in parking management and o ering participation in the station area way nding system as an incentive to private owners and managers. A combination of these systems can serve to greatly extend the perceived availability and actual utilization of parking in todays market where construction costs have greatly increased. Mobility Recommendation 16 Demand Reduction Reducing vehicle use will meet several plan objectives and inherently assuage neighborhood concerns of tra c and parking impacts. Multi-modal improvements will o er choices but demand reduction incentives and programs are also e ective. Universal Transit Pass: In Metro Denver and nationally, these programs are a highly e ective tool for reducing parking demand and increasing transit ridership. e principle of employee or residential transit passes is similar to that of insurancetransit agencies can o er lower rates on passes on the basis that not all those o ered the pass will actually use them regularly. e universal passes are bene cial to everyone involved: For transit agencies, universal transit passes provide a stable source of income, while helping them meet their ridership goals Employers reduce the demand for parking on-site and are able to provide an additional bene t that helps recruit and retain employees. For commuters, the transit pass reduces the cost of getting to work and a ords a hassle-free level of transit mobility. Transportation Management Associations: Many parking management tools could be e ciently administered through a Transportation Management Association (TMA), a member-controlled organization that encourages e cient use of transportation and parking resources in a nite area, such as around Union Station. TMAs provide a centralized framework to support Tra c Demand Management (TDM) strategies. Car-Share Programs: Car-sharing is a service that provides members with access to a eet of vehicles on an hourly basis. One of the newest additions to the transportation toolbox, car-sharing has the potential to change peoples relationship to the car. At the home, car-sharing can substitute for car ownership. At the workplace, it provides access to a vehicle for business use and personal errands during the day, allowing employees to avoid driving to work. Members can use transit, cycling and walking for most of their daily trips, but have access to a car when required. In Denver, members can use car-sharing for a range of needs from trips to the mountains to trips to the grocery store. Given the planned densities and large-scale development of the Alameda and Broadway Station areas, car-sharing could be very successful.

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Alameda Station Area Plan Mobility 26

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Alameda Station Area Plan Infrastructure27 Infrastructure

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Alameda Station Area Plan Infrastructure 28 Infrastructure is chapter identi es essential infrastructure investments needed to ensure a successful station area. ese projects provide a balance that leverages private investment, ensures infrastructure capacity and enhances the character of the station area. Given that connectivity is a primary challenge for the Alameda Station Area, street construction and pedestrian and bicycle improvements are the focus of these infrastructure recommendations. ALAMEDA AVE. VIRGINIA AVE. BAYAUD AVE. ARCHER PL.S. BROADWAY ST. BANNOCK ST. CHEROKEE ST.ALASKA PL. DAKOTA AVE.S. SHERMAN ST. S. GRANT ST. S. JASON ST. S. LIPAN ST. S. LINCOLN ST.VIRGINIA AVE. CENTER AVE. EXPOSITION AVE. OHIO AVE. KENTUCKY AVE.EXPOSITION AVE.SANTA FE DR. CHEROKEE ST. KALAMATH ST.HURON ST.Vanderbilt ParkELATI ST. FOX ST.Habitat ParkSouth Platte RiverSANTA FE DR. PLATTE RIVER DR.CEDAR AVE. BYERS AVE. MAPLE AVE.INTERSTATE 25 Existing Parcel Existing Building Typical Neighborhood Street Light Rail Alignment LEGEND:Light Rail Station Redevelopment Parcel Open Space/Plaza 1/4Mile1/2MileAlameda Station Broadway Station Picture 5.1 Neighborhood Street Concept

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Alameda Station Area Plan Infrastructure29 Picture 5.3 Typical Neighborhood Street Plan View Neighborhood Street Design Recommendations Extension of the established street grid is a key recommendation of the mobility chapter. is is a signi cant infrastructure investment and is necessary to improve connectivity within the station area. e majority of these streets are classi ed as neighborhood streets. Neighborhood streets accommodate lower vehicular tra c volumes than arterial or collector streets and provide opportunities for public interaction. ese streets should complement adjacent land uses and accommodate pedestrians, bicycles and motorized vehicles without compromising safety or function. e following are recommendations on the basic cross section and design elements of neighborhood streets. ey are generally consistent with national and local street standards. I nfrastructure Recommendation 1 Typical Neighborhood Streets Typical Neighborhood Streets should include the following minimum elements. ese elements accommodate multiple travel modes in an enhanced environment. 13.5-foot sidewalks or a combination of 8-foot sidewalks, 1-foot curbs and a 5-foot landscaped areas with street trees, turf and ground cover between the sidewalks and the curbs on each side of the street. Wider sidewalks would be necessary if the street is an Enhanced Pedestrian Route Two 10-foot two-directional travel lanes and two 8-foot parallel parking lanes Landscaped curb extensions at each street corner and crosswalks aligned with the sidewalk Additional special emphasis such as a bicycle boulevard or other enhancements Infrastructure Recommendation 2 Sustainable Street Design Strive to achieve sustainable streets in the station area. Sustainable streets (1) apply widely accepted sustainable design principles, including stormwater in ltration and permeable surface treatments (2) promote least-polluting ways to connect people and goods to their destinations, and (3) make transportation facilities and services part of livable communities. Picture 5.2 Typical Neighborhood Street Cross Section

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Alameda Station Area Plan Infrastructure 30 Key Street Design Recommendations e South Platte River, I-25, Santa Fe/ Kalamath, heavy rail line and light rail line are signi cant barriers within the Alameda Station area that impede connectivity. e Mobility chapter identi es enhanced sidewalk and bicycle routes for moving higher volumes of people to and through the station area. Consistent with Plan Objectives, these routes e ciently accommodate multiple travel choices. In order to create these routes, these Key Streets require signi cant investment and improvement. Beyond the Typical Street design, the following is a description of the Key Street Design Recommendations for each of these streets. Infrastructure Recommendation 3 Virginia Avenue Virginia Avenue enhancements will improve local auto and pedestrian access and serve as a primary east-west bicycle connection to and from the Alameda Station. Virginia Avenue should accommodate the following minimum elements within a 75-foot right-of-way between Broadway and Cherokee Streets. Cherokee Street between Alameda and Alaska Place should have a similar cross section. Two 11-foot, two-directional travel lanes Two 5-foot on-street bike lanes Two 8-foot curbside parking lanes Two 13.5-foot sidewalks including an 8.5-foot pedestrian zone, 4-foot planters for street trees and a 1-foot curb Consider wider sidewalks widths (2 feet ) either through wider right-of-way or through a private amenity zone easement Infrastructure Recommendation 4 Cherokee Street Cherokee Street serves as a primary north-south station access street from the neighborhoods north of Alameda Avenue. Enhancements to Cherokee Street will maintain service for autos and buses and improve access for pedestrians and bicycles. Cherokee Street should accommodate the following minimum elements within a 75-foot right-of-way between Alameda Avenue and Alaska Place. ese are the same improvements recommended for Virginia Avenue: Two 11-foot, two-directional travel lanes Picture 5.5 Cherokee Street Cross Section between Alaska Place and I-25 Picture 5.4 Virginia Avenue Cross Section

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Alameda Station Area Plan Infrastructure31 Picture 5.6 Alameda Avenue Cross Section Two 5-foot on-street bike lanes Two 8-foot curbside parking lanes Two 13.5-foot sidewalks including an 8.5-foot pedestrian zone, 4-foot planters for street trees and a 1-foot curb Consider wider sidewalks widths (2 feet ) either through wider right-of-way or through private easements Cherokee Street should accommodate the following minimum elements within a 65.5-foot right-of-way from Alaska Place to the south: A 20-foot shared bicycle/pedestrian route, including two 5-foot planters with street trees and one 10-foot bicycle/ pedestrian path Extend the bicycle/pedestrian path from the Alameda Station platform to the new Exposition alignment as part of the Broadway NEPA improvements A 32-foot roadway, including one 13-foot southbound travel lane, one 11-foot northbound travel lane and one 8-foot curbside parking lane A 13.5-foot sidewalk including an 8.5-foot pedestrian zone, 4-foot planters with street trees and a 1 foot curb Infrastructure Recommendation 5 Galapago Bicycle/Pedestrian Path and Elati Bridge Reclamation e intersection of Cherokee Street and Alameda Avenue is a prime gateway into the station area and the Baker Neighborhood.Every attempt should be made to maintain pedestrian comfort and access at this intersection. North of the station is the Atlantis Community Center which provides valuable services and activities for people with disabilities. is generates a greater need for sensitivity to barrier-free access across Alameda Avenue and leading to the station. ere is an opportunity for an alternative route that creates access but also can function as part of a regional recreation route that links the Baker neighborhood, Alameda Station Area, Broadway Station Area, the South Platte Greenway and other destinations along the route. e following improvements capitalize on this opportunity: Construct a multi-use bicycle/pedestrian path along the west edge of Galapago Street between Bayaud Avenue and the Alameda Station platform Reconstruct the Elati bridge to accommodate the bicycle/pedestrian path Link this route to Cherokee Street north of Alameda for neighborhood access Link this route to the bicycle/pedestrian path recommended along Cherokee Street Infrastructure Recommendation 6 Alameda Avenue Alameda Avenue serves as a key east-west connection to and from the Alameda Station to the neighborhoods west of the alignment. Enhancements to Alameda Avenue will maintain auto access while improving pedestrian and bicycle access. Alameda Avenue should accommodate the following minimum elements within its varying right-of-way: Existing curb-to-curb dimensions and travel lanes (existing curb-to-curb dimensions and number of lanes vary) Two 5-foot landscape zones to separate pedestrians and bikes from travel lanes; includes a 4foot planter with street trees and a 1-foot curb One 10-foot, two-directional bicycle track One 4-foot planter with street trees to separate pedestrians from the bicycle track One 8-foot pedestrian path is cross section will have to vary at the railroad underpass. However, improvements are needed to accommodate

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Alameda Station Area Plan Infrastructure 32 travel lanes and a wider side walk for bikes and pedestrians. Speci cally: Remove/repair concrete from the underpass wall and cover the entire exposed surface with architectural shot crete or other durable and aesthetic material Raise the sidewalk section of the north side of the underpass to improve the accessibility of the grade and improve the comfort and separation from tra c Infrastructure Recommendation 7 South Broadway South Broadway serves as a key north-south connection to and from the Alameda Station study area. Enhancements to South Broadway are intended to maintain existing trafc ow while improving the pedestrian environment. South Broadway should accommodate the following minimum elements within its proposed right-of-way: Two 20-foot sidewalks, including 15-foot pedestrian zones, 4-foot planters for street trees and 1-foot curbs Two 8-foot parallel parking lanes Five 11-foot southbound travel lanes Infrastructure Recommendation 8 Storm Water To the greatest extent possible use best management practices for on-site stormwater detention and water quality. Picture 5.7 South Broadway Cross Section

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Alameda Station Area Plan Ecomonic Opportunity33 Economic Opportunity

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Alameda Station Area Plan Ecomonic Opportunity 34Economic Opportunity FasTracks promises to bring the Denver region an unprecedented opportunity to promote and facilitate transit-oriented higher density, mixed-use residential and commercial development.While the amount, type and mix of uses within the transit station area and corridor in uences market potential, the presence of undeveloped and under utilized land can be a source of the greatest economic opportunity. Generally speaking, prospects for redevelopment are stronger when station areas features: Relatively high levels of undeveloped and under utilized land Fewer landowners such that land is concentrated in fewer hands Under utilized land consolidated into fewer parcels, therefore requiring less land assembly to facilitate redevelopment Residential, O ce and Retail Market Alameda Station contains 138 acres of under utilized land. is is the highest amount of land capacity when compared to other Denver stations. It also has one of the lowest amounts of parcels which means there are fewer landowners and greater potential for larger scale development. is statistical nding is supported by the recent development plans for the Broadway Marketplace and Denver Design Center in the form of the Denver Design District General Development Plan. Trends indicate demand for new residential, o ce and retail development near transit through 2030. e TOD Market Analysis provides three potential long term (over the next 20 years) development scenarios for the 138 under utilized acres. e following is a breakdown of the three development scenarios for Alameda: Economic Strategies e realization of TOD will require a combination of near and long term e orts and the use of best practices and innovative strategies. e city should continue to use all available resources and contacts in the TOD eld at the national level to identify solutions to challenges as they emerge. An ongoing regional dialogue is critical to address challenges faced by multiple jurisdictions and the challenges inherent in implementation where station areas straddle jurisdictional boundaries. e City should continue its communication with regional entities (e.g. Denver Regional Council of Governments, Urban Land Institute, RTD) and surrounding jurisdictions to investigate regional approaches to shared obstacles. Implementation will be most e ective if carried out under a broad framework that establishes strategies to advance TOD at the system level. ese system-wide strategies will in turn support individual e orts undertaken at the corridor and station area levels. Participating actors in the implementation of TOD include transit agencies, local jurisdictions, and developers. e City & County of Denver presently o ers a broad array of programs that could be used to e ectuate transit-supportive development. Rather than providing an exhaustive list of programs already available in Denver, the following are key existing programs that could be focused or expanded as well as innovative strategies not currently used in Denver that could help facilitate positive reinvestment in the Alameda Station area. Regulations, guidelines and development Memorandums of Understanding: Formalizing standards for transit-oriented development whether through local regulations and ordinances, guidelines, or memorandum of understanding is a key rst step in facilitating the type of development that will support transit service Direct and indirect nancial incentives: In addition to direct nancial incentives to facilitate transit-oriented development, regulations can provide a number of indirect nancial incentives. Indirect incentives often used to facilitate development include exible zoning provisions and density bonuses, while direct incentives include reduced development fees, expedited development review, and team inspections to streamline and reduce the total costs of the review and permitting pr ocess. Market Modest Moderate Large Scale Capacity Residential 1,040 units 1,390 units 6,110 units Oce 240,000 sq ft 430,000 sq ft 1,530,000 sq ft Retail 229,000 sq ft 342,242 sq ft 1,020,000 square feet

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Alameda Station Area Plan Ecomonic Opportunity35 Financing/Funding methods: Transit-oriented development often occurs as in ll development in established areas or through redevelopment of sometimes contaminated sites. In these types of developments, the level of infrastructure required may include extensive reconstruction of the street network (or introduction of new streets), installation of structured parking, addition of pedestrian enhancements and public plazas, and stormwater infrastructure. Obtaining nancing and/or funding for these critical infrastructure enhancements can be a key challenge in e ectuating transit-oriented development. Small Business and Technical Assistance : Community members in many of the selected Denver station areas have cited a desire for local entrepreneurship opportunities and jobs within their station areas. Small businesses can be encouraged through multiple methods, including the Main Street Program approach, business incubation, and small business support programs (including loans and technical assistance). Phasing Strategies Many communities have used phasing strategies to address the lag time that often occurs between transit service introduction and transit oriented development realization. Such strategies can help establish supportive conditions in the near-term to set the stage for future development that is supportive of transit at the Alameda Station. Land Banking & Assembly Methods: Realization of transit-oriented development often requires assembly of various properties owned by di erent property owners and/or banking of land until transit service becomes operable or market conditions support the level of desired mixed-use development. Several models for land banking and assembly were presented above, including: transit authority/local government acquisition, the equity investment approach (a public-private partnership model), and special legislation. Zoning : Regulations play an important role in determining what uses will be allowed within station areas. Once market conditions support TOD, zoning may be amended to provide for the full density desired within station areas. Consider incentives and eliminate barriers to the recommendations of this plan such as a ordable housing. Infrastructure Improvements, Special Assessments & Tax Incentives: As a pre-development phase, public entities working alone or in partnership with developers may undertake infrastructure improvement projects such as parking facilities, parks, streetscapes, pedestrian and bicycle enhancements, road reconstruction and extension, park beauti cation and signage. e purpose of such projects are to set the stage for and encourage transit-supportive development. ese activities can also provide early marketing of the station areas identity to future prospective residents, employees and visitors. To fund infrastructure investments, a special assessment district may be formed (either through a charter district or statutory district in Denvers case) in the pre-development phase. Alternatively, tax incentive programs such as tax increment nancing, tax abatements, or payment in lieu of taxes may be used to bolster developers resources for funding infrastructure. Joint Development, Revenue Sharing & Cost Sharing: In station areas where joint development is an option, the landowner (often the transit authority) can enter into revenue or cost sharing arrangements with the private sector in order to either secure a source of revenue for improvements or divide the cost of infrastructure construction and maintenance. Types of revenue sharing arrangements include land leases, air rights development, and special assessment districts. Cost sharing arrangements can include sharing of construction expenses and density bonuses o ered in exchange for infrastructure construction. South Broadway's commercial corridor

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Alameda Station Area Plan Ecomonic Opportunity 36

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Alameda Station Area Plan Implementation37 Implementation

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Alameda Station Area Plan Implementation 38 Implementation e Implementation Chapter identi es the essential action items necessary to accomplish Alameda Station Plan Objectives and Recommendations. e chapter is divided into two sections. e rst is a discussion of the Denver Design District project. is is a signi cant redevelopment of the existing auto-oriented shopping center and professional ofce complex located on the east side of the station area. e second is a list of action items for city sta and community organizations to consider in the next 10-20 years. Denver Design District Implementation e Denver Design District is a private redevelopment project for the area south of Alameda Avenue, west of S. Broadway and east of the Consolidated Mainline. e Alameda Station Plan provides the foundation and vision for redeveloping this area.Due to the scale of this project, further study and analysis is necessary before zoning changes, development plan approvals or infrastructure improvements. Phase 1 General Development Plan e city and the majority landowner are in the process of preparing a General Development Plan (GDP). A GDP is a planning document that o ers a higher level of analysis than a small area plan. is analysis will o er a better understanding of the opportunities, constraints and improvements of redeveloping this larger area. Speci cally, the applicant prepares a development concept in conjunction with studies of tra c impacts, storm water management, sanitary sewer capacity, water capacity and market conditions. e results of this detailed analysis will yield a development concept that is more realistic and tailored to the results of the numerous studies. is will result in a better understanding of the improvements necessary in order to mitigate impacts. Ultimately there is a greater level of con dence in the development concept and allows the city and community organizations to move forward to the second phase of implementation such as zoning. GDP Components: e components of the Denver Design District GDP are listed below. e details of these components will be more re ned than the Alameda Station Plan because it will have the bene t of the additional analysis. While the details may not be exact, the GDP must meet the spirit and intent of the Station Plan Objectives and Recommendations. Development Concept (land use types, land use arrangement and building height) Urban Design Standards and Guidelines Open Space Concept Circulation Concept (car, bus, pedestrian and bicycle) Utility Plans (storm water, sanitary and water) GDP Must-Haves: e GDP must respect all of the objectives and recommendations of this plan.More speci cally, there are key elements that are important to the success of this new neighborhood. Partnership with city, neighborhood organizations and business organizations Transit supportive land uses Predictable form and scale Main Streets: Dakota, Bannock and S. Broadway Open space system that is publicly usable and o er multiple bene ts including recreation and urban design Multi-modal circulation and accessibility improvements ( e.g. public street grid, tra c mitigation, bike lanes and sidewalks) Consideration of mixed income housing strategy as a part of GDP or separate e ort Phase 2 Zoning Based on the results of the GDP process, the applicant will pursue zoning changes that will implement the development concept. e GDP area is currently zoned B-4 and I-1. ese districts will not easily allow the desired land use mix and arrangement of the GDP. In addition, it will not create a predictable form and scale consistent with plan recommendations.Consider zoning changes to one district or a few districts that e ectively implement the GDP. Phase 3 Infrastructure and Development Development of the Denver Design District will occur in multiple phases over a long time frame.Ideally, development will begin closest to the station to allow for much needed improvements to the platform and the surrounding environment. However, market factors and the reality of existing businesses and long-term leases may not accommodate this recommendation.Consistent collaboration and communication between the developers, the city and community organizations will be essential as this project evolves over the years.

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Alameda Station Area Plan Implementation39 Regulatory ToolsRecommendations Implementation Strategy Timeframe Key Responsibility Land Use Mixture and Aordable Housing LU-1 thru 10 Ground Floor Uses LU-9 thru 10 Parking Ratios LU-8 MO-13 thru 16 Active Edges, Build-To Lines and Building Heights LU-11 thru 15 Sustainability LU-16 Complete Streets MO-1 thru 6 IN 1-8 Short Short Short Short Short Long Community Planning & Development (CPD) CPD CPD CPD CPD Public Works (PW) Current zoning is primarily B-4 and Industrial. Evaluate alternative zoning districts that allow the recommended mix of land uses. Coordinate with the New Zoning Code to ensure there is a menu of zoning districts that promote this mixture. Eliminate barriers to aordable housing such as an improved review process, parking reductions, form-based regulations rather than use-based. Existing mixed use districts do not oer incentives or mandates for mixing uses or required ground oor commercial or retail.Concentrating and allocating commercial and retail within the station area is essential to crea ting a vibrant successful station. Coordina te with the New Zoning Code to create incentives. Coordinate with the New Zoning Code to incorporate dierent techniques for regulating and designing parking facilities. Coordinate with the New Zoning Code to develop form-based regulations that mandate a predictable scale and form. For example, the form standards should require active edges along main streets that promote active uses and frontage types. Build-to lines create a dened street wall. Transition in heights with 1-3 st ories on edges and the greatest height of 14 stories closest to the Alameda and Broadway Stations. Eliminate regulatory barriers int the New Code to sustainable practices. Work with PW on new Right-of-way cross sections that are specic to station areas in accordance with adopted plansand accomodate vehicle, bike, pedestrian and bus mobility. Station Area Implementation e following are Implementation Strategies for the Station Area outside of the Denver Design District GDP boundary. e table is organized by Regulatory Tools, Public Infrastructure Tools and Partnership Tools.Each Implementation Strategy includes reference to the numbered Plan Recommendation(s) it implements, a general time frame and key responsibility. e Plan Recommendations are abbreviated for each section: 1) LU = Land Use and Urban Design; 2) MO = Mobility; and 3) IN = Infrastructure. While all strategies are important, the reality of market conditions, infrastructure constraints and funding require assigning time frames by short-term (1-5 years) or long-term (5-10 years). is table does not require these time frames if opportunities arise sooner than predicted. A team approach is crucial to implementation. ere are many parties involved including city departments, elected and appointed o cials, neighborhood organizations and business organizations. e table identi es Key Responsi-bility so it is clear who will take the lead on the e ort.

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Alameda Station Area Plan Implementation 40 Investment ToolsRecommendations Implementation Strategy Timeframe Key Responsibility Galapago Bicycle/ Pedestrian Path and Elati Bridge MO-8; IN-5 Cherokee Street O-Street Bike/ Pedestrian Path MO-9 and 10; IN-4 Enhanced Bicycle Routes MO-6 General Bicycle Facilities MO-7 Alameda Avenue MO-8 IN-6 South Broadway IN-7 Bayaud Bridge MO-10 Santa Fe to Jason Bridge MO-10 Short Short Long Long Long Long Long Long PW/CPD PW/CPD PW PW PW PW/ Private PW PW Public Works and Community Planning and Development should collaborate to obtain funding for this bicycle/pedestrian improvement.It is a short term priority because it is essential to station connectivity and accomplished relatively independently of future development projects. PW and CPD should collaborate with property owners to obtain funding for this o-street bicycle/pedestrian improvement. It is a short term priority because it is essential to station connectivity and accomplished independently of future development projects. On-street bicycle route recommendations are consistent with the Bicycle Master Plan. Therefore, there is additional reinforcement and support for these improvements. Pursue funding opportunities to provide enhanced bicycle routes on designated streets. As the station area redevelops there will be a need for bicycle facilities. As funding becomes available, provide additional bike racks and storage lockers at the station. Upon full build-out consider whether there is demand and funding for bike services such as rentals and locker rooms. Alameda has a varied cross section and implementation of the desired section will occur in phases.The priority recommendation is the separated bike/ped route as Alameda Avenue is improved. The recommended cross-section for S. Broadway is not a dramatic change from the current section. As new development is proposed or if there are street improvements, there should be gradual implementation. The bicycle/pedestrian bridge is a recommendation of the Valley Highway Environmental Impact St atement (VHEIS).Therefore, there is additional reinforcement and support for this improv ement. Pursue funding in conjunction with VHEIS improvements. Consider long-term opportunities and funding

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Alameda Station Area Plan Implementation41 Partnership ToolsRecommendations Implementation Strategy Timeframe Key Responsibility Business Recruitment, Retention & Relocation LU-1 thru 10 Aordable Housing LU-1 Alameda Station Bridge MO-10 Parks Department LU-5 MO-8 thru 10 Parking MO-13 thru 16 Sustainability LU-16 RTD MO-11&12 Business Associations Fire Department IN-1 thru 7 Stormwater IN-8 Short Short Short Short Short Long Long Long Long Short OED/CPD OED/CPD CPD/ Private CPD/ Parks/ PW CPD/ PW CPD/Greenprint Denver CPD/ PW/ RTD CPD/ PW/ Private CPD/ PW/ Fire CPD/PW Greenprint Denver As the station area redevelops there are existing industrial uses that are not consistent with the plans land use recommendations. Oce of Economic Development (OED) can play a pro-active role in assisting these businesses in relocating to a more desirable site within the city. Additionally, OED should play an active role in recruiting and retaining businesses consistent with this plan. Partner with OED to seek funding opportunities for aordable housing. This bike/ped bridge will be installed and funded by the developer of the Bus Barn Site.CPD needs to collaborate with the developer to ensure that placement of the bridge optimizes access to the station and future development near the platform. Many of the mobility recommendations and recreation/open space recommendations oer park and recreation benets.For example, the o-street pathway along Cherokee will enable access to the South Platte River Greenway and the park system along the greenway. As these recommendations move forward, the Parks Department must be involved in the early stages to maximize benets. It is also important to collaborate with Parks on ways to ensure existing parks can meet demands. Inform the Strategic Parking Plan with the parking strategies identied in this plan. Collaborate with Greenprint Denver oce on opportunities for sustainable practices at the station There are some recommendations that are under the authority of the Regional Transportation District (RTD), not the City and County of Denver. In those cases it is important to be an active partner with RTD and work together to achieve the plan recommendations as feasible.Specically, this includes recommendations on the park-N-ride, platform open space, and bus circulation changes at the time of redevelopment. Historically, along S. Broadway, business marketing, recruitment and streetcape improvements have been primarily implemented by business organizations. These groups will continue to play an active role and should continue to collaborate as new development occurs. As projects move forward, collaboration with the Fire Department is necessary to ensure re safety regulations are met.In some cases the basic minimum requirements should be re-evaluated in order to reect the urban context of the Alameda Station area. Collaborate with developers, PW & Greenprint Denver

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Alameda Station Area Plan Implementation 42

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Alameda Station Area Plan The Community43 The Community

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Alameda Station Area Plan The Community 44The CommunityStudy Area Location and Overview e Alameda Station is one of 57 new and existing transit stations creating the Denver Metro area xed rail system. Alameda is part of the Central Corridor beginning at I-25 and Broadway continues into the heart of downtown and then continues to Welton Street. e half mile station area extends from Bayaud Avenue to the north, Grant Street to the east, the Broadway station/Ohio Avenue to the south and Lipan Street to the west. e Alameda Station is an Urban Center station type by the Denver Transit-Oriented Development Strategic Plan, which accommodate the greatest concentrations of employment and housing opportunities throughout the system. Due to the employment and housing densities existing and planned the Alameda Station also o ers an important transportation enter of light rail and bus routes. e rail line runs along the Consolidate Main Line to the west of the platform. RTD parking for the station is on the east side of the platform. The Alamedda Station Area

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Alameda Station Area Plan The Community45Population and Housing Characteristics e total estimated population of the station area is 2,410 people with 1,158 housing units. is yields an average of 2.24 people per household. e station area includes portions of four Denver statistical neighborhoods: Washington Park West, Speer, Baker and Athmar Park. While Athmar experiences signi cant growth in the 1960s, all neighborhoods declined in the 1980s and early 1990s. All three are seeing health growth between 2000 and 2007. e housing stock has remained relatively stable through the past 40 years. Continued growth and reinvestment in these neighborhoods are expected given the public investment in transit. Total Population (1950 2007) Athmar Park, Baker, Speer and Washington Park West Neighborhoods12,092 5,714 6,508 9,161 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 14,000 1950196019701980199020002007YearTotal Population Athmar Park Baker Washington Park West SpeerSource: U.S. Census (1950 2000); Denver CPD (2007) Total Housing Units (1950 2007) Athmar Park, Baker, Speer and Washington Park West Neighborhoods6,117 3,011 2,721 3,620 0 1,000 2,000 3,000 4,000 5,000 6,000 7,000 8,000 9,000 1950196019701980199020002007YearTotal Population Athmar Park Baker Washington Park West SpeerSource: U.S. Census (1950 2000); Denver CPD (2007)

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Alameda Station Area Plan The Community 46 Alameda Station Land Use and Zoning Land Use : e majority land use is the Alameda Station Area is surface parking, right-of-way and vacant land. Active land uses include retail, industrial and some residential. While there is a presence of active uses and established residential areas, approximately 50% of the land area within the station area has redevelopment potential. ere is a foundation of community assets such as 3.48% public-quasi public uses, 7.87% parks and 12% housing. Zoning: ere are currently 14 zone districts in the Alameda Station Area. 50.7% of the station area is industrial zoning. Much of this located immediately adjacent to the station platform. Only about 27.2 percent of the 1/2 mile station area is commercial or mixed-use zoning concentrated closest to the Alameda and Broadway stations and along S. Broadway. e next predominant zoning category is 19.2% residential districts found within the three adjoining neighborhoods Washington Park West, Speer, Baker and Athmar Park. ese zone districts all allow a mixture of single-unit and multiunit dwellings. e current residential land use in the Alameda Station Area is a mixture of single-family and low-rise multi-family residential with some higher-density apartment buildings. Surface Parking 0% 5% 10% 15% 25% 20% 30% 35%105.98 acres ROW101.9 acres Industrial58.38 acres Vacant44.89 acres Single Family38.31 acres MultiFamily Low Rise22.2 acres Retail42.74 acres Commercial18.69 acres Parks, Open Space7.87 acres Office4.25 acres 3.89 acres 3.48 acres 1.03 acresMixed Use Public/ QuasiPublic UnknownPercentage of LandLand UseAlameda Station Area Land Use Distribution (2008)

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Alameda Station Area Plan The Community47 Distribution of Denver Zoning Districts Alameda Station Area (2008) Zoning District Acres Percent B-1 B-2 B-4 I-0 I-1 I-2 O-1 P-1 PUD R-1 R-2 R-2-A R-3 T-MU-30 Total acres Total acres 7.30 0.05 99.36 8.02 197.42 49.12 13.97 0.39 0.72 0.28 36.78 38.78 20.36 28.77 502.3 502.3 1.5% 0.0% 19.8% 1.6% 39.3% 9.8% 2.8% 0.1% 0.1% 0.1% 7.3% 7.7% 4.1% 5.9% B-1 Limited O ce District: is district provides o ce space for services related to dental and medical care and for o cetype services, often for residents of nearby residential areas. e district has a low volume of direct daily customer contact. is district is characteristically small in size and is situated near major hospitals or residential areas. e district regulations establish standards comparable to those of the low density residential districts, resulting in similar building bulk and retaining the low concentration of pedestrian and vehicular tra c. B-2 Neighborhood Business District: is district provides for the retailing of commodities classi ed as convenience goods and the furnishing of certain personal services to satisfy the daily and weekly household or personal needs of residents of surrounding residential neighborhoods. is district is located on collector streets, characteristically is small in size, usually is entirely surrounded by residential districts and is located at a convenient walking distance from the residential districts it is designed to serve. B-4 General Business District: is district is intended to provide for and encourage appropriate commercial uses adjacent to arterial streets, which are normally transit routes. Uses include a wide variety of consumer and business services and retail establishments that serve other business activities, and local transit-dependent residents within the district as well as residents throughout the city. e regulations generally allow a moderate intensity of use and concentration for the purpose of achieving compatibility between the wide variety of uses permitted in the district. Building height is not controlled by bulk standards unless there is a property line to property line abutment with a residential use. Building oor area cannot exceed twice the site area. T-MU-30 Transit Mixed-Use District: e T-MU-30 district provides for urban development proximate to a mass transit railway system station to promote a mix, arrangement, and intensity of uses that support transit ridership and use of other transit modes. e district allows the broadest range of uses and most development intensity of the mixed use districts. e district is for use at station areas with adequate land area to create a viable transit oriented development (TOD) and to transition to the surrounding community. Speci c additional criteria to the T-MU-30 district are approval of a general development plan and site improvements, which reinforce both the relationship of structures to the transit station and the pedestrian connections and linkages throughout the TOD. Basic maximum gross oor area is equal to ve (5) times the area of the zone lot. P-1 O -Street Parking District: Allows parking lots and structures. Bulk and setback regulations apply to structures. is zone is intended to provide needed business parking without the expansion of the business zone; e.g. a bu er between business and residential uses. Requires visual barriers adjacent to residential uses. R-1 Single-Unit Detached Dwellings, Low Density: Same as R-0 except that other additional home occupations and roomrenting to one or two persons are allowed upon application and issuance of a permit. Density = 7.3 dwelling units/acre. R-2 Multi-Unit Dwellings, Low Density: Typically duplexes and triplexes. Home occupations are allowed by permit. Minimum of 6,000 square feet of land required for each duplex structure with an additional 3,000 square feet required for every unit over 2. R-2-A Multi-Unit Dwellings, Medium Density: 2,000 square feet of land required for each dwelling unit unless site plan is submitted under planned building group (PBG) provisions, in which case 1,500 square feet of land is required for each unit. Home occupations are allowed by permit.

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Alameda Station Area Plan The Community 48 R-3 Multi-Unit Dwellings, High Density: Building siz e is contr olled by bulk standards, o -street parking and open space requirements. Building oor area cannot exceed three times the site area. O-1 Open Space District: Allows airports, recreation uses, parks, cemeteries, reservoirs, community correctional facilities, and other public and semi-public uses housed in buildings. Setback requirements apply to the location of structures. I-0 Light Industrial/O ce District: is district is intended to be an employment area containing o ces, and light industrial uses which are generally compatible with residential uses. I-0 zoned areas are designed to serve as a bu er between residential areas and more intensive industrial areas. Bulk plane, setback and landscaping standards apply in this district. Building oor area cannot exceed 50% of the site area; however, o ce oor area may equal site area. Some uses are conditional uses. I-1 General Industrial District: is district is intended to be an employment area containing industrial uses which are generally more intensive than those permitted in the I-0 zone. Bulk plane, setback and landscape standards apply in this district. Building oor area cannot exceed twice the site area. Some uses are conditional uses. I-2 Heavy Industrial District: is district is intended to be an employment area containing uses which are generally more intensive than that permitted in either of the other two industrial zones. Bulk plane, setback and landscape standards apply in this district. Building area cannot exceed twice the site area. Some uses are conditional uses. PUD Planned Unit Development District: e PUD district is an alternative to conventional land use regulations, combining use, density and site plan considerations into a single process. e PUD district is speci cally intended to encourage diversi cation in the use of land and exibility in site design with respect to spacing, heights and setbacks of buildings, densities, open space and circulation elements; innovation in residential development that results in the availability of adequate housing opportunities for varying income levels; more e cient use of land and energy through smaller utility and circulation networks; pedestrian considerations; and development patterns in harmony with nearby areas and with the goals and objectives of the comprehensive plan for the city. Alameda Station Blueprint Denver Land Uses Blueprint Denver identi es the majority of the station area as Area of Change. e Core Station Area is planned for Transit Oriented Development and Town Center. However, due to close proximity to the station, it should contain many transit-supportive uses and design elements. ere is also a mixture of Industrial, Employment and Mixed Use within the station area. e adjoining residential areas are Areas of Stability recommended for Single Family Residential and Single Family/ Duplex to preserve the predominantly residential character of the neighborhoods. As an Area of Stability, it is important to promote the valued attributes and ensure that adjoining Areas of Change are planned in a manned that o ers a respectful and complementary transition. For Areas of Change, Blueprint Denver identi es several goals for the areas surrounding rail transit stations. ese goals include: A balanced mix of uses. Compact midto high-density development. Reduced emphasis on auto parking. Attractive multi-story buildings. A variety of housing types and prices. Access to open space and recreation amenities. A high degree of connectivity between the station area and surrounding neighborhoods. Transportation Alameda Avenue and the Broadway/Lincoln Couplet dominate the station area. Signalized intersections along Broadway/Lincoln include Alameda, Virginia and Center. Broadway NEPA anticipate some changes as part of implementing that study. e remaining streets north of Alameda and east of Broadway/Lincoln built on the Denver grid system. However, within the Broadway Marketplace and Denver Design Center, the public grid breaks down. While the grid network is generally intact, none of these drives are public streets and therefore not o cially part of the Denver public street grid. Alleys provide vehicle and loading access to most residential and commercial properties. ere are three bus routes that serve the station. ere is a mixture of comfortable pedestrian and bicycle conditions.

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Alameda Station Area Plan The Community49 Alameda Station Area Blueprint Denver Land Use

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Alameda Station Area Plan Relevant Plans51 Relevant Plans

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Alameda Station Area Plan Relevant Plans 52Relevant Plans e Alameda Station Area Plan builds upon a solid foundation of existing documents and guiding principles. is section provides a review of the applicable content of adopted citywide plans. e Alameda Station Area Plan provides speci c recommendations for the planning area that, in case of con ict, supersede general recommendations from existing plans. Comprehensive Plan, 2000 e City Council adopted Denver Comprehensive Plan in 2000. Plan 2000 provides the planning and policy framework for development of Denvers human and physical environment. e key subjects of Plan 2000 that relate to this Station Plan are land use, mobility, legacies, and housing. Land Use: Land use recommendations promote new investment that accommodates new residents, improves economic vitality and enhances the Citys aesthetics and livability. In addition, Plan 2000 supports sustainable development patterns by promoting walking, biking and transit use. Mobility: Plan 2000 emphasizes planning for multiple modes of transportation walking, biking, transit and cars. Key concepts include expanding mobility choices for commuters and regional cooperation in transit system planning. Plan 2000 also promotes compact, mixed-use development in transit rich places (like station areas). Legacies: Plan 2000 prioritizes planning for park, open space and recreation systems. Historic building preservation and respect for traditional patterns of development in established areas are also key tenets of Plan 2000. To this end, Plan 2000 places a high value on maintenance of streets, trails, and parkways that link destinations within the community. Ensuring that new buildings, infrastructure and open spaces create attractive, beautiful places is the foundation of the legacies chapter. Housing: Plan 2000 recognizes that access to housing is a basic need for Denver citizens. us, Plan 2000 emphasizes preservation and maintenance of the existing housing stock and expanding housing options. Providing a variety of unit types and costs, in addition to housing development in transit rich places are fundamental tenets of Plan 2000. is ensures a sustainable balance of jobs and housing as the city matures. Blueprint Denver: An Integrated Land Use and Transportation Plan, 2002 Plan 2000 recommended that the city create a plan to integrate land use and transportation planning. Blueprint Denver is the implementation plan that recognizes this relationship and describes the building blocks and tools necessary to achieve the vision outlined in Plan 2000. Areas of Change and Stability: Blueprint Denver divides the city into areas of change and areas of stability. Over time, all areas of the city will uctuate between change and stability. e goal for areas of stability is to identify and maintain the character of an area while accommodating new development and redevelopment. e goal for areas of change is to channel growth where it will be bene cial and can best improve access to jobs, housing and services. Blueprint Denver describes two types of areas of stability: committed areas and reinvestment areas. Committed areas are stable neighborhoods that may bene t from the stabilizing e ects of small, individual lot in ll development rather than large-scale land assembly and redevelopment. Reinvestment areas are neighborhoods with a character that is desirable to maintain but would bene t from reinvestment and modest in ll. is reinvestment, however, is more limited in comparison to that of areas of change. Transportation: e transportation component of Blueprint Denver provides transportation building blocks and

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Alameda Station Area Plan Relevant Plans53tools that promote multimodal and inter-modal connections. Elements of connection include the street system, bus transit system, bicycle system, and pedestrian system. ese components must work together to realize the guiding principles of Blueprint Denver. New Zoning Code (in development) Denver citizens called for reform of the Citys Zoning Code in the 1989 Comprehensive Plan and again in the Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000. Blueprint Denver (2002) provided the vision and initial strategy to begin this e ort. Adopted in the 1950s, the current zoning code assumes an automobile oriented land use development pattern. It also implies that what existed at the time needed to be replaced regardless of it value or context. Further, the complexity of the current zoning code is not predictable or clear for property owners. at complexity can make doing quality development more di cult and raises the cost of doing business in Denver by requiring lengthy study of our unique and cumbersome zoning code. e updated zoning code will incorporate a context-based and form-based approach. is approach will better re ect the vision of Blueprint Denver by promoting proper development in areas of change while enhancing neighborhood character in areas of stability. Transit Oriented Development Strategic Plan, 2006 e Transit Oriented Development (TOD) Strategic Plan prioritizes the citys planning and implementation e orts related to the transit system and station area development. TOD De ned: The TOD Strategic Plan de nes TOD as development near transit that creates beautiful, vital, walkable neighborhoods; provides housing, shopping, and transportation choices; generates lasting value; and provides access to the region via transit. TOD Typologies: e TOD Strategic Plan establishes TOD typologies for every transit station in the city. Typologies establish a framework to distinguish the types of places linked by the transit system. e typologies frame expectations about the land use mix and intensity of development at each of the stations. Station Area Planning: While providing an important planning framework, the TOD Strategic Plan calls for more detailed station area plans. Such plans o er speci c direction for appropriate development, needed infrastructure investments and economic development strategies. Bicycle Master Plan, 2002 In 2002 in response to Plan 2000, the Bicycle Master Plan (2002) provides a framework for an interconnected bicycle system. e primary objectives of the Bicycle Master Plan are: Develop new neighborhood routes that create connections between the existing bicycle route system and nearby facilities not currently on a bicycle route. Close the gaps in the existing bicycle routes to complete the bicycle grid route system. Improve access with bike route and trail signage around light rail stations to make bicycling and transit work in a seamless manner. Support education, enforcement and public policy for the bicycle system. Greenprint Denver, 2006 Greenprint Denver is an e ort to integrate sustainability as a core value and operating principle in Denver city government. e Greenprint Denver Action Agenda for 2006 charts the citys course over the next ve years. Included in Greenprint Denver Action Agenda are speci c actions that relate directly to the Citys ambitious station area planning e ort. For example, this plan directs the City to decrease reliance on automobiles through public transit use and access, and promote transit-oriented development, as well as bike and pedestrian enhancements, and increase by 20% the new development located within mile of existing transit stations by 2011. Parks and Recreation Game Plan, 2002 e Game Plan is a master plan for the citys park, open space and recreation system. A primary principle is to create The Transit Oriented Development Strategic Plan and the Denver Bicycle Master Plan

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Alameda Station Area Plan Relevant Plans 54 greener neighborhoods. Game Plan establishes a street tree and tree canopy goal of 15-18 per cent for the entir e city. e plan also establishes a parkland acreage target of 8-10 acres per 1,000 residents. Tools to accomplish these goals include promoting green streets and parkways, which indicate routes that require greater emphasis and additions to the landscape. Strategic Transportation Plan, 2006 Denver Public Works drafted the Strategic Transportation Plan (STP). e STP will be a primary implementation tool for Blueprint Denver and Plan 2000. e objective of the STP is to determine needed transportation investments. e STP process will (1) provide education concerning options for transportation alternatives; (2) reach consensus on transportation strategies along transportation corridors through a collaborative process; and (3) build stakeholder support. e STP represents a new approach to transportation planning in Denver. Instead of forecasting future auto travel on Denver streets, the STP will forecast person-trips to evaluate the magnitude of transportation impacts caused by all types of travel. is person-trip data provides the ability to plan for bikes, pedestrians, transit, and street improvements. e STP is the rst step in identifying the needs for every major travel corridor in the city. e STP will create concepts for how to meet transportation needs, including a prioritization of corridor improvements. Storm Drainage Master Plan (2005) and Sanitary Sewer Master Plan, 2006 e Storm Drainage Master Plan and the Sanitary Sewer Master Plan evaluates adequacy of the existing systems assuming the future land uses identi ed in Blueprint Denver. e Storm Drainage Master Plan determines the amount of imperviousness resulting from future land development and the subsequent runo e Sanitary Sewer Master Plan identi es needed sanitary sewer improvements to respond to the forecasted development. Pedestrian Master Plan, 2004 e Pedestrian Master Plan was written to address the mobility goals of the Comprehensive Plan and Blueprint Denver. Speci cally, the plan calls for a pedestrian environment that is: safe from automobiles; encourages barrier free pedestrian mobility; enables pedestrians to move safely and comfortably between places and destinations; attractive, human scale and encourages walking; and promotes the role of walking in maintaining health and preventing disease. To achieve these goals, the plan calls for land use changes to encourage walking through mixed-use development patterns. e plan identi es a minimum 13 foot pedestrian zone on all streets including an 8 foot tree lawn and a 5 foot sidewalk and a minimum 16 foot pedestrian zone on most arterial streets. West Washington Park Neighborhood Plan 1991 In collaboration with the city, the West Washington Park neighborhood prepared a neighborhood plan. e plan promotes patterns of land use, urban design, circulation and services that contribute to the economic, social, and physical health, safety and welfare of the people living and working in the neighborhood. e vision is to preserve and enhance the positive qualities of the neighborhood. is includes a diversity of people, historic buildings, mature landscape, humanscale land use, urban character, convenient transportation access and the high level of energy and interaction among residents and business people.

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Alameda Station Area Plan Relevant Plans55Baker Neighborhood Plan 2003 e Baker Neighborhood Plan is a supplement to the Denver Comprehensive Plan. It addresses and provides guidance that is more re ned and speci c than can be done at a citywide level. e Plan focuses on neighborhood issues related to land use, design and transportation for the entire neighborhood. e plan provides a vision and goals for the neighborhood over the next 20 years. Some major elements include: Logical approach to land use to protect the integrity of the residential areas Reinforce traditional commercial and housing mix on the major corridors Supporting increased density and development at the light rail stations Prioritize infrastructure investments Expand transportation choices Create new opportunities for open space and parks Athmar Park Perimeter Plan 2000 e Athmar Park Perimeter Plan is a supplement to the Denver Comprhensive Plan. It addresses and provides guidance that is more re ned and speci c to the Athmar Park neighborhood issues and opportunities. e plan provides a vision and goals for the neighborhood over the next 20 years. Some major elements include: Promote neighborhood stability Encourage business growth and revitalization Develop interaction and communication strategies betweeen residents, businesses and the city Develop an e ective implementation strategy

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Alameda Station Area Plan MobilityiiiTable of ContentsAcknowledgements iv Introduction 1 Vision 7 Land Use and Urban Design 11 Mobility 19 Infrastructure 27 Economic Opportunity 33 Implementation 37 The Community 43 Relevant Plans 51