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61st and Pena station area plan

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Title:
61st and Pena station area plan
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Community Planning and Development, City and County of Denver
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Denver, CO
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City and County of Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English

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Subjects / Keywords:
Transit oriented development
Public transportation

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Full Text
IF
DENVER
THI MICE HIGH CITY
61 ST & PENA
STATION AREA PLAN
2 0 14


Acknowledgements
MAYOR MICHAEL B. HANCOCK
DENVER CITY COUNCIL
District 1 Susan Shepherd
District 2- Jeanne Faatz
Districts Paul D. Lopez
District 4 Peggy Lehmann
District 5 Mary Beth Susman (President)
District 6 Charlie Brown
District 7 Chris Nevitt
District 8-Albus Brooks
District 9 Judy Montero
District 10 Jeanne Robb
District 11 Christopher Herndon
At- Large- Robin Kniech
At-Large Deborah Ortega
DENVER PLANNING BOARD
Kenneth Ho, Chairman
Andy Baldyga
Shannon Gifford
Anna Jones
Brittany Morris Saunders
Sharon Nunnally
Susan Pearce
ArleenTaniwaki
Julie Underdahl
COMMUNITY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT
Rocky Piro, Manager
Molly Urbina, Deputy Manager
Steve Gordon, Planning Services Director
David Gaspers
Deirdre Oss
Caryn Champine
Steve Nalley
Michelle Pyle
Todd Wenskoski
Tim Watkins
Andrea Santoro
Carolyne Janssen
Andrea Burns
PUBLIC WORKS
Jose Cornejo, Manager
Crissy Fanganello, Policy and Planning Director
Jenn Hillhouse
Emily Snyder
Justin Schmitz
Mike Anderson
PARKS AND RECREATION
Lauri Dannemiller, Manager
Gordon Robertson, Parks Director
David Marquardt, Parks Planning Manager
DENVER INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT
Kim Day, Manager
John Ackerman
Neil Maxfield
Tom Reed
Dan Poremba
PLAN STAKEHOLDERS
L.C. Fulenwider Inc.
Karl D. Smith Estate
SMT Investors
Dave Webster


Table of Contents
INTRODUCTION................................................................1
Plan Approach............................................................2
Planning Process.........................................................3
Planning Context.........................................................4
How to Use this Plan.....................................................5
FRAMEWORK PLAN..............................................................6
Vision and Principles....................................................8
A. Community...........................................................10
B. Connect.............................................................16
C. Vibrant.............................................................24
D. Catalyze............................................................30
MOVING FORWARD.............................................................32


"Arriving and departing passengers will easily identify this TOD as a new center due to the proposed compact, dense,
urban form. Instead of being focused along an arterial, as Tower Road development has been, this TOD clusters
around the station, increases in height and density as it faces Pena Boulevard and gains significant market advantage
with 180 degree, unobstructed views of the Front Range.."-Aviation Station Proposal
IV
61st & Pena Station Area Plan | Introduction


Introduction
Denver's airport gateway area has been a "place in progress"for more than 25 years. The area
connects the City to Denver International Airport (DIA). Since initial planning and regulatory efforts
in the early 1990s, significant changes have occurred to the area's surrounding context. After
opening in 1995, DIA has become the fifth busiest airport in the country, a key entry point to the
Rocky Mountain West, and a significant economic engine for the Denver region. In 2004, voters
passed the Regional Transportation District's (RTD) FasTracks Program, which included extending
rail transit from Downtown Denver to DIA. Denver's population, once declining in the 1970s and
1980s, is now one of the fastest growing in the country.
The DIA and Gateway statistical neighborhoods, with several thousand acres of undeveloped land,
is positioned to take advantage of these changed circumstances. To date, growth in the area has
occurred sporadically, and due to its location and limited mobility connections, the development
pattern focused on the automobile. With the arrival of the RTD East Commuter Rail Line in 2016
and a rail station located at 61 st Avenue and Pena Boulevard, the opportunity to spur a high-
quality, sustainable, transit-oriented development pattern focused on walkable neighborhoods and
easy access to transit is now at hand.
The area around the 61 st and Pena Commuter Rail Station is positioned to become a national
model for sustainable, transit-oriented, greenfield development while contributing to the robust
economic generator that is Denver International Airport. The station area can enhance the region's
overall economic competitiveness by linking employment opportunities with a wide range of
housing choices through increased transportation options and building value in existing and new
neighborhoods along the East Corridor.
The 61st and Pena Commuter Rail Station is unique within the City and County of Denver. Its
location in the Gateway neighborhood near Denver International Airport truly sets it apart from
other transit communities throughout Denver and throughout the metropolitan region. As a site
yet to be developed, it provides both tremendous opportunities and some significant challenges.
Development at this particular station is important in shaping the future of the airport and the
northeast quadrant of the metropolitan area. As a greenfield area, the 61 st and Pena transit
community has the opportunity to showcase the best in transit-oriented development. State-
of-the-art treatments for creating mixed-use development, establishing walkable urban patterns,
and advancing a lifestyle less reliant on the automobile can literally be developed from the ground
up. The proximity to Denver International Airport, which employs more than 35,000 (2013), easily
makes this a highly desirable new community from the outset.
Key influences for guiding the 61st and Pena station area plan include the City's TOD Strategic Plan,
Blueprint Denver, the City's integrated Land Use and Transportation Plan and on-going planning
efforts by Denver International Airport. Key values include sustainability, world-class design, state-
of-the-art conservation practices, and 21 st century solutions for mobility and infrastructure.
Greenfield sites can also provide challenges. Today, the stakeholders are working towards
developing the initial phases of the station area, but the transit community itself will evolve over
a period of time. Current market considerations, as well as longer-range market projections, are
critical to phasing strategies for growing the community over time to achieve the desired vision.
Development today has to be sited and designed in a manner that recognizes current market and
financing conditions and accommodates phasing, densification, and evolving the 61 st and Pena
station area to meet the vision for a vibrant, sustainable and healthy transit community in which
to live, work and play. As a showcase community, it will embrace a 21 st century lifestyle with easy
transit connections to transportation hubs and amenities throughout the Denver region.
RTD FASTRACKS PROGRAM AND
THE EAGLE P3 PROJECT
The RTD FasTracks program, passed by
voters in November 2004, includes the
East Rail line that connects Downtown
Denver to Denver International Airport.
RTD chose a private partner, Denver
Transit Partners, to design, build,
partially finance, operate, and maintain
the East Line, as well as the Gold Line
and elements of the Northwest Corridor
Line as part of the Eagle P3 project.
The Eagle P3 is the first public-private
partnership of its kind in the United
States with an expected total budget of
$2.1 billion. The East Line is scheduled
to begin operation in 2016.
LEGEND
Under Construction
Future Construction
Completed
Pre-FasTracks
!
Station
61 st & Pena Station Area Plan | Introduction
1


Plan Approach
The station area boundaries are similar in scale to
the size of downtown Denver.
BACKGROUND
The 61 st and Pena Station Area Plan encompasses 382 acres immediately adjacent to the
future East Commuter Rail Station near where the future 61 st Avenue terminates east of
the Pena Boulevard Corridor. The location is currently agricultural and grazing land with no
structures on the entire 382 acres. The futureTelluride Street provides the eastern boundary of
the Transit Community Core of the station area. The station is one of eight stations along the
East Commuter Rail Line, scheduled to begin operations between Denver Union Station (DUS)
to Denver International Airport (DIA) in 2016.
PROPOSAL
The 61 st and Pena station was advanced by a team led by L.C. Fulenwider Inc. in reply to a
Request for Responses issued by DIA. It is envisioned as a catalyst for a regional aerotropolis,
spurring a more compact urban development pattern in the Gateway area. This location
allows a wide range of urban development opportunities including market-rate multifamily
housing, workforce and affordable housing, commercial-office, hotel/hospitality, retail, and
airport related office. The nucleus of the proposal is organized around a pedestrian-scale
street and block network with more intense transit-oriented development within Vi mile of the
transit station, while strengthening connectivity to existing and future surrounding land uses.
STATION AREA
The East Rail Line to the west, 64th Avenue to the north,Tower Road to the east, and 56th
Avenue to the south define the station plan area. It is divided into two sections totaling 382
acres. The first section is theTransit Community Core, generally located west of Telluride and
totaling 115 acres. The second section is the Mixed-Use Area, the remaining land within the
station area boundaries, at 267 acres.
GATEWAY AREA PLAN
The boundaries of the station area plan fall within Denver's larger Gateway planning
area. The existing Gateway Area Plan, adopted in 1990 and updated in 1993, provided
recommendations for land use, transportation, urban design, and open space as the City
anticipated the opening of DIA. An arrangement of mixed-use zone districts allowing a range
of activities and densities, generally focusing on Tower Road, were adopted for the Gateway
based on the plan's recommendations.
However, much has happened since the Gateway Plan was conceived and written. Most
notably is the determination of the alignment for the East Rail Corridor with a rail station
located at approximately 61 stand Pena Boulevard. The City's Transit-Oriented Development
Strategic Plan was also developed after the Gateway Plan was complete. The Strategic Plan
addresses commercial building intensities and residential densities now found at the rail
stations in the Denver metropolitan area, similar to other cities with expanding rail transit
systems. This plan supersedes the portion of the existing Gateway Plan within the boundaries
of the 61 st and Pena Station Area Plan. This 61st and Pena Station Area Plan is also intended
to be incorporated into a new neighborhood plan for the Gateway area to be developed in the
future.
2
61st & Pena Station Area Plan | Introduction


Planning Process
PLANNING PROCESS
Four components guide planning and decision making in the station area. These include (1)
station area planning, (2) general development planning, (3) zoning, and (4) design standards
and guidelines.
Station Area Plans A station area plan articulates the vision for the transit community,
providing the basic policy framework for decision making and is adopted by City Council
as a supplement to the City's Comprehensive Plan.
General Development Plans A General Development Plan (GDP) is a regulatory tool
administered through the Denver Zoning Code and establishes a framework for phased
development intended to occur on larger sites over a longer period of time. The GDP
process does not result in a site-specific development plan, but is designed to implement
recommendations from City-adopted small area plans (including station area plans),
documenting master plan level concepts for land use, publicly-accessible open space,
wet and dry utilities, associated multi-modal street network, development phasing and
concepts for design guidelines.
Zoning The Denver Zoning Code, part of the Denver Revised Municipal Code, is a
regulatory tool that directs development in the station area in a manner that achieves the
station area vision.
Design Standards and Guidelines Design Standards and Guidelines articulate the
level of quality expected of development within the station area. It is intended to
complement, reinforce, and implement regulations and design intent found in other
documents mentioned above.
PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT PROCESS
A multi-tiered strategy for involving stakeholders ensured that all perspectives were
considered throughout the planning process. Public input informed the identification of key
issues as well as concepts and plan recommendations for addressing the key issues.
Denver City Council City Councilmember Chris Hearndon (District 11) was briefed
multiple times during the plan process. City Councilmembers at-large Robing Kneich
and Debbie Ortega also received a briefing during the plan process. City staff gave a
presentation to the Land Use.Transportation and Infrastructure (LUTI) Committee. A City
Council public hearing and vote culminated the planning process.
Denver Planning Board The City staff briefed Planning Board on three separate
occasions regarding the 61 st and Pena Station Area Plan. After conducting a public
hearing. Planning Board approved the Station Area Plan.
61st & Pena Station Area Stakeholder Committee Within the plan boundaries, four
landowners control all of the property; Denver International Airport, L.C. Fulenwider Inc.,
the Karl D. Smith Estate, and SMT Investors. These land owners, as well as various City and
County staff, made up the Stakeholder Committee.
Neighborhood Organizations -Inter Neighborhood Cooperation, Denver
Neighborhood Association, Inc., Green Valley Ranch Citizens Advisory Board, Wild Florse
Ridge Flomeowners Association
General Public
Public Meetings July 18,2013 and November 14,2013
Plan Website A plan website to provide updates and important information to the
general public.
61 st & Pena Station Area Plan | Introduction
3


Planning Context
Blueprint
Denver -
An h u<'urriu< I
Uinrl I'sr .mil
TTrius| n PI. in
Blueprint Denver is the City's integrated land use and
transportation plan.
The RTD East Commuter Rail Line will begin serving
the station in 2016.
DENVER COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AND SUPPLEMENTS
The Denver Comprehensive Plan is established in the Denver City Charter and Revised
Municipal Code to"...provide an expression of the city's vision forthe future with a listing of
goals and objectives. Once prepared and adopted, the plan will guide and influence decisions
that affect the future of the city." The Comprehensive Plan and its supplements are adopted
by City Council ordinance after plan approval from the Denver Planning Board. Planning
Board's criteria for approval of supplements are: a long term view, inclusive public process,
and consistency with the Denver Comprehensive Plan. This Plan incorporates or refines
recommendations of previous Plans and studies for the station area and the Gateway area.
Any updates to the following Plans should incorporate and refine recommendations forthe
station area based on this Plan:
Gateway Area Plan (1990/1993)
Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000
Bicycle Master Plan (2001)
Blueprint Denver: An Integrated Land Use and Transportation Plan (2002)
Denver Parks and Recreation Game Plan (2002)
Pedestrian Master Plan (2004)
Water Quality Management Plan (2004)
IMPLEMENTATION PLANS
City agencies prepare implementation plans to guide their policies and work programs.
Although these plans are not adopted as supplements to the Comprehensive Plan, they
provide important guidance to the City and its agencies for implementing the Comprehensive
Plan and its supplements.
Greenprint Denver (2006)
Transit Oriented Development Strategic Plan (2006)
StrategicTransportation Plan (2008)
Gateway Travelshed Transportation Study (2008)
Storm Drainage Master Plan (2009)
Sanitary Sewer Master Plan (2009)
Strategic Parking Plan (2010)
Denver Moves (2011)
DIA Aviation Plan (2011)
DIA Airport City Plan (2012)
COORDINATION WITH CONCURRENT PLANNING EFFORTS
Over the course of the planning process, there were several other efforts underway within the
study area. The 61 st and Pena Station Area Plan team coordinated with each of these efforts to
maximize resources and to help ensure consistency with each.
MetroVision 2040
Eagle P3 East Corridor
TOD Strategic Plan Update
DRCOG Sustainable Communities Initiative
DIA Comprehensive Transportation Plan
4
61st & Pena Station Area Plan | Introduction


How to Use this Plan
This Plan establishes a long-range vision and guiding principles for the development and
future of the 61st and Pena Station area. The elements of the Plan provide a vision for a vibrant
and connected, compact, transit-oriented community in the heart of the developing Gateway
area and region. This Plan sets the larger stage for a responsible, sustainable growth pattern
within the station area.
Public agencies and private entities rely on this Plan for many purposes and actions that
affect the near and long term development activity near the station. The Plan provides city-
adopted policy direction to guide decision-making related to development opportunities,
transportation, partnerships, land use, infrastructure and public investment. The Plan contains
both intent language and recommendations; intent language establishes the larger concepts
in the Plan, while recommendations provide the specificity needed for future decision-
making. Many of the recommendations require multiple steps over a period ofyears bya
variety of participants. At the same time, the Plan allows the latitude to pursue unforeseen
opportunities that will arise and to respond to new challenges over the coming years.
Unlike most small area plans in the City, the station area is currently a greenfield development
site lacking context, existing development and infrastructure. Without existing businesses,
residents, and public amenities, the station area has both fewer constraints as well as greater
opportunities. Development in the station area will occur over multiple phases, reacting
to changing market conditions, all while maintaining the long-range vision of becoming a
vibrant, compact, urban center and world-class transit-oriented community. Users of this Plan
should recognize the unique circumstances of this station area when working with its policy
direction and provisions. The planning horizon for this Plan is 20 years, but since the duration
of development activity and long term market demands in the station area is unknown, the
plan is intended to be reviewed within 10 years of initial plan adoption to determine if an
update would be beneficial.
The Plan is divided into two sections in addition to this introduction:
The Framework Plan provides content that applies to the entire plan area and provides
the background to support the recommendations for the 61 st and Pena Station Area to
become a vibrant urban center and world-class transit-oriented community.
The concluding section is entitled Moving Forward, addressing implementation and
priorities for the short and long term to ensure the success of the Plan. This portion also
highlights the multiple steps that may be necessary to work toward implementation of
the plan concepts and recommendations.
As with the citywide Comprehensive Plan and its supplements, this area plan establishes
goals and objectives, policy direction, and guiding provisions. The plan is not intended
to, and does not, rezone any property, render any existing uses non-conforming, or pre-
dispose the outcome of any permitting processes related to properties within the planning
boundary. Future implementation actions, such as zoning map or text amendments, general
development plans, design standards and guidelines, metro districts, parking management
districts, capital improvements, and public-private partnerships, require specific actions on the
part of the city, property owners, and stakeholders.
THE BIRTH OF DENVER
INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT
Stapleton International Airport, located
east of Quebec Avenue between
Montview Boulevard and 56th Avenue,
served the Denver region from 1929
to 1995. The site was chosen during
the 1920s for the location of a new
municipal airport in part due to
its remote location on the eastern
boundary of the city. Dedicated
in 1929, the airport was renamed
Stapleton after Mayor Ben Stapleton
in 1944. Almost continuous expansion
occurred beginning at the dawn of the
jet age in the late 1950s, eventually
comprising 4,700 acres, six runways,
and five terminal concourses. During
the 1980s, Mayor Federico Pena and
other local leaders, knowing the now
landlocked airport was outdated
and overstrained with passengers,
examined opportunities to build a
new Denver International Airport. In
1989, voters approved a site for the
new airport, 25 miles from Downtown
Denver, that was originally located in
Adams County.
On March 1,1995, Denver International
Airport better known as DIA was
open for business. DIA currently has
six runways and serves 53 million
passengers annually. That makes DIA
the 5th busiest passenger airport in
the US and 13th in the world1. Situated
on 53 square miles, DIA is the largest
commercial airport in the country, with
the ability to expand to 12 runways and
serve 100 million passengers a year.
(Source: DIA)
61 st & Pena Station Area Plan | Introduction
5


Framework Plan
The 61 st and Pena Station Area will see great changes as it evolves into a vibrant urban center
for all of northeast Denver. Taking a cue from Denver's best neighborhoods while learning
from the lessons of other greenfield communities in the shadow of an international airport,
61st and Pena is the center of activity in the Gateway, using the basic principles of town
building to create a livable place for residents, employees, and visitors. By focusing this plan
on the best placemaking and urban design concepts, 61 st and Pena is a transit community
built for how current and future generations will live, work, and play in the Gateway.
To be an effective tool in guiding development in the Gateway, this Station Area Plan
acknowledges that the build out of the station area may exceed the 20-year plan horizon, and
that a strategic approach to development phasing, including the evolution of parcels from
lower density to higher density in the future, is needed to achieve the long-term vision of the
area.
6
61st & Pena Station Area Plan | Framework Plan


The 61st and Pena Station Area presents the broad, foundational components for development
of a vibrant urban center and compact, transit-oriented community for the Gateway. The four
plan principles that establish this framework are:
Transit Community: Building neighborhoods with a rich mix of uses and urban character
Connected: The multi-modal lifestyle
Vibrant: Place-making with urban design, parks, and public space
Catalyze: Sustainable development for generations
Each plan principle has a set of concepts and recommendations that influence a specific aspect
of the station area. The long-term success and value of the station area plan will depend on
how the plan concepts and recommendations are implemented as real world projects and
what resulting actions occur to capitalize on those projects.
TRANSIT-ORIENTED
DEVELOPMENT PRINCIPLES
Transit-oriented development
creates a dense mix of uses within
walking distance of transit stations
where people can live, work, shop,
and connect to destinations around
the region without relying on their
automobiles.Transit-oriented areas
are lively, walkable and provide
alternatives to driving alone in both
new development and surrounding
neighborhoods. Principles include:
Place-making: Creating safe,
comfortable, varied and attractive
station areas with distinct identities.
Rich Mix of Choices: Providing housing,
employment, transportation and
shopping choices for people of all
ages, household types, incomes and
lifestyles.
Location Efficiency: Placing homes,
jobs, shopping, entertainment, parks
and other amenities in proximity to
one another and close to the station
to promote walking, biking and transit
use.
Value Capture: Using plans to
encourage all stakeholders residents,
business owners. Regional Transit
District, and the city to take full
economic advantage of the value of the
transit infrastructure.
Portal to the Region: Serving as a
gateway to the regional transit network
by providing a safe and welcoming
environment.
(Source: TOD Strategic Plan, 2006)
Caption
61 st & Pena Station Area Plan | Framework Plan
7


The Vision for 61 st & Pena Station
61st and Pena Station serves as a vibrant, compact, urban center of the regional
aerotropolis, a world-class transit-oriented community, catalyzing development and
connecting people.
This vision does not happen overnight; rather, the station area evolves over time, starting from
a rail station with initial development to an established transit community. The plan reflects
those iterations. It speaks to the ultimate build-out of an established transit community,
but also addresses the reality that development phases build in intensity as the Plan's vision
becomes reality. The frameworkfor the station area guides development through these
multiple development phases.
Transit Community The station area is a pedestrian-friendly, transit-oriented community
with a rich mix of uses and a variety of building types that promote a strong sense of
place.
Connected The station area optimizes connectivity of the rail station to the entire station
area and surrounding neighborhoods through a comprehensive, multi-modal approach
to mobility and accessibility.
Vibrant The station area core is a vibrant, walkable, compact, urban center characterized
by high quality urban places and interconnected open space accessible to a wide variety
of users.
Catalyze The station area catalyzes a sustainable development pattern for the regional
aerotropolis, promoting economic vitality and housing opportunities, while respecting
the unique High Plains ecosystem for the betterment of today's residents and future
generations.
A. Transit Community
Building Neighborhoods with a Rich Mix of
Uses and Urban Character
A.1 A Mixed-Use Community
A.2 Varying Scales of
Development
A.3 Front Range Views
A.4 Transitions
61 ST AND PENA STATION AREA EVOLUTION OF A TRANSIT COMMUNITY
TRANSIT COMMUNITIES TEND TO BE PEDESTRIAN-FRIENDLY, CONTAIN A MIX OF HOUSING, WORK, AND SHOPPING
OPPORTUNITIES, AND ARE LOCATED WITHIN WALKING DISTANCE FROM A MAJOR TRANSIT STOP. THEY ARE
DESIGNED TO MAXIMIZE RESIDENTS'ACCESS TO PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION AND OPTIMIZE ALTERNATIVE MODES
OF TRANSPORTATION LIKE WALKING AND BIKING. THE STATION AREA AT 61 ST AND PENA WILL DEVELOP AS A
TRANSIT COMMUNITY FOCUSED ON THE RAIL STATION. AS A GREENFIELD LOCATION, THE STATION AREA WILL BE
DEVELOPED WITHIN A WELL CONNECTED STREET GRID BUT DENSITY MAY BE LESS INTENSE IN EARLY PHASES THAN
TYPICAL TRANSIT-ORIENTED DEVELOPMENT. STRATEGIC INCREASES IN DENSITY SHOULD OCCUR OVERTIME TO
TAKE FULL ADVANTAGE OF THE COMMUNITY'S TRANSIT AMENITY.
8
61st & Pena Station Area Plan | Framework Plan


B. Connected
The Multi-Modal Lifestyle
C. Vibrant
D. Catalyze
Sustainable Development for Generations
Place-making with Urban Design, Parks, and
Public Space
B.1 Living Streets
B.2 Connecting to the Gateway
and Beyond
B.3 Parking Management
B.4 Transit Plaza
C.1 Urban Design
C.2 Parks and Recreation
C.3 Streetscapes
C.4 Aviation Park
D.1 Economic Vitality
D.2 Aerotropolis
D.3 High Plains Ecosystem and
Natural Open Space
D.4 Jobs and Housing Balance
61 st & Pena Station Area Plan | Framework Plan
9


Transit Community
PRINCIPLE STATEMENT
The station area is a pedestrian-friendly,
transit-oriented community with a rich
mix of uses and a variety of building
types that promote a strong sense of
place and promotes transit ridership.
WHY IS ATRANSIT COMMUNITY IMPORTANT TO 61 ST AND PENA?
A transformational moment in the development of the Gateway Area and the regional
aerotropolis takes place when the East Line Commuter Rail begins operating between Denver
International Airport (DIA) and Denver Union Station (DUS) in 2016. Taking great care with the
various place-making elements of the station area is critical to the success of the development
and is a significant opportunity to begin to unite the various communities in the Gateway
by creating an attractive destination. The station area needs a strong mix of uses, a blend
of building types, and a respect of the natural environment and Front Range views within
the station area. Achieving these elements is the foundation fora unique community in the
Gateway Area with superior connectivity, easily reaching both the heart of Downtown Denver
with transit connections throughout the metro area and into DIA's South Terminal, ready to
depart to any one of hundreds of domestic or international destinations. This exciting level of
multi-modal connectivity presents great potential to attract international and local business
users, hotels, retail, and new residents to locate within walking distance of the rail station.
CONCEPTS &
RECOMMENDATIONS:
A.1 A Mixed-Use Community
A.2 Varying Scales of
Development
A.3 Front Range Views
To fully capitalize on the location efficiency of the rail station, development near the station
area should strive to be built at commercial intensities and residential densities that support
transit use. A mix of uses at appropriate densities will help the station area serve as the portal
to the Gateway area and benefit from its location between DUS and DIA, two of the biggest
activity centers in Denver.
TRANSIT COMMUNITY CONCEPTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS
A.1 A MIXED-USE COMMUNITY
Blueprint Denver, Denver's integrated land use and transportation plan (adopted in 2002),
identifies Areas of Change and Areas of Stability throughout the City with the goal of directing
new development and infill projects toward Areas of Change. The station area plan maintains
the area's status as an Area of Change. The 61 st and Pena Station Area Plan uses the framework
10
61st & Pena Station Area Plan | Framework Plan


in Blueprint Denver as the basis of its recommended conceptual land use map. Land use types
in the plan include Transit-Oriented Development, Town Center, Commercial Corridor and two
variations of Mixed Use, Mixed Use Residential and Mixed Use Employment.
The Plan land use map presents the conceptual layout and mix of uses for the station area at
build-out. As development begins to occur in the station area, some variation in the ultimate
land use mix is expected as unforeseen opportunities arise. The Blueprint Denver Plan map
61 ST & PENA STATION CONCEPTUAL LAND USE MAP
64TH AVE
"Aviation Community Station at
6 IstAve is central to extensive
existing development and clearly
positioned to become the urban
center and catalyst..." Aviation
Station Proposal
TOD -Transit Community Core
Mixed Use Employment
Mixed Use Residential
Commercial Corridor
Town Center
Proposed Open Space Network
| | | | Commuter Rail Tracks
O Proposed Commuter Rail Station
Future Connection
N
All streets shown in this plan are conceptual and
adjustments may need to be made to the final layout
and alignment to meet City roadway design criteria.
61 st & Pena Station Area Plan | Framework Plan
11


will be amended as needed based on this plan.
Development can be closely integrated into a rail
station, such as this residential building at the Del
Mar station in Pasadena, GA.
Stapleton's 29th Avenue Town Center has a mix
of buildings that relate to one another, creating a
well-defined, pedestrian friendly street. Buildings at
61st and Pena should be carefully integrated into the
urban design of the community to create a waikabie
core of the transit community.
A.1.A TRANSIT-ORIENTED DEVELOPMENT: THE TRANSIT COMMUNITY CORE
In the 61 st and Pena Station Area, transit-oriented development is envisioned as a compact,
mixed-use urban community, in the medium to long term, with the highest densities and
commercial uses clustered near the commuter station. The transit community core shows
the greatest attention to urban design within the station area, providing housing, hospitality
services, and employment opportunities for a diverse population in a configuration that
facilitates pedestrian and transit access. This mix of land uses is intended to create a vibrant,
compact place that supports transit use, both as an origin and destination, throughout the
day. The blocks along Aviation Place are key to this vision and should be held for higher
density, transit supportive development.
A.1.B LAND USE TYPES
Land use types in the station area should generally allow for a mix of uses. Mixed-use areas
may have a sizable employment base as well as higher density housing. Uses are often, but not
necessarily, mixed in each building, development, or block. More importantly, residential and
non-residential uses are within walking distance of one another within the neighborhood. The
proportion of residential to commercial uses varies considerably from one area to another. In
the 61 st and Pena Station area, land use categories are broken out into four sub-categories,
each with an emphasis on a different predominant use. A full range of uses except for
traditional forms of industrial is encouraged in each sub-category.
Mixed-Use Residential: Predominately residential uses with a variety of building forms
and the opportunity for compatible commercial uses with strong station connectivity.
Mixed-Use Employment: Predominately office and commercial employment uses with
a variety of building forms. The opportunity for compatible multi-family uses with strong
station connectivity also exists.
Town Center: Variety of shopping, entertainment, service, and employment needs
provided at a scale that can serve several nearby neighborhoods. The town center on
12
61st & Pena Station Area Plan | Framework Plan


Tower Road should be a focal point of the corridor with design features that identify the
area as a gateway to the station area.
Commercial Corridor: Influenced by the presence of one or more major arterials on the
boundary of the station area and generally more than one-half mile from the rail platform.
Greater flexibility in use and form is expected in the commercial corridor areas, providing
visual and physical access to a variety of uses at different scales and accommodating auto
traffic, major bus routes, and pedestrian activity.
Land uses in the station area are affected by the proximity to Denver International Airport.
Existing zoning regulations limit the type and location of residential uses allowed in the station
area. Land use types identified in the station area plan still apply even if these existing zoning
regulations change in the future.
A.2 VARYING SCALES OF DEVELOPMENT
The station area has a wide variety of building heights and forms that promote a diverse
neighborhood while the transit community core has the greatest sense of compact urbanism
in the entire Gateway Area. Other areas should have their own unique neighborhood
characteristics that are generally less intense than the transit community core. Collectively, the
entire station area should strive towards achieving a level of development intensity typically
found in great transit communities. This desired intensity level may be achieved over multiple
phases of development in the station area and be accomplished through exploring various
tools with plan stakeholders.
Allow taller building forms with higher densities and greater emphasis on pedestrian
orientation near the station. As development densities decrease further from the station,
allow a wider range of building forms in the mixed-use areas.
Promote varied building heights throughout the station area while capitalizing on the
best locations to site prominent buildings with greater intensities.
Taller buildings, especially near the station and along Richfield Street, should have design
elements that promote greater opportunities for viewing Front Range vistas, increasing
solar access to the pedestrian level, and enhancing the walking experience in the station
TRANSIT SUPPORTIVE
COMMUNITIES
Studies have shown that residents
living near rail stations are 5 to 6 times
more likely to commute by rail and
employees working near rail stations
are 2 to 3 times more likely to commute
by rail. Additional research indicates
thatareas within a quarter-mile of a
station that have strong transit ridership
typically have a combination of
minimum residential densities around
30 units per acre or more and minimum
commercial intensities of 50 employees
or more per acre.
TransitType Min./Residential Density
within 1/4 mile
Basic Bus 7
Premium Bus 15
Rail Transit 30
Transit Type Min. /Employee Density
within 1/4 mile
High Capacity Bus 25
Rail Transit 50
Sources: Pushkarev and Zupan 1977,
Ewing 1999, Cervero et al. 2004,
Reconnecting America and Center for
Transit Oriented Development, 2008)
"create a dense, mixed-use
urban development pattern
with all of the desired multi
modal transportation elements
necessary for a successful TOD."
-Aviation Station Proposal
61 st & Pena Station Area Plan | Framework Plan
13


COMMUNITY
RECOMMENDATIONS
area. Achieve implementation of these design considerations through zoning, design
standards and guidelines, or other applicable land use and building form regulatory tools.
Design tools that may be utilized include but are not limited to:
Upper story stepbacks
Setbacks
Street frontage heights
Building orientation
Massing variation
LEGEND__________________________
Maximum 5 stories
H Maximum 8 stories
H Maximum 12 stories
H Proposed Open Space Network
Future Connection
| | | | Commuter Rail Tracks
O Proposed Commuter Rail Station
N
61 ST & PENA STATION CONCEPTUAL BUILDING HEIGHTS MAP
64TH AVE
TOPEflABLVD 56THAVE
14
61st & Pena Station Area Plan | Framework Plan


Recognize where flexibility may be appropriate to adapt to changing market conditions
or to further City goals and objectives.
A.3 FRONT RANGE VIEWS
Expansive views of the Rocky Mountains are a valuable amenity in the station area.
Development should capitalize on this amenity to the fullest extent.
Strategically consider howto maximize full or partial views of the Front Range from as
many development sites as possible.
Promote Front Range views from Aviation Place and key locations along natural open
space corridors, such as First Creek and Blue Grama Draw.
Utilize public right-of-way as de facto view corridors in a manner that increases viewing
opportunities to the Front Range.
A.4 TRANSITIONS
Locate higher intensity development closer to the transit station with generally decreasing
intensities occurring further from the station. Some variation in this pattern may occur with
possible higher densities and building forms located along Telluride Street and the Blue Grama
Draw and First Creek corridors. Appropriate transitions should occur where higher intensity
mixed-use areas meet lower intensity mixed-use residential areas.
Use design elements, such as upper story stepbacks, as necessary, to structure massing
adjacent to predominantly residential areas.
Consider utilizing collector and arterial streets to ease transitions between mixed-use and
predominately residential neighborhoods.
Consider utilizing mid-block transitions (e.g., alley ways, walkways) where more intense
mixed-use development is located on the same block as lower intensity residential uses.
Promote the use of building design elements that create a pedestrian scaled environment
on streets that traverse between mixed-use and more residential neighborhoods.
/ i
h -- / ._____________________________L
Taller buildings should incorporate design elements
that enhance the pedestrian experience.
61 st & Pena Station Area Plan | Framework Plan
15


Eb Connected
PRINCIPLE STATEMENT
The station area optimizes local
connectivity of the station area and
surrounding neighborhoods to the
rail system and the region through a
comprehensive, multi-modal approach
to mobility and accessibility.
CONCEPTS &
RECOMMENDATIONS:
WHY IS BEING CONNECTED IMPORTANT TO THE 61 ST AND PENA STATION
AREA?
A comprehensive, multi-modal approach to connectivity is essential in transit planning and
creating great communities. The East Rail Line provides a high level of regional mobility,
reaching both Denver International Airport and Denver Union Station, while the future
station near 61 st and Pena functions as a portal to the regional aerotropolis and the Gateway
Area. The station is in proximity to DIA, presenting exceptional access for residents and
businesses wanting to reach the airport and all of its national and international destinations
with great ease. To capitalize on this great location, 61st and Pena Station needs to provide
a high level of local, multi-modal mobility and accessibility. Strong local access to the station
extends the impact of rail transit in the Gateway, resulting in a higher level of ridership and
increased transit equity for surrounding neighborhoods. As the larger Gateway Area develops,
connections are strengthened to new and existing residential areas and the station area can
serve as a transportation hub for the entire Gateway Area. This station access increases the
ability to leverage the significant public investment that has occurred with the East Rail Line
and supports DIA as a regional engine for economic growth.
CONNECTED CONCEPTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS
B.1 LIVING STREETS
B.1 Living Streets
B.2 Connecting to the Gateway
and Beyond
Living Streets are vibrant places where people of all ages and physical abilities feel safe
and comfortable using any mode of travel (walking, biking, transit, or private auto). Living
Streets combine context sensitive development with complete streets to offer solutions that
promote active living, increase mobility, capitalize on infrastructure investments and stimulate
economic development.
B.3 Parking Management
B.4 Transit Plaza
Create a street grid in the development area, recognizing limitations due to topography,
other natural constraints, and market/economic development opportunities.
Blueprint Denver Street Classifications:
Commercial Arterials: These streets are designed to balance mobility with access to
nearby businesses and the surrounding area. Commercial arterials generally serve
RTD rail service is one component to a well-
connected station area.
A comfortable pedestrian experience promotes walking within the station area.
16
61st & Pena Station Area Plan | Framework Plan


61 ST & PENA STATION CONCEPTUAL BLUEPRINT STREET CLASSIFICATION
All streets shown in this plan are conceptual and adjustments may need to be made to the final layout and
alignment to meet City roadway design criteria.
"a rich mix of complimentary uses organized around a pedestrian scale
street and block network" Aviation Station Proposal
Commercial Arterial
Mixed Use Arterial
Mixed Use Collector
Mixed Use Local
Main Street Local
Future Commercial Arterial
Commuter Rail Tracks
Proposed Commuter
Rail Station
Future Connection
61 st & Pena Station Area Plan | Framework Plan
17


CONNECTED
RECOMMENDATIONS
Station area trails will connect with the larger
regional trail system.
Careful integration of multiple modes of transit can
increase mobility in the station area.
longer vehicle trips and interconnect major urban elements such as employment
centers, commercial centers,and residential neighborhoods.
Mixed-Use Arterial: Mixed-use arterials provide a variety of travel choices for
multiple users while balancing mobility with access to nearby businesses.
Mixed-Use Collectors: Mixed-use collectors are designed to provide a greater
balance between mobility and land access with a variety of travel choices.
Main Street Local: Main street local streets provides the highest level of access to
businesses in a pedestrian-friendly environment. Vehicle trips are typically shorter
and occur at lower speeds.
Mixed-Use Local: Mixed-use local streets balance providing local mobility with a
variety of choices at lower vehicular speeds while delivering a high level of access to
neighborhood businesses and residences.
Design streets for lower speeds to enhance travel by all users including pedestrians,
bicyclists, and motorists.
Aviation Place should serve as a special pedestrian street.
ConsiderTelluride Street becoming a parkway or boulevard within the station area.
Consider design elements forTower Road to balance its importance as the major north-
south commercial arterial in the Gateway area and its role as one of the main routes to
the 61 st and Pena rail station.
Identify ways to minimize conflicts along Yampa Street for bicyclists while acknowledging
the potential for service vehicles utilizing the same space. This could include travel lane
design or focused access points.
Consider incorporating green infrastructure into streetscapes such as curb extensions or
stormwater planters.
B.2 CONNECTINGTO THE GATEWAY AND BEYOND
Establish strong, effective connections between regional and local bike facilities:
1st Creek at 56th Avenue
1st Creek at Richfield Street
Blue Grama at Yampa Street
Blue Grama at Richfield Street
18
61st & Pena Station Area Plan | Framework Plan


61 ST & PENA STATION CONCEPTUAL BICYCLE AND PEDESTRIAN NETWORK
LEGEND
Multi-Use Path (Off Street)
On Street Bike Route
Facility Type To Be Determined
Regional Trail
?$S$5S Special Pedestrian Street
X1 At-Grade Crossing
O Grade Separated Crossing
| | | | Commuter Rail Tracks
O Proposed Commuter Rail Station
Future Connection
Open Space Recreation
Open Space Publicly Accessible
N
e
scale_________
0 400 800
All streets shown in this plan are conceptual and adjustments may need to be made to the final layout and
alignment to meet City roadway design criteria. Future connections to be determined.
"All residences are located
within 800' of a park or natural
open space system" Aviation
Station Proposal
61 st & Pena Station Area Plan | Framework Plan
19


STRATEGIC PARKING PLAN FOR
61 ST & PENA
61stand Pena has unique parking
challenges due to its utilization by
different users. A strategic approach
to parking management in the station
area is needed to promote the proper
use of parking as the East Rail line
begins service and as development
occurs in the future. Users to consider
when developing the strategic parking
plan include:
DIA travelers
RTD commuters
Station area residents, workers, and
visitors
The 61 st and Pena Strategic Parking
Plan will be a joint effort of the City
and County of Denver's Public Works
Department, Community Planning
and Development Department,
Denver International Airport, and key
stakeholders.
Parking management strategies in the station area
can ensure a proper balance of supply and demand
for different users.
m Support RTD buses accessing the station via 61 st and 60th Avenues.
Evaluate opportunities for enhanced bicycle facilities (cycletracks, protected bike lanes,
buffered bike lanes, bicycle boulevards) on the identified on-street bicycle routes and
future roadway connections to provide high ease of use bicycle network throughout
the area.The station should be accessible via off-street bike paths or bike lanes from all
directions.
Incorporate bicycle recommendations from this station area plan into Denver Moves.
Locate bike lanes on 60th Avenue providing the opportunity to continue to the east of
Tower Road.
Locate bike lanes on Yampa Street as the primary north/south bicycle connection in the
station area.
Focus regional bicycle traffic onto the First Creek Regional Bicycle Trail.
Determine and provide the appropriate bicycle and pedestrian accommodations within
the Richfield Street corridor to access the station.
Examine local shuttle service and regional bus service connecting the station area with
nearby residential and commercial areas.
Ensure adequate multi-modal access from the station to the civic amenities such as
recreation centers, schools,and public libraries.
B.3 PARKING MANAGEMENT
Evaluate and identify parking management strategies near the station that ensure a
proper balance of supply and demand for different users.
Promote proper use of parking facilities, while providing convenient parking for nearby
businesses and residences. Strategies for this area should align with the City's three-
fold vision for parking management as identified in the Strategic Parking Plan (SPP);
(1) manage parking as a valued asset, (2) acknowledge a variety of land use patterns
and contexts, (3) encourage an integrated approach to parking management with a
commitment to stakeholder outreach. In addition, strategies should be implemented
following the SPP's five-step process, which orders management approaches
incrementally through demand, location, time, pricing, and supply opportunities. This
process coupled with stakeholder involvement will help determine the most effective
and incremental parking management strategy for this area as the area grows and
changes. Possible strategies to explore include but are not limited to:
Shared or Accessory parking agreements between future park-n-ride operator,
nearby multi-family, commercial, or office uses. This includes opportunities to share
off-street or structured parking inventory to reduce development costs. May be
subject to zoning approval.
Explore the opportunity to"Unbundle" parking requirements from individual
uses and explore establishing an overall parking requirement/cap fortheTransit
Community Core.
On-Street Time Limited Parking Restrictions and/or a combination of on and off
street strategies to help manage commuter parking options
Corridor-wide strategies for commuter and DIA parking
Transportation Demand Management strategies including employer or community
funded transit passes or car sharing
Locational considerations and format for DIA, commuter, or other higher inventory
parking lots as TOD evolves and transitions to an active mix of uses
20
61st & Pena Station Area Plan | Framework Plan


Appropriate pricing strategies to manage demand forTransit Community Core and
best utilize DIA and commuter lots
Other creative parking management tools as outlined in the Strategic Parking Plan
(SPP).
Recognize on-street parking as a valuable asset to promote access to both residential and
commercial uses while acknowledging that these uses will not be able to rely on the on-
street parking to meet all their parking needs.
Recognize that during early phases of development, surface parking may occur at
market-based ratios.
Environmental documents for the East Commuter Rail Line identified the parking
needs at this station for transit users on the opening day of service. This parking will be
accommodated within the station area.
Consider establishing a parking management district or utilize the existing metropolitan
district to coordinate multiple strategies to manage the supply and demand for parking
in the station area. The district should generally focus on management of off-street
parking, but coordinate its efforts with the City regarding management of on-street
parking.
B.4 TRANSIT PLAZA
The transit plaza, located at the rail station platform, is the gateway to the 61 st and Pena
station area community, designed in a manner to meet the needs of residents and visitors
alike. Integrating the transit plaza into the overall open space system gives it a place and
function within the community, providing connectivity to land uses not immediately adjacent
to the commuter rail platform. As the terminus of Aviation Place, the southern portion of the
transit plaza is designed as an important civic space.
Avoid bicycle and pedestrian conflicts at the transit plaza and make appropriate
connections to the First Creek Regional Trail.
Bicycle storage consideration should be given to locations throughout the plaza and not
consolidated into one location. Developing a bike station with enclosed storage and
other amenities is should be considered when bicycle use in the area merits enhanced
facilities.
An example of a rail transit plaza at the Englewood
Town Center.
61 st & Pena Station Area Plan | Framework Plan
21


CONNECTED
RECOMMENDATIONS
STREET CROSS SECTIONS
These street cross sections provide recommendations for the general components travel lanes, parking, tree lawns, and sidewalks of key
streets in the station area.
AVIATION PLACE Aviation Place is the key local pedestrian priority street in the station area, connecting the
transit plaza at the commuter rail station with Aviation Park at the center of the Transit
Community Core of the station area. As the key street in the station area. Aviation Place
should have the flexibility to serve multiple roles for the community, not only moving people
through its space with two vehicular travel lanes and ample pedestrian zones, but also a
place to host festivals and other neighborhood events. Buildings along Aviation Place should
consider appropriate siting, height, and design elements that promote strong solar access to
the street. Aviation Place may be a private street to meet all of its various roles.
TELLURIDE STREET Telluride Street serves as a mixed-use arterial in the station area with four vehicular travel
lanes and ample pedestrian zones but without on-street parking. The street has a wide
parkway-like median with trees and a clear zone to accommodate the Phillips gas pipeline
that travels from southwest to northeast through the station area. This cross section generally
applies to Telluride north of First Creek and south of Blue Grama Draw.
22
61st & Pena Station Area Plan | Framework Plan


"This is the core of the urban place-making approach; to use streets as the primary attributes of a quality
neighborhood instead of conventional plans that use streets as merely the primary access for vehicles."-Aviation
Station Proposal
60TH AVENUE 60th Avenue is a mixed use collector street that serves as the key east/west bicycle route to
reach the station. The street has two vehicular travel lanes, two on-street bicycle lanes, on-
street parking, and ample pedestrian zones.
SALIDA STREET
Salida Street is an example of a mixed-use collector, balancing multiple modes of travel with
two vehicular travel lanes, on-street parking, and ample pedestrian zones.
61 st & Pena Station Area Plan | Framework Plan
23


^yi brant
PRINCIPLE STATEMENT
The station area core is a vibrant,
walkable, compact, urban center
characterized by high quality urban
places and interconnected open space
accessible to a wide variety of users.
WHY IS BEING VIBRANT IMPORTANT TO THE 61 ST AND PENA STATION?
This East Commuter Rail transit station at 61 st Avenue is the heartbeat of the development,
bringing activity to the area almost twenty-four hours a day. Due to the unique situation of
being one stop away from DIAand being the end-of-line station for commuters-the 61st and
Pena station experiences more users during early morning and late night hours than a typical
rail station. The design and layout of development in the station area seeks to assemble
people and integrate activities closer to the Transit Plaza, along Aviation Place, Richfield
Street, and in Aviation Park, creating the most energy within the transit community core. Key
public spaces need easy access to encourage people to move between the private and public
environments of the station. An active, vibrant environment promotes a feeling of safety and
visual interest for pedestrians by providing amenities such as outdoor seating areas, ground
floor windows, cafes, accessible buildings, street trees, and other civic amenities. As pedestrian
activity levels increase in an area, offices, retail shops, and urban housing choices all become
more viable.
CONCEPTS &
RECOMMENDATIONS:
C.1 Urban Design
C.2 Parks and Recreation
C.3 Streetscapes
C.4 Aviation Park
VIBRANT CONCEPTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS
C.1 URBAN DESIGN
The design of a place correlates directly with the activity level found on the street. An area
that promotes a sense of place through thoughtful urban design not only supports pedestrian
activities, but also social activities that build a vibrant community. A thoughtful urban design
approach to 61 st and Pena allows the station area to take advantage of national trends that
indicate that pedestrian-oriented, mixed-use communities will prove most attractive to the
creative class,young professionals, seniors, single-parent households, and families.
C.1.A TRANSIT COMMUNITY CORE DESIGN ELEMENTS
Active Edges Urban neighborhoods need buildings that contribute to a safe and vibrant
pedestrian environment. Promoting active edges on buildings located along pedestrian
priority streets, key intersections, and urban open space adds to the urban experience,
increases visual and physical interaction between the public and private realm, and results in
more" eyes on the street." Buildings with active edges may include the following elements:
Prominent, street-facing entries
Ground floor windows and entrances
Great urban design helps build vibrant communities.
m Pedestrian-oriented design emphasizing pedestrian comfort, safety, scale and amenities
Building entrances that meet the sidewalk
Entries and active uses in situations where parking is on the ground floor
Stoops, raised porches, terraces, and small quasi-public open space in lower density
residential areas may be appropriate
Building Frontages A fundamental urban design principle is to have continuous building
fronts define the vital public realm. This urban design principle is applicable on key streets
throughout the station area and is considered vital to the overall pedestrian experience. As
the street grid is extended in the station area, continuous building fronts should be considered
on key streets. Building frontages may contain the following elements:
Building edges within a build-to zone
No surface parking between the primary structure and the street
Scaling elements to break up the appearance of tall buildings and continuous street
edges
24 61st & Pena Station Area Plan | Framework Plan


61 ST & PENA STATION ACTIVE EDGES AND BUILDING FRONTAGES
64TH AVE
-TO PEfiA BLVD
56TH AVE
Active Edges
Building Frontage
Gateway Entry Architectural, Signage &
Landscape Feature
| | | | Commuter Rail Tracks
O Proposed Commuter Rail Station
Future Connection
n scale

... 0 400' 800'
All streets shown in this plan are conceptual and adjustments may need to be made to the final layout and
alignment to meet City roadway design criteria.
Active Edges contribute to a safe and vibrant
pedestrian environment.
Buildings brought to the street help to define the
street.
61 st & Pena Station Area Plan | Framework Plan
25


VIBRANT
RECOMMENDATIONS
Potential Street Grid: A strong network of streets
creating a block and grid system that promotes
walkability is an important principle to adhere to as
the station area develops.
64THAVE
All streets shown in this plan are conceptual and
adjustments may need to be made to the final layout
and alignment to meet City roadway design criteria.
Development Phasing The nature of greenfield development patterns may cause the 61 st
and Pena station area to have some less intense development in initial phases, gradually
increasing density overtime as demand for close-in locations near the transit station increases.
To maintain the ability to accept these higher density building forms at a later date, a strategic
phasing strategy may be required for the station area.
As development occurs in the Transit Community Core, maintain flexibility to increase
development density on individual blocks with thoughtful site design that allows later
infill projects that do not require demolition of earlier phases. Consider using Design
Standards and Guidelines to support this effort.
Solar Access An important component to creating lively, active outdoor spaces is strong
solar access. Public spaces such as parks, plazas, and streets tend to be utilized more when
designed to consider sunlight. Solar access should be addressed in various ways within the
station area, including the use of design standards and guidelines. Key public spaces where
solar access should be addressed include but are not limited to Aviation Place and Aviation
Park.
C.1.B MIXED-USE DESIGN ELEMENTS
Mixed-use areas located east of Telluride Street recognize the importance of contributing
to the overall sense of place in the station area. Designed around a pedestrian friendly,
interconnected street network, these areas acknowledge that bringing development to the
edges of key streets creates a stronger neighborhood. Development is at a scale that creates a
walkable, pedestrian-oriented community.
Building Frontages This urban design principle is also applicable on key streets outside of the
Transit Community Core and is considered vital to the overall pedestrian experience. As the
street grid is extended in the station area, establish continuous building fronts on key streets.
Orient towards primary streets
Locate prominent, direct pedestrian entrances off primary streets
Provide vehicular access from secondary streets where feasible
In employment areas, consider auxiliary ground level uses on primary streets that
generate activity outside of typical office work hours such as:
employee recreation centers
daycare facilities
business support services such as copying and printing companies, computer
services and mailing services
casual restaurants
meeting spaces
In mixed-use residential areas, provide a variety of housing types.
C.1.C BLOCK AND LOT SIZE PATTERNS
Establish a block pattern that provides a high level of connectivity to promote walkable
neighborhoods and strong place making principles while providing flexibility for larger
blocks for special development projects.
Encourage single-family residential housing to be located on smaller lot sizes to establish
quality, compact, urban residential neighborhoods and help support transit use.
Encourage the use of private alleys for primarily low-density residential blocks outside of
the Transit Community Core.
Attract office users seeking the synergy gained from being integrated into a well-
26
61st & Pena Station Area Plan | Framework Plan


"Aviation Square, is a place for people that combines nature with active ground floor uses to include entertainment,
restaurants and shopping. A mix of uses will be stacked vertically to allow a complete living environment, one that
is supported by residents but used by visitors, transit riders, employees, cyclists, and pedestrians." Aviation Station
Proposal
61 st & Pena Station Area Plan | Framework Plan
27


VIBRANT
RECOMMENDATIONS
"sub areas are intentionally
organized around a series
of interconnected parks and
natural open spaces that
are positioned to preserve
mountain views, promote
pedestrian connectivity, convey
storm water naturally, and
preserve wildlife corridors."-
Aviation Station Proposal
connected, walkable community that promotes a culture of corporate innovation.
C.1.D DESIGN STANDARDS AND GUIDELINES
Design standards and guidelines for the station area will provide guidance for individual
development projects, ensuring high-quality design throughout the station area, and can be
administered by various mechanisms.
C.2 PARKS AND RECREATION
Parks and recreation areas, sized and located appropriately, provide a variety of users the
opportunity to engage in recreational activities in close proximity to their home or place of
work.
Provide a neighborhood park that provides space comparable to a full-size soccer field
for informal active uses such as volleyball, Frisbee, lawn games, pick-up soccer, picnicking
and complementary amenities such as a playground and walking trail. Additional active
recreational uses to consider include tennis courts, informal play fields, skate facilities,
dog parks, and multipurpose courts.
Plan active park space in proximity to areas expected to have a higher proportion of
residential uses.
Pocket parks may be desirable within the station area. Although pocket parks are
generally passive places, they can include a limited number of small-scale areas for active
uses such as a small playground or another play environment.
Organize and design parks and recreational facilities in a way that is easy to understand,
provides simple and safe access from residential and other proposed uses within the
station area, and connects through various facility types or other green infrastructure
components. (Green Streets, Parkways, Urban Trail Corridors)
C.3 STREETSCAPES
Successful streetscape design reinforces the pedestrian scale and character and enhances the
quality, identity, physical function, and economic vitality of an area.
Encourage the use of streetscape amenities that promote high levels of pedestrian
activity, physical comfort and visual interest including pedestrian lighting, seating,
landscaping, trash receptacles, bike racks and curb extensions at intersections.
Encourage green infrastructure practices such as porous pavers and stormwater planters,
designed to treat stormwater and provide environmental and aesthetic benefits.
Promote low water landscape between the sidewalk and the street.
Establish an ample minimum sidewalk width within the Transit Community Core and
along key connections such as 60th and 61 st Avenues.
Utilize zoning and appropriate design standards and guidelines to allow space for
sidewalk cafes along mixed use and special pedestrian streets.
C.4 AVIATION PARK
As the central urban open space. Aviation Park is an important focus for the transit-oriented
development in the area, serving residents, workers, and visitors. A variety of spaces provide
opportunities for programmed events as well as informal activities. The park has great access,
both physically and visually, with a mix of experiences for all users.
28
61st & Pena Station Area Plan | Framework Plan


61 ST & PENA STATION CONCEPTUAL PARKS AND OPEN SPACE NETWORK
64TH AVE
-TO PEISIA BLVD
56TH AVE
RegionalTrail
Open Space-Active
Open Space Passive
| | | | Commuter Rail Tracks
Q Proposed Commuter Rail Station
Future Connection
scale_______
0 400' 800'
All streets shown in this plan are conceptual and adjustments may need to be made to the final layout and
alignment to meet City roadway design criteria.
Parks and open space should provide a variety of
activities in close proximity to their home or place
ofwork.
61 st & Pena Station Area Plan | Framework Plan
29


fl Catalyze
PRINCIPLE STATEMENT
The station area will seek to catalyze a
sustainable development pattern for
the regional aerotropolis, promoting
economic vitality and housing
opportunity while respecting the
unique High Plains ecosystem for the
betterment of today's residents and
future generations.
WHY IS BEING CATALYTIC IMPORTANT TO 61 ST AND PENA STATION?
A truly sustainable community begins with an economically viable concept, focused on
nurturing a vibrant social and cultural environment, while being responsive to its natural
environment. This broader concept of sustainability involves a comprehensive approach to
building a stable community-for today and future generations-a critical idea for 61 st and Pena
as the station area is a cornerstone for Denver's Gateway and the regional aerotropolis. This
effort builds on the station's proximity to DIA, a major economic driver for the entire region.
This economic development opportunity relies on a comprehensive approach to integrating
economically, culturally, and environmentally sustainable principles.
CATALYZE CONCEPTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS
D.1 ECONOMIC VITALITY
CONCEPTS &
RECOMMENDATIONS:
D.1 EconomicVitality
D.2 Aerotropolis
D.3 High Plains Ecosystem and
Natural Open Spaces
D.4 Jobs and Housing Balance
Seek to develop the station area as a regional center with a strong, vibrant mix of office,
hotel, retail, entertainment, and residential uses at varied intensities sustainable for
generations of residents and visitors.
Maintain the ability to react to changing market opportunities throughout the build-out
of the station area while encouraging the highest intensity of uses near the station.
Encourage high quality development with design elements and materials appropriate
and durable for the High Plains environment.
Encourage new businesses in the station area to utilize green business practices at
the forefront of their culture, encouraging innovative programs and design to reduce
resource consumption.
Seek a mix of employers that provide jobs at various skill levels suitable for workers with a
diverse range of education.
Encourage a mix of jobs and housing in this transit community core as a way of
supporting the area, both as a destination and as an origin for transit purposes.
Support well-designed, pedestrian friendly, and appropriately-scaled development along
Tower Road that takes advantage of existing utility infrastructure.
Pursue new economy employers attracted to locations with high quality transit service, a
walkable environment, and the proximity to DIA.
D.2 AEROTROPOLIS
The station area is located in a High Plains
ecosystem.
m Seek to catalyze development by creating an identity and center for the regional
aerotropolis.
Seek to attract large regional corporate headquarters looking to take advantage of the
close proximity to DIA and easy transit access to downtown Denver and other major
employment centers including Anschutz Medical Campus and the DenverTech Center via
the 1-225 light rail line.
Seek to attract one or more hotels serving business travelers, aviation-related businesses,
and corporate meetings.
D.3 HIGH PLAINS ECOSYSTEM AND NATURAL OPEN AREAS
An integrated approach to manage stormwater runoff is needed to protect water quality
within our urban watersheds. This requires cooperation among City agencies and
help from our regional and development partners. By incorporating stormwater best
management practices into urban design and transportation decisions, the opportunity
30
61st & Pena Station Area Plan | Framework Plan


presents itself to not only manage stormwater and treat associated pollutants, but to also
create public amenities.
Promote sustainable design for transit facilities and all subsequent development
appropriate for the local High Plains ecosystem through developing design standards and
guidelines and utilizing a review process that includes qualified design professionals.
Active land uses should be located adjacent to open space including natural areas such as
Blue Grama Draw and First Creek to improve visibility, increase use, and promote safety.
Explore the opportunity for healthy food choices by neighborhood residents through
urban agriculture and other programs identified by the Sustainable Food Policy Council.
Natural open space should feel public. Design features and programming that achieves
this recommendation may include:
Orient buildings to acknowledge the open space and avoid buildings that place
service uses adjacent to the open space
Locate streets parallel to the open space
Orient pedestrian paths and promenades to open space
Provide frequent access points to multi-use paths within the open space
Locate residential uses adjacent to open space when possible
Provide appropriate transitions from office or commercial uses to open space
Identify strong connections between natural open space corridors in the station area
through on/off street trail connections and defined, safe points of entry from public
streets
Encourage buildings in the station area to seek LEED certification or similar green
building standards.
Seek to improve access to nearby open space and recreation areas including the Rocky
Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge.
Use sustainable design best practices in designing public urban open space.
D.4 JOBS AND HOUSING BALANCE
Encourage development to achieve a balance between jobs and housing.
Develop affordable and workforce housing strategies.
Encourage the exploration of partnerships with local affordable housing advocates
and providers, such as the Urban Land Conservancy, Enterprise Community Partners,
Denver Housing Authority, Mile High Transit Opportunity Collaborative, and the Colorado
Community Land Trust to facilitate diverse housing opportunities.
Encourage a diversity of housing sizes and types that will attract a mix of family, single
residents, single-family households, and empty nesters. Support a diversity of unit sizes,
configurations and price points, and include housing opportunities that are priced to
attract people who work in the area, at DIA and at other transit-oriented employment
destinations.
Provide housing consistent with the City's Inclusionary Housing Ordinance.
"Only a TOD with a complete mix of uses can create the activity and sense
of place that can become a true catalyst for the region." Aviation Station
Proposal
LEED CERTIFICATION
LEED, or Leadership in Energy and
Environmental Design, provides
a third party verification that a
building was designed and built using
strategies aimed at achieving high
performance in key areas of human and
environmental health: sustainable site
development, water savings, energy
efficiency, materials selection and
indoor environmental quality. Station
area development should strive to
meet LEED or similar green building
standards.
Sustainable design best practices can add value to
public urban open space.
61 st & Pena Station Area Plan | Framework Plan
31




Moving Forward
MOVING FORWARD
PHASING
REALIZING THE VISION
TIMEFRAME
Plan implementation takes place over many
years and is the result of large and small
actions by the public sector and the private
sector, sometimes in partnership. Plan
recommendations are intended to provide
direction for the actions that are now seen
as means to achieve the plan vision. These
recommendations are just that because the
future will bring unforeseen opportunities
and challenges. A successful plan serves as
a guide to realize the vision for the 61 st and
Pena Station Area.
The chart below is a rough outline of the major tasks involved with implementing the
Plan. The chart is not meant to provide a step-by-step approach to implementation.
Each task contains a multitude of additional steps related to successful
implementation and many are hard to predict at this time. The chart is meant to
provide rough timeframes for implementation short-term, medium term, and long
term, and identify how certain tasks are interrelated (i.e., one must be accomplished
or started before moving on to the next).
IMPLEMENTATION PHASING
61st & Pena Station Area Plan Implementation
SHORT MEDIUM LONG
General Development Plan
Form Implementing Partnerships
Commuter Rail Line & Platform
Regulatory Implementation
Design Standards and Guidelines
Phase 1 Street Network
Open Space
Aviation Park
Commuter Rail Transit Plaza
Aviation Place
Multi-Use Trail System
Neighborhood Parks
61 st & Pena Station Area Plan | Framework Plan
33


IMPLEMENTATION: REGULATORY AND POLICYTOOLS LEAD RECOMMENDATIONS IMPLEMENTATION ACTION TIMEFRAME STAKEHOLDERS
Regulatory Implementation Land Uses A.1.A-A.1.B Update the Blueprint Denver conceptual land use map as directed from plan recommendations. Short Community Planning and Development (CPD)
Regulatory Implementation Zoning A.1.A.2, C.1.D.1 Entitle property with zone districts compatible with plan recommendations. Short CPD and Property Owners
Design Standards and Guidelines A.2, A.3, A.4, C.1.D.1 Develop design standards and guidelines that address building forms, active edges, building frontages, solar access, block and lot size patterns, development phasing, and other design elements as directed from plan recommendations and otherwise not implemented through zoning. Short CPD and Property Owners
Street Network Classification B.1 Update the Blueprint Denver Street Classifications as directed from plan recommendations. Short CPD
Parking Strategies B.3 Develop a parking management strategy that promotes the proper use of parking facilities, provides convenient parking for nearby businesses and residences, and addresses issues related to parking requirements during early phases of station area development. Short CPD, PublicWorks, Property Owners, Metro District, and DIA
Economic D.1.D.2, D.4, C.1.C Catalyze a sustainable development pattern that promotes economic vitality through plan recommendations. On-going Property Owners, Office of Economic Development (OED)
Aerotropolis D.2 Support the development of a regional Aerotropolis through plan recommendations On-going DIA, Property Owners, others
Jobs and Housing D.4, D.1 Strive to achieve a jobs and housing balance in the station area through plan recommendations. On-going CPD, OED, Property Owners,
34
61st & Pena Station Area Plan | Framework Plan


IMPLEMENTATION: INFRASTRUCTURE TOOLS
RECOMMENDATIONS IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY TIMEFRAME LEAD STAKEHOLDERS
Commuter Rail Transit Plaza B.4 Design and construct transit plaza. Medium Metro District, DIA
Street Network Phase 1 B.1 Design and construct street network for initial development in the station area. Short Metro District, DIA
Street Network Later Phases B.1, C.1.C Design and construct street network for later phases of development in the station area. This should include necessary streets to provide connectivity through the station area. Medium Long Metro District, DIA, Property Owners
Bicycle Network B.2 Design and implement on-street and off-street bicycle facilities as directed from plan recommendations. Medium- Long Metro District, Public Works, DIA, Property Owners
Public Transportation B.2 Examine local shuttle service and regional bus service connecting the station area with nearby residential and commercial areas and accessing the station via 60th and 61 st avenues. Medium Long RTD, others
Streetscapes C.3 Design and implement streetscapes that reinforce the pedestrian scale and character and enhances the quality, identity, physical function, and economic vitality of the station area as directed from plan recommendations. On-going Metro District, DIA, Property Owners
Parks and Recreation C.2 Design, construct, and maintain parks and recreation areas sized and located appropriately when demand warrants. Parks should be able to provide a variety of users the opportunity to engage in recreational activities in close proximity to their home or place of work as directed from plan recommendations. Long Metro District, Parks and Recreation, DIA, Property Owners
Aviation Park C.4 Design, construct, and maintain Aviation Park as the central urban open space for the station area. Medium Metro District, Parks and Recreation
Natural Open Space D.3 Preserve and maintain natural open areas as directed from plan recommendations that address design, visibility, access, and adjacent land uses. Medium Long Metro District, Parks and Recreation, DIA, Property Owners
High Plains Ecosystem and Sustainability D.3 Promote environmental sustainability as directed from plan recommendations that address stormwater, land use, and building design. On-going Metro District, Public Works, CPD, Parks and Recreation, DIA, Property Owners
61 st & Pena Station Area Plan | Framework Plan
35


Full Text

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Adopted January 13, 20142014 61ST & PEA STATION AREA PLAN

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Acknowledgements MAYOR MICHAEL B. HANCOCKDENVER CITY COUNCIL District 1 Susan Shepherd District 2 Jeanne Faatz District 3 Paul D. Lopez District 4 Peggy Lehmann District 5 Mary Beth Susman (President) District 6 Charlie Brown District 7 Chris Nevitt District 8 Albus Brooks District 9 Judy Montero District 10 Jeanne Robb District 11 Christopher Herndon AtLargeRobin Kniech At-Large Deborah Ortega DENVER PLANNING BOARD Kenneth Ho, Chairman Andy Baldyga Shannon Gi ord Anna Jones Brittany Morris Saunders Sharon Nunnally Susan Pearce Arleen Taniwaki Julie Underdahl Dave Webster COMMUNITY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT Rocky Piro, Manager Molly Urbina, Deputy Manager Steve Gordon, Planning Services Director David Gaspers Deirdre Oss Caryn Champine Steve Nalley Michelle Pyle Todd Wenskoski Tim Watkins Andrea Santoro Carolyne Janssen Andrea Burns PUBLIC WORKS Jose Cornejo, Manager Crissy Fanganello, Policy and Planning Director Jenn Hillhouse Emily Snyder Justin Schmitz Mike Anderson PARKS AND RECREATION Lauri Dannemiller, Manager Gordon Robertson, Parks Director David Marquardt, Parks Planning Manager DENVER INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT Kim Day, Manager John Ackerman Neil Max eld Tom Reed Dan Poremba PLAN STAKEHOLDERS L.C. Fulenwider Inc. Karl D. Smith Estate SMT Investors

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Table of ContentsINTRODUCTION ......................................................................................................................1 Plan Approach.................................................................................................................. ................................... 2 Planning Process ................................................................................................................................................3 Planning Cont ext ............................................................................................................. ..................................4 How to Use this Plan .........................................................................................................................................5 FRAMEWORK PLAN ............................................................................................................... .6 Vision and Principles ......................................................................................................................................... 8 A. Community ................................................................................................................. .................................10 B. Connect .........................................................................................................................................................16 C. Vibrant .................................................................................................................. ..........................................24 D. Catalyze .........................................................................................................................................................30 MOVING FORWARD .............................................................................................................. 32

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61st & Pena Station Area Plan | Introduction iv 61st & Pea 61st & Pea Station Station Downtown Downtown DIA DIA Arriving and departing passengers will easily identify this TOD as a new center due to the proposed compact, dense, urban form. Instead of being focused along an arterial, as Tower Road development has been, this TOD clusters around the station, increases in height and density as it faces Pea Boulevard and gains signi cant market advantage with 180 degree, unobstructed views of the Front Range.. Aviation Station Proposal Gateway Gateway

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61st & Pena Station Area Plan | Introduction 1 Introduction Denvers airport gateway area has been a place in progress for more than 25 years. The area connects the City to Denver International Airport (DIA). Since initial planning and regulatory e orts in the early 1990s, signi cant changes have occurred to the areas surrounding context. After opening in 1995, DIA has become the fth busiest airport in the country, a key entry point to the Rocky Mountain West, and a signi cant economic engine for the Denver region. In 2004, voters passed the Regional Transportation Districts (RTD) FasTracks Program, which included extending rail transit from Downtown Denver to DIA. Denvers population, once declining in the 1970s and 1980s, is now one of the fastest growing in the country. The DIA and Gateway statistical neighborhoods, with several thousand acres of undeveloped land, is positioned to take advantage of these changed circumstances. To date, growth in the area has occurred sporadically, and due to its location and limited mobility connections, the development pattern focused on the automobile. With the arrival of the RTD East Commuter Rail Line in 2016 and a rail station located at 61st Avenue and Pea Boulevard, the opportunity to spur a highquality, sustainable, transit-oriented developmen t pattern focused on walkable neighborhoods and easy access to transit is now at hand. The area around the 61st and Pea Commuter Rail Station is positioned to become a national model for sustainable, transit-oriented, green eld development while contributing to the robust economic generator that is Denver International Airport. The station area can enhance the regions overall economic competitiveness by linking employment opportunities with a wide range of housing choices through increased transportation options and building value in existing and new neighborhoods along the East Corridor. The 61st and Pea Commuter Rail Station is unique within the City and County of Denver. Its location in the Gateway neighborhood near Denver International Airport truly sets it apart from other transit communities throughout Denver and throughout the metropolitan region. As a site yet to be developed, it provides both tremendous opportunities and some signi cant challenges. Development at this particular station is important in shaping the future of the airport and the northeast quadrant of the metropolitan area. As a green eld area, the 61st and Pea transit community has the opportunity to showcase the best in transit-oriented development. Stateof-the-art treatments for creating mixed-use dev elopment, establishing walkable urban patterns, and advancing a lifestyle less reliant on the automobile can literally be developed from the ground up. The proximity to Denver International Airport, which employs more than 35,000 (2013), easily makes this a highly desirable new community from the outset. Key in uences for guiding the 61st and Pea station area plan include the Citys TOD Strategic Plan, Blueprint Denver, the Citys integrated Land Use and Transportation Plan and on-going planning e orts by Denver International Airport. Key values include sustainability, world-class design, stateof-the-art conservation practices, and 21st century solutions for mobility and infrastructure. Green eld sites can also provide challenges. Today, the stakeholders are working towards developing the initial phases of the station area, but the transit community itself will evolve over a period of time. Current market considerations as well as longer-range market projections, are critical to phasing strategies for growing the community over time to achieve the desired vision. Development today has to be sited and designed in a manner that recognizes current market and nancing conditions and accommodates phasing, densi cation, and evolving the 61st and Pea station area to meet the vision for a vibrant, sustainable and healthy transit community in which to live, work and play. As a showcase community, it will embrace a 21st century lifestyle with easy transit connections to transportation hubs and amenities throughout the Denver region. RTD FASTRACKS PROGRAM AND THE EAGLE P3 PROJECTThe RTD FasTracks program, passed by voters in November 2004, includes the East Rail line that connects Downtown Denver to Denver International Airport. RTD chose a private partner, Denver Transit Partners, to design, build, partially nance, operate, and maintain the East Line, as well as the Gold Line and elements of the Northwest Corridor Line as part of the Eagle P3 project. The Eagle P3 is the rst public-private partnership of its kind in the United States with an expected total budget of $2.1 billion. The East Line is scheduled to begin operation in 2016. 76 E-470 70 270 25 76 70 70 C-470 E-470 285 25 THORNTON NORTHGLENN W Southeast Rail Line Gold Line 20 6 Northwest Rail Line Northwest Rail Line 20 6 R Southwest Rail Line Central Rail Line Central Rail Extension Southwest Rail Extension Southeast Rail Extension North Metro Rail LineDENVER WHEAT RIDGE LAKEWOOD MORRISON AURORA GLENDALE CENTENNIAL LONE TREE LITTLETON GREENWOOD VILLAGE SHERIDAN ENGLEWOOD HIGHLANDS RANCH PARKER COMMERCE CITY BRIGHTON BROOMFIELD LOUISVILLE LAFAYETTE ERIE NIWOT BOULDER LONGMONT GOLDEN ARVADA FEDERAL HEIGHTS WESTMINSTER SUPERIOR UNION STATION PROGRESS MAP N LEGEND

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61st & Pena Station Area Plan | Introduction 2 Plan ApproachBACKGROUNDThe 61st and Pea Station Area Plan encompasses 382 acres immediately adjacent to the future East Commuter Rail Station near where the future 61st Avenue terminates east of the Pea Boulevard Corridor. The location is currently agricultural and grazing land with no structures on the entire 382 acres. The future Telluride Street provides the eastern boundary of the Transit Community Core of the station area. The station is one of eight stations along the East Commuter Rail Line, scheduled to begin operations between Denver Union Station (DUS) to Denver International Airport (DIA) in 2016.PROPOSALThe 61st and Pea station was advanced by a team led by L.C. Fulenwider Inc. in reply to a Request for Responses issued by DIA. It is envisioned as a catalyst for a regional aerotropolis, spurring a more compact urban development pattern in the Gateway area. This location allows a wide range of urban development opportunities including market-rate multifamily housing, workforce and a ordable housing, commercial-o ce, hotel/hospitality, retail, and airport related o ce. The nucleus of the proposal is organized around a pedestrian-scale street and block network with more intense tr ansit-oriented development within mile of the transit station, while strengthening connectivity to existing and future surrounding land uses. STATION AREA The East Rail Line to the west, 64th Avenue to the north, Tower Road to the east, and 56th Avenue to the south de ne the station plan area. It is divided into two sections totaling 382 acres. The rst section is the Transit Community Core, generally located west of Telluride and totaling 115 acres. The second section is the Mixed-Use Area, the remaining land within the station area boundaries, at 267 acres.GATEWAY AREA PLANThe boundaries of the station area plan fall within Denvers larger Gateway planning area. The existing Gateway Area Plan, adopted in 1990 and updated in 1993, provided recommendations for land use, transportation, urban design, and open space as the City anticipated the opening of DIA. An arrangemen t of mixed-use zone districts allowing a range of activities and densities, generally focusing on Tower Road, were adopted for the Gateway based on the plans recommendations. However, much has happened since the Gateway Plan was conceived and written. Most notably is the determination of the alignment for the East Rail Corridor with a rail station located at approximately 61st and Pea Boulevard. The Citys Transit-Oriented Development Strategic Plan was also developed after the Gatewa y Plan was complete. The Strategic Plan addresses commercial building intensities and residential densities now found at the rail stations in the Denver metropolitan area, similar to other cities with expanding rail transit systems. This plan supersedes the portion of the existing Gateway Plan within the boundaries of the 61st and Pea Station Area Plan. This 61st and Pea Station Area Plan is also intended to be incorporated into a new neighborhood plan for the Gateway area to be developed in the future. The station area boundaries are similar in scale to the size of downtown Denver.

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61st & Pena Station Area Plan | Introduction 3PLANNING PROCESSFour components guide planning and decision making in the station area. These include (1) station area planning, (2) general development planning, (3) zoning, and (4) design standards and guidelines. Station Area Plans A station area plan articulates the vision for the transit community, providing the basic policy framework for decision making and is adopted by City Council as a supplement to the Citys Comprehensive Plan. General Development Plans A General Development Plan (GDP) is a regulatory tool administered through the Denver Zoning Code and establishes a framework for phased development intended to occur on larger sites over a longer period of time. The GDP process does not result in a site-speci c development plan, but is designed to implement recommendations from City-adopted small area plans (including station area plans), documenting master plan level concepts for land use, publicly-accessible open space, wet and dry utilities, associated multi-modal street network, development phasing and concepts for design guidelines. Zoning The Denver Zoning Code, part of the Denver Revised Municipal Code, is a regulatory tool that directs development in the station area in a manner that achieves the station area vision. Design Standards and Guidelines Design Standards and Guidelines articulate the level of quality expected of development within the station area. It is intended to complement, reinforce, and implement regulations and design intent found in other documents mentioned above. PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT PROCESSA multi-tiered strategy for involving stakeholders ensured that all perspectives were considered throughout the planning process. Public input informed the identi cation of key issues as well as concepts and plan recommendations for addressing the key issues. Denver City Council City Councilmember Chris Hearndon (District 11) was briefed multiple times during the plan process. City Councilmembers at-large Robing Kneich and Debbie Ortega also received a brie ng during the plan process. City sta gave a presentation to the Land Use, Transportation and Infrastructure (LUTI) Committee. A City Council public hearing and vote culminated the planning process. Denver Planning Board The City sta briefed Planning Board on three separate occasions regarding the 61st and Pea Station Area Plan. After conducting a public hearing, Planning Board approved the Station Area Plan. 61st & Pea Station Area Stakeholder Committee Within the plan boundaries, four landowners control all of the property; Denver International Airport, L.C. Fulenwider Inc., the Karl D. Smith Estate, and SMT Investors. These land owners, as well as various City and County sta made up the Stakeholder Committee. Neighborhood Organizations Inter Neighborhood Cooperation, Denver Neighborhood Association, Inc., Green Valley Ranch Citizens Advisory Board, Wild Horse Ridge Homeowners Association General Public Public Meetings July 18, 2013 and November 14, 2013 Plan Website A plan website to provide updates and important information to the general public. Planning Process Public Meetings were held on July 18 and November 14, 2013.

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61st & Pena Station Area Plan | Introduction 4 Planning ContextDENVER COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AND SUPPLEMENTSThe Denver Comprehensive Plan is established in the Denver City Charter and Revised Municipal Code to provide an expression of the citys vision for the future with a listing of goals and objectives. Once prepared and adopted, the plan will guide and in uence decisions that a ect the future of the city. The Comprehensive Plan and its supplements are adopted by City Council ordinance after plan approval from the Denver Planning Board. Planning Boards criteria for approval of supplements are: a long term view, inclusive public process, and consistency with the Denver Comprehensive Plan. This Plan incorporates or re nes recommendations of previous Plans and studies for the station area and the Gateway area. Any updates to the following Plans should incorporate and re ne recommendations for the station area based on this Plan: Gateway Area Plan (1990/1993) Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000 Bicycle Master Plan (2001) Blueprint Denver: An Integrated Land Use and Transportation Plan (2002) Denver Parks and Recreation Game Plan (2002) Pedestrian Master Plan (2004) Water Quality Management Plan (2004)IMPLEMENTATION PLANSCity agencies prepare implementation plans to guide their policies and work programs. Although these plans are not adopted as supplements to the Comprehensive Plan, they provide important guidance to the City and its agencies for implementing the Comprehensive Plan and its supplements. Greenprint Denver (2006) Transit Oriented Development Strategic Plan (2006) Strategic Transportation Plan (2008) Gateway Travelshed Transportation Study (2008) Storm Drainage Master Plan (2009) Sanitary Sewer Master Plan (2009) Strategic Parking Plan (2010) Denver Moves (2011) DIA Aviation Plan (2011) DIA Airport City Plan (2012)COORDINATION WITH CONCURRENT PLANNING EFFORTSOver the course of the planning process, there were several other e orts underway within the study area. The 61st and Pea Station Area Plan team coordinated with each of these e orts to maximize resources and to help ensure consistency with each. MetroVision 2040 Eagle P3 East Corridor TOD Strategic Plan Update DRCOG Sustainable Communities Initiative DIA Comprehensive Transportation Plan The RTD East Commuter Rail Line will begin serving the station in 2016. Blueprint Denver is the Citys integrated land use and transportation plan.

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61st & Pena Station Area Plan | Introduction 5 How to Use this PlanThis Plan establishes a long-range vision and guiding principles for the development and future of the 61st and Pea Station area. The elemen ts of the Plan provide a vision for a vibrant and connected, compact, transit-oriented community in the heart of the developing Gateway area and region. This Plan sets the larger stage for a responsible, sustainable growth pattern within the station area. Public agencies and private entities rely on this Plan for many purposes and actions that a ect the near and long term development activity near the station. The Plan provides cityadopted policy direction to guide decision-making related to development opportunities, transportation, partnerships, land use, infrastructure and public investment. The Plan contains both intent language and recommendations; intent language establishes the larger concepts in the Plan, while recommendations provide the speci city needed for future decisionmaking. Many of the recommendations require multiple steps over a period of years by a variety of participants. At the same time, the Plan allows the latitude to pursue unforeseen opportunities that will arise and to respond to new challenges over the coming years. Unlike most small area plans in the City, the station area is currently a green eld development site lacking context, existing development and infrastructure. Without existing businesses, residents, and public amenities, the station area has both fewer constraints as well as greater opportunities. Development in the station area will occur over multiple phases, reacting to changing market conditions, all while maintaining the long-range vision of becoming a vibrant, compact, urban center and world-class transit-oriented community. Users of this Plan should recognize the unique circumstances of this station area when working with its policy direction and provisions. The planning horizon for this Plan is 20 years, but since the duration of development activity and long term market demands in the station area is unknown, the plan is intended to be reviewed within 10 years of initial plan adoption to determine if an update would be bene cial. The Plan is divided into two sections in addition to this introduction: The Framework Plan provides content that applies to the entire plan area and provides the background to support the recommendations for the 61st and Pea Station Area to become a vibrant urban center and world-class transit-oriented community. The concluding section is entitled Moving Forward, addressing implementation and priorities for the short and long term to ensure the success of the Plan. This portion also highlights the multiple steps that may be necessary to work toward implementation of the plan concepts and recommendations. As with the citywide Comprehensive Plan and its supplements, this area plan establishes goals and objectives, policy direction, and guiding provisions. The plan is not intended to, and does not, rezone any property, render any existing uses non-conforming, or predispose the outcome of any permitting processes related to properties within the planning boundary. Future implementation actions, such as zoning map or text amendments, general development plans, design standards and guidelines, metro districts, parking management districts, capital improvements, and public-private partnerships, require speci c actions on the part of the city, property owners, and stakeholders. THE BIRTH OF DENVER INTERNATIONAL AIRPORTStapleton International Airport, located east of Quebec Avenue between Montview Boulevard and 56th Avenue, served the Denver region from 1929 to 1995. The site was chosen during the 1920s for the location of a new municipal airport in part due to its remote location on the eastern boundary of the city. Dedicated in 1929, the airport was renamed Stapleton after Mayor Ben Stapleton in 1944. Almost continuous expansion occurred beginning at the dawn of the jet age in the late 1950s, eventually comprising 4,700 acres, six runways, and ve terminal concourses. During the 1980s, Mayor Federico Pea and other local leaders, knowing the now landlocked airport was outdated and overstrained with passengers, examined opportunities to build a new Denver International Airport. In 1989, voters approved a site for the new airport, 25 miles from Downtown Denver, that was originally located in Adams County. On March 1, 1995, Denver International Airport better known as DIA was open for business. DIA currently has six runways and serves 53 million passengers annually. That makes DIA the 5th busiest passenger airport in the US and 13th in the world1. Situated on 53 square miles, DIA is the largest commercial airport in the country, with the ability to expand to 12 runways and serve 100 million passengers a year. (1 Source: DIA)

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61st & Pena Station Area Plan | Framework Plan 6 Framework Plan F P S S S S S S F S S F L R F R S S S S S S S S S S S ST N Existing Fire Station Proposed Fire Station Public School Private School Recreation Center Police Station Library Planned Commuter Rail Station Commuter Rail Tracks 00 51 0.25 Mile s F S P S F L R TThe 61st and Pea Station Area will see great changes as it evolves into a vibrant urban center for all of northeast Denver. Taking a cue from Denvers best neighborhoods while learning from the lessons of other green eld communities in the shadow of an international airport, 61st and Pea is the center of activity in the Gateway, using the basic principles of town building to create a livable place for residents, employees, and visitors. By focusing this plan on the best placemaking and urban design concepts, 61st and Pea is a transit community built for how current and future generations will live, work, and play in the Gateway. To be an e ective tool in guiding development in the Gateway, this Station Area Plan acknowledges that the build out of the station area may exceed the 20-year plan horizon, and that a strategic approach to development phasing, including the evolution of parcels from lower density to higher density in the future, is needed to achieve the long-term vision of the area.

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61st & Pena Station Area Plan | Framework Plan 7 CaptionThe 61st and Pea Station Area presents the broad, foundational components for development of a vibrant urban center and compact, transit-or iented community for the Gateway. The four plan principles that establish this framework are: Transit Community: Building neighborhoods with a rich mix of uses and urban character Connected: The multi-modal lifestyle Vibrant: Place-making with urban design, parks, and public space Catalyze: Sustainable development for generations Each plan principle has a set of concepts and recommendations that in uence a speci c aspect of the station area. The long-term success and value of the station area plan will depend on how the plan concepts and recommendations are implemented as real world projects and what resulting actions occur to capitalize on those projects. TRANSITORIENTED DEVELOPMENT PRINCIPLESTransit-oriented development creates a dense mix of uses within walking distance of transit stations where people can live, work, shop, and connect to destinations around the region without relying on their automobiles. Transit-oriented areas are lively, walkable and provide alternatives to driving alone in both new development and surrounding neighborhoods. Principles include: Place-making: Creating safe, comfortable, varied and attractive station areas with distinct identities. Rich Mix of Choices: Providing housing, employment, transportation and shopping choices for people of all ages, household types, incomes and lifestyles. Location E ciency: Placing homes, jobs, shopping, entertainment, parks and other amenities in proximity to one another and close to the station to promote walking, biking and transit use. Value Capture: Using plans to encourage all stakeholders residents, business owners, Regional Transit District, and the city to take full economic advantage of the value of the transit infrastructure. Portal to the Region: Serving as a gateway to the regional transit network by providing a safe and welcoming environment. (Source: TOD Strategic Plan, 2006)

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61st & Pena Station Area Plan | Framework Plan 8 A.1 A Mixed-Use Community A.3 Front Range Views A.2 Varying Scales of Development A.4 Transitions The Vision for 61st & Pea Station 61ST AND PEA STATION AREA EVOLUTION OF A TRANSIT COMMUNITY TRANSIT COMMUNITIES TEND TO BE PEDESTRIANFRIENDLY, CONTAIN A MIX OF HOUSING, WORK, AND SHOPPING OPPORTUNITIES, AND ARE LOCATED WITHIN WALKING DISTANCE FROM A MAJOR TRANSIT STOP. THEY ARE DESIGNED TO MAXIMIZE RESIDENTS ACCESS TO PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION AND OPTIMIZE ALTERNATIVE MODES OF TRANSPORTATION LIKE WALKING AND BIKING. THE STATION AREA AT 61ST AND PEA WILL DEVELOP AS A TRANSIT COMMUNITY FOCUSED ON THE RAIL STATION. AS A GREENFIELD LOCATION, THE STATION AREA WILL BE DEVELOPED WITHIN A WELL CONNECTED STREET GRID BUT DENSITY MAY BE LESS INTENSE IN EARLY PHASES THAN TYPICAL TRANSITORIENTED DEVELOPMENT. STRATEGIC INCREASES IN DENSITY SHOULD OCCUR OVER TIME TO TAKE FULL ADVANTAGE OF THE COMMUNITYS TRANSIT AMENITY.A. Transit CommunityBuilding Neighborhoods with a Rich Mix of Uses and Urban Character 61st and Pea Station serves as a vibrant, compact, urban center of the regional aerotropolis, a world-class transit-oriented community, catalyzing development and connecting people. This vision does not happen overnight; rather, the station area evolves over time, starting from a rail station with initial development to an established transit community. The plan re ects those iterations. It speaks to the ultimate build-out of an established transit community, but also addresses the reality that development phases build in intensity as the Plans vision becomes reality. The framework for the station area guides development through these multiple development phases. Transit Community The station area is a pedestrian-friendly, transit-oriented community with a rich mix of uses and a variety of building types that promote a strong sense of place. Connected The station area optimizes connectivity of the rail station to the entire station area and surrounding neighborhoods through a comprehensive, multi-modal approach to mobility and accessibility. Vibrant The station area core is a vibrant, walkable, compact, urban center characterized by high quality urban places and interconnected open space accessible to a wide variety of users. Catalyze The station area catalyzes a sustainable development pattern for the regional aerotropolis, promoting economic vitality and housing opportunities, while respecting the unique High Plains ecosystem for the betterment of todays residents and future generations.

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61st & Pena Station Area Plan | Framework Plan 9B. ConnectedThe Multi-Modal LifestyleC. VibrantPlace-making with Urban Design, Parks, and Public SpaceD. CatalyzeSustainable Development for Generations B.1 Living Streets B.3 Parking Management B.2 Connecting to the Gateway and Beyond B.4 Transit Plaza D.1 Economic Vitality D.3 High Plains Ecosystem and Natural Open Space D.2 Aerotropolis C.4 Aviation Park C.2 Parks and Recreation C.3 Streetscapes C.1 Urban Design D.4 Jobs and Housing Balance

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61st & Pena Station Area Plan | Framework Plan 10 A. Transit CommunityWHY IS A TRANSIT COMMUNITY IMPORTANT TO 61ST AND PEA?A transformational moment in the development of the Gateway Area and the regional aerotropolis takes place when the East Line Commuter Rail begins operating between Denver International Airport (DIA) and Denver Union Station (DUS) in 2016. Taking great care with the various place-making elements of the station area is critical to the success of the development and is a signi cant opportunity to begin to unite the various communities in the Gateway by creating an attractive destination. The station area needs a strong mix of uses, a blend of building types, and a respect of the natural environment and Front Range views within the station area. Achieving these elements is the foundation for a unique community in the Gateway Area with superior connectivity, easily reaching both the heart of Downtown Denver with transit connections throughout the metro area and into DIAs South Terminal, ready to depart to any one of hundreds of domestic or international destinations. This exciting level of multi-modal connectivity presents great potential to attract international and local business users, hotels, retail, and new residents to locate within walking distance of the rail station. To fully capitalize on the location e ciency of the rail station, development near the station area should strive to be built at commercial intensities and residential densities that support transit use. A mix of uses at appropriate densities will help the station area serve as the portal to the Gateway area and bene t from its location between DUS and DIA, two of the biggest activity centers in Denver. TRANSIT COMMUNITY CONCEPTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS A.1 A MIXEDUSE COMMUNITYBlueprint Denver, Denvers integrated land use and transportation plan (adopted in 2002), identi es Areas of Change and Areas of Stability throughout the City with the goal of directing new development and in ll projects toward Areas of Change. The station area plan maintains the areas status as an Area of Change. The 61st and Pea Station Area Plan uses the framework A.1 A Mixed-Use Community A.3 Front Range Views A.2 Varying Scales of Development A.4 Transitions PRINCIPLE STATEMENTThe station area is a pedestrian-friendly, transit-oriented community with a rich mix of uses and a variety of building types that promote a strong sense of place and promotes transit ridership. CONCEPTS & RECOMMENDATIONS:The Denver region is home to numerous mixed-use developments located in more traditionally suburban markets. Transit Communities provide connectivity through multiple modes of transit.

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61st & Pena Station Area Plan | Framework Plan 11in Blueprint Denver as the basis of its recommended conceptual land use map. Land use types in the plan include Transit-Oriented Development, Town Center, Commercial Corridor and two variations of Mixed Use, Mixed Use Residential and Mixed Use Employment. The Plan land use map presents the conceptual layout and mix of uses for the station area at build-out. As development begins to occur in the station area, some variation in the ultimate land use mix is expected as unforeseen opportunities arise. The Blueprint Denver Plan map Aviation Community Station at 61st Ave is central to extensive existing development and clearly positioned to become the urban center and catalyst... Aviation Station Proposal BLUE GRAMA DRAW TO PEA BLVD AVIATION PLACE SALIDA STREET TTELLURIDE ST 64TH AVE 56TH AVE TOWER RD YAMPA ST RICHFIELD STREET 61ST & PEA STATION CONCEPTUAL LAND USE MAP NTOD Transit Community Core Mixed Use Employment Mixed Use Residential Commercial Corridor Town Center 0 400800 Proposed Open Space Network Commuter Rail Tracks Proposed Commuter Rail Station TFuture Connection All streets shown in this plan are conceptual and adjustments may need to be made to the nal layout and alignment to meet City roadway design criteria.

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61st & Pena Station Area Plan | Framework Plan 12will be amended as needed based on this plan. A.1.A TRANSITORIENTED DEVELOPMENT: THE TRANSIT COMMUNITY COREIn the 61st and Pea Station Area, transit-oriented development is envisioned as a compact, mixed-use urban community, in the medium to long term, with the highest densities and commercial uses clustered near the commuter station. The transit community core shows the greatest attention to urban design within the station area, providing housing, hospitality services, and employment opportunities for a diverse population in a con guration that facilitates pedestrian and transit access. This mix of land uses is intended to create a vibrant, compact place that supports transit use, both as an origin and destination, throughout the day. The blocks along Aviation Place are key to this vision and should be held for higher density, transit supportive development. A.1.B LAND USE TYPESLand use types in the station area should generally allow for a mix of uses. Mixed-use areas may have a sizable employment base as well as higher density housing. Uses are often, but not necessarily, mixed in each building, development, or block. More importantly, residential and non-residential uses are within walking distance of one another within the neighborhood. The proportion of residential to commercial uses varies considerably from one area to another. In the 61st and Pea Station area, land use categories are broken out into four sub-categories, each with an emphasis on a di erent predominant use. A full range of uses except for traditional forms of industrial is encouraged in each sub-category. Mixed-Use Residential: Predominately residential uses with a variety of building forms and the opportunity for compatible commercial uses with strong station connectivity. Mixed-Use Employment: Predominately o ce and commercial employment uses with a variety of building forms. The opportunity for compatible multi-family uses with strong station connectivity also exists. Town Center: Variety of shopping, entertainment, service, and employment needs provided at a scale that can serve several nearby neighborhoods. The town center on Stapletons 29th Avenue Town Center has a mix of buildings that relate to one another, creating a well-de ned, pedestrian friendly street. Buildings at 61st and Pea should be carefully integrated into the urban design of the community to create a walkable core of the transit community. Development can be closely integrated into a rail station, such as this residential building at the Del Mar station in Pasadena, CA.

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61st & Pena Station Area Plan | Framework Plan 13Tower Road should be a focal point of the corridor with design features that identify the area as a gateway to the station area. Commercial Corridor: In uenced by the presence of one or more major arterials on the boundary of the station area and generally more than one-half mile from the rail platform. Greater exibility in use and form is expected in the commercial corridor areas, providing visual and physical access to a variety of uses at di erent scales and accommodating auto tra c, major bus routes, and pedestrian activity. Land uses in the station area are a ected by the proximity to Denver International Airport. Existing zoning regulations limit the type and location of residential uses allowed in the station area. Land use types identi ed in the station area plan still apply even if these existing zoning regulations change in the future.A.2 VARYING SCALES OF DEVELOPMENTThe station area has a wide variety of building heights and forms that promote a diverse neighborhood while the transit community core has the greatest sense of compact urbanism in the entire Gateway Area. Other areas should have their own unique neighborhood characteristics that are generally less intense than the transit community core. Collectively, the entire station area should strive towards achieving a level of development intensity typically found in great transit communities. This desired intensity level may be achieved over multiple phases of development in the station area and be accomplished through exploring various tools with plan stakeholders. Allow taller building forms with higher densities and greater emphasis on pedestrian orientation near the station. As development densities decrease further from the station, allow a wider range of building forms in the mixed-use areas. Promote varied building heights throughout the station area while capitalizing on the best locations to site prominent buildings with greater intensities. Taller buildings, especially near the station and along Rich eld Street, should have design elements that promote greater opportunities for viewing Front Range vistas, increasing solar access to the pedestrian level, and enhancing the walking experience in the station create a dense, mixed-use urban development pattern with all of the desired multi modal transportation elements necessary for a successful TOD. Aviation Station Proposal TRANSIT SUPPORTIVE COMMUNITIESStudies have shown that residents living near rail stations are 5 to 6 times more likely to commute by rail and employees working near rail stations are 2 to 3 times more likely to commute by rail. Additional research indicates that areas within a quarter-mile of a station that have strong transit ridership typically have a combination of minimum residential densities around 30 units per acre or more and minimum commercial intensities of 50 employees or more per acre. Transit Type M in. /Residential Density within 1/4 mile Basic Bus 7 Premium Bus 15 Rail Transit 30 Transit Type Min. /Employee Density within 1/4 mile High Capacity Bus 25 Rail Transit 50 Sources: Pushkarev and Zupan 1977, Ewing 1999, Cervero et al. 2004, Reconnecting America and Center for Transit Oriented Development, 2008)

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61st & Pena Station Area Plan | Framework Plan 14 COMMUNITY RECOMMENDATIONSarea. Achieve implementation of these design considerations through zoning, design standards and guidelines, or other applicable land use and building form regulatory tools. Design tools that may be utilized include but are not limited to: Upper story stepbacks Setbacks Street frontage heights Building orientation Massing variation 61ST & PEA STATION CONCEPTUAL BUILDING HEIGHTS MAP Maximum 5 stories NMaximum 8 stories Maximum 12 stories 0 400800 Commuter Rail Tracks Proposed Open Space Network Proposed Commuter Rail Station TFuture Connection BLUE GRAMA DRAW TO PEA BLVD AVIATION PLACE TELLURIDE ST 64TH AVE 56TH AVE TOWER RD YAMPA ST SALIDA STREET RICHFIELD STREET T

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61st & Pena Station Area Plan | Framework Plan 15 Recognize where exibility may be appropriate to adapt to changing market conditions or to further City goals and objectives.A.3 FRONT RANGE VIEWSExpansive views of the Rocky Mountains are a valuable amenity in the station area. Development should capitalize on this amenity to the fullest extent. Strategically consider how to maximize full or partial views of the Front Range from as many development sites as possible. Promote Front Range views from Avia tion Place and key locations along natural open space corridors, such as First Creek and Blue Grama Draw. Utilize public right-of-way as de facto view corridors in a manner that increases viewing opportunities to the Front Range.A.4 TRANSITIONSLocate higher intensity development closer to the transit station with generally decreasing intensities occurring further from the station. Some variation in this pattern may occur with possible higher densities and building forms located along Telluride Street and the Blue Grama Draw and First Creek corridors. Appropriate transitions should occur where higher intensity mixed-use areas meet lower intensity mixed-use residential areas. Use design elements, such as upper story stepbacks, as necessary, to structure massing adjacent to predominantly residential areas. Consider utilizing collector and arterial streets to ease transitions between mixed-use and predominately residential neighborhoods. Consider utilizing mid-block transitions (e.g., alley ways, walk ways) where more intense mixed-use development is located on the same block as lower intensity residential uses. Promote the use of building design elements that create a pedestrian scaled environment on streets that traverse between mixed-use and more residential neighborhoods.Taller buildings should incorporate design elements that enhance the pedestrian experience.

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61st & Pena Station Area Plan | Framework Plan 16 B. ConnectedWHY IS BEING CONNECTED IMPORTANT TO THE 61ST AND PEA STATION AREA?A comprehensive, multi-modal approach to connectivity is essential in transit planning and creating great communities. The East Rail Line provides a high level of regional mobility, reaching both Denver International Airport and Denver Union Station, while the future station near 61st and Pea functions as a portal to the regional aerotropolis and the Gateway Area. The station is in proximity to DIA, presenting exceptional access for residents and businesses wanting to reach the airport and all of its national and international destinations with great ease. To capitalize on this great location, 61st and Pea Station needs to provide a high level of local, multi-modal mobility and accessibility. Strong local access to the station extends the impact of rail transit in the Gateway, resulting in a higher level of ridership and increased transit equity for surrounding neighborhoods. As the larger Gateway Area develops, connections are strengthened to new and existing residential areas and the station area can serve as a transportation hub for the entire Gateway Area. This station access increases the ability to leverage the signi cant public investment that has occurred with the East Rail Line and supports DIA as a regional engine for economic growth. CONNECTED CONCEPTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS B.1 LIVING STREETSLiving Streets are vibrant places where people of all ages and physical abilities feel safe and comfortable using any mode of travel (walking, biking, transit, or private auto). Living Streets combine context sensitive development with complete streets to o er solutions that promote active living, increase mobility, capitalize on infrastructure investments and stimulate economic development. Create a street grid in the development area, recognizing limitations due to topography, other natural constraints, and market/economic development opportunities. Blueprint Denver Street Classi cations: Commercial Arterials: These streets are designed to balance mobility with access to nearby businesses and the surrounding area. Commercial arterials generally serve B.1 Living Streets B.3 Parking Management B.2 Connecting to the Gateway and Beyond B.4 Transit Plaza PRINCIPLE STATEMENTThe station area optimizes local connectivity of the station area and surrounding neighborhoods to the rail system and the region through a comprehensive, multi-modal approach to mobility and accessibility. CONCEPTS & RECOMMENDATIONS:A comfortable pedestrian experience promotes walking within the station area. RTD rail service is one component to a wellconnected station area.

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61st & Pena Station Area Plan | Framework Plan 17 BLUE GRAMMA DRAW TO PEA BLVD TO PEA BLVD AVIATION PL. SALIDA ST. RICHFIELD ST. TTELLURIDE ST 64TH AVE 56TH AVE TOWER RD YAMPA ST. 57 59 TH AVE. 63RD AVE. 61ST & PEA STATION CONCEPTUAL BLUEPRINT STREET CLASSIFICATION a rich mix of complimentary uses organized around a pedestrian scale street and block network Aviation Station Proposal All streets shown in this plan are conceptual and adjustments may need to be made to the nal layout and alignment to meet City roadway design criteria. N0 scale 400800 Commercial Arterial Mixed Use Arterial Mixed Use Collector Mixed Use Local Main Street Local Future Commercial Arterial Commuter Rail Tracks Proposed Commuter Rail Station T Future Connection

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61st & Pena Station Area Plan | Framework Plan 18 CONNECTED RECOMMENDATIONSlonger vehicle trips and interconnect major urban elements such as employment centers, commercial centers, and residential neighborhoods. Mixed-Use Arterial: Mixed-use arterials provide a variety of travel choices for multiple users while balancing mobility with access to nearby businesses. Mixed-Use Collectors: Mixed-use collectors are designed to provide a greater balance between mobility and land access with a variety of travel choices. Main Street Local: Main street local streets provides the highest level of access to businesses in a pedestrian-friendly environment. Vehicle trips are typically shorter and occur at lower speeds. Mixed-Use Local: Mixed-use local streets balance providing local mobility with a variety of choices at lower vehicular speeds while delivering a high level of access to neighborhood businesses and residences. Design streets for lower speeds to enhance travel by all users including pedestrians, bicyclists, and motorists. Aviation Place should serve as a special pedestrian street. Consider Telluride Street becoming a parkway or boulevard within the station area. Consider design elements for Tower Road to balance its importance as the major northsouth commercial arterial in the Gateway area and its role as one of the main routes to the 61st and Pea rail station. Identify ways to minimize con icts along Yampa Street for bicyclists while acknowledging the potential for service vehicles utilizing the same space. This could include travel lane design or focused access points. Consider incorporating green infrastructure into streetscapes such as curb extensions or stormwater planters.B.2 CONNECTING TO THE GATEWAY AND BEYOND Establish strong, e ective connections between regional and local bike facilities: 1st Creek at 56th Avenue 1st Creek at Rich eld Street Blue Grama at Yampa Street Blue Grama at Rich eld Street Station area trails will connect with the larger regional trail system. Careful integration of multiple modes of transit can increase mobility in the station area.

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61st & Pena Station Area Plan | Framework Plan 19 BLUE GRAMA DRAW TO PEA BLVD AVIATION PLACE SALIDA STREET TTELLURIDE ST 56TH AVE TOWER RD YAMPA ST 64TH AVE *RICHFIELD STREET N0 scale 400800 Grade Separated Crossing Multi-Use Path (O Street) On Street Bike Route Facility Type To Be Determined Regional Trail Special Pedestrian Street At-Grade Crossing Open Space Publicly Accessible Open Space Recreation Commuter Rail Tracks Proposed Commuter Rail Station Future Connection T* 61ST & PEA STATION CONCEPTUAL BICYCLE AND PEDESTRIAN NETWORK All residences are located within 800 of a park or natural open space system Aviation Station Proposal All streets shown in this plan are conceptual and adjustments may need to be made to the nal layout and alignment to meet City roadway design criteria. Future connections to be determined.

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61st & Pena Station Area Plan | Framework Plan 20 Support RTD buses accessing the station via 61st and 60th Avenues. Evaluate opportunities for enhanced bicycle facilities (cycletracks, protected bike lanes, bu ered bike lanes, bicycle boulevards) on the identi ed on-street bicycle routes and future roadway connections to provide high ease of use bicycle network throughout the area. The station should be accessible via o -street bike paths or bike lanes from all directions. Incorporate bicycle recommendations from this station area plan into Denver Moves. Locate bike lanes on 60th Avenue providing the opportunity to continue to the east of Tower Road. Locate bike lanes on Yampa Street as the primary north/south bicycle connection in the station area. Focus regional bicycle tra c onto the First Creek Regional Bicycle Trail. Determine and provide the appropriate bicycle and pedestrian accommodations within the Rich eld Street corridor to access the station. Examine local shuttle service and regional bus service connecting the station area with nearby residential and commercial areas. Ensure adequate multi-modal access from the station to the civic amenities such as recreation centers, schools, and public libraries.B.3 PARKING MANAGEMENT Evaluate and identify parking management str ategies near the station that ensure a proper balance of supply and demand for di erent users. Promote proper use of parking facilities, while providing convenient parking for nearby businesses and residences. Strategies for this area should align with the Citys threefold vision for parking management as identi ed in the Strategic Parking Plan (SPP) ; (1) manage parking as a valued asset, (2) acknowledge a variety of land use patterns and contexts, (3) encourage an integrated approach to parking management with a commitment to stakeholder outreach. In addition, strategies should be implemented following the SPPs ve-step process, which orders management approaches incrementally through demand, location, time, pricing, and supply opportunities. This process coupled with stakeholder involvement will help determine the most e ective and incremental parking management strategy for this area as the area grows and changes. Possible strategies to explore include but are not limited to: Shared or Accessory parking agreements between future park-n-ride operator, nearby multi-family, commercial, or o ce uses. This includes opportunities to share o -street or structured parking inventory to reduce development costs. May be subject to zoning approval. Explore the opportunity to Unbundle parking requirements from individual uses and explore establishing an overall parking requirement/cap for the Transit Community Core. On-Street Time Limited Parking Restrictions and/or a combination of on and o street strategies to help manage commuter parking options Corridor-wide strategies for commuter and DIA parking Transportation Demand Management strategies including employer or community funded transit passes or car sharing Locational considerations and format for DIA, commuter, or other higher inventory parking lots as TOD evolves and transitions to an active mix of uses STRATEGIC PARKING PLAN FOR 61ST & PEA61st and Pea has unique parking challenges due to its utilization by di erent users. A strategic approach to parking management in the station area is needed to promote the proper use of parking as the East Rail line begins service and as development occurs in the future. Users to consider when developing the strategic parking plan include: DIA travelers RTD commuters Station area residents, workers, and visitors The 61st and Pea Strategic Parking Plan will be a joint e ort of the City and County of Denvers Public Works Department, Community Planning and Development Department, Denver International Airport, and key stakeholders. Parking management strategies in the station area can ensure a proper balance of supply and demand for di erent users.

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61st & Pena Station Area Plan | Framework Plan 21 Appropriate pricing strategies to manage demand for Transit Community Core and best utilize DIA and commuter lots Other creative parking management tools as outlined in the Strategic Parking Plan (SPP). Recognize on-street parking as a valuable asset to promote access to both residential and commercial uses while acknowledging that these uses will not be able to rely on the onstreet parking to meet all their parking needs. Recognize that during early phases of development, surface parking may occur at market-based ratios. Environmental documents for the East Commuter Rail Line identi ed the parking needs at this station for transit users on the opening day of service. This parking will be accommodated within the station area. Consider establishing a parking management district or utilize the existing metropolitan district to coordinate multiple strategies to manage the supply and demand for parking in the station area. The district should generally focus on management of o -street parking, but coordinate its e orts with the City regarding management of on-street parking.B.4 TRANSIT PLAZAThe transit plaza, located at the rail station pla tform, is the gateway to the 61st and Pea station area community, designed in a manner to meet the needs of residents and visitors alike. Integrating the transit plaza into the overall open space system gives it a place and function within the community, providing connectivity to land uses not immediately adjacent to the commuter rail platform. As the terminus of Aviation Place, the southern portion of the transit plaza is designed as an important civic space. Avoid bicycle and pedestrian con icts at the transit plaza and make appropriate connections to the First Creek Regional Trail. Bicycle storage consideration should be given to locations throughout the plaza and not consolidated into one location. Developing a bike station with enclosed storage and other amenities is should be considered when bicycle use in the area merits enhanced facilities. An example of a rail transit plaza at the Englewood Town Center.

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61st & Pena Station Area Plan | Framework Plan 22 CONNECTED RECOMMENDATIONS AVIATION PLACEAviation Place is the key local pedestrian priority street in the station area, connecting the transit plaza at the commuter rail station with Aviation Park at the center of the Transit Community Core of the station area. As the key street in the station area, Aviation Place should have the exibility to serve multiple roles for the community, not only moving people through its space with two vehicular travel lanes and ample pedestrian zones, but also a place to host festivals and other neighborhood events. Buildings along Aviation Place should consider appropriate siting, height, and design elements that promote strong solar access to the street. Aviation Place may be a private street to meet all of its various roles. TELLURIDE STREET STREET CROSS SECTIONSThese street cross sections provide recommendations for the general c omponents travel lanes, parking, tree lawns, and sidewal ks of key streets in the station area. Telluride Street serves as a mixed-use arterial in the station area with four vehicular travel lanes and ample pedestrian zones but without on-street parking. The street has a wide parkway-like median with trees and a clear zone to accommodate the Phillips gas pipeline that travels from southwest to northeast through the station area. This cross section generally applies to Telluride north of First Creek and south of Blue Grama Draw.

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61st & Pena Station Area Plan | Framework Plan 23 SALIDA STREETSalida Street is an example of a mixed-use collector, balancing multiple modes of travel with two vehicular travel lanes, on-street parking, and ample pedestrian zones. 60TH AVENUE60th Avenue is a mixed use collector street that serves as the key east/west bicycle route to reach the station. The street has two vehicular travel lanes, two on-street bicycle lanes, onstreet parking, and ample pedestrian zones. This is the core of the urban place-making approach; to use streets as the primary attributes of a quality neighborhood instead of conventional plans that use streets as merely the primary access for vehicles. Aviation Station Proposal

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61st & Pena Station Area Plan | Framework Plan 24 C. Vibrant WHY IS BEING VIBRANT IMPORTANT TO THE 61ST AND PEA STATION?This East Commuter Rail transit station at 61st Avenue is the heartbeat of the development, bringing activity to the area almost twenty-four hours a day. Due to the unique situation of being one stop away from DIA and being the end-of-line station for commuters-the 61st and Pea station experiences more users during early morning and late night hours than a typical rail station. The design and layout of development in the station area seeks to assemble people and integrate activities closer to the Transit Plaza, along Aviation Place, Rich eld Street, and in Aviation Park, creating the most energy within the transit community core. Key public spaces need easy access to encourage people to move between the private and public environments of the station. An active, vibrant environment promotes a feeling of safety and visual interest for pedestrians by providing amenities such as outdoor seating areas, ground oor windows, cafes, accessible buildings, street trees, and other civic amenities. As pedestrian activity levels increase in an area, o ces, retail shops, and urban housing choices all become more viable. VIBRANT CONCEPTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS C.1 URBAN DESIGNThe design of a place correlates directly with the activity level found on the street. An area that promotes a sense of place through thoughtful urban design not only supports pedestrian activities, but also social activities that build a vibrant community. A thoughtful urban design approach to 61st and Pea allows the station area to take advantage of national trends that indicate that pedestrian-oriented, mixed-use communities will prove most attractive to the creative class, young professionals, seniors, single-parent households, and families. C.1.A TRANSIT COMMUNITY CORE DESIGN ELEMENTSActive Edges Urban neighborhoods need buildings that contribute to a safe and vibrant pedestrian environment. Promoting active edges on buildings located along pedestrian priority streets, key intersections, and urban open space adds to the urban experience, increases visual and physical interaction between the public and private realm, and results in more eyes on the street. Buildings with active edges may include the following elements: Prominent, street-facing entries Ground oor windows and entrances Pedestrian-oriented design emphasizing pedestrian comfort, safety, scale and amenities Building entrances that meet the sidewalk Entries and active uses in situations where parking is on the ground oor Stoops, raised porches, terraces, and small quasi-public open space in lower density residential areas may be appropriate Building Frontages A fundamental urban design principle is to have continuous building fronts de ne the vital public realm. This urban design principle is applicable on key streets throughout the station area and is considered vital to the overall pedestrian experience. As the street grid is extended in the station area, continuous building fronts should be considered on key streets. Building frontages may contain the following elements: Building edges within a build-to zone No surface parking between the primary structure and the street Scaling elements to break up the appearance of tall buildings and continuous street edges C.1 Urban Design C.3 Streetscapes C.2 Parks and Recreation C.4 Aviation Park PRINCIPLE STATEMENTThe station area core is a vibrant, walkable, compact, urban center characterized by high quality urban places and interconnected open space accessible to a wide variety of users. CONCEPTS & RECOMMENDATIONS:Great urban design helps build vibrant communities.

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61st & Pena Station Area Plan | Framework Plan 25 BLUE GRAMMA DRAW TO PEA BLVD AVIATION PLACE TELLURIDE ST 64TH AVE 56TH AVE TOWER RD YAMPA ST SALIDA STREET RICHFIELD STREET T 61ST & PEA STATION ACTIVE EDGES AND BUILDING FRONTAGES N0 scale 400800 Active Edges Building Frontage Gateway Entry Architectural, Signage & Landscape Feature Commuter Rail Tracks Proposed Commuter Rail Station T Future Connection Active Edges contribute to a safe and vibrant pedestrian environment. All streets shown in this plan are conceptual and adjustments may need to be made to the nal layout and alignment to meet City roadway design criteria. Buildings brought to the street help to de ne the street.

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61st & Pena Station Area Plan | Framework Plan 26Development Phasing The nature of green eld development patterns may cause the 61st and Pea station area to have some less intense development in initial phases, gradually increasing density over time as demand for close-in locations near the transit station increases. To maintain the ability to accept these higher density building forms at a later date, a strategic phasing strategy may be required for the station area. As development occurs in the Transit Community Core, maintain exibility to increase development density on individual blocks with thoughtful site design that allows later in ll projects that do not require demolition of earlier phases. Consider using Design Standards and Guidelines to support this e ort. Solar Access An important component to creating lively, active outdoor spaces is strong solar access. Public spaces such as parks, plazas, and streets tend to be utilized more when designed to consider sunlight. Solar access should be addressed in various ways within the station area, including the use of design standards and guidelines. Key public spaces where solar access should be addressed include but are not limited to Aviation Place and Aviation Park.C.1.B MIXEDUSE DESIGN ELEMENTSMixed-use areas located east of Telluride Street recognize the importance of contributing to the overall sense of place in the station area. Designed around a pedestrian friendly, interconnected street network, these areas acknowledge that bringing development to the edges of key streets creates a stronger neighborhood. Development is at a scale that creates a walkable, pedestrian-oriented community. Building Frontages This urban design principle is also applicable on key streets outside of the Transit Community Core and is considered vital to the overall pedestrian experience. As the street grid is extended in the station area, establish continuous building fronts on key streets. Orient towards primary streets Locate prominent, direct pedestrian entrances o primary streets Provide vehicular access from secondary streets where feasible In employment areas, consider auxiliary ground level uses on primary streets that generate activity outside of typical o ce work hours such as: employee recreation centers daycare facilities business support services such as copying and printing companies, computer services and mailing services casual restaurants meeting spaces In mixed-use residential areas, provide a variety of housing types.C.1.C BLOCK AND LOT SIZE PATTERNS Establish a block pattern that provides a high level of connectivity to promote walkable neighborhoods and strong place making principles while providing exibility for larger blocks for special development projects. Encourage single-family residential housing to be located on smaller lot sizes to establish quality, compact, urban residential neighborhoods and help support transit use. Encourage the use of private alleys for primarily low-density residential blocks outside of the Transit Community Core. Attract o ce users seeking the synergy gained from being integrated into a wellVIBRANT RECOMMENDATIONS BLUE GRAMMA DRAW AVIATION PL. SALIDA ST. RICHFIELD ST. T64TH AVE 57 63RD A YAMPA ST. D E ST 59 TH A Potential Street Grid: A strong network of streets creating a block and grid system that promotes walkability is an important principle to adhere to as the station area develops. All streets shown in this plan are conceptual and adjustments may need to be made to the nal layout and alignment to meet City roadway design criteria.

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61st & Pena Station Area Plan | Framework Plan 27 Aviation Square, is a place for people that combines nature with active ground oor uses to include entertainment, restaurants and shopping. A mix of uses will be stacked vertically to allow a complete living environment, one that is supported by residents but used by visitors, transit riders, employees, cyclists, and pedestrians. Aviation Station Proposal

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61st & Pena Station Area Plan | Framework Plan 28 VIBRANT RECOMMENDATIONSconnected, walkable community that promotes a culture of corporate innovation. C.1.D DESIGN STANDARDS AND GUIDELINESDesign standards and guidelines for the station area will provide guidance for individual development projects, ensuring high-quality design throughout the station area, and can be administered by various mechanisms. C.2 PARKS AND RECREATIONParks and recreation areas, sized and located appropriately, provide a variety of users the opportunity to engage in recreational activities in close proximity to their home or place of work. Provide a neighborhood park that provides space comparable to a full-size soccer eld for informal active uses such as volleyball, Frisbee, lawn games, pick-up soccer, picnicking and complementary amenities such as a playground and walking trail. Additional active recreational uses to consider include tennis courts, informal play elds, skate facilities, dog parks, and multipurpose courts. Plan active park space in proximity to areas expected to have a higher proportion of residential uses. Pocket parks may be desirable within the station area. Although pocket parks are generally passive places, they can include a limited number of small-scale areas for active uses such as a small playground or another play environment. Organize and design parks and recreational facilities in a way that is easy to understand, provides simple and safe access from residential and other proposed uses within the station area, and connects through various facility types or other green infrastructure components. (Green Streets, Parkways, Urban Trail Corridors)C.3 STREETSCAPESSuccessful streetscape design reinforces the pedestrian scale and character and enhances the quality, identity, physical function, and economic vitality of an area. Encourage the use of streetscape amenities that promote high levels of pedestrian activity, physical comfort and visual interest including pedestrian lighting, seating, landscaping, trash receptacles, bike racks and curb extensions at intersections. Encourage green infrastructure practices such as porous pavers and stormwater planters, designed to treat stormwater and provide environmental and aesthetic bene ts. Promote low water landscape between the sidewalk and the street. Establish an ample minimum sidewalk width within the Transit Community Core and along key connections such as 60th and 61st Avenues. Utilize zoning and appropriate design standards and guidelines to allow space for sidewalk cafes along mixed use and special pedestrian streets. C.4 AVIATION PARK As the central urban open space, Aviation Park is an important focus for the transit-oriented development in the area, serving residents, workers, and visitors. A variety of spaces provide opportunities for programmed events as well as informal activities. The park has great access, both physically and visually, with a mix of experiences for all users. sub areas are intentionally organized around a series of interconnected parks and natural open spaces that are positioned to preserve mountain views, promote pedestrian connectivity, convey storm water naturally, and preserve wildlife corridors. Aviation Station Proposal

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61st & Pena Station Area Plan | Framework Plan 29 BLUE GRAMA DRAW TO PEA BLVD SALIDA STREET RICHFIELD STREET TTELLURIDE ST 56TH AVE TOWER RD YAMPA ST 64TH AVE AVIATION PLACE AVIATION PARKNEIGHBORHOOD PARK ACTIVE PARK SPACE CONNECTED TO OPEN SPACE SYSTEM ACTIVE PARK SPACE CONNECTED TO OPEN SPACE SYSTEM 61ST & PEA STATION CONCEPTUAL PARKS AND OPEN SPACE NETWORK N0 scale 400800 Regional Trail Open Space Passive Open Space Active Commuter Rail Tracks Proposed Commuter Rail Station TFuture Connection All streets shown in this plan are conceptual and adjustments may need to be made to the nal layout and alignment to meet City roadway design criteria. Parks and open space should provide a variety of activities in close proximity to their home or place of work.

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61st & Pena Station Area Plan | Framework Plan 30 D. CatalyzeWHY IS BEING CATALYTIC IMPORTANT TO 61ST AND PEA STATION?A truly sustainable community begins with an economically viable concept, focused on nurturing a vibrant social and cultural environmen t, while being responsive to its natural environment. This broader concept of sustainability involves a comprehensive approach to building a stable community-for today and future generations-a critical idea for 61st and Pea as the station area is a cornerstone for Denvers Gateway and the regional aerotropolis. This e ort builds on the stations proximity to DIA, a major economic driver for the entire region. This economic development opportunity relies on a comprehensive approach to integrating economically, culturally, and environmentally sustainable principles. CATALYZE CONCEPTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS D.1 ECONOMIC VITALITY Seek to develop the station area as a regional center with a strong, vibrant mix of o ce, hotel, retail, entertainment, and residential uses at varied intensities sustainable for generations of residents and visitors. Maintain the ability to react to changing market opportunities throughout the build-out of the station area while encouraging the highest intensity of uses near the station. Encourage high quality development with design elements and materials appropriate and durable for the High Plains environment. Encourage new businesses in the station area to utilize green business practices at the forefront of their culture, encouraging innovative programs and design to reduce resource consumption. Seek a mix of employers that provide jobs at various skill levels suitable for workers with a diverse range of education. Encourage a mix of jobs and housing in this transit community core as a way of supporting the area, both as a destination and as an origin for transit purposes. Support well-designed, pedestrian friendly, and appropriately-scaled development along Tower Road that takes advantage of existing utility infrastructure. Pursue new economy employers attracted to locations with high quality transit service, a walkable environment, and the proximity to DIA. D.2 AEROTROPOLIS Seek to catalyze development by creating an identity and center for the regional aerotropolis. Seek to attract large regional corpor ate headquarters looking to take advantage of the close proximity to DIA and easy transit access to downtown Denver and other major employment centers including Anschutz Medical Campus and the Denver Tech Center via the I-225 light rail line. Seek to attract one or more hotels serving business travelers, aviation-related businesses, and corporate meetings.D.3 HIGH PLAINS ECOSYSTEM AND NATURAL OPEN AREAS An integrated approach to manage stormwater runo is needed to protect water quality within our urban watersheds. This requires cooperation among City agencies and help from our regional and development partners. By incorporating stormwater best management practices into urban desig n and transportation decisions, the opportunity D.1 Economic Vitality D.3 High Plains Ecosystem and Natural Open Spaces D.2 Aerotropolis PRINCIPLE STATEMENTThe station area will seek to catalyze a sustainable development pattern for the regional aerotropolis, promoting economic vitality and housing opportunity while respecting the unique High Plains ecosystem for the betterment of todays residents and future generations. D.4 Jobs and Housing Balance CONCEPTS & RECOMMENDATIONS:The station area is located in a High Plains ecosystem.

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61st & Pena Station Area Plan | Framework Plan 31presents itself to not only manage stormwater and treat associated pollutants, but to also create public amenities. Promote sustainable design for transit facilities and all subsequent development appropriate for the local High Plains ecosystem through developing design standards and guidelines and utilizing a review process that includes quali ed design professionals. Active land uses should be located adjacent to open space including natural areas such as Blue Grama Draw and First Creek to improve visibility, increase use, and promote safety. Explore the opportunity for healthy food choices by neighborhood residents through urban agriculture and other programs identi ed by the Sustainable Food Policy Council. Natural open space should feel public. Desig n features and programming that achieves this recommendation may include: Orient buildings to acknowledge the open space and avoid buildings that place service uses adjacent to the open space Locate streets parallel to the open space Orient pedestrian paths and promenades to open space Provide frequent access points to multi-use paths within the open space Locate residential uses adjacent to open space when possible Provide appropriate transitions from o ce or commercial uses to open space Identify strong connections between natural open space corridors in the station area through on/o street trail connections and de ned, safe points of entry from public streets Encourage buildings in the station area to seek LEED certi cation or similar green building standards. Seek to improve access to nearby open space and recreation areas including the Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge. Use sustainable design best practices in designing public urban open space.D.4 JOBS AND HOUSING BALANCE Encourage development to achieve a balance between jobs and housing. Develop a ordable and workforce housing strategies. Encourage the exploration of partnerships with local a ordable housing advocates and providers, such as the Urban Land Conservancy, Enterprise Community Partners, Denver Housing Authority, Mile High Transit Opportunity Collaborative, and the Colorado Community Land Trust to facilitate diverse housing opportunities. Encourage a diversity of housing sizes and types that will attract a mix of family, single residents, single-family households, and empty nesters. Support a diversity of unit sizes, con gurations and price points, and include housing opportunities that are priced to attract people who work in the area, at DIA and at other transit-oriented employment destinations. Provide housing consistent with the Citys Inclusionary Housing Ordinance. LEED CERTIFICATIONLEED, or Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, provides a third party veri cation that a building was designed and built using strategies aimed at achieving high performance in key areas of human and environmental health: sustainable site development, water savings, energy e ciency, materials selection and indoor environmental quality. Station area development should strive to meet LEED or similar green building standards. Only a TOD with a complete mix of uses can create the activity and sense of place that can become a true catalyst for the region. Aviation Station ProposalSustainable design best practices can add value to public urban open space.

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61st & Pena Station Area Plan | Framework Plan 32

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61st & Pena Station Area Plan | Framework Plan 33 Moving ForwardREALIZING THE VISIONPlan implementation takes place over many years and is the result of large and small actions by the public sector and the private sector, sometimes in partnership. Plan recommendations are intended to provide direction for the actions that are now seen as means to achieve the plan vision. These recommendations are just that because the future will bring unforeseen opportunities and challenges. A successful plan serves as a guide to realize the vision for the 61st and Pea Station Area.TIMEFRAME The chart below is a rough outline of the major tasks involved with implementing the Plan. The chart is not meant to provide a step-by-step approach to implementation. Each task contains a multitude of additional steps related to successful implementation and many are hard to predict at this time. The chart is meant to provide rough timeframes for implementation short-term, medium term, and long term, and identify how certain tasks are interrelated (i.e., one must be accomplished or started before moving on to the next). IMPLEMENTATION PHASING PHASING MOVING FORWARD 61st & Pena Station Area Plan ImplementationGeneral Development Plan Form Implementing Partnerships Regulatory Implementation Open Space Aviation Place Phase 1 Street Network Multi-Use Trail System Commuter Rail Transit Plaza Aviation Park Neighborhood Parks SHORT MEDIUM LONG Design Standards and Guidelines Commuter Rail Line & Platform

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61st & Pena Station Area Plan | Framework Plan 34 IMPLEMENTATION: REGULATORY AND POLICY TOOLSRECOMMENDATIONS IMPLEMENTATION ACTION TIMEFRAME LEAD STAKEHOLDERSRegulatory Implementation Land Uses A.1.A A.1.B Update the Blueprint Denver conceptual land use map as directed from plan recommendations. Short Community Planning and Development (CPD) Regulatory Implementation Zoning A.1, A.2, C.1, D.1 Entitle property with zone districts compatible with plan recommendations. Short CPD and Property Owners Design Standards and Guidelines A.2, A.3, A.4, C.1, D.1 Develop design standards and guidelines that address building forms, active edges, building frontages, solar access, block and lot size patterns, development phasing, and other design elements as directed from plan recommendations and otherwise not implemented through zoning. Short CPD and Property Owners Street Network Classi cation B.1 Update the Blueprint Denver Street Classi cations as directed from plan recommendations. ShortCPD Parking Strategies B.3 Develop a parking management strategy that promotes the proper use of parking facilities, provides convenient parking for nearby businesses and residences, and addresses issues related to parking requirements during early phases of station area development. Short CPD, Public Works, Property Owners, Metro District, and DIA Economic D.1, D.2, D.4, C.1.C Catalyze a sustainable development pattern that promotes economic vitality through plan recommendations. On-going Property Owners, O ce of Economic Development (OED) Aerotropolis D.2 Support the development of a regional Aerotropolis through plan recommendations On-going DIA, Property Owners, others Jobs and Housing D.4, D.1 Strive to achieve a jobs and housing balance in the station area through plan recommendations. On-going CPD, OED, Property Owners,

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61st & Pena Station Area Plan | Framework Plan 35 IMPLEMENTATION: INFRASTRUCTURE TOOLSRECOMMENDATIONS IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY TIMEFRAME LEAD STAKEHOLDERS Commuter Rail Transit Plaza B.4 Design and construct transit plaza. MediumMetro District, DIA Street Network Phase 1 B.1 Design and construct street network for initial development in the station area. ShortMetro District, DIA Street Network Later Phases B.1, C.1.C Design and construct street network for later phases of development in the station area. This should include necessary streets to provide connectivity through the station area. Medium Long Metro District, DIA, Property Owners Bicycle Network B.2 Design and implement on-street and o -street bicycle facilities as directed from plan recommendations. MediumLong Metro District, Public Works, DIA, Property Owners Public Transportation B.2 Examine local shuttle service and regional bus service connecting the station area with nearby residential and commercial areas and accessing the station via 60th and 61st avenues. Medium LongRTD, others Streetscapes C.3 Design and implement streetscapes that reinforce the pedestrian scale and character and enhances the quality, identity, physical function, and economic vitality of the station area as directed from plan recommendations. On-going Metro District, DIA, Property Owners Parks and Recreation C.2 Design, construct, and maintain parks and recreation areas sized and located appropriately when demand warrants. Parks should be able to provide a variety of users the opportunity to engage in recreational activities in close proximity to their home or place of work as directed from plan recommendations. Long Metro District, Parks and Recreation, DIA, Property Owners Aviation Park C.4 Design, construct, and maintain Aviation Park as the central urban open space for the station area. Medium Metro District, Parks and Recreation Natural Open Space D.3 Preserve and maintain natural open areas as directed from plan recommendations that address design, visibility, access, and adjacent land uses. Medium Long Metro District, Parks and Recreation, DIA, Property Owners High Plains Ecosystem and Sustainability D.3 Promote environmental sustainability as directed from plan recommendations that address stormwater, land use, and building design. On-going Metro District, Public Works, CPD, Parks and Recreation, DIA, Property Owners