Citation
Central Park station area plan

Material Information

Title:
Central Park station area plan
Creator:
Community Planning and Development, City and County of Denver
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
City and County of Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Transit oriented development
Public transportation
Spatial Coverage:
Denver -- Central Park

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
Central Park Station
Area Plan
r*
September 24,2012 IIP
DENVER


Acknowledgements
Mayor Michael B. Hancock
DENVER CITY COUNCIL
District 1- Susan K. Shepherd
District 2- Jeanne Faatz
District 3- Paul D. Lopez
District 4- Peggy Lehmann
District 5- Mary Beth Susman, President
District 6- Charlie Brown
District 7- Chris Nevitt
District 8-Albus Brooks
District 9- Judy H. Montero
District 10-Jeanne Robb
District 11- Christopher Herndon, President
Pro Tern
At-Large- Robin Kniech
At-Large- Deborah (Debbie) Ortega
DENVER PLANNING BOARD
Brad Buchanan, Chairman
Andy Baldyga
Julie Bender
Richard Delanoy
Shannon Gifford
Kenneth Ho
Anna Jones
Brittany Morris Saunders
Sharon Nunnally
Susan Pearce
K.C. Veio
Dave Webster
COMMUNITY PLANNING &
DEVELOPMENT
Molly Urbina, Interim Manager
Steve Gordon, Comprehensive Planning
Manager
David Gaspers, Project Manager
Theresa Lucero, Project Manager
Caryn Wenzara
Steve Nalley
Tim Watkins
Eric McClelland
Carolyne Janssen
FINANCE
Bar Chadwick
PUBLIC WORKS
Jose Cornejo, Manager
Crissy Fanganello, Policy and Planning
Director
Emily Silverman
Jennifer Hillhouse
Eric Osmundson
Emily Snyder
Becky Simon
Mike Anderson
Walt Hime
Russ Price
Justin Schmitz
PARKS & RECREATION
Lauri Dannemiller, Manager
Gordon Robertson, Park Planning, Design and
Construction Director
David Marquardt, Landscape Architect
Supervisor
Mark Upshaw
OFFICE OF ECONOMIC
DEVELOPMENT
Jeff Romine
Christopher Smith
Stephanie Inderwiesen
ARTS AND VENUES
Kendall Peterson
STAPLETON ART PROGRAM
Barbara Neal
HEALTH IMPACT ASSESSEMENT
Alisha Brown, Director BeWell Stapleton
Karen Roof- Envirohealth Consulting
Chad Reischl Envirohealth Consulting
Bill Sadler Envirohealth Consulting
Carrie Murphy Envirohealth Consulting
KEY STAKEHOLDER GROUP
Angie Malpiede, Chair
Charles Bayley
Keven Burnett
Jim Chrisman
Cheryl Cohen-Vader
Beverly Haddon
Donn Hogan
Rhonda Jones
Jody Martin-Witt
Bette Matkowski
Tom Michals
David Netz
Justin Ross
Andrew Schurger
Heather Shockey
John Smith
Patrick Stanley
MikeTurner
Michele Wheeler
Rob Wilson
Ex-Officio Members
Councilmember Chris Herndon
State Representative Angela Williams


Introduction.......................................1
Planning Approach................................2
Planning Process.................................4
Planning Context.................................6
Strategy Framework.................................9
Accomplishments, Challenges, Opportunities......10
Vision and Principles...........................12
Overall Plan Concept............................14
A. Destination..................................16
B. Active.......................................24
C. Accessible...................................32
D. Sustainable..................................40
Transformative Projects...........................47
Uinta Street....................................48
Improved Street Network.........................52
Sand CreekTrail Connections.....................54
Station Landmark................................56
Innovative Station Site Design..................58
Quebec Square Redevelopment.....................62
Intermodal Transportation Center................66
Bike Sharing and Rental Program.................68
Moving Forward....................................71




Introduction
Stapleton served as Denver's airport for better than six decades, serving as the region's con-
nection to destinations around the world. Since the adoption of the Stapleton Development
Plan, the process to turn the former Stapleton International Airport into a thriving, environ-
mentally conscious, economically and socially diverse, mixed-use, cutting-edge neighbor-
hood is recognized as one of the most significant brownfield redevelopment projects in
history. Acknowledged internationally, the neighborhood is a "best practice" in New Urban-
ism planning and traditional neighborhood design. The Stapleton Development Plan, better
known as the Green Book, laid the groundwork for this much-lauded reputation through the
establishment of an ambitious vision, fundamental goals, and plan principles. The Green
Book addresses the economic, social, and environmental objectives of the project, as well as
the physical design of the neighborhood.
The Stapleton neighborhood has a strong tradition of outstanding citizen participation and
involvement and this station area planning effort has strived to continue that precedent. The
Central Park Station Area Plan is an exciting milestone in the redevelopment of Stapleton.
As residential development begins to occur in North Stapleton and South Stapleton begins
to mature and fill-in the remaining development opportunities, the future of Stapleton as a
diverse neighborhood of housing options and employment opportunities gradually be-
comes a reality. The station area is a critical component for the character and function of the
neighborhood. The opportunity to create a walkable, urban, mixed-use environment that
seamlessly transitions to diverse residential neighborhoods positions the Central Park Station
at the forefront of transit-oriented development in the country. At the same time, the station
functions as the Northeast Denver's portal to the rest of the region and the world, connecting
travelers to both Downtown Denver and Denver International Airport. Central Park Station's
vision to become a sustainable, active, and accessible destination will only add to the reputa-
tion of Stapleton as a world-class modern neighborhood.
STAPLETON DEVELOPMENT PLAN
FUNDAMENTAL GOALS
Economic Opportunity: Stapleton
will be a regional center for job cre-
ation in diverse fields, with an empha-
sis on new technologies and emerging
industries. When completed. Staple-
ton could support more than 30,000
jobs and 25,000 residents, becoming
a major contributor to the long term
economic health of the city.
Environmental Responsibility:
Stapleton will demonstrate the eco-
nomic and community benefits of a
long-term commitment to reducing
consumption of natural resources and
impacts on the natural environment.
Human activities will be conducted
in a fashion that acknowledges and
respects the importance of natural
systems.
Social Equity: Stapleton will provide
broad access to social, cultural, and
economic opportunities for all seg-
ments of the community. Successful
redevelopment of the Stapleton site
will be a catalyst for improvements in
the larger community and particular
in the neighborhoods surrounding
the site.
Central Park Station Area Plan Introduction
1


Plan Approach
APPROACH
The Stapleton Development Plan established the
long-term vision for redevelopment in Stapleton.
The RTD FasTracks program includes the East Rail line
that connects Downtown Denver to Denver Interna-
tional Airport, with a station stop in Stapleton.
The Central Park Station Area Plan encompasses a one-half mile radius of the planned
Stapleton Transit Facility located near the intersection of Uinta Street and Smith Road. The
transit facility includes one of six stations on the East Commuter Rail Line, which is scheduled
to begin operations between Denver Union Station to Denver International Airport in 2016,
a Park-n-Ride, and a major bus transfer center. The East Rail Line runs parallel to Smith Road
and the Union Pacific rail corridor. A majority of the station area is within the boundaries of
the Stapleton Development Plan. Since the adoption of the Plan in 1995, the station area has
been intended to become a walkable, transit-oriented neighborhood serving as Stapleton's
portal to the regional transit network. The East Corridor Rail Line environmental impact
statement finalized the location of the Stapleton station and renamed it Central Park Station
(Central Park Boulevard is the nearest major arterial cross street) near the intersection of Smith
Road and Uinta Street.
The 2006 Transit-Oriented Development (TOD) Strategic Plan identified the Central Park Sta-
tion TOD typology as "Urban Center" with a relatively dense mix of office, retail, and residential
uses acting as a sub-regional destination. Following the TOD Strategic Plan, the City part-
nered with RTD and Forest City, Stapleton's master developer, to initiate conceptual planning
work for the approximately 20 acres that would become the RTD Park-n-Ride and BusTransfer
Facility. Multiple recommendations developed as part of the Stapleton Station Conceptual
Plan (2009) will carry over into the Central Park Station Area Plan. These recommendations
include the key concept of a phased approach to promoting future transit-oriented develop-
ment on the RTD surface parking lots as the area develops around the station.
HOWTO USE THIS PLAN
The Plan establishes a vision and principles for the development and future of the Central
Park Station area. The elements of this plan will direct the Stapleton neighborhood, adjacent
neighborhoods, and key stakeholders towards a vision as a community where people live,
work, play, and celebrate the diversity of the best Denver neighborhoods.
Public and private agencies and organizations will use this plan in coming years for many pur-
poses and actions that affect the form and function of the Central Park Station area. The Plan
provides city-adopted policy direction to guide decision-making and prioritization related to
development opportunities, transportation, partnerships, additional study and analysis, fund-
ing and public investments.
In some cases, as identified in this plan, recommendations will require multiple steps before
moving forward with implementation. For example, transportation and infrastructure con-
cepts will require further analysis, including the identification of funding sources. In addition,
zone district changes may be necessary to implement development concepts.
The plan structure has three major components:
Strategy Framework: This section presents content that generally applies to the plan
area as a whole. Existing conditions, plan concepts, and recommendations are presented
for the entire plan area and are organized into four categories or plan principles:
Destination
Active
Access
Sustainable
2
Central Park Station Area Plan Introduction


Transformative Concepts: These are big ideas that, if implemented, could help to cata-
lyze private investment.
Uinta Street
Improved Street Network
Sand CreekTrail Connections
Station Landmark
Innovative Station Site Design
Quebec Square Redevelopment
Intermodal Transportation Center
Bike Sharing and Rental Program
Moving Forward: This section addresses the implementation framework for the plan.
All of the plan recommendations from previous chapters are listed in the implementa-
tion matrix, which also categorizes each recommendation in terms of timing, type, and
potential funding sources.
Efforts were made to eliminate redundancies in plan recommendations. Therefore, recom-
mendations appear once in the plan and although they may be referenced in other chapters,
they are generally not repeated as recommendations in multiple chapters. For example, the
transformative concepts are identified as recommendations in the Strategy Framework, but
greater detail is provided for each recommendation in the transformative concepts section.
Stapleton served as Denver's airport from 1929 to 1995.
BRIEF HISTORY OF STAPLETON
INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT
Several sites were considered for the
location of a new municipal airport
during the 1920's. The "Sand Creek"
site, southeast of 32nd Avenue and
Syracuse Street, was chosen in part due
to its remote location on the far eastern
edge of the city. Dedicated in 1929, the
airport was renamed Stapleton after
Mayor Ben Stapleton in 1944. Almost
continuous expansion occurred, begin-
ning at the dawn of the jet age in the
late 1950's, eventually being comprised
of 4,700 acres, six runways, and five
terminal concourses. During the 1980's,
Mayor Federico Pena and other local
leaders, knowing the now landlocked
airport was outdated and overstrained
with passengers, examined opportuni-
ties to build a new Denver International
Airport. In 1989, voters approved a site
for the new airport 25 miles from Down-
town Denver that was originally located
in Adams County. Stapleton's last flight
left on February 28,1995 the next
day Denver International Airport, better
known as DIA, was open for business
and Stapleton's next life as a Denver
neighborhood began.
Central Park Station Area Plan Introduction
3


Planning Process
The public process forthe Central ParkStation Area Plan kicked of in June 2011 with a public
meeting to begin development of the draft plan vision and principles, which included a brain-
storming activity to generate potential plan concepts. The organizing structure of the plan
document is closely tied to the plan vision and principles, as the concepts and recommenda-
tions are intended to relate back to the four core principles expressed in the plan vision. After
the initial kickoff meeting, the Stapleton Foundation and Stapleton Transportation Manage-
ment Association (TMA) assisted City staff in forming a Key Stakeholder Group to refine
the plan vision and principles and aid City staff in developing the plan concepts. The Key
Stakeholder Group met five times between September 2011 and February 2012. Meetings
with individual stakeholders, such as RTD, the Stapleton Foundation, Stapleton TMA, BeWell
Stapleton, and Forest City helped to shape plan content throughout the process. A concur-
rent planning effort, a station area health impact assessment (HIA), funded by the Stapleton
Foundation, informed many of the plan recommendations. The HIA had a broader study area
than the station area plan, looking at health impacts to neighborhoods within a mile and a
half of the station. The process also involved collaboration between the City and County of
Denver's Community Planning and Development Department, the Public Works Department,
the Department of Parks and Recreation, the Department of Arts and Venues, and the Office
of Economic Development. A second public meeting occurred on June 14,2012 to present
the plan concepts and draft document. Briefings and public hearings with City Council, Den-
ver Planning Board and interagency City staff were also crucial to the process.
PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT PROCESS:
Key Stakeholder Group (KSG) The key responsibility for the Key Stakeholder Group
was to craft a plan vision and principles that is reflective of the larger Northeast Denver
community and guide city staff in developing plan concepts and recommendations that
lead to the implementation of that vision. Throughout the plan process, the KSG was
able to provide invaluable feedback to City staff on key issues, available opportunities,
and potential partnerships while distributing information about the plan to the larger
community. There were five KSG meetings held at the offices of the Stapleton Founda-
tion over the course of the process. Key Stakeholder Group members included represen-
tatives from the Stapleton Development Corporation, Stapleton Foundation, Stapleton
TMA, Citizen's Advisory Board, Stapleton Master Community Association, Stapleton
United Neighbors, nearby neighborhood groups, business owners. Forest City, and RTD.
City and County of Denver District 11 Councilmember Chris Flerndon and Colorado State
Representative Angela Williams served as ex-officio members of the Key Stakeholder
Group.
Individual Stakeholder Interviews -Throughout the station area plan process, a series
of informal interviews were conducted with local citizens, land owners, and City and
County of Denver agencies to identify current initiatives and understand key issues
within the study area. These interviews were a supplement to the public process and
helped to uncover local dynamics.
Public Meetings In addition to meetings with the KSG members and various stake-
holders, two public meetings were held to engage the community on key issues. This
process included:
Public Meeting #1-June 29,2011 The formal public kick-off meeting was an
introduction to the station area planning process with a presentation on the exist-
ing station area conditions and policies, previous station area planning work, and
examples of Transit-Oriented Development. This was followed by a draft plan vision,
principles, and concepts. There was then an open house session designed to gather
4
Central Park Station Area Plan Introduction


ideas and input by focusing on three main questions: What do you like? What do
you not like? How would you change it?
Public Meeting #2-June 14, 2012 -This public meeting was held to review the final
plan concepts and recommendations developed by the Key Stakeholder Group and
provide comments or ask questions of city staff who produced the draft plan docu-
ment. After an initial presentation, a question and answer session and open house
ensued.
CENTRAL PARK STATION HEALTH IMPACT ASSESSMENT
At the outset of the process of developing the Central Park Station Area Plan, the
Stapleton Foundation for Sustainable Urban Communities hired EnviroHealth Consult-
ing to assist with completing a Health Impact Assessment (HIA), which examines how
the built environment affects residents'health. The HIA covers the station area and the
communities within a mile and a half from the station. The study area for the HIA con-
tains neighborhoods as well as commercial and industrial areas located within a broad
rectangle bounded by Montview Blvd, Holly St., 56nd Ave. and Peoria St. The HIA focuses
primarily on the residential neighborhoods of Northeast (NE) Park Hill, North (N) Park Hill,
Northwest (NW) Aurora and much of Stapleton. Five primary questions are addressed by
the HIA:
What is the current health status of the population within the study area and how
might it be affected (positively and negatively) by the Central Park Station and devel-
opment at the TOD Site?
What pedestrian and bicycle routes should be enhanced/created in order to better
connect local residents and employees to the station area?
What transit routes would help connect local residents and employees to the station
area, employment centers and other local services?
What programming and/or housing policy would be necessary to ensure a diverse
population of the people, within the neighborhoods in the study area, benefit from the
development of the TOD Site?
What need (if any) is there fora grocery store that sells and promotes healthy and af-
fordable food items neartheTOD Site?
The HIA evaluates the availability of transportation options, housing quality, access to
jobs, recreation, and healthy food for residents within the study area and describes the
opportunities that exist for incorporating health recommendations into the Central Park
Station Area Plan. The goal of the HIA is to improve local decision making, explicitly
address health impacts of underserved populations and broadly promote health and
well-being.

The goal of the Central Park Station Health Impact
Assessment is to improve local decision making,
explictly address health impacts of underserved
populations and broadly promote health and well-
being.
Central Park Station Area Plan Introduction
5


Planning Context
Blueprint
Denver
An lim-yrnu'il
Unitl r.s4- .mil
Tr-nii'|i>riiiin)n plan
ifronr rjiy a
;: 'f'iilj i,'>.
" ^|jV
^Tlhr
Blueprint Denver is the City's integrated land use and
transportation plan.
The RTD East Commuter Rail Line will begin serving
the station in 2016.
This plan represents the land use, urban form, and transportation vision for the Central Park
Station area. It updates and incorporates recommendations of earlier plans. Previously ad-
opted planning documents that are relevant to this area include:
Stapleton Development Plan (1995)
Stapleton Development Guidelines and Standards (1999)
Denver Comprehensive Plan (2000)
Stapleton Sustainability Plan (2001)
Bicycle Master Plan (2001)
Blueprint Denver: An Integrated Land Use and Transportation Plan (2002)
Denver Parks and Recreation Game Plan (2003)
Pedestrian Master Plan (2004)
Water Quality Management Plan (2004)
TOD Strategic Plan (2006)
Greenprint Denver (2006)
StrategicTransportation Plan (2008)
Stapleton Station Conceptual Plan (2009)
Storm Drainage Master Plan (2009)
Sanitary Sewer Master Plan (2009)
Strategic Parking Plan (2010)
COORDINATION WITH CONCURRENT PLANNING EFFORTS
Over the course of the planning process, there were several other efforts underway within the
study area. The Central Park Station Area Plan team coordinated with each of these efforts to
maximize resources and to help ensure consistency with each.
Denver Moves (2011)
North Stapleton General Development Plan (2012)
Central Park Boulevard, Denver CO Commuter Rail Station Health Impact Assessment
Eagle P3 East Corridor
RTD Central Park Station Park-n-Ride and Bus Transfer Facility design
6
Central Park Station Area Plan Introduction


Central Park Station Area Plan Introduction
7




Strategy Framework
Central Park Station will serve as a critical portal to Stapleton and adjacent neighborhoods
from the entire Denver region. Identifying key Accomplishments, Challenges, and Opportuni-
ties at the beginning of this chapter sets the stage for the plan's concepts and recommenda-
tions and provides an understanding of the needs of the area.
The Overall Plan Concept, Vision, and Principles establish a snapshot of the Central Park Sta-
tion Area Plan. The Key Stakeholder Group took great care in refining the Vision and Prin-
ciples, as they not only provide the desired expectations for the station area but also establish
a standard to judge the validity of the plan's concepts and recommendations. The Plan
Principles serving as the evaluation criteria are:
Destination
Active
Accessible
Sustainable
Each plan principle has a set of detailed concepts that influence a specific aspect of the sta-
tion area. Concepts that further the vision through all four plan principles have been elevated
to Transformative Concepts. The long-term success and value of the Central Park Station
Area Plan will depend on howthe plan concepts, especially the Transformative Concepts.are
implemented as real world projects and what resulting actions occur to capitalize on those
projects.
Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework
9


Accomplishments, Challenges, Opportunities
ACCOMPLISHMENTS
29th Street serves as a "Main Street" for many of
Stapleton's residents.
Adoption of the Stapleton Development Plan (1995), the visioning document for the
redevelopment of the former Stapleton International Airport.
Adoption of numerous other plans intended to guide development in Stapleton and
the station area, including the Stapleton Development Guidelines (1999), the Staple-
ton Housing Plan (2001), and the Stapleton Sustainability Plan (2002).
Addition of over 4,600 homes within the Stapleton Development Area.
Development of Quebec Square within the station area, as well as Northfield Shop-
ping Center and the 29th Street Town Center, bringing over 2 million square feet of
retail to Stapleton and adjacent neighborhoods, areas that were previously under-
served for basic goods and services.
Establishment of the Sand Creek Regional Greenway Trail, connecting the area to the
regional trail system and providing access to an important natural amenity.
A successful federal New Starts Program application for over $1 billion in federal
funds to build the East Corridor Commuter Rail line from Denver Union Station to
Denver International Airport, including the Central Park Station.
Central Park Boulevard will run the length of the
Stapleton redevelopment from 56th Avenue to Mont-
view Boulevard.
Northfield is a regional shopping and entertainment
destination.
m Opening of the Central Park Boulevard/lnterstate 70 interchange in November 2011
and the expected completion of the Central Park Boulevard Overpass in the spring
of 2012. This new connection will provide greater access to the Stapleton neighbor-
hood, especially the Northfield Shopping Center.
The Federal Bureau of Investigation moved into a new 220,000 square foot office
building at 35th Avenue and Ulster Street in 2010, the first major office tenant in the
station area.
CHALLENGES
There is an abundance of retail in the area, Quebec Square, Northfield, and 29th
Street Town Center, creating a challenge for retail opportunities near the station.
The station platform is positioned south of the Union Pacific Railroad tracks and north
of Smith Road, creating barriers in both directions and complicating access to the rail
platform from the bus transfer facility. Park -n -Ride and any future development.
Smith Road currently terminates at Sand Creek, failing to provide a connection to
Havana Street, approximately one-half mile away. Commuters will use 40th Avenue
or Martin Luther King Boulevard to reach the station from neighborhoods and com-
munities to the east of the station.
Quebec Square is an auto-oriented retail center that will need to become more pedes-
trian friendly in the future to fully integrate into the planned adjacent transit oriented
development.
Central Park Boulevard, the main arterial street between South and North Stapleton,
10
Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework


will see increasing traffic levels as Stapleton fully develops, potentially becoming a
barrier for pedestrian and bicycle traffic to and from the east.
Quebec Street is a major arterial roadway acting as a barrier to the station from
neighborhoods to and from the west.
1-70 can be a barrier for pedestrians and bicyclists to and from the north.
Central Park Boulevard is the only grade separated crossing of the UPRR ROW in the
study area, limiting north-south connectivity.
Market competition from other TOD locations exists for higher density residential and
offices uses.
Ulster Street is an at-grade crossing of the Union Pacific and future East Rail line tracks
that provides the predominant access to the existing Stapleton Industrial Area.
The need to balance goals of a walkable, urban neighborhood versus the needs of a
busy Park-n-Ride in the RTD system.
)
4
Stapleton's residential population continues to grow
OPPORTUNITIES
A large portion of the station area is a brownfield redevelopment site at various
stages of environmental remediation.
Strong cooperation from partners RTD and Forest City both committed to the long
term vision of a walkable, mixed-use neighborhood near Central Park Station.
Stapleton provides a growing, desirable residential neighborhood capable of sup-
porting a significant employment center near the station.
Strong bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure already exists within Stapleton's residen-
tial neighborhoods.
Long-term redevelopment opportunities exist to intensify the uses within Quebec
Square, transferring the shopping center into a more walkable, mixed-use neighbor-
hood.
There is an identified need in Stapleton for higher density multi-family housing.
The station incorporates an established, busy, bus transfer facility that provides
transit connections to adjacent neighborhoods as well as destinations throughout
the region.
As a master planned neighborhood, Stapleton
has strong pedestrian and bicycle infrastructure in
already developed areas
m The station is located at a convenient location approximately half way between DIA
and Downtown Denver on the East Commuter Rail Line.
1-70 is a major regional roadway, moving thousands of people through the region,
providing access to Downtown and DIA, and generating economic activity and jobs at
nearby employment centers.
The FBI relocated to Central Park Station in 2010
Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework
11


Vision and Principles
A key to the development of the Central Park Station Area Plan was the establishment of a
strong plan vision and plan principles. The kickoff meeting provided a draft version of the
plan vision and principles to the public for initial input and the Key Stakeholder Group later
refined the vision and principles to ensure they provided the correct framework for the entire
plan. The vision describes the area as it could be twenty or more years into the future, while
the principles establish specific elements that this plan should strive to achieve.
VISION STATEMENT
Central Park Station will be a sustainable, active, and accessible destination for Stapleton,
nearby neighborhoods, and the Denver region.
PLAN PRINCIPLES
A. Destination -The station area will serve as a crossroads of the Stapleton neighbor-
hood, connecting people from all segments of the community to the diverse activities
found throughout Stapleton and the Denver region.
B. Active The station area will be a safe, vibrant, urban place that provides stimulating,
enjoyable, and convenient activities and amenities for a wide variety of different users.
C. Accessible -The station area will build upon its regional connections to provide an
extremely high level of mobility and multi-modal access for all users in a safe, easy, and
convenient manner.
D. Sustainable -The station area will seek innovative ways to better nurture natural,
economic, and social systems and resources for today and future generations.
These four principles are used as a measuring stick to assess the degree to which any given
plan concept helps to promote or achieve a broad array of goals. In this way, the principles
are both an organizing element for the plan and a means by which to evaluate its content.
Plan Vision
Plan Principles
Plan Concepts
Central Park Station will be the sustainable, active, and
accessible destination for Stapleton, nearby neighborhoods,
and the Denver region.
I
I
r
ACCC ssiblr-

Urban Design
Improved Street Network Affordable Housing
Quebec Square Innovative Park N Ride Mnhilitu
r. Landmark irrty
Bike Sharing Use and Form Station ITC
Sand Creek Trail Connections
12
Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework


STAPLETON DEVELOPMENT PLAN BOUNDARIES
REDEVELOPMENT OF
AN AIRPORT
The former Stapleton International Airport has undergone significant redevelopment over the last decade.
Stapleton, bounded by on the west by Quebec Street, north by 64th Avenue, east by Havana Street and south
byMontview Boulevard, encompasses 4,700 acres.
Almost as soon as the decision to build
Denver International Airport hap-
pened, thoughts of how to redevelop
the soon to be abandoned Staple-
ton International Airport began. To
organize this effort, the Stapleton
Foundation for Sustainable Urban
Communities (formerly the Staple-
ton Redevelopment Foundation)
was established in 1990 to develop a
visionary plan for the redevelopment
of Stapleton that would maximize the
long-term benefit of the site. A part-
nership between the Stapleton Foun-
dation, the Citizen's Advisory Board,
the Stapleton Tomorrow Committee,
and the City and County of Denver
produced The Stapleton Development
Plan in 1995. This document, formally
adopted by City Council, focused on
five guiding principles. Environmental
Responsibility, Social Equity, Economic
Opportunity, Physical Design, and
Implementation, to direct develop-
ment within the boundaries of the
former airport.
As an abandoned redevelopment site,
the Denver Urban Renewal Author-
ity established Stapleton as an urban
renewal area, while Mayor Wellington
Webb and the City Council created the
non-profit Stapleton Development
Corporation (SDC) to oversee the rede-
velopment. SDC selected Forest City
as the master developer of Stapleton
in 1998, with construction beginning
in 2001. Since that time, the Stapleton
Foundation, Stapleton Development
Corporation, and Forest City have been
working together to deliver the Devel-
opment Plan's vision of Stapleton as a
sustainable urban community.
Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework
13


Overall Plan Concept
Central Park Station will be the sustainable, active, and accessible heart of the Stapleton neighborhood, serving as a destination for the area.
Strategy Framework
Recommendations that have a impact over a specific aspect of the station area.
A. DESTINATION
The station area will serve as a crossroads of the Stapleton
neighborhood, connecting people from all segments of
the community to the diverse activities found throughout
Stapleton and the Denver region.
A.1 High Intensity Development near the Station
A.2 1-70 Employment Centers
A.3 Infill Development at Appropriate Locations
A.4 Establish Transitions to Residential Neighborhoods
A.5 Change existing residential neighborhoods to areas of
stability
B. ACTIVE
The station area will be a safe, vibrant, urban place that
provides stimulating, enjoyable, and convenient activities
and amenities for a wide variety of different users.
B.1 Active Edges
B.2 Building Frontages
B.3 Building Placement and Massing
B.4 Parks, Plazas, Open Space
B.5 Cultural Activity Generators
B.6 Design Guidelines Review
UINTA STREET
Create a pedestrian-scaled
public realm along Uinta
Street, serving as the primary
walking street and spine of the
station area.
IMPROVED STREET
NETWORK
Improve the surrounding
Central Park Station area street
network to provide a high level
of regional and local access to
the station.
SAND CREEKTRAIL
CONNECTIONS
Increase multi-modal connec-
tions to the station through
strategic improvements to the
existing trail system.
STATION LANDMARK
Provide a visual marker near
the station that allows easy
recognition for transit users
approaching the station from
any direction while enhancing
the public realm and identity of
the area.
14
Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework


D. SUSTAINABLE
C. ACCESSIBLE
The station area will build upon its regional connections
to provide an extremely high level of mobility and multi-
modal access for all users in a safe, easy, and convenient
manner.
C.1 Mobility Network Improvements
C.2 Promote a High Level of Bicycle Usage
C.3 Pedestrian Mobility Improvements
C.4 Enhance Pedestrian and Bicycle through Evaluation of
Traffic Calming and Signalization Improvements
The station area will seek innovative ways to better nur-
ture natural, economic, and social systems and resources
for today and future generations.
A.1 Environmental Sustainability
A.2 Social and Cultural Sustainability
A.3 Housing Sustainability
A.4 Economic Sustainability
C.5 Distribute Bus Routes through the Major Street Network
C.6 Parking Management
C.7 Street Cross Sections
INNOVATIVE STATION
SITE DESIGN
Achieve a sustainable, in-
novative station design that
promotes a walkable, mixed-
use, transit-oriented commu-
nity for Stapleton and adjacent
neighborhoods.
QUEBEC SQUARE
Long-term redevelopment of
Quebec Square into a more
walkable, mixed-use shopping
and residential neighborhood.
INTERMODAL
TRANSPORTATION
CENTER
Create a centralized location
for users to access a wide vari-
ety of multi-modal transporta-
tion options.
BIKE SHARING
Create a bike sharing and rent-
al program in the station area
that provides alternatives to
single occupancy automobile
trips for both local residents
and visitors.
Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework
15


A. Destination
PRINCIPLE STATEMENT
The station area will serve as a cross-
roads of the Stapleton neighborhood,
connecting people from all segments of
the community to the diverse activities
found throughout Stapleton and the
Denver region.
WHY IS BEING A DESTINATION IMPORTANT TO THE CENTRAL PARK
STATION AREA?
The East Line Commuter Rail begins operating between Denver International Airport (DIA)
and Denver Union Station in 2016. Central ParkStation will begin to play an important role
as a portal for the neighborhood to local and global destinations once rail service begins. A
15-minute train ride from Central Park Station will deliver someone into the heart of Down-
town Denver with transit connections throughout the metro area, or into DIA's South Termi-
nal, ready to depart to any one of hundreds of domestic or international destinations. The
easy access to the region and the world gained by boarding a train at Central Park Station is
reciprocated when a transit user gets off the train to access the activities and amenities within
Stapleton from the Station. This exciting level of multi-modal connectivity is exceptional,
and presents an amazing opportunity for Central ParkStation to serve as the first and last
impression of Stapleton for residents, employees, and visitors alike. To make the most out of
that impression, the station area will need to meld a mix of uses, attractive and active building
frontages, quality urban open space, and multi-modal transportation options to become the
most urban and walkable place in Stapleton.
SUMMARY OF EXISTING CONDITIONS
There are six subareas identified for the purpose of capturing the existing conditions of the
study area. The mix of uses, intensity of commercial development, and density of residen-
tial housing types in these areas will have the greatest impact on the how the station area
matures as a regional destination. The different subareas of the overall study area take on
highly varied characteristics due to the uses, building forms, and amount of redevelopment
that has occurred in each. As a result, some of the existing conditions represent the expected
development pattern in the area for the next 20 to 30 years, where other areas expect rapid
character changes within a few years. A brief summary of the existing conditions in each
subarea is below.
Central Park West is a mix of single family homes,
rowhouses, and duplexes.
Central Park Station is the future TOD neighborhood directly south of the transit sta-
tion, bounded by Quebec Square to the west. Smith Road to the north. Central Park
Boulevard to the east, and 35th Avenue on the south. The area is predominantly vacant
with the recently opened FBI building, a modern, mid-rise office building, and RTD's
1,500 space temporary Park-n-Ride lot being the only current uses.
Central Park West is directly south of Central ParkStation, bounded by Syracuse Street
on the west, 35th Avenue on the north. Central Park Boulevard to the east and MLK Bou-
levard to the south. This neighborhood has a mix of new construction housing types,
with mostly two or three story single-family homes and rowhouses near 35th Avenue.
The Swigert-McAulliffe International School, an early learning through 8th grade school
opened in 2011 at Syracuse Street and 35th Avenue. The Stapleton Airport Tower, main-
tained from Stapleton's historic use as an airport, rises over 100 feet near the corner of
Central Park Boulevard and MLK.
Central Park North is generally southeast of the station, bounded by Central Park
Boulevard on the west. Sand Creekto the north. Westerly Creekto the east, and Central
Park to the south. The neighborhood is generally two to three story single-family homes.
RK Mechanical occupies a 15-acre site along Sand Creek in the northern portion of the
area. Lots adjacent to Central Park Boulevard and north of 35th Street are reserved for
affordable housing.
Centerfield Campus is mostly undeveloped land bounded by Sand Creek on the west.
Interstate 70 (1-70) on the north, Havana Street on the east, and Smith Road on the
16
Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework


south. The Sand Creek Regional Greenway runs along the western border of Centerfield,
providing access to the regional open space network. The only significant building in
Centerfield is an industrial warehouse building that houses the offices of DenverTransit
Partners near 1-70 and Havana Street.
Quebec Square was the first area redeveloped as part of the Stapleton Redevelopment
Plan, with stores initially opening in 2002.The property is bounded by Quebec Street
on the west. Smith Road on the north, the future RTD Park-n-Ride on the east, and 35th
Avenue on the south. This 75-acre open-air power center has 740,000 square feet of re-
tail space with Wal-Mart, Sam's Club, and The Home Depot as major anchor tenants. The
site planning is typical of suburban, auto-oriented shopping centers, using large tilt-wall
construction buildings spaced between significant amounts of surface parking. Ad-
ditional retail near the station is located at the 29th Street Town Center (126,000 square
feet) and The Shops at Northfield (1.2 million square feet).
Stapleton Industrial Area is a developed area northwest of the transit station, bounded
by Quebec Street on the west, 1-70 on the north. Sand Creek on the east, and Smith Road
on the south. This area, which is not part of the Stapleton Development Plan, was in use
when Stapleton was functioning as an airport. Primarily industrial in nature, the area
includes an airplane salvage yard, motor freight company, and taxicab company as major
property owners. The Sand Creek Prairie Dog Preserve is located along Sand Creek in the
location of the former Stapleton fuel storage facilities. Two hotels,The Red Lion and the
Courtyard by Marriott, are located near Quebec Street and a group home is located on
Ulster Street just south of 40th Avenue.
CENTRAL PARK STATION AREA PLAN SUB AREAS
... . ____________________________________________________________________; The Wal-Mart Supercenter is one of Quebec Square's
anchor tenants.
Many of the businesses in the Stapleton Industrial
Area date back to the historic aviation use of Staple-
ton.
Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework
17


The Central Platte Valley, an example of transit
oriented development in Denver.
Station areas on the Southeast Line, such as
Arapahoe at Village Center, are employment focused.
Large industrial buildings on 40th Avenue have easy
access to Interstate 70.
FUTURE LAND USE CONCEPTS
Blueprint Denver, Denver's integrated land use and transportation plan, adopted in 2002,
identifies Areas of Change and Areas of Stability throughout the city with the goal of direct-
ing new development and infill projects toward Areas of Change. Blueprint Denver estab-
lished land use types based on a framework of "building blocks"- Districts, Residential Areas,
Centers, and Corridors. Each category has individual land use types and describes a particu-
lar character and scale that is desired in the future but does not necessarily reflect existing
conditions. The Central Park Station Plan uses this as the basis of its recommended land use
map. Two sub-categories of land uses. Industrial Mixed-Use and TOD Employment, have been
added to reflect the specific conditions in the plan area. The Blueprint Denver Plan map will
be amended as needed based on this plan as illustrated in the Moving Forward section.
Transit Oriented Development: Transit-oriented developments have land uses with a
direct correlation to the function of a mass transit system. These development sites are
located at stations or stops along mass transit lines, especially rail lines. Transit-oriented
developments provide housing, services, and employment opportunities for a diverse
population in a configuration that facilitates pedestrian and transit access. TOD is a
central land use concept in the study area due to the multi-modal nature of the Central
Park Station that will be located at Smith Road and Uinta Street. Central Park Station was
identified in the Transit Oriented Development Strategic Plan as an Urban Center station
typology that should include a mix of office, retail, and multi-family residential uses.
TOD Employment: Areas near transit stations should take advantage of the multi-mod-
al nature ofthe location regardless of the predominant existing orfuture uses. TheTOD
Employment is a sub-category of theTransit Oriented Development land use concept
found in Blueprint Denver. TOD Employment recognizes the potential for a large amount
of employment, including industrial uses, near a transit station. These areas may have
existing industrial uses requiring access to major arterials or interstates and are adjacent
to heavy rail facilities, yet should work to promote pedestrian and bicycle access and
allow for additional uses such as office buildings and hotel accommodations. Although
not common in the Denver area, other areas with commuter rail service have stations in
industrial areas with significant employee ridership. Portions ofthe Stapleton Industrial
Area could serve as an example of this land use concept in the future.
Employment: Employment areas contain office, warehousing, light manufacturing and
high tech uses such as clean manufacturing or information technology. Sometimes big-
box retail is found in these areas.These areas are distinguished from mixed-use centers
in that they have few residences and typically have more extensive commercial and
some industrial activity. Employment areas require access to major arterials or inter-
states. Those areas with manufacturing and warehousing uses must be able to accom-
modate extensive truck traffic and rail in some instances. The Centerfield Campus in the
study area is a strong example of this land use type.
Industrial: The need for heavy industrial areas in Denver has changed as manufacturing
and shipment have become more sophisticated. Even though some industrial areas have
become more diverse employment areas, the need for industrially zoned land remains.
Active industrial areas require access to major arterials or interstates. Heavy rail facili-
ties also are often adjacent to industrial districts. Streets in these districts must be able
to accommodate heavy trucks. Special attention to design, screening, and buffering is
necessary where industrial districts abut districts that include residential use. Examples
of this form of development include the 1-70 and South Platte River corridors.
18
Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework


CENTRAL PARK STATION CONCEPT LAND USE MAP PLAN RECOMMENDATION
TOD |_
TOD I
Employment
Employment
Industrial I
Mixed Use
Industrial
Regional Center
Single Family Duplex
Park
Mixed Use
Note: Dashed lines on this map represent potential future connections in the station area. These connections may take the form of future public or private streets, alleys,
pedestrian passages, or mews with the intent of increasing access in the station area while breaking up large blocks to improve the pedestrian experience.
Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework
19


Industrial Mixed-Use can support a wide variety of
building forms and business types.
Quebec Square is an example of a regional center
Single Family Duplex Much of Stapleton has a mix
of housing types, such as this Mansion style multi-
family building that is integrated into what otherwise
appears to be a completely single family residential
area.
Industrial Mixed-Use: Industrial Mixed-Use is a versatile land use concept, derived from
Blueprint Denver's Industrial land use concept, that recognizes that light industrial uses,
such as light manufacturing and smaller warehouses are compatible with urban residen-
tial housing types. These areas have both a sizable employment base as well as a variety
of mid-to-high density housing options. Land uses can be, but are not necessarily, mixed
in each building, development, or block. Pedestrian access is of importance within the
area, with residential and non-residential uses always within walking distance of one
another. The Stapleton Industrial Area, northwest of the future station location, has a
mix of industrial uses and hotels and could accommodate some office/employment uses
as well as urban residential housing types as theTOD area matures.
Mixed-Use: In the context of this plan, there is one area designated for mixed-use, the
RK Mechanical site. The existing light industrial use has been in its current location and is
a permitted use in the existing C-MU-30 zone district. If a re-zoning is sought, mixed-use
in this context would be primarily residential with the potential fora small amount of
neighborhood serving retail. Any redevelopment plan should acknowledge the adjacent
residential uses and utilize appropriate transitions.
Regional Center: Ideally, a regional center has a balance of retail, employment and resi-
dential uses; however, many began as one major use, such as a regional shopping center
or a large office park. These centers cover a fairly large area and are dense enough to
encompass both the dominant use and a wide variety of other uses. These centers have
an atmosphere that is attractive to patrons from throughout the region. Quebec Square
and the adjacent United Airlines training facility in Stapleton is an example of a regional
center where a major shopping center is at the core of many other uses concentrated in
a small area.
Single Family Duplex: Single family duplex residential areas are primarily residential
with some complementary, small-scale commercial uses.There is a mixture of hous-
ing types, including single-family houses, duplexes, rowhouses,and small apartment
buildings. Typical densities are between 10 and 20 housing units per acre area-wide,
and single family detached structures often predominate. Many historic neighborhoods
contain this combination of housing types including City Park West, Alamo Placita, and
portions of West Washington Park. Newer neighborhoods with this land use type, such
as Cherry Creek, typically have a greater ratio of rowhouses and duplexes included in the
housing mix.
Parks: Parks and natural open space are public spaces, ranging from highly pro-
grammed parks to natural areas along the waterways. Parks and open spaces range from
active neighborhood and community parks with recreation fields and centers to larger
preserves of natural open areas that provide space for wildlife habitat. A"greenway"is a
linear park or open space developed along a stream, canal, or other natural or man-made
feature. They enhance nearby neighborhoods by providing park space and frequently
off-street bicycle paths.
20
Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework


DESTINATION CONCEPTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS
A.1 High Intensity Development near the Station
The area nearest the station should have the greatest sense of urbanism of the
entire Stapleton neighborhood:
Allow taller general, shopfront, and apartment building forms with higher densities
near the station.
Allow a mix of uses within the area and within buildings with a emphasis on office
and multi-family development.
Promote a high level of flexibility, mixing uses to react to changing market condi-
tions and encouraging the highest intensity of uses near the station.
Through existing design review processes, encourage a wide mix of building heights
and forms throughout the station area to provide visual interest, needed sunlight,
and appropriate natural view corridors.
Orient building forms and active ground floor uses towards the street with parking
and vehicular access in the rear/off the alley.
Identify opportunities to use mid-block passages that could take the form of public
or private streets, alleys, or pedestrian paths to increase connectivity in the station
area and break up large blocks.
Capitalize on the delayed vertical construction ofTOD on the RTD surface parking
lots by seeking developers interested in high-density residential product types as
the market matures in the station area. Residential development on RTD property
should anticipate exceeding affordable housing goals set forth in the Stapleton
Affordable Housing Plan.
FUTURE BUILDING HEIGHTS CONCEPT MAP
{J)-' 's
3 stories stories ^|8stories ^|l2stories ^|l6stories |_JTransition Area
Mid-block connections improve pedestrian access in
urban areas.
Higher Intensity development nearest the station is
desired.
Note: Dashed lines on this map represent potential
future connections in the station area. These con-
nections may take the form of future public or private
streets, alleys, pedestrian passages, or mews with the
intent of increasing access in the station area while
breaking up large blocks to improve the pedestrian
experience.
Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework
21


A.2 1-70 Employment Centers
"Big Box" retail can be integrated into a more pedes-
trian scaled environment.
Apartment buildings with pedestrian-scaled elements
on the ground floor can help transition from a mixed-
use neighborhood to a residential neighborhood.
Existing Stapleton residential neighborhoods are now
an area of stability.
Areas north of Smith Road and south of 1-70 have strong access from both transit and
automobiles, with a high level of visibility attractive to major employers:
Allow a mix of general and industrial building forms north of Smith Road.
Encourage an employment focus in the Centerfield Campus and the Stapleton
Industrial Area to capitalize on the location's high level of visibility.
Promote infill development that enhances the built environment and capitalizes on
the proximity to a passenger rail station while functioning next to existing industrial
uses.
A.3 Infill Development at Appropriate Locations
Non-residential areas within the station area built at auto-oriented development
intensities, such as Quebec Square, are candidates for future infill development:
Allow general, shopfront, apartment, and industrial building forms compatible to
existing uses.
Infill development should reinforce the pedestrian nature of Stapleton at densities
that support the high degree of nearby transit options.
Large-scale infill development, such as within Quebec Square, should utilize varied
building heights and design elements to establish a diverse built environment.
Enhance mountain views from nearby public open space through careful site plan-
ning and building orientation.
A.4. Establish Transitions to Residential Neighborhoods
A higher intensity of development is expected within the TOD site than nearby residen-
tial neighborhoods. Appropriate transitions should occuratthe edge of the TOD to ease
from the mixed-use development pattern to the predominantly residential neighbor-
hoods.
Allow general, shopfront, and apartment building forms in transition areas.
Locate residential building types at the edge of the TOD site with a height and scale
that transitions between higher intensity building types in the TOD core and lower
intensity development in existing residential neighborhoods.
Make use of design elements, such as upper story setbacks, as necessary, to mini-
mize massing adjacent to residential areas.
Utilize major arterials, such as Central Park Boulevard and 35th Avenue, to ease
transitions between mixed-use and residential neighborhoods.
Promote the use of design elements that create a pedestrian scaled environment on
streets that traverse between mixed-use and residential neighborhoods.
A.5. Change existing residential neighborhoods to Areas of Stability
Blueprint Denver, adopted in 2003, considers Stapleton as an area of change due to its
status as a major redevelopment site. Since that time, the Central Park North neighbor-
hood and the Central Park West neighborhood became substantially complete. Both
residential areas should be Areas of Stability on Blueprint Denver Concept Land Use map.
Station area parks and open space should also be considered Areas of Stability with the
understanding that programing and activities will likely evolve over the plan horizon.
22
Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework


AREAS OF CHANGE/AREAS OF STABILITY CONCEPT MAP
Area Of Change
Area of Stability
Note: Dashed lines on this map represent potential future connections in the station area. These connections may take the form of future public or private streets, alleys,
pedestrian passages, or mews with the intent of increasing access in the station area while breaking up large blocks to improve the pedestrian experience.
Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework
23


B. Active
PRINCIPLE STATEMENT
The station area will be a safe, vibrant,
urban place that provides stimulating,
enjoyable, and convenient activities and
amenities fora wide variety of different
users.
Existing condition of station platform location at
Smith Road and Uinta Street.
The 16th Street mall is a world-reknown pedestrian
environment.
WHY IS BEING ACTIVE IMPORTANT TO THE CENTRAL PARK STATION AREA?
The Central Park Station expects a high level of activity due to its multi-modal nature, frequen-
cy of service, and substantial projected ridership. The degree to which that activity extends
out from the station will largely depend on the built environment and design of public spaces.
Great urban neighborhoods are not places just to travel through but rather to stop, linger,
converse, and generally live life. These activities happen in the public realm between build-
ings the streets and open space framed by the built environment. The design and layout
of development in the station area should seek to assemble people and activities through
keeping distances for pedestrian travel and visual experiences as short as possible. The key
public spaces need easy access to encourage people to move between the private and public
environments of the station. Public spaces that integrate various activities and amenities in
the station area increase the sense of activity. An active environment promotes a feeling
of safety and visual interest for pedestrians by providing amenities such as outdoor seating
areas, ground floor windows, cafes, accessible buildings, street trees, and other civic ameni-
ties. As pedestrian activity increase in an area, offices, retail shops, and urban housing choices
all become more viable.
SUMMARY OF EXISTING CONDITIONS
Since a large portion of the study area is undeveloped, there is a prevalent lack of active uses
and amenities. Existing activity generators in the study area are limited to a few specific loca-
tions and generally lack urban qualities. Quebec Square is the most active place within a half-
mile of the station but is predominantly an auto-oriented suburban retail center challenged
to provide a good pedestrian environment. The shopping center does respect elements
of the Denver street grid, has detached sidewalks, and a number of the pad retail sites have
buildings brought up to the street with outdoor patio seating. Considerable activity occurs at
the current RTD Park-n-Ride and bus transfer facility near 36th Avenue and Uinta Street, but
this facility will relocate by opening day to a location directly south of the commuter rail plat-
form. Another activity generator, the FBI Building, utilizes a campus setting that limits street
24
Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework


activity. The Swigert-McAulliffe International School also has a campus setting, but does
generate foot traffic and street level activity during peak hours. The Stapleton Industrial Area,
with a mix of industrial facilities, transportation companies, and hotels, lacks the convenient
pedestrian connections to other portions of the study area and activity is limited beyond
job-related automobile and truck traffic. Minimal activity occurs in the mostly undeveloped
Centerfield Campus subarea, but the opening of the Central Park Boulevard overpass in the
spring of 2012 will bring more multi-modal traffic through the area.
ACTIVE CONCEPTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS
B.1 Active Edges
Urban neighborhoods need buildings that contribute to a safe and vibrant pedestrian
environment. Promoting active edges on buildings located along pedestrian priority
streets and key intersections adds to the urban experience, increases visual and physi-
cal interaction between the public and private realm, and results in more" eyes on the
street". Uinta Street, as a pedestrian priority street, and its corresponding intersections
are important locations to apply this concept in the station area. Buildings with active
edges should contain the following elements:
Prominent, street facing entries
Extensive ground floor windows and frequent entrances
Articulated, pedestrian-scaled facades
Awnings to protect pedestrians and mark entrances
Building entrances that meet the sidewalk
No ground floor parking along active edges
Stoops, raised porches, terraces, and small quasi-public open space can be used in
lower density residential uses
Many of the restaurants along 17th Avenue in North
Capitol Hill provide the street with an active edge.
STREETS WITH ACTIVE EDGES AND BUILDING FRONTAGES
Active Edge
!,32ofeet ^ Building Frontage
Note: Dashedlineson this map represent potential future connections in the station area. These connections may take the form of future public or private streets, alleys, pedes-
trian passages, or mews with the intent of increasing access in the station area while breaking up large blocks to improve the pedestrian experience.
The 29th Street Town Center has a strong public realm
where many Stapleton residents enjoying walking,
sitting, and meeting friends and neighbors.
Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework
25


B.2 Building Frontages
Large corporate office uses benefit from nearby high
density housing, restaurants, and shopping.
Employment Center Primary Street
Note: Dashedlineson this map represent potential future connections in the station
area. These connections may take the form of future public or private streets, alleys,
pedestrian passages, or mews with the intent of increasing access in the station area
while breaking up large blocks to improve the pedestrian experience.
Having a strong continuous street wall is a fundamental urban design principle used to
define the vital public realm between buildings, which is often the most utilized public
space in an urban environment. Building Frontages require buildings to be brought up
to the street right-of-way, meeting the sidewalk or public open space. This urban design
principle is applicable on many of the streets in the station area and is considered vital
to the overall pedestrian experience. Buildings with this requirement should contain the
following elements:
Building edges brought to the sidewalk with minimal setbacks
No surface parking between the primary structure and the street
Scaling elements to break up the appearance of tall buildings and continuous street
walls
B.3 Building Placement and Massing
B.3.A Employment Centers: Employment centers designed to be pedestrian friendly
by utilizing the street grid to blend into the surrounding neighborhoods can promote
greater activity beyond typical office work hours. Large corporate office campuses,
research and design facilities, or industrial uses developed within the station area need
special attention to achieve desired levels of activity. The Centerfield Campus and the
Stapleton Industrial Area are likely locations for these large-scale uses. Focusing devel-
opment towards Central Park Boulevard, 40th Avenue, and Ulster Street as the primary
streets in these areas should bring more activity to the public realm. Buildings located in
employment centers should:
STAPLETON INDUSTRIAL AREA AND CENTERFIELD CAMPUS
Focus development in the Centerfield Campus and Stapleton Industrial Area towards the primary streets of
Central Park Boulevard, 40th Avenue, and Ulster Street.
26
Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework


Orient towards primary streets
Locate prominent, direct pedestrian entrances on primary streets
Provide vehicular access from secondary streets whenever possible
Consider auxiliary ground level uses on primary streets that generate activity out-
side of typical office work hours such as
Employee recreation centers
Daycare facilities
Business support services such as copying and printing companies, computer
services and mailing services
Casual restaurants
B.3.B Central Park Station: Uinta Street is the spine of the TOD site, serving as a
pedestrian priority street where the most prominent buildings in the TOD should be lo-
cated. Proper building placement and massing that frames and defines Uinta Street and
promotes a high quality public realm through concentrating and reinforcing pedestrian
activity is critical to the success of the station area. Varied building heights that increase
the visual interest of the station area are expected. Important natural and man-made
views should be utilized to enhance the quality of the public realm. Key building loca-
tions along Uinta Street include:
35th Avenue and Uinta Street: This intersection serves as the gateway into the TOD
from existing residential neighborhoods to the south. Buildings placed at this inter-
CENTRAL PARK STATION
Central Park Station's has several important intersections that should receive additional attention from the
built environment.
The Downtown Area Plan identifies 16th Street as
the spine of Downtown Denver, serving as its key
pedestrian priority street.
*
%
Key Intersection
Ga teway In tersection
Note: Dashed lines on this map represent potential future connections in the station
area. These connections may take the form of future public or private streets, alleys,
pedestrian passages, or mews with the intent of increasing access in the station area
while breaking up large blocks to improve the pedestrian experience.
Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework
27


Some large shopping centers in the Denver metro
region have been transformed into more walkable,
mixed-use areas. Belmar in Lakewood is just one
example.
section should utilize architectural elements that establish the intersection as a key
entry point into the station area.
36th Avenue/37th Avenue and Uinta Street: Building placement and massing
should recognize the prominence of these intersections as the heart of the TOD.
Special corner treatments such as signature entries, special roof shapes, and taller,
iconic architectural elements should be utilized.
Smith Road and Uinta Street: This intersection serves as the gateway into the TOD
from the station platform. Buildings placed at this intersection should have a strong
visual presence from the station platform and be oriented towards both Uinta Street
and Smith Road, establishing a clear and defined edge with the public right-of-way.
36th Avenue and Central Park Boulevard: This intersection serves as the gateway
into the TOD from Central Park Boulevard. Buildings placed at this intersection
should utilize architectural elements that establish the intersection as a key entry
point into the station area.
B.3.C Quebec Square: The long-term redevelopment of Quebec Square is discussed
as a Transformative Concept. If Quebec Square begins to experience infill development,
building placement and massing considerations at specific locations should be utilized
to increase activity levels throughout the area. Important natural and man-made views
from public open space should be utilized to enhance the quality of the public realm.
Key building locations in Quebec Square include:
36th Avenue and Quebec: Building placement and massing should recognize this as
a gateway into Quebec Square by emphasizing the prominence of this intersection
through appropriately composed architectural elements.
Syracuse Street and Smith Road: Building placement and massing should recognize
this as a gateway into Quebec Square by emphasizing the prominence of this inter-
section through appropriately composed architectural elements.
Gateway Intersection
Note: Dashedlineson this map represent potential future connections in the station
area. These connections may take the form of future public or private streets, alleys,
pedestrian passages, or mews with the intent of increasing access in the station area
while breaking up large blocks to improve the pedestrian experience.
QUEBEC SQUARE
Quebec Square's Gateway Intersections
28
Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework


B.4 Parks, Plazas, and Open Space
Open spaces should serve as an organizing element of the urban environment within the
station area. As the most intensively developed area of Stapleton, the station area needs
publicly accessible open spaces (publicly or private owned) that create a sense of place
and help define the character of the station.
Position plazas at locations where pedestrian activity is encouraged with consider-
ation to integrate the open space into and bound by streets and buildings.
Plazas, courtyards, and other urban open spaces should be oriented to take advan-
tage of views and sunlight.
Amenities should be included within the urban open space such as benches, kiosks,
and public art.
Uinta Street should be a priority location for plazas or other urban open space.
B.5 Cultural Activity Generators
Promote the integration of cultural activity generators such as an auxiliary site of a
museum, art institute, science center, or similar civic venture into the TOD site as part of a
larger, mixed-use, high density development project.
B.6 Design Guidelines Review
The Design Guidelines for Stapleton (City document) and the Stapleton Design Criteria
(Stapleton Development Corporation document) informs the design of development in
Stapleton. An established review process ensures high quality design throughout the
neighborhood for all residential, retail, and commercial projects. The recommendations
within this plan should reinforce and complement these existing standards and guide-
lines. If found that recommendations in this plan go beyond the current guidelines, the
revision and adoption of an updated version of the Design Guidelines for Stapleton is
recommended.
An auxiliary site of a museum or similar cultural
activity would be a great addition to the vitality of the
station area.
Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework
29


ACTIVE CONCEPTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS ILLUSTRATION
This hypothetical build-out scenario illustrates the Active Concepts and Recommendations. Buildings are brought up to the street, Uinta Street and intersections have ac-
tive uses, and key intersections have prominent building forms.
Note: Some of the lines on this map represent potential future connections in the station area. These connections may take the form of future public or private streets, alleys, pedestrian passages, or mews with the intent of increasing access in the station area while breaking
up large blocks to improve the pedestrian experience.
30
Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework


UINTA STREET AND 37TH AVENUE
37th Avenue and Uinta Street will be at the heart of Central Park Station, providing Stapleton with a active, pedestrian friendly public realm surrounding by a mix of high
intensity employment and high density residential uses.
Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework
31


C. Accessible
PRINCIPLE STATEMENT
The station area will build upon its
regional connections to provide an
extremely high level of mobility and
multi-modal access for all users in a safe,
easy, and convenient manner.

Bike Lanes on Central Park Boulevard
WHY IS BEING ACCESSIBLE IMPORTANTTO CENTRAL PARK STATION?
The relationship between mobility and access is essential in transportation planning. Mobility
refers to the movement of people or goods. The term access implies reaching a location that
has value, somewhere that provides a needed or desired amenity, service, or product. In the
case of Central Park Station, the East Rail Line provides a high level of regional mobility, while
the station functions as a portal, ora means of access, to a valued location such as Denver
International Airport or Denver Union Station. This idea of access works in both directions;
the East Line's connection to DIA allows delivery of a world traveler to the station while a local
resident can reach an airport with international destinations, all with relative ease. What is vi-
tal for Central Park Station to thrive is the ability of the neighborhood surrounding the station
to provide a high level of local, multi-modal mobility. This promotes strong local access to the
station for the widest array of users. The ability to provide access to the station extends local
and global connectivity to Stapleton and adjacent neighborhoods, resulting in higher levels
of ridership and a greater amount of transit equity. Station accessibility increases the ability
to leverage the significant public investment of a commuter rail line to promote economic
development and enhance the surrounding area's quality of life.
SUMMARY OF EXISTING CONDITIONS
Current access to the future station location is difficult due to the lack of existing develop-
ment near the site. The lack of connectivity from north to south across the Union Pacific
Railroad right-of-way and 1-70 and the incomplete street grid from east to west constitute
the general access issues in the study area. Pedestrian and bicycle facilities vary with some
significant barriers existing on the edge of the study area.
Automobile Access: In its previous life as an International Airport, Stapleton required
a significant roadway network. 1-70 and 1-270 directed regional automobile traffic from
throughout the region to the area and arterial roadways built to accommodate high traf-
fic volumes fed into the airport. Much of this roadway network remains in place today.
Major arterials in the study area include the existing six-lane configurations of Quebec
Street and Martin Luther King Junior (MLK) Boulevard (between Quebec Street and Cen-
tral Park Boulevard) that reflect Stapleton's past airport use. Smith Road currently does
not extend past Sand Creek on the eastern side of the study area. Central Park Boulevard
and 35th Avenue, two new four-lane roadways, were added to the street network as
Stapleton redeveloped into a new neighborhood. An interchange at Central Park Sta-
tion and 1-70 opened in November 2011, and 40th Avenue now connects Central Park
Boulevard with Havana Street to the east. These major streets provide the framework for
automobile and truck traffic in the station area today. The typical grid of local streets in
Denver carries over into Stapleton, with the notable exception of Quebec Square, which
mostly has private streets that only partially follow the Denver street pattern.
Bicycle and Pedestrian Access: The study areas varied land use mix of undeveloped
land, newly completed residential neighborhoods, and auto-oriented shopping areas
creates an inconsistent level of bicycle connections. The New Urbanism principles ap-
plied to the redevelopment of Stapleton resulted in a bicycle friendly environment in the
completed residential areas of the neighborhood. Quebec Square lacks the same level
of bicycle facilities while the existing industrial area and the undeveloped area nearest to
the station have little to no bicycle amenities. Bicycle lanes are located on Central Park
Boulevard and 35th Avenue within the study area and on multiple routes near the study
area, most notably on MLK Boulevard. The Sand Creek Regional Greenway provides an
off-street bicycle path that connects to the larger regional bicycle network. Off-street
paths are also located outside the study area in Central Park and along Westerly Creek.
32
Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework


The quality of pedestrian connections also varies in the study area. Stapleton generally
utilizes the Denver street grid with sidewalks that provides easy and convenient pedes-
trian routes throughout the residential portions of the neighborhood. Pedestrian chal-
lenges in the study area center on the auto-oriented Quebec Square shopping center
and the major auto-oriented streets near the station including Smith Road, Central Park
Boulevard, 35th Avenue, and Quebec Street.
Bus Routes: Bus service is robust for the area due to the presence ofa bus transfer
center located at a temporary RTD Park-n-Ride facility on 36th Avenue. Ten bus routes,
providing various cross-town routes and connections to Downtown Denver, DIA, light-
rail stations, and other destinations serve the station area. Buses arriving at the Park-n-
Ride use 36th Avenue and Central Park Boulevard. This temporary facility will move to a
location near Smith Road and Uinta Street before the East Line begins operation in 2016.
Parking: The temporary RTD Park-n-Ride facility is currently located north of 36th
Avenue, between Central Park Boulevard and Ulster Street, in tandem with the existing
bus transfer center. The facility is free to park for users within the RTD service boundary
for the first 24 hours. Fees apply after the first 24-hour period and if the user is not within
the RTD service boundary. This vehicle parking lot moves to a new location across Smith
Road from the East Line rail platform no later than early 2016. The new RTD facility will
have approximately 20 acres for parking and the bus transfer facility. Few streets cur-
rently exist in the station area, but most future streets are anticipated to have on-street
parking.
The station area will need to simultaneously accommodate multiple modes of travel.
Interstates 70 and 270 merge just to the north of the
station area.
The Central Park Station will be the third busiest bus
transfer center in the RTD system.
Sand Creek Regional Greenway Trail
Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework
33


ACCESSIBLE CONCEPTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

Residents have identified the 36th Avenue andXan-
thia Street intersection as a safety concern.
DENVER MOVES
Denver Moves is the vision plan for Den-
ver's non-motorized transportation and
recreation system, identifying the next
phase of priorities for making bicycle
and pedestrian connections throughout
the city. The goals of the plan is to cre-
ate a biking and walking network where
every household is within a quarter mile
of a high ease of use facility and achieve
a 15% bicycling and walking commute
mode share by 2020. The four objectives
established for Denver Moves are:
1. Create a New Identity
2. Build a Simpler System
3. Embrace Innovative, Practical Ideas
4. Include All Users
Through an extensive plan process,
Denver Moves identifies a total network
of 442 miles of multi-use and bicycle
facilities. The network incorporates a
wide range of facility types based on
innovations in multi-use trail, bicycle,
and pedestrian facility design, each
being categorized into relative"ease
of use" classifications. Denver Moves
identifies new on-street and off-street
bicycle facilities that will improve access
throughout the Central Park Station area
and especially to the commuter rail sta-
tion. For more details about the Denver
Moves networkand facility types, down-
load the plan atwww.denvergov.org.
C.1 Mobility Network Improvements
C.1 .A Extend the existing Denver street grid into redevelopment areas whenever
possible.
C.1 .B Evaluate future network improvements to traverse regional greenways for
improved multi-modal connectivity throughout Stapleton.
C.1.C Continue the evaluation of traffic calming and pedestrian crossings forthe
36th Avenue and Xanthia Street corridor between Central Park Boulevard and Smith
Road. Traffic calming elements may include medians, pedestrian bump-outs and
additional signage. As part of this process, consider other improvement options
including an enhanced pedestrian crossing at 36th Avenue and Willow Street and
identify an implementation strategy.
C.1.D Reconstruct Smith Road section between the Quebec Square improvements
that end at Syracuse Street and the future RTD Park-n-Ride improvements west of
the future rail station.
C.1.E As infill redevelopment occurs in the Stapleton Industrial Area, work with de-
velopers to determine the feasibility and implementation of additional multi-modal
connections to the station.
C.2 Promote a High Level of Bicycle Usage
The station should be accessible via off-street bike paths or bike lanes from all direc-
tions.
C.2.A Support the recommendations identified by Denver Moves for the station
area and seek opportunities to implement Denver Moves whenever possible.
CENTRAL PARK STATION EXISTING AND PLANNED BICYCLE FACILITIES
On Street Off Street
Existing Existing
Planned Planned
Note: Dashedlineson this map represent potential future connections in the station
area. These connections may take the form of future public or private streets, alleys,
pedestrian passages, or mews with the intent of increasing access in the station area
while breaking up large blocks to improve the pedestrian experience.
34
Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework


C.2.B Continue the multi-use bicycle and pedestrian path parallel to Smith Road
beyond the RTD Park-n-Ride to the west.
C.2.C Support implementation of bicycle facility improvements on MLK Boulevard
between Quebec Street and Central Park Boulevard.
C.2.D Evaluate alternatives to improve bicycle crossings on MLK Boulevard and
Quebec Street.
C.2.E Support wayfinding efforts that enhance the bicycling experience, increase
ease of use and enhance safety for all users. Incorporate new bicycle route signage
that displays destination, distance, and direction.
C.2.F Consider additional connections from existing bike lanes to off-street paths
such as the 35th Avenue bike lanes to the Sand Creek Regional GreenwayTrail and
identify a implement strategy if needed.
C.3 Pedestrian Mobility Improvements
C.3.A Prioritize Uinta Street as the primary pedestrian street in the station area,
providing connectivity to the station from a large majority of the existing Stapleton
neighborhoods to the south.
C.3.B Evaluate and implement crosswalk treatments/enhancements at proposed
signalized intersections on Smith Road at Ulster Street, Uinta Street, and the eastern
terminus of the rail platform.
C.3.C Evaluate and implement crosswalk treatments/enhancements at proposed
signalized intersections on Uinta Street at 35th and 36th Avenues.
C.4 Enhance Pedestrian and Bicycle Connections through Evaluation of Traffic
Calming and Signalization Improvements
C.4.A Evaluate intersection signalization within Quebec Square, especially on
Syracuse Street (the privately-owned road in Quebec Square) at 35th, 36th, and 38th
Avenues. If signalization is not warranted, consider improved signage or other im-
provements to ease traffic issues within Quebec Square. These intersections include
private roads so implementation costs and funding sources should be considered as
part of the evaluation.
C.4.B Continue to evaluate signalization of intersection at Central Park Boulevard
and 33rd Street and implement as warranted.
C.4.C Evaluate the need and potential implementation of traffic calming tools on
MLK Boulevard between Quebec Street and Monaco Street.
C.5 Distribute Bus Routes through the Major Street Network
Avoid the concentration of bus routes on one street by distributing bus service equally
throughout the station areas major street network. Special attention should be given to
limiting the amount of buses on Uinta Street to the greatest extent possible.
C.6 Parking Management
Evaluate parking patterns and needs within the station impact area as phased develop-
ment occurs, beginning with the RTD Park-n-Ride facility and continuing throughout
the build-out of the TOD area. The evaluation will identify strategies that ensure a proper
balance of supply and demand for different users with the goal of promoting proper use
of RTD parking facilities from opening day onward while maintaining convenient parking
to support adjacent business and residential uses. Parking strategies for this area should
follow the Strategic Parking Plan's (SPP) five-step process, which orders management
approaches incrementally through demand, location, time, pricing, and supply opportu-
As the primary pedestrian street in the station area
and a bicycle route, Uinta Street needs safe crossings
at major intersections, such as 35th Avenue.
A BICYCLE TOOLBOX FOR
CENTRAL PARK STATION
Denver Moves presents a toolbox of
bicycle facilities for use in the non-mo-
torized network.This includes innova-
tions such as cycle tracks, buffered bike
lanes, and bicycle turn pockets. As the
bicycle network evolves in the Central
Park Station area, it may be appropriate
to upgrade existing facilities to these
new options that provide a higher ease
of use.
4% -
----------+
BUFFER BIKE ONLY
An example of a bi-directional cycle track with a
vertical, physical buffer. Singe direction cycle tracks
or buffered bike lanes should be evaluated for higher-
volume arterials in the Central Park Station area.
Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework
35


STRATEGIC PARKING PLAN
The Strategic Parking Plan (SPP) identi-
fies a five-step process coupled with
stakeholder involvement to determine
the most effective parking management
strategy for a specific area.
Demand
Location
Time
nities. This process coupled with stakeholder involvement will help determine the most
effective parking management strategy for this area. Some strategies may include but
are not limited to:
Transportation Demand Management strategies including employer or community
funded transit passes
Shared or Accessory parking agreements between RTD, nearby multi-family, com-
mercial, or office uses. This includes opportunities to share off-street or structured
parking inventory to reduce development costs. Subject to zoning approval.
On-Street Time Limited Parking Restrictions
Pricing
Supply
The SPP was a joint effort of the City and
County of Denver's Public Works and
Community Planning and Development
Departments in 2010. The Plan can be
found at www.denvergov.org/parking.
Other parking management tools as outlined in the Strategic Parking Plan (SPP).
C.7 Street Cross Sections
Typical design considerations of the cross section recommendations are based on the
City's Rules and Regulations for Standard Right-of-Way Cross Sections. Bike lanes, shar-
rows and other recommended enhancements to the City standards are proposed where
relevant.
UINTA STREET
Connecting existing Stapleton neighborhoods to the station through the heart of the TOD, Uinta
should have two travel lanes, designated bike lanes, on-street parking on both sides of the street,
UINTA STREET At intersections, Uinta Street should have two travel lanes, a, left-turn lane, designated bike lanes,
36
Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework


37th Avenue should have two travel lanes, a left-turn lane, on-street parking on both sides of the
street, and a large sidewalk and pedestrian amenity zone with street trees in grates.

> m
ULSTER STREET

ft w *, ^ijiiiL
'ir.t ........................
Ulster Street should have two travel lanes, a left-turn lane, on-street parking on both sides of the
street, and a large sidewalk and pedestrian amenity zone with street trees in grates.
j, n.i
r >
i:y
& I I 'HK"
> mSk
1
SMITH ROAD
Smith Road should have four travel lanes and a divided median. Initially, the RTD Park-n-Ride
facility will border Smith Road to the south (left) with a muiti-use path. As transit oriented develop-
ment replaces the surface parking lots, the path may become pedestrian oriented.
Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework
37


FUTURE ACCESSIBILITY MAP
Industrial ____________ Mixed Use ____________ Residential ____________ Undesignated ________________ Commercial Main Street
Arterial -------- Arterial ------------- Arterial f 1 Arterial Arterial Local
Industrial
Collector
Mixed Use
Collector
Residential
Collector
Undesignated
Local
Potential Future
Street Connections
Note: Dashed lines on this map represent potential future connections in the station area. These connections may take the form of future public or private streets, alleys, pedestrian passages, or mews with the intent of increasing access in the station area while breaking up
large blocks to improve the pedestrian experience.
38
Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework


FUTURE ACCESSIBILITY CONCEPTS LIST
Project
C.1.A Extend the existing Denver street grid into redevelopment areas whenever possible.
C.1.B Evaluate future network improvements to traverse regional greenways for improved multi-modal connectivity throughout Staple-
ton.
C.1.C Continue evaluation of traffic calming elements for the 36th Avenue and Xanthia Street corridor between Central Park Boulevard
9> and Smith Road.
C.1 .D Reconstruct Smith Road section between the Quebec Square improvements that end at Syracuse Street and the future RTD Park-
n-Ride improvements
C.1.E As infill redevelopment occurs in the Stapleton Industrial Area, work with developers to determine the feasibility and implementa-
tion of additional multi-modal connections to the station.
C.2.B Continue the multi-use bicycle and pedestrian path parallel to Smith Road beyond the RTD Park-n-Ride to the west.
C.2.C Support implementation of bicycle facility improvements on MLK Boulevard between Quebec Street and Central Park Boulevard.
C.2.D Evaluate alternatives to improve bicycle crossings on MLK Boulevard and Quebec Street.
C.2.F Consider additional connections from existing bike lanes to off-street paths and identify an implementation strategy.
C.3.B Evaluate and implement crosswalk treatments/enhancements at proposed signalized intersections on Smith Road at Ulster Street,
Uinta Street, and the eastern terminus of the rail platform.
C.3.C Evaluate and implement crosswalk treatments/enhancements at proposed signalized intersections on Uinta Street at 35th and
36th Avenues.
C.4.A Evaluate intersection signalization within Quebec Square, especially on Syracuse Street at 35th, 36th, and 38th Avenues.
C.4.B Continue to evaluate signalization of intersections on Central Park Boulevard.
C.4.C Evaluate the need and potential implementation of traffic calming tools on MLK between Quebec Street and Monaco Street.
C.5 Distribute Bus Routes through the Major Street Network.
Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework
39


D. Sustainable
PRINCIPLE STATEMENT
The station area will seek innovative
ways to better nurture natural, econom-
ic, and social systems and resources for
today and future generations.
The Stapleton Development Plan established
sustainable development as a major goal for the
neighborhood.
WHY IS SUSTAINABILITY IMPORTANT TO THE CENTRAL PARK STATION AREA?
When it was adopted in 1995,The Stapleton Development Plan was a bold, visionary docu-
ment, setting the expectations for redevelopment of the airport at a very high level. The plan
is no different today, pushing forward an agenda of community objectives and principles
that carries great value when planning for the area surrounding the Central Park Station.
At the heart of the Stapleton Development Plan is the goal of building a more sustainable,
environmentally responsible community that integrates the urban and natural environment
together. However, the plan goes well beyond environmental sustainability, firmly addressing
Stapleton's role as a regional employment center that makes a positive contribution to the
overall economic base of the region, insuring opportunities for jobs, housing,and recreation
fora diverse set of age, income, and ethnic groups. These principles take the concept of
sustainability from the more narrow focus of environmental issues, to a much wider, holistic
approach to building an inclusive, stable community for today and future generations. Some
of the key objectives and principles found in the Stapleton Development Plan include:
Position Denver to compete in increasingly global markets and provide opportunities to
capitalize on emerging technologies
Address the need to directly link job creation on the site with training and skill develop-
ment opportunities for those currently least able to take advantage of such opportuni-
ties
Improve public safety and reconnect long-separated neighborhoods
Increase the supply of middle and upper end housing to improve the diversity of hous-
ing options in the northeast area
Demonstrate effective approaches to development that emphasize efficiency, reduced
resource consumption and reduced impacts on the natural environment
Promote the integration of employment, housing, and recreation, and insure diversity in
age, income, and ethnic groups
Place priority on pollution prevention rather than control. Mitigate impacts on site
where possible and as close to the point of impact as possible.
Senior housing is a part of the housing mix needed in
Stapleton. The Clyburn Apartments, located at 26th
Avenue and Quebec Street is a senior living rental
building.
Create a community that accommodates a diversity of people ages, incomes, races,
occupations, and lifestyles and reinforces and enhances the cultural, ethnic, and racial
diversity of adjacent neighborhoods.
Seek partners for demonstration projects to reduce up front capital costs of community
and project infrastructure
Provide fora broad mix of land use types, densities, and prices to serve multiple markets,
and create economic and social diversity
Connect the Stapleton open space system not only with regional resources, but also with
adjacent neighborhoods
40
Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework


SUMMARY OF EXISTING CONDITIONS
Parks, Open Space, and Environmental Leadership: One of the key structural ele-
ments of the station area is the Sand Creek Regional Greenway running diagonally
through the site to the northeast of the rail platform. The Greenway, a 14-mile path that
connects to the extensive regional trail system, is a major component of the Stapleton
open space system, providing a natural recreation area for all of northeast Denver. The
adjacent Sand Creek Prairie Dog Preserve and the Greenway provide 45 acres of open
space within the station area. There has been recent concern about the health of the
prairie dog population at the Preserve. Central Park, Stapleton's urban park, is just to
the southeast of the station area and presents a combination of passive open space and
recreational activities. The Westerly Creek and Northfield Pond Parks are also just outside
the study area. Pocket Parks are sprinkled throughout Stapleton's residential areas,
including the homes just south of 35th Avenue in the station area. Many of the single-
family and row homes in Stapleton utilize green building techniques to improve energy
efficiency and reduce resource use. The first major office development in the station
area, the recently completed FBI building, is Leadership in Energy and Environmental
Design (LEED) certified.
Affordable Housing and Job Diversity: The availability of affordable housing and a
wide variety of job opportunities are significant elements to Stapleton's goal of being a
diverse, inclusive community. The Stapleton Development Plan identified this area as
the Stapleton Park Neighborhood, calling for it to serve the area as a regional activity
center with higher density development and significant buildings and infrastructure. At
the center of this neighborhood would bean intermodal centeratthe location ofa rail
transit station.
The Stapleton Development Plan envisioned the station area being a major employ-
ment center with the potential to support 6 to 7 million square feet of office space with
15,000 employees. Currently, jobs are far below the expected build-out, but are gener-
ally diverse in nature. Quebec Square Shopping Center, 29th Street Town Center and the
nearby Shops at Northfield provide over two million square feet of retail within a one-
mile radius of the rail platform. Significant employment centers are Quebec Square, the
FBI Office Building, RK Mechanical, and the United Airlines Training Center (just outside
the station area). Other employers are located in the existing Stapleton Industrial Area,
including two hotels and a major freight company.
The Stapleton Affordable Flousing Plan, adopted in 2001, supports the inclusion of af-
fordable housing within the entire Stapleton Redevelopment Area. The plan assumes an
ultimate build out of Stapleton with 66 percent for-sale and 33 percent rental housing.
Ten percent of for-sale units and twenty percent of rental units are to be considered
affordable. As of August 31,2011, just over 5.5 percent of for-sale units, (232 units) and
over 38 percent of rental units (186 units) are affordable (another 92 units of affordable
rental housing are under construction for a scheduled completion in spring 2012). The
greatest challenge to achieving the ultimate affordable housing goals is the current ratio
of nine for-sale units to one rental unit built-to-date.
Affordable housing goals for projects located outside the Stapleton Development Area
are addressed by the City's Inclusionary Flousing Ordinance (IFIO). The IFHO states that
any for-sale development of thirty (30) or more units at one location shall provide ten
percent (10%) of the units as affordable based on the area median income calculation
adjusted for household size. The IFIO was crafted, in part, to increase the availability of
Sand Creek and the Sand Creek Regional Green way
is a major component of the Stapleton open space
system.
Multi-family apartments being constructed in
Stapleton.
Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework
41


THE STAPLETON AFFORDABLE
HOUSING PLAN DEFINITIONS:
Affordable Workforce Housing: Means
dwelling units that are offered for sale at
a price which is affordable by, and that
are in fact are sold to households earn-
ing 80% and below of Median Family
Income (MFI) for owner-occupancy only.
Affordable Housing: Means Affordable
Workforce Housing and Affordable
Rental Housing.
Affordable Rental Housing: Means dwell-
ing units that are offered for lease at a
rent which is affordable by, and that are
in fact leased to households earning
60% and below of MFI, including Very
Low-Income Housing.
MFI: Means the most current median
family income for the Denver Metropoli-
tan Statistical Area as published from
time to time by the U.S. Department
of Housing and Urban Development,
adjusted for household size.
The Swigert-McAulliffe International School opened
in the fall of 2011.
additional low and moderate income housing to address existing and anticipated future
housing needs and to assure that moderately priced housing is dispersed throughout
Denver.
Community Safety and Services Community Safety and Services are not found within
but are located just outside the station area. The District 2 Police Station is 1.5 miles
from the station and the nearest Denver COP Shop is located in the 29th Street Town
Center. The Central Park Boulevard Commuter Rail Station Health Impact Assessment
notes that a high percentage of the motor vehicle thefts in the area occurred at the
temporary RTD Park-n-Ride facility. Fire Station #26 is located south of the station area
on MLK Boulevard, just over a half-mile away.
As a new neighborhood, Stapleton's community services are quickly being developed.
Stapleton's first library, scheduled for completion in 2012, is being constructed at 2900
Rosyln Street in the 29th Street Town Center. The Swigert-McAulliffe International
School, with early learning through 8th grade is on the edge of the station area near 35th
Avenue and Syracuse Street. The Stapleton Recreation Center, serving multiple neigh-
borhoods of Northeast Denver, is also outside the station area on the east side of Central
Park on MLK Boulevard.
Historic Resources As the international airport for the Denver metropolitan area,
Stapleton served as a major destination for over 65 years. Remnants of this historical use
are largely eliminated from the existing condition of the station area. The runways were
recycled for new uses within the neighborhood. The Sand Creek Prairie Dog Preserve oc-
cupies the former jet fuel tank farm north of the future rail platform. New home sites are
located where the terminal building and parking structure once stood. The most signifi-
cant remaining element of the former airport is the Air Traffic Control Tower, constructed
in the early 1960's as part of a major renovation project.
42
Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework


SUSTAINABLE CONCEPTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS
D.1 Environmental Sustainability
D.1 .A Improve access to the Sand Creek Regional Greenway and nearby open space
and recreation areas. Additional details are included in the Sand CreekTrail Connec-
tions Transformative Concept.
D.1 .B Promote sustainable design with the transit facilities and all subsequent de-
velopment, including seeking LEED or similar green building certifications through
existing design review processes.
D.1 .C Create parks, plazas, open space, and streetscapes in the station area that
makes use of sustainable design solutions, including porous pavers, bioswales, and
other best practices. Additional details are included in the Innovative Station Site
Design Transformative Concept.
D.1 .D As development occurs, promote the walkable, mixed-use nature of the sta-
tion area to potential tenants in order to maximize location efficiency.
D.1 .E Identify a more appropriate use for the trunk open space currently utilized
for a prairie dog preserve as the station area develops into a high density, urban
environment.
D.2. Social and Cultural Sustainability
D.2.A Seekan adaptive reuse of the Stapleton Airport Tower into a cultural amenity
that is accessible to the public.
D.2.B Explore the incorporation of a community gathering facility as part of a larger
development jointly utilized by either office and/or residential uses.
D.2.C Work with RTD to improve the safety of the Park-n-Ride. Consider adding or
relocating a COP shop to the station area to improve the overall safety of the facility.
D.2.D Encourage healthy food choices by neighborhood residents through urban
agriculture, healthy corner store initiatives, and other programs identified by the
Sustainable Food Policy Council.
D.2.E Locate mobile food vendors in or near the station area that provide healthy
food options to waiting transit users and nearby residents.
D.2.F Work with RTD to ensure bus routing that provides access to affordable fresh
food options.
D.2.G Ensure adequate and safe multi-modal access from the station to the Swigert-
McAulliffe International School, Stapleton Recreation Center, and the new public
library.
D.2.H The Stapleton Development Plan promotes continuing education opportuni-
ties and an environment that encourages and rewards innovation. Identify ways to
introduce these elements into the station area as development occurs.
D.3 Housing Sustainability
D.3.A Utilize the update of the TOD Strategic Plan and the DRCOG Sustainable Com-
munities Regional Planning Grant Project to examine affordable housing strategies
in the East Corridor.
D.3.B Address the overall affordable housing goals in Stapleton with multi-family
development within the station area that contains 20 percent or more affordable
units.
Central Park Recreation Center opened in 2011, is
certified as a LEED Gold project.
The availability of affordable housing is an impor-
tant TOD strategy. The Denver Elousing Authority is
constructing the South Lincoln Project at the 10th and
Osage Station.
The lack of readily available healthy food choices has
become a growing concern for many cities.
Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework
43


D.3.C Seek opportunities with partners such as the Urban Land Conservancy, Enter-
prise Community Partners, Denver Housing Authority, Mile High Connects, and the
Colorado Community Land Trust to develop a significant amount affordable housing
projects within the station area.
D.3.D Incorporate affordable housing units into mixed-income development proj-
ects spread out geographically throughout the station area and the larger Stapleton
neighborhood.
D.3.E As part of the Inclusionary Housing Ordinances developer has the oppor-
tunity to build affordable housing units within a half-mile of a rail transit station in
lieu of building the units at the primary development site. Work with the Office of
Economic Development to promote the Central Park Station as a desirable site to
receive affordable housing in lieu projects from developers who choose that option
to meet the affordable housing requirements of the IHO.
D.4 Economic Sustainability
D.4.A Support the long-term viability of Quebec Square as a major shopping center
for Northeast Denver, including the possibility of mixed-use infill development of
surface parking lots.
D.4.B Support the existing industrial uses and encourage development of viable
commercial uses with employers that provide a high jobs-per-acre ratio.
D.4.C Market the primary blocks of the TOD opportunity as a walkable, mixed-use
environment with a focus on high quality commercial office uses mixed with high-
density residential development.
D.4.D Support the development of the Centerfield Campus area as a location for
large corporate office tenants, research and design facilities, or appropriate light
industrial uses seeking high visibility and access to transit.
D.4.E Promote new businesses in the station area to utilize green business practices
at the forefront of their culture, encouraging innovative programs and design to
reduce resource consumption.
D.4.F Seek a mix of employers that provide jobs at various skill levels suitable for
workers with a diverse range of educations. Encourage businesses to provide on-
going training opportunities for workers seeking advancement.
Denver has often utilized green business practices, including installing solar panels atDIA that produces six
percent of the airports energy requirement.
44
Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework


PROMOTING HEALTHY LIFESTYLES
Central Park Station is a great opportunity to encourage nearby neighborhood residents
to make choices that result in a healthier lifestyle. Local officials across the country are
becoming increasingly aware of how the built environment affects the health and influ-
ences the lifestyle choices of residents. Many major U.S. cities are taking great strides to
make choosing a healthy lifestyle easier for their residents. Promoting a healthy lifestyle
is at the heart of many of Central Park Station Area Plan recommendations. A few ex-
amples include:
Pedestrian friendly streets and crosswalk treatments
Improved bicycle access and promotion of bicycle sharing and rental programs
Building design that promotes an active, walkable, urban neighborhood
Locating healthy food vendors at the station for commuters and residents
Greater connectivity between on-street bicycle facilities, the Sand Creek Regional Green-
way Trail, and corresponding recreational opportunities
Extension of the Denver street grid into redevelopment areas whenever possible
The Stapleton TMA will lead the effort to develop an Intermodal Transportation Center at
the station that centralizes and coordinates multiple mobility options
As development occurs within the station area, attention should be given to crafting the
public realm in a way that encourages and supports integrated exercise opportunities,
making exercise access easier and a part of the neighborhoods daily activity. This in-
cludes providing access to parks, plazas, open space, streetscapes, and other recreational
opportunities throughout the station area.
The Stapleton Foundation, Stapleton Transportation Management Association, and
BeWell Stapleton will utilize the Central Park Station Area Plan and the associated Health
Impact Assessment to promote healthy lifestyle choices in Stapleton and surrounding
neighborhoods and workto identify funding sources to implement both of the plans
health-related recommendations.
0^0
A high quality bicycle network is one way that the
built environment can promote healthy lifestyle
choices.
Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework
45




Transformative
Concepts
This chapter presents eight different development concepts that, if constructed, would likely
have a catalytic effect on stimulating additional investment in the Central Park Station area.
These concepts represent"big ideas"for positively transforming the station area:
Uinta Street
Improved Street Network
Sand CreekTrail Connections
Station Landmark
Innovative Station Site Design
Quebec Square Redevelopment
IntermodalTransportation Center
Bike Sharing and Rental Programs
Each concept is presented and then evaluated against the four plan principles that are the
organizing elements for this plan:
Destination
Active
Accessible
Sustainable
: Parted lines onSiis map represent potemial futurevcmnections in the station
area. TheSe connections may take the form of fmure public orPriyate streets, alleys,
prjdes&iaftpassaqes, or mews with the intent omncreasing access irfthe^tation area
whilerireakfng up large blocks to improve the pedestrian experience.
TRANSFORMATIVE CONCEPTS
Uinta Street
Improved Street Network
Sand CreekTrail Connections
Station Landmark
Innovative Station Site Design
Quebec Square Redevelopment
Intermodal Transportation Center
Bike Sharing and Rental Program
Central Park Show Station Area Plan Transformative Concepts
47


Uinta Street
GOAL STATEMENT
Create a pedestrian-scaled public
realm along Uinta Street, serving as
the primary walking street and spine
of the station area.
Larimer Street in Downtown Denver has a very active
pedestrian realm thanks to the numerous sidewalk
cafes and seating areas.
UINTA STREET MID-BLOCK
WHAT IS IT?
Uinta Street holds a key distinction as the nearest cross street to the Central Park Station
rail platform and bus transfer facility. The importance of Uinta Street as a significant path to
the station has been universally supported by the stakeholders, being identified in the 2009
Conceptual Plan as the pedestrian priority street and the spine of the station area. Identifying
Uinta Street as the pedestrian priority street in the station area is applicable in both the short-
term and long-term station environments. On opening day, Uinta will be a logical choice for
pedestrians and cyclists trying to reach the station from neighborhoods to the south as it
gives the most direct connection to the rail platform. As development occurs in the TOD area,
development will want to capitalize on Uinta's direct access to the rail station, orientating
buildings towards the street and beginning to create a urban, pedestrian-friendly, main street
for the station area. To achieve this vision and maximize the opportunity that Uinta presents,
special detail is necessary in the design of the street.
Uinta's public realm, the space framed by the future transit-oriented development in the
station area, needs to function as a linear collection of spaces that assemble people and
activities. This occurs through careful thought and design of the space for the best pedes-
trian experience possible. Keeping visual and physical distances as short as possible while
providing convenient access between the public and private environments along the street
will result in a more intimate, comfortable surrounding for residents, workers, visitors, and
commuters alike. Public spaces positioned along Uinta can work to integrate various activities
and amenities in the station for a wide variety of different users and in turn generate greater
amounts of activity, promote a feeling of safety, and provide visual interest.
Connecting existing Stapleton neighborhoods to the station through the heart of the TOD, Uinta
should have two travel lanes, designated bike lanes, on-street parking on both sides of the street,
and a large sidewalk and pedestrian amenity zone with street trees in grates.
48
Central Park Station Area Plan Transformative Concepts


HOW DOES UINTA STREET ADDRESS BEING A DESTINATION?
Uinta Street has the opportunity to be the main street of the station area, providing
residents and visitors a high quality public realm, becoming the focal axis of the transit
oriented development.
HOW DOES UINTA STREET ADDRESS BEING ACTIVE?
The urban design of buildings and streetscapes along Uinta should encourage pedes-
trian activity and promote community gathering.
Uinta Street should provide a safe and visually interesting pedestrian experience through
amenities such as outdoor seating areas, ground floor windows, cafes, accessible ser-
vices, and street trees.
HOW DOES UINTA STREET ADDRESS BEING ACCESSIBLE?
Uinta Street will serve as a multi-modal street, providing access to pedestrians, bicyclists,
and motorists. Special attention should be given to establishing Uinta as the pedestrian
priority street in the station area.
HOW DOES UINTA STREET ADDRESS BEING SUSTAINABLE?
Uinta Street promotes alternative modes of transportation, potentially reducing vehicle
miles traveled, reducing traffic congestion and improving air quality.
The design of Uinta's public realm can strive to improve water quality and reduce water
runoff by incorporating sustainable best practices in urban design and streetscapes.
Outdoor seating areas help to promote a safe and
visually interesting pedestrian experience.
UINTA STREET INTERSECTION At intersections, Uinta Street should have two travel lanes, a, left-turn lane when traffic levels de-
Central Park Show Station Area Plan Transformative Concepts
49


KEY ASPECTS OF UINTA'S PUBLIC
REALM
Active Edges
Building Frontages
^9 Crossings on Smith Road
^9 Crossings at 35th and 36th Ave
^9 Plaza and Open Space
^9 Gateway 35th Ave
^9 Key Building Location 36th Ave
^9 Key Building Location 37th Ave
^9 Gateway Smith Road
Bike Lanes
On-street parking
^9 Minimize Bus Traffic
Note: Some lines on this map represent potential future connections in the station area. These connections may take the form of future public or private streets, alleys, pedestrian
passages, or mews with the intent of increasing access in the station area while breaking up large blocks to improve the pedestrian experience.
50
Central Park Station Area Plan Transformative Concepts


RECOMMENDATIONS
E.1 .A Prioritize Uinta Street as the primary pedestrian street in the station area, providing
connectivity to the station from a large majority of the existing Stapleton neighborhoods
to the south. The Uinta Street cross section should provide mobility for multiple modes
of transportation with a special emphasis on pedestrians.
E.1.B-D Prominent buildings in theTOD should be located along Uinta Street. Proper
building placement and massing that frames and defines Uinta Street and promotes
a high quality public realm through concentrating and reinforcing pedestrian activity
is critical to the success of the station area. Key building locations along Uinta Street
include:
E.1 .B 35th Avenue and Uinta Street: This intersection serves as the gateway into the
TOD from existing residential neighborhoods to the south. Buildings placed at this
intersection should utilize architectural elements that establish the intersection as a
key entry point into the station area.
E.1.C 36th Avenue/37th Avenue and Uinta Street: Building placement and massing
should recognize the prominence of these intersections as the heart of theTOD.
Special corner treatments such as signature entries, special roof shapes, and taller,
iconic architectural elements should be utilized.
E.1.D Smith Road and Uinta Street: This intersection serves as the gateway into the
TOD from the station platform. Buildings placed at this intersection should have
a strong visual presence from the station platform and be oriented towards both
Uinta Street and Smith Road, establishing a clear and defined edge with the public
right-of-way.
E.1 .E Evaluate and implement crosswalk treatments/enhancements at proposed signal-
ized intersections on Uinta Street at 35th and 36th Avenues.
E.1.F Minimize regional bus traffic on Uinta Street whenever possible.
Creative amenity zones can encourage pedestrians to
stop, interact, and converse with others.
Central Park Show Station Area Plan Transformative Concepts
51


Improved Street Network
GOAL STATEMENT
Improve the surrounding Central Park
Station area street network to provide
a high level of regional and local ac-
cess to the station.
40th Avenue east of Central Park Boulevard, opened
in November, 2011.
WHAT IS IT?
This transformative concept focuses around a series of improvements to the street network in
the station area to increase access to the station and improve the potential for transit-orient-
ed development north of Smith Road.
There are currently numerous deficiencies to the street grid in the station area. Although
transportation planning and programming has occurred as part of the Stapleton Redevelop-
ment Project, not all of the street grid deficiencies had been previously identified. East to
west through traffic movement is limited to 35th Avenue, with two other major east-west
streets. Smith Road and 40th Avenue, having significant roadway gaps (Interstate 70 and Mar-
tin Luther King Jr. Boulevard are through routes on the edge of the study area). An interrup-
tion of Smith Road occurs between Sand Creek and Havana Street. The Stapleton Develop-
ment Plan and other planning documents identify the need to fix this approximately half-mile
gap in Smith Road. A considerable portion of the gap in 40th Avenue was resolved as part
of the development of the Stapleton Centerfield Campus, as 40th Avenue opened between
Havana Street and Central Park Boulevard in November 2011. This new street terminates
at Central Park Boulevard though, not extending across Sand Creek to the west. This leaves
no connection to the existing 40th Avenue at Ulster Street in the Stapleton Industrial Area.
The addition of a continuous Smith Road and 40th Avenue greatly enhances the fragmented
street grid within the station area. The two roads may also alleviate traffic concerns on Martin
Luther King Boulevard, currently the lone east-west arterial route through the community. In
addition, an improved Smith Road bridge over Sand Creekallows accommodation of bicycle
and pedestrian traffic approaching the station from the Sand Creek Greenway Trail. The trail
will access Smith Road on the east side of the creek via a trail ramp.
The portion of Ulster Street between Smith Road and 40th Avenue serves as the primary
access point to the existing Stapleton Industrial Area. Ulster Street is currently a narrow
street lacking curbs, sidewalks, or bicycle facilities and contains an at-grade crossing of the
existing Union Pacific railroad tracks. Before opening day of commuter rail service, Ulster
will be rebuilt as part of the East Rail Line and Central Park Station construction projects with
one travel lane in each direction, curb, gutter, sidewalk, and a raised median between Smith
Road and 39th Avenue. An at-grade crossing of the new East Rail Line tracks is also included.
Ulster Street between 39th Avenue and 40th Avenue is not part of the project. Improved
multi-modal access to this industrial area from both the Centerfield Campus area and the TOD
area south of the future rail platform would strengthen its existing businesses, promote new
development opportunities, and allows the proposed Sand Creek Greenway Trail extension
from the north to reach the station (see Sand CreekTrail Connections).
Current condition of Smith Road at the station
location.
New Street Connection
Note: Dashedlineson this map represent potential future connections in the station
area. These connections may take the form of future public or private streets, alleys,
pedestrian passages, or mews with the intent of increasing access in the station area
while breaking up large blocks to improve the pedestrian experience.
The East Rail Line project includes improvements to Ulster between Smith Road and 39th
PROPOSED STREET CONNECTIONS
52
Central Park Station Area Plan Transformative Concepts


Avenue in additional to a quiet zone crossing of both the Union Pacific and commuter rail
tracks. As development occurs in the station area, a further improved Ulster Street should
be evaluated through enhancing the crossing of the Union Pacific and East Rail Line railroad
tracks, strengthening the connection to the north and the Sand CreekTrail and enhancing
multi-modal connections. In addition, as development occurs in the Stapleton Industrial Area,
additional opportunities for improved connectivity should be evaluated.
HOW DOES AN IMPROVED STREET NETWORK ADDRESS
BEING A DESTINATION?
Adding streets such as Smith Road and 40th Avenue makes locating in the station area
more attractive for businesses and employers.
HOW DOES AN IMPROVED STREET NETWORK ADDRESS
BEING ACTIVE?
A street grid system that provides greater options, more connections, and easier naviga-
tion can promote the use of more multi-modal transportation options such as walking
and bicycling.
HOW DOES AN IMPROVED STREET NETWORK ADDRESS
BEING ACCESSIBLE?
A more connected street network improves access to the station from more neighbor-
hoods and employment centers.
HOW DOES AN IMPROVED STREET NETWORK ADDRESS
BEING SUSTAINABLE?
An improved street network can reduce vehicles miles traveled by shortening trips and
improve air quality by reducing congestion. Streets that provide facilities for multiple
modes complete streets promote alternatives to single occupancy car trips.
RECOMMENDATIONS
New Street Connections
E.2.A Smith Road: Extend Smith Road to the east from the station area, connecting
Stapleton to Havana Street.
E.2.B 40th Avenue: Connect the existing 40th Avenue in the existing Stapleton
Industrial Area to the recently completed 40th Avenue in the Centerfield Campus. This
street connection will require a new bridge constructed over Sand Creek, right of way
acquisition, and potential environmental remediation.
Street and Bridge Construction
E.2.C Smith Road Sand Creek Bridge: Construct a new multi-modal Smith Road
Sand Creek Bridge that accommodates automobile, bicycle, and pedestrian traffic.
E.2.D Ulster Street: Improve Ulster Street from 39th Avenue to 40th Avenue to in-
clude curbs and sidewalks in a compatible fashion with the Ulster Street cross-section
to be built as part of the East Rail Line project if redevelopment occurs or as traffic
demand merits. Evaluate improving multi-modal access to the area to support the
proposed Sand Creek Greenway Trail connection north of Smith Road, providing North
Stapleton bicycle commuters a more direct route to the station platform. As develop-
ment occurs in the station area, evaluate an improved Ulster Street through enhancing
the crossing of the Union Pacific and East Rail Line railroad tracks.
STREET IMPROVEMENT PROJECT
HIERARCHY
1. Smith Road between Xanthia Street
and Havana Street
2. 40th Avenue between Ulster Street
and Central Park Boulevard
3. Ulster Street between 39th Avenue
and 40th Avenue
4. Additional potential connections
identified as future needs arise
The current condition of Ulster Street lacks curbs,
gutter, and sidewalks.
Central Park Show Station Area Plan Transformative Concepts
53


Sand Creek Greenway Trail Connections
GOAL STATEMENT
Increase multi-modal connections to
the station through strategic improve-
ments to the existing trail system.
A bicyclist turning onto the existing Smith Road
Sand Creek bridge to access the Sand Creek Regional
Green way Trail.
WHAT IS IT?
The Sand Creek Regional Greenway is an important component of the Denver regional trail
system.This 14-mile public greenway connects the High Line Canal in Aurora with the South
Platte River Greenway in Commerce City. The trail system then connects to Downtown
Denver and the rest of the regional trail system. Strong, direct connections to the Central
Park Station are critical for encouraging commuters to utilize the trail and produce additional
transit ridership along the East Corridor. On opening day of rail service at Central Park Station
the best connection will be from an access ramp from the trail to Smith Road, east of Sand
Creek. It will be important that the future design of Smith Road allows for safe pedestrian and
bicycle access to the station. An additional connection to consider is a bicycle and pedestrian
bridge crossing Sand Creekapproximately one-quarter mile north of the station platform.
This bridge should be timed as development begins to occur north of the UPRR right of way
on both sides of Sand Creek. As improvements occur west of Sand Creek in the existing in-
dustrial area, bike facilities should be evaluated for Ulster Street from the creek to Smith Road.
Bicyclists will utilize the Ulster Street at-grade railroad crossing to reach Smith Road and finally
the commuter rail platform. If bicycle commuting increases in the station area, consider a
direct connection to the rail platform from the new pedestrian and bicycle bridge over Sand
Creek via a path or street along the western boundary of the Sand Creek Prairie Dog Preserve.
As infill redevelopment occurs in the Stapleton Industrial Area, work with developers to deter-
mine the feasibility and implementation of additional multi-modal connections to the station
that would benefit trail users.
SAND CREEKTRAIL CONNECTIONS TO CENTRAL PARK STATION
Providing improved bicycle connections to the station
can promote commuters to choose an alternative to
driving a car to the station.
Note: Dashedlineson this map represent potential future connections in the station
area. These connections may take the form of future public or private streets, alleys,
pedestrian passages, or mews with the intent of increasing access in the station area
while breaking up large blocks to improve the pedestrian experience.
Sand Creek Trail Proposed Trail enhancements Rridoe connection
ft Improved Trail Access t0 improve station access ^^Future 40th Avenue
54
Central Park Station Area Plan Transformative Concepts


HOW DOES THE SAND CREEKTRAIL CONNECTIONS ADDRESS
BEING A DESTINATION?
A connecting point for transit and regional trail users. If built in conjunction with a bike
station, the connection would help promote the Central Park Station as an urban trail
head for the regional trail system.
HOW DOES THE SAND CREEKTRAIL CONNECTIONS ADDRESS
BEING ACTIVE?
Promotes walking and bicycle use
Promotes a healthy lifestyle by providing access to station via non-motorized modes
HOW DOES THE SAND CREEKTRAIL CONNECTIONS ADDRESS
BEING ACCESSIBLE?
Provides greater access to the rail station, bus transfer facility, regional trail system, and
local bicycle facilities within Stapleton
Linking to the regional trail system allows trail users access to other Stapleton attractions
like the 29th Street Town Center and the Shops at Northfield.
HOW DOES THE SAND CREEKTRAIL CONNECTIONS ADDRESS
BEING SUSTAINABLE?
Has the potential to reduce vehicle miles traveled, improve air quality and generate
greater recognition of alternative transportation choices
Increases attractiveness for transit-oriented development in the northern portion of the
station area.
Denver has had great success with utilizing pedes-
trian and bicycle bridges to increase station access in
TOD areas.
RECOMMENDATIONS
E.3.A On opening day of the rail station, seek to provide access for pedestrians and
bicyclists from the Sand Creek Regional Greenway Trail via Smith Road.
E.3.B At the time of design and construction, include pedestrian and bicycle facilities
on the new Smith Road Bridge over Sand Creek.
E.3.C Construct a new pedestrian and bicycle bridge over Sand Creek between the
existing Stapleton Industrial Area and Centerfield Campus. The bridge should corre-
spond to a trail extension into the Stapleton Industrial Area, creating a second connec-
tion from the Sand Creek Regional Greenway and the station via Ulster Street.
E.3.D As bicycle traffic demands, consider a direct connection to the rail platform from
the new pedestrian and bicycle bridge over Sand Creek via a path or street along the
western boundary of the Sand Creek Prairie Dog Preserve.
E.3.E Consider additional connections between on-street bicycle facilities and the
Sand Creek Regional Greenway where feasible.

As Stapleton north of Interstate 70 is constructed,
greater connectivity to regional destinations such as
Dick's Sporting Goods Park will gain in importance.
Central Park Show Station Area Plan Transformative Concepts
55


Station Landmark
GOAL STATEMENT
Provide a visual marker near the sta-
tion that allows easy recognition for
transit users approaching the station
from any direction while enhancing
the public realm and identity of the
area.
Union Station's sign and slogan, "Travel by Train" is
almost as iconic as the building itself and helps give
an identity to it's neighborhood.
WHAT IS IT?
The 2009 Conceptual Station Plan identified the need to locate a vertical landmark or public
art piece to give the station an identity, provide a unique character to the area, and serve as
a visual marker to commuters arriving at the station from all mode types. The design of the
Central Park Station will accommodate the addition of a vertical installation near the inter-
section of Smith Road and Uinta Street, either on the western edge of the rail platform or in
a public plaza near the bus transfer facility. This location provides excellent sight lines for
approaching commuters arriving from Smith Road, Central Park Boulevard, or Uinta Street. As
the opening day of service nears, it will be critical to foster partnerships to facilitate the instal-
lation of the landmark. The City and County of Denver Department of Arts and Venues, the
Stapleton Art Foundation, private donors, and others are likely participants in any partnership.
The exact design, scale, and placement of the landmark will need careful consideration to
meet the goals and expectations of all stakeholders. The Stapleton air control tower, located
directly south of the station near 35th Avenue, is a clear opportunity to relate the landmark to
the long aviation history of the Stapleton neighborhood.
HOW DOES THE STATION LANDMARK ADDRESS BEING A DESTINATION?
Adds to the unique character and gives an identity to the area.
HOW DOES THE STATION LANDMARK ADDRESS BEING ACTIVE?
Promotes greater pedestrian and bicyclist activity by providing a visual marker for ap-
proaching commuters
Several pieces of large-scale artwork are located in the Pena Boulevard corridor as travelers approach or depart
the Denver International Airport. The East Rail Line continues past Stapleton and is aligned parallel to Pena
Boulevard as it nears DIA.
56
Central Park Station Area Plan Transformative Concepts


HOW DOES THE STATION LANDMARK ADDRESS BEING ACCESSIBLE?
Directs more pedestrians and bicyclists to the station location and serves as an identifi-
able object for commuters on the train as they approach the station
HOW DOES THE STATION LANDMARK ADDRESS BEING SUSTAINABLE?
The greater use of the station due to the visual identification provided by the landmark
will assist in reducing carbon emissions from single occupancy vehicle trips
RECOMMENDATIONS
E.4.A Explore financing and implementation strategies to install a station landmark to
serve as a visual identify to the station.
E.4.B Choose a selection process for the station landmark artist that refines the goals
of the landmark for the community including acknowledging Stapleton's pastaviation
use.
Contrasting styles of station landmarks. Above: A
traditional clock tower. Below: A modern bridge and
tower.
The station plaza as part of the larger station area design presents an opportunity to create a space that is
unique to the Central Park Station
Central Park Show Station Area Plan Transformative Concepts
57


Innovative Station Site Design
GOAL STATEMENT
Achieve a sustainable, innovative sta-
tion design that promotes a walkable,
mixed-use, transit-oriented com-
munity for Stapleton and adjacent
neighborhoods.
WHAT IS IT?
Early in the planning process, stakeholders stated their desire that development happen
near the station "sooner than later". Even though this may be a common desire for many TOD
locations. Central Park Station does have several factors that give it a unique advantage to
promote transit-oriented development. These advantages include having a master developer
over a significant portion of the station area, large amounts of undeveloped land, a popular,
successful adjacent residential neighborhood, interstate highway access, and high visibility
contribute to the overall appeal of the station.
This station in Portland, Oregon directly addresses
the rail platform, increasing the ease of access for it's
residents.
Mockingbird Station in Dallas, Texas is a well known
example of transit oriented development closely
weaved into a passenger rail station.
Development Scenarios
On opening day of commuter rail service. Central Park Station will serve primarily as a Park-n-
Ride lot. RTD has 70 such Park-n-Ride lots serving both light rail and bus service across the
Denver region. On the East Rail Line, each station will have surface parking lots for commut-
ers except the end-of-line stations at Denver International Airport and Denver Union Station.
Because the demand for parking may continue well into the future at these stations, parking
structures constructed to allow the repurposing of the initial surface parking lots into a higher
and better use will be necessary. The 2009 conceptual station plan envisioned how transit-
oriented development could occur atthe Central Park Station, including the location ofa
2009 Conceptual Plan Phase One: RTD's Bus Transfer Facility and Park-n -Ride
TOD shares structured parking incorporated into the development.
58
Central Park Station Area Plan Transformative Concepts


1,500 parking structure on the same block as the bus transfer facility. RTD has further concep-
tualized the bus transfer facility with a north to south orientation with access from Smith Road
and 37th Avenue.
Additional development scenarios and concepts may further this vision of a transit-oriented
future for the Central Park Station and possibly remove barriers to accelerate development.
Three additional development scenarios to consider include:
Alternate Location for a Public/Private Partnership Parking Garage
The 2009 Station Conceptual Plan considered the future parking structure adjacent to the
bus transfer facility. The construction of this parking structure is contingent on RTD identify-
ing a private partner to share in the costs of the garage. Alternate locations for the parking
structure may need consideration to facilitate this necessary public/private partnership. The
RTD property at Central Park Station provides multiple options for private development that
integrates a parking structure and promoting this added flexibility to the final build out of the
station may encourage development to occur at a quicker rate.
Small Swap
This development scenario considers a small land swap between RTD and Forest City near the
bus transfer facility. In an effort to utilize the most valuable land for development sooner. For-
est City obtains from RTD the property north of 37th Avenue and directly east of Uinta Street
in exchange for a parcel south of 37th Avenue and directly west of Central Park Boulevard.
This allows Forest City to develop one of the most desirable locations within the station area
as soon as the market bears and establishes a strong street wall near the station along Uinta
Street, which is the primary pedestrian corridor for the station. The small swap could occur
before or after the opening day of rail service.
Large Swap
This development scenario expands on the small land swap to include all of the RTD Park-
n-Ride facility west of Uinta Street. The station site plan for opening day utilizes the land
closest to the station along Smith Road for commuter parking. The large land swap concept
proposes a move of the RTD Park-n-Ride in part or in total to the east of Uinta Street, from
Smith Road to 36th Avenue. Forest City obtains the two large development parcels north of
the future 37th Avenue in exchange for this property with the ability to market the parcels
as the most desirable development opportunity near the station with high visibility due to
the frontage along Smith Road. This scenario could occur before or after the opening day of
rail service. If it occurs after opening day, the large swap will likely tie into a public/private
partnership to construct a parking structure as a second phase of the station's development
and may not include an actual land exchange between RTD and Forest City.
A Green Station
The Stapleton Redevelopment Plan sets goals and objectives to restore and protect the area's
environmental resources while demonstrating innovative approaches to development that
emphasize efficiency and reduced resource consumption. The RTD Park-n-Ride and bus
transfer facility is a great opportunity to employ sustainability measures in its design and
construction. On-site power generation through solar roofs or wind turbines would reduce
energy consumption at the station. Utilizing stormwater best management practices such
as bioswales, porous pavers, and other green technologies in the parking lots further the
sustainability of the station. Since the long-term vision for the station focuses on a walkable,
mixed-use urban environment, consideration on how green construction methods could
minimize initial capital costs for the station while reducing long-term maintenance and future
redevelopment costs is needed.
Possible land swaps have been explored by RTD
and Forest City. Above: A small swap scenario that
brings development to Uinta Street in place of surface
parking. Below: A big swap scenario where parking is
relocated further from the rail platform.
Central Park Show Station Area Plan Transformative Concepts
59


Innovative station site design can have benefits to
both transit users and the surrounding community.
Development is integrated into the design of the Del
Mar Station in Pasadena, GA.
Stormwater best practices that are suited for the
conditions of the station area minimize the impact on
the natural environment.
Note: Some lines on this map represent potential future connections in the station area. These connections may take the form of future public or private streets, alleys, pedestrian
passages, or mews with the intent of increasing access in the station area while breaking up large blocks to improve the pedestrian experience.
An ultimate build-out scenario for Central Park Station The majority of the RTD Park-n-Ride is redeveloped as
part of a TOD neighborhood. Parking for the station is accommodated through a combination of remaining
surface parking lots and parking structures that also provide parking of the businesses and residents of Central
Park Station.
HOW DOES INNOVATIVE STATION SITE DESIGN ADDRESS
BEING A DESTINATION?
The ultimate goal of a transit-oriented community surrounding Central Park Station will
make the area a destination for Stapleton, adjacent neighborhoods, and visitors alike.
Bioswales, porous pavers, and other innovative
"green" techniques can reduce stormwater runoff
from parking lots.
HOW DOES INNOVATIVE STATION SITE DESIGN ADDRESS BEING ACTIVE?
A more flexible approach to the station site plan that incorporates sustainable design
features could accelerate development to occur sooner than later at the station, promot-
ing a more vibrant, urban character for the neighborhood.
HOW DOES INNOVATIVE STATION SITE DESIGN ADDRESS
BEING ACCESSIBLE?
The Park-n-Ride provides opening day parking access while promoting a long-term vi-
sion of a more walkable, pedestrian oriented station.
HOW DOES INNOVATIVE STATION SITE DESIGN ADDRESS
BEING SUSTAINABLE?
Greater permeability of parking surfaces positively contributes to stormwater absorption
and helps prevent pollutants from entering our rivers, streams and creeks. An energy
efficient transit station reduces the demand on the power grid.
60
Central Park Station Area Plan Transformative Concepts


RECOMMENDATIONS
E.5.A Seek station site design that allows the greatest opportunity for future transit ori-
ented development to occur as quickly as possible. Station site design should consider
future development through:
Sizing of parking lots to accommodate future building footprints
Future street connectivity
Pedestrian access
Multiple options for future structured parking
E.5.B Utilize sustainable stormwater best practices when designing the station area.
Specific opportunities include:
Bioswales
Rain gardens
Reduced interior curbs
Porous pavers
E.5.C Prioritize the reduction of impervious surfaces.
E.5.D Pursue transit-oriented residential and commercial development at the station
as market conditions deem feasible.
Sustainable design that is sensitive to the existing natural environment is a important principle of the
Stapleton Development Plan.
Mid-block connections in the future transit oriented
development anticipated to replace the initial surface
parking lots could be utilized to break up large blocks
near the station.
Central Park Show Station Area Plan Transformative Concepts
61


Quebec Square Redevelopment
GOAL STATEMENT
Long-term redevelopment of Quebec
Square into a more walkable, mixed-
use shopping and residential neigh-
borhood
Some of the private streets within Quebec Square
function very much like public streets including
providing on-street parking.
WHAT IS IT?
Quebec Square was one of the first developments built in Stapleton, with stores opening in
2002 and 2003. The Power Retail center has 740,000 square feet of retail space, with Wal-Mart,
Sam's Club, and Home Depot as the major anchors. The site plan for Quebec Square acknowl-
edges the existing Denver street grid with several city streets providing access and circulation
for the shopping center. 35th and 36th Avenues are major east/west streets providing access
to Quebec Square from Stapleton and adjacent neighborhoods. Syracuse Street, Roslyn
Street, and 38th Avenue are private streets that provide internal circulation within Quebec
Square. The pad sites located along 36th, 38th, Syracuse, and Roslyn streets have buildings
that are either partially or completely oriented towards the street, which begins to create a
more pedestrian friendly area. It is reasonable to expect that as Quebec Square ages, incre-
mental or comprehensive alterations will substantially change its function, form and appear-
ance. As development occurs near the Central Park Station, pressure to increase the inten-
sity of uses within the shopping center may occur. In this situation, the parking lots would
become candidates for retrofitting to accommodate mixed-use residential development. If
an incremental redevelopment approach is taken, a phased strategy to manage the transition
from an auto-oriented retail center to a mixed-use development will need to be considered.
Establishing further connections to the existing street grid, including the addition of new
public streets within Quebec Square, improves connectivity to expected high-density resi-
dential development near the station. The continuation of the existing street block pattern
is essential to the transition of Quebec Square into a more urban, mixed-use shopping and
residential neighborhood within the greater Stapleton redevelopment.
STREET GRID AND BLOCK PATTERN CONTEXT
E 40TH AVE
CO
O
w Note: Dashedlineson this map represent potential future connections in the station
|j area. These connections may take the form of future public or private streets, alleys,
O pedestrian passages, or mews with the intent of increasing access in the station area
z while breaking up large blocks to improve the pedestrian experience.
E 32ND AVE
The Park Hill neighborhood (green) west of Quebec Street utilizes the traditional Denver street grid. Central
Park Station (yellow) will be built with a similar grid. In order for Quebec Square to knit these areas together, a
stronger block structure needs to be established.
62
Central Park Station Area Plan Transformative Concepts


HOW DOES THE QUEBEC SQUARE REDEVELOPMENT ADDRESS
BEING A DESTINATION?
The long-term redevelopment of Quebec Square through significant capital investments,
both public and private, would ensure that the shopping district would continue to be
an attraction for residents of all of Northeast Denver.
Conversion of Quebec Square from an auto-oriented retail center to a walkable, mixed-
use center assists in bridging the gap between Stapleton residential areas and the North-
east Park Hill neighborhood to the west.
HOW DOES THE QUEBEC SQUARE REDEVELOPMENT ADDRESS
BEING ACTIVE?
Promotes a healthy lifestyle by becoming a more walkable, pedestrian scaled shopping
district that provides many daily needs to residents without the use of an automobile.
HOW DOES THE QUEBEC SQUARE REDEVELOPMENT ADDRESS
BEING ACCESSIBLE?
Continuation of the existing city streetand block pattern, direct transit connections, and
sufficient parking for large retailers would encourage accessibility by all modes.
Example of a large retail anchor store in an urban, pedestrian-scaled environment. The Villa Italia Mall in Lakewood was reimagined as
a walkable town center when it was redeveloped as
Belmar.
Central Park Show Station Area Plan Transformative Concepts
63


More pedestrian scaled blocks would improve the walkability to and from the station
platform.
Higher density residential development within walking distance to a rail station and bus
transfer facility promotes access to employment across the region.
HOW DOES THE QUEBEC SQUARE REDEVELOPMENT ADDRESS
BEING SUSTAINABLE?
Higher intensity of uses and greater density of residents within V2 mile of transit stations
use land more efficiently then low density, auto-oriented development.
Diversified land uses in a redeveloped Quebec Square, including residential uses,
strengthens its long-term viability as competing retail development is constructed
nearby and market conditions change.
City Center Englewood Station is on the site of the
former Cinderella City Mall.
RECOMMENDATIONS
E.6.A Encourage infill development of surface parking lots in Quebec Square with
mixed-use buildings that utilize structured parking.
E.6.B Consider joint or shared parking programs for businesses and residents in Que-
bec Square.
E.6.C Establish greater connectivity to the existing Denver street grid as redevelop-
ment occurs in the area.
E.6.D Consider converting private streets to public right-of-way as development oc-
curs within Quebec Square.
E.6.E Maintain Quebec Square as an area of change in the expected update to The
Blueprint Denver Plan.
E.6.F Support any improvements to Quebec Street that increases safe pedestrian and
bicycle access to Quebec Square.
64
Central Park Station Area Plan Transformative Concepts


STREET GRID AND BLOCK PATTERN CONTEXT EXISTING
STREET GRID AND BLOCK PATTERN CONTEXT POTENTIAL
A combination of mixed-use buildings and parking structures as infill development in the existing surface park-
ing lots would dramatically increase the density in Quebec Square while improving the pedestrian experience.
Potential Future Mixed-Use
Development
Potential Future
Parking Structure
Existing Private Street
Existing Public Street
Potential Future Connection
Note: Dashed lines on this map represent potential future connections in the station
area. These connections may take the form of future public or private streets, alleys,
pedestrian passages, or mews with the intent of increasing access in the station area
while breaking up large blocks to improve the pedestrian experience.
Central Park Show Station Area Plan Transformative Concepts
65


Intermodal Transportation Center (ITC)
GOAL STATEMENT
Create a centralized location for users
to access a wide variety of multi-mod-
al transportation options.
WHAT IS IT?
An intermodal transportation center (ITC) that centralizes and coordinates multiple mobility
options would provide great benefit to Stapleton and the surrounding areas. The ITC could
function either as a stand-alone concept or in conjunction with a future parking structure.
The Central Park Station will have rail service every 15 minutes from both Denver Union Sta-
tion and Denver International Airport for the majority of the day. A 12-bay bus facility, serving
ten or more routes, provides additional connections to destinations in east Denver, Aurora,
and other parts of the RTD service area. An ITC that included bike rentals, car sharing, and
taxi service has great potential to make the station a transit rich location. Major elements in a
Central Park Station Intermodal Transportation Center may include:
Bike sharing and bike rental program: These bike programs turn the station into
an "urban trail head", providing access to the wide array of parks and open space in
Stapleton and the Sand Creek Greenway. Bike sharing, as illustrated by the success of the
Denver B-Cycle program, can help complete the'last mile" of a trip, making nearby des-
tinations, such as the 29th Street Town Center, more accessible for transit users. A bike
rental service provides options for bicyclists that enjoy longer rides and may be seeking
major destinations on the regional trail network such as Bluff Lake, the Rocky Mountain
Arsenal, or Dick's Sporting Goods Park. More details about these potential programs are
located in the Bike Sharing Transformative Concept.
Bike Station: The station should include the availability of repair and maintenance
services, secured interior bike storage, product sales, and shower facilities.
Car-sharing Program: The eGo CarShare service found in the 29th Street Town Center is
a model for similar service at the Central Park Station. This feature adds mobility options
for travelers needing to reach destinations beyond walking or bicycling distance from
66
Central Park Station Area Plan Transformative Concepts


the station.
Taxi Station: Designated locations for taxi queuing and loading to provide easy connec-
tions to hotels.
Hotel Shuttle Service: Sponsorship of one or more bus bays by nearby hotels such as
the Renaissance Denver, Red Lion, and Courtyard by Marriott providing convenient ac-
cess to Stapleton area hotels from DIA.
RTD Kiosk: Ticketing and travel assistance for RTD services in combination with a visitor
information booth ora community greeting station manned by volunteers.
HOW DOES A STATION ITC ADDRESS BEING A DESTINATION?
Acts as the portal to Stapleton from Downtown and DIA serving visitors and residents
alike as one of the most convenient, reliable locations in Denver to access amenities
HOW DOES A STATION ITC ADDRESS BEING ACTIVE?
As a centralized point of mobility options, an ITC assists the overall station area becom-
ing a vibrant, active area.
HOW DOES A STATION ITC ADDRESS BEING ACCESSIBLE?
Provides greater mobility choices, including options for completing the "last mile" of a
trip and access to the regional trail system.
HOW DOES A STATION ITC ADDRESS BEING SUSTAINABLE?
Reduces the amount of vehicles miles travelled by providing multiple options for com-
muters to connect to the region and reach nearby destinations without the use of a
personal automobile.
Taxi Stands are used at Northfieid Shopping Center in
Stapleton.
RECOMMENDATIONS
E.7.A Establish a long-term goal of an Intermodal Transportation Center building at
the station, serving Stapleton and surrounding neighborhoods with an array of multi-
modal transportation options.
E.7.B Coordinate the bicycle sharing and rental program transformative concept with
future on-site needs of RTD at the station.
E.7.C Coordinate with RTD and others to consider the inclusion of car sharing parking
spaces, hotel shuttle service loading areas, and taxi stations in the station area.
E.7.D Work with nearby hotels and with local taxi companies to serve the station by
opening day of rail service.
Central Park Show Station Area Plan Transformative Concepts
67


Bike Sharing and Rental Programs
GOAL STATEMENT
Create a bike sharing and rental pro-
gram in the station area that provides
alternatives to single occupancy au-
tomobile trips for both local residents
and visitors.
The Denver B-Cyde Program is a local example of a
bike sharing program.
Downtown Denver and nearby neighborhoods are
currently served by the Denver B-Cycle Program
WHAT IS IT?
Bike sharing and bike rental programs have seen recent success at both the local and national
level. The local B-Cycle bike-sharing program provides daily, weekly, and annual members ac-
cess to over 500 bikes and 51 stations in Downtown Denver and nearby neighborhoods. The
program makes it convenient and economical to substitute bicycle trips for automobile trips
to nearby destinations such as a local park, grocery store, or restaurant. A bike-sharing pro-
gram is a viable "last-mile" option for commuters and visitors on opening day of Central Park
Station and only increases in value once higher density development occurs near the station.
Bike rental programs are a common amenity in tourist locations and are currently available at
three popular Denver city parks (City, Washington, and Berkeley). At Central Park Station, such
a program may coordinate with a bike station that provides long-term rental, maintenance,
secured storage, and other services. These longer, daily rental bikes serve users interested in
accessing the Sand Creek Regional Greenway Trail that connects to the regional trail system
and destinations such as Bluff Lake, the Rocky Mountain Arsenal, or Dick's Sporting Goods
Park. The bike rental users also have access to any of the trails within Stapleton's parks and
greenways.
On Street Off Street
Existing Existing
Planned Planned
Existing Stapleton neighborhoods have strong bicycle infrastructure.
68
Central Park Station Area Plan Transformative Concepts


HOW DO BIKE SHARING AND RENTAL PROGRAMS ADDRESS
BEING A DESTINATION?
Acts as the portal to Stapleton from Downtown and DIA serving visitors and residents
alike as one of the most convenient, reliable locations in Denver to access amenities
HOW DO BIKE SHARING AND RENTAL PROGRAMS ADDRESS
BEING ACTIVE?
As a centralized point of mobility options, an ITC assists the overall station area becom-
ing a vibrant, active area.
HOW DO BIKE SHARING AND RENTAL PROGRAMS ADDRESS
BEING ACCESSIBLE?
Provides greater mobility choices, including options for completing the "last mile" of a
trip and access to the regional trail system.
HOW DO BIKE SHARING AND RENTAL PROGRAMS ADDRESS
BEING SUSTAINABLE?
Reduces the amount of vehicles miles travelled by providing multiple options for com-
muters to connect to the region and reach nearby destinations without the use of a
personal automobile.
RECOMMENDATIONS
E.8 Develop a bike sharing and rental program and analyze financing strategies with
interested stakeholders such as the Stapleton Transportation Management Area,
the Sand Creek Regional Greenway, RTD, Forest City, Quebec Square, and Shops at
Northfield. An existing or new non-profit organization may be required to develop the
program.
Bicycle rental programs exist at several Denver city
parks.
A bike rental program would enhance the Sand Creek
Regional Greenway's opportunity to provide residents
with access to the natural environment.
Central Park Show Station Area Plan Transformative Concepts
69




Moving Forward
Implementation of a plan for the Central Park Station Area is accomplished incrementally over
many years through the efforts of the City government, residents, business owners, property
owners, and nonprofit organizations. The plan provides a picture into the future of what the
community wants the station area to become. As a result, the image of "what we want" is
clear. The "how we are going to get there" will be the responsibility of the numerous studies
and project planning that will be developed to forward specific objectives and projects within
the context of city-wide priorities and resource availability.
Central Park Show Station Area Plan Moving Forward
71


Implementation Framework
PLAN IMPLEMENTATION
The implementation matrix that concludes this chapter summarizes the recommended
strategies, associated with the Strategy Framework and Transformative Concepts. Each one is
further defined by type, timeframe, funding source, and lead entity.
IMPLEMENTATION TYPES
Blueprint Denver identifies three types of implementation activities: regulatory or policy,
public investment, and partnership. The Central Park Station Area Plan also recognizes the
importance of private development and business investment in realizing the plan.
Regulatory and policy strategies change City codes or regulations to affect desired out-
comes. Typical examples include Denver Zoning Code text and map amendments. Pub-
lic Works requirements for infrastructure improvements associated with development
projects, and Parks and Recreation requirements regarding open space and plantings.
Public investment strategies are those involving public funding of public infrastructure.
Examples include street reconstruction, bike lanes, new transit lines, park improvements,
or new or expanded recreation centers. The City takes the lead in designing, construct-
ing, and funding these projects and may use a variety of public funding sources such
as the annual Capital Improvements Program, bond funds, or state or federal grant
programs.
Partnership strategies represent the most diverse category. Public-private partnership
(PPP) activity has expanded exponentially and has gone well beyond public subsidy of a
private development project. Increasingly public-private partnerships are being used to
fund public infrastructure projects. Denver Union Station and RTD's East and Gold Lines
are among the largest PPP projects in the country.
IMPLEMENTATION TIMEFRAMES
Timeframes recognize both the order in which certain strategies must be undertaken and the
feasibility of undertaking them given known resources. As a result, the timeframes provide
guidance for expectations and initial efforts. Every opportunity to advance a plan should be
taken, regardless of the suggested timing.
This plan recognizes four time-frames:
Short-term one to three years
Medium-term four to ten years
Long-term beyond ten years
On-going continuing application/utilization
FUNDING SOURCES
The Implementation Framework identifies possible funding sources for public improvements
and studies. The Plan is a forward-looking document which contemplates a vision for future
development. Funding sources available to public and private entities are continually evolv-
ing based on economic, political, legal and neighborhood objectives. Though the names and
purposes of funding sources change overtime, they fall into three distinct categories.
Tax Base Support: Tax base supported sources are characterized by the involvement of
the local sales and property taxing authorities. The most common tax base support is
through the City's annual budget, especially the annual Capital Improvements Program
(CIP). Periodically, the City requests its voters to approve a tax increase to pay for specific
72
Central Park Station Area Plan Moving Forward


public improvements. For instance, the citizens of Denver voted in 2007 to raise their
property taxes in a specific amount to support the issuance of over $500 million Better
Denver Bonds whose proceeds funded 290 specific public improvements.
Tax Increment Finance is another means of tax-base support most typically associ-
ated with an Urban Renewal Area. Once created by the City Council and Denver Urban
Renewal Authority (DURA), property and sales tax over and above the base year are paid
to DURA to be used to pay for eligible public improvements. Designation as an Urban
Renewal Area occurred for Stapleton in 1997.
Grants: Grants come from public or private organizations that are interested in en-
couraging a specific outcome and these grants typically include specific conditions and
requirements as to how the funds may be deployed. For instance, a state or federal
transportation grant will need to be used for street, mass transit, or regional mobil-
ity studies or projects. The Office of Economic Development receives federal funds to
support certain types of housing projects. Additionally, foundations provide grants for
projects orientated with the organization's goals, such as green spaces or social services.
Special Districts: The City Charter and State Statute enable various types of districts to
be created. Examples of special districts include Business Improvement Districts, Met-
ropolitan Districts, Local Improvement or Maintenance Districts, and General Improve-
ment Districts. The districts are classified as special because they are typically created by
a localized group of citizens who want to achieve specific outcomes in their locality and
are willing to pool their economic resources in order to implement identified projects.
For example, if a majority of business owners desire to improve the streetscape of the
street in which they operate, the businesses could organize a Business Improvement
District which would assess the participants an amount of money sufficient to pay for
the project. Special districts are a useful tool when a localized population desire and are
willing to pay for an enhanced level of public improvement. District revenues can be
used to pay for improvements on a "pay-as-you-go basis", for ongoing operations and
maintenance, or to support payment of bonds.
Two Metropolitan Districts have been established within Stapleton, the Park Creek Met-
ropolitan District and the Westerly Creek Metropolitan District, to construct the necessary
infrastructure and planned open space system for the neighborhood.
Lead Entity: The implementation matrix identifies a lead entity that the plan recom-
mends for having primary responsibility for undertaking the implementation recom-
mendation. The entities are recommendations only. Other public and private entities
may have roles to initiate, undertake, or participate in these efforts.
CHAMPIONS AND ADVOCATES
Once a plan is adopted as a supplement to the Comprehensive Plan, the City has direction to
implement the plan. Given the number of plans providing this direction, competing interests
in the city, and the budget issues at all levels of government, little plan implementation is
undertaken without champions for certain actions and advocates for the plan area. Typically
registered neighborhood organizations work with the Mayor and their City Council represen-
tatives to promote certain actions and outcomes. Membership organizations such as mer-
chant associations, business partnerships, and non-profits do the same for business areas.The
Downtown Denver Partnership's focus on implementation of the Downtown Area Plan both
as part of their organizational work program and their advocacy with the City is one example
of a concerted effort at implementing a plan.
Central Park Show Station Area Plan Moving Forward
73


BLUEPRINT DENVER FUTURE LAND USE CONCEPTS
The Central Platte Valley, an example of transit
oriented development in Denver.
Industrial Mixed-Use can support a wide variety of
building forms and business types.
Station areas on the Southeast Line, such as
Arapahoe at Village Center, are employment focused.
Blueprint Denver, Denver's integrated land use and transportation plan adopted in 2002,
identifies Areas of Change and Areas of Stability throughout the city with the goal of direct-
ing new development and infill projects toward Areas of Change. Blueprint Denver estab-
lished land use types based on a framework of "building blocks"- Districts, Residential Areas,
Centers, and Corridors. Each category has individual land use types and describes a particu-
lar character and scale that is desired in the future but does not necessarily reflect existing
conditions. The Central Park Station Plan uses this as the basis of its recommended land use
map. Two sub-categories of land uses. Industrial Mixed Use and TOD Employment, have
been added to the Central Park Station Land Use Map found on page 17 to reflect the specific
conditions in the plan area. Those land use concepts are shown here as Industrial and Mixed
Use respectively to illustrate how those recommendations translate to an updated Blueprint
Concept Land Use map. The Blueprint Denver Plan map will be amended as needed based on
this plan.
BLUEPRINT DENVER CONCEPT LAND USE MAP EXISTING
Town Center
Employment__________~] Industry! _______| Single Fanxly Residential
Regional Center
Park
74
Central Park Station Area Plan Moving Forward


BLUEPRINT DENVER CONCEPT LAND USE MAP PLAN RECOMMENDATION
TOD
] Mixed Use
Employment | | Industrial
Regional Center [' | Single Family Duplex
Park
Note: Dashed lines on this map represent potential future connections in the station area. These connections may take the form of future public or private streets, alleys, pedestrian passages, or mews with the intent of increasing access in the station area while breaking up
large blocks to improve the pedestrian experience.
Central Park Show Station Area Plan Moving Forward
75


BLUEPRINT DENVER STREET
CLASSIFICATIONS
BLUEPRINT DENVER STREET CLASSIFICATIONS
Functional Street Classifications:
Blueprint Denver provides functional
street classifications that are intended
to encompass both design character-
istics of the streets and the character
of service the streets are intended to
provide. The functional classification
system recognizes that individual
streets do not act independently
of one another but instead form a
network that works together to serve
travel needs on a local, citywide, and
regional level.
Blueprint Denver recognized and
retains the City's existing classification
system of arterials, collectors and local
streets, but also presents criteria to
better classify the function of the city's
streets. The four functional street cat-
egories identified in Blueprint Denver
are Arterial Streets, Collector Streets,
Local streets, and Downtown Access
Streets. The functional classification
broadly defines its design and opera-
tional characteristics as they relate to
the movement of motor vehicles.
Multi-Modal Street Classifications:
The Multi-Modal Street Type define
streets by relating them to the adja-
cent land use and their function for
pedestrians, bicyclists, and transit. The
street types attempt to strike a bal-
ance between functional classification,
adjacent land use, and competing
travel needs. There are five multi-
modal street type categories that
include Residential Street, Main Street,
Mixed-Use Street, Commercial Street,
and industrial street.
The Central Park Station Area Plan plan draws on the street classifications and types estab-
lished by Blueprint Denver and makes recommendations for updates based on the future land
use and mobility vision for the area. The Blueprint Denver Street Classification Map will be
amended as needed based on this plan. The future street classification maps on the following
pages show this plan's recommendations for updates.
EXISTING BLUEPRINT DENVER STREET CLASSIFICATIONS
Industrial
Collector
Mbced Use
Collector
Undeskg retted
Local
76
Central Park Station Area Plan Moving Forward


FUTURE BLUEPRINT DENVER STREET CLASSIFICATIONS
K S O K 2 U] ^J4THj V WE s K S' 5
lZ/
OJi -§! <£- SOL j j s g 5
UJ rn h* K
K M CO u h|, o CO or
§ UJ 2 * s % UJ a: UJ
Oi o o p
VC) o: +-V UJ UJ
x\ sc -i UJ UJ
_sL *1 no
33RD AVE
A
MARTIN LUTHER KING JR BLVD
II II
*/ ' ' J ~\m * >* M*,- ^ * -j ^,
Industrial Mixed Use Residential Undesionated Commercial Main Street
Arterial Arterial Arterial Arterial Arterial Local
Industrial Mixed Use Residential Undesignated ^ i Potential Future
Collector Collector Collector Local Street Connections
Note: Dashedlineson this map represent potential future connections in the station area. These connections may take the form of future public or private streets, alleys, pedestrian passages, or mews with the intent of increasing access in the station area whilebreakingup
large blocks to improve the pedestrian experience.
Central Park Show Station Area Plan Moving Forward
77


| Regulatory and Policy Tools J
RECOMMENDATIONS IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY TIMEFRA^^ ^lead^H STAKEHOLDERS
B.1 -B.4; B.6; C.3.A; D.1.A; E.1.A- E.1.D Design Review Conduct a review of existing design standards and guidelines for the station area and make any necessary changes to reflect plan recommen- dations including Active Edges, Building Frontages, Building Placement and Massing, Pedestrian Priority Streets, Key Intersections, Gateways, and Location of Parks, Plazas, and Open Space. Short Department of Plan- ning and Community Development (CPD) and Stapleton Devel- opment Corporation (SDC)
D.3.A D.3.E Housing Sustainability Coordinate the City's existing affordable housing strategies to build multi-family development within the station area that contains 20% or more affordable housing units. Short City and County of Denver, Regional Transportation Dis- trict (RTD)
E.6.D Maintain Quebec Square as an area of change in the expected update to the Blueprint Denver Plan. Short CPD
C.5; E.1.F; D.2.F; D.2.G Bus Service Adopt a service plan that distributes bus routes through the major street network that serves the neighborhood and transit facility while promot- ing access to fresh food, civic uses, and recognizing Uinta Street as the neighborhoods pedestrian priority street. Short Medium RTD, Transportation Management Associa- tion (TMA), others
A.1 -A.3; D.4.A; E.6.A, TOD Zoning Much of the station already hasTOD-friendly zoning that allows for increased densities and reductions in parking, enable mixed-use develop- ment, and prohibit new uses that would not be transit supportive. New zoning is needed as private developers begin to consider redevelopment opportunities in Quebec Square and other possible infill locations. Medium CPD and Private Developers
A.4 Use building form and design standards to ease the transition between theTOD development and surrounding residential neighborhoods. Medium CPD, Forest City, Pri- vate Developers
A. 5 Change existing residential neighborhoods to Areas of Stability Short CPD
B.5 Promote the integration of cultural activity generators as part of larger, mixed-use, higher-density development projects. Medium CPD, Forest City, Pri- vate Developers
D.4.B; D.4.D Seek and retain employers in the station area with a high jobs-per-acre- ratio including the development of Centerfield Campus as a location for large corporate office tenants, research and design facilities, or appropri- ate light industrial uses. On-going Forest City, Office of Economic Develop- ment, SDC, Private Developers
D.4.F Seek a mix of employers that provide jobs at various skill levels suitable for workers with a diverse range of educations. Encourage businesses to provide on-going training opportunities. On-going Forest City, Stapleton Foundation, others
E.1.A Prioritize Uinta Street as the primary pedestrian street in the station area and provide multiple modes of transportation options. On-going RTD, CPD, Public Works, Forest City
E.1.B- E.1.D Locate the most prominent buildings in theTOD on Uinta Street empha- sizing key intersections of Uinta Street with 35th, 36th, 37th avenues and Smith Road. On-going RTD, CPD, Public Works, Forest City
E.5.A; E.5.D Design the station site to allow the greatest opportunity for future transit oriented development to occur as quickly as possible and consider solicit- ing proposals from private developers to redevelop the surface parking lots into high density residential and commercial uses when feasible. On-going RTD, CPD
78
Central Park Station Area Plan Moving Forward


Infrastructure Tools

RECOMMENDATIONS H IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY H TIMEFRAME LEAD STAKEHOLDERS
C.2.C Build bicycle lanes on Martin Luther King Boulevard between Quebec Street and Central Park Boulevard. Short Public Works
C.2.D Evaluate alternatives to improve bicycle crossings of Quebec Street on Martin Luther King Boulevard. Short Public Works
C.2.E Install wayfinding signage that enhance the bicycling experience, in- creases ease of navigation and enhances bicycle safety. Short Public Works
E.3.A Provide regional access to the station for pedestrians and bicyclists from the Sand CreekTrail via Smith Road. Short Sand Creek Regional Greenway (SCRG), PCMD, RTD
C.1.D Reconstruct Smith Road section between the Quebec Square and the future RTD Park-n-Ride improvements. Short- Medium Park Creek Metro District (PCMD)
C.2.B Continue the multi-use path parallel to Smith Road beyond the RTD Park- n-Ride to the west. Short- Medium Public Works
C.3.B; C.3.C; E.1.E CrosswalkTreatments/En- hancements Evaluate and implement crosswalk treatments/enhancements at pro- posed signalizations along Smith Road (at Ulster, Uinta, Rail Platform) and Uinta Street (at 35th and 36th), key bicycle and pedestrian routes to the station. Short- Medium Public Works, RTD, others
C.4.A Evaluate and implement intersection traffic signalization within Quebec Square. Short- Medium Private Property Own- ers, Public Works
C.4.B Continue evaluating intersection signalization on Central Park Boulevard. Short- Medium Public Works, PCMD
C.4.C Evaluate the need and potential implementation of traffic calming tools on Martin Luther King Boulevard between Quebec Street and Monaco Street. Medium Public Works
C.1.B Evaluate network improvements to traverse regional greenways for improved multi-modal connectivity throughout Stapleton. Medium Long PublicWorks, Private Developers
C.2.F Consider additional connections from existing bike lanes to off-street paths. Medium Long PublicWorks, SCRG, TMA
E.2.A E.2.D; C.1.B; D.1.A Improved Street Network Key network improvements that are considered transformative are the extension of Smith Road to Havana St., completely 40th Avenue between Ulster St. and Central Park Blvd., replacement of the Smith Road Sand Creek bridge, and an improved Ulster Street between 39th and 40th Avenues. Medium Long PublicWorks (40th; Ulster), PCMD (Smith Road; Smith Rd. bridge; Ulster) Private Developers (40th; Ulster)
Central Park Show Station Area Plan Moving Forward
79


Infrastructure Tools (cont.)

RECOMMENDATIONS H IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY H TIMEFRAME LEAD STAKEHOLDERS
D.1.A Improve access from the station area to the Sand Creek Regional Green- way and to nearby open space and recreation areas. Medium Long Public Works, Private Developers
E.2.A Extend Smith Road from Central Park Boulevard to Havana Street. Medium Long Public Works, Private Developers
E.2.B Complete 40th Avenue between Ulster Street and Central Park Boule- vard through the Centerfield Campus. Medium Long Public Works, Private Developers
E.2.C; E.3.B Replace the Smith Road bridge over Sand Creek and include pedestrian and bicycle facilities in the bridge design. Medium Long Public Works, Park Creek Metropolitan Dis- trict, Private Developers
E.2.D Build curb and sidewalks on Ulster Street between 39th and 40th Av- enues. Medium Long Public Works, Private Developers
E.3.C; E.3.D Construct a new pedestrian/bicycle bridge, north of the station, over Sand Creek between the existing Stapleton Industrial Area and Center- field Campus at approximately the Ulster Street alignment and extend a new direct pedestrian and bicycle connection between Sand Creek Regional Trail and the station. Medium Long SCRG.TMA, Private Developers, etc
E.7.A Establish an Intermodal Transportation Center at the Central Park Sta- tion. Medium Long RTD, TMA, SCRG, Staple- ton Foundation, Others
E.3.E Consider additional connections between on-street bicycle facilities and the Sand Creek Regional Greenway. Long Public Works, DPR, SCRG.TMA
C.1.A; E.6.C; E.6.D; C.1.E Improve street grid to achieve greater connec- tivity Establish greater connectivity to the existing Denver street grid when- ever possible including the consideration of converting private streets to public right-of-way as redevelopment occurs. On-going Public Works, Private Developers
C.1.C Evaluate traffic calming elements for the 36th Avenue and Xanthia Street corridor between Central Park Boulevard and Smith Road. On-going Public Works
C.2.A Build the bicycle and pedestrian improvements recommended in Denver Moves. On-going Public Works
D.1.E Identify a more appropriate use for the trunk open space currently utilized for a prairie dog preserve as the station area develops into a high density, urban environment. On-going Denver Parks and Rec- reation (DPR)
80
Central Park Station Area Plan Moving Forward


Partnership Tools
RECOMMENDATIONS IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY TIMEFRAME LEAD STAKEHOLDERS
D.2.C Park-n-Ride Safety Work to improve the safety of the Park-n-Ride. Consider adding or relocating a COP shop to the station area to improve overall safety of the facility. Short Medium CCD Police, RTD, TMA, Others
D.1.D; D.4.C TOD Marketing Strategy Promote the walkable, mixed-use environment of the primary TOD area to potential tenants of commercial space and residents of multi-family housing. Short Medium RTD, Forest City, Others
E.4.A B Station Landmark Explore financing and implementation strategies to install a station landmark to serve as a visual identity for the station. Short Medium RTD, Forest City, Others
E.6.F Support any improvements to Quebec Square that increases safe pedes- trian and bicycle access to Quebec Square. Short Medium TMA, Stapleton Founda- tion, Private Property Owners, Public Works
E.7.B E.7.D; E.8 Station Intermodal Trans- portation Center and Bike Programs The establishment of a Intermodal Transportation Center at Central Park Station creates a centralized point of mobility options for transit users and residents. A station ITC would include bike sharing and rental programs, a bike station, a car sharing program, taxi services, and hotel shuttles. Short Medium Stapleton Foundation, TMA, RTD, CPD, SCRG, Hotels,Taxi Providers
D.2.H Promote continuing education opportunities. Medium Long Stapleton Foundation, Others
D.2.A; D.2.B Community and Cultural Amenities Seekan adaptive reuse of the Stapleton Airport Tower in a cultural ame- nity that is accessible to the public. Explore the incorporation of a com- munity gathering facility as part of a larger development jointly utilized by either office and/or residential uses. On-going SDC, neighborhood associations, private developers, others
D.2.D D.2.E Healthy Food Choices Encourage healthy food choices by neighborhood residents through urban agriculture, healthy corner store initiatives, and other programs identified by the Sustainable Food Policy Council. Provide healthy food options to waiting transit users and nearby residents by locating mobile food vendors in or near the station area. On-going; Me- dium Stapleton Foundation
D. 1.A; D.1.B; D.1.QD.4.E; E. 5.B; E.5.C Sustainable Design Support green building practices and promote standards of Leader- ship In Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) for new construction beginning with transit facility design and all subsequent development through project review within the City's and SDC's design guidelines. On-going Development Services, SDC, Forest City
C.6; E.6.B Parking Management Evaluate parking patterns and needs within the station impact area as phased development occurs and identify strategies that ensure a proper balance of supply and demand for different users. On-going Public Works, Stapleton Transportation Man- agement Association (TMA)
D.3.A D.3.E Housing Sustainability Develop affordable housing within the station area and throughout Stapleton by partnering with RTD, Forest City, City agencies, and non- profit housing developers. On-going RTD, Forest City, OED, Private Developers
Central Park Show Station Area Plan Moving Forward
81


Full Text

PAGE 1

Central Park Station Area Plan September 24, 2012

PAGE 2

Mayor Michael B. HancockDENVER CITY COUNCILDistrict 1Susan K. Shepherd District 2Jeanne Faatz District 3Paul D. Lpez District 4Peggy Lehmann District 5Mary Beth Susman, President District 6Charlie Brown District 7Chris Nevitt District 8Albus Brooks District 9Judy H. Montero District 10Jeanne Robb District 11Christopher Herndon, President Pro Te m At-LargeRobin Kniech At-LargeDeborah (Debbie) OrtegaDENVER PLANNING BOARDBrad Buchanan, Chair man Andy Baldyga Julie Bender Richard Delanoy Shannon Gi ord Kenneth Ho Anna Jones Brittany Morris Saunders Sharon Nunnally Susan Pearce K.C. Veio Dave WebsterCOMMUNITY PLANNING & DEVELOPMENTMolly Urbina, Interi m Manager Steve Gordon, Co mprehensive Planning Manager David Gaspers, Project Manager Theresa Lucero, Project Manager Caryn Wenzara Steve Nalley Ti m Watkins Eric McClelland Carolyne JanssenFINANCEBar Chadwick PUBLIC WORKSJose Cornejo, Manager Crissy Fanganello, Policy and Planning Director Emily Silver man Jennifer Hillhouse Eric Osmundson Emily Snyder Becky Si mon Mike Anderson Walt Hime Russ Price Justin SchmitzPARKS & RECREATIONLauri Dannemiller, Manager Gordon Robertson, Park Planning, Design and Construction Director David Marquardt, Landscape Architect Supervisor Mark UpshawOFFICE OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENTJe Ro mine Christopher Smith Stephanie InderwiesenARTS AND VENUESKendall PetersonSTAPLETON ART PROGRAMBarbara NealHEALTH IMPACT ASSESSEMENTAlisha Brown, Director BeWell Stapleton Karen Roof Envirohealth Consulting Chad Reischl Envirohealth Consulting Bill Sadler Envirohealth Consulting Carrie Murphy Envirohealth ConsultingKEY STAKEHOLDER GROUPAngie Malpiede, Chair Charles Bayley Keven Burnett Jim Chrisman Cheryl Cohen-Vader Beverly Haddon Donn Hogan Rhonda Jones Jody Martin-Witt Bette Matkowski To m Michals David Netz Justin Ross Andrew Schurger Heather Shockey John Smith Patrick Stanley Mike Turner Michele Wheeler Rob Wilson Ex-O cio Members Councilmember Chris Herndon State Representative Angela Willia ms Acknowledgements

PAGE 3

Introduction ..................................................1Planning Approach ...........................................................................2 Planning Process ...............................................................................4 Planning Context ...............................................................................6Strategy Framework .....................................9Acco mplishments, Challenges, Opportunities .....................10 Vision and Principles ......................................................................12 Overall Plan Concept......................................................................14 A. Destination ..................................................................................16 B. Active .............................................................................................24 C. Accessible .....................................................................................32 D. Sustainable ...................................................................................40Transformative Projects .............................47Uinta Street........................................................................................48 I mproved Street Network .............................................................52 Sand Creek Trail Connections ....................................................54 Station Landmark ............................................................................56 Innovative Station Site Design ...................................................58 Quebec Square Redevelop ment................................................62 Inter modal Transportation Center.............................................66 Bike Sharing and Rental Progra m..............................................68Moving Forward .........................................71

PAGE 5

Central Park Station Area Plan Introduction 1 IntroductionStapleton served as Denvers airport for better than six decades, serving as the regions connection to destinations around the world. Since the adoption of the Stapleton Development Plan, the process to turn the for mer Stapleton International Airport into a thriving, environmentally conscious, economically and socially diverse, mixed-use, cutting-edge neighborhood is recognized as one of the most signi cant brown eld redevelopment projects in history. Acknowledged internationally, the neighborhood is a best practice in New Urbanism planning and traditional neighborhood design. The Stapleton Development Plan, better known as the Green Book, laid the groundwork for this much-lauded reputation through the establishment of an a mbitious vision, fundamental goals, and plan principles. The Green Book addresses the economic, social, and environmental objectives of the project, as well as the physical design of the neighborhood. The Stapleton neighborhood has a strong tradition of outstanding citizen participation and involvement and this station area planning e ort has strived to continue that precedent. The Central Park Station Area Plan is an exciting milestone in the redevelopment of Stapleton. As residential development begins to occur in North Stapleton and South Stapleton begins to mature and ll-in the remaining development opportunities, the future of Stapleton as a diverse neighborhood of housing options and e mployment opportunities gradually beco mes a reality. The station area is a critical component for the character and function of the neighborhood. The opportunity to create a walkable, urban, mixed-use environment that seamlessly transitions to diverse residential neighborhoods positions the Central Park Station at the forefront of transit-oriented develop ment in the country. At the sa me time, the station functions as the Northeast Denvers portal to the rest of the region and the world, connecting travelers to both Downtown Denver and Denver Interna tional Airport. Central Park Stations vision to become a sustainable, active, and accessible destination will only add to the reputation of Stapleton as a world-class modern neighborhood. STAPLETON DEVELOPMENT PLAN FUNDAMENTAL GOALS Economic Opportunity : Stapleton will be a regional center for job creation in diverse elds, with an emphasis on new technologies and emerging industries. When co mpleted, Stapleton could support more than 30,000 jobs and 25,000 residents, beco ming a major contributor to the long ter m economic health of the city. Environmental Responsibility: Stapleton will demonstrate the economic and community bene ts of a long-ter m co mmitment to reducing consumption of natural resources and impacts on the natural environ ment. Human activities will be conducted in a fashion that acknowledges and respects the importance of natural systems. Social Equity: Stapleton will provide broad access to social, cultural, and economic opportunities for all segments of the co mmunity. Successful redevelopment of the Stapleton site will be a catalyst for improvements in the larger community and particular in the neighborhoods surrounding the site.

PAGE 6

Central Park Station Area Plan Introduction 2Plan ApproachAPPROACHThe Central Park Station Area Plan enco mpasses a one-half mile radius of the planned Stapleton Transit Facility located near the intersection of Uinta Street and S mith Road. The transit facility includes one of six stations on the East Commuter Rail Line, which is scheduled to begin operations between Denver Union Station to Denver International Airport in 2016, a Park-n-Ride, and a major bus transfer center. The East Rail Line runs parallel to S mith Road and the Union Paci c rail corridor. A majority of the station area is within the boundaries of the Stapleton Develop ment Plan. Since the adoption of the Plan in 1995, the station area has been intended to become a walkable, transit-oriented neighborhood serving as Stapletons portal to the regional transit network. The East Corridor Rail Line environ mental impact state ment nalized the location of the Stapleton station and rena med it Central Park Station (Central Park Boulevard is the nearest major arterial cross street) near the intersection of Smith Road and Uinta Street. The 2006 Transit-Oriented Develop ment (TOD) Strategic Plan identi ed the Central Park Station TOD typology as Urban Center with a relatively dense mix of o ce, retail, and residential uses acting as a sub-regional destination. Following the TOD Strategic Plan, the City partnered with RTD and Forest City, Stapletons master developer, to initiate conceptual planning work for the approximately 20 acres that would become the RTD Park-n-Ride and Bus Transfer Facility. Multiple recommendations developed as part of the Stapleton Station Conceptual Plan (2009) will carry over into the Central Park Station Area Plan. These recommendations include the key concept of a phased approach to promoting future transit-oriented development on the RTD surface parking lots as the area develops around the station. HOW TO USE THIS PLANThe Plan establishes a vision and principles for the develop ment and future of the Central Park Station area. The ele ments of this plan will direct the Stapleton neighborhood, adjacent neighborhoods, and key stakeholders towards a vision as a community where people live, work, play, and celebrate the diversity of the best Denver neighborhoods. Public and private agencies and organizations will use this plan in co ming years for many purposes and actions that a ect the for m and function of the Central Park Station area. The Plan provides city-adopted policy direction to guide decision-making and prioritization related to development opportunities, transportation, partnerships, additional study and analysis, funding and public investments. In some cases, as identi ed in this plan, recommendations will require multiple steps before moving forward with implementation. For exa mple, transportation and infrastructure concepts will require further analysis, including the identi cation of funding sources. In addition, zone district changes may be necessary to implement development concepts. The plan structure has three major components: Strategy Framework: This section presents content that generally applies to the plan area as a whole. Existing conditions, plan concepts, and reco mmendations are presented for the entire plan area and are organized into four categories or plan principles: Destination Active Access Sustainable The Stapleton Development Plan established the long-term vision for redevelopment in Stapleton. The RTD FasTracks program includes the East Rail line that connects Downtown Denver to Denver International Airport, with a station stop in Stapleton.

PAGE 7

Central Park Station Area Plan Introduction 3 Transformative Concepts: These are big ideas that, if implemented, could help to catalyze private invest ment. Uinta Street Improved Street Network Sand Creek Trail Connections Station Landmark Innovative Station Site Design Quebec Square Redevelopment Intermodal Transportation Center Bike Sharing and Rental Program Moving Forward: This section addresses the implementation framework for the plan. All of the plan recommendations from previous chapters are listed in the implementation matrix, which also categorizes each recommendation in ter ms of timing, type, and potential funding sources. E orts were made to eliminate redundancies in plan recommendations. Therefore, reco mmendations appear once in the plan and although they may be referenced in other chapters, they are generally not repeated as reco mmendations in multiple chapters. For exa mple, the transfor mative concepts are identi ed as recommendations in the Strategy Fra mework, but greater detail is provided for each recommendation in the transfor mative concepts section. BRIEF HISTORY OF STAPLETON INTERNATIONAL AIRPORTSeveral sites were considered for the location of a new municipal airport during the 1920s. The Sand Creek site, southeast of 32nd Avenue and Syracuse Street, was chosen in part due to its remote location on the far eastern edge of the city. Dedicated in 1929, the airport was renamed Stapleton after Mayor Ben Stapleton in 1944. Al most continuous expansion occurred, beginning at the dawn of the jet age in the late 1950s, eventually being comprised of 4,700 acres, six runways, and ve ter minal concourses. During the 1980s, Mayor Federico Pena and other local leaders, knowing the now landlocked airport was outdated and overstrained with passengers, examined opportunities to build a new Denver International Airport. In 1989, voters approved a site for the new airport 25 miles from Downtown Denver that was originally located in Adams County. Stapletons last ight left on February 28, 1995 the next day Denver International Airport, better known as DIA, was open for business and Stapletons next life as a Denver neighborhood began. Stapleton served as Denvers airport from 1929 to 1995.

PAGE 8

Central Park Station Area Plan Introduction 4The public process for the Central Park Station Area Plan kicked of in June 2011 with a public meeting to begin development of the draft plan vision and principles, which included a brainstor ming activity to generate potential plan concepts. The organizing structure of the plan document is closely tied to the plan vision and principles, as the concepts and recommendations are intended to relate back to the four core principles expressed in the plan vision. After the initial kicko meeting, the Stapleton Foundation and Stapleton Transportation Management Association (TMA) assisted City sta in for ming a Key Stakeholder Group to re ne the plan vision and principles and aid City sta in developing the plan concepts. The Key Stakeholder Group met ve times between September 2011 and February 2012. Meetings with individual stakeholders, such as RTD, the Stapleton Foundation, Stapleton TMA, BeWell Stapleton, and Forest City helped to shape plan content throughout the process. A concurrent planning e ort, a station area health impact assessment (HIA), funded by the Stapleton Foundation, infor med many of the plan recommendations. The HIA had a broader study area than the station area plan, looking at health impacts to neighborhoods within a mile and a half of the station. The process also involved collaboration between the City and County of Denvers Co mmunity Planning and Develop ment Department, the Public Works Depart ment, the Department of Parks and Recreation, the Department of Arts and Venues, and the O ce of Econo mic Development. A second public meeting occurred on June 14, 2012 to present the plan concepts and draft document. Brie ngs and public hearings with City Council, Denver Planning Board and interagency City sta were also crucial to the process. PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT PROCESS: Key Stakeholder Group (KSG) The key responsibility for the Key Stakeholder Group was to craft a plan vision and principles that is re ective of the larger Northeast Denver co mmunity and guide city sta in developing plan concepts and recommendations that lead to the implementation of that vision. Throughout the plan process, the KSG was able to provide invaluable feedback to City sta on key issues, available opportunities, and potential partnerships while distributing infor mation about the plan to the larger co mmunity. There were ve KSG meetings held at the o ces of the Stapleton Foundation over the course of the process. Key Stakeholder Group members included representatives from the Stapleton Develop ment Corporation, S tapleton Foundation, Stapleton TMA, Citizens Advisory Board, Stapleton Master Co mmunity Association, Stapleton United Neighbors, nearby neighborhood groups, business owners, Forest City, and RTD. City and County of Denver District 11 Council member Chris Herndon and Colorado State Representative Angela Williams served as ex-o cio members of the Key Stakeholder Group. Individual Stakeholder Interviews Throughout the station area plan process, a series of infor mal interviews were conducted with local citizens, land owners, and City and County of Denver agencies to identify current initiatives and understand key issues within the study area. These interviews were a supple ment to the public process and helped to uncover local dynamics. Public Meetings In addition to meetings with the KSG members and various stakeholders, two public meetings were held to engage the community on key issues. This process included: Public Meeting #1June 29, 2011 The for mal public kick-o meeting was an introduction to the station area planning pr ocess with a presentation on the existing station area conditions and policies, previous station area planning work, and exa mples of Transit-Oriented Develop m ent. This was followed by a draft plan vision, principles and concepts. T her e was then an open house session designed to gather The Stapleton Master Community Association is one of many community organizations that contributed to the public involvement process.Planning Process The Key Stakeholder Group meetings were hosted by the Stapleton Foundation, located in the 29th Street Town Center.

PAGE 9

Central Park Station Area Plan Introduction 5ideas and input by focusing on three main questions: What do you like? What do you not like? How would you change it? Public Meeting #2June 14, 2012 This public meeting was held to review the nal plan concepts and recommendations developed by the Key Stakeholder Group and provide comments or ask questions of city sta who produced the draft plan document. After an initial presentation, a question and answer session and open house ensued. CENTRAL PARK STATION HEALTH IMPACT ASSESSMENTAt the outset of the process of developing the Central Park Station Area Plan, the Stapleton Foundation for Sustainable Urban Co mmunities hired EnviroHealth Consulting to assist with completing a Health I mpact Assessment (HIA), which examines how the built environment a ects residents health. The HIA covers the station area and the co mmunities within a mile and a half from the station. The study area for the HIA contains neighborhoods as well as co mmercial and industrial areas located within a broad rectangle bounded by Montview Blvd, Holly St., 56nd Ave. and Peoria St. The HIA focuses pri marily on the residential neighborhoods of Northeast (NE) Park Hill, North (N) Park Hill, Northwest (NW) Aurora and much of Stapleton. Five pri mary questions are addressed by the HIA: What is the current health status of the population within the study area and how might it be a ected (positively and negatively) by the Central Park Station and development at the TOD Site? What pedestrian and bicycle routes should be enhanced/created in order to better connect local residents and employees to the station area? What transit routes would help connect local residents and e mployees to the station area, employment centers and other local services? What progra mming and/or housing policy would be necessary to ensure a diverse population of the people, within the neighborhoods in the study area, bene t from the development of the TOD Site? What need (if any) is there for a grocery store that sells and pro motes healthy and affordable food items near the TOD Site? The HIA evaluates the availability of transportation options, housing quality, access to jobs, recreation, and healthy food for residents within the study area and describes the opportunities that exist for incorporating health reco mmendations into the Central Park Station Area Plan. The goal of the HIA is to i mprove local decision making, explicitly address health impacts of underserved populations and broadly promote health and well-being. The goal of the Central Park Station Health Impact Assessment is to improve local decision making, explictly address health impacts of underserved populations and broadly promote health and wellbeing.

PAGE 10

Central Park Station Area Plan Introduction 6Planning ContextThis plan represents the land use, urban for m, and transportation vision for the Central Park Station area. It updates and incorporates reco mmendations of earlier plans. Previously adopted planning documents that are relevant to this area include: Stapleton Develop ment Plan (1995) Stapleton Develop ment Guidelines and Standards (1999) Denver Comprehensive Plan (2000) Stapleton Sustainability Plan (2001) Bicycle Master Plan (2001) Blueprint Denver: An Integrated Land Use and Transportation Plan (2002) Denver Parks and Recreation Game Plan (2003) Pedestrian Master Plan (2004) Water Quality Management Plan (2004) TOD Strategic Plan (2006) Greenprint Denver (2006) Strategic Transportation Plan (2008) Stapleton Station Conceptual Plan (2009) Stor m Drainage Master Plan (2009) Sanitary Sewer Master Plan (2009) Strategic Parking Plan (2010)COORDINATION WITH CONCURRENT PLANNING EFFORTSOver the course of the planning process, there were several other e orts underway within the study area. The Central Park Station Area Plan team coordinated with each of these e orts to maximize resources and to help ensure consistency with each. Denver Moves (2011) North Stapleton General Develop ment Plan (2012) Central Park Boulevard, Denver CO Co mmuter Rail Station Health I mpact Assessment Eagle P3 East Corridor RTD Central Park Station Park-n-Ride and Bus Transfer Facility design The RTD East Commuter Rail Line will begin serving the station in 2016. Blueprint Denver is the Citys integrated land use and transportation plan.

PAGE 11

Central Park Station Area Plan Introduction 7

PAGE 13

Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework 9 Strategy FrameworkCentral Park Station will serve as a critical portal to Stapleton and adjacent neighborhoods from the entire Denver region. Identifying key Accomplishments, Challenges, and Opportunities at the beginning of this chapter sets the stage for the plans concepts and reco mmendations and provides an understanding of the needs of the area. The Overall Plan Concept, Vision, and Principles establish a snapshot of the Central Park Station Area Plan. The Key Stakeholder Group took great care in re ning the Vision and Principles, as they not only provide the desired expectations for the station area but also establish a standard to judge the validity of the plans concepts and recommendations. The Plan Principles serving as the evaluation criteria are: Destination Active Accessible Sustainable Each plan principle has a set of detailed concepts that in uence a speci c aspect of the station area. Concepts that further the vision through all four plan principles have been elevated to Transfor mative Concepts. The long-ter m success and value of the Central Park Station Area Plan will depend on how the plan concepts, especially the Transfor mative Concepts, are implemented as real world projects and what resulting actions occur to capitalize on those projects.

PAGE 14

Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework 10Accomplishments, Challenges, OpportunitiesACCOMPLISHMENTS Adoption of the Stapleton Development Plan (1995), the visioning document for the redevelopment of the former Stapleton International Airport. Adoption of numerous other plans intended to guide development in Stapleton and the station area, including the Stapleton Development Guidelines (1999), the Stapleton Housing Plan (2001), and the Stapleton Sustainability Plan (2002). Addition of over 4,600 homes within the Stapleton Development Area. Development of Quebec Square within the station area, as well as North eld Shopping Center and the 29th Street Town Center, bringing over 2 million square feet of retail to Stapleton and adjacent neighborhoods, areas that were previously underserved for basic goods and services. Establishment of the Sand Creek Regional Greenway Trail, connecting the area to the regional trail system and providing access to an important natural amenity. A successful federal New Starts Program application for over $1 billion in federal funds to build the East Corridor Commuter Rail line from Denver Union Station to Denver International Airport, including the Central Park Station. Opening of the Central Park Boulevard/Interstate 70 interchange in November 2011 and the expected completion of the Central Park Boulevard Overpass in the spring of 2012. This new connection will provide greater access to the Stapleton neighborhood, especially the North eld Shopping Center. The Federal Bureau of Investigation moved into a new 220,000 square foot o ce building at 35th Avenue and Ulster Street in 2010, the rst major o ce tenant in the station area.CHALLENGES There is an abundance of retail in the area, Quebec Square, North eld, and 29th Street Town Center, creating a challenge for retail opportunities near the station. The station platform is positioned south of the Union Paci c Railroad tracks and north of Smith Road, creating barriers in both directions and complicating access to the rail platform from the bus transfer facility, Park n Ride and any future development. Smith Road currently terminates at Sand Creek, failing to provide a connection to Havana Street, approximately one-half mile away. Commuters will use 40th Avenue or Martin Luther King Boulevard to reach the station from neighborhoods and communities to the east of the station. Quebec Square is an auto-oriented retail center that will need to become more pedestrian friendly in the future to fully integrate into the planned adjacent transit oriented development. Central Park Boulevard, the main arterial street between South and North Stapleton, 29th Street serves as a Main Street for many of Stapletons residents. North eld is a regional shopping and entertainment destination. Central Park Boulevard will run the length of the Stapleton redevelopment from 56th Avenue to Montview Boulevard.

PAGE 15

Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework 11will see increasing tra c levels as Stapleton fully develops, potentially becoming a barrier for pedestrian and bicycle tra c to and from the east. Quebec Street is a major arterial roadway acting as a barrier to the station from neighborhoods to and from the west. I-70 can be a barrier for pedestrians and bicyclists to and from the north. Central Park Boulevard is the only grade separated crossing of the UPRR ROW in the study area, limiting north-south connectivity. Market competition from other TOD locations exists for higher density residential and o ces uses. Ulster Street is an at-grade crossing of the Union Paci c and future East Rail line tracks that provides the predominant access to the existing Stapleton Industrial Area. The need to balance goals of a walkable, urban neighborhood versus the needs of a busy Park-n-Ride in the RTD system.OPPORTUNITIES A large portion of the station area is a brown eld redevelopment site at various stages of environmental remediation. Strong cooperation from partners RTD and Forest City both committed to the long term vision of a walkable, mixed-use neighborhood near Central Park Station. Stapleton provides a growing, desirable residential neighborhood capable of supporting a signi cant employment center near the station. Strong bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure already exists within Stapletons residential neighborhoods. Long-term redevelopment opportunities exist to intensify the uses within Quebec Square, transferring the shopping center into a more walkable, mixed-use neighborhood. There is an identi ed need in Stapleton for higher density multi-family housing. The station incorporates an established, busy, bus transfer facility that provides transit connections to adjacent neighborhoods as well as destinations throughout the region. The station is located at a convenient location approximately half way between DIA and Downtown Denver on the East Commuter Rail Line. I-70 is a major regional roadway, moving thousands of people through the region, providing access to Downtown and DIA, and generating economic activity and jobs at nearby employment centers. As a master planned neighborhood, Stapleton has strong pedestrian and bicycle infrastructure in already developed areas The FBI relocated to Central Park Station in 2010 Stapletons residential population continues to grow

PAGE 16

Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework 12Vision and PrinciplesA key to the development of the Central Park Station Area Plan was the establish ment of a strong plan vision and plan principles. The kicko meeting provided a draft version of the plan vision and principles to the public for initial input and the Key Stakeholder Group later re ned the vision and principles to ensure they provided the correct fra mework for the entire plan. The vision describes the area as it could be twenty or more years into the future, while the principles establish speci c elements that this plan should strive to achieve. VISION STATEMENTCentral Park Station will be a sustainable, active, and accessible destination for Stapleton, nearby neighborhoods, and the Denver region.PLAN PRINCIPLESA. Destination The station area will serve as a crossroads of the Stapleton neighborhood, connecting people from all seg ments of the co mmunity to the diverse activities found throughout Stapleton and the Denver region. B. Active The station area will be a safe, vibrant, urban place that provides sti mulating, enjoyable, and convenient activities and a menities for a wide variety of di erent users. C. Accessible The station area will build upon its regional connections to provide an extre mely high level of mobility and multi-modal access for all users in a safe, easy, and convenient manner. D. Sustainable The station area will seek innovative ways to better nurture natural, economic, and social systems and resources for today and future generations. These four principles are used as a measuring stick to assess the degree to which any given plan concept helps to promote or achieve a broad array of goals. In this way, the principles are both an organizing element for the plan and a means by which to evaluate its content. Quebec Square Improved Street Network Station ITC Innovative Park N Ride Sand Creek Trail Connections Bike Sharing Landmark Mobility Urban Design Use and Form Affordable Housing Plan Vision Plan Principles Plan Concepts

PAGE 17

Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework 13 REDEVELOPMENT OF AN AIRPORTAl most as soon as the decision to build Denver International Airport happened, thoughts of how to redevelop the soon to be abandoned Stapleton International Airport began. To organize this e ort, the Stapleton Foundation for Sustainable Urban Co mmunities (for merly the Stapleton Redevelopment Foundation) was established in 1990 to develop a visionary plan for the redevelopment of Stapleton that would maximize the long-ter m bene t of the site. A partnership between the Stapleton Foundation, the Citizens Advisory Board, the Stapleton Tomorrow Committee, and the City and County of Denver produced The Stapleton Develop ment Plan in 1995. This docu ment, for mally adopted by City Council, focused on ve guiding principles, Environ mental Responsibility, Social Equity, Econo mic Opportunity, Physical Design, and I mplementation, to direct development within the boundaries of the for mer airport. As an abandoned redevelopment site, the Denver Urban Renewal Authority established Stapleton as an urban renewal area, while Mayor Wellington Webb and the City Council created the non-pro t Stapleton Develop ment Corporation (SDC) to oversee the redevelopment. SDC selected Forest City as the master developer of Stapleton in 1998, with construction beginning in 2001. Since that time, the Stapleton Foundation, Stapleton Development Corporation, and Forest City have been working together to deliver the Development Plans vision of Stapleton as a sustainable urban community. The former Stapleton International Airport has undergone signi cant redevelopment over the last decade. Stapleton, bounded by on the west by Quebec Street, north by 64th Avenue, east by Havana Street and south by Montview Boulevard, encompasses 4,700 acres.STAPLETON DEVELOPMENT PLAN BOUNDARIES

PAGE 18

Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework 14 Overall Plan Concept Strategy Framework Reco mmendations that have a i mpact over a speci c aspect of the station area. Transformative Concepts These concepts represent big ideas for positively transfor ming Central Park Station. Central Park Station will be the sustainable, active, and accessible heart of the Stapleton neighborhood, serving as a destination for the area.IMPROVED STREET NETWORKImprove the surrounding Central Park Station area street network to provide a high level of regional and local access to the station.SAND CREEK TRAIL CONNECTIONSIncrease multi-modal connections to the station through strategic improvements to the existing trail system.STATION LANDMARKProvide a visual marker near the station that allows easy recognition for transit users approaching the station from any direction while enhancing the public realm and identity of the area. UINTA STREETCreate a pedestrian-scaled public realm along Uinta Street, serving as the primary walking street and spine of the station area. A. DESTINATIONThe station area will serve as a crossroads of the Stapleton neighborhood, connecting people from all segments of the community to the diverse activities found throughout Stapleton and the Denver region. A.1 High Intensity Development near the Station A.2 I-70 Employment Centers A.3 In ll Development at Appropriate Locations A.4 Establish Transitions to Residential Neighborhoods A.5 Change existing residential neighborhoods to areas of stabilityB. ACTIVEThe station area will be a safe, vibrant, urban place that provides stimulating, enjoyable, and convenient activities and amenities for a wide variety of di erent users. B.1 Active Edges B.2 Building Frontages B.3 Building Placement and Massing B.4 Parks, Plazas, Open Space B.5 Cultural Activity Generators B.6 Design Guidelines Review

PAGE 19

Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework 15 INNOVATIVE STATION SITE DESIGNAchieve a sustainable, innovative station design that promotes a walkable, mixeduse, transit-oriented community for Stapleton and adjacent neighborhoods.C. ACCESSIBLEThe station area will build upon its regional connections to provide an extremely high level of mobility and multimodal access for all users in a safe, easy, and convenient manner. C.1 Mobility Network Improvements C.2 Promote a High Level of Bicycle Usage C.3 Pedestrian Mobility Improvements C.4 Enhance Pedestrian and Bicycle through Evaluation of Tra c Calming and Signalization Improvements C.5 Distribute Bus Routes through the Major Street Network C.6 Parking Management C.7 Street Cross SectionsD. SUSTAINABLEThe station area will seek innovative ways to better nurture natural, economic, and social systems and resources for today and future generations. A.1 Environmental Sustainability A.2 Social and Cultural Sustainability A.3 Housing Sustainability A.4 Economic Sustainability QUEBEC SQUARELong-term redevelopment of Quebec Square into a more walkable, mixed-use shopping and residential neighborhood.INTERMODAL TRANSPORTATION CENTERCreate a centralized location for users to access a wide variety of multi-modal transportation options.BIKE SHARINGCreate a bike sharing and rental program in the station area that provides alternatives to single occupancy automobile trips for both local residents and visitors.

PAGE 20

Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework 16A. DestinationWHY IS BEING A DESTINATION IMPORTANT TO THE CENTRAL PARK STATION AREA?The East Line Commuter Rail begins operating between Denver International Airport (DIA) and Denver Union Station in 2016. Central Park Station will begin to play an i mportant role as a portal for the neighborhood to local and global destinations once rail service begins. A 15-minute train ride fro m Central Park Station will deliver someone into the heart of Downtown Denver with transit connections throughout the metro area, or into DIAs South Ter minal, ready to depart to any one of hundreds of domestic or international destinations. The easy access to the region and the world gained by boarding a train at Central Park Station is reciprocated when a transit user gets o the train to access the activities and a menities within Stapleton from the Station. This exciting level of multi-modal connectivity is exceptional, and presents an amazing opportunity for Central Park Station to serve as the rst and last impression of Stapleton for residents, employees, and visitors alike. To make the most out of that impression, the station area will need to meld a mix of uses, attractive and active building frontages, quality urban open space, and multi-modal transportation options to become the most urban and walkable place in Stapleton. SUMMARY OF EXISTING CONDITIONS There are six subareas identi ed for the purpose of capturing the existing conditions of the study area. The mix of uses, intensity of commercial development, and density of residential housing types in these areas will have the greatest i mpact on the how the station area matures as a regional destination. The di erent subareas of the overall study area take on highly varied characteristics due to the uses, building for ms, and amount of redevelopment that has occurred in each. As a result, some of the existing conditions represent the expected development pattern in the area for the next 20 to 30 years, where other areas expect rapid character changes within a few years. A brief su mmary of the existing conditions in each subarea is below. Central Park Station is the future TOD neighborhood directly south of the transit station, bounded by Quebec Square to the west, Smith Road to the north, Central Park Boulevard to the east, and 35th Avenue on the south. The area is predo minantly vacant with the recently opened FBI building, a modern, mid-rise o ce building, and RTDs 1,500 space temporary Park-n-Ride lot being the only current uses. Central Park West is directly south of Central Park Station, bounded by Syracuse Street on the west, 35th Avenue on the north, Central Park Boulevard to the east and MLK Boulevard to the south. This neighborhood has a mix of new construction housing types, with mostly two or three story single-family homes and rowhouses near 35th Avenue. The Swigert-McAulli e International School, an early learning through 8th grade school opened in 2011 at Syracuse Street and 35th Avenue. The Stapleton Airport Tower, maintained from Stapletons historic use as an airport, rises over 100 feet near the corner of Central Park Boulevard and MLK. Central Park North is generally southeast of the station, bounded by Central Park Boulevard on the west, Sand Creek to the north, Westerly Creek to the east, and Central Park to the south. The neighborhood is generally two to three story single-fa mily homes. RK Mechanical occupies a 15-acre site along Sand Creek in the northern portion of the area. Lots adjacent to Central Park Boulevard and north of 35th Street are reserved for a ordable housing. Center eld Campus is mostly undeveloped land bounded by Sand Creek on the west, Interstate 70 (I-70) on the north, Havana Street on the east, and S mith Road on the Central Park North is a primarily single-family residential neighborhood located across Central Park Boulevard from the station. Central Park West is a mix of single family homes, rowhouses, and duplexes. PRINCIPLE STATEMENTThe station area will serve as a crossroads of the Stapleton neighborhood, connecting people from all seg ments of the community to the diverse activities found throughout Stapleton and the Denver region.

PAGE 21

Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework 17south. The Sand Creek Regional Greenway runs along the western border of Center eld, providing access to the regional open space network. The only signi cant building in Center eld is an industrial warehouse building that houses the o ces of Denver Transit Partners near I-70 and Havana Street. Quebec Square was the rst area redeveloped as part of the Stapleton Redevelop ment Plan, with stores initially opening in 2002. The property is bounded by Quebec Street on the west, Smith Road on the north, the future RTD Park-n-Ride on the east, and 35th Avenue on the south. This 75-acre open-air power center has 740,000 square feet of retail space with Wal-Mart, Sa m s Club, and The Home Depot as major anchor tenants. The site planning is typical of suburban, auto-oriented shopping centers, using large tilt-wall construction buildings spaced between signi cant amounts of surface parking. Additional retail near the station is located at the 29th Street Town Center (126,000 square feet) and The Shops at North eld (1.2 million square feet). Stapleton Industrial Area is a developed area northwest of the transit station, bounded by Quebec Street on the west, I-70 on the north, Sand Creek on the east, and Smith Road on the south. This area, which is not part of the Stapleton Development Plan, was in use when Stapleton was functioning as an airport. Pri marily industrial in nature, the area includes an airplane salvage yard, motor freight company, and taxicab company as major property owners. The Sand Creek Prairie Dog Preserve is located along Sand Creek in the location of the for mer Stapleton fuel storage facilities. Two hotels, The Red Lion and the Courtyard by Marriott, are located near Quebec Street and a group ho me is located on Ulster Street just south of 40th Avenue. The Wal-Mart Supercenter is one of Quebec Squares anchor tenants. Many of the businesses in the Stapleton Industrial Area date back to the historic aviation use of Stapleton. TH Sand Cr e E 40TH AVEE 39TH AVEE 41ST AVE D C Half Mile E 34TH AVE E 34TH A V E 37T H E 36 T N ULSTER ST N XANTHIA CT N XANTHIA CT N YOSEMITE ST N AKRON ST N XENIA ST N WABASH ST N CENTRAL PARK BLVD N CENTRAL PARK BLVD N SYRACUSE ST N SYRACUSE ST N QUEBEC ST E 38TH AVE E 37TH AVE N ULSTER STN UINTA ST CENTRAL PARK STATION CENTERFIELD CAMPUS STAPLETON INDUSTRIAL AREA CENTRAL PARK NORTH CENTRAL PARK WEST QUEBEC SQUARE CENTRAL PARK STATION AREA PLAN SUB AREAS

PAGE 22

Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework 18FUTURE LAND USE CONCEPTSBlueprint Denver, Denvers integrated land use and transportation plan, adopted in 2002, identi es Areas of Change and Areas of Stability throughout the city with the goal of directing new development and in ll projects toward Areas of Change. Blueprint Denver established land use types based on a fra mework of building blocks Districts, Residential Areas, Centers, and Corridors. Each category has individual land use types and describes a particular character and scale that is desired in the future but does not necessarily re ect existing conditions. The Central Park Station Plan uses this as the basis of its reco mmended land use map. Two sub-categories of land uses, Industrial Mixed-Use and TOD E mployment, have been added to re ect the speci c conditions in the plan area. The Blueprint Denver Plan map will be amended as needed based on this plan as illustrated in the Moving Forward section. Transit Oriented Development: Transit-oriented developments have land uses with a direct correlation to the function of a mass transit system. These development sites are located at stations or stops along mass transit lines, especially rail lines. Transit-oriented developments provide housing, services, and e mployment opportunities for a diverse population in a con guration that facilitates pedestrian and transit access. TOD is a central land use concept in the study area due to the multi-modal nature of the Central Park Station that will be located at S mith Road and Uinta Street. Central Park Station was identi ed in the Transit Oriented Develop ment Strategic Plan as an Urban Center station typology that should include a mix of o ce, retail, and multi-family residential uses. TOD Employment: Areas near transit stations should take advantage of the multi-modal nature of the location regardless of the predominant existing or future uses. The TOD Employment is a sub-category of the Transit Oriented Develop ment land use concept found in Blueprint Denver. TOD E mployment recognizes the potential for a large a mount of e mplo yment, including industrial uses, near a transit station. These areas may have existing industrial uses r equiring ac cess to major arterials or interstates and are adjacent to heavy rail facilities, yet should work to pro mote pedestrian and bicycle access and allow for additional uses such as o ce buildings and hotel accommodations. Although not common in the Denver area, other areas with commuter rail service have stations in industrial areas with signi cant employee ridership. Portions of the Stapleton Industrial Area could serve as an example of this land use concept in the future. Employment: Employment areas contain o ce, warehousing, light manufacturing and high tech uses such as clean manufacturing or infor mation technology. Sometimes bigbox retail is found in these areas. These areas are distinguished from mixed-use centers in that they have few residences and typically have more extensive co mmercial and some industrial activity. Employment areas require access to major arterials or interstates. Those areas with manufacturing and warehousing uses must be able to accommodate extensive truck tra c and rail in so me instances. The Center eld Campus in the study area is a strong exa mple of this land use type. Industrial: The need for heavy industrial areas in Denver has changed as manufacturing and shipment have become more sophisticated. Even though so m e industrial areas have bec ome mor e div erse employment areas, the need for industrially zoned land remains. Active industrial areas require access to major arterials or interstates. Heavy rail facilities also are often adjacent to industrial districts. Streets in these districts must be able to acco mmodate heavy trucks. Special attention to design, screening, and bu ering is necessary where industrial districts abut districts that include residential use. Exa mples of this for m of development include the I-70 and South Platte River corridors. Station areas on the Southeast Line, such as Arapahoe at Village Center, are employment focused. The Central Platte Valley, an example of transit oriented development in Denver. Large industrial buildings on 40th Avenue have easy access to Interstate 70.

PAGE 23

Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework 19 CENTRAL PARK STATION CONCEPT LAND USE MAP PLAN RECOMMENDATIONNote: Dashed lines on this map represent potential future connections in the station area. These connections may take the form of future public or private streets, alleys, pedestrian passages, or mews with the intent of increasing access in the station area while breaking up large blocks to improve the pedestrian experience.

PAGE 24

Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework 20 Industrial Mixed-Use: Industrial Mixed-Use is a versatile land use concept, derived from Blueprint Denvers Industrial land use concept, that recognizes that light industrial uses, such as light manufacturing and s maller warehouses are compatible with urban residential housing types. These areas have both a sizable employment base as well as a variety of mid-to-high density housing options. Land uses can be, but are not necessarily, mixed in each building, development, or block. Pedestrian access is of importance within the area, with residential and non-residential uses always within walking distance of one another. The Stapleton Industrial Area, northwest of the future station location, has a mix of industrial uses and hotels and could accommodate so me o ce/employment uses as well as urban residential housing types as the TOD area matures. Mixed-Use: In the context of this plan, there is one area designated for mixed-use, the RK Mechanical site. The existing light industrial use has been in its current location and is a per mitted use in the existing C-MU-30 zone district. If a re-zoning is sought, mixed-use in this context would be pri marily residential with the potential for a small amount of neighborhood serving retail. Any redevelop ment plan should acknowledge the adjacent residential uses and utilize appropriate transitions. Regional Center: Ideally, a regional center has a balance of retail, e mployment and residential uses; however, many began as one major use, such as a regional shopping center or a large o ce park. These centers cover a fairly large area and are dense enough to encompass both the dominant use and a wide variety of other uses. These centers have an at mosphere that is attractive to patrons fro m throughout the region. Quebec Square and the adjacent United Airlines training facility in Stapleton is an exa mple of a regional center where a major shopping center is at the core of many other uses concentrated in a small area. Single F amily Duplex: Single family duplex residential areas ar e pri marily residential with some complementary, s mall-scale commercial uses. There is a mixture of housing types, including single-family houses, duplexes, rowhouses, and small apartment buildings. Typical densities are between 10 and 20 housing units per acre area-wide, and single family detached structures often predominate. Many historic neighborhoods contain this combination of housing types including City Park West, Ala mo Placita, and portions of West Washington Park. Newer neighborhoods with this land use type, such as Cherry Creek, typically have a greater ratio of rowhouses and duplexes included in the housing mix. Parks: Parks and natural open space are public spaces, ranging from highly progra mmed parks to natural areas along the waterways. Parks and open spaces range fro m active neighborhood and community parks with recreation elds and centers to larger preserves of natural open areas that provide space for wildlife habitat. A greenway is a linear park or open space developed along a stream, canal, or other natural or man-made feature. They enhance nearby neighborhoods by providing park space and frequently o -street bicycle paths. Single Family Duplex Much of Stapleton has a mix of housing types, such as this Mansion style multifamily building that is integrated into what otherwise appears to be a completely single family residential area. Industrial Mixed-Use can support a wide variety of building forms and business types. Quebec Square is an example of a regional center

PAGE 25

Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework 21DESTINATION CONCEPTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS A.1 High Intensity Development near the Station The area nearest the station should have the greatest sense of urbanis m of the entire Stapleton neighborhood: Allow taller general, shopfront, and apartment building for ms with higher densities near the station. Allow a mix of uses within the area and within buildings with a emphasis on o ce and multi-family development. Pro mote a high level of exibility, mixing uses to react to changing market conditions and encouraging the highest intensity of uses near the station. Through existing design review processes, encourage a wide mix of building heights and for ms throughout the station area to provide visual interest, needed sunlight, and appropriate natural view corridors. Orient building for ms and active ground oor uses towards the street with parking and vehicular access in the rear/o the alley. Identify opportunities to use mid-block passages that could take the for m of public or private streets, alleys, or pedestrian paths to increase connectivity in the station area and break up large blocks. Capitalize on the delayed vertical construction of TOD on the RTD surface parking lots by seeking developers interested in high-density residential product types as the market matures in the station area. Residential development on RTD property should anticipate exceeding a ordable housing goals set forth in the Stapleton A ordable Housing Plan. E 36TH AVE N CENTRAL PARK BLVD E 35TH AVE E 38TH AVE E 39TH AVE Half Mile 3 stories 5 stories 8 stories 12 stories 16 stories Transition Area N N SYRACUSE ST N XENIA ST N YOSEMITE ST N XANTHIA CT E 40TH AVE E 40TH AVE E 40TH AVE 0 0.25 0.5 Miles N ULSTER ST N UINTA ST FUTURE BUILDING HEIGHTS CONCEPT MAP Note: Dashed lines on this map represent potential future connections in the station area. These connections may take the form of future public or private streets, alleys, pedestrian passages, or mews with the intent of increasing access in the station area while breaking up large blocks to improve the pedestrian experience. Mid-block connections improve pedestrian access in urban areas. Higher Intensity development nearest the station is desired.

PAGE 26

Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework 22 Big Box retail can be integrated into a more pedestrian scaled environment. Apartment buildings with pedestrian-scaled elements on the ground oor can help transition from a mixeduse neighborhood to a residential neighborhood. A.2 I-70 Employment Centers Areas north of S mith Road and south of I-70 have strong access from both transit and automobiles, with a high level of visibility attractive to major employers: Allow a mix of general and industrial building for ms north of Smith Road. Encourage an employment focus in the Center eld Campus and the Stapleton Industrial Area to capitalize on the locations high level of visibility. Pro mote in ll development that enhances the built environ ment and capitalizes on the proximity to a passenger rail station while functioning next to existing industrial uses. A.3 In ll Development at Appropriate Locations Non-residential areas within the station area built at auto-oriented development intensities, such as Quebec Square, are candidates for future in ll development: Allow general, shopfront, apart ment, and industrial building for ms compatible to existing uses. In ll development should reinforce the pedestrian nature of Stapleton at densities that support the high degree of nearby transit options. Large-scale in ll development, such as within Quebec Square, should utilize varied building heights and design ele ments to establish a diverse built environment. Enhance mountain views fro m nearby public open space through careful site planning and building orientation. A.4. Establish Transitions to Residential Neighborhoods A higher intensity of develop ment is expected within the TOD site than nearby residential neighborhoods Appropriate transitions should occur at the edge of the T OD t o ease from the mixed-use development pattern to the predominantly residential neighborhoods. Allow general, shopfront, and apart ment building for ms in transition areas. Locate residential building types at the edge of the TOD site with a height and scale that transitions between higher intensity building types in the TOD core and lower intensity development in existing residential neighborhoods. Make use of design elements, such as upper story setbacks, as necessary, to minimize massing adjacent to residential areas. Utilize major arterials, such as Central Park Boulevard and 35th Avenue, to ease transitions between mixed-use and residential neighborhoods. Pro mote the use of design elements that create a pedestrian scaled environ ment on streets that traverse between mixed-use and residential neighborhoods. A.5. Change existing residential neighborhoods to Areas of Stability Blueprint Denver, adopted in 2003, considers Stapleton as an area of change due to its status as a major redevelopment site. Since that ti me, the Central Park North neighborhood and the Central Park West neighborhood beca me substantially complete. Both residential areas should be Areas of Stability on Blueprint Denver Concept Land Use map. Station area parks and open space should also be considered Areas of Stability with the understanding that progra ming and activities will likely evolve over the plan horizon. Existing Stapleton residential neighborhoods are now an area of stability.

PAGE 27

Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework 23 AREAS OF CHANGE/AREAS OF STABILITY CONCEPT MAP Note: Dashed lines on this map represent potential future connections in the station area. These connections may take the form of future public or private streets, alleys, pedestrian passages, or mews with the intent of increasing access in the station area while breaking up large blocks to improve the pedestrian experience.

PAGE 28

Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework 24B. ActiveWHY IS BEING ACTIVE IMPORTANT TO THE CENTRAL PARK STATION AREA?The Central Park Station expects a high level of activity due to its multi-modal nature, frequency of service, and substantial projected ridership. The degree to which that activity extends out from the station will largely depend on the built environment and design of public spaces. Great urban neighborhoods are not places just to travel through but rather to stop, linger, converse, and generally live life. These activities happen in the public realm between buildings the streets and open space fra med by the built environment. The design and layout of development in the station area should seek to asse mble people and activities through keeping distances for pedestrian travel and visual experiences as short as possible. The key public spaces need easy access to encourage people to move between the private and public environments of the station. Public spaces that integrate various activities and a menities in the station area increase the sense of activity. An active environ ment pro motes a feeling of safety and visual interest for pedestrians by providing amenities such as outdoor seating areas, ground oor windows, cafes, accessible buildings, street trees, and other civic amenities. As pedestrian activity increase in an area, o ces, retail shops, and urban housing choices all become more viable. SUMMARY OF EXISTING CONDITIONS Since a large portion of the study area is undeveloped, there is a prevalent lack of active uses and amenities. Existing activity generators in the study area are limited to a few speci c locations and generally lack urban qualities. Quebec Square is the most active place within a halfmile of the station but is predo minantly an auto-oriented suburban retail center challenged to provide a good pedestrian environ ment. The shopping center does respect elements of the Denver street grid, has detached sidewalks, and a number of the pad retail sites have buildings brought up to the street with outdoor patio seating. Considerable activity occurs at the current RTD Park-n-Ride and bus transfer facility near 36th Avenue and Uinta Street, but this facility will relocate by opening day to a location directly south of the co mmuter rail platfor m. Another activity generator, the FBI Building, utilizes a ca mpus setting that li mits street PRINCIPLE STATEMENTThe station area will be a safe, vibrant, urban place that provides stimulating, enjoyable, and convenient activities and amenities for a wide variety of di erent users. An active edge increases the visual and physical interaction between the public and private realm. The 16th Street mall is a world-reknown pedestrian environment. Existing condition of station platform location at Smith Road and Uinta Street.

PAGE 29

Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework 25activity. The Swigert-McAulli e International School also has a campus setting, but does generate foot tra c and street level activity during peak hours. The Stapleton Industrial Area, with a mix of industrial facilities, transportation companies, and hotels, lacks the convenient pedestrian connections to other portions of the study area and activity is li mited beyond job-related auto mobile and truck tra c. Minimal activity occurs in the mostly undeveloped Center eld Campus subarea, but the opening of the Central Park Boulevard overpass in the spring of 2012 will bring more multi-modal tra c through the area. ACTIVE CONCEPTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS B.1 Active Edges Urban neighborhoods need buildings that contribute to a safe and vibrant pedestrian environment. Pro moting active edges on buildings located along pedestrian priority streets and key intersections adds to the urban experience, increases visual and physical interaction between the public and private real m, and results in more eyes on the street. Uinta Street, as a pedestrian priority street, and its corresponding intersections are important locations to apply this concept in the station area. Buildings with active edges should contain the following ele ments: Pro minent, street facing entries Extensive ground oor windows and frequent entrances Articulated, pedestrian-scaled facades Awnings to protect pedestrians and mark entrances Building entrances that meet the sidewalk No ground oor parking along active edges Stoops, raised porches, terraces, and s mall quasi-public open space can be used in lower density residential uses Many of the restaurants along 17th Avenue in North Capitol Hill provide the street with an active edge. The 29th Street Town Center has a strong public realm where many Stapleton residents enjoying walking, sitting, and meeting friends and neighbors.STREETS WITH ACTIVE EDGES AND BUILDING FRONTAGES E 37TH AVE E 35TH AVE N UINTA ST N ULSTER ST N CENTRAL PARK BLVD Active Edge Building Frontage N 0 0.25 mile 1,320 feet 0.125 mile 660 feet E 36TH AVE Note: Dashed lines on this map represent potential future connections in the station area. These connections may take the for m of future public or private streets, alleys, pedestrian passages, or mews with the intent of increasing access in the station area while breaking up large blocks to improve the pedestrian experience.

PAGE 30

Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework 26 Focus development in the Center eld Campus and Stapleton Industrial Area towards the primary streets of Central Park Boulevard 40th A venue, and Ulster Street. B.2 Building Frontages Having a strong continuous street wall is a fundamental urban design principle used to de ne the vital public realm between buildings, which is often the most utilized public space in an urban environment. Building Frontages require buildings to be brought up to the street right-of-way, meeting the sidewalk or public open space. This urban design principle is applicable on many of the streets in the station area and is considered vital to the overall pedestrian experience. Buildings with this requirement should contain the following elements: Building edges brought to the sidewalk with minimal setbacks No surface parking between the primary structure and the street Scaling elements to break up the appearance of tall buildings and continuous street walls B.3 Building Placement and Massing B.3.A Employment Centers: Employment centers designed to be pedestrian friendly by utilizing the street grid to blend into the surrounding neighborhoods can pro mote greater activity beyond typical o ce work hours. Large corporate o ce campuses, research and design facilities, or industrial uses developed within the station area need special attention to achieve desired levels of activity. The Center eld Campus and the Stapleton Industrial Area are likely locations for these large-scale uses. Focusing development towards Central Park Boulevard, 40th Avenue, and Ulster Street as the pri mary streets in these areas should bring more activity to the public realm. Buildings located in employment centers should: Large corporate o ce uses bene t from nearby high density housing, restaurants, and shopping. TH Sand Cr e E 39TH AVEE 41ST AVE D Half Mile E 34TH AVE E 34TH A V E 37T H E 36 T N ULSTER ST N XANTHIA CT N XANTHIA CT N YOSEMITE ST N AKRON ST N XENIA ST N WABASH ST N CENTRAL PARK BLVD N CENTRAL PARK BLVD N SYRACUSE ST N SYRACUSE ST N QUEBEC ST E 38TH AVE E 37TH AVE N ULSTER STE 40TH AVE E 40TH AVE N UINTA ST CENTERFIELD CAMPUS STAPLETON INDUSTRIAL AREA Employment Center Primary StreetNote: Dashed lines on this map represent potential future connections in the station area. These connections may take the form of future public or private streets, alleys, pedestrian passages, or mews with the intent of increasing access in the station area while breaking up large blocks to improve the pedestrian experience. STAPLETON INDUSTRIAL AREA AND CENTERFIELD CAMPUS

PAGE 31

Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework 27 Orient towards primary streets Locate pro minent, direct pedestrian entrances on pri mary streets Provide vehicular access from secondary streets whenever possible Consider auxiliary ground level uses on primary streets that generate activity outside of typical o ce work hours such as Employee recreation centers Daycare facilities Business support services such as copying and printing companies, computer services and mailing services Casual restaurants B.3.B Central Park Station: Uinta Street is the spine of the TOD site, serving as a pedestrian priority street where the most prominent buildings in the TOD should be located. Proper building place ment and massing that fra mes and de nes Uinta Street and promotes a high quality public realm through concentrating and reinforcing pedestrian activity is critical to the success of the station area. Varied building heights that increase the visual interest of the station area are expected. I mportant natural and man-made views should be utilized to enhance the quality of the public real m. Key building locations along Uinta Street include: 35th Avenue and Uinta Street: This intersection serves as the gateway into the TOD from existing residential neighborhoods to the south. Buildings placed at this interThe Downtown Area Plan identi es 16th Street as the spine of Downtown Denver, serving as its key pedestrian priority street. E 35TH AVE E 40TH AVEE 39TH AVE 41ST AVE E 34TH A V N ULSTER ST N XANTHIA CT N XANTHIA CT N YOSEMITE ST NAKRONST N XENIA ST N WABASH ST N CENTRAL PARK BLVD N SYRACUSE ST N SYRACUSE ST 8TH AVE E 37TH AVE N ULSTER ST E 36TH AVE N UINTA ST Central Park Stations has several important intersections that should receive additional attention from the built environment.CENTRAL PARK STATION Key Intersection Gateway IntersectionNote: Dashed lines on this map represent potential future connections in the station area. These connections may take the form of future public or private streets, alleys, pedestrian passages, or mews with the intent of increasing access in the station area while breaking up large blocks to improve the pedestrian experience. CENTRAL PARK STATION

PAGE 32

Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework 28 Some large shopping centers in the Denver metro region have been transformed into more walkable, mixed-use areas. Belmar in Lakewood is just one example.section should utilize architectural ele ments that establish the intersection as a key entry point into the station area. 36th Avenue/37th Avenue and Uinta Street: Building place ment and massing should recognize the prominence of these intersections as the heart of the TOD. Special corner treatments such as signature entries, special roof shapes, and taller, iconic architectural ele ments should be utilized. Smith Road and Uinta Street: This intersection serves as the gateway into the TOD from the station platfor m. Buildings placed at this intersection should have a strong visual presence from the station platfor m and be oriented towards both Uinta Street and Smith Road, establishing a clear and de ned edge with the public right-of-way. 36th Avenue and Central Park Boulevard: This intersection serves as the gateway into the TOD from Central Park Boulevard. Buildings placed at this intersection should utilize architectural ele ments that establish the intersection as a key entry point into the station area. B.3.C Quebec Square: The long-ter m redevelopment of Quebec Square is discussed as a Transfor mative Concept. If Quebec Square begins to experience in ll development, building placement and massing considerations at speci c locations should be utilized to increase activity levels throughout the area. I mportant natural and man-made views from public open space should be utilized to enhance the quality of the public real m. Key building locations in Quebec Square include: 36th Avenue and Quebec: Building place ment and massing should recognize this as a gateway into Quebec Square by emphasizing the prominence of this intersection through appropriately composed architectural ele ments. Syracuse Street and S mith Road: Building plac ement and massing should rec og nize this as a gateway into Quebec Square by emphasizing the prominence of this intersection through appropriately composed architectural ele ments. TH E 40TH AVEE 39TH AVE N ULSTER ST N WABASH ST N CENTRAL PARK BLVD N SYRACUSE ST N SYRACUSE ST N POPLAR ST N QUEBEC ST E 38TH AVE E 38TH AVE E SANDOWN RD E 37TH A V N ULSTER ST N UINTA ST Quebec Squares Gateway IntersectionsQUEBEC SQUARE Gateway Intersection QUEBEC SQUARENote: Dashed lines on this map represent potential future connections in the station area. These connections may take the form of future public or private streets, alleys, pedestrian passages, or mews with the intent of increasing access in the station area while breaking up large blocks to improve the pedestrian experience.

PAGE 33

Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework 29 An auxiliary site of a museum or similar cultural activity would be a great addition to the vitality of the station area. B.4 Parks, Plazas, and Open Space Open spaces should serve as an organizing element of the urban environment within the station area. As the most intensively developed area of Stapleton, the station area needs publicly accessible open spaces (publicly or private owned) that create a sense of place and help de ne the character of the station. Position plazas at locations where pedestrian activity is encouraged with consideration to integrate the open space into and bound by streets and buildings. Plazas, courtyards, and other urban open spaces should be oriented to take advantage of views and sunlight. A menities should be included within the urban open space such as benches, kiosks, and public art. Uinta Street should be a priority location for plazas or other urban open space. B.5 Cultural Activity Generators Pro mote the integration of cultural activity generators such as an auxiliary site of a museum, art institute, science center, or similar civic venture into the TOD site as part of a larger, mixed-use, high density development project. B.6 Design Guidelines Review The Design Guidelines for Stapleton (City docu ment) and the Stapleton Design Criteria (Stapleton Develop ment Corporation document) infor ms the design of development in Stapleton. An established review process ensures high quality design throughout the neighborhood for all residential, retail, and commercial projects. The recommendations within this plan should reinforce and complement these existing standards and guidelines. If found that recommendations in this plan go beyond the current guidelines, the revision and adoption of an updated version of the Design Guidelines for Stapleton is reco mmended. Plazas and other open spaces in urban environments help create a sense of place.

PAGE 34

Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework 30 This hypothetical build-out scenario illustrates the Active Concepts and Recommendations. Buildings are brought up to the street, Uinta Street and intersections have active uses, and key intersections have prominent building forms. Note: Some of the lines on this map represent potential future connections in the station area. These connections may take the form of future public or private streets, alleys, pedestrian passages, or mews with the intent of increasing access in the station area while breaking up large blocks to improve the pedestrian experience. ACTIVE CONCEPTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS ILLUSTRATION

PAGE 35

Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework 31 37th Avenue and Uinta Street will be at the heart of Central Park Station, providing Stapleton with a active, pedestrian friendly public realm surrounding by a mix of high intensity employment and high density residential uses.UINTA STREET AND 37TH AVENUE

PAGE 36

Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework 32C. AccessibleWHY IS BEING ACCESSIBLE IMPORTANT TO CENTRAL PARK STATION?The relationship between mobility and access is essential in transportation planning. Mobility refers to the move ment of people or goods. The ter m access implies reaching a location that has value, so mewhere that provides a needed or desired amenity, service, or product. In the case of Central Park Station, the East Rail Line provides a high level of regional mobility, while the station functions as a portal, or a means of access, to a valued location such as Denver International Airport or Denver Union Station. This idea of access works in both directions; the East Lines connection to DIA allows delivery of a world traveler to the station while a local resident can reach an airport with international destinations, all with relative ease. What is vital for Central Park Station to thrive is the ability of the neighborhood surrounding the station to provide a high level of local, multi-modal mobility. This promotes strong local access to the station for the widest array of users. The ability to provide access to the station extends local and global connectivity to Stapleton and adjacent neighborhoods, resulting in higher levels of ridership and a greater amount of transit equity. Station accessibility increases the ability to leverage the signi cant public invest ment of a co mmuter rail line to promote economic development and enhance the surrounding areas quality of life.SUMMARY OF EXISTING CONDITIONSCurrent access to the future station location is di cult due to the lack of existing development near the site. The lack of connectivity from north to south across the Union Paci c Railroad right-of-way and I-70 and the inco mplete street grid from east to west constitute the general access issues in the study area. Pedestrian and bicycle facilities vary with so me signi cant barriers existing on the edge of the study area. Automobile Access: In its previous life as an International Airport, Stapleton required a signi cant roadway network. I-70 and I-270 directed regional auto mobile tra c from throughout the region to the area and arterial roadways built to accommodate high trafc volumes fed into the airport. Much of this roadway network remains in place today. Major arterials in the study area include the existing six-lane con gurations of Quebec Street and Martin Luther King Junior (MLK) Boulevard (between Quebec Street and Central Park Boulevard) that re ect Stapletons past airport use. S mith Road currently does not extend past Sand Creek on the eastern side of the study area. Central Park Boulevard and 35th Avenue, two new four-lane roadways, were added to the street network as Stapleton redeveloped into a new neighborhood. An interchange at Central Park Station and I-70 opened in November 2011, and 40th Avenue now connects Central Park Boulevard with Havana Street to the east. These major streets provide the framework for automobile and truck tra c in the station area today. The typical grid of local streets in Denver carries over into Stapleton, with the notable exception of Quebec Square, which mostly has private streets that only partially follow the Denver street pattern. Bicycle and Pedestrian Access: The study areas varied land use mix of undeveloped land, newly completed residential neighborhoods, and auto-oriented shopping areas creates an inconsistent level of bicycle connections. The New Urbanis m principles applied to the redevelopment of Stapleton resulted in a bicycle friendly environ ment in the co mpleted residential areas of the neighborhood. Quebec Square lacks the sa me level of bicycle facilities while the existing industrial area and the undeveloped area nearest to the station have little to no bicycle a menities. Bicycle lanes are located on Central Park Boulevard and 35th Avenue within the study area and on multiple routes near the study area, most notably on MLK Boulevard. The Sand Creek Regional Greenway provides an o -street bicycle path that connects to the larger regional bicycle network. O -street paths are also located outside the study area in Central Park and along Westerly Creek. Bike Lanes on Central Park Boulevard PRINCIPLE STATEMENTThe station area will build upon its regional connections to provide an extre mely high level of mobility and multi-modal access for all users in a safe, easy, and convenient manner.

PAGE 37

Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework 33 Interstates 70 and 270 merge just to the north of the station area.The quality of pedestrian connections also varies in the study area. Stapleton generally utilizes the Denver street grid with sidewalks that provides easy and convenient pedestrian routes throughout the residential portions of the neighborhood. Pedestrian challenges in the study area center on the auto-oriented Quebec Square shopping center and the major auto-oriented streets near the station including Smith Road, Central Park Boulevard, 35th Avenue, and Quebec Street. Bus Routes : Bus service is robust for the area due to the presence of a bus transfer center located at a temporary RTD Park-n-Ride facility on 36th Avenue. Ten bus routes, providing various cross-town routes and connections to Downtown Denver, DIA, lightrail stations, and other destinations serve the station area. Buses arriving at the Park-nRide use 36th Avenue and Central Park Boulevard. This temporary facility will move to a location near Smith Road and Uinta Street before the East Line begins operation in 2016. Parking : The temporary RTD Park-n-Ride facility is currently located north of 36th Avenue, between Central Park Boulevard and Ulster Street, in tandem with the existing bus transfer center. The facility is free to park for users within the RTD service boundary for the rst 24 hours. Fees apply after the rst 24-hour period and if the user is not within the RTD service boundary. This vehicle parking lot moves to a new location across Smith Road from the East Line rail platfor m no later than early 2016. The new RTD facility will have approximately 20 acres for parking and the bus transfer facility. Few streets currently exist in the station area, but most future streets are anticipated to have on-street parking. The Central Park Station will be the third busiest bus transfer center in the RTD system. Sand Creek Regional Greenway Trail The station area will need to simultaneously accommodate multiple modes of travel.

PAGE 38

Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework 34 ACCESSIBLE CONCEPTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS C.1 Mobility Network Improvements C.1.A Extend the existing Denver street grid into redevelop ment areas whenever possible. C.1.B Evaluate future network improvements to traverse regional greenways for improved multi-modal connectivity throughout Stapleton. C.1.C Continue the evaluation of tra c calming and pedestrian crossings for the 36th Avenue and Xanthia Street corridor between Central Park Boulevard and S mith Road. Tra c calming elements may include medians, pedestrian bump-outs and additional signage. As part of this process, consider other improvement options including an enhanced pedestrian crossing at 36th Avenue and Willow Street and identify an i mplementation strategy. C.1.D Reconstruct S mith Road section between the Quebec Square improvements that end at Syracuse Street and the future RTD Park-n-Ride i mprovements west of the future rail station. C.1.E As in ll redevelopment occurs in the Stapleton Industrial Area, work with developers to deter mine the feasibility and implementation of additional multi-modal connections to the station. C.2 Promote a High Level of Bicycle Usage The station should be accessible via o -street bike paths or bike lanes from all directions. C.2.A Support the recommendations identi ed by Denver Moves for the station area and seek opportunities to implement Den ver Moves whenev er possible Residents have identi ed the 36th Avenue and Xanthia Street intersection as a safety concern.CENTRAL PARK STATION EXISTING AND PLANNED BICYCLE FACILITIES NNote: Dashed lines on this map represent potential future connections in the station area. These connections may take the form of future public or private streets, alleys, pedestrian passages, or mews with the intent of increasing access in the station area while breaking up large blocks to improve the pedestrian experience. DENVER MOVESDenver Moves is the vision plan for Denvers non-motorized transportation and recreation syste m, identifying the next phase of priorities for making bicycle and pedestrian connections throughout the city. The goals of the plan is to create a biking and walking network where every household is within a quarter mile of a high ease of use facility and achieve a 15% bicycling and walking co mmute mode share by 2020. The four objectives established for Denver Moves are: 1. Create a New Identity 2. Build a Simpler System 3. Embrace Innovative, Practical Ideas 4. Include All Users Through an extensive plan process, Denver Moves identi es a total network of 442 miles of multi-use and bicycle facilities. The network incorporates a wide range of facility types based on innovations in multi-use trail, bicycle, and pedestrian facility design, each being categorized into relative ease of use classi cations. Denver Moves identi es new on-street and o -street bicycle facilities that will i mprove access throughout the Central Park Station area and especially to the commuter rail station. For more details about the Denver Moves network and facility types, download the plan at www.denvergov.org.

PAGE 39

Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework 35 As the primary pedestrian street in the station area and a bicycle route, Uinta Street needs safe crossings at major intersections, such as 35th Avenue. An example of a bi-directional cycle track with a vertical, physical bu er. Singe direction cycle tracks or bu ered bike lanes should be evaluated for highervolume arterials in the Central Park Station area. C.2.B Continue the multi-use bicycle and pedestrian path parallel to Smith Road beyond the RTD Park-n-Ride to the west. C.2.C Support implementation of bicycle facility improvements on MLK Boulevard between Quebec Street and Central Park Boulevard. C.2.D Evaluate alternatives to improve bicycle crossings on MLK Boulevard and Quebec Street. C.2.E Support way nding e orts that enhance the bicycling experience, increase ease of use and enhance safety for all users. Incorporate new bicycle route signage that displays destination, distance, and direction. C.2.F Consider additional connections from existing bike lanes to o -street paths such as the 35th Avenue bike lanes to the Sand Creek Regional Greenway Trail and identify a implement strategy if needed. C.3 Pedestrian Mobility Improvements C.3.A Prioritize Uinta Street as the pri mary pedestrian street in the station area, providing connectivity to the station from a large majority of the existing Stapleton neighborhoods to the south. C.3.B Evaluate and implement crosswalk treat ments/enhancements at proposed signalized intersections on S mith Road at Ulster Street, Uinta Street, and the eastern ter minus of the rail platfor m. C.3.C Evaluate and implement crosswalk treat ments/enhancements at proposed signalized intersections on Uinta Street at 35th and 36th Avenues. C.4 Enhance Pedestrian and Bicycle Connections through Evaluation of Tra c Calming and Signalization Improvements C.4.A Evaluate intersection signalization within Quebec Square, especially on Syracuse Street (the privately-owned road in Quebec Square) at 35th, 36th, and 38th Avenues. If signalization is not warranted, consider i mproved signage or other improvements t o ease tra c issues within Quebec Squar e These intersections include private roads so i mplementation costs and funding sources should be considered as part of the evaluation. C.4.B Continue to evaluate signalization of intersection at Central Park Boulevard and 33rd Street and implement as warranted. C.4.C Evaluate the need and potential i mplementation of tra c calming tools on MLK Boulevard between Quebec Street and Monaco Street. C.5 Distribute Bus Routes through the Major Street Network Avoid the concentration of bus routes on one street by distributing bus service equally throughout the station areas major street network. Special attention should be given to limiting the amount of buses on Uinta Street to the greatest extent possible. C.6 Parking Management Evaluate parking patterns and needs within the station impact area as phased development occurs, beginning with the RTD Park-n-Ride facility and continuing throughout the build-out of the TOD area. The evaluation will identify strategies that ensure a proper balance of supply and demand for di erent users with the goal of pro moting proper use of RTD parking facilities fro m opening day onward while maintaining convenient parking to support adjacent business and residential uses. Parking strategies for this area should follow the Strategic Parking Plans (SPP) ve-step process, which orders management approaches incrementally through de mand, location, ti me, pricing, and supply opportuA BICYCLE TOOLBOX FOR CENTRAL PARK STATION Denver Moves presents a toolbox of bicycle facilities for use in the non-motorized network. This includes innovations such as cycle tracks, bu ered bike lanes, and bicycle turn pockets. As the bicycle network evolves in the Central Park Station area, it may be appropriate to upgrade existing facilities to these new options that provide a higher ease of use.

PAGE 40

Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework 36nities. This process coupled with stakeholder involvement will help deter mine the most e ective parking management strategy for this area. So me strategies may include but are not limited to: Transportation De mand Management strategies including e mployer or community funded transit passes Shared or Accessory parking agreements between RTD, nearby multi-family, commercial, or o ce uses. This includes opportunities to share o -street or structured parking inventory to reduce develop ment costs. Subject to zoning approval. On-Street Time Limited Parking Restrictions Other parking management tools as outlined in the Strategic Parking Plan (SPP). C.7 Street Cross Sections Typical design considerations of the cross section recommendations are based on the Citys Rules and Regulations for Standard Right-of-Way Cross Sections. Bike lanes, sharrows and other recommended enhancements to the City standards are proposed where relevant.UINTA STREET MIDBLOCK UINTA STREET UINTA STREET Connecting existing Stapleton neighborhoods to the station through the heart of the TOD, Uinta should have two travel lanes, designated bike lanes, on-street parking on both sides of the street, and a large sidewalk and pedestrian amenity zone with street trees in grates. At intersections, Uinta Street should have two travel lanes, a, left-turn lane, designated bike lanes, and a large sidewalk and pedestrian amenity zone with street trees in grates. On-street parking is lost as the turn lane is introduced. STRATEGIC PARKING PLANThe Strategic Parking Plan (SPP) identies a ve-step process coupled with stakeholder involvement to deter mine the most e ective parking management strategy for a speci c area. De mand Location Ti me Pricing Supply The SPP was a joint e ort of the City and County of Denvers Public Works and Co mmunity Planning and Develop ment Departments in 2010. The Plan can be found at www.denvergov.org/parking.

PAGE 41

Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework 37 ULSTER STREET 37TH AVENUE SMITH ROAD 37th Avenue should have two travel lanes, a left-turn lane, on-street parking on both sides of the street, and a large sidewalk and pedestrian amenity zone with street trees in grates. Ulster Street should have two travel lanes, a left-turn lane, on-street parking on both sides of the street, and a large sidewalk and pedestrian amenity zone with street trees in grates. Smith Road should have four travel lanes and a divided median. Initially, the RTD Park-n-Ride facility will border Smith Road to the south (left) with a multi-use path. As transit oriented development replaces the surface parking lots, the path may become pedestrian oriented.

PAGE 42

Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework 38 FUTURE ACCESSIBILITY MAP N 8 1 2 3 9 11 12 13 4 10 6 7 14 14 15Note: Dashed lines on this map represent potential future connections in the station area. These connections may take the for m of future public or private streets, alleys, pedestrian passages, or mews with the intent of increasing access in the station area while breaking up large blocks to improve the pedestrian experience. 5

PAGE 43

Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework 39 ProjectMobility Network 1 C.1.A Extend the existing Denver street grid into redevelopment areas whenever possible. 2 C.1.B Evaluate future network improvements to traverse regional greenways for improved multi-modal connectivity throughout Stapleton. 3 C.1.C Continue evalua tion of tr a c calming elements for the 36th Avenue and X anthia Street corridor between Central Park Boulevard and Smith Road. 4 C.1.D Reconstruct Smith Road section between the Quebec Square improvements that end at Syracuse Street and the future RTD Par kn-Ride improvements 5 C.1.E As in ll redevelopment occurs in the Stapleton Industrial Area, work with developers to determine the feasibility and implementation of additional multi-modal connections to the station.Bicycle Mobility Improvements6 C.2.B Continue the multi-use bicycle and pedestrian path parallel to Smith Road beyond the RTD Park-n-Ride to the west. 7 C.2.C Support implementation of bicycle facility improvements on MLK Boulevard between Quebec Street and Central Park Boulevar d. 8 C.2.D Evaluate alternatives to improve bicycle crossings on MLK Boulevard and Quebec Street. 9 C.2.F Consider additional connections from existing bike lanes to o -street paths and identify an implementa tion str ategy.Pedestrian Mobility Improvements10 C.3.B Evaluate and implement crosswalk treatments/enhancements at proposed signalized intersections on Smith Road at Ulster Street, Uinta Street, and the eastern terminus of the rail platform. 11 C.3.C E valuate and implement crosswalk treatments/enhancements at proposed signalized intersections on Uinta Street at 35th an d 36th Avenues. 12 C.4.A Evalua te in tersection signalization within Quebec Square, especially on Syracuse Street at 35th, 36th, and 38th Avenues. 13 C.4.B Continue to evaluate signalization of intersections on Central Park Boulevard. 14 C.4.C Evaluate the need and potential implementation of tra c calming tools on MLK between Quebec Street and Monaco Street .Transit15 C.5 Distribute Bus Routes through the Major Street Network.FUTURE ACCESSIBILITY CONCEPTS LIST

PAGE 44

Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework 40D. SustainableWHY IS SUSTAINABILITY IMPORTANT TO THE CENTRAL PARK STATION AREA?When it was adopted in 1995, The Stapleton Development Plan was a bold, visionary document, setting the expectations for redevelop ment of the airport at a very high level. The plan is no di erent today, pushing forward an agenda of community objectives and principles that carries great value when planning for the ar ea surrounding the Central Park Station. At the heart of the Stapleton Develop ment Plan is the goal of building a more sustainable, environmentally responsible community that integrates the urban and natural environment together. However, the plan goes well beyond environmental sustainability, r mly addressing Stapletons role as a regional employment center that makes a positive contribution to the overall econo mic base of the region, insuring opportunities for jobs, housing, and recreation for a diverse set of age, income, and ethnic groups. These principles take the concept of sustainability from the more narrow focus of environmental issues, to a much wider, holistic approach to building an inclusive, stable community for today and future generations. So me of the key objectives and principles found in the Stapleton Develop ment Plan include: Position Denver to compete in increasingly global markets and provide opportunities to capitalize on emerging technologies Address the need to directly link job creation on the site with training and skill development opportunities for those currently least able to take advantage of such opportunities I mprove public safety and reconnect long-separated neighborhoods Increase the supply of middle and upper end housing to improve the diversity of housing options in the northeast area De monstrate e ective approaches to development that e mphasize e ciency, reduced resource consumption and r educed impacts on the natural en vir on ment Pro mote the integration of employment, housing, and recreation, and insure diversity in age, income, and ethnic groups Place priority on pollution prevention rather than control. Mitigate impacts on site where possible and as close to the point of impact as possible. Create a community that acco mmodates a diversity of people ages, incomes, races, occupations, and lifestyles and reinforces and enhances the cultural, ethnic, and racial diversity of adjacent neighborhoods. Seek partners for demonstration projects to reduce up front capital costs of co mmunity and project infrastructure Provide for a broad mix of land use types, densities, and prices to serve multiple markets, and create economic and social diversity Connect the Stapleton open space system not only with regional resources, but also with adjacent neighborhoods The Stapleton Development Plan established sustainable development as a major goal for the neighborhood. Senior housing is a part of the housing mix needed in Stapleton. The Clyburn Apartments, located at 26th Avenue and Quebec Street is a senior living rental building. PRINCIPLE STATEMENTThe station area will seek innovative ways to better nurture natural, econo mic, and social systems and resources for today and future generations.

PAGE 45

Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework 41SUMMARY OF EXISTING CONDITIONS Parks, Open Space, and Environmental Leadership: One of the key structural elements of the station area is the Sand Creek Regional Greenway running diagonally through the site to the northeast of the rail platfor m. The Greenway, a 14-mile path that connects to the extensive regional trail system, is a major component of the Stapleton open space system, providing a natural recreation area for all of northeast Denver. The adjacent Sand Creek Prairie Dog Preserve and the Greenway provide 45 acres of open space within the station area. There has been recent concern about the health of the prairie dog population at the Preserve. Central Park, Stapletons urban park, is just to the southeast of the station area and presents a combination of passive open space and recreational activities. The Westerly Creek and North eld Pond Parks are also just outside the study area. Pocket Parks are sprinkled throughout Stapletons residential areas, including the homes just south of 35th Avenue in the station area. Many of the singlefamily and row homes in Stapleton utilize green building techniques to i mprove energy e ciency and reduce resource use. The rst major o ce development in the station area, the recently co mpleted FBI building, is Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certi ed. A ordable Housing and Job Diversity: The availability of a ordable housing and a wide variety of job opportunities are signi cant ele ments to Stapletons goal of being a diverse, inclusive community. The Stapleton Develop ment Plan identi ed this area as the Stapleton Park Neighborhood, calling for it to serve the area as a regional activity center with higher density develop ment and signi cant buildings and infrastructure. At the center of this neighborhood would be an inter modal center at the location of a rail transit station. The Stapleton Develop ment Plan envisioned the station area being a major employment center with the potential to support 6 to 7 million square feet of o ce space with 15,000 employees. Currently, jobs are far below the expected build-out, but are generally diverse in nature. Quebec Square Shopping Center, 29th Street Town Center and the nearby Shops at North eld provide over two million square feet of retail within a onemile radius of the rail platfor m. Signi cant employ ment c enters are Quebec Square, the FBI O ce Building RK M echanical, and the United Airlines Training Center (just outside the station area). Other employers are located in the existing Stapleton Industrial Area, including two hotels and a major freight company. The Stapleton A ordable Housing Plan, adopted in 2001, supports the inclusion of affordable housing within the entire Stapleton Redevelop ment Area. The plan assu mes an ultimate build out of Stapleton with 66 percent for-sale and 33 percent rental housing. Ten percent of for-sale units and twenty percent of rental units are to be considered a ordable. As of August 31, 2011, just over 5.5 percent of for-sale units, (232 units) and over 38 percent of rental units (186 units) are a ordable (another 92 units of a ordable rental housing are under construction for a scheduled completion in spring 2012). The greatest challenge to achieving the ultimate a ordable housing goals is the current ratio of nine for-sale units to one rental unit built-to-date. A ordable housing goals for projects located outside the Stapleton Develop ment Area are addressed by the Citys Inclusionary Housing Ordinance (IHO). The IHO states that any for-sale development of thirty (30) or more units at one location shall provide ten percent (10%) of the units as a ordable based on the area median income calculation adjusted for household size. The IHO was crafted, in part, to increase the availability of United Airlines Training Center is a signi cant employer in Stapleton. Multi-family apartments being constructed in Stapleton. Sand Creek and the Sand Creek Regional Greenway is a major component of the Stapleton open space system.

PAGE 46

Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework 42additional low and moderate inco me housing to address existing and anticipated future housing needs and to assure that moderately priced housing is dispersed throughout Denver. Community Safety and Services Co mmunity Safety and Services are not found within but are located just outside the station area. The District 2 Police Station is 1.5 miles from the station and the nearest Denver COP Shop is located in the 29th Street Town Center. The Central Park Boulevard Co mmuter Rail Station Health I mpact Assessment notes that a high percentage of the motor vehicle thefts in the area occurred at the te mporary RTD Park-n-Ride facility. Fire Station #26 is located south of the station area on MLK Boulevard, just over a half-mile away. As a new neighborhood, Stapletons co mmunity services are quickly being developed. Stapletons rst library, scheduled for completion in 2012, is being constructed at 2900 Rosyln Street in the 29th Street Town Center. The Swigert-McAulli e International School, with early learning through 8th grade is on the edge of the station area near 35th Avenue and Syracuse Street. The Stapleton Recreation Center, serving multiple neighborhoods of Northeast Denver, is also outside the station area on the east side of Central Park on MLK Boulevard. Historic Resources As the international airport for the Denver metropolitan area, Stapleton served as a major destination for over 65 years. Re mnants of this historical use are largely eliminated from the existing condition of the station area. The runways were recycled for new uses within the neighborhood. The Sand Creek Prairie Dog Preserve occupies the for mer jet fuel tank far m north of the future rail platfor m. New home sites are located where the ter minal building and parking structure once stood. The most signi cant remaining element of the for mer airport is the Air Tra c Control Tower, constructed in the early 1960s as part of a major renovation project. THE STAPLETON AFFORDABLE HOUSING PLAN DEFINITIONS: A ordable Workforce Housing: Means dwelling units that are o ered for sale at a price which is a ordable by, and that are in fact are sold to households earning 80% and below of Median Family Inco me (MFI) for owner-occupancy only. A ordable Housing: Means A ordable Workforce Housing and A ordable Rental Housing. A ordable Rental Housing: Means dwelling units that are o ered for lease at a rent which is a ordable by, and that are in fact leased to households earning 60% and below of MFI, including Very Low-Inco me Housing. MFI: Means the most current median family income for the Denver Metropolitan Statistical Area as published fro m time to time by the U.S. Depart ment of Housing and Urban Develop ment, adjusted for household size. Stapleton Airport Control Tower a remaining symbol of Stapletons past aviation history. The Swigert-McAulli e International School opened in the fall of 2011. Stapletons rst public library will open at 2961 Roslyn Street in the East 29th Avenue Town Center in 2012.

PAGE 47

Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework 43SUSTAINABLE CONCEPTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS D.1 Environmental Sustainability D.1.A I mprove access to the Sand Creek Regional Greenway and nearby open space and recreation areas. Additional details are included in the Sand Creek Trail Connections Transfor mative Concept. D.1.B Promote sustainable design with the transit facilities and all subsequent development, including seeking LEED or si milar green building certi cations through existing design review processes. D.1.C Create parks, plazas, open space, and streetscapes in the station area that makes use of sustainable design solutions, including porous pavers, bioswales, and other best practices. Additional details are included in the Innovative Station Site Design Transfor mative Concept. D.1.D As development occurs, promote the walkable, mixed-use nature of the station area to potential tenants in order to maximize location e ciency. D.1.E Identify a more appropriate use for the trunk open space currently utilized for a prairie dog preserve as the station area develops into a high density, urban environment. D.2. Social and Cultural Sustainability D.2.A Seek an adaptive reuse of the Stapleton Airport Tower into a cultural a menity that is accessible to the public. D.2.B Explore the incorporation of a co mmunity gathering facility as part of a larger development jointly utilized by either o ce and/or residential uses. D.2.C Work with RTD to improve the safety of the Park-n-Ride. Consider adding or relocating a COP shop to the station area to i mprove the overall safety of the facility. D.2.D Encourage healthy food choices by neighborhood residents through urban agriculture, healthy corner store initiatives, and other progra ms identi ed by the Sustainable Food Policy Council. D.2.E Locate mobile food vendors in or near the station area that provide healthy food options to waiting transit users and nearby residents. D.2.F Work with RTD to ensure bus routing that provides access to a ordable fresh food options. D.2.G Ensure adequate and safe multi-modal ac cess from the station t o the SwigertMcAulli e International School, Stapleton Recreation Center, and the new public library. D.2.H The Stapleton Develop ment Plan pro motes continuing education opportunities and an environment that encourages and rewards innovation. Identify ways to introduce these ele ments into the station area as develop ment occurs. D.3 Housing Sustainability D.3.A Utilize the update of the TOD Strategic Plan and the DRCOG Sustainable Co mmunities Regional Planning Grant Project to exa mine a ordable housing strategies in the East Corridor. D.3.B Address the overall a ordable housing goals in Stapleton with multi-family development within the station area that contains 20 percent or more a ordable units. The availability of a ordable housing is an important TOD strategy. The Denver Housing Authority is constructing the South Lincoln Project at the 10th and Osage Station. Central Park Recreation Center opened in 2011, is certi ed as a LEED Gold project. The lack of readily available healthy food choices has become a growing concern for many cities.

PAGE 48

Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework 44 D.3.C Seek opportunities with partners such as the Urban Land Conservancy, Enterprise Community Partners, Denver Housing Authority, Mile High Connects, and the Colorado Community Land Trust to develop a signi cant amount a ordable housing projects within the station area. D.3.D Incorporate a ordable housing units into mixed-income development projects spread out geographically throughout the station area and the larger Stapleton neighborhood. D.3.E As part of the Inclusionary Housing Ordinance, a developer has the opportunity to build a ordable housing units within a half-mile of a rail transit station in lieu of building the units at the primary development site. Work with the O ce of Econo mic Development to pro mote the Central Park Station as a desirable site to receive a ordable housing in lieu projects from developers who choose that option to meet the a ordable housing requirements of the IHO. D.4 Economic Sustainability D.4.A Support the long-ter m viability of Quebec Square as a major shopping center for Northeast Denver, including the possibility of mixed-use in ll development of surface parking lots. D.4.B Support the existing industrial uses and encourage develop ment of viable co mmercial uses with employers that provide a high jobs-per-acre ratio. D.4.C Market the pri mary blocks of the TOD opportunity as a walkable, mixed-use environment with a focus on high quality co mmercial o ce uses mixed with highdensity residential development. D .4.D Support the development of the Center eld Campus ar ea as a location f or large corporate o ce tenants, research and design facilities, or appropriate light industrial uses seeking high visibility and access to transit. D.4.E Promote new businesses in the station area to utilize green business practices at the forefront of their culture, encouraging innovative progra ms and design to reduce resource consumption. D.4.F Seek a mix of employers that provide jobs at various skill levels suitable for workers with a diverse range of educations. Encourage businesses to provide ongoing training opportunities for workers seeking advancement. Denver has often utilized green business practices, including installing solar panels at DIA that produces six percent of the airports energy requirement.

PAGE 49

Central Park Station Area Plan Strategy Framework 45 PROMOTING HEALTHY LIFESTYLES Central Park Station is a great oppor tunity to encourage nearby neighborhood residents to make choices that result in a healthier lifestyle. Local o cials across the country are becoming increasingly aware of how the built environment a ects the health and in uences the lifestyle choices of residents. Many major U.S. cities are taking great strides to make choosing a healthy lifestyle easier for their residents. Promoting a healthy lifestyle is at the heart of many of Central Park Station Area Plan reco mmendations. A few examples include: Pedestrian friendly streets and crosswalk treatments I mproved bicycle access and promotion of bicycle sharing and rental progra ms Building design that promotes an active, walkable, urban neighborhood Locating healthy food vendors at the station for co mmuters and residents Greater connectivity between on-street bicycle facilities, the Sand Creek Regional Greenway Trail, and corresponding recreational opportunities Extension of the Denver street grid into redevelopment areas whenever possible The Stapleton TMA will lead the e ort to develop an Inter modal Transportation Center at the station that centralizes and coordinates multiple mobility options As development occurs within the station area, attention should be given to crafting the public realm in a way that encourages and supports integrated exercise opportunities, making exercise access easier and a part of the neighborhoods daily activity. This includes providing access to parks, plazas, open space, streetscapes, and other recreational opportunities throughout the station area. The Stapleton Foundation, Stapleton Transportation Manage ment Association, and BeWell Stapleton will utilize the Central Park Station Area Plan and the associated Health I mpact Assessment to pro mote healthy lifestyle choices in Stapleton and surrounding neighborhoods and work to identify funding sources to i mplement both of the plans health-related recommendations. A high quality bicycle network is one way that the built environment can promote healthy lifestyle choices.

PAGE 51

Central Park Show Station Area Plan Transformative Concepts 47 Transformative ConceptsThis chapter presents eight di erent development concepts that, if constructed, would likely have a catalytic e ect on stimulating additional investment in the Central Park Station area. These concepts represent big ideas for positively transfor ming the station area: Uinta Street I mproved Street Network Sand Creek Trail Connections Station Landmark Innovative Station Site Design Quebec Square Redevelop ment Inter modal Transportation Center Bike Sharing and Rental Progra ms Each concept is presented and then evaluated against the four plan principles that are the organizing elements for this plan: Destination Active Accessible Sustainable Sand Creek E 40TH AVEE 39TH AVEE 41ST AVE D Half Mile E 34TH AVE E 34TH AVE E 37TH AVE E 36TH AVE N XANTHIA CT N XANTHIA CT N YOSEMITE ST N AKRON ST N XENIA ST N WABASH ST N CENTRAL PARK BLVD N CENTRAL PARK BLVD N SYRACUSE ST N POPLAR ST N QUEBEC ST E 38TH AVE E 38TH AVE E SANDOWN RD E 37TH AVE N ULSTER ST UINTA ST N UINTA ST E 36TH AVE N ULSTER ST N SYRACUSE ST TRANSFORMATIVE CONCEPTS1. Uinta Street 2. Improved Street Network 3. Sand Creek Trail Connections 4. Station Landmark 5. Innovative Station Site Design 6. Quebec Square Redevelopment 7. Intermodal Transportation Center 8. Bike Sharing and Rental Program 4 4 1 1 2 2 3 3 8 8 5 5 7 7 6 6Note: Dashed lines on this map represent potential future connections in the station area. These connections may take the form of future public or private streets, alleys, pedestrian passages, or mews with the intent of increasing access in the station area while breaking up large blocks to improve the pedestrian experience.

PAGE 52

Central Park Station Area Plan Transformative Concepts 48Uinta Street Larimer Street in Downtown Denver has a very active pedestrian realm thanks to the numerous sidewalk cafes and seating areas. GOAL STATEMENTCreate a pedestrian-scaled public realm along Uinta Street, serving as the primary walking street and spine of the station area. WHAT IS IT?Uinta Street holds a key distinction as the nearest cross street to the Central Park Station rail platfor m and bus transfer facility. The importance of Uinta Street as a signi cant path to the station has been universally supported by the stakeholders, being identi ed in the 2009 Conceptual Plan as the pedestrian priority street and the spine of the station area. Identifying Uinta Street as the pedestrian priority street in the station area is applicable in both the shortter m and long-ter m station environments. On opening day, Uinta will be a logical choice for pedestrians and cyclists trying to reach the station from neighborhoods to the south as it gives the most direct connection to the rail platform. As development occurs in the TOD area, development will want to capitalize on Uintas direct access to the rail station, orientating buildings towards the street and beginning to create a urban, pedestrian-friendly, main street for the station area. To achieve this vision and maximize the opportunity that Uinta presents, special detail is necessary in the design of the street. Uintas public realm, the space fra med by the future transit-oriented develop ment in the station area, needs to function as a linear collection of spaces that asse mble people and activities. This occurs through careful thought and design of the space for the best pedestrian experience possible. Keeping visual and physical distances as short as possible while providing convenient access between the public and private environments along the street will result in a more inti mate, co mfortable surrounding for residents, workers, visitors, and co mmuters alike. Public spaces positioned along Uinta can work to integrate various activities and amenities in the station for a wide variety of di erent users and in turn generate greater amounts of activity, promote a feeling of safety, and provide visual interest. UINTA STREET MIDBLOCK Connecting existing Stapleton neighborhoods to the station through the heart of the TOD, Uinta should have two travel lanes, designated bike lanes, on-street parking on both sides of the street, and a large sidewalk and pedestrian amenity zone with street trees in grates.

PAGE 53

Central Park Show Station Area Plan Transformative Concepts 49 Outdoor seating areas help to promote a safe and visually interesting pedestrian experience.HOW DOES UINTA STREET ADDRESS BEING A DESTINATION? Uinta Street has the opportunity to be the main street of the station area, providing residents and visitors a high quality public realm, becoming the focal axis of the transit oriented development.HOW DOES UINTA STREET ADDRESS BEING ACTIVE? The urban design of buildings and streetscapes along Uinta should encourage pedestrian activity and promote community gathering. Uinta Street should provide a safe and visually interesting pedestrian experience through amenities such as outdoor seating areas, ground oor windows, cafes, accessible services, and street trees. HOW DOES UINTA STREET ADDRESS BEING ACCESSIBLE? Uinta Street will serve as a multi-modal street, providing access to pedestrians, bicyclists, and motorists. Special attention should be given to establishing Uinta as the pedestrian priority street in the station area. HOW DOES UINTA STREET ADDRESS BEING SUSTAINABLE? Uinta Street promotes alternative modes of transportation, potentially reducing vehicle miles traveled, reducing tra c congestion and improving air quality. The design of Uintas public real m can strive to improve water quality and reduce water runo by incorporating sustainable best practices in urban design and streetscapes. Small, intimate, publicly accessible open space can help create a sense of place within the station area. UINTA STREET INTERSECTION At intersections, Uinta Street should have two travel lanes, a, left-turn lane when tra c levels demand, designated bike lanes, and a large sidewalk and pedestrian amenity zone with street trees in grates. On-street parking is lost as the turn lane is introduced.

PAGE 54

Central Park Station Area Plan Transformative Concepts 50 KEY ASPECTS OF UINTAS PUBLIC REALM Active Edges Building Frontages Crossings on Smith Road Crossings at 35th and 36th Ave Plaza and Open Space Gateway 35th Ave Key Building Location 36th Ave Key Building Location 37th Ave Gateway Smith Road Bike Lanes On-street parking Minimize Bus Tra c 4 2 2 3 8 8 5 7 7 6 6 12 12 9 9 11 11 1 1 10 10 3 5 4Note: Some lines on this map represent potential future connections in the station area. These connections may take the form of future public or private streets, alleys, pedestrian passages, or mews with the intent of increasing access in the station area while breaking up large blocks to improve the pedest rian experience.

PAGE 55

Central Park Show Station Area Plan Transformative Concepts 51 RECOMMENDATIONS E.1.A Prioritize Uinta Street as the primary pedestrian street in the station area, providing connectivity to the station from a large majority of the existing Stapleton neighborhoods to the south. The Uinta Street cross section should provide mobility for multiple modes of transportation with a special emphasis on pedestrians. E.1.B D Prominent buildings in the TOD should be located along Uinta Street. Proper building placement and massing that fra mes and de nes Uinta Street and pro motes a high quality public realm through concentrating and reinforcing pedestrian activity is critical to the success of the station area. Key building locations along Uinta Street include: E.1.B 35th Avenue and Uinta Street: This intersection serves as the gateway into the TOD from existing residential neighborhoods to the south. Buildings placed at this intersection should utilize architectural ele ments that establish the intersection as a key entry point into the station area. E.1.C 36th Avenue/37th Avenue and Uinta Street: Building place ment and massing should recognize the prominence of these intersections as the heart of the TOD. Special corner treatments such as signature entries, special roof shapes, and taller, iconic architectural ele ments should be utilized. E.1.D Smith Road and Uinta Street: This intersection serves as the gateway into the TOD from the station platfor m. Buildings placed at this intersection should have a strong visual presence from the station platfor m and be oriented towards both Uinta Street and S mith Road, establishing a clear and de ned edge with the public right-of-way. E.1.E Evaluate and i mplement crosswalk treat ments/enhancements at proposed signalized intersections on Uinta Street at 35th and 36th Avenues. E.1.F Minimize regional bus tra c on Uinta Street whenever possible. Creative amenity zones can encourage pedestrians to stop, interact, and converse with others.

PAGE 56

Central Park Station Area Plan Transformative Concepts 52 GOAL STATEMENTImprove the surrounding Central Park Station area street network to provide a high level of regional and local access to the station.WHAT IS IT?This transfor mative concept focuses around a series of improvements to the street network in the station area to increase access to the station and i mprove the potential for transit-oriented development north of S mith Road. There are currently numerous de ciencies to the street grid in the station area. Although transportation planning and progra mming has occurred as part of the Stapleton Redevelopment Project, not all of the street grid de ciencies had been previously identi ed. East to west through tra c move ment is li mited to 35th Avenue, with two other major east-west streets, Smith Road and 40th Avenue, having signi cant roadway gaps (Interstate 70 and Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard are through routes on the edge of the study area). An interruption of Smith Road occurs between Sand Creek and Havana Street. The Stapleton Development Plan and other planning docu ments identify the need to x this approximately halfmile gap in Smith Road. A considerable portion of the gap in 40th Avenue was resolved as part of the development of the Stapleton Center eld Campus, as 40th Avenue opened between Havana Street and Central Park Boulevard in November 2011. This new street ter minates at Central Park Boulevard though, not extending across Sand Creek to the west. This leaves no connection to the existing 40th Avenue at Ulster Street in the Stapleton Industrial Area. The addition of a continuous Smith Road and 40th Avenue greatly enhances the frag mented street grid within the station area. The two roads may also alleviate tra c concerns on Martin Luther King Boulevard, currently the lone east-west arterial route through the co mmunity. In addition, an improved Smith Road bridge over Sand Creek allows acco mmodation of bicycle and pedestrian tra c approaching the station fro m the Sand Creek Greenway Trail. The trail will access Smith Road on the east side of the creek via a trail ra mp. The portion of Ulster Street between Smith Road and 40th Avenue serves as the pri mary access point to the existing Stapleton Industrial Area. Ulster Street is currently a narrow street lacking curbs, sidewalks, or bicycle facilities and contains an at-grade crossing of the existing Union Paci c railroad tracks. Before opening day of co mmut er rail service, Ulster will be rebuilt as part of the East Rail Line and Central P ark Station c onstruction projects with one travel lane in each direction, curb, gutter, sidewalk, and a raised median between Smith Road and 39th Avenue. An at-grade crossing of the new East Rail Line tracks is also included. Ulster Street between 39th Avenue and 40th Avenue is not part of the project. I mproved multi-modal access to this industrial area from both the Center eld Campus area and the TOD area south of the future rail platform would strengthen its existing businesses, promote new development opportunities, and allows the proposed Sand Creek Greenway Trail extension from the north to reach the station (see Sand Creek Trail Connections). The East Rail Line project includes improvements to Ulster between Smith Road and 39th Improved Street Network 40th Avenue east of Central Park Boulevard, opened in November, 2011. Current condition of Smith Road at the station location. New Street Connec onPROPOSED STREET CONNECTIONS Note: Dashed lines on this map represent potential future connections in the station area. These connections may take the form of future public or private streets, alleys, pedestrian passages, or mews with the intent of increasing access in the station area while breaking up large blocks to improve the pedestrian experience. UINTA ST UIN UIN UIN UIN UIN UIN UIN UIN N IN U U U TA TA TA TA A TA T T T ST ST ST T T ST ST S U U U U U E 39TH AVEE 40TH AVEE 40TH AVE CENTRAL PARK BLVD N ULSTER ST Smith Road

PAGE 57

Central Park Show Station Area Plan Transformative Concepts 53Avenue in additional to a quiet zone crossing of both the Union Paci c and commuter rail tracks. As development occurs in the station area, a further i mproved Ulster Street should be evaluated through enhancing the crossing of the Union Paci c and East Rail Line railroad tracks, strengthening the connection to the north and the Sand Creek Trail and enhancing multi-modal connections. In addition, as develop ment occurs in the Stapleton Industrial Area, additional opportunities for improved connectivity should be evaluated. HOW DOES AN IMPROVED STREET NETWORK ADDRESS BEING A DESTINATION? Adding streets such as Smith Road and 40th Avenue makes locating in the station area more attractive for businesses and employers. HOW DOES AN IMPROVED STREET NETWORK ADDRESS BEING ACTIVE? A street grid system that provides greater options, more connections, and easier navigation can promote the use of more multi-modal transportation options such as walking and bicycling. HOW DOES AN IMPROVED STREET NETWORK ADDRESS BEING ACCESSIBLE? A more connected street network improves access to the station from more neighborhoods and employment centers.HOW DOES AN IMPROVED STREET NETWORK ADDRESS BEING SUSTAINABLE? An improved street network can reduce vehicles miles traveled by shortening trips and improve air quality by reducing congestion. Streets that provide facilities for multiple modes complete streets promote alternatives to single occupancy car trips. The current condition of Ulster Street lacks curbs, gutter, and sidewalks. STREET IMPROVEMENT PROJECT HIERARCHY1. Smith Road between Xanthia Street and Havana Street 2. 40th Avenue between Ulster Street and Central Park Boulevard 3. Ulster Street between 39th Avenue and 40th Avenue 4. Additional potential connections identi ed as future needs arise RECOMMENDATIONSNew Street Connections E.2.A Smith Road: Extend Smith Road to the east from the station area, connecting Stapleton to Havana Street. E.2.B 40th Avenue: Connect the existing 40th Avenue in the existing Stapleton Industrial Area to the recently co mpleted 40th Avenue in the Center eld Campus. This street connection will require a new bridge constructed over Sand Creek, right of way acquisition, and potential environ mental remediation. Street and Bridge Construction E.2.C Smith Road Sand Creek Bridge : Construct a new multi-modal Smith Road Sand Creek Bridge that acco mmodates automobile, bicycle, and pedestrian tra c. E.2.D Ulster Street : I mprove Ulster Street from 39th Avenue to 40th Avenue to include curbs and sidewalks in a compatible fashion with the Ulster Street cross-section to be built as part of the East Rail Line project if redevelopment occurs or as tra c demand merits. Evaluate improving multi-modal access to the area to support the proposed Sand Creek Greenway Trail connection north of S mith Road, providing North Stapleton bicycle commuters a more direct route to the station platfor m. As development occurs in the station area, evaluate an i mproved Ulster Street through enhancing the crossing of the Union Paci c and East Rail Line railroad tracks.

PAGE 58

Central Park Station Area Plan Transformative Concepts 54 Bridge connection Future 40th Avenue Sand Creek Trail Improved Trail Access Proposed Trail enhancements to improve station access Sand Creek Greenway Trail Connections GOAL STATEMENTIncrease multi-modal connections to the station through strategic improvements to the existing trail system.WHAT IS IT?The Sand Creek Regional Greenway is an i mportant component of the Denver regional trail system. This 14-mile public greenway connects the High Line Canal in Aurora with the South Platte River Greenway in Co mmerce City. The trail syste m then connects to Downtown Denver and the rest of the regional trail syste m. Strong, direct connections to the Central Park Station are critical for encouraging commuters to utilize the trail and produce additional transit ridership along the East Corridor. On opening day of rail service at Central Park Station the best connection will be from an access ra mp from the trail to S mith Road, east of Sand Creek. It will be i mportant that the future design of S mith Road allows for safe pedestrian and bicycle access to the station. An additional connection to consider is a bicycle and pedestrian bridge crossing Sand Creek approxi mately one-quarter mile north of the station platfor m. This bridge should be timed as development begins to occur north of the UPRR right of way on both sides of Sand Creek. As i mprovements occur west of Sand Creek in the existing industrial area, bike facilities should be evaluated for Ulster Street fro m the creek to Smith Road. Bicyclists will utilize the Ulster Street at-grade railroad crossing to reach S mith Road and nally the commuter rail platfor m. If bicycle commuting increases in the station area, consider a direct connection to the rail platfor m from the new pedestrian and bicycle bridge over Sand Creek via a path or street along the western boundary of the Sand Creek Prairie Dog Preserve. As in ll redevelopment occurs in the Stapleton Industrial Area, work with developers to determine the feasibility and implementation of additional multi-modal connections to the station that would bene t trail users.A bicyclist turning onto the existing Smith Road Sand Creek bridge to access the Sand Creek Regional Greenway Trail. Providing improved bicycle connections to the station can promote commuters to choose an alternative to driving a car to the station. Note: Dashed lines on this map represent potential future connections in the station area. These connections may take the form of future public or private streets, alleys, pedestrian passages, or mews with the intent of increasing access in the station area while breaking up large blocks to improve the pedestrian experience. SAND CREEK TRAIL CONNECTIONS TO CENTRAL PARK STATIONUINTA ST

PAGE 59

Central Park Show Station Area Plan Transformative Concepts 55HOW DOES THE SAND CREEK TRAIL CONNECTIONS ADDRESS BEING A DESTINATION? A connecting point for transit and regional trail users. If built in conjunction with a bike station, the connection would help pro mote the Central Park Station as an urban trail head for the regional trail syste m. HOW DOES THE SAND CREEK TRAIL CONNECTIONS ADDRESS BEING ACTIVE? Pro motes walking and bicycle use Pro motes a healthy lifestyle by providing access to station via non-motorized modesHOW DOES THE SAND CREEK TRAIL CONNECTIONS ADDRESS BEING ACCESSIBLE? Provides greater access to the rail sta tion, bus transfer facility, regional trail syste m, and local bicycle facilities within Stapleton Linking to the regional trail syste m allows trail users access to other Stapleton attractions like the 29th Street Town Center and the Shops at North eld.HOW DOES THE SAND CREEK TRAIL CONNECTIONS ADDRESS BEING SUSTAINABLE? Has the potential to reduce vehicle miles traveled, i mprove air quality and generate greater recognition of alternative transportation choices Increases attractiveness for transit-oriented develop ment in the northern portion of the station area. Denver has had great success with utilizing pedestrian and bicycle bridges to increase station access in TOD areas. RECOMMENDATIONS E.3.A On opening day of the rail station, seek to provide access for pedestrians and bicyclists from the Sand Creek Regional Greenway Trail via S mith Road. E.3.B At the time of design and construction, include pedestrian and bicycle facilities on the new Smith Road Bridge over Sand Creek. E.3.C Construct a new pedestrian and bicycle bridge over Sand Creek between the existing Stapleton Industrial Area and Center eld Campus. The bridge should correspond to a trail extension into the Stapleton Industrial Area, creating a second connection from the Sand Creek Regional Greenway and the station via Ulster Street. E.3.D As bicycle tra c demands, consider a direct connection to the rail platfor m from the new pedestrian and bicycle bridge over Sand Creek via a path or street along the western boundary of the Sand Creek Prairie Dog Preserve. E.3.E Consider additional connections between on-street bicycle facilities and the Sand Creek Regional Greenway where feasible. As Stapleton north of Interstate 70 is constructed, greater connectivity to regional destinations such as Dicks Sporting Goods Park will gain in importance.

PAGE 60

Central Park Station Area Plan Transformative Concepts 56Station Landmark GOAL STATEMENTProvide a visual marker near the station that allows easy recognition for transit users approaching the station from any direction while enhancing the public realm and identity of the area. WHAT IS IT?The 2009 Conceptual Station Plan identi ed the need to locate a vertical land mark or public art piece to give the station an identity, provide a unique character to the area, and serve as a visual marker to commuters arriving at the station from all mode types. The design of the Central Park Station will acco mmodate the addition of a vertical installation near the intersection of Smith Road and Uinta Street, either on the western edge of the rail platfor m or in a public plaza near the bus transfer facility. This location provides excellent sight lines for approaching commuters arriving fro m Smith Road, Central Park Boulevard, or Uinta Street. As the opening day of service nears, it will be critical to foster partnerships to facilitate the installation of the land mark. The City and County of Denver Department of Arts and Venues, the Stapleton Art Foundation, private donors, and others are likely participants in any partnership. The exact design, scale, and placement of the landmark will need careful consideration to meet the goals and expectations of all stakeholders. The Stapleton air control tower, located directly south of the station near 35th Avenue, is a clear opportunity to relate the land mark to the long aviation history of the Stapleton neighborhood.HOW DOES THE STATION LANDMARK ADDRESS BEING A DESTINATION? Adds to the unique character and gives an identity to the area. HOW DOES THE STATION LANDMARK ADDRESS BEING ACTIVE? Pro motes greater pedestrian and bicyclist activity by providing a visual marker for approaching commuters Several pieces of large-scale artwork are located in the Pena Boulevard corridor as travelers approach or depart the Denver International Airport. The East R ail Line continues past Stapleton and is aligned parallel to Pena Boulevard as it nears DIA. Union Stations sign and slogan, Travel by Train is almost as iconic as the building itself and helps give an identity to its neighborhood.

PAGE 61

Central Park Show Station Area Plan Transformative Concepts 57HOW DOES THE STATION LANDMARK ADDRESS BEING ACCESSIBLE? Directs more pedestrians and bicyclists to the station location and serves as an identi able object for commuters on the train as they approach the stationHOW DOES THE STATION LANDMARK ADDRESS BEING SUSTAINABLE? The greater use of the station due to the visual identi cation provided by the landmark will assist in reducing carbon e missions from single occupancy vehicle trips RECOMMENDATIONS E.4.A Explore nancing and implementation strategies to install a station land mark to serve as a visual identify to the station. E.4.B Choose a selection process for the station landmark artist that re nes the goals of the landmark for the community including acknowledging Stapletons past aviation use. Contrasting styles of station landmarks. Above: A traditional clock tower. Below: A modern bridge and tower. The station plaza as part of the larger station area design presents an opportunity to create a space that is unique to the Central Park Station

PAGE 62

Central Park Station Area Plan Transformative Concepts 58 Mockingbird Station in Dallas, Texas is a well known example of transit oriented development closely weaved into a passenger rail station. This station in Portland, Oregon directly addresses the rail platform, increasing the ease of access for its residents. GOAL STATEMENTAchieve a sustainable, innovative station design that promotes a walkable, mixed-use, transit-oriented community for Stapleton and adjacent neighborhoods.Innovative Station Site DesignWHAT IS IT?Early in the planning process, stakeholders stated their desire that develop ment happen near the station sooner than later. Even though this may be a common desire for many TOD locations, Central Park Station does have several factors that give it a unique advantage to promote transit-oriented development. These advantages include having a master developer over a signi cant portion of the station area, large a mounts of undeveloped land, a popular, successful adjacent residential neighborhood, interstate highway access, and high visibility contribute to the overall appeal of the station. Development Scenarios On opening day of commuter rail service, Central Park Station will serve pri marily as a Park-nRide lot. RTD has 70 such Park-n-Ride lots serving both light rail and bus service across the Denver region. On the East Rail Line, each station will have surface parking lots for co mmuters except the end-of-line stations at Denver International Airport and Denver Union Station. Because the demand for parking may continue well into the future at these stations, parking structures constructed to allow the repurposing of the initial surface parking lots into a higher and better use will be necessary. The 2009 conceptual station plan envisioned how transitoriented development could occur at the Central Park Station, including the location of a 2009 Conceptual Plan Phase Two: Transit Oriented Development replaces RTDs surface parking lots. RTD and TOD shares structured parking incorporated into the development. 2009 Conceptual Plan Phase One: RTDs Bus Transfer Facility and Park -n -Ride

PAGE 63

Central Park Show Station Area Plan Transformative Concepts 591,500 parking structure on the sa me block as the bus transfer facility. RTD has further conceptualized the bus transfer facility with a north to south orientation with access fro m Smith Road and 37th Avenue. Additional development scenarios and concepts may further this vision of a transit-oriented future for the Central Park Station and possibly re move barriers to accelerate develop ment. Three additional development scenarios to consider include: Alternate Location for a Public/Private Partnership Parking Garage The 2009 Station Conceptual Plan considered the future parking structure adjacent to the bus transfer facility. The construction of this parking structure is contingent on RTD identifying a private partner to share in the costs of the garage. Alternate locations for the parking structure may need consideration to facilitate this necessary public/private partnership. The RTD property at Central Park Station provides multiple options for private develop ment that integrates a parking structure and pro moting this added exibility to the nal build out of the station may encourage development to occur at a quicker rate. Small Swap This development scenario considers a small land swap between RTD and Forest City near the bus transfer facility. In an e ort to utilize the most valuable land for develop ment sooner, Forest City obtains from RTD the property north of 37th Avenue and directly east of Uinta Street in exchange for a parcel south of 37th Avenue and directly west of Central Park Boulevard. This allows Forest City to develop one of the most desirable locations within the station area as soon as the market bears and establishes a strong street wall near the station along Uinta Street, which is the primary pedestrian corridor for the station. The small swap could occur before or after the opening day of rail service. Large Swap This development scenario expands on the small land swap to include all of the RTD Parkn-Ride facility west of Uinta Street. The station site plan for opening day utilizes the land closest to the station along S mith Road for commuter parking. The large land swap concept proposes a move of the RTD Park-n-Ride in part or in total to the east of Uinta Street, fro m Smith Road to 36th Avenue. Forest City obtains the two large development parcels north of the future 37th Avenue in exchange for this property with the ability to market the parcels as the most desirable develop ment opportunity near the station with high visibility due to the frontage along S mith Road. This scenario could occur before or after the opening day of rail service. If it occurs after opening day, the large swap will likely tie into a public/private partnership to construct a parking structure as a second phase of the stations develop ment and ma y not include an actual land exchange between R TD and F orest City. A Green Station The Stapleton Redevelop ment Plan sets goals and objectives to restore and protect the areas environmental resources while demonstrating innovative approaches to develop ment that emphasize e ciency and reduced resource consumption. The RTD Park-n-Ride and bus transfer facility is a great opportunity to e mploy sustainability measures in its design and construction. On-site power generation through solar roofs or wind turbines would reduce energy consumption at the station. Utilizing stor m water best management practices such as bioswales, porous pavers, and other green technologies in the parking lots further the sustainability of the station. Since the long-ter m vision for the station focuses on a walkable, mixed-use urban environment, consideration on how green construction methods could minimize initial capital costs for the station while reducing long-ter m maintenance and future redevelopment costs is needed. Possible land swaps have been explored by RTD and Forest City. Above: A small swap scenario that brings development to Uinta Street in place of surface parking. Below: A big swap scenario where parking is relocated further from the rail platform.

PAGE 64

Central Park Station Area Plan Transformative Concepts 60HOW DOES INNOVATIVE STATION SITE DESIGN ADDRESS BEING A DESTINATION? The ultimate goal of a transit-oriented co mmunity surrounding Central Park Station will make the area a destination for Stapleton, adjacent neighborhoods, and visitors alike.HOW DOES INNOVATIVE STATION SITE DESIGN ADDRESS BEING ACTIVE? A more exible approach to the station site plan that incorporates sustainable design features could accelerate development to occur sooner than later at the station, pro moting a more vibrant, urban character for the neighborhood.HOW DOES INNOVATIVE STATION SITE DESIGN ADDRESS BEING ACCESSIBLE? The Park-n-Ride provides opening day parking access while pro moting a long-ter m vision of a more walkable, pedestrian oriented station.HOW DOES INNOVATIVE STATION SITE DESIGN ADDRESS BEING SUSTAINABLE? Greater per meability of parking surfaces positively contributes to stor m water absorption and helps prevent pollutants from entering our rivers, streams and creeks. An energy e cient transit station reduces the de mand on the power grid. Stormwater best practices that are suited for the conditions of the station area minimize the impact on the natural environment. Bioswales, porous pavers, and other innovative green techniques can reduce stormwater runo from parking lots. An ultimate build-out scenario for Central Park Station The majority of the RTD Park-n-Ride is redeveloped as part of a TOD neighborhood. Parking for the station is accommodated through a combination of remaining surface parking lots and parking structures that also provide parking of the businesses and residents of Central Park Station. Innovative station site design can have bene ts to both transit users and the surrounding community. Development is integrated into the design of the Del Mar Station in Pasadena, CA. Note: Some lines on this map represent potential future connections in the station area. These connections may take the form of future public or private streets, alleys, pedestrian passages, or mews with the intent of increasing access in the station area while breaking up large blocks to improve the pedest rian experience.

PAGE 65

Central Park Show Station Area Plan Transformative Concepts 61 RECOMMENDATIONS E.5.A Seek station site design that allows the greatest opportunity for future transit oriented development to occur as quickly as possible. Station site design should consider future development through: Sizing of parking lots to accommodate future building footprints Future street connectivity Pedestrian access Multiple options for future structured parking E.5.B Utilize sustainable stor m water best practices when designing the station area. Speci c opportunities include: Bioswales Rain gardens Reduced interior curbs Porous pavers E.5.C Prioritize the reduction of impervious surfaces. E.5.D Pursue transit-oriented residential and co mmercial development at the station as market conditions deem feasible. Sustainable design that is sensitive to the existing natural environment is a important principle of the Stapleton Development Plan. Mid-block connections in the future transit oriented development anticipated to replace the initial surface parking lots could be utilized to break up large blocks near the station.

PAGE 66

Central Park Station Area Plan Transformative Concepts 62 GOAL STATEMENTLong-term redevelopment of Quebec Square into a more walkable, mixeduse shopping and residential neighborhoodWHAT IS IT?Quebec Square was one of the rst developments built in Stapleton, with stores opening in 2002 and 2003. The Power Retail center has 740,000 square feet of retail space, with Wal-Mart, Sa m s Club, and Home Depot as the major anchors. The site plan for Quebec Square acknowledges the existing Denver street grid with several city streets providing access and circulation for the shopping center. 35th and 36th Avenues are major east/west streets providing access to Quebec Square from Stapleton and adjacent neighborhoods. Syracuse Street, Roslyn Street, and 38th Avenue are private streets that provide internal circulation within Quebec Square. The pad sites located along 36th, 38th, Syracuse, and Roslyn streets have buildings that are either partially or co mpletely oriented towards the street, which begins to create a more pedestrian friendly area. It is reasonable to expect that as Quebec Square ages, incremental or comprehensive alterations will substantially change its function, for m and appearance. As development occurs near the Central Park Station, pressure to increase the intensity of uses within the shopping center may occur. In this situation, the parking lots would become candidates for retro tting to accommodate mixed-use residential develop ment. If an incremental redevelopment approach is taken, a phased strategy to manage the transition from an auto-oriented retail center to a mixed-use development will need to be considered. Establishing further connections to the existing street grid, including the addition of new public streets within Quebec Square, i mproves connectivity to expected high-density residential development near the station. The continua tion of the existing street block pattern is essential to the transition of Quebec Square into a more urban, mixed-use shopping and residential neighborhood within the greater Stapleton redevelop ment. Quebec Square Redevelopment Quebec Square draws shoppers from all over Northeast Denver and surrounding communities. Some of the private streets within Quebec Square function very much like public streets including providing on-street parking. The Park Hill neighborhood (green) west of Quebec Street utilizes the traditional Denver street grid. Central Park Station (yellow) will be built with a similar grid. In order for Quebec Square to knit these areas together, a stronger block structure needs to be established. Note: Dashed lines on this map represent potential future connections in the station area. These connections may take the form of future public or private streets, alleys, pedestrian passages, or mews with the intent of increasing access in the station area while breaking up large blocks to improve the pedestrian experience. STREET GRID AND BLOCK PATTERN CONTEXT

PAGE 67

Central Park Show Station Area Plan Transformative Concepts 63 The Wal-Mart at City Place in Long Beach, CA is located in a mixed-use environment and utilizes structured parking for customers. The Villa Italia Mall in Lakewood was reimagined as a walkable town center when it was redeveloped as Belmar.HOW DOES THE QUEBEC SQUARE REDEVELOPMENT ADDRESS BEING A DESTINATION? The long-ter m redevelopment of Quebec Square through signi cant capital invest ments, both public and private, would ensure that the shopping district would continue to be an attraction for residents of all of Northeast Denver. Conversion of Quebec Square from an auto-oriented retail center to a walkable, mixeduse center assists in bridging the gap between Stapleton residential areas and the Northeast Park Hill neighborhood to the west.HOW DOES THE QUEBEC SQUARE REDEVELOPMENT ADDRESS BEING ACTIVE? Pro motes a healthy lifestyle by becoming a more walkable, pedestrian scaled shopping district that provides many daily needs to residents without the use of an automobile.HOW DOES THE QUEBEC SQUARE REDEVELOPMENT ADDRESS BEING ACCESSIBLE? Continuation of the existing city street and block pattern, direct transit connections, and su cient parking for large retailers would encourage accessibility by all modes. Example of a large retail anchor store in an urban, pedestrian-scaled environment.

PAGE 68

Central Park Station Area Plan Transformative Concepts 64 RECOMMENDATIONS E.6.A Encourage in ll development of surface parking lots in Quebec Square with mixed-use buildings that utilize structured parking. E.6.B Consider joint or shared parking progra ms for businesses and residents in Quebec Square. E.6.C Establish greater connectivity to the existing Denver street grid as redevelopment occurs in the area. E.6.D Consider converting private streets to public right-of-way as develop ment occurs within Quebec Square. E.6.E Maintain Quebec Square as an area of change in the expected update to The Blueprint Denver Plan. E.6.F Support any i mprovements to Quebec Street that increases safe pedestrian and bicycle access to Quebec Square. City Center Englewood Station is on the site of the former Cinderella City Mall. More pedestrian scaled blocks would i mprove the walkability to and fro m the station platfor m. Higher density residential develop ment within walking distance to a rail station and bus transfer facility promotes access to employment across the region.HOW DOES THE QUEBEC SQUARE REDEVELOPMENT ADDRESS BEING SUSTAINABLE? Higher intensity of uses and greater density of residents within mile of transit stations use land more e ciently then low density, auto-oriented develop ment. Diversi ed land uses in a redeveloped Quebec Square, including residential uses, strengthens its long-ter m viability as competing retail development is constructed nearby and market conditions change.

PAGE 69

Central Park Show Station Area Plan Transformative Concepts 65 A combination of mixed-use buildings and parking structures as in ll development in the existing surface parking lots would dramatically increase the density in Quebec S quare while improving the pedestrian experience. P P P P PNote: Dashed lines on this map represent potential future connections in the station area. These connections may take the form of future public or private streets, alleys, pedestrian passages, or mews with the intent of increasing access in the station area while breaking up large blocks to improve the pedestrian experience. STREET GRID AND BLOCK PATTERN CONTEXT EXISTING STREET GRID AND BLOCK PATTERN CONTEXT POTENTIAL P Existing Private Street Potential Future Connection Existing Public Street Existing Private Street Existing Public Street Potential Future Parking Structure Potential Future Mixed-Use Development SMITH ROAD35TH AVE 36TH AVE 38TH AVESYRACUSE ST ULSTER ST ROSLYN STSMITH ROAD38TH AVESYRACUSE ST ULSTER ST ROSLYN ST35TH AVE 36TH AVE

PAGE 70

Central Park Station Area Plan Transformative Concepts 66Intermodal Transportation Center (ITC)WHAT IS IT?An inter modal transportation center (ITC) that centralizes and coordinates multiple mobility options would provide great bene t to Stapleton and the surrounding areas. The ITC could function either as a stand-alone concept or in conjunction with a future parking structure. The Central Park Station will have rail service every 15 minutes from both Denver Union Station and Denver International Airport for the majority of the day. A 12-bay bus facility, serving ten or more routes, provides additional connections to destinations in east Denver, Aurora, and other parts of the RTD service area. An ITC that included bike rentals, car sharing, and taxi service has great potential to make the station a transit rich location. Major ele ments in a Central Park Station Intermodal Transportation Center may include: Bike sharing and bike rental program: These bike progra ms turn the station into an urban trail head, providing access to the wide array of parks and open space in Stapleton and the Sand Creek Greenway. Bike sharing, as illustrated by the success of the Denver B-Cycle program, can help complete the last mile of a trip, making nearby destinations, such as the 29th Street Town Center, more accessible for transit users. A bike rental service provides options for bicyclists that enjoy longer rides and may be seeking major destinations on the regional trail network such as Blu Lake, the Rocky Mountain Arsenal, or Dicks Sporting Goods Park. More details about these potential progra ms are located in the Bike Sharing Transfor mative Concept. Bike Station: The station should include the availability of repair and maintenance services, secured interior bike storage, product sales, and shower facilities. Car-sharing Program: The eGo CarShare service found in the 29th Street Town Center is a model for similar service at the Central Park Station. This feature adds mobility options for travelers needing to reach destinations beyond walking or bicycling distance fro m GOAL STATEMENTCreate a centralized location for users to access a wide variety of multi-modal transportation options. A bike sharing program would extend the commuter shed to the station. Bike Stations provide secure storage for bikes as well as maintenance, product sales and shower facilities. Bike stations often include maintenance and repair.

PAGE 71

Central Park Show Station Area Plan Transformative Concepts 67the station. Taxi Station: Designated locations for taxi queuing and loading to provide easy connections to hotels. Hotel Shuttle Service : Sponsorship of one or more bus bays by nearby hotels such as the Renaissance Denver, Red Lion, and Courtyard by Marriott providing convenient access to Stapleton area hotels from DIA. RTD Kiosk: Ticketing and travel assistance for RTD services in co mbination with a visitor infor mation booth or a co mmunity greeting station manned by volunteers. HOW DOES A STATION ITC ADDRESS BEING A DESTINATION? Acts as the portal to Stapleton from Downtown and DIA serving visitors and residents alike as one of the most convenient, reliable locations in Denver to access amenities HOW DOES A STATION ITC ADDRESS BEING ACTIVE? As a centralized point of mobility options, an ITC assists the overall station area beco ming a vibrant, active area. HOW DOES A STATION ITC ADDRESS BEING ACCESSIBLE? Provides greater mobility choices, including options for completing the last mile of a trip and access to the regional trail syste m. HOW DOES A STATION ITC ADDRESS BEING SUSTAINABLE? Reduces the a mount of vehicles miles travelled by providing multiple options for commuters to connect to the region and reach nearby destinations without the use of a personal automobile. RECOMMENDATIONS E.7.A Establish a long-ter m goal of an Inter modal Transportation Center building at the station, serving Stapleton and surrounding neighborhoods with an array of multimodal transportation options. E.7.B Coordinate the bicycle sharing and rental progra m transfor mative concept with future on-site needs of RTD at the station. E.7.C Coordinate with RTD and others to consider the inclusion of car sharing parking spaces, hotel shuttle service loading areas, and taxi stations in the station area. E.7.D Work with nearby hotels and with local taxi companies to serve the station by opening day of rail service. Taxi Stands are used at North eld Shopping Center in Stapleton. A car sharing program would increase access to the station and increase transit ridership.

PAGE 72

Central Park Station Area Plan Transformative Concepts 68WHAT IS IT?Bike sharing and bike rental progra ms have seen recent success at both the local and national level. The local B-Cycle bike-sharing program provides daily, weekly, and annual members access to over 500 bikes and 51 stations in Downtown Denver and nearby neighborhoods. The progra m makes it convenient and economical to substitute bicycle trips for automobile trips to nearby destinations such as a local park, grocery store, or restaurant. A bike-sharing progra m is a viable last-mile option for commuters and visitors on opening day of Central Park Station and only increases in value once higher density development occurs near the station. Bike rental progra ms are a common amenity in tourist locations and are currently available at three popular Denver city parks (City, Washington, and Berkeley). At Central Park Station, such a progra m may coordinate with a bike station that provides long-ter m rental, maintenance, secured storage, and other services. These longer, daily rental bikes serve users interested in accessing the Sand Creek Regional Greenway Trail that connects to the regional trail syste m and destinations such as Blu Lake, the Rocky Mountain Arsenal, or Dicks Sporting Goods Park. The bike rental users also have access to any of the trails within Stapletons parks and greenways. Bike Sharing and Rental Programs GOAL STATEMENTCreate a bike sharing and rental program in the station area that provides alternatives to single occupancy automobile trips for both local residents and visitors. Downtown Denver and nearby neighborhoods are currently served by the Denver B-Cycle Program Existing Stapleton neighborhoods have strong bicycle infrastructure. The Denver B-Cycle Program is a local example of a bike sharing program.

PAGE 73

Central Park Show Station Area Plan Transformative Concepts 69HOW DO BIKE SHARING AND RENTAL PROGRAMS ADDRESS BEING A DESTINATION? Acts as the portal to Stapleton from Downtown and DIA serving visitors and residents alike as one of the most convenient, reliable locations in Denver to access amenities HOW DO BIKE SHARING AND RENTAL PROGRAMS ADDRESS BEING ACTIVE? As a centralized point of mobility options, an ITC assists the overall station area beco ming a vibrant, active area. HOW DO BIKE SHARING AND RENTAL PROGRAMS ADDRESS BEING ACCESSIBLE? Provides greater mobility choices, including options for completing the last mile of a trip and access to the regional trail syste m. HOW DO BIKE SHARING AND RENTAL PROGRAMS ADDRESS BEING SUSTAINABLE? Reduces the a mount of vehicles miles travelled by providing multiple options for commuters to connect to the region and reach nearby destinations without the use of a personal automobile. RECOMMENDATIONS E.8 Develop a bike sharing and rental progra m and analyze nancing strategies with interested stakeholders such as the Stapleton Transportation Manage ment Area, the Sand Creek Regional Greenway, RTD, Forest City, Quebec Square, and Shops at North eld. An existing or new non-pro t organization may be required to develop the progra m. Bicycle rental programs exist at several Denver city parks. A bike rental program would enhance the Sand Creek Regional Greenways opportunity to provide residents with access to the natural environment.

PAGE 75

Central Park Show Station Area Plan Moving Forward 71 Moving ForwardI mplementation of a plan for the Central Park Station Area is acco mplished incrementally over many years through the e orts of the City govern ment, residents, business owners, property owners, and nonpro t organizations. The plan provides a picture into the future of what the co mmunity wants the station area to become. As a result, the image of what we want is clear. The how we are going to get there will be the responsibility of the nu merous studies and project planning that will be developed to forward speci c objectives and projects within the context of city-wide priorities and resource availability.

PAGE 76

Central Park Station Area Plan Moving Forward 72PLAN IMPLEMENTATIONThe implementation matrix that concludes this chapter su mmarizes the recommended strategies, associated with the Strategy Fra mework and Transfor mative Concepts. Each one is further de ned by type, timefra me, funding source, and lead entity. IMPLEMENTATION TYPESBlueprint Denver identi es three types of implementation activities: regulatory or policy, public investment, and partnership. The Central Park Station Area Plan also recognizes the importance of private develop ment and business investment in realizing the plan. Regulatory and policy strategies change City codes or regulations to a ect desired outco mes. Typical examples include Denver Zoning Code text and map amendments, Public Works requirements for infrastructure i mprovements associated with development projects, and Parks and Recreation requirements regarding open space and plantings. Public investment strategies are those involving public funding of public infrastructure. Examples include street reconstruction, bike lanes, new transit lines, park i mprovements, or new or expanded recreation centers. The City takes the lead in designing, constructing, and funding these projects and may use a variety of public funding sources such as the annual Capital I mprovements Progra m, bond funds, or state or federal grant progra ms. Partnership strategies represent the most diverse category. Public-private partnership (PPP) activity has expanded exponentially and has gone well beyond public subsidy of a private develop ment project. Increasingly public-private partnerships are being used to fund public infrastructure projects. Denver Union Station and RTDs East and Gold Lines are among the largest PPP projects in the country. IMPLEMENTATION TIMEFRAMES Ti mefra mes recognize both the order in which certain strategies must be undertaken and the feasibility of undertaking them given known resources. As a result, the ti mefra mes provide guidance for expectations and initial e orts. Every opportunity to advance a plan should be taken, regardless of the suggested timing. This plan recognizes four time-fra mes: Short-ter m one to three years Medium-ter m four to ten years Long-ter m beyond ten years On-going continuing application/utilizationFUNDING SOURCESThe I mplementation Framework identi es possible funding sources for public improvements and studies. The Plan is a forward-looking docu ment which conte mplates a vision for future development. Funding sources available to public and private entities are continually evolving based on economic, political, legal and neighborhood objectives. Though the na mes and purposes of funding sources change over time, they fall into three distinct categories. Tax Base Support: Tax base supported sources are characterized by the involve ment of the local sales and property taxing authorities. The most common tax base support is through the Citys annual budget, especially the annual Capital I mprovements Progra m (CIP). Periodically, the City requests its voters to approve a tax increase to pay for speci c Implementation Framework

PAGE 77

Central Park Show Station Area Plan Moving Forward 73public improvements. For instance, the citizens of Denver voted in 2007 to raise their property taxes in a speci c amount to support the issuance of over $500 million Better Denver Bonds whose proceeds funded 290 speci c public improvements. Tax Increment Finance is another means of tax-base support most typically associated with an Urban Renewal Area. Once created by the City Council and Denver Urban Renewal Authority (DURA), property and sales tax over and above the base year are paid to DURA to be used to pay for eligible public i mprovements. Designation as an Urban Renewal Area occurred for Stapleton in 1997. Grants: Grants co me from public or private organizations that are interested in encouraging a speci c outcome and these grants typically include speci c conditions and requirements as to how the funds may be deployed. For instance, a state or federal transportation grant will need to be used for street, mass transit, or regional mobility studies or projects. The O ce of Econo mic Development receives federal funds to support certain types of housing projects. Additionally, foundations provide grants for projects orientated with the organizations goals, such as green spaces or social services. Special Districts: The City Charter and State Statute enable various types of districts to be created. Examples of special districts include Business I mprovement Districts, Metropolitan Districts, Local I mprovement or Maintenance Districts, and General I mprovement Districts. The districts are classi ed as special because they are typically created by a localized group of citizens who want to achieve speci c outcomes in their locality and are willing to pool their economic resources in order to implement identi ed projects. For example, if a majority of business owners desire to improve the streetscape of the street in which they operate, the businesses could organize a Business I mpr ovement District which would assess the participants an amount of m oney su cient to pay for the project. Special districts are a useful tool when a localized population desire and are willing to pay for an enhanced level of public improvement. District revenues can be used to pay for improvements on a pay-as-you-go basis, for ongoing operations and maintenance, or to support pay ment of bonds. Two Metropolitan Districts have been established within Stapleton, the Park Creek Metropolitan District and the Westerly Creek Metropolitan District, to construct the necessary infrastructure and planned open space syste m for the neighborhood. Lead Entity: The implementation matrix identi es a lead entity that the plan recommends for having pri mary responsibility for undertaking the implementation recommendation. The entities are recommendations only. Other public and private entities may have roles to initiate, undertake, or participate in these e orts.CHAMPIONS AND ADVOCATESOnce a plan is adopted as a supple ment to the Comprehensive Plan, the City has direction to implement the plan. Given the nu mber of plans providing this direction, co mpeting interests in the city, and the budget issues at all levels of govern ment, little plan implementation is undertaken without champions for certain actions and advocates for the plan area. Typically registered neighborhood organizations work with the Mayor and their City Council representatives to pro mote certain actions and outcomes. Membership organizations such as merchant associations, business partnerships, and non-pro ts do the same for business areas. The Downtown Denver Partnerships focus on i mplementation of the Downtown Area Plan both as part of their organizational work progra m and their advocacy with the City is one exa mple of a concerted e ort at i mplementing a plan.

PAGE 78

Central Park Station Area Plan Moving Forward 74BLUEPRINT DENVER FUTURE LAND USE CONCEPTSBlueprint Denver, Denvers integrated land use and transportation plan adopted in 2002, identi es Areas of Change and Areas of Stability throughout the city with the goal of directing new development and in ll projects toward Areas of Change. Blueprint Denver established land use types based on a fra mework of building blocks Districts, Residential Areas, Centers, and Corridors. Each category has individual land use types and describes a particular character and scale that is desired in the future but does not necessarily re ect existing conditions. The Central Park Station Plan uses this as the basis of its reco mmended land use map. Two sub-categories of land uses, Industrial Mixed Use and TOD E mployment, have been added to the Central Park Station Land Use Map found on page 17 to re ect the speci c conditions in the plan area. Those land use concepts are shown here as Industrial and Mixed Use respectively to illustrate how those reco mmendations translate to an updated Blueprint Concept Land Use map. The Blueprint Denver Plan map will be amended as needed based on this plan. The Central Platte Valley, an example of transit oriented development in Denver. Station areas on the Southeast Line, such as Arapahoe at Village Center, are employment focused. Industrial Mixed-Use can support a wide variety of building forms and business types. BLUEPRINT DENVER CONCEPT LAND USE MAP EXISTING N

PAGE 79

Central Park Show Station Area Plan Moving Forward 75 BLUEPRINT DENVER CONCEPT LAND USE MAP PLAN RECOMMENDATION Note: Dashed lines on this map represent potential future connections in the station area. These connections may take the for m of future public or private streets, alleys, pedestrian passages, or mews with the intent of increasing access in the station area while breaking up large blocks to improve the pedestrian experience.

PAGE 80

Central Park Station Area Plan Moving Forward 76BLUEPRINT DENVER STREET CLASSIFICATIONSThe Central Park Station Area Plan plan draws on the street classi cations and types established by Blueprint Denver and makes recommendations for updates based on the future land use and mobility vision for the area. The Blueprint Denver Street Classi cation Map will be amended as needed based on this plan. The future street classi cation maps on the following pages show this plans recommendations for updates. BLUEPRINT DENVER STREET CLASSIFICATIONS Functional Street Classi cations : Blueprint Denver provides functional street classi cations that are intended to encompass both design characteristics of the streets and the character of service the streets are intended to provide. The functional classi cation system recognizes that individual streets do not act independently of one another but instead for m a network that works together to serve travel needs on a local, citywide, and regional level. Blueprint Denver recognized and retains the Citys existing classi cation system of arterials, collectors and local streets, but also presents criteria to better classify the function of the citys streets. The four functional street categories identi ed in Blueprint Denver are Arterial Streets, Collector Streets, Local streets, and Downtown Access Streets. The functional classi cation broadly de nes its design and operational characteristics as they relate to the move ment of motor vehicles. Multi-Modal Street Classi cations: The Multi-Modal Street Type de ne streets by relating them to the adjacent land use and their function for pedestrians, bicyclists, and transit. The street types attempt to strike a balance between functional classi cation, adjacent land use, and competing travel needs. There are ve multimodal street type categories that include Residential Street, Main Street, Mixed-Use Street, Co mmercial Street, and industrial street. EXISTING BLUEPRINT DENVER STREET CLASSIFICATIONS N

PAGE 81

Central Park Show Station Area Plan Moving Forward 77FUTURE BLUEPRINT DENVER STREET CLASSIFICATIONS NNote: Dashed lines on this map represent potential future connections in the station area. These connections may take the for m of future public or private streets, alleys, pedestrian passages, or mews with the intent of increasing access in the station area while breaking up large blocks to improve the pedestrian experience.

PAGE 82

Central Park Station Area Plan Moving Forward 78 Regulatory and Policy ToolsRECOMMENDATIONS IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY TIMEFRAME LEAD STAKEHOLDERSB.1 B.4; B.6; C.3.A; D.1.A; E.1.A E.1.D Design Review Conduct a review of existing design standards and guidelines for the station area and make any necessary changes to re ect plan recommendations including Active Edges, Building Frontages, Building Place ment and Massing, Pedestrian Priority Streets, Key Intersections, Gateways, and Location of Parks, Plazas, and Open Space. Short Department of Planning and Community Development (CPD) and Stapleton Development Corporation (SDC) D.3.A D.3.E Housing Sustainability Coordinate the Citys existing a ordable housing strategies to build multi-family development within the station area that contains 20% or more a ordable housing units. Short City and County of Denver, Regional Transportation District (RTD) E.6.DMaintain Quebec Square as an area of change in the expected update to the Blueprint Denver Plan. ShortCPD C.5; E.1.F; D.2.F; D.2.G Bus Service Adopt a service plan that distributes bus routes through the major street network that serves the neighborhood and transit facility while pro moting access to fresh food, civic uses, and recognizing Uinta Street as the neighborhoods pedestrian priority street. Short Medium RTD, Transportation Management Association (TMA), others A.1 A.3; D.4.A; E.6.A, TOD Zoning Much of the station already has TOD-friendly zoning that allows for increased densities and reductions in parking, enable mixed-use development, and prohibit new uses that would not be transit supportive. New zoning is needed as private developers begin to consider redevelop ment opportunities in Quebec Square and other possible in ll locations. Medium CPD and Private Developers A.4Use building for m and design standards to ease the transition between the TOD development and surrounding residential neighborhoods. Medium CPD, Forest City, Private Developers A.5 Change existing residential neighborhoods to Areas of Stability ShortCPD B.5 Pro mote the integration of cultural activity generators as part of larger, mixed-use, higher-density development projects. Medium CPD, Forest City, Privat e Developers D.4.B; D.4.D Seek and r etain e mployers in the station area with a high jobs-per-acreratio including the develop ment of Center eld Campus as a location for large corporate o ce tenants, research and design facilities, or appropriate light industrial uses. On-going Forest City, O ce of Econo mic Development, SDC, Private Developers D.4.F Seek a mix of employers that provide jobs at various skill levels suitable for workers with a diverse range of educations. Encourage businesses to provide on-going training opportunities. On-going Forest City, Stapleton Foundation, others E.1.A Prioritize Uinta Street as the primary pedestrian street in the station area and provide multiple modes of transportation options. On-going RTD, CPD, Public Works, Forest City E.1.B E.1.D Locate the most prominent buildings in the TOD on Uinta Street emphasizing key intersections of Uinta Street with 35th, 36th, 37th avenues and Smith Road. On-going RTD, CPD, Public Works, Forest City E.5.A; E.5.D Design the station site to allow the greatest opportunity for future transit oriented development to occur as quickly as possible and consider soliciting proposals from private developers to redevelop the surface parking lots into high density residential and co mmercial uses when feasible. On-goingRTD, CPD

PAGE 83

Central Park Show Station Area Plan Moving Forward 79 Infrastructure ToolsRECOMMENDATIONS IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY TIMEFRAME LEAD STAKEHOLDERS C.2.C Build bicycle lanes on Martin Luther King Boulevard between Quebec Street and Central Park Boulevard. ShortPublic Works C.2.D Evaluate alternatives to i mprove bicycle crossings of Quebec Street on Martin Luther King Boulevard. ShortPublic Works C.2.E Install way nding signage that enhance the bicycling experience, increases ease of navigation and enhances bicycle safety. Short Public Works E.3.A Provide regional access to the station for pedestrians and bicyclists fro m the Sand Creek Trail via S mith Road. Short Sand Creek Regional Greenway (SCRG), PCMD, RTD C.1.D Reconstruct Smith Road section between the Quebec Square and the future RTD Park-n-Ride i mprovements. Short Medium Park Creek Metro District (PCMD) C.2.B Continue the multi-use path parallel to Smith Road beyond the RTD Parkn-Ride to the west. Short Medium Public Works C.3.B; C.3.C; E.1.E Crosswalk Treat ments/Enhancements Evaluate and i mplement crosswalk treat ments/enhancements at proposed signalizations along S mith Road (at Ulster, Uinta, Rail Platfor m) and Uinta Street (at 35th and 36th), key bicycle and pedestrian routes to the station. Short Medium Public Works, RTD, others C.4.A Evaluate and implement intersection tra c signalization within Quebec Square. Short Medium Private Property Owners, Public Works C.4.B Continue evaluating intersection signaliza tion on Central Park Boulevard. Short Medium Public Works, PCMD C.4.C Evaluate the need and potential i mplementation of tra c calming tools on Martin Luther King Boulevard between Quebec Street and Monaco Street. Medium Public Works C.1.B Evaluate network improvements to traverse regional greenways for impr oved multi-modal connectivity throughout Stapleton. Medium Long P ublic W orks, Private Developers C.2.F Consider additional connections from existing bike lanes to o -street paths. Medium Long Public Works, SCRG, TMA E.2.A E.2.D; C.1.B; D.1.A I mproved Street Network Key network i mprovements that are considered transfor mative are the extension of S mith Road to Havana St., completely 40th Avenue between Ulster St. and Central Park Blvd., replacement of the Smith Road Sand Creek bridge, and an i mproved Ulster Street between 39th and 40th Avenues. Medium Long Public Works (40th; Ulster), PCMD (Smith Road; Smith Rd. bridge; Ulster) Private Developers (40th; Ulster)

PAGE 84

Central Park Station Area Plan Moving Forward 80 Infrastructure Tools (cont.)RECOMMENDATIONS IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY TIMEFRAME LEAD STAKEHOLDERSD.1.A I mprove access from the station area to the Sand Creek Regional Greenway and to nearby open space and recreation areas. Medium Long Public Works, Private Developers E.2.AExtend S mith Road from Central Park Boulevard to Havana Street. Medium Long Public Works, Private Developers E.2.B Complete 40th Avenue between Ulster Street and Central Park Boulevard through the Center eld Campus. Medium Long Public Works, Private Developers E.2.C; E.3.B Replace the Smith Road bridge over Sand Creek and include pedestrian and bicycle facilities in the bridge design. Medium Long Public Works, Park Creek Metropolitan District, Private Developers E.2.D Build curb and sidewalks on Ulster Street between 39th and 40th Avenues. Medium Long Public Works, Private Developers E.3.C; E.3.D Construct a new pedestrian/bicycle bridge, north of the station, over Sand Creek between the existing Stapleton Industrial Area and Centereld Campus at approxi mately the Ulster Street align ment and extend a new direct pedestrian and bicycle connection between Sand Creek Regional Trail and the station. Medium Long SCRG, TMA, Private Developers, etc E.7.A Establish an Inter modal Transportation Center at the Central Park Station. Medium Long RTD, TMA, SCRG, Stapleton Foundation, Others E.3.E Consider additional connections between on-street bicycle facilities and the Sand Creek Regional Greenway. Long Public Works, DPR, SCRG, TMA C.1.A; E.6.C; E.6.D; C.1.E I mprove street grid to achieve greater connectivity Establish greater connectivity to the existing Denver street grid whenever possible including the consideration of converting private streets to public right-of-way as redevelop ment occurs. On-going Public Works, Private Developers C.1.C Evaluate tra c calming elements for the 36th Avenue and Xanthia Street corridor between Central Park Boulevard and S mith Road. On-goingPublic Works C.2.A Build the bicycle and pedestrian i mpr ovements recommended in Denver Moves. Ongoing Public Works D.1.E Identify a more appropriate use for the trunk open space currently utilized for a prairie dog preserve as the station area develops into a high density, urban environment. On-going Denver Parks and Recreation (DPR)

PAGE 85

Central Park Show Station Area Plan Moving Forward 81 Partnership ToolsRECOMMENDATIONS IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY TIMEFRAME LEAD STAKEHOLDERSD.2.C Park-n-Ride Safety Work to i mprove the safety of the Park-n-Ride. Consider adding or relocating a COP shop to the station area to i mprove overall safety of the facility. Short Medium CCD Police, RTD, TMA, Others D.1.D; D.4.C TOD Marketing Strategy Pro mote the walkable, mixed-use environment of the primary TOD area to potential tenants of co mmercial space and residents of multi-family housing. Short Medium RTD, Forest City, Others E.4.A B Station Landmark Explore nancing and implementation strategies to install a station landmark to serve as a visual identity for the station. Short Medium RTD, Forest City, Others E.6.F Support any i mprovements to Quebec Square that increases safe pedestrian and bicycle access to Quebec Square. Short Medium TMA, Stapleton Foundation, Private Property Owners, Public Works E.7.B E.7.D; E.8 Station Inter modal Transportation Center and Bike Progra ms The establishment of a Inter modal Transportation Center at Central Park Station creates a centralized point of mobility options for transit users and residents. A station ITC would include bike sharing and rental progra ms, a bike station, a car sharing progra m, taxi services, and hotel shuttles. Short Medium Stapleton Foundation, TMA, RTD, CPD, SCRG, Hotels, Taxi Providers D.2.H Promote continuing education opportunities. Medium Long Stapleton Foundation, Others D.2.A; D.2.B Co mmunity and Cultural A menities Seek an adaptive reuse of the Stapleton Airport Tower in a cultural a menit y that is accessible to the public. Explor e the inc orporation of a co mmunity gathering facility as part of a larger development jointly utilized by either o ce and/or residential uses. On-going SDC, neighborhood associations, private developers, others D.2.D D.2.E Healthy Food Choices Encourage healthy food choices by neighborhood residents through urban agriculture, healthy corner store initiatives, and other progra ms identi ed by the Sustainable Food Policy Council. Provide healthy food options to waiting transit users and nearby residents by locating mobile food vendors in or near the station area. On-going; Medium Stapleton Foundation D.1.A; D.1.B; D.1.C; D.4.E; E.5.B; E.5.C Sustainable Design Support green building practices and pro mote standards of Leadership In Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) for new construction beginning with transit facility design and all subsequent develop ment through project review within the Citys and SDCs design guidelines. On-going Development Services, SDC, Forest City C.6; E.6.B Parking Manage ment Evaluate parking patterns and needs within the station impact area as phased development occurs and identify strategies that ensure a proper balance of supply and demand for di erent users. On-going Public Works, Stapleton Transportation Management Association (TMA) D.3.A D.3.E Housing Sustainability Develop a ordable housing within the station area and throughout Stapleton by partnering with RTD, Forest City, City agencies, and nonpro t housing developers. On-going RTD, Forest City, OED, Private Developers