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Cherry Creek area plan, 2012

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Title:
Cherry Creek area plan, 2012
Creator:
Community Planning and Development, City and County of Denver
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Denver, CO
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City and County of Denver
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English

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Community planning
Neighborhood plans
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Denver -- Cherry Creek

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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DENVER'
THE MILE HIGH CITY
2 0 12
CHERRY CREEK AREA PLAN


Acknowledgements
MAYOR MICHAEL B. HANCOCK
DENVER CITY COUNCIL
District 1 Susan Shepherd
District 2 Jeanne Faatz
Districts Paul D. Lopez
District 4 Peggy Lehmann
District 5 Mary Beth Susman
District 6 Charlie Brown
District 7 Chris Nevitt (President)
District 8-Albus Brooks
District 9 Judy Montero
District 10 Jeanne Robb
District 11 Christopher Herndon
At- Large- Robin Kniech
At-Large Deborah Ortega
DENVER PLANNING BOARD
Brad Buchanan, Chairman
Laura Aldrete
Andy Baldyga
Shannon Gifford
Kenneth Ho
Anna Jones
Brittany Morris Saunders
Sharon Nunnally
K.C. Veio
Dave Webster
COMMUNITY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT
Molly Urbina, Interim Manager
Steve Gordon, Planning Services Manager
Ellen Ittelson
Chris Gleissner
Barbara Fromm el I
Steve Nalley
Todd Wenskoski
Caryn Wenzara
Tim Watkins
Andrea Santoro
Carolyne Janssen
Andrea Burns
PUBLIC WORKS
Jose Cornejo, Manager
Crissy Fanganello, Policy and Planning Director
Brian Mitchell,Traffic Engineering Services Director
Karen Good
Cindy Patton
Emily Snyder
Justin Schmitz
Mike Anderson
PARKS AND RECREATION
Laura Dannemiller, Manager
Gordon Robertson, Parks Director
David Marquardt, Parks Planning Manager
Mark Upshaw
CONSULTANT SUPPORT
KHO Consulting
Fehrand Peers


Table of Contents
INTRODUCTION.................................................................1
Planning Process..........................................................2
Planning Context..........................................................4
How to Use this Plan......................................................5
FRAMEWORK PLAN...............................................................7
Accomplishments, Challenges, Opportunities................................8
A. A Connected Cherry Creek.............................................12
B. A Distinctive Cherry Creek...........................................26
C. A Green Cherry Creek.................................................36
D. A Prosperous Cherry Creek............................................44
SUBAREA STRATEGIES..........................................................55
Cherry Creek Shopping District...........................................56
Cherry Creek North Neighborhood .........................................64
Cherry Creek East........................................................70
Cherry CreekTriangle.....................................................74
MOVING FORWARD..............................................................79
GLOSSARY....................................................................85
REFERENCE APPENDICES*
Cherry Creek North Urban Form Study
Cherry Creek Shopping District Development Study
*Reference appendices are intended to provide direction for future implementation actions. As such, they will
provide important guidance, but are not adopted as part of the Cherry Creek Area Plan.




Introduction
Cherry Creek has a strong history of planning and implementing plans. Cherry Creek's original
Neighborhood Plan was adopted in 1976. Updates in 1986 and 2000 have largely focused
on growth in the area and finding balance between commercial and residential land uses.
Recommendations from these plans have guided decision making regarding land use and
mobility as Cherry Creek matured into the region's premier mixed-use shopping district and
upscale urban neighborhood.
Most themes from previous planning efforts remain important in this 2012 Cherry Creek
Area Plan enhancing the character of existing neighborhoods, encouraging a greater mix
of land uses, enhancing the economic prosperity of mixed-use areas, creating a pedestrian-
friendly environment, improving the public realm, and creating a high degree of multi-modal
connectivity. The interdependent nature of retail, office and residential uses within Cherry
Creek and the important role Cherry Creek plays in Denver's economy are also themes that are
still very relevant in this plan update.
Some themes are emphasized in this plan due to changing conditions Narrowing the target
areas for growth within Cherry Creek, highlighting better transit connections as a way to grow
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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Introduction
1


Planning Process
A series of three focus group meetings were held in
July 2011 to review draft plan concepts.
The public process for the Cherry Creek Area Plan (CCAP) kicked off in January, 2010. Over
the course of the following two years, community members and city staff collaborated to
articulate opportunities and challenges and develop a vision for the next twenty years.
Denver's Community Planning and Development Department, Public Works Department,
Department of Parks and Recreation and dedicated Cherry Creek stakeholders provided
technical expertise for the planning effort. Regular meetings with the Cherry Creek Steering
Committee (CCSC) and the Area Plan Leadership Team (Leadership Team), and public
stakeholder meetings helped guide the process and the content of the Area Plan.
PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT PROCESS
A multi-tiered strategy for involving stakeholders ensured that all perspectives were
considered throughout the planning process. Public input informed the identification of key
issues as well as concepts and plan recommendations for addressing the key issues.
Denver City Council City Council member Jeanne Robb (District 10) was a member of
the Area Plan LeadershipTeam and provided critical guidance regarding the planning
process. City staff gave 2 presentations to the Land Use.Transportation and Infrastructure
(LUTI) Committee. A City Council public hearing and vote will culminate the planning
process.
Walking tours helped familiarize plan stakeholders
with issues in each subarea.
Denver Planning Board-The City staff briefed Planning Board on three separate
occasions regarding the Cherry CreekArea Plan. Aftera public hearing. Planning Board
will be responsible for approving the Area Plan and recommending it to City Council.
Area Plan LeadershipTeam Made up of Cherry Creek leaders representing business,
residential, retail and development interests, this small group was tasked with keeping
the planning process moving forward.
Cherry Creek Steering Committee A group of 25 individuals representing business,
residential, retail and development interests as well as several RNOs, the CCSC has been
in existence since the 1980s. The CCSC's mission includes leadership in developing
the contents and process of the plan and advocating for its approval and subsequent
implementation.
Focus Groups A series of intensive focus group meetings were held in July 2011 to
review Area Plan concepts through the lenses of (l.)Urban Form and Public Realm, (2.)
Mobility and Connections, and (3.)Economic and Development Opportunities. Over 50
people (representing business owners, residents and property owners) participated in
these focus group meetings.
2
Cherry Creek Area Plan | Introduction


Working Groups Several working groups were established throughout the planning
process to focus on particular issues, as the need arose. Topic-specific meetings included:
Fillmore Plaza working group and public meetings (dozens of public and neighborhood
meetings). Cherry Creek North building form working group, a mobility workshop and
two Cherry CreekTriangle workshops. Informal groups of stakeholders met throughout
the process to discuss various issues.
Neighborhood Organizations City staff attended neighborhood organization
meetings upon request. Meetings included: Cherry Creek East Neighborhood Association
(4 meetings). Cherry Creek North Neighborhood Association (3 meetings). Country Club
(2 meetings), Capitol Hill United Neighbors (CHUN) Zoning Committee (2 meetings).
Cherry Creek North Business Improvement District Board of Directors (5 meetings).
General Public
Public Meetings Two public meetings were held, one in July 2010 (attended by 75
people) to kickoff the plan and the other in April 2012 (attended by 135 people) to
present the plan draft.
Online surveys Online surveys were utilized to gain an understanding of key
issues in the area. Approximately 1,000 people responded to three separate online
surveysone survey focused on mobility and use of Fillmore Plaza in the Shopping
District, and another focused on long-term vision for Cherry Creek. A third online
survey was utilized to gather input regarding draft plan recommendations.
Individual correspondence City Planning Staff from various departments were
available throughout the process to discuss the plan by e-mail, phone or for face-to-
face meetings upon request by any plan stakeholder.
Plan Website A plan website was established at the beginning of the planning
process and utilized to provide updates and important plan resources as information
to the general public.
Overall, an estimated 1000 people participated in the planning process. It is their ideas,
enthusiasm, commitment and love of Cherry Creek that have contributed so much to the plan.
Cherry Creek residents, property owners and
business owners discussing economic development
opportunities.
Plan stakeholders played the "Right-of-Way Game'
to better understand tradeoffs of accommodating
various transportation modes on 1st Avenue.
Cherry Creek Area Plan | Introduction
3


Planning Context
The Cherry Creek Area has changed dramatically over the past decades, and as a result,
its planning history and context are richer than other parts of the City. The Denver
Comprehensive Plan provides the vision for the entire city. Citywide and small area plans
are adopted as supplements to the Comprehensive Plan to provide additional direction for a
certain topic or area. It is important to note that each of the Cherry Creek Plans superseded
the previous plan, as will be the case with the 2012 Cherry Creek Area Plan superseding the
2000 Cherry Creek Neighborhood Plan. Cherry Creek Plans:
Cherry Creek Neighborhood Plan (1976)
Cherry Creek Neighborhood Plan (1986)
Cherry Creek Neighborhood Plan (2000)
Denver Comprehensive Plan and Supplements
The Denver Comprehensive Plan is established in the Denver City Charter and Revised
Municipal Code to"...provide an expression of the city's vision forthe future with a listing of
goals and objectives. Once prepared and adopted, the plan will guide and influence decisions
that affect the future of the city." The Comprehensive Plan and its supplements are adopted
by City Council ordinance based on a recommendation of approval from the Denver Planning
Board. Planning Board's criteria for approval of supplements are: a long term view, inclusive
public process, and consistency with the Denver Comprehensive Plan. The following is a list of
applicable plans:
Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000
Cherry Creek Greenway Master Plan (2000)
Bicycle Master Plan (2001)
Blueprint Denver: an Integrated Land Use and Transportation Plan (2002)
Denver Parks and Recreation Game Plan (2002)
Pedestrian Master Plan (2004)
Implementation Plans
City agencies prepare implementation plans to guide their policies and work programs.
Although these plans are not adopted as supplements to the Comprehensive Plan, they
provide important guidance to the City and its agencies for implementing the Comprehensive
Plan and its supplements.
Cherry Creek Greenway Master Plan-Reach 1 Plan Update (2003)
Greenprint Denver (2006)
StrategicTransportation Plan (2008)
Denver Neighborhood Market Plan Initiative for Cherry Creek Shopping District (2009)
Storm Drainage Master Plan (2009)
Sanitary Sewer Master Plan (2009)
Strategic Parking Plan (2010)
Denver Moves (2011)
4
Cherry Creek Area Plan | Introduction


How to Use this Plan
This Plan establishes a long range vision and guiding principles for the development and
future of the Cherry Creek area. The elements of this Plan will direct the community toward a
vision for a connected, distinctive, green and prosperous Cherry Creek.
Public agencies and private entities will use this Plan in coming years for many purposes
and actions that will affect the form and function of Cherry Creek. The Plan provides city-
adopted policy direction to guide decision-making related to development opportunities,
transportation, partnerships, and many others. Many of the recommendations will require
multiple steps over several years by a variety of participants.
The plan provides a sound policy basis fora thriving Cherry Creek Area. The recommendations
identified in the plan provide enough direction to guide day-to-day decision making related to
land use, public investment, private development, and partnerships. The plan is intended to
give the latitude needed to pursue unforeseen opportunities that will arise and to respond to
new challenges over the coming years.
The plan is divided into three sections in addition to this introduction:
The Framework Plan provides content that applies to the entire plan area and provides
the background to support the recommendations for a Connected, Distinctive, Green
and Prosperous Cherry Creek. Some of the recommendations are highlighted as
"transformative" meaning that the Cherry Creek community has identified these as being
essential to achieving the plan vision over the next 10 to 20 years.
Each of the four subareas, the Shopping District, Cherry Creek North Neighborhood,
Cherry Creek East, and Cherry CreekTriangle, is described in greater detail and has specific
recommendations, as well as references to applicable framework recommendations.
The final section describes plan implementation in terms of the types of implementation
and priorities for plan implementation. This chapter also highlights the multiple
steps that may be necessary to work toward implementation of the transformative
recommendations.
As with the Comprehensive Plan and its supplements, plan recommendations provide
guidance. Future implementation actions such as zoning map or text amendments, capital
improvements and public-private partnerships require specific actions on the part of the city.
Cherry Creek Area Plan | Introduction
5


6
Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan


Framework Plan
The Cherry Creek Area at its core is a successful mixed-use district surrounded by a collection
of residential neighborhoods that each have their own unique quality and characteristics.
The Framework Plan presents issues and recommendations relevant throughout the
entire Cherry Creek Area. This framework treats Cherry Creek as a whole. It focuses
on recommendations thattie individual districts within Cherry Creek together and on
recommendations thattie the Cherry Creek Area to the city and to the region.
The Framework Plan summarizes the key issues identified in the planning process that need to
be addressed in the area. These key issues are presented as Accomplishments, Challenges
and Opportunities. The Vision and Vision Elements for the Cherry Creek Area included in
this Framework Plan provide a framework for implementation.
The success of Cherry Creek requires that the individual districts and neighborhoods within the
area work together with the city toward a common vision. The vision and recommendations
within this Framework Plan serve as a guide for that collaboration over the coming decades.
Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan
7


Accomplishments, Challenges, Opportunities
ACCOMPLISHMENTS
Over $170 million in private investment in the last decade solidifies Cherry Creek's role as
a major economic generator for the City of Denver. Improvements have resulted in new
housing stock, high quality mixed-use infill development, streetscape improvements and
a greater mix of land uses, much of which directly implemented recommendations in the
2000 Cherry Creek Neighborhood Plan.
Successful public-private partnerships and investments have led the way toward a "new"
Cherry Creek Northwith enhanced streetscapes, branding, intuitive wayfinding, and
smart parking meters. Together these efforts improve the district's identity, cohesiveness,
and pedestrian experience.
The Cherry Creek Shopping District continues to boast the highest concentration of high-
end retail in the region, the highest concentration of local independent retailers in the
City and County of Denver and is touted as the #1 retail destination in the metro area.
The newly-renovated Cherry Creek Denver Public Library and a new playground at Pulaski
Park (both Better Denver Bond projects) celebrate the city's dedication to enhancing and
supporting neighborhood amenities that contribute to the Cherry Creek's strength and
diversity.
Cherry Creek is the premier retail destination in the
region.
Alameda Avenue does not currently function as a
Parkway
m The Denver Zoning Code was updated in 2010 to a new form- and context-based format
replacing the outdated 1950's code that addressed many long standing zoning issues.
Portions of the Cherry Creek North and East neighborhoods were rezoned to new form-
based zone districts.
CHALLENGES
Cherry Creek's popularity as a destination and its position on a major travel shed mean
that transportation infrastructure must continue to seekan effective balance between
different modes in order to address existing and anticipated demand. Transportation
decisions for the area have implications on quality of life and economic development as
well as local and regional mobility.
Pedestrian and bicycle connectivity along and across Cherry Creek's roadways represents
an important component of increased multi-modal options in Cherry Creek. Particular
attention should be given to improve connections across major arterials and to and from
the Cherry Creek Greenway.
Cherry Creek retail must be supported and encouraged to find ways to stay successful
and competitive, given the changing nature of the retail environment and the growing
number of shopping districts throughout the region offering the pedestrian-oriented,
mixed-use shopping and lifestyle experience.
With national attention on Denver for its unparalleled rail-transit expansion, it is
important to strengthen priority transit connections to Downtown, Denver International
Airport and the regional rail network to support both increased levels of mobility and
economic development.
Dedicated parkways within the study area can be improved to better accommodate
multi-modal movements and contribute to the look, feel or functionality of a parkway.
The east side of Harrison Street and the north side of Alameda have seen little
reinvestment.
8
Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan


Several public spaces are underutilized for a variety of reasons. These include Burns Park,
Pulaski Park and the north side plaza of the Cherry Creek Greenway.
Drainage issues in Cherry Creek North and Cherry Creek East can lead to flooding or
ponding during significant storm events. Denver completed a Cherry Creek Study
and identified stormwater improvements for implementation that will address these
conditions.
Although Cherry Creek is accessed along multiple streets, additional signature gateways
would better announce entry into the Cherry Creek Area. Currently, locations that should
include signature gateways are dominated by surface parking, vacant lots, and generally
areas in need of reinvestment.
OPPORTUNITIES
Locational advantage Cherry Creek is three miles from Downtown, well-connected
by regional multi-modal transportation routes, a connected street grid, and the Cherry
Creek Greenway. Cherry Creek is also adjacent to the small but densely-populated City
of Glendale. The 90,000 multi-modal person trips per day along the 1 st Avenue/Steele/
Alameda route help to support the local Cherry Creek economy.
Cherry Creekand surrounding established neighborhoods are some of the most desirable
residential areas in Denver.
The Cherry Creek Shopping District attempts to balance its identities and land uses as
a unique, local, pedestrian shopping experience and an upscale retail destination of
national appeal.
Cherry Creek offers a wide range of office types and employment opportunities, resulting
in over 14,500 jobs.
A wide array of development opportunities exist ranging from small residential infill to
large underdeveloped parcels with outdated buildings or with interim uses as surface
parking lots.
High bus ridership and traffic volumes suggest an opportunity to consider improved
transit service to and through Cherry Creek. Future improved transit expansion between
Downtown, Cherry Creek, Lowry and Aurora has been identified in DRCOG's MetroVision
2035 Regional Plan.
Residents, business owners, and property owners are committed to ensuring a high
quality of life within a growing mixed-use area and offer high levels of expertise and
resources. Opportunities exist to enhance and refine existing partnerships and consider
new ones.
The Cherry Creek Area is committed to the enhancement of arts and culture and supports
local events that build community and create a sense of vibrancy.
The Cherry Creek Greenway is a unique asset with tremendous educational,
environmental and recreational benefits.
Continued investment in amenities such as the
Denver Public Library contribute to Cherry Creek's
strength, diversity and desirability.
Cherry Creek offers a diverse set of housing choices
creating a unique character and identity.
Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan
9


The Vision for Cherry Creek
A thriving Cherry Creek for the 21 st Century: connected, distinctive, green, and prosperous.
The Cherry Creek Area Plan builds on the area's established and emerging assets.
A unique combination of the Cherry Creek Shopping Center, an outdoor shopping district
and great neighborhoods
A growing variety of people who live, work and shop in the area
Strong local and regional amenities
Unique connections to the Cherry Creek Greenwaywild below, urban above
Exceptional pedestrian experience
Great regional and national image and signature identity for Denver
Centrally locatedaccessible from throughout the region
High Quality building and streetscape design
Compact live, work, and play community
A. A Connected Cherry Creek
Mobility and Connectivity
A.1 Connect to the Region
A.2 A Walkable Cherry Creek
A.3 A Bikeable Cherry Creek
A.4 Multi-modal Streets
TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECTS
These six transformative projects will act as catalysts toward
achieving the vision for the Cherry Creek Area. All are long-term
and will require multiple steps by the public and private sectors.
All require concerted effort on the part of the City, community,
and key stakeholders.
10
Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan


B. A Distinctive Cherry Creek
Land Use and Urban Design
B.1 Target Growth Appropriately
B.2 Enhance the Pedestrian
Nature & Character
B.3 Concentrate Economic
Activity
B.4 Great Neighborhoods
C. A Green Cherry Creek
Signature Parks and Public Spaces
C.1 Cherry Creek Greenway
C.2 Parks
C.3 Streets and Streetscapes
D. A Prosperous Cherry Creek
Economic and Development Opportunities
D.1 Economic Vitality
D.2 Reinvesting in the Future
D.3 Organization and identity
B.1 Target Growth
Appropriately
Promote appropriate
reinvestment in Areas of
Change
D.1 Economic
Vitality
Reinforce the attractiveness
of Cherry Creek for
residents, shoppers,
employees, businesses and
visitors
Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan
11


Q A Connected Cherry Creek
1st Avenue is Cherry Creek's "spine" and acts as the
area's primary connection with downtown Denver.
WHY IS THIS IMPORTANTTO CHERRY CREEK?
Cherry Creek's economic prosperity and high quality of life rely in part on a well-connected
and multi-modal transportation system. Cherry Creek's location on one of Denver's main travel
sheds, the Speer/lst Avenue/ Leetsdale corridor, provides a direct route through the heart of
Cherry Creek into central Denver. Building on the existing strengths of Cherry Creek as a very
walkable and livable community and providing a world class experience for every resident,
employee and visitor of Cherry Creek requires a comprehensive transportation strategy
that promotes walking, biking and access to high quality transit service as well as its street
connections. Cherry Creek's ability to stay competitive and reach the global marketplace
will rely heavily on its ability to connect locally and regionally including Downtown, Denver
International Airport and other urban centers throughout the region.
This mobility and connectivity framework articulates an overall strategy for keeping Cherry
Creek livable and prosperous by balancing the different transportation modes within the
Cherry Creek Area. Regardless of the mode chosen, the goal is for those who live, work, or play
in Cherry Creek to continue to navigate safely, efficiently and reliably to and from the area.
RECOMMENDATIONS AND
TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECTS:
A.1 Connect to the Region
A.2 A Walkable Cherry Creek
A.3 A Bikeable Cherry Creek
A.4 Multi-modal Streets
KEY ISSUES
Accommodating the growing number of person trips along the travel shed
Home to two of the most significant destinations and sales tax generators in the Denver
region the Cherry Creek Shopping Center and the Cherry Creek North business
districtthe area attracts an estimated 15,000 employees per day and 1.3 million
visitors per month.
The Speer/1 st Avenue/Leetsdale travel shed runs through the heart of Cherry Creek.
It is one of the region's highest-volume transportation facilities and one of the only
continuous east-west facilities that links suburbs as far away as Parker through southeast
Aurora, southeast Denver and central Denver to Downtown. Demand for the travel shed
is also expected to grow. Currently estimated at 90,000 multi-modal person trips per day
along 1 st Avenue between University Boulevard and Steele, the DRCOG travel demand
forecasting model estimates that multi-modal trips originating or destined for this travel
shed will increase 15% by 2030. Vehicle hours of delay in the travel shed are forecasted to
increase by more than 70% between 2015 and 2030.
Available data indicates that traffic increases over several decades were gradual and
generally related to regional growth not to any one development within the Cherry Creek
Area. In addition, vehicular trips on 1 st Avenue in Cherry Creek at peak hours are split
fairly evenly between through and local trips, with 47% of trips moving through the area,
52% starting or finishing in the area and 1% starting and finishing in the area.
Bus route 83L is the only daily transit connection between Cherry Creek and Downtown
(Civic Center Station), with service every 30 minutes for 18 continuous hours during
the weekdays and weekends. High bus ridership coupled with traffic volumes and the
economic significance of destinations within Cherry Creek suggest an opportunity for
improved transit service, especially to connect downtown destinations with Cherry Creek.
As Cherry Creek seeks to remain competitive in the region, the lack of an priority transit
connection between Cherry Creek, the downtown core including the Convention Center
and Denver Union Station, Denver International Airport, and other established and
emerging urban centers could present a challenge.
Walkability along and across high volume arterial streets
A traditional street grid and many examples of enhanced streetscapes make Cherry Creek
12
Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan


RTD's regional rail network does not provide service to east central Denver neighborhoods
one of Denver's most walkable areas. The Cherry Creek North Business Improvement
District recently invested $18.5 million in streetscape improvements for their outdoor
shopping, restaurant, and entertainment area.
Higher volume, arterial streets in and adjacent to Cherry Creek can seem like barriers to
pedestrians. However, opportunities exist on these streets and with private property to
improve walkability through enhanced pedestrian amenities and streetscape elements
as appropriate. In addition, 1 st Avenue and Alameda Avenue at Colorado Boulevard
are key gateways into Cherry Creek. These locations show particular opportunity for
improvements to the pedestrian realm that can both improve a pedestrian's experience
and better balance multi-modal needs through the integration of land use and
transportation.
Some key intersections along arterial streets may merit special pedestrian consideration
based on complete streets and living streets policies. Example locations include the
intersection of Cherry Creek North Drive and Alameda and several intersections along
Steele Street (1st Avenue, Ellsworth and Bayaud) that provide important connections for
Cherry Creek residents, employees, and visitors.
The west and east ends of the Shopping Center and areas within the Cherry Creek
Triangle can also seem challenging to pedestrians due to larger block sizes, surface
parking lots, and more inconsistent streetscape enhancements.
A more complete and intuitive bicycle network
Cherry Creek is adjacent to the Cherry Creek Greenway, a highly utilized regional bicycle
facility and multi-use trail that connects Downtown with southeast Denver. Connections
and accessibility between the Cherry Creek Shopping District, adjacent neighborhoods
and the Greenway are in need of physical improvements and better signage. Improved
bicycle connections along and across arterial streets linking destinations, open space, and
other regional routes are also needed.
Tree lined and landscaped residential streets in
Cherry Creek neighborhoods create a walkable and
highly desirable place to live.
Enhanced streetscapes in Cherry Creek North include
special pavers, park benches, pedestrian lighting,
short crossing distances, landscaping and planters.
Intersection enhancements in some Cherry Creek
locations, such as Steele and Ellsworth, should
consider high concentrations of elderly residents
living nearby.
Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan
13


RECOMMENDATION A.1 CONNECTTOTHE REGION
TRANSIT SERVICE GOALS FOR
PRIORITY TRANSIT CORRIDORS
Increased Trip Capacity
Increase convenience and
reliability of transit service
Increase connections with
regional transportation networks
(bus, light rail, bicycle, auto)
Frequent stop spacing,
coordinated with key origins/
destinations
Frequent headways
Avoid right-of-way expansion
Increased Prosperity
Promote vitality and higher
density development in Areas of
Change
Direct and convenient service to/
from Downtown, DIA, and the
regional rail network
Aesthetically Pleasing
Low noise
High air quality
Comfortable, modern transit
vehicles
Inviting streetscape
Low impact on adjacent
neighborhoods
Attractive stations and stops
Safe, Accessible, Inviting
ADA accessible
Serve transit dependent riders
Appeals to and increases choice
ridership
Streetscape amenities to
promote pedestrian safety and
comfort
Low Environmental Impact
Low carbon emissions
Low energy use
A.1.A IMPROVE BUS SERVICE
Advocate for improved bus transit service that directly links Cherry Creekto the downtown
core including Denver Union Station and the Colorado Convention Center. Service
characteristics should include the following:
More frequent service with headways of 15 minutes or less on weekdays and weekends.
Consider providing fast, "express" style service with key stops such at locations such as the
Colorado Convention Center, the Denver Performing Arts Center, Lower Downtown, Civic
Center Station and Union Station.
Explore the possibility of a customized shuttle or bus vehicle with marketable or
brandable identity specific to Cherry Creek and Downtown.
Capitalize on the convergence of other important transit routes on the boundaries of the
study area including route 40 (Colorado) and route 24 (University).
Consider ways to make the transfer experience between buses more efficient, convenient
and comfortable and explore the opportunities to link transfer stops with nearby land
uses.
A.1.B CONDUCT STUDY OF PRIORITYTRANSIT CORRIDORS
Further study is needed to determine the feasibility for priority transit service along identified
corridors. Further study would also serve to test a similar concept presented in DRCOG's
MetroVision 2035 Vision Plan, which shows an intercity rail service connecting Downtown,
Cherry Creek, Lowry and points east. The appropriate type of study must be conducted in
order to align with federal funding requirements.
Following through on one of the 2008 Denver StrategicTransportation Plan recommendations
for the Speer/1 st Avenue/Leetsdale Travel shed, a Planning Environmental Linkage Study
(PEL) will consider potential impacts from the projected increases in trips along the roadway
network and will identify needs and alternatives for accommodating this additional person-
trip demand. The (PEL) will focus on multi-modal strategies using an approach that seeks to
incorporate environmental, economic, and community values into transportation decisions so
that those values are carried forward through project development and implementation. A
PEL is an important step to complete in order to understand needs and compete for federal
funding that can help make transportation improvements, such as priority transit, in the travel
shed a reality.
A.1.C ADD PERSON-TRIP CAPACITY
In 2008, Denver's StrategicTransportation Plan (STP) seta new standard for how to
accommodate the growing number of person trips within the city. With the direction of the
STP's philosophy, the goal is to accommodate trips both to and through Cherry Creek by
expanding multi-modal choices without expanding existing right-of-way. Strengthening
and adding multi-modal transportation options will add capacity to help address growing
person trip numbers through possibilities discussed during the Area Plan Process including
fixed guideway, streetcar, light rail, bus rapid transit and better bus service. A set of transit
service goals important to the Cherry Creek Area was identified by plan participants. These
characteristics, listed at the bottom of this page, should be considered as future conversations
and studies regarding priority transit service in Cherry Creek continue.
14
Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan


A.1.D RECOGNIZE PRIORITY TRANSIT CORRIDORS
Establishing a direct connection between Cherry Creek and Union Station is a top priority
in Cherry Creek's pursuit of improved connections to the region since Union Station is the
primary hub for regional transit service and the FasTracks system. Improved direct connections
to fixed rail lines such as RTD's East and Southeast Lines is also an important step for Cherry
Creek's regional connectivity. For this reason, 1st Avenue/Steele/Alameda and Colorado
Boulevard are identified in this plan as priority routes for enhanced transit service. Significant
additional study of these priority transit corridors is needed to determine feasibility, alternative
modes and routes, funding opportunities and phasing.
A streetcar in Portland, OR picks up passengers.
RTD buses provide Cherry Creek residents, employees
and visitors with transit connections, amounting to
5,000 people boarding and alighting buses each day
in Cherry Creek.
WHO SHOULDTRANSIT SERVE
IN CHERRY CREEK?
The transit system must be designed to
serve:
People of all ages and abilities
Employees
Residents
National and international tourists
Hotel guests in Cherry Creek
Everyday shoppers / customers
Business travelers
Commuters
Downtown hotel guests and
conventioneers
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/V


RECOMMENDATION A.2 A WALKABLE CHERRY CREEK
A.2.A PEDESTRIAN PRIORITY ZONE
In 2007, Denver City Council passed proclamation No.59, which included permanent
designation of Downtown as Denver's first"Pedestrian Priority Zone" (PPZ). Cherry Creek's
existing urban development pattern, retail and commercial success, high transit ridership,
and vision for priority transit connections make this area a candidate for Denver's second
designated Pedestrian Priority Zone. Strengthening the priority of pedestrians in Cherry
Creek can contribute to the area's vision for great neighborhoods and economic prosperity.
A corresponding Pedestrian Priority Zone Toolkit with street design elements and
implementation strategies can help guide private and public projects that take place on PPZ-
designated streets.
Most collector and local streets within the designated PPZ area are meant to prioritize
pedestrian movements while accommodating the other transportation modes.
Pedestrian Priority Intersections with arterial streets within the PPZ should balance the
needs of multiple transportation modes and provide clearly marked pedestrian crossings.
Identified Pedestrian Priority Intersections are locations where additional enhancements
can help to provide the most comfortable and convenient crossing points along these
multi-modal streets to facilitate connections to major destinations.
Both public and private projects should consider the goals of the PPZ while planning for
and designing improvements within the designated area. The PPZ toolkit identifies a
menu of potential pedestrian enhancements that can be considered for projects located
within the PPZ.
As redevelopment occurs, property owners in the designated PPZ area are encouraged
to work with the city to determine how best accommodate all modes along the adjacent
right of way and to explore private funding sources or special districts to meet the goals
of the PPZ.
A.2.B PEDESTRIAN PRIORITY INTERSECTIONS
Cherry Creek includes several high demand, arterial streets that divide the area into Cherry
Creek East, the Shopping Center and Cherry Creek North as well as surround the study area
on three sides. These streets serve as the main existing vehicular and transit routes, host
existing and future bicycle connections, and are locations for potential priority transit. Special
multi-modal consideration for these streets can successfully balance diverse demands and
accessibility responsibilities. To ensure that these multi-modal streets provide high quality
connections for pedestrians and cyclists, priority intersections on arterial streets where the
pedestrian crossing movement should be enhanced to better balance the use of the right-of-
way.
A.2.C SIDEWALK IMPROVEMENTS
Prioritize improvements in the sidewalk network as development occurs. Focus locations
include:
University Boulevard, east side between 1 st Avenue and Cherry Creek North Drive
Colorado Boulevard, west side, between Cedar Avenue and 6th Avenue
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PEDESTRIAN PRIORITY ZONE
AND INTERSECTION TOOLKIT
This toolkit identifies potential
pedestrian enhancement options
within the Cherry Creek PPZ. The
application of these design options will
vary, depending on location and the
public or private resources available
for construction and maintenance.
There is an opportunity for property
owners, special districts and the city
to work together to consider these
enhancements where appropriate.
Each option should be weighed
against any potential trade-offs
including impacts to drainage or on-
street parking. Possible elements for
consideration include:
Well marked crosswalks
Curb extensions
Full ADA compliance
Median nose extension
4-Way stop control
No right turn bypasses
Countdown pedestrian signals
Shallow building setbacks
Detached 8-foot-wide sidewalks
Vegetated tree lawn or trees in grates
Street trees
On-street parking
Pedestrian lighting
Outdoor seating areas
Trash receptacles
Wayfinding signage
Publicart
Banners/flags
Landscaped planters
Well marked transit stops
Enhanced pavement
Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan
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RECOMMENDATION A.3
A BIKEABLE CHERRY CREEK
A.3.A EXPAND NETWORK AND IMPROVE GREENWAY CONNECTIONS
In 2011, Denver approved Denver Moves, a plan that would provide access to better
bicycle facilities within 1/4 mile of all Denver households. The Denver Moves network
recommendations for Cherry Creek are reflected in this plan and represent significant
improvements to the bicycle network. Improvements include more intuitive connections
between the Cherry Creek Greenway, neighborhoods and the Shopping District, as well
as improved connections between neighborhoods in Cherry Creek and surrounding
neighborhoods to the north, east and west. Recommended facilities include:
"Sidewalk, Bikes Permitted" on 1st Avenue, University and Steele and well marked
connections across University at 1 st Avenue
"Bicycle Boulevard"on Garfield
Shared road on St. Paul
"Bicycle Boulevard"on 4th Avenue
Bike lanes on Bayaud
Connections to the regional trail along the Cherry Creek Greenway
Neighborhood trail on Alameda
More information about facility types can be found in the Denver Moves Plan.
A.3.B A MORE INTUITIVE BICYCLE WAYFINDING SYSTEM
This plan highly supports system-wide destination-based signage and route identifiers
to create a simpler and more user-friendly system. New signage will also help improve
wayfinding within Cherry Creek.
A.3.C BRING BACK"THE BIKE RACK"
Bicycle friendly cities across the country have built bike stations that include bicycle parking,
repair, rental, shower and locker facilities, hydration stations, and even food stops. Bike
stations are typically located in or near multi-modal transportation centers to establish easy
connections between different transportation modes. Locating a bike station near the Cherry
Creek Greenway, bus transfer points like University and 1st Avenue, the Shopping District
parking garages, and/or future priority transit routes is ideal. An appropriate entity must be
identified to develop, maintain and operate this bike station.
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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan


Bcycle station
Bicycle Network Map
Destination based signage for bicycle network similar to the Berkeley, GA Bicycle Boulevard system.
Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan
19


RECOMMENDATION A.4
MULTI-MODAL STREETS
A multi-use trail is recommended for the north side
of Alameda Parkway.
AAA IMPROVE THE ALAMEDA PARKWAY
Create a signature multi-modal street with noticeable tree canopy and landscaping,
contributing to the lookand feel of a parkway and a great public space within the existing
right-of-way and parkway setbacks.
Create a safe, comfortable pedestrian and bicycle connection between Burns Park, Pulaski
Park and the Cherry Creek Greenway; also between Cherry Creek East and the Cherry
CreekTriangle.
Encourage private investment in properties adjacent to Alameda.
Activate the public realm by fronting new buildings onto Alameda.
Implement this parkway vision at one time rather than incrementally so that Alameda
Parkway serves as a catalyst for private development.
The Alameda Parkway concept, as envisioned, is a change from previous planning documents
and represents the preferred future vision of Alameda. This concept includes the following
details, which will need to be tested further during preliminary engineering and design to
determine costand feasibility:
Design the north side of Alameda to include a bicycle/pedestrian connection between
Burns Park and Pulaski Park.
Amend rules and regulations for parkway setback requirements to reflect the Parkway
design and to ensure an equitable solution for all adjacent properties.
Study the potential to reconfigure Madison, Alameda, and Cherry Creek North Drive
intersection to shorten walk distance between Cherry Creek Greenway and Pulaski Park,
including elimination of right turn bypass along Cherry Creek North Drive. Look for
opportunities to align Madison and Cherry Creek Drive North at this intersection.
Provide convenient crossing for pedestrians and bikes at Garfield and Alameda.
Proposed Alameda Parkway, Madison Street to alley between Garfield Street and Jackson Street.
20
Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan


Rendition of existing
Alameda Avenue
looking west
Mil
Proposed Alameda Parkway, alley between Garfield Street and Jackson Street to Colorado Boulevard
Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan
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A.4.B IMPROVE 1 ST AVENUE BETWEEN STEELE AND COLORADO
Existing istAve east of Steele Street looking east
A two-phase approach to 1st Avenue improvements will add on-street parking and reduce
the existing curb to curb crossing distance across 1 st Avenue. A separate 1 st Avenue
Improvement Study yielded an approach that maximizes cost savings by adding streetscape
elements like bulb out and intersection enhancements thereby improving the pedestrian
experience without resetting curbs. Further engineering study will be required to understand
the drainage and utility impacts for both phases and to calculate a detailed cost estimate for
the project phases.
Phase One. The first phase provides bulb-outs on the north side of the street while
maintaining the current lane configuration. The additional bulb-outs will narrow the curb
to curb crossing distance and add further distinction to each intersection.
Phase Two. The second phase would add bulb-outs on the south side of the street to
match the north side and narrow the curb-to-curb crossing distance even further. The
second phase would also introduce on-street parking on the south side of the street. In
order to fit these new elements within the right of way, the final phase would reduce the
current five-lane cross section configuration to four lanes with two east bound lanes, one
west bound lane and a continuous left turn lane.
The lanes would transition at the west and east ends in order to interface with the existing
Steele Street and Colorado Boulevard intersections. A future study should examine the multi-
modal connectivity of the east and west ends. The study of the Colorado intersection should
examine the right turn bypasses and connection to the Hilltop neighborhood.
RIGHT OF WAY
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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan
23


A.4.C 1ST AND STEELE INTERSECTION
The 1st Avenue and Steele Street intersection is one of the primary nodes of opportunity
and development activity in Cherry Creek. Several properties adjacent to the 1 st and
Steele intersection are expected to undergo redevelopment over the next 10 years. Traffic
and property access patterns may change as a result of these redevelopments. While the
intersection functions to help vehicle traffic flow smoothly, pedestrians and cyclists are
required to make up to five crossing movements in order to get from the northeast corner of
the intersection to the Shopping Center on the southwest corner. With increases in density
expected at the intersection, there is an opportunity for the intersection to better serve
demand from all modes. Further study of the intersection is recommended to determine the
best relationship between the intersection, surrounding development, and the multi-modal
needs of local and regional traffic to create balance between vehicles and pedestrians, a
shorter walk distance for pedestrians, and better access to adjacent developing properties.
1st Avenue and Steele intersection
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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan


A.4.D COLORADO BOULEVARD
The reach of Colorado Boulevard extends well beyond Cherry Creek's borders. A
comprehensive study of this important roadway is recommended to improve its function for
all modes and enhance the user experience. A study should address the following possibilities,
ata minimum:
Partner with CDOT to study pedestrian and bicycle movements along and across
Colorado Boulevard for additional improvements to facilitate better connections and
access to destinations and transit service.
Priority transit service connecting urban centers along Colorado Boulevard to rail service
on the East Corridor and on the Southeast Corridor.
Since Colorado Boulevard is a state highway, work with CDOT to study multi-modal
improvements to the Colorado Boulevard. As a major arterial and priority transit corridor,
Colorado Boulevard needs to serve many functions and could be improved to accommodate
all these modes more effectively. This study should consider alternatives for accommodating
the increasing trip demand on Colorado and recommend modal priorities for accommodating
those trips. The study should also address the parkway designation and recommend howto
make Colorado look, feel and function better as a parkway. Streetscape improvements desired
by Cherry Creek include a planted median, separated sidewalks, and tree lawn to make the
street look, feel and function as a parkway and create a better gateway to the Cherry Creek
Area. Pedestrian crossings at existing traffic signals can be evaluated for enhancements that
could better facilitate connections between Cherry Creek, the Hilltop Neighborhood and the
City of Glendale.
Missing sidewalk along the west side of Colorado
Boulevard
Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan
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Distinctive Cherry Creek
WHY IS THIS IMPORTANTTO CHERRY CREEK?
Cherry Creek is a mixed-use neighborhood allowing people the opportunity to live, work
and play in a successful, vibrant place that incorporates high quality urban design thereby
enhancing quality of life. Urban design links the pattern of streets, blocks and public spaces
with buildings and establishes how buildings enhance streets and how different land uses
interact with each other. Urban design directly influences how livable, memorable and vital
a place is and is a critical element in achieving Cherry Creek's vision of being connected,
distinctive, green and prosperous.
Continued emphasis on quality urban design has resulted in improved development quality
within Cherry Creek. This improvement has impacted residential, commercial and mixed-use
locations throughout the area. Continued development should further enhance and reinforce
Cherry Creek as a desirable location to live, work and play.
KEY ISSUES
RECOMMENDATIONS AND
TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECTS:
B.1 Target Growth Appropriately
B.2 Enhance the Pedestrian
Nature & Character
B.3 Concentrate Economic
Activity
B.4 Great Neighborhoods
Desirability, population growth and housing options. Due to its central location,
great schools and high quality of life. Cherry Creek and surrounding neighborhoods
are some of the most desirable places in Denver to live. Cherry Creek is home to about
6,000 people. DRCOG projects the population will grow to over 9,000 by 2035. Housing
types in Cherry Creek are very diverse; the current distribution of housing types include
65% multifamily, 19% duplex, 10% single family and 6% in mixed-use buildings. This
diversity of housing stock is a strength throughout Cherry Creek, attracting a variety
of residents representative of multiple generations and household types. Because
opportunities for new housing in the Areas of Stability are limited to scattered infill, much
of the new housing will be in mixed-use developments within the Areas of Change. This
development should continue the diversity of housing types available in the Cherry Creek
Area.
Census Year Cherry Creek Cherry Creek
Population Households
2000 5,028 3,198
2010 5,881 3,754
Source US Census Bureau, 2010
m Urban form. Cherry Creek is organized around a regular pattern of streets, resulting in a
walkable district including sidewalks and tree lawns, buildings oriented to the street and
on-street parking throughout the area. On the south side of Cherry Creek, the pattern
of blocks and buildings shifts to incorporate the Greenway. The continued evolution of
the Shopping Center has enhanced the pedestrian experience while accommodating
the vehicular access necessary to support the regional activity within Cherry Creek.
The Cherry Creek North BID'S reconstructed streetscapes and main street character are
reinforced by an effective design review process including an active Design Advisory
Board, ensuring that new development enhances the district. Cherry Creek East
and the Shopping Centeralso utilize sets of design guidelines to promote continued
development improvements over time.
Mix of land uses. Part of the character of Cherry Creek is its mixture of land uses. Retail
and service uses appealing to both local and regional shoppers, office and established
residential neighborhoods weave an interdependent mixed-use urban environment
resulting in a variety of amenities benefiting the quality of life. With a wide range of office
types and employment opportunities, the Cherry Creek area provides almost 15,000
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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan


A Cherry Creek landmark
people with jobs. Continued introduction of office space, retail, and residential units will
enhance the mixed-use nature of the neighborhood and reinforce the plan vision. As in
most mixed-use districts throughout the country, the desire to maintain the character
of Cherry Creek must be balanced with the thoughtful redevelopment of underutilized
properties.
Distinct subareas. Cherry Creek's land use patterns and partnerships create four
subareas: Cherry Creek North Neighborhood (CCN), Cherry Creek East (CCE), the Cherry
Creek Shopping District and Cherry CreekTriangle. In some cases, boundaries between
these subareas overlap. Improvements in the neighborhood must continue to realize
the importance of identity within Cherry Creek while simultaneously removing barriers
between the subareas.
Redevelopment Opportunities. Cherry Creek has seen significant redevelopment over
the past decade. This continued evolution has helped maintain Cherry Creek's unique
identity in the region. The next generation of development within Cherry Creek will
influence the continued success and desirability of the area.
Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan
27


RECOMMENDATION B.1 TARGET GROWTH APPROPRIATELY
Blueprint Denver designates Areas of Change and Areas of Stability to guide decisions on
where growth should be targeted within the City of Denver. For Cherry Creek to remain
prosperous, growth and change should occur in Areas of Change while enhancing the
established residential neighborhoods within Areas of Stability. By encouraging the strategic
growth of the area, the quality of life in the residential Areas of Stability will be enhanced while
promoting continued success in the Areas of Change within Cherry Creek.
B.1 .A AREAS OF STABILITY
Most of Denver's neighborhoods were identified as Areas of Stability with a primary goal to
maintain the cherished characteristics of these neighborhoods. In 2002 Blueprint Denver
designated the entire Cherry Creek Area as an Area of Change. Since then, CCN and CCE
have transformed from primarily single family neighborhoods with post-World War II era
cottage style houses to upscale neighborhoods with a greater mix of housing types including
duplexes, row houses and apartment and condominium buildings, as well as single family
houses. These neighborhoods have stabilized with this new identity over the last decade.
They are now characterized by a high quality and diverse housing stockand an enhanced
pedestrian environment that equates to a high quality of life for Cherry Creek residents.
Overarching recommendations for Areas of Stability include:
Adjust the Blueprint Denver Areas of Change map to reflect that much of Cherry Creek
North and Cherry Creek East neighborhoods are now Areas of Stability.
Maintain a mix of low scale residential building forms such as single family, duplex, row
house and accessory dwelling units; low scale multi-unit buildings are also appropriate in
Cherry Creek East east of Madison.
Infill development should reinforce pedestrian friendly qualities of existing development
patterns including entry features facing the street, moderate setbacks, vehicle parking
and access located off the alley, and detached sidewalks with tree lawns.
In Areas of Stability, limit commercial uses to existing mixed-use zone districts and
encourage any reinvestment or redevelopment of commercial properties to respect the
residential scale and character of the adjacent stable neighborhood.
Residential Areas of Stability
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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan


B.1.B AREAS OF CHANGE
Cherry Creek will continue to grow over the next 20 years. This growth has the potential
to benefit existing businesses, property owners and residents through greater diversity of
housing types, increased business revenues, higher property values, additional public and
private investment and a greater diversity of shops, restaurants and cultural amenities. The
Areas of Change in Cherry Creek have the greatest potential to accommodate this growth,
both in terms of market demand and available land. Although not every property will see
significant redevelopment, overall these areas benefit from new development, reinvestment,
and more intense use. Areas of Change include the Shopping District, Cherry CreekTriangle,
1 st Avenue, the commercial node at Madison and Bayaud and Harrison Street south of 1 st
Avenue. Recommendations for Areas of Change include:
Acknowledge that to remain prosperous. Cherry Creek must continue to grow and
change. In order for this growth to occur in a way that reinforces the quality of life for
Cherry Creek residents, the bulk of this growth should occur in these areas rather than
stable neighborhoods.
Update the Blueprint Denver map to reflect revised Areas of Change boundaries. The
updated Areas of Change are targeted to receive most of Cherry Creek's residential and
commercial growth overthe next twenty years.
Modify land use policy, zoning regulations and design guidelines to encourage
appropriate reinvestment to assure that Areas of Change continue to mature in positive
ways.
Cherry Creek Shopping Center Areas of Change
Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan
29


RECOMMENDATION B.2
ENHANCE THE PEDESTRIAN NATURE & CHARACTER
Character throughout Cherry Creek varies dependant on the subarea. Each subarea has
developed a distinct character through reinvestment and redevelopment over time. These
individual identities have been crafted utilizing high quality character defining features
consistently across the subareas.
B.2.A STREETSCAPE
The streetscape provides the array of pedestrian amenities throughout each subarea. In
addition to sidewalks and streets, these can include a variety of features from simple to
complex including landscaping and mature trees, tree lawns, amenity zones, lighting,
fountains, benches, trash receptacles, sidewalk cafes and plazas. The following strategies are
targeted to improving the streetscape:
Design and install streetscape elements that promote high levels of pedestrian activity
including pedestrian lighting, seating, landscaping, trash receptacles, and bike racks as
appropriate to the area's character.
Promote compact development patterns within a highly connected street grid and
buildings that make efficient use of available land and help create a very walkable place.
Encourage consistent shallow, block-sensitive building setbacks with some offset for
patio seating or public plazas help create active, vibrant streets.
In mixed-use areas, enhance the public realm with landscaping, wayfinding signage,
pedestrian lighting, public art and inviting building entries is essential to the area's
vitality.
Retain the regular street, sidewalk and block pattern which offers a high degree of
connectivity for pedestrians, bicycles and vehicles.
In residential areas, enhance the public realm with block sensitive building setbacks,
detached sidewalks, tree lawns with street trees and alley access thereby creating a
comfortable pedestrian environment.
B.2.B ARCHITECTURE
The architecture of the buildings has a direct correlation to the understanding of a place.
Buildings provide comfort, shelter, activity, destinations, identity, or other iconic symbol.
People interact with these structures and are provided a sense of place through the detailing,
scaling elements and purpose behind the design of each building. The combination of
buildings provides the artistic palette informing continued design choices throughout the
subareas. The following strategies promote appropriate architectural elements:
Orient buildings and entries toward the street using context sensitive setbacks.
Include design elements and details such as pedestrian scaled signage, transparent
windows, storefronts, building entries, building articulation, patio seating, pedestrian
plazas and courtyards.
Study the use of upper story setbacks and height datum lines to maintain a comfortable
pedestrian scale at the street and to allow sunlight to reach the street.
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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan


Provide visual interest at ground level and active ground floor uses along the building
frontage; articulate facade treatments by creating a regular pattern of storefronts,
providing a range of entry features and signage. More doors denotes more activity.
Encourage a regular rhythm of buildings and building entries along the street.
Place buildings to define the street edge.
B.2.C LAND USE
Land use includes the mixture of options for activities within the subareas. Some places may
have only residential uses providing a predictable understanding of what will happen over
time. Other locations contain a rich mix of uses contributing to their successful animation
and promoting the messy vitality of a thriving mixed-use community. The following land use
strategies reinforce the distinct character areas:
In mixed-use areas, promote the use of design elements that link the building directly
to the street. Uses are horizontally and vertically mixed and include regional and
neighborhood-serving retail, large and small scale office uses, specialized high-end
boutiques, low and mid-rise multi-family, stacked flats, row house, duplex, single family
and accessory dwelling units.
Reinforce residential character in neighborhoods.
Embedded small-scale commercial uses may be appropriate within primarily residential
areas to provide neighborhood serving amenities.
B.2.D ACCESS
Access is instrumental to the success and navigability of all locations within Cherry Creek.
Proper access denotes an expectation for the use of streets and sidewalks. The understanding
of the priority nature of pedestrians within Cherry Creek informs decisions regarding how
streets are used, how plazas and sidewalks are designed, and how properties are accessed by
different transportation modes. The following access strategies ensure the proper distribution
of access throughout Cherry Creek:
Provide vehicle parking and access in the rear of buildings or off the alley.
Promote convenient, comfortable transit access which is necessary in regional centers like
Cherry Creek to move the thousands of people to and through each day.
Ensure that residents and employees are able to conveniently navigate the
neighborhoods by walking, biking or driving.
Provide information to Cherry Creek visitors so transportation movements within and
through Cherry Creekare easily understood.
Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan
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RECOMMENDATION B.3
CONCENTRATE ECONOMIC ACTIVITY
Continue to concentrate high development intensity
along multi-modal corridors like 1st Avenue and
Steele Street.
Enhance successful redevelopment in currently designated areas of change by identifying
appropriate uses, scale and intensities.
B.3.A CONCENTRATE HIGHER INTENSITY MIXED-USE BUILDINGS ALONG
MULTI-MODAL STREETS, MAJOR INTERSECTIONS AND MAJOR PUBLIC OPEN
SPACES.
Cherry Creek's high intensity nodes are appropriate for increased development intensity
allowing for the concentration of active uses utilizing appropriate locational criteria. These
locational criteria include:
Adjacency to multi-modal corridors (includes the shopping district segments of 1 st
Avenue and Steele Street as well as the Cherry Creek Greenway and Colorado Boulevard)
Major intersections (1 st and Steele, 1 st and University)
Adjacency to major public open spaces (such as the Cherry Creek Greenway)
This increased intensity serves to most efficiently utilize existing infrastructure, minimize
development impacts in adjacent residential areas and provide continued growth to support
the continued success of Cherry Creek. Any new development should reinforce the pedestrian
scale and character of Cherry Creek. Structures should enhance pedestrian experience with
active uses, improved streetscape, and prominent entrances. Mass and height transitions
should appropriately balance higher intensity development with adjacent planned land uses.
Structures should provide a gateway into the district and create a unique identifying character
along 1st Avenue.
B.3.B ENCOURAGE MODERATE SCALE DEVELOPMENT IN MIXED-USE AREAS
OF CHANGE.
Areas of Change which are not adjacent to the higher intensity locational criteria are
appropriate for mid-rise buildings to accommodate continued growth. General locations
include the Shopping District and 1 st Avenue (east of Steele), and some existing mixed-
use areas within Cherry Creek North Residential and Cherry Creek East. Specific locations
recommended for mid-rise buildings are indicated in the Subarea Strategies section.
Encourage mid-rise buildings to promote reinvestment and to help transition
development intensity and buffer stable residential areas from higher intensity locations.
Orient taller mid-rise buildings along multi-modal corridors, existing or planned high
intensity nodes, and adjacent to public open space not identified for higher intensity.
Any new development should reinforce the pedestrian scale and character of Cherry
Creek.
B.3.C UTILIZE URBAN DESIGN STRATEGIES TO CREATE APPROPRIATE
TRANSITIONS IN BUILDING HEIGHTS AND USES.
Several key areas exist in Cherry Creek where areas of change sit adjacent to areas of stability.
In these cases, new development should provide appropriate transitions in scale. Key
transition areas include the following:
Between the Shopping District and the adjacent residential neighborhoods
Across Alameda Parkway between Cherry Creek East and Cherry CreekTriangle
1 st Avenue mixed-use properties backing to residential neighborhoods
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These transitions should be handled through modifications to both building scale and site
design. Generally, buildings should be located and shaped to minimize negative impacts
to adjacent residential neighborhoods while providing increased density and amenities
to accommodate continued growth and improve the quality of life within Cherry Creek.
Shaping standards should reflect the desire for pedestrian scale across all areas of Cherry
Creek while recognizing that a variety of styles, alternatives and approaches to design will
successfully yield a series of solutions. Scale transitions should be designed to allow for the
evolution of structures overtime. Modification to use allowances also affects the success of
transitions within Cherry Creek. Uses should be thoughtfully allowed to encourage continued
development of a mixed-use nature within the areas of change while minimizing external
effects of uses adjacent to residential areas. Addressing scale, site design and use will result in
the creation of enhanced transitions within Cherry Creek.
B.3.D IDENTIFY PROMINENT DEVELOPMENT LOCATIONS AT KEY VISTAS.
A key vista is a building or monument that serves as the focal point of a view that ends a
street or street segment thereby creating a "terminating vista". Treating key vistas with design
excellence helps to orient users of the street and create an identity and sense of place that
is unique to Cherry Creek. Key vistas also help stitch together various districts within Cherry
Creek, as these prominent structures are visible from several blocks away and different
directions, beckoning pedestrians to keep walking as something interesting lies ahead. The
following design elements may help create visual interest at a key vista:
highly detailed building facades primary building entries
increased mass or scale interesting signage
active public spaces unique building materials
public art
Detroit Street hasa key vista with theShopping Center a thesouthern focal point
Mid-rise buildings are appropriate for areas of
change where growth is encouraged.
Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan
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RECOMMENDATION B.4
GREAT NEIGHBORHOODS
The introduction of new residential units in mixed-
use areas encourages expanded options and
diversity for residen ts.
Cherry Creek includes a diverse assembly of great neighborhoods. The variety of places
includes residential neighborhoods, mixed-use neighborhoods and emerging neighborhoods.
New development in each of these areas should enhance the individual character of
neighborhoods responding specifically to their qualities and locations.
BAA RESPECT THE EXISTING CHARACTER OF STABLE RESIDENTIAL
NEIGHBORHOODS.
Cherry Creek is known for the series of great neighborhoods within and surrounding its
boundaries. Cherry Creek North Neighborhood and Cherry Creek East include variety of
architectural styles and housing types that contribute to the character, quality of life, and
diversity of housing choices within the area. These neighborhoods also include shopping
choices outside of the Shopping District which are embedded into the neighborhood fabric
and provide a prime location for neighborhood gatherings. The choices and varieties of
residential, commercial and social opportunities within these residential areas are exactly
what define them as great neighborhoods. Continued reinvestment in these areas should
reinforce the quality and scale of development that currently exists. Regardless of use, new
development should enhance the residential character of these neighborhoods including
contributing to the mix of housing types, improving the embedded commercial uses,
landscaped block-sensitive setbacks, detached sidewalks, tree lawns, alley access to structures,
limited curb cuts and street-facing entries.
BAB ENCOURAGE THE CONTINUED EVOLUTION OF MIXED-USE
NEIGHBORHOODS.
The Cherry Creek Shopping District has evolved into an 18-hour, mixed-use neighborhood
consisting of retail, commercial and residential uses. Continued development in the district
has resulted in the introduction of residential units in the district, encouraging expanded
options and diversity for residents. This district has seen an introduction of high quality
urban design introduced into a former pattern of renovated and obsolete commercial space.
This emergence of quality, design integrity and mix of uses has set the standard for future
development. This development results in active streetscapes with layers of pedestrian
amenities such as seating, planters, art, cafes and adjoining active retail space. This space is
clearly pedestrian-focused with entries, materials, signage and building details scaled to the
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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan


person. Continued development in this district should reinforce the new standard of quality
and pedestrian activity.
B.4.C PROMOTE CONTINUED INVESTMENT AND DEVELOPMENT IN
EMERGING NEIGHBORHOODS.
The Cherry CreekTriangle is an emerging neighborhood providing a direct link between
Cherry Creek and Glendale along the Cherry Creek Greenway. Development in this
neighborhood has recently featured two multi-story residential structures to complement
the existing mixture of office, hotel and retail uses within the area. New development should
continue to upgrade the quality of buildings in the area and take cues from the proximity
ofthe districtto existing parkways and the Cherry Creek Greenway. The introduction of an
improved pedestrian space complete with detached sidewalks, wide tree lawns, street trees,
and buildings that face the streets results in a glimpse of things to come to this neighborhood.
Continued development should focus on quality architecture, improved streetscapes and
enhancing the connections to Cherry Creek East, Glendale and the Cherry Creek Greenway.
Former character Cherry Creek North and Cherry Creek East neighborhoods were characterized by small one-
story cottage style houses with deep setbacks. Sidewalks were narrow and attached to the street.
New character Cherry Creek's residential neighborhoods consist of variety of housing types, with large units
and 2-3 story buildings. Setbacks are shallow and landscaped. New sidewalks are wider and detached from the
street to form an attractive tree lawn.
New multi-story residential development in the
emerging Cherry Creek Triangle neighborhood.
Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan
35


c.
Green Cherry Creek
Public spaces serve three main functions in an urban
area to attract people and activate a place, to allow
people to escape from the urban environment, or to
connect people with places.
RECOMMENDATIONS AND
TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECTS:
C.1 Cherry Creek Greenway
C.2 Parks
C.3 Streets and Streetscapes
WHY IS THIS IMPORTANTTO CHERRY CREEK?
Public spaces form the heart of any community. They promote health, happiness and
well being. They celebrate a community's assets. Successful public spaces attract people,
economic vitality and investment in an area. Failed public spaces create a perception of
emptiness and can result in a lack of investment. In urban areas like Cherry Creek, the
relationship between public spaces and adjacent development is critical to the success of
both. From large parks to small plazas and town squares, the quality and success of public
spaces provides a critical representation of the quality of life and degree of prosperity in the
area.
Public spaces serve three main functions in an urban area: activating a place by attracting
many people, helping people to escape the urban environment (through recreation or passive
activity), or helping connect people with places. Some public spaces perform more than one
of these functions. From an infrastructure perspective, urban public spaces can also help with
stormwater quality and conveyance. Analyzing each public space according to its intended
use leads to recommendations on how the space could be better designed to perform a
particular function. One of Cherry Creek's main assets is its broad spectrum of public spaces.
These include a regional greenway, large and small parks, a system of festival streets, small
urban plazas, pedestrian-friendly streetscapes and privately owned public spaces. While
some of these are designed well for their intended function, several public spaces are not well
utilized by residents or by visitors.
KEY ISSUES
Cherry Creek Greenway. The Cherry Creek Greenway and Trail are one of Cherry Creek's
great assets. It provides a regional bike connection, open space, and scenic beauty.
Despite its adjacency to a vibrant shopping district and high population and employment
densities, the section of the Greenway between University and Colorado lacks points of
visual and physical access and is therefore underutilized as a neighborhood resource.
Neighborhood access to the trail is via Cherry Creek Drive North, the recently-improved
bike/ped bridge at Steele, and the Steele Street multi-use sidewalk. The plazas on either
side of Cherry Creek Drive North are both underutilized.
Regionally, the 40-mile long Cherry CreekTrail connects from the South Platte River
Greenway and Trail in Downtown to the Cherry Creek Reservoir and Douglas County. It is
a unique natural area with educational, environmental and recreational benefits.
Two master plans for the greenway corridor are relevant to future improvements: the
three volumes of the "Cherry Creek Greenway Master PlanPreferred Plan" (2000) and
the "Conceptual Design Report" (May 2003) for Reach One (University to Colorado). Reach
One is characterized by naturalistic vegetation, which is beneficial to wildlife, water
quality and the user experience. This plan and Denver Moves provide recommendations
for improved bike connections.
Parks. The Gates Tennis Center was completely rehabilitated in 2008 with a new club
house and four reconstructed tennis courts. The ColoradoTennis Association, a member
of the USTA, has its corporate offices in the club house. It is one of the top tennis facilities
in the region. Flowever, for the surrounding Pulaski Park, there is no visibility or entrance
into the park from Bayaud Street for the large residential population. A new playground
at Pulaski Park funded by the Better Denver Bond Program has increased the utilization of
the park by families with young children, but the park lacks usability for more age groups.
36
Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan



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CCN Festival Street
Public Building
Cherry Creek
Parks and Public Spaces Map
Manley Park serves the needs of Cherry Creek North residents. Burns Park contains a
handful of large sculptures and open green space. The sculptures provide a visual escape
for people driving quickly along Colorado Boulevard, Alameda Avenue, or Leetsdale
Drive. However, residents of adjacent neighborhoods are not served well by the park's
current function and design, and the park is usually void of people. The sculptures are
the result of a 1968 art competition that attracted nationally known sculptors to create
large plywood and paint"archetectonic" sculptures in the park. Four of these original
temporary sculptures remain in place.
Pulaski Park privides all three functionsactivate,
escape and connect.
m Streets and streetscapes. Cherry Creek has some of the most successful streets and
streetscapes in Denver such as the Cherry Creek North Festival Streets and the privately
owned public spaces throughout the area. However, areas such as the Cherry Creek
Triangle lack high quality streetscapes and public spaces and seem disconnected from
the rest of Cherry Creek.
Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan
37


RECOMMENDATION C.1 CHERRY CREEK GREENWAY
The Cherry Creek Greenway provides recreation
opportunities for Cherry Creek residents and
employees. It runs adjacent to the Cherry Creek
Shopping District but is not designed to be
integrated with the Shopping District.
C.1.A IMPROVE VISUAL AND PHYSICAL ACCESS
Improve access to the Cherry Creek Greenway from the Cherry Creek East neighborhood,
from Cherry CreekTriangle, the Shopping District, from Cherry Creek North residential
and from neighborhoods to the south. See individual Sub Area Strategies for details.
Enhance the visual connection between the Greenway and the Shopping Center.
Strategically improve existing access and create more points of physical and visual access
to the creek without destroying the integrity of the greenway as a natural feature. Public
access into the Cherry Creek channel should be limited, appropriate and designed with
care, such as for observation and rest areas. Appropriately placed and well-designed
pedestrian bridge crossings would improve visual connections and allow people to
interact sensitively with the natural creek.
Look for opportunities to better embrace the Greenway as new development takes place
on the west side of the Shopping Center. Creating a vibrant public space such as a plaza
that links the Greenway with the Shopping Center is one option. This should be done in
a way that clearly differentiates the higher use public areas from the natural area while
integrating these two land uses.
C.1.B NEW BIKE/PED BRIDGES
Build a pedestrian bridge over the creek at Dakota Street to better connect the two sides
of the creekand neighborhoods to the south.
Study opportunities for an additional connection across the creek to integrate with the
redevelopment of the Cherry Creek Shopping Center (west end) and better connect the
neighborhoods to the north and south, as well as the business district.
C.1.C UNIVERSITY, CHERRY CREEK DRIVE NORTH AND SOUTH PARKWAYS
Denver's parkway system creates a network of streets throughout the city that serve as critical
connections linking parks to each other. Designated parkways in Cherry Creek include:
University, Alameda, Cherry Creek Drive North, Cherry Creek Drive South, and Colorado
Boulevard. Of these streets. University, Cherry Creek North Drive and Cherry Creek South
Drive currently look, feel and function as parkways. They have planted tree lawns and planted
medians to evoke the feeling of a "green" street.
Connect to the Greenway by introducing a sidewalk and streetscape amenities along the
east side of University parkway between the creekand 1 st Avenue.
Continue the Greenway theme along the south side of 1 st Avenue and west side of Steele
Street.
Explore opportunities to integrate recently constructed parkway amenities along Cherry
Creek Drive South to the Greenway.
Introduce parkway amenities to Alameda.
Enhance the connection between Pulaski Park, Alameda Parkway, Cherry Creek Drive
North and the Greenway.
38
Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan


Continue the Greenway
.to the north along the
east side of University
Parkway
*
*
a
h 1 *
* i *
5 *
*
Through redevelopment of the west
side of the Shopping Center create a
vibrant link to the Greenway through
additional plazas and/or a bike/ped
bridge
Continue the Greenway theme
. along the south side of 1 st
Avenue and west side of Steele
Street
Strengthen existing connections
between Shopping Center and
Greenway
Explore opportunities to better
ingrate Cherry Creek Drive South
to Greenway
Improve connection between
Pulaski Park, Alameda Parkway,
Cherry Creek Drive North and
the Greenway
^ ^ 'i- 2 ALAMEDA AVE

Improve bicycle
connectivity to and
from the Greenway
at Garfield Street
(see bicycle network
map on page 19)
Bike / ped bridge opportunity over
Cherry Creek at Dakota Street to
improve connectivity between Cherry
CreekTriangle and Cherry Creek East
and neighborhoods to the south
rsr**r*
Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan
39


RECOMMENDATION C.2
PARKS
The new Pulaski Park playground provides a
gathering place and play opportunities for families
with young children.
C.2.A PULASKI PARK
Create a public park entrance / access point from the north on Bayaud, including a paved
trail into the park.
Look for opportunities to improve the relationship between the Cherry Creek East
"village center" buildings on the southwest corner of Madison and Bayaud and the park.
Any redevelopment in this location should integrate the park into the design of new
buildings.
Increase the usability of the park for all ages. The new playground is a great achievement
toward this end. Adding park benches, a paved walking trail and/or a picnic pavilion are
small steps to making this park usable for the large elderly population that lives just north
of the park.
Study the feasibility of park improvements that would allow the park to be better utilized
for community or cultural events. Ideas include a small amphitheater or pavilion.
C.2.B BURNS PARK
Establish a comprehensive vision for Burns Park to determine how it can better serve
residents. A park master plan would help document this vision and consider the
following: access to and through the park, creation of various microzones or destinations
in the park, appropriate types of sculpture, landscape plants and hardscape elements,
parking, benches and lighting, compatible park uses and activities, signage/wayfinding,
phasing, funding, programming and marketing of the park.
Cherry Creek East residents would like to see Pulaski
Park used for more community events.
No marked entrance to Pulaski Park exists from
Bayaud Street, where thousands of residents live.
The way into the park from Bayaud looks like private
property but is publicly owned. It is blocked by
electrical equipment and tall pine trees.
40
Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan


Explore partnerships with the Cherry Creek Arts Festival, Cherry Creek North BID and/
or the Denver Botanic Gardens to improve the ability to attract high quality art to the
sculpture garden and to extend the sculpture garden's reach to a larger audience. Such
partnerships create an opportunity fora sculpture garden that is unique in the region and
serves to attract people to the park and to the Cherry Creek Area.
Consider, during the master planning process, the appropriateness of including artwork
that is interesting at the human scale or that invites human interaction. Explore
opportunities to incorporate temporary art installations into the programming for Burns
Park for added interest and to encourage return visits to the park.
Consider, during the master planning process, the appropriateness of introducing
active and recreational uses to the park. Ideas from Cherry Creek East residents include
basketball courts, a running path, and a dog park. Use the master planning process
to determine which active uses will serve adjacent neighborhoods, attract people and
complement the sculpture garden.
C.2.C MANLEY PARK
Continue to maintain the attractiveness, quality and function of Manley Parkas a small
neighborhood respite for Cherry Creek North residents.
Interactive public artwork, such as "The Musical
Fence" in Lincoln, Massachusetts, provides an
incentive for people to approach the sculpture.
A Giant Knitting Nancy in a London park welcomed
human interaction. The temporary installation
invited people to knit and help create the art. It
also provided popular park seating. (Photo credit:
Superblue)
The Burns Park sculpture garden provides visual
interest from the car. The sculptures do not
encourage human interaction.
Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan
41


RECOMMENDATION C.3
STREETS AND STREETSCAPES
C.3.A CCN FESTIVAL STREETS
Clayton, Detroit, Milwaukee, St. Paul streets between 2nd and 3rd Avenue and Fillmore Street
between 1 st and 3rd Avenue make up the Cherry Creek North Festival Streets. These streets
are designed to encourage a variety of events fostering social interaction while supporting the
identity of Cherry Creek.
Maintain the successful balance between functional aspects for events and placemaking
aspects for the quality and identity of Cherry Creek.
C.3.B FILLMORE PLAZA
The recently completed Fillmore Plaza is an exemplary street designed for enhanced
pedestrian, event and retail activity that benefits businesses, residents, shoppers and visitors
on the block, and also serves as the primary gateway to Cherry Creek North from the Shopping
Center and 1st Avenue. The plaza establishes an identity for the area through enhanced
lighting, trees and landscaping, pavers, street furniture, wayfinding signage and a central
iconic structure spanning the street.
Maintain the appeal of Fillmore plaza as a gateway and high quality pedestrian
environment and continue to explore ways to enhance and promote the success of
surrounding businesses.
Continue a positive partnership between the BID, business owners, property owners,
residents and the city to manage Fillmore Street closings for the benefit of community
events.
C.3.C STREETSCAPES AND PEDESTRIAN AMENITIES
Successful streetscape design reinforces the pedestrian scale and character and enhances
the quality, identity, physical function, and economic vitality of an area. Cherry Creek's
streetscapes are unique to the Denver area due to the influence of the garden. Many gardens,
especially in the residential areas, are located between the street and the building instead
of behind the structure or in the backyard. This streetscape configuration sets Cherry
Creek apart from other areas of the city and helps establish a high quality of life for Cherry
Fillmore Plaza is one of CCN's festival streets and is the gateway to the art and garden district.
42
Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan


Creek residents, businesses, shoppers and visitors. As part of the 2011 Cherry Creek North
streetscape improvements, the influence of the garden was integrated into the design through
highlighting all corners with enhanced pavement, planters, banners, wayfinding and seating
totaling 20 art and garden locations throughout the area.
Encourage the use of streetscape amenities that promote high levels of pedestrian
activity, physical comfort and visual interest including pedestrian lighting, seating,
landscaping, trash receptacles, bike racks and curb extensions at intersections.
Maintain the beauty of the streetscape in residential areas with detached sidewalks,
landscaped tree lawns and gardens between the sidewalkand buildings.
Explore opportunities for streetscapes improvements in the Cherry CreekTriangle.
Establish a clear function for the open space created by the University and Josephine one-
way couplets and determine the upgrades needed for the desired outcome. These spaces
provide an opportunity for an attractive green space that can contribute to the overall
quality of the streetscape.
Establish a "green alley" toolkit to be implemented as alleys are repaved.
C.3.D PRIVATELY OWNED PUBLIC SPACE
Not all successful public spaces are publicly owned. Privately owned public spaces also
activate a place, help people to escape, or help connect people to other places. There are
many successful examples of privately owned public spaces in Cherry Creek: the Gart Building
plaza at 3rd and Milwaukee, the outdoor seating area at Starbucks on Fillmore Street and 2nd
Avenue, the landscaped front facade and streetscape at Nordstrom along 1 st Avenue, and the
playground inside the Cherry Creek Shopping Center.
Maintain the quality of existing privately owned public space and continue to embrace its
contribution to better placemaking.
Lookfor opportunities to improve the public realm through the creation of new privately
owned public spaces.
Privately owned public space at 3rd and Milwaukee
Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan
43


prosperous Cherry Creek
WHY IS THIS IMPORTANT TO CHERRY CREEK?
Cherry Creek is unique both as one of Denver's major attractions and economic generators
and as a cherished neighborhood. Outstanding features are its walkability, up-scale local and
national retail, mix of uses, broad range of housing types, and availability of arts, culture and
recreation. Very few neighborhoods in the country offer this range of uses and quality and
variety of housing within easy walking distance of an outdoor shopping area and regional
mall.
Denver's Comprehensive Plan (Plan 2000) recommends enhancing existing business centers
to retain and expand a variety of high quality uses, support Denver's business climate, create
jobs, complement neighboring residential areas and to generate public revenue. Plan 2000
specifically recommends maintaining Cherry Creek as a premier retail destination in the
Denver Metro Area and Rocky Mountain Region. Together, the Cherry Creek Shopping Center
and Cherry Creek North generate nearly 5% of Denver's sales tax revenue on 0.14% of Denver's
land area.
RECOMMENDATIONS AND
TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECTS:
D.1 EconomicVitality
D.2 Reinvesting in the Future
D.3 Organization and identity
Enhancing the attractiveness and competitiveness as a mixed-use neighborhood with local,
regional and national appeal is essential to the economic well-being of the Cherry Creek Area
and the City. Optimizing economic and development opportunities benefits residents as well
as businesses with more choice of shops and restaurants, access to amenities, and attractive
street and building design. National research and best practices are demonstrating that
walkable, mixed-use communities are desirable for all age groups and have retained their
value and thrived in tough economic times.
KEY ISSUES
Encouraging high quality development. Over time, public policies need to be
evaluated based on successful outcomes and need to be modified, reinforced or
eliminated to encourage high quality development and reduce impediments. Current
zoning in the areas of change and the need for public investment in stormwater
improvements are two examples.
Continued reinvestment. The Cherry Creek Area has seen significant redevelopment
over the past decade. This continued development and evolution has reinforced Cherry
Creek's unique identity in the region as a regional retail center and exciting mixed-use
community. The next generation of development within Cherry Creek must enhance the
established prosperity, attractiveness and desirability of the area for residents, businesses,
shoppers, and visitors.
Mixed-use district. Retaining and enhancing Cherry Creek's character as a mixed-use
areaprosperous retail district, employment center, visitor destination and residential
neighborhoodis essential to future success for both the neighborhood and City and
County of Denver.
Importance of residential development. Cherry Creek's continued success depends on
attracting more people to the area and having more people live within walking distance
of the business and retail destinations. These factors contribute greatly to sustaining the
area's economic and community vitality. Improving the design quality while expanding
the diversity of housing types assures that the area will attract a range of households and
families thereby enhancing the attractiveness of the area to people of all ages.
Retail strength. The Cherry Creek Shopping District has the highest concentration of
upscale and local independent retailers in the region. As such. Cherry Creek is touted
as the number one retail destination in the Denver metro area. Yet given the changing
44
Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan


nature of the retail environment nationally and the growing number of shopping districts
offering the pedestrian shopping experience locally. Cherry Creek must find ways to
continue to thrive and stay competitive.
Regional retail destination. For nearly every category of retail. Cherry Creek carries
a substantial market surplus, meaning that Cherry Creek's retail success depends on
increasing the number of people who live and work in the Cherry Creek area and on
attracting shoppers who do not live and work in Cherry Creek. Therefore convenient
access via walking, biking, transit and auto is essential to continued retail success.
Local retail center. Cherry Creek North has long been known as a center for local
retail businesses, and continues to host the largest selection of independent retailers.
Retaining this balance of local and national retailers is important to enhancing the
distinctive character of the Shopping District.
Shopping Center redevelopment. The Cherry Creek Shopping Center opened
in 1990. The original shopping center to the west was repurposed as a variety of
medium and big box stores and restaurants with varying degrees of remodeling. The
east end retains the Safeway and Rite-Aid stores. While all of the stores and uses at
the east and west ends are desirable and well-used, the configuration underutilizes
its land with one -and two-story buildings within surface parking lots. As was
recommended in the 2000 Cherry Creek Plan, these sites are major opportunities for
a greater mix of uses and greater intensity to add vitality to the entire area.
Office and employment. Cherry Creek has emerged as a recognized office sector in the
metro area with its wide range of office types accommodating over 14,500 employees.
Cherry Creek is increasingly a regional hub for financial services, and it also attracts
advertising, creative media, architecture and design firms, as well as boutique medical
offices. Continuing to provide high quality office space for these boutique firms and
creative industries is essential to the mixed-use character of Cherry Creek and the
continued attraction of a broad demographic of visitors.
Hotels and visitors. Hotels in and around Cherry Creek, as well as in Downtown and
along Colorado Boulevard, are an essential component of the area's economic vitality.
Market research surveys indicate that visitors spend three times more than Denverites
on retail purchases in Cherry Creek. Hotel guests add necessary pedestrian vitality,
supporting the surrounding businesses and restaurants. The lodging and meeting/event
facilities are important to area businesses, as well.
Creating community. The Cherry Creek Area is committed to building community
through the enhancement of arts, culture and recreation. The dedication to the arts in
Cherry Creek is evident with the annual Cherry Creek Arts Festival, one of the largest and
most prestigious outdoor art festivals in the country; eighteen art galleries; and the use
of an "art and garden" theme throughout the Cherry Creek North streetscape. The Cherry
CreekTheatre recent addition to the arts scene resulted from the vision of a group of
Cherry Creek residents, business representatives. City Council and local theater leaders.
Enhancing the sense of community for the Cherry Creek area, each of its subareas and
the surrounding neighborhoods is important to the quality of life for current and future
residents.
Identity. Cherry Creek is one of the top visitor attractions in Colorado, the Shopping
Center is known nationally as a top performer, and the area produces significant tax
revenue for the city, state and RTD. The Cherry Creek Area gets inadequate recognition
for its contribution to Denver's economy and quality of life. Additionally, the perimeter
streets, especially Alameda and Colorado provide poor gateways to the area due to
vacant land, underdeveloped buildings and lack of sidewalks.
Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan
45


"W TBSMt.W*'
RECOMMENDATION D.1 ECONOMIC VITALITY
The Cherry Creek Area and its neighborhoods are recognized for their high quality of life. All
of the plan recommendations must contribute to complementing the elements that make
it attractive to live, work, shop, and play in the Cherry Creek Area. Areas such as this do not
retain this quality and advantage without positive change. One of the purposes of this plan is
to define positive change from all perspectives.
D.1 .A SYNERGISTIC MIX OF USES
The Cherry Creek Area has thrived with its diverse mix of uses. From its origins as a residential
neighborhood, shopping district and mall, expanded uses have included offices, hotels
and higher density residential. The area has proven to be very attractive to all of these
development types, so plan recommendations focus on enhancing amenities and removing
public policy impediments.
Retail uses. The Shopping District is one of the prime retail centers in the metro area
because it combines the large format retail and national tenants of the Shopping
Center with the boutique retail of Cherry Creek North. Retail uses should continue to be
concentrated in the Shopping District. The smaller retail nodes and strips such as those
along 6th Avenue and Colorado Boulevard will continue to serve nearby residents and
passers-by.
Office uses. Cherry Creek is increasingly a regional hub for financial services. It also
attracts smaller advertising, creative media, architectural and design firms, as well as
boutique medical offices. Medium and small office buildings in Cherry Creek North are
increasingly in demand. Banks are finding 1 st Avenue east of Steele to be good locations.
Opportunities for larger office buildings exist along 1 st Avenue, the east side of Steele
and in Cherry CreekTriangle.
Hospitality uses. Hotels have emerged as another synergistic use. Colorado Boulevard
has proven to be an excellent location for limited service hotels. Full service hotels, such
as J.W. Marriott, are likely to cluster along 1 st Avenue. Boutique hotels add vitality at a
greater variety of locations. Hotel patrons take advantage of shopping and restaurants.
Public policy should reinforce location decisions to place larger hotels and hospitality
uses closer to 1 st Avenue, while allowing boutique hotels in more locations within the
Shopping District.
D.1 .B MORE HOUSING
Residential uses contribute significantly to the vitality of the area. While Cherry Creek North
and East continue to experience infill development, the greatest potential for new residential
is as a part of mixed-use development in the Shopping District and on vacant parcels in the
Cherry CreekTriangle. All of this housing will continue to reinforce the range of housing types
already found in the Cherry Creek Areasingle family, duplexes, row houses, and condo and
apartment towers. Where appropriate, this housing will include retail, office or hotel uses
to further the mixed-use character of the area. The area has proven to be very attractive
to residential development, so plan recommendations focus on enhancing amenities and
removing public policy impediments.
D.1 .C IMPORTANCE OF VISITORS
Visitorswhether families coming for a day, hotel guests coming for a week, or
conventioneers seeing the sitesare an important economic driver for Cherry Creek retail.
The shopping center attracts an estimated 1.3 million visitors per month and 30% are domestic
and foreign tourists. Partnerships with Downtown, DIA, and Visit Denver will be increasingly
important. Adding more rooms in Cherry Creek and improving access to and from Downtown
46
Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan


(especially Denver Union Station, the Convention Center and 14th Street hotels, the Theatre
District, and the 16th Street Mall) and Colorado Boulevard hotels is important.
Hotels have proven to be beneficial to Cherry Creek's prosperity; however, the location of
different types is sensitive due primarily to traffic impacts. Full service hotels with meeting
facilities should be located in proximity to 1 st Avenue for visibility and to minimize impacts
to residential areas. Limited service hotels are located along Colorado Boulevard, including
Cherry CreekTriangle. This type of hotel needs access and visibility from major streets.
Boutique hotels are a welcome addition throughout the Shopping District and Cherry Creek
Triangle.
D.1 .D WALKABILITY EQUALS PROSPERITY
National trends indicate that pedestrian-oriented, mixed-use communities will prove most
attractive to the creative class, young professionals, seniors, and families, as well as empty
nesters. Aside from a few locations called out in the "A Connected Cherry Creek" chapter, most
of the Cherry Creek Area has adequate sidewalks. Pedestrian oriented development creates
the visual interest and eyes on the street to encourage walking in an attractive, convenient
and safe area. Providing attractive connections within the Cherry Creek area assures that the
subareas are well connected and interrelated.
D.1 .E CREATING COMMUNITY
Arts, culture and recreation have emerged as significant factors in establishing a sense of
community for area residents and business owners. Having places and events where people
can meet formally and informally is an important attribute of a healthy neighborhood. Seeing
friends and neighbors at outdoor cafes, coffee shops, the library, on the street or at stores,
as well as at events such as the Cherry CreekTheater, Farmers Market, gallery opening or
Arts Festival provides a sense of connection and community. In addition, the neighborhood
Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan
47


RECOMMENDATION D.2 REINVESTING IN THE FUTURE
Cherry Creek Shopping Center east end
associations in Cherry Creek North and East sponsor many activities.
D.2.A LOCAL CHARACTER/NATIONAL PROMINENCE
The Cherry Creek Shopping District provides identity, amenity and value to the entire plan
area with its variety of retail businesseslarge and small, local and national. Enhancing
the symbiotic relationship and the distinctive character of Cherry Creek North and Cherry
Creek Shopping Center is important to the entire area. While it is recognized by residents
and business owners alike that reinvestment in Cherry Creek North is needed, the walkable
character and rhythm of storefronts is essential to its unique character. Equally important, the
Shopping Center has sites at the east and west end, as well as along the Greenway that will
benefit from more intense development. Land use regulations must be crafted to encourage
appropriate development in both areas.
D.2.B DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES
Plan concepts and recommendations point to the benefit of attracting more people -
residents, employees, and visitors and reinvestment to areas of change, namely the Shopping
District and Cherry CreekTriangle. Study of land and development economics point to
the need for updated land use and regulatory strategies in these areas. A wide array of
development opportunities exist including small residential infill, outdated buildings and
underdeveloped parcels. There are a number of surface parking lots with redevelopment
potential. Highly visible opportunities include:
West end of Cherry Creek Shopping Center (approx. 11 acres)
East end of Cherry Creek Shopping Center (approx. 4.5 acres)
Josephine / Columbine Street between 2nd and 3rd (approx. 2 acres)
Cherry CreekTriangle (approx. 10.5 acres)
1st Bank site (approx. 1.85 acres)
Steele Creek site (approx. 1 acre)
3000 East 3rd site (approx. 1.2 acres)
Cherry Creek East village center
Colorado Boulevard gateways on 1 st Avenue and Bayaud
As these sites and areas develop and redevelop over the next ten or twenty years, it will
be essential to enhance the quality of design, relationship to surrounding buildings and
neighborhoods, mix of uses, quality of the pedestrian experience and overall character of the
Cherry Creek Area. Land use regulatory tools including zoning, general development plans,
and design standards and guidelines are available tools to establish the regulatory framework
to achieve high quality private development.
48
Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan


6THAVE
Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan
49


D.2.C HIGH QUALITY DEVELOPMENT
Recommendations in the "A Distinctive Cherry Creek" chapter address land use and urban
design. Assuring the balance of uses to retain the synergy and enhancing pedestrian-friendly
design to enliven the street level are key aspects of high quality development. Setting high
standards gives the residents, business owners, building owners and the development
community the assurance that their investment in high quality will be reinforced in the future.
Regulatory tools such as design review with clear design standards and guidelines, transitions
between intensities and uses, and investment in the public realm are key implementation
strategies.
D.2.D MULTI-MODAL STREETS
Much of the Shopping District's success depends on people being able to access the area
from all directions on the street network. Having streets that accommodate cars, pedestrians,
bikes, and transit comfortably is important to the area's future success. Arterial streets such as
Colorado, 1st Avenue, Alameda and University are the Cherry Creek Area's connection to the
region. Making investments that enhance the value and attractiveness of the area and expand
the multi-modal access is essential.
D.2.E LOCATIONAL ADVANTAGE AND ACCESS
Cherry Creek is three miles from downtown, connected by regional bus routes, a street grid,
and the Cherry Creek Greenway. The 90,000 person trips per day along 1st Avenue help
generate visibility and a customer base for Cherry Creek businesses. Convenient access to the
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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan


Cherry Creek Area via transit is an important component of remaining competitive. As the
"A Connected Cherry Creek" chapter states, regional investment in transit on the Speer/lst/
Alameda corridor is a long-term solution. In the short term. Cherry Creek needs to investigate
public-private and private solutions to connecting Cherry Creek to destinations such as DIA,
Downtown, Denver Union Station, and the regional rail network. Options include supporting
expanded RTD service, shuttles, or reduced taxi fares. This multi-modal access should both
bring more people to Cherry Creek and encourage Cherry Creek residents and employees to
use alternative transportation.
D.2.F STORMWATER IMPROVEMENTS
Without needed stormwater improvements, private development in Cherry Creekfaces an
additional impediment. Two major projects identified in the City's 2009 Storm Drainage
Master Plan include a new 60-inch Cherry Creek outfall along University and the Bayaud outfall
in Cherry Creek East. Both projects will provide significant drainage improvements during
storm events. Both projects are in design and scheduled for construction in the next few years.
Over the long term, sustainable stormwater solutions such as green alleys, streets and
parking lots should be pursued. The solutions include features such as porous pavement,
landscaped swales, and additional plantings.
Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan
51


RECOMMENDATION D.3
ORGANIZATION AND IDENTITY
D.3 .A SHOPPING DISTRICT ORGANIZATION
Established in 1989, the Cherry Creek North Business Improvement District (BID) is the second
largest BID by budget in Colorado. The BID serves the Cherry Creek North shopping district, a
16-block area that contains over 100 property owners and over 300 retail and personal service
businesses. BID powers are established by state statute so some important activities are
limited. While the Shopping District is gaining identity in the market, it lacks an organizational
entity. Such an entity could be a 501 (c) 6 organization that advocates for Cherry Creek
business interests and coordinates efforts of the BID, Transportation Solutions, the Cherry
Creek Chamber and other organizations.
D.3.B PERIMETER STREET GATEWAYS
Providing gateways at key entrances to the Cherry Creek Area can reinforce the area's identity.
The Shopping Center and BID have gateway features, as does Clayton Lane; North Creek uses
building design and materials to establish this identity. Other locations that are just as key,
Colorado Boulevard at Alameda and 1 st Avenue, lack any features that tie these portals to
Cherry Creek. Entry monuments, building features, or special street signs are examples of
gateways that can assist in reinforcing Cherry Creek's identity and providing more intuitive
wayfinding. Public policies can affect building design and quality. Private sector investment
will be needed for any monuments or entry features.
D.3.C CITYWIDE RETAIL STRATEGY
Should the city undertake a citywide retail strategy, the Cherry Creek Shopping District must
be a primary participant. Any such study should differentiate types of retail centers and
develop strategies to ensure the success of various types. Finding ways to increase Denver's
overall retail success based on its assets should be the outcome. For example, improving
transit access to established retail centers such as Cherry Creek may prove more beneficial
than simply increasing competition and diluting success by adding retail centers to more
locations.
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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan


Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan
53


54
Cherry Creek Area Plan | Subarea Strategies


Subarea Strategies
The success of the Cherry Creek Area depends on the health of its individual subareas and
surrounding neighborhoods. Maintaining the distinct identity of each district while balancing
transitions and improving connections between them in a manner that enhances character,
quality, prosperity and livability has always been a key goal in Cherry Creek.
This Plan acknowledges four distinct subareas within Cherry Creek.
Cherry Creek Shopping District the region's most vibrant upscale retail and mixed-use
district
Cherry Creek North Neighborhood a highly desirable, moderate density residential
neighborhood with some embedded neighborhood-serving commercial uses
Cherry Creek East a highly desirable moderate density residential neighborhood that
also includes a high density office and residential district on its western edge
Cherry CreekTriangle a high density mixed-use district
Along 1 st Avenue and Steele Street, there is a desire to reflect the overlapping character of
subareas. For this reason, the subarea maps intentionally include duplicate blocks across those
edges.
Issues and recommendations specific for each
subarea are documented in this section of the Plan to
supplement the more general recommendations that
apply to the entire planning area in the Framework
Plan. The sub area goals:
Enhance character and livability.
Maintain distinct identity of each.
Improve connections.
Balance transition.
Cherry Creek Area Plan | Subarea Strategies 55


Cherry Creek Shopping District
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The Cherry Creek Shopping District is Denver's premier retail destination, and as such, it
creates amenity and value to entire Cherry Creek Area, as well as to the City, region and
state. The Shopping District encompasses Cherry Creek Shopping Center (a regional mall)
and Cherry Creek North Business Improvement District, (a local mixed-use / retail district)a
synergistic combination found in few other cities. Mixed-use districts east of Steele Street are
also included within the Shopping District subarea in order to improve the connectivity of
these mixed-use areas across 1 st Avenue and Steele Street. While best known for its variety
of local and national retailers, both large and small, as well as its exclusive retail, the Shopping
District is becoming increasingly mixed-use with the introduction of more housing, hotel and
office uses above retail, along with the office and residential towers to the east.
KEY ISSUES: ENTIRE CHERRY CREEK SHOPPING DISTRICT
Retail strength. As all retail districts do, the Shopping District must continually reinvest in and
reinvent itself to retain its competitive position and exclusive reputation for high quality and
successful retail. Recent improvements include the north elevation of the Shopping Center
(especially Nordstrom), the BID'S streetscape and Fillmore Plaza improvements,and new
development along 1st Avenue. Future opportunities include the east and west ends of the
Shopping Center and vacant and underutilized properties throughout the Shopping District.
Regional and local connectivity. The Shopping District's role as an economic generator and
its pivotal location within a regional travel shed prioritizes the importance of addressing multi-
modal connectivity to and through Cherry Creek. It is important for residents, employees and
visitors of every subarea to have easy, convenient access to each other and with the Shopping
District, with multiple transportation choices available.
Quality of place. Quality of place and the pedestrian experience is a combination of the
public realm (streets, sidewalks, pedestrian amenities) and the adjacent private development
and its relationship to the street (entrances, windows, outdoor dining, merchandise displays).
Neither one can fully succeed without the other.
1st and Steele intersection. Istand Steele is one of the Cherry CreekArea's most challenging
intersections. In addition to the complex vehicular and pedestrian movements described in
the "A Well Connected Cherry Creek" chapter, its width and curvature make the relationship
between the public realm and adjacent buildings challenging. All four corners of the Istand
Steele intersection are considered catalytic redevelopment sites.
1st Avenue and Ellsworth intersection. Steele and Ellsworth is an important pedestrian
crossing between the high density residential development to the east and the Safeway,
Rite-Aide and Shopping Center to the west. A safe, ADA compliant crossing is particularly
important for the residents of Allied Jewish Flousing.
Shopping District identity. The Shopping District concept is one of the unique attributes of
the Cherry Creek Area; however, no single organization serves the entire district to coordinate
events, support appropriate development concepts, and to market the mixed-use attributes of
the subarea.
KEY ISSUES: CHERRY CREEK SHOPPING CENTER
Redevelopment potential. The Cherry Creek Shopping Center opened in 1990 in the center
of a large, continuous property. The original shopping center at the west end was repurposed
for big and mid size national retailers and restaurants. The Safeway and Rite-Aide were
incorporated into the east end.
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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Subarea Strategies
Limitations of current zoning. The shopping center's current zoning of B-3 does not provide
a predictable set of building forms or patterns. An alternative regulatory framework is needed


to envision and enable contextually appropriate development for the mall property.
Long term success. The Cherry Creek Shopping Center has evolved over time to meet the
needs of the regional customer base.
Shopping Center as superblock. As is typical of regional shopping malls, the Cherry Creek
Shopping Center sits within a superblock. Vehicular access serves parking garages and parking
lots. Pedestrian and bike portals to the site are inconsistent along all sides of the property. The
Clayton connection to Nordstrom and its plaza and the Fillmore crossing to the main entrance
are examples of improved connection.
Relationship to Greenway. The relationship between the Shopping Center and Cherry Creek
Greenway is diminished because of the placement of the east and west parking garages.
Plazas connecting the Shopping Center and the Cherry Creek Greenway lack vibrancy.
Additionally, connections between 1 st Avenue and the Greenway at St. Paul and at Steele are
not well marked. There is no bike trail or sidewalk on the east side of University.
KEY ISSUES: MIXED-USE AREAS EAST OF STEELE ST.
Cherry Creek East mixed-use area. The area between Steele and Madison and 1st Avenue
and Pulaski Park has emerged as a high-density, mixed-use area. Major developments include
offices, condo towers, senior housing, and apartment complexes.
Steele St. Steele St between 1 st and Bayaud serves as the front door to Cherry Creek East.
1st Avenuenorth side. The north side of 1 st Avenue from Steele east to Jackson and north
to 2nd is another mixed-use area containing medium density residential and office uses.
KEY ISSUES: CHERRY CREEK NORTH RETAIL DISTRICT (BID AREA)
Streetscape improvements. In 2011, the Cherry Creek North Business Improvement District
(BID) streetscape improvements refined the successful concept of highlighting all of the
corners with enhanced pavement, planters, banners, wayfinding, and seating, creating visual
interest throughout the area.
Development economics. A study of land and development economics conducted for
this plan (KHO Consulting, 2011) indicates that the current zoning makes redevelopment
challenging in the BID area. In addition to the height limit, the C-CCN zone district's relatively
high parking ratios and low floor area ratio are the critical factors in limiting the potential for
BID properties to redevelop. Retaining C-CCN zoning as-is will limit the ability of the BID to
attract additional mixed-use development including retail, high quality office space, hotels,
and more residential units.
Quality retail experience. The quality and continuity of retail storefronts varies from block
to block resulting in a fragmented retail district. Disruptions to the continuity of ground floor
active uses include surface parking, unscreened parking garages, garden-level retail, and
vacant buildings. Furthermore, some older buildings do not meet accessibility codes making
access for all difficult.
3rd Avenue character. 3rd Avenue is a locally serving retail street dominated by one and
two story buildings and small retail tenants, some of which are well-known, long-time local
businesses. The north side of the street has the additional role of acting as a height transition
from the Shopping District to the Cherry Creek North neighborhood. Many buildings need
reinvestment and access improvements for continued viability.
Parking. The perception of a parking "shortage" has been a challenge for Cherry Creek North.
A parking study conducted in 2007 as part of Denver's Strategic Parking Plan revealed that
there is a generous supply of on- and off-street parking. The transition from parking kiosks to
smart meters has helped to better manage on-street parking.
Many Cherry Creek North BID properties have not
seen significant reinvestment for 3 or 4 decades. The
desirability of the area, high land values, high rents
and small parcels create a challenge for property
owners to find redevelopment scenarios that are as
profitable as no reinvestment.
Properties that have developed in Cherry Creek
North BID tend to be owner-occupier situations,
which makes redevelopment financially feasible.
High end retail in Cherry Creek North
Cherry Creek Area Plan | Subarea Strategies 57


SUBAREA RECOMMENDATIONS: ENTIRE SHOPPING DISTRICT
Enhance retail quality and district character through appropriate change. Positive
change is needed throughout the Shopping District to enhance this vibrant mixed-use
regional center. The Cherry Creek Shopping District remains an area of change. Its central
location, existing mixture of high end retail, economic development opportunities,
walkable streets and access to regional multi-modal connections create an ideal location for
encouraging additional residential and employment growth. It needs to retain its combination
of national retailers, exclusive retailers, local retailers, and neighborhood serving retailers.
Plan guidance and the resulting regulatory framework should encourage appropriate new
development throughout the Shopping District.
Regional Center and Town Center. Continue to support a mix of uses in the Regional
Center (see Future Land Use Map on page 63) including office, retail, commercial,
multifamily residential and hotels. Support compact development patterns and an
enhanced public realm including landscaping, wayfinding signage, pedestrian lighting,
publicartand inviting building entries. TheTown Center areas act as an important
transition between Regional Center and residential areas.
Scale. Maximum building heights in the Shopping District should range from 4 to 12
stories, per the Maximum Building Heights Map (page 63). Building heights should
be lowest adjacent to residential areas in Cherry Creek North and Country Club
neighborhoods. Higher development intensity is encouraged along multi-modal
streets and at key intersections. Mid rise buildings (maximum of 5 or 8 stories) are
recommended as transitions between high intensity and low intensity residential
neighborhoods.
Support better regional connectivity. As described in the"A Connected Cherry Creek"
chapter, enhanced transit connections between Cherry Creek and downtown Denver, as well
as to DIA and the global marketplace, are necessary to keep Cherry Creek competitive within
the region.
Continue to attract shoppers. The Cherry Creek Shopping District must continue to attract
shoppers from the nearby neighborhoods as well as the city and region. Having daily needs
met within walking distance of all parts of the area and nearby neighborhoods is important
to quality of life and greater sustainability. The Shopping District thrives because of the large
number of people within Cherry Creekand nearby neighborhoods, visitors and the much
larger number within the trade area.
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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Subarea Strategies


More residential, hotel and office development in Shopping District and other nearby
Areas of Change, such as Cherry CreekTriangle
More visitors from within Cherry Creek and from Downtown, Colorado Boulevard and
Glendale
Better transit service between the Shopping District, Downtown, DIAand other nearby
neighborhoods and urban centers: Capitol Hill, Colorado Boulevard and 1-25, University
of Denver, Lowry and Glendale.
Continued auto access from throughout the metro area.
Pedestrian oriented development. All new development should serve to enhance the
pedestrian realm. Line streets with storefronts, windows and building entrances. Place
active uses at the street and parking at the rear. New developments and reinvestments along
Fillmore and 1st Avenue are good examples of pairing public and private investment.
Improve the 1st and Steele intersection. As the primary node of economic opportunity
and multi-modal connectivity in Cherry Creek, improving this intersection is critical to the
Shopping District's long-term success. A study to identify possible improvements should
prioritize making pedestrian and vehicle movements more intuitive as well as considering the
relationship of buildings to the street. Enhancements to this intersection should contribute
torather than detract fromthe Shopping District's walkability. Improvements should
reconnect the Shopping Center, the Cherry Creek North BID, Cherry Creek East and 1 st Avenue.
Improve the Steele and Ellsworth intersection. The Steele and Ellsworth intersection
presents conflicts between vehicles and pedestrians crossing from the high density residential
area to the east, for bikes using the sidewalk bike lane along Steele, and destinations (mall
and one of the area's only full service grocery stores) on the west. Strategies may include
shortening intersection crossing distances where possible; more enforcement for the no-
turn-on-red signage; ADA compliance; longer crossing times; improving median refuge; and
smaller turning radius on the west side of intersection to slow traffic speeds. Intersection
improvements should give priority to pedestrian and bike use.
Create a unified Shopping District identity. Look for opportunities to forge a partnership
that represents the entire Shopping District. Such a partnership will help with coordinating
events, supporting appropriate development concepts, improving regional connections and in
marketing and branding.


SUBAREA RECOMMENDATIONS: CHERRY CREEK SHOPPING CENTER
Support appropriate change. The long-term vision for the Shopping Center as stated in the
2000 Neighborhood plan and further refined in this plan includes greater density at the east
and west ends, as well as a greater mix of uses that may include higher intensity mixed-use
office, hotel and residential along with ground floor retail. The Safeway and Rite-Aid serve
the Cherry Creek Area and surrounding neighborhoods; both uses can be incorporated into
mixed-use structures. The arrangement of new buildings and modification of the shopping
center should reinforce key intersections, pedestrian wayfinding, the Greenway, and vista
terminations.
Utilize appropriate land use regulations. Future redevelopment of the east and west ends
of the Shopping Center presents the opportunity enhance the success of the area and to
establish improved visual and physical connections across 1st Avenue and Steele Street. In
addition to form-based and context-based zoning, appropriate regulatory tools such as a
general development plan and design standards and guidelines should be developed and
applied.
Embrace continued evolution. Ensure the continued evolution and success of the Shopping
Center and allow new development to embrace its regional function while providing
pedestrian scale, orientation and circulation. This Shopping Center has remained successful
even as competition has intensified because of the variety of buildings intended to suit
different local/regional functions, its distinctiveness within a shopping district, its central
location, and convenient access from the entire region. Public policy actions must enable this
evolution.
Create welcoming portals. All of the edges of the Shopping Center need well-defined
portals for pedestrians and bicyclists and automobiles. Portal locations should be informed by
building entrances, the opposing street grid, and pedestrian oriented perimeter development.
To the extent possible, provide physical and visual connections to soften the seams and edges
between 1 st Avenue and the Greenway.
Celebrate the Greenway. The Cherry Creek Greenway is one of the area's greatest assets. The
Framework Plan recommends improvements along all four edges of the Shopping Center.
Coordinate these improvements to provide a distinctive and consistent visual identity and
recommended connections.
Enhance the quality and connection of the Greenway plazas on either side of Cherry
Creek Drive North. One option for activating the Shopping Center Plaza is to add a bike
station.
As the west side of the shopping center redevelops, look for opportunities to incorporate
and embrace the Greenway and creek into the design and provide active uses along the
Greenway's edge in a way that does not compromise the natural beauty of the creek
channel.
Continue the Cherry Creek Greenway multiuse trail along the east, west and north edges
of the site with a combination sidewalk and bike lane, along with landscaping. Highlight
pedestrian and bicycle portals with amenities and signage.
Tie plazas and building forecourts to the Greenway edge.
Connect to the bike network as described previously in this plan and in Denver Moves.
60
Cherry Creek Area Plan | Subarea Strategies


SUBAREA RECOMMENDATIONS: MIXED-USE AREAS EAST OF STEELE
Build on success. Continue to develop vacant and underutilized parcels with midand
highrise mixed-use buildings that complement Cherry Creek East and the Shopping District
on. Quality development is encouraged through the existing zoning and design standards
and guidelines. The design quality of development at 1st and Steele is particularly important.
Improve pedestrian friendly character of Steele Street. As redevelopment occurs, new
buildings should enhance the streetscape and promote improved pedestrian amenities.
Improve pedestrian friendly character of 1st Avenue. As the street redesign described
in the"A Connected Cherry Creek"chapter is implemented, encourage buildings that add
pedestrian activation features to the 1 st Avenue frontage. Review the C-MX-5 zoning to
assure consistency with the subarea vision. Investigate application of design standards and
guidelines.
SUBAREA RECOMMENDATIONS: CCN BUSINESS IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT
Revise land use regulation. Enact zoning and other land use regulatory tools for the C-CCN
zone district to encourage rather than inhibit high quality redevelopment and reinvestment
across all parcel sizes, large and small. Retain positive elements of current zoning including
ground floor retail, design review, quality design and materials, interesting signage, and
parking location. Reconsider height, FAR, building form, and parking requirements. Engage
in an open, transparent and efficient public process that includes all stakeholder interests and
includes the following goals created by the CCN Urban Form Working Group, 2012:
Goal #1 Retain and enhance Cherry Creek North's unique physical character. The
high quality design of buildings, streetscape and public realm within Cherry Creek North
are unique urban design attributes that distinguish the area within the city and region.
Retaining and enhancing the high-quality architectural and public realm character is
critical to the future success of the area. The design intent includes:
Variety of building sizes, heights and types on both named and numbered streets
High quality public realm: high level of pedestrian amenity, streetscaping and active
stro refronts
The newly developed Santa Monica Place mall in
Santa Monica, CA exemplifies how a visual and
physical connection can be made between a mall
and a mixed-use district across a busy street.
High quality architectural design and building materials
Evolving distinctiveness between 2nd and 3rd avenues
Compact area with clear boundaries and attractive entry points
Goal #2 Make reinvestment economically viable in the entire district. Current zoning
is insufficient to achieve the Plan's vision fora prosperous Cherry Creek and the need for
reinvestment, redevelopment and sustained economic viability. Factors to be addressed
include:
Height limit of 55 feet throughout the CCN district does not reflect emerging
character differences of 2nd and 3rd avenues
FAR of 1 with a 0.5 premium is inadequate to achieve desired urban character
High parking requirements do not reinforce plan recommendations regarding
parking management and alternative transportation. Furthermore, the current
parking requirements are among the highest in the city and cannot be met
economically on small lots and add substantial cost to development
Cherry Creek Area Plan | Subarea Strategies 61


Making parking intuitive and easy leaves a lasting
impression for visitors to the area and cuts down on
traffic congestion.
RIGHT SIZING PARKING
Right sizing parking, defined as
providing no more or less parking
needed to support the use it serves,
is critical to both quality of life and
prosperity in an urban environment. A
residential or office building containing
too few parking spaces can result in
difficulty for the property owner to
find tenants and over use of on-street
parking, all of which contributes to
a perception of having a "parking
problem." Conversely, too much
parking creates a substantial financial
burden for development because of
the expense of parking, especially
underground parking. Above grade
parking and surface parking less costly
options can degrade the pedestrian
experience and quality of the place.
Goal #3 Encourage small lot reinvestment. Multiple small lots fronting the named
streets and 3rd Avenue are among the defining characteristics within the district. A
variety of lot and building sizes reinforces the architectural variety and organic character
of Cherry Creek North and reinvestment in a variety of small lots throughout the district
is desired. Tools such as reduced parking and relaxed building form requirements can
be used to encourage redevelopment of smaller parcels and reinvestment in smaller
buildings.
Goal #4 Transition from higher buildings along 2nd to lower buildings along 3rd.
Continue to evolve the distinct character of 2nd and 3rd avenues by distinguishing each
street with a special character that supports the overall vision for the district. 2nd Avenue
will support higher intensity due to its proximity and 1 st Avenue and 3rd Avenue is
envisioned a boutique street and a transition to the neighborhood. The block between
2nd and 3rd will transition from the greater height of 8 stories along 2nd Avenue to the
4-story height along 3rd Avenue. The transition should reinforce the variety of building
heights and widths along the named streets.
Goal #5 Create height transition from the business district to adjacent residential.
The Denver Zoning Code establishes protected and control districts to create height and
form relationships between higher and lower intensity zone districts. These designations
are appropriate for the transition between the business district and neighborhood.
Goal #6 Retain sunlight on streets and views between buildings. Sun and sky
exposure are among the attributes that make Cherry Creek North a highly walkable
district. Building form tools such as breaks between buildings, upper story setbacks and
solar bulk planes can be used to provide openness as building heights increase.
Goal #7 Prevent the creation of"walled"or monolithic streets. Reinforcing the
attributes of Cherry Creek such as building size and height variety, breaks between
buildings, and street level building articulation contribute to a pedestrian scale, thereby
avoiding the sense of street canyons, especially for larger scale development.
Goal #8 Active storefronts and ground floor uses. Cherry Creek North is best known
as a retail district. Continuing the zoning requirement for ground floor retail and the
strorefront articulation provided in the Cherry Creek Design Standards and Guidelines is
essential to its walkability and vitality.
Assure design quality. The Cherry Creek North Design Standards and Guidelines and Design
Advisory Board have been successful and assure that new development engages the street
and reinforces the quality of the pedestrian experience.
Enhance 3rd Avenue charm and viability. Any revisions to the land use regulatory
documents must both reinforce 3rd Avenue's characteristic rhythm of smaller storefronts and
transition to the residential uses to the north.
Manage parking. For many shoppers and visitors, parking is an impression that contributes
to the overall experience, so providing parking choices that are intuitive and convenient is
important for the retail area. Several strategies should be considered as described in the
parking management strategy toolbox of the Strategic Parking Plan.
Marketing existing off-street parking lots to visitors and employees would make better
use of existing supply. Additional public parking signs denoting the location of public
off-street lots and new technology and emerging mobile phone"apps"may be used.
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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Subarea Strategies


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Capitalize on shared parking opportunities so that private off-street parking could be
shared among retailers as allowed in the Denver Zoning Code.
In addition, a "park once and walk" strategy can have multiple benefits: reduces overall
demand for parking; makes better use of parking supply; minimizes traffic searching for
parking; and increases pedestrian traffic.
A private parking district, through the BID or another entity, could take responsibility
for managing all off-street parking and constructing new parking as needed. An off-
street parking district relies on paid off-street parking to fund its capital and operating
expenses.
Cherry Creek Area Plan | Subarea Strategies 63


Cherry Creek North Neighborhood
The Cherry Creek North neighborhood stretches across the northern edge of the Cherry Creek
Area. It is an L-shaped area bounded by 6th Avenue on the north, Josephine on the west and
Colorado Boulevard on the east. The southern boundary from Josephine to the Steele-Adams
alley is the Cherry Creek Shopping District which extends about 150 feet north of 3rd Avenue;
1st Avenue forms the southern boundary of the remainder of the subarea.
The neighborhood is predominantly residential, though the character of the residential has
been changing small bungalows replaced with large duplexes, row houses and single family
houses. The neighborhood has developed an identity of being one of the most desirable and
upscale residential areas in Denver. The chart below illustrates the housing types, number
of housing units, average sizes, average assessed values, and total property tax generated in
2011, according to the City of Denver property records.
Cherry Creek North Neighborhood Housing Types, 2011
House Type Number (%) Housing Units Average S.F. (excluding basement) Average Assessed Value Total Annual Property Taxes (all houses)
1-Story Bungalow 165(10%) 1214 $529,157 $465,285
2-Story Single Family 134 (8%) 3575 $1,604,601 $1,145,836
3-Story Single Family 11 (<1%) 4016 $1,462,145 $85,710
Condo 342 (22%) 1335 $454,747 $828,794
Single Family Attached* 938 (59%) 2454 $865,927 $4,328,473
Subtotal / Average 1590 2519 $983,315 $6,854,099
Apartments 75
Total Residential Units 1665
Source: Realty Resources; Real Property Records, City and County of Denver Assessor, 2011
*Single Family Attached includes duplexes, row houses and townhouses
Office
Retail
Commercial
Mixed Use
Industrial
Garage/carport/shed
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64
Cherry Creek Area Plan | Subarea Strategies


Several exceptions to the predominant use and scale are important to note:
Medium height residential buildings immediately north of the business districttwo
buildings on the 300 block of Detroit Street (4 stories and 5 stories); one building on the
300 block of Fillmore Street (4 stories);
Mixed-use area consisting of a condo building, banks, offices, and retail between 1st and
2nd on Adams, Cook, and Madison and continuing east along the north side of 1 st to
Colorado; and,
Retail uses in one-story buildings along the south side of 6th Avenue between Josephine
and Steele.
Urban form and building form are consistent with the street grid. With few exceptions,
buildings are oriented to the street and vehicular access is from the mid-block alley. Streets are
narrow with detached sidewalks and tree lawns. On-street parking is provided on all streets.
Sidewalks are lacking only in locations where older houses have not been replaced. Cherry
Creek North is a highly walkable, bikeable neighborhood throughout. East-west transit service
is available on the Route 6 (6th and 8th Avenues) and the 1 st Avenue routes; north-south
service is Route 40 on Colorado Boulevard and Route 24 on University/Josephine.
For the most part, zoning in the Cherry Creek North neighborhood reinforces the existing
character. The core of the neighborhood is zoned G-RFI-3, which allows fora mix of housing
types and development patterns consistent with the current character of the neighborhood
and building height of 30 to 35 feet. Portions of the 300 block Clayton, Detroit and Fillmore
Streets are zoned G-MU-5, allowing for multifamily residential development up to five stories.
Mixed-use zoned districts are located along the 6th Avenue retail strip and in the mixed-use
area in the blocks northeast of Steele and 1 st.
Community facilities within the neighborhood are limited to Manley Park and Bromwell
School on the western edge of the neighborhood. Two of Denver's top public schools provide
education to Cherry Creek North residential children. Bromwell Elementary School is located
in CCN on the southwest corner of Columbine and 4th Avenue, and Steck Elementary School is
east of CCN on Albion Street.
Cherry Creek North has seen much change over the
past three decades: small bungalows, duplexes, row
houses and single family homes.
Large Cherry Creek North Neighborhood duplex
Low scale retail on 6th Avenue
Cherry Creek Area Plan | Subarea Strategies 65


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KEY ISSUES: CHERRY CREEK NORTH NEIGHBORHOOD
Residential character and scale. The Cherry Creek North neighborhood is a walkable upscale
residential area with some embedded mixed-use areas. Boundaries between residential and
mixed-use areas are well established. Recent development patterns have resulted in low scale
development throughout the neighborhood, so transitions between adjacent mixed-use areas
and residential areas in both scale and uses are important factors in maintaining the existing
character.
Neighborhood traffic. Traffic counts on Cherry Creek North neighborhood streets indicate
minimal increase since the 2000 Cherry Creek Area Plan despite substantial new residential
and commercial development in the BID. Nevertheless, the perception remains that cut-
through traffic, especially between 6th Avenue and the Shopping District, is prevalent. Despite
this perception, there are few continuous streets through Cherry Creek North. The addition
of regular stop control at alternating intersections is intended to prevent vehicles from easily
cutting through the neighborhood.
Perimeter streets. Busy arterial streets lining Cherry Creek North's perimeter, specifically 1 st
Avenue and Colorado Boulevard can seem like barriers, presenting challenges for pedestrians
and adjacent property owners, as described in the"A Connected Cherry Creek"chapter.
Parking. On-street parking is in higher demand in areas that directly border the Shopping
District. While two-hour time restrictions discourage employees and visitors from parking in
these locations, the CCN residential parking permit (RPP) program excludes residents from the
time restriction in order to balance the on-street parking demands.
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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Subarea Strategies


Pedestrian and bicycle connections. All streets within the Cherry Creek North neighborhood
have comfortable pedestrian connections. Marked bike routes connecting to the local and
regional system are lacking. Bicycle and pedestrian connectivity across arterial streets is also a
challenge. Some sidewalk segments are lacking.
East-West connections 4th Avenue leads directly to Bromwell Elementary School and
has traffic signals on Josephine and University couplet. 3rd Avenue leads directly to
Cranmer Park east of Colorado and 5th Avenue leads directly to Steck Elementary School,
also east of Colorado. These two streets have traffic signals to facilitate crossing of
Colorado Boulevard.
North-south connection on St. Paul-The St. Paul bike route extends from City Parkto
the Cherry Creek Greenway and provides access to the 7th Avenue Parkway bike lanes,
but there is no marked bicycle facility and minimal signage associated with this route.
The 6th Avenue"platooning" signal is located to the east of St. Paul. The Cherry Creek
Greenway is difficult to access from St. Paul and 1 st Avenue due to lack of signage and
inadequate bicycle and pedestrian facilities on Steele Street.
Connections across 1st Avenue -There is no designated bike connection between Cherry
Creek North and Cherry Creek East across 1 st Avenue. A clear route designation and
bicycle facilities would provide Cherry Creek North residents with better access to Pulaski
Park and the Cherry Creek Greenway. Garfield is the only signalized intersection between
Steele and Colorado.
Cherry Creek Area Plan | Subarea Strategies 67


RECOMMENDATIONS: CHERRY CREEK NORTH NEIGHBORHOOD
Reinforce the residential character. Maintain and enhance the existing residential
character and walkable environment of Cherry Creek North. New development will respect
the predominant urban form of detached sidewalks, tree lawns, landscaped block-sensitive
setbacks, alley access to structures, limited curb cuts, and building entry features that
are visible from the street. Land uses should conform with existing boundaries between
residential and mixed-use areas.
Recommended land use categories are depicted on the Future Land Use Map:
Urban Residential Row House. Continue to support a mix of housing types including
single family, accessory dwelling units, duplexes and row houses.
Urban Residential. Continue supporting a variety of housing types including low- and
mid-rise multifamily, row house, duplex, single family and accessory dwelling units.
Pedestrian Shopping District. Support a mix of uses on 6th Avenue including small scale
neighborhood serving commercial and retail.
Regional Center and Town Center. Continue to support a mix of uses including office,
retail, commercial and multifamily residential. Support compact development patterns
and an enhanced public realm including landscaping, wayfinding signage, pedestrian
lighting, public art and inviting building entries. TheTown Center areas act as an
important transition between Regional Center and residential areas in scale and/or use.
Respect the existing scale. Retain the existing pattern of development intensity, with low
scale buildings in the residential areas and mid-rise buildings in the transition area between
1 st and 2nd Avenue and Steele and Monroe Street, per the Maximum Building Heights Map.
Monitor and discourage"cut-through" traffic. Traffic patterns should continue to be
monitored with periodic traffic engineering studies. If traffic counts indicate that street
capacity is exceeded, the city and neighborhood should work together to identify appropriate
traffic management tools for the area.
Implement "A Connected Cherry Creek" chapter recommendations regarding
perimeter streets. Further study of Colorado Boulevard and finding funding for 1 st Avenue
improvements are important next steps in addressing challenges with perimeter arterials.
Continue the neighborhood parking permit program. The neighborhood parking permit
program has limited visitor parking within the neighborhood. The program should be
monitored to ensure consistent applicability of the intent of the residential parking permit
program.
Improve pedestrian connections. Continue to require installation of sidewalks and tree
lawns as new development occurs.
4th Avenue Designate a bicycle boulevard along 4th Avenue connecting the Country
Club neighborhood, across University Boulevard, to Bromwell Elementary and Manley
Park. Include a bicycle connection through the park and continuing to the east. The
bike route would turn south on Harrison Street to 3rd Avenue in order to cross Colorado
Boulevard at a traffic signal; access to Steck is provided at 5th with a pedestrian activated
signal. The 4th Avenue route would effectively connect residents with parks and
elementary schools.
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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Subarea Strategies


St. Paul Improve the St. Paul bicycle route by adding destination based signage and
route markings. Consider moving the crossing signal on 6th Avenue west to facilitate
crossing at St. Paul.
Garfield bicycle boulevard Designate a bicycle boulevard along Garfield Street using the
traffic light at 1 st Avenue to connect Cherry Creek North with Cherry Creek East, Cherry
CreekTriangle and the Cherry Creek Greenway to the south and with 7th Avenue, Colfax
and City Park to the north.
Regional Center
Town Center
Pedestrian Shopping Corridor
Urban Residential
Urban Residential Row House
Other subareas
Future land use map- Cherry Creek North neighborhood
2ND AVE
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6THAVE
5THAV6
5 Stories
3 Stories
Other subareas
3RD AVE
2ND AVE
1ST AVE
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Maximum building heights map Cherry Creek North neighborhood


Cherry Creek East
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Located due east of the Cherry Creek Shopping Center, Cherry Creek East (CCE) is bordered by
Steele Street, Cherry Creek North Drive, Alameda Avenue, Colorado Boulevard and 1 st Avenue.
This area supports a mix of residential and office uses and some of the highest residential and
employment densities in all of Cherry Creek, as well as the greatest diversity of housing types.
Cherry Creek East is cherished as a walkable place to live and work with easy access to great
schools, parks and recreation, shopping and entertainment. As a result it has become one of
Denver's most desirable neighborhoods for both residents and employees alike.
Madison Street serves to define two character areas: east of Madison Street is low- to medium-
scale residential and west is a mid- to high-rise mixed-use area. Similar to the Cherry Creek
North neighborhood, the eastern part of Cherry Creek East has seen much redevelopment
over the last two decades. As a result, small cottage style houses have been replaced with
duplexes, row houses, large single family homes, accessory dwelling units and multi-family
structures. Building heights typically range from 1-3 stories, with some 4-5 story buildings
along 1 st Avenue and Alameda Avenue.
West of Madison, the district supports primarily high-rise residential and office uses with
buildings reaching 16 stories. The development intensity and types of uses west of Madison
are more consistent with development along the north side of 1 st Avenue in the Shopping
District. For this reason, this area between Madison and Steele is also considered part of the
Shopping District Subarea. Cherry Creek East's "village center" is located at the intersection
these two character areas and Pulaski Park at Bayaud and Madison.
The urban form in Cherry Creek East creates a walkable environment. Detached sidewalks,
tree lawns and on-street parking as well as block-sensitive setbacks, alley access to structures,
limited curb cuts and street-facing building entry features create a comfortable pedestrian
realm. The majority of the area has PUD or Denver Zoning Code G-RH-3 zoning. Recent
development has resulted in a mix of housing types and an urban form that enhances the
character of the neighborhood.
West of Madison Street, Cherry Creek East is characterized by high rise residential and office buildings.
70
Cherry Creek Area Plan | Subarea Strategies


KEY ISSUES: CHERRY CREEK EAST
Aging undeveloped PUDs. There are nearly 100 individually adopted PUDs in Cherry
Creek East and some of these properties have not been developed. Because PUD zoning
typically does not provide the flexibility needed to react to the changing real estate market
and updating a PUD entails a lengthy rezoning process, these unbuilt PUD projects create
uncertainty for the owner and community.
Cherry Creek East design guidelines. The Cherry Creek East design guidelines promote high
quality development throughout Cherry Creek East. These guidelines envision continued
redevelopment of CCE as an urban, mixed-use neighborhood. The regulatory authority of
these guidelines is not clearly established.
Pulaski Park/Gates Tennis Center. Pulaski Parkand the adjacent Gates Tennis Centerare
important recreational assets for Cherry Creek East, Cherry Creek Greenway users, and the
tennis community. Pulaski Park is underutilized because of it lack of access from the north,
which limits use by neighbors, especially residents of Allied Jewish Housing. Challenges for
daily use and activation include adjacent buildings turning their backs on the park, lack of a
clear entry point from the north, and the tennis court screening. The playground has helped to
attract families to the southeast corner of the park; however, few other amenities are in place
for community gatherings or daily use.
Madison-Bayaud village center. This small commercial node has historically supported
neighborhood-serving commercial uses such a sports bar and grill, a pilates studio and small
office uses. Despite widespread growth and redevelopment in Cherry Creek East in the last
two decades, this small commercial node has seen little reinvestment or redevelopment since
the 1980s. Zoning is in place to support redevelopment; however, the streetscape needs
improvement and existing buildings do not have pedestrian friendly ground floor use or
design.
Pedestrian and bicycle connections. Pedestrian and bicycle connections across perimeter
arterials can be challenging, which impacts connectivity between Cherry Creek East and
adjacent subareas across Alameda, 1 st Avenue and Steele Street, as well as between Cherry
Creek East and the Cherry Creek Greenway.
Access between Cherry Creek East and the Cherry Creek Greenway is challenging due to
the configuration of the Alameda and Cherry Creek North Drive intersection.
Access to the Shopping District via Ellsworth and Bayaud can be challenging for those
with mobility impairments due to the high volumes of traffic and turning movements on
Steele Street.
Connections across Alameda between the Cherry CreekTriangle and Cherry Creek East
can be challenging due to the high volumes of traffic on Alameda Avenue and the lack of
crossing locations between Cherry Creek North Drive and Colorado Boulevard.
Stormwater. Drainage issues can create ponding and icing on local streets.
Harrison Street. Properties on the east side of Harrison have seen a continued lack of private
investment. Existing buildings have deteriorated and vacant lots remain undeveloped.
Challenges include adjacency with the heavily travelled Colorado Boulevard and its parkway
setbacks, parcel depth, and access. Though there is a desire for change along Harrison to spark
private investment, multiple property owners with varied goals, narrow block depth, lack of
sidewalks, and high traffic volumes are all challenges.
Connectivity and lack of investment along perimeter arterials. Cherry Creek East is
surrounded by busy arterials that create hard edges and inhibit multi-modal connectivity
between Cherry Creek East and adjacent subareas. Properties adjacent to Alameda Avenue
and Colorado Boulevard and portions of 1st Avenue have seen little reinvestment.
Cherry Creek Area Plan | Subarea Strategies
71


CHERRY CREEK EAST SUBAREA RECOMMENDATIONS
Reinforce the residential character. Maintain and enhance the existing character and
walkable environment of Cherry Creek East. New development will respect the predominant
urban form of detached sidewalks, tree lawns, landscaped block-sensitive setbacks, alley
access to structures, limited curb cuts and building entry features that are visible from the
street. Land uses should respect existing boundaries between residential and mixed-use areas.
Recommended land use categories are depicted on the future land use map:
Urban Residential. Continue supporting a variety of housing types including low and
mid-rise multifamily, row houses, duplex, single family and accessory dwelling units.
Town Center. Support a mix of land uses including ground floor commercial with office
or residential above.
Regional Center. Continue to support a mix of uses including office, retail, commercial,
multifamily residential and hotels. Support compact development patterns and an
enhanced public realm including landscaping, wayfinding signage, pedestrian lighting,
public art and inviting building entries.
Respect the existing scale. Enhance the existing pattern of development intensity with low
scale buildings in the residential areas. Mid-rise buildings may be appropriate near Alameda
and Colorado. The mixed-use area between Steele and Madison will remain the most intensely
developed portion of the neighborhood, with building heights ranging from 5 to 12 stories,
per the maximum building heights map.
Rezone PUDs. As opportunities arise with new development or property owner interest,
property owners and neighborhood representatives will work together with the City to
determine an appropriate Denver Zoning Code district that serves to implement this plan.
Formalize the Cherry Creek East design guidelines. Review and the revise the contents of
these guidelines and the area to which they apply. Adopt as rules and regulations through
Chapter 12, Revised Municipal Code.
Activate Pulaski Park. Work with Parks and Recreation and the Gates Tennis Center to make
the northern entrance to the park more visible and more accessible to all Cherry Creek East
residents. Also consider longer term actions to activate the park and to encourage daily use.
Create a "village center". The mixed-use node at the intersection of Madison and Bayaud has
long been envisioned as a village center for Cherry Creek East.
Encourage property owners to reinvest and redevelop in manner that results in a vibrant
mixed-use node, including ground floor commercial with office or residential uses above.
Small scale, neighborhood-serving retail and commercial uses are encouraged.
Upgrade the streetscape with detached sidewalks and landscaped tree lawns. Desired
enhanced streetscape amenities include removal of the median, on-street parking, curb
extensions, pedestrian lighting, benches, and trash receptacles.
Any reinvestment or redevelopment occurring on the southwest corner should
incorporate access to and visibility of Pulaski Park into the design of the structure. Ideas
include patio seating fronting the park, and high degrees of transparency on the street
and park facades. Such strategies add vibrancy both to the park and the village center.
Improve pedestrian and bicycle connections.
Utilize the bike connections at Garfield and Steele/St. Paul as the primary connections for
Cherry Creek East residents accessing the Cherry Creek Greenway or neighborhoods to
the north.
Improve pedestrian crossings of Steele Street at Ellsworth and Bayaud
72
Cherry Creek Area Plan | Subarea Strategies


Stripe bike lanes on Bayaud to connect west to the bike route on Steele Street
Improve north/south pedestrian crossings of Alameda as part of the Alameda Parkway
project and of 1st Avenue as part of the East 1 st Avenue project.
Stormwater improvements. In addition to implementing the improvements recommended
in the Stormwater Master Plan and the Cherry Creek Stormwater Study, look for opportunities
to incorporate sustainable stormwater technologies, such as green streets, where possible.
Cherry Creek East's wide streets may be appropriate for green street elements.
Address Harrison Street challenges associated with Colorado Boulevard. As part
of visioning for Colorado Boulevard, study appropriate mechanisms for improving
redevelopment opportunities for properties between Harrison Street and Colorado Boulevard.
Having a comprehensive vision in place for Colorado Boulevard will help clarify appropriate
strategies and phasing for Harrison Street revitalization. The vacant properties at 1 st between
Harrison and Colorado are especially important to creating a gateway into the Cherry Creek
Area.
Encourage private reinvestment along perimeter streets. As recommendations for
Alameda, Colorado, 1st and Steele are implemented, encourage private investment through
appropriate public policy actions. High quality development that enlivens the street is a key
component of a quality pedestrian experience.
The northwestern corner of CCE (block between 1 st and Ellsworth, Steele and Adams)
should be developed with a mix of uses creating a visually iconic landmark at the corner
of 1 st and Steele which transitions to lower heights toward the southeast.
Encourage the redevelopment of the existing vacant lots at the corner of 1st and
Colorado. Reconfiguring the intersection to create regularly shaped parcels may facilitate
redevelopment.
Improve Bayaud Street. Encourage the reconfiguration of Bayaud to include bike lanes,
sidewalks, tree lawns and improved urban design. As deemed necessary, introduce traffic
management strategies to reduce vehicular impacts.
Future land use map- Cherry Creek East neighborhood
Regional Center
Town Center
Urban Residential
Other subareas
Maximum building heights map Cherry Creek East neighborhood
12 Stories
8 Stories
5 Stories
3 Stories
Other subareas
Cherry Creek Area Plan | Subarea Strategies 73


Cherry CreekTriangle
Cherry CreekTriangle is located in the southeastern corner of the Cherry Creek Area, just south
of Cherry Creek East. It is bounded on all sides by highly travelled arterials including Alameda
Avenue to the north, Colorado Boulevard on the east, and Cherry Creek North Drive and the
Cherry Creek Greenway on the southwest. Across Colorado Boulevard from Cherry Creek
Triangle is the City of Glendale.
Cherry CreekTriangle supports nearly 2,000 jobs and over 300 households within a wide
range of land uses, including large office towers such as the Ptarmigan Place, smaller office
buildings, new multifamily residential structures such as Monroe Point and Talvera, small scale
commercial that primarily serves Colorado Boulevard vehicle traffic, and a Holiday Inn hotel.
Numerous large parcels remain vacant or underdeveloped as surface parking lots, offering
much opportunity for infill development to create a vibrant mixed-use district. Both sides of
Colorado Boulevard have significant regional and local retail destinations.
KEY ISSUES: CHERRY CREEKTRIANGLE
Challenging access and connectivity. Vehicles cannot easily access Cherry CreekTriangle
from westbound Alameda, northbound Colorado or southbound Cherry Creek North Drive.
This challenge will grow as population and employment densities increase in Cherry Creek
Triangle. Existing access to Cherry CreekTriangle also impacts pedestrian movement across
these three arterial streets that surround Cherry CreekTriangle somewhat isolating it from
adjacent areas. Poor access to the Cherry Creek Greenway and associated parks makes it
challenging for people living and working in Cherry CreekTriangle to make use of this major
public amenity located across the street. Likewise, it limits the use of the Cherry Creek
Greenway as a commuting option for people living and working in Cherry CreekTriangle.
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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Subarea Strategies


Internal circulation. Circulation within Cherry CreekTriangle is challenging due to the extra
long north/south dimensions of the block structure resulting in Dakota being the only east-
west connection. This means that people trying to circulate within the subarea have to rely on
Dakota and Alameda for their east/west connections. Also, Dakota near Colorado Boulevard is
substandard and does not accommodate two-way traffic.
Walkability. Sidewalks internal to Cherry CreekTriangle are narrow, sloping, attached to the
streets and intersected by many driveways, resulting in a challenging pedestrian environment.
Recent projects have responded by creating a pedestrian system of improved detached
sidewalks with tree lawns and landscaping.
Bikability. Cherry CreekTriangle is served by the Cherry Creek Greenway, a major regional
bicycle corridor. However, no existing bicycle facilities actually enter into Cherry CreekTriangle
that provide residents and employees of Cherry CreekTriangle more direct and intuitive access
to the Greenway. Additionally, no B-Cycle station exists within the subarea.
Connections to the City of Glendale. The City of Glendale, located across Colorado
Boulevard from Cherry CreekTriangle, has a population of nearly 5,000 people and is growing.
Glendale's proposed Riverwalk development is projected to result in 1.5 million square feet
of new retail, entertainment, office and hotel development. This riverwalk is located directly
across from Cherry CreekTriangle along the Cherry Creek Greenway with its main access at the
intersection of Cherry Creek Drive North and Colorado Boulevard.
Unpredictable zoning. Most properties within Cherry CreekTriangle are zoned B-4 with a
variety of waivers and conditions. This zoning district includes no form standards to ensure
an improved development pattern as the subarea redevelops. As a result, the B-4 zoning will
result in development patterns that do not promote continued urban design improvements
reinforcing such elements as uniform building setbacks, screened parking and appropriate
building mass and scale. The waivers and conditions placed on existing zoning are difficult to
understand and predict, reducing the certainty of what can be built and negatively impacting
future investment.
Transit access. Cherry CreekTriangle is serviced by RTD bus routes 1,3L, 83L, 79L, 40 and DD.
Ridership is high, with over 3000 people boarding and alighting at the intersection of Alameda
and Colorado. As Cherry CreekTriangle continues to grow, better transit connections will be
necessary to serve the residents and employees of this urban district and connect Cherry Creek
Triangle to Cherry Creek Shopping District and Glendale.
Cherry CreekTriangle neighborhood identity. Cherry CreekTriangle does not currently
have a strong neighborhood identity. The area lacks consistency in streetscapes, architectural
and urban design quality. Cherry CreekTriangle's mix of uses and buildings does not result
in a synergistic character. The subarea contains no public spaces,"village center" or other
amenities around which to organize development and create a sense of community and an
identity. Cherry CreekTriangle does not take advantage of its prime location adjacent to the
Cherry Creek Greenway, between the Cherry Creek Shopping District and the City of Glendale.
Property owners, businesses and residents do not benefit from organized partnerships like
those in place for the rest of Cherry Creek.
Harrison Street. Harrison Street, as currently configured, serves as a service street for Cherry
CreekTriangle.
Alameda Parkway. Alameda creates a hard edge and inhibits multi-modal connectivity
between Cherry CreekTriangle and Cherry Creek East. Properties adjacent to Alameda Avenue
and Colorado Boulevard have experienced a lack of investment.
Cherry Creek Area Plan | Subarea Strategies 75


Cherry Creek Triangle needs to embrace its prime
location by adding more density, a greater mix of
uses, and orienting buildings toward perimeter
streets and especially toward the Cherry Creek
Green way.
CHERRY CREEKTRIANGLE RECOMMENDATIONS
Improve connectivity and access across perimeter arterials.
Continue to monitor traffic patterns on Alameda Parkway and appropriate north-south
crossing locations to facilitate pedestrian and bike connections such as the proposed
bicycle boulevard on Garfield.
Study the potential to reconfigure the Cherry Creek North Drive and Dakota/Garfield
intersection with the objective of simplifying the intersection and shortening the crossing
distance between Cherry CreekTriangle and the Cherry Creek Greenway.
Work with the City of Glendale and CDOT to improve the intersection of Cherry Creek
North Drive and Colorado Boulevard. This will be a primary access point between Cherry
CreekTriangle and Glendale's proposed Riverwalk development. This intersection will
need to accommodate high levels of pedestrian and vehicle traffic as redevelopment
occurs.
Improve internal circulation.
Improve east/west connectivity As development concepts are reviewed, work with
property owners to find opportunities to improve internal street circulation.
Improve Dakota, especially near Harrison Street, to meet minimum Public Works street
standards, including accommodating one traffic lane in each direction and separated
sidewalks.
Improve the pedestrian realm. Cherry CreekTriangle is included in the Cherry Creek
Pedestrian Priority Zone. As such, pedestrian mobility should be considered a high priority
as streets are reconstructed in this district. The "A Connected Cherry Creek" chapter includes
details on the Pedestrian Priority Zone and the Pedestrian Priority Zone toolkit.
Bicycle improvements. The Garfield bicycle boulevard will connect Cherry CreekTriangle
directly to the Cherry Creek Greenway via a proposed traffic signal and a reconfigured "Y"
shaped intersection at Garfield/Dakota and Cherry Creek North Drive. A bike/ped bridge is
also proposed over the creek at or near this traffic signal. The Garfield bicycle boulevard will
also connect north across Alameda Avenue, through Cherry Creek East and all the way to City
Park.
Encourage positive change to create a vibrant, urban mixed-use district.
Cherry CreekTriangle remains an area of change, meaning growth and reinvestment
should be encouraged. Its prime location, existing mixture of uses, economic
development opportunities and access to transit service create an ideal location for
encouraging residential, commercial, and employment growth.
New development should continue to include a mix of land uses, especially office and
residential. These uses should continue to be integrated into the neighborhood and
serve residents, employees and visitors. Commercial uses on Colorado Boulevard should
be better integrated into the fabric of Cherry CreekTriangle.
New development within the Triangle should respond to the surrounding conditions of
parkways, greenways and other development. Special attention should be placed on the
Greenway edge of theTriangle to enhance visibility and connectivity to this important
amenity. Street facing entries and ground floor transparency will be key elements for
activating the pedestrian realm.
Vehicle access to buildings should be through alleys or service roads. Locate parking
in centers of blocks and wrap with active uses on the street. To encourage a walkable
district, parking should not be permitted between the building and the street.
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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Subarea Strategies


Appropriate building mass transitions are important adjacent to Cherry Creek East to
integrate development and reinvestment into the area. Maximum building heights will
range from 5 to 12 stories, with a 5-story edge along Alameda to respond to lower scale
residential on the north side of the street. This transition may be accomplished through
variations in building height, upper story setbacks or other mass and scale alternatives.
Adopt form-based and context-based zoning for Cherry CreekTriangle properties to
encourage predictable development patterns that reinforce the development quality of
Cherry CreekTriangle.
Support better regional connectivity. As described in the "A Connected Cherry Creek"
chapter, transit connections between Cherry Creekand downtown Denver, as well as to DIA,
and other locations are prioritized to keep Cherry Creek competitive within the region. Direct
and convenient transit links between Cherry CreekTriangle and the region are important to
this connectivity.
Create an identity for Cherry CreekTriangle.
Mid-rise, mixed-use building on a transit line
m Embrace Cherry CreekTriangle's prime location connecting the Cherry Creek Shopping
District and the City of Glendale along the Cherry Creek Greenway.
Improve placemaking. New infill development should improve the public realm including
improved streetscapes and urban public spaces as included in the Pedestrian Priority
Zone. Better placemaking will create an identity for Cherry CreekTriangle drawing both
residents and employees.
Create Partnerships. Establishing partnerships would give Cherry CreekTriangle
businesses, property owners and residents a common voice, a forum to discuss issues
and potentially a means to create a marketing and branding scheme for the area and
implement area improvements.
ALAMEDA AVE
Future land use map- Cherry Creek Triangle
Regional Center
Other subareas
Maximum building heights map Cherry Creek Triangle
12 Stories
8 Stories
5 Stories
Other subareas
Cherry Creek Area Plan | Subarea Strategies 77




Moving Forward
REALIZING THE VISION
Plan implementation takes place over many years and is the result of large and small actions
by the public sector and the private sector, sometimes in partnership. Plan recommendations
are intended to provide direction for the actions that are now seen as means to achieve the
plan vision. These recommendations are just that because the future will bring unforeseen
opportunities and challenges. A successful plan serves a guide to realize the vision for the
Cherry Creek Area.
Cherry Creek Area Plan | Moving Forward
79


IMPLEMENTATION ACTIVITIES
Blueprint Denver identifies three types of implementation activities: regulatory or policy,
public investment, and partnership. These activities focus on public sector actions, many of
which create a positive environment that enables actions by other groups, such as property
owners, developers, neighborhood organizations, districts or homeowners. These private
actions such as constructing new buildings and houses, opening new businesses, and
attracting new residents are the most critical elements to implementing the plan vision.
Regulatory and policy strategies change City codes or regulations to affect desired outcomes.
Typical examples include Denver Zoning Code text and map amendments. Public Works
requirements for infrastructure improvements associated with development projects, and
Parks and Recreation requirements regarding open space and plantings.
Regulatory or policy implementation priorities:
C-CCN Land Use Regulation
Revise the C-CCN zone district to better realize the plan goals for distinctiveness and
prosperous
Evaluate the Cherry Creek North Design Standards and Guidelines and modify if
necessary to supplement the plan goals and revised zoning
Cherry Creek East Design Standards and Guidelines
Review the Cherry Creek East Design Standards and Guidelines for clarity and
consistency with the plan goals
Adopt as rules and regulations through Community Planning and Development
Public investment strategies are those involving public funding of public infrastructure.
Examples include street reconstruction, bike lanes, new transit lines, park improvements, or
new or expanded recreation centers. The City takes the lead in designing, constructing, and
funding these projects and may use a variety of public funding sources such as the annual
Capital Improvements Program, bond funds, or state or federal grant programs.
In several cases, public transportation projects are identified as studies because the impacts
and consequences of a particular improvement on the transportation system is so complex
that the broader system must be examined to determine the feasible options to meet the
intent. In many cases, extensive study is needed to meet eligibility criteria to apply for federal
funding.
Public investment implementation priorities:
1 st Avenue/Speer priority transit corridor
Seek funding to initiate feasibility study for this regional corridor
Continue to seek funding for studies and preliminary design to obtain eligibility for
federal funding
Alameda Parkway design and construction
Initiate preliminary design
Identify potential funding sources such as General Obligation Bond and complete
necessary studies and cost estimates
Cherry Creek interests advocate for funding
Complete design and construction
80 Cherry Creek Area Plan | Moving Forward


1st Avenue (Steele to Colorado)
Initiate preliminary design
Identify potential funding sources such as the Capital Improvement Program and
budget and complete necessary studies and cost estimates
Cherry Creek interests advocate for funding
Complete design and construction
Bike connections to the Cherry Creek Greenway
Confirm connection types along Steele, 1st and University
Coordinate with Shopping Center for short and long-term bike and pedestrian
connections to the Cherry Creek Greenway and Cherry Creek North and East
Initiate connection on Garfield to the Greenway.
Partnership strategies represent the most diverse category. Public-private partnership (PPP)
activity has expanded exponentially and has gone well beyond public subsidy of a private
development project. Increasingly, public-private partnerships are being used to fund public
infrastructure projects. Denver Union Station and RTD's East and Gold lines are among
the largest PPP projects in the country. Another example is reconstruction of 14th Street
as the Ambassador Street using City Bond funds and a property-owner approved General
Improvement District.
Partnership implementation priorities
Citywide retail strategy
Shopping District organization
CHAMPIONS AND ADVOCATES
Once a plan is adopted as a supplement to the Comprehensive Plan, the City has direction to
implement the plan. Given the number of plans providing this direction, competing interests
in the city, and the budget issues at all levels of government, little plan implementation
is undertaken without champions for certain actions and advocates for the plan area.
Typically registered neighborhood organizations work with the mayor and their City Council
representatives to promote certain actions and outcomes. Membership organizations such
as merchant associations, business partnerships, and nonprofits do the same for business
areas. The Downtown Denver Partnership's focus on implementation of the Downtown Area
Plan both as part of their organizational work program and their advocacy with the City is one
example of a concerted effort at implementing a plan.
PUBLIC FUNDING SOURCES
Funding sources, especially for public investment and partnership actions, available to
public and private entities are continually evolving based on economic, political, legal and
neighborhood objectives. Though the names and purposes of funding sources change over
time, they fall into three distinct categories.
Tax Base Support. Tax base supported sources are characterized by the involvement of
the local sales and property taxing authorities. The most common tax base support is
through the City's annual budget, especially the annual Capital Improvements Program
(CIP). Periodically, the City requests its voters to approve a tax increase to pay for specific
public improvements. For instance, the citizens of Denver voted in 2007 to raise their
Cherry Creek Area Plan | Moving Forward 81


property taxes in a specific amount to support the issuance of over $500 million Better
Denver Bonds whose proceeds funded 290 specific public improvements.
Tax increment finance (TIF) is another means of tax-base support most typically
associated with an Urban Renewal Area. Once created by the City Council and Denver
Urban Renewal Authority (DURA), property and sales tax over and above the base year
are paid to DURA to fund eligible public improvements or financing gaps for private
development. To qualify for tax increment financing through urban renewal, an area
must meet certain criteria to establish "blight", as defined in state statute.
Grants. Grants come from public agencies that are interested in encouraging a specific
outcome and these grants typically include specific conditions and requirements as to
how the funds may be deployed. For instance, a state or federal transportation grant
will need to be used for street, mass transit, or regional mobility studies or projects.
The Office of Economic Development receives federal funds to support certain types of
housing projects. Additionally, foundations provide grants for projects aligned with the
organization's goals, such as green spaces, creative enterprises or social services.
Special Districts. The city charter and state statute enable various types of districts to be
created. Examples of special districts include business improvement districts (such as
the Cherry Creek North BID), metropolitan districts, local improvement or maintenance
districts, and general improvement districts. The districts are classified as special because
they are typically created by a localized group of citizens who want to achieve specific
outcomes in their locality and are willing to pool their economic resources in order to
implement identified projects. For example as in Cherry Creek North, if a majority of
business owners desire to improve the streetscape of the street in which they operate,
the businesses could organize a business improvement district which would assess the
participants an amount of money sufficient to pay for the project. Special districts are
a useful tool when a localized population desire and are willing to pay for an enhanced
level of public improvement. District revenues can be used to pay for improvements on
a "pay-as-you-go" basis, for ongoing operations and maintenance, or to support payment
of bonds. Special districts typically require a vote of the electorate within the area and
approval of Denver City Council.
PARTNERSHIPTOOLS
In addition to special districts, a variety of public-private partnerships or private organizations
will be instrumental in plan implementation. As states and communities reduce use of urban
renewal and tax increment finance for improvements, some of these other organizational
types will come into broader, more innovative use. Some examples of these organizations
include: community development corporations, membership organizations, nonprofits or
foundations, parking districts, and transportation management organizations. Quite a number
of these organizational types already exist in the Cherry Creek Area. Implementation of
the Cherry Creek Area Plan will call on these organizations and others to pursue a variety of
activities with existing and new funding sources and coordinated effort among them.
82
Cherry Creek Area Plan | Moving Forward


CHERRY CREEK AREA FRAMEWORK PLAN IMPLEMENTATION
RECOMMENDATION IMPLEMENTATION TYPE
A. A CONNECTED CHERRY CREEK
A.1 Connect to the Region
A.1 .A Improve bus service Partnership
A.1 .B Study priority transit corridors Public investment
A.1 .C Add person-trip capacity Public investment
A.1 .D Recognize priority transit corridors Public investment
A.2 A Walkable Cherry Creek
A.2.A Pedestrian priority zone Partnership
A.2.B Pedestrian priority intersections Partnership
A.2.C Sidewalk improvements Partnership
A.3 A Bikeable Cherry Creek
A.3.A Expand network and improve Greenway connections Public investment
A.3.B A more intuitive wayfinding system Public investment
A.3.C Bring back"The Bike Rack" Partnership
A.3.D Expand B-Cycle station locations Partnership
A.4 Multi-modal Streets
A.4.A Improve the Alameda Parkway Public investment
A.4.B Improve 1 st Avenue (Steele-Colorado) Public investment
A.4.C 1st and Steele intersection Public investment/Partnership
A.4.D Colorado Boulevard Public investment
B. A DISTINCTIVE CHERRY CREEK
B.1 Target Growth Appropriately
B.1.A Areas of Stability Regulatory
B.1 .B Areas of Change Regulatory
B.2 Enhance the Pedestrian Nature and Character
B.2.A Streetscape Partnership/Private investment
B.2.B Architecture Regulatory/Private investment
B.2.C Land use Regulatory
B.3 Concentrate Economic Activity
B.3.A Higher intensity building locations, multi-modal streets, etc Regulatory
B.3.B Moderate scale development in mixed-use areas of change Regulatory
B.3.C Appropriate transitions using design strategies Regulatory
B.3.D Prominent development at key vistas Regulatory/Private investment
B.4 Great Neighborhoods
B.4.A Respect the existing character of stable residential areas Regulatory
B.4.B Encourage the evolution of mixed-use neighborhoods Partnership/Private investment
B.4.C Investment and development in emerging neighborhoods Partnership/Private investment
Cherry Creek Area Plan | Moving Forward 83


C. A GREEN CHERRY CREEK
C.1 Cherry Creek Greenway
C.1.A Improve visual and physical access Public investment
C.1 .B New bike/ped bridges Public investment
C.1.C Parkways-University and Cherry Creek Drive North and South Public investment
C.2 Parks
C.2.A Pulaski Park Public investment/Private investment
C.2.B Burns Park Public investment
C.2.C Manley Park Public investment
C.3 Streets and Streetscapes
C.3.A CCN Festival Streets Partnership
C.3.B Fillmore Plaza Partnership
C.3.C Streetscapes and pedestrian amenities Partnership
C.4.D Privately owned public space Private investment
D. A PROSPEROUS CHERRY CREEK
D.1 Economic Vitality
D.1.A Synergistic mix of uses Private investment
D.1.B More housing Private investment
D.1.C Importance of visitors Private investment
D.1.D Walkability equals prosperity Partnership
D.1 .E Creating community Partnership
D.2 Reinvesting in the Future
D.2.A Local character/national prominence Private investment
D.2.B Development opportunities Private investment
D.2.C High quality development Regulatory/Private investment
D.2.D Multi-modal streets Public investment
D.2.E Locational advantage and access Private investment
D.2.F Stormwater improvements Public investment
D.3 Organization and Identity
D.3.A Shopping District organization Partnership
D.3.B Perimeter street gateways Private investment
D.3.C Citywide retail strategy Partnership
84 Cherry Creek Area Plan | Moving Forward


Glossary
Access -The ability to reach desired goods,
services and activities. Access also refers to
the ability to get into and out of a particular
piece of property. See "mobility".
Alley Narrow access ways mid-block, at the
rear of residential and business properties.
Alternative Transportation Travel by
means other than a car. Light rail, commuter
rail, bus, bicycling and walking are often
grouped together under this heading. Also
referred to as "active transportation".
Area of Change Locations where
Denver intends to direct residential and
employment growth taking advantage
of existing and planned transitand
infrastructure.
Area of Stability Locations that represent
an established character to enhance as
reinvestment and redevelopment occur.
Arterial Major roadway designed to
provide a high degree of mobility and serve
longer vehicle trips to, from, and within
major activity centers in Denver and the
region.
Bicycle Facilities and Amenities Includes
bike routes, lanes and paths which are
interconnected, safe and attractive; bike
parking and storage (racks & lockers).These
efforts are further defined by Denver Moves.
Bike Station Attended bike-transit centers
that offer secure, covered, valet bicycle
parking and other amenities.
Blueprint Denver Denver's citywide land
use and transportation plan adopted in
2002. This plan defines areas of change and
stability.
Bulb Out See curb extension.
Bus Circulator or Shuttle Bus A bus
providing more localized bus service for
a specific area such as a transit station,
shopping area, employment center, the
Downtown area, or other activity center.
Bus Rapid Transit Buses using and
occupying a separate right-of-way for
the exclusive use of public transportation
service.
Capital Improvement Program -
Scheduled infrastructure improvements as
part of a city budget.
Collector A roadway that collects and
distributes local traffic to and from arterial
streets, and provides access to adjacent
properties.
Complete Streets The practice to promote
safe and convenient access for all users
along and across travelways.
Comprehensive Plan 2000-The Denver
Comprehensive Plan 2000.
Curb Extension An area where the
sidewalkand curb are extended into
the parking lane, resulting in a narrower
roadway, usually to shorten pedestrian
crossing distance. (Often referred to as a
"bulbout"or"neckdown")
Density also referred to as intensity. The
quantity of development as measured by
dwelling units or square feet on a certain
amount of land.
DRCOG Denver Regional Council of
Governments.The Metropolitan Planning
Organization for the Denver region.
Floor Area Ratio (FAR) The ratio of the
gross floor area ofa building to the area of
the land on which it rests.
Frontage-The part ofa lot that touches a
street.
Geographic Information System (GIS) -
Computer generated maps based on data
such as land use or population.
Green Streets Streets with additional
landscaping, often linking parks. Defined in
the Parks Game Plan.
Infill Development Development on
vacant properties in developed areas.
Infrastructure Public improvements such
as roads and traffic signals, sidewalks and
bicycle paths, parks, water and sewer lines,
power and telecommunication lines.
Landmark Streets Streets, typically
historic parkways, designated as landmarks
under Chapter 30, RMC.
Cherry Creek Area Plan | Glossary 85


Land Use Regulation -The collection of
City laws, codes, and design guidelines
used to evaluate proposals for private
development.
Light Rail A rail system with vehicles
operating on a fixed track and powered by
an overhead electric power source.
Living Streets A collaborative approach to
re-imagining the design of street rights-of-
way to accommodate a variety of modes
including pedestrians, transit, bicycles and
vehicles.
Local Street A neighborhood or minor
street that provides access to adjacent
properties only. Mobility on local streets is
typically incidental and involves relatively
short trips at lower speeds to and from
collector streets.
Medians A linear strip of island in the
center of a street often planted with trees,
bushes and other landscaping.
Metro Vision DRCOG's long-range growth
strategy for the Denver region. Metro Vision
is updated every five years. The current plan
is Metro Vision 2035 and 2040 is underway.
Mixed-Use Development Mixes of
residential, commercial and office space
within the same buildings and districts.
Mobility-The ability to move from one
place to another, or movement of people
and goods from one place to another. See
"access".
Multi-Modal Streets Streets that
accommodate multiple modes of travel
including rapid transit (bus and rail options),
bicycles, pedestrians, and vehicles.
Off-Street Parking Parking that is
provided outside of the right-of-way of a
public street, typically in a surface parking
lot or parking structure.
On-Street Parking Parking that is
provided within the right-of-way of a public
street, typically in designated parallel
or diagonally striped spaces adjacent to
moving traffic lanes.
Parking Management A tool to address
localized parking issues, e.g. Colorado Health
Center District, Old South Gaylord area.
Commons Neighborhood in the Platte Valley.
Parking Ratio A ratio expressing the
number of parking spaces per dwelling unit,
or per certain amounts of square footage of
commercial space (office or retail space).
Pedestrian-Friendly Street design that
facilitates safe, comfortable and attractive
pedestrian travel.
Pedestrian Realm Sidewalks, pedestrian
signals, crosswalks, benches and other
amenities designed to improve the
pedestrian friendly nature of both the
mixed-use and residential areas.
Person Trips An estimate of the total
number of people moving along a corridor
in a variety of transportation modes.
Estimate is derived from travel behavior data
collected by DRCOG.
Planned Unit Development (PUD) -
Specific zoning for a specific parcel of land.
Priority Transit Frequent, convenient,
high quality transit serving both the local
and regional needs of the transit system
connecting Cherry Creek to Downtown, DIA
and other important regional locations.
Public-Private Partnership An agreement
between a public agency (federal, state or
local) and a private sector entity through
which the skills and assets of each sector are
shared in delivering a service or facility for
the use of the general public.
Regional Transportation District (RTD) -
The regional public transportation agency
for the Denver metro area.
Scale -The relative proportion of the size of
different elements of the built environment
to one another; the measurement of the
relationship of one object to another.
Setback-The distance a building is set back
from the property line.
Shared Parking Combining parking
spaces for different uses that require peak
parking at different times of the day.
Special Improvement Districts -
Organizational and financing mechanisms
authorized in State Statute and City Charter
involving special tax assessments and fees
to build, operate, and/or maintain public
infrastructure. Examples include Business,
General and Local Improvement Districts.
Streetscaping Physical amenities added
to the roadway and intersections, including
lighting, trees, landscaping, art, surface
textures and colors and street furniture.
86 Cherry Creek Area Plan | Glossary


Stormwater Improvements Facilities to
control surface runoff from precipitation;
alleys, curbs and gutters, and intersection
drainage ("cross-pans"), in addition to
underground pipes are components of the
system.
Structured Parking Parking that is
provided in a structure, either above or
below grade, as opposed to surface parking.
Sustainability-The long-term social,
economic and environmental health of a
community. A sustainable city survives
today without compromising the ability of
future generations to meet their needs.
Traffic Calming Methods used to reduce
vehicular speed and volume, and increase
the sharing of streets by pedestrians and
other users.
Traffic Management Includes various
"traffic calming" strategies to address
pedestrian safety, traffic speed and cut-
through traffic in neighborhoods.
Transit Public transportation by bus, rail,
or other conveyance.
Tree Lawn -The strip of land, usually
vegetated, between the sidewalk and street.
Urban Design Involves the social,
economic, functional, environmental, and
aesthetic objectives that result in the plan or
structure of a city, in whole or in part.
Zoning Basic means of land use control
used by local governments. It divides
the community into districts (zones) and
imposes different land use controls on each
district, specifying the allowed uses of land
and buildings, the intensity or density of
such uses, and the bulk of buildings on the
land.
Zoning Code -The compilation of land
use regulations for the City. It includes
definitions and land use, and building size
and location requirements by zone district.
Cherry Creek Area Plan | Glossary 87


Full Text

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2012 CHERRY CREEK AREA PLAN Adopted July 16, 2012

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Acknowledgements MAYOR MICHAEL B. HANCOCKDENVER CITY COUNCIL District 1 Susan Shepherd District 2 Jeanne Faatz District 3 Paul D. Lopez District 4 Peggy Lehmann District 5 Mary Beth Susman District 6 Charlie Brown District 7 Chris Nevitt (President) District 8 Albus Brooks District 9 Judy Montero District 10 Jeanne Robb District 11 Christopher Herndon AtLargeRobin Kniech At-Large Deborah Ortega DENVER PLANNING BOARD Brad Buchanan, Chairman Laura Aldrete Andy Baldyga Shannon Giord Kenneth Ho Anna Jones Brittany Morris Saunders Sharon Nunnally K.C. Veio Dave Webster COMMUNITY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT Molly Urbina, Interim Manager Steve Gordon, Planning Services Manager Ellen Ittelson Chris Gleissner Barbara Frommell Steve Nalley Todd Wenskoski Caryn Wenzara Tim Watkins Andrea Santoro Carolyne Janssen Andrea Burns PUBLIC WORKS Jose Cornejo, Manager Crissy Fanganello, Policy and Planning Director Brian Mitchell, Trac Engineering Services Director Karen Good Cindy Patton Emily Snyder Justin Schmitz Mike Anderson PARKS AND RECREATION Laura Dannemiller, Manager Gordon Robertson, Parks Director David Marquardt, Parks Planning Manager Mark Upshaw CONSULTANT SUPPORT KHO Consulting Fehr and Peers

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Table of ContentsINTRODUCTION ......................................................................................................................1 Planning Process ................................................................................................................................................2 Planning Context ...............................................................................................................................................4 How to Use this Plan .........................................................................................................................................5 FRAMEWORK PLAN ................................................................................................................7 Accomplishments, Challenges, Opportunities........................................................................................8 A. A Connected Cherry Creek .....................................................................................................................12 B. A Distinctive Cherry Creek ......................................................................................................................26 C. A Green Cherry Creek ..............................................................................................................................36 D. A Prosperous Cherry Creek .....................................................................................................................44 SUBAREA STRATEGIES .........................................................................................................55 Cherry Creek Shopping District .................................................................................................................56 Cherry Creek North Neighborhood ........................................................................................................64 Cherry Creek East ............................................................................................................................................70 Cherry Creek Triangle .....................................................................................................................................74 MOVING FORWARD ..............................................................................................................79 GLOSSAR Y..............................................................................................................................85 REFERENCE APPENDICES* Cherry Creek North Urban Form Study Cherry Creek Shopping District Development Study*Reference appendices are intended to provide direction for future implementation actions. As such, they will provide important guidance, but are not adopted as part of the Cherry Creek Area Plan.

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Introduction iv 1933 Aerial Imagery

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Introduction 1 IntroductionCherry Creek has a strong history of planning and implementing plans. Cherry Creeks original Neighborhood Plan was adopted in 1976. Updates in 1986 and 2000 have largely focused on growth in the area and nding balance between commercial and residential land uses. Recommendations from these plans have guided decision making regarding land use and mobility as Cherry Creek matured into the regions premier mixed-use shopping district and upscale urban neighborhood. Most themes from previous planning eorts remain important in this 2012 Cherry Creek Area Plan enhancing the character of existing neighborhoods, encouraging a greater mix of land uses, enhancing the economic prosperity of mixed-use areas, creating a pedestrianfriendly environment, improving the public realm, and creating a high degree of multi-modal connectivity. The interdependent nature of retail, oce and residential uses within Cherry Creek and the important role Cherry Creek plays in Denvers economy are also themes that are still very relevant in this plan update. Some themes are emphasized in this plan due to changing conditions Narrowing the target areas for growth within Cherry Creek, highlighting better transit connections as a way to grow sustainably and ensure prosperity, promoting predictable development patterns and creating better partnerships for success. These are the big ideas that will carry Cherry Creek forward to 2030. Cherry Creek Downtown DIA

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Introduction 2 Planning ProcessThe public process for the Cherry Creek Area Plan (CCAP) kicked o in January, 2010. Over the course of the following two years, community members and city sta collaborated to articulate opportunities and challenges and develop a vision for the next twenty years. Denvers Community Planning and Development Department, Public Works Department, Department of Parks and Recreation and dedicated Cherry Creek stakeholders provided technical expertise for the planning eort. Regular meetings with the Cherry Creek Steering Committee (CCSC) and the Area Plan Leadership Team (Leadership Team), and public stakeholder meetings helped guide the process and the content of the Area Plan. PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT PROCESSA multi-tiered strategy for involving stakeholders ensured that all perspectives were considered throughout the planning process. Public input informed the identication of key issues as well as concepts and plan recommendations for addressing the key issues. Denver City Council City Councilmember Jeanne Robb (District 10) was a member of the Area Plan Leadership Team and provided critical guidance regarding the planning process. City sta gave 2 presentations to the Land Use, Transportation and Infrastructure (LUTI) Committee. A City Council public hearing and vote will culminate the planning process. Denver Planning Board The City sta briefed Planning Board on three separate occasions regarding the Cherry Creek Area Plan. After a public hearing, Planning Board will be responsible for approving the Area Plan and recommending it to City Council. Area Plan Leadership Team Made up of Cherry Creek leaders representing business, residential, retail and development interests, this small group was tasked with keeping the planning process moving forward. Cherry Creek Steering Committee A group of 25 individuals representing business, residential, retail and development interests as well as several RNOs, the CCSC has been in existence since the 1980s. The CCSCs mission includes leadership in developing the contents and process of the plan and advocating for its approval and subsequent implementation. Focus Groups A series of intensive focus group meetings were held in July 2011 to review Area Plan concepts through the lenses of (1.)Urban Form and Public Realm, (2.) Mobility and Connections, and (3.)Economic and Development Opportunities. Over 50 people (representing business owners, residents and property owners) participated in these focus group meetings. A series of three focus group meetings were held in July 2011 to review draft plan concepts. Walking tours helped familiarize plan stakeholders with issues in each subarea.

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Introduction 3 Working Groups Several working groups were established throughout the planning process to focus on particular issues, as the need arose. Topic-specic meetings included: Fillmore Plaza working group and public meetings (dozens of public and neighborhood meetings), Cherry Creek North building form working group, a mobility workshop and two Cherry Creek Triangle workshops. Informal groups of stakeholders met throughout the process to discuss various issues. Neighborhood Organizations City sta attended neighborhood organization meetings upon request. Meetings included: Cherry Creek East Neighborhood Association (4 meetings), Cherry Creek North Neighborhood Association (3 meetings), Country Club (2 meetings), Capitol Hill United Neighbors (CHUN) Zoning Committee (2 meetings), Cherry Creek North Business Improvement District Board of Directors (5 meetings). General Public Public Meetings Two public meetings were held, one in July 2010 (attended by 75 people) to kick o the plan and the other in April 2012 (attended by 135 people) to present the plan draft. Online surveys Online surveys were utilized to gain an understanding of key issues in the area. Approximately 1,000 people responded to three separate online surveysone survey focused on mobility and use of Fillmore Plaza in the Shopping District, and another focused on long-term vision for Cherry Creek. A third online survey was utilized to gather input regarding draft plan recommendations. Individual correspondence City Planning Sta from various departments were available throughout the process to discuss the plan by e-mail, phone or for face-toface meetings upon request by any plan stakeholder. Plan Website A plan website was established at the beginning of the planning process and utilized to provide updates and important plan resources as information to the general public. Overall, an estimated 1000 people participated in the planning process. It is their ideas, enthusiasm, commitment and love of Cherry Creek that have contributed so much to the plan. Plan stakeholders played the Right-of-Way Game to better understand tradeos of accommodating various transportation modes on 1st Avenue. Cherry Creek residents, property owners and business owners discussing economic development opportunities.

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Introduction 4 Planning ContextThe Cherry Creek Area has changed dramatically over the past decades, and as a result, its planning history and context are richer than other parts of the City. The Denver Comprehensive Plan provides the vision for the entire city. Citywide and small area plans are adopted as supplements to the Comprehensive Plan to provide additional direction for a certain topic or area. It is important to note that each of the Cherry Creek Plans superseded the previous plan, as will be the case with the 2012 Cherry Creek Area Plan superseding the 2000 Cherry Creek Neighborhood Plan. Cherry Creek Plans: Cherry Creek Neighborhood Plan (1976) Cherry Creek Neighborhood Plan (1986) Cherry Creek Neighborhood Plan (2000) Denver Comprehensive Plan and Supplements The Denver Comprehensive Plan is established in the Denver City Charter and Revised Municipal Code to provide an expression of the citys vision for the future with a listing of goals and objectives. Once prepared and adopted, the plan will guide and inuence decisions that aect the future of the city. The Comprehensive Plan and its supplements are adopted by City Council ordinance based on a recommendation of approval from the Denver Planning Board. Planning Boards criteria for approval of supplements are: a long term view, inclusive public process, and consistency with the Denver Comprehensive Plan. The following is a list of applicable plans: Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000 Cherry Creek Greenway Master Plan (2000) Bicycle Master Plan (2001) Blueprint Denver: an Integrated Land Use and Transportation Plan (2002) Denver Parks and Recreation Game Plan (2002) Pedestrian Master Plan (2004) Implementation Plans City agencies prepare implementation plans to guide their policies and work programs. Although these plans are not adopted as supplements to the Comprehensive Plan, they provide important guidance to the City and its agencies for implementing the Comprehensive Plan and its supplements. Cherry Creek Greenway Master Plan-Reach 1 Plan Update (2003) Greenprint Denver (2006) Strategic Transportation Plan (2008) Denver Neighborhood Market Plan Initiative for Cherry Creek Shopping District (2009) Storm Drainage Master Plan (2009) Sanitary Sewer Master Plan (2009) Strategic Parking Plan (2010) Denver Moves (2011)

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Introduction 5 How to Use this PlanThis Plan establishes a long range vision and guiding principles for the development and future of the Cherry Creek area. The elements of this Plan will direct the community toward a vision for a connected, distinctive, green and prosperous Cherry Creek. Public agencies and private entities will use this Plan in coming years for many purposes and actions that will aect the form and function of Cherry Creek. The Plan provides cityadopted policy direction to guide decision-making related to development opportunities, transportation, partnerships, and many others. Many of the recommendations will require multiple steps over several years by a variety of participants. The plan provides a sound policy basis for a thriving Cherry Creek Area. The recommendations identied in the plan provide enough direction to guide day-to-day decision making related to land use, public investment, private development, and partnerships. The plan is intended to give the latitude needed to pursue unforeseen opportunities that will arise and to respond to new challenges over the coming years. The plan is divided into three sections in addition to this introduction: The Framework Plan provides content that applies to the entire plan area and provides the background to support the recommendations for a Connected, Distinctive, Green and Prosperous Cherry Creek. Some of the recommendations are highlighted as transformative meaning that the Cherry Creek community has identied these as being essential to achieving the plan vision over the next 10 to 20 years. Each of the four subareas, the Shopping District, Cherry Creek North Neighborhood, Cherry Creek East, and Cherry Creek Triangle, is described in greater detail and has specic recommendations, as well as references to applicable framework recommendations. The nal section describes plan implementation in terms of the types of implementation and priorities for plan implementation. This chapter also highlights the multiple steps that may be necessary to work toward implementation of the transformative recommendations. As with the Comprehensive Plan and its supplements, plan recommendations provide guidance. Future implementation actions such as zoning map or text amendments, capital improvements and public-private partnerships require specic actions on the part of the city.

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan 6

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan 7 Framework PlanThe Cherry Creek Area at its core is a successful mixed-use district surrounded by a collection of residential neighborhoods that each have their own unique quality and characteristics. The Framework Plan presents issues and recommendations relevant throughout the entire Cherry Creek Area. This framework treats Cherry Creek as a whole. It focuses on recommendations that tie individual districts within Cherry Creek together and on recommendations that tie the Cherry Creek Area to the city and to the region. The Framework Plan summarizes the key issues identied in the planning process that need to be addressed in the area. These key issues are presented as Accomplishments, Challenges and Opportunities. The Vision and Vision Elements for the Cherry Creek Area included in this Framework Plan provide a framework for implementation. The success of Cherry Creek requires that the individual districts and neighborhoods within the area work together with the city toward a common vision. The vision and recommendations within this Framework Plan serve as a guide for that collaboration over the coming decades.

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan 8 Accomplishments, Challenges, OpportunitiesACCOMPLISHMENTS Over $170 million in private investment in the last decade solidies Cherry Creeks role as a major economic generator for the City of Denver. Improvements have resulted in new housing stock, high quality mixed-use inll development, streetscape improvements and a greater mix of land uses, much of which directly implemented recommendations in the 2000 Cherry Creek Neighborhood Plan. Successful public-private partnerships and investments have led the way toward a new Cherry Creek Northwith enhanced streetscapes, branding, intuitive waynding, and smart parking meters. Together these eorts improve the districts identity, cohesiveness, and pedestrian experience. The Cherry Creek Shopping District continues to boast the highest concentration of highend retail in the region, the highest concentration of local independent retailers in the City and County of Denver and is touted as the #1 retail destination in the metro area. The newly-renovated Cherry Creek Denver Public Library and a new playground at Pulaski Park (both Better Denver Bond projects) celebrate the citys dedication to enhancing and supporting neighborhood amenities that contribute to the Cherry Creeks strength and diversity. The Denver Zoning Code was updated in 2010 to a new formand context-based format replacing the outdated 1950s code that addressed many long standing zoning issues. Portions of the Cherry Creek North and East neighborhoods were rezoned to new formbased zone districts.CHALLENGES Cherry Creeks popularity as a destination and its position on a major travel shed mean that transportation infrastructure must continue to seek an eective balance between dierent modes in order to address existing and anticipated demand. Transportation decisions for the area have implications on quality of life and economic development as well as local and regional mobility. Pedestrian and bicycle connectivity along and across Cherry Creeks roadways represents an important component of increased multi-modal options in Cherry Creek. Particular attention should be given to improve connections across major arterials and to and from the Cherry Creek Greenway. Cherry Creek retail must be supported and encouraged to nd ways to stay successful and competitive, given the changing nature of the retail environment and the growing number of shopping districts throughout the region oering the pedestrian-oriented, mixed-use shopping and lifestyle experience. With national attention on Denver for its unparalleled rail-transit expansion, it is important to strengthen priority transit connections to Downtown, Denver International Airport and the regional rail network to support both increased levels of mobility and economic development. Dedicated parkways within the study area can be improved to better accommodate multi-modal movements and contribute to the look, feel or functionality of a parkway. The east side of Harrison Street and the north side of Alameda have seen little reinvestment. Cherry Creek is the premier retail destination in the region. Alameda Avenue does not currently function as a Parkway Open Spaces within Cherry Creek provide activities for all ages.

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan 9 Several public spaces are underutilized for a variety of reasons. These include Burns Park, Pulaski Park and the north side plaza of the Cherry Creek Greenway. Drainage issues in Cherry Creek North and Cherry Creek East can lead to ooding or ponding during signicant storm events. Denver completed a Cherry Creek Study and identied stormwater improvements for implementation that will address these conditions. Although Cherry Creek is accessed along multiple streets, additional signature gateways would better announce entry into the Cherry Creek Area. Currently, locations that should include signature gateways are dominated by surface parking, vacant lots, and generally areas in need of reinvestment. OPPORTUNITIES Locational advantage Cherry Creek is three miles from Downtown, well-connected by regional multi-modal transportation routes, a connected street grid, and the Cherry Creek Greenway. Cherry Creek is also adjacent to the small but densely-populated City of Glendale. The 90,000 multi-modal person trips per day along the 1st Avenue/Steele/ Alameda route help to support the local Cherry Creek economy. Cherry Creek and surrounding established neighborhoods are some of the most desirable residential areas in Denver. The Cherry Creek Shopping District attempts to balance its identities and land uses as a unique, local, pedestrian shopping experience and an upscale retail destination of national appeal. Cherry Creek oers a wide range of oce types and employment opportunities, resulting in over 14,500 jobs. A wide array of development opportunities exist ranging from small residential inll to large underdeveloped parcels with outdated buildings or with interim uses as surface parking lots. High bus ridership and trac volumes suggest an opportunity to consider improved transit service to and through Cherry Creek. Future improved transit expansion between Downtown, Cherry Creek, Lowry and Aurora has been identied in DRCOGs MetroVision 2035 Regional Plan. Residents, business owners, and property owners are committed to ensuring a high quality of life within a growing mixed-use area and oer high levels of expertise and resources. Opportunities exist to enhance and rene existing partnerships and consider new ones. The Cherry Creek Area is committed to the enhancement of arts and culture and supports local events that build community and create a sense of vibrancy. The Cherry Creek Greenway is a unique asset with tremendous educational, environmental and recreational benets. Continued investment in amenities such as the Denver Public Library contribute to Cherry Creeks strength, diversity and desirability. Cherry Creek oers a diverse set of housing choices creating a unique character and identity. The Cherry Creek Greenway

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan 10 A.1 Connect to the Region A.3 A Bikeable Cherry Creek A.2 A Walkable Cherry Creek A.4 Multi-modal Streets The Vision for Cherry Creek TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECTS These six transformative projects will act as catalysts toward achieving the vision for the Cherry Creek Area. All are long-term and will require multiple steps by the public and private sectors. All require concerted eort on the part of the City, community, and key stakeholders.A. A Connected Cherry CreekMobility and Connectivity A.1 Connect to the Region A.2 A Walkable Cherry Creek Expand transit connections to key destinations Downtown, Denver Union Station, Denver International Airport, and the RTD rail system Unsurpassed pedestrian experience for all everywhere A thriving Cherry Creek for the 21st Century: connected, distinctive, green, and prosperous. The Cherry Creek Area Plan builds on the areas established and emerging assets. A unique combination of the Cherry Creek Shopping Center, an outdoor shopping district and great neighborhoods A growing variety of people who live, work and shop in the area Strong local and regional amenities Unique connections to the Cherry Creek Greenwaywild below, urban above Exceptional pedestrian experience Great regional and national image and signature identity for Denver Centrally locatedaccessible from throughout the region High Quality building and streetscape design Compact live, work, and play community

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan 11B. A Distinctive Cherry CreekLand Use and Urban DesignC. A Green Cherry CreekSignature Parks and Public SpacesD. A Prosperous Cherry CreekEconomic and Development Opportunities B.1 Target Growth Appropriately B.3 Concentrate Economic Activity B.2 Enhance the Pedestrian Nature & Character B.4 Great Neighborhoods D.1 Economic Vitality D.3 Organization and identity D.2 Reinvesting in the Future C.1 Cherry Creek Greenway C.3 Streets and Streetscapes C.2 Parks B.1 Target Growth Appropriately D.1 Economic Vitality C.1 Cherry Creek Greenway D.2 Reinvesting in the Future Promote appropriate reinvestment in Areas of Change Provide visual and physical connections to the Greenway to celebrate the proximity of the urban edge with the wild creek Reinforce the attractiveness of Cherry Creek for residents, shoppers, employees, businesses and visitors Encourage public investment in streets and infrastructure and modify public policies to encourage appropriate private investment

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan 12 A. A Connected Cherry CreekWHY IS THIS IMPORTANT TO CHERRY CREEK?Cherry Creeks economic prosperity and high quality of life rely in part on a well-connected and multi-modal transportation system. Cherry Creeks location on one of Denvers main travel sheds, the Speer/1st Avenue/ Leetsdale corridor, provides a direct route through the heart of Cherry Creek into central Denver. Building on the existing strengths of Cherry Creek as a very walkable and livable community and providing a world class experience for every resident, employee and visitor of Cherry Creek requires a comprehensive transportation strategy that promotes walking, biking and access to high quality transit service as well as its street connections. Cherry Creeks ability to stay competitive and reach the global marketplace will rely heavily on its ability to connect locally and regionally including Downtown, Denver International Airport and other urban centers throughout the region. This mobility and connectivity framework articulates an overall strategy for keeping Cherry Creek livable and prosperous by balancing the dierent transportation modes within the Cherry Creek Area. Regardless of the mode chosen, the goal is for those who live, work, or play in Cherry Creek to continue to navigate safely, eciently and reliably to and from the area. KEY ISSUESAccommodating the growing number of person trips along the travel shed Home to two of the most signicant destinations and sales tax generators in the Denver region the Cherry Creek Shopping Center and the Cherry Creek North business districtthe area attracts an estimated 15,000 employees per day and 1.3 million visitors per month. The Speer/1st Avenue/Leetsdale travel shed runs through the heart of Cherry Creek. It is one of the regions highest-volume transportation facilities and one of the only continuous east-west facilities that links suburbs as far away as Parker through southeast Aurora, southeast Denver and central Denver to Downtown. Demand for the travel shed is also expected to grow. Currently estimated at 90,000 multi-modal person trips per day along 1st Avenue between University Boulevard and Steele, the DRCOG travel demand forecasting model estimates that multi-modal trips originating or destined for this travel shed will increase 15% by 2030. Vehicle hours of delay in the travel shed are forecasted to increase by more than 70% between 2015 and 2030. Available data indicates that trac increases over several decades were gradual and generally related to regional growth not to any one development within the Cherry Creek Area. In addition, vehicular trips on 1st Avenue in Cherry Creek at peak hours are split fairly evenly between through and local trips, with 47% of trips moving through the area, 52% starting or nishing in the area and 1% starting and nishing in the area. Bus route 83L is the only daily transit connection between Cherry Creek and Downtown (Civic Center Station), with service every 30 minutes for 18 continuous hours during the weekdays and weekends. High bus ridership coupled with trac volumes and the economic signicance of destinations within Cherry Creek suggest an opportunity for improved transit service, especially to connect downtown destinations with Cherry Creek. As Cherry Creek seeks to remain competitive in the region, the lack of an priority transit connection between Cherry Creek, the downtown core including the Convention Center and Denver Union Station, Denver International Airport, and other established and emerging urban centers could present a challenge. Walkability along and across high volume arterial streets A traditional street grid and many examples of enhanced streetscapes make Cherry Creek 1st Avenue is Cherry Creeks spine and acts as the areas primary connection with downtown Denver. A.1 Connect to the Region A.3 A Bikeable Cherry Creek A.2 A Walkable Cherry Creek A.4 Multi-modal StreetsRECOMMENDATIONS AND TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECTS:

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan 13one of Denvers most walkable areas. The Cherry Creek North Business Improvement District recently invested $18.5 million in streetscape improvements for their outdoor shopping, restaurant, and entertainment area. Higher volume, arterial streets in and adjacent to Cherry Creek can seem like barriers to pedestrians. However, opportunities exist on these streets and with private property to improve walkability through enhanced pedestrian amenities and streetscape elements as appropriate. In addition, 1st Avenue and Alameda Avenue at Colorado Boulevard are key gateways into Cherry Creek. These locations show particular opportunity for improvements to the pedestrian realm that can both improve a pedestrians experience and better balance multi-modal needs through the integration of land use and transportation. Some key intersections along arterial streets may merit special pedestrian consideration based on complete streets and living streets policies. Example locations include the intersection of Cherry Creek North Drive and Alameda and several intersections along Steele Street (1st Avenue, Ellsworth and Bayaud) that provide important connections for Cherry Creek residents, employees, and visitors. The west and east ends of the Shopping Center and areas within the Cherry Creek Triangle can also seem challenging to pedestrians due to larger block sizes, surface parking lots, and more inconsistent streetscape enhancements. A more complete and intuitive bicycle network Cherry Creek is adjacent to the Cherry Creek Greenway, a highly utilized regional bicycle facility and multi-use trail that connects Downtown with southeast Denver. Connections and accessibility between the Cherry Creek Shopping District, adjacent neighborhoods and the Greenway are in need of physical improvements and better signage. Improved bicycle connections along and across arterial streets linking destinations, open space, and other regional routes are also needed. Enhanced streetscapes in Cherry Creek North include special pavers, park benches, pedestrian lighting, short crossing distances, landscaping and planters. Intersection enhancements in some Cherry Creek locations, such as Steele and Ellsworth, should consider high concentrations of elderly residents living nearby. Tree lined and landscaped residential streets in Cherry Creek neighborhoods create a walkable and highly desirable place to live. RTDs regional rail network does not provide service to east central Denver neighborhoods

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan 14A.1.A IMPROVE BUS SERVICEAdvocate for improved bus transit service that directly links Cherry Creek to the downtown core including Denver Union Station and the Colorado Convention Center. Service characteristics should include the following: More frequent service with headways of 15 minutes or less on weekdays and weekends. Consider providing fast, express style service with key stops such at locations such as the Colorado Convention Center, the Denver Performing Arts Center, Lower Downtown, Civic Center Station and Union Station. Explore the possibility of a customized shuttle or bus vehicle with marketable or brandable identity specic to Cherry Creek and Downtown. Capitalize on the convergence of other important transit routes on the boundaries of the study area including route 40 (Colorado) and route 24 (University). Consider ways to make the transfer experience between buses more ecient, convenient and comfortable and explore the opportunities to link transfer stops with nearby land uses. A.1.B CONDUCT STUDY OF PRIORITY TRANSIT CORRIDORSFurther study is needed to determine the feasibility for priority transit service along identied corridors. Further study would also serve to test a similar concept presented in DRCOGs MetroVision 2035 Vision Plan, which shows an intercity rail service connecting Downtown, Cherry Creek, Lowry and points east. The appropriate type of study must be conducted in order to align with federal funding requirements. Following through on one of the 2008 Denver Strategic Transportation Plan recommendations for the Speer/1st Avenue/Leetsdale Travel shed, a Planning Environmental Linkage Study (PEL) will consider potential impacts from the projected increases in trips along the roadway network and will identify needs and alternatives for accommodating this additional persontrip demand. The (PEL) will focus on multi-modal strategies using an approach that seeks to incorporate environmental, economic, and community values into transportation decisions so that those values are carried forward through project development and implementation. A PEL is an important step to complete in order to understand needs and compete for federal funding that can help make transportation improvements, such as priority transit, in the travel shed a reality.A.1.C ADD PERSONTRIP CAPACITYIn 2008, Denvers Strategic Transportation Plan (STP) set a new standard for how to accommodate the growing number of person trips within the city. With the direction of the STPs philosophy, the goal is to accommodate trips both to and through Cherry Creek by expanding multi-modal choices without expanding existing right-of-way. Strengthening and adding multi-modal transportation options will add capacity to help address growing person trip numbers through possibilities discussed during the Area Plan Process including xed guideway, streetcar, light rail, bus rapid transit and better bus service. A set of transit service goals important to the Cherry Creek Area was identied by plan participants. These characteristics, listed at the bottom of this page, should be considered as future conversations and studies regarding priority transit service in Cherry Creek continue. TRANSIT SERVICE GOALS FOR PRIORITY TRANSIT CORRIDORS Increased Trip Capacity Increase convenience and reliability of transit service Increase connections with regional transportation networks (bus, light rail, bicycle, auto) Frequent stop spacing, coordinated with key origins/ destinations Frequent headways Avoid right-of-way expansion Increased Prosperity Promote vitality and higher density development in Areas of Change Direct and convenient service to/ from Downtown, DIA, and the regional rail network Aesthetically Pleasing Low noise High air quality Comfortable, modern transit vehicles Inviting streetscape Low impact on adjacent neighborhoods Attractive stations and stops Safe, Accessible, Inviting ADA accessible Serve transit dependent riders Appeals to and increases choice ridership Streetscape amenities to promote pedestrian safety and comfort Low Environmental Impact Low carbon emissions Low energy use RECOMMENDATION A.1 CONNECT TO THE REGION

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan 15 WHO SHOULD TRANSIT SERVE IN CHERRY CREEK? The transit system must be designed to serve: People of all ages and abilities Employees Residents National and international tourists Hotel guests in Cherry Creek Everyday shoppers / customers Business travelers Commuters Downtown hotel guests and conventioneersA.1.D RECOGNIZE PRIORITY TRANSIT CORRIDORSEstablishing a direct connection between Cherry Creek and Union Station is a top priority in Cherry Creeks pursuit of improved connections to the region since Union Station is the primary hub for regional transit service and the FasTracks system. Improved direct connections to xed rail lines such as RTDs East and Southeast Lines is also an important step for Cherry Creeks regional connectivity. For this reason, 1st Avenue/Steele/Alameda and Colorado Boulevard are identied in this plan as priority routes for enhanced transit service. Signicant additional study of these priority transit corridors is needed to determine feasibility, alternative modes and routes, funding opportunities and phasing. RTD buses provide Cherry Creek residents, employees and visitors with transit connections, amounting to 5,000 people boarding and alighting buses each day in Cherry Creek. A streetcar in Portland, OR picks up passengers. Opportunity to connect to regional rail and transportation network. Regional transportation network map Cherry Creek DIA Planned-FasTracks rail Existing rail Downtown

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan 16A.2.A PEDESTRIAN PRIORITY ZONEIn 2007, Denver City Council passed proclamation No.59, which included permanent designation of Downtown as Denvers rst Pedestrian Priority Zone (PPZ). Cherry Creeks existing urban development pattern, retail and commercial success, high transit ridership, and vision for priority transit connections make this area a candidate for Denvers second designated Pedestrian Priority Zone. Strengthening the priority of pedestrians in Cherry Creek can contribute to the areas vision for great neighborhoods and economic prosperity. A corresponding Pedestrian Priority Zone Toolkit with street design elements and implementation strategies can help guide private and public projects that take place on PPZdesignated streets. Most collector and local streets within the designated PPZ area are meant to prioritize pedestrian movements while accommodating the other transportation modes. Pedestrian Priority Intersections with arterial streets within the PPZ should balance the needs of multiple transportation modes and provide clearly marked pedestrian crossings. Identied Pedestrian Priority Intersections are locations where additional enhancements can help to provide the most comfortable and convenient crossing points along these multi-modal streets to facilitate connections to major destinations. Both public and private projects should consider the goals of the PPZ while planning for and designing improvements within the designated area. The PPZ toolkit identies a menu of potential pedestrian enhancements that can be considered for projects located within the PPZ. As redevelopment occurs, property owners in the designated PPZ area are encouraged to work with the city to determine how best accommodate all modes along the adjacent right of way and to explore private funding sources or special districts to meet the goals of the PPZ.A.2.B PEDESTRIAN PRIORITY INTERSECTIONSCherry Creek includes several high demand, arterial streets that divide the area into Cherry Creek East, the Shopping Center and Cherry Creek North as well as surround the study area on three sides. These streets serve as the main existing vehicular and transit routes, host existing and future bicycle connections, and are locations for potential priority transit. Special multi-modal consideration for these streets can successfully balance diverse demands and accessibility responsibilities. To ensure that these multi-modal streets provide high quality connections for pedestrians and cyclists, priority intersections on arterial streets where the pedestrian crossing movement should be enhanced to better balance the use of the right-ofway. A.2.C SIDEWALK IMPROVEMENTSPrioritize improvements in the sidewalk network as development occurs. Focus locations include: University Boulevard, east side between 1st Avenue and Cherry Creek North Drive Colorado Boulevard, west side, between Cedar Avenue and 6th Avenue RECOMMENDATION A.2 A WALKABLE CHERRY CREEK

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan 17 Pedestrian Priority Zone and Intersections Map Pedestrian Priority Zone Pedestrian Priority Intersections PEDESTRIAN PRIORITY ZONE AND INTERSECTION TOOLKITThis toolkit identies potential pedestrian enhancement options within the Cherry Creek PPZ. The application of these design options will vary, depending on location and the public or private resources available for construction and maintenance. There is an opportunity for property owners, special districts and the city to work together to consider these enhancements where appropriate. Each option should be weighed against any potential trade-os including impacts to drainage or onstreet parking. Possible elements for consideration include: Well marked crosswalks Curb extensions Full ADA compliance Median nose extension 4-Way stop control No right turn bypasses Countdown pedestrian signals Shallow building setbacks Detached 8-foot-wide sidewalks Vegetated tree lawn or trees in grates Street trees On-street parking Pedestrian lighting Outdoor seating areas Trash receptacles Waynding signage Public art Banners/ags Landscaped planters Well marked transit stops Enhanced pavement A Pedestrian Priority Zone prioritizes travel by foot over other modes of transportation.

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan 18A.3.A EXPAND NETWORK AND IMPROVE GREENWAY CONNECTIONSIn 2011, Denver approved Denver Moves, a plan that would provide access to better bicycle facilities within 1/4 mile of all Denver households. The Denver Moves network recommendations for Cherry Creek are reected in this plan and represent signicant improvements to the bicycle network. Improvements include more intuitive connections between the Cherry Creek Greenway, neighborhoods and the Shopping District, as well as improved connections between neighborhoods in Cherry Creek and surrounding neighborhoods to the north, east and west. Recommended facilities include: Sidewalk, Bikes Permitted on 1st Avenue, University and Steele and well marked connections across University at 1st Avenue Bicycle Boulevard on Gareld Shared road on St. Paul Bicycle Boulevard on 4th Avenue Bike lanes on Bayaud Connections to the regional trail along the Cherry Creek Greenway Neighborhood trail on Alameda More information about facility types can be found in the Denver Moves Plan. A.3.B A MORE INTUITIVE BICYCLE WAYFINDING SYSTEMThis plan highly supports system-wide destination-based signage and route identiers to create a simpler and more user-friendly system. New signage will also help improve waynding within Cherry Creek. A.3.C BRING BACK THE BIKE RACKBicycle friendly cities across the country have built bike stations that include bicycle parking, repair, rental, shower and locker facilities, hydration stations, and even food stops. Bike stations are typically located in or near multi-modal transportation centers to establish easy connections between dierent transportation modes. Locating a bike station near the Cherry Creek Greenway, bus transfer points like University and 1st Avenue, the Shopping District parking garages, and/or future priority transit routes is ideal. An appropriate entity must be identied to develop, maintain and operate this bike station.Example of a bicycle boulevard in Berkeley, CA. RECOMMENDATION A.3 A BIKEABLE CHERRY CREEK

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan 19 Destination based signage for bicycle network similar to the Berkeley, CA Bicycle Boulevard system. Bicycle Network MapBicycle boulevard Shared road Regional or neighborhood trail Bcycle station Bike lane Sidewalk, Bikes Permitted

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan 20A.4.A IMPROVE THE ALAMEDA PARKWAY Create a signature multi-modal street with noticeable tree canopy and landscaping, contributing to the look and feel of a parkway and a great public space within the existing right-of-way and parkway setbacks. Create a safe, comfortable pedestrian and bicycle connection between Burns Park, Pulaski Park and the Cherry Creek Greenway; also between Cherry Creek East and the Cherry Creek Triangle. Encourage private investment in properties adjacent to Alameda. Activate the public realm by fronting new buildings onto Alameda. Implement this parkway vision at one time rather than incrementally so that Alameda Parkway serves as a catalyst for private development. The Alameda Parkway concept, as envisioned, is a change from previous planning documents and represents the preferred future vision of Alameda. This concept includes the following details, which will need to be tested further during preliminary engineering and design to determine cost and feasibility: Design the north side of Alameda to include a bicycle/pedestrian connection between Burns Park and Pulaski Park. Amend rules and regulations for parkway setback requirements to reect the Parkway design and to ensure an equitable solution for all adjacent properties. Study the potential to recongure Madison, Alameda, and Cherry Creek North Drive intersection to shorten walk distance between Cherry Creek Greenway and Pulaski Park, including elimination of right turn bypass along Cherry Creek North Drive. Look for opportunities to align Madison and Cherry Creek Drive North at this intersection. Provide convenient crossing for pedestrians and bikes at Gareld and Alameda.Proposed Alameda Parkway, Madison Street to alley between Gareld Street and Jackson Street. A multi-use trail is recommended for the north side of Alameda Parkway. RECOMMENDATION A.4 MULTIMODAL STREETS

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan 21 Rendition of existing Alameda Avenue looking west Proposed Alameda Avenue looking west Proposed Alameda Parkway, alley between Gareld Street and Jackson Street to Colorado Boulevard

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan 22A.4.B IMPROVE 1ST AVENUE BETWEEN STEELE AND COLORADOA two-phase approach to 1st Avenue improvements will add on-street parking and reduce the existing curb to curb crossing distance across 1st Avenue. A separate 1st Avenue Improvement Study yielded an approach that maximizes cost savings by adding streetscape elements like bulb out and intersection enhancements thereby improving the pedestrian experience without resetting curbs. Further engineering study will be required to understand the drainage and utility impacts for both phases and to calculate a detailed cost estimate for the project phases. Phase One. The rst phase provides bulb-outs on the north side of the street while maintaining the current lane conguration. The additional bulb-outs will narrow the curb to curb crossing distance and add further distinction to each intersection. Phase Two. The second phase would add bulb-outs on the south side of the street to match the north side and narrow the curb-to-curb crossing distance even further. The second phase would also introduce on-street parking on the south side of the street. In order to t these new elements within the right of way, the nal phase would reduce the current ve-lane cross section conguration to four lanes with two east bound lanes, one west bound lane and a continuous left turn lane. The lanes would transition at the west and east ends in order to interface with the existing Steele Street and Colorado Boulevard intersections. A future study should examine the multimodal connectivity of the east and west ends. The study of the Colorado intersection should examine the right turn bypasses and connection to the Hilltop neighborhood. Existing 1st Ave east of Steele Street looking east Scale: 1=101st Avenue Streetscape Typical Blocks April 6th, 2010 CONSrequires on-property walk easement to achieve tree lawns no pedestrian refuge at crossingsTYPICAL BLOCK AT FULL BUILD OUT: North and South Side Bulb Outs, Four Lanes of Traffic, LandscapingPROSreduced pedestrian crossing distance continuous dual-use turn lane parking both sides maintains existing curb-to curb width single west-bound lane and bulb-outs slow traffic TYPICAL BLOCK AT PHASE ONE: North Side Bulb Outs, Five Lanes of TrafficCONSminimal improvement at pedestrian crossings requires on-property walk easement to achieve tree lawns minimal traffic calmingPROSreduced pedestrian crossing distance less costly, spot installation parking on north side maintains existing curb-to curb width feasible on all 7 blocks of project

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan 23 1st Avenue and Madison Street perspective at full build out: looking west toward Cherry Creek Shopping Center Typical block at full build out: north and south side bulb outs, four lanes of trac, landscaping Scale: 1=101st Avenue Streetscape Typical Blocks April 6th, 2010 CONSrequires on-property walk easement to achieve tree lawns no pedestrian refuge at crossingsTYPICAL BLOCK AT FULL BUILD OUT: North and South Side Bulb Outs, Four Lanes of Traffic, LandscapingPROSreduced pedestrian crossing distance continuous dual-use turn lane parking both sides maintains existing curb-to curb width single west-bound lane and bulb-outs slow traffic TYPICAL BLOCK AT PHASE ONE: North Side Bulb Outs, Five Lanes of TrafficCONSminimal improvement at pedestrian crossings requires on-property walk easement to achieve tree lawns minimal traffic calmingPROSreduced pedestrian crossing distance less costly, spot installation parking on north side maintains existing curb-to curb width feasible on all 7 blocks of project

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan 24 1st Avenue and Steele intersectionA.4.C 1ST AND STEELE INTERSECTIONThe 1st Avenue and Steele Street intersection is one of the primary nodes of opportunity and development activity in Cherry Creek. Several properties adjacent to the 1st and Steele intersection are expected to undergo redevelopment over the next 10 years. Trac and property access patterns may change as a result of these redevelopments. While the intersection functions to help vehicle trac ow smoothly, pedestrians and cyclists are required to make up to ve crossing movements in order to get from the northeast corner of the intersection to the Shopping Center on the southwest corner. With increases in density expected at the intersection, there is an opportunity for the intersection to better serve demand from all modes. Further study of the intersection is recommended to determine the best relationship between the intersection, surrounding development, and the multi-modal needs of local and regional trac to create balance between vehicles and pedestrians, a shorter walk distance for pedestrians, and better access to adjacent developing properties. Pedestrian waiting to cross at the 1st and Steele intersection

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan 25A.4.D COLORADO BOULEVARDThe reach of Colorado Boulevard extends well beyond Cherry Creeks borders. A comprehensive study of this important roadway is recommended to improve its function for all modes and enhance the user experience. A study should address the following possibilities, at a minimum: Partner with CDOT to study pedestrian and bicycle movements along and across Colorado Boulevard for additional improvements to facilitate better connections and access to destinations and transit service. Priority transit service connecting urban centers along Colorado Boulevard to rail service on the East Corridor and on the Southeast Corridor. Since Colorado Boulevard is a state highway, work with CDOT to study multi-modal improvements to the Colorado Boulevard. As a major arterial and priority transit corridor, Colorado Boulevard needs to serve many functions and could be improved to accommodate all these modes more eectively. This study should consider alternatives for accommodating the increasing trip demand on Colorado and recommend modal priorities for accommodating those trips. The study should also address the parkway designation and recommend how to make Colorado look, feel and function better as a parkway. Streetscape improvements desired by Cherry Creek include a planted median, separated sidewalks, and tree lawn to make the street look, feel and function as a parkway and create a better gateway to the Cherry Creek Area. Pedestrian crossings at existing trac signals can be evaluated for enhancements that could better facilitate connections between Cherry Creek, the Hilltop Neighborhood and the City of Glendale. Missing sidewalk along the west side of Colorado Boulevard

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan 26 B. A Distinctive Cherry CreekWHY IS THIS IMPORTANT TO CHERRY CREEK?Cherry Creek is a mixed-use neighborhood allowing people the opportunity to live, work and play in a successful, vibrant place that incorporates high quality urban design thereby enhancing quality of life. Urban design links the pattern of streets, blocks and public spaces with buildings and establishes how buildings enhance streets and how dierent land uses interact with each other. Urban design directly inuences how livable, memorable and vital a place is and is a critical element in achieving Cherry Creeks vision of being connected, distinctive, green and prosperous. Continued emphasis on quality urban design has resulted in improved development quality within Cherry Creek. This improvement has impacted residential, commercial and mixed-use locations throughout the area. Continued development should further enhance and reinforce Cherry Creek as a desirable location to live, work and play.KEY ISSUES Desirability, population growth and housing options. Due to its central location, great schools and high quality of life, Cherry Creek and surrounding neighborhoods are some of the most desirable places in Denver to live. Cherry Creek is home to about 6,000 people. DRCOG projects the population will grow to over 9,000 by 2035. Housing types in Cherry Creek are very diverse; the current distribution of housing types include 65% multifamily, 19% duplex, 10% single family and 6% in mixed-use buildings. This diversity of housing stock is a strength throughout Cherry Creek, attracting a variety of residents representative of multiple generations and household types. Because opportunities for new housing in the Areas of Stability are limited to scattered inll, much of the new housing will be in mixed-use developments within the Areas of Change. This development should continue the diversity of housing types available in the Cherry Creek Area. Census Year Cherry Creek Population Cherry Creek Households 2000 5,028 3,198 2010 5,881 3,754 Source US Census Bureau, 2010 Urban form. Cherry Creek is organized around a regular pattern of streets, resulting in a walkable district including sidewalks and tree lawns, buildings oriented to the street and on-street parking throughout the area. On the south side of Cherry Creek, the pattern of blocks and buildings shifts to incorporate the Greenway. The continued evolution of the Shopping Center has enhanced the pedestrian experience while accommodating the vehicular access necessary to support the regional activity within Cherry Creek. The Cherry Creek North BIDs reconstructed streetscapes and main street character are reinforced by an eective design review process including an active Design Advisory Board, ensuring that new development enhances the district. Cherry Creek East and the Shopping Center also utilize sets of design guidelines to promote continued development improvements over time. Mix of land uses. Part of the character of Cherry Creek is its mixture of land uses. Retail and service uses appealing to both local and regional shoppers, oce and established residential neighborhoods weave an interdependent mixed-use urban environment resulting in a variety of amenities beneting the quality of life. With a wide range of oce types and employment opportunities, the Cherry Creek area provides almost 15,000 RECOMMENDATIONS AND TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECTS: B.1 Target Growth Appropriately B.3 Concentrate Economic Activity B.2 Enhance the Pedestrian Nature & Character B.4 Great Neighborhoods

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan 27 A Cherry Creek landmarkpeople with jobs. Continued introduction of oce space, retail, and residential units will enhance the mixed-use nature of the neighborhood and reinforce the plan vision. As in most mixed-use districts throughout the country, the desire to maintain the character of Cherry Creek must be balanced with the thoughtful redevelopment of underutilized properties. Distinct subareas. Cherry Creeks land use patterns and partnerships create four subareas: Cherry Creek North Neighborhood (CCN), Cherry Creek East (CCE), the Cherry Creek Shopping District and Cherry Creek Triangle. In some cases, boundaries between these subareas overlap. Improvements in the neighborhood must continue to realize the importance of identity within Cherry Creek while simultaneously removing barriers between the subareas. Redevelopment Opportunities. Cherry Creek has seen signicant redevelopment over the past decade. This continued evolution has helped maintain Cherry Creeks unique identity in the region. The next generation of development within Cherry Creek will inuence the continued success and desirability of the area.Cherry Creek Sub-areas map

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan 28 Blueprint Denver designates Areas of Change and Areas of Stability to guide decisions on where growth should be targeted within the City of Denver. For Cherry Creek to remain prosperous, growth and change should occur in Areas of Change while enhancing the established residential neighborhoods within Areas of Stability. By encouraging the strategic growth of the area, the quality of life in the residential Areas of Stability will be enhanced while promoting continued success in the Areas of Change within Cherry Creek.B.1.A AREAS OF STABILITYMost of Denvers neighborhoods were identied as Areas of Stability with a primary goal to maintain the cherished characteristics of these neighborhoods. In 2002 Blueprint Denver designated the entire Cherry Creek Area as an Area of Change. Since then, CCN and CCE have transformed from primarily single family neighborhoods with post-World War II era cottage style houses to upscale neighborhoods with a greater mix of housing types including duplexes, row houses and apartment and condominium buildings, as well as single family houses. These neighborhoods have stabilized with this new identity over the last decade. They are now characterized by a high quality and diverse housing stock and an enhanced pedestrian environment that equates to a high quality of life for Cherry Creek residents. Overarching recommendations for Areas of Stability include: Adjust the Blueprint Denver Areas of Change map to reect that much of Cherry Creek North and Cherry Creek East neighborhoods are now Areas of Stability. Maintain a mix of low scale residential building forms such as single family, duplex, row house and accessory dwelling units; low scale multi-unit buildings are also appropriate in Cherry Creek East east of Madison. Inll development should reinforce pedestrian friendly qualities of existing development patterns including entry features facing the street, moderate setbacks, vehicle parking and access located o the alley, and detached sidewalks with tree lawns. In Areas of Stability, limit commercial uses to existing mixed-use zone districts and encourage any reinvestment or redevelopment of commercial properties to respect the residential scale and character of the adjacent stable neighborhood.Residential Areas of Stability Residential Areas of Stability RECOMMENDATION B.1 TARGET GROWTH APPROPRIATELY

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan 29B.1.B AREAS OF CHANGECherry Creek will continue to grow over the next 20 years. This growth has the potential to benet existing businesses, property owners and residents through greater diversity of housing types, increased business revenues, higher property values, additional public and private investment and a greater diversity of shops, restaurants and cultural amenities. The Areas of Change in Cherry Creek have the greatest potential to accommodate this growth, both in terms of market demand and available land. Although not every property will see signicant redevelopment, overall these areas benet from new development, reinvestment, and more intense use. Areas of Change include the Shopping District, Cherry Creek Triangle, 1st Avenue, the commercial node at Madison and Bayaud and Harrison Street south of 1st Avenue. Recommendations for Areas of Change include: Acknowledge that to remain prosperous, Cherry Creek must continue to grow and change. In order for this growth to occur in a way that reinforces the quality of life for Cherry Creek residents, the bulk of this growth should occur in these areas rather than stable neighborhoods. Update the Blueprint Denver map to reect revised Areas of Change boundaries. The updated Areas of Change are targeted to receive most of Cherry Creeks residential and commercial growth over the next twenty years. Modify land use policy, zoning regulations and design guidelines to encourage appropriate reinvestment to assure that Areas of Change continue to mature in positive ways. Area of Change in Cherry Creek (2012) Area of Change in Blueprint Denver (2002) Cherry Creek Shopping Center Areas of ChangeArea of Change Area of Change

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan 30Character throughout Cherry Creek varies dependant on the subarea. Each subarea has developed a distinct character through reinvestment and redevelopment over time. These individual identities have been crafted utilizing high quality character dening features consistently across the subareas. B.2.A STREETSCAPEThe streetscape provides the array of pedestrian amenities throughout each subarea. In addition to sidewalks and streets, these can include a variety of features from simple to complex including landscaping and mature trees, tree lawns, amenity zones, lighting, fountains, benches, trash receptacles, sidewalk cafes and plazas. The following strategies are targeted to improving the streetscape: Design and install streetscape elements that promote high levels of pedestrian activity including pedestrian lighting, seating, landscaping, trash receptacles, and bike racks as appropriate to the areas character. Promote compact development patterns within a highly connected street grid and buildings that make ecient use of available land and help create a very walkable place. Encourage consistent shallow, block-sensitive building setbacks with some oset for patio seating or public plazas help create active, vibrant streets. In mixed-use areas, enhance the public realm with landscaping, waynding signage, pedestrian lighting, public art and inviting building entries is essential to the areas vitality. Retain the regular street, sidewalk and block pattern which oers a high degree of connectivity for pedestrians, bicycles and vehicles. In residential areas, enhance the public realm with block sensitive building setbacks, detached sidewalks, tree lawns with street trees and alley access thereby creating a comfortable pedestrian environment.B.2.B ARCHITECTUREThe architecture of the buildings has a direct correlation to the understanding of a place. Buildings provide comfort, shelter, activity, destinations, identity, or other iconic symbol. People interact with these structures and are provided a sense of place through the detailing, scaling elements and purpose behind the design of each building. The combination of buildings provides the artistic palette informing continued design choices throughout the subareas. The following strategies promote appropriate architectural elements: Orient buildings and entries toward the street using context sensitive setbacks. Include design elements and details such as pedestrian scaled signage, transparent windows, storefronts, building entries, building articulation, patio seating, pedestrian plazas and courtyards. Study the use of upper story setbacks and height datum lines to maintain a comfortable pedestrian scale at the street and to allow sunlight to reach the street. RECOMMENDATION B.2 ENHANCE THE PEDESTRIAN NATURE & CHARACTER

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan 31 Provide visual interest at ground level and active ground oor uses along the building frontage; articulate facade treatments by creating a regular pattern of storefronts, providing a range of entry features and signage. More doors denotes more activity. Encourage a regular rhythm of buildings and building entries along the street. Place buildings to dene the street edge.B.2.C LAND USELand use includes the mixture of options for activities within the subareas. Some places may have only residential uses providing a predictable understanding of what will happen over time. Other locations contain a rich mix of uses contributing to their successful animation and promoting the messy vitality of a thriving mixed-use community. The following land use strategies reinforce the distinct character areas: In mixed-use areas, promote the use of design elements that link the building directly to the street. Uses are horizontally and vertically mixed and include regional and neighborhood-serving retail, large and small scale oce uses, specialized high-end boutiques, low and mid-rise multi-family, stacked ats, row house, duplex, single family and accessory dwelling units. Reinforce residential character in neighborhoods. Embedded small-scale commercial uses may be appropriate within primarily residential areas to provide neighborhood serving amenities.B.2.D ACCESSAccess is instrumental to the success and navigability of all locations within Cherry Creek. Proper access denotes an expectation for the use of streets and sidewalks. The understanding of the priority nature of pedestrians within Cherry Creek informs decisions regarding how streets are used, how plazas and sidewalks are designed, and how properties are accessed by dierent transportation modes. The following access strategies ensure the proper distribution of access throughout Cherry Creek: Provide vehicle parking and access in the rear of buildings or o the alley. Promote convenient, comfortable transit access which is necessary in regional centers like Cherry Creek to move the thousands of people to and through each day. Ensure that residents and employees are able to conveniently navigate the neighborhoods by walking, biking or driving. Provide information to Cherry Creek visitors so transportation movements within and through Cherry Creek are easily understood.

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan 32Enhance successful redevelopment in currently designated areas of change by identifying appropriate uses, scale and intensities.B.3.A CONCENTRATE HIGHER INTENSITY MIXEDUSE BUILDINGS ALONG MULTIMODAL STREETS, MAJOR INTERSECTIONS AND MAJOR PUBLIC OPEN SPACES. Cherry Creeks high intensity nodes are appropriate for increased development intensity allowing for the concentration of active uses utilizing appropriate locational criteria. These locational criteria include: Adjacency to multi-modal corridors (includes the shopping district segments of 1st Avenue and Steele Street as well as the Cherry Creek Greenway and Colorado Boulevard) Major intersections (1st and Steele, 1st and University) Adjacency to major public open spaces (such as the Cherry Creek Greenway) This increased intensity serves to most eciently utilize existing infrastructure, minimize development impacts in adjacent residential areas and provide continued growth to support the continued success of Cherry Creek. Any new development should reinforce the pedestrian scale and character of Cherry Creek. Structures should enhance pedestrian experience with active uses, improved streetscape, and prominent entrances. Mass and height transitions should appropriately balance higher intensity development with adjacent planned land uses. Structures should provide a gateway into the district and create a unique identifying character along 1st Avenue. B.3.B ENCOURAGE MODERATE SCALE DEVELOPMENT IN MIXEDUSE AREAS OF CHANGE.Areas of Change which are not adjacent to the higher intensity locational criteria are appropriate for mid-rise buildings to accommodate continued growth. General locations include the Shopping District and 1st Avenue (east of Steele), and some existing mixeduse areas within Cherry Creek North Residential and Cherry Creek East. Specic locations recommended for mid-rise buildings are indicated in the Subarea Strategies section. Encourage mid-rise buildings to promote reinvestment and to help transition development intensity and buer stable residential areas from higher intensity locations. Orient taller mid-rise buildings along multi-modal corridors, existing or planned high intensity nodes, and adjacent to public open space not identied for higher intensity. Any new development should reinforce the pedestrian scale and character of Cherry Creek. B.3.C UTILIZE URBAN DESIGN STRATEGIES TO CREATE APPROPRIATE TRANSITIONS IN BUILDING HEIGHTS AND USES.Several key areas exist in Cherry Creek where areas of change sit adjacent to areas of stability. In these cases, new development should provide appropriate transitions in scale. Key transition areas include the following: Between the Shopping District and the adjacent residential neighborhoods Across Alameda Parkway between Cherry Creek East and Cherry Creek Triangle 1st Avenue mixed-use properties backing to residential neighborhoods Continue to concentrate high development intensity along multi-modal corridors like 1st Avenue and Steele Street. RECOMMENDATION B.3 CONCENTRATE ECONOMIC ACTIVITY

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan 33These transitions should be handled through modications to both building scale and site design. Generally, buildings should be located and shaped to minimize negative impacts to adjacent residential neighborhoods while providing increased density and amenities to accommodate continued growth and improve the quality of life within Cherry Creek. Shaping standards should reect the desire for pedestrian scale across all areas of Cherry Creek while recognizing that a variety of styles, alternatives and approaches to design will successfully yield a series of solutions. Scale transitions should be designed to allow for the evolution of structures overtime. Modication to use allowances also aects the success of transitions within Cherry Creek. Uses should be thoughtfully allowed to encourage continued development of a mixed-use nature within the areas of change while minimizing external eects of uses adjacent to residential areas. Addressing scale, site design and use will result in the creation of enhanced transitions within Cherry Creek.B.3.D IDENTIFY PROMINENT DEVELOPMENT LOCATIONS AT KEY VISTAS.A key vista is a building or monument that serves as the focal point of a view that ends a street or street segment thereby creating a terminating vista. Treating key vistas with design excellence helps to orient users of the street and create an identity and sense of place that is unique to Cherry Creek. Key vistas also help stitch together various districts within Cherry Creek, as these prominent structures are visible from several blocks away and dierent directions, beckoning pedestrians to keep walking as something interesting lies ahead. The following design elements may help create visual interest at a key vista: Mid-rise buildings are appropriate for areas of change where growth is encouraged. Detroit Street has a key vista with the Shopping Center a the southern focal point highly detailed building facades increased mass or scale active public spaces public art primary building entries interesting signage unique building materials

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan 34 The introduction of new residential units in mixeduse areas encourages expanded options and diversity for residents.Cherry Creek includes a diverse assembly of great neighborhoods. The variety of places includes residential neighborhoods, mixed-use neighborhoods and emerging neighborhoods. New development in each of these areas should enhance the individual character of neighborhoods responding specically to their qualities and locations.B.4.A RESPECT THE EXISTING CHARACTER OF STABLE RESIDENTIAL NEIGHBORHOODS.Cherry Creek is known for the series of great neighborhoods within and surrounding its boundaries. Cherry Creek North Neighborhood and Cherry Creek East include variety of architectural styles and housing types that contribute to the character, quality of life, and diversity of housing choices within the area. These neighborhoods also include shopping choices outside of the Shopping District which are embedded into the neighborhood fabric and provide a prime location for neighborhood gatherings. The choices and varieties of residential, commercial and social opportunities within these residential areas are exactly what dene them as great neighborhoods. Continued reinvestment in these areas should reinforce the quality and scale of development that currently exists. Regardless of use, new development should enhance the residential character of these neighborhoods including contributing to the mix of housing types, improving the embedded commercial uses, landscaped block-sensitive setbacks, detached sidewalks, tree lawns, alley access to structures, limited curb cuts and street-facing entries.B.4.B ENCOURAGE THE CONTINUED EVOLUTION OF MIXEDUSE NEIGHBORHOODS.The Cherry Creek Shopping District has evolved into an 18-hour, mixed-use neighborhood consisting of retail, commercial and residential uses. Continued development in the district has resulted in the introduction of residential units in the district, encouraging expanded options and diversity for residents. This district has seen an introduction of high quality urban design introduced into a former pattern of renovated and obsolete commercial space. This emergence of quality, design integrity and mix of uses has set the standard for future development. This development results in active streetscapes with layers of pedestrian amenities such as seating, planters, art, cafs and adjoining active retail space. This space is clearly pedestrian-focused with entries, materials, signage and building details scaled to the New development in residential neighborhoods should enhance the existing character. RECOMMENDATION B.4 GREAT NEIGHBORHOODS

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan 35 New character Cherry Creeks residential neighborhoods consist of variety of housing types, with large units and 2-3 story buildings. Setbacks are shallow and landscaped. New sidewalks are wider and detached from the street to form an attractive tree lawn. New multi-story residential development in the emerging Cherry Creek Triangle neighborhood. Former character Cherry Creek North and Cherry Creek East neighborhoods were characterized by small onestory cottage style houses with deep setbacks. Sidewalks were narrow and attached to the street.person. Continued development in this district should reinforce the new standard of quality and pedestrian activity.B.4.C PROMOTE CONTINUED INVESTMENT AND DEVELOPMENT IN EMERGING NEIGHBORHOODS.The Cherry Creek Triangle is an emerging neighborhood providing a direct link between Cherry Creek and Glendale along the Cherry Creek Greenway. Development in this neighborhood has recently featured two multi-story residential structures to complement the existing mixture of oce, hotel and retail uses within the area. New development should continue to upgrade the quality of buildings in the area and take cues from the proximity of the district to existing parkways and the Cherry Creek Greenway. The introduction of an improved pedestrian space complete with detached sidewalks, wide tree lawns, street trees, and buildings that face the streets results in a glimpse of things to come to this neighborhood. Continued development should focus on quality architecture, improved streetscapes and enhancing the connections to Cherry Creek East, Glendale and the Cherry Creek Greenway.

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan 36 C. A Green Cherry Creek WHY IS THIS IMPORTANT TO CHERRY CREEK?Public spaces form the heart of any community. They promote health, happiness and well being. They celebrate a communitys assets. Successful public spaces attract people, economic vitality and investment in an area. Failed public spaces create a perception of emptiness and can result in a lack of investment. In urban areas like Cherry Creek, the relationship between public spaces and adjacent development is critical to the success of both. From large parks to small plazas and town squares, the quality and success of public spaces provides a critical representation of the quality of life and degree of prosperity in the area. Public spaces serve three main functions in an urban area: activating a place by attracting many people, helping people to escape the urban environment (through recreation or passive activity), or helping connect people with places. Some public spaces perform more than one of these functions. From an infrastructure perspective, urban public spaces can also help with stormwater quality and conveyance. Analyzing each public space according to its intended use leads to recommendations on how the space could be better designed to perform a particular function. One of Cherry Creeks main assets is its broad spectrum of public spaces. These include a regional greenway, large and small parks, a system of festival streets, small urban plazas, pedestrian-friendly streetscapes and privately owned public spaces. While some of these are designed well for their intended function, several public spaces are not well utilized by residents or by visitors. KEY ISSUES Cherry Creek Greenway. The Cherry Creek Greenway and Trail are one of Cherry Creeks great assets. It provides a regional bike connection, open space, and scenic beauty. Despite its adjacency to a vibrant shopping district and high population and employment densities, the section of the Greenway between University and Colorado lacks points of visual and physical access and is therefore underutilized as a neighborhood resource. Neighborhood access to the trail is via Cherry Creek Drive North, the recently-improved bike/ped bridge at Steele, and the Steele Street multi-use sidewalk. The plazas on either side of Cherry Creek Drive North are both underutilized. Regionally, the 40-mile long Cherry Creek Trail connects from the South Platte River Greenway and Trail in Downtown to the Cherry Creek Reservoir and Douglas County. It is a unique natural area with educational, environmental and recreational benets. Two master plans for the greenway corridor are relevant to future improvements: the three volumes of the Cherry Creek Greenway Master PlanPreferred Plan (2000) and the Conceptual Design Report (May 2003) for Reach One (University to Colorado). Reach One is characterized by naturalistic vegetation, which is benecial to wildlife, water quality and the user experience. This plan and Denver Moves provide recommendations for improved bike connections. Parks. The Gates Tennis Center was completely rehabilitated in 2008 with a new club house and four reconstructed tennis courts. The Colorado Tennis Association, a member of the USTA, has its corporate oces in the club house. It is one of the top tennis facilities in the region. However, for the surrounding Pulaski Park, there is no visibility or entrance into the park from Bayaud Street for the large residential population. A new playground at Pulaski Park funded by the Better Denver Bond Program has increased the utilization of the park by families with young children, but the park lacks usability for more age groups. Connect Escape ActivatePublic spaces serve three main functions in an urban area to attract people and activate a place, to allow people to escape from the urban environment, or to connect people with places. RECOMMENDATIONS AND TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECTS: C.1 Cherry Creek Greenway C.3 Streets and Streetscapes C.2 Parks

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan 37 Pulaski Park privides all three functions activate, escape and connect. Parks and Public Spaces MapPark / Open Space CCN Festival Street Cherry Creek Parkway Public Building Manley Park serves the needs of Cherry Creek North residents. Burns Park contains a handful of large sculptures and open green space. The sculptures provide a visual escape for people driving quickly along Colorado Boulevard, Alameda Avenue, or Leetsdale Drive. However, residents of adjacent neighborhoods are not served well by the parks current function and design, and the park is usually void of people. The sculptures are the result of a 1968 art competition that attracted nationally known sculptors to create large plywood and paint archetectonic sculptures in the park. Four of these original temporary sculptures remain in place. Streets and streetscapes. Cherry Creek has some of the most successful streets and streetscapes in Denver such as the Cherry Creek North Festival Streets and the privately owned public spaces throughout the area. However, areas such as the Cherry Creek Triangle lack high quality streetscapes and public spaces and seem disconnected from the rest of Cherry Creek.

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan 38C.1.A IMPROVE VISUAL AND PHYSICAL ACCESS Improve access to the Cherry Creek Greenway from the Cherry Creek East neighborhood, from Cherry Creek Triangle, the Shopping District, from Cherry Creek North residential and from neighborhoods to the south. See individual Sub Area Strategies for details. Enhance the visual connection between the Greenway and the Shopping Center. Strategically improve existing access and create more points of physical and visual access to the creek without destroying the integrity of the greenway as a natural feature. Public access into the Cherry Creek channel should be limited, appropriate and designed with care, such as for observation and rest areas. Appropriately placed and well-designed pedestrian bridge crossings would improve visual connections and allow people to interact sensitively with the natural creek. Look for opportunities to better embrace the Greenway as new development takes place on the west side of the Shopping Center. Creating a vibrant public space such as a plaza that links the Greenway with the Shopping Center is one option. This should be done in a way that clearly dierentiates the higher use public areas from the natural area while integrating these two land uses. C.1.B NEW BIKE/PED BRIDGES Build a pedestrian bridge over the creek at Dakota Street to better connect the two sides of the creek and neighborhoods to the south. Study opportunities for an additional connection across the creek to integrate with the redevelopment of the Cherry Creek Shopping Center (west end) and better connect the neighborhoods to the north and south, as well as the business district. C.1.C UNIVERSITY, CHERRY CREEK DRIVE NORTH AND SOUTH PARKWAYSDenvers parkway system creates a network of streets throughout the city that serve as critical connections linking parks to each other. Designated parkways in Cherry Creek include: University, Alameda, Cherry Creek Drive North, Cherry Creek Drive South, and Colorado Boulevard. Of these streets, University, Cherry Creek North Drive and Cherry Creek South Drive currently look, feel and function as parkways. They have planted tree lawns and planted medians to evoke the feeling of a green street. Connect to the Greenway by introducing a sidewalk and streetscape amenities along the east side of University parkway between the creek and 1st Avenue. Continue the Greenway theme along the south side of 1st Avenue and west side of Steele Street. Explore opportunities to integrate recently constructed parkway amenities along Cherry Creek Drive South to the Greenway. Introduce parkway amenities to Alameda. Enhance the connection between Pulaski Park Alameda Parkway, Cherry Creek Drive North and the Greenway. The Cherry Creek Greenway provides recreation opportunities for Cherry Creek residents and employees. It runs adjacent to the Cherry Creek Shopping District but is not designed to be integrated with the Shopping District. RECOMMENDATION C.1 CHERRY CREEK GREENWAY

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan 39 Improve connection between Pulaski Park Alameda Parkway, Cherry Creek Drive North and the Greenway Improve bicycle connectivity to and from the Greenway at Gareld Street (see bicycle network map on page 19) Continue the Greenway theme along the south side of 1st Avenue and west side of Steele Street Bike / ped bridge opportunity over Cherry Creek at Dakota Street to improve connectivity between Cherry Creek Triangle and Cherry Creek East and neighborhoods to the south Strengthen existing connections between Shopping Center and Greenway Explore opportunities to better ingrate Cherry Creek Drive South to Greenway Continue the Greenway to the north along the east side of University Parkway Through redevelopment of the west side of the Shopping Center create a vibrant link to the Greenway through additional plazas and/or a bike/ped bridge

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan 40C.2.A PULASKI PARK Create a public park entrance / access point from the north on Bayaud, including a paved trail into the park. Look for opportunities to improve the relationship between the Cherry Creek East village center buildings on the southwest corner of Madison and Bayaud and the park. Any redevelopment in this location should integrate the park into the design of new buildings. Increase the usability of the park for all ages. The new playground is a great achievement toward this end. Adding park benches, a paved walking trail and/or a picnic pavilion are small steps to making this park usable for the large elderly population that lives just north of the park. Study the feasibility of park improvements that would allow the park to be better utilized for community or cultural events. Ideas include a small amphitheater or pavilion.C.2.B BURNS PARK Establish a comprehensive vision for Burns Park to determine how it can better serve residents. A park master plan would help document this vision and consider the following: access to and through the park, creation of various microzones or destinations in the park, appropriate types of sculpture, landscape plants and hardscape elements, parking, benches and lighting, compatible park uses and activities, signage/waynding, phasing, funding, programming and marketing of the park. No marked entrance to Pulaski Park exists from Bayaud Street, where thousands of residents live. The way into the park from Bayaud looks like private property but is publicly owned. It is blocked by electrical equipment and tall pine trees. Cherry Creek East residents would like to see Pulaski Park used for more community events. The new Pulaski Park playground provides a gathering place and play opportunities for families with young children. RECOMMENDATION C.2 PARKS

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan 41 Explore partnerships with the Cherry Creek Arts Festival, Cherry Creek North BID and/ or the Denver Botanic Gardens to improve the ability to attract high quality art to the sculpture garden and to extend the sculpture gardens reach to a larger audience. Such partnerships create an opportunity for a sculpture garden that is unique in the region and serves to attract people to the park and to the Cherry Creek Area. Consider, during the master planning process, the appropriateness of including artwork that is interesting at the human scale or that invites human interaction. Explore opportunities to incorporate temporary art installations into the programming for Burns Park for added interest and to encourage return visits to the park. Consider, during the master planning process, the appropriateness of introducing active and recreational uses to the park. Ideas from Cherry Creek East residents include basketball courts, a running path, and a dog park. Use the master planning process to determine which active uses will serve adjacent neighborhoods, attract people and complement the sculpture garden.C.2.C MANLEY PARK Continue to maintain the attractiveness, quality and function of Manley Park as a small neighborhood respite for Cherry Creek North residents. The Burns Park sculpture garden provides visual interest from the car. The sculptures do not encourage human interaction. Interactive public artwork, such as The Musical Fence in Lincoln, Massachusetts, provides an incentive for people to approach the sculpture. A Giant Knitting Nancy in a London park welcomed human interaction. The temporary installation invited people to knit and help create the art. It also provided popular park seating. (Photo credit: Superblue)

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan 42 Fillmore Plaza is one of CCNs festival streets and is the gateway to the art and garden district. C.3.A CCN FESTIVAL STREETSClayton, Detroit, Milwaukee, St. Paul streets between 2nd and 3rd Avenue and Fillmore Street between 1st and 3rd Avenue make up the Cherry Creek North Festival Streets. These streets are designed to encourage a variety of events fostering social interaction while supporting the identity of Cherry Creek. Maintain the successful balance between functional aspects for events and placemaking aspects for the quality and identity of Cherry Creek.C.3.B FILLMORE PLAZAThe recently completed Fillmore Plaza is an exemplary street designed for enhanced pedestrian, event and retail activity that benets businesses, residents, shoppers and visitors on the block, and also serves as the primary gateway to Cherry Creek North from the Shopping Center and 1st Avenue. The plaza establishes an identity for the area through enhanced lighting, trees and landscaping, pavers, street furniture, waynding signage and a central iconic structure spanning the street. Maintain the appeal of Fillmore plaza as a gateway and high quality pedestrian environment and continue to explore ways to enhance and promote the success of surrounding businesses. Continue a positive partnership between the BID, business owners, property owners, residents and the city to manage Fillmore Street closings for the benet of community events.C.3.C STREETSCAPES AND PEDESTRIAN AMENITIES Successful streetscape design reinforces the pedestrian scale and character and enhances the quality, identity, physical function, and economic vitality of an area. Cherry Creeks streetscapes are unique to the Denver area due to the inuence of the garden. Many gardens, especially in the residential areas, are located between the street and the building instead of behind the structure or in the back yard. This streetscape conguration sets Cherry Creek apart from other areas of the city and helps establish a high quality of life for Cherry Front gardens are a key feature of Cherry Creek residential streets. RECOMMENDATION C.3 STREETS AND STREETSCAPES

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan 43Creek residents, businesses, shoppers and visitors. As part of the 2011 Cherry Creek North streetscape improvements, the inuence of the garden was integrated into the design through highlighting all corners with enhanced pavement, planters, banners, waynding and seating totaling 20 art and garden locations throughout the area. Encourage the use of streetscape amenities that promote high levels of pedestrian activity, physical comfort and visual interest including pedestrian lighting, seating, landscaping, trash receptacles, bike racks and curb extensions at intersections. Maintain the beauty of the streetscape in residential areas with detached sidewalks, landscaped tree lawns and gardens between the sidewalk and buildings. Explore opportunities for streetscapes improvements in the Cherry Creek Triangle. Establish a clear function for the open space created by the University and Josephine oneway couplets and determine the upgrades needed for the desired outcome. These spaces provide an opportunity for an attractive green space that can contribute to the overall quality of the streetscape. Establish a green alley toolkit to be implemented as alleys are repaved.C.3.D PRIVATELY OWNED PUBLIC SPACENot all successful public spaces are publicly owned. Privately owned public spaces also activate a place, help people to escape, or help connect people to other places. There are many successful examples of privately owned public spaces in Cherry Creek: the Gart Building plaza at 3rd and Milwaukee, the outdoor seating area at Starbucks on Fillmore Street and 2nd Avenue, the landscaped front facade and streetscape at Nordstrom along 1st Avenue, and the playground inside the Cherry Creek Shopping Center. Maintain the quality of existing privately owned public space and continue to embrace its contribution to better placemaking. Look for opportunities to improve the public realm through the creation of new privately owned public spaces. Privately owned public space at 3rd and Milwaukee Clayton Lane provides valued streetscapes pedestrian amenities and privately owned open spaces.

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan 44 D. A Prosperous Cherry CreekWHY IS THIS IMPORTANT TO CHERRY CREEK?Cherry Creek is unique both as one of Denvers major attractions and economic generators and as a cherished neighborhood. Outstanding features are its walkability, up-scale local and national retail, mix of uses, broad range of housing types, and availability of arts, culture and recreation. Very few neighborhoods in the country oer this range of uses and quality and variety of housing within easy walking distance of an outdoor shopping area and regional mall. Denvers Comprehensive Plan (Plan 2000) recommends enhancing existing business centers to retain and expand a variety of high quality uses, support Denvers business climate, create jobs, complement neighboring residential areas and to generate public revenue. Plan 2000 specically recommends maintaining Cherry Creek as a premier retail destination in the Denver Metro Area and Rocky Mountain Region. Together, the Cherry Creek Shopping Center and Cherry Creek North generate nearly 5% of Denvers sales tax revenue on 0.14% of Denvers land area. Enhancing the attractiveness and competitiveness as a mixed-use neighborhood with local, regional and national appeal is essential to the economic well-being of the Cherry Creek Area and the City. Optimizing economic and development opportunities benets residents as well as businesses with more choice of shops and restaurants, access to amenities, and attractive street and building design. National research and best practices are demonstrating that walkable, mixed-use communities are desirable for all age groups and have retained their value and thrived in tough economic times. KEY ISSUES Encouraging high quality development. Over time, public policies need to be evaluated based on successful outcomes and need to be modied, reinforced or eliminated to encourage high quality development and reduce impediments. Current zoning in the areas of change and the need for public investment in stormwater improvements are two examples. Continued reinvestment. The Cherry Creek Area has seen signicant redevelopment over the past decade. This continued development and evolution has reinforced Cherry Creeks unique identity in the region as a regional retail center and exciting mixed-use community. The next generation of development within Cherry Creek must enhance the established prosperity, attractiveness and desirability of the area for residents, businesses, shoppers, and visitors. Mixed-use district. Retaining and enhancing Cherry Creeks character as a mixed-use areaprosperous retail district, employment center, visitor destination and residential neighborhoodis essential to future success for both the neighborhood and City and County of Denver. Importance of residential development. Cherry Creeks continued success depends on attracting more people to the area and having more people live within walking distance of the business and retail destinations. These factors contribute greatly to sustaining the areas economic and community vitality. Improving the design quality while expanding the diversity of housing types assures that the area will attract a range of households and families thereby enhancing the attractiveness of the area to people of all ages. Retail strength. The Cherry Creek Shopping District has the highest concentration of upscale and local independent retailers in the region. As such, Cherry Creek is touted as the number one retail destination in the Denver metro area. Yet given the changing D.1 Economic Vitality D.3 Organization and identity D.2 Reinvesting in the FutureRECOMMENDATIONS AND TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECTS:

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan 45nature of the retail environment nationally and the growing number of shopping districts oering the pedestrian shopping experience locally, Cherry Creek must nd ways to continue to thrive and stay competitive. Regional retail destination. For nearly every category of retail, Cherry Creek carries a substantial market surplus, meaning that Cherry Creeks retail success depends on increasing the number of people who live and work in the Cherry Creek area and on attracting shoppers who do not live and work in Cherry Creek. Therefore convenient access via walking, biking, transit and auto is essential to continued retail success. Local retail center. Cherry Creek North has long been known as a center for local retail businesses, and continues to host the largest selection of independent retailers. Retaining this balance of local and national retailers is important to enhancing the distinctive character of the Shopping District. Shopping Center redevelopment. The Cherry Creek Shopping Center opened in 1990. The original shopping center to the west was repurposed as a variety of medium and big box stores and restaurants with varying degrees of remodeling. The east end retains the Safeway and Rite-Aid stores. While all of the stores and uses at the east and west ends are desirable and well-used, the conguration underutilizes its land with one -and two-story buildings within surface parking lots. As was recommended in the 2000 Cherry Creek Plan, these sites are major opportunities for a greater mix of uses and greater intensity to add vitality to the entire area. Oce and employment. Cherry Creek has emerged as a recognized oce sector in the metro area with its wide range of oce types accommodating over 14,500 employees. Cherry Creek is increasingly a regional hub for nancial services, and it also attracts advertising, creative media, architecture and design rms, as well as boutique medical oces. Continuing to provide high quality oce space for these boutique rms and creative industries is essential to the mixed-use character of Cherry Creek and the continued attraction of a broad demographic of visitors. Hotels and visitors. Hotels in and around Cherry Creek, as well as in Downtown and along Colorado Boulevard, are an essential component of the areas economic vitality. Market research surveys indicate that visitors spend three times more than Denverites on retail purchases in Cherry Creek. Hotel guests add necessary pedestrian vitality, supporting the surrounding businesses and restaurants. The lodging and meeting/event facilities are important to area businesses, as well. Creating community. The Cherry Creek Area is committed to building community through the enhancement of arts, culture and recreation. The dedication to the arts in Cherry Creek is evident with the annual Cherry Creek Arts Festival, one of the largest and most prestigious outdoor art festivals in the country; eighteen art galleries; and the use of an art and garden theme throughout the Cherry Creek North streetscape. The Cherry Creek Theatre recent addition to the arts scene resulted from the vision of a group of Cherry Creek residents, business representatives, City Council and local theater leaders. Enhancing the sense of community for the Cherry Creek area, each of its subareas and the surrounding neighborhoods is important to the quality of life for current and future residents. Identity. Cherry Creek is one of the top visitor attractions in Colorado, the Shopping Center is known nationally as a top performer, and the area produces signicant tax revenue for the city, state and RTD. The Cherry Creek Area gets inadequate recognition for its contribution to Denvers economy and quality of life. Additionally, the perimeter streets, especially Alameda and Colorado provide poor gateways to the area due to vacant land, underdeveloped buildings and lack of sidewalks.

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan 46 The Cherry Creek Area and its neighborhoods are recognized for their high quality of life. All of the plan recommendations must contribute to complementing the elements that make it attractive to live, work, shop, and play in the Cherry Creek Area. Areas such as this do not retain this quality and advantage without positive change. One of the purposes of this plan is to dene positive change from all perspectives. D.1.A SYNERGISTIC MIX OF USES The Cherry Creek Area has thrived with its diverse mix of uses. From its origins as a residential neighborhood, shopping district and mall, expanded uses have included oces, hotels and higher density residential. The area has proven to be very attractive to all of these development types, so plan recommendations focus on enhancing amenities and removing public policy impediments. Retail uses. The Shopping District is one of the prime retail centers in the metro area because it combines the large format retail and national tenants of the Shopping Center with the boutique retail of Cherry Creek North. Retail uses should continue to be concentrated in the Shopping District. The smaller retail nodes and strips such as those along 6th Avenue and Colorado Boulevard will continue to serve nearby residents and passers-by. Oce uses. Cherry Creek is increasingly a regional hub for nancial services. It also attracts smaller advertising, creative media, architectural and design rms, as well as boutique medical oces. Medium and small oce buildings in Cherry Creek North are increasingly in demand. Banks are nding 1st Avenue east of Steele to be good locations. Opportunities for larger oce buildings exist along 1st Avenue, the east side of Steele and in Cherry Creek Triangle. Hospitality uses. Hotels have emerged as another synergistic use. Colorado Boulevard has proven to be an excellent location for limited service hotels. Full service hotels, such as J.W. Marriott, are likely to cluster along 1st Avenue. Boutique hotels add vitality at a greater variety of locations. Hotel patrons take advantage of shopping and restaurants. Public policy should reinforce location decisions to place larger hotels and hospitality uses closer to 1st Avenue, while allowing boutique hotels in more locations within the Shopping District. D.1.B MORE HOUSINGResidential uses contribute signicantly to the vitality of the area. While Cherry Creek North and East continue to experience inll development, the greatest potential for new residential is as a part of mixed-use development in the Shopping District and on vacant parcels in the Cherry Creek Triangle. All of this housing will continue to reinforce the range of housing types already found in the Cherry Creek Areasingle family, duplexes, row houses, and condo and apartment towers. Where appropriate, this housing will include retail, oce or hotel uses to further the mixed-use character of the area. The area has proven to be very attractive to residential development, so plan recommendations focus on enhancing amenities and removing public policy impediments.D.1.C IMPORTANCE OF VISITORS Visitorswhether families coming for a day, hotel guests coming for a week, or conventioneers seeing the sitesare an important economic driver for Cherry Creek retail. The shopping center attracts an estimated 1.3 million visitors per month and 30% are domestic and foreign tourists. Partnerships with Downtown, DIA, and Visit Denver will be increasingly important. Adding more rooms in Cherry Creek and improving access to and from Downtown RECOMMENDATION D.1 ECONOMIC VITALITY

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan 47(especially Denver Union Station, the Convention Center and 14th Street hotels, the Theatre District, and the 16th Street Mall) and Colorado Boulevard hotels is important. Hotels have proven to be benecial to Cherry Creeks prosperity; however, the location of dierent types is sensitive due primarily to trac impacts. Full service hotels with meeting facilities should be located in proximity to 1st Avenue for visibility and to minimize impacts to residential areas. Limited service hotels are located along Colorado Boulevard, including Cherry Creek Triangle. This type of hotel needs access and visibility from major streets. Boutique hotels are a welcome addition throughout the Shopping District and Cherry Creek Triangle. D.1.D WALKABILITY EQUALS PROSPERITY National trends indicate that pedestrian-oriented, mixed-use communities will prove most attractive to the creative class, young professionals, seniors, and families, as well as empty nesters. Aside from a few locations called out in the A Connected Cherry Creek chapter, most of the Cherry Creek Area has adequate sidewalks. Pedestrian oriented development creates the visual interest and eyes on the street to encourage walking in an attractive, convenient and safe area. Providing attractive connections within the Cherry Creek area assures that the subareas are well connected and interrelated. D.1.E CREATING COMMUNITY Arts, culture and recreation have emerged as signicant factors in establishing a sense of community for area residents and business owners. Having places and events where people can meet formally and informally is an important attribute of a healthy neighborhood. Seeing friends and neighbors at outdoor cafes, coee shops, the library, on the street or at stores, as well as at events such as the Cherry Creek Theater, Farmers Market, gallery opening or Arts Festival provides a sense of connection and community. In addition, the neighborhood

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan 48associations in Cherry Creek North and East sponsor many activities.D.2.A LOCAL CHARACTER/NATIONAL PROMINENCE The Cherry Creek Shopping District provides identity, amenity and value to the entire plan area with its variety of retail businesseslarge and small, local and national. Enhancing the symbiotic relationship and the distinctive character of Cherry Creek North and Cherry Creek Shopping Center is important to the entire area. While it is recognized by residents and business owners alike that reinvestment in Cherry Creek North is needed, the walkable character and rhythm of storefronts is essential to its unique character. Equally important, the Shopping Center has sites at the east and west end, as well as along the Greenway that will benet from more intense development. Land use regulations must be crafted to encourage appropriate development in both areas. D.2.B DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES Plan concepts and recommendations point to the benet of attracting more people residents, employees, and visitors and reinvestment to areas of change, namely the Shopping District and Cherry Creek Triangle. Study of land and development economics point to the need for updated land use and regulatory strategies in these areas. A wide array of development opportunities exist including small residential inll, outdated buildings and underdeveloped parcels. There are a number of surface parking lots with redevelopment potential. Highly visible opportunities include: West end of Cherry Creek Shopping Center (approx. 11 acres) East end of Cherry Creek Shopping Center (approx. 4.5 acres) Josephine / Columbine Street between 2nd and 3rd (approx. 2 acres) Cherry Creek Triangle (approx. 10.5 acres) 1st Bank site (approx. 1.85 acres) Steele Creek site (approx. 1 acre) 3000 East 3rd site (approx. 1.2 acres) Cherry Creek East village center Colorado Boulevard gateways on 1st Avenue and Bayaud As these sites and areas develop and redevelop over the next ten or twenty years, it will be essential to enhance the quality of design, relationship to surrounding buildings and neighborhoods, mix of uses, quality of the pedestrian experience and overall character of the Cherry Creek Area. Land use regulatory tools including zoning, general development plans, and design standards and guidelines are available tools to establish the regulatory framework to achieve high quality private development. RECOMMENDATION D.2 REINVESTING IN THE FUTURE Cherry Creek Shopping Center east end

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan 49 Key development opportunities map Key development opportunity

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan 50D.2.C HIGH QUALITY DEVELOPMENTRecommendations in the A Distinctive Cherry Creek chapter address land use and urban design. Assuring the balance of uses to retain the synergy and enhancing pedestrian-friendly design to enliven the street level are key aspects of high quality development. Setting high standards gives the residents, business owners, building owners and the development community the assurance that their investment in high quality will be reinforced in the future. Regulatory tools such as design review with clear design standards and guidelines, transitions between intensities and uses, and investment in the public realm are key implementation strategies.D.2.D MULTIMODAL STREETSMuch of the Shopping Districts success depends on people being able to access the area from all directions on the street network. Having streets that accommodate cars, pedestrians, bikes, and transit comfortably is important to the areas future success. Arterial streets such as Colorado, 1st Avenue, Alameda and University are the Cherry Creek Areas connection to the region. Making investments that enhance the value and attractiveness of the area and expand the multi-modal access is essential.D.2.E LOCATIONAL ADVANTAGE AND ACCESSCherry Creek is three miles from downtown, connected by regional bus routes, a street grid, and the Cherry Creek Greenway. The 90,000 person trips per day along 1st Avenue help generate visibility and a customer base for Cherry Creek businesses. Convenient access to the

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan 51Cherry Creek Area via transit is an important component of remaining competitive. As the A Connected Cherry Creek chapter states, regional investment in transit on the Speer/1st/ Alameda corridor is a long-term solution. In the short term, Cherry Creek needs to investigate public-private and private solutions to connecting Cherry Creek to destinations such as DIA, Downtown, Denver Union Station, and the regional rail network. Options include supporting expanded RTD service, shuttles, or reduced taxi fares. This multi-modal access should both bring more people to Cherry Creek and encourage Cherry Creek residents and employees to use alternative transportation.D.2.F STORMWATER IMPROVEMENTSWithout needed stormwater improvements, private development in Cherry Creek faces an additional impediment. Two major projects identied in the Citys 2009 Storm Drainage Master Plan include a new 60-inch Cherry Creek outfall along University and the Bayaud outfall in Cherry Creek East. Both projects will provide signicant drainage improvements during storm events. Both projects are in design and scheduled for construction in the next few years. Over the long term, sustainable stormwater solutions such as green alleys, streets and parking lots should be pursued. The solutions include features such as porous pavement, landscaped swales, and additional plantings.

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan 52D.3.A SHOPPING DISTRICT ORGANIZATIONEstablished in 1989, the Cherry Creek North Business Improvement District (BID) is the second largest BID by budget in Colorado. The BID serves the Cherry Creek North shopping district, a 16-block area that contains over 100 property owners and over 300 retail and personal service businesses. BID powers are established by state statute so some important activities are limited. While the Shopping District is gaining identity in the market, it lacks an organizational entity. Such an entity could be a 501(c) 6 organization that advocates for Cherry Creek business interests and coordinates eorts of the BID, Transportation Solutions, the Cherry Creek Chamber and other organizations. D.3.B PERIMETER STREET GATEWAYSProviding gateways at key entrances to the Cherry Creek Area can reinforce the areas identity. The Shopping Center and BID have gateway features, as does Clayton Lane; North Creek uses building design and materials to establish this identity. Other locations that are just as key, Colorado Boulevard at Alameda and 1st Avenue, lack any features that tie these portals to Cherry Creek. Entry monuments, building features, or special street signs are examples of gateways that can assist in reinforcing Cherry Creeks identity and providing more intuitive waynding. Public policies can aect building design and quality. Private sector investment will be needed for any monuments or entry features.D.3.C CITYWIDE RETAIL STRATEGYShould the city undertake a citywide retail strategy, the Cherry Creek Shopping District must be a primary participant. Any such study should dierentiate types of retail centers and develop strategies to ensure the success of various types. Finding ways to increase Denvers overall retail success based on its assets should be the outcome. For example, improving transit access to established retail centers such as Cherry Creek may prove more benecial than simply increasing competition and diluting success by adding retail centers to more locations. RECOMMENDATION D.3 ORGANIZATION AND IDENTITY

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Framework Plan 53 Perimeter street gateways mapPerimeter street gateway

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Subarea Strategies 54

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Subarea Strategies 55 Subarea StrategiesThe success of the Cherry Creek Area depends on the health of its individual subareas and surrounding neighborhoods. Maintaining the distinct identity of each district while balancing transitions and improving connections between them in a manner that enhances character, quality, prosperity and livability has always been a key goal in Cherry Creek. This Plan acknowledges four distinct subareas within Cherry Creek. Cherry Creek Shopping District the regions most vibrant upscale retail and mixed-use district Cherry Creek North Neighborhood a highly desirable, moderate density residential neighborhood with some embedded neighborhood-serving commercial uses Cherry Creek East a highly desirable moderate density residential neighborhood that also includes a high density oce and residential district on its western edge Cherry Creek Triangle a high density mixed-use district Along 1st Avenue and Steele Street, there is a desire to reect the overlapping character of subareas. For this reason, the subarea maps intentionally include duplicate blocks across those edges. Issues and recommendations specic for each subarea are documented in this section of the Plan to supplement the more general recommendations that apply to the entire planning area in the Framework Plan. The sub area goals: Enhance character and livability. Maintain distinct identity of each. Improve connections. Balance transition.

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Subarea Strategies 56 Cherry Creek Shopping District The Cherry Creek Shopping District is Denvers premier retail destination, and as such, it creates amenity and value to entire Cherry Creek Area, as well as to the City, region and state. The Shopping District encompasses Cherry Creek Shopping Center (a regional mall) and Cherry Creek North Business Improvement District, (a local mixed-use / retail district)a synergistic combination found in few other cities. Mixed-use districts east of Steele Street are also included within the Shopping District subarea in order to improve the connectivity of these mixed-use areas across 1st Avenue and Steele Street. While best known for its variety of local and national retailers, both large and small, as well as its exclusive retail, the Shopping District is becoming increasingly mixed-use with the introduction of more housing, hotel and oce uses above retail, along with the oce and residential towers to the east. KEY ISSUES: ENTIRE CHERRY CREEK SHOPPING DISTRICT Retail strength. As all retail districts do, the Shopping District must continually reinvest in and reinvent itself to retain its competitive position and exclusive reputation for high quality and successful retail. Recent improvements include the north elevation of the Shopping Center (especially Nordstrom), the BIDs streetscape and Fillmore Plaza improvements, and new development along 1st Avenue. Future opportunities include the east and west ends of the Shopping Center and vacant and underutilized properties throughout the Shopping District. Regional and local connectivity. The Shopping Districts role as an economic generator and its pivotal location within a regional travel shed prioritizes the importance of addressing multimodal connectivity to and through Cherry Creek. It is important for residents, employees and visitors of every subarea to have easy, convenient access to each other and with the Shopping District, with multiple transportation choices available. Quality of place. Quality of place and the pedestrian experience is a combination of the public realm (streets, sidewalks, pedestrian amenities) and the adjacent private development and its relationship to the street (entrances, windows, outdoor dining, merchandise displays). Neither one can fully succeed without the other. 1st and Steele intersection. 1st and Steele is one of the Cherry Creek Areas most challenging intersections. In addition to the complex vehicular and pedestrian movements described in the A Well Connected Cherry Creek chapter, its width and curvature make the relationship between the public realm and adjacent buildings challenging. All four corners of the 1st and Steele intersection are considered catalytic redevelopment sites. 1st Avenue and Ellsworth intersection. Steele and Ellsworth is an important pedestrian crossing between the high density residential development to the east and the Safeway, Rite-Aide and Shopping Center to the west. A safe, ADA compliant crossing is particularly important for the residents of Allied Jewish Housing. Shopping District identity. The Shopping District concept is one of the unique attributes of the Cherry Creek Area; however, no single organization serves the entire district to coordinate events, support appropriate development concepts, and to market the mixed-use attributes of the subarea. KEY ISSUES: CHERRY CREEK SHOPPING CENTERRedevelopment potential. The Cherry Creek Shopping Center opened in 1990 in the center of a large, continuous property. The original shopping center at the west end was repurposed for big and mid size national retailers and restaurants. The Safeway and Rite-Aide were incorporated into the east end. Limitations of current zoning. The shopping centers current zoning of B-3 does not provide a predictable set of building forms or patterns. An alternative regulatory framework is needed

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Subarea Strategies 57to envision and enable contextually appropriate development for the mall property. Long term success. The Cherry Creek Shopping Center has evolved over time to meet the needs of the regional customer base. Shopping Center as superblock. As is typical of regional shopping malls, the Cherry Creek Shopping Center sits within a superblock. Vehicular access serves parking garages and parking lots. Pedestrian and bike portals to the site are inconsistent along all sides of the property. The Clayton connection to Nordstrom and its plaza and the Fillmore crossing to the main entrance are examples of improved connection. Relationship to Greenway. The relationship between the Shopping Center and Cherry Creek Greenway is diminished because of the placement of the east and west parking garages. Plazas connecting the Shopping Center and the Cherry Creek Greenway lack vibrancy. Additionally, connections between 1st Avenue and the Greenway at St. Paul and at Steele are not well marked. There is no bike trail or sidewalk on the east side of University.KEY ISSUES: MIXEDUSE AREAS EAST OF STEELE ST.Cherry Creek East mixed-use area. The area between Steele and Madison and 1st Avenue and Pulaski Park has emerged as a high-density, mixed-use area. Major developments include oces, condo towers, senior housing, and apartment complexes. Steele St. Steele St between 1st and Bayaud serves as the front door to Cherry Creek East. 1st Avenue north side. The north side of 1st Avenue from Steele east to Jackson and north to 2nd is another mixed-use area containing medium density residential and oce uses.KEY ISSUES: CHERRY CREEK NORTH RETAIL DISTRICT BID AREAStreetscape improvements. In 2011, the Cherry Creek North Business Improvement District (BID) streetscape improvements rened the successful concept of highlighting all of the corners with enhanced pavement, planters, banners, waynding, and seating, creating visual interest throughout the area. Development economics. A study of land and development economics conducted for this plan (KHO Consulting, 2011) indicates that the current zoning makes redevelopment challenging in the BID area. In addition to the height limit, the C-CCN zone districts relatively high parking ratios and low oor area ratio are the critical factors in limiting the potential for BID properties to redevelop. Retaining C-CCN zoning as-is will limit the ability of the BID to attract additional mixed-use development including retail, high quality oce space, hotels, and more residential units. Quality retail experience. The quality and continuity of retail storefronts varies from block to block resulting in a fragmented retail district. Disruptions to the continuity of ground oor active uses include surface parking, unscreened parking garages, garden-level retail, and vacant buildings. Furthermore, some older buildings do not meet accessibility codes making access for all dicult. 3rd Avenue character. 3rd Avenue is a locally serving retail street dominated by one and two story buildings and small retail tenants, some of which are well-known, long-time local businesses. The north side of the street has the additional role of acting as a height transition from the Shopping District to the Cherry Creek North neighborhood. Many buildings need reinvestment and access improvements for continued viability. Parking. The perception of a parking shortage has been a challenge for Cherry Creek North. A parking study conducted in 2007 as part of Denvers Strategic Parking Plan revealed that there is a generous supply of onand o-street parking. The transition from parking kiosks to smart meters has helped to better manage on-street parking. Properties that have developed in Cherry Creek North BID tend to be owner-occupier situations, which makes redevelopment nancially feasible. Many Cherry Creek North BID properties have not seen signicant reinvestment for 3 or 4 decades. The desirability of the area, high land values, high rents and small parcels create a challenge for property owners to nd redevelopment scenarios that are as protable as no reinvestment. High end retail in Cherry Creek North

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Subarea Strategies 58SUBAREA RECOMMENDATIONS: ENTIRE SHOPPING DISTRICT Enhance retail quality and district character through appropriate change. Positive change is needed throughout the Shopping District to enhance this vibrant mixed-use regional center. The Cherry Creek Shopping District remains an area of change. Its central location, existing mixture of high end retail, economic development opportunities, walkable streets and access to regional multi-modal connections create an ideal location for encouraging additional residential and employment growth. It needs to retain its combination of national retailers, exclusive retailers, local retailers, and neighborhood serving retailers. Plan guidance and the resulting regulatory framework should encourage appropriate new development throughout the Shopping District. Regional Center and Town Center. Continue to support a mix of uses in the Regional Center (see Future Land Use Map on page 63) including oce, retail, commercial, multifamily residential and hotels. Support compact development patterns and an enhanced public realm including landscaping, waynding signage, pedestrian lighting, public art and inviting building entries. The Town Center areas act as an important transition between Regional Center and residential areas. Scale. Maximum building heights in the Shopping District should range from 4 to 12 stories, per the Maximum Building Heights Map (page 63). Building heights should be lowest adjacent to residential areas in Cherry Creek North and Country Club neighborhoods. Higher development intensity is encouraged along multi-modal streets and at key intersections. Mid rise buildings (maximum of 5 or 8 stories) are recommended as transitions between high intensity and low intensity residential neighborhoods. Support better regional connectivity. As described in the A Connected Cherry Creek chapter, enhanced transit connections between Cherry Creek and downtown Denver, as well as to DIA and the global marketplace, are necessary to keep Cherry Creek competitive within the region. Continue to attract shoppers. The Cherry Creek Shopping District must continue to attract shoppers from the nearby neighborhoods as well as the city and region. Having daily needs met within walking distance of all parts of the area and nearby neighborhoods is important to quality of life and greater sustainability. The Shopping District thrives because of the large number of people within Cherry Creek and nearby neighborhoods, visitors and the much larger number within the trade area.

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Subarea Strategies 59 More residential hotel and oce development in Shopping District and other nearby Areas of Change, such as Cherry Creek Triangle More visitors from within Cherry Creek and from Downtown, Colorado Boulevard and Glendale Better transit service between the Shopping District, Downtown, DIA and other nearby neighborhoods and urban centers: Capitol Hill, Colorado Boulevard and I-25, University of Denver, Lowry and Glendale. Continued auto access from throughout the metro area. Pedestrian oriented development. All new development should serve to enhance the pedestrian realm. Line streets with storefronts, windows and building entrances. Place active uses at the street and parking at the rear. New developments and reinvestments along Fillmore and 1st Avenue are good examples of pairing public and private investment. Improve the 1st and Steele intersection. As the primary node of economic opportunity and multi-modal connectivity in Cherry Creek, improving this intersection is critical to the Shopping Districts long-term success. A study to identify possible improvements should prioritize making pedestrian and vehicle movements more intuitive as well as considering the relationship of buildings to the street. Enhancements to this intersection should contribute to rather than detract fromthe Shopping Districts walkability. Improvements should reconnect the Shopping Center, the Cherry Creek North BID, Cherry Creek East and 1st Avenue. Improve the Steele and Ellsworth intersection. The Steele and Ellsworth intersection presents conicts between vehicles and pedestrians crossing from the high density residential area to the east, for bikes using the sidewalk bike lane along Steele, and destinations (mall and one of the areas only full service grocery stores) on the west. Strategies may include shortening intersection crossing distances where possible; more enforcement for the noturn-on-red signage; ADA compliance; longer crossing times; improving median refuge; and smaller turning radius on the west side of intersection to slow trac speeds. Intersection improvements should give priority to pedestrian and bike use. Create a unied Shopping District identity. Look for opportunities to forge a partnership that represents the entire Shopping District. Such a partnership will help with coordinating events, supporting appropriate development concepts, improving regional connections and in marketing and branding.

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Subarea Strategies 60 SUBAREA RECOMMENDATIONS: CHERRY CREEK SHOPPING CENTERSupport appropriate change. The long-term vision for the Shopping Center as stated in the 2000 Neighborhood plan and further rened in this plan includes greater density at the east and west ends, as well as a greater mix of uses that may include higher intensity mixed-use oce, hotel and residential along with ground oor retail. The Safeway and Rite-Aid serve the Cherry Creek Area and surrounding neighborhoods; both uses can be incorporated into mixed-use structures. The arrangement of new buildings and modication of the shopping center should reinforce key intersections, pedestrian waynding, the Greenway, and vista terminations. Utilize appropriate land use regulations. Future redevelopment of the east and west ends of the Shopping Center presents the opportunity enhance the success of the area and to establish improved visual and physical connections across 1st Avenue and Steele Street. In addition to form-based and context-based zoning, appropriate regulatory tools such as a general development plan and design standards and guidelines should be developed and applied. Embrace continued evolution. Ensure the continued evolution and success of the Shopping Center and allow new development to embrace its regional function while providing pedestrian scale, orientation and circulation. This Shopping Center has remained successful even as competition has intensied because of the variety of buildings intended to suit dierent local/regional functions, its distinctiveness within a shopping district, its central location, and convenient access from the entire region. Public policy actions must enable this evolution. Create welcoming portals. All of the edges of the Shopping Center need well-dened portals for pedestrians and bicyclists and automobiles. Portal locations should be informed by building entrances, the opposing street grid, and pedestrian oriented perimeter development. To the extent possible, provide physical and visual connections to soften the seams and edges between 1st Avenue and the Greenway. Celebrate the Greenway. The Cherry Creek Greenway is one of the areas greatest assets. The Framework Plan recommends improvements along all four edges of the Shopping Center. Coordinate these improvements to provide a distinctive and consistent visual identity and recommended connections. Enhance the quality and connection of the Greenway plazas on either side of Cherry Creek Drive North. One option for activating the Shopping Center Plaza is to add a bike station. As the west side of the shopping center redevelops, look for opportunities to incorporate and embrace the Greenway and creek into the design and provide active uses along the Greenways edge in a way that does not compromise the natural beauty of the creek channel. Continue the Cherry Creek Greenway multiuse trail along the east, west and north edges of the site with a combination sidewalk and bike lane, along with landscaping. Highlight pedestrian and bicycle portals with amenities and signage. Tie plazas and building forecourts to the Greenway edge. Connect to the bike network as described previously in this plan and in Denver Moves.

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Subarea Strategies 61 The newly developed Santa Monica Place mall in Santa Monica, CA exemplies how a visual and physical connection can be made between a mall and a mixed-use district across a busy street.SUBAREA RECOMMENDATIONS: MIXEDUSE AREAS EAST OF STEELEBuild on success. Continue to develop vacant and underutilized parcels with midand highrise mixed-use buildings that complement Cherry Creek East and the Shopping District on. Quality development is encouraged through the existing zoning and design standards and guidelines. The design quality of development at 1st and Steele is particularly important. Improve pedestrian friendly character of Steele Street. As redevelopment occurs, new buildings should enhance the streetscape and promote improved pedestrian amenities. Improve pedestrian friendly character of 1st Avenue. As the street redesign described in the A Connected Cherry Creek chapter is implemented, encourage buildings that add pedestrian activation features to the 1st Avenue frontage. Review the C-MX-5 zoning to assure consistency with the subarea vision. Investigate application of design standards and guidelines.SUBAREA RECOMMENDATIONS: CCN BUSINESS IMPROVEMENT DISTRICTRevise land use regulation. Enact zoning and other land use regulatory tools for the C-CCN zone district to encourage rather than inhibit high quality redevelopment and reinvestment across all parcel sizes, large and small. Retain positive elements of current zoning including ground oor retail, design review, quality design and materials, interesting signage, and parking location. Reconsider height, FAR, building form, and parking requirements. Engage in an open, transparent and ecient public process that includes all stakeholder interests and includes the following goals created by the CCN Urban Form Working Group, 2012: Goal #1 Retain and enhance Cherry Creek Norths unique physical character. The high quality design of buildings, streetscape and public realm within Cherry Creek North are unique urban design attributes that distinguish the area within the city and region. Retaining and enhancing the high-quality architectural and public realm character is critical to the future success of the area. The design intent includes: Variety of building sizes, heights and types on both named and numbered streets High quality public realm: high level of pedestrian amenity, streetscaping and active strorefronts High quality architectural design and building materials Evolving distinctiveness between 2nd and 3rd avenues Compact area with clear boundaries and attractive entry points Goal #2 Make reinvestment economically viable in the entire district. Current zoning is insucient to achieve the Plans vision for a prosperous Cherry Creek and the need for reinvestment, redevelopment and sustained economic viability. Factors to be addressed include: Height limit of 55 feet throughout the CCN district does not reect emerging character dierences of 2nd and 3rd avenues FAR of 1 with a 0.5 premium is inadequate to achieve desired urban character High parking requirements do not reinforce plan recommendations regarding parking management and alternative transportation. Furthermore, the current parking requirements are among the highest in the city and cannot be met economically on small lots and add substantial cost to development

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Subarea Strategies 62 Goal #3 Encourage small lot reinvestment. Multiple small lots fronting the named streets and 3rd Avenue are among the dening characteristics within the district. A variety of lot and building sizes reinforces the architectural variety and organic character of Cherry Creek North and reinvestment in a variety of small lots throughout the district is desired. Tools such as reduced parking and relaxed building form requirements can be used to encourage redevelopment of smaller parcels and reinvestment in smaller buildings. Goal #4 Transition from higher buildings along 2nd to lower buildings along 3rd. Continue to evolve the distinct character of 2nd and 3rd avenues by distinguishing each street with a special character that supports the overall vision for the district. 2nd Avenue will support higher intensity due to its proximity and 1st Avenue and 3rd Avenue is envisioned a boutique street and a transition to the neighborhood. The block between 2nd and 3rd will transition from the greater height of 8 stories along 2nd Avenue to the 4-story height along 3rd Avenue. The transition should reinforce the variety of building heights and widths along the named streets. Goal #5 Create height transition from the business district to adjacent residential. The Denver Zoning Code establishes protected and control districts to create height and form relationships between higher and lower intensity zone districts. These designations are appropriate for the transition between the business district and neighborhood. Goal #6 Retain sunlight on streets and views between buildings. Sun and sky exposure are among the attributes that make Cherry Creek North a highly walkable district. Building form tools such as breaks between buildings, upper story setbacks and solar bulk planes can be used to provide openness as building heights increase. Goal #7 Prevent the creation of walled or monolithic streets. Reinforcing the attributes of Cherry Creek such as building size and height variety, breaks between buildings, and street level building articulation contribute to a pedestrian scale, thereby avoiding the sense of street canyons, especially for larger scale development. Goal #8 Active storefronts and ground oor uses. Cherry Creek North is best known as a retail district. Continuing the zoning requirement for ground oor retail and the strorefront articulation provided in the Cherry Creek Design Standards and Guidelines is essential to its walkability and vitality. Assure design quality. The Cherry Creek North Design Standards and Guidelines and Design Advisory Board have been successful and assure that new development engages the street and reinforces the quality of the pedestrian experience. Enhance 3rd Avenue charm and viability. Any revisions to the land use regulatory documents must both reinforce 3rd Avenues characteristic rhythm of smaller storefronts and transition to the residential uses to the north. Manage parking. For many shoppers and visitors, parking is an impression that contributes to the overall experience, so providing parking choices that are intuitive and convenient is important for the retail area. Several strategies should be considered as described in the parking management strategy toolbox of the Strategic Parking Plan. Marketing existing o-street parking lots to visitors and employees would make better use of existing supply. Additional public parking signs denoting the location of public o-street lots and new technology and emerging mobile phone apps may be used. Making parking intuitive and easy leaves a lasting impression for visitors to the area and cuts down on trac congestion. RIGHT SIZING PARKINGRight sizing parking, dened as providing no more or less parking needed to support the use it serves, is critical to both quality of life and prosperity in an urban environment. A residential or oce building containing too few parking spaces can result in diculty for the property owner to nd tenants and over use of on-street parking, all of which contributes to a perception of having a parking problem. Conversely, too much parking creates a substantial nancial burden for development because of the expense of parking, especially underground parking. Above grade parking and surface parking less costly options can degrade the pedestrian experience and quality of the place.

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Subarea Strategies 63 Future land use map Cherry Creek Shopping District Maximum building heights map Cherry Creek Shopping District Regional Center Town Center 12 Stories 8 Stories 3 Stories 8 Stories 4 Stories3rd Ave 2nd AveOther subareas Other subareas *CCN Transition 8 stories at 2nd Ave and 4 stories at 3rd Ave 5 Stories CCN Transition* see graphic below 4 Stories Capitalize on shared parking opportunities so that private o-street parking could be shared among retailers as allowed in the Denver Zoning Code. In addition, a park once and walk strategy can have multiple benets: reduces overall demand for parking; makes better use of parking supply; minimizes trac searching for parking; and increases pedestrian trac. A private parking district, through the BID or another entity, could take responsibility for managing all o-street parking and constructing new parking as needed. An ostreet parking district relies on paid o-street parking to fund its capital and operating expenses.

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Subarea Strategies 64 Existing land use Cherry Creek North neighborhoodThe Cherry Creek North neighborhood stretches across the northern edge of the Cherry Creek Area. It is an L-shaped area bounded by 6th Avenue on the north, Josephine on the west and Colorado Boulevard on the east. The southern boundary from Josephine to the Steele-Adams alley is the Cherry Creek Shopping District which extends about 150 feet north of 3rd Avenue; 1st Avenue forms the southern boundary of the remainder of the subarea. The neighborhood is predominantly residential, though the character of the residential has been changing small bungalows replaced with large duplexes, row houses and single family houses. The neighborhood has developed an identity of being one of the most desirable and upscale residential areas in Denver. The chart below illustrates the housing types, number of housing units, average sizes, average assessed values, and total property tax generated in 2011, according to the City of Denver property records. Cherry Creek North Neighborhood Housing Types, 2011 House Type Number (%) Housing Units Average S.F. (excluding basement) Average Assessed Value Total Annual Property Taxes (all houses) 1-Story Bungalow 165 (10%) 1214$529,157$465,285 2-Story Single Family 134 (8%) 3575$1,604,601$1,145,836 3-Story Single Family 11 (<1%) 4016$1,462,145$85,710 Condo 342 (22%) 1335$454,747$828,794 Single Family Attached*938 (59%) 2454$865,927$4,328,473 Subtotal / Average 1590 2519$983,315$6,854,099 Apartments 75 Total Residential Units 1665 Source: Realty Resources; Real Property Records, City and County of Denver Assessor, 2011 *Single Family Attached includes duplexes, row houses and townhouses Cherry Creek North Neighborhood Oce Retail Garage/carport/shed Single-family Park Public/quasi public Multi-family Other subareas Mixed Use Commercial Industrial

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Subarea Strategies 65 Cherry Creek North has seen much change over the past three decades: small bungalows, duplexes, row houses and single family homes. Low scale retail on 6th Avenue Large Cherry Creek North Neighborhood duplexSeveral exceptions to the predominant use and scale are important to note: Medium height residential buildings immediately north of the business district two buildings on the 300 block of Detroit Street (4 stories and 5 stories); one building on the 300 block of Fillmore Street (4 stories); Mixed-use area consisting of a condo building, banks, oces, and retail between 1st and 2nd on Adams, Cook, and Madison and continuing east along the north side of 1st to Colorado; and, Retail uses in one-story buildings along the south side of 6th Avenue between Josephine and Steele. Urban form and building form are consistent with the street grid. With few exceptions, buildings are oriented to the street and vehicular access is from the mid-block alley. Streets are narrow with detached sidewalks and tree lawns. On-street parking is provided on all streets. Sidewalks are lacking only in locations where older houses have not been replaced. Cherry Creek North is a highly walkable, bikeable neighborhood throughout. East-west transit service is available on the Route 6 (6th and 8th Avenues) and the 1st Avenue routes; north-south service is Route 40 on Colorado Boulevard and Route 24 on University/Josephine. For the most part, zoning in the Cherry Creek North neighborhood reinforces the existing character. The core of the neighborhood is zoned G-RH-3, which allows for a mix of housing types and development patterns consistent with the current character of the neighborhood and building height of 30 to 35 feet. Portions of the 300 block Clayton, Detroit and Fillmore Streets are zoned G-MU-5, allowing for multifamily residential development up to ve stories. Mixed-use zoned districts are located along the 6th Avenue retail strip and in the mixed-use area in the blocks northeast of Steele and 1st. Community facilities within the neighborhood are limited to Manley Park and Bromwell School on the western edge of the neighborhood. Two of Denvers top public schools provide education to Cherry Creek North residential children. Bromwell Elementary School is located in CCN on the southwest corner of Columbine and 4th Avenue, and Steck Elementary School is east of CCN on Albion Street.

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Subarea Strategies 66KEY ISSUES: CHERRY CREEK NORTH NEIGHBORHOODResidential character and scale. The Cherry Creek North neighborhood is a walkable upscale residential area with some embedded mixed-use areas. Boundaries between residential and mixed-use areas are well established. Recent development patterns have resulted in low scale development throughout the neighborhood, so transitions between adjacent mixed-use areas and residential areas in both scale and uses are important factors in maintaining the existing character. Neighborhood trac. Trac counts on Cherry Creek North neighborhood streets indicate minimal increase since the 2000 Cherry Creek Area Plan despite substantial new residential and commercial development in the BID. Nevertheless, the perception remains that cutthrough trac, especially between 6th Avenue and the Shopping District, is prevalent. Despite this perception, there are few continuous streets through Cherry Creek North. The addition of regular stop control at alternating intersections is intended to prevent vehicles from easily cutting through the neighborhood. Perimeter streets. Busy arterial streets lining Cherry Creek Norths perimeter, specically 1st Avenue and Colorado Boulevard can seem like barriers, presenting challenges for pedestrians and adjacent property owners, as described in the A Connected Cherry Creek chapter. Parking. On-street parking is in higher demand in areas that directly border the Shopping District. While two-hour time restrictions discourage employees and visitors from parking in these locations, the CCN residential parking permit (RPP) program excludes residents from the time restriction in order to balance the on-street parking demands.

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Subarea Strategies 67 Pedestrian and bicycle connections. All streets within the Cherry Creek North neighborhood have comfortable pedestrian connections. Marked bike routes connecting to the local and regional system are lacking. Bicycle and pedestrian connectivity across arterial streets is also a challenge. Some sidewalk segments are lacking. East-West connections 4th Avenue leads directly to Bromwell Elementary School and has trac signals on Josephine and University couplet. 3rd Avenue leads directly to Cranmer Park east of Colorado and 5th Avenue leads directly to Steck Elementary School, also east of Colorado. These two streets have trac signals to facilitate crossing of Colorado Boulevard. North-south connection on St. Paul The St. Paul bike route extends from City Park to the Cherry Creek Greenway and provides access to the 7th Avenue Parkway bike lanes, but there is no marked bicycle facility and minimal signage associated with this route. The 6th Avenue platooning signal is located to the east of St. Paul. The Cherry Creek Greenway is dicult to access from St. Paul and 1st Avenue due to lack of signage and inadequate bicycle and pedestrian facilities on Steele Street. Connections across 1st Avenue There is no designated bike connection between Cherry Creek North and Cherry Creek East across 1st Avenue. A clear route designation and bicycle facilities would provide Cherry Creek North residents with better access to Pulaski Park and the Cherry Creek Greenway. Gareld is the only signalized intersection between Steele and Colorado.

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Subarea Strategies 68 RECOMMENDATIONS: CHERRY CREEK NORTH NEIGHBORHOODReinforce the residential character. Maintain and enhance the existing residential character and walkable environment of Cherry Creek North. New development will respect the predominant urban form of detached sidewalks, tree lawns, landscaped block-sensitive setbacks, alley access to structures, limited curb cuts, and building entry features that are visible from the street. Land uses should conform with existing boundaries between residential and mixed-use areas. Recommended land use categories are depicted on the Future Land Use Map: Urban Residential Row House. Continue to support a mix of housing types including single family, accessory dwelling units, duplexes and row houses. Urban Residential. Continue supporting a variety of housing types including lowand mid-rise multifamily, row house, duplex, single family and accessory dwelling units. Pedestrian Shopping District. Support a mix of uses on 6th Avenue including small scale neighborhood serving commercial and retail. Regional Center and Town Center. Continue to support a mix of uses including oce, retail, commercial and multifamily residential. Support compact development patterns and an enhanced public realm including landscaping, waynding signage, pedestrian lighting, public art and inviting building entries. The Town Center areas act as an important transition between Regional Center and residential areas in scale and/or use. Respect the existing scale. Retain the existing pattern of development intensity, with low scale buildings in the residential areas and mid-rise buildings in the transition area between 1st and 2nd Avenue and Steele and Monroe Street, per the Maximum Building Heights Map. Monitor and discourage cut-through trac. Trac patterns should continue to be monitored with periodic trac engineering studies. If trac counts indicate that street capacity is exceeded, the city and neighborhood should work together to identify appropriate trac management tools for the area. Implement A Connected Cherry Creek chapter recommendations regarding perimeter streets. Further study of Colorado Boulevard and nding funding for 1st Avenue improvements are important next steps in addressing challenges with perimeter arterials. Continue the neighborhood parking permit program. The neighborhood parking permit program has limited visitor parking within the neighborhood. The program should be monitored to ensure consistent applicability of the intent of the residential parking permit program. Improve pedestrian connections. Continue to require installation of sidewalks and tree lawns as new development occurs. 4th Avenue Designate a bicycle boulevard along 4th Avenue connecting the Country Club neighborhood, across University Boulevard, to Bromwell Elementary and Manley Park. Include a bicycle connection through the park and continuing to the east. The bike route would turn south on Harrison Street to 3rd Avenue in order to cross Colorado Boulevard at a trac signal; access to Steck is provided at 5th with a pedestrian activated signal. The 4th Avenue route would eectively connect residents with parks and elementary schools.

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Subarea Strategies 69 St. Paul Improve the St. Paul bicycle route by adding destination based signage and route markings. Consider moving the crossing signal on 6th Avenue west to facilitate crossing at St. Paul. Gareld bicycle boulevard Designate a bicycle boulevard along Gareld Street using the trac light at 1st Avenue to connect Cherry Creek North with Cherry Creek East, Cherry Creek Triangle and the Cherry Creek Greenway to the south and with 7th Avenue, Colfax and City Park to the north.Future land use map Cherry Creek North neighborhood Maximum building heights map Cherry Creek North neighborhood Regional Center Town Center Pedestrian Shopping Corridor Urban Residential Urban Residential Row House 3 Stories Other subareas 5 Stories Other subareas

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Subarea Strategies 70Located due east of the Cherry Creek Shopping Center, Cherry Creek East (CCE) is bordered by Steele Street, Cherry Creek North Drive, Alameda Avenue, Colorado Boulevard and 1st Avenue. This area supports a mix of residential and oce uses and some of the highest residential and employment densities in all of Cherry Creek, as well as the greatest diversity of housing types. Cherry Creek East is cherished as a walkable place to live and work with easy access to great schools, parks and recreation, shopping and entertainment. As a result it has become one of Denvers most desirable neighborhoods for both residents and employees alike. Madison Street serves to dene two character areas: east of Madison Street is low to medium scale residential and west is a mid to high-rise mixed-use area. Similar to the Cherry Creek North neighborhood, the eastern part of Cherry Creek East has seen much redevelopment over the last two decades. As a result, small cottage style houses have been replaced with duplexes, row houses, large single family homes, accessory dwelling units and multi-family structures. Building heights typically range from 1-3 stories, with some 4-5 story buildings along 1st Avenue and Alameda Avenue. West of Madison, the district supports primarily high-rise residential and oce uses with buildings reaching 16 stories. The development intensity and types of uses west of Madison are more consistent with development along the north side of 1st Avenue in the Shopping District. For this reason, this area between Madison and Steele is also considered part of the Shopping District Subarea. Cherry Creek Easts village center is located at the intersection these two character areas and Pulaski Park at Bayaud and Madison. The urban form in Cherry Creek East creates a walkable environment. Detached sidewalks, tree lawns and on-street parking as well as block-sensitive setbacks, alley access to structures, limited curb cuts and street-facing building entry features create a comfortable pedestrian realm. The majority of the area has PUD or Denver Zoning Code G-RH-3 zoning. Recent development has resulted in a mix of housing types and an urban form that enhances the character of the neighborhood. Cherry Creek East West of Madison Street, Cherry Creek East is characterized by high rise residential and oce buildings.

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Subarea Strategies 71KEY ISSUES: CHERRY CREEK EASTAging undeveloped PUDs. There are nearly 100 individually adopted PUDs in Cherry Creek East and some of these properties have not been developed. Because PUD zoning typically does not provide the exibility needed to react to the changing real estate market and updating a PUD entails a lengthy rezoning process, these unbuilt PUD projects create uncertainty for the owner and community. Cherry Creek East design guidelines. The Cherry Creek East design guidelines promote high quality development throughout Cherry Creek East. These guidelines envision continued redevelopment of CCE as an urban, mixed-use neighborhood. The regulatory authority of these guidelines is not clearly established. Pulaski Park/Gates Tennis Center. Pulaski Park and the adjacent Gates Tennis Center are important recreational assets for Cherry Creek East, Cherry Creek Greenway users, and the tennis community. Pulaski Park is underutilized because of it lack of access from the north, which limits use by neighbors, especially residents of Allied Jewish Housing. Challenges for daily use and activation include adjacent buildings turning their backs on the park, lack of a clear entry point from the north, and the tennis court screening. The playground has helped to attract families to the southeast corner of the park; however, few other amenities are in place for community gatherings or daily use. Madison-Bayaud village center. This small commercial node has historically supported neighborhood-serving commercial uses such a sports bar and grill, a pilates studio and small oce uses. Despite widespread growth and redevelopment in Cherry Creek East in the last two decades, this small commercial node has seen little reinvestment or redevelopment since the 1980s. Zoning is in place to support redevelopment; however, the streetscape needs improvement and existing buildings do not have pedestrian friendly ground oor use or design. Pedestrian and bicycle connections. Pedestrian and bicycle connections across perimeter arterials can be challenging, which impacts connectivity between Cherry Creek East and adjacent subareas across Alameda, 1st Avenue and Steele Street, as well as between Cherry Creek East and the Cherry Creek Greenway. Access between Cherry Creek East and the Cherry Creek Greenway is challenging due to the conguration of the Alameda and Cherry Creek North Drive intersection. Access to the Shopping District via Ellsworth and Bayaud can be challenging for those with mobility impairments due to the high volumes of trac and turning movements on Steele Street. Connections across Alameda between the Cherry Creek Triangle and Cherry Creek East can be challenging due to the high volumes of trac on Alameda Avenue and the lack of crossing locations between Cherry Creek North Drive and Colorado Boulevard. Stormwater. Drainage issues can create ponding and icing on local streets. Harrison Street. Properties on the east side of Harrison have seen a continued lack of private investment. Existing buildings have deteriorated and vacant lots remain undeveloped. Challenges include adjacency with the heavily travelled Colorado Boulevard and its parkway setbacks, parcel depth, and access. Though there is a desire for change along Harrison to spark private investment, multiple property owners with varied goals, narrow block depth, lack of sidewalks, and high trac volumes are all challenges. Connectivity and lack of investment along perimeter arterials. Cherry Creek East is surrounded by busy arterials that create hard edges and inhibit multi-modal connectivity between Cherry Creek East and adjacent subareas. Properties adjacent to Alameda Avenue and Colorado Boulevard and portions of 1st Avenue have seen little reinvestment.

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Subarea Strategies 72CHERRY CREEK EAST SUBAREA RECOMMENDATIONSReinforce the residential character. Maintain and enhance the existing character and walkable environment of Cherry Creek East. New development will respect the predominant urban form of detached sidewalks, tree lawns, landscaped block-sensitive setbacks, alley access to structures, limited curb cuts and building entry features that are visible from the street. Land uses should respect existing boundaries between residential and mixed-use areas. Recommended land use categories are depicted on the future land use map: Urban Residential. Continue supporting a variety of housing types including low and mid-rise multifamily, row houses, duplex, single family and accessory dwelling units. Town Center. Support a mix of land uses including ground oor commercial with oce or residential above. Regional Center. Continue to support a mix of uses including oce, retail, commercial, multifamily residential and hotels. Support compact development patterns and an enhanced public realm including landscaping, waynding signage, pedestrian lighting, public art and inviting building entries. Respect the existing scale. Enhance the existing pattern of development intensity with low scale buildings in the residential areas. Mid-rise buildings may be appropriate near Alameda and Colorado. The mixed-use area between Steele and Madison will remain the most intensely developed portion of the neighborhood, with building heights ranging from 5 to 12 stories, per the maximum building heights map. Rezone PUDs. As opportunities arise with new development or property owner interest, property owners and neighborhood representatives will work together with the City to determine an appropriate Denver Zoning Code district that serves to implement this plan. Formalize the Cherry Creek East design guidelines. Review and the revise the contents of these guidelines and the area to which they apply. Adopt as rules and regulations through Chapter 12, Revised Municipal Code. Activate Pulaski Park. Work with Parks and Recreation and the Gates Tennis Center to make the northern entrance to the park more visible and more accessible to all Cherry Creek East residents. Also consider longer term actions to activate the park and to encourage daily use. Create a village center. The mixed-use node at the intersection of Madison and Bayaud has long been envisioned as a village center for Cherry Creek East. Encourage property owners to reinvest and redevelop in manner that results in a vibrant mixed-use node, including ground oor commercial with oce or residential uses above. Small scale, neighborhood-serving retail and commercial uses are encouraged. Upgrade the streetscape with detached sidewalks and landscaped tree lawns. Desired enhanced streetscape amenities include removal of the median, on-street parking, curb extensions, pedestrian lighting, benches, and trash receptacles. Any reinvestment or redevelopment occurring on the southwest corner should incorporate access to and visibility of Pulaski Park into the design of the structure. Ideas include patio seating fronting the park, and high degrees of transparency on the street and park facades. Such strategies add vibrancy both to the park and the village center. Improve pedestrian and bicycle connections. Utilize the bike connections at Gareld and Steele/St. Paul as the primary connections for Cherry Creek East residents accessing the Cherry Creek Greenway or neighborhoods to the north. Improve pedestrian crossings of Steele Street at Ellsworth and Bayaud

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Subarea Strategies 73 Stripe bike lanes on Bayaud to connect west to the bike route on Steele Street Improve north/south pedestrian crossings of Alameda as part of the Alameda Parkway project and of 1st Avenue as part of the East 1st Avenue project. Stormwater improvements. In addition to implementing the improvements recommended in the Stormwater Master Plan and the Cherry Creek Stormwater Study, look for opportunities to incorporate sustainable stormwater technologies, such as green streets, where possible. Cherry Creek Easts wide streets may be appropriate for green street elements. Address Harrison Street challenges associated with Colorado Boulevard. As part of visioning for Colorado Boulevard, study appropriate mechanisms for improving redevelopment opportunities for properties between Harrison Street and Colorado Boulevard. Having a comprehensive vision in place for Colorado Boulevard will help clarify appropriate strategies and phasing for Harrison Street revitalization. The vacant properties at 1st between Harrison and Colorado are especially important to creating a gateway into the Cherry Creek Area. Encourage private reinvestment along perimeter streets. As recommendations for Alameda, Colorado, 1st and Steele are implemented, encourage private investment through appropriate public policy actions. High quality development that enlivens the street is a key component of a quality pedestrian experience. The northwestern corner of CCE (block between 1st and Ellsworth, Steele and Adams) should be developed with a mix of uses creating a visually iconic landmark at the corner of 1st and Steele which transitions to lower heights toward the southeast. Encourage the redevelopment of the existing vacant lots at the corner of 1st and Colorado. Reconguring the intersection to create regularly shaped parcels may facilitate redevelopment. Improve Bayaud Street. Encourage the reconguration of Bayaud to include bike lanes, sidewalks, tree lawns and improved urban design. As deemed necessary, introduce trac management strategies to reduce vehicular impacts. Future land use map Cherry Creek East neighborhood Maximum building heights map Cherry Creek East neighborhood 12 Stories 8 Stories 3 Stories Other subareas 5 Stories Regional Center Town Center Urban Residential Other subareas

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Subarea Strategies 74Cherry Creek Triangle is located in the southeastern corner of the Cherry Creek Area, just south of Cherry Creek East. It is bounded on all sides by highly travelled arterials including Alameda Avenue to the north, Colorado Boulevard on the east, and Cherry Creek North Drive and the Cherry Creek Greenway on the southwest. Across Colorado Boulevard from Cherry Creek Triangle is the City of Glendale. Cherry Creek Triangle supports nearly 2,000 jobs and over 300 households within a wide range of land uses, including large oce towers such as the Ptarmigan Place, smaller oce buildings, new multifamily residential structures such as Monroe Point and Talvera, small scale commercial that primarily serves Colorado Boulevard vehicle trac, and a Holiday Inn hotel. Numerous large parcels remain vacant or underdeveloped as surface parking lots, oering much opportunity for inll development to create a vibrant mixed-use district. Both sides of Colorado Boulevard have signicant regional and local retail destinations. KEY ISSUES: CHERRY CREEK TRIANGLEChallenging access and connectivity. Vehicles cannot easily access Cherry Creek Triangle from westbound Alameda, northbound Colorado or southbound Cherry Creek North Drive. This challenge will grow as population and employment densities increase in Cherry Creek Triangle. Existing access to Cherry Creek Triangle also impacts pedestrian movement across these three arterial streets that surround Cherry Creek Triangle somewhat isolating it from adjacent areas. Poor access to the Cherry Creek Greenway and associated parks makes it challenging for people living and working in Cherry Creek Triangle to make use of this major public amenity located across the street. Likewise, it limits the use of the Cherry Creek Greenway as a commuting option for people living and working in Cherry Creek Triangle. Cherry Creek Triangle Iconic redevelopment in Cherry Creek Triangle will help to forge an identity for the district.

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Subarea Strategies 75Internal circulation. Circulation within Cherry Creek Triangle is challenging due to the extra long north/south dimensions of the block structure resulting in Dakota being the only eastwest connection. This means that people trying to circulate within the subarea have to rely on Dakota and Alameda for their east/west connections. Also, Dakota near Colorado Boulevard is substandard and does not accommodate two-way trac. Walkability. Sidewalks internal to Cherry Creek Triangle are narrow, sloping, attached to the streets and intersected by many driveways, resulting in a challenging pedestrian environment. Recent projects have responded by creating a pedestrian system of improved detached sidewalks with tree lawns and landscaping. Bikability. Cherry Creek Triangle is served by the Cherry Creek Greenway, a major regional bicycle corridor. However, no existing bicycle facilities actually enter into Cherry Creek Triangle that provide residents and employees of Cherry Creek Triangle more direct and intuitive access to the Greenway. Additionally, no B-Cycle station exists within the subarea. Connections to the City of Glendale. The City of Glendale, located across Colorado Boulevard from Cherry Creek Triangle, has a population of nearly 5,000 people and is growing. Glendales proposed Riverwalk development is projected to result in 1.5 million square feet of new retail, entertainment, oce and hotel development. This riverwalk is located directly across from Cherry Creek Triangle along the Cherry Creek Greenway with its main access at the intersection of Cherry Creek Drive North and Colorado Boulevard. Unpredictable zoning. Most properties within Cherry Creek Triangle are zoned B-4 with a variety of waivers and conditions. This zoning district includes no form standards to ensure an improved development pattern as the subarea redevelops. As a result, the B-4 zoning will result in development patterns that do not promote continued urban design improvements reinforcing such elements as uniform building setbacks, screened parking and appropriate building mass and scale. The waivers and conditions placed on existing zoning are dicult to understand and predict, reducing the certainty of what can be built and negatively impacting future investment. Transit access. Cherry Creek Triangle is serviced by RTD bus routes 1, 3L, 83L, 79L, 40 and DD. Ridership is high, with over 3000 people boarding and alighting at the intersection of Alameda and Colorado. As Cherry Creek Triangle continues to grow, better transit connections will be necessary to serve the residents and employees of this urban district and connect Cherry Creek Triangle to Cherry Creek Shopping District and Glendale. Cherry Creek Triangle neighborhood identity. Cherry Creek Triangle does not currently have a strong neighborhood identity. The area lacks consistency in streetscapes, architectural and urban design quality. Cherry Creek Triangles mix of uses and buildings does not result in a synergistic character. The subarea contains no public spaces, village center or other amenities around which to organize development and create a sense of community and an identity. Cherry Creek Triangle does not take advantage of its prime location adjacent to the Cherry Creek Greenway, between the Cherry Creek Shopping District and the City of Glendale. Property owners, businesses and residents do not benet from organized partnerships like those in place for the rest of Cherry Creek. Harrison Street. Harrison Street, as currently congured, serves as a service street for Cherry Creek Triangle. Alameda Parkway. Alameda creates a hard edge and inhibits multi-modal connectivity between Cherry Creek Triangle and Cherry Creek East. Properties adjacent to Alameda Avenue and Colorado Boulevard have experienced a lack of investment.

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Subarea Strategies 76CHERRY CREEK TRIANGLE RECOMMENDATIONSImprove connectivity and access across perimeter arterials. Continue to monitor trac patterns on Alameda Parkway and appropriate north-south crossing locations to facilitate pedestrian and bike connections such as the proposed bicycle boulevard on Gareld. Study the potential to recongure the Cherry Creek North Drive and Dakota/Gareld intersection with the objective of simplifying the intersection and shortening the crossing distance between Cherry Creek Triangle and the Cherry Creek Greenway. Work with the City of Glendale and CDOT to improve the intersection of Cherry Creek North Drive and Colorado Boulevard. This will be a primary access point between Cherry Creek Triangle and Glendales proposed Riverwalk development. This intersection will need to accommodate high levels of pedestrian and vehicle trac as redevelopment occurs. Improve internal circulation. Improve east/west connectivity As development concepts are reviewed, work with property owners to nd opportunities to improve internal street circulation. Improve Dakota, especially near Harrison Street, to meet minimum Public Works street standards, including accommodating one trac lane in each direction and separated sidewalks. Improve the pedestrian realm. Cherry Creek Triangle is included in the Cherry Creek Pedestrian Priority Zone. As such, pedestrian mobility should be considered a high priority as streets are reconstructed in this district. The A Connected Cherry Creek chapter includes details on the Pedestrian Priority Zone and the Pedestrian Priority Zone toolkit. Bicycle improvements. The Gareld bicycle boulevard will connect Cherry Creek Triangle directly to the Cherry Creek Greenway via a proposed trac signal and a recongured Y shaped intersection at Gareld/Dakota and Cherry Creek North Drive. A bike/ped bridge is also proposed over the creek at or near this trac signal. The Gareld bicycle boulevard will also connect north across Alameda Avenue, through Cherry Creek East and all the way to City Park. Encourage positive change to create a vibrant, urban mixed-use district. Cherry Creek Triangle remains an area of change, meaning growth and reinvestment should be encouraged. Its prime location, existing mixture of uses, economic development opportunities and access to transit service create an ideal location for encouraging residential, commercial, and employment growth. New development should continue to include a mix of land uses, especially oce and residential. These uses should continue to be integrated into the neighborhood and serve residents, employees and visitors. Commercial uses on Colorado Boulevard should be better integrated into the fabric of Cherry Creek Triangle. New development within the Triangle should respond to the surrounding conditions of parkways, greenways and other development. Special attention should be placed on the Greenway edge of the Triangle to enhance visibility and connectivity to this important amenity. Street facing entries and ground oor transparency will be key elements for activating the pedestrian realm. Vehicle access to buildings should be through alleys or service roads. Locate parking in centers of blocks and wrap with active uses on the street. To encourage a walkable district, parking should not be permitted between the building and the street. Cherry Creek Triangle needs to embrace its prime location by adding more density, a greater mix of uses, and orienting buildings toward perimeter streets and especially toward the Cherry Creek Greenway.

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Subarea Strategies 77 Appropriate building mass transitions are important adjacent to Cherry Creek East to integrate development and reinvestment into the area. Maximum building heights will range from 5 to 12 stories, with a 5-story edge along Alameda to respond to lower scale residential on the north side of the street. This transition may be accomplished through variations in building height, upper story setbacks or other mass and scale alternatives. Adopt form-based and context-based zoning for Cherry Creek Triangle properties to encourage predictable development patterns that reinforce the development quality of Cherry Creek Triangle. Support better regional connectivity. As described in the A Connected Cherry Creek chapter, transit connections between Cherry Creek and downtown Denver, as well as to DIA, and other locations are prioritized to keep Cherry Creek competitive within the region. Direct and convenient transit links between Cherry Creek Triangle and the region are important to this connectivity. Create an identity for Cherry Creek Triangle. Embrace Cherry Creek Triangles prime location connecting the Cherry Creek Shopping District and the City of Glendale along the Cherry Creek Greenway. Improve placemaking. New inll development should improve the public realm including improved streetscapes and urban public spaces as included in the Pedestrian Priority Zone. Better placemaking will create an identity for Cherry Creek Triangle drawing both residents and employees. Create Partnerships. Establishing partnerships would give Cherry Creek Triangle businesses, property owners and residents a common voice, a forum to discuss issues and potentially a means to create a marketing and branding scheme for the area and implement area improvements. Mid-rise, mixed-use building on a transit line Future land use map Cherry Creek Triangle Maximum building heights map Cherry Creek Triangle Regional Center Other subareas 12 Stories 8 Stories 5 Stories Other subareas

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Moving Forward 79 Moving ForwardREALIZING THE VISIONPlan implementation takes place over many years and is the result of large and small actions by the public sector and the private sector, sometimes in partnership. Plan recommendations are intended to provide direction for the actions that are now seen as means to achieve the plan vision. These recommendations are just that because the future will bring unforeseen opportunities and challenges. A successful plan serves a guide to realize the vision for the Cherry Creek Area.

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Moving Forward 80IMPLEMENTATION ACTIVITIESBlueprint Denver identies three types of implementation activities: regulatory or policy, public investment, and partnership. These activities focus on public sector actions, many of which create a positive environment that enables actions by other groups, such as property owners, developers, neighborhood organizations, districts or homeowners. These private actions such as constructing new buildings and houses, opening new businesses, and attracting new residents are the most critical elements to implementing the plan vision. Regulatory and policy strategies change City codes or regulations to aect desired outcomes. Typical examples include Denver Zoning Code text and map amendments, Public Works requirements for infrastructure improvements associated with development projects, and Parks and Recreation requirements regarding open space and plantings. Regulatory or policy implementation priorities: C-CCN Land Use Regulation Revise the C-CCN zone district to better realize the plan goals for distinctiveness and prosperous Evaluate the Cherry Creek North Design Standards and Guidelines and modify if necessary to supplement the plan goals and revised zoning Cherry Creek East Design Standards and Guidelines Review the Cherry Creek East Design Standards and Guidelines for clarity and consistency with the plan goals Adopt as rules and regulations through Community Planning and Development Public investment strategies are those involving public funding of public infrastructure. Examples include street reconstruction, bike lanes, new transit lines, park improvements, or new or expanded recreation centers. The City takes the lead in designing, constructing, and funding these projects and may use a variety of public funding sources such as the annual Capital Improvements Program, bond funds, or state or federal grant programs. In several cases, public transportation projects are identied as studies because the impacts and consequences of a particular improvement on the transportation system is so complex that the broader system must be examined to determine the feasible options to meet the intent. In many cases, extensive study is needed to meet eligibility criteria to apply for federal funding. Public investment implementation priorities: 1st Avenue/Speer priority transit corridor Seek funding to initiate feasibility study for this regional corridor Continue to seek funding for studies and preliminary design to obtain eligibility for federal funding Alameda Parkway design and construction Initiate preliminary design Identify potential funding sources such as General Obligation Bond and complete necessary studies and cost estimates Cherry Creek interests advocate for funding Complete design and construction

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Moving Forward 81 1st Avenue (Steele to Colorado) Initiate preliminary design Identify potential funding sources such as the Capital Improvement Program and budget and complete necessary studies and cost estimates Cherry Creek interests advocate for funding Complete design and construction Bike connections to the Cherry Creek Greenway Conrm connection types along Steele, 1st and University Coordinate with Shopping Center for short and long-term bike and pedestrian connections to the Cherry Creek Greenway and Cherry Creek North and East Initiate connection on Gareld to the Greenway. Partnership strategies represent the most diverse category. Public-private partnership (PPP) activity has expanded exponentially and has gone well beyond public subsidy of a private development project. Increasingly, public-private partnerships are being used to fund public infrastructure projects. Denver Union Station and RTDs East and Gold lines are among the largest PPP projects in the country. Another example is reconstruction of 14th Street as the Ambassador Street using City Bond funds and a property-owner approved General Improvement District. Partnership implementation priorities Citywide retail strategy Shopping District organizationCHAMPIONS AND ADVOCATES Once a plan is adopted as a supplement to the Comprehensive Plan, the City has direction to implement the plan. Given the number of plans providing this direction, competing interests in the city, and the budget issues at all levels of government, little plan implementation is undertaken without champions for certain actions and advocates for the plan area. Typically registered neighborhood organizations work with the mayor and their City Council representatives to promote certain actions and outcomes. Membership organizations such as merchant associations, business partnerships, and nonprots do the same for business areas. The Downtown Denver Partnerships focus on implementation of the Downtown Area Plan both as part of their organizational work program and their advocacy with the City is one example of a concerted eort at implementing a plan.PUBLIC FUNDING SOURCESFunding sources, especially for public investment and partnership actions, available to public and private entities are continually evolving based on economic, political, legal and neighborhood objectives. Though the names and purposes of funding sources change over time, they fall into three distinct categories. Tax Base Support. Tax base supported sources are characterized by the involvement of the local sales and property taxing authorities. The most common tax base support is through the Citys annual budget, especially the annual Capital Improvements Program (CIP). Periodically, the City requests its voters to approve a tax increase to pay for specic public improvements. For instance, the citizens of Denver voted in 2007 to raise their

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Moving Forward 82property taxes in a specic amount to support the issuance of over $500 million Better Denver Bonds whose proceeds funded 290 specic public improvements. Tax increment nance (TIF) is another means of tax-base support most typically associated with an Urban Renewal Area. Once created by the City Council and Denver Urban Renewal Authority (DURA), property and sales tax over and above the base year are paid to DURA to fund eligible public improvements or nancing gaps for private development. To qualify for tax increment nancing through urban renewal, an area must meet certain criteria to establish blight, as dened in state statute. Grants. Grants come from public agencies that are interested in encouraging a specic outcome and these grants typically include specic conditions and requirements as to how the funds may be deployed. For instance, a state or federal transportation grant will need to be used for street, mass transit, or regional mobility studies or projects. The Oce of Economic Development receives federal funds to support certain types of housing projects. Additionally, foundations provide grants for projects aligned with the organizations goals, such as green spaces, creative enterprises or social services. Special Districts. The city charter and state statute enable various types of districts to be created. Examples of special districts include business improvement districts (such as the Cherry Creek North BID), metropolitan districts, local improvement or maintenance districts, and general improvement districts. The districts are classied as special because they are typically created by a localized group of citizens who want to achieve specic outcomes in their locality and are willing to pool their economic resources in order to implement identied projects. For example as in Cherry Creek North, if a majority of business owners desire to improve the streetscape of the street in which they operate, the businesses could organize a business improvement district which would assess the participants an amount of money sucient to pay for the project. Special districts are a useful tool when a localized population desire and are willing to pay for an enhanced level of public improvement. District revenues can be used to pay for improvements on a pay-as-you-go basis, for ongoing operations and maintenance, or to support payment of bonds. Special districts typically require a vote of the electorate within the area and approval of Denver City Council.PARTNERSHIP TOOLSIn addition to special districts, a variety of public-private partnerships or private organizations will be instrumental in plan implementation. As states and communities reduce use of urban renewal and tax increment nance for improvements, some of these other organizational types will come into broader, more innovative use. Some examples of these organizations include: community development corporations, membership organizations, nonprots or foundations, parking districts, and transportation management organizations. Quite a number of these organizational types already exist in the Cherry Creek Area. Implementation of the Cherry Creek Area Plan will call on these organizations and others to pursue a variety of activities with existing and new funding sources and coordinated eort among them.

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Moving Forward 83CHERRY CREEK AREA FRAMEWORK PLAN IMPLEMENTATION RECOMMENDATION IMPLEMENTATION TYPE A. A CONNECTED CHERRY CREEK A.1 Connect to the Region A.1.A Improve bus service Partnership A.1.B Study priority transit corridors Public investment A.1.C Add person-trip capacity Public investment A.1.D Recognize priority transit corridors Public investment A.2 A Walkable Cherry Creek A.2.A Pedestrian priority zone Partnership A.2.B Pedestrian priority intersections Partnership A.2.C Sidewalk improvements Partnership A.3 A Bikeable Cherry Creek A.3.A Expand network and improve Greenway connections Public investment A.3.B A more intuitive waynding system Public investment A.3.C Bring back The Bike Rack Partnership A.3.D Expand B-Cycle station locations Partnership A.4 Multi-modal Streets A.4.A Improve the Alameda Parkway Public investment A.4.B Improve 1st Avenue (Steele-Colorado) Public investment A.4.C 1st and Steele intersection Public investment/Partnership A.4.D Colorado Boulevard Public investmentB. A DISTINCTIVE CHERRY CREEK B.1 Target Growth Appropriately B.1.A Areas of Stability Regulatory B.1.B Areas of Change Regulatory B.2 Enhance the Pedestrian Nature and Character B.2.A Streetscape Partnership/Private investment B.2.B Architecture Regulatory/Private investment B.2.C Land use Regulatory B.3 Concentrate Economic Activity B.3.A Higher intensity building locations, multi-modal streets, etc Regulatory B.3.B Moderate scale development in mixed-use areas of change Regulatory B.3.C Appropriate transitions using design strategies Regulatory B.3.D Prominent development at key vistas Regulatory/Private investment B.4 Great Neighborhoods B.4.A Respect the existing character of stable residential areas Regulatory B.4.B Encourage the evolution of mixed-use neighborhoods Partnership/Private investment B.4.C Investment and development in emerging neighborhoods Partnership/Private investment

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Moving Forward 84 C. A GREEN CHERRY CREEK C.1 Cherry Creek Greenway C.1.A Improve visual and physical access Public investment C.1.B New bike/ped bridges Public investment C.1.C Parkways-University and Cherry Creek Drive North and South Public investment C.2 Parks C.2.A Pulaski Park Public investment/Private investment C.2.B Burns Park Public investment C.2.C Manley Park Public investment C.3 Streets and Streetscapes C.3.A CCN Festival Streets Partnership C.3.B Fillmore Plaza Partnership C.3.C Streetscapes and pedestrian amenities Partnership C.4.D Privately owned public space Private investmentD. A PROSPEROUS CHERRY CREEK D.1 Economic Vitality D.1.A Synergistic mix of uses Private investment D.1.B More housing Private investment D.1.C Importance of visitors Private investment D.1.D Walkability equals prosperity Partnership D.1.E Creating community Partnership D.2 Reinvesting in the Future D.2.A Local character/national prominence Private investment D.2.B Development opportunities Private investment D.2.C High quality development Regulatory/Private investment D.2.D Multi-modal streets Public investment D.2.E Locational advantage and access Private investment D.2.F Stormwater improvements Public investment D.3 Organization and Identity D.3.A Shopping District organization Partnership D.3.B Perimeter street gateways Private investment D.3.C Citywide retail strategy Partnership

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Glossary 85Access The ability to reach desired goods, services and activities. Access also refers to the ability to get into and out of a particular piece of property. See mobility. Alley Narrow access ways mid-block, at the rear of residential and business properties. Alternative Transportation Travel by means other than a car. Light rail, commuter rail, bus, bicycling and walking are often grouped together under this heading. Also referred to as active transportation. Area of Change Locations where Denver intends to direct residential and employment growth taking advantage of existing and planned transit and infrastructure. Area of Stability Locations that represent an established character to enhance as reinvestment and redevelopment occur. Arterial Major roadway designed to provide a high degree of mobility and serve longer vehicle trips to, from, and within major activity centers in Denver and the region. Bicycle Facilities and Amenities Includes bike routes, lanes and paths which are interconnected, safe and attractive; bike parking and storage (racks & lockers). These eorts are further dened by Denver Moves. Bike Station Attended bike-transit centers that oer secure, covered, valet bicycle parking and other amenities. Blueprint Denver Denvers citywide land use and transportation plan adopted in 2002. This plan denes areas of change and stability. Bulb Out See curb extension. Bus Circulator or Shuttle Bus A bus providing more localized bus service for a specic area -such as a transit station, shopping area, employment center, the Downtown area, or other activity center. Bus Rapid Transit Buses using and occupying a separate right-of-way for the exclusive use of public transportation service. Capital Improvement Program Scheduled infrastructure improvements as part of a city budget. Collector A roadway that collects and distributes local trac to and from arterial streets, and provides access to adjacent properties. Complete Streets The practice to promote safe and convenient access for all users along and across travelways. Comprehensive Plan 2000 The Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000. Curb Extension An area where the sidewalk and curb are extended into the parking lane, resulting in a narrower roadway, usually to shorten pedestrian crossing distance. (Often referred to as a bulbout or neckdown) Density also referred to as intensity. The quantity of development as measured by dwelling units or square feet on a certain amount of land. DRCOG Denver Regional Council of Governments. The Metropolitan Planning Organization for the Denver region. Floor Area Ratio (FAR) The ratio of the gross oor area of a building to the area of the land on which it rests. Frontage The part of a lot that touches a street. Geographic Information System (GIS) Computer generated maps based on data such as land use or population. Green Streets Streets with additional landscaping, often linking parks. Dened in the Parks Game Plan. Inll Development Development on vacant properties in developed areas. Infrastructure Public improvements such as roads and trac signals, sidewalks and bicycle paths, parks, water and sewer lines, power and telecommunication lines. Landmark Streets Streets, typically historic parkways, designated as landmarks under Chapter 30, RMC. Glossary

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Glossary 86Land Use Regulation The collection of City laws, codes, and design guidelines used to evaluate proposals for private development. Light Rail A rail system with vehicles operating on a xed track and powered by an overhead electric power source. Living Streets A collaborative approach to re-imagining the design of street rights-ofway to accommodate a variety of modes including pedestrians, transit, bicycles and vehicles. Local Street A neighborhood or minor street that provides access to adjacent properties only. Mobility on local streets is typically incidental and involves relatively short trips at lower speeds to and from collector streets. Medians A linear strip of island in the center of a street often planted with trees, bushes and other landscaping. Metro Vision DRCOGs long-range growth strategy for the Denver region. Metro Vision is updated every ve years. The current plan is Metro Vision 2035 and 2040 is underway. Mixed-Use Development Mixes of residential, commercial and oce space within the same buildings and districts. Mobility The ability to move from one place to another, or movement of people and goods from one place to another. See access. Multi-Modal Streets Streets that accommodate multiple modes of travel including rapid transit (bus and rail options), bicycles, pedestrians, and vehicles. O-Street Parking Parking that is provided outside of the right-of-way of a public street, typically in a surface parking lot or parking structure. On-Street Parking Parking that is provided within the right-of-way of a public street, typically in designated parallel or diagonally striped spaces adjacent to moving trac lanes. Parking Management A tool to address localized parking issues, e.g. Colorado Health Center District, Old South Gaylord area, Commons Neighborhood in the Platte Valley. Parking Ratio A ratio expressing the number of parking spaces per dwelling unit, or per certain amounts of square footage of commercial space (oce or retail space). Pedestrian-Friendly Street design that facilitates safe, comfortable and attractive pedestrian travel. Pedestrian Realm Sidewalks, pedestrian signals, crosswalks, benches and other amenities designed to improve the pedestrian friendly nature of both the mixed-use and residential areas. Person Trips An estimate of the total number of people moving along a corridor in a variety of transportation modes. Estimate is derived from travel behavior data collected by DRCOG. Planned Unit Development (PUD) Specic zoning for a specic parcel of land. Priority Transit Frequent, convenient, high quality transit serving both the local and regional needs of the transit system connecting Cherry Creek to Downtown, DIA and other important regional locations. Public-Private Partnership An agreement between a public agency (federal, state or local) and a private sector entity through which the skills and assets of each sector are shared in delivering a service or facility for the use of the general public. Regional Transportation District (RTD) The regional public transportation agency for the Denver metro area. Scale The relative proportion of the size of dierent elements of the built environment to one another; the measurement of the relationship of one object to another. Setback The distance a building is set back from the property line. Shared Parking Combining parking spaces for dierent uses that require peak parking at dierent times of the day. Special Improvement Districts Organizational and nancing mechanisms authorized in State Statute and City Charter involving special tax assessments and fees to build, operate, and/or maintain public infrastructure. Examples include Business, General and Local Improvement Districts. Streetscaping Physical amenities added to the roadway and intersections, including lighting, trees, landscaping, art, surface textures and colors and street furniture.

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Cherry Creek Area Plan | Glossary 87Stormwater Improvements Facilities to control surface runo from precipitation; alleys, curbs and gutters, and intersection drainage (cross-pans), in addition to underground pipes are components of the system. Structured Parking Parking that is provided in a structure, either above or below grade, as opposed to surface parking. Sustainability The long-term social, economic and environmental health of a community. A sustainable city survives today without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs. Trac Calming Methods used to reduce vehicular speed and volume, and increase the sharing of streets by pedestrians and other users. Trac Management Includes various trac calming strategies to address pedestrian safety, trac speed and cutthrough trac in neighborhoods. Transit Public transportation by bus, rail, or other conveyance. Tree Lawn The strip of land, usually vegetated, between the sidewalk and street. Urban Design Involves the social, economic, functional, environmental, and aesthetic objectives that result in the plan or structure of a city, in whole or in part. Zoning Basic means of land use control used by local governments. It divides the community into districts (zones) and imposes dierent land use controls on each district, specifying the allowed uses of land and buildings, the intensity or density of such uses, and the bulk of buildings on the land. Zoning Code The compilation of land use regulations for the City. It includes denitions and land use, and building size and location requirements by zone district.