Citation
Connecting Auraria

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Title:
Connecting Auraria
Creator:
Design Workshop
Felsburg, Hoyt, & Ullevig
Sky to Ground
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
City and County of Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English

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Subjects / Keywords:
Auraria Higher Education Center (Denver, Colo.)
City planning
Community planning
Spatial Coverage:
Denver -- Auraria

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Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Full Text
DESIGIWORKSHOP
FELSRURG
HOLT &
ULLEVIG
DENVER
THE MILE HIGH CITY
CONNECTING AURARIA:
Improving Connectivity Across Speer, Colfax, and Auraria Parkway
Denver, Colorado
June 2014


CONNECTING AURARIA | Denver, Colorado


Report Acknowledgements
Consultant Team
Project Management Team
City Team
Cynthia Patton
Project Manager; City and County of Denver-
Public Works
Crissy Fanganello
City and County of Denver Public Works
Michael Finochio
City and County of Denver Public Works
Emily Silverman
City and County of Denver Public Works
Mark Bernstein
City and County of Denver Parks and
Recreation
Chris Gleissner
City and County of Denver Community
Planning & Development
Mark Najarian
City and County of Denver Arts and Venues
Partner Organizations
Gary Desmond
Connect Auraria Coalition Chair
Barb Weiske
Auraria Higher Education Center
Jill Jennings Golich
Auraria Higher Education Center
John Desmond
Downtown Denver Partnership
Aylene McCallum
Downtown Denver Partnership
Genevieve Hutchison
RTD
Design Workshop
Felsburg, Hoyt & Ullevig
Sky to Ground
Connecting Auraria Coalition
Jose Cornejo
Manager of Public Works, City and County of
Denver
Tami Door
President and CEO of DDP; Auraria Board -
Vice Chair
Don Elliman
Chancellor University of Colorado Denver
Dave Jolette
VP Venue Operations, Kroenke Sports
Enterprises
Steve Jordan
President Metropolitan State University of
Denver
Angie Malpiede
RTD Board, District Director C
Everette Freeman
President Community College of Denver
Anita Riley
Board Member La Alma Lincoln Park
Neighborhood
Gordon Robertson
Director, Parks and Recreation: Planning,
Design, City and County of Denver
Chris Shears
Chair, LoDo District Board of Directors
Molly Urbina
Interim Director, Community Planning &
Development, City and County of Denver

CONNECTING
AURARIA
Barb Weiske
Executive VP for Administration/ CEO Auraria
Higher Education Center
CONNECTING AURARIA | Denver, Colorado


CONNECTING AURARIA | Denver, Colorado


Contents
This report summarizes the work conducted
and conclusions identified by Design Workshop,
FHU and the City and County of Denver for
the Colfax/Auraria/Speer Next Steps Study.
The document focuses on overall goals, needs
inventory, the preliminary project packages,
recommendations, and implementation
strategies.
Prepared for:
City and County of Denver
Prepared by:
Design Workshop
1390 Lawrence Street, Suite 200
Denver, Colorado 80204
TABLE OF CONTENTS
STUDY HISTORY AND OVERVIEW...............................................Ill
STUDY CONTEXT AND PROCESS..................................................7
NEEDS INVENTORY...........................................................11
CORRIDOR VISIONS AND PROJECT OPPORTUNITIES................................33
RECOMMENDATIONS...........................................................43
IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGIES.................................................69
APPENDIX A: CONNECT AURARIA COALITION MISSION.............................73
CONNECTING AURARIA
Denver, Colorado


1
STUDY HISTORY AND OVERVIEW


CONNECTING AURARIA | Denver, Colorado


OVERVIEW AND HISTORY
Established in 1858, the Town of Auraria
grew from a mining settlement to a center of
commerce eventually incorporating its vibrancy
into what is now known as Denvers Central
Business District. Over the years, significant
changes to the land use and street grid have
changed the way the Auraria area relates to
Downtown. The Auraria Higher Education
Center (AHEC) opened in the 1970s after
demolition allowed for a suburban land use
scheme with various campus buildings for the
three institutions supported by an abundance of
surface parking.
In the late 1980s, the major thoroughfares of
Larimer and Lawrence Street viaducts were
removed. Vehicular traffic flowing in and out
of Downtown shifted to the newly created
Auraria Parkway, which provided a connection
to I-25. The viaduct removals transformed the
campus and added pedestrian walkways and
promenades internal to campus. However, the
campus remained separated from its adjacent
neighborhoods by three main arterials: Speer,
Colfax and Auraria Parkway.
The Auraria Higher Education Center and
its surrounding neighborhoods have grown
steadily over the decades and the campus
is experiencing a resurgence of construction
activity with the addition of Metropolitan State
University of Denvers Hotel and Hospitality
Learning Center and Student Success
Center, Community College of Denvers
(CCD) Confluence Building, the University of
Colorado Denvers Academic Building One
(under construction), and the shared Science
Building. A new parking facility with 1,000+
spaces is under construction on the west side
of campus. In addition, the institutional assets
are expanding outside the traditional campus
boundaries. The University of Colorado
Denver purchased and renovated a 120,000
square foot building at 15th and Lawrence to
house the institutions Business School, which
accommodates an additional 5,000 students
daily. These new investments reflect the
implementation goals of the recently updated
Auraria Campus Master Plan, which seeks
to integrate Downtowns urban form onto the
campus and create a city in the campus or
campus in the city experience. While the built
form of these new structures help to provide a
stronger visual connection between the campus
and its adjacent neighborhoods, there are
physical and perceptual barriers that remain for
pedestrians and cyclists that move across the
three main arterials. This study concentrates
on identifying strategies that can strengthen the
physical connections across these edges.
The vision for a denser, more integrated
urban campus environment evolved through
recommendations from the Downtown Area
Plan (2007). Through a partnership between
the City and County of Denver, the Downtown
Denver Partnership, and numerous other public
and private entities, this plan set forth a goal to
enhance public safety, personal interactions,
and economic vitality through strategies that
emphasize walkability and an outstanding
pedestrian environment. The Downtown Area
Plan specifically identified Connecting Auraria
as one of its seven transformative projects
with the goal to fully integrate the Auraria
Campus and the Downtown core through strong
physical, social, economic, and programmatic
connections. (Downtown Area Plan, 2007).
The Downtown Area Plan recognized that
closing the gap between the campus and its
surrounding neighborhoods was a critical
component in maximizing the institutions value
and its contribution to the surrounding area.
After the completion of the Downtown Area
Plan, a group of highly engaged and interested
partners formed the Connect Auraria Coalition
to work towards achieving the recommendations
put forth in the Downtown Area Plan through
a unified effort. With the growing campus
population and expansion plans underway
for all three schools, the Coalition recognized
an increasing, immediate demand for better
connections with surrounding neighborhoods
such as La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood,
Golden Triangle, Pepsi Center, and Downtown
Districts all of which are also growing and
evolving. The Coalition recognized the need to
significantly improve the pedestrian environment
to improve both safety and the qualitative
experience of the corridor for those who use
it. The Coalition worked to document the most
critical challenges for pedestrians and cyclists
and brainstormed potential strategies that could
better merge the urban fabrics between the
campus and its surrounding destinations (see
Appendix A: Connecting Auraria Coalition).
The Coalitions work positioned the effort to
successfully compete for grant funding in 2012
and secure resources for a more detailed study.
This study, detailed on the following pages,
seeks to create a thoughtful, implementable
short-term physical plan connecting the
campus with its surrounding neighborhoods
and Downtown districts based on an engaging
long-term vision. While future conditions like
additional mixed-use development, additional
transportation choices, and more integrated
land uses all contribute to this still evolving
long-term vision, this report summarizes an
effort focused on near-term strategies within
the public right of way that can promote high
quality pedestrian and bicycle connections
and reduce the physical and psychological
distance between campus and its adjacent
neighborhoods. The recommendations from
this study were identified for their ability to
address operational, behavioral, and physical
needs and facilitate multimodal connectivity as
the campus and greater area continue to grow.
Project Management Team (PMT)
To help identify the most impactful and
beneficial near-term, implementable strategies,
a Project Management Team (PMT) was created
to offer insight, feedback, and direction for the
duration of the study effort. The PMT included
representatives from a number of public and
private entities who served to represent various
stakeholder groups and serve the best interests
of the community. Representatives included
City and County of Denver staff from Public
Works, Parks and Recreation, Arts and Venues,
and Community Planning and Development;
Executive Leadership and staff from the Auraria
Higher Education Center (AHEC); Executive
Leadership and staff from the Downtown Denver
Partnership, and the Connect Auraria Coalition.
The valuable suggestions and thoughtful
insights represented a broader community of
residents, business owners, and the political
community in addition to serving as project
liaisons to their respective organizations and
stakeholder groups.
The PMT provided oversight to each stage of
the study process and were faithful in continuing
the Downtown Area Plan and Connect Auraria
Coalitions commitment to improvements
and strategies that prioritize pedestrians and
cyclists. The energy and insight provided by the
PMT and their commitment to public outreach
allowed for the study resources to stretch.
It was clear in the early stages of the effort,
that the grant resources allocated for the
study would be insufficient to address all
the needs and provide truly transformational
recommendations for the three subject arterials.
While the study was successful in identifying
several near term, implementable projects to
improve pedestrian and cyclist connections,
the project was only able to focus on localized
improvements at specific intersections. The
resulting recommendations were thus limited
by an awareness of greater corridor issues and
complexities especially along Speer Boulevard
- that currently create traffic and connection
patterns that should be re-evaluated from a
broader perspective. A major recommendation
of this study is to fund and prioritize a Speer
Corridor Study that can explore alternatives to
these existing configurations and explore new,
transformative opportunities that position the
roadway to contribute as much to Downtowns
character is it does to Denvers multi-modal
transportation network. Outcomes from a future
Speer Corridor study may support or modify the
project package recommendations outlined in
this report.
While this effort and report is very supportive of
the Connect Auraria Coalition priorities, due to
the short-term focus of this report, it is important
to recognize that the recommendations do not
represent a full realization of that vision and
some intersections merit additional study and
dialogue.


Study Overview
Historically the Auraria Campus has been
disconnected from its surroundings by three
large arterials Speer Boulevard, Colfax
Avenue, and Auraria Parkway. Given the
increasing downtown population and the
growth and recent trend towards more urban
scale development on the Auraria Campus,
there is a critical need and new opportunity
to connect Auraria with its surrounding
neighborhood including Lincoln Park, Golden
Triangle, Pepsi Center as well as Downtown
Districts. Growing demand for connections
between these locations and campus coupled
with several recent incidents involving serious
modal conflicts between pedestrians, bicyclists,
transit users, and vehicles reaffirm the need to
evaluate how all modes of transportation can
operate safely and efficiently in and around the
campus area.
Study Context
This study capitalizes on the momentum and
vision created by several major preceding and
current initiatives:
1. The 2007 Downtown Denver Area Plan:
This plan discusses the concept of
economic, programmatic, perceptual, and
physical connectivity of the Campus with
the surrounding districts and neighbor-
hoods.
2. The Denver Strategic Transportation
Plan (2008): This strategic plan sets the
city-building philosophy for Denver Public
Works and emphasizes maximizing multi-
modal transportation to off-set increased
demand for lane miles dedicated to
personal vehicles alone.
3. The Auraria Campus Master Plan
(Updated 2012): This plan articulates a
vision for increased urban densification
within the campus and on its edges to
strengthen the relationship between the
campus institutional neighborhoods and
its adjacent neighborhoods located across
each of the three surrounding arterials.
4. Denver Moves (2012): This plan focuses
on integrating on and off-street bicycle
facilities to make bicycle and multi-use
connections in Denver. It builds on
recommendations made in the Bicycle
Master Plan Update (2001), the Denver
Parks and Recreation Game Plan (2003),
and the Pedestrian Master Plan (2004).
Denver Moves also sets the Citywide goal
to achieve a 15% bicycling and walking
commute mode share by 2020.
5. Other preceding studies and policy
documents were considered through-
out the study process. These studies
include but are not limited to the Denver
Comprehensive Plan (2000), Blueprint
Denver (2002), Downtown Multimodal
Access Plan (2006) and Greenprint
Denver (2006).
6. Finally, increased emphasis of multimodal
transit options in Denver through the
build-out of FASTRACKS, the regions
voter-approved rail transit expansion
program, and other transit achievements
has led to higher rates of pedestrian and
bicycle activity.
Study Purpose
Connecting Auraria creates a strategic,
implementable short-term plan that enhances
bicycle and pedestrian safety and comfort
between the Auraria Campus and its
surrounding neighborhoods and Downtown
Districts. This study focuses on developing
implementable improvements within the public
right of way that are strategically focused
on operational, behavioral, and physical pragmatic linkages between the Auraria
interventions. These strategies will be Campus, Downtown Districts, and adjacent
prioritized for their abilities to improve access for neighborhoods.
bicycles and pedestrians; facilitate multimodal
connectivity among the Campus and its
adjacent areas; and improve the thoroughfares
surrounding the campus by lessening the
physical and psychological barriers they current
present to those who study, work, or play in the
area.
This study is based on an engaging
and still evolving long-term vision that
supports the broader social, economic, and
U R A R
I A
8 | Project Background and Context
CONNECTING AURARIA | Denver, Colorado


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Public Engagement Process
Community and stakeholder involvement was
a critical component to the development and
future success of the study. In addition to the
Project Management Team (PMT) that was
created to help inform and guide the study, the
community was also engaged in various ways
online and at public meetings during several
important milestones throughout the process.
The project website at
www.denvergov.org/connectingauraria served
as a central location for information on the study
goals, approach, and important information or
meeting dates. Graphic materials from each
public meeting were also available at this site.
In addition to the study website, the team set up
a MindMixer site at
www.connectauraria.com to supplement the
Needs Assessment process and provide
a place for stakeholders to talk about their
experiences. Public engagement opportunities
and conversations also helped the PMT identify
challenges that the study could address. The
project team also coordinated with Denver City
Council District #9, RTD, and various internal
City departments throughout the process.
Two community meetings were held on the
Auraria Campus in the heart of the study area.
The graphics presented to the public during
these two meetings are available online on the
project website.
Community Meeting #1 Tuesday, June 23rd,
2014
The first community meeting was held at the
Tivoli Student Union from 4PM to 6PM with
a total of 62 attendees (not including staff
or PMT members). Attendees represented
Auraria Campus faculty and staff, students,
downtown stakeholders, business owners and
neighborhood residents. The beginning of the
meeting was an open house to facilitate smaller
group conversations with attendees regarding
their experiences with the three subject arterial
roadways. Display boards and maps were
posted throughout the room and PMT members
engaged attendees in a dot exercise to capture
where each persons comments. Next, a
presentation covered the history of the study
and its goal to identify near-term strategies that
improve multimodal connections. Finally, a
survey was distributed to attendees so that each
person could provide greater detail on his or her
experiences and/or offer other suggestions.
Based on the survey results and the overall
feedback from the meeting, it was determined
that the attendees were most uncomfortable
crossing Colfax Avenue and Speer Boulevard
due to various challenges including narrow
sidewalks, criminal activities, and vehicle
congestion. Many solutions were proposed
including wider sidewalks, a pedestrian bridge,
improved landscaping and lighting, and
additional signage.
Community Meeting #2 Tuesday, January 28th,
2014
The second community meeting was held
at the CCD Confluence Building from 4PM
to 6PM. Over 60 stakeholders attended
including representatives from the surrounding
neighborhoods, Auraria campus faculty/
staff, Auraria Campus students, Downtown
stakeholders, and other stakeholders.
The meeting was designed as an open-house
with stations and information display boards that
graphically presented the preliminary Project
Packages. The project packages highlighted
improvement recommendations for the five
(5) most critical intersections including Speer
and Larimer, Speer and Lawrence, Speer and
Arapahoe, Colfax and Lipan and Auraria and
9th Avenue. Meeting participants were asked to
comment on the components of each package.
In addition, participants were asked to comment
on the relative implementation priority of each
component by identifying which project would
have the most positive impact on pedestrian and
bicycle mobility or could be of greatest benefit to
all users. A project representative was available
at each station to answer questions and gather
input.
9 | Executive Summary
CONN ECPWdjScAlBBiAJg tAu (i cDannMlptetotra|cl @


AURARIA TODAY:
EMPLOYMENT, POPULATION,
AND STUDENTS
Auraria is located in the heart of downtown
Denver and is experiencing change both along
its edges and internally.
Currently the Auraria Campus serves around
40,000 students at three institutions of higher
education with the largest population attending
MSU Denver.
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12 | Needs Inventory
CONNECTING AURARIA | Denver, Colorado


AURARIA TODAY:
RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT
AVERAGES AS OF JULY 2013
Numerous residential projects are either in
construction or in concept development around
the Auraria Campus. Approximately 4,000 new
residential units will be added to the surrounding
area and increase the amount of potential
student housing in the downtown core.
It
Developments
Calculated
Lincoln Park
9 0 0 units
Arapahoe SquarefBall park
1000 units
Curtis Slraet Lofts
* Rtniliitnes Stout Street Lolt
* Legacy 22nd
* 2020 Liwrtnct
* Th* Douglas
* Walnut Flats
Central Platte Valley/
Union Station
1600 units
1650 Wowalta
Cadinct
20th and Chestnut
AM LI Riverfront
Alta City House
Balfour at Riverfront Park
U ptown
400 units
Ascent Uptown
op* City Block
1T59 Clarkson
Capitol H 111
S0 units
ft****
Central Platte Valley/
Union Station
Arapa hoe
Square/Ballpark
*****
Uptown
lit
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Capitol
Hill
D eve I opme n t
Hi ur \i
Total: 3950 units
13 | Site Analysis
Sauw
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CONNECTING AURARIAI^eQtetTvearpGxDjor|ad8


AURARIA TOMORROW:
2035 PROJECTED
EMPLOYMENT AND
POPULATIONS
As Denver continues to grow, the
neighborhoods surrounding Auraria will
experience a significant increase in both
population and employment. Many employees
will utilize the continuing education opportunities
at the Auraria Campus. This increase and
synergies of uses again highlight the need to
create a connected and comfortable pedestrian
experience in and around Auraria.
Population &
Employment:
Growth Rate
Central
District
f ; 2%
5 0% Employment
Central Platte Valley/
Union Station
A J 3 1"''
9% Employment
Lincoln Park
1 6 e4 :
40% Employment
Lincoln Park
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14 | Needs Inventory
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CONNECTING AURARIA | Denver, Colorado


PATTERNS OF CIRCULATION
AND AREAS TO ACTIVATE
New campus development since 2011, as
directed by the Auraria Higher Education
Center Master Plan, has influenced and shifted
patterns of multimodal circulation on the
campus. Plans for additional density will create
additional activity along the edges and in the
core, increase circulation need and affect the
patterns of people as they move in and around
the Auraria Campus.
Activating campus edges is critical and
opportunity areas can be divided into three
categories:
1. Vacant land: These parcels currently have
no development on them.
2. Lacks pedestrian amenities within the
right-of-way: These areas have narrow
sidewalks, little or no buffer from the road,
lack clear pedestrian access, and buildings
are set back from ROW.
3. Surface parking lots: The only current use
of these lots is for parking.
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15 | Site Analysis
CONNECTING AURARIA^eftelTO8arpf&Jor|ad6


EXISTING AND PROPOSED
BIKE FACILITIES
While there are numerous existing and
proposed bicycle facilities within and around
the study area, many are disconnected across
the three subject arterials mainly Speer and
Colfax.
Legend
Existing Facilities
_ _ Bike Lane
v Sharrow
7 Shared Use Sidewalk
i ----------Trail
Trail Access
0 B^Cycie Station
Rinded Facilities
Bike Lane
\ L V J'
i Proposed Facilities r
I :_ji_ Bike Lane ,(
; Sharrow
Bike Route 1
" '
/ ,
* -,b
SOURCES Qrt-ciifnfxn Aw& (W jmeocfrncrt5 to £Wf
16 | Needs Inventory
CONNECTING AURARIA | Denver, Colorado


PEDESTRIAN FACILITIES-
SIDEWALKS
Sidewalks exist along the three arterials,
but in some locations may provide a more
uncomfortable walking environment (especially
along Colfax and sections of Speer) because
the sidewalks are narrow and/or attached with
ADA accessibility issues, utilities blocking or
constraining the sidewalk, minimal landscaping
and urban design elements and high adjacent
traffic volumes.
17 | Site Analysis
V
CONNECTING AURARIA^daerirai?rfl(n)itpr|ad3


PEDESTRIAN FACILITIES-
INTERSECTIONS: SPEER
Although Speer is divided into a one-way
couplet on either side of Cherry Creek and
the Cherry Creek Trail, at some locations
pedestrians must cross a long distance (for
the purpose of this inventory, defined as five or
more lanes) to traverse one direction of Speer
due to the number of through and turning lanes.
The curb ramps at most of the intersections
along Speer do not comply with current ADA
requirements (truncated domes, minimum
slopes/cross-slopes, minimum unobstructed
landing area, etc.). Utilities, inlets, and signs
obstruct the pedestrian landing area (the area
where pedestrians wait to cross at the corner
of the intersection) at several intersections.
In some cases, these obstructions force an
awkward configuration between the curb ramps
and the crosswalks.
PHOTO 1 PHOTO 2
Curb ramp directed toward middle of
intersection; signal pole and utilities
conhnc landing area.
PHOTO 3
Inlet located at
end of crosswalk:
bridge seam
interferes with
crosswalk and
make bike
crossing difficult,
PHOTO 4
LRT crosses sidewalk; warning sign
obstructs walkway
[intersection is inadequate
[share some of their .. ,
\signalized "vnlk L**6**
\ time* with vehicles |k:
| turning left from
Larimer onto
southbound Speer
18 | Needs Inventory
CONNECTING AURARIA | Denver, Colorado


PEDESTRIAN FACILITIES-
INTERSECTIONS: COLFAX
Crossing Colfax Avenue can be difficult or
uncomfortable because of the high degree of
activity along the corridor including high overall
traffic volumes and turning movements, bus
lanes, light rail lights, long crossing distances
(for the purpose of this inventory, defined as
five or more lanes), and lack of median refuges.
Several of the crosswalks were recently
restriped to a 15 foot width, but the crosswalks
do not align with the median breaks (where
they exist) or the curb ramps, both of which are
narrower than the crosswalks. The pedestrian
landing areas (the area where pedestrians wait
to cross at the corner of the intersection) are
constrained at many locations by utilities, signs,
signal poles, and/or the light rail transit (LRT)
tracks. Pedestrians must also cross the LRT at
grade to enter campus. The curb ramps at most
of the intersections along Colfax do not comply
with current ADA requirements (truncated
domes, minimum slopes/cross-slopes, minimum
unobstructed landing area, etc.)
PHOTO 7
PHOTOS
Inlet, fencing
and LRT
tracks Limit
landing area.
PHOTO 6
Signs and
utilities
obstruct
pedestrian
landing
areas;
narrow (4.5)
path through
island.
Landing area
and sidewalk
confined by
signal pole,
bollards and
LRT tracks.
PHOTO 8
Legend
Wide Crossing Distance (5+ lanes) without Refuge
O Confined Pedestrian Landing/Refuge Area
Pedeslrian/LRT Mixing Area
Crosswalks Misaligned with Ramps and/or Median
inlet, manhole, signal pole and LRT
tracks limit landing area; undefined
crossing of LRT tracks. No pedestrian
notification of LRT crossing.
PHOTO 9
Pedestrians
must wait in
narrow refuge
to cross
Colfax;
crosswalk
striping wider
than curb
ramps and
median break.
PHOTO 10
Narrow path
(& ) through
median and
island;
crosswalk
striping
wider than
median
break.
PHOTO 11
Wide
crossing
distances at
A Coffax/Speer.
MOOTH
CONNECTING AURARIA I Denver, Colorado
19 | Needs Inventory


PEDESTRIAN FACILITIES-
INTERSECTIONS:
AURARIA PARKWAY
Most of the pedestrian facilities, including
sidewalks and curb ramps, along Auraria
Parkway have been upgraded in recent years
and meet current ADA requirements. However,
crossing Auraria Parkway can be uncomfortable
for pedestrians due to the wide distance (for
the purpose of this inventory, defined as five or
more lanes) and lack of median refuge areas.
Legend
Wide Crossing Distance (5+ lanes) without Refuge
O Confined Pedestrian Landing/Refyge Area
PedesirianfLRT Mjxlng Area
Crosswalks Misaligned with Ramps and/or Median
PHOTO 12

A
AJ|*
Wide pedestrian
crossing with no
median refuge.
Pedestrian push
buttons in
median are not
accessible.
------------1
I
/

20 | Site Analysis
CONNECTING AURARIAe|efelTWBTiojor|aa6


PEDESTRIAN COUNTS
The intersections with the highest volumes of
pedestrian activity are 1) Colfax/Lipan, 2) Speer/
Larimer, and 3) Speer/Lawrence. Pedestrian
activity across Auraria Parkway is relatively low
during commuter peak hours.
i'
Legs nd
XXX/YYY Weekday Wtid-Day/Evening
j Pedestrian Counts (Sept. 20t2)


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rvWeekday AM/FM Peak 2 Hours /
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21 | Site Analysis
SOURCES: 2007 counts Cfr amfOMirffir of Paiyet. PawflgrtT? Stanal-TimuK
20T?wtf*. jcamtew apiffliy ft 12 PtHtsttHM Covti s CONNECTING AURARIAJ£e0eriTOer1to1pr|aa<)
Cherokee St


BICYCLE PARKING COUNTS
There are nearly 1,500 bike rack stalls on the
Auraria Campus with a 43% utilization on a
typical in-session weekday. B-cycle checkouts
along 14th Street are substantially higher than
on Campus; however, a new B-cycle station
was recently installed at 9th and Curtis, which is
expected to see higher utilization.
Legend
I
Xx
XX
XXXX
Total:
64 j
14W
Bike Rack Location
Bikes Parked (10/2/12, Noon}
Bike Parking Spaces Available
B cycle Checkouts in 2012
(March December)
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22 | Needs Inventory
CONNECTING AURARIA | Denver, Colorado


LIGHT RAIL SERVICE
All six of the existing RTD light rail lines connect
to the Auraria Campus at either the Colfax at
Auraria Station or the Auraria West Station.
Stations adjacent to the campus include the
Sports Authority at Mile High and the Pepsi
Center. While not on the Auraria Campus
proper, both can be used to access parts of the
campus.
5 OUWCE fil D
w
mm
23 | Site Analysis
CONNECTING AURARIAe|effiElTWBTit&ojor|aa8


BUS SERVICE
There are 20 bus routes and over 40 bus stops
that service the area within a quarter-mile of the
Auraria Campus.
Legend
Routes
AF: Downtown/DIA
B: Boulder/Denver
L: Longmont/Denver
MALL: Free Mall Ride
1: West IstAve.
6: East 6th Ave./North Pecos
8: North Broadway/Fluron
9: West 10thAve.
10: East 12thAve.
15: East Colfax Ave.
16: West Colfax Ave.
20: 20th Ave.
28: 28th Ave.
32: West 32nd Ave./City Park
36L: Fort Logan Limited
38: 38th Ave.
44: 44th Ave.
48: East 48th Ave./Commerce City
52: West 52nd Ave./S. Bannock
86X: Westminster Center Express
Bus Stop
(within 1/4 mile of corridors)
Light Rail Station
SOURCE: RTD
CD
24 | Needs Inventory
CONNECTING AURARIA | Denver, Colorado


TRANSIT BOARDINGS AND
ALIGHTINGS
The light rail stations and bus stops within a
quarter-mile of the Auraria Campus generate an
average of over 20,000 boardings and alightings
per day. The vast majority of these transit
riders become pedestrians before or after their
transit trip. Data from the initiation of the West
Line show a marked increase in boardings and
alightings at the Auraria West Station.
KWH
25 | Site Analysis
CONNECTING AURARlAJ^daerlKieerffi^ytlaaS


TRAFFIC DATA
Colfax carries the highest traffic volumes of the
three corridors, with 43,000 vehicles per day
(vpd). Speer Boulevard carries approximately
37,000 vpd adjacent to the Campus, and Auraria
carries nearly 27,000 vpd. Colfax and Auraria
both transition from higher speeds (40 mph)
near 1-25 to slower posted speeds approaching
the Campus and downtown. Speer has a posted
speed limit of 35 mph.
The traffic signals along the three corridors
generally operate at acceptable levels of
service; however, vehicle queuing between
many closely spaced intersections can cause
backups during the peak hours.
SOURCES COOIiDRCOG Ofy ert Coaly tfOewv
MDKTM
26 | Needs Inventory
CONNECTING AURARIA | Denver, Colorado
Cherokee St.


PARKING INVENTORY
There are a multitude of surface parking lots,
parking garages and on-street metered parking
on the Auraria Campus or in close proximity to
the Campus. The scattered nature of the various
on and off-street parking inventories generates
walking trips throughout the area. Not all of the
parking lots shown are publicly accessible or are
dedicated to serve the Auraria Campus.
There are more than 130 metered parking
spaces on campus (including both AHEC and
City and County of Denver owned).
Legend


I '1 i
>v
Building under
construction.
Wifi include 180
surface parking
spaces.
V

§ Under construction.
Q? (Opening July 2014)

Colfax Ave

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27 | Site Analysis
CONNECTING AURARIA^eEteriireisrtltariyilaaS


BICYCLE AND PEDESTRIAN
CRASH HISTORY
Over the three year period from January 2010
through December 2012, there were 33 crashes
along the grand boulevards that involved
either a bicyclist or a pedestrian being hit by
a vehicle. The majority of these crashes (22)
occurred along Colfax. Colfax/Kalamath is the
intersection with the highest number of bicycle
crashes (4), while Colfax/Mariposa has the
highest number of pedestrian crashes (4).
I Legend

Bicycle/Vehlcfe Crashes (20
10-2012>
' \
Pedestrian/Vehicle Crashes (2010-2012}



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28 | Needs Inventory
CONNECTING AURARIA | Denver, Colorado
'IS QBtffUOUO


CRASH HISTORY
The Colorado Department of Transportation
(CDOT) uses Safety Performance Functions (SPF)
to evaluate the overall safety at intersections. The
SPFs, which are essentially accident predication
models, can be used to assess the magnitude
of a safety problem based on the expected
number of crashes at intersections with common
characteristics (e.g., traffic volumes, traffic control,
travel lanes, and area type). The results of applying
CDOTs methodology indicate that four of the study
intersections have high potential for crash reduction
based on their higher than expected total number
of accidents: the Colfax Avenue intersections with
Kalamath Street, Lipan Street, Mariposa Street, and
Osage Street. Over the three year period studied
(2010 2012), there were two fatal accidents: one
involving two vehicles at Colfax/Kalamath and one
involving a pedestrian/vehicle at Colfax/Mariposa.
CDOT also uses crash diagnostics to identify
patterns with crash types that may be higher
than expected based on comparisons with
similar intersections. This helps analysts identify
appropriate strategies that may help to address these
patterns. Four accident types were identify as higher
than expected at four study area intersections:
The intersection of Colfax/Kalamath shows a
higher than expected number of accidents in-
volving a b i eye I i st/ve hide (4), and approach turn
accidents (35).
The Colfax/Lipan intersection shows a higher
than expected number of accidents involving a
bicyclist/vehicle (2) and a pedestrian/vehicle (2),
a sideswipe of two vehicles traveling in the same
direction (6), and involving a fixed object such as
a sign, curb or pole (4).
The Colfax/Mariposa intersection shows a higher
than expected number of accidents involving a
pedestrian/vehicle (4 one of which was fatal),
a sideswipe of two vehicles traveling in the same
direction (9), and involving a fixed object such as
a sign, curb or pole (2).
The intersection of Colfax/Osage shows a higher
than expected number of accidents involving a
fixed object such as a sign, curb or pole (6), a
vehicle with a LRT vehicle (4), pedestrian/vehicle
(3), and bicyclist/vehicle (4).
1

29 | Site Analysis
CONNECTING AURARIAJi(;e[aeriireprt!taly>itaa@
JS 9QHQJ3UD


EXISTING ROW AND
CITY AND COUNTY OF DENVER
PARCELS
This map shows the average right of way (ROW)
owned by the City and County of Denver along
the three subject arterials. In addition, the City
and County of Denver owns several parcels
adjacent to the grand boulevards (most notably
on Speer and Auraria Parkway). Opportunity
exists to better utilize these parcels to either
enhance connections or activate edges along or
across the corridors.
30 | Needs Inventory
- if
. . p'"i .---- J.... ,"
iliSA 1 / . -v" -< ! 1 '
S 0 URCE: City and County of Denver GIS Database
CONNECTING AURARIA I Denver, Colorado


31 | Site Analysis
CONNECTING AURARIAIe|eflfelTWSTiffoJor|a36


4
CORRIDOR VISIONS AND PROJECT
OPPORTUNITIES


Overall Strategies
1. Recognize different characteristics of the
three arterials and adjacent land uses.
2. Identify best strategies to address each
arterials need within its context.
3. Implement traffic calming strategies and
tactics within and along the ROW of the
surrounding thoroughfares
4. Improve ADA accessibility, multimodal
movements along and across the three
subject roadways, and comfort and ease
of use especially for pedestrians and
bicyclists.
5. Designate and identify preferred crossing
locations through infrastructure, amenity,
and aesthetic improvements along each of
the arterials.
6. Acknowledge the future build-out of the
Auraria Master Plan by aligning project
outcomes with the vision of the master
plan.
7. Coordinate infrastructure and streetscape
designs with other studies and ongoing
efforts such as the two-way streets initia-
tives and Denver Moves bicycle plan.
8. Encourage development of public, private
and public/private buildable land to be
urban/dense to the right-of-way lines.
A pedestrian crosses multiple lanes at Speer and Arapahoe.
34 | Corridor Visions and Project Opportunities
CONNECTING AURARIA | Denver, Colorado


Speer Boulevard Vision
The overall vision for the Speer Boulevard
arterial is to enhance and facilitate activity
along Speer Boulevard through improved
pedestrian and bicycle connections and
amenities, high quality urban design elements,
and urban development. These strategies will
help weave the fabrics of Downtown Denver
and the Auraria Campus neighborhoods
together, with a specific focus on the University
of Colorado Denver (CU Denver).
Objectives:
1. Enhance visual and psychological link-
ages and physical connections for all
travel modes across Speer Boulevard,
especially at Market, Larimer, Lawrence
and Arapahoe Streets.
2. Enhance visual communication of the
adjacent campus land use and environ-
ment to vehicles along Speer Boulevard,
to slow drivers and alert them to high
pedestrian and cyclist volumes.
3. Create edges and a sense of pedestrian
enclosure by encouraging all new devel-
opment to be built to the right-of-way with
high levels of transparency and activa-
tion at the ground level. Maintain exist-
ing street trees and add a double row of
street trees where possible.
4. Expand sidewalk widths and other pe-
destrian amenities along the bridges over
Cherry Creek.
5. Ensure all sidewalks and pedestrian
crossings are ADA compliant.
6. Improve pedestrian/bicycle connections
and wayfinding to the Cherry Creek trail.
7. Establish high visibility intersections
through pavement/crosswalk treatments
(i.e. contrasting color and/or texture) at
crossing locations with higher levels of
pedestrian and bicycle activity.
8. Address overall wayfinding needs by
replacing current signs with a more com-
prehensive, destination-based system and
acknowledge Speers historic parkway
designation.
9. Explore dynamic pedestrian level train
warning signals at potential transit/pedes-
trian conflict points.
10. Encourage maximizing the use of vacant
or underutilized parcels along and within
northbound (NB) and southbound (SB)
Speer Boulevard to improve connections
and/or activate the edges.
Cherry Creek Trail access meets Speer Boulevard mid-block. Right turn bypass lane onto Lawrence from Speer.
35 | Site Analysis
C6l$illslt>tB0sniM@ AyjfTASjte&t |OlppaKteiiniOfc>i[a36


Colfax Avenue Vision
The overall vision for the Colfax Avenue arterial
is to improve safety, ease, and attractiveness
of multimodal connections along and across
Colfax Avenue. This vision will connect Colfax
Avenue with adjacent commercial properties
and the La Alma/Lincoln Park and Civic
Center neighborhoods south of the Auraria
Campus, specifically the CCD and Metropolitan
State University of Denver (MSU Denver)
neighborhoods. This vision will contribute to
increased activity and may catalyze future
urban redevelopment and additional pedestrian
amenities.
Objectives:
1. Create high quality pedestrian crossing
locations along Colfax Avenue and make
them both physically and psychologically
more comfortable.
2. Expand and improve the quality of existing
medians to match the quality of the Colfax
medians located east of Speer Boulevard.
3. Establish high visibility intersections
through pavement/crosswalk treatments
(i.e. contrasting color and/or texture) at
crossing locations with higher levels of
pedestrian/bike activity.
4. Improve bus and light rail transit accessi-
bility, safety, and amenities.
5. Ensure all sidewalks and pedestrian
crossings are ADA compliant.
6. Improve at-grade connections along and
across Colfax and facilitate intuitive con-
nections below grade to the new athletic
fields southwest of campus.
7. Encourage more urban development
along Colfax Avenue with transparency
and activation at ground level while allow-
ing for high quality streetscape and wide,
comfortable sidewalks to facilitate multi-
modal movements.
Pedestrian and transit areas merge without clear delineation.
36 | Corridor Visions and Project Opportunities
CONNECTING AURARIA | Denver, Colorado


Auraria Parkway Vision
The overall vision for the Auraria Parkway
arterial includes intensifying the urban
development along Auraria Parkway so that
it becomes a welcoming urban gateway to
the City of Denver and the Auraria Campus,
specifically during special events and to
support the MSU Denver neighborhood, while
accommodating multimodal movements and
crossings for all activities.
Objectives:
1. Create identifiable gateways between
Downtown and the Auraria Campus
and between the Pepsi Center and the
Auraria Campus through architecture and
environmental elements.
2. Enhance the 7th Street and 9th Street
intersections so that the crossing dis-
tance is comfortable for pedestrians
and bicyclists and crossing locations are
highly visible to vehicles.
3. Create pedestrian refuges in medians
where there are higher levels of pedes-
trian/bicycle activity to provide a safe and
comfortable place to wait.
4. Ensure all sidewalks and pedestrian
crossings are ADA compliant.
5. Increase pedestrian and bicycle safety by
slowing traffic along the parkway.
6. Encourage public/private partnerships
that will work together to implement the
vision for high quality edges along the
Parkway.
7. Increase urban development along
Auraria Parkway that will facilitate a high
quality pedestrian environment, focusing
on opportunities with the existing surface
parking lots.
8. Encourage all new development to be
built to the right-of-way with transparency
and activation at ground level.
Long crossing distances with no pedestrian refuge on the Auraria Parkway.
37 | Site Analysis
C(QfMkMBBiT6hl£jaftdfRAJp^t ppfHn1?ittin,i1!ifeslot|a80


To implement these visions, thirteen project
opportunities were identified to facilitate multimodal
connectivity along and across the arterials. The project
opportunities are near-term implementable and are
mostly focused on the intersections.
?Â¥
Speer/Larimer (priority intersection)
38 | Corridor Visions and Project Opportunities
CONNECTING AURARIA | Denver, Colorado


Project Opportunities
1. Speer and Larimer
Existing Conditions:
The Speer and Larimer intersection functions
as one of the main connections to downtown
from the Auraria Campus. With direct
connections to CU Denver buildings and
Larimer Square, this intersection has some of
the highest pedestrian and bicycle counts of
all the intersections surrounding the campus.
Existing pedestrian facilities at the intersection
are non-standard especially along the
constrained bridge area over Cherry Creek.
Non ADA complaint ramps and sidewalks
make crossing north and southbound Speer
challenging especially during peak pedestrian
times. Due to the variety of modes active
at this location including vehicles turning or
traveling south, bus operations, and bicycle and
pedestrian activities; the potential for conflict
is present. Despite the bicycle demand, no
dedicated facility exists to guide cyclists into the
campus area across the two busy directions of
Speer. In addition, confused or non-compliant
behavior from vehicles, pedestrians and
cyclists often causes unnecessary delay and
unpredictable conditions for all modes.
Improvement Opportunities:
(See Speer/Larimer Project Package)
2. Speer and Lawrence
Existing Conditions:
The Speer and Lawrence intersection has
evolved significantly since the mid-1990s with
pedestrian volumes increasing to rival those at
Speer and Larimer. The Lawrence connection
facilitates a high volume of pedestrian and cy-
clist movements due to its proximity to the Law-
rence Street Center and the new CU Denver
Business School both located on the Downtown
side of Lawrence Street with over 400 pedestri-
ans crossing Speer Boulevard in between class
times. A safety study in 1995 recommended
several adjustments at this intersection that are
still in place today including the closing of 13th
Street and the elimination of the dual right turn
from NB Speer onto Lawrence. At the time of
the study, poor behavior from both pedestrians
and vehicles justified the need for an atypical
configuration that could control right turning ve-
hicles from NB Speer to Lawrence and provide
the pedestrian a fully protected crossing experi-
ence. In order to physically communicate the
elimination of the dual right turn and emphasize
the no right turn on red condition to vehicles,
a channelizing median and median nose were
constructed. This intersection treatment was
designed to better control the right turn on red
violations by vehicles and Dont Walk viola-
tions by pedestrians. While the intersection was
designed to provide a safety benefit to pedestri-
ans, the atypical nature of the intersection can
be confusing. The channelizing median is often
treated like a pedestrian refuge with pedestrians
crossing the right turn lane and then waiting
until the designated walk phase to proceed all
the way to the bridge. Conditions have since
changed at this intersection with a higher vol-
ume of pedestrians and cyclists crossing due to
new institutional assets on either side of Speer
including the CU Denver business school and
the shared Science Building.
In addition, Lawrence also serves as a key
gateway into downtown for southbound vehicles
along Speer since this intersection provides the
first opportunity to turn left into downtown.
High vehicular turn volumes almost 490 ve-
hicles in the AM peak hour reflect the demand
for turning movements at this intersection.
Another multimodal challenge is the constrained
access to the Cherry Creek Trail at two loca-
tions. The small landing area at the corner of
SB Speer and Lawrence and the hairpin turn
required to access the main trail below-grade
can create an uncomfortable situation with
potential for modal conflicts. The current ramp
and landing area configurations create difficult
maneuvers for bicyclists and poor sight lines.
Improvement Opportunities:
(See Speer/Lawrence Project Package for still
evolving ideas)
3. Speer and Arapahoe
Existing Conditions:
The Speer and Arapahoe intersection is the
third busiest pedestrian intersection along Speer
and also carries a high volume of bicycles due
to the direct bicycle connection to the Auraria
campus and the Curtis Street bicycle facility,
which is one of the primary bike routes on
campus. This intersection experiences high
vehicular volumes on a more irregular schedule
due to the access it provides to the Denver
Performing Arts Complex parking garage, one
of the largest off-street parking facilities in the
Downtown area.
The Cherry Creek Trail maintenance ramp
terminates south of the Speer and Arapahoe
intersection, but is used regularly by bicyclists
going to/from downtown or the campus. The
access provided by the ramp can cause
confusion for bicyclists because there is no
intuitive connection onto the campus or into
Downtown from the trail access point causing
many cyclists to cut across Speer mid-block.
Improvement Opportunities:
(See Speer/Arapahoe Project Package)
4. Speer and Champa
Existing Conditions:
Because Champa is a one-way street carrying
vehicles out of downtown, the Speer and
Champa intersection is most active during the
P.M. peak hour. The intersection facilitates
connections for a smaller volume of pedestrians
and bicyclists, however, the buffered bike lane
along Champa stops shy of Speer Boulevard
at 13th Street. Buildings are set back from the
curb on both the downtown side and the Auraria
side making this intersection feel expansive and
overwhelming from a pedestrian standpoint.
The Denver Performing Arts Complex Sculpture
Park is located on the corner or Champa and
NB Speer with occasional event programming
throughout the year.
Improvement Opportunities:
The opportunities at Speer and Champa
include continuing a bicycle facility across
Speer to Kalamath to be received by a widened
shared use path on the west side of Kalamath
designated for both bicycles and pedestrians.
This shared use path could serve to connect
users to the transit opportunities along
westbound Colfax.
Urban design elements such as banners,
signage and pots can be added to extend
across Speer Boulevard, better connect to the
Denver Performing Arts Complex, and reflect
arts and cultural programming.
5. Speer and Stout
Existing Conditions:
Stout is a one-way street into downtown and
therefore carries a high volume of vehicles
during the morning (AM) peak hour. Operations
at the intersection are complicated by the
addition of the light rail transit vehicles running
at grade along Stout. There is a higher crash
incidence at this intersection between personal
and transit vehicles due to the unique nature
of the intersection. While the pedestrian and
bicycle demand at this intersection is not as high
as other intersections along Speer, there are
still improvement opportunities that could better
serve bicyclist demand and connect patrons
of the Denver Performing Arts Center and
Colorado Convention Center across Speer.
Improvement Opportunities:
Opportunities at this intersection include the
addition of urban design elements that highlight
the light rail crossing and add to the quality of
the pedestrian environment. Truncated domes,
signage, bollards and dynamic pedestrian level
train warning signals. Additionally, the creation
of a raised median with enhanced colored
treatments, pavement, or landscape on the west
side of southbound Speer between the light
rail tracks and road would help to better guide
pedestrians so that they walk in the designated
pedestrian zone.
6. Colfax and Kalamath
Existing Conditions:
The Colfax and Kalamath intersection is an
extremely busy intersection at all times and can
be challenging for pedestrians and bicyclists to
navigate due to the high vehicular volumes and
wide turning movements. Pedestrian ramps are
non-standard in some locations. Pedestrians
who cross at this location face wide crossing
distances due to the number of travel and
turning lanes and, while there are pedestrian
refuge areas provided within the median areas,
many are small and can feel uncomfortable.
Additionally, the pedestrian and bicycle crash
history is higher than normal in this location.
Improvement Opportunities:
Further study is needed at this intersection to
determine a comprehensive strategy that will
balance the many multimodal movements and
create a high quality, comfortable entry into the
Downtown area. Future study may consider
eliminating turn lanes in order to expand the
median and pedestrian refuge areas and reduce
the crossing distance for pedestrians. High
turning demand at the intersection will need
to be analyzed and considered to ensure that
any change to the turning movement does not
negatively impact the pedestrian experience at
this or adjacent intersections. Urban design
elements such as new public art installations
39 | Site Analysis
C (fl-aMM BSTd h&Baftdl (ppjKrrtonjt&sloitaa


and high quality landscaping along the edges
and in the medians will contribute greatly to the
gateway nature of this intersection.
7. Colfax and Lipan
Existing Conditions:
The Colfax and Lipan intersection is adjacent to
busy nodes north and south of the intersection.
The Colfax at Auraria light rail station and
adjacent bus stop serve hundreds of transit
riders each day. Students, faculty, employees
and neighborhood residents use this transit
hub to access destinations all over the metro
area. The retail area south of the intersection
serves students and faculty from the campus
as well as neighborhood residents or nearby
workers. In addition, Lipan serves as a main
entry into campus as well as a connection to
adjacent retail offerings that serve a variety
of patrons. Due to the variety of modes active
at this intersection, the crash history is higher
than normal in this location. In addition, the
high volume of pedestrian and bicycle demand
around the light rail platform area creates a very
constrained and congested mixing zone for
these activities.
Improvement Opportunities:
(See Colfax/Lipan Project Package)
8. Colfax and Mariposa
Existing conditions:
The Colfax and Mariposa intersection serves
largely as a gateway to the residences in the La
Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood to the south
of Colfax including a number of senior housing
units located on both Mariposa and Osage. The
intersection also sees a significant amount of
cut-through traffic during both the morning and
afternoon commutes for those trying to avoid
the Speer and Colfax intersection. High volumes
of vehicular traffic can make the intersection
uncomfortable for pedestrians and there have
been complaints of heavy truck traffic. Addition-
ally, Mariposa has a bike lane that does not cur-
rently connect north across Colfax into campus.
Improvement Opportunities:
Opportunities for improvement at Colfax and
Mariposa are influenced by the improvements
at Colfax and Lipan. The left turn movement
at Mariposa is maintained and may have
increased demand due to the recommended
changes at Lipan. Traffic calming on Mariposa
should be considered to help address impacts
or increased volumes from cut through traffic -
especially adjacent to the senior housing units.
Adequate sidewalk widths and conditions are
important. Other recommendations at Colfax
and Mariposa include realignment of the current
crosswalk location in order to provide protected
pedestrian refuges and the opportunity to widen
the sidewalk on the south side of Colfax as
redevelopment occurs.
9. Colfax and Osage
Existing Conditions:
The Colfax and Osage intersection is an ex-
tremely busy intersection and can be challeng-
ing for pedestrians and bicyclists to navigate
due to the high vehicular volumes and proximity
to light rail operations. Pedestrians face wide
crossing distances due to the number of travel
lanes, and pedestrian ramps are non-standard
in some locations. Pedestrian movements are
complicated due to the number of traffic chan-
nelization (pork chop) islands. These islands
house a number of utilities including electric
lines, signal poles, and controls for the adjacent
light rail operation. Additionally, the pedestrian
and bicycle crash history is higher than normal
in this location. Denver Moves identifies the
need for a future bicycle facility on Osage to of-
fer a southern connection into the neighborhood
but providing a comfortable connection across
Colfax to facilitate access onto campus could
be challenging with the intersections current
configuration.
Improvement Opportunities:
Further study for a design solution at this inter-
section is recommended in order to improve
pedestrian and bicycle access across Colfax
into both the campus and neighborhood areas
while balancing the heavy traffic volumes and
adjacent light rail operations. It is important for
the improvements at this intersection to estab-
lish a gateway feeling so that vehicles traveling
from the west understand the change in condi-
tion and respond with slower speeds and an
awareness of pedestrian activities. Treatments
at this intersection should also work to simplify
the pedestrian crossing movement as well as
work to integrate full ADA complaint ramps and
truncated domes. Pedestrian level light rail
warning signals may also help pedestrians be
more aware of oncoming trains.
10. Auraria and 7th Avenue
Existing Conditions:
The 7th Avenue corridor has experienced
increased vehicular and pedestrian demand as
the campus grows and develops, however the
wide crossing distance across Auraria Park-
way can be daunting for pedestrians. Campus
programming and special event activities create
pedestrian demand at Auraria and 7th Avenue
- especially due to the use of public off-street
parking lots on the Auraria Campus. Addition-
ally, high vehicular speeds are common in this
location making it especially important for the
improvements at this intersection to signal a
change in condition to vehicles exiting I-25 to
encourage slower speeds and an awareness of
pedestrian activities.
Improvement Opportunities:
Recently several signal timing adjustments were
made along 7th Avenue at Walnut, Lawrence,
and Curtis in order to reduce the wait time for
pedestrians. This small adjustment further
prioritizes the pedestrian movement at these
locations and encourages pedestrians to cross
at designated crossing locations. At Auraria and
7th Avenue, wider crosswalks and an extension
of the existing median noses would provide a
larger, more protected pedestrian refuge. High
quality landscaping and urban design elements
such as planted pots or additional banner sig-
nage at the intersections will also help con-
tribute to the pedestrian experience and could
communicate Pepsi Center programming.
11. Auraria and 9th Avenue
Existing Conditions:
Special event activity is highest at Auraria and
9th Avenue due to the direct connection the in-
tersection provides to the Pepsi Center and the
Pepsi Center light rail station. Pedestrian cross-
ing activity is high before and after professional
sporting or other special events due to the
numerous off-street public parking lots located
on the Auraria Campus. Wide crossing dis-
tances across Auraria Parkway make is difficult
for pedestrians. The existing pedestrian cross-
ing push-buttons provided in the median are not
ADA accessible. Some urban design elements
have been provided as the new buildings on the
campus were built but they do not cross Auraria
Parkway providing a stronger connection across
the parkway.
Improvement Opportunities:
(See Auraria/9th Avenue Project Package)
12. Auraria and 11th Avenue
Existing Conditions:
An intersection at Auraria and 11th Avenue
currently does not exist. However, with the
addition of the new Auraria Hotel and Hospitality
Learning Center and further redevelopment
on the campus, this intersection will facilitate
transit operations as well as increasing amounts
of pedestrian movements associated with the
adjacent Pepsi Center or campus activities.
Improvement Opportunities:
As detailed in the Auraria Higher Education
Center Master Plan Update (2012), future plans
for this intersection include full signalization
to increase include access onto the campus
40 | Corridor Visions and Project Opportunities
from the northwest and northeast. When the
intersection is constructed, it should be built with
wider crosswalks and median noses that provide
a protected refuge for pedestrians. High quality
landscaping and urban design elements such
as planted pots or additional banner signage at
the intersections will also help contribute to the
pedestrian experience and could communicate
Pepsi Center or campus programming.
Auraria and Speer
Existing Conditions:
The Auraria and Speer intersection functions
mostly as a vehicular intersection managing
the regional traffic movement as it moves
into the downtown area from i-25 and other
arterial connections. The intersection can feel
overwhelming due to its scale and it provides
limited pedestrian and bicycle amenities
despite its wide crossing distance. As Denver
Union Station opens as the regional transit
hub with new retail and restaurant offerings,
there is a greater need to provide a high quality
connection between it and the Auraria Campus.
Improvement Opportunities:
Due to the complexity of the Auraria and Speer
intersection and the amount of regional travel it
facilitates, a full study is required to understand
redesign options that might improve bicycle and
pedestrian connectivity. It is important for any
design changes at this intersection to establish
a gateway feeling so that vehicles traveling from
the west understand the downtown condition
and respond with slower speeds and an
awareness of pedestrian activities. Treatments
at this intersection should also work to improve
the comfort and function of the pedestrian
crossing movement as well as work to integrate
full ADA complaint ramps and truncated domes.
CONNECTING AURARIA | Denver, Colorado


Preliminary Screening
The project team worked together to develop
methodology and evaluation criteria to analyze
and prioritize the project opportunities. The
evaluation criteria were based largely on safety,
multi-modal demand, alignment with other plans
and visions and partnership opportunities. The
project opportunities were ranked relative to one
another, and at least one project opportunity
was selected for each arterial. The detailed
criteria are listed below.
Evaluation Criteria
Safety Benefits (Physical): Does this provide
a safety enhancement (eliminate or minimize
conflicts, improve sight distance, etc.); is it at an
intersection with a higher than expected number
of crashes, and does it specifically address a
higher than expected crash type?
Safety Benefits (Perceived): Does this provide
a more comfortable experience for bicyclists
and pedestrians?
ADA Compliance: Does this address a current
ADA deficiency?
Ease of Bicycling: Does this make bicycling
easier by reducing delays for bicyclists, provid-
ing a new bike facility, providing improved cross-
ings and/or wayfinding?
Ease of Walking: Does this make walking
easier by reducing delays for pedestrians, short-
ening the crossing distance, widening sidewalks,
adding landscape buffers and/or lighting?
Ease of Transit Use: Does this improve con-
nections/wayfinding to and/or amenities at bus
stop or light rail station?
Level of Bicycle Activity: Does this area expe-
rience high bike activity at peak or other times
and/or is it located along a current or proposed
designated bike facility?
Level of Pedestrian Activity: Does this area
experience high pedestrian activity at peak or
other times?
Traffic Operations: Does this allow vehicu-
lar and transit traffic to operate in a manner
similar to the current conditions (i.e., maintains
roadways ability to move people and does not
significantly increase level of delay)
Aesthetics/Context: Does this improve the
aesthetics (by adding landscaping, lighting,
urban design elements, etc.) and/or improve the
context sensitivity (by enhancing the visual con-
nection between downtown and the campus)?
Supports Future Plans and Visions: Is it
compatible with future visions and plans such
as Auraria Campus Master Plan, Denver Moves,
DUS, DAP, Grand Boulevards, etc.? Does it help
implement future visions and plans?
Partnership Opportunities: Is there potential
to leverage funding from public/public or private/
public partnerships?
Short Term Implementability: Can this be
implemented with relatively low utility and ROW
impacts at a relatively low construction cost?
Analysis of Project
Opportunities
Following the preliminary screening, five project
packages were identified as priorities for further
analysis. The priority projects include Speer
and Larimer, Speer and Lawrence, Speer and
Arapahoe, Colfax and Lipan and Auraria and 9th
Avenue.
41 | Site Analysis
CfiK£MttMBKTdiN£a^ldH?A^At ppjHnrteniffi&slor|add


42 | Site Analysis
CONNECTING AURARIA |
Denver, Colorado


RECOMMENDATIONS


LARIMER:
KEY CHALLENGES

Narrow sidewalks along Larimer
bridge and west towards campus
6 ramps do not meet ADA
standards
9 pedestrian path: bikes are not
allowed
mu
Wide crossing distance
TURNING MOVEMENTS
Turning movement
XXX AM (PM) Peak Hour
2007 Counts from Downtown Retiming
44 | Recommendations
CONNECTING AURARIA | Denver, Colorado


Recommendations
Speer Corridor
Acknowledge importance of a corridor wide
approach to slow vehicles and establish clear
priority zones for pedestrians and bicyclists.
Corridor approach will include physical intersec-
tion improvements as well as an assessment of
signal timing operations to determine feasibil-
ity of establishing exclusive pedestrian phases
south from Wewatta.
Speer and Larimer
The recommended improvements included
in the project package for Speer and Larimer
are designed to improve the comfort, safety
and convenience for pedestrian and bicycle
movements across Speer.
First, in order to address the demand for bicycle
access to and from campus, the downtown-
bound exclusive bus lane could be removed to
gain additional space. RTDs Route 15 travels
from the campus east on Larimer Street to 14th
Street. By eliminating the exclusive bus lane on
eastbound Larimer (#2) and rerouting the Route
15 to head east on Lawrence, the gained width
could be used to widen the sidewalks between
NB and SB Speer and across the bridge over
Cherry Creek. With nine foot sidewalks on both
sides of the bridge, the pedestrian comfort
would be improved; however, there is a desire
for further widening of the sidewalks along
Larimer to the 16 foot City standard in the
future (which would require bridge widening or
reconstruction).
The additional width gained from eliminating
the bus only lane would allow for a striped
bike lane connection from downtown to the
campus. This new bicycle facility (inbound
to campus) would be functionally paired with
a complementary bicycle lane described in
the set of recommendations for Speer and
Lawrence. A widened shared bike/pedestrian
path is recommended on the edge of the
campus between Larimer and Arapahoe (#4)
to facilitate bicycle movements between the
bike lane couplet and the primary bike route on
campus which is accessed near the Speer and
Arapahoe intersection.
Also recommended is a broader corridor
signal retiming effort to pursue an opportunity
to create exclusive pedestrian/bicycle phases
along the Speer corridor to separate the conflict
between the pedestrians and the vehicles (#3).
To complement the exclusive bike/ped phase, a
separate left turn from Larimer onto SB Speer
would be provided, eliminating the conflict
between pedestrians and left turning vehicles.
Next, the existing left turn lane from NB
Speer onto Larimer could be eliminated to
gain additional sidewalk width due to its low
utilization rates. By eliminating this turn lane
(#1), the distance for pedestrians crossing NB
Speer can be shortened, and the sidewalk along
Speer can be widened. Vehicles could make the
NB left from the left-most through lane.
The pedestrian realm will also benefit from
additional high quality urban design elements
including additional banners, signage, and
planted pots that can wrap each corner to
slow drivers and convey the high degree of
multimodal activity present between campus
and Downtown along Larimer (#5).
Lastly, establishing a highly visible crosswalk
through colored treatments or concrete sections
will draw additional attention to the pedestrian
activity at the intersection and improve the
comfort for those crossing (#6).
Note: This study acknowledges the recent
initiative to convert one-way streets in the
downtown area to two-way operations. Larimer
and Lawrence are two candidate streets that
will be subject to further study to assess the
feasibility of two-way operations (#7). These
recommendations will not preclude a future
conversion.
Curb moves
45 | Site Analysis
LARIMER :
TECHNICAL IMPROVEMENTS
EXISTING SIGNAL POLE
' (BY OTHERS)
EXISTING INLET
(TO REMAIN)
CONNECTING AURARbflco|nr1rhB3TOtati6iaitoita45


LARIMER:
ILLUSTRATIVE LANDSCAPING
IMPROVEMENTS
Project Package Summary:
Q Remove NB turn lane (between
Speer and Lawrence) to expand
sidewalk
9
Remove NE bound exclusive
bus lane to widen sidewalks and
create WB bike lane
9
Create exclusive pedestrian/
bicycle phase and a protected
WB to SB left turn phase
Q Widen existing sidewalk to 12
to create shared bike/pedestrian
facility connecting Larimer to
Arapahoe (explore separated off-
street bike facility in future)
9 Extend lighting, banners, signage
and pots along Larimer and into
campus
9
High visibility crosswalks through
colored treatments or concrete
sections
^ Study conversion of Larimer to
two-way street
46 | Recommendations
CONNECTING AURARIA | Denver, Colorado


LARIMER AND SPEER
LONG TERM VISION
47 | Site Analysis
CONNECTING AURA^Ao(nBen\2lat;i(islotla^


LAWRENCE:
KEY CHALLENGES
s----s-----\ 15 wide lanes on the Lawrence
bridge.
Small pedestrian and bike landing
zone from Cherry Creek Trail.
5 ramps do not meet ADA
standards.
9 pedestrian path: bikes are not
allowed
mu
Wide crossing distance
TURNING MOVEMENTS
Turning movement
xxx AM (PM) Peak Hour
2007 Counts from Downtown Retiming
48 | Recommendations
CONNECTING AURARIA | Denver, Colorado


Speer and Lawrence
The improvement ideas included in the project
package for Speer and Lawrence are still evolv-
ing to improve the comfort, safety and conve-
nience for pedestrian and bicycle movements
across Speer. With over 400 pedestrians cross-
ing Speer in between CU Denver class times,
pedestrian safety and comfort is paramount at
this complex, but important intersection. Travel
lanes across the bridge can be narrowed to
provide a striped bicycle lane connecting the
campus to downtown (#1). This lane comple-
ments the striped bike lane included in the
Speer and Larimer project package. Together
the two lanes will operate as a couplet with the
widened shared bike/pedestrian path connec-
tion along the campus edge as described in the
Speer/Larimer package. An exclusive bike/ped
phase is also recommended at the SB Speer
and Lawrence intersection (#4).
Lawrence presents another important opportu-
nity to establish highly visible crosswalks across
NB and SB Speer, further contributing to a pat-
tern that may help make drivers more aware of
pedestrians. Urban design elements can help
provide a consistent, visually appealing and
inviting environment (#3). Colored treatments
or concrete sections at the crosswalks will draw
additional attention to pedestrians (#6).
Improvement opportunities for the Speer/
Lawrence intersection were a subject of much
debate throughout the study process underscor-
ing the importance of a Speer Corridor Study
that can evaluate existing travel patterns created
by current configurations. The PMT supports
a design solution for Lawrence and Speer that
prioritizes pedestrians, creates more intuitive
and narrower crossings, and provides comfort-
able access to the Cherry Creek Trail for cyclists
of all experience levels. The ultimate solution
will expand the landing area at the northeast
corner of SB Speer and Lawrence (and narrow
the crossing distance across SB Speer) while
considering the high demand for left-turn access
into Downtown by both transit and vehicles (#7).
A redesigned trail entrance could also improve
the sharp turn below grade onto the trail itself.
The PMT and broader community participated in
numerous conversations regarding an alterna-
tive to the current Speer and Lawrence right turn
configuration. Two alternatives are presented
here but do not reflect final recommendations or
PMT endorsement. The first approach simply
removes the northernmost section of the chan-
nelizing median or nose. Today the single right
turn lane is an established condition and the
nose is no longer needed to reinforce elimina-
tion of the dual right turn option that existed in
the past.
Since the nose is the widest portion of the chan-
nelizing median, the lanes can be restriped in
order to extend the southeast curb line. This will
both narrow the crossing distance for pedes-
trians as well as better square the intersection
along the curve in the road.
A second approach reconstructs and narrows
the full extent of the channelizing feature, pull-
ing it farther south and out of the way of the
pedestrian crossing area. The narrowness of
the reconstructed median would further discour-
age its use as a pedestrian refuge. This option
also allows for an extension of the curb line in
order to narrow the crossing distance and better
square the intersection.
Both right turn reconfiguration options maintain
the safety benefits of the original design by con-
trolling the right turning vehicle to preserve the
protected pedestrian phase. Both alternatives
also create a more typical crossing experience
by moving the channelization south so that it
controls vehicles without confusing pedestrians.
An extension of the adjacent tree lawn may
also help encourage pedestrians to cross at the
corner.
Note: This study acknowledges the recent initia-
tive to convert one-way streets in the down-
town area to two-way operations. Larimer and
Lawrence are two candidate streets that will be
subject to further study to assess the feasibility
of two-way operations (#8). These recommen-
dations will not preclude a future conversion.
This study also acknowledges the recent study
of protected bicycle facilities in the downtown
area. Alternative configurations for bicycle facili-
ties on Lawrence are currently being studied.
Curb moves
LAWRENCE :
TECHNICAL IMPROVEMENTS
OPTION 1
*STUOV AND FUND A RE-DE3K1N OF TK L4NDWG
AND ACCEW POWTE TO TWE TRAIL
49 | Site Analysis
CONNECTING AURARfefeqrr1Bm(tatieiaitotta4@


LAWRENCE:
ILLUSTRATIVE LANDSCAPING
IMPROVEMENTS OPTION 1
Project Package Summary:
O
Reduce lane widths across
bridge to provide NE bound
bicycle lane
0 Remove duplicate/south diagonal
pedestrian crosswalk across
NB Speer and relocate stop bar
closer to intersection. Extend tree
lawn on north side of Speer
^ Extend lighting, banners, signage
and pots along Lawrence

Provide exclusive bicycle/
pedestrian phase for Lawrence at
SB Speer
0 Reduce width of parking to
expand sidewalk by 3 along
Lawrence north of Speer
0
High visibility crosswalks through
colored treatments or concrete
sections
^ Prioritize and fund a design
project that explores ways to
regrade/reconstruct the access
ramp for a larger landing area at
the street level and a gentler turn
at the trail access below grade.
Study conversion of Lawrence to
two-way operations and continue
to coordinate with protected bike
lane plans and projects
50 | Recommendations
CONNECTING AURARIA | Denver, Colorado


LAWRENCE :
TECHNICAL IMPROVEMENTS
OPTION 2
Curb moves
**TUD* AH9 FVND A M-MttCN Of THI LMtW
AMD ACCESS POINTS TO THE TRAN.
51 | Recommendations
CONNECTING AURARIA | Denver, Colorado


LAWRENCE:
ILLUSTRATIVE LANDSCAPING
IMPROVEMENTS OPTION 2
Project Package Summary:
^ Reduce lane widths across
bridge to provide NE bound
bicycle lane
@ Remove duplicate/south diagonal
pedestrian crosswalk across
NB Speer and relocate stop bar
closer to intersection. Extend tree
lawn on north side of Speer
^ Extend lighting, banners, signage
and pots along Lawrence
Q Provide exclusive bicycle/
pedestrian phase for Lawrence at
SB Speer
Reduce width of parking to
expand sidewalk by 3 along
Lawrence north of Speer

High visibility crosswalks through
colored treatments or concrete
sections
^ Prioritize and fund a design
project that explores ways to
regrade/reconstruct the access
ramp for a larger landing area at
the street level and a gentler turn
at the trail access below grade.
Study conversion of Lawrence to
two-way operations
52 | Site Analysis
CONNECTING AURARfefeo|rriBm^ffl.tilaifcl,taa


LAWRENCE AND SPEER:
LONG TERM VISION
53 | Site Analysis
CONNECTING AUR/m6oi|nBienx2latjcfiisloita38


ARAPAHOE:
KEY CHALLENGES
4-+
Narrow sidewalk along south side
of Arapahoe bridge
4 ramps do not meet ADA
standards
9 pedestrian path: bikes are not
allowed
mi
Wide crossing distances
TURNING MOVEMENTS
Turning movement
xxx AM (PM) Peak Hour
2007 Counts from Downtown Retiming
54 | Recommendations
CONNECTING AURARIA | Denver\*3/ado


Speer and Arapahoe
The recommended improvements included in
the project package for Speer and Arapahoe
are designed to improve the comfort, safety and
convenience for pedestrian and bicycle move-
ments across Speer while heightening drivers
awareness of users crossing the intersections.
Existing travel lane widths allow for the addition
of shared lane markings (sharrows) in both di-
rections along Arapahoe to connect the campus
bike route on Curtis Street into downtown (#1).
The sharrows could also serve to connect to
the existing Arapahoe bicycle lane to the east,
which currently ends at 14th St. In the west-
bound direction, a striped bike lane is recom-
mended across the bridge (#2). Because this
bike lane would necessarily be narrow to retain
the existing travel lanes, a bike box is recom-
mended to provide adequate queuing space for
bicyclists (#2) and to position bicyclists in front
of motor vehicles for a recommended exclusive
bicycle/pedestrian signal phase (#3). In addition,
a new mountable curb could facilitate a better,
more direct connection to the Curtis Street bike
lanes as cyclists travel west onto campus.
Arapahoe presents another important oppor-
tunity to establish highly visible crosswalks
across northbound and southbound Speer,
further contributing to a pattern along the cor-
ridor that may help make drivers more aware of
pedestrian activities. Urban design elements
such as banners and planted pots can also add
to the intersection enhancements providing a
consistent, visually appealing and inviting en-
vironment between downtown and the campus
(#4). Banners or other elements may also be
designed to reflect the proximity and program-
ming of the Denver Performing Arts Complex.
Colored treatments at the crosswalks or colored
concrete sections will draw additional atten-
tion to the pedestrian activities and improve the
comfort for those crossing (#5).
A redesign of the trail access just south of
Arapahoe should be further studied to better
highlight and formalize use of the existing ramp
and provide intuitive connections to Downtown
and the campus (#6).
Finally, the existing right turn bypass median
that serves to facilitate turning movements from
Downtown onto northbound Speer can be en-
larged to narrow the right turning lane and slow
moving vehicles.
Curb moves
ARAPAHOE:
TECHNICAL IMPROVEMENTS

EXISTING INLET
(TO REMAIN)
REMOVE AND REPLACE
TRAFFIC SIGNAL LIGHT
POLE AND EQUIPMENT
EXISTING INLET
(TO REMAIN)
EXISTING SIGNAL POLE
(TO REMAIN)
55 | Site Analysis
CONNECTING AURARk&qrrBwrvfa;tiQia>fc>i[a36


ARAPAHOE:
ILLUSTRATIVE LANDSCAPING
IMPROVEMENTS
Project Package Summary:
Q Add sharrows to extend
connection into downtown from
Curtis St. bike lanes
0 Add bike box and WB bike lane
(on bridge only) to facilitate
access to campus
Create exclusive pedestrian/
bicycle phase
Q Extend lighting, banners, signage
and pots along Arapahoe to
reflect DPAC programming
0 High visibility crosswalks through
colored treatments or concrete
sections
0 Redesign the Cherry Creek
Trail access ramp with clear
wayfinding to/from trail
0
0
Expand the right turn bypass
median at northbound Speer
Mountable curb for bikers on WB
bike lane
56 | Recommendations
CONNECTING AURARIA | Denver, Colorado


57 | Site Analysis
CONNECTING AUR/m&Di|nffiendait,i

COLFAX AND LIPAN:
KEY CHALLENGES
llll
Wide crossing distance
4 ramps do not meet ADA
standards.
4
Pedestrian crossing/staging area
is undefined

Pedestrian button push-button in
too small of a median refuge
Medians do not provide pedestrian
refuge
Turning movement
xxx AM (PM) Peak Hour
2007 Counts from Downtown Retiming
58 | Recommendations
CONNECTING AURARIA | Denver, Colorado


Colfax Corridor
Acknowledge importance of a corridor wide
approach to slow vehicles and establish clear
priority zones for pedestrians and bicyclists.
Corridor approach will include physical improve-
ments throughout but will also include highlight-
ing some intersections as pedestrian priority by
limiting vehicular movements and redirecting
turning movement demand to adjacent loca-
tions.
Colfax and Lipan
The opportunities identified at Colfax and Lipan
have the ability to transform this intersection
and improve its ability to achieve a high quality
pedestrian experience while balancing the vari-
ous multimodal demands. The recommended
package of improvements for Colfax and Lipan
was developed to establish the intersection as
the primary pedestrian crossing location facili-
tating connections between the light rail and
transit center on the Auraria Campus and the
businesses and neighborhoods to the south. To
achieve this, high visibility crosswalks are an im-
portant recommendation and should be installed
at the current 15 width. Colored treatments at
the crosswalks or colored concrete sections will
draw additional attention to the high volume of
pedestrian activities and improve the comfort for
those crossing.
In addition, there is opportunity to reconfigure
the current allocation of space at the intersec-
tion to improve the pedestrian crossing experi-
ence. By removing the left turn movement from
westbound Colfax to southbound Lipan (#1),
the movements at the intersection are simplified
and the landscaped center median is expanded
to provide a wider refuge for pedestrians and
cyclists. Southbound access into the retail
strip at Lipan or into the neighborhood south of
Colfax can be served by left-turn movements
at Kalamath, Mariposa or Osage (see alterna-
tive in-bound and out-bound routing options
on page 61) though additional analysis will be
needed to understand the impacts. The me-
dian is extended across the intersection (#2) to
provide additional landscape area and reinforce
the elimination of the left turn movement. This
configuration will minimize conflicts between
vehicles and pedestrians, signify visually that
this crossing is primarily for pedestrians (right
turns to and from Lipan would still be allowed),
and allow for an exclusive pedestrian phase in
the future. The expanded median (#5) provides
additional opportunity for urban design elements
like high quality landscaping, public art, and
other gateway treatments that can communicate
proximity to the campus and downtown environ-
ments.
Curb extensions or bulb outs on the south leg of
the intersection are also recommended (#1) to
shorten the crossing distance of Lipan.
To address the non-standard pedestrian refuge
on the north side of the intersection, elimina-
tion of the median separating the bus lane from
westbound travel lanes is recommended (#3).
With the bus lane adjacent to the travel lane, a
transit priority signal should be considered to
facilitate the bus movement into the westbound
through lane.
Finally, urban design elements such as banners
and planted pots can also add to the intersec-
tion enhancements providing a consistent, visu-
ally appealing and inviting environment between
the businesses on the south side of Colfax and
the campus (#3). Enhancements to center
median landscaping should be coupled with a
maintenance plan to ensure sustainability of the
vegetation and design elements.
Curb moves
COLFAX AND LIPAN:
TECHNICAL IMPROVEMENTS
REMOVE AND REPLACE
EXISTING TRAFFIC SIGNAL LIGHT
POLE AND EQUIPMENT
PROPOSED INLET
1=0 -4
59 | Site Analysis
CONNECTING AUR/m^i|nffiem2lait,icS&sloita3@


COLFAX AND LIPAN:
ILLUSTRATIVE LANDSCAPING
IMPROVEMENTS
Project Package Summary:
Remove left turning movements from WB
Colfax and add bulb-outs on Lipan at
intersection south of Colfax to make this
intersection the primary crossing location
for pedestrians
0
Extend median so that it is continuous
across Lipan along Colfax and add
plantings

Eliminate median separating bus lane
from WB Colfax lanes and explore transit
priority or queue jumping for buses
9
9
High visibility crosswalks through colored
treatments or concrete sections
Establish gateway treatments referencing
Auraria Higher Education Center within
median areas
60 | Recommendations
CONNECTING AURARIA | Denver, Colorado


COLFAX AND LIPAN:
INBOUND AND OUTBOUND
ROUTING OPTIONS
Inbound routing
61 | Site Analysis
Outbound routing
CONNECTING AURAR8Ao|nBien'(2l0it;i

COLFAX AND LIPAN:
LONG TERM VISION
62 | Recommendations
CONNECTING AURARIA | Denver, Colorado


63 | Site Analysis
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9TH AVENUE AND AURARIA
PARKWAY:
KEY CHALLENGES
llll
Wide crossing distance
Medians do not provide pedestrian
refuge
Pedestrian push-button difficult to
access in the median
TURNING MOVEMENTS
- Turning movement
xxx AM (PM) Peak Hour
2007 Counts from Downtown Retiming
64 | Recommendations
CONNECTING AURARIA | Denver, Colorado


9TH AVENUE AND AURARIA
PARKWAY:
TECHNICAL IMPROVEMENTS
Auraria Corridor
Acknowledge importance of a corridor wide
approach to slow vehicles and establish clear
priority zones for pedestrians and bicyclists.
Acknowledge unique nature of the pedestrian
and bicycle movements as they relate to both
special event activities at the Pepsi Center as
well as campus activities. Corridor approach
will include physical improvements throughout
and integrating additional improvements as the
Auraria Higher Education Center Master Plan
details.
Auraria and 9th Avenue
The recommended improvements included in
the project package for Auraria and 9th Avenue
are intended to improve the comfort, safety and
convenience for pedestrian movements across
Auraria Parkway. In order to facilitate connec-
tions between the event venue and the public
parking facilities located on the Auraria cam-
pus, opportunities at Auraria and 9th include
wider crosswalks and high visibility intersection
treatments. In addition, the median noses on
either end of the intersection could be rebuilt to
provide a larger landing area and a protected
refuge.
The crosswalks should be restriped to 15 foot
width (#1) and repositioned in order to extend
the Auraria medians to provide pedestrian
refuges (#2). The pedestrian push buttons in the
median are currently not ADA accessible, and
should be repositioned with the median recon-
figuration to be accessible.
Finally, urban design elements such as banners
and planted pots can also be added along 9th
Ave. to connect the Pepsi Center/Elitch Gardens
light rail station to the campus. These ele-
ments will add to the intersection enhancements
providing a consistent, visually appealing and
inviting environment. Enhancements to center
median landscaping should be coupled with a
maintenance plan to ensure sustainability of the
vegetation and design elements.
Curb moves
65 | Site Analysis
CONNECTING AURARfefeo|rr1EteTvtafieiaitoita05


9TH AVENUE AND AURARIA
PARKWAY:
ILLUSTRATIVE LANDSCAPING
IMPROVEMENTS
Project Package Summary:
O


High visibility crosswalks
Restripe crosswalks to 15
Pull back crosswalk and stop bar in
order to extend medians for protected
pedestrian refuge

Add lighting, banners, pots and
wayfinding to connect campus to Pepsi
Center/Elitch Gardens LRT station
66 | Recommendations
CONNECTING AURARIA | Denver, Colorado


67 | Site Analysis
CONNECTING AURAlAo|nBemteti<£Iisloi|a63


6
IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGIES
69


IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY
Phase 1
Phasing Plan
The focus of this Connecting Auraria study effort
is to idenfity improvement opportunities for near-
term implementation. The following recom-
mended phasing plan below serves to lay out
a potential path forward as funding sources for
project implementation are identified. Certainly
phases can be modified or move concurrently if
resources allow.
The overall strategy of the phasing plan is to
minimize throw-away and mobilization costs by
completing all intersection reconstruction items
for each project package at one time. The cost
estimates associated with each project and
phase are conceptual and do not include long-
term maintenance needs or permitting costs.
Phase 1 includes only those items that could
be more simply implemented (i.e. striping and
urban design elements). Phase 1 also includes
preliminary and final design for Colfax/Lipan and
Auraria/9th project packages. Finally, Phase 1
includes a comprehensive Speer Corridor Study
focused on the north and southbound directions
between Wewatta and Kalamath to consider
how the existing transportation patterns and in-
tersection configurations impact pedestrian con-
nectivity. This effort will continue in the spirit of
the Downtown Area Plan and Connect Auraria
Coalitions visions for a reimagined Speer where
pedestrian connections are prioritized and a
stronger sense of place emerges through active
edges along the corridor.
Improvement Location(s) Estimated Cost
High visibility intersections- there are a number of ways to provide high visibility intersections including gateway treatments, urban design elements, and enhanced crosswalks. Colored crosswalks, either through concrete sections or color application treatments, are priced here by square foot for reference. While, colored application treatments may be less expensive per square foot, their life span is much shorter than concrete. Thermoplastic products have a usable life span of 3-5 years whereas concrete sections can last three to four times as long. Speer/Colfax Speer/Stout Speer/Champa Speer/Arapahoe Speer/Lawrence Speer/Larimer Speer/Market Speer/Blake Speer/Wewatta Colored concrete- $30- $40/SF Colored application treatment- $10- $16/SF
Urban design elements pots and banners Speer/Wewatta Speer/Larimer Speer/Lawrence Speer/Arapahoe Colfax/Lipan Auraria/9th $1,100,000 (materials only)
Restriping to eliminate EB bus only lane and add bike lane Speer/Larimer $3,000 (materials only)
Restriping to add bike lane Speer/Lawrence $3,000 (materials only)
Restriping to add sharrows, bike lane and bike box Speer/Arapahoe $5,000 (materials only)
Comprehensive corridor study to explore alternative configurations and approaches that serve all transportation modes but highly prioritize pedestrian and cyclist movements. Includes signal timing analysis for exclusive pedestrian phasing per project package recommendations Speer Corridor Study (Wewatta to Kalamath) $250,000
Preliminary and Final Design Colfax/Lipan intersection reconfiguration (including consideration of needed improvements at Colfax/Mariposa) $50,000
Preliminary and Final Design Auraria/9th $30,000
Phase 2 includes reconstruction of those two
intersections, plus the study and design needed
for the Speer intersections (further directed by
the Speer Corridor Study).
Finally, Phase 3 includes reconstruction of the
Speer intersections and further study of the
other important intersections not highlighted in
the five project packages.
*These estimates are provided for planning purposes only and are based off
unit costs not specific to any particular location. They are order of magnitude
construction costs only meant to provide estimate information; they do not
include design, mobilization, permitting, or other contingencies.
70 | Implementation Strategies
CONNECTING AURARIA | Denver, Colorado


Phase 2
Improvement Location(s) Estimated Cost
Intersection Reconstruction Median reconstruction, landscaping, and maintenance plan Removal of bus lane median and curbline reconstruction on north side Curb extensions on south side to narrow crossing distance of Lipan New curb ramps to align with 15' crosswalks Signal and light pole resets Drainage inlet resets High visibility crosswalks Transit priority signal for WB buses Colfax/Lipan $500,000
Intersection Reconstruction Median nose reconstruction and landscape replacement to create pedestrian refuge New curb ramps to align with 15' crosswalks Pedestrian push button pedestal and light pole resets Drainage inlet resets High visibility concrete intersection and crosswalks Auraria/9th $250,000
Feasibility Study Cherry Creek Trail ramp and access at Speer/Lawrence and relationship to Arapahoe trail access point $50,000
Preliminary and Final Design (includes project package recommendations but acknowledges potential for new or revised recommendations following the Speer Corridor Study) Speer Corridor -Arapahoe to Larimer Arapahoe infrastructure improvements Lawrence infrastructure improvements (integrating CC Trail ramp configuration recommendations) Larimer infrastructure improvements Sidewalk widening west side of NB Speer (Lawrence to Larimer) Shared use path widening adjacent to campus (Arapahoe to Larimer) $160,000 (estimate for project package recommendations only)
71 | Site Analysis
Phase 3
Improvement Location(s) Estimated Cost
Intersection Improvements Sidewalk widening along south side of Larimer (SB Speer to 14th) Sidewalk widening along west side of NB Speer (Lawrence to Larimer) ADA compliant curb ramps Light pole resets Drainage inlet resets High visibility concrete intersections and crosswalks Speer/Larimer $610,000 (estimate for project package recommendations only)
Intersection Improvements Sidewalk widening along south side of Lawrence (NB Speer to 14th) Cherry Creek Trail ramp reconfiguration (Note: configuration to be studied; not included in cost estimate) Reconfiguration of NB right turn and associated channelization and curbline modifications (final configuration to be determined) ADA compliant curb ramps Light pole resets Drainage inlet resets High visibility concrete intersections and crosswalks Speer/Lawrence $710,000 (estimate for project package recommendations only)
Intersection Improvements Reconstruction of right turn channelization island (Arapahoe to NB Speer) ADA compliant curb ramps Signal and light pole resets Drainage inlet resets High visibility concrete intersections and crosswalks Speer/Arapahoe $820,000
Shared Use Path Widening/Reconstruction Campus side of Speer Arapahoe to Larimer $110,000
Feasibility Study Colfax/Osage/7th intersection improvements TBD
Feasibility Study Speer/Auraria/Market/Blake TBD
Feasibility Study Colfax/Speer TBD
CON N ECTINGI ntylBABMatf oBStr^gletorla^


7
APPENDIX A: CONNECT AURARIA
COALITION MISSION


74 | Appendix A
A
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Connect Auraria Coalition (CAC)
COALITION PURPOSE: Create a thoughtful, implementable short-term PHYSICAL plan to connect the Auraria
Campus with its surrounding neighborhoods and Downtown Districts based upon a flexible/engaging long-term vision.
VISION: Create a high quality physical environment that enhances connections across three major vehicular
thoroughfares to support broader social, economic and programmatic linkages between the Auraria Campus and
Downtown districts and adjacent neighborhoods, and to transform the thoroughfares into Grand Boulevards as
envisioned in the 2007 Downtown Area Plan, (this study focus is the physical connections).
CONNECT AURARIA COALITION Stakeholder Leadership
Jose Cornejo
Tami Door
Don Elliman
Dave Jolette
Steve Jordan
Angie Malpiede
Everette Freeman
Anita Riley
Gordon Robertson
Chris Shears
Molly Urbina
Barb Weiske
Manager of Public Works, City and County of Denver
President and CEO of DDP; Auraria Board Vice Chair
Chancellor University of Colorado Denver
VP Venue Operations, Kroenke Sports Enterprises
President Metropolitan State University of Denver
RTD Board, District Director C
President Community College of Denver
Board Member La Alma Lincoln Park Neighborhood
Director, Parks and Recreation: Planning, Design, City and County of Denver
Chair, LoDo District Board of Directors
Interim Director, Community Planning & Development, City and County of Denver
Executive VP for Administration/ CEO Auraria Higher Education Center
STRATEGIC ACTION PLAN: APPROACH
Broad Vision: Merge the densifying environments and systems of the campus and surrounding neighborhoods.
Create opportunities for future development, including public/private partnerships. Improve pedestrian environement.
Within the broad vision, focus upon strategies for a realistic, implementable short term plan. Short-Term plans to
improve pedestrian environment + intersections and allow future, transformative projects to occur overtime P3s
Short Term Plan Implementation:
1) 2011: Form Stakeholder Coalition: Connect Auraria Coalition
2) 2011: Create Steering Committee and ultimately a Project Management Tearn from stakeholder groups;
conduct research to identify studies, plans, and influences (2011-2012)
3) 2011: Gain support from civic, political, business communities
4) 2011: Update the issues, responses, and document [do the homework]
5) 2011: Create strategies, presentations for promotion, and implementation
6) 2012: Outreach: Promote the CAC Initiative and conduct workshops, outreach, input for ideas, priorities, etc.
7) OCTOBER 2012: Finalize funding for study CCD
8) DECEMBER 2012: Select consultant to perform study
9) JANUARY 2013 CONTRACT: Retain professionals to create the plan based upon work to date; adjust
a. Document the Vision, Guiding Principles, Strategies, Issues, Homework done, action plan
b. Stakeholder and Public outreach
c. Identify the major elements and cost magnitudes
d. Identify key criteria to evaluate priorities
e. Evaluate phasing, increments, costs for short term plan(s), projects
f. Identify potential incremental packages for implementation
g. Evaluate and prioritize the short-term potential projects
h. Others per Request for Proposal
10) OCTOBER 2013: Complete Study: approximately 9 months from start
11) ON-GOING: Identify funding sources [stakeholders, CCD bond fund, et al]
CONNECTING AURARIA | Denver, Colorado


GENERAL INFORMATION
Major Influences and Studies To Date:
2007 Downtown Area Plan (DAP)
o Downtown Area Plan (DAP) Connecting Auraria Goal: Fully integrate the Auraria Campus and the
Downtown core through strong physical, social, economic and programmatic connections,
o DAP Grand Boulevards Goal: Transform Speer Boulevard, Colfax Avenue and Auraria Parkway into
celebrated, multimodal boulevards to overcome the physical and perceptual barriers of these major
thoroughfares.
Auraria Master Plan Update and Strategic Implementation Plan A new paradigm for campus development: New
Design Guidelines are based upon the need for densification from previous suburban enclave and commuter
campus to a densely built, urban campus that is also outwardly focused. Each of the institutions have a
neighborhood that connects to the campus core
La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan (2010)
o Goal: A comfortable, convenient connection for students, employees and residents is provided between
AHEC and the residential areas of La Alma/Lincoln Park; connections: Osage and 5th
Strategic Transportation Plan
Denver: Blueprint Denver; Pedestrian Priority Zone; Denver Moves;
Parks Game Plan; Speer Boulevard improvements
South Platte River (re)Development (Study underway)
Speer Boulevard Design Guidelines [1988]; ROW and also for Private Development
LoDo District Historic Urban Edge District Design Guidelines
Landmark Preservation: Historic Resources and Guidelines [to be determined]
Emerging other studies and plans, i.e. One-Way Streets, Street cars, Parks Plan for Speer, etc.
EMERGING STRATEGIES
A. Enhance the presence of the Campus along the three perimeter Grand Boulevards and provide
welcoming and clear gateways for pedestrians, bicyclists, transit riders and vehicles.
1) Minimize the perceptual spatial separation by planning building locations tight to the ROW lines and on
property owned by City and County of Denver that has potential for (private) development
2) Create a safe and pedestrian friendly environment within the Rights of Ways (ROW)
B. Create safe, convenient, and comfortable intersections for all users.
1) Create pedestrian friendly pathways and environments at intersections crossing the Grand Boulevards.
2) Promote integration of land use and ROW with all forms of multimodal public transportation
3) Evaluate traffic patterns
C. Consider each Grand Boulevard as a series of segments along its entire length, rather than as one
single thoroughfare, with the Campus Zone segment emphasizing an urban, pedestrian-oriented
environment.
1) Employ traffic calming measures along the Campus edges
2) Create a pedestrian friendly environment within the entire public ROW, and adjacent land.
D. Merge the urban fabrics of the Auraria Campus and its neighbors as development opportunities
emerge along the edges of the three Grand Boulevards.
1) Plan new buildings with an urban density both on campus and within
surrounding neighborhoods
2) Consider public/private development strategies for current public land
(not designated as parks)
3) Utilize potential developable land as infill vertically and horizontally
4) Consider Campus and adjacent potential building sites for development that will density and connect to
Cherry Creek pathway system (starting in LoDo to Confluence Park)
E. Connect the main campus with off campus facilities and destinations.
1) Consider the various plans and influences including the Downtown Area Plan
2) Study the following key intersections to determine initial priorities:
Speer Boulevard at Market, Larimer, Lawrence, Arapahoe [UCD Neighborhood],
Colfax Avenue at Lipan and Mariposa [CCD Neighborhood];
also center divider improvements to make Colfax a pedestrian friendly street
Auraria Parkway at 9th and 7th [Metro State Neighborhood]
. Other intersections?
75 | Site Analysis
CONTEXT:
The Auraria Campus is separated perceptually and physically by three major vehicular thoroughfares from its
surroundings (Speer Blvd., Colfax Ave., and Auraria Parkway). The need to improve pedestrian safety is paramount.
Increasing demands for academic space coupled with limited land for expansion have generated an urban vision for
the campus. This creates the opportunity and need to merge the urban environments of the Campus and the
surrounding neighborhoods and Downtown Districts.
Challenges:
The three Grand Boulevards (Speer, Auraria Parkway, and Colfax) present highly trafficked vehicular barriers to
pedestrian crossings to/from Campus.
The intersections of Speer and Colfax, Speer and Auraria Parkway, and Colfax and Santa Fe/Kalamath are
especially busy and challenging for pedestrians.
Potential to merge urban fabrics emerges when both the Campus and the opposing property owner(s) are
redeveloping/densifying.
o This potential exists for the Larimer to Auraria Parkway segment of Speer.
o Elsewhere better connections are being made to destinations (e.g. parking at Pepsi Center opposite
the Student Success Building and retail and services on the south side of Colfax).
The Bell Park View Plane allows one story building along Speer thereby conflicting with the concept of urbanizing
the Campus and creating visual/perceptual connections with LoDo. This is standing in the way of Adjacent
Campus land being planned/assigned to UCDs neighborhood and splitting the neighborhood into two parts. A
politically sensitive issue. Some progress has been made with new UCD Building to allow more height.
Speer ROW designated as a Denver Landmark District per CCD Parks and Recreation. Unless other design
review requirements are in place, buildings are not required to relate to Speer.
Existing Bridges: Narrow width for circulation and safety improvements
Underground utility infrastructure in public ROW and adjacent land, including Campus, is cost I y/d iff i c u It to move.
Additional Information and Considerations
Speer Boulevard
o CU-Denver has several buildings on the Downtown side of Speer,
o The Downtown side of Speer segment, Colfax to Lawrence is built-out with no planned changes.
Colfax Avenue
o Heavily-used transit corridor for buses and light rail. East-bound bus stops on south side of street,
o High-speed traffic from the west coming off the viaduct.
o Colfax intersections with Speer and Santa Fe/Kalamath are often congested and dangerous,
o Amenities such as restaurants and coffee shops located on the south side of Colfax,
o Auraria has purchased land south of Colfax for future athletic fields (Metro State)
o Auraria Institutions are using rented space south of Colfax
o Previous studies and initiatives for Colfax improvements from Broadway to Speer
Auraria Parkway
o High speed traffic connecting with I-25
o Parking reservoir, future development of Pepsi Center
For the illustrative vision, recognize that the Speer Boulevard segment between Lawrence and Auraria Parkway has
the most potential for merging the urban fabrics given the new campus hotel, CU-Denvers plans, and the Historic
Urban Edge District of LoDo and existing fabric at Larimer and Lawrence, as well as the Creekfront Park. The
merging fabrics at the other edges will have to await redevelopment but a vision for this needs to be illustrated. The
south side of Colfax can be seen as something other than suburban-style commercial development as well as the
development of the Pepsi Center parking lots on the west side of Auraria Parkway.
PROJECT MANAGEMENT TEAM:
Mark Bernstein
Gary Desmond
John Desmond
Crissy Fanganello
Chris Gleissner
Jill Jennings Golich
Aylene McCallum
Cindy Patton
Emily Silverman
Michael Finochio
Barbara Weiske
CCD Parks and Recreation Downtown Area Planner
Connect Auraria Coalition Chair, and NAC Architecture Principal
Downtown Denver Partnership Executive VP, Downtown Environment
CCD Public Works Director; Division of Transportation
CCD Community Planning and Development Senior City Planner
Auraria Higher Education Center Campus Planner (left May 2014)
Downtown Denver Partnership Senior Manager, Transportation and Research
CCD PROJECT MANAGER; CCD Public Works Senior Transportation Planner
CCD Policy, Planning & Sustainability Associate City Planner
CCD Public Works City Traffic Engineer/ Deputy Director
Executive VP for Administration/ CEO of Auraria Higher Education Center
CONNECTING AURARIA | DfcppendIol&r]atf6


Full Text

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CONNECTING AURARIA:Denver, Colorado June 2014 Improving Connectivity Across Speer, Colfax, and Auraria Parkway

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b |

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c | Report Acknowledgements Project Management TeamCity Team Cynthia PattonProject Manager; City and County of Denver Public WorksCrissy FanganelloCity and County of Denver Public WorksMichael FinochioCity and County of Denver Public WorksEmily SilvermanCity and County of Denver Public WorksMark BernsteinCity and County of Denver Parks and RecreationChris GleissnerCity and County of Denver Community Planning & DevelopmentMark NajarianCity and County of Denver Arts and VenuesPartner Organizations Gary DesmondConnect Auraria Coalition Chair Barb WeiskeAuraria Higher Education CenterJill Jennings GolichAuraria Higher Education CenterJohn DesmondDowntown Denver Partnership Aylene McCallumDowntown Denver PartnershipGenevieve Hutchison RTD Consultant TeamDesign Workshop Felsburg, Hoyt & Ullevig Sky to GroundConnecting Auraria CoalitionJose CornejoManager of Public Works, City and County of DenverTami Door President and CEO of DDP; Auraria Board Vice ChairDon Elliman Chancellor University of Colorado DenverDave JoletteVP Venue Operations, Kroenke Sports EnterprisesSteve JordanPresident Metropolitan State University of DenverAngie MalpiedeRTD Board, District Director CEverette FreemanPresident Community College of DenverAnita RileyBoard Member La Alma Lincoln Park NeighborhoodGordon RobertsonDirector, Parks and Recreation: Planning, Design, City and County of DenverChris ShearsChair, LoDo District Board of DirectorsMolly UrbinaInterim Director, Community Planning & Development, City and County of DenverBarb WeiskeExecutive VP for Administration/ CEO Auraria Higher Education Center

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d |

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i | TABLE OF CONTENTSSTUDY HISTORY AND OVERVIEW ................................................................................................................... iiiIII STUDY CONTEXT AND PROCESS .................................................................................................................... 7 N eedsEEDS inventoryINVENT ORY. ......................................................................................................................................... 11 CORRIDOR VISIONS AND PROJECT OPPORTUNITIES ............................................................................... 33 R ecoECO MM endationsENDA TIONS. ...................................................................................................................................... 43 IM pP L eE M entationENT ATION strateSTRA TE G iesIES. .................................................................................................................... 69 A ppendixPPENDIX A: C onnectONNECT A urariaURARIA C oaOA L itionITION MissionMISSION. ........................................................................... 73ContentsPrepared for:City and County of DenverPrepared by:Design Workshop 1390 Lawrence Street, Suite 200 Denver, Colorado 80204This report summarizes the work conducted FHU and the City and County of Denver for the Colfax/Auraria/Speer Next Steps Study. The document focuses on overall goals, needs inventory, the preliminary project packages, recommendations, and implementation strategies.

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2.1 = STUDY HISTORY AND OVERVIEW | iii

PAGE 8

iv |

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v | OVERVIEW AND HISTORYEstablished in 1858, the Town of Auraria grew from a mining settlement to a center of commerce eventually incorporating its vibrancy into what is now known as Denvers Central changes to the land use and street grid have changed the way the Auraria area relates to Downtown. The Auraria Higher Education Center (AHEC) opened in the 1970s after demolition allowed for a suburban land use scheme with various campus buildings for the three institutions supported by an abundance of surface parking. In the late 1980s, the major thoroughfares of Larimer and Lawrence Street viaducts were of Downtown shifted to the newly created Auraria Parkway, which provided a connection to I-25. The viaduct removals transformed the campus and added pedestrian walkways and promenades internal to campus. However, the campus remained separated from its adjacent neighborhoods by three main arterials: Speer, Colfax and Auraria Parkway. The Auraria Higher Education Center and its surrounding neighborhoods have grown steadily over the decades and the campus is experiencing a resurgence of construction activity with the addition of Metropolitan State University of Denvers Hotel and Hospitality Learning Center and Student Success Center, Community College of Denvers Colorado Denvers Academic Building One (under construction), and the shared Science Building. A new parking facility with 1,000+ spaces is under construction on the west side of campus. In addition, the institutional assets are expanding outside the traditional campus boundaries. The University of Colorado Denver purchased and renovated a 120,000 square foot building at 15th and Lawrence to house the institutions Business School, which accommodates an additional 5,000 students implementation goals of the recently updated Auraria Campus Master Plan, which seeks to integrate Downtowns urban form onto the campus and create a city in the campus or campus in the city experience. While the built form of these new structures help to provide a stronger visual connection between the campus and its adjacent neighborhoods, there are physical and perceptual barriers that remain for pedestrians and cyclists that move across the three main arterials. This study concentrates on identifying strategies that can strengthen the physical connections across these edges. The vision for a denser, more integrated urban campus environment evolved through recommendations from the Downtown Area Plan (2007). Through a partnership between the City and County of Denver, the Downtown Denver Partnership, and numerous other public and private entities, this plan set forth a goal to enhance public safety, personal interactions, and economic vitality through strategies that emphasize walkability and an outstanding pedestrian environment. The Downtown Area as one of its seven transformative projects with the goal to fully integrate the Auraria Campus and the Downtown core through strong physical, social, economic, and programmatic connections. (Downtown Area Plan, 2007). The Downtown Area Plan recognized that closing the gap between the campus and its surrounding neighborhoods was a critical component in maximizing the institutions value and its contribution to the surrounding area. After the completion of the Downtown Area Plan, a group of highly engaged and interested partners formed the Connect Auraria Coalition to work towards achieving the recommendations put forth in the Downtown Area Plan through population and expansion plans underway for all three schools, the Coalition recognized an increasing, immediate demand for better connections with surrounding neighborhoods such as La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood, Golden Triangle, Pepsi Center, and Downtown Districts all of which are also growing and evolving. The Coalition recognized the need to to improve both safety and the qualitative experience of the corridor for those who use it. The Coalition worked to document the most critical challenges for pedestrians and cyclists and brainstormed potential strategies that could better merge the urban fabrics between the campus and its surrounding destinations (see Appendix A: Connecting Auraria Coalition). The Coalitions work positioned the effort to successfully compete for grant funding in 2012 and secure resources for a more detailed study. This study, detailed on the following pages, seeks to create a thoughtful, implementable short-term physical plan connecting the campus with its surrounding neighborhoods and Downtown districts based on an engaging long-term vision. While future conditions like additional mixed-use development, additional transportation choices, and more integrated land uses all contribute to this still evolving long-term vision, this report summarizes an effort focused on near-term strategies within the public right of way that can promote high quality pedestrian and bicycle connections and reduce the physical and psychological distance between campus and its adjacent neighborhoods. The recommendations from address operational, behavioral, and physical needs and facilitate multimodal connectivity as the campus and greater area continue to grow. Project Management Team (PMT) To help identify the most impactful and a Project Management Team (PMT) was created to offer insight, feedback, and direction for the duration of the study effort. The PMT included representatives from a number of public and private entities who served to represent various stakeholder groups and serve the best interests of the community. Representatives included City and County of Denver staff from Public Works, Parks and Recreation, Arts and Venues, and Community Planning and Development; Executive Leadership and staff from the Auraria Higher Education Center (AHEC); Executive Leadership and staff from the Downtown Denver Partnership, and the Connect Auraria Coalition. The valuable suggestions and thoughtful insights represented a broader community of residents, business owners, and the political community in addition to serving as project liaisons to their respective organizations and stakeholder groups. The PMT provided oversight to each stage of the study process and were faithful in continuing the Downtown Area Plan and Connect Auraria Coalitions commitment to improvements and strategies that prioritize pedestrians and cyclists. The energy and insight provided by the PMT and their commitment to public outreach allowed for the study resources to stretch. It was clear in the early stages of the effort, that the grant resources allocated for the the needs and provide truly transformational recommendations for the three subject arterials. While the study was successful in identifying several near term, implementable projects to improve pedestrian and cyclist connections, the project was only able to focus on localized resulting recommendations were thus limited by an awareness of greater corridor issues and complexities especially along Speer Boulevard patterns that should be re-evaluated from a broader perspective. A major recommendation of this study is to fund and prioritize a Speer Corridor Study that can explore alternatives to transformative opportunities that position the roadway to contribute as much to Downtowns character is it does to Denvers multi-modal transportation network. Outcomes from a future Speer Corridor study may support or modify the project package recommendations outlined in this report. While this effort and report is very supportive of the Connect Auraria Coalition priorities, due to the short-term focus of this report, it is important to recognize that the recommendations do not represent a full realization of that vision and some intersections merit additional study and dialogue.

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7 STUDY CONTEXT AND PROCESS

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8 | Project Background and Context Study OverviewHistorically the Auraria Campus has been disconnected from its surroundings by three large arterials Speer Boulevard, Colfax Avenue, and Auraria Parkway. Given the increasing downtown population and the growth and recent trend towards more urban scale development on the Auraria Campus, there is a critical need and new opportunity to connect Auraria with its surrounding neighborhood including Lincoln Park, Golden Triangle, Pepsi Center as well as Downtown Districts. Growing demand for connections between these locations and campus coupled with several recent incidents involving serious evaluate how all modes of transportation can campus area.Study ContextThis study capitalizes on the momentum and vision created by several major preceding and current initiatives: 1. Th e 2007 Downtown Denver Area Plan: This plan discusses the concept of economic, programmatic, perceptual, and physical connectivity of the Campus with the surrounding districts and neighbor hoods. 2. Th e Denver Strategic Transportation Plan (2008): This strategic plan sets the city-building philosophy for Denver Public Works and emphasizes maximizing multimodal transportation to off-set increased demand for lane miles dedicated to personal vehicles alone. 3. Th e Auraria Campus Master Plan (Updated 2012): This plan articulates a within the campus and on its edges to strengthen the relationship between the campus institutional neighborhoods and its adjacent neighborhoods located across each of the three surrounding arterials. 4. De nver Moves (2012): This plan focuses on integrating on and off-street bicycle facilities to make bicycle and multi-use connections in Denver. It builds on recommendations made in the Bicycle Master Plan Update (2001), the Denver Parks and Recreation Game Plan (2003), and the Pedestrian Master Plan (2004). Denver Moves also sets the Citywide goal to achieve a 15% bicycling and walking commute mode share by 2020. 5. Ot her preceding studies and policy documents were considered through out the study process. These studies include but are not limited to the Denver Comprehensive Plan (2000), Blueprint Denver (2002), Downtown Multimodal Access Plan (2006) and Greenprint Denver (2006). 6. Fi nally, increased emphasis of multimodal transit options in Denver through the build-out of FASTRACKS, the regions voter-approved rail transit expansion program, and other transit achievements has led to higher rates of pedestrian and bicycle activity.Study PurposeConnecting Auraria creates a strategic, implementable short-term plan that enhances bicycle and pedestrian safety and comfort between the Auraria Campus and its surrounding neighborhoods and Downtown Districts. This study focuses on developing implementable improvements within the public right of way that are strategically focused on operational, behavioral, and physical interventions. These strategies will be prioritized for their abilities to improve access for bicycles and pedestrians; facilitate multimodal connectivity among the Campus and its adjacent areas; and improve the thoroughfares surrounding the campus by lessening the physical and psychological barriers they current present to those who study, work, or play in the area. This study is based on an engaging and still evolving long-term vision that supports the broader social, economic, and pragmatic linkages between the Auraria Campus, Downtown Districts, and adjacent neighborhoods.

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9 | Executive Summary Project Background and Context | 9 Public Engagement ProcessCommunity and stakeholder involvement was a critical component to the development and future success of the study. In addition to the Project Management Team (PMT) that was created to help inform and guide the study, the community was also engaged in various ways online and at public meetings during several important milestones throughout the process. The project website at www.denvergov.org/connectingauraria served as a central location for information on the study goals, approach, and important information or meeting dates. Graphic materials from each public meeting were also available at this site. In addition to the study website, the team set up a MindMixer site at www.connectauraria.com to supplement the Needs Assessment process and provide a place for stakeholders to talk about their experiences. Public engagement opportunities and conversations also helped the PMT identify challenges that the study could address. The project team also coordinated with Denver City Council District #9, RTD, and various internal City departments throughout the process. Two community meetings were held on the Auraria Campus in the heart of the study area. The graphics presented to the public during these two meetings are available online on the project website.Community Meeting #1 Tuesday, June 23rd, 2014 Tivoli Student Union from 4PM to 6PM with a total of 62 attendees (not including staff or PMT members). Attendees represented Auraria Campus faculty and staff, students, downtown stakeholders, business owners and neighborhood residents. The beginning of the meeting was an open house to facilitate smaller group conversations with attendees regarding their experiences with the three subject arterial roadways. Display boards and maps were posted throughout the room and PMT members engaged attendees in a dot exercise to capture where each persons comments. Next, a presentation covered the history of the study and its goal to identify near-term strategies that improve multimodal connections. Finally, a survey was distributed to attendees so that each person could provide greater detail on his or her experiences and/or offer other suggestions. Based on the survey results and the overall feedback from the meeting, it was determined that the attendees were most uncomfortable crossing Colfax Avenue and Speer Boulevard due to various challenges including narrow sidewalks, criminal activities, and vehicle congestion. Many solutions were proposed including wider sidewalks, a pedestrian bridge, improved landscaping and lighting, and additional signage. Community Meeting #2 Tuesday, January 28th, 2014The second community meeting was held to 6PM. Over 60 stakeholders attended including representatives from the surrounding neighborhoods, Auraria campus faculty/ staff, Auraria Campus students, Downtown stakeholders, and other stakeholders. The meeting was designed as an open-house with stations and information display boards that graphically presented the preliminary Project Packages. The project packages highlighted (5) most critical intersections including Speer and Larimer, Speer and Lawrence, Speer and Arapahoe, Colfax and Lipan and Auraria and 9th Avenue. Meeting participants were asked to comment on the components of each package. In addition, participants were asked to comment on the relative implementation priority of each component by identifying which project would have the most positive impact on pedestrian and all users. A project representative was available at each station to answer questions and gather input. Graphs 0 5 10 15 20 Q 0 5 10 15 20 Q 5 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 C 1: Are you 5 : Cherry C Trail Exit Q7: Mos t C omforta b a reek t b le 0 5 10 15 20 Q2: Ti V 0 5 10 15 20No Bike Lane Limited Trains DistanceQ4: B Obstac l 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 Q8: Im p me of Day isited Bike Parking Bike Safety Signage No Problems Never Ride B iggest e on Bike p rovemen t 0 5 10 15 20 T Never Ride N/A 0 5 10 15 20 t s Q3: Form T ransporta t Q6: Pede s Obstac of t ion s trian le 6 Graphs 0 5 10 15 20 Q 0 5 10 15 20 Q 5 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 C 1: Are you 5 : Cherry C Trail Exit Q7: Mos t C omforta b a reek t b le 0 5 10 15 20 Q2: Ti V 0 5 10 15 20No Bike Lane Limited Trains Distance Q4: B Obstac l 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 Q8: Im p me of Day isited Bike Parking Bike Safety Signage No Problems Never Ride B iggest e on Bike p rovemen t 0 5 10 15 20 T Never Ride N/A 0 5 10 15 20 t s Q3: Form T ransporta t Q6: Pede s Obstac of t ion s trian le 6

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11 NEEDS INVENTORY

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12 | Needs Inventory AURARIA TODAY: E MM P LL OY MM EN T, POPU LL AT ION, AND STUDENTSAuraria is located in the heart of downtown Denver and is experiencing change both along its edges and internally. Currently the Auraria Campus serves around 40,000 students at three institutions of higher education with the largest population attending MSU Denver.

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13 | Site Analysis Needs Inventory | 13AURARIA TODAY: RESIDENTIA LL D EVE LL OP MM EN T AVERA GG ES AS OF JU LL Y 20 13Numerous residential projects are either in construction or in concept development around the Auraria Campus. Approximately 4,000 new residential units will be added to the surrounding area and increase the amount of potential student housing in the downtown core.

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14 | Needs InventoryAURARIA TO MM ORR OW: 2035 PROJECTED E MM P LL OY MM ENT AND POPU LL AT IONSAs Denver continues to grow, the neighborhoods surrounding Auraria will population and employment. Many employees will utilize the continuing education opportunities at the Auraria Campus. This increase and synergies of uses again highlight the need to create a connected and comfortable pedestrian experience in and around Auraria.

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15 | Site Analysis Needs Inventory | 15 PATTERNS OF CIRCU LL AT ION AND AREAS TO ACTIVATENew campus development since 2011, as directed by the Auraria Higher Education patterns of multimodal circulation on the campus. Plans for additional density will create additional activity along the edges and in the core, increase circulation need and affect the patterns of people as they move in and around the Auraria Campus. Activating campus edges is critical and opportunity areas can be divided into three categories: 1. Va cant land: These parcels currently have no development on them. 2. La cks pedestrian amenities within the right-of-way: These areas have narrow sidewalks, little or no buffer from the road, lack clear pedestrian access, and buildings are set back from ROW. 3. Sur face parking lots: The only current use of these lots is for parking.

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16 | Needs Inventory EXISTIN GG A ND PROPOSED BIKE FACI LL I TIESWhile there are numerous existing and proposed bicycle facilities within and around the study area, many are disconnected across the three subject arterials mainly Speer and Colfax.

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17 | Site Analysis Needs Inventory | 17 PEDESTRIAN FACI LL IT IESSIDEWA LL KSSidewalks exist along the three arterials, but in some locations may provide a more uncomfortable walking environment (especially along Colfax and sections of Speer) because the sidewalks are narrow and/or attached with ADA accessibility issues, utilities blocking or constraining the sidewalk, minimal landscaping and urban design elements and high adjacent

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18 | Needs Inventory PEDESTRIAN FACI LL IT IESINTERSECTIONS: SPEERAlthough Speer is divided into a one-way couplet on either side of Cherry Creek and the Cherry Creek Trail, at some locations pedestrians must cross a long distance (for more lanes) to traverse one direction of Speer due to the number of through and turning lanes. The curb ramps at most of the intersections along Speer do not comply with current ADA requirements (truncated domes, minimum slopes/cross-slopes, minimum unobstructed landing area, etc.). Utilities, inlets, and signs obstruct the pedestrian landing area (the area where pedestrians wait to cross at the corner of the intersection) at several intersections. In some cases, these obstructions force an and the crosswalks.

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19 | Needs Inventory PEDESTRIAN FACI LL IT IESINTERSECTIONS: CO LL FA X uncomfortable because of the high degree of activity along the corridor including high overall lanes, light rail lights, long crossing distances Several of the crosswalks were recently restriped to a 15 foot width, but the crosswalks do not align with the median breaks (where they exist) or the curb ramps, both of which are narrower than the crosswalks. The pedestrian landing areas (the area where pedestrians wait to cross at the corner of the intersection) are constrained at many locations by utilities, signs, signal poles, and/or the light rail transit (LRT) tracks. Pedestrians must also cross the LRT at grade to enter campus. The curb ramps at most of the intersections along Colfax do not comply with current ADA requirements (truncated domes, minimum slopes/cross-slopes, minimum unobstructed landing area, etc.)

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20 | Site Analysis Needs Inventory | 20PEDESTRIAN FACI LL IT IESINTERSECTIONS: AURARIA PARKWAYMost of the pedestrian facilities, including sidewalks and curb ramps, along Auraria Parkway have been upgraded in recent years and meet current ADA requirements. However, crossing Auraria Parkway can be uncomfortable for pedestrians due to the wide distance (for more lanes) and lack of median refuge areas.

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21 | Site Analysis Needs Inventory | 21PEDESTRIAN COUNTSThe intersections with the highest volumes of pedestrian activity are 1) Colfax/Lipan, 2) Speer/ Larimer, and 3) Speer/Lawrence. Pedestrian activity across Auraria Parkway is relatively low during commuter peak hours.

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22 | Needs Inventory BICYC LL E PARKIN GG CO UNTSThere are nearly 1,500 bike rack stalls on the Auraria Campus with a 43% utilization on a typical in-session weekday. B-cycle checkouts along 14th Street are substantially higher than on Campus; however, a new B-cycle station was recently installed at 9th and Curtis, which is expected to see higher utilization.

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23 | Site Analysis Needs Inventory | 23 LL I GG HT RAI LL S ERVICEAll six of the existing RTD light rail lines connect to the Auraria Campus at either the Colfax at Auraria Station or the Auraria West Station. Stations adjacent to the campus include the Sports Authority at Mile High and the Pepsi Center. While not on the Auraria Campus proper, both can be used to access parts of the campus.

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24 | Needs InventoryBUS SERVICEThere are 20 bus routes and over 40 bus stops that service the area within a quarter-mile of the Auraria Campus. Legend Routes AF: Downtown/DIA B: Boulder/Denver L: Longmont/Denver MALL: Free Mall Ride 1: West 1st Ave. 6: East 6th Ave./North Pecos 8: North Broadway/Huron 9: West 10th Ave. 10: East 12th Ave. 15: East Colfax Ave. 16: West Colfax Ave. 20: 20th Ave. 28: 28th Ave. 32: West 32nd Ave./City Park 36L: Fort Logan Limited 38: 38th Ave. 44: 44th Ave. 48: East 48th Ave./Commerce City 52: West 52nd Ave./S. Bannock 86X: Westminster Center Express Bus Stop (within 1/4 mile of corridors) Light Rail Station Colfax Ave. 13th Ave.Osage St. Rio Ct. Shoshone St. Mariposa St. Lipan St. Kalamath St. Santa Fe Dr.14th Ave.Welton St. Glenarm Pl. Champa St. Stout St. Curtis St. Arapahoe St. Lawrence St. Larimer St. Market St. Blake St. W azee St. 14th St. 15th St. 16th St. 17th St.Galapago St. Fox St. Elati St. Delaware St. Cherokee St.Auraria Pkwy.7th St. 9th St. 11th St. 5th St.Curtis St.Lawrence St.WalnutSt.Speer Blvd.ChopperCir.Platte RiverOldColfax SOURCE: RTD 25

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25 | Site Analysis Needs Inventory | 25TRANSIT BOARDIN GG S AN D A LL I GG HTI N GG SThe light rail stations and bus stops within a quarter-mile of the Auraria Campus generate an average of over 20,000 boardings and alightings per day. The vast majority of these transit riders become pedestrians before or after their transit trip. Data from the initiation of the West Line show a marked increase in boardings and alightings at the Auraria West Station. 7322 236 1362 93 13 144 74 35 1 1 1 3 10 118 79 13 4602 17 164 458 437 297 272 28 24 49 110 371 141 70 538 471 184 170 14 38 887 173 649 0 168 11 1468 95 8 1362 4602 1 Legend Bus Stop (within 1/4 mile of corridors) Light Rail Station Bus Routes Light Rail Routes Average Weekday Boardings & Alightings (January April 2013) Average Weekday Boardings & Alightings April 2013 (includes West Line) < 50 51 200 201 400 401 1,000 > 1,000 Boardings & Alightings 578 361 XXX XXX > 1, Colfax Ave. 13th Ave.Osage St. Rio Ct. Shoshone St. Mariposa St. Lipan St. Kalamath St. Santa Fe Dr.14th Ave.Welton St. Glenarm Pl. Champa St. Stout St. Curtis St. Arapahoe St. Lawrence St. Larimer St. Market St. Blake St. Wazee St.14th St. 15th St. 16th St. 17th St.Galapago St. Fox St. Elati St. Delaware St. Cherokee St.Auraria Pkwy.7th St. 9th St. 11th St. 5th St.Curtis St.Lawrence St.WalnutSt.Speer Blvd.ChopperCir.Platte RiverOldColfaxSOURCE: RTD 25

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26 | Needs InventoryTRAFFIC DATA three corridors, with 43,000 vehicles per day (vpd). Speer Boulevard carries approximately 37,000 vpd adjacent to the Campus, and Auraria carries nearly 27,000 vpd. Colfax and Auraria both transition from higher speeds (40 mph) near I-25 to slower posted speeds approaching the Campus and downtown. Speer has a posted speed limit of 35 mph. generally operate at acceptable levels of service; however, vehicle queuing between many closely spaced intersections can cause backups during the peak hours.

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27 | Site Analysis Needs Inventory | 27 PARKIN GG INVE NTORYThere are a multitude of surface parking lots, parking garages and on-street metered parking on the Auraria Campus or in close proximity to the Campus. The scattered nature of the various on and off-street parking inventories generates walking trips throughout the area. Not all of the parking lots shown are publicly accessible or are dedicated to serve the Auraria Campus. There are more than 130 metered parking spaces on campus (including both AHEC and City and County of Denver owned).

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28 | Needs Inventory BICYC LL E AN D PEDESTRIAN CRASH HISTORYOver the three year period from January 2010 through December 2012, there were 33 crashes along the grand boulevards that involved either a bicyclist or a pedestrian being hit by a vehicle. The majority of these crashes (22) occurred along Colfax. Colfax/Kalamath is the intersection with the highest number of bicycle crashes (4), while Colfax/Mariposa has the highest number of pedestrian crashes (4).

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29 | Site Analysis Needs Inventory | 29CRASH HISTORYThe Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT) uses Safety Performance Functions (SPF) to evaluate the overall safety at intersections. The SPFs, which are essentially accident predication models, can be used to assess the magnitude of a safety problem based on the expected number of crashes at intersections with common travel lanes, and area type). The results of applying CDOTs methodology indicate that four of the study intersections have high potential for crash reduction based on their higher than expected total number of accidents: the Colfax Avenue intersections with Kalamath Street, Lipan Street, Mariposa Street, and Osage Street. Over the three year period studied (2010 2012), there were two fatal accidents: one involving two vehicles at Colfax/Kalamath and one involving a pedestrian/vehicle at Colfax/Mariposa. CDOT also uses crash diagnostics to identify patterns with crash types that may be higher than expected based on comparisons with similar intersections. This helps analysts identify appropriate strategies that may help to address these patterns. Four accident types were identify as higher than expected at four study area intersections: Th e intersection of Colfax/Kalamath shows a higher than expected number of accidents involving a bicyclist/vehicle (4), and approach turn accidents (35). Th e Colfax/Lipan intersection shows a higher than expected number of accidents involving a bicyclist/vehicle (2) and a pedestrian/vehicle (2), a sideswipe of two vehicles traveling in the same a sign, curb or pole (4). Th e Colfax/Mariposa intersection shows a higher than expected number of accidents involving a pedestrian/vehicle (4 one of which was fatal), a sideswipe of two vehicles traveling in the same a sign, curb or pole (2). Th e intersection of Colfax/Osage shows a higher than expected number of accidents involving a vehicle with a LRT vehicle (4), pedestrian/vehicle (3), and bicyclist/vehicle (4).

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30 | Needs InventoryEXISTIN GG R OW AND CITY AND COUNTY OF DENVER PARCE LL SThis map shows the average right of way (ROW) owned by the City and County of Denver along the three subject arterials. In addition, the City and County of Denver owns several parcels adjacent to the grand boulevards (most notably on Speer and Auraria Parkway). Opportunity exists to better utilize these parcels to either enhance connections or activate edges along or across the corridors. Legend City and County o f Denver P arc els P arks/ Regional T rail Colfax Ave.Osage St. Rio Ct. Shoshone Mariposa St. Lipan St. Kalamath St.14th Ave.Welton St. Glenarm Pl. Champa St. Stout St. Curtis St. Arapahoe St. Lawrence St. Larimer St. Market St. Blake St. Wazee St.14th St. 15th St. 16th St. 17th St.Fox St. Elati St.Auraria Pkwy.7th St. 9th St. 11th St. 5th St.Curtis St.Lawrence St.WalnutSt.Speer Blvd.ChopperCir.Platte RiverOldColfax average 100' ROW K g C C C average 70' ROW 15 average 70' ROW average 80' ROW o p p average 150' ROW Cherry Creek Trail (below grade) SOURCE: City and County of Denver GIS Database 25

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31 | Site Analysis Needs Inventory | 31

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33 CORRIDOR VISIONS AND PROJECT OPPORTUNITIES

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34 | Corridor Visions and Project Opportunities Overall Strategies1. Recognize different characteristics of the t hree arterials and adjacent land uses. 2. Id entify best strategies to address each arterials need within its context. 3. tactics within and along the ROW of the surrounding thoroughfares 4. Im prove ADA accessibility, multimodal movements along and across the three subject roadways, and comfort and ease of use especially for pedestrians and bicyclists. 5. De signate and identify preferred crossing locations through infrastructure, amenity, and aesthetic improvements along each of the arterials. 6. Ack nowledge the future build-out of the Auraria Master Plan by aligning project outcomes with the vision of the master plan. 7. Co ordinate infrastructure and streetscape designs with other studies and ongoing efforts such as the two-way streets initiatives and Denver Moves bicycle plan. 8. En courage development of public, private and public/private buildable land to be urban/dense to the right-of-way lines. Bus, light rail, pedestrians, and vehicle activities all converge at Colfax and Lipan. A pedestrian crosses multiple lanes at Speer and Arapahoe.

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35 | Site Analysis Corridor Visions and Project Opportunities | 35Speer Boulevard VisionThe overall vision for the Speer Boulevard arterial is to enhance and facilitate activity along Speer Boulevard through improved pedestrian and bicycle connections and amenities, high quality urban design elements, and urban development. These strategies will help weave the fabrics of Downtown Denver and the Auraria Campus neighborhoods of Colorado Denver (CU Denver). Objectives: 1. En hance visual and psychological link ages and physical connections for all travel modes across Speer Boulevard, especially at Market, Larimer, Lawrence and Arapahoe Streets. 2. Enh ance visual communication of the adjacent campus land use and environment to vehicles along Speer Boulevard, to slow drivers and alert them to high pedestrian and cyclist volumes. 3. Cr eate edges and a sense of pedestrian enclosure by encouraging all new development to be built to the right-of-way with high levels of transparency and activation at the ground level. Maintain existing street trees and add a double row of street trees where possible. 4. Ex pand sidewalk widths and other pedestrian amenities along the bridges over Cherry Creek. 5. Ens ure all sidewalks and pedestrian crossings are ADA compliant. Right turn bypass lane onto Lawrence from Speer. Cherry Creek Trail access meets Speer Boulevard mid-block. Utility pole located in the middle of a narrow sidewalk along Speer Boulevard. 6. Improve pedestrian/bicycle connections 7. Est ablish high visibility intersections through pavement/crosswalk treatments (i.e. contrasting color and/or texture) at crossing locations with higher levels of pedestrian and bicycle activity. 8. replacing current signs with a more comprehensive, destination-based system and acknowledge Speers historic parkway designation. 9. Ex plore dynamic pedestrian level train warning signals at potential transit/pedes 10. En courage maximizing the use of vacant or underutilized parcels along and within northbound (NB) and southbound (SB) Speer Boulevard to improve connections and/or activate the edges.

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36 | Corridor Visions and Project Opportunities Colfax Avenue VisionThe overall vision for the Colfax Avenue arterial is to improve safety, ease, and attractiveness of multimodal connections along and across Colfax Avenue. This vision will connect Colfax Avenue with adjacent commercial properties and the La Alma/Lincoln Park and Civic Center neighborhoods south of the Auraria State University of Denver (MSU Denver) neighborhoods. This vision will contribute to increased activity and may catalyze future urban redevelopment and additional pedestrian amenities. Objectives: 1. Cr eate high quality pedestrian crossing locations along Colfax Avenue and make them both physically and psychologically more comfortable. 2. Ex pand and improve the quality of existing medians to match the quality of the Colfax medians located east of Speer Boulevard. 3. Est ablish high visibility intersections through pavement/crosswalk treatments (i.e. contrasting color and/or texture) at crossing locations with higher levels of pedestrian/bike activity. 4. Im prove bus and light rail transit accessibility, safety, and amenities. 5. Ens ure all sidewalks and pedestrian crossings are ADA compliant. 6. Im prove at-grade connections along and across Colfax and facilitate intuitive connections below grade to the new athletic 7. En courage more urban development along Colfax Avenue with transparency and activation at ground level while allowing for high quality streetscape and wide, comfortable sidewalks to facilitate multimodal movements. Pedestrian and transit areas merge without clear delineation. Pedestrian crossing is interrupted by median. Lack of intuitive bus and light rail transit access in high use mixing areas.

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37 | Site Analysis Corridor Visions and Project Opportunities | 37Auraria Parkway VisionThe overall vision for the Auraria Parkway arterial includes intensifying the urban development along Auraria Parkway so that it becomes a welcoming urban gateway to the City of Denver and the Auraria Campus, support the MSU Denver neighborhood, while accommodating multimodal movements and crossings for all activities. Objectives: 1. Downtown and the Auraria Campus and between the Pepsi Center and the Auraria Campus through architecture and environmental elements. 2. Enh ance the 7th Street and 9th Street intersections so that the crossing distance is comfortable for pedestrians and bicyclists and crossing locations are highly visible to vehicles. 3. Cr eate pedestrian refuges in medians where there are higher levels of pedestrian/bicycle activity to provide a safe and comfortable place to wait. 4. Ens ure all sidewalks and pedestrian crossings are ADA compliant. 5. In crease pedestrian and bicycle safety by 6. Enc ourage public/private partnerships that will work together to implement the vision for high quality edges along the Parkway. 7. In crease urban development along Auraria Parkway that will facilitate a high quality pedestrian environment, focusing on opportunities with the existing surface parking lots. 8. En courage all new development to be built to the right-of-way with transparency and activation at ground level. Auraria Parkway serves as a gateway to the Auraria Campus and to Downtown Denver. Bus stop along Auraria Parkway. Long crossing distances with no pedestrian refuge on the Auraria Parkway.

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38 | Corridor Visions and Project Opportunities Colfax Pepsi CenterAuraria Pkwy.Champa11th st.10th st. 9th st. 8th st.5th st.7th st.StoutKalamath Arapahoe LL awrence LL ar imer MM ar ket Osage st. MM ariposa st 1 24 5 6 8 9 12 10 133 111 4 6 7 8 9 5 3 2 7 11 12 10 13 To implement these visions, thirteen project connectivity along and across the arterials. The project opportunities are near-term implementable and are mostly focused on the intersections.

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39 | Site Analysis Corridor Visions and Project Opportunities | 39Project Opportunities1. Speer and LarimerExisting Conditions:The Speer and Larimer intersection functions as one of the main connections to downtown from the Auraria Campus. With direct connections to CU Denver buildings and Larimer Square, this intersection has some of the highest pedestrian and bicycle counts of all the intersections surrounding the campus. Existing pedestrian facilities at the intersection are non-standard especially along the constrained bridge area over Cherry Creek. Non ADA complaint ramps and sidewalks make crossing north and southbound Speer challenging especially during peak pedestrian times. Due to the variety of modes active at this location including vehicles turning or traveling south, bus operations, and bicycle and is present. Despite the bicycle demand, no dedicated facility exists to guide cyclists into the campus area across the two busy directions of Speer. In addition, confused or non-compliant behavior from vehicles, pedestrians and cyclists often causes unnecessary delay and unpredictable conditions for all modes. Improvement Opportunities: (See Speer/Larimer Project Package)2. Speer and LawrenceExisting Conditions: The Speer and Lawrence intersection has pedestrian volumes increasing to rival those at Speer and Larimer. The Lawrence connection facilitates a high volume of pedestrian and cyclist movements due to its proximity to the Lawrence Street Center and the new CU Denver Business School both located on the Downtown side of Lawrence Street with over 400 pedestrians crossing Speer Boulevard in between class times. A safety study in 1995 recommended several adjustments at this intersection that are still in place today including the closing of 13th Street and the elimination of the dual right turn from NB Speer onto Lawrence. At the time of the study, poor behavior from both pedestrians hicles from NB Speer to Lawrence and provide the pedestrian a fully protected crossing experience. In order to physically communicate the elimination of the dual right turn and emphasize the no right turn on red condition to vehicles, a channelizing median and median nose were constructed. This intersection treatment was designed to better control the right turn on red violations by vehicles and Dont Walk violations by pedestrians. While the intersection was ans, the atypical nature of the intersection can be confusing. The channelizing median is often treated like a pedestrian refuge with pedestrians crossing the right turn lane and then waiting until the designated walk phase to proceed all the way to the bridge. Conditions have since changed at this intersection with a higher volume of pedestrians and cyclists crossing due to new institutional assets on either side of Speer including the CU Denver business school and the shared Science Building. In addition, Lawrence also serves as a key gateway into downtown for southbound vehicles along Speer since this intersection provides the High vehicular turn volumes almost 490 vefor turning movements at this intersection. Another multimodal challenge is the constrained access to the Cherry Creek Trail at two locations. The small landing area at the corner of SB Speer and Lawrence and the hairpin turn required to access the main trail below-grade can create an uncomfortable situation with maneuvers for bicyclists and poor sight lines. Improvement Opportunities: (See Speer/Lawrence Project Package for still evolving ideas)3. Speer and ArapahoeExisting Conditions:The Speer and Arapahoe intersection is the third busiest pedestrian intersection along Speer and also carries a high volume of bicycles due to the direct bicycle connection to the Auraria campus and the Curtis Street bicycle facility, which is one of the primary bike routes on campus. This intersection experiences high vehicular volumes on a more irregular schedule due to the access it provides to the Denver Performing Arts Complex parking garage, one of the largest off-street parking facilities in the Downtown area. The Cherry Creek Trail maintenance ramp terminates south of the Speer and Arapahoe intersection, but is used regularly by bicyclists going to/from downtown or the campus. The access provided by the ramp can cause confusion for bicyclists because there is no intuitive connection onto the campus or into Downtown from the trail access point causing many cyclists to cut across Speer mid-block. Improvement Opportunities: (See Speer/Arapahoe Project Package)4. Speer and ChampaExisting Conditions:Because Champa is a one-way street carrying vehicles out of downtown, the Speer and Champa intersection is most active during the P.M. peak hour. The intersection facilitates connections for a smaller volume of pedestrians and bicyclists, however, the buffered bike lane along Champa stops shy of Speer Boulevard at 13th Street. Buildings are set back from the curb on both the downtown side and the Auraria side making this intersection feel expansive and overwhelming from a pedestrian standpoint. The Denver Performing Arts Complex Sculpture Park is located on the corner or Champa and NB Speer with occasional event programming throughout the year. Improvement Opportunities:The opportunities at Speer and Champa include continuing a bicycle facility across Speer to Kalamath to be received by a widened shared use path on the west side of Kalamath designated for both bicycles and pedestrians. This shared use path could serve to connect users to the transit opportunities along westbound Colfax. Urban design elements such as banners, signage and pots can be added to extend across Speer Boulevard, better connect to the arts and cultural programming.5. Speer and StoutExisting Conditions:Stout is a one-way street into downtown and therefore carries a high volume of vehicles during the morning (AM) peak hour. Operations at the intersection are complicated by the addition of the light rail transit vehicles running at grade along Stout. There is a higher crash incidence at this intersection between personal and transit vehicles due to the unique nature of the intersection. While the pedestrian and bicycle demand at this intersection is not as high as other intersections along Speer, there are still improvement opportunities that could better serve bicyclist demand and connect patrons of the Denver Performing Arts Center and Colorado Convention Center across Speer.Improvement Opportunities:Opportunities at this intersection include the addition of urban design elements that highlight the light rail crossing and add to the quality of the pedestrian environment. Truncated domes, signage, bollards and dynamic pedestrian level train warning signals. Additionally, the creation of a raised median with enhanced colored treatments, pavement, or landscape on the west side of southbound Speer between the light rail tracks and road would help to better guide pedestrians so that they walk in the designated pedestrian zone. 6. Colfax and KalamathExisting Conditions:The Colfax and Kalamath intersection is an extremely busy intersection at all times and can be challenging for pedestrians and bicyclists to navigate due to the high vehicular volumes and wide turning movements. Pedestrian ramps are non-standard in some locations. Pedestrians who cross at this location face wide crossing distances due to the number of travel and turning lanes and, while there are pedestrian refuge areas provided within the median areas, many are small and can feel uncomfortable. Additionally, the pedestrian and bicycle crash history is higher than normal in this location. Improvement Opportunities:Further study is needed at this intersection to determine a comprehensive strategy that will balance the many multimodal movements and create a high quality, comfortable entry into the Downtown area. Future study may consider eliminating turn lanes in order to expand the median and pedestrian refuge areas and reduce the crossing distance for pedestrians. High turning demand at the intersection will need to be analyzed and considered to ensure that any change to the turning movement does not negatively impact the pedestrian experience at this or adjacent intersections. Urban design elements such as new public art installations

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40 | Corridor Visions and Project Opportunities and high quality landscaping along the edges and in the medians will contribute greatly to the gateway nature of this intersection. 7. Colfax and LipanExisting Conditions:The Colfax and Lipan intersection is adjacent to busy nodes north and south of the intersection. The Colfax at Auraria light rail station and adjacent bus stop serve hundreds of transit riders each day. Students, faculty, employees and neighborhood residents use this transit hub to access destinations all over the metro area. The retail area south of the intersection serves students and faculty from the campus as well as neighborhood residents or nearby workers. In addition, Lipan serves as a main entry into campus as well as a connection to adjacent retail offerings that serve a variety of patrons. Due to the variety of modes active at this intersection, the crash history is higher than normal in this location. In addition, the high volume of pedestrian and bicycle demand around the light rail platform area creates a very constrained and congested mixing zone for these activities. Improvement Opportunities: (See Colfax/Lipan Project Package)8. Colfax and MariposaExisting conditions:The Colfax and Mariposa intersection serves largely as a gateway to the residences in the La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood to the south of Colfax including a number of senior housing units located on both Mariposa and Osage. The afternoon commutes for those trying to avoid the Speer and Colfax intersection. High volumes uncomfortable for pedestrians and there have ally, Mariposa has a bike lane that does not currently connect north across Colfax into campus. Improvement Opportunities:Opportunities for improvement at Colfax and at Colfax and Lipan. The left turn movement at Mariposa is maintained and may have increased demand due to the recommended should be considered to help address impacts especially adjacent to the senior housing units. Adequate sidewalk widths and conditions are important. Other recommendations at Colfax and Mariposa include realignment of the current crosswalk location in order to provide protected pedestrian refuges and the opportunity to widen the sidewalk on the south side of Colfax as redevelopment occurs.9. Colfax and OsageExisting Conditions:The Colfax and Osage intersection is an extremely busy intersection and can be challenging for pedestrians and bicyclists to navigate due to the high vehicular volumes and proximity to light rail operations. Pedestrians face wide crossing distances due to the number of travel lanes, and pedestrian ramps are non-standard in some locations. Pedestrian movements are nelization (pork chop) islands. These islands house a number of utilities including electric lines, signal poles, and controls for the adjacent light rail operation. Additionally, the pedestrian and bicycle crash history is higher than normal need for a future bicycle facility on Osage to offer a southern connection into the neighborhood but providing a comfortable connection across Colfax to facilitate access onto campus could be challenging with the intersections current Improvement Opportunities:Further study for a design solution at this intersection is recommended in order to improve pedestrian and bicycle access across Colfax into both the campus and neighborhood areas adjacent light rail operations. It is important for the improvements at this intersection to establish a gateway feeling so that vehicles traveling from the west understand the change in condition and respond with slower speeds and an awareness of pedestrian activities. Treatments at this intersection should also work to simplify the pedestrian crossing movement as well as work to integrate full ADA complaint ramps and truncated domes. Pedestrian level light rail warning signals may also help pedestrians be more aware of oncoming trains.10. Auraria and 7th AvenueExisting Conditions:The 7th Avenue corridor has experienced increased vehicular and pedestrian demand as the campus grows and develops, however the wide crossing distance across Auraria Parkway can be daunting for pedestrians. Campus programming and special event activities create pedestrian demand at Auraria and 7th Avenue especially due to the use of public off-street parking lots on the Auraria Campus. Additionally, high vehicular speeds are common in this location making it especially important for the improvements at this intersection to signal a change in condition to vehicles exiting I-25 to encourage slower speeds and an awareness of pedestrian activities. Improvement Opportunities:Recently several signal timing adjustments were made along 7th Avenue at Walnut, Lawrence, and Curtis in order to reduce the wait time for pedestrians. This small adjustment further prioritizes the pedestrian movement at these locations and encourages pedestrians to cross at designated crossing locations. At Auraria and 7th Avenue, wider crosswalks and an extension of the existing median noses would provide a larger, more protected pedestrian refuge. High quality landscaping and urban design elements such as planted pots or additional banner signage at the intersections will also help contribute to the pedestrian experience and could communicate Pepsi Center programming.11. Auraria and 9th AvenueExisting Conditions:Special event activity is highest at Auraria and 9th Avenue due to the direct connection the intersection provides to the Pepsi Center and the Pepsi Center light rail station. Pedestrian crossing activity is high before and after professional sporting or other special events due to the numerous off-street public parking lots located on the Auraria Campus. Wide crossing disfor pedestrians. The existing pedestrian crossing push-buttons provided in the median are not ADA accessible. Some urban design elements have been provided as the new buildings on the campus were built but they do not cross Auraria Parkway providing a stronger connection across the parkway. Improvement Opportunities: (See Auraria/9th Avenue Project Package)12. Auraria and 11th AvenueExisting Conditions:An intersection at Auraria and 11th Avenue currently does not exist. However, with the addition of the new Auraria Hotel and Hospitality Learning Center and further redevelopment on the campus, this intersection will facilitate transit operations as well as increasing amounts of pedestrian movements associated with the adjacent Pepsi Center or campus activities. Improvement Opportunities:As detailed in the Auraria Higher Education Center Master Plan Update (2012), future plans for this intersection include full signalization to increase include access onto the campus from the northwest and northeast. When the intersection is constructed, it should be built with wider crosswalks and median noses that provide a protected refuge for pedestrians. High quality landscaping and urban design elements such as planted pots or additional banner signage at the intersections will also help contribute to the pedestrian experience and could communicate Pepsi Center or campus programming.Auraria and SpeerExisting Conditions:The Auraria and Speer intersection functions mostly as a vehicular intersection managing into the downtown area from I-25 and other arterial connections. The intersection can feel overwhelming due to its scale and it provides limited pedestrian and bicycle amenities despite its wide crossing distance. As Denver Union Station opens as the regional transit hub with new retail and restaurant offerings, there is a greater need to provide a high quality connection between it and the Auraria Campus. Improvement Opportunities:Due to the complexity of the Auraria and Speer intersection and the amount of regional travel it facilitates, a full study is required to understand redesign options that might improve bicycle and pedestrian connectivity. It is important for any design changes at this intersection to establish a gateway feeling so that vehicles traveling from the west understand the downtown condition and respond with slower speeds and an awareness of pedestrian activities. Treatments at this intersection should also work to improve the comfort and function of the pedestrian crossing movement as well as work to integrate full ADA complaint ramps and truncated domes.

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41 | Site Analysis Corridor Visions and Project Opportunities | 41Preliminary ScreeningThe project team worked together to develop methodology and evaluation criteria to analyze and prioritize the project opportunities. The evaluation criteria were based largely on safety, multi-modal demand, alignment with other plans and visions and partnership opportunities. The project opportunities were ranked relative to one another, and at least one project opportunity was selected for each arterial. The detailed criteria are listed below. Evaluation Criteria Does this provide a safety enhancement (eliminate or minimize intersection with a higher than expected number higher than expected crash type? Does this provide a more comfortable experience for bicyclists and pedestrians? ADA Compliance: Does this address a current Ease of Bicycling: Does this make bicycling easier by reducing delays for bicyclists, providing a new bike facility, providing improved crossEase of Walking: Does this make walking easier by reducing delays for pedestrians, shortening the crossing distance, widening sidewalks, adding landscape buffers and/or lighting? Ease of Transit Use: Does this improve constop or light rail station? LL ev el of Bicycle Activity: Does this area experience high bike activity at peak or other times and/or is it located along a current or proposed designated bike facility? Does this area experience high pedestrian activity at peak or other times?Analysis of Project Opportunities analysis. The priority projects include Speer and Larimer, Speer and Lawrence, Speer and Arapahoe, Colfax and Lipan and Auraria and 9th Avenue. Does this allow vehicusimilar to the current conditions (i.e., maintains roadways ability to move people and does not Aesthetics/Context: Does this improve the aesthetics (by adding landscaping, lighting, urban design elements, etc.) and/or improve the context sensitivity (by enhancing the visual connection between downtown and the campus)? Is it compatible with future visions and plans such as Auraria Campus Master Plan, Denver Moves, DUS, DAP, Grand Boulevards, etc.? Does it help implement future visions and plans? Partnership Opportunities: Is there potential to leverage funding from public/public or private/ public partnerships? Short Term Implementability: Can this be implemented with relatively low utility and ROW impacts at a relatively low construction cost?

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42 | Site Analysis

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RECOMMENDATIONS43

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44 | Recommendations LL ARI MM ER: KEY CHA LLLL EN GG ES T URNIN GG MM OV E MM EN TSNarrow sidewalks along Larimer bridge and west towards campus 6 ramps do not meet ADA standards 9 pedestrian path: bikes are not allowed Wide crossing distance 9 pedestrian path 9 pedestrian path Ramps do not meet ADA standards 7 detached sidewalk 6 attached sidewalk 5 sidewalk on bridge 8 sidewalk on bridge 12 Bus lane 11 Bus lane 11 Bus lane 11 11 11 11 11 11 turn lane 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 6 attached sidewalk North bound SpeerSouth bound SpeerLarimerTo Downtown 12 attached sidewalk xxx 218 (406) 69 (234)Turning movement AM (PM) Peak Hour2007 Counts from Downtown Retiming 1583 (3260) 9 (11) 4 (6) 9 (13)

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45 | Site Analysis Recommendations | 45 LL ARI MM ER : TECHNICA LL I MM PR OVE MM EN TSRecommendationsSpeer Corridor Acknowledge importance of a corridor wide approach to slow vehicles and establish clear priority zones for pedestrians and bicyclists. Corridor approach will include physical intersection improvements as well as an assessment of signal timing operations to determine feasibil ity of establishing exclusive pedestrian phases south from Wewatta. Speer and Larimer The recommended improvements included in the project package for Speer and Larimer are designed to improve the comfort, safety and convenience for pedestrian and bicycle movements across Speer. First, in order to address the demand for bicycle access to and from campus, the downtownbound exclusive bus lane could be removed to gain additional space. RTDs Route 15 travels from the campus east on Larimer Street to 14th Street. By eliminating the exclusive bus lane on eastbound Larimer (#2) and rerouting the Route 15 to head east on Lawrence, the gained width could be used to widen the sidewalks between NB and SB Speer and across the bridge over Cherry Creek. With nine foot sidewalks on both sides of the bridge, the pedestrian comfort would be improved; however, there is a desire for further widening of the sidewalks along Larimer to the 16 foot City standard in the future (which would require bridge widening or reconstruction). The additional width gained from eliminating the bus only lane would allow for a striped bike lane connection from downtown to the campus. This new bicycle facility (inbound to campus) would be functionally paired with a complementary bicycle lane described in the set of recommendations for Speer and Lawrence. A widened shared bike/pedestrian path is recommended on the edge of the campus between Larimer and Arapahoe (#4) to facilitate bicycle movements between the bike lane couplet and the primary bike route on campus which is accessed near the Speer and Arapahoe intersection. Also recommended is a broader corridor signal retiming effort to pursue an opportunity to create exclusive pedestrian/bicycle phases between the pedestrians and the vehicles (#3). To complement the exclusive bike/ped phase, a separate left turn from Larimer onto SB Speer between pedestrians and left turning vehicles. Next, the existing left turn lane from NB Speer onto Larimer could be eliminated to gain additional sidewalk width due to its low utilization rates. By eliminating this turn lane (#1), the distance for pedestrians crossing NB Speer can be shortened, and the sidewalk along Speer can be widened. Vehicles could make the NB left from the left-most through lane. additional high quality urban design elements including additional banners, signage, and planted pots that can wrap each corner to slow drivers and convey the high degree of multimodal activity present between campus and Downtown along Larimer (#5). Lastly, establishing a highly visible crosswalk through colored treatments or concrete sections will draw additional attention to the pedestrian activity at the intersection and improve the comfort for those crossing (#6). Note: This study acknowledges the recent initiative to convert one-way streets in the downtown area to two-way operations. Larimer and Lawrence are two candidate streets that will be subject to further study to assess the feasibility of two-way operations (#7). These recommendations will not preclude a future conversion. Speer Blvd / Larimer St Intersection Layout REMOVE AND REPLACE EXISTING TRAFFIC SIGNAL LIGHT POLE AND EQUIPMENT LARIMER ST LARIMER ST NB SPEER BLVDNB SPEER BLVD 2'X10' CROSSWALK BAR (TYP) EXISTING INLET (TO REMAIN) SB SPEER BLVD SB SPEER BLVD 2'X10' CROSSWALK BAR (TYP) EXISTING SIGNAL POLE (BY OTHERS) EXISTING SIGNAL POLE (BY OTHERS) REMOVE AND REPLACE EXISTING TRAFFIC SIGNAL LIGHT POLE AND EQUIPMENT EXISTING INLET (TO BE RESET) EXISTING INLET (TO BE RESET) EXISTING SIGNAL POLE (TO REMAIN) EXISTING LIGHT (TO REMAIN)(TYP) EXISTING INLET (TO BE RESET) EXISTING SIGNAL POLE (TO REMAIN) EXISTING LIGHT (TO REMAIN) EXISTING LIGHT (TO REMAIN) EXISTING LIGHT (TO REMAIN)(TYP) N S E W April 1, 2014 Curb moves

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46 | Recommendations LL ARI MM ER: I LLLL US TRATIVE LL AN DSCAPIN GG I MM PROV E MM EN TS 1 2 2 3 4 4 2 3 5 7 6 1 5 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 5 5 5 5 5 7Remove NB turn lane (between Speer and Lawrence) to expand sidewalk Remove NE bound exclusive bus lane to widen sidewalks and create WB bike lane Create exclusive pedestrian/ bicycle phase and a protected WB to SB left turn phase Widen existing sidewalk to 12 to create shared bike/pedestrian facility connecting Larimer to Arapahoe (explore separated offstreet bike facility in future) Extend lighting, banners, signage and pots along Larimer and into campus High visibility crosswalks through colored treatments or concrete sections Study conversion of Larimer to two-way street Project Package Summary:

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47 | Site Analysis Recommendations | 47 LL ARI MM ER AND SPEER: LL ON GG T ER MM V ISIONDowntown Larimer North Bound Speer South Bound Speer

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48 | Recommendations LL AWRENCE: K EY CHA LLLL EN GG ES 9 pedestrian path Ramps do not meet ADA standards Parking Parking 12 sidewalk on bridge 10 multiuse landing zone for pedestrians right turn lane separated by median 12 sidewalk on bridge 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 15 15 10 left turn lane 11 11 11 11 South bound Speer North bound SpeerLawrenceTo Downtown 15 wide lanes on the Lawrence bridge. Small pedestrian and bike landing zone from Cherry Creek Trail. 5 ramps do not meet ADA standards. 9 pedestrian path: bikes are not allowed Wide crossing distance TURNIN GG MM OV E MM EN TS xxxTurning movement AM (PM) Peak Hour2007 Counts from Downtown Retiming 13 (13) 470 (114) 397 (250) 1579 (3250)

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49 | Site Analysis Recommendations | 49 LL AWRENCE : T ECHNICA LL I MM PR OVE MM EN TS OPTION 1Speer and Lawrence The improvement ideas included in the project package for Speer and Lawrence are still evolving to improve the comfort, safety and convenience for pedestrian and bicycle movements across Speer. With over 400 pedestrians crossing Speer in between CU Denver class times, pedestrian safety and comfort is paramount at this complex, but important intersection. Travel lanes across the bridge can be narrowed to provide a striped bicycle lane connecting the campus to downtown (#1). This lane complements the striped bike lane included in the Speer and Larimer project package. Together the two lanes will operate as a couplet with the widened shared bike/pedestrian path connec tion along the campus edge as described in the Speer/Larimer package. An exclusive bike/ped phase is also recommended at the SB Speer and Lawrence intersection (#4). Lawrence presents another important opportu nity to establish highly visible crosswalks across NB and SB Speer, further contributing to a pattern that may help make drivers more aware of pedestrians. Urban design elements can help provide a consistent, visually appealing and inviting environment (#3). Colored treatments or concrete sections at the crosswalks will draw additional attention to pedestrians (#6). Improvement opportunities for the Speer/ Lawrence intersection were a subject of much debate throughout the study process underscor ing the importance of a Speer Corridor Study that can evaluate existing travel patterns created a design solution for Lawrence and Speer that prioritizes pedestrians, creates more intuitive and narrower crossings, and provides comfortable access to the Cherry Creek Trail for cyclists of all experience levels. The ultimate solution will expand the landing area at the northeast corner of SB Speer and Lawrence (and narrow the crossing distance across SB Speer) while considering the high demand for left-turn access into Downtown by both transit and vehicles (#7). A redesigned trail entrance could also improve the sharp turn below grade onto the trail itself. The PMT and broader community participated in numerous conversations regarding an alternative to the current Speer and Lawrence right turn removes the northernmost section of the channelizing median or nose. Today the single right turn lane is an established condition and the nose is no longer needed to reinforce elimination of the dual right turn option that existed in the past. Since the nose is the widest portion of the channelizing median, the lanes can be restriped in order to extend the southeast curb line. This will both narrow the crossing distance for pedestrians as well as better square the intersection along the curve in the road. A second approach reconstructs and narrows the full extent of the channelizing feature, pulling it farther south and out of the way of the pedestrian crossing area. The narrowness of the reconstructed median would further discourage its use as a pedestrian refuge. This option also allows for an extension of the curb line in order to narrow the crossing distance and better square the intersection. trolling the right turning vehicle to preserve the protected pedestrian phase. Both alternatives also create a more typical crossing experience by moving the channelization south so that it controls vehicles without confusing pedestrians. An extension of the adjacent tree lawn may also help encourage pedestrians to cross at the corner. Note: This study acknowledges the recent initiative to convert one-way streets in the downtown area to two-way operations. Larimer and Lawrence are two candidate streets that will be subject to further study to assess the feasibility of two-way operations (#8). These recommendations will not preclude a future conversion. This study also acknowledges the recent study of protected bicycle facilities in the downtown ties on Lawrence are currently being studied. Curb moves

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50 | Recommendations LL AWRENCE: I LLLL US TRATIVE LL AN DSCAPIN GG I MM PROV E MM EN TS OPTION 1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 1 1 2 2 4 3 3 3 7 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 5 8Reduce lane widths across bridge to provide NE bound bicycle lane Remove duplicate/south diagonal pedestrian crosswalk across NB Speer and relocate stop bar closer to intersection. Extend tree lawn on north side of Speer Extend lighting, banners, signage and pots along Lawrence Provide exclusive bicycle/ pedestrian phase for Lawrence at SB Speer Reduce width of parking to expand sidewalk by 3 along Lawrence north of Speer High visibility crosswalks through colored treatments or concrete sections Prioritize and fund a design project that explores ways to regrade/reconstruct the access ramp for a larger landing area at the street level and a gentler turn at the trail access below grade. Study conversion of Lawrence to two-way operations and continue to coordinate with protected bike lane plans and projects Project Package Summary:

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51 | Recommendations LL AWRENCE : T ECHNICA LL I MM PR OVE MM EN TS OPTION 2 Curb moves

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52 | Site Analysis Recommendations | 52 LL AWRENCE: I LLLL US TRATIVE LL AN DSCAPIN GG I MM PROV E MM EN TS OPTION 2 1 1 1 2 2 2 3 4 4 3 3 3 5 6 7 7 8 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 5 8Reduce lane widths across bridge to provide NE bound bicycle lane Remove duplicate/south diagonal pedestrian crosswalk across NB Speer and relocate stop bar closer to intersection. Extend tree lawn on north side of Speer Extend lighting, banners, signage and pots along Lawrence Provide exclusive bicycle/ pedestrian phase for Lawrence at SB Speer Reduce width of parking to expand sidewalk by 3 along Lawrence north of Speer High visibility crosswalks through colored treatments or concrete sections Prioritize and fund a design project that explores ways to regrade/reconstruct the access ramp for a larger landing area at the street level and a gentler turn at the trail access below grade. Study conversion of Lawrence to two-way operations Project Package Summary:

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53 | Site Analysis Recommendations | 53 LL AWRENCE AND SPEER: LL ON GG T ER MM V ISION Downtown Lawrence North Bound Speer South Bound Speer

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54 | Recommendations ARAPAHOE: KEY CHA LLLL EN GG ES Ramps do not meet ADA standards 5 sidewalk on bridge 6 detached sidewalk 6 detached sidewalk 6 detached sidewalk 14 sidewalk on bridge 11 11 11 11 11 11 15 11 11 11 11 11 9 9 right turn lane 11 11 12 right turn lane 9 pedestrian pathSouth bound SpeerNorth bound SpeerArapahoeTo Downtown Narrow sidewalk along south side of Arapahoe bridge 4 ramps do not meet ADA standards 9 pedestrian path: bikes are not allowed Wide crossing distances TURNIN GG MM OV E MM EN TS xxxTurning movement AM (PM) Peak Hour2007 Counts from Downtown Retiming 113 (731) 187 (731) 1871 (2747) 241 (100) 100 (56) 2 (2)

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55 | Site Analysis Recommendations | 55ARAPAHOE: TECHNICA LL I MM PR OVE MM EN TS Speer Blvd / Arapahoe St Intersection Layout ARAPAHOE ST ARAPAHOE ST SB SPEER BLVDSB SPEER BLVD 2'X10' CROSSWALK BAR (TYP) NB SPEER BLVD NB SPEER BLVD 2'X10' CROSSWALK BAR (TYP) EXISTING SIGNAL POLE (TO REMAIN) REMOVE AND REPLACE EXISTING TRAFFIC SIGNAL LIGHT POLE AND EQUIPMENT EXISTING INLET (TO REMAIN) REMOVE AND REPLACE EXISTING TRAFFIC SIGNAL LIGHT POLE AND EQUIPMENT REMOVE AND REPLACE EXISTING TRAFFIC SIGNAL LIGHT POLE AND EQUIPMENT EXISTING INLET (TO REMAIN) EXISTING INLET (TO BE RESET) EXISTING INLET (TO REMAIN) REMOVE AND REPLACE EXISTING TRAFFIC SIGNAL POLE, MAST ARM AND EQUIPMENT EXISTING LIGHT (TO REMAIN) EXISTING INLET (TO BE RESET) REMOVE AND REPLACE EXISTING TRAFFIC SIGNAL POLE, MAST ARM AND EQUIPMENT EXISTING INLET (TO BE RESET) EXISTING SIGNAL POLE (TO REMAIN) EXISTING INLET (TO REMAIN) N S E W April 1, 2014 MOUNTABLE CURB Speer and Arapahoe The recommended improvements included in the project package for Speer and Arapahoe are designed to improve the comfort, safety and convenience for pedestrian and bicycle movements across Speer while heightening drivers awareness of users crossing the intersections. Existing travel lane widths allow for the addition of shared lane markings (sharrows) in both di rections along Arapahoe to connect the campus bike route on Curtis Street into downtown (#1). The sharrows could also serve to connect to the existing Arapahoe bicycle lane to the east, which currently ends at 14th St. In the westbound direction, a striped bike lane is recommended across the bridge (#2). Because this bike lane would necessarily be narrow to retain the existing travel lanes, a bike box is recommended to provide adequate queuing space for bicyclists (#2) and to position bicyclists in front of motor vehicles for a recommended exclusive bicycle/pedestrian signal phase (#3). In addition, a new mountable curb could facilitate a better, more direct connection to the Curtis Street bike lanes as cyclists travel west onto campus. Arapahoe presents another important oppor tunity to establish highly visible crosswalks across northbound and southbound Speer, further contributing to a pattern along the corridor that may help make drivers more aware of pedestrian activities. Urban design elements such as banners and planted pots can also add to the intersection enhancements providing a consistent, visually appealing and inviting en vironment between downtown and the campus (#4). Banners or other elements may also be ming of the Denver Performing Arts Complex. Colored treatments at the crosswalks or colored concrete sections will draw additional attention to the pedestrian activities and improve the comfort for those crossing (#5). A redesign of the trail access just south of Arapahoe should be further studied to better highlight and formalize use of the existing ramp and provide intuitive connections to Downtown and the campus (#6). Finally, the existing right turn bypass median that serves to facilitate turning movements from Downtown onto northbound Speer can be enlarged to narrow the right turning lane and slow moving vehicles. Curb moves

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56 | Recommendations ARAPAHOE: I LLLL US TRATIVE LL AN DSCAPIN GG I MM PROV E MM EN TS 1 1 1 2 2 3 3 4 6 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 6 7 8 8 7 4 4 4Add sharrows to extend connection into downtown from Curtis St. bike lanes Add bike box and WB bike lane (on bridge only) to facilitate access to campus Create exclusive pedestrian/ bicycle phase Extend lighting, banners, signage and pots along Arapahoe to High visibility crosswalks through colored treatments or concrete sections Redesign the Cherry Creek Trail access ramp with clear Expand the right turn bypass median at northbound Speer Mountable curb for bikers on WB bike lane Project Package Summary:

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57 | Site Analysis Recommendations | 57

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58 | Recommendations CO LL FAX AND LL IP AN: KEY CHA LLLL EN GG ES Wide crossing distance 4 ramps do not meet ADA standards. Pedestrian crossing/staging area Pedestrian button push-button in too small of a median refuge Medians do not provide pedestrian refuge Pedestrian button in median Bus Lane No refuge at median Pedestrian crossing/ staging area is No refuge at median 95 Crosswalk with no refuge 11 11 11 11 11 11 turn lane 11 11 11 12 right turn lane Ramps do not meet ADA standards West bound Colfax East bound ColfaxTo Downtown Lipan Lipan TURNIN GG MM OV E MM EN TSxxxTurning movement AM (PM) Peak Hour2007 Counts from Downtown Retiming 1789 (1710) 1194 (2004) 19 (22) 11 (13) 61 (93) 57 (32)

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59 | Site Analysis Recommendations | 59CO LL FAX AND LL IP AN: TECHNICA LL I MM PR OVE MM EN TSColfax Corridor Acknowledge importance of a corridor wide approach to slow vehicles and establish clear priority zones for pedestrians and bicyclists. Corridor approach will include physical improvements throughout but will also include highlighting some intersections as pedestrian priority by limiting vehicular movements and redirecting turning movement demand to adjacent locations. Colfax and Lipan have the ability to transform this intersection and improve its ability to achieve a high quality pedestrian experience while balancing the vari ous multimodal demands. The recommended package of improvements for Colfax and Lipan was developed to establish the intersection as the primary pedestrian crossing location facilitating connections between the light rail and transit center on the Auraria Campus and the businesses and neighborhoods to the south. To achieve this, high visibility crosswalks are an important recommendation and should be installed at the current 15 width. Colored treatments at the crosswalks or colored concrete sections will draw additional attention to the high volume of pedestrian activities and improve the comfort for those crossing. the current allocation of space at the intersection to improve the pedestrian crossing experience. By removing the left turn movement from westbound Colfax to southbound Lipan (#1), and the landscaped center median is expanded to provide a wider refuge for pedestrians and cyclists. Southbound access into the retail strip at Lipan or into the neighborhood south of Colfax can be served by left-turn movements at Kalamath, Mariposa or Osage (see alterna tive in-bound and out-bound routing options on page 61) though additional analysis will be needed to understand the impacts. The median is extended across the intersection (#2) to provide additional landscape area and reinforce the elimination of the left turn movement. This vehicles and pedestrians, signify visually that this crossing is primarily for pedestrians (right turns to and from Lipan would still be allowed), and allow for an exclusive pedestrian phase in the future. The expanded median (#5) provides additional opportunity for urban design elements like high quality landscaping, public art, and other gateway treatments that can communicate proximity to the campus and downtown environments. Curb extensions or bulb outs on the south leg of the intersection are also recommended (#1) to shorten the crossing distance of Lipan. To address the non-standard pedestrian refuge on the north side of the intersection, elimination of the median separating the bus lane from westbound travel lanes is recommended (#3). With the bus lane adjacent to the travel lane, a transit priority signal should be considered to facilitate the bus movement into the westbound through lane. Finally, urban design elements such as banners and planted pots can also add to the intersection enhancements providing a consistent, visually appealing and inviting environment between the businesses on the south side of Colfax and the campus (#3). Enhancements to center median landscaping should be coupled with a maintenance plan to ensure sustainability of the vegetation and design elements. Colfax Ave / Lipan St Intersection Layout EXISTING MANHOLE (TO BE ADJUSTED) REMOVE AND REPLACE EXISTING TRAFFIC SIGNAL LIGHT POLE AND EQUIPMENT COLFAX AVE COLFAX AVE LIPAN STLIPAN ST REMOVE AND REPLACE EXISTING TRAFFIC SIGNAL POLE, MAST ARM AND EQUIPMENT REMOVE AND REPLACE EXISTING TRAFFIC SIGNAL POLE, MAST ARM AND EQUIPMENT REMOVE AND REPLACE EXISTING TRAFFIC SIGNAL POLE, MAST ARM AND EQUIPMENT EXISTING FIRE HYDRANT (TO BE RESET) 2'X15' CROSSWALK BAR (TYP) EXISTING LIGHT (TO REMAIN) EXISTING LIGHT (TO REMAIN) PROPOSED INLET EXISTING INLET (TO BE REMOVED) EXISTING INLET (TO BE REMOVED) PROPOSED INLET N S E W April 1, 2014 Curb moves

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60 | Recommendations CO LL FAX AND LL IP AN: I LLLL US TRATIVE LL AN DSCAPIN GG I MM PROV E MM EN TS 1 1 2 2 3 3 4 4 4 4 5 5 5Remove left turning movements from WB Colfax and add bulb-outs on Lipan at intersection south of Colfax to make this intersection the primary crossing location for pedestrians Extend median so that it is continuous across Lipan along Colfax and add plantings Eliminate median separating bus lane from WB Colfax lanes and explore transit priority or queue jumping for buses High visibility crosswalks through colored treatments or concrete sections Establish gateway treatments referencing Auraria Higher Education Center within median areas Project Package Summary:

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61 | Site Analysis Recommendations | 61CO LL FAX AND LL IP AN: INBOUND AND OUTBOUND ROUTIN GG OP TIONS

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62 | Recommendations CO LL FAX AND LL IP AN: LL ON GG T ER MM V ISION West Bound Colfax East Bound Colfax Lipan

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63 | Site Analysis Recommendations | 63

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64 | Recommendations 9TH AVENUE AND AURARIA PARKWAY: KEY CHA LLLL EN GG ES 130 Crosswalk with no refuge 10 10 10 9 turn lane 11 12 12 12 12 12 10 turn lane 12 turn lane 11 11 11 11 11 11 No refuge at median No refuge at median 8 detached sidewalk 8 detached sidewalk 8 detached sidewalk West bound AurariaEast bound AurariaTo Downtown 9th Wide crossing distance Medians do not provide pedestrian refuge access in the median TURNIN GG MM OV E MM EN TS xxxTurning movement AM (PM) Peak Hour2007 Counts from Downtown Retiming 29 (63) 11 (8) 3 (19) 100 (76) 25 (23) 6 (68) 21 (4) 1 (3) 30 (41) 9 (26) 783 (1527) 1512 (1144)

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65 | Site Analysis Recommendations | 659TH AVENUE AND AURARIA PARKWAY: TECHNICA LL I MM PR OVE MM EN TSAuraria Corridor Acknowledge importance of a corridor wide approach to slow vehicles and establish clear priority zones for pedestrians and bicyclists. Acknowledge unique nature of the pedestrian and bicycle movements as they relate to both special event activities at the Pepsi Center as well as campus activities. Corridor approach will include physical improvements throughout and integrating additional improvements as the Auraria Higher Education Center Master Plan details. Auraria and 9th Avenue The recommended improvements included in the project package for Auraria and 9th Avenue are intended to improve the comfort, safety and convenience for pedestrian movements across Auraria Parkway. In order to facilitate connections between the event venue and the public parking facilities located on the Auraria campus, opportunities at Auraria and 9th include wider crosswalks and high visibility intersection treatments. In addition, the median noses on either end of the intersection could be rebuilt to provide a larger landing area and a protected refuge. The crosswalks should be restriped to 15 foot width (#1) and repositioned in order to extend the Auraria medians to provide pedestrian refuges (#2). The pedestrian push buttons in the median are currently not ADA accessible, and should be repositioned with the median recon Auraria Pkwy / 9th St Intersection Layout 2'X10' CROSSWALK BAR (TYP) 2'X15' CROSSWALK BAR (TYP) EXISTING SIGNAL POLE (TO REMAIN) EXISTING INLET (TO REMAIN) EXISTING INLET (TO REMAIN) EXISTING SIGNAL POLE (TO REMAIN) EXISTING MANHOLE (TO BE ADJUSTED) EXISTING LIGHT (TO BE RESET) EXISTING INLET (TO REMAIN) EXISTING INLET (TO BE RESET) EXISTING SIGNAL POLE (TO REMAIN) EXISTING SIGNAL POLE (TO REMAIN) REMOVE AND REPLACE EXISTING TRAFFIC SIGNAL PEDESTAL POLE AND EQUIPMENT REMOVE AND REPLACE EXISTING TRAFFIC SIGNAL PEDESTAL POLE AND EQUIPMENT AURARIA PKWY AURARIA PKWY 9TH ST9TH STN S E W April 1, 2014 Finally, urban design elements such as banners and planted pots can also be added along 9th Ave. to connect the Pepsi Center/Elitch Gardens light rail station to the campus. These elements will add to the intersection enhancements providing a consistent, visually appealing and inviting environment. Enhancements to center median landscaping should be coupled with a maintenance plan to ensure sustainability of the vegetation and design elements. Curb moves

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66 | Recommendations 9TH AVENUE AND AURARIA PARKWAY: I LLLL US TRATIVE LL AN DSCAPIN GG I MM PROV E MM EN TS 1 2 2 3 2 3 3 4 4 4 4 4High visibility crosswalks Restripe crosswalks to 15 Pull back crosswalk and stop bar in order to extend medians for protected pedestrian refuge Add lighting, banners, pots and Center/Elitch Gardens LRT station Project Package Summary:

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67 | Site Analysis Recommendations | 67

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69 IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGIES

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70 | Implementation Strategies Phasing PlanThe focus of this Connecting Auraria study effort term implementation. The following recommended phasing plan below serves to lay out a potential path forward as funding sources for resources allow. The overall strategy of the phasing plan is to minimize throw-away and mobilization costs by completing all intersection reconstruction items for each project package at one time. The cost estimates associated with each project and phase are conceptual and do not include longterm maintenance needs or permitting costs. Phase 1 includes only those items that could be more simply implemented (i.e. striping and urban design elements). Phase 1 also includes Auraria/9th project packages. Finally, Phase 1 includes a comprehensive Speer Corridor Study focused on the north and southbound directions between Wewatta and Kalamath to consider how the existing transportation patterns and innectivity. This effort will continue in the spirit of the Downtown Area Plan and Connect Auraria Coalitions visions for a reimagined Speer where pedestrian connections are prioritized and a stronger sense of place emerges through active edges along the corridor. Phase 2 includes reconstruction of those two intersections, plus the study and design needed for the Speer intersections (further directed by the Speer Corridor Study). Finally, Phase 3 includes reconstruction of the Speer intersections and further study of the other important intersections not highlighted in *These estimates are provided for planning purposes only and are based off construction costs only meant to provide estimate information; they do not include design, mobilization, permitting, or other contingencies. High visibility intersections there are a number of ways to provide high visibility intersections including gateway treatments, urban design elements, and enhanced crosswalks. Colored crosswalks, either through concrete sections or color application treatments, are priced here by square foot for reference. While, colored application treatments may be less expensive per square foot, their life span is much shorter than concrete. Thermoplastic products have a us able life span of 35 years whereas concrete sections can last three to four times as long. Speer/Colfax Speer/Stout Speer/Champa Speer/Arapahoe Speer/Lawrence Speer/Larimer Speer/Market Speer/Blake Speer/Wewatta Colored concrete$30 $40/SF Colored application treatment$10 $16/SF Urban design elements pots and banners Speer/Wewatta Speer/Larimer Speer/Lawrence Speer/Arapahoe Colfax/Lipan Auraria/9th $ 1,100,000 (materials only) Restriping to eliminate EB bus only lane and add bike lane Speer/Larimer $ 3,000 (materials only) Restriping to add bike lane Speer/Lawrence $ 3,000 (materials only) Restriping to add sharrows, bike lane and bike box Speer/Arapahoe $ 5,000 (materials only) Comprehensive corridor study to explore alternative configurations and approaches that serve all transportation modes but highly prioritize pedestrian and cyclist movements. Includes signal timing analysis fo r exclusive pedestrian phasing per project package recommendations Speer Corridor Study (Wewatta to Kalamath) $2 50,000 Preliminary and Final Design Colfax/Lipan intersection reconfiguration (including consideration of needed improvements at Colfax/Mariposa) $ 50,000 Preliminary and Final Design Auraria/9th $ 30,000 I MM P LL E MM ENTATION STRATE GG Y

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71 | Site Analysis Implementation Strategies | 71 Intersection Reconstruction Median reconstruction, landscaping, and maintenance plan Removal of bus lane median and curbline reconstruction on north side Curb extensions on south side to narrow crossing distance of Lipan New curb ramps to a lign with 15 crosswalks Signal and light pole resets Drainage inlet resets High visibility crosswalks Transit priority signal for WB buses Colfax/Lipan $500 ,000 Intersection Reconstruction Median nose reconstruction and landscape replacement to create pedestrian refuge New curb ramps to align with 15 crosswalks Pedestrian push button pedestal and light pole resets Drainage inlet resets High visibility concrete intersection and crosswalks Auraria/9th $ 250 ,000 Feasibility Study Cherry Creek Trail ramp and access at Speer/Lawrence and relationship to Arapahoe tr ai l access point $ 50,000 Preliminary and Final Design (includes project package recommendations but acknowledges potential for new or revised recommendations following the Speer Corridor Study) Speer Corridor Arapahoe to Larimer Arapahoe infrastructure improvements Lawrence infrastructure improvements (integrating CC Trail ramp configuration recommendations) Larimer infrastructure improvements Sidewalk widening west side of NB Speer (Lawrence to Larimer) Shared use path widening adjacent to campus (Arapahoe to Larimer) $ 160,000 (estimate for project package recommendations only) Intersection Improvements Sidewalk widening along south side of Larimer (SB Speer to 14th) Sidewalk widening along west side of NB Speer (Lawrence to Larimer) ADA compliant curb ramps Light pole resets Drainage inlet resets High visibility concrete intersections and crosswalks Speer/Larimer $ 610,000 (estimate for project package recommendations only) Intersection Improvements Sidewalk widening along south side of Lawrence (NB Speer to 14th) Cherry Creek Trail ramp reconfiguration ( configuration to be studied; not included in cost estimate) Reconfiguration o f NB right turn and associated channelization and curbline modifications ( final configuration to be determined) ADA compliant curb ramps Light pole resets Drainage inlet resets High visibility concrete intersections and crosswalks Speer/Lawrence $ 710,000 (e stimate for project package recommendations only) Intersection Improvements Reconstruction of right turn channelization island (Arapahoe to NB Speer) ADA compliant curb ramps Signal and light pole resets Drainage inlet resets High visibility concrete intersections and crosswalks Speer/Arapahoe $ 820,000 Shared Use Path Widening/Reconstruction Campus side of Speer Arapahoe to Larimer $ 110,000 Feasibility Study Colfax/ Osage /7 th intersection improvements TBD Feasibility Study Speer/Auraria /Market/Blake TBD Feasibility Study Colfax/Speer TBD

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73 APPENDIX A: CONNECT AURARIA COALITION MISSION

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74 | Appendix A (U pdated June 2014 Connect Auraria Study) COALITION PURPOSE: Create a thoughtful, implementable short-term PHYSICAL plan to connect the Auraria Campus with its surrounding neighborhoods and Downtown Districts based upon a flexible/ engaging long -term vision VISION: Create a high quality physical environment that enhances connections across three major vehicular thoroughfares to support broader social, economic and programmatic linkages between the Auraria Campus and Downtown districts and adjacent neighborhoods, and to transform the thoroughfares into Grand Boulevards as envisioned in the 2007 Downtown Area Plan. (this study focus is the physical connections). CONNECT AURARIA COALITION Jose Cornejo Manager of Public Works, City and County of Denver Tami Door President and CEO of DDP; Auraria Board Vice Chair Don Elliman Chancellor University of Colorado Denver Dave Jolette VP Venue Operations, Kroenke Sports Enterprises Steve Jordan President Metropolitan State University of Denver Angie Malpiede RTD Board, District Director C Everette Freeman President Community College of Denver Anita Riley Board Member La Alma Lincoln Park Neighborhood Gordon Robertson Director, Parks and Recreation: Planning, Design, City and County of Denver Chris Shears Chair, LoDo District Board of Directors Molly Urbina Interim Director, Community Planning & Development, City and County of Denver Barb Weiske Exec utive VP for Administration/ CEO Auraria Higher Education Center STRATEGIC ACTION PLAN: APPROACH Merge the densifying environments and systems of the campus and surrounding neighborhoods. Create opportunities for future development, including public/private partnerships. Improve pedestrian environement. Within the focus upon strategies for a realistic, implementable short term plan. Short -Term plans to improve pedestrian environment + intersections and allow future, transformative projects to occur over time P3s Short Term Plan Implementation : 1) 2011: Form Stakeholder Coalition: Connect Auraria Coalition 2) 2011: Create Steering Committee and ultimately a Project Management Team from stakeholder groups ; conduct research to identify studies, plans, and influences (2011-2012) 3) 2011: Gain support from civic, political, business communities 4) 2011: Update the issues, responses, and document [do the homework] 5) 2011 : Create strategies presentations for promotion, and implementation 6) 2012: Outreach: Promote the CAC Initiative and conduct workshops, outreach, input for ideas, priorities, etc. 7) OCTOBER 2012: Finalize funding for study CCD 8) DECEMBER 2012: Select consultant to perform study 9) JANUARY 2013 CONTRACT : Retain professionals to create the plan based upon work to date; adjust a. Document the Vision, Guiding Principles, Strategies, Issues, Homework done, action plan b. Stakeholder and Public outreach c. Identify the major elements and cost magnitudes d. Identify key criteria to evaluate priorities e. Evaluate phasing, increments, costs for short term plan(s), projects f. Identify potential incremental packages for implementation g. Evaluate and prioritize the short -term potential projects h. Others per Request for Proposal 10) O CTOBER 2013: Complete Study: approximately 9 months from start ON -GOING: Identify funding sources [stakeholders, CCD bond fund, et al]

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75 | Site Analysis Appendix A | 75 (U pdated June 2014 Connect Auraria Study) GENERAL INFORMATION : 2007 Downtown Area Plan (DAP) D owntown A rea P lan (DAP) Connecting Auraria Goal: Fully integrate the Auraria Campus and the Downtown core through strong physical, social, economic and programmatic connections. DAP Grand Boulevards Goal: Transform Speer Boulevard, Colfax Avenue and Auraria Parkway into celebrated, multimodal boulevards to overcome the physical and perceptual barriers of these major thoroughfares. Auraria Master Plan Update and Strategic Implementation Plan A new paradigm for campus development: New Design Guidelines are based upon the need for densification from previous suburban enclave and commuter campus to a densely built, urban campus that is also outwardly focu sed. Each of the institutions have a neighborhood that connects to the campus core La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan (2010) Goal: A comfortable, convenient connection for students, employees and residents is provided between AHEC and the residential areas of La Alma/Lincoln Park; connections: Osage and 5th Strategic Transportation Plan Denver: Blueprint Denver; Pedestrian Priority Zone; Denver Moves; Parks Game Plan; Speer Boulevard improvements South Platte River (re)Development (Study underway) Speer Boulevard Design Guidelines [1988]; ROW and also for Private Development LoDo District Historic Urban Edge District Design Guidelines Landmark Preservation: Historic Resources and Guidelines [to be determined] Emerging other studies and plans, i.e. One -Way Streets, Street cars, Parks Plan for Speer, etc. EMERGING STRATEGIES A. vehicles. Minimize the perceptual spatial separation by planning building locations tight to the ROW lines and on property owned by City and County of Denver that has potential for (private) development 2) Create a safe and pedestrian friendly environment within the Rights of Ways (ROW) B. 1) Create pedestrian friendly pathways and environments at intersections crossing the Grand Boulevards. 2) Promote integration of land use and ROW with all forms of multimodal public transportation 3) Evaluate traffic patterns C. -orient environment. 1) Employ traffic calming measures along the Campus edges 2) Create a pedestrian friendly environment within the entire public ROW, and adjacent land. D. 1) Plan new buildings with an urban density both on campus and within surrounding neighborhoods 2) Consider public/private development strategies for current public land (not designated as parks) 3) Utilize potential developable land as infill vertically and horizontally 4) Consider Campus and adjacent potential building sites for development that will densify and connect to Cherry Creek pathway system (starting in LoDo to Confluence Park) E. Connect the main campus with off campus facilities and destinations. 1) Consider the various plans and influences including the Downtown Area Plan 2) Study the following key intersections to determine initial priorities: Speer Boulevard at Market, Larimer, Lawrence, Arapahoe [UCD Neighborhood], Colfax Avenue at Lipan and Mariposa [CCD Neighborhood] ; also center divider improvements to make Colfax a pedestrian friendly street Auraria Parkway at 9th and 7th [Metro State Neighborhood] Other intersections? (U pdated June 2014 Connect Auraria Study) CONTEXT: The Auraria Campus is separated perceptually and physically by three major vehicular thoroughfares from its surroundings (Speer Blvd., Colfax Ave., and Auraria Parkway). The need to improve pedestrian safety is paramount. Increasing demands for academic space coupled with limited land for expansion have generated an urban vision for the campus. This creates the opportunity and need to merge the urban environments of the Campus and the surrounding neighborhoods and Downtown Districts. Challenges: The three Grand Boulevards (Speer, Auraria Parkway, and Colfax) present highly trafficked vehicular barriers to pedestrian crossings to/from Campus. The intersections of Speer and Colfax, Speer and Auraria Parkway, and Colfax and Santa Fe/Kalamath are especially busy and challenging for pedestrians. Potential to merge urban fabrics emerges when both the Campus and the opposing property owner(s) are redeveloping/den sifying. This potential exists for the Larimer to Auraria Parkway segment of Speer. Elsewhere better connections are being made to destinations (e.g. parking at Pepsi Center opposite the Student Success Building and retail and services on the south side of Colfax). The Bell Park View Plane allows one story building along Speer thereby conflicting with the concept of urbanizing the Campus and creating visual/perceptual connections with LoDo. This is standing in the way of Adjacent Campus land being planned/assigned to UCDs neighborhood and splitting the neighborhood into two parts. A politically sensitive issue. Some progress has been made with new UCD Building to allow more height. Speer ROW designated as a Denver Landmark District per CCD Parks and Recreation. Unless other design review requirements are in place, buildings are not required to relate to Speer. Existing Bridges: Narrow width for circulation and safety improvements Underground utility infrastructure in public ROW and adjacent land, including Campus, is costly/difficult to move. Speer Boulevard CU -Denver has several buildings on the Downtown side of Speer, The Downtown side of Speer segment, Colfax to Lawrence is bu ilt -out with no planned changes. Colfax Avenue Heavily-used transit corridor for buses and light rail. East-bound bus stops on south side of street. High-speed traffic from the west coming off the viaduct. Colfax intersections with Speer and Santa Fe/Kalamath are often congested and dangerous Amenities such as restaurants and coffee shops located on the south side of Colfax. Auraria has purchased land south of Colfax for future athletic fields (Metro State) Auraria Institutions are using rented space south of Colfax Previous studies and initiatives for Colfax improvements from Broadway to Speer Auraria Parkway High speed traffic connecting with I25 Parking reservoir, future development of Pepsi Center For the illustrative vision, recognize that the Speer Boulevard segment between Lawrence and Auraria Parkway has the most potential for merging the urban fabrics given the new campus hotel, CU Denvers plans and the Historic Urban Edge District of LoDo and existing fabric at Larimer and Lawrence, as well as the Creekfront Park. The merging fabrics at the other edges will have to await redevelopment but a vision for this needs to be illustrated T he south side of Colfax can be seen as something other than suburban-style commercial development as well as the development of the Pepsi Center parking lots on the west side of Auraria Parkway. PROJECT MANAGEMENT TEAM: Mark Bernstein CCD Parks and Recreation Downtown Area Planner Gary Desmond Connect Auraria Coalition Chair, and NAC Architecture Principal John Desmond Downtown Denver Partnership Executive VP, Downtown Environment Crissy Fanganello CCD Public Works Director; Division of Transportation Chris Gleissner CCD Community Planning and Development Senior Ci ty Planner Jill Jennings Golich Auraria Higher Education Center Campus Planner (left May 2014) Aylene McCallum Downtown Denver Partnership Senior Manager, Transportation and Research Cindy Patton CCD PROJECT MANAGER; CCD Public Works Senior Trans portation Planner Emily Silverman CCD Policy, Planning & Sustainability Associate City Planner Michael Finochio CCD Public Works City Traffic Engineer/ Deputy Director Barbara Weiske Executive VP for Administration/ CEO of Auraria Higher Education Center