Citation
Confluence Park

Material Information

Title:
Confluence Park
Creator:
Wenk Associates, Inc.
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
Department of Parks and Recreation, City and County of Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Parks
Landscape architecture
Spatial Coverage:
Denver -- Confluence Park

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
i
Confluence Park
A Plan for the Future of Denver's Gathering Place
Prepared for: City and County of Denver Department of Parks and Recreation
Draft: May 01, 2013




Stakeholder Advisory Group
Amanda Sandoval, City Council District 9
Anthony E. Graves, Visit Denver Inc.
Brian Hyde, Walk Denver
Bryan Kohlenberg, Urban Drainage and Flood Control District
Corry Fairbanks, Colorado Adaptive Sports
David Bennetts, Urban Drainage and Flood Control District
David Booth, Riverfront Park Neighborhood
David Brehm, Highland Neighborhood
Dennis Ohlrogge, City and County of Denver (CCD) Public Works
Ellen Ittelson, CCD Community Planning and Development
Emily Snyder, CCD Public Works Planning
Jeff Romine, CCD Office of Economic Development
Jeff Shoemaker, The Greenway Foundation
Jesse Ogar, Denver Public Schools
John Desmond, Downtown Denver Partnership
John Hayden, Mayor's Bicycle Advisory Committee
Jolon Clark, The Greenway Foundation
Jon Kahn, Confluence Kayaks
Jonathan Goldstein, Denver Children's Museum
Keith Pryor, Denver Parks and Recreation Advisory Board
Kevin Brown, Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT)
Leslie Tyson, Colorado Whitewater
Lindy Eichenbaum, Civic Center Conservancy
Paul J. Stann, 2166 LLC
Pete Citrano, REI Denver
Pete West, Platte Valley Trolley
Piep Van Heuven, Bike Denver
Raul Rodriguez, CCD-Wastewater
Savannah Jameson, CCD-City Planning Department
Todd Wenskowski, CCD-City Planning Department
Trish Thibodo, Platte Forum
Wade Shelton, Trust for Public Land
DRAFT -
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
Project Team
Wenk Associates, Inc.
Prime Consultant, Landscape Architect
Bill Wenk, FASLA
Craig Coronato, FASLA
Tyrel Sturgeon, PLA
Supporting Consultants:
Merrick/McLaughlin Whitewater Group,
River Hydraulics and Whitewater Course
Anderson Mason Dale Architects,
Design and Architecture
Entitlement & Engineering Solutions, Inc.
Civil Engineering
ERO Resources, Inc.
Environmental Planning
KL&A,
Structural Engineering
Clanton & Associates, Inc.
Site Lighting
Vigil Land Consultants
Survey
HR&A Advisors
Economics
Zoeller Consulting, LLC
Community Involvement
01, 2013 5:42 PM
Confluence Park Master Plan
INTRODUCTION
3


LETTERS OF SUPPORT
Cp 1^
DENVER
Barks Brcrcatlan TM( MIL! KISw CITY
The Greenway Foundation
nywrg. Funang. ana Daiign rrvtronmancai MOuc&uon fTwOt Event* Youcn Empioynent
WWW,CM EtNWAVf OUNOATlON.OnG
February, 2012
Confluence Park is the heart and soul of Denver. At the location where the
city was founded more than 150 years ago, the confluence is now a destination
where the people of Denver can expmi^nce the great outdoors right downtown.
At the confluence of regionaJ_tra^^ Victors will find a unique combination of
people, nature and his
Many years of ri^sr Je3(pWrtTT)n and cl^ErPUp, planning and hard work, have set
the stage for thislEffnsformatit^g §Pfne riverfront. At the heart of a growing and
changing community, the ggf'fs must serve the recreational needs of neighbor-
hood and the city, andQ&ntinue to be a must-see for out of town visitors. This
plan, driven by the vision of the community, is the key for Confluence Park to
become Denver's original gathering place, a destination for both activity and
stewardship.
Sincerely,
Lauri Dannemiller,
Parks and Recreation Manager
The Confluence of the South Platte River and the Cherry Creek has been a central hub,
meeting place, and landmark for as long as people have inhabited the land that is now Denver.
For the Arapahoe and Cheyenne, the confluence was a meeting place, a source of food, and
a shady spot to rest. For the pioneers that came later, the confluence was a source of hope
for riches and an ideal place to found a city. The river was so important to these early settlers
that to this day the streets in Downtown Denver align with the river and run upstream and
downstream instead of north and south.
As Denver began to grow, however, the city turned its back to the river and forgot its
significance. Never was it worse than in the decade following the 1965 flood. Forty years ago
Confluence Park was a dump, literally. Debris from the flood was left in the river, raw sewage
was being pumped, untreated, into the river, and landfills, factories, and junkyards dominated
the riverfront. The river was toxic to touch and ecologically dead.
In 1974, The Greenway Foundation was founded, and, in partnership with the City and County
of Denver, Urban Drainage and Flood Control District, and others, the fight to reclaim, restore,
and revitalize the South Platte River begun. Under the leadership of Joe Shoemaker, the
confluence was transformed into a park and the central hub for an ever-expanding urban
greenway. Shoemaker Plaza and the Confluence Whitewater boat chute became a nationally
recognized example of what an urban riverfront could be and spurred investment in the
surrounding neighborhoods.
The South Platte River is Denver's waterfront. Traversing downtown through Confluence
and Commons Park it is a place where residents and visitors can experience nature in the
city. Confluence Park has expanded and now provides better access to the river. It is now in
the center of a rapidly changing and vibrant urban community. People come to the river from
throughout the region. The original improvements, however, are showing signs of age. They
are under built and over utilized by the multitude of different users who traverse to and through
the park each day.
The Greenway Foundation was thrilled to be part of the development of a plan for the future of
Denver's gathering place at Confluence Park. It was inspiring to see so many people come out
to give us their ideas and to see how deeply they all care about the health and vibrancy of the
river and the city. Led by Denver Parks and Recreation, the project team developed creative
solutions that will transform the park for future generations.
This plan provides a blueprint for implementation of the South Platte River Master Plans and for
the next evolution of Confluence Park. It identifies ways to protect and restore the river, provide
places for recreation, connect regional trails, and provide opportunities for neighborhoods and
businesses to participate in the stewardship of this great resource at the historic birthplace of
Denver.
Jolon Clark
Associate Director
The Greenway Foundation
4
Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc.
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM


TABLE OF CONTENTS
Project Sponsors
City & County of Denver
Mayor Michael Hancock
Department of Parks & Recreation:
Lauri Dannemiller, Manager
Gordon Robertson, Director of Planning
Mark Bernstein, Project Manager
Department of Public Works:
Dennis Ohlrogge, PE
Urban Drainage & Flood Control District
Dave Bennetts, Design, Construction, & Maintenance Manager
Laura Kroeger, Assistant Manager
The Greenway Foundation
Jeff Shoemaker, Executive Director
Jolon Clark, Associate Director
INTRODUCTION 7
PLAN SUMMARY
OVERALL PLAN
PLAN FRAMEWORK 13
CONTEXT
GUIDING PRINCIPLES
PLAN COMPONENTS
21
ORGANIZATION & USE AREAS
FORMS & MATERIALS
OVERALL PLAN
THE RIVER
THE LOOP
THE OUTDOOR LIVING ROOM
THE OASIS
THE RIVER LAWN
PLAN ELEMENTS
IMPLEMENTATION
49
ARCHITECTURAL MATERIALS
SIGNAGE, WAYFINDING, & INTERPRETATION
MATERIALS & CHARACTER
LIGHTING
FUNDING & PROGRAMMING
APPENDICES
A3
APPENDIX A: PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT
APPENDIX B: HISTORIC RESOURCES SUMMARY
APPENDIX C: ENVIRONMENTAL
APPENDIX D: GAP ANALYSIS
APPENDIX E: COST OPINION
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM
Confluence Park Master Plan
INTRODUCTION
5


Il


INTRODUCTION
the next generation of confluence park
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM
Confluence Park Master Plan
INTRODUCTION
7


INTRODUCTION PLAN SUMMARY
Why A Master Plan?
Confluence Park has grown and evolved over
the past 40 years to become one of Denver's
most widely known and heavily used parks. The
Park has become a symbol for revitalization and
restoration of the Platte River, and has become
a wildly popular destination for water oriented
recreation, especially in summer months. Heavy
use has exceeded the capacity of existing
improvements, aging and outdated infrastructure
no longer serves the needs of park visitors, and
the transformation of surrounding areas into
urban neighborhoods has brought a broader
specter of park users to the River. Development
of this master plan has been prompted by
funding secured by the city to replace the most
deteriorated of existing improvements. This
plan describes a vision for the park that better
accommodates existing uses, describes a
broader vision that improves the environmental
qualities of the river itself, and anticipates
recreational and leisure activities of the future.
Guiding Principles adapted from the River Vision Implementation Plan
Create a river-focused urban environment that is healthy, habitable, and connected .
Promote ecosystem restoration through sustainable design. Improve water quality, habitat
and river stability.
Augment existing parks and venues by creating new, diverse activity centers along the
Greenway.
Create a park for urban living that reflects the history and culture of Denver.
Enhance the safety of the river corridor and the surrounding areas.
Create a sense of place and a community focal point that increases economic vitality.
Create a regional gateway to downtown Denver.
Establish a destination for entertainment, recreation, commercial, and residential amenities.
Connect neighborhoods and public facilities to local businesses and entertainment
venues by expanding green links and regional trails.
Encourage mobility options including transit, bicycle, and pedestrian thoroughfares.
Make the River's edge more accessible to people with different abilities.
Provide a nationally recognized destination for boaters that accommodates a variety of
skill levels.
Ensure that park improvements improve flood control capacity and stability.
Public Engagement
Six months, public meetings, stakeholder
workshops, and field intercept surveys yielded
clear consensus on the master plan's approach.
Reference Appendix A for more information.
What We Heard From the Public:
Improve the water for boating and swimming
Provide better access to the river
Reduce bicycle and pedestrian conflicts
Provide more activities for all age groups
Address real and perceived safety concerns
Provide better facilities and amenities.
Today's park is the legacy of many eras of development.
Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc. DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM
8


INTRODUCTION PLAN SUMMARY
*
The vision for Confluence Park will unify the three parts of the park, invite people to touch the water, and create a destination for recreation and leisure along the river.
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM
Confluence Park Master Plan
INTRODUCTION
9


INTRODUCTION OVERALL PLAN
Confluence Park will be a regional destination and a local hangout. Park improvements
balance river restoration and recreational use to demonstrate the city's highest aspirations.
Creating a more flexible framework protects and enhances the river, provides an
attractive gathering place in the city, and contributes to the vitality of the neighborhoods.
Confluence Park represents the next generation of Denver's parks.
A Unified Whole
The Central Platte Valley has changed
dramatically over the last 30 years, including the
land uses along the edges of Confluence Park.
Confluence Park has grown in size incrementally
over the years and has been a major regional
attraction on the river. This master plan makes
large and small changes to unify the park to
take better advantage of its unique location and
resources.
A Place to Touch the Water
Located at the confluence of Denver's two
watercourses, Confluence Park has become
increasingly popular for boating, wading,
and water play. The plan provides expanded
opportunities for people to sit along the river's
edge and touch the water. It also demonstrates
ways to improve water quality and raise public
awareness of the river's value as a resource.
A "Third Place"
Contemporary social theory defines the
"Third Place" as a gathering place that is neither
home nor work. It is a place to relax, meet
friends, and socialize; increasingly important
parts of contemporary life. Confluence Park
has the potential to become one of Denver's
best "Third Places" by activating its edges
and linking park activities with adjacent
private development. Confluence Park can
become integral to the daily life of downtown
residents and visitors with better connections to
neighboring restaurants and businesses as well
as providing more places for special activities.
A Regional Destination
As one of Denver's Festival Parks, Confluence
Park is poised to become a venue for
competitive Whitewater competitions as well
as expanded outdoor entertainment, natural
resource and fitness oriented programs,
and other civic events. With the support of
Denver Parks and Recreation, the Greenway
Foundation, REI, and others, the proposed
improvements will allow robust programming to
be balanced with areas for individual and small
group use on a daily basis.
|Q Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc. DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM


INTRODUCTION OVERALL PLAN
KEY:
A UNIFIED WHOLE:
@ Pedestrian Bridges
@ Pedestrian Promenade
The Ramp
TOUCH THE WATER:
@ Stepped Terraces
Expanded River Course
Water Quality Treatment
A "THIRD PLACE":
Upper Plaza
Overlook Cafe
Shoemaker Plaza
A REGIONAL DESTINATION:
Adventure Play Area
River Amphitheater
River Lawn
North
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM
Confluence Park Master Plan INTRODUCTION -j-j




PLAN
FRAMEWORK
context + guiding principles
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM
Confluence Park Master Plan
PLAN FRAMEWORK 13


PLAN FRAMEWORK context
History
The confluence of Cherry Creek and the South
Platte River is considered to be the historic
birthplace of Denver. Layers of history and many
eras of development have shaped Confluence
Park. It has changed considerably over time
as adjacent land uses evolved from mining
settlements to industrial dump sites. The river
itself was controlled and walled off to prevent
flooding and to keep people away from the
polluted and dangerous waterways.
Now a regional destination for outdoor
enthusiasts, the REI flagship store was formerly
the historic power plant for the Denver Tramway
Company. Trolley car no. 25 is the last
remaining railway car in service, using the Platte
Valley rail tracks that once delivered coal to
the power plant. Now unused, the Farmers and
Gardener's Diversion and Ditch originally served
the farming communities of north Denver before
being re-purposed for power plant cooling.
The popularity of the park leads to traffic congestion.
A 1970's transformation of the River as a
recreational greenway was driven by the
damming of the river upstream at Chatfield
Reservoir, new flood control measures in the
river, and a growing public consciousness of
the ecological value of the river. In 1974, the
City and County of Denver and The Greenway
Foundation formed a public-private partnership
to reclaim the South Platte River as a
recreational and environmental amenity. These
improvements have resulted in Confluence Park
becoming one of the first nationally recognized
urban riverfront destinations.
Urban Context
Confluence Park is located in what is now a
vibrant urban neighborhood. Confluence Park
can be considered the center of a larger river
"district" that includes cultural institutions,
entertainment venues, major transportation
systems, and higher density residential and
retail neighborhoods. It is surrounded by
regional attractions including the REI flagship
store, Elitch Gardens Amusement Park, Union
Station, the Downtown Aquarium, the Children's
Museum, the Pepsi Center, and Sports Authority
Field at Mile High.
The park is at the junction of two regional
trail networks that extend throughout the
Denver metropolitan area, providing both
recreational and commuter bicycle access
between downtown Denver and surrounding
neighborhoods.
Improvements to Confluence Park and the larger
Greenway have already encouraged significant
reinvestment in surrounding neighborhoods. Just
as the Cheyenne and Arapaho tribes gathered
at the confluence of the South Platte River and
Cherry Creek for hundreds of years, Confluence
Park continues the tradition of bringing people
from all walks of life together on their banks
today.
Abandoned structures limit river access.
14
Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc.
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM


PLAN FRAMEWORK CONTEXT
Downtown River District
Regional On-Street
Multi-Use Trail Bike Route
Transit Transit
Lines Station
Project Area
Destinations
Parks
--------- 0
0 200 400 800 North
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM
Confluence Park Master Plan
PLAN FRAMEWORK 15


PLAN FRAMEWORK context
Recreation
The River Vision Implementation Plan (RVIP)
envisions Confluence Park as the center of
transformational change along the South
Platte River in Denver. The Park is identified
as a gateway between downtown and the river
greenway. It will be connected by walkable
and bicycle friendly streets and serve as a
hub of outdoor adventure-type recreation for
the surrounding neighborhoods and the larger
community.
As one of Denver's designated Festival Parks,
Confluence Park will be a venue for local and
regional cultural events such as Whitewater
festivals, summer films, concerts, and river-
oriented adventure and environmental activities.
As an active urban park, it will be a place to
meet and hang out, a destination for bicyclists
and trail users from throughout the region, and
host to less-formal group activities such as
family picnics and fitness boot camps.
Deteriorating infrastructure doesn't meet current
building codes.
Environment
The South Platte River and Cherry Creek face
environmental challenges that are a result of
prior uses and urbanization. Channelization in
the early 20th Century, along with engineering
requirements for flood and erosion control,
have resulted in a hardening of the channel.
Stormwater runoff from impervious areas
and upstream wastewater discharges carry
contaminants and sediment into the river.
Water quality issues that must be addressed
at a regional level include elevated bacteria,
suspended metals, nitrogen, phosphorous,
and trash accumulating in and along the
streams. The RVIP has established the goals
of providing a swimmable and fishable river
with improved habitat connections and public
access. Confluence Park will be a highly
visible place where improvements demonstrate
many of the best practices available to
achieve those goals. See Appendix C for more
information.
While the river is attractive to swimmers, water quality
is a concern.
Existing Conditions
Confluence Park is showing signs of age and
exposure. The ramps at Shoemaker Plaza,
built prior to the Americans with Disabilities Act,
are deteriorating and do not meet current code
requirements. Trail connections are disjointed
and confusing, and the bridges are aging and
undersized, creating areas of conflict for the
growing number of park users.
The walls and hard edges of the river create
barriers and diminish the potential for floodplain
habitat. The silted-in main river channel no
longer exhibits the character and ecological
value of one of the city's most important
waterways. The Whitewater course is no
longer adequate for desired levels of boating
use and competition. The City and the Urban
Drainage and Flood Control District also need
better access to the river for maintenance and
emergency access.
Areas with poor visibility and access are perceived by
the public as dangerous.
16
Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc.
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM


PLAN FRAMEWORK CONTEXT
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM
Confluence Park Master Plan
PLAN FRAMEWORK 17


PLAN FRAMEWORK GUIDING PRINCIPLES
Four key ideas form the basis of the plan:
- A place for gathering and leisure.
- A place that supports active outdoor lifestyles.
- A place to experience nature in the city.
- An opportunity to improve the river.
The following principles, goals and objectives
outline the process for plan implementation:
Principle: Embrace Active Lifestyles and Opportunities for Leisure on the River
Goal: Position Confluence Park as an Urban
Gathering Place for Downtown Denver
Objectives:
Encourage informal gathering by
providing a variety of seating options, an
outdoor cafe, and public restrooms.
Work with the Downtown Denver
Partnership to extend and complement
Downtown Area programming and
wayfinding at Confluence Park.
Collaborate with nearby businesses to
support park programming and activities.
Encourage outdoor health and wellness
by supporting group fitness activities and
programs.
Coordinate programming with other
downtown and riverfront parks.
Encourage/allow evening park uses to
accommodate urban lifestyles.
Goal: Promote River Oriented
Leisure Activities
Objectives:
Focus improvements on enhancing and
drawing attention to the river and its
history as the first settlement of Denver.
Provide outdoor cafe and seating areas
with views of the river.
Provide gathering and event areas
that encourage enjoyment of the river
environment.
Add more family-friendly amenities such
as picnicking and play areas.
Provide facilities and programs
that promote historic interpretation,
environmental education, and
stewardship.
Support technology in the park for
communication, wayfinding, and
interpretation.
Principle: Improve Safety and
Convenience for All Modes of
Park Access
Goal: Improve Real and Perceived Safety
within the Park
Objectives:
Improve the flood control functions of
the river and adjacent areas.
Reduce pedestrian and bicycle conflicts.
Reduce the number of isolated areas,
and maintain visibility to all areas of the
park.
Provide adequate nighttime light levels.
Improve emergency and maintenance
access for equipment and personnel.
Goal: Improve Park Access and Mobility
Objectives:
Improve the trail network in the park to
accommodate the traffic volumes for all
modes of transportation.
Improve pedestrian and bicycle access
from local streets and neighborhoods and
expand capacity for bicycle parking on
site.
Expand vehicle parking capacity in
neighboring areas through the creation of
cooperative parking agreements.
Enhance views from the park to the river
and the downtown skyline.
Integrate trolley improvements as a
recreational asset and transportation
mode.
Support Bikeshare programs by
accommodating bicycle share station
expansion at the park.
Improve signage and wayfinding within
and around the park.
18
Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc.
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM


PLAN FRAMEWORK GUIDING PRINCIPLES
Principle: Celebrate Confluence Park as a Local and Regional Destination
Principle: Improve the River as a
Recreational and Natural Resource
Goal: Improve the River's Natural Qualities
Objectives:
Improve the water quality in the river.
Improve aquatic and terrestrial habitat in
the park.
Provide opportunities for people to learn
about river ecology.
Increase the shade canopy for both
people and wildlife.
Goal: Expand Recreation Opportunities
on the River
Objectives:
Promote active lifestyles through
expanded recreational activities for all
ages and skill levels.
Expand recreational boating opportunities
to include all ability levels.
Improve the Whitewater course to expand
competitive and recreational boating use.
Expand opportunities for people of all
ages and abilities to get to the river's
edge.
Provide safe alternatives to swimming in
the river.
Expand active uses to include
appropriate adventure activities such as
bouldering, fishing, etc.
Goal: Position Confluence as the Heart of a
Larger Downtown Riverfront Park
Objectives:
Establish a distinct urban identity for
Confluence Park that complements other
riverfront parks.
Incorporate common elements that
unify all parks along the river and in the
Downtown area.
Develop stronger physical links between
Confluence Park and adjacent parks and
institutions.
Incorporate high quality design and
materials to signify the importance of the
Park to the City.
Goal: Enhance the Park's Potential as a
Local and Regional Destination for Events
Objectives:
Identify and promote Confluence Park as
the Birthplace of Denver.
Encourage river-oriented special events
of regional and national significance.
Provide a variety of river-oriented
activities and events that appeal to a
broad range of visitors.
Goal: Develop Public/Private Partnerships
to Activate the Park and to Support its Long-
Term Success
Objectives:
Partner with adjacent and area
businesses and institutions to provide
amenities and services.
Plan for the long-term costs of
maintaining the park given higher levels
of use.
Consider the feasibility of establishing
a special river district or conservancy
that supports ongoing programming and
management of park facilities.
Review the feasibility of district-scale
parking strategies.
Continue to review park policies as they
apply to vendors, permitted activities, and
events.
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM
Confluence Park Master Plan
PLAN FRAMEWORK -|g




PLAN
COMPONENTS
subarea descriptions + elements
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM
Confluence Park Master Plan
PLAN COMPONENTS 21


PLAN COMPONENTS ORGANIZATION + USE AREAS
The plan for Confluence Park is formed by two foundational elements- The River and
The Loop.The Riverand The Loop linkthree useareasthat each have a distinct character
and use to accommodate a diverse user population.
Organization and Form
The master plan will transform the park into a
cohesive whole organized around the river, the
loop, and three major use areas: the outdoor
living room, the oasis, and the river lawn. The
sweeping bridge provides both a connection
and a destination. The plan takes three
disconnected parts, under-utilized spaces, and
deteriorating structures and molds them into
a cohesive and sustainable urban park that
provides access to outdoors and adventure in
the heart of Denver. When various alternatives
were considered, the consensus was to "go big
or go home".
This plan represents a vision that has broad
support from both the people who use it and the
civic leaders that recognize its value to Denver's
urban environment and quality of life.
Recreational Use
Confluence Park will accommodate small
and large events that focus on the river. It
improves access to the park, the river, and to
the regional trail system, while reducing conflicts
between trail users. It recognizes that the
park is both a destination and a starting point
for those exploring the river and the city. The
park provides flexibility for public gathering and
daily leisure use in a shady riverside location,
enhancing views of the river and the downtown
skyline. By reducing barriers and walls, orienting
the landscape towards the river, and providing
consistent high quality design and materials the
park will balance the importance of history and
prospect, flood control and recreation, resources
and access.
The River The Loop Use Areas
Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc.
22
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM


PLAN COMPONENTS ORGANIZATION + USE AREAS


PLAN COMPONENTS
Primary Forms
A singular unifying form that connects park
subareas identifies Confluence Park as a
regional destination, symbolizing the river's
importance to the city and its future. The
natural attributes of water, historic elements
juxtaposed with contemporary design, and the
subtle integration of trail connections with public
gathering places are the primary inspiration for
the physical form of Confluence Park.
Historic River and Creek Walls: The board-
formed concrete walls of historic Cherry Creek
and South Platte River flood control inspire the
design of new walls and vertical surfaces in
the park.
Shoemaker Plaza and the Whitewater
Course: The diagonal geometry of Shoemaker
Plaza is extended into the river to better
integrate natural and man-made forms. Clusters
of cleaved granite boulders are connected by
simple concrete steps that eliminate barriers to
access.

Historic board-formed walls line the river and the creek.
Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Ass
FORM + MATERIALS
Special Features: Forms and materials for
signature park features, such as the bridges,
the oval stage, and the children's playground
are exceptions to the basic park geometries. At
the same time they integrate complementary
materials of historic industrial character from the
flood walls, plaza and river.
Materials and Their Use
As one of Denver's most visible parks, its
design, materials, detailing and implementation
must demonstrate high standards of quality.
Materials are selected to recognize the river's
premier role, the original design of the park and
its industrial history, and the significance of river
recreation.
The evolution of a new Confluence Park must
include sustainable and durable materials.
Implemented in phases over several years,
materials will need to be available in large
quantities locally and be capable of meeting
engineering design standards for floodplain
construction.
ociates, Inc. DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM
Industrial Past: Concrete, brick, cast-iron,
corrugated and industrial grade metals, simple
lines, and functional details inspire the design of
buildings and other architectural park elements.
River Elements: The river is formed by large
granite boulders, formed and sculpted concrete,
and riparian vegetation. At the street level,
board-formed concrete, high quality cast
unit pavers, permanent steel elements and
contemporary flexible use furnishings are used
to anchor the park. The arcing bridge appears
to float above the river, allowing the surrounding
built edges to define the park.


PLAN COMPONENTS OVERALL PLAN

li-!
KEY:
THE RIVER:
@ River Terraces
@ Improved Whitewater Cours
Biofiltration Area
THE LOOP
0 Pedestrian Bridge
Promenade
Trail Ramp
THE OUTDOOR LIVING ROOM:
0 Outdoor Cafe
Stepped Seating Areas
0 Shoemaker Plaza
THE RIVER LAWN:
Adventure Play Area
The Beach
@ River Lawn Area
THE OASIS
Amphitheater
Multifunctional Lawn
Cottonwood Grove
o
20 40
0.
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM
Confluence Park Master Plan
PLAN COMPONENTS 25


PLAN COMPONENTS the river
River Environment and
Water Resources
Flows in the South Platte River have
changed significantly since the dam was
constructed at Chatfield Reservoir in 1970.
Annual peak flows have been reduced from
4,000 cubic feet per second (cfs) in the
1960's to an average of 650 cfs today.
Denver Parks, the Greenway Foundation
and UDFCD are committed to improving
water quality in the South Platte River and
see Confluence Park as a place where it can
implement high visibility programs to that end.
The form, alignment, and profile of the
channel will be modified to support aquatic
and wildlife habitat.
Extended low flows from summer through
winter, along with reduced frequency and
size of cleansing floods, and channel widths
driven by flood control have resulted in
poor river conditions, stagnant water, and a
silted-in channel.
The proposed river modifications include
new types of bank stabilization, including
riffle pool sequences that create shallow,
fast moving water, deeper, slower moving
pools that provide refuge for fish, and
benches that support a variety of riparian
and upland vegetation.
Water Quality Strategies:
Monitoring: Denver Environmental Health
(DEH) will build a water quality monitoring
station that includes public interpretation
of seasonal and daily variations in river
flows and water quality factors and trends.
Denver Water will install a measuring
device to measure flows associated with the
Farmers and Gardeners Ditch.
Treatment: Three water quality
improvement approaches are included in the
plan:
- The first diverts and treats river water
through constructed wetlands and
biofiltration materials. The water wall
along the west side is used to highlight
this passive biological treatment
technique.
- The low flow section of the Whitewater
course utilizes a re-circulating system
and active filtration to improve river
water to meet state in-river recreation
standards.
- The interactive water feature at the
children's play area will be treated
to meet state health department
requirements for water quality.
Swimmable and Fishable: One of the
stated goals of the RVIP is to make the river
swimmable and fishable. Confluence Park is
a very small contributor to the larger water
quality issues in the river.
The goal of regional treatment programs
must be to reduce bacterial load in the river,
as indicated by the amount of e-coli. The
City's Department of Environmental Health
(DEH) indicates that the most important
control is source control; preventing bacteria
from entering the river by utilizing Best
Management Practices (BMPs) in upstream
watersheds.
26
Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM


PLAN COMPONENTS the river
PROPOSED RIVER EDGE LOOKING TOWARD 15TH STREET BRIDGE: Pedestrians stroll along the River Walk. Kayakers test their skill on the Whitewater course in the South
Platte River (right). Other visitors enjoy the sights and sounds of a water feature (left), which is supplied by water that is taken out of the river upstream, biologically treated and
filtered on site, and released back into the river through artful cascades and runnels. In the distance, people chat and have lunch in the shade at a renovated Shoemaker Plaza.
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM
Confluence Park Master Plan
PLAN COMPONENTS
27


PLAN COMPONENTS
Touch the Water
The master plan restores riverine forms and
river vegetation while providing various levels
of access for park users. It also balances the
needs of recreational boating and water play
with urban and natural features to improve
access for public enjoyment of the river.
Urban Whitewater
The whitewater course will be expanded and
lengthened to include two chutes that provide a
variety of challenges for different ages and skill
levels. By moving the main chute to the west
side of the river and extending it from above
Speer Boulevard to below 15th street, a longer
slalom run nearly 1,000 feet long can be
achieved. A continuous accessible river's edge
path, designed to minimize conflicts between
whitewater users and park visitors, will extend
from Fishback Landing Park to downriver of the
15th street bridge to provide universal access for
recreational boaters.
Due to limited flows in the South Platte River,
a year round slalom course is not currently
feasible. With the removal of the Farmer's and
Gardener's Ditch diversion, the main chute will
provide challenges for more advanced boaters.
The existing chute on the east side of the river
will be modified to provide a low flow channel
for a year round training and skills development
course. A recirculation system could be added
to this channel to treat river water to meet water
quality standards for in-river recreation.
23 Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk As
THE RIVER
A "park and play" freestyle standing wave
feature is added at the confluence of the two
courses below Cherry Creek, where the flow is
highest and with direct access from adjacent
lawn areas. Facilities that support regional
and national whitewater events are provided
including ample spectator viewing areas on the
Loop Bridge, stepped terraces, and adjacent
park areas. Areas of flat water are planned for
paddleboarding and other more passive boating
activities.
Growing number of disabled users:
Confluence Park was one of the first Americans
with Disabilities Act (ADA) accessible whitewater
courses in the country. To aid the physically
challenged, ramped entry and egress points and
jetties for refuge will be created, as will options
for less difficult boating routes. Needs for the
visually and cognitively impaired- such as gaps
between features for broader recovery- will be
provided, as will clearly marked entry/exit points
and course wayfinding. The plan includes
adding accessible routes along the west side
of the river to allow expansion of programs and
opportunities for disabled recreational users.
Form and Materials
Forms and materials used to stabilize the
River and to create recreational boating and
River edge access will comply with design
criteria established by the Urban Drainage
and Flood Control District (UDFCD). Poured
in-place concrete, sculpted concrete, quarried
boulders, and riprap, similar to materials and
forms currently used to stabilize the channel,
ociates, Inc. DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM
will be the primary means of constructing the
proposed flood control and recreational boating
improvements in the river. Geometric forms of
the existing River edges will be expanded in
a manner that incorporates the geometries of
Shoemaker Plaza into boulder and concrete
drop structures. The geometries of Shoemaker
Plaza will be complemented by more sinuous
riverine forms as the river transitions into a
more naturalized state up and downstream of
the park. Use of grout to stabilize riprap should
be kept to a minimum, and installed so as to be
minimally visible. Pinning and other means of
stabilization should be used when possible to
minimize grouting.
Riparian plant species, including native willows
and deeply rooted riparian grasses and forbes,
will create a riparian link between upstream and
downstream riparian areas on the reconstructed
island. The treated river water infiltration area
will serve to passively treat river water through
biological uptake. Cattails, bulrushes, and other
hearty forbes that are effective at pollutant
removal will reduce pollutant levels prior to
returning the water to the river through the water
feature.


PLAN COMPONENTS the river
KEY:__________________
Q Extend Course
Upstream
Seasonal 'Big
Wave' Course
Re-Configured
Slalom Skills &
Training Course
with High Level
of Access for the
Disabled
Real-Time
Adjustable
Signature Freestyle
Feature
@ Venice on the
Creek (Existing)
Splash Play with
Treated River
Water
River Access
(5) Wetland Treatment
Area
Water Feature With
Filtered River Water
Extend Course
Downstream
River: Improvement Area Creek (No Significant Changes)
-

4
-?; -J 4 . 4 *
T reated Water
Features/Splash Play
Biological
Treatment Area
Riparian
Edge
North

ti
Plaza

River-Fed Water Feature
Kayak Access

SECTION A
/
Whitewater
Island Viewing Terrace
*4

V
Tubing
Trail
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM
Confluence Park Master Plan
PLAN COMPONENTS 29


PLAN COMPONENTS
Unifying Arc
Pedestrian bridges proposed to replace existing
bridges over the South Platte River and Cherry
Creek form a singular unifying arc linking the
three areas of the park. The arc extends into
the pavement of the Plaza at the Outdoor Living
room, forms a continuous arced edge as a trail
passing through the Oasis, and gives form to
the bridge across Cherry Creek. All forms in
The Oasis are influenced and derived from the
unifying arc.
Existing regional and local trails are linked to
adjacent neighborhoods, adjacent destinations,
and other connection points. In some cases, it
is necessary for those linkages to deviate from
the unifying arc geometry, Shoemaker Plaza
diagonals, and the riverine organizing elements.
Den
THE LOOP
Trails/Circulation
Trail connections will accommodate bicyclists
but also encourage very slow speeds within
the park. A speed limit of 5 mph is proposed
in the park and detours will be provided during
events and festivals. Trail connections will meet
AASHTO design requirements for bicycle trails
and Denver trail design guidelines.
The South Platte River Regional trail will be
realigned to connect through on the east side
of the river. This allows the west side to remain
more pedestrian friendly. While trail access is
maintained on both sides of the river, the east-
side regional trail improves connections to the
Cherry Creek trail as well as to points north and
south.
The Park entry at 15th Street on the west side
of the river will be enhanced and identified as a
park entry point of a similar scale to Nuesteter
Plaza on the east side. Better access to the
river from the street level is provided at 15th
street, Little Raven Street, and at various points
along the loop trail.
Improved connections below the bridges
including design features and lighting will make
these area safer at all times of the year.
A comprehensive wayfinding system will be
developed to identify major destinations in the
park, along the river, and in Downtown Denver.
30
ver Parks & Recreatio
| | We
k Associates, Inc
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM


PLAN COMPONENTS THE LOOP
Circulation
Pedestrian Priority
Trail or Walk
Multi-Use Local Trail
Multi-Use Regional Trail
A Park Entry
0 20 40
80 FEET
0
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM
Confluence Park Master Plan
PLAN COMPONENTS 31


PLAN COMPONENTS THE LOOP
Form and Material
The looped connections shown in the plan will
improve access and circulation and reduce user
conflicts in the park. As a major destination park
at the nexus of two regional trail systems, the
circulation system will need to accommodate
people walking, jogging and riding bicycles.
Bridges: The bridge designs indicated are
conceptual in nature, however, sufficient
structural design has been performed to validate
the basic concepts and geometry, and to make
preliminary cost estimates. For the purpose
of these analyses, the bridges were analyzed
under self-weight, superimposed dead loads,
live loads, and snow loads, both balanced
(uniform) and unbalanced. A basic live load of
100 psf was assumed for analysis. No analysis
for vehicular loads (other than bicycles) was
performed.
Bridge Concepts- separated hiked and ped traffic, integrated seating, and structural trusses.
32
Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc.
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM


PLAN COMPONENTS THE LOOP
Pedestrian Bridge, as viewed from the River Walk on the west side of the river.
The structural trusses form the divider between bicycle and pedestrian traffic, and
create a space for seating overlooking the river.
Renderings, Models, and Sketches by AMD Architects.
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM
Confluence Park Master Plan
PLAN COMPONENTS 33


PLAN COMPONENTS
The South Platte Bridge near Speer Boulevard
is curved in plan, and has three spans totaling
approximately 190 feet in length. The width
varies over the length, from approximately 16
feet at the east end to about 50 feet at the west
end. The curved geometry is accommodated by
using a segmented, orthotropic steel deck. The
hollow bridge section occupies the approximate
area of a trapezoid. The cross sections indicate
the desired hollow plate shape contained within
the architectural surface finishes. Ultimately, the
final bridge section may vary from segment to
segment as required to meet both architectural
and structural constraints.
The "wings" that form the walking and biking
surfaces are formed with steel ribs that radiate
from the spine of the orthotropic plates, and
which are connected at the segment joints.
There are interior support piers in addition to the
concrete abutments. The piers are envisioned as
built-up, curved steel sections which will support
both the wings and the spine of the bridge.
Alternate forms for the bridge structure
(e.g. cable stay, suspension, or arch) were
considered and rejected in favor of a lower
profile that would not compete with adjacent
structures such as the Speer Boulevard Bridge.
Alternate materials and systems within the
general proposed geometry are possible, and
can be considered during the detailed design
phase. They include trussed steel or post-
tensioned concrete systems.
Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Ass
THE LOOP
The Cherry Creek Bridge has three spans
totaling approximately 150 ft., and is a
combination of straight and curved sections. It is
anticipated to be the same type of cross section
and construction type as the Platte Bridge,
although its width is constant over its length.
Along 15th Street, single span parallel bridges
approximately 190 feet long area are an
alternative to replacing or retrofitting the existing
bridge to provide better pedestrian and bicycle
access. These bridges would be conventional
steel arch structures, with interconnected
shallow arched trusses constructed of curved
hollow pipe sections, framing the pedestrian
walks adjacent to the vehicle bridge. Decks
would be trussed steel beams supporting a
concrete walking surface.
34
i
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM


PLAN COMPONENTS THE OUTDOOR LIVING ROOM
The Outdoor Living Room offers a variety of seating, a cafe for informal gathering, and a pedestrian promenade that also accommodates festivals or
markets. A seating terrace replaces the existing wall to allow access to the river, encouraging picnicking, performances, or simply enjoying views of the
river and the downtown skyline.
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM
Confluence Park Master Plan
PLAN COMPONENTS 35


PLAN COMPONENTS THE OUTDOOR LIVING ROOM
An Outdoor Living Room for
the Central Platte Valley
The outdoor living room is a place that supports
a variety of leisure and recreational activities
along the river. Public restrooms, covered
storage and a new terminal area for the Platte
Valley Historic Trolley anchor the south end
of the plaza. Removal of the Farmers and
Gardeners Ditch diversion will allow expansion
of the Upper Terrace to provide additional area
for circulation and activities such as farmers
markets and fairs, and a cafe with sweeping
views of the river. A pedestrian promenade
connects to the expanded park entry at 15th
Street with an overlook and stepped access to
the river. The new ramp connects the street level
to Shoemaker Plaza and also provides places
for shaded seating at the river level.
The Outdoor Living Room is a place to see and
be seen, a place to hang out with family and
friends, and to enjoy the public life of the city. It
is a destination and an urban counterpoint to the
more relaxed environments of the Oasis and the
River Lawn.
The Upper Terrace
The cafe builds upon the success of the existing
outdoor seating area to provide a shady place
to have a light meal or to enjoy a beverage as
you overlook the activities on the river. Terraces
stepping down to the river are a great place
to rest, work, or view impromptu or scheduled
entertainment at Shoemaker Plaza. The historic
trolley adds activity to the richness and diversity
of experiences. A variety of seating encourages
individuals and small groups to spend the
afternoon or to stop for a break from riding the
trail.
Shoemaker Plaza
The historic forms of the riverside plaza are
preserved, while being reshaped to better
accommodate a variety of activities and events.
Better access from the Upper Terrace to all
levels will be created.
36
Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc.
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM


PLAN COMPONENTS the outdoor living room-south
AREA P*LAN
KEY:
Park & Trolley Storage
Ticket Office &
Public Restrooms
Covered Trolley Bay
@ Bicycle Parking
Upper Terrace
Trail Connection
Feature Bridge
Cafe & River Overlook
Biofiltration Area
Water Wall Feature
River Access
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM
Confluence Park Master Plan
PLAN COMPONENTS 37


PLAN COMPONENTS THE OUTDOOR LIVING ROOM
Form and Materials
As the central gathering place in the park, the
outdoor living room is intended to accommodate
high levels of use and activity. Forms and
materials reflect the area's industrial past
and incorporate the forms and materials of
Shoemaker Plaza. Cleaved granite boulders are
a visual connection between the Upper Terrace
and the River.
Pavements: Concrete pavements are used
primarily where trail connections pass through
the terraced steps leading to Shoemaker Plaza.
Pavements include scoring patterns and textures
that encourage slower speeds on the regional
trails. A variety of pavement types support urban
uses at both upper and lower levels. Consider
the use of porous pavements and soft surface
pavements that reduce surface storm runoff
within the park.
Walls, Water Feature, and Stepped Terrace:
Cast in place concrete walls have board formed
vertical faces to reflect the character of the site's
historic flood walls. Horizontal surfaces are
lightly textured to accommodate pedestrian use
and seating. A river diversion passes through
bio-filtration to improve water quality before
flowing through the water feature wall.
Buildings: Park buildings consist of
contextual industrial materials developed
into contemporary forms. Buildings should
be simple yet bold, and oriented toward the
river. Use board formed concrete, brick,
weathered steel, and generous amounts of
glass to connect indoor and outdoor spaces.
Site structures, screen walls, and railings:
Galvanized and corrugated metals, steel cables,
wire mesh, exposed fittings, industrial materials,
and simple construction techniques reflect the
need for durability and low maintenance, and
recall the area's industrial past.
Plantings and landscaping: A dense
canopy of deciduous shade trees provide
shelter for primary gathering areas along the
Upper Terrace and Shoemaker Plaza edges.
The ground plane includes turfgrass, low
maintenance groundcovers, and wetland and
upland riparian plants as appropriate. Shade
tolerant climbing vines separate the Upper
Terrace edge from adjacent parking.
Amenities: This area includes new types of
outdoor furnishings and amenities. The outdoor
cafe includes a bar height rail overlooking the
river. Numerous overlook opportunities provide
flexible areas for seating and leaning. Portable
tables, chairs, and umbrellas can be secured
when not in use. Green screens separate the
Promenade from adjacent parking. Bicycle
parking and covered storage will meet City
bicycle parking design standards.
SECTION B: The Upper Promenade steps down to the renovated Shoemaker Plaza.
Terrace
38
Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc.
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM


PLAN COMPONENTS the outdoor living room-north
AREA PLAN
KEY:
Overlook Cafe
Upper Terrace
0 Access Ramp
River Terraces
15th St. Entry Plaza
Biofiltration Area
Water Feature
Shoemaker Plaza
Shaded Lawn
Expanded REI Terrace
River Overlook
Green Screen
DRAFT May 01,2013 5:42 PM Confluence Park Master Plan PLAN COMPONENTS 39
15th St.


PLAN COMPONENTS THE OASIS
An Oasis on the River
The area formed by the confluence of the South
Platte River and Cherry Creek will be a verdant
refuge in the city. The sloping lawn of the Oasis
amphitheater provides a quiet contrast to more
active uses at the Outdoor Living Room and
River Lawn areas. The removal of the large flood
walls along the South Platte River and Cherry
Creek allow much greater public access to the
river's edge. The sloping lawn and associated
planted terraces expand the capacity of the
amphitheater for events and expand options for
informal seating and picnicking.
Relocation of the regional trail through the site
and away from the river significantly reduces
user conflicts and provides a strong organizing
element that ties the park together. Shady
groves recall the groves of trees that once lined
the river while buffering the park from adjacent
traffic, providing ample shade, and defining the
edges of the space.
Form and Materials
The central oval and other forms in the Oasis
integrate the geometry of the unifying arc
created by the Loop with the triangular point
created by the confluence of the creek and the
river. The sloping oval is the primary form-giver.
Plantings and lawn constitute the primary palette
of materials, supporting more passive uses in
addition to concerts and scheduled events.
Pavements: Trails, steps, and walkways are
poured in place concrete, with scoring patterns
that encourage slower speeds on the regional
trail. Trail widths accommodate anticipated uses
and provide rest areas for pedestrians to pause
or gather. Intersections at merging trails are in-
filled with brick pavers to help direct the flow of
traffic, moderate speeds, and reinforce the arced
forms. They reduce the expanse of concrete
required and create a place for trail users to stop
out of traffic flows.
Walls and stepped terraces: Cast in place
concrete walls and stepped seat walls are
board formed to reflect the character of the
historic flood walls. Horizontal surfaces are
lightly textured to accommodate pedestrian use
and seating. Landing areas between terrace
and seat walls consist of crusher fines in high
use areas or drought tolerant grasses and low
shrubs. Lower walls transition into a stepped
concrete edge connected to the river by large
cleaved granite boulders.
Planting and landscaping: The amphitheater
of irrigated turfgrass lawn forms the centerpiece
of the area framed by lower maintenance
plantings. Native drought tolerant grasses and
tree clusters frame the lawn on the steeper
slopes transitioning to Speer Boulevard. Tree
plantings must be selected to maintain adequate
clearances to not conflict with the overhead
power lines. The city's perennial planting
program is accommodated along the top of the
bowl near Speer Boulevard.
Amenities: Seating areas are integral to
the graded terrace and lawn areas. The
stage supports access and equipment for
amphitheater programming including power,
lighting, and storage. Equipment for support of
pumps and water treatment for the Whitewater
course is accommodated in this area.
SECTION C: Removing the river walls brings the amphitheater to the river's edge.
Stage
Cottonwood Grove
,*pv
Beach
Confluence
40
Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc.
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM


PLAN COMPONENTS THE OASIS
AREA PLAN
KEY:___________________
Grove
Beach
River Access
@ Flexible Open Lawn
Stage
Overflow Seating/
Slope Retaining
Terraces
Rest Areas
Pedestrian Bridge
Connection to
Regional Trail
Landscape Terrace
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM
Confluence Park Master Plan
PLAN COMPONENTS 41


PLAN COMPONENTS THE RIVER LAWN
A Family Gathering Place
on the River
The River lawn enhances the existing Nuesteter
Plaza as the major park entry from 15th Street
and expands opportunities for family activities
near the river's edge. A large, shaded terrace
between the plaza and the sloping lawn provides
flexible spaces for seating and picnicking.
Terraced seat walls provide informal seating and
a place to relax and enjoy the river setting.
The south facing lawn is expanded to
accommodate higher levels of uses such
as informal play and sunning. A children's
adventure and splash play area serves as
a vertical transition between the upper level
and the lawn. The play area includes climbing
walls, a boulder maze, slides, and tunnels that
celebrate the outdoor experience of the river and
its natural environment. It will be a neighborhood
and regional destination. The splash play pool
adjacent to the play area is a safe opportunity
for children to experience the river environment.
Form and Materials
The River Lawn is the transition between the
City and the River. As such, design elements
mesh naturalistic forms and processes with
geometries and materials of the city.
Pavements and Walls: The slope connecting
existing Nuesteter plaza and the lawn will be
terraced to provide shaded picnicking near the
adventure play area. The Platte River regional
trail is routed to connect to Commons Park.
Concrete seating terraces transition between
the lawn and the plaza. Crusher fines in picnic
areas minimize water use and maintenance,
and allow maximum flexibility for picnic areas.
The location, size, and character of a proposed
outdoor street-level cafe and seating area at the
adjacent redevelopment site would be subject to
approval by Denver Parks for joint use of public
property.
Adventure Playground: Play opportunities
include real and faux rock and other materials
for climbing, sliding, crawling, balancing, and
nature-based play as part of a river-themed
environment. Specific goals for age group, play,
fitness, educational value, and play element
types will be determined in the design process.
Lawn and beach area: The existing beach
area will be maintained, and the lawn expanded
to accommodate higher levels of use. The
whitewater wave feature will be integrated
into the shoreline and riparian willow plantings
will frame the lawn area, providing habitat
enhancements.
Planting and landscaping: A deciduous tree
canopy provides shade at the lawn edges. A
view corridor is left open to enhance views from
Nuesteter Plaza to the river, and to maintain
open lawns for sunning and informal games.
Amenities: This area supports flexible uses
and minimizes fixed amenities beyond what are
already located at the upper entry plaza.
Adventure & Water Play
I
1
SECTION D: The River Lawn connects Downtown Denver to its riverfront.
42
Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc.
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM


PLAN COMPONENTS THE RIVER LAWN
AREA PLAN
KEY:__________________
River Terraces
Beach
Flexible Open Lawn
Adventure Play
Splash Play
Connection to
Commons Park
Picnic Terrace
Nuesteter Plaza
Adventure Play at Teardrop Park, NYC.
Splash Play at the Pittsburgh Riverfront.
Adventure and Splash Play at Confluence Park.
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM
Confluence Park Master Plan
PLAN COMPONENTS 43


PLAN COMPONENTS ARCHITECTURAL MATERIALS
Architectural elements, including the trolley shed,
cafe/concession buildings, and related site elements
such as handrails and screen fencing, have significant
potential to further define the image and character of
Confluence Park.
Architecture in the Park
Given the visual significance of the arced bridge
over the Platte River as the primary identifying
element of the park, these structures should be
simple and straightforward forms that reflect the
area's industrial past. They should be durable
and low maintenance structures that are strongly
rooted to the ground, and exhibit substantial
indoor/outdoor visual and physical connections.
Structural systems of heavy timber and
steel, exposed surfaces of rusted steel,
and unfinished, board formed, and smooth
finish concrete, should be used in simple,
visible structural connections to give form to
architecture and site elements. Galvanized steel,
woven and welded wire mesh, steel decking,
and related materials will be the basis for
guardrails, screens, and related site elements.

Heavy, exposed wood or steel structures recall structural
systems of nearby industrial buildings.
Rusted steel and simple architectural massing characterize
the Trolley and Cafe Buildings.
Industrial railings and related site elements minimize maintenance
and recall the area's industrial past.
44
Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc.
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM


PLAN COMPONENTS SIGNAGE + WAYFINDING
Interpretive Themes
Recognizing and celebrating the significance
of Confluence Park to the history and
growth of Denver will be integral to its
design. Working with City and State historic
preservation specialists, the following
interpretive themes were identified:
Historic Periods of Significance
Birthplace of Denver (1850s-60s)
City Beautiful (turn of 19th century)
River Renewal (1970s)
Cultural Significance
Discovery of Gold
Urban and Industrial Development
Environmental Awareness
Outdoor Recreation and Leisure
Possible Approaches
Use design as metaphor
Use of historic materials and
construction techniques
Provide interpretive signage
Engage artists as interpreters
Specific story lines
The role that water has played in the
West; Colorado, Denver and on the
Confluence site
- Source and destination
- Resource and riparian environment
- Quality and treatment
Water usage
- Agricultural and power
- Industry
- Flood control
Settlement and gathering place
- Community shared resource
- Sight and sound of water
- Recreation and interaction
- Urban environment relief
Signage and Wayfinding
Providing the right amount of interpretive,
wayfinding, and regulatory signage is an
important issue for park users. Design and
placement must be carefully determined to
enhance user experience and safety, while
supporting educational objectives.
Identification and Wayfinding: Park
signage should balance the need to identify
the park as part of the larger Denver Parks
system while also celebrating the unique
aspects of this downtown riverfront amenity.
A simple hierarchy of well placed signs
direct people to downtown area landmarks
and help orient users within the park.
Interpretive Elements: The historic and
water resource significance of Confluence
Park should be celebrated through
interpretive elements, not necessarily signs.
Public art should be utilized to create an
integral approach to interpretation.
Regulatory Signs: Speed limit and warning
signs should be employed in highly visible
locations were they do not interfere with
views or park design elements.
Story Trek and Technology: Assure that
resources that guide people to Confluence
Park, and those that help interpret its
significance, are incorporated into all future
improvements. Support technology updates
and look for new opportunities to connect to
the internet and social media within the park
Public Art
As part of Denver's Percent for Public Art
program, ensure that artists are an integral
part of all future park design programs from
their earliest stages.
Interpretation
Integrated public art
DRAFT May 01,2013 5:42 PM Confluence Park Master Plan PLAN COMPONENTS 45


PLAN COMPONENTS
Lighting and Power
A quality lighting system will support visitors'
enjoyment of the nighttime environment
while enhancing safety and security. The
various areas of the Park have unique
illumination and visibility needs and lighting
must respond to those accordingly. Putting
light only where and when it is needed will
reduce lighting energy consumption and
improve visual quality. The lighting system
must provide the correct lighting levels,
minimize glare, balance surface brightness
and enhance landscape features. The
lighting design will use layers of ambient,
task and accent lighting and combine those
layers at varied levels as the program
requires. While lighting levels are important,
good color rendering sources and glare
control are also important for successful
lighting.
Create Layers of Light:
Varying brightness and the use of contrast
of light and dark can complement the
landscape design, create focus on feature
elements, and define the circulation paths to
create a secure public space.
Ambient. Pedestrian-scale luminaires
can provide light for the primary
circulation paths by illuminating people
as well as the path.
Task. Identify the entry points and
other important nodes that visitors will
need for guidance and wayfinding.
Provide sufficient illumination for safe
travel where cyclists and pedestrians
will share the bikeways and pathways.
40 Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk As
LIGHTING
Accent. Rendering special landscape
elements with light makes the park
more inviting at night. Different levels
of brightness will create a visual
hierarchy, supporting the focal points
of the landscape design. Lighting
vertical surfaces or landscape
also improves sense of security by
enhancing visibility.
Events. Supplemental lighting will be
needed for special events which utilize
the stage area and accommodate
audience access and egress. Electrical
infrastructure will be provided to
accommodate additional lighting and
sound support.
Integrate Lighting with Landscape and
Structures:
Low level path lighting and landscape
accent lighting should be concealed within
landscape and structural elements so that
the lighting effect is seen while the lighting
fixture is minimally visible. By concealing
the source from direct view, glare is reduced
and more pleasant visual environment is
created.
Interactive and Seasonal Effects:
An interactive lighting feature, possibly
integrated within the water feature or splash
pool, can change color and intensity to
interact with visitors' movement, by time of
day or the change of seasons.
Provide Sustainable Lighting:
Illuminate what is needed: Lighting
pathways, gathering areas and structures
is necessary for safety and security. Large
open areas may be left without light,
minimizing energy use, maintenance costs,
and impact on neighbors.
ociates, Inc. DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM
Illuminate when needed: Some accent and
feature lighting for aesthetics does not need
to be operating late at night. Lighting control
zones may be used to turn some lighting
off after park closing, while pathway and
structure lighting may remain on all night.
Minimize Light Trespass: Light trespass onto
neighboring residences, adjacent properties,
and river-edge habitat will be minimized with
careful equipment selection, proper location,
and proper aiming and shielding.
Minimize Light Pollution: Light pollution is
uncontrolled light that wastes energy and
creates "sky glow" that reduces visibility of
stars in the night sky. Un-shielded luminaires
and excessively high lighting levels cause
light pollution. The lighting within Confluence
Park will be well shielded and designed to
limit light levels to help maintain dark skies.
Form and materials:
Utilize Long Life Light Sources, such as LED
and induction (electrode-less fluorescent)
lamps, that are rated for 50,000 hours to
100,000 hours of operational life. These
sources may have a higher initial cost,
but greatly reduce maintenance and
replacement costs.
Use Lighting Controls to Reduce Operation
Time. Lighting controls increase the life
of the lighting system, save energy and
minimize impact on neighbors.
Install Products that are durable and
easy to maintain. Lighting equipment and
mounting methods should be carefully
selected and detailed to withstand a high-
abuse environment, especially those within
areas that are regularly flooded, yet still be
accessible and easily maintainable by parks
personnel.


PLAN COMPONENTS lighting
Accent Wall Lighting
u e n c e
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM
C o n f I
Park Master PI
PLAN COMPONENTS 47




IMPLEMENTATION
funding + phasing
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM
Confluence Park Master Plan IMPLEMENTATION 4g


IMPLEMENTATION FUNDING + PROGRAMMING
Not all parks are created equal. A great park system is
the sum of many disparate but interconnected parks.
Forward-looking cities know that the general fund
will never be enough to meet their goals.
Funding, Management, and
Phasing
As part of the planning process a two day
workshop was held with HR&A Advisors
to assess and evaluate the management
and funding opportunities related to
implementation of the Confluence Park plan.
Following are the primary recommendations
generated in the workshop:
Establish an expansive Riverfront district
Consider the Confluence Park Master Plan
the starting point and catalytic project for
establishing an expansive Riverfront District
that will facilitate the branding of a major
new frontier of downtown development.
Creating a branded "District" will also
permit access to new funding sources that
can ensure that the public realm and its
infrastructure receive the level of operating
funding that will be required for long-term
vibrancy and value creation. The new district
should include parks that extend along
the Platte River from Mile High Stadium to
Cuernavaca Park.
Reassess the role and funding sources of
heavily used urban parks
Reassess permissible sources and uses of
funds for parks by virtue of establishment
of park "zoning' that would specify what
activities, events, and developments are
acceptable in different parks throughout the
city. Envision a public process by which
park typologies in Denver are debated and
specific parks sorted into typologies. The
same process could be used to begin to
develop new private sources of funding and
new partnerships for parks as interested
non-profits and citizens advocate for specific
parks.
Identify new sources of revenue for
programming and maintenance
Develop sizable new sources of revenue to
ensure that once rebuilt, Confluence Park
has sufficient dedicated funding to ensure it
is both programmed and maintained to the
standard desired. Potential revenue sources
for programming and maintenance include:
Dedicate retail sales taxes from nearby
businesses to the park;
Develop destinations within the park
with partial revenues dedicated to
the park. An example is Sea Salt
restaurant in Minnehaha Falls Park in
Minneapolis;
Establish a Park improvement district
to generate ongoing revenue.
Confluence Today, Confluence Tomorrow: Denver
Parks estimates current spending for maintenance
for Confluence Park to be $15,000-50,000 per year.
With master plan improvements, increased use, and
heightened visibility, the maintenance budget for the park
could be $250,000 annually.
The 'Sea Salt' restaurant at Minnehaha Falls Park,
Minneapolis, MN, generated $2 million in 2011, $240,000
(12%) of which was paid to the Park. (Image by HR&A
Advisors)
50
Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc. DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM


IMPLEMENTATION FUNDING + PROGRAMMING
SOUTH PLATTE TODAY n #
X Z\.r *' ? ^ ^
>*t . . a. ..1 1 V
i;*-' PLATTE SIflEET
SOUTH PLATTE TOMORROW? ^ .
CONFLUENCE PARK DISTRICT .
V-
Destinations that: i, *
Are linked and branded as a system ^ "f
Maintain their own identity ,^L
Encourage new infill development
Create programmatic synergies i >
: t.:" : DEICER AQUARIUM -X
. / .-..w i>
, 4r* v ci itvlj r' a nnckic
,-.,j , ; jw/ *V-; ELITCH GARDENS
CHILDREN'S AoSEUM Mi .. * £ -r'" tr#
- *#(:' v 'XT.*/
- 'Sr* ^
at '<
MILE HIGH *\
", %
A'V-

y


Diagrams by HR&A Advisors
Waterfront Toronto: Signature design along the waterfront brands the district and creates a sense of community and ownership in the parks while attracting 12 million visitors
annually. A phased funding strategy uses a Park Improvement District to fund the vast majority of operating costs. (Photographs, text, & Diagram by HR&A Advisors)
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM
Confluence Park Master Plan IMPLEMENTATION 51


IMPLEMENTATION phasing
OPINION OF PROBABLE COSTS:
For Discussion Only
See Appendix E for more detail
Phase Total Cost
Phase 1 Outdoor Living Room North
Demolition and Removals $ 282,000
River Improvements $ 600,000
Grading and Grade Control $ 68,000
Utilities $ 90,000
Buildings and Structures $ 18,000
Pavements $ 236,000
Walls and Steps $ 495,000
Landscape $ 34,000
Site Amenities $ 376,000
Mobilization and Contingency $ 769,650
Design & Engineering $ 542,245
Add Alternate 1: Addt'l River Improvements $ 325,000
Add Alternate 2: Gabion Terrace Replacement $ 337,500
Subtotal $ 4,174,500
Phase 2 Outdoor Living Room South
Demolition and Removals $ 100,000
River Improvements $ 6,480,000
Grading and Grade Control $ 68,000
Utilities $ 95,000
Buildings and Structures $ 6,970,000
Pavements $ 161,000
Walls and Steps $ 182,000
Landscape $ 31,000
Site Amenities $ 465,000
Mobilization and Contingency $ 5,094,000
Design & Engineering $ 2,946,900
Subtotal $ 22,593,000
Phase 3 Oasis
Demolition and Removals $ 104,000
River Improvements $ 3,270,000
Grading and Grade Control $ 1,720,000
Utilities $ 135,000
Buildings and Structures $ 2,540,000
Pavements $ 236,000
Walls and Steps $ 270,000
Landscape $ 115,000
Site Amenities $ 365,000
Mobilization and Contingency $ 3,065,000
Design & Engineering $ 1,773,000
Subtotal $ 13,593,000
Phase 4 River Lawn
Demolition and Removals $ 51,000
River Improvements $ 364,500
Grading and Grade Control $ 106,000
Utilities $ 89,000
Buildings and Structures $ 15,000
Pavements $ 125,000
Walls and Steps $ 183,500
Landscape $ 34,000
Site Amenities $ 575,000
Mobilization and Contingency $ 541,000
Design & Engineering $ 313,000
Subtotal $ 2,397,000
Total All Phases $ 42,758,000
52
Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc.
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM


IMPLEMENTATION phasing
PHASING DIAGRAM:
1 i .
i *
20 40
SO FEET
0
KEY:
PHASE 1
Ramp
/y. Renovated
U Plaza
River Terraces
0 Freestyle
Feature
PHASE 2
Big Wave
Whitewater
Course
0 S. Platte
^ Bridge
Cafe Building
Trolley Buildinc
PHASE 3
Terraces
Amphitheater
0 including wall
removal
0 Cherry Creek
^ Bridge
PHASE 4
@ Adventure
Play Area &
Splash Pad
Lawn
Picnic Terrace
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM
Confluence Park Master Plan IMPLEMENTATION 53







APPENDICES
support + background
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:54 PM
Confluence Park Master Plan APPENDICES ^3


A4
Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc.
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:54 PM


APPENDICES TABLE OF CONTENTS
APPENDIX A: PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT
PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT
STAKEHOLDERS INVOLVEMENT
APPENDIX b: historic resources summary
SUMMARY
RESOURCES
APPENDIX c: ENVIRONMENTAL
OPPORTUNITIES & CONSTRAINTS
SUMMARY
APPENDIX d: gap analysis
RECREATION & LEISURE
CONNECTIVITY
REGIONAL DESTINATION & LOCAL HANGOUT
RIVER
APPENDIX El COST OPINION
PHASE 1-OUTDOOR LIVING ROOM NORTH
PHASE 2- OUTDOOR LIVING ROOM SOUTH
PHASE 3- THE OASIS
PHASE 4- THE RIVER LAWN
APPENDIX F: H.A.L.S. SURVEY
Historic American Landscapes Survey for Confluence Park, written and prepared by
Emily Lynam, University of Colorado Denver, Janurary 25, 2013
A6
A10
A12
A20
A24
A36
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:54 PM
Confluence Park Master Plan APPENDICES ^5


APPENDIX A PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT
Public Involvement Process for
Confluence Park Master Plan
Introduction: The goal of the public involvement
process for the Confluence Park Master Plan
was to communicate and solicit input from the
many constituencies of the park, including local
residents, businesses and outdoor enthusiasts.
It is recognized that the park has a significant
local as well as regional appeal, and that
different constituencies use the park at different
times of the day on different days of the week.
Public involvement activities need to reflect
diversity and use patterns in order to capture
a broad range of public input. Craig Coronato
of Wenk Associates and Lisa Zoeller of Zoeller
Consulting are the primary team members
working on public involvement.
Preparation for Public Involvement: created
a distribution list of 125 key leaders, identify
local media contacts, develop web site, create
online survey for web site, and develop written
materials and flyers.
General Notification Process for all three
public meetings :
Electronic invitation and short project
description emailed 30 days in advance to
over 7,000 people: Parks & Rec list: 4,500;
Parks RNO list: 140; distribution list of 125;
emails to 2,400 local tenants
Flyers printed and distribution begins for
mail rooms in 14 tenant building mail rooms;
flyers posted on community boards at REI
and Starbuck's, as well as posting in various
businesses on both sides of the Platte River,
including Little Raven Winery, Paris on the
Platte, Corks, and McCloughlin's Restaurant
General publicity in North Denver Tribune,
Your Hub; web sites for District 9, Greenway
Foundation, REI and various advocacy
groups; Parks and Recreation Facebook,
River Vision web site and Twitter
Second round of emails and flyers beginning
approximately 10 days prior to the public
activity; two to three additional Tweets,
Facebook posts and other communication
via Parks and Recreation site
Public Involvement Activities:
Walked Platte Street businesses, Riverfront
businesses and surrounding area in early
June to identify key contacts for project and
to tell them about the June 30 Open House
Public Open House on Saturday, June 30
in REI Community Room from 10-noon;
reached many people who live in the area
or representative various biking, walking,
kayaking groups
Tent outside REI on Saturday, June 30
10-noon to hand out information on west
side of Platte and ask park users to fill out
park survey; reached many bikers including
many from outside of Denver. Approx,
attendance?
Intercept interviews of park users midday
on Tuesday, July 10 on east side of park to
reach parents and kids swimming in the river
and people who live or work in the Riverfront
area.
Publicity of online survey and web site,
resulting in over 300 survey responses
regarding Confluence Park area.
Stakeholder meeting on Wednesday,
August 8 with about 20 key leaders and
representatives to look at concept options
and give opinions
A6
Denver Parks & Recreatio
| | We
k Associates, Inc.
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:54 PM


APPENDIX A PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT
Second public meeting at REI Community
room on Tuesday, August 21 to present
three concept alternatives for the master
plan, hear opinions and develop concept
preferences. Approx attendance?
Second stakeholder meeting on
Wednesday, September 12 with about 20
key leaders to look at selected concept in
more detail.
LUTI and Parks Advisory board meetings
10/9 and 10/11?
Third stakeholder meeting planned for
October 10 to vet final plan prior to public
presentation on the 15th.
Third and final public meeting planned
for Monday, October 15 to present the
proposed master plan concept and to
get additional feedback that would be
incorporated into the final plan.
Determine the level of public involvement
required for phase 2 implementation
Stakeholders Committee:
Denver Parks & Rec Mark Bernstein m ark. be rn ste i n @de n ve rgo v. o rg
Greenway Foundation Jeff Shoemaker wjshoemaker@comcast.net
City Council District 9 aide Nathan Batchelder Nathan.batchelder@denvergov.org
REI Pete Citrano pkenned@rei.com
Riverfront Siri Sellers ssellers@eastwestresorts.com
Highland United Neighbors, Inc. Kristin Morley packerfan 1967@msn .com
Businesses on the Platte Glenn Ehrlich glenn@corksonline.com
Downtown Denver Partnership John Desmond jdesmond@downtowndenver.com
Bike Denver Piep van Heuven piep@bikedenver.org
Walk Denver Gosia Kung gkung@kungarch.com
Trout Unlimited Cory Stansbury cory@thecory.com
Denver Bicycle Touring Club John Campbell president@dbtc.org
Rocky Mtn Cycling Club Tom Foss foss.tom@gmail.com
Denver Rail Heritage Society Darrell Arndt trainpix@aol.com
Rocky Mtn Canoe Club Bill Ashworth washwort@comcast.net
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:54 PM
Confluence Park Master Plan
APPENDICES 47


APPENDIX A PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT
Confluence Park
Denver, Colorado
the river
improve water quality and enhance
the river as an amenity for recreation
recreation + leisure
provide a better variety of recreation
opportunities for all age groups and better
distribute them in the park
access + connections
reduce congestion and conflicts by
improving bridges, trails and
walkways to provide better access
and safer conditions
regional destination
activate the park and better integrate it
within its changing urban context
A Community's Outlook
444

safety
reduce real and perceived threats in the park
A A.
more evwnts fiat can focues on water quality and bring people to Ihe liver to realize issues
wnprcn* water quaky and add more ripanan areas, too many concrete watis and banks
more of a dry wide focus cn improved water quality seems necessary et the point
i am concerned about water quaky and kids playing fi tl when ecoli coins are rnjpi we all need to help clean it up
i tove (hat Ih* park gives people direct access to toe water,
wtiflewator course used more by swimmers
dein* water quality responsibly fo> inspect on, alerts, enforcement, s^nagt. etc. trfio s in charge7
rnprtve water quaity to akrw trout fishing
trie kayaieng is a fui irtique part of confluence park
encourage the swimming and tubing, people kwe n
il smelts bid and that makes me not want to get in Ihe water
would be a great connection for kayakers firm here to 13th and Zini
water quality is a concern
can we Hk the polluUon problem Ike eliminating ecoi?
the water is polluted
the best views are not avaiable because of the wrong program there
shoemaker reeds to tie updated
triangular park needs to be lariated because of shifting walls
the amphitheater has terrible aspect, the sun is in you eyes and it s hot
there isn't a playground, but there is potential fer some
Ih* part. gets too crowded
need to understand all user groups from tameless to hl^-end road ttkes
new 'amphitheater' at NE intersection of river and rtorry creek faces due west needs shade trees al west edge!
lh*i* should be more things to) chtidfen to play with
i would like to sob die park ba mors natural with peen. plantings, trees, eta instead of cafes and realaurants
develop volunteer stewardship plan as part of process
develop operations and maintenance plan as part of process
build ijpiger station to provide permanent resource protection
visit confluence park to experience open space, sahkide, and nature
activate space with diverse programmng
them should bt a speed femil in the park
dogwafcersand bikers staiid be separated
people stop at points fer views and end up causing congestion
15ft street needs a bike lane
zij tag* in shoemakei splat* thanktoty slowdown (hebikers
resolve bite''ped conflict issues Is ksy
separate bikes tern pedestrians and dog walkers
bityaing and wahng a>e most mtoorlant to me, i bite or wafc to the park never *ive
better bike signage, way finding
new bridge over the river, wide enough fee pedestrians and bike traffic conics took?
widen 1 S3) st nver bridge lor better through biking
adequate^ scaled oatos tor bikes and peds
rework an ramp to shoemaker plaza to be much wider and remove tight turns
separate wheel and foot traffic where possible
can the connection to commons park visual and physic^ be improved?
effective sototion to pedestrian and tike orciiallon through west side and cherry creek a multi-use bridge
ccnnecllon to street gnd fer bates
mprenement to path under 15th wdw and remove curves
^_eornoction to south plotte and cherry creek bails: il is a great hub
nBed to conned south plane, c^ieny creek, and Highland bo the city grid
use t5toas a connection to highland
there should be concerts on the earn side again
the park is a central Ink the regional tiifcei'ped network and should be planned accwdngly
canfuence part neecs to play a rote in a system of water, bite, ana walkng networks, as well as a destination
_ buy bod across from shoemaker plaza from the developer iSift and Lithe Raven tor growing use
.ncorpoiBte connection to downtown mad
..the private parcel on Little Raven s a key gateway to the park hew can we encourage that to support part activity?
activate water's edge with retail arid commercial on cr>e side
.create ccnflusnc* park alliance to care tor part
_secLrtly 19 a tig concern, especially m ihe later afternoon
"_ticmeless numbers have Increased makng it feel unsafe
~7_there is drug dealing around toe rivers
batter visfoity Or poice access would make it feel sator
aecirtty cameras or more lighting would make ihe park lee* sarer
pro-activato ralher than re-adrvate wtiien ft cemes to security problems
pik feels drty and un-kept
jjroupa cd homsaess and a lot at litter feels drty and unsafe
Community Outreach Meeting #1 June 30, 2012 Summary of Public Comments
A8
Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc.
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:54 PM


APPENDIX A PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT
summary of comments on concept plans- public meeting #2
the ramp terrace_________________________
replace failing infrastructure, improve river access,
and add key amenities.
the spine bridge
park elements organized along a central spine.
% -
the park loop
park amenities connected by a signature element.
ikV
%
k proforcd concopl xxmwq to public input
DttiliniJk* loo ffwch kXu& onherak (404*. NetOOOutTi R.OJ. OTSdaly baMfc rii part uM
I love fe idildrerfp eptah poo?
Too line Nettt more acton
OEUGQRGOHUMc ItiitttrtbfrptontLtetTref Oolngrt* NClT&HfcAP
second Hal oten.
*thrd Pnl fflofar.
Kuyrtl6 0f*roMeOT*pt*wilofwr.fcUbi,rpstotMii9jtliifllion*ehare grinds.
Dog days lorboml CKnligncf# fed that dcg*p*r upta d parwn highestand *eshMet sutt
*B^Md
Prater curved bn^jes to the ilraqhi sngWir fret ot ttis ptti.
The scheme brib the blent and esodno potenlal at the place
Kmq te spkseh poet rsntirtd tom the rtver sends the message dial (Me m# i* Ml at ler irrtw*on The acuesft pi naan use rd be patted the rver aiporterc*.
I Hrfcbasing a payrspiwh are* onto?oTfahts area would ttdargaroustocdtfdwi baeaua* ftul a a hkjh trrtcaraa
Usng Mflnlsaa a wryb rrpnes* after guilty is a pentad oppcrpiniy tosher* hma wear 'acrtadti nfturetoirrprcw htt> and safety
sifteod af a man made SnxSjre
Can it a great Idas! Do moreto KitaiPtdgftitfti ratal rd restaurants
Low (n* idea deem bn ng n a bridge'
ale aooess to bite and pedestwi
pcwl liwrTTij prints ot the *Tfs
safe pies for iids.
recytiriQef Pc*.
flexhta fbapotarAeifpropitnufripoMnfl pierejfimcwabecteMcten
- wnoa laws to acccnimutate MmIs otacMy
Ike ipne bilge seems In rtndetheaieaeitoimtlple veoesm ansailTK iwy Bke crcUatcndomrunes die scheme rstead of powrij through
This Ha key ntedtonge for bicycle padis It would be great to buId separated fad 6es ter bit camming Himi park.
Al 3 plsis hate ,pg h rath Q ISIh Street &kige. Dar^ercus peidi point.
Where uan camdt>Tlma occurf
f Mi* cot racing |P7) He ^agtone: Trel. This is erfcel ae it Is s recreation and commuter TNI
Tktsamy tawniiajictthalcptwa Whet ere tie haft tspkory ter farievvg?
1 tern* Ha tot by plau wfo cate ktkea etc
fe he beadr gov? Too bad
Wyfaw! I Ike that you nantne.'deepened die Alette to accommodate (tanHg seasons Keep a dire -more rrcnlhs
AfrealapportirWr s tost br piling (hidfei! cut wyren te after. Mmvoppcrtiiriti!a*v childrenand*4jkaesteem he tatmsfc ak>e6* waterway
itrMidetSp by mjfcMrK*o it (touch fog, rtfujy
1 don't m fed reed fc we No. uiBcrewrerTrwrthbwdhdbM*prth would t**b cure tsrwr end be tlpparyd^rg
pa Milter
Hire the amftiifrgBlef but dent Ike theover* foaaci kayak come
1 love die 'trbge' at MiWifiim Pat it Cteago. This caiid be ambr.
You wd to kMrtrw bke peft-s West to east on the Soufi Piaffe Rrw ao d's noerjrstdri.
The ircr*t^ieeu'K|jereebre. yetseeme ticked away PiddenH' this peart Yfflvistorehnc* ire Ban* without 01*1(110111* uaN 7
The M iWi the pcM warns To be tefBcHarvurdaHJlIasCi. It b sleep? I Me the brow sm in Ire put loop daftr (19|.
t ttuik the cbtben't spray pool end {Taye'eats n oflr spot Lotts out or pore
J-Sflorral ErfflortV
1 Mw the loop brdje ttow he ka^k routes better Ihar hemg abridge ootirp iy> the row Could the spue berebcMed?
Hoptip kr Chtnen fln*r doeb>T rapjire s mare v b Inst not a substandard mew-to the befey ^iKerely The Pafle Vsley WIev'
kkad mora sanng by the flmr l kk* the satps twdng K the rwer Mf. grwri spaces trees robperatad
I lk the cawi'rMCjurret
Low the oft am
lkk*thec#ikw'3jifff rwainboihHekweenddiespsw.
f Me* tt>* worked bUB path cn 5^ oxrw away rrem He edge end kmmsiwi tether ^-enaHetperecns agreed wth tvs cctrrmenl.
1 Me the cM* met the bridge etsalcr vaaitg
Need fc address hor ttis psfc reioes to he area irrmadatety rwin ana socth ct t
1 Me In watemys as dqided in He cptm
Ike pat Mp is anal mff^ie add arwdier pay and imIb park on the cfer sde
Ljked^pedestnanbndge $ 15(h.
te Here itxikriWHjgh iocmTih ecwpektai kuwk cctiree 7k* Part kxp-icrt tr* dee & dnAte twiHne eetie< or>e more ctniangrrg amt Weeftvke fetlure at lh botom
I Me* Ih* obttia kayat ccun*
ttets cn Cherry Creek? Ramwe Sen fe them dam a t*y gel oter tote Plate
Wcukd Ike to see 11. t2. and 13 mere IhougfC Hmiiftt'concEpI desi^-ed.
Use Itjtrtrro as 9 design elemenl.
1 Mar like wSulidnJiufikSi odik and putrtrd Mck WteybrUeek Maw loom.
1 Mi* rernttlH] r 5W WMI (*(Df H Tie dMr and iP9f H the {tr*e detltn
t lerj* P real ler b rtdge des gn
1 am ccnoared NMullte salety ter the lubera |HOf quatarngc 'ilfnh,'bio: 15thstwtbtgeisNOTgnngfcb?redone. Hite neeosto becocrdinelea
Ahw bikes wdy an 15th Sbeel Bridge. Mo tikes in He CcnfLenceaark. prnpw.
Can he Kayek come be mewed 10P upslmir' tu trowle more epece Nr eUMti betow?
iMietheeeaArpwhB kVothd 5.11.12.13 be Doodad *menT*(*elarrts7
No neterercetD tr* brtipac* attWrwr'l' UeSye theuffcrturihes lWt**iTie>j hsgaials^nficatre-MilreaslalwiieiU *ffi (
Bfcerecks^MmbefrfQems'JJkmenlieiyurrnLfldmteertysuerie Mcfeepodeslrenbtaln)g*owtt&dh Pl^ewder
Low thebiaiorirved trdge thSelmroles sci(eatheshirped9es I feel tieerhledurE shoJdredect he pattern o1 the nwr.
ONFLUENCE
PARK M
H
ASTER PLAN
:' r
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:54 PM
Confluence Park Master Plan
APPENDICES Ag


APPENDIX B HISTORIC RESOURCES SUMMARY
Confluence Park: An Historical
Review
Early Settlement of Denver: In 1849 William
Greeneberry Russel heard about a discovery of
gold along the South Platte River. He organized
a party and left his mining venture in California
to explore the rivers in Colorado in 1858.
The site of their initial exploration is where
Confluence Park is located today. The park is
embedded in the lower downtown (LoDo) area
of Denver, the oldest and original settlement of
the City of Denver. During the exploration for
gold, General William Larimer founded Denver
by putting down cottonwood logs in the center of
a square mile plot that would become the current
LoDo neighborhood. In 1870, residents passed
bonds that brought a railroad from Cheyenne.
The thriving business area became a skid row
in the mid twentieth century. In the 1960's
and 1970's urban renewal plans were realized,
including storefront redevelopment near the park
in the late 1980's.
Speer Boulevard:
Speer Boulevard and Cherry Creek are both
in a Denver Landmark District upstream
of Auraria Parkway. Downstream only the
road remains in the district.
On Cherry Creek the walls parallel concrete
walls 10 feet tall and 80 feet apart were
constructed between 1906 and 1911 from
Downing Street to Blake Street to contain
Cherry Creek. In 1912 there was a massive
flood, which hastened the need to finish the
walls along Cherry Creek up to the South
Platte River. The dimensions of these walls
were increased to 12 feet high and 88 feet
wide. This final section was completed in
1914. The walls are still in use and provide
a continuous walled channel for Cherry
Creek for the 3.2 miles from Downing Street
to the South Platte River.
It was added in 1986 to the National
Register of Historic Places for the area of
the Boulevard that stretches from W. Colfax
to Downing Street, Denver. The historic
significance is the architecture/engineering
and events. The area of significance is the
community planning and development, and
landscape architecture.
Laminated Beam Wood Bridge across Cherry
Creek:
Located just downstream of Little Raven St
in confluence Park, this is the last of its kind
on Cherry Creek. Its age and significance
are unknown.
1970's era design of Shoemaker Plaza and
ramps:
Because the point wall reconstruction
and diversion structure were likely built
during the 70s when the park was first
developed, they don' meet the 50 year
mark for potentially historic structures (from
the Federal perspective, not sure about
Denver).
Denver Tramway Power Company Plant
Building:
The Denver Tramway Company was
developed in 1886 by John and William
Evans and the Power Company Plant
building was established in 1901. The
Tramway installed a city-wide network
of overhead electric trolleys for lines that
reached numerous neighborhoods in Denver
and the Power Company Plant served as
the power source for these electric trolleys.
The power plant closed in the 19500s and
was used by the International Harvester
A10
Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc.
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:54 PM


APPENDIX B HISTORIC RESOURCES SUMMARY
Company and then became the Forney
FIistoric Transportation Museum in 1969,
which later moved to a different location.
The building was designated a Denver
Landmark Building in 1971. In 1998 REI
looked to this historic building location
as a new sustainable retail development
opportunity. The REI Denver project and
its measures of sustainable development
lead to the Denver Tramway Building being
added to the National Register of Historic
Places in September 2001.
Platte Valley Trolley:
The Trolley car, No. 25, is the last
remaining, completely intact, electric railway
car. It was built in 1911 and operated until
1950. It is listed on the State Register of
Historic Properties and was sold to the West
Corridor Rail Historical Cooperative. It is
now run by the Denver Tramway Heritage
Society and its north terminus is located in
Confluence Park.
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:54 PM
Shoemaker Plaza and the Whitewater course:
One of the first urban riverfront parks in
the US, including the development of
river access points, a Whitewater course
and other park improvements, Historic
information available from the Greenway
Foundation.
The Farmers and Gardener's Ditch:
Served the North Denver Power plant,
abandoned, now belongs to Denver Water.
History available from Denver Water and
History of Denver Water System: George M.
Bull, at DPL.
Partial list of Sources:
http://www.ucdenver.edu/academics/
colleges/SPA/Buechnerlnstitute/Centers/
WirthChair/Publications/Documents/
Sustainable%20Retail%20Development%20
at%20REI%20Denver.pdf
http ://www. way m arki n g .co m/way m arks/
WM31 Q1_Denver_Tramway_Power_
Company_Plant_building_Denver_CO
http://coloradopreservation .org /
http://www.denverstreetcars.net/history.htm
http://landscapeonline.com/research/
article/8521
http://landscapeonline.com/research/
article/8521
http://nepis.epa.gov
Confluence Park Master Plan APPENDICES
A11


APPENDIX C ENVIRONMENTAL
Opportunities and Challenges:
Riparian Corridor, Cultural Resources and Hazardous Materials
Opportunities
O Potential to narrow South
Platte River channel to create
riparian ovcrbanks
Opportunity to limit access
and enhance plantings
Hazardous Mat
O Potential hazardous materials
at former landfill site
O Potential hazardous materials
at former power substation
National Registertff
Historic Places (BE)
0
0
0
0
0
Denver Tramway Powerhouse -
Listed on National Register
of Historic Places
Cherry Creek Floodwall -
Will be evaluated for NR Listing,
(Likely eligible)
Cherry Creek Floodwall -
Will be evaluated for NR Listing,
(Likely not eligible)
KJverpuint Building -
Will be evaluated for NR Listing.
(Likely not eligible)
Irrigation Canal Diversion -
Will be evaluated for NR Listing.
(Likely noL eligible)
City and County
of Denver ____
(0)
Speer Boulevard Historic District
A12
Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc.
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:54 PM


APPENDIX C ENVIRONMENTAL
DRAFT RESOURCE
ASSESSMENT AND
COMPLIANCE SUMMARY
CONFLUENCE PARK MASTER PLAN
CITY AND COUNTY OF DENVER, COLORADO
Prepared for:
Wenk Associates
1335 Elati Street
Denver, CO 80204
Prepared by:
ERO Resources Corporation
1842 Clarkson Street
Denver, Colorado 80218
(303) 830-1188
ERO Project #5226
October 8, 2012
CONTENTS:
Summary i
Introduction 1
Site Description 1
Wetlands and Waters of the U.S. 2
Background 2
Site Conditions and Clearance Process 3
Threatened, Endangered, and Candidate
Species 4
Background 4
Site Conditions and Clearance Process 4
Raptors and Migratory Birds 6
Background 6
Site Conditions and Clearance Process 7
Historic Properties 7
Background 7
Site Conditions and Clearance Process 7
Hazardous Materials 8
Background 8
Site Conditions and Clearance Process 8
CDOT Categorical Exclusion Process 8
Senate Bill 40 Certification 9
Wetland Finding 9
Paleontological Resources 9
TABLES: 4
Table 1. Federally threatened and endangered
species potentially found in County County
or potentially affected by projects in Denver
County.
Summary
The City and County of Denver (City), in
partnership with stakeholders that include
Urban Drainage and Flood Control District,
the Greenway Foundation, and Colorado
Department of Transportation, is developing a
master plan for Shoemaker Plaza at Confluence
Park. Shoemaker Plaza was constructed in
1975 and is one of the earliest examples of an
urban riverside park in the country. Additional
improvements have been made to the area,
including a Whitewater kayak course and
connections to the South Platte River and
Cherry Creek regional trails.
The City retained the Wenk Associates team
to develop a master plan for Confluence Park.
Concepts developed during the master plan
include the potential for impacts to various
sensitive and regulated resources in the project
area. Additionally, it is likely that federal
funds, administered by Colorado Department
of Transportation, will be used during the
construction phase of the project. For these
reasons, ERO Resources Corporation (ERO)
is part of the Wenk team to inventory natural
and cultural resources and potential hazardous
materials and provide an assessment of
potential effects and regulatory processes that
may be triggered by those effects. Below is a
summary of the resources found at the project
area and recommendations or future actions
necessary based on the current site conditions
and federal, state, and local regulations.
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:54 PM
Confluence Park Master Plan APPENDICES ^13


APPENDIX C ENVIRONMENTAL
A14
Wetlands and Other Waters of the U.S. -
The South Platte River and Cherry Creek are
present in the project area and are jurisdictional
waters of the U.S., into which the discharge of
dredged and fill material is regulated by Section
404 of the Clean Water Act. The master plan
alternatives would all likely trigger the need for
a Section 404 individual general permit from the
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps). None of
the alternatives contain any significant permitting
obstacles and a permit would be issued up to six
month from application submittal.
Threatened and Endangered Species -
Suitable habitat for federally listed threatened or
endangered species is not present in the project
area and the project would have no indirect
effects on listed species. The City should submit
a habitat assessment letter to the U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service for its review and concurrence
that the project would have no effect on
threatened or endangered species.
Migratory Birds Migratory birds may nest in
trees or under bridges in the project area. If
vegetation and structures cannot be removed
during the non-nesting season, a survey for
active nest should be done prior to construction.
If active nests are found in the project area,,
any work that would destroy a nest or cause
abandonment should not be conducted until the
birds have completed nesting.
Historic Properties The Denver Tramway
Power Building is listed on the National Register
of Historic Places and several other structures
and landscape features, including the Cherry
Creek floodwalls and River Pointe Building
should be assessed for eligibility. The City has
also designated a number of other features,
including the Speer Boulevard corridor, as
historic under City criteria. Consultation
between either the Corps or Colorado
Department of Transportation and the State
Historic Preservation Office on eligibility and
effects determinations will be required because
of federal involvement in the project. In the
unlikely event that a listed or eligible resource
would be adversely affected by the project,
mitigation would be required.
Hazardous Materials Many areas along the
South Platte River and Cherry Creek have
been used as dump sites or have been used
for industrial purposes. The resulting potential
for the presence of hazardous materials is
high. A dump is known to have been present
on the south west arm of the confluence and an
electrical transmission substation was present
in the south east arm of the confluence. The
Colorado Department of Transportation will
require that a Phase I Environmental Site
Assessment be prepared that assesses the
likelihood of contamination in the project area.
The findings of the Phase I Environmental Site
Assessment may indicate the need for soil
and/or groundwater testing to determine the
presence or extent of contamination.
CDOT Categorical Exclusion Process -
Because CDOT administered federal funds
will be used for the construction phase of
the project, the project must comply with the
National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA).
NEPA requires an analysis of environmental
impacts that may result from federal actions,
in this case, funding of the project. CDOT will
use its Categorical Exclusion (CE) process
to document NEPA compliance. Several CE
clearance items are specific to CDOT CE
projects, including Senate Bill 40 Certification, a
wetland finding, and addressing paleontological
resources.
Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc. DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:54 PM


APPENDIX C ENVIRONMENTAL
Introduction
The City and County of Denver (City), in
partnership with stakeholders that include
Urban Drainage and Flood Control District,
the Greenway Foundation, and Colorado
Department of Transportation (CDOT), is
developing a master plan for Shoemaker Plaza
at Confluence Park. Shoemaker Plaza was
constructed in 1975 and is one of the earliest
examples of an urban riverside park in the
country. Additional improvements have been
made to the area, including a Whitewater kayak
course and connections to the South Platte
River and Cherry Creek regional trails.
The City retained the Wenk Associates team
to develop a master plan for Confluence Park.
Concepts developed during the master plan
include the potential for impacts to various
sensitive and regulated resources in the project
area. Additionally, it is likely that federal funds,
administered by CDOT, will be used during the
construction phase of the project. For these
reasons, ERO Resources Corporation (ERO)
is part of the Wenk team to inventory natural
and historic resources and potential hazardous
materials and provide an assessment of
potential effects and regulatory processes that
may be triggered by those effects. Below is a
summary of the resources found at the project
area and recommendations on future actions
necessary based on the current site conditions
and federal, state, and local regulations.
Site Description
Confluence Park is located at the Confluence of
the South Platte River and Cherry Creek. Both
streams have perennial flows that are highly
regulated by releases from upstream dams and
that convey larger volumes of urban stormwater
runoff. Development has encroached upon the
floodplains of both streams and both streams
have been channelized to better convey
flood flows. Cherry Creek is contained within
vertical floodwalls and the South Platte River
is contained within a constructed trapezoidal
channel. Because of channelization and
encroachment by development, there is virtually
no riparian or wetland vegetation along the
streams. Most of the vegetation in the project
area is maintained turf grass associated with
park areas. There are scattered patches of
sandbar willow (Salix exigua), reed canarygrass
(Phalaris arundinacea), Siberian elm (Ulmus
pumila), and plains cottonwood (Populus
deltoides) along the South Platte River.
Development around the park includes a mix of
19th, 20th, and 21st century development. The
most prominent existing building is the Denver
Tramway Company Power Building, which
became fully functional in 1902. The building
now houses the REI Flagship store. The Platte
Valley Trolley provides rides on restored Denver
Trolley cars between REI and Sports Authority
Field at Mile High during the summer.
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:54 PM
Wetlands and Waters of the U.S.
Background The Clean Water Act (CWA) was
passed by the U.S. Congress in 1972 to protect
the physical, biological, and chemical quality
of waters of the U.S. The U.S. Army Corps
of Engineers' (Corps) Regulatory Program
administers and enforces Section 404 of the
CWA. Under Section 404, a Corps; permit
is required for the discharge of dredged or
fill material into wetlands and waters of the
U.S. The Corps defines waters of the U.S.
as all navigable waters and their tributaries,
all interstate waters and their tributaries, all
wetlands adjacent to these waters, and all
impoundments of these waters.
Section 404 of the CWA includes provisions
for three types of authorization to discharge
dredged or fill material into waters of the U.S
- nationwide permit authorization, regional
general permits, and individual general permits.
The nationwide permits are a series of activity-
based permits with limits on impacts to waters
of the U.S. and adjacent wetlands. Nationwide
permits are used to authorize activities such as
utility and transportation crossings, small bank
stabilization projects, outfalls, and some types of
maintenance activities. Regional and individual
general permits are used to authorize activities
that either exceed the impact thresholds of
nationwide permits or that are not activities
covered by nationwide permits. Examples of
activities that are not covered by nationwide
permits include stabilizing channels with drop
structures, dams, stream diversions, and kayak
courses. In most cases, CWA authorization
requires compensatory mitigation for permanent
loss of wetlands in the form of either constructed
wetlands or purchase of wetland mitigation bank
credits.
Confluence Park Master Plan APPENDICES ^15


APPENDIX C ENVIRONMENTAL
Applications for individual general permits
must include an analysis of alternatives
considered for the project. The Corps is only
able to issue an individual general permit for
the least environmentally damaging practicable
alternative that meets the project purpose and
need.
Site Conditions and Clearance Process:
As previously described, Confluence Park
includes the South Platte River and Cherry
Creek, both of which, and their adjacent
wetlands, have previously been determined by
the Corps to be jurisdictional waters of the U.S.
If any work is planned within the South Platte
River or Cherry Creek, a wetland delineation
should be conducted and a report should be
submitted to the Corps for its review. Activities
planned that would require the placement
of dredged or fill material within wetlands or
below the ordinary high water mark would
require authorization under Section 404 of the
CWA. Current master plan concepts include
a variety of activities that would require CWA
authorization including reconfiguring the
South Platte River channel and kayak course,
improving access to the stream banks, and
constructing new stream crossings.
The extent of likely disturbance to jurisdictional
waters of the U.S. under current alternatives
is great enough that CWA authorization would
likely be in the form of an individual general
permit. The permit would require compensatory
wetland mitigation, which could likely be
accomplished in the project area if incorporated
into final design. It would take up to six
months to receive authorization once a permit
application has been submitted. None of the
master plan alternatives includes any proposed
activities for which it would be difficult to obtain
authorization, but a thorough alternatives
analysis for the selected alternative will be
necessary. A preapplication meeting with the
Corps and other review agencies should be held
at the start of the design process for the selected
alternative.
Threatened, Endangered, and Candidate
Species
Background: Federally threatened and
endangered species are protected under the
Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973, as
amended (16 U.S.C. 1531 etseq.). Significant
adverse effects to a federally listed species or
its habitat require consultation with the U.S. Fish
and Wildlife Service (Service) under Section
7 or 10 of the ESA. Section 7 consultation
occurs between the Service and another
federal agency whose actions may affect listed
species. Implementing the selected alternative
from the Confluence Park master plan will
likely trigger federal actions on the part of the
Corps (issuing CWA authorization) and Federal
Highway Administration (through federal funds
administered by CDOT) that will require Section
7 consultation.
Site Conditions and Clearance Process:
The project area was assessed for potential
habitat for threatened, endangered, and
candidate species under the ESA. The Service
lists several threatened and endangered species
with potential habitat in the City and County of
Denver, or potentially affected by projects in the
City and County of Denver (Table 1).
The proposed project would not directly affect
the Preble's meadow jumping mouse or Ute
ladies-tresses orchid because of the lack
of suitable habitat in the project area. The
project is also located within block clearance
areas for Preble's meadow jumping mouse
and Ute ladies-tresses orchid. The Colorado
butterfly plant is a short-lived perennial herb
found in moist areas of floodplains. It occurs
on subirrigated, alluvial soils on level or slightly
sloping floodplains and drainage bottoms at
elevations 5,000 to 6,400 feet. The Service
has not established official survey guidelines
for the Colorado butterfly plant; however, no
suitable habitat is present within the project area
because a natural drainage characterized by
wetlands and an active floodplain is not present
within the project area. Because of the lack of
suitable habitat, the project would have no effect
on Colorado butterfly plant.
The interior least tern, piping plover, whooping
crane, pallid sturgeon, and western prairie
fringed orchid are species affected by water
depletions from the South Platte River. Because
the current alternatives do not include activities
that would deplete water in the South Platte
River, such as diverting water from a stream,
these species would not be affected by the
project.
To document compliance with the Endangered
Species Act, the City should submit a habitat
assessment to the Service that documents the
lack of suitable habitat in the project area for
federally listed species and the lack of indirect
effects associated with depletions and that
requests concurrence from the Service that the
selected alternative would have no effect on
federally listed species.
A16
Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc.
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:54 PM


APPENDIX C ENVIRONMENTAL
Table 1. Federally threatened and endangered species potentially found in County County or
potentially affected by projects in Denver County
Common Name Scientific Name Status4 Habitat Suitable Habitat Potential to be ^jecjl
Who oping crane** Grus armricana E Mudflats around re sen1 oirs and in agricultural areas No suitable habitat, no depletions, no potential to affect
Fish
Pallid sturgeon** Scaphirhynch us alb us E Large, turbid, free-flowing rivers with a strong current and gravel or sandy substrate No suitable habitat, no depletions, no potential to affect
Plants
Ute la die s-tresses orchid Sp iranthes diluvialis T Moist to wet alluvial meadows, floodplains of perennial streams, and around springs and lakes below 6,500 feet In block clearance, no potential to affect
WTe stem prairie fringed orchid** Plaianihera praeclara T Moist to wet tallgrass prairies and sedge meadows,mostly in relatively undisturbed grasslands No suitable habitat, no depletions, no potential to affect
*T= Federally Threatened Species, E = Federally Endangered Species.
* Water depletions in the South Platte River may affect the species andyor critical habitat in downstream
re ache sin other counties or states.

Raptors and Migratory Birds
Background: Migratory birds, as well as their
eggs and nests, are protected under the
Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA). The MBTA
does not contain any prohibition that applies to
the destruction of a bird nest alone (without birds
or eggs), provided that no possession occurs
during the destruction. While destruction of a
nest by itself is not prohibited under the MBTA,
nest destruction that results in the unpermitted
take of migratory birds or their eggs is illegal and
fully prosecutable under the MBTA (Migratory
Bird Permit Memorandum, U.S. Fish and Wildlife
April 15, 2003). The regulatory definition of a
take means to pursue, hunt, shoot, wound, kill,
trap, capture, or collect; or attempt to pursue,
hunt, shoot, wound, kill, trap, capture, or collect.
Under the MBTA, the Service may issue nest
depredation permits, which allow a permittee to
remove an active nest. The Service, however,
issues few permits and only under specific
circumstances, usually related to human health
and safety. Obtaining a nest depredation permit
is unlikely and involves a process that takes
from 4 to 8 weeks. The best way to avoid a
violation of the MBTA is to remove vegetation
outside of the active breeding season, which
typically falls between March and August,
depending on the species. Public awareness of
the MBTA has grown in recent years, and most
MBTA enforcement actions are the result of a
concerned member of the community reporting
a violation.
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:54 PM
Confluence Park Master Plan APPENDICES A17


APPENDIX C ENVIRONMENTAL
Site Conditions and Clearance Process:
No nests were observed within the project area
during the YEAR site visit. It is recommended
that all vegetation be removed from the site
outside of the breeding season to avoid
destroying any potential nests. If an active
nest is identified within or near the project area,
activities that would directly impact the nest,
or that would encroach close enough to cause
adult birds to abandon the nest during the
breeding season, should be restricted.
Historic Properties
Background: The National Historic Preservation
Act (NHPA) is federal legislation intended to
preserve historical and archaeological sites.
The act created the National Register of Historic
Places, the list of National Historic Landmarks,
and the State Historic Preservation Offices.
In order for a structure or building to be listed
in the national register, it must be associated
with an important historic event or person or
have distinctive characteristics or qualities of
workmanship. Typically, historic properties are
more than 50 years old and generally look the
way they did during their period of significance.
Section 106 of the NHPA sets forth the process
that federal agencies must follow when their
actions have the potential to affect historic
properties. The federal agency with jurisdiction
over the action is responsible for complying with
Section 106. For this project, the Corps and
Federal Highway Administration (represented by
CDOT) will be involved. In cases such as these,
CDOT typically leads the Section 106 process.
Site Conditions and Clearance Process:
Given that the Confluence Park area is generally
considered the birthplace of Denver, structures
and landscape elements date from the late
1800s to the present. The Denver Tramway
Power Building is listed on the National Register
of Historic Places and several other structures
and landscape features, including the Cherry
Creek floodwalls and River Pointe Building
should be assessed for eligibility. The City has
also designated a number of other features,
including the Speer Boulevard corridor, as
historic under City criteria. Consultation
between either the Corps or Colorado
Department of Transportation and the State
Historic Preservation Office on eligibility and
effects determinations will be required because
of federal involvement in the project. In the
unlikely event that a listed or eligible resource
would be adversely affected by the project,
mitigation would be required.
Hazardous Materials
Background: Following a number of judicial
decisions, including some related to the
Comprehensive Environmental Response,
Compensation and Liability Act of 1980
(CERCLA), property owners were assigned
liability to effect site cleanup of hazardous
materials, even if a prior owner caused the
contamination. As part of the due diligence
process of acquiring property, many potential
property owners undertake a Phase I
Environmental Site Assessment, which is a
report prepared for a real estate holding that
identifies potential or existing environmental
contamination liabilities. Phase I Environmental
Site Assessments are also prepared to identify
potential liabilities associated with worker safety.
Site Conditions and Clearance Process:
Many areas along the South Platte River and
Cherry Creek have been used as dump sites
or have been used for industrial purposes.
The resulting potential for the presence of
hazardous materials is high. A dump is known
to have been present on the south west arm of
the confluence and an electrical transmission
substation was present in the south east arm
of the confluence. The Colorado Department
of Transportation will require that a Phase I
Environmental Site Assessment be prepared
that assesses the likelihood of contamination
in the project area. The findings of the
Phase I Environmental Site Assessment may
indicate the need for soil and/or groundwater
testing to determine the presence or extent
of contamination. If contamination is present,
remedial actions may be necessary to reduce
the possibility of injury to workers
CDOT Categorical Exclusion Process
Because the project will be partially funded
through CDOT, the project must comply with
the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA).
NEPA compliance will be addressed through
the Categorical Exclusion (CE) process, which
assumes the project will have no significant
environmental impacts. The CE will require
several environmental clearances, including
those for wetlands and waters, threatened
and endangered species, wildlife, cultural and
paleontological resources, and hazardous
materials. Most of these clearances are also
necessary as part of the Section 404 permitting
process. The final clearances and anticipated
levels of effort will be determined during a
scoping meeting with CDOT environmental
staff. Clearances specific to the CE process are
described below.
A18
Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc.
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:54 PM


APPENDIX C ENVIRONMENTAL
Senate Bill 40 Certification
Because the project will include stream
crossings and, possibly, work in stream
channels, formal SB 40 Certification will be
required from Colorado Parks and Wildlife. The
certification is necessary when state agencies, in
this case CDOT, undertake activities that affect
streams in Colorado. The certification would be
requested based on the selected alternative and
is often obtained between FIR and FOR designs.
Wetland Finding
To comply with Presidential Executive Order
11990 Protection of Wetlands, CDOT must
prepare a Wetland Finding according to
Federal Highway Administration guidelines.
The wetland finding addresses impacts to all
wetlands, regardless of jurisdictional status
under the Clean Water Act. The wetland finding
describes project alternatives, why impacts are
unavoidable under the selected alternative, and
compensatory mitigation for wetland impacts.
The wetland finding is usually prepared between
FIR and FOR designs.
Paleontological Resources
The Historical, Prehistorical, and Archaeological
Resources Act protects all fossils on state-
owned lands and lands controlled by any
subdivision of state government. While the
requirement to locate and assess the scientific
importance of fossils on state-owned lands is
not stated explicitly in the law, CDOT undertakes
assessment on many of its projects. If a
fossiliferous geologic stratum may be affected by
a project, CDOT may require a paleontologist be
present during certain portions of construction.
Because of the extensive disturbance in the
project area, it is unlikely that CDOT will require
a detailed assessment of paleontological
resources. If a resource is encountered during
construction, the CDOT paleontologist would be
notified before work could proceed.
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:54 PM
Confluence Park Master Plan
APPENDICES Aig


APPENDIX D GAP ANALYSIS
recreation + leisure: gap analysis
Opportunities for... Recreation & Leisure
Confluence Park can become a better destination for recreation and
leisure by improving its urban environment and amenities.
Improve Recreation Opportunities
Expand areas for river-related activities such as picnicking, sunning, and fishing.
Provide family friendly facilities and areas for children's play.
Evaluate ways to accommodate pets in recreational use areas.
Expand Events and Programming
Provide expanded viewing areas for activities and events along the river's edge.
Expand the potential for large and small events, such as concerts, movies, boating
competitions, etc.
Accommodate small group activities such as fitness, fishing, and yoga classes,
Partner with institutions to provide environmental education.
Provide Enhanced Leisure Opportunities
Expand recreation amenities to accommodate park users, including
seating, shade, lawn and picnic areas.
Create gathering places that provide food, outdoor cafe seating, public
restrooms, rentals, storage and related support facilities through public/
private partnerships.
Improve lighting to support evening leisure activities and increase safety.
Provide wireless internet access throughout the park.
Key Issues:_________________________
. Large areas are under utilized and
have limited amenities.
Isolated areas of overuse and conflict
during certain seasons and times of
the day.
. Not enough places for seating
or shade.
. Park amenities such as seating,
trash, bicycle parking and way finding
are limited.
. No public restrooms or drinking
fountains.
. Off leash pets contribute to conflicts
and water quality concerns.
Unauthorized activities that currently
occur in the park can be dangerous.
Park elements are aging, dated,
and some need major repairs or
replacement.
. Increasing demand for fitness and
adventure recreation in the park.
Not enough activities for all ages,
especially children.
w tin It
l
p
CONFLUENCE
PARK MASTER PLAN
A20
Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc.
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:54 PM


APPENDIX D GAP ANALYSIS
connectivity: gap analysis
Opportunities to... Improve Access & Connections
Improving access to and within Confluence Park should make it safer and
easier to get to the park by overcoming barriers.
Improve Access to the Park
Identify means to expand visitor parking by improving and/or sharing existing
parking areas.
Provide universal access through the park and to the river's edge.
Utilize the historic trolley to link to the Children's Museum, Aquarium and other
cultural institutions.
Enhance views of the river and downtown skyline.
Improve views into the park from the street and neighborhood.
Improve pedestrian connections from adjacent neighborhoods.
Increase User Safety Within the Park
Reduce conflicts by providing capacity for different types of trail users.
Maintain and enhance emergency and maintenance access to all parts of the park.
Improve lighting and visibility within the park.
Minimize isolated areas, dense vegetation, and dead end paths.
Create Continuous Connections Within the Park
Create a hierarchy of trails with flexibility to accommodate different types of
recreational and commuter uses.
Minimize conflicts by providing adequate space for pedestrians, bicyclists and
other users of different ages and skill levels.
Improve trail connections to the Cherry Creek and South Platte River Regional
Trail systems.
Replace the aging bridges and provide better opportunities to view the river from
them.
Connect the past to the present interpret the history of the confluence.
Improve connections to adjacent parks.
Provide more opportunities to access the River and Cherry Creek.
CONFLUENCE
. icjm aWTUAE TAM.
aonuui
Key Issues:
Regional trails converge, and
increasing use causes conflicts with
recreational users.
There are numerous places where
bicycles and pedestrians interfere
with each others' use of the trails.
. Local connections from streets and
parking areas are inadequate and
not clearly marked.
There is not enough parking for
visitors traveling by car.
. Bridges and ramps are aging, do
not meet current accessibility codes,
and need replacement.
Visual connections from the street
and surrounding neighborhood are
limited and/or blocked.
. Limited visibility contributes to
the perception of the park as a
dangerous place.
. The Trolley is an under-utilized and
historic resource.
. There are limited places where
visitors can learn about the history of
the Confluence as the birthplace of
Denver.
. Infrastructure for power and wireless
Internet access are limited.
PARK MASTER PLAN
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:54 PM
Confluence Park Master Plan APPENDICES ^21


APPENDIX D GAP ANALYSIS
regional destination + local hangout: gap analysis
Opportunities to...Celebrate the Confluence
Denver can recognize the value of one of its most important
historic, recreational, and open space resources by
partnering to invest in its future.
Improve the Park to Become a Centerpiece of the Central
Platte Valley Event District
Establish the park as a downtown urban park that complements, but provides
different experiences than Civic Center and Skyline Parks.
Engage nearby business redevelopment areas and look for ways that park
improvements can be mutually beneficial.
Provide continuous riverfront access and public gathering places.
Create river crossings that serve multiple purposes and become part of the river
experience.
Integrate the Park as a Major River Gateway
Create signature gateway elements such as a feature bridge, pedestrian
promenade, and gathering places along the river.
Improve park entrances to create identity, invite access, and increase visibility of
the park.
Make the park a destination for regional and local events
Partner with regional and other nearby cultural and entertainment destinations to
provide environmental, entertainment, and educational programming.
Create areas in the park that can accommodate large and small spectator
events such as movies, concerts, fireworks, and recreation events.
Create a world class Whitewater facility capable of hosting local, regional and
national competitions
Celebrate the Confluence as Denver's birthplace by interpreting it through
design, stories and art
Key Issues:__________________________
. Confluence Park is recognized as a
"major river gateway", yet existing
facilities currently do not support that
status.
. There are not enough places along the
riverfront that combine opportunities to
recreate, people watch, eat, surf the
web. and just hang out.
Increased use of regional trails and infill
development along the river will draw
more people to the park.
The Park is Denvers waterfront, an
attraction for people from all over the
region at the confluence of the river and
the creek,
Park edges and adjacent uses have
changed dramatically since the park was
constructed
. The Whitewater course has aged and
does not meet current competitive
standards.
. Areas for events and spectators are
limited. Access and facilities in these
areas are insufficient.
. There is a lack of awareness of the
river and the park, as well as visual
connections from surrounding downtown
neighborhoods.
The river provides significant value to
the community but realizes little in return
in terms of program and maintenance
funding.
As a signature park. Confluence is
used much more heavily than typical
neighborhood parks, but currently
receives the same funding for
maintenance.
w tin It
l
p
ONFLUENCE PARK MASTER PLAN
A22
Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc.
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:54 PM


APPENDIX D GAP ANALYSIS
river: gap analysis
Opportunities to... Enhance the River
Providing better access and a cleaner river wilt
improve its value as a recreational resource.
Expand the Potential for People to Interact With Water
Provide safe alternatives to swimming in the river,
Improve opportunities to get to the river's edge.
Provide more places for people to relax and enjoy the river.
Improve Recreational Boating in the River
Improve the Whitewater course to support seasonal and/or year round competitive
and recreational boating.
Renovate the whitewater course to make it safer and more accessible to
recreational boaters and tubers.
Expand and improve river access and portages to accommodate more recreational
boating.
Improve the Water Quality in the River
Treat on-site stormwater runoff to remove pollutants before entering the river.
Create wetland edges or other biological treatments of in-stream river flows.
Strike a balance between urban and natural river edge conditions.
Improve aquatic habitat in the river.
Increase awareness of regional water quality issues by providing public access to
water quality monitoring information.
Provide greater diversity and interest in the ways that water moves and flows in
the river.
CONFLUENCE
I: h ill.
I

vi
. ^
Key Issues:
This part of the river has tittle
riparian or aquatic habitat value.
. Highly variable seasonal and flood
flows limit the ability to establish
habitat.
The existing whitewater course
doesn't meet the standards of today's
competition whitewater courses.
. There are few possibilities for safe
interaction with water.
Existing walls limit opportunities to
get to the Rivers edge.
People are concerned about the
levels of pollution in the river.
Although it is prohibited, swimming in
the river is very popular.
. Emergency access to the river for
rescues and flood control is difficult.
. Access for security, maintenance,
inspection, and debris removal is
limited.
Agencies need upgraded flow and
water quality monitoring devices in
this location.
. Shoreline conditions require
stabilization for flood control.
PARK MASTER PLAN
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:54 PM
Confluence Park Master Plan APPENDICES ^23


APPENDIX E COST OPINION
PHASE 1-OUTDOOR LIVING ROOM NORTH
Outdoor Living Room North For Discussion Only
____Item_________________________________Qty. Unit Unit Cost_Total Cost____Notes_______
Demolition & Removals
1 Tree Removal Clear & Grub 18 EA $ 750.00 $ 13,500
2 Remove Walls and structures 1,000 CY $ 75.00 $ 75,000
3 Remove Pavements and Curbs Concrete and Brick 155 CY $ 50.00 $ 7,750
4 Tree Protection 1,200 LF $ 4.00 $ 4,800
5 Salvage & Store materials brick, steel, furnishings 1 LS $ 30,000.00 $ 30,000
6 Shoring, Cofferdam, Temp. Sheeting, Dewatering 1 LS $ 150,000.00 $ 150,000 West Side of River at Shoemaker Plaza
Subtotal s 282,000
River Improvements-Whitewater Feature @ Shoemaker Plaza
7 Dewatering (East bank only) 1 LS $ 50,000.00 $ 50,000
8 Erosion Sediment Control (East bank only) 1 LS $ 5,000.00 $ 5,000 Assumes that west bank erosion sediment control include in Shoemaker Plaza work
g River Excavation (haul off site) 800 CY $ 20.00 $ 16,000
10 Boulders to be Grouted 440 CY $ 165.00 $ 72,600 Includes feature crest, invert, and subsurface structure for east shoulder
11 Grout 150 CY $ 220.00 $ 33,000 Assumed 35% void ratio
12 Sheet Pile Cutoff 1,800 SF $ 60.00 $ 108,000 Assume Depth = 15'
13 Sheet Pile Rein. Concrete Cap 80 LF $ 200.00 $ 16,000
14 Type M Riprap 135 CY $ 75.00 $ 10,125 Self launchina alona downstream toe of structure & at sheet pile at east bank
15 15wide x 4' deep x 6' long 12" thick reinforced concrete.
15 Rein. Concrete Wave Shaper Foundation CY $ 900.00 $ 13,500 Includes two 4'x4x4 vaults for hydraulic cylinders
16 Wave Shaper Gate and Controls 1 LS $ 120,000.00 $ 120,000 15'wide x 6' Iona fabricated steel. Assumed 200 Ibs/sf ( $3/lb fabricate
Subtotal $ 450,000
River Improvements- Bank & Toe Protection at Shoemaker Plaza
17 Boulders to be Grouted Terrace at Plaza Toe 100 CY $ 165.00 $ 16,500 Boulder terrace alona west bank u/s & d/ of ww feature alona plaza
18 Grout 35 CY $ 220.00 $ 7,700 Assumed 35% void ratio
19 Type VL Riprap Filter Boulder Terrace 65 CY $ 75.00 $ 4,875 filter layer behind and under arouted boulder terrace
20 Type M Riprap 100 CY $ 75.00 $ 7,500 Toe protection alona boulder terrace
21 Excavation (haul off site) 250 CY $ 20.00 $ 5,000
Subtotal $ 50,000
River Improvements- West Abutment Substructure @ Shoemaker Plaza
22 Boulders to be Grouted 100 CY $ 165.00 $ 16,500 Includes subsurface structure west shoulder of ww feature
23 Grout 40 CY $ 220.00 $ 8,800 Assumed 35% void ratio
24 Sheet Pile Cutoff 900 SF $ 60.00 $ 54,000 Perimeter of shoulder; Depth = 15 based on seepage calcs for Oxford
25 Sheet Pile Rein. Concrete Cap 60 LF $ 200.00 $ 12,000
26 Excavation (haul off site) 150 CY $ 20.00 $ 3,000
Subtotal $ 100,000
Grading & Grade Control
27 Imported Structural Backfill 1,000 CY $ 30.00 $ 30,000
28 Structural Soil 50 CY $ 50.00 $ 2,500
27 Earthwork/Excavation 1,000 CY $ 20.00 $ 20,000
29 Topsoil 150 CY $ 35.00 $ 5,250
30 Storm Drainage & Erosion Control 1 LS 10.000.00 $ 10,000
Subtotal $ 68,000
A24
Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc.
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:54 PM


APPENDIX E COST OPINION
PHASE 1-OUTDOOR LIVING ROOM NORTH (CONTINUED)
Utilities
31 Water Service 1 LS $ 25,000.00 $ 25,000
32 Electric Service 1 LS $ 15,000.00 $ 15,000
33 Utilities (Protection, Removals, Connections) 1 LS $ 50,000.00 $ 50,000
Subtotal $ 90,000
Buildings and Structures
34 Bicycle Storage Cover 120 SF $ 150.00 $ 18,000
Subtotal $ 18,000
Pavements
35 Regular Concrete for Trails 4,300 SF $ 7.00 $ 30,100
36 Color and Special Finish Concrete 8,600 SF $ 12.00 $ 103,200
37 Unit Pavers (Sand Set) 6,800 SF $ 15.00 $ 102,000
Subtotal $ 236,000
Walls & Steps
38 Concrete Walls (Board-Formed)< 30" Height (Non Structural) 1,500 FF $ 40.00 $ 60,000
39 Concrete Walls (Board-Formed) > 30" Height (Structural) 2,000 FF $ 60.00 $ 120,000
40 Concrete Seating Terrace/Steps (Board-Formed) 9,000 SF $ 35.00 $ 315,000
Subtotal $ 495,000
Landscape
41 Trees 25 EA $ 600.00 $ 15,000
42 Shrubs & Groundcover 800 SF $ 5.00 $ 4,000
43 Turfgrass Sod 6,000 SF $ 1.00 $ 6,000
44 Irrigation Svstem 6,800 SF $ 1.25 $ 8,500
Subtotal $ 34,000
Amenities
45 Railings 200 LF $ 200.00 $ 40,000
46 Site Furnishings (Furniture, trash receptacles, etc) 1 LS $ 60,000.00 $ 60,000
47 Bike Storage Racks (1/2 covered) 20 EA $ 800.00 $ 16,000
48 Site Lighting 1 LS $ 60,000.00 $ 60,000
49 Signage (Wavfinding and Directional) 1 LS $ 35,000.00 $ 35,000
50 Public Art 1 LS $ 30,000.00 $ 30,000
Soecialtv Boulders 150 CY $ 900.00 $ 135,000
Subtotal $ 376,000
Mobilization, Contingency, & Design
51 Mobilization (10%) LS $ 219,900.00
52 Contingency (25%) LS $ 549,750.00
Subtotal $ 769,650
Project Subtotal (Construction): $ 2,969,000
53 Design and Engineering LS $ 542,245
Grand Total: $ 3,512,000
$5K added to lighting unit cost.
Assume irrigation system will utilize existing tap & meter.
Assume 1% of $3 million
Park Master Plan
APPENDICES A25
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:54 PM
Confluence


APPENDIX E COST OPINION
PHASE 1-OUTDOOR LIVING ROOM NORTH (CONTINUED)
Add Alternates:
ADD ALT 1A: River Improvements @ 16th Street
1 Dewaterinq 1 LS $ 25,000.00 $ 25,000
2 Erosion Sediment Control 1 LS $ 7,000.00 $ 7,000
3 Access & Restoration 1 LS $ 10,000.00 $ 10,000
4 Excavation (haul off site) 200 CY $ 20.00 $ 4,000
5 Remove Boat Chute & 16th Street (center of drop) 1 LS $ 10,000.00 $ 10,000 3' thick arouted boulders. Replace removed chute (lowered)
6 Boulders to be Grouted for Replaced 16th Street Drop 150 CY $ 165.00 $ 24,750
7 Grout 45 CY $ 220.00 $ 9,900
8 Boulder Terrace at 16th Street West Bank 25 CY $ 165.00 $ 4,125 Add another row of boulders to existing terracing along bank. Riprap alona toe included in sepatate item. No arom
Subtotal 1A $ 100,000

ADD ALT IB: River Improvements Shoemaker Plaza to 16th Street
g Dewaterinq 1 LS $ 40,000.00 $ 40,000 Work in low flow. Able to use excavated area for riprap placement for coffer.
10 Access & Restoration 1 LS $ 20,000.00 $ 20,000
11 Type M Riprap 365 CY $ 75.00 $ 27,375 3' thick mat extend down 2 for revised channel grade both sides of river Riprap along shoemaker plaza subtracted from this item added to plaza cosh
12 Channel Excavation (haul off site) 1,600 CY $ 20.00 $ 32,000 30'w x 2' deep excavation from ww feature to 16th street
13 Riprap Outfall Protection (Type H w/ VL filter) 70 CY $ 75.00 $ 5,250 Three existing storm outfalls. Improve protection at end of pipe for channel degradation
14 Boulder Terrace @ WW Feature 60 CY $ 165.00 $ 9,900 Terrace along east bank downstream of ww feature. Toe protectior, (riprap) included in other item.
15 Grout 20 CY $ 220.00 $ 4,400 Grout for terracing
16 Type VL Riprap Filter Boulder Terrace & WW Feature 35 CY $ 75.00 $ 2,625 Filter laver behind/under boulder terracing
17 Boulder Terracinq D/S of Plaza (West Bank) 35 CY $ 75.00 $ 2,625 Replace gabion terracing.
18 Grout for Boulder Terracinq D/S of Plaza (West Bank) 35 CY $ 220.00 $ 7,700 Assumed 35% void ratio
Subtotal 1B $ 160,000
SUBTOTAL, ADD ALT 1: $ 260,000
I Contingency (25%) $ 65,000
GRAND TOTAL, ADD ALT 1: $ 325,000
A26
Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates,
Inc.
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:54 PM


APPENDIX E COST OPINION
PHASE 1-OUTDOOR LIVING ROOM NORTH (CONTINUED)
ADD ALT 2: Gabion Terrace Replacement Assumes work to be completed with other river improvements from 15th to 16th
1 Demolition of Existing Gabions & Earthwork 1 LS $ 20,000.00 $ 20,000
2 Dewatering 1 LS $ 15,000.00 $ 15,000
3 Erosion & Sediment Control 1 LS $ 5,000.00 $ 5,000
1 Two crossings cost based on rein. Concrete box culvert type:
4 Storm Crossing at Paths LS $ 30,000.00 $ 30,000 Regional Path 3'h x 10'wx 151 w/ 12" thick walls (16 cy) & Boat ramp same dimensions (16 cv)
5 Boulder Terracing D/S of Plaza (West Bank) 815 CY $ 165.00 $ 134,475 Replace gabion terracing with boulder terracing. Assume UDFCD tvoical materials per meeting with Dave Bennetts
6 Grout for Boulder Terracing D/S of Plaza (West Bank) 205 CY $ 220.00 $ 45,100 Assumed 25% void ratio
7 Riprap Type M at Toe of Terracing 265 CY $ 75.00 $ 19,875 self launching at toe of terracing
SUBTOTAL, ADD ALT 2: $ 270,000
I Contingency (25%) $ 67,500
GRAND TOTAL, ADD ALT 2: $ 337,500
Add Alternates Total (1 & 2): $ 662,500
GRAND TOTAL (Base Bid + Add Alts): $ 4,174,500
General Costing Assumptions:
This cost opinion is preliminary and based on limited information from Master Plan design concepts. The information will be
updated during final design as geotech and environmental reports are finalized, as in-river and up and downstream survey
information is compiled, and as design drawings develop.
River Work Costing Assumptions:
Surface finishing (concrete steps & boulders) on the east bank shoulderNOT included in these costs. To be added during a future phase.
Sheet pile can be driven with a standard pile driver (shaker head)
24" Water line crossing the river south of 16th street will NOT need to be lowered with channel improvements
No river utility crossing need to be lowered with channel improvements
Gabion terrace replacement only with UDFCD typical terraced boulder construction.
Gabion terracing replacement may need to be vertical or steeper for flood conveyence and river take out. May require retaining walls or MSE walls.
Gabion replacement work at same time as other downstream river improvements
Gabion terrace replacement does NOT include river access path
Cost for feature boulder shown in the river downstream of ww featuure not included______________________________________________
Park Master Plan
APPENDICES £27
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:54 PM
Confluence


APPENDIX E COST OPINION
PHASE 2-OUTDOOR LIVING ROOM SOUTH
OLR South For Discussion Only
_____Item___________________________________________Qty. Unit Unit Cost____Total Cost___________Notes
Demolition & Removals
1 Tree Removal Clear & Grub 18 EA $ 750.00 $ 13,500
2 Remove Walls and structures 300 CY $ 150.00 $ 45,000
3 Remove Pavements, Tracks and Curbs 300 CY $ 50.00 $ 15,000
4 Tree Protection 12 EA $ 500.00 $ 6,000
5 Salvage & Store materials brick, steel, furnishings 1 LS $ 20,000.00 $ 20,000
Subtotal $ 100,000
River Improvements
6 Shoring, Cofferdam, Temp. Sheeting, Dewatering 1 LS $ 175,000.00 $ 175,000
7 River Excavation & Earthwork 500 CY $ 70.00 $ 35,000
8 New Sheet Piling & Cap 450 LF $ 2,000.00 $ 900,000
9 Modify Existing Sheet Piling & Cap - LF $ 1,000.00 $ -
10 Concrete Steps structural bank stabilization 150 CY $ 400.00 $ 60,000
11 Grouted Rip Rap bank stabilization 300 CY $ 200.00 $ 60,000
12 River Recreation, Whitewater Course 600 LF $ 8,000.00 $ 4,800,000
13 Boulders and Faux Rock 500 CY $ 900.00 $ 450,000
Subtotal $ 6,480,000
Grading & Grade Control
14 Earthwork/Excavation 1,000 CY $ 20.00 $ 20,000
16 Storm Drainage & Erosion Control 1 LS $ 10,000.00 $ 10,000
13 Imported Structural Backfill 1,000 CY $ 30.00 $ 30,000
14 Structural Soil 50 CY $ 50.00 $ 2,500
15 Topsoil 150 CY $ 35.00 $ 5,250
Subtotal $ 68,000
Utilities
16 Water Service 1 LS $ 30,000.00 $ 30,000
17 Electric Service 1 LS $ 15,000.00 $ 15,000
18 Utilities (Protection, Removals, Connections) 1 LS $ 50,000.00 $ 50,000
Subtotal $ 95,000
A28
Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc.
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:54 PM


APPENDIX E COST OPINION
PHASE 2-OUTDOOR LIVING ROOM SOUTH (CONTINUED)
Buildings and Structures
19 Feature Bridge 1 LS $ 6,000,000.00 $ 6,000,000
20 Cafe Building 300 SF $ 400.00 $ 120,000
21 Restroom Building 800 SF $ 300.00 $ 240,000
22 Trolley Enclosure 1,500 SF $ 100.00 $ 150,000
23 Add RR Tracks 110 LF $ 3,000.00 $ 330,000
24 Storage Building 650 SF $ 200.00 $ 130,000
Subtotal $ 6,970,000
Pavements
25 Regular Concrete for Trails 5,000 SF $ 7.00 $ 35,000
26 Color and Special Finish Concrete 500 SF $ 12.00 $ 6,000
27 Unit Pavers (Sand Set) 8,000 SF $ 15.00 $ 120,000
Subtotal $ 161,000
Walls & Steps
28 Concrete Walls (Board-Formed)< 30" Height (Non Structural) 50 FF $ 40.00 $ 2,000
29 Concrete Walls (Board-Formed) > 30" Height (Structural) 3,000 FF $ 60.00 $ 180,000
30 Concrete Seating Terrace/Steps (Board-Formed) - SF $ 35.00 $ -
Subtotal $ 182,000
Landscape
31 Trees 10 EA $ 600.00 $ 6,000
32 Shrubs & Groundcover 4,000 SF $ 5.00 $ 20,000
33 Turfgrass Sod - SF $ 1.00 $ -
34 Irrigation System 4,000 SF $ 1.25 $ 5,000
Subtotal $ 31,000
Amenities
35 Railings 250 LF $ 100.00 $ 25,000
36 Site Furnishings (Furniture, trash receptacles, etc) 1 LS $ 75,000.00 $ 75,000
37 Site Lighting 1 LS $ 150,000.00 $ 150,000
38 Signage (Wayfinding and Directional) 1 LS $ 50,000.00 $ 50,000
39 Public Art LS $ 165,000
Subtotal $ 465,000
Assume 1% of construction cost
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:54 PM
Confluence Park Master Plan APPENDICES ^29


APPENDIX E COST OPINION
PHASE 2-OUTDOOR LIVING ROOM SOUTH (CONTINUED)
Mobilization & Contingency
40 Mobilization (10%) LS $ 1,455,200
41 Contingency (25%) LS $ 3,638,000
Subtotal $ 5,094,000
Project Subtotal (Construction): $ 19,646,000
Design & Engineering
42 Design and Engineering (15%) 1 LS $ 2,946,900
Grand Total: $ 22,593,000
A30
Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc.
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:54 PM


APPENDIX E COST OPINION
PHASE 3- OASIS
Oasis For Discussion Only
Item_______________________________________________________________Qty. Unit Unit Cost_________________Total Cost________________Notes
Demolition & Removals
1 Tree Removal Clear & Grub 22 EA $ 750.00 $ 16,500
2 Remove Walls and structures 400 CY $ 150.00 $ 60,000
3 Remove Pavements and Curbs Concrete and Brick 300 CY $ 50.00 $ 15,000
4 Tree Protection 4 LF $ 500.00 $ 2,000
5 Salvage & Store materials brick, steel, furnishings 1 LS $ 10,000.00 $ 10,000
Subtotal $ 104,000
River Improvements
6 Shoring, Cofferdam, Temp. Sheeting, Dewatering 1 LS $ 125,000.00 $ 125,000
7 River Excavation & Earthwork 500 CY $ 70.00 $ 35,000
8 New Sheet Piling & Cap - LF $ 2,000.00 $ -
9 Modify Existing Sheet Piling & Cap 500 LF $ 1,000.00 $ 500,000
10 Concrete Steps structural bank stabilization 300 CY $ 400.00 $ 120,000
11 Grouted Rip Rap bank stabilization 1,200 CY $ 200.00 $ 240,000
12 River Recreation, Whitewater Course 450 LF $ 4,000.00 $ 1,800,000
13 Boulders and Faux Rock 500 CY $ 900.00 $ 450,000
Subtotal $ 3,270,000
Grading & Grade Control
14 Earthwork/Excavation 5,000 CY $ 20.00 $ 100,000
15 Trash Excavation & Disposal 15,000 CY $ 100.00 $ 1,500,000
16 Storm Drainage & Erosion Control 1 LS $ 20,000.00 $ 20,000
17 Imported Structural Backfill 1,000 CY $ 30.00 $ 30,000
18 Structural Soil - CY $ 50.00 $ -
19 Topsoil 2,000 CY $ 35.00 $ 70,000
Subtotal $ 1,720,000
Utilities
20 Water Service 1 LS $ 10,000 $ 10,000
21 Electric Service 1 LS $ 25,000 $ 25,000
22 Utilities (Protection, Removals, Connections) 1 LS $ 100,000 $ 100,000
Subtotal $ 135,000
Buildings and Structures
23 Feature Bridge @ Cherry Creek 1 LS $ 2,500,000.00 $ 2,500,000
24 Eguipment Vault Enclosure 400 SF $ 100.00 $ 40,000
Subtotal $ 2,540,000
Confluence Park Master Plan
APPENDICES A31
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:54 PM


APPENDIX E COST OPINION
PHASE 3-OASIS (CONTINUED)
Pavements
25 Regular Concrete for Trails 4,300 SF $ 7.00 $ 30,100
26 Color and Special Finish Concrete 8,600 SF $ 12.00 $ 103,200
27 Unit Pavers (Sand Set) 6,800 SF $ 15.00 $ 102,000
Subtotal $ 236,000
Walls & Steps
28 Concrete Walls (Board-Formed)< 30" Heiqht (Non Structural) 2,000 FF $ 35.00 $ 70,000
29 Concrete Walls (Board-Formed) > 30" Heiaht (Structural) 3,000 FF $ 55.00 $ 165,000
30 Concrete Steps 1,000 SF $ 35.00 $ 35,000
Subtotal $ 270,000
Landscape
31 Trees 50 EA $ 600.00 $ 30,000
32 Shrubs & Groundcover 770 SF $ 5.00 $ 3,850
33 Turfgrass Sod 40,000 SF $ 0.75 $ 30,000
34 Irrigation System 40,770 SF $ 1.25 $ 50,963
Subtotal $ 115,000
Amenities
35 Railings 300 LF $ 100.00 $ 30,000 Assume 1 % of construction cost
36 Site Furnishings (Furniture, trash receptacles, etc) 1 LS $ 50,000.00 $ 50,000
37 Bicycle Parking 1 LS $ 10,000.00 $ 10,000
38 Site Lighting 1 LS $ 150,000.00 $ 150,000
39 Signage (Wavfinding and Directional) 1 LS $ 35,000.00 $ 35,000
40 Public Art 1 LS $ 90,000.00 $ 90,000
Subtotal $ 365,000
Mobilization & Contingency
41 Mobilization (10%) 1 LS $ 875,500
42 Contingency (25%) 1 LS $ 2,188,750
Subtotal $ 3,065,000
Project Subtotal (Construction): $ 11,820,000
Design and Engineering
43 Design and Engineering (15%) 1 LS _________________| $ 1,773,000
Grand Total: $ 13,593,000
A32
Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc.
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:54 PM


APPENDIX E COST OPINION
PHASE 4- RIVER LAWN
River Lawn For Discussion Only
Item___________________________________________________________________Qty. Unit Unit Cost___________________Total Cost_______________Notes
Demolition & Removals
1 Tree Removal Clear & Grub 22 EA $ 750.00 $ 16,500
2 Remove Walls and structures 50 CY $ 150.00 $ 7,500
3 Remove Pavements and Curbs Concrete and Brick 100 CY $ 50.00 $ 5,000
4 Tree Protection 4 EA $ 500.00 $ 2,000
5 Salvage & Store materials brick, steel, furnishings 1 LS $ 20,000.00 $ 20,000
Subtotal $ 51,000
River Improvements
6 Shoring, Cofferdam, Temp. Sheeting, Dewatering 1 LS $ 75,000.00 $ 75,000
7 River Excavation & Earthwork 750 CY $ 70.00 $ 52,500
8 New Sheet Piling & Cap - LF $ 2,000.00 $ -
9 Concrete Steps structural bank stabilization - CY $ 400.00 $ -
10 Grouted Rip Rap bank stabilization 600 CY $ 200.00 $ 120,000
11 Boulders and Faux Rock 130 CY $ 900.00 $ 117,000
Subtotal $ 364,500
Grading & Grade Control
12 Earthwork/Excavation 3,000 CY $ 20.00 $ 60,000
13 Storm Drainage & Erosion Control 1 LS $ 10,000.00 $ 10,000
14 Imported Structural Backfill 500 CY $ 40.00 $ 20,000
15 Structural Soil 50 CY $ 50.00 $ 2,500
16 Topsoil 360 CY $ 35.00 $ 12,600
Subtotal $ 106,000
Utilities
17 Water Service 1 LS $ 24,000.00 $ 24,000
18 Electric Service 1 LS $ 15,000.00 $ 15,000
19 Utilities (Protection, Removals, Connections) 1 LS $ 50,000.00 $ 50,000
Subtotal $ 89,000
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:54 PM
Confluence Park Master Plan
APPENDICES A33


APPENDIX E COST OPINION
A34
PHASE 4-RIVER LAWN (CONTINUED)
Buildings and Structures
20 Mechanical Equipment Vault Pavements 100 SF $ Subtotal 150.00 $ $ 15.000 15.000
21 Regular Concrete for Trails 9,500 SF $ 7.00 $ 66,500
22 Color and Special Finish Concrete 1,800 SF $ 12.00 $ 21,600
23 Unit Pavers (Sand Set) 1,600 SF $ 15.00 $ 24,000
24 Crusher Fine 4,000 SF $ 3.00 $ 12,000
Subtotal $ 125,000
Walls & Steps
25 Concrete Walls (Board-Formed)< 30" Height (Non Structural) 1,500 FF $ 35.00 $ 52,500
26 Concrete Walls (Board-Formed) > 30" Height (Structural) 2,000 FF $ 55.00 $ 110,000
27 Concrete Steps 600 SF $ 35.00 $ 21,000
Subtotal $ 183,500
Landscape
28 Trees 25 EA $ 600.00 $ 15,000
29 Shrubs & Groundcover 770 SF $ 5.00 $ 3,850
30 Turf grass Sod 6,000 SF $ 1.00 $ 6,000
31 Irrigation System 6,770 SF $ 1.25 $ 8,463
Subtotal $ 34,000
Amenities
32 Playground 3,500 SF $ 70.00 $ 245,000
33 Splash Pad 1,500 SF $ 100.00 $ 150,000
34 Site Furnishings (Furniture, trash receptacles, etc) 1 LS $ 30,000.00 $ 30,000
35 Bicycle Parking 1 LS $ 20,000.00 $ 20,000
36 Site Lighting 1 LS $ 75,000.00 $ 75,000
37 Siqnage (Wayfinding and Directional) 1 LS $ 35,000.00 $ 35,000
38 Public Art 1 LS $ 30,000.00 $ 20,000
Assume
Subtotal $ 575,000
1% of const cost
Denver Parks &
Recreation
|| Wenk Associates, Inc.
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:54 PM


APPENDIX E COST OPINION
PHASE 4- RIVER LAWN (CONTINUED)
Mobilization & Contingency
39 Mobilization (10%) 1 LS $ $ 154,300
40 Continqency (25%) 1 I LS $ $ 385,750
Subtotal $ 541,000
Project Subtotal (Construction): $ 2,084,000
Design and Engineering
41 Design and Engineering (15%) 1 LS $ 600,000.00 $ 313,000
Grand Total: $ 2,397,000
DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:54 PM
Confluence Park Master Plan APPENDICES ^35


Full Text

PAGE 1

CONFLUENCE ONFLUENCE PARK ARK A Plan for the Future of Denver's Gathering Place

PAGE 3

Confluence Park Master Plan INTRODUCTION DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM ACKNOWLEDGEMENTSProject Team

PAGE 4

Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc. DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM LETTERS OF SUPPORTDRAFT

PAGE 5

Confluence Park Master Plan INTRODUCTION DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM TABLE OF CONTENTS 7INTRODUCTION 13PLAN FRAMEWORK 21PLAN COMPONENTS 49IMPLEMENTATION A3APPENDICESProject Sponsors

PAGE 6

Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc. DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM WINTER, 1900THREE MEN POSE AT THE RIVER BANK OF THE PLATTE RIVER, WHERE GOLD WAS FIRST PANNED IN 1869.

PAGE 7

Confluence Park Master Plan INTRODUCTION DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PMINTRODUCTIONthe next generation of con uence park

PAGE 8

Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc. DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM INTRODUCTION PLAN SUMMARY

PAGE 9

Confluence Park Master Plan INTRODUCTION DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM INTRODUCTION PLAN SUMMARY

PAGE 10

Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc. DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM Con uence Park will be a regional destination and a local hangout. Park improvements balance river restoration and recreational use to demonstrate the city's highest aspirations. Creating a more exible framework protects and enhances the river, provides an attractive gathering place in the city, and contributes to the vitality of the neighborhoods. Con uence Park represents the next generation of Denver's parks .INTRODUCTION OVERALL PLAN

PAGE 11

Confluence Park Master Plan INTRODUCTION DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM INTRODUCTION OVERALL PLAN

PAGE 12

Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc. DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM NOV. 20, 2012COMMEMORATIVE MANHOLE COVER

PAGE 13

Confluence Park Master Plan PLAN FRAMEWORK DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PMPLAN FRAMEWORKcontext + guiding principles

PAGE 14

Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc. DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM PLAN FRAMEWORK CONTEXT

PAGE 15

Confluence Park Master Plan PLAN FRAMEWORK DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM PLAN FRAMEWORK CONTEXT

PAGE 16

Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc. DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM PLAN FRAMEWORK CONTEXT

PAGE 17

Confluence Park Master Plan PLAN FRAMEWORK DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM PLAN FRAMEWORK CONTEXT

PAGE 18

Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc. DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM Four key ideas form the basis of the plan: A place for gathering and leisure. A place that supports active outdoor lifestyles. A place to experience nature in the city. An opportunity to improve the river. The following principles, goals and objectives outline the process for plan implementation: PLAN FRAMEWORK GUIDING PRINCIPLES

PAGE 19

Confluence Park Master Plan PLAN FRAMEWORK DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM PLAN FRAMEWORK GUIDING PRINCIPLES

PAGE 20

EARLY 1970SVIEW OF SHOEMAKER PLAZA UNDER CONSTRUCTION, SPEER BOULEVARD (PRIOR TO REPLACEMENT)IS IN THE BACKGROUND

PAGE 21

Confluence Park Master Plan PLAN COMPONENTS DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PMPLAN COMPONENTSsubarea descriptions + elements

PAGE 22

Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc. DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PMPLAN COMPONENTS ORGANIZATION + USE AREAS The plan for Con uence Park is formed by two foundational elementsThe River and The Loop. The River and The Loop link three use areas that each have a distinct character and use to accommodate a diverse user population.

PAGE 23

Confluence Park Master Plan PLAN COMPONENTS DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM PLAN COMPONENTS ORGANIZATION + USE AREAS

PAGE 24

Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc. DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM PLAN COMPONENTS FORM + MATERIALS

PAGE 25

Confluence Park Master Plan PLAN COMPONENTS DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM PLAN COMPONENTS OVERALL PLAN

PAGE 26

Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc. DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM PLAN COMPONENTS THE RIVER

PAGE 27

Confluence Park Master Plan PLAN COMPONENTS DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM PLAN COMPONENTS THE RIVER

PAGE 28

Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc. DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM PLAN COMPONENTS THE RIVER PLACEHOLDER

PAGE 29

Confluence Park Master Plan PLAN COMPONENTS DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM 02040 80 FEET North PLAN COMPONENTS THE RIVER

PAGE 30

Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc. DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PMPLAN COMPONENTS THE LOOP

PAGE 31

Confluence Park Master Plan PLAN COMPONENTS DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM Circulation PLAN COMPONENTS THE LOOP

PAGE 32

Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc. DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM PLAN COMPONENTS THE LOOP

PAGE 33

Confluence Park Master Plan PLAN COMPONENTS DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM PLAN COMPONENTS THE LOOP

PAGE 34

Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc. DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM PLAN COMPONENTS THE LOOP

PAGE 35

Confluence Park Master Plan PLAN COMPONENTS DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PMPLAN COMPONENTS THE OUTDOOR LIVING ROOM

PAGE 36

Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc. DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM PLAN COMPONENTS THE OUTDOOR LIVING ROOM

PAGE 37

Confluence Park Master Plan PLAN COMPONENTS DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM PLAN COMPONENTS THE OUTDOOR LIVING ROOM-SOUTH

PAGE 38

Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc. DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM PLAN COMPONENTS THE OUTDOOR LIVING ROOM

PAGE 39

Confluence Park Master Plan PLAN COMPONENTS DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM PLAN COMPONENTS THE OUTDOOR LIVING ROOM-NORTH

PAGE 40

Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc. DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM PLAN COMPONENTS THE OASIS

PAGE 41

Confluence Park Master Plan PLAN COMPONENTS DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM PLAN COMPONENTS THE OASIS

PAGE 42

Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc. DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM PLAN COMPONENTS THE RIVER LAWN

PAGE 43

Confluence Park Master Plan PLAN COMPONENTS DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM PLAN COMPONENTS THE RIVER LAWN

PAGE 44

Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc. DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM PLAN COMPONENTS ARCHITECTURAL MATERIALSArchitectural elements including the trolley shed, cafe/concession buildings, and related site elements such as handrails and screen fencing, have signi cant potential to further de ne the image and character of Con uence Park.

PAGE 45

Confluence Park Master Plan PLAN COMPONENTS DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM PLAN COMPONENTS SIGNAGE + WAYFINDING

PAGE 46

Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc. DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM PLAN COMPONENTS LIGHTING

PAGE 47

Confluence Park Master Plan PLAN COMPONENTS DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM PLAN COMPONENTS LIGHTING

PAGE 48

JUNE 24, 2012A WARM SUMMER DAY AT THE CONFLUENCE

PAGE 49

Confluence Park Master Plan IMPLEMENTATION DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PMIMPLEMENTATION funding + phasing

PAGE 50

Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc. DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM IMPLEMENTATION FUNDING + PROGRAMMING Not all parks are created equal. A great park system is the sum of many disparate but interconnected parks. Forward-looking cities know that the general fund will never be enough to meet their goals

PAGE 51

Confluence Park Master Plan IMPLEMENTATION DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM HR&A Advisors, Inc. 41 CONFLUENCE PARK COMMONS PARK SKATEPARK ELITCH GARDENS CENTENNIAL GARDENS FISHBACK PARK CRESCENT PARK CUERNAVACA PARK DENVER AQUARIUM CHILDRENS MUSEUM MILE HIGH PEPSI CENTER REI SOUTH PLATTE TODAY PLATTE STREET HR&A Advisors, Inc. 42 CONFLUENCE PARK DISTRICT Destinations that: Are linked and branded as a system Maintain their own identity Encourage new infill development Create programmatic synergies SOUTH PLATTE TOMORROW? IMPLEMENTATION FUNDING + PROGRAMMING

PAGE 52

Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc. DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PMIMPLEMENTATION PHASING

PAGE 53

Confluence Park Master Plan IMPLEMENTATION DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:42 PM IMPLEMENTATION PHASING

PAGE 55

Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc. DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:54 PM CONFLUENCE PARK FROM THE SPEER BRIDGE FALL 2012

PAGE 56

Confluence Park Master Plan APPENDICES DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:54 PMAPPENDICESsupport + background

PAGE 57

Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc. DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:54 PM

PAGE 58

Confluence Park Master Plan APPENDICES DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:54 PMAPPENDIX A: PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT A6 APPENDIX B: HISTORIC RESOURCES SUMMARY A10 APPENDIX C: ENVIRONMENTAL A12 APPENDIX D: GAP ANALYSIS A20 APPENDIX E: COST OPINION A24 APPENDIX F: H.A.L.S. SURVEY A36 APPENDICES TABLE OF CONTENTS

PAGE 59

Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc. DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:54 PMAPPENDIX A PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT

PAGE 60

Confluence Park Master Plan APPENDICES DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:54 PMAPPENDIX A PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT

PAGE 61

Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc. DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:54 PMAPPENDIX A PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT

PAGE 62

Confluence Park Master Plan APPENDICES DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:54 PMAPPENDIX A PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT

PAGE 63

Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc. DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:54 PMAPPENDIX B HISTORIC RESOURCES SUMMARY

PAGE 64

Confluence Park Master Plan APPENDICES DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:54 PMAPPENDIX B HISTORIC RESOURCES SUMMARY

PAGE 65

Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc. DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:54 PMAPPENDIX C ENVIRONMENTAL

PAGE 66

Confluence Park Master Plan APPENDICES DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:54 PMAPPENDIX C ENVIRONMENTAL

PAGE 67

Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc. DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:54 PMAPPENDIX C ENVIRONMENTAL

PAGE 68

Confluence Park Master Plan APPENDICES DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:54 PMAPPENDIX C ENVIRONMENTAL

PAGE 69

Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc. DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:54 PMAPPENDIX C ENVIRONMENTAL

PAGE 70

Confluence Park Master Plan APPENDICES DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:54 PMAPPENDIX C ENVIRONMENTAL

PAGE 71

Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc. DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:54 PMAPPENDIX C ENVIRONMENTAL

PAGE 72

Confluence Park Master Plan APPENDICES DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:54 PMAPPENDIX C ENVIRONMENTAL

PAGE 73

Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc. DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:54 PMAPPENDIX D GAP ANALYSIS

PAGE 74

Confluence Park Master Plan APPENDICES DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:54 PMAPPENDIX D GAP ANALYSIS

PAGE 75

Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc. DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:54 PM APPENDIX D GAP ANALYSIS

PAGE 76

Confluence Park Master Plan APPENDICES DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:54 PM APPENDIX D GAP ANALYSIS

PAGE 77

Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc. DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:54 PMAPPENDIX E COST OPINION

PAGE 78

Confluence Park Master Plan APPENDICES DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:54 PMAPPENDIX E COST OPINION

PAGE 79

Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc. DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:54 PM APPENDIX E COST OPINION

PAGE 80

Confluence Park Master Plan APPENDICES DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:54 PM APPENDIX E COST OPINION

PAGE 81

Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc. DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:54 PM APPENDIX E COST OPINION

PAGE 82

Confluence Park Master Plan APPENDICES DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:54 PM APPENDIX E COST OPINION

PAGE 83

Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc. DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:54 PM APPENDIX E COST OPINION

PAGE 84

Confluence Park Master Plan APPENDICES DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:54 PMAPPENDIX E COST OPINION

PAGE 85

Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc. DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:54 PMAPPENDIX E COST OPINION

PAGE 86

Confluence Park Master Plan APPENDICES DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:54 PMAPPENDIX E COST OPINION

PAGE 87

Denver Parks & Recreation || Wenk Associates, Inc. DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:54 PMAPPENDIX E COST OPINION

PAGE 88

Confluence Park Master Plan APPENDICES DRAFT May 01, 2013 5:54 PMAPPENDIX E COST OPINION