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Central Platte Valley comprehensive plan amendment

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Title:
Central Platte Valley comprehensive plan amendment
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Community Planning and Development, City and County of Denver
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Denver, CO
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City and County of Denver
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English

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Community planning
Neighborhood plans
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Denver -- Central Platte Valley

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT
PLANNING AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OFFICE
CITY AND COUNTY' OF DENVER
JUNE 1, 1991


CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991
June 1, 1991
Dear Residents and Friends of Denver:
It is our pleasure to present to you the Central Platte Valley Plan
Amendment. This document represents the product of fifteen months of
work by the twenty-three member Steering Committee appointed by
Mayor Pena in February of 1990.
The Mayor charged the committee with re-writing the CPV Plan in relation
to 27 changed conditions that have occurred in the valley since adoption
of the 1986 CPV Plan. The most significant of these changes is the
continuation of rail passenger traffic at the Denver Union Terminal. The
plan is to serve as a framework for future public and private development
in the CPV.
The Steering Committee worked hard and enthusiastically to respond to
the challenge of the changed conditions within the CPV. With the
assistance of a broad spectrum of interest groups within the Valley and
numerous City departments, agencies, and consultants, we have developed
a vision for the Central Platte Valley. The pages that follow represent the
committee's best effort to define what the CPV can and should be in the
future.
At the core of the plan is an inter-modal transit facility which provides for
a single interface point for heavy and light rail, inter- and intra-city bus,
automobile, and pedestrian activity. The development of such a facility
will make the Platte Valley the transportation HUB of the region.
The Valley described in this plan will not emerge overnight, but it is
achievable. This Plan is rooted in the pragmatism of economic and
engineering analysis. At the same time, it recognizes the vital need for the
Valley to be a compliment to Downtown and Lower Downtown as well as
a place that is human, economically viable and fun.
Our sincere thanks to all of those who have dedicated their talent, energy
and ideas to this effort.
Frank B. Gray, Chairman
Central Platte Valley Steering Committee
PageL


CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991
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AREA OF THE 1991 CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY PLAN
AMENDMENT
BOUNDARY OF THE 1986 CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY
PLAN; AND THE 1987 PLATTE RIVER VALLEY ZONE
DISTRICT
Page I.I.


CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991
FEDERICO PENA
MAYOR
CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY STEERING COMMITTEE
Frank Gray, Chair
Director, Planning and Community
Development Office
J. Timothy Bickmore
Burlington Northern Railroad
Tim Boers
District 9 Neighborhood
Representative
Diana Boulter
President, Denver Partnership
Dana Crawford
Lower Downtown Property Owner
District 9 Neighborhood
Representative
Stephanie Foote
Councilwoman, District 4
Jerry Glick
Lower Downtown Design Review
Board, CPV Design Advisory
Committee
Lloyd Goff
Platte Valley Landowners
Association
Sandy Gurtler
Elitch Gardens
Steve Hebert
Anschutz Corporation
John Hickenlooper
Lower Downtown property owner.
District 9 Neighborhood
Representative
Gail Handby
United Union of Roofers
Mike LaMair
Glacier Park Co.
Richard McSpadden
Denver Union Terminal
Philip Milstein
Denver Planning Board,
Auraria Higher Education Center
Deborah Ortega
Councilwoman District 9
Art Prentiss
Amtrak
Tom Ragonetti
Water Street Joint Venture
Martin Saiz
Denver Planning Board, District 9
Neighborhood Represenative
Jim Swanson
Denver Planning Board
George Thorn
Developer
Barbara Zandberger
Union Pacific Railroad
Mickey Zeppelin
Lower Downtown District, District 9
Neighborhood Representative
PAGE i.


CENTRAL PLA TTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991
TABLE OF CON TENTS
PREFACE l
ABBREVIATIONS USED IN TEXT 3
PROCESS 4
GOALS AND INTENT STATEMENTS 5
CONCEPTS 10
FRAMEWORK MAPS 13
Open Space and Special Landscaped Streets 14
Preferred Land Use 17
Views, Building Heights, and Densities 18
Pedestrian Routes 21
Bicycle Routes 22
Transit:Rail, Bus and High Occupancy Vehicles 25
Major Streets, and Parking 26
Local Access Streets 29
SUB-AREA INTENT STATEMENTS
General 31
Cherry Creek 32
Commons 34
Commons Plaza 36
Denver Union Terminal 38
Upland 40
Prospect 42
Platte 44
Rockmont 46
West Bank 48
Water Street 50
Gates Crescent 52
Rice Yards 53
Auraria Village 54
Auraria Research Park 56
APPENDIX 57
Deliberations of the Steering Committee 71
Historic Structures 64
1986 Plan Maps 59-61
Criteria and Assumptions 74
ILLUSTRATIONS
Open Space and Special Landscaped Streets 15
Preferred Land Uses 16
Views, Landmarks, and Building Heights 19
Pedestrian Routes 20
Bicycle Routes 23
Transit, Rail, Bus and High Occupancy Vehicles 24
Major Streets and Parking 27
CPV Access Streets 28
Historic Structures 70
1986 Plans 59-61
PAGE It


CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991
P R E F A C E
History
Since adoption of the Central Platte Valley Comprehensive Plan
Amendment in 1986, a series of profound changes has affected the valley.
Major changes in ownership, establishment of a consolidated mainline for
all railroads through the valley and more recently, a decision to retain rail
passenger operations at Denver Union Terminal have all influenced the
ways in which the Central Platte Valley might be used. However, the basic
intent of the Plan remains unchanged: to guide the development of
resources which will benefit the whole Valley as well as adjoining
neighborhoods and the Downtown.
In January 1990, Mayor Pena appointed a special Steering Committee to
review and assess these changes and to direct the efforts of an urban
design consultant team. The Steering Committee was made up of
community, business, railroad and property owner representatives from
neighborhoods within and adjacent to the Central Platte Valley and
included representatives of the Denver Planning Board. Each member was
charged with disseminating relevant information within his or her
community, and bringing back a broader perspective on issues to the
Committee. The CPV Steering Committee met regularly throughout the
year, periodically holding joint sessions with the Denver Planning Board to
keep them appraised of progress and ultimately presented this document
to them, requesting that it be formally approved and forwarded to the City
Council for their consideration and adoption. Periodically, the Steering
Committee held public meetings at which the public at large was invited to
participate. Each Steering Committee meeting closed with a public forum
during which comments by the public were heard by the Committee.
The Steering Committee began its task by identifying the many changes
which had occurred since adoption of the 1986 Plan. They considered the
possible consequences of these changes and drafted a list of fundamental
issues to be addressed in developing a revised plan for the Valley. Goals
and intent statements were developed taking into consideration both the
contents of the 1986 Plan, the changes which had occurred since and the
identified fundamental issues. Changes, issues and goals developed by
the Committee gave direction to the plan which follows. Lists of each are
given in full in the Appendix.
PAGE 1


CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991
The 1986 Plan had included 17 sub-areas, each of which was to have had
a sub-area plan developed, reviewed and adopted to direct development
within it. In the interim, considerable effort had been expended in
developing plans and compatible zoning for sub-areas west of 1-25.
Consequently, much of the Steering Committee's effort was focussed in the
area between the freeway to the west and Auraria Parkway, Lower
Downtown and the Arapahoe Triangle to the east. This was the area
primarily affected by change.
Purpose
This document is the product of the Steering Committee's work. It is
intended to supercede the 1986 Comprehensive Plan Amendment, and
differs from it in two significant ways. The 1986 Plan was obliged to deal
with the quantifiable aspects of development control as well as addressing
larger policy issues. This document distinguishes between policy direction
and development regulation, addressing only the former. The specifics of
land use and development regulation were considered, but are left to be
detailed in the Zoning Code. This is an important difference since it
allows consideration and approval of plans for the valley without
involvement in the technicalities of specific regulations. Another
advantage is that amendments can be made to the zoning code over time
without risk of rendering the Plan obsolete.
The other significant difference stems from a change in procedure which
occurred after adoption of the 1986 Plan but before development of its
1991 successor. The zoning process for achieving approved development
plans has been modified to temporarily favor the Planned Unit
Development process until the PRV zone district is modified to incorporate
the new plan, and to further streamline the approval process.. This has
replaced the responsibility of those wishing to undertake development to
prepare sub-area plans. Consequently, the Plan must provide clear
guidance on how the sub-areas are to function cooperatively as parts of
the city, and what the principal features of each sub-area should be.
Considerable latitude in choice of land uses and building form remains in
most sub-areas, but the overall intent for each is spelled out more
specifically than it was in the 1986 document.
Coordination of land uses, facilities and functions throughout the CPV and
its immediate surroundings was accomplished using a series of Framework
Maps, each highlighting a single topic, such as Views, Landmarks and
Building Heights and Pedestrian Routes. These maps evolved with
successive evaluation by the Steering Committee, culminating in the set of
maps included in this Plan. Guidance for their formulation was found in
the goals and intent statements developed by the Steering Committee at
the beginning of the process.
PAGE 2


CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991
The Framework Maps provide a basis and context for examination of
opportunities and constraints affecting each sub-area. A brief description
of the intended character of each sub-area was developed, and a series of
design guidelines specific to that sub-area was drafted. These are included
in this Plan.
Abbreviations Used In the Text:
CCD City and County of Denver
CPV Central Platte Valley
CML Consolidated Main Line railroad tracks
DPB Denver Planning Board
DURA Denver Urban Renewal Authority
DUT Denver Union Terminal (Union Station)
FAR Floor Area Ratio
HOV High Occupancy Vehicle
LoDo Lower Downtown
LRT Light Rail Transit
PRV Platte River Valley zoning district
ROW Right of Way
RTD Regional Transportation District
TDR Transfer of Development Rights
PAGE 3


CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991
P R O C E S S :
The draft 1991 CPV Comprehensive Plan Amendment will be refined and
submitted by the Steering Committee to the Denver Planning Board and to
the City Council for approval. Once approved, it will supercede the 1986
Plan as the effective policy document directing land use and development
in the Central Platte Valley.
Following approval of the 1991 Plan, existing zoning regulations will
remain in place. While developers will no longer be required to prepare
and submit sub-area zoning standards and plans of their own,
development can proceed using established Planned Unit Development
regulations. Meanwhile amended land use and development regulations
for the CPV will be designed to implement policy and direction contained
in the adopted plan. After formal scrutiny of draft regulations, including
assurance of their consistency with other parts of the zoning code, these
too will be adopted. Together, the adopted 1991 CPV Comprehensive
Plan Amendment and development regulations will give potential
developers a precise view of the range,type and size of developments
which are likely to meet with City and County of Denver [CCD] Planning
and Zoning approval in any particular part of the CPV.
PAGE 4


CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991
OVERALL CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY
GOALS AND INTENT STATEMENTS:
GOAL 1: Land Use
1.1 Redevelop the Valley in ways that recognize it as a valuable
resource to the whole City.
1.2 Encourage a mix of land uses in the CPV which willl
support a dense urban character
1.3 Provide amenities which will knit Downtown and adjacent
neighborhoods together
1.4 Encourage a mix of commercial development which will:
V create new jobs
/ generate direct and indirect tax revenue
/ attract new Downtown residents
/ provide new amenities
1.5 Accommodate an appropriate mix of uses and encourage
viable development to satisfy both the economic needs of
landowners and public needs, including:
/ public open space
/ economic development
V housing
/ public facilities
INTENT STATEMENTS: Land Use
A. Capitalize on a unique opportunity to reuse former rail-
yard and obsolete industrial land in the heart of Denver.
B. Redevelop the Valley with uses that take advantage of its
unique characteristics, namely:
/ the South Platte River and Cherry Creek
/ proximity to Downtown and northwest
neighborhoods
/ historic value as the birthplace of Denver
/ railroad heritage and railroad facilities
/ regional vehicular access
/ large, land assemblages
/ central location, and the 'seam' between the
northwest neighborhoods and the center of the City
C. Redevelop the Valley to help satisfy the needs of the
Downtown and the adjoining neighborhoods by
making provision for:
/ neighborhood parks and recreation facilities
/ city-wide parking and recreation facilities
/ housing to develop a 24-hour Downtown
population
/ housing to reinforce adjoining neighborhoods
PAGE 5


CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991
Increased tax base
Support for Downtown retail, hotels, restaurants, and entertainment facilities
/ Downtown access and parking
Increased employment opportunities for residents of adjoining neighborhoods
/ Support for Denver's cultural, and arts resources
/ Support services for Downtown's businesses and employees.
GOAL 2: Open Space and Pedestrian System
2.1 Form the centerpiece of the regional open space system
2.2 Create a comprehensive network, linking areas within and around the valley
2.3 Provide an orderly, visually pleasing and active environment for:
/ workers
residents
/ neighbors
/ visitors
2.4 Reinforce desired land use patterns
2.5 Enhance amenities for new residential, specialized office,
research and development uses
2.6 Give public access to waterways from Downtown and
Lower Downtown
2.7 Recognize the South Platte River and Cherry Creek as focii
of the open space system
2.8 Create Denver Commons to be a focus for the South Platte
River Greenway
2.9 Develop Rockmont Park as the primary public open space
for the Highland neighborhood
INTENT STATEMENT: Open Space and Pedestrian System
A. Reconstruct the Valley's pedestrian and bicycle systems,
flood control, and parks facilities so that they become
armatures to foster a livable and interconnected urban
environment suited for the demands of the next century.
PAGE 6


CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991
GOAL 3: Transportation
3-1 Develop a multi-modal transportation center in the middle
of the valley which will:
/ connect with the Sixteenth Street Mall when it is
extended
/ ultimately replace the Market Street regional bus
terminal
/ be linked to the light rail system
/ provide a parking reservoir for Downtown and Lower
Downtown
/ intercept High Occupancy Vehicles [HOVs] and
general traffic as it enters the city center from the
north and from the south via Auraria Parkway and
Wewatta
3.2 Provide access to and through the CPV for autos and buses
to:
/ improve access to and around Downtown
/ improve access within the CPV
3-3 Improve access off 1-25 into the CPV
3.4 Accommodate through freight movements within the
CML corridor and future tracked transit adjacent to it
3.5 Accommodate rail passenger platforms and associated
facilities
at DUT
3.6 Reconstruct 20th Street to provide HOV, regional bus and
local access to Downtown, allowing an at-grade access to
the CPV at Chestnut St., and Bassett St.
3.7 Upgrade the 23rd Street viaduct and construct a new fly-
over to create the primary regional access route to
Downtown from the north with a connection to the future
Wewatta St.
3.8 Design 15th Street to provide local access to Downtown and
the northwest neighborhoods with near or at grade
connections at Wewatta St., Delgany St., and 'new' Bassett
St.
3.9 Remove the 16th Street viaduct
/ preserve the 16th Street bridge over the South Platte
River for pedestrian use
3.10 Extend the Sixteenth Street Mall into the CPV
/ connect Downtown and Lower Downtown to the
multi modal transportation center, to public open
spaces and the South Platte River
3.11 Extend the Lower Downtown street grid into Cherry Creek,
Commons Plaza and Upland sub-areas
3.12 Provide for light rail connections into the CPV and
Downtown
PAGE 7


CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991
INTENT STATEMENT: Transportation
A* Reconstruct the Valley's streets, major arterials, transit,
utilities, railroads, pedestrian and bicycle systems to foster
development of a livable and interconnected urban
environment suited for the demands of the next century
GOAL 4: Character
4.1 Foster a character for the CPV which is different and
distinct from that of Downtown:
/ Urban, but with more public open space
/ Developed to densities and heights which are
closely related to those in Lower Downtown
/ Building heights consistent with the fabric of Lower
Downtown
/ Different parking requirements
4.2 Encourage the individual qualities of each sub-area to be
manifest in local urban character; do not generate a single
image for the entire CPV
4.3 Preserve views of natural and man-made features including:
/ The mountains
/ The Downtown skyline
V Denver Union Terminal
4.4 Maintain traditional street-to-building relationships
4.5 Step down building heights near Cherry Creek and major
public open spaces
INTENT STATEMENT: Character
A. Redevelop the Valley in such a way that it complements the
character and functions of Downtown and Lower
Downtown, reinforcing them with uses and densities which
will rebuild a market for retail, housing, services, hotels,
entertainment, and first class office space.
GOAL 5: Flood Control
5.1 Remove CPV south of Speer Boulevard from the floodplain
5.2 Pursue opportunities for water-related amenities while also
meeting flood control needs
GOAL 6: Consolidated Main Line Railroad Corridor
6.1 Minimize physical barriers across the CPV without
compromising safety
6.2 Buffer views of railroad tracks but maintain open views
across the valley along street alignments and designated
view corridors
PAGE 8


CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991
6.3 Provide a right of way for light rail in conjunction with the
CML but physically separated from active trackage
INTENT STATEMENT: Consolidated Main Line Railroad Corridor
A. Overcome, to the extent possible, railroad and roadway
barriers between CPV sub-areas, Lower Downtown, and the
northwest neighborhoods.
GOAL 7: History
7.1 Preserve Denver Union Terminal (train room and two-story
wings) as an active rail passenger center
7.2 Encourage preservation of significant historic structures
including older quality buildings in Cherry Creek, West
Bank, Water Street, Auraria Village and Prospect sub-areas
PAGE 9


CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991
C O N CEP T S :
Overall concepts that guide the revision of the Central Platte Valley
Comprehensive Plan Amendment
A. Develop a multi-modal transportation center Qocal, regional
and interstate transit, high occupancy vehicle [HOV]
parking, 'interceptor' parking for general Downtown auto
traffic, and shuttle facilities) in the center of the Valley,
connected to Downtown by an extension of the Sixteenth
Street Mall.
The provision of this multi-modal transportation center will:
1) provide a crucial amenity for the development of
the CPV
2) help reduce through-auto traffic on the 20th Street
Viaduct Replacement Project within Lower
Downtown
3) improve access to, and thus attractiveness of
development in and adjacent to the CPV
4) reinforce the DUT as the interstate rail entry to
Denver and Downtown
5) provide long term parking relief for Downtown and
Lower Downtown, intercepting automobiles before
they penetrate heavily pedestrianized areas
6) permanently anchor the l6th Street Mall
B. Create the multi-modal transportation center, and adjoining
parking within a deck structure that serves as a platform for
new development. The top level, or 'artificial ground level'
of this platform would be high enough to span over the
CML railroad tracks and the passenger rail tracks at the
DUT, thereby bridging the railroad barriers between the
Valley development, Downtown, and the Platte River. The
deck would be designed so that it slopes to grade at its
northern, eastern, and southern edges allowing cars and
pedestrians to naturally drive or walk to its upper level.
The multi-modal transportation center would be connected
to Downtown bus shuttle vehicles running on an extended
Sixteenth Street Mall. Ultimately, the Mall would be
extended over the CML providing access to the Commons
Park, Cherry Creek, Platte River and areas south of Speer.
C. In the long term, construct a bus/HOV lane from the 20th
St. Viaduct Replacement Project on a R.O.W. along the CML
ultimately terminating at the multi-modal transportation
center. This would locate the bus lane so that it could serve
a future regional bus terminal (replacing the Market St.
Station) next to the CML where it can interface with a light
rail stop.
PAGE 10


CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991
In the short term, construct a bus-only lane
bound for the Market St. Station on a route directly behind
Union Station to the 16th St. Mall.
Critical to this concept and to the multi-modal center as a
whole, is resolution of issues concerning rail tracks that
cross Sixteenth Street near the DUT.
D. Provide, at full build-out, a central Commons open space
that has two distinct areas:
1) a compact urban 'square' on the east side of the
CML for CPV, Downtown and Lower Downtown
residents and workers (Commons Plaza)
2) an expansive regional park along the Platte River,
suitable for large festivals such as the People's Fair,
and the Festival of Mountain and Plains; but also
suitable for unprogrammed active and passive
recreation (Commons Park)
E. Develop Rockmont Park in the earliest phases of Valley
improvement as a large neighborhood-related park in
which active recreation facilities predominate.
F. Construct Wewatta St. between Speer Blvd and 23rd Street
(Park Ave West) as a connector that links the Valley sub-
areas east of the CML tracks. Continuing south, ultimately
connecting through the Auraria Village subarea to Auraria
Parkway along 7th Street or 9th Street, it will provide a by-
pass route for traffic not destined for Lower Downtown.
G. Provide a secondary street system that effectively
interconnects the sub-areas of the Valley. Provide access to
the Commons from the east via general traffic grade
separations at the CML on 16th Street, and possibly on 19th
Street the former shared with the Mall shuttle bus system
from Wewatta to new Bassett St.
H. In the light of existing neighborhood plans, review and
selectively preserve the planning and sub-area zoning
standards now in place west of 1-25. Encourage housing
infill projects, at scales compatible with the adjoining
residential neighborhoods along the western edges of the
Valley.
I. Preserve the DUT as Denver's main passenger rail terminal.
In the long term, bridge over the loading platforms to link
the upper level of the multi-modal transportation center and
other uses in the valley.
PAGE 11


CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991
J. Develop a major public'square'along the entire east
frontage of the DUT facing Wynkoop St. as an additional
open space for Lower Downtown.
K. Develop an internal transit system for the Valley based on
the extension of the Sixteenth Street Mall.. Link the river
and Rice Yard sub-area directly with Downtown by
extension of the Sixteenth Street Mall and its shuttle system.
Link them also with general traffic via 15th Street and Speer
Blvd.
L. Locate public facilities (such as an amusement park, a
baseball stadium, an aquarium, and other cultural
/recreational facilities), in the Valley. Create more
tourist attractions in support of Downtown hotel, retail, and
convention center trade. Encourage a recreational use such
as an amusement park in the Rice Yards sub-area.
M. Allow warehousing, distribution, and light industrial uses in
some specific areas of the Valley as support facilities for
Downtown, and to take advantage of the Valley's good
access to regional and interstate transportation .
N. Create a network of pedestrian and bicycle routes that:
1) connect Downtown, the Valley development, and
the northwest neighborhoods with the Platte River
and Cherry Creek
2) inter-connect the sub-areas of the Valley.
Build this network onto the Commons Park,
Greenway system, and the Cherry Creek bike and
pedestrian system. Consider the Sixteenth Street
Mall Extension as the major pedestrian connection
from Downtown to the Commons Park, making an
overpass at the CML, the preferred method of
bridging this barrier. In the long term, create
pedestrian overhead crossings of DUT trackage and
the CML between 16th and 20th Streets.
O. Preserve and reuse as many of the old industrial and
railroad-related buildings and structures in the Valley as
possible, in order to build on their character and give the
Valley a unique identity.
P. Consider creating additional water features in the Valley,
building on the Platte River, and Cherry Creek water
environments.
Q. Develop a plan that can be implemented in phases,
so that it does not depend on large advance investments in
infrastructure.
PAGE 12


CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991
FRAMEWORK MAPS:
The maps which follow were developed and refined during the course of
the Steering Committee's deliberations. They reflect a complex series of
interconnected decisions affecting many aspects of the intended built
environment in the CPV. Their purpose is to demonstrate how the uses,
structures and activities planned for each sub-area are intended to
interface with those of adjacent areas, collectively comprising a rational
system, capable of supporting attainment of the goals which are
enumerated above.
PAGE 13


CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991
Open Space and Special Landscaped Streets
Increased open space and public recreational use of the valley are the
most powerful character-defining elements of the plan. The South Platte
River and Cherry Creek are the major natural features of the CPV to which
all parks and public open spaces relate directly or indirectly. The inter-
connected system of public open spaces constitutes the major form-giving
element of CPV infrastructure.
Public open spaces have been designed as an integrated system of large,
intermediate and small amenities, each intended to fulfill different
functions within the urban environment. Most prominent is Commons
Park, an open meadow by the river big enough to accommodate regional
events and other large festivals. At other times, it will support a diversity
of unprogrammed active and passive activities. Other regional facilities
such as an aquarium may be added later to the Commons Park or on
some other site within the contiguous system of parks and waterways.
At the other extreme are small and intimate squares introduced into built
up areas, giving people some opportunity for passive relaxation close to
places of work or residence. These squares also provide a framework for
future development.
Rockmont park is intended to fulfill the needs of the Highland
neighborhood for both active and passive recreational facilities. It will be
equipped with ball fields as well as informal grassy areas near the river. It
will be accessible from the neighborhood via 20th Street, Bassett Street,
Platte Street and the connection beneath 1-25 to Inca Street.
Intermediate open spaces such as those along Cherry Creek and the river
provide a continuous band of greenery through the valley, relating it to its
larger natural context. These spaces serve a variety of active and passive
functions. They provide continuous trails for cyclists and those on foot
between destinations across the valley. They also provide an attractive
outlook for buildings constructed along their margins, particularly
residential and entertainment uses adjacent to public open spaces. Not
only can such uses capitalize on views over the parks; the occupants also
provide 'eyes on the park', improving safety for park users.
These regional, neighborhood and local open spaces are connected by
special landscaped streets creating a continuous network crisscrossing the
valley and providing a unique setting for development, providing links
between sub-areas in the valley and adjacent neighborhoods, and
increasing public access to all of the valley's amenities.
Interim landscaping ( such as hydroseeding ) is strongly encouraged for
large vacant areas in the Valley prior to the first stages of development.
PAGE 14


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PAGE 16


CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSLVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991
Preferred Land Uses
The predominant character of development in the valley will be an urban
mix of office, residential, entertainment, recreational, and commercial uses
consistent, in almost all cases, with the land uses listed in thel986 Plan.
Each of the subareas will exhibit uses consistent with its locational
characteristics and established activities where these are significant. This
overall mixed-use character is intended to provide a broad range of
development activities capable of supporting and complementing existing
uses nearby. It also provides for varied future market conditions. Proposed
uses will knit the Central Platte Valley together while allowing for a high
degree of diversity and distinctiveness between subareas.
Residential use should be concentrated as much as possible in areas that
will extend existing, adjacent housing redevelopments (particularly in the
Lower Downtown area) into the valley and in areas that will maximize
proximity to the South Platte River, Cherry Creek and other open-space
amenities. Since development of additional housing has been identified as
a high priority, preference has also been given to areas in which
infrastructure is largely in place.
Light industrial and warehouse uses, previously eliminated from the Valley
in the 1986 CPV plan, are now proposed to be allowed in some subareas
because of the continuation of passenger railroad uses at DUT not
contemplated in the previous plan.
Entertainment uses should be concentrated along the South Platte River
and Cherry Creek where they can complement recreational activities
associated with the various parks and other public open spaces which are
connected to the waterways. Amusement park use has been added to the
land uses allowed in the Rice Yards subarea.
This plan does not readdress land uses in those sub-areas west of 1-25 for
which neighborhood plans and zoning regulations have been largely
developed.
PAGE 17


CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991
Views, Visual Landmarks, Building Heights and Densities
The pattern of building heights in the Central Platte Valley favors lower-
rise structures adjacent to major open spaces, within protected view
corridors, and near existing lower-density, low-rise neighborhoods. This
pattern recognizes the importance of ensuring that sunlight can reach
major open spaces and responds to the desire for pedestrian-scaled
development along the waterways. It also ensures the continued
preeminence of landmark features in the valley and complements the scale
and fabric of Lower Downtown and existing adjacent development.
To balance the impact of lower building heights in the Valley, and to
better develop a compact urban character, the previous plan's FAR
restrictions have been eliminated, letting the height limits become the
primary determinant of density.
High rise development is generally disallowed, since it would tend to
encourage developments which would be out of scale with Lower
Downtown and would compete directly with Downtown instead of
complementing it as the goals dictate. For a discusion of height and
density issues, including the Steering Committees assumed height values
and locational criteria see the paper on criteria and assumptions
underlying the recommendations which is included in the Appendix.
In order to provide some choice in certain areas where the existing low
rise character is less prevalent, but where midrise development would
require additional controls, a 'Flex Area' is proposed. Owners in these
areas would have two options: 1) to develop up to the maximum low rise
height without any limit on floor area ratio, or 2) to build up to the
maximum mid-rise height limit in exchange for accepting a 2:1 floor area
ratio density constraint. If the latter option is taken, additional design
criteria would be applicable such as increases in landscape requirements,
and review of building locations to minimize the interference of views
from public places.
The existing DUT Development Agreement allows high rise structures
(250' high) on either side of the Terminal, subject to locational criteria and
design standards, in return for the preservation of the building. If the
Agreement is terminated, the high rise areas shown in the Agreement shall
revert to the mid-rise height limits shown in this Plan.
PAGE 18




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OVERALL URBAN DESIGN PLAN
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PAGE 20


CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991
Pedestrian Routes
The system of pedestrian routes throughout the CPV has been designed to
give safe and convenient access to all destinations for those on foot. It is
not regarded as a secondary system, but rather as one which will
recommend itself as the access system of choice for many who live or
work in the valley. Pedestrian routes are closely integrated with the open
space system since open spaces and parks often offer the most amenable
walking environments, provided that they are safe and reasonably direct.
Established major pedestrian routes such as 16th Street and Cherry Creek
are used as arteries to which lesser routes are connected. The objective is
to provide major connections between sub-areas in the valley, sub-areas
and adjacent neighborhoods and to provide overall improved access to
the regional recreational trail system and the proposed open spaces and
parks. These routes create a comprehensive network of cross-valley and
through-valley connection.
Designated pedestrian routes will be provided with continuous, wide
sidewalks, street trees, pedestrian lighting and railings (where appropriate)
and informational and directional signing. All major pedestrian routes will
be handicap accessible. Continuity with connecting streets is necessary to
the guiding principles of safety and convenience. It is important that high
standards of pedestrian amenity be maintained throughout the street
system so that circulation on foot is actively encouraged.
PAGE 21


CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991
Bicycle Routes
Criteria of safety, convenience and connection to established routes guide
design of the bicycle routes network. Full advantage is taken of the
continuous system of public open spaces along Cherry Creek and the
South Platte River to provide safe and amenable routes. Many routes are
segregated from vehicular traffic, but access needs often dictate shared use
of streets. In such instances, safety considerations are paramount,
minimizing risks associated with potentially dangerous intersections and
heavily trafficked streets.
Defined bicycle routes provide additional connections between sub-areas,
sub-areas and adjacent neighborhoods, and improved access to proposed
regional and neighborhood parks and open spaces. These routes create a
comprehensive and continuous network of cross-valley and through-valley
connections that complement existing regional bicycle trails along the S.
Platte River Greenway and Cherry Creek, and the system of on-street and
off-street routes developed in the city.
PAGE 22


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PAGE 24


CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991
Transit: Rail, Bus and High Occupancy Vehicles
The focus of transit improvements in the valley is the Multi-Modal
Transportation Center centrally located in the valley northwest of DUT.
This multi-modal center will provide an interface between regional buses
and local circulators (ultimately replacing the existing Market Street Station
in Lower Downtown), light rail connections to Downtown from the
airport, southeast and southwest destinations, passenger rail service
including Amtrak and the Ski Train, interstate and tour buses, 1-25 high-
occupancy vehicles, a possible historic trolley and transit system operating
on the 16th St. Mall extension from Lower Downtown through the valley.
Another important constituant of the Multi-Modal Transportation Center
will be a large capacity parking facility. This will intercept High
Occupancy Vehicles arriving from the future 20th Street HOV ramp along
the CML, and single passenger vehicles arriving on Speer Boulevard, new
20th St., and the new Park Ave. West (23rd St. Viaduct) via new Wewatta
Street before they reach streets in Downtown and Lower Downtown. The
function of the mid-valley intercept parking facility is expected to change
over time. In the short-term, it is integral to the planning for areas of the
CPV and Lower Downtown. Other downtown-related parking intercept
facilities may be planned.
The Multi-Modal Transportation Center will focus the interface of these
various transit modes at a single location in the valley, assuring the future
of DUT as Denver's premier point of entry to downtown.
The Multi-Modal Transportation Center will also provide a unique real
estate catalyst for development in the area, providing unparalleled
accessibility and a regional parking resource in the valley. It is important
to locate this facility in the center of the Valley in order to stimulate other
development. Locating it adjacent to the DUT would leave the mid-valley
isolated while possibly increasing bus traffic in Lower Downtown, and
degrading the architecture of the Terminal itself. The DUT will remain the
center for passenger rail transportation, accommodating national
connections through Amtrak operations, and possibly commuter rail
service between front range cities. The proximity of the two transit
centers will provide the ability for passengers to make cross connections
between the two facilities. However, through-freight movement will
continue on the CML adjacent to the future light rail corridor.
The Sixteenth Street Mall will be extended into the valley providing a
strong and amenable connection to Lower Downtown and Downtown.
A transit system operating on the Mall will provide direct and convenient
service for those arriving at and departing from the city center via the
Multi-Modal Transportation Center. The historic trolley system could
provide an additional recreation amenity in the Valley, as well as a
delightful linkage between recreation and entertainment facilities.
PAGE 25


CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991
Major Streets and Parking
Street improvements planned for the CPV are consistent with the system of
arterial, collector, and local streets which serves the city as a whole. They
are designed to provide a rational hierarchy of major and minor traffic
routes whose capacity and design speed are consistent with the vehicle
trips accommodated. At one extreme, the 23rd Street ( Park Ave. West)
replacement structure serves primarily as a regional link between 1-25 and
Downtown Denver, with minimal need for local access within the valley.
Consequently it is designed as a high capacity arterial street. 15th Street,
though also an arterial street, fulfills a more local function, linking Lower
Downtown and the Highland and West Denver neighborhoods and
providing access from both into the Cherry Creek and West Bank sub-
areas.
Regional and local traffic access to the valley, amongst sub-areas, and
between sub-areas and adjacent neighborhoods will be significantly
improved when planned viaduct and roadway improvements have been
completed. Regional traffic flows to and from 1-25 will be carried by
three major arterials: Auraria Parkway, Speer Boulevard, and Park Ave.
West (23rd Street). Local connections between sub-areas and between
sub-areas and adjacent neighborhoods will be provided on local arterial
streets: 15th Street, 20th Street and new Wewatta Street.
The Multi-Modal Transportation Center will provide a major new public
parking reservoir in the valley for regional traffic from 1-25 including high-
occupancy vehicles. Initially this will be landscaped on-grade parking ,
but as phased development of the center proceeds, will be replaced by
structured parking Transit connections to valley development and
Downtown will be an integral part of the Multi-Modal Transportation
Center, making it an effective interceptor of traffic which would otherwise
contribute to congestion in Downtown and Lower Downtown.
PAGE 26


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PAGE 28


CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991
CPV Access Streets
The Major Streets and Parking Plan addresses primary and secondary
street systems. Local access streets are, however, important to the
attractiveness of property to prospective developers and are vital to the
efficiency with which different facilities in the Valley can interact. This
plan is included to demonstrate how such access is to be provided to
areas in which it is presently inadequate. Wewatta Street, though it will be
classified as an arterial, is included since it is a new street and will provide
the only continuous north and south route in the Valley between DUT and
the river. Its local circulatory functions are therefore of great importance.
The following comments describe aspects of the system.
A partial frontage road system is recommended along the CML to
provide secondary access between several subareas. A continuous system
may not be necessary or desireable. Service access for railroad
maintenance will be provided separately within the CML right-of way.
A road in the Commons park is also recommended. However, this road is
only for park access, and should be located and designed to discourage
through traffic.
Also shown on the Local Access Street Map is the 1-25 Collector/
Distributor system proposed in the Colorado Department of Highways'
1985 125 CBD Access Study. The recommendations of this study were
accepted by the 1986 CPV Comprehensive Plan Amendment, and since
conditions affecting these recommendations have not changed
significantly, the current 1991 plan revisions assume their continued
validity.
PAGE 29


-----SUBAREA BOUNDARIES
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PAGE 30


CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991
SUB-AREA. INTENT STATEMENTS:
General
Sub-Areas identified in the 1986 CPV Comprehensive Plan Amendment
which are located west of 1-25 have undergone varying degrees of
planning analysis and evaluation by community representatives in the last
few years. Several of these subareas are covered by neighborhood plans
and Subarea Zoning Standards crafted to respond to neighborhood
concerns. Because these areas have had additional planning efforts, and
have been little affected by the changes which have occurred in property
ownership and railroad operations east of 1-25, they have not been
reevaluated here.
Sub-Areas east of 1-25 have each been evaluated in the context of the
Framework Maps. Some have had their boundaries amended to conform
with 1) road or rail alignments which have changed since 1986, and 2)
with new park configurations. Some new sub-areas have also been
proposed to acknowledge changing use and ownership conditions.
Particular characteristics of each sub-area have been considered in
conjunction with overall CPV objectives, and in relation to functional
relationships with adjacent areas. From this, an intent statement and a
series of design guidelines peculiar to each sub-area has been derived.
Together with the Framework Maps, these statements and guidelines
provide policy direction for future improvements in each sub-area and a
basis for subsequent redrafting of specific zoning standards and
development regulations.
PAGE 31


CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991
Cherry Creek Sub-Area
Intended Character:
The Cherry Creek sub-area occupies a critical location at the heart of the
CPV. It includes important portions of the public open space system along
the Creek itself, at Confluence Park and at the southern extremity of the
Commons Park. The sub-area is bisected by 15th Street, the principal
connection between Downtown, West Bank and the Highland
Neighborhood. Historic buildings on either side of 15th Street extend the
character of Lower Downtown into the CPV and establish a precedent for
the scale and uses of future development. Cherry Creek, West Bank and
portions of Water Street have been identified as housing priority areas,
where new development and rehabilitation of existing structures are
expected to add substantially to inner city housing in support of other
uses in the CPV and Lower Downtown.
East and west halves of the sub-area are separated by the CML. Only 15th
and 16th Streets will cross this barrier, with no lateral access into the area
closer to the railroad than Bassett and Delgany Streets. Land immediately
adjacent to the railroad will thus remain difficult to access and limited in
its appeal for redevelopment. The remainder of the sub-area, by contrast,
benefits from proximity to public open space, easy access to Lower
Downtown and to transit and parking facilities in the Commons Plaza sub-
area.
The extension of the l6th Street Mall transit and pedestrian corridor is
planned on the area's northern edge. This system will connect to a new
, Nj^north/south street aligned with the Arched Bridge on Speer Boulevard,
' giving access to the Rice Yards (Elitch's Amusement Park) from the l6th
Street Mall. Local general traffic on 16th Street west of Wewatta will be
permissable in order to provide additional access to the Cherry Creek
subarea. See the Local Access Street Map for a general description of
access options in the area.
The boundaries of the Cherry Creek sub-area remain unchanged from the
1986 Comprehensive plan amendment.
Guidelines:
is* Strengthen the historic function of this area as the primary
connection between Lower Downtown, the river, West Bank and the
Highland neighborhood.
US Mixed use development should be encouraged, with an emphasis
on housing throughout the area and into West Bank so that a viable
residential neighborhood emerges, populous enough to sustain a variety of
support facilities in addition to those already existing nearby. Discourage
expansion of the electrical sub-station at Confluence Park which conflicts
directly with housing objectives.
PAGE 32


CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991
o Buildings should be predominantly low-rise to encourage reuse of
existing structures, to compliment the scale of the existing buildings in the
area and in Lower Downtown, and to preserve views between the City
center and northwest neighborhoods.
o- Buildings and entries should orient to the street as much as
possible, in order to continue the character of a traditional urban
downtown.
Building heights should step down toward Cherry Creek in order
to provide a comfortable pedestrian scale along the Creek edge.
is* Buildings should connect to each other as much as possible in
order to create spatially defined streets and courtyards, and to create a
compact district where uses in close proximity to each other foster a
pedestrian-friendly environment.
is Preservation of historical structures in Cherry Creek should take
account of future access needs so that they can remain viable contributors
to the sub-area's liveliness.
is- The Cherry Creek frontage should be developed as a pedestrian-
only creekside promenade with no access for general traffic, (service and
emergency vehicles excepted) and with buildings set back from the Creek
bank. This space is intended to be an active interface between public
open space and the mixed use buildings which are to front it. Extensions
of this open space to the interior of adjacent blocks is encouraged.
Restaurants, night clubs, and shops with housing above are encouraged to
locate along this creekside promenade.
i&r Trails along Cherry Creek are intended to provide primary
pedestrian and bicycle access between Downtown, the Highland
Neighborhood, West Bank, the Platte Valley Greenway, and other
destinations in the Central Platte Valley.
13* Pedestrian and bicycle access into Auraria Village and Commons
Plaza should be provided on Delgany, Wewatta and Wynkoop; into the
Rice Yards and Commons via the 16th Street extension and new Bassett
Street. Abandoned historic railroad bridges over Cherry Creek should be
reused for pedestrian and bicycle traffic.
PAGE 33


CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991
Commons Sub-Area
Intended Character:
The Commons sub-area has been redefined as the area between the CML
and the river, 16th and 20th Streets. It is to function as a regional park.
Commons Park will be a major component in the public open space
system of the Central Platte Valley. The Commons will be connected by
the Platte River Greenway to Confluence Park and Cherry Creek to the
south, and to Rockmont Park to the north. It will provide a large and
uninterrupted grassy area with the flexibility to accommodate everything
from informal field sports to major regional festivals. Since both direct
vehicular access and parking facilities will be limited, the Commons will
depend on pedestrian access to and from parking facilities in the
Commons Plaza area.
Guidelines:
ts- Only uses which contribute directly to the regional park functions
of the Commons should be permitted. Examples of such uses are: park
administration, aquarium, and limited parking areas.
es- Vehicular access within the Commons between 16th St. and 20th St.
should be limited to park access, maintenance, service and security
purposes. Any streets within the park should not create barriers between
sections of the park.
tsr Pedestrian access from Commons Plaza via 16th, 17th, 18th, 19th
and 20th streets is to be encouraged, especially since the majority of
parking spaces available to park users will be located at the Multi-Modal
Transportation Center.
ss- Landscaping should preserve large, uninterrupted open areas
suitable for field sports and occasional major festivals.
13- Native, informal landscaping should reinforce the existing
environment, possibly introducing additional water features to the park.
13- The creative use of water is encouraged, as well as the close
interaction with and easy access to the river.
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CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991
is1 The CML should be screened with berms, walls and landscaping to
minimize noise and other adverse impacts on the park. However, buffer
landscaping should not block mountain view corridors along the
numbered streets.
csr The parking needs of the Commons should only be partially
accommodated in the park. Park users (particularly for festivals) should
be encouraged to use the multi-modal parking reservoir east of the CML,
accessing the Commons by pedestrian bridges over the railroad tracks.
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CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991
Commons Plaza Sub-Area
Intended Character:
Commons Plaza sub-area has been redefined as the area between DLJT
and CML from 16th Street to 20th Street. The urban character of Lower
Downtown is to be extended into this sub-area despite isolation from it by
intervening railroad platforms and tracks. The principal uses will be a
Multi-Modal Transportation Center and an associated large parking
intercept facility. The Center will include a terminus for the extended
Sixteenth Street Mall shuttle, a light rail stop, interchange with commercial
interstate buses, and will incorporate a bus terminus for RTD which will
eventually supersede the Market Street Station for regional services.
Ultimately, a landscaped plaza will be built over this facility with low-rise,
mixed-use development on either side of it framing views of DUT from the
Commons and beyond.
The parking intercept facility will serve Lower Downtown and Downtown
Denver by feeding local transit service and sidewalks. It will also serve
mid-rise commercial development in the northern part of the Commons
Plaza sub-area. A local park for passive recreation will be located near
16th St. Eventually, this will provide access to the landscaped plaza and,
hence, via footbridges to the Commons Park. One or more pocket parks
will be located in the northern part of the sub-area. See illustrations on
pages 59-63 for a representation of the phased, and full build-out
development desired by this Plan
Guidelines:
S3- Mixed commercial and limited retail uses should be encouraged on
the north and east sides of the Multi-modal Transportation Center and
parking intercept facilities.
S3- Housing with active plaza level uses should be encouraged
adjacent to the landscaped plaza.
is- Public streets and other public open spaces should be structured to
strengthen physical and visual connections between Commons Plaza and
adjacent sub-areas.
is- Convenient pedestrian access to adjacent sub-ares should be
maintained as a priority; particularly to Commons Park and Cherry Creek.
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CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991
is- Streets within the sub-area should be structured to create an
artificial ground level above the Multi-Modal Transportation Center at an
elevation which will accommodate foot-bridge conections over platforms
to DUT and over the CML to the Commons Park.
During early phases of development, ultimate street and access
patterns should be established to subdivide surface parking lots, which
should be relieved by interim landscaping.
be provided in the early phases of development.
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CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991
Denver Union Terminal Sub-Area
Intended Character:
Views across the valley toward DUT are protected, so it is important that
new development should not obscure the main elevation of the original
station building. The existing train room and two storey wings must be
preserved and maintained. Any changes to the exterior of the building
must be approved by the historic preservation organizations listed in the
DUT Development Agreement. The height and location of the buildings
in the sub-area must be consistent with those established in the
Agreement. If the Development Agreement should be terminated, then
the right to build high rises shall also be terminated, and revert to a
maximum mid-rise height in the zones previously indicated as high rise in
the Development Agreement. Areas already indicated as suitable for
midrise and low rise in the Development Agreement should remain
designated as such.
Guidelines:
ts* New buildings should step down towards Lower Downtown from
high-rise over the tracks to low-rise along the Lower Downtown edge.
is- As described in the Development Agreement's guidelines, the
architecture of new buildings should be compatible with that of the
existing terminal Train Room and wings in materials, colors, scale and
form. Any new development must provide urban open space in front of
the Terminal from 16th St. to 18th St. facing Wynkoop St. Open space
shown in the Development Agreement on the west side of the Terminal
assumed that the passenger rail function would be moved to another
location. The purpose of this open space was to primarily preserve the
view of the Terminal from the west. Although passenger rail operations
will now continue, making ground level open space impossible, the
principle reason for the open space still remains to insure that no
development blocks this view. Consequently, no structure higher than the
sill line of the large arched windows shall be allowed in front of the west
face of the train room.
i* Public pedestrian connections should be provided from DUT over
the passenger platforms to the Commons Plaza, ensuring convenient
access between Lower Downtown and the Multi-Modal Transportation
Center, public open spaces and other facilities in the valley.
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CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991
New development in and adjoining DUT should incorporate uses
which are compatible with those established in the adjacent Lower
Downtown and may include office, hotel, retail and residential uses. Any
above-grade parking structure which faces onto a Lower Downtown street
should provide ground floor commercial space accessible and visible from
the street for the majority of the garage's street frontage.
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CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991
Upland Sub-Area
Intended Character:
This is a new sub-area located between Wewatta and Wazee Streets, DUT
and Broadway. Upland was until recently occupied by Union Pacific
Railroad operations. It represents an important addition to the land
resource of the CPV because it immediately abuts the Lower Downtown
and Arapahoe Triangle districts.
Despite the steep escarpment which bounds the southeast side of the
Upland sub-area, the established downtown street grid could be extended
across the land, giving flexibility in access and establishing an urban
development pattern consistent with its location and development
potential. Consequently, projected uses are mixed with a predominance
of office uses south of 22nd Street and extension of Arapahoe Triangle
activities into the northern part of the sub-area. Development of the Multi-
Modal Transportation Center and intercept parking facility in the adjoining
Commons Plaza sub-area will provide a stimulus to development of the
southern part of Upland.
Guidelines:
The UP Head-house, the scale and character of Lower Downtown,
and other historic buildings adjacent to this sub-area set a precedent for
the scale and quality of future development.
i3* Pedestrian and bicycle access to Lower Downtown should be
provided by extension of Wynkoop at or near grade over depressed 20th
Street. Additionally, access for pedestrians, bicycles and local vehicular
traffic should be provided by extension of the established street grid across
the entire sub-area, as well as from the new cross-valley structures at 20th
Street and Park Avenue West.
13* The parkway character of Park Ave. should be continued in the
transition between the new Park Ave West viaduct structure and the city
streets that serve it. Since this transition is the first introduction of
downtown to the motorist, it should include some kind of gateway
treatment either by landscaping, entry elements, and/or signage.
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CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991
cr A small public open space should be identified and dedicated at a
location convenient for most future occupants.
tss- Property between 19th and 20th Street should be developed for
uses which complement and strengthen the prevailing Lower Downtown
mix of office, retail, housing and galleries. Between 20th and 23rd Streets,
office uses should predominate, with the mix of uses favoring light
industrial and warehousing between 23rd Street and Broadway.
es" If a baseball stadium is sited in this area, a set of additional
guidelines should be followed. These guidlines should include the
following:
/ Pedestrian access between LoDo and the stadium should be
provided along Wynkoop, Wazee, and Blake Streets.
/ Pedestrian access from the CPV should be from 20th St.,
and new pedestrian bridges over the tracks between
20th and Park Ave. West, and, possibly, at 18th St.
/ Primary vehicular access should be from 22nd. St., and
Park Ave. West.(23rd St.), with secondary vehicular
access from 20th St.
/ Major parking areas should occur north of 22nd. St. and
west of Blake St., and west of Wewatta in the CPV. Avoid
the dependence on parking in Lower Downtown
/ The existing warehouses along Blake St. north of 20th
St. should be preserved as much as possible and integrated
into the project.
/ Minimize the height of the stadium by recessing it into
the existing slope.
/ The stadium's form, functional organization, and
architecture should reflect the characteristics of LoDo
buildings: street oriented, brick, pedestrian scaled
facades, and retail and transparent facades at ground
level along Blake St., and 20th St.
/ Light glare and noise should be confined to the site as
much as possible.
PAGE 41


CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991
Prospect Sub-Area
Intended Character:
Originally an area of industrial activities exclusively related to the railroads,
Prospect has provided incubator space for a wide variety of uses in recent
years. Buildings vary in condition from derelict to new and vary in quality
from solidly built old warehouses to less substantial recent structures. The
sub-area is redefined in this plan to accommodate a reconfigured
Rockmont Park. It is bounded on three sides by active railroad lines, due
to the continued operation of Amtrak at DUT. Consequently, light
industrial and warehouse uses have been added to the list of permissable
new uses. Access will be significantly improved over the existing situation
with the construction of new street intersections at Chestnut/20th Street
and at Wewatta/Park Avenue West.
Development in Commons Plaza and Upland sub-areas will bring Prospect
into the mainstream of Central Platte Valley activities, further eroding its
sense of isolation and enabling it to capitalize directly from the visibility it
will enjoy from both 23rd and 20th Street viaduct replacement structures.
A unique characteristic of the area is the street grid which is aligned north
and south as in areas west of the freeway, but at variance with the Lower
Downtown. This grid is to be maintained and expanded throughout the
sub-area, consistent with the preservation of historic buildings and
nurturing of most existing businesses in the area. Attractiveness of the
sub-area to new occupants will be improved by the improvement of its
street and open space infrastructure. In the long term, pedestrian access
over the railroad tracks to Rockmont Park and the Greenway will further
enhance the Prospect sub-area.
Guidelines:
A broad mix of uses should be encouraged in the area, using
renovation and infill development to enable loft residences and studios,
showroom and specialty retail, office and entertainment activities to
coexist with light industrial and warehouse uses. Surface parking may be
allowed as an interim use.
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CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991
s Since access to the Commons and Rockmont Park will be limited
and views out of the sub-area will be blocked for most occupants, a public
open space should be created as a development amenity near the center
of Prospect.
US Taller buildings developed on vacant land near 20th Street should
step down in height northward towards the river, approximating the
massing of historic buildings which are to be retained. Lower building
heights toward the river will also help to preserve views of the City center
from Park Avenue West in the Platte sub-area.
is* Pedestrian, bicycle and local vehicular access between Prospect,
Commons Plaza and Upland sub-areas should be safe and convenient so
that facilities in each may be mutually supportive. Access to bus and HOV
facilities will potentially be important to growth in Prospect.
A portion of this sub-area has been designated as a 1 Flex Area'.
Refer to page 18 for a detailed description.
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CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991
Platte Sub-Area
Intended Character:
This newly identified sub-area should provide an attractive introduction to
the CPV and downtown Denver for the motorists arriving from the north
who will cross the river on Park Avenue West (the 23rd Street viaduct
replacement structure). The sub-area is currently characterized by a mix
of industrial and railroad-related uses, but its prominence from the I-
25/Fox interchange and its bisection by 23rd Street (the northward
continuation of Park Avenue West) gives some expectation of new
development and a consequent change in character. Some brick industrial
buildings survive in this area, and it is intended that new commercial and
industrial structures will display similar characteristics in massing and civic
design so that a suitably dignified if utilitarian environment can be created
at this important entry.
Guidelines:
is- The Platte River Greenway should provide a strong element of
continuity between the Platte sub-area, public open spaces to the west and
the Prospect sub-area to the south. An addition to the Greenway system
should be established on the west side of the river with connections to
Rockmont Park and the new Park Ave West river bridge.
is- This sub-area has good freeway access, but local street access is
restricted by railroads and freeway which surround it on three sides,
reducing its attractiveness for many potential uses. However, a broad
range of uses should be encouraged with particular emphasis on public,
industrial, and highway-related hotel and restaurant uses which can benefit
from immediate freeway access and can provide an appropriate
introduction to the city.
is- Park Avenue West (23rd Street) will be the dominant structure
within the area. Its crossing of the river is an important event in motorists'
approach to the City center and should be afforded special consideration
in design of the bridge and its built and landscaped setting. Design of the
street should otherwise stress its local function as a high quality street and
pedestrian connection between northwest neighborhoods and Downtown.
n
PAGE 44


CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991
ts" Pedestrian and bicycle access into the Platte sub-area will be
limited to Park Avenue West, Fox Street, 38th Ave., and Globeville Road.
Access to and from the Platte River Greenway via Park Avenue West
should thus be considered a priority.
<3? Landscaping should stress the connective role of the Greenway
between this sub-area, Prospect and Rockmont sub-areas. It should
strengthen the sense of entry into the CPV from 1-25.Landscaping and
other landscape elements will also play an important role in screening
existing and new industrial uses from the street, and from the elevated
portions of the Park Ave West/125 interchange.
sr Views toward the downtown skyline from Park Avenue West are
particularly important and should be safeguarded from obstruction by tall
structures.
cy A portion of this sub-area has been designated as a' Flex Area'.
Refer to page 18 for a detailed description.
PAGE 45


CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991
Rockmont Sub-Area
Intended Character:
This sub-area has been redefined in this plan, now being bounded by I-
25 to the west, active railroad tracks to the north and the 20th Street
viaduct replacement structure which will separate Rockmont from the
Commons sub-area to the south. Obsolete industrial structures on both
sides of the river are gradually being cleared to make way for an extensive
neighborhood park to serve the Highland neighborhood. It should retain
its own identity as a neighborhood park, but function as a constituent of
the Central Platte Valley's overall open space system. The park is to
provide for active field sports as well as passive recreation on both sides
of the river. Connections to the Highland neighborhood are of
fundamental importance, with primary access via the new 20th Street
bridges and Bassett Street, 19th Street, Platte Street and the improved 1-25
underpass from Inca Street. The northerly part of this sub-area is
expected to continue to include light industrial activities for some years,
but in the long term it is intended for park expansion or a use compatible
with park activities.
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CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991
Guidelines:
The Platte River Greenway should provide a sense of continuity
between the Rockmont sub-area and public open spaces to the south.
o- With the exception of continuing light industrial uses in the
northern part of the sub-area, development should provide only for
neighborhood recreational activities and local access to them.
o Shared use parking to serve both commercial traffic and park users
should be located away from the river near the 1-25 right of way. Other
parking areas may be appropriate for the eastern segment of the park.
o- Pedestrian and bicycle access from northwest neighborhoods
should be safe and convenient. Vehicular access to both sides of the river
should be provided for safety and maintenance purposes. Additional foot-
bridges should be constructed to link the park across the river.
s Landscaping should reinforce the special character of the
Greenway and should unify areas of the park on either side of the river.
sr A portion of this sub-area has been designated as a 'Flex Area'.
Refer to page 18 for a detailed description.
PAGE 47


CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991
West Bank Sub-Area
Intended Character:
Historic brick structures in the West Bank sub-area establish a distinctive
character and architectural scale. Redevelopment of vacant and under-
developed lots should relate in scale with the historic brick buildings and
should strive for a significant component of residential uses with a mix of
retail, entertainment and office uses. It is intended that this area should
complement Cherry Creek and Water Street sub-areas in uses and activities
accommodated, so that together they will comprise a cohesive district
containing substantial amounts of residential development focusing on the
City's primary waterways and associated public open space.
Guidelines:
is* Residential uses should be a significant component of
development in this mixed use sub-area.
is* Heights should be limited to the Plan's low rise category in order
to encourage the rehabilitation of existing buildings and the development
of consistently scaled infill buildings. Some buildings .may be further
restricted in height to preserve views from Hirshorn Park as required by
ordinance.
is* Scale and massing of buildings should step down towards the river,
with as much residential use as possible overlooking the Greenway and
the future Commons Park.
is* Public access to the South Platte River should be provided from
Platte St.
is* Safe and convenient pedestrian, bicycle and vehicular access to the
Cherry Creek and Water Street sub-areas should be recognized as a
priority.
is* Buildings fronting Platte St. should have no setbacks at street level
so that a distinctly urban street space is defined.
is* Active retail and restaurant uses should border the Platte River,
encouraging pedestrian useage along and next to the Greenway.
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CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991
es- The existing 16th St. Viaduct will be at least partially demolished,
saving the arched bridge over the Platte, and as much of the remaining
structure as necessary to create a distinctive and useful pedestrian
connection from the Overlook and West bank subareas to the Commons
Park and the l6th St. Mall Extension.
PAGE 49


CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991
Water Street Sub-Area
Intended Character:
The Water Street Subarea will be a mixed-use area of commercial, retail,
office, research/development, technological services, hotel and residential
development. Housing has been identified as a priority use in the CPV
and portions of the Water Street sub-area have much to recommend them
for this use. On the property between Water Street and the river,
preference should be given to residential development amongst a mix of
commercial uses including offices, restaurants, shops and hotels; however,
the entire site may be devoted to any one or more of the possible uses. If
only a portion of this part of the sub-area is proposed for development,
other uses clearly incompatible with housing will be precluded. This is a
preferred housing location because of its proximity to the South Platte
River Greenway, its excellent views to downtown, and its adjacency to the
West Bank sub-area which is also indicated as a residential preference
area.
Between Water Street and the freeway, consideration should be given to
office or hotel development amongst a mix of commercial uses compatible
with adjacent residential development in the subarea. This is a potential
office or hotel location because of the excellent views to downtown, and
the existing direct access from the freeway. Although this access may be
eventually replaced by a frontage road system, good visibility and
reasonable access will be maintained.
Building heights should step down towards the river from the freeway. By
stepping buildings down towards the river, development in the subarea
will contribute to a pedestrian scaled and active urban edge along the
river. It is also important that buildings in the Water Street Subarea should
minimize obstructions to public views from the northwest neighborhood.
PAGE 50


CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991
Guidelines:
c-3- Waterfront uses should be responsive to natural amenities and
should complement pedestrian and recreational activities north and south
along the riverfront, including the trolley line, Forney Museum and
Children's Museum.
a- Uses oriented towards the freeway should complement those in
the neighboring sub-areas of Diamond Hill and West Bank.
is- Frequent pedestrian and bicycle links between Water Street and the
Greenway should be encouraged.
Landscaping should be consistent with the native plantings of the
Greenway and should give a sense of continuity between Gates Crescent
Park and Fishback Park.
A pedestrian bridge across the river should be provided
on or near 7th Street to connect with a new pedestrian/bike route on the
east side of the river, and link the Gates Crescent Park and Children's
Museum to the proposed Elitch's amusement park, in the Rice Yards sub-
area.
^ A portion of this sub-area has been designated as a 'Flex-Area'.
Refer to page 18 for a detailed description.
PAGE 51


CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991
Gates Crescent Park Sub-Area
Intended Character:
Primarily used as a park, Gates Crescent Park includes the Children's
Museum, a length of the Rail Heritage's historic trolly line and a segment
of the South Platte River Greenway. Connected to the Forney Museum
and the entertainment/tourist attractions in the Rice Yards, this sub-area
could contribute to the growing concentration of recreational facilities
along the river.
Guidelines:
ta- The park and Children's Museum should be buffered from the
sights and sounds of the freeway to the extent possible without obscuring
public views of Downtown from Jefferson Park and Front View Crescent.
is* Landscaping should favor indigenous riparian species of plants and
should maintain frequent and direct access to the Greenway.
is* Any new construction should conform to low-rise height limits.
is* The new bridge link between Rice Yards and the Mile Hi Stadium
parking should also provide comfortable pedestrian and bicycle access to
both sides of the river.
PAGE 52


CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT
1991
Rice Yards Sub-Area
Intended Character:
The Rice Yards sub-area boundary has been amended to exclude areas
east of the Consolidated Main Line. It is characterized as an adjunct of the
Platte River/Cherry Creek public open space system in which recreational
uses such as those provided by an entertainment park are to be the
primary focus. Formerly occupied by railroad yards, the entire area west
of the Consolidated Main Line is now vacant. Only a historic turntable
remains as a relic of its past. The dominant structure on the property is
the elevated portion of Speer Blvd which forms the northeast boundary.
The Platte River Greenway forms the west boundary and is intended to
establish a strong landscaped edge.
A current subarea plan for an amusement park covers the entire area. It is
not expected that further review of this development will occur other than
that mandated by the subarea plan approval conditions.
Guidelines:
sr The distribution of entertainment facilities on the property should
respect the passive recreation functions of the Greenway and Centennial
Park.
is* Building heights should step down towards the river, allowing
riparian vegetation to dominate and mark the course of the river.
is As patrons will be drawn from the region and beyond, good access
from the freeway and from the Multi-modal Transportation Center in
Commons Plaza sub-area will be essential. Pedestrian and bicycle access
from Downtown via 16th Street and Cherry Creek should be safe and
convenient, with eventual extension of Sixteenth Street Mall shuttle service
providing excellent downtown connections.
is- Parking should be away from the river. A vehicular connection to
Mile High Stadium should be established so that overflow parking can be
directed there whenever necessary.
isr Vehicular access from Speer Blvd should be provided as a direct
connection to the regional road system.
es The Platte River Greenway path system should be extended to the
east side of the river, with connections to El itch's where ever possible.
A trolley connection to Elitch's from the west bank line would do
much to tie together the Children's Museum, the Forney Museum and
Elitch's into a strong entertainment/cultural complex.
PAGE 53


CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991
Aurarla Village Sub-Area
Intended Character:
The Auraria Village sub-area has been redefined to occupy the entire area
between the CML railroad tracks to the west and Auraria Parkway to the
east, with Speer Blvd forming its north boundary. The only notable
features of this largely undeveloped tract are the old warehouses, Auraria
Parkway, Speer Boulevard, and the open space near Cherry Creek.
A direct pedestrian connection to Lower Downtown via Wynkoop across
Speer Blvd and Cherry Creek will become the focus of pedestrian-oriented
development. Office and residential developments should have retail and
entertainment uses at street level, especially on Wynkoop and 9th Street -
the latter providing access to Tivoli to the east and eventually to the Rice
Yards sub-area to the west via a footbridge over the CML. Mid-rise
buildings would predominate except in the vicinity of the old warehouses
along Auraria Parkway and in southerly parts of the sub-area affected by
the Front Range view corridor from Bell Park also known as the Mount
Evans or Old City Hall Mountain Views Preservation Ordinance.
Guidelines:
i* A broad mix of uses which will complement nearby activities
should be encouraged. These may include office, residential, support
retail and office/research facilities.
Street level uses, especially on Wynkoop and 9th Streets, should be
pedestrian oriented retail and entertainment.
a* Uses along Auraria Parkway should be consistent with the civic
image of the Parkway and with existing historic and nearby academic
buildings. No auto-oriented uses such as gas stations, and drive-in
restaurants should be allowed along the parkway. No new (post 1989)
curb cuts or vehicular access other than existing public rights of way are
allowed onto Auraria Parkway.
is* The open space system of Cherry Creek and east of Auraria
Parkway should be complemented by one or more public open spaces
within the sub-area. These spaces may be small and urban in nature and
locations should be identified and dedicated as part of the initial phase of
development.
PAGE 54


CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991
Pedestrian and bicycle access to Cherry Creek, Lower Downtown,
Auraria Higher Education Center and the Rice Yards should be both safe
and convenient. Primary routes will be Wynkoop, 9th Street and Speer
Blvd. A pedestrian/bicycle bridge extending 9th Street over the CML
would complete a primary pedestrian route in the Valley.
es- Wewatta Street should make a clear connection with Auraria
Parkway through this subarea via a route along the CML to 7th and/or 9th
Streets, using one or both streets to link up with the Parkway.
PAGE 55


CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991
Auraria Research Park Sub-Area
Intended Character:
The Auraria Research Park sub-area is now largely devoted to surface
parking, providing a parking reservoir for Auraria Higher Education
Center. Eventually the Research Park is intended to support the Auraria
Higher Education Center, Auraria Village and other nearby areas with
research and development facilities and incubator business space.
Buildings within the Front Range view corridor will be subject to special
height limits. Those buildings south of the view corridor should be limited
to the low rise height category. Auraria Research Park should develop a
character which is sympathetic with its intended activities and with its
immediate neighbors to the north and east.
Plans are being developed for a new light rail route along the southern
boundary of this sub-area boundary on Colfax Ave. Its construction can
be expected to stimulate new development in the research park.
Guidelines:
is? A mix of uses which will complement both the academic
endeavors of the Auraria Higher Education Center and business and
manufacturing ventures located elsewhere in the CPV and downtown
should be encouraged.
er Priority routes for the safe and convenient passage of pedestrians
should connect the sub-area to the Bronco Bridge and the Greenway to
the west and to 7th Street, Larimer and Lawrence to the east. These routes
should extend lighting and landscaping from the Auraria Higher Education
Center to the river.
ca- Low rise structures should be located south of Lawrence, clear of
the Front Range view corridor.
PAGE 56


CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991
A P P E N D I X
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
City Staff Participants
Frank Gray, Director, Planning and Community Development Office
Richard Farley
Bar Chadwick
David Wicks
Dorothy Nepa
Joy Gibson
Mark Hess, Graphic Artist
William Roberts, Director, Department of Public Works
Richard Brasher
Robert Dorroh
Ed Ellerbrock
Don & Carolyn Etter, Directors, Parks & Recreation Department
Paul Foster
Neil Sperandeo
Consultants
Greg Baldwin, Zimmer Gunsul Frasca Partnership
Paddy Tillett, Zimmer Gunsul Frasca Partnership
Brian McCarter, Zimmer Gunsul Frasca Partnership
Larry Gibson, BRW, Inc.
Dick Marshall, DHM, Inc.
Gregg Brown, DHM, Inc.
PAGE 57


CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991
Build-out
The following build-out drawings illustrate the kind of development
necessary to fulfill the goals and policies of the Plan. These build-out
studies also provide an initial test of the CPV Plan's objectives.
The drawings show three phases in the build-out of the valley. The first
phase, the time range of which is probably within the next five to ten
years, foresees the completion of three major viaduct replacement projects
(15th Street, 20th Street and 23rd Street); the purchase and improvement of
Rockmont Park; the construction of Wewatta Street from Speer Blvd. to
23rd Street; the development of a large surface parking reservoir between
16th and 20th Streets; die development of Elitch's Amusement Park; the
construction of a new bridge over Cherry Creek to serve Elitch's; the
extension of the 16th Street Mall to Wewatta Street;the construction of a
Baseball Stadium; and new infill private development (office and
residential) along Cherry Creek. The possibility of an Aquarium being
developed in the early phases is also quite real.
The second phase, probably within the next 10 to 20 years, would see the
relocation of the Market Street regional bus station into the valley; the
construction of a 16th Street overpass across the CML, linking the Mall
Extension to Elitch's; the purchase and development of the Common Park;
continued infill private development along Cherry Creek; and in the
Prospect area; and the construction of a new bus/HOV ramp along the
CML.
The third or final build-out phase would see the completion of the Multi-
modal transportation center including decked parking with a formal park
and development on top, full infill along Cherry Creek and the Westbank
area responding to the stimulus of the Commons Park amenity; full build-
out in the Prospect, Water Street and Auraria Village subareas; and
development of a light rail line along the CML. The time frame for this
final phase could be in the range of 30 to 50 years.
PAGE 58



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PAGE 59


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PAGE 60


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PAGE 61


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PAGE 62
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PAGE 63
15TH ST


CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991
HISTORIC STRUCTURES IN THE CPV EAST OF 1-25
Concentrations of historic structures set a precedent for the height and
character of development in several of the sub-areas addressed in the Plan.
This plan is included as a convenient but generalized reference to such
structures. This map is not intended to be a reference for the specific
designation status of any particular building.
MULTI-MODAL PHASED BUILD-OUT
The initial phases are designed to create the basis of the multi-modal
facilityby 1) extending the 16th Street Mall shuttle and pedestrian system
across an at-grade crossing of the DUT tail tracks; 2) building Wewatta
Street from Speer Boulevard to Park Ave West (23rd St.) as access to the
multi-modal area, and as a by-pass around Lower Downtown for
north/south CPV traffic; and 3) establishing intercept off-site parking lots
possibly through a downtown-wide parking district, and/or the
involvement of a potential Baseball District An express bus lane to the
Market St, Station will be built behind the DUT to connect to the 16th
Street Mall east of the tail tracks. A small open space at the intersection of
the 16th Street Mall and Wewatta should be provided for Lower
Downtown and CPV use in the initial stages of the development. Early
commercial and residential development is seen as occuring along the
15th Street corridor. Early construction of a HOV ramp along the CML
from the 20th Street Bus/HOV system to the intercept parking lots is an
important factor in establishing the importance of the lots, and the
immutability of the relocation of the Market Street regional bus station well
away from Lower Downtown.
The intermediate phases of the multi-modal facility development depend
on 1) the relocation of the Market Street regional bus station to the
intersection of thel6th Street Mall and the CML; 2) the construction of a
16th Street Mall grade separation (preferably an overpass) at the CML,
extending the Mall to the west side of the tracks; 3) die creation of the
Commons Park; and 4) the development of a light rail line next to the
CML. Commercial and residential development is seen as completing its
build-out along the 15th St. corridor, and accompanying the construction
of the new regional bus terminal and its interface with a light rail line
along the CML. Light industrial, display /showroom and back office space
would begin to infill into the adjoining Prospect Subarea as its
infrastructure is up-graded. The development of the above grade parking
structures which act as a platform for development over the multi-modal
facility begins with the construction of the relocated regional bus/light rail
station.
The final stages of the multi-modal build-out depend on the close
coordination of the parking decks which create the platform for
development over the multi-modal facility. It is crucial to coordinate these
decks so that they form a network of streets leading from ground level to
the decks upper level so that easy and natural pedestrian and vehicular
access can penetrate into the multi-modal development area.
PAGE 64


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PAGE 69


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PAGE 70


CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991
DELIBERATIONS
OF THE CPV STEERING COMMITTEE
Process:
The Steering Committee began its task by identifying the many changes
which had occurred since adoption of the 1986 Plan. They considered the
possible consequences of these changes and drafted a list of fundamental
issues to be addressed in developing a revised plan for the Valley. These
fundamental issues were subsequently catagorized under five topics as
reproduced below.
An initial list of goals for the CPV was drawn from the 1986 plan. This
provided a starting place for the Steering Committee in reviewing and
updating goals and formulating intent statements. Goals were reviewed
again in July following the decision to retain railroad passenger platforms
at DUT. A refined version of the goals and intent statements appears on
page 3. The original list of goals drafted by the Steering Committee is
included here for reference.
Conditions That Have Changed Since Adoption of the CPV Plan in 1986
/ Amtrak service at DUT
/ Change in market / drop in land value
/ Elitch's location, site, access
/ Hazardous material impact
RTD 1-25 North HOV Project
/ Changing ownership
/ Specifics of viaduct replacement projects
Zoning ordinance passed to implement Plan, but serious
problems have developed in it's process
Bond issue projects, ability to do things
/ MTDC / commuter rail
/ River flood control study underway
/ Creation of Lower Downtown Historic District
Creation of the Lower Downtown, Inc., LoDo has become
more active
/ Development of Highlands Neighborhood Plan
/ Heliport/baseball stadium/aquarium site being studied in Valley
/ Comprehensive Plan adoption
/ Business Improvement District enabling legislation
/ Speer Blvd. viaduct replaced
/ Mainline rail consolidated in mid-valley
/ Delgany interceptor built
/ Auraria Parkway built
/ Airport Gateway and Stapleton are new City development areas
/ DUT development agreement
/ Enterprise zone
Auraria land acquisition to the west
/ Auraria Master Plan completed
/ Trolley operational on west side of River
PAGE 71


CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991
Fundamental Issues
(Categorized Into Topics for Steering Committee Discusssion)
Transportation
/ Tracks at DUT
/ Impacts of viaducts on the CPV
/ Is there a CPV multi-modal point7
Valley road system
/ Function and future of commuter rail in Valley
/ Pedestrian system
/ 20th/23rd traffic
/ Is mid-valley alignment possible?
/ Aesthetics of viaducts
/ How to Connect LoDo and CPV with tracks at DUT ?
/ LoDo Interface/parking
Open Space
/ What is the Common?
/ Greater public uses in the Valley
/ Are there regional park needs in the Valley?
/ Relationship of CPV development to new opportunity/
Stapleton/Gateway
/ Pedestrian system
/ Type of open space
Land Use Development
/ What is the edge of LoDo & CPV? Blended? Break?
/ How to connect LoDo to CPV with tracks at DUT?
/ How much flexibility in land uses? Industrial? Residential
/ Relationship of CPV development to new opportunity at
Stapleton and Airport Gateway
/ Small parcel development/PRV Zoning Subarea Plan
concept/validity
/ LoDo interface/traffic and parking
/ Parking
/ Reuse of Post Office Terminal
/ What is common?
/ How to build upon critical mass
/ Greater public uses in Valley
/ Valley road system
/ TDR transfer
PAGE 72


CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991
Character
/ Impacts of viaducts on CPV
/ LoDo interface/traffic parking
/ Aesthetics of viaducts
/ What is edge of LoDo and CPV
/ How much flexibility uses?
/ Historic/P.R. heritage
/ Mid-Valley alignment
/ Historic preservation
/ RR Heritage
Other
/ Public and private actions needed to stimulate development
/ TDR transfer strategies in CPV given new conditions
/ How to create/build upon critical mass
/ Leverage of city money
/ Long term administrative structure for Plan implementation
/ Role of DURA in blighted area
/ How to implement flood control improvements
/ Historic preservation
RR heritage
/ Other projects depending upon this review
PAGE 73


CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991
CRITERIA AND ASSUMPTIONS
Underlying the Plan Recomendations
The Plan and Future Zoning
The approach taken is one where the desired character is clearly
understood and defined. Measureable standards to achieve this character
are then drafted as performance criteria. Other factors which are less
important or not related to the desired character are not included in the
standards. The idea is to regulate only that which is necessary to produce
the desired result, and to avoid regulating by broad traditional categories
which may or may not directly affect the desired result.
The Plan has avoided the establishment of quantifiable definitions for
heights and other development criteria in order to preserve it as a general
policy document, assigning the task of setting specific standards to the up-
coming zoning ordinance revision. This will allow the Plan to remain
valid through the numerous changes in the zoning ordinance which may
be expected to occur over the years. However, the Steering Committee in
its deliberations accepted the following approximate parameters for the
three height categories: low rise about 80 feet, mid-rise about 140
feet, and high rise 250 feet. High rise was eliminated as a category from
the 1991 Plan, allowing it only as a previously agreed upon condition of
the DUT Development Agreement.
The physical form goals for most of the Valley are 1) to create a set of
clearly defined public parks and squares, ranging in size from large to
small, around which are focused various development projects; and 2) to
develop a low to mid-rise, dense urban environment in keeping with the
character of Lower Downtown. This results in open space which is
shared in the sense that it is large and developed enough to provide for
the needs of several projects. It also results in buildings which fill up their
sites providing gaps and internal spaces only when nessary for functional
reasons.
Consequently, future zoning regulations should specify relatively low
height limits; setbacks only where they are specificly needed; minimum (if
any) on-site open space requirements and/or the ability for balconies and
roof-top decks to count as open space; minimum restrictions to
building/impervious surface coverage; build-to lines where development
is required to extend to a line (usually the property line adjoining a street
or public space); and no bonuses for on-site plazas or interior atria. This
is intended to spread building form over greater proportions of the site, in
keeping with lower height limits. The current PRV zoning ordinance
requirement for a 6% open space exaction for all development is retained,
using its payments in-lieu of actual land dedication' provisions to build a
fund to purchase and/or develop the large park areas and smaller squares
indicated in the Plan.
PAGE 74


CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991
Heights and Densities
Under the provisions of the 1986 CPV Comprehensive Plan Amendment,
the base development density throughout the district was set at a floor
area ratio of 2:1. By taking advantage of bonuses (mostly for housing),
transfer of development rights (TDRs), and taller height limits in certain
locations, it was possible to achieve densities higher than 2:1 FAR in some
areas in return for lower densities in other areas. The total overall
permitted density would remain unchanged, yielding a theoretical
development capacity of approximately 32,000,000 square feet of floor
space. Because of the vast amount of vacant land and development
potential, a great deal of doubt has been expressed about the value of
TDRs, and the efficacy of bonuses to achieve housing.
The 1991 Plan proposes to streamline this system by removing the FAR
limits entirely and thus the need for TDRs. Instead, building height limits
would be the principle determinants of the maximum densities. These
would equal or, more likely, exceed on a case-by-case basis the maximum
densities achievable under the 1986 Plan if all of its bonuses and TDRs
were exploited. In addition, the 1991 Plan removes the 60 dwelling unit
per acre density restriction included in the 1986 Plan.
Land Uses
Housing
Much discussion focussed on the issue of indicating a housing preference
for certain areas. The Committee placed emphasis on housing as a
significant component in the Valleys land use mix. However, the decrease
in railroad infrastructure and operations previously envisioned has left
fewer areas attractive to the housing market.
Consequently, an effort was made in the Plan to identify areas which
appear to hold the best promise for housing in the Valley. It is not the
intention of the Plan to force private development to build only housing
within a housing preference area. The intention is to encourage, as much
as possible, the development of housing in these areas through the
creation of amenities, the provision of zoning incentives (possibly through
height bonuses), and the targeting of available public subsidies.
In view of the desire to encourage housing in the Valley, it makes sense to
keep the current 10% housing exaction, possibly applying its provisions
for in-lieu payments to build a housing loan/grant fund to encourage
housing development within the housing preference areas.
Other reasons for indicating housing preference areas are: 1) to cluster
residential development creating a sense of neighborhood which attracts
even more residential; 2) to, conversely, avoid isolated residential
outposts which dilute the positive impact of people living downtown;
and 3) to build a market for walk-in residential services such as day care,
food stores, cafes, cleaners, drug stores, and other convenience retail.
PAGE 75


CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991
Besides the areas indicated on the Land Use plan, all residential
neighborhoods in the PRV district west of 125 should be also be
considered ashousing preferenceareas.
Flex Areas
As described in the text, some zones are designated as flex areas, where
a choice between low rise and mid rise development is offered. The
criteria which follow were used to determine these flex areas:
Locational Criteria for Low-Rise Buildings:
/ near existing low-rise residential neighborhoods
/ near existing historic and contributing buildings
/ near major public open spaces which would be over-
shadowed by taller buildings
/ next to the South Platte River and Cherry Creek where
smaller scale architecture should predominate
/ where taller buildings would obstruct key public views of
DUT, the mountains or the downtown skyline
Locational Criteria for Mid-Rise Buildings:
/ where the infrastructure systems, including transit, can
support greater development densities
/ next to elevated roadways to allow a greater proportion
of the building to be above the street
/ next to railroads as an added incentive to development
/ in areas where substantial parking facilities are available
/ wherever neither public views nor shadowing are at issue
Light Industrial Uses
Because of the increase in railroad facilities, (the Prospect and Platte
subareas) have had general light industrial/ warehouse activities added to
their list of allowable land uses. This does not mean that these new uses
are the preferred uses in these areas, but merely that the increased
railroad facilities in the areas warrant greater flexibility in capturing the
available market. Additional design review will be necessary in order to
insure compatibility with other uses, and a higher quality of development.
Environmental Concerns
Inherent throughout this plan is the understanding that environmental
issues do exist and remedial measures will be necessary and required
before any detailed development can occur.
PAGE 76


Full Text

PAGE 1

CENTRAL PlATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT JUNE 1, 1991

PAGE 2

CENTRAL PlATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENF 1991 June 1, 1991 Dear Residents and Friends of Denver: It is our pleasure to present to you the Central Platte Valley Plan Amendment. This document represents the product of ftfteen months of work by the twenty-three member Steering Committee appointed by Mayor Pena in February of 1990. The Mayor charged the committee with re-writing the CPV Plan in relation to 27 changed conditions that have occurred in the valley since adoption of the 1986 CPV Plan. The most signillcant of these changes is the continuation of rail passenger traffic at the Denver Union Terminal. The plan is to serve as a framework for future public and private development in the CPV. The Steering Committee worked hard and enthusiastically to respond to the challenge of the changed conditions within the CPV. With the assistance of a broad spectrum of interest groups within the Valley and numerous City departments, agencies, and consultants, we have developed a vision for the Central Platte Valley. The pages that follow represent the committee's best effort to deftne what the CPV can and should be in the future. At the core of the plan is an inter-modal transit facility which provides for a single interface point for heavy and light rail, interand intra-city bus, automobile, and pedestrian activity. The development of such a facility will make the Platte Valley the transportation HUB of the region. The Valley described in this plan will not emerge overnight, but it is achievable. This Plan is rooted in the pragmatism of economic and engineering analysis. At the same time, it recognizes the vital need for the Valley to be a compliment to Downtown and Lower Downtown as well as a place that is human, economically viable and fun. Our sincere thanks to all of those who have dedicated their talent, energy and ideas to this effort. Frank B. Gray, Chairman Central Platte Valley Steering Committee PageL

PAGE 3

38TH AVE. 37TH AVE. 36TH AVE. 35TH AVE. 3HH AVE. 33RD AVE. 3:?tl0 AVE. 31ST AVE. 30TH AVE. 29Tti AVE. 26TH AVE. 27TH AVE. 26TH AVE. 25TH AVE. 2HH AVE. 2JRD AVE. 22UD AVE. 21ST AVE. 20TH AVE. 19TH AVE. 18TH AVE. 17TH AVE. 16TH AVE. COLFAX CENTRAL PIA1TE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991 STUDY LOCATION .... "' a: w a 1-a: > 1-5 1-Q z w "' "' w "' z z "' 0 :::> "' 1-0 0 z "' 0 <.:J "' 0 u :::; !;; .... 0 N a w ;;J 0 > u "' 0 a. "'z '" u :i .... :I: 5 w "' a. :::; :; -u .... 1-"' 0 .. 0 a: w "' > 0 a l: :=; "' ::::-:::::<> AREA OF THE 1991 CENTRAL PLATIE VALLEY PLAN OF THE 1986 CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY PLA.t'\1; AND THE 1987 PLATIE RIVER VALLEY ZONE DISTRICT Page 1.1. 25TH AVE. 24TH AVE. 23RD AVE. 22ND AVE. 21ST AVE. 20TH AVE. 19TH AVE. 18TH AVE. .17TH AVE. 16TH AVE. COLFAX 14TH AVE. 13TH AVE. 12TH AVE. 11TH AVE. 10TH AVE. 9TH AVE. 8TH AVE. 7TH AVE. 6TH AVE.

PAGE 4

CENTRAL PLA7TE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991 FEDERICO PENA MAYOR CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY STEERING COMMITTEE Frank Gray, Chair Director, Planning and Community Development Office J. Timothy Bickmore Burlington Northern Railroad Tim Boers District 9 Neighborhood Representative Diana Boulter President, Denver Partnership Dana Crawford Lower Downtown Property Owner District 9 Neighborhood Representative Stephanie Foote Councilwoman, District 4 Jerry Glick Lower Downtown Design Review Board, CPV Design Advisory Committee lloyd Goff Platte Valley Landowners Association Sandy Gurtler Elitch Gardens Steve Hebert Anschutz Corporation John Hickenlooper Lower Downtown property owner. District 9 Neighborhood Representative GailHandby United Union of Roofers MikeLaMair Glacier Park Co. Richard McSpadden Denver Union Terminal Philip Milstein Denver Planning Board, Auraria Higher Education Center Deborah Ortega Councilwoman District 9 Art Prentiss Amtrak Tom Ragonetti Water Street Joint Venture Martin Saiz Denver Planning Board, District 9 Neighborhood Represenative Jim Swanson Denver Planning Board George Thorn Developer Barbara Zandberger Union Pacific Railroad Mickey Zeppelin Lower Downtown District, District 9 Neighborhood Representative PAGEt.

PAGE 5

CENTRAL PlATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991 T A B L E 0 F C 0 N T E N T s PREFACE 1 ABBREVIATIONS USED IN TEXT 3 PROCESS 4 GOALS AND INTEI\'T STATEMENTS 5 CONCEPTS 10 FRAMEWORK MAPS 13 Open Space and Special Landscaped Streets 14 Preferred Land Use 17 Views, Building Heights, and Densities 18 Pedestrian Routes 21 Bicycle Routes 22 Transit:Rail, Bus and High Occupancy Vehicles 25 Major Streets, and Parking 26 Local Access Streets 29 SUB-AREA INTENT STATEMENTS General 31 Cherry Creek 32 Commons 34 Commons Plaza 36 Denver Union Terminal 38 Upland 40 Prospect 42 Platte 44 Rockmont 46 West Bank 48 Water Street 50 Gates Crescent 52 Rice Yards 53 Auraria Village 54 Auraria Research Park 56 APPENDIX 57 Deliberations of the Steering Committee 71 Historic Structures 64 1986 Plan Maps 59-61 Criteria and Assumptions 74 IlLUSTRATIONS Open Space and Special Landscaped Streets 15 Preferred Land Uses 16 Views, Landmarks, and Building Heights 19 Pedestrian Routes 20 Bicycle Routes 23 Transit, Rail, Bus and High Occupancy Vehicles 24 Major Streets and Parking 27 CPV Access Streets 28 Historic Structures 70 1986 Plans 59-61 PAGE H.

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CENIRAL PLA17E VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991 p R E F A c E History Since adoption of the Central Platte Valley Comprehensive Plan Amendment in 1986, a series of profound changes has affected the valley. Major changes in ownership, establishment of a consolidated mainline for all railroads through the valley and more recently, a decision to retain rail passenger operations at Denver Union Terminal have all influenced the ways in which the Central Platte Valley might be used. However, the basic intent of the Plan remains unchanged: to guide the development of resources which will benefit the whole Valley as well as adjoining neighborhoods and the Downtown. In January 1990, Mayor Pei'ia appointed a special Steering Committee to review and assess these changes and to direct the efforts of an urban design consultant team. The Steering Committee was made up of community, business, railroad and property owner representatives from neighborhoods within and adjacent to the Central Platte Valley and included representatives of the Denver Planning Board. Each member was charged with disseminating relevant information within his or her community, and bringing back a broader perspective on issues to the Committee. The CPV Steering Committee met regularly throughout the year, periodically holding joint sessions with the Denver Planning Board to keep them appraised of progress and ultimately presented this document to them, requesting that it be formally approved and forwarded to the City Council for their consideration and adoption. Periodically, the Steering Committee held public meetings at which the public at large was invited to participate. Each Steering Committee meeting closed with a public forum during which comments by the public were heard by the Committee. The Steering Committee began its task by identifying the many changes which had occurred since adoption of the 1986 Plan. They considered the possible consequences of these changes and drafted a list of fundamental issues to be addressed in developing a revised plan for the Valley. Goals and intent statements were developed taking into consideration both the contents of the 1986 Plan, the changes which had occurred since and the identified fundamental issues. Changes, issues and goals developed by the Committee gave direction to the plan which follows. Lists of each are given in full in the Appendix. PAGEl

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CENTRAL PlATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PIAN AMENDMENI' 1991 The 1986 Plan had included 17 sub-areas, each of which was to have had a sub-area plan developed, reviewed and adopted to direct development within it. In the interim, considerable effort had been expended in developing plans and compatible zoning for sub-areas west of I-25. Consequently, much of the Steering Committee's effort was focussed in the area between the freeway to the west and Auraria Parkway, Lower Downtown and the Arapahoe Triangle to the east. This was the area primarily affected by change. Purpose This document is the product of the Steering Committee's work. It is intended to supercede the 1986 Comprehensive Plan Amendment, and differs from it in two significant ways. The 1986 Plan was obliged to deal with the quantifiable aspects of development control as well as addressing larger policy issues. This document distinguishes between policy direction and development regulation, addressing only the former. The specifics of land use and development regulation were considered, but are left to be detailed in the Zoning Code. This is an important difference since it allows consideration and approval of plans for the valley without involvement in the technicalities of specific regulations. Another advantage is that amendments can be made to the zoning code over time without risk of rendering the Plan obsolete. The other significant difference stems from a change in procedure which occurred after adoption of the 1986 Plan but before development of its 1991 successor. The zoning process for achieving approved development plans has been modified to temporarily favor the Planned Unit Development process until the PRV zone district is modified to incorporate the new plan, and to further streamline the approval process.. This has replaced the responsibility of those wishing to undertake development to prepare sub-area plans. Consequently, the Plan must provide clear guidance on how the sub-areas are to function cooperatively as parts of the city, and what the principal features of each sub-area should be. Considerable latitude in choice of land uses and building form remains in most sub-areas, but the overall intent for each is spelled out more specifically than it was in the 1986 document. Coordination of land uses, facilities and functions throughout the CPV and its immediate surroundings was accomplished using a series of Framework Maps, each highlighting a single topic, such as Views, Landmarks and Building Heights and Pedestrian Routes. These maps evolved with successive evaluation by the Steering Committee, culminating in the set of maps included in this Plan. Guidance for their formulation was found in the goals and intent statements developed by the Steering Committee at the beginning of the process. PAGE2

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CE/1;7RAL PlATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PIAN AMENDMENT 1991 The Framework Maps provide a basis and context for examination of opportunities and constraints affecting each sub-area. A brief description of the intended character of each sub-area was developed, and a series of design guidelines specific to that sub-area was drafted. These are included in this Plan. Abbreviations Used in the Text: CCD City and County of Denver CPV Central Platte Valley CML Consolidated Main Line railroad tracks DPB Denver Planning Board DURA Denver Urban Renewal Authority DUT Denver Union Terminal (Union Station) FAR Floor Area Ratio HOV High Occupancy Vehicle LoDo Lower Downtown LRT Light Rail Transit PRV Platte River Valley zoning district ROW Right of Way RTD Regional Transportation District TDR Transfer of Development Rights PAGE3

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CENTRAL PlATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PIAN AMENDMENT 1991 p R 0 c E s s : The draft 1991 CPV Comprehensive Plan Amendment will be refined and submitted by the Steering Committee to the Denver Planning Board and to the City Council for approval. Once approved, it will supercede the 1986 Plan as the effective policy document directing land use and development in the Central Platte Valley. Following approval of the 1991 Plan, existing zoning regulations will remain in place. While developers will no longer be required to prepare and submit sub-area zoning standards and plans of their own, development can proceed using established Planned Unit Development regulations. Meanwhile amended land use and development regulations for the CPV will be designed to implement policy and direction contained in the adopted plan. After formal scrutiny of draft regulations, including assurance of their consistency with other parts of the zoning code, these too will be adopted. Together, the adopted 1991 CPV Comprehensive Plan Amendment and development regulations will give potential developers a precise view of the range,type and size of developments which are likely to meet with City and County of Denver [CCD] Planning and Zoning approval in any particular part of the CPV. PAGE4

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CENIRAL PIAT7E VALLEY COlvf.PREHENSIVE PIAN AMENDAfENT 1!)!)1 OVERAll CENTRAL PlATTE VALLEY GOALS AND INTENT STATEMENTS: GOAL 1: Land Use 1.1 Redevelop the Valley in ways that recognize it as a valuable resource to the whole City. 1.2 Encourage a mix of land uses in the CPV which willl support a dense urban character 1.3 Provide amenities which will knit Downtown and adjacent neighborhoods together 1.4 Encourage a mix of commercial development which will: ./ create new jobs ./ generate direct and indirect tax revenue ./ attract new Downtown residents ./ provide new amenities 1.5 Accommodate an appropriate mix of uses and encourage viable development to satisfy both the economic needs of landowners and public needs, including: ./ public open space ./ economic development ./ housing ./ public facilities INTENT STATEMENTS: Land Use A. Capitalize on a unique opportunity to reuse former rail yard and obsolete industrial land in the heart of Denver. B. Redevelop the Valley with uses that take advantage of its unique characteristics, namely: ./ the South Platte River and Cherry Creek ./ proximity to Downtown and northwest neighborhoods ./ historic value as the birthplace of Denver ./ railroad heritage and railroad facilities ./ regional vehicular access ./ large. land assemblages ./ central location, and the 'seam' between the northwest neighborhoods and the center of the City C. Redevelop the Valley to help satisfy the needs of the Downtown and the adjoining neighborhoods by making provision for: ./ neighborhood parks and recreation facilities ./ city-wide parking and recreation facilities ./ housing to develop a 24-hour Downtown population ./ housing to reinforce adjoining neighborhoods PAGES

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CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PIAN AMENDMENT 1991 ./ Increased tax base ./ Support for Downtown retail, hotels, restaurants, and entertainment facilities ./ Downtown access and parking ./ Increased employment opportunities for residents of adjoining neighborhoods ./ Support for Denver's cultural, and arts resources ./ Support services for Downtown's businesses and employees. GOAL 2: open Space and Pedestrian System 2.1 Form the centerpiece of the regional open space system 2.2 Create a comprehensive network, linking areas within and around the valley 2.3 Provide an orderly, visually pleasing and active environment for: ./ workers ./ residents ./ neighbors ./ visitors 2.4 Reinforce desired land use patterns 2.5 Enhance amenities for new residential, specialized office, research and development uses 2.6 Give public access to waterways from Downtown and Lower Downtown 2. 7 Recognize the South Platte River and Cherry Creek as focii of the open space system 2.8 Create Denver Commons to be a focus for the South Platte River Greenway 2.9 Develop Rockmont Park as the primary public open space for the Highland neighborhood INTENT STATEMENT: open Space and Pedestrian System A. Reconstruct the Valley's pedestrian and bicycle systems, flood control, and parks facilities so that they become armatures to foster a livable and interconnected urban environment suited for the demands of the next century. PAGE6

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CENIRAL PlATTE VALLEY COit1PREHENSIVE PIAN AMENDMENT 15)5)1 GOAL 3: Transportation 3.1 Develop a multi-modal transportation center in the middle of the valley which will: ./ connect with the Sixteenth Street Mall when it is extended ./ ultimately replace the Market Street regional bus terminal ./ be linked to the light rail system ./ provide a parking reservoir for Downtown and Lower Downtown ./ intercept High Occupancy Vehicles [HOVs] and general traffic as it enters the city center from the north and from the south via Auraria Parkway and Wewatta 3.2 Provide access to and through the CPV for autos and buses to: ./ improve access to and around Downtown ./ improve access within the CPV 3.3 Improve access off I-25 into the CPV 3.4 Accommodate through freight movements within the CML corridor and future tracked transit adjacent to it 3.5 Accommodate rail passenger platforms and associated facilities atDUf 3.6 Reconstruct 20th Street to provide HOV, regional bus and local access to Downtown, allowing an at-grade access to the CPV at Chestnut St., and Bassett St. 3.7 Upgrade the 23rd Street viaduct and construct a new flyover to create the primary regional access route to Downtown from the north with a connection to the future Wewatta St. 3.8 Design 15th Street to provide local access to Downtown and the northwest neighborhoods with near or at grade connections at Wewatta St., Delgany St., and 'new' Bassett St. 3.9 Remove the 16th Street viaduct ./ preserve the 16th Street bridge over the South Platte River for pedestrian use 3.10 Extend the Sixteenth Street Mall into the CPV ./ connect Downtown and Lower Downtown to the multi modal transportation center, to public open spaces and the South Platte River 3.11 Extend the Lower Downtown street grid into Cherry Creek, Commons Plaza and Upland sub-areas 3.12 Provide for light rail connections into the CPV and Downtown PAGE7

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CENTRAL PlATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PIAN AMENDMENT 1991 INTENf STATEMENT: Transportation A. Reconstruct the Valley's streets, major arterials, transit, utilities, railroads, pedestrian and bicycle systems to foster development of a livable and interconnected urban environment suited for the demands of the next century GOAL 4: Character 4.1 Foster a character for the CPV which is different and distinct from that of Downtown: ./ Urban, but with more public open space ./ Developed to densities and heights which are closely related to those in Lower Downtown ./ Building heights consistent with the fabric of Lower Downtown ./. Different parking requirements 4.2 Encourage the individual qualities of each sub-area to be manifest in local urban character; do not generate a single image for the entire CPV 4.3 Preserve views of natural and man-made features including: ./ The mountains ./ The Downtown skyline ./ Denver Union Terminal 4.4 Maintain traditional street-to-building relationships 4.5 Step down building heights near Cherry Creek and major public open spaces INTENT STATEMENT: Character A. Redevelop the Valley in such a way that it complements the character and functions of Downtown and Lower Downtown, reinforcing them with uses and densities which will rebuild a market for retail, housing, services, hotels, entertainment, and first class office space. GOAL 5: Flood Control 5.1 Remove CPV south of Speer Boulevard from the floodplain 5.2 Pursue opportunities for water-related amenities while also meeting flood control needs GOAL 6: Consolidated Main Line Railroad Corridor 6.1 Minimize physical barriers across the CPV without compromising safety 6.2 Buffer views of railroad tracks but maintain open views across the valley along street alignments and designated view corridors PAGES

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CENIRAL PLAITE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991 6.3 Provide a right of way for light rail in conjunction with the CML but physically separated from active trackage INTENT STATEMEI\"'1': Consolidated Main Line Railroad Corridor A. Overcome, to the extent possible, railroad and roadway barriers between CPV sub-areas, Lower Downtown, and the northwest neighborhoods. GOAL 7: History 7.1 Preserve Denver Union Terminal (train room and two-story wings) as an active rail passenger center 7.2 Encourage preservation of significant historic structures including older quality buildings in Cherry Creek, West Bank, Water Street, Auraria Village and Prospect sub-areas PAGE9

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CENIRAL PLAITE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PIAN AMENDMENT 1991 c 0 N c E p T s: Overall concepts that guide the revision of the Central Platte Valley Comprehensive Plan Amendment A. Develop a multi-modal transportation center Oocal, regional and interstate transit, high occupancy vehicle [HOV] parking, 'interceptor' parking for general Downtown auto traffic, and shuttle facilities) in the center of the Valley, connected to Downtown by an extension of the Sixteenth Street Mall. The provision of this multi-modal transportation center will: 1) provide a crucial amenity for the development of the CPV 2) help reduce through-auto traffic on the 20th Street Viaduct Replacement Project within Lower Downtown 3) improve access to, and thus attractiveness of development in and adjacent to the CPV 4) reinforce the DCT as the interstate rail entry to Denver and Downtown 5) provide long term parking relief for Downtown and Lower Downtown, intercepting automobiles before they penetrate heavily pedestrianized areas 6) permanently anchor the 16th Street Mall B. Create the multi-modal transportation center, and adjoining parking within a deck structure that serves as a platform for new development. The top level, or 'artificial ground level' of this platform would be high enough to span over the CML railroad tracks and the passenger rail tracks at the DUT, thereby bridging the railroad barriers between the Valley development, Downtown, and the Platte River. The deck would be designed so that it slopes to grade at its northern, eastern, and southern edges allowing cars and pedestrians to naturally drive or walk to its upper level. The multi-modal transportation center would be connected to Downtown bus shuttle vehicles running on an extended Sixteenth Street Mall. Cltimately, the Mall would be extended over the CML providing access to the Commons Park, Cherry Creek, Platte River and areas south of Speer. C. In the long term, construct a bus/HOV lane from the 20th St. Viaduct Replacement Project on a R.O.W. along the CML ultimately terminating at the multi-modal transportation center. This would locate the bus lane so that it could serve a future regional bus terminal (replacing the Market St. Station) next to the CML where it can interface with a light rail stop. PAGE 10

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CENTRAL PIA7TE VALLEY CO,VfPREHENSIVE PIAN AMENDMENT 1991 In the short term, construct a bus-only lane bound for the Market St. Station on a route directly behind Union Station to the 16th St. Mall. Critical to this concept and to the multi-modal center as a whole, is resolution of issues concerning rail tracks that cross Sixteenth Street near the DUT. D. Provide, at full build-out, a central Commons open space that has two distinct areas: 1) a compact urban 'square' on the east side of the CML for CPV, Downtown and Lower Downtown residents and workers (Commons Plaza) 2) an expansive regional park along the Platte River, suitable for large festivals such as the People's Fair, and the Festival of Mountain and Plains; but also suitable for unprogrammed active and passive recreation (Commons Park) E. Develop Rockmont Park in the earliest phases of Valley improvement as a large neighborhood-related park in which active recreation facilities predominate. F. Construct Wewatta St. between Speer Blvd and 23rd Street (Park Ave West) as a connector that links the Valley sub areas east of the CML tracks. Continuing south, ultimately connecting through the Auraria Village subarea to Auraria Parkway along 7th Street or 9th Street, it will provide a by pass route for traffic not destined for Lower Downtown. G. Provide a secondary street system that effectively interconnects the sub-areas of the Valley. Provide access to the Commons from the east via general traffic grade separations at the CML on 16th Street, and possibly on 19th Street the former shared with the Mall shuttle bus system from Wewatta to new Bassett St. H. In the light of existing neighborhood plans, review and selectively preserve the planning and sub-area zoning standards now in place west of 1-25. Encourage housing infill projects, at scales compatible with the adjoining residential neighborhoods along the western edges of the Valley. I. Preserve the DUT as Denver's main passenger rail terminal. In the long term, bridge over the loading platforms to link the upper level of the multi-modal transportation center and other uses in the valley. PAGE 11

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CENTRAL PLAITE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991 J. Develop a major public 'square' along the entire east frontage of the Dill facing Wynkoop St. as an additional open space for Lower Downtoirn. K. Develop an internal transit system for the VaHey based on the extension of the Sixteenth Street Mail.. Link the river and Rice Yard sub-area directly with Downtown by extension of the Sixteenth Street Mall and its shuttle system. Link them also with general traffic via 15th Street and Speer Blvd. L Locate public facilities (such as an amusement park, a basebaH stadium, an aquarium, and other cultural /recreational facilities), in the Valley. Create more tourist attractions in support of Downtown hotel, retail, and convention center trade. Encourage a recreational use such as an amusement park in the Rice Yards sub-area. M. Allow warehousing, distribution, and light industrial uses in some specific areas of the Valley as support facilities for Downtown, and to take advantage of the Valley's good access to regional and interstate transportation N. Create a network of pedestrian and bicycle routes that: 1) connect Downtown, the Valley development, and the northwest neighborhoods with the Platte River and Cherry Creek 2) inter-connect the sub-areas of the VaHey. Build this network onto the Commons Park, Greenway system, and the Cherry Creek bike and pedestrian system. Consider the Sixteenth Street Mall Extension as the major pedestrian connection from Downtown to the Commons Park, making an overpass at the CiviL, the preferred method of bridging this barrier. In the long term, create pedestrian overhead crossings of Dill trackage and the CML between 16th and 20th Streets. 0. Preserve and reuse as many of the old industrial and railroad-related buildings and structures in the Valley as possible, in order to build on their character and give the Valley a unique identity. P. Consider creating additional water features in the VaHey, building on the Platte River, and Cherry Creek water environments. Q. Develop a plan that can be implemented in phases, so that it does not depend on large advance investments in infrastructure. PAGE 12

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CENIRAL PlATTE VALLEY CQliJPREHENSIVE PIAN AMENDMENT 1991 FRAMEWORK MAPS: The maps which follow were developed and refined during the course of. the Steering Committee's deliberations. They reflect a complex series of interconnected decisions affecting many aspects of the intended built environment in the CPV. Their purpose is to demonstrate how the uses, structures and activities planned for each sub-area are intended to interface with those of adjacent areas, collectively comprising a rational system, capable of supporting attainment of the goals which are enumerated above. PAGE 13

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CENIRAL PIA'ITE VALLEY COMPREHENSWE PIAN AMENDMENT 1991 Open Space and Special Landscaped Streets Increased open space and public recreational use of the valley are the most powerful character-defining elements of the plan. The South Platte River and Cherry Creek are the major natural features of the CPV to which all parks and public open spaces relate directly or indirectly. The inter connected system of public open spaces constitutes the major form-giving element of CPV infrastructure. Public open spaces have been designed as an integrated system of large, intermediate and small amenities, each intended to fulfill different functions within the urban environment. Most prominent is Commons Park, an open meadow by the river big enough to accommodate regional events and other large festivals. At other times, it will support a diversity of unprogrammed active and passive activities. Other regional facilities such as an aquarium may be added later to the Commons Park or on some other site within the contiguous system of parks and waterways. At the other extreme are small and intimate squares introduced into built up areas, giving people some opportunity for passive relaxation close to places of work or residence. These squares also provide a framework for future development. Rockmont park is intended to fulfill the needs of the Highland neighborhood for both active and passive recreational facilities. It will be equipped with ball fields as well as informal grassy areas near the river. It will be accessible from the neighborhood via 20th Street, Bassett Street, Platte Street and the connection beneath 1-25 to Inca Street. Intermediate open spaces such as those along Cherry Creek and the river provide a continuous band of greenery through the valley, relating it to its larger natural context. These spaces serve a variety of active and passive functions. They provide continuous trails for cyclists and those on foot benveen destinations across the valley. They also provide an attractive outlook for buildings constructed along their margins, particularly residential and entertainment uses adjacent to public open spaces. Not only can such uses capitalize on views over the parks; the occupants also provide 'eyes on the park', improving safety for park users. These regional, neighborhood and local open spaces are connected by special landscaped streets creating a continuous network crisscrossing the valley and providing a unique setting for development, providing links between sub-areas in the valley and adjacent neighborhoods, and increasing public access to all of the valley's amenities. Interim landscaping ( such as hydroseeding ) is strongly encouraged for large vacant areas in the Valley prior to the first stages of development. PAGE 14

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SMALL PARKS OR SQUARES LOCATION TO BE DETERMINED r;:"J: ::1 OPEN SPACE SPECIAL LANDSCAPED STREETS PAGE 15 !;; :c \;: ... MARKET STREET STATION,-i } J j !;:; !;:; !;:; !;:; :r: :r: iS b ::1 OPEN SPACE AND i l j !;:; :r: ... i l --1 l J !;:; :r: ... 0 "' j I "j j !;:; ... ttl Cl z OJ "' "' SPECIAL LANDSC.APED STREETS DENVER CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY OVERALL URBAN DESIGN PLAN '-J j !;:; [2 f1 ,p. : ";' l -,. l ----./ .) J !;:; ... !;:; ttl :c :r: :c b b ... "' "' "' North D 1 Acre l i .J ... ttl :r: t:: "' j J i ., ... ttl :r: t;; "' ZGF BRW DHM,Jnc. Long Hoeft Design Core _.] !;:; "' "' q 200" 600' 1200' I-25 SB I-25NB WYNKOOPST WAZEEST BLAKE ST MARKETST LARIMERST LAWRENCEST

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.Yo,?, '/"'{ <$>"'{ '<;. '<;. l --.;;._ ... _\ -_.:-JIII!JIIIIIhl GENERAL MIXED USE (OFFICE, RETAIL, HOUSING, ENTERTAINMENT, HOTEL) /LIGHT INDUSTRIAL WAREHOUSES NOT ALLOWED """I S.....-\...-\'<"'1\1 GENERAL MIXED USE/HOUSING PREFERENCE J; J>"'k "..r '<"o "1[; 1>0(50<1 GENERAL MIXED USE/OFFICE/RESEARCH,SHOWROOM, CBD SUPPORT ALLOWED PREFERRED LAND (LT INDUSTRIAL/WAREHOUSE ALLOWED IN PROSPECT, PLATTE AND UPLAND ... USE/ AMUSEMENT PARK ALLOWED II I i 1 i I REFER TO EXISTING NEIGHBORHOOD PLANS AND SUBAREA ZONING STANDARDS .Ys,?, ..16')l <$>"'{ <$>"'{ <$>"'{ '<;. '<;. '<;. tii tii tii tii J: Cl t:; 11 "' "' "' USES POTENTIAL BASEBALL STADIUM SITES ::::::l INTERMODAL TRANSPORTATION CENTER DENVER CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY OVERALL URBAN DESIGN PLAN "'"'! '<;. tii Cl <:<: i::J PAGE 16 J>9)l "o,?, /;-<$>"'{ tii i'i "' "' North D 1 Acre POTENTIAL HELIPORT ZGF BRW DHM,Inc. Long Hoeft Design Core Q 200' 600' 1200' wYNKOOPST WAZEEST BLAKEST MARKETST LARIMERST LAWRENCEST

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CENIRAL PIATIE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PIAN AMENDMENT 1991 Preferred Land Uses The predominant character of development in the valley will be an urban mix of office, residential, entertainment, recreational, and commercial uses consistent, in almost all cases, with the land uses listed in the1986 Plan. Each of the subareas will exhibit uses consistent with its locational characteristics and established activities where these are significant. This overall mixed-use character is intended to provide a broad range of development activities capable of supporting and complementing existing uses nearby. It also provides for varied future market conditions. Proposed uses will knit the Central Platte Valley together while allowing for a high degree of diversity and distinctiveness between subareas. Residential use should be concentrated as much as possible in areas that will extend existing, adjacent housing redevelopments (particularly in the Lower Downtown area) into the valley and in areas that will maximize proximity to the South Platte River, Cherry Creek and other open-space amenities. Since development of additional housing has been identified as a high priority, preference has also been given to areas in which infrastructure is largely in place. Light industrial and warehouse uses, previously eliminated from the Valley in the 1986 CPV plan, are now proposed to be allowed in some subareas because of the continuation of passenger railroad uses at DUT not contemplated in the previous plan. Entertainment uses should be concentrated along the South Platte River and Cherry Creek where they can complement recreational activities associated with the various parks and other public open spaces which are connected to the waterways. Amusement park use has been added to the land uses allowed in the Rice Yards subarea. This plan does not readdress land uses in those sub-areas west of I-25 for which neighborhood plans and zoning regulations have been largely developed. PAGE 17

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' ,. CENTRAL PIAITE VAUEY COMPREHENSIVE PIAN AMENDMENT 1991 Views, Visual Landmarks, Building Heights and Densities The pattern of building heights in the Central Platte Valley favors lower rise structures adjacent to major open spaces, within protected view corridors, and near existing lower-density, low-rise neighborhoods. This pattern recognizes the importance of ensuring that sunlight can reach major open spaces and responds to the desire for pedestrian-scaled development along the waterways. It also ensures the continued preeminence of landmark features in the valley and complements the scale and fabric of Lower Downtown and existing adjacent development. To balance the impact of lower building heights in the Valley, and to better develop a compact urban character, the previous plan's FAR restrictions have been eliminated, letting the height limits become the primary determinant of density. High rise development is generally disallowed, since it would tend to encourage developments which would be out of scale with Lower Downtown and would compete directly with Downtown instead of complementing it as the goals dictate. For a discusion of height and density issues, including the Steering Committees assumed height values and locational criteria see the paper on criteria and assumptions underlying the recommendations which is included in the Appendix. In order to provide some choice in certain areas where the existing low rise character is less prevalent, but where midrise development would require additional controls, a 'Flex Area' is proposed. Owners in these areas would have two options: 1) to develop up to the maximum low rise height without any limit on floor area ratio, or 2) to build up to the maximum mid-rise height limit in exchange for accepting a 2:1 floor area ratio density constraint. If the latter option is taken, additional design criteria would be applicable such as increases in landscape requirements, and review of building locations to minimize the interference of views from public places. The existing DUT Development Agreement allows high rise structures (250' high) on either side of the Terminal, subject to locational criteria and design standards, in return for the preservation of the building. If the Agreement is terminated, the high rise areas shown in the Agreement shall revert to the mid-rise height limits shown in this Plan. PAGE 18

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t>o VIEWS ):( HISTORIC BRIDGES NEW LANDMARK BRIDGES HIGHRISE MIDRISE K S I LOW RISE --HISTORIC DISTRICT fi'/&d4 FLEX AREAS: EITHER MID RISE AT 2:1 F.A.R. OR LOW RISE WITH NO F.A.R. LIMITS PAGE 19 .0 i i i i j j j t; !-< !-< t; t; t; t; !-< t; Ul Ul 0 Ul :r:: ;!; :r:: ;!; t iS !-< z 0 N "' N N VIEWS, VISUAL LANDMARKS AND BUILDING HEIGHTS DENVER CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY OVERALL URBAN DESIGN PLAN ;l 'd t; t; !-< : \;: ::3 N AYBE LOWER DEPENDING ON VIEW PLANE .. CONSTRAINTS --. .. --.....:. 1 .. t; :r:: !o "' North D 1 Acre .. !-<
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REGIONAL PEDESTRIAN TRAIL SYSTEM PRIMARY CENTRAL PLA TIE VALLEY ROUTES INTERSECTIONS OF ABOVE SYSTEMS 0 BASEBALL STADIUM SITE GRADE SEPARATION *ALL STREETS WILL HAVE SIDEWALKS; ROUTES SHOWN HAVE ADDITIONAL PEDESTRIAN <{>'k d._;> J'6";, J'-7, 11'o .y .Y_,. .,.'<;. .,.'<;. .,.'<;. .,.'<;. .,.'<;. '<;. '-/ PEDESTRIAN ROUTES DENVER CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY OVERALL URBAN DESIGN PLAN PAGE 20 !;; c} 49 c} 60 <:)<# ,,! !i; !;; "' "' North D ---. _;:; f-o "' "' ZGF BRW DHM,lnc. Long Hoeft Design Core !i; .'-< f-o "' "' 1 Acre q 200' 600' 1200' l-25SB I-25NB "olV !Jcvo BROADWAY AVE wYNKOOPST WAZEEST BLAKEST MARKETST LARIMERST LAWRENCEST

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CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PIAN AMENDMENT 1991 Pedestrian Routes The system of pedestrian routes throughout the CPV has been designed to give safe and convenient access to all destinations for those on foot. It is not regarded as a secondary system, but rather as one which will recommend itself as the access system of choice for many who live or work in the valley. Pedestrian routes are closely integrated with the open space system since open spaces and parks often offer the most amenable walking environments, provided that they are safe and reasonably direct. Established major pedestrian routes such as 16th Street and Cherry Creek are used as arteries to which lesser routes are connected. The objective is to provide major connections between sub-areas in the valley, sub-areas and adjacent neighborhoods and to provide overall improved access to the regional recreational trail system and the proposed open spaces and parks. These routes create a comprehensive network of cross-valley and through-valley connection. Designated pedestrian routes will be provided with continuous, wide sidewalks, street trees, pedestrian lighting and railings (where appropriate) and informational and directional signing. All major pedestrian routes will be handicap accessible. Continuity with connecting streets is necessary to the guiding principles of safety and convenience. It is important that high standards of pedestrian amenity be maintained throughout the street system so that circulation on foot is actively encouraged. PAGE 21

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CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991 Bicycle Routes Criteria of safety, convenience and connection to established routes guide design of the bicycle routes network. Full advantage is taken of the continuous system of public open spaces along Cherry Creek and the South Platte River to provide safe and amenable routes. Many routes are segregated from vehicular traffic, but access needs often dictate shared use of streets. In such instances, safety considerations are paramount, minimizing risks associated with potentially dangerous intersections and heavily trafficked streets. Defined bicycle routes provide additional connections between sub-areas, sub-areas and adjacent n.eighborhoods, and improved access to proposed regional and neighborhood parks and open spaces. These routes create a comprehensive and continuous network of cross-valley and through-valley connections that complement existing regional bicycle trails along the S. Platte River Greenway and Cherry Creek, and the system of on-street and off-street routes developed in the city. PAGE22

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SIGNED BIKE ROUTE (SHARE STREET WITH VEHICLES) t:lCCCI:I BIKE TRAIL (SEPARATE FROM TRAFFIC) 1.-------1 GRADE SEPARATION INTERSECTIONS OF ABOVE SYSTEMS PAGE 23 / / / l ,_,,.;:_-o, ] 1 J Iii '""' Iii Iii Iii Iii Iii '""'
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"";, .?_p;, "'o "'--DIAMOND LANE "'6';, .Y.y""<> TRANSIT-RAIL, BUS AND HIGH OCCUPANCY VEHICLES DENVER CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY OVERALL URBAN DESIGN PLAN PAGE 24 North D 1Acre Centennial HNTB ZGF BRW DHM,lnc. Long Hoeft Design Core Q 200' 600' 1200' l-25SB 1-25NB wYNKOOPST WAZEEST BLAKEST MARKETST LARIMERST LAWRENCEST

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CENTRAL PlATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PIAN AMENDMENT 1991 Transit: Rail, Bus and High Occupancy Vehicles The focus of transit improvements in the valley is the Multi-Modal Transportation Center centrally located in the valley northwest of DUT. This multi-modal center will provide an interface between regional buses and local circulators (ultimately replacing the existing Market Street Station in Lower Downtown), light rail connections to Downtown from the airport, southeast and southwest destinations, passenger rail service including Amtrak and the Ski Train, interstate and tour buses, I-25 high occupancy vehicles, a possible historic trolley and transit system operating on the 16th St. Mall extension from Lower Downtown through the valley. Another important constituant of the Multi-Modal Transportation Center will be a large capacity parking facility. This will intercept High Occupancy Vehicles arriving from the future 20th Street HOY ramp along the CML, and single passenger vehicles arriving on Speer Boulevard, new 20th St., and the new Park Ave. West (23rd St. Viaduct) via new Wewatta Street before they reach streets in Downtown and Lower Downtown. The function of the mid-valley intercept parking facility is expected to change over time. In the short-term, it is integral to the planning for areas of the CPV and Lower Downtown. Other downtown-related parking intercept facilities may be planned. The Multi-Modal Transportation Center will focus the interface of these various transit modes at a single location in the valley, assuring the future of DUT as Denver's premier point of entry to downtown. The Multi-Modal Transportation Center will also provide a unique real estate catalyst for development in the area, providing unparalleled accessibility and a regional parking resource in the valley. It is important to locate this facility in the center of the Valley in order to stimulate other development. Locating it adjacent to the DUT would leave the mid-valley isolated while possibly increasing bus traffic in Lower Downtown, and degrading the architecture of the Terminal itself. The DUT will remain the center for passenger rail transportation, accommodating national connections through Amtrak operations, and possibly commuter rail service between front range cities. The proximity of the two transit centers will provide the ability for passengers to make cross connections between the two facilities. However, through-freight movement will continue on the CML adjacent to the future light rail-corridor. The Sixteenth Street Mall will be extended into the valley providing a strong and amenable connection to Lower Downtown and Downtowp. A transit system operating on the Mall will provide direct and convenient service for those arriving at and departing from the city center via the Multi-Modal Transportation Center. The historic trolley system could provide an additional recreation amenity in the Valley, as well as a delightful linkage between recreation and entertainment facilities. PAGE25

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CENTRAL PLAITE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991 Majo:r St:reets and Parking Street improvements planned for the CPV are consistent with the system of arterial, collector, and local streets which serves the city as a whole. They are designed to provide a rational hierarchy of major and minor traffic routes whose capacity and design speed are consistent with the vehicle trips accommodated. At one extreme, the 23rd Street (Park Ave. West) replacement structure serves primarily as a regional link between I-25 and Downtown Denver, with minimal need for local access within the valley. Consequently it is designed as a high capacity arterial street. 15th Street, though also an arterial street, fulfllls a more local function, linking Lower Downtown and the Highland and West Denver neighborhoods and providing access from both into the Cherry Creek and West Bank sub areas. Regional and local traffic access to the valley, amongst sub-areas, and between sub-areas and adjacent neighborhoods will be significantly improved when planned viaduct and roadway improvements have been completed. Regional traffic flows to and from I-25 will be carried by three major arterials: Auraria Parkway, Speer Boulevard, and Park Ave. West (23rd Street). Local connections between sub-areas and between sub-areas and adjacent neighborhoods will be provided on local arterial streets: 15th Street, 20th Street and new Wewatta Street. The Multi-Modal Transportation Center will provide a major new public parking reservoir in the valley for regional traffic from I-25 including high occupancy vehicles. Initially this will be landscaped on-grade parking but as phased development of the center proceeds, will be replaced by structured parking Transit connections to valley development and Downtown will be an integral part of the Multi-Modal Transportation Center, making it an effective interceptor of traffic which would otherwise contribute to congestion in Downtown and Lower Downtown. PAGE 26

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./-?:y "&;, -$>'1 ./6;, -$>'1 .l.s_, -$>'1 S';. C'o '1+ ./.9;, '1 .. 91! --'.-_, 0 .:<, '1[.. -----., C'o 1:: : .' MAJOR PLANNED PARKING AREAS (}( FREEWAY INTERCHANGE -ARTERIAL (REGIONAL/LOCAL) PAGE 27 <$> <6;, -$>'1 MAJOR STREETS AND PARKING DENVER CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY OVERALL URBAN DESIGN PLAN t;; iS t;; e "' 0 North D 1 Acre ; 'i l J i-: i:l t;; :r: -'1 f ... j 1 :} t;; :r: !;; "' ZGF BRW DHM,lnc. L
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' t --"a, <.;J';. "% .q1'o .<_,. -1t-MAJOR CPV THROUGH ROUTES CPV ACCESS STREETS "-?:s. "O>;, .y-1 .y /? "'-t O'o 0'.;.5). cOd' 0 .y-1 .y-1 ""' 0 ... :''% """ "": BOULDER ST" CPV ACCESS STREETS NOTE: THIS IS A REPRESENTATION OF THE MOST LIKELY OVERALL SYSTEM. ALIGNMENT CHANGES OR OTHER MODIFICATIONS ARE POSSIBLE. DENVEI{ CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY OVERALL URBAN DESIGN PLAN PAGE 28
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CENTRAL PIA7TE l'liLLEY COMPREHENSIVE PIAN AMENDMENT 1991 CPV Access Streets The Major Streets and Parking Plan addresses primary and secondary street systems. Local access streets are, however, important to the attractiveness of property to prospective developers and are vital to the efficiency with which different facilities in the Valley can interact. This plan is included to demonstrate how such access is to be provided to areas in which it is presently inadequate. Wewatta Street, though it will be classified as an arterial, is included since it is a new street and will provide the only continuous north and south route in the Valley between DUT and the river. Its local circulatory functions are therefore of great importance. The following comments describe aspects of the system. A partial frontage road system is recommended along the CML to provide secondary access between several subareas. A continuous system may not be necessary or desireable. Service access for railroad maintenance will be provided separately within the CML right-of way. A road in the Commons park is also recommended. However, this road is only for park access, and should be located and designed to discourage through traffic. Also shown on the Local Access Street Map is the I-25 Collector/ Distributor system proposed in the Colorado Department of Highways' 1985 125 CBD Access Study. The recommendations of this study were accepted by the 1986 CPV Comprehensive Plan Amendment, and since conditions affecting these recommendations have not changed significantly, the current 1991 plan revisions assume their continued validity. PAGE29

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0 0 SPORTS COMPLEX --SUBAREA BOUNDARIES NEW SUBAREA BOUNDARIES (MODIFIED FROM 1986 PLAN) "'{ .;s..-1 North D 1 Acre ZGF BRW OHM, Inc. Long Hoeft Design Core Q 200' 600' 1200' WYNKOOPST WAZEEST BLAKE ST MARKETST LARIMERST LAWRENCEST

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CENIRAL PlATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991 SUB-AREA INTENT STATEMENTS: General Sub-Areas identified in the 1986 CPV Comprehensive Plan Amendment which are located west of I-25 have undergone varying degrees of planning analysis and evaluation by community representatives in the last few years. Several of these subareas are covered by neighborhood plans and Subarea Zoning Standards crafted to respond to neighborhood concerns. Because these areas have had additional planning efforts, and have been little affected by the changes which have occurred in property ownership and railroad operations east of I-25, they have not been reevaluated here. Sub-Areas east of I-25 have each been evaluated in the context of the Framework Maps. Some have had their boundaries amended to conform with 1) road or rail alignments which have changed since 1986, and 2) with new park configurations. Some new sub-areas have also been proposed to acknowledge changing use and ownership conditions. Particular characteristics of each sub-area have been considered in conjunction with overall CPV objectives, and in relation to functional relationships with adjacent areas. From this, an intent statement and a series of design guidelines peculiar to each sub-area has been derived. Together with the Framework Maps, these statements and guidelines provide policy direction for future improvements in each sub-area and a basis for subsequent redrafting of specific zoning standards and development regulations. PAGE31

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CENTRAL PIAITE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PIAN AMENDMENT 1991 Cherry Creek Sub-Area Intended Character: The Cherry Creek sub-area occupies a critical location at the heart of the CPV. It includes important portions of the public open space system along the Creek itself, at Confluence Park and at the southern extremity of the Commons Park. The sub-area is bisected by 15th Street, the principal connection between Downtown, West Bank and the Highland Neighborhood. Historic buildings on either side of 15th Street extend the character of Lower Downtown into the CPV and establish a precedent for the scale and uses of future development. Cherry Creek, West Bank and portions of Water Street have been identified as housing priority areas, where new development and rehabilitation of existing structures are expected to add substantially to inner city housing in support of other uses in the CPV and Lower Downtown. East and west halves of the sub-area are separated by the CML. Only 15th and 16th Streets will cross this barrier, with no lateral access into the area closer to the railroad than Bassett and Delgany Streets. Land immediately adjacent to the railroad will thus remain difficult to access and limited in its appeal for redevelopment. The remainder of the sub-area, by contrast, benefits from proximity to public open space, easy access to Lower Downtown and to transit and parking facilities in the Commons Plaza sub area. The extension of the 16th Street Mall transit and pedestrian corridor is planned on the area's northern edge. This system will connect to a new \ street aligned with the Arched Bridge on Speer Boulevard, giving access to the Rice Yards (Elitch's Amusement Park) from the 16th Street Mall. Local general traffic on 16th Street west of Wewatta will be permissable in order to provide additional access to the Cherry Creek subarea. See the Local Access Street Map for a general description of access options in the area. The boundaries of the Cherry Creek sub-area remain unchanged from the 1986 Comprehensive plan amendment. Guidelines: IJ(ii" Strengthen the historic function of this area as the primary connection between Lower Downtown, the river, West Bank and the Highland neighborhood. w Mixed use development should be encouraged, with an emphasis on housing throughout the area and into West Bank so that a viable residential neighborhood emerges, populous enough to sustain a variety of support facilities in addition to those already existing nearby. Discourage expansion of the electrical sub-station at Confluence Park which conflicts directly with housing objectives. PAGE32

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CENIRAL PLA17E VAUEY COMPREHENSIVE PIAN AMENDMENT 1991 aBuildings should be predominantly low-rise to encourage reuse of existing structures, to compliment the scale of the existing buildings in the area and in Lower Downtown, and to preserve views between the City center and northwest neighborhoods. a'" Buildings and entries should orient to the street as much as possible, in order to continue the character of a traditional urban downtown. aBuilding heights should step down toward Cherry Creek in order to provide a comfortable pedestrian scale along the Creek edge. PW Buildings should connect to each other as much as possible in order to create spatially defmed streets and courtyards, and to create a compact district where uses in close proximity to each other foster a pedestrian-friendly environment. a'" Preservation of historical structures in Cherry Creek should take account of future access needs so that they can remain viable contributors to the sub-area's liveliness. PW The Cherry Creek frontage should be developed as a pedestrianonly creekside promenade with no access for general traffic, (service and emergency vehicles excepted) and with buildings set back from the Creek bank. This space is intended to be an active interface between public open space and the mixed use buildings which are to front it. Extensions of t.,is open space to the interior of adjacent blocks is encouraged. Restaurants, night clubs, and shops with housing above are encouraged to locate along this creekside promenade. aTrails along Cherry Creek are intended to provide primary pedestrian and bicycle access between Downtown, the Highland Neighborhood, West Bank, the Platte Valley Greenway, and other destinations in the Central Platte Valley. aPedestrian and bicycle access into Auraria Village and Commons Plaza should be provided on Delgany, Wewatta and Wynkoop; into the Rice Yards and Commons via the 16th Street extension and new Bassett Street. Abandoned historic railroad bridges over Cherry Creek should be reused for pedestrian and bicycle traffic. PAGE33

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CENIRAL PLATTE VAUEY COMPREHENSIVE PIAN AMENDMENI' 1991 Commons Sub-Area Intended Character: The Commons sub-area has been redefmed as the area between the CML and the river, 16th and 20th Streets. It is to function as a regional park. Commons Park will be a major component in the public open space system of the Central Platte Valley. The Commons will be connected by the Platte River Greenway to Confluence Park and Cherry Creek to the south, and to Rockmont Park to the north. It will provide a large and uninterrupted grassy area with the flexibility to accommodate everything from informal field sports to major regional festivals. Since both direct vehicular access and parking facilities will be limited, the Commons will depend on pedestrian access to and from parking facilities in the Commons Plaza area. Guidelines: tar Only uses which contribute directly to the regional park functions of the Commons should be permitted. Examples of such uses are: park administration, aquarium, and limited parking areas. aVehicular access within the Commons between 16th St. and 20th St. should be limited to park access, maintenance, service and security purposes. Any streets within the park should not create barriers between sections of the park. tar Pedestrian access from Commons Plaza via 16th, 17th, 18th, 19th and 20th streets is to be encouraged, especially since the majority of parking spaces available to park users will be located at the Multi-Modal Transportation Center. aLandscaping should preserve large, uninterrupted open areas suitable for field sports and occasional major festivals. aNative, informal landscaping should reinforce the existing environment, possibly introducing additional water features to the park. aThe creative use of water is encouraged, as well as the close interaction with and easy access to the river. PAGE34

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CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENI' 1991 aThe CML should be screened with berms, walls and landscaping to minimize noise and other adverse impacts on the park. However, buffer landscaping should not block mountain view corridors along the numbered streets. aThe parking needs of the Commons should only be partially accommodated in the park. Park users (particularly for festivals) should be encouraged to use the multi-modal parking reservoir east of the CML, accessing the Commons by pedestrian bridges over the railroad tracks. PAGE35

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CENIRAL PLATTE VAUEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENI' 1991 Commons Plaza Sub-Area Intended Character: Commons Plaza sub-area has been redefined as the area between DUf and CML from 16th Street to 20th Street. The urban character of Lower Downtown is to be extended into this sub-area despite isolation from it by intervening railroad platforms and tracks. The principal uses will be a Multi-Modal Transportation Center and an associated large parking intercept facility. The Center will include a terminus for the extended Sixteenth Street Mall shuttle, a light rail stop, interchange with commercial interstate buses, and will incorporate a bus terminus for RTD which will eventually supersede the Market Street Station for regional services. Ultimately, a landscaped plaza will be built over this facility with low-rise, mixed-use development on either side of it framing views of DUf from the Commons and beyond. The parking intercept facility will serve Lower Downtown and Downtown Denver by feeding local transit service and sidewalks. It will also serve mid-rise commercial development in the northern part of the Commons Plaza sub-area. A local park for passive recreation will be located near 16th St. Eventually, this will provide access to the landscaped plaza and, hence, via footbridges to the Commons Park. One or more pocket parks will be located in the northern part of the sub-area. See illustrations on pages 59-63 for a representation of the phased, and full build-out development desired by this Plan Guidellnes: Mixed commercial and limited retail uses should be encouraged on the north and east sides of the Multi-modal Transportation Center and parking intercept facilities. aHousing with active plaza level uses should be encouraged adjacent to the landscaped plaza. aPublic streets and other public open spaces should be structured to strengthen physical and visual connections between Commons Plaza and adjacent sub-areas. aConvenient pedestrian access to adjacent sub-ares should be maintained as a priority; particularly to Commons fark and Cherry Creek. PAGE36

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CENIRAL PlATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PIAN AMENDMENT 1991 G" Streets within the sub-area should be structured to create an artificial ground level above the Multi-Modal Transportation Center at an elevation which will accommodate foot-bridge conections over platforms to DUI' and over the CML to the Commons Park. G" During early phases of development, ultimate street and access patterns should be established to subdivide surface parking lots, which should be relieved by interim landscaping. An at-grade local open space at 16th and Wewatta streets should be provided in the early phases of development. PAGE37

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CENIRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PIAN AMENDMENT 1991 Denver Union Terminal Sub-Area Intended Character: Views across the valley toward DUT are protected, so it is important that new development should not obscure the main elevation of the original station building. The existing train room and two storey wings must be preserved and maintained. Any changes to the exterior of the building must be approved by the historic preservation organizations listed in the DUT Development Agreement. The height and location of the buildings in the sub-area must be consistent with those established in the Agreement. If the Development Agreement should be terminated, then the right to build high rises shall also be terminated, and revert to a maximum mid-rise height in the zones previously indicated as high rise in the Development Agreement. Areas already indicated as suitable for midrise and low rise in the Development Agreement should remain designated as such. Guidelines: .ar New buildings should step down towards Lower Downtown from high-rise over the tracks to low-rise along the Lower Downtown edge .ar As described in the Development Agreement's guidelines, the architecture of new buildings should be compatible with that of the existing terminal Train Room and wings in materials, colors, scale and form. Any new development must provide urban open space in front of the Terminal from 16th St. to 18th St. facing Wynkoop St. Open space shown in the Development Agreement on the west side of the Terminal assumed that the passenger rail function would be moved to another location. The purpose of this open space was to primarily preserve the view of the Terminal from the west. Although passenger rail operations will now continue, making ground level open space impossible, the principle reason for the open space still remains to insure that no development blocks this view. Consequently, no structure higher than the sill line of the large arched windows shall be allowed in front of the west face of the train room .ar Public pedestrian connections should be provided from DUT over the passenger platforms to the Commons Plaza, ensuring convenient access between Lower Downtown and the Multi-Modal Transportation Center, public open spaces and other facilities in the valley. PAGE38

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CENIRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991 aNew development in and adjoining our should incorporate uses which are compatible with those established in the adjacent Lower Dov.'TI.town and may include office, hotel, retail and residential uses. Any above-grade parking structure which faces onto a Lower Downtown street should provide ground floor commercial space accessible and visible from the street for the majority of the garage's street frontage. PAGE39

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CENIRAL PlATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PIAN AMENDMENT 1991 Upland Sub-Area Intended Character: This is a new sub-area located between Wewatta and Wazee Streets, DUT and Broadway. Upland was until recently occupied by Union Pacific Railroad operations. It represents an important addition to the land resource of the CPV because it immediately abuts the Lower Downtown and Arapahoe Triangle districts. Despite the steep escarpment which bounds the southeast side of the Upland sub-area, the established downtown street grid could be extended across the land, giving flexibility in access and establishing an urban development pattern consistent with its location and development potential. Consequently, projected uses are mixed with a predominance of office uses south of 22nd Street and extension of Arapahoe Triangle activities into the northern part of the sub-area. Development of the Multi Modal Transportation Center and intercept parking facility in the adjoining Commons Plaza sub-area will provide a stimulus to development of the southern part of Upland. Guidelines: aThe UP Head-house, the scale and character of Lower Downtown, and other historic buildings adjacent to this sub-area set a precedent for the scale and quality of future development. aPedestrian and bicycle access to Lower Downtown should be provided by extension of Wynkoop at or near grade over depressed 20th Street. Additionally, access for pedestrians, bicycles and local vehicular traffic should be provided by extension of the established street grid across the entire sub-area, as well as from the new cross-valley structures at 20th Street and Park Avenue West. The parkway character of Park Ave. should be continued in the transition between the new Park Ave West viaduct structure and the city streets that serve it. Since this transition is the first introduction of downtown to the motorist, it should include some kind of gateway treatment either by landscaping, entry elements, and/or signage. PAGE40

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CENIRAL PLATTE VALLEY COivfPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991 1:-'E A small public open space should be identified and dedicated at a iocation convenient for most future occupants. 1:-'E Property between 19th and 20th Street should be developed for uses which complement and strengthen the prevailing Lower Downtown mix of office, retail, housing and galleries. Between 20th and 23rd Streets, office uses should predominate, with the mix of uses favoring light industrial and warehousing between 23rd Street and Broadway. If a baseball stadium is sited in this area, a set of additional guidelines should be followed. These guidlines should include the following: -.' Pedestrian access between LoDo and the stadium should be provided along Wynkoop, Wazee, and Blake Streets. Pedestrian access from the CPV should be from 20th St., and new pedestrian bridges over the tracks between 20th and Park Ave. West, and, possibly, at 18th St. Primary vehicular access should be from 22nd. St., and Park Ave. West.(23rd St.), with secondary vehicular access from 20th St. -.' Major parking areas should occur north of 22nd. St. and west of Blake St., and west of Wewatta in the CPV. Avoid the dependence on parking in Lower Downtown -.' The existing warehouses along Blake St. north of 20th St. should be preserved as much as possible and integrated into the project. Minimize the height of the stadium by recessing it into the existing slope. -.' The stadium's form, functional organization, and architecture should reflect the characteristics of LoDo buildings: street oriented, brick, pedestrian scaled facades, and retail and transparent facades at ground level along Blake St., and 20th St. Light glare and noise should be confined to the site as much as possible. PAGE41

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CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991 Prospect Sub-Area Intended Character: Originally an area of industrial activities exclusively related to the railroads, Prospect has provided incubator space for a wide variety of uses in recent years. Buildings vary in condition from derelict to new and vary in quality from solidly built old warehouses to less substantial recent structures. The sub-area is redefined in this plan to accommodate a reconfigured Rockmont Park. It is bounded on three sides by active railroad lines, due to the continued operation of Amtrak at DUT. Consequently, light industrial and warehouse uses have been added to the list of permissable new uses. Access will be significantly improved over the existing situation with the construction of new street intersections at Chestnut/20th Street and at Wewatta/Park Avenue West. Development in Commons Plaza and Upland sub-areas will bring Prospect into the mainstream of Central Platte Valley activities, further eroding its sense of isolation and enabling it to capitalize directly from the visibility it will enjoy from both 23rd and 20th Street viaduct replacement structures. A unique characteristic of the area is the street grid which is aligned north and south as in areas west of the freeway, but at variance with the Lower Downtown. This grid is to be maintained and expanded throughout the sub-area, consistent with the preservation of historic buildings and nurturing of most existing businesses in the area. Attractiveness of the sub-area to new occupants will be improved by the improvement of its street and open space infrastructure. In the long term, pedestrian access over the railroad tracks to Rockmont Park and the Greenway will further enhance the Prospect sub-area. Guidelines: aA broad mix of uses should be encouraged in the area, using renovation and infill development to enable loft residences and studios, showroom and specialty retail, office and entertainment activities to coexist with light industrial and warehouse uses. Surface parking may be allowed as an interim use. PAGE42

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CENIRAL PLA17E VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991 .ar Since access to the Commons and Rockmont Park will be limited and views out of the sub-area will be blocked for most occupants, a public open space should be created as a development amenity near the center of Prospect. Taller buildings developed on vacant land near 20th Street should step down in height northward towards the river, approximating the massing of historic buildings which are to be retained. Lower building heights toward the river will also help to preserve views of the City center from Park Avenue West in the Platte sub-area. Pedestrian, bicycle and local vehicular access between Prospect, Commons Plaza and Upland sub-areas should be safe and convenient so that facilities in each may be mutually supportive. Access to bus and HOV facilities will potentially be important to growth in Prospect. l!:ir A portion of this sub-area has been designated as a' Flex Area'. Refer to page 18 for a detailed description. PAGE43

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CENFRAL PIA1TE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PIAN AMENDMENJ' 1991 Platte Sub-Area Intended Character: This newly identified sub-area should provide an attractive introduction to the CPV and downtown Denver for the motorists arriving from the north who will cross the river on Park Avenue West (the 23rd Street viaduct replacement structure). The sub-area is currently characterized by a mix of industrial and railroad-related uses, but its prominence from the 125/Fox interchange and its bisection by 23rd Street (the northward continuation of Park Avenue West) gives some expectation of new development and a consequent change in character. Some brick industrial buildings survive in this area, and it is intended that new commercial and industrial structures will display similar characteristics in massing and civic design so that a suitably dignified if utilitarian environment can be created at this important entry. Guidelines: a.The Platte River Greenway should provide a strong element of continuity between the Platte sub-area, public open spaces to the west and the Prospect sub-area to the south. An addition to the Greenway system should be established on the west side of the river with connections to Rockmont Park and the new Park Ave West river bridge. aThis sub-area has good freeway access, but local street access is restricted by railroads and freeway which surround it on three sides, reducing its attractiveness for many potential uses. However, a broad range of uses should be encouraged with particular emphasis on public, industrial, and highway-related hotel and restaurant uses which can benefit from immediate freeway access and can provide an appropriate introduction to the city. a-Park Avenue West (23rd Street) will be the dominant structure within the area. Its crossing of the river is an important event in motorists' approach to the City center and should be afforded special consideration in design of the bridge and its built and landscaped setting. Design of the street should otherwise stress its local function as a high quality street and pedestrian connection between northwest neighborhoods and Downtown. PAGE44

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CENIRAL PLATTE VALLEY COi\1PREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991 a" Pedestrian and bicycle access into the Platte sub-area will be limited to Park Avenue West, Fox Street, 38th Ave., and Globeville Road. Access to and from the Platte River Greenway via Park Avenue West should thus be considered a priority. a" Landscaping should stress the connective role of the Greenway between this sub-area, Prospect and Rockmont sub-areas. It should strengthen the sense of entry into the CPV from I-25.Landscaping and other landscape elements will also play an important role in screening existing and new industrial uses from the street, and from the elevated portions of the Park Ave West/125 interchange. a-Views toward the downtown skyline from Park Avenue West are particularly important and should be safeguarded from obstruction by tall structures. a" A portion of this sub-area has been designated as a' Flex Area'. Refer to page 18 for a detailed description. PAGE45

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CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991 Rockmont SUb-Area Intended Character: This sub-area has been redefined in this plan, now being bounded by 125 to the west, active railroad tracks to the north and the 20th Street viaduct replacement structure which will separate Rockmont from the Commons sub-area to the south. Obsolete industrial structures on both sides of the river are gradually being cleared to make way for an extensive neighborhood park to serve the Highland neighborhood. It should retain its own identity as a neighborhood park, but function as a constituent of the Central Platte Valley's overall open space system. The park is to provide for active field sports as well as passive recreation on both sides of the river. Connections to the Highland neighborhood are of fundamental importance, with primary access via the hew 20th Street bridges and Bassett Street, 19th Street, Platte Street and the improved 1-25 underpass from Inca Street. The northerly part of this sub-area is expected to continue to include light industrial activities for some years, but in the long term it is intended for park expansion or a usc compatible with park activities. PAGE46

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CEN7RAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMEIVDMENT 1991 Guidelines: .aThe Platte River Greenway should provide a sense of continuity between the Rockmont sub-area and public open spaces to the south .aWith the exception of continuing light industrial uses in the northern part of the sub-area, development shouldprovide only for neighborhood recreational activities and local access to them .aShared use parking to serve both commercial traffic and park users should be located away from the river near the I-25 right of way. Other parking areas may be appropriate for the eastern segment of the park. sPedestrian and bicycle access from northwest neighborhoods should be safe and convenient. Vehicular access to both sides of the river should be provided for safety and maintenance purposes. Additional foot bridges should be constructed to link the park across the river. sLandscaping should reinforce the special character of the Greenway and should unify areas of the park on either side of the river. sA portion of this sub-area has been designated as a 'Flex Area'. Refer to page 18 for a detailed description. PAGE47

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CENTRAL PlATTE VALLEY COMPREHEf.lSIVE PIAN AMENDMENT 1991 West Bank Sub-Area Intended Character:. Historic brick structures in the West Bank sub-area establish a distinctive character and architectural scale. Redevelopment of vacant and under developed lots should relate in scale with the historic brick buildings and should strive for a significant component of residential uses with a mix of retail, entertainment and office uses. It is intended that this area should complement Cherry Creek and Water Street sub-areas in uses and activities accommodated, so that together they will comprise a cohesive district containing substantial amounts of residential development focusing on the City's primary waterways and associated public open space. Guidelines: aResidential uses should be a significant component of development in this mixed use sub-area. aHeights should be limited to the Plan's low rise category in order to encourage the rehabilitation of existing buildings and the development of consistently scaled infill buildings. Some buildings may be further restricted in height to preserve views from Hirshorn Park as required by ordinance. aScale and massing of buildings should step down towards the river, with as much residential use as possible overlooking the Greenway and the future Commons Park. aPublic access to the South Platte River should be provided from Platte St. a-Safe and convenient pedestrian, bicycle and vehicular access to the Cherry Creek and Water Street sub-areas should be recognized as a priority. aBuildings fronting Platte St. should have no setbacks at street level so that a distinctly urban street space is defined. aActive retail and restaurant uses should border the Platte River, encouraging pedestrian useage along and next to the Greenway. PAGE48

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CENIRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991 tS" The existing 16th St. Viaduct \vii! be at least partially demolished, saving the arched bridge over the Platte, and as much of the remaining structure as necessary to create a distinctive and useful pedestrian connection from the Overlook and West bank subareas to the Commons Park and the 16th St. Mall Extension. PAGE49

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CENIRAL PLAITE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991 Water Street Sub-Area Intended Character: The Water Street Subarea will be a mixed-use area of commercial, retail, office, research/development, technological services, hotel and residential development. Housing. has been identified as a priority use in the CPV and portions of the Water Street sub-area have much to recommend them for this use. On the property between Water Street and the river, preference should be given to residential development amongst a mix of commercial uses including offices, restaurants, shops and hotels; however, the entire site may be devoted to any one or more of the possible uses. If only a portion of this part of the sub-area is proposed for development, other uses clearly incompatible with housing will be precluded. This is a preferred housing location because of its proximity to the South Platte River Greenway, its excellent views to downtown, and its adjacency to the West Bank sub-area which is also indicated as a residential preference area. Between Water Street and the freeway, consideration should be given to office or hotel development amongst a mix of commercial uses compatible with adjacent residential development in the subarea. This is a potential office or hotel location because of the excellent views to downtown, and the existing direct access from the freeway. Although this access may be eventually replaced by a frontage road system, good visibility and reasonable access will be maintained. Building heights should step down towards the river from the freeway. By stepping buildings down towards the river, development in the subarea will contribute to a pedestrian scaled and active urban edge along the river. It is also important that buildings in the Water Street Subarea should minimize obstructions to public views from the northwest neighborhood. PAGE 50

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CENIRAL PlATTE VALLEY COlvfPREHENSIVE PIAN AMENDMENT 1991 Guidelines: c:'l" Waterfront uses should be responsive to natural amenities and should complement pedestrian and recreational activities north and south along the riverfront, including the trolley line, Forney Museum and Children's Museum. a-Uses oriented towards the freeway should complement those in the neighboring sub-areas of Diamond Hill and West Bank. e Frequent pedestrian and bicycle links between Water Street and the Greenway should be encouraged .aLandscaping should be consistent with the native plantings of the Greenway and should give a sense of continuity between Gates Crescent Park and Fishback Park. e A pedestrian bridge across the river should be provided on or near 7th Street to connect with a new pedestrian/bike route on the east side of the river, and link the Gates Crescent Park and Children's Museum to the proposed Elitch's amusement park, in the Rice Yards sub area .aA portion of this sub-area has been designated as a 'Flex-Area'. Refer to page 18 for a detailed description. PAGE 51

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CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENI' 1991 Gates Crescent Park Sub-Area Intended Character: Primarily used as a park, Gates Crescent Park includes the Children's Museum, a length of the Rail Heritage's historic trolly line and a segment of the South Platte River Greenway. Connected to the Forney Museum and the entertainment/tourist attractions in the Rice Yards, this sub-area could contribute to the growing concentration of recreational facilities along the river. Guidelines: The park and Children's Museum should be buffered from the sights and sounds of the freeway to the extent possible without obscuring public views of Downtown from Jefferson Park and Front View Crescent. Ia" Landscaping should favor indigenous riparian species of plants and should maintain frequent and direct access to the Greenway. Ia" Any new construction should conform to low-rise height limits. Ia" The new bridge link between Rice Yards and the Mile Hi Stadium parking should also provide comfortable pedestrian and bicycle access to both sides of the river. PAGE 52

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CEN1P..AL PLA7TE VALLEY COil1PREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 195)1 Rice Yards Sub-Area Intended Character: The Rice Yards sub-area boundary has been amended to exclude areas east of the Consolidated Main Line. It is characterized as an adjunct of the Platte River/Cherry Creek public open space system in which recreational uses such as those provided by an entertainment park are to be the primary focus. Formerly occupied by railroad yards, the entire area west of the Consolidated Main Line is now vacant. Only a historic turntable remains as a relic of its past. The dominant structure on the property is the elevated portion of Speer Blvd which forms the northeast boundary. The Platte River Greenway forms the west boundary and is intended to establish a strong landscaped edge. A current subarea plan for an amusement park covers the entire area. It is not expected that further review of this development will occur other than that mandated by the subarea plan approval conditions. Guidelines: The distribution of entertainment facilities on the property should respect the passive recreation functions of the Greenway and Centennial Park. Building heightS should step down towards the river, allowing riparian vegetation to dominate and mark the course of the river. As patrons will be drawn from the region and beyond, good access from the freeway and from the Multi-modal Transportation Center in Commons Plaza sub-area will be essential. Pedestrian and bicycle access from Downtown via 16th Street and Cherry Creek should be safe and convenient, with eventual extension of Sixteenth Street Mall shuttle service providing excellent downtown connections. Parking should be away from the river. A vehicular connection to Mile High Stadium should be established so that overflow parking can be directed there whenever necessary. Vehicular access from Speer Blvd should be provided as a direct connection to the regional road system. aThe Platte River Greenway path system should be extended to the east side of the river, with connections to Elitch's where ever possible. A trolley connection to Elitch's from the west bank line would do much to tie together the Children's Museum, the Forney Museum and Elitch's into a strong entertainment/cultural complex. PAGE 53

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CENFRAL PLATTE VAlLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENF 1991 Aurarla Village Sub-Area Intended Character: The Auraria Village sub-area has been redefmed to occupy the entire area between the CML railroad tracks to the west and Auraria Parkway to the east, with Speer Blvd forming its north boundary. The only notable features of this largely undeveloped tract are the old warehouses, Auraria Parkway, Speer Boulevard, and the open space near Cherry Creek. A direct pedestrian connection to Lower Downtown via Wynkoop across Speer Blvd and Cherry Creek will become the focus of pedestrian-oriented development. Office and residential developments should have retail and entertainment uses at street level, especially on Wynkoop and 9th Street -the latter providing access to Tivoli to the east and eventually to the Rice Yards sub-area to the west via a footbridge over the CML. .Mid-rise buildings would predominate except in the vicinity of the old warehouses along Auraria Parkway and in southerly parts of the sub-area affected by the Front Range view corridor from Bell Park also known as the Mount Evans or Old City Hall Mountain Views Preservation Ordinance. Guidelines: aA broad mix of uses which will complement nearby activities should be encouraged. These may include office, residential, support retail and office/research facilities. a-Street level uses, especially on Wynkoop and 9th Streets, should be pedestrian oriented retail and entertainment. a-Uses along Auraria Parkway should be consistent with the civic image of the Parkway and with existing historic and nearby academic buildings. No auto-oriented uses such as gas stations, and drive-in restaurants should be allowed along the parkway. No new (post 1989) curb cuts or vehicular access other than existing public rights of way are allowed onto Auraria Parkway. aThe open space system of Cherry Creek and east of Auraria Parkway should be complemented by one or more public open spaces within the sub-area. These spaces may be small and urban in nature and locations should be identified and dedicated as part of the initial phase of development. PAGE 54

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CENIRAL PIAT1E VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PIAN AMENDMENF 1991 Pedestrian and bicycle access to Cherry Creek, Lower Downtown, Auraria Higher Education Center and the Rice Yards should be both safe and convenient. Primary routes will be Wynkoop, 9th Street and Speer Blvd. A pedestrian/bicycle bridge extending 9th Street over the CML would complete a primary pedestrian route in the Valley. Wewatta Street should make a clear connection with Auraria Parkway through this subarea via a route along the CML to 7th and/or 9th Streets, using one or both streets to link up with the Parkway. PAGE 55

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CENIRAL PLATTE VAUEY COA1PREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENJ' 1991 Aurarla Research Park Sub-Area Intended Character: The Auraria Research Park sub-area is now largely devoted to surface parking, providing a parking reservoir for Auraria Higher Education Center. Eventually the Research Park is intended to support the Auraria Higher Education Center, Auraria Village and other nearby areas with research and development facilities and incubator business space. Buildings within the Front Range view corridor will be subject to special height limits. Those buildings south of the view corridor should be limited to the low rise height category. Auraria Research Park should develop a character which is sympathetic with its intended activities and with its immediate neighbors to the north and east. Plans are being developed for a new light rail route along the southern boundary of this sub-area boundary on Colfax Ave. Its construction can be expected to stimulate new development in the research park. Guidelines: A mix of uses which will complement both the academic endeavors of the Auraria Higher Education Center and business and manufacturing ventures located elsewhere in the CPV and downtown should be encouraged. Priority routes for the safe and convenient passage of pedestrians should connect the sub-area to the Bronco Bridge and the Greenway to the west and to 7th Street, Larimer and Lawrence to the east. These routes should extend lighting and landscaping from the Auraria Higher Education Center to the river. Low rise structures should be located south of Lawrence, clear of the Front Range view corridor. PAGE 56

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CEN7RAL PIATIE VAUEY COMPREHENSIVE PIAN AMENDMENJ' 1991 A p p E N D ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS City Staff Participants Frank Gray, Director, Planning and Community Development Office Richard Farley Bar Chadwick David Wicks Dorothy Nepa Joy Gibson Mark Hess, Graphic Artist William Roberts, Director, Department of Public Works Richard Brasher Robert Dorroh Ed Ellerbrock Don & Carolyn Etter, Directors, Parks & Recreation Department Paul Foster Neil Sperandeo Consultants Greg Baldwin, Zimmer Gunsul Frasca Partnership Paddy Tillett, Zimmer Gunsul Frasca Partnership Brian McCarter, Zimmer Gunsul Frasca Partnership Larry Gibson, BRW, Inc. Dick Marshall, DHM, Inc. Gregg Brown, DHM, Inc. PAGE 57 X

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CEN/RAL PLA1TE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991 Build-out The following build-out drawings illustrate the kind of development necessary to fulflll the goals and policies of the Plan. These build-out studies also provide an initial test of the CPV Plan's objectives. The drawings show three phases in the build-out of the valley. The first phase, the time range of which is probably within the next five to ten years, foresees the completion of three major viaduct replacement projects (15th Street, 20th Street and 23rd Street); the purchase and improvement of Rockmont Park; the construction of Wewatta Street from Speer Blvd. to 23rd Street; the development of a large surface parking reservoir between 16th and 20th Streets; the development of Blitch's Amusement Park; the construction of a new bridge over Cherry Creek to serve Blitch's; the extension of the 16th Street Mall to Wewatta Street;the construction of a Baseball Stadium; and new infill private development (office and residential) along Cherry Creek. The possibility of an Aquarium being developed in the early phases is also quite real. The second phase, probably within the next 10 to 20 years, would see the relocation of the Market Street regional bus station into the valley; the construction of a 16th Street overpass across the CML, linking the Mall Extension to Blitch's; the purchase and development of the Common Park; continued inflil private development along Cherry Creek; and in the Prospect area; and the construction of a new bus/HOV ramp along the CML. The third or fmal build-out phase would see the completion of the Multi modal transportation center including decked parking with a formal park and development on top, full infill along Cherry Creek and the Westbank area responding to the stimulus of the Commons Park amenity; full build out in the Prospect, Water Street and Auraria Village subareas; and development of a light rail line along the CML. The time frame for this fmal phase could be in the range of 30 to 50 years. PAGE 58

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BASSETT ST DELGANYST WEWATTAST WYNKOOPST WAZEEST PHASE 1 MID-VALLEY AREA DENVER CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY OVERALL URBAN DESIGN PLAN ILLUSTRATIVE DESIGN PAGE 59

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DELGANYST WTh'KOOP ST WAZEEST rb BLAKEST rllJ[_YL_1C:J\ r 11!-< !ii !ii !-< !-< Fl
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BASSETTST DELGANYST WYNKOOPST WAZEEST BLAKE ST DENVER CENTRAL PAGE 61 COMMONS Flr--t====:J-----j 0 200 500 1000 PHASE 3 BUILDOUT MID-VALLEY AREA PLATTE VALLEY OVERALL URBAN DESIGN PLAN ILLUSTRATIVE DESIGN

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COMMONS PARK 1 I PEDEST!jlAN BRIDG I I -< Cl"'
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CONSOLIDATED MAINLINE RAIL 3 DENVER CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY OVERALL URBAN DESIGN PLAN ILLUSTRATIVE DESIGN INFILL DEVELOPMENT AROUND MID-BLOCK COURTYARD PAGE 63 D
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CENTRAL PIA1TE miLEY COMPREHENSIVE PIAN AMENDMENT 1991 IDSTORIC STRUCTURES IN TilE CPV EAST OF 1-25 Concentrations of historic structures set a precedent for the height and character of development in several of the sub-areas addressed in the Plan. This plan is included as a convenient but generalized reference to such structures. This map is not intended to be a reference for the specific designation status of any particular building. MULTI-MODAL PHASED BUDD-OUf The initial phases are designed to create the basis of the multi-modal facilityby 1) extending the 16th Street Mall shuttle and pedestrian system across an at-grade crossing of the DliT tail tracks; 2) building Wewatta Street from Speer Boulevard to Park Ave West (23rd St.) as access to the multi-modal area, and as a by-pass around Lower Downtown for north/south CPY traffic; and 3) establishing intercept off-site parking lots possibly through a downtown-wide parking district, and/or the involvement of a potential Baseball District An express bus lane to the Market St, Station will be built behind the DliT to connect to the 16th Street Mall east of the tail tracks. A small open space at the intersection of the 16th Street Mall and Wewatta should be provided for Lower Downtown and CPY use in the initial stages of the development. Early commercial and residential development is seen as occuring along the 15th Street corridor. Early construction of a HOY ramp along the CML from the 20th Street Bus/HOY system to the intercept parking lots is an important factor in establishing the importance of the lots, and the immutability of the relocation of the Market Street regional bus station well away from Lower Downtown. The intermediate phases of the multi-modal facility development depend on 1) the relocation of the Market Street regional bus station to the intersection of the 16th Street Mall and the CML; 2) the construction of a 16th Street Mall grade separation (preferably an overpass) at the CML, extending the Mall to the west side of the tracks; 3) the creation of the Commons Park; and 4) the development of a light rail line next to the CML. Commercial and residential development is seen as completing its build-out along the 15th St. corridor, and accompanying the construction of the new regional bus terminal and its interface with a light rail line along the CML. Light industrial, display /showroom and back office space would begin to inflll into the adjoining Prospect Subarea as its infrastructure is up-graded. The development of the above grade parking structures which act as a platform for development over the multi-modal facility begins with the construction of the relocated regional bus/light rail station. The fmal stages of the multi-modal build-out depend on the close coordination of the parking decks which create the platform for development over the multi-modal facility. It is crucial to coordinate these decks so that they form a network of streets leading from ground level to the deck's upper level so that easy and natural pedestrian and vehicular access can penetrate into the multi-modal development area. PAGE64

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17L:i'L:7L:7.tJ EXISTING UNDERGROUND 230 .KV. LINE EXISTING UNDERGROUND ELECTRIC DISTRIBUTION .,...,.....,......,...,. EXISTING 230 KV. TRANSMISSION LINE-OVERHEAD PROPOSED 230 .KV. TRANSMISSION Lll\TE-UNDERGROUND ----EXISTING OVERHEAD ELECTRIC DISTRIBUTION LINE rzqe.su;,r.tu;w.a4l PROPOSED UNDERGROUND ELECTRIC DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM ------STEAM LINE r .. :uu:ulillllllllllllllllllllll INTERMEDIATE PRESSURE GAS [EJ EXISTING ELECTRIC SUBSTATION ( lllllllillllllllllllllllllilllllllun LOW PRESSURE GAS cru:;ccru:::z;-COMMUNICATIONS CABLES PROPOSED ELECTRIC SUBSTATION [Ri EXISTING GAS REGULATOR STATION f.S] EXISTING STEAM PLANT UTILITIES: ENERGY SYSTEMS INFORMATION PROVIDED BY THE PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY, AND FROM THE 1989 DENVER URBAN RENEWAL AUTHORITY'S CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY BLIGHT STUDY DENVER CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY OVERALL URBAN DESIGN PLAN PAGE 66 .c ,, r. ---'' J, [ t --t l !;; tii 15 :r: "' t;; N N North D 1 Acre !;; J-o tfl :r: :r: f-o 00 '"' N N Centennial HNTB ZGF BRW DJ-L\1, Inc. Long Hoeft Desib"nCore 0 200' 600' 1200' I-25 SB l-25 ]\.'B wYNKOOPST WAZEEST BLAKEST MARKETST LARIMERST LAWRENCEST

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CML: CEN1RAL MAINLINE (JOINT OWNERSHIP OF BN AND D&RGW BN: BURLINGTON NORTHERN RAILROAD D&RGW: DENVER AND RIO GRAND WESTERN RAILROAD UP: .UNION PACIFIC DUT: DENVER UNION TERMINAL TRANSITION OF RAILROAD OWNERSHIP PAGE67 DENVERCENTRALPLATTEVALLEY RAILROAD TRACK OWNERSHIP 4/91

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---+Q SKI 1RAIN IN (WED.FRI.) Cl Cl c:::J CJ SKI 1RAIN IN & OUT, TO WINTER PARK C)4:lt:::lc::JCU::J (BOTH DAYS) SATURDAY AND SUNDAY SATURDAYNIGHTTURNAROUND ----)() HEAD-IN I HEAD-OUT (FORWARD) -< ={) BACK-IN I BACK-OUT DENVER CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY SKI TRAIN OPERATIONS 4/91 PAGE 68

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WESTBOUND AMTRAK PAGE 69 EASTBOUND AMTRAK PASSENGER RAIL SERVICE DENVERCENTRALPLATTEVALLEY OVERALL URBAN DESIGN PLAN

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.-. ... -o 7 C?s>.A ?. 7 /,. DENVER LANDMARKS/ NATIONAL REGISTER BUILDINGS/ BUILDINGS CONTRIBUTING TO HISTORIC DISTRICTS/ SIGNIFICANT BUILDINGS RECOGNIZED BY DENVER LANDMARKS COMMISSION 5 AUG 1987. HISTORIC BRIDGES NOTE: FOR INFORMATION ON INDIVIDUAL BUILDING STATUSREFER TO DENVER PLANNING OFFICE BUILDING SURVEY 21 OCT 1987 BOULDERST : CENTRAL ST --.HISTORIC STRUCTURES AS A CONTEXT FOR FUTURE DEVELOPMENT DENVER CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY URBAN DESIGN PLAN PAGE 70 North D 1 Acre ZGF BRW DHlvl1 Inc. Long Hoeft Design Core 0 200' 600' 1200' l-2SSB l-2SNB wYNKOOPST WAZEEST BLAKE ST MARKETST LARIMERST LAWRENCEST

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CENIRAL PlATTE VALLEY COi'JPREHENSIVE PIAN AMENDMENT 195)1 DELIBERATIONS OF THE CPV STEERING COMMIITEE Process: The Steering Committee began its task by identifying the many changes which had occurred since adoption of the 1986 Plan. They considered the possible consequences of these changes and drafted a list of fundamental issues to be addressed in developing a revised plan for the Valley. These fundamental issues were subsequently catagorized under five topics as reproduced below. An initial list of goals for the CPV was drawn from the 1986 plan. This provided a starting place for the Steering Committee in reviewing and updating goals and formulating intent statements. Goals were reviewed again in July following the decision to retain railroad passenger platforms at DliT. A refined version of the goals and intent statements appears on page 3. The original list of goals drafted by the Steering Committee is included here for reference. Conditions That Have Changed Since Adoption of the CPV Plan in 1986 ./ Amtrak service at DliT ./ Change in market I drop in land value ./ Elitch's -location, site, access ./ Hazardous material impact ./ RTD I-25 North HOV Project ./ Changing ownership ./ Specifics of viaduct replacement projects ./ Zoning ordinance passed to implement Plan, but serious problems have developed in it's process ./ Bond issue projects, ability to do things ./ MTDC I commuter rail ./ River flood control study underway ./ Creation of Lower Downtown Historic District ./ Creation of the Lower Downtown, Inc., LoDo has become more active ./ Development of Highlands Neighborhood Plan ./ Heliport/baseball stadium/aquarium site being studied in Valley ./ Comprehensive Plan adoption ./ Business Improvement District enabling legislation ./ Speer Blvd. viaduct replaced ./ Mainline rail consolidated in mid-valley ./ Delgany interceptor built ./ Auraria Parkway built ./ Airport Gateway and Stapleton are new City development areas ./ DliT development agreement ./ Enterprise zone ./ Auraria land acquisition to the west ./ Auraria Master Plan completed ./ Trolley operational on west side of River PAGE 71

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CENTRAL PLAITE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENJ' 1991 Fundamental Issues (Categorized Into Topics for Steering Committee Discusssion) Transportation ./ Tracks at DUT ./ Impacts of viaducts on the CPV ./ Is there a CPV multi-modal point? ./ Valley road system ./ Function and future of commuter rail in Valley ./ Pedestrian system ./ 20th/23rd traffic ./ Is mid-valley alignment possible? ./ Aesthetics of viaducts ./ How to Connect LoDo and CPV with tracks at DUT ? ./ LoDo Interface/parking Open Space ./ What is the Common? ./ Greater public uses in the Valley ./ Are there regional park needs in the Valley? ./ Relationship of CPV development to new opportunity/ Stapleton/Gateway ./ Pedestrian system ./ Type of open space Land Use Development ./ What is the edge of LoDo & CPV? Blended? Break? ./ How to connect LoDo to CPV with tracks at DUT? ./ How much flexibility in land uses? Industrial? Residential ./ Relationship of CPV development to new opportunity at Stapleton and Airport Gateway ./ Small parcel development/PRY Zoning Subarea Plan concept/validity ./ LoDo interface/traffic and parking ./ Parking ./ Reuse of Post Office Terminal ./ What is common? ./ How to build upon critical mass ./ Greater public uses in Valley ./ Valley road system ./ TDR transfer PAGE72

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CENIRAL PlAnE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PIAN AMENDMENI' 1991 Character .I Impacts of viaducts on CPV .t LoDo interface/traffic parking .I Aesthetics of viaducts .I What is edge of LoDo and CPV .I How much flexibility uses? .I Historic/P.R. heritage .I MidValley alignment .I Historic preservation .I RR Heritage Other .I Public and private actions needed to stimulate development .t IDR transfer strategies in CPV given new conditions .t How to create/build upon critical mass .t Leverage of city money .I Long term administrative structure for Plan implementation .I Role of DURA in blighted area .I How to implement flood control improvements .I Historic preservation .t RR heritage .I Other projects depending upon this review PAGE73

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CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT 1991 CRITERIA AND ASSUMPTIONS Underlying the Plan Recomendations The Plan and Future Zoning The approach taken is one where the desired character is clearly understood and defined. Measureable standards to achieve this character are then drafted as 'performance criteria'. Other factors which are less important or not related to the desired character are not included in the standards. The idea is to regulate only that which is necessary to produce the desired result, and to avoid regulating by broad traditional categories which may or may not directly affect the desired result. The Plan has avoided the establishment of quantifiable definitions for heights and other development criteria in order to preserve it as a general policy document, assigning the task of setting specific standards to the up coming zoning ordinance revision. This will allow the Plan to remain valid through the numerous changes in the zoning ordinance which may be expected to occur over the years. However, the Steering Committee in its deliberations accepted the following approximate parameters for the three height categories: 'low rise'about 80 feet, 'mid-rise'about 140 feet, and 'high rise' 250 feet. High rise was eliminated as a category from the 1991 Plan, allowing it only as a previously agreed upon condition of the DUT Development Agreement. The physical form goals for most of the Valley are 1) to create a set of clearly defined public parks and squares, ranging in size froin large to small, around which are focused various development projects; and 2) to develop a low to mid-rise, dense urban environment in keeping with the character of Lower Downtown. This results in open space which is 'shared' in the sense that it is large and developed enough to provide for the needs of several projects. It also results in buildings which fill up their sites providing gaps and internal spaces only when nessary for functional reasons. Consequently, future zoning regulations should specify relatively low height limits; setbacks only where they are specificly needed; minimum (if any) on-site open space requirements and/or the ability for balconies and roof-top decks to count as open space; minimum restrictions to building/impervious surface coverage; 'build-to' lines where development is required to extend to a line (usually the property line adjoining a street or public space); and no bonuses for on-site plazas or interior atria. This is intended to spread building form over greater proportions of the site, in keeping with lower height limits. The current PRV zoning ordinance requirement for a 6% open space exaction for all development is retained, using its 'payments in-lieu of actual land dedication' provisions to build a fund to purchase and/or develop the large park areas and smaller squares indicated in the Plan. PAGE74

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CENIRAL PLATTE VALLEY COMPREHENSIVE PIAN AMENDMENT 1991 Heights and Densities Under the provisions of the 1986 CPV Comprehensive Plan Amendment, the base development density throughout the district was set at a floor area ratio of 2:1. By taking advantage of bonuses (mostly for housing), transfer of development rights (TDRs), and taller height limits in certain locations, it was possible to achieve densities higher than 2:1 FAR in some areas in return for lower densities in other areas. The total overall permitted density would remain unchanged, yielding a theoretical development capacity of approximately 32,000,000 square feet of floor space. Because of the vast amount of vacant land and development potential, a great deal of doubt has been expressed about the value of TDRs, and the efficacy of bonuses to achieve housing. The 1991 Plan proposes to streamline this system by removing the FAR limits entirely and thus the need for TDRs. Instead, building height limits would be the principle determinants of the maximum densities. These would equal or, more likely, exceed on a case-by-case basis the maximum densities achievable under the 1986 Plan if all of its bonuses and IDRs were exploited. In addition, the 1991 Plan removes the 60 dwelling unit per acre density restriction included in the 1986 Plan. Land Uses Housing Much discussion focussed on the issue of indicating a 'housing preference' for certain areas. The Committee placed emphasis on housing as a significant component in the Valley's land use mix. However, the decrease in railroad infrastructure and operations previously envisioned has left fewer areas attractive to the housing market. Consequently, an effort was made in the Plan to identify areas which appear to hold the best promise for housing in the Valley. It is not the intention of the Plan to force private development to build only housing within a 'housing preference' area. The intention is to encourage, as much as possible, the development of housing in these areas through the creation of amenities, the provision of zoning incentives (possibly through height bonuses), and the targeting of available public subsidies. In view of the desire to encourage housing in the Valley, it makes sense to keep the current 10% housing exaction, possibly applying its provisions for 'in-lieu' payments to build a housing loan/grant fund to encourage housing development within the 'housing preference areas'. Other reasons for indicating 'housing preference' areas are: 1) to cluster residential development creating a sense of neighborhood which attracts even more residential; 2) to, conversely, avoid isolated residential 'outposts' which dilute the positive impact of people living downtown; and 3) to build a market for walk-in residential services such as day care, food stores, cafes, cleaners, drug stores, and other convenience retail. PAGE75

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CENIRAL PlATTE VA.UEY COMPREHENSIVE PIAN AMENDMENT 1991 Besides the areas indicated on the Land Use plan, all residential neighborhoods in the PRY district west of !25 should be also be considered as 'housing preference' areas. Flex Areas As described in the text, some zones are designated as 'flex areas', where a choice between low rise and mid rise development is offered. The criteria which follow were used to determine these 'flex areas': Locational Criteria for Low-Rise Buildings: ./ near existing low-rise residential neighborhoods ./ near existing historic and 'contributing' buildings ./ near major public open spaces which would be over shadowed by taller buildings ./ next to the South Platte River and Cherry Creek where smaller scale architecture should predominate ./. where taller buildings would obstruct key public views of DUT, the mountains or the downtown skyline Locational Criteria for Mid-Rise Buildings: ./ where the infrastructure systems, including transit, can support greater development densities ./ next to elevated roadways to allow a greater proportion of the building to be above the street ./ next to railroads as an added incentive to development ./ in areas where substantial parking facilities are available ./ wherever neither public views nor shadowing are at issue Light Industrial Uses Because of the increase in railroad facilities, (the Prospect and Platte subareas) have had general light industrial/ warehouse activities added to their list of allowable land uses. This does not mean that these new uses are the preferred uses in these areas, but merely that the increased railroad facilities in the areas warrant greater flexibility in capturing the available market. Additional design review will be necessary in order to insure compatibility with other uses, and a higher quality of development. Environmental Concerns Inherent throughout this plan is the understanding that environmental issues do exist and remedial measures will be necessary and required before any detailed development can occur. PAGE76