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Baker neighborhood plan

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Title:
Baker neighborhood plan
Creator:
Community Planning and Development, City and County of Denver
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
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City and County of Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English

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Neighborhood plans
Community planning
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Denver -- Baker

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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BAKER
NEIGHBORHOOD
PLAN




BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN


ICKNDWIEDE
Initial Steering Committee
Dominique Acevedo
Amber Giauque Callender
Vic Calonder
Roger Day
Tony Gengaro
Kevin Gerrits
A1 Habercorn
Steve Harley
David Hemsi
Kim Kucera
Tom Kuspiel
Gillian McCune
Kathleen MacKenzie
Kara Mueller
Dorothy Norbie
Debbie Ortega
Bruce Peterson
Marleen Seckendorf
Courmey Sturtz
Nell Swiers
Ed Williams
Steve Winter
Evelyn Wolf
Final Steering Committee
Dominique Acevedo
Amber Giauque Callender
Roger Day
Tony Gengaro
A1 Habercorn
Steve Harley
Kim Kucera
Kathleen MacKenzie
Debbie Ortega
EMENTS
Bruce Peterson
Nell Swiers
Assessment of Existing
Conditions
James Bertini
Adrian Brown
Luchia Williams Brown
Roger Day
Steve Dreher
Tony Gengaro
Suzanne Gruba
Kim Kucera
Marcy Lister
Ben Madrid
Mark Nielson
Cec Ortiz
Bruce Peterson
Arturo Rodriguez
Nell Swiers
City Council
Cathy Reynolds Council President,
At Large
Debbie Ortega District 9
Kathleen MacKenzie District 7
Dennis Gallagher District 1
Ted Hackworth District 2
Ramona Martinez District 3
Joyce FosterDistrict 4
Polly Flobeck District 5
Charlie Brown District 6
ElbraWedgeworth Districts
Ed Thomas District 10
Happy Haynes District 11
Susan Barnes-Gelt At Large
Planning Board
William H. Hornby Chair
Jan Marie Belle
Frederick Corn
Pat Cortez
Daniel Guimond
Mark Johnson
Barbara Kelley
Joyce Oberfeld
Bruce ODonnell
Jim Raughton
Robert Wright
City and County of Denver
Wellington E.Webb Mayor
Jennifer T. Moulton Director,
Community Planning and
Development Agency
Ellen T.Ittelson Deputy Director for
Planning Services
Dennis Swain Program Manager for
Small Area and Comprehensive
Planning
Kiersten Faulkner Senior City Planner
and Project Manager
Carla McConnell Urban Design
Architect
Jodi Adkins Housing & Neighborhood
Development Services
Ken Barkema Maps
Julie Connor Graphic Design
Mike Aleksick Treasury
Bill Sirois Transportation Planner
Specialist
Phil Plienas Data


BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
ABLE OF CONTENTS
Executive Summary
v
1. Introduction 1
Location.............................................................................2
Purpose of the Plan .................................................................3
Plan Components......................................................................4
Relationship to Citywide Plans.......................................................6
Planning Process....................................................................11
2. A Vision for Bakers Future 13
3. Guiding Principles 19
4. Framework Plan 23
Land Use......................................................................24
Urban Form....................................................................26
Transportation and Circulation................................................28
5. Subarea Plans
Commercial Corridors .............
Single Family and Rowhouse Residential


BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
Mid-rise and High-rise Residential ...................................................47
Residential-Office Area of Change ....................................................50
Industrial-Commercial Area of Change..................................................55
Industrial............................................................................60
Transit-Oriented Development..........................................................65
Retail Centers .......................................................................72
6. Implementation Plan 77
Regulatory Actions....................................................................79
Public Investment.....................................................................81
Partnerships..........................................................................84
7. Assessment of Existing Conditions 91
Human Services and Demographics.......................................................92
Environmental Conditions..............................................................94
Land Use .................................................................... 97
Zoning...............................................................................101
Mobility.............................................................................104
Legacies.............................................................................109
Housing..............................................................................113
Economic Activity ...................................................................115
Neighborhood Lacilities and Organizations ...........................................119
Appendix 123
Wish List of neighborhood Projects...................................................124
Results of Community Assemblies .....................................................125
Glossary.............................................................................136
Data Sources ........................................................................137
Map of Subareas......................................................................138
Map of Existing Zoning and Proposed Land Use ........................................139
IV




EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
The Baker Neighborhood Plan is adopted by City Council as a supplement to the Denver
Comprehensive Plan. It addresses issues and provides guidance that is more refined and specific than
can be done at a citywide level. The Baker Neighborhood Plan provides more detail than is included in
Plan 2000 or Blueprint Denver: An Integrated Land Use and Transportation Plan, but it is consistent
with and guided by those citywide plans.The Neighborhood Plan is focused on neighborhood issues
related to land use, design and transportation for the entire neighborhood, with specific
recommendations for individual subareas.The Plan recognizes Baker as a multi-use area with strong
assets and many opportunities. It provides a vision and goals for the neighborhood over the next 20
years. It acknowledges current opportunities, but is not limited to them. Recommendations are for
both short-term and long-term improvements.
The major elements of the neighborhood plan are:
) Recommendations for a more logical approach to land use throughout the neighborhood using
both framework goals for the entire neighborhood and subarea goals that include:
I protecting the integrity of the residential and industrial sectors as Areas of Stability;
I providing for change over time to buffer the edge between the industrial and residential areas
with multi-use Areas of Change.The Plan recommends a housing emphasis next to the residential
area and a commercial emphasis next to the industrial area;
I reinforcing the traditional retail, commercial and housing mix on the major corridors; and,
I supporting increased density and development at the light rail stations.
) Priorities for infrastructure, public investment, public-private partnerships, and city regulations.The
plan provides input for City programs, including the Focus Neighborhoods Initiative and the Capital
Improvements Program. It helps elevate the Baker neighborhood in these areas, but does not
replace the overall City budgeting process.
) Design Guidelines for new development.The guidelines present design principles which promote
excellence in urban design. They are written to provide for flexibility and creativity while
articulating basic considerations for cohesiveness and compatibility with the existing and desired
character of individual subareas.
VI


BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
I Better use of transportation options, including mitigation of traffic speed and volume, improved
parking solutions, safer pedestrian crossings and improved sidewalks, improvements to bus stops
and service, better access to light rail, and improved bicycle connections.
I Opportunities for new and improved open space and parks, including new parks at the Gates
Rubber redevelopment site and improvements to Dailey Park and La Familia Recreation Center. The
plan recommends better maintenance of the tree lawns along public streets and replacement of
missing trees.
I Cooperation and collaborative problem-solving between neighborhood residents, businesses,
property owners and City officials. It articulates a common desire to work together for the
common good and to avoid divisiveness.
VII


VIII


INTRODUCTION


INTRODUCTION
Location
The Baker neighborhood is located in central Denver. Neighborhood boundaries are west to the South
Platte River, north to West Sixth Avenue, east to Broadway, and south to Mississippi Avenue.
2


BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
Purpose of the plan
The Plan establishes long range goals and objectives for the development and stabilization of the
neighborhood. It provides a framework and establishes implementation strategies which will direct the
neighborhood towards its vision as a community where people live, work, play, and celebrate the
neighborhoods cultural heritage. It is primarily a plan for land use, transportation and urban form.
The plan provides a neighborhood and city-approved guide to the acceptable future development of
Baker. It is intended for use by Denvers Community Planning and Development Agency, Department of
Public Works,Transportation Planning, Transportation Engineering,Traffic Operations, Department of
Parks and Recreation, Police Department, other City agencies, Denver Planning Board, the Mayor, City
Council, other public and quasi-public agencies, neighborhood associations, residents, property owners,
business people and private organizations concerned with planning, development and neighborhood
improvement.
The plan is intended to promote patterns of land use, urban design, circulation and services that
contribute to the economic, social, and physical health, safety and welfare of the people who live and
work in the neighborhood. The neighborhood plan addresses issues and opportunities at a scale that is
more refined and more responsive to specific needs than the Citys Comprehensive Plan. The
neighborhood plan serves as a supplement of the Comprehensive Plan.
The plan is neither an official zone map, nor does it create or deny any rights. Zone changes that may be
proposed as part of any development must be initiated under a separate procedure established under
the Revised Municipal Code.
3


INTRODUCTION
WLAN COMPONENTS
Vision Statement
The vision describes Baker in the future, as an end result, with current issues resolved and goals met.
Guiding Principles
Guiding principles are the concepts that frame the plan recommendations to achieve the goals of the
neighborhood. They are the neighborhood and City expectations for implementation processes and the
values that underlie the goals and recommendations.
Framework Plan
The framework plan identifies the overall land use and transportation goals. The framework plan
presents the issues that are relevant to the entire neighborhood and recommendations that tie the
neighborhood together.
Subarea Plans
The plan establishes eight subareas that have distinct characteristics and uses. The subarea plans present
issues and recommendations that are more specific than those presented in the framework plan.
Implementation Plan
The implementation plan consists of specific actions that can be taken to achieve the recommendations
contained in the framework and subarea plans.
Assessment of Existing Conditions
The assessment describes the physical conditions and regulations of the neighborhood as it currently exists.


BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
Achieving the Vision
Plan visions are just that a collective picture of a more desirable future. There are few if any
circumstances in the complex milieu of neighborhoods and cities in which the planning, design,
ownership, financing, and political resources align to implement a plans visions and goals quickly and
simultaneously. As a result, by necessity7, plans are implemented incrementally with the vision and goals
providing common direction to the multitude of public and private undertakings. Part of the City process
is to evaluate each of these large and small, public and private undertakings in light of the plans vision and
goals, the current situation, and the available resources. Despite this imperfect situation, plans have proven
to have substantial influence on the future direction of a plan area over a period of five, 10 or 20 years.
Previous Plans
This plan represents the land use, transportation and urban design vision for the Baker Neighborhood. It
updates and incorporates recommendations of earlier plans. Previously adopted planning documents
that are relevant to the Baker Neighborhood are:
I Westside Neighborhood Plan, 1981
I West Washington Park Neighborhood Plan, 1991
I South Broadway/Montgomery Ward Urban Renewal Plan, 1991
I Light Rail Station Development Program, 1997
I Broadway Plaza Pedestrian Mall Design Guidelines, 1999
I South Platte River Management Plan, 2000
I South Broadway Urban Design and Transportation Study, 2001
I Blueprint Denver: An Integrated Land Use and Transportation Plan, 2002
| Bicycle Master Plan Update, 2002
I Denver Parks and Recreation Game Plan, 2002, in progress
These documents have been reviewed and relevant material has been incorporated in the development of
this plan. This and all other neighborhood plans supplement die Citys Comprehensive Plan. The
Comprehensive Plan presents a citywide perspective, while each neighborhood plan provides more specific
guidance both for the allocation of City resources and for the location and design of private development.
5


INTRODUCTION
Dnrer
CnprclasiTc
m 20011
Relationship to citywide plans
All neighborhood and small area plans are expected to comply with the citywide policies contained in
Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000 and Blueprint Denver:An Integrated Land Use and Transportation
Plan. The Baker Neighborhood Plan implements the following policies from the plans:
Plan 2000
Communication and Partnerships
i Engage neighborhood residents and organizations in collaborative efforts to share information, solve
problems and plan for the future.
Land Use and Transportation
% High density residential developments should be well-served by public transportation and should
be in close proximity to employment centers, amenities and shopping facilities.
) Activity areas should provide housing as one of the mixture of uses so as to provide the population base
to support non-residential activities and minimize growth in auto use, air condition, and energy use.
) Improve access to employment and activity centers in a manner consistent with commitments to
provide a full range of travel modes and to protect living quality and promote good urban design.
) Land use patterns and zoning must support effective public rapid transit, an efficient roadway
system and alternative transportation modes.
) It is incumbent upon an applicant proposing a zone change to a more intense use to substantially
mitigate negative impacts on existing uses.
Encourage a mixture of uses that assure the availability of neighborhood services and amenities that
reinforce the role, identity and needs of the neighborhood.


BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
Transit, Mobility and Parking
I Bicycle facilities, including lanes and storage, should be included in new road and bridge
construction. Direct bicycle access should be provided to transit stations and park-n-rides, both of
which should be equipped with high quality bicycle parking.
I Sidewalks and facilities for pedestrians are integral components of the transportation system. New
roads and transit facilities must be designed to include pedestrian facilities and when existing
arterials are reconstructed they should be furnished with sidewalks and pedestrian access to
neighborhoods.
I Encourage the reuse older structures and the revitalization and efficient development of
commercial areas by promoting the creation of parking districts to provide pooled, shared parking.
I Local streets not designated as collectors must serve neighborhood purposes and through traffic
must be diverted from these streets whenever possible.
I Enforce a citywide truck route system that limits truck traffic to specific streets. While making
necessary and reasonable policies and exceptions to allow efficient movement of goods in the city,
the City must protect neighborhoods and pedestrian areas from excessive intrusion by truck
traffic.
Urban Design
I Develop and maintain a well-designed urban environment, promoting the use of designs and
materials that reflect the communitys culture and materials.
I All projects must be built to the highest urban design standards. New facilities must make a
positive design contribution to the neighborhood and include facilities for bicycles, sidewalks,
trees, medians, lighting, and other high-quality physical design features.
I The location and design of public facilities and utilities, including utility rights of way, should be
subject to design review to encourage compatibility with surrounding residential areas.
I Particular attention should be paid to public maintenance and service functions in residential areas,
especially in older neighborhoods, to aid neighborhood stabilization.
I View corridors and solar access should be provided or preserved wherever feasible and
appropriate.
7


INTRODUCTION
Commerce and Industry
I Both large and small businesses which meet economic and community criteria must be sought,
retained and supported.
I Economic development programs should emphasize retention and expansion of existing businesses
as well as attracting new businesses.
I The revitalization of older neighborhood commercial centers that provide shopping within walking
distance to residences should be encouraged to assist the stabilization of older neighborhoods.
I Commercial development must be compatible in operation and design with the residential fabric
and character of the neighborhood.
I Off-street parking facilities should be landscaped, designed and located in a manner that minimizes
disruption and inconvenience to adjacent residential properties and streets.
| Deteriorated and declining business and shopping areas should be revitalized by rehabilitation or
replacement with appropriate uses.
I Adjacent residential areas should be protected from the activities of shopping areas by adequate
buffering and by ensuring adequate off-street parking and circulation is provided.
I Strip commercial development in new areas should be discouraged and existing strip commercial
developments should be redeveloped, restructured and landscaped.
I Linear business areas in older neighborhoods should encourage consistency with other buildings in
the area, their pedestrian orientation and buffering from adjacent residential uses. Operations
should avoid negative impacts on surroundings of lights, hours of operation, noise, drive-in speakers,
trash removal, deliveries, etc.
I Streetscaping and street amenities should be installed in both revitalizing and new commercial
areas.
Neighborhoods
I Preserve and improve the existing stock of housing, especially encourage the rehabilitation and re-
occupancy of vacant buildings.
I Subsidized housing should be designed to be compatible with surrounding housing and the
character of the neighborhoods and should be located to promote economic and racial integration.
8


BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
) Preserve and improve the quality of the neighborhood. An important element is to preserve and
improve the existing stock of housing, especially the rehabilitation and re-occupancy of vacant
buildings.
) The character of stable residential neighborhoods should be preserved. Requests for rezonings on
the periphery of stable residential neighborhoods must be evaluated to ensure that long-term
stability is not threatened and the rezoning is compatible.
) Improvements in the condition of dwelling units and non-residential buildings to bring them into
conformance with code requirements should be enforced to improve living conditions and remove
blighting influences from neighborhoods.
) Stabilize and then upgrade neighborhoods in which physical conditions are declining or
inadequate. The strategies used must be those that minimize adverse impacts on the socio-
economic composition of existing residents.
) Historic buildings and areas must be protected and the destruction of any structures or landscape
which are part of the areas historic fabric must be discouraged.
) Compatible residential development on vacant sites within developed residential areas should be
encouraged.
) Development must be compatible with and sensitive to the immediate environment of the site and
neighborhood in terms of architectural design, scale, bulk and building height, historic character,
orientation of the building on the lot, landscaping and visual integrity.
Blueprint Denver
Blueprint Denver:An Integrated Land Use and Transportation Plan is a citywide plan that outlines
Denvers growth management and development strategy. Blueprint Denver divides the city into Areas of
Change, where reinvestment and redevelopment is desirable, and Areas of Stability, where the existing
land use and character should be maintained and enhanced.
Baker has both Areas of Change and Areas of Stability. The Areas of Change include:
) The Gates Rubber Plant site adjacent to the Broadway light rail station and the Broadway Marketplace
at Alameda station. Both sites provide exciting opportunities for transit-oriented development with a
mix of high-density housing, retail, office and other employment, and light industry.
Blueprint
Denver ^
An Integrated
Land Use and
Transportation Plan


INTRODUCTION
Blueprint Denvers Plan Map
) The corridor between the industrial west and the residential east portions of the Baker
neighborhood. These areas of change are divided into an industrial-commercial corridor adjacent to
the light rail line and Santa Fe Drive and a residential-office corridor roughly between Cherokee
Street and Santa Fe Drive. The residential-office area of change also includes the northeast portion
of the neighborhood, between Broadway and the residential core. These areas reflect the mixed-use
nature of the historic land uses and build upon those uses while embracing opportunities for
reinvestment and change.
) Corridors on the perimeter of the neighborhood offer infill opportunities that focus on filling the
gaps in the historic fabric. Older buildings are treasured and encouraged for redevelopment, while
opportunities to build new mixed-use and residential projects on vacant and underutilized parcels
are abundant.
Baker also contains several Areas of Stability, recognizing the characteristic urban fabric that creates a
strong sense of place. The Areas of Stability are:
) The residential core of the neighborhood. About half of the residential area lies within the Baker
Historic District, but the remainder of the residential area is also an area of stability. The residential
uses, density and design characteristics are the predominant elements of stability.
) The industrial corridor between the Platte River and the light rail line is a vital, cohesive industrial
area. While there are opportunities for business expansion and reinvestment, the fundamental
nature of the area is stable.
A
0
Blueprint Denver also places emphasis on linking land use and transportation, reinforcing that cities are
combinations of places to live, work and play and means to get to those places. The plan reinforces the
Citys goal of accommodating a wide variety of transportation options, including cars, transit, walking
and biking.
10


BAKER N E I G H B
Planning process
The Baker neighborhood plan is the result of a two-year collaboration between the City and County of
Denver and the Baker community. A steering committee comprised of Baker residents, business
owners, and representatives from the three registered neighborhood associations provided policy
direction for the plan, while City staff provided professional and technical expertise. Community
Planning and Development staff facilitated the planning process and reviewed plan concepts for
consistency with citywide policies.
The steering committee, with City staff, researched and evaluated Bakers existing conditions (see
chapter 7); articulated a vision for Bakers stabilization and development (see chapter 2); developed goals
and recommendations to achieve the vision (chapters 4 and 5); and identified opportunities for
implementing the recommendations (chapter 6).
In addition to the ongoing Steering Committee and Technical Committee discussions (a total of more
than 50 public meetings), hundreds of people participated directly in the planning process, providing
valuable comments and direction:
0 Six community meetings (August 1999, June 2000, October 2000, February 2001, May 2001 and
February 2002) helped identify community issues and goals, confirm plan policies and
recommendations, and prioritize implementation actions (see Appendix for details). Meetings were
advertised in both English and Spanish and interpreters were available. Meeting notices were
mailed directly to property owners of record and tenants. Fliers were also distributed through
Fairmont Elementary School, Baker Middle School and the business community. Neighborhood
associations included the meeting announcements in newsletters and websites.
0 Planning staff and steering committee representatives attended several meetings of Bakers three
registered neighborhood associations (Baker Historic Neighborhood Association, Broadway
Partnership and Sumner Neighborhood Association of Businesses) to give updates and gather
comments on the plan.
O R H O O D PLAN
A community planning meeting May 2001 at
Denuer Health confirmed the subarea concepts
n


INTRODUCTION
I Issue-specific subcommittees developed plan recommendations related to the industrial subarea,
residential subarea, transportation, and design guidelines.
I Two surveys, in English and Spanish, were sent to all property owners and all residents regarding
community issues and priorities.
I Individual meetings on particular issues or concerns were held when requested.
In addition to the ongoing public participation, the Plan was also shaped through:
I Contemporaneous public meetings, open houses, surveys and directives related to Blueprint
Denver, the citywide land use and transportation plan.
I City Council representative and staff briefings and review comments.
I CPDA staff review and discussions.
As part of City Councils adoption of the plan as a supplement to the Denver Comprehensive Plan, the
plan document was further refined through:
I Denvers Interagency Plan Review Committee standards of completeness, presentation and
consistency with Plan 2000 and Blueprint Denver,
I Denver Planning Board work session and public hearing.
I City Council committee review and final action.
The cooperation between the City and the public will not end with plan adoption. Many of the
implementation strategies and priorities rely on continued public involvement and partnerships between
city agencies and the neighborhood.
12


A VISION FOR
RAKERS FUTURE


VISION
La Familia Recreation Center
The vision statement describes the Baker neighborhood in the future, as an end result. The vision
uses the present tense to indicate the expectation that current issues will be resolved and goals will
be met. It articulates the outcomes that the plan policies and recommendations are intended to
implement and against which actions should be measured. The neighborhood is envisioned as it
should appear in 20 years.
The overriding goal of the plan is to create a community that accommodates a wide variety of functions,
enhances the quality of life for residents and the vitality of businesses. In building the community, the
intent is to embrace Bakers many existing assets and maximize their value. The vision statement
describes the Baker neighborhood as it will continue to evolve with the successful implementation of the
goals and the recommendations of the plan.
General Vision
Baker is an urban neighborhood that includes several distinct areas. The residential core
consists primarily of older homes and some new housing, served by the vibrant and pedestrian-friendly
commercial districts. Well-established and vital industrial areas and commercial corridors provide an
employment base for the neighborhood and the region. The common edge between the industrial and
residential areas serves both, with western industrial uses changing to eastern residential uses, with
sensitive design and careful location of new development. Baker benefits from a strong sense of place
and enjoys a positive reputation. The entrances to the neighborhood are clearly marked, although the
neighborhood also has strong connections to adjacent neighborhoods.
Neighborhood and business associations advocate for the needs of their members and work
cooperatively with each other and with city and special district governments. The neighborhood groups
have achieved a united sense of purpose and improved community image. Pride of community is
apparent in the care given to the homes and businesses, as well as to the parks and other community
areas. Visitors and residents have many transportation choices, including light rail train,
buses, driving, bicycling and walking. Crime and vandalism are unusual and people are safe in their
homes, jobs, and on the streets. Views of the mountains from public vantage points are preserved
through building height limits. Improvements to utilities, stormwater drainage, streets, alleys, sidewalks
and other infrastructure support new and existing development in each of the subareas and make infill
development possible. Overhead utility lines have been placed undergrounds areas redevelop.
14


BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
Public spaces enhance neighborhood experiences. Dailey and Flores Parks are well maintained
and used by a wide variety of community members. The facilities, including the bathrooms, picnic
areas, playgrounds, and landscaping, have been improved. Small pocket parks and urban gardens are
abundant in the neighborhood, using formerly vacant lots and parts of new developments for
neighborhood green space. The small parks and gardens are neighborhood amenities because they
are well maintained and serve residents. Landscaping and adequate have been integrated into large-
scale new developments at transit stops. Easy access to the Platte River Greenway links the
neighborhood to an open space amenity, giving the neighborhood a good connection to downtown
and the river. The Greenway includes parks, community gardens and a bicycle path and is served by
small-scale commercial establishments such as snack bars and bicycle repair shops. Another linear
park links the Alameda and Broadway light rail stations, providing a pedestrian and bicycle link
between the stations. The recreation center is a vibrant center that serves the neighborhood and
complements other recreation in the system. Neighborhood schools provide high-quality education,
programs and facilities for students. The schools also support the community through continuing
education programs and by providing facilities for community gatherings. Kiosks with public
bulletin boards are posted in areas with abundant pedestrian traffic to provide a means for
public communication. A circulator transit system serves the public spaces, allowing
convenient visitation.
Commercial Corridors
The neighborhood commercial corridors of West 6th Avenue, Broadway, Alameda Avenue
and Santa Fe Drive display a healthy mixture of retail, office and medium-density housing,
providing ample employment, retail and service opportunities. Broadway is a thriving
commercial district with a variety of retail and commercial establishments and both neighborhood-
serving and destination shops. Mixed-use developments along Broadway include both residential and
commercial space. Large-scale destination stores serve the needs of the neighborhood, but they are
integrated into a more diverse retail setting with locally owned businesses of various scales, goods,
services and clientele. Neighborhood-friendly businesses make the corridors comfortable for families
and children.
Public art, pocket parks and public gathering places are integrated into large redevelopment projects on
the sites of the Broadway Marketplace TOD (Alameda-Exposition, Broadway-Bannock) and the former
Department of Motor Vehicles (W. 6th Ave. and Bannock). Santa Fe Drive reflects the areas Hispanic
15


VISION
House in the Baker Historic District
heritage and influence through southwestern architecture and materials, and in shops offering Latin
American goods and Spanish-language services. West SixthAvenue has a mixture of residential,
neighborhood-serving businesses, offices, and health-care related uses.
Redevelopment projects reinforce the neighborhoods urban design and character. Historic development
patterns are consistent, with buildings placed at the property line adjacent to the street, doors and
windows oriented to the major streets, tree-lined sidewalks, adequate parking situated to minimize
pedestrian disruptions and hidden from the street, and appropriate levels of lighting. Pedestrian
connections within the commercial areas and linking to the residential neighborhood are safe and
comfortable with continuous tree-lined sidewalks, landscaping and crosswalks. Adequate space, fences
and landscaping buffer active commercial uses from adjacent housing. Billboards have been amortized.
xcel Energy campus in the industrial area
Residential Areas
The residential center of the neighborhood is primarily comprised of single detached homes,
duplexes and rowhouses. Slightly higher-density residential projects buffer the low-density
center from higher intensity uses on the perimeter. The residential area preserves and enhances its
rich architectural and historic character by caring for and maintaining the homes and landscaping. New
residential developments show innovative and complementary architecture within a common urban
design framework: the scale, orientation to the street, vehicular access, open space and building setbacks
are consistent, while a diversity of architecture and richness of design is apparent. Expansions and new
buildings are designed in a manner that complements the historic character of the community. Unsafe
and deteriorating residences have been replaced with new, compatible, high-quality housing.
Here people of diverse cultures, ages, ethnicity, educational and economic backgrounds value a unified
and integrated neighborhood and share a sense of community. A variety of housing opportunities
including dwelling size and style, number of units, number of bedrooms, and housing costs support
the diverse population, without undue concentration of subsidized housing or residential care facilities.
The neighborhood is attractive to people at all stages of life. There is strong community interaction on
the streets and in the public spaces, supporting neighborhood pride. Activities and amenities make the
neighborhood comfortable for the elderly and for children. Residents value older homes and mature
street trees, and enjoy the convenience of city living and the stability of a thriving neighborhood.
16


BAKER N E I G H B
Industrial Area
The industrial area near the river and railroad remain vital, with businesses upgrading and
moving into the 21st century with a commitment to the city and its vital growth and
industrial needs. In addition to manufacturing, warehousing and other industrial uses, the area
contains office buildings, wholesale stores and other commercial uses.
The businesses continue to landscape and improve their sites, improving the visual landscape. Safety
and environmental sensitivity remain high with a concern for the safety and cleanliness of the area. The
manufacturing companies remain clean in their impact and meet all federal, state and city codes. The
industrial area is vital but fundamentally non-residential. Residential and industrial uses do not mix and
the fundamental separation remains important for the harmony of all. Nonconforming residences within
the industrial area have been phased out and the industrial area remains intact with industrial and
commercial uses.
Industrial-Commercial Area of Change
The area immediately to the east of the light rail line is an area of change. The predominant use is light
industry and commercial businesses with normal business practices and effects such as heavy traffic,
noise and light. The industrial businesses remain vital and have reinvested in their businesses. Vacant
and underutilized sites provide opportunities for business expansion and relocation. The area has
extensive commercial activity, making it unsuitable for most residential uses, although a few
work-live units provide housing for resident business owners. The area requires access to major
arterial streets and the interstate highway. It must accommodate extensive truck traffic. Attention to
design, screening and open space buffering improves the operations and appearance of the area.
Residential-Office Area of Change
This area continues the blend between the residential and industrial subareas. The primary
land uses are higher-density residential and office uses. Vital office and industrial businesses
continue to operate and provide an employment base for the city and neighborhood. Non-
retail business activity is intense and new housing at a moderate density is located in the area.
Residential and commercial uses are not necessarily mixed in each building or development, or even
within each block in the subarea, but residential and commercial uses are not strictly separated from
each other. Siting and design of each new development help ensure compatibility and blending of uses.
O R H O O D PLAN
Broadway light rail train station is adjacent
to the Gates Rubber redeueiopment site
17


VISION
Public art display in the Design Center
New projects are responsible for demonstrating compatibility with existing land uses and for mitigating
the effects of the existing uses. New construction is expected to provide landscaping, appropriate design
and buffering from existing uses.
Transit-Oriented Development
The Gates Rubber Company and the Broadway Marketplace sites adjacent to the Broadway and
Alameda light rail stops have developed into active and vital transit-oriented developments of
high-density housing combined with offices, retail shops and light manufacturing, all served
by the light rail stations, while still providing ample customer parking for destination
businesses. At Gates, many of the brick industrial buildings have been renovated and reused, while new
buildings have been added. Landscaping, sidewalks and crosswalks create strong and safe pedestrian
connections to the neighborhood. Connections across 1-25 and the railroad tracks are safe and include
crossing points for pedestrians and bicyclists. A linear park connects the two light rail stops, allowing for
pedestrian and bicycle connections between them.
Retail Centers
The Design Center and the island between 1-25 and the railroad are commercial centers with retail,
wholesale and office buildings. The areas are well served by streets and utilities and are convenient to
their customers. Moderate-density residential projects are considered on a case by case basis.
18


BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
GUIDING PRINCIPLES
19


GUIDING PRINCIPLES
Guiding principles are the concepts that frame the plan recommendations to achieve the goals of the
neighborhood. They are the neighborhood expectations for implementation processes and the values
that underlie the goals and recommendations.
1: Build on the strengths and opportunities in the community.
I Involve neighborhood associations, immediate neighbors and interested members of the public in
community decision-making related to changes in zoning, land use and mobility, siting of community
facilities, and changes to public infrastructure and facilities. Public process must be open and equitable.
I New residential, commercial, industrial and civic buildings must be located and designed sensitively,
with significant public review of new uses, design and overall development.
I Create opportunities for residents to participate and be involved in the community through events,
information-sharing and decision-making.
I Create opportunities for informal interaction and gathering through the provision of public spaces
and activity nodes.
2: Protect and enhance a vital business community.
I Promote employment and business opportunities by supporting the existing businesses and civic
institutions within the neighborhood.
I Recognize the importance of existing businesses in building and maintaining the neighborhood.
I Add new businesses in appropriate infill locations.
3: Continue to create a livable neighborhood.
I Provide diversity of housing stock to allow affordable products and a diverse resident population.
Undue concentration of residential care facilities or subsidized housing is inappropriate.
I Create a walkable neighborhood by providing active pedestrian-oriented uses on the ground
floors of buildings, generous sidewalks, enhanced streetscaping, and building design with human
scale and detail.
I Provide opportunities for passive and active recreation through enhanced parks, additional open
space, and improved access to existing parks, such as the Platte River Greenway.
20


BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
4: Baker is one neighborhood in a city of neighborhoods.
I This plan recognizes that there are citywide needs that must be accommodated and that all
neighborhoods share in the responsibility to accomplish those needs.
I Projects in the Baker neighborhood should not adversely impact other neighborhoods.
I City resources are limited and the Baker Neighborhood Plan recognizes that those resources need
to apportioned to many needs throughout the city.
21


22


BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
FRAMEWORK PLAN
The framework plan looks at the
neighborhood in the larger view
and provides overall concepts that
will guide its development. It
addresses core issues and provides
basic recommendations for the
entire neighborhood.
23


FRAMEWORK PLAN
Portions of the neighborhood include both
residential and industrial uses and lack
infrastructure, such as sidewalks
Rand use
Priority Issues and Opportunities
) Baker is an urban neighborhood with a variety of land uses commercial, industrial, residential at a
variety of scales and densities, and healthcare that co-exist with awkwardness and difficulty,
leading to strains on both residents and businesses.
) New uses or intensification of old uses may have negative effects on other properties.
) Denver Health and other public institutions need to remain viable and active, but the adjacent
residential uses are threatened by undue expansion pressure.
) Denver Parks and Recreation has found that Baker is in moderate need for park amenities, primarily
increased acreage, because it has less than 7.5 acres of park land per 1000 people. The need will
increase as more housing is added to the neighborhood.
) Households in the far northeast and southwest parts of the neighborhood do not have good access
to community and neighborhood parks, since they are not within six blocks of a park without
crossing a major obstacle.
Goals
) Create and maintain an appropriate balance of land uses that preserves the stability of the
residential, business and industrial sectors, while allowing for flexibility over time.
) Arrange residential, employment, retail, service, and open space uses to be convenient to and
compatible with each other.
) Support infill development on the Denver Health and Hospital campus, including higher densities
and new buildings, with emphasis on using available space within the existing campus. Denver
Health and Hospital should not expand into adjacent residential areas.
) Reduce conflicts between existing incompatible uses and discourage future conflicts.
24


BAKER N E IG H B
I Develop vacant land in a manner that is compatible with surrounding land uses in terms of use,
operations, character, and density.
I Encourage a mixture of uses that assure the availability of neighborhood services and amenities
that reinforce the role, identity and needs of the neighborhood, as appropriate to the subarea.
I Within the industrial and industrial-commercial areas, locate more intense industrial uses away from
residential areas.
| Enhance and protect the South Platte River as a neighborhood and citywide amenity.
I Add new parks and green space as available, especially through the Learning Landscapes program
at area schools, development of the unimproved portion ofVanderbilt Park land near Santa Fe Drive
and Mississippi Avenue, and conversion of appropriate brownfields to non-irrigated natural areas.
Recommendations
I Protect the industrial character of the western neighborhood, the residential character of the
central neighborhood and the commercial perimeter with blended transitions between subareas.
Lise regulatory and infrastructure resources to accommodate the changes.
I Applicants proposing a zone change to a more intense or different uses must substantially mitigate
negative impacts on existing uses and demonstrate that new projects substantially further the
neighborhood goals and vision.
Achieving the Vision
Zoning is the primary land use regulatory mechanism. The plans land use vision is easiest to achieve
when the zoning reinforces the vision through its allowed use and permitted structure provisions. If the
zoning does not reinforce the plan vision, changing the zoning to be compatible is the primary
implementation mechanism. When these regulatory changes are not accomplished in a timely manner, it
is more difficult to achieve the plan vision because zoning takes precedence over a plan. The plan
vision and goals are used during negotiations at the development review stage and often assist in
creating greater conformance with the plan. A development application cannot be denied for lack of
plan conformance.
O R H O O D PLAN
Bakers subareas should haue consistent and
logical relationships that create greater
compatibility
25


FRAMEWORK PLAN
URBAN FORM
Priority Issues
) Some new construction is not compatible with existing or desired neighborhood character.
) Baker currently has less than 5% tree canopy, substantially lower than the overall City goal of 18%.
Goals
) New construction shall be designed and built to high quality standards and respect the scale,
materials, detailing and site plan goals of the subarea.
) Continue Denvers physical character, including mixed-use development, parks and parkways, tree-
lined streets, detached sidewalks, interconnected street networks, and convenient access to parks,
open space and transit.
) Use manmade and natural features, such as open spaces, drainage corridors, parkways, streets and
alleys, as development edges, transitions and interconnections to organize private development.
) Create spatial definition of the street with buildings and landscaping to promote pedestrian activity
and a comprehensive urban framework.
) Using street trees, private landscaping and parks planting, increase Bakers tree canopy to 18%, as
measured by the Department of Parks and Recreation. Dought-tolerant and low-water landscaping
is encouraged throughout the neighborhood.
Recommendations
) City review of new development shall expect conformance with subarea plan goals and policies, as
well as with other citywide plans, rules and regulations. All subareas include recommendations for
quality urban design. Regulatory action to enable City design review is recommended for mixed
use areas, and high traffic locations. Voluntary conformance, rather than regulatory compliance, is
26


BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
encouraged for the single-family/rowhouse and industrial areas.
I The urban design strategies present design goals that encourage cohesiveness and compatibility
with the existing and desired character of the area as well as excellence in urban design. They are
not intended to restrict innovation, imagination or variety in design. The strategies are organized
both by land use type and by geographic subarea. New development is expected to meet the
design goals of the most appropriate category.
I Developers and designers are expected to meet with neighborhood associations and with
immediate neighbors to discuss their projects and to solicit input.
I Neighborhood groups are expected to give timely and appropriate feedback based on elements in the
public interest and to support development proposals that meet neighborhood goals. Neighborhood
input on new developments should be consistent with subarea plan goals and policies.
TYPICAL
COMMERCIAL
STREETSCAPE
TYPICAL
RESIDENTIAL
STREETSCAPE
Achieving the Vision
Zoning regulations alone do not necessarily achieve the desired urban form. Design review using
adopted standards and guidelines can be enabled through zoning or Landmark designation. While much
of the residential portion of Baker is within the Landmark-designated Baker Historic District, the
commercial and industrial areas are not subject to required design review. The standards and guidelines
provided in the plan give further direction to development projects undergoing site plan review. The
standards and guidelines remain advisory until adopted through a formal regulatory process. Past
experience has shown, however, that providing this direction during the site plan review process can be
effective in improving a projects conformance with the plan.
BUILDING
FRONTS,
SIGNAGE.
(PEDESTRIAN
ORIENTED
SIDEWALK
("THE COMMON SPACE")
- AMENITY ZONE
(ENHANCED PAVING, STREET TREES,
PEDESTRIAN LIGHTS, BENCHES,
TRASH RECEPTACLE, ETC)
TREE LAWN
(STREET TREES, TURFGRASS
OR GROUND COVERS)
FRONT
YARD
SETBACK
DETACHED
SIDEWALK
27


FRAMEWORK PLAN
Priority Issues and Opportunities
) Overall traffic volume and speed is dangerous and detracts from quality of life.
) Congestion occurs on streets near high-volume centers.
TRANSPORTATION AND CIRCULATION
Light rail stop
) Car and bus congestion occurs on streets near light rail stations.
) Public traffic and transit projects may neglect pedestrian and bicycle connections.
) Truck traffic and cut-through commuter traffic within the residential section of the neighborhood is
dangerous, noisy and causes air pollution.
) Some bus stops are unsafe and unattractive.
) Pedestrian crossings at major intersections are hazardous.
) Parking overflow from commercial areas impacts residential areas, including blocking alleys and
sidewalks.
) Bicycle routes are discontinuous.
) Provide an adaptable and interconnected transportation system that encourages multiple modes of
transportation, disperses traffic, and provides streets that accommodate motor vehicles, transit,
bicycles and pedestrians.
) Provide safe, convenient access to and from the neighborhood.
) Employ structural and non-structural traffic mitigation measures to discourage commuter traffic
cutting through the residential area.
) Provide an increase in alternative modes of transportation, other than the automobile, by
Goals
28


BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
encouraging bus, bicycle and pedestrian travel.
) Improve access to employment and activity centers in a manner consistent with commitments to
provide a full range of travel modes, to protect quality of life and to promote good urban design.
) All projects must be built to the highest urban design standards. New facilities must make a
positive design contribution to the neighborhood and include facilities for bicycles, sidewalks,
trees, medians, lighting, and other high-quality physical design features.
) Provide for the efficient movement of goods by monitoring truck routes, and enforcing truck-
exclusion regulations.
) Create safe and convenient access to light rail stations for pedestrians and bicyclists.
) Land use patterns and zoning must support effective public rapid transit, an efficient roadway
system and alternative transportation modes.
) Improve the appearance and safety of bus shelters.
) Create safe, well-lit pedestrian connections.
) Use street trees and sidewalk improvements to create Green Streets that connect people to parks,
schools and commercial areas.
Recommendations
1-25 bordering Baker
) Sidewalks and facilities for pedestrians are integral components of the transportation system. New
roads and transit facilities must be designed to include pedestrian facilities and when existing
arterials are reconstructed they should be furnished with sidewalks and pedestrian access to
neighborhoods.
) Bicycle facilities, including lanes and storage, should be included in new road and bridge
construction. Direct bicycle access should be provided to transit stations and park-and-rides, both
of which should be equipped with high quality bicycle parking.
) Speed limits need to be enforced on all streets, especially the collector thoroughfares of Bannock,
Cherokee, 1st Avenue, 3rd Avenue and Bayaud.
) Encourage the use of traffic mechanisms that will mitigate or limit cut-through or hazardous traffic.
) Repair and replace broken and missing sidewalks throughout the neighborhood.
) Add new detached walks with street trees in new developments.
29


FRAMEWORK PLAN
) Repair and replace substandard alleys.
) Improve pedestrian and bicycle access along the Alameda underpass and across Alameda Avenue.
) Repair and improve the 1-25 Broadway viaduct, maintaining highway access to and egress from
Broadway.
) Improve vehicular, pedestrian and bicycle access to Broadway Station, especially as new transit lines
are added.
) Separate the railroad lines from the street grade at Kalamath Street and Santa Fe Drive.
) Any future light rail lines must support and reinforce both commercial and residential land uses in
the neighborhood, especially on Broadway and Lincoln.
) Post clear truck routes for industrial traffic and enforce No Truck streets in the residential area.
) Improve neighborhood input process for bus service decisions and changes.
) Develop bicycle connections to fill the gaps in the citywide system, including:
I Alameda at Santa Fe Drive (Routes D-7, D-14, D-16)
I Broadway Station
) Develop pedestrian and bicycle access to the Platte River Greenway.
Achieving the Vision
The plan vision and goals for transportation and circulation include a combination of enforcement and
capital improvements and maintenance. Enforcement of vehicular traffic laws such as speed and truck
routes is a need throughout the city. Capital projects are funded by the City through its capital
improvements program, by property owners through districts, or by private sources as development
occurs. Many of these projects promote multimodal streets. Funding availability and fixed amount of
street right-of-way are two constraints to achieving the vision and goals.
30


SUBAREA MANS


SUBAREA PLANS
Baker Plan establishes subareas, which have relatively distinct characteristics. The subareas are
characterized by their land use functions, locations and distinct urban form. Although the boundaries
between subareas are not absolute and some characteristics overlap subarea boundaries, the
neighborhood subareas are:
I Commercial Corridors
I Single Family and Rowhouse Residential
| Mid-rise and High-rise Residential
I Residential-Office Area of Change
I Industrial-Commercial Area of Change
I Industrial
I Transit Oriented Development
I Retail Centers
The following sections outline key issues and opportunities, goals, recommendations, and design
guidelines for the development of each subarea.
32


BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
Subareas
Legend
Industrial
Industrial/Commercial Area of Change
Residential/Office Area of Change
Commercial Corridors
Mid- and High-Rise Residential
Single-Family and Rowhouse Residential
Transit-Oriented Development
Retail Centers
Baker Historic District
33
SjuuuUULJL


SUBAREA PLANS COMMERCIAL CORRIDORS
The historic 1st Avenue Hotel on Broadway
has a traditional design, with ground-floor
commercial uses and upper-level
housing potential
Commercial corridors
Broadway, Santa Fe Drive, West SixthAvenue and West Alameda Avenue are streets that have traditionally
been associated with commerce and that have a primarily commercial character. Historically, many
commercial corridors were pleasant, tree-lined streets with smaller-scale neighborhood-oriented retail
shops. They were easily accessible by foot, car or transit, usually trolley or bus.
The intent for these corridors is to recapture the pedestrian and transit-friendly character of the streets
with traditional development patterns and enhanced streetscaping while accommodating vehicular
traffic, parking, and new uses, including residential and larger destination stores and offices.
Land Use
Primary Issues and Opportunities
) High-volume transportation corridors offer opportunities for economic development, increased
density, and increased transit use.
) Vacant and underutilized properties interrupt the cohesive business environment.
) Business impacts may be incompatible with adjacent residences.
) Businesses in or adjacent to residential areas may desire to expand.
) Parking supply is inadequate for customer use.
) Parking solutions are poorly located and designed, undermining a pedestrian-friendly environment.
Goals
) Develop a mix of land uses, which includes housing, office, commercial, destination and
neighborhood-serving retail in the subarea.
) Create a stable, safe, attractive, well-lighted retail area with a mix of offices, neighborhood
businesses, and destination businesses.
) Manage business operations to avoid negative impacts from lighting, hours of operation, noise, drive-
in speakers, trash removal, deliveries, etc.
34


BAKER N E I G H B
) Maintain and enhance the viability of high-density residential and commercial uses.
) Provide adequate, well-designed parking to support customers, residents and employees.
Recommendations
) Support infill development of retail, office and residential uses. Mixed-use projects, with
commercial or public uses on the ground floor and residential uses on upper levels, are especially
appropriate.
) Deteriorating and declining business and shopping areas are expected to be revitalized by
rehabilitation or replacement with appropriate uses.
) Auto-oriented commercial development is inappropriate. Existing strip commercial developments
are expected to be redeveloped, restructured and landscaped.
) Adjacent residential areas should be protected from the activities of shopping areas by adequate
buffering and by ensuring that adequate off-street parking and circulation is provided. Buffering
methods may include:
I Locating traffic, noise, light and activities away from the residential areas;
I Using attractive fencing and landscaping to buffer adjacent residences;
I Transition from commercial uses to residential uses through consistent sidewalks, treelawns,
setbacks, and architectural treatments.
) Prohibit the expansion of commercial uses into existing residentially zoned and used areas, unless
such expansion maintains or improves the residential desirability of the affected residential area.
Improvements include:
I Removing a destabilizing or incompatible element from the neighborhood;
I Providing for the expansion of an established use that will not adversely affect the
neighborhood;
I Increasing the availability of neighborhood shopping and services;
I Providing for a unique citywide need that can be met by balancing city and neighborhood
concerns only at that location;
I Improving the appearance of a business area or established use; and
I Improving buffering between business and non-business uses.
) Develop vacant land in a manner that is compatible with surrounding land uses in terms of use and
character.
O R H O O D PLAN
Parking structures should complement
existing architecture and prouide retail
spaces at ground level
35


SUBAREA PLANS COMMERCIAL CORRIDORS
) Develop shared parking arrangements among retail establishments to meet customer demand,
explore regulatory changes to allow parking credits for pedestrian-accessible transit facilities, and
research the viability of establishing a local parking district.
Urban Form
Primary Issues and Opportunities
) Automobile-oriented developments may undermine the traditional development patterns and
pedestrian-friendly design of the commercial areas.
) Character-defining historic buildings are threatened with demolition.
Goals
) Develop business areas in a manner that encourages pedestrian and transit friendliness, reinforces
the character of the area and buffers adjacent residential uses.
) Create a walkable neighborhood by providing active pedestrian-oriented public uses on the ground
floors of commercial, residential and mixed-use projects, generous sidewalks, enhanced
streetscaping, and building design with human scale and detail.
) Maintain the grid pattern of streets and alleys to reinforce the block pattern and the existing urban
structure.
) Enhance each corridors traditional street-oriented development patterns, setbacks, and build-to
lines, provide a consistent edge to the public street and sidewalk in order to provide pedestrian
scale and access, and encourage pedestrian-oriented activity.
) Minimize the presence of parking areas and parking structures along the corridor edge to limit the
conflicts with desired pedestrian activity. Minimize the negative visual and noise impacts of parked
autos on the corridors and adjacent residential areas through a combination of site planning,
building placement, landscaping, screening, fencing and other effective buffering.
) Use durable materials that complement Denvers tradition as a brick and masonry city.
) Protect, preserve and reuse historic buildings.
Recommendations
) The following buildings have historic significance and help define the character of the corridors.
Most (except as shown in italics) have not been designated as historic landmarks. They should be
preserved and reused, although not necessarily designated as historic structures:
36


BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
I First Avenue Hotel, 115 Broadway I
I Lehman Auto Company 550 Broadway I
I Glass Emporium, 424 Broadway I
I Johnson Moving and Storage, 221 Broadway I
I Rocky Mountain Camera, 240 Broadway I
I 232-234-236 Broadway I
I Union Bank, 104 Broadway I
I Skylark Lounge, 58-64 Broadway I
I Bookmall, 26 Broadway I
I 22-24 South Broadway I
I Werner Building, 80 South Broadway I
I Allen Paint, 141 South Broadway I
I Sooper B Liquor, 102 South Broadway I
I Broadway Bodyworks, 160 South Broadway I
I Imperial Building, 240 South Broadway I
I Shepton Antiques, 339 South Broadway I
I Jefferson Building, 432 South Broadway I
I Denver Lire Department No. 18,600 South Brc
I Ruins, 574 Santa Le Drive I
Mayan Theater, 110 Broadway
Eron Johnson Antiques, 451 Broadway
Gateway Antiques, 357 Broadway
Lrenchs Gun Shop, 258 Broadway
Trains and Sundance Publishing, 250 Broadway
Varsity Lormal, 70 Broadway
The Hornet, 76 Broadway
Lreakys, 6 Broadway
Leizys Rugs, 21 South Broadway
Decade, 56 South Broadway
Lamous Pizza, 94 South Broadway
United States Post Office, 225 South Broadway
Townhouses, 122-126 South Broadway
Karate, 226 South Broadway
Appliances, 245 South Broadway
Masonic Temple, 350 South Broadway
Little Shanghai, 456 South Broadway
idway
604 West 6th Avenue
Design Guidelines
\ Site
I Provide convenient pedestrian access from the public right of way, parking areas, and transit
areas and utilize pedestrian-friendly site and building design.
I Do not locate parking and/or drive aisles between buildings and the public street.
I Place curb cuts, drive aisles and ramps to parking structures perpendicular to the public street
and other public right of way.
37


SUBAREA PLANS COMMERCIAL CORRIDORS
Broadway Sites of Historic Significance
Allen Paint
141 South
Feizy's Rugs
Johnson Moving Gateway Antiques
and Storage
357
Johnson
Antiques
Firehouse #18
600 South
Jefferson
Building
432 South
Townhouses
122-126South
Famous
Pizza
94 South
Werner ^ , ,
Building Freaky s
80 South 6
Lehman Auto Co.
550
French's Guns
258
Trains and Sundance
250
Rocky Mountain
Camera
232- 240
236
38


BAKER N E I G H B
) Building Orientation
I Locate building walls at the property line adjacent to the public street, creating a consistent
street wall.
I Locate auto-oriented and drive-through uses away from street frontage, such as on the side or
rear of buildings and buffered from residential uses.
I Locate parking underground or to the rear of buildings.
I Locate loading, storage, HVAC, garbage dumpsters and other service functions away from
pedestrian routes and access points. Screen service functions from view using walls, fences and
landscaping. Delivery and other service operations are expected not to disturb adjoining
residences and properties.
) Massing and Scale
I Mid-rise buildings are appropriate. Taller buildings are expected to step back at the fourth story
to reduce overall mass and scale, while maintaining human scale at the ground level.
) Materials
I Ground floor of new buildings are expected to be of durable solid materials, such as brick,
masonry, architectural metals, cast in place concrete, tile, and glass block systems when properly
finished and detailed. Storefront window systems should be used in commercial and mixed-use
buildings. Stucco systems may be appropriate on levels above the ground floor.
I Relate new construction to existing buildings through the use of similar detail elements present
in standard brick, modular stone, cast stone accents, concrete masonry and detailed stucco.
I Use carefully detailed combinations of materials to reinforce architectural scaling elements.
) Detailing
I Include human-scaled building elements and architectural variation, including form, detail,
materials and colors to provide visual interest. Prominent and/or decorative parapets and
cornices are appropriate. Repeating patterns of color, texture, material or change in plane shall
be used as integral parts of the building fabric, not superficially applied.
I Except for commercial storefront systems, all windows should be recessed. Subdivide glazing
by systems of framing and mullions to reinforce architectural scaling elements.
I Windows on the residential portion of any building should reflect the more vertically oriented,
deeply set punched opening characteristics typical of Denver architecture.
O R H O O D PLAN
Building detailing adds richness through
decorative elements and materials
39


SUBAREA PLANS COMMERCIAL CORRIDORS
I Size and proportions of storefront systems in mixed use or commercial buildings should be
subdivided by substantial columns, piers and or wall areas that visually bring the building mass
and structural system to the ground.
I Use prominent windows and operable doors at the street-facing facades.
) Streescape
I Use streetscape elements to create a pedestrian-friendly environment, including:
- sidewalks;
- street trees, either in grates or in landscaped tree lawns, with automatic irrigation systems;
- safe pedestrian crossing points;
- street furniture such as benches and trash receptacles at high-volume pedestrian areas;
- street and pedestrian lighting;
- on-street parking and bus stops.
I Streetscape elements on Broadway and Alameda are expected to be consistent with the design
standards and spacing of the Metropolitan Denver Local Development Corporation.
I Streetscape elements on Santa Fe Drive are expected to be consistent with the design standards
and elements of the Santa Fe Drive Redevelopment Corporation.
Transportation and Circulation
Primary Issues and Opportunities
) Sidewalks and pedestrian amenities are inconsistent throughout the district
) Bus stops are uncomfortable and unsafe.
) Parking is inadequate for customers and employees.
) Pedestrian crossings are unsafe.
Goals
) Improve sidewalks and add pedestrian amenities in conjunction with business revitalization.
) Develop bus and train service to be efficient, comfortable and convenient.
Recommendations
) Add sidewalks and trees along West 6th Avenue, which may require narrowing the lanes or
acquiring additional right of way to accommodate pedestrians.
40


BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
) Narrow the pedestrian crossing points on Alameda Avenue, possibly using curb bulb-outs at
corners.
) Reconfigure traffic and pedestrian signals to increase amount of pedestrian-crossing time at
intersections:
I 6th Avenue at Santa Fe, Kalamath, Broadway, and Lincoln
I Alameda at Cherokee, Bannock, Broadway, and Lincoln
) Maintain on-street parking on Broadway.
) Any displaced parking should be recaptured in centralized and shared-use parking lots and
structures. Parking facilities must comply with the urban design goals and standards for the area.
) Repair and improve the Alameda Avenue underpass, widen sidewalks, provide handicap
accessibility, provide for bicycles, improve overall aesthetics and urban design.
Streetscaping enhances the pedestrian
experience
41


SUBAREA PLANS SINGLE FAMILY AND ROWHOUSE RESIDENTIAL
Rowhouses in the residential subarea
SINGLE FAMILY AND ROWHOUSE
RESIDENTIAL
The core of the Baker neighborhood is a residential area that allows single family houses, duplexes and
rowhouses. There is an average density of 19 dwelling units per acre, which is a moderate urban density
sufficient to support transit and adjacent commercial areas.
Land Use
Primary Issues and Opportunities
) Threat of demolition of existing housing and increased density of replacement housing could alter
the areas stability.
) Existing non-conforming industrial uses undermine the integrity and pedestrian-friendliness of the
residential area.
) Vacant and underutilized commercial buildings offer opportunities for services and retail at an
appropriate neighborhood scale.
Goals
) Enhance the character of the residential area and quality of life for the residents.
) Protect the integrity of the residential area by prohibiting industrial and new commercial infill or
encroachment.
) Rehabilitate and reuse existing commercial structures for neighborhood-scale commerce.
) Maintain the current residential density.
) Remove existing nonconforming uses in the residential area.
) Increase and improve the parks, green streets and recreation facilities in the neighborhood.
) Support a diverse population by providing support services such as childcare facilities, transit, and a
variety of housing opportunities.
42


BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
Recommendations
b Limit site rezonings to those that enhance the residential character. Community Planning and
Development Agency and neighborhood associations should oppose inappropriate zoning
applications to City Council.
b Develop relocation and buy-out program for nonconforming uses,
b Work with Denver Department of Parks and Recreation to develop detailed site facility and
program analysis for Baker parks and recreation, including:
I Enhance recreation facilities, programs and maintenance.
I Improve landscaping in tree lawns and other public areas, including Dailey Park.
I Identify priorities for Park improvements and landscaping.
I Develop a landscaping improvements priority list and pursue funding and labor for implementation.
I Identify appropriate locations for additional neighborhood parks, especially in redeveloping
areas and transition areas,
b Increase level of property maintenance.
b Increase infrastructure maintenance, especially for utilities and drainage. Improve aging utilities
and provide access to new technology,
b Replace old main sewer lines and gas lines,
b Upgrade electrical and fiber optics systems,
b Assess adequacy of sewer and storm drainage system,
b Identify funding mechanism to repair and maintain deteriorating buildings,
b Educate residents and property owners about home maintenance, funding options, city regulations
and requirements, and historic preservation.
incompatible new residential building
Urban Form
Primary Issues and Opportunities
b Some infill buildings, replacement structures and additions to existing buildings are incompatible in
style, orientation, scale, massing and overall character, especially outside the historic district,
b The single family and rowhouse residential subarea includes the Baker Historic District, which
provides for demolition protection and design review of new construction and changes to historic
homes. The Denver Landmark Preservation Commission has authority in reviewing all proposed
demolition and design review over any exterior construction requiring a building permit.
However, the remainder of the subarea lacks this level of design review and protection.
43


SUBAREA PLANS SINGLE FAMILY AND ROWHOUSE RESIDENTIAL
Compatible new residential building
Goals
b Maintain a stable residential area of low-scale single family and rowhouse housing,
b Reinforce the existing neighborhood character through streetscape and building design,
b Design infill construction and changes to existing structures to compliment and be compatible with
the desired neighborhood character. Although regulatory design review outside the historic district
is unlikely, voluntary commitment to excellent design will enhance the neighborhood,
b Use an urban design framework for right of way improvements, directional and interpretive signs,
and streetscaping elements to identify the Baker neighborhood and knit the residential area to the
adjacent commercial areas.
Urban Design Strategies
b Site
I Where usable alleys exist, they are expected to be used for vehicular access to the site. Orient
garages and parking stalls towards alleys.
I On corner lots where alley access is not feasible, orient garages and parking stalls towards side
streets.
I Where alley access is not feasible, set back front-loaded garages and parking from the front
facade of the building.
I Individual garage doors should not be wider than 10'-0" For multiple-car garages, multiple doors
or doors with scaling elements are expected.
I Do not provide for parking of vehicles, circular drives and/or porte cocheres in the front setback
between the house and the street.
b Building Orientation
I Orient the narrow end of the single residence or residential unit in a multi-unit dwelling toward
the public street.
I Provide operable front doors or building entryways oriented toward and accessible from the
public street.
I Open porches on the front facade are expected,
b Massing and Scale
I Respect the proportions, materials, scale and massing rhythm of the buildings in the surrounding
face blocks when constructing new buildings.
44


BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
I Reflect the proportions, materials and scale of existing structures when constructing vertical
and horizontal expansions.
I Articulate facades of rowhouses and townhouses to define the individual units in multi-unit
dwellings, consistent with the scale and proportions of the existing single family homes in the
immediate area.
) Roof Pitches
I The dominant ridgeline is expected to be perpendicular to the public street.
I For both new construction and changes to existing structures, steep roof pitches (over 8:12) are
expected over the primary occupiable space. Shallower pitches (6:12) are appropriate over
porches, dormers, accessory buildings, etc.
I Flat rooflines, such as on territorial-style residences, are an acceptable alternative, provided that
they include prominent and/or decorative parapets.
h Materials
I Materials on the ground floor of front facades are expected to be modular unit masonry.
I Careful combinations of materials should be used to reinforce architectural scaling and detailing
and to reflect the materials and details used in the neighborhood.
I Horizontal additions to existing structures are expected to be consistent in material cladding
with the original structure.
h Detailing
I Provide richness of scale through change in plane, contrast and intricacy in form, color and
materials.
I Windows should differentiate upper and lower floors through fenestration pattern, sizes and
detailing. Recess windows from the main facade.
I Brick detailing on front corners is encouraged.
Decorative security bars provide safety
without undermining the buildings character
h Streetscape
I Any fences in the front yard should be provide transparency through use of pickets or spacing
of infill materials.
I Window security bars and security doors are expected to be decorative and in keeping with the
character of the residence.
I Existing stone walks and curbs shall be preserved and maintained. Detached sidewalks with
45


SUBAREA PLANS SINGLE FAMILY AND ROWHOUSE RESIDENTIAL
A typical alley
landscaped tree lawns are required. The City has a goal to plant and grow a tree canopy over
18% of the area, including both public and private landscaping.
I The tree lawn is expected to be landscaped and maintained.
Transportation and Circulation
Primary Issues and Opportunities
) Lack of well-maintained sidewalks makes pedestrian connections difficult.
) On-street parking for residents is difficult near the commercial corridors and the hospital.
) Alleys are deteriorating, unpaved and poorly maintained.
) Vehicular speed and volume through the neighborhood decreases public safety.
Pleasant treeiawn and sidewalk
Goals
) Protect and enhance transportation opportunities, including walking, biking, transit use and driving.
) Enhance transportation options for residents and visitors, including light rail, circulator and regular
buses, bicycle lanes and sidewalks.
Recommendations
\ Construct right of way improvements, especially streets, curb and gutter, treeiawn and sidewalks
where needed.
) Identify opportunities for additional parking areas adjacent to commercial areas.
) Limit time parking in some areas, adjacent to commercial, institutional or industrial uses.
) Conduct capital improvement study for drainage, curb and gutter, sidewalk, and street
improvements.
) Improve pedestrian crossing points
) Research adding a light rail stop between Alameda and 10th Avenue to better serve the
neighborhood.
) Identify areas needed for bus service and bus stops.
) Pursue pilot program of circulator buses to connect industrial area to light rail stops and Broadway.
) Increase enforcement of existing traffic laws related to speeding and parking to slow traffic and
increase safety.
) Repair potholes in streets and alleys; pave unimproved alleys.
) Identify areas for dedicated bicycle lanes and paths.
46


BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
MID-RISE AND HIGH-RISE RESIDENTIAL
This subarea serves as a transition and a buffer between the lower-scale residential core subarea and the
more intense subareas on the neighborhood perimeter. Although not recommended by this plan,
current zoning allows higher density residential and mixed use projects near West 6th Avenue and
Broadway. Any new projects should be appropriately designed.
Land Use
Primary Issues and Opportunities
) Vacant and underutilized buildings offer opportunities for increased residential density.
) Some portions of the neighborhood are zoned for high density housing, regardless of prevalent character.
Goals
) Rehabilitate and reuse underutilized commercial structures for new residential units.
) Develop new residential structures at a scale and density that enhances the neighborhood. The
subareas proximity to employment and supporting infrastructure suggest the development of
moderate-cost housing in future development.
) Enhance the character of the residential area and quality of life for the residents.
) Support a diverse population by providing support services such as childcare facilities, transit, and
a variety of housing opportunities.
Hirshield Tower near Dailey Park is an
existing high rise building
Recommendations
\ Adjust zoning and other regulations to allow new residential structures to be built.
% Encourage redevelopment of vacant and underutilized sites at an appropriate scale and density.
47


SUBAREA PLANS MID-RISE
This high-rise building shows one pedestrian-
friendly facade and one blank wall
Garage entry should be subordinated by
emphasizing the pedestrian entry
AND HIGH-RISE RESIDENTIAL
Urban Form
Primary Issues and Opportunities
) Some infill buildings, replacement structures and additions to existing buildings are incompatible in
style, orientation, scale, massing and overall character.
Goals
) Ensure that higher-scale development reinforces and enhances neighborhood character through
appropriate bulk, scale and pedestrian-level interest.
) Provide a logical transition between the commercial corridors and the low-scale residential neighborhood.
) Modulate abrupt differences in building height and scale between the commercial corridors and
the low-scale residential neighborhood.
) Moderate scale and height of higher-scale buildings adjacent to lower-scale buildings.
) Maintain Denvers traditional street and alley grid system.
) Maintain a vital pedestrian-friendly environment that avoids conflicts between pedestrians and
vehicles and reinforces traditional neighborhood design characteristics, including landscaped front
yards, uninterrupted sidewalks, and ground floor architectural interest.
) Provide building design with human scale and interest through use of varied forms, materials, details
and colors. Avoid expanses of blank walls in new construction.
) Maintain and increase available on-street parking by minimizing numbers of curb cuts and loading zones.
Urban Design Strategies
) Site
I Minimize the number of curb cuts and drive aisles across sidewalks. Where usable alleys exist,
they are expected to be used for vehicular access to the site. Orient garages and parking stalls
towards alleys where safe and practical.
I Where alley access is not feasible, all drive aisles and curb cuts are expected to be perpendicular
to the public street. Minimize the number of curb cuts.
I Do not provide for parking of vehicles in the front setback between the structure and the street.
I Locate surface parking to the side or rear of buildings. Screen all surface parking with finished
architectural facades or landscaping.
I Landscape the front setback.
I Do not provide for circular drives and/or porte cocheres in the front setback.
I Gated communities are not appropriate.
48


BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
) Building Orientation
I Orient primary front doors, primary building entryways and lobbies toward, visible from and
accessible from the public street.
) Massing and Scale
I Use building articulation, recessed and cantilevered balconies and stepbacks at upper levels to reduce
overall mass and bulk of larger multi-unit dwellings to create a graceful building silhouette.
) Building Base
I Articulate and detail the lower 80' of buildings to provide human scale and interest. Finish all
facades to create a consistent appearance; secondary facades need not be treated as primary facades.
I Where structured parking is exposed above grade, screen the exposed wall through pedestrian
active uses, architectural treatment and/or landscaping.
) Materials
I Materials on the ground floor of facades visible from the public right of way are expected to be
modular unit masonry and at least 65% transparent glazing.
I Careful combinations of materials should be used to reinforce architectural scaling and detailing
and to reflect the materials and details used in the neighborhood.
) Detailing
I Provide richness of scale through change in plane, contrast and intricacy in form, fenestration
patterns, color and materials.
I Balconies, where used, are expected to be integral to the building design, not superficially applied.
I Emphasize building entries through the use of glazing, colors, detailing, canopies or other methods.
) Streetscape
I Fences in the front setback are expected to provide transparency through use of pickets or
spacing of infill materials. Only retaining walls should be of solid materials.
I Window security bars and security doors are expected to be decorative and in keeping with the
character of the residence.
I Existing stone walks and curbs shall be preserved and maintained.
I Sidewalks shall be detached from the curb and separated from the street by a landscaped tree lawn.
I Cuts into the tree lawns for loading zones or other purposes shall not be allowed.
Direct entries to the street emphasize
pedestrian connections
ITXj X
rrr _n n n u n n_

i _n _n n n DO n n
* r a mt r JL L n
__D_ n i L n
Architectuai features like cornices can relate
to adjacent buildings, lowering the apparent
height of the building
49


SUBAREA PLANS RESIDENTIAL-OFFICE AREA OF CHANGE
LiIesidential-office area of change
The residential-office area of change has two purposes: to buffer the impacts of the residential,
commercial and industrial subareas from each other through more sensitive site and building design, and
to allow property owners the flexibility to maintain and expand existing office and light industrial uses,
to build new residential uses, and to respond to the long-term evolution of development trends. It serves
as a blend of land uses from the solidly residential area to the solidly industrial area, and between the
intense commercial activity on Broadway and the residential interior.
Land Use
Primary Issues and Opportunities
) The area has a rough mixture of industrial uses and housing that is difficult for both.
) There are vacant and underutilized sites throughout the area, providing opportunities for
development.
) Dailey Park is the centerpiece of the neighborhood and is within easy walking distance of sites in
the subarea, providing an opportunity for more residential uses.
) The neighborhood is challenged to protect and enhance current business and light industrial uses
in the area while allowing new development that improves the neighborhood.
Goals
) Develop a logical change between Bakers subareas that protects the viability of existing industrial
businesses and enhances the quality of life of the residents. Intense non-retail business activity and
new housing at a moderate density are appropriate in the area.
) Provide a range of residential and office uses that allow property owners the flexibility to respond
to the long-term evolution of development trends. Residential uses are supported, but it is
expected that residential uses are responsible for buffering themselves from nonresidential uses that
may be located on adjacent property. Siting and design of each new development must ensure
compatibility and blending of uses.
50


BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
) Reinvestment in existing light industrial and non-retail commercial properties is expected.
Businesses are encouraged to expand and replace facilities within existing property boundaries to
ensure economic viability and good facility maintenance.
) Arrange residential, office, service and open space uses to be convenient to and compatible with
each other. Residential and office/light industrial uses are not necessarily mixed in each building
or development, or even within each block in the subarea, but residential and commercial uses are
not strictly separated from each other.
) Support the existing and new uses with parks, pedestrian and transit amenities, shared parking
arrangements, and multi-use structures.
Recommendations
) As properties redevelop, support rezoning applications that allow for a mix of residential and office
uses, shared parking, and appropriate buffering, mitigation and design. To determine compatible
uses, the following effects must be considered:
I The proposed use will not be harmful to the public or threaten the general welfare of the area.
I The use and enjoyment of existing uses on surrounding property will not be impaired by the
proposed new use.
I The establishment of the new use shall not impede the normal and orderly practices of existing uses.
I The aggregate impacts of similar uses shall not result in harmful external effects or
environmental impacts.
I All uses and structures are sited and designed to be compatible with one another, including
location, orientation, scale, visual and sound privacy.
) In considering new uses, the following values must be considered:
I Fairness: The viability of the existing land uses must be protected.
I Due Process: Any changes to property rights, such as zoning, must occur through a fair and
equitable public process.
I Balance: Changes must balance citywide and local goals and issues.
) Support applications for additions to and replacement of buildings on existing light industrial and
commercial sites to maintain good physical condition of the properties.
Urban Form
Primary Issues and Opportunities
) The current arrangement of uses lacks cohesion and sensible development patterns.
51


SUBAREA PLANS RESIDENTIAL-OFFICE AREA OF CHANGE
Deep setbacks in the Residential-Office
Area of Change add green space and
attractiveness
Goals
h Provide for and encourage a compatible mix of housing and office uses in a pedestrian-friendly
environment.
h Provide public amenities such as streets with detached sidewalks and tree lawns, connections to
parks and open spaces, public art and public gathering places. Provision of significant public
amenities in private development projects may compensate for additional building density,
h Increase the amount of landscaping and greenery in the neighborhood,
h Create a cohesive streetscape using detached sidewalks and consistent building setback line,
h Create compatibility between uses and improve the overall appearance of the area through design
and character of the buildings and sites.
h Preserve buildings of architectural merit and use design of contemporary structures to create
a unique character and sense of place. The Residential-Office Area of Change is envisioned
as an eclectic neighborhood where no specific architectural style is intended. However, all
projects should be contextual in their nature, influenced by adjacent buildings scale and
architectural character.
h Provide building design with human scale and interest through use of varied forms, materials, details
and colors. Avoid expanses of blank walls in new construction,
h Maintain and increase the availability of on-street parking through minimizing numbers of curb cuts
and loading zones.
Urban Design Strategies
\ Site
I Maintain deep, consistent setbacks along the front property lines throughout the area of change.
Corner lots may orient towards either street.
I Landscape the setback with live plants and permeable materials. Do not use the front setback
for parking, loading or service.
I Locate parking to the side or rear of buildings, or underground. Landscape all parking lots.
I Locate, screen and buffer service, storage, delivery, utilities and refuse areas to minimize the view
from streets, adjacent zone lots, and open spaces.
I Use a combination of site planning, building design, and operational requirements to buffer new
uses from impacts from existing uses. Appropriate buffering may include a combination of:
additional side and rear setbacks, landscaping, fencing or walls, operational conditions, such as
hours of operation or public access, vehicular access and circulation pattern arrangement, and
52


BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
mitigation of external effects, such as noise, vibration and odor
I Minimize the visual impact of parking areas and structures on streets, open spaces, and adjoining
development through provision of on-grade habitable space, architectural finishes and landscaping.
I Improve the efficiency of parking areas by allowing multiple uses to share parking spaces, curb
cuts and circulation drives.
I Provide direct pedestrian access from the front sidewalk to the building.
I Provide for bicycle parking and access during site planning.
) Massing and Scale
I Mid-rise buildings are appropriate. Taller buildings are expected to step back at the fourth story
to reduce overall mass and scale, while maintaing human scale at the ground level.
I Roof forms should be used to reinforce the character of the building and should reflect the use
of the building.
I Flat rooflines with prominent or decorative parapets are most reflective of the historic industrial
context. Steeply-pitched rooflines are most reflective of the historic residential context.
) Materials
I Ground floor of new buildings are expected to be of durable solid materials. Brick, masonry,
architectural metals, cast in place concrete, tile, glass block systems, etc. are acceptable materials
when properly finished and detailed. Storefront window systems should be used in commercial
and mixed-use buildings. Stucco systems may be used on levels above the ground floor.
I Relate new construction to existing buildings through the predominant use of similar detail
elements present in standard brick, modular stone, cast stone accents, concrete masonry,
detailed stucco, and wood.
I Use carefully detailed combinations of materials to reinforce architectural
scaling elements.
) Detailing
I Provide human-scaled building elements and architectural variation, including use of varied
forms, materials, details and colors.
I Provide architecturally-finished and detailed elevations for all exposures of the building with the
primary facade (typically the street-facing elevation) having dominant architectural expression.
The front entrance and primary facade should be clearly visible and accessible.
I Provide primary building entrance facing or clearly visible from the public sidewalk.
character of a street
53


SUBAREA PLANS RESIDENTIAL-OFFICE AREA OF CHANGE
Residential-Office Area of Change detailing
0 Streetscape
I Streetscape elements shall be used to create a pedestrian-friendly environment, including
detached sidewalks, street trees, safe pedestrian crossing points, street lighting, on-street parking,
and bus stops.
I Sidewalks shall be a minimum of 5' and shall be detached from the curb by a landscaped tree
lawn a minimum of 8'. The tree lawn shall be planted with living, organic, growing ground cover
and appropriate street trees.
I Existing or historic sandstone walks shall be retained and maintained. New use of historic
sandstone walks is encouraged.
Transportation and Circulation
Primary Issues and Opportunities
0 The mix of industrial, residential and commercial traffic can create conflicts between pedestrians
and truck traffic.
) Overall speed and volume of traffic create unsafe conditions.
) Business customers and employees need transportation options to access the area.
Goals
) Enhance the transit and pedestrian opportunities for residents and employees.
) Create safe conditions to avoid or mitigate traffic conflicts.
Recommendations
\ Provide continuous detached sidewalks with street trees to buffer pedestrians from traffic.
) Direct truck traffic to designated truck routes and away from the residential subarea.
) Keep Bayaud from Fox Street to Kalamath Street as a primary east-west truck access route.
) Direct truck loading and service away from primary streets to the side or rear of buildings
and to alleys.
54


BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
INDUSTRIAL-COMMERCIAL AREA OF CHANGE
The industrial-commercial area of change continues the blend between the residential and industrial subareas
and allows property owners the flexibility to respond to the long-term evolution of development trends. The
predominant use is light industry and commercial businesses with normal business practices and effects such
as heavy traffic, noise and light. The area has extensive commercial activity, making it unsuitable for most
residential uses, although a few work-live units provide housing for resident business owners.
Land Use
Primary Issues and Opportunities
) The area has an illogical mixture of industrial uses and housing that is difficult for both.
) There are vacant and underutilized sites throughout the area, providing opportunities for
development and expansion.
) Adjacency to residential zone districts triggers regulations that impact industrial sites, placing a
burden on industrial businesses.
Goals
) Develop a logical change between Bakers subareas that protects the viability of existing industrial
businesses and provides opportunities for appropriate intensification of commercial uses.
) Limit residential uses to those that currently exist or that provide small-scale housing for resident
business owners in work-live units. Although extensive new housing development is
inappropriate, limited work-live units may be allowed.
) Provide a range of industrial and commercial uses that allow property owners the flexibility to
respond to the long-term evolution of development trends.
) Arrange industrial, office, service and open space uses to be convenient to and compatible with each other.
) Support the existing and new uses with pedestrian and transit amenities, shared parking
arrangements, and multi-use structures.
55
iuBuBujuUUL


SUBAREA PLANS INDUSTRIAL-COMMERCIAL AREA OF CHANGE
Recommendations
) As properties redevelop, support rezoning applications that allow for a mix of industrial, office and
other commercial uses, shared parking facilities, and appropriate buffering, mitigation and design.
To determine compatible uses, the following effects must be considered:
I The proposed use will not be harmful to the public or threaten the general welfare of the area.
I The use and enjoyment of existing uses on surrounding property will not be impaired by the
proposed new use.
I The establishment of the new use will not impede the normal and orderly practices
of existing uses.
I The aggregate impacts of similar uses shall not result in harmful external effects or
environmental impacts.
I All uses and structures are sited and designed to be compatible with one another, including
location, orientation, scale, visual and sound privacy.
) In considering new uses, the following values must be considered:
I Fairness: The viability of the existing land uses must be protected.
I Due Process: Any changes to property rights, such as zoning, must occur through a fair and
equitable public process.
I Balance: Changes must balance citywide and local goals and issues.
Urban Form
Primary Issues and Opportunities
) The current arrangement of uses lacks cohesion and sensible development patterns.
) Incompatible design elements and lack of landscaping create an unpleasant entry to the
neighborhood. New development projects provide opportunities to improve the overall
appearance of the area.
Goals
) Provide for and encourage a compatible mix of industrial, office and retail uses in a pedestrian-
friendly environment.
) Provide public amenities such as streets with detached sidewalks and tree lawns, parks
and open spaces.
) Create a cohesive streetscape that buffers pedestrians from traffic.
56


BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
) Increase the amount of landscaping and greenery in the neighborhood.
) Create compatibility between uses and improve the overall appearance of the area through design
and character of the buildings and sites.
) Preserve buildings of architectural merit and use design of contemporary structures to create a
unique character and sense of place. The Industrial-Commercial Area of Change is envisioned as an
eclectic neighborhood where no specific architectural style is intended. However, all projects should
be contextual in their nature, influenced by adjacent buildings scale and architectural character.
) Provide building design with human scale and interest through use of varied forms, materials,
details and colors. Avoid expanses of blank walls in new construction.
) Maintain and increase the availability of on-street parking through minimizing numbers of curb
cuts and loading zones.
Palace Construction headquarters is a recent
addition to the subarea
Urban Design Strategies
\ Site
I Landscape the front building setback with live plants and permeable materials. Do not use front
setback for parking, loading or service.
I Locate parking to the side or rear of buildings, or underground. Landscape all parking areas.
I Locate, screen and buffer service, storage, delivery and refuse areas to minimize the view from
streets, adjacent zone lots, and open spaces.
I Use a combination of site planning, building design, and operational requirements to buffer
new uses from impacts from existing uses. Appropriate buffering may include a
combination of additional side and rear setbacks, landscaping, fencing or
walls, operational conditions, such as hours of operation or public access, vehicular access
and circulation pattern arrangement, and mitigation of external effects, such as noise,
vibration and odor
I Minimize the visual impact of parking areas, parking structures, and garages on streets, open
spaces, and adjoining development.
I Improve the efficiency of parking areas by allowing multiple uses to share parking spaces, curb
cuts and circulation drives.
57


SUBAREA PLANS INDUSTRIAL-COMMERCIAL AREA OF CHANGE
) Massing and Scale
I Buildings should be up to four stories tall.
I Simple building forms with horizontal elements and flat rooflines with prominent or decorative
parapets are most reflective of the industrial context.
) Materials
I Ground floors of new buildings are expected to be of durable solid materials. Brick, masonry,
architectural metals, cast in place concrete, tile, glass block systems, etc. are acceptable materials
when properly finished and detailed. Storefront window systems should be used in commercial
and mixed-use buildings. Stucco systems may be used on levels above the ground floor.
I New construction is expected to relate to existing buildings through the predominant use of
similar detail elements present in standard brick, modular stone, cast stone accents, concrete
masonry, detailed stucco, and wood.
I Use carefully detailed combinations of materials to reinforce architectural scaling elements.
) Detailing
I Include human-scaled building elements and architectural variation, including use of varied
forms, materials, details and colors.
I Provide architecturally finished and detailed elevations for all exposures of the building with the
primary facade (typically the street-facing elevation) having appropriate architectural expression.
I Provide primary building entrance facing or clearly visible from the public sidewalk. The front
entrance and primary facade should be clearly visible and accessible.
) Streetscape
I Streetscape elements shall be used to create a pedestrian-friendly environment, including
detached sidewalks, street trees, safe pedestrian crossing points, street lighting, on-street parking,
and bus stops.
I Sidewalks shall be a minimum of 5' and shall be detached from the curb by a landscaped tree
lawn a minimum of 8'. The tree lawn shall be planted with living, organic, growing ground cover
and appropriate street trees.
58


BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
Transportation and Circulation
Primary Issues and Opportunities
I New retail and commercial businesses will bring pedestrians into the area. Conflicts between
truck traffic and pedestrians may occur.
I Overall speed and volume of traffic create unsafe conditions.
I Business customers and employees need transportation options to access the area.
Goals
I Enhance the transit and pedestrian opportunities for residents and employees.
I Create safe conditions to avoid or mitigate traffic conflicts.
Recommendations
I Provide continuous detached sidewalks with street trees to buffer pedestrians from traffic.
I Direct truck traffic to designated truck routes and away from the residential subarea.
I Direct truck loading and service away from primary streets to the side or rear of buildings
and to alleys.
59


SUBAREA PLANS INDUSTRIAL
Industrial
The industrial area lies between the South Platte River and the light rail tracks north of Alameda Avenue.
Manufacturing, warehousing, distribution and wholesale activities occur here. The area is a key
component of Denvers economic and employment base. This area of stability remains vital, with
businesses upgrading and moving into the 21st century with a commitment to the city and its vital
growth and industrial needs.
Typical industrial buildings house
manufacturing, assembly, distribution and
warehousing
The businesses continue to landscape and improve their sites, improving the visual landscape. Safety and
environmental sensitivity remain high with a concern for the safety and cleanliness of the area. The
manufacturing companies have goals to remain clean in their impact and to meet all federal, state and city
codes. The industrial area is vital and fundamentally non-residential. Residential and industrial uses do
not mix in this subarea and the fundamental separation remains important for the harmony of all.
Nonconforming residences within the industrial areas should be phased out, leaving the area intact with
industrial and commercial uses.
Land Use
Primary Issues and Opportunities
h Existing non-conforming residential uses undermine the integrity and business practices of the
industrial area.
h Vacant and underutilized sites offer opportunities for expansion and reinvestment.
Goals
h Maintain the integrity of the industrial business area by continuing industrial zoning and prohibiting
residential infill or encroachment. Appropriate uses are manufacturing, warehousing and other
industrial uses, as well as office, wholesale stores and other commercial uses.
60


BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
I Enhance the viability of the industrial business area by attracting and retaining viable industrial
businesses. Support expansion of existing business and addition of new businesses, especially new
clean industries.
I Phase out non-industrial and commercial uses that negatively impact the industrial uses.
I Locate more intense industry farthest away from residential edges.
Recommendations
I Maintain strong City policy against housing in the industrial area during review of zoning and
development applications.
I Business associations and City staff should work together to clarify rules and regulations that affect
industrial properties and areas.
I Develop relocation and buy-out program for nonconforming uses. Consider condemnation of
nonconforming uses in limited cases.
I Increase funding available to businesses to renovate and improve their properties.
I Pursue funding for environmental clean-up and re-use of contaminated sites.
I Identify parking and loading areas to be maintained and identify opportunities for additional
parking and loading areas.
Economic and Business Development
Primary Issues and Opportunities
I Crime and vandalism undermine the safety of the area.
Goals
I Support expansion and reinvestment in existing businesses and add new complementary
businesses.
I Increase safety and security in the industrial area.
I Maintain and increase property values.
Recommendations
I Develop and maintain positive working relationships with the community.
I Increase level of city services for public safety trash removal, graffiti removal and code enforcement.
I Address common issues with neighborhood associations and City agencies, especially Police, Public
Works/Transportation, Planning, Zoning, and Excise and License.
61


SUBAREA PLANS INDUSTRIAL
Urban Form
Primary Issues and Opportunities
I Overall appearance and function of the area is undermined by poorly maintained and designed properties.
Goals
) Encourage and maintain industrial development while maintaining a high standard of visual
integration into the built and natural environment.
) Minimize negative impacts on neighboring uses and adjacent properties.
) Create a cohesive appearance and attractive character that reflects the industrial uses in the area.
) Redevelop industrial sites in a logical and respectful manner.
Recommendations
) Increase code enforcement and property maintenance.
) Encourage voluntary commitment to high quality building and site design.
Urban Design Strategies
) Site
I Locate parking and site entrances for heavy vehicles, service vehicles and trucks away from the
primary building entries.
I Provide landscaping and other buffering measures to reduce noise, fumes, and screen or conceal
service areas from public streets.
I Design vehicle parking to avoid conflicts between trucks or other heavy vehicles and employees
and visitors passenger vehicles.
I Locate loading areas to the rear and sides of buildings.
I Use landscaping and screening elements to define surface parking.
I Locate required landscaping in front setbacks and adjacent to public streets.
I Integrate fences into the landscaping. Industrial materials such as masonry or metal should be
used for fencing.
I Locate outside storage and staging areas to the side or rear of buildings. Screen storage areas
from public streets.
I Screen service areas, dumpsters and garbage containers, recycling containers and utility kiosks
from public streets with landscaping or screening finished in a manner consistent with the
principle building.
62


BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
I For sites with multiple buildings, provide safe pedestrian connections between buildings.
) Building Orientation
I Locate principle buildings within 5' of the minimum front setback facing public streets.
I Locate offices, reception and other public use areas at the front of buildings and lacing public streets.
I Design facades so public use areas are easily identifiable and visible from public streets.
I Locate and design main entries to be clearly identifiable and accessible from public streets.
Provide landscaping to identify and define entrances to the site and buildings.
I Secondary buildings on a site, including those designed for storage of materials, should be
screened from public streets with landscaping or should be designed and finished in a manner
consistent with the principle building.
) Massing and Scale
I Industrial buildings should be 1-3 stories tall.
I Simple building forms with horizontal elements and flat rooflines with prominent or decorative
parapets are most reflective of the industrial context.
) Detailing
I Use articulation on street-facing facades to create depth and variation.
I Use architectural elements, materials, finishes, glazing and textured surfaces to provide visual interest.
I Include glazing as a major component of street-facing facades. Features such as texture,
graphics, reveals and colors should be incorporated into facades that may contain blank walls.
Provide landscaping in front of blank walls that face public streets.
I Light entrances to buildings to enhance after-dark visibility and safety.
I Integrate visual landmarks into building design at locations of high visibility such as significant
street corners.
I Encourage features such as flag poles, awnings, canopies, visual art and entry statements.
I Where lot size permits, service doors (e.g. overhead doors at loading docks) should not be
located on a building facade that faces a public street. Design service doors to fit with the
overall design of the building.
I All rooftop mechanical equipment and telecommunications facilities should be screened from
public view or integrated within the building architecture.
63


SUBAREA PLANS INDUSTRIAL
At-grade train crossing blocks rush-hour
traffic
Screening of seruice areas is integral to site
planning
h Streetscape
I Retain existing mature trees on adjacent public right of way. Provide measures for their long-
term maintenance.
I Follow Denver streetscape standards along all public streets. Sidewalks may either be attached
to the curb, or detached with tree lawns, depending on the predominant character in the
immediate area. Logical connections to adjacent sidewalks are required,
h Mitigation of External Effects
I Use site and building design of industrial development to minimize external effects so the uses
and activities do not cause or become an excessive annoyance or nuisance to adjacent areas.
External effects may include unsightliness; the emission of odors, liquid effluents, dust, fumes or
smoke; vibration; noise or glare; high brightness light sources; heat; or anything which creates or
causes a health, fire, or explosion hazard; electrical interference; or undue traffic congestion.
I Store garbage and waste material in containers which are weatherproof and animal-resistant
within the boundaries of each site. Screen dumpsters from all adjacent sites and public streets.
I Provide site and building lighting that increases safety and security without causing glare or
casting deep shadows. Lighting should be even across the site.
Transportation and Circulation
Primary Issues and Opportunities
h Conflicts between truck traffic and pedestrians may occur,
h Overall speed and volume of traffic create unsafe conditions,
h Business customers and employees need transportation options to access the area,
h At grade railroad crossings disrupt traffic flow and impede public safety.
Goals
h Enhance the transit and pedestrian opportunities for residents and employees,
h Create safe conditions to avoid or mitigate traffic conflicts.
Recommendations
\ Provide continuous sidewalks to provide for pedestrians movement,
h Direct truck traffic to designated truck routes and away from the residential subarea.
| Direct truck loading and service away from primary streets to the side or rear of buildings and to alleys,
h Separate trains and roads at Santa Fe Drive and Kalamath Street.
64


BAKER N E I G H B
Transit-oriented development
Transit-oriented development (TOD) is a strategy to preserve regional mobility and quality of life by
reinforcing Denvers light rail system and supporting ridership growth. The concept involves placing
high density housing and jobs, along with complementing public uses, retail, and services, in mixed-use,
pedestrian-friendly development patterns adjacent to light rail stops. The mix of uses must be
supportable with or without light rail and must serve as an amenity to the neighborhood as well as to
people traveling to the area. The Baker TODs are located at the Broadway light rail station and the
Alameda light rail stop.
Land Use
Primary Issues and Opportunities
) Both Alameda and Broadway light rail stations are underused, with vehicle -oriented commerce,
industrial and vacant land nearby. Current land uses at the train stations are not served by the light
rail train and serve as barriers to transit use.
) Parcel sizes are large, either industrial or big box in character, and much of the area lacks a regular
street grid.
) An unimproved portion ofVanderbilt Park is located adjacent to the Gates Rubber site and is
available for development as a new park or recreation center.
) Environmental contamination is present at the Broadway Station site.
Goals
) Redevelop the area with high-density housing, a mixture of neighborhood and destination retail, an
office and employment center that is served by light rail, strong pedestrian and bicycle
connections, and adequate parking. Existing retail stores should remain or be replaced as
appropriate, with new development in underused parcels (such as parking lots).
O R H O O D PLAN
Alameda station transit station is adjacent to a
commercial center with development potential
65


SUBAREA PLANS TRANSIT-ORIENTED DEVELOPMENT
TDD Land Use Concept Plan and Conneeting Greenway
This map from the 1 997 Light Rail Station Development plan shows preliminary concepts for development near the stations, including the linear park
connecting Broadway and Alameda stations. However, the areas will be the subject of later site-specific master plans to show actual transit alignment,
streets, and associated land uses and building design.
5 I & f ? I 3
66


BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
I Integrate new parks into the redevelopment of the area, providing adequate parks and open space
for new residents and employees, transit riders and adjacent residents.
I Connect the Alameda and Broadway stations to each other, using a landscaped pedestrian/bicycle
greenway, to add needed connections and open space as the area redevelops.
I Encourage mixed-uses, including a mix of housing, commercial uses, neighborhood centers,
shared parking opportunities, and the integration of different land uses within the subarea and
within buildings.
I Provide common useable open space that is of mutual benefit to surrounding property owners,
businesses and residents.
I Create more retail opportunities for businesses.
I Develop more parking for light rail users and shoppers on less land.
I Increase light rail ridership.
I Complete environmental remediation to a level that is safe for residents, employees, and parks.
Recommendations
I Align new roads, rail spurs, and overpasses to reinforce the connections between transit and land use.
I Develop a greenway linear park connecting the stations.
I Clean the environmental contamination from the subarea.
I Plan and construct storm water drainage improvements.
I Develop and implement zone district regulations to reinforce desired land uses.
I Integrate new parks into redevelopment.
I Build parking with ground floor active uses.
Urban Form
Primary Issues and Opportunities
I The wide expanses of surface parking lots, large-scale buildings and introverted site orientation are
incompatible with the older small-scale, street-oriented retail on Broadway and with the intimate
residential streets of the surrounding neighborhoods.
I The stations are hidden from the adjacent streets, leading to confusion for drivers and pedestrians.
I Vacant and underutilized buildings are immediately adjacent to the stations, especially at the Gates
Rubber site.
67


SUBAREA PLANS TRANSIT-ORIENTED DEVELOPMENT

The familiar Gates tower and brick buildings
at the potential redeueiopment site
Goals
) Accommodate a broad mix of development types that encourage use of alternative transportation,
especially walking and transit use.
) Create a built environment that is in scale and character with pedestrian-oriented activities.
) Restore a sense of human scale and walkability to the area.
) Retain and extend the street grid system into redevelopment areas.
) Develop adjacent land in a manner that reflects historic development patterns, is sensitive to the
neighborhood context, and preserves historic structures while allowing new architectural styles
to develop.
) Develop business areas in a manner that encourages pedestrian and transit friendliness, reinforces
the character of the area and connects to adjacent residential uses.
) Create a walkable neighborhood by providing active pedestrian-oriented public uses on the ground
floors of commercial and mixed-use projects, generous sidewalks, enhanced streetscaping, and
building design with human scale and detail.
) Minimize the presence of parking areas and parking structures to limit the conflicts with desired
pedestrian activity. Minimize the negative visual and noise impacts of parked autos through a
combination of ground-floor active uses wrapping structured parking, site planning, building
placement, landscaping, screening, fencing and other effective buffering.
) Provide for shared parking facilities for transit riders and other users.
) Use durable materials that complement Denvers tradition as a brick and masonry city.
Recommendations
% Preserve, renovate and reuse the following historic buildings to the greatest extent possible:
I Signature Gates water tower and sign
I Large brick warehouses adjacent to Broadway Station
) Enhance pedestrian connections through the Marketplace and across adjacent streets.
% Create a gateway that links the station to the retail center.
\ Develop a linear park for pedestrian and bicycle movement between the Broadway and Alameda
stations.
) Continue Cherokee Street to the Denver Design Center and Broadway Station. Maintain and
develop the grid pattern of streets and alleys to reinforce the block pattern and the existing
urban structure.
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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
) Develop pedestrian-oriented commercial space along Alaska Avenue within the existing Broadway
Marketplace parking lot, preferably around structured parking.
Urban Design Strategies
) Site
I Provide convenient pedestrian access from the public right of way, parking areas, and transit
areas and utilize pedestrian-friendly site and building design.
I Do not locate parking and/or drive aisles between buildings and the public street.
I Design new streets to align with and continue the Denver street grid. Retain and be
constructed to Denver standards.
I Locate detached sidewalks and streets trees adjacent to all public and private streets.
) Building Orientation
I Locate building walls at the property line adjacent to the public street, creating a consistent
street wall.
I Locate parking underground, to the rear of buildings, or in structures wrapped in ground floor
active uses.
I Locate loading, storage, HVAC, garbage dumpsters, noise generators and other service functions
away from pedestrian routes and access points. Screen service functions from view using walls,
fences and landscaping. Delivery and other service operations are expected to avoid disturbing
adjoining residences and properties.
) Massing and Scale
I Buildings should be 4-12 stories tall. Taller buildings are expected to step back at the fourth
story to reduce the overall mass and scale.
I Ensure that new buildings consistent with the height restrictions of the Washington ParkView
Plane and any other view protection corridors (see page 111).
Pedestrian businesses screening parking
) Materials
I Use durable materials, especially at the ground floor. Brick, masonry, metals, cast in place
concrete, tile, glass, glass block systems, etc. are acceptable materials.
I Relate to existing buildings through the use of similar scale elements present in standard brick,
modular stone, cast stone accents, concrete masonry and detailed stucco.
I Use carefully detailed combinations of materials to reinforce architectural scaling requirements.
69


SUBAREA PLANS TRANSIT-ORIENTED DEVELOPMENT
) Detailing
I Include human-scaled building elements and architectural variation, including form, detail,
materials and colors to provide visual interest. Prominent and/or decorative parapets and
cornices are appropriate.
I All glazing should be recessed and subdivided by systems of framing and mullions to reinforce
architectural scaling elements.
I Windows on the residential portion of any building should reflect the more vertically oriented,
deeply set punched opening characteristics typical of traditional Denver architecture.
I Size and proportions of storefront systems in mixed use or commercial buildings should be
subdivided by substantial columns, piers and or wall areas that visually bring the building mass
and structural system to the ground.
I Use prominent windows and operable doors at the street-facing facades.
) Streetscape
I Detached sidewalks with generous tree lawns shall be incorporated into new development.
I Streetscape elements shall be used to unify the TOD districts. The streetscape may include
lighting, benches, landscaping, pavement patterns, public art and/or similar elements.
Transportation and Circulation
Primary Issues and Opportunities
) Threat of inappropriate alignment of new light rail line that could cut off Gates redevelopment area
from the LRT station.
) Street, bicycle and sidewalk connections to and between the stations are poor or nonexistent.
) Connections to the parks west of the South Platte River and the greenway are difficult and unsafe.
) Alameda Avenue underpass lacks pedestrian, bicycle and handicapped accessibility. It has drainage
problems and is unsightly.
) The Denver street grid is incomplete and fractured in the area.
) There is simultaneously too much surface retail parking and too little commuter parking.
) A north-south freight rail is active and is a major presence at both stops.
Prominent entries and storefront window
systems on street-facing facades
70


BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
Goals
) Construct new tracks, buttresses, highway lanes and local streets in a manner that reinforces the
connection and use of the redevelopment area. Pedestrians and bicyclists must have usable access
to the stations.
Recommendations
) Develop a green corridor connection between stations.
) Improve pedestrian crossings of perimeter streets through improved signal timing and sidewalks.
) Create a pedestrian and bicycle bridge over the tracks, Santa Fe Drive and the South Platte River to
the river path.
) Maintain and reintroduce the street grid into new developments to the greatest extent possible,
including:
I At Alameda Station: West Nevada Place, West Dakota Place, West Alaska Place, West Virginia
Avenue, and South Bannock Street
I At Broadway Station: West Exposition Avenue, West Ohio Avenue, West Kentucky Avenue, West
Tennessee Avenue, South Acoma Street, South Bannock Street, and South Cherokee Street
) Enhance the Alameda underpass with new sidewalks, ADA ramps, and bicycle lanes. Integrate
streetscaping elements and artwork to enhance the aesthetics of the underpass.
) Develop structured parking wrapped in active uses to be shared by retailers, residents and
commuters on the site of the existing surface lots both at and adjacent to the train stations.
71


Home Depot is a destination retail store
near 1-25
RETAIL CENTER
JETAIL CENTERS
The retail centers are destination business areas, including retail and offices. The subarea may contain
some moderate-density housing, but is predominantly commercial. The area may eventually redevelop to
a more intense use, but that is not anticipated within the planning horizon of this plan. Nevertheless,
new development should be located to maintain options for future intensification.
Land Use
Primary Issues and Opportunities
) The retail areas are easily accessible by vehicles, but not by transit or pedestrians.
Goals
) Develop the area with destination retail or wholesale businesses and services.
Recommendations
) Support redevelopment proposals on vacant and underutilized sites.
Urban Form
Primary Issues and Opportunities
) Large-scale retail development can create gaps in the urban design of the area and present a poor
entry to the neighborhood.
Goals
) Design retail centers to address the urban context.
) Develop retail centers to be safe, convenient and comfortable for drivers, pedestrians and bicyclists.
) Construct retail center sites in a manner that establishes a pattern and character for the long-term
evolution to more intense and dense uses over time.
72


BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
) Use new development to reinforce the character and quality of public streets through buildings
that provide orientation and access toward the street.
Urban Design Strategies
) Site
I Continue and extend the Denver street grid. Construct private streets to City of Denver
standards.
I Provide detached sidewalks and street trees along both sides of all public and private streets.
I Provide direct pedestrian access from the public street by internal sidewalks.
I Connect primary building entries to the street sidewalk by the most direct route practicable.
I Provide entrances to large retail buildings that reduce walking distance from cars, facilitate
pedestrian and bicycle access from public sidewalks, and mitigate unbroken walls and facades.
At least one entry per retail bay or tenant is appropriate.
I Locate building entries and internal sidewalks to facilitate pedestrian access between retail sites.
I Divide surface parking lots into small and moderate-sized parcels to reduce expanses of
pavement. Landscape and provide pedestrian access to buildings from distinct parking areas.
I Public art, water features, pocket parks and public gathering places should be included in large
sites and located to encourage public use.
) Building Orientation
I Buildings are expected to be parallel to the street grid and adjacent to the street. Do not place
or orient buildings, parking, circulation, or service facilities on a lot in such a way as to treat
primary street frontage as a rear lot line.
I All building frontages visible from a street or residential area are expected to have the equivalent
treatment of the primary building facade.
I Locate parking to the interior of building sites and screen it from the public rights of way.
Structured parking is expected to have active ground-floor uses.
I Locate loading, storage, HVAC, garbage dumpsters and other service functions away from
pedestrian routes and access points. Screen service functions from view using walls, fences and
landscaping. Delivery and other service operations is expected to avoid disturbing adjoining
residences and properties.
I Locate auto-oriented and drive-through uses away from street frontage. Locate drive-up and
drive-through facilities on the side or rear of a building and away from residential uses.
73


SUBAREA PLANS RETAIL CENTER
Design Center on Broadway provides a
destination for interior design and
architectural products
) Massing and Scale
I New development is expected to relate architecturally to other existing or proposed
development.
I Articulate facades to reduce massive scale and uniform appearance of large retail buildings.
) Materials and Colors
I Exterior building materials is expected to be of durable, solid materials such as brick, stone, other
masonry, cast in place concrete, or steel. Commercial storefront systems are appropriate on the
ground floor. Stucco systems may be used above the lower lO'-O" of buildings.
I Colors should be complimentary to building architecture and to the adjacent neighborhood.
) Detailing
I Building facades facing arterial streets are expected to either be the primary entry facade or of
comparable quality in terms of architecture, materials and detailing. Corner buildings need only
provide public entry on one street-oriented facade.
I Ground floor facades that face public streets are expected to have display windows, entry areas,
awnings, or other such features along 2/3 of the horizontal length.
I Use architectural features and patterns that provide visual interest at the pedestrian level, and
reduce monolithic aesthetic effects. Repeating patterns of color, texture, material or change in
plane are integral parts of the building fabric, not superficially applied.
I All building frontages visible from a street or residential area are expected to have the equivalent
treatment of the primary building facade.
I Sign locations and design are expected to relate to the building architecture.
) Streetscape
I Detached sidewalks and street trees shall be required along both sides of all public and private
streets. Use internal sidewalks to connect the public street to buildings.
I Provide internal landscaping within surface parking lots.
74


BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
Transportation and Circulation
Primary Issues and Opportunities
I The intersection of Alameda Avenue, Santa Fe Drive and 1-25 is unsafe and poorly designed.
Goals
I Improve the safety and accessibility of the intersection.
Recommendations
I Site and design adjacent development to keep access away from the intersection.
I Add safe bicycle and pedestrian connections.
75


76


BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
IMPLEMENTATION
PLAN
77


IMPLEMENTATION PLAN
Implementation of the recommendations in this plan will occur through a series of private, public-
private, and public actions. The scale of many implementation actions will be small. Many will not be
subject to public debate or review, while others will be extensively reviewed and intensely debated.
Implementation by the private sector may be accomplished through new construction or major
renovations. If they are located and designed consistent with the recommendations in the Plan, each new
house, office building, business, sidewalk, park facility and tree will help achieve the vision for Baker. Most
of the implementation strategies rely on partnerships between public agencies and the private sector,
including developers, property owners and residents, and neighborhood associations. It will take the
combined efforts of all to realize the goals of the plan.
Public implementation actions will be both initiated by the City and reactive to opportunities or proposals
as they arise. Directed public actions may include a change in operations, such as maintenance programs;
the planning and construction of public infrastructure, funded through the Citys capital improvements
program or general fund; or adoption of regulatory changes, such as zoning language, design guidelines and
map amendments. Implementation may include the review of private uses and construction for
consistency with the plan. Review processes vary depending on the type and location of construction
and uses being reviewed. Review may be limited to City agency and utility review for projects proposed
under existing regulations. It may also include review by neighborhood associations, adjacent property
owners, the Denver Planning Board and Denver City Council for zoning changes or map amendments.
The Baker Neighborhood Plan identifies the top administrative and capital improvement project
priorities. This list includes both specific projects that were identified in the planning process and
general awareness of opportunities that may develop later.
Implementation actions include three general categories:
I Regulatory actions (e.g. zoning, design review, landmark district, view protection)
I Public investment (e.g. transportation, parks, facilities, utilities)
I Partnerships between the public and private sectors (e.g. residents, businesses, neighborhood
associations, special districts).
Regulation is a powerful but not entirely sufficient tool for bringing about the vision of the neighborhood
plan. While creating the regulatory framework of zoning and design standards, the public sector also
must create a climate that attracts private investment. The neighborhood residents, businesses and
others must also do their parts to implement the neighborhood plan.
78


BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
[Regulatory actions
Use the recommendations of the neighborhood plan in City review of all
development and infrastructure projects.
) CPDA and other City agencies will use the Baker Neighborhood Plan to guide decision-making and
development-review comments, consistent with applicable City rules, regulations and procedures.
) Implement design standards as outlined in the framework and subarea plans for all new
construction projects.
) CPDA expects that all significant private and public proposals and projects be referred to the
neighborhood associations for information and comment.
) All neighborhood associations should be knowledgeable of the plan and use it in the evaluation of
proposals and association actions.
) Initiate or support zoning changes to better achieve the plan goals, especially in the Areas of Change
(see map on page 80).
) Develop and apply a TOD zone district for Gates and Alameda stations.
) Support site by site rezonings that implement the Plan vision.
) Use Plan recommendations to inform regulators as they work on citywide zoning changes and
rules and regulations for development review.
) Use other zoning changes to bring regulations into compliance with the Plan vision.
These general recommendations
outline the top priorities for regulatory
actions at the time the plan was
prepared. Other opportunities may
arise that will require a neighborhood
response and that will become higher
priorities. The list of
recommendations show general
implementation actions in this
category, while the following chart
takes some of the specific community
priorities and adds more strategic
information.
Priority Action Timeframe Strategies
1 Remove existing non- conforming uses Medium-long term Engage owners in constructive dialogue.
2 Zoning changes where discrepancies between existing regulations and desired land Medium-long term Support individual site rezoning applications that further the vision. Develop and apply a zone district that enables
uses occur transit-oriented development for that subarea.
3 Slow traffic on residential streets Ongoing Public Works and CPDA to develop a traffic management program.
4 Implement design guidelines Ongoing Use plan design guidelines in administrative development review. Use plan design guidelines in rezoning applications.
Use plan design guidelines as a resources in
revisions to citywide regulatory framework to
encourage site-appropriate design.
79


^'MISSISSIPPI AVE.
IMPLEMENTATION PLAN
Existing Zoning and Proposed Land Use
Legend
Industrial
Industrial/Commercial Area of Change
Residential/Office Area of Change
Commercial Corridors
Mid-and High-Rise Residential
Single-Family and Rowhouse Residential
TOD Area of Change
Retail Centers
----Zoning
Light Rail
Light Rail Station
[pud
80


BAKER N E I G H B
JUBLIC INVESTMENT
1. Transportation and Mobility
) Improve access to Alameda light rail station.
) Separate grade of railroad and road at Santa Fe and Kalamath.
) Install curb, gutter and street improvements.
) Use the light rail extension alignment at Broadway station to reinforce TOD goals.
) Reconstruct Broadway overpass at 1-25, maintaining full access to and from Broadway.
) Design and implement a greenway connection between Alameda and Broadway stations.
) Add bicycle lanes, bridges and racks at stations and other locations.
) Provide improved access points, especially sidewalks, on corridors.
) Develop the Alameda underpass to include bicycle and pedestrian paths (see map on page 83).
2. Parks
) Dailey Park improvements may include new flower beds and new or improved restrooms. Existing
landscaping should be preserved and enhanced. Explore oppostunities, such as closing the
adjacent Archer Place or Ellsworth Avenue, to provide more parkland.
) Flores Park improvements could include repair and enhancement of playground equipment.
) Engage residents in open space planning for a new park at the Gates Rubber TOD site, currently an
undeveloped part ofVanderbilt Park.
) Design and construct a new greenway connection between Broadway and Alameda stations.
3. Facilities
) Develop shared parking garage and lots on Broadway for commercial use and to support transit.
) Install bicycle parking at Alameda station.
O R H O O D PLAN
These general recommendations
outline the top priorities for regulatory
actions at the time the plan was
prepared. Other opportunities may
arise that will require a neighborhood
response and that will become higher
priorities. The list of
recommendations show general
implementation actions in this
category, while the following chart
takes some of the specific community
priorities and adds more strategic
information.
81


IMPLEMENTATION PLAN
4. Utilities
) Develop a storm water drainage capacity study and improvements
) Develop infrastructure to support redevelopment of Gates Rubber and Broadway Marketplace sites.
The Baker neighborhood prioritized the following infrastructure improvements to be pursued. Other
infrastructure investment should be made as opportunities arise.
Priority Action Timeframe Strategies
1 Improve access to and appearance of South Platte River Medium-long term Parks/CPDA plan CIP Dedicated Parks funding
2 Reduce crime Short term Neighborhood Watch Work with DPD Increase use of existing programs
3 Facilities and landscaping improvements at Dailey Park Short term Parks/CPDA plan CIP Dedicated Parks funding
4 Build bicycle connections Medium term CIP Dedicated Parks funding
5 Increase graffiti removal Ongoing
6 Upgrade storm water drainage svstem Long Wastewater Management Department Enterprise Fund
Post and enforce truck- Short CIP
exclusion routes FNI
8 Improve pedestrian crossings of Alameda, Broadway, Santa Fe Medium PW operating CIP FNI
Construct new linear park CIP Parks Fund RTD Private development
9 connection Alameda and Broadway LRT stations Long
10 Develop Alameda underpass Medium Public Works Maintenance funds CIP
82


BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
Bike Route Connections
Alameda Avenue: Platte River to Cherokee Street Connection (Routes D-7; D-I4; D-I6):
This section of Alameda Avenue is a central connection for three bicycle routes. The Platte River Trail con-
nects to the north side of Alameda Avenue via a ramp. Between the ramp and Santa Fe Drive, bicyclists and
pedestrians must cross three high-volume intersections complicated by turning movements at the 1-25 exit
ramp, Kalamath Street and Santa Fe Drive. Multiple curb cuts and an existing bus stop further complicate
the route.
83


IMPLEMENTATION PLAN
These general recommendations outline
the top priorities for regulatory actions
at the time the plan was prepared.
Other opportunities may arise that will
require a neighborhood response and
that will become higher priorities. The
list of recommendations show general
implementation actions in this category,
while the following chart takes some of
the specific community priorities and
adds more strategic information.
Partnerships
1. Make people aware of the neighborhood plan, its recommendations
and its purpose as a road map for the neighborhood:
I CPDA and Baker neighborhood associations will make copies of the plan available to the neighborhood.
) CPDA will distribute final plan internally to other city departments.
) CPDA and Baker neighborhood associations will make the plan available to potential developers
and others as requested.
) Make Baker Neighborhood Plan available on the Internet.
2. Use public-private partnerships to acquire funding and labor for plan
priorities.
) Upgrade household utilities and building frames
) Restore facades of older buildings
) Pave unimproved and inadequate alleys (see map page 87)
) Restore inadequate tree lawns (see map page 86)
) Relay historic stone sidewalks
) Replace broken concrete walks (see map page 88)
) 1-25 and Broadway viaduct improvements
) Alameda underpass improvements, including bicycle and pedestrian access
) Add sidewalks and trees along 6th Avenue
) Environmental contamination clean-up through Brownfields reclamation programs, especially on the
neighborhood edges and at the transit-oriented developments..
3. Work with RTD on new service decisions.
) Participate in Capitol Connector transit study to promote local interests, as well as city and region-
wide connections.
84


BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
) Provide neighborhood input for bus route and service changes.
) Participate in transit-service planning related to transit-oriented development, changes to highway
and rail configurations, and improvements to infrastructure.
) Redevelop the Alameda underpass to include better bicyle and pedestrian connections, attractive
design and solve drainage problems.
rarinersnips laoie
Priority Action Timeframe Strategies
1 Pave alleys Short-term Focus Neighborhood Initiative (FNI) Capital Improvement Programs (CIP) LID
Property owners
2 Add and replace sidewalks throughout neighborhood Ongoing FNI CIP Property owners
3 Rail separation on Santa Fe and Kalamath Long-term CDOT highway maintenance project Railroad funding
4 Improve maintenance and appearance of residential buildings Ongoing Property owners
5 Add sidewalks and trees to 6th Avenue Medium FNI Forestry Property owners/businesses
6 Add needed curbs, gutters and sidewalks Ongoing FNI CIP
7 Increase use of street, pedestrian and bus stop lighting to increase safetv Short LID RTD Bond issues/neighborhood small project
8 Upgrade utilities and telecommunications Long Utilities
9 Develop new park and recreation facilities at Gates TOD Long CIP Parks Fund Private development
10 Plant and maintain treelawns throughout the neighborhood Ongoing FNI, Community Block Grants Parks Fund Property owners Neighborhood associations
11 Remediate environmental contamination Medium-Long term EPA/MOED brownfields remediation funds Property owners
12 Parking solutions at LRT, Broadway, Santa Fe Medium-long term RTD Local improvement district Property owners
13 Improve pedestrian connections to Alameda station Medium CIP FNI RTD
CIP
Property owners
RTD
CDOT
LID
Parks
cip...........
15 Mitigate negative effects of new LRT service; increase benefits of new LRT service Medium RTD LID Neighborhood associations Property owners
Improve transit service to RTD
l6 neighborhood: safety, comfort and convenience Ongoing Neighborhood associations
14
Develop TODs at Gates and
Alameda
Long
85


IMPLEMENTATION PLAN
Treelawn Conditions
LEGEND
-- GOOD
-- FAIR
--- POOR
ATTACHED
WALK
_c ir _ Pi
nJJ bz.
1 II II ifp "" Jl L4 rTPD
b uuI|^IId DII.o 11 | U
iTIMA^ f^ll K-mhM
86


BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
Alley Conditions
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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLANBAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLANBAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN FEBRUARY 2003

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTSInitial Steering CommitteeDominique Acevedo Amber Giauque Callender Vi c Calonder Roger Day To ny Gengaro Kevi n Gerrits Al Habercorn Steve Harley David Hemsi Kim Kucera T om Kuspiel Gillian McCune Kathleen MacKenzie Kara Mueller Dorothy Norbie Debbie Ortega Bruce Peterson Marleen Seckendorf Courtney Sturtz Nell Swiers Ed Williams Steve Winter Evelyn WolfFinal Steering CommitteeDominique Acevedo Amber Giauque Callender Roger Day To ny Gengaro Al Habercorn Steve Harley Kim Kucera Kathleen MacKenzie Debbie Ortega Bruce Peterson Nell SwiersAssessment of Existing ConditionsJam es Bertini Adrian Brown Luchia Williams Brown Roger Day Steve Dreher To ny Gengaro Suzanne Gruba Kim Kucera Marcy Lister Ben Madrid Mark Nielson Cec Ortiz Bruce Peterson Arturo Rodriguez Nell SwiersCity CouncilCathy ReynoldsCouncil President, At LargeDebbie OrtegaDistrict 9Kathleen MacKenzieDistrict 7Dennis GallagherDistrict 1T ed HackworthDistrict 2Ramona MartinezDistrict 3Jo yce FosterDistrict 4Po lly FlobeckDistrict 5Charlie BrownDistrict 6Elbra WedgeworthDistrict 8Ed ThomasDistrict 10Happy HaynesDistrict 11Susan Barnes-GeltAt LargePlanning BoardW illiam H.HornbyChairJ an Marie Belle Fr ederick Corn P at Cortez Daniel Guimond Mark Johnson Barbara Kelley Jo yce Oberfeld Bruce O'Donnell Jim Raughton Robert WrightCity and County of DenverWe llington E.WebbMayorJ ennifer T.MoultonDirector, Community Planning and Development AgencyEllen T.IttelsonDeputy Director for Planning ServicesDennis Swain Program Manager for Small Area and Comprehensive PlanningKiersten FaulknerSenior City Planner and Project ManagerCarla McConnellUrban Design ArchitectJ odi Adkins Housing & Neighborhood Development ServicesK en BarkemaMapsJu lie Connor Graphic DesignMike Aleksick Tr easuryBill Sirois Tr ansportation Planner SpecialistPhil Plienas Data ii ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLANTA BLE OF CONTENTS Executive Summaryv 1. Introduction 1Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Purpose of the Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Plan Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Relationship to Citywide Plans . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Planning Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 2. A Vision for Baker's Future13 3. Guiding Principles19 4. Framework Plan23Land Use. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Urban Form. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Tr ansportation and Circulation. . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 5. Subarea Plans31Commercial Corridors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Single Family and Rowhouse Residential . . . . . . . . . . 42 iii

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLANMid-rise and High-rise Residential . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Residential-Office Area of Change . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Industrial-Commercial Area of Change . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Industrial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Tr ansit-Oriented Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 Retail Centers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 6. Implementation Plan77Regulatory Actions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 Public Investment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 Part nerships. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 7. Assessment of Existing Conditions91Human Services and Demographics . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 Environmental Conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 Land Use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Zoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 Mobility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 Legacies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 Housing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 Economic Activity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 Neighborhood Facilities and Organizations . . . . . . . . . . 119 Appendix 123W ish List of neighborhood Projects. . . . . . . . . . . . 124 Results of Community Assemblies. . . . . . . . . . . . 125 Glossary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136 Data Sources. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137 Map of Subareas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138 Map of Existing Zoning and Proposed Land Use. . . . . . . . . . 139 Color Maps:Subareas and Existing Zoning & Proposed Land Use. . . . . . 135 iv

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLANEXECUTIVE SUMMARY v

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EXECUTIVE SUMMARYThe Baker Neighborhood Plan is adopted by City Council as a supplement to the Denver Comprehensive Plan.It addresses issues and provides guidance that is more refined and specific than can be done at a citywide level.The Baker Neighborhood Plan provides more detail than is included in Plan 2000 or Blueprint Denver:An Integrated Land Use and Transportation Plan,but it is consistent with and guided by those citywide plans.The Neighborhood Plan is focused on neighborhood issues r elated to land use,design and transportation for the entire neighborhood,with specific r ecommendations for individual subareas.The Plan recognizes Baker as a multi-use area with strong assets and many opportunities.It provides a vision and goals for the neighborhood over the next 20 y ears.It acknowledges current opportunities,but is not limited to them.Recommendations are for both short-term and long-term improvements. The major elements of the neighborhood plan are: Recommendations for a more logical approach to land use throughout the neighborhood using both framework goals for the entire neighborhood and subarea goals that include:protecting the integrity of the residential and industrial sectors as Areas of Stability;providing for change over time to buffer the edge between the industrial and residential areas with multi-use Areas of Change.The Plan recommends a housing emphasis next to the residential area and a commercial emphasis next to the industrial area;r einforcing the traditional retail,commercial and housing mix on the major corridors;and,supporting increased density and development at the light rail stations. Priorities for infrastructure,public investment,public-private partnerships,and city regulations.The plan provides input for City programs,including the Focus Neighborhoods Initiative and the Capital Improvements Program.It helps elevate the Baker neighborhood in these areas,but does not r eplace the overall City budgeting process. Design Guidelines for new development.The guidelines present design principles which promote e xcellence in urban design.They are written to provide for flexibility and creativity while articulating basic considerations for cohesiveness and compatibility with the existing and desired ch aracter of individual subareas. vi

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Better use of transportation options,including mitigation of traffic speed and volume,improved parking solutions,safer pedestrian crossings and improved sidewalks,improvements to bus stops and service,better access to light rail,and improved bicycle connections. Opportunities for new and improved open space and parks,including new parks at the Gates Rubber redevelopment site and improvements to Dailey Park and La Familia Recreation Center.The plan recommends better maintenance of the tree lawns along public streets and replacement of missing trees. Cooperation and collaborative problem-solving between neighborhood residents,businesses, property owners and City officials.It articulates a common desire to work together for the common good and to avoid divisiveness. vii

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLANINTRODUCTION 1

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INTRODUCTIONLOCATIONThe Baker neighborhood is located in central Denver.Neighborhood boundaries are west to the South Platte River,north to West Sixth Avenue,east to Broadway,and south to Mississippi Avenue. Regis Berkeley Chaffee Park Sunnyside Highland West Highland Sloan Lake Globeville Elyria Swansea Five Points Cole CBD City Park West Clayton Skyland Whittier City Park Capitol Hill North Capitol Hill West Colfax Jefferson Park Union Station Auraria Barnum Barnum WestSun ValleyLincoln Park Civic Center SpeerBAKERValverde Westwood Athmar Park Cheesman Park Country Club Wash. Park Wash. Park West Ruby Hill Platt Park Rosedale Overland College Hill South Platte Harvey Park South Harvey Park Mar Lee Marston Fort Logan Bear Valley Northeast Park Hill North Park Hill Stapleton South Park Hill Montbello East Colfax Lowry Field Hale Montclair Congress Park Cherry Creek Hilltop Gateway Green Valley Ranch Windsor Washington Virginia Vale Belcaro CoryMerrill Virginia Village Hampden Goldsmith Kennedy University Hills Southmoor Park Hampden South University Park Wellshire University Indian Creek Villa Park DIA 2

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLANPURPOSE OF THE PLANThe Plan establishes long range goals and objectives for the development and stabilization of the neighborhood.It provides a framework and establishes implementation strategies which will direct the neighborhood towards its vision as a community where people live,work,play,and celebrate the neighborhood's cultural heritage.It is primarily a plan for land use,transportation and urban form. The plan provides a neighborhood and city-approved guide to the acceptable future development of Baker.It is intended for use by Denver's Community Planning and Development Agency,Department of Public Works,Transportation Planning,Transportation Engineering,Traffic Operations,Department of Pa r ks and Recreation,Police Department,other City agencies,Denver Planning Board,the Mayor,City Council,other public and quasi-public agencies,neighborhood associations,residents,property owners, business people and private organizations concerned with planning,development and neighborhood improvement. The plan is intended to promote patterns of land use,urban design,circulation and services that contribute to the economic,social,and physical health,safety and welfare of the people who live and wo rk in the neighborhood.The neighborhood plan addresses issues and opportunities at a scale that is more refined and more responsive to specific needs than the City's Comprehensive Plan.The neighborhood plan serves as a supplement of the Comprehensive Plan. The plan is neither an official zone map,nor does it create or deny any rights.Zone changes that may be proposed as part of any development must be initiated under a separate procedure established under the Revised Municipal Code. 3

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INTRODUCTIONPLAN COMPONENTSV ision StatementThe vision describes Baker in the future,as an end result,with current issues resolved and goals met.Guiding PrinciplesGuiding principles are the concepts that frame the plan recommendations to achieve the goals of the neighborhood.They are the neighborhood and City expectations for implementation processes and the v alues that underlie the goals and recommendations.Framework PlanThe framework plan identifies the overall land use and transportation goals.The framework plan presents the issues that are relevant to the entire neighborhood and recommendations that tie the neighborhood together.Subarea PlansThe plan establishes eight subareas that have distinct characteristics and uses.The subarea plans present issues and recommendations that are more specific than those presented in the framework plan.Implementation PlanThe implementation plan consists of specific actions that can be taken to achieve the recommendations contained in the framework and subarea plans.Assessment of Existing ConditionsThe assessment describes the physical conditions and regulations of the neighborhood as it currently exists. 4

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLANAchieving the VisionPlan visions are just that a collective picture of a more desirable future.There are few if any circumstances in the complex milieu of neighborhoods and cities in which the planning,design, o wnership,financing,and political resources align to implement a plan's visions and goals quickly and simultaneously.As a result,by necessity,plans are implemented incrementally with the vision and goals providing common direction to the multitude of public and private undertakings.Part of the City process is to evaluate each of these large and small,public and private undertakings in light of the plan's vision and go als,the current situation,and the available resources.Despite this imperfect situation,plans have proven to have substantial influence on the future direction of a plan area over a period of five,10 or 20 years.Previous PlansThis plan represents the land use,transportation and urban design vision for the Baker Neighborhood.It updates and incorporates recommendations of earlier plans.Previously adopted planning documents that are relevant to the Baker Neighborhood are: W estside Neighborhood Plan,1981 W est Washington Park Neighborhood Plan,1991 South Broadway/Montgomery Ward Urban Renewal Plan,1991 Light Rail Station Development Program,1997 Broadway Plaza Pedestrian Mall Design Guidelines,1999 South Platte River Management Plan,2000 South Broadway Urban Design and Transportation Study,2001 Blueprint Denver:An Integrated Land Use and Transportation Plan,2002 Bicycle Master Plan Update,2002 Denver Parks and Recreation Game Plan,2002,in progressThese documents have been reviewed and relevant material has been incorporated in the development of this plan.This and all other neighborhood plans supplement the City's Comprehensive Plan.The Comprehensive Plan presents a citywide perspective,while each neighborhood plan provides more specific guidance both for the allocation of City resources and for the location and design of private development. 5

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INTRODUCTIONRELATIONSHIP TO CITYWIDE PLANSAll neighborhood and small area plans are expected to comply with the citywide policies contained in Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000 and Blueprint Denver:An Integrated Land Use and Transportation Plan. The Baker Neighborhood Plan implements the following policies from the plans:Plan 2000Communication and Partnerships Engage neighborhood residents and organizations in collaborative efforts to share information,solve problems and plan for the future.Land Use and Transportation High density residential developments should be well-served by public transportation and should be in close proximity to employment centers,amenities and shopping facilities. Activity areas should provide housing as one of the mixture of uses so as to provide the population base to support non-residential activities and minimize growth in auto use,air condition,and energy use. Improve access to employment and activity centers in a manner consistent with commitments to provide a full range of travel modes and to protect living quality and promote good urban design. Land use patterns and zoning must support effective public rapid transit,an efficient roadway system and alternative transportation modes. It is incumbent upon an applicant proposing a zone change to a more intense use to substantially mitigate negative impacts on existing uses. Encourage a mixture of uses that assure the availability of neighborhood services and amenities that r einforce the role,identity and needs of the neighborhood. 6

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLANT ransit, Mobility and Parking Bicycle facilities,including lanes and storage,should be included in new road and bridge construction.Direct bicycle access should be provided to transit stations and park-n-rides,both of which should be equipped with high quality bicycle parking. Sidewalks and facilities for pedestrians are integral components of the transportation system.New r oads and transit facilities must be designed to include pedestrian facilities and when existing arterials are reconstructed they should be furnished with sidewalks and pedestrian access to neighborhoods. Encourage the reuse older structures and the revitalization and efficient development of commercial areas by promoting the creation of parking districts to provide pooled,shared parking. Local streets not designated as collectors must serve neighborhood purposes and through traffic must be diverted from these streets whenever possible. Enforce a citywide truck route system that limits truck traffic to specific streets.While making necessary and reasonable policies and exceptions to allow efficient movement of goods in the city, the City must protect neighborhoods and pedestrian areas from excessive intrusion by truck traffic.Urban Design Develop and maintain a well-designed urban environment,promoting the use of designs and materials that reflect the community's culture and materials. All projects must be built to the highest urban design standards.New facilities must make a positive design contribution to the neighborhood and include facilities for bicycles,sidewalks, trees,medians,lighting,and other high-quality physical design features. The location and design of public facilities and utilities,including utility rights of way,should be subject to design review to encourage compatibility with surrounding residential areas. Pa r ticular attention should be paid to public maintenance and service functions in residential areas, especially in older neighborhoods,to aid neighborhood stabilization. Vi ew corridors and solar access should be provided or preserved wherever feasible and appropriate. 7

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INTRODUCTIONCommerce and Industry Both large and small businesses which meet economic and community criteria must be sought, r etained and supported. Economic development programs should emphasize retention and expansion of existing businesses as well as attracting new businesses. The revitalization of older neighborhood commercial centers that provide shopping within walking distance to residences should be encouraged to assist the stabilization of older neighborhoods. Commercial development must be compatible in operation and design with the residential fabric and character of the neighborhood. Off-street parking facilities should be landscaped,designed and located in a manner that minimizes disruption and inconvenience to adjacent residential properties and streets. Deteriorated and declining business and shopping areas should be revitalized by rehabilitation or r eplacement with appropriate uses. Adjacent residential areas should be protected from the activities of shopping areas by adequate buffering and by ensuring adequate off-street parking and circulation is provided. Strip commercial development in new areas should be discouraged and existing strip commercial developments should be redeveloped,restructured and landscaped. Linear business areas in older neighborhoods should encourage consistency with other buildings in the area,their pedestrian orientation and buffering from adjacent residential uses.Operations should avoid negative impacts on surroundings of lights,hours of operation,noise,drive-in speakers, trash removal,deliveries,etc. Streetscaping and street amenities should be installed in both revitalizing and new commercial areas.Neighborhoods Preserve and improve the existing stock of housing,especially encourage the rehabilitation and reoccupancy of vacant buildings. Subsidized housing should be designed to be compatible with surrounding housing and the ch aracter of the neighborhoods and should be located to promote economic and racial integration. 8

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Preserve and improve the quality of the neighborhood.An important element is to preserve and improve the existing stock of housing,especially the rehabilitation and re-occupancy of vacant buildings. The character of stable residential neighborhoods should be preserved.Requests for rezonings on the periphery of stable residential neighborhoods must be evaluated to ensure that long-term stability is not threatened and the rezoning is compatible. Improvements in the condition of dwelling units and non-residential buildings to bring them into conformance with code requirements should be enforced to improve living conditions and remove b lighting influences from neighborhoods. Stabilize and then upgrade neighborhoods in which physical conditions are declining or inadequate.The strategies used must be those that minimize adverse impacts on the socioeconomic composition of existing residents. Historic buildings and areas must be protected and the destruction of any structures or landscape which are part of the areas historic fabric must be discouraged. Compatible residential development on vacant sites within developed residential areas should be encouraged. Development must be compatible with and sensitive to the immediate environment of the site and neighborhood in terms of architectural design,scale,bulk and building height,historic character, orientation of the building on the lot,landscaping and visual integrity.Blueprint DenverBlueprint Denver:An Integrated Land Use and Transportation Plan is a citywide plan that outlines Denvers growth management and development strategy. Blueprint Denver divides the city into Areas of Change,where reinvestment and redevelopment is desirable,and Areas of Stability,where the existing land use and character should be maintained and enhanced. Baker has both Areas of Change and Areas of Stability.The Areas of Change include: The Gates Rubber Plant site adjacent to the Broadway light rail station and the Broadway Marketplace at Alameda station.Both sites provide exciting opportunities for transit-oriented development with a mix of high-density housing,retail,office and other employment,and light industry. 9

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INTRODUCTION The corridor between the industrial west and the residential east portions of the Baker neighborhood.These areas of change are divided into an industrial-commercial corridor adjacent to the light rail line and Santa Fe Drive and a residential-office corridor roughly between Cherokee Street and Santa Fe Drive.The residential-office area of change also includes the northeast portion of the neighborhood,between Broadway and the residential core.These areas reflect the mixed-use nature of the historic land uses and build upon those uses while embracing opportunities for re investment and change. Corridors on the perimeter of the neighborhood offer infill opportunities that focus on filling the gaps in the historic fabric.Older buildings are treasured and encouraged for redevelopment,while opportunities to build new mixed-use and residential projects on vacant and underutilized parcels are abundant. Baker also contains several Areas of Stability,recognizing the characteristic urban fabric that creates a strong sense of place.The Areas of Stability are: The residential core of the neighborhood.About half of the residential area lies within the Baker Historic District,but the remainder of the residential area is also an area of stability.The residential uses,density and design characteristics are the predominant elements of stability. The industrial corridor between the Platte River and the light rail line is a vital,cohesive industrial area.While there are opportunities for business expansion and reinvestment,the fundamental nature of the area is stable. Blueprint Denver also places emphasis on linking land use and transportation,reinforcing that cities are combinations of places to live,work and play and means to get to those places.The plan reinforces the Citys goal of accommodating a wide variety of transportation options,including cars,transit,walking and biking. 10 Baker neighborhood enlargement from Blueprint Denvers Plan Map

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLANPLANNING PROCESSThe Baker neighborhood plan is the result of a two-year collaboration between the City and County of Denver and the Baker community.A steering committee comprised of Baker residents,business o wners,and representatives from the three registered neighborhood associations provided policy direction for the plan,while City staff provided professional and technical expertise.Community Planning and Development staff facilitated the planning process and reviewed plan concepts for consistency with citywide policies. The steering committee,with City staff,researched and evaluated Baker's existing conditions (see c hapter 7);articulated a vision for Baker's stabilization and development (see chapter 2);developed goals and recommendations to achieve the vision (chapters 4 and 5);and identified opportunities for implementing the recommendations (chapter 6). In addition to the ongoing Steering Committee and Technical Committee discussions (a total of more than 50 public meetings),hundreds of people participated directly in the planning process,providing v aluable comments and direction: Six community meetings (August 1999,June 2000,October 2000,February 2001,May 2001 and F ebruary 2002) helped identify community issues and goals,confirm plan policies and r ecommendations,and prioritize implementation actions (see Appendix for details).Meetings were advertised in both English and Spanish and interpreters were available.Meeting notices were mailed directly to property owners of record and tenants.Fliers were also distributed through F airmont Elementary School,Baker Middle School and the business community.Neighborhood associations included the meeting announcements in newsletters and websites. Planning staff and steering committee representatives attended several meetings of Baker's three re gistered neighborhood associations (Baker Historic Neighborhood Association,Broadway Pa rt nership and Sumner Neighborhood Association of Businesses) to give updates and gather comments on the plan. 11 A community planning meeting May 2001 at Denver Health confirmed the subarea concepts

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INTRODUCTION Issue-specific subcommittees developed plan recommendations related to the industrial subarea, r esidential subarea,transportation,and design guidelines. Tw o surveys,in English and Spanish,were sent to all property owners and all residents regarding community issues and priorities. Individual meetings on particular issues or concerns were held when requested. In addition to the ongoing public participation,the Plan was also shaped through: Contemporaneous public meetings,open houses,surveys and directives related to Blueprint Denver,the citywide land use and transportation plan. City Council representative and staff briefings and review comments. CPDA staff review and discussions. As part of City Council's adoption of the plan as a supplement to the Denver Comprehensive Plan,the plan document was further refined through: Denver's Interagency Plan Review Committee standards of completeness,presentation and consistency with Plan 2000 and Blueprint Denver Denver Planning Board work session and public hearing. City Council committee review and final action. The cooperation between the City and the public will not end with plan adoption.Many of the implementation strategies and priorities rely on continued public involvement and partnerships between city agencies and the neighborhood. 12

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLANA VISION FOR BAKER'S FUTURE 13

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VISIONThe vision statement describes the Baker neighborhood in the future,as an end result.The vision uses the present tense to indicate the expectation that current issues will be resolved and goals will be met.It articulates the outcomes that the plan policies and recommendations are intended to implement and against which actions should be measured.The neighborhood is envisioned as it should appear in 20 years. The overriding goal of the plan is to create a community that accommodates a wide variety of functions, enhances the quality of life for residents and the vitality of businesses.In building the community,the intent is to embrace Baker's many existing assets and maximize their value.The vision statement describes the Baker neighborhood as it will continue to evolve with the successful implementation of the g oals and the recommendations of the plan.General VisionBaker is an urban neighborhood that includes several distinct areas. The residential core consists primarily of older homes and some new housing,served by the vibrant and pedestrian-friendly commercial districts.Well-established and vital industrial areas and commercial corridors provide an employment base for the neighborhood and the region.The common edge between the industrial and r esidential areas serves both,with western industrial uses changing to eastern residential uses,with sensitive design and careful location of new development.Baker benefits from a strong sense of place and enjoys a positive reputation.The entrances to the neighborhood are clearly marked,although the neighborhood also has strong connections to adjacent neighborhoods. Neighborhood and business associations advocate for the needs of their members and work cooperatively with each other and with city and special district governments.The neighborhood groups have achieved a united sense of purpose and improved community image.Pride of community is apparent in the care given to the homes and businesses,as well as to the parks and other community areas. V isitors and residents have many transportation choices, including light rail train, buses, driving, bicycling and walking. Crime and vandalism are unusual and people are safe in their homes,jobs,and on the streets.Views of the mountains from public vantage points are preserved through building height limits.Improvements to utilities,stormwater drainage,streets,alleys,sidewalks and other infrastructure support new and existing development in each of the subareas and make infill development possible.Overhead utility lines have been placed underground.as areas redevelop. 14 Dailey Park La Familia Recreation Center

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLANPublic spaces enhance neighborhood experiences. Dailey and Flores Parks are well maintained and used by a wide variety of community members.The facilities,including the bathrooms,picnic areas,playgrounds,and landscaping,have been improved.Small pocket parks and urban gardens are a bundant in the neighborhood,using formerly vacant lots and parts of new developments for neighborhood green space.The small parks and gardens are neighborhood amenities because they are well maintained and serve residents.Landscaping and adequate have been integrated into largescale new developments at transit stops.Easy access to the Platte River Greenway links the neighborhood to an open space amenity,giving the neighborhood a good connection to downtown and the river.The Greenway includes parks,community gardens and a bicycle path and is served by small-scale commercial establishments such as snack bars and bicycle repair shops.Another linear park links the Alameda and Broadway light rail stations,providing a pedestrian and bicycle link between the stations.The recreation center is a vibrant center that serves the neighborhood and complements other recreation in the system.Neighborhood schools provide high-quality education, programs and facilities for students.The schools also support the community through continuing education programs and by providing facilities for community gatherings.Kiosks with public bulletin boards are posted in areas with abundant pedestrian traffic to provide a means for public communication.A circulator transit system serves the public spaces,allowing convenient visitation.Commercial CorridorsThe neighborhood commercial corridors of West 6th Avenue, Broadway, Alameda Avenue and Santa Fe Drive display a healthy mixture of retail, office and medium-density housing, providing ample employment, retail and service opportunities. Broadway is a thriving commercial district with a variety of retail and commercial establishments and both neighborhoodserving and destination shops.Mixed-use developments along Broadway include both residential and commercial space.Large-scale destination stores serve the needs of the neighborhood,but they are integrated into a more diverse retail setting with locally owned businesses of various scales,goods, services and clientele.Neighborhood-friendly businesses make the corridors comfortable for families and children. Public art,pocket parks and public gathering places are integrated into large redevelopment projects on the sites of the Broadway Marketplace TOD (Alameda-Exposition,Broadway-Bannock) and the former Department of Motor Vehicles (W.6th Ave.and Bannock).Santa Fe Drive reflects the area's Hispanic 15 Broadway corridor is a pedestrian-friendly environment

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VISIONheritage and influence through southwestern architecture and materials,and in shops offering Latin American goods and Spanish-language services.West Sixth Avenue has a mixture of residential, neighborhood-serving businesses,offices,and health-care related uses. Redevelopment projects reinforce the neighborhood's urban design and character.Historic development patterns are consistent,with buildings placed at the property line adjacent to the street,doors and windows oriented to the major streets,tree-lined sidewalks,adequate parking situated to minimize pedestrian disruptions and hidden from the street,and appropriate levels of lighting.Pedestrian connections within the commercial areas and linking to the residential neighborhood are safe and comfortable with continuous tree-lined sidewalks,landscaping and crosswalks.Adequate space,fences and landscaping buffer active commercial uses from adjacent housing.Billboards have been amortized.Residential AreasThe residential center of the neighborhood is primarily comprised of single detached homes, duplexes and rowhouses.Slightly higher-density residential projects buffer the low-density center from higher intensity uses on the perimeter. The residential area preserves and enhances its ri ch architectural and historic character by caring for and maintaining the homes and landscaping.New r esidential developments show innovative and complementary architecture within a common urban design framework:the scale,orientation to the street,vehicular access,open space and building setbacks are consistent,while a diversity of architecture and richness of design is apparent.Expansions and new buildings are designed in a manner that complements the historic character of the community.Unsafe and deteriorating residences have been replaced with new,compatible,high-quality housing. Here people of diverse cultures,ages,ethnicity,educational and economic backgrounds value a unified and integrated neighborhood and share a sense of community.A variety of housing opportunities including dwelling size and style,number of units,number of bedrooms,and housing costs support the diverse population,without undue concentration of subsidized housing or residential care facilities. The neighborhood is attractive to people at all stages of life.There is strong community interaction on the streets and in the public spaces,supporting neighborhood pride.Activities and amenities make the neighborhood comfortable for the elderly and for children.Residents value older homes and mature street trees,and enjoy the convenience of city living and the stability of a thriving neighborhood. 16 House in the Baker Historic District Xcel Energy campus in the industrial area

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLANIndustrial AreaThe industrial area near the river and railroad remain vital, with businesses upgrading and moving into the 21st century with a commitment to the city and its vital growth and industrial needs. In addition to manufacturing,warehousing and other industrial uses,the area contains office buildings,wholesale stores and other commercial uses. The businesses continue to landscape and improve their sites,improving the visual landscape.Safety and environmental sensitivity remain high with a concern for the safety and cleanliness of the area.The manufacturing companies remain clean in their impact and meet all federal,state and city codes.The industrial area is vital but fundamentally non-residential.Residential and industrial uses do not mix and the fundamental separation remains important for the harmony of all.Nonconforming residences within the industrial area have been phased out and the industrial area remains intact with industrial and commercial uses.Industrial-Commercial Area of ChangeThe area immediately to the east of the light rail line is an area of change.The predominant use is light industry and commercial businesses with normal business practices and effects such as heavy traffic, noise and light.The industrial businesses remain vital and have reinvested in their businesses.Vacant and underutilized sites provide opportunities for business expansion and relocation. The area has extensive commercial activity, making it unsuitable for most residential uses, although a few work-live units provide housing for resident business owners. The area requires access to major arterial streets and the interstate highway.It must accommodate extensive truck traffic.Attention to design,screening and open space buffering improves the operations and appearance of the area.Residential-Office Area of ChangeThis area continues the blend between the residential and industrial subareas.The primary land uses are higher-density residential and office uses.Vital office and industrial businesses continue to operate and provide an employment base for the city and neighborhood. Nonr etail business activity is intense and new housing at a moderate density is located in the area. Residential and commercial uses are not necessarily mixed in each building or development,or even within each block in the subarea,but residential and commercial uses are not strictly separated from each other.Siting and design of each new development help ensure compatibility and blending of uses. 17 Broadway light rail train station is adjacent to the Gates Rubber redevelopment site

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VISIONNew projects are responsible for demonstrating compatibility with existing land uses and for mitigating the effects of the existing uses.New construction is expected to provide landscaping,appropriate design and buffering from existing uses.T ransit-Oriented DevelopmentThe Gates Rubber Company and the Broadway Marketplace sites adjacent to the Broadway and Alameda light rail stops have developed into active and vital transit-oriented developments of high-density housing combined with offices, retail shops and light manufacturing, all served by the light rail stations, while still providing ample customer parking for destination businesses. At Gates,many of the brick industrial buildings have been renovated and reused,while new buildings have been added.Landscaping,sidewalks and crosswalks create strong and safe pedestrian connections to the neighborhood.Connections across I-25 and the railroad tracks are safe and include crossing points for pedestrians and bicyclists.A linear park connects the two light rail stops,allowing for pedestrian and bicycle connections between them.Retail CentersThe Design Center and the island between I-25 and the railroad are commercial centers with retail, wholesale and office buildings.The areas are well served by streets and utilities and are convenient to their customers.Moderate-density residential projects are considered on a case by case basis. 18 Public art display in the Design Center

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLANGUIDING PRINCIPLES 19

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GUIDING PRINCIPLESGuiding principles are the concepts that frame the plan recommendations to achieve the goals of the neighborhood.They are the neighborhood expectations for implementation processes and the values that underlie the goals and recommendations.1: Build on the strengths and opportunities in the community. Involve neighborhood associations,immediate neighbors and interested members of the public in community decision-making related to changes in zoning,land use and mobility,siting of community fa cilities,and changes to public infrastructure and facilities.Public process must be open and equitable. New residential,commercial,industrial and civic buildings must be located and designed sensitively, with significant public review of new uses,design and overall development. Create opportunities for residents to participate and be involved in the community through events, information-sharing and decision-making. Create opportunities for informal interaction and gathering through the provision of public spaces and activity nodes.2: Protect and enhance a vital business community. Promote employment and business opportunities by supporting the existing businesses and civic institutions within the neighborhood. Recognize the importance of existing businesses in building and maintaining the neighborhood. Add new businesses in appropriate infill locations.3: Continue to create a livable neighborhood. Provide diversity of housing stock to allow affordable products and a diverse resident population. Undue concentration of residential care facilities or subsidized housing is inappropriate. Create a walkable neighborhood by providing active pedestrian-oriented uses on the ground fl oors of buildings,generous sidewalks,enhanced streetscaping,and building design with human scale and detail. Provide opportunities for passive and active recreation through enhanced parks,additional open space,and improved access to existing parks,such as the Platte River Greenway. 20

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN4: Baker is one neighborhood in a city of neighborhoods. This plan recognizes that there are citywide needs that must be accommodated and that all neighborhoods share in the responsibility to accomplish those needs. Projects in the Baker neighborhood should not adversely impact other neighborhoods. City resources are limited and the Baker Neighborhood Plan recognizes that those resources need to apportioned to many needs throughout the city. 21

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLANFRAMEWORK PLANThe framework plan looks at the neighborhood in the larger view and provides overall concepts that will guide its development.It addresses core issues and provides basic recommendations for the entire neighborhood. 23

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FRAMEWORK PLANLAND USEPriority Issues and Opportunities Baker is an urban neighborhood with a variety of land uses commercial,industrial,residential at a va r iety of scales and densities,and healthcare that co-exist with awkwardness and difficulty, leading to strains on both residents and businesses. New uses or intensification of old uses may have negative effects on other properties. Denver Health and other public institutions need to remain viable and active,but the adjacent r esidential uses are threatened by undue expansion pressure. Denver Parks and Recreation has found that Baker is in moderate need for park amenities,primarily increased acreage,because it has less than 7.5 acres of park land per 1000 people.The need will increase as more housing is added to the neighborhood. Households in the far northeast and southwest parts of the neighborhood do not have good access to community and neighborhood parks,since they are not within six blocks of a park without crossing a major obstacle.Goals Create and maintain an appropriate balance of land uses that preserves the stability of the r esidential,business and industrial sectors,while allowing for flexibility over time. Arrange residential,employment,retail,service,and open space uses to be convenient to and compatible with each other. Support infill development on the Denver Health and Hospital campus,including higher densities and new buildings,with emphasis on using available space within the existing campus.Denver Health and Hospital should not expand into adjacent residential areas. Reduce conflicts between existing incompatible uses and discourage future conflicts. 24 Po rtions of the neighborhood include both residential and industrial uses and lack infrastructure, such as sidewalks

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Develop vacant land in a manner that is compatible with surrounding land uses in terms of use, operations,character,and density. Encourage a mixture of uses that assure the availability of neighborhood services and amenities that reinforce the role,identity and needs of the neighborhood,as appropriate to the subarea. W ithin the industrial and industrial-commercial areas,locate more intense industrial uses away from r esidential areas. Enhance and protect the South Platte River as a neighborhood and citywide amenity. Add new parks and green space as available,especially through the Learning Landscapes program at area schools,development of the unimproved portion of Vanderbilt Park land near Santa Fe Drive and Mississippi Avenue,and conversion of appropriate brownfields to non-irrigated natural areas.Recommendations Protect the industrial character of the western neighborhood,the residential character of the central neighborhood and the commercial perimeter with blended transitions between subareas. Use regulatory and infrastructure resources to accommodate the changes. A pplicants proposing a zone change to a more intense or different uses must substantially mitigate negative impacts on existing uses and demonstrate that new projects substantially further the neighborhood goals and vision.Achieving the VisionZoning is the primary land use regulatory mechanism.The plans land use vision is easiest to achieve when the zoning reinforces the vision through its allowed use and permitted structure provisions.If the zoning does not reinforce the plan vision,changing the zoning to be compatible is the primary implementation mechanism.When these regulatory changes are not accomplished in a timely manner,it is more difficult to achieve the plan vision because zoning takes precedence over a plan.The plan vision and goals are used during negotiations at the development review stage and often assist in creating greater conformance with the plan.A development application cannot be denied for lack of plan conformance. 25 Bakers subareas should have consistent and logical relationships that create greater compatibility

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FRAMEWORK PLANURBAN FORMPriority Issues Some new construction is not compatible with existing or desired neighborhood character. Baker currently has less than 5% tree canopy,substantially lower than the overall City goal of 18%.Goals New construction shall be designed and built to high quality standards and respect the scale, materials,detailing and site plan goals of the subarea. Continue Denver's physical character,including mixed-use development,parks and parkways,treelined streets,detached sidewalks,interconnected street networks,and convenient access to parks, open space and transit. Use manmade and natural features,such as open spaces,drainage corridors,parkways,streets and alleys,as development edges,transitions and interconnections to organize private development. Create spatial definition of the street with buildings and landscaping to promote pedestrian activity and a comprehensive urban framework. Using street trees,private landscaping and parks planting,increase Baker's tree canopy to 18%,as measured by the Department of Parks and Recreation.Dought-tolerant and low-water landscaping is encouraged throughout the neighborhood.Recommendations City review of new development shall expect conformance with subarea plan goals and policies,as w ell as with other citywide plans,rules and regulations.All subareas include recommendations for quality urban design.Regulatory action to enable City design review is recommended for mixed use areas,and high traffic locations.Voluntary conformance,rather than regulatory compliance,is 26

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLANencouraged for the single-family/rowhouse and industrial areas. The urban design strategies present design goals that encourage cohesiveness and compatibility with the existing and desired character of the area as well as excellence in urban design.They are not intended to restrict innovation,imagination or variety in design.The strategies are organized both by land use type and by geographic subarea.New development is expected to meet the design goals of the most appropriate category. Developers and designers are expected to meet with neighborhood associations and with immediate neighbors to discuss their projects and to solicit input. Neighborhood groups are expected to give timely and appropriate feedback based on elements in the public interest and to support development proposals that meet neighborhood goals.Neighborhood input on new developments should be consistent with subarea plan goals and policies.Achieving the VisionZoning regulations alone do not necessarily achieve the desired urban form.Design review using adopted standards and guidelines can be enabled through zoning or Landmark designation.While much of the residential portion of Baker is within the Landmark-designated Baker Historic District,the commercial and industrial areas are not subject to required design review.The standards and guidelines provided in the plan give further direction to development projects undergoing site plan review.The standards and guidelines remain advisory until adopted through a formal regulatory process.Past e xperience has shown,however,that providing this direction during the site plan review process can be effective in improving a project's conformance with the plan. 27 TYPICAL COMMERCIAL STREETSCAPE TYPICAL RESIDENTIAL STREETSCAPE ROADWAY FRONT YARD SETBACK DETACHED SIDEWALK TREE LAWN(STREET TREES, TURFGRASS OR GROUND COVERS)SIDEWALK AMENITY ZONE(ENHANCED PAVING, STREET TREES, PEDESTRIAN LIGHTS, BENCHES, TRASH RECEPTACLE, ETC.) PUBLIC RIGHT-OF-WAY (THE COMMON SPACEŽ) BUILDING FRONTS, SIGNAGE. (PEDESTRIAN ORIENTED

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TRANSPORTATION AND CIRCULATIONPriority Issues and Opportunities Overall traffic volume and speed is dangerous and detracts from quality of life. Congestion occurs on streets near high-volume centers. Car and bus congestion occurs on streets near light rail stations. Public traffic and transit projects may neglect pedestrian and bicycle connections. Tr uck traffic and cut-through commuter traffic within the residential section of the neighborhood is dangerous,noisy and causes air pollution. Some bus stops are unsafe and unattractive. P edestrian crossings at major intersections are hazardous. Pa r king overflow from commercial areas impacts residential areas,including blocking alleys and sidewalks. Bicycle routes are discontinuous.Goals Provide an adaptable and interconnected transportation system that encourages multiple modes of transportation,disperses traffic,and provides streets that accommodate motor vehicles,transit, bicycles and pedestrians. Provide safe,convenient access to and from the neighborhood. Employ structural and non-structural traffic mitigation measures to discourage commuter traffic cutting through the residential area. Provide an increase in alternative modes of transportation,other than the automobile,by 28 Light rail stop FRAMEWORK PLAN

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLANencouraging bus,bicycle and pedestrian travel. Improve access to employment and activity centers in a manner consistent with commitments to provide a full range of travel modes,to protect quality of life and to promote good urban design. All projects must be built to the highest urban design standards.New facilities must make a positive design contribution to the neighborhood and include facilities for bicycles,sidewalks, trees,medians,lighting,and other high-quality physical design features. Provide for the efficient movement of goods by monitoring truck routes,and enforcing truckex cl usion regulations. Create safe and convenient access to light rail stations for pedestrians and bicyclists. Land use patterns and zoning must support effective public rapid transit,an efficient roadway system and alternative transportation modes. Improve the appearance and safety of bus shelters. Create safe,well-lit pedestrian connections. Use street trees and sidewalk improvements to create Green Streets that connect people to parks, schools and commercial areas.Recommendations Sidewalks and facilities for pedestrians are integral components of the transportation system.New r oads and transit facilities must be designed to include pedestrian facilities and when existing arterials are reconstructed they should be furnished with sidewalks and pedestrian access to neighborhoods. Bicycle facilities,including lanes and storage,should be included in new road and bridge construction.Direct bicycle access should be provided to transit stations and park-and-rides,both of which should be equipped with high quality bicycle parking. Speed limits need to be enforced on all streets,especially the collector thoroughfares of Bannock, Cherokee,1st Avenue,3rd Avenue and Bayaud. Encourage the use of traffic mechanisms that will mitigate or limit cut-through or hazardous traffic. Repair and replace broken and missing sidewalks throughout the neighborhood. Add new detached walks with street trees in new developments. 29 I-25 bordering Baker

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FRAMEWORK PLAN Repair and replace substandard alleys. Improve pedestrian and bicycle access along the Alameda underpass and across Alameda Avenue. Repair and improve the I-25 Broadway viaduct,maintaining highway access to and egress from Broadway. Improve vehicular,pedestrian and bicycle access to Broadway Station,especially as new transit lines are added. Separate the railroad lines from the street grade at Kalamath Street and Santa Fe Drive. Any future light rail lines must support and reinforce both commercial and residential land uses in the neighborhood,especially on Broadway and Lincoln. Po st clear truck routes for industrial traffic and enforce "No Truck"streets in the residential area. Improve neighborhood input process for bus service decisions and changes. Develop bicycle connections to fill the gaps in the citywide system,including:Alameda at Santa Fe Drive (Routes D-7,D-14,D-16)Broadway Station Develop pedestrian and bicycle access to the Platte River Greenway.Achieving the VisionThe plan vision and goals for transportation and circulation include a combination of enforcement and capital improvements and maintenance.Enforcement of vehicular traffic laws such as speed and truck r outes is a need throughout the city.Capital projects are funded by the City through its capital improvements program,by property owners through districts,or by private sources as development occurs.Many of these projects promote multimodal streets.Funding availability and fixed amount of street right-of-way are two constraints to achieving the vision and goals. 30

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLANSUBAREA PLANS 31

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SUBAREA PLANSBaker Plan establishes subareas,which have relatively distinct characteristics.The subareas are ch aracterized by their land use functions,locations and distinct urban form.Although the boundaries between subareas are not absolute and some characteristics overlap subarea boundaries,the neighborhood subareas are: Commercial Corridors Single Family and Rowhouse Residential Mid-rise and High-rise Residential Residential-Office Area of Change Industrial-Commercial Area of Change Industrial Tr ansit Oriented Development Retail Centers The following sections outline key issues and opportunities,goals,recommendations,and design guidelines for the development of each subarea. 32

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Industrial Industrial/Commercial Area of Change Residential/Office Area of Change Commercial Corridors Midand High-Rise Residential Single-Family and Rowhouse Residential T ransit-Oriented Development Retail Centers Baker Historic District SO U TH PLA TTE RIV ER LegendS. SANT A FE D R .S. BROADWAY BROADWAY AC OMA ST. BANNOCK ST. CHEROKEE ST. DELAWARE ST. ELATI ST. FOX ST. BAKER MIDDLE SCHOOL FAIR MONT ELEMENTARY DA ILEY PARKW 6TH AVE. W 5TH AVE. W 4TH AVE. W 3RD AVE. W 2ND AVE. W 1ST AVE. IRVINGTON PL. ARCHER PL. BAYAUD AVE. MAPLE AVE. CEDAR AVE. BYERS PL. ALAMEDA AVE. DAKOTA AVE. VIRGINIA AVE. CENTER AVE. EXPOSITION AVE. OHIO AVE. TENNESSEE AVE. MISSISSIPPI AVE. ELLSWORTH AVE.GALAPAGO ST. INCA ST. SANTA FE ST. KALAMATH ST. LIPAN ST. OSAGE ST. QUIVAS ST. RARITAN ST.I-25 N 33 Subareas

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SUBAREA PLANS COMMERCIAL CORRIDORSCOMMERCIAL CORRIDORSBroadway,Santa Fe Drive,West Sixth Avenue and West Alameda Avenue are streets that have traditionally been associated with commerce and that have a primarily commercial character.Historically,many commercial corridors were pleasant,tree-lined streets with smaller-scale neighborhood-oriented retail shops.They were easily accessible by foot,car or transit,usually trolley or bus. The intent for these corridors is to recapture the pedestrian and transit-friendly character of the streets with traditional development patterns and enhanced streetscaping while accommodating vehicular traffic,parking,and new uses,including residential and larger destination stores and offices.Land UsePrimary Issues and Opportunities High-volume transportation corridors offer opportunities for economic development,increased density,and increased transit use. V acant and underutilized properties interrupt the cohesive business environment. Business impacts may be incompatible with adjacent residences. Businesses in or adjacent to residential areas may desire to expand. Pa r king supply is inadequate for customer use. Pa r king solutions are poorly located and designed,undermining a pedestrian-friendly environment.Goals Develop a mix of land uses,which includes housing,office,commercial,destination and neighborhood-serving retail in the subarea. Create a stable,safe,attractive,well-lighted retail area with a mix of offices,neighborhood businesses,and destination businesses. Manage business operations to avoid negative impacts from lighting,hours of operation,noise,drivein speakers,trash removal,deliveries,etc. 34 The historic 1st Avenue Hotel on Broadway has a traditional design, with ground-floor commercial uses and upper-level housing potential SOUTH PLATTE RIV ER BROADWAY ACOMA ST. B ANNOCK ST. CHEROKEE ST. DELAWARE ST. ELATI ST. FOX ST.BAKER MIDDLE SCHOOL FAIR MONT ELEMENTARY DAILEY P ARK6TH AVE. 5TH AVE. 4TH AVE. 3RD AVE. 2ND AVE. 1ST AVE. IRVINGTON PL. ARCHER PL. BAYA UD AVE. MAPLE AVE. CEDAR AVE. BYERS PL. ALAMEDA AVE. ELLSWORTH AVE.GALAPAGO ST. INCA ST. SANTA FE ST. KALAMATH ST.

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Maintain and enhance the viability of high-density residential and commercial uses. Provide adequate,well-designed parking to support customers,residents and employees.Recommendations Support infill development of retail,office and residential uses.Mixed-use projects,with commercial or public uses on the ground floor and residential uses on upper levels,are especially appropriate. Deteriorating and declining business and shopping areas are expected to be revitalized by re habilitation or replacement with appropriate uses. A uto-oriented commercial development is inappropriate.Existing strip commercial developments are expected to be redeveloped,restructured and landscaped. Adjacent residential areas should be protected from the activities of shopping areas by adequate buffering and by ensuring that adequate off-street parking and circulation is provided.Buffering methods may include:Locating traffic,noise,light and activities away from the residential areas;Using attractive fencing and landscaping to buffer adjacent residences;Tr ansition from commercial uses to residential uses through consistent sidewalks,treelawns, setbacks,and architectural treatments. Prohibit the expansion of commercial uses into existing residentially zoned and used areas,unless such expansion maintains or improves the residential desirability of the affected residential area. Improvements include:Removing a destabilizing or incompatible element from the neighborhood;Providing for the expansion of an established use that will not adversely affect the neighborhood;Increasing the availability of neighborhood shopping and services;Providing for a unique citywide need that can be met by balancing city and neighborhood concerns only at that location;Improving the appearance of a business area or established use;andImproving buffering between business and non-business uses. Develop vacant land in a manner that is compatible with surrounding land uses in terms of use and c haracter. 35 Pa rking structures should complement existing architecture and provide retail spaces at ground level

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SUBAREA PLANS COMMERCIAL CORRIDORS Develop shared parking arrangements among retail establishments to meet customer demand, ex plore regulatory changes to allow parking credits for pedestrian-accessible transit facilities,and r esearch the viability of establishing a local parking district.Urban FormPrimary Issues and Opportunities A utomobile-oriented developments may undermine the traditional development patterns and pedestrian-friendly design of the commercial areas. Character-defining historic buildings are threatened with demolition.Goals Develop business areas in a manner that encourages pedestrian and transit friendliness,reinforces the character of the area and buffers adjacent residential uses. Create a walkable neighborhood by providing active pedestrian-oriented public uses on the ground fl oors of commercial,residential and mixed-use projects,generous sidewalks,enhanced streetscaping,and building design with human scale and detail. Maintain the grid pattern of streets and alleys to reinforce the block pattern and the existing urban structure. Enhance each corridor's traditional street-oriented development patterns,setbacks,and build-to lines,provide a consistent edge to the public street and sidewalk in order to provide pedestrian scale and access,and encourage pedestrian-oriented activity. Minimize the presence of parking areas and parking structures along the corridor edge to limit the conflicts with desired pedestrian activity.Minimize the negative visual and noise impacts of parked autos on the corridors and adjacent residential areas through a combination of site planning, building placement,landscaping,screening,fencing and other effective buffering. Use durable materials that complement Denver's tradition as a brick and masonry city. Protect,preserve and reuse historic buildings.Recommendations The following buildings have historic significance and help define the character of the corridors. Most (except as shown in italics) have not been designated as historic landmarks.They should be preserved and reused,although not necessarily designated as historic structures: 36 Traditional buildings help establish the urban character

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLANFi r st Avenue Hotel,115 BroadwayMayan Theater,110 BroadwayLehman Auto Company,550 BroadwayEron Johnson Antiques,451 BroadwayGlass Emporium,424 BroadwayGateway Antiques,357 BroadwayJ ohnson Moving and Storage,221 BroadwayFr ench's Gun Shop,258 BroadwayRocky Mountain Camera,240 BroadwayTr ains and Sundance Publishing,250 Broadway232-234-236 BroadwayVa r sity Formal,70 BroadwayUnion Bank,104 BroadwayThe Hornet,76 BroadwaySkylark Lounge,58-64 BroadwayFr eaky's,6 BroadwayBookmall,26 BroadwayF eizy's Rugs,21 South Broadway22-24 South BroadwayDecade,56 South BroadwayWe r ner Building,80 South BroadwayF amous Pizza,94 South BroadwayAllen Paint,141 South BroadwayUnited States Post Office,225 South BroadwaySooper B Liquor,102 South BroadwayTo wnhouses,122-126 South BroadwayBroadway Bodyworks,160 South BroadwayKarate,226 South BroadwayImperial Building,240 South BroadwayA ppliances,245 South BroadwayShepton Antiques,339 South BroadwayMasonic Temple,350 South BroadwayJe ff erson Building,432 South BroadwayLittle Shanghai,456 South BroadwayDenver Fire Department No.18,600 South BroadwayRuins,574 Santa Fe Drive604 West 6th AvenueDesign Guidelines SiteProvide convenient pedestrian access from the public right of way,parking areas,and transit areas and utilize pedestrian-friendly site and building design.Do not locate parking and/or drive aisles between buildings and the public street.Place curb cuts,drive aisles and ramps to parking structures perpendicular to the public street and other public right of way. 37 Unacceptable location of parking Acceptable location of parking Preferred location of parking

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SUBAREA PLANS COMMERCIAL CORRIDORS 38Broadway Sites of Historic Significance

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Building OrientationLocate building walls at the property line adjacent to the public street,creating a consistent "street wall."Locate auto-oriented and drive-through uses away from street frontage,such as on the side or r ear of buildings and buffered from residential uses.Locate parking underground or to the rear of buildings.Locate loading,storage,HVAC,garbage dumpsters and other service functions away from pedestrian routes and access points.Screen service functions from view using walls,fences and landscaping.Delivery and other service operations are expected not to disturb adjoining r esidences and properties. Massing and ScaleMid-rise buildings are appropriate.Taller buildings are expected to step back at the fourth story to reduce overall mass and scale,while maintaining human scale at the ground level. MaterialsGround floor of new buildings are expected to be of durable solid materials,such as brick, masonry,architectural metals,cast in place concrete,tile,and glass block systems when properly finished and detailed.Storefront window systems should be used in commercial and mixed-use buildings.Stucco systems may be appropriate on levels above the ground floor.Relate new construction to existing buildings through the use of similar detail elements present in standard brick,modular stone,cast stone accents,concrete masonry and detailed stucco.Use carefully detailed combinations of materials to reinforce architectural scaling elements. DetailingInclude human-scaled building elements and architectural variation,including form,detail, materials and colors to provide visual interest.Prominent and/or decorative parapets and cornices are appropriate.Repeating patterns of color,texture,material or change in plane shall be used as integral parts of the building fabric,not superficially applied.Except for commercial storefront systems,all windows should be recessed.Subdivide glazing by systems of framing and mullions to reinforce architectural scaling elements.W indows on the residential portion of any building should reflect the more vertically oriented, deeply set punched opening characteristics typical of Denver architecture. 39 Building detailing adds richness through decorative elements and materials

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SUBAREA PLANS COMMERCIAL CORRIDORSSize and proportions of storefront systems in mixed use or commercial buildings should be subdivided by substantial columns,piers and or wall areas that visually bring the building mass and structural system to the ground.Use prominent windows and operable doors at the street-facing facades. StreescapeUse streetscape elements to create a pedestrian-friendly environment,including:-sidewalks;-street trees,either in grates or in landscaped tree lawns,with automatic irrigation systems;-safe pedestrian crossing points;-street furniture such as benches and trash receptacles at high-volume pedestrian areas;-street and pedestrian lighting;-on-street parking and bus stops.Streetscape elements on Broadway and Alameda are expected to be consistent with the design standards and spacing of the Metropolitan Denver Local Development Corporation.Streetscape elements on Santa Fe Drive are expected to be consistent with the design standards and elements of the Santa Fe Drive Redevelopment Corporation.T ransportation and CirculationPrimary Issues and Opportunities Sidewalks and pedestrian amenities are inconsistent throughout the district Bus stops are uncomfortable and unsafe. Pa r king is inadequate for customers and employees. P edestrian crossings are unsafe.Goals Improve sidewalks and add pedestrian amenities in conjunction with business revitalization. Develop bus and train service to be efficient,comfortable and convenient.Recommendations Add sidewalks and trees along West 6th Avenue,which may require narrowing the lanes or acquiring additional right of way to accommodate pedestrians. 40 Broadway template for prototypical bulb-out, trees and streetscape elements BROADWAYN CROSS STREET T ree with tree grate Brick sidewalk pavers T rash receptacle Bench

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Narrow the pedestrian crossing points on Alameda Avenue,possibly using curb bulb-outs at corners. Reconfigure traffic and pedestrian signals to increase amount of pedestrian-crossing time at intersections:6th Avenue at Santa Fe,Kalamath,Broadway,and LincolnAlameda at Cherokee,Bannock,Broadway,and Lincoln Maintain on-street parking on Broadway. Any displaced parking should be recaptured in centralized and shared-use parking lots and structures.Parking facilities must comply with the urban design goals and standards for the area. Repair and improve the Alameda Avenue underpass,widen sidewalks,provide handicap accessibility,provide for bicycles,improve overall aesthetics and urban design. (Improve Pedestrian Crossing) (Enhance Pedestrian Access) SO U T H P LA T T E R IV ER BROADWAY ACOMA ST. B ANNOCK ST. CHEROKEE ST. DELAWARE ST. ELATI ST. FOX ST. B AKER MIDDLE SCHOOL FAIR MONT ELEMENTARY DAI LEY P ARK6TH AVE. 5TH AVE. 4TH AVE. 3RD AVE. 2ND AVE. 1ST AVE. IRVINGTON PL. ARCHER PL. BAYAUD AVE. MAPLE AVE. CEDAR AVE. BYERS PL.ALAMEDA AVE.ELLSWORTH AVE.GALAPAGO ST. INCA ST. SANTA FE ST. KALAMATH ST. LIPAN ST.I-25 41 Streetscaping enhances the pedestrian experience

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SUBAREA PLANS SINGLE FAMILY AND ROWHOUSE RESIDENTIALSINGLE FAMILY AND ROWHOUSE RESIDENTIALThe core of the Baker neighborhood is a residential area that allows single family houses,duplexes and ro whouses.There is an average density of 19 dwelling units per acre,which is a moderate urban density sufficient to support transit and adjacent commercial areas.Land UsePrimary Issues and Opportunities Threat of demolition of existing housing and increased density of replacement housing could alter the area's stability. Existing non-conforming industrial uses undermine the integrity and pedestrian-friendliness of the r esidential area. V acant and underutilized commercial buildings offer opportunities for services and retail at an appropriate neighborhood scale.Goals Enhance the character of the residential area and quality of life for the residents. Protect the integrity of the residential area by prohibiting industrial and new commercial infill or encroachment. Rehabilitate and reuse existing commercial structures for neighborhood-scale commerce. Maintain the current residential density. Remove existing nonconforming uses in the residential area. Increase and improve the parks,green streets and recreation facilities in the neighborhood. Support a diverse population by providing support services such as childcare facilities,transit,and a va r iety of housing opportunities. 42 Rowhouses in the residential subarea BROADWAY ACOMA ST. B ANNOCK ST. CHEROKEE ST. DELAWARE ST. ELATI ST. FOX ST.BAKER MIDDLE SCHOOL FAIR MONT ELEMENTARY DAILEY P ARKW 6TH AVE. W 5TH AVE. W 4TH AVE. W 3RD AVE. W 2ND AVE. W 1ST AVE. IRVINGTON PL. ARCHER PL. BAYA UD AVE. MAPLE AVE. CEDAR AVE. BYERS PL. ALAMEDA AVE. ELLSWORTH AVE.GALAPAGO ST. INCA ST. SANTA FE ST.

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLANRecommendations Limit site rezonings to those that enhance the residential character.Community Planning and Development Agency and neighborhood associations should oppose inappropriate zoning applications to City Council. Develop relocation and buy-out program for nonconforming uses. Wo rk with Denver Department of Parks and Recreation to develop detailed site facility and program analysis for Baker parks and recreation,including:Enhance recreation facilities,programs and maintenance.Improve landscaping in tree lawns and other public areas,including Dailey Park.Identify priorities for Park improvements and landscaping.Develop a landscaping improvements priority list and pursue funding and labor for implementation.Identify appropriate locations for additional neighborhood parks,especially in redeveloping areas and transition areas. Increase level of property maintenance. Increase infrastructure maintenance,especially for utilities and drainage.Improve aging utilities and provide access to new technology. Replace old main sewer lines and gas lines. Upgrade electrical and fiber optics systems. Assess adequacy of sewer and storm drainage system. Identify funding mechanism to repair and maintain deteriorating buildings. Educate residents and property owners about home maintenance,funding options,city regulations and requirements,and historic preservation.Urban FormPrimary Issues and Opportunities Some infill buildings,replacement structures and additions to existing buildings are incompatible in style,orientation,scale,massing and overall character,especially outside the historic district. The single family and rowhouse residential subarea includes the Baker Historic District,which provides for demolition protection and design review of new construction and changes to historic homes.The Denver Landmark Preservation Commission has authority in reviewing all proposed demolition and design review over any exterior construction requiring a building permit. However,the remainder of the subarea lacks this level of design review and protection. 43 Incompatible new residential building

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SUBAREA PLANS SINGLE FAMILY AND ROWHOUSE RESIDENTIALGoals Maintain a stable residential area of low-scale single family and rowhouse housing. Reinforce the existing neighborhood character through streetscape and building design. Design infill construction and changes to existing structures to compliment and be compatible with the desired neighborhood character.Although regulatory design review outside the historic district is unlikely,voluntary commitment to excellent design will enhance the neighborhood. Use an urban design framework for right of way improvements,directional and interpretive signs, and streetscaping elements to identify the Baker neighborhood and knit the residential area to the adjacent commercial areas.Urban Design Strategies SiteWhere usable alleys exist,they are expected to be used for vehicular access to the site.Orient garages and parking stalls towards alleys.On corner lots where alley access is not feasible,orient garages and parking stalls towards side streets.Where alley access is not feasible,set back front-loaded garages and parking from the front f aade of the building.Individual garage doors should not be wider than 10'-0".For multiple-car garages,multiple doors or doors with scaling elements are expected.Do not provide for parking of vehicles,circular drives and/or porte cocheres in the front setback between the house and the street. Building OrientationOrient the narrow end of the single residence or residential unit in a multi-unit dwelling toward the public street.Provide operable front doors or building entryways oriented toward and accessible from the public street.Open porches on the front faade are expected. Massing and ScaleRespect the proportions,materials,scale and massing rhythm of the buildings in the surrounding f ace blocks when constructing new buildings. 44 Compatible new residential building Rowhouse articulation and orientation

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLANReflect the proportions,materials and scale of existing structures when constructing vertical and horizontal expansions.Articulate facades of rowhouses and townhouses to define the individual units in multi-unit dwellings,consistent with the scale and proportions of the existing single family homes in the immediate area. Roof PitchesThe dominant ridgeline is expected to be perpendicular to the public street.F or both new construction and changes to existing structures,steep roof pitches (over 8:12) are e xpected over the primary occupiable space.Shallower pitches (6:12) are appropriate over porches,dormers,accessory buildings,etc.Flat rooflines,such as on territorial-style residences,are an acceptable alternative,provided that they include prominent and/or decorative parapets. MaterialsMaterials on the ground floor of front facades are expected to be modular unit masonry.Careful combinations of materials should be used to reinforce architectural scaling and detailing and to reflect the materials and details used in the neighborhood.Horizontal additions to existing structures are expected to be consistent in material cladding with the original structure. DetailingProvide richness of scale through change in plane,contrast and intricacy in form,color and materials.W indows should differentiate upper and lower floors through fenestration pattern,sizes and detailing.Recess windows from the main faade.Brick detailing on front corners is encouraged. StreetscapeAny fences in the front yard should be provide transparency through use of pickets or spacing of infill materials.W indow security bars and security doors are expected to be decorative and in keeping with the c haracter of the residence.Existing stone walks and curbs shall be preserved and maintained.Detached sidewalks with 45 Steep roof pitches help define neighborhood character Decorative security bars provide safety without undermining the buildings character

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SUBAREA PLANS SINGLE FAMILY AND ROWHOUSE RESIDENTIALlandscaped tree lawns are required.The City has a goal to plant and grow a tree canopy over 18% of the area,including both public and private landscaping.The tree lawn is expected to be landscaped and maintained.T ransportation and CirculationPrimary Issues and Opportunities Lack of well-maintained sidewalks makes pedestrian connections difficult. On-street parking for residents is difficult near the commercial corridors and the hospital. Alleys are deteriorating,unpaved and poorly maintained. V ehicular speed and volume through the neighborhood decreases public safety.Goals Protect and enhance transportation opportunities,including walking,biking,transit use and driving. Enhance transportation options for residents and visitors,including light rail,circulator and regular buses,bicycle lanes and sidewalks.Recommendations Construct right of way improvements,especially streets,curb and gutter,treelawn and sidewalks where needed. Identify opportunities for additional parking areas adjacent to commercial areas. Limit time parking in some areas,adjacent to commercial,institutional or industrial uses. Conduct capital improvement study for drainage,curb and gutter,sidewalk,and street improvements. Improve pedestrian crossing points Research adding a light rail stop between Alameda and 10th Avenue to better serve the neighborhood. Identify areas needed for bus service and bus stops. Pursue pilot program of circulator buses to connect industrial area to light rail stops and Broadway. Increase enforcement of existing traffic laws related to speeding and parking to slow traffic and increase safety. Repair potholes in streets and alleys;pave unimproved alleys. Identify areas for dedicated bicycle lanes and paths. 46 A typical alley Pleasant treelawn and sidewalk

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLANMID-RISE AND HIGH-RISE RESIDENTIALThis subarea serves as a transition and a buffer between the lower-scale residential core subarea and the more intense subareas on the neighborhood perimeter.Although not recommended by this plan, current zoning allows higher density residential and mixed use projects near West 6th Avenue and Broadway.Any new projects should be appropriately designed.Land UsePrimary Issues and Opportunities V acant and underutilized buildings offer opportunities for increased residential density. Some portions of the neighborhood are zoned for high density housing,regardless of prevalent character.Goals Rehabilitate and reuse underutilized commercial structures for new residential units. Develop new residential structures at a scale and density that enhances the neighborhood.The subarea's proximity to employment and supporting infrastructure suggest the development of moderate-cost housing in future development. Enhance the character of the residential area and quality of life for the residents. Support a diverse population by providing support services such as childcare facilities,transit,and a variety of housing opportunities.Recommendations Adjust zoning and other regulations to allow new residential structures to be built. Encourage redevelopment of vacant and underutilized sites at an appropriate scale and density. 47 Hirshfeld Tower near Dailey Park is an existing high rise building B ANNOCK ST. CHEROKEE ST. DELAWARE ST.FAIR MONT ELEMENTARY DAILEY P ARK4TH AVE. 3RD AVE. 2ND AVE. 1ST AVE. IRVINGTON PL. ARCHER PL. ELLSWORTH AVE.

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SUBAREA PLANS MID-RISE ANDHIGH-RISERESIDENTIALUrban FormPrimary Issues and Opportunities Some infill buildings,replacement structures and additions to existing buildings are incompatible in style,orientation,scale,massing and overall character.Goals Ensure that higher-scale development reinforces and enhances neighborhood character through appropriate bulk,scale and pedestrian-level interest. Provide a logical transition between the commercial corridors and the low-scale residential neighborhood. Modulate abrupt differences in building height and scale between the commercial corridors and the low-scale residential neighborhood. Moderate scale and height of higher-scale buildings adjacent to lower-scale buildings. Maintain Denver's traditional street and alley grid system. Maintain a vital pedestrian-friendly environment that avoids conflicts between pedestrians and v ehicles and reinforces traditional neighborhood design characteristics,including landscaped front ya r ds,uninterrupted sidewalks,and ground floor architectural interest. Provide building design with human scale and interest through use of varied forms,materials,details and colors.Avoid expanses of blank walls in new construction. Maintain and increase available on-street parking by minimizing numbers of curb cuts and loading zones.Urban Design Strategies SiteMinimize the number of curb cuts and drive aisles across sidewalks.Where usable alleys exist, they are expected to be used for vehicular access to the site.Orient garages and parking stalls towards alleys where safe and practical.Where alley access is not feasible,all drive aisles and curb cuts are expected to be perpendicular to the public street.Minimize the number of curb cuts.Do not provide for parking of vehicles in the front setback between the structure and the street.Locate surface parking to the side or rear of buildings.Screen all surface parking with finished architectural facades or landscaping.Landscape the front setback.Do not provide for circular drives and/or porte cocheres in the front setback.Gated communities are not appropriate. 48 This high-rise building shows one pedestrianfriendly faade and one blank wall Garage entry should be subordinated by emphasizing the pedestrian entry No Yes

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Building OrientationOrient primary front doors,primary building entryways and lobbies toward,visible from and accessible from the public street. Massing and ScaleUse building articulation,recessed and cantilevered balconies and stepbacks at upper levels to reduce ov erall mass and bulk of larger multi-unit dwellings to create a graceful building silhouette. Building BaseArticulate and detail the lower 80' of buildings to provide human scale and interest.Finish all f acades to create a consistent appearance;secondary facades need not be treated as primary facades.Where structured parking is exposed above grade,screen the exposed wall through pedestrian active uses,architectural treatment and/or landscaping. MaterialsMaterials on the ground floor of facades visible from the public right of way are expected to be modular unit masonry and at least 65% transparent glazing.Careful combinations of materials should be used to reinforce architectural scaling and detailing and to reflect the materials and details used in the neighborhood. DetailingProvide richness of scale through change in plane,contrast and intricacy in form,fenestration patterns,color and materials.Balconies,where used,are expected to be integral to the building design,not superficially applied.Emphasize building entries through the use of glazing,colors,detailing,canopies or other methods. StreetscapeF ences in the front setback are expected to provide transparency through use of pickets or spacing of infill materials.Only retaining walls should be of solid materials.W indow security bars and security doors are expected to be decorative and in keeping with the c haracter of the residence.Existing stone walks and curbs shall be preserved and maintained.Sidewalks shall be detached from the curb and separated from the street by a landscaped tree lawn.Cuts into the tree lawns for loading zones or other purposes shall not be allowed. 49 Direct entries to the street emphasize pedestrian connections Architectual features like cornices can relate to adjacent buildings, lowering the apparent height of the building

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SUBAREA PLANS RESIDENTIAL-OFFICEAREAOFCHANGERESIDENTIAL-OFFICE AREA OF CHANGEThe residential-office area of change has two purposes:to buffer the impacts of the residential, commercial and industrial subareas from each other through more sensitive site and building design,and to allow property owners the flexibility to maintain and expand existing office and light industrial uses, to build new residential uses,and to respond to the long-term evolution of development trends.It serves as a blend of land uses from the solidly residential area to the solidly industrial area,and between the intense commercial activity on Broadway and the residential interior.Land UsePrimary Issues and Opportunities The area has a rough mixture of industrial uses and housing that is difficult for both. There are vacant and underutilized sites throughout the area,providing opportunities for development. Dailey Park is the centerpiece of the neighborhood and is within easy walking distance of sites in the subarea,providing an opportunity for more residential uses. The neighborhood is challenged to protect and enhance current business and light industrial uses in the area while allowing new development that improves the neighborhood.Goals Develop a logical change between Baker's subareas that protects the viability of existing industrial businesses and enhances the quality of life of the residents.Intense non-retail business activity and new housing at a moderate density are appropriate in the area. Provide a range of residential and office uses that allow property owners the flexibility to respond to the long-term evolution of development trends.Residential uses are supported,but it is e xpected that residential uses are responsible for buffering themselves from nonresidential uses that may be located on adjacent property.Siting and design of each new development must ensure compatibility and blending of uses. 50 Residential and industrial uses are adjacenct to each other near Dailey Park BROADWAY AC OMA ST. BANNOC K ST. CHEROKEE ST. DELAWARE ST. ELATI ST. FOX ST. BAKER MIDDLE SCHOOL FAIR MONT ELEMENTARY DA ILEY PARKW 6TH AVE. W 5TH AVE. W 4TH AVE. W 3RD AVE. W 2ND AVE. W 1ST AVE. IRVINGTON PL. ARCHER PL. B AYAUD AVE. MAPLE AVE. CEDAR AVE. BYERS PL. ALAMEDA AVE. ELLSWO RTH AVE.GALAPAGO ST. INCA ST.

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Reinvestment in existing light industrial and non-retail commercial properties is expected. Businesses are encouraged to expand and replace facilities within existing property boundaries to ensure economic viability and good facility maintenance. Arrange residential,office,service and open space uses to be convenient to and compatible with each other.Residential and office/light industrial uses are not necessarily mixed in each building or development,or even within each block in the subarea,but residential and commercial uses are not strictly separated from each other. Support the existing and new uses with parks,pedestrian and transit amenities,shared parking arrangements,and multi-use structures.Recommendations As properties redevelop,support rezoning applications that allow for a mix of residential and office uses,shared parking,and appropriate buffering,mitigation and design.To determine compatible uses,the following effects must be considered:The proposed use will not be harmful to the public or threaten the general welfare of the area.The use and enjoyment of existing uses on surrounding property will not be impaired by the proposed new use.The establishment of the new use shall not impede the normal and orderly practices of existing uses.The aggregate impacts of similar uses shall not result in harmful external effects or environmental impacts.All uses and structures are sited and designed to be compatible with one another,including location,orientation,scale,visual and sound privacy. In considering new uses,the following values must be considered:F airness:The viability of the existing land uses must be protected.Due Process:Any changes to property rights,such as zoning,must occur through a fair and equitable public process.Balance:Changes must balance citywide and local goals and issues. Support applications for additions to and replacement of buildings on existing light industrial and commercial sites to maintain good physical condition of the properties.Urban FormPrimary Issues and Opportunities The current arrangement of uses lacks cohesion and sensible development patterns. 51

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SUBAREA PLANS RESIDENTIAL-OFFICEAREAOFCHANGEGoals Provide for and encourage a compatible mix of housing and office uses in a pedestrian-friendly environment. Provide public amenities such as streets with detached sidewalks and tree lawns,connections to parks and open spaces,public art and public gathering places.Provision of significant public amenities in private development projects may compensate for additional building density. Increase the amount of landscaping and greenery in the neighborhood. Create a cohesive streetscape using detached sidewalks and consistent building setback line. Create compatibility between uses and improve the overall appearance of the area through design and character of the buildings and sites. Preserve buildings of architectural merit and use design of contemporary structures to create a unique character and sense of place.The Residential-Office Area of Change is envisioned as an eclectic neighborhood where no specific architectural style is intended.However,all projects should be contextual in their nature,influenced by adjacent buildings'scale and architectural character. Provide building design with human scale and interest through use of varied forms,materials,details and colors.Avoid expanses of blank walls in new construction. Maintain and increase the availability of on-street parking through minimizing numbers of curb cuts and loading zones.Urban Design Strategies SiteMaintain deep,consistent setbacks along the front property lines throughout the area of change. Corner lots may orient towards either street.Landscape the setback with live plants and permeable materials.Do not use the front setback f or parking,loading or service.Locate parking to the side or rear of buildings,or underground.Landscape all parking lots.Locate,screen and buffer service,storage,delivery,utilities and refuse areas to minimize the view from streets,adjacent zone lots,and open spaces.Use a combination of site planning,building design,and operational requirements to buffer new uses from impacts from existing uses.Appropriate buffering may include a combination of: additional side and rear setbacks,landscaping,fencing or walls,operational conditions,such as hours of operation or public access,vehicular access and circulation pattern arrangement,and 52 Deep setbacks in the Residential-Office Area of Change add green space and attractiveness

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLANmitigation of external effects,such as noise,vibration and odorMinimize the visual impact of parking areas and structures on streets,open spaces,and adjoining development through provision of on-grade habitable space,architectural finishes and landscaping.Improve the efficiency of parking areas by allowing multiple uses to share parking spaces,curb cuts and circulation drives.Provide direct pedestrian access from the front sidewalk to the building.Provide for bicycle parking and access during site planning. Massing and ScaleMid-rise buildings are appropriate.Taller buildings are expected to step back at the fourth story to reduce overall mass and scale,while maintaing human scale at the ground level.Roof forms should be used to reinforce the character of the building and should reflect the use of the building.Flat rooflines with prominent or decorative parapets are most reflective of the historic industrial context.Steeply-pitched rooflines are most reflective of the historic residential context. MaterialsGround floor of new buildings are expected to be of durable solid materials.Brick,masonry, architectural metals,cast in place concrete,tile,glass block systems,etc.are acceptable materials when properly finished and detailed.Storefront window systems should be used in commercial and mixed-use buildings.Stucco systems may be used on levels above the ground floor.Relate new construction to existing buildings through the predominant use of similar detail elements present in standard brick,modular stone,cast stone accents,concrete masonry, detailed stucco,and wood.Use carefully detailed combinations of materials to reinforce architectural scaling elements. DetailingProvide human-scaled building elements and architectural variation,including use of varied fo r ms,materials,details and colors.Provide architecturally-finished and detailed elevations for all exposures of the building with the primary faade (typically the street-facing elevation) having dominant architectural expression. The front entrance and primary faade should be clearly visible and accessible.Provide primary building entrance facing or clearly visible from the public sidewalk. 53 Rooflines can reinforce the architectural character of a street

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SUBAREA PLANS RESIDENTIAL-OFFICEAREAOFCHANGE StreetscapeStreetscape elements shall be used to create a pedestrian-friendly environment,including detached sidewalks,street trees,safe pedestrian crossing points,street lighting,on-street parking, and bus stops.Sidewalks shall be a minimum of 5' and shall be detached from the curb by a landscaped tree lawn a minimum of 8'.The tree lawn shall be planted with living,organic,growing ground cover and appropriate street trees.Existing or historic sandstone walks shall be retained and maintained.New use of historic sandstone walks is encouraged.T ransportation and CirculationPrimary Issues and Opportunities The mix of industrial,residential and commercial traffic can create conflicts between pedestrians and truck traffic. Overall speed and volume of traffic create unsafe conditions. Business customers and employees need transportation options to access the area.Goals Enhance the transit and pedestrian opportunities for residents and employees. Create safe conditions to avoid or mitigate traffic conflicts.Recommendations Provide continuous detached sidewalks with street trees to buffer pedestrians from traffic. Direct truck traffic to designated truck routes and away from the residential subarea. K eep Bayaud from Fox Street to Kalamath Street as a primary east-west truck access route. Direct truck loading and service away from primary streets to the side or rear of buildings and to alleys. 54 Residential-Office Area of Change detailing

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLANINDUSTRIAL-COMMERCIAL AREA OF CHANGEThe industrial-commercial area of change continues the blend between the residential and industrial subareas and allows property owners the flexibility to respond to the long-term evolution of development trends.The predominant use is light industry and commercial businesses with normal business practices and effects such as heavy traffic,noise and light.The area has extensive commercial activity,making it unsuitable for most r esidential uses,although a few work-live units provide housing for resident business owners.Land UsePrimary Issues and Opportunities The area has an illogical mixture of industrial uses and housing that is difficult for both. There are vacant and underutilized sites throughout the area,providing opportunities for development and expansion. Adjacency to residential zone districts triggers regulations that impact industrial sites,placing a burden on industrial businesses.Goals Develop a logical change between Baker's subareas that protects the viability of existing industrial businesses and provides opportunities for appropriate intensification of commercial uses. Limit residential uses to those that currently exist or that provide small-scale housing for resident business owners in work-live units.Although extensive new housing development is inappropriate,limited work-live units may be allowed. Provide a range of industrial and commercial uses that allow property owners the flexibility to r espond to the long-term evolution of development trends. Arrange industrial,office,service and open space uses to be convenient to and compatible with each other. Support the existing and new uses with pedestrian and transit amenities,shared parking arrangements,and multi-use structures. 55 ELATI ST. FOX ST.BAKER MIDDLE SCHOOL FAIR MONT ELEMENTARY DAILEY P ARKGALAPAGO ST. INCA ST. SANTA FE ST. KALAMATH ST. LIPAN ST.I-25

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SUBAREA PLANS INDUSTRIAL-COMMERCIAL AREAOFCHANGERecommendations As properties redevelop,support rezoning applications that allow for a mix of industrial,office and other commercial uses,shared parking facilities,and appropriate buffering,mitigation and design. To determine compatible uses,the following effects must be considered:The proposed use will not be harmful to the public or threaten the general welfare of the area.The use and enjoyment of existing uses on surrounding property will not be impaired by the proposed new use.The establishment of the new use will not impede the normal and orderly practices of existing uses.The aggregate impacts of similar uses shall not result in harmful external effects or environmental impacts.All uses and structures are sited and designed to be compatible with one another,including location,orientation,scale,visual and sound privacy. In considering new uses,the following values must be considered:F airness:The viability of the existing land uses must be protected.Due Process:Any changes to property rights,such as zoning,must occur through a fair and equitable public process.Balance:Changes must balance citywide and local goals and issues.Urban FormPrimary Issues and Opportunities The current arrangement of uses lacks cohesion and sensible development patterns. Incompatible design elements and lack of landscaping create an unpleasant entry to the neighborhood.New development projects provide opportunities to improve the overall appearance of the area.Goals Provide for and encourage a compatible mix of industrial,office and retail uses in a pedestrianfriendly environment. Provide public amenities such as streets with detached sidewalks and tree lawns,parks and open spaces. Create a cohesive streetscape that buffers pedestrians from traffic. 56

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Increase the amount of landscaping and greenery in the neighborhood. Create compatibility between uses and improve the overall appearance of the area through design and character of the buildings and sites. Preserve buildings of architectural merit and use design of contemporary structures to create a unique character and sense of place.The Industrial-Commercial Area of Change is envisioned as an eclectic neighborhood where no specific architectural style is intended.However,all projects should be contextual in their nature,influenced by adjacent buildings'scale and architectural character. Provide building design with human scale and interest through use of varied forms,materials, details and colors.Avoid expanses of blank walls in new construction. Maintain and increase the availability of on-street parking through minimizing numbers of curb cuts and loading zones.Urban Design Strategies SiteLandscape the front building setback with live plants and permeable materials.Do not use front setback for parking,loading or service.Locate parking to the side or rear of buildings,or underground.Landscape all parking areas.Locate,screen and buffer service,storage,delivery and refuse areas to minimize the view from streets,adjacent zone lots,and open spaces.Use a combination of site planning,building design,and operational requirements to buffer new uses from impacts from existing uses.Appropriate buffering may include a combination of additional side and rear setbacks,landscaping,fencing or w alls,operational conditions,such as hours of operation or public access,vehicular access and circulation pattern arrangement,and mitigation of external effects,such as noise, vibration and odorMinimize the visual impact of parking areas,parking structures,and garages on streets,open spaces,and adjoining development.Improve the efficiency of parking areas by allowing multiple uses to share parking spaces,curb cuts and circulation drives. 57 P alace Construction headquarters is a recent addition to the subarea

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SUBAREA PLANS INDUSTRIAL-COMMERCIAL AREAOFCHANGE Massing and ScaleBuildings should be up to four stories tall.Simple building forms with horizontal elements and flat rooflines with prominent or decorative parapets are most reflective of the industrial context. MaterialsGround floors of new buildings are expected to be of durable solid materials.Brick,masonry, architectural metals,cast in place concrete,tile,glass block systems,etc.are acceptable materials when properly finished and detailed.Storefront window systems should be used in commercial and mixed-use buildings.Stucco systems may be used on levels above the ground floor.New construction is expected to relate to existing buildings through the predominant use of similar detail elements present in standard brick,modular stone,cast stone accents,concrete masonry,detailed stucco,and wood.Use carefully detailed combinations of materials to reinforce architectural scaling elements. DetailingInclude human-scaled building elements and architectural variation,including use of varied fo rm s,materials,details and colors.Provide architecturally finished and detailed elevations for all exposures of the building with the primary faade (typically the street-facing elevation) having appropriate architectural expression.Provide primary building entrance facing or clearly visible from the public sidewalk.The front entrance and primary facade should be clearly visible and accessible. StreetscapeStreetscape elements shall be used to create a pedestrian-friendly environment,including detached sidewalks,street trees,safe pedestrian crossing points,street lighting,on-street parking, and bus stops.Sidewalks shall be a minimum of 5' and shall be detached from the curb by a landscaped tree lawn a minimum of 8'.The tree lawn shall be planted with living,organic,growing ground cover and appropriate street trees. 58

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLANT ransportation and CirculationPrimary Issues and Opportunities New retail and commercial businesses will bring pedestrians into the area.Conflicts between truck traffic and pedestrians may occur. Overall speed and volume of traffic create unsafe conditions. Business customers and employees need transportation options to access the area.Goals Enhance the transit and pedestrian opportunities for residents and employees. Create safe conditions to avoid or mitigate traffic conflicts.Recommendations Provide continuous detached sidewalks with street trees to buffer pedestrians from traffic. Direct truck traffic to designated truck routes and away from the residential subarea. Direct truck loading and service away from primary streets to the side or rear of buildings and to alleys. 59

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INDUSTRIALThe industrial area lies between the South Platte River and the light rail tracks north of Alameda Avenue. Manufacturing,warehousing,distribution and wholesale activities occur here.The area is a key component of Denver's economic and employment base.This area of stability remains vital,with businesses upgrading and moving into the 21st century with a commitment to the city and its vital gr o wth and industrial needs. The businesses continue to landscape and improve their sites,improving the visual landscape.Safety and environmental sensitivity remain high with a concern for the safety and cleanliness of the area.The manufacturing companies have goals to remain clean in their impact and to meet all federal,state and city codes.The industrial area is vital and fundamentally non-residential.Residential and industrial uses do not mix in this subarea and the fundamental separation remains important for the harmony of all. Nonconforming residences within the industrial areas should be phased out,leaving the area intact with industrial and commercial uses.Land UsePrimary Issues and Opportunities Existing non-conforming residential uses undermine the integrity and business practices of the industrial area. V acant and underutilized sites offer opportunities for expansion and reinvestment.Goals Maintain the integrity of the industrial business area by continuing industrial zoning and prohibiting r esidential infill or encroachment.Appropriate uses are manufacturing,warehousing and other industrial uses,as well as office,wholesale stores and other commercial uses. 60 T ypical industrial buildings house manufacturing, assembly, distribution and warehousing DELAWARE ST. ELATI ST. FOX ST.BAKER MIDDLE SCHOOL FAIR MONT ELEMENTARY DAILEY P ARKGALAPAGO ST. INCA ST. SANTA FE ST. KALAMATH ST. LIPAN ST. OSAGE ST. Q UIVAS ST. RARITAN ST.I-25 SUBAREA PLANS INDUSTRIAL

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Enhance the viability of the industrial business area by attracting and retaining viable industrial businesses.Support expansion of existing business and addition of new businesses,especially new c lean industries. Phase out non-industrial and commercial uses that negatively impact the industrial uses. Locate more intense industry farthest away from residential edges.Recommendations Maintain strong City policy against housing in the industrial area during review of zoning and development applications. Business associations and City staff should work together to clarify rules and regulations that affect industrial properties and areas. Develop relocation and buy-out program for nonconforming uses.Consider condemnation of nonconforming uses in limited cases. Increase funding available to businesses to renovate and improve their properties. Pursue funding for environmental clean-up and re-use of contaminated sites. Identify parking and loading areas to be maintained and identify opportunities for additional parking and loading areas.Economic and Business DevelopmentPrimary Issues and Opportunities Crime and vandalism undermine the safety of the area.Goals Support expansion and reinvestment in existing businesses and add new complementary businesses. Increase safety and security in the industrial area. Maintain and increase property values.Recommendations Develop and maintain positive working relationships with the community. Increase level of city services for public safety,trash removal,graffiti removal and code enforcement. Address common issues with neighborhood associations and City agencies,especially Police,Public Wo r ks/Transportation,Planning,Zoning,and Excise and License. 61

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SUBAREA PLANS INDUSTRIALUrban FormPrimary Issues and Opportunities Overall appearance and function of the area is undermined by poorly maintained and designed properties.Goals Encourage and maintain industrial development while maintaining a high standard of visual integration into the built and natural environment. Minimize negative impacts on neighboring uses and adjacent properties. Create a cohesive appearance and attractive character that reflects the industrial uses in the area. Redevelop industrial sites in a logical and respectful manner.Recommendations Increase code enforcement and property maintenance. Encourage voluntary commitment to high quality building and site design.Urban Design Strategies SiteLocate parking and site entrances for heavy vehicles,service vehicles and trucks away from the primary building entries.Provide landscaping and other buffering measures to reduce noise,fumes,and screen or conceal service areas from public streets.Design vehicle parking to avoid conflicts between trucks or other heavy vehicles and employees' and visitors'passenger vehicles.Locate loading areas to the rear and sides of buildings.Use landscaping and screening elements to define surface parking.Locate required landscaping in front setbacks and adjacent to public streets.Integrate fences into the landscaping.Industrial materials such as masonry or metal should be used for fencing.Locate outside storage and staging areas to the side or rear of buildings.Screen storage areas from public streets.Screen service areas,dumpsters and garbage containers,recycling containers and utility kiosks from public streets with landscaping or screening finished in a manner consistent with the principle building. 62

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLANF or sites with multiple buildings,provide safe pedestrian connections between buildings. Building OrientationLocate principle buildings within 5' of the minimum front setback facing public streets.Locate offices,reception and other public use areas at the front of buildings and facing public streets.Design facades so public use areas are easily identifiable and visible from public streets.Locate and design main entries to be clearly identifiable and accessible from public streets. Provide landscaping to identify and define entrances to the site and buildings.Secondary buildings on a site,including those designed for storage of materials,should be screened from public streets with landscaping or should be designed and finished in a manner consistent with the principle building. Massing and ScaleIndustrial buildings should be 1-3 stories tall.Simple building forms with horizontal elements and flat rooflines with prominent or decorative parapets are most reflective of the industrial context. DetailingUse articulation on street-facing facades to create depth and variation.Use architectural elements,materials,finishes,glazing and textured surfaces to provide visual interest.Include glazing as a major component of street-facing facades.Features such as texture, gr aphics,reveals and colors should be incorporated into facades that may contain blank walls. Provide landscaping in front of blank walls that face public streets.Light entrances to buildings to enhance after-dark visibility and safety.Integrate visual landmarks into building design at locations of high visibility such as significant street corners.Encourage features such as flag poles,awnings,canopies,visual art and entry statements.Where lot size permits,service doors (e.g.overhead doors at loading docks) should not be located on a building faade that faces a public street.Design service doors to fit with the ov erall design of the building.All rooftop mechanical equipment and telecommunications facilities should be screened from public view or integrated within the building architecture. 63 Emphasize corner entry

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SUBAREA PLANS INDUSTRIAL StreetscapeRetain existing mature trees on adjacent public right of way.Provide measures for their longterm maintenance.F ollow Denver streetscape standards along all public streets.Sidewalks may either be attached to the curb,or detached with tree lawns,depending on the predominant character in the immediate area.Logical connections to adjacent sidewalks are required. Mitigation of External EffectsUse site and building design of industrial development to minimize external effects so the uses and activities do not cause or become an excessive annoyance or nuisance to adjacent areas. External effects may include unsightliness;the emission of odors,liquid effluents,dust,fumes or smoke;vibration;noise or glare;high brightness light sources;heat;or anything which creates or causes a health,fire,or explosion hazard;electrical interference;or undue traffic congestion.Store garbage and waste material in containers which are weatherproof and animal-resistant within the boundaries of each site.Screen dumpsters from all adjacent sites and public streets.Provide site and building lighting that increases safety and security without causing glare or casting deep shadows.Lighting should be even across the site.T ransportation and CirculationPrimary Issues and Opportunities Conflicts between truck traffic and pedestrians may occur. Overall speed and volume of traffic create unsafe conditions. Business customers and employees need transportation options to access the area. At grade railroad crossings disrupt traffic flow and impede public safety.Goals Enhance the transit and pedestrian opportunities for residents and employees. Create safe conditions to avoid or mitigate traffic conflicts.Recommendations Provide continuous sidewalks to provide for pedestrians movement. Direct truck traffic to designated truck routes and away from the residential subarea. Direct truck loading and service away from primary streets to the side or rear of buildings and to alleys. Separate trains and roads at Santa Fe Drive and Kalamath Street. 64 At-grade train crossing blocks rush-hour traffic Screening of service areas is integral to site planning

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLANTRANSIT-ORIENTED DEVELOPMENTTr ansit-oriented development (TOD) is a strategy to preserve regional mobility and quality of life by r einforcing Denver's light rail system and supporting ridership growth.The concept involves placing high density housing and jobs,along with complementing public uses,retail,and services,in mixed-use, pedestrian-friendly development patterns adjacent to light rail stops.The mix of uses must be supportable with or without light rail and must serve as an amenity to the neighborhood as well as to people traveling to the area.The Baker TODs are located at the Broadway light rail station and the Alameda light rail stop.Land UsePrimary Issues and Opportunities Both Alameda and Broadway light rail stations are underused,with vehicle -oriented commerce, industrial and vacant land nearby.Current land uses at the train stations are not served by the light r ail train and serve as barriers to transit use. Pa r cel sizes are large,either industrial or "big box"in character,and much of the area lacks a regular street grid. An unimproved portion of Vanderbilt Park is located adjacent to the Gates Rubber site and is available for development as a new park or recreation center. Environmental contamination is present at the Broadway Station site.Goals Redevelop the area with high-density housing,a mixture of neighborhood and destination retail,an office and employment center that is served by light rail,strong pedestrian and bicycle connections,and adequate parking.Existing retail stores should remain or be replaced as appropriate,with new development in underused parcels (such as parking lots). 65 Alameda station transit station is adjacent to a commercial center with development potential V ANDERBILT PARKSOUTH P LATTE RIV E R S. HURON ST. S. GALAPAGO ST.S. PLATTE R I V ER DR .S. SANT A FE D R.S. BROADWAYBYERS PL. ALAMEDA AVE. MISSISSIPPI AVE.S. FOX ST.

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66 TOD Land Use Concept Plan and Connecting GreenwayThis map from the 1997 Light Rail Station Development plan shows preliminary concepts for development near the stations, includ ing the linear park connecting Broadway and Alameda stations. However, the areas will be the subject of later site-specific master plans to show a ctual transit alignment, streets, and associated land uses and building design.SUBAREA PLANS TRANSIT-ORIENTED DEVELOPMENT

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Integrate new parks into the redevelopment of the area,providing adequate parks and open space f or new residents and employees,transit riders and adjacent residents. Connect the Alameda and Broadway stations to each other,using a landscaped pedestrian/bicycle gr eenway,to add needed connections and open space as the area redevelops. Encourage mixed-uses,including a mix of housing,commercial uses,neighborhood centers, shared parking opportunities,and the integration of different land uses within the subarea and within buildings. Provide common useable open space that is of mutual benefit to surrounding property owners, businesses and residents. Create more retail opportunities for businesses. Develop more parking for light rail users and shoppers on less land. Increase light rail ridership. Complete environmental remediation to a level that is safe for residents,employees,and parks.Recommendations Align new roads,rail spurs,and overpasses to reinforce the connections between transit and land use. Develop a greenway linear park connecting the stations. Clean the environmental contamination from the subarea. Plan and construct storm water drainage improvements. Develop and implement zone district regulations to reinforce desired land uses. Integrate new parks into redevelopment. Build parking with ground floor active uses.Urban FormPrimary Issues and Opportunities The wide expanses of surface parking lots,large-scale buildings and introverted site orientation are incompatible with the older small-scale,street-oriented retail on Broadway and with the intimate r esidential streets of the surrounding neighborhoods. The stations are hidden from the adjacent streets,leading to confusion for drivers and pedestrians. V acant and underutilized buildings are immediately adjacent to the stations,especially at the Gates Rubber site. 67

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SUBAREA PLANS TRANSIT-ORIENTED DEVELOPMENTGoals Accommodate a broad mix of development types that encourage use of alternative transportation, especially walking and transit use. Create a built environment that is in scale and character with pedestrian-oriented activities. Restore a sense of human scale and walkability to the area. Retain and extend the street grid system into redevelopment areas. Develop adjacent land in a manner that reflects historic development patterns,is sensitive to the neighborhood context,and preserves historic structures while allowing new architectural styles to develop. Develop business areas in a manner that encourages pedestrian and transit friendliness,reinforces the character of the area and connects to adjacent residential uses. Create a walkable neighborhood by providing active pedestrian-oriented public uses on the ground fl oors of commercial and mixed-use projects,generous sidewalks,enhanced streetscaping,and building design with human scale and detail. Minimize the presence of parking areas and parking structures to limit the conflicts with desired pedestrian activity.Minimize the negative visual and noise impacts of parked autos through a combination of ground-floor active uses wrapping structured parking,site planning,building placement,landscaping,screening,fencing and other effective buffering. Provide for shared parking facilities for transit riders and other users. Use durable materials that complement Denver's tradition as a brick and masonry city.Recommendations Preserve,renovate and reuse the following historic buildings to the greatest extent possible:Signature "Gates"water tower and signLarge brick warehouses adjacent to Broadway Station Enhance pedestrian connections through the Marketplace and across adjacent streets. Create a gateway that links the station to the retail center. Develop a linear park for pedestrian and bicycle movement between the Broadway and Alameda stations. Continue Cherokee Street to the Denver Design Center and Broadway Station.Maintain and develop the grid pattern of streets and alleys to reinforce the block pattern and the existing urban structure. 68 The familiar Gates tower and brick buildings at the potential redevelopment site

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Develop pedestrian-oriented commercial space along Alaska Avenue within the existing Broadway Marketplace parking lot,preferably around structured parking.Urban Design Strategies SiteProvide convenient pedestrian access from the public right of way,parking areas,and transit areas and utilize pedestrian-friendly site and building design.Do not locate parking and/or drive aisles between buildings and the public street.Design new streets to align with and continue the Denver street grid.Retain and be constructed to Denver standards.Locate detached sidewalks and streets trees adjacent to all public and private streets. Building OrientationLocate building walls at the property line adjacent to the public street,creating a consistent "street wall."Locate parking underground,to the rear of buildings,or in structures wrapped in ground floor active uses.Locate loading,storage,HVAC,garbage dumpsters,noise generators and other service functions aw ay from pedestrian routes and access points.Screen service functions from view using walls, f ences and landscaping.Delivery and other service operations are expected to avoid disturbing adjoining residences and properties. Massing and ScaleBuildings should be 4-12 stories tall.Taller buildings are expected to step back at the fourth story to reduce the overall mass and scale.Ensure that new buildings consistent with the height restrictions of the Washington Park View Plane and any other view protection corridors (see page 111). MaterialsUse durable materials,especially at the ground floor.Brick,masonry,metals,cast in place concrete,tile,glass,glass block systems,etc.are acceptable materials.Relate to existing buildings through the use of similar scale elements present in standard brick, modular stone,cast stone accents,concrete masonry and detailed stucco.Use carefully detailed combinations of materials to reinforce architectural scaling requirements. 69 Screen wall with trellis P edestrian businesses screening parking

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SUBAREA PLANS TRANSIT-ORIENTED DEVELOPMENT DetailingInclude human-scaled building elements and architectural variation,including form,detail, materials and colors to provide visual interest.Prominent and/or decorative parapets and cornices are appropriate.All glazing should be recessed and subdivided by systems of framing and mullions to reinforce architectural scaling elements.W indows on the residential portion of any building should reflect the more vertically oriented, deeply set punched opening characteristics typical of traditional Denver architecture.Size and proportions of storefront systems in mixed use or commercial buildings should be subdivided by substantial columns,piers and or wall areas that visually bring the building mass and structural system to the ground.Use prominent windows and operable doors at the street-facing facades. StreetscapeDetached sidewalks with generous tree lawns shall be incorporated into new development.Streetscape elements shall be used to unify the TOD districts.The streetscape may include lighting,benches,landscaping,pavement patterns,public art and/or similar elements.T ransportation and CirculationPrimary Issues and Opportunities Threat of inappropriate alignment of new light rail line that could cut off Gates redevelopment area from the LRT station. Street,bicycle and sidewalk connections to and between the stations are poor or nonexistent. Connections to the parks west of the South Platte River and the greenway are difficult and unsafe. Alameda Avenue underpass lacks pedestrian,bicycle and handicapped accessibility.It has drainage problems and is unsightly. The Denver street grid is incomplete and fractured in the area. There is simultaneously too much surface retail parking and too little commuter parking. A north-south freight rail is active and is a major presence at both stops. 70 Prominent entries and storefront window systems on street-facing facades

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLANGoals Construct new tracks,buttresses,highway lanes and local streets in a manner that reinforces the connection and use of the redevelopment area.Pedestrians and bicyclists must have usable access to the stations.Recommendations Develop a green corridor connection between stations. Improve pedestrian crossings of perimeter streets through improved signal timing and sidewalks. Create a pedestrian and bicycle bridge over the tracks,Santa Fe Drive and the South Platte River to the river path. Maintain and reintroduce the street grid into new developments to the greatest extent possible, including:At Alameda Station:West Nevada Place,West Dakota Place,West Alaska Place,West Virginia Av enue,and South Bannock StreetAt Broadway Station:West Exposition Avenue,West Ohio Avenue,West Kentucky Avenue,West T ennessee Avenue,South Acoma Street,South Bannock Street,and South Cherokee Street Enhance the Alameda underpass with new sidewalks,ADA ramps,and bicycle lanes.Integrate streetscaping elements and artwork to enhance the aesthetics of the underpass. Develop structured parking wrapped in active uses to be shared by retailers,residents and commuters on the site of the existing surface lots both at and adjacent to the train stations. 71

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SUBAREA PLANS RETAILCENTERRETAIL CENTERSThe retail centers are destination business areas,including retail and offices.The subarea may contain some moderate-density housing,but is predominantly commercial.The area may eventually redevelop to a more intense use,but that is not anticipated within the planning horizon of this plan.Nevertheless, new development should be located to maintain options for future intensification.Land UsePrimary Issues and Opportunities The retail areas are easily accessible by vehicles,but not by transit or pedestrians.Goals Develop the area with destination retail or wholesale businesses and services.Recommendations Support redevelopment proposals on vacant and underutilized sites.Urban FormPrimary Issues and Opportunities Large-scale retail development can create gaps in the urban design of the area and present a poor entry to the neighborhood.Goals Design retail centers to address the urban context. Develop retail centers to be safe,convenient and comfortable for drivers,pedestrians and bicyclists. Construct retail center sites in a manner that establishes a pattern and character for the long-term evolution to more intense and dense uses over time. 72 Home Depot is a destination retail store near I-25 SOUTH PLATTE R IVER BYERS PL. ALAMEDA AVE.

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Use new development to reinforce the character and quality of public streets through buildings that provide orientation and access toward the street.Urban Design Strategies SiteContinue and extend the Denver street grid.Construct private streets to City of Denver standards.Provide detached sidewalks and street trees along both sides of all public and private streets.Provide direct pedestrian access from the public street by internal sidewalks.Connect primary building entries to the street sidewalk by the most direct route practicable.Provide entrances to large retail buildings that reduce walking distance from cars,facilitate pedestrian and bicycle access from public sidewalks,and mitigate unbroken walls and facades. At least one entry per retail bay or tenant is appropriate.Locate building entries and internal sidewalks to facilitate pedestrian access between retail sites.Divide surface parking lots into small and moderate-sized parcels to reduce expanses of pavement.Landscape and provide pedestrian access to buildings from distinct parking areas.Public art,water features,pocket parks and public gathering places should be included in large sites and located to encourage public use. Building OrientationBuildings are expected to be parallel to the street grid and adjacent to the street.Do not place or orient buildings,parking,circulation,or service facilities on a lot in such a way as to treat primary street frontage as a rear lot line.All building frontages visible from a street or residential area are expected to have the equivalent treatment of the primary building faade.Locate parking to the interior of building sites and screen it from the public rights of way. Structured parking is expected to have active ground-floor uses.Locate loading,storage,HVAC,garbage dumpsters and other service functions away from pedestrian routes and access points.Screen service functions from view using walls,fences and landscaping.Delivery and other service operations is expected to avoid disturbing adjoining r esidences and properties.Locate auto-oriented and drive-through uses away from street frontage.Locate drive-up and drive-through facilities on the side or rear of a building and away from residential uses. 73 Development over time

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SUBAREA PLANS RETAILCENTER Massing and ScaleNew development is expected to relate architecturally to other existing or proposed development.Articulate facades to reduce massive scale and uniform appearance of large retail buildings. Materials and ColorsExterior building materials is expected to be of durable,solid materials such as brick,stone,other masonry,cast in place concrete,or steel.Commercial storefront systems are appropriate on the gr ound floor.Stucco systems may be used above the lower 10'-0" of buildings.Colors should be complimentary to building architecture and to the adjacent neighborhood. DetailingBuilding facades facing arterial streets are expected to either be the primary entry faade or of comparable quality in terms of architecture,materials and detailing.Corner buildings need only provide public entry on one street-oriented faade.Ground floor facades that face public streets are expected to have display windows,entry areas, a wnings,or other such features along 2/3 of the horizontal length.Use architectural features and patterns that provide visual interest at the pedestrian level,and r educe monolithic aesthetic effects.Repeating patterns of color,texture,material or change in plane are integral parts of the building fabric,not superficially applied.All building frontages visible from a street or residential area are expected to have the equivalent treatment of the primary building faade.Sign locations and design are expected to relate to the building architecture. StreetscapeDetached sidewalks and street trees shall be required along both sides of all public and private streets.Use internal sidewalks to connect the public street to buildings.Provide internal landscaping within surface parking lots. 74 Design Center on Broadway provides a destination for interior design and architectural products

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLANT ransportation and CirculationPrimary Issues and Opportunities The intersection of Alameda Avenue,Santa Fe Drive and I-25 is unsafe and poorly designed.Goals Improve the safety and accessibility of the intersection.Recommendations Site and design adjacent development to keep access away from the intersection. Add safe bicycle and pedestrian connections. 75

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLANIMPLEMENTATION PLAN 77

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Implementation of the recommendations in this plan will occur through a series of private,publicprivate,and public actions.The scale of many implementation actions will be small.Many will not be subject to public debate or review,while others will be extensively reviewed and intensely debated. Implementation by the private sector may be accomplished through new construction or major r enovations.If they are located and designed consistent with the recommendations in the Plan,each new house,office building,business,sidewalk,park facility and tree will help achieve the vision for Baker.Most of the implementation strategies rely on partnerships between public agencies and the private sector, including developers,property owners and residents,and neighborhood associations.It will take the combined efforts of all to realize the goals of the plan. Public implementation actions will be both initiated by the City and reactive to opportunities or proposals as they arise.Directed public actions may include a change in operations,such as maintenance programs; the planning and construction of public infrastructure,funded through the City's capital improvements program or general fund;or adoption of regulatory changes,such as zoning language,design guidelines and map amendments.Implementation may include the review of private uses and construction for consistency with the plan.Review processes vary depending on the type and location of construction and uses being reviewed.Review may be limited to City agency and utility review for projects proposed under existing regulations.It may also include review by neighborhood associations,adjacent property o wners,the Denver Planning Board and Denver City Council for zoning changes or map amendments. The Baker Neighborhood Plan identifies the top administrative and capital improvement project priorities.This list includes both specific projects that were identified in the planning process and g eneral awareness of opportunities that may develop later. Implementation actions include three general categories: Regulatory actions (e.g.zoning,design review,landmark district,view protection) Public investment (e.g.transportation,parks,facilities,utilities) Pa rt nerships between the public and private sectors (e.g.residents,businesses,neighborhood associations,special districts). Regulation is a powerful but not entirely sufficient tool for bringing about the vision of the neighborhood plan.While creating the regulatory framework of zoning and design standards,the public sector also must create a climate that attracts private investment.The neighborhood residents,businesses and others must also do their parts to implement the neighborhood plan. 78 IMPLEMENTATION PLAN

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLANREGULATORY ACTIONSUse the recommendations of the neighborhood plan in City review of all development and infrastructure projects.CPDA and other City agencies will use the Baker Neighborhood Plan to guide decision-making and development-review comments,consistent with applicable City rules,regulations and procedures. Implement design standards as outlined in the framework and subarea plans for all new construction projects. CPDA expects that all significant private and public proposals and projects be referred to the neighborhood associations for information and comment. All neighborhood associations should be knowledgeable of the plan and use it in the evaluation of proposals and association actions. Initiate or support zoning changes to better achieve the plan goals,especially in the Areas of Change (see map on page 80). Develop and apply a TOD zone district for Gates and Alameda stations. Support site by site rezonings that implement the Plan vision. Use Plan recommendations to inform regulators as they work on citywide zoning changes and r ules and regulations for development review. Use other zoning changes to bring regulations into compliance with the Plan vision. PriorityActionTimeframeStrategies 1 Remove existing nonconforming uses Medium-long term € Engage owners in constructive dialogue. 2 Zoning changes where discrepancies between existing regulations and desired land uses occur Medium-long term € Support individual site rezoning applications that further the vision. € Develop and apply a zone district that enables transit-oriented development for that subarea. 3 Slow traffic on residential streets Ongoing € Public Works and CPDA to develop a traffic management program. 4I mplement design guidelinesOngoing € Use plan design guidelines in administrative development review. € Use plan design guidelines in rezoning applications. € Use plan design guidelines as a resources in revisions to citywide regulatory framework to encourage site-appropriate design. 79 These general recommendations outline the top priorities for regulatory actions at the time the plan was prepared. Other opportunities may arise that will require a neighborhood r esponse and that will become higher priorities. The list of r ecommendations show general implementation actions in this category, while the following chart takes some of the specific community priorities and adds more strategic information.

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GATES TOD DESIGN CENTER RETAIL BROADWAY TRANSIT GREEN TOD INDUSTRIAL Industrial Industrial/Commercial Area of Change Residential/Office Area of Change Commercial Corridors Midand High-Rise Residential Single-Family and Rowhouse Residential TOD Area of Change Retail Centers Legend S O UTH P LA TTE RIV ER S. SAN T A FE D R .S. BROADWAY BROADWAY AC OMA ST. BANNOCK ST. CHEROKEE ST. DELAWARE ST. ELATI ST. FOX ST. BAKER MIDDLE SCHOOL FAIR MONT ELEMENTARY DA ILEY PARKW 6TH AVE. W 5TH AVE. W 4TH AVE. W 3RD AVE. W 2ND AVE. W 1ST AVE. IRVINGTON PL. ARCHER PL. BAYAUD AVE. MAPLE AVE. CEDAR AVE. BYERS PL. ALAMEDA AVE. DAKOTA AVE. VIRGINIA AVE. CENTER AVE. EXPOSITION AVE. OHIO AVE. TENNESSEE AVE. MISSISSIPPI AVE. ELLSWORTH AVE.GALAPAGO ST. INCA ST. SANTA FE ST. KALAMATH ST. LIPAN ST. OSAGE ST. QUIVAS ST. RARITAN ST.I-25 N B-8 I-2B-4I-2B-4PUDB-4R-3B-4I-2 I-1 I-1 I-1O-1PUDB-1B-1B-1B-1I-0 PUD R-3PUDP1R-3 R-3 B-4R-2-A Light Rail Light Rail Station Zoning 80Existing Zoning and Proposed Land UseIMPLEMENTATION PLAN

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLANPUBLIC INVESTMENT1. Transportation and Mobility Improve access to Alameda light rail station. Separate grade of railroad and road at Santa Fe and Kalamath. Install curb,gutter and street improvements. Use the light rail extension alignment at Broadway station to reinforce TOD goals. Reconstruct Broadway overpass at I-25,maintaining full access to and from Broadway. Design and implement a greenway connection between Alameda and Broadway stations. Add bicycle lanes,bridges and racks at stations and other locations. Provide improved access points,especially sidewalks,on corridors. Develop the Alameda underpass to include bicycle and pedestrian paths (see map on page 83).2. Parks Dailey Park improvements may include new flower beds and new or improved restrooms.Existing landscaping should be preserved and enhanced.Explore oppostunities,such as closing the adjacent Archer Place or Ellsworth Avenue,to provide more parkland. Flores Park improvements could include repair and enhancement of playground equipment. Engage residents in open space planning for a new park at the Gates Rubber TODsite,currently an undeveloped part of Vanderbilt Park. Design and construct a new greenway connection between Broadway and Alameda stations.3. Facilities Develop shared parking garage and lots on Broadway for commercial use and to support transit. Install bicycle parking at Alameda station. 81 These general recommendations outline the top priorities for regulatory actions at the time the plan was prepared. Other opportunities may arise that will require a neighborhood r esponse and that will become higher priorities. The list of r ecommendations show general implementation actions in this category, while the following chart takes some of the specific community priorities and adds more strategic information.

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IMPLEMENTATION PLAN4. Utilities Develop a storm water drainage capacity study and improvements Develop infrastructure to support redevelopment of Gates Rubber and Broadway Marketplace sites. The Baker neighborhood prioritized the following infrastructure improvements to be pursued.Other infrastructure investment should be made as opportunities arise. PriorityActionTimeframeStrategies 1 Improve access to and appearance of South Platte River Medium-long term € Parks/CPDA plan € CIP € Dedicated Parks funding 2R educe crimeShort term € Neighborhood Watch € Work with DPD € Increase use of existing programs 3 Facilities and landscaping improvements at Dailey Park Short term € Parks/CPDA plan € CIP € Dedicated Parks funding 4 Build bicycle connectionsMedium term € CIP € Dedicated Parks funding 5 Increase graffiti removal Ongoing € 6 Upgrade storm water drainage system Long € Wastewater Management Department Enterprise Fund 7 Post and enforce truckexclusion routes Short € CIP € FNI 8 Improve pedestrian crossings of Alameda, Broadway, Santa Fe Medium € PW operating € CIP € FNI 9 Construct new linear park connection Alameda and Broadway LRT stations Long € CIP € Parks Fund € RTD € Private development 10Develop Alameda underpassMedium € Public Works Maintenance funds € CIP 82

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN A l a m e d a A v e n u e : P l a t t e R i v e r t o C h e r o k e e S t r e e t C o n n e c t i o n ( R o u t e s D -7 7 ; D -1 1 4 ; D -1 1 6 ) : This section of Alameda Avenue is a central connection for three bicycle routes. The Platte River Trail connects to the north side of Alameda Avenue via a ramp. Between the ramp and Santa Fe Drive, bicyclists and pedestrians must cross three high-volume intersections complicated by turning movements at the I-25 exit ramp, Kalamath Street and Santa Fe Drive. Multiple curb cuts and an existing bus stop further complicate the route. Recommendation: Prioritization/Implementation: 83 Bike Route Connections

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IMPLEMENTATION PLANP ARTNERSHIPS1. Make people aware of the neighborhood plan, its recommendations and its purpose as a road map for the neighborhood: CPDA and Baker neighborhood associations will make copies of the plan available to the neighborhood. CPDA will distribute final plan internally to other city departments. CPDA and Baker neighborhood associations will make the plan available to potential developers and others as requested. Make Baker Neighborhood Plan available on the Internet.2. Use public-private partnerships to acquire funding and labor for plan priorities. Upgrade household utilities and building frames Restore facades of older buildings Pa ve unimproved and inadequate alleys (see map page 87) Restore inadequate tree lawns (see map page 86) Relay historic stone sidewalks Replace broken concrete walks (see map page 88) I-25 and Broadway viaduct improvements Alameda underpass improvements,including bicycle and pedestrian access Add sidewalks and trees along 6th Avenue Environmental contamination clean-up through Brownfields reclamation programs,especially on the neighborhood edges and at the transit-oriented developments..3. Work with RTD on new service decisions. Pa r ticipate in Capitol Connector transit study to promote local interests,as well as city and regionwide connections. 84 These general recommendations outline the top priorities for regulatory actions at the time the plan was prepared. Other opportunities may arise that will re quire a neighborhood response and that will become higher priorities. The list of recommendations show general implementation actions in this category, while the following chart takes some of the specific community priorities and adds more strategic information.

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Provide neighborhood input for bus route and service changes. Pa r ticipate in transit-service planning related to transit-oriented development,changes to highway and rail configurations,and improvements to infrastructure. Redevelop the Alameda underpass to include better bicyle and pedestrian connections,attractive design and solve drainage problems. Partnerships table PriorityActionTimeframeStrategies 1 Pave alleys Short-term € Focus Neighborhood Initiative (FNI) € Capital Improvement Programs (CIP) € LID € Property owners 2 Add and replace sidewalks throughout neighborhood Ongoing € FNI € CIP € Property owners 3 Rail separation on Santa Fe and Kalamath Long-term € CDOT highway maintenance project € Railroad funding 4 Improve maintenance and appearance of residential buildings Ongoing € Property owners 5 Add sidewalks and trees to 6th Avenue Medium € FNI € Forestry € Property owners/businesses 6 Add needed curbs, gutters and sidewalks Ongoing € FNI € CIP 7 Increase use of street, pedestrian and bus stop lighting to increase safety Short € LID € RTD € Bond issues/neighborhood small project 8 Upgrade utilities and telecommunications Long € Utilities 9 Develop new park and recreation facilities at Gates TOD Long € CIP € Parks Fund € Private development 10 Plant and maintain treelawns throughout the neighborhood Ongoing € FNI, Community Block Grants € Parks Fund € Property owners € Neighborhood associations 11 Remediate environmental contamination Medium-Long term € EPA/MOED brownfields remediation funds € Property owners 12 Parking solutions at LRT, Broadway, Santa Fe Medium-long term € RTD € Local improvement district € Property owners 13 Improve pedestrian connections to Alameda station Medium € CIP € FNI € RTD 14 Develop TODs at Gates and Alameda Long € CIP € Property owners € RTD € CDOT € LID € Parks 15 Mitigate negative effects of new LRT service; increase benefits of new LRT service Medium € CIP € RTD € LID € Neighborhood associations € Property owners 16 Improve transit service to neighborhood: safety, comfort and convenience Ongoing € RTD € Neighborhood associations 85

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AT TA CHED W ALK POOR F AIR GOOD LEGEND SO U T H P L AT T E RIVER S. SA N T A FE D R .S. BROADWAY BROADWAY AC OMA ST. BANNOC K ST. CHEROKEE ST. DELAWARE ST. ELATI ST. FOX ST. BAKER MIDDLE SCHOOL FAIR MONT ELEMENTARY DA ILEY PARKW 6TH AVE. W 5TH AVE. W 4TH AVE. W 3RD AVE. W 2ND AVE. W 1ST AVE. IRVINGTON PL. ARCHER PL. B AYAUD AVE. MAPLE AVE. CEDAR AVE. BYERS PL. ALAMEDA AVE. DAKOTA AVE. VIRGINIA AVE. CENTER AVE. EXPOSITION AVE. OHIO AVE. TENNESSEE AVE. MISSISSIPPI AVE. ELLSWO RTH AVE.GALAPAGO ST. INCA ST. SANTA FE ST. KALAMATH ST. LIPAN ST. OSAGE ST. QUIVAS ST. RARITAN ST.I-25 N 86T reelawn ConditionsIMPLEMENTATION PLAN

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN POOR (Large potholes,paving, cracks) F AIR (Paving cracks and/or small potholes) GOOD (No potholes, few paving cracks) NO PAVING (Dirt alley) VAN DERBILT PARKSO U T H P LA T T E RIV ER S. HURON ST. S. GALAPAGO ST.S. PLA TT E R I VER D R.S. SA N TA F E D R .S. BROADWAY BROADWAY ACOMA ST. B ANNOCK ST. CHEROKEE ST. DELAWARE ST. ELATI ST. FOX ST. B AKER MIDDLE SCHOOL FAIR MONT ELEMENTARY DAI LEY P ARK6TH AVE. 5TH AVE. 4TH AVE. 3RD AVE. 2ND AVE. 1ST AVE. IRVINGTON PL. ARCHER PL. BAYAUD AVE. MAPLE AVE. CEDAR AVE. BYERS PL. ALAMEDA AVE. ELLSWORTH AVE.GALAPAGO ST. INCA ST. SANTA FE ST. KALAMATH ST. LIPAN ST. OSAGE ST. QUIV AS ST. RARITAN ST.MISSISSIPPI AVE.S. FOX ST.I-25LEGEND 87 Alley Conditions

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POOR F AIR GOOD VAN DERBILT PARKSO U T H P LA T T E R IV ER S. HURON ST. S. GALAPAGO ST.S. PLATT E R I VER D R.S. SA N TA F E D R .S. BROADWAY BROADWAY ACOMA ST. B ANNOCK ST.CHEROKEE ST.DELAWARE ST. ELATI ST. FOX ST. B AKER MIDDLE SCHOOL FAIR MONT ELEMENTARY DAI LEY P ARK6TH AVE. 5TH AVE. 4TH AVE. 3RD AVE. 2ND AVE. 1ST AVE. IRVINGTON PL. ARCHER PL. BAYAUD AVE. MAPLE AVE. CEDAR AVE. BYERS PL.ALAMEDA AVE.ELLSWORTH AVE.GALAPAGO ST. INCA ST. SANTA FE ST. KALAMATH ST. LIPAN ST. OSAGE ST. QUIV AS ST. RARITAN ST.MISSISSIPPI AVE.S. FOX ST.I-25LEGEND 88Sidewalk ConditionsIMPLEMENTATION PLAN

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN SO U T H P LA T T E RIV ER S. SANTA F E DR.S. BROADWAY BROADWAY ACOMA ST. BANNOCK ST. CHEROKEE ST. DELAWARE ST. ELATI ST. FOX ST. BAKER MIDDLE SCHOOL FA IRMONT ELEMENTARY DAILEY PARKW 6TH AVE. W 5TH AVE. W 4TH AVE. W 3RD AVE. W 2ND AVE. W 1ST AVE. IRVINGTON PL. ARCHER PL. BAYAUD AVE. MAPLE AVE. CEDAR AVE. BYERS PL. ALAMEDA AVE. DAKOTA AVE. VIRGINIA AVE. CENTER AVE. EXPOSITION AVE. OHIO AVE. TENNESSEE AVE. MISSISSIPPI AVE. ELLSWORTH AVE.GALAPAGO ST. INCA ST. SANTA FE ST. KALAMATH ST. LIPAN ST. OSAGE ST. QUIVAS ST. RARITAN ST.I-25 N 89 Potential Sites for Significant DevelopmentThe map shows sites that are currently vacant,occupied by large parking lots or outdoor storage,or are otherwise not used to their full potential.They provide opportunities for development that is consistent with the subarea plan goals and r ecommendations.There are additional redevelopment opportunties throughout the neighborhood that are not shown.

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90

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLANASSESSMENT OF EXISTING CONDITIONSAn analysis and understanding of the Baker neighborhood in 2000 underlies the goals and vision of the neighborhood plan. 91

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EXISTING CONDITIONSHUMAN SERVICES AND DEMOGRAPHICSHistoryThe area now known as the Baker neighborhood began as a rural suburb in the 1870s.People lived in widely scattered frame houses and rough cabins surrounded by large tracts of land.The early settlers cultivated vegetables and raised poultry for the local market.An Englishman named Frederick Greenway gr ew 20 varieties of strawberries on the land between Broadway,Bannock,Byers Place and Alameda. Until the early 1900s,vegetable farms lined the South Platte River. The Lake Archer canal headgate took water out of the Platte River at what is now the intersection of Alameda and I-25.As part of Denver's water supply system,Lake Archer stretched from present-day Ellsworth Avenue to the Denver Water Department north of 6th Avenue.The presence of the lake was re f lected in two early-day street names:prior to 1886 Galapago Street was known as Water Street and Fir st Avenue was known as Lake Avenue. P eople were first attracted to the Baker area because of its location on a broad and beautiful plateau with a magnificent view of the mountains"and to get away from the noise and saloons of Denver.The Baker area experienced rapid residential development in the 1880s from the impetus of public transportation in the form of horse-drawn streetcars.Home to railroad and trolley workers,as well as prominent citizens such as Rocky Mountain News founder William Byers,the area was annexed to the city in 1883. The neighborhood takes its name from a local landmark,Baker Middle School,which was named for J ames H.Baker,principal of Denver's first high school and president of Colorado University from 1892 to 1915. After the mid-point of the 20th century,the Baker area experienced a loss of housing to business,industry and parking.Several of its streets were converted to allow parking on only one side to speed the 92 Broadway served as a parade route during the 1940s Broadway in the 1940s

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLANmovement of motor vehicles through the area.After World War II many lovely homes were converted to several units to help ease the housing shortage.Throughout the 1990s Baker has experienced a steady r ise in property values as many of the old homes continue to be renovated and inner city housing becomes more desirable.Many of the vacant lots are being developed with single family housing and townhomes.PopulationThe Baker Neighborhood consists of Census Tract 21.Data is from the 2000 U.S.Census.Population expanding at a slower rate than the city as a whole:Baker had a population of 5810 people in 2000,an 11% increase from the 1990 population of 5247.The population of the city as a whole increased 18% during the same period.Larger households:Baker had an average of 2.4 persons living in each household,compared with 2.27 persons per household in Denver.More children and fewer older adults:In the Baker neighborhood,33.4% of the population is age 18 or younger,compared to 24.5% of the City.People over age 65 comprise 6.2 percent of the neighborhood population and 11.2% for Denver.More married couples:71.9% of the neighborhood families with children were married,compared to 69.6% for Denver.A more heavily Hispanic population:Baker's population was 53.6% Anglo,39.7% Hispanic,2.9% Black,and 2.2% other.Denver as a whole is 52.2% Anglo,31.5% Hispanic,10.7% Black and 3.7% other.Population less proficient in English:42% of students in Baker's public schools are not proficient in English,an 11% increase between 1995 and 1998.In all of Denver's public schools,19% of the students are not proficient in English,an 18% increase during the same period.A less educated population:58.77% and 19.91% of the neighborhood population have high school and college diplomas,respectively,compared to 79.20% and 29.05% of Denver's population. 93 P opulation 8 0 7 5 7 6 4 6 6 1 5 1 5 2 4 7 5 6 5 51 9 6 0 1 9 7 0 1 9 8 0 1 9 9 0 1 9 9 80 2000 4000 6000 8000 5 8 1 02 0 0 0

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EXISTING CONDITIONSENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONSAn assessment of environmental conditions within the neighborhood shows 316 environmental records. United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) records include: National Priority List Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Corrective Actions RCRA permitted treatment,storage,disposal facilities RCRA registered small or large generators of hazardous waste RCRA violations/enforcement Comprehensive Environmental Response,Compensation,and Liability Act (CERCLA,aka Superfund) sites under review F acility Index System To xic Release Inventory State of Colorado records include: State equivalent priority list Leaking Underground Storage Tanks Solid waste landfills,incinerators or transfer stations F ederal and State drinking water sources Registered underground storage tanks Registered aboveground storage tanks Agency Type of Record 94

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Areas of Environmental Concern generators of hazardous waste RCRA violations/enforcement actions spills Risk Sites SOU T H PLAT T E R IVE R S. SANTA F E DR.S. BROADWAY BROADWAY ACOMA ST. BANNOCK ST. CHEROKEE ST. DELAWARE ST. ELATI ST. FOX ST. BAKER MIDDLE SCHOOL FA IRMONT ELEMENTARY DAILEY PARKW 6TH AVE. W 5TH AVE. W 4TH AVE. W 3RD AVE. W 2ND AVE. W 1ST AVE. IRVINGTON PL. ARCHER PL. BAYAUD AVE. MAPLE AVE. CEDAR AVE. BYERS PL. ALAMEDA AVE. DAKOTA AVE. VIRGINIA AVE. CENTER AVE. EXPOSITION AVE. OHIO AVE. TENNESSEE AVE. MISSISSIPPI AVE. ELLSWORTH AVE.GALAPAGO ST. INCA ST. SANTA FE ST. KALAMATH ST. LIPAN ST. OSAGE ST. QUIVAS ST. RARITAN ST.I-25 N 95 Environmental Sites

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Areas of Environmental Concern AgencyType of Record No. w/in 1/8 mile Sites US EPA National Priority List 1 Denver Radium US EPARCRA Corrective Actions1 Barter Machinery, 701 W. Bayaud State State equivalent priority list 0 US EPARCRA permitted treatment, storage, disposal facilities 0 US EPA CERCLA Sites under review 4 Cherokee Solvents, 201 S. Cherokee St. Continental Can C., 241 S. Cherokee St. Barter Machinery, 701 W. Bayaud Denver Radium StateLeaking Underground Storage Tanks 51 State Solid waste landfills, incinerators or transfer stations 7 US EPAFacility Index System88 USGS/State Federal and State Drinking Water sources (wells) 15 US EPAToxic Release Inventory1 Jackson Ice Cream, 400 Yuma St. State Registered underground storage tanks 80 StateRegistered aboveground storage tanks 8 EPA RCRA registered small or large generators of hazardous waste 20 CCD Wastewater Management, 2000 W. 3rd Ave. Union Pacific, 680 Seminole Rosemont Pharmaceuticals, 301 S. Cherokee St. Exhibits, Inc., 601 Acoma St. Automotive Design, 645 Acoma St. WR Grace Co, 111 S. Navajo Hawk Automotive, 330 Quivas Public Service Co., 1123 W. 3rd Avenue and 100 S. Santa Fe Dr. US Autobody Paint, 450 Kalamath Rickenbaugh, 444 Kalamath Frankel Mfg., 285 Rio Grande Office Scrapes, 80 S. Santa Fe Dr. Barter Machinery, 701 W. Bayaud Signs Inc., 201 S. Cherokee Gates Sons Fleet Maintenance, 501 W. Cedar Gates Sons, 125 S. Elati (2) US Mix Products, 112 S. Santa Fe Dr. One Hour Modern Cleaners, 103 Broadway EPARCRA violations/enforcement actions 8 Denver Wood Products, 1945 W. 3rd Avenue Rosemont Pharmaceuticals, 301 S. Cherokee St. Exhibits, Inc., 601 Acoma St. Iliff Meadows Partnership, 1001 W. Bayaud Mibar, 77 S. Jason St. Barter Machinery, 701 W. Bayaud Signs Inc., 201 S. Cherokee US Mix Products, 112 S. Santa Fe Dr. EPA State spills lists 32 96 EXISTING CONDITIONS

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLANLAND USEThe Baker neighborhood is centrally located within Denver.It is adjacent to the South Platte River,is traversed by I-25 and several railroad lines and is located near the Central Business District.Several commercial corridors cross the neighborhood.Because of the abundance of transportation corridors and citywide and regional connections,Baker's development followed a traditional pattern of industrial uses near the river and the railroad,commercial uses along major streets,and housing in the neighborhood's interior.However,land uses are not strictly separated:housing is also located in industrial and commercial areas;industry is found in residential blocks;mixed-use areas are scattered throughout the neighborhood. Some general land use patterns are apparent.The western portion of the neighborhood is industrial. Residential uses comprise the heart of the neighborhood.The residential area is characterized by single f amily homes,duplexes,and rowhouses with a few high-density multifamily buildings.The neighborhood's eastern and southern edges are commercial/retail corridors along Broadway and Alameda Avenue.Throughout the neighborhood are pockets of mixed-use areas,where no single category of land use dominates.Natural Features, Parks and Open SpaceBaker neighborhood houses three parks,a total of 38.36 acres.Dailey Park is located between Cherokee,Ellsworth,Elati and Archer Streets.A basketball court,playground,picnic tables and restrooms are located in the park.Vanderbilt Park is a narrow stretch of open space between the South Platte River and I-25 south of Alameda Ave.Hector M.Flores Park is a neighborhood pocket park at Galapago St.and W.4th Ave.It contains a basketball court,playground and picnic table. Denver Urban Gardens manages a community garden at Fox Street and West 1st Avenue,and another at Bayaud Avenue and Bannock Street. 97 Land Use No. of Acres % of Total Vacant 15.47 2.4 Single Family Residential 100.24 15.3 Multifamily Residential 35.15 5.4 Commercial (retail) 89.84 13.7 Services (offices) 18.18 2.8 Industrial 181.07 27.7 Transportation/Communications/ Utilities 111.09 17 Public and Quasi-Public 63.96 9.8 Parks and Recreation 38.36 5.9 TOTAL 653.36 100

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SINGLE FAMILY MULTI-FAMILY (High Density) MULTI-FAMILY (Medium Density) OFFICE MIXED USE BUSINESS/RETAIL PARKS & RECREATION PUBLIC FACILITIES PARKING VACANT LEGEND PUD LIGHT INDUSTRIALHEAVY INDUSTRIALMULTI-FAMILY (Low Density) BIKE TRAIL LIGHT RAIL LIGHT RAIL STATION NOVEMBER 2001 6th Ave.Santa Fe Dr. Kalamath St. Galapago St. Fox St. Cherokee St. Bannock St. Acoma St. Elati St. Delaware St. Lipan St. Mariposa St. Broadway Inca St.Na va jo St.Osage St. Quivas St.Sout h Pla t te Riv e rI25R i o Gr ande Blvd.5th Ave. 4th Ave. 3rd Ave. 2nd Ave. 1st Ave. Irvington Pl. Ellsworth Ave. Archer Pl. Bayaud Ave. Maple Ave. Cedar Ave. Byers Pl. Alameda Ave. Mississippi Ave.Raritan St. 98Existing Land UseEXISTING CONDITIONS

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLANOther nearby parks are Sunken Gardens at 8th Avenue and Delaware Street;Lincoln Park at 11th Avenue and Mariposa Street;and Denver Water's low-water demonstration garden at its headquarters at 1600 We st 12th Avenue.ResidentialAbout 20% of the land area in Baker is used for housing.Although there are a few high-rise structures, most buildings are less than 45-feet tall.Baker has a mix of single family houses,rowhouses and townhomes.Commercial: Retail and OfficeBroadway Streetfrom 6th Avenue on the north to I-25 on the south is the primary commercial corridor for the Baker neighborhood.Urban design elements and maintenance within these corridors is the responsibility of the Metro Denver Local Development Corporation (MDLDC),which has developed a comprehensive streetscape design for the corridor.The Broadway district is further divided into five sections: Gateway Section,from Speer Boulevard south to 2nd Avenue; Boutique Section,from 2nd Avenue to Bayaud Avenue; P ost Office Section,Bayaud Avenue to Alameda Avenue; Marketplace Section,Alameda Avenue to Broadway and Broadway south to Center Avenue; Design Center Section,Center Avenue to Ohio Avenue.W est 6th Avenueis a mixture of office,retail,residential and institutions (churches,community centers, Denver Health,and Baker Middle School) from Kalamath Street to Broadway.Santa Fe Drive consists of both retail and industrial uses,with a few offices.North of West 4th Avenue, Santa Fe Drive is part of a local improvement district.Emphasis is on pedestrian access and neighborhood serving businesses,although more destination retail stores are locating on the corridor.Alameda Avenue is a primary east-west connection across the neighborhood.It provides access to the South Platte River,as well as to the light rail station and destination retail center at Broadway and Cherokee Street.Land use is a mix of office and retail.Near Broadway,retail use of residential structures is common. 99 Existing Land Use Industrial / Utility / Public55%Commercial / Service17%Single Family Residential15%Multifamily Residential5%Parks6%V acant2%

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IndustrialThe industrial area is a mix of light and heavy manufacturing,warehousing and storage,and office and commercial uses that are accessory to the industrial uses.The industrial area is generally well-developed and provides an employment and tax base for the City of Denver.The industrial area is primarily contiguous and vibrant,although there are some nonconforming residential uses scattered through the eastern portion.Gates Rubber Company,south of I-25,is primarily vacant,except for some office uses. 100 EXISTING CONDITIONS

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLANZONINGThe following descriptions and maps are for general information only.For official zoning interpretation and mapping,contact City of Denver Zoning Administration. Most of the residential areas of the Baker neighborhood are zoned R-2-A,although there are a few areas of R-3.Residential uses are also allowed in the commercial zones.The R-2-A zone is a medium-density, multi-unit residential district that allows duplexes to be built at a density of 21.8 dwelling units per acre. R-3 is a high-density zone where the number of units is controlled by bulk standards and open space r equirements.The development cannot exceed three times the site area (3:1 Floor Area Ratio). The industrial area is zoned I-1 and I-2.The I-1 zone is a general industrial district while I-2 allows more intensive industrial uses.Development in both zones is controlled by bulk,setback and landscaping r equirements.Buildings cannot exceed twice the site area (2:1 FAR) and some uses are conditional. There is also less than 2 acres of I-0 zoned land,a light industrial district (.5:1 FAR allowed as base, increase to 1:1 FAR in some circumstances). Most of the commercial areas are zoned B-4,although the northeast corner of the neighborhood is zoned B8.The B-8 zone is an intensive general business/high density residential district which provides for the concentration of retail,personal and business services,as well as residential and cultural uses. Developments may be built to four times the site area (4:1 FAR) plus floor area premiums (up to 6:1) for providing specific public amenities.The B-4 zone is a general business district that encourages commercial uses adjacent to arterial streets.A high intensity of uses is allowed,including a wide variety of consumer and business services,retail establishments,and many industrial uses.Building floor area cannot exceed twice the site area (2:1 FAR).There are also about two acres in the B-1 and B-2 zones.B-1 is a limited office district for services related to health care and B-2 is a general neighborhood business district. Tw o special districts are represented in Baker.O-1 is an open space district for parks and other public uses,while P-1 is an off-street parking district. 101

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EXISTING CONDITIONSIn addition to these standard zones,there are four Planned Unit Developments (PUD) in the neighborhood: PUD 82:Office,commercial and residential uses on the site of the former St.Joseph's Elementary School at 604 W.6th Ave. PUD 87:Condominiums,office and retail space at Broadway and W.Ellsworth. PUD 393:Industrial uses and a single family residence at 200-210 Santa Fe Drive. PUD 474:A uto repair facility at 65 S.Cherokee St. COMPARISON OF EXISTING LAND USE AND ZONINGThis table shows actual land use in each zone,in acres.(Non-conforming uses are italicized.)Zoning ClassResidentialCommercial/IndustrialParks/VacantTotal OfficeRecreation B101.6300.221.85 B20.35000.35 B43.9767.928.2102.8983.01 B83.045.235.940.4316.65 I00.411.15001.56 I1 4.71 14.42138.0230.307.08284.52 I2015.6798.880.75115.30 O10004.0004.00 P100.0900.09 R2A117.25 1.2011.82 4.054.03138.36 R36.43 1.18 00 .067.67 T otal135.39108.02356.1238.3615.47653.36 A pproximately 33.15 acres of developed land in the neighborhood do not conform with the underlying zone,amounting to about 5% of all land in the neighborhood.The majority of the discrepancy is industrial uses in commercial zones (14.15 acres),followed by industrial uses in residential zones (11.82 acres).There are also some residential uses in industrial zones (4.71 acres) and commercial uses in the r esidential zone districts (2.38 acres). 102

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN B-8 I-2 B-4 PUD B-4 R-3 B-4 I-2 I-1 I-1 O-1 PUD B-1 B-1 B-1 B-1I-0 PUD R-3PUD P-1 R-3 B-4R-2-AI-2 S O U T H P LAT T E R IV ER S. SAN T A FE D R .S. BROADWAY BROADWAY AC OMA ST. BANNOCK ST. CHEROKEE ST. DELAWARE ST. ELATI ST. FOX ST. BAKER MIDDLE SCHOOL FAIR MONT ELEMENTARY DA ILEY PARKW 6TH AVE. W 5TH AVE. W 4TH AVE. W 3RD AVE. W 2ND AVE. W 1ST AVE. IRVINGTON PL. ARCHER PL. BAYAUD AVE. MAPLE AVE. CEDAR AVE. BYERS PL. ALAMEDA AVE. DAKOTA AVE. VIRGINIA AVE. CENTER AVE. EXPOSITION AVE. OHIO AVE. TENNESSEE AVE. MISSISSIPPI AVE. ELLSWORTH AVE.GALAPAGO ST. INCA ST. SANTA FE ST. KALAMATH ST. LIPAN ST. OSAGE ST. QUIVAS ST. RARITAN ST.I-25 N 103 Existing Zoning

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EXISTING CONDITIONSMOBILITYV ehicular CirculationCity streets fall under one of four classifications established by the Department of Public Works:local, collector,arterial or freeway.Baker contains streets in all of these categories. Local streets provide direct access to adjacent properties and carry low volumes of traffic within the neighborhood.Daily volumes are less than 2000 vehicles.Baker local streets:5th Ave.;4th Ave.;2nd Ave.;Irvington Place;Ellsworth Ave.;Archer Ave.;Maple Av e.;Cedar Ave.;Byers Ave.;Raritan Way;Quivas St.;Lipan St.;Inca St.;Fox.St.;Elati St.;Delaware St.; Acoma St. Collector streets collect and distribute traffic between arterial and local streets within the community and link major land use elements such as residential areas and shopping facilities.Daily volumes are 5000-12,000 vehicles.Baker collector streets:Galapago St.;Bannock St.;Bayaud Ave.;Cherokee St.;3rd Ave.;1st Ave.; Rio Grande Ct. Arterial streets permit rapid and relatively unimpeded traffic movement throughout the city and serve as primary links between communities and major land use elements.Daily volumes are 17,500 to 35,000 vehicles.Baker arterial streets:Broadway;Alameda Ave.;6th Ave.;Mississippi Ave.;Kalamath St.;Santa Fe Drive; Fr eeways permit traffic to flow rapidly and unimpeded through and around the metropolitan area.Baker freeways:Interstate 25,Hwy.6 104

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN S O U TH PLAT T E R IV E R Interstates Arterials Collectors Bike Routes S. SANTA F E DR.S. BROADWAY BROADWAY ACOMA ST. BANNOCK ST. CHEROKEE ST. DELAWARE ST. ELATI ST. FOX ST. BAKER MIDDLE SCHOOL FA IRMONT ELEMENTARY DAILEY PARKW 6TH AVE. W 5TH AVE. W 4TH AVE. W 3RD AVE. W 2ND AVE. W 1ST AVE. IRVINGTON PL. ARCHER PL. BAYAUD AVE. MAPLE AVE. CEDAR AVE. BYERS PL. ALAMEDA AVE. DAKOTA AVE. VIRGINIA AVE. CENTER AVE. EXPOSITION AVE. OHIO AVE. TENNESSEE AVE. MISSISSIPPI AVE. ELLSWORTH AVE.GALAPAGO ST. INCA ST. SANTA FE ST. KALAMATH ST. LIPAN ST. OSAGE ST. QUIVAS ST. RARITAN ST.I-25 N 105 Street Types and Bicycle Routes

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FreightUnion Pacific and Burlington Northern and Santa Fe Railroad operate railroad lines through the industrial area.The City of Denver has designated two routes in Baker as maximum weight trucking routes.Any vehicle ov er 10,000 pounds must use these routes if passing through the community.The truck routes are Santa Fe Drive/Kalamath St.,and 6th/8th Ave.T ransitBuses serving the Baker neighborhood include:No.0:This route travels Broadway/Lincoln and provides service to downtown.No.1:This service connects Aurora with Lakewood,primarily along 1st Ave.between Galapago and Broadway,with a loop through downtown.No.3:This route connects Aurora to the Cherry Creek commercial area and downtown Denver,via E. Alameda and Broadway/Lincoln.No.11:This route is on Baker's southern edge,primarily in the vicinity of Gates Rubber Company. Although it does not directly serve the residential portions of Baker,#0 riders can connect with it on Mississippi Ave.for service west or east.No.34:This route connects the industrial businesses on West 3rd Avenue with the Broadway light rail station.No.52:This route connects the Olde Town Arvada park-n-ride with University Hills shopping center on Colorado Boulevard,by way of Downtown Denver,Denver Health Medical Center,and the Alameda light rail station. A light rail line parallels the heavy rail tracks through the center of the Baker neighborhood.The line connects the Broadway station at I-25 with downtown Denver.Another neighborhood station is located at Cherokee Street south of Alameda Avenue.New light rail lines are planned that will connect the e xisting service to the southwest Metro area,along the Southeast Corridor to the Denver Technical Center and to Douglas County,and north through the Central Platte Valley to Denver's Union Terminal. Baker has bicycle routes that connect to both downtown Denver and to the South Platte River Greenway. 106 EXISTING CONDITIONS

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 52 1 52 334 523 1 1 1 34 1114 034 0Ltd L ight Ra il VAN DERBILT PARKSO U T H P LA T T E RIV ER S. HURON ST. S. GALAPAGO ST.S. PLA TT E R I VER D R.S. SA N TA F E D R .S. BROADWAY BROADWAY ACOMA ST. B ANNOCK ST. CHEROKEE ST. DELAWARE ST. ELATI ST. FOX ST. B AKER MIDDLE SCHOOL FAIR MONT ELEMENTARY DAI LEY P ARK6TH AVE. 5TH AVE. 4TH AVE. 3RD AVE. 2ND AVE. 1ST AVE. IRVINGTON PL. ARCHER PL. BAYAUD AVE. MAPLE AVE. CEDAR AVE. BYERS PL. ALAMEDA AVE. ELLSWORTH AVE.GALAPAGO ST. INCA ST. SANTA FE ST. KALAMATH ST. LIPAN ST. OSAGE ST. QUIV AS ST. RARITAN ST.MISSISSIPPI AVE.S. FOX ST.I-25 107 Bus Routes and Light Rail Stops

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EXISTING CONDITIONSPedestrian CirculationHigh volume streets within and bordering the neighborhood are difficult to cross and disrupt pedestrian circulation.Sidewalks are common throughout the residential area,but many are in poor condition. Landscaped areas and tree lawns are inconsistent.Broadway has maintained its identity as a tree-lined pedestrian corridor,but West 6th Avenue is hazardous and uncomfortable for pedestrians.The neighborhood has critical needs to increase pedestrian safety and improve pedestrian facilities such as sidewalks and crosswalks. 108

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLANLEGACIESHistoric Landmark District and StructuresHistoric Residential AreaThe residential interior of the Baker neighborhood was listed as a National Register of Historic Places district in 1985 and designated a local Denver landmark district in 2000.The historic district is c haracterized by Queen Anne homes,built primarily between 1888 and 1893.The predominant architectural style in the residential area is a spindlework subtype of the Queen Anne house, c haracterized by a wide variety of turned wood ornamentation in porch supports and balustrades,friezes suspended from porch ceilings,and decorated bargeboards.Other subtypes of Queen Anne architecture in the neighborhood include half-timbered,free classic,and patterned masonry styles.Other architectural types are also represented in the district,including Italianate,Classical Revival,Dutch Colonial Revival,Denver Squares,and two Shotgun-style houses.Local LandmarksThree buildings within the Baker neighborhood have been listed as Denver Historic Landmark Structures.The Coyle/Chase House at 532 W.4th Avenue was the childhood home of Mary Coyle Chase,the author of the 1945 Pulitzer Prize-winning play Harvey.Fire Station #11,located at 40 W. Second Ave.,was a Works Progress Administration project that was built about 1936.The First and Broadway Building at 101-115 Broadway was built in 1907 as the First Avenue Hotel. The Mayan Theater,110 Broadway,is an art deco theater built in 1930 and is another Denver Landmark building along Broadway.The Leeman Auto Building,on the eastside of Broadway at 6th Avenue is another Landmark structure.Although these buildings are located just outside the official neighborhood boundaries,they influence and enrich the Baker community. 109 The historic Fire Station No. 11

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S OU TH PLAT TE RI VE R S. SANTA F E DR.S. BROADWAY BROADWAY ACOMA ST. BANNOCK ST. CHEROKEE ST. DELAWARE ST. ELATI ST. FOX ST. BAKER MIDDLE SCHOOL FA IRMONT ELEMENTARY DAILEY PARKW 6TH AVE. W 5TH AVE. W 4TH AVE. W 3RD AVE. W 2ND AVE. W 1ST AVE. IRVINGTON PL. ARCHER PL. BAYAUD AVE. MAPLE AVE. CEDAR AVE. BYERS PL. ALAMEDA AVE. DAKOTA AVE. VIRGINIA AVE. CENTER AVE. EXPOSITION AVE. OHIO AVE. TENNESSEE AVE. MISSISSIPPI AVE. ELLSWORTH AVE.GALAPAGO ST. INCA ST. SANTA FE ST. KALAMATH ST. LIPAN ST. OSAGE ST. QUIVAS ST. RARITAN ST.I-25 N 110Historic DistrictEXISTING CONDITIONS

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLANV iew PreservationThe portion of the neighborhood south of Alameda Avenue lies within the Washington Park View Plane. The City of Denver uses additional building height restrictions to preserve views from public reference points.This view plane originates at the intersection of South Franklin Street and East Arizona Avenue, on the east side of Washington Park. Building heights in Baker,south of Alameda Avenue,are restricted to an elevation of 5,323.9 feet above sea level,plus one foot for each 100-feet of horizontal distance from the reference point.The South Platte River at Alameda Avenue is approximately 10,000 feet from the view plane reference point. 111 This view from Washington Park is protected through building height restrictions

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BAKER SANTA FE DR. EMERSON ST. DOWNING ST. WASHINGTON ST. BROADWAY LINCOLN ST.WALS H PL.ALAMEDA AVE.DOWNING ST. WASHINGTON ST. BROADWAY LOGAN ST. EMERSON ST. SANTA FE DR. KALAMATH ST.MISSISSIPPI AVE. MISSISSIPPI AVE. EVANS AVE. 1ST AVE. VIRGINIA AVE. LOUISIANA AVE. IOWA AVE.JASON ST.SOUTH PLATTE RIVE R DR IV E W ESTLOUISIANA AVE.HIGH ST. RACE ST. VINE ST. GAYLORD ST. OGDEN ST. CORONA ST. MARION ST. PKWY. PEARL ST.2ND AVE.PENNSYLVANIA ST. CLARKSON ST. SHERMAN ST. GRANT ST.BAYAUD AVE.LOGAN ST.CEDAR AVE. ELLSWORTH AVE. DAKOTA AVE. CENTER AVE. EXPOSITION AVE. OHIO AVE.WILLIAMS ST. GILPIN ST. MARION ST. OGDEN ST. CORONA ST. LAFAYETTE ST. HUMBOLDT ST. FRANKLIN ST. CLARKSON ST. PENNSYLVANIA ST. PEARL ST.ARKANSAS AVE. ARIZONA AVE.GRANT ST. LINCOLN ST. SHERMAN ST.FLORIDA AVE. MEXICO AVE. COLORADO AVE. JEWELL AVE. ASBURY AVE. KENTUCKY AVE. TENNESSEE AVE. MAPLE AVE. ARCHER AVE. IRVINGTON PL.ACOMA ST. INCA ST. GALAPAGO ST. FOX ST. ELATI ST.BYERS AVE.LIPAN ST. LIPAN ST.MARIPOSA AVE. WAYPECOS ST. ST.OH I OCUSTER AVE. GILL PL. CENTER AVE.NAVAJO ST. SANTA FE DR. CHEROKEE ST. BANNOCK ST. ACOMA ST. ELATI ST. FOX ST. GALAPAGO ST. HURON ST.OS AGEERB PL. ADA PL. TENNESSEE AVE. PL.WAYHOYEPE COS S T.NAVAJO ST. OSAGE ST. QUIVAS ST.ALYS PL.WASHINGTON ST. PENNSYLVANIA ST. CLARKSON ST. PEARL ST. N +10'+20'+30'+40'+50'+60'+70'+80'+90'+100' +90' +80' +70'+60'+50'+40'+30'+20'+10'Reference Point 5,323.9' 112View Preservation CorridorEXISTING CONDITIONS

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLANHOUSINGHousing UnitsDecreasing number of housing units:In 1981 there were 2660 residential units in Baker.In 1990, this increased very slightly to 2675 units.However,by 2000 the number had decreased to 2556 units, including 350 public housing units and three residential care facilities.Density:W ith 2556 dwelling units on 135.39 residential acres,Baker has an average density of 18.88 dwelling units per acre.Age of Housing UnitsAging housing stock:Assessor's data show that 86% of Baker's housing units were built before 1940, compared to 28% of dwellings in the entire city.A verage ValuesLower prices than Denver average:According to the Assessors'Office,the average value of a Baker home in 2000 was $132,061 and the average value of a Denver home that year was $172,730.Baker housing sold for $132 per square foot,compared to a $154 per square foot mean price in Denver as a whole.High rate of value increase:Baker's average home price was $42,076 in 1991 and was $132,061 in 1998,a 314% increase. 113 Housing Units available A verage Home Sale Price 0 20,000 40,000 60,000 80,000 100,000 120,000 140,000 1 9 9 1 1 9 9 2 1 9 9 3 1 9 9 4 1 9 9 5 1 9 9 6 1 9 9 7 1 9 9 8 4 2 0 7 6 5 9 3 2 8 7 2 3 1 7 8 0 4 9 2 9 4 1 0 7 9 6 7 5 0 1 2 0 7 0 2 1 3 2 0 6 1 3 2 9 3 3 2 9 2 2 6 6 0 2 6 7 5 2 5 4 41 9 6 0 1 9 7 0 1 9 8 0 1 9 9 0 1 9 9 8 0 500 1500 2500 3500 2 5 5 62 0 0 0

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EXISTING CONDITIONSOwner-occupied housingMore tenants paying lower rents:64.79% of Baker dwelling units were rented,compared to the Denver average of 50.80%.Renters paid an average of $265 in Baker,compared to $363 in the city.Residents pay more income on housing: In Baker,40.5% of occupants were paying more than 30% of their income in rents,and in Denver this figure was 38.6%.Less vacant housing:5.58% of Baker's housing units were vacant in 1998,and 11.97% were vacant city-wide.Public and Special Residential UsesMore subsidized housing:In 1999,Baker had 13.7% of its housing units utilized as publicly-assisted housing and 1.4% was in use as residential care facilities.The corresponding figures for the city were 6.6% and .8% respectively.Residential care facilities:three residential care facilities,or group homes,are registered within the Baker neighborhood. 114 Owner-versus Renter-occupied Housing 35% 65% 49% 51%Owner-occupied Renter-occupiedDENVER BAKER

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLANECONOMIC ACTIVITYIncome and EmploymentLower incomes and more children in poverty:The median income in Baker is $20,848,compared to the Denver median of $33,983.58.85% of Baker children live in poverty,more than double the Denver average of 27.42%.More people receiving public assistance:6.30% of Baker's population received public assistance in 1998 and 3.55% received Aid to Families with Dependent Children/Temporary Assistance to Needy F amilies compared to 4.56% and 3.02%,respectively,of Denver's population.83.52% of children attending public school qualified for the free lunch program,compared to 56.54% of the students throughout the city.Losing total jobs:Baker provided 9397 jobs in 1996 and 10402 jobs in 1993.An estimated 9.7% of the total neighborhood jobs have been lost since 1990.In 2000,Denver as a whole provided 426,778 jobs,a gain of 1.8% since 1990.Market ConditionsBusiness located in the Baker neighborhood paid $7,932,047 in sales and use taxes in 1999,representing a bout $226,629,914 of sales.This is about 1.4% of the total city tax collections for sales and use taxes. There are about 300 businesses in Baker,including the industrial and commercial sections and smaller businesses in the residential core. Property owners and business people on Broadway formed a Local Improvement District (LID) in 1980 to improve and maintain the public realm along the corridor.The district has been expanded several times over the years and now stretches from 2nd Avenue to Ohio Avenue.Future expansion is possible from 2nd Avenue to 6th Avenue.Owners of real property pay an assessment based on square foot of 115 Employment by Occupation Occupation No. % Agriculture 11 0.1 Mining 11 0.1 Construction 643 6.2 Manufacturing 1103 10.6 Transportation, Communications, Public Utilities 259 2.5 Wholesale Trade 3819 36.7 Retail Trade 1396 13.4 Finance, Insurance, Real Estate 271 2.6 Services 1308 12.6 Government 1348 13.0 Military 0 0.0 All Other 233 2.2 TOTAL 10,402 100.0

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EXISTING CONDITIONSland in exchange for improved maintenance,streetscape improvements,enhanced security,and marketing of the neighborhood. The western industrial section is currently experiencing a period of growth and reinvestment,enhancing the vitality of the Denver's industrial market.The location attracts distribution companies of all types because of its access to and from all areas of metropolitan Denver.Inventory of Baker BusinessesIn 1999,there were about 300 businesses in Baker,including the industrial and commercial sections and smaller businesses in the residential core. Building and Construction Material and Farm Equipment ABC Custom Iron and Lock AAA Metric Supply Inc. Ace High Glass Inc. Adams John Locksmith Alpine AC and Heating Service American roofing Sheet Metal Co. Arapahoe House Inc. Atlantis Equipment Co. Augie Construction & Millwork Inc. A wning Company of America Bath and Kitchen Design Center Blackinton and Becker Inc Calahan Construction Inc Cashway Electric Supply Central Regridgeration Inc Colo Wire and Cable Co Colorado Climate Control Inc Commercial Lighting Commercial Testing Labs Concrete Foundations Inc. Contractors Heating and Supply Inc CPS Distributors Inc Crescent Electric Supply Dahl Inc Design Materials Inc. Distributors Service Co El Rey Distributing Inc Electrical Agencies Company Environmental Materials Inc Flink Supply Co Gates and Sons Inc Granite/Marble Import Inc HBF Marble and Granite LLC The Home Depot Hyder Construction Inc Jim Dawson Co Lighting Services Inc MacDonald Lumber Co The Miters Touch Nielsen Plastering Co NPW Contracting Inc PE Ohair and Co Pa lace Construction Company Inc Pa lace Enterprises Plastering Specialties Inc. PPG Industries Inc. Rampart Plumbing and Heating Supply Inc Rent All Service Inc Rio Grande Company Santa Fe Carpenter Shop Shaw Construction LLC Silver Brush Productions SMS Studio Stark Lumber Co Starward Supply Co Suntronics Inc T obin Refrigeration Inc T om Meyer Sheet Metal Inc T ools for Bending Inc Tr icomm Systems Inc Tu ff Shed Inc Uncle Mikes Pool Coping Stones United States Welding Inc The Veneer Works W ildwood Joinery and Design Inc General Merchandise Colorado Pen Company Grocery and Delicatessens 3rd Avenue Market 7-11 Food Stores 7-11 Food Stores #23899 Albertsons Fi r st Avenue Grocery Grocery Express La Tiendita Sam's Club Sav O Mat Inc 116

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Automotive Dealers and Gasoline Stations ABC Imports and Salvage Inc All Imports Astro Automotive MGT Inc Bavarian Autohaus Inc Cadillac Plastic Group Inc Central Auto and Truck Service Colorado Clutch Co Denver Body Shop Denver Rubber Co Eisenbuds Inc Enterprise Rent a Car Insync Creative Marketing Inc Je rr y's Standard KOK O il Co Inc Mile Hi Body Shop Inc NA PA A uto Parts Inc Olympic Distributing Co. Par ts Import Inc Quezada Auto Repair Rainbow Designs Rauls Auto Trim Inc Rauls Paint and Auto Supplies Santa Fe Auto Service Oil Co Tar in Auto Electric To tal Petroleum Vo lvo Specialists Apparel and Accessories Barry MFG Co Why Not! From Down Under Home Furnishings and Equipment 574 Santa Fe Drive LLC Allure Rug Studio Av enrich Glamboyant Av is Upholstering Ltd. Beyond Technology Cash Registers to Go Inc Chess Inc Cover Up Custom Upholstery Inc Crawford Printing Ink Inc Custom Shades and Specialties Customized Tabs Denver Floor Designs Inc Discreet Systems Estate Pro Everything for Offices Fi ne Materials Guitar Clinic Input EZ Corp JK Concepts Inc Kacey Fine Furniture Kimbulian and Noury Oriental Rug Larimer Woodworking Inc Las Vegas Adult Palace Mariposa Supply Mid Continent Office Distribution Inc No Necktie Productions Inc Pe r sonal Computer Systems Corp P ossibilities for Design Inc Pro File Systems Inc R OH Properties Ruins Etc. Shaw Contract Flooring Services Inc. Supportek Inc Ve terans Interiors Inc Eating and Drinking Places Breakfast King Breckenridge Brewery of Colorado Burger King #4732 Culinaire Inc Denny's Restaurant #370 F ifth Avenue Tavern Heavenly Daze Brewery The Hot Dog Guy Lucille's Bar Lundco Inc Nancy's Edible Treats Planet Perk Inc Santa Fe Bar Inc Ya n Kee Noodle Company YJ&K Inc Miscellaneous Stores A1 Quick Haul Accuracy First Printing Adrian Brown Consultants Inc Advance Neon Sign Co Advanced Interior Manufacture Inc All Clay Always and Forever Private Event F acility Amalgamated Transit Union Local #150 Ap ex Multimedia Art Dynamic and Graphic Signs Aspen Trophies Inc Aspire Model and Talent Inc. Bada Boom Productions Ben and Sons Inc Best Wood Designs Big Timber Taxidermy Birlauf & Steen Inc Boyd Investment Co Breckenridge Holding Co Brokers International Ltd. Browne Bros Parking & Decorating Inc Busick Insulated Glass Inc By Jeeves Carlston Ann YC The Carpet Magnet Co Castleworks The Cat Hospital of Denver Chavez Produce Cherokee Street Investments Inc. 117

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EXISTING CONDITIONS Color Graphix Incorporated Colorado Federation of Teachers Colorado Film and Video Association Colorado Mold Supply Concrete Solutions LLC Consolidated Parts Inc Cooperation Inc Dacks Texturing Service Inc Dean the Printer Denver Federation for Pa r aprofessionals Dever Typographical Union Denver Woodwrights LLC Dewey Obenchain Films Inc Distinctive Mantle Designs Dixon Paper Company Dolan Bookbinding Driver Development Center Eggen Violin Shop Episcopal Church of St.Peter and St.Mary Exhibit Design Builders LLC Expanded Colora Far Blue F astening Systems Inc Gina Siegel CMT Gryphon Design Hilary Depolo Marketing Consultation Holtby Michael E.LCSW Howell Construction Hutchs Ian Adamson Properties Ian Smith Information Industrial Western Inc International Union of Bricklayers and Allied Cra JE Dunn Construction Co Je nson Advertising Jimenez Alan Jay Esq. JL Silver Jo rd an Art Consulting K&M Cigarettes Store Kaiser Sign and Design Inc Kalidascope Paiting Services Inc Karen White Studio Kick in the Grass Kidskits Inc Kimball Electronics Inc Lifelike Taxidermy Inc Lockheed Martin Corporation Ly on Studio Mercnats Building Maintenance LLC Metron Inc Mile High Appraisal Mile High Ceramics Inc Mountain X-Ray and Equipment Inc Multi Arts LLC National Repack Distribution Services North American Services Inc Open Press Ltd. Optics Unlimited Out West Productions P acific Food Products Inc Pa ntech Machine Services Pa stime Co P earl Trade Bindery Inc Plateau Machinery Inc Platte River Art Service Platte River Letterpress Po int Ground Pressed 4 Time #139 Pressed 4 Time #205 Printers Personnel Inc R&R Pallet Recycling R Solutions Rann M Pest Management Rapid Molds Register Graphics Inc Remote Broadcasts Inc Rice Investment Company Rice P aper Ricks Rocky Mtn Wreaths Rocky Mountain Cable Assemblies Inc Rocky Mountain Delivery Inc Rosemont Pharmaceutical Corp Saint Augustine Orthodox Church Santa Fe Treasures Savoy Color Imaging Scott Group Shades & Such Signs Inc The Slide Printer Spearhead Inc Stanisz Construction Inc Stella Adler Technique Workshop Stobie Mary Strasburg Sharon Summit Pressed Brick & tile Svedala Industries Inc. SVS Architecture TG X Ray Ltd. Thermo Tech Division of Minnesota Ti p Top Nails To tal Vending Services Inc Tr ee of Life Wellness Systems Inc Tri Gabl es Realty Co The Tribe Tur bo Press Inc V ision Contracting Inc The Walman Optical Co Wa tson Compact Wa ve media Productions W eimar William C,DDS W estwood Insurance Agency The Women's Art Center and Gallery Zen Pottery Equipment Inc. 118

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLANNEIGHBORHOOD FACILITIES AND ORGANIZATIONSPublic, Cultural and Religious FacilitiesThree facilities in the Denver Public Schools system are located in Baker.Fairmont Elementary School, 520 West 3rd Avenue,educates children from kindergarten through fifth grade.Baker Middle School,574 W est 6th Avenue,has students in sixth through eighth grades,and West High School,951 Elati Street, teaches students in ninth through 12th grades. The La Familia Recreation Center is located at 65 S.Elati St.,near Dailey Park.The Baker Community Garden on the northeast corner of Bannock and Bayaud provides additional open space for the community. Atlantis Community Center is located at 188 W.Cedar Ave. Denver Public Library has two branch buildings that serve the neighborhood.The Ross-Broadway Branch Library is located at 33 E.Bayaud Avenue and the Byers Branch Library is located at 675 Santa Fe Drive. Denver Health and Hospital's main campus is located at the northern boundary of the neighborhood, between 6th Ave.and 8th Ave.,Speer Boulevard to Delaware St.A trauma education center was recently added south of West 6th Avenue. Baker maintains its diversity in the provision of religious facilities.Examples include:First Avenue Presbyterian Church at 120 W.1st Ave.;St.Peter & St.Mary Episcopal Church at 126 W.2nd Ave.;St. A ugustine's Orthodox Church at 55 W.3rd Ave.;St.Joseph's Redemptorist Church at W.6th Ave.& Galapago;Jeremiah Baptist Church at 465 Galapago St.;Templo Bethel Assembly of God at 201 Fox St.;All Gods Children Assembly at 520 Cherokee St.;Mission Denver Christian Church at Ellsworth and Lincoln; South Broadway Christian Church at 23 Lincoln St.;Living Waters Fellowship at 215 W.5th Ave.;and J ehovah's Witnesses Spanish at 290 W.Ellsworth Ave. 119

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S O U T H P LAT T E R IV ER Non-profit Organizations Religious Institutions Childcare Facilities Atlantis Community Center La Familia Recreation Center Dailey Park Fairmont Elementary Baker Community Garden Hector Flores Park Baker Middle School Denver Health CampusS. SANTA F E DR.S. BROADWAY BROADWAY ACOMA ST. BANNOCK ST. CHEROKEE ST. DELAWARE ST. ELATI ST. FOX ST.W 6TH AVE. W 5TH AVE. W 4TH AVE. W 3RD AVE. W 2ND AVE. W 1ST AVE. IRVINGTON PL. ARCHER PL. BAYAUD AVE. MAPLE AVE. CEDAR AVE. BYERS PL. ALAMEDA AVE. DAKOTA AVE. VIRGINIA AVE. CENTER AVE. EXPOSITION AVE. OHIO AVE. TENNESSEE AVE. MISSISSIPPI AVE. ELLSWORTH AVE.GALAPAGO ST. INCA ST. SANTA FE ST. KALAMATH ST. LIPAN ST. OSAGE ST. QUIVAS ST. RARITAN ST.I-25 N 120Neighborhood FacilitiesEXISTING CONDITIONS

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLANThe neighborhood is home to several childcare centers,including Westside Day Care at 55 Elati St.; Babyland Nursery Montessori at 131 W.2nd Ave.;and Denver Early Childhood Connections, 124 W.5th Ave. Several non-profit organization are located in the Baker community,including Arapahoe House,Bayaud Industries,Inc.,Wishing Well,Evangelical Organizing Project,Labor Community Agency,Pet Net,Sobriety House,LARASA,The Stanley Foundation,Atlantis Community,Brokers International,Bannock Shelter for Boys,Bayaud Central Rehabilitation,Just for Today Inc.,Street Intervention Project,Sobriety House Inc., and Mi Casa Resource Center.Baker Neighborhood AssociationsBaker Historic Neighborhood AssociationBaker Historic Neighborhood Association (BHNA),originally named Organized Baker Residents,was f ounded in 1978.It represents approximately 3,000 residents in the area. The mission of BHNA is: Promoting cooperation and harmony among residents in the Baker neighborhood; Maintaining and promoting the residential character of the neighborhood; Assisting Baker residents in solving neighborhood problems; Assisting city,state and federal agencies in making informed decisions on issues related to Baker; and Developing and maintaining links to other neighborhood,nonprofit and governmental organizations to remain aware of and involved in issues that affect Baker. BHNA's membership meets monthly and also communicates through a monthly newsletter and a web site for neighborhood communication and discussion.The association was the leader in designating a large portion of the neighborhood as a National Historic district in 1985 and as a Denver Historic Landmark district in 2000.The association also worked with the City to downzone the residential district for R3 to R2A,a direct implementation of the 1981 Westside Neighborhood Plan.BHNA is a member of Inter-Neighborhood Cooperation and is a registered neighborhood organization with the City and County of Denver. 121

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EXISTING CONDITIONSDiversified Broadway Business AssociationDiversified Broadway is an organization of merchants and property owners along the Broadway corridor. The group works to promote business and economic development opportunities.Metropolitan Denver Local Development Corporation/Broadway PartnershipMDLDC is a non-profit neighborhood association formed in 1980 to manage the affairs of the Broadway Plaza Pedestrian Mall and Maintenance Districts.Its primary goals are to effectively and efficiently manage the maintenance district at a level of service desired by property owners and their merchant tenants;to maintain the district in a safe and orderly fashion for clients and customers of the district businesses;and to encourage neighborhood preservation and business revitalization.The organization r epresents 175 properties,358 businesses and 1050 employees.Its planning area includes Broadway between I-25 and Speer Boulevard,and the district maintains 13,500 linear feet of streetscape improvements.The MDLDC board meets monthly.Sumner Neighborhood Association of BusinessesSumner NA is a neighborhood association registered with the City and County of Denver.Property o wners and business people established the association in 1994 to address neighborhood issues of interaction with the Denver Police Department,graffiti,vandalism,illegal dumping,neighborhood nuisances,physical crimes,burglaries,abandoned structures,neighborhood lighting,development and city planning,legislation,neighborhood business networking,and improving the overall business atmosphere. The membership meets monthly. 122

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLANAPPENDIX 123

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WISH LIST OF NEIGHBORHOOD PROJECTSDuring the planning process,the Baker community generated a list of projects that could enhance the aesthetics,function,or identity of the neighborhood.Many of the ideas were far-reaching and visionary, but were found to be impractical,primarily because of cost constraints.These concepts were not carried f orward in complete forms to the body of the plan or incorporated in the plan recommendations. However,there may come a time when Denver's resources are not as limited,or new opportunities may arise that make these concepts more feasible.The list is included here in the hopes that it may someday find fertile ground and some of the more visionary ideas may be developed. Building better connections from the residential neighborhood to the South Platte River,especially the greenway on the west side.This may include pedestrian and bicycle bridges over I-25 and the ri ve r, as well as on-street bicycle lanes and improved paths and sidewalks. Developing a landscaped,tree-lined median on Bannock Street. Adding a new park at Broadway Marketplace,perhaps on the surface of an underground parking structure. Using neighborhood gateways and identification signs that showcase the neighborhood as a unique place within the city.The signs should relate to the character of the historic district and the gateways should include opportunities for public art. Constructing a subway to connect Broadway Station to Civic Center Station downtown,causing minimal impact to surface land uses while providing additional transit service to area residents and employees. Adding another stop on the existing light rail line between Alameda Station and 10th & Osage,to better serve the existing neighborhood. 124 APPENDIX

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLANIn developing the Baker Neighborhood Plan,six large community meetings were held to develop the inventory of primary issues and goals,narrow the focus of the neighborhood plan,develop a list of implementation options,prioritize that list and confirm the concepts and recommendations of the plan.The entire plan was shaped to reflect that input.This appendix provides more details a bout the particular results of those meetings.AUGUST 1999: SWOT AnalysisUsing a planning tool called Strengths,Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats (SWOT),Baker stakeholders identified the following c haracteristics of the neighborhood (Note: Pe r centages may not add to 100 due to rounding):StrengthsPhysical attributes % of MentionsTotalHistoric character and revitalization efforts. . . 4. . 29 Central location and access to downtown, trails,metro area. . . . . . . 2. . 14 Vi ew s of the mountains and downtown. . . 1. . 7 Small geographic area. . . . . . . 1. . 7 Subtotal. . . . . . . . . 8. . 57Social attributes % of MentionsTotalP ositive,committed individuals. . . . . 2. . 14 Strong neighborhood organization. . . . 1. . 7 Cooperative business community. . . . . 1. . 7 Diverse population (age,ethnicity,sexuality). . . 1. . 7 Subtotal. . . . . . . . . 5. . 35Economic attributes % of MentionsTotalDiverse retail offerings. . . . . . . 1. . 7 Subtotal. . . . . . . . . 1. . 7 TOTAL # RESPONSES. . . . . . 14. . 99W eaknessesPhysical attributes % of MentionsTotalLack of code enforcement. . . . . . 2. . 13 Lack of buffer between industrial and r esidential uses. . . . . . . 1. . 6 Santa Fe corridor to Mississippi Ave.. . . . 1. . 6 Alameda corridor and underpass. . . . . 1. . 6 R TD lot on Alameda. . . . . . . 1. . 6 Graffiti. . . . . . . . . . 1. . 6 Lack of surface infrastructure. . . . . 1. . 6 Neighborhood erosion through lack of redevelopment. . . . . . . 1. . 6 Subtotal. . . . . . . . . 9. . 55 125 RESULTS OF COMMUNITY ASSEMBLIES

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APPENDIXSocial attributes % of MentionsTotalHigh transient population. . . . . . 1. . 6 Lack of common ground between long-term residents and recent immigrants (language/cultural barriers) 1. . 6 Neighborhood is split geographically and ethnically. 1. . 6 High rate of absentee ownership. . . . . 1. . 6 Crime and gangs. . . . . . . . 1. . 6 A pathy of property owners and tenants. . . 1. . 6 Subtotal. . . . . . . . . 6. . 36Economic attributes % of MentionsTotalHigh cost of housing. . . . . . . 1. . 6 Subtotal. . . . . . . . . 1. . 6 TOTAL # RESPONSES. . . . . . 16. . 97OpportunitiesPhysical Issues % of MentionsTotalLandscape and maintain public spaces. . . . 3. . 14 Increase code enforcement. . . . . . 2. . 9 Examine appropriateness of neighborhood zoning. 2. . 9 Examine zoning along neighborhood edges. . . 2. . 9 Create parks out of vacant lots. . . . . 1. . 5 Develop design guidelines. . . . . . 1. . 5 Promote mixed-use development along Santa Fe/Kalamath. . . . . . . 1. . 5 Protect views. . . . . . . . . 1. . 5 Begin neighborhood planning efforts. . . . 1. . 5 Educate residents on permit processes. . . . 1. . 5 Become educated about mixed-use zoning. . . 1. . 5 Subtotal. . . . . . . . . 16. . 76Social Issues % of MentionsTotalCreate neighborhood unity through fun events. . 1. . 5 Create a neighborhood center with public meeting space. . . . . . . . 1. . 5 Explore level of political interest in revitalization. . 1. . 5 Involve youth in neighborhood projects. . . 1. . 5 Gentrification may lead to revitalization. . . 1. . 5 Subtotal. . . . . . . . . 5. . 25Economic Issues % of MentionsTotalDevelop income-sensitive housing. . . . . 1. . 5 Subtotal. . . . . . . . . 1. . 5 TOTAL # RESPONSES. . . . . . 22. 106ThreatsPhysical Issues % of MentionsTotalUnplanned and incompatible development and design. 3. . 21 T ypes of uses allowed in B-4 corridors. . . . 2. . 14 Traffic. . . . . . . . . . 1. . 7 Po ssible expansion of Denver Health. . . . 1. . 7 Buses on narrow,residential streets. . . . 1. . 7 Lackluster code enforcement. . . . . . 1. . 7 Substandard building and in-fill. . . . . 1. . 7 Residential interface with industrial areas. . . 1. . 7 Po ssible loss of access to neighborhood by trains bl ocking roads,loss of I-25 ramps. . . . 1. . 7 Subtotal. . . . . . . . . 12. . 84 126

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLANSocial Issues % of MentionsTotalGangs and crime. . . . . . . . 1. . 7 Fr actionalization of neighborhood along ethnic lines. 1. . 7 Subtotal. . . . . . . . . 2. . 14 TOTAL # RESPONSES. . . . . . 14. . 98JUNE 2000: Strengths and W eaknessesThe second large community gathering,attended by a bout 55 people,was used to confirm and e xpand the list of community strengths and w eaknesses in the categories of Land Use,Urban Design,Housing,Transportation,Business Development,and Crime/Public Safety.The r esults of that meeting were (Note:Percentages may not add to 100 due to rounding):Land Use Strengths % of MentionsTotalProximity of commercial and residential. . . 4. . 13 Distinction among different uses. . . . . 4. . 13 Va ri ety of uses. . . . . . . . 3. . 10 Small neighborhood with specific boundaries. . 2. . 7 Historic character. . . . . . . . 2. . 7 Synergy of uses among industrial,commercial and residential. . . . . . . . 2. . 7 Good communication among industrial, commercial and residential. . . . . 2. . 7 Interest in restoration and preservation. . . . 2. . 7 Distinction between residential and commercial. . 2. . 7 Existing density. . . . . . . . 2. . 7 Increasing property values. . . . . . 2. . 7 Land available for redevelopment and new development1. . 3 Mixed-use residential. . . . . . . 1. . 3 Commitment to broad development. . . . 1. . 3 TOTAL. . . . . . . . . 30. 101Land Use Weaknesses % of MentionsTotalOld infrastructure (water,sewer,power). . . 5. . 17 No light rail stop. . . . . . . . 2. . 7 Lack of open space. . . . . . . 2. . 7 Nonconforming uses (industrial vs.residential). . 2. . 7 Inadequate facilities for children. . . . . 2. . 7 Tr ucks navigating residential neighborhoods. . . 2. . 7 Small lots make infill and development difficult. . 2. . 7 P oorly-maintained properties. . . . . . 1. . 3 Inadequate landscaping and green. . . . . 1. . 3 Children playing in industrial areas. . . . 1. . 3 Narrow streets and poor parking. . . . . 1. . 3 Pa rk ing issues due to mixed-use. . . . . 1. . 3 Restrictive zoning laws related to carriage houses and garages. . . . . . . 1. . 3 Modern residential structures. . . . . 1. . 3 Low density. . . . . . . . . 1. . 3 Inadequate planned development. . . . . 1. . 3 Increase in residential prices. . . . . . 1. . 3 Loss of affordable housing. . . . . . 1. . 3 P oor quality of pop-top and scrape-off development. 1. . 3 Antiquated zoning laws. . . . . . . 1. . 3 TOTAL. . . . . . . . . 30. . 98Urban Design Strengths % of MentionsTotalW alkable neighborhood,good pedestrian access. . 3. . 14 High density promotes neighborhood intimacy. . 3. . 14 Architectural style shows harmony and coherence. 3. . 14 Tr aditional town design of alleys,front porches, on-street parking. . . . . . . 2. . 10 Balance and integration between business and residential. . . . . . . . 2. . 10 Industrial area adds to diversity. . . . . 2. . 10 Lighting on 3rd and 4th Avenues. . . . . 1. . 5 127

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APPENDIXHistoric designation signs. . . . . . 1. . 5 Corner stores. . . . . . . . . 1. . 5 "Village-like"and self-contained. . . . . 1. . 5 Santa Fe buffers industrial and residential. . . 1. . 5 Flagstone sidewalks and traditional building materials. 1. . 5 TOTAL. . . . . . . . . 21. 102Urban Design Weaknesses % of MentionsTotalNo design guidelines exist to protect old development and fit new construction into existing neighborhood. 3. . 25 No aesthetic guidelines related to building materials. 1. . 8 Need beautification of existing spaces. . . . 1. . 8 Lack of open space. . . . . . . 1. . 8 No real monumentation to announce entry into the neighborhood or historic district. . . . 1. . 8 Lack of design continuity of sidewalks,lighting,signs. 1. . 8 Lighting,sidewalks,signs need to reinforce historic elements to identify the unique character of neighborhood.. 1. . 8 Better lighting needed for safety. . . . . 1. . 8 Zoning maintains status quo of existing development. 1. . 8 Industrial areas need improvement. . . . 1. . 8 Total. . . . . . . . . 12. . 97Housing Strengths % of MentionsTotalHistoric architecture. . . . . . . 6. . 20 Va r iety of architecture. . . . . . . 1. . 3 Multiple economic levels. . . . . . 3. . 10 Upswing in maintenance/pride of ownership. . 3. . 10 Innovative/creative landscaping. . . . . 2. . 7 Renovations,returning to beauty. . . . . 2. . 7 Caring neighbors. . . . . . . . 2. . 7 Ethnic diversity. . . . . . . . 2. . 7 Close to downtown. . . . . . . 2. . 7 Houses for rent/sale available. . . . . 1. . 3 Good attention zoning. . . . . . . 1. . 3 Va ri ety of types of housing. . . . . . 1. . 3 Compactness of neighborhood/good neighboring. 1. . 3 More affordable than some city neighborhoods. . 1. . 3 Ambience of neighborhood. . . . . . 1. . 3 All level of schools. . . . . . . . 1. . 3 TOTAL. . . . . . . . . 30. . 99Housing Weaknesses % of MentionsTotalNo rules for renovation/urban design . . . 4. . 11 Expensive to renovate,upkeep,maintain houses. . 3. . 8 Lack of parking on street/garages not used for parking. 3. . 8 Alleys have tire hazards/dirty. . . . . . 3. . 8 Less diversity as prices skyrocket. . . . . 2. . 5 T oo many people in houses (e.g.12 people in 2 bedrooms). . . . 2. . 5 Run down homes. . . . . . . . 2. . 5 Housing is 110 years old,structurally challenged. . 1. . 3 Wo rk done without permits. . . . . . 1. . 3 Prices are skyrocketing. . . . . . . 1. . 3 Affordable/attractive/ adequate housing disappearing. 1. . 3 Drug houses/selling. . . . . . . 1. . 3 Houses too close together. . . . . . 1. . 3 Sidewalks need improvement. . . . . 1. . 3 Old wiring is a fire hazard,other fire hazards. . 1. . 3 Upgrading wiring isn't affordable. . . . . 1. . 3 Graffiti. . . . . . . . . . 1. . 3 Traffic. . . . . . . . . . 1. . 3 Tr ee lawns very ugly. . . . . . . 1. . 3 Building codes not enforced. . . . . . 1. . 3 Old sewer,water pipes,mains. . . . . 1. . 3 Lack of house,street,and alley lighting. . . . 1. . 3 No senior housing available (Hirschfield changing pop.)1. . 3 More trash pickup,dumpsters. . . . . 1. . 3 TOTAL. . . . . . . . . 36. 101T ransportation Strengths % of MentionsTotalNeighborhood bordered by arterials,but limited through traffic. . . . . . . . 3. . 23 128

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLANP edestrian-friendly and attractive streetscaping. . 3. . 23 Multimodal (all means) available. . . . . 2. . 15 Non-highway access to downtown. . . . 1. . 8 Tr ansit-oriented development. . . . . 1. . 8 Broadway traffic businesses/pedestrians. . . 1. . 8 Light rail connections. . . . . . . 1. . 8 Light and heavy rail. . . . . . . 1. . 8 To tal. . . . . . . . . 13. 101T ransportation Weaknesses % of MentionsTotalP edestrian crossings unsafe. . . . . . 1. . 5 Heavy rush-hour traffic. . . . . . . 1. . 5 Alameda Station is not pedestrian-friendly or transit-oriented. . . . . . . 1. . 5 Lack of a direct bus stop from Alameda station to north Broadway. . . . . . . 1. . 5 Cut through traffic due to arterials. . . . 1. . 5 Noise pollution from trains. . . . . . 1. . 5 Tr uck traffic/routes on narrow streets. . . . 1. . 5 Heavy rail blocks traffic. . . . . . . 1. . 5 Commercial parking spills into residential areas. . 1. . 5 Signal time and speed for business viability. . . 1. . 5 Not enough quick routes to downtown/too many stops1. . 5 Noise pollution from helicopters. . . . . 1. . 5 Lack of residential parking,even at night. . . 1. . 5 Ozone pollution. . . . . . . . 1. . 5 Bike routes are not clearly marked/lack of signs. . 1. . 5 I-25 expansion could lead to congestion. . . 1. . 5 Crime and danger (theft) at Alameda station and Broadway Marketplace.. . . . . . 1. . 5 Alleys and sidewalks need maintenance. . . 1. . 5 P oor access to Platte with various transit boundaries. 1. . 5 Grade level crossing at Santa Fe for heavy rail. . 1. . 5 TOTAL. . . . . . . . . 20. 100Business Development Strengths % of MentionsTotalEclectic character . . . . . . . 3. . 23 Diversity of small businesses. . . . . . 2. . 15 Val ues going up. . . . . . . . 2. . 15 Owners live in nearby neighborhood. . . . 2. . 15 Central location. . . . . . . . 1. . 8 Local ownership and owner/operator. . . . 1. . 8 Existing zoning laws clear. . . . . . 1. . 8 Recreation Center serves business and residents. . 1. . 8 TOTAL. . . . . . . . . 13. 100Business Development Weaknesses % of MentionsTotalCity government intimidating,non-responsive, too bureaucratic. . . . . . . 4. . 21 Lack of parking for patrons and employees. . . 3. . 16 Smarmy pornographic establishments. . . . 4. . 21 Tr ash. . . . . . . . . . 1. . 5 Run-down,poorly-maintained buildings. . . . 2. . 11 Signage inability because of codes. . . . . 2. . 11 T oo many poorly managed liquor establishments. . 2. . 11 No neighborhood directory/lack of communication. 1. . 5 TOTAL. . . . . . . . . 19. 101Public Safety Strengths % of MentionsTotalPresence of neighbors. . . . . . . 2. . 20 Strong neighborhood association. . . . . 1. . 10 Poli ce responsive. . . . . . . . 1. . 10 Coverage by police anti-gang cars. . . . . 1. . 10 Good fire department. . . . . . . 1. . 10 Aw areness of neighborhood meetings. . . . 1. . 10 Good alley policing. . . . . . . 1. . 10 Effective District Police Captain. . . . . 1. . 10 Graffiti under control. . . . . . . 1. . 10 TOTAL. . . . . . . . . 10. 100 129

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APPENDIXPublic Safety Weaknesses % of MentionsTotalNeed more blocks in neighborhood watch. . . 1. . 8 Alleys are dirty,need to be cleaner. . . . 1. . 8 Insufficient number of detox vans. . . . . 1. . 8 Lack of policing in Dailey Park. . . . . 1. . 8 Lack of street and alley lighting. . . . . 1. . 8 High level of violent crime. . . . . . 1. . 8 High level of substance abuse. . . . . 1. . 8 Streets unsafe. . . . . . . . . 1. . 8 Occurrence of gang recruitment. . . . . 1. . 8 Lack of curfew enforcement. . . . . . 1. . 8 Need more bicycle police. . . . . . 1. . 8 Lack of neighborhood participation by Hispanic residents. . . . . . . 1. . 8 Total. . . . . . . . . 12. . 96OCTOBER 2000: Industrial Issues, Opportunities and PrioritiesAbout 70 property owners from the Baker industrial zones met to learn about the neighborhood planning effort,discuss the major issues confronting the area,and brainstorm possible solutions to the problems.Each member of the group was asked to indicate which issues are of most concern within the industrial areas by placing dots on the list of issues.Participants could also add new issues on blank sheets.These numbers also included issues that were identified in the surveys that were returned.In order of highest priority,the issues were identified as: Crime,graffiti,and gang activity = 27 Po orly maintained properties and alleys = 15 Lack of parking = 12 Non-industrial uses in the industrial area = 11 P oor streets and transportation options = 11 Aging infrastructure and utilities = 9 Unclear City rules and procedures for permitting,expansion = 8 Increasing land values creates pressure to convert industrial buildings to housing = 6 Environmental contamination = 6 Lack of skilled workforce = 6 Dangerous railroad crossings = 5 Loss of truck loading zones = 5 Lack of support services (transportation, housing) for employees = 5 The participants divided into three groups to discuss the issues and brainstorm possible solutions.Issue Crime,graffiti and gangsOptions Expand Neighborhood Watch program Add street lighting Remove graffiti immediately (property o wners,city program) Lobby legislature for laws revoking drivers licenses for anyone convicted of graffiti Increase police presence,especially NPOs V olunteer with youth programs Increase police responsiveness to calls K eep neighborhood organizations active and vital 130

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Improve communication between neighborhood organizations (Sumner,Baker, Broadway) Involve tenants in enforcement,reporting Contract for private,paid security in area Create a new police precinct for the industrial areaIssue P oorly-maintained properties and alleysOptions Increase code enforcement Increase penalties for non-compliance with codes City assist property owners to meet code r equirements Provide tax incentives (credits/rebates) for improvements Create neighborhood improvement district Pa ge police when dumping occurs;advertise the pager number Increase City funding for enforcement, r esources Replace damaged dumpsters and add new ones Increase alley sweeping Add more lighting,especially sensor lighting in cages Increase weed controlIssue Lack of parking Options New uses should provide adequate parking Limit time parking in some areas (1st Ave.) Review parking restrictions/signs for appropriatenessIssue Non-industrial uses in industrial areaOptions Need governmental participation to amortize non-conforming residential uses Purchase/buy down;return in property taxesIssue P oor streets and transportationOptions Improve flow of traffic,not speed Improve street drainage Provide bus access Put traffic on corridors;discourage traffic on secondary streets (stop signs) K eep loading off Santa Fe/Kalamath during r ush hour Complete transportation study of corridor Improve pedestrian crossing points Research adding a light rail stop between Alameda and 10th Ave. Add circulator buses Increase enforcement of existing laws (speeding,parking)Issue Aging infrastructure 131

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Options Study and upgrade capacity of new and e xisting phone service Review power capacity and forecasts for new uses Replace old main sewer lines Replace old gas lines Repair potholes in streets and alleys Upgrade electrical to include fiber optics Assess adequacy of sewer and storm drainage system Railroad should remove and clean a bandoned railroad spursIssue City rules and proceduresIssue Pressure for housing/transition between industrial and residentialOptions Maintain strong City policy against housing in the industrial zones Require rezoning for new uses Require new uses to mitigate traffic and other impacts Neighborhood organizations fight rezoning applications Increase funding available to businesses to r enovate/improve their properties Educate residents about needs of industrial, including 24 hour activity,trucks and noise, that make housing inappropriate Use landscaping to buffer uses Research funding options for buffering and maintenance,including tax incentives Tr ansition area at Santa Fe and Kalamath Use design elements to buffer usesIssue Environmental contaminationIssue Lack of skilled workforceIssue Railroad crossingsOptions Elevate or depress railroad at Santa F e/Kalamath,other stress points K eep trains from blocking traffic during rush hour Improve signage Consider pedestrian bridge over Santa Fe and Kalamath Require RR to maintain their right of wayIssue Loss of truck loading spacesIssue Lack of support services for employeesOption Increase bus routes and stops 132 APPENDIX

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLANFEBRUARY 2001: Commercial Corridor Issues, Opportunities and PrioritiesA meeting co-sponsored with the Broadway Partnership was attended by about 10 major land owners on the Broadway Corridor.The group prioritized issues and opportunities that affect commercial development. PrioritiesImplementation Options 1. Support new and existing viable commercial businesses. 2. Support employees by providing support such as childcare facilities, transit, and worker housing. € City regulations and development review. 1. Implement an area-wide crime prevention program. 2. Increase security patrols. 3. Remove graffiti and repair vandalism immediately. € Expand Neighborhood Watch program € Remove graffiti immediately (property owners, city program) € Increase police presence, especially NPOs € Increase police responsiveness to calls € Keep neighborhood organizations active and vital € Improve communication between neighborhood organizations (Sumner, Baker, Broadway) € Involve tenants in enforcement, reporting 133

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PrioritiesImplementation Options 1. Maintain existing on-street parking and transportation corridors. 2. Identify areas for new on-street parking. 3. Improve aging utilities and provide access to new technology. 4. Construct right of way improvements, especially streets, curb and gutter, treelawn and sidewalks where needed. 5. Enhance transportation options for residents and visitors, including light rail, circulator and regular buses, and sidewalks. 6. Increase level of property maintenance. € Identify parking areas to maintain. € Identify opportunities for additional parking areas. € New uses should provide adequate parking. € Limit time parking in some areas, adjacent to commercial or industrial uses. € Conduct capital improvement study for drainage, curb and gutter, sidewalk, and street improvements. € Replace old main sewer lines € Replace old gas lines € Repair potholes in streets and alleys € Assess adequacy of sewer and storm drainage system € Improve pedestrian crossing points € Identify areas needed for bus service and bus stops. € Pursue pilot program of circulator buses to connect industrial area to light rail stops, Broadway. € Increase enforcement of existing laws (speeding, parking) 1. Increase awareness of and participation in business association. 2. Create action program for business association, including ongoing issues, priority actions and guiding policies. 3. Address common issues with other neighborhood associations. 4. Work with City agencies to address common issues, especially Police, Public Works/Transportation, Planning, Zoning, and Excise and License. € Develop regular communication with other neighborhood associations. € Work with City agencies to clarify rules and regulations that affect properties. € Participate in public processes and hearings related to planning, capital improvements, rezoning applications, liquor license applications and renewals, etc. € Sponsor educational programs about neighborhood issues. 134 APPENDIX

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLANMAY 2001: Confirm and Refine Subarea Boundaries and IssuesThis community meeting was attended by over 70 people,who reviewed the issues,goals,land use and design intent,and transportation issues for the neighborhood plan's eight subareas:Commercial corridors,Transit-oriented Development,Retail and Office Centers,Low-density residential;Medium-density r esidential;Industrial;Residential-Industrial Transition (later called Residential-Office Area of Change);and Industrial-Residential Transition (later called IndustrialCommercial Area of Change).Comments at the meeting were used to refine the subarea plans.FEBRUARY 2002: Community Implementation PrioritiesAn activity at the final large community meeting involved about 100 participants in ranking the importance of different implementation options.Each participants had 10 votes,in the form of fake money, called "Baker Bucks."The participants showed support f or different options by "spending"the money.The options were organized by categories of land use and design;parks;traffic;transit,pedestrians and bicycles; safety;and infrastructure.The ranking of these issues weighe d heavily toward short-term physical improvements rather than larger,longer-term projects. The results showed the following priorities (number of vo tes is shown in parentheses):1.Pave alleys (76) 2.Improve access to and appearance of South Platte River (64) 3.Increase police patrols (53) 4.Facilities and landscaping improvements at Dailey Park (48) 5.Remove existing non-conforming uses (43) 6.Build bicycle connections (42) 7.Zoning changes where discrepancies between existing r egulations and desired land uses occur (41) 8.Add and replace sidewalks throughout neighborhood (39) 9.Rail separation on Santa Fe and Kalamath (35) 10.Improve maintenance and appearance of residential buildings (31) 11.Increase graffiti removal (30) 12.Add sidewalks and trees to 6th Avenue (29) 13.Add needed curbs,gutters and sidewalks (23) Slow traffic on residential streets (23) 14.Increase use of street,pedestrian and bus stop lighting to increase safety (21) Upgrade storm water drainage system (21) 15.Post and enforce truck-exclusion routes (20) 16.Upgrade utilities and telecommunications (19) Develop new park and recreation facilities at Gates T OD (19) 17.Plant and maintain treelawns throughout the neighborhood (18) 18.Remediate environmental contamination (16) 19.Improve pedestrian crossings of Alameda,Broadway, Santa Fe (14)20.Parking solutions at LRT,Broadway,Santa Fe (13)21.Improve pedestrian connections to Alameda station (12) 22.Implement design guidelines (10) Construct new linear park connection Alameda and Broadway LRT stations (10) 23.Develop TODs at Gates and Alameda (9) 24.Mitigate negative effects of new LRT service;increase benefits of new LRT service (7) 25.Develop Alameda underpass (6) 26.Improve transit service to neighborhood:safety, comfort and convenience (2) 135 1010BakerNeighborhoodNeighborhoodPlanTender

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Brownfields Sites that are known or suspected to contain environmental contamination where clean-up,mitigation and re development will bring the land back into economic viability CDOT Colorado Department of Transportation CERCLA Comprehensive Environmental Response,Compensation and Liability Act,aka Superfund CIP Capital Improvements Program,a subset of Denver's annual budget used for capital improvements CPDA Denver Community Planning and Development Agency EPA United States Environmental Protection Agency FAR Floor Area Ratio,the area of building as a ratio to the area of land FNI Mayor's Focus Neighborhood Initiative,a city program to address infrastructure deficiencies in Denver's poorest neighborhoods Human-Scale A design term that denotes building variety,contrast,fine detail,texture and proportion.It includes those elements which relate architecture to the size of an individual and includes an intuitive understanding of the function and size of buildings.Human-scale architectural elements allow for comfortable interaction and use and the environment by integrating individual buildings into their surrounding context. LID Local Improvement District LPC Landmark Preservation Commission LRT Light Rail Train LUTP Citywide Land Use and Transportation Plan MOED/IT Mayor's Office of Economic Development and International Trade Parks Fund Proposed dedicated funding stream for Denver parks;not yet approved PW Denver Department of Public Works RCRA Resource Conservation and Recovery Act RTD Regional Transportation District TOD Tr ansit-Oriented Development USGS United States Geographic Service 136 APPENDIXGLOSSARY OF ACRONYMS AND TERMS

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BAKER NEIGHBORHOOD PLANDATA SOURCESHistory of BakerSmith,Kathryn.1994 Baker Neighborhood Resource Guide.Architecture in Baker Historic DistrictW idmann,Nancy.The Baker Historic District.Denver: Historic Denver,Inc.,1999Environmental AnalysisAdrian Brown Consultants,Inc.Phase I Environmental Analysis of Baker,2000.Demographic and Economic ProfilesUnited States Census,1980,1990 and 2000;Denver Regional Council of Governments;Denver Community Planning and Development AgencyHousing ProfilesDenver Community Planning and Development AgencyLand Use and Zoning ProfilesDenver Community Planning and Development Agency;Denver Assessor's OfficeBusiness InventoryDenver Treasury Department 137