Citation
41st and Fox station area plan

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Title:
41st and Fox station area plan
Creator:
Community Planning and Development, City and County of Denver
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
City and County of Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Transit oriented development
Public transportation

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Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
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This item is presumed to be in the public domain.

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Full Text
41 st and Fox




Table of Contents
Acknowledgements...........................................................iv
Executive Summary...........................................................v
Introduction................................................................1
Vision & Goals..............................................................7
The Plan Concept...........................................................11
Implementation and Next Steps..............................................29
Supporting Documentation
.35


41st and Fox Station Area Plan Acknowledgements
Acknowledgements Public Works
Jennifer Hillhouse, Planning and Policy
Eric Osmundsen, Development Engineering Services
Mayor John W Hickenlooper Justin Schmitz, Traffic Engineering Services
Denver City Council
District 1 Rick Garcia
District 2 Jeanne Faatz
District 3 Paul D. Lopez
District 4 Peggy Lehmann
District 5 Marcia Johnson
District 6 Charlie Brown
District 7 Chris Nevitt
District 8 Carla Madison
District 9 Judy Montero
District 10 Jeanne Robb President
District 11 Michael Hancock
At-Large Carol Boigon
At-Large Doug Linkhart
Community Planning & Development
Peter J. Park, Manager
Steve Gordon, Comprehensive Planning Manager
Caryn Wenzara, Principal City Planner
Thomas Hoaglund, Project Manager
Deirdre Oss, Senior City Planner
Savannah Jameson, Landmark Preservation
Barbara Frommell, Senior City Planner
Steve Nalley, Associate City Planner
Eric McClelland, Senior GIS Analyst
Andrea Santoro, GIS Analyst
Carolyne Janssen, Graphic Designer
Jim Ottenstein, Graphic Designer
Denver Planning Board
Brad Buchanan, Chairman
Laura E. Aldrete
Richard Delanoy
Shannon Gifford
Anna Jones
Judith Martinez
Sharon Nunnally
Kenneth Ho
Karen Perez
Jeffrey Walker
Dave Webster
Parks & Recreation
Scott Robson, Deputy Manager
Gordon Robertson, Planning Manager
David Marquardt
Devon Buckels
Office of Economic Development
Andre Pettigrew, Executive Director
Cec Ortiz, Deputy Director
Terrence Ware
Will Kralovec
Michael Miera
Department of Cultural Affairs
Ginger White Brunetti
Regional Transportation District
Liz Telford, Gold Line Project Manager
Bill Sirois, TOD Program Manager
Consultant Team
PB Placemaking, Urban Design Consultant
Placematters, Visualization Consultant
Fehr & Peers, Transportation Consultant
Navjoy Consulting Services, Traffic Consultant
Hartwig and Associates, cost Estimating Consultant
NelsonYNygaard, Parking Consultant
Baisle Baumann Prost Cole and Associates, Economic Con-
sultant
Arland, Economic Consultant
Neighborhood Organizations
Fox Street Neighbors Association
Globeville Civic Association
Sunnyside United Neighborhood, Inc.
Highland United Neighborhood, Inc.
IV


41st and Fox Station Area Plan Executive Summary
v


41st and Fox Station Area Plan Executive Summary
Introduction
The City and County of Denver is embracing the unprec-
edented opportunity for economic and environmentally sus-
tainable development created by the FasTracks rapid transit
system. Land use and transportation decisions are directly
related and impact our economy, human health, and envi-
ronmental quality Recognizing this relationship, Blueprint
Denver recommends directing growth and change to the areas
surrounding rapid transit stations where expanded transpor-
tation choices are available.
The 41st and Fox Station is the first station outside of Down-
town on the Gold Line and Northwest Rail corridors -five
minutes from Union Station. It will be located near some of
Denvers most exciting and vibrant neighborhoods in an area
already experiencing significant change. In 2008 and 2009,
the City and County of Denver worked with community
41st and Fox Station Area
^I I W Proposed Station
Park
Denver Public School
VI


41st and Fox Station Area Plan Executive Summary
members in a series of public workshops and neighborhood
meetings to develop a vision, analyze future possibilities, and
recommend implementation strategies for the Vi mile area
surrounding RTDs future 41st and Fox Station. The plan
involved close coordination with RTD and their planning for
the Gold Line Commuter Rail Corridor. Ideas and concepts
were also reviewed by technical staff of city departments,
City Council, and the Denver Planning Board.
This plan is intended to guide future land use and infrastruc-
ture decisions to foster transit oriented development. The
Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000, Blueprint Denver and other
adopted city-wide plans and small-area plans formed the
basis for recommendations contained in the 41 st and Fox Sta-
tion Area Plan. Once adopted, the 4lst and Fox Station Area
Plan will serve as a supplement to the Denver Comprehensive
Plan 2000.
The Vision
The 41st and Fox Station will develop over the coming de-
cades into the focal point of a diverse, transit supportive and
environmentally sustainable urban center. Many new resi-
dents and businesses will be drawn to the convenient loca-
tion close to Downtown near some of Denvers most vibrant
urban neighborhoods.
The vision, created through community input and transit
oriented development principles, provides the basis for five
primary goals for the station area:
Improve pedestrian connections to the station, between
neighborhoods, and along major corridors
Create opportunities to add more housing, jobs and
services to the station area
Incorporate plazas, parks and open space into
redevelopment areas
Capitalize on the station areas proximity to Downtown
and location on the Gold Line and Northwest Rail cor-
ridors
Balance the needs of new development and existing uses
The plan seeks to address each of these goals through the
implementation recommendations and relate them to the
more specific objectives of the plan concepts.
r
Fox Street near the station will transform over time with pedestrian
infrastructure and new development
VII


41st and Fox Station Area Plan Executive Summary
Station Area Location
Key elements of this concept in-
clude:
Development of a high intensity
activity node close to the station on
the east side
Creation of a pedestrian shopping
corridor along Fox Street
Mixed-use redevelopment of the
former Denver Post site
Linked park and open space
improvements to enhance neighbor-
hood livability by providing positive
orientation, buffering, aesthetics,
recreational amenities, and storm-
water management
Capture partnership benefits
with Regency Student Housing by
encouraging ties between academic
institutions, student populations,
and incubator employment uses
Respect existing housing west of
the station by redeveloping along
the edges of the Sunnyside neigh-
borhood leading to Inca Street and
in a mixed-use node at 38th and
Navajo
The 41 st and Fox Station is the first station outside of Downtown on the Cold Line and Northwest Rail cor-
ridors -five minutes from Union Station
The Plan Concept
The plan concept is focused on the long term redevelop-
ment of the entire area east of the railroad tracks to create a
complete, transit-friendly neighborhood. This would require
a transition over time through private redevelopment from
heavy industrial uses to more light industrial, office, com-
mercial, mixed-use, and residential uses located close to the
transit station.
The plan also includes opportunities for a variety of new,
mixed-income residential developments.
Incorporate historically signifi-
cant structures by drawing design
inspiration from the areas historic,
industrial character
Promote pedestrian and bicycle connectivity with improve-
ments to Navajo, 38th, Elati, 4lst, 44th, Fox, Inca and
other streets
Promote structured RTD parking that is shared with adja-
cent development
Capture views of Downtown and buffer the station area by
locating taller structures along 1-25 and 1-70
VIII


41st and Fox Station Area Plan Executive Summary
Land Use and Circulation Plan Concept

X- Note: It is likely that only one of the
connections shown, either 44th or
46th Avenue, would be constructed
pending further study.
GLOBEVILLE
NEIGHBORHOOD
Pedestrian Shopping District (2-8 stories) ... Pedestrian Shopping District Improvements : Proposed Ped. Bridge /Potential Future Vehicular Access
Pedestrian Shopping District (2-5 stories) ... Priority Street for Pedestrian/Bike Improvements Transit Platform and Pedestrian Bridge
Mixed-Use Office/Residential (3-20 stories) Off-Street Multi-Use Path Future RTD Structured Parking
Urban Residential (2-12 stories) Existing Bus Routes iiiiiiin FasTracks Gold Line
Urban Residential (2-8 stories) * Intersection Improvements p? Existing Park
Urban Residential (1-3 stories) Pedestrian Connection Improvements L. i 38th Avenue Improvements
1 Single Family / Single Family Duplex X Funded New Pedestrian/Bike Bridge over 38th Ave. Historically Significant Buildings
Proposed Open Space/ Parks/ Plaza V77\ Pedestrian Plaza Navajo District
PlaceMaking Group
IX


41st and Fox Station Area Plan Executive Summary
Implementation and Next Steps
Transforming Denvers transit stations into vital, dynamic
transit oriented development areas will not happen over
night. Implementing the plan will take many years.
The implementation recommendations for the 4lst and
Fox Station Area are intended to create the transit oriented
development envisioned in this plan. The specific recommen-
dations for implementing the 41st and Fox plan concept are
divided into three categories: regulatory tools, infrastructure
tools, and partnership tools.
Specific recommendations in each of these categories are
presented in the tables in the implementation section. Each
table contains details on the implementation strategy, time-
frame, and responsible parties. Key implementation actions
identified in the table include:
Regulatory:
New zoning with transit oriented development supportive
attributes
On-street parking management
Support for green building practices, such as LEED
certification for new development
Work to change state legislative requirements
that limit joint develoment and transit oriented develop-
ment on RTD property at the station
Eliminate regulatory barriers to affordable housing and
develop an affordable and mixed income housing strategy
consistent with the TOD Strategic Plan
Infrastructure:
Improvements to Fox Street to create a pedestrian
shopping district
Improvements to Inca Street including a separated
bicycle path connecting the station to Highland and the
City of Cuernavaca Park
Study transit and pedestrian improvements to 38th
Avenue following recommendations of Denvers Living
Streets Initiative
Provide a grid system of streets with detached sidewalks in
development areas
Partnerships:
Take an area based management approach to explore the
parking management techniques that support shared park-
ing arrangements
Explore infrastructure financing tools including special dis-
tricts; tax increment financing; regional, state and federal
infrastructure funds; and public-private partnerships
Continue coordination with RTD on the planning and
design of the Gold Line and Northwest Rail Line
Work with local and state agencies to track community
health indicators related to transportation and air quality
as the area changes over time
The implementation recommendations for the 41 st and Fox Station Area will create the transit oriented development envisioned in this plan
X


41st and Fox Station Area Plan Introduction
1


41st and Fox Station Area Plan Introduction
Background
The City and County of Denver is planning for change in
the areas surrounding rapid transit stations. In November
2004, voters in the Denver Metropolitan Region passed
the FasTracks ballot measure to fund and construct six new
transit lines in 15 years. The 119 miles of new track and the
70 transit stations will provide an unparalleled level of mobil-
ity for the Denver region and fundamentally reshape growth
patterns.
Following the passage of FasTracks, the City and County of
Denver completed a Transit Oriented Development (TOD)
Strategic Plan as a first step in planning for the areas sur-
rounding the rapid transit stations. The TOD Strategic Plan
provided a framework for analyzing the area surrounding the
38th and Inca station on RTDs future Gold Line commuter
rail corridor.
In 2008, RTD examined the station location as part of the
Gold Line Environmental Impact Statement. As a result of this
process, RTD recommended relocating the planned 38th and
Inca station to approximately 41st and Fox streets on the east
side of the Union Pacific and Burlington Northern and Santa
Fe railroad tracks.
In 2009, the City and County of Denver worked with com-
munity members to develop a station area plan for the area
surrounding the 41st and Fox Station. In a series of public
workshops and neighborhood meetings, city staff worked
with stakeholders to create a vision for the station area and
develop land use and circulation concepts. This plan is the
result of this community driven process to develop a vision,
analyze future possibilities, and recommend strategies to
implement the vision.
41st and Fox
Station Area
The 41 st and Fox Station Area
contains portions of three
neighborhoods along the
Union Pacific/BNSF Railroad
line; the Union Pacific/BNSF
Railroad line parallels Inca
Street and is a major barrier
to pedestrian and vehicle
circulation
Proposed Station
Park
Denver Public School
2


41st and Fox Station Area Plan Introduction
Station Area
Location
The 41 st and Fox Station and the Gold Line will be part of the future
FasTracks System
RTD's Gold Line Environmental Impact Statement includes
plans for a pedestrian bridge connecting over the railroad lines
and a 500 space park-n-Ride on opening day in 2015
3


41st and Fox Station Area Plan Introduction
Station Area Context
The 41st and Fox Station will be situated in the Globeville
neighborhood at the edge of two other Denver neighbor-
hoods: Sunnyside and Highland. The portion of the Globev-
ille neighborhood where the station is located is primarily
industrial and cut-off from the rest of Globeville by 1-25- In
recent years, the area has begun transitioning to new uses
including student housing.
The Sunnyside neighborhood is located on the west side of
the Union Pacific and Burlington Northern and Santa Fe
railroad tracks. This neighborhood will be connected to the
41st and Fox Station by a new pedestrian bridge over the
railroad tracks. Sunnyside is primarily a residential neigh-
borhood with some smaller scale industrial properties along
its eastern and northern edges. Quigg Newton Homes, a
Denver Housing Authority property, is located in the Sun-
nyside neighborhood close to the station. Recently, the area
has become attractive for middle-class residents and young
families drawn to its affordable housing stock and location
close to Downtown Denver.
The Highland neighborhood is located south of 38th Avenue
on the edge of the station area. The Highland neighbor-
hood has become one of Denvers most desirable neighbor-
hoods in the past decade with many new restaurants, shops
and residential mixed-use developments. The portion of
Highland near the station includes the Navajo Arts District,
a small business area of restaurants, bars, art galleries, and
theaters located south of 38th Avenue along Navajo Street.
The Highland neighborhood will be connected to the station
through a new pedestrian and bicycle bridge that will be
constructed over 38th Avenue at Inca Street.
The station area contains the Trevista at Horace Mann School
and several parks including Atzlan, Ciancio and Columbus
parks in Sunnyside and Franco and City of Cuernavaca parks
in Highland. The most important street in the station area is
38th Avenue, a main street with many businesses connecting
the neighborhoods to Downtown Denver and 1-25.
In the future, the Gold Line will connect the station area to
Downtown Denver and communities to the west including
Arvada and Wheat Ridge. The station will also have limited
service on the Northwest Corridor Commuter Rail Line
connecting to Westminster, Boulder and Longmont. As the
first transit stop outside of Downtown, the station area could
see considerable growth and development due to its desir-
able location. In order to accommodate commuters from the
surrounding neighborhoods, the 41st and Fox Station will
include a 500 space park-n-Ride that may be expanded to
1,000 spaces to accommodate expected ridership growth.
The 41 st and Fox Station Area Station includes two distinct areas: an established residential neighborhood to the west and an evolving mixed use
Industrial area on the east along Fox Street
4


41st and Fox Station Area Plan Introduction
Purpose of the Plan
The 4lst and Fox Station Area Plan articulates near and long-
term goals, issues and recommendations for future develop-
ment. The plan provides a guide to determine appropriate
development, including recommendations for land-use pat-
terns, urban design, circulation and infrastructure. The Denver
Comprehensive Plan 2000, Blueprint Denver and other adopted
city-wide plans and small-area plans formed the basis for
recommendations contained in the 41st and Fox Station Area
Plan. Once adopted, the 4lst and Fox Station Area Plan will
serve as a supplement to the Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000.
The plan is not an official zoning map, nor does it create or
deny any rights.
Property owners, elected officials, the planning board, neigh-
borhood organizations and city departments will use the 4lst
and Fox Station Area Plan for many purposes including:
Data Resource: The plan offers data on existing conditions
for the planning area in an easy to reference document.
Reinvestment Guidance: The plan guides public and private
decision making and investment in the planning area over
the coming years as it relates to land use, urban design and
mobility.
Capital Improvements: A plan can provide the justification
for the allocation of funding from the citys capital improve-
ment budget and other sources.
Funding and Partnership Opportunities: Implementation
of plans requires a collaborative effort between neighbor-
hoods, developers, businesses, elected officials, city depart-
ments and neighboring jurisdictions. The plan identifies and
supports partnerships and resource leveraging efforts.
Reference for Larger City-Wide Plans: The station area
plan may include analysis that can inform other city-wide
plans. The analysis and recommendations included here
should be considered in future updates of Blueprint Denver
and the Denver Comprehensive Plan.
Blueprint
Denver

TRANSIT-ORIENTED DEVELOPMENT
STRATEGIC PLAN
The 41 stand Fox Station Area Plan builds upon the foundation of the
Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000, Blueprint Denver and the Transit
Oriented Development Strategic Plan.
5


41st and Fox Station Area Plan Introduction
Plan Process
The 4lst and Fox Station Area Plan is the result of a commu-
nity driven planning process for the Vi mile area surrounding
RTDs future commuter rail station and park-n-Ride at 41st
and Fox Streets. The planning team engaged the community
in the following process to create the plan:
Create the vision and identify goals
Examine opportunities and constraints of the existing
conditions
Create and analyze alternative concepts for land use, urban
design and circulation
Develop a preferred concept based on the best elements of
the draft alternatives
Develop recommendations for implementing the preferred
land use, urban design and circulation concepts
Over the course of approximately two years, community
members representing businesses, developers and residents in
the Vi mile station area worked with city staff through a series
of meetings and workshops to complete this process. In the
workshops, community members divided into groups and
were asked to develop plan concepts. Each group worked
closely with the citys project team to identify ideas, concepts
and recommendations. The best ideas from each group were
then combined to create the concepts presented in this plan
document.
The plan also involved close coordination with RTD and
their planning for the Gold Line Commuter Rail Corridor.
Ideas and concepts were also reviewed by City Council, the
Denver Planning Board, and by staff of city departments.
Additional information including meeting dates and work-
shop summaries can be found in the appendix.
Residents, business owners and property owners worked with city staff
over the course of two years to develop the vision and plan concepts
presented In the 41 stand Fox Station Area Plan
6


41st and Fox Station Area Plan Vision and Goals
7


41st and Fox Station Area Plan Vision and Goals
Transit Oriented Development Principles
The communitys vision began with the underlying principles
of transit oriented development. Transit oriented develop-
ment means creating a dense mix of uses within walking
distance of transit stations where people can live, work, shop,
and connect to destinations around the region without rely-
ing on their automobiles. Transit oriented areas should be
lively and walkable and integrate transit into new develop-
ment and surrounding neighborhoods. Principles include:
Place-making: Creating safe, comfortable, varied and at-
tractive station areas with distinct identities.
Rich Mix of Choices: Providing housing, employment,
transportation and shopping choices for people of all ages,
household types, incomes and lifestyles.
Location Efficiency: Placing homes, jobs, shopping, en-
tertainment, parks and other amenities close to the station
to promote walking, biking and transit use.
Value Capture: Using plans to encourage all stakeholders
residents, business owners, RTD and the city- to take full
economic advantage of the value of the transit infrastruc-
ture.
Portal to the Region: The station area should serve as a
gateway to the regional transit network by providing a safe
and welcoming environment.
Opportunities and Constraints
The 41st and Fox Station has many advantages relative to
other stations making it an attractive area for new residents,
businesses, shops and services to locate. The area is just over
a mile a five minute trip- from central Denver and the first
stop on the Gold and Northwest rail lines outside of Down-
town. It is also close to the vibrant and growing Highland
neighborhood where many successful restaurants and shops
and desirable residential areas are located. The Sunnyside
neighborhood immediately to the west of the station is a
neighborhood in transition with new families and businesses
moving into the area attracted to the affordable housing and
convenient location.
The area also has good visibility and direct access from 1-25.
Views from the eastern portion of the station area to Down-
town will likely make high and medium rise buildings along
1-25 marketable.
In addition, the station area contains many large parcels
under single ownership that have the potential to redevelop
without requiring many years of private land assembly. Many
of these same parcels are currently underutilzed relative to
their land value making it likely that they will redevelop in
the near future. Some large parcels have already been devel-
oped bringing change to the area. In particular, the Regency
Student Housing marked a significant change in character
for the portion of Globeville west of 1-25. As development
occurs over time, the existing businesses and residents in the
Opportunities include capitalizing on the station area's close proximity to
Downtown
Challenges that must be overcome Include the poor condition of existing
Infrastructure
8


41st and Fox Station Area Plan Vision and Goals
area will provide an important base for the transit station and
attract new services to the area.
Connections to the South Platte River and regional parks
are also an important feature of the station area. With the
completion of the pedestrian and bicycle bridge over the
38th Avenue Viaduct and the new pedestrian connection
across the railroad tracks at 41st Avenue, the station will
be connected to the Platte River Greenway and the City of
Cuernavaca Park. This will not only tie the station to open
space, it will also provide bicycle and pedestrian connections
to the Platte River Valley, LoDo and Downtown.
However, there are many challenges that must be overcome.
1-25 and the Union Pacific and BNSF railroad tracks are
major barriers to connectivity in the station area making
new east-west connections difficult. Traffic congestion on
38th Avenue is forecast to increase in the future and does not
have enough right-of-way to accommodate all of the capac-
ity needed for cars, bicycles, pedestrians, transit, on-street
parking and streetscape improvements. New development
on the east side of the tracks should take into consideration
the long-standing industrial uses in the area as it transitions
over time. In addition, many of the roadways and much of
the other infrastructure in the area are deficient. Most of the
industrial streets on the east side of the tracks lack curbs, gut-
ters, sidewalks and street trees. Finally, new parks and com-
munity spaces on the east side of the tracks will be necessary
to serve future residents of the area.
Vision Statement
The 41st and Fox Station will develop over the coming de-
cades into the focal point of a diverse, transit supportive and
environmentally sustainable urban center. Many new resi-
dents and businesses will be drawn to the convenient loca-
tion close to Downtown near some of Denvers most vibrant
urban neighborhoods.
38th Avenue will become a transit and pedestrian supportive
main street through a variety of streetscape improvements
such as on-street parking, wider sidewalks, better lighting,
and transit infrastructure. Pedestrian and bicycle crossings of
38th Avenue, including a new bicycle and pedestrian bridge
over the 38th Avenue Viaduct, will help connect the High-
land and Sunnyside neighborhoods to existing parks along
the Platte River and the transit station. Further from the sta-
tion, the Navajo neighborhood business area will continue to
grow and connect to 38th Avenue. The corner of Navajo and
r
Along FoxStreet, new mixed-use buildings with ground-floor restaurants
and shops will become a destination for people using the station
9


41st and Fox Station Area Plan Vision and Goals
38th will be a very popular area for people using the transit
system to connect to interesting neighborhood venues and
restaurants.
Although 38th Avenue will continue to be the main street of
Northwest Denver, a new pedestrian shopping district will
grow next to the 41st and Fox Station. Along Fox Street,
new mixed-use buildings with ground-floor restaurants and
shops will become a destination for people using the 41st
and Fox Station. A plaza along 4lst Street will connect the
station platform to Fox Street through the heart of the pedes-
trian shopping area. People will live, work and shop within a
few blocks of the transit station. Over time, the RTD park-
n-Ride should evolve into shared parking for new, mixed-use
buildings adjacent to the station.
Further east along the edge of 1-25, mixed-use high-rise
buildings will take advantage of the views across the highway
to Downtown Denver. These new buildings will also buffer
the pedestrian shopping district from the noise of the nearby
highways. These high-rise buildings will contain apart-
ments and condominiums for people of a variety of ages and
incomes and offices for businesses wanting to locate close to
Downtown.
New development may occur gradually and will build upon
the existing industrial and residential character of the area.
Where possible, historically significant buildings will provide
inspiration for building designs and be incorporated into
new development. As the area transitions, there will be an
eclectic blend of old and new. Improvements to the 44th
Avenue connection to Globeville will help tie development in
this area to the residents and businesses east of 1-25.
On the west side of the tracks, the Sunnyside neighborhood
will connect to the station through a new pedestrian bridge
at 41st Avenue and eventually through an additional street
connection on the northern end of the station area. New
residential development along Inca Street will transition
into the Sunnyside neighborhood and provide more housing
options including both market rate housing and affordable,
workforce housing for individuals and families wanting the
convenience of living near a transit station. For many, the
new housing will be more affordable due to a reduced need
for auto ownership and parking, providing significant savings
in transportation-related expenses.
Throughout the station area, a focus on green construction
and walkable, mixed-use development will make the area a
model for environmental sustainability and ensure the areas
long-term economic competitiveness. A variety of parks and
open spaces will provide shared places to relax and recre-
ate and create value for surrounding buildings. These new
public spaces will incorporate green design providing water
quality benefits for the area. Walking and a healthy lifestyle
will be reinforced by this pedestrian oriented design.
This vision for the future shows what can be achieved
through coordinated change and investment in transit. To
achieve this vision, cooperation between the city, RTD,
neighborhood groups, and private developers will be neces-
sary to guide change occurring over many years. Creating
a vision is an important first step in identifying goals and
methods to achieve them.
Station Area Goals
The vision, created through community input and transit
oriented development principles, provided the basis for five
primary goals for the station area:
Improve pedestrian connections to the station, between
neighborhoods, and along major corridors
Create opportunities to add more housing for a variety of
income levels, jobs and services to the station area
Incorporate plazas, parks and open space into redevelop-
ment areas
Capitalize on the station areas proximity to Downtown
and location on the Gold Line and Northwest Rail cor-
ridors
Balance the needs of new development and existing uses
The plan seeks to address each of these goals through the
implementation recommendations and relate them to the
more specific objectives of the plan concept.
10


41st and Fox Station Area Plan Plan Concept
11


41st and Fox Station Area Plan Plan Concept
The Plan Concept
The TOD Strategic Plan assigned a typology to each Fas-
Tracks station to help frame the expectations about the mix
and intensity of development at specific stations. The pro-
posed typology was developed after looking at each station
area and its surroundings. The typology provides a starting
point for the station area planning process.
At the time the TOD Strategic Plan was written, the 41st and
Fox station was proposed for a different location and less was
known about the areas development potential. The TOD
Strategic Plan originally proposed an Urban Neighborhood
typology described as a walk-up station with some residential
development and limited neighborhood retail.
During the course of the planning process centered around
the new station location at 41st Avenue and Fox Street on the
east side of the UP/BNSF railroad tracks, it became evident
that there was much more development potential in the sta-
tion area. The eastern portion of the station area has already
begun to change with new development and new uses geared
toward larger-scale development. Through the examination
of land use alternatives, it was determined that the eastern
portion of the station area would develop into an Urban
Center typology to create a complete, transit-friendly neigh-
borhood. This would require a transition over time through
private redevelopment from heavy industrial uses to more
light industrial, office, commercial, mixed-use, and residen-
tial uses located close to the transit station.
Meanwhile the western portion of the station area would
continue to be based on the less intense Urban Neighbor-
hood typology with residential infill development and some
The plan concept is focused on the long-term redevelopment of the entire
neighborhood
limited, neighborhood serving retail. In this area, new variety
of housing and improved connections to Quigg Newton
Fiomes will provide opportunities for a diverse population to
live near the station.
The plan concept is centered around the development of
a high intensity activity node close to the station on the
east side that includes a 41st Avenue plaza and a pedestrian
shopping corridor along Fox Street. To support this activity
center, parking in the station area would be placed in struc-
tures and shared between park-n-Ride users and adjacent
businesses.
Taller structures along 1-25 would capture views of Down-
town and create a buffer between the station and the nearby
freeway. Mixed-use redevelopment of the former Denver Post
site and continued partnership benefits between the Regency
Student Fiousing and academic institutions will act as a cata-
lyst for change in the station area.
The concept also includes the development of strong bi-
cycle and pedestrian connections to the City of Cuernavaca
Park and the Platte River Greenway linking the Sunnyside,
Globeville and Fiighland neighborhoods. This includes
improvements to Inca Street and connections across the UP/
BNSF railroad and 38th Avenue. In addition, new park
and open space improvements will help create value for new
development and provide natural buffering and stormwater
management.
The following pages contain more detailed recommendations
concerning land use, urban design, circulation and infra-
structure, and economic development strategies.
east of the railroad tracks to create a complete, transit-friendly
12


41st and Fox Station Area Plan Plan Concept
Plan Concept
The plan concept includes creating a new urban center on the east side of the station tying to urban neighborhoods west of the station
13


41st and Fox Station Area Plan Plan Concept
Land Use Plan
Pedestrian Shopping District (2-8 stories)
Pedestrian Shopping District (2-5 stories)
Mixed-Use Office/Residential (3-20 stories)
Urban Residential (2-12 stories)
Urban Residential (2-8 stories)
Urban Residential (1-3 stories)
Single Family / Single Family Duplex
Proposed Open Space/ Parks/ Plaza

iiiiiiiii

Funded New Pedestrian/Bike Bridge over 38th Ave.
Proposed Ped. Bridge /Potential Future Vehicular Access
Transit Platform and Pedestrian Bridge
Future RTD Structured Parking
FasTracks Gold Line
Existing Park
38th Avenue Main Street
Historically Significant Buildings
Navajo District

DI_N V_
R
Map Date: December 2008
Community Planning and Development
14


41st and Fox Station Area Plan Plan Concept
Recommendation LU 1: Land Use Components
The land use components are the building blocks of the land use concept for the station area. The approximate locations and
boundaries of each land use area are shown on the land use concept map. In general, future land use regulations in the station
area should support walkable, mixed-use development and contain restrictions on non-transit supportive uses such as drive-
through businesses, auto services, and noxious uses. The following are descriptions of each of the components:
la. Pedestrian Shopping District (2-8 stories) is centered on
the intersection of 4lst Avenue and Fox Street in close proximity
to the transit station. Ground floor uses include a wide variety of
shopping, entertainment, and services with residential, employ-
ment or expanded commercial uses on the upper floors. Some of
the ground floor uses found would include: specialty shops such
as food markets, clothing boutiques and book stores; restaurants,
bars and entertainment uses such as movie theaters; and stores
serving the daily needs of residents such as dry cleaners, hardware
stores, grocery stores, pharmacies, and similar uses. Because of
the high level of service provided by the transit station, both
local and regional customers can easily visit the unique shops
and restaurants of this area. When fully developed, this area
should contain shopping and commercial uses totaling 150,000
square feet or more. Urban design features such as continuous
street frontages with sidewalk entrances, ground floor windows,
awnings, pedestrian oriented signs and lighting are important to
creating the necessary building forms.
lb. Pedestrian Shopping District (2-5 stories) is centered at
Navajo and 38th and acts as a gateway to the Sunnyside and
Highland communities. This intersection will be an impor-
tant activity node directing visitors to the Navajo Arts District.
Ground floors of buildings will contain a mix of land uses includ-
ing convenience shopping, personal services, and restaurants with
commercial or residential uses on upper floors. Urban design
features should support pedestrian orientation including sidewalk
entrances, ground floor windows, awnings, pedestrian oriented
signs and lighting.
lc. Mixed-Use Office/Residential (3-20 stories) has a sizable
employment base as well as housing and may include a wide va-
riety of uses including hotels and lodging. Intensity is higher in
these areas than in the urban residential areas. Land uses are not
necessarily mixed in each building but the area will include em-
ployment, services and residential uses within walking distance.
The proportion of residential to commercial will vary from one
development to another. Because these mixed-use developments
are within the transit oriented development area, form of the
buildings and pedestrian orientation are very important.
Pedestrian Shopping District 2-8 stories
Pedestrian Shopping District 2-5 stories
Mixed-Use Office/Residential
15


41st and Fox Station Area Plan Plan Concept
ld. Urban Residential (2-12 stories) is located on the east
side of the station area, primarily bordering 1-25 and 1-70.
These areas contain the highest population density in the
station area. Uses are primarily residential but may include
a noteworthy number of complementary commercial uses.
New housing tends to be in mid- to high-rise structures to
take advantage of Downtown and mountain views, and there
is a greater housing than employment base. Urban design
features that reinforce the pedestrian environment while still
providing for privacy of ground floor residents are important.
le. Urban Residential (2-8 stories) is found in two parts of
the station area: north of the existing Regency Student Hous-
ing and along the west side of the tracks along Inca Street
near the station. These areas are intended as new, moderate-
density neighborhoods. On the west side of the tracks along
Inca it forms a new edge between the station and the existing
neighborhood to the west. On the east side of the tracks, this
moderate-density residential will provide a range of housing
types that help support the pedestrian shopping district and
employment base. New parks and plazas on the east side
will provide needed relaxation and breathing space for new
residents and help to increase the values of nearby residential
buildings.
lf. Urban Residential (1-3 stories) is located at the transi-
tion to the established Sunnyside neighborhood. This will
create an improved edge for adjacent residential areas and the
Quigg Newton Homes. A range of housing types includ-
ing single family houses, accessory dwelling units, duplexes,
townhouses, and small condominium and apartment build-
ings will provide a variety of housing options for residents
living near the transit station. Urban design features that
reinforce the pedestrian environment while still providing
for privacy of ground floor residents are important. These
features may include stoops and raised porches, terraces, and
landscaping.
lg. Single Family/Single Family Duplex includes most
of the established neighborhoods surrounding the transit
station. These areas are expected to see reinvestment in the
mix of housing types which includes small-lot, single-family
houses with duplexes and townhomes in certain areas near
major corridors. Homeowners may wish to develop accesso-
ry dwelling units or garage apartments to provide additional
housing opportunities in the neighborhood. Houses in these
areas are less than three stories in height.
Urban Residential2-12 stories
Urban Residential2-8 stories
16


41st and Fox Station Area Plan Plan Concept
lh. The RTD Station and park-n-Ride is being designed to
accommodate future streets and structured parking. RTD
currently faces legal limitations to development on land
acquired for parking. However, future support for transit
oriented development may lead to the legislative changes
necessary to allow homes and businesses in these important
areas closest to the transit station. Opportunities for shared
parking that serves both RTD commuters and nearby shops
and residences could provide more efficient use of the areas
parking supply. If this becomes possible, parking structures
should be wrapped with active pedestrian retails uses with
residential or commercial uses on upper floors. The city
should work with RTD to limit the need for future park-n-
Ride expansion and associated automobile trips if ridership
goals can be met with transit oriented development.
li. Proposed Open Space/Parks/Plazas on the northeast
portion of the station area will be needed in response to the
conversion of industrial uses to higher density residential.
Although parks are conceptually shown on the land use plan,
the actual size and locations are not determined. Future park
space in the station area will require working with private
property owners, additional study by the Parks Department,
and developing funding partnerships to pay for park land,
improvements, and maintenance. However, the basic ele-
ments are described below.
Parks and public spaces should include a variety of types
beginning with a formal plaza at the station and transitioning
to more naturalized areas. Near the station, a formal public
space can provide a focus for transit patrons and future em-
ployment and residential uses. Further from the station, new
neighborhood parks in mixed-use residential areas can help
create value for new development and attract new residents.
Along 1-25 and the railroad tracks, passive naturalized land-
scape buffers can offer visual relief and storm water manage-
ment benefits. Bicycle trails and on-street paths will link to
existing bike routes to the north and south and nearby parks
along the South Platte. Identified routes should include land-
scape improvements such as street trees, green street storm
water planters, pedestrian scaled lighting, and signage.
Sustainable, surface treatment of storm water should occur
through a linked system of devices including bio-swales, filter
strips, and storm water planters as part of the open space
system. These features could provide benefits to encourage
redevelopment and support wildlife.
Parks and plazas can provide a focal point for new development
17


41st and Fox Station Area Plan Plan Concept
Recommendation UD 1: Urban Design
In mixed-use areas, the physical form of buildings and devel-
opment is more important than the land use. Proper urban
design can help ensure that offices, retail and residential can
function in close proximity and create vibrant, walkable com-
munities. The following elements are critical to creating areas
supportive of high-frequency transit service:
UD la. Streetscape Features are important throughout the
station area. Sidewalk widths will vary by street type but
should meet the minimums of the Pedestmin Master Plan.
In the pedestrian shopping districts and along arterial streets
there should be a pedestrian zone that includes sidewalks,
street trees in grates, improved bus stops, and enough room
for sidewalk uses, outdoor seating, street carts and vendors.
All other streets should have a pedestrian zone that includes
a tree lawn and detached sidewalk. These areas should also
contain restrictions on curb cuts to ensure continuity of the
sidewalk and maximize the supply of on-street parking. Ve-
hicle access should come from the alley or the side-street.
UD lb. Active Edges and Design Elements of Building
Ground Floors help create a feeling of activity, safety and
visual interest for pedestrians. In the pedestrian shopping
districts and along arterial streets, ground floor uses should
consist of retail or similar active uses. The ground floors of
building in all areas should contain the following elements:
Prominent, street facing entries
Extensive ground floor windows and frequent entrances
Pedestrian scaled facades
Awnings to protect pedestrians and mark entrances
Building entrances that meet the sidewalk (no parking
between primary structure and the street)
In areas where the ground floor is occupied by a residential
use, stoops, raised porches, terraces and landscaping can be
used to protect the privacy of occupants.
UD lc. Building Placement and Massing requirements
help create places that feel enclosed and oriented toward the
street. In the station area, full site coverage of the buildings
will ensure the continuity of the streetscape. Building edges
should be brought to the sidewalk with minimal setbacks. In
some areas, such as the pedestrian shopping district, mini-
mum building heights can help create a sense of enclosure
and encourage activity. Architectural scaling elements such
as eves and cornices, material transitions, balconies and
terraces, and window elements can be used to break up the
appearance of taller buildings.
UD Id. Parking is a critical piece of the urban design in
transit oriented development areas. To make transit oriented
development successful, parking must be designed and man-
aged in a way that does not create barriers for pedestrians
or prioritize automobile use over transit. The high cost of
providing parking also impacts development costs and affects
the affordability of housing and commercial space.
Blueprint Denver recommends eliminating or reducing park-
ing minimums or establishing parking maximums in districts
around transit and structured or underground parking to
ensure continuity of the streetscape. Where surface parking
is provided, it should be located behind the buildings -not
between the building entrance and the sidewalk.
Whenever possible, parking should be shared amongst all
users in an area to avoid use-specific parking lots that remain
vacant much of the time. Some cities successfully encour-
age shared parking through in-lieu fees and use parking
districts that collectively manage the parking supply for an
area. Public parking can also be a source of shared parking.
For example, RTD will be providing between 500 and 1,000
parking spaces for the station park-n-Ride. Although RTD
currently has legal restrictions on the use of its parking, in
the future it may be possible to manage RTDs parking sup-
ply in a shared arrangement between the transit patrons and
area businesses and residents.
Unbundling of parking can help ensure housing affordability.
When unbundled parking spaces are sold or rented separately
from the housing unit, those who do not own a car, or own
fewer cars, can save money on housing costs.
On-street parking can calm traffic, provide a buffer between
traffic and pedestrians on the sidewalk, and provide conve-
nient, front door parking for customers of shops and restau-
rants. In order to properly manage the parking supply, the
city may need to use tools including time limits and meters
to ensure parking availability. On some streets with wider
rights-of-ways, angled parking can be used as a strategy to
provide more on-street spaces.
UD le. Historically significant structures should be
incorporated into future redevelopment by drawing design
inspiration from the areas industrial character.
18


41st and Fox Station Area Plan Plan Concept
Character Concept
7. Transit station area 2. Employment and residential 3. Urban living with 4. Integrated 5. Urban residential
open space parking
6. Housing diversity 7. Capture views of Downtown 8. Transition scale into neigh- 9. Variety of building scale 7 0. Reinforce retail
borhood
4istand Fox Urban Design Character Concept
19


41st and Fox Station Area Plan Plan Concept
Recommendation Ml 1: Mobility and Infra-
structure
The plan concept is based on a well connected street grid
with a few new streets on both the eastern and western por-
tions of the station area. A station entrance and bus transfer
area is proposed on both sides of the tracks, connected with
a pedestrian bridge. The station platform will connect to
Fox and Elati streets to the east with a pedestrian plaza along
41st Avenue. Improved north-south pedestrian facilities and
a detached bicycle path along Inca will connect to planned
development and parks. Pedestrian intersection improve-
ments at Navajo will assist in safer north-south pedestrian
connections.
MI la. Pedestrian Bridges
Two new pedestrian bridges are funded and will help connect
the station platform to surrounding neighborhoods. RTD
is funding the construction of a pedestrian bridge over the
railroad tracks at 41st Avenue and Inca Street to connect to
the neighborhoods west of the station. This connection will
replace the existing, dilapidated pedestrian bridge at 43rd Av-
enue. In addition, the city is constructing a pedestrian and
bicycle bridge over the 38th Avenue Viaduct at Inca Street
that will connect the station to the Highland neighborhood,
Cuernavaca Park and Platte River Trail.
MI lb. New Street Connections
A new street connection with pedestrian and bicycle facilities
is proposed across the railroad tracks at either 44th or 46th
Avenue to provide additional connectivity options beyond
the 38th and Fox Street intersection and 44th Avenue con-
nection to Globeville. It is likely only one connection would
be built. A street connection at 46th Avenue would have
many advantages including more direct access to 1-70 via
Pecos Street; reduced traffic impact to residential areas in
Sunnyside; better access to the northern portion of the sta-
tion area; and the viaduct would not cut-off access close to
the station. A 44th Avenue connection would be less desir-
able because of viaduct impacts to the station area and traffic
impacts to the Sunnyside residential areas. However, feasibil-
ity of either connection would require detailed engineering
and cost analysis, an identified source of funding, and coop-
eration from the railroads. Traffic analysis shows that adding
this additional connection when redevelopment of the east
side occurs would improve east-west mobility and the level of
service at the 38th and Fox intersection.
New local streets to provide a well connected grid are pro-
posed to coincide with new development in the areas north
of 44th Avenue on both sides of the tracks. In addition, the
north-south alignment of the street grid would be restored
with new development in the areas east of Delaware Street.
The Millenium Bridge in the Platte Valley connects neighborhoods
over freight rail tracks
New local streets to provide a well connected grid are proposed to coin-
cide with new development on large sites such as the former Denver Post
Property
20


41st and Fox Station Area Plan Plan Concept
Circulation Plan

Note: It is likely that only one of the
connections shown, either 44th or
46th Avenue, would be constructed
pending further study.
GLOBEVILLE
NEIGHBORHOOD
Pedestrian Shopping District (2-8 stories)
| Pedestrian Shopping District (2-5 stories)
Mixed-Use Office/Residential (3-20 stories)
Urban Residential (2-12 stories)
Urban Residential (2-8 stories)
Urban Residential (1-3 stories)
Single Family / Single Family Duplex
Proposed Open Space/Parks/Plaza
Mobility and Infrastructure Plan
Proposed Ped. Bridge /Potential Future Vehicular Access
Transit Platform and Pedestrian Bridge
Pedestrian Shopping District Improvements
Priority Street for Pedestrian/Bike Improvements
Off-Street Multi-Use Path
Existing Bus Routes
Intersection Improvements
^ Pedestrian Connection Improvements
Funded New Pedestrian/Bike Bridge over 38th Ave. I I Historically Significant Buildings
V77\ Pedestrian Plaza | | Navajo District
| Q | Future RTD Structured Parking
iiiiiiiii FasTracks Gold Line
W* Existing Park
_____j 38th Avenue Improvements
Ilf
DlHVll
PlaceMaking Group
21


41st and Fox Station Area Plan Plan Concept
MI lc. Intersection Improvements
Intersection improvements at 38th and Fox may be neces-
sary as redevelopment occurs on the east side of the tracks. In
addition, improvements to the intersection of 38th Avenue
and Navajo Street will be necessary to improve the pedestrian
environment at this important activity center. Improvements
might include enhanced crosswalk treatments, curb bulb outs
and ramps, and median pedestrian refuges.
MI Id. Priority Streets for Pedestrian and Bicycle Im-
provements, Pedestrian Shopping District Improvements
and Bicycle Facilities
Fox Street, Elati Sreet, Inca Street, Navajo Street, 38th
Avenue, 41st Avenue, 44th Avenue and 46th Avenue and
portions of other streets have been identified as priorities
for pedestrian improvements. Most important will be the
improvements to the pedestrian shopping district areas along
Fox Street.
Along 41st Avenue, a pedestrian plaza will connect the sta-
tion platform to Fox Street and Elati Street to the east. This
pedestrian plaza should include decorative pavers or pave-
ment, benches, trees and planters, pedestrian-scale lighting,
outdoor seating, and room for street carts and vendors.
Angled, on-street parking may also be desirable in the plaza
area.
Sidewalk widths will vary by street type but should meet the
minimum requirements of Denvers Pedestrian Master Plan.
In the pedestrian shopping corridors and along arterial streets
there should be a minimum of a 16 pedestrian zone that
Potential Fox Street cross section
76-80' ROW'
Potential Inca Street cross section
Crosswalk treatments can help make intersections more pedestrian Potential cross section for bicycle and pedestrian improvements that
friendly could be applied to priority streets in the station area where feasible
22


41st and Fox Station Area Plan Plan Concept
includes sidewalks, street trees in grates, improved bus stops,
and enough room for sidewalk uses, outdoor seating, street
carts and vendors. All other streets should have a minimum
13 pedestrian zone that includes a tree lawn and detached
sidewalk.
considered. If a T-alley is used, it must be designed with
proper turning radii on internal corners for trash and delivery
vehicles.
MI If. Travel Demand Management
On-street parking should be provided on all streets in the
station area with sufficient right-of-way as a way to calm
traffic, provide a buffer between traffic and pedestrians on
the sidewalk, and provide convenient, front door parking for
customers of shops and restaurants. On some streets with
wider rights-of-ways, angled parking could be used as a strat-
egy to provide more on-street spaces if additional street cross
sections are developed.
Outside of the pedestrian shopping districts, bicycle facilities
should be provided on the streets identified for bicycle and
pedestrian improvements. Where right-of-way is sufficient,
bicycle lanes should be provided. These streets include Elati
Street and 41st, 44th, and 46th avenues. These streets should
incorporate sustainable street design elements such as storm
water treatment features in the tree-lawn. Along Inca Street
a detached, multi-use bicycle path is proposed paralleling the
railroad tracks and connecting to the pedestrian and bicycle
bridge over 38th Avenue. This path would connect to the
City of Cuernavaca Park via an improved underpass of 1-25.
For 38th Avenue, additional analysis will be necessary as part
of Denvers Living Streets Initiative to determine options and
trade-offs within the existing right-of-way for multi-modal
improvements such as wider sidewalks, on-street parking,
transit-only lanes, or planted medians. Living Streets will
recommend solutions to provide a more sustainable transpor-
tation balance than relying soley on private automobiles and
integrate the land use and form of adjacent development to
acheive great destinations for people.
MI le. Alleys
Alleys are important to the proper functioning of the trans-
portation system and land uses. Alleys should generally be
required within all blocks in both residential and commer-
cial areas to allow for loading functions, trash pick-up, and
vehicle and utility access. Alleys must be a minimum of
16-feet wide to meet Denver Public Works access standards.
The preferred configuration for alleys is a mid-block straight
alley. However, in certain cases where alleys would otherwise
connect to arterial streets, a T alley configuration may be
Travel demand management is a key tool in making the
existing transportation infrastructure more effective by reduc-
ing the demand for single-occupancy vehicle trips. Travel
demand management is focused on promoting capooling,
vanpooling, transit use, bicycling, walking, teleworking and
off-peak travel options over driving alone. The Denver Re-
gional Council of Governments (DRCOG) currently offers a
variety of services through its RideArrangers program to pro-
mote travel demand management on a regional level includ-
ing a carpool-matching database, vanpool program, telework
programs, regional campaigns such as Bike-to-Work Day, and
employer-based promotion of alternative travel options.
In addition, area-based transportation management orga-
nizations (TMOs) and associations (TMAs) are non-profit
partnerships that support and promote travel demand man-
agement programs. Three TMOs currently operate within
the City and County of Denver but there is not currently
aTMO for the area surrounding the 41st and Fox Station.
Given the limited roadway capacity in the station area and
the need to promote transit use and alternative modes of
travel, it is recommended that the city partner with area
property owners and businesses to form a TMO for North-
west Denver that would include the 41st and Fox Station
Area. In the interim, the city could partner with DRCOG
RideArrangers to promote TDM programs to area businesses
and residents.
Alleys should generally be required within all blocks in both residential
and commercial areas to allow for loading functions, trash pick-up, and
vehicle and utility access
23


41st and Fox Station Area Plan Plan Concept

24


41st and Fox Station Area Plan Plan Concept
Economic Opportunity
The Denver FasTracks transit initiative brings the Denver re-
gion an unprecedented opportunity to promote and facilitate
transit-oriented, higher-density, mixed-use residential and
commercial development. Recognizing this opportunity, the
City and County of Denver has taken a proactive approach
toward refocusing growth into neighborhoods and districts
near existing and future transit stations.
To identify, leverage, and maximize these opportunities, the
city retained a project team to conduct a TOD Economic
Analysis and Market Study. The primary goal of the TOD Eco-
nomic Analysis and Market Study was to provide the city with
an assessment of transit oriented development potential at
the regional, corridor, and station area levels through analysis
of short- and long-term demand.
Conducted in coordination with station area planning ef-
forts, the market study is meant to better align station area
plans with market realities and dynamics. The overall objec-
tives of the TOD Economic Analysis and Market Study includ-
ed forging a better understanding of the economic context
in which the city may plan for transit oriented development,
and specific recommendations regarding the amount, type,
mix, and intensity of uses appropriate for selected station
areas.
Transit Induced Economic Growth
Based on survey results and national experience, the TOD
Economic Analysis and Market Study estimated that the
Denver region could see a modest level of growth induced by
The Denver FasTracks transit initiative brings the Denver region an
ty, mixed-use residential and commercial development
transit between 2015 to 2030. It is during this time period
that the FasTracks system will be a complete system serving
the Denver region, and will place the region in a better com-
petitive position to attract new growth compared to other
regions without full transit systems. The study also examined
how transit would affect where growth would occur within
the region, noting that transit areas could potentially attract a
significant portion of regional growth.
The TOD Economic Analysis and Market Study estimated that
there will be an additional 2 percent growth in population
and employment above what would normally have occurred
from 2015 to 2030 because of the transit system and that 40
percent of this growth could be captured within the Vi mile
walksheds surrounding transit stations. Research examined in
the TOD Economic Analysis and Market Study has suggested
that transit station areas may capture relatively more regional
growth when located in regions that are fast-growing, are
experiencing growth of households likely to be interested
in living near transit, have experienced demand for higher-
intensity development, and benefit from public policies that
support transit oriented development.
Further detail on these growth assumptions can be found in
the City and County of Denvers transit oriented develop-
ment market study report, Regional Demand Analysis & TOD
Market Analysis.
Existing Market Conditions
The 41st and Fox Station Area is situated in close proximity
to Downtown Denver and established residential neighbor-
hoods. The station area has exhibited recent development in-
transit-oriented, hlgher-densT
25


41st and Fox Station Area Plan Plan Concept
terest following conversion of a former hotel space to student
housing. The area features residential neighborhoods, retail
uses congregated along 38th Avenue, and industrial uses east
and west of the station.
The built environment surrounding the 41st and Fox Sta-
tion includes a mix of industrial, residential, retail, and office
space. Retail buildings are older, with most constructed prior
to 1988, but exhibit high occupancy. The real estate commu-
nity has taken interest in retail expansion in the area and the
Railyard Marketplace project includes 28,000 square feet of
retail space. Current uses in the area include the following:
A variety of industrial uses parallel to the rail line
Residential including small single family homes, DHA
public housing, and recently built student housing
Older retail building stock clustered along 38th Avenue
Office, including older class C and B office buildings
located along 38th Avenue
Modest retail investment occurring, including the Railyard
Marketplace
Community services including a police station, public
school, family health center, and recreation center
The area currently has a larger household size, lower house-
hold income, and higher unemployment rate compared to
the city and region. Zoning is mostly industrial on the east
side of the station. On the west side of the station, there is a
mix of industrial, residential and mixed-use zoning.
Future Market Demand
At the time the market study was conducted in 2007, the
41st and Fox Station was planned for a location approximate-
ly two blocks to the south near 38th Avenue in the center
of the railroad right-of-way. In addition, market analysis
assumed a lower-intensity Urban Neighborhood typology
based on the Transit Oriented Development Strategic Plan,
rather than the higher-intensity Urban Center typology de-
veloped through the station area planning process. Finally, it
is important to note that national economic conditions have
changed significantly since the market study was conducted.
The nation, state and local economies have witnessed a reces-
sion since the summer of 2008 with a collapse in housing
prices, retail sales, and new construction.
Flowever, the opportunities and constraints of the station
area have remained the same and the market analysis still
provides useful information on the long-term development
potential of the station area. Further detail on the market
analysis can be found in the City and County of Denvers
transit oriented development market study report, TOD Op-
portunities & Constraints.
The 41st and Fox Station Area exhibits many strengths rela-
tive to other station areas. Several projects recently com-
pleted, under construction, or proposed have already begun
to create a mixed-use, mixed-income, mixed-age community
26


41st and Fox Station Area Plan Plan Concept
with new residential units oriented to students and those
seeking affordable housing. The area has seen demonstrated
developer interest through projects such as the Regency Stu-
dent Housing, Railyard Marketplace, and Renaissance River
Lofts. The proximity to Downtown, Auraria Higher Educa-
tion Center, and Denver Union Station enhances the station
areas redevelopment potential. Several property owners own
multiple properties, providing opportunities for assemblage
and redevelopment. Of note is the 45 acre parcel in the
northeast portion of the station area, the site of the former
Denver Post printing and distribution facility.
Some of the economic opportunities of this station include
strong potential for mixed-income housing and neighbor-
hood revitalization, neighborhood-oriented retail and services
and redevelopment of former industrial sites.
The market study identified redevelopment scenarios for
net new development in the station area based on market
conditions and trends. The first two scenarios, Modest and
Moderate, call for 1.1 to 1.6 million square feet of devel-
opment. Further redevelopment of vacant or underutilized
parcels could yield an estimated 4.3 million square feet of
development under current zoning.
Recommendation ED 1: Economic Develop-
ment Strategies
The realization of transit oriented development will require a
combination of private and public sector support including
involvement at the local, regional, and state levels. Given the
potential demand for housing, retail, and office space in ad-
vance of the introduction of transit service, it is necessary for
local municipalities, RTD, and the development community
to work in partnership to stimulate transit-supportive devel-
opment and discourage uses that would be less supportive.
The TOD Station Area Strategies, Implementation and Phasing
Toolbox and Matrix identified a variety of implementation
and phasing strategies that the City and County of Denver,
other local jurisdictions, RTD, and the development com-
munity can implement to ensure successful transit oriented
development within existing and future transit corridors.
Several of the transit oriented development implementation
tools can be used to encourage the appropriate phasing of
development both prior to and following the opening of the
transit line. These include the the following recommenda-
tions:
ED la. Interim uses. In situations in which the operation of
transit is years away, it may be beneficial for station areas to
develop uses that generate income but are removable in the
future (e.g. have a short lifespan). Mobile and seasonal mar-
kets (both open air and enclosed) may be accommodated on
such lots. However, the future value of redevelopment must
provide incentive for these uses to be removed over time.
ED lb. Zoning incentives for transit oriented develop-
ment. Implement new zone districts with TOD supportive
attributes, including those for the interim period and the
transit operation period. These zones typically allow for
increased densities and reductions in required parking, enable
mixed-use development, and prohibit uses that would not
be transit supportive. Innovative parking standards include
parking maximums, no requirement for parking, and unbun-
dling of parking and development.
ED lc. Infrastructure improvements, special assessments
and tax incentives. As a pre-development phase, public enti-
ties working alone or in partnership with developers may un-
dertake infrastructure improvement projects such as parking
facilities, parks, streetscapes, pedestrian and bicycle enhance-
ments, road reconstruction and extension, park beautification
and signage. The purpose of such projects is to set the stage
for and encourage transit-supportive development. These
activities can also provide early marketing of the station areas
identity to future prospective residents, employees and visi-
tors. To fund infrastructure investments, a special assessment
district may be formed (either through a charter district or
statutory district in Denvers case) in the pre-development
phase. Also tax incentive programs such as tax increment
financing, or tax abatements, may be used to bolster develop-
ers resources for funding infrastructure.
ED Id. Joint development, revenue sharing and cost shar-
ing. In station areas where joint development is an option,
the landowner (often the transit authority) can enter into
revenue or cost sharing arrangements with the private sector
in order to either secure a source of revenue for improve-
ments or divide the cost of infrastructure construction and
maintenance. Types of revenue sharing arrangements include
land leases, air rights development, and special assessment
districts. Cost sharing arrangements can include sharing of
construction expenses and density bonuses offered in ex-
change for infrastructure construction.
27


41st and Fox Station Area Plan Plan Concept
ED le. Affordable housing incentives and regulations.
The regions large, public investment in transit provides an
opportunity to ensure that housing affordability and trans-
portation access goals are addressed. Growing the supply
of housing and the diversity of housing types in the station
area ensures that there will be adequate housing available for
individuals and families wishing to live near transit. Housing
affordability is also enhanced by the potential transportation
cost savings for households living near transit that can save
money on vehicle ownership costs.
The City of Denver has adopted a policy to increase the sup-
ply of affordable and mixed income housing in close proxim-
ity to transit stations. Recent recommendations by the City
of Denver affordable housing task force include locating 50
percent of new city-subsidized housing for low and moderate
income households in bus and rail transit corridors.
Recommendations include increasing the supply and variety
of for sale and rental housing, seeking funding partnerships
to facilitate affordable housing within the station area, elimi-
nating regulatory barriers to affordable housing, and follow-
ing the affordable and mixed income housing recommenda-
tions in the TOD Strategic Plan.
The City and County of Denver presently offers a broad
array of programs that could be used to support transit-
supportive development. Some of the tools appropriate for
the 41st and Fox Station are included in the implementation
chapter of this plan.
Development Program Total Estimate
Residential square feet 7,576,000
Retail square feet 185,500
Office square feet 2,660,000
Housing units 6,310
Population 13,100
Employment 9,000
The numbers represent a substantial increase over the TOD Economic
Analysis and Market Study projections due to the shift in station loca-
tion and typology for the eastern portion of the station area. Numbers
represent total, gross development in the i/2 mile station area including
existing and future land use.
ED If. Capture partnership benefits between industry
and academic institutions. Encourage ties between area
businesses, academic institutions, and student populations
to foster research industries as well as entrepreneurial and
incubator employment uses in the station area. Build off of
the partnerships already created between Regency Student
Housing and the Auraria Campus.
41 st and Fox Station Area Development Summary
The development program presented in the table below rep-
resents a substantial increase over the TOD Economic Analysis
and Market Study projections due to the shift in station loca-
tion and typology for the eastern portion of the station area.
The numbers shown represent a transit oriented develop-
ment scale similar to the Urban Center typology that was
developed through the public involvement process. Given
the number of acres within the station area (excluding public
right-of-way, utilities and parks), the devlopment program
equates to an average floor-to-area ratio of approximately 1
for all parcels. This is well within the 0.5 to 4 floor to area
ratio for transit oriented development areas outlined in
Blueprint Denver. However, there would be significant varia-
tion within the station area with much denser development
on the eastern portion than the western portion. The land
use mix is also similar to what is recommended for an Urban
Center and includes the necessary mix of residential, employ-
ment, and retail critical to creating a walkable environment.
The actual amount of development may be more or less than
shown below. Future development projections assume an av-
erage unit size of approximately 1,200 square feet, an average
household size of approximately 2.2, an average of approxi-
mately 300 square feet for each employee and a vacancy rate
of 5-7 percent for residential and commercial properties.
28


41st and Fox Station Area Plan Implementation and Next Steps
29


41st and Fox Station Area Plan Implementation and Next Steps
Implementation and Next Steps
Transforming Denvers transit stations into vital, dynamic
transit oriented development areas will not happen over
night. The market, planning, infrastructure, community
and political readiness around each of Denvers existing and
future FasTracks stations will vary considerably Understand-
ing that not all stations will be ripe for attention at any one
time is an important consideration when implementing a
city-wide strategy
The implementation recommendations for the 41st and Fox
Station Area will create the transit oriented development
envisioned in this plan. The implementation plan covers a
series of actions:
Specific recommendations
Strategies for implementation
Implementation timing
Responsible entity
To aid the City and County of Denver and its partners in
completing an assessment of the station area, each station
should be evaluated in relation to how it measures against the
following transit oriented development success factors:
Implementation Continuum: Transit oriented development
at stations requires a series of actions ranging from initial
planning, to making targeted investments, to putting the full
range of necessary tools and leadership in place.
Cost Benefit Payback: It is important to target the limited
funds available for public investment in infrastructure and
economic development to transit areas, and, in particular,
those transit areas where public investment can leverage the
most private investment and create successful examples of
transit oriented development.
Development Ready: Before private investment can occur,
it is important to ensure that all necessary steps have been
taken to make the station area development ready. This in-
cludes regulations, zoning, entitlements, basic infrastructure,
and incentives.
Current Trends: Transit oriented development will depend
on the real estate market dynamics of the station area.
Developer Interest in Transit Oriented Development: Dem-
onstrated developer interest is a critical component of transit
oriented development. The city should use the planning pro-
cess to create interest in the station area and highlight transit
oriented development activities that may already be occurring.
Ability to Nudge: Nudging development at a station re-
quires a series of factors supportive of transit oriented develop-
ment to be in place. The public sector should be playing an
active role in moving private activities forward.
Cataylitic projects include:
Completion of the RTD pedestrian bridge at 41st Avenue,
the city funded bicycle and pedestrian bridge over 38th
Avenue, and the 38th Avenue viaduct improvements
Completion of the Gold Line and Northwest Rail corridor
projects by RTD
Rezoning to new zone districts with TOD supportive at-
tributes
Infrastructure improvements to Fox Street including side-
walks, bicycle lanes and street improvements
Leadership in Place: A lesson learned repeatedly is that strong
public and private leadership is necessary to make transit ori-
ented development successful. Often this will require not only
strong policy direction, but also vision and risk taking both by
elected officials and private developers.
Recommendations and Implementation Strategies
The specific recommendations for implementing the 41st and
Fox plan are divided into three categories: regulatory tools,
infrastructure tools, and partnership tools.
Specific recommendations in each of these categories are
presented in the tables on the following pages. Each table
contains details on the implementation strategy, timeframe,
and responsible parties.
Timeframes identified include short, medium, and long. In
general, short refers to actions between plan adoption and
opening of the transit station (approximately 2015). Me-
dium timeframe are those actions that should occur between
2015 and the planning horizon of 2030. Long timeframe
are those actions that will likely occur further out than 2030.
30


41st and Fox Station Area Plan Implementation and Next Steps
Regulatory Tools
Recommendations Implementation Strategy Timeframe Key Responsibility
LU 1: UD 1; ED la, 1b, 1e: New zone districts with TOD supportive attributes New zoning should allow for increased densities and reductions in parking, enable mixed-use development, and prohibit new uses that would not be transit supportive. New zoning should generally conform to the recommendations of the land use and urban design plan concept. While some properties will be rezoned upon adoption of Denver's New Zoning Code other properties may be rezoned through later legislative rezonings or as property owners apply or following the completion of a General Development Plan. Short to Medium Department of Community Planning and Development
UD 2d: On-street parking and area based management of parking Promote parallel or angled parking on streets to calm traffic, provide a buffer between traffic and pedestrians on the sidewalk, and provide convenient, front door parking for customers of shops and restaurants. In order to properly manage the parking supply, the city will need to conduct an area-based parking management plan to examine tools including time limits and meters to manage on-street spaces and ensure parking availability in the station area. Short to Medium Department of Public Works
UD 2d: Parking design regulations Use structured or underground parking to ensure continuity of the streetscape. Structures should be wrapped with active uses. Where surface parking is provided, it should be located behind the buildings -not between the building entrance and sidewalk. Short Department of Community Planning and Development
LU 1; UD 1; Mil: General development plans (GDPs) for large redevelopments GDPs provide a tool for large, often phased developments that benefit from coordinated plans rather than traditional site plans. This will bean especially useful tool for the eastern portion of the station area. Short to Medium Departments of Community Planning and Development, Public Works, and Parks
LU 1; UD 1; ED 1: Support green building practices, such as LEED certification for new development in transit oriented development areas Meet goals of Greenprint Denver and longterm economic development by creating new regulatory incentives to support green"construction of new buildings in station areas. Promote standards of Leadership In Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) for new construction. Short Development Services
LU 1h; UD Id; ED Id: Support legislative changes to allow joint development on RTD owned parking The City and Count of Denver should actively support changing RTD's enabling legislation in the Colorado State Legislature to allow joint residential and commercial transit oriented development with shared parking on land acquired for RTD park-n-Rides. Short to Medium Mayor and City Council
EDIe: Eliminate regulatory barriers to affordable housing Zoning and land use regulations should allow for a variety of housing types and smaller, more affordable housing units including small lot single-family and multi-family housing. This will allow the housing supply to increase in response to housing demand. Parking requirements should be reduced and unbundled for residential development to make housing more affordable for individuals who do not own cars. Short Department of Community Planning and Development
ED 1e: Create an Affordable Housing and Mixed Income Housing Strategy for TOD consistent with the TOD Strategic Plan Recommendations of the TOD Strategic Plan include provision of affordable housing when determining the allocation of public assistance to development projects and revisions to the inclusionary housing ordinance. Short Office of Economic Development, Department of Community Planning and Development, City Council
31


41st and Fox Station Area Plan Implementation and Next Steps
Infrastructure Tools
Recommendations Implementation Strategy Timeframe Key Responsibility
Ml la, Id: Complete funded improvements including RTD pedestrianand bicycle bridge at 41st Avenue, Inca pedestrian and bicycle bridge over 38th Avenue, and 38th Avenue Viaduct improvements Coordinate between city agencies, the community and RTD to ensure funded improvements are completed and designed to fit the goals of this station area plan. Short City and County of Denver, RTD
Ml Id:Study 38th Avenue pedestrian and transit improvements following policies of Denver's Living Streets Initiative Examine 38th Avenue right-of-way for inclusion of multi-modal improvements such as wider sidewalks, on-street parking, transit-only lanes and planted medians following the recommendations of Denver's Living Streets Initiative. Living Streets are designed to acheive a more sustainable transportation balance, maximize the efficiency of a corridor's person- trip capacity (compared to auto-trip capacity), and integrate the use and form of adjacent development to create great destinations. Short to Medium City and County of Denver
LU 1i: Develop an urban open space system with variety of parks and public spaces on east side of railroad tracks Develop parks and public spaces in the eastern portion of the station area in response to the conversion of industrial uses to higher density residential. Funding for new parks could come through public purchase of property through bond funds, or through consolidation of required private open space through the GDP process. Short to Long Parks and Recreation Department, private developers
Ml Id: Pedestrian and bicycle i m provement s to 41 st, 44t h, and 46th Avenues, and Elati and Navajo Streets Bicycle lanes should be provided on the streets identified for bicycle and pedestrian improvements. These streets would include Elati Street and 41st, 44th, and 46th Avenues. Along Inca Street a detached multi-use path is proposed paralleling the railroad tracks and connecting to the pedestrian and bicycle bridge over 38th Avenue. These streets should incorporate sustainable street design elements such as storm water treatment features in the tree-lawn. The 44th Avenue bridge over 1-25 should undergo aesthetic improvements including better lighting, fencing and bicycle lane markings in the shoulder. Short to Long Department of Public Works, private developers
Ml 1 e: Promote alley access and develop alleys in blocks in conjunction with redevelopment Alleys are important to the proper functioning of the transportation system and land uses. Alleys should generally be required within blocks in both residential and commercial areas to allow for loading functions, trash pick-up, and vehicle and utility access. Short to Long Department of Public Works, private developers
Ml 1 b: New street grid between 44th and 1-70; between the railroad tracks and Delaware St. New streets should follow local street standards that have a minimum of a 13' pedestrian zone that includes a tree lawn and detached sidewalk Short to Long Department of Public Works, private developers
Ml 1b: Vacate 31st Street; new street connection of 41st Ave. and Delaware Streets The block between Elati and Delaware Streets between 41 st and 42nd Avenue should be developed on the north-south grid and the right-of way for 31st Street should be vacated. Short to Long Department of Public Works, private developers
Ml 1 b: New street connection along east side of railroad tracks at approximately Galapago Street between 40th and 44th avenues. A new street paralleling the east side of the railroad tacks at approximately Galapego Street between 40th and 44th Avenues will be necessary to provide circulation through the station area.This street should be constructed in segments in conjunction with new development. RTD will be responsible for the street adjacent to the station and the City and private developers will be responsible for other portions. Short to Long Department of Public Works, private developers, RTD
Ml Id: Inca Street Improvements between 36th and 46th Avenues Improvements should include an 18'pedestrian zone on the west side of the street that includes sidewalks, pedestrian-scale lighting, street trees, improved bus stops and a 12' detached bicycle path on the east side of Inca. Medium Department of Public Works, private developers
Ml Id: Fox Street improvements between 38th and 45th Avenues Improvements should generally follow the cross section shown in the plan. There should be a 20'pedestrian zone that includes sidewalks, pedestrian-scale lighting, street trees in grates, improved bus stops, and enough room for sidewalk uses, outdoor seating, street carts and vendors. The street should include on-street parking. Medium Department of Public Works, private developers
Ml Id: Improvements to the bicycle/pedestrian underpass of 1-25 to City of Cuernavca Park Improvements should include improved lighting, aesthetic treatments and maintenance Short to Medium Department of Public Works, Colorado Department of Transportation
32


41st and Fox Station Area Plan Implementation and Next Steps
Infrastructure Tools (continued)
Recommendations Implementation Strategy Timeframe Key Responsibility
Ml 1c: Intersection improvements to 38th Avenue and Fox Street Improvements to the intersection of 38th Avenue and Fox Street may be necessary to improve traffic flow and the pedestrian environment at this critical intersection. Medium to Long Department of Public Works
Ml 1 b: New street grid between 44th and 46th Avenues; between Inca Street and Lipan Street New streets should follow local street standards that have a minimum of a 13' pedestrian zone that includes a tree lawn and detached sidewalk Medium to Long Department of Public Works, private developers
Ml 1c: Intersection improvements to 38th Avenue and Navajo Street Improvements to the intersection of 38th Avenue and Navajo Street will be necessary to improve the pedestrian environment at this important activity center. Improvements could include improved crosswalk treatments, curb bulb outs and ramps, and median pedestrian refuges pending additional engineering analysis. Medium to Long Department of Public Works
Ml Id: 41st Avenue Plaza between station and Elati Street Along 41st Street, construct a pedestrian plaza connecting the station platform to Fox Street and Elati Street to the east. This pedestrian plaza should include decorative pavers or pavement, benches, trees and planters, pedestrian-scale lighting, outdoor seating, street carts, and vendors. Access for angled, on-street parking may also be necessary. Medium to Long Department of Public Works, private developers, RTD
Ml 1 b: New street connection over or under the railroad tracks at 46th or 44th Avenue A new street connection or pedestrian bridge is proposed across the railroad tracks at either 44th or 46th Avenue. It is likely only one connection would be built. A street connection at 46th Avenue would have many advantages including more direct access to 1-70 via Pecos Street; reduced traffic impact to residential areas in Sunnyside; better access to the northern portion of the station area; and not impacting areas close to the station with a viaduct. A 44th Avenue connection would be less desirable because of impacts to the station area from a viaduct and traffic impacts to the Sunnyside residential areas. Flowever, feasibility of either connection would require detailed engineering and cost analysis, an identified source of funding, and cooperation from the railroads. Long Department of Public Works, Union Pacific Railroad, Colorado Department of Transportation
Partnership Tools
Recommendations Implementation Strategy Timeframe Key Responsibility
UD2d; ED 1b,1c,1e: Explore shared parking solutions through an area based management plan process that could potentially include in lieu fees or the creation of a parking district to address shared parking in the station area if these mechanisms are developed Through an area based management plan process, analyze parking problems and solutions comprehensively to promote shared parking arrangements where possible. Mechanisms to explore include districts. In other cities, these districts set up a management entity and process through which new developments have the option of paying into a fund rather than constructing parking (payment in lieu of parking). The parking fee is often structured to be less than the actual cost of providing a parking space to offer the developer an incentive for choosing the district option. The management entity is then in charge of constructing and operating pooled parking for the entire district, and may also manage other programs, such as arrangements with shared car service providers. Short to Long City and County of Denver, private property owners
LU 1i; UD2a, 2d; Ml 1b, 1d;1f; ED 1 a, 1c, Id: Special tax assessment districts for infrastructure funding and maintenance Promote legislated districts to fund infrastructure improvements associated with development. The City and County of Denver offers two types of special assessment districts than may be used: charter districts and statutory districts. Charter districts are public improvement districts and local maintenance districts created and operated by the City and County for the construction and maintenance of public improvements, and are funded by annual assessments. Statutory districts are independent districts with the ability to separately tax, assess and impose fees (examples include Business Improvement Districts). Upon formation of a district, a variety of mechanisms to fund streetscape improvements should be explored. Short to Long City and County of Denver, private property owners
LU 1i: Passive, naturalized landscaped areas along 1-25 to improve water quality and provide a scenic buffer The City and County of Denver should work in partnership with CDOT to improve the landscaping and maintenance along 1-25, including the land between 38th Avenue and 1-25 and the Park Avenue Interchange, to provide passive open space and water quality benefits. Short to Long City and County of Denver, Colorado Department of Transportation
33


41st and Fox Station Area Plan Implementation and Next Steps
Partnership Tools (continued)
Recommendations Implementation Strategy Timeframe Key Responsibility
LU la, 1b; UD la; Ml 1b, 1c; ED 1 c: Pursue tax increment financing to pay for infrastructure improvements to pedestrian shopping district at 41st Avenue and Fox Street The Denver Urban Renewal Authority can use tax increment financing (TIF) as a method of financing redevelopment (specifically improvements offering a public benefit, such as site acquisition and/or clearance, streets, utilities, parks, parking, and removal of hazardous materials). Generally speaking, TIF works best in Denver on projects with a large retail component that can generate retail sales tax revenues to support the redevelopment effort; a determination of blight is also required. Short to Long Denver Urban Renewal Authority, private property owners
Ml la, 1c, Id: Pursue infrastructure funding through DRCOG TIP especially CMAQ funds The Denver Regional Council of Governments allocates funding for transportation improvements within the region such as roadway reconstruction, bicyde/pedestrian enhancements, and other enhancement projects through ^Transportation Improvement Program (TIP). DRCOG uses a number of criteria to determine how funding is allocated. In addition to such criteria as safety, cost-effectiveness, connectivity and usage, DRCOG could consider elevating projects that support mixed-use, transit-supportive development as a top policy objective and criteria for selection. Short to Long City and County of Denver, DRCOG
UD 1e: Partner with private property owners to preserve or incorporate historic structures Work with private property owners on adaptive reuse of historic structures or incorporation of design elements into new development. Short to Long Denver Landmark Preservation, State Historic Preservation Office, private land owners
LU 1 h, UD 1 dMI la:Continue coordination with RTD on Gold Line Final Design The city should continue its coordination with RTD and members of the community to ensure that final design of the Gold Line meets the goals and vision of this station area plan. Work with RTD on limiting future park-n-Ride spaces to the 500 proposed for 2015 in conjunction withfutureTOD if ridership goals can be met through land use changes. Short City and County of Denver, RTD
LU 1; UD 1; Ml Id, If: Identify scope of work and fund ing for a health impact assessment Use the recommendations of the station area plan to develop targets for tracking health indicators related to land use and transportation planning including safe pedestrian routes, reduction of vehicle miles traveled and automobile emissions, and access to recreation and health facilities. Short Denver Department of Environmental Health, State Department of Health, Denver Housing Authority
Ml If: Given the limited roadway capacity in the station area, use travel demand management to reduce the demand for single- occupancy vehicle trips through capooling, vanpooling, transit use, bicycling, walking, teleworking and off-peak travel. Partner with area property owners and businesses to form a TMO for Northwest Denver that would include the 41 st and Fox Station Area. In the interim, the City could partner with DRCOG RideArrangersto promote TDM programs to area businesses and residents. Short to Long City and County of Denver, Area Businesses and Residents, DRCOG
ED 1e: Seek funding partnerships to facilitate affordable housing within the station area Use the recently established TOD Fund to strategically invest in properties in order to preserve and expand the amount of affordable housing at transit stations. Promote the use of Community Block Grant, FIOME, Multi-family Revenue Bond allocations and Low Income Housing Tax Credits for affordble housing projects in close proximity to transit. Short to Long Community Planning and Development Department, Office of Economic Development, non-profits, private developers
LU 1h; UD Id; ED Id: Joint development guidelines and memoranda of understanding for RTD park-n-Ride Joint development guidelines provide a frameworkfor transit authorities to enter partnerships with private developers to redevelop authority-owned land. Memoranda of understanding can be used to stipulate terms of joint development agreements, shared parking arrangements, or agreements between local municipalities and developers. Medium to Long City and County of Denver, RTD
34


41st and Fox Station Area Plan Supporting Documention
35


41st and Fox Station Area Plan Supporting Documention
The Community
Location and Overview
The 41st and Fox Station will be situated in the Globeville
neighborhood at the edge of two other Denver neighbor-
hoods: Sunnyside and Highland. The Sunnyside neigh-
borhood composes the west half of the station area and is
separated from Globeville by the UP and BNSF railroad
tracks. Globeville and Sunnyside are two of the oldest neigh-
borhoods in Denver, and benefit from the close proximity to
the Downtown core. Globeville has its roots in the smelting
industry, and continues to be dominated by industrial uses
today. Sunnyside is primarily single-family residential with
some industrial uses along the eastern boundary. Due to the
predominance of industrial uses in both neighborhoods, a co-
hesive network of infrastructure including streets, sidewalks,
landscaping/trees and utilities does not exist. Furthermore,
both neighborhoods lack sufficient community services such
as grocery stores, and the income levels are lower as com-
pared to other neighborhoods in the city. The community
has a strong sense of cultural identity and high rate of home
ownership.
The station area includes many barriers such as the railroad
tracks, 1-70, 1-25 and 38th Avenue. These major roadways, as
well as the railroad, separate the station platform from nearby
neighborhoods. Therefore, strengthening access points to the
station for vehicles, bicyclists and pedestrians will be an im-
portant factor in encouraging and sustaining private develop-
ment. Primary access to the station is planned via Fox Street,
a north-south street that extends from 38th Avenue to the
former Denver Post property. The Denver Post site is vacant
and the 44-acre grounds are under private ownership. Other
access points include 44th Avenue from the east across 1-25
and the existing pedestrian bridge across the railroad tracks at
43rd Avenue.
Schools
The Sunnyside neighborhood has three schools in proxim-
ity to the station area: the Horace Mann Middle School,
Smedley Elementary School and Garden Place Elementary.
Horace Mann is located on 41st between Lipan and Maripo-
sa Streets. The school has 210 students and is at 33% capac-
ity. Smedley Elementary is outside of the Vi mile boundary at
42nd and Shoshone and was recently closed by Denver Pub-
lic Schools. The Garden Place Elementary School is located
east of 1-25 in Globeville. The current student population is
386 and is just under 60 percent capacity (Source: The Piton
Foundation). The school structures add to the neighborhood
character and play a positive role in the community.
Parks and Open Space
Four neighborhood parks are within the station area all are
west of the railroad tracks. Columbus, Ciancio and Aztlan
Parks are within Sunnyside. Franco Park is located in the
Highland neighborhood at 37th Avenue and Lipan Street.
The area east of the station is industrial in nature and does
not have parks.
Columbus Park: This 3-acre park is located on the north
side of 38th at Osage Street and contains a shelter, toilets,
group facilities, playground and open fields.
Ciancio Park: Ciancio Park is located at 4lst Avenue and Li-
pan Street, adjacent to Horace Mann School. It is a five acre
neighborhood park that contains three baseball/softball fields
and a junior football field. Except for a few picnic tables that
the public can use, it primarily exists to provide recreation
space for the school and city softball teams. The entire perim-
eter of the park is fenced which may suggest school owner-
ship or private property.
Aztlan Park: Aztlan Park is located near the Quigg-Newton
Homes at 44th Avenue and Navajo Street. The park has a
playground, picnic tables, outdoor pool, basketball court and
softball field. The Aztlan Recreation Center is located on-site.
The park is approximately 3.6 acres.
Franco Park: Franco Park is a small 1/2 acre park located at
37th Avenue and Lipan Street. The park has a playground,
picnic tables and basketball court.
Housing
The Globeville, Sunnyside and Highland neighborhoods
have an affordable housing stock composed of single-family
homes with some duplexes and apartments. The single-
family housing stock is fairly well maintained, but could use
improvement. The average household income and percentage
home ownership in each neighborhood is shown in the table
below. While the home prices remain affordable to existing
residents, the presence of the station may increase property
values and the overall desirability of the area. This will create
a need for new development to provide housing types for
diverse income levels.
36


41st and Fox Station Area Plan Supporting Documention
Station Area
4 7 stand Fox Station Area Location
37


41st and Fox Station Area Plan Supporting Documention
Quigg Newton Homes
Quigg Newton Homes, Denvers largest public housing
project, is a HOPE VI affordable housing complex bounded
by 42nd, 46th, Lipan and Navajo (approximately 7 blocks).
There are a number of facilities on site, including a recre-
ation center, senior housing facility, Boys and Girls Club and
employment assistance center. The facility has approximately
380 units and serves a largely Hispanic population (accord-
ing to a recent survey, the population of Quigg Newton is
86 percent Hispanic). Just under a quarter are married, and
there are also more older and childless adults among Quigg
Newton residents: 17 percent are over 62, and 44 percent say
they have no children under 18 living in their household.
Historic Properties
There are no historic districts in the Vi mile study area. The
Gold Line EIS documented resources listed or eligible for list-
ing on the National Register of Historic Places in the vicin-
ity of the rail station. The study found five resources in the
area, including 2 residences on Fox Street, one commercial
building on Inca Street, a set of commercial buildings at 38th
and Fox Street (now Wagner Rents) and the BN Railroad.
According to the Sunnyside Neighborhood Assessment, one
structure has been designated as a local Denver historic struc-
tures for preservation: Horace Mann School at 4130 Navajo
Street. A 1981 historic buildings inventory listed 55 Sunny-
side structures as having potential for designation, primarily
residential.
View Planes
A City and County of Denver view plane originates at
51st Avenue and Zuni Street and extends southeast toward
Downtown. The intent of this view plane is to protect views
toward Downtown Denver. Structures in this area are not to
exceed 5,347 feet. Based on spot elevations, this would allow
buildings as tall as approximately 150 feet within the portion
of the station area that is within the view plane.
Floodplains and Drainage
All portions of the 41st and Fox Station Area west of 1-25
fall outside of the 100 year floodplain. The City and County
of Denver Storm Drainage Master Plan (2005) identifies two
basins in the 41st and Fox Station Area: The Highland Basin
(0061-02) and the Globeville Basin (0059-01). In conjunc-
tion with future development in the station area, analysis of
the storm and sanitary sewer capacity will be required and
should be incorporated into future updates of the Storm
Water Master Plan and Sanitary Sewer Master Plan. Identi-
fied issues and necessary infrastructure improvements can
best be addressed through consolidated improvements as
part of a general development plan process but can also be
addressed through site plan review. Wherever possible, low
impact development and best management practices with
hydrological function landscape, vegetative swale, permeable
(porous) pavement, and green roofs may be incorporated
into development design for stormwater quality control and
aesthetic purpose. In addition, street drainage capacity must
be checked for both minor storm and major storm events as
part of any new roadway construction and street rehabilita-
tion. During the major storm event, stormwater conveyance
within the right-of-way may not exceed 12 inches at the
gutter flowline and must remain in the right-of-way. During
the minor storm event, no curb overtopping is allowable.
Neighborhood Housing Characteristics
Neighb orho o d Average Household Income Percent Home Ownership
Globeville $37,063 63
Sunnyside $43,226 59
Highland $39,568 43
City and County of Denver $55,128 52
Source: Piton Foundation, 2000
38


41st and Fox Station Area Plan Supporting Documention
View Planes
Floodplains
^v.:- 100-year Floodplain
500-year Floodplain
39


41st and Fox Station Area Plan Supporting Documention
Land Use and Zoning
There are currently 11 zone districts in the 41st and Fox
Station Area. The majority of the station area, approximately
69 percent, is currently zoned for industrial uses including
the entire eastern portion of the station area and much of
the western portion of the station area closest to the station.
Only about 4 percent of the 1/2 mile station area is zoned
for commercial mixed-use development, concentrated along
38th Avenue. Approximately 26 percent of the land area is
zoned residential in the form of R-2, R-3 or RMU-30. These
zone districts all allow multi-unit dwellings. No portion of
the station area is zoned exclusively for single-family residen-
tial development. The remainder of the station area is zoned
as PRV or as a PUD.
The current residential land use in the 41st and Fox Station
Area is a mixture of single-family and low-rise multi-family
residential with some higher-density apartment buildings.
Approximately 51 percent of the land area is public or quasi-
public comprising such uses as street right-of-way and pub-
licly owned park or open space. Only 4 percent of the land is
vacant or counts surface parking as an independent use.
Existing Zone Districts
The following are descriptions of the existing zone districts
in the 41st and Fox Station Area. These zone districts will
change in the future with the adoption of the New Code.
Business and Mixed Use Districts
B-l Limited Office District: This district provides office
space for services related to dental and medical care and for
office-type services, often for residents of nearby residential
areas. The district is characterized by a low volume of direct
daily customer contact. This district is characteristically small
in size and is situated near major hospitals or between large
business areas and residential areas. The district regulations
establish standards comparable to those of the low density
residential districts, resulting in similar building bulk and
retaining the low concentration of pedestrian and vehicular
traffic. Building height is controlled by bulk standards and
open space requirements. Building floor cannot exceed the
site area.
B-2 Neighborhood Business District: This district provides
for the retailing of commodities classified as convenience
goods and the furnishing of certain personal services to
The station area contains a mix of residential and industrial areas
40


41st and Fox Station Area Plan Supporting Documention
Existing Land Use
Single-Family l I Multi-Family Low Rise l I Multi-Family High Rise Park-Open Space
Retail l | Commercial Industrial Public/Quasi-Public l I Vacant
Transportation, Communication, Utility I I ROW/Road
Office
Parking: Surface or Structure
41


41st and Fox Station Area Plan Supporting Documention
satisfy the daily and weekly household or personal needs of
residents of surrounding residential neighborhoods. This
district is located on collector streets, characteristically is
small in size, usually is entirely surrounded by residential
districts and is located at a convenient walking distance from
the residential districts it is designed to serve. The district
regulations establish standards comparable to those of low
density residential districts. Building floor cannot exceed the
site area.
B-4 General Business District This district is intended to
provide for and encourage appropriate commercial uses adja-
cent to arterial streets, which are normally transit routes. Uses
include a wide variety of consumer and business services and
retail establishments that serve other business activities, and
local transit-dependent residents within the district as well
as residents throughout the city. The regulations generally
allow a moderate intensity of use and concentration for the
purpose of achieving compatibility between the wide variet-
ies of uses permitted in the district. Building height is not
controlled by bulk standards unless there is a property line to
property line abutment with a residential use. Building floor
area cannot exceed twice the site area.
Industrial Districts
1-0 Light Industrial/Office District: This district is intend-
ed to be an employment area containing offices, and light
industrial uses which are generally compatible with residen-
tial uses. 1-0 zoned areas are designed to serve as a buffer
between residential areas and more intensive industrial areas.
Bulk plane, setback and landscaping standards apply in this
district. Building floor area cannot exceed 50% of the site
area; however, office floor area may equal site area. Some uses
are conditional uses.
1-1 General Industrial District: This district is intended
to be an employment area containing industrial uses which
are generally more intensive than those permitted in the 1-0
zone. Bulk plane, setback and landscape standards apply in
this district. Building floor area cannot exceed twice the site
area. Some uses are conditional uses.
1-2 Heavy Industrial District: This district is intended to
be an employment area containing uses which are generally
more intensive than that permitted in either of the other two
industrial zones. Bulk plane, setback and landscape standards
apply in this district. Building area cannot exceed twice the
site area. Some uses are conditional uses.
Residential Districts
R-2 Multi-Unit Dwellings, Low Density: Typically duplex-
es and triplexes. Home occupations are allowed by permit.
Minimum of 6,000 square feet of land required for each du-
plex structure with an additional 3,000 square feet required
for every unit over 2.
R-3 Multi-Unit Dwellings, High Density: Building size
is controlled by bulk standards, off-street parking and open
space requirements. Building floor area cannot exceed three
times the site area.
R-MU-30 Residential Mixed-Use District: The R-MU-
30 district is a primarily residential district allowing higher
density multiple unit dwellings of a density appropriate to
the center city and other activity centers such as light rail
transit stations. Supporting commercial development, such
as consumer retail and service uses and small-scale office uses,
is encouraged to create a truly mixed-use environment. No
maximum residential density is prescribed. Instead, maxi-
mum height, setbacks, and open space requirements deter-
mine the scale of buildings.
Other Districts
PRV Platte River Valley District: This district is intended to
promote and encourage a diversity of land uses having urban
character, integrating the districts unique geographic loca-
tion and setting, amenities of view, transportation linkages
and open space. A variety of land uses are permitted in order
to facilitate new development, allow for the reuse of eligible
historic structures and to complement development in the
adjacent neighborhoods and Downtown. New residential
development and open space is encouraged.
PUD Planned Unit Development District: The PUD
district is an alternative to conventional land use regula-
tions, combining use, density and site plan considerations
into a single process. The PUD district is specifically intended
to encourage diversification in the use of land and flexibility
in site design with respect to spacing, heights and setbacks
of buildings, densities, open space and circulation elements;
innovation in residential development that results in the avail-
ability of adequate housing opportunities for varying income
levels; more efficient use of land and energy through smaller
utility and circulation networks; pedestrian considerations; and
development patterns in harmony with nearby areas and with
the goals and objectives of the comprehensive plan for the city.
42


41st and Fox Station Area Plan Supporting Documention
Existing Zoning
43


41st and Fox Station Area Plan Supporting Documention
Blueprint Denver Land Uses
Blueprint Denver divides Denver into areas of change where
growth should be directed and areas of stability, where
only limited change should be allowed. In general, areas
of change tend to be places where land use and transporta-
tion are closely linked with good transit service and a mix of
uses that can support significant in-fill development. Station
areas fit this definition of areas of change.
Blueprint Denvers concept land uses for the station area were
based on a station location at 38th and Inca instead of 41 st
and Fox. It identifies portions of the west side of the station
area in Sunnyside and Highland as areas of change and
transit oriented development. This includes the area gener-
ally between 44th and 36th Avenue along Inca, Jason and
portions of Lipan Street.
Blueprint Denver identifies the area east of the transit sta-
tion as an industrial area and an area of stability. However,
through the planning process, it was determined that the
eastern portion of the station area is already undergoing a
fundamental change in land use. This change in land use
began with the development of the Regency Student Hous-
ing and has accelerated in recent years. Moreover, the area
exhibits the strong link between transportation and land use
that defines areas of change in Blueprint Denver.
Blueprint Denver identifies several goals for the areas sur-
rounding rail transit stations. These goals include:
A balanced mix of uses
Compact mid- to high-density development
Reduced emphasis on auto parking
Attractive multi-story buildings
A variety of housing types and prices
Access to open space and recreation amenities
A high degree of connectivity between the station area and
surrounding neighborhoods
The 41st and Fox Station transit oriented development will
embody these objectives as the station links multi-modal
transit elements with existing and developing residential and
commercial elements in this area of change.
The Central Platte Valley Is Identified as an area of change In Blueprint
Denver and could serve as a model for the future development surround-
ing the 41 st and Fox Station
Transportation
The primary roadways in the study area are 38th Avenue, Fox
Street, 44th Avenue and Inca Street. According to RTDs
Gold Line Final Environmental Impact Statement, 89 percent
of the 41st and Fox Station users will drive and park at the
station, 4 percent will walk and 7 percent will access the sta-
tion by bus in 2030 with a total of 2,700 daily boardings and
alightings at the station. However, this could change signifi-
cantly with future transit oriented development resulting in
more walk and transit trips to the station.
38th Avenue
38th Avenue is a five-lane arterial extending from Park
Avenue to the Northwest Denver neighborhoods of Sunny-
side, Highland, Berkeley and West Highland. The roadway
is an important commuter arterial that carries peak hour
44


41st and Fox Station Area Plan Supporting Documention
Blueprint Denver Land Use
Single Family Residential Single Family Duplex Transit Oriented Development
1 Neighborhood Center [ Industrial Park ::::: Area of Change:::::
traffic into and out of Downtown. Between Inca Street and
Sheridan Boulevard (City of Denver boundary), 38th Avenue
is designated a Pedestrian Shopping Corridor and Area of
Change in Blueprint Denver. Blueprint Denver states that
market demand will drive the amount of commercial retail
development, while West 38th Avenues pedestrian and tran-
sit orientation will influence the amount of urban residential
development along corridor. The 41st and Fox Station will
be located at the east end of the corridor, approximately 3
blocks north of 38th Avenue.
45


41st and Fox Station Area Plan Supporting Documention
The 38th Avenue underpass crosses below the railroad tracks
just 3 blocks south of the proposed station. The sidewalks are
narrow through the underpass, making pedestrian connectiv-
ity difficult. The city has plans to upgrade the sidewalks on
38th Avenue at the underpass to ADA compliance, as well as
make other faqade improvements in 2009. The city also plans
to fund a new pedestrian bridge over 38th Avenue at Inca
Street to link the Sunnyside and Highland neighborhoods.
This bridge is planned to be built parallel to the Gold Line
commuter rail tracks.
The 38th Avenue and Fox Street intersection is a three-way
intersection with access to the 1-25 on and off ramps. The
intersection is offset and thus is more difficult for vehicles to
navigate. The intersection also lacks crosswalks in each direc-
tion for pedestrians and bicyclists.
Fox Street
The most direct vehicular route to the station from 38th
Avenue and 1-25 is Fox Street. Fox Street is a 2-lane collector
with few sidewalks and a substantial amount of truck traffic.
The street terminates at the former Denver Post site. RTD
plans to improve Fox Street to allow for access into the transit
station. Two full movement access points from Fox Street onto
41st Avenue and 42nd Avenue will be constructed. A north-
bound left turn late on Fox Street at 41st Avenue is planned.
Eastbound thru/left and right turn lanes are planned at 41st
Avenue and eastbound thru/left turn and right turn lanes are
planned on 42nd Avenue, all at station opening in 2015.
44th Avenue
44th Avenue is an east-west arterial that connects across
1-25. 44th Avenue will become an important connection for
Globeville residents living east of 1-25 to access the proposed
station west of 1-25. 44th Avenue ends at Fox Street and does
not connect directly to Sunnyside.
Inca Street
Inca Street is a two-lane local street that parallels the railroad
tracks west of the station. The roadway lacks sidewalks, curb
and gutter and landscaping. The streetscape is dominated by
large overhead utilities along the east side of the roadway.
Sidewalks
The existing pedestrian environment in the station area is
not conducive to transit oriented development; many streets
lack sidewalks and the area as a whole lacks a cohesive street
grid. The area is further divided by the existing railroads and
highways. Sidewalks currently exist within the residential
neighborhood of Sunnyside west of the station and provide
interior linkages to neighborhood parks, schools and church-
es. However, the east side of the railroad tracks (Globeville)
has predominantly industrial uses and very few or fragment-
ed sidewalks.
Local Bike Paths
In addition to the pedestrian bridge over 38th Avenue
described above, a few of the streets in the study area are des-
ignated as bike routes. Bike Route D-7 runs along Fox Street
from 44th Avenue south to Downtown via Park Avenue.
Route D-2 runs extends from the western suburbs along
46th Avenue, south to 43rd Avenue between Navajo and Fox
Streets, and then jogs north on Fox Street to 44th Avenue.
The route extends east of 1-25 into Globeville and serves as a
primary east-west route. An aging pedestrian bridge is located
over the railroad tracks at 43rd Streetalong the D-2 route
but the bridge is not ADA compliant. It is anticipated that
this bridge will be demolished and a new pedestrian bridge
will be constructed between 41st and 42nd Avenues to serve
the transit station. The Denver Bicycle Master Plan Update
identifies the 43rd Avenue Pedestrian Bridge as a major
missing link in the citys bicycle system. Route D-5 extends
along Navajo Street, then runs east/west along 36th Avenue,
crosses under 1-25 and connects with the South Platte River
Trail. Overall, the number of bicycle routes crossing through
the study area is substantial, but the quality of these routes
should be improved to make the station area and connections
to it more bicycle and pedestrian friendly.
Bus Transit Routes
Existing local RTD bus routes within a Vi mile of the station
include the 38 (along 38th Avenue), the 8 (along Fox Street),
the 6 and the 52 along Navajo and Pecos Streets, respectively.
These routes have approximately 15 to 30 minute frequen-
cies, depending on peak vs. off-peak hours. The 38 will stop
at the 41 st and Fox station, but the 6, 8, and 52 will not
change with the presence of the station. The 44, which cur-
rently travels along 44th Avenue to Tejon Street and south
into Downtown, will stop at the 41st and Fox station. The
Strategic Transportation Plan states that pedestrian-oriented
improvements are a focus within the Northwest Travel Shed
of the city. Improved and expanded transit routes along 32nd
46


41st and Fox Station Area Plan Supporting Documention
Existing Bus and Bicycle Routes
Off Street Bike Routes Street Grid Bike Routes
RTD Local Bus Routes RTD Local Bus Stops Express / Limited Service Stops
Existing Bus and Bicycle Routes in the Station Area
Sidewalks and bicycle paths are Important components of the station area's transportation infrastructure
47


41st and Fox Station Area Plan Supporting Documention
and 38th Avenues as well as Speer and Federal Boulevards
will serve the increased travel demands in this area.
Parking
The street networks within the neighborhoods of Sunnyside
and Highland neighborhoods have on-street parking to serve
residents. 38th Avenue does not currently have on-street
parking.
Freight Rail
The Union Pacific and Burlington Northern Santa Fe
Railroads have operated in the area for over a century. These
trains provide service to local and regional industries and to
locations throughout the west. The presence of freight tracks
creates a significant barrier for pedestrians, bicyclists and
motorists, and separates Globeville from the other neighbor-
hoods. These facilities are not anticipated to change in the
foreseeable future.
The Sunnyside neighborhood has relatively high levels of local bus service
The presence of freight tracks creates a significant barrier for pedestrians,
bicyclists and motorists
Public Engagement
The goal of the outreach process was to provide a fair, open
and effective process for engaging the community in the de-
velopment of the plan for the 41st and Fox Station Area. The
outreach objectives included:
Receive meaningful and useful input from residents and
community interests
Directly engage a broad representation of residents and
community interests by using several different methods of
community outreach
Ensure openness in communication of all aspects of the
plan and make relevant information freely available
Ensure fairness in consideration of all opinions and ideas
from community members and interest groups within the
context of city and regional objectives and the framework
of the planning process
Three public workshops and a focus group were held as part
the public involvement process. These hands on, interactive
meetings included a brief presentation on project issues and
process followed by interactive sessions aimed at soliciting
input. The public meetings occurred at the following project
milestones:
Plan visioning
Development of alternative concepts
48


41st and Fox Station Area Plan Supporting Documention
Plan recommendations and implementation
In addition, planning staff attended numerous meetings with
stakeholders throughout the process, including presentations
to registered neighborhood organizations, business associa-
tions and other interest groups.
Outreach Methods
City staff provided meeting notices and copies of informa-
tional material to the registered neighborhood organizations,
business organizations and City Council offices in the station
area. City staff also provided notification through an initial
mailing to all property owners within Vi mile of the station,
flyers at the elementary schools in the station area, presenta-
tions to interest groups, postings on the citys website, and
direct contact to plan participants via email and phone calls.
City staff sent meeting notices and copies of informational
material to neighboring jurisdictions and our regional part-
ners including:
The Denver Regional Council of Governments
The Regional Transportation District
Denver Public Schools
Denver Public Libraries
City staff also provided press releases concerning the project
and public meetings to the Rocky Mountain News, the Den-
ver Post and community newspapers.
Workshop Summaries
Visioning Workshop
The 38th and Inca Station Public Workshop was held Janu-
ary 23rd, 2008. 73 members of the public were in atten-
dance. Tom Hoagland of the City and County of Denver
provided opening remarks. GB Arrington of PB PlaceMaking
provided an overview of Transit-Oriented Development.
The full presentation is available on the City and County of
Denver website (www.denvergov.org/tod).
Following the presentation, the attendees were divided into
small groups with a facilitator and notetaker at each table.
The following summarizes the notes from each presentation:
Group 1
Pedestrian/bike connectivity north/south & east/west
Improve substandard pedestrian areas
Improve connectivity to Globeville
Locate parking away from station make people walk
through a mixed-use district next to the station
Parks on north and south ends of the stations area
Intense development close to station, decrease develop-
ment intensity further from station
Integrate public spaces into new development
38th Ave. transition to pedestrian oriented mixed use
development over time
Group 2
Maintain existing character of the neighborhood
Build on the neighborhood character and history
Lower density development further to the west, range of
2-3 stories
Provide housing for families
Pull Cuernavaca park under 1-25 creating a linear park
along the rail
Student housing could be catalyst for more intense devel-
opment and new residential towers on the east side of the
tracks
Future development in the industrial area on the east
side of the tracks could include high density, mixed-use
residential and commercial development with ground floor
retail and additional employment and light industrial uses
Group 3
Preserve neighborhoods to the west of the tracks and south
of 38th
Development opportunity on empty land between 38th,
freeway, and tracks
49


41st and Fox Station Area Plan Supporting Documention
Improve access to the student housing at the Regency Tower
Provide more services in the area for college students
Lower density mixed-use along Inca Street
Pedestrian connection over 38th
Group 4
More businesses along 38th and Fox Street to tie both
together
Residential and business along Fox
Make 38th a safer pedestrian environment
Improve freeway underpass
East/west connection on 45th to reach Globeville
Group 5
Make 38th Avenue viaduct wider and safer
Link bike paths at 45th
Convert Denver Post building to office and catalyze devel-
opment to the south along Fox Street
Change development along Fox and make a mixed-use
neighborhood
Bike path towards 20th Street
Path to stadium over 38th Avenue
Student housing link to transit and bike paths to alleviate
isolation
Link students to the transit station and provide more ser-
vices for college students
44th Street car/pedestrian bridge
Bridge over 1-25 to Globeville
Group 6
Mixed use buildings wrapping parking structure
High density mixed-use along Inca 4-6 story
Yellow areas lower height infill housing to transition into
existing neighborhood
Natural buffer along Inca to screen rail yards pollution
and noise
South along Inca to park at south end of station area
Increase bike/ped access
Fox corridor as Main Street prioritize pedestrians
38th Avenue pedestrian improvements prioritize pedes-
trians
Opportunities as destinations new parks, Main Street, etc.
Parking in small lots in between buildings
Sustainability green development
Economic opportunities Denver Post area kept as light
industrial
Connect neighborhoods together
50


41st and Fox Station Area Plan Supporting Documention
Architectural style of station to be compatible with neigh-
borhood.
Common Themes
Improve 38th Ave. -traffic calming, wider sidewalks, better
lighting.
More pedestrian crossings on 38th.
Make the station very visible from the streets
Preserve/enhance character or the existing neighborhoods
Bike/pedestrian connection north-south along west side on Inca
St. connecting to existing bike trail near Cuernavaca Park.
Mixed use, higher density on east side of tracks
Site station to attract employment opportunities to the area
Keep parking on eastside of tracks.
More parks, particularly on the east side of tracks
Transition to less dense areas on west side of tracks further
from station
Mixed-use local serving retail on west side of tracks
Potential redevelopment into live/work on 43rd and Jason
St. near tracks
Pedestrian bridges at, 43rd and 39th Ave
Pedestrian bridge crossing at 38th
Improve retail environment along 38th Avenue
Alternatives Workshop
The 41st and Fox Public Workshop was held February 3,
2009. 25 members of the public were in attendance. Tom
Floagland of the City and County of Denver provided open-
ing remarks. Tom reviewed a number of changes that have
occurred between the last workshop for this station (held in
January 2008) and this workshop. These changes include the
shift in the RTD Gold Line from the west side of the Union
Pacific railroad tracks to the east side; the confirmation of
the station location at 41st and Fox Street; and a shift in the
RTD maintenance facility. One location considered for the
RTD bus maintenance facility was at the Denver Post site.
Flowever, since that time, the preferred option is to retain the
bus maintenance facility at its existing location.
GB Arrington of PB PlaceMaking gave an overview of the
two concepts developed for the station area to-date, based on
public feedback and design. These concepts are referred to as
crash test dummies because they represent different land
use scenarios that are not designed to survive on their own.
The purpose of this workshop was to evaluate each of these
concepts in small groups and to modify them to form a de-
sired land use scenario. The following summarizes the notes
from each presentation.
Summary of Group Comments/Common Themes:
Encourage a dense mix of residential and employment on
the east side of the tracks.
Provide a mix of housing types including affordable/work-
force housing, middle income and market-rate housing,
student housing, and housing for families.
Create better ties between the station and existing parks
and open space and examine opportunities for a new park
on the east side of the tracks.
Improve east-west connections across the railroad tracks.
Improve the pedestrian environment on streets including
38th, Fox, Elati, 44th, Navajo and Inca.
Incorporate green/sustainability objectives in the station
area plan.
Group 1
Residential on west side of the railroad tracks should be
lower scale (4 stories or below).Transition to the neighbor-
hood as you move west.
East side-concentrate employment at the north end.
Retain industrial on the Denver Post site but do adaptive
reuse at the north end.
Likes the pedestrian shopping district in Alternative A and
higher densities along Fox and Elati.
Preserve single-family character south of 38th Avenue
(make it affordable)
51


41st and Fox Station Area Plan Supporting Documention
Find development opportunities-mixed use (1-3 stories)
for properties adjacent to 38th Avenue-create a streetfront
along 38th Avenue.
Shared parking is a good idea.
Add green space (dog park/park) on east side along Fox
and focused at intersection with the station.
Green corridor: multi-use in Alternative A, improvements
to 38th Avenue, connect Navajo District
Transform Elati Street into a green street, perhaps a park-
way that connects to the larger trail system.
38th Avenue between Navajo and Inca: Enhance with
street amenities, including improvements to 38th Avenue
underpass.
Need a pedestrian bridge at 44th Avenue.
Group 2
Recommended a combination of development shown on
Alternative A for the east side and Alternative B for the
west side development scenarios.
Improve existing parks.
Need another connection across the tracks at 46th Avenue
Create complete streets-need trees
Sustainable urbanism in the streets (drainage, solar)
Slow traffic on 38th Avenue, bulb outs
Park needed in the northwest residential area
Eclectic mix with employment on east side

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tf
Pedestrian Shopping District 2 (4-7 stories)
Pedestrian Shopping (tattler 1 (1-d stones)
Urban Residential (6-stories)
Urban Residential (4-7 stories)
Urban Residential (l-istones)
Single Family 7Single Family Duplex
Commercial-Industrial Mixed-Use
Pnlciludii Bridge
Proposed Transit Station
PedestiiarVBike Soeetscope Improvements (Existing)
Pedestrian^ Bike Stioclscape Improvements (Proposed)
Pedestuan Shopping District Streetscape Improvements
Intersection Improvements
Proposed RTD Pai k and Ride Options
Shared Parking
Landscaped Buffer
Urban Stormwater Treatment
fcxhting Stoimwater Gunnel
FasTtacks Gold Line
Existing Park
Potential Park
Naturalized Open Space
Potential Histone Preservation Area
f"
t

41 st & Fox Station Area Alternative A Draft 1.19.09
Area of Influence
1/2 Mile Radius from Station
52


41st and Fox Station Area Plan Supporting Documention
LEGEND
Pedestrian Shoppmq Dntr ict J (4-7 stories)
Pedeslrun Utoppirty Oistric.11 (1-3 stories)
Urbdin Rcsidcntidi (9 italics)
Urban Residential (4-7 stories)
Urban Residential(1-3storres)
Single Family / Single Family Duplex
Industrial
Pedestrian Bridge
Proposed Tiansit Station
Pedestrian/ Bike Streetscape Improvements (Existing)
Pedestrian/ Bike Streetscape Improvements (Proposed ]
Pedestrian Shopping District Streetscape Improvements
Intersection Improvements
|Q£ Proposed RTD Park and Ride

I andscaped Ruffei
Urban Stormwater Treatment
Faslracks Gold Line
Fxisting Park
Potential Park
Italuiiilucd Open Space
Historic Structure

r£MUta
41 st & Fox Station Area Alternative B Draft 1.19.09
Area of Influence
112 Mile Radius from Station
Group 3
Station as a destination, not a parking garage
Combination of Alternative A and B scenarios. Mixed use
and office on the east side.
Need a pedestrian connection at 44th Avenue (across the
tracks).
Moderate income housing, not high end.
Node at Navajo without increase in height.
Streetscape enhancements on 8th Avenue.
Knit Quigg Newton homes in with the neighborhood
Fine grain, small-scale attention to 38th and Navajo
Connect Inca Street south/improve Inca Street/3 stories on
Inca Street.
Group 4
Plan for considerably greater density
Promenade east/west
Need better bike/pedestrian connections along 44th and
45th to connect to Globeville.
High density at the Denver Post site-consider a medical
facility or other major employment center.
Campus-like closer to the station
Security, safety, schools, need more parks
Housing for families, middle income
Need node at 38th and Lipan already zoned B-4.
Building heights west of the station (along Inca) may block
views of the city-8 stories is too high.
53


41st and Fox Station Area Plan Supporting Documention
Plan Recommendations Public Meeting
The 41st and Fox Open House was held June 2, 2009- 30
members of the public were in attendance. The purpose
of this meeting was to gather feedback on a preferred plan
developed for the station area.
Tom Hoaglund of the City and County of Denver provided
opening remarks. Tom reviewed the alternatives evaluated
throughout this process, as well as the existing city plans
that relate to this plan. Laura Aldrete of PB PlaceMaking
gave an overview of the preferred concept developed for the
station area, based on public feedback and design. There are
a number of supporting graphics (circulation, urban design,
etc) that support this plan. The powerpoint presentation can
be viewed on the citys website at: http://www.denvergov.org/
TOD/StationAreas/4lstFoxStation/tabid/395233/Default.
aspx
Many questions were asked about the relationship between
this process and the City Zoning Code Update, which is
currently underway. The city will be holding a series of public
meetings throughout the summer as part of the release of
the new Zoning Code.It is anticipated that this plan will be
adopted prior to the new Zoning Code and thus reflected in
the final Zoning Code and map to be adopted. Once adopt-
ed, this plan will offer guidance as to the appropriate use and
form when rezonings occur in the Station Area.
Questions:
How does this plan relate to future zoning discussions/ac-
tions?
This plan is advisory only and does not change the zoning
of the area. However, once adopted this plan will inform
rezonings in the future.
Concern about health impacts from living near a highway
and a railyard maintenance facility.
The current RTD Commuter Railyard Maintenance Facil-
ity is located north of 1-70 outside of the general area of
this Station Area. The city is beginning a Health Impact
Assessment (in partnership with UC Denver) in neighbor-
hoods within Council District 9 to evaluate the linkages
between health, transportation and land use.
Need emphasis on 44th Avenue connection to Globeville
so that residents can access the future station. Also need
to focus attention on a connection to the Railyard Market
Place.
The Circulation Plan recommends improved connectivity
along 44th Avenue into Globeville and connections south
toward Downtown.
Are there incentives associated with TOD? What happens
firstpublic improvements or private development?
Private investment may occur firstthat depends on the
market and timing of redevelopment. Infrastructure invest-
ment funds may be available through the city.
How long will this new plan take to implement?
That depends on the market as well as the catalysts for
redevelopment in the area. Some redevelopment may occur
prior to opening day of the stationthe full build-out vi-
sion may take 20-30 years to fully implement.
54


41st and Fox Station Area Plan Supporting Documention
What do pedestrian/bicycle improvements look like? How
would they change existing streets?
Most would be new bicycle lanes on existing streets.
Does redevelopment begin before or after the station
comes in?
That depends on the market and there are examples of it
occurring before or after, but in most cases it occurs after
the transit station is in place.
TOD process: Can Registered Neighborhood Organiza-
tions approach developers about their plans for new proj-
ects based on the community desires?
The public input process for new development projects
was discussedthere are public hearings at both Planning
Board and City Council meetings prior to development
project rezoning approval.
Comment: would love to see Main Street zoning along Fox
Street.
Comment: There is a lack of true pedestrian access in this
area. Need to make a stronger statement for bicycles and
pedestrians and keep cars away.
There was discussion concerning whether to restrict ve-
hicles along the green link on 41st Avenue between Elati
and the railroad tracks. The plan currently allows vehicles
along this connection to provide parallel parking and acces-
sibility to future retail uses. Some felt that it is important
to have that visibility and accessibility for vehicles (Engle-
wood station along the Southwest Corridor was mentioned
as an example of an area where the retail is struggling since
commuters move from the parking to the station without
visiting the retail).
Comment: Experts contest that parallel parking calms
traffic. Consider eliminating parallel parking and replac-
ing with bicycle lanes. Or, consider angled parking. Other
commenters argued that parallel parking does slow traffic
and is important in supporting retail. Colfax Avenue is an
example where the parking is placed behind buildings in
some locations, which affects the level of pedestrian activity
happening on the street.
The city agrees that it is important to make cars behave
and find ways to slow traffic.
Comment: Route traffic around the perimeter of the sta-
tion areaconcentrate parking on the edges. Keep inner
streets safer for pedestrians and bicyclists.
Comment: 46th Avenue makes more sense to put a vehicu-
lar connection over/under the railroad tracks. This location
supports the previous comment concerning the direct-
ing of traffic around the neighborhood. A connection at
44th Avenue would have greater impacts to the Sunnyside
Neighborhood.
Can we look at stormwater/sustainable solutions at a
neighborhood level?
One idea that this plan considers is implementation of
sustainable streets to capture stormwater. This idea is being
considered along Elati Street.
The open space shown on the plan seems randompark
along the highway may not make sense. How did the plan
address the diagonal grade change and the existing ditch
along the Regency property?
The open space shown along the highway provides a buffer
between the highway and future residential/mixed-use.
This has a number of benefits. This plan evaluated land use
and circulation options to accommodate the ditch. How-
ever a storm sewer parallels the ditch and the ditch is below
grade through much of the area. Thus, transforming it into
a park amenity may be challenging.
How do we decide how/where public parks will be dedicated?
There are various options. One is a General Development
Plan (GDP) that can allow for the accumulation of open
space amongst parcels. The other option is for the city to
purchase the land and create a park.
Comment: The city needs to display an integrated future
land use map that shows future plans for Denargo Market,
38th and Blake (station), 41 st and Fox, River North, etc
so that the community can see how all of these projects fit
together.
The city has created such a map and will provide the
weblink. It will be available on the Planning Departments
news website as of June 12.
Comment: This station will service both the Gold Line
and Northwest Rail. The Northwest Rail is more important
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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Supporting Documention
to this neighborhood than the Gold Line due to its con-
nection to Boulder and cities along that route. It will likely
trigger redevelopment in this neighborhood.
Does this plan connect to the US 36 BRT project? No, not
directly.
Relevant Plans
The 4lst and Fox Station Area Plan builds upon a founda-
tion of adopted plans and policies of the City and County
of Denver. The section provides a summary of plans and
policies guiding the 4lst and Fox Station Area Plan. When
adopted, the 4lst and Fox Station Area Plan will serve as a
supplement to the Comprehensive Plan and supersede the
general recommendations of citywide plans.
Comprehensive Plan, 2000
The Comprehensive Plan 2000 provides the planning and
policy framework for development of Denvers human and
physical environment. The key subjects of Plan 2000 that
relate to this station plan are land use, mobility, legacies, and
housing.
Land Use: Land use recommendations promote new invest-
ment that accommodates new residents, improves economic
vitality and enhances the citys aesthetics and livability. In ad-
dition, Plan 2000 supports sustainable development patterns
by promoting walking, biking and transit use.
Mobility: Plan 2000 emphasizes planning for multiple
modes of transportation walking, biking, transit and cars.
Key concepts include expanding mobility choices for com-
muters and regional cooperation in transit system planning.
Plan 2000 also promotes compact, mixed-use development
in transit rich places.
Legacies: Plan 2000 prioritizes planning for park, open space
and recreation systems. Historic building preservation and
respect for traditional patterns of development in established
areas are also key tenets of Plan 2000. To this end, Plan
2000 places a high value on maintenance of streets, trails,
and parkways that link destinations within the community.
Ensuring that new buildings, infrastructure and open spaces
create attractive, beautiful places is the foundation of the
legacies chapter.
Housing: Plan 2000 recognizes that access to housing is a
basic need for Denver citizens. Thus, Plan 2000 emphasizes
preservation and maintenance of the existing housing stock
and expanding housing options. Providing a variety of unit
types and costs, in addition to housing development in transit
rich places are fundamental tenets of Plan 2000. This ensures a
sustainable balance of jobs and housing as the city matures.
Blueprint Denver: An Integrated Land Use and Transpor-
tation Plan, 2002
Plan 2000 recommended that the city create a plan to inte-
grate land use and transportation planning. Blueprint Denver
is the implementation plan that recognizes this relationship
and describes the building blocks and tools necessary to
achieve the vision outlined in Plan 2000.
Areas of Change and Stability: Blueprint Denver divides the
city into areas of change and areas of stability. Over time,
all areas of the city will fluctuate between change and stabil-
ity. The goal for areas of stability is to identify and maintain
the character of an area while accommodating new develop-
ment and redevelopment. The goal for areas of change is to
channel growth where it will be beneficial and can best im-
prove access to jobs, housing and services. Blueprint Denver
describes two types of areas of stability: committed areas
56


41st and Fox Station Area Plan Supporting Documention
Blueprint
Denver
An Inicj4mn'f1
I mi id l sc mid
and reinvestment areas. Committed areas are stable neigh-
borhoods that may benefit from the stabilizing effects of
small, individual lot infill development rather than large-scale
land assembly and redevelopment. Reinvestment areas are
neighborhoods with a character that is desirable to maintain
but would benefit from reinvestment and modest infill. This
reinvestment, however, is more limited in comparison to that
of areas of change.
tion choices; generates lasting value; and provides access to
the region via transit.
TOD Typologies: The TOD Strategic Plan establishes TOD
typologies for every transit station in the city. Typologies estab-
lish a framework to distinguish the types of places linked by the
transit system. The typologies frame expectations about the land
use mix and intensity of development at each of the stations.
Station Area Planning: While providing an important
planning framework, the TOD Strategic Plan calls for more
detailed station area plans. Such plans offer specific direction
for appropriate development, needed infrastructure invest-
ments and economic development strategies.
Pedestrian Master Plan, 2004
The Pedestrian Master Plan was written to address the mobil-
ity goals of the Comprehensive Plan and Blueprint Denver.
Specifically, the plan calls for a pedestrian environment that
is: safe from automobiles; encourages barrier free pedestrian
mobility; enables pedestrians to move safely and comfort-
ably between places and destinations; attractive, human scale
and encourages walking; and promotes the role of walking
in maintaining health and preventing disease. To achieve
TRANSIT-ORIENTED DEVELOPMENT
STRATEGIC PLAN
Transportation: The transportation component of Blueprint
Denver provides transportation building blocks and tools that
promote multimodal and intermodal connections. Elements
of connection include the street system, bus transit system,
bicycle system, and pedestrian system. These components
must work together to realize the guiding principles of Blue-
print Denver.
Transit Oriented Development Strategic Plan, 2006
The Transit Oriented Development (TOD) Strategic Plan pri-
oritizes the citys planning and implementation efforts related
to the transit system and station area development.
TOD Defined: The TOD Strategic Plan defines TOD as de-
velopment near transit that creates beautiful, vital, walkable
neighborhoods; provides housing, shopping, and transporta-
57


41st and Fox Station Area Plan Supporting Documention
these goals, the plan calls for land use changes to encourage
walking through mixed-use development patterns. The plan
identifies a minimum 13-foot pedestrian zone on all streets
including an 8-foot tree lawn and a 5-foot sidewalk and a
minimum 16-foot pedestrian zone on most arterial streets.
Bicycle Master Plan, 2002
In 2002 in response to Plan 2000, the Bicycle Master Plan
(2002) provides a framework for an interconnected bicycle
system. The primary objectives of the Bicycle Master Plan are:
Develop new neighborhood routes that create connections
between the existing bicycle route system and nearby facili-
ties not currently on a bicycle route.
Close the gaps in the existing bicycle routes to complete
the bicycle grid route system.
Improve access with bike route and trail signage around
light rail stations to make bicycling and transit work in a
seamless manner.
Support education, enforcement and public policy for the
bicycle system.
Greenprint Denver, 2006
Greenprint Denver is an effort to fully integrate sustainability
as a core value and operating principle in Denver city govern-
ment. The Greenprint Denver action agenda for 2006 charts
the citys course over the next five years. Included in Green-
print Denver action agenda are specific actions that relate di-
rectly to the citys ambitious station area planning effort. For
example, this plan directs the city to decrease reliance on au-
tomobiles through public transit use and access, and promote
transit-oriented development, as well as bike and pedestrian
enhancements, and increase by 20% the new development
located within Vi mile of existing transit stations by 2011.
Parks and Recreation Game Plan, 2002
The Game Plan is a master plan for the citys park, open
space and recreation system. A primary principle is to create
greener neighborhoods. Game Plan establishes a street tree
and tree canopy goal of 15-18 percent for the entire city. The
plan also establishes a parkland acreage target of 8-10 acres
per 1,000 residents. Tools to accomplish these goals include
promoting green streets and parkways, which indicate routes
that require greater emphasis and additions to the landscape.
Strategic Transportation Plan, 2006
Denvers Department of Public Works created the Strategic
Transportation Plan (STP). The STP is a primary implemen-
tation tool for Blueprint Denver and Plan 2000. The STP
represents a new approach to transportation planning in
Denver. Instead of forecasting future auto travel on Denver
streets, the STP will forecast person-trips to evaluate the
magnitude of transportation impacts caused by all types of
travel. This person-trip data provides the ability to plan for
bikes, pedestrians, transit, and street improvements. The STP
is the first step in identifying the needs for every major travel
corridor in the city. The .STIPwill create concepts for how to
meet transportation needs, including a prioritization of cor-
ridor improvements.
Storm Drainage Master Plan (2005) and Sanitary Sewer
Master Plan, 2006
The Storm Drainage Master Plan and the Sanitary Sewer
Master Plan evaluates adequacy of the existing systems as-
suming the future land uses identified in Blueprint Denver.
The Storm Drainage Master Plan determines the amount of
imperviousness resulting from future land development and
58


41st and Fox Station Area Plan Supporting Documention
moving
bicycle, bus service improvements, changing the B-4 zone
district, encouraging a variety of residential mixed use proj-
ects, creating more housing opportunities, and promoting a
mix of low and moderate income housing.
Gold Line Environmental Impact Statement, 2009
The Gold Line Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS)
provides information on the design and impacts of RTDs
41st and Fox Station. The EIS recommends that RTD
construct a station platform, bus transfer facility, and park-
n-Ride on industrial property on the east side of the Union
Pacific/Burlington Northern and Santa Fe Railroad at ap-
proximately 41st Street. RTD will construct a 500 space
surface parking to serve the station on opening day. The EIS
recommends expanding the park-n-Ride to 1,000 spaces in
2030 to meet projected future demand. The EIS also identi-
fies construction of a new pedestrian bridge over the railroad
tracks at 41st Avenue to connect the neighborhoods west of
the tracks to the station.
the subsequent runoff. The Sanitary Sewer Master Plan iden-
tifies needed sanitary sewer improvements to respond to the
forecasted development.
Sunnyside Neighborhood Plan, 1992
The Sunnyside Neighborhood Plan was adopted in August of
1992 and includes recommendations for the western portion
of the area boarding the planned Gold Line Commuter Rail
Station. Although the neighborhood plan was adopted prior
to Blueprint Denver and FasTracks, it contains several general
recommendations that are still relevant including streetscape
improvements to 38th Avenue, identification of Florace
Mann School as a historic landmark and providing better
compatibility between industrial and residential uses.
Highland Neighborhood Plan, 1986
The Highland Neighborhood Plan was adopted in April of
1986 and includes recommendations for the southern por-
tion of the area near the planned Gold Line Commuter Rail
Station. Although the neighborhood plan was adopted prior
to Blueprint Denver and FasTracks, it contains several general
recommendations that are still relevant including pedestrian,
Implementing Living Streets: Ideas and Opportunities for
the City and County of Denver, U.S. EPA, 2009
This study, completed as part of Denvers Living Streets Initia-
tive, examined how existing commercial corridors could be
redesigned. The study identified three principles for future
corridor street investments: reduce the number of travel lanes
dedicated to moving cars to add space for bus lanes, bike
lanes and sidewalks; create a pedestrian and transit friendly
streetscape by widening sidewalks, providing buffers along
the street and reducing the frequency of curb cuts; and relat-
ing development to the street by locating new buildings close
to the street edge and facing building entrances to the street.
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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Executive Summary ii

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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Executive SummaryiiiTable of ContentsAcknowledgements .................................................................................................................................................iv Executive Summar y ....................................................................................................................................................v Introduction ....................................................................................................................................................................1 Vision & G oals .................................................................................................................................................................7 The Plan C oncept ......................................................................................................................................................11 Implementation and Next St eps .....................................................................................................................29 Supporting D ocumentation ...............................................................................................................................35

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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Acknowledgements ivAcknowledgementsMayor John W. Hickenlooper Denver City Council District 1 Rick Garcia District 2 Jeanne Faatz District 3 Paul D. Lpez District 4 Peggy Lehmann District 5 Marcia Johnson District 6 Charlie Brown District 7 Chris Nevitt District 8 Carla Madison District 9 Judy Montero District 10 Jeanne Robb President District 11 Michael Hancock At-Large Carol Boigon At-Large Doug Linkhart Community Planning & Development Peter J. Park, Manager Steve Gordon, Comprehensive Planning Manager Caryn Wenzara, Principal City Planner omas Hoaglund, Project Manager Deirdre Oss, Senior City Planner Savannah Jameson, Landmark Preservation Barbara Frommell, Senior City Planner Steve Nalley, Associate City Planner Eric McClelland, Senior GIS Analyst Andrea Santoro, GIS Analyst Carolyne Janssen, Graphic Designer Jim Ottenstein, Graphic Designer Denver Planning Board Brad Buchanan, Chairman Laura E. Aldrete Richard Delanoy Shannon Giord Anna Jones Judith Martinez Sharon Nunnally Kenneth Ho Karen Perez Jerey Walker Dave Webster Public Works Jennifer Hillhouse, Planning and Policy Eric Osmundsen, Development Engineering Services Justin Schmitz, Trac Engineering Services Parks & Recreation Scott Robson, Deputy Manager Gordon Robertson, Planning Manager David Marquardt Devon Buckels Oce of Economic Development Andre Pettigrew, Executive Director Cec Ortiz, Deputy Director Terrence Ware Will Kralovec Michael Miera Department of Cultural Aairs Ginger White Brunetti Regional Transportation District Liz Telford, Gold Line Project Manager Bill Sirois, TOD Program Manager Consultant Team PB Placemaking, Urban Design Consultant Placematters, Visualization Consultant Fehr & Peers, Transportation Consultant Navjoy Consulting Services, Trac Consultant Hartwig and Associates, cost Estimating Consultant Nelson\Nygaard, Parking Consultant Baisle Baumann Prost Cole and Associates, Economic Consultant Arland, Economic Consultant Neighborhood Organizations Fox Street Neighbors Association Globeville Civic Association Sunnyside United Neighborhood, Inc. Highland United Neighborhood, Inc.

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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Executive Summaryv Executive Summary

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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Executive Summary viIntroductione City and County of Denver is embracing the unprecedented opportunity for economic and environmentally sustainable development created by the FasTracks rapid transit system. Land use and transportation decisions are directly related and impact our economy, human health, and environmental quality. Recognizing this relationship, Blueprint Denver recommends directing growth and change to the areas surrounding rapid transit stations where expanded transportation choices are available. e 41st and Fox Station is the rst station outside of Downtown on the Gold Line and Northwest Rail corridors -ve minutes from Union Station. It will be located near some of Denvers most exciting and vibrant neighborhoods in an area already experiencing signicant change. In 2008 and 2009, the City and County of Denver worked with community 41st and Fox Station Area

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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Executive Summaryviimembers in a series of public workshops and neighborhood meetings to develop a vision, analyze future possibilities, and recommend implementation strategies for the mile area surrounding RTDs future 41st and Fox Station. e plan involved close coordination with RTD and their planning for the Gold Line Commuter Rail Corridor. Ideas and concepts were also reviewed by technical sta of city departments, City Council, and the Denver Planning Board. is plan is intended to guide future land use and infrastructure decisions to foster transit oriented development. e Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000, Blueprint Denver and other adopted city-wide plans and small-area plans formed the basis for recommendations contained in the 41st and Fox Station Area Plan. Once adopted, the 41st and Fox Station Area Plan will serve as a supplement to the Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000. The Visione 41st and Fox Station will develop over the coming decades into the focal point of a diverse, transit supportive and environmentally sustainable urban center. Many new residents and businesses will be drawn to the convenient location close to Downtown near some of Denvers most vibrant urban neighborhoods. e vision, created through community input and transit oriented development principles, provides the basis for ve primary goals for the station area: neighborhoods, and along major corridors eate opportunities to add more housing, jobs and services to the station area redevelopment areas and location on the Gold Line and Northwest Rail corridors e plan seeks to address each of these goals through the implementation recommendations and relate them to the more specic objectives of the plan concepts.Fox Street near the station will transform over time with pedestrian infrastructure and new development

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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Executive Summary viii The Plan Concepte plan concept is focused on the long term redevelopment of the entire area east of the railroad tracks to create a complete, transit-friendly neighborhood. is would require a transition over time through private redevelopment from heavy industrial uses to more light industrial, oce, commercial, mixed-use, and residential uses located close to the transit station. e plan also includes opportunities for a variety of new, mixed-income residential developments. Key elements of this concept include: evelopment of a high intensity activity node close to the station on the east side corridor along Fox Street former Denver Post site improvements to enhance neighborhood livability by providing positive orientation, buering, aesthetics, recreational amenities, and stormwater management with Regency Student Housing by encouraging ties between academic institutions, student populations, and incubator employment uses the station by redeveloping along the edges of the Sunnyside neighborhood leading to Inca Street and in a mixed-use node at 38th and Navajo cant structures by drawing design inspiration from the areas historic, industrial character ments to Navajo, 38th, Elati, 41st, 44th, Fox, Inca and other streets cent development locating taller structures along I-25 and I-70The 41st and Fox Station is the rst station outside of Downtown on the Gold Line and Northwest Rail corridors -ve minutes from Union StationStation Area Location

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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Executive Summaryix Sub Station Railyard MarketplaceDelaware St. Cherokee St. Cahita Ct. 0 400 800 1,200 200 Feet PlaceMaking Group e 1/2 mile1/4 mile T P T P P 37th Ave 39th Ave 40th Ave 41st Ave 44th AveNavajo St. Lipan St. Park Ave. Fox St. Elati St.Atzlan Park Ciancio Park Franco Park City of Cuernavaca Park Quigg Newton Homes Horace Mann Middle School SUNNYSIDE NEIGHBORHOODKalamath St. Mariposa St. Osage St. Pecos St.36th Ave 42nd Ave 43rd AveInca St.GLOBEVILLE NEIGHBORHOOD46th Ave 45th Ave 35th AveI-70I-25To I-70 Columbus Park HIGHLAND NEIGHBORHOODPedestrian Shopping District (2-8 stories) Pedestrian Shopping District (2-5 stories) Mixed-Use Office/Residential (3-20 stories) Urban Residential (2-12 stories) Urban Residential (2-8 stories) Urban Residential (1-3 stories) Single Family / Single Family Duplex Proposed Open Space/ Parks/ Plaza Pedestrian Shopping District Improvements Priority Street for Pedestrian/Bike Improvements Off-Street Multi-Use Path Existing Bus Routes Intersection Improvements Pedestrian Connection Improvements Funded New Pedestrian/Bike Bridge over 38th Ave. Pedestrian Plaza Proposed Ped. Bridge /Potential Future Vehicular Access Transit Platform and Pedestrian Bridge Future RTD Structured Parking FasTracks Gold Line Existing Park 38th Avenue Improvements Historically Significant Buildings Navajo District 38th Ave Jason St. Note: It is likely that only one of the connections shown, either 44th or 46th Avenue, would be constructed pending further study. Note: It is likely that only one of the connections shown, either 44th or 46th Avenue, would be constructed pending further study. Land Use and Circulation Plan Concept

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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Executive Summary xImplementation and Next StepsTransforming Denvers transit stations into vital, dynamic transit oriented development areas will not happen over night. Implementing the plan will take many years. e implementation recommendations for the 41st and Fox Station Area are intended to create the transit oriented development envisioned in this plan. e specic recommendations for implementing the 41st and Fox plan concept are divided into three categories: regulatory tools, infrastructure tools, and partnership tools. Specic recommendations in each of these categories are presented in the tables in the implementation section. Each table contains details on the implementation strategy, timeframe, and responsible parties. Key implementation actions identied in the table include: Regulatory: attributes certication for new development that limit joint develoment and transit oriented development on RTD property at the station develop an aordable and mixed income housing strategy consistent with the TOD Strategic Plan Infrastructure: shopping district ovements to Inca Street including a separated bicycle path connecting the station to Highland and the City of Cuernavaca Park Av enue following recommendations of Denvers Living Str eets Initiative development areas Partnerships: parking management techniques that support shared parking arrangements tricts; tax increment nancing; regional, state and federal infrastructure funds; and public-private partnerships design of the Gold Line and Northwest Rail Line health indicators related to transportation and air quality as the area changes over time The implementation recommendations for the 41st and Fox Station Area will create the transit oriented development envisioned in this plan

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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Introduction1 Introduction

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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Introduction 2Backgrounde City and County of Denver is planning for change in the areas surrounding rapid transit stations. In November 2004, voters in the Denver Metropolitan Region passed the FasTracks ballot measure to fund and construct six new transit lines in 15 years. e 119 miles of new track and the 70 transit stations will provide an unparalleled level of mobility for the Denver region and fundamentally reshape growth patterns. Following the passage of FasTracks, the City and County of Denver completed a Transit Oriented Development (TOD) Strategic Plan as a rst step in planning for the areas surrounding the rapid transit stations. e TOD Strategic Plan provided a framework for analyzing the area surrounding the 38th and Inca station on RTDs future Gold Line commuter rail corridor.The 41st and Fox Station Area contains portions of three neighborhoods along the Union Pacic/BNSF Railroad line; the Union Pacic/BNSF Railroad line parallels Inca Street and is a major barrier to pedestrian and vehicle circulation In 2008, RTD examined the station location as part of the Gold Line Environmental Impact Statement. As a result of this process, RTD recommended relocating the planned 38th and Inca station to approximately 41st and Fox streets on the east side of the Union Pacic and Burlington Northern and Santa Fe railroad tracks. In 2009, the City and County of Denver worked with community members to develop a station area plan for the area surrounding the 41st and Fox Station. In a series of public workshops and neighborhood meetings, city sta worked with stakeholders to create a vision for the station area and develop land use and circulation concepts. is plan is the result of this community driven process to develop a vision, analyze future possibilities, and recommend strategies to implement the vision.41st and Fox Station Area

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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Introduction3The 41st and Fox Station and the Gold Line will be part of the future FasTracks System Alameda Ave. 20th Ave.Edgewater Wheat Ridge Golden Morrison Lakewood Englewood Denver North Metro Corridor US 36 BRT Corridor Northwest Corridor Gold Line East Corridor Southeast Corridor Southwest Corridor Colfax Ave. 26th Ave. 32nd Ave. 38th Ave. 44th Ave. 52nd Ave. Ralston Rd. Mississippi Ave. Florida Ave. Hampden Jewell Ave. Evans Ave. 41st & Fox Federal Pecos Sheridan Ward Olde Town Arvada RidgeKipling St. Wadsworth Blvd. Sheridan Blvd. Federal Blvd. Federal Blvd. Pecos St. Sheridan Blvd. Wadsworth Blvd. Kipling St. Simms St. Ward Rd. Broadway Downing St. 285 25 70 70 76 Gold Line Rapid Transit park-n-RideFinal alignment and technology to be determined during the environmental study process N Union Station Station Area Location RTDs Gold Line Environmental Impact Statement includes plans for a pedestrian bridge connecting over the railroad lines and a 500 space park-n-Ride on opening day in 2015

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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Introduction 4Station Area Contexte 41st and Fox Station will be situated in the Globeville neighborhood at the edge of two other Denver neighborhoods: Sunnyside and Highland. e portion of the Globeville neighborhood where the station is located is primarily industrial and cut-o from the rest of Globeville by I-25. In recent years, the area has begun transitioning to new uses including student housing. e Sunnyside neighborhood is located on the west side of the Union Pacic and Burlington Northern and Santa Fe railroad tracks. is neighborhood will be connected to the 41st and Fox Station by a new pedestrian bridge over the railroad tracks. Sunnyside is primarily a residential neighborhood with some smaller scale industrial properties along its eastern and northern edges. Quigg Newton Homes, a Denver Housing Authority property, is located in the Sunnyside neighborhood close to the station. Recently, the area has become attractive for middle-class residents and young families drawn to its aordable housing stock and location close to Downtown Denver. e Highland neighborhood is located south of 38th Avenue on the edge of the station area. e Highland neighborhood has become one of Denvers most desirable neighborhoods in the past decade with many new restaurants, shops and residential mixed-use developments. e portion of Highland near the station includes the Navajo Arts District, a small business area of restaurants, bars, art galleries, and theaters located south of 38th Avenue along Navajo Street. e Highland neighborhood will be connected to the station through a new pedestrian and bicycle bridge that will be constructed over 38th Avenue at Inca Street. e station area contains the Trevista at Horace Mann School and several parks including Atzlan, Ciancio and Columbus parks in Sunnyside and Franco and City of Cuernavaca parks in Highland. e most important street in the station area is 38th Avenue, a main street with many businesses connecting the neighborhoods to Downtown Denver and I-25. In the future, the Gold Line will connect the station area to Downtown Denver and communities to the west including Arvada and Wheat Ridge. e station will also have limited service on the Northwest Corridor Commuter Rail Line connecting to Westminster, Boulder and Longmont. As the rst transit stop outside of Downtown, the station area could see considerable growth and development due to its desirable location. In order to accommodate commuters from the surrounding neighborhoods, the 41st and Fox Station will include a 500 space park-n-Ride that may be expanded to 1,000 spaces to accommodate expected ridership growth.The 41st and Fox Station Area Station includes two distinct areas: an established residential neighborhood to the west and an evolving mixed use industrial area on the east along Fox Street

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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Introduction5Purpose of the Plane 41st and Fox Station Area Plan articulates near and longterm goals, issues and recommendations for future development. e plan provides a guide to determine appropriate development, including recommendations for land-use patterns, urban design, circulation and infrastructure. e Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000, Blueprint Denver and other adopted city-wide plans and small-area plans formed the basis for recommendations contained in the 41st and Fox Station Area Plan. Once adopted, the 41st and Fox Station Area Plan will serve as a supplement to the Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000. e plan is not an ocial zoning map, nor does it create or deny any rights. Property owners, elected ocials, the planning board, neighborhood organizations and city departments will use the 41st and Fox Station Area Plan for many purposes including: Data Resource: e plan oers data on existing conditions for the planning area in an easy to reference document. Reinvestment Guidance: e plan guides public and private decision making and investment in the planning area over the coming years as it relates to land use, urban design and mobility. Capital Improvements: A plan can provide the justication for the allocation of funding from the citys capital improvement budget and other sources. Funding and Partnership Opportunities: Implementation of plans requires a collaborative eort between neighborhoods, developers, businesses, elected ocials, city departments and neighboring jurisdictions. e plan identies and supports partnerships and resource leveraging eorts. Reference for Larger City-Wide Plans: e station area plan may include analysis that can inform other city-wide plans. e analysis and recommendations included here should be considered in future updates of Blueprint Denver and the Denver Comprehensive Plan. The 41st and Fox Station Area Plan builds upon the foundation of the Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000, Blueprint Denver and the Transit Oriented Development Strategic Plan.

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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Introduction 6Plan Processe 41st and Fox Station Area Plan is the result of a community driven planning process for the mile area surrounding RTDs future commuter rail station and park-n-Ride at 41st and Fox Streets. e planning team engaged the community in the following process to create the plan:Create the vision and identify goalsExamine opportunities and constraints of the existing conditionsCreate and analyze alternative concepts for land use, urban design and circulationDevelop a preferred concept based on the best elements of the draft alternativesDevelop recommendations for implementing the preferred land use, urban design and circulation concepts Over the course of approximately two years, community members representing businesses, developers and residents in the mile station area worked with city sta through a series of meetings and workshops to complete this process. In the workshops, community members divided into groups and were asked to develop plan concepts. Each group worked closely with the citys project team to identify ideas, concepts and recommendations. e best ideas from each group were then combined to create the concepts presented in this plan document. e plan also involved close coordination with RTD and their planning for the Gold Line Commuter Rail Corridor. Ideas and concepts were also reviewed by City Council, the Denver Planning Board, and by sta of city departments. Additional information including meeting dates and workshop summaries can be found in the appendix.Residents, business owners and property owners worked with city sta over the course of two years to develop the vision and plan concepts presented in the 41st and Fox Station Area Plan

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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Vision and Goals7 Vision and Goals

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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Vision and Goals 8Transit Oriented Development Principlese communitys vision began with the underlying principles of transit oriented development. Transit oriented development means creating a dense mix of uses within walking distance of transit stations where people can live, work, shop, and connect to destinations around the region without relying on their automobiles. Transit oriented areas should be lively and walkable and integrate transit into new development and surrounding neighborhoods. Principles include: Place-making: Creating safe, comfortable, varied and attractive station areas with distinct identities. Rich Mix of Choices: Providing housing, employment, transportation and shopping choices for people of all ages, household types, incomes and lifestyles. Location Eciency: Placing homes, jobs, shopping, entertainment, parks and other amenities close to the station to promote walking, biking and transit use. Value Capture: Using plans to encourage all stakeholders residents, business owners, RTD and the cityto take full economic advantage of the value of the transit infrastructure. Portal to the Region: e station area should serve as a gateway to the regional transit network by providing a safe and welcoming environment.Opportunities and Constraintse 41st and Fox Station has many advantages relative to other stations making it an attractive area for new residents, businesses, shops and services to locate. e area is just over a mile a ve minute tripfrom central Denver and the rst stop on the Gold and Northwest rail lines outside of Downtown. It is also close to the vibrant and growing Highland neighborhood where many successful restaurants and shops and desirable residential areas are located. e Sunnyside neighborhood immediately to the west of the station is a neighborhood in transition with new families and businesses moving into the area attracted to the aordable housing and convenient location. e area also has good visibility and direct access from I-25. Views from the eastern portion of the station area to Downtown will likely make high and medium rise buildings along I-25 marketable. In addition, the station area contains many large parcels under single ownership that have the potential to redevelop without requiring many years of private land assembly. Many of these same parcels are currently underutilzed relative to their land value making it likely that they will redevelop in the near future. Some large parcels have already been developed bringing change to the area. In particular, the Regency Student Housing marked a signicant change in character for the portion of Globeville west of I-25. As development occurs over time, the existing businesses and residents in the Opportunities include capitalizing on the station areas close proximity to Downtown Challenges that must be overcome include the poor condition of existing infrastructure

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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Vision and Goals9area will provide an important base for the transit station and attract new services to the area. Connections to the South Platte River and regional parks are also an important feature of the station area. With the completion of the pedestrian and bicycle bridge over the 38th Avenue Viaduct and the new pedestrian connection across the railroad tracks at 41st Avenue, the station will be connected to the Platte River Greenway and the City of Cuernavaca Park. is will not only tie the station to open space, it will also provide bicycle and pedestrian connections to the Platte River Valley, LoDo and Downtown. However, there are many challenges that must be overcome. I-25 and the Union Pacic and BNSF railroad tracks are major barriers to connectivity in the station area making new east-west connections dicult. Trac congestion on 38th Avenue is forecast to increase in the future and does not have enough right-of-way to accommodate all of the capacity needed for cars, bicycles, pedestrians, transit, on-street parking and streetscape improvements. New development on the east side of the tracks should take into consideration the long-standing industrial uses in the area as it transitions over time. In addition, many of the roadways and much of the other infrastructure in the area are decient. Most of the industrial streets on the east side of the tracks lack curbs, gutters, sidewalks and street trees. Finally, new parks and community spaces on the east side of the tracks will be necessary to serve future residents of the area.Vision Statemente 41st and Fox Station will develop over the coming decades into the focal point of a diverse, transit supportive and environmentally sustainable urban center. Many new residents and businesses will be drawn to the convenient location close to Downtown near some of Denvers most vibrant urban neighborhoods. 38th Avenue will become a transit and pedestrian supportive main street through a variety of streetscape improvements such as on-street parking, wider sidewalks, better lighting, and transit infrastructure. Pedestrian and bicycle crossings of 38th Avenue, including a new bicycle and pedestrian bridge over the 38th Avenue Viaduct, will help connect the Highland and Sunnyside neighborhoods to existing parks along the Platte River and the transit station. Further from the station, the Navajo neighborhood business area will continue to grow and connect to 38th Avenue. e corner of Navajo and Along Fox Street, new mixed-use buildings with ground-oor restaurants and shops will become a destination for people using the station

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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Vision and Goals 10 38th will be a very popular area for people using the transit system to connect to interesting neighborhood venues and restaurants. Although 38th Avenue will continue to be the main street of Northwest Denver, a new pedestrian shopping district will grow next to the 41st and Fox Station. Along Fox Street, new mixed-use buildings with ground-oor restaurants and shops will become a destination for people using the 41st and Fox Station. A plaza along 41st Street will connect the station platform to Fox Street through the heart of the pedestrian shopping area. People will live, work and shop within a few blocks of the transit station. Over time, the RTD parkn-Ride should evolve into shared parking for new, mixed-use buildings adjacent to the station. Further east along the edge of I-25, mixed-use high-rise buildings will take advantage of the views across the highway to Downtown Denver. ese new buildings will also buer the pedestrian shopping district from the noise of the nearby highways. ese high-rise buildings will contain apartments and condominiums for people of a variety of ages and incomes and oces for businesses wanting to locate close to Downtown. New development may occur gradually and will build upon the existing industrial and residential character of the area. Where possible, historically signicant buildings will provide inspiration for building designs and be incorporated into new development. As the area transitions, there will be an eclectic blend of old and new. Improvements to the 44th Avenue connection to Globeville will help tie development in this area to the residents and businesses east of I-25. On the west side of the tracks, the Sunnyside neighborhood will connect to the station through a new pedestrian bridge at 41st Avenue and eventually through an additional street connection on the northern end of the station area. New residential development along Inca Street will transition into the Sunnyside neighborhood and provide more housing options including both market rate housing and aordable, workforce housing for individuals and families wanting the convenience of living near a transit station. For many, the new housing will be more aordable due to a reduced need for auto ownership and parking, providing signicant savings in transportation-related expenses. roughout the station area, a focus on green construction and walkable, mixed-use development will make the area a model for environmental sustainability and ensure the areas long-term economic competitiveness. A variety of parks and open spaces will provide shared places to relax and recreate and create value for surrounding buildings. ese new public spaces will incorporate green design providing water quality benets for the area. Walking and a healthy lifestyle will be reinforced by this pedestrian oriented design. is vision for the future shows what can be achieved through coordinated change and investment in transit. To achieve this vision, cooperation between the city, RTD, neighborhood groups, and private developers will be necessary to guide change occurring over many years. Creating a vision is an important rst step in identifying goals and methods to achieve them.Station Area Goalse vision, created through community input and transit oriented development principles, provided the basis for ve primary goals for the station area: neighborhoods, and along major corridors income levels, jobs and services to the station area ment areas and location on the Gold Line and Northwest Rail corridors e plan seeks to address each of these goals through the implementation recommendations and relate them to the more specic objectives of the plan concept.

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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Plan Concept11 The Plan Concept

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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Plan Concept 12The Plan Concepte TOD Strategic Plan assigned a typology to each FasTracks station to help frame the expectations about the mix and intensity of development at specic stations. e proposed typology was developed after looking at each station area and its surroundings. e typology provides a starting point for the station area planning process. At the time the TOD Strategic Plan was written, the 41st and Fox station was proposed for a dierent location and less was known about the areas development potential. e TOD Strategic Plan originally proposed an Urban Neighborhood typology described as a walk-up station with some residential development and limited neighborhood retail. During the course of the planning process centered around the new station location at 41st Avenue and Fox Street on the east side of the UP/BNSF railroad tracks, it became evident that there was much more development potential in the station area. e eastern portion of the station area has already begun to change with new development and new uses geared toward larger-scale development. rough the examination of land use alternatives, it was determined that the eastern portion of the station area would develop into an Urban Center typology to create a complete, transit-friendly neighborhood. is would require a transition over time through private redevelopment from heavy industrial uses to more light industrial, oce, commercial, mixed-use, and residential uses located close to the transit station. Meanwhile the western portion of the station area would continue to be based on the less intense Urban Neighborhood typology with residential inll development and some limited, neighborhood serving retail. In this area, new variety of housing and improved connections to Quigg Newton Homes will provide opportunities for a diverse population to live near the station. e plan concept is centered around the development of a high intensity activity node close to the station on the east side that includes a 41st Avenue plaza and a pedestrian shopping corridor along Fox Street. To support this activity center, parking in the station area would be placed in structures and shared between park-n-Ride users and adjacent businesses. Taller structures along I-25 would capture views of Downtown and create a buer between the station and the nearby freeway. Mixed-use redevelopment of the former Denver Post site and continued partnership benets between the Regency Student Housing and academic institutions will act as a catalyst for change in the station area. e concept also includes the development of strong bicycle and pedestrian connections to the City of Cuernavaca Park and the Platte River Greenway linking the Sunnyside, Globeville and Highland neighborhoods. is includes improvements to Inca Street and connections across the UP/ BNSF railroad and 38th Avenue. In addition, new park and open space improvements will help create value for new development and provide natural buering and stormwater management. e following pages contain more detailed recommendations concerning land use, urban design, circulation and infrastructure, and economic development strategies.The plan concept is focused on the long-term redevelopment of the entire area east of the railroad tracks to create a complete, transit-friendly neighborhood

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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Plan Concept13 41st AveNavajo St. Lipan St.Horace Mann Middle SchoolSUNNYSIDE NEIGHBOHOODInca St.46th Ave 44th Ave Fox St. Elati St.I-70I-2536th AveViews To Downtown DenverThe plan concept includes creating a new urban center on the east side of the station tying to urban neighborhoods west of the stationPlan Concept

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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Plan Concept 14 46th AveI-70I-25 MapDate:December 2008 CommunityPlanningandDevelopment 0 400 800 1,200 200 Feet P T P P 37th Ave 38th Ave 39th Ave 40th Ave 41st Ave 44th AveNavajo St. Lipan St. Jason St. Fox St. Elati St.Atzlan Park Ciancio Park Columbus Park Franco Park City of Cuernavaca Park Quigg Newton Homes Horace Mann Middle School SUNNYSIDE NEIGHBORHOODKalamath St. Park Ave. Osage St. Pecos St.36th Ave 42nd Ave 43rd AveInca St.GLOBEVILLE NEIGHBORHOOD Sub Station Railyard MarketplaceDelaware St. Cherokee St.45th Ave 35th Ave HIGHLAND NEIGHBORHOOD 1/2 mile1/4 mile T D Cahita Ct. T Pedestrian Shopping District (2-8 stories) Pedestrian Shopping District (2-5 stories) Mixed-Use Office/Residential (3-20 stories) Urban Residential (2-12 stories) Urban Residential (2-8 stories) Urban Residential (1-3 stories) Single Family / Single Family Duplex Proposed Open Space/ Parks/ Plaza Funded New Pedestrian/Bike Bridge over 38th Ave. Proposed Ped. Bridge /Potential Future Vehicular Access Transit Platform and Pedestrian Bridge Future RTD Structured Parking FasTracks Gold Line Existing Park 38th Avenue Main Street Historically Significant Buildings Navajo District Land Use Plan

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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Plan Concept151a. Pedestrian Shopping District (2-8 stories) is centered on the intersection of 41st Avenue and Fox Street in close proximity to the transit station. Ground oor uses include a wide variety of shopping, entertainment, and services with residential, employment or expanded commercial uses on the upper oors. Some of the ground oor uses found would include: specialty shops such as food markets, clothing boutiques and book stores; restaurants, bars and entertainment uses such as movie theaters; and stores serving the daily needs of residents such as dry cleaners, hardware stores, grocery stores, pharmacies, and similar uses. Because of the high level of service provided by the transit station, both local and regional customers can easily visit the unique shops and restaurants of this area. When fully developed, this area should contain shopping and commercial uses totaling 150,000 square feet or more. Urban design features such as continuous street frontages with sidewalk entrances, ground oor windows, awnings, pedestrian oriented signs and lighting are important to creating the necessary building forms. 1b. Pedestrian Shopping District (2-5 stories) is centered at Navajo and 38th and acts as a gateway to the Sunnyside and Highland communities. is intersection will be an important activity node directing visitors to the Navajo Arts District. Ground oors of buildings will contain a mix of land uses including convenience shopping, personal services, and restaurants with commercial or residential uses on upper oors. Urban design features should support pedestrian orientation including sidewalk entrances, ground oor windows, awnings, pedestrian oriented signs and lighting. 1c. Mixed-Use Oce/Residential (3-20 stories) has a sizable employment base as well as housing and may include a wide variety of uses including hotels and lodging. Intensity is higher in these areas than in the urban residential areas. Land uses are not necessarily mixed in each building but the area will include employment, services and residential uses within walking distance. e proportion of residential to commercial will vary from one development to another. Because these mixed-use developments are within the transit oriented development area, form of the buildings and pedestrian orientation are very important.Mixed-Use Oce/ResidentialRecommendation LU 1: Land Use Componentse land use components are the building blocks of the land use concept for the station area. e approximate locations and boundaries of each land use area are shown on the land use concept map. In general, future land use regulations in the station area should support walkable, mixed-use development and contain restrictions on non-transit supportive uses such as drivethrough businesses, auto services, and noxious uses. e following are descriptions of each of the components: Pedestrian Shopping District 2-8 stories Pedestrian Shopping District 2-5 stories

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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Plan Concept 16 1d. Urban Residential (2-12 stories) is located on the east side of the station area, primarily bordering I-25 and I-70. ese areas contain the highest population density in the station area. Uses are primarily residential but may include a noteworthy number of complementary commercial uses. New housing tends to be in midto high-rise structures to take advantage of Downtown and mountain views, and there is a greater housing than employment base. Urban design features that reinforce the pedestrian environment while still providing for privacy of ground oor residents are important. 1e. Urban Residential (2-8 stories) is found in two parts of the station area: north of the existing Regency Student Housing and along the west side of the tracks along Inca Street near the station. ese areas are intended as new, moderatedensity neighborhoods. On the west side of the tracks along Inca it forms a new edge between the station and the existing neighborhood to the west. On the east side of the tracks, this moderate-density residential will provide a range of housing types that help support the pedestrian shopping district and employment base. New parks and plazas on the east side will provide needed relaxation and breathing space for new residents and help to increase the values of nearby residential buildings. 1f. Urban Residential (1-3 stories) is located at the transition to the established Sunnyside neighborhood. is will create an improved edge for adjacent residential areas and the Quigg Newton Homes. A range of housing types including single family houses, accessory dwelling units, duplexes, townhouses, and small condominium and apartment buildings will provide a variety of housing options for residents living near the transit station. Urban design features that reinforce the pedestrian environment while still providing for privacy of ground oor residents are important. ese features may include stoops and raised porches, terraces, and landscaping. 1g. Single Family/Single Family Duplex includes most of the established neighborhoods surrounding the transit station. ese areas are expected to see reinvestment in the mix of housing types which includes small-lot, single-family houses with duplexes and townhomes in certain areas near major corridors. Homeowners may wish to develop accessory dwelling units or garage apartments to provide additional housing opportunities in the neighborhood. Houses in these areas are less than three stories in height. Urban Residential 2-12 stories Urban Residential 2-8 stories Urban Residential 1-3 stories Single Family/Single Family Duplex

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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Plan Concept171h. e RTD Station and park-n-Ride is being designed to accommodate future streets and structured parking. RTD currently faces legal limitations to development on land acquired for parking. However, future support for transit oriented development may lead to the legislative changes necessary to allow homes and businesses in these important areas closest to the transit station. Opportunities for shared parking that serves both RTD commuters and nearby shops and residences could provide more ecient use of the areas parking supply. If this becomes possible, parking structures should be wrapped with active pedestrian retails uses with residential or commercial uses on upper oors. e city should work with RTD to limit the need for future park-nRide expansion and associated automobile trips if ridership goals can be met with transit oriented development. 1i. Proposed Open Space/Parks/Plazas on the northeast portion of the station area will be needed in response to the conversion of industrial uses to higher density residential. Although parks are conceptually shown on the land use plan, the actual size and locations are not determined. Future park space in the station area will require working with private property owners, additional study by the Parks Department, and developing funding partnerships to pay for park land, improvements, and maintenance. However, the basic elements are described below. Parks and public spaces should include a variety of types beginning with a formal plaza at the station and transitioning to more naturalized areas. Near the station, a formal public space can provide a focus for transit patrons and future employment and residential uses. Further from the station, new neighborhood parks in mixed-use residential areas can help create value for new development and attract new residents. Along I-25 and the railroad tracks, passive naturalized landscape buers can oer visual relief and storm water management benets. Bicycle trails and on-street paths will link to existing bike routes to the north and south and nearby parks along the South Platte. Identied routes should include landscape improvements such as street trees, green street storm water planters, pedestrian scaled lighting, and signage. Sustainable, surface treatment of storm water should occur through a linked system of devices including bio-swales, lter strips, and storm water planters as part of the open space system. ese features could provide benets to encourage redevelopment and support wildlife. Parking structures wrapped with active pedestrian uses Parks and plazas can provide a focal point for new development Riverfront Park was an important part of new residential development in the Platte Valley

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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Plan Concept 18Recommendation UD 1: Urban DesignIn mixed-use areas, the physical form of buildings and development is more important than the land use. Proper urban design can help ensure that oces, retail and residential can function in close proximity and create vibrant, walkable communities. e following elements are critical to creating areas supportive of high-frequency transit service: UD 1a. Streetscape Features are important throughout the station area. Sidewalk widths will vary by street type but should meet the minimums of the Pedestrain Master Plan. In the pedestrian shopping districts and along arterial streets there should be a pedestrian zone that includes sidewalks, street trees in grates, improved bus stops, and enough room for sidewalk uses, outdoor seating, street carts and vendors. All other streets should have a pedestrian zone that includes a tree lawn and detached sidewalk. ese areas should also contain restrictions on curb cuts to ensure continuity of the sidewalk and maximize the supply of on-street parking. Vehicle access should come from the alley or the side-street. UD 1b. Active Edges and Design Elements of Building Ground Floors help create a feeling of activity, safety and visual interest for pedestrians. In the pedestrian shopping districts and along arterial streets, ground oor uses should consist of retail or similar active uses. e ground oors of building in all areas should contain the following elements: between primary structure and the street) In areas where the ground oor is occupied by a residential use, stoops, raised porches, terraces and landscaping can be used to protect the privacy of occupants. UD 1c. Building Placement and Massing requirements help create places that feel enclosed and oriented toward the street. In the station area, full site coverage of the buildings will ensure the continuity of the streetscape. Building edges should be brought to the sidewalk with minimal setbacks. In some areas, such as the pedestrian shopping district, minimum building heights can help create a sense of enclosure and encourage activity. Architectural scaling elements such as eves and cornices, material transitions, balconies and terraces, and window elements can be used to break up the appearance of taller buildings. UD 1d. Parking is a critical piece of the urban design in transit oriented development areas. To make transit oriented development successful, parking must be designed and managed in a way that does not create barriers for pedestrians or prioritize automobile use over transit. e high cost of providing parking also impacts development costs and aects the aordability of housing and commercial space. Blueprint Denver recommends eliminating or reducing parking minimums or establishing parking maximums in districts around transit and structured or underground parking to ensure continuity of the streetscape. Where surface parking is provided, it should be located behind the buildings -not between the building entrance and the sidewalk. Whenever possible, parking should be shared amongst all users in an area to avoid use-specic parking lots that remain vacant much of the time. Some cities successfully encourage shared parking through in-lieu fees and use parking districts that collectively manage the parking supply for an area. Public parking can also be a source of shared parking. For example, RTD will be providing between 500 and 1,000 parking spaces for the station park-n-Ride. Although RTD currently has legal restrictions on the use of its parking, in the future it may be possible to manage RTDs parking supply in a shared arrangement between the transit patrons and area businesses and residents. Unbundling of parking can help ensure housing aordability. When unbundled parking spaces are sold or rented separately from the housing unit, those who do not own a car, or own fewer cars, can save money on housing costs. On-street parking can calm trac, provide a buer between trac and pedestrians on the sidewalk, and provide convenient, front door parking for customers of shops and restaurants. In order to properly manage the parking supply, the city may need to use tools including time limits and meters to ensure parking availability. On some streets with wider rights-of-ways, angled parking can be used as a strategy to provide more on-street spaces. UD 1e. Historically signicant structures should be incorporated into future redevelopment by drawing design inspiration from the areas industrial character.

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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Plan Concept19 PlaceMaking Group Active Retail Edges Transit Station Parks /Open Space Building Frontage LEGEND I-25 37th Ave 38th 39th Ave 40th Ave 41st Ave 44th Ave Navajo St. Lipan St. Jason St. Fox St. Fox St. Elati St. Ciancio Park Columbus Park Franco Park Quigg Newton Horace Mann Middle SUNNYSIDE NEIGHBOHOOD Kalamath St. Mariposa St. Osage St. Pecos St. 36th Ave 42nd Ave 43rd Ave Inca St. Sub Station Navajo Navajo District District Delaware St. Delaware St. Cherokee St. 45th Ave 35th Ave Cahita Ct. REGENCY STUDENT HOUSING 5. Transitional scale to neighborhood 4. Variety of Building scale8. Medium Density Residential w/ Mixed-Use Way Finding 1 Transit Station Area 2 Employment and Residential Uses 3 Urban living w/ Open space 4 Integrated Parking 5 Urban Residential 2-12 stories 6 Housing Diversity 7 Capture Views of Downtown 8 Transition Scale into Existing Neighborhoods 9 Reinforce Retail 1. Transit station area 2. Employment and residential 3. Urban living with open space 4. Integrated parking 5. Urban residential 6. Housing diversity7. Capture views of Downtown8. Transition scale into neighborhood 9. Variety of building scale10. Reinforce retail 41st and Fox Urban Design Character Concept Character Concept

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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Plan Concept 20Recommendation MI 1: Mobility and Infrastructuree plan concept is based on a well connected street grid with a few new streets on both the eastern and western portions of the station area. A station entrance and bus transfer area is proposed on both sides of the tracks, connected with a pedestrian bridge. e station platform will connect to Fox and Elati streets to the east with a pedestrian plaza along 41st Avenue. Improved north-south pedestrian facilities and a detached bicycle path along Inca will connect to planned development and parks. Pedestrian intersection improvements at Navajo will assist in safer north-south pedestrian connections. MI 1a. Pedestrian Bridges Two new pedestrian bridges are funded and will help connect the station platform to surrounding neighborhoods. RTD is funding the construction of a pedestrian bridge over the railroad tracks at 41st Avenue and Inca Street to connect to the neighborhoods west of the station. is connection will replace the existing, dilapidated pedestrian bridge at 43rd Avenue. In addition, the city is constructing a pedestrian and bicycle bridge over the 38th Avenue Viaduct at Inca Street that will connect the station to the Highland neighborhood, Cuernavaca Park and Platte River Trail. MI 1b. New Street Connections A new street connection with pedestrian and bicycle facilities is proposed across the railroad tracks at either 44th or 46th Avenue to provide additional connectivity options beyond the 38th and Fox Street intersection and 44th Avenue connection to Globeville. It is likely only one connection would be built. A street connection at 46th Avenue would have many advantages including more direct access to I-70 via Pecos Street; reduced trac impact to residential areas in Sunnyside; better access to the northern portion of the station area; and the viaduct would not cut-o access close to the station. A 44th Avenue connection would be less desirable because of viaduct impacts to the station area and trac impacts to the Sunnyside residential areas. However, feasibility of either connection would require detailed engineering and cost analysis, an identied source of funding, and cooperation from the railroads. Trac analysis shows that adding this additional connection when redevelopment of the east side occurs would improve east-west mobility and the level of service at the 38th and Fox intersection. The Millenium Bridge in the Platte Valley connects neighborhoods over freight rail tracks New local streets to provide a well connected grid are proposed to coincide with new development on large sites such as the former Denver Post Property New local streets to provide a well connected grid are proposed to coincide with new development in the areas north of 44th Avenue on both sides of the tracks. In addition, the north-south alignment of the street grid would be restored with new development in the areas east of Delaware Street.

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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Plan Concept21 Sub Station Railyard MarketplaceDelaware St. Cherokee St. Cahita Ct. 0 400 800 1,200 200 Feet PlaceMaking Group e 1/2 mile1/4 mile T P T P P 37th Ave 39th Ave 40th Ave 41st Ave 44th AveNavajo St. Lipan St. Park Ave. Fox St. Elati St.Atzlan Park Ciancio Park Franco Park City of Cuernavaca Park Quigg Newton Homes Horace Mann Middle School SUNNYSIDE NEIGHBORHOODKalamath St. Mariposa St. Osage St. Pecos St.36th Ave 42nd Ave 43rd AveInca St.GLOBEVILLE NEIGHBORHOOD46th Ave 45th Ave 35th AveI-70I-25To I-70 Columbus Park HIGHLAND NEIGHBORHOODPedestrian Shopping District (2-8 stories) Pedestrian Shopping District (2-5 stories) Mixed-Use Office/Residential (3-20 stories) Urban Residential (2-12 stories) Urban Residential (2-8 stories) Urban Residential (1-3 stories) Single Family / Single Family Duplex Proposed Open Space/ Parks/ Plaza Pedestrian Shopping District Improvements Priority Street for Pedestrian/Bike Improvements Off-Street Multi-Use Path Existing Bus Routes Intersection Improvements Pedestrian Connection Improvements Funded New Pedestrian/Bike Bridge over 38th Ave. Pedestrian Plaza Proposed Ped. Bridge /Potential Future Vehicular Access Transit Platform and Pedestrian Bridge Future RTD Structured Parking FasTracks Gold Line Existing Park 38th Avenue Improvements Historically Significant Buildings Navajo District 38th Ave Jason St. Note: It is likely that only one of the connections shown, either 44th or 46th Avenue, would be constructed pending further study. Note: It is likely that only one of the connections shown, either 44th or 46th Avenue, would be constructed pending further study. Mobility and Infrastructure PlanCirculation Plan

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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Plan Concept 22 MI 1c. Intersection Improvements Intersection improvements at 38th and Fox may be necessary as redevelopment occurs on the east side of the tracks. In addition, improvements to the intersection of 38th Avenue and Navajo Street will be necessary to improve the pedestrian environment at this important activity center. Improvements might include enhanced crosswalk treatments, curb bulb outs and ramps, and median pedestrian refuges. MI 1d. Priority Streets for Pedestrian and Bicycle Improvements, Pedestrian Shopping District Improvements and Bicycle Facilities Fox Street, Elati Sreet, Inca Street, Navajo Street, 38th Avenue, 41st Avenue, 44th Avenue and 46th Avenue and portions of other streets have been identied as priorities for pedestrian improvements. Most important will be the improvements to the pedestrian shopping district areas along Fox Street. Along 41st Avenue, a pedestrian plaza will connect the station platform to Fox Street and Elati Street to the east. is pedestrian plaza should include decorative pavers or pavement, benches, trees and planters, pedestrian-scale lighting, outdoor seating, and room for street carts and vendors. Angled, on-street parking may also be desirable in the plaza area. Sidewalk widths will vary by street type but should meet the minimum requirements of Denvers Pedestrian Master Plan. In the pedestrian shopping corridors and along arterial streets there should be a minimum of a 16 pedestrian zone that rf n n t b nnt n n t b nnt n n n n Crosswalk treatments can help make intersections more pedestrian friendly Potential Fox Street cross section Potential Inca Street cross section Potential cross section for bicycle and pedestrian improvements that could be applied to priority streets in the station area where feasible

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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Plan Concept23includes sidewalks, street trees in grates, improved bus stops, and enough room for sidewalk uses, outdoor seating, street carts and vendors. All other streets should have a minimum 13 pedestrian zone that includes a tree lawn and detached sidewalk. On-street parking should be provided on all streets in the station area with sucient right-of-way as a way to calm trac, provide a buer between trac and pedestrians on the sidewalk, and provide convenient, front door parking for customers of shops and restaurants. On some streets with wider rights-of-ways, angled parking could be used as a strategy to provide more on-street spaces if additional street cross sections are developed. Outside of the pedestrian shopping districts, bicycle facilities should be provided on the streets identied for bicycle and pedestrian improvements. Where right-of-way is sucient, bicycle lanes should be provided. ese streets include Elati Street and 41st, 44th, and 46th avenues. ese streets should incorporate sustainable street design elements such as storm water treatment features in the tree-lawn. Along Inca Street a detached, multi-use bicycle path is proposed paralleling the railroad tracks and connecting to the pedestrian and bicycle bridge over 38th Avenue. is path would connect to the City of Cuernavaca Park via an improved underpass of I-25. For 38th Avenue, additional analysis will be necessary as part of Denvers Living Streets Initiative to determine options and trade-os within the existing right-of-way for multi-modal improvements such as wider sidewalks, on-street parking, transit-only lanes, or planted medians. Living Streets will recommend solutions to provide a more sustainable transportation balance than relying soley on private automobiles and integrate the land use and form of adjacent development to acheive great destinations for people. MI 1e. Alleys Alleys are important to the proper functioning of the transportation system and land uses. Alleys should generally be required within all blocks in both residential and commercial areas to allow for loading functions, trash pick-up, and vehicle and utility access. Alleys must be a minimum of 16-feet wide to meet Denver Public Works access standards. e preferred conguration for alleys is a mid-block straight alley. However, in certain cases where alleys would otherwise connect to arterial streets, a T alley conguration may be Alleys should generally be required within all blocks in both residential and commercial areas to allow for loading functions, trash pick-up, and vehicle and utility accessconsidered. If a T-alley is used, it must be designed with proper turning radii on internal corners for trash and delivery vehicles. MI 1f. Travel Demand Management Travel demand management is a key tool in making the existing transportation infrastructure more eective by reducing the demand for single-occupancy vehicle trips. Travel demand management is focused on promoting capooling, vanpooling, transit use, bicycling, walking, teleworking and o-peak travel options over driving alone. e Denver Revariety of services through its RideArrangers program to promote travel demand management on a regional level including a carpool-matching database, vanpool program, telework programs, regional campaigns such as Bike-to-Work Day, and employer-based promotion of alternative travel options. In addition, area-based transportation management orgapartnerships that support and promote travel demand management programs. ree TMOs currently operate within the City and County of Denver but there is not currently a TMO for the area surrounding the 41st and Fox Station. Given the limited roadway capacity in the station area and the need to promote transit use and alternative modes of travel, it is recommended that the city partner with area property owners and businesses to form a TMO for Northwest Denver that would include the 41st and Fox Station Area. In the interim, the city could partner with DRCOG RideArrangers to promote TDM programs to area businesses and residents.

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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Plan Concept 24 Along 41st Avenue, a pedestrian plaza will connect the station platform to Fox Street and Elati Street to the east. This pedestrian plaza should include decorative pavers or pavement, benches, trees and planters, pedestrian-scale lighting, outdoor seating, and room for street carts and vendors.

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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Plan Concept25Economic Opportunitye Denver FasTracks transit initiative brings the Denver region an unprecedented opportunity to promote and facilitate transit-oriented, higher-density, mixed-use residential and commercial development. Recognizing this opportunity, the City and County of Denver has taken a proactive approach toward refocusing growth into neighborhoods and districts near existing and future transit stations. To identify, leverage, and maximize these opportunities, the city retained a project team to conduct a TOD Economic Analysis and Market Study. e primary goal of the TOD Economic Analysis and Market Study was to provide the city with an assessment of transit oriented development potential at the regional, corridor, and station area levels through analysis of shortand long-term demand. Conducted in coordination with station area planning efforts, the market study is meant to better align station area plans with market realities and dynamics. e overall objectives of the TOD Economic Analysis and Market Study included forging a better understanding of the economic context in which the city may plan for transit oriented development, and specic recommendations regarding the amount, type, mix, and intensity of uses appropriate for selected station areas. Transit Induced Economic Growth Based on survey results and national experience, the TOD Economic Analysis and Market Study estimated that the Denver region could see a modest level of growth induced by transit between 2015 to 2030. It is during this time period that the FasTracks system will be a complete system serving the Denver region, and will place the region in a better competitive position to attract new growth compared to other regions without full transit systems. e study also examined how transit would aect where growth would occur within the region, noting that transit areas could potentially attract a signicant portion of regional growth. e TOD Economic Analysis and Market Study estimated that there will be an additional 2 percent growth in population and employment above what would normally have occurred from 2015 to 2030 because of the transit system and that 40 percent of this growth could be captured within the mile walksheds surrounding transit stations. Research examined in the TOD Economic Analysis and Market Study has suggested that transit station areas may capture relatively more regional growth when located in regions that are fast-growing, are experiencing growth of households likely to be interested in living near transit, have experienced demand for higherintensity development, and benet from public policies that support transit oriented development. Further detail on these growth assumptions can be found in the City and County of Denvers transit oriented development market study report, Regional Demand Analysis & TOD Market Analysis. Existing Market Conditions e 41st and Fox Station Area is situated in close proximity to Downtown Denver and established residential neighborhoods. e station area has exhibited recent development inThe Denver FasTracks transit initiative brings the Denver region an unprecedented opportunity to promote and facilitate transit-oriented, higher-density, mixed-use residential and commercial development

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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Plan Concept 26 terest following conversion of a former hotel space to student housing. e area features residential neighborhoods, retail uses congregated along 38th Avenue, and industrial uses east and west of the station. e built environment surrounding the 41st and Fox Station includes a mix of industrial, residential, retail, and oce space. Retail buildings are older, with most constructed prior to 1988, but exhibit high occupancy. e real estate community has taken interest in retail expansion in the area and the Railyard Marketplace project includes 28,000 square feet of retail space. Current uses in the area include the following: public housing, and recently built student housing located along 38th Avenue Marketplace school, family health center, and recreation center e area currently has a larger household size, lower household income, and higher unemployment rate compared to the city and region. Zoning is mostly industrial on the east The station area has begun to transform with new uses including student housing, and large, underutilized parcels may redevelop to take advantage of transit serviceside of the station. On the west side of the station, there is a mix of industrial, residential and mixed-use zoning. Future Market Demand At the time the market study was conducted in 2007, the 41st and Fox Station was planned for a location approximately two blocks to the south near 38th Avenue in the center of the railroad right-of-way. In addition, market analysis assumed a lower-intensity Urban Neighborhood typology based on the Transit Oriented Development Strategic Plan, rather than the higher-intensity Urban Center typology developed through the station area planning process. Finally, it is important to note that national economic conditions have changed signicantly since the market study was conducted. e nation, state and local economies have witnessed a recession since the summer of 2008 with a collapse in housing prices, retail sales, and new construction. However, the opportunities and constraints of the station area have remained the same and the market analysis still provides useful information on the long-term development potential of the station area. Further detail on the market analysis can be found in the City and County of Denvers transit oriented development market study report, TOD Opportunities & Constraints. e 41st and Fox Station Area exhibits many strengths relative to other station areas. Several projects recently completed, under construction, or proposed have already begun to create a mixed-use, mixed-income, mixed-age community

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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Plan Concept27with new residential units oriented to students and those seeking aordable housing. e area has seen demonstrated developer interest through projects such as the Regency Student Housing, Railyard Marketplace, and Renaissance River Lofts. e proximity to Downtown, Auraria Higher Education Center, and Denver Union Station enhances the station areas redevelopment potential. Several property owners own multiple properties, providing opportunities for assemblage and redevelopment. Of note is the 45 acre parcel in the northeast portion of the station area, the site of the former Denver Post printing and distribution facility. Some of the economic opportunities of this station include strong potential for mixed-income housing and neighborhood revitalization, neighborhood-oriented retail and services and redevelopment of former industrial sites. e market study identied redevelopment scenarios for net new development in the station area based on market conditions and trends. e rst two scenarios, Modest and Moderate, call for 1.1 to 1.6 million square feet of development. Further redevelopment of vacant or underutilized parcels could yield an estimated 4.3 million square feet of development under current zoning.Recommendation ED 1: Economic Development Strategiese realization of transit oriented development will require a combination of private and public sector support including involvement at the local, regional, and state levels. Given the potential demand for housing, retail, and oce space in advance of the introduction of transit service, it is necessary for local municipalities, RTD, and the development community to work in partnership to stimulate transit-supportive development and discourage uses that would be less supportive. e TOD Station Area Strategies, Implementation and Phasing Toolbox and Matrix identied a variety of implementation and phasing strategies that the City and County of Denver, other local jurisdictions, RTD, and the development community can implement to ensure successful transit oriented development within existing and future transit corridors. Several of the transit oriented development implementation tools can be used to encourage the appropriate phasing of development both prior to and following the opening of the transit line. ese include the the following recommendations: ED 1a. Interim uses. In situations in which the operation of transit is years away, it may be benecial for station areas to develop uses that generate income but are removable in the such lots. However, the future value of redevelopment must provide incentive for these uses to be removed over time. ED 1b. Zoning incentives for transit oriented development. Implement new zone districts with TOD supportive attributes, including those for the interim period and the transit operation period. ese zones typically allow for increased densities and reductions in required parking, enable mixed-use development, and prohibit uses that would not be transit supportive. Innovative parking standards include parking maximums, no requirement for parking, and unbundling of parking and development. ED 1c. Infrastructure improvements, special assessments and tax incentives. As a pre-development phase, public entities working alone or in partnership with developers may undertake infrastructure improvement projects such as parking facilities, parks, streetscapes, pedestrian and bicycle enhancements, road reconstruction and extension, park beautication and signage. e purpose of such projects is to set the stage for and encourage transit-supportive development. ese activities can also provide early marketing of the station areas identity to future prospective residents, employees and visitors. To fund infrastructure investments, a special assessment statutory district in Denvers case) in the pre-development phase. Also tax incentive programs such as tax increment nancing, or tax abatements, may be used to bolster developers resources for funding infrastructure. ED 1d. Joint development, revenue sharing and cost sharing. In station areas where joint development is an option, revenue or cost sharing arrangements with the private sector in order to either secure a source of revenue for improvements or divide the cost of infrastructure construction and maintenance. Types of revenue sharing arrangements include land leases, air rights development, and special assessment districts. Cost sharing arrangements can include sharing of construction expenses and density bonuses oered in exchange for infrastructure construction.

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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Plan Concept 28 Development Program Total Estimate Residential square feet 7,576,000 Retail square feet 185,500 Oce square feet 2,660,000 Housing units 6,310 Population 13,100 Employment 9,000 ED 1e. Aordable housing incentives and regulations. e regions large, public investment in transit provides an opportunity to ensure that housing aordability and transportation access goals are addressed. Growing the supply of housing and the diversity of housing types in the station area ensures that there will be adequate housing available for individuals and families wishing to live near transit. Housing aordability is also enhanced by the potential transportation cost savings for households living near transit that can save money on vehicle ownership costs. e City of Denver has adopted a policy to increase the supply of aordable and mixed income housing in close proximity to transit stations. Recent recommendations by the City of Denver aordable housing task force include locating 50 percent of new city-subsidized housing for low and moderate income households in bus and rail transit corridors. Recommendations include increasing the supply and variety of for sale and rental housing, seeking funding partnerships to facilitate aordable housing within the station area, eliminating regulatory barriers to aordable housing, and following the aordable and mixed income housing recommendations in the TOD Strategic Plan. e City and County of Denver presently oers a broad array of programs that could be used to support transitsupportive development. Some of the tools appropriate for the 41st and Fox Station are included in the implementation chapter of this plan.The numbers represent a substantial increase over the TOD Economic Analysis and Market Study projections due to the shift in station location and typology for the eastern portion of the station area. Numbers represent total, gross development in the 1/2 mile station area including existing and future land use.ED 1f. Capture partnership benets between industry and academic institutions. Encourage ties between area businesses, academic institutions, and student populations to foster research industries as well as entrepreneurial and incubator employment uses in the station area. Build o of the partnerships already created between Regency Student Housing and the Auraria Campus. 41st and Fox Station Area Development Summary e development program presented in the table below represents a substantial increase over the TOD Economic Analysis and Market Study projections due to the shift in station location and typology for the eastern portion of the station area. e numbers shown represent a transit oriented development scale similar to the Urban Center typology that was developed through the public involvement process. Given right-of-way, utilities and parks), the devlopment program equates to an average oor-to-area ratio of approximately 1 for all parcels. is is well within the 0.5 to 4 oor to area ratio for transit oriented development areas outlined in Blueprint Denver. However, there would be signicant variation within the station area with much denser development on the eastern portion than the western portion. e land use mix is also similar to what is recommended for an Urban Center and includes the necessary mix of residential, employment, and retail critical to creating a walkable environment. e actual amount of development may be more or less than shown below. Future development projections assume an average unit size of approximately 1,200 square feet, an average household size of approximately 2.2, an average of approximately 300 square feet for each employee and a vacancy rate of 5.7 percent for residential and commercial properties.

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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Implementation and Next Steps29 Implementation and Next Steps

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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Implementation and Next Steps 30Implementation and Next StepsTransforming Denvers transit stations into vital, dynamic transit oriented development areas will not happen over night. e market, planning, infrastructure, community and political readiness around each of Denvers existing and future FasTracks stations will vary considerably. Understanding that not all stations will be ripe for attention at any one time is an important consideration when implementing a city-wide strategy. e implementation recommendations for the 41st and Fox Station Area will create the transit oriented development envisioned in this plan. e implementation plan covers a series of actions: To aid the City and County of Denver and its partners in completing an assessment of the station area, each station should be evaluated in relation to how it measures against the following transit oriented development success factors: Implementation Continuum: Transit oriented development at stations requires a series of actions ranging from initial planning, to making targeted investments, to putting the full range of necessary tools and leadership in place. Cost Benet Payback: It is important to target the limited funds available for public investment in infrastructure and economic development to transit areas, and, in particular, those transit areas where public investment can leverage the most private investment and create successful examples of transit oriented development. Development Ready: Before private investment can occur, it is important to ensure that all necessary steps have been taken to make the station area development ready. is includes regulations, zoning, entitlements, basic infrastructure, and incentives. Current Trends: Transit oriented development will depend on the real estate market dynamics of the station area. Developer Interest in Transit Oriented Development: Demonstrated developer interest is a critical component of transit oriented development. e city should use the planning process to create interest in the station area and highlight transit oriented development activities that may already be occurring. Ability to Nudge: Nudging development at a station requires a series of factors supportive of transit oriented development to be in place. e public sector should be playing an active role in moving private activities forward. Cataylitic projects include: the city funded bicycle and pedestrian bridge over 38th Avenue, and the 38th Avenue viaduct improvements projects by RTD tributes walks, bicycle lanes and street improvements Leadership in Place: A lesson learned repeatedly is that strong public and private leadership is necessary to make transit oriented development successful. Often this will require not only strong policy direction, but also vision and risk taking both by elected ocials and private developers. Recommendations and Implementation Strategies e specic recommendations for implementing the 41st and Fox plan are divided into three categories: regulatory tools, infrastructure tools, and partnership tools. Specic recommendations in each of these categories are presented in the tables on the following pages. Each table contains details on the implementation strategy, timeframe, and responsible parties. Timeframes identied include short, medium, and long. In general, short refers to actions between plan adoption and dium timeframe are those actions that should occur between 2015 and the planning horizon of 2030. Long timeframe are those actions that will likely occur further out than 2030.

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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Implementation and Next Steps31 Regulatory ToolsRecommendations Implementation Strategy TimeframeKey ResponsibilityLU 1: UD 1; ED 1a, 1b, 1e: New zone districts with TOD supportive attributes New zoning should allow for increased densities and reductions in parking, enable mixed-use development, and prohibit new uses that would not be transit supportive. New zoning should generally conform to the recommendations of the land use and urban design plan concept. While some properties will be rezoned upon adoption of Denvers New Zoning Code other properties may be rezoned through later legislative rezonings or as property owners apply or following the completion of a General Development Plan. Short to Medium Department of Community Planning and Development UD 2d: On-street parking and area based management of parking Promote parallel or angled parking on streets to calm traffic, provide a buffer between traffic and pedestrians on the sidewalk, and provide convenient, front door parking for customers of shops and restaurants. In order to properly manage the parking supply, the city will need to conduct an area-based parking management plan to examine tools including time limits and meters to manage on-street spaces and ensure parking availability in the station area. Short to Medium Department of Public Works UD 2d: Parking design regulationsUse structured or underground parking to ensure continuity of the streetscape. Structures should be wrapped with active uses. Where surface parking is provided, it should be located behind the buildings -not between the building entrance and sidewalk. Short Department of Community Planning and Development LU 1; UD 1; MI 1: General development plans (GDPs) for large redevelopments GDPs provide a tool for large, often phased developments that benefit from coordinated plans rather than traditional site plans. This will be an especially useful tool for the eastern portion of the station area. Short to Medium Departments of Community Planning and Development, Public Works, and Parks LU 1; UD 1; ED 1: Support green building practices, such as LEED certification for new development in transit oriented development areas Meet goals of Greenprint Denver and long term economic development by creating new regulatory incentives to support green construction of new buildings in station areas. Promote standards of Leadership In Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) for new construction. ShortDevelopment Services LU 1h; UD 1d; ED 1d: Support legislative changes to allow joint development on RTD owned parking The City and Count of Denver should actively support changing RTDs enabling legislation in the Colorado State Legislature to allow joint residential and commercial transit oriented development with shared parking on land acquired for RTD park-n-Rides. Short to MediumMayor and City CouncilED 1e: Eliminate regulatory barriers to affordable housing Zoning and land use regulations should allow for a variety of housing types and smaller, more affordable housing units including small lot single-family and multi-family housing. This will allow the housing supply to increase in response to housing demand. Parking requirements should be reduced and unbundled for residential development to make housing more affordable for individuals who do not own cars. ShortDepartment of Community Planning and DevelopmentED 1e: Create an Affordable Housing and Mixed Income Housing Strategy for TOD consistent with the TOD Strategic Plan Recommendations of the TOD Strategic Plan include provision of affordable housing when determining the allocation of public assistance to development projects and revisions to the inclusionary housing ordinance. Short Office of Economic Development, Department of Community Planning and Development, City Council

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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Implementation and Next Steps 32 Infrastructure ToolsRecommendations Implementation Strategy TimeframeKey ResponsibilityMI 1a, 1d: Complete funded improvements including RTD pedestrianand bicycle bridge at 41st Avenue, Inca pedestrian and bicycle bridge over 38th Avenue, and 38th Avenue Viaduct improvements Coordinate between city agencies, the community and RTD to ensure funded improvements are completed and designed to fit the goals of this station area plan. ShortCity and County of Denver, RTD MI 1d: Study 38th Avenue pedestrian and transit improvements following policies of Denvers Living Streets Initiative Examine 38th Avenue right-of-way for inclusion of multi-modal improvements such as wider sidewalks, on-street parking, transit-only lanes and planted medians following the recommendations of Denvers Living Streets Initiative. Living Streets are designed to acheive a more sustainable transportation balance, maximize the efficiency of a corridors persontrip capacity (compared to auto-trip capacity), and integrate the use and form of adjacent development to create great destinations. Short to MediumCity and County of Denver LU 1i: Develop an urban open space system with variety of parks and public spaces on east side of railroad tracks Develop parks and public spaces in the eastern portion of the station area in response to the conversion of industrial uses to higher density residential. Funding for new parks could come through public purchase of property through bond funds, or through consolidation of required private open space through the GDP process. Short to Long Parks and Recreation Department, private developersMI 1d: Pedestrian and bicycle improvements to 41st, 44th, and 46th Avenues, and Elati and Navajo Streets Bicycle lanes should be provided on the streets identified for bicycle and pedestrian improvements. These streets would include Elati Street and 41st, 44th, and 46th Avenues. Along Inca Street a detached multi-use path is proposed paralleling the railroad tracks and connecting to the pedestrian and bicycle bridge over 38th Avenue. These streets should incorporate sustainable street design elements such as storm water treatment features in the tree-lawn. The 44th Avenue bridge over I-25 should undergo aesthetic improvements including better lighting, fencing and bicycle lane markings in the shoulder. Short to LongDepartment of Public Works, private developersMI 1e: Promote alley access and develop alleys in blocks in conjunction with redevelopment Alleys are important to the proper functioning of the transportation system and land uses. Alleys should generally be required within blocks in both residential and commercial areas to allow for loading functions, trash pick-up, and vehicle and utility access. Short to LongDepartment of Public Works, private developersMI 1b: New street grid between 44th and I-70; between the railroad tracks and Delaware St. New streets should follow local street standards that have a minimum of a 13 pedestrian zone that includes a tree lawn and detached sidewalk Short to LongDepartment of Public Works, private developersMI 1b: Vacate 31st Street; new street connection of 41st Ave. and Delaware Streets The block between Elati and Delaware Streets between 41st and 42nd Avenue should be developed on the north-south grid and the right-of way for 31st Street should be vacated. Short to LongDepartment of Public Works, private developersMI 1b: New street connection along east side of railroad tracks at approximately Galapago Street between 40th and 44th avenues. A new street paralleling the east side of the railroad tacks at approximately Galapego Street between 40th and 44th Avenues will be necessary to provide circulation through the station area. This street should be constructed in segments in conjunction with new development. RTD will be responsible for the street adjacent to the station and the City and private developers will be responsible for other portions. Short to LongDepartment of Public Works, private developers, RTDMI 1d: Inca Street Improvements between 36th and 46th Avenues Improvements should include an 18 pedestrian zone on the west side of the street that includes sidewalks, pedestrian-scale lighting, street trees, improved bus stops and a 12 detached bicycle path on the east side of Inca. MediumDepartment of Public Works, private developersMI 1d: Fox Street improvements between 38th and 45th Avenues Improvements should generally follow the cross section shown in the plan. There should be a 20 pedestrian zone that includes sidewalks, pedestrian-scale lighting, street trees in grates, improved bus stops, and enough room for sidewalk uses, outdoor seating, street carts and vendors. The street should include on-street parking. MediumDepartment of Public Works, private developersMI 1d: Improvements to the bicycle /pedestrian underpass of I-25 to City of Cuernavca Park mprovements should include improved lighting, aesthetic treatments and maintenanceShort to Medium Department of Public Works, Colorado Department of Transportation

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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Implementation and Next Steps33 Infrastructure Tools (continued)Recommendations Implementation Strategy TimeframeKey ResponsibilityMI 1c: Intersection improvements to 38th Avenue and Fox Street Improvements to the intersection of 38th Avenue and Fox Street may be necessary to improve traffic flow and the pedestrian environment at this critical intersection. Medium to LongDepartment of Public WorksMI 1b: New street grid between 44th and 46th Avenues; between Inca Street and Lipan Street New streets should follow local street standards that have a minimum of a 13 pedestrian zone that includes a tree lawn and detached sidewalk Medium to LongDepartment of Public Works, private developersMI 1c: Intersection improvements to 38th Avenue and Navajo Street Improvements to the intersection of 38th Avenue and Navajo Street will be necessary to improve the pedestrian environment at this important activity center. Improvements could include improved crosswalk treatments, curb bulb outs and ramps, and median pedestrian refuges pending additional engineering analysis. Medium to LongDepartment of Public Works MI 1d: 41st Avenue Plaza between station and Elati Street Along 41st Street, construct a pedestrian plaza connecting the station platform to Fox Street and Elati Street to the east. This pedestrian plaza should include decorative pavers or pavement, benches, trees and planters, pedestrian-scale lighting, outdoor seating, street carts, and vendors. Access for angled, on-street parking may also be necessary. Medium to Long Department of Public Works, private developers, RTDMI 1b: New street connection over or under the railroad tracks at 46th or 44th Avenue A new street connection or pedestrian bridge is proposed across the railroad tracks at either 44th or 46th Avenue. It is likely only one connection would be built. A street connection at 46th Avenue would have many advantages including more direct access to I-70 via Pecos Street; reduced traffic impact to residential areas in Sunnyside; better access to the northern portion of the station area; and not impacting areas close to the station with a viaduct. A 44th Avenue connection would be less desirable because of impacts to the station area from a viaduct and traffic impacts to the Sunnyside residential areas. However, feasibility of either connection would require detailed engineering and cost analysis, an identified source of funding, and cooperation from the railroads. LongDepartment of Public Works, Union Pacific Railroad, Colorado Department of Transportation Partnership ToolsRecommendations Implementation Strategy TimeframeKey ResponsibilityUD 2d; ED 1b,1c,1e: Explore shared parking solutions through an area based management plan process that could potentially include in lieu fees or the creation of a parking district to address shared parking in the station area if these mechanisms are developed Through an area based management plan process, analyze parking problems and solutions comprehensively to promote shared parking arrangements where possible. Mechanisms to explore include districts. In other cities, these districts set up a management entity and process through which new developments have the option of paying into a fund rather than constructing parking (payment in lieu of parking). The parking fee is often structured to be less than the actual cost of providing a parking space to offer the developer an incentive for choosing the district option. The management entity is then in charge of constructing and operating pooled parking for the entire district, and may also manage other programs, such as arrangements with shared car service providers. Short to Long City and County of Denver, private property owners LU 1i; UD 2a, 2d; MI 1b, 1d;1f; ED 1 a, 1c, 1d: Special tax assessment districts for infrastructure funding and maintenance Promote legislated districts to fund infrastructure improvements associated with development. The City and County of Denver offers two types of special assessment districts than may be used: charter districts and statutory districts. Charter districts are public improvement districts and local maintenance districts created and operated by the City and County for the construction and maintenance of public improvements, and are funded by annual assessments. Statutory districts are independent districts with the ability to separately tax, assess and impose fees (examples include Business Improvement Districts). Upon formation of a district a variety of mechanisms to fund streetscape improvements should be explored. Short to Long City and County of Denver, private property owners LU 1i: Passive, naturalized landscaped areas along I-25 to improve water quality and provide a scenic buffer The City and County of Denver should work in partnership with CDOT to improve the landscaping and maintenance along I-25, including the land between 38th Avenue and I-25 and the Park Avenue Interchange, to provide passive open space and water quality benefits. Short to Long City and County of Denver, Colorado Department of Transportation

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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Implementation and Next Steps 34 Partnership Tools (continued)Recommendations Implementation Strategy TimeframeKey ResponsibilityLU 1a, 1b; UD 1a; MI 1b, 1c; ED 1c: Pursue tax increment financing to pay for infrastructure improvements to pedestrian shopping district at 41st Avenue and Fox Street The Denver Urban Renewal Authority can use tax increment financing (TIF) as a method of financing redevelopment (specifically improvements offering a public benefit, such as site acquisition and/or clearance, streets, utilities, parks, parking, and removal of hazardous materials). Generally speaking, TIF works best in Denver on projects with a large retail component that can generate retail sales tax revenues to support the redevelopment effort; a determination of blight is also required. Short to Long Denver Urban Renewal Authority, private property owners MI 1a, 1c, 1d: Pursue infrastructure funding through DRCOG TIP especially CMAQ funds The Denver Regional Council of Governments allocates funding for transportation improvements within the region such as roadway reconstruction, bicycle/pedestrian enhancements, and other enhancement projects through its Transportation Improvement Program (TIP). DRCOG uses a number of criteria to determine how funding is allocated. In addition to such criteria as safety, cost-effectiveness, connectivity and usage, DRCOG could consider elevating projects that support mixed-use, transit-supportive development as a top policy objective and criteria for selection. Short to Long City and County of Denver, DRCOG UD 1e: Partner with private property owners to preserve or incorporate historic structures Work with private property owners on adaptive reuse of historic structures or incorporation of design elements into new development. Short to Long Denver Landmark Preservation, State Historic Preservation Office, private land owners LU 1h, UD 1dMI 1a: Continue coordination with RTD on Gold Line Final Design The city should continue its coordination with RTD and members of the community to ensure that final design of the Gold Line meets the goals and vision of this station area plan. Work with RTD on limiting future park-n-Ride spaces to the 500 proposed for 2015 in conjunction with future TOD if ridership goals can be met through land use changes.Short City and County of Denver, RTD LU 1; UD 1; MI 1d, 1f : Identify scope of work and funding for a health impact assessment Use the recommendations of the station area plan to develop targets for tracking health indicators related to land use and transportation planning including safe pedestrian routes, reduction of vehicle miles traveled and automobile emissions, and access to recreation and health facilities. Short Denver Department of Environmental Health, State Department of Health, Denver Housing Authority MI 1f: Given the limited roadway capacity in the station area, use travel demand management to reduce the demand for singleoccupancy vehicle trips through capooling, vanpooling, transit use, bicycling, walking, teleworking and off-peak travel. Partner with area property owners and businesses to form a TMO for Northwest Denver that would include the 41st and Fox Station Area. In the interim, the City could partner with DRCOG RideArrangers to promote TDM programs to area businesses and residents. Short to Long City and County of Denver, Area Businesses and Residents, DRCOG ED 1e: Seek funding partnerships to facilitate affordable housing within the station area Use the recently established TOD Fund to strategically invest in properties in order to preserve and expand the amount of affordable housing at transit stations. Promote the use of Community Block Grant, HOME, Multi-family Revenue Bond allocations and Low Income Housing Tax Credits for affordble housing projects in close proximity to transit. Short to Long Community Planning and Development Department, Office of Economic Development, non-profits, private developers LU 1h; UD 1d; ED 1d: Joint development guidelines and memoranda of understanding for RTD park-n-Ride Joint development guidelines provide a framework for transit authorities to enter partnerships with private developers to redevelop authority-owned land. Memoranda of understanding can be used to stipulate terms of joint development agreements, shared parking arrangements, or agreements between local municipalities and developers. Medium to Long City and County of Denver, RTD

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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Supporting Documention35 Supporting Documentation

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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Supporting Documention 36 Foundation). e school structures add to the neighborhood character and play a positive role in the community. Parks and Open Space Four neighborhood parks are within the station area all are west of the railroad tracks. Columbus, Ciancio and Aztlan Parks are within Sunnyside. Franco Park is located in the Highland neighborhood at 37th Avenue and Lipan Street. e area east of the station is industrial in nature and does not have parks. Columbus Park: is 3-acre park is located on the north side of 38th at Osage Street and contains a shelter, toilets, group facilities, playground and open elds. Ciancio Park: Ciancio Park is located at 41st Avenue and Lipan Street, adjacent to Horace Mann School. It is a ve acre neighborhood park that contains three baseball/softball elds and a junior football eld. Except for a few picnic tables that the public can use, it primarily exists to provide recreation space for the school and city softball teams. e entire perimeter of the park is fenced which may suggest school ownership or private property. Aztlan Park: Aztlan Park is located near the Quigg-Newton Homes at 44th Avenue and Navajo Street. e park has a playground, picnic tables, outdoor pool, basketball court and softball eld. e Aztlan Recreation Center is located on-site. e park is approximately 3.6 acres. Franco Park: Franco Park is a small 1/2 acre park located at 37th Avenue and Lipan Street. e park has a playground, picnic tables and basketball court. Housing e Globeville, Sunnyside and Highland neighborhoods have an aordable housing stock composed of single-family homes with some duplexes and apartments. e singlefamily housing stock is fairly well maintained, but could use improvement. e average household income and percentage home ownership in each neighborhood is shown in the table below. While the home prices remain aordable to existing residents, the presence of the station may increase property values and the overall desirability of the area. is will create a need for new development to provide housing types for diverse income levels. The Community Location and Overviewe 41st and Fox Station will be situated in the Globeville neighborhood at the edge of two other Denver neighborhoods: Sunnyside and Highland. e Sunnyside neighborhood composes the west half of the station area and is separated from Globeville by the UP and BNSF railroad tracks. Globeville and Sunnyside are two of the oldest neighborhoods in Denver, and benet from the close proximity to the Downtown core. Globeville has its roots in the smelting industry, and continues to be dominated by industrial uses today. Sunnyside is primarily single-family residential with some industrial uses along the eastern boundary. Due to the predominance of industrial uses in both neighborhoods, a cohesive network of infrastructure including streets, sidewalks, landscaping/trees and utilities does not exist. Furthermore, both neighborhoods lack sucient community services such as grocery stores, and the income levels are lower as compared to other neighborhoods in the city. e community has a strong sense of cultural identity and high rate of home ownership. e station area includes many barriers such as the railroad tracks, I-70, I-25 and 38th Avenue. ese major roadways, as well as the railroad, separate the station platform from nearby neighborhoods. erefore, strengthening access points to the station for vehicles, bicyclists and pedestrians will be an important factor in encouraging and sustaining private development. Primary access to the station is planned via Fox Street, a north-south street that extends from 38th Avenue to the former Denver Post property. e Denver Post site is vacant and the 44-acre grounds are under private ownership. Other access points include 44th Avenue from the east across I-25 and the existing pedestrian bridge across the railroad tracks at 43rd Avenue. Schools e Sunnyside neighborhood has three schools in proximity to the station area: the Horace Mann Middle School, Smedley Elementary School and Garden Place Elementary. Horace Mann is located on 41st between Lipan and Mariposa Streets. e school has 210 students and is at 33% capacity. Smedley Elementary is outside of the mile boundary at 42nd and Shoshone and was recently closed by Denver Public Schools. e Garden Place Elementary School is located east of I-25 in Globeville. e current student population is

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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Supporting Documention37 Public facilities include Trevista at Horace Mann School and Columbus Park 41st and Fox Station Area LocationStation Area

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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Supporting Documention 38 Quigg Newton Homes Quigg Newton Homes, Denvers largest public housing project, is a HOPE VI aordable housing complex bounded ere are a number of facilities on site, including a recreation center, senior housing facility, Boys and Girls Club and employment assistance center. e facility has approximately ing to a recent survey, the population of Quigg Newton is 86 percent Hispanic). Just under a quarter are married, and there are also more older and childless adults among Quigg Newton residents: 17 percent are over 62, and 44 percent say they have no children under 18 living in their household. Historic Properties ere are no historic districts in the mile study area. e Gold Line EIS documented resources listed or eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places in the vicinity of the rail station. e study found ve resources in the area, including 2 residences on Fox Street, one commercial building on Inca Street, a set of commercial buildings at 38th According to the Sunnyside Neighborhood Assessment, one structure has been designated as a local Denver historic structures for preservation: Horace Mann School at 4130 Navajo Street. A 1981 historic buildings inventory listed 55 Sunnyside structures as having potential for designation, primarily residential. View Planes A City and County of Denver view plane originates at 51st Avenue and Zuni Street and extends southeast toward Downtown. e intent of this view plane is to protect views toward Downtown Denver. Structures in this area are not to exceed 5,347 feet. Based on spot elevations, this would allow buildings as tall as approximately 150 feet within the portion of the station area that is within the view plane. Floodplains and Drainage All portions of the 41st and Fox Station Area west of I-25 fall outside of the 100 year oodplain. e City and County of Denver Storm Drainage Master Plan basins in the 41st and Fox Station Area: e Highland Basin tion with future development in the station area, analysis of the storm and sanitary sewer capacity will be required and should be incorporated into future updates of the Storm Water Master Plan and Sanitary Sewer Master Plan. Identied issues and necessary infrastructure improvements can best be addressed through consolidated improvements as part of a general development plan process but can also be addressed through site plan review. Wherever possible, low impact development and best management practices with hydrological function landscape, vegetative swale, permeable into development design for stormwater quality control and aesthetic purpose. In addition, street drainage capacity must be checked for both minor storm and major storm events as part of any new roadway construction and street rehabilitation. During the major storm event, stormwater conveyance within the right-of-way may not exceed 12 inches at the gutter owline and must remain in the right-of-way. During the minor storm event, no curb overtopping is allowable. Neighborhood Average Household Income Percent Home Ownership Globeville $37,063 63 Sunnyside $43,226 59 Highland $39,568 43 City and County of Denver $55,128 52Source: Piton Foundation, 2000Neighborhood Housing Characteristics

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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Supporting Documention39 View Planes Floodplains

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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Supporting Documention 40Land Use and Zoningere are currently 11 zone districts in the 41st and Fox Station Area. e majority of the station area, approximately 69 percent, is currently zoned for industrial uses including the entire eastern portion of the station area and much of the western portion of the station area closest to the station. Only about 4 percent of the 1/2 mile station area is zoned for commercial mixed-use development, concentrated along 38th Avenue. Approximately 26 percent of the land area is zoned residential in the form of R-2, R-3 or RMU-30. ese zone districts all allow multi-unit dwellings. No portion of the station area is zoned exclusively for single-family residential development. e remainder of the station area is zoned as PRV or as a PUD. e current residential land use in the 41st and Fox Station Area is a mixture of single-family and low-rise multi-family residential with some higher-density apartment buildings. Approximately 51 percent of the land area is public or quasipublic comprising such uses as street right-of-way and publicly owned park or open space. Only 4 percent of the land is vacant or counts surface parking as an independent use. Existing Zone Districts Business and Mixed Use Districts B-1 Limited Oce District: is district provides oce space for services related to dental and medical care and for oce-type services, often for residents of nearby residential areas. e district is characterized by a low volume of direct daily customer contact. is district is characteristically small in size and is situated near major hospitals or between large business areas and residential areas. e district regulations establish standards comparable to those of the low density residential districts, resulting in similar building bulk and retaining the low concentration of pedestrian and vehicular trac. Building height is controlled by bulk standards and open space requirements. Building oor cannot exceed the site area. B-2 Neighborhood Business District: is district provides for the retailing of commodities classied as convenience goods and the furnishing of certain personal services to The station area contains a mix of residential and industrial areas

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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Supporting Documention41Existing land use map here Existing Land Use

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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Supporting Documention 42 Residential Districts R-2 Multi-Unit Dwellings, Low Density: Typically duplexes and triplexes. Home occupations are allowed by permit. Minimum of 6,000 square feet of land required for each duplex structure with an additional 3,000 square feet required for every unit over 2. R-3 Multi-Unit Dwellings, High Density: Building size is controlled by bulk standards, o-street parking and open space requirements. Building oor area cannot exceed three times the site area. R-MU-30 Residential Mixed-Use District: e R-MU30 district is a primarily residential district allowing higher density multiple unit dwellings of a density appropriate to the center city and other activity centers such as light rail transit stations. Supporting commercial development, such as consumer retail and service uses and small-scale oce uses, is encouraged to create a truly mixed-use environment. No maximum residential density is prescribed. Instead, maximum height, setbacks, and open space requirements determine the scale of buildings. Other Districts PRV Platte River Valley District: is district is intended to promote and encourage a diversity of land uses having urban character, integrating the districts unique geographic location and setting, amenities of view, transportation linkages and open space. A variety of land uses are permitted in order to facilitate new development, allow for the reuse of eligible historic structures and to complement development in the adjacent neighborhoods and Downtown. New residential development and open space is encouraged. PUD Planned Unit Development District: e PUD district is an alternative to conventional land use regulations, combining use, density and site plan considerations into a single process. e PUD district is specically intended to encourage diversication in the use of land and exibility in site design with respect to spacing, heights and setbacks of buildings, densities, open space and circulation elements; innovation in residential development that results in the availability of adequate housing opportunities for varying income levels; more ecient use of land and energy through smaller utility and circulation networks; pedestrian considerations; and development patterns in harmony with nearby areas and with the goals and objectives of the comprehensive plan for the city. satisfy the daily and weekly household or personal needs of residents of surrounding residential neighborhoods. is district is located on collector streets, characteristically is small in size, usually is entirely surrounded by residential districts and is located at a convenient walking distance from the residential districts it is designed to serve. e district regulations establish standards comparable to those of low density residential districts. Building oor cannot exceed the site area. B-4 General Business District: is district is intended to provide for and encourage appropriate commercial uses adjacent to arterial streets, which are normally transit routes. Uses include a wide variety of consumer and business services and retail establishments that serve other business activities, and local transit-dependent residents within the district as well as residents throughout the city. e regulations generally allow a moderate intensity of use and concentration for the purpose of achieving compatibility between the wide varieties of uses permitted in the district. Building height is not controlled by bulk standards unless there is a property line to property line abutment with a residential use. Building oor area cannot exceed twice the site area. Industrial Districts I-0 Light Industrial/Oce District: is district is intended to be an employment area containing oces, and light industrial uses which are generally compatible with residential uses. I-0 zoned areas are designed to serve as a buer between residential areas and more intensive industrial areas. Bulk plane, setback and landscaping standards apply in this district. Building oor area cannot exceed 50% of the site area; however, oce oor area may equal site area. Some uses are conditional uses. I-1 General Industrial District: is district is intended to be an employment area containing industrial uses which are generally more intensive than those permitted in the I-0 zone. Bulk plane, setback and landscape standards apply in this district. Building oor area cannot exceed twice the site area. Some uses are conditional uses. I-2 Heavy Industrial District: is district is intended to be an employment area containing uses which are generally more intensive than that permitted in either of the other two industrial zones. Bulk plane, setback and landscape standards apply in this district. Building area cannot exceed twice the site area. Some uses are conditional uses.

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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Supporting Documention43 Existing Zoning

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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Supporting Documention 44Blueprint Denver Land UsesBlueprint Denver divides Denver into areas of change where growth should be directed and areas of stability, where only limited change should be allowed. In general, areas of change tend to be places where land use and transportation are closely linked with good transit service and a mix of uses that can support signicant in-ll development. Station areas t this denition of areas of change. Blueprint Denvers concept land uses for the station area were based on a station location at 38th and Inca instead of 41st and Fox. It identies portions of the west side of the station area in Sunnyside and Highland as areas of change and transit oriented development. is includes the area generally between 44th and 36th Avenue along Inca, Jason and portions of Lipan Street. Blueprint Denver identies the area east of the transit station as an industrial area and an area of stability. However, through the planning process, it was determined that the eastern portion of the station area is already undergoing a fundamental change in land use. is change in land use began with the development of the Regency Student Housing and has accelerated in recent years. Moreover, the area exhibits the strong link between transportation and land use that denes areas of change in Blueprint Denver. Blueprint Denver identies several goals for the areas surrounding rail transit stations. ese goals include: surrounding neighborhoods e 41st and Fox Station transit oriented development will embody these objectives as the station links multi-modal transit elements with existing and developing residential and commercial elements in this area of change. The Central Platte Valley is identied as an area of change in Blueprint Denver and could serve as a model for the future development surrounding the 41st and Fox StationTransportatione primary roadways in the study area are 38th Avenue, Fox Street, 44th Avenue and Inca Street. According to RTDs Gold Line Final Environmental Impact Statement, 89 percent of the 41st and Fox Station users will drive and park at the station, 4 percent will walk and 7 percent will access the station by bus in 2030 with a total of 2,700 daily boardings and alightings at the station. However, this could change signicantly with future transit oriented development resulting in more walk and transit trips to the station. 38th Avenue 38th Avenue is a ve-lane arterial extending from Park Avenue to the Northwest Denver neighborhoods of Sunnyside, Highland, Berkeley and West Highland. e roadway is an important commuter arterial that carries peak hour

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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Supporting Documention45 Blueprint Denver Land Usetrac into and out of Downtown. Between Inca Street and is designated a Pedestrian Shopping Corridor and Area of Change in Blueprint Denver. Blueprint Denver states that market demand will drive the amount of commercial retail development, while West 38th Avenues pedestrian and transit orientation will inuence the amount of urban residential development along corridor. e 41st and Fox Station will be located at the east end of the corridor, approximately 3 blocks north of 38th Avenue.

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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Supporting Documention 46 e 38th Avenue underpass crosses below the railroad tracks just 3 blocks south of the proposed station. e sidewalks are narrow through the underpass, making pedestrian connectivity dicult. e city has plans to upgrade the sidewalks on 38th Avenue at the underpass to ADA compliance, as well as make other faade improvements in 2009. e city also plans to fund a new pedestrian bridge over 38th Avenue at Inca Street to link the Sunnyside and Highland neighborhoods. is bridge is planned to be built parallel to the Gold Line commuter rail tracks. e 38th Avenue and Fox Street intersection is a three-way intersection with access to the I-25 on and o ramps. e intersection is oset and thus is more dicult for vehicles to navigate. e intersection also lacks crosswalks in each direction for pedestrians and bicyclists. Fox Street e most direct vehicular route to the station from 38th Avenue and I-25 is Fox Street. Fox Street is a 2-lane collector with few sidewalks and a substantial amount of truck trac. e street terminates at the former Denver Post site. RTD plans to improve Fox Street to allow for access into the transit station. Two full movement access points from Fox Street onto 41st Avenue and 42nd Avenue will be constructed. A northbound left turn late on Fox Street at 41st Avenue is planned. Eastbound thru/left and right turn lanes are planned at 41st Avenue and eastbound thru/left turn and right turn lanes are planned on 42nd Avenue, all at station opening in 2015. 44th Avenue 44th Avenue is an east-west arterial that connects across I-25. 44th Avenue will become an important connection for Globeville residents living east of I-25 to access the proposed station west of I-25. 44th Avenue ends at Fox Street and does not connect directly to Sunnyside. Inca Street Inca Street is a two-lane local street that parallels the railroad tracks west of the station. e roadway lacks sidewalks, curb and gutter and landscaping. e streetscape is dominated by large overhead utilities along the east side of the roadway. Sidewalks e existing pedestrian environment in the station area is not conducive to transit oriented development; many streets lack sidewalks and the area as a whole lacks a cohesive street grid. e area is further divided by the existing railroads and highways. Sidewalks currently exist within the residential neighborhood of Sunnyside west of the station and provide interior linkages to neighborhood parks, schools and churchhas predominantly industrial uses and very few or fragmented sidewalks. Local Bike Paths In addition to the pedestrian bridge over 38th Avenue described above, a few of the streets in the study area are designated as bike routes. Bike Route D-7 runs along Fox Street from 44th Avenue south to Downtown via Park Avenue. Route D-2 runs extends from the western suburbs along 46th Avenue, south to 43rd Avenue between Navajo and Fox Streets, and then jogs north on Fox Street to 44th Avenue. e route extends east of I-25 into Globeville and serves as a primary east-west route. An aging pedestrian bridge is located over the railroad tracks at 43rd Streetalong the D-2 route but the bridge is not ADA compliant. It is anticipated that this bridge will be demolished and a new pedestrian bridge will be constructed between 41st and 42nd Avenues to serve the transit station. e Denver Bicycle Master Plan Update identies the 43rd Avenue Pedestrian Bridge as a major missing link in the citys bicycle system. Route D-5 extends along Navajo Street, then runs east/west along 36th Avenue, crosses under I-25 and connects with the South Platte River Trail. Overall, the number of bicycle routes crossing through the study area is substantial, but the quality of these routes should be improved to make the station area and connections to it more bicycle and pedestrian friendly. Bus Transit Routes Existing local RTD bus routes within a mile of the station the 6 and the 52 along Navajo and Pecos Streets, respectively. ese routes have approximately 15 to 30 minute frequencies, depending on peak vs. o-peak hours. e 38 will stop at the 41st and Fox station, but the 6, 8, and 52 will not change with the presence of the station. e 44, which currently travels along 44th Avenue to Tejon Street and south into Downtown, will stop at the 41st and Fox station. e Strategic Transportation Plan states that pedestrian-oriented improvements are a focus within the Northwest Travel Shed of the city. Improved and expanded transit routes along 32nd

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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Supporting Documention47 Sidewalks and bicycle paths are important components of the station areas transportation infrastructure Existing Bus and Bicycle Routes in the Station AreaExisting Bus and Bicycle Routes

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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Supporting Documention 48 and 38th Avenues as well as Speer and Federal Boulevards will serve the increased travel demands in this area. Parking e street networks within the neighborhoods of Sunnyside and Highland neighborhoods have on-street parking to serve residents. 38th Avenue does not currently have on-street parking. Freight Rail e Union Pacic and Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railroads have operated in the area for over a century. ese trains provide service to local and regional industries and to locations throughout the west. e presence of freight tracks creates a signicant barrier for pedestrians, bicyclists and motorists, and separates Globeville from the other neighborhoods. ese facilities are not anticipated to change in the foreseeable future. The presence of freight tracks creates a signicant barrier for pedestrians, bicyclists and motorists The Sunnyside neighborhood has relatively high levels of local bus servicePublic Engagemente goal of the outreach process was to provide a fair, open and eective process for engaging the community in the development of the plan for the 41st and Fox Station Area. e outreach objectives included: community interests community interests by using several dierent methods of community outreach plan and make relevant information freely available from community members and interest groups within the context of city and regional objectives and the framework of the planning process ree public workshops and a focus group were held as part the public involvement process. ese hands on, interactive meetings included a brief presentation on project issues and process followed by interactive sessions aimed at soliciting input. e public meetings occurred at the following project milestones:

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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Supporting Documention49 In addition, planning sta attended numerous meetings with stakeholders throughout the process, including presentations to registered neighborhood organizations, business associations and other interest groups. Outreach Methods City sta provided meeting notices and copies of informational material to the registered neighborhood organizations, business organizations and City Council oces in the station area. City sta also provided notication through an initial mailing to all property owners within mile of the station, yers at the elementary schools in the station area, presentations to interest groups, postings on the citys website, and direct contact to plan participants via email and phone calls. City sta sent meeting notices and copies of informational material to neighboring jurisdictions and our regional partners including: City sta also provided press releases concerning the project and public meetings to the Rocky Mountain News, the Denver Post and community newspapers. Workshop Summaries Visioning Workshop e 38th and Inca Station Public Workshop was held January 23rd, 2008. 73 members of the public were in attendance. Tom Hoagland of the City and County of Denver provided opening remarks. GB Arrington of PB PlaceMaking provided an overview of Transit-Oriented Development. e full presentation is available on the City and County of Following the presentation, the attendees were divided into small groups with a facilitator and notetaker at each table. e following summarizes the notes from each presentation: Group 1 through a mixed-use district next to the station ment intensity further from station development over time Group 2 2-3 stories along the rail opment and new residential towers on the east side of the tracks side of the tracks could include high density, mixed-use residential and commercial development with ground oor retail and additional employment and light industrial uses Group 3 of 38th freeway, and tracks

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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Supporting Documention 50 Group 4 together Group 5 opment to the south along Fox Street neighborhood isolation vices for college students Group 6 existing neighborhood and noise trians industrial

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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Supporting Documention51 borhood. Common emes lighting. St. connecting to existing bike trail near Cuernavaca Park. from station St. near tracks Alternatives Workshop e 41st and Fox Public Workshop was held February 3, 2009. 25 members of the public were in attendance. Tom Hoagland of the City and County of Denver provided opening remarks. Tom reviewed a number of changes that have January 2008) and this workshop. ese changes include the shift in the RTD Gold Line from the west side of the Union Pacic railroad tracks to the east side; the conrmation of the station location at 41st and Fox Street; and a shift in the RTD maintenance facility. One location considered for the RTD bus maintenance facility was at the Denver Post site. However, since that time, the preferred option is to retain the bus maintenance facility at its existing location. GB Arrington of PB PlaceMaking gave an overview of the two concepts developed for the station area to-date, based on public feedback and design. ese concepts are referred to as crash test dummies because they represent dierent land use scenarios that are not designed to survive on their own. e purpose of this workshop was to evaluate each of these concepts in small groups and to modify them to form a desired land use scenario. e following summarizes the notes from each presentation. Summary of Group Comments/Common emes: the east side of the tracks. force housing, middle income and market-rate housing, student housing, and housing for families. and open space and examine opportunities for a new park on the east side of the tracks. 38th, Fox, Elati, 44th, Navajo and Inca. area plan. Group 1 hood as you move west. Retain industrial on the Denver Post site but do adaptive reuse at the north end. higher densities along Fox and Elati.

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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Supporting Documention 52 for properties adjacent to 38th Avenue-create a streetfront along 38th Avenue. and focused at intersection with the station. to 38th Avenue, connect Navajo District way that connects to the larger trail system. street amenities, including improvements to 38th Avenue underpass. Group 2 Alternative A for the east side and Alternative B for the west side development scenarios.

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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Supporting Documention53 Group 3 and oce on the east side. tracks). Inca Street. Group 4 45th to connect to Globeville. facility or other major employment center. views of the city-8 stories is too high.

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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Supporting Documention 54 Plan Recommendations Public Meeting e 41st and Fox Open House was held June 2, 2009. 30 members of the public were in attendance. e purpose of this meeting was to gather feedback on a preferred plan developed for the station area. Tom Hoaglund of the City and County of Denver provided opening remarks. Tom reviewed the alternatives evaluated throughout this process, as well as the existing city plans that relate to this plan. Laura Aldrete of PB PlaceMaking gave an overview of the preferred concept developed for the station area, based on public feedback and design. ere are etc) that support this plan. e powerpoint presentation can be viewed on the citys website at: http://www.denvergov.org/ TOD/StationAreas/41stFoxStation/tabid/395233/Default. aspx Many questions were asked about the relationship between this process and the City Zoning Code Update, which is currently underway. e city will be holding a series of public meetings throughout the summer as part of the release of the new Zoning Code.It is anticipated that this plan will be adopted prior to the new Zoning Code and thus reected in the nal Zoning Code and map to be adopted. Once adopted, this plan will oer guidance as to the appropriate use and form when rezonings occur in the Station Area. Questions: tions? of the area. However, once adopted this plan will inform rezonings in the future. and a railyard maintenance facility. ity is located north of I-70 outside of the general area of this Station Area. e city is beginning a Health Impact hoods within Council District 9 to evaluate the linkages between health, transportation and land use. so that residents can access the future station. Also need to focus attention on a connection to the Railyard Market Place. along 44th Avenue into Globeville and connections south toward Downtown. rstpublic improvements or private development? market and timing of redevelopment. Infrastructure investment funds may be available through the city. redevelopment in the area. Some redevelopment may occur prior to opening day of the stationthe full build-out vision may take 20-30 years to fully implement.

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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Supporting Documention55 would they change existing streets? comes in? occurring before or after, but in most cases it occurs after the transit station is in place. tions approach developers about their plans for new projects based on the community desires? was discussedthere are public hearings at both Planning Board and City Council meetings prior to development project rezoning approval. Street. area. Need to make a stronger statement for bicycles and pedestrians and keep cars away. hicles along the green link on 41st Avenue between Elati and the railroad tracks. e plan currently allows vehicles along this connection to provide parallel parking and accessibility to future retail uses. Some felt that it is important wood station along the Southwest Corridor was mentioned as an example of an area where the retail is struggling since commuters move from the parking to the station without visiting the retail). trac. Consider eliminating parallel parking and replacing with bicycle lanes. Or, consider angled parking. Other commenters argued that parallel parking does slow trac and is important in supporting retail. Colfax Avenue is an example where the parking is placed behind buildings in some locations, which aects the level of pedestrian activity happening on the street. and nd ways to slow trac. tion area---concentrate parking on the edges. Keep inner streets safer for pedestrians and bicyclists. lar connection over/under the railroad tracks. is location supports the previous comment concerning the directing of trac around the neighborhood. A connection at 44th Avenue would have greater impacts to the Sunnyside Neighborhood. neighborhood level? sustainable streets to capture stormwater. is idea is being considered along Elati Street. along the highway may not make sense. How did the plan address the diagonal grade change and the existing ditch along the Regency property? between the highway and future residential/mixed-use. is has a number of benets. is plan evaluated land use and circulation options to accommodate the ditch. However a storm sewer parallels the ditch and the ditch is below grade through much of the area. us, transforming it into a park amenity may be challenging. space amongst parcels. e other option is for the city to purchase the land and create a park. land use map that shows future plans for Denargo Market, so that the community can see how all of these projects t together. weblink. It will be available on the Planning Departments news website as of June 12. and Northwest Rail. e Northwest Rail is more important

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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Supporting Documention 56 to this neighborhood than the Gold Line due to its connection to Boulder and cities along that route. It will likely trigger redevelopment in this neighborhood. directly.Relevant Plans e 41st and Fox Station Area Plan builds upon a foundation of adopted plans and policies of the City and County of Denver. e section provides a summary of plans and policies guiding the 41st and Fox Station Area Plan. When adopted, the 41st and Fox Station Area Plan will serve as a supplement to the Comprehensive Plan and supersede the general recommendations of citywide plans. Comprehensive Plan, 2000 e Comprehensive Plan 2000 provides the planning and policy framework for development of Denvers human and physical environment. e key subjects of Plan 2000 that relate to this station plan are land use, mobility, legacies, and housing. Land Use: Land use recommendations promote new investment that accommodates new residents, improves economic vitality and enhances the citys aesthetics and livability. In addition, Plan 2000 supports sustainable development patterns by promoting walking, biking and transit use. Mobility: Plan 2000 emphasizes planning for multiple modes of transportation walking, biking, transit and cars. Key concepts include expanding mobility choices for commuters and regional cooperation in transit system planning. Plan 2000 also promotes compact, mixed-use development in transit rich places. Legacies: Plan 2000 prioritizes planning for park, open space and recreation systems. Historic building preservation and respect for traditional patterns of development in established areas are also key tenets of Plan 2000. To this end, Plan 2000 places a high value on maintenance of streets, trails, and parkways that link destinations within the community. Ensuring that new buildings, infrastructure and open spaces create attractive, beautiful places is the foundation of the legacies chapter. Housing: Plan 2000 recognizes that access to housing is a basic need for Denver citizens. us, Plan 2000 emphasizes preservation and maintenance of the existing housing stock and expanding housing options. Providing a variety of unit types and costs, in addition to housing development in transit rich places are fundamental tenets of Plan 2000. is ensures a sustainable balance of jobs and housing as the city matures. Blueprint Denver: An Integrated Land Use and Transportation Plan, 2002 Plan 2000 recommended that the city create a plan to integrate land use and transportation planning. Blueprint Denver is the implementation plan that recognizes this relationship and describes the building blocks and tools necessary to achieve the vision outlined in Plan 2000. Areas of Change and Stability: Blueprint Denver divides the city into areas of change and areas of stability. Over time, all areas of the city will uctuate between change and stability. e goal for areas of stability is to identify and maintain the character of an area while accommodating new development and redevelopment. e goal for areas of change is to channel growth where it will be benecial and can best improve access to jobs, housing and services. Blueprint Denver describes two types of areas of stability: committed areas

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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Supporting Documention57 and reinvestment areas. Committed areas are stable neighborhoods that may benet from the stabilizing eects of small, individual lot inll development rather than large-scale land assembly and redevelopment. Reinvestment areas are neighborhoods with a character that is desirable to maintain but would benet from reinvestment and modest inll. is reinvestment, however, is more limited in comparison to that of areas of change. Transportation: e transportation component of Blueprint Denver provides transportation building blocks and tools that promote multimodal and intermodal connections. Elements of connection include the street system, bus transit system, bicycle system, and pedestrian system. ese components must work together to realize the guiding principles of Blueprint Denver. Transit Oriented Development Strategic Plan, 2006 e Transit Oriented Development (TOD) Strategic Plan prioritizes the citys planning and implementation eorts related to the transit system and station area development. TOD Dened: e TOD Strategic Plan denes TOD as development near transit that creates beautiful, vital, walkable neighborhoods; provides housing, shopping, and transportation choices; generates lasting value; and provides access to the region via transit. TOD Typologies: e TOD Strategic Plan establishes TOD typologies for every transit station in the city. Typologies establish a framework to distinguish the types of places linked by the transit system. e typologies frame expectations about the land use mix and intensity of development at each of the stations. Station Area Planning: While providing an important planning framework, the TOD Strategic Plan calls for more detailed station area plans. Such plans oer specic direction for appropriate development, needed infrastructure investments and economic development strategies. Pedestrian Master Plan, 2004 e Pedestrian Master Plan was written to address the mobility goals of the Comprehensive Plan and Blueprint Denver. Specically, the plan calls for a pedestrian environment that is: safe from automobiles; encourages barrier free pedestrian mobility; enables pedestrians to move safely and comfortably between places and destinations; attractive, human scale and encourages walking; and promotes the role of walking in maintaining health and preventing disease. To achieve

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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Supporting Documention 58 these goals, the plan calls for land use changes to encourage walking through mixed-use development patterns. e plan identies a minimum 13-foot pedestrian zone on all streets including an 8-foot tree lawn and a 5-foot sidewalk and a minimum 16-foot pedestrian zone on most arterial streets. Bicycle Master Plan, 2002 In 2002 in response to Plan 2000, the Bicycle Master Plan system. e primary objectives of the Bicycle Master Plan are: between the existing bicycle route system and nearby facilities not currently on a bicycle route. the bicycle grid route system. light rail stations to make bicycling and transit work in a seamless manner. bicycle system. Greenprint Denver, 2006 Greenprint Denver is an eort to fully integrate sustainability as a core value and operating principle in Denver city government. e Greenprint Denver action agenda for 2006 charts the citys course over the next ve years. Included in Greenprint Denver action agenda are specic actions that relate directly to the citys ambitious station area planning eort. For example, this plan directs the city to decrease reliance on automobiles through public transit use and access, and promote transit-oriented development, as well as bike and pedestrian enhancements, and increase by 20% the new development located within mile of existing transit stations by 2011. Parks and Recreation Game Plan, 2002 e Game Plan is a master plan for the citys park, open space and recreation system. A primary principle is to create greener neighborhoods. Game Plan establishes a street tree and tree canopy goal of 15-18 percent for the entire city. e plan also establishes a parkland acreage target of 8-10 acres per 1,000 residents. Tools to accomplish these goals include promoting green streets and parkways, which indicate routes that require greater emphasis and additions to the landscape. Strategic Transportation Plan, 2006 Denvers Department of Public Works created the Strategic Transportation Plan (STP). e STP is a primary implementation tool for Blueprint Denver and Plan 2000. e STP represents a new approach to transportation planning in Denver. Instead of forecasting future auto travel on Denver streets, the STP will forecast person-trips to evaluate the magnitude of transportation impacts caused by all types of travel. is person-trip data provides the ability to plan for bikes, pedestrians, transit, and street improvements. e STP is the rst step in identifying the needs for every major travel corridor in the city. e STP will create concepts for how to meet transportation needs, including a prioritization of corridor improvements. Storm Drainage Master Plan (2005) and Sanitary Sewer Master Plan, 2006 e Storm Drainage Master Plan and the Sanitary Sewer Master Plan evaluates adequacy of the existing systems assuming the future land uses identied in Blueprint Denver. e Storm Drainage Master Plan determines the amount of imperviousness resulting from future land development and

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41st and Fox Station Area Plan Supporting Documention59 the subsequent runo. e Sanitary Sewer Master Plan identies needed sanitary sewer improvements to respond to the forecasted development. Sunnyside Neighborhood Plan, 1992 e Sunnyside Neighborhood Plan was adopted in August of 1992 and includes recommendations for the western portion of the area boarding the planned Gold Line Commuter Rail Station. Although the neighborhood plan was adopted prior to Blueprint Denver and FasTracks, it contains several general recommendations that are still relevant including streetscape improvements to 38th Avenue, identication of Horace Mann School as a historic landmark and providing better compatibility between industrial and residential uses. Highland Neighborhood Plan, 1986 e Highland Neighborhood Plan was adopted in April of 1986 and includes recommendations for the southern portion of the area near the planned Gold Line Commuter Rail Station. Although the neighborhood plan was adopted prior to Blueprint Denver and FasTracks, it contains several general recommendations that are still relevant including pedestrian, bicycle, bus service improvements, changing the B-4 zone district, encouraging a variety of residential mixed use projects, creating more housing opportunities, and promoting a mix of low and moderate income housing. Gold Line Environmental Impact Statement, 2009 e Gold Line Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) provides information on the design and impacts of RTDs 41st and Fox Station. e EIS recommends that RTD construct a station platform, bus transfer facility, and parkn-Ride on industrial property on the east side of the Union Pacic/Burlington Northern and Santa Fe Railroad at approximately 41st Street. RTD will construct a 500 space surface parking to serve the station on opening day. e EIS recommends expanding the park-n-Ride to 1,000 spaces in 2030 to meet projected future demand. e EIS also identies construction of a new pedestrian bridge over the railroad tracks at 41st Avenue to connect the neighborhoods west of the tracks to the station. Implementing Living Streets: Ideas and Opportunities for the City and County of Denver, U.S. EPA, 2009 is study, completed as part of Denvers Living Streets Initiative, examined how existing commercial corridors could be redesigned. e study identied three principles for future corridor street investments: reduce the number of travel lanes dedicated to moving cars to add space for bus lanes, bike lanes and sidewalks; create a pedestrian and transit friendly streetscape by widening sidewalks, providing buers along the street and reducing the frequency of curb cuts; and relating development to the street by locating new buildings close to the street edge and facing building entrances to the street.