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Auraria West station area plan

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Title:
Auraria West station area plan
Creator:
Community Planning and Development, City and County of Denver
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
City and County of Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Transit oriented development
Public transportation

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Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
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This item is presumed to be in the public domain.

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Auraria West




Table of Contents
Acknowledgements vi
Executive Summary 1
Overview 7
Vision & Goals 17
Land Use and Urban Design 25
Mobility & Infrastructure 37
Economic Opportunity 63
Implementation 67
Acronyms 75
The Community 79
Public Engagement 91
Relevant Plans 95


IV


Auraria West Station Area Plan Acknowledgements
Acknowledgements
V


Auraria West Station Area Plan Acknowledgements
Acknowledgements
Mayor John W Hickenlooper
Denver City Council
District 1 Rick Garcia
District 2 Jeanne Faatz
District 3 Paul D. Lopez
District 4 Peggy Lehmann
District 5 Marcia Johnson
District 6 Charlie Brown
District 7 Chris Nevitt
District 8 Carla Madison
District 9 Judy Montero
District 10 Jeanne Robb President
District 11 Michael Hancock
At-Large Carol Boigon
At-Large Doug Linkhart
Community Planning & Development
Peter J. Park, Manager, AICP, Manager
Steve Gordon, Comprehensive Planning Manager
Kristin Krasnove, AICP, Project Manager
Barbara Frommell
Steve Nalley
Ellen Ittelson
Eric McClelland
Andrea Santoro
Carolyne Janssen
Jim Ottenstein
Denver Planning Board
Brad Buchanan, Chairman
Laura E. Aldrete
Richard Delanoy
William H. Hornby
Anna Jones
Judith Martinez
Sharon Nunnally
Bruce ODonnell
Karen Perez
Jeffrey Walker
Dave Webster
Public Works
Guillerme Vidal, Manager
Gretchen Hollrah, TOD Coordination
Robert Kochaver, FasTracks Liason
Crissy Fanganello
Karen Good, AICP, Planing and Policy
Eric Osmundsen; Development Engineering Services
Michelle Melonakis; Traffic Engineering Services
Parks & Recreation
Scott Robson
Gordon Robertson
Devon Buckels
Office of Economic Development
Andre Pettigrew, Executive Director
Cec Ortiz, Deputy Director
Will Kralovec, TOD Specialist
Michael Meira
Christopher Smith
Richard Warren
Other Agencies
Regional Transportation District
Denver Urban Renewal Authority
Consultant Team
Crandall Arambula
Carter & Burgess, Environmental Consultant Fehr and Peers
Hartwig and Associates
Basile Bauman Probst
ArLand
VI


Auraria West Station Area Plan Executive Summary
1


Auraria West Station Area Plan Executive Summary
Executive Summary
The planning, design, construction and opening of the ex-
panded FasTracks transit corridors are a source of pride and
excitement for neighborhoods and businesses in Denver. Op-
portunities for changes to land use, design and mobility exist
at each new station in Denver. Through the planning process,
community members, City staff and the station area plan-
ning team worked together to identify these opportunities and
develop strategies to achieve a vision for the station area.
The Auraria West light rail station is located in RTDs Platte
River line at the west side of the Auraria Higher Education
Center (Auraria or AHEC) Campus. It is currently located
adjacent to a pedestrian only section of Lawrence Street and
is being relocated further north and west to 5th Street as part
of the West Corridor light rail project, planned for comple-
tion in 2013. The West Corridor will be a 12.1-mile light
rail transit corridor between the Denver Union Station in
downtown Denver and the Jefferson County Government
Center in Golden, serving Denver, Lakewood, the Denver
Federal Center, Golden and Jefferson County.
The Auraria West Station Area is just east of Downtown
Denver in the Auraria statistical neighborhood and partially
in the La Alma/Lincoln Park (LALP) neighborhood. The
existing land uses surrounding the station include educa-
tional, industrial, and a large amount of surface parking as
well as a student housing facility. The Pepsi Center, owned
by Kroenke Sports Enterprises, is immediately north of the
Auraria Campus.
The station typology is a campus/special events station. The
location provides students convenient access to Auraria
Campus and will serve as a major transfer point from the
West Corridor to the Central Corridor upon relocation. The
Auraria West Station is projected to experience the second
highest ridership in the FasTracks system due in part to
the proximity to Auraria Higher Education Center with 3
institutions of higher education of 43,000 students who are
provided RTD bus/light rail passes through an approved
student fee.
The Auraria West Station Area Plan articulates near and
long-term goals, issues, and recommendations for the future.
The plan provides a sound policy basis for citywide decision-
making and guiding positive changes, including land-use
patterns, urban design, circulation, and infrastructure. The
Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000, Blueprint Denver, the
Transit-Oriented Development Strategic Plan, and other
adopted city-wide plans form the basis for recommendations
contained in the Auraria West Station Area Plan.
In the future, Kroenke Sports plans to develop a transit-
friendly, mixed-use, entertainment district, on part of
their existing surface parking lots. The potential entertain-
ment district could create a vibrant pedestrian link to the
Pepsi Center from the Auraria West Station. In addition, a
local real estate development company, Urban Ventures, has
assembled land surrounding the existing Campus Village
Apartments. Urban Ventures plans to work with the Auraria
Higher Education Center redevelop the area directly west of
the station with additional student housing and commercial/
mixed use.
Vision and Goals
Transit-oriented development is a mix of uses at various
densities within a half-mile radius, or walking distance, of a
transit stop. TOD ought to create specific areas that inte-
grate transit into neighborhoods and help support lively and
vital communities.
From discussions with the stakeholders and through a series
of public meetings, the following goals were established for
the plan:
These goals formed the basis of the specific land use concepts
and recommendations of the plan.
The Plan: Land Use and Urban Design
The future land use plan for the Auraria West Station was
developed with the community at three public workshops.
The plan includes the following priorities:
Campus Hot-Spot and Main Street Elements along
5th Street: The campus hot spot on 5th Street is
intended to provide campus-oriented commercial and
retail uses for the projected increase of students and
transit riders at the station. Commercial ground-floor
uses near the station are intended to be student oriented
and will activate the station platform and surrounding
area and complement the existing Tivoli Student Union.
2


Auraria West Station Area Plan Executive Summary
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Lightrail Stalbn
Existing Lightrail
Proposed Lightrail
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Auraria West Station Area Vicinity
3


Auraria West Station Area Plan Executive Summary
Mixed Use Entertainment District: This area
includes a mix of transit-supportive land uses, primarily
entertainment, commercial, residential and office/
employment. Entertainment uses may include a pool
hall, bowling alley, movie theatre or other uses that may
benefit students as well as downtown and regional users.
Auraria Campus: This area provides for the growing
needs of Auraria Higher Education Center in a transit-
supportive manner.
Student Housing: The existing and planned student
housing on the west side of the station will be better
integrated into the campus and have improved
pedestrian access to downtown on Larimer and
Lawrence Streets.
Fundamental Concept Diagram
10th & Osage
Station
4


Auraria West Station Area Plan Executive Summary
The Plan: Circulation and Mobility
The circulation plan identifies the key connections for ve-
hicles, pedestrians and bicycles throughout the station area.
Streets that should be priorities for pedestrian improvements
include:
5th, 7th, and Shoshone streets, and Rio Court are the
key to supporting the commercial and retail uses
surrounding the station
Lawrence Street is a pedestrian mall that provides the key
connection through the campus to downtown
13th Avenue is the primary east/west connection
Other key elements of the circulation plan include:
Extending Shoshone Street to Old Colfax Avenue
(eliminating 14th Ave in this location) and relocating
Curtis between 5th and 7th streets. This will also
support commercial and retail uses on 5th Street
Creating a primary auto loop on 5th, 7th, Rio Court,
and Osage streets. This will provide north-south access
through the site, ventilate the heavy traffic generated by
the Pepsi Center events and increase access and visibility
at the station
Station Area Mobility
Light Rail Station
Light Rail Alignment
Primary Street Grid
| | Redevelopment Parcel
| | Open Space
| | Existing Building
| | Existing Parcel
5


Auraria West Station Area Plan Executive Summary
Implementation and Next Steps
The implementation plan for the Auraria West Station is in-
tended to lay out the framework to enable development and
infrastructure consistent with the plan. The Auraria West
implementation covers a series of actions:
Specific recommendations
Strategies for implementation
Implementation timing
Citywide TOD implementation evaluation
Specific recommendations are listed in tables in the imple-
mentation section. The most immediate steps include plan
adoption followed by rezonings that provide the regulatory
framework to implement the recommendations. Rezonings
should occur within the context and timeframe of Denvers
zoning code update. It is anticipated that new zone districts
will be available under the updated code that will be suited to
the unique development character of the station areas.
Another immediate step includes the scoping of infrastruc-
ture projects and the identification of potential funding
sources to implement the infrastructure needed in the station
area. These infrastructure improvements should be pursued
through public-private partnerships between local, university,
regional, state and federal agencies.
First Tier Implementation
Recommendations and Timing
It is important to have the city set up the Auraria West
Station as development ready. Development ready includes:
Getting new zoning in place
Identifying an implementation toolbox both financial
and regulatory
Putting in place the partnerships with other agencies
and departments Community Planning and
Development (CPD), Public Works (PW), Regional
Transportation District (RTD), and the Auraria Higher
Education Center (Auraria or AHEC)
6


Auraria West Station Area Plan Overview
7


Auraria West Station Area Plan Overview
Introduction
In 2002 the City adopted Blueprint Denver An Inte-
grated Land Use and Transportation Plan, to further the
goals identified in Comprehensive Plan 2000 and promote
more efficient use of transportation systems, expanded
transportation choices, and appropriate and mixed land
uses. Blueprint Denver identifies Areas of Change where
growth should be directed and Areas of Stability where
change should be limited. When voters passed the Fas-
Tracks ballot measure in 2004, Denver was poised to take a
more significant leadership role in implementing Blueprint
Denver and focusing growth near transit stations. This
agenda was furthered by the adoption of Greenprint Denver
in 2006. The Greenprint agenda promotes transit-oriented
development (TOD) by setting a goal of increasing new de-
velopment located within a Vi mile of existing transit stations
by 20% by 2011 and decreasing reliance on automobiles
through public transit and access.
In an effort to prioritize planning and implementation
activities related to transit and TOD, the City prepared the
Transit Oriented Development Strategic Plan in 2006.
Expanding on the goals and policies identified in the TOD
Strategic Plan, the Auraria West Station Plan provides a
sound policy basis for citywide decisionmaking and guid-
ing positive changes to the built environment. This docu-
ment outlines the key components of the planning process,
establishes a foundation of essential objectives and provides
strategies on how to realize the vision.
The Auraria West light rail station is located in RTDs
Central Corridor at the west side of the Auraria Campus.
It is currently located adjacent to a pedestrian only section
of Lawrence Street and is being relocated further north and
west to 5th Street as part of the West Corridor light rail
project, planned for completion in 2013. The West Cor-
ridor will be a 12.1-mile light rail transit corridor between
the Denver Union Station in downtown Denver and the
Jefferson County Government Center in Golden, serving
Denver, Lakewood, the Denver Federal Center, Golden and
Jefferson County.
Picture 1.1 Rail system in the Denver region
Existing:
Central Corridor (1994)
Southwest Corridor (2000)
Central Platte Valley Spur (2002)
Southeast Corridor (2006)
FasTracks
West Corridor opening 2013
East Corridor -2015, subject to change
Gold Line-2015, subject to change
Central Corridor Extension-2015*
1-225 Corridor -2016*
North Metro Corridor -2016*
* curren tly insufficien t funding
8


Auraria West Station Area Plan Overview
Purpose of the Plan
Property owners, elected officials, neighborhood organiza-
tions and city departments will use the Auraria West Station
Area Plan for many purposes over its lifespan. The following
is a description of the primary uses of the plan ranging from
big picture expectations to implementation.
Infrastructure Improvements: A plan can provide the justi-
fication or the prioritization and allocation of funding from
private sources or the citys capital improvement budget and
other sources.
Funding and Partnership Opportunities: Implementation
of plans requires a collaborative effort between neighbor-
hoods, businesses, elected officials and city departments.
Plans typically require funding beyond the citys budget. This
plan identifies and supports these partnerships and resource
leveraging efforts.
Reference for Larger City Wide Plans: The station area
plan may include analysis that can inform other larger city-
wide plans. For example, as parking is a major issue that is
addressed in this station area plan, the analysis and recom-
mendations included here should be considered in the devel-
opment of the city-wide strategic parking plan.
Data Resource: The plan offers a collection of existing con-
ditions data about the planning area in an easy-to-reference
document.
Reinvestment Guidance: Market conditions cannot be
guaranteed and changes in demographics cannot be accu-
rately predicted. However, it is clear that the relocation of
the light rail station and construction of the West Corridor
generates reinvestment interest. The plan guides public and
private decision-making and investment in the planning area
over the coming years as it relates to land use, urban design
and mobility. The plan offers guidance on this reinvestment
for the near-term and flexibility to adapt to changing demo-
graphics and market demands.
Zoning Amendments: The plan does not convey or deny
any zoning entitlement but is an essential evaluation tool
used in proposed zoning changes. Furthermore, the plan does
not change zoning code language, but informs the pending
zoning code update.
Picture 1.2 Existing Auraria West Station
9


Auraria West Station Area Plan Overview
Plan Process
Over a course of approximately 18 months, community
members worked together with City staff and the station
area planning team (made up of multiple agencies, property
owners and stakeholders) to articulate opportunities, develop
a vision and craft strategies to achieve the vision. With the
strong foundation of adopted plans, stakeholders focused on
the vision for creating a stronger sense of connection to the
Auraria Campus and the surrounding neighborhoods while
creating opportunities for mixed use development with cam-
pus supportive uses.
These community members represented residents, prop-
erty owners, university officials, businesses and community
organizations in the area. In addition, the process involved
collaboration between the City and County of Denvers
Community Planning and Development Department, Office
of Economic Development, and Public Works Department,
with support from the Department of Parks and Recreation
and Environmental Health. Consulting assistance was pro-
vided by Crandall-Arambula.
Regular public meetings and stakeholder work sessions
shaped plan contents for the station area planning. Briefings
and public hearings with City Council, Denver Planning
Board and interagency city staff were also crucial to the pro-
cess. The working group engaged in the following process:
1. Collect and analyze background information
2. Identify opportunities and constraints
3. Public Workshop 1 provide overview, identify issues
and concerns
4. Draft vision and key objectives
5. Public workshop 2 review findings/finalize vision and
project objectives
6. Develop and analyze land use and circulation alternatives
7. Technical review of parking, traffic, transportation,
environmental and economic alternative concepts
8. Public workshop 3 present alternative concepts and
identify preferred alternative
9. Refine preferred alternative
10. Draft station area plan, implementation strategy and
infrastructure assessment
11. Finalize station area plan
12. Circulate station area plan for external
stakeholder review
13. Bring final draft of station area plan through adoption
process including public hearings before the Planning
Board and Denver City Council
Picture 1.3 Community members worked together with City staff and the
station area planning team to articulate these opportunities, develop a
vision and craft strategies to achieve the vision.
Context
Planning Area: The Auraria West light rail station on RTDs
central light rail corridor is located at 5th Street and Old
Colfax Avenue on the Auraria Campus. The entire Auraria
West Station planning area is delineated by a 1/2 mile radius
(10 minute walk) from the station. The planning area is
located within Council District 9 and primarily within the
Auraria statistical neighborhood, the boundaries of which
include Colfax, the South Platte River and Speer Boulevard/
Cherry Creek. This area is just east of Downtown Denver
and a portion is also in the La Alma/Lincoln Park (LALP)
neighborhood.
Core Station Area: The core station area is defined as sites
closest to the station that are likely to see the most change
and redevelopment within the planning time frame (see
Picture 1.4). The core station area is currently dominated
by surface parking areas for the Auraria Campus and Pepsi
Center. The predominant surrounding land uses also include
educational, industrial, as well as a student housing facility.
This station plan considers the entire 1/2 mile radius but has
some more specific recommendations for the core station
area.
10


Auraria West Station Area Plan Overview
jy ^a~rF?
Picture 1.4 Core Station Area-2006 Aerial Photograph
11


Auraria West Station Area Plan Overview
The Kroenke Sports property (Pepsi Center) to the north of
Auraria Parkway is within the core station area and provides a
large potential area for redevelopment. The core station area
also includes the Auraria Campus; however, land uses on the
campus are governed by the Auraria Campus Master Plan.
Because circulation and connectivity through the campus
are key to activating the station, these topics are emphasized
and recommendations for AHEC are included. The land as-
semblage south of Colfax is also included in the core station
area. With substantial acreage, underutilization, and direct
access to 5th Street, this area is an important component
of the plan. The main focus of the core station area is 5th
Street, between Auraria Parkway and Old Colfax as this will
be the location of the campus hot spot and serve as a spine
connecting the street network. The areas west of 1-25 are
not included in the core station area due to the physical and
perceptual barrier of the interstate.
Beyond the Planning Area: While the planning area is the
1/2 mile radius of the Auraria West Station, it is important to
understand the land use and transportation pattern beyond
that boundary. Beyond the planning area, to the east of the
campus is downtown and the central business district (CBD).
To the west is Invesco Field with medium to high density
residential neighborhoods. The area to the south is pre-
dominantly industrial and to the southeast is predominantly
residential. While these areas contain a diversity of land uses,
the proximity to downtown, educational and entertainment
centers makes access to the planning area important. A
consideration addressed in this document is the need for im-
proved connections from the Auraria Campus and La Alma/
Lincoln Park neighborhood to downtown.
Station Typology: According to Denvers Transit Oriented
Development Strategic Plan (August 2006), the Auraria
West Station TOD typology is campus/special events with a
desired land use mix of university campus, sports facilities,
limited multi-family housing, and limited office/retail.
The TOD typology developed by the City is an attempt
to recognize the important differences among places and
destinations within regions and then to identify appropriate
performance and descriptive benchmarks for these places.
The basic station area place types as defined by the typol-
ogy are intended to provide a very general idea of the overall
character of and vision for each station area without spelling
out too many specific details.
Planning Context: Denvers adopted plans provided the
basis for the Auraria West Station Plan and represent official
policy adopted by elected representatives with public input.
It is essential to ensure consistency with the goals, objec-
tives and recommendations of these plans. An overview of
all documents considered during this planning process is
found in the Appendix. The overriding principles of these
plans are:
Promoting urban infill and compact, mixed-use develop-
ment patterns that use resources more efficiently
Creating multi-modal streets that facilitate walking,
bicycling and public transportation use along
with automobiles
Providing parks, schools, civic uses and open space that
are safely accessible by pedestrians
Restricting development in areas that would affect the
sustainability of regional facilities
Market Context: To identify, leverage, and maximize TOD
opportunities, the City commissioned a TOD Economic
Analysis and Market Study. The primary goal of the TOD
Economic Analysis and Market Study was to provide the
city with an assessment of TOD potential at the regional,
corridor, and station area levels through analysis of short- and
long-term demand (e.g. demand in 2015 and 2030). Con-
ducted in coordination with station area planning efforts,
the market study helped to better align station plans with
market realities and dynamics. The overall objectives of the
TOD Economic Analysis and Market Study were to forge
a better understanding of the economic context in which the
City plans for TOD, and to develop specific recommenda-
tions regarding the amount, type, mix, and intensity of uses
appropriate for selected station areas. The study established a
few key projections and findings which provide a framework
for economic opportunities in Denver:
The build-out of FasTracks will create a comprehensive
transit system and should place the region in a better
competitive position to attract new growth compared to
other regions without full transit-systems
The region should experience relatively high rates of
household and employment growth in the next 20 years
There is a demonstrated market interest in higher-
intensity development
12


Auraria West Station Area Plan Overview
The City and County of Denver has taken a proactive
role in planning for transit and other transit-supportive
public policies
Current development activity near existing transit
stations in the region far exceeds DRCOG growth
projections
Station areas are attracting (capturing) new development
at a rate of 25%-40% depending on the development
type (residential, retail, or office)
Existing Planning Area
Population and Housing
Dominated by the Auraria Campus and the Pepsi Center,
the Auraria statistical neighborhood supports a very small
residential population. In 2000 the Census estimated a
neighborhood population of 123 people. The Auraria Cam-
pus itself housed no students in 2000. In 2005 the Campus
Village Apartments were constructed adjacent to the campus.
The Campus Village Apartments currently house approxi-
mately 685 students in 230 units and experiences very low
vacancy rates. South of Colfax approximately 405 residential
units within the La Alma / Lincoln Park neighborhood are
located within 1/2 mile of the station. Because the student
housing and a large Denver Housing Authority property in
La Alma/Lincoln Park are rental properties, only 12% of the
units within the station area are owner-occupied.
Entertainment
Kroenke Sports Enterprises is the owner of the Pepsi Center,
home to the Denver Nuggets, Colorado Avalanche, Colorado
Mammoth and the Colorado Crush. Kroenkes property is
surrounded by three of Denvers light rail stations: Pepsi
Center, Invesco Field and Auraria West Campus. It is also
located immediately north of the Auraria Campus. The
Picture 1.5 The Pepsi Center is located just north of the Auraria West
Station within the 1/2 mile radius
majority of Kroenkes land currently serves as surface park-
ing lots. In the future, the property owner plans to apply
for rezoning to enable the development of a transit-friendly,
mixed-use, entertainment district using a general develop-
ment plan (GDP) or other applicable planning process. The
GDP process identifies issues related to land use, open space,
transportation, water, wastewater, utilities and urban design
and provides a conceptual plan for integrating the anticipated
land uses with the necessary infrastructure. Upon redevelop-
ment, a pedestrian scale block pattern should be incorporated
to capitalize on the propertys proximity to light rail. Im-
proving connectivity will be essential to the success of the
entertainment district and creating a more walkable station
area.
Six Flags Elitch Gardens is a downtown amusement park
located north of the Central Corridor rail line and Kroenke
Sports property. The southern portion of the amusement
park is within the 1/2 mile radius of the Auraria West Sta-
tion. The rail line creates a barrier for pedestrians walking
from the Auraria West Station; however, better access is
provided from the Pepsi Center station.
Schools and Public Facilities
The Auraria Higher Education Center (AHEC or Auraria)
campus area is home to three educational institutions: the
Community College of Denver, Metropolitan State College
and the University of CO Denver downtown campus. The
student population is increasing and is projected to substan-
tially increase over the next 20 to 25 years. Every five years
AHEC is required to update the master plan for the campus.
An updated campus master plan was adopted in 2007.
The 2007 Campus Master Plan calls for expanding and
intensifying the campus to meet the current and future space
needs of the Auraria Campus.
Picture 1.6 Urban Ventures Phase 1 of the Campus Village development
13


Auraria West Station Area Plan Overview
c \ B G L i r_ i r- r i Ja
Picture 1.7 Auraria Campus Illustrative Master Plan
facility adjacent to the Auraria Campus. Phase One of the
project, a $50 million, 250,000-square foot development,
was completed fall of 2006. In conjunction with the con-
struction of the West Corridor and relocation of the Auraria
West Campus Station, Urban Ventures plans to complete the
additional phases and redevelop the underutilized parcels sur-
rounding Campus Village apartments.
South of Colfax. The South of Colfax site includes 22
acres of land located between Old Colfax and 13 th Avenues
currently consisting of industrial uses and underutilized par-
cels. The site is impacted by the realignment of Union Pacific
Railroads Burnham Lead through the site due to FasTracks.
Currently, freight trains access the Burnham Yard, a mainte-
nance facility south of the Auraria West Campus station area,
from a track that parallels the light rail alignment, passing
under the Colfax viaduct and heading south. As part of the
FasTracks project, this track, known as the Burnham Lead,
will be relocated east, just north of 13th Avenue, passing
through the South of Colfax property where it would recon-
The plan also hopes to enhance the identity of the individual
institutions through the creation of individual neighbor-
hoods. Key to improving campus connectivity is the recom-
mendation to extend Larimer Street through the campus as
a pedestrian walk and bikeway, and allowing for a shuttle
or trolley. The parking strategy in the plan locates parking
at campus edges and maintains current parking capacity by
transitioning from surface parking to structured parking.
These planning efforts will greatly improve the access and
activity around the light rail station. The Campus Master
Plan also identifies new potential approaches for real estate
transactions enabling public-private development on campus
property.
Land Assemblage
Campus Village. Urban Ventures, a local real estate develop-
ment company, partnered with the University of Colorado
Real Estate Foundation to develop the student housing
14


Auraria West Station Area Plan Overview
RTD Busstops Parks / Open Space f Golf Course [fr| Lightrail Station
RTD Local Bus Route Green streets 1 Existing Lightrail
Bike Route (Onstreet) Enhanced Transit Corridors Railroad
Bike Path (Offstreet) 4 Station Buffer
** 1/4 and 1/2 Mile
Aerial Imagery: April 2008
Picture 1.8 Existing transportation station area
15


Auraria West Station Area Plan Overview
nect with the Burnham Yard. The Auraria Higher Education
Center has recently purchased 13-5 acres of the property
north of the Burnham Lead to develop recreation fields to
meet their growing demand for athletic facilities. AHEC
will be working to improve the connection to the fields
from the campus.
Transit System
FasTracks. With the Denver region currently serving as
home to 2.5 million people and another 1 million expected
to move to the metro area by 2030, improvements in trans-
portation infrastructure are critical to maintaining the
excellent quality of life that attracts so many to this area. In
the past 10 years alone, RTD ridership has increased more
than 28 percent. The existing light rail system is a total of 35
miles, 6 lines and 34 stations. By 2007 ridership was an aver-
age of 63,000 boardings per weekday systemwide.
The RTD FasTracks program is an integration of several tran-
sit modes and other programs into a comprehensive region-
wide system. FasTracks will improve accessibility, quality of
life and commuting times. Several transit technologies will
be used as determined through the environmental process on
each corridor. RTD has already been using buses and light
rail to meet the Denver metro areas transit needs. As part of
FasTracks, three new technologies commuter rail, bus rapid
transit and streetcars may be introduced to the region. In
addition to the new rail corridors, extensions and bus rapid
transit, FasTracks includes new Park-N-Rides, a new com-
muter rail maintenance facility, expanded bus service called
FastConnects and the redevelopment of Denver Union Sta-
tion. This unprecedented transit investment will include:
122 miles of new rail
6 new rail corridors (light rail and heavy rail)
Expansion of 3 existing corridors
18 miles of Bus Rapid Transit (BRT)
31 new Park-n-Rides 21,000 spaces
Enhanced bus network & transit hubs (FastConnects)
Existing Transportation: Major east-west automobile cor-
ridors include 13th Avenue, Colfax Avenue and Auraria
Parkway. Sections of the latter two roadways are elevated.
In the vicinity of the station, Interstate 25 is a major north-
south elevated automobile corridor located on the western
edge of the study area and Speer Boulevard is located east of
Auraria Campus. These north-south and east-west corridors
act as visual and physical barriers that isolate the Auraria
Campus and limit connectivity to adjacent neighborhoods
and downtown.
16


Auraria West Station Area Plan Vision and Goals
Vision & Goals
17


Auraria West Station Area Plan Vision and Goals
Vision Statement
The City and County of Denver is poised to take a significant
leadership role in implementing the new transit lines and
focusing growth into neighborhoods and areas near almost
40 transit stations. This section begins with the established
TOD principles for the City of Denver. The unique qualities
of the Auraria West Station Area substantially contribute to
this effort. Realizing this vision will depend on the ability to
overcome distinct challenges and capitalize on strengths and
opportunities described in this section. This section estab-
lishes the specific vision for the Auraria West Station and the
primary Transit-Oriented Development objectives for the
station area are described.
The Auraria West Station will develop over the coming
decades into an energized area of sustainable mixed-use
development with campus-supportive uses. Students, faculty
and visitors will be drawn to the convenience and amenities
of this location. The station will be connected to downtown,
surrounding neighborhoods and adjacent light rail stations
through the regional transportation system.
Improved pedestrian and bicycle connectivity will tie the
light rail station with the student housing, campus, down-
town, mixed-use entertainment district, and future main
street uses along 5th Street. Development of new housing on
the west side of the station will allow more students and fac-
ulty to live near the light rail connecting them to the campus
and the region. The increased population base will support a
variety of campus-oriented commercial, retail, and entertain-
ment uses.
The growth and development on the Auraria Campus will
be coordinated with the transit-oriented development sur-
rounding the station. These efforts will include activating
the station platform with a campus hot spot, providing a
destination for students and transit riders.
5th Street will be transformed by new development and
improvements coordinated between the City of Denver,
AHEC, Urban Ventures, and the Regional Transportation
District. On-street parking, premium pedestrian treatments,
and ground-floor commercial and retail will transform 5th
Street into a spine connecting the street network. Buildings
on both sides of 5th Street will also complement the street
and the transit station. Pedestrian improvements on 5th
Street, Larimer, Lawrence Street, Shoshone and Rio Court
will make walking easy and convenient to and from the sta-
tion, campus, downtown, Pepsi Center, Invesco Field and
adjacent neighborhoods. Students will be able to walk to
entertainment and services and be more integrated into the
urban fabric.
Improvements to the street grid through the campus and
south towards 13th Avenue will provide much needed con-
nections. 13th Avenue will remain an important connection
for neighborhoods to the east and west, allowing residents
to conveniently walk or bicycle to the Auraria West and
Decatur Stations.
New development will be high-quality, sustainable and
architecturally interesting with ground floors and building
entrances that open onto the sidewalk. Buildings will be of
a scale that helps create a sense of enclosure and safety for
pedestrians as they walk to their destinations.
TOD and Sustainability
Defined by the Brundtland Commission (World Commission
on Environment and Development), sustainable development
meets the needs of the present without compromising the
ability of future generations to meet their own needs. Transit-
oriented development addresses the three Es of sustainability:
environment, economy, and social equity and furthers the
climate objectives set forth by Green print Denver.
Environment Mobile sources account for as much as 90%
of all carbon-monoxide emissions. Transit-oriented develop-
ment supports use of public transportation over private au-
tomobiles and can help reduce traffic and air pollution. For
every passenger mile traveled, public transportation is twice
as efficient as private automobiles.
Economy The average working American drives 396 hours
each year, the equivalent of 10 workweeks. More than one-
fourth of this time is spent commuting to and from work.
Transit-oriented and mixed-use development can convey sub-
stantial fiscal and economic benefits for workers by reducing
commute costs and increasing available hours for productiv-
ity In addition, businesses recognize that TOD encourages a
variety of local employment opportunities, and helps attract
new businesses and industries.
Equity The cost of buying, maintaining, and operating ve-
hicles is the largest source of personal debt after home mort-
gages. TOD offers a framework to build community and
help create and preserve a sense of place. It does this through
housing and transportation choices, urban green spaces, ac-
cessible recreational and cultural attractions, and policies and
incentives that promote mixed-use neighborhoods for the
benefit of everyone.
18


Auraria West Station Area Plan Vision and Goals
Picture 2.1 Emerging opportunities create energy and excitement for the
station area and present the potential to create a main street of mixed
uses along 5th Street.
Foundation of TOD Principles
Developing a vision begins with establishing the underlying
principles of transit-oriented development. Transit-oriented
development is a mix of uses at various densities within
a half-mile radius, or walking distance, of a transit stop.
TOD should create specific areas that integrate transit into
neighborhoods and help support lively and vital communi-
ties. The TOD Strategic Plan defines TOD in Denver and
establishes strategies for implementation.
In order to succeed, TOD should address these five guiding
principles.
Place-making: Create safe, comfortable, varied and
attractive station areas with a distinct identity.
Rich Mix of Choices: Provide housing, employment,
transportation and shopping choices for people of all
ages, household types, incomes and lifestyles.
Location Efficiency: Place homes, jobs, shopping,
entertainment, parks and other amenities close to the
station to promote walking, biking and transit use.
Value Capture: Encourage all stakeholders residents,
business owners, RTD and the City to take full
economic advantage of the amenity of enhanced transit
services.
Portal to the Region: Understand and maximize the
stations role as an entry to the regional transit network
and as a safe pleasant and private place to live.
Strengths, Opportunities and Challenges
To successfully accomplish the TOD principles and adopted
city policies, a full understanding of the strengths, oppor-
tunities and challenges of the Auraria West Station Area is
needed. Realizing this vision will depend on the ability to
overcome distinct challenges and capitalize on accomplish-
ments and opportunities described in this section.
The Auraria West Station has excellent potential for future
development because of the strong existing student base in
the area, the proximity to Auraria Campus and downtown,
the planned student housing, and the interest of surround-
ing property owners and AHEC to redevelop underutilized
properties surrounding the station.
Existing strengths, or assets, within the station area set the
stage for the plans vision and add significant value to future
improvements.
Expanding Auraria Campus provides a strong transit
user base
Major transfer point for commuters coming on the West
Line to transition to the Central Corridor
Proximity to downtown Denver
Recent addition of student housing to station area
Emerging opportunities create energy and excitement for
the station area and present unprecedented resources to
evolve the built environment.
Potential to create main street of mixed uses along
5th Street
Ability to strengthen connections to the north-south
roadway network by linking 5th and 7th Streets to the
north of Auraria Parkway and strengthening connections
to 13 th Avenue
Expansion of student housing immediately west
of the station
Landowner interest in redevelopment of key sites,
including Pepsi Center parking lots, and infill and
expansion of the Auraria Campus
Despite a strong foundation of significant strengths and
opportunities, challenges remain. The plans objectives and
recommendations will greatly assist in overcoming these
obstacles.
The station area is not well connected to the campus
Timeline for potential redevelopment to the north and
south has yet to be determined
No bus connections to and from the station
Roadway network does not provide direct connections
to nearby corridors of Colfax, Auraria Parkway or
13 th Avenue
19


Auraria West Station Area Plan Vision and Goals
Bike routes and linkages are insufficient
Barrier to the south created by the 60-acre rail yard
(Burnham Yard), owned by Union Pacific Railroad.
There are currently no plans for the sale of this
property
Auraria West Station Plan Objectives
To achieve a vibrant, economically healthy, growing and vital
station area, a sustained effort in each of the following ele-
ments is essential:
Place-Making
Improving the stations status as a destination
Enhancing the experience along and crossing 5th Street
Creating main street character along 5th Street around
the station
Creating a sense of arrival for the station area and the
station itself
Developing strong connections between the station and
Auraria Campus Creating a consistent and predictable
form within the station area
Rich Mix of Choices
Offering safe, convenient and pleasant pedestrian,
bicycle and vehicular access between the station, campus,
downtown, and surrounding neighborhoods
Interweaving transit and pedestrian oriented uses
(campus, small scale shops, restaurants, residential, etc.)
Supporting main street environment with buildings and
pedestrian entrances at the street
Providing new opportunities for housing (mix of types
and affordability)
Location Efficiency
Considering reinvestment opportunities and accessibility
improvements within the planning area
Providing extension of 5th Street to the north and
additional circulation opportunities through connection
of 7th Street to the grid
Integrating and embracing the station into the street and
land use pattern
Improving accessibility and consolidating parking
locations for campus users and businesses
Value Capture
Ensuring investments add value to existing campus and
surrounding land owners
Considering existing neighborhood plans and other
planning efforts (e.g. Decatur Station Area Plan,
Downtown Area Plan, La Alma Lincoln Park
Neighborhood Plan/lOth & Osage Station Area Plan,
Strategic Transportation Plan, Strategic Parking Plan
and the Living Streets Initiative)
Examining capacity of infrastructure to accommodate
new development (water, sewer, traffic, etc..)
Exploring opportunities to access regional recreation
systems
Portal to the Region
Addressing existing and potential barriers between the
station and campus
Enhancing experience along 5th Street and cross campus
routes, including Lawrence and Larimer streets
Emphasizing alternative methods to access the station,
such as providing bus connections and bicycle facilities
Creating a street hierarchy and extending the grid both
to the north and south of the station to access the mixed
use entertainment district, Auraria athletic fields, and
employment along 13th Avenue
Highlighting the station as a transfer point for commut-
ers coming on the West Line to the Central Corridor
20


Auraria West Station Area Plan Vision and Goals
m
I;
Existing LRT Station
13 Proposed Auraria West Campus LRT Station
Light Rail Alignment
Southern Pacific Railroad Alignment
Proposed Burnham Lead Alignment
| | Auraria Campus
I Office/Mixed Use
I Commercial/Mixed Use
~ ] Residential/Mixed Use
| | Mixed Use/Entertainment District
| | Parking Structure
| | New/Enhanced Parks and Open Space
| | New Private Open Space
| | Existing Parks and Open Space
| | Existing Building
| | Existing Parcel
| Enhanced Bike/Ped Route
Picture 2.2 Build-out Concept Diagram
21


Auraria West Station Area Plan Vision and Goals
Key Elements
The plans objectives will be realized through the following
key design elements described here and shown in the Build-
out Concept Diagram to the left.
Primary Pedestrian/Bicycle Station Access Routes on
Lawrence Street, Shoshone Street and 13th Avenue: The
Lawrence Street pedestrian mall will continue to provide
pedestrian and add bicycle access and serve as an organizing
public open space green system that connects transit riders
to key campus destinations and the downtown core. Larimer
and Curtis Streets could provide alternative bicycle access.
Rio Court Old Colfax, and Shoshone Streets will link via
5th street to the Lawrence mall system and provide access
to the 10th & Osage light rail station and neighborhoods to
the south. 13th Avenue runs along the office/employment
corridor, linking to the Decatur Station to the west and
the Golden Triangle to the east. These routes will serve as a
premium pedestrian and bicycle system that will supplement
additional pedestrian and bicycle connections in the area.
Mixed-Use Entertainment District: A portion of the Pepsi
Center surface parking will be transformed to include a mix
of transit-supportive land uses, primarily entertainment,
commercial, residential and office/employment. Entertain-
ment uses may include a pool hall, bowling alley, movie
theatre or other uses that may benefit Auraria students and
downtown and regional users.
Auraria Campus: This area will provide for the growing
needs of the campus in a transit-supportive manner. The ex-
isting Tivoli Student Union on campus will be complimented
by nearby development and additional students and faculty
will be drawn from around the region.
Student Housing: The existing and planned student hous-
ing will be better integrated into the campus and station and
have improved pedestrian access to downtown on Larimer
and Lawrence Streets.
Campus Hot Spot: The campus hot spot on 5th Street is
intended to provide campus-oriented commercial and retail
uses for the projected increase of students and transit riders at
the Auraria West Campus Station. Commercial ground-floor
uses near the station are intended to be student oriented and
will activate the station platform and surrounding area and
complement the existing Tivoli Student Union.
South of Colfax and Office/Employment Corridor: This
area will provide a mix of land uses, including office and
employment, that support transit ridership and complement
the nearby Auraria Campus. It is also a planned location for
expanded campus recreation facilities and athletic fields.
Primary Auto Loop on 5th and 7th Streets: This loop will
maintain and improve existing auto connectivity within the
site and to local and regional road systems. 5th Street and
Shoshone Street/Rio Court will extend south to 13th Av-
enue, providing an important connection between the future
mixed-use entertainment district to the north and future resi-
dential neighborhoods to the south. 7th Street remains open
to auto traffic, providing circulation through the campus and
increasing accessibility to nearby facilities. The extension of
5th and 7th streets to the north through the mixed-use en-
tertainment district will help provide additional connectivity
for the area and support the need to serve Pepsi Center event
traffic. The fundamental concept diagram below illustrates
the proposed primary auto loop through the station area.
22


Auraria West Station Area Plan Vision and Goals
Campus Hot Spot
(Commercial / Retail)
Primary Ped/Bike
Station Access
Route
(Lawrence, Shoshone and 13th)
Primary Auto
Loop
(5th, 7th, Rio Court and Osage)
To
10th & Osage
Station
To
Sth Avenue and
10th & Osage
Station
Picture 2.3 Fundamental Concept Diagram
23


Auraria West Station Area Plan Land Use & Urban Design
24


Auraria West Station Area Plan Land Use & Urban Design


lid Use &
Urban Design
25


Auraria West Station Area Plan Land Use & Urban Design
Land Use and Urban Design
Station areas thrive on a rich mix of land uses and efficient
placement of those uses. This creates a diversity of people,
choice, and opportunities. Attracting jobs, residents, ameni-
ties and visitors is essential to a vital station area, neighbor-
hood and transportation system. The intensity and arrange-
ment of land use correlate to the typology of the station area.
Auraria West Station Area typology of campus/special events
is reinforced by the land use plan.
The land use plan illustrates types and locations of transit
supportive uses on parcels that are most likely to be developed
or redeveloped over time. The primary land use within the
station area is educational; however, commercial, employ-
ment, entertainment and residential uses support the adjoining
campus. Major parcels that are envisioned for transit-oriented
redevelopment include the mixed-use entertainment district,
campus hot spot, Auraria Campus and the south of Colfax
property (See Picture 3.1). The Land Use Concept Diagram on
the following page illustrates the recommended land uses for
the properties likely to redevelop in the station area.
Each station area must emerge as a destination with its own
sense of place and identity. This plan provides strategies for
making the Auraria West Station Area a distinctive neighbor-
hood while respecting surrounding conditions. Urban design
encompasses fundamental elements such as ground floor
uses, build-to lines and building heights. All are essential to
an active and vital station area and maximize transit oriented
development opportunities.
To create land use choices in the Auraria West Station Area
and create sustainable transit- and pedestrian-oriented
development, the land use concept recommends a combina-
tion of a mixed-use entertainment district, campus housing,
a campus hot spot, office/employment, and open space uses.
On many parcels a mix of uses, both vertically and horizon-
tally, is recommended. Where parcels contain a vertical mix
of uses, the predominate, or most important use, is indicated.
This range of uses will allow for a balanced level of activity
throughout the day and week and can accommodate market
demands and fluctuations over a long period of time.
While the entire station area should be mixed use, the Land
Use Concept illustrates the ideal concentration of student-
serving retail and commercial. The land uses illustrated also
reflect existing development plans. Promoting mixed use
near transit can help reach the Citys sustainability goals by
bringing more people within easy access of public transporta-
tion, bike facilities and pedestrian routes, thereby reducing
our dependence on oil and energy in the future.
26


Auraria West Station Area Plan Land Use & Urban Design
Picture 3.1 Land Use Concept Diagram
27


Auraria West Station Area Plan Land Use & Urban Design
Land Use Recommendations
To achieve the rich mix of choices and eliminate the auto-
oriented development pattern of the Auraria Station area the
land use concept recommends educational, residential, open
space and office employment. Retail and commercial uses
are also suggested as part of the ground floor uses framework.
The following are detailed land use recommendations for the
station area that respond to the vision.
Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 1
Housing Opportunities
The Auraria West Campus Station TOD offers opportunities
for transit-oriented housing. The housing framework should
support a variety of housing types, including rentals and
for-sale units. This will help infuse market-rate, student and
affordable housing into the station area.
Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 2
Office/Employment Base
New office/employment uses are suggested to the north
and south of the Auraria Campus. Employment uses may
include office and/or light-industrial uses. Family-wage
jobs (sufficient to support a spouse and children), nontradi-
tional employment, and live/work opportunities should be
encouraged.
Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 3
Campus Commercial (Campus Hot Spot)
New campus-serving commercial uses, with a strong prefer-
ence for retail uses is suggested for the station area along 5th
Street between Walnut and Curtis streets. These commercial
services should support, strengthen and serve as an anchor
for the station area and provide pedestrian-oriented street
frontages with services located on both sides of the street.
Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 4
Retail
Pedestrian-oriented retail uses are encouraged wherever pos-
sible on 5th Street, beginning at the station and extending
from that retail core. Retail success typically depends on suf-
ficient drive-by traffic. The traffic volumes on 5th Street are
currently low but should increase in the future as the street
becomes better connected to the surrounding area. A mix of
commercial as well as retail is recommended along 5th Street
Retail use should primarily serve students and transit riders.
Appropriate retail types to serve campus and transit users
may include restaurants, coffee shops, bookstores, campus
supply stores, clothing stores, copy/print shops, and others.
Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 5
Open Space and Plaza
Existing parks and open spaces within the study area include
the South Platte River greenway to the west and La Alma/
Lincoln Park to the south, as well as the greens along the
Lawrence Street pedestrian mall which serves as an organiz-
ing open space element on the campus. Open space en-
hancements include the Lawrence Street pedestrian mall and
transit station plaza. Proposed athletic fields south of Colfax
Avenue will provide opportunity for active recreational space
for the students and neighboring community.
Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 6
Parking
Parking requirements should be reduced in the station area
due to its proximity to transit and pedestrian infrastructure.
AHEC has seen an increase in students using transit to access
the campus and currently the campus inventory of parking
spaces exceeds the effective demand. Once the West Cor-
ridor opens, student transit demand will increase even more
and parking needs should be reassessed. The Auraria Cam-
pus Master Plan supports eliminating all surface parking lots
through potential expansion of existing structure parking
options and pursuing the potential of shared parking alterna-
tives. Although minimum market requirements for parking
should be met for all land uses, alternative methods to meet
the minimum standards should be utilized. See the Mobil-
ity and Infrastructure Parking section for detailed parking
recommendations.
28


Auraria West Station Area Plan Land Use & Urban Design
Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 7
Mixed Use/Entertainment District
A mixed-use entertainment district is proposed north of
Auraria Parkway on the property owned by Kroenke Sports
Enterprises (Pepsi Center). Given its proximity to the
Auraria Campus and three light rail stations, residential and
office/employment should be included in the upper floor uses
to support transit ridership and serve the expanding student/
faculty population. A mix of residential, office/employment,
commercial, entertainment and retail uses are recommended.
To accommodate redevelopment and maintain adequate
parking for events, existing surface lots should be replaced
with structured parking to create redevelopment opportuni-
ties. Existing Pepsi Center Street Development Agreements
requiring vehicle exit time (45 minutes) after events will need
to be revisited to accommodate redevelopment of the existing
surface parking lot areas. The parking requirements should be
revisited based on current use and transit access. Land uses
should compliment the Pepsi Centers existing and future en-
tertainment uses while providing strong pedestrian connec-
tions. Uses and design should provide links to the Auraria
Campus and consider complementing the campus serving
uses adjacent to the Auraria West Station.
Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 8
Auraria Higher Education Center Campus
With the recent completion of the Auraria Campus Master
Plan (2007), a number of key issues and concerns have been
identified. The plan attempts to accommodate a number of
challenging objectives including expanding academic and
office space as well as athletic and recreational fields and
facilities, while transitioning surface parking into structured
parking. Student housing will also expand to the west of
the station where the first phase of campus adjacent student
housing has been completed.
Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 9
South of Colfax Avenue
The Auraria Higher Education Center has recently purchased
13-5 acres of property north of the future Burnham Lead
to develop recreational fields. These fields will help meet
AHEC s growing demand for athletic and recreation facilities
on the campus. South of the Burnham Lead, 13th Avenue is
well suited for office/employment and mixed use due to its
regional connectivity and high visibility. These uses along 13th
Avenue could also serve to buffer future residential uses to the
south and campus serving uses from the Burnham Lead track.
Appropriate use for the existing building on Rio Court will be
determined upon final RTD acquisition determinations.
Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 10
Ground Floor Commercial and Retail
Ground-floor retail and commercial uses are an essential
component of an active and vital station area. Neighbor-
hood-serving retail and commercial uses provide goods and
services to local residents, employees, students and light-rail
passengers. They are accessible by vehicles, transit and pedes-
trians. They create activity at the station platform. These uses
should be pedestrian oriented and organized so that buildings
are built edge to edge forming a continuous row of commer-
cial and retail uses.
5th Street between Larimer and Lawrence Street should serve
as the campus hot spot with predominantly commercial
and retail uses. Other locations within the study area may
include retail or commercial uses; however, they are not
priority areas. The map below shows recommended locations
for ground floor commercial and retail uses. The use of active
edges, transparency, and build-to lines is recommended for
the entire campus hot spot. The space should be designed to
activate the street and enhance the pedestrian experience but
can be flexible to allow needed academic/administrative uses.
Commercial uses are defined as businesses that engage in the
sale of services. Primary permitted uses should be limited
financial services, real estate services and lodging. Retail uses
are defined as businesses that engage in the sale of merchan-
dise. Primary permitted uses should be limited to merchan-
dise sales and eating and drinking establishments.
29


Auraria West Station Area Plan Land Use & Urban Design
II U '1 f'v.
Picture 3.3 Ground Floor Uses Framework
30


Auraria West Station Area Plan Land Use & Urban Design
Urban Design
Urban design recommendations are the additional layer to
the land use concept that ensures placemaking for the station
area. The main features that will be addressed include active
edges, build-to lines and building heights. Attention to
these design features will help support a shared vision for the
future evolution of the Auraria West Station Area and form
a cohesive and vibrant destination. The main goals of the
urban design recommendations are to:
Strengthen the pedestrian experience along 5th Street
with a mix of uses and an active street edge
Provide strong visual connection between the station
plaza and the core of the Auraria Campus
Allow for a range of building heights that respect the
surrounding uses and structures
Active Edges are characterized as building frontages with
direct entries from the sidewalk and a high degree of trans-
parency. This increases visual and physical interaction
between people inside and outside of the buildings, creating
a safe and vibrant pedestrian environment. This eyes on the
street environment will promote safety and activity. Build-
ing facades facing the station platform must also include
active-edge treatments. This is critical to the safe pedestrian
environment at the platform. The framework identifies the
essential building frontages to include active-edge treatments.
Other building frontages may include these treatments but it
is not crucial.
Build-To The build-to lines plan identifies locations where
ground-floor building facades must be built directly to the
property line. A build-to line can also be described as a
zero-foot building setback from the property line where the
sidewalk is built directly up to the facade. They are recom-
mended in the same locations where ground-floor commer-
cial uses are located. Providing build-to lines in a commercial
area will help establish a continuous street wall, framing the
pedestrian-oriented 5th Street and strengthening the campus
hot spot.
Building Heights should maximize transit-oriented develop-
ment opportunities, while remaining consistent with existing
ordinances and view planes.
Picture 3.4 Building facade built to street edge with variations for door-
way setbacks; Street Car Lofts, Portalnd, Oregon
Picture 3.5 "Street Wall" established by build-to lines; Stapleton, Denver,
Colorado
Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 11
Locations for Key Active Edges
Suggested active edge locations are along important streets
within the station area and connecting to the adjacent neigh-
borhoods. These locations include (see Picture 3.6, right):
5th Street
7th Street
13 th Avenue
31


Auraria West Station Area Plan Land Use & Urban Design

/
Existing Light Rail Station
13 Light Rail Station
Light Rail Alignment
Active Edges
| | Redevelopment Parcel
| | Open Space
| | Existing Building
| | Existing Parcel
Picture 3.6 Active Edges Framework
32


Auraria West Station Area Plan Land Use & Urban Design
Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 12
Design of Ground-Floor Retail and
Commercial Active Edges
To activate the street edges, a minimum of 70 percent
transparent glass or screens along ground-floor facades is
recommended. Frosted, tinted, reflective glass or other types
of glass that diminish transparency should be prohibited.
Primary entrances to all ground-floor uses should be oriented
to the public right-of-way. Near the station, active edges
should include both the platform-adjacent development and
5th Street.
Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 14
Locations for Build-To Lines
The build-to lines framework identifies only the essential
building frontages. Other building frontages may have
ground-floor facades built up to the property line, but are
not priority areas. Build-to lines are identified along 5th
Street between Curtis and Walnut streets (see Picture 3.8).
Windows and walls may be recessed up to 18 inches from the
build-to line to accommodate columns or other architectural
elements that engage the build-to line. Build-to lines should
only be interrupted for access points to courtyards or other
private space.
Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 15
Design of Build-To Lines
Build-to lines should be located along the entire block length
where indicated on the opposite diagram. The following
build-to line criteria should be met:
Ground-floor entrances to buildings may be recessed up
to five feet behind the build-to line
Windows and walls may be recessed up to 18 inches
from the build-to line to accommodate columns or other
architectural elements that engage the build-to line
Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 13
Design of all other Ground-Floor Active Edges
Primary entrances must be oriented toward the street. Qua-
si-public terraces, stoops or porches are appropriate, but not
essential. Windows should be provided along facades, but
no minimum percentage of transparency or minimum size
opening should be required. Art walls, flower booths, news
stands or other activating uses are appropriate throughout the
station area.
33


Auraria West Station Area Plan Land Use & Urban Design
i'1;] I i'W-_ -*;i 1 '
V I'll 1 I -L

S2
LEGEND:
U Light Rail Station
Light Rail Alignment
Build-to Lines
| | Redevelopment Parcel
| | Open Space
| | Existing Building
| | Existing Parcel
'1_. 'I hi*
: ..^l i'flc1 '
'/ j !j .---i' L
. J;." ;:J3~

Picture 3.8 Build to Lines Framework
34


Auraria West Station Area Plan Land Use & Urban Design
Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 16
Range of Building Heights
The building heights framework indicates a range of mini-
mum to maximum building height recommendations con-
sistent with plan objectives. Recommendations for building
heights have been made for the Core Planing Area. Building
heights should maximize transit-oriented development op-
portunities, while remaining consistent with existing old city
hall and state capitol view planes ordinances (see Picture
3-9 below). These heights range from approximately 60- to
90-feet in the planning area, depending on location. Further
study will be needed to determine actual building heights.
Building heights should also respect and not overwhelm the
scale and massing of the campus and adjacent neighbor-
hoods. See map to the right for recommended building
heights by location.
+ afcwnliW euMtrqHxjhll Lghtrail Sutiem
OWCrtyWIViewfiwf -I Emting laghbal
EWtCwaoiArw vwwPhoe , Railroad
gatoneirfer
M* 1M and 1/2 M/tr
Aena) imagery Aon) 2006
Picture 3.9 State Capitol view plane and Old City Hall view plane both
Impact the station area
The building heights framework indicates minimum and
maximum building height recommendations as follows.
Building heights should:
Range from a minimum of four to a maximum of eight
floors adjacent to the Auraria West Station.
Range from five to twelve floors on the outer edge of the
Kroenke Sports property to accommodate the Mixed-
Use Entertainment District
Range from two to four floors along the office/
employment corridor on 13th Avenue
Respond to the existing view plane ordinances and adja-
cent campus building heights, surrounding the station
Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 17
Build Green
A green building approach to design and construction
protects the environment, conserves resources, creates
healthier air quality, and saves money. Green building prac-
tices include siting and design to utilize passive solar, cross
ventilation, energy and water efficiency, renewable energy,
and recycled and reused building materials. Well-designed
buildings with efficient appliances can use up to 75 percent
less energy.
35


Auraria West Station Area Plan Land Use & Urban Design
Existing Light Rail Station
Proposed Light Rail Station
Light Rail Alignment
| | 2-4 Floors
| | 4-8 Floors
5-12 Floors
| | Redevelopment Parcel
| | Open Space
| | Existing Building
| | Existing Parcel
Picture 3.10 Building Heights Framework
36


Auraria West Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure
Sobility &
Infrastructure

>
37


Auraria West Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure
Picture 4.1 Larimer Street on the Campus is designed for pedestrians only
Mobility and Infrastructure
Mobility choices and connectivity are key ingredients to a
livable station environment because it increases access to jobs,
conserves energy, relieves congestion, supports public safety
and encourages social and economic activity Additionally,
people at various stages of life share these benefits. The mobil-
ity framework recommends enhanced pedestrian and bicycle
routes that provide safe, direct, convenient and attractive con-
nections. The street grid offers essential routes for auto and bus
traffic to maintain and improve regional mobility.
The mobility plan identifies the primary vehicular routes
to and from the Auraria West Campus Station Area. It is
designed to maintain and enhance existing vehicular routes
and create new ones for a cohesive multimodal circulation
system. The plan improves mobility between the station, Au-
raria Campus, the mixed-use entertainment district, nearby
light-rail stations and adjacent neighborhoods. The primary
vehicular routes establish a street grid that creates develop-
ment blocks. These blocks define the scale, massing and char-
acter of new buildings and open spaces. Street enhancements
also consider pedestrian and bicycle access, which is further
detailed on the following pages.
Key Concepts
The key mobility and infrastructure recommendations include:
Extend Shoshone Street to Old Colfax Avenue, eliminate
14th Avenue, and relocate Curtis Street between 5th and
7th Streets. This will support commercial and retail uses
Create a primary auto loop on 5th, 7th, Shoshone and
Osage Streets. This will provide north-south access
through the site, ventilate the heavy traffic generated by
Pepsi Center events and increase access and visibility at
the station on 5th Street.
Improve the primary east-west connection on
13th Avenue. This will link the Decatur Station to the
Auraria West Campus Station
Extending Quivas Street to 5th Street would provide an
improved block pattern and better traffic flow; however,
the Quivas extension could preclude the construction
of Aurarias much needed athletic fields. In addition, the
existing environmental contamination could make it
difficult for the City to accept a public street in this
location. If and when the Burnham Yard south of 13 th
Avenue redevelops, the Quivas Street extension should
be further analyzed and considered as an additional
connection. In addition, if Rio Court were to close in
the future, Quivas Street would need to be constructed.
Picture 4.2 5th Street going under Colfax Avenue In the station area
38


Auraria West Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure
Picture 4.3 Mobility Framework
39


Auraria West Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure
Essential infrastructure investments are needed to ensure a
successful station area. These projects provide a balance that
leverages private investment, ensures infrastructure capac-
ity and enhances the character of the station area. Given
connectivity is a challenge for the Auraria West Station Area,
street construction and pedestrian and bicycle improvements
are the focus of these infrastructure recommendations.
Street Network
New and enhanced streets complete the street grid and
ensure improved circulation throughout the station area. The
new and enhanced streets framework (see figure opposite)
identifies new streets and enhanced streets.
Mobility and Infrastructure Recommendation 1
New Streets
New streets are indicated in brown in the figure to the right.
Recommendations for new streets vary depending on loca-
tion, however all new streets must:
Provide sidewalk curb extensions or bulb-outs where
curbside parking is located to minimize pedestrian
street-crossing distances where possible
Comply with ADA standards for all new
public sidewalks
Be a sustainable street that (1) apply widely accepted
sustainable design principles, including stormwater
infiltration and permeable surface treatments (2)
promote least-polluting ways to connect people and
goods to their destinations, and (3) make transportation
facilities and services part of a livable community
Mobility and Infrastructure Recommendation 2
Enhanced Streets
Enhanced Streets are indicated in orange in the figure to the
right. These streets may include the following:
Sidewalk curb extensions or bulb-outs where curbside
parking is located to minimize pedestrian street-crossing
distances where possible
Wider or enhanced sidewalk area all of which must be
ADA compliant
Special paving patterns to alert drivers to pedestrian
crossings
Enhanced pedestrian/bicycle amenities where
appropriate
On-street parking
Pedestrian-scaled lighting
Benches
Bus stop shelters
Sustainable street features (see Mobility and
Infrastructure Recommendation 1)
Picture 4.4 Streets in Stapleton provide enhanced pedestrian amenities
along a well-connected grid
40


Auraria West Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure
Existing Light Rail Station
m Proposed Light Rail Station
Light Rail Alignment
New Roads
Future Alignment
Enhanced Roads
| | Redevelopment Parcel
| | Open Space
| | Existing Building
| | Existing Parcel
Picture 4.5 New and Enhanced Streets Framework
41


Auraria West Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure
Mobility and Infrastructure Recommendation 3
Signature Streets
The most significant new and enhanced streets are identi-
fied as signature streets and identified in Picture 4.6 to
the right. Signature streets provide key connections to and
from the Auraria West Campus Station and have enhanced
special treatments and provide places for public interaction
and environmental enhancements, as well as a functional
transportation system. Signature streets are intended to:
Provide a sustainable transportation balance consistent
with Denvers Living Streets Initiative and Strategic
Transportation Plan
Improve access to and from adjacent and nearby districts,
regional corridors and between light rail stations
Accommodate multiple transportation modes, pedestri-
ans, bicyclists and motorized vehicles, without compro-
mising safety or function
Establish and improve neighborhood identity
Ensure economic viability for commercial or retail
ground-floor uses
Support and complement surrounding land uses (the
diagrams on the previous pages illustrate the primary
land uses along each section of signature street)
Depending on their designated function, signature
streets may require additional width (building edge to
building edge) to accommodate motor vehicles,
pedestrians and bicycles.
Each signature street has a corresponding cross section and
plan view identifying minimum street elements and features.
Existing streets that should be enhanced or extended to be-
come signature streets include: (see Picture 4.6 to the right):
5th Street
7th Street*
Shoshone Street
13 th Avenue
* The construction of 5th and 7th streets through the Kroen-
ke Sports property will be a cooperative process completed
upon redevelopment of the site. The street construction will
have to address the existing waivers and conditions as well as
parking and street development agreements.
42


Auraria West Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure




Existing Light Rail Station
Light Rail Station
Light Rail Alignment
Signature Streets
Redevelopment Parcel
Open Space
Existing Building
Existing Parcel
Picture 4.6 Signature Streets Framework
43


Auraria West Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure
Signature Streets
5th Street/Campus Hot Spot: To support the ground floor
commercial and retail uses that line 5th Street between Curtis
and Walnut streets, 5th must be pedestrian-oriented and of-
fer on-street parking. The 5th Street design is detailed in the
following pages.
7th Street/Auraria Campus Facilities: With its central loca-
tion on the Auraria Campus, 7th Street must accommodate
high levels of pedestrian and bike activity and still maintain
vehicular access to campus facilities and parking structures.
The 7th Street design is detailed in the following pages.
5th and 7th Streets/Mixed Use Entertainment District:
5th and 7th streets (north of Auraria Parkway) loop through
the mixed-use entertainment district, a site that includes a
recommended mix of ground-floor uses including commer-
cial, retail and entertainment. These uses generate high levels
of pedestrian traffic and activity. 5th and 7th streets (north
of Auraria Parkway) must be designed to support auto and
bicycle traffic while maintaining an atmosphere that is pedes-
trian oriented (see photo to the right).
Shoshone Street and Rio Court/Recreation/Residential
and Office/Employment: Shoshone Street and Rio Court
pass through an active recreation area and an office/employ-
ment corridor. These uses benefit from multimodal vehicu-
lar, pedestrian and bicycle accessibility.
13th Avenue/Office/Employment Corridor: Office/em-
ployment uses have been recommended along 13th Avenue
due to its regional connectivity and high level of visibility.
As an employment corridor, heavy commuter traffic can be
expected. In addition to light rail, accessibility for autos,
pedestrians and bicycles is important.
Picture 4.7Mixed use entertainment; Beale Street, Memphis, Tennessee
Picture 4.8 Signature Streets: 5th and 7th Streets
44


Auraria West Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure
Mobility and Infrastructure Recommendation 4 -
Signature Streets: 5th & 7th Street Auto Loop
The intent of 5th and 7th Streets is to serve as a primary auto
loop and primary bicycle route. This loop will:
Create an economically viable environment that will
support transit-supportive retail uses by providing
necessary drive-by traffic
Support the mixed-use entertainment districts
pedestrian orientation while providing vehicular access
Maintain circulation through the Auraria Campus for
access to important facilities
Connect to regional and district road systems, improving
connectivity
Improve local access to and within the Auraria West
Campus Station Area, supporting proposed development
5th and 7th Streets
The design of 5th and 7th Streets should include the follow-
ing minimum elements (see cross section and plan view on
the following page):
80 cross-section measured from building-edge to
building-edge
Two-directional travel
16 sidewalk areas with a combination of 8 sidewalks,
and 8 landscaped areas with trees, turf and ground cover
between the sidewalks and the curbs
8 curbside parallel parking lanes on both sides of
the roadway
5 bike lanes (or sharrows in any location where right of
way is constrained)
Landscaped curb extensions at each street corner
where possible
Green street design principles, such as stormwater
infiltration and permeable surface treatments are
encouraged
SIDEWALKS
i
i
PARKING
BIKE LANE
TRAVEL
LANES
V V
8' 5' 11' 11' 5' 8'
PARKING BIKE TRAVEL TRAVEL BIKE PARKING
LANE LANE LANE LANE LANE LANE
16' SIDEWALK-^
"48'CURBTO CURB-
j{16' SIDEWALK-
#------------------------------------80'-----------------------------------7T
Picture 4.9 5th and 7th Streets section minimum street elements
Note: Where right of way is constrained on 5th and 7th streets, sharrows should be used In place of bike lanes
45


Auraria West Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure
Mobility and Infrastructure Recommendation 5
Signature Streets: Shoshone Street and Rio Court
The extension and enhancement of Shoshone Street and Rio
Court will improve regional circulation and reduce traffic
congestion by providing more multi-modal transportation
options, including pedestrian, bicycle and auto. Enhance-
ments should be made from Old Colfax to 13th Avenue.
The design of Shoshone Street should include:
70 right-of-way (existing)
Two-directional travel
Striped bike sharrows
13 sidewalks including 8-9 tree lawn and 5 sidewalks
9 curbside parallel parking lanes on both sides of
the roadway
Landscaped curb extensions at each street corner where
possible
Green street design principles, such as stormwater infil-
tration and permeable surface treatments are encouraged
Shoshone Street
Picture 4.10 Shoshone Street section minimum street elements
46


Auraria West Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure
The design of Rio Court should include:
60 right-of-way (50 existing)
Two-directional travel
Striped bike sharrows
8 attached sidewalks
9 curbside parallel parking lanes on both sides of
the roadway
Landscaped curb extensions at each street corner where
possible
Green street design principles, such as stormwater infil-
tration and permeable surface treatments are encouraged
Rio Court
8'
SIDEWALK
9'
PARKING
13'
TRAVEL LANE
w/
SHARROW
13'
TRAVEL LANE
w/
SHARROW
?*
X-
x-
44'CURB TO CURB
-------60'-----
Picture 4.11 Rio Court section minimum street elements
9'
PARKING
8'
SIDEWALK
X----------7-
-----------7i
47


Auraria West Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure
Mobility and Infrastructure Recommendation 6
Signature Streets: 13 th Avenue
Enhancements to 13th Avenue improve regional circulation
and reduce traffic congestion by providing transportation op-
tions that include pedestrian, bicycle and auto. 13th Avenue
is an important link between the Federal Boulevard/Decatur
light rail station, Auraria West Campus and 10th & Osage
light rail stations. Enhancements to 13th Avenue should be
made from Decatur Street to Osage Street.
The design of 13th Avenue should include the following
minimum elements:
Decatur Street to Quivas Street
70right of way
Two-directional auto travel with shared center left
turn lane
Six foot bike lanes in both directions
A 8 tree lawn on the north and south side of the street
separating the 5 sidewalk from the street
Picture 4.12 13th Avenue multimodal circulation route
Quivas Streets to Osage Street
80 right of way
Two-directional auto travel with shared center left
turn lane
Six foot bike lanes in both directions
A 10 tree lawn on the north and south sides of the street
separate the 10 sidewalk from the street
NOTE: If property owners are interested in on-street parking
upon major redevelopment, the City would support explor-
ing additional right of way to achieve the parking.
48


Auraria West Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure
13th Avenue: Decatur to Quivas
SIDEWALKS
BIKE LANE
i <~
-44'CURBTO CURB-
~X~
-?<-
X--------------------------------------70'------------------------
Picture 4.13 13th Ave street section minimum street elements
13th Avenue: Quivas to Osage
SIDEWALKS
BIKE LANE
TRAVEL
LANES
'v
SIDEWALK

-X-
44'CURBTO CURB
-x-

X------------------------------------------SO'---------------------------------------x-
Picture 4.14 13th Ave street section minimum street elements
49


Auraria West Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure
Primary Auto and Bus Circulation
The intent of the auto and bus plan is to identify primary
vehicular circulation routes that will improve or enhance
connectivity and disperse traffic. The proposed land-use plan
suggests new development within the station area that will
increase congestion on existing streets unless transportation
improvements are made. The plan identifies the locations of
important auto routes, as well as existing and proposed bus
routes that:
Integrate the study area into the local and regional
transportation system
Improve visibility and access to the commercial and retail
uses on 5th Street
Enhance connections to the Auraria Campus from
outlying neighborhoods where students and faculty
members may reside
Ventilate heavy event traffic generated by the
Pepsi Center
Mobility and Infrastructure Recommendation 7
Primary Auto Routes
The proposed primary auto loop, illustrated in the graphic
below, increases station access and improves viability of
commercial uses adjacent to the station. The loop is created
by 5th, 7th, Shoshone (or Quivas) and Osage streets. The
primary auto circulation framework routes include critical
roadways that are necessary for improved station accessibility.
These include the following considerations:
Auraria Parkway, Colfax Avenue and 13th Avenue as
regional east-west auto routes
Walnut and Curtis streets as local east-west auto routes
Interstate 25 and Speer Boulevard as regional north-
south auto routes
5th, 7th, Shoshone, Rio Court (Quivas) and Osage
streets as local north-south auto routes
Mobility and Infrastructure Recommendation 8
Primary Bus Routes
Existing and proposed bus routes should include the follow-
ing attributes:
Improved bus circulation to and from the Auraria West
Campus Station to compliment the light rail system
Improved station access with connections to major arterial
Local and regional access provided for students and
faculty members who commute to the campus
Improved connection to downtown with the Intra-
Downtown Transit proposed along Larimer Street from
the campus hot spot to the Ballpark (see Downtown
Area Plan, 2007)
50


Auraria West Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure
WVi A
I Redevelopment Parcel
| | Open Space
| | Existing Building
| | Existing Parcel
Picture 4.15 Auto and Bus Circulation Framework
51


Auraria West Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure
Primary Pedestrian Concept
The primary pedestrian framework identifies circulation
routes leading to and from the Auraria West Campus Station,
Auraria Campus, downtown, Pepsi Center, Invesco Field, ad-
jacent neighborhoods and nearby light-rail stations. The pri-
mary pedestrian circulation framework is intended to provide
safe, direct, convenient and attractive connections within the
station area and to key attractions and destinations.
Mobility and Infrastructure Recommendation 9
Pedestrian Routes
5th, Lawrence, Shoshone Streets, Rio Court and 13th Avenue
The most critical pedestrian routes are the primary pedestrian
routes on 5th, Lawrence and Shoshone/Old Colfax streets
and 13th Avenue. At a minimum, these primary pedes-
trian routes should include pedestrian-scaled lighting, wide
sidewalks and crosswalks. Each of these streets include special
treatments:
5th Street between Lawrence Street and Walnut:
Includes premium pedestrian treatments (meet MUTCD
requirements) for sidewalks and intersections, wide side
walks, street trees, special paving, etc.
Connects the Auraria West Campus Station to adjacent
commercial and retail uses located on 5th Street between
Lawrence and Walnut Streets
Pedestrian and bicycle mall on Lawrence Street (5th Street
to Speer Blvd):
Is accessible to pedestrians (and possibly bicycles in the
future) only; no vehicular access is permitted
Includes pedestrian and bicycle paths that are physically
separated by plantings, paint striping, signs (preferably
on the paved surface) and/or change in paving material
Connects the Auraria West Campus Station to the
Auraria Campus and the downtown core
Shoshone Street, Rio Court, 7th Street, Walnut St, and
13 th Avenue:
Include current best practices for pedestrian treatments
that meet MUTCD requirements for sidewalks and
intersections, detached sidewalks, street trees, special
paving, etc
Connect the Auraria Campus Station to the 10th &
Osage and Decatur Stations and provide access to and
from proposed development to the south
52


Auraria West Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure
Proposed Light Rail Station
Light Rail Alignment
Primary Pedestrian Circulation
III Future Pedestrian Circulation
| | Redevelopment Parcel
| | Open Space
| | Existing Building
| | Existing Parcel
Picture 4.16 Primary Pedestrian Circulation
53


Auraria West Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure
Primary Bicycle Concept
The primary bicycle circulation framework identifies routes
leading to and from the Station, Auraria Campus, down-
town, Pepsi Center, Invesco Field, adjacent neighborhoods
and nearby light-rail stations: Invesco Field, Pepsi Center,
Federal Blvd/Decatur and 10th & Osage. The framework is
intended to provide safe, direct, convenient and attractive
connections within the station area and to key attractions
and destinations, including future bike share stations. The
Citys planned bike share initiative (scheduled to launch sum-
mer 2009) will include up to 1,000 bikes by 2010. Bike share
stations are planned both at the Auraria West Campus LRT
station and Colfax at Auraria LRT station.
Mobility and Infrastructure Recommendation 10
Primary Bicycle Circulation
Primary bicycle circulation is indicated in the graphic on the
following page. These bike routes may either be an off-street
or an on-street bicycle route.
At a minimum, all bicycle routes should include:
Bicycle route signs
Adequate space for cyclists on or off the roadway
Other important considerations for the bicycle routes
include:
Cyclist-activated motion-detecting crossing signals at
major intersections
A bicycle facility, including storage racks, lockers/showers
and possibly rentals and sales at the station
Clear connections to planned bike share stations in
the vicinity
54


Auraria West Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure
m Existing Light Rail Station
m Proposed Light Rail Station
Light Rail Alignment
Primary Bicycle Circulation
III Future Bicycle Circulation
| | Redevelopment Parcel
| | Open Space
| | Existing Building
| | Existing Parcel
Picture 4.7 7 Primary Bicycle Circulation Framework, including on-street bicycle boulevards and off-street bike paths

55


Auraria West Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure
Mobility and Infrastructure Recommendation 11
Off-Street Bicycle Route
The most critical bicycle route is the off-street Bicycle Route
on Lawrence Street on Auraria Campus. This route links the
Auraria West Station, Auraria Campus and the downtown
core. This two-way bicycle path is separated from auto and
pedestrian traffic, creating a safe and efficient route designed
for both recreational and commuter bicyclists.
Although bicyclists are currently prohibited from riding on
most campus streets (including Lawrence Street), the City
recommends that the Auraria Higher Education Center
open more streets to cyclists in the future. At a minimum,
a physically separated bike path along Lawrence Street (and/
or Larimer, Curtis/Arapahoe Streets) should be developed to
help provide the much needed bicycle connection through
the campus. The existing City-owned streets on campus
where cyclists are permitted include 5th, 7th, Walnut, and
Curtis Streets. Recommendations for improving the bicycle
infrastructure on these streets are included.
Each off-street bicycle route includes special treatments as
specified below:
Lawrence Street
The pedestrian and bicycle mall on Lawrence Street should:
Be accessible to pedestrian and bicycles only; no
vehicular access is permitted
Include pedestrian and bicycle paths that are physically
separated by plantings, striping, signs (preferably on the
paved surface) and/or changes in paving materials
Connect the Auraria West Campus Station to the
Auraria Campus and the downtown core
Improve station access with connections to
major arterials
Provide local and regional access for students and faculty
members who commute to the campus
Picture 4.18 Two-directional bicycle path separated from pedestrian path San Sebastian, Spain
56


Auraria West Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure
Mobility and Infrastructure Recommendation 12
Primary On-Street Bicycle Facilities
The primary on-street bicycle facilities run along 13th
Avenue and north up Shoshone Street to 5th Street through
the campus hot spot and the mixed-use entertainment dis-
trict before looping back on 7th Street through the Auraria
Campus. This route links the Auraria West Station, Auraria
Campus, 10th & Osage and Decatur light-rail stations.
On-street bicycle facilities should:
Be a designated bicycle route
Include five to six foot striped bike lanes (or sharrows if
right of way is constrained),
Include signs that clearly signals shared and equal use
of roadway travel lanes for both cyclists and motor
vehicles. In some cases, streets with low traffic volumes
may be a designated bicycle route without a striped lane
or sharrow. In these cases, bicycle signage should be
emphasized.
Picture 4. i 9 Bicycle Awareness Sign
Picture 4.19 Bike lanes provide provide adequate space for cyclists on the road
57


Auraria West Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure
Parking
The economic success ofTOD projects requires sufficient
parking since most trips to Denvers TOD land uses will not
involve transit. But just as too little parking will create eco-
nomic problems, so will too many spaces. Real estate studies
in San Franciscos transit-oriented neighborhoods found that
for every parking space provided with a residential unit, the
number of units achievable on a typical parcel decrease by
20 percent, and the market cost of each unit increased by
20 percent. Since Denvers TOD policy seeks to maximize
the number of units around its stations and maximize those
units affordability, it will be important to ensure parking
does not consume too much of the buildable square footage
in TOD projects.
Parking and Walkability: Walkability is a key measurement
of the quality of public space. In addition, ridership at rail
stations increases as the quality of the walk environment
improves in the station area. For these reasons, it is impor-
tant that the design of parking not create barriers real or
perceived to pedestrians. Denver has already established
design guidelines for parking downtown, requiring that park-
ing be wrapped in active uses rather than create blank walls
or surface parking lots along its downtown streets.
Parking and Trip Generation: Parking determines automo-
bile trip generation in two ways. Poorly managed and under-
supplied parking results in cruise traffic as drivers circle to
find an available space. Donald Shoup describes how this sort
Picture 4.20 Belmar's Block 7 Studios and Galleries demonstrate a flexible approach to activating parking structures
58


Auraria West Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure
of cruising has a significantly negative impact on traffic in his
publication Cruising for Parking, due to its added turning
movements. Properly managed parking dictates automobile
trip generation rates. In auto-dependent areas, the size of
different land uses is the best predictor of automobile traffic.
Where there are transportation choices, however, automobile
trip rates become highly variable. In these locations, parking
supply is a more effective predictor of auto trips, provided this
supply is properly managed to ensure adequate availability at
all times. In such locations, more parking means more traffic.
Parking as an Economic Asset: The high prices people pay
to park in Lower Downtown is a testament to the value of
parking near mixed-use, compact and pedestrian-oriented
development. But not all spaces have the same value. In all
mixed-use districts, some parking spaces are more desirable
than others. Left to market forces, the more desirable spaces
would command higher prices and vice versa.
When parking is underpriced, such as at curbside meters in
downtown, the City incurs all the burden of operating and
maintaining it while enjoying less of the financial benefits
of controlling it. More importantly, underpriced parking
reduces customer convenience, with the best spaces quickly
filled by the lucky few. While underpriced parking results in
direct loss of revenue to the City, the indirect costs are even
higher if shoppers and developers are deterred by a lack of
convenient parking.
In Denver, most on-street metered parking currently costs up
to $ 1 an hour, regardless of demand patterns. In high-demand
areas, the result is that on street parking utilization regularly
exceeds 95 percent, resulting in added search traffic and
customer inconvenience. This in turn leads to poorer business
performance and greater traffic congestion and pollution.
The purpose of parking in TODs is to:
Provide sufficient parking to support a strong
development market
Generate foot traffic to support a thriving retail district
New Approaches to Parking: Traditionally, solving the
parking problem almost always meant increasing supply.
But transportation planners have begun to acknowledge
that there are many different types of parking problems, and
many different solutions. In addition, recognizing that not
all station areas are alike, it is acknowledged that while there
may be a wide range of strategies for addressing parking
challenges, the types of strategies selected must be tailored to
address specific conditions within an individual station area.
The amount of parking required for new development cur-
rently determined by the City of Denver Zoning Code (not
applicable to Auraria Campus) depends on the use. Parking
at the Auraria West Campus Station could be reduced how-
ever, depending on the tenant mix, the quality and accessibil-
ity of the local transit (bus, light rail, bicycle and pedestrian),
trip reduction requirements or incentives, mode split calcu-
lations, residential demographics, site conditions and other
local factors.
Currently the Pepsi Center and Auraria Campus surface
parking lots dominate the landscape around the station area.
As redeveloment occurs, surface parking lots should generally
be avoided within the station planning area. Plans to convert
surface parking lots to structured parking should continue
to be supported. One of the many benefits of transit in this
area is the potential to reduce the amount of parking for new
development because of its close proximity to transit and the
possibility of shared parking.
After the opening of the West Corridor in mid 2013, parking
within the area will need to be reviewed and monitored. Fol-
lowing is a list of additional strategies identified to date for
parking implementation in the Auraria West Station Area.
59


Auraria West Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure
Mobility and Infrastructure Recommendation 13
Establish Shared and Reserved Parking Requirements
While it might be logical to allow the free market to deter-
mine the optimal number of parking spaces in a TOD proj-
ect, it is possible to eliminate the negative impacts of parking
requirements and capture some of their value.
Consider parking in a station area as a system serving dif-
ferent parking needs. Operating and treating parking in this
efficient and comprehensive manner can eliminate overpark-
ing, reduce construction costs and facilitate better design
investments.
Allow developers to share parking between uses as
necessary, provided they offer equal access to all users.
When parking is shared, consider reduced parking ratios.
Consider reducing minimum parking ratios and
increasing ways to meet parking requirements.
Consider parking maximums
Permit tandem spaces, un-bundled parking, off-site
parking, valet parking and all varieties of mechanical or
lift parking devices to count toward any minimum
requirements.
Consider allowing developers to pay a fee in lieu of
meeting their parking requirements. This fee would be
paid either to the City or to a local management authority
that would build and manage parking and alternative
transportation programs for the TOD area.
Allow developers ample creativity in meeting their
parking requirements. Consider allowing off-site parking
within Vi mile without restriction.
Mobility and Infrastructure Recommendation 14
Establish Strong Parking Design Controls
To ensure that parking does not damage the walkability of
station areas, good design is important. Care should be taken
to ensure that parking does not diminish the attractiveness of
other modes. Key tools include:
Establish building build-to lines and parking
setbacks. To optimize personal security and the
attractiveness of station areas, parking should be
wrapped in active uses so that doors and windows face
the street, rather than the blank facades of parking
structures and garage doors (see figure 3-1). In all TOD
areas, build-to lines should be established to ensure the
proper relationship between buildings and the sidewalk.
More importantly, parking should be set back from the
building line by at least 15 feet, particularly along the
sides of buildings that face pedestrian ways.
Minimize negative impacts of driveways. Parking lots
and garages should be accessed primarily from the side
and rear of buildings, with driveways and curb cuts
strongly discouraged or banned from main pedestrian
ways. In TOD areas, alleys should be encouraged; where
provided, parking should be required to be accessed from
the alley.
Establish and enforce landscape setback requirements
for surface lots. While surface parking can be seen as a
land bank for future development, oftentimes surface
parking is a necessary temporary use as TODs gain
momentum. Require that parking be screened from side
walks with low walls and landscaping. Where possible,
push surface parking lots to the back of buildings,
accessed from the side or from alleys, so that buildings
line the sidewalk. Where pedestrians are expected to walk
across a parking lot to get from one destination to
another, align drive aisles in parallel with primary
pedestrian movements, and where possible provide
sidewalks in parking lots alongside what will be future
streets. Acknowledgement should be given to poten-
tial constraints to meet these setback requirements when
redeveloping existing buildings.
60


Auraria West Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure
Mobility and Infrastructure Recommendation 15
Utilize Effective Public Information and
Wayfinding Program
To improve parking access and information in TOD areas,
consider electronic wayfinding and guidance systems that
use variable messaging signs to direct visitors and com-
muters to specific parking areas with available parking and
to access routes. Another system used effectively in some
new parking structures is an electronic space count system,
which can sense individual space availability and direct us-
ers to open spaces.
A Web-based parking information and reservation system is
another option. This could be a website that shows drivers
where there are available spaces in surface 1 ots and garages.
Sensors at entry and exit points in every lot and structure
send information to a server in the Citys parking office,
which updates the website every five seconds.
Other wayfinding policies include designing a universal logo
and rate structure for all short-term public parking, establish-
ing signage ordinances to encourage private participation in
parking management and offering participation in the station
area wayfinding system as an incentive to private owners
and managers. A combination of these systems can serve to
greatly extend the perceived availability and actual utilization
of parking in todays market where construction costs have
greatly increased.
Mobility and Infrastructure Recommendation 16
Demand Reduction
Reducing vehicle use will meet several plan objectives and
inherently assuage neighborhood concerns of traffic and
parking impacts. Multi-modal improvements will offer
choices and reduce parking demand but additional demand
reduction incentives and programs are also effective.
Develop Car-Share Programs. Car-sharing is a service
that provides members with access to a fleet of
vehicles on an hourly basis. Members reserve a car online
or by phone, walk to the nearest lot, open the doors with
an electronic key card, and drive off. They are billed at
the end of the month for time and/or mileage. One of
the newest additions to the transportation toolbox, car-
sharing has the potential to change peoples relationship
to the carparticularly in dense, urban communities.
At the home, car-sharing can substitute for car owner
ship. At the workplace, it provides access to a vehicle
for business use and personal errands during the day,
allowing employees to avoid driving to work. By
December 2004, operators claimed more than 60,000
members in the United States and nearly 11,000
in Canada.
Utilize Universal Transit Passes: In Metro Denver and
nationally, these programs are a highly effective tool for
reducing parking demand and increasing transit rider
ship. The principle of employee or residential transit
passes is similar to that of insurancetransit agencies
offer lower rates on passes on the basis that not all those
offered the pass will actually use them regularly. The
Auraria Higher Education Center currently provides
transit passes to all students through an approved
student fee. Faculty and staff can purchase
an eco pass. These program has been highly
effective in increasing student ridership. These passes
are beneficial to everyone involved and
should be continued.
Develop Transportation Management Associations:
Many parking management tools could be efficiently
administered through a Transportation Management
Association (TMA), a member-controlled organization
that encourages efficient use of transportation and
parking resources in a finite area, such as around Union
Station. TMAs provide a centralized framework to
support Traffic Demand Management (TDM) strategies.
61


Auraria West Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure
62


Auraria West Station Area Plan Ecomonic Opportunity
Opportunity^

63


Auraria West Station Area Plan Ecomonic Opportunity
Economic Opportunity
FasTracks promises to bring the Denver region an unprece-
dented opportunity to promote and facilitate transit-oriented
higher density, mixed-use residential and commercial devel-
opment. While the amount, type and mix of uses within the
transit station area and corridor influences market potential,
the presence of undeveloped and underutilized land can be
a source of the greatest economic opportunity Generally
speaking, prospects for redevelopment are stronger when sta-
tion areas features:
Relatively high levels of undeveloped and
underutilized land
Fewer landowners such that land is concentrated in
fewer hands
Underutilized land consolidated into fewer parcels,
therefore requiring less land assembly to facilitate
redevelopment
Residential, Office and Retail Market
Auraria West Station contains numerous underutilized
surface parking lots. It also has low amounts of landowners
which mean there is greater potential for organized redevel-
opment. The presence of a large student population, planned
development in the vicinity, and proximity to downtown,
Invesco Field and the Pepsi Center also provide unique op-
portunities to activate the station area with a campus hot
spot and mixed use/entertainment district.
Trends indicate demand for new residential, office and retail
development near transit through 2030. The TOD Market
Analysis provides three potential long term (over the next 20
years) development scenarios for the station area. The follow-
ing is a breakdown of the three development scenarios for
Auraria West:
Large-
Scale
Market Existing Modest Net New Moderate Net New Capacity Net New
Residential 578 units 1,758 units 2,102 units 2,413 units
Office 94,027 sf 436,092 sf 990,425 sf 2,413,261 sf
Retail 217,006 sf 65,430 sf 130,637 sf 909,973 sf
Economic Strategies
The realization of TOD will require a combination of near
and long term efforts and the use of best practices and inno-
vative strategies. The city should continue to use all available
resources and contacts in the TOD field at the national level
to identify solutions to challenges as they emerge.
Implementation will be most effective if carried out under a
broad framework that establishes strategies to advance TOD
at the system level. These system-wide strategies will in turn
support individual efforts undertaken at the corridor and sta-
tion area levels. Participating actors in the implementation of
TOD at the Auraria West Station include AHEC, City and
County of Denver, Kroenke Sports, Urban Ventures, Quad-
rant Properties, and surrounding landowners.
The City & County of Denver presently offers a broad array
of programs that could be used to effectuate transit-support-
ive development. Rather than providing an exhaustive list
of programs already available in Denver, the following are
key existing programs that could be focused or expanded as
well as innovative strategies not currently used in Denver
that could help facilitate positive reinvestment in the Auraria
West Station area.
Regulations, guidelines and development MOUs:
Formalizing standards for transit-oriented development
whether through local regulations and ordinances, guide-
lines, or memorandum of understanding is a key first
step in facilitating the type of development that will
support transit service
Direct and indirect financial incentives: In addition to
direct financial incentives to facilitate transit-oriented
development, regulations can provide a number of
indirect financial incentives. Indirect incentives often
used to facilitate development include flexible zoning
provisions and density bonuses, while direct incentives
include reduced development fees, expedited development
review, and team inspections to streamline and reduce
the total costs of the review and permitting process.
Financing/Funding methods: Transit-oriented develop-
ment often occurs as infill development in established
areas or through redevelopment of sometimes contami-
nated sites. In these types of developments, the
level of infrastructure required may include extensive
reconstruction of the street network (or introduction of
new streets), installation of structured parking, addition
of pedestrian enhancements and public plazas, and
64


Auraria West Station Area Plan Ecomonic Opportunity
stormwater infrastructure. Obtaining financing
and/or funding for these critical infrastructure
enhancements can be a key challenge in
effectuating transit-oriented development.
Small Business and Technical Assistance: Community
members in many of the selected Denver station areas
have cited a desire for local entrepreneurship opportuni-
ties and jobs within their station areas. Small businesses
can be encouraged through multiple methods, including
the Main Street Program approach, business incubation,
and small business support programs (including loans
and technical assistance).
Phasing Strategies
Many communities have used phasing strategies to address
the lag time that often occurs between transit service intro-
duction and transit oriented development realization. Such
strategies can help establish supportive conditions in the
near-term to set the stage for future development that is sup-
portive of transit at the Auraria West Station.'
Land Banking & Assembly Methods: Realization of
transit-oriented development often requires assembly of
various properties owned by different property owners
and/or banking of land until transit service becomes
operable or market conditions support the level of
desired mixed-use development. In the case of the
Auraria West Station with few landowners (AHEC,
Urban Ventures, Kroenke Sports, and Quadrant
Properties) who have already banked land, the opportu-
nity for transit-oriented development is greatly increased.
Zoning & Density Bonuses: Regulations play an
important role in determining what uses will be allowed
within station areas. Once market conditions support
TOD, zoning may be amended to provide for the full
density desired within station areas, either through full
entitlement or partial entitlement coupled with density
bonuses to encourage the provision of certain public
benefits (such as affordable/workforce housing).
Infrastructure Improvements, Special Assessments & Tax
Incentives: As a pre-development phase, public entities
working alone or in partnership with developers may
undertake infrastructure improvement projects such as
parking facilities, parks, streetscapes, pedestrian and
bicycle enhancements, road reconstruction and
extension, park beautification and signage. The pur-
poses of such projects are to set the stage for and
encourage transit-supportive development. These
activities can also provide early marketing of the station
areas identity to future prospective residents, employees
and visitors. To fund infrastructure investments, a special
assessment district may be formed (either through a
charter district or statutory district in Denvers case)
in the pre-development phase. Alternatively, tax
incentive programs such as tax increment financing,
tax abatements, or payment in lieu of taxes may be used
to bolster developers resources for funding infrastructure.
Joint Development, Revenue Sharing & Cost Sharing:
With joint development as an option in the Auraria West
station area, the landowners can enter into revenue or
cost sharing arrangements in order to either secure
a source of revenue for improvements or divide the cost
of infrastructure construction and maintenance. Types
of revenue sharing arrangements include land leases, air
rights development, and special assessment districts. Cost
sharing arrangements can include sharing of construction
expenses and density bonuses offered in exchange for
infrastructure construction.
65


Auraria West Station Area Plan Ecomonic Opportunity
66


* t*
Auraria West Station Area Plan Implementation
67


Auraria West Station Area Plan Implementation
Implementation
The Implementation Chapter identifies the essential action
items necessary to accomplish Auraria West Station Plan Ob-
jectives and Recommendations. The list of action items is for
city staff and stakeholders to consider over the next 20 years.
Catalyst Projects
Key Elements
The following circulation catalyst projects are required as first
steps in station area plan implementation:
Improvements to the existing 5th Street
Extension of 5th Street to 13th Avenue via Old Colfax to
Shoshone Street
Relocation of Curtis Street between 5th and 7th streets.
Intent
Today, the Auraria West Campus Station has limited con-
nectivity to local and regional transportation systems and
is not a desirable location for new development. To pro-
mote and sustain new development in this area, the catalyst
projects must:
Improve auto, pedestrian and bicycle circulation to and
from the station, supporting ridership
Support the campus hot spot, by increasing visibility
for the commercial and retail uses
Provide necessary infrastructure to ventilate traffic
generated by proposed new development on the Pepsi
Center and south of Colfax Properties (indicated on the
following page)
Improve access to and from facilities on the
Auraria Campus
Picture 6.1 Mixed-use entertainment;Memphis, Tennessee
68


Auraria West Station Area Plan Implementation
Pepsi
Center

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l
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\

>*/
/
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/
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y
/
/
/
\
\
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\

Proposed Auraria West Campus LRT Station
Light Rail Alignment
| | Auraria West Campus
| Office
| Commercial
| | New/Enhanced Parks and Open Space
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y
/ La Alma/
Lincoln Park
Picture 6.2 Catalyst Projects Framework
69


Auraria West Station Area Plan Implementation
The following are Implementation Strategies for the Station
Area. The table is organized by Regulatory Tools, Public
Infrastructure Tools and Partnership tools. Each Imple-
mentation Strategy includes reference to the numbered Plan
Recommendation(s) it implements, a general timeframe and
key responsibility. The Plan recommendations are abbrevi-
ated for each section: 1) LU = Land Use and Urban Design;
2) MO = Mobility; and 3) IN = Infrastructure. While all
strategies are important, the reality of market conditions,
infrastructure constraints and funding require assigning time-
frames by short term (1-5 years) or long term (5-10 years).
This table does not require these timeframes if opportunities
arise sooner than predicted.
A team approach is crucial to implementation. There are
many parties involved including all city departments, elected
and appointed officials, RTD, AHEC, Urban Ventures,
Kroenke Sports, and Quadrant Properties,. The table identi-
fies Key Responsibility so it is clear who will take the lead on
the effort.
70


Auraria West Station Area Plan Implementation
Regulatory Tools
Recommendations Implementation Strategy Time- frame Key Responsibility
Land Use Mixture LU-1 thru 9 Current zoning varies greatly throughout the station area. The Pepsi Center parking lots are currently zoned C-MU-30. Support the planned zone change reguest to promote a mix, arrangement, and intensity of uses that support transit ridership. The station is located within the Platte River Valley (PRV) zone district, which is intended to promote and encourage diversified land use. Due to the GDP reguirement in the PRV zone, which has been a barrier to development in the past, an alternative transit mixed use district should be supported for the station. The majority of the remaining land area is zoned R-5 (institutional) and 1-2 (industrial). The Institutional district does not allow residential and the Industrial district does not allow mixed-use, specifically residential. Evaluate alternative zoning districts that allow the recommended mix of land uses for these properties. Coordinate with the Zoning Code Update to ensure there is a menu of zoning districts that promote this mixture. Short Community Planning and Development (CPD)
Ground Floor Uses LU-10 Existing mixed use districts do not offer incentives or mandates for mixing uses or reguired ground floor commercial or retail. Concentrating and allocating commercial and retail within the station area is essential to creating a vibrant successful station. Coordinate with the Zoning Code Update to create these mandate incentives. Short CPD
Active Edges, Build-To Lines and Building Heights LU-11 thru 16 Coordinate with the Zoning Code Update to develop form-based regulations that mandate a predictable scale and form. For example, the form standards should reguire active edges along main streets that promote active uses and frontage types. Build-to-lines create a defined street wall. Transition in heights with 2-8 stories within the 1/2 mile radiusand 5- 12floorson the outer Kroenke Sports property. Short CPD
Parking Ratios MO & IN-13 thru 17 Coordinate with the Zoning Code Update and the Strategic Parking Plan to incorporate different technigues for regulating and designing parking facilities. Short CPD
Enhanced Streets MO & IN-2 Work with PW on new street-cross sections that are specific to station areas in accordance with adopted plans. Short CPD/Public Works (PW)
*Time frames include: Immediate (0-1 years); Short term (I-5 years); Medium term (5-10 years); and Long term (over 10 years)
71


Auraria West Station Area Plan Implementation
Public Infrastructure Tools
Recommendations Implementation Strategy Time- frame Key Responsibility
Extend Shoshone Street to Old Colfax Avenue As redevelopment occurs, Public Works and Community Planning and Development should ensure property owners build this road improvement. It is a short term priority because it is essential to improving station access and supporting commercial and retail uses along 5th Street Short AHEC, PW, Private
Relocate Curtis Street between 5th and 7th streets As the West Corridor is constructed and the existing station is relocated, Public Works, the Auraria Higher Education Center (AHEC), and RTD should ensure this road improvement is built It is an immediate priority because it is essential to improving station access and supporting commercial and retail uses along 5th Street. Immediate PW, RTD
Create a primary auto loop on 5th and 7th Streets MO & IN-4 As redevelopment occurs, the Pepsi Center group should work to build this road improvement. This will provide north-south access through the site, ventilate the heavy traffic generated by Pepsi Center events and increase access and visibility at the station. Medium/ Long Private/PW
Improve the primary east-west connection on 13th Avenue, including new 80' cross section Public Works and Community Planning and Development should ensure property owners build this road improvement. It is a medium term priority because it is essential to providing east-west access but the timeline for redevelopment on 13th Ave. is unknown. This will link the Decatur Station to the Auraria West Campus Station. Medium PW
Improvements to 5th Street between Lawrence and Walnut Include premium pedestrian treatment for sidewalks and intersections, wide sidewalks, street trees, special paving, etc. MO & IN-4 As redevelopment occurs, AHEC should work with RTD to ensure the proposed pedestrian improvements are fully constructed to help create a main street and campus hot spot around the station. It is short term because it connects the Auraria Campus Station to adjacent com- mercial and retail uses along 5th Street. Short AHEC, RTD
Pedestrian and Bicycle mall on Lawrence Street MO & IN-9,11 As the Auraria Campus Master Plan is implemented and development occurs, AHEC should work to build the pedestrian and bicycle mall improvements. It is short term because it provides needed bike/ped connections from the Auraria West Campus Station to the Auraria Campus and the downtown core. Medium AHEC
Shoshone Street, Rio Court and 13th Ave bicycle and pedestrian improvements MO & IN-5,6,9,12 As redevelopment occurs, collaborate with Public Works and Community Planning and Development should ensure property owners build the pedestrian and bicycle improvements. It is short term because it connects the Auraria West Campus Station to the 10th and Osage Station and provides access to and from proposed development to the south. As the station redevelops and the bike sharing initiative materializes, there will be a need for additional bicycle facilities. Existing bike routes do not connect to the station. Connections are needed from nearby routes (D-8 & D-10). Should funding become available, coordinate with public works to develop bike routes and provide additional bike racks and storage lockers at the station. Upon full build-out consider whether there is demand and funding for bike services such as rentals and locker rooms. Short PW/CPD
72


Auraria West Station Area Plan Implementation
Partnership Tools
Recommendations Implementation Time- Key Strategy frame Responsibility
Business Relocation As the station area redevelops there are existing industrial uses that are not consistent with the plan's land use recommendations. In addition, as the built environment changes over the years it may not be conducive for successful business operation. Office of Economic Development (OED) can play a pro-active role in assisting these businesses in relocating to a more desirable site within the city. Short OED/CPD
Affordable Housing LU-1 Partner with OED to seek funding opportunities for affordable housing Medium/ Long OED/CPD Neighborhood Development
Green Building LU-17 Partner with Greenprint Denver and non-profit organi- zations to provide resources and educate builders and residents about green building. Short/ Medium CPD/Greenprint Denver/non-profit organizations
Parks Department MO & IN-8 thru 11 LU-5 Many of the mobility recommendations and open space recommendations offer park and recreation benefits. For example, the primary bicycle and pedestrian routes will enable access to the South Platte River greenway and La Alma/Lincoln Park. As these recommendations move forward, the Parks and Public Works Departments must be involved in early stages to maximize benefits. Short CPD/Parks/PW
Parking MO & IN-13 thru 16 Inform the Strategic Parking Plan with the parking strategies identified in this plan. Immediate CPD/PW
RTD MO & IN-7 There are some recommendations that are under the authority of the Regional Transportation District (RTD), not the City and County of Denver. In those cases it is important to be an active partner with RTD and work together to achieve the plan recommendations as feasible. Specifically, this includes recommendations on improving bus circu- lation to and from the station. Medium CPD/PW/RTD
Auraria Higher Education Center/ CampusVillage As the campus hot spot develops, and the second phase of Campus Village is developed, collaboration with AHEC and Urban Ventures will be essential to carry out the goals of the plan. Short CPD/AHEC Urban Ventures
Fire Department MO & IN-1 thru 6 As projects move forward, collaboration with the Fire Department is necessary to ensure fire safety regulations are met. In some cases the basic mini- mum reguirements should be re-evaluated in order to reflect the urban context of the Auraria West Station area. Short FIRE, CPD
*Time frames include: Immediate (0-1 years); Short term (1-5 years); Medium term (5-10 years); and Long term (over 10 years)
73


Auraria West Station Area Plan Implementation
74


Auraria West Station Area Plan Acronyms
75


Auraria West Station Area Plan Acronyms
Draft List of Acronyms
To be included in SAPs /modified as needed with area specific groups such as RNOs etc. Sample plan from Philadelphia that
used this model had the list up front & went straight to the acronym, no spelled out & acronym in parentheses for the first use.
ADA Americans with Disabilities Act (1990)
AHEC Auraria Higher Education Center
AIA American institute of Architects
AVR Average Vehicle Ridership
BID Business Improvement District
CBD Central Business District
CBO Community Based organizations
CCD City and County of Denver
CDBG Community Development Block Grant
CDC Community Development Corporation
CDFI Community Development Financial Institution
CDOT Colorado Department ofTransportation
CHFA Colorado Housing Finance Agency
CIP Capital Improvements Plan (or Program)
COP Shop Community Organized Policing
CPD Community Planning & Development
DHA Denver housing Authority
DHND Division of Housing and Neighborhood Development
DMU Diesel Motor Unit
DPD Denver Police Department
DPR Parks & Recreation
DPS Denver Public Schools
DPW Public Works
DRCOG Denver Council of Regional Governments
DURA Denver Urban Renewal Agency
EMU Electric Motor Unit
EPA Environmental Protection Agency
FAR Floor Area Ratio
FHA Federal Housing Administration
76


Auraria West Station Area Plan Acronyms
GIS Geographic Information Systems
HUD US Department of Housing and Urban Development
FRESC
LEED Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design
LRT Light Rail Technology
MBD Micro business Development
MC-Denver Making Connections Denver
NEPA National Environmental Policy Act
OED Office of Economic Development
RAC Resident Advisory Committee
RNO Registered Neighborhood Organization
RTD Regional Transportation District
SAP Station Area Plan
SEEDCO Denver a Community Development Financial Institution
TAZ Traffic Analysis Zone
TIF Tax Increment Financing
TIP Transportation Improvement Program
TDM Transportation Demand Management
TOD Transit Oriented Development
ZCU Zoning Code Update
77


Auraria West Station Area Plan Acronyms
78


Auraria West Station Area Plan The Community


Auraria West Station Area Plan The Community
Study Area Location & Overview Existing Land Uses
and Zoning: The existing land uses in the 1/2- mile radius
surrounding the station are predominantly educational and
industrial. The area also includes a large amount of surface
parking that serves the Pepsi Center and Auraria Campus.
Existing and proposed student housing facilities are located
west of the proposed station. There are four major land own-
ers within the Auraria Campus study area: Kroenke Sports
Enterprises, Auraria Higher Education Center, Urban Ven-
tures and Quadrant Properties.
Zoning varies greatly throughout the station area. The sta-
tion is located within the Platte River Valley (PRV) zone dis-
tricts that extends west and north along the Platte River. An
institutional R-5 district contains the main Auraria Campus,
while a residential mixed-use R-MU-30 zone houses Auraria
Campus Village student housing. Between Auraria Parkway
and the freight/light rail tacks ex-
ists a commercial mixed use zone.
Land zoned for heavy industrial
use (1-2) comprises 25% the
southwest quadrant of the station
area. Dominated by the Auraria
Campus, and the Pepsi Center, the
Auraria statistical neighborhood
supports a very small residential
population. In 2000 the Census
estimated a neighborhood popula-
tion of 123 people. The Auraria
Campus itself housed no students
in 2000. In 2005 the Campus
Village at Auraria was constructed.
The Campus Village currently
houses approximately 685 stu-
dents in 230 units and experiences
very low vacancy rates. South of
Colfax approximately 405 resi-
dential units within the La Alma
/ Lincoln Park neighborhood are
located within the station area.
The Auraria West light rail sta-
tion on RTDs central light rail
corridor is located at 5th Street
and Colfax Avenue on the Auraria
Higher Education Campus (Aura-
ria Campus). The Auraria Cam-
pus is surrounded by the Central
Business District to the east, the
Pepsi Center to the north, Invesco Field at Mile High to the
west and the La Alma/Lincoln Park neighborhood to the
south. The station area plan study area is delineated by a 0.5
mile radius (10 minute walk) from the station. Several major
transportation corridors are located in the station area. Col-
fax Avenue comprises the major east-west corridor. North-
south corridors include 1-25, the Platte River, Burlington
Northern Railroad, Southern Pacific Railroad, the RTD Cen-
tral Corridor light rail, Speer Boulevard and Cherry Creek.
The study area is located primarily within the Auraria statisti-
cal neighborhood, the boundaries of which include Colfax,
the South Platte River and Speer Blvd. / Cherry Creek. The
station area extends north to the Pepsi Center, east as far as
Speer Boulevard and south into La Alma-Lincoln Park statis-
tical neighborhood to 11th Avenue. To the west, the study
area encompasses the 1-25 / Colfax Ave. / Auraria Parkway
interchange and the South Platte River.
Picture 8.1 Auraria West Station Area
80


Auraria West Station Area Plan The Community
Population & Housing Characteristics
Dominated by the Auraria Campus, Pepsi Center and Elitch
gardens, the Auraria statistical neighborhood supports a very
small residential population. In 2000 the Census estimated
a neighborhood population of 123 people. Neighborhood
residential units at the time included approximately 100 loft
condominiums converted in the late 1990s from warehouses
along Auraria Parkway and between Speer Boulevard and
14th Street, all of which are located outside the station area
to the northeast. The Auraria Campus itself housed no
students in 2000.
In 2005 the Campus Village at Auraria was constructed on
5th Street between Colfax and Auraria Parkway. The Cam-
pus Village currently houses approximately 685 students in
230 units and experiences very low vacancy rates. South
of Colfax approximately 405 residential units within the
La Alma / Lincoln Park neighborhood are located within
the station area. Using DRCOGs 2007 estimates of 3.05
persons per household and a 1.27% vacancy rate in this
neighborhood, the total 2007 population living in La Alma /
Lincoln Park neighborhood within the Auraria West station
area is estimated to be 1,220.
Totaling the Auraria Campus Village and the La Alma/
Lincoln Park neighborhood residents, an estimated 1,905
people lived in 635 housing units within a half-mile of the
station in 2007. Given the large student population and a
large Denver Housing Authority population in La Alma/Lin-
coln Park, only 12% of the units within the station area are
owner-occupied.
Population and Housing Table Auraria West Station Area
Total Population 1,905
Group Quarters Population 685
Residential Population 1,220
Total Housing Units 635
Group Quarters Units 230
Residential Units 405
Vacancy Rate (residential units only) 1.27%
Number of Persons Per Household (residential units only) 3.05
% of Housing Units Owner Occupied 12%
81


Auraria West Station Area Plan The Community
The number of dwelling units in Auraria and La Alma/Lin-
coln Park has swung wildly over the years. Between 1950 and
1980 the neighborhood lost over 2,000 units, partially due to
the development of the Auraria Campus in the 1970 s. New
residential development occurred in La Alma / Lincoln Park
throughout the 1980s and has leveled off since then. The U.S.
Census estimated slightly over 2,900 housing units in 2000,
and assessors data indicates that this number is slightly higher
in 2007 at 3,124 units. Multi-family low-rise and mixed-use
structures dominate the housing types available in the station
area, with only 12% of the residential units being single fam-
ily homes. MLS data between the 4th quarter 2006 and 3rd
quarter 2007, during which time 40 homes were sold, reveal
that the average single family home value in La Alma / Lincoln
Park is $183,000 (Your Castle Real Estate, 2007).
Housing Type Distribution (2008)
Auraria West Station Area
Total Housing Units
Auraria and La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhoods (1950-2007)
Source: U.S. Census (1950-2000); Denver CPD (2007)
Auraria and La Alma/Lincoln Park Housing Units
Mixed Multi-Family Single-Family
Use Low Rise
Housing Type
Source: Assessors Data
Housing Type Distribution
82


Auraria West Station Area Plan The Community
Age distribution is considered separately for the two neigh-
borhoods within the station area, as the neighborhoods differ
greatly in character. In the Auraria neighborhood an estimat-
ed 92% of the population ranges between 18 and 64 years
of age. As would be expected in an urban campus setting,
children and senior citizens comprise a very small percent of
the neighborhood population. In contrast, the La Alma /
Lincoln Park neighborhood is home to many families, with
26% of the population being under the age of 18.
Auraria West Station Area
Neighborhood Age Distribution (2007)
Racial and ethnic diversity characterize the Auraria and La
Alma / Lincoln Park neighborhoods. The 2000 Census
indicated that 2% of the population in these neighborhoods
are Native American, 4% Asian, 7% Black, 32% Non-Latino
White, 53% Latino, and 2% reported having more than one
race. Birth data from the Colorado Department of Pub-
lic Health and Environment reveal a decline in the overall
percentage of Latino births in the neighborhood over the last
decade. In the same time period, the percentage of Non-
Latino White and African American births has been on the
rise, indicating that the overall neighborhood demographics
may be shifting in this direction as well.
o
1m
3
.Q
9)
<
100%
90%
80%
70%
60%
50%
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%
Auraria
Year
La Alma/Lincoln Rark
65+
18 to 64
5 to 17
<5
Source: Claritas
Picture 10.5 Age Distribution
Births by Ethnicity
Auraria and La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhoods (1996-2006)
100%
90%
80%
70%
60%
50%
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%
1996
2000
2006
Year
Naitive American I
Asian/Pacific Islander I
Non-Latino White
Latino
African American
Source: CDPHE via Piton Foundation (2007)
Picture 10.6 Births by Ethnicity
83


Auraria West Station Area Plan The Community
A median income level of approximately $34,000 (compared
to $54,400 in Denver as a whole) reflects the presence of
a large low-income population in La Alma / Lincoln Park.
More than 700 households earn less than $15,000 per year.
Likewise, poverty levels have historically been higher among
Lincoln Park residents than the city as a whole. For instance,
in 2000 the 37.7% persons lived in poverty compared to
14.3% in Denver.
Auraria La Alma/Lincoln Park (2000)
7%
<1%
2%
32%
53%
2
o
0)
3
O
0)
-Q
E
3
700
600
500
400
300
200
100
0
11
11
n
11
<$15,000 $15,000-
$25,000
$25,000- $35,000-
$35,000 $50,000
$50,000- $75,000-
$75,000 $100,000
$100,000- $150,000-
$150,000 $250,000
$250,000- >$500,000
$500,000
Income Range
Picture 10.8 Household Income
Source: Claritas, 2007
Naitive American
Asian/Pacific Islander
Non-Latino White
Latino
African American
Other Race
2 or More Races
Population by Race & Ethnicity
84


Auraria West Station Area Plan The Community
Land Use & Zoning
Surface parking associated with the Auraria Campus and the
Pepsi Center dominates the area directly surrounding the
Auraria West station. In fact, parking covers a total of 17%
of the station area and ranks as the second most dominant
land use, with right-of-way covering 24% of the station
area. Campus uses cover 12% of the station area, mostly to
the east of the station itself. With large amounts of acreage
dedicated to right-of-way, industry and uses associated with
transportation, communication and utilities (TCU), the
character of the western half of the station area reflects the
abundance of transportation infrastructure in the neighbor-
hood. Residential uses cover 4% of the station area and an-
other 2% of the land supports mixed use buildings that also
include residential units. A mix of residential types including
low rise multi-family structures, mixed use structures and sin-
gle family homes characterize housing options in the station
area. Entertainment-Cultural uses including Invesco Field,
Elitch Gardens, the Pepsi Center and the Denver Performing
Arts Center surround the station area on three sides.

Picture 8.2 Existing Land Use
Land Use by Parcel
Office
1^1 Relail
Commercial
Mixed-Use
Industrial
Entertainment-Cultural
Public-'Quusi-Publk;
Single-Family
Molti-Farnity Low Rise
Mutn-Farmty Mid Rise
[___* Mufti-Famity High Rise
Parki'Open Space
Transportation. Conw>unicat*on, Utility (TCU)
ROW'RoBd
Surface Parking
Parking Structure
Vacant
Ughlrail Station
* *
Existing Ughlrail
Reload
Station Bullet
Vtfand ?,'2PAte
85


Auraria West Station Area Plan The Community
Zoning varies greatly throughout the station area. The sta-
tion is located within the Platte River Valley (PRV) zone dis-
trict that extends west and north along the Platte River. An
institutional (R-5) district contains the main Auraria Cam-
pus, while a residential mixed-use R-MU-30 zone houses
Auraria Campus Village student housing. Between Auraria
Parkway and the freight/light rail tracks exists a commercial
mixed use zone (C-MU-30 surrounding a small C-MU-10
zone at 5th and Auraria). Land zoned for heavy industrial
use (1-2) comprises 25% the southwest quadrant of the
station area. The southeast quadrant of the station area in
La Alma / Lincoln Park neighborhood contains a mixture of
residential zone districts including R-2, R-3, R-MU-20 and
R-MU-30, as well as a commercial district (dominated by
B-4 zoning) along the south side of Colfax Ave. Below are
general descriptions of each zoning district within the station
Auraria West Station Area
Land Use Distribution (2008)
35%
30%
122
"C
c
IQ
_J
M-
o
AS
c
a.
25%'
20%
15%-
10%
5%
0%
acres
87
acres
-62-
acres 57 54
acres acres

29
acres
Other Surface Public/ Industrial Vacant TCU Park/ Residential Entertainment/ Office
(e.g, Parking Quasi- Open Cultural
ROW) Public Space
Land Use
Existing Land Use
Mixed Parking Commercial Retail
Use Structure
86


Auraria West Station Area Plan The Community
V-
Zone Districts
CUB-1
CUB-2
B-3
B-4
B-5
B-5-T
B-7
|H B-8
H B-8-G
cu C-MU-10
C-MU-30
I h-o
CUi-1
H[-2
Op-i
I I PRV
PUD
I lR-2
I lR-3
H R-4
R-5
CU R-MU-20
CU R-MU-30
Liyhlmil Station
Existing Lighlrai
1--Railroad
4 Station Buffer
% 9 1/4 and 1/2 Mile
Picture 8.3 Current Zoning
Zoning District General Descriptions
R-2 Multi-Unit Dwellings, Low Density: Typically
duplexes and triplexes. Home occupations are allowed by per-
mit. Minimum of 6,000 square feet of land required for each
duplex structure with an additional 3,000 square feet required
for every unit over 2. Density =14.5 dwelling units/acre.
R-3 Multi-Unit Dwellings, High Density: Building size
is controlled by bulk standards, off-street parking and open
space requirements. Building floor area cannot exceed 3 times
the site area. Maximum density is determined by the size of
the units and the factors mentioned above.
R-5 Institutional District: Allows colleges, schools,
churches and other institutional uses. Maximum lot cover-
age is 60% of the zone lot. Building height is controlled by
bulk standards.
R-MU-20 Residential Mixed-Use District: The R-MU-
20 district is primarily residential, allowing either single or
multiple-unit dwellings. Along heavily traveled streets, de-
velopment may be either residential or mixed-use, combining
residential with neighborhood-serving retail, office, or service
uses. No maximum residential density is prescribed; instead,
the scale of buildings is determined by bulk plane, maximum
height, setbacks, open space requirements, and parking ratios.
The intent is to encourage a full range of housing types, in-
cluding affordable housing.
R-MU-30 Residential Mixed-Use District: The R-MU-30
district is a primarily residential district allowing higher density
multiple unit dwellings of a density appropriate to the center-
city and other activity centers such as light rail transit stations.
Supporting commercial development, such as consumer retail
and service uses and small-scale office uses, is encouraged to
create a truly mixed-use environment. No maximum residen-
87


Auraria West Station Area Plan The Community
tial density is prescribed. Instead, maximum height, setbacks,
and open space requirements determine the scale of buildings.
B-l Limited Office District: This district provides office
space for services related to dental and medical care and for
office-type services, often for residents of nearby residential
areas. The district is characterized by a low-volume of direct
daily customer contact. This district is characteristically small
in size and is situated near major hospitals or between large
business areas and residential areas. The district regulations
establish standards comparable to those of the low density
residential districts, resulting in similar building bulk and
retaining the low concentration of pedestrian and vehicular
traffic. Building height is controlled by bulk standards and
open space requirements. Building floor area cannot exceed
the site area.
B-2 Neighborhood Business District: This district pro-
vides for the retailing of commodities classed as convenience
goods, and the furnishing of certain personal services, to
satisfy the daily and weekly household or personal needs of
the residents of surrounding residential neighborhoods. This
district is located on collector streets, characteristically is small
in size, usually is entirely surrounded by residential districts
and is located at a convenient walking distance from the
residential districts it is designed to serve. The district regula-
tions establish standards comparable to those of low density
residential districts, resulting in similar standards. Building
floor area cannot exceed the site area.
B-4 General Business District This district is intended to
provide for and encourage appropriate commercial uses adja-
cent to arterial streets, which are normally transit routes. Uses
include a wide variety of consumer and business services and
retail establishments that serve other business activities, and
local transit-dependent residents within the district as well as
residents throughout the city. The regulations generally allow
a moderate intensity of use and concentration for the purpose
of achieving compatibility between the wide varieties of uses
permitted in the district. Building height is not controlled by
bulk standards unless there is a property line to property line
abutment with a residential use. Building floor area cannot
exceed twice the site area.
C-MU-10 Commercial Mixed-Use District: The C-MU-
10 district is the most restrictive of the commercial mixed-use
districts, with the shortest list of allowed uses. It includes
commercial uses appropriate for high-visibility locations such
as employment centers and the intersections of arterial streets.
The purpose of the district is to concentrate higher intensity
commercial uses, spatially define streets, encourage higher site
standards, and create a more attractive pedestrian environ-
ment. Uses incompatible with this purpose, such as auto-
related uses, industrial uses, and single unit dwellings, are
not allowed. Although residential uses are permitted in the
C-MU districts, it is expected that residential uses shall be
responsible for buffering themselves from nonresidential uses
that may locate on adjacent property. Basic maximum gross
floor area is equal to two (2) times the area of the zone lot.
C-MU-30 Commercial Mixed-Use District: The C-MU-
30 district provides for a wide range of commercial, office, re-
tail, industrial, and residential uses that allow property owners
the flexibility to respond to the long-term evolution of devel-
opment trends. Although residential uses are permitted in the
C-MU districts, it is expected that residential uses shall be
responsible for buffering themselves from nonresidential uses
that may locate on adjacent property. Maximum gross floor
area is equal to one (1) times the area of the zone lot.
PRV Platte River Valley Zone District: This district is
intended to promote and encourage diversified land uses
and to integrate the districts unique geographic location and
setting, amenities of view, transportation linkages and open
space. A variety of land uses are permitted to facilitate new
development, allow for the reuse of eligible historic structures
and to complement development in adjacent neighborhoods
and downtown. New residential development and open-space
is encouraged. Regulatory flexibility is provided to facilitate
development responsive to current and future market condi-
tions, and to encourage creativity in the development of the
Platte River Valley. Subarea boundaries are delineated on
the PRV zoning map. A subarea plan, including preliminary
design guidelines, is required for all or part of the subarea to be
used as a framework for private and public development proj-
ects. Rules and criteria adopted by the Planning Board govern
the content and requirements of subarea plans. Plans for any
given subarea must conform with the subarea zoning standards
enacted by City Council.
1-1 General Industrial District: This district is intended to
be an employment area containing industrial uses which are
generally more intensive than those permitted in the 1-0 zone.
Bulk plane, setback and landscape standards apply in this
district. Building floor area cannot exceed twice the site area.
Some uses are conditional uses.
88


Auraria West Station Area Plan The Community
1-2 Heavy Industrial District: This district is intended to
be an employment area containing uses which are generally
more intensive than that permitted in either of the other two
industrial zones. Bulk plane, setback and landscape standards
apply in this district. Building area cannot exceed twice the
site area. Some uses are conditional uses.
Blueprint Denver: An Integrated Land Use and Trans-
portation Plan was adopted in 2002 and places a city-wide
priority on land use, transportation, housing, environmental
sustainability and protection of Denvers historic legacies.
Blueprint Denver identifies Areas of Stability and Areas of
Change throughout the city with the goal of directing new
developments and infill projects toward Areas of Change
in order to preserve Denvers stable neighborhoods. It also
establishes citywide concept land use and concept street clas-
sifications. Most of the Auraria West Station Area is identified
in Blueprint as an Area of Change. The concept land use
includes campus and entertainment facilities north of Colfax
Avenue, industrial land in the southwest portion of the station
area, and a mixture of residential and retail south of Colfax
Ave. and east of the light rail line.
Downtown
Transit Oriented Development
Mbted Use
Urban Residential
Single Fairuty Duplex
Single Famtfy Residential
Commercial Cornel or
Campus
Entertainment, Cultural, Exhibition
Park
., l Industrial
|^| LigKtrait Station
Existing Lightrail
1 Railroad
0 % Station Suffer
* 9 t*4erv 1/2 WVe
89


Auraria West Station Area Plan The Community
90


Auraria West Station Area Plan Public Engagement
91


Auraria West Station Area Plan Public Engagement
Public Process
Community outreach provided was a major component of
the planning process for the Auraria West Station Area. Pub-
lic involvement included focus groups, public workshops and
meetings with individual property owners.
Redevelopment Alternatives
Three alternative designs for the Auraria West Campus Sta-
tion area were reviewed by residents and stakeholders at focus
groups and public workshops between April and May, 2007.
The alternatives were evaluated by the degree to which they
satisfied the indicated plan objectives.
Option B was selected as the preferred alternative and be-
came the basis for the station area plan detailed in this report.
The evaluated alternatives follow.
Auraria West Campus Station
Plan Objectives
Option
ABC
Provide an opportunity for an energized neighborhood of mixed-use development O o o
with campus-supportive uses
Enhance pedestrian connectivity to campus and downtown O o o
Develop a vision for 5th Street as a spine connecting to the neighborhood grid o o o
Enhance transit connectivity to downtown o o o
Coordinate implementation strategies with AHAC o o o
Picture 11.1 Community evaluation of design alternatives
92


Auraria West Station Area Plan Public Engagement
Option A
Reflects existing conditions; does not propose any changes to
land uses surrounding the station platform
PEPSI CENTER
EUTCH GARDENS
STATION
PLATFORM
..V
rmi
cental

INVESCO FIELD
STATION
PLATFORM
AURARIA
WEST CAMPUS
STATION
PLATFORM
COLFAX AT
AURARIA
STATION
PLATFORM
LRT
ALIGNMENT .--r"
Itl 11*11041
TIVOLI
*
**
Option A
Option B
Fifth Street is extended north and connects to
Cottonwood St. to the south improving station access
and visibility. The looping road will serve as an armature
for transit-supportive development. Transit supportive
retail/commercial, mixed-income high-density housing
and campus-related uses, including student and faculty
housing are oriented along this spine
The existing parking lots serving the Pepsi Center are
redeveloped with employment/office and student/faculty
housing. Pepsi Center replacement parking is located in
a parking structure adjacent to the arena
The Auraria Campus Master Plan is amended to
better support transit uses adjacent to the station and
provide improved transit access. The primary campus
pedestrian and bicycle access are on Larimer and
Lawrence streets
Additional pedestrian and bicycle connections are
envisioned along 13th Avenue, connecting to the
Decatur and 1 Oth and Osage station areas
INVESCO
STATION
PLATFORM
AURARIA
STATION
PLATFORM
IRT
ALIGNMENT
IPTSUTON
COMMICI**
H MflOIMlNI
cwrvt
rm CAMhij FAKIFRO
TOTING UNO
0 TOTING WIUHMCS
Option B
93


Auraria West Station Area Plan Public Engagement
Option C
Fifth Street is extended north and south providing
improved station access and visibility. The looping road
will serve as an armature for transit-supportive develop-
ment. Transit-supportive retail/commercial, mixed-
income high-density housing and campus-related uses,
including student and faculty housing are oriented along
this spine.
The existing parking lots serving the Pepsi Center are
redeveloped as Auraria Campus athletic facilities, and
student and faculty housing. Pepsi Center replacement
parking is located in two structures adjacent to the arena
The Auraria Campus Master Plan is amended to better
support transit uses adjacent to the station and provide
improved transit access
The primary campus pedestrian and bicycle access is
from a new Larimer
Street Mall located on axis with the Tivoli
Student Union
The focus for main-street retail development is extend
south form the station along Fifth Street to 13th Avenue
PEPSI CENTER
ELITCH GARDENS
STATION
PLATFORM
IRT
ALIGNMENT
INVESCO FIELD
STATION
PLATFORM
PROPOSED
AURARIA
WEST CAMPUS
STATION
PLATFORM
COLFAX AT
AURARIA
STATION
PLATFORM
^ NEW fNHAttCH) Of CM !7AC£
NEW GWBIWAY
PROPOSED in Ha DC*
mitnnoidf
Moraw
^ 4E1AIL
^ EMAOYXEttt
CAum
PAfcWS
WIPING PARCH*
EKIPINQBUIIBHGS
Option C
Additional pedestrian and bicycle connections are
envisioned along 13th Avenue, connecting to the
Decatur and 1 Oth and Osage station areas
94


Full Text

PAGE 1

Community Planning & DevelopmentAdopted June 15, 2009 Auraria WestStation Area Plan

PAGE 3

Table of ContentsAcknowledgements vi Executive Summary 1 Overview 7 Vision & Goals 17 Land Use and Urban Design 25 Mobility & Infrastructure 37 Economic Opportunity 63 Implementation 67 Acronyms 75 The Community 79 Public Engagement 91 Relevant Plans 95

PAGE 4

Auraria West Station Area Plan Acknowledgements iv

PAGE 5

Auraria West Station Area Plan Acknowledgementsv Acknowledgements

PAGE 6

Auraria West Station Area Plan Acknowledgements viAcknowledgementsMayor John W. Hickenlooper Denver City Council District 1 Rick Garcia District 2 Jeanne Faatz District 3 Paul D. Lpez District 4 Peggy Lehmann District 5 Marcia Johnson District 6 Charlie Brown District 7 Chris Nevitt District 8 Carla Madison District 9 Judy Montero District 10 Jeanne Robb President District 11 Michael Hancock At-Large Carol Boigon At-Large Doug Linkhart Community Planning & Development Peter J. Park, Manager, AICP, Manager Steve Gordon, Comprehensive Planning Manager Kristin Krasnove, AICP, Project Manager Barbara Frommell Steve Nalley Ellen Ittelson Eric McClelland Andrea Santoro Carolyne Janssen Jim Ottenstein Denver Planning Board Brad Buchanan, Chairman Laura E. Aldrete Richard Delanoy William H. Hornby Anna Jones Judith Martinez Sharon Nunnally Bruce ODonnell Karen Perez Je rey Walker Dave Webster Public Works Guillerme Vidal, Manager Gretchen Hollrah, TOD Coordination Robert Kochaver, FasTracks Liason Crissy Fanganello Karen Good, AICP, Planing and Policy Eric Osmundsen; Development Engineering Services Michelle Melonakis; Tra c Engineering Services Parks & Recreation Scott Robson Gordon Robertson Devon Buckels O ce of Economic Development Andre Pettigrew, Executive Director Cec Ortiz, Deputy Director Will Kralovec, TOD Specialist Michael Meira Christopher Smith Richard Warren Other Agencies Regional Transportation District Denver Urban Renewal Authority Consultant Team Crandall Arambula Carter & Burgess, Environmental Consultant Fehr and Peers Hartwig and Associates Basile Bauman Probst ArLand

PAGE 7

Auraria West Station Area Plan Executive Summary1 Executive Summary

PAGE 8

Auraria West Station Area Plan Executive Summary 2Executive Summary e planning, design, construction and opening of the expanded FasTracks transit corridors are a source of pride and excitement for neighborhoods and businesses in Denver. Opportunities for changes to land use, design and mobility exist at each new station in Denver. rough the planning process, community members, City sta and the station area planning team worked together to identify these opportunities and develop strategies to achieve a vision for the station area. e Auraria West light rail station is located in RTDs Platte River line at the west side of the Auraria Higher Education Center (Auraria or AHEC) Campus. It is currently located adjacent to a pedestrian only section of Lawrence Street and is being relocated further north and west to 5th Street as part of the West Corridor light rail project, planned for completion in 2013. e West Corridor will be a 12.1-mile light rail transit corridor between the Denver Union Station in downtown Denver and the Je erson County Government Center in Golden, serving Denver, Lakewood, the Denver Federal Center, Golden and Je erson County. e Auraria West Station Area is just east of Downtown Denver in the Auraria statistical neighborhood and partially in the La Alma/Lincoln Park (LALP) neighborhood. e existing land uses surrounding the station include educational, industrial, and a large amount of surface parking as well as a student housing facility. e Pepsi Center, owned by Kroenke Sports Enterprises, is immediately north of the Auraria Campus. e station typology is a campus/special events station. e location provides students convenient access to Auraria Campus and will serve as a major transfer point from the West Corridor to the Central Corridor upon relocation. e Auraria West Station is projected to experience the second highest ridership in the FasTracks system due in part to the proximity to Auraria Higher Education Center with 3 institutions of higher education of 43,000 students who are provided RTD bus/light rail passes through an approved student fee. e Auraria West Station Area Plan articulates near and long-term goals, issues, and recommendations for the future. e plan provides a sound policy basis for citywide decisionmaking and guiding positive changes, including land-use patterns, urban design, circulation, and infrastructure. e Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000, Blueprint Denver, the Transit-Oriented Development Strategic Plan, and other adopted city-wide plans form the basis for recommendations contained in the Auraria West Station Area Plan. In the future, Kroenke Sports plans to develop a transitfriendly, mixed-use, entertainment district, on part of their existing surface parking lots. e potential entertainment district could create a vibrant pedestrian link to the Pepsi Center from the Auraria West Station. In addition, a local real estate development company, Urban Ventures, has assembled land surrounding the existing Campus Village Apartments. Urban Ventures plans to work with the Auraria Higher Education Center redevelop the area directly west of the station with additional student housing and commercial/ mixed use. Vision and GoalsTransit-oriented development is a mix of uses at various densities within a half-mile radius, or walking distance, of a transit stop. TOD ought to create speci c areas that integrate transit into neighborhoods and help support lively and vital communities. From discussions with the stakeholders and through a series of public meetings, the following goals were established for the plan: ese goals formed the basis of the speci c land use concepts and recommendations of the plan.The Plan: Land Use and Urban Design e future land use plan for the Auraria West Station was developed with the community at three public workshops. e plan includes the following priorities: Campus Hot-Spot and Main Street Elements along 5th Street: e campus hot spot on 5th Street is intended to provide campus-oriented commercial and retail uses for the projected increase of students and transit riders at the station. Commercial groundoor uses near the station are intended to be student oriented and will activate the station platform and surrounding area and complement the existing Tivoli Student Union.

PAGE 9

Auraria West Station Area Plan Executive Summary3Auraria West Station Area Vicinity

PAGE 10

Auraria West Station Area Plan Executive Summary 4 Mixed Use Entertainment District: is area includes a mix of transit-supportive land uses, primarily entertainment, commercial, residential and o ce/ employment. Entertainment uses may include a pool hall, bowling alley, movie theatre or other uses that may bene t students as well as downtown and regional users. Auraria Campus: is area provides for the growing needs of Auraria Higher Education Center in a transitsupportive manner. Student Housing: e existing and planned student housing on the west side of the station will be better integrated into the campus and have improved pedestrian access to downtown on Larimer and Lawrence Streets.

PAGE 11

Auraria West Station Area Plan Executive Summary5The Plan: Circulation and Mobility e circulation plan identi es the key connections for vehicles, pedestrians and bicycles throughout the station area. Streets that should be priorities for pedestrian improvements include: 5th, 7th, and Shoshone streets, and Rio Court are the key to supporting the commercial and retail uses surrounding the station Lawrence Street is a pedestrian mall that provides the key connection through the campus to downtown 13th Avenue is the primary east/west connection Other key elements of the circulation plan include: Extending Shoshone Street to Old Colfax Avenue (eliminating 14th Ave in this location) and relocating Curtis between 5th and 7th streets. is will also support commercial and retail uses on 5th Street Creating a primary auto loop on 5th, 7th, Rio Court, and Osage streets. is will provide north-south access through the site, ventilate the heavy tra c generated by the Pepsi Center events and increase access and visibility at the station Existing Burnham Yard The Quivas Street extension and enhanced street grid would be recommended with long-term redevelopment in the vicinity including the Burnham Yard. Station Area Mobility

PAGE 12

Auraria West Station Area Plan Executive Summary 6Implementation and Next Steps e implementation plan for the Auraria West Station is intended to lay out the framework to enable development and infrastructure consistent with the plan. e Auraria West implementation covers a series of actions: Speci c recommendations Strategies for implementation Implementation timing Citywide TOD implementation evaluation Speci c recommendations are listed in tables in the implementation section. e most immediate steps include plan adoption followed by rezonings that provide the regulatory framework to implement the recommendations. Rezonings should occur within the context and timeframe of Denvers zoning code update. It is anticipated that new zone districts will be available under the updated code that will be suited to the unique development character of the station areas. Another immediate step includes the scoping of infrastructure projects and the identi cation of potential funding sources to implement the infrastructure needed in the station area. ese infrastructure improvements should be pursued through public-private partnerships between local, university, regional, state and federal agencies. First Tier Implementation Recommendations and Timing It is important to have the city set up the Auraria West Station as development ready. Development ready includes: Getting new zoning in place Identifying an implementation toolbox both nancial and regulatory Putting in place the partnerships with other agencies and departments Community Planning and Development (CPD), Public Works (PW), Regional Transportation District (RTD), and the Auraria Higher Education Center (Auraria or AHEC)

PAGE 13

Auraria West Station Area Plan Overview7 Overview

PAGE 14

Auraria West Station Area Plan Overview 8IntroductionIn 2002 the City adopted Blueprint Denver An Integrated Land Use and Transportation Plan, to further the goals identi ed in Comprehensive Plan 2000 and promote more e cient use of transportation systems, expanded transportation choices, and appropriate and mixed land uses. Blueprint Denver identi es Areas of Change where growth should be directed and Areas of Stability where change should be limited. When voters passed the FasTracks ballot measure in 2004, Denver was poised to take a more signi cant leadership role in implementing Blueprint Denver and focusing growth near transit stations. is agenda was furthered by the adoption of Greenprint Denver in 2006. e Greenprint agenda promotes transit-oriented development (TOD) by setting a goal of increasing new development located within a mile of existing transit stations by 20% by 2011 and decreasing reliance on automobiles through public transit and access. In an e ort to prioritize planning and implementation activities related to transit and TOD, the City prepared the Transit Oriented Development Strategic Plan in 2006. Expanding on the goals and policies identi ed in the TOD Strategic Plan, the Auraria West Station Plan provides a sound policy basis for citywide decisionmaking and guiding positive changes to the built environment. is document outlines the key components of the planning process, establishes a foundation of essential objectives and provides strategies on how to realize the vision. e Auraria West light rail station is located in RTDs Central Corridor at the west side of the Auraria Campus. It is currently located adjacent to a pedestrian only section of Lawrence Street and is being relocated further north and west to 5th Street as part of the West Corridor light rail project, planned for completion in 2013. e West Corridor will be a 12.1-mile light rail transit corridor between the Denver Union Station in downtown Denver and the Je erson County Government Center in Golden, serving Denver, Lakewood, the Denver Federal Center, Golden and Je erson County. Picture 1.1 Rail system in the Denver region Existing: Central Corridor (1994) Southwest Corridor (2000) Central Platte Valley Spur (2002) Southeast Corridor (2006) FasTracks West Corridor opening 2013 East Corridor 2015, subject to change Gold Line 2015, subject to change Central Corridor Extension 2015* I-225 Corridor 2016* North Metro Corridor 2016 currently insu cient funding

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Overview9Purpose of the PlanProperty owners, elected o cials, neighborhood organizations and city departments will use the Auraria West Station Area Plan for many purposes over its lifespan. e following is a description of the primary uses of the plan ranging from big picture expectations to implementation. Infrastructure Improvements: A plan can provide the justication or the prioritization and allocation of funding from private sources or the citys capital improvement budget and other sources. Funding and Partnership Opportunities: Implementation of plans requires a collaborative e ort between neighborhoods, businesses, elected o cials and city departments. Plans typically require funding beyond the citys budget. is plan identi es and supports these partnerships and resource leveraging e orts. Reference for Larger City Wide Plans: e station area plan may include analysis that can inform other larger citywide plans. For example, as parking is a major issue that is addressed in this station area plan, the analysis and recommendations included here should be considered in the development of the city-wide strategic parking plan. Data Resource: e plan o ers a collection of existing conditions data about the planning area in an easy-to-reference document. Reinvestment Guidance: Market conditions cannot be guaranteed and changes in demographics cannot be accurately predicted. However, it is clear that the relocation of the light rail station and construction of the West Corridor generates reinvestment interest. e plan guides public and private decision-making and investment in the planning area over the coming years as it relates to land use, urban design and mobility. e plan o ers guidance on this reinvestment for the near-term and exibility to adapt to changing demographics and market demands. Zoning Amendments: e plan does not convey or deny any zoning entitlement but is an essential evaluation tool used in proposed zoning changes. Furthermore, the plan does not change zoning code language, but informs the pending zoning code update.Picture 1.2 Existing Auraria West Station

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Overview 10Plan Process Over a course of approximately 18 months, community members worked together with City sta and the station area planning team (made up of multiple agencies, property owners and stakeholders) to articulate opportunities, develop a vision and craft strategies to achieve the vision. With the strong foundation of adopted plans, stakeholders focused on the vision for creating a stronger sense of connection to the Auraria Campus and the surrounding neighborhoods while creating opportunities for mixed use development with campus supportive uses. ese community members represented residents, property owners, university o cials, businesses and community organizations in the area. In addition, the process involved collaboration between the City and County of Denvers Community Planning and Development Department, O ce of Economic Development, and Public Works Department, with support from the Department of Parks and Recreation and Environmental Health. Consulting assistance was provided by Crandall-Arambula. Regular public meetings and stakeholder work sessions shaped plan contents for the station area planning. Brie ngs and public hearings with City Council, Denver Planning Board and interagency city sta were also crucial to the process. e working group engaged in the following process: 1. Collect and analyze background information 2. Identify opportunities and constraints 3. Public Workshop 1 provide overview, identify issues and concerns 4. Draft vision and key objectives 5. Public workshop 2 review ndings/ nalize vision and project objectives 6. Develop and analyze land use and circulation alternatives 7. Technical review of parking, tra c, transportation, environmental and economic alternative concepts 8. Public workshop 3 present alternative concepts and identify preferred alternative 9. Re ne preferred alternative 10. Draft station area plan, implementation strategy and infrastructure assessment 11. Finalize station area plan 12. Circulate station area plan for external stakeholder review 13. Bring nal draft of station area plan through adoption process including public hearings before the Planning Board and Denver City CouncilContextPlanning Area: e Auraria West light rail station on RTDs central light rail corridor is located at 5th Street and Old Colfax Avenue on the Auraria Campus. e entire Auraria West Station planning area is delineated by a 1/2 mile radius (10 minute walk) from the station. e planning area is located within Council District 9 and primarily within the Auraria statistical neighborhood, the boundaries of which include Colfax, the South Platte River and Speer Boulevard/ Cherry Creek. is area is just east of Downtown Denver and a portion is also in the La Alma/Lincoln Park (LALP) neighborhood. Core Station Area: e core station area is de ned as sites closest to the station that are likely to see the most change and redevelopment within the planning time frame (see Picture 1.4). e core station area is currently dominated by surface parking areas for the Auraria Campus and Pepsi Center. e predominant surrounding land uses also include educational, industrial, as well as a student housing facility. is station plan considers the entire 1/2 mile radius but has some more speci c recommendations for the core station area.Picture 1.3 Community members worked together with City sta and the station area planning team to articulate these opportunities, develop a vision and craft strategies to achieve the vision.

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Overview11 South of Colfax Auraria Campus Kroenke Sports PropertyUrban Ventures Campus Village Picture 1.4 Core Station Area 2006 Aerial Photograph

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Overview 12 e Kroenke Sports property (Pepsi Center) to the north of Auraria Parkway is within the core station area and provides a large potential area for redevelopment. e core station area also includes the Auraria Campus; however, land uses on the campus are governed by the Auraria Campus Master Plan. Because circulation and connectivity through the campus are key to activating the station, these topics are emphasized and recommendations for AHEC are included. e land assemblage south of Colfax is also included in the core station area. With substantial acreage, underutilization, and direct access to 5th Street, this area is an important component of the plan. e main focus of the core station area is 5th Street, between Auraria Parkway and Old Colfax as this will be the location of the campus hot spot and serve as a spine connecting the street network. e areas west of I-25 are not included in the core station area due to the physical and perceptual barrier of the interstate. Beyond the Planning Area: While the planning area is the 1/2 mile radius of the Auraria West Station, it is important to understand the land use and transportation pattern beyond that boundary. Beyond the planning area, to the east of the campus is downtown and the central business district (CBD). To the west is Invesco Field with medium to high density residential neighborhoods. e area to the south is predominantly industrial and to the southeast is predominantly residential. While these areas contain a diversity of land uses, the proximity to downtown, educational and entertainment centers makes access to the planning area important. A consideration addressed in this document is the need for improved connections from the Auraria Campus and La Alma/ Lincoln Park neighborhood to downtown. Station Typology: According to Denvers Transit Oriented Development Strategic Plan (August 2006), the Auraria West Station TOD typology is campus/special events with a desired land use mix of university campus, sports facilities, limited multi-family housing, and limited o ce/retail. e TOD typology developed by the City is an attempt to recognize the important di erences among places and destinations within regions and then to identify appropriate performance and descriptive benchmarks for these places. e basic station area place types as de ned by the typology are intended to provide a very general idea of the overall character of and vision for each station area without spelling out too many speci c details. Planning Context: Denvers adopted plans provided the basis for the Auraria West Station Plan and represent o cial policy adopted by elected representatives with public input. It is essential to ensure consistency with the goals, objectives and recommendations of these plans. An overview of all documents considered during this planning process is found in the Appendix. e overriding principles of these plans are: Promoting urban in ll and compact, mixed-use development patterns that use resources more e ciently Creating multi-modal streets that facilitate walking, bicycling and public transportation use along with automobiles Providing parks, schools, civic uses and open space that are safely accessible by pedestrians Restricting development in areas that would a ect the sustainability of regional facilities Market Context: To identify, leverage, and maximize TOD opportunities, the City commissioned a TOD Economic Analysis and Market Study. e primary goal of the TOD Economic Analysis and Market Study was to provide the city with an assessment of TOD potential at the regional, corridor, and station area levels through analysis of shortand long-term demand (e.g. demand in 2015 and 2030). Conducted in coordination with station area planning e orts, the market study helped to better align station plans with market realities and dynamics. e overall objectives of the TOD Economic Analysis and Market Study were to forge a better understanding of the economic context in which the City plans for TOD, and to develop speci c recommendations regarding the amount, type, mix, and intensity of uses appropriate for selected station areas. e study established a few key projections and ndings which provide a framework for economic opportunities in Denver: e build-out of FasTracks will create a comprehensive transit system and should place the region in a better competitive position to attract new growth compared to other regions without full transit-systems e region should experience relatively high rates of household and employment growth in the next 20 years ere is a demonstrated market interest in higherintensity development

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Overview13 e City and County of Denver has taken a proactive role in planning for transit and other transit-supportive public policies Current development activity near existing transit stations in the region far exceeds DRCOG growth projections Station areas are attracting (capturing) new development at a rate of 25%-40% depending on the development type (residential, retail, or o ce)Existing Planning AreaPopulation and Housing Dominated by the Auraria Campus and the Pepsi Center, the Auraria statistical neighborhood supports a very small residential population. In 2000 the Census estimated a neighborhood population of 123 people. e Auraria Campus itself housed no students in 2000. In 2005 the Campus Village Apartments were constructed adjacent to the campus. e Campus Village Apartments currently house approximately 685 students in 230 units and experiences very low vacancy rates. South of Colfax approximately 405 residential units within the La Alma / Lincoln Park neighborhood are located within 1/2 mile of the station. Because the student housing and a large Denver Housing Authority property in La Alma/Lincoln Park are rental properties, only 12% of the units within the station area are owner-occupied. Entertainment Kroenke Sports Enterprises is the owner of the Pepsi Center, home to the Denver Nuggets, Colorado Avalanche, Colorado Mammoth and the Colorado Crush. Kroenkes property is surrounded by three of Denvers light rail stations: Pepsi Center, Invesco Field and Auraria West Campus. It is also located immediately north of the Auraria Campus. e majority of Kroenkes land currently serves as surface parking lots. In the future, the property owner plans to apply for rezoning to enable the development of a transit-friendly, mixed-use, entertainment district using a general development plan (GDP) or other applicable planning process. e GDP process identi es issues related to land use, open space, transportation, water, wastewater, utilities and urban design and provides a conceptual plan for integrating the anticipated land uses with the necessary infrastructure. Upon redevelopment, a pedestrian scale block pattern should be incorporated to capitalize on the propertys proximity to light rail. Improving connectivity will be essential to the success of the entertainment district and creating a more walkable station area. Six Flags Elitch Gardens is a downtown amusement park located north of the Central Corridor rail line and Kroenke Sports property. e southern portion of the amusement park is within the 1/2 mile radius of the Auraria West Station. e rail line creates a barrier for pedestrians walking from the Auraria West Station; however, better access is provided from the Pepsi Center station. Schools and Public Facilities e Auraria Higher Education Center (AHEC or Auraria) campus area is home to three educational institutions: the Community College of Denver, Metropolitan State College and the University of CO Denver downtown campus. e student population is increasing and is projected to substantially increase over the next 20 to 25 years. Every ve years AHEC is required to update the master plan for the campus. An updated campus master plan was adopted in 2007. e 2007 Campus Master Plan calls for expanding and intensifying the campus to meet the current and future space needs of the Auraria Campus. Picture 1.5 The Pepsi Center is located just north of the Auraria West Station within the 1/2 mile radius Picture 1.6 Urban Ventures Phase 1 of the Campus Village development

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Overview 14 e plan also hopes to enhance the identity of the individual institutions through the creation of individual neighborhoods. Key to improving campus connectivity is the recommendation to extend Larimer Street through the campus as a pedestrian walk and bikeway, and allowing for a shuttle or trolley. e parking strategy in the plan locates parking at campus edges and maintains current parking capacity by transitioning from surface parking to structured parking. ese planning e orts will greatly improve the access and activity around the light rail station. e Campus Master Plan also identi es new potential approaches for real estate transactions enabling public-private development on campus property. Land AssemblageCampus Village. Urban Ventures, a local real estate development company, partnered with the University of Colorado Real Estate Foundation to develop the student housing facility adjacent to the Auraria Campus. Phase One of the project, a $50 million, 250,000-square foot development, was completed fall of 2006. In conjunction with the construction of the West Corridor and relocation of the Auraria West Campus Station, Urban Ventures plans to complete the additional phases and redevelop the underutilized parcels surrounding Campus Village apartments. South of Colfax. e South of Colfax site includes 22 acres of land located between Old Colfax and 13th Avenues currently consisting of industrial uses and underutilized parcels. e site is impacted by the realignment of Union Paci c Railroads Burnham Lead through the site due to FasTracks. Currently, freight trains access the Burnham Yard, a maintenance facility south of the Auraria West Campus station area, from a track that parallels the light rail alignment, passing under the Colfax viaduct and heading south. As part of the FasTracks project, this track, known as the Burnham Lead, will be relocated east, just north of 13th Avenue, passing through the South of Colfax property where it would reconPicture 1.7 Auraria Campus Illustrative Master Plan

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Overview15 Picture 1.8 Existing transportation station area

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Overview 16 nect with the Burnham Yard. e Auraria Higher Education Center has recently purchased 13.5 acres of the property north of the Burnham Lead to develop recreation elds to meet their growing demand for athletic facilities. AHEC will be working to improve the connection to the elds from the campus. Transit SystemFasTracks. With the Denver region currently serving as home to 2.5 million people and another 1 million expected to move to the metro area by 2030, improvements in transportation infrastructure are critical to maintaining the excellent quality of life that attracts so many to this area. In the past 10 years alone, RTD ridership has increased more than 28 percent. e existing light rail system is a total of 35 miles, 6 lines and 34 stations. By 2007 ridership was an average of 63,000 boardings per weekday systemwide. e RTD FasTracks program is an integration of several transit modes and other programs into a comprehensive regionwide system. FasTracks will improve accessibility, quality of life and commuting times. Several transit technologies will be used as determined through the environmental process on each corridor. RTD has already been using buses and light rail to meet the Denver metro areas transit needs. As part of FasTracks, three new technologies commuter rail, bus rapid transit and streetcars may be introduced to the region. In addition to the new rail corridors, extensions and bus rapid transit, FasTracks includes new Park-N-Rides, a new commuter rail maintenance facility, expanded bus service called FastConnects and the redevelopment of Denver Union Station. is unprecedented transit investment will include: 122 miles of new rail 6 new rail corridors (light rail and heavy rail) Expansion of 3 existing corridors 18 miles of Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) 31 new Park-n-Rides 21,000 spaces Enhanced bus network & transit hubs (FastConnects) Existing Transportation: Major east-west automobile corridors include 13th Avenue, Colfax Avenue and Auraria Parkway. Sections of the latter two roadways are elevated. In the vicinity of the station, Interstate 25 is a major northsouth elevated automobile corridor located on the western edge of the study area and Speer Boulevard is located east of Auraria Campus. ese north-south and east-west corridors act as visual and physical barriers that isolate the Auraria Campus and limit connectivity to adjacent neighborhoods and downtown.

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Vision and Goals17 Vision & Goals

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Vision and Goals 18Vision Statement e City and County of Denver is poised to take a signi cant leadership role in implementing the new transit lines and focusing growth into neighborhoods and areas near almost 40 transit stations. is section begins with the established TOD principles for the City of Denver. e unique qualities of the Auraria West Station Area substantially contribute to this e ort. Realizing this vision will depend on the ability to overcome distinct challenges and capitalize on strengths and opportunities described in this section. is section establishes the speci c vision for the Auraria West Station and the primary Transit-Oriented Development objectives for the station area are described. e Auraria West Station will develop over the coming decades into an energized area of sustainable mixed-use development with campus-supportive uses. Students, faculty and visitors will be drawn to the convenience and amenities of this location. e station will be connected to downtown, surrounding neighborhoods and adjacent light rail stations through the regional transportation system. Improved pedestrian and bicycle connectivity will tie the light rail station with the student housing, campus, downtown, mixed-use entertainment district, and future main street uses along 5th Street. Development of new housing on the west side of the station will allow more students and faculty to live near the light rail connecting them to the campus and the region. e increased population base will support a variety of campus-oriented commercial, retail, and entertainment uses. e growth and development on the Auraria Campus will be coordinated with the transit-oriented development surrounding the station. ese e orts will include activating the station platform with a campus hot spot, providing a destination for students and transit riders. 5th Street will be transformed by new development and improvements coordinated between the City of Denver, AHEC, Urban Ventures, and the Regional Transportation District. On-street parking, premium pedestrian treatments, and groundoor commercial and retail will transform 5th Street into a spine connecting the street network. Buildings on both sides of 5th Street will also complement the street and the transit station. Pedestrian improvements on 5th Street, Larimer, Lawrence Street, Shoshone and Rio Court will make walking easy and convenient to and from the station, campus, downtown, Pepsi Center, Invesco Field and adjacent neighborhoods. Students will be able to walk to entertainment and services and be more integrated into the urban fabric. Improvements to the street grid through the campus and south towards 13th Avenue will provide much needed connections. 13th Avenue will remain an important connection for neighborhoods to the east and west, allowing residents to conveniently walk or bicycle to the Auraria West and Decatur Stations. New development will be high-quality, sustainable and architecturally interesting with ground oors and building entrances that open onto the sidewalk. Buildings will be of a scale that helps create a sense of enclosure and safety for pedestrians as they walk to their destinations. TOD and Sustainability De ned by the Brundtland Commission (World Commission on Environment and Development), sustainable development meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. Transitoriented development addresses the three Es of sustainability: environment, economy, and social equity and furthers the climate objectives set forth by Greenprint Denver. Environment Mobile sources account for as much as 90% of all carbon-monoxide emissions. Transit-oriented development supports use of public transportation over private automobiles and can help reduce tra c and air pollution. For every passenger mile traveled, public transportation is twice as e cient as private automobiles. Economy e average working American drives 396 hours each year, the equivalent of 10 workweeks. More than onefourth of this time is spent commuting to and from work. Transit-oriented and mixed-use development can convey substantial scal and economic bene ts for workers by reducing commute costs and increasing available hours for productivity In addition, businesses recognize that TOD encourages a variety of local employment opportunities, and helps attract new businesses and industries. Equity e cost of buying, maintaining, and operating vehicles is the largest source of personal debt after home mortgages. TOD o ers a framework to build community and help create and preserve a sense of place. It does this through housing and transportation choices, urban green spaces, accessible recreational and cultural attractions, and policies and incentives that promote mixed-use neighborhoods for the bene t of everyone.

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Vision and Goals19Foundation of TOD Principles Developing a vision begins with establishing the underlying principles of transit-oriented development. Transit-oriented development is a mix of uses at various densities within a half-mile radius, or walking distance, of a transit stop. TOD should create speci c areas that integrate transit into neighborhoods and help support lively and vital communities. e TOD Strategic Plan de nes TOD in Denver and establishes strategies for implementation. In order to succeed, TOD should address these ve guiding principles. Place-making: Create safe, comfortable, varied and attractive station areas with a distinct identity. Rich Mix of Choices: Provide housing, employment, transportation and shopping choices for people of all ages, household types, incomes and lifestyles. Location E ciency: Place homes, jobs, shopping, entertainment, parks and other amenities close to the station to promote walking, biking and transit use. Value Capture: Encourage all stakeholders residents, business owners, RTD and the City to take full economic advantage of the amenity of enhanced transit services. Portal to the Region: Understand and maximize the stations role as an entry to the regional transit network and as a safe pleasant and private place to live. Strengths, Opportunities and Challenges To successfully accomplish the TOD principles and adopted city policies, a full understanding of the strengths, opportunities and challenges of the Auraria West Station Area is needed. Realizing this vision will depend on the ability to overcome distinct challenges and capitalize on accomplishments and opportunities described in this section. e Auraria West Station has excellent potential for future development because of the strong existing student base in the area, the proximity to Auraria Campus and downtown, the planned student housing, and the interest of surrounding property owners and AHEC to redevelop underutilized properties surrounding the station. Existing strengths, or assets, within the station area set the stage for the plans vision and add signi cant value to future improvements. Expanding Auraria Campus provides a strong transit user base Major transfer point for commuters coming on the West Line to transition to the Central Corridor Proximity to downtown Denver Recent addition of student housing to station area Emerging opportunities create energy and excitement for the station area and present unprecedented resources to evolve the built environment. Potential to create main street of mixed uses along 5th Street Ability to strengthen connections to the north-south roadway network by linking 5th and 7th Streets to the north of Auraria Parkway and strengthening connections to 13th Avenue Expansion of student housing immediately west of the station Landowner interest in redevelopment of key sites, including Pepsi Center parking lots, and in ll and expansion of the Auraria Campus Despite a strong foundation of signi cant strengths and opportunities, challenges remain. e plans objectives and recommendations will greatly assist in overcoming these obstacles. e station area is not well connected to the campus Timeline for potential redevelopment to the north and south has yet to be determined No bus connections to and from the station Roadway network does not provide direct connections to nearby corridors of Colfax, Auraria Parkway or 13th AvenuePicture 2.1 Emerging opportunities create energy and excitement for the station area and present the potential to create a main street of mixed uses along 5th Street.

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Vision and Goals 20 Bike routes and linkages are insu cient Barrier to the south created by the 60-acre rail yard (Burnham Yard), owned by Union Paci c Railroad. ere are currently no plans for the sale of this property.Auraria West Station Plan Objectives To achieve a vibrant, economically healthy, growing and vital station area, a sustained e ort in each of the following elements is essential: Place-Making Improving the stations status as a destination Enhancing the experience along and crossing 5th Street Creating main street character along 5th Street around the station Creating a sense of arrival for the station area and the station itself Developing strong connections between the station and Auraria Campus Creating a consistent and predictable form within the station area Rich Mix of Choices O ering safe, convenient and pleasant pedestrian, bicycle and vehicular access between the station, campus, downtown, and surrounding neighborhoods Interweaving transit and pedestrian oriented uses (campus, small scale shops, restaurants, residential, etc.) Supporting main street environment with buildings and pedestrian entrances at the street Providing new opportunities for housing (mix of types and a ordability) Location E ciency Considering reinvestment opportunities and accessibility improvements within the planning area Providing extension of 5th Street to the north and additional circulation opportunities through connection of 7th Street to the grid Integrating and embracing the station into the street and land use pattern Improving accessibility and consolidating parking locations for campus users and businesses Value Capture Ensuring investments add value to existing campus and surrounding land owners Considering existing neighborhood plans and other planning e orts (e.g. Decatur Station Area Plan, Downtown Area Plan, La Alma Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan/10th & Osage Station Area Plan, Strategic Transportation Plan, Strategic Parking Plan and the Living Streets Initiative) Examining capacity of infrastructure to accommodate new development (water, sewer, tra c, etc..) Exploring opportunities to access regional recreation systems Portal to the Region Addressing existing and potential barriers between the station and campus Enhancing experience along 5th Street and cross campus routes, including Lawrence and Larimer streets Emphasizing alternative methods to access the station, such as providing bus connections and bicycle facilities Creating a street hierarchy and extending the grid both to the north and south of the station to access the mixed use entertainment district, Auraria athletic elds, and employment along 13th Avenue Highlighting the station as a transfer point for commuters coming on the West Line to the Central Corridor

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Vision and Goals21 Picture 2.2 Build-out Concept Diagram

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Vision and Goals 22Key Elements e plans objectives will be realized through the following key design elements described here and shown in the Buildout Concept Diagram to the left. Primary Pedestrian/Bicycle Station Access Routes on Lawrence Street, Shoshone Street and 13th Avenue: e Lawrence Street pedestrian mall will continue to provide pedestrian and add bicycle access and serve as an organizing public open space green system that connects transit riders to key campus destinations and the downtown core. Larimer and Curtis Streets could provide alternative bicycle access. Rio Court Old Colfax, and Shoshone Streets will link via 5th street to the Lawrence mall system and provide access to the 10th & Osage light rail station and neighborhoods to the south. 13th Avenue runs along the o ce/employment corridor, linking to the Decatur Station to the west and the Golden Triangle to the east. ese routes will serve as a premium pedestrian and bicycle system that will supplement additional pedestrian and bicycle connections in the area. Mixed-Use Entertainment District: A portion of the Pepsi Center surface parking will be transformed to include a mix of transit-supportive land uses, primarily entertainment, commercial, residential and o ce/employment. Entertainment uses may include a pool hall, bowling alley, movie theatre or other uses that may bene t Auraria students and downtown and regional users. Auraria Campus: is area will provide for the growing needs of the campus in a transit-supportive manner. e existing Tivoli Student Union on campus will be complimented by nearby development and additional students and faculty will be drawn from around the region. Student Housing: e existing and planned student housing will be better integrated into the campus and station and have improved pedestrian access to downtown on Larimer and Lawrence Streets. Campus Hot Spot: e campus hot spot on 5th Street is intended to provide campus-oriented commercial and retail uses for the projected increase of students and transit riders at the Auraria West Campus Station. Commercial groundoor uses near the station are intended to be student oriented and will activate the station platform and surrounding area and complement the existing Tivoli Student Union. South of Colfax and O ce/Employment Corridor: is area will provide a mix of land uses, including o ce and employment, that support transit ridership and complement the nearby Auraria Campus. It is also a planned location for expanded campus recreation facilities and athletic elds. Primary Auto Loop on 5th and 7th Streets: is loop will maintain and improve existing auto connectivity within the site and to local and regional road systems. 5th Street and Shoshone Street/Rio Court will extend south to 13th Avenue, providing an important connection between the future mixed-use entertainment district to the north and future residential neighborhoods to the south. 7th Street remains open to auto tra c, providing circulation through the campus and increasing accessibility to nearby facilities. e extension of 5th and 7th streets to the north through the mixed-use entertainment district will help provide additional connectivity for the area and support the need to serve Pepsi Center event tra c. e fundamental concept diagram below illustrates the proposed primary auto loop through the station area.

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Vision and Goals23 Picture 2.3 Fundamental Concept Diagram

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Land Use & Urban Design 24

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Land Use & Urban Design25 Land Use & Urban Design

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Land Use & Urban Design 26Land Use and Urban DesignStation areas thrive on a rich mix of land uses and e cient placement of those uses. is creates a diversity of people, choice, and opportunities. Attracting jobs, residents, amenities and visitors is essential to a vital station area, neighborhood and transportation system. e intensity and arrangement of land use correlate to the typology of the station area. Auraria West Station Area typology of campus/special events is reinforced by the land use plan. e land use plan illustrates types and locations of transit supportive uses on parcels that are most likely to be developed or redeveloped over time. e primary land use within the station area is educational; however, commercial, employment, entertainment and residential uses support the adjoining campus. Major parcels that are envisioned for transit-oriented redevelopment include the mixed-use entertainment district, campus hot spot, Auraria Campus and the south of Colfax property (See Picture 3.1). e Land Use Concept Diagram on the following page illustrates the recommended land uses for the properties likely to redevelop in the station area. Each station area must emerge as a destination with its own sense of place and identity. is plan provides strategies for making the Auraria West Station Area a distinctive neighborhood while respecting surrounding conditions. Urban design encompasses fundamental elements such as ground oor uses, build-to lines and building heights. All are essential to an active and vital station area and maximize transit oriented development opportunities. To create land use choices in the Auraria West Station Area and create sustainable transitand pedestrian-oriented development, the land use concept recommends a combination of a mixed-use entertainment district, campus housing, a campus hot spot, o ce/employment, and open space uses. On many parcels a mix of uses, both vertically and horizontally, is recommended. Where parcels contain a vertical mix of uses, the predominate, or most important use, is indicated. is range of uses will allow for a balanced level of activity throughout the day and week and can accommodate market demands and uctuations over a long period of time. While the entire station area should be mixed use, the Land Use Concept illustrates the ideal concentration of studentserving retail and commercial. e land uses illustrated also re ect existing development plans. Promoting mixed use near transit can help reach the Citys sustainability goals by bringing more people within easy access of public transportation, bike facilities and pedestrian routes, thereby reducing our dependence on oil and energy in the future.

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Land Use & Urban Design27 Picture 3.1 Land Use Concept Diagram Area 1: Mixed-Use Entertainment District Area 2: Auraria Campus Area 3: Campus Hot Spot Area 4: South of Colfax Avenue

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Land Use & Urban Design 28Land Use Recommendations To achieve the rich mix of choices and eliminate the autooriented development pattern of the Auraria Station area the land use concept recommends educational, residential, open space and o ce employment. Retail and commercial uses are also suggested as part of the ground oor uses framework. e following are detailed land use recommendations for the station area that respond to the vision. Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 1 Housing Opportunities e Auraria West Campus Station TOD o ers opportunities for transit-oriented housing. e housing framework should support a variety of housing types, including rentals and for-sale units. is will help infuse market-rate, student and a ordable housing into the station area. Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 2 O ce/Employment Base New o ce/employment uses are suggested to the north and south of the Auraria Campus. Employment uses may include o ce and/or light-industrial uses. Family-wage jobs (su cient to support a spouse and children), nontraditional employment, and live/work opportunities should be encouraged. Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 3 Campus Commercial (Campus Hot Spot) New campus-serving commercial uses, with a strong preference for retail uses is suggested for the station area along 5th Street between Walnut and Curtis streets. ese commercial services should support, strengthen and serve as an anchor for the station area and provide pedestrian-oriented street frontages with services located on both sides of the street. Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 4 Retail Pedestrian-oriented retail uses are encouraged wherever possible on 5th Street, beginning at the station and extending from that retail core. Retail success typically depends on sufcient drive-by tra c. e tra c volumes on 5th Street are currently low but should increase in the future as the street becomes better connected to the surrounding area. A mix of commercial as well as retail is recommended along 5th Street Retail use should primarily serve students and transit riders. Appropriate retail types to serve campus and transit users may include restaurants, co ee shops, bookstores, campus supply stores, clothing stores, copy/print shops, and others. Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 5 Open Space and Plaza Existing parks and open spaces within the study area include the South Platte River greenway to the west and La Alma/ Lincoln Park to the south, as well as the greens along the Lawrence Street pedestrian mall which serves as an organizing open space element on the campus. Open space enhancements include the Lawrence Street pedestrian mall and transit station plaza. Proposed athletic elds south of Colfax Avenue will provide opportunity for active recreational space for the students and neighboring community. Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 6 Parking Parking requirements should be reduced in the station area due to its proximity to transit and pedestrian infrastructure. AHEC has seen an increase in students using transit to access the campus and currently the campus inventory of parking spaces exceeds the e ective demand. Once the West Corridor opens, student transit demand will increase even more and parking needs should be reassessed. e Auraria Campus Master Plan supports eliminating all surface parking lots through potential expansion of existing structure parking options and pursuing the potential of shared parking alternatives. Although minimum market requirements for parking should be met for all land uses, alternative methods to meet the minimum standards should be utilized. See the Mobility and Infrastructure Parking section for detailed parking recommendations. Picture 3.2 Ground oor commercial o ce

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Land Use & Urban Design29Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 7 Mixed Use/Entertainment District A mixed-use entertainment district is proposed north of Auraria Parkway on the property owned by Kroenke Sports Enterprises (Pepsi Center). Given its proximity to the Auraria Campus and three light rail stations, residential and o ce/employment should be included in the upper oor uses to support transit ridership and serve the expanding student/ faculty population. A mix of residential, o ce/employment, commercial, entertainment and retail uses are recommended. To accommodate redevelopment and maintain adequate parking for events, existing surface lots should be replaced with structured parking to create redevelopment opportunities. Existing Pepsi Center Street Development Agreements requiring vehicle exit time (45 minutes) after events will need to be revisited to accommodate redevelopment of the existing surface parking lot areas. e parking requirements should be revisited based on current use and transit access. Land uses should compliment the Pepsi Centers existing and future entertainment uses while providing strong pedestrian connections. Uses and design should provide links to the Auraria Campus and consider complementing the campus serving uses adjacent to the Auraria West Station. Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 8 Auraria Higher Education Center Campus With the recent completion of the Auraria Campus Master Plan (2007), a number of key issues and concerns have been identi ed. e plan attempts to accommodate a number of challenging objectives including expanding academic and o ce space as well as athletic and recreational elds and facilities, while transitioning surface parking into structured parking. Student housing will also expand to the west of the station where the rst phase of campus adjacent student housing has been completed. Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 9 South of Colfax Avenue e Auraria Higher Education Center has recently purchased 13.5 acres of property north of the future Burnham Lead to develop recreational elds. ese elds will help meet AHECs growing demand for athletic and recreation facilities on the campus. South of the Burnham Lead, 13th Avenue is well suited for o ce/employment and mixed use due to its regional connectivity and high visibility. ese uses along 13th Avenue could also serve to bu er future residential uses to the south and campus serving uses from the Burnham Lead track. Appropriate use for the existing building on Rio Court will be determined upon nal RTD acquisition determinations. Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 10 Ground Floor Commercial and Retail Groundoor retail and commercial uses are an essential component of an active and vital station area. Neighborhood-serving retail and commercial uses provide goods and services to local residents, employees, students and light-rail passengers. ey are accessible by vehicles, transit and pedestrians. ey create activity at the station platform. ese uses should be pedestrian oriented and organized so that buildings are built edge to edge forming a continuous row of commercial and retail uses. 5th Street between Larimer and Lawrence Street should serve as the campus hot spot with predominantly commercial and retail uses. Other locations within the study area may include retail or commercial uses; however, they are not priority areas. e map below shows recommended locations for ground oor commercial and retail uses. e use of active edges, transparency, and build-to lines is recommended for the entire campus hot spot. e space should be designed to activate the street and enhance the pedestrian experience but can be exible to allow needed academic/administrative uses. Commercial uses are de ned as businesses that engage in the sale of services. Primary permitted uses should be limited nancial services, real estate services and lodging. Retail uses are de ned as businesses that engage in the sale of merchandise. Primary permitted uses should be limited to merchandise sales and eating and drinking establishments.

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Land Use & Urban Design 30 Picture 3.3 Ground Floor Uses Framework

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Land Use & Urban Design31Urban DesignUrban design recommendations are the additional layer to the land use concept that ensures placemaking for the station area. e main features that will be addressed include active edges, build-to lines and building heights. Attention to these design features will help support a shared vision for the future evolution of the Auraria West Station Area and form a cohesive and vibrant destination. e main goals of the urban design recommendations are to: Strengthen the pedestrian experience along 5th Street with a mix of uses and an active street edge Provide strong visual connection between the station plaza and the core of the Auraria Campus Allow for a range of building heights that respect the surrounding uses and structures Active Edges are characterized as building frontages with direct entries from the sidewalk and a high degree of transparency. is increases visual and physical interaction between people inside and outside of the buildings, creating a safe and vibrant pedestrian environment. is eyes on the street environment will promote safety and activity. Building facades facing the station platform must also include active-edge treatments. is is critical to the safe pedestrian environment at the platform. e framework identi es the essential building frontages to include active-edge treatments. Other building frontages may include these treatments but it is not crucial. Build-To e build-to lines plan identi es locations where groundoor building facades must be built directly to the property line. A build-to line can also be described as a zero-foot building setback from the property line where the sidewalk is built directly up to the facade. ey are recommended in the same locations where groundoor commercial uses are located. Providing build-to lines in a commercial area will help establish a continuous street wall, framing the pedestrian-oriented 5th Street and strengthening the campus hot spot. Building Heights should maximize transit-oriented development opportunities, while remaining consistent with existing ordinances and view planes.Picture 3.4 Building facade built to street edge with variations for doorway setbacks; Street Car Lofts, Portalnd, Oregon Picture 3.5 Street Wall established by build-to lines; Stapleton, Denver, Colorado Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 11 Locations for Key Active Edges Suggested active edge locations are along important streets within the station area and connecting to the adjacent neighborhoods. ese locations include (see Picture 3.6, right): 5th Street 7th Street 13th Avenue

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Land Use & Urban Design 32 Picture 3.6 Active Edges Framework

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Land Use & Urban Design33Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 12 Design of Ground-Floor Retail and Commercial Active Edges To activate the street edges, a minimum of 70 percent transparent glass or screens along groundoor facades is recommended. Frosted, tinted, re ective glass or other types of glass that diminish transparency should be prohibited. Primary entrances to all groundoor uses should be oriented to the public right-of-way. Near the station, active edges should include both the platform-adjacent development and 5th Street. Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 13 Design of all other Ground-Floor Active Edges Primary entrances must be oriented toward the street. Quasi-public terraces, stoops or porches are appropriate, but not essential. Windows should be provided along facades, but no minimum percentage of transparency or minimum size opening should be required. Art walls, ower booths, news stands or other activating uses are appropriate throughout the station area. Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 14 Locations for Build-To Lines e build-to lines framework identi es only the essential building frontages. Other building frontages may have groundoor facades built up to the property line, but are not priority areas. Build-to lines are identi ed along 5th Street between Curtis and Walnut streets (see Picture 3.8). Windows and walls may be recessed up to 18 inches from the build-to line to accommodate columns or other architectural elements that engage the build-to line. Build-to lines should only be interrupted for access points to courtyards or other private space. Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 15 Design of Build-To Lines Build-to lines should be located along the entire block length where indicated on the opposite diagram. e following build-to line criteria should be met: Groundoor entrances to buildings may be recessed up to ve feet behind the build-to line Windows and walls may be recessed up to 18 inches from the build-to line to accommodate columns or other architectural elements that engage the build-to linePicture 3.7 Street edge activated by building transparence; Santa Fe, New Mexico

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Land Use & Urban Design 34 Picture 3.8 Build to Lines Framework

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Land Use & Urban Design35Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 16 Range of Building Heights e building heights framework indicates a range of minimum to maximum building height recommendations consistent with plan objectives. Recommendations for building heights have been made for the Core Planing Area. Building heights should maximize transit-oriented development opportunities, while remaining consistent with existing old city hall and state capitol view planes ordinances (see Picture 3.9 below). ese heights range from approximately 60to 90-feet in the planning area, depending on location. Further study will be needed to determine actual building heights. Building heights should also respect and not overwhelm the scale and massing of the campus and adjacent neighborhoods. See map to the right for recommended building heights by location. e building heights framework indicates minimum and maximum building height recommendations as follows. Building heights should: Range from a minimum of four to a maximum of eight oors adjacent to the Auraria West Station. Range from ve to twelve oors on the outer edge of the Kroenke Sports property to accommodate the MixedUse Entertainment District Range from two to four oors along the o ce/ employment corridor on 13th Avenue Respond to the existing view plane ordinances and adjacent campus building heights, surrounding the station Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 17 Build Green A green building approach to design and construction protects the environment, conserves resources, creates healthier air quality, and saves money. Green building practices include siting and design to utilize passive solar, cross ventilation, energy and water e ciency, renewable energy, and recycled and reused building materials. Well-designed buildings with e cient appliances can use up to 75 percent less energy. Picture 3.9 State Capitol view plane and Old City Hall view plane both impact the station area

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Land Use & Urban Design 36 Picture 3.10 Building Heights Framework

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure37 Mobility & Infrastructure

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure 38Mobility and InfrastructureMobility choices and connectivity are key ingredients to a livable station environment because it increases access to jobs, conserves energy, relieves congestion, supports public safety and encourages social and economic activity. Additionally, people at various stages of life share these bene ts. e mobility framework recommends enhanced pedestrian and bicycle routes that provide safe, direct, convenient and attractive connections. e street grid o ers essential routes for auto and bus tra c to maintain and improve regional mobility. e mobility plan identi es the primary vehicular routes to and from the Auraria West Campus Station Area. It is designed to maintain and enhance existing vehicular routes and create new ones for a cohesive multimodal circulation system. e plan improves mobility between the station, Auraria Campus, the mixed-use entertainment district, nearby light-rail stations and adjacent neighborhoods. e primary vehicular routes establish a street grid that creates development blocks. ese blocks de ne the scale, massing and character of new buildings and open spaces. Street enhancements also consider pedestrian and bicycle access, which is further detailed on the following pages. Key Concepts e key mobility and infrastructure recommendations include: Extend Shoshone Street to Old Colfax Avenue, eliminate 14th Avenue, and relocate Curtis Street between 5th and 7th Streets. is will support commercial and retail uses Create a primary auto loop on 5th, 7th, Shoshone and Osage Streets. is will provide north-south access through the site, ventilate the heavy tra c generated by Pepsi Center events and increase access and visibility at the station on 5th Street. Improve the primary east-west connection on 13th Avenue. is will link the Decatur Station to the Auraria West Campus Station Extending Quivas Street to 5th Street would provide an improved block pattern and better tra c ow; however, the Quivas extension could preclude the construction of Aurarias much needed athletic elds. In addition, the existing environmental contamination could make it di cult for the City to accept a public street in this location. If and when the Burnham Yard south of 13th Avenue redevelops, the Quivas Street extension should be further analyzed and considered as an additional connection. In addition, if Rio Court were to close in the future, Quivas Street would need to be constructed. Picture 4.2 5th Street going under Colfax Avenue in the station area Picture 4.1 Larimer Street on the Campus is designed for pedestrians only

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure39Picture 4.3 Mobility Framework Existing Burnham Yard The Quivas Street extension and enhanced street grid would be recommended with long-term redevelopment in the vicinity including the Burnham Yard.

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure 40 Essential infrastructure investments are needed to ensure a successful station area. ese projects provide a balance that leverages private investment, ensures infrastructure capacity and enhances the character of the station area. Given connectivity is a challenge for the Auraria West Station Area, street construction and pedestrian and bicycle improvements are the focus of these infrastructure recommendations. Street Network New and enhanced streets complete the street grid and ensure improved circulation throughout the station area. e new and enhanced streets framework (see gure opposite) identi es new streets and enhanced streets. Mobility and Infrastructure Recommendation 1 New Streets New streets are indicated in brown in the gure to the right. Recommendations for new streets vary depending on location, however all new streets must: Provide sidewalk curb extensions or bulb-outs where curbside parking is located to minimize pedestrian street-crossing distances where possible Comply with ADA standards for all new public sidewalks Be a sustainable street that (1) apply widely accepted sustainable design principles, including stormwater in ltration and permeable surface treatments (2) promote least-polluting ways to connect people and goods to their destinations, and (3) make transportation facilities and services part of a livable community Mobility and Infrastructure Recommendation 2 Enhanced Streets Enhanced Streets are indicated in orange in the gure to the right. ese streets may include the following: Sidewalk curb extensions or bulb-outs where curbside parking is located to minimize pedestrian street-crossing distances where possible Wider or enhanced sidewalk area all of which must be ADA compliant Special paving patterns to alert drivers to pedestrian crossings Enhanced pedestrian/bicycle amenities where appropriate On-street parking Pedestrian-scaled lighting Benches Bus stop shelters Sustainable street features (see Mobility and Infrastructure Recommendation 1) Picture 4.4 Streets in Stapleton provide enhanced pedestrian amenities along a well-connected grid

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure41 Existing Burnham Yard The Quivas Street extension and enhanced street grid would be recommended with long-term redevelopment in the vicinity including the Burnham Yard. Picture 4.5 New and Enhanced Streets Framework

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure 42 Mobility and Infrastructure Recommendation 3 Signature Streets e most signi cant new and enhanced streets are identied as signature streets and identi ed in Picture 4.6 to the right. Signature streets provide key connections to and from the Auraria West Campus Station and have enhanced special treatments and provide places for public interaction and environmental enhancements, as well as a functional transportation system. Signature streets are intended to: Provide a sustainable transportation balance consistent with Denvers Living Streets Initiative and Strategic Transportation Plan Improve access to and from adjacent and nearby districts, regional corridors and between light rail stations Accommodate multiple transportation modes, pedestrians, bicyclists and motorized vehicles, without compromising safety or function Establish and improve neighborhood identity Ensure economic viability for commercial or retail groundoor uses Support and complement surrounding land uses (the diagrams on the previous pages illustrate the primary land uses along each section of signature street) Depending on their designated function, signature streets may require additional width (building edge to building edge) to accommodate motor vehicles, pedestrians and bicycles. Each signature street has a corresponding cross section and plan view identifying minimum street elements and features. Existing streets that should be enhanced or extended to become signature streets include: (see Picture 4.6 to the right): 5th Street 7th Street* Shoshone Street 13th Avenue e construction of 5th and 7th streets through the Kroenke Sports property will be a cooperative process completed upon redevelopment of the site. e street construction will have to address the existing waivers and conditions as well as parking and street development agreements.

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure43 Picture 4.6 Signature Streets Framework

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure 44Signature Streets5th Street/Campus Hot Spot: To support the ground oor commercial and retail uses that line 5th Street between Curtis and Walnut streets, 5th must be pedestrian-oriented and offer on-street parking. e 5th Street design is detailed in the following pages. 7th Street/Auraria Campus Facilities: With its central location on the Auraria Campus, 7th Street must accommodate high levels of pedestrian and bike activity and still maintain vehicular access to campus facilities and parking structures. e 7th Street design is detailed in the following pages. 5th and 7th Streets/Mixed Use Entertainment District: 5th and 7th streets (north of Auraria Parkway) loop through the mixed-use entertainment district, a site that includes a recommended mix of groundoor uses including commercial, retail and entertainment. ese uses generate high levels of pedestrian tra c and activity. 5th and 7th streets (north of Auraria Parkway) must be designed to support auto and bicycle tra c while maintaining an atmosphere that is pedestrian oriented (see photo to the right). Shoshone Street and Rio Court/Recreation/Residential and O ce/Employment: Shoshone Street and Rio Court pass through an active recreation area and an o ce/employment corridor. ese uses bene t from multimodal vehicular, pedestrian and bicycle accessibility. 13th Avenue/O ce/Employment Corridor: O ce/employment uses have been recommended along 13th Avenue due to its regional connectivity and high level of visibility. As an employment corridor, heavy commuter tra c can be expected. In addition to light rail, accessibility for autos, pedestrians and bicycles is important. Picture 4.7 Mixed use entertainment; Beale Street, Memphis, Tennessee Picture 4.8 Signature Streets: 5th and 7th Streets

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure45Mobility and Infrastructure Recommendation 4 Signature Streets: 5th & 7th Street Auto Loop e intent of 5th and 7th Streets is to serve as a primary auto loop and primary bicycle route. is loop will: Create an economically viable environment that will support transit-supportive retail uses by providing necessary drive-by tra c Support the mixed-use entertainment districts pedestrian orientation while providing vehicular access Maintain circulation through the Auraria Campus for access to important facilities Connect to regional and district road systems, improving connectivity Improve local access to and within the Auraria West Campus Station Area, supporting proposed development e design of 5th and 7th Streets should include the following minimum elements (see cross section and plan view on the following page): 80 cross-section measured from building-edge to building-edge Two-directional travel 16 sidewalk areas with a combination of 8 sidewalks, and 8 landscaped areas with trees, turf and ground cover between the sidewalks and the curbs 8 curbside parallel parking lanes on both sides of the roadway 5 bike lanes (or sharrows in any location where right of way is constrained) Landscaped curb extensions at each street corner where possible Green street design principles, such as stormwater in ltration and permeable surface treatments are encouraged 808 PARKING LANE 8 PARKING LANE 5 BIKE LANE 11 TRAVEL LANE 11 TRAVEL LANE 5 BIKE LANE 48 CURB TO CURB 16 SIDEWALK 16 SIDEWALK Picture 4.9 5th and 7th Streets section minimum street elements Note: Where right of way is constrained on 5th and 7th streets, sharrows should be used in place of bike lanes5th and 7th Streets

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure 46 Mobility and Infrastructure Recommendation 5 Signature Streets: Shoshone Street and Rio Court e extension and enhancement of Shoshone Street and Rio Court will improve regional circulation and reduce tra c congestion by providing more multi-modal transportation options, including pedestrian, bicycle and auto. Enhancements should be made from Old Colfax to 13th Avenue. e design of Shoshone Street should include: 70 right-of-way (existing) Two-directional travel Striped bike sharrows 13 sidewalks including 8-9 tree lawn and 5 sidewalks 9 curbside parallel parking lanes on both sides of the roadway Landscaped curb extensions at each street corner where possible Green street design principles, such as stormwater in ltration and permeable surface treatments are encouraged 709 PARKING 13 TRAVEL LANE w/ SHARROW 5 SIDEWALK 8 TREE LAWN 13 TRAVEL LANE w/ SHARROW 9 PARKING 8 TREE LAWN 5 SIDEWALK 44 CURB TO CURB Picture 4.10 Shoshone Street section minimum street elementsShoshone Street

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure47 609 PARKING 13 TRAVEL LANE w/ SHARROW 8 SIDEWALK 13 TRAVEL LANE w/ SHARROW 9 PARKING 8 SIDEWALK 44 CURB TO CURB Picture 4.11 Rio Court section minimum street elementsRio Court e design of Rio Court should include: 60 right-of-way (50 existing) Two-directional travel Striped bike sharrows 8 attached sidewalks 9 curbside parallel parking lanes on both sides of the roadway Landscaped curb extensions at each street corner where possible Green street design principles, such as stormwater in ltration and permeable surface treatments are encouraged

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure 48 Mobility and Infrastructure Recommendation 6 Signature Streets: 13th Avenue Enhancements to 13th Avenue improve regional circulation and reduce tra c congestion by providing transportation options that include pedestrian, bicycle and auto. 13th Avenue is an important link between the Federal Boulevard/Decatur light rail station, Auraria West Campus and 10th & Osage light rail stations. Enhancements to 13th Avenue should be made from Decatur Street to Osage Street. e design of 13th Avenue should include the following minimum elements: Decatur Street to Quivas Street 70 right of way Two-directional auto travel with shared center left turn lane Six foot bike lanes in both directions A 8 tree lawn on the north and south side of the street separating the 5 sidewalk from the street Quivas Streets to Osage Street 80 right of way Two-directional auto travel with shared center left turn lane Six foot bike lanes in both directions A 10 tree lawn on the north and south sides of the street separate the 10 sidewalk from the street NOTE: If property owners are interested in on-street parking upon major redevelopment, the City would support exploring additional right of way to achieve the parking. Picture 4.12 13th Avenue multimodal circulation route

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure49 706 BIKE LANE 11 TRAVEL LANE 5 SIDEWALK 8 TREE LAWNDOUBLE YELLOW DOUBLE YELLOW11 TRAVEL LANE 10 SHARED CENTER LEFT TURN LANE 6 BIKE LANE 8 TREE LAWN 5 SIDEWALK 44 CURB TO CURB 806 BIKE LANE 11 TRAVEL LANE 8 SIDEWALK 10 TREE LAWNDOUBLE YELLOW DOUBLE YELLOW11 TRAVEL LANE 10 SHARED CENTER LEFT TURN LANE 6 BIKE LANE 10 TREE LAWN 8 SIDEWALK 44 CURB TO CURB 13th Avenue: Decatur to QuivasPicture 4.13 13th Ave street section minimum street elements Picture 4.14 13th Ave street section minimum street elements13th Avenue: Quivas to Osage

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure 50Primary Auto and Bus Circulation e intent of the auto and bus plan is to identify primary vehicular circulation routes that will improve or enhance connectivity and disperse tra c. e proposed land-use plan suggests new development within the station area that will increase congestion on existing streets unless transportation improvements are made. e plan identi es the locations of important auto routes, as well as existing and proposed bus routes that: Integrate the study area into the local and regional transportation system Improve visibility and access to the commercial and retail uses on 5th Street Enhance connections to the Auraria Campus from outlying neighborhoods where students and faculty members may reside Ventilate heavy event tra c generated by the Pepsi Center Mobility and Infrastructure Recommendation 7 Primary Auto Routes e proposed primary auto loop, illustrated in the graphic below, increases station access and improves viability of commercial uses adjacent to the station. e loop is created by 5th, 7th, Shoshone (or Quivas) and Osage streets. e primary auto circulation framework routes include critical roadways that are necessary for improved station accessibility. ese include the following considerations: Auraria Parkway, Colfax Avenue and 13th Avenue as regional east-west auto routes Walnut and Curtis streets as local east-west auto routes Interstate 25 and Speer Boulevard as regional northsouth auto routes 5th, 7th, Shoshone, Rio Court (Quivas) and Osage streets as local north-south auto routes Mobility and Infrastructure Recommendation 8 Primary Bus Routes Existing and proposed bus routes should include the following attributes: Improved bus circulation to and from the Auraria West Campus Station to compliment the light rail system Improved station access with connections to major arterial Local and regional access provided for students and faculty members who commute to the campus Improved connection to downtown with the IntraDowntown Transit proposed along Larimer Street from the campus hot spot to the Ballpark (see Downtown Area Plan, 2007)

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure51Picture 4.15 Auto and Bus Circulation Framework

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure 52Primary Pedestrian Concept e primary pedestrian framework identi es circulation routes leading to and from the Auraria West Campus Station, Auraria Campus, downtown, Pepsi Center, Invesco Field, adjacent neighborhoods and nearby light-rail stations. e primary pedestrian circulation framework is intended to provide safe, direct, convenient and attractive connections within the station area and to key attractions and destinations. Mobility and Infrastructure Recommendation 9 Pedestrian Routes 5th, Lawrence, Shoshone Streets, Rio Court and 13th Avenue e most critical pedestrian routes are the primary pedestrian routes on 5th, Lawrence and Shoshone/Old Colfax streets and 13th Avenue. At a minimum, these primary pedestrian routes should include pedestrian-scaled lighting, wide sidewalks and crosswalks. Each of these streets include special treatments: 5th Street between Lawrence Street and Walnut: Includes premium pedestrian treatments (meet MUTCD requirements) for sidewalks and intersections, wide side walks, street trees, special paving, etc. Connects the Auraria West Campus Station to adjacent commercial and retail uses located on 5th Street between Lawrence and Walnut Streets Pedestrian and bicycle mall on Lawrence Street (5th Street to Speer Blvd): Is accessible to pedestrians (and possibly bicycles in the future) only; no vehicular access is permitted Includes pedestrian and bicycle paths that are physically separated by plantings, paint striping, signs (preferably on the paved surface) and/or change in paving material Connects the Auraria West Campus Station to the Auraria Campus and the downtown core Shoshone Street, Rio Court, 7th Street, Walnut St, and 13th Avenue: Include current best practices for pedestrian treatments that meet MUTCD requirements for sidewalks and intersections, detached sidewalks, street trees, special paving, etc Connect the Auraria Campus Station to the 10th & Osage and Decatur Stations and provide access to and from proposed development to the south

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure53Picture 4.16 Primary Pedestrian Circulation

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure 54Primary Bicycle Concept e primary bicycle circulation framework identi es routes leading to and from the Station, Auraria Campus, downtown, Pepsi Center, Invesco Field, adjacent neighborhoods and nearby light-rail stations: Invesco Field, Pepsi Center, Federal Blvd/Decatur and 10th & Osage. e framework is intended to provide safe, direct, convenient and attractive connections within the station area and to key attractions and destinations, including future bike share stations. e Citys planned bike share initiative (scheduled to launch summer 2009) will include up to 1,000 bikes by 2010. Bike share stations are planned both at the Auraria West Campus LRT station and Colfax at Auraria LRT station. Mobility and Infrastructure Recommendation 10 Primary Bicycle Circulation Primary bicycle circulation is indicated in the graphic on the following page. ese bike routes may either be an o -street or an on-street bicycle route. At a minimum, all bicycle routes should include: Bicycle route signs Adequate space for cyclists on or o the roadway Other important considerations for the bicycle routes include: Cyclist-activated motion-detecting crossing signals at major intersections A bicycle facility, including storage racks, lockers/showers and possibly rentals and sales at the station Clear connections to planned bike share stations in the vicinity

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure55 Picture 4.17 Primary Bicycle Circulation Framework, including on-street bicycle boulevards and o -street bike paths

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure 56 Mobility and Infrastructure Recommendation 11 O -Str eet Bicycle Route e most critical bicycle route is the o -street Bicycle Route on Lawrence Street on Auraria Campus. is route links the Auraria West Station, Auraria Campus and the downtown core. is two-way bicycle path is separated from auto and pedestrian tra c, creating a safe and e cient route designed for both recreational and commuter bicyclists. Although bicyclists are currently prohibited from riding on most campus streets (including Lawrence Street), the City recommends that the Auraria Higher Education Center open more streets to cyclists in the future. At a minimum, a physically separated bike path along Lawrence Street (and/ or Larimer, Curtis/Arapahoe Streets) should be developed to help provide the much needed bicycle connection through the campus. e existing City-owned streets on campus where cyclists are permitted include 5th, 7th, Walnut, and Curtis Streets. Recommendations for improving the bicycle infrastructure on these streets are included. Each o -street bicycle route includes special treatments as speci ed below: Lawrence Street e pedestrian and bicycle mall on Lawrence Street should: Be accessible to pedestrian and bicycles only; no vehicular access is permitted Include pedestrian and bicycle paths that are physically separated by plantings, striping, signs (preferably on the paved surface) and/or changes in paving materials Connect the Auraria West Campus Station to the Auraria Campus and the downtown core Improve station access with connections to major arterials Provide local and regional access for students and faculty members who commute to the campusPicture 4.18 Two-directional bicycle path separated from pedestrian path San Sebastian, Spain

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure57Picture 4.19 Bike lanes provide provide adequate space for cyclists on the roadMobility and Infrastructure Recommendation 12 Primary On-Street Bicycle Facilities e primary on-street bicycle facilities run along 13th Avenue and north up Shoshone Street to 5th Street through the campus hot spot and the mixed-use entertainment district before looping back on 7th Street through the Auraria Campus. is route links the Auraria West Station, Auraria Campus, 10th & Osage and Decatur light-rail stations. On-street bicycle facilities should: Be a designated bicycle route Include ve to six foot striped bike lanes (or sharrows if right of way is constrained), Include signs that clearly signals shared and equal use of roadway travel lanes for both cyclists and motor vehicles. In some cases, streets with low tra c volumes may be a designated bicycle route without a striped lane or sharrow. In these cases, bicycle signage should be emphasized. Picture 4.19 Bicycle Awareness Sign

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure 58Parking e economic success of TOD projects requires su cient parking since most trips to Denvers TOD land uses will not involve transit. But just as too little parking will create economic problems, so will too many spaces. Real estate studies in San Franciscos transit-oriented neighborhoods found that for every parking space provided with a residential unit, the number of units achievable on a typical parcel decrease by 20 percent, and the market cost of each unit increased by 20 percent. Since Denvers TOD policy seeks to maximize the number of units around its stations and maximize those units a ordability, it will be important to ensure parking does not consume too much of the buildable square footage in TOD projects. Parking and Walkability: Walkability is a key measurement of the quality of public space. In addition, ridership at rail stations increases as the quality of the walk environment improves in the station area. For these reasons, it is important that the design of parking not create barriers real or perceived to pedestrians. Denver has already established design guidelines for parking downtown, requiring that parking be wrapped in active uses rather than create blank walls or surface parking lots along its downtown streets. Parking and Trip Generation: Parking determines automobile trip generation in two ways. Poorly managed and undersupplied parking results in cruise tra c as drivers circle to nd an available space. Donald Shoup describes how this sort Picture 4.20 Belmars Block 7 Studios and Galleries demonstrate a exible approach to activating parking structures

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure59of cruising has a signi cantly negative impact on tra c in his publication Cruising for Parking, due to its added turning movements. Properly managed parking dictates automobile trip generation rates. In auto-dependent areas, the size of di erent land uses is the best predictor of automobile tra c. Where there are transportation choices, however, automobile trip rates become highly variable. In these locations, parking supply is a more e ective predictor of auto trips, provided this supply is properly managed to ensure adequate availability at all times. In such locations, more parking means more tra c. Parking as an Economic Asset: e high prices people pay to park in Lower Downtown is a testament to the value of parking near mixed-use, compact and pedestrian-oriented development. But not all spaces have the same value. In all mixed-use districts, some parking spaces are more desirable than others. Left to market forces, the more desirable spaces would command higher prices and vice versa. When parking is underpriced, such as at curbside meters in downtown, the City incurs all the burden of operating and maintaining it while enjoying less of the nancial bene ts of controlling it. More importantly, underpriced parking reduces customer convenience, with the best spaces quickly lled by the lucky few. While underpriced parking results in direct loss of revenue to the City, the indirect costs are even higher if shoppers and developers are deterred by a lack of convenient parking. In Denver, most on-street metered parking currently costs up to $1 an hour, regardless of demand patterns. In high-demand areas, the result is that on street parking utilization regularly exceeds 95 percent, resulting in added search tra c and customer inconvenience. is in turn leads to poorer business performance and greater tra c congestion and pollution. e purpose of parking in TODs is to: Provide su cient parking to support a strong development market Generate foot tra c to support a thriving retail district New Approaches to Parking: Traditionally, solving the parking problem almost always meant increasing supply. But transportation planners have begun to acknowledge that there are many di erent types of parking problems, and many di erent solutions. In addition, recognizing that not all station areas are alike, it is acknowledged that while there may be a wide range of strategies for addressing parking challenges, the types of strategies selected must be tailored to address speci c conditions within an individual station area. e amount of parking required for new development currently determined by the City of Denver Zoning Code (not applicable to Auraria Campus) depends on the use. Parking at the Auraria West Campus Station could be reduced however, depending on the tenant mix, the quality and accessibility of the local transit (bus, light rail, bicycle and pedestrian), trip reduction requirements or incentives, mode split calculations, residential demographics, site conditions and other local factors. Currently the Pepsi Center and Auraria Campus surface parking lots dominate the landscape around the station area. As redeveloment occurs, surface parking lots should generally be avoided within the station planning area. Plans to convert surface parking lots to structured parking should continue to be supported. One of the many bene ts of transit in this area is the potential to reduce the amount of parking for new development because of its close proximity to transit and the possibility of shared parking. After the opening of the West Corridor in mid 2013, parking within the area will need to be reviewed and monitored. Following is a list of additional strategies identi ed to date for parking implementation in the Auraria West Station Area.

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure 60 Mobility and Infrastructure Recommendation 13 Establish Shared and Reserved Parking Requirements While it might be logical to allow the free market to determine the optimal number of parking spaces in a TOD project, it is possible to eliminate the negative impacts of parking requirements and capture some of their value. Consider parking in a station area as a system serving different parking needs. Operating and treating parking in this e cient and comprehensive manner can eliminate overparking, reduce construction costs and facilitate better design investments. Allow developers to share parking between uses as necessary, provided they o er equal access to all users. When parking is shared, consider reduced parking ratios. Consider reducing minimum parking ratios and increasing ways to meet parking requirements. Consider parking maximums Permit tandem spaces, un-bundled parking, o -site parking, valet parking and all varieties of mechanical or lift parking devices to count toward any minimum requirements. Consider allowing developers to pay a fee in lieu of meeting their parking requirements. is fee would be paid either to the City or to a local management authority that would build and manage parking and alternative transportation programs for the TOD area. Allow developers ample creativity in meeting their parking requirements. Consider allowing o -site parking within mile without restriction. Mobility and Infrastructure Recommendation 14 Establish Strong Parking Design Controls To ensure that parking does not damage the walkability of station areas, good design is important. Care should be taken to ensure that parking does not diminish the attractiveness of other modes. Key tools include: Establish building build-to lines and parking setbacks. To optimize personal security and the attractiveness of station areas, parking should be wrapped in active uses so that doors and windows face the street, rather than the blank facades of parking structures and garage doors (see gure 3-1). In all TOD areas, build-to lines should be established to ensure the proper relationship between buildings and the sidewalk. More importantly, parking should be set back from the building line by at least 15 feet, particularly along the sides of buildings that face pedestrian ways. Minimize negative impacts of driveways. Parking lots and garages should be accessed primarily from the side and rear of buildings, with driveways and curb cuts strongly discouraged or banned from main pedestrian ways. In TOD areas, alleys should be encouraged; where provided, parking should be required to be accessed from the alley. Establish and enforce landscape setback requirements for surface lots. While surface parking can be seen as a land bank for future development, oftentimes surface parking is a necessary temporary use as TODs gain momentum. Require that parking be screened from side walks with low walls and landscaping. Where possible, push surface parking lots to the back of buildings, accessed from the side or from alleys, so that buildings line the sidewalk. Where pedestrians are expected to walk across a parking lot to get from one destination to another, align drive aisles in parallel with primary pedestrian movements, and where possible provide sidewalks in parking lots alongside what will be future streets. Acknowledgement should be given to potential constraints to meet these setback requirements when redeveloping existing buildings.

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure61Mobility and Infrastructure Recommendation 15 Utilize E ective Public Information and Way nding Program To improve parking access and information in TOD areas, consider electronic way nding and guidance systems that use variable messaging signs to direct visitors and commuters to speci c parking areas with available parking and to access routes. Another system used e ectively in some new parking structures is an electronic space count system, which can sense individual space availability and direct users to open spaces. A Web-based parking information and reservation system is another option. is could be a website that shows drivers where there are available spaces in surface l ots and garages. Sensors at entry and exit points in every lot and structure send information to a server in the Citys parking o ce, which updates the website every ve seconds. Other way nding policies include designing a universal logo and rate structure for all short-term public parking, establishing signage ordinances to encourage private participation in parking management and o ering participation in the station area way nding system as an incentive to private owners and managers. A combination of these systems can serve to greatly extend the perceived availability and actual utilization of parking in todays market where construction costs have greatly increased. Mobility and Infrastructure Recommendation 16 Demand Reduction Reducing vehicle use will meet several plan objectives and inherently assuage neighborhood concerns of tra c and parking impacts. Multi-modal improvements will o er choices and reduce parking demand but additional demand reduction incentives and programs are also e ective. Develop Car-Share Programs. Car-sharing is a service that provides members with access to a eet of vehicles on an hourly basis. Members reserve a car online or by phone, walk to the nearest lot, open the doors with an electronic key card, and drive o ey are billed at the end of the month for time and/or mileage. One of the newest additions to the transportation toolbox, carsharing has the potential to change peoples relationship to the carparticularly in dense, urban communities. At the home, car-sharing can substitute for car owner ship. At the workplace, it provides access to a vehicle for business use and personal errands during the day, allowing employees to avoid driving to work. By December 2004, operators claimed more than 60,000 members in the United States and nearly 11,000 in Canada. Utilize Universal Transit Passes: In Metro Denver and nationally, these programs are a highly e ective tool for reducing parking demand and increasing transit rider ship. e principle of employee or residential transit passes is similar to that of insurancetransit agencies o er lower rates on passes on the basis that not all those o ered the pass will actually use them regularly. e Auraria Higher Education Center currently provides transit passes to all students through an approved student fee. Faculty and sta can purchase an eco pass. ese program has been highly e ective in increasing student ridership. ese passes are bene cial to everyone involved and should be continued. Develop Transportation Management Associations: Many parking management tools could be e ciently administered through a Transportation Management Association (TMA), a member-controlled organization that encourages e cient use of transportation and parking resources in a nite area, such as around Union Station. TMAs provide a centralized framework to support Tra c Demand Management (TDM) strategies.

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Ecomonic Opportunity63 Economic Opportunity

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Ecomonic Opportunity 64Economic OpportunityFasTracks promises to bring the Denver region an unprecedented opportunity to promote and facilitate transit-oriented higher density, mixed-use residential and commercial development. While the amount, type and mix of uses within the transit station area and corridor in uences market potential, the presence of undeveloped and underutilized land can be a source of the greatest economic opportunity. Generally speaking, prospects for redevelopment are stronger when station areas features: Relatively high levels of undeveloped and underutilized land Fewer landowners such that land is concentrated in fewer hands Underutilized land consolidated into fewer parcels, therefore requiring less land assembly to facilitate redevelopment Residential, O ce and Retail Market Auraria West Station contains numerous underutilized surface parking lots. It also has low amounts of landowners which mean there is greater potential for organized redevelopment. e presence of a large student population, planned development in the vicinity, and proximity to downtown, Invesco Field and the Pepsi Center also provide unique opportunities to activate the station area with a campus hot spot and mixed use/entertainment district. Trends indicate demand for new residential, o ce and retail development near transit through 2030. e TOD Market Analysis provides three potential long term (over the next 20 years) development scenarios for the station area. e following is a breakdown of the three development scenarios for Auraria West:Residential 578 units 1,758 units 2,102 units 2,413 units Oce 94,027 sf 436,092 sf 990,425 sf 2,413,261 sf Retail 217,006 sf 65,430 sf 130,637 sf 909,973 sf LargeScale Capacity Net New Moderate Net New Modest Net New Existing Market Economic Strategies e realization of TOD will require a combination of near and long term e orts and the use of best practices and innovative strategies. e city should continue to use all available resources and contacts in the TOD eld at the national level to identify solutions to challenges as they emerge. Implementation will be most e ective if carried out under a broad framework that establishes strategies to advance TOD at the system level. ese system-wide strategies will in turn support individual e orts undertaken at the corridor and station area levels. Participating actors in the implementation of TOD at the Auraria West Station include AHEC, City and County of Denver, Kroenke Sports, Urban Ventures, Quadrant Properties, and surrounding landowners. e City & County of Denver presently o ers a broad array of programs that could be used to e ectuate transit-supportive development. Rather than providing an exhaustive list of programs already available in Denver, the following are key existing programs that could be focused or expanded as well as innovative strategies not currently used in Denver that could help facilitate positive reinvestment in the Auraria West Station area. Regulations, guidelines and development MOUs: Formalizing standards for transit-oriented development whether through local regulations and ordinances, guidelines, or memorandum of understanding is a key rst step in facilitating the type of development that will support transit service Direct and indirect nancial incentives: In addition to direct nancial incentives to facilitate transit-oriented development, regulations can provide a number of indirect nancial incentives. Indirect incentives often used to facilitate development include exible zoning provisions and density bonuses, while direct incentives include reduced development fees, expedited de velopment review, and team inspections to streamline and reduce the total costs of the review and permitting process. Financing/Funding methods: Transit-oriented development often occurs as in ll development in established areas or through redevelopment of sometimes contaminated sites. In these types of developments, the level of infrastructure required may include extensive reconstruction of the street network (or introduction of new streets), installation of structured parking, addition of pedestrian enhancements and public plazas, and

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Ecomonic Opportunity65 stormwater infrastructure. Obtaining nancing and/or funding for these critical infrastructure enhancements can be a key challenge in e ectuating transit-oriented development. Small Business and Technical Assistance: Community members in many of the selected Denver station areas have cited a desire for local entrepreneurship opportunities and jobs within their station areas. Small businesses can be encouraged through multiple methods, including the Main Street Program approach, business incubation, and small business support programs (including loans and technical assistance). Phasing Strategies Many communities have used phasing strategies to address the lag time that often occurs between transit service introduction and transit oriented development realization. Such strategies can help establish supportive conditions in the near-term to set the stage for future development that is supportive of transit at the Auraria West Station.` Land Banking & Assembly Methods: Realization of transit-oriented development often requires assembly of various properties owned by di erent property owners and/or banking of land until transit service becomes operable or market conditions support the level of desired mixed-use development. In the case of the Auraria West Station with few landowners (AHEC, Urban Ventures, Kroenke Sports, and Quadrant Properties) who have already banked land, the opportu nity for transit-oriented development is greatly increased. Zoning & Density Bonuses: Regulations play an important role in determining what uses will be allowed within station areas. Once market conditions support TOD, zoning may be amended to provide for the full density desired within station areas, either through full entitlement or partial entitlement coupled with density bonuses to encourage the provision of certain public bene ts (such as a ordable/workforce housing). Infrastructure Improvements, Special Assessments & Tax Incentives: As a pre-development phase, public entities working alone or in partnership with developers may undertake infrastructure improvement projects such as parking facilities, parks, streetscapes, pedestrian and bicycle enhancements, road reconstruction and extension, park beauti cation and signage. e purposes of such projects are to set the stage for and encourage transit-supportive development. ese activities can also provide early marketing of the station areas identity to future prospective residents, employees and visitors. To fund infrastructure investments, a special assessment district may be formed (either through a charter district or statutory district in Denvers case) in the pre-development phase. Alternatively, tax incentive programs such as tax increment nancing, tax abatements, or payment in lieu of taxes may be used to bolster developers resources for funding infrastructure. Joint Development, Revenue Sharing & Cost Sharing: With joint development as an option in the Auraria West station area, the landowners can enter into revenue or cost sharing arrangements in order to either secure a source of revenue for improvements or divide the cost of infrastructure construction and maintenance. Types of revenue sharing arrangements include land leases, air rights development, and special assessment districts. Cost sharing arrangements can include sharing of construction expenses and density bonuses o ered in exchange for infrastructure construction.

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Implementation67 Implementation

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Implementation 68Implementation e Implementation Chapter identi es the essential action items necessary to accomplish Auraria West Station Plan Objectives and Recommendations. e list of action items is for city sta and stakeholders to consider over the next 20 years. Catalyst Projects e following circulation catalyst projects are required as rst steps in station area plan implementation: Improvements to the existing 5th Street Extension of 5th Street to 13th Avenue via Old Colfax to Shoshone Street Relocation of Curtis Street between 5th and 7th streets. Intent Today, the Auraria West Campus Station has limited connectivity to local and regional transportation systems and is not a desirable location for new development. To promote and sustain new development in this area, the catalyst projects must: Improve auto, pedestrian and bicycle circulation to and from the station, supporting ridership Support the campus hot spot, by increasing visibility for the commercial and retail uses Provide necessary infrastructure to ventilate tra c generated by proposed new development on the Pepsi Center and south of Colfax Properties (indicated on the following page) Improve access to and from facilities on the Auraria CampusPicture 6.1 Mixed-use entertainment; Memphis, Tennessee

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Implementation69 Picture 6.2 Catalyst Projects Framework

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Implementation 70 e following are Implementation Strategies for the Station Area. e table is organized by Regulatory Tools, Public Infrastructure Tools and Partnership tools. Each Implementation Strategy includes reference to the numbered Plan Recommendation(s) it implements, a general timeframe and key responsibility. e Plan recommendations are abbreviated for each section: 1) LU = Land Use and Urban Design; 2) MO = Mobility; and 3) IN = Infrastructure. While all strategies are important, the reality of market conditions, infrastructure constraints and funding require assigning timeframes by short term (1-5 years) or long term (5-10 years). is table does not require these timeframes if opportunities arise sooner than predicted. A team approach is crucial to implementation. ere are many parties involved including all city departments, elected and appointed o cials, RTD, AHEC, Urban Ventures, Kroenke Sports, and Quadrant Properties,. e table identies Key Responsibility so it is clear who will take the lead on the e ort.

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Implementation71 Regulatory ToolsRecommendations Implementation Strategy Timeframe Key Responsibility Land Use Mixture LU-1 thru 9 Ground Floor Uses LU-10 Active Edges, Build-To Lines and Building Heights LU-11 thru 16 Parking Ratios MO & IN-13 thru 17 Enhanced Streets MO & IN-2 Short Short Short Short Short Community Planning and Development (CPD) CPD CPD CPD CPD/Public Works (PW) Current zoning varies greatly throughout the station area. The Pepsi Center parking lots are currently zoned C-MU-30. Support the planned zone change request to promote a mix, arrangement, and intensity of uses that support transit ridership. The station is located within the Platte River Valley (PRV) zone district, which is intended to promote and encourage diversied land use. Due to the GDP requirement in the PRV zone, which has been a barrier to development in the past, an alternative transit mixed use district should be supported for the station. The majority of the remaining land area is zoned R-5 (institutional) and I-2 (industrial). The Institutional district does not allow residential and the Industrial district does not allow mixed-use, specically residential. Evaluate alternative zoning districts that allow the recommended mix of land uses for these properties. Coordinate with the Zoning Code Update to ensure there is a menu of zoning districts that promote this mixture. Existing mixed use districts do not oer incentives or mandates for mixing uses or required ground oor commercial or retail. Concentrating and allocating commercial and retail within the station area is essential to creating a vibrant successful station. Coordinate with the Zoning Code Update to create these mandate incentives. Coordinate with the Zoning Code Update to develop form-based regulations that mandate a predictable scale and form. For example, the form standards should require active edges along main streets that promote active uses and frontage types. Build-to-lines create a dened street wall. Transition in heights with 2-8 stories within the 1/2 mile radius and 5 12 oors on the outer Kroenke Sports property. Coordinate with the Zoning Code Update and the Strategic Parking Plan to incorporate dierent techniques for regulating and designing parking facilities. Work with PW on new street-cross sections that are specic to station areas in accordance with adopted plans. *Time frames include: Immediate (0-1 years); Short term (1-5 years); Medium term (5-10 years); and Long term (over 10 years)

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Implementation 72 Public Infrastructure ToolsRecommendations Implementation Strategy Timeframe Key Responsibility Extend Shoshone Street to Old Colfax Avenue Relocate Curtis Street between 5th and 7th streets Create a primary auto loop on 5th and 7th Streets MO & IN-4 Improve the primary east-west connection on 13th Avenue, including new 80' cross section Improvements to 5th Street between Lawrence and Walnut Include premium pedestrian treatment for sidewalks and intersections, wide sidewalks, street trees, special paving, etc. MO & IN-4 Pedestrian and Bicycle mall on Lawrence Street MO & IN-9, 11 Shoshone Street, Rio Court and 13th Ave bicycle and pedestrian improvements MO & IN-5, 6, 9, 12 Short Immediate Medium/ Long Medium Short Medium Short AHEC, PW, Private PW, RTD Private/PW PW AHEC, RTD AHEC PW/CPD As redevelopment occurs, Public Works and Community Planning and Development should ensure property owners build this road improvement. It is a short term priority because it is essential to improving station access and supporting commercial and retail uses along 5th Street. As the West Corridor is constructed and the existing station is relocated, Public Works, the Auraria Higher Education Center (AHEC), and RTD should ensure this road improvement is built. It is an immediate priority because it is essential to improving station access and supporting commercial and retail uses along 5th Street. As redevelopment occurs, the Pepsi Center group should work to build this road improvement. This will provide north-south access through the site, ventilate the heavy trac generated by Pepsi Center events and increase access and visibility at the station. Public Works and Community Planning and Development should ensure property owners build this road improvement. It is a medium term priority because it is essential to providing east-west access but the timeline for redevelopment on 13th Ave. is unknown. This will link the Decatur Station to the Auraria West Campus Station. As redevelopment occurs, AHEC should work with RTD to ensure the proposed pedestrian improvements are fully constructed to help create a main street and campus hot spot around the station. It is short term because it connects the Auraria Campus Station to adjacent commercial and retail uses along 5th Street. As the Auraria Campus Master Plan is implemented and development occurs, AHEC should work to build the pedestrian and bicycle mall improvements. It is short term because it provides needed bike/ped connections from the Auraria West Campus Station to the Auraria Campus and the downtown core. As redevelopment occurs, collaborate with Public Works and Community Planning and Development should ensure property owners build the pedestrian and bicycle improvements. It is short term because it connects the Auraria West Campus Station to the 10th and Osage Station and provides access to and from proposed development to the south. As the station redevelops and the bike sharing initiative materializes, there will be a need for additional bicycle facilities. Existing bike routes do not connect to the station. Connections are needed from nearby routes (D-8 & D-10). Should funding become available, coordinate with public works to develop bike routes and provide additional bike racks and storage lockers at the station. Upon full build-out consider whether there is demand and funding for bike services such as rentals and locker rooms.

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Implementation73 Partnership ToolsRecommendations Implementation Strategy Timeframe Key Responsibility Business Relocation Aordable Housing LU-1 Green Building LU-17 Parks Department MO & IN-8 thru 11 LU-5 Parking MO & IN-13 thru 16 RTD MO & IN-7 Auraria Higher Education Center/ Campus Village Fire Department MO & IN-1 thru 6 Short Medium/ Long Short/ Medium Short Immediate Medium Short Short OED/CPD OED/CPD Neighborhood Development CPD/Greenprint Denver/non-prot organizations CPD/Parks/PW CPD/PW CPD/PW/RTD CPD/AHEC Urban Ventures FIRE, CPD As the station area redevelops there are existing industrial uses that are not consistent with the plan's land use recommendations. In addition, as the built environment changes over the years it may not be conducive for successful business operation. Oce of Economic Development (OED) can play a pro-active role in assisting these businesses in relocating to a more desirable site within the city. Partner with OED to seek funding opportunities for aordable housing Partner with Greenprint Denver and non-prot organizations to provide resources and educate builders and residents about green building. Many of the mobility recommendations and open space recommendations oer park and recreation benets. For example, the primary bicycle and pedestrian routes will enable access to the South Platte River greenway and La Alma/Lincoln Park. As these recommendations move forward, the Parks and Public Works Departments must be involved in early stages to maximize benets. Inform the Strategic Parking Plan with the parking strategies identied in this plan. There are some recommendations that are under the authority of the Regional Transportation District (RTD), not the City and County of Denver. In those cases it is important to be an active partner with RTD and work together to achieve the plan recommendations as feasible. Specically, this includes recommendations on improving bus circulation to and from the station. As the campus hot spot develops, and the second phase of Campus Village is developed, collaboration with AHEC and Urban Ventures will be essential to carry out the goals of the plan. As projects move forward, collaboration with the Fire Department is necessary to ensure re safety regulations are met. In some cases the basic minimum requirements should be re-evaluated in order to reect the urban context of the Auraria West Station area. *Time frames include: Immediate (0-1 years); Short term (1-5 years); Medium term (5-10 years); and Long term (over 10 years)

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Acronyms75 Acronyms

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Acronyms 76Draft List of AcronymsTo be included in SAPs /modi ed as needed with area speci c groups such as RNOs etc. Sample plan from Philadelphia that used this model had the list up front & went straight to the acronym, no spelled out & acronym in parentheses for the rst use. ADA Americans with Disabilities Act (1990) AHEC Auraria Higher Education Center AIA American institute of Architects AVR Average Vehicle Ridership BID Business Improvement District CBD Central Business District CBO Community Based organizations CCD City and County of Denver CDBG Community Development Block Grant CDC Community Development Corporation CDFI Community Development Financial Institution CDOT Colorado Department of Transportation CHFA Colorado Housing Finance Agency CIP Capital Improvements Plan (or Program) COP Shop Community Organized Policing CPD Community Planning & Development DHA Denver housing Authority DHND Division of Housing and Neighborhood Development DMU Diesel Motor Unit DPD Denver Police Department DPR Parks & Recreation DPS Denver Public Schools DPW Public Works DRCOG Denver Council of Regional Governments DURA Denver Urban Renewal Agency EMU Electric Motor Unit EPA Environmental Protection Agency FAR Floor Area Ratio FHA Federal Housing Administration

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Acronyms77GIS Geographic Information Systems HUD US Department of Housing and Urban Development FRESC LEED Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design LRT Light Rail Technology MBD Micro business Development MC-Denver Making Connections Denver NEPA National Environmental Policy Act OED O ce of Economic Development RAC Resident Advisory Committee RNO Registered Neighborhood Organization RTD Regional Transportation District SAP Station Area Plan SEEDCO Denver a Community Development Financial Institution TAZ Tra c Analysis Zone TIF Tax Increment Financing TIP Transportation Improvement Program TDM Transportation Demand Management TOD Transit Oriented Development ZCU Zoning Code Update

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Acronyms 78

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Auraria West Station Area Plan The Community79 The Community

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Auraria West Station Area Plan The Community 80 Study Area Location & Overview Existing Land Uses and Zoning: e existing land uses in the 1/2mile radius surrounding the station are predominantly educational and industrial. e area also includes a large amount of surface parking that serves the Pepsi Center and Auraria Campus. Existing and proposed student housing facilities are located west of the proposed station. ere are four major land owners within the Auraria Campus study area: Kroenke Sports Enterprises, Auraria Higher Education Center, Urban Ventures and Quadrant Properties. Zoning varies greatly throughout the station area. e station is located within the Platte River Valley (PRV) zone districts that extends west and north along the Platte River. An institutional R-5 district contains the main Auraria Campus, while a residential mixed-use R-MU-30 zone houses Auraria Campus Village student housing. Between Auraria Parkway and the freight/light rail tacks exists a commercial mixed use zone. Land zoned for heavy industrial use (I-2) comprises 25% the southwest quadrant of the station area. Dominated by the Auraria Campus, and the Pepsi Center, the Auraria statistical neighborhood supports a very small residential population. In 2000 the Census estimated a neighborhood population of 123 people. e Auraria Campus itself housed no students in 2000. In 2005 the Campus Village at Auraria was constructed. e Campus Village currently houses approximately 685 students in 230 units and experiences very low vacancy rates. South of Colfax approximately 405 residential units within the La Alma / Lincoln Park neighborhood are located within the station area. e Auraria West light rail station on RTDs central light rail corridor is located at 5th Street and Colfax Avenue on the Auraria Higher Education Campus (Auraria Campus). e Auraria Campus is surrounded by the Central Business District to the east, the Pepsi Center to the north, Invesco Field at Mile High to the west and the La Alma/Lincoln Park neighborhood to the south. e station area plan study area is delineated by a 0.5 mile radius (10 minute walk) from the station. Several major transportation corridors are located in the station area. Colfax Avenue comprises the major east-west corridor. Northsouth corridors include I-25, the Platte River, Burlington Northern Railroad, Southern Paci c Railroad, the RTD Central Corridor light rail, Speer Boulevard and Cherry Creek. e study area is located primarily within the Auraria statistical neighborhood, the boundaries of which include Colfax, the South Platte River and Speer Blvd. / Cherry Creek. e station area extends north to the Pepsi Center, east as far as Speer Boulevard and south into La Alma-Lincoln Park statistical neighborhood to 11th Avenue. To the west, the study area encompasses the I-25 / Colfax Ave. / Auraria Parkway interchange and the South Platte River. Picture 8.1 Auraria West Station Area

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Auraria West Station Area Plan The Community81Population and Housing Table Auraria West Station Area Total Population 1,905 Group Quarters Population 685 Residential Population 1,220 Total Housing Units 635 Group Quarters Units 230 Residential Units 405 Vacancy Rate (residential units only) 1.27% Number of Persons Per Household (residential units only) 3.05 % of Housing Units Owner Occupied 12% Population & Housing Characteristics Dominated by the Auraria Campus, Pepsi Center and Elitch gardens, the Auraria statistical neighborhood supports a very small residential population. In 2000 the Census estimated a neighborhood population of 123 people. Neighborhood residential units at the time included approximately 100 loft condominiums converted in the late 1990s from warehouses along Auraria Parkway and between Speer Boulevard and 14th Street, all of which are located outside the station area to the northeast. e Auraria Campus itself housed no students in 2000. In 2005 the Campus Village at Auraria was constructed on 5th Street between Colfax and Auraria Parkway. e Campus Village currently houses approximately 685 students in 230 units and experiences very low vacancy rates. South of Colfax approximately 405 residential units within the La Alma / Lincoln Park neighborhood are located within the station area. Using DRCOGs 2007 estimates of 3.05 persons per household and a 1.27% vacancy rate in this neighborhood, the total 2007 population living in La Alma / Lincoln Park neighborhood within the Auraria West station area is estimated to be 1,220. Totaling the Auraria Campus Village and the La Alma/ Lincoln Park neighborhood residents, an estimated 1,905 people lived in 635 housing units within a half-mile of the station in 2007. Given the large student population and a large Denver Housing Authority population in La Alma/Lincoln Park, only 12% of the units within the station area are owner-occupied.

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Auraria West Station Area Plan The Community 82 e number of dwelling units in Auraria and La Alma/Lincoln Park has swung wildly over the years. Between 1950 and 1980 the neighborhood lost over 2,000 units, partially due to the development of the Auraria Campus in the 1970s. New residential development occurred in La Alma / Lincoln Park throughout the 1980s and has leveled o since then. e U.S. Census estimated slightly over 2,900 housing units in 2000, and assessors data indicates that this number is slightly higher in 2007 at 3,124 units. Multi-family low-rise and mixed-use structures dominate the housing types available in the station area, with only 12% of the residential units being single family homes. MLS data between the 4th quarter 2006 and 3rd quarter 2007, during which time 40 homes were sold, reveal that the average single family home value in La Alma / Lincoln Park is $183,000 (Your Castle Real Estate, 2007). 1950 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 2,500 3,500 3,000 4,500 4,000 1960Total Housing Units 1970 1980 Year 1990Source: U.S. Census (1950-2000); Denver CPD (2007) 2000 2007 3,124 3,211 3,122 2,621 2,906 2,039 4,133 Total Housing UnitsAuraria and La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhoods (1950-2007) 0 50 100 150 250 200 350 300 Mixed Use252 (40% of units)Multi-Family Low Rise306 (48% of units)Single-Family77 (12% of units)Number of UnitsHousing TypeSource: Assessors DataHousing Type Distribution (2008)Auraria West Station Area Auraria and La Alma/Lincoln Park Housing Units Housing Type Distribution

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Auraria West Station Area Plan The Community83Age distribution is considered separately for the two neighborhoods within the station area, as the neighborhoods di er greatly in character. In the Auraria neighborhood an estimated 92% of the population ranges between 18 and 64 years of age. As would be expected in an urban campus setting, children and senior citizens comprise a very small percent of the neighborhood population. In contrast, the La Alma / Lincoln Park neighborhood is home to many families, with 26% of the population being under the age of 18. Racial and ethnic diversity characterize the Auraria and La Alma / Lincoln Park neighborhoods. e 2000 Census indicated that 2% of the population in these neighborhoods are Native American, 4% Asian, 7% Black, 32% Non-Latino White, 53% Latino, and 2% reported having more than one race. Birth data from the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment reveal a decline in the overall percentage of Latino births in the neighborhood over the last decade. In the same time period, the percentage of NonLatino White and African American births has been on the rise, indicating that the overall neighborhood demographics may be shifting in this direction as well. 0% 10% 20% 30%Auraria La Alma/Lincoln Park40% 50% 100% 60% 70% 80% 90%Age DistributionSource: ClaritasAuraria West Station Area Neighborhood Age Distribution (2007)65+ 18 to 64 5 to 17 <5 Year 4% 92% 2% 18% 66% 8% 8% 2% 0% 10% 20% 30% 1996 2000 Year 2006 40% 50% 100% 60% 70% 80% 90%Percentage of BirthsSource: CDPHE via Piton Foundation (2007)Births by EthnicityAuraria and La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhoods (1996-2006)Naitive American Asian/Pacific Islander Non-Latino White Latino African American 57% 23% 14% 4% 77% 11% 7% 3% 77% 10% 5% 5% 4% Picture 10.5 Age Distribution Picture 10.6 Births by Ethnicity

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Auraria West Station Area Plan The Community 84 Auraria La Alma/Lincoln Park (2000)Naitive American Asian/Pacic Islander Non-Latino White Latino African American Other Race 2 or More Races 53% 32% 2% 4% 7% <1% 2% Population by Race & Ethnicity <$15,000$15,000$25,000 $25,000$35,000 $35,000$50,000 $50,000$75,000 $75,000$100,000 $100,000$150,000 $150,000$250,000 $250,000$500,000 >$500,0000 100 200 300 500 400 600 700Number of HouseholdsIncome RangeSource: Claritas, 2007 Picture 10.8 Household Income A median income level of approximately $34,000 (compared to $54,400 in Denver as a whole) re ects the presence of a large low-income population in La Alma / Lincoln Park. More than 700 households earn less than $15,000 per year. Likewise, poverty levels have historically been higher among Lincoln Park residents than the city as a whole. For instance, in 2000 the 37.7% persons lived in poverty compared to 14.3% in Denver.

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Auraria West Station Area Plan The Community85Land Use & Zoning Surface parking associated with the Auraria Campus and the Pepsi Center dominates the area directly surrounding the Auraria West station. In fact, parking covers a total of 17% of the station area and ranks as the second most dominant land use, with right-of-way covering 24% of the station area. Campus uses cover 12% of the station area, mostly to the east of the station itself. With large amounts of acreage dedicated to right-of-way, industry and uses associated with transportation, communication and utilities (TCU), the character of the western half of the station area re ects the abundance of transportation infrastructure in the neighborhood. Residential uses cover 4% of the station area and another 2% of the land supports mixed use buildings that also include residential units. A mix of residential types including low rise multi-family structures, mixed use structures and single family homes characterize housing options in the station area. Entertainment-Cultural uses including Invesco Field, Elitch Gardens, the Pepsi Center and the Denver Performing Arts Center surround the station area on three sides. Picture 8.2 Existing Land Use

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Auraria West Station Area Plan The Community 86 Zoning varies greatly throughout the station area. e station is located within the Platte River Valley (PRV) zone district that extends west and north along the Platte River. An institutional (R-5) district contains the main Auraria Campus, while a residential mixed-use R-MU-30 zone houses Auraria Campus Village student housing. Between Auraria Parkway and the freight/light rail tracks exists a commercial mixed use zone (C-MU-30 surrounding a small C-MU-10 zone at 5th and Auraria). Land zoned for heavy industrial use (I-2) comprises 25% the southwest quadrant of the station area. e southeast quadrant of the station area in La Alma / Lincoln Park neighborhood contains a mixture of residential zone districts including R-2, R-3, R-MU-20 and R-MU-30, as well as a commercial district (dominated by B-4 zoning) along the south side of Colfax Ave. Below are general descriptions of each zoning district within the station Other (e.g., ROW) 0% 5% 10% 15% 25% 20% 30% 35%122 acres Surface Parking87 acres Public/ QuasiPublic62 acres Industrial57 acres TCU29 acres Park/ Open Space23 acres Vacant54 acres Residential20 acres Entertainment/ Cultural16 acres Oce9 acres 9 acresMixed Use Parking Structure7 acres 4 acresCommercial 4 acresRetailPercentage of LandLand UseAuraria West Station Area Land Use Distribution (2008) Existing Land Use

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Auraria West Station Area Plan The Community87Picture 8.3 Current Zoning Zoning District General Descriptions R-2 Multi-Unit Dwellings, Low Density: Typically duplexes and triplexes. Home occupations are allowed by permit. Minimum of 6,000 square feet of land required for each duplex structure with an additional 3,000 square feet required for every unit over 2. Density = 14.5 dwelling units/acre. R-3 Multi-Unit Dwellings, High Density: Building size is controlled by bulk standards, o -street parking and open space requirements. Building oor area cannot exceed 3 times the site area. Maximum density is determined by the size of the units and the factors mentioned above. R-5 Institutional District: Allows colleges, schools, churches and other institutional uses. Maximum lot coverage is 60% of the zone lot. Building height is controlled by bulk standards. R-MU-20 Residential Mixed-Use District: e R-MU20 district is primarily residential, allowing either single or multiple-unit dwellings. Along heavily traveled streets, development may be either residential or mixed-use, combining residential with neighborhood-serving retail, o ce, or service uses. No maximum residential density is prescribed; instead, the scale of buildings is determined by bulk plane, maximum height, setbacks, open space requirements, and parking ratios. e intent is to encourage a full range of housing types, including a ordable housing. R-MU-30 Residential Mixed-Use District: e R-MU-30 district is a primarily residential district allowing higher density multiple unit dwellings of a density appropriate to the centercity and other activity centers such as light rail transit stations. Supporting commercial development, such as consumer retail and service uses and small-scale o ce uses, is encouraged to create a truly mixed-use environment. No maximum residen-

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Auraria West Station Area Plan The Community 88 tial density is prescribed. Instead, maximum height, setbacks, and open space requirements determine the scale of buildings. B-1 Limited O ce District: is district provides o ce space for services related to dental and medical care and for o ce-type services, often for residents of nearby residential areas. e district is characterized by a low-volume of direct daily customer contact. is district is characteristically small in size and is situated near major hospitals or between large business areas and residential areas. e district regulations establish standards comparable to those of the low density residential districts, resulting in similar building bulk and retaining the low concentration of pedestrian and vehicular tra c. Building height is controlled by bulk standards and open space requirements. Building oor area cannot exceed the site area. B-2 Neighborhood Business District: is district provides for the retailing of commodities classed as convenience goods, and the furnishing of certain personal services, to satisfy the daily and weekly household or personal needs of the residents of surrounding residential neighborhoods. is district is located on collector streets, characteristically is small in size, usually is entirely surrounded by residential districts and is located at a convenient walking distance from the residential districts it is designed to serve. e district regulations establish standards comparable to those of low density residential districts, resulting in similar standards. Building oor area cannot exceed the site area. B-4 General Business District: is district is intended to provide for and encourage appropriate commercial uses adjacent to arterial streets, which are normally transit routes. Uses include a wide variety of consumer and business services and retail establishments that serve other business activities, and local transit-dependent residents within the district as well as residents throughout the city. e regulations generally allow a moderate intensity of use and concentration for the purpose of achieving compatibility between the wide varieties of uses permitted in the district. Building height is not controlled by bulk standards unless there is a property line to property line abutment with a residential use. Building oor area cannot exceed twice the site area. C-MU-10 Commercial Mixed-Use District: e C-MU10 district is the most restrictive of the commercial mixed-use districts, with the shortest list of allowed uses. It includes commercial uses appropriate for high-visibility locations such as employment centers and the intersections of arterial streets. e purpose of the district is to concentrate higher intensity commercial uses, spatially de ne streets, encourage higher site standards, and create a more attractive pedestrian environment. Uses incompatible with this purpose, such as autorelated uses, industrial uses, and single unit dwellings, are not allowed. Although residential uses are permitted in the C-MU districts, it is expected that residential uses shall be responsible for bu ering themselves from nonresidential uses that may locate on adjacent property. Basic maximum gross oor area is equal to two (2) times the area of the zone lot. C-MU-30 Commercial Mixed-Use District: e C-MU30 district provides for a wide range of commercial, o ce, retail, industrial, and residential uses that allow property owners the exibility to respond to the long-term evolution of development trends. Although residential uses are permitted in the C-MU districts, it is expected that residential uses shall be responsible for bu ering themselves from nonresidential uses that may locate on adjacent property. Maximum gross oor area is equal to one (1) times the area of the zone lot. PRV Platte River Valley Zone District: is district is intended to promote and encourage diversi ed land uses and to integrate the districts unique geographic location and setting, amenities of view, transportation linkages and open space. A variety of land uses are permitted to facilitate new development, allow for the reuse of eligible historic structures and to complement development in adjacent neighborhoods and downtown. New residential development and open-space is encouraged. Regulatory exibility is provided to facilitate development responsive to current and future market conditions, and to encourage creativity in the development of the Platte River Valley. Subarea boundaries are delineated on the PRV zoning map. A subarea plan, including preliminary design guidelines, is required for all or part of the subarea to be used as a framework for private and public development projects. Rules and criteria adopted by the Planning Board govern the content and requirements of subarea plans. Plans for any given subarea must conform with the subarea zoning standards enacted by City Council. I-1 General Industrial District: is district is intended to be an employment area containing industrial uses which are generally more intensive than those permitted in the I-0 zone. Bulk plane, setback and landscape standards apply in this district. Building oor area cannot exceed twice the site area. Some uses are conditional uses.

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Auraria West Station Area Plan The Community89I-2 Heavy Industrial District: is district is intended to be an employment area containing uses which are generally more intensive than that permitted in either of the other two industrial zones. Bulk plane, setback and landscape standards apply in this district. Building area cannot exceed twice the site area. Some uses are conditional uses. Blueprint Denver: An Integrated Land Use and Transportation Plan was adopted in 2002 and places a city-wide priority on land use, transportation, housing, environmental sustainability and protection of Denvers historic legacies. Blueprint Denver identi es Areas of Stability and Areas of Change throughout the city with the goal of directing new developments and in ll projects toward Areas of Change in order to preserve Denvers stable neighborhoods. It also establishes citywide concept land use and concept street classi cations. Most of the Auraria West Station Area is identi ed in Blueprint as an Area of Change. e concept land use includes campus and entertainment facilities north of Colfax Avenue, industrial land in the southwest portion of the station area, and a mixture of residential and retail south of Colfax Ave. and east of the light rail line. Picture 8.4 Blueprint Denver

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Auraria West Station Area Plan The Community 90

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Public Engagement91 Public Engagement

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Public Engagement 92 Picture 11.1 Community evaluation of design alternativesPublic Process Community outreach provided was a major component of the planning process for the Auraria West Station Area. Public involvement included focus groups, public workshops and meetings with individual property owners. Redevelopment Alternatives ree alternative designs for the Auraria West Campus Station area were reviewed by residents and stakeholders at focus groups and public workshops between April and May, 2007. e alternatives were evaluated by the degree to which they satis ed the indicated plan objectives. Option B was selected as the preferred alternative and became the basis for the station area plan detailed in this report. e evaluated alternatives follow.

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Public Engagement93Option A Re ects existing conditions; does not propose any changes to land uses surrounding the station platform Option B Fifth Street is extended north and connects to Cottonwood St. to the south improving station access and visibility. e looping road will serve as an armature for transit-supportive development. Transit supportive retail/commercial, mixed-income high-density housing and campus-related uses, including student and faculty housing are oriented along this spine e existing parking lots serving the Pepsi Center are redeveloped with employment/o ce and student/faculty housing. Pepsi Center replacement parking is located in a parking structure adjacent to the arena e Auraria Campus Master Plan is amended to better support transit uses adjacent to the station and provide improved transit access. e primary campus pedestrian and bicycle access are on Larimer and Lawrence streets Additional pedestrian and bicycle connections are envisioned along 13th Avenue, connecting to the Decatur and 10th and Osage station areas Option A Option B

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Public Engagement 94 Option COption C Fifth Street is extended north and south providing improved station access and visibility. e looping road will serve as an armature for transit-supportive development. Transit-supportive retail/commercial, mixedincome high-density housing and campus-related uses, including student and faculty housing are oriented along this spine. e existing parking lots serving the Pepsi Center are redeveloped as Auraria Campus athletic facilities, and student and faculty housing. Pepsi Center replacement parking is located in two structures adjacent to the arena e Auraria Campus Master Plan is amended to better support transit uses adjacent to the station and provide improved transit access e primary campus pedestrian and bicycle access is from a new Larimer Street Mall located on axis with the Tivoli Student Union e focus for main-street retail development is extend south form the station along Fifth Street to 13th Avenue Additional pedestrian and bicycle connections are envisioned along 13th Avenue, connecting to the Decatur and 10th and Osage station areas

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Relevant Plans95 Relevant Plans

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Relevant Plans 96Relevant Plans e Auraria West Station Area Plan builds upon a solid foundation of existing documents and guiding principles. is section provides a review of the applicable content of adopted citywide plans. e Auraria West Station Area Plan provides speci c recommendations for the planning area that, in case of con ict, supersede general recommendations from existing plans Comprehensive Plan, 2000 e City Council adopted Denver Comprehensive Plan in 2000. Plan 2000 provides the planning and policy framework for development of Denvers human and physical environment. e key subjects of Plan 2000 that relate to this Station Plan are land use, mobility, legacies, and housing. Land Use: Land use recommendations promote new investment that accommodates new residents, improves economic vitality and enhances the citys aesthetics and livability. In addition, Plan 2000 supports sustainable development patterns by promoting walking, biking and transit use. Mobility: Plan 2000 emphasizes planning for multiple modes of transportation walking, biking, transit and cars. Key concepts include expanding mobility choices for commuters and regional cooperation in transit system planning. Plan 2000 also promotes compact, mixed-use development in transit rich places (like station areas). Legacies: Plan 2000 prioritizes planning for park, open space and recreation systems. Historic building preservation and respect for traditional patterns of development in established areas are also key tenets of Plan 2000. To this end, Plan 2000 places a high value on maintenance of streets, trails, and parkways that link destinations within the community. Ensuring that new buildings, infrastructure and open spaces create attractive, beautiful places is the foundation of the legacies chapter. Housing: Plan 2000 recognizes that access to housing is a basic need for Denver citizens. us, Plan 2000 emphasizes preservation and maintenance of the existing housing stock and expanding housing options. Providing a variety of unit types and costs, in addition to housing development in transit rich places are fundamental tenets of Plan 2000. is will ensure a sustainable balance of jobs and housing as the city matures. Blueprint Denver: An Integrated Land Use and Transportation Plan, 2002 Plan 2000 recommended that the city create a plan to integrate land use and transportation planning. Blueprint Denver is an implementation plan that recognizes this relationship and describes the building blocks and tools necessary to achieve the vision outlined in Plan 2000. Areas of Change and Stability: Blueprint Denver divides the city into Areas of Change and Areas of Stability. Over time, all areas of the city will uctuate between change and stability. e goal for Areas of Stability is to identify and maintain the character of an area while accommodating new development and redevelopment. e goal for Areas of Change is to channel growth where it will be bene cial and can best improve access to jobs, housing and services. Blueprint Denver describes two types of Areas of Stability: Committed Areas and Reinvestment Areas. Committed areas are stable neighborhoods that may bene t from the stabilizing e ects of small, individual lot in ll development rather than large-scale land assembly and redevelopment.

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Relevant Plans97Reinvestment areas are neighborhoods with a character that is desirable to maintain but would bene t from reinvestment and modest in ll. is reinvestment, however, is more limited in comparison to that of Areas of Change. Transportation: e transportation component of Blueprint Denver provides transportation building blocks and tools that promote multimodal and intermodal connections. Elements of connection include the street system, bus transit system, bicycle system, and pedestrian system. ese components must work together to realize the guiding principles of Blueprint Denver. Transit Oriented Development Strategic Plan, 2006 e Transit Oriented Development (TOD) Strategic Plan prioritizes the citys planning and implementation e orts related to the transit system and station area development. TOD De ned: e TOD Strategic Plan de nes TOD as development near transit that creates beautiful, vital, walkable neighborhoods; provides housing, shopping, and transportation choices; generates lasting value, and provides access to the region via transit. TOD Typologies: e TOD Strategic Plan establishes TOD typologies for every transit station in the city. Typologies establish a framework to distinguish the types of places linked by the transit system. e typologies frame expectations about the land use mix and intensity of development at each of the stations. Station Area Planning: While providing an important planning framework, the TOD Strategic Plan calls for more detailed station area plans. Such plans o er speci c direction for appropriate development, needed infrastructure investments and economic development strategies. Pedestrian Master Plan, 2004 e Pedestrian Master Plan serves as a framework for implementation of new city policies that place an emphasis on pedestrian mobility in planning. Speci cally, the plan considers safety, accessibility, education, connectivity, streetscape, land use, and public health as it relates to the creation of a citywide pedestrian circulation system. Plan 2000 and Blueprint Denver recommended preparation of this plan. e plan establishes street classi cations for the pedestrian networ k in order to highlight routes that require greater emphasis on the pedestrian. Parks and Recreation Game Plan, 2002 e Game Plan is a master plan for the citys park, open space and recreation system. A primary principle is to create The Transit Oriented Development Strategic Guide and the Pedestrian Master Plan

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Relevant Plans 98 greener neighborhoods. Game Plan establishes a street tree and tree canopy goal of 15-18% for the entire city. e plan also establishes a parkland acreage target of 8-10 acres per 1,000 residents. T ools to accomplish these goals include promoting green streets and parkways, which indicate routes that require greater emphasis and additions to the landscape. Strategic Transportation Plan, 2008 Denver Public Works drafted the Strategic Transportation Plan (STP). e STP is a primary implementation tool for Blueprint Denver and Plan 2000. e objective of the STP is to determine needed transportation investments. e STP process will (1) provide education concerning options for transportation alternatives; (2) reach consensus on transportation strategies along transportation corridors through a collaborative process; and (3) build stakeholder support. e STP represents a new approach to transportation planning in Denver. Instead of forecasting future auto travel on Denver streets, the STP forecasts person-trips to evaluate the magnitude of transportation impacts caused by all types of travel. is person-trip data provides the ability to plan for bikes, pedestrians, transit, and street improvements. e STP is the rst step in identifying the needs for every major travel corridor in the city. e STP creates concepts for how to meet transportation needs, including a prioritization of corridor improvements. Storm Drainage Master Plan (2005) and Sanitary Sewer Master Plan (2006) e Storm Drainage Master Plan and the Sanitary Sewer Master Plan evaluates adequacy of the existing systems assuming the future land uses identi ed in Blueprint Denver. e Storm Drainage Master Plan determines the amount of imperviousness resulting from future land development and the subsequent runo e Sanitary Sewer Master Plan identi es needed sanitary sewer improvements to respond to the forecasted development. Zoning Code Update (in development) Denver citizens called for reform of the Citys Zoning Code in the 1989 Comprehensive Plan and again in the Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000. Blueprint Denver (2002) provided the vision and initial strategy to begin this e ort. e framework for the current zoning code was established in the 1950s and assumes an automobile oriented land use development pattern. Further, the complexity of the current zoning code makes it di cult for property owners to easily identify what is allowed to be built on a given property. at complexity can make doing quality development more di cult and raises the cost of doing business in Denver by requiring lengthy study of our unique and cumbersome zoning code. moving people. The Strategic Transportation Plan The Denver Bicycle Master Plan and a Zoning Code Update Newsletter

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Auraria West Station Area Plan Relevant Plans99 e updated zoning code will better re ect the vision of Blueprint Denver by promoting proper development in Areas of Change while enhancing neighborhood character in Areas of Stability. Denver Union Station Master Plan (2004) e Denver Union Station Master Plan serves as the blueprint for redeveloping and preserving Denvers historic Union Station and 19.85 acres of surrounding land. Union Station will be transformed into a transportation hub serving the needs of residents, tourists and commuters. Greenprint Denver (2006) Greenprint Denver is an e ort to fully integrate sustainability as a core value and operating principle in Denver city government. e Greenprint Denver Action Agenda for 2006 charts the citys course over the next ve. Included in Greenprint Denver Action Agenda are speci c actions that relate directly to the Citys ambitious station area planning e ort. For example, this plan directs the City to decrease reliance on automobiles through public transit use and access, and promote transit-oriented development, as well as bike and pedestrian enhancements, and increase by 20% the new development located within mile of existing transit stations by 2011.

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End Notes1. Amy Herman. Study Findings Regarding Condominium Parking Ratios. Sedway Group. San Francisco 2001. 2. TCRP Report 102. Transit-Oriented Development in the United States: Experiences, Challenges, and Prospects, pg. 157. 2001. is study found that transit commute shares increase with pedestrian-oriented design of neighborhoods around rail stops in the Bay Area. 3. Donald Shoup. Transport Policy, Vol. 13, No. 6 Cruising for Parking, pp. 479-486. November 2006 4. Nelson\Nygaard. Alaskan Way Viaduct and Seawall Replacement Parking Assessment, Appendix B: Electronic Parking Guidance Systems March 2007. 5. Victoria Transport Policy Institute TDM Encyclopedia, www.vtpi.org/tdm/tdm44.htm, accessed on 4/5/07 6. Note: Historically this area was considered one Denver statistical neighborhood, called Auraria Lincoln Park. Many data sources still combine these neighborhoods and report one number for both neighborhoods. erefore, some of the data in this plan is reported for the Auraria neighborhood, some is for the combined neighborhoods of Auraria and La Alma / Lincoln Park, and some data is for the station area itself.