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Capitol Hill / Cheesman Park neighborhood plan

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Title:
Capitol Hill / Cheesman Park neighborhood plan
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Community Planning and Development, City and County of Denver
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Denver, CO
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City and County of Denver
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Language:
English

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Subjects / Keywords:
Neighborhood plans
Community planning
Spatial Coverage:
Denver -- Capitol Hill

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Full Text
CAPITOL HILL
CHEESMAN PARK
NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
PLANNING AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OFFICE
CITY AND COUNTY OF DENVER
__________ JUNE 2 8, 1 9 9 3 ________




CAPITOL HILL / CHEESMAN PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN




TABLE OF CONTENTS
TITLE
PAGE
INTRODUCTION
A The Vision for Capitol Hill and Cheesman Park ................ 1
B. Organization and Use of this Plan............................. 2
C. Relationship to Other Plans................................... 3
D. The Planning Process ......................................... 3
E. The History of Capitol Hill and Cheesman Park ................ 3
F. The Setting for Capitol Hill and Cheesman Park................ 6
I. FRAMEWORK PLAN
A. Land Use ..........................
1. Housing ......................
2. Density.......................
3. Vacant and Abandoned Buildings
4. Businesses....................
5. Mixed-Use Developments .......
6. Assemblages..................
7. Community Facilities..........
B. Zoning ............................
C. Character and Form ................
1. Historic Preservation.........
2. Landscaping ..................
3. Parks and Recreation .........
4. Open Space....................
5. Pedestrian Orientation........
6. Neighborhood Edge.............
7. Landform .....................
8. Urban Design..................
D. Circulation .......................
1. Circulation Studies ..........
2. Streets.......................
3. Pedestrians and Bicycles ......
4. Transit ......................
5. Parking.......................
E. Community Services ................
1. Schools.......................
2. Crime Prevention .............
3. Special Populations...........
F. Environment........................
1. Graffiti......................
2. Trash Collection..............
13
18
23
25
25
26
29
30
30
30
42
44
46
51
53
54
54
56
56
57
58
65
67
69
71
74
75
77
78
80
80
81


3. Street Sweeping.............................................82
4. Snow Removal ...............................................82
5. Pet Care....................................................83
6. Noise ......................................................83
II. DISTRICT PLAN 85
A. Broadway / Lincoln..............................................90
B. Sherman.........................................................97
C. Grant / Logan ..................................................101
D. Capitol District................................................104
E. Heart of Capitol Hill...........................................107
F. Cheesman North..................................................110
G. Cheesman West...................................................112
H. Botanic Gardens.................................................114
I. Morgans Addition...............................................117
J. 7th Avenue / Country Club North.................................120
K. 7th Avenue West.................................................122
L. Governors Park ................................................124
III. FOCUS AREA PLAN 135
A. 9th and Corona..................................................138
B. 11th and Ogden..................................................146
C* 6th .Avenue 150
D. East Colfax / Park Avenue ......................................156
E. East Colfax / Esplanade ........................................159
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
165


LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
TITLE PAGE
I. FRAMEWORK PLAN 13
OVERALL NEIGHBORHOOD CONCEPTS.................. 15
LAND USE
GENERALIZED EXISTING LAND USE ................. 19
BUILDING FABRIC ............................... 21
NEW DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY....................... 27
ZONING
EXISTING ZONING AND MOUNTAIN VIEW ORDINANCE.... 33
EXISTING HEIGHT LIMITS IN NEIGHBORHOOD ........ 35
BUILDING HEIGHT STRATEGY ...................... 37
FORM
CIRCULATION
EXISTING STREET SYSTEM......................... 61
EXISTING ONE-WAY STREETS ...................... 63
II. DISTRICT PLANS 85
DISTRICT BOUNDARIES (STUDY SUBAREAS) ............ 87
GOVERNORS PARK SUBAREA
FORM ANALYSIS....................................127
GOVERNORS PARK URBAN DESIGN IDEAS...............129
III. FOCUS AREA PLANS 135
9TH AND CORONA FOCUS AREA
URBAN DESIGN IDEAS.............................139
EAST COLFAX / ESPLANADE FOCUS AREA
URBAN DESIGN IDEAS............................ 161




INTRODUCTION




A. THE VISION FOR CAPITOL HILL AND CHEESMAN PARK
Capitol Hill and Cheesman Park neighborhoods are unique. With a mixture of single-family
and multiple-family housing, they are the most densely populated neighborhoods in Denver.
Home to a wealth of late 19th century and early 20th century residential, commercial, and
public structures, they provide an irreplaceable historic resource for the City. Located
between Downtown Denver, the State Capitol complex, and the Cherry Creek shopping
district, they create a housing base for the regions largest employment and retail centers.
The neighborhoods are home to the Citys most diverse population: elderly, young, middle-
aged, single, married, physically disabled, homeless, mentally disabled, runaway youth,
wealthy, poor, middle class, gay, straight, African-American, Native American, White, Asian,
and Hispanic. Finally, because of their location, their zoning, and the supportive nature of
their residents, Capitol Hill and Cheesman Park neighborhoods have a concentration of
group homes and other social service facilities.
Responding to these qualities, the vision for Capitol Hill and Cheesman Park neighborhoods
has the following themes:
o LIVABILITY: The neighborhoods will be reinforced as an inviting, well maintained,
safe, and comfortable living environment for individuals and families of diverse ages,
capabilities, incomes, lifestyles, and ethnic backgrounds. Schools, parks, transportation
systems, retail businesses, and public and private maintenance programs will meet the needs
of a diverse and dense urban residential neighborhood.
o DIVERSITY: The rich mixture and diversity of age, lifestyle, ability, income, and
ethnicity of residents will be encouraged and supported as valued characteristics of Capitol
Hill and Cheesman Park neighborhoods.
o HISTORIC CHARACTER: Parks, parkways, and historically and architecturally
significant structures, streetscapes, and places will be preserved and enhanced. The design
of new development and redevelopment will be compatible with the historic fabric of the
neighborhoods.
o DISTINCTION WITHIN A COMMON FRAMEWORK: While the distinct character
of both neighborhoods and each of their sub-districts will be retained and enhanced, a
common urban design framework will provide a cohesive visual image.
l.


B. ORGANIZATION AND USE OF THIS PLAN
For simplification, this plan often refers to Capitol Hill and Cheesman Park as a single
neighborhood.
The Capitol Hill / Cheesman Park Neighborhood Plan has three major sections: the
Framework Plan, the District Plans, and the Focus Area Plans.
The Framework Plan presents the issues and recommendations which are relevant
throughout the entire neighborhood and tie the neighborhood together. It provides a central
theme or framework for the neighborhood, its districts, and focus areas.
*
The District Plans establish twelve districts which have relatively distinct characteristics,
acknowledging that the boundaries between the districts are not sacrosanct and that some *
characteristics overlap district boundaries. The District Plans present issues and
recommendations which are supplemental to those presented in the Framework Plan.
The Focus Area Plans establish five focus areas which are distinct from the character
immediately surrounding them and provide important opportunities and challenges for the
entire neighborhood. The Focus Area Plans present issues and recommendations which are
supplemental to those included in the Framework and District Plans.
The Capitol Hill / Cheesman Park Neighborhood Plan functions as the official planning
document for the neighborhood. Adopted by City Council, it is an element of the Citys
Comprehensive Plan. As such, it is used by City agencies, organizations, and private
developers. It provides guidance for public improvements, programs, and private
development.
The Neighborhood Plan is a guideline, not a regulation. Changes which it recommends for
zoning or other City ordinances will require public notification and public hearings prior to
their adoption and implementation.
2.


C. RELATIONSHIP TO OTHER PLANS
This plan updates the Capitol Hill and Cheesman Park neighborhood plans adopted in 1973.
The 1973 plans were revised because the conditions, issues, and priorities in the
neighborhoods have changed significantly and because the programs for implementing the
plans have evolved.
This and all other neighborhood plans are consistent with, and supplemental to, the Citys
Comprehensive Plan. The Comprehensive Plan presents a Citywide perspective, while each
neighborhood plan provides more specific guidance both for the allocation of City resources
and for the location and design of private development.
Other planning documents which impact the neighborhood have been reviewed and relevant
material has been incorporated in the development of this plan. The plans which were
reviewed include the Denver Comprehensive Plan, the Downtown Area Plan, the Uptown
Neighborhood Plan, the Draft Denver Parks Master Plan, and the Southeast Quadrant
Study.
D. THE PLANNING PROCESS
This plan was sponsored by the Denver Planning and Community Development Office and
was developed by a residents planning committee. Capitol Hill United Neighborhoods
(CHUN) provided essential coordination and resources. Representatives of Colfax-on-the-
Hill, Denver East Central Civic Association (DECCA), and Cheesman Area Residents
Association provided valuable assistance. Graduate students from the Planning Studio II
at the University of Colorado at Denver, School of Architecture and Planning, provided an
excellent first draft of the revised neighborhood plan for Capitol Hill.
E. THE HISTORY OF CAPITOL HILL AND CHEESMAN PARK
Capitol Hill and Cheesman Park are two of the oldest residential neighborhoods in Denver
and provide an irreplaceable legacy for the City.
The impetus for development of Capitol Hill was largely the work of two men, Horace A.
W. Tabor and Henry C. Brown. Until Tabors arrival in the 1880s, Denvers growth had
been northwest, nearer to the South Platte River. Tabor bought land east of Larimer Street
and wanted the City to develop in an easterly direction. To encourage such growth, he built
the famous Tabor Grand Opera House on the comer of 16th and Curtis Streets.
About this time, building began on the site Henry C. Brown donated to the State of
Colorado for the Capitol, on the brow of a hill looking west toward the mountains. The
3.


ridge was known as Browns Bluff, a Victorian double entendre indicting the folly of
developing land so far off course from the downtown of the City.
These two acts served to turn the growth of Denvers business district eastward. As the
business district advanced, the residential section moved before it and occupied the high
prairie known as Capitol Hill.
By the end of the 1880s, Capitol Hill was completely platted and a sizable amount of
development had occurred east of the Capitol and along the trolley lines which ran on East
Colfax Avenue as far east as Alta Street, now known as Ogden Street. At this point, East
Colfax Avenue was the Citys premier residential street, home to some of Denvers most
prominent families.
While during this period, Denvers wealthy built their mansions on Capitol Hill, the
neighborhood was also home to many of the Citys middle class. The architecture of the ;
houses and of the commercial and public buildings reflected the diversity of the
neighborhood and the eclecticism of the time, including Neoclassical, Colonial Revival,
French, Italian Renaissance, Mission Revival, Craftsman, and Queen Anne designs.
While the Victorian-era building boom ended with the panic of 1893, the prominence of
Capitol Hill as the fashionable residential area continued until after the turn of the century.
After the panic, many of the single-family houses were converted to boarding houses. At
the same time, investors, attracted by the prestige of Capitol Hill and by its proximity to
Downtown, began building apartments in the neighborhood. In 1902, as apartment houses
replaced single-family houses on Broadway and East Colfax, The Denver Times referred to
the neighborhood as "flatberg". As the City grew and prospered and as more apartment
buildings were built in the neighborhood, the wealthy began to move further east and south
to the Cheesman Park and Country Club neighborhoods.
The first subdivision plat in the Cheesman Park neighborhood was recorded in 1868, and
by the end of the 1880s the entire neighborhood was platted and sparse development had
occurred. The Session Laws of 1883 annexed the majority of the neighborhood to the City.
The Cheesman Park neighborhood was almost totally developed by 1915, and was
characterized by large homes for the wealthy.
The land that is now Cheesman Park and the Botanic Gardens was platted in 1859 by
General William Larimer and his son as Mount Prospect Cemetery. It was later described
as a "crowded, confused bone yard overrun with weeds and livestock." Given to the City for
use as a cemetery in 1872 by a Congressional grant, in 1893, Congress awarded a grant to
permit the use of the site as a park. The residents of the cemetery were then moved to
Riverside, Fairmount, and Mount Olivet cemeteries. The entire park was called Congress
Park until 1907, when the western section was named Cheesman Park in honor of Walter
S. Cheesman, an early water and real estate tycoon. The Cheesman Park Pavilion was
completed in 1910. It was not until 1958, that the City finished removal of the graves from
the site of the Botanic Gardens and the development of the arboretum began.
4.


The character of Capitol Hill changed rapidly after 1910. As early as 1929, Denvers first
Master Plan described East Colfax as "formerly a principal residential street, and now, in
larger part, zoned for business and the principal artery through the Capitol Hill apartment
district." The conversion of single-family houses to apartments increased during World War
II when Capitol Hill provided rooms and apartments for people who could not find housing
elsewhere. What started as legally non-conforming apartments and apartment conversions
of single-family houses were legally recognized in 1955 when most of the neighborhood was
rezoned for high density residential uses (primarily, the R-3 zone district). This zoning,
combined with the high real estate values created by the neighborhoods central location and
proximity to Downtown, spurred the construction of additional apartment buildings and the
additional conversion of single-family homes to apartments.
This trend continued through the 1960s, until the movement toward citizen activism and a
renewed interest in historic preservation and inner-city living led to a significant number of
people questioning the future of the neighborhood and actively involving themselves in that
future. In 1969, Reverend Bob Musil of Warren Methodist Church organized a group of
concerned neighbors to fight the proposed conversion of East 11th and 12th Avenues into
one-way streets. Encouraged by their success in this effort, the Capitol Hill Congress
evolved, later to become Capitol Hill United Neighborhoods (CHUN). Also during 1969,
Molly Browns house was threatened by demolition, leading to the formation of Historic
Denver and the preservation of Mollys house as a museum. The Denver Planning Office
and the neighborhood residents worked together to develop the 1973 neighborhood plans,
which were designed to "encouraged and reinforce continuing private redevelopment which
will complement the unique character" of the neighborhoods. In 1974, CHUN took
responsibility for running the Capitol Hill Peoples Fair, which quickly grew into a citywide
event, attracting more than 250,000 people to its annual spring celebration. In 1975, the
Denver Landmark Commission approved the status of Dora Moore School as a Denver
Historic Landmark and in 1977 the Denver School Board appropriated funds for the
renovation of the school, culminating a long effort by the students of Dora Moore School
and the residents of the neighborhood to preserve and renovate the school. Also in 1977,
homeowners around the 1100 blocks of Vine and Gaylord successfully petitioned City
Council to downzone their property from R-3 to R-2, as recognition of their desire to retain
the low density residential character of the area.
Combined, all of these actions indicated a resurgence of energy and a rededication to the
neighborhood. They have been followed by the continuing revitalization of East Colfax and
other retail areas as high quality neighborhood shopping districts, the renovation of single-
family and multi-family houses and apartments, the conversion of multi-family units back
to single-family units, the return of families to the neighborhood, a process for conversion
of two of the one-way streets, the rezoning of other areas to lower zone districts to protect
the existing low density residential uses, and numerous other actions which indicate the
health of the neighborhoods.
5.


F. THE SETTING FOR CAPITOL HILL AND CHEESMAN PARK
1, LOCATION OF THE NEIGHBORHOODS
Capitol Hill adjoins the southeast comer of Downtown Denver; Cheesman Park extends to
the east of Capitol Hill. The official boundaries of Capitol Hill are Broadway on the west,
Seventh Avenue on the south, Downing on the east, and Colfax on the north. The official
boundaries of the Cheesman Park neighborhood are Downing on the west, Eighth Avenue
on the south, York Street on the east, and Colfax on the north. Because the neighborhood
tends to define itself as continuing south at least to Sixth Avenue and functions as though
it extends to Sixth, the study area for this plan includes this area. The study area extends
at least one block beyond all the stated boundaries in order to emphasize connections
between the adjoining neighborhoods and Capitol Hill and Cheesman Park.
2. DISTRICTS WITHIN THE NEIGHBORHOODS
Capitol Hill and Cheesman Park have within their boundaries sub-areas, or districts, with
distinct characteristics, issues, and opportunities. This plan explores each of these districts
and recommends for each unique standards for land uses, open space, building height,
density, and setbacks.
3. EXISTING CHARACTER OF THE NEIGHBORHOODS
a. RESIDENTS
o DECLINING POPULATION: Between 1970 and 1985, Capitol Hill and Cheesman
Park each experienced a drop in population, together declining from a population of 26,730
in 1970 to an estimated population in 1985 of 21,808, a decrease of 4,922 people, 18% of
the 1970 population. This trend is expected to slow, with the 1990 population projected to
be 21,214.
o SMALLER HOUSEHOLDS: There are fewer people in the average household in
both Capitol Hill and Cheesman Park than in the average household in Denver as a whole.
The average number of persons per household in both the City and the neighborhoods is
declining; the average number of persons per household in both neighborhoods dropped
from 1.5 in 1970 to 1.3 in 1980 and is estimated at 1.2 for 1985. The 1985 estimate for
Denver as a whole is 2.2 persons per household.
6.


o FEWER HOUSEHOLDS: Between 1980 and 1985, the total number of households
is estimated to have declined in both Capitol Hill and Cheesman Park, for a total decline
from 15,458 households to 14,733 households.
o INCREASING INCOMES: Generally, the median household income in Capitol Hill
and Cheesman Park is estimated to have increased between 1980 and 1985, with only one
census tract (32.01 West Cheesman Park) showing a decrease. While the estimated
household income is lower than for the City as a whole (except for 32.02 East Cheesman
Park, where it is higher), the estimated 1985 per capita income is higher in the
neighborhoods than for the City as a whole in all five census tracts. The most dramatic
change, however, occurred in 32.01 (West Cheesman Park), where the per capita income is
estimated to have dropped from $18,276 to $12,646 (both in 1985 dollars).
b. LAND USE AND ZONING
o HIGH DENSITY HOUSING: With the mixture of high-rise, mid-rise, and low-rise
apartments; townhouses; apartment conversions of single-family houses; and single-family
homes, Capitol Hill is the most densely populated neighborhood in the City. Cheesman
Park is the third most densely populated neighborhood in the City. The census tracts in
Capitol Hill (27.03, 27.01, and 27.02) are the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd most densely populated in
the City, respectively. Census tract 27.03 (northeastern Capitol Hill) is the most densely
populated census tract in the neighborhood and the City and has an estimated 1985
population density of 19,663 dwelling units per square mile. The census tracts in Cheesman
Park (32.02, and 32.01) are the 5th and 6th most densely populated in the City, respectively.
Census tract 32.01 (western Cheesman Park) is the least densely populated census tract in
the neighborhoods and has a population density of 11,293 dwelling units per square mile.
The density of the City as a whole is 2,333 dwelling units per square mile.
o HIGHER PERCENTAGE OF MULTIPLE-FAMILY AND HIGH DENSITY ZONING:
# In Capitol Hill and Cheesman Park, 63% of the total area is zoned for multiple-family and
high density residential uses (77% in Capitol Hill and 47% in Cheesman Park). Only 17%
of the City as a whole is zoned for multiple-family and high density housing. The majority
of the zoning in the neighborhoods is R-3, accounting for 52% of the total area.
c. HOUSING
o OLDER HOUSING STOCK: The average age of the residential structures in Capitol
Hill and Cheesman Park is 45 years (48 years for Capitol Hill and 44 years for Cheesman
Park), while the average age for residential structures in the City as a whole is 39 years.
o SMALLER DWELLING UNITS: The average size of the dwelling units in Capitol
Hill is 864 square feet (784 square feet for Capitol Hill and 1019 square feet for Cheesman
Park). The average size for the City as a whole is 1024 square feet.
7.


o MORE RENTER-OCCUPIED UNITS: In Capitol Hill and Cheesman Park, 86% of
all the dwelling units are renter-occupied (89% in Capitol Hill and 81% in Cheesman Park).
For the City as a whole, 52% of the units are renter-occupied, and 48% are owner-occupied.
d. HISTORIC DISTRICTS AND STRUCTURES
o DESIGNATED DENVER HISTORIC DISTRICTS: The Capitol Hill / Cheesman
Park neighborhood has three designated Denver Historic Districts within its boundaries:
the Civic Center, Humboldt Street, and Morgans Subdivision districts.
o DESIGNATED DENVER LANDMARKS: In addition to the historic districts, the
neighborhood has more than 50 designated structures and landmarks, including houses*
schools, churches, and parks. Notable among these are the Molly Brown House, the
Cheesman-Boettcher (Governors) mansion, Saint Johns Cathedral, the Botanic Gardens,
and the Cheesman Pavilion. Several of the structures have approved "use exceptions",
allowing their use as offices or art galleries, uses otherwise not allowed within their
respective zone districts.
WmTTTlT ¥/'" ¥7* A r*II WnTHTlT'O
e. PUBLIC FACILITIES
o COMMUNITY CENTER: The Capitol Hill Community Center is located in the Tears-
McFarlane House at 1290 Williams, adjacent to the north edge of Cheesman Park. Run by
the Board of Directors of the non-profit Capitol Hill Community Center, Inc., the Center
provides space for the offices and activities of a diversity of neighborhood and special
interest organizations and functions.
o FIRE PROTECTION: There are no fire stations located within the neighborhood.
The closest stations are located at 1616 Park Avenue, 40 West 2nd Avenue, 14th and
Harrison, and Speer and West Colfax.
o PARKS AND RECREATION FACILITIES: The neighborhood has, within and
adjacent to its boundaries, several of the finest parks within Denver.
BOTANIC GARDENS Located between Cheesman and Congress Parks, the Botanic
Gardens provide 21.9 acres of both outdoor and indoor gardens with exotic and native
plants, all with dramatic views of the mountains and skyline. The Gardens host a series of
summer concerts.
CHEESMAN PARK Having been described as a national treasure, Cheesman Park is
the psychological heart of the neighborhood. With 80.7 acres in the main park and 3.7 acres
in its Williams Street Parkway esplanade, Cheesman is primarily a passive neighborhood
park containing a childrens playground, a walking/jogging trail, expansive lawns, and an
impressive, protected, view of the mountains and skyline from the Cheesman PaviUon.
Historically, Cheesman Park was the site of the Denver Post Opera, an annual event wnicn
8.


produced Broadway plays at the Cheesman Pavilion. In more recent years, Cheesman has
been the location of a summer concert series sponsored by the Capitol Hill Community
Center.
CITY PARK Two blocks from the neighborhood, City Park is the largest and most
significant park within the City. With a total of 484.2 acres, City Park is an active park,
containing the Denver Museum of Natural History, the Denver Zoo, an eighteen hole golf
course, lakes, a band shell, monumental sculptures, flower gardens, tennis courts, baseball
and softball diamonds, walking/jogging trail, childrens playground, and a protected view of
the mountains and skyline.
CIVIC CENTER Located at the northwest comer of the neighborhood, Civic Center
combines with the Colorado Capitol complex and the States Lincoln Park (between Lincoln
and Broadway, 14th and Colfax) to form the nucleus for State and City governmental offices
and facilities, including the State Capitol, the City and County Building, Denver Art
Museum, the central branch of the Denver Public Library, the Colorado History Museum,
RTDs Civic Center Station, and the Colorado Supreme Court. Formerly the site of housing
and commercial buildings, the Civic Center was developed as an urban renewal project at
the beginning of the 20th Century. Within its 18.2 acres, the Civic Center contains a Greek
Theater and numerous monuments. Primarily a passive park, the Civic Center has in the
last few years served as the location for numerous Citywide festivals, including the annual
Capitol Hill Peoples Fair and the Taste of Colorado.
CONGRESS PARK Immediately to the east of the Botanic Gardens, Congress Park
is adjacent to the neighborhood and functions as the primary site of active recreation for the
Cheesman Park/Botanic Gardens/Congress Park complex. With 20.0 acres, Congress Park
contains an outdoor swimming pool, tennis courts, a baseball diamond, and a childrens
playground.
- GOVERNORS PARK A relatively new park, Governors Park was an urban renewal
project in 1966. Combined with the adjacent Humphreys Mansion Park, developed in 1977,
Governors Park provides a focal point for the southwest comer of the neighborhood and
a setting for both the Governors Mansion and the Humphreys Mansion, a property
belonging to the Colorado Historic Society. With a total of 4.4 acres, this is a passive park
with lawns, trees, and benches.
QUALITY HILL PARK A new mini-park located at 10th and Pennsylvania, Quality
Hill Park includes grass, trees, benches, and a flower display planted by its neighbors.
- SEVENTH AVENUE PARKWAY Stretching from Williams Street east to Colorado
Boulevard, Seventh Avenue Parkway is part of a parkway system which connects Cheesman
Park, the Williams Street Esplanade and Parkway, Downing Street Parkway, Marion Street
Parkway, Washington Park, Botanic Gardens, Congress Park, Sixth Avenue Parkway,
Clermont Street Parkway, and Cranmer Park. Heavily landscaped and well maintained,
Seventh Avenue Parkway is a focal point for the southeast comer of the neighborhood.
9.


ZECKENDORF PARK A mini-park adjacent to Speer Boulevard as it passes through
the neighborhood between Lincoln and Broadway, Zeckendorf Park was dedicated in 1966
with a statue and a landscaped backdrop.
o POLICE PROTECTION: East Colfax divides Police District 2 (north of Colfax) from
District 3 (south of Colfax). The headquarters for District 3 is at 1625 South University.
o RECREATION CENTER: There is no City recreation center in or near the
neighborhood.
o SCHOOLS: There are two schools one elementary school and one middle school -
within the boundaries of the neighborhood. Four other schools three elementary and one
high school are just beyond the neighborhood boundaries. Dora Moore Elementary, at
846 Corona, was built in 1889 with a second, attached, building constructed in 1909. Dora
Moore has a capacity for 796 students. A designated Denver Historic Landmark, the school
is a highly visible symbol of the pride the neighborhood takes in its children, its history, and
its diversity. Morey Middle School, 840 East 14th Avenue, was constructed in 1921 and
expanded in 1926. With a capacity of 968 students, the school is an important focal point
in the neighborhoods northwest corner, the "Capitol District". The four schools located just
beyond the neighborhood boundaries are Bromwell Elementary at 2500 East Fourth
Avenue, Wyman Elementary at 1630 Williams, and East High School at 1545 Detroit.
f MOVEMENT
o STREETS: The Capitol Hill/Cheesman Park neighborhood has ten north-south and
four east-west one-way streets within its boundaries. East Colfax, one of the City major
arterials, provides the northern boundary for the neighborhood. A report prepared by
Denver Public Works, Transportation Division, in February 1988 for the Southeast Quadrant
Study provides both average daily traffic volumes for 1988 and projected average traffic
volumes for 2010 for these and other streets in the southeast quadrant of metropolitan
Denver. The projected volumes were developed using several assumptions about changes
in land use, transit, ride sharing, and the roadway network. Readers should refer to the
final report of the Southeast Quadrant Study for a complete explanation of the methodology
used to develop the projections.
1988 traffic volumes for the north-south one-way streets in the neighborhood totaled almost
one and one-half times the volume of the east-west one-way streets and East Colfax.
Together, the north-south and east-west one-way streets and East Colfax carried in excess
of 240,000 vehicles per day through the neighborhood in 1988. 2010 traffic volume
projections rise to 554,500 vehicles per day, a 130% increase over 1988 traffic volumes.
Projected changes vary widely, with the Broadway/Lincoln corridor and Grant/Logan
showing a dramatic increase, while Washington/Clarkson and Corona/Downing each are
projected to have decreased traffic volumes.
10.


n
o BUS ROUTES: Because of its proximity to Downtown, Capitol Hill / Cheesman Park
has some of the most frequent bus service in the metropolitan area. The "15" route along
East Colfax is the most heavily-used and most frequent route. Additionally, the
neighborhood is served by routes 0 (Broadway), 2 (Broadway/Colfax/Grant/Sixth/Corona-
Downing/Eighth/Logan/Colfax/15th), 6 (Broadway/Sixth-Eighth/Lincoln), 10
(Broadway/12th), 12 (17th/Corona-Downing/Colfax/15th), and 24 (York/Josephine).
0 PEDESTRIAN CONNECTIONS: With its high density; proximity to Downtown; wide,
detached sidewalks; mature street trees; and interesting streetscape, the neighborhood
provides many natural encouragements to pedestrian traffic. Both the Downtown Plan and
the Uptown Neighborhood Plan recognized this characteristic of Capitol Hill/Cheesman
Park and made recommendations for improvements to the pedestrian connections into the
neighborhood. Sherman, Pennsylvania, Clarkson, Franklin, 7th, 9th, 11th, and 12th already
provide many of the characteristics desired for good pedestrian connections and have been
identified as such in the Downtown and Uptown plans.
o BICYCLE ROUTES: The Gty has designated both on-street and off-street bicycle
routes. Within Capitol Hill/Cheesman Park, there are on-street bicycle routes along
Sherman, Ogden, east of Williams, 12th, and 14th. The neighborhood also has good access
to the off-street bicycle path along Cherry Creek and to the on-street route on East 16th
Avenue. A 1987 report from the Department of Public Works Transportation Division
recommends removing the bicycle lane from 14th Avenue because of traffic conflicts and
the existence of better alternative routes.
g. CRIME STATISTICS
o CRIME ISSUE REAL, BUT LOWER THAN MAY BE PERCEIVED: In 1988, Capitol
Hill ranked as the 16th neighborhood in the City in terms of serious crimes per 1000
population. Cheesman Park ranked 26th. The highest ranked neighborhood,
Auraria/Lincoln Park, had 316.8 crimes per 1000 population. In contrast, Capitol Hill had
152.7 and Cheesman Park 108.3 serious crimes per 1000 population. The safest
neighborhood, Wellshire, had 33.2 crimes per 1000 population. The average for the City
was 117.5 crimes per 1000 population.
11.




I. FRAMEWORK PLAN


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i iviLr ALL
The Capitol Hill / Cheesman Park neighborhood is diverse: diverse culturally, socially,
economically, and physically. As a result, while it is important to consider the elements
which provide the distinctions in the neighborhood, it is perhaps even more critical to
respond to those issues which create the framework of unity for the neighborhood.
The Framework Plan, therefore, includes the issues and recommendations which are
relevant throughout the entire neighborhood and which tie the neighborhood together. As
such, it provides a central design theme, or framework, for the neighborhood.
17.


A. LAND USE
BACKGROUND ANALYSIS
Initially a single-family residential neighborhood, Capitol Hill / Cheesman Park has since
its earliest days experienced pressures for redevelopment to higher densities and more
intense uses. Because of this pressure, many of what were originally single-family houses
have been converted to apartments and many others have been replaced by medium to high
density apartment buildings or commercial structures. As a result, Capitol Hill / Cheesman
Park is a medium to high density residential neighborhood with both destination and
neighborhood retail areas.

The conversion and redevelopment in the neighborhood have followed patterns established
by a variety of factors. The amenities of view and activities provided by Cheesman Park, '
for example, have attracted redevelopment along its northern, northwestern, and north-
eastern edges. The southeastern, southern, and western edges have retained their single-
family houses, in part because of restrictive zoning and their designation as Denver
Landmark Districts. Traffic patterns have also created land use patterns. For example, as
traffic increased on East Colfax, which was once one of the premier residential streets in
the City, the large houses were either converted to or replaced by commercial structures.
Similarly, the conversion of two-way streets into one-way streets was followed by the
conversion of single-family houses into apartments and the construction of medium and high
density apartments along these streets. Another pattern has been affected by the size of
parcels, since larger parcels are easier and more profitable to develop than smaller parcels,
which may need to be purchased individually over time in order to assemble a parcel large
enough to redevelop economically. As a result of this pattern, many of the largest houses
in the neighborhood have been replaced by apartments or commercial structures. A final
sample pattern is created by proximity to Downtown. This has resulted in intense real
estate speculation and commercial redevelopment in the northwestern and western edges
of the neighborhood because they are closest to Downtown and have the most permissive
zoning.
Remnants of the historic land use patterns remain in redeveloped areas, while more stable
areas often have isolated examples of the continuing redevelopment pressure: conversion
of single-family homes to apartments and redevelopment to higher densities. Single-family
houses, for example, remain on Logan Street, despite the conversion of most of the street
to high density residential and office uses. On the other hand, even areas which are zoned
R-0 have examples of "grandfathered" duplexes and single-family homes which are divided
into apartments.
Service retail uses are located both within and at the edges of the neighborhood. While
these shopping districts are outgrowths of historic retail areas, the conflicts between the
18.


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retail and the surrounding residential uses have increased over time because of the
increasing intensity of the uses and the resulting need for additional parking and other
services. Nonetheless, the retail areas function as focal points for the neighborhood and are
essential to the urban character of the neighborhood.
The following land use issues and recommendations are considered to be those which apply
to the entire neighborhood and, therefore, to the framework plan.
1. HOUSING ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS
HOUSING ISSUE 1: Market and economic pressures threaten the quantity, quality,
affordability, and diversity of housing.
sub-issue a: There are too many vacant apartments, too many irresponsible landlords,
and too many run down buildings in the neighborhood.
HOUSING RECOMMENDATION la:
SUPPORT GOOD PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
Support landlords in getting good tenants, in being able to
quickly get rid of irresponsible and potentially dangerous
tenants, and in applying pressures to irresponsible property
managers. Establish regularly scheduled meetings of the
property managers within the neighborhood. Use these
meetings to share information and ideas.
HOUSING RECOMMENDATION lb:
IMPROVE THE ENFORCEMENT OF CODES
Establish regularly scheduled meetings between all the City
inspectors assigned to the neighborhood and the neighbors.
Use these meetings to identify problem buildings and sites, to
assign priorities for dealing with these, and for aiding the
inspectors in their efforts.
Identify buildings which do not comply with City health and
safety codes and enforce compliance. The process of enforcing
compliance and achieving a final resolution should be faster.
The cost of habitual irresponsibility should be higher.
Strengthen the Citys "registered agent" program with additional
enforcement authority.
23.


HOUSING RECOMMENDATION lc:
MARKET THE ATTRIBUTES OF THE NEIGHBORHOOD
Improve the public perception of the neighborhood by
marketing its attributes. The target of the marketing effort
should include the press, City agencies, real estate brokers, and
potential residents.
HOUSING RECOMMENDATION Id:
ENCOURAGE HOME OWNERSHIP
Encourage owner occupancy in the neighborhood. Among
potential programs is the expansion of the Citys current
Mortgage Bond Program to include greater participation for
condominium and single-family owners.
HOUSING RECOMMENDATION le:
SUPPORT THE CONCEPT OF GUARANTEED HABITABILITY
Establish a standard for habitability and a process for
guaranteeing landlord compliance with that standard.
sub-issue b: Housing, particularly low income housing, is deteriorating, and is
being demolished or converted to non-residential uses.
HOUSING RECOMMENDATION If:
RETAIN AND IMPROVE EXISTING HOUSING
Provide programs and incentives for preserving and renovating
existing housing. Potential methods might include a community
development corporation or another form of neighborhood
organization which focuses on housing, a property tax freeze for
housing rehabilitation, a demolition tax, a land use tax, or a
neighborhood housing trust funded by demolition fees or taxes.
Existing tax incentives for abandoned housing should be
eliminated.
HOUSING RECOMMENDATION Ig:
REPLACE LOW INCOME HOUSING
Develop a program requiring the replacement of low income
housing which is demolished for redevelopment of the site.
Replacement could be in the form of either actual housing units
or a comparable fee in lieu of the actual units.
24.


2. DENSITY ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS
DENSITY ISSUE 1: Capitol Hill and Cheesman Park are the highest density
neighborhoods in Denver.
sub-issue a: Although the recent population trend in the neighborhood has included
a decrease in density, the residential density of the neighborhood as a whole can be
expected to increase.
sub-issue b: The increase in residential density is a factor in many of the other issues
facing the neighborhood, including noise, parking, inadequate public facilities, crime,
loss of historic character, vacant and abandoned buildings, vacant lots, etc.
DENSITY RECOMMENDATION la:
SUPPORT COMPATIBLE HIGHER DENSITY
Support higher density residential development in the
neighborhood, when that development is located and designed
to be compatible with the character and livability of the
neighborhood, particularly the immediate area, and when that
development does not necessitate the demolition of an historic
or architecturally significant structure.
DENSITY RECOMMENDATION lb:
SUPPORT INFILL DEVELOPMENT
Give high priority to new development on sites which are
currently either vacant or used as parking lots.
NOTE: Because of the close relationship between density and zoning, the reader interested
in density recommendations should also pay close attention to the zoning recommendations.
3. VACANT AND ABANDONED BUILDINGS ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS
VACANT AND ABANDONED BUILDINGS ISSUE 1: There are too many vacant and
abandoned buildings in the neighborhood.
sub-issue a: There are no incentives for owners to have their buildings occupied.
VACANT AND ABANDONED BUILDINGS RECOMMENDATION la:
OCCUPY VACANT & ABANDONED BUILDINGS
Identify vacant and abandoned buildings, set priorities for
targeting those buildings, enforce existing City vacant and
25.


abandoned building ordinances, implement existing programs,
strengthen and expand the existing programs, and create new
programs and ordinances to deal with unmet needs.
sub-issue b: There is no policy on the maintenance of landscaping around vacant
and abandoned buildings.
VACANT AND ABANDONED BUILDINGS RECOMMENDATION lb:
MAINTAIN LANDSCAPING AT VACANT AND ABANDONFD RTIII DINCS
Identify vacant and abandoned buildings which have poorly
maintained landscaping, set priorities for targeting those
buildings, enforce existing City weed and other property
maintenance ordinances, and create new programs and
ordinances to deal with unmet needs.
4. BUSINESS ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS
BUSINESS ISSUE 1: The image of some of the commercial areas and businesses in the
area is a detriment to the success of other businesses and to the neighborhood.
sub-issue a: Abandoned / vacant commercial space is a serious problem in some
commercial areas.
sub-issue b: There are commercial areas and businesses in the neighborhood which
are cluttered with litter.
sub-issue c: Signage can be either attractive or unattractive.
sub-issue d: Some of the buildings and streetscape in the commercial areas are poorly
maintained.
26.


R&rasi AREA WHERE New NoN~NEI6H0oRHODP RELATBP
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27.


BUSINESS RECOMMENDATION 1:
FORM BUSINESS AND PROPERTY OWNER ASSOCIATIONS
Establish new business and property owner associations or
reinforce existing business associations. These associations
should focus on providing a focus for their areas, filling
abandoned / vacant commercial structures, cleaning up litter,
improving signage and streetscape, marketing the areas, and
improving maintenance of buildings and streetscape. The
associations should deal with these issues by using procedures
similar to those used by the neighborhood association for the
same issues.
BUSINESS ISSUE 2: There are many neighborhood-oriented businesses, but the diversity
provided by these businesses is being lost to large, absentee-owned businesses.
BUSINESS RECOMMENDATION 2:
ENCOURAGE A DIVERSITY OF BUSINESSES
Direct economic development programs in the neighborhood
primarily to encouraging small, diverse businesses. Similarly,
support building designs and land use patterns which encourage
small, pedestrian-oriented businesses. The exception to this
recommendation would be destination businesses which would
help draw customers to other, smaller businesses. Large
destination businesses should be carefully located, most likely
on East Colfax, Lincoln, or Broadway.
NOTE: The Uptown Neighborhood Plan includes an extensive section on East Colfax. This
plan supports the recommendations from the Uptown Plan.
5. MIXED-USE DEVELOPMENT ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS
MIXED-USE DEVELOPMENT ISSUE 1: The current zoning ordinance and building and
fire codes do not encourage developers to include residential units in retail projects. The
building and fire codes, particularly, include provisions which raise costs and, therefore, may
discourage mixed-use projects.
MIXED-USE DEVELOPMENT RECOMMENDATION 1:
ENCOURAGE RESIDENTIAL USES IN RETAIL PROJECTS
Develop incentives, and remove any unnecessary disincentives,
for developers to include residential units in retail projects in
commercially zoned areas. Incentives should be tied to meeting
location and design criteria.
29.


6. ASSEMBLAGE ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS
ASSEMBLAGE ISSUE 1: Public and private interests have large land assemblages which,
if redeveloped, would place additional traffic and parking pressures on the neighborhood
and possibly disrupt the existing fabric of the neighborhood with incompatible building types
and design.
ASSEMBLAGE RECOMMENDATION 1:
DEVELOP JOINT PLANS FOR LARGE ASSEMBLAGES
Identify the owners of large land assemblages, contact those
owners, and work with them to develop plans for their property
which meet both their needs and the needs and desires of the
neighborhood.
7. COMMUNITY FACILITY ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS
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COMMUNITY FACILITY ISSUE 1: While community gardens are an important asset
for the neighborhood residents, they are generally located on privately owned land which
is being held for future redevelopment. As a result, there is no guarantee of their
continuing availability.
COMMUNITY FACILITY RECOMMENDATION 1:
ENCOURAGE COMMUNITY GARDENS
Acquire parcels which can be used as community gardens on a permanent
basis and use temporarily vacant parcels as community gardens as long as they
are vacant.
B. ZONING
BACKGROUND AND ANALYSIS
He current zoning in Capitol Hill and Cheesman Park is an outgrowth of a long history of
changing expectations for the neighborhood. Although initially developed as a low density,
single-unit residential neighborhood, by the early 1900s, Capitol Hill / Cheesman Park was
already seeing the construction of apartment buildings and the redevelopment of residential
areas for retail use. Zoning, from its earliest application in Denver, has reflected both tne
changing character of the neighborhood and the assumption that the intensification of land
uses in the neighborhood would continue.
30.


The 1925 zoning map for Denver, for example, shows the Capitol Hill and Cheesman Park
neighborhood zoned similarly to the current zoning. Residential zoning districts at that time
ranged from a low density "Residence A District" to a relatively high density "Residence
E District". Most of what was then zoned "Residence D is now zoned R-3, a high density
residential district. The western edge of the neighborhood was zoned "Residence E" in
1925 and is now zoned R-4, the highest density residential district, which also allows office
uses. That portion of the southern edge of the neighborhood which was zoned "Residence
*A" in 1925 was generally rezoned R-l at the time of the Citywide rezoning in 1956 and was
later rezoned R-0, a restrictive, single-unit residential zone. In 1925, areas along Sixth
Avenue, Thirteenth Avenue, and East Colfax, and at Ninth and Corona and Eleventh and
Ogden were zoned for neighborhood businesses. While these patterns have shifted to some
degree, with higher density zoning moving farther south and more restrictive zoning
instituted in other areas, the historic zoning pattern is generally consistent with the current
zoning.
Despite this long history of high density zoning, the neighborhood as a whole is still, at least
65 years later, not as dense as it was anticipated to become. In fact, the neighborhood as
a whole in its most recent history has lost population, numerous apartment conversions have
been converted back to single-unit houses, and the pattern of high-rise apartment
construction has slowed dramatically. As a result, the existing character and density of the
land uses in the neighborhood is significantly different from the existing zoning.
The potential impact of high-rise construction has been mitigated somewhat by a zoning
ordinance passed by City Council in 1986 which established height controls on buildings
adjacent to R-2 and lower density zoning districts, e.g. R-l and R-0. This ordinance,
however, does not apply to most of the neighborhood as it is currently zoned. The other
mitigating elements are the Mountain View Preservation Ordinances. The Cheesman Park-
Botanic Gardens Mountain View Preservation Ordinance sets a maximum building height
for the majority of the areas west of the park, while the State Capitol Area Mountain View
Preservation Ordinance restricts building height west of the Capitol. The City Park
Mountain View Protection Ordinance covers a portion of the northwest comer of the
neighborhood and a special set of building height restrictions has been adopted to protect
the Civic Center from being surrounded by intense development. Even with these
restrictions, however, the majority of the Capitol Hill/Cheesman Park neighborhood can still
be developed to a significantly higher density than current uses, and views of the mountains
and Downtown skyline are not adequately protected.
The following zoning issues and recommendations are those which are considered critical
to the entire neighborhood and, thus, to the framework plan.
31.


1. ZONING ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS
ZONING ISSUE 1: Many areas of the neighborhood are overzoned relative to the existing
character of those areas and the character desired by the respective residents and property
owners.
ZONING RECOMMENDATION 1:
INITIATE REZONINGS
Initiate rezonings for areas which are currently overzoned in
relation to both the existing and desired uses and character.
ZONING ISSUE 2: As currently written, R-4 zoning allows commercial parking lots which
can service office uses in adjacent neighborhoods or Downtown. Because they are
considered uses by right in the R-4, these commercial parking lots are not subject to review
by either the City or the neighborhood organizations.
ZONING RECOMMENDATION 2:
MAKE COMMERCIAL PARKING LOTS USES BY SPECIAL REVIEW IN
THE R-4
Amend the R-4 zoning district to change commercial parking
lots to uses by special review.
ZONING ISSUE 3: The Cheesman Park Mountain View Preservation Ordinance is not
working as it was initially intended. It does not cover a significant portion of the northern
and eastern sectors of the neighborhood and extends only to Broadway on the west and to
Speer on the southwest. New development outside these boundaries can be unlimited in
height. Similarly, the Cheesman Park Mountain View Preservation Ordinance does not
protect views from the neighborhood toward Downtown and the State Capitol or from the
Grant-Humphreys Mansion and Governors Park.
ZONING RECOMMENDATION 3:
STUDY THE EXTENSION OF THE MOUNTAIN VIEW ORDINANCE
Study the extension of the existing Mountain View Preservation
Ordinance and the creation of new view preservation
ordinances to better protect views from the neighborhood.
32.


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37.


ZONING ISSUE 4: The density and building height allowed under the current zoning in
some cases may be inconsistent with the character of the neighborhood and may allow both
buildings which are out of scale with surrounding buildings and uses which create excessive
noise, generate unusually intense automobile traffic, or attract criminal activity.
sub-issue a: The R-3 zoning, which covers the majority of the neighborhood, allows
high-rise residential structures.
If developed to the fullest extent allowed by the current zoning, the character of
the neighborhood would change dramatically.
sub-issue b: The R-4 zoning on the western edge of Capitol Hill allows both high
density residential and office uses as uses by right. If developed to the fullest extent
allowed by the current zoning, the character of the western edge would change
dramatically.
ZONING RECOMMENDATION 4a:
ADD COMPATIBILITY CRITERIA TO THE R-3 AND R-4 DISTRICTS
Develop a review process and review criteria which address
compatibility in the R-3 and R-4 zoning districts. The use of
the process would be required for any development which is
larger than a given size or which includes the demolition of an
existing structure.
ZONING RECOMMENDATION 4b:
REQUIRE NEIGHBORHOOD IMPACT STUDIES
As part of the development review process, require applicants
for large scale developments in or adjacent to the neighborhood
to provide an analysis of potential impacts and possible
mitigation measures.
ZONING ISSUE 5: The current definitions of group homes, adult community correctional
facilities, and similar uses have been out-dated by changes in the provision of these services.
As a result, the City spacing ordinances can no longer achieve their original intent of
dispersing these facilities.
ZONING RECOMMENDATION 5:
MODIFY THE DEFINITIONS AND ORDINANCES FOR GROUP HOMES
AND SIMILAR USES
Modify the definitions and ordinances relating to group homes,
adult community correctional facilities, and similar uses to
further clarify the language and, thus, better achieve dispersal
of these uses.
39.


ZONING ISSUE 6: The neighborhood has a history of single and multiple-unit houses
being converted to offices. While this often allows the preservation of historic homes, it can
also result in a loss of housing and residents, and an increase in daytime traffic and parking
demand.
ZONING RECOMMENDATION 6:
REVIEW EACH OFFICE CONVERSION
Develop a process and criteria for reviewing the potential
impact of each proposed conversion of a residential structure in
the neighborhood to a non-residential use.
ZONING ISSUE 7: Constant vigilance and creative alternatives are required to enforce
the Citys sign code. ;
ZONING RECOMMENDATION 7:
CONSISTENTLY ENFORCE THE SIGN CODE
Support continued and increased City enforcement of the sign
code, including the prohibition and removal of handbills
attached to private property. Educate the public to the fact
that it is illegal to post handbills without first receiving
permission from the property owner. Support the introduction
of kiosks which can be used for handbills.
ZONING ISSUE 8: Billboards are incompatible with the residential character of the
neighborhood and with neighborhood businesses. The current billboard ordinance does not
protect the neighborhood from the intrusion of billboards located in adjacent business zones.
ZONING RECOMMENDATION 8:
ELIMINATE BILLBOARDS
Eliminate the potential of any new off-premise general outdoor
advertising devices (billboards), both within the neighborhood
and in areas adjacent to the neighborhood. Consider providing
an amortization schedule as just compensation for the removal
of existing billboards.


ZONING ISSUE 9: Convenience food stores, drive-throughs, and drive-ins are generally
incompatible with both the character of the residential sections of the neighborhood and the
desire to reduce the number of automobile trips.
ZONING RECOMMENDATION 9:
PROHIBIT NEW CONVENIENCE FOOD STORES, DRIVE-THROUGHS,
AND DRIVE-INS IN RESIDENTIAL AREAS
Prohibit new convenience stores, drive-throughs, and drive-ins
in all areas of the neighborhood except Broadway and those
sections of East Colfax which are designated for automobile-
oriented uses in the Uptown Neighborhood Plan.
41.


C. CHARACTER AND FORM
BACKGROUND AND ANALYSIS
The character and form of the neighborhood derive from a combination of natural and man-
made elements: natural features, the street system, the parks and parkways, the "building
fabric", and the prevalent landscaping.
The Capitol Hill / Cheesman Park neighborhood presents a diversity of images, each image
dependent upon whether one is a resident, someone driving through, or someone who has
merely heard tales of the neighborhood. Part of the diversity of images results from the true
diversity which the neighborhood contains. Other images result from unrepresentative
information or from total misinformation.
Non-residents often develop their image while hurrying through the neighborhood along one
of the fourteen one-way streets which pass through the neighborhood. By doing so, they
miss many of the aspects of the neighborhood which form the residents image of Capitol
Hill and Cheesman Park.
The Capitol Hill / Cheesman Park neighborhood is located on a bluff rising above
Downtown and Cherry Creek. While the location and topography provide excellent views
of the Downtown skyline and the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains, the neighborhood
is generally flat.
While the City Ditch winds its way through the neighborhood on its way from Washington
Park to City Park, the ditch has been covered, and thus, hidden from sight for many years.
Nonetheless, the ditch left a legacy of mature landscaping and fine homes along its path.
Cherry Creek passes to the south and west of the neighborhood, yet, because it is easily
accessed from the neighborhood, it provides a recreational opportunity for pedestrians and
bicyclists.
The north-south-east-west grid establishes a clearly legible pattern of streets and blocks.
Blocks in the neighborhood are elongated north-south, with the majority of the structures
thus having either an eastern or western frontage. Lot width generally follows a 25
increment. Heavily travelled one-way streets provide boundaries for districts within the
neighborhood.
Cheesman Park is the psychological heart of the neighborhood, with the Cheesman Pavilion
framing its commanding view of the mountains and skyline. A formal park, it is valued as
a passive retreat. Together, Cheesman, the Botanic Gardens, and Congress Park form an
impressive complex of active and passive parks and cultural and recreational facilities. All
three provide outstanding mountain views. Seventh Avenue Parkway is both an impressive
connection between neighborhoods and one of the Citys premier residential streets. The
Williams Street Parkway provides a distinctive north-south connection between neighbor-
42.


hoods. The Civic Center, although it adjoins Capitol Hill / Cheesman Park on the west, is
not easily accessed from the neighborhood and does not provide a quiet, safe, and inviting
environment for neighborhood residents. As a result, it is not perceived as a major asset.
The neighborhoods "building fabric" is a product of interrelated factors, including building
siting, age, materials, scale, and historic value. The majority of buildings in Capitol Hill /
Cheesman Park, for example, are related to the grid pattern of streets, with common
setbacks, widths, and frontages. Service access is generally from the rear, through the alleys
which divide the blocks longitudinally. While the image presented by the neighborhood is
diverse and sometimes confusing, the most prevalent building type is late nineteenth and
early twentieth century (pre-automobile) homes. Stone chinches and red brick schools
provide a sense of history. More recent apartment buildings and commercial structures,
including numerous high-rises, provide a counterpoint to the historic image. The building
material perceived to be most common is red brick, with stone foundations and lintels. New
buildings have neither followed the historic precedent nor established a new standard for
materials. The neighborhood has a "human scale", created by the predominance of 2-3 story
houses and setbacks deep enough to allow front yards and front porches. Hand-crafted
ornaments on homes, churches and schools add interest and a sense of history. The
neighborhood is historically significant. It is the location of the homes of some of Denvers
most interesting and well-known citizens, several of its premier parks and parkways, and a
well preserved architectural legacy.
The street trees, parks, and parkways of Capitol Hill / Cheesman Park are the foremost
elements of Denvers landscaping legacy, reminders that Denver is a green oasis in the dry
High Plains grasslands. Unfortunately, a significant portion of the mature landscaping has
been lost to age and disease, and with it, the historic landscape pattern has often been lost
as well.
Capitol Hill / Cheesman Park is an urban, high density residential neighborhood, with a
wealth of neighborhood shopping districts, good access to Downtown, good transit service,
and a population distinct in its economic and lifestyle diversity.
43.


1. HISTORIC PRESERVATION ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS
HISTORIC PRESERVATION ISSUE 1: The historic integrity of the neighborhood has
deteriorated, continues to be threatened, and is neither adequately recognized nor protected.
HISTORIC PRESERVATION RECOMMENDATION la:
EXPAND UPON THE HISTORIC CHARACTER
Both the public and private sector should use the historic
residential, commercial, and institutional character of the
neighborhood as the basis for the design of new development
and redevelopment activities, including streetscape
improvements. Flagstone sidewalks, for example, should be
preserved and repaired. Where new sidewalks are constructed,
they should either be flagstone or, if that proves too expensive,
flagstone-colored concrete. Funding should be provided to
assist with the preservation and repair of flagstone sidewalks.
HISTORIC PRESERVATION RECOMMENDATION lb:
EMPHASIZE HISTORIC PRESERVATION
Give top priority to the preservation of the historic and
architecturally interesting buildings and the historic fabric of the
neighborhood when reviewing development proposals,
proposing capital improvements, and allocating funding.
Emphasis should be placed on preserving structures on their
original sites, rather than moving them.
HISTORIC PRESERVATION RECOMMENDATION lc:
DESIGNATE HISTORIC DISTRICTS AND STRUCTURES
Improve the current historic inventory of the neighborhood and
review areas and structures in the neighborhood for potential
designation as Denver Landmark Districts or as individual
landmarks. Consider designating the entire neighborhood as a
Denver Landmark District At a minimum, seek landmark
designation for the most cohesive areas in the neighborhood,
including areas along Sherman, Pennsylvania, Franklin, and
Vine.
44.


HISTORIC PRESERVATION RECOMMENDATION Id:
EXPLORE STRONGER PRESERVATION STRATEGIES
Develop additional and stronger preservation strategies,
programs, incentives, and funding sources for preserving
historically significant and architecturally interesting structures
and districts in the neighborhood.
HISTORIC PRESERVATION RECOMMENDATION le:
EMPHASIZE PUBLIC EDUCATION
Continue to educate the public about the presence of historic
resources in the neighborhood, about the significance of their
preservation, about the preservation process and available
programs, and about how to get involved in that process.
HISTORIC PRESERVATION RECOMMENDATION If:
ESTABLISH TDR DISTRICTS
Establish within the neighborhood boundaries transferable
development rights (TDR) districts. Within the districts, owners
of registered Denver Historic Landmarks would be allowed to
sell or transfer to another owner the right to use the amount of
square footage not used by the first owner. The purpose of
these districts is to promote preservation of historic structures.
To illustrate this recommendation: a person might own a
single-family house, say of 1,200 square feet. If the lot were
1,000 square feet, with the R-3 zone 3 to 1 floor area ratio,
1800 of the 3,000 square feet allowable would not be used. The
1800 square feet of allowable floor area could be sold to
another owner within the district. The first owner would then
have a deed restriction or covenant running with the property
which bound development on it to a maximum 1,200 square
feet. The second owner would be able to apply the extra
square footage to a new building or the expansion of an existing
building, with the provision that no development in the district
could exceed the allowable floor area ratio by more than a
given percentage, e.g. 15%. The transfer of rights would only
be applicable within the designated districts and could never be
transferred outside the particular district.
45.


2. LANDSCAPING ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS
LANDSCAPING ISSUE 1: While the neighborhood is distinguished by mature
landscaping, changes to this landscaping have altered the character of the neighborhood.
sub-issue a: Trees and other landscaping throughout the neighborhood have been lost
to old age, disease, and poor maintenance.
sub-issue b: Much of this landscaping has not been replaced.
sub-issue c: More trees will be lost in the future.
LANDSCAPING RECOMMENDATION la:
PLANT TREES
Support and enlarge existing tree planting programs for both
the public rights-of-way and private property. Efforts should be
directed to re-establishing and enhancing the neighborhoods
historic tree canopy. Species similar to those of the mature
trees in the neighborhood should be planted so that the size,
shape, and density of the street trees create a cohesive canopy.
Attention should also be paid to maintaining a similar
alignment and spacing of trees to help preserve the historic
character of the neighborhood.
LANDSCAPING RECOMMENDATION lb:
PLANT SHRUBBERY AND FLOWERS
Encourage property owners, business owners, and tenants to
soften the urban landscape with shrubbery and flowers.
LANDSCAPING RECOMMENDATION lc:
PROTECT EXISTING TREES
Discourage the removal of healthy trees from either private or
public property by tightening procedures for approving tree
removal. Establish maintenance programs. Assist low income
property owners with maintenance.
46.
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LANDSCAPING RECOMMENDATION Id:
REPLACE TREES WHICH ARE REMOVED
Require the replacement of street trees immediately following
the removal of existing trees.
LANDSCAPING RECOMMENDATION le:
REQUIRE STREET TREES AND LANDSCAPING
Require street trees and landscaping for any new development.
sub-issue d: In too many cases, sod has been replaced by rocks, gravel, dirt, or
pavement.
LANDSCAPING RECOMMENDATION If:
PLANT GRASS
Sod is the ground cover which is most consistent with the
residential character of the neighborhood.
Therefore, discourage property owners from using rocks, gravel,
dirt, or pavement as a ground cover.
sub-issue e: Many of the tree lawns, or parking strips, (the area between the street
and the sidewalk), particularly along the one-way and more heavily travelled streets,
are poorly landscaped and poorly maintained.
LANDSCAPING RECOMMENDATION lg:
LANDSCAPE AND MAINTAIN PARKING STRIPS
Improve the landscaping and maintenance of the tree lawns.
Most tree lawns should be planted with sod, rather than
covered with rocks, gravel, dirt or pavement. Tree lawns along
heavily travelled streets require special consideration, and may
benefit from a combination of raised landscaping and pavement
or from alternative plant materials. Encourage designs which
are consistent with the historic urban character of the
neighborhood. Focus efforts on one-way streets. Enforce City
requirements for trimming trees which overhang sidewalks.
sub-issue f: Tree trimming can be an exorbitantly expensive procedure for low-
income homeowners. There is currently only one, limited, public assistance program
which can be used for tree trimming.
47.


LANDSCAPING RECOMMENDATION lh:
HELP LOW-INCOME HOMEOWNERS WITH TREE TRIMMING
Either expand existing City programs or find alternative funding
sources to help low-income homeowners with the expense of
tree trimming.
sub-issue g: There is a lack of information on landscaping maintenance procedures
and responsibilities.
LANDSCAPING RECOMMENDATION li:
PROVIDE LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE INFORMATION
*
Disseminate information on landscaping maintenance
procedures and responsibilities, including information on plants
which require less water than normal but which maintain the
historic character of the landscaping in the neighborhood.
LANDSCAPING RECOMMENDATION lj:
PARTICIPATE IN A PILOT PROJECT
Participate in a pilot project to test alternative methods for
lowering landscaping water and maintenance requirements,
while enhancing the historic and urban character of the
neighborhood.
sub-issue h: City requirements for planting trees are in many cases unclear, too
restrictive, or too complex.
LANDSCAPING RECOMMENDATION lk:
SIMPLIFY TREE PLANTING REQUIREMENTS
Minimize the impediments to planting trees by simplifying and
clarifying the City requirements for planting trees in the public
rights-of-way.
LANDSCAPING ISSUE 2: Poorly located or inadequately landscaped and buffered
parking lots and structures can be incompatible with the uearby residential uses and the
character of the neighborhood.
LANDSCAPING RECOMMENDATION 2:
CAREFULLY LOCATE & BUFFER PARKING
Attain compatibility of parking with the character of the
neighborhood by sensitively locating, landscaping, and further
buffering parking from nearby residential uses.
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48.


LANDSCAPING ISSUE 3: The neighborhood has too many ugly, unlandscaped, and poorly
maintained parking lots and vacant lots.
LANDSCAPING RECOMMENDATION 3a:
MAINTAIN VACANT LOTS
Identify vacant lots which are not in compliance with City
ordinance requirements for maintenance, establish priorities for
enforcement, and enforce the ordinances.
sub-issue a: The parking lot landscaping ordinance does not contain a provision for
retroactive enforcement. As a result, the existing parking lots will not be landscaped.
LANDSCAPING RECOMMENDATION 3b:
LANDSCAPE EXISTING PARKING LOTS
Amend the Citys parking lot landscaping ordinance to include
a provision for retroactive enforcement. Consider an
amortization schedule as an implementation method which
would help minimize the financial burden.
sub-issue b: The new parking lot landscaping ordinance provides only minimum
requirements for interior landscaping and no requirements for small lots.
LANDSCAPING RECOMMENDATION 3c:
LANDSCAPE INTERIORS & SMALL LOTS
Amend the Citys parking lot landscaping ordinance to include
additional provisions for interior landscaping, for small lots, and
for permanent maintenance.
LANDSCAPING ISSUE 4: The edge between retail and residential uses is often ugly,
noisy, too bright, lacking in landscaping, attractive to anti-social activity, uncomfortable, and
disruptive to residential uses.
LANDSCAPING RECOMMENDATION 4:
EXTEND THE RETAIL STREETSCAPE INTO THE NEIGHBORHOOD
As street trees, pedestrian lights, and other streetscape
improvements are installed in retail areas, extend them around
the street comers to the edge between the retail and residential
uses.
49.


LANDSCAPING ISSUE 5: Several streetscaping projects have been completed, along East
Colfax and on the 1500 block of Clarkson. Each of these projects is an element of a larger
streetscape project, Colfax between Grant and Josephine and Clarkson from 13th to 20th
Avenue.
LANDSCAPING RECOMMENDATION 5:
COMPLETE EXISTING STREETSCAPE PROJECTS
Give priority to completing existing streetscaping projects
in order to maximize their impact.
LANDSCAPING ISSUE 6: Overhead utility lines dominate the streetscape along Sixth,
Seventh, Eighth, Eleventh, Thirteenth, and Colfax Avenues and will detract from othgr
programs and expenditures designed to improve the image of those streets. Overhead lines
on the west edge of Cheesman create a jarring edge between the park and the
neighbor hood.
LANDSCAPING RECOMMENDATION 6:
UNDERGROUND UTILITY LINES ALONG 6TH, 7TH, 8TH, 11TH, 13TH,
141rf, AINU lAILl'AA AVLINUlLo AINU UIN BO lxl Irih, CAM AINU WH-al
EDGES OF CHEESMAN PARK.
Underground the overhead utility lines which currently run
along 6th, 7th, 8th, 11th, 13th, and Colfax Avenues and on the
west edge of Cheesman Park. As part of the effort to improve
the streetscape in the neighborhood, coordinate the timing of
the undergrounding with other streetscaping projects.


3. PARKS AND RECREATION ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS
PARKS AND RECREATION ISSUE 1: With the exception of the Capitol grounds and
the adjoining Civic Center, there are limited parks and open space available for the western
end of the neighborhood.
PARKS AND RECREATION RECOMMENDATION la:
IMPROVE EXISTING PARKS
Improve Civic Center, Governors Park, and Quality Hill Park
in order to better accommodate and encourage use by
neighborhood residents. Add fountains, similar focal points,
and better pedestrian lighting to help add life to currently
under-utilized parks. All three parks should continue to
provide passive, rather than active, open space. All
improvements should be compatible with the formal urban
qualities of these parks.
PARKS AND RECREATION RECOMMENDATION lb:
IMPROVE THE LINKAGES TO PARKS
Improve landscaping, sidewalks, crosswalks, and other
pedestrian treatments along connecting streets such as 11th,
Sherman, Pennsylvania, and Franklin in order to improve the
pedestrian and bicycle linkages to Cheesman, Congress, City,
Civic Center, Quality Hill, and Governors Parks and to Cherry
Creek and the Platte River.
PARKS AND RECREATION RECOMMENDATION 1c:
DESIGNATE ADDITIONAL PARKWAYS
Designate the Capitol Hill / Cheesman Park segments of York,
Josephine, Franklin, and Eleventh Avenues as City Parkways.
PARKS AND RECREATION ISSUE 2: Maintenance is less than desirable in the parks.
sub-issue a: The sprinkler system in Cheesman Park is one of the oldest in the City,
is irreparable, and needs to be replaced.
PARKS AND RECREATION RECOMMENDATION 2:
IMPROVE PARKS MAINTENANCE
Give higher priority to parks maintenance, including funding a
new sprinkler system for Cheesman Park.
51.


PARKS AND RECREATION ISSUE 3: The majority of park space in the neighborhood
is passive, rather than active.
sub-issue a: The Capitol grounds, Cheesman Park, Governors Park, Quality Hill
Park, and Seventh Avenue Parkway provide needed passive open space without the
level of activity of parks with athletic facilities.
sub-issue b: The neighborhood has ready access to Congress Park and City Park,
where active recreation facilities are concentrated and are more appropriate.
PARKS AND RECREATION RECOMMENDATION 3a:
PROTECT PASSIVE PARK SPACE
Protect the integrity of the neighborhoods passive park space
from active and organized uses.
PARKS AND RECREATION RECOMMENDATION 3b:
IMPROVE ACTIVE PARK SPACE AND ACCESS
Improve the active recreation facilities in Congress Park and
City Park and improve the access to those parks and their
facilities.
PARKS AND RECREATION ISSUE 4: Improvements to the neighborhood parks seem
to happen on a piecemeal basis and have little sense of permanence, consistency with a
grand design, or compatibility with the character of the neighborhood.
sub-issue a: The impact of the collection of these individual actions is to denigrate
the quality of the parks.
PARKS AND RECREATION RECOMMENDATION 4a:
ADOPT AND FOLLOW A PARKS MASTER PLAN
Adopt and follow a master plan for City parks, including their
improvement and maintenance. Improvements should be
compatible with the historic designs for the parks and the
character of the neighborhood.
sub-issue b: Changes to Cheesman Park and the traffic flow through it run the risk
of creating more negative impacts on the surrounding streets.
PARKS AND RECREATION RECOMMENDATION 4b:
STUDY ANY TRAFFIC PATTERN CHANGES
Involve the neighborhood in the discussion of any proposed changes to Cheesman
Park and the traffic flow through it. Thoroughly review potential impacts on the
park and the surrounding streets.
52.


sub-issue c: The west entrance to the Botanic Gardens is closed, making pedestrian
access from the west end of the neighborhood more difficult.
PARKS AND RECREATION RECOMMENDATION 4c:
OPEN THE WEST ENTRANCE TO THE GARDENS
Whenever possible, the Botanic Gardens should open its west
entrance.
sub-issue d: The parks have inadequate and poorly designed pedestrian lighting.
PARKS AND RECREATION RECOMMENDATION 4d:
IMPROVE LIGHTING IN PARKS
Improve the pedestrian lighting m the parks. The lighting
should be compatible with the historic designs of the parks and
with the character of the neighborhood.
PARKS AND RECREATION ISSUE 5: There is a lack of recreation facilities in the
neighborhood, especially for children.
sub-issue a: The residents of the neighborhood do not have adequate access to any
city recreation center.
PARKS AND RECREATION RECOMMENDATION 5:
PROVIDE RECREATION FACILITIES
Provide additional recreation facilities, particularly a community
recreation center and childrens facilities. Consider joint
parks/school use of facilities at Morey Middle School, East
High School, and Dora Moore Elementary.
4. OPEN SPACE ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS
OPEN SPACE ISSUE 1: The current zoning ordinance allows new developments to meet
their open space requirements in ways which do not best serve the neighborhood and which
may not be compatible with the character of the neighborhood. The zoning ordinance states
that "unobstructed open space may be located on the ground and on roof decks having an
average height of not more than six (6) feet above grade and shall be utilized only for
landscaping and/or recreational facilities." This language does not include sufficient criteria
for determining the quality or compatibility of open space.
53.


OPEN SPACE RECOMMENDATION 1:
IMPROVE TOE CRITERIA FOR OPEN SPACE
Tighten the criteria for open space to improve both its quality
and its compatibility with the character of the neighborhood.
S. PEDESTRIAN ORIENTATION ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS
PEDESTRIAN ORIENTATION ISSUE 1: New commercial development tends to be
more automobile-oriented than pedestrian-oriented.
sub-issue a: The neighborhood has the history and potential of being more pedestrian
oriented.
PEDESTRIAN ORIENTATION RECOMMENDATION la:
ORIENT RETAIL AREAS TO PEDESTRIANS
Orient new and existing commercial development to
pedestrians, rather than to automobiles. The only exception to
this would is in areas designated for automobile-oriented uses.
sub-issue b: Narrow sidewalks create pedestrian / automobile conflicts.
PEDESTRIAN ORIENTATION RECOMMENDATION 2b:
WIDEN AND BUFFER NARROW SIDEWALKS
Widen sidewalks, while retaining landscaped parking strips, and
buffer the sidewalks from traffic.
6. NEIGHBORHOODS EDGE ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS
NEIGHBORHOOD EDGE ISSUE 1: The edges of the neighborhood show the greatest
impacts from the character and density of adjoining areas, act as transition zones between
the neighborhood and those adjoining areas, and have a concentration of arterial streets
and, consequently, heavy traffic.
sub-issue a: The area between 13th and Colfax is heavily affected by the cumulative
impact of traffic and the associated noise and dirt.
sub-issue b: The area between 13th and Colfax is not as well maintained as other
areas in the neighborhood because of a complex of interrelated factors, some of which
are not in themselves problematic.
sub-issue c: Redevelopment of areas peripheral to the neighborhood may cause .
significant impacts in the neighborhood.
54.


NEIGHBORHOOD EDGE RECOMMENDATION la:
DIRECT EFFORTS TO IMPROVING EDGES
Improve and stabilize the edges of the neighborhood,
minimizing and buffering the impacts of traffic and intense
development.
NEIGHBORHOOD EDGE RECOMMENDATION lb:
WORK WITH NEIGHBORING ORGANIZATIONS
The neighborhood organizations should work with organizations
from adjoining neighborhoods, including Downtown, to support
common and compatible goals.
sub-issue d: Sherman provides a strong residential edge for the neighborhood but is
threatened with redevelopment by the existing R-4 zoning and the large land
assemblages.
sub-issue e: The area between Broadway and Logan, an extension of the western
edge of the neighborhood, has a mixture of older residential uses and newer offices,
retail uses, and parking lots. This mixture of uses encourages intrusions of
incompatible land uses into the neighborhood and increases the difficulty of protecting
the character of the neighborhood.
NEIGHBORHOOD EDGE RECOMMENDATION lc:
EMPHASIZE THE RESIDENTIAL CHARACTER AND USE OF THE
WESTERN EDGE OF THE NEIGHBORHOOD
Encourage retention and enhancement of the residential
character and use of the western edge of the neighborhood.
NEIGHBORHOOD EDGE RECOMMENDATION Id:
DEVELOP DESIGN GUIDELINES
Develop design guidelines which will help retain and enhance
the residential character of the western edge of the
neighborhood. These guidelines should evolve from the urban
design strategy for the neighborhood.
sub-issue f: East Colfax, the northern edge of the neighborhood, is commercial, while
the southern and eastern edges of the neighborhood are residential. Because the
streets which form the southern and eastern edges are busy, there are on-going
pressures to convert the residential uses to commercial uses.
55.


NEIGHBORHOOD EDGE RECOMMENDATION le:
RETAIN THE RESIDENTIAL CHARACTER AND USE OF 6TH AVENUE
YORK, AND JOSEPHINE
The primary uses on 6th, York, and Josephine should be
residential. Any additional commercial or office uses should be
neighborhood-oriented, pedestrian-oriented, and compatible
with the residential scale and character of the neighborhood.
7. LANDFORM ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS
LANDFORM ISSUE 1: The neighborhood has interesting topography which provided tl;e
original attraction for building houses in the area, served as an inspiration for naming the
neighborhood (Capitol Hill / Quality Hill), and continues to distinguish the neighborhood ;
from surrounding areas. The design of buildings and other improvements can serve to
either accentuate or minimize this topography.
LANDFORM RECOMMENDATION 1:
ACCENTUATE TOPOGRAPHY
The design of new construction located on hillside sites should
accentuate the topography, placing high-rise buildings on the
top of hills and low-rise buildings at the base of hills.
8. URBAN DESIGN ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS
URBAN DESIGN ISSUE 1: There is not a grand design which defines the character of
the neighborhood and which provides guidelines for public improvements, such as additions
to neighborhood schools and the construction of State office buildings, and for
improvements within the public rights-of-way.
sub-issue a: Recent streetscape improvements such as trees, pedestrian lights, and
benches may be helping to define individual commercial areas, but may not be
compatible with each other or with future streetscape improvements. They may not
be building upon the character of the neighborhood and helping to distinguish it from
adjoining neighborhoods.
URBAN DESIGN RECOMMENDATION 1:
CREATE A COHESIVE URBAN DESIGN STRATEGY
Create an urban design strategy for the neighborhood which
will provide general guidelines for new public and private
improvements and help reinforce the distinct character of the
neighborhood.
56.


P. CIRCULATION
BACKGROUND AND ANALYSIS
Because of its location between Downtown and the ever-expanding eastern and southeastern
sectors of the metropolitan area, the neighborhood is, and always has been, directly affected
by the external demand for improved traffic circulation. Similarly, as the neighborhood has
become more dense and as the number of automobiles has increased, the neighborhood has
also experienced an increased internal demand for improved traffic circulation, parking,
transit service, and bicycle and pedestrian opportunities and safety.
East Colfax Avenue provides an example of the changes produced by increased external
traffic demands. Originally, East Colfax was one of Denvers premier residential streets.
However, as the City developed to the east, traffic along the street increased, the street
became a transit route, and the character of East Colfax changed from residential to
commercial.
Similar pressures have been placed on other streets throughout the neighborhood. As traffic
demands increased, many streets were converted from two-way to one-way traffic.
Currently, there are 14 one-way streets in the neighborhood: Broadway, Lincoln, Grant,
Logan, Washington, Clarkson, Corona, Downing, York, Josephine, 6th, 8th, 13th, and 14th.
According to a report produced by the Denver Public Works Transportation Division in
February of 1988 for the Southeast Quadrant Study, average daily traffic volume on these
one-way streets as they pass through the neighborhood exceeds 240,000 vehicles per day.
For the same report, the Transportation Division produced a 2010 Average Daily Traffic
Volume Projection, which projects average daily traffic volume on these same sections of
the one-way streets to increase approximately 130% to 554,500 vehicles per day. These
projected traffic volumes assume the following:
1. Land Use
a. Realization of the Southeast Quadrant Study 2010 population
and employment forecasts
2. Transit
a. Construction of a regional system on 1-25 and 1-225
b. Use of a high frequency bus network
c. Use of activity center circulators
3. Ride Sharing
a. A 30% increase ride sharing for work trips
4. Roadway Network
a. Construction of the Quebec and Alameda connectors
b. Expansion of 1-25 and 1-225 to 10 lanes
c. Implementation of the recommendations from the One-Way Street
Study 57.


As a result of the need to carry traffic more efficiently, streets were widened, resulting in
narrower sidewalks and yards; and in some cases, the landscaped tree lawns between the
sidewalk and the street were eliminated entirely. At the same time, increased demands for
on-street parking have clogged the already narrow streets. Along with congestion, increased
traffic has brought additional noise, dirt, and safety concerns to the neighborhood. Because
of the significance of these issues, Sixth Avenue has been included in the Plan as a Focus
Area, and many of the issues and recommendations for 6th Avenue also are relevant to the
other one-way streets in the neighborhood.
With its proximity to Downtown, having the highest density of any neighborhood in the City,
and having healthy and centrally located neighborhood-orientated retail uses, Capitol Hill
/ Cheesman Park has heavy transit ridership and a highly pedestrianized population. Both
the transit and the pedestrian environment need improvements, however, and these
improvements would result in higher transit ridership and pedestrian activity.
Over the years, numerous responses have been generated for these and related
transportation issues. Recent studies include the "Central Denver North-South Traffic
Impact Mitigation Study", also known as the One-Way Street Study, and the Southeast
Quadrant Land Use and Transportation Review, known as the Southeast Quadrant Study.
The recommendations related to the Capitol Hill / Cheesman Park neighborhood from
these two studies are consistent with the recommendations in this plan.
The following circulation issues and recommendations are those which are considered
critical to the entire neighborhood and, thus, to the framework plan.
1. ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS FROM CIRCULATION STUDIES
CIRCULATION STUDIES ISSUE 1: There is an exceptionally high volume of traffic
through the neighborhood which creates a negative impact on the adjoining property and
on both pedestrian and bicycle traffic.
CIRCULATION STUDIES RECOMMENDATION 1:
CONSIDER EXISTING STUDY RECOMMENDATIONS
Consider those recommendations of the One-way Street study and
the Southeast C^uadrant Study which relate to the neighborhood.
Delay further consideration and studies of one-way conversions until
the construction of the Speer Boulevard / Sixth Avenue / Lincoln
Street grade separation project is completed and its effect on traffic
patterns can be adequately assessed. In assessing one-way street
conversions, the status of major ingress and egress routes to
Downtown should be considered. Specifically, the recommendations
of these studies which apply to the neighborhood include:
58.


CORRIDOR/SEGMENT
PRIMARY INTENT
PROPOSED ACTION
BROADWAY / LINCOLN
and EAST COLFAX
CORONA STREET
Colfax to 6th Ave.
DOWNING STREET
Colfax to 8th Ave.
DOWNING STREET
8th Ave. to Speer
PEDESTRIAN/BICY CLE
CORRIDOR
Downtown to
Cheesman Park
COLFAX AVENUE
Broadway to Yosemite
ENHANCE THE DESIRABILITY
OF USING TRANSIT FOR
MID-DAY DEMANDS ALONG
CORRIDORS
REDUCE TRAFFIC FLOW
THROUGH CAPITOL HILL
AND PROVIDE A
NEIGHBORHOOD COLLECTOR
ROUTE
REDUCE TRAFFIC FLOW
THROUGH CAPITOL HILL
AND PROVIDE A
MTJTnUP AD UAnn PAT T PTAD
INEluilDUKnUUiJ LULLdLIUK
ROUTE
REDUCE TRAFFIC FLOW
THROUGH CAPITOL HILL
AND PROVIDE A
NEIGHBORHOOD COLLECTOR
ROUTE
Provide high frequency
bus transit services.
Convert to 2-way local
collector street, subject
to adequate alternative
roadway/transit
improvements and
access to the Central
Business District and
other appropriate
employment and
activity centers.
Convert to 2-way local
street, subject to
adequate alternative
roadway/transit
improvements and
access to the Central
Business District and
other appropriate
employment and
activity centers.
Convert to 2-way
collector street, subject
to adequate alternative
roadway / transit
improvements and
access to the Central
Business District and
other appropriate
employment and
activity centers.
PROVIDE PHYSICAL 11th Avenue
CORRIDOR FOR ALTERNATIVE
TRAVEL MODES
INCREASE AUTOMOBILE Improve signalization
CAPACITY TO REDUCE to facilitate traffic flow.
TRAFFIC DEMANDS ON
ALTERNATIVE ROUTES


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61.


Existing One Way Streets
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2. STREET ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS
STREET ISSUE 1: A conflict exists between the need to carry traffic around the City and
through the neighborhood and the desire to retain and reinforce the character and livability
of Capitol Hill.
sub-issue a: Although they are an essential element of the existing metropolitan
transportation system, the one-way arterial street pairs divide the neighborhood and are
destructive to the quality and livability of the neighborhood.
sub-issue b: Actual traffic speeds are too high on the one-way streets.
STREET RECOMMENDATION la:
DISCOURAGE ADDITIONAL TRAFFIC
Find alternative means for carrying traffic through or around the
neighborhood. Additional traffic, street widening, and additional
negative impacts on the residential desirability of the neighborhood
are to be avoided. Traffic improvements should improve the
residential quality of the neighborhood.
STREET RECOMMENDATION lb:
STUDY THE CONVERSION OF ADDITIONAL ONE-WAY STREETS AND
OTHER IMPROVEMENTS
To help protect the livability of the neighborhood, study both the
conversion of additional one-way streets to two-way traffic and the
introduction of other improvements which will help buffer the
neighborhood from traffic impacts. Consider, for example, off-peak
on-street parking along East Eighth Avenue between Colorado
Boulevard and Lincoln Street.
STREET RECOMMENDATION lc:
ENFORCE SPEEDS ON ONE-WAY AND TWO-WAY ARTERIALS
Improve enforcement of posted traffic speeds on one-way and two-
way arterial streets, study the potential for lowering speed limits on
those streets, and time lights to limit effective speeds.
sub-issue c: Traffic flow, particularly in the commercial areas at 9th and Corona and
11th and Ogden, needs to be reviewed for efficiency and safety.
65.


}
STREET RECOMMENDATION Id:
STUDY TRAFFIC FLOW IN COMMERCIAL AREAS
Study and implement improvements to the traffic flow, efficiency,
and safety in commercial areas of the neighborhood.
STREET ISSUE 2: Thirteenth Avenue widens from two to three traffic lanes west of
Franklin Street. Because the right-of-way itself does not expand until Grant Street, the
additional street width results in reduced setbacks between the street and the adjoining
buildings, most of which are residential, and in narrower sidewalks. The narrow setbacks
intensify the impacts of noise, dirt, and safety hazards.
STREET RECOMMENDATION 2a:
STUDY THE POTENTIAL NARROWING OF THIRTEENTH AVENUE
Complete a traffic study of 13th Avenue between Franklin and
Broadway, focusing on the potential for narrowing the street and
widening the setbacks, allowing for widening the sidewalks and
providing additional landscaping and other buffering for the
adjoining land uses. Address capacity issues, sub-area circulation
and access concerns, air quality impacts, and other related issues.
Implement the recommendations of the study.
STREET RECOMMENDATION 2b:
IMPLEMENT AN INTERIM SOLUTION FOR THIRTEENTH AVENUE
Until a permanent solution can be constructed for Thirteenth
Avenue, allow parking on the south side of Thirteenth Avenue
during off-peak hours, focusing on the area between Washington and
Logan.
STREET ISSUE 3: The neighborhood suffers because of the flow of traffic through it,
rather than traffic which is generated within it.
STREET RECOMMENDATION 3:
LOBBY FOR A STATE TAX TO MITIGATE TRAFFIC IMPACTS
Lobby for a State tax on gasoline which will go for mitigating
impacts on existing neighborhoods, similar to the subsidy program
for noise barriers along Interstate Highways.
66.


STREET ISSUE 4: The reconstruction of the intersection of 6th, Lincoln, and Speer has
been funded. The design of the intersection will impact the neighborhood.
STREET RECOMMENDATION 4:
INVOLVE THE NEIGHBORHOOD IN DESIGNING 6TH/LINCOLN/SPEER
The design of the 6th/Lincoln/Speer intersection, at a minimum,
should consider aesthetic compatibility with the historic character of
Speer and with the neighborhood, the traffic impact on the
surrounding area, access to Cherry Creek, and creation of a gateway
for Downtown.
3. PEDESTRIAN AND BICYCLE ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS
PEDESTRIAN ISSUE 1: The pedestrian orientation of the neighborhood as a whole is
strong, but the scarcity of marked crosswalks and drivers ignorance of pedestrian rights
weaken the system.
PEDESTRIAN AND BICYCLE RECOMMENDATION la:
GIVE PRIORITY TO WALKING AS THE MOST DESIRABLE FORM OF
TRANSPORTATION
Encourage people in the neighborhood to walk to work, shopping,
and recreation. Give other forms of transportation lower priority.
PEDESTRIAN AND BICYCLE RECOMMENDATION lb:
ENFORCE PEDESTRIAN LAWS
Enforce laws which give pedestrians the right-of-way over
automobiles, educate the public to these laws, and institute
significant fines for violations.
sub-issue a: Pedestrian crossing of arterials such as Colfax, Lincoln, Broadway, 13th,
and 14th is difficult at best.
PEDESTRIAN AND BICYCLE RECOMMENDATION lc:
IMPROVE PEDESTRIAN CROSSINGS
Identify priority intersections where pedestrian crosswalks should be
marked. Mark these crosswalks and then give higher priority to
maintaining them.
sub-issue b: The neighborhood suffers from inadequate pedestrian and bicycle
linkages between both external and internal destinations. Parking lots, barren
streetscapes, narrow sidewalks, and poorly maintained properties on the northern and
67.


western edges of the neighborhood make walking less comfortable and enjoyable, thus
discouraging pedestrian traffic.
PEDESTRIAN AND BICYCLE RECOMMENDATION Id:
IMPROVE THE PEDESTRIAN ENVIRONMENT
Improve the pedestrian environment with streetscape programs,
landscaping of parking lots, and improved property maintenance.
PEDESTRIAN AND BICYCLE RECOMMENDATION le:
EMPHASIZE PEDESTRIAN STREETS
Improve both north-south and east-west streets as pedestrian and
visual linkages within the neighborhood and with adjoining
neighborhoods, including Downtown. North-south streets which
should be considered include Sherman, Pennsylvania, Clarkson,
Franklin, Columbine, and Elizabeth. East-west streets include
Seventh, Ninth, Eleventh, and Twelfth Avenues.
PEDESTRIAN AND BICYCLE RECOMMENDATION If:
COMPLETE EXISTING STREETSCAPE PROJECTS
East Colfax and Clarkson both have had initial streetscape
improvements completed. Give priority to completing these projects.
PEDESTRIAN AND BICYCLE ISSUE 2: Bicycle ridership is lower than one would
anticipate given the location of the neighborhood, its demographics, and Denvers climate.
sub-issue a: Bicycles are thought of primarily as recreation, rather than as
transportation.
sub-issue b: Conflicts exist among automobiles, bicycles, and pedestrians.
PEDESTRIAN AND BICYCLE RECOMMENDATION 2a:
GIVE HIGHER PRIORITY TO BICYCLES
Develop strategies for improving the capacity, safety, enjoyment,
and speed of bicycle travel. Strategies should include improved
maintenance of both on-street and off-street bicycle routes, the
review of existing and possible bicycle routes for their capacity,
safety and efficiency, and the provision of bicycle racks in
commercial area.
68.


PEDESTRIAN AND BICYCLE RECOMMENDATION 2b:
EDUCATE DRIVERS AND BICYCLISTS
Develop public education programs on the rights and
obligations of bicycle ridership and safety precautions for both
bicyclists and automobile drivers.
PEDESTRIAN AND BICYCLE RECOMMENDATION 2c:
ENFORCE BICYCLE LAWS
More strictly enforce bicycle laws, emphasizing the rights and
responsibilities of bicyclists.
4. TRANSIT ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS
TRANSIT ISSUE 1: The neighborhood has a large transit-independent population, the
highest residential density in the City, proximity to Downtown, and a higher-than-normal
level of transit ridership. While the neighborhood has a high bus ridership, given its
location and the character of its residents, it should have even higher ridership.
sub-issue a: RTD bus transfers currently cannot be used for return trips, thus
discouraging use of the bus for short shopping trips.
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TRANSIT RECOMMENDATION la:
PROVIDE RETURN TRIP BUS TRANSFERS
Expand the current use of bus transfers to allow roundtrip
transfers within a two hour period.
sub-issue b: The bus shelters in the neighborhood are scarce and in poor condition.
TRANSIT RECOMMENDATION lb:
PROVIDE MORE BUS SHELTERS
Provide additional bus shelters. Shelters should be located and
designed to be compatible with the neighborhood and adjacent
property.
sub-issue c: Bus stop areas and bus benches are in need of better maintenance.
TRANSIT RECOMMENDATION lc:
MAINTAIN BUS STOPS AND BENCHES
Develop programs and funding for improved maintenance of
bus stops and benches.
69.


TRANSIT RECOMMENDATION Id:
IMPROVE BUS STOPS
Improve bus stops to better buffer them from weather and
traffic.
sub-issue d: Riding a bus to and from Downtown is convenient, but other areas of
the metropolitan area are far less accessible by bus from the neighborhood.
TRANSIT RECOMMENDATION le:
EXPAND BUS SERVICE
Support efforts of RTD to expand bus service throughout the
metropolitan area.
sub-issue e: Peak hour circulator buses are too infrequent and too widely spaced.
Additional circulator routes and buses would help make bus service more convenient
and competitive and, thus, would attract additional ridership.
TRANSIT RECOMMENDATION If:
ADD MORE PEAK HOUR CIRCULATOR BUSES
Support and work with RTD in their efforts to expand the
system of circulator buses through the neighborhood and to
improve headway between buses. RTD and the neighborhood
organizations should work together in locating additional bus
routes.
sub-issue f: Diesel buses pollute the neighborhood with particulates and odors. Many
of the buses generate excessive noise and vibrations.
TRANSIT RECOMMENDATION lg:
BUY QUIET, NON-POLLUTING BUSES
Work with RTD to assure that new buses will be quiet and non-
polluting.
TRANSIT ISSUE 2: As mass transit systems are developed, their design and location will
potentially both impact the livability of the neighborhood and create pressure for more
intense redevelopment.
TRANSIT RECOMMENDATION 2a:
INVOLVE THE NEIGHBORHOOD
Incorporate representatives of the neighborhood and its
concerns in key discussions regarding future mass transit and
rapid transit alignments and technology.
70.


TRANSIT RECOMMENDATION 2b:
PROVIDE READY ACCESS TO RAPID TRANSIT ROUTES
As alternative rapid transit routes are analyzed and routes are
proposed and selected, study the potential for ready access from
the neighborhood to the rapid transit lines while meeting the
needs of the neighborhood.
TRANSIT RECOMMENDATION 2c:
REZONE THE NEIGHBORHOOD TO ACCOMMODATE TRANSIT
IMPACTS
jLIYaa a.
If rapid transit is approved adjacent to the neighborhood, zone
the neighborhood to allow it to take advantage of the potential
positive effects and to protect from the potential negative
impacts.
5. PARKING ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS
PARKING ISSUE 1: The neighborhood suffers from limited on-street and off-street
parking. Both are less than is necessary to meet the needs of the residents, institutions, and
businesses in the neighborhood. While on-street parking clogs the already-narrow streets,
it does help buffer the sidewalks and the adjoining uses from the traffic and helps slow
traffic.
PARKING RECOMMENDATION la:
PROVIDE TRANSPORTATION ALTERNATIVES
Improve transit, pedestrian, and bicycle alternatives to the use of
automobiles and thus, help limit the demand for parking.
PARKING RECOMMENDATION lb:
USE ON-STREET PARKING TO BUFFER TRAFFIC IMPACTS
Use on-street parking as a buffer between the traffic, the sidewalks,
and the uses adjacent to the street.
PARKING RECOMMENDATION lc:
STUDY THE CREATION OF PARKING DISTRICTS
Study the creation of parking districts which would provide joint
parking facilities.
sub-issue a: The inadequacy and under-utilization of commercial parking is partially
a result of a parking management problem.
71.


PARKING RECOMMENDATION Id:
IMPROVE COMMERCIAL PARKING
Inventory existing parking, evaluate parking needs, and establish
programs for better managing available parking and, if necessary,
acquiring additional parking.
PARKING ISSUE 2: A conflict arises between the desire to provide adequate parking and
the desire to retain the historic urban residential character of the neighborhood.
sub-issue a: Parking is perceived as both pervasive and inadequate.
PARKING RECOMMENDATION 2a:
IDENTIFY WHERE OFF-STREET PARKING WILL BE ENCOURAGED OR
DISCOURAGED
Identify specific locations where off-street parking will be
encouraged and specific locations where it will be discouraged.
sub-issue b: Existing on-street parking laws are not well enforced.
PARKING RECOMMENDATION 2b:
ENFORCE ON STREET PARKING LAWS
Giver higher priority to enforcing existing on-street parking laws.
sub-issue c: Some of the major employers in and near the neighborhood provide
neither adequate parking nor transportation alternatives for their employees and
visitors.
PARKING RECOMMENDATION 2c:
ENCOURAGE EMPLOYEE TRANSIT OPTIONS
Employers should provide incentives for their employees to use
transportation alternatives and should provide adequate parking for
those employees who cannot use alternative transportation.
sub-issue d: Parking lots and structures are both incompatible with the residential
character of the neighborhood.
PARKING RECOMMENDATION 2d:
REVIEW PARKING FOR COMPATIBILITY
Review proposals and designs for parking lots and structures for
compatibility with the surrounding land uses and the character of the
neighborhood.
72.


1- SCHOOL ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS
SCHOOL ISSUE 1: The presence of public and private schools in the neighborhood is
essential to maintaining the residential character of the neighborhood and to attracting
families to live here.
SCHOOL RECOMMENDATION la:
RETAIN NEIGHBORHOOD SCHOOLS
Retain and improve the public schools in the neighborhood. The
City and the neighborhood organizations also should work together
to encourage private schools to locate and stay in the neighborhood.
sub-issue a: The retention and maintenance of the historic school buildings as
neighborhood schools is critical to retaining the sense of history in the neighborhood
and the character of the neighborhood.
SCHOOL RECOMMENDATION lb:
PRESERVE HISTORIC SCHOOL BUILDINGS
Maintain and improve the historic school buildings as neighborhood
schools.
SCHOOL ISSUE 2: Community members who are not parents of school age children are
seldom involved in education issues or programs.
SCHOOL RECOMMENDATION 2:
ENCOURAGE PARTICIPATION IN EDUCATION
Encourage all residents, property owners, and business owners,
including those who are not parents of school age children, to
participate in school issues, and programs, including budgeting.
As part of this effort to encourage participation, the School District
should designate a permanent community contact person for each
school.
The School District should also stabilize the administration of each
school, extending the tenure of school principals rather than
transferring them from school to school.
75.


SCHOOL ISSUE 3: There is little encouragement of community use of school facilities.
SCHOOL RECOMMENDATION 3:
ENCOURAGE COMMUNITY USE OF SCHOOLS
Open school facilities for greater community use.
The School District should develop a policy allowing and
encouraging community use of schools for recreation programs and
public open space.
76.


2. CRIME PREVENTION ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS
CRIME PREVENTION ISSUE 1: Neighborhood crime is a serious problem but receives
undue adverse publicity.
sub-issue a: While the neighborhood and the District 3 office of the Police
Department have an excellent working relationship, crime prevention would benefit
from an even stronger police presence in the neighborhood.
CRIME PREVENTION RECOMMENDATION la:
CREATE A STRONGER POLICE PRESENCE
Strengthen the presence and the perception of the presence of the
police in the neighborhood. The Police Departments newly created
bicycle patrol program is an excellent example of developing a
program which responds to the unique characteristics of the
neighborhood.
As part of this recommendation, the Police Department should
encourage longer tours of duty within the neighborhood in order to
allow officers to be more familiar with the area and for the people
within the area to be more familiar with the each officer.
sub-issue b: Because of the differences between Capitol, Hill / Cheesman Park and
other neighborhoods in the City, there is a question whether the neighborhood watch
program is the appropriate model for the neighborhood.
CRIME PREVENTION RECOMMENDATION lb:
ESTABLISH A UNIQUE NEIGHBORHOOD WATCH PROGRAM
Establish a resident crime prevention program which is tailored to
the neighborhood. The program should respond to the
characteristics which make the neighborhood unique, such as the
high percentage of residents who are renters and the high density of
the housing. Crime prevention programs in similar neighborhoods
throughout the country should be reviewed for replicable ideas. The
need for 15% participation should be reviewed and, if appropriate,
modified for the neighborhood. Once a new program is developed,
the Police Department and the neighborhood organizations should
work together to promote the program and to encourage police and
citizen participation.
sub-issue c: Alleys, streets, parking lots, and parks need better standards for lighting.
77.


CRIME PREVENTION RECOMMENDATION lc:
IMPROVE NEIGHBORHOOD LIGHTING
Improve neighborhood street, alley, and pedestrian lighting. Efforts
should be directed to public education of the available options, their
costs and benefits. Residents and property owners should be
included in selecting locations for additional light fixtures.
sub-issue d: X-rated bookstores and theaters and some bars are a magnet for anti-
social and criminal activity. The comfort and safety of residents, business people, and
visitors to the area are threatened by the activity.
CRIME PREVENTION RECOMMENDATION Id:
REMOVE AND DISCOURAGE TROUBLESOME USES
Remove those uses which have been demonstrated to be a public
nuisance. Discourage new uses which are likely to act as magnets
for anti-social and criminal activity.
3. SPECIAL POPULATIONS ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS
SPECIAL POPULATIONS ISSUE 1: The neighborhood has a high concentration of
special populations and their service facilities.
- GROUP HOMES AND OTHER SOCIAL SERVICE FACILITIES
sub-issue a: There is an unequal share of group homes and other social service
facilities in the neighborhood.
sub-issue b: Current City and State legislation regarding the siting of group homes
and other social service facilities does not adequately address the concerns of either
the neighborhood or of the social service providers.
- ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE
sub-issue a: The neighborhood is highly impacted by a high incidence of alcohol and
drug abuse.
w w-w-w -m jrly""'lvy'
- HOMELESS
sub-issue a: There are many homeless people in the neighborhood.
- RUNAWAY AND THROWAWAY YOUTH
sub-issue a: There has been an increase of runaway and throwaway youth living in the
neighborhood.


SPECIAL POPULATIONS RECOMMENDATION la:
DISCOURAGE ADDITIONAL SOCIAL SERVICE FACILITIES IN THE
NEIGHBORHOOD
Do not locate any additional social service facilities in the
neighborhood until other areas of the metropolitan area accept their
fair share of facilities.
SPECIAL POPULATIONS RECOMMENDATION lb:
SUPPORT FUNDING OF PROGRAMS AND FACILITIES
Support funding of programs and facilities throughout the City for
the treatment of alcohol and drug abuse, caring for the homeless,
and caring for runaway and throwaway youth.
SPECIAL POPULATIONS RECOMMENDATION lc:
WORK WITH SOCIAL SERVICES PROVIDERS TO REVIEW THE
LOCATION OF FACILITIES AND TO DEVELOP PROGRAMS
Once other areas of the metropolitan area have accepted their fair
share of social service facilities, then require social service providers
to work with the neighborhood organizations in locating social
service facilities and in developing programs which will impact the
neighborhood.
SPECIAL POPULATIONS RECOMMENDATION Id:
ESTABLISH ONGOING RELATIONSHIPS WITH SERVICE PROVIDERS
Establish ongoing relationships between the neighborhood
organizations and the social service providers in the neighborhood.
ELDERLY AND PHYSICALLY DISABLED
sub-issue a: The neighborhood has a high concentration of elderly and physically
disabled residents.
sub-issue b: There are not enough sidewalk curb cuts for the elderly and disabled.
SPECIAL POPULATIONS RECOMMENDATION le:
BUILD MORE SIDEWALK HANDICAP RAMPS
Identify priority locations for building new sidewalk handicap ramps,
identify funding sources, get funding commitments, and monitor the
construction and maintenance.
79.


F. ENVIRONMENT
BACKGROUND AND ANALYSIS
The high density, urban character of the neighborhood and its location create special
environmental challenges. Graffiti and trash proliferate. The high volume of traffic, the
narrow streets, and the high density of residents generate sand, dirt, and trash on the streets
and make street sweeping difficult. Similarly, the traffic and density of residents generate
a high volume of noise. Because the neighborhood is highly pedestrianized, residents are
particularly dependent on safe, accessible sidewalks.
1. GRAFFITI ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS
GRAFFITI ISSUE 1: The problem of graffiti is increasing throughout the neighborhood.
sub-issue a: While graffiti lowers property values as well as our senses of enjoyment,
security, ownership, and pride in the neighborhood, no successful means has yet been
developed for protecting against it.
GRAFFITI RECOMMENDATION 1:
DISCOURAGE GRAFFITI
Discourage graffiti, using techniques such as the installation of
protective wall coverings and landscaping, immediate removal of
graffiti, brighter lighting, enforcement of existing ordinances
prohibiting graffiti, and public education and awareness. Work with
Keep Denver Beautiful and other anti-graffiti programs. Consider
using juvenile offenders in graffiti removal efforts.
80.


2. TRASH COLLECTION ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS
TRASH COLLECTION ISSUE 1: Trash accumulates in streets, alleys, bus stops, and
poorly maintained yards and parking lots.
TRASH COLLECTION RECOMMENDATION la:
IMPROVE TRASH COLLECTION AND INCREASE PUBLIC AWARENESS
Work with "Keep Denver Beautiful" and similar programs to
disseminate information on requirements and procedures for trash
collection and litter prevention, encourage private and public trash
collection efforts, and enforce City trash ordinances. Consider the
City taking over commercial trash collection programs and charging
a fee, offering more frequent trash pick-up, and enforcing stricter
standards.
TRASH COLLECTION RECOMMENDATION lb:
EXPAND RECYCLING EFFORTS AND PROVIDE CURBSIDE RECYCLING
Work to expand existing recycling programs and to institute curbside
recycling throughout the neighborhood.
TRASH COLLECTION RECOMMENDATION lc:
PROVIDE ENOUGH DUMPSTERS
Provide enough dumpsters to meet the demand generated by
residents and businesses.
TRASH COLLECTION RECOMMENDATION Id:
PROVIDE ADDITIONAL TRASH RECEPTACLES
Place trash receptacles and provide for improved maintenance at bus
stops, convenience stores, carry-out fast food restaurants, and other
locations where trash is either generated or where it collects.
TRASH COLLECTION RECOMMENDATION le:
CREATE SPECIAL DISTRICTS TO IMPROVE AND MAINTAIN ALLEYS
Consider the creation of special taxing districts to improve and maintain alleys.
TRASH COLLECTION ISSUE 2: Dumpster lids are heavy and create a hazard tor many
elderly and disabled residents.
TRASH COLLECTION RECOMMENDATION 2:
INSTALL LIGHTER LIDS ON DUMPSTERS
Install lighter lids, perhaps plastic, on dumpsters.
81.


TRASH COLLECTION ISSUE 3: Because the neighborhood has a mixture of single-
family and multiple-family residential, retail, and institutional uses, the demands for trash
collection for each of these uses often conflict with one another.
TRASH COLLECTION RECOMMENDATION 3:
RESTRICT TRASH COLLECTION
In areas which include residential uses, restrict trash collection to
those times which do not conflict either with residents sleeping or
with access or egress from their garages or parking areas through the
alleys.
3. STREET SWEEPING ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS
STREET SWEEPING ISSUE 1: Major traffic arteries accumulate sand, dirt, and trash,
creating hazards for bicyclists and degrading the air quality by adding particulates.
STREET SWEEPING RECOMMENDATION 1:
SWEEP STREETS MORE FREQUENTLY
Because of the demands created by the high density of the
neighborhood, the City should give the neighborhood a higher
priority for street maintenance and should demonstrate its
commitment by sweeping streets more frequently and by improving
the cleanup of sand following snowstorms. Signs giving notice of
impending street cleaning should be more visible larger and more
colorful, while being designed and located to minimize the potential
for additional visual clutter.
4. SNOW REMOVAL ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS
SNOW REMOVAL ISSUE 1: Too many people do not clean snow off their sidewalks.
SNOW REMOVAL RECOMMENDATION 1:
ENFORCE SNOW SHOVELLING
Disseminate information on requirements and procedures for snow
removal from sidewalks, encourage snow removal, and enforce City
snow removal ordinances.
82.


5, PET CARE ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS
PET CARE ISSUE 1: Too many people do not clean up after their pets.
PET CARE RECOMMENDATION 1:
CLEAN UP AFTER PETS
Initiate a concerted public relations effort which will educate people
to their responsibility to clean-up after their pets, particularly in the
parks, by disseminating information on requirements and procedures
for cleaning up after pets, encouraging individuals to clean up after
their pets, and enforcing City animal ordinances.
6. NOISE ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS
NOISE ENFORCEMENT ISSUE 1: The neighborhood is too noisy.
NOISE ENFORCEMENT RECOMMENDATION 1:
ENFORCE THE NOISE ORDINANCE
Disseminate information on the City noise ordinance and its
enforcement procedures, and aid its enforcement.


II. DISTRICT PLANS


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7.


PREFACE
The Capitol Hill / Cheesman Park neighborhood is diverse culturally, socially, economically,
and physically. Because it is important to consider the elements which provide the
distinctions in the neighborhood, the District Plan establishes 12 districts which have
relatively distinct characteristics, acknowledging that the boundaries between the districts
are not sacrosanct and that some characteristics overlap district boundaries.
The District Plan provides a description of each of the 12 districts, a vision for what the
characteristics of the district should be in the future, and the issues and recommendations,
including general zoning recommendations, which are most important to the district. These
issues and recommendations are in addition to those which are included in the Framework
Plan, and which are considered to generally apply to the entire neighborhood, including each
district.
89.


A. BROADWAY /
DESCRIPTION
The Broadway / Lincoln District forms the western edge of the neighborhood. It is one and
one-half blocks wide and seven and one-half blocks long, extending from the middle of
Broadway on the west to the alley between Lincoln and Sherman on the east, and from
Speer Boulevard on the south to Thirteenth Avenue on the north.
The district is heavily impacted by traffic on one-way streets, including Lincoln,
(northbound), Broadway (southbound), Thirteenth Avenue (westbound), Eighth Avenue
(westbound), and Sixth Avenue (eastbound). The district is bounded on the south by yet
another major thoroughfare, Speer Boulevard. Five two-way streets cross the district:'
Seventh Avenue, Ninth Avenue, Tenth Avenue, Eleventh Avenue, and Twelfth Avenue.
The zoning in the district is B-8, with the exception of one PUD in the 900 block of Lincoln.
B-8 zoning is an intensive general business and very high density residential district. The
PUD allows high density mixed residential / retail mixed use development, with a higher
residential density than allowed in the B-8 district. The area covered by the Cheesman Park
Mountain View Ordinance extends from the east to the middle of Broadway. Development
which is in the district is, therefore, subject to the restrictions of this ordinance.
A major transportation corridor, the Broadway / Lincoln District provides the southern
gateway to Downtown Denver, with the intersection of Speer / Lincoln / Broadway the
point of entry. The district is linear, running north-south, parallel to Lincoln and Broadway.
With a character which is distinct from the rest of the neighborhood, development in the
district is primarily commercial, with offices and destination retail uses. Older commercial
buildings are inter-mixed with newer commercial structures, including several large office
buildings, including the Blue Cross Blue Shield Building, the new Security Life Building, and
the Chancery Building. Potentially the most significant commercial development is Bannock
Center, a proposed eight block mixed-use project extending between Eighth and Tenth
Avenue, and from Lincoln to Speer. A few older residential structures remain in the
district; of these, Sherman Towers is the largest and most visible. The potential for
redevelopment to higher intensity uses exists throughout the district.
While significant structures will be preserved, the Lincoln/Broadway Corridor will
experience major redevelopment, resulting in the creation of a strong anchor at both its
north and south ends, each of which will act as a gateway for Downtown and for the
corridor. The scale of development will step down from the middle of the corridor to the
east and west edges in order to create a sensitive transition into the adjoining
neighborhoods. East-west linkages will cross the corridor and connect La Alma/Lincoln
90.



Park to Cheesman Park. The corridor will provide restaurants, retail activity, art galleries,
offices, and other commercial uses; residential uses will line Ninth and Eleventh Avenues,
and in other cases will adjoin the corridor and be buffered from it.
ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS
BROADWAY / LINCOLN DISTRICT ISSUE 1: The Lincoln / Broadway corridor joins
two neighborhoods Capitol Hill to the east and the Golden Triangle to the west.
BROADWAY / LINCOLN DISTRICT RECOMMENDATION 1:
DEVELOP A NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN FOR THE GOLDEN TRIANGLE
Develop a Golden Triangle neighborhood plan which will also
address the Lincoln / Broadway corridor, so that a cohesive
plan for the corridor can be implemented. Until that plan is
developed, delay the implementation of any recommendations
for the Broadway / Lincoln corridor which might conflict with
the recommendations in the proposed Golden Triangle plan.
Upon completion, recommendations in the Golden Triangle
plan which conflict with those in this plan will take precedence.
BROADWAY / LINCOLN DISTRICT ISSUE 2: The corridor is one of the districts in the
neighborhood which can most easily accommodate redevelopment and which, in fact, can
benefit from sensitive redevelopment.
BROADWAY / LINCOLN DISTRICT RECOMMENDATION 2:
ENCOURAGE NEW CONSTRUCTION IN THE CORRIDOR
BROADWAY / LINCOLN DISTRICT ISSUE 3: Because of its history as a commercial
district, there are several architecturally significant commercial buildings in the district.
There also is an historically important church (St. Mark's) and several other public and
private structures which are important to the character of the district, the neighborhood, and
the City.
nn y-v a r\ni a \/ / t \t thtphttit*/i rp\Tr\ a nrry^XT .
BROADWAY / LINCOLN DISTRICT RECOMMENDATION 3:
PRESERVE SIGNIFICANT STRUCTURES IN THE CORRIDOR
BROADWAY / LINCOLN DISTRICT ISSUE 4: As a result of the heavy loads of traffic
carried by both Lincoln and Broadway, the district has severe limitations for residential uses.
On the other hand, because of the traffic load and Lincoln/Broadways proximity to
Downtown and dense residential areas which have only limited retail and other commercial
uses, the district has opportunities for retail, entertainment, and other commercial uses.
91.


BROADWAY / LINCOLN DISTRICT RECOMMENDATION 4:
PROVIDE GROUND FLOOR RETAIL
Ground floor uses should be retail, emphasizing active uses
such as restaurants, bars, theaters, and other entertainment
facilities.
BROADWAY / LINCOLN DISTRICT ISSUE 5: With the obvious exception of the
Chancery Building, the land use pattern in the district creates gateways at both the north
and south ends of the corridor and buffers the surrounding areas.
BROADWAY / LINCOLN DISTRICT RECOMMENDATION 5a: .
REINFORCE THE EXISTING LAND USE PATTERN
Use new construction in the corridor to reinforce the existing
land use pattern.
BROADWAY / LINCOLN STRICT RECOMMENDATION 5b:
REINFORCE THE GATEWAYS TO THE DISTRICT
Use new construction surrounding the gateways at the north
and south ends of the corridor to reinforce their significance
and function, while new construction between the gateways
should be of lower scale.
BROADWAY / LINCOLN DISTRICT ISSUE 6: The existing land use pattern in the
corridor includes several uses which accentuate the comer of buildings at intersections. This
pattern has the advantage of helping to accentuate the east/west streets, which provide the
linkages into the adjoining neighborhoods. It also helps to create distinct areas within an
otherwise indistinct linear corridor.
BROADWAY / LINCOLN DISTRICT RECOMMENDATION 6:
ACCENTUATE THE STREET CORNERS
Make the street comers on Broadway and Lincoln into special
places in order to accentuate them. Consider either locating
primary entrances to buildings or open space on the comers.
Establish a single pattern for all four comers at any
intersection, but encourage variety among the different
intersections.
BROADWAY / LINCOLN DISTRICT ISSUE 7: The corridor has the potential for
reinforcing its north and south gateways, its "boulevard" character, and its sensitive
relationship with the adjoining residential areas. The relative height of buildings within the
corridor is the most important characteristic in achieving this desired character.
92.


BROADWAY / LINCOLN DISTRICT RECOMMENDATION 7:
SET MAXIMUM AND MINIMUM BUILDING HEIGHTS
Set maximum and minimum building heights for the corridor.
The highest buildings should be in the middle of the
corridor, in the block between Lincoln and Broadway.
The maximum height of these buildings should be 150
feet. Only buildings at the north and south gateways
should exceed this height.
- Buildings on the east edge should be lower.
- Building heights should create a formal pattern which
emphasizes the boulevard quality of Lincoln and
Broadway.
- Consider using either an overlay zone or an extension of
the mountain view ordinance to help implement these
building height provisions.
BROADWAY / LINCOLN ISSUE 8: It is important to reinforce both the formal
boulevard character of the street and the residential and pedestrian scale of buildings
adjoining the surrounding residential areas while allowing additional density in order to
encourage redevelopment.
BROADWAY / LINCOLN RECOMMENDATION 8:
CREATE UPPER-LEVEL BUILDING SETBACKS
For buildings which are outside of the gateways and are on the
west side of Lincoln and the east side of Broadway, create
upper-level building setbacks. The maximum height directly
adjacent to the street should be 2-3 floors.
BROADWAY / LINCOLN ISSUE 9: With the exception of Sherman Towers, buildings
adjoining the district on the east are no more than 4 stories. Buddings on the east side of
the district should be compatible with this existing height in order to avoid an
incompatibility of scales, such as has been created by the Chancery Building looming over
3-story apartments on Sherman.
BROADWAY / LINCOLN RECOMMENDATION 9:
SET A MAXIMUM HEIGHT ON THE EAST SIDE OF LINCOLN
For new buildings on the east side of Lincoln, between Lincoln
and the Lincoln / Sherman alley, set a maximum height of 80
feet.
93.


BROADWAY / LINCOLN DISTRICT ISSUE 10: The corridor has street trees along its
length, but not enough to create the desired image of an urban boulevard / Downtown
gateway.
BROADWAY / LINCOLN DISTRICT RECOMMENDATION 10:
PLANT TREES
Plant as many trees as possible along both Lincoln and
Broadway.
BROADWAY / LINCOLN DISTRICT ISSUE 11: Eleventh Avenue connects Cheesman
Park on the east to La Alma/Lincoln Park on the west. It has a bridge which crosses
Cherry Creek, it is exceptionally wide through most of Capitol Hill, and it is being improved ^
with a landscaped median between Ogden and Washington.
BROADWAY / LINCOLN DISTRICT RECOMMENDATION 11:
USE ELEVENTH AVENUE AS THE LINKAGE TO THE
NEIGHBORHOODS
Use Eleventh Avenue as the linkage to the adjoining
neighborhoods and from Capitol Hill to the Golden Triangle
and La Alma / Lincoln Park neighborhoods.
BROADWAY / LINCOLN DISTRICT ISSUE 12: Both Ninth and Eleventh Avenues are
designated as east-west pedestrian linkages through Capitol Hill / Cheesman Park. The
presence of residential uses along these streets helps reinforce this pattern.
BROADWAY / LINCOLN DISTRICT RECOMMENDATION 12:
ENCOURAGE RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT ON 9TH AND 11TH
Encoqcage residential development to be built facing both 9th
and lltfe Avenues through the corridor.
BROADWAY / LINCOLN DISTRICT ISSUE 13: Seventh Avenue is a third important
east-west pedestrian linkage through Capitol Hill / Cheesman Park. The street terminates
at Cherry Creek / Speer Boulevard.
BROADWAY / LINCOLN DISTRICT RECOMMENDATION 13:
CREATE A TERMINATION FOR 7TH AVENUE
At 7th Avenue, construct both stairs down to Cherry Creek and
a marker, statue, or other feature as a western termination for
the street.
94.


BROADWAY / LINCOLN DISTRICT ISSUE 14: Essential to the concept of pedestrian
linkages is a welcoming, softened, pedestrian character for the streets which are designated
as linkages.
BROADWAY / LINCOLN DISTRICT RECOMMENDATION 14:
CREATE A PEDESTRIAN CHARACTER ON 7TH, 9TH, AND 11TH
Along 7th, 9th, and 11th Avenues, establish building setbacks
which are deeper than those on other streets in the corridor.
Heavily landscape these deeper setbacks in order to soften the
streetscape and create more of a residential character.
BROADWAY / LINCOLN DISTRICT ISSUE 15: The main Denver Public Library is an
important element of the northern gateway to the district. The current library facility is
outdated and far too small to meet the expanding demand for its services.
BROADWAY / LINCOLN DISTRICT RECOMMENDATION 15:
MAINTAIN THE LIBRARY AT THE CIVIC CENTER
Expand the existing library or build a new library facility at the
Civic Center. If the library is moved to another site at the
Civic Center, either renovate the current building for another
public use or replace it with another architecturally significant
building with a public use.
BROADWAY / LINCOLN DISTRICT ISSUE 16: The City facilities in the Civic Center
and the uses in Civic Center Park have inadequate parking.
BROADWAY / LINCOLN DISTRICT RECOMMENDATION 16:
PROVIDE ADDITIONAL PARKING FOR THE CIVIC CENTER
Build a new parking structure which is located and sized so that
it can serve the new library, the art museum, the City and
County buildings, and activities within the Civic Center.
95.


GENERAL ZONING RECOMMENDATIONS
1. USES
a. Lincoln and Broadway:
- Street level: RETAIL, RESTAURANT, AND ENTERTAINMENT
- Above ground level: OFFICE AND RESIDENTIAL
b. Ninth and Eleventh Avenues: RESIDENTIAL
2. RESIDENTIAL OCCUPANCY
SINGLES / COUPLES
YOUNG ADULTS / ADULTS
STUDIO / 1-2 BEDROOM UNITS
3. OPEN SPACE
OUTDOOR RECREATION AREAS
BALCONIES
4. HEIGHT
a. Within the North and South Gateways:
- LIMITED ONLY BY MOUNTAIN VIEW, SKYLINE VIEW
AND CIVIC CENTER PRESERVATION ORDINANCES
b. On the blocks between Lincoln and Broadway and outside of the north
and south gateways:
- MAXIMUM OF 3 OR 4 STORES ADJACENT TO THE
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cl A. *v ill IL X AInXj In JT JKV/I^i X. vJ£* AXn Uir c il - MAXIMUM OF 12 STORIES BEHIND AN UPPER-LEVEL
SETBACK
c. On the east side of Lincoln and outside of the north and south
gateways:
- MAXIMUM OF 2 TO 4 STORIES
d. Buildings facing Acoma and outside of the north and south gateways:
- MID-RISE OR HIGH-RISE BUILDINGS
5. DENSITY
a. DENSITY ESTABLISHED BY HEIGHT LIMITATIONS
6. SETBACKS
a. RESIDENTIAL AND BOULEVARD SETBACKS THROUGHOUT THE
DISTRICT
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96.



B. SHERMAN DISTRICT
DESCRIPTION
The Sherman District is on the west side of the neighborhood. It is one block wide,
bounded on the west by the alley between Sherman and Lincoln and on the east by the alley
between Sherman and Grant. It extends for five blocks, from Eighth Avenue on the south
to Thirteenth Avenue on the north.
The District extends along Sherman Street, a two-way north-south street, unusual in an area
predominated by one-way streets. As defined, it is bounded on the north and south by one-
way streets (Eighth and Thirteenth), but has only two-way streets intersecting it.
The district is zoned R-4, with the exception of the northern edge, which is zoned B-2. R-4
is a very high density apartment and office zone district, while B-2 is defined as a
neighborhood business zone district.
Sherman Street is the westernmost outpost of the residential character of the neighborhood.
The street is tree-lined and bordered by low-rise apartment buildings, including Poets Row,
a collection of apartment buildings named for famous poets and literary figures. With the
Capitol on the northern termination of the street, Cherry Creek on the southern
termination, its historic and low-rise buildings, its street tree canopy, and its residential
character, Sherman is a significant asset to the neighborhood. The intensity of uses allowed
by the R-4 zoning of district, however, threatens the character of Sherman. Intrusions have
already appeared on the northern end of the district where buildings have been demolished
for surface parking lots and where apartments have been converted to offices.
VISION
North of Ninth Avenue, Sherman will be a residential and civic street. Between Eighth and
Ninth Avenues, Sherman will build upon the character provided by the Colorado Institute
of Art. The street will also function as a north-south pedestrian and bicycle connection
between the neighborhood, the Capitol complex, and Downtown. A pedestrian scale,
residential setbacks, and landscaped tree lawns will help retain the residential character of
the street. The view from the street to the Capitol will be highlighted. North of Ninth
Avenue, vacant lots will be replaced by residential structures. Parking lots and parking
structures will be set back from the sidewalk, landscaped, and further buffered from the
street and adjoining properties.
97.


SHERMAN DISTRICT ISSUE 3: Street trees are particularly important to Sherman: they
are essential to creating the residential character of the street and they frame the view of
the Capitol. Currently, however, there are not enough trees along the street, particularly
on the north end of the street, north of 10th Avenue. Furthermore, many of the existing
street trees are the wrong species for the street: they are so large that they block the view
from the south to the Capitol.
SHERMAN DISTRICT RECOMMENDATION 3:
PLANT A DOUBLE ROW OF TREES
Replace overgrown, sick, and out-of-scale trees with a double
row of trees along the full length of the street, from Speer to
the Capitol. Insist on more uniformity of species. Flowering
trees, such as the Bradford Pear, would be desirable.
SHERMAN DISTRICT ISSUE 4: There are gaps in the streetscape created by vacant lots,
which are currently used as surface parking lots.
SHERMAN DISTRICT RECOMMENDATION 4:
ENCOURAGE LOW SCALE, RESIDENTIAL INFILL DEVELOPMENT
In the 900 to 1300 blocks of Sherman, encourage high density,
low scale residential infill development.
99.


ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS
SHERMAN DISTRICT ISSUE 1: The current zoning allows uses which are more intense
than the current and desired uses. The setback, floor area ratio, open space, and bulk limit
requirements of the current zoning will create a more intense urban character than currently
exists or is desired for the street.
SHERMAN DISTRICT RECOMMENDATION la:
REZONE FOR CONFORMITY
Rezone to bring the zoning into conformity with the existing
and desired uses, scale, and character.
SHERMAN DISTRICT RECOMMENDATION lb:
ESTABLISH A DESIGN REVIEW ZONING OVERLAY
Establish a design review overlay for the zoning on Sherman.
The design guidelines should give priority to retaining the
residential / civic character of the street and protecting the
current scale, setbacks, etc.
SHERMAN DISTRICT RECOMMENDATION lc:
EXPAND UPON THE ALLOWABLE USES IN THE 800 BLOCK OF
SHERMAN
In conjunction with reducing the allowable Floor Area Ratio
(FAR), in the 800 block of Sherman look favorably upon PUD
applications for mixed-use developments which include limited
retail uses which would build upon the character and use of the
Colorado Institute of Art. Antique stores, art galleries, small
coffee houses, and similar uses might be appropriate for this
area.
SHERMAN DISTRICT ISSUE 2: Because of the location, surrounding land uses, and
zoning, structures along Sherman are vulnerable to demolition and replacement by parking
lots or by larger and taller buildings with less open space and smaller setbacks. Loss of
these buildings would lead to a dramatic change in character for the street, and thus, for the
entire neighborhood.
SHERMAN DISTRICT RECOMMENDATION 2:
DESIGNATE SHERMAN A DENVER LANDMARK DISTRICT
Designate the 900 1400 blocks of Sherman a Denver
Landmark District. Include a height limit as part of the criteria
for new development in the district.
98.


GENERAL ZONING RECOMMENDATIONS
1. USES
a. North of 12th Avenue: STATE OFFICES AND RESIDENTIAL
b. 9th Avenue to 12th Avenue: RESIDENTIAL
c. 8th Avenue to 9th Avenue: MIXED-USE RESIDENTIAL /
LIMITED RETAIL / OFFICE /SCHOOL-RELATED
2. RESIDENTIAL OCCUPANCY
SINGLES / COUPLES
YOUNG ADULTS / ADULTS / ELDERLY
STUDIO / 1-2 BEDROOM UNITS
3. OPEN SPACE
FRONT YARDS
ATTTnAAD HFrUITATTAM ADFAC
NO BALCONIES
4 HEIGHT
a. North of 13th Avenue: LIMITED ONLY BY MOUNTAIN VIEW AND
SKYLINE VIEW PRESERVATION ORDINANCES
b. South of 13th Avenue: UNIFORM HEIGHT FOR AN INITIAL
SETBACK, AND AN ADDITIONAL ALLOWANCE FOR A SECOND
SETBACK, NOT TO EXCEED 75 FEET
5. DENSITY
a. North of 13th Avenue: 4:1 FAR
b. South of 13th Avenue: 2:1 FAR
6. SETBACKS
MAINTAIN THE MOST PREVALENT CURRENT SETBACK BETWEEN
BUILDINGS AND THE STREET
100.


1
r. GRANT / LOGAN DISTRICT
DESCRIPTION
The Grant / Logan District is on the west side of the neighborhood. It is two blocks wide,
bounded on the west by the alley between Grant and Sherman and on the east by the alley
between Logan and Pennsylvania. It extends for five blocks, from Eighth Avenue on the
south to Thirteenth Avenue on the north.
Grant and Logan are both one-way streets, Grant southbound and Logan northbound.
While the district is bounded on the north by one-way streets, the cross streets in the district
are all two-way streets.
The zoning in the district is a combination of R-3 and R-4, with Grant being zoned primarily
R-4, with the area along Thirteenth zoned B-2, and Logan zoned primarily R-3, with two
small extensions of R-4 between Eighth and Ninth. R-3 is a high density apartment district
and R-4 a very high density apartment and office district.
The common character of the district is created by the one-way street pair, Grant and
Logan, since the zoning and the resulting land uses and image of the two streets vary
significantly. Grant, being zoned R-4, is lined with offices, surface parking lots, office
conversions, hotels, and apartments. Logan is predominantly residential, and includes both
high density apartments and lower density uses, including apartment conversions of single
family homes. Logan is narrower, with a good street tree canopy, while Grant is wider and
has lost most of its street tree canopy. Despite these differences, however, Grant and Logan
have enough commonalties to form a district distinct from the surrounding districts.
VISION
While Grant will experience significant residential, hotel, and office redevelopment, Logan
will stabilize as a medium to high density residential street. Historic and other significant
structures will be preserved along both streets, helping to create the distinct residential
character of the district. The tree canopy will be re-established along Grant and preserved
along Logan.
101.


ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS
GRANT / LOGAN DISTRICT ISSUE 1: Grant Street has the character of an urban,
mixed-use street. It has high intensity zoning which allows residential, office, hotel, and
limited retail uses. It also has a variety of land uses, a plethora of surface parking lots, and
several poorly maintained properties. As a result, it provides an opportunity for additional
development.
GRANT / LOGAN DISTRICT RECOMMENDATION la:
ENCOURAGE ADDITIONAL REDEVELOPMENT ON GRANT
Encourage additional redevelopment on Grant, particularly at
those sites currently used as surface parking lots.
GRANT / LOGAN DISTRICT RECOMMENDATION lb:
FOCUS ON GRANT FOR LARGE SCALE DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS
Focus on Grant Street as a location for large scale residential,
hotel, and residential / office / retail mixed-use projects.
GRANT / LOGAN DISTRICT ISSUE 2: Despite its mixture of uses, Grant projects an
image which is generally compatible with the residential character of the neighborhood.
GRANT / LOGAN DISTRICT RECOMMENDATION ISSUE 2:
ENHANCE THE RESIDENTIAL CHARACTER OF GRANT
Enhance the residential character of Grant Street by requiring
residential setbacks and intense landscaping for new buildings
and for parking lots and structures.
GRANT / LOGAN DISTRICT ISSUE 3: Generally, uses along Logan are stable and well
maintained. As a result, the street provides a healthy edge for the residential section of the
neighborhood.
GRANT / LOGAN DISTRICT RECOMMENDATION 3:
DISCOURAGE ADDITIONAL REDEVELOPMENT ALONG LOGAN
With the exception of small infill projects, discourage additional
redevelopment along Logan, and reinforce the quality of the
existing development.
102.


GENERAL ZONING RECOMMENDATIONS
1. USES
a. Grant: RESIDENTIAL, HOTEL, AND RESIDENTIAL /
OFFICE / RETAIL MIXED-USE PROJECTS
b. Logan: RESIDENTIAL
c. B-2: RETAIL AND RESIDENTIAL / RETAIL
MIXED-USE PROJECTS
2. RESIDENTIAL OCCUPANCY
SINGLES / COUPLES
YOUNG ADULTS, ADULTS, AND ELDERLY
STUDIO / 1-2 BEDROOM UNITS
3. OPEN SPACE
a. Grant: FRONT YARDS
OUTDOOR RECREATION AREAS
BALCONIES
4. HEIGHT
a. Grant: LIMITED ONLY BY MOUNTAIN VIEW AND SKYLINE
VIEW PRESERVATION ORDINANCES
b. Logan: LIMITED ONLY BY MOUNTAIN VIEW AND SKYLINE
VIEW PRESERVATION ORDINANCE
5. DENSITY
a. Grant: 3:1 FAR
. I^^3 gan il
c. B-2: RETAIL DENSITY: 1:1 FAR; the density of residential or
residential/retail mixed-use projects shall not exceed a 3:1 FAR,
with the retail component of such projects not exceeding a 1:1 FAR.
6. SETBACKS
a. Grant: RESIDENTIAL
b. Logan: RESIDENTIAL
103.


D. CAPITOL DISTRICT
DESCRIPTION
The Capitol District forms the northwest comer of the neighborhood. It is bounded on the
west by Broadway, on the east by Downing, on the north by Colfax, and on the south by
Thirteenth Avenue.
The district is severely impacted by traffic. All three east-west streets are heavily travelled:
East Colfax (a two-way commercial street and State Highway), Fourteenth (an eastbound
one-way street), and Thirteenth (a westbound one-way street). Eight north south one-
way streets cross the district: Broadway (southbound), Lincoln (northbound), Grant
(southbound), Logan (northbound), Washington (southbound), Clarkson (northbound), ;
Corona (southbound), and Downing (northbound). Only five of the streets in the district
have two-way, local, traffic.
The zoning in the district decreases in intensity from west (R-4, very high density apartment
and office district) to east (R-3, a high density apartment district). Zoning on the northern
edge along East Colfax is primarily B-4, a general business district, and zoning on the
southern edge along Thirteenth includes two areas of B-2, a neighborhood business district.
Adjacent to Downtown and the State Capitol Complex, zoned R-4 as far west as the alley
between Pennsylvania and Pearl, largely outside the boundaries for the Cheesman Park
Mountain View Preservation Ordinance, and heavily impacted by traffic on one-way streets,
the district has been subject to speculative purchases, demolition, the loss of housing units,
the replacement of buildings by surface parking lots, lower levels of maintenance, and the
construction of office structures which are incompatible with its historic character.
Simultaneous with these actions, the district has deteriorated as a desirable residential area.
Because of its location and its historic legacy, however, the health of the district as a
residential area is critical not only to the neighborhood but also to Downtown. Its location
and legacy create challenges and opportunities; while the district has numerous problems,
it also has tremendous potential.
VISIONS
The Capitol District will stabilize as a desirable, well maintained medium density residential,
office, and retail area with a diversity of rental and owner-occupied housing opportunities
for singles and couples of various ages and income levels. The impact of traffic along 13th,
14th, and Colfax Avenues will be mitigated. While there will be office and commercial
redevelopment and infill west of Logan, the historic and residential character of the district
will be preserved. The retail areas in the district will be more inviting for pedestrians and
will function more effectively than they do now as focal points for the district. Transit will
be readily accessible and the parking demand will be accommodated. Pedestrian access to
the Civic Center and Downtown will be improved.
104.


ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS
CAPITOL DISTRICT ISSUE 1: While the Capitol District has great opportunities,
locational advantages, and tremendous historic and human resources, it also is experiencing
the greatest deterioration of any of the districts and is faced with serious social issues.
CAPITOL DISTRICT RECOMMENDATION la:
ESTABLISH A COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION (CDC)
Establish a Capitol District Corporation (CDC). Fund the
CDC with assistance from the major institutions and property
owners in the District. Coordinate the functions of the CDC
with the neighborhood organizations, the City, major institutions
in the District, residents, business owners, and other property
owners. Hire an executive director for the CDC.
CAPITOL DISTRICT RECOMMENDATION lb:
ESTABLISH A PERMANENT WORKING RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN
THE NEIGHBORHOOD AND THE INSTITUTIONS
Take advantage of the CDC to establish permanent
relationships between the neighborhood organizations and the
major institutions in the neighborhood.
CAPITOL DISTRICT ISSUE 2: There are an increasing number of deteriorated, vacant,
and boarded-up buildings.
CAPITOL DISTRICT RECOMMENDATION 2:
FOCUS HOUSING PROGRAMS ON THE DISTRICT
Focus existing City Housing programs on the District; expand
existing programs: and devise new programs to respond to
neighborhood needs.
CAPITOL DISTRICT ISSUE 3: The commercial area on 13th Avenue between
Washington and Pennsylvania, although vibrant, has severe problems due to lack of parking,
sidewalks too narrow for pedestrian appeal, and a deteriorating environment.
CAPITOL DISTRICT RECOMMENDATION 3a:
REINFORCE THE 13TH AVENUE COMMERCIAL DISTRICT
Reinforce the 13th Avenue commercial district as a
concentration of unique retail, restaurant, and entertainment
uses.
105.


CAPITOL DISTRICT RECOMMENDATION 3b:
RTITUTD TWIT CTT1PWAI If 1?PAM TPAPTtr HW 11TH
ourriLiv inL aiujDTYAijiv riu/iu iaatriv_, uii uin
As an interim improvement, allow off-peak parking on the
south side of 13th Avenue in order to provide a buffer between
the sidewalk and traffic.
CAPITOL DISTRICT RECOMMENDATION 3c:
INSTALL DISTINCTIVE STREETSCAPE IMPROVEMENTS
Design and install streetscape improvements which are
consistent with the unique character of the area, something
distinct from the improvements in the remainder of the
neighborhood. Consider a "neon" design theme, or another
distinctive theme which will impart the idea that the area is
entertainment-oriented.
GENERAL ZONING RECOMMENDATIONS
1. USES
a. West of the Logan-Pennsylvania alley: MULTIPLE-FAMILY
RESIDENTIAL, OFFICE, AND RETAIL
b. East of the Logan-Pennsylvania alley:
- Retail areas: RETAIL
Residential areas: MULTIPLE-FAMILY RESIDENTIAL
2. RESIDENTIAL OCCUPANCY
a. West of the Logan-Pennsylvania alley: Singles / Couples
b. East of the Logan-Pennsylvania alley: Singles / Couples
3. OPEN SPACE
FRONT YARDS
OUTDOOR RECREATION AREAS
BALCONIES
4. HEIGHT
LIMITED BY MOUNTAIN VIEW AND SKYLINE VIEW PRESERVATION
ORDINANCES
5. DENSITY
a. West of the Logan-Pennsylvania alley: 3:1 FAR
b. East of the Logan-Pennsylvania alley: 2:1 FAR
6. SETBACKS
a. Residential and office areas: RESIDENTIAL
b. Retail areas: RETAIL
106.


Full Text

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CAPITOL HILL CHEESMAN PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN PLANNING AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OFFICE CITY AND COUNTY OF DENVER JUNE 28, 1993

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CAPITOL HILL/ CHEES:MAN PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN CAPITOL HILL CHEESMAN PARK

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TABLE OF CONTENTS TITLE ____________________________________________________ PAGE INTRODUCTION A. The Vision for Capitol Hill and Cheesman Park . . . . 1 B. Organization and Use of this Plan .............................. 2 C. Relationship to Other Plans . . . . . . . . 3 D. The Planning Process . . . . . . . . . 3 E. The History of Capitol Hill and Cheesman Park . . . . 3 F. The Setting for Capitol Hill and Cheesman Park . . . . 6 I. FRAMEWORK PLAN 13 A. I.a.nd Use ................................................ 18 1. Housing . . . . . . . . . . . 23 I i 2. Density .............................................. 25 3. Vacant and Abandoned Buildings .......................... 25 4. Businesses ............................................ 26 5. Mixed-Use Developments ................................ 29 6. Assemblages .......................................... 30 7. Community Facilities .................................... 30 B. Zoning . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 C. Character and Form ........................................ 42 1. Historic Presexvation . . . . . . . . 44 2. I...a.ndscaping . . . . . . . . . . 46 3. Parks and Recreation ................................... 51 4. Open Space . . . . . . . . . . 53 5. Pedestrian Orientation ................................... 54 6. Neighborhood Edge ..................................... 54 7. I..a.ndform ............................................ 56 8. Urban Design. . . . . . . . . . . 56 D. Circulation ............................................... 57 1. Circulation Studies ..................................... 58 2. Streets . . . . . . . . . . . 65 3. Pedestrians and Bicycles ..... ............................ 67 4. Transit .............................................. 69 5. Parking .............................................. 71 E. Community Services . . . . . . . . . . 7 4 1. Schools .............................................. 75 2. Crime Prevention . . . . . . . . . 77 3. Special Populations ..................................... 78 F. Environment .............................................. 80 1. Graffiti .............................................. 80 2. Trash Collection . . . . . . . . . 81

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3. Street Sweeping . . . . . . . . . . 82 4. Snow Removal ........................................ 82 5. Pet Care ............................................. 83 6. Noise ............................................... 83 II. DISTRICT PLAN 85 A. Broadway I Lincoln . . . . . . . . . . 90 B. Sherman ................................................. 97 C. Grant I l....<>gan . . . . . . . . . . . 101 D. Capitol District ............................................ 104 E. Heart of Capitol Hill . . . . . . . . . . 107 F. Cheesman North . . . . . . . . . . 110 G. Cheesman West . . . . . . . . . . . 112 H. Botanic Gardens . . . . . . . . . . 114 I. Morgan's Addition .......................................... 117 J. 7th Avenue I Country Club North .............................. 120 K. 7th Avenue West ........................................... 122 L. Governor's Park ........................................... 124 -III. FOCUS AREA PLAN 135 A 9th and Corona . . . . . . . . . . . 138 B. 11th and Ogden ............................................ 146 C. 6th Avenue .................. . . . . . . . 150 D. East Colfax I Park Avenue ................................... 156 E. East Colfax I Esplanade ..................................... 159 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS .............................................. 165

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LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS I. FRAMEWORK PLAN 13 OVERALL NEIGHBORHOOD CONCEPTS . . . . . 15 LAND USE GENERAUZED EXISTING LAND USE . . . . . 19 BUILDING FABRIC ....................................... 21 NEW DEVELOPMENT S1RATEGY . . . . . . 27 ZONING EXISTING ZONING AND MOUNTAIN VIEW ORDINANCE . 33 EXISTING HEIGHT LIMITS IN NEIGHBORHOOD . . . 35 BUILDING HEIGHT S1RATEGY . . . . . . . 37 FORM CIRCUlATION EXISTING STREET SYSTEM ................................ 61 EXISTING ONE-WAY STREETS ............................. 63 II. DISTRICT PLANS 85 DISTRICf BOUNDARIES (S1UDY SUBAREAS) . . . . 87 GOVERNOR'S PARK SUBAREA FORM ANALYSIS .......................................... 127 GOVERNOR'S PARK URBAN DESIGN IDEAS .................. 129 III. FOCUS AREA PLANS 135 9TII AND CORONA FOCUS AREA URBAN DESIGN IDEAS ..................................... 139 EAST COLFAX/ ESPLANADE FOCUS AREA URBAN DESIGN IDEAS ..................... ................ 161

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INTRODUCTION -

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A. THE VISION FOR CAPITOL HILL AND CHEESMAN PARK Capitol Hill and Cheesman Park neighborhoods are unique. With a mixture of single-family and multiple-family housing, they are the most densely populated neighborhoods in Denver. Home to a wealth of late 19th century and early 20th century residential, commercial, and public structures, they provide an irreplaceable historic resource for the City. Located between Downtown Denver, the State Capitol complex, and the Cherry Creek shopping district, they create a housing base for the region's largest employment and retail centers. The neighborhoods are home to the City's most diverse population: elderly, young, middle aged, single, married, physically disabled, homeless, mentally disabled, runaway youth, wealthy, poor, middle class, gay, straight, African-American, Native American, White, Asian, and Hispanic. Finally, because of their location, their zoning, and the supportive nature of their residents, Capitol Hill and Cheesman Park neighborhoods have a concentration of group homes and other social service facilities. Responding to these qualities, the vision for Capitol Hill and Cheesman Park neighborhoods has the following themes: o LIVABILI1Y: The neighborhoods will be reinforced as an inviting, well maintained, safe, and comfortable living environment for individuals and families of diverse ages, capabilities, incomes, lifestyles, and ethnic backgrounds. Schools, parks, transportation systems, retail businesses, and public and private maintenance programs will meet the needs of a diverse and dense urban residential neighborhood. o DIVERSI1Y: The rich mixture and diversity of age, lifestyle, ability, income, and ethnicity of residents will be encouraged and supported as valued characteristics of Capitol Hill and Cheesman Park neighborhoods. o HISTORIC CHARACTER: Parks, parkways, and historically and architecturally significant structures, streetscapes, and places will be preserved and enhanced. The design of new development and redevelopment will be compatible with the historic fabric of the neighborhoods. o DISTINCTION WITHIN A COMMON FRAMEWORK: While the distinct character of both neighborhoods and each of their sub-districts will be retained and enhanced, a common urban design framework will provide a cohesive visual image. 1

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B. ORGANIZATION AND USE OF THIS PLAN For simplification, this plan often refers to Capitol Hill and Cheesman Park as a single neighborhood. The Capitol Hill I Cheesman Park Neighborhood Plan has three major sections: the Framework Plan, the District Plans, and the Focus Area Plans. The Framework Plan presents the issues and recommendations which are relevant throughout the entire neighborhood and tie the neighborhood together. It provides a central theme or framework for the neighborhood, its districts, and focus areas. The District Plans establish twelve districts which have relatively distinct characteristics, acknowledging that the boundaries between the districts are not sacrosanct and that some characteristics overlap district boundaries. The District Plans present issues and recommendations which are supplemental to those presented in the Framework Plan. The Focus Area Plans establish five focus areas which are distinct from the character immediately surrounding them and provide important opportunities and challenges for the entire neighborhood. The Focus Area Plans present issues and recommendations which are supplemental to those included in the Framework and District Plans. The Capitol Hill I Cheesman Park Neighborhood Plan functions as the official planning document for the neighborhood. Adopted by City Council, it is an element of the City's Comprehensive Plan. As such, it is used by City agencies, organizations, and private developers. It provides guidance for public improvements, programs, and private development. The Neighborhood Plan is a guideline, not a regulation. Changes which it recommends for zoning or other City ordinances will require public notification and public hearings prior to their adoption and implementation. 2.

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I l [ C. RELATIONSHIP TO OTHER PLANS This plan updates the Capitol Hill and Cheesman Park neighborhood plans adopted in 1973. The 1973 plans were revised because the conditions, issues, and priorities in the neighborhoods have changed significantly and because the programs for implementing the plans have evolved. This and all other neighborhood plans are consistent with, and supplemental to, the City's Comprehensive Plan. The Comprehensive Plan presents a Citywide perspective, while each neighborhood plan provides more specific guidance both for the allocation of City resources and for the location and design of private development. Other planning documents which impact the neighborhood have been reviewed and relevant material has been incorporated in the development of this plan. The plans which were reviewed include the Denver Comprehensive Plan, the Downtown Area Plan, the Uptown Neighborhood Plan, the Draft Denver Parks Master Plan, and the Southeast Quadrant Study. D. 1HE PLANNING PROCESS This plan was sponsored by the Denver Planning and Community Development Office and was developed by a residents' planning committee. Capitol Hill United Neighborhoods (CHUN) provided essential coordination and resources. Representatives of Colfax-on-the Hill, Denver East Central Civic Association (DECCA), and Cheesman Area Residents Association provided valuable assistance. Graduate students from the Planning Studio II at the University of Colorado at Denver, School of Architecture and Planning, provided an excellent first draft of the revised neighborhood plan for Capitol Hill. E. 1HE HISTORY OF CAPITOL HILL AND CHEESMAN PARK Capitol Hill and C:heesman Park are two of the oldest residential neighborhoods in Denver and provide an irreplaceable legacy for the City. The impetus for development of Capitol Hill was largely the work of two men, Horace A. W. Tabor and Henry C. Brown. Until Tabor's arrival in the 1880's, Denver's growth had been northwest, nearer to the South Platte River. Tabor bought land east of Larimer Street and wanted the City to develop in an easterly direction. To encourage such growth, he built the famous Tabor Grand Opera House on the corner of 16th and Curtis Streets. About this time, building began on the site Henry C. Brown donated to the State of Colorado for the Capitol, on the brow of a hill looking west toward the mountains. The 3.

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ridge was known as Brown's Bluff, a Victorian double entendre indicting the folly of developing land so far off course from the downtown of the City. These two acts served to tum the growth of Denver's business district eastward. As the business district advanced, the residential section moved before it and occupied the high prairie known as Capitol Hill. By the end of the 1880's, Capitol Hill was completely platted and a sizable amount of development had occurred east of the Capitol and along the trolley lines which ran on East Colfax Avenue as far east as Alta Street, now known as Ogden Street. At this point, East Colfax Avenue was the City's premier residential street, home to some of Denver's most prominent families. While during this period, Denver's wealthy built their mansions on Capitol Hill, the neighborhood was also home to many of the City's middle class. The architecture of the houses and of the commercial and public buildings reflected the diversity of the neighborhood and the eclecticism of the time, including Neoclassical, Colonial Revival, French, Italian Renaissance, Mission Revival, Craftsman, and Queen Anne designs. While the Victorianera building boom ended with the panic of 1893, the prominence of Capitol Hill as the fashionable residential area continued until after the tum of the century. After the panic, many of the single-family houses were converted to boarding houses. At the same time, investors, attracted by the prestige of Capitol Hill and by its proximity to Downtown, began building apartments in the neighborhood. In 1902, as apartment houses replaced single8family houses on Broadway and East Colfax, The Denver Times referred to the neighborhood as "flatberg". As the City grew and prospered and as more apartment buildings were built in the neighborhood, the wealthy began to move further east and south to the Cheesman Park and Country Club neighborhoods. The first subdivision plat in the Cheesman Park neighborhood was recorded in 1868, and by the end of the 1880's the entire neighborhood was platted and sparse development had occurred. The Session Laws of 1883 annexed the majority of the neighborhood to the City. The Cheesman Park neighborhood was almost totally developed by 1915, and was characterized by large homes for the wealthy. The land that is now Cheesman Park and the Botanic Gardens was platted in 1859 by General William Larimer and his son as Mount Prospect Cemetery. It was later described as a "crowded, confused bone yard overrun with weeds and livestock." Given to the City for use as a cemetery in 1872 by a Congressional grant, in 1893, Congress awarded a grant to permit the use of the site as a park. The residents of the cemetery were then moved to Riverside, Fairmount, and Mount Olivet cemeteries. The entire park was called Congress Park unti11907, when the western section was named Cheesman Park in honor of Walter S. Cheesman, an early water and real estate tycoon. The Cheesman Park Pavilion -was completed in 1910. It was not until 1958, that the City finished removal of the graves from the site of the Botanic Gardens and the development of the arboretum began. 4.

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Jl I The character of Capitol Hill changed rapidly after 1910. As early as 1929, Denver's first Master Plan described East Colfax as "formerly a principal residential street, and now, in larger part, zoned for business and the principal artery through the Capitol Hill apartment district." The conversion of single-family houses to apartments increased during World War II when Capitol Hill provided rooms and apartments for people who could not find housing elsewhere. What started as legally non-conforming apartments and apartment conversions of single-family houses were legally recognized in 1955 when most of the neighborhood was rezoned for high density residential uses (primarily, the R-3 zone district). This zoning, combined with the high real estate values created by the neighborhood's central location and proximity to Downtown, spurred the construction of additional apartment buildings and the additional conversion of single-family homes to apartments. This trend continued through the 1960's, until the movement toward citizen activism and a renewed interest in historic preservation and inner-city living led to a significant number of people questioning the future of the neighborhood and actively involving themselves in that future. In 1969, Reverend Bob Musil of Warren Methodist Church organized a group of concerned neighbors to fight the proposed conversion of East 11th and 12th Avenues into one-way streets. Encouraged by their success in this effort, the Capitol Hill Congress evolved, later to become Capitol Hill United Neighborhoods (CHUN). Also during 1969, Molly Brown's house was threatened by demolition, leading to the formation of Historic Denver and the preservation of Molly's house as a museum. The Denver Planning Office and the neighborhood residents worked together to develop the 1973 neighborhood plans, which were designed to "encouraged and reinforce continuing private redevelopment which will complement the unique character" of the neighborhoods. In 1974, CHUN took responsibility for running the Capitol Hill People's Fair, which quickly grew into a citywide event, attracting more than 250,000 people to its annual spring celebration. In 1975, the Denver Landmark Commission approved the status of Dora Moore School as a Denver Historic Landmark and in 1977 the Denver School Board appropriated funds for the renovation of the school, culminating a long effort by the students of Dora Moore School and the residents of the neighborhood to preserve and renovate the school. Also in 1977, homeowners around the 1100 blocks of Vine and Gaylord successfully petitioned City Council to downzone their property from R-3 to R-2, as recognition of their desire to retain the low density residential character of the area. Combined, all of these actions indicated a resurgence of energy and a rededication to the neighborhood. They have been followed by the continuing revitalization of East Colfax and other retail areas as high quality neighborhood shopping districts, the renovation of single family and multi-family houses and apartments, the conversion of multi-family units back to single-family units, the return of families to the neighborhood, a process for conversion of two of the one-way streets, the rezoning of other areas to lower zone districts to protect the existing low density residential uses, and numerous other actions which indicate the health of the neighborhoods. 5.

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F. THE SETIING FOR CAPITOL HILL AND CHEESMAN PARK 1. LOCATION OF THE NEIGHBORHOODS Capitol Hill adjoins the southeast comer of Downtown Denver; Cheesman Park extends to the east of Capitol Hill. The official boundaries of Capitol Hill are Broadway on the west, Seventh Avenue on the south, Downing on the east, and Colfax on the north. The official boundaries of the Cheesman Park neighborhood are Downing on the west, Eighth Avenue on the south, York Street on the east, and Colfax on the north. Because the neighborhood tends to define itself as continuing south at least to Sixth Avenue and functions as though it extends to Sixth, the study area for this plan includes this area. The study area extends at least one block beyond all the stated boundaries in order to emphasize connections between the adjoining neighborhoods and Capitol Hill and Cheesman Park. 2. DISTRICTS WITHIN THE NEIGHBORHOODS Capitol Hill and Cheesman Park have within their boundaries sub-areas, or districts, with distinct characteristics, issues, and opportunities. 'fhis plan explores each of these districts and recommends for each unique standards for land uses, open space, building height, density, and setbacks. 3. EXISTING CHARACTER OF TilE NEIGHBORHOODS a. RESIDENTS o DECLINING POPULATION: Between 1970 and 1985, Capitol Hill and Cheesman Park each experienced a drop in population, together declining from a population of 26,730 in 1970 to an estimated population in 1985 of 21,808, a decrease of 4,922 people, 18% of the 1970 population. This trend is expected to slow, with the 1990 population projected to be 21,214. o SMALLER HOUSEHOLDS: There are fewer people in the average household in both Capitol Hill and Cheesman Park than in the average household in Denver as a whole. The average number of persons per household in both the City and the neighborhoods is declining; the average number of persons per household in both neighborhoods dropped from 1.5 in 1970 to 1.3 in 1980 and is estimated at 1.2 for 1985. The 1985 estimate for Denver as a whole is 2.2 persons per household. 6.

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o FEWER HOUSEHOLDS: Between 1980 and 1985, the total number of households is estimated to have declined in both Capitol Hill and Cheesman Park, for a total decline from 15,458 households to 14,733 households. o INCREASING INCOMES: Generally, the median household income in Capitol Hill and Cheesman Park is estimated to have increased between 1980 and 1985, with only one census tract (32.01 West Cheesman Park) showing a decrease. While the estimated household income is lower than for the City as a whole (except for 32.02 -East Cheesman Park, where it is higher), the estimated 1985 per capita income is higher in the neighborhoods than for the City as a whole in all five census tracts. The most dramatic change, however, occurred in 32.01 (West Cheesman Park), where the per capita income is estimated to have dropped from $18,276 to $12,646 (both in 1985 dollars). b. LAND USE AND ZONING o HIGH DENSITY HOUSING: With the mixture of high-rise, mid-rise, and low-rise apartments; townhouses; apartment conversions of single-family houses; and single-family homes, Capitol Hill is the most densely populated neighborhood in the City. Cheesman Park is the third most densely populated neighborhood in the City. The census tracts in Capitol Hill (27.03, 27.01, and 27.02) are the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd most densely populated in the City, respectively. Census tract 27.03 (northeastern Capitol Hill) is the most densely populated census tract in the neighborhood and the City and has an estimated 1985 population density of 19,663 dwelling units per square mile. The census tracts in Cheesman Park (32.02, and 32.01) are the 5th and 6th most densely populated in the City, respectively. Census tract 32.01 (western Cheesman Park) is the least densely populated census tract in the neighborhoods and has a population density of 11,293 dwelling units per square mile. The density of the City as a whole is 2,333 dwelling units per square mile. o HIGHER PERCENTAGE OF MULTIPLE .. FAMILY AND HIGH DENSI1Y ZONING: In Capitol Hill and Cheesman Park, 63% of the total area is zoned for multiple family and high density residential uses (77% in Capitol Hill and 47% in Cheesman Park}. Only 17% of the City as a whole is zoned for multiple-family and high density housing. The majority of the zoning in the neighborhoods is accounting for 52% of the total area. c. HOUSING o OLDER HOUSING STOCK: The average age of the residential structures in Capitol Hill and Cheesman Park is 45 years ( 48 years for Capitol Hill and 44 years for Cheesman Park), while the average age for residential structures in the City as a whole is 39 years. o SMALLER DWELLING UNITS: The average size of the dwelling units in Capitol Hill is 864 square feet (784 square feet for Capitol Hill and 1019 square feet for Cheesman Park). The average size for the City as a whole is 1024 square feet. 7.

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o MORE RENTEROCCUPIED UNITS: In Capitol Hill and Cheesman Park, 86% of all the dwelling units are (89% in Capitol Hill and 81% in Cheesman Park). For the City as a whole, 52% of the units are and 48% are owner-occupied. d. HISTORIC DISTRICTS AND STRUCTURES o DESIGNATED DENVER HISTORIC DISTRICTS: The Capitol Hill / Cheesman Park neighborhood has three designated Denver Historic Districts within its boundaries: the Civic Center, Humboldt Street, and Morgan's Subdivision districts. o DESIGNATED DENVER LANDMARKS: In addition to the historic districts, the neighborhood has more than 50 designated structures and landmarks, including houses"' schools, churches, and parks. Notable among these are the Molly Brown House, the Cheesman-Boettcher (Governor's) mansion, Saint John's Cathedral, the Botanic Gardens, and the Cheesman Pavilion. Several of the structures have approved "use exceptions", allowing their use as offices or art galleries, uses otherwise not allowed within their respective zone districts. e. PUBLIC FACILITIES o COMMUNITY CENTER: The Capitol Hill Community Center is located in the Tears McFarlane House at 1290 Williams, adjacent to the north edge of Cheesman Park. Run by the Board of Directors of the non-profit Capitol Hill Community Center, Inc., the Center provides space for the offices and activities of a diversity of neighborhood and special interest organizations and functions. o FIRE PROTECI'ION: There are no fire stations located within the neighborhood. The closest stations are located at 1616 Park Avenue, 40 West 2nd Avenue, 14th and Harrison, and Speer and West Colfax. o PARKS AND RECREATION FACILITIES: The neighborhood has, within and adjacent to its boundaries, several of the finest parks within Denver. BOTANIC GARDENS Located between Cheesman and Congress Parks, the Botanic Gardens provide 21.9 acres of both outdoor and indoor gardens With exotic and native plants, all with dramatic views of the mountains and skyline. The Gardens host a series of summer concerts. CHEESMAN PARK Having been described as a national treasure, Cheesman Park is the psychological heart of the neighborhood. With 80.7 acres in the main park and 3.7 acres in its Williams Street Parkway esplanade, Cheesman is primarily a passive neighborhood park containing a children's playground, a walking/jogging trail, expansive lawns, impressive, protected, view of the mountains and skyline from the Cheesman Pavili?n. Historically, Cheesman Park was the site of the Denver Post Opera, an annual event which 8.

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..-; I produced Broadway plays at the Cheesman Pavilion. In more recent years, Cheesman has been the location of a summer concert series sponsored by the Capitol Hill Community Center. CITY PARK Two blocks from the neighborhood, City Park is the largest and most significant park within the City. With a total of 484.2 acres, City Park is an active park, containing the Denver Museum of Natural History, the Denver Zoo, an eighteen hole golf course, lakes, a band shell, monumental sculptures, flower gardens, tennis courts, baseball and softball diamonds, walking/jogging trail, children's playground, and a protected view of the mountains and skyline. CMC CENTER Located at the northwest comer of the neighborhood, Civic Center combines with the Colorado Capitol complex and the State's Lincoln Park (between Lincoln and Broadway, 14th and Colfax) to form the nucleus for State and City governmental offices and facilities, including the State Capitol, the City and County Building, Denver Art Museum, the central branch of the Denver Public Library, the Colorado History Museum, RID's Civic Center Station, and the Colorado Supreme Court. Formerly the site of housing and commercial buildings, the Civic Center was developed as an urban renewal project at the beginning of the 20th Century. Within its 18.2 acres, the Civic Center contains a Greek Theater and numerous monuments. Primarily a passive park, the Civic Center has in the last few years served as the location for numerous Citywide festivals, including the annual Capitol Hill People's Fair and the Taste of Colorado. CONGRESS PARK Immediately to the east of the Botanic Gardens, Congress Park is adjacent to the neighborhood and functions as the primary site of active recreation for the Cheesman Park/Botanic Gardens/Congress Park complex. With 20.0 acres, Congress Park contains an outdoor swimming pool, tennis courts, a baseball diamond, and a children's playground. GOVERNOR'S PARK A relatively new park, Governor's Park was an urban renewal project in 1966. Combined with the adjacent Humphrey's Mansion Park, developed in 1977, Governor's Park provides a focal point for the southwest corner of the neighborhood and a setting for both the Governor's Mansion and the Humphrey's Mansion, a property belonging to the Colorado Historic Society. With a total of 4.4 acres, this is a passive park with lawns, trees, and benches. QUALITY HILL PARK A new mini-park located at lOth and Pennsylvania, Quality Hill Park includes grass, trees, benches, and a flower display planted by its neighbors. SEVENTH AVENUE PARKWAY Stretching from Williams Street east to Colorado Boulevard, Seventh Avenue Parkway is part of a parkway system which connects Cheesman Park, the Williams Street Esplanade and Parkway, Downing Street Parkway, Marion Street Parkway, Washington Park, Botanic Gardens, Congress Park, Sixth Avenue Parkway, Clermont Street Parkway, and Cranmer Park. Heavily landscaped and well maintained, Seventh Avenue Parkway is a focal point for the southeast corner of the neighborhood. 9.

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ZECKENDORF PARK A mini-park adjacent to Speer Boulevard as it passes through the neighborhood between Lincoln and Broadway, Zeckendorf Park was dedicated in 1966 with a statue and a landscaped backdrop. o POLICE PROTECTION: East Colfax divides Police District 2 (north of Colfax) from District 3 (south of Colfax). The headquarters for District 3 is at 1625 South University. o RECREATION CENTER: There is no City recreation center in or near the neighborhood. o SCHOOLS: There are two schools-one elementary school and one middle school. within the boundaries of the neighborhood. Four other schoolsthree elementary and one high school are just beyond the neighborhood boundaries. Dora Moore Elementary, at 846 Corona, was built in 1889 with a second, attached, building constructed in 1909. Doni Moore has a capacity for 796 students. A designated Denver Historic Landmark, the school is a highly visible symbol of the pride the neighborhood takes in its children, its history, and its diversity. Morey Middle School, 840 East 14th Avenue, was constructed in 1921 and expanded in 1926. With a capacity of 968 students, the school is an important focal point in the neighborhood's northwest comer, the "Capitol District". The four schools located just beyond the neighborhood boundaries are Bromwell Elementary at 2500 East Fourth Avenue, Wyman Elementary at 1630 Williams, and East High School at 1545 Detroit. f. MOVEMENT o STREETS: The Capitol Hill/Cheesman Park neighborhood has ten north-south and four east-west one-way streets within its boundaries. East Colfax, one of the City' major arterials, provides the northern boundary for the neighborhood. A report prepared by Denver Public Works, Transportation Division, in February 1988 for the Southeast Quadrant Study provides both average daily traffic volumes for 1988 and projected average traffic volumes for 2010 for these and other streets in the southeast quadrant of metropolitan Denver. The projected volumes were developed using several assumptions about changes in land use, transit, ride sharing, and the roadway network. Readers should refer to the final report of the Southeast Quadrant Study for a complete explanation of the methodology used to develop the projections. 1988 traffic volumes for the north-south one-way streets in the neighborhood totaled almost one and one-half times the volume of the east-west one-way streets and East Colfax. Together, the north-south and east-west one-way streets and East Colfax carried in excess of 240,000 vehicles per day through the neighborhood in 1988. 2010 traffic volume projections rise to 554,500 vehicles per day, a 130% increase over 1988 traffic volumes. Projected changes vary widely, with the Broadway /Lincoln corridor and Grant/Logan showing a dramatic increase, while Washington/Clarkson and Corona/Downing each are projected to have decreased traffic volumes. 10.

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o BUS ROUTES: Because of its proximity to Downtown, Capitol Hill/ Cheesman Park has some of the most frequent bus service in the metropolitan area. The "15" route along East Colfax is the most heavily-used and most frequent route. Additionally, the neighborhood is served by routes 0 (Broadway), 2 (Broadway /Colfax/Grant/Sixth/CoronaDowning/Eighth/Logan/Colfax/15th), 6 (Broadway /Sixth-Eighth/Lincoln), 10 (Broadway /12th), 12 (17th/Corona-Downing/Colfax/15th), and 24 (York/Josephine). o PEDESTRJAN CONNECTIONS: With its high density; proximity to Downtown; wide, detached sidewalks; mature street trees; and interesting streetscape, the neighborhood provides many natural encouragements to pedestrian traffic. Both the Downtown Plan and the Uptown Neighborhood Plan recognized this characteristic of Capitol Hill/Cheesman Park and made reconunendations for improvements to the pedestrian connections into the neighborhood. Sherman, Pennsylvania, Clarkson, Franklin, 7th, 9th, 11th, and 12th already provide many of the characteristics desired for good pedestrian connections and have been identified as such in the Downtown and Uptown plans. o BICYCLE ROUTES: The City has designated both on-street and off-street bicycle routes. Within Capitol Hill/Cheesman Park, there are on-street bicycle routes along Sherman, Ogden, east of Williams, 12th, and 14th. The neighborhood also has good access to the off-street bicycle path along Cherry Creek and to the on-street route on East 16th Avenue. A 1987 report from the Department of Public Works Transportation Division recommends removing the bicycle lane from 14th Avenue because of traffic conflicts and the existence of better alternative routes. g. CRIME STATISTICS o CRIME ISSUE REAL, BUT LOWER THAN MAY BE PERCEIVED: In 1988, Capitol Hill ranked as the 16th neighborhood in the City in terms of serious crimes per 1000 population. Cheesman Park ranked 26th. The highest ranked neighborhood, Auraria/Lincoln Park, had 316.8 crimes per 1000 population. In contrast, Capitol Hill had 152.7 and Cheesman Park 108.3 serious crimes per 1000 population. The safest neighborhood, Wellshire, had 33.2 crimes per 1000 population. The average for the City was 117.5 crimes per 1000 population. 11.

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I. FRAMEWORK PLAN

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%W l,OOO' 15.

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PREFACE The Capitol Hill / Cheesman Park neighborhood is diverse: diverse culturally, socially, economically, and physically. As a result, while it is important to consider the elements which provide the distinctions in the neighborhood, it is perhaps even more critical to respond to those issues which create the framework of unity for the neighborhood. The Framework Plan, therefore, includes the issues and recommendations which are relevant throughout the entire neighborhood and which tie the neighborhood together. As such, it provides a central design theme, or framework, for the neighborhood. 17.

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A. LAND USE BACKGROUND ANALYSIS Initially a single-family residential neighborhood, Capitol Hill I Cheesman Park has since its earliest days experienced pressures for redevelopment to higher densities and more intense uses. Because of this pressure, many of what were originally single-family houses have been converted to apartments and many others have been replaced by medium to high density apartment buildings or commercial structures. As a result, Capitol Hill I Cheesman Park is a medium to high density residential neighborhood with both destination and neighborhood retail areas. The conversion and redevelopment in the neighborhood have followed patterns established by a variety of factors. The amenities of view and activities provided by Cheesman Park, for example, have attracted redevelopment along its northern, northwestern, and northeastern edges. The southeastern, southern, and western edges have retained their single family houses, in part because of restrictive zoning and their designation as Denver Landmark Districts. Traffic patterns have also created land use patterns. For example, as traffic increased on East Colfax, which was once one of the premier residential streets in the City, the large houses were either converted to or replaced by commercial structures. Similarly, the conversion of two-way streets into one-way streets was followed by the conversion of single-family houses into apartments and the construction of medium and high density apartments along these streets. Another pattern has been affected by the size of parcels, since larger parcels are easier and more profitable to develop than smaller parcels, which may need to be purchased individually over time in order to assemble a parcel large enough to redevelop economically. As a result of this pattern, many of the largest houses in the neighborhood have been replaced by apartments or commercial structures. A final sample pattern is created by proximity to Downtown. This has resulted in intense real estate speculation and commercial redevelopment in the northwestern and western edges of the neighborhood because they are closest to Downtown and have the most permissive zoning. Remnants of the historic land use patterns remain in redeveloped areas, while more stable areas often have isolated examples of the continuing redevelopment pressure: conversion of single-family homes to apartments and redevelopment to higher densities. Single-family houses, for example, remain on Logan Street, despite the conversion of most of the street to high density residential and office uses. On the other hand, even areas which are zoned R-0 have examples of "grandfathered" duplexes and single-family homes which are divided into apartments. Service retail uses are located both within and at the edges of the neighborhood. While these shopping districts are outgrowths of historic retail areas, the conflicts between the 18. r lr .. .. .. ,. 19 ..,

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Existing Land Use : 19. ........................................ ; ..... .... ., ......... ... . .. ". ......... ""' 1t"" ......

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Building Fabric N EB 21.

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_. retail and the surrounding residential uses have increased over time because of the increasing intensity of the uses and the resulting need for additional parking and other services. Nonetheless, the retail areas function as focal points for the neighborhood and are essential to the urban character of the neighborhood. The following land use issues and recommendations are considered to be those which apply to the entire neighborhood and, therefore, to the framework plan. 1. HOUSING ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS HOUSING ISSUE 1: Market and economic pressures threaten the quantity, quality, affordability, and diversity of housing. sub-issue a: There are too many vacant apartments, too many irresponsible landlords, and too many run down buildings in the neighborhood. HOUSING RECOMMENDATION la: SUPPORT GOOD PROPERTY MANAGEMENT Support landlords in getting good tenants, in being able to quickly get rid of irresponsible and potentially dangerous tenants, and in applying pressures to irresponsible property managers. Establish regularly scheduled meetings of the property managers withia the neighborhood. Use these meetings to share information and ideas. HOUSING RECOMMENDATION lb: IMPROVE THE ENFORCEMENT OF CODES Establish regularly scheduled meetings between all the City inspectors assigned to the neighborhood and the neighbors. Use these meetings to identify problem buildings and sites, to assign priorities for dealing with these, and for aiding the inspectors in their efforts. Identify buildings which do not comply with City health and safety codes and enforce compliance. The process of enforcing compliance and achieving a final resolution should be faster. The cost of habitual irresponsibility should be higher. Strengthen the City's "registered agent" program with additional enforcement authority. 23.

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HOUSING RECOMMENDATION lc: MARKET TilE AITRIBUTES OF TilE NEIGHBORHOOD Improve the public perception of the neighborhood by marketing its attributes. The target of the marketing effort should include the press, City agencies, real estate brokers, and potential residents. HOUSING RECOMMENDATION ld: ENCOURAGE HOME OWNERSHIP Encourage owner occupancy in the neighborhood. Among potential programs is the expansion of the City's current Mortgage Bond Program to include greater participation for condominium and single-family owners. HOUSING RECOMMENDATION le: SUPPORT THE CONCEPT OF GUARANTEED HABITABILITY Establish a standard for habitability and a process for guaranteeing landlord compliance with that standard. sub-issue b: Housing, particularly low income housing, is deteriorating, and is being demolished or converted to non-reside.ntial uses. HOUSING RECOMMENDATION lf: RETAIN AND IMPROVE EXISTING HOUSING Provide programs and incentives for preserving and renovating existing housing. Potential methods might include a community development corporation or another form of neighborhood organization which focuses on housing, a property tax freeze for housing rehabilitation, a demolition tax, a land use tax, or a neighborhood housing trust funded by demolition fees or taxes. Existing tax incentives for abandoned housing should be eliminated. HOUSING RECOMMENDATION lg: REPLACE LOW INCOME HOUSING Develop a program requiring the replacement of low income housing which is demolished for redevelopment of the site. Replacement could be in the form of either actual housing units or a comparable fee in lieu of the actual units. 24. ,. ,. I I I 'I 'I .I fr II .r if r ; f ir l' ; .. -' : .. 1 [ I J J I

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2. DENSITY ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS DENSITY ISSUE 1: neighborhoods in Denver. Capitol Hill and Cheesman Park are the highest density sub-issue a: Although the recent population trend in the neighborhood has included a decrease in density, the residential density of the neighborhood as a whole can be expected to increase. sub-issue b: The increase in residential density is a factor in many of the other issues facing the neighborhood, including noise, parking, inadequate public facilities, crime, loss of historic character, vacant and abandoned buildings, vacant lots, etc. DENSITY RECOMMENDATION 1a: SUPPORT COMPATIBLE HIGHER DENSI1Y Support higher density residential development in the neighborhood, when that development is located and designed to be compatible with the character and livability of the neighborhood, particularly the immediate and when that development does not necessitate the demolition of an historic or architecturally significant structure. DENSITY RECOMMENDATION 1b: SUPPORT INFILL DEVELOPMENT Give high priority to new development on sites which are currently either vacant or used as parking lots. NOTE: Because of the close relationship between density and zoning, the reader interested in density recommendations should also pay close attention to the zoning recommendations. 3. VACANT AND ABANDONED BUILDINGS ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS VACANT AND ABANDONED BUILDINGS ISSUE 1: There are too many vacant and abandoned buildings in the neighborhood. sub-issue a: There are no incentives for owners to have their buildings occupied. VACANT AND ABANDONED BUILDINGS RECOMMENDATION 1a: OCCUPY VACANT & ABANDONED BUILDINGS Identify vacant and abandoned buildings, set priorities for targeting those buildings, enforce existing City vacant and 25.

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abandoned building ordinances, implement existing programs, strengthen and expand the existing programs, and create new programs and ordinances to deal with unrnet needs. b: There is no policy on the maintenance of landscaping around vacant and abandoned buildings. VACANT AND ABANDONED BUILDINGS RECOMMENDATION lb: MAINTAIN LANDSCAPING AT VACANT AND ABANDONED BUILDINGS Identify vacant and abandoned buildings which have poorly maintained landscaping, set priorities for targeting those buildings, enforce existing City weed and other property maintenance ordinances, and create new programs and ordinances to deal with unmet needs. 4. BUSINESS ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS BUSINESS ISSUE 1: The image of some of the commercial areas and businesses in the area is a detriment to the success of other businesses and to the neighborhood. a: Abandoned / vacant commercial space is a serious problem in some commercial areas. sub-issue b: There are commercial areas and businesses in the neighborhood which are cluttered with litter. sub-issue c: Signage c&ll be either attractive or unattractive. sub-issue d: Some of the buildings and streetscape in the commercial areas are poorly maintained. 26. fll fl 1 fl' Ill II I \I t ll J ll J {I I il I II 1 ttl l.fl lfl

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BUSINESS RECOMMENDATION 1: FORM BUSINESS AND PROPER'IY OWNER ASSOCIATIONS Establish new business and property owner associations or reinforce existing business associations. These associations should focus on providing a focus for their areas, filling abandoned / vacant commercial structures, cleaning up litter, improving signage and streetscape, marketing the areas, and improving maintenance of buildings and streetscape. The associations should deal with these issues by using procedures similar to those used by the neighborhood association for the same issues. BUSINESS ISSUE 2: There are many neighborhood-oriented businesses, but the diversity provided by these businesses is being lost to large, absentee-owned businesses. BUSINESS RECOMMENDATION 2: ENCOURAGE A DIVERSITY OF BUSINESSES Direct economic development programs in the neighborhood primarily to encouraging small, diverse businesses. Similarly, support building designs and land use patterns which encourage small, pedestrian-oriented The exception to this recommendation would be destination businesses which would help draw customers to other, smaller businesses. Large destination businesses should be carefully located, most likely on East Colfax, lincoln, or Broadway. NOTE: The Uptown Neighborhood Plan includes an extensive section on East Colfax. This plan supports the recommendations from the Uptown Plan. 5. MIXED-USE DEVELOPMENT ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS MIXED-USE DEVELOPMENT ISSUE 1: The current zoning ordinance and building and fire codes do not encourage developers to include residential units in retail projects. The building and fire codes, particularly, include provisions which raise costs and, therefore, may discourage mixed-use projects. MIXED-USE DEVELOPMENT RECOMMENDATION 1: ENCOURAGE RESIDENTIAL USES IN RETAIL PROJECTS Develop incentives, and remove any unnecessary disincentives, for developers to include residential units in retail projects in commercially zoned areas. Incentives should be tied to meeting location and design criteria. 29.

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6. ASSEMBLAGE ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS ASSEMBLAGE ISSUE 1: Public and private interests have large land assemblages which, if redeveloped, would place additional traffic and parking pressures on the neighborhood and possibly disrupt the existing fabric of the neighborhood with incompatible building types and design. ASSEMBLAGE RECOMMENDATION 1: DEVELOP JOINT PLANS FOR LARGE ASSEMBLAGES Identify the owners of large land assemblages, contact those owners, and work with them to develop plans for their property which meet both their needs and the needs and desires of the neighborhood. "' ,. 7. COMMUNI1Y FACILITY ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS COMMUNITY FACILITY ISSUE 1: While community gardens are an important asset for the neighborhood residents, they are generally located on privately owned land which is being held for future redevelopment. As a result, there is no guarantee of their continuing availability. B. ZONING COMMUNITY FACILITY RECOMMENDATION 1: ENCOURAGE COMMUNI1Y GARDENS Acquire parcels which can be used as community gardens on a permanent basis and use temporarily vacant parcels as community gardens as long as they are vacant. BACKGROUND AND ANALYSIS The current zoning in Capitol Hill and Cheesman Park is an outgrowth of a long history_ of changing expectations for the neighborhood. Although initially developed as a low density, single-unit residential neighborhood, by the early 1900's, Capitol Hill/ Cheesman already seeing the construction of apartment buildings and the redevelopment of res1dent1al areas for retail use. Zoning, from its earliest application in Denver, has reflected both the changing character of the neighborhood and the assumption that the intensification of land uses in the neighborhood would continue. 30.

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The 1925 zoning map for Denver, for example, shows the Capitol Hill and Cheesman Park neighborhood zoned similarly to the current zoning. Residential zoning districts at that time ranged from a low density "Residence 'A' District" to a relatively high density "Residence 'E' District". Most of what was then zoned "Residence 'D' is now zoned R-3, a high density residential district. The western edge of the neighborhood was zoned "Residence 'E'" in 1925 and is now zoned R-4, the highest density residential district, which also allows office uses. That portion of the southern edge of the neighborhood which was zoned "Residence 'A'" in 1925 was generally rezoned R-1 at the time of the Citywide rezoning in 1956 and was later rezoned R-0, a restrictive, single-unit residential zone. In 1925, areas along Sixth Avenue, Thirteenth Avenue, and East Colfax, and at Ninth and Corona and Eleventh and Ogden were zoned for neighborhood businesses. While these patterns have shifted to some degree, with higher density zoning moving farther south and more restrictive zoning instituted in other areas, the historic zoning pattern is generally consistent with the current zoning. Despite this long history of high density zoning, the neighborhood as a whole is still, at least 65 years later, not as dense as it was anticipated to become. In fact, the neighborhood as a whole in its most recent history has lost population, numerous apartment conversions have been converted back to single-unit houses, and the pattern of high-rise apartment construction has slowed dramatically. As a result, the existing character and density of the land uses in the neighborhood is significantly different from the existing zoning. The potential impact of high-rise construction has been mitigated somewhat by a zoning ordinance passed by City Council in 1986 which established height controls on buildings adjacent to R-2 and lower density zoning districts, e.g. R-1 and R-0. This ordinance, however, does not apply to most of the neighborhood as it is currently zoned. The other mitigating elements are the Mountain View Preservation Ordinances. The Cheesman Park Botanic Gardens Mountain View Preservation Ordinance sets a maximum building height for the majority of the areas west of the park, while the State Capitol Area Mountain View Preservation Ordinance restricts building height west of the Capitol. The City Park Mountain View Protection Ordinance covers a portion of the northwest comer of the neighborhood and a special set of building height restrictions has been adopted to protect the Civic Center from being surrounded by intense development. Even with these restrictions, however, the majority of the Capitol Hill/Cheesman Park neighborhood can still be developed to a significantly higher density than current uses, and views of the mountains and Downtown skyline are not adequately protected. The following zoning issues and recommendations are those which are considered critical to the entire neighborhood and, thus, to the framework plan. 31.

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1. ZONING ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS ZONING ISSUE 1: Many areas of the neighborhood are overzoned relative to the existing character of those areas and the character desired by the respective residents and property owners. ZONING RECOMMENDATION 1: INITIATE REZONINGS Initiate rezonings for areas which are currently overzoned in relation to both the existing and desired uses and character. ZONING ISSUE 2: As currently written, zoning allows commercial parking lots which can service office uses in adjacent neighborhoods or Downtown. Because they are considered uses by right in the R-4, these commercial parking lots are not subject to review by either the City or the neighborhood organizations. ZONING RECOMMENDATION 2: MAKE COMMERCIAL PARKING LOTS USES BY SPECIAL REVIEW IN THE R-4 Amend the R-4 zoning district to change commercial parking lots to uses by special review. ZONING ISSUE 3: The Cheesman Park Mountain View Preservation Ordinance is not working as it was initially intended. It does not cover a significant portion of the northern and eastern sectors of the neighborhood and extends only to Broadway on the west and to Speer on the southwest. New development outside these boundaries can be unlimited in height. Similarly, the Cheesman Park Mountain View Preservation Ordinance does not protect views from the neighborhood toward Downtown and the State Capitol or from the Grant-Humphrey's Mansion and Governor's Park. ZONING RECOMMENDATION 3: STUDY THE EXTENSION OF THE MOUNTAIN VIEW ORDINANCE Study the extension of the existing Mountain View Preservation Ordinance and the creation of new view preservation ordinances to better protect views from the neighborhood. 32. p b II II II II ;

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ZONING ISSUE 4: The density and building height allowed under the current zoning in some cases may be inconsistent with the character of the neighborhood and may allow both buildings which are out of scale with surrounding buildings and uses which create excessive noise, generate unusually intense automobile traffic, or attract criminal activity. sub-issue a: The R-3 zoning, which covers the majority of the neighborhood, allows high-rise residential structures. If developed to the fullest extent allowed by the current zoning, the character of the neighborhood would change dramatically. sub-issue b: The R-4 zoning on the western edge of Capitol Hill allows both high density residential and office uses as uses by right. If developed to the fullest extent allowed by the current zoning, the character of the western edge would change dramatically. ZONING RECOMMENDATION 4a: ADD COMPATIBILI1Y CRITERIA TO THE R-3 AND R-4 DISTRJCTS Develop a review process and review criteria which address compatibility in the R-3 and R-4 zoning districts. The use of the process would be required for any development which is larger than a given size or which includes the demolition of an existing structure. ZONING RECOMMENDATION 4b: REQillRE NEIGHBORHOOD IMPACT STUDIES As part of the development review process, require applicants for large scale developments in or adjacent to the neighborhood to provide an analysis of potential impacts and possible mitigation measures. ZONING ISSUE 5: The current definitions of group homes, adult community correctional facilities, and similar uses have been out-dated by changes in the provision of these services. As a result, the City spacing ordinances can no longer achieve their original intent of dispersing these facilities. ZONING RECOMMENDATION 5: MODIFY THE DEFINITIONS AND ORDINANCES FOR GROUP HOMES AND SIMILAR USES Modify the definitions and ordinances relating to group homes, adult community correctional facilities, and similar uses to further clarify the language and, thus, better achieve dispersal of these uses. 39.

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ZONING ISSUE 6: The neighborhood has a history of single and multiple-unit houses being converted to offices. While this often allows the preservation of historic homes, it can also result in a loss of housing and residents, and an increase in daytime traffic and parking demand. ZONING RECOMMENDATION 6: REVIEW EACH OFFICE CONVERSION Develop a process and criteria for reviewing the potential impact of each proposed conversion of a residential structure in the neighborhood to a non-residential use. ,. ZONING ISSUE 7: Constant vigilance and creative alternatives are required to enforce the City's sign code. ZONING RECOMMENDATION 7: CONSISTENTLY ENFORCE THE SIGN CODE Support continued and increased City enforcement of the sign code, including the prohibition and removal of handbills attached to private property. Educate the public to the fact that it is illegal to post handbills without first receiving permission from the property Support the introduction of kiosks which can be used for handbills. ZONING ISSUE 8: Billboards are incompatible with the residential character of the neighborhood and with neighborhood businesses. The current billboard ordinance does not protect the neighborhood from the intrusion of billboards located in adjacent business zones. ZONING RECOMMENDATION 8: ELIMINA'IT BILLBOARDS Eliminate the potential of any new off-premise general outdoor advertising devices (billboards), both within the neighborhood and in areas adjacent to the neighborhood. Consider providing an amortization schedule as just compensation for the removal of existing billboards. 40. l l l l 1

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-ZONING ISSUE 9: Convenience food stores, and driveins are generally incompatible with both the character of the residential sections of the neighborhood and the desire to reduce the number of automobile trips. ZONING RECOMMENDATION 9: PROHIBIT NEW CONVENIENCE FOOD STORES, DRIVE-THROUGHS, AND DRIVE-INS IN RESIDENTIAL AREAS Prohibit new convenience stores, drive-throughs, and drive-ins in all areas of the neighborhood except Broadway and those sections of East Colfax which are designated for automobile oriented uses in the Uptown Neighborhood Plan. 41.

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C. CHARACTER AND FORM AND ANALYSIS The character and form of the neighborhood derive from a combination of natural and man made elements: natural features, the street system, the parks and parkways, the "building fabric", and the prevalent landscaping. The Capitol Hill / Cheesman Park neighborhood presents a diversity of images, each image dependent upon whether one is a resident, someone driving through, or someone who has merely heard tales of the neighborhood. Part of the diversity of images results from the true Ill' diversity which the neighborhood contains. Other images result from unrepresentative information or from total misinformation. Non residents often develop their image while hurrying through the neighborhood along one of the fourteen one-way streets which pass through the neighborhood. By doing so, they miss many of the aspects of the neighborhood which form the residents' image of Capitol Hill and Cheesman Park. The Capitol Hill I Cheesman Park neighborhood is located on a bluff rising above Downtown and Cherry Creek. While the location and topography provide excellent views of the Downtown skyline and the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains, the neighborhood is generally flat. While the City Ditch winds its way through the neighborhood on its way from Washington Park to City Park, the ditch has been covered, and thus, hidden from sight for many years. Nonetheless, the ditch left a legacy of mature landscaping and fine homes along its path. Cherry Creek passes to the south and west of the neighborhood, yet, because it is easily accessed from the neighborhood, it provides a recreational opportunity for pedestrians and bicyclists. The north-south-east-west grid establishes a clearly legible pattern of streets and blocks. Blocks in the neighborhood are elongated north-south, with the majority of the structures thus having either an eastern or western frontage. Lot width generally follows a 25' increment. Heavily travelled one-way streets provide boundaries for districts within the neighborhood. Cheesman Park is the psychological heart of the neighborhood, with the Cheesman Pavilion framing its commanding view of the mountains and skyline. A formal park, it is valued as a passive retreat. Together, Cheesman, the Botanic Gardens, and Congress Park form an impressive complex of active and passive parks and cultural and recreational facilities. All three provide outstanding mountain views. Seventh Avenue Parkway is both an impressive connection between neighborhoods and one of the City's premier residential streets. The Williams Street Parkway provides a distinctive north-south connection between neighbor-42. r .-I ).-r ,r r ,fl n r-n rl 'l I i l 1 ., I

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hoods. The Civic Center, although it adjoins Capitol Hill I Cheesman Park on the west, is not easily accessed from the neighborhood and does not provide a quiet, safe, and inviting environment for neighborhood residents. As a result, it is not perceived as a major asset. The neighborhood's "building fabric" is a product of interrelated factors, including building siting, age, materials, scale, and historic value. The majority of buildings in Capitol Hill I Cheesman Park, for example, are related to the grid pattern of streets, with common setbacks, widths, and frontages. Service access is generally from the rear, through the alleys which divide the blocks longitudinally. While the image presented by the neighborhood is diverse and sometimes confusing, the most prevalent building type is late nineteenth and early twentieth century (pre-automobile) homes. Stone churches and red brick schools provide a sense of history. More recent apartment buildings and commercial structures, including numerous high-rises, provide a counterpoint to the historic image. The building material perceived to be most common is red brick, with stone foundations and lintels. New buildings have neither followed the historic precedent nor established a new standard for materials. The neighborhood has a "human scale", created by the predominance of 2-3 story houses and setbacks deep enough to allow front yards and front porches. Hand-crafted ornaments on homes, churches and schools add interest and a sense of history. The neighborhood is historically significant. It is the location of the homes of some of Denver's most interesting and well-known citizens, several of its premier parks and parkways, and a well preserved architectural legacy. The street trees, parks, and parkways of Capitol Hill I Cheesman Park are the foremost elements of Denver's landscaping legacy, reminders that Denver is a green oasis in the dry High Plains grasslands. Unfortunately, a significant portion of the mature landscaping has been lost to age and disease, and with it, the historic landscape pattern has often been lost as well. Capitol Hill I Cheesman Park is an urban, high density residential neighborhood, with a wealth of neighborhood shopping districts, good access to Downtown, good transit service, and a population distinct in its economic and lifestyle diversity. 43.

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1. HISTORIC PRESERVATION ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS HISTORIC PRESERVATION ISSUE 1: The historic integrity of the neighborhood has deteriorated, continues to be threatened, and is neither adequately recognized nor protected. HISTORIC PRESERVATION RECOMMENDATION la: EXPAND UPON THE HISTORIC CHARACTER Both the public and private sector should use the historic residential, commercial, and institutional character of the neighborhood as the basis for the design of new development and redevelopment activities, including streetscape improvements. Flagstone sidewalks, for example, should be preserved and repaired. Where new sidewalks are constructed, they should either be flagstone or, if that proves too expensive, flagstone-colored concrete. Funding should be provided to assist with the preservation and repair of flagstone sidewalks. HISTORIC PRESERVATION RECOMMENDATION lb: EMPHASIZE HISTORIC PRESERVATION Give top priority to the preservation of the historic and architecturally interesting buildings and the historic fabric of the neighborhood when reviewing development proposals, proposing capital improvements, and allocating funding. Emphasis should be placed on preserving structures on their original sites, rather than moving them. HISTORIC PRESERVATION RECOMMENDATION lc: DESIGNATE HISTORIC DISTRICTS AND STRUCTURES Improve the current historic inventory of the neighborhood and review areas and structures in the neighborhood for potential designation as Denver Landmark Districts or as individual landmarks. Consider designating the entire neighborhood as a Denver Landmark District. At a minimum, seek landmark designation for the most cohesive areas in the neighborhood, including areas along Sherman, Pennsylvania, Franklin, and Vine. 44. n r J-l fl Jl .fl r: f1 fl r, n r. .I ,, ,

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--HISTORIC PRESERVATION RECOMMENDATION ld: EXPLORE STRONGER PRESERVATION STRATEGIES Develop additional and stronger preservation strategies, programs, incentives, and funding sources for preserving historically significant and architecturally interesting structures and districts in the neighborhood. HISTORIC PRESERVATION RECOMMENDATION le: EMPHASIZE PUBLIC EDUCATION Continue to educate the public about the presence of historic resources in the neighborhood, about the significance of their preservation, about the preservation process and available programs, and about how to get involved in that process. HISTORIC PRESERVATION RECOMMENDATION lf: ESTABLISH TDR DISTRICTS Establish within the neighborhood boundaries transferable development rights (IDR) districts. Within the districts, owners of registered Denver Historic Landmarks would be allowed to sell or transfer to another owner the right 'to use the amount of square footage not used by the first owner. The purpose of these districts is to promote preservation of historic structures. To illustrate this recommendation: a person might own a single-family house, say of 1,200 square feet. If the lot were 1,000 square feet, with the R-3 zone 3 to 1 floor area ratio, 1800 of the 3,000 square feet allowable would not be used. The 1800 square feet of allowable floor area could be sold to another owner within the district. The first owner would then have a deed restriction or covenant running with the property which bound development on it to a maximum 1,200 square feet. The second owner would be able to apply the extra square footage to a new building or the expansion of an existing building, with the prpvision that no development in the district could exceed the allowable floor area ratio by more than a given percentage, e.g. 15%. The transfer of rights would only be applicable within the designated districts and could never be transferred outside the particular district. 45.

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2. LANDSCAPING ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS LANDSCAPING ISSUE 1: While the neighborhood is distinguished by mature landscaping, changes to this landscaping have altered the character of the neighborhood. sub-issue a: Trees and other landscaping throughout the neighborhood have been lost to old age, disease, and poor maintenance. sub-issue b: Much of this landscaping has not been replaced. sub-issue c: More trees will be lost in the future. LANDSCAPING RECOMMENDATION la: PLANT TREES Support and enlarge existing tree planting programs for both the public rights-of-way and private property. Efforts should be directed to re-establishing and enhancing the neighborhood's historic tree canopy. Species similar to those of the mature trees in the neighborhood should be planted so that the size, shape, and density of the street trees create a cohesive canopy. Attention should also be paid to maintaining a similar alignment and spacing of trees to help preserve the historic character of the neighborhood. LANDSCAPING RECOMMENDATION lb: PLANT SHRUBBERY AND FLOWERS Encourage property owners, business owners, and tenants to soften the urban landscape with shrubbery and flowers. LANDSCAPING RECOMMENDATION lc: PROTECf EXISTING TREES Discourage the removal of healthy trees from either private or public property by tightening procedures for approving tree removal. Establish maintenance programs. Assist low income property owners with maintenance. 46. r I 1 .(l [l I l fl rr ll r n 1l :rl n r--1

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LANDSCAPING RECOMMENDATION ld: REPLACE TREES WHICH ARE REMOVED Require the replacement of street trees immediately following the removal of existing trees. LANDSCAPING RECOMMENDATION le: REQUIRE STREET TREES AND LANDSCAPING Require street trees and landscaping for any new development. sub-issue d: In too many cases, sod has been replaced by rocks, gravel, dirt, or pavement. LANDSCAPING RECOMMENDATION lf: PLANT GRASS Sod is the ground cover which is most consistent with the residential character of the neighborhood. Therefore, discourage property owners from using rocks, gravel, dirt, or pavement as a ground cover. sub-issue e: Many of the tree lawns, or parking strips, (the area between the street and the sidewalk), particularly along the and more heavily travelled streets, are poorly landscaped and poorly maintained. LANDSCAPING RECOMMENDATION lg: LANDSCAPE AND MAINTAIN PARKING STRIPS Improve the landscaping and maintenance of the tree lawns. Most tree lawns should be planted with sod, rather than covered with rocks, gravel, dirt or pavement. Tree lawns along heavily travelled streets require special consideration, and may benefit from a combination of raised landscaping and pavement or from alternative plant materials. Encourage designs which are consistent with the historic urban character of the neighborhood. Focus efforts on streets. Enforce City requirements for trimming trees which overhang sidewalks. f: Tree trimming can be an exorbitantly expensive procedure for income homeowners. There is currently only one, limited, public assistance program which can be used for tree trimming. 47.

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LANDSCAPING RECOMMENDATION lh: HELP LOW-INCOME HOMEOWNERS WITH TREE TRIMMING Either expand existing City programs or find alternative funding sources to help low-income homeowners with the expense of tree trimming. sub-issue g: There is a lack of information on landscaping maintenance procedures and responsibilities. LANDSCAPING RECOMMENDATION li: PROVIDE LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE INFORMATION Disseminate information on landscaping maintenance procedures and responsibilities, including information on plants which require less water than normal but which maintain the historic character of the landscaping in the neighborhood. LANDSCAPING RECOMMENDATION lj: PARTICIPATE IN A PILOT PROJECT Participate in a pilot project to test alternative methods for lowering landscaping water and requirements, while enhancing the historic and urban character of the neighborhood. sub-issue h: City requirements for planting trees are in many cases unclear, too restrictive, or too complex. LANDSCAPING RECOMMENDATION lk: SIMPLIFY TREE PLANTING REQillREMENTS Minimize the impediments to planting trees by simplifying and clarifying the City requirements for planting trees in the public rights-of-way. LANDSCAPING ISSUE 2: Poorly located or inadequately landscaped and buffered parking lots and structures can be incompatible with the tiearby residential uses and the character of the neighborhood. LANDSCAPING RECOMMENDATION 2: CAREFULLY LOCATE & BUFFER PARKING Attain compatibility of parking with the character of the neighborhood by sensitively locating, landscaping, and further buffering parking from nearby residential uses. 48. I I I I I I # I f (, J [I (f rl r ., If l r1 r: n fl

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LANDSCAPING ISSUE 3: The neighborhood has too many ugly, unlandscaped, and poorly maintained parking lots and vacant lots. LANDSCAPING RECOMMENDATION 3a: MAINTAIN VACANT LOTS Identify vacant lots which are not in compliance with City ordinance requirements for maintenance, establish priorities for enforcement, and enforce the ordinances. sub-issue a: The parking lot landscaping ordinance does not contain a provision for retroactive enforcement. As a result, the existing parking lots will not be landscaped. LANDSCAPING RECOMMENDATION 3b: LANDSCAPE EXISTING PARKING LOTS Amend the City's parking lot landscaping ordinance to include a provision for retroactive enforcement. Consider an amortization schedule as an implementation method which would help minimize the financial burden. sub-issue b: The new parking lot landscaping ordinance provides only minimum requirements for interior landscaping and no requirements for small lots. LANDSCAPING RECOMMENDATION 3c: LANDSCAPE INTERIORS & SMALL LOTS Amend the City's parking lot landscaping ordinance to include additional provisions for interior landscaping, for small lots, and for permanent maintenance. LANDSCAPING ISSUE 4: The edge between retail and residential uses is often ugly, noisy, too bright, lacking in landscaping, attractive to anti-social activity, uncomfortable, and disruptive to residential uses. LANDSCAPING RECOMMENDATION 4: EXTEND TilE RETAIL STREETSCAPE INTO THE NEIGHBORHOOD As street trees, pedestrian lights, and other streetscape improvements are installed in retail areas, extend them around the street comers to the edge between the retail and residential uses. 49.

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LANDSCAPING ISSUE 5: Several streetscaping projects have been completed, along East Colfax and on the 1500 block of Clarkson. Each of these projects is an element of a larger streetscape project, Colfax between Grant and Josephine and Clarkson from 13th to 20th Avenue. LANDSCAPING RECOMMENDATION 5: COMPLETE EXISTING STREETSCAPE PROJECTS Give priority to completing existing streetscaping projects in order to maximize their impact. LANDSCAPING ISSUE 6: Overhead utility lines dominate the streetscape along Sixth, Seventh, Eighth, Eleventh, Thirteenth, and Colfax Avenues and will detract from programs and expenditures designed to improve the image of those streets. Overhead lines on the west edge of Cheesman create a jarring edge between the park and the neighborhood. lANDSCAPING RECOMMENDATION 6: UNDERGROUND UTILI1Y LINES ALONG 6TH, ITH, 8TH, 11TH, 13111, 14TH, AND COLFAX AVENUES AND ON BOTH THE EAST AND WEST EDGES OF CHEESMAN PARK. Underground the overhead utility .lines which currently run along 6th, 7th, 8th, 11th, 13th, and Colfax Avenues and on the west edge of Cheesman Park. As part of the effort to improve the streetscape in the neighborhood, coordinate the timing of the undergrounding with other streetscaping projects. 50. I r I r I I r f r r fl r: r1 fl fl rJ r n n

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3. PARKS AND RECREATION ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS PARKS AND RECREATION ISSUE 1: With the exception of the Capitol grounds and the adjoining Civic Center, there are limited parks and open space available for the western end of the neighborhood. PARKS AND RECREATION RECOMMENDATION 1a: IMPROVE EXISTING PARKS Improve Civic Center, Governor's Park, and Quality Hill Park in order to better accommodate and encourage use by neighborhood residents. Add fountains, similar focal points, and better pedestrian lighting to help add life to currently under-utilized parks. All three parks should continue to provide passive, rather than active, open space. All improvements should be compatible with the formal urban qualities of these parks. PARKS AND RECREATION RECOMMENDATION 1b: IMPROVE THE LINKAGES TO PARKS Improve landscaping, sidewalks, crosswalks, and other pedestrian treatments along connecting streets such as 11th, Sherr.11an, Pennsylvania, and Franklin in order to improve the pedestrian and bicycle linkages to Cheesman, Congress, City, Civic Center, Quality Hill, and Governor's Parks and to Cherry Creek and the Platte River. PARKS AND RECREATION RECOMMENDATION 1c: DESIGNATE ADDITIONAL PARKWAYS Designate the Capitol Hill I Cheesman Park segments of York, Josephine, Franklin, and Eleventh Avenues as City Parkways. PARKS AND RECREATION ISSUE 2: Maintenance is less than desirable in the parks. sub-issue a: The sprinkler system in Cheesman Park is one of the oldest in the City, is irreparable, and needs to be replaced. PARKS AND RECREATION RECOMMENDATION 2: IMPROVEPARKSN.VUNTENANCE Give higher priority to parks mainten[!T\Ce, including funding a new sprinkler system for Cheesman Park. 51.

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-PARKS AND RECREATION ISSUE 3: The majority of park space in the neighborhood is passive, rather than active. sub-issue a: The Capitol grounds, Cheesman Park, Governor's Park, Quality Hill Park, and Seventh Avenue Parkway provide needed passive open space without the level of activity of parks with athletic facilities. b: The neighborhood has ready access to Congress Park and City Park, where active recreation facilities are concentrated and are more appropriate. PARKS AND RECREATION RECOMMENDATION 3a: PROTECT PASSIVE PARK SPACE Protect the integrity of the neighborhood's passive park space from active and organized uses. PARKS AND RECREATION RECOMMENDATION 3b: IMPROVE ACTIVE PARK SPACE AND ACCESS Improve the active recreation facilities in Congress Park and City Park and improve the access to those parks and their facilities. .. PARKS AND RECREATION ISSUE 4: Improvements to the neighborhood parks seem to happen on a piecemeal basis and have little sense of permanence, consistency with a grand design, or compatibility with the character of the neighborhood. a: The impact of the collection of these individual actions is to denigrate the quality of the parks. PARKS AND RECREATION RECOMMENDATION 4a: ADOPT AND FOLLOW A PARKS MASTER PLAN Adopt and follow a master plan for City parks, including their improvement and maintenance. Improvements should be compatible with the historic designs for the parks and the character of the neighborhood. sub-issue b: Changes to Cheesman Park and the traffic flow through it run the risk of creating more negative impacts on the surrounding streets. PARKS AND RECOMMENDATION 4b: STUDY ANY TRAFFIC PA'ITERN CHANGES Involve the neighborhood in the discussion of any proposed changes to Cheesman Park and the traffic flow through it. Thoroughly review potential impacts on the park and the surrounding streets. 52. I I I I I I I I ,. I t I .I I I ,. I fl fl fJ r: fl fl

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sub-issue c: The west entrance to the Botanic Gardens is closed, making pedestrian access from the west end of the neighborhood more difficult. PARKS AND RECREATION RECOMMENDATION 4c: OPEN THE WEST ENTRANCE TO THE GARDENS Whenever possible, the Botanic Gardens should open its west entrance. sub-issue d: The parks have inadequate and poorly designed pedestrian lighting. PARKS AND RECREATION RECOMMENDATION 4d: IMPROVE LIGHTING IN PARKS Improve the pedestrian lighting in the parks. The lighting should be compatible with the historic designs of the parks and with the character of the neighborhood. PARKS AND RECREATION ISSUE 5: There is a lack of recreation facilities in the neighborhood, especially for children. subissue a: The residents of the neighborhood do not have adequate access to any city recreation center. PARKS AND RECREATION RECOMMENDATION 5: PROVIDE RECREATION FACILITIES Provide additional recreation facilities, particularly a community recreation center and children's facilities. Consider joint parks/school use of facilities at Morey Middle School, East High School, and Dora Moore Elementary. 4. OPEN SPACE ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS OPEN SPACE ISSUE 1: The current zoning ordinance allows new developments to meet their open space requirements in ways which do not best serve the neighborhood and which may not be compatible with the character of the neighborhood. The zoning ordinance states that "unobstructed open space may be located on the ground and on roof decks having an average height of not more than six ( 6) feet above grade and shall be utilized only for landscaping and/or recreational facilities." This language does not include sufficient criteria for determining the quality or compatibility of open space. 53. i I

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OPEN SPACE RECOMMENDATION 1: IMPROVE TilE CRITERIA FOR OPEN SPACE Tighten the criteria for open space to improve both its quality and its compatibility with the character of the neighborhood. 5. PEDESTRIAN ORIENTATION ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS PEDESTRIAN ORIENTATION ISSUE 1: New commercial development tends to be more automobile-oriented than pedestrian-oriented. sub-issue a: The neighborhood has the history and potential of being more pedestrian oriented. PEDESTRIAN ORIENTATION RECOMMENDATION la: ORIENT RETAIL AREAS TO PEDESTRIANS Orient new and existing commercial development to pedestrians, rather than to automobiles. The only exception to this would is in areas designated for automobile-oriented uses. sub-issue b: Narrow sidewalks create pedestrian I automobile conflicts. PEDESTRIAN ORIENTATION RECOMMENDATION 2b: WIDEN AND BUFFER NARROW SIDEWALKS Widen sidewalks, while retaining landscaped parking strips, and buffer the sidewalks from traffic. 6. NEIGHBORHOODS EDGE ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS NEIGHBORHOOD EDGE ISSUE 1: The edges of the neighborhood show the greatest impacts from the character and density of adjoining areas, act as transition zones between the neighborhood and those adjoining areas, and have a concentration of arterial streets and, consequently, heavy traffic. sub-issue a: The area between 13th and Colfax is heavily affected by the cumulative impact of traffic and the associated noise and dirt. sub-issue b: The area between 13th and Colfax is not as well maintained as other areas in the neighborhood because of a complex of interrelated factors, some of which are not in themselves problematic. sub-issue c: Redevelopment of areas peripheral to the neighborhood may cause significant impacts in the neighborhood. 54. .-r .-I r r #' r r r fl fl r fl fl n n r; !1

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-NEIGHBORHOOD EDGE RECOMMENDATION la: DIRECT EFFORTS TO IMPROVING EDGES Improve and stabilize the edges of the neighborhood, minimizing and buffering the impacts of traffic and intense development. NEIGHBORHOOD EDGE RECOMMENDATION lb: WORK WITH NEIGHBORING ORGANIZATIONS The neighborhood organizations should work with organizations from adjoining neighborhoods, including Downtown, to support common and compatible goals. sub-issue d: Sherman provides a strong residential edge for the neighborhood but is threatened with redevelopment by the existing R-4 zoning and the large land assemblages. sub-issue e: The area between Broadway and Logan, an extension of the western edge of the neighborhood, has a mixture of older residential uses and newer offices, retail uses, and parking lots. This mixture of uses encourages intrusions of incompatible land uses into the neighborhood and increases the difficulty of protecting the character of the neighborhood. NEIGHBORHOOD EDGE RECOMMENDATION lc: EMPHASIZE THE RESIDENTIAL CHARACTER AND USE OF TilE WESTERN EDGE OF THE NEIGHBORHOOD Encourage retention and enhancement of the residential character and use of the western edge of the neighborhood. NEIGHBORHOOD EDGE RECOMMENDATION ld: DEVELOP DESIGN GUIDELINES Develop design guidelines which will help retain and enhance the residential character of the western edge of the neighborhood. These guidelines should evolve from the urban design strategy for the neighborhood. sub-issue f: East Colfax, the northern edge of the neighborhood, is commercial, while the southern and eastern edges of the neighborhood are residential. Because the streets which form the southern and eastern edges are busy, there are on-going pressures to convert the residential uses to commercial uses. 55.

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NEIGHBORHOOD EDGE RECOMMENDATION 1e: RETAIN THE RESIDENTIAL CHARACIER AND USE OF 6TH AVENUE YORK, AND JOSEPHINE The primary uses on 6th, Y ark, and Josephine should be residential. Any additional commercial or office uses should be neighborhood-oriented, pedestrian-oriented, and compatible with the residential scale and character of the neighborhood. 7. LANDFORM ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS LANDFORM ISSUE 1: The neighborhood has interesting topography which provided tqe original attraction for building houses in the area, served as an inspiration for naming the neighborhood (Capitol Hill I Quality Hill), and continues to distinguish the neighborhood from surrounding areas. The design of buildings and other improvements can serve to either accentuate or minimize this topography. lANDFORM RECOMMENDATION 1: ACCENTUATE TOPOGRAPHY The design of new construction located on hillside sites should accentuate the topography, placing_ high-rise buildings on the top of hills and low-rise buildings at the base of hills. 8. URBAN DESIGN ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS URBAN DESIGN ISSUE 1: There is not a grand design which defines the character of the neighborhood and which provides guidelines for public improvements, such as additions to neighborhood schools and the construction of State office buildings, and for improvements within the public rights-of-way. sub-issue a: Recent streetscape improvements such as trees, pedestrian lights, and benches may be helping to define individual commercial areas, but may not be compatible with each other or with future streetscape improvements. They may not be building upon the character of the neighborhood and helping to distinguish it from adjoining neighborhoods. URBAN DESIGN RECOMMENDATION 1: CREATE A COHESIVE URBAN DESIGN STRATEGY Create an urban design strategy for the neighborhood which will provide general guidelines for new public and private improvements and help reinforce the distinct character of the neighborhood. 56. ,. ,-,. .-r-,-t r ,-r r I r r ,.., r1 ., n

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D. CIRCULATION BACKGROUND AND ANALYSIS Because of its location between Downtown and the ever-expanding eastern and southeastern sectors of the metropolitan area, the neighborhood is, and always has been, directly affected by the external demand for improved traffic circulation. Similarly, as the neighborhood has become more dense and as the number of automobiles has increased, the neighborhood has also experienced an increased internal demand for improved traffic circulation, parking, transit service, and bicycle and pedestrian opportunities and safety. East Colfax Avenue provides an example of the changes produced by increased external traffic demands. Originally, East Colfax was one of Denver's premier residential streets. However, as the City developed to the east, traffic along the street increased, the street became a transit route, and the character of East Colfax changed from residential to commercial. Similar pressures have been placed on other streets throughout the neighborhood. As traffic demands increased, many streets were converted from two-way to one-way traffic. Currently, there are 14 one-way streets in the neighborhood: Broadway, Lincoln, Grant, Logan, Washington, Clarkson, Corona, Downing, York, Josephine, 6th, 8th, 13th, and 14th. According to a report produced by the Denver Public Works Transportation Division in February of 1988 for the Southeast Quadrant Study, average daily traffic volume on these one-way streets as they pass through the neighborhood exceeds 240,000 vehicles per day. For the same report, the Transportation Division produced a 2010 Average Daily Traffic Volume Projection, which projects average daily traffic volume on these same sections of the oneway streets to increase approximately 130% to 554,500 vehicles per day. These projected traffic volumes assume the following: 1. Land Use a. Realization of the Southeast Quadrant Study 2010 population and employment forecasts 2. Transit a. Construction of a regional system on 1-25 and I-225 b. Use of a high frequency bus network c. Use of activity center circulators 3. Ride Sharing a. A 30% increase ride sharing for work trips 4. Roadway Network a. Construction of the Quebec and Alameda connectors b. Expansion of 1-25 and I-225 to 10 lanes c. Implementation of the recommendations from the OneWay Street Study 57.

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As a result of the need to carry traffic more efficiently, streets were widened, resulting in narrower sidewalks and yards; and in some cases, the landscaped tree lawns between the sidewalk and the street were eliminated entirely. At the same time, increased demands for on-street parking have clogged the already narrow streets. Along with congestion, increased traffic has brought additional noise, dirt, and safety concerns to the neighborhood. Because of the significance of these issues, Sixth Avenue has been included in the Plan as a Focus Area, and many of the issues and recommendations for 6th Avenue also are relevant to the other one-way streets in the neighborhood. With its proximity to Downtown, having the highest density of any neighborhood in the City, and having healthy and centrally located neighborhood-orientated retail uses, Capitol Hill I Cheesman Park has heavy transit ridership and a highly pedestrianized population. Both the transit and the pedestrian environment need improvements, however, and these improvements would result in higher transit ridership and pedestrian activity. Over the years, numerous responses have been generated for these and related transportation issues. Recent studies include the "Central Denver North-South Traffic Impact Mitigation Study", also known as the OneWay Street Study, and the Southeast Quadrant Land Use and Transportation Review, known as the Southeast Quadrant Study. The recommendations related to the Capitol Hill I Cheesman Park neighborhood from these two studies are consistent with the recommendations in this plan. The following circulation issues and recommendations are those which are considered critical to the entire neighborhood and, thus, to the framework plan. 1. ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS FROM CIRCULATION STUDIES CIRCULATION STUDIES ISSUE 1: There is an exceptionally high volume of traffic through the neighborhood which creates a negative impact on the adjoining property and on both pedestrian and bicycle traffic. CIRCULATION STUDIES RECOMMENDATION 1: CONSIDER EXISTING STUDY RECOMMENDATIONS Consider those recommendations of the One-way Street study and the Southeast Quadrant Study which relate to the neighborhood. Delay further consideration and studies of one-way conversions until the construction of the Speer Boulevard I Sixth Avenue I Lincoln Street grade separation project is completed and its effect on traffic patterns can be adequately assessed. In assessing one-way street conversions, the status of major ingress and egress routes to Downtown should be considered. Specifically, the recommendations of these studies which apply to the neighborhood include: 58. ,. 1 1 l l 1 1 _,,

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CORRIDOR/SEGMENT PRIMARY INTENT PROPOSED AcriON BROADWAY/ UNCOLN ENHANCE THE DESIRABIUTY Provide high frequency and EAST COLFAX OF USING TRANSIT FOR bus transit services. MID-DAY DEMANDS ALONG CORRIDORS CORONA STREET REDUCE 1RAFFIC FLOW Convert to 2-way local Colfax to 6th Ave. 1HROUGH CAPITOL HILL collector street, subject AND PROVIDE A to adequate alternative NEIGHBORHOOD COLLECTOR roadway /transit ROUTE improvements and access to the Central Business District and other appropriate employment and activity centers. DOWNING STREET REDUCE 1RAFFIC FLOW Convert to 2-way local Colfax to 8th Ave. THROUGH CAPITOL HILL street, subject to AND PROVIDE A adequate alternative NEIGHBORHOOD COLLECTOR roadway /transit ROUTE improvements and access to the Central r Business District and other appropriate employment and activity centers. ... DOWNING STREET REDUCE 1RAFFIC FLOW Convert to 2-way -' 8th Ave. to Speer THROUGH CAPITOL HILL collector street, subject AND PROVIDE A to adequate alternative NEIGHBORHOOD COLLECTOR roadway /transit ROUTE improvements and access to the Central Business District and other appropriate employment and activity centers. PEDESTRIAN /BICYCLE PROVIDE PHYSICAL 11th Avenue CORRIDOR CORRIDOR FOR ALTERNATIVE Downtown to TRAVEL MODES Cheesman Park COLFAX A VENUE INCREASE AUTOMOBILE Improve signalization Broadway to Yosemite CAPACITY TO REDUCE to facilitate traffic flow. 1RAFFIC DEMANDS ON ALTERNATIVE ROUTES 59.

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. \ : "+" r i I ,"'-' 1'\. 1 \l \J ( Existing Street System N EB 61.

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-Existing One Way Streets 63.

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f f I t I t I 2. STREET ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS STREET ISSUE 1: A conflict exists between the need to carry traffic around the City and through the neighborhood and the desire to retain and reinforce the character and livability of Capitol Hill. sub-issue a: Although they are an essential element of the existing metropolitan transportation system, the one-way arterial street pairs divide the neighborhood and are destructive to the quality and livability of the neighborhood. sub-issue b: Actual traffic speeds are too high on the one-way streets. STREET RECOMMENDATION 1a: DISCOURAGE ADDITIONAL TRAFFIC Find alternative means for carrying traffic through or around the neighborhood. Additional traffic, street widening, and additional negative impacts on the residential desirability of the neighborhood are to be avoided. Traffic improvements should improve the residential quality of the neighborhood. STREET RECOMMENDATION lb: STUDY TilE CONVERSION OF ADDITIONAL ONE-WAY STREETS AND OTHER IMPROVEMENTS To help protect the livability of the neighborhood, study both the conversion of additional one-way streets to two-way traffic and the introduction of other improvements which will help buffer the neighborhood from traffic impacts. Consider, for example, off-peak on-street parking along East Eighth Avenue between Colorado Boulevard and Lincoln Street. STREET RECOMMENDATION lc: ENFORCE SPEEDS ON ONE-WAY AND 1WO-WAY ARTERIALS Improve enforcement of posted traffic speeds on one-way and two way arterial streets, study the potential for lowering speed limits on those streets, and time lights to limit effective speeds. sub-issue c: Traffic flow, particularly in the conunercial areas at 9th and Corona and 11th and Ogden, needs to be reviewed for efficiency and safety. 65.

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...... -STREET RECOMMENDATION ld: STUDY TRAFFIC FLOW IN COMMERCIAL AREAS Study and implement improvements to the traffic flow, efficiency, and safety in commercial areas of the neighborhood. STREET ISSUE 2: Thirteenth Avenue widens from two to three traffic lanes west of Franklin Street. Because the right-of-way itself does not expand until Grant Street, the additional street width results in reduced setbacks between the street and the adjoining buildings, most of which are residential, and in narrower sidewalks. The narrow setbacks intensify the impacts of noise, dirt, and safety hazards. STREET RECOMMENDATION 2a: STUDY THE POTENTIAL NARROWING OF TIIIRTEENTII AVENUE Complete a traffic study of 13th Avenue between Franklin and Broadway, focusing on the potential for narrowing the street and widening the setbacks, allowing for widening the sidewalks and providing additional landscaping and other buffering for the adjoining land uses. Address capacity issues, sub-area circulation and access concerns, air quality impacts, and other related issues. Implement the recommendations of the study STREET RECOMMENDATION 2b: IMPLEMENT AN INTERIM SOLUTION FOR THIRTEENTII A VENUE Until a permanent solution can be constructed for Thirteenth Avenue, allow parking on the south side of Thirteenth Avenue during offpeak hours, focusing on the area between Washington and Logan. STREET ISSUE 3: The neighborhood suffers because of the flow of traffic through it, rather than traffic which is generated within it. SlREET RECOMMENDATION 3: FOR A STATE TAX TO MITIGATE TRAFFIC IMPACTS Lobby for a State tax on gasoline which will go for mitigating impacts on existing neighborhoods, similar to the subsidy program for noise barriers along Interstate Highways. 66. II IJ II II II II II II II II

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S1REET ISSUE 4: The reconstruction of the intersection of 6th, Lincoln, and Speer has been funded. The design of the intersection will impact the neighborhood. STREET RECOMMENDATION 4: INVOLVE THE NEIGHBORHOOD IN DESIGNING 6111/LINCOLN/SPEER The design of the 6th/Lincoln/Speer intersection, at a minimum, should consider aesthetic compatibility with the historic character of Speer and with the neighborhood, the traffic impact on the surrounding area, access to Cherry Creek, and creation of a gateway for Downtown. 3. PEDESTRIAN AND BICYCLE ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS PEDESTRIAN ISSUE 1: The pedestrian orientation of the neighborhood as a whole is strong, but the scarcity of marked crosswalks and drivers' ignorance of pedestrian rights weaken the system. PEDESTRIAN AND BICYCLE RECOMMENDATION la: GIVE PRIORI1Y TO WALKING AS THE MOST DESIRABLE FORM OF TRANSPORTATION Encourage people in the neighborhood to walk to work, shopping, and recreation. Give other forms of transportation lower priority. PEDESTRIAN AND BICYCLE RECOMMENDATION lb: ENFORCE PEDESTRIAN LAWS Enforce laws which give pedestrians the right-of-way over automobiles, educate the public to these laws, and institute significant fines for violations. sub-issue a: Pedestrian crossing of arterialssuch as Colfax, Lincoln, Broadway, 13th, and 14th is difficult at best. PEDESTRIAN AND BICYCLE RECOMMENDATION lc: IMPROVE PEDESTRIAN CROSSINGS Identify priority intersections where pedestrian crosswalks should be marked. Mark these crosswalks and then give higher priority to maintaining them. sub-issue b: The neighborhood suffers from inadequate pedestrian and bicycle linkages between both external and internal destinations. Parking lots, barren streetscapes, narrow sidewalks, and poorly maintained properties on the northern and 67.

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western edges of the neighborhood make walking less comfortable and enjoyable, thus discouraging pedestrian traffic. PEDESTRIAN AND BICYCLE RECOMMENDATION ld: IMPROVE TIIE PEDESTRIAN ENVIRONMENT Improve the pedestrian environment with streetscape programs, landscaping of parking lots, and improved property maintenance. PEDES1RIAN AND BICYCLE RECOMMENDATION le: EMPHASIZE PEDESTRIAN STREETS Improve both and east-west streets as pedestrian and visual linkages within the neighborhood and with adjoining neighborhoods, including Downtown. North-south streets which should be considered include Sherman, Pennsylvania, Clarkson, Franklin, Columbine, and Elizabeth. East-west streets include Seventh, Ninth, Eleventh, and Twelfth Avenues. PEDES1RIAN AND BICYCLE RECOMMENDATION lf: COMPLETE EXISTING STREETSCAPE PROJECTS East Colfax and Clarkson both have had initial streetscape improvements completed. Give priority to completing these projects. "' PEDES1RIAN AND BICYCLE ISSUE 2: Bicycle ridership is lower than one would anticipate given the location of the neighborhood, its demographics, and Denver's climate. sub-issue a: Bicycles are thought of primarily as recreation, rather than as transportation. sub-issue b: Conflicts exist among automobiles, bicycles, and pedestrians. PEDES1RIAN AND BICYCLE RECOMMENDATION 2a: GIVE HIGHER PRIORI1Y TO BICYCLES Develop strategies for improving the capacity, safety, enjoyment, and speed of bicycle travel. Strategies should include improved maintenance of both on-street and off-street bicycle routes, the review of existing and possible bicycle routes for their capacity, safety and efficiency, and the provision of bicycle racks in commercial area. 68. II t: II II II II r t t J

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-PEDESTRIAN AND BICYCLE RECOMMENDATION 2b: EDUCATE DRIVERS AND BICYCLISTS Develop public education programs on the rights and obligations of bicycle ridership and safety precautions for both bicyclists and automobile drivers. PEDESTRIAN AND BICYCLE RECOMMENDATION 2c: ENFORCE BICYCLE LAWS More strictly enforce bicycle laws, emphasizing the rights and responsibilities of bicyclists. 4. TRANSIT ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS 1RANSIT ISSUE 1: The neighborhood has a large transit-independent population, the highest residential density in the City, proximity to Downtown, and a higher-than-normal level of transit ridership. While the neighborhood has a high bus ridership, given its location and the character of its residents, it should have even higher ridership. sub-issue a: RID bus transfers currently cannot be used for return trips, thus discouraging use of the bus for short shopping trips. 1RANSIT RECOMMENDATION la: PROVIDE RETURN TRIP BUS TRANSFERS Expand the current use of bus transfers to allow roundtrip transfers within a two hour period. sub-issue b: The bus shelters in the neighborhood are scarce and in poor condition. 1RANSIT RECOMMENDATION lb: PROVIDE MORE BUS SHELTERS Provide additional bus shelters. Shelters should be located and designed to be compatible with the neighborhood and adjacent property. sub-issue c: Bus stop areas and bus benches are in need of better maintenance. 1RANSIT RECOMMENDATION lc: MAINTAIN BUS STOPS AND BENCHES Develop programs arid funding for improved maintenance of bus stops and benches. 69.

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1RANSIT RECOMMENDATION ld: IMPROVE BUS STOPS Improve bus stops to better buffer them from weather and traffic. sub-issue d: Riding a bus to and from Downtown is convenient, but other areas of the metropolitan area are far less accessible by bus from the neighborhood. 1RANSIT RECOMMENDATION le: EXPAND BUS SERVICE Support efforts of R1D to expand bus service throughout the metropolitan area. ,. subissue e: Peak hour circulator buses are too infrequent and too widely spaced. Additional circulator routes and buses would help make bus service more convenient and competitive and, thus, would attract additional ridership. 1RANSIT RECOMMENDATION lf: ADD MORE PEAK HOUR CIRCULATOR BUSES Support and work with RID in their efforts to expand the system of circulator buses through the neighborhood and to improve headway between buses. RID and the neighborhood organizations should work together in locating additional bus routes. sub-issue f: Diesel buses pollute the neighborhood with particulates and odors. Many of the buses generate excessive noise and vibrations. 1RANSIT RECOMMENDATION lg: BUY QUIET, NQN .. POLLUTING BUSES Work with RID to assure that new buses will be quiet and non polluting. 1RANSIT ISSUE 2: As mass transit systems are developed, their design and location will potentially both impact the livability of the neighborhood and create pressure for more intense redevelopment. 1RANSIT RECOMMENDATION 2a: INVOLVE THE NEIGHBORHOOD Incorporate representatives of the neighborhood and its concerns in key discussions regarding future mass transit and rapid transit alignments and technology. 70. II J II ll II ll ,. r I I I I I I I I I I I

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' -TRANSIT RECOMMENDATION 2b: PROVIDE READY ACCESS TO RAPID TRANSIT ROUTES As alternative rapid transit routes are analyzed and routes are proposed and selected, study the potential for ready access from the neighborhood to the rapid transit lines while meeting the needs of the neighborhood. TRANSIT RECOMMENDATION 2c: REZONE TilE NEIGHBORHOOD TO ACCOMMODATE TRANSIT IMPACTS If rapid transit is approved adjacent to the neighborhood, zone the neighborhood to allow it to take advantage of the potential positive effects and to protect from the potential negative impacts. 5. PARKING ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS PARKING ISSUE 1: The neighborhood suffers from limited onstreet and offstreet parking. Both are less than is necessary to meet the needs of the residents, institutions, and businesses in the neighborhood. While on-street parking clogs the already-narrow streets, it does help buffer the sidewalks and the adjoining uses from the traffic and helps slow traffic. PARKING RECOMMENDATION la: PROVIDE TRANSPORTATION ALTERNATIVES Improve transit, pedestrian, and bicycle alternatives to the use of automobiles and thus, help limit the demand for parking. PARKING RECOMMENDATION lb: USE ON-STREET PARKING TO BUFFER TRAFFIC IMPACTS Use on-street parking as a buffer between the traffic, the sidewalks, and the uses adjacent to the street. PARKING RECOMMENDATION lc: STUDY TilE CREATION OF PARKING DISTRICTS Study the creation of parking districts which would provide joint parking facilities. sub-issue a: The inadequacy and under-utilization of commercial parking is partially a result of a parking management problem. 71.

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I PARKING RECOMMENDATION ld: IMPROVE COMMERCIAL PARKING Inventory existing parking, evaluate parking needs, and establish programs for better managing available parking and, if necessary, acquiring additional parking. PARKING ISSUE 2: A conflict arises between the desire to provide adequate parking and the desire to retain the historic urban residential character of the neighborhood. sub-issue a: Parking is perceived as both pervasive and inadequate. PARKING RECOMMENDATION 2a: ,. IDENTIFY WHERE OFF-STREET PARKING WILL BE ENCOURAGED OR DISCOURAGED Identify specific locations where off-street parking will be encouraged and specific locations where it will be discouraged. sub-issue b: Existing on-street parking laws are not well enforced. PARKING RECOMMENDATION 2b: ENFORCE ON STREET PARKING LAWS Giver higher priority to enforcing existing on-street parking laws. sub-issue c: Some of the major employers in and near the neighborhood provide neither adequate parking nor transportation alternatives for their employees and visitors. PARKING RECOMMENDATION 2c: ENCOURAGE EMPLOYEE TRANSIT OPTIONS Employers should provide incentives for their employees to use transportation alternatives and should provide adequate parking for those employees who cannot use alternative transportatiOJ?-. sub-issue d: Parking lots and structures are both incompatible with the residential character of the neighborhood. PARKING RECOMMENDATION 2d: REVIEW PARKING FOR COMPATIBILI1Y Review proposals and designs for parking lots and structures for compatibility with the surrounding land uses and the character of the neighborhood. 72. II IJ II II II II If r I I I I I I

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1. SCHOOL ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS SCHOOL ISSUE 1: The presence of public and private schools in the neighborhood is essential to maintaining the residential character of the neighborhood and to attracting families to live here. SCHOOL RECOMMENDATION la: RETAIN NEIGHBORHOOD SCHOOLS Retain and improve the public schools in the neighborhood. The City and the neighborhood organizations also should work together to encourage private schools to locate and stay in the neighborhood. sub-issue a: The retention and maintenance of the historic school buildings as neighborhood schools is critical to retaining the sense of history in the neighborhood and the character of the neighborhood. SCHOOL RECOMMENDATION lb: PRESERVE HISTORIC SCHOOL BUILDINGS Maintain and improve the historic school buildings as neighborhood schools. SCHOOL ISSUE 2: Community members who are not parents of school age children are seldom involved in education issues or programs. SCHOOL RECOMMENDATION 2: ENCOURAGE PARTICIPATION IN EDUCATION Encourage all residents, property owners, and business owners, including those who are not parents of school age children, to participate in school issues, and programs, including budgeting. As part of this effort to encourage participation, the School District should designate a permanent community contact person for each school. The School District should also stabilize the administration of each school, extending the tenure of school principals rather than transferring them from school to school. 75. I l 'j l t I f I I I J I j I I I l

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'SCHOOL ISSUE 3: There is little encouragement of community use of school facilities. SCHOOL RECOMMENDATION 3: ENCOURAGE COMMUNITY USE OF SCHOOLS Open school facilities for greater community use. The School District should develop a policy allowing and encouraging community use of schools for recreation programs and public open space. 76. I I I r.J I II II J II II II

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2. CRIME PREVENTION ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS CRIME PREVENTION ISSUE 1: Neighborhood crime is a serious problem but receives undue adverse publicity. sub-issue a: While the neighborhood and the District 3 office of the Police Department have an excellent working relationship, crime prevention would benefit from an even stronger police presence in the neighborhood. CRIME PREVENTION RECOMMENDATION la: CREATE A STRONGER POLICE PRESENCE Strengthen the presence and the perception of the presence of the police in the neighborhood. The Police Department's newly created bicycle patrol program is an excellent example of developing a program which responds to the unique characteristics of the neighborhood. As part of this recommendation, the Police Department should encourage longer tours of duty within the neighborhood in order to allow officers to be more familiar with the area and for the people within the area to be more familiar with the each officer. sub-issue b: Because of the differences between Capitol, Hill I Cheesman Park and other neighborhoods in the City, there is a question whether the neighborhood watch program is the appropriate model for the neighborhood. CRIME PREVENTION RECOMMENDATION lb: ESTABLISH A UNIQUE NEIGHBORHOOD WATCH PROGRAM Establish a resident crime prevention program which is tailored to the neighborhood. The program should respond to the characteristics which make the neighborhood unique, such as the high percentage of residents who are renters and the high density of the housing. Crime. prevention programs in similar neighborhoods throughout the country should be reviewed for replicable ideas. The need for 75% participation should be reviewed and, if appropriate, modified for the neighborhood. Once a new program is developed, the Police Department and the neighborhood organizations should work together to promote the program and to encourage police and citizen participation. sub-issue c: Alleys, streets, parking lots, and parks need better standards for lighting. 77.

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CRIME PREVENTION RECOMMENDATION lc: IMPROVE NEIGHBORHOOD LIGHTING Improve neighborhood street, alley, and pedestrian lighting. Efforts should be directed to public education of the available options, their costs and benefits. Residents and property owners should be included in selecting locations for additional light fixtures. 1:: t J J sub-issue d: X-rated bookstores and theaters and some bars are a magnet for anti1 social and criminal activity. The comfort and safety of residents, business people, and visitors to the area are threatened by the activity. CRIME PREVENTION RECOMMENDATION ld: REMOVE AND DISCOURAGE TROUBLESOME USES Remove those uses which have been demonstrated to be a public nuisance. Discourage new uses which are likely to act as magnets for anti-social and criminal activity. 3. SPECIAL POPULATIONS ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS SPECIAL POPULATIONS ISSUE 1: The neighborhood has a high concentration of special populations and their service facilities. GROUP HOMES AND OTIIER SOCIAL SERVICE FACiliTIES sub-issue a: There is an unequal share of group homes and other social service facilities in the neighborhood. sub-issue b: Current City and State legislation regarding the siting of group homes and other social service facilities does not adequately address the concerns of either the neighborhood or of the social service providers. ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE sub-issue a: The neighborhood is highly impacted by a high incidence of alcohol and drug abuse. HOMELESS sub-issue a: There are many homeless people in the neighborhood. RUNAWAY AND TIIROWAWAY YOUTII sub-issue a: There has been an increase of runaway and throwaway youth living in the neighborhood. 78. I .. I \:._ I ..._., I .._ __ I ,..

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SPECIAL POPUlATIONS RECOMMENDATION la: DISCOURAGE ADDITIONAL SOCIAL SERVICE FACILITIES IN TilE NEIGHBORHOOD Do not locate any additional social service facilities in the neighborhood until other areas of the metropolitan area accept their fair share of facilities. SPECIAL POPULATIONS RECOMMENDATION lb: SUPPORT FUNDING OF PROGRAMS AND FACILITIES Support funding of programs and facilities throughout the City for the treatment of alcohol and drug abuse, caring for the homeless, and caring for runaway and throwaway youth. SPECIAL POPULATIONS RECOMMENDATION lc: WORK WITH SOCIAL SERVICES PROVIDERS TO REVIEW THE LOCATION OF FACILITIES AND TO DEVELOP PROGRAMS Once other areas of the metropolitan area have accepted their fair share of social service facilities, then require social service providers to work with the neighborhood organizations in locating social service facilities and in developing programs which will impact the neighborhood. SPECIAL POPULATIONS RECOMMENDATION ld: ESTABLISH ONGOING RELATIONSHIPS WITII SERVICE PROVIDERS Establish ongoing relationships between the neighborhood organizations and the social service providers in the neighborhood. ELDERLY AND PHYSICALLY DISABLED sub-issue a: The neighborhood has a high concentration of elderly and physically disabled residents. sub-issue b: There are not enough sidewalk curb cuts for the elderly and disabled. SPECIAL POPULATIONS RECOMMENDATICN le: BUILD MORE SIDEWALK HANDICAP RAMPS Identify priority locations for building new sidewalk handicap ramps, identify funding sources, get funding commitments, and monitor the construction and maintenance. 79.

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-F. ENVIRONMENT BACKGROUND AND ANALYSIS The high density, urban character of the neighborhood and its location create special environmental challenges. Graffiti and trash proliferate. The high volume of traffic, the narrow streets, and the high density of residents generate sand, dirt, and trash on the streets and make street sweeping difficult. Similarly, the traffic and density of residents generate a high volume of noise. Because the neighborhood is highly pedestrianized, residents are particularly dependent on safe, accessible sidewalks. .. 1. GRAFFITI ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS GRAFFITI ISSUE 1: The problem of graffiti is increasing throughout the neighborhood. sub-issue a: While graffiti lowers property values as well as our senses of enjoyment, security, ownership, and pride in the neighborhood, no successful means has yet been developed for protecting against it. GRAFFffi RECOMMENDATION 1: DISCOURAGE GRAFFITI Discourage graffiti, using techniques such as the installation of protective wall coverings and landscaping, immediate removal of graffiti, brighter lighting, enforcement of existing ordinances prohibiting graffiti, and public education and awareness. Work with Keep Denver Beautiful and other anti-graffiti programs. Consider using juvenile offenders in graffiti removal efforts. 80. 1: II p II II ,. II II I I

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2. TRASH COLLECTION ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS TRASH COLLECTION ISSUE 1: Trash accumulates in streets, alleys, bus stops, and poorly maintained yards and parking lots. TRASH COLLECTION RECOMMENDATION la: IMPROVE TRASH COLLECI10N AND INCREASE PUBLIC AWARENESS Work with "Keep Denver Beautiful" and similar programs to disseminate information on requirements and procedures for trash collection and litter prevention, encourage private and public trash collection efforts, and enforce City trash ordinances. Consider the City taking over commercial trash collection programs and charging a fee, offering more frequent trash pick-up, and enforcing stricter standards. TRASH COLLECTION RECOMMENDATION lb: EXPAND RECYCLING EFFORTS AND PROVIDE CURBSIDE RECYCLING Work to expand existing recycling programs and to institute curbside recycling throughout the neighborhood. TRASH COLLECTION RECOMMENDATION lc: PROVIDE ENOUGH DUMPSTERS Provide enough dumpsters to meet the demand generated by residents and businesses. TRASH COLLECTION RECOMMENDATION ld: PROVIDE ADDITIONAL TRASH RECEPTACLES Place trash receptacles and provide for improved maintenance at bus stops, convenience stores, carry-out fast food restaurants, and other locations where trash is either generated or where it collects. TRASH COLLECTION RECOMMENDATION le: CREATE SPECIAL DISTRICTS TO IMPROVE AND MAINTAIN ALLEYS Consider the creation of special taxing districts to improve and maintain alleys. TRASH COLLECTION ISSUE 2: Dumpster lids are heavy and create a hazard for many elderly and disabled residents. TRASH COLLECTION RECOMMENDATION 2: INSTALL LIGHTER LIDS ON DUMPSTERS Install lighter lids, perhaps plastic, on dumpsters. 81.

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I -TRASH COU..ECTION ISSUE 3: Because the neighborhood has a mixture of singlefamily and multiple-family residential, retail, and institutional uses, the demands for trash collection for each of these uses often conflict with one another. TRASH COLLECTION RECOMMENDATION 3: RESTRICT TRASH COLLECTION In areas which include residential uses, restrict trash collection to those times which do not conflict either with residents sleeping or with access or egress from their garages or parking areas through the alleys. 3. STREET SWEEPING ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS STREET SWEEPING ISSUE 1: Major traffic arteries accumulate sand, dirt, and trash, creating hazards for bicyclists and degrading the air quality by adding particulates. S1REET SWEEPING RECOMMENDATION 1: SWEEP STREETS MORE FREQUENTLY Because of the demands created by the high density of the neighborhood, the City should give the neighborhood a higher priority for street maintenance and should demonstrate its commitment by sweeping streets more frequently and by improving the cleanup of sand following snowstorms. Signs giving notice of impending street cleaning should be more visible larger and more colorful, while being designed and located to minimize the potential for additionaivisual clutter. 4. SNOW REMOVAL ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS SNOW REMOVAL ISSUE 1: Too many people do not clean snow off their sidewalks. SNOW REMOVAL RECOMMENDATION 1: ENFORCE SNOW SHOVELLING Disseminate information on requirements and procedures for snow removal from sidewalks, encourage snow removal, and enforce City snow removal ordinances. 82. l r. t II II II II

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5. PET CARE ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS PET CARE ISSUE 1: Too many people do not clean up after their pets. PET CARE RECOMMENDATION 1: CLEAN UP AFTER PETS Initiate a concerted public relations effort which will educate people to their responsibility to clean-up after their pets, particularly in the parks, by disseminating information on requirements and procedures for cleaning up after pets, encouraging individuals to clean up after their pets, and enforcing City animal ordinances. 6. NOISE ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS NOISE ENFORCEMENT ISSUE 1: The neighborhood is too noisy. NOISE ENFORCEMENT RECOMMENDATION 1: ENFORCE THE NOISE ORDINANCE Disseminate information on the City noise ordinance and its enforcement procedures, and aid its enforcement. 83. -J

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I I I. D I S T R I C T P L A N S

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J.l Study Subareas & District Boundaries N EB 87.

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PREFACE The Capitol Hill / Cheesman Park neighborhood is diverse culturally, socially, ec.onornically, and physically. Because it is important to consider the elements which provide the distinctions in the neighborhood, the District Plan establishes 12 districts which have relatively distinct characteristics, acknowledging that the boundaries between the districts are not sacrosanct and that some characteristics overlap district boundaries. The District Plan provides a description of each of the 12 districts, a vision for what the characteristics of the district should be in the future, and the issues and recommendations, including general zoning recommendations, which are most important to the district. These issues and recommendations are in addition to those which are included in the Framework Plan, and which are considered to generally apply to the entire neighborhood, including each district. 89.

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A. BROADWAY I LINCOLN DISTRICf DESCRIPTION The Broadway / lincoln District forms the western edge of the neighborhood. It is one and one-half blocks wide and seven and one-half blocks long, extending from the middle of Broadway on the west to the alley between Lincoln and Sherman on the east, and from Speer Boulevard on the south to Thirteenth Avenue on the north. The district is heavily impacted by traffic on one-way streets, including lincoln, (northbound), Broadway (southbound), Thirteenth Avenue (westbound), Eighth Avenue (westbound), and Sixth Avenue (eastbound). The district is bounded on the south by yet another major thoroughfare, Speer Boulevard. Five two-way streets cross the district: Seventh Avenue, Ninth Avenue, Tenth Avenue, Eleventh Avenue, and Twelfth Avenue. The zoning in the district is B-8, with the exception of one PUD in the 900 block of Lincoln. B-8 zoning is an intensive general business and very high density residential district. The PUD allows high density mixed residential / retail mixed use development, with a higher residential density than allowed in the B-8 district. The area covered by the Cheesman Park Mountain View Ordinance extends from the east to the middle of Broadway. Development which is in the district is, therefore, subject to the restrictions of this ordinance. A major transportation corridor, the Broadway / lincoln District provides the southern gateway to Downtown Denver, with the intersection of Speer I Lincoln / Broadway the point of entry. The district is linear, running north-south, parallel to Lincoln and Broadway. With a character which is distinct from the rest of the neighborhood, development in the district is primarily commercial, with offices and destination retail uses. Older commercial buildings are inter-mixed with newer commercial structures, including several large office buildings, including the Blue Cross Blue Shield Building, the new Security Life Building, and the Chancery Building. Potentially the most significant commercial development is Bannock Center, a proposed eight block mixed-use project extending between Eighth and Tenth Avenue, and from Lincoln to Speer. A few older residential structures remain in the district; of these, Sherman Towers is the largest and most visible. The potential for redevelopment to higher intensity uses exists throughout the district. VISION While significant structures will be preserved, the Lincoln/Broadway Corridor will .experience major redevelopment, resulting in the creation of a strong anchor at both its north and south ends, each of which will act as a gateway for Downtown and for the corridor. The scale of development will step down from the middle of the corridor to the east and west edges in order to create a sensitive transition into the adjoining neighborhoods. East-west linkages will cross the corridor and connect La Alma/Lincoln 90. I r r I l l l l l l l l 1

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., Park to Cheesman Park. The corridor will provide restaurants, retail activity, art galleries, offices, and other commercial uses; residential uses will line Ninth and Eleventh Avenues, and in other cases will adjoin the corridor and be buffered from it. ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS BROADWAY I UNCOLN DISTRICf ISSUE 1: The Lincoln I Broadway corridor joins two neighborhoods Capitol Hill to the east and the Golden Triangle to the west. BROADWAY I UNCOLN DISTRICf RECOMMENDATION 1: DEVELOP A NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN FOR THE GOLDEN TRIANGLE Develop a Golden Triangle neighborhood plan which will also address the Lincoln I Broadway corridor, so that a cohesive plan for the corridor can be implemented. Until that plan is developed, delay the implementation of any recommendations for the Broadway I Lincoln corridor which might conflict with the recommendations in the proposed Golden Triangle plan. Upon completion, recommendations in the Golden Triangle plan which conflict with those in this plan will take precedence. BROADWAY I UNCOLN DISTRICT ISSUE 2: The corridor is one of the districts in the neighborhood which can most easily accommodate redevelopment and which, in fact, can benefit from sensitive redevelopment. BROADWAY I UNCOLN DISTRICT RECOMMENDATION 2: ENCOURAGE NEW CONSTRUCI10N IN THE CORRIDOR BROADWAY I UNCOLN DISTRICT ISSUE 3: Because of its history as a commercial district, there are several architecturally significant commercial buildings in the district. There also is an historically important church (St. Mark's) and several other public and private structures which are important to the character of the district, the neighborhood, and the City. BROADWAY I UNCOLN DISTRICT RECOMMENDATION 3: PRESERVE SIGNIFICANT STRUCTURES IN THE CORRIDOR BROADWAY I UNCOLN DISTRICT ISSUE 4: As a result of the heavy loads of traffic carried by both Lincoln and Broadway, the district has severe limitations for residential uses. On the other hand, because of the traffic load and UncolniBroadway's proximity to Downtown and dense residential areas which have only limited retail and other commercial uses, the district has opportunities for retail, entertainment, and other commercial uses. 91.

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BROADWAY/ LINCOLN DISTRICT RECOMMENDATION 4: PROVIDE GROUND FLOOR RETAIL Ground floor uses should be retail, emphasizing active uses such as restaurants, bars, theaters, and other entertainment facilities. BROADWAY / UNCOLN DISTRICT ISSUE 5: With the obvious exception of the Chancery Building, the land use pattern in the district creates gateways at both the north and south ends of the corridor and buffers the surrounding areas. BROADWAY/ UNCOLN DISTRICf RECOMMENDATION Sa: REINFORCE TilE EXISTING LAND USE PATTERN Use new construction in the corridor to reinforce the existing land use pa,ttern. BROADWAY/ UNCOLN DISTRICf RECOMMENDATION 5b: REINFORCE THE GATEWAYS TO TIJE DISTRicr Use new construction surrounding .the gateways at the north and south ends of the corridor to reinforce their significance and function, while new construction between the gateways should be of lower scale. BROADWAY / LINCOLN DISlRICT ISSUE 6: The existing land use pattern in the corridor includes several uses which accentuate the comer of buildings at intersections. This pattern has the advantage of helping to accentuate the east/west streets, which provide the linkages into the adjoining neighborhoods. It also helps to create distinct areas within an othetwise indistinct linear corridor. BROADWAY/ LINCOLN DISTRICf RECOMMENDATION 6: ACCENTUATE THE STREET CORNERS Make the street comers on Broadway and Lincoln into special places in order to accentuate them. Consider either locating primary entrances to buildings or open space on the comers. Establish a single pattern for all four comers at any intersection, but encourage variety among the different intersections. BROADWAY / UNCOLN DISTRICT ISSUE 7: The corridor has the potential for reinforcing its north and south gateways, its "boulevard" character, and its sensitive relationship with the adjoining residential areas. The relative height of buildings within the corridor is the most important characteristic in achieving this desired character. 92. 1 I l l l l l l l l

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I ._) BROADWAY I UNCOLN DISTRICT RECOMMENDATION 7: SET MAXIMUM AND MINIMUM BUILDING HEIGHTS Set maximum and minimum building heights for the corridor. The highest buildings should be in the middle of the corridor, in the block between Lincoln and Broadway. The maximum height of these buildings should be 150 feet. Only buildings at the north and south gateways should exceed this height. Buildings on the east edge should be lower. Building heights should create a formal pattern which emphasizes the boulevard quality of Lincoln and Broadway. Consider using either an overlay zone or an extension of the mountain view ordinance to help implement these building height provisions. BROADWAY I UNCOLN ISSUE 8: It is important to reinforce both the formal boulevard character of the street and the residential and pedestrian scale of buildings adjoining the surrounding residential areas while allowing additional density in order to encourage redevelopment. BROADWAY I UNCOLN RECOMMENDATION 8: CREATE UPPERLEVEL BUILDING SETBACKS For buildings which are outside of the gateways and are on the west side of Lincoln and the east side of Broadway, create upper-level building setbacks. The maximum height directly adjacent to the street should be 2-3 floors. BROADWAY I UNCOLN ISSUE 9: With the exception of Sherman Towers, buildings adjoining the district on the east are no more than 4 stories. Buildings on the east side of the district should be compatible with this existing height in order to avoid an incompatibility of scales, such as has been created by the Chancery Building looming over 3-story apartments on Sherman. BROADWAY/ UNCOLN RECOMMENDATION 9: SET A MAXIMUM HEIGHT ON THE EAST SIDE OF LINCOLN For new buildings on the east side of Lincoln, between Lincoln and the Lincoln I Sherman alley, set a maximum height of 80 feet. 93.

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BROADWAY / UNCOLN DISTRICT ISSUE 10: The corridor has street trees along its length, but not enough to create the desired image of an urban boulevard I Downtown gateway. BROADWAY/ UNCOLN DISTRICT RECOMMENDATION 10: PLANT TREES Plant as many trees as possible along both Lincoln and Broadway. BROADWAY/ UNCOLN DISTRICf ISSUE 11: Eleventh Avenue connects Park on the east to La Alma/Lincoln Park on the west. It has a bridge which crosses Cherry Creek, it is exceptionally wide through most of Capitol Hill, and it is being improved : with a landscaped median between Ogden and Washington. BROADWAY/ UNCOLN DISTRICf RECOMMENDATION 11: USE ELEVENTH AVENUE AS THE LINKAGE TO THE NEIGHBORHOODS Use Eleventh Avenue as the linkage to the adjoining neighborhoods and from Capitol Hill to the Golden Triangle and La Alma / Lincoln Park neighborhoods. BROADWAY / UNCOLN DISTRICT ISSUE 12: Both Ninth and Eleventh Avenues are designated as east-west pedestrian linkages through Capitol Hill I Cheesman Park. The presence of residential uses along these streets helps reinforce this pattern. BROADWAY/ UNCOLN DISTRICT RECOMMENDATION 12: ENCOURAGE RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT ON 9TH AND llTII residential development to be built facing both 9th and 11th Avenues through the corridor. BROADWAY/ UNCOLN DISTRICT ISSUE 13: Seventh Avenue is a third important east-west pedestrian linkage through Capitol Hill I Cheesman Park. The street terminates at Cherry Creek / Speer Boulevard. BROADWAY/ LINCOLN DISTRICT RECOMMENDATION 13: CREATE A TERMINATION FOR TfH AVENUE At 7th Avenue, construct both stairs down to Cherry Creek and a marker, statue, or other feature as a western termination for the meet. 94. -l l l l 1 l l 1 l l

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BROADWAY I LINCOLN DIS1RICf ISSUE 14: Essential to the concept of pedestrian linkages is a welcoming, softened, pedestrian character for the streets which are designated as linkages. BROADWAY I UNCOLN DISTRICT RECOMMENDATION 14: CREATE A PEDESTRIAN CHARACTER ON 7TH, 9TH, AND 11TH Along 7th, 9th, and 11th Avenues, establish building setbacks which are deeper than those on other streets in the corridor. Heavily landscape these deeper setbacks in order to soften the streetscape and create more of a residential character. BROADWAY I UNCOLN DISTRICf ISSUE 15: The main Denver Public Library is an important element of the northern gateway to the district. The current library facility is outdated and far too small to meet the expanding demand for its services. BROADWAY I UNCOLN DISTRICT RECOMMENDATION 15: MAINTAIN TilE LIBRARY AT THE CIVIC CENTER Expand the existing library or build a new library facility at the Civic Center. If the library is moved to another site at the Civic Center, either renovate the current building for another public use or replace it with another architecturally significant building with a public use. BROADWAY I UNCOLN DISTRICf ISSUE 16: The City facilities in the Civic Center and the uses in Civic Center Park have inadequate parking. BROADWAY I UNCOLN DIS1RICf RECOMMENDATION 16: PROVIDE ADDITIONAL PARKING FOR TilE CIVIC CENTER Build a new parking structure which is located and sized so that it can seiVe the new library, the art museum, the City and County buildings, and activities within the Civic Center. 95.

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r.o. GENERAL ZONING RECOMMENDATIONS 1. USES a. Lincoln and Broadway: Street level: RETAIL, RESTAURANT, AND ENTERTAINMENT Above ground level: OFFICE AND RESIDENTIAL b. Ninth and Eleventh Avenues: RESIDENTIAL :;;::_ 2. RESIDENTIAL OCCUPANCY SINGLES / COUPLES YOUNG ADULTS / ADULTS STUDIO / 1-2 BEDROOM UNITS .. 3. OPEN SPACE OUTDOOR RECREATION AREAS BALCONIES 1 4. HEIGHT a. Within the North and South Gateways: 1 LIMITED ONLY BY MOUNTAIN VIEW, SKYLINE VIEW AND CMC CENTER PRESERVATION ORDINANCES b. On the blocks between Lincoln and Broadway and outside of the north l and south gateways: MAXIMUM OF 3 OR 4 STORES ADJACENT TO THE STREET AND IN FRONT OF AN UPPER-LEVEL SETBACK l MAXIMUM OF 12 STORIES BEHIND AN UPPER-LEVEL SETBACK c. On the east side of Lincoln and outside of the north and south l gateways: MAXIMUM OF 2 TO 4 STORIES d. Buildings facing Acoma and outside of the north and south gateways: l MID-RISE OR HIGH-RISE BUILDINGS 5. DENSITY l a. DENSI'IY ESTABLISHED BY HEIGHT LIMITATIONS 6. SETBACKS '1 a. RESIDENTIAL AND BOULEVARD SETBACKS TIIROUGHOUTTHE DISTRICT 'l ., I 'l 96. ...

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., B. SHERMAN DISTRICT DESCRIPTION The Sherman District is on the west side of the neighborhood. It is one block wide, bounded on the west by the alley between Sherman and Lincoln and on the east by the alley between Sherman and Grant. It extends for five blocks, from Eighth Avenue on the soutil to Thirteenth Avenue on the north. The District extends along Sherman Street, a north-south street, unusual in an area predominated by one-way streets. As defined, it is bounded on the north and south by one way streets (Eighth and Thirteenth), but has only two-way streets intersecting it. The district is zoned R-4, with the exception of the northern edge, which is zoned B-2. R-4 is a very high density apartment and office zone district, while B-2 is defined as a neighborhood business zone district. Sherman Street is the westernmost outpost of the residential character of the neighborhood. The street is tree-lined and bordered by low-rise apartment buildings, including Poets' Row, a collection of apartment buildings named for famous poets and literary figures. With the Capitol on the northern termination of the street, Cherry Creek on the southern termination, its historic and low-rise buildings, its street tree canopy, and its residential character, Sherman is a significant asset to the neighborhood. The intensity of uses allowed by the R-4 zoning of district, however, threatens the character of Sherman. Intrusions have already appeared on the northern end of the district where buildings have been demolished for surface parking lots and where apartments have been converted to offices. VISION North of Ninth Avenue, Sherman will be a residential and civic street. Between Eighth and Ninth Avenues, Sherman will build upon the character provided by the Colorado Institute of Art. The street will also function as a north-south pedestrian and bicycle connection between the neighborhood, the Capitol complex, and Downtown. A pedestrian scale, residential setbacks, and landscaped tree lawns will help retain the residential character of the street. The view from the street to the Capitol will be highlighted. North of Ninth Avenue, vacant lots will be replaced by residential structures. Parking lots and parking structures will be set back from the sidewalk, landscaped, and further buffered from the street and adjoining properties. 97.

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SHERMAN DISTRICT ISSUE 3: Street trees are particularly important to Sherman: they are essential to creating the residential character of the street and they frame the view of the Capitol. Currently, however, there are not enough trees along the street, particularly on the north end of the street, north of lOth Avenue. Furthermore, many of the existing street trees are the wrong species for the street: they are so large that they block the view from the south to the Capitol. SHERMAN DISTRICT RECOMMENDATION 3: PLANT A DOUBLE ROW OF TREES Replace overgrown, sick, and outofscale trees with a double row of trees along the full length of the street, from Speer to the Capitol. Insist on more uniformity of species. Flowering trees, such as the Bradford Pear, would be desirable. SHERMAN DISTRICT ISSUE 4: There are gaps in the streetscape created by vacant lots, which are currently used as surface parking lots. SHERMAN DISlRICf RECOMMENDATION 4: ENCOURAGE LOW SCALE, RESIDENTIAL INFILL DEVELOPMENT In the 900 to 1300 blocks of Sherman, encourage high density, low scale residential infill development. 99.

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ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS SHERMAN DISTRICT ISSUE 1: The current zoning allows uses which are more intense than the current and desired uses. The setback, floor area ratio, open space, and bulk limit requirements of the current zoning will create a more intense urban character than currently exists or is desired for the street. SHERMAN DISTRICf RECOMMENDATION 1a: REZONE FOR CONFORMITY Rezone to bring the zoning into conformity with the existing and desired uses, scale, and character. SHERMAN DISTRICf RECOMMENDATION 1b: ESTABLISH A DESIGN REVIEW ZONING OVERLAY Establish a design review overlay for the zoning on Sherman. The design guidelines should give priority to retaining the residential I civic character of the street and protecting the current scale, setbacks, etc. SHERMAN DISTRICf RECOMMENDATION 1c: ,. EXPAND UPON TilE ALLOWABLE USES IN THE 800 BLOCK OF SHERMAN In conjunction with reducing the allowable Floor Area Ratio (FAR), in the 800 block of Sherman look favorably upon PUD applications for developments which include limited retail uses which would build upon the character and use of the Colorado Institute of Art. Antique stores, art galleries, small coffee houses, and similar uses might be appropriate for this area. SHERMAN DIS1RICf ISSUE 2: Because of the location, surrounding land uses, and zoning, structures along Sherman are vulnerable to demolition and replacement by parking lots or by larger and taller buildings with less open space and smaller setbacks. Loss of these buildings would lead to a dramatic change in character for the street, and thus, for the entire neighborhood. SHERMAN DISTRICf RECOMMENDATION 2: DESIGNATE SHERMAN A DENVER LANDMARK DISTRICT Designate the 900 1400 blocks of Sherman a Denver Landmark District. Include a height limit as part of the criteria for new development in the district. 98. J II II II J .II .II tJ \II '-I --

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GENERAL ZONING RECOMMENDATIONS 1. USES 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. a. North of 12th Avenue: STATE OFFICES AND RESIDENTIAL b. 9th Avenue to 12th Avenue: RESIDENTIAL c. 8th Avenue to 9th Avenue: MIXED-USE RESIDENTIAL I LIMITED RETAIL / OFFICE /SCHOOL-RELATED RESIDENTIAL OCCUPANCY SINGLES / COUPLES YOUNG ADULTS I ADULTS / ELDERLY STUDIO / 1-2 BEDROOM UNITS OPEN SPACE FRONT YARDS OUTDOOR RECREATION AREAS NO BALCONIES HEIGHT a. North of 13th Avenue: LIMITED ONLY BY MOUNTAIN VIEW AND SKYLINE VIEW PRESERVATION ORDINANCES b. South of 13th Avenue: UNIFORM HEIGHT FOR AN INITIAL SETBACK, AND AN ADDITIONAL ALLOWANCE FOR A SECOND SETBACK, NOT TO EXCEED 75 FEET DENSITY a. North of 13th Avenue: 4:1 FAR b. South of 13th Avenue: 2:1 FAR SETBACKS MAINTAIN 1HE MOST PREVALENT CURRENT SETBACK BE'IWEEN BUILDINGS AND TilE STREET 100. -l l 'l fl 1

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., C. GRANT I LOGAN DISTRICT DESCRIPTION The Grant / Logan District is on the west side of the neighborhood. It is two blocks wide, bounded on the west by the alley between Grant and Sherman and on the east by the alley between Logan and Pennsylvania. It extends for five blocks, from Eighth Avenue on the south to Thirteenth Avenue on the north. Grant and Logan are both one-way streets, Grant southbound and Logan northbound. While the district is bounded on the north by one-way streets, the cross streets in the district are all two-way streets. The zoning in the district is a combination of R-3 and R-4, with Grant being zoned primarily R-4, with the area along Thirteenth zoned B, and Logan zoned primarily R-3, with two small extensions of R-4 between Eighth and Ninth. R-3 is a high density apartment district and R-4 a very high density apartment and office district. The common character of the district is created by the one-way street pair, Grant and Logan, since the zoning and the resulting land uses and image of the two streets vary significantly. Grant, being zoned R-4, is lined with offices, surface parking lots, office conversions, hotels, and apartments. Logan is predominantly residential, and includes both high density apartments and lower density uses, including apartment conversions of single family homes. Logan is narrower, with a good street tree canopy, while Grant is wider and has lost most of its street tree canopy. Despite these differences, however, Grant and Logan have enough commonalties to form a district distinct from the surrounding districts. VISION While Grant will experience significant residential, hotel, and office redevelopment, Logan will stabilize as a medium to high density residential street. Historic and other significant structures will be preserved along both streets, helping to create the distinct residential character of the district. The tree canopy will be re-establjshed along Grant and preserved along Logan. 101.

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ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS GRANT I LOGAN DISTRICT ISSUE 1: Grant Street has the character of an urban, mixed-use street. It has high intensity zoning which allows residential, office, hotel, and limited retail uses. It also has a variety of land uses, a plethora of surface parking lots, and several poorly maintained properties. As a result, it provides an opportunity for additional development. GRANT I LOGAN DISTRICf RECOMMENDATION la: ENCOURAGE ADDITIONAL REDEVELOPMENT ON GRANT Encourage additional redevelopment on Grant, particularly at those sites currently used as surface parking lots. GRANT I LOGAN DISTRICT RECOMMENDATION lb: ... FOCUS ON GRANT FOR LARGE SCALE DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS Focus on Grant Street as a location for large scale residential, hotel, and residential I office I retail mixed-use projects. GRANT I LOGAN DISTRICT ISSUE 2: Despite its mixture of uses, Grant projects an image which is generally compatible with the residential character of the neighborhood. GRANT I LOGAN DISTRICT RECOMMENDATION ISSUE 2: ENHANCE THE RESIDENTIAL CHARACfER OF GRANT Enhance the residential character of Grant Street by requiring residential setbacks and intense landscaping for new buildings and for parking lots and structures. GRANT I LOGAN DISTRICf ISSUE 3: Generally, uses along Logan are stable and well maintained. As a result, the street provides a healthy edge for the residential section of the neighborhood. GRANT I LOGAN DIS'IRICf RECOMMENDATION 3: DISCOURAGE ADDITIONAL REDEVELOPMENT ALONG LOGAN With the exception of small infill projects, discourage additional redevelopment along Logan, and reinforce the quality of the existing development. 102. l l l l l l l "l I "l '1 ) l ., "1

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GENERAL ZONING RECOMMENDATIONS 1. USES a. Grant: RESIDENTIAL, HOTEL, AND RESIDENTIAL I OFFICE I RETAIL MIXED-USE PROJECTS b. I....ogan: RESIDENTIAL c. B-2: RETAIL AND RESIDENTIAL I RETAIL MIXED-USE PROJECTS 2. RESIDENTIAL OCCUPANCY SINGLES I COUPLES YOUNG ADULTS, ADULTS, AND ELDERLY STUDIO I 1-2 BEDROOM UNITS 3. OPEN SPACE a. Grant: FRONT YARDS OUTDOOR RECREATION AREAS BALCONIES 4. HEIGHT a. Grant: LIMITED ONLY BY MOUNTAIN VIEW AND SKYLINE VIEW PRESERVATION ORDINANCES b. I....ogan: LIMITED ONLY BY MOUNTAIN VIEW AND SKYLINE VIEW PRESERVATION ORDINANCE 5. DENSITY a. Grant: 3:1 FAR b. I....ogan: 3:1 FAR c. B-2: RETAIL DENSITY: 1:1 FAR; the density of residential or residential/retail mixed-use projects shall not exceed a 3:1 FAR, with the retail component of such projects not exceeding a 1:1 FAR. 6. SETBACKS a. Grant: RESIDENTIAL b. Logan: RESIDENTIAL 103.

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D. CAPITOL DISTRICf DESCRIPTION The Capitol District forms the northwest comer of the neighborhood. It is bounded on the west by Broadway, on the east by Downing, on the north by Colfax, and on the south by Thirteenth Avenue. The district is severely impacted by traffic. All three east-west streets are heavily travelled: East Colfax (a two-way commercial street and State Highway), Fourteenth (an eastbound one-way street), and Thirteenth (a westbound one-way street). Eight north-south way streets cross the district: Broadway (southbound), Lincoln (northbound), Grant (southbound), Logan (northbound), Washington (southbound), Clarkson (northbound), : Corona (southbound), and Downing (northbound). Only five of the streets in the district have two-way, local, traffic. The zoning in the district decreases in intensity from west (R-4, very high density apartment and office district) to east (R-3, a high density apartment district). Zoning on the northern edge along East Colfax is primarily B-4, a general business district, and zoning on the southern edge along Thirteenth includes two areas of B, a neighborhood business district. Adjacent to Downtown and the State Capitol Complex, zoned R-4 as far west as the alley between Pennsylvania and Pearl, largely outside the boundaries for the Cheesman Park Mountain View Preservation Ordinance, and heavily impacted by traffic on one-way streets, the district has been subject to speculative purchases, demolition, the loss of housing units, the replacement of buildings by surface parking lots, lower levels of maintenance, and the construction of office structures which are incompatible with its historic character. Simultaneous with these actions, the district has deteriorated as a desirable residential area. Because of its location and its historic legacy, however, the health of the district as a residential area is critical not only to the neighborhood but also to Downtown. Its location and legacy create challenges and opportunities; while the district has numerous problems, it also has tremendous potential. VISIONS The Capitol District will stabilize as a desirable, well maintained medium density residential, office, and retail area with a diversity of rental and owneroccupied housing opportunities for singles and couples of various ages and income levels. The impact of traffic along 13th, 14th, and Colfax Avenues will be mitigated. While there will be office and commercial redevelopment and infill west of Logan, the historic and residential character of the district will be preserved. The retail areas in the district will be more inviting for pedestrians and will function more effectively than they do now as focal points for the district. Transit will be readily accessible and the parking demand will be accommodated. Pedestrian access to the Civic Center and Downtown will be improved. 104. J r r r r r r I I T ... J

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ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS CAPITOL DISTRICf ISSUE 1: While the Capitol District has great opportunities, locational advantages, and tremendous historic and human resources, it also is experiencing the greatest deterioration of any of the districts and is faced with serious social issues. CAPITOL DISTRICT RECOMMENDATION la: ESTABLISH A COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION (CDC) Establish a Capitol District Corporation (CDC). Fund the CDC with assistance from the major institutions and property owners in the District. Coordinate the functions of the CDC with the neighborhood organizations, the City, major institutions in the District, residents, business owners, and other property owners. Hire an executive director for the CDC. CAPITOL DISTRICf RECOMMENDATION lb: ESTABLISH A PERMANENT WORKING RELATIONSHIP BE1WEEN THE NEIGHBORHOOD AND THE INSTITUTIONS Take advantage of the CDC to establish permanent relationships between the neighborhood organizations and the major institutions in the neighborhood. CAPITOL DISTRICf ISSUE 2: There are an increasing number of deteriorated, vacant, and boarded-up buildings. CAPITOL DISTRICT RECOMMENDATION 2: FOCUS HOUSING PROGRAMS ON THE DISTRICT Focus existing City Housing programs on the District; expand existing programs: and devise new programs to respond to neighborhood needs. CAPITOL DISTRICf ISSUE 3: The commercial area on 13th Avenue between Washington and Pennsylvania, although vibrant, has severe problems due to lack of parking, sidewalks too narrow for pedestrian appeal, and a deteriorating environment. CAPITOL DISTRICT RECOMMENDATION 3a: REINFORCE THE 13TII AVENUE COMMERCIAL DISTRICT Reinforce the 13th Avenue commercial district as a concentration of unique retail, restaurant, and entertainment uses. 105. I

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CAPITOL DISTRICf RECOMMENDATION 3b: BUFFER THE SIDEWALK FROM TRAFFIC ON 13TH As an interim improvement, allow off-peak parking on the south side of 13th Avenue in order to provide a buffer between the sidewalk and traffic. CAPITOL DISTRICT RECOMMENDATION 3c: INSTALL DISTINCTIVE STREETSCAPE IMPROVEMENTS Design and install streetscape improvements which are consistent with the unique character of the area, something distinct from the improvements in the remainder of the neighborhood. Consider a "neon" design theme, or another distinctive theme which will impart the idea that the area is entertainment-oriented. GENERAL ZONING RECOMMENDATIONS 1. USES a. West of the Logan-Pennsylvania alley: MULTIPLE-FAMILY RESIDENTIAL, OFFICE, AND RETAI:L b. East of the Logan-Pennsylvania alley: Retail areas: RETAIL Residential areas: MULTIPLE-FAMILY RESIDENTIAL 2. RESIDENTIAL OCCUPANCY a. West of the Logan-Pennsylvania alley: Singles I Couples b. East of the Logan-Pennsylvania alley: Singles I Couples 3. OPEN SPACE FRONT YARDS OUTDOOR RECREATION AREAS BALCONIES 4. HEIGHT LIMITED BY MOUNTAIN VIEW AND SKYLINE VIEW PRESERVATION ORDINANCES 5. DENSITY a. West of the Logan-Pennsylvania alley: 3:1 FAR b. East of the Logan-Pennsylvania alley: 2:1 FAR 6. SETBACKS a. Residential and office areas: RESIDENTIAL b. Retail areas: RETAIL 106. 1 1 l I l ,. n n n n Fl n tl t.. tl r-.;:.; I I l l

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l E. "HEART OF CAPITOL HILL" DISTRICT In the center of the neighborhood, the "Heart of Capitol Hill" District is bounded on the west by the alley between Logan and Pennsylvania, on the east by Downing, on the north by Thirteenth Avenue, and on the south by Eighth Avenue. While less heavily impacted by traffic on oneway streets than some of the other districts, the "Heart of Capitol Hill" District still has significant impacts from the six one-way streets which either divide or bound the district, including Washington (southbound), Clarkson (northbound), Corona (southbound), Downing (northbound), Eighth (westbound), and Thirteenth (westbound). The eight twoway streets in the district provide critical relief from the impacts of the oneway streets. With the exception of the three neighborhood retail areas which are zoned B-1 and and four small PUD's, the district is zoned R-3, a high density apartment zone district. The character of this district perhaps most closely aligns with the public image of the greater Capitol Hill neighborhood. It is largely an area of single-family homes which have been converted to apartments. Interspersed among these homes are both old and new apartment buildings. Buildings within the district are generally low to mid-rise. Mature landscaping prevails. The three largest neighborhood retail areas are found within this district, making it a focal point for the entire neighborhood. Note: Because of their importance to the entire neighborhood and the opportunities and challenges which they provide, the retail areas at both 9th and Corona and 11th and Ogden are subjects of focus area plans in Section IV of this plan VISION The "Heart of Capitol Hill" will stabilize as a desirable, well maintained medium density residential area with a diversity of rental and owner-occupied housing opportunities for singles, couples, and families of various sizes and income levels. While there will be some residential infill development, the historic character of the district will be preserved. The retail areas in the district will be more inviting for pedestrians and will function even more effectively than they do now as focal points for the district. New commercial development will incorporate housing and parking as part of mixed-use projects. Pedestrian and bicycle traffic will be encouraged with inviting streetscaping along both 9th and 11th Avenues. Transit will be readily accessible and the parking demand will be accommodated. 107.

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ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS HEART OF CAPITOL HILL DISTRICT ISSUE 1: Many of the housing structures in the district are deteriorating, and several are vacant and boarded. HEART OF CAPITOL HILL DISTRICT RECOMMENDATION 1: FOCUS HOUSING PROGRAMS ON THE DISTRICT Focus existing City housing programs on the district; expand existing programs; and devise new programs to respond to neighborhood needs. HEART OF CAPITOL HILL DISTRICf ISSUE 2: The main pedestrian streets are dark ,. and less inviting than is desirable. HEART OF CAPITOL HILL DISTRICf RECOMMENDATION 2: NARROW AND SOFrEN TilE IMAGE OF 11TH AVENUE Narrow and soften the image of 11th Avenue with a landscaped median, street trees, and pedestrian lights. HEART OF CAPITOL HILL DISTRICT ISSUE 3: The two commercial areas at 9th and Corona and 11th and Ogden are significant nodes. of activity and focal points for the entire neighborhood. HEART OF CAPITOL HILL DISTRICf RECOMMENDATION 3: CREATE A SENSE OF "PUBLIC SQUARE" Consider the commercial areas at 9th and Corona and 11th and Ogden as potential "public squares" and direct efforts toward creating a unique "sense of place" for each. 108. l

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.., GENERAL ZONING RECOMMENDATIONS 1. USES a. Residential areas: SINGLE AND MULTIPLE FAMILY RESIDENTIAL b. Retail areas: RETAIL AND RESIDENTIAL I RETAIL MIXED-USE PROJECfS 2. RESIDENTIAL OCCUPANCY SINGLES I COUPLES I FAMILIES I CHILDREN I YOUNG ADULTS I ELDERLY STUDIO I 1 BEDROOM UNITS I SINGLE FAMILY HOUSES 3. OPEN SPACE a. Residential areas: FRONT YARDS OUTDOOR RECREATION AREAS COMMON PLAY YARDS BALCONIES PRIVATE YARDS b. Retail areas: COMMON PLAZAS 4. HEIGHT a. Residential areas: LIMITED ONLY BY MOUNTAIN VIEW AND SKYLINE PRESERVATION ORDINANCES b. Retail areas: LIMITED ONLY BY MOUNTAIN VIEW AND SKYLINE PRESERVATION ORDINANCES 5. DENSITY a. Residential areas: 3:1 FAR b. Retail areas: RETAIL DENSI1Y: 1:1 FAR; the denisty of residential or residential/retail mixed-use projects shall not exceed a 3:1 FAR, with the retail component of such projects not exceeding a 1:1 FAR. 4. SETBACKS a. Residential areas: RESIDENTIAL b. Retail areas: RETAIL 109.

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F. CHEESMAN PARK NORTII DISTRICT Cheesman Park North is located in the northeast corner of the neighborhood. It is bounded on the north by East Colfax and on the south by Thirteenth Avenue and Cheesman Park. It extends from Josephine on the east to Downing on the west. The district is heavily impacted by traffic on 13th Avenue (one way west), 14th Avenue (one way east), and East Colfax (a twoway arterial and State Highway). Downing (northbound), York (southbound), and Josephine (northbound) are also one-way streets. The ten remaining north-south streets in the district are two-way. Zoning in the district is primarily R-3 (a high density apartment zoning district), the commercial property facing onto East Colfax is zoned B-4 (a general business zoning district). The Cheesman Park North District is largely residential, with a combination of single-family homes, apartment conversions of single-family homes, older low-rise apartments and newer mid-rise and high-rise apartments. The district has a legacy of large, architecturally significant Victorian homes and mature landscaping. Adding to its desirability as a residential area is its proximity to both Cheesman Park, which it borders, and City Park, the Esplanade of which is only one block from the northeast comer of the district. Nevertheless, the district is so heavily impacted by.noise, dirt, and safety hazards emanating from 13th, 14th, and East Colfax, that it faces declining desirability as a residential area. Note: Because of their significance to the entire neighborhood and the challenges and opportunities which they face, the areas surrounding the intersections of Colfax and Park Avenue and Colfax and York are addressed by Focus Area Plans in Section IV of this plan. VISION Cheesman Park North will be stabilized as a desirable, well maintained medium density residential area with a diversity of rental and owner-occupied housing opportunities for singles, couples, and families of various sizes and income levels. While there will be some residential infill development, the historic character of the neighborhood will be preserved and enhanced. The impact of traffic along 13th, 14th, and Colfax Avenues will be mitigated. Transit will be readily accessible and the parking demand will be accommodated. Pedestrian accessibility to Cheesman Park and City Park will be improved. 110.

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GENERAL ZONING RECOMMENDATIONS 1. USES a. Residential areas: SINGLE AND MULTIPLE FAMILY RESIDENTIAL b. Retail areas: RETAIL AND RESIDENTIAL I RETAIL MIXED USE PROJECTS 2. RESIDENTIAL OCCUPANCY SINGLES I COUPLES I FAMILIES I CHILDREN I YOUNG ADULTS I ADULTS I ELDERLY STUDIO I 1 BEDROOM UNITS I SINGLE FAMILY HOUSES 3. OPEN SPACE a. Residential areas: b. Retail areas: 4. HEIGHT FRONT YARDS OUTDOOR RECREATION AREAS COMMON PLAY YARDS BALCONIES PRIVATE YARDS COMMON PLAZAS a. Residential areas: LIMITED ONLY BY MOUNTAIN VIEW AND SKYLINE PRESERVATION ORDINANCES b. Retail areas: LIMITED ONLY BY MOUNTAIN VIEW AND SKYLINE PRESERVATION ORDINANCES 5. DENSITY a. Residential areas: 3:1 FAR b. Retail areas: RETAIL DENSI1Y: 1:1 FAR; the density of residential or residential/retail mixeduse projects shall not exceed a3:1 FAR, with the retail component of such projects not exceeding a 1:1 FAR. 6. SETBACKS a. Residential areas: RESIDENTIAL b. Retail areas: RETAIL 111.

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G. CHEESMAN WEST DISTRICT DESCRIPTION The Cheesman West District is located in the center of the neighborhood, on the western edge of Cheesman Park. It is bounded on the west by Downing, on the east by Cheesman Park, on the north by 13th Avenue, and on the south by 8th Avenue. While bounded on three sides by oneway streets, the Cheesman West District is not intersected by any one-ways. The district, however, does experience a traffic impact from the two street entrances to Cheesman Park at 9th and 12th Avenues. The zoning in the district is R-3, a high density apartment distric4 with the exception of the 800 blocks of Downing, Marion, Lafayette, and the west side of Humboldt and Humboldt Island, a two block historic district, which, at the request of property owners, were rezoned to R-1, a low density zone district for single-unit detached dwellings. The Cheesman West District is residential, with a combination of single-family homes, apartment conversions of single-family homes, older low-rise apartments, and newer mid-rise and high-rise apartments. Adding to its desirability as a residential area is the district's proximity to Cheesman Park, which it borders, its mature landscaping and tree canopy, and its relative freedom from the traffic impacts of one-way streets. The district has numerous historically significant homes and apartment buildings. Humboldt Island, a two-block-long enclave of large, architecturally and historically sun plant homes, is both a designated Denver Landmark District and a National Historic District. VISION The Cheesman West District will be stabilized as a desirable, well maintained medium density residential area with a diversity of rental and owner-occupied housing opportunities for singles, couples, and families of various sizes, ages, and income levels. The district will be known for its wealth of older residential buildings, well preserved historic structures, attractive pedestrian linkages into Cheesman Park and the surrounding districts, canopy of trees along its streets, protected views of the mountains and the Downtown skyline, and desirable residential areas both internal to the district and at its edges. 112. f r r r--I I f : r1 )1 l l fl l f 1 Jl 1 I 1 l

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.., ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS CHEESMAN WESTDIS1RICT ISSUE 1: While most of the district is well maintained and landscaped, the quality deteriorates at the edges, specifically along 13th, 8th, and Downing all three one-way streets. CHEESMAN WEST DIS'IRICf RECOMMENDATION 1: FOCUS MAINTENANCE AND LANDSCAPING ON 8TH, 13TH, AND DOWNING Focus landscaping, tree planting, and property maintenance efforts along 8th, 13th, and Downing. GENERAL ZONING RECOMMENDATIONS 1. USES SINGLE AND MULTIPLE-FAMILY RESIDENTIAL 2. RESIDENTIAL OCCUPANCY SINGLES I COUPLES I FAMILIES CHILDREN I YOUNG ADULTS I ADULTS I ELDERLY STUDIO I 1-3 BEDROOM UNITS I SINGLE FAMILY HOUSES 3. OPEN SPACE FRONT YARDS OUTDOOR RECREATION AREAS COMMON PLAY YARDS BALCONIES PRIVATE YARDS 4. HEIGHT LIMITED BY MOUNTAIN VIEW AND SKYLINE PRESERVATION ORDINANCES 5. DENSITY 800 BLOCKS 1:1 FAR 900-1200 BLOCKS 2:1 FAR 6. SETBACKS RESIDENTIAL 113.

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H. BOTANIC GARDENS DISTRICf DESCRIPTION The Botanic Gardens District is located on the east side of the neighborhood. It is bounded on the west by Cheesman Park, on the east by Josephine, on the north by 13th Avenue, and on the south by the Botanic Gardens. The district is impacted by one-way streets on its north (westbound 13th) and east boundaries (southbound York and northbound Josephine). The district also experiences a traffic impact from the street entrances to Cheesman Park at 11th and 12th Avenues. The traffic impacts on the district are offset to a degree, however, by its location, buffered on the south by the Botanic Gardens, which cuts access into the district from the south and by: the fact that the streets which are internal to the district (11th, 12th, Race, Vine, and Gaylord) are two-way streets. The zoning in the district is a combination of R-3, a high density apartment district, and R-2, a low density residential zone district which allows dwellings. The zone district was rezoned from R-3 at the request of the property owners. The Botanic Gardens District is residential, with a combination of single-family homes, apartment conversions of single-family homes, older low-rise apartments, and newer mid rise and high-rise apartments. Adding to its desirability as a residential area is the district's proximity to Cheesman Park, the Botanic Gardens, and Congress Park; its mature landscaping and tree canopy; and its relative freedom from the traffic impacts of one-way streets. The proximity to Cheesman Park, the high density zoning, and the lack until recently of building height limits have contributed, however, to pressures for redevelopment to higher density residential uses. As a result, the district, particularly Race Street, which is closest to Cheesman Park, has been subject to speculative ownership and the lower level of property maintenance, the demolition, and the resulting proliferation of vacant lots which often accompanies land speculation. These pressures led some of the property owners along Vine and Gaylord to rezone their properties to a lower zone district, which they felt would be less attractive for property speculation and would, therefore, help preserve the area as a low density residential district. VISION The Botanic Gardens District will be a well maintained residential area with diversity of rental and owner-occupied housing opportunities for singles, couples, and families of various sizes, ages, and income levels. Infill housing development will help provide a transition from high density, high-rise development on the western edge of the district to low and medium density housing on the eastern edge. The northern edge of the Botanic Gardens will be landscaped and buffered to provide an amenity for the district. Inviting pedestrian linkages will connect the district to Cheesman Park and the surrounding districts. A canopy of trees will line the streets, adding to the residential character of the district. 114. r r r r-1 l l 1 1

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ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS BOTANIC GARDENS DISTRICT ISSUE 1: The relationship between the single-family houses and the high-rises in the district is poor. BOTANIC GARDENS DISTRICT RECOMMENDATION 1: CREATE A TRANSITION FROM HIGHRISES TO HOUSES Include within the proposed zoning designation a transiti0n down from the high-rises to the single-family homes on the east. As redevelopment occurs in the transition area, it should be low-rise, whether medium or high density. BOTANIC GARDENS DISTRICT ISSUE 2: The northern edge of the Botanic Gardens abutting the district is the site of the service areas for the gardens and provides an unattractive edge to the district. BOTANIC GARDENS DIS1RICT RECOMMENDATION 2a: BUFFER THE BOTANIC GARDENS FROM THE DISTRICT Buffer the northern edge of the Gardens with solid fences and landscaping. BOTANIC GARDENS DISTRICT RECOMMENDATION 2b: BUFFER TilE COMMUNITY GARDENS Improve the fencing the landscaping around the community gardens at York and 11th Avenue. 115.

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GENERAL ZONING RECOMMENDATIONS 1. USES SINGLE AND MULTIPLE .. FAMILY RESIDENTIAL 2. RESIDENTIAL OCCUPANCY SINGLE I COUPLES I FAMILIES CHILDREN I YOUNG ADULTS I ADULTS I ELDERLY STUDIO I 1 BEDROOM UNITS I SINGLE FAMILY HOUSES 3. OPEN SPACE FRONT YARDS OUTDOOR RECREATION AREAS COMMON PLAY AREAS BALCONIES PRIVATE YARDS 4. HEIGHT Western edge: LIMITED BY THE BUILDING HEIGHT CONTROL ORDINANCE Transition area: 75 FEET Eastern edge: 4 STORIES 5. DENSITY Western edge: 3:1 FAR Transition area: 3:1 FAR Eastern edge: 2:1 FAR R-2 Area: 14.5 DUIACRES 6. SETBACKS RESIDENTIAL 116. r, r. fl fl fl [l .. -, I J l .-, 1 -, ., 1 ., .,

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I. MORGAN'S ADDITION DISTRICf DESCRIPTION Morgan's Addition is located in the southeast comer of the neighborhood. It is bounded on the west by Cheesman Park, on the east by Josephine Street and Congress Park, on the north by the Botanic Gardens, and on the south by 8th Avenue. The district is impacted by one-way c:treets on its south (westbound 8th Avenue) and east boundaries (southbound York and northbound Josephine). The district also experiences a traffic impact from the entrance to Cheesman Park at 9th Avenue although the recent installation of stop signs along 9th Avenue has helped mitigate that impact. The traffic impacts on the district are also offset to a degree by its location, buffered on the north by the Botanic Gardens, which cuts access into the district from the north and by the fact that the streets which are internal to the district (9th, Race, Vine, and Gaylord) are two-way streets. The zoning in the district is R-0, a low density zoning district which allows single-unit detached dwellings. Morgan's Addition is a single-family residential district, which has been protected from pressures for redevelopment by its low density zoning, its designation as a Denver Landmark District, and its desirability as a residential area. Contributing to its desirability are its proximity to Cheesman Park, the Botanic Gardens, Congress Park, and the 7th Avenue Parkway; its rich legacy of large, architecturally significant homes from the "City Beautiful" era; and its mature landscaping and street tree canopy. By maintaining its landscaping and tree canopy along its one-way streets, and by retaining a high quality of maintenance of the homes facing onto the streets, Morgan's Addition has offset the negative impacts from traffic better than any of the other districts in the neighborhood. VISION Morgan's Addition will remain a desirable, well maintained low density residential district with a wealth of large, historic single-family homes. The edges of the district will be further protected from the impacts of traffic. 117.

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ISSYES AND RECOMMENDATIONS MORGAN'S ADDITION DISTRICI' ISSUE 1: Morgan's Addition has excellent urban design qualities and relatively few problems. MORGAN'S ADDITION DISTRICT RECOMMENDATION 1: PROTECT THE NEIGHBORHOOD FROM HIGHER INTENSI1Y USES Retain the District's current low density zoning and design new development in surrounding areas, including at the Botanic Gardens, to protect the urban design qualities of the District. .. MORGAN'S ADDmON DISTRICT ISSUE 2: Traffic along York, Josephine, and Eighth Avenue generates noise, light, dirt, and safety problems which are incompatible with a : residential neighborhood. While the streets retain a strong residential character in part because of the canopy formed by the mature street trees and because of the well maintained landscaping on both sides of the streets, other neighborhoods which have experienced similar pressures have seen a steady deterioration of their landscaping and housing. MORGAN'S ADDITION DISTRICT RECOMMENDATION 2a: BUFFER THE HOUSING FROM THE IMPACfS OF TRAFFIC Protect the residential character of the edges of the District by maintaining the existing landscaping, replacing lost landscaping, and planting additional landscaping which will help form a canopy for the one-way streets and a strong landscaped edge for the streets, and which will help buffer the housing from the impacts of the traffic. MORGAN'S ADDITION DISTRICT RECOMMENDATION 2b: LIMIT THROUGH-TRAFFIC TO THAT ON YORK, JOSEPHINE, AND EIGHTH 118. I J l l l l l l 1 l *1

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t ... -GENERAL ZONING RECOMMENDATIONS 1. USES SINGLE-FAMILY RESIDENTIAL 2. RESIDENTIAL OCCUPANCY SINGLES/ COUPLES/ FAMILIES CHILDREN /YOUNG ADULTS /ADULTS / ELDERLY SINGLE-FAMILY HOUSES 3. OPEN SPACE PRIVATE YARDS 4. HEIGHT 5. DENSITY SEVEN DWELLING UNITS/ACRE 6. SETBACKS RESIDENTIAL 119.

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.I. SEVENTH AVENUE I COUNTRY CLUB NORTH DISTRICT DESCRIPTION The Seventh Avenue I Country Club North District is on the southeast edge of the neighborhood. It is bounded on the east by Josephine, on the west by Downing, on the north by 8th Avenue, and the south by 6th Avenue. r I While it is bounded on all four sides by one-way streets, including both York (southbound) and Josephine (northbound) on the east, the district is not intersected by any one-ways. J I Seventh Avenue Parkway serves as the focal point for the district. .. Zoning in the district is primarily R-0, with R-3 facing Eighth Avenue between Downing and the Humboldt/ Franklin alley, R-2 between Downing and the Downing/ Marion alley, and B-2 facing Sixth Avenue between Downing and Lafayette. The district is primarily a single-family residential area, with only a few pre-existing multiple-family residences and a small area of commercial uses along Sixth and Eighth Avenues. The district has been protected from pressures for redevelopment by its low density zoning and its desirability as a residential area. Contributing to its desirability are its proximity to both Cheesman and Congress Parks; its legacy of large, architecturally significant homes; its mature landscaping and tree canopy; and the presence of 7th Avenue Parkway, which acts as the focal point for the district. Note: While the landscaping, tree canopy, and homes along 8th Avenue, York, and Josephine are well maintained, the edge of the district along 6th Avenue is not faring as well and warrants additional attention. Because of its significance to the entire neighborhood and the challenges and opportunities which it faces, Sixth Avenue between Speer Boulevard and Josephine has been covered as a focus area in Section IV of this plan. VISION Seventh Avenue I Country Club North will remain a desirable, well maintained, low density residential district with a wealth of large, older single-family homes. The edges of the district along 6th, 8th, Downing, and Josephine will be protected from the impacts of traffic with better maintained landscaping and additional street trees. Retail areas along 6th Avenue will continue to have primarily neighborhood-serving uses, will have improved -, landscaping, and will be buffered from adjoining homes. l 120. l

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ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS SEVENTH A VENUE / COUNTRY CLUB NORTH DISTRICT ISSUE 1: Seventh Avenue 1 Country Club North has excellent urban design qualities and relatively few problems. SEVENTH A VENUE/COUNTRY CLUB NORTH RECOMMENDATION 1: PROTECT THE NEIGHBORHOOD FROM HIGHER INTENSI1Y USES Retain the district's current low density zoning and design new development in surrounding areas to protect the urban design qualities of the District. GENERAL ZONING RECOMMENDATIONS 1. USES a. Residential areas: SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENTIAL b. Retail areas: NEIGHBORHOOD-SERVING RETAIL 2. RESIDENTIAL OCCUPANCY SINGLES / COUPLES I FAMILIES CHILDREN I YOUNG ADULTS I ADULTS / ELDERLY SINGLE FAMILY HOUSES 3. OPEN SPACE a. Residential areas: PRIVATE YARDS b. Retail areas: COMMON PlAZAS 4. HEIGHT a. Residential areas: 3 STORIES b. Retail areas: 1 STORY 5. DENSITY SEVEN DWELLING UNITS/ACRE 6. SETBACKS a. Residential areas: RESIDENTIAL b. Retail areas: RETAIL 121.

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K. SEVENTII A VENUE WEST DISTRICT DESCRIPTION The Seventh Avenue West District is on the south end of the neighborhood, bounded on the east by Downing, on the west by the alley between Clarkson and Washington, on the north by 8th Avenue, and on the south by 6th Avenue. While not as heavily impacted as other districts, Seventh Avenue West is still more impacted by traffic on one-way streets than is desirable for a residential area. The five one-way streets dominate the traffic pattern in the district and include 8th Avenue, 6th Clarkson, Corona, and Downing. Only three streets, including 7th Avenue, Emerson, and Ogden, are two-way streets. # Zoning in Seventh Avenue West is indicative of the diverse influences on the district from the surrounding districts. Within the nine square blocks of the district, zoning includes R-0 (low density single-unit detached dwelling zone district), R-2 (low density multi-unit dwelling zone district), R-3 (high density apartment zone district), and B-2 (neighborhood business zone district). The district is primarily residential, with a combination of single-family homes, single-family homes which have been converted to apartments, townhouses, and a few apartment buildings. Commercial uses along Sixth Avenue are generally located either in converted I I 1. ( I I. J single-family homes or older commercial structures. There are several large vacant lots near J or adjacent to Eighth Avenue. Property along both 8th and 6th Avenues has been more heavily impacted by the traffic than have been parcels farther east in the Seventh Avenue I Country Club North District. Many properties along these streets in the Seventh Avenue West District have lost their mature landscaping and tree canopy and, generally, have not retained as high a level of maintenance. Note: Because of its significance to the entire neighborhood and the challenges and opportunities which it faces, Sixth Avenue between Speer Boulevard and Josephine has been covered as a focus area in Section IV of this plan. VISION The Seventh Avenue West District will be stabilized as a desirable, well maintained residential district with a diversity of rental and owner-occupied housing opportunities for singles, couples, and families of various sizes and income levels. While there will be residential infill development along 8th Avenue, the historic character of the district will be preserved and enhanced. The edges of the district will be further protected from the impacts of traffic, with tree planting and other landscaping efforts focused on 8th Avenue. 122. I -, l l

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ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS SEVENlH A VENUE WEST DISTRICT ISSUE 1: There are several large vacant lots and assemblages. Highrise development on these parcels would be incompatible with adjacent development and would destabilize the character of the district. This conflict is partially resolved by the building height limitation imposed by the current zoning. SEVENTH A VENUE WEST DISTRICT RECOMMENDATION 1: DEVELOP THE VACANT LOTS WITH HIGH DENSITY, LOW-RISE RESIDENTIAL PROJECTS GENERAL ZONING RECOMMENDATIONS 1. USES a. Residential areas: SINGLE AND MULTIPLE-FAMILY RESIDENTIAL b. Retail areas: NEIGHBORHOOD-SERVING RETAIL 2. RESIDENTIAL OCCUPANCY SINGLES I COUPLES I FAMILIES CHILDREN I YOUNG ADULTS I ADULTS I ELDERLY STUDIO I 1-3 BEDROOM UNITS I SINGLE-FAMILY HOUSES 3. OPEN SPACE a. Residential areas: b. Retail areas: 4. HEIGHT FRONT YARDS OUTDOOR RECREATION AREAS COMMON PLAY YARDS BALCONIES PRIVATE YARDS COMMON PLAZAS a. 8th Avenue: 4-6 STORIES b. Remainder of residential area: 3 STORIES c. Retail areas: 1 STORY 5. DENSITY a. 8th Avenue: 3:1 FAR b. Remainder of residential area: SEVEN DWELLING UNITS/ ACRE c. Retail areas: 1:1 FAR 6. SETBACKS a. Residential area: RESIDENTIAL b. Retail area: RETAIL 123.

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L. GOVERNOR'S PARK DISTRICT DESCRIPTION The Governor's Park District is located in the southwest comer of the neighborhood. It is bounded by 8th Avenue on the north and 6th Avenue on the south. On the east it is bounded by the alley between Clarkson and Washington, and on the west it extends to the alley between Sherman and Lincoln. The District is heavily impacted by traffic on one-way streets, including 8th Avenue (westbound), 6th Avenue (eastbound), Washington (southbound), Logan (northbound), and Grant (southbound). While five streets are one-way, only four streets in the district are two-" way: 7th Avenue, Pearl, Pennsylvania, and Sherman. The zoning in the district decreases in intensity from west to east, starting with B-8 (an intensive general business/ very high density residential zone district) and decreasing to R-4 (a very high density apartment and office), R-3 (a high density apartment zone district), and B-2 (a neighborhood business zone district). ( I I I I The Governor's Park District is a mixed-use area, with residential, office, and retail uses. I The area is underdeveloped, with vacant lots, parking lots, and low density structures. Current pedestrian and retail activity is minimal, and most of the retail is destination-oriented, rather than neighborhood-oriented. Similarly, the high density residential development is not well integrated into the district. However, because of its location adjacent to Cherry Creek and Speer Boulevard, the presence of Governor's Park, and topography which allows views of the mountains and Downtown skyline, the district has the potential for additional development and intensification. Note: Because of its significance to the entire neighborhood and the challenges and opportunities which it faces, Sixth Avenue between Speer Boulevard and Josephine has been covered as a focus area in Section IV of this plan. VISION The Governor's Park District will experience extensive redevelopment, adding additional residential units and retail activity. As part of a larger effort to establish the district as an inviting, urban mixed-use area, the park will be redesigned to offer mountain views and to more effectively act as a focus of district activity. The unique character of the district will be established by the historic structures. A new mountain view preservation ordinance will protect the view from the park. A landscaped median and additional streetscape improvements will enhance 7th Avenue as a pedestrian and bicycle linkage through the district, as well as the primary spine of the district. 124. l l l l l

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J ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS GOVERNOR'S PARK DISTRICT ISSUE 1: The topography adds views and interest to the district, but views have been lost and continue to be threatened by the construction of mid-rise and high-rise buildings to the west and south of Governor's Park. The view from the Grant-Humphrey's Mansion and the park are particularly important, but they are threatened. While the Cheesman Park Mountain View Ordinance extends to Cherry Creek and Broadway, it does not adequately protect the views from Governor's Park. GOVERNOR'S PARK DISTRICT RECOMMENDATION la: INSTITUTE A MOUNTAIN VIEW PRESERVATION ORDINANCE Institute a mountain view preservation ordinance to protect views from Governor's Park. GOVERNOR'S PARK DISTRICf RECOMMENDATION lb: RESTRICT NEW DEVELOPMENT TO LOW-RISE STRUCTURES Restrict new development within the District to high density, low-rise structures, except in those areas outside the area protected by a mountain view preservation ordinance. GOVERNOR'S PARK DISTRICT ISSUE 2: The property across the street to the west of the Governor's Mansion is a particularly unsightly surface parking lot with minimal landscaping. While off-street parking is necessary to support the public use of the Governor's Mansion, this lot is visually and functionally incompatible with both the Mansion and the park. According to the current zoning, this and other sites adjoining the Governor's Mansion also could "by right" be redeveloped at a scale and with materials which are incompatible with the Governor's Mansion. GOVERNOR'S PARK DISTRICT RECOMMENDATION 2a: LANDSCAPE OR REDEVELOP THE PARKING LOT AT EIGHTH AND LOGAN Target the parking lot at Eighth and Logan either for landscaping or for redevelopment to a use more compatible with the Governor's Mansion and Governor's Park. If the site is redeveloped, then provide off-street parking at a more appropriate alternative location. GOVERNOR'S PARK DISTRICf RECOMMENDATION 2b: INSTITUTE DESIGN GUIDELINES Apply special design guidelines to the area surrounding the Governor's Mansion and Governor's Park to assure compatibility of new development with both the Mansion and the Park. 125.

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GOVERNOR'S PARK DISTRICT ISSUE 3:The district has significant historic structures, mountain views, interesting topography, a well-located park, healthy neighborhood retail, a relatively large number of residents, and examples of interesting and compatible redevelopment, but it does not present a cohesive image and does not have a strong and unique sense of place. The district also has numerous surface parking lots, vacant lots, deteriorating buildings, and underdeveloped sites which provide opportunities for redevelopment. GOVERNOR'S PARK DISTRICf RECOMMENDATION 3a: ENCOURAGE HIGH DENSITY, LOW-RISE RESIDENTIAL REDEVELOPMENT THROUGHOUT THE DISTRICT To respond to the potentially conflicting goals of preserving the historic character of the district and encouraging redevelopment and additional activity at the intersection of Logan and Seventh, design new development as high density, low-rise structures, similar to the Encore development at the Bonfils mansion. GOVERNOR'SPARKDISTRICTRECOMMENDATION3b: ENCOURAGE ADDITIONAL NEIGHBORHOOD DEVELOPMENT Encourage additional neighborhood retail development, particularly restaurants, which is adjacent to and takes advantage of the park in order to provide more activity adjacent to and in the park. Any new retail development must provide parking sufficient to meet its own needs and must be designed to be compatible with the surrounding land uses. GOVERNOR'S PARK DISTRICf RECOMMENDATION 3c: REZONE TilE NORTIIWEST CORNER OF 7TH AND LOGAN Rezone the northwest comer of 7th Avenue and Logan for neighborhood retail uses. These uses should be limited to those which can most effectively take advantage of the park and which will generate activity for the park. If the site is redeveloped, residential uses should be built over the retail. GOVERNOR'S PARK DISTRICT RECOMMENDATION 3d: INSTALL DISTINCTIVE STREETSCAPE IMPROVEMENTS Develop a streetscape design which will help create a distinctive image for the district. Base that design on the historic residential character of the district and the character of the individual buildings within the district. 126. .,. RETAIL # l l ll \ l l l l 1 1 1 1 rf I

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QOVIDUIOR"S PARK Governor's Park Subarea form Analysis 127.

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= i GOVIRNOWS PARK Governor's Park Subarea Urban Design Ideas 129.

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I. -t GOVERNOR'S PARK DISTRICf ISSUE 4: The park does not draw people from more than the immediate area and, thus, is under-used. Similarly, it doesn't, at least not to the extent which it should, serve as the focal point for the neighborhood. It neither provides its own activity nor generates activity from the neighborhood. I GOVERNOR'S PARK DISTRICf RECOMMENDATION 4: REDESIGN THE PARK Redesign the park to more effectively function as a "town square" for the district. Emphasize mountain and city views. Provide more interest and activity within the park, such as an area designed for outdoor concerts. Better coordinate the park with the design of the Grant-Humphrey's Mansion and the Governor's Mansion and with the character of the district. Create more obvious entrances to the park from Eighth Avenue at Pennsylvania and through the grounds of the Grant Humphrey's Mansion from Pearl. GOVERNOR'S PARK DISlRICf ISSUE 5: The west side of the district is zoned R-4 and B-8, both of which allow office uses. As a result, within these areas residential uses have been and continue to be replaced by office uses. Much of the west side of the district, however, is vacant or underdeveloped, a condition which aggravates the already weak image of the district. GOVERNOR'S PARK DISTRICT RECOMMENDATION 5: ENCOURAGE HIGH DENSI1Y RESIDENTIAL AND MIXED-USE PROJECfS Encourage high density residential or retail I office I residential mixed-use development in the west side of the district. GOVERNOR'S PARK DISTRICT ISSUE 6: West of Pennsylvania, Seventh Avenue widens beyond the width needed to carry its traffic load. The result is additional asphalt and less landscaping in a district already perceived as too harsh. GOVERNOR'S PARK DIS1RICf RECOMMENDATION 6: FOCUS ON SEVENTH A VENUE AS A PEDESTRIAN CONNECTION Narrow Seventh Avenue and make it more pedestrian-oriented by adding a landscaped median between Pennsylvania and Lincoln. 131.

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GOVERNOR'S PARK DISTRICT ISSUE : While Washington Street is lined with medium and high density apartment buildings, the street is not inviting to pedestrians and, therefore, does not have good pedestrian connections to the retail areas on either 6th or 7th Avenues. The residents of these buildings, therefore, do not use the neighborhood retail facilities or the park as frequently as they would if there were better pedestrian connections. GOVERNOR'S PARK DISTRICf RECOMMENDATION 7: ENHANCE THE PEDESTRIAN ENVIRONMENT ON WASHINGTON Enhance the pedestrian environment on Washington by adding landscaping, limiting curb cuts and pull-out lanes, and retaining on-street parking. GOVERNOR'S PARK DISTRICT RECOMMENDATION ISSUE 8: Parking in .tlie District is extremely limited. Retail and restaurant uses place extraordinary pressures on the parking which does exist. Retail, restaurant and residential parking needs often conflict with one another. GOVERNOR'S PARK DISTRICf RECOMMENDATION 8: PROVIDE RESIDENT PARKING Provide either one-hour parking zones or resident parking zones surrounding the retail / restaurant areas. 132. I r r I ,-1 r ...... r rrl fl fl fl n n /l n l

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..._, _. GENERAL ZONING RECOMMENDATIONS 1. USES a. WEST: GENERALLY, RESIDENTIAL AND OFFICE EXCEPTION, SHERMAN: RESIDENTIAL ONLY b. EAST: GENERALLY, RESIDENTIAL c. SELECT AREAS: SEVENTH AVENUE, PENNSYLVANIA EAST TO THE LOGAN I SHERMAN ALLEY, RETAIL AND RETAIL I RESIDENTIAL MIXED-USE SIXTH AVENUE, FOLLOW EXISTING USES, BUT NO EXPANSION OF RETAIL TO THE RETAIL COULD EXTEND WEST OF GRANT 2. RESIDENTIAL OCCUPANCY SINGLES I COUPLES YOUNG ADULTS I ADULTS I ELDERLY STUDIO I 1-2 BEDROOM UNITS 3. OPEN SPACE a. Residential areas: b. Retail areas: 4. HEIGHT FRONT YARDS OUTDOOR RECREATION AREAS BALCONIES COMMON PLAZAS a. CONSISTENT WITH THE NEW MOUNTAIN VIEW PRESERVATION ORDINANCE AND THE EXISTING ORDINANCE b. GENERALLY, LOW-RISE TO MID-RISE 5. DENSITY a. Residential areas: 3:1 FAR b. Retail areas: RETAIL DENSITY: 1:1 FAR; the density of residential or residential/retail mixed-use projects shall not exceed a 3:1 FAR, with the retail component of such projects not exceeding a 1:1 FAR. 6. SETBACKS a. Residential areas: RESIDENTIAL b. Retail areas: RETAIL 133.

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I I I. F 0 C U S A R E A P L A N S i I -

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I I I I I I I I I I I I I I PREFACE Several areas within the neighborhood are distinct from the character immediately surrounding them and provide important opportunities and challenges for the entire neighborhood. In order to respond to these distinctions, opportunities, and challenges, the Task Force determined that these areas needed additional attention. As a result, the problems and opportunities of five "focus areas" were analyzed and recommendations were developed for each. The Focus Area Analysis provides a description of each of the five focus areas, a vision statement for what the characteristics of the focus area should be in the future, and the issues and recommendations, including general zoning recommendations, which are most important to the focus area. These issues and recommendations are in addition to those included in the Framework Plan, and which are considered to generally apply to the entire neighborhood, including the Focus Areas. 137.

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-A. 9TH AND CORONA FOCUS AREA DESCRIPTION The 9th and Corona Focus Area is in the middle of the neighborhood. It is centered at 9th Avenue between Corona and Downing, and extends from Ogden on the west to Marion on the east and from 8th Avenue on the south to lOth Avenue on the north. Both Corona and Downing are one-way streets, southbound and northbound, respectively. Eighth Avenue (one-way westbound) forms the south boundary. Ogden, Marion, Ninth, and Tenth are two-way streets. The street system generally works well to provide automobUe, bus, pedestrian, and bicycle access to the uses in the focus area. The retail uses in the focus area are generally B-2 (neighborhood business zone district), with the exception of the shopette at the northwest corner of Corona and 9th, which is zoned PUD; the Conoco service station at the southwest corner of 8th and Downing, which is a pre-existing legal nonconforming use in the R-3 zone district; and the northwest King Soopers parking lot between 9th and lOth on Corona, which is also a pre-existing legal nonconforming use in the R -3 zone district. Dora Moore School and the residential area surrounding the retail uses are zoned R-3 (high density apartment zone district). The 9th and Corona Focus Area is the largest concentration of neighborhood-serving retail uses within Capitol Hill / Cheesman Park. As such, it is one of the primary centers of activity in the neighborhood, the area which people identify as a de facto community center, where neighbors see one another, the proverbial "village square.'' VISION The 9th and Corona Focus Area will be reinforced as a pedestrian-oriented activity center for the neighborhood. While landscaping, circulation, and signage improvements will be made to the existing parking lots to improve their utility and image, these improvements will be balanced by improvements to the pedestrian circulation system. 138. ,. t I I I I I I I I I l I I I I I

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9th and Corona Commerical Area Urban Design Ideas 139.

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-ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS 9TH AND CORONA FOCUS AREA ISSUE 1: While retail and residential interests realize the value of the other, each also deals with a continuing set of operational conflicts. The area has a good track record of communicating and resolving those conflicts. 9TH AND CORONA FOCUS AREA RECOMMENDATION 1: WORK TOGETHER TO RESOLVE OPERATIONAL CONFLICTS Continue and reinforce the communication between the residential and retail interests in order to resolve any operational conflicts. 9111 AND CORONA FOCUS AREA ISSUE 2: Although the 9th and Corona retail area serves as the primary retail center for the neighborhood, it does not provide many pedestrian amenities nor many opportunities for community activities. 9TH AND CORONA FOCUS AREA RECOMMENDATION 2a: IMPROVE PEDESTRIAN CROSSINGS Emphasize and increase the safety of pedestrian street crossing by widening the sidewalks and narrowing the street at intersections with pedestrian "bulb outs". 9TII AND CORONA FOCUS AREA RECOMMENDATION 2b: INSTALL PEDESTRIAN-SCALE STREET LIGHTS Install pedestrian-scale street lights throughout the focus area to add to the sense of pedestrian comfort and safety. 9TH AND CORONA FOCUS AREA RECOMMENDATION 2c: DEVELOP A COMMUNI1Y PLAZA Develop the area between King Soopers and Dora Moore School as a community plaza. Because of the traffic circulation and parking needs in the area, 9th Avenue need to serve a double function: most of the time as a local street, but on special occasions as a street which can be closedoff to become a community plaza. The streetscape design on both sides of 9th should accommodate the double duty played by the street. 141.

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9TII AND CORONA FOCUS AREA ISSUE 3: While most of the commercial buildings in the focus area are designed to be pedestrian-oriented, that is, built to the sidewalk, a few of the uses have parking in front of their buildings. When parking is in front, areas develop more of a suburban, automobile-oriented, character, rather than an urban, pedestrian oriented, character. 9TH AND CORONA FOCUS AREA RECOMMENDATION 3a: LOCATE NEW BUILDINGS ADJACENT TO SIDEWALKS Locate new buildings adjacent to sidewalks, with parking either internal to or in the rear of each building. 9TII AND CORONA FOCUS AREA RECOMMENDATION 3b: LIMIT CURB CUTS Eliminate as many of the existing curb cuts as possible and limit any new curb cuts. 9TII AND CORONA FOCUS AREA RECOMMENDATION 3c: DESIGN NEW BUILDINGS WITH A DISTINCT URBAN CHARACTER Design new buildings with a distinct urban character. Include retail/residential mixed-use projects, with retail on the ground level and residential units above. Similar to older buildings such as the Pencol and Leetonia on East Colfax, the residential entrance could be on the side street, separate from the retail uses. 9TII AND CORONA FOCUS AREA ISSUE 4: Dora Moore School has a shortage of parking for its staff and visitors. Currently, it uses parking spaces at Corona Presbyterian Church to help alleviate the shortage. The school does not, however, have a permanent solution to its parking shortage. Its current parking lot faces onto 9th Avenue, is inadequately screened from the street and sidewalk, and does not meet current landscaping requirements. 9TII AND CORONA FOCUS AREA RECOMMENDATION 4a: PROVIDE A PARKING SOLUTION FOR DORA MOORE Include a discussion of a permanent parking solution for Dora Moore in any planning for improving the area between King Soopers and Dora Moore as a community plaza. Pursue a long-term lease of the Corona Presbyterian Church parking lot in order to solve the parking problems at Dora Moore and to allow alternative use of the north edge of the school property. 142. l l l l

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-9TII AND CORONA FOCUS AREA RECOMMENDATION 4b: SOFTEN THE IMPACT OF THE DORA MOORE PARKING LOT At a minimum, add landscaping to screen the Dora Moore parking lot from the street and sidewalk and landscape the interior of the lot to soften its impact on the focus area. 9TH AND CORONA FOCUS AREA ISSUE 5: Dora Moore School uses the alley between its two buildings as a service entrance and loading facility. 9TH AND CORONA FOCUS AREA RECOMMENDATION 5: PROVIDE A SERVICE ENTRANCE AND LOADING FACILITY Include a service entrance and loading facility in any planning for a community plaza. 91H AND CORONA FOCUS AREA ISSUE 6: Dora Moore School also needs an improved system which will allow parents to safely drop-off their children. The proposal which they are considering is a pull-off from 8th Avenue. 9TH AND CORONA FOCUS AREA RECOMMENDATION 6a: PROVIDE A STUDENT DROP-OFF Include provisions for an improved student drop-off in any planning for a community plaza. 9TH AND CORONA FOCUS AREA RECOMMENDATION 6b: BUFFER THE STUDENT DROPOFF Because curb cuts and pull-offs are generally inconsistent with the goal of increasing the level of pedestrian comfort within the focus area, carefully review any proposals and include provisions for extensive landscaping and other amenities which will improve the pedestrian environment 9TH AND CORONA FOCUS AREA ISSUE 7: While King Soopers has adequate parking at its central and two peripheral lots, customers prefer parking in the central lot, causing unnecessary congestion in that lot and on the surrounding streets. The other commercial uses in the focus area suffer from a lack of adequate parking. 91H AND CORONA FOCUS AREA RECOMMENDATION 7a: REDESIGN ALL OF KING SOOPERS PARKING LOTS Redesign all three of King Soopers parking lots to allow improved access, internal circulation, and landscaping. 143.

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9TH AND CORONA FOCUS AREA RECOMMENDATION 7b: IMPROVE KING SOOPERS 1WO PERIPHERAL LOTS Improve the desirability, visibility, and accessibility of the peripheral lots with improved signage, curb ramps on both sides of Corona to facilitate buggies, and improved landscaping and lighting at the two lots. 91H AND CORONA FOCUS AREA RECOMMENDATION 7c: PROVIDE JOINT PARKING FACILITIES Provide joint parking facilities which will be owned, maintained, and used by all of the retail uses and by Dora Moore School. Consider placing a parking deck on top of the existing surface parking lot on the west side of Corona. 9TII AND CORONA FOCUS AREA ISSUE 8: Because they were developed prior to the adoption of the current parking landscaping ordinance, the landscaping of the three parking' lots does not meet the current requirements. 9TH AND CORONA FOCUS AREA RECOMMENDATION 8: IMPROVE THE LANDSCAPING OF KING SOOPERS PARKING LOTS Improve both the interior and exterior landscaping at all three of the King Soopers parking lots. 91H AND CORONA FOCUS AREA ISSUE 9: Recent developments in lighting allow for more attractive and welcoming lights than those currently in the King Soopers parking lots. 91H AND CORONA FOCUS AREA RECOMMENDATION 9: REPLACE THE LIGHTS IN KING SOOPERS PARKING LOTS Replace the existing lights in the King Soopers parking lots with low cut-off high pressure sodium or similar fiXtures which will provide a more natural light. 144. j r r r r .. ---l ., l J l 1

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GENERAL ZONING RECOMMENDATIONS 1. USES RETAIL AND RESIDENTIAL I RETAIL MIXED-USE PROJECTS 2. RESIDENTIAL OCCUPANCY SINGLES I COUPLES YOUNG ADULTS I ADULTS I ELDERLY STUDIOS / 1 BEDROOM UNITS 3. OPEN SPACE a. Retail projects: COMMON PLAZAS b. Residential I retail mixed-use projects: BALCONIES COMMON PLAZAS 4. HEIGHT LIMITED ONLY BY MOUNTAIN VIEW AND SKYLINE PRESERVATION ORDINANCES 5. DENSITY Residential or commercial density as allowed by existing zoning. N01E: The density of residential or residential/retail mixed-use projects in business zone districts shall not exceed the density of the adjacent residential zone districts, with the retail component of such projects not exceeding a 1:1 FAR. Where recommended zoning densities are not in agreement with the allowed density of the existing zone district, a P.U.D. could be supported. 6. SETBACKS a. Retail projects: RETAIL b. Residential / retail mixedvuse projects: RETAIL ON THE RETAIL SIDE AND RESIDENTIAL AT THE RESIDENTIAL ENTRANCE 145.

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B. 11TH AND OGDEN FOCUS AREA DESCRIPTION The 11th and Ogden Focus Area is located in the center of the neighborhood, extending from Emerson on the west to Corona on the east, and from lOth on the south to 12th on the north. While the focus area is between two oneway street pairs (Washington I Clarkson on the west and Corona I Downing on the east) the streets within the focus area are all two 'Yay (lOth, 11th, 12th, Ogden and Emerson). The retail and office uses in the focus area are zoned 1 (limited Office zoning district) and B-2 (neighborhood business district). The residential areas surrounding the retail and office uses are zoned R-3 (high density apartment zoning district). The 11th and Ogden Focus Area includes both neighborhood serving and destination retail uses. While it is not as large an area as 9th and Corona, the focus area is, nonetheless, an important activity center for the neighborhood. VISION The 11th and Ogden Focus Area will be enhanced as both a neighborhood-serving and destination retail area. The relationship between the retail uses and the surrounding residential uses will be improved, with additional landscaping acting as a buffer between the two uses. A landscaped median and additional streetscaping improvements on 11th Avenue will enhance the pedestrian character of both the focus area and of 11th, which will serve as a major east-west pedestrian linkage through the neighborhood. 146. r r r r r r r r r r n r fl i j 1

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ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS 11TII AND OGDEN FOCUS AREA ISSUE 1: The 11th and Ogden retail area has few amenities or safety provisions which will attract and protect pedestrian activity. 11TH AND OGDEN FOCUS AREA RECOMMENDATION 1a: WIDEN TilE SIDEWALKS AND NARROW THE STREETS Emphasize and increase the safety of pedestrian street crossings by widening the sidewalks and narrowing the street at intersections with pedestrian "bulb-outs". 11TH AND OGDEN FOCUS AREA RECOMMENDATION 1b: INSTALL PEDESTRIANSCALE STREET LIGHTS Install pedestrian-scale street lights throughout the focus area to add to the sense of pedestrian comfort and safety. lllH AND OGDEN FOCUS AREA RECOMMENDATION 1c: IMPROVE THE APPEARANCE OF THE PARKING STRIP To improve the appearance of the parking strip, plant grass in the less impacted areas, and install attractive paving in the more impacted areas. 11th AND OGDEN FOCUS AREA ISSUE 2: While 11th Avenue is well located to act as a pedestrian linkage through the neighborhood, it is too wide and has too little streetscaping to provide a comfortable environment for pedestrians. 11th AND OGDEN FOCUS AREA RECOMMENDATION 2: INSTALL A LANDSCAPED MEDIAN Install a landscaped median in 11th Avenue, between Ogden and Logan. 11TH AND OGDEN FOCUS AREA ISSUE 3: New commercial uses in the focus area tend to have parking in front of their buildings. As a result, pedestrians have to cross parking lots to enter the buildings and automobiles have to cross parking lots to enter the parking lots. Sidewalks are interrupted by numerous curb cuts. Little or no landscaping separates the parking lot from either the sidewalk and street or from the buildings. With these characteristics, the area has developed more of a suburban, automobile-oriented, character, rather than an urban, pedestrianoriented character. 147.

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11TH AND OGDEN FOCUS AREA RECOMMENDATION 3a: LOCATE NEW BUILDINGS ADJACENT TO SIDEWALKS Locate new buildings adjacent to sidewalks, with parking either internal to or in the rear of each building. 11TH AND OGDEN FOCUS AREA RECOMMENDATION 3b: ELIMINATE CURB CUTS Eliminate as many of the existing curb cuts as possible and limit any new curb cuts. 11TH AND OGDEN FOCUS AREA RECOMMENDATION 3c: _. DESIGN NEW BUILDINGS WITH A DISTINCI' URBAN CHARACTER Design new buildings with a distinct urban character. Include retail / residential mixeduse projects, with retail on the ground level and residential units above. Similar to older buildings such as the Pencol and Leetonia on East Colfax, the residential entrance could be on the side street, separate from the retail uses. 11TH AND OGDEN FOCUS AREA ISSUE 4: .The sidewalk on the north side of 11th is wide and has excellent solar access. 11th AND OGDEN FOCUS AREA RECOMMENDATION 4: USE THE SIDEWALK FOR OUTDOOR ACfiVITIES Use the sidewalk on the north side of 11th for outdoor activities, such as a sidewalk cafe. 148. j I r f I I f j l l

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.. -GENERAL ZONING RECOMMENDATIONS 1. USES RETAIL AND RESIDENTIAL I RETAIL MIXED-USE PROJECTS 2. RESIDENTIAL OCCUPANCY SINGLES I COUPLES YOUNG ADULTS I ADULTS I ELDERLY STUDIO I 1 BEDROOM UNITS 3. OPEN SPACE a. Retail projects: COMMON PLAZAS b. Residential I retail mixeduse projects: BALCONIES COMMON PLAZAS 4. HEIGHT LIMITED ONLY BY MOUNTAIN AND SKYLINE PRESERVATION ORDINANCES 5. DENSITY Residential or commercial density as allowed by existing zoning. NOTE: The density of residential or residential/retail mixed-use projects in business zone districts shall not exceed the density of the adjacent residential zone districts, with the retail component of such projects not exceeding a 1: 1 FAR. Where recommended zoning densities are not in agreement with the allowed density of the existing zone district, a P.U.D. could be supported. 6. SETBACKS a. Retail projects: RETAIL b. Residential / retail mixed-use projects: RETAIL ON THE RETAIL SIDE AND RESIDENTIAL AT TilE RESIDENTIAL ENTRANCE 149.

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C. SIXTH A VENUE FOCUS AREA DESCRIPTION The 6th Avenue Focus Area forms the southern edge for both the neighborhood study area and for three of the neighborhood districts -Governors Park, 7th Avenue West, and 7th Avenue/ Country Club North. One property deep, the focus area runs along both sides of 6th Avenue, from Speer Boulevard on the west to Josephine on the east. The focus area is heavily impacted by traffic on 6th Avenue and on the eight one-way cr9ss streets: Grant (southbound), Logan (northbound), Washington (southbound), Clarkson (northbound), Corona (southbound), Downing (northbound), York (southbound), and Josephine (northbound). The zoning in the district decreases in intensity from west to east, starting with B-8 (intensive general business /very high density residential zone district) and decreasing to R-4 (very high density apartment and office zone district), R-3 (high density apartment district), B-2 ( neighborhood business district), and R-0 (low density single-unit detached dwelling zone district). Sixth Avenue has a mixture of office, vacant, moderate and low density residential, and neighborhood-serving retail uses. While the focus area adjoins stable, desirable residential areas, Sixth Avenue has lost most of its mature landscaping and tree canopy, and with that loss, it has deteriorated as a residential street. Parallel to that, the maintenance of housing along the street has also deteriorated. Retail uses along the street create parking pressures and suffer from a lack of adequate parking. VISION Sixth Avenue will remain and will be reinforced as a residential and residentially-compatible retail area. It will not become an automobile-oriented commercial area. While additional businesses may not be beneficial, increased neighborhood and destination use of existing business is desirable. 150. ,. r J -l .. I --1 l l l -----I l l l l l l l

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.., ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS SIXTH AVENUE RECOMMENDATION la: CLUSTER AND INTEGRATE USES Consistent with the urban character of the neighborhood, cluster retail uses and integrate those retail clusters with the adjoining residential uses. SIXTH AVENUE RECOMMENDATION lb: FACE RESIDENTIAL USES ONTO SIDE STREETS Face new residential structures along 6th Avenue onto the north-south streets, rather than onto 6th. SIXTH A VENUE RECOMMENDATION lc: DISCOURAGE ADDITIONAL TRAFFIC CONGESTION Discourage additional traffic volume and enforce the existing speed limit on 6th Avenue. SIXTH A VENUE ISSUE 2: The entire length of the street is losing its residential character. Even in the residential sections, there are areas without landscaping in the tree lawns, and those tree lawns which are landscaped are often poorly maintained. While many sections of Sixth appear to be well landscaped, these areas often benefit from mature landscaping in the adjoining residential areas, while many of the tree lawns actually facing onto Sixth are poorly landscaped and poorly maintained. SIXTH A VENUE RECOMMENDATION 2a: lANDSCAPE AND MAINTAIN THE TREE LAWNS Landscape and maintain the tree lawns along Sixth Avenue. Plant trees which will provide a canopy over the street. SIXTH AVENUE RECOMMENDATION 2b: SELECT PLANTS WHICH WILL SURVIVE Trees and junipers can be planted along Sixth Avenue and will survive relatively well. Sod will probably have to be replaced approximately every 10 years. 151.

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SIXTH AVENUE RECOMMENDATION 2c: USE PLANTING TO DISTINGUISH BE'IWEEN RETAIL AND HOUSING Use the tree pattern and species to differentiate between retail and residential areas. In retail areas, plant trees that provide color and which can be planted closer to one another, but that will not block the view of store fronts. In residential areas, plant trees which will form a canopy over the street. SIXTH A VENUE ISSUE 3: Maintenance along the sidewalks and tree lawns in some cases is so bad that City ordinances are being violated. SIXTH A VENUE RECOMMENDATION 3: ENFORCE CI1Y ORDINANCES REGARDING LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE Ask the City inspectors to cite violations for weeds in yards and vegetation blocking sidewalks. SIXTH A VENUE ISSUE 4: There is pressure to rezone areas along Sixth for retail uses. Often, these rezonings would result in the loss of housing. SIXTH AVENUE RECOMMENDATION 4: DISCOURAGE REZONING FROM RESIDENTIAL TO COMMERCIAL Rezoning from residential to commercial districts are discouraged along Sixth Avenue. Only applications for rezoning to PUD or from commercial to residential will be considered. West of Washington Street, mixed retail and residential uses might be appropriate. SIXTH AVENUE ISSUE 5: New commercial uses tend to have parking in front of their buildings. As a result, pedestrians have to cross parking lots to enter the parking lots. Sidewalks are interrupted by numerous curb cuts. little or no landscaping separates the parking lot from either the sidewalk and street or from the buildings. With these characteristics, the area is developing more of a suburban, character, rather than an urban, pedestrian-oriented character. SIXTH A VENUE RECOMMENDATION Sa: EMPHASIZE PEDESTRIAN-ORIENTED USES New retail uses must be pedestrian-oriented, rather than automobileoriented. 152. r r .. 1'." r I J r: r1 r' r' rJ r: r1 -I .. l

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SIXTH AVENUE RECOMMENDATION Sb: LOCATE NEW BUILDINGS ADJACENT TO TilE SIDEWALK Locate new buildings adjacent to sidewalks, with parking either internal to or in the rear of each building. SIXTH AVENUE RECOMMENDATION Sc: IMPROVE THE STREETSCAPE IN TilE RETAIL AREAS Install pedestrian lighting and street trees in the retail areas. Attractive paving may be more appropriate than sod in these areas. SIXTH A VENUE RECOMMENDATION 5d: DESIGN NEW BUILDINGS WITH A DISTINCT URBAN CHARACTER Design new buildings with a distinct urban character. West of Washington Street, include retail/residential mixed-use projects, with retail on the ground level and residential units above. Similar to older buildings such as the Pencol and Leetonia on East Colfax, the residential entrances could be on the side streets, separate from the retail uses. SIXTH A VENUE ISSUE 6: Parking is limited along Sixth and where it does exist, is often unattractive and incompatible with adjoining residential uses. SIXTH AVENUE RECOMMENDATION 6a: PROVIDE MORE PARKING Make more efficient use of existing parking and provide joint parking facilities. Establish a business improvement district, special district, maintenance district, and/ or parking district, to provide common parking, streetscape improvements, and maintenance. Review the potential for providing a single large lot with a shuttle to businesses and several smaller lots adjacent to businesses. 153.

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SIXTH A VENUE RECOMMENDATION 6b: LANDSCAPE EXISTING PARKING LOTS Landscape the existing parking lots, giving highest priority to those which front directly on Sixth Avenue, such as the lot at Williams and Sixth and the Safeway lot. Consider a permanent arrangement between the church which owns the lot at 6th and Williams and the adjoining businesses for use and improvement of the lot. SIXTH A VENUE ISSUE 7: Business and property owners along Sixth have recently formed an association which can help coordinate issues such as parking and property maintenance. SIXTH A VENUE RECOMMENDATION 7: ENCOURAGE NEIGHBORHOOD ASSOCIATIONS TO WORK TOGETHER' Encourage cooperation between the new 6th Avenue merchants association and the neighborhood organizations representing the adjoining residential areas in order to accomplish the goals of this plan. As a responsibility of the merchants association, work on safety, beautification, and design continuity projects. Look to other associations for organizational and funding models. 154. r I r i l r r, -

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...., GENERAL ZONING RECOMMENDATIONS 1. USES a. Within existing commercial areas: RETAIL, RETAIL I RESIDENTIAL MIXED-USE, OR RESIDENTIAL b. Within existing residential areas: RESIDENTIAL 2. RESIDENTIAL OCCUPANCY SINGLES I COUPLES I FAMILIES CHILDREN I YOUNG ADULTS I ADULTS I ELDERLY STUDIO I 1-3 BEDROOM UNITS I SINGLE-FAMILY HOUSES OPEN SPACE a. Retail projects: b. Residential / retail mixed-use projects: c. Residential: 4. HEIGHT COMMON PLAZAS FRONT YARDS COMMON PLAY YARDS BALCONIES COMMON PLAZAS FRONT YARDS COMMON PLAY YARDS BALCONIES PRIVATE YARDS a. West of Washington: LIMITED ONLY BY MOUNTAIN VIEW AND SKYLINE PRESERVATION ORDINANCES 5. DENSITY Commercial density as allowed by existing zoning. NOTE: Residential density allowed in business zones shall equal adjacent residential densities; i.e., for R-3 zone, a 3:1 FAR. Where R-0, R-1, or R-2 densities exist, no additional density nor density greater than the existing zoning will be allowed. Where recommended zoning densities are not in agreement with the allowed density of the existing zone district, a P.U.D. could be supported. 6. SETBACKS a. Residential areas: b. Retail areas: RESIDENTIAL RETAIL 155.

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D. EAST COLFAX I PARK AVENUE FOCUS AREA DESCRIPTION The East Colfax I Park Avenue Focus Area is on the northern edge of the neighborhood study area and surrounds the five-point intersection of East Colfax, Park Avenue, and Franklin. While the complex signalization and traffic pattern at this five-point intersection complicates and slows the traffic flow, it also creates a distinct identity. The intersection is a focal point for automobile, bus, pedestrian, and bicycle traffic. "' I I .. The zoning in the focus area is primarily B-4 (general business district), while the 1 surrounding zoning is R-4 (very high density apartment and office district) and R-3 density apartment district). I The intersection of Park Avenue I Franklin I East Colfax is the heart of Colfax-on-the-Hill, the area along Colfax between Broadway and Josephine. Park Avenue provides the connection between Cheesman Park, Capitol Hill, Uptown, San Rafael, Clements, Curtis -, Park, the Gateway District of Downtown, and 1-25. The intersection in an asset and an opportunity because of the unique views it create&, the traffic pattern which causes people to slow, and the designation of Park Avenue as an official City parkway. "l VlSION It The East Colfax I Park Avenue Focus Area will develop as the central ''village center" for Colfax-on-the-Hill. As such, it will be oriented primarily to pedestrians. The area will It experience significant redevelopment, with new buildings creating an urban, pedestrianized environment. The entrance to Park Avenue will be highlighted, a "village square" will ., provide a focus for neighborhood activity, and Park Avenue will be re-established as one of the premier boulevards in the City. 156.

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ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS EAST COLFAX I PARK A VENUE FOCUS AREA ISSUE 1: The report from the East Colfax Charette, a workshop focused on planning issues along East Colfax and held in 1985, cites the area surrounding the Park Avenue I East Colfax intersection as one of three potential "village centers" for Colfax-on-the-Hill. The current land use pattern, however, is not conducive to pedestrian activity. EAST COLFAX / PARK A VENUE FOCUS AREA RECOMMENDATION 1: LOCATE BUILDINGS FACING COLFAX ADJACENT TO THE SIDEWALK Design all public and private development to encourage pedestrian activity. At a minimum, as redevelopment occurs, locate all buildings facing East Colfax adjacent to the sidewalk. Place parking in the rear of the buildings. Never place parking in the front of buildings. EAST COLFAX I PARK AVENUE FOCUS AREA ISSUE 2: The entrance to Park Avenue is not readily seen from East Colfax. A closely related issue is that the small triangular parks near the intersection are too small for any organized activity, discouraging their use by Colfax merchants or by the surround.ing neighborhood. EAST COLFAX I PARK AVENUE FOCUS AREA RECOMMENDATION 2a: EMPHASIZE THE ENTRANCE TO PARK AVENUE Design all public and private development to emphasize the entrance to Park Avenue. Keep the triangular parks at the intersection open to aid visibility, but add focal points, such as fountains or art work, to draw attention to them. EAST COLFAX I PARK AVENUE FOCUS AREA RECOMMENDATION 2b: ENLARGE THE PARK AT TilE NORTHWEST CORNER As part of a long-term solution, consider two alternatives for enlarging the park at the northwest comer of Park Avenue and Colfax: ( 1) purchase all property on the block bounded by Park Avenue, Humboldt, and East Colfax for demolition and redevelopment of the site as a "village square" for East Colfax, or (2) vacate Humboldt between East Colfax and Park Avenue as part of a land trade with the owner(s) of the property closer to the corner. 157.

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EAST COLFAX I PARK A VENUE FOCUS AREA ISSUE 3: Park Avenue does not feel like a landscaped parkway; the street is too wide and the landscaping too inconsistent and informal. EAST COLFAX I PARK A VENUE FOCUS AREA RECOMMENDATION 3: NARROW PARK AVENUE As a long-term solution, narrow Park Avenue by adding a median or extending the curbs into the street. Be careful to maintain the existing axis of the street. Improve the streetscape by planting additional trees and adding street furniture. Establish an historic, formal landscape design for Park Avenue. GENERAL ZONING RECOMMENDATIONS 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. USES RETAIL, RESIDENTIAL, AND RESIDENTIAL I RETAIL MIXED-USE PROJECTS RESIDENTIAL OCCUPANCY SINGLES / COUPLES YOUNG ADULTS I ADULTS I ELDERLY STUDIO I 1-2 BEDROOM UNITS OPEN SPACE a. Residential areas: FRONT YARDS OUTDOOR RECREATION AREAS BALCONIES b. Retail areas: COMMON PLAZAS HEIGHT LIMITED ONLY BY MOUNTAIN VIEW AND SKYLINE PRESERVATION ORDINANCES DENSITY Residential or commercial density as allowed by existing zoning. The density of residential or residential/retail mixed-use projects in business zone districts shall not exceed the density of the adjacent residential zone districts, with the retail component of such projects not exceeding a 1:1 FAR. J -J .. [ l I I I i l l l 1 NOTE: Where recommended zoning densities are not in agreement with the allowed 1 density of the existing zone district, a P.U.D. could be supported. 6. SETBACKS a. Residential areas: b. Retail areas: RESIDENTIAL RETAIL 158. 1 1

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I I I !! IJ E. EAST C
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ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS EAST COLFAX ESPLANADE FOCUS AREA ISSUE 1: The corners at the intersection of Josephine and East Colfax are currently under-developed and could be redeveloped to higher intensity uses and in a manner which underscores the importance of this intersection as a termination for East Colfax and an entrance to the Esplanade and to City Park. EAST COLFAX I ESPLANADE FOCUS AREA RECOMMENDATION 1: i DESIGN NEW DEVELOPMENT TO HELP EMPHASIZE THE INTERSECTION On the northwest, southwest, and southeast corners of Josephine and East Colfax, build new development to the sidewalk and at least two stories. New development on the northeast corner should be pulled .. back from the sidewalk in order to provide an entrance to the Esplanade. "' l 1 EAST COLFAX I ESPLANADE FOCUS AREA ISSUE 2: The northeast corner of the 1 intersection is a large, commercially zoned, but under-developed parcel. It currently contains a vacant Safeway store, a large parking lot, a gasoline service station, and an aluminum can bank. The parcel is one of the largest along this section of East Colfax and has good visibility and an l important location, backing onto the Esplanade. The site has the potential to provide a retail anchor for Colfax-onthe-Hill. EAST COLFAX I ESPLANADE FOCUS AREA RECOMMENDATION 2: CREATE A RETAIL ANCHOR Use the current Safeway building or redevelop the site with a retail use which can setve as an anchor for Colfax on the Hill. Fallow the recommendations of the 1988 marketing study for Colfax on the Hill in determining a potential use: e.g. a retail furniture store. 1 1 1 EAST COLFAX I ESPLANADE FOCUS AREA ISSUE 3: Almost all of the retail uses along 1 East Colfax back onto residential parcels. As a result, the residences are often adjacent to parking lots and service entrances for the retail uses. This juxtaposition results in noise, light, and odor 1 impacts which are less than optimum for the residential uses. EAST COLFAX I ESPLANADE FOCUS AREA RECOMMENDATION 3: LOCATE PARKING BEHIND THE COMMERCIAL STRUCTURES Locate parking for commercial uses along East Colfax behind the commercial structures and buffer it from residential structures. Between the fence and the parking lot, create a landscaped buffer to help mitigate any negative impacts resulting from the parking. 160. 1 1 1 1 I

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-East Colfax and York Commerical Area Urban Design Ideas 161.

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I I I I I I I I I I I I -EAST COLFAX I ESPlANADE FOCUS AREA ISSUE 4: The blocks bounded by East Colfax on the south, 17th on the north, York on the west, and Josephine on the east, narrow to the north and become islands surrounded by heavy traffic. While they retain some isolated houses which may be of historic value, they also contain vacant lots and under-utilized public rights-of-way and should, therefore, be considered for redevelopment which could complement the commercial uses along East Colfax, the character and residential and office uses in the neighborhood, and the character and use of the Esplanade and East High School. EAST COLFAX I ESPLANADE FOCUS AREA RECOMMENDATION 4: REPLICATE THE HISTORIC PAITERN OF MAJOR USES ON CORNERS With any redevelopment, replicate the historic pattern of major uses on the comers of blocks. Given this, consider new office structures at the north end of the 1500 block and at both the north and south end of the 1600 block. Locate parking in the middle of each block between the office structures. GENERAL ZONING RECOMMENDATIONS 1. USES RETAIL, OFFICE, AND RESIDENTIAL I RETAIL MIXED-USE PROJECfS 2. RESIDENTIAL OCCUPANCY SINGLES I COUPLES YOUNG ADULTS I ADULTS I ELDERLY STUDIOS I 1 BEDROOM UNITS 3. OPEN SPACE 4. 5. COMMON PLAZAS HEIGHT LIMITED ONLY BY MOUNTAIN VIEW AND SKYLINE PRESERVATION ORDINANCES DENSITY Residential or commercial density as allowed by existing zoning. The density of residential or residential/retail mixed-use projects in business zone districts shall not exceed the density of the adjacent residential zone districts, with the retail component of such projects not exceeding a 1:1 FAR. NOTE: Where recommended zoning densities are not in agreement with the allowed density of the existing zone district, a P.U.D. could be supported. 163.

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.. --"1 -6. SETBACKS a. Residential areas: RESIDENTIAL I I b. Retail areas: RETAIL, WITH THE EXCEPTION OF THE NORTHEAST I CORNER OF EAST COLFAX AND JOSEPHINE, WHERE BUILDINGS WILL BE 164. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS In the last 25 years, the people of Capitol Hill and Cheesman Park have set an example for every other neighborhood in Denver. Together, they have resurrected a deteriorating neighborhood; established the largest and strongest neighborhood and merchants associations in the City; developed a small neighborhood fair, into the Capitol Hill People's Fair, annually attracting more than a quarter of a million people to the inner-city; committed the proceeds from that fair to operate the largest neighborhood association and to fund a grant program for non-profit organizations which serve the people of the neighborhood; and created a non-profit organization of their own which has served as an for new non-profit organizations. The energy and commitment evidenced by these accomplishments is embodied in the people who dedicated themselves to this neighborhood planning process. Innumerable meetings, drafts, re-drafts, public hearings, and more meetings called for an unparalleled commitment and sense of humor. Even within this large group of dedicated individuals, one person stands out as a model for all of the rest of us. Michael Henry, the chairperson of Capitol Hill United Neighborhoods' Land Use and Zoning Committee, has been the inspiration and the driving force behind both the planning process and the implementation of this plan. Without his vision, commitment to an inclusive process, and steadfast willingness to commit time and energy, this plan could not have been produced. As City Council person for the neighborhood, Cathy Donohue provided both leadership and support. Jennifer Macy, Councilwoman Donohue's Administrative Aide, readily shared her knowledge and insight. Dick Farley, the City's head Urban Designer, created and led the urban design portion of the planning process and pulled the elements of the plan together. Don Dethlefs, Chairperson of the Urban Design Task Force, led the creation of a vision for the neighborhood. Paul Faster, Marvin Hatami, Jeanette Lostracco, and Guenther Vogt provided inspiration, expertise, and practical wisdom as members of the Urban Design Task Force. The University of Colorado of Denver supplied us with a stream of talented, hard working students, including the graduate students in the Planning Studio II, who provided an excellent first draft for the plan; Robin Adams, who provided detailed research; and numerous landscape architecture and architecture students, who provided research and graphic assistance. Chuck Michaels, Jill Morelli, and Ed Thomas, past .. Presidents and current President of CHUN, provided organizational support. Ron Hillstrom, Executive Director of CHUN, and the CHUN staff provided unparalleled technical support. City staff, including Dorothy Nepa, Terry Rosapep, Dennis Royer, and Doug Hendrixson, Elaine Espinosa, Dennis Frank, and Sandra Jackson provided technical review of the plan. The Steering Committee for this planning process was open to everyone who lives, works, owns property, or has an interest in Capitol Hill / Cheesman Park. Among the hundreds of people who committed themselves to creating this plan, special thanks must go to the following individuals. 165.

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l l L L L L L l l l l I_ IJ IJ BJ IJ 1_1 Lynn Adams Marty Amble AJ Bailey Dan Barnett Lee Belstock Reggie Bennett Brad Cameron Bruce Coulter Fred Criswell Peg Ekstrand John Hitch Erick Holland Jim Holland Sarah Holland Stephanie Holle Bernie Jones Ken Judd Andrea Klein Rick Larson Diane Lowry Paula Machlin Marilyn Megenity Marvin Naiman Holly Oteo Dan Otero Kathleen Reilly Dave Sheridan David Sledge Gary Stewart Candace Stowell Rob Weil Neil Woodward Together, along with innumerable other participants whom I have not named, these individuals are responsible for the Capitol Hill / Cheesman Park Neighborhood Plan. I extend my appreciation to each of them. Senior City Planner 166.