Citation
Decatur-Federal station area plan

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Title:
Decatur-Federal station area plan
Creator:
Community Planning and Development, City and County of Denver
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
City and County of Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English

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Subjects / Keywords:
Public transit
Transit oriented development
Spatial Coverage:
Denver -- Decatur-Federal

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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ADOPTED BY CITY COUNCIL
APRIL 22,2013
APPROVED BY PLANNING BOARD
MARCH 6,2013
DENVER
THE MILE HIGH CITY


Acknowledgments
MAYOR MICHAEL B.
HANCOCK
DENVER CITY COUNCIL
District 1 Susan Shepherd
District 2 Jeanne Faatz
Districts Paul D. Lopez
District 4 Peggy Lehmann
District 5 Mary Beth Susman (President)
District 6 Charlie Brown
District 7 Chris Nevitt
District 8-Albus Brooks
District 9 Judy H. Montero
District 10 Jeanne Robb
District 11 Christopher Herndon
At- Large- Robin Kniech
At-Large Deborah Ortega
DENVER PLANNING BOARD
Brad Buchanan, Chairman
Andy Baldyga
Shannon Gifford
Kenneth Ho
Anna Jones
Brittany Morris Saunders
Sharon Nunnally
Susan Pearce
ArleenTaniwaki
Julie Underdahl
Dave Webster
COMMUNITY PLANNING AND
DEVELOPMENT
Rocky Piro, Manager
Molly Urbina, Deputy Manager
Kelly Leid, Development Services Manager
Steve Gordon, Planning Services Manager
Barbara Frommell
Steven Chester
Todd Wenskoski
Caryn Champine
Andrea Burns
DENVER HOUSING AUTHORITY
Ismael Guerrero, Executive Director
Chris Parr
Melissa Rummel
PUBLIC WORKS
Jose Cornejo, Manager
Crissy Fanganello, Policy and Planning
Director
Brian Mitchell,Traffic Engineering Services
Director
Karen Good
Emily Snyder
Justin Schmitz
Mike Anderson
Ryan Billings
PARKS AND RECREATION
Laura Dannemiller, Manager
Gordon Robertson, Parks Director
David Marquardt, Parks Planning Manager
Mark Bernstein
Jay Henke
OFFICE OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
Paul Washington
John Lucero
Jeff Romine
Doug Smith
RTD
William Van Meter, AGM of Planning
Kate Iverson
Patrick McLaughlin
CONSULTANT SUPPORT
Design Workshop
Fehrand Peers
Sky to Ground, LLC
Studio Completiva
KHO Consulting
ArLand Land Use Economics
Marti n/Martin
Two Hundred
DENVER HEALTH
Jaclyn Cheves
The work that provided the basis for this publication was supported by funding under an award with the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Cooperative Agreement
No. CCPO-0029-10 and Federal Transit Administration Cooperative Agreement No. CO-79-1000. The substance and findings of the work are dedicated to the public. The author and
publisher are solely responsible for the accuracy of the statements and interpretations contained in this publication. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations
expressed in this publication are those of the Author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Federal Government.
ft
2 Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT | Introduction
^


Table of Contents
INTRODUCTION ..........................................................4
Planning Area Overview..............................................6
Planning Process....................................................8
Planning Context...................................................12
Howto Use this Plan................................................13
Accomplishments, Challenges, Opportunities.........................14
Development Concept................................................16
Vision ForSunValley................................................18
A CELEBRATED SUN VALLEY...............................................20
A CONNECTED SUN VALLEY................................................26
AN INNOVATIVE SUN VALLEY..............................................38
A HEALTHY SUN VALLEY..................................................56
TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECTS...............................................62
13th Avenue........................................................64
Riverfront Park....................................................66
Stadium, Entertainment & Culture...................................68
High Quality Residential Communities...............................70
Connect People with Jobs and Education.............................72
10th Avenue........................................................74
Federal/Colfax Interchange.........................................76
MOVING FORWARD........................................................78
Regulatory and Policy Strategies...................................80
Partnerships.......................................................86
Investment Strategies..............................................88
Phasing............................................................90
GLOSSARY..............................................................92
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Introduction | Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT
3


I
The vision set forth by this plan and the willingness
of residents, businesspeople, and property owners to
work with the city toward that vision, charts a course
for Sun Valley to evolve into a thriving, healthy and
livable neighborhood that better serves everyone
who lives, works, or plays in the community.
Rocky Piro // Manager of Community Planning and
Development // City and County of Denver
The Denver Housing Authority is transforming
public housing in Denver, creating vibrant,
sustainable, affordable mixed-income communities.
Sun ValleV is"next"on DHA's list for mixed income
development and presents tremendous potential
for creating livable communities adjacent to light
rail, downtown, regional trails, higher education,
jobs and community amenities.
Ismael Guerrero // Director, Denver Housing Authority
This plan is a culmination of years of work led by
a culturally diverse group of residents, a creative
city planning tearrvactivists^for sustainable
communities, family-owned businesses, and
Denver Housing Authority that will set a clear
vision for balanced, healthy, and innovative
development in Sun Valley.
Councilwoman Judy Montero // District 9
Sports Authority Field at Mile High draws
over 750,000 visitors a year. Providing more
entertainment and shoppin^options near the
stadium will heighten the experience for Broncos
fans, help enliven the Sun Valley neighborhood,
spread out event-related traffic impacts and bring
more jobs to West Denver.
Malcolm "Mac" Freeman // Denver Broncos
Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT | Introduction


introduction
Recently Denver has experienced a renaissance centered along the Platte River. Within the last
thirty years the South Platte Greenway has become an amenity for the region and a boom to
real estate values. The influence of riverfront revitalization is expanding north and south from
its origins at Confluence Park. Sun Valley is at the heart of this revitalization.
For the Sun Valley neighborhood, this transformation couldn't be more welcome. Long
known as the home to riverfront factories, public housing, football stadium surface parking,
drainage ditches, and highway noise, the Sun Valley neighborhood has suffered. Despite these
challenges. Sun Valley residents and business owners share a sense of pride for this community
and strong determination to help it rise up to meet its potential.
Change is in the air. Recent improvements to the greenways and trails improve the safety and
livability of the area and put Sun Valley on the map as an important crossroads for regional
bicycle trails. April 2013 brings a pivotal moment, when the West Light Rail Line connecting
downtown Denver, Lakewood and Golden opens, including the Decatur-Federal Station in Sun
Valley. Sun Valley residents will have convenient transit access to downtown and to a region of
opportunities. Light rail access also enhances Sun Valley's opportunities as a destination not
just for football, but for a variety of entertainment or employment purposes.
With tremendous potential for infill development to integrate with greenways, the light rail
station. Sports Authority Field at Mile High, a high concentration of community amenities, and
a thriving employment district. Sun Valley is about to experience its own renaissance.
The Decatur-Federal Station Area Plan guides future growth and change near the light
rail station and in the Sun Valley neighborhood over the next 20 years. Facilitating the
transformation of Sun Valley into a place that is celebrated, connected, innovative and healthy
is a critical element in Denver's mission to create a world class city where everyone matters.

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Introduction | Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT
5


Planning Area Overview
1. SOUTH PLATTE GREENWAY
Building on the success of the
Central Platte Valley, a high degree
of momentum exists for "reclaiming"
the South Platte River and adjacent
lands for parks, recreation, water
quality and habitat enhancements.
Potential phasing out of some
Xcel utility operations heightens
the potential for greenway
enhancements in Sun Valley.
2. RTDWEST RAIL LINE
The West Rail Line brings consistent
and reliable transit service to
Sun Valley and West Denver
neighborhoods. The 12.1 mile light
rail transit corridor connects Denver
Union Station with West Denver,
Lakewood, Golden and Jefferson
County.
6. RUDERECCENTER/PARK
This regional Denver recreation
center offers a variety of exercise
programs and facilities a gym,
indoor pool, and community
meeting rooms. Adjacent Rude Park
is an open space amenity featuring
ballfields.
7. LAKEWOOD GULCH
Recently opened up from a
box culvert and enhanced with
expanded open space, new trails,
natural vegetation and a water
feature, Lakewood Gulch is an
important neighborhood and
regional amenity. It is also the
historic location of the Interurban
Shortline Railway.
3. DECATUR-FEDERAL STATION
Sun Valley's light rail station is the
first station on the West Rail Line
outside of downtown and 4 stops
from Union Station (11 minute ride
to Union Station). Trains run every 5
minutes during peak times.
4. SPORTS AUTHORITY
FIELD AT MILE HIGH
Home of the Denver Broncos, the
stadium is a major regional draw
for the area. However, the activity
created by the stadium is limited to
game days.The opportunity exists
to transform the stadium area to a
district with activity throughout the
year.
5. SUN VALLEY HOMES
Sun Valley Homes, a 33 acre public
housing site, is some of the oldest
housing in DHA's portfolio. DHA has
targeted Sun Valley as "next"on their
list (after South Lincoln Homes) for
development of livable and high
quality mixed income communities
near transit.
8. WEIR GULCH
Denver Parks and Rec has
undergone a visioning and design
process for the revamping of Weir
Gulch in order to increase the
amenities and landscape character
of the green way. Improved safety
and access will increase its value as a
neighborhood amenity.
9. AURARIA CAMPUS
The campus houses facilities of three
separate universities: the University
of Colorado Denver, Community
College of Denver, and Metropolitan
State College of Denver, with almost
40,000 students among them.
There are currently limited student
housing options near the campus.
10. DOWNTOWN DENVER
The views of Downtown Denver
from the station area are stunning,
mainly because the close proximity
this area enjoys to the employment
and entertainment opportunities
downtown has to offer.
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6 Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT | Introduction

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11. LOWER COLFAX
Prior to the construction of the
existing Colfax viaduct, Lower Colfax
was the main connection from
west Denver to Downtown and was
a commercial main street for the
historic neighborhood. A few historic
buildings remain but the main street
character has been lost.
12. FAIRVIEW ELEMENTARY
The school, located in the heart of
the station area, is a vital community
gathering place. Amenities included
at the school are a community
garden and a neighborhood park,
frequented by Sun Valley Homes
residents.
13. DENVER HUMAN SERVICES
The main office for DHS is a major
employer and service provider in the
neighborhood. DHS provides both
assistance services and protection
and prevention services to Denver's
most vulnerable residents.
14. WESTSIDE HEALTH CENTER
Established in 1969, the Westside
Health Center is the largest clinic
in Denver Health's CHS system and
provides comprehensive primary
and preventive care, including
management of chronic diseases for
patients of all ages.
15. 8TH AVENUE INDUSTRIAL AREA
This Industrial area features a variety
of employers with very low vacancy
rates. While the area contains many
jobs at different skill levels, few
of them are filled by Sun Valley
residents.
STUDY AREA


Introduction | Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT
7


Planning Process
This Plan was made possible by a 2011 federal grant from the Partnership for
Sustainable Communities, specifically the Department of Housing and Urban
Development (HUD) and Department of Transportation (DOT). The Plan was co-
managed by the City and County of Denver and the Housing Authority of Denver
(DHA) under the umbrella of the Denver Livability Partnership, a coalition of
organizations working to improve livability in west Denver neighborhoods.
PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT PROCESS
Creation of the Plan involved an extensive public process that engaged residents,
business owners, property owners, several government agencies, Sun Valley area
employees, non-profits, real estate development experts and anyone who expressed
interest in participating. The public process kicked off in January 2012 with a public
"listening session"and the convening of a Plan Steering Committee that would help
guide the Plan process and content. A Public Engagement Strategy was written
containing strategies from the Steering Committee and members of the public after
input received from the first round of meetings. The team set a goal of using creative
approaches to public engagement in order to hear from members of the community
who are typically "hard-to-reach" in planning processes. The effort paid off. The year-
long planning process offered approximately 30 stakeholder meetings, events, and/
or opportunities to participate in this planning effort. The total number of people
reached by the process is approximated at 2,500.
Plan Steering Committee
Members of the Steering Committee were nominated by City Council Members in
Districts 1,3 and 9. Participants represented key Plan stakeholders and organizations.
The Steering Committee helped craft the Plan goals, provided invaluable information
regarding issues and opportunities, and gave advice regarding Plan process. Steering
Committee members also helped get the word out about meetings and offered ways
to get involved. A total of four full steering committee meetings were held over
the course of the planning process. Additional check-ins with individual steering
committee members and/or their organizations were scheduled throughout the
process as needed.
Sun Valley Homes Local Residents Council (LRC)
Planning Team members attended these monthly meetings with Sun Valley Homes
residents and gave updates on the Plan process and/or content. Approximately 25
residents attend these meetings monthly. Planning team held "office hours"after
these meetings for anyone wishing to stay longer and discuss the Plan.
Sun Valley Children
Over half of Sun Valley's population is under the age of 15. Since these kids are the
future of Sun Valley, the planning team reached out to them to engage them in the
process. The planning team included activities for kids in every public meeting,
empowered the children to present their ideas for the community at public meetings,
held children's workshops and attended kid-focused community events such as the
Harvest Festival.
Sun Valley Stakeholders Meetings
Planning Team members regularly attended these quarterly meetings to give Sun
Valley stakeholders updates on the Plan and Plan process.
8 Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT | Introduction


Workshops
Three workshops were held throughout the course of the planning process in order
to focus on a specific issue or geographic area within the Plan. These include:
South Platte River Greenway Workshop (in conjunction with the South Platte
River Brownfields Area Wide Plan) Approximately 40 stakeholders met to discuss
the relationship between the river and any new development. Attendees were
asked to describe their vision for the river and its surrounding uses in the Sun
Valley area
Residential Communities Tour Several planning team members and
stakeholders (primarily Sun Valley Homes residents) attended this halfday tour
of multi-family, mixed use and mixed income neighborhoods around Denver.
Photos were taken along the tour of participants'Likes'and'Dislikes'to capture
values and preferences regarding residential communities
Federal Boulevard This workshop focused primarily on opportunities to improve
the pedestrian and business environment along Federal Boulevard. It was
attended by a diverse mix of business owners, Federal Boulevard Partnership
representatives and residents of nearby communities
Public Meetings
Public Meeting #1 Listening Session Attended by 97 participants, this kickoff
public meeting allowed stakeholders to do the talking and Planing team to do the
listening. Questions to get people talking included:
What do you love about your community?
What businesses, services and jobs do you want in your community?
How do you want to get around? And where do you want to go?
How are the cultures of this community celebrated?
Public Meeting #2 Neighborhood Identity- Attended by 88 participants, this
meeting included a review of the Draft Plan Goals, a discussion of neighborhood
identity and a presentation of the draft Plan framework. In addition to the public
meeting, a Children's Workshop was also held with activities such as city bingo and a
Lego city building exercise. Approximately 60 children attended the workshop
Public Meeting #3 Creating Places Attended by 57 participants gathered to view
and comment on draft placemaking concepts for 3 areas of the planning area; the
"Neighborhood Mixed Use"area, the Station Core, and the "Riverfront."Comment
cards with specific questions about the draft Plan concepts were collected and
summarized.
Public Meeting #4 A Brighter Future- Attended by 125 stakeholders, this meeting
allowed for participants to view and comment on draft Plan concepts for the Station
Area Plan. Concepts and recommendations were presented for the four chapters of
the Plan, Celebrated, Connected, Innovative, and Healthy. Attendees were asked to
gauge their comfort with a number of the ley draft Plan recommendations.
Surveys
Several surveys were created to give people a way to participate even if they could
not attend the meetings.
Organizations Represented on Plan
Steering Committee
Council Districts 1,3,9 and 2 At-large
Denver Housing Authority
Denver Public Health
Denver Urban Gardens
Fairview Elementary
Federal Boulevard Corridor
Improvement Partnership
Fresh Start Denver
Jefferson Park United Neighbors
LiveWell West Denver
Local Businesses
Mercy Housing / Decatur Place
Metropolitan Football Stadium
District
Metropolitan Organizers of People
Prevention Before Infection
Rude Recreation Center
Sisters of Color United for Education
South Platte River Trolley
Sun Valley Coalition
Sun Valley Homeowners
Sun Valley Local Residents Council
Sun Valley Youth Center
Tha Myx Church
The Greenway Foundation
Urban Land Conservancy
Villa Park Neighborhood Association
WalkDenver
West Colfax Association of Neighbors
West Colfax Business Improvement
District
Xcel
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Introduction | Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT
9


Property Owners Meetings
Several meetings were held with small Sun Valley property owners to ensure that they
are engaged in the process, aware of the Plan status and have an understanding of
how it will affect them.
Business Community Outreach
The team made a great effort to include the business community in this planning
effort. Strategies such asflyering businesses, holding public meetings during
working hours and meeting with individual business owners on their time schedule
brought a valuable perspective to the Plan process.
Individual Stakeholder Outreach
The planning team was available throughout the process to meet with any
stakeholder expressing an interest in the Plan. The team also proactively interviewed
individuals representing all stakeholder groups incorporate personal stories into the
Plan.
Plan Website and Social Media
A Plan website has been frequently updated since the planning process begun. The
website has been updated with public meeting and workshop announcements,
materials presented at all public meetings, along with links to online surveys. Since
the planning process begun the website has seen nearly 1,500 hits (page views).
Urban Land Institute (ULI) Technical Assistance Panel (TAP)
Nine months into the planning process, the team hired ULI panel to provide technical
assistance to the Plan. Panelists included members of the development and finance
community. The purpose of the panel was twofold: (1) provide constructive criticism
on the draft Plan concepts, and (2) suggest critical first steps toward implementing
the Plan. The panel's recommendations are included as a technical memo attached to
this Plan and helped inform the Plan recommendations as well as the implementation
strategies in the Moving Forward section.
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Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT | Introduction

10


Public Meeting #2 "Neighborhood Identity" Public Meeting #3 "Creating Places"
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Introduction | Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT 11


Planning Context
EXISTING PLANS AND STUDIES
This Plan represents the land use, urban form, transportation and economic
development vision for the Decatur-Federal station area and Sun Valley. Adoption
of this Plan by Denver City Council updates the Denver comprehensive Plan and
Blueprint Denver recommendations for this part of the City. This Plan incorporates or
refines recommendations of previous Plans and studies for the station area and Sun
Valley neighborhood. Any updates to the following Plans should incorporate and
refine recommendations for Sun Valley based on this Plan:
Denver Comprehensive Plan (2000)
Blueprint Denver (2002)
Denver Parks and Recreation Game Plan (2003)
TOD Strategic Plan (2006)
Greenprint Denver (2006)
Strategic Transportation Plan (2008)
Storm Drainage Master Plan (2009)
Gulch Master Plan (2009)
Sanitary Sewer Master Plan (2009)
Strategic Parking Plan (2010)
Federal Boulevard Planning and Environmental Linkages Study 5th To Howard
(2011)
Denver Moves (2011)
Denver Complete Streets Policy (2011)
Colfax and Federal Interchange Study (2012)
CONCURRENT PLANNING EFFORTS AND STUDIES
Several studies and planning efforts contributed to the Station Area planning process
and overlapped geographically. The Decatur-Federal Station Area planning team
coordinated with each of these efforts to ensure the most efficient use of resources
and to help ensure consistency among Plan recommendations. Links to these
documents are available online at www.denvergov.org/decaturfederal.
Decatur-Federal Station Area Plan Market Study
Colfax / Federal Health Impact Scoping
Colfax/Federal Interchange Study
South Platte River Brownfields Area Wide Plan
West SideTransit Enhancement Study
City Kitchen Model Business Plan
TOD Strategic Plan Update
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12 Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT | Introduction

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How to Use this Plan
This Plan establishes a long range vision and guiding principles for the development and
future of the Decatur/Federal Station area. The elements ofthis Plan will direct the community
toward a vision fora celebrated, connected, innovative and healthy Station Area.
Public agencies and private entities will use this Plan in coming years for many purposes and
actions that will affect the form and function of the Station Area. The Plan provides city-
adopted policy direction to guide decision-making related to development opportunities,
transportation, partnerships, and many others. Many of the recommendations will require
multiple steps over several years by a variety of participants.
The Plan provides a sound policy basis for a thriving Station Area. The recommendations
identified in the Plan provide direction to guide day-to-day decision making related to land
use, public investment, private development, and partnerships. The Plan is intended to give
the latitude needed to pursue unforeseen opportunities that will arise and to respond to new
challenges over the coming years.
The Plan is divided into six sections in addition to this introduction:
The first four chapters outline the Plan's guiding principals and the recommendations to
achieve a celebrated, connected, innovative, and healthy station area
Highlighted in some recommendations are transformative projects which are identified
in the fifth chapter as being essential to achieving the Plan vision over the next 10 to 20
years
The final section describes moving forward in terms of the types of implementation and
priorities for the short and long term to ensure the success of the Plan. This chapter also
highlights the multiple steps that may be necessary to work toward implementation of
the transformative concepts
As with the Comprehensive Plan and its supplements, this Area Plan's recommendations
provide guidance. This plan is not intended to, and does not, rezone any property, render any
existing uses non-conforming, or pre-dispose the outcome of any permitting processes related
to properties within the planning boundary. Future implementation actions such as zoning
map or text amendments, capital improvements and public-private partnerships require
specific actions on the part of the city, property owners and stakeholders.
ft


Introduction | Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT 13


Accomplishments, Challenges, Opportunities
Sun Valley, 1947
Sun Valley Homes
ACCOMPLISHMENTS
RTD's construction of the West Rail Line will bring consistent and reliable transit service
to Sun Valley and west Denver neighborhoods. The Decatur-Federal Station is the first
stop on the West Rail Line outside of Downtown Denver and 4 stops from Union Station
(11 minute ride to Union Station). Trains will run every 15 minutes, greatly increasing the
convenience of transit for these communities
In a partnership between the City of Denver and the Urban Drainage and Flood Control
District, Lakewood Gulch was opened up from a box culvert in 2012 and enhanced with
expanded open space, new trails, natural vegetation and a trickling water feature. This
project has also removed much of the 100 year floodplain from the neighborhood
Through the 2007 Better Denver Bond, Denver invested in new sidewalks, pedestrian
lighting and security cameras in and around the Decatur-Federal Light Rail Station
platform
A partnership between Denver Urban Gardens and Fairview Elementary School has
continued to shine as a resource for hands-on learning, an important neighborhood focal
point and a celebration of community and healthy food
The Denver Broncos have been a significant component in the area. The fan base, and the
team's frequent success provide football excitement throughout the region.
The River South Greenway Master Plan and more recent River Vision Implementation Plan
have seta clear path for prioritized improvements along the South Platte River.
Denver Parks has successfully transitional Rude Recreation Center into a "regional" center -
bringing more resources and recreation programming to the neighborhood
The Flousing Authority of Denver (DHA) has successfully transformed distressed public
housing projects into high quality mixed income residential communities throughout
Denver including Benedict Park Place and Mariposa (Formerly South Lincoln Flomes)
CHALLENGES
Sun Valley is Denver's poorest neighborhood. Over 90% of Sun Valley's 3000 residents live
in subsidized housing, and the median household income in 2010 was only $8000
Decatur-Federal Station
Sun Valley Flomes residents complain about their neighborhood and housing not being
wheelchair accessible, having sporadic heat, too few bedrooms and bathrooms, and no
laundry facilities
Sun Valley lacks a daily population of residents, employees and visitors sufficient to
support local businesses
Over its long history. Sun Valley has accumulated split personalities transportation
crossroads, sports venue, residential neighborhood, public housing, river habitat,
industrial area. In many ways, these "multiple Sun Valleys" have worked against each over
time, rather than working together toward success
Street grid connections between Sun Valley, adjacent neighborhoods and downtown
have become challenging over time due to infrastructure and natural features that inhibit
mobility
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14
Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT | Introduction


East-West connectivity is especially challenging. Currently only three streets (the Colfax
viaduct, 8th Avenue and 6th Avenue) connect across Federal Boulevard, the South Platte
River and 1-25. Due to their location and design, these streets do not serve Sun Valley
residents, and do not adequately accommodate pedestrians and bicycles
Pedestrian and bicycle connections to the Decatur-Federal Light Rail Station may be
challenging forWest Colfax residents due to the Federal-Colfax interchange and limited
places to cross Federal Boulevard and Colfax Avenue
Several vacant or underutilized industrial properties that are considered redevelopment
opportunities are in need of environmental cleanup prior to redevelopment
Education levels and graduation rates are some of the lowest in the city
Sun Valley is in a "food desert"- limited access to stores that sell fresh and healthy foods.
Sun Valley consistently ranks among the worst of Denver's neighborhoods for health
indicators, such as access to healthy foods, preventative care, and income
Decatur Street
m Connections across Federal Boulevard and Colfax Avenue are challenging for residents
of Sun Valley, West Colfax and Villa Park, as there are only a few streets that offer traffic
signals and crosswalks
OPPORTUNITIES
Approximately 100 acres of land are or may be soon available for redevelopment within a
Vi mile radius of the Decatur-Federal Light Rail Station
DFIA has targeted Sun Valley as "next" on their list (after South Lincoln Flomes) for
development of livable and high quality mixed income communities. This will improve
the living condition for Sun Valley Flomes residents and alleviate the symptoms of
concentrated poverty in Sun Valley
Building on the success of the Central Platte Valley, a high degree of momentum exists
for"reclaiming"the South Platte River and adjacent lands for parks, recreation, water
quality and habitat enhancements
The Broncos, Stadium District and RTD seem interested in joint development
opportunities and making shared and structured parking work, opening up land for more
efficient development patterns
Sports Authority Filed at Mile FUgh Stadium
m Property owners recognize the opportunity to bring back Lower Colfax as the area's
authentic main street and center for cultural activities
Rich cultural diversity exists in Sun Valley like few neighborhoods in Denver and could be
celebrated to create an identity for the area
The average American family spends 19 percent of their household budget on
transportation. Encouraging growth of a variety of housing types in a place like Sun Valley
- where walking, biking and transit will become the default modes used by residents to
get where they are going greatly reduces this budgetary drain and makes living more
affordable for all households
Nearby Auraria Higher Education Campus (AHEC) has a growing student population and
little housing near campus. With great multi-modal connections, access to downtown,
recreation amenities, low lease rates and a "funky vibe," Sun Valley presents a great
opportunity for student living
Lakewood Gulch
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Introduction | Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT 15


Development Concept
Sun Valley's Development Concept
presents the broad, foundational
components for development of a
celebrated, connected, innovative and
healthy Sun Valley.
Physical assets and amenities anchor
cities and neighborhoods. Natural
features, a regional greenway, a
stadium or entertainment destination,
distinctive historic buildings, unique
cultural facilities these are elements
which people remember. The specific
arrangement of the elements, the
links among them, and their character
distinguish a neighborhood and make it
truly unique and desirable.
Sun Valley is fortunate to have an
abundance of assets, but the opportunity
remains to create more, and to improve
the links between them.
Light Rail Line
Light Rail Station
Opening in 2013, the Decatur-Federal
Station along the West Light Rail Line
will efficiently connect the area to
Downtown and the rest of the region.
The station and the connections it will
provide will be a gateway between Sun
Valley and the region.
Neighborhood
Activity Node
Regional
Activity Node
Key connections will serve to link the
four neighborhood activity nodes: the
New Riverfront Park, 10th Avenue, 17th
and Federal and the new West Side
Library and market. Key connections
also connect the neighborhood with
larger, regional activity nodes including
the Station area, Lower Colfax/Stadium
Entertainment, and the Auraria Campus.
Stadium/Entertainment
Destination
Transit Oriented
Development
Employment TOD
Industrial
The future vision for the station area
includes four, new unique character
areas within the station area:
Stadium/Cultural Destination
Key Multi-modal
Connection
Key Regional
Connection
The neighborhood currently suffers from
a lack of connectivity to surrounding
neighborhoods and destinations.This
Plan provides the framework for better
connectivity within the neighborhood,
along with better connecting Sun Valley
with the city and region.
Transit Oriented Development area
Employment TOD area
Industrial area
Together, these elements create a
framework to guide and foster a
celebrated, connected, innovative, and
healthy Sun Valley.
ft
16 Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT | Introduction


Introduction | Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT 17


THE VISION FOR SUN VALLEY
A.1 Build upon Sun Valley's
History and Assets
A.2 Encourage Diversity
A.3 Celebrate Culture
B.1 Reknitting Neighborhoods
B.2 Integrated System of
Parks and Public Spaces
B.3 Enhance Walkability and
Bikeability
B.4 Make Transit Convenient
TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECTS
The seven projects are identified as
the most critical steps to positively
transform the station area.
Multi-layered and long-term in nature,
these projects will take a concerted
effort by both public and private
sectors. All energy and resources
should be harnessed toward making
these a reality. Only through executing
these projects can Sun Valley truly
transform and achieve the vision of a
celebrated, connected, innovative and
healthy station area.
1. 13TH AVENUE
2. RIVERFRONT PARK
3. STADIUM,
ENTERTAINMENT &
CULTURE
ft
18 Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT | Introduction


C.1 Transit Oriented Development
r ~ Stadium Entertainment
^ Destination
C.3 Open For Business
C.4 A Vibrant Corridor
D.1 Healthy For People
D.2 Healthy for the Environment
D3. Healthy for the Economy
4. HIGH QUALITY 5. CONNECT PEOPLE 6.10TH AVE
RESIDENTIAL WITH JOBS AND
COMMUNITIES EDUCATION
7. FEDERAL/COLFAX
INTERCHANGE
ft


Introduction | Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT 19


HISTORY OF SUN VALLEY:
Late 1800's
Jewish immigrants settled in
Sun Valley. Old Colfax Road was
at the center of this boom. The
building that is now Brooklyn's
was constructed in 1896.
1917
Old Colfax Viaduct is constructed
for cars and trolleys connecting
downtown Denver and West
Side neighborhoods.
1920's
City of Denver passed first
zoning law-Sun Valley,
especially around the South
Platte River becomes an
industrial zone.
1936
Fairview Elementary School is
built.
1942
First public housing
development, LasCasitas,
opened. Included 184
units. Rent was $2.44 a
room per month.
1948
Denver Bears Stadium is
constructed. The stadium holds
18,000 and would later become
Mile High Stadium.
1950's
1-25, the Valley Highway, is
constructed, as well as the
Colfax/Federal Interchange.
1952
The Denver Housing Authority
constructs Sun Valley
Homes a 330 unit barracks-
style affordable housing
development.
1960's
Broncos become a staple of the
community-setting up shop
in the old Mile High Stadium.
At the time, the stadium had
seating for 34,000.
1999
Denver Human Services moved
thei r offices to Su n Val ley,
building a newfacility at Federal
& Holden.
2001
Sports Authority Field at Mile
High opened. The new stadium
seats 76,125.
2003
The new state-of-the-art Rude
Recreation Center opened.
2012
Lakewood Gulch undergoes
extensive reconstruction to
improve the safety of the area.
2013
The Regional Transportation
District (RTD) Decatur-Federal
Station opens- one of 13 stations
along the newWest Rail Line.
Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT | Celebrated


a. a celebrated sun valley
celebrating the history, diversity, and culture of Sun Valley
Why is being celebrated important to Sun Valley? The area has a long and varied history
dating back to the beginnings of Denver. Growth and development west of downtown
radiated outward from Colfax Avenue connecting early Denver with settlements to the
west. DenverTramway streetcar lines built in the late 1800's along Colfax spurred this
growth. Colfax served as a main street of commercial activity for nearby residential
neighborhoods housing working class families in the late 1800's, Jewish families in the
mid 1900's and Latino families in the late 1900's. West Colfax Avenue retains a significant
amount of its Jewish cultural history. Latino and Asian cultures currently thrive in
the area, primarily along Federal Boulevard. Somali and Vietnamese immigrants and
refugees are also very prominent in Sun Valley.
Today, people know this part of Denver as a sports venue home of the Denver Broncos
and Sports Authority Field at Mile High. The area is also frequented by users of the
South Platte River Greenway Trail or the Lakewood Gulch trail primarily bikers, joggers,
or tourists experiencing the greenway trails or riding the heritage Platte River Trolley.
Just south of the stadium parking lots and west of the South Platte River is the poorest
and most isolated neighborhood in the city remnants of a late 19th century working
class neighborhood intertwined with public housing, heavy industry and government
services. Further south toward 6th Avenue is Sun Valley's thriving light industrial district
employing thousands of people, few of whom actually live in the neighborhood.
In many ways the troubled history of the area is about these "multiple Sun Valleys"
working against each other over time sports venue, neighborhood, infrastructure and
industry. This Plan charts a new course of action that requires partnership among all of
Sun Valley's stakeholders to achieve the vision for a brighter future.
One path toward success involves better celebrating Sun Valley's assets. A celebrated
Sun Valley builds upon the area's amenities, bright spots in history and hints of culture,
creating a place that is aesthetically pleasing, culturally rich and full of activity. A
celebrated Sun Valley is connected to its past; it inspires the present and will help shape
the future.
A.1 Build upon Sun Valley's History and Assets
A.2 Encourage Diversity
A.3 Celebrate Culture

Celebrated | Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT 21


RECOMMENDATION A.1
BUILD UPON SUN VALLEYS HISTORY AND ASSETS
SPORTS HISTORY IN THE STATION AREA:
Denver Broncos 1960 -
Deawrnusoets
Denver Nuggets 1975-1999
Colorado Rockies (NHL) 1976-1982
Colorado Rockies (MLB)1993-1995
OUTLAWS
Colorado Outlaws 2006 -
A.1.A. CREATE LOWER COLFAX MAIN STREET
Bring back Lower Colfax as the main street it formerly was for the neighborhood.
Encourage preservation or adaptive reuse of buildings along Lower Colfax with
historic significance, such as Brooklyn's and the Ironworks Building, while improving
the public realm.
A.1 .B. EXTEND PLATTE RIVER TROLLEY
Extend the Platte River Trolley along Lower Colfax and to the Decatur-Federal Light
Rail Station. While primarily serving a cultural and historic function, the Platte River
Trolley does provide an important transportation function on game days.
A.1 .C. CAPTURE CULTURAL HISTORY
Capture the area's ethnic and cultural history, as well as its history as an important
transportation corridor. Support the creation of cultural venues, increased public
art, aggressive business recruitment, and enhanced programming and community
events.
A.1 .D. CELEBRATE SPORTS AND ENTERTAINMENT HISTORY
Celebrate the area as the host for many of Denver's historic and existing professional
sports teams and music events. Build upon this sports culture by including
Commercial venues such as sports bar & grills, cultural venues such as an expanded
Broncos Hall of Fame, business recruitment such as sports training centers, sports-
based programming and community events.
A.I.E. FEATURE OUTDOOR RECREATION
Celebrate Sun Valley as a paradise for bicycle and river recreation enthusiasts.
Situated at the crossroads of two "bicycle super-highways" Sun Valley provides
immediate access to hundreds of miles of paved bicycle trails. For boaters, Sun
Valley is one mile upstream from Denver's famed Confluence Park and kayak
course. Outdoor recreation can be best celebrated through continued greenway
improvements, public art, recreation-based business recruitment, programming and
community events.
A.1 .F. INDUSTRY/INNOVATION
Celebrate the area's history as an industrial employment area and a place of
innovation. This theme can be captured in public art, architecture, business
recruitment, innovation-themed programming and events. Encourage preservation
or adaptive reuse of buildings with historic significance related to industry in the area,
such as the Zuni generation plant.
A.I.G. SUPPORT INTERNATIONAL FOOD
Build upon the area's current demand for international and ethnic foods and Sun
Valley residents'increasing interest in local food production. Capture food as a theme
in public art, business recruitment, weekly markets and cultural venues and events.
A.1 .H. SUPPORT PUBLIC AMENITIES
Continue to support existing public and cultural amenities such as Rude Recreation
Center, Fairview Elementary School, Denver Human Services and West Denver Library.
4r,W
22
Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT | Celebrated


CULTURE MAP
Sports Authority Field at Mile FUgh
Community Garden
Sun Valley Youth Center


A
Celebrated | Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT 23


RECOMMENDATION A.2
ENCOURAGE DIVERSITY
A.2.A. SUPPORT A MIXTURE OF INCOMES
Sun Valley has historically supported lower income families and should continue to
do so in a way that does not concentrate poverty and the symptoms of poverty into
one isolated place. Encourage population growth, a mixture of residential options
and a more seamless integration of low income, workforce and market rate residential
choices.
A.2.B. ACCOMMODATE ALL AGES & ABILITIES
Continue to offer multiple convenient transportation choices, a high quality built
environment and diverse neighborhood services and amenities so that people of
all ages and abilities feel comfortable living and working in Sun Valley. If the built
environment is accessible, usable, convenient and a pleasure to use, everyone
benefits.
A.2.C. ATTRACT BUSINESSES
Attract a diversity of large and small businesses to the area that serve the shopping,
entertainment, services, training and employment needs of Sun Valley residents,
employees and visitors. Attracting a mixture of businesses can add to the sense of
place and neighborhood character of Sun Valley.

Wji -A, iiifii
Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT | Celebrated
24


RECOMMENDATION A.3
CELEBRATE CULTURE
A.3.A. UTILIZE PUBLIC SPACES AND GATHERING PLACES
The Sun Valley neighborhood is lacking in high quality, successful public spaces.
Successful public spaces have four key qualities 1) the space is accessible to all 2)they
are programed effectively and people are engaged in activities there 3)the space is
comfortable and has a positive perception, and lastly 4) it is a sociable place, meaning
a place where people can meet each other and take people when they come to visit.
A.3.B. PROMOTE A CULTURAL CENTER
A cultural center is an organization, building, or complex that promotes culture and
the arts. Cultural centers can be neighborhood community arts organizations, private
facilities, government sponsored, or activist run. The opportunity exists in Sun Valley
for one or more of these institutions.
A.3.C. CREATE FOOD VENUES
Food is a vital component of many of the different cultures in Sun Valley. Additionally,
Sun Valley is a food desert, meaning it lacks access to healthy foods. This plan
recommends the creation of a number of food oriented destinations including:
Community gardens
International food co-op
International market
Food hub
A.3.C. SUPPORT PUBLIC ART
Public Art serves two primary roles, as a tool for economic revitalization and it helps
contribute to a community's identity. When used correctly, public art can represent
a sense of community pride and help to bring people together. Also, public art can
attract people to a community who bring a broad array of talents and experiences.
Public Art will play an important role in the revitalization of Sun Valley and can help
bring the community together while honoring the past. Locations for new public art
have been identified in this Plan.
A.3.D. SUPPORT COMMUNITY EVENTS AND CELEBRATIONS
Create places for community events and celebrations within Sun Valley. Public spaces
should be designed in a way to accommodate larger events and gatherings. These
events will bring the Sun Valley neighborhood closer together, along with expose the
neighborhood to the greater Denver region.
International Market
La Pena Cultural Center- Berkeley, CA
Welton Jazz Festival


I think I will like the changes in the
neighborhood. The new light rail will
make it easier for my family to go see my
grandparents. I am very, very excited for
this.
David // 5th Grader// Sun Valley Homes Resident
When I go to King Soopers, I don't find
everything I need. So I take a bus to an
African store in Aurora. I do not know how
to drive. The bus takes a very long time. If
the train can take me to an African store, I
will be very happy.
Beatrice Hwraa // Sun Valley Homes Resident

Sun Valley is hidden, tucked away and has
always had challenges with access. This
plan's recommendations for better street
connections will significantly improve the
neighborhood's accessibility.
Cindy Everett// Senior Associate, Urban Land
Conservancy
One of Khadika's sons goes to South High
School. He takes three buses and a train -
a 40 minute commute. When the light rail
opens, he can board the train at Decatur-
Federal Station a short walk from home.
He'll make one train transfer, and the trip will
take 20 minutes or less.
Khadika //Sun Valley Homes Resident
Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT | Connected


b. a connected sun valley
Connecting Sun Valley to the City and Region
Why is being connected important to Sun Valley? A well connected place has many direct and
convenient routes leading into, through and out of the community. "Connections" come in many
forms: pedestrian friendly streets, bus routes, bike trails and routes, passenger rail lines and
stations, and parks and public spaces. Places with many high quality physical connections to other
places offer a host of advantages for residents, businesses and the cities in which they are located.
Connected places allow people the choice to walk, bike, ride transit, or drive to where they need to
go. A large and growing collection of research is finding that connectivity is associated with more
walking, less driving, greater safety, less crime, better physical fitness, greater private investment
and lower per capita greenhouse gas emissions.
Sun Valley benefits from great highway access and regional trail connectivity. The transit system
has also served Sun Valley residents well both with bus service and now the new West Rail service
that stops at the Decatur-Federal Station. Nevertheless, Sun Valley is surrounded by infrastructure
and natural features that isolate it from surrounding neighborhoods and downtown. Poor
street grid connectivity to and through Sun Valley's residential areas has created a seemingly
isolated, often forgotten community. Federal Boulevard and the elevated Colfax Avenue offer
a challenging pedestrian environment and limited pedestrian crossing opportunities, further
isolating Sun Valley from its neighbors. Once in Sun Valley, it is difficult to find one's way due to
dead ends, winding roads and unintuitive street connections.
Sun Valley and the Decatur-Federal Station Area will truly be connected when walking, biking,
taking the train or bus becomes the default choices for how residents and employees get around.
A connected Sun Valley is a place people will want to live, locate their business, or visit and they
have many convenient choices for how to get around.
B.1 Reknitting Neighborhoods
B.2 Integrated Parks and Public Spaces
B.3 Enhance Walkability and Bikeability
B.4 Make Transit Convenient
*7v%3T I
*
Connected | Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT 27


RECOMMENDATION B.1
REKNITTING NEIGHBORHOODS
Internal Circulation New Streets Detail
B.1.A. CONNECT SUN VALLEY WITH ITS SURROUNDINGS
Increase the number and quality of connections between Sun Valley, the Decatur-
Federal Station, adjacent neighborhoods, Auraria Campus and Downtown Denver by
extending and/or reconstructing the following key multimodal streets:
13th Avenue- Realign 13th Avenue west of the S. Platte River to connect
to Federal Boulevard. Reconstruct 13th Avenue to accommodate separated
sidewalks, on-street parking and bike lanes, per this plan's recommended cross
section. More detail is in theTransformative Projects section of this Plan.
10th Avenue- As redevelopment occurs, extend and enhance 10th Avenue
eastward to create a direct multimodal connection from the Villa Park
neighborhood, across Federal Boulevard to the S. Platte River Greenway. More
detail is in theTransformative Projects section of this Plan.
Federal Boulevard-Work with CDOT to reconstruct Federal Boulevard from 5th
Avenue to 20th Avenue. An environmental review process in 2009 determined
the preferred cross section for the reconstructed Federal Boulevard from 5th to
Howard. Information can be found at Denvergov.org/FederalHoward. Complete
the design and continue to look for funding opportunities to construct the
project. As improvements are implemented, look for additional opportunities to
improve pedestrian and/or bicycle crossing conditions at key intersections along
Federal- 17th,Colfax, 14th, Holden, 10th and 8th. Continue to study alternative
designs for the Colfax/Federal intersection a Transformative Project of this Plan.
8th Avenue Reconstruct 8th Avenue to improve pedestrian and bicycle
facilities, in addition to accommodating cars and trucks.
B.1 .B. IMPROVE INTERNAL CIRCULATION
As redevelopment occurs, improve internal circulation in parts of Sun Valley that have
large "superblocks". Superblocks can create directional challenges, unnecessarily
lengthen travel distances and give people a sense of being lost. Sun Valley's
superblocks occur near the Stadium, on DHA property and in the industrial areas.
Stadium parking lots Construct new, landscaped streets on stadium property
between the Stadium and Colfax based on the concept in this plan. This
circulation concept will help organize new development and create a more
"green"and inviting environment.
DHA Parcel and Riverfront As redevelopment occurs, recreate a street grid
and pedestrian-friendly blocks on the DHA parcel (Sun Valley Homes property)
and along the riverfront to help organize new development and provide better
access to the proposed riverfront park.
Street grid extension Look for opportunities to extend the street grid or
pedestrian connections into large parcels as they redevelop. Examples include
the Stadium's Parking Lot M north of the Decatur-Federal Station and industrial
properties to the south.
Proposed Street Removal
----- Proposed New/Extended Street
Potential Street Grid Extension
4r. V
Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT | Connected
28


KEY MOBILITY CONNECTIONS
^ Multimodal Street Reconstruction Multimodal Street Enhancement
Internal Circulation New Streets ^ Off street Bike/Ped Connection
ft
W I

Connected | Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT 29


B.I.C. ENHANCE KEY MULTIMODAL STREETS
Lookfor opportunities to implement approved cross sections and/or streetscape
enhancements for the following key multi-modal streets as development occurs.
14th Avenue- A full array of streetscape enhancements is appropriate for this
connector to the Light Rail Station and community amenities wide or separated
sidewalks, pedestrian lighting, wayfinding signage, benches, special pavers,
trash receptacles. Change the name "Howard Place" to "14th Avenue" to provide
consistency across Federal Boulevard and improve wayfinding.
Lower Colfax- Considered part of the Stadium Entertainment and Culture
Transformative Project in this plan, Lower Colfax is a main street witha wide
range of streetscape enhancements that will balance pedestrian activity, bicycle
traffic, the South Platte River trolly extension and stadium event related traffic.
Further study is needed to identify an appropriate cross section and design.
Decatur Street As redevelopment occurs along this spine of Sun Valley, ensure
that Decatur Street is improved to include detached sidewalks, on street parking
and bike lanes, per this plan's recommended cross section. Additional street
enhancements could include pedestrian lighting and wayfinding signage.
B.I.D. CREATE A INTUITIVE MULTIMODAL NETWORK
The recommendations in this plan, if fully implemented, will result in an intuitive
multimodal network linked with adjacent land uses. The hierarchy of the
transportation network proposed balances mobility with access so that Sun Valley
streets are well equipped to move people, not just cars. Blueprint Denver street
classifications are best used to describe not only the function of streets, but how their
function relates to adjacent land uses. The Proposed Blueprint Street Classifications
Map identifies the following types of multimodal streets. This plan makes
recommendations for cross sections of several streets. Blueprint Denver provides
additional guidance on design elements for each multimodal street type at www.
denvergov.org/blueprint.
Residential designed to primarily serve pedestrians, bicycles and provide
property access
Mixed Use emphasizes a variety of travel choices to provide access to adjacent
residential, commercial and employment uses
Main streets highest intensity retail streets with expanded pedestrian amenity
zones designed to promote walking such as wide or separated sidewalks,
pedestrian lighting, wayfinding signage, benches, special pavers, trash
receptacles
Industrial designed to serve a high volume of large vehicles, such as trucks

30
Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT | Connected


DATED BLUEPRINT STREET CLASSIFICATIONS
PROPOSED STREET CROSS-
SECTIONS
\ 14' 1 48'
1. Stadium Festival Street

14' 48" * 14'
2.13th Street, Decatur Street, Zuni Street
t I 1
14' 36' park
3. Riverfront Drive w/ Water Quality
# ll H II
Mixed Use-Arterial
Mixed Use Collector
Mixed Use Local
Main Street
Industrial Arterial
Industrial Collector
Residential Collector
Bicycle/Pedestrian Only
Undesignated
14'
4. lOthAve
38' 16'(N)

A
AL
I All 9fi
Connected | Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT 31


INTEGRATED SYSTEM OF PARKS AND PUBLIC SPACES
RECOMMENDATION B.2
B.2.A. ENHANCE REGIONAL GREENWAY AND TRAIL SYSTEM
Expand the vision laid out by the River South Greenway Master Plan (RISO) as it
pertains to Sun Valley
New Riverfront Park Build a new park on the west side of the South Platte River
between Weir Gulch and 13th Avenue, including well-lit trail connections, activity
nodes and passive and active recreation opportunities
Provide more neighborhood connections to greenways through well designed
streets and pedestrian walkways or publicly accessible spaces within private
development.
As the property between Lakewood Gulch and Lower Colfax redevelops, consider
the appropriateness of creating a publicly accessible pedestrian link between the
Stadium Festival Street and Lakewood Gulch
Continue to maintain and enhance the existing parks, Rude Recreation Center
and regional bike trails
Improve Weir Gulch Continue to look for opportunities to expand and enhance
the gulch and provide better connectivity across Federal Boulevard and 8th
Avenue to Barnum North Park
As redevelopment occurs on properties adjacent to the river, work with property
owners to expand or improve the attractiveness of the greenway
B.2.B. UTILIZE STREETS AS PUBLIC SPACES
The best neighborhoods have welcoming public space within 1/8th mile (700 feet)
of all homes. Several opportunities exist in the Sun Valley neighborhood to create
streets as public spaces. These include the Pedestrian Priority Streets of Stadium
Festival Street, Lower Colfax, 10th Avenue and Park Drive. These pedestrian priority
streets should include enhanced pedestrian amenity zones including sidewalk cafe
seating, pedestrian lighting, public plazas, and pedestrian-scaled signage.
B.2.C. CREATE PLACES TO PLAY AND RECREATE
Create a variety of places for residents and employees to play and recreate, including
informal play, passive and active recreation and team activities. A water-based play
area would be suitable at the confluence of the Lakewood Gulch and the South Platte
River greenway to connect these two regional greenways.
B.2.D. GREEN THE NEIGHBORHOOD
Bring "green"areas into the community interior in theform of tree-lined streets,
water quality features, community gardens, pocket parks, playgrounds and public
plazas. Look for opportunities to expand community gardens. Several proposed sites
are included in the Parks and Open Spaces concept. Continue to work with Parks
Department and developers to find sites for community gardens.
B.2.E. REGIONAL STORMWATER QUALITY AND DETENTION
Take advantage of opportunities for providing regional detention and water quality in
parks and along streets without sacrificing the quality or usability of the park or open
space.
4r. V
Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT | Connected
32


PARKS AND OPEN SPACES
O
O

o
Active Recreation
Meeting Place
Community Gardens
Playgrounds
Regional Trails
iiiiiii Pedestrian Priority Streets

Conceptual Building Placement
Plaza
Riverfron t Activation
Active Public Space
Existing Lakewood Gulch Improvements
RIVERFRONT PARK AND DRIVE SECTION

Connected | Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT 33


RECOMMENDATION B.3
ENHANCE WALKABILITY AND BIKEABILITY
a
Creating a walkable and bikeable neighborhood requires an integrated system of well-
designed street, parkand public space connections. This allows the healthy choice of walking
or biking to become the most convenient and comfortable choice for people. Increased
walkability and bikeablity enhances public health, community livability (including community
cohesion), as well as offering substantial environmental and equity benefits.
B.3.A. COMPLETE THE BICYCLE NETWORK
Complete an integrated system of bicycle routes within the neighborhood that links
intuitively to the citywide bicycle network, transit, destinations and regional multipurpose
trails.
Update the Denver Moves Plan to reflect bicycle connections recommended in this
plan. In some cases, this Plan specifies the type of bicycle facility (e.g."bike lanes") within
the approved street cross section. In other cases, the type of facility is unspecified and
left for DenverMoves to determine (e.g."bike connection"). The Bicycle and Pedestrian
Connections Map indicates existing bicycle connections, planned connections currently in
DenverMoves, and new connections proposed by this plan as an update to DenverMoves.
Implement the DenverMoves plan for Sun Valley as opportunities arise or as
redevelopment occurs. High priorities for implementation include bicycle connections
along 13th Avenue, 14th Avenue and Lower Colfax. 8th Avenue needs further study due
to constrained right of way and truck traffic.
B.3.B. IMPROVE THE PEDESTRIAN ENVIRONMENT
With great transit access and tremendous opportunity for compact urban residential and
employment growth, a high quality pedestrian realm is crucial to Sun Valley's future.
Pedestrian Priority Streets- While all streets in Sun Valley need to contribute to pedestrian
safety and comfort, several streets are recommended as"Pedestrian Priority". These streets
should offer enhanced features that create an inviting and active public realm. These
pedestrian priority streets largely occur in the vicinity of the Decatur-Federal Station, the
stadium and along the riverfront park.
Priority Intersections-These are highly utilized crossing locations by pedestrians or bicyclists,
and therefore should be designed with the safety and comfort of pedestrians and riders in
mind. Design enhancements that may be appropriate for priority intersections include:
Wide and well-marked crosswalks Countdown pedestrian signals
Full ADA compliance Curb extensions
4-Way stop control No right turn bypasses
B.3.C. CONNECT WITH BIKE SHARING NETWORK
Extend the network of bike sharing (B-Cycle) stations to Sun Valley to better serve the growing
number of Sun Valley residents, employees and visitors. Since no B-Cycle stations currently exist
in the area, stations should be placed accordingly to serve residential developments. Other
destination locations for new bike stations may include but are not limited to:
Decatur-Federal light rail station Mile High Vista/New Westside
Sports Authority Filed at Mile Library
High New riverfront park
4r. V
Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT | Connected
34


BICYCLE AND PEDESTRIAN CONNECTIONS
Existing Bicycle Connection
Existing Mulit-use Path
---Planned Bicycle Connection (DenverMoves)
1 Proposed Additions to DenverMoves
Pedestrian Priority Street
*#
a a
*
Priority Intersection
Complete Street
Enhanced Intersection Kelowna, BC
Pedestrian Priority Street- Fillmore St, Denver
ft
*****

Connected | Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT 35


RECOMMENDATION B.4
MAKE TRANSIT CONVENIENT
BAA. SUPPORT TRANSIT SERVICE
While bus service is and will continue to be well-utilized by Sun Valley residents,
new light rail service will be transformational in people's daily lives. One study by
Reconnecting America suggests that travel time on an average day for Sun Valley
residents will decrease by half as a result of light rail access.
Ensure that light rail and bus service continues to be consistent, accessible and
affordable so that it is the convenient mode of choice for people living and
working in the Decatur-Federal station area
New developments should consider Community/Neighborhood RTD Eco-passes
to lower the cost of transit, especially for affordable and mixed income housing
residents
As growth in Sun Valley occurs, continue to improve bus routing and service
as needed to accommodate new destinations and transit needs. Specifically,
growth of entertainment venues near the stadium may increase demand
for weekend and late night transit service. Consider adding Call-n-Ride
as recommended by the 2012 West Side Transit Enhancement Study to
accommodate these additional service needs.
Ensure that bus-to-train connections are safe and convenient, with clear lines-of-
sight and signage directing people to the train station and bus stops
BAA IMPROVE LAST MILE CONNECTIONS
Every transit trip is a multi-modal journey, as people need to either bike, walk, or drive
to the station. Even if someone drives to the station, they must eventually walk to
the rail platform. Getting people to and from the station is fundamentally important.
Safe bike routes to transit hubs reduce the need for feeder transit service, potentially
cutting bus costs. More residents bicycling can also relieve pressure on transit service
during peak hours. Ensuring that the transit station is served by adequate pedestrian
infrastructure is the minimum required to connect residents to transit. While the city
and RTD have invested resources into new sidewalks, lighting and security cameras,
more can be done to improve last mile connections to the light rail station.
Enhance the pedestrian and bicycle experience near the new light rail station
and along routes to nearby destinations such as the West Side Library, the
Stadium, and Rude Recreation Center
Pedestrian and bicycle connections to the station platform should be
comfortable and convenient for aII users, regardless of their ability
Connect bikeways to transit stops, add additional bicycle parking by these stops,
and provide adequate sidewalk space to accommodate bicycle parking
Lookfor opportunities to implement streetscape improvements along 14th
Ave and along Decatur Street, create a more direct pedestrian connection from
the LRT station to Rude Recreation Center, and consider creating a mid-block
crossing on Howard (14th Ave) between Federal and Decatur to connect with
new development to the north.
BAB CREATE WAYFINDING AND SIGNAGE
Create intuitive and consistent wayfinding system such as signage and other graphic
communication to establish clear and comfortable connections between the LRT
platform and nearby landmarks and destinations, including Rude Rec Center,
Sports Authority Field at Mile High Stadium, West Side Library, and Lower Colfax
District. Signage should be geared toward pedestrians and possibly list walking
times to neighborhood destinations rather than distances to help encourage active
transportation. Signage should be incorporated and build upon Parks and Recreation
signage currently present in Lakewood Gulch.
4r. V
Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT | Connected
36


BUSTRANSIT SERVICE
PRIORITY PEDESTRIAN IMPROVEMENTS
Time/Destination Based Signage Walk Raleigh
Shared Sidewalk
Wayfinding in Downtown Denver


Connected | Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT 37


We love living in Sun Valley. We like the urban
grittiness the industrial mix. We like how
close we are to downtown without having to
pay downtown prices. The light rail station
was a key decision factor to buy a house in
this area. And we like the stadium we are
huge football fans.
Seth and Erin McCarthy// First time homeowners

I'm all for growth. I'm all for changes as long
as it helps the community to grow. Look
at the elementary kids ten years down
the line, they will be in high school and
Sun Valley will have transitioned. We need
to make sure that these kids graduate and
have opportunities to succeed.
Angelo Crowell // Sun Valley Homes resident
North of the stadium has grown with
townhomes and lofts. We need new
residential on the south side of the stadium
for the neighborhood to work. I think more
density around the transit station with
apartments above and retail on the first floor
is just what the area needs.
Dave Keefe// Owner, Brooklyn's Restaurant
Stable income is not common for Sun Valley
residents. In all my years here, I have known
very few people who have stayed in a job
and "climbed up the ladder". I would love
to see Sun Valley kids and parents learning
skills that will help them find stable careers.
Kris Rollerson // Sun Valley Youth Center
Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT | Innovative


c. an innovative sun valley
attracting jobs, investment, and diverse housing choices
Why is being innovative important to Sun Valley? Cities across the country
are experiencing a multi-generational demand for walkable, affordable
neighborhoods that offer a rich mix of amenities, provide convenient access
to education and jobs and facilitate active lifestyles. Sun Valley presents a
tremendous opportunity for this type of eclectic urban lifestyle. This plan's
innovative approach to growth and development in Sun Valley will increase
the number of residents, employees and visitors to the area while continuing
to build a socially and economically inclusive place.
The Sun Valley neighborhood has three distinct character areas that possess
their own unique opportunities:Transit Oriented Development, Stadium
Entertainment, and Employment (aka "Open for Business"). The South Platte
River Greenway threads its way along the east side of each of these character
areas, tying them together. This Innovative section of the plan addresses
growth and development in each character area. Recommendations for
growth and development along the South Platte are also organized within
the three character areas.
Federal Boulevard the spine of West Denver also connects Sun
Valley's character areas and neighborhoods to the west. This commercial
corridor provides its own unique challenges and opportunities. While
Federal Boulevard is addressed in each character area, a compilation of
recommendations covering the corridor from 6th Avenue to 17th Avenue is
included in "A Vibrant Boulevard."
C.1 Transit Oriented Development
CHARACTER AREAS
C.2 Stadium Entertainment Destination
C.3 Open for Business
C.4 A Vibrant Corridor
i
Innovative | Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT 39


RECOMMENDATION C.1
TRANSIT ORIENTED DEVELOPMENT
C.1.A. CREATE A LIVABLE TOD COMMUNITY
Facilitate TOD near the Decatur-Federal Light Rail Station (per the TOD Area Map)
that integrates private development with a vibrant public realm and provides
great access to the transit system and green ways
Create compact development patterns with small blocks and consistent building
frontages that spatially define public streets and open spaces, creating a diverse,
cohesive and walkable community
Encourage both a vertical and horizontal mix of land uses including multifamily
residential, office, commercial, and public uses
Attract high quality, mixed income residential communities within theTOD
area (a transformative project in this Plan). Encourage housing development
that meets the needs of families, young professionals, students and elderly
households of various income levels. A variety of residential building forms
appropriate for this TOD include row houses, low-, midland high-rise
multifamily, and live/work.
Concentrate commercial activity near the light rail station, on Lower Colfax
and at intersections to serve transit riders and the community. Recognize
Lower Colfax as a special opportunity to bring back a historic main street and
commercial and cultural center.
Encourage shared, consolidated and/or structured parking with new
developments (see page 50)
C.1 .B. FACILITATE HIGH QUALITY URBAN DESIGN
New development should utilize the following urban design principles to maximizing
the quality of development and pedestrian amenities within theTOD.
Encourage a wide mix of building heights and variation in building forms to
provide visual interest, needed sunlight, air circulation and natural view corridors.
Respect maximum building heights of 5 to 12 stories, per the Maximum Building
Heights Map
Arrange building heights and scaling devices to provide transitions to adjacent
areas
Create visually interesting and human-scaled facades. Utilize doors, windows and
articulation to establish scale, variation and patterns on building facades that
provide visual interest and reflect uses within the buildings
Primary Streets- Consider identified Primary Streets (TOD Area Map) during zoning
and site plan review to determine appropriate setbacks, building configuration,
parking location and pedestrian access requirements for new development. All
other Primary Streets required by zoning shall be determined at the time of Site
Development Plan.
Active edges- Consider identified Active Edges (TOD Area Map) during zoning and
site plan review to guide decisions on siting active ground floor uses, such as retail,
commercial, community space or residential lobbies. Active edges should have
prominent, street facing entries, pedestrian-oriented signage and high degrees of
ground-floor transparency
40 Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT | Innovative


MAXIMUM BUILDING HEIGHTS
3 Stories
5 Stories
8 Stories
12 Stories
TOD AREA
W COLFAX Avl
I I
West Side Library (2013)
W 14TH AVE
Primary Street Transit Oriented Development Area Active Edges
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Innovative | Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT 41


C.1
.C. ACTIVATE THE GREENWAYS
Ensure that new development in the TOD area helps activate the South Platte
River Greenway and Lakewood Gulch to promote the safety and attractiveness of
these green ways.
Orient buildings to provide entrances, attractive frontages and pedestrian access
along greenways.
Multi-family residential uses are especially appropriate along greenways to
provide residents immediate access to recreation opportunities and create day
and evening activity in the parks.
Commercial or office uses may also be appropriate if they include a publicly
accessible use or are designed in a way that engages with and compliments the
greenway. Commercial or office uses fronting greenways should have a high
degree of transparency and architectural interest as well as pedestrian access
connecting to the greenway.
C.1 .D. IMPROVE THE VISUAL ENVIRONMENT
New development in Sun Valley's TOD area is both dependent on and may offer
opportunities for improving the visual environment with regards to energy
infrastructure.
Transmission lines Work with stakeholders, developers, energy and regulatory
companies to explore looking at underground options for large transmission
lines, subject to operational and other constraints.
Substation Work with Xcel, area developers and partners to screen the 13th
Avenue substation with new structures, vegetation or other measures to
minimize visual impacts.
Zuni Power Plant Upon the pending (2016) decommissioning of this plant, look
for opportunities to redevelop all or portions of this site in a way that activates
the riverfrontand 13th Avenue. Encourage adaptive reuse of appropriate or
historically important portions of the plant to maintain a connection with Sun
Valley's industrial past
Cooling Towers Encourage demolition of the large riverfront cooling towers
south of 13th Avenue on the east side of South Platte River. Work toward
redevelopment of this site that activates 13th Avenue and enhances the
green way
The city acknowledges that properties owned by Xcel may become available
for redevelopment only when and to the extent that Xcel determines that such
properties are not needed for the purpose of providing energy to its customers and
the Denver Community.
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Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT | Innovative


FUTURE LAKEWOOD GULCH

Innovative | Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT 43


C.I.E. UTILIZE CREATIVE STORMWATER SOLUTIONS
Clean waterways are precious amenities that connect land and water, provide
important wildlife habitat, offer vibrant recreational and educational opportunities,
and enhance livability and economic vitality of our neighborhoods (Greenprint 2020).
Located on the S. Platte River, at the confluence of two gulch systems, Sun Valley
presents a tremendous opportunity for strategic and innovative approaches to water
quality systems.
Sustainable development practices are encouraged throughout Sun Valley
including water quality facilities that are of superior quality, are functional, protect
environmental health, serve as a public amenity, and support public safety.
Current city policy requires that water quality facilities be 1) safe, 2) meet treatment
requirements (UDFCD Vol III technical criteria), 3) be aesthetically pleasing, and 4)
will be maintained by an entity other than the City.
Large scale development should consider incorporating consolidated water
detention and water quality features. Consolidating stormwater features may reduce
development costs by achieving economies of scale and facilitating more compact
development patterns. Consolidated facilities would require significant coordination
between property owners, developers and the city.
This Plan presents a concept for consolidated water quality features. Details of the
water quality and detention will need to be addressed in a General Development Plan
and at the time of development. In this Plan's concept, properties west of Decatur
would be responsible for on-site detention and water quality. Properties east of
Decatur would utilize consolidated stormwater detention and water quality features.
The consolidated stormwater concept includes the following elements:
1. Four dual-purpose stormwater detention / wildlife habitat areas integrated into
the new riverfront park in an aesthetically pleasing manner that enhances the
quality and usability of the park / open space that could also serve water quality
functions and act as passive recreation areas (e.g. nature trails).
2. Three additional stormwater detention / water quality areas are proposed; One
potential location is west of the Xcel substation north of 13th Avenue to act as
a buffer between adjacent development and the substation. Another location
could be south of the stadium and west of the Comcast building. The third
location could be on the play field east of Fairview Elementary School and could
serve a dual purpose of passive recreation or environmental education.
3. Roadside water quality features (e.g. bioswales) within the public right-of-way
along the east side of Decatur Street and on the east side of Bryant.
4. Roadwide water quality feature within park boundaries along the east side of
the riverside park drive.
5. Roadside bioswales typically need to be maintained by the property owner or
a district, with the exception of the riverfront park bioswale, which could be
maintained by the City's Parks Department. Dual-purpose detention areas within
the park would be maintained by a district or by the Parks Department.
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Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT | Innovative


Integrated Water Detention Denver, CO Integrated Water Quality Seattle, WA
Integrated Water Detention Denver, CO
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Innovative | Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT 45


RECOMMENDATION C.2
STADIUM ENTERTAINMENT DESTINATION
Broncos Tailgate
C.2.A. CREATE A YEAR-ROUND DESTINATION
Encourage growth of a stadium-oriented entertainment and commercial
destination to create year-round shopping and entertainment opportunities,
improve the vibrancy and attractiveness of the area and compliment
entertainment options downtown and along the South Platte River.
Appropriate land uses include commercial, retail, entertainment, hotels and
cultural uses. Multi-family residential and office may also be appropriate within
the mix of uses.
Recruit Commercial Anchors Two or three commercial, retail or cultural anchors
are necessary to create a vibrant year-round destination.
Sports and Entertainment Niche Capitalize on the sports and recreation themes
in the area by recruiting complimentary and synergistic businesses sports-
themed restaurants, museums, health clubs, training gyms, merchandise stores,
and or related office headquarters.
Incorporate an internal network of landscaped streets and public spaces such
as the Stadium Festival Street. New streets and public spaces should break up
expanses of parking, organize new development, offer priority to pedestrian
movement and connect the stadium with light rail station bus routes. The
Stadium Festival Street is a Transformative Project in this Plan.
Maintain adequate transit and vehicle access to the site.
Work with partners on activating the space underneath the Colfax Viaduct with
public art and active uses, such as a proposed international / farmers market.
Work with the Platte River Trolley toward extension of the line to provide access
to growing entertainment destinations near the stadium.
C.2.B. FACILITATE HIGH QUALITY URBAN DESIGN
Orient buildings and create a consistent street frontage along internal public spaces
-including the proposed Stadium Festival Street and outwardly toward Federal
Boulevard and the intersection with 17th Avenue.
Encourage a mix of building heights and variation in building forms to provide visual
interest, needed sunlight, air circulation and natural view corridors. Recommended
maximum building height is 5 stories, per the Maximum Building Heights Map in the
TOD section of this Plan.
Create visually interesting and human-scaled facades. Utilize doors, windows and
articulation to establish scale, variation and patterns on building facades that provide
visual interest and reflect uses within the buildings
S. Platte River Trolly
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46 Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT | Innovative


STADIUM ENTERTAINMENT DESTINATION
Primary Streets Consider identified Primary Streets (Stadium Entertainment
Destination Map) during zoning and site plan review to determine appropriate
setbacks, building configuration, parking location and pedestrian access
requirements for new development. All other Primary Streets required by zoning
shall be determined at the time of Site Development Plan.
Active edges Consider identified Active Edges (Stadium Entertainment Destination
Map) during zoning and site plan review to guide decisions on siting active ground
floor uses, such as retail, commercial, community space or residential lobbies. Active
edges should have prominent, street facing entries, pedestrian-oriented signage,
high degrees of ground-floor transparency, and visually interesting and human-
scaled facades.
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Innovative | Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT 47


| C.2.C. SHARE AND CONSOLIDATE PARKING
Concentrating residents, employees and daily needs within walkable distance to
transit typically reduces the need for people to use automobiles and find a parking
space for every trip. Consequently, TOD areas need less parking than places where
the automobile is the primary form of transportation. As a result, parking in TOD
areas is often treated as a common resource for adjacent land uses, rather than as a
requirement of each building or land use.
With an overabundance of Stadium District owned surface parking lots, Sun Valley
presents a tremendous opportunity to consolidate and manage parking more
efficiently. With the opening of the light rail line in 2013, up to 1,900 parking spaces
on stadium district owned lots will be shared with RTD so that transit riders from
nearby neighborhoods can park and ride.
As Sun Valley grows and attracts new development, physical constraints will drive the
need for consolidated, structured and shared parking. An organized approach for
parking consolidation, design and management is necessary to ensure a successful
parking system that balances the needs of residents, employees, the stadium, transit
riders and visitors.
Consider creating a parking Area Management Plan, as described in the city's
Strategic Parking Plan, to analyze and document opportunities to consolidate
and manage parking more efficiently
Encourage shared and structured parking among RTD, the Stadium and new
development, to maximize land available for development in the TOD area
RTD Parkand Ride- monitor utilization of RTD's 1900 parking spacesand lookfor
opportunities to reduce the number of RTD parking spaces in the TOD area
Wrap structured parking with active street frontage where appropriate
Residential parking and affordability new residential developments should
consider unbundling parking so that a resident can lease a unit with or without
the extra cost of leasing a parking space. This approach provides more choices
for residents and keeps costs down for both residents and developers
With new development, lookfor creative approaches to meet parking
requirements including shared, tandem, remote or bicycle parking
Increase opportunities for bicycle parking and storage at key locations
throughout the station area the Decatur-Federal Station platform, the stadium,
along Lower Colfax, in parks, and at public facilities. RTD's offers bicycle lockers
for rent at most Park-nRide stations for transit passengers who need regular,
secure storage for their bike. Bicycle parking should also be provided for visitors
to the station area as well.
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Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT | Innovative


Parking Demand
PARKING OPPORTUNITIES
Garage w/Active Street Frontage Bellmar, CO
Parking Demand Weekday
Parking Demand Gameday

Innovative | Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT 49


RECOMMENDATION C.3
OPEN FOR BUSINESS
New Belgium Brewery Fort Collins, CO
Build on the success of Sun Valley's existing industrial area in a way that increases job
opportunities near transit and invites Sun Valley residents to work near where they live.
C.3.A. SUPPORT EXISTING INDUSTRIAL BUSINESSES
Continue to support businesses in the existing industrial area from 6th Avenue to 9th
Avenue and from Federal Boulevard to the South Platte River
Appropriate land uses in the existing industrial area include light industrial and flex space,
with some commercial uses, especially along Federal Boulevard
Encourage existing businesses to stay and grow in Sun Valley by increasing business
outreach and improving access to technical and capital resources
Work with businesses to attract and train a high quality workforce. This is a transformative
project of this plan see"Access to Jobs and Education"
Identify opportunities for industrial infill development. Work with property owners
toward more efficient use of underutilized land and opening up of land for new
businesses
Continue to provide signed, intuitive truck access to the area off of 1-25,6th Avenue, 8th
Avenue and Federal Boulevard
Taxi Community, Denver
C.3.B. ENCOURAGE EMPLOYMENT TOD
Create a new Employment TOD area north of the existing industrial district, south of 11th
Avenue and east of Federal Boulevard. With DFIA as the primary property owner, creation
of this district would occurafter DFIA has developed new housing and relocated Sun
Valley Flomes residents to more livable and healthy living environment closer to transit
and amenities (See High Quality Residential Communities Transformative Project).
Encourage a vertical and horizontal mix of land uses, including light industrial, small
office, institutional/vocational, commercial, flex and live/work. Multifamily residential may
also be appropriate within a mix of land uses that includes employment
Create more compact development patterns with smaller blocks, a connected street grid
and consistent building frontages that spatially define streets and open spaces
Provide employees with both indoor and outdoor active collaborative spaces and great
walkable access to the transit system and greenways
Concentrate commercial activity serving employees along 10th Avenue with nodes at
Federal, Decatur and at the riverfront park, as well as 8th Avenue and Decatur
C.3.C. FACILITATE HIGH QUALITY URBAN DESIGN
New development should utilize the following urban design principles to enhance the quality
of development and pedestrian amenities Sun Valley's employment areas.
Respect maximum recommended building heights of 5 stories throughout the
EmploymentTOD Area and a maximum of 3 stories in the existing industrial area.
Encourage a mix of building heights and variation in building forms to provide visual
interest, needed sunlight, and air circulation
Nestle Laboratory, Mexico City
m In the EmploymentTOD Area, create visually interesting and human-scaled facades. Utilize
doors, windows and articulation to establish scale and variation and reflect uses within
the buildings
In the EmploymentTOD Area, minimize the visual impact of parking and loading areas by
locating them behind buildings and providing vehicle and truck access to properties off of
alleys
Primary Streets Consider Federal Boulevard, Decatur Street and 10th Avenue as
recommended Primary Streets (Employment Area Map) during zoning and site plan review
to determine appropriate setbacks, building configuration, parking location and pedestrian
access requirements for new development. All other Primary Streets required by zoning shall
be determined at the time of site plan development.
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50 Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT | Innovative


Active edges- Consider recommended Active Edges (Employment Area Map) during
zoning and site plan review to guide decisions on siting active ground floor uses, such as
retail, commercial, or collaborative spaces serving employees. Active edges should have
prominent, street facing entries, pedestrian-oriented signage and high degrees of ground-floor
transparency.
Greenways New development should contribute to the attractiveness and environmental
quality of the South Platte River greenway and Weir Gulch. Any of the following design features
are encouraged for new development adjacent to the greenway, as appropriate: landscaped
buffers, vegetative screen, water quality features, attractive building frontages with a high
degree of transparency or architectural interest, locating a publicly accessible use (such as a
showroom) toward the greenway, and pedestrian access connecting to the greenway.
EMPLOYMENT AREA
Primary Street Employment TOD / *** Freeway Access
Active Edges Existing Industrial Area
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Innovative | Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT 51


C.3.D. ACTIVELY RECRUIT INNOVATIVE BUSINESSES
Recruit new, growing, entrepreneurial and innovative businesses seeking to
locate in a growing employment district.
Build upon existing themes of food production, sports/recreation, construction,
and craft brewing. Targeted businesses for the community may also include
light assembly and manufacturing, scientific and medical equipment, energy
and information technology, small scale commercial distribution and wholesale,
construction support, conference center and theater support services, catering
and restaurant support, and arts/design businesses.
Seek to include specific industry clusters in which businesses will energize one
another and can be marketed together.
Seek businesses that are willing to hire locally and provide training and
professional development opportunities for nearby residents.
C.3.E. CREATE SHARED SPACES
Encourage the development of tech-friendly shared spaces and collaborative
work environments in order to:
Respond to the demand for a more creative, multidisciplinary collaborative
culture in the work environment
Encourage entrepreneurial and start up activities and accommodate growing
companies
Build on the success of creative or high tech co-offices and shared spaces in
Denver like The Battery and Galvanize
Facilitate the growth and success of non-profit service providers, advocacy
groups and other organizations trying to solve social or environmental problems
Work with the Mayor's Office of Strategic Partnerships'Shared Spaces Initiative to
facilitate the location of non-profit shared spaces in Sun Valley
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52
Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT | Innovative


SHARED OFFICE SPACES
Laundry on Laurence Space Creators
Wazee Union Space Creators
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Innovative | Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT 53


RECOMMENDATION C.4
A VIBRANT CORRIDOR
C.4.A. ENHANCE FEDERAL BOULEVARD AS THE SPINE OF WEST
DENVER
Encourage continued investment in public infrastructure and private property
development along Federal Boulevard
As Federal Boulevard is reconstructed, incorporate enhanced pedestrian amenities at
priority intersections to improve the pedestrian crossing experience: 17th, Howard
(proposed 14th Ave.) Holden (proposed 13th Ave.) 10th Ave, and 8th Avenue
Lookfor ways to overcome challenges for commercial development along Federal -
these include high traffic speeds, property access near the interchange and lack of on-
street parking. Overcoming these challenges may help attract more neighborhood
serving commercial uses such as restaurants, coffee shops, convenience and transit-
oriented retail, personal care and general merchandise.
Incorporate high quality bus stop facilities, complete with shelters, maps, schedules,
benches and trash receptacles
Continue studying alternative configurations for the Federal and Colfax Interchange
with the goal of improving pedestrian connectivity, access to private properties, and
economic development opportunities while also accommodating vehicle and bus
traffic (for more detail, see Transformative Projects)
Incorporate wayfinding signage to the Decatur-Federal light rail station, Lakewood
Gulch, South Platte River Greenway and to other community destinations such as
Rude Recreation Center and the West Side Library.
CAB. FACILITATE HIGH QUALITY URBAN DESIGN
As new development occurs, lookfor opportunities to expand and enhance
the pedestrian environment by setting buildings back from property lines to
accommodate wider sidewalks, tree lawns, or other pedestrian amenities
Identified as a Primary Street for zoning purposes in this Plan, new development
should provide consistent building frontage along Federal Boulevard, with parking
and property access located off of side streets or alleys. Curb cuts on Federal should
be minimized.
Consider Federal intersections with 17th Avenue, Howard (proposed 14th) and 10th
Avenue as "Active Edges" during site plan review to guide decisions on siting active
ground floor uses (retail, commercial or community spaces). Active edges should
have prominent street facing entries, pedestrian-oriented signage and high degrees
of ground-floor transparency. Such treatments of these intersections can also help
them act as neighborhood gateways.
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54 Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT | Innovative


FEDERAL BOULEVARD ENHANCEMENTS
Innovative | Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT 55


I think more and more about the importance
of food in Sun Valley. Our neighbors have
different religions, ethnic groups and
backgrounds. Many of us are refugees.
Unless people are eating food from their
own culture, they don't feel like they are
eating. If you give them a hamburger, they
aren't satisfied.
Asnake Deferse // Sun Valley Homes Resident
Sun Valley has a history as a food-based
neighborhood with a small Jewish
community and the Star Bakery that
operated on Lower Colfax for more than half
a century. Today Ready Foods that prepares
Mexican food. We need to bring food back
as something to celebrate the history of Sun
Valley by living it, breathing it and even
better eating it.
David Zucker// Zocalo Community Development
In terms of better health in Sun Valley, access
to food is key. You'll see plenty of Sun Valley
folks at the 7-11 on Federal especially the
kids. There are no healthy alternatives for
them. We also don't have enough ball fields.
More parks with ball fields would allow us
to expand programming for soccer, football,
baseball and other activities.
James Salinas // Manager, Rude Recreation Center
As a partner of the Denver Housing Authority,
Denver Health supports the development of
Sun Valley. The new riverfront park contributes
to health by promoting physical activity and
relaxation. Parks, greenways and trails make it
easier to choose walking or biking. Greenways
support dedicated exercise programs and
incidental exercise and decrease the number
of cars on the road, reduce air pollution, and
eliminate the stress of driving.
Jaclyn Cheves // Project Director // Denver Public
Health
Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT | Healthy


d. a healthy sun valley
attracting jobs, investment, and diverse housing choices
Why is being healthy important to Sun Valley? A combination of factors, including
industrialization of the S. Platte River, construction of large infrastructure projects
and concentration of public housing, have resulted in poor environmental, public
and economic health conditions in Sun Valley. Sun Valley consistently ranks low
compared to other Denver neighborhoods for health indicators. With over 50% of the
population under the age of 15, household education levels are among the lowest in
Denver and teen pregnancies are common. For years Sun Valley residents have lived
in a "food desert"- meaning they have limited access to supermarkets or grocery
stores. Residents have a significantly higher obesity rate (52%) than the average for
Coloradans (19.1%). Despite being adjacent to downtown and an employment area,
few residents have found job opportunities nearby -- their commute times are the
longest in the city. The lack of private investment has exacerbated these problems. A
dearth of neighborhood-supporting businesses in the area means that residents have
to travel to other parts of the city to buy food and fulfill other daily needs.
A brighter future seems possible. The opening of the West Light Rail line will improve
residents'access to education and job opportunities throughout the region and spark
private investment in Sun Valley. Recent improvements to Lakewood Gulch and the
South Platte River have improved the watershed's ability to handle stormwater flows
and have shrunk the floodplain, opening up more land for redevelopment. DHA is
planning for Sun Valley Homes redevelopment in the 2014-2017 timeframe, and DHA
has a successful track record of creating very livable, mixed income communities
that seamlessly integrate affordable units with market rate and workforce units.
Entrepreneurial residents and business owners have ideas for creating food
cooperatives, cultural centers and international markets. The future looks bright for
public and private investment to flow into the area, making Sun Valley healthy for
people, the environment and the economy.

D.1 Healthy for People
D.2 Healthy for the Environment
D.3 Healthy for the Economy
In
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Healthy | Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT 57


RECOMMENDATION D.1
HEALTHY FOR PEOPLE
D.1.A. INCREASE ACCESS TO DAILY NEEDS
People who live and work in or visit Sun Valley should be able to walk to businesses
where they can grab a bite to eat, get their hair cut, send a letter, have coffee with a
friend, or fulfill other daily needs.
Allow for a greater mix of land uses in the neighborhood; mixed use zone
districts are generally encouraged over those that allow single land uses
Encourage new development to include commercial spaces that support
neighborhood-serving businesses. Likely locations for neighborhood serving
businesses include Federal Boulevard, Colfax Avenue west of Federal Boulevard,
Lower Colfax, Decatur Street, 14th Ave, 13th Avenue,10th Avenueand the
riverfront park drive.
Work toward streetscape improvements along key pedestrian routes through the
neighborhood; especially critical is the connection on 14th / Howard between
Decatur and Irving, to connect Sun Valley residents with the new West Side
Library and Mi Pueblo food market
D.1 .B. INCORPORATE HEALTHY AND CULTURALLY APPROPRIATE
FOOD AS A CONSISTENT THEME IN REDEVELOPMENT AND
CULTURAL ACTIVITIES
Support the creation of seasonal open-air market under the Colfax viaduct
Encourage the opening of a year-long international food market/co-op
Consider the potential for incorporating a "food hub"into the area, as depicted in
Denver's "City Kitchen" business plan
Encourage healthy food retailers and produce stands to locate near the light rail
station to serve both the community and transit riders
Continue to support existing or new community gardens as a way to educate
families about healthy food and share food culture
D.1 .C. IMPROVE THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT IN A WAY THAT
HELPS WALKING, BIKING OR TAKING TRANSIT BECOME DEFAULT
CHOICE FOR RESIDENTS AND EMPLOYEES
Implement bicycle and pedestrian improvements as recommended in this Plan
and Denver Moves
Promote safe routes to schools and to higher education
Extend the network of bike sharing (B-Cycle) stations to Sun Valley (locations for
new stations may include the Decatur-Federal Light Rail Station, the stadium,
near residential developments and/or near the riverfront park)

58
Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT | Healthy


D.l.D. ENSURE ALL RESIDENTS (ESPECIALLY CHILDREN) AND
EMPLOYEES HAVE ACCESS TO RECREATION
Create places to play team sports as well as unstructured activities
Implement the new riverfront park, as proposed by this plan, to provide a place
for people to experience nature, engage in physical activity and relax. The park
also promotes dedicated exercise programs as well as incidental exercise.
Continue to support Rude Recreation Center with funding to ensure the
continuation and enhancement of recreation programming and community
events. Look for ways to expand scholarship programs for low income families.
Work with partners to incorporate recreational and sports programming and
events in the neighborhood such as the NFL's Play60 program.
D.I.E. IMPROVE COMMUNITY HEALTH SERVICES AND SOCIAL
SERVICES
Sun Valley is home to Denver Human Services and the Denver Health Sandos
Westide Health Center. Denver Human Services provides assistance, protection and
prevention programs for Denver's most vulnerable residents, while Denver Westside
Health Center provides comprehensive and primary care to primarily west Denver
patients. The location of these facilities in Sun Valley is very much appreciated by Sun
Valley residents, many of whom greatly need the services but do not drive or have
access to an automobile.
Implement the recommendations from the 2012 Denver Human Services Needs
Assessment report. Recommendations address improving community members'
access to services, information about services and effectiveness of programs and
services offered. A key recommendations includes strengthening collaboration
between Denver Human Services and non-profit partners or local service
providers.
As high growth neighborhoods such as Sun Valley attract more residents and
employees, the demand for Denver Health's services will increase. Denver Health
may want to consider expanding or enhancing health services to meet the needs
of a growing and more diversified patient population.
D.I.F. CONSIDER HEALTH AND PUBLIC SAFETY IMPACTS OF
NEW DEVELOPMENT
Work with developers (such as DHA) to consider health impacts of new
development in the area using tools such as Health Impact Assessment (HIA),
Healthy Development Measurement Tools (HDMT) or other useful frameworks
Incorporate best practices for crime prevention through environmental design
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Healthy | Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT 59


RECOMMENDATION D.2
HEALTHY FOR THE ENVIRONMENT
Healthy Housing
Riverfront Housing
D.2.A. CLEAN UP RIVERFRONT HEAVY INDUSTRY
Historic industrialization of the S. Platte River remains very evident in Sun Valley. Xcel
Energy owns various parcels along both sides of the riverfront. Operations of some
utility properties may be phased out, subject to regulatory approval, while others will
remain essential to providing energy to the Denver community. Xcel will continue
to have a strong presence in Sun Valley, but these changes present opportunities to
improve the riverfront environment.
D.2.B. IMPROVE RIPARIAN HABITAT
Continue to rehabilitate the riparian habitats along the South Platte River and
the Lakewood and Weir gulches
Look for opportunities to reduce riverbank slopes and pull banks back from the
water
Incorporate new wetlands and riparian habitats into the greenway system that
include self-sustaining native vegetation, increase wildlife habitat, increase the
capacity for the river to accommodate storm flows and contribute toward water
quality improvements
D.2.C. CREATE HIGH PERFORMING BUILDINGS AND
NEIGHBORHOODS.
Encourage sustainable development that is energy and resource-efficient, using
lessons learned from innovative work by the Rocky Mountain Institute, Alliance
for Sustainable Colorado and Living City Block
Create communities that contribute toward meeting or exceeding Greenprint
Denver citywide goals for decreased greenhouse gas emissions
Encourage developers to set goals for LEED, Enterprise Green Communities or
other green building frameworks and develop high performing neighborhoods
and buildings which are healthy for both the environment and people
LEED for Neighborhood Development
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60 Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT | Healthy


RECOMMENDATION D.3
D.3.A. CREATE NEW JOBS
Increase the number and diversity of jobs in the area by expanding the
employment district, encouraging existing industrial property owners to utilize
land more efficiently and recruiting large and small employers to the area
Support existing businesses and businesses looking to locate in Sun Valley with
strategic, capital and technical resources
Market the Sun Valley area for new business recruitment
D.3.B. INCREASE ACCESS TO JOBS AND JOB TRAINING
Encourage organizations providing job and small business training to locate in
the area and focus efforts in Sun Valley
Improve job search tools so that low income residents can more easily access
information about jobs in Sun Valley and near light rail stations
D.3.C. EXPAND THE ECONOMIC BENEFITS OF SPORTS
AUTHORITY FIELD AT MILE HIGH STADIUM
Improve Denver's ability to attract large national and international events by
enhancing the stadium experience and proactive recruiting
Provide more entertainment, cultural and retail destinations for visitors on non-
game days and more reasons for visitors to extend their stays in the stadium area
Create more robust partnerships as well as physical and economic connections
between the stadium and nearby neighborhoods so that area residents and
employees benefit from growth of the stadium entertainment destination
ft
Healthy | Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT 61


I am thrilled aboutthe possibility of bringing
more arts and culture into Sun Valley. We
would like to scrape our colorful buildings
on Lower Colfax and rebuild a mixture of
uses in the same location. It's ideal for an
art complex where my family could share
our art collection with the public.
Adriana Abarca // Ready Foods
The Platte River Trolley serves to connect
Lower Colfax and the .stadium to
pri
entertainment venues along the river to the
norths the Childrenl'I^seum^Aqtrarium,
REI and Confluence Parkr^TTie trolley is a
historic cultural amenity that should be part
of the redevelopment of the Lower Colfax
main street and stadium entertainment area.
Pete West// Denver Tramway Heritage Society
*

Investing in Sun Valley makes sense for
many reasons: proximity to the river and
downtown, extensive developable land
near the light rail station, public and private
interest in continuing to serve those who
live there now as well as expanding the
community.
Cindy Everett// Urban Land Conservancy
Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT | Transformative Projects
The southern portion of Sun Valley is most
appropriate for light industrial, flex and
employment spaces, while housing should
be concentrated to the north near the light
rail station, neighborhood amenities and
the S. Platte River. DHA should consider
residential development closer to the light
rail station rather than on its current parcel.
Urban Land Institute//Technical Advisory Panel


transformative projects
Multi-layered and long-term- the most critical steps
Seven projects are identified as the most critical steps to positively transform
the station area. Multi-layered and long-term in nature, these projects will take a
concerted effort by both the public and private sectors. Partnerships and resources
should be harnessed toward making these a reality. Only through executing these
projects can Sun Valley be transformed and achieve the vision of a celebrated,
connected, innovative and healthy part of Denver.
1. 13th Avenue
2. New Riverfront Park
3. Stadium, Entertainment & Culture
4. High Quality Residential Communities
5. Connect People with Jobs and Education
6. 10th Avenue
7. Federal/Colfax Interchange
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Transformative Projects | Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT 63


TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECT 1
13TH AVENUE
WHAT IS IT?
13th Avenue is a major east-west connection linking Sun Valley to Downtown and
neighborhoods to the east. To improve the east-west connectivity in Sun Valley, a
realigned 13th Avenue will bring new investment into the area by establishing a new
direct connection between Federal Boulevard and neighborhoods to the east.
As a major connection, the Avenue will include a robust multi-modal facility, higher
density mixed use development corridor, gateway elements highlighting the South
Platte River connections and new riverfront park, and a strong pedestrian realm
shaped by active street building frontages and improved streetscapes.
The direct connection will provide greater connectivity and access to key assets,
including Auraria Campus, Metro State Recreation Fields, Rude Rec Center, Denver
Human Services, Lincoln Park Neighborhood and Downtown. 13th Avenue will
transform Sun Valley by integrating it into the larger context south of Downtown.
RECOMMENDATIONS
Realign 13th Avenue west of the river to create a direct connection from Federal
Boulevard to Downtown along what is now Holden Place
Enhance multi-modal connectivity along 13th Avenue to accommodate
bicyclists, pedestrians and motorists in a balanced transportation solution,
including separated sidewalks, street trees, on-street parking and bike lanes
Celebrate the South Platte River crossing with gateway treatments such as,
signage, plazas, direct river access and other public space improvements
Encourage active uses along the street and higher density mixed use
reinvestment through the use of good urban design and placemaking principles
As design moves forward continue to maintain access to existing 13th Avenue
properties east of Decatur, connect to the new riverfront drive, park, and
regional trails
Evaluate the access impacts to Sun Valley of the at-grade crossings of the BNSF
freight line and, if necessary, identify strategies to reduce those impacts.
How does 13th Avenue contribute to CELEBRATED?
The realigned 13th Avenue will connect people to several important
community amenities: Rude Recreation Center, Denver Human Services, the
proposed riverfront park, Auraria Campus and Metro State Athletic Complex,
Lincoln Park and the Cherry CreekTrail.
How does 13th Avenue contribute to CONNECTED?
As a critical multi-modal connection linking Auraria Campus, Downtown,
Lincoln Park to Sun Valley and Federal Boulevard, 13th Avenue provides safe
and convenient access for pedestrian, bicyclists and motorists
How does 13th Avenue contribute to INNOVATIVE?
The reinvestment along 13th Avenue will contribute to creating a walkable
and connected area that encourages an eclectic urban lifestyle. The mixture of
uses, multi-modal functions and accessibility to parks and neighborhoods will
provide a major amenity for the area
How does 13th Avenue contribute to HEALTHY?
With direct access to the South Platte River trail network, 13th Avenue creates a
healthy built environment by promoting active walking and biking to and from
the River and in between downtown neighborhoods
64 Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT | Transformative Projects


13th avenue proposed alignment
Downtown ,

Transformative Projects | Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT 65


TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECT 2
NEW RIVERFRONT PARK
Integrated Soccer Field Los Angeles, CA
Development oriented to open space Denver, CO
WHAT IS IT?
Sun Valley sits at the confluence of three greenways- Lakewood Gulch, Weir Gulch and
the South Platte RiverTrail. Significant resources have been committed to ensure
these facilities are valuable amenities for the city and the neighborhood. Partners
including Parks, Public Works, Urban Drainage, RTD and Greenway Foundation have
made significant improvements in these areas in recent years.
It is time to build upon this success and momentum. Currently, the greenway
system functions as a way to move through Sun Valley rather than connect people to
waterways. Since these amenities are primarily behind major land uses, they are not
very visible and easily accessible. These challenges can also limit the ability to use
these amenities as a draw for future residents, retail and jobs. A stronger statement
is needed to unify these resources and offer opportunities for active engagement and
connection along the South Platte Riverand the gulches. The construction ofa new
park on the west side of the South Platte River between Weir Gulch and 13th Avenue
will help address these challenges. This new park must also have a new street along
the frontage to offer public access and visibility. Essential elements of this project are
described below.
RECOMMENDATIONS
New Riverfront Park
Widen the South Platte River greenway corridor between Weir Gulch and 13th
Avenue to accommodate approximately 10 additional acres of parkland
Create a long, gradual slope or terracing leading down into the water to create
usable park space separate from the water but also offer safe water access
Offer active and passive recreation opportunities consistent with the vision in
the River South Master Plan such as environmental education, water feature play
area, seating and gathering areas, cafes, active play fields and courts
Maintain and enhance the existing regional bike trail along the river for through
traffic as well as connections to gulch trails
Provide local connections for bike and pedestrian access to the neighborhood
and activity areas within the park
Incorporate opportunities for regional storm water storage in riparian planting/
habitat areas without sacrificing the quality or usability of the park
Maintain the current South Platte RiverTrail and greenway to link the new park to
Lakewood Gulch
New Riverfront Drive
Construct a parkside street along the frontage of the park
Incorporate a widened swale on the parkside of the road for regional water
quality treatment and a soft transition from roadway to park
Design the street for bikes, pedestrians and cars operating at slow vehicle speeds
Incorporate streetscape enhancements and crosswalks that signal it is a
gathering area for the neighborhood where pedestrians are the priority
Encourage commercial activity and other ground floor active uses along the
west side of the street creating additional "eyes on the park"and retail and
employment opportunities
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Create active commercial uses with a river/park focus at 10th Avenue on the
edge of proposed public open space that integrates with the open space
through strong public space design
Create a gateway at 13th Avenue and the South Platte River with a plaza and
commercial /destination uses that activate and engage the street, the park and
the river
How does the Riverfront Park contribute to CELEBRATED?
Creates opportunity for new community assets including playgrounds,
recreation, public art, markets, gardens
Offers neighborhood gathering space for different cultural events and activities
How does the Riverfront Park contribute to CONNECTED?
Unifies and integrates the system of parks and public spaces
Provides additional opportunities for multi-modal connections within the
neighborhood
How does the Riverfront Park contribute to INNOVATIVE?
Contributes to a livable community for existing and future residents and
workers by embracing the River and regional trail system
How does the Riverfront Park contribute to HEALTHY?
Creates opportunity for community gardens and active play areas
Will provide increased riparian habitat for the River
New Riverfron t Park and Park Drive
Transformative Projects | Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT 67


TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECT 3
STADIUM, ENTERTAINMENT & CULTURE
WHAT IS IT?
The intersection of Lower Colfax, Decatur Street and Mile High Drive is an essential
convergence of important activity areas within the Sun Valley neighborhood that
includes established businesses, the football stadium, the transit station and nearby
Lakewood Gulch. For some time these functioned as independent components, each
with their own history, challenges and opportunities. This Transformative Project
brings those qualities together into a cohesive cultural and entertainment hub for
Sun Valley.
RECOMMENDATIONS
Stadium Festival Street
The Festival Street connects Lower Colfax to the south side of the stadium. Special
paving, wide sidewalks, on street parking, one lane of travel in each direction, bike
connections, and streetscape improvements will create a festive environment. These
improvements will allow the street to be programmed and closed to vehicular traffic
for game days and big events and allow active retail, restaurants and commercial
uses to expand their outdoor seating area into the street. Signage and branding will
compliment the street and embrace the heritage of sports in the neighborhood.
Attract Anchor Tenants
Part of the success of this project relies on the recruitment of two to three anchor
tenants that provide year-round destinations. Anchor tenants could include a mix of
retail, entertainment, and cultural facilities. In addition, recreation-based commercial,
retail and restaurants will be targeted to compliment the stadium and recreation
opportunities in the area.
Lower Colfax "Main Street"
Create an active main street along Lower Colfax. An active main street supports uses
such as commercial, retail, small office, residential or cultural. The opportunity exists
to build on existing entertainment businesses such as Brooklyn's, which compliment
the stadium festival street and contribute to the vibrancy and authenticity of the
cultural activities. Cultural and historic elements such as a museum, international
marketplace, and other destinations will enhance the main street as will creating an
active public realm with streetscape improvements and branding. The extension of
the Platte RiverTrolley into the area along the street will further help to activate the
main street.
68 Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT | Transformative Projects


How does Stadium, Entertainment and Culture contribute to CELEBRATED?
Creates an opportunity for a street to become a vibrant public place for residents and visitors to connect
Showcases the rich heritage of long standing businesses, football, culture and recreation
How does Stadium, Entertainment and Culture contribute to CONNECTED?
Connects stadium to LRT station and neighborhood while dispersing peak loads on transit service after/before games
Improves pedestrian connectivity between key destinations of station platform, football stadium, Lakewood Gulch and
Lower Colfax
How does Stadium, Entertainment and Culture contribute to INNOVATIVE?
Embraces the unique characteristics and heritage of Sun Valley that is not found elsewhere in the City
Offers new amenities such as the extension of the Platte River Trolley
Provides a cultural core that is desirable for a neighborhood and attracting jobs
How does Stadium, Entertainment and Culture contribute to HEALTHY?
Supports an active lifestyle where bikes and pedestrians are given priority
Creates easier, more pleasant routes for walking and biking to important destinations such as the transit station and
football stadium
STADIUM FESTIVAL STREET (GAME DAY)
Transformative Projects | Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT 69



TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECT 4
HIGH QUALITY RESIDENTIAL COMMUNITIES
WHAT IS IT?
Sun Valley is and will continue to be a place where people from all walks of life have
convenient access to high quality housing, transportation, great schools, secure jobs
and opportunities for active lifestyles.
An equitable approach to growth, by creating high quality residential communities,
will be transformative for Sun Valley. Preserving opportunities for affordable living,
and providing existing residents with an opportunity to remain and grow with the
neighborhood are important goals of this Plan.
Alleviating Sun Valley's isolation and concentrated poverty is also critically important
if we are to succeed in addressing crime, economic distress and health discrepancies
in the neighborhood. Area partners, such as the Denver Housing Authority and the
Urban Land Conservancy, have achieved an appropriate balance between these
sometimes conflicting goals in other Denver communities by seamlessly integrating
affordable units into mixed use and mixed-income communities.
While residential uses will be permitted throughout the station area, the best
locations for high quality mixed income development allow close proximity to the
light rail station, regional greenway and trail system, West Side Library, market, Rude
Recreation Center, Lower Colfax "main street" Fairview Elementary School and the
new riverfront park.
RECOMMENDATIONS
Create a mixed income neighborhood
Target new multifamily residential development within the TOD area and along
the riverfront to achieve greatest proximity to transit, parks, and neighborhood
amenities
Encourage development of a variety of high quality and attainably priced
residential options to meet the needs of families, young professionals, students
and elderly households of various income levels
Encourage development of new high quality affordable housing units while
seamlessly integrating them with workforce and market rate units
Use the most current best practices in sustainable development and architectural
design to create attractive, healthy living environments
Locate DHA Redevelopment closer to transit and neighborhood amenities
Provide opportunities for current Sun Valley Homes residents and future DHA
residents to live in high quality mixed income communities
Consider several suitable sites north of 11th Avenue for DHA mixed income
residential development to provide DHA residents with close access to transit
and neighborhood amenities
Continue to actively engage Sun Valley Homes Residents in the design of mixed
income communities
Continue to create and enhance community amenities
Build upon existing assets such as Rude Recreation Center, Fairview Elementary,
Denver Urban Gardens, greenways and regional trails
Incorporate public gathering spaces and play spaces into residential areas, parks
and streetscapes to encourage community building and chance meetings with
neighbors
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MIXED INCOME COMMUNITY
Regional Trail
Existing Residential Neighborhoods
Transit Oriented Development Area
Opportunity Sites for DHA Residential Development
Proposed/Existing Mixed-Income Developments
How do High Quality Residential
Communities contribute to CELEBRATED?
Many Denverites will soon discover
Sun Valley as the next great place to
live, work and play
As the population grows, and as Sun
Valley improves, more people will
have more reasons to celebrate the
neighborhood's many assets
People of all walks of life will contribute
their ideas, skills and cultural heritage
toward shaping a new future for the
neighborhood, giving the city even
more reason to celebrate Sun Valley
How do High Quality Residential
Communities contribute to CONNECTED?
As the neighborhood grows and
develops with a mixture of residences,
offices, businesses, entertainment and
recreation options, as well as great
access to transit, more people will have
easier walkable and transit access to
their jobs and daily needs
How do High Quality Residential
Communities contribute to INNOVATIVE?
Growth of high quality residential
communities within walking distance
of transit, employment centers and
recreation opportunities invites flexible
lifestyles, where the lines are blurred
between life, learning and work
How do High Quality Residential
Communities contribute to H E ALTHY?
Encouraging mixed income, mixed use
development will alleviate many of
the symptoms of poverty in Sun Valley
and improve health indicators for the
neighborhood
Less money and time spent by Sun
Valley residents on transportation will
increase time available for recreation,
learning or to spend with family,
and creates less strain on household
budgets
i
Transformative Projects | Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT 71


TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECT 5
CONNECT PEOPLE WITH JOBS AND EDUCATION
Taxi Community, Denver
Granville Island, Vancouver
Fairview Elementary
WHAT IS IT?
With the buildout of the region's passenger rail network, the majority of jobs offered in the
Denver region will be accessible by transit. The West Rail Line will connect Sun Valley and west
Denver residents with major office centers, retail hubs, hospitals, schools, light industrial areas
and other places that provide job opportunities. Light rail will also reduce significantly the
commute time of many Sun Valley residents.
In addition to linking west Denver residents to regional jobs, the Decatur-Federal station offers
a unique opportunity for job growth near transit. The neighborhood over time will grow to
support commercial, entertainment, office and light industrial or flex uses, all within a short
walking distance to mixed-income and multi-family residential. This allows Sun Valley to offer
the choice of "living where you work".
In order for Sun Valley residents to be prepared for the workforce, educational outcomes
must improve. Sun Valley youth experience many unnecessary barriers to academic success,
contributing to the cycle of poverty in this neighborhood. Gaining a better understanding
of the factors inhibiting educational attainment and tackling those issues head on is one of
the most transformative actions Denver can take toward improving the lives of Sun Valley
residents.
RECOMMENDATIONS
Improve access to education
Educate Sun Valley youth on "Safe Routes to School" Ensure that Sun Valley youth
and parents have up-to-date information on existing transportation options for getting
to middle and high school safely. Provide residents with bicycle maps, transit maps and
schedules. Discuss creative ways for improving travel to school, such as organizing "bike
to school" groups, bus rider groups, or the like.
Make transit an affordable option for Sun Valley youth Sun Valley youth are not
eligible for free RTD passes from Denver Public Schools, because they live within 3.5 miles
of their neighborhood high school. Yet many Sun Valley families have no vehicle and
cannot afford RTD passes for their kids. Identify programs to offer free transit passes to
middle and high school students based on household income and/or other barriers to
accessing middle and high neighborhood school (e.g. inability to walk or bike to school).
Perform a place-based K-12 education assessment Work with DPS, housing providers.
Sun Valleyyouth and parents.and non-profit partners toanalyze Sun Valley's existing
education attainment levels. Identify key factors inhibiting educational attainment for
Sun Valley kids.
Sun Valley Education Strategic Plan Identify a clear strategy for improving educational
outcomes for Sun Valley kids, in response to findings of the place-based education
assessment
Consider expanding educational facilities Limited space exists in nearby DPS facilities.
Work collaboratively with the community and DPS to forecast growth and assess the need
to expand K-12 educational facilities to serve Sun Valley's growing population. Organize
sources of funding to fill educational needs. Options may include traditional DPS
programs, charter school programs and/or locating an online school in the neighborhood.
Forge strong employer community connection
Encourage Sun Valley's existing and new businesses to forge a strong community
connection
Encourage employers to offer transit passes to workers
As new employment development occurs, seek employers who will enact "hire local"
programs, provide training and professional development opportunities for nearby
residents
ft
72 Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT | Transformative Projects


Connect Sun Valley residents to available job training and placement services
Educate Sun Valley residents on available workforce training and job placement
resources. The Denver Office of Economic Development (OED) offers full-service
employment and training capabilities to help assist job seekers with gaining needed
skills and securing sustainable employment. One of OED's Workforce Center's is located
in Sun Valley at the Denver Human Services Building at 1200 Federal Blvd.
RTD has formed a collaborative partnership with Community College of Denver,
DenverTransit Partners and the Urban League of Metropolitan Denver to establish this
innovative program. The WIN program offers employment training, assessment, and job
placement in the transportation and construction industries (http://www.rtd-denver.com/wiN)
How does Connecting Jobs to People
contribute to CELEBRATED?
Target employers who can benefit
from the cultural diversity in the
area
Less time commuting and more
expendable household income
will bring increased prosperity to
neighborhood residents
Hold regular workforce training / job fairs. Form partnerships between housing
providers and workforce training programs
Partner with Auraria Higher Education Campus
Auraria campus one light rail stop away or a quick bike ride from the Decatur-Federal
station is home to five different institutions offering a wide range of technical and
professional training. Auraria schools are growing rapidly, and Sun Valley may prove to
be an ideal, attainably priced location for future expansion. Work with Auraria schools to
locate new facilities in Sun Valley as part of Sun Valley's expanded employment district.
Encourage the construction of new Auraria schools'training facilities, conference facilities,
co-office space and classrooms for entrepreneurial training (e.g. CU Denver's Bard Center for
Entrepreneurship). An ideal location would be on the riverfront park at 10th Avenue. Ensure
that Sun Valley residents are aware of all that Auraria programs have to offer.
SUN VALLEY AURARIA CONNECTIONS
How does Connecting Jobs to People
contribute to CONNECTED?
Reducing the commute time for
Sun Valley residents will reduce
household transportation costs
along with the benefits of reduced
VMT
Bringing more jobs to the
neighborhood will improve the
jobs/housing balance of the area
How does Connecting Jobs to People
contribute to INNOVATIVE?
Targeting innovative job clusters
which can have a unique
downtown adjacent home in Sun
Valley
Target jobs for low to middle
skill workers as well has those for
higher education levels
How does Connecting Jobs to People
contribute to HEALTHY?
Increased household income in
directly correlated to improved
health
Bike Connection
Car Connection
Bus Connection
LRT Connection
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___t
*
Transformative Projects | Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT 73


TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECT 6
10TH AVENUE
WHAT IS IT?
Envisioned as a unique type of main street, 10th Avenue will be the hub of activity
and collaboration for a thriving employment district. It will bring together diverse
residents with entrepreneurs, businesses ,and employees. The urban design of the
street will support this vision by providing flexible work spaces, spill out and open
air commercial spaces, cafes, comfortable seating, trees and improved streetscapes.
A primary public space will be established for Sun Valley by connecting Federal
Boulevard and the western neighborhoods to the new Riverfront Park and greater
South Platte River greenway network.
RECOMMENDATIONS
Extend and enhance 10th Avenue to connect the neighborhoods west of Federal
Boulevard to the river, including a public space or activity node at 10th and
Decatur
Allow for active uses at 10th Avenue and the proposed park: commercial uses
such as shared conferencing or shared office; focus on uses and tenants/owners
who will activate park edge
Enhance 10th Avenue with an expanded pedestrian amenity zone (for patio
seating), separated sidewalks, on-street parking and street trees
How does 10th Avenue contribute to CELEBRATED?
Will create a centerpiece for the community,celebrating its diverse history,
deep cultural heritage and future vision as an innovative neighborhood
How does 10th Avenue contribute to CONNECTED?
A direct public space connection from Federal Boulevard and the western
neighborhoods to the new Riverfront Park increases community connectivity
Encourages multi-modal uses in the area
How does 10th Avenue contribute to INNOVATIVE?
Will encouraging a broad mix of uses and activities that support
entrepreneurial investment, knowledge sharing, and training within the area
How does 10th Avenue contribute to HEALTHY?
10th Avenue promotes a walkable, bikeableand pedestrian friendly
neighborhood that benefits from immediate proximity to the active
recreational uses along the South Platte River
ft
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Transformative Projects | Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT 75


TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECT 7
COLFAX AND FEDERAL INTERCHANGE
WHAT IS IT?
Colfax-Federal is a cloverleaf interchange of two urban arterials at the gateway
of Downtown Denver and adjacent to a light rail station, a recreation center,
a new library, Denver's professional football stadium and several established
neighborhoods. The current interchange configuration covers a large infrastructure
footprint approximately 29 acres of land to support free-flowing, high
speed vehicle traffic. The current configuration limits pedestrian access across
neighborhoods and to light rail, bus services, and adjacent businesses and
community amenities such as Rude Recreation Center, Fairview Elementary School
and the West Side Library.
The Station Area planning process included a study of alternative configurations for
the Federal and Colfax interchange to better understand the range of possibilities
for the future of this intersection. The study considered a wide range of criteria for
evaluating alternatives based on goals for the station area identified early in the
process. Key criteria included economic development potential and multi-modal
connectivity. The study also considered traffic operations, engineering feasibility,
phasing opportunities and costs.
No single intersection of two arterials in Denver even those that support more
daily traffic has been designed as a cloverleaf interchange. Reconfiguring the
interchange to a design that more appropriately fits its urban context could have
tremendous benefits for nearby residents, businesses, the stadium and the city as a
whole.
RECOMMENDATIONS
Work with CDOT to continue to study the interchange and identify an
appropriate alternative design; an appropriate next study could be a Planning
and Environmental Linkage from Howard to 20th that includes consideration of
the interchange; studies should build off of the feasibility study and may include
other alternatives such as a one-way couplet option
Ensure that pedestrian and bicycle connectivity, access to transit, access to
adjacent properties and economic development potential are included as
evaluation criteria in future studies
As new development is proposed on properties adjacent to the interchange,
look for opportunities for public-private partnerships to help fund design/
construction of an alternative configuration while also expanding the footprint
of developable property and improving pedestrian connections
As reconfiguration of the interchange occurs or redevelopment occurs in the
area, adequate stormwater conveyance will need to be provided, given that
the 100-year floodplain runs through this location; it is possible that additional
storm sewer, open channels or other routing methods may be necessary to meet
stormwater needs
Prioritize short term pedestrian and bicycle connectivity improvements in the
vicinity of the interchange, as recommended by this plan and the Denver Moves
Plan
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How does the Colfax/Federal Interchange contribute to CELEBRATED?
Provides the opportunity to create a gateway to the community -
strengthening its identity and celebrating its rich history
How does the Colfax/Federal Interchange contribute to CONNECTED?
Improves access between neighborhoods and the station area.
Greater access and connectivity promotes the use of more multi-modal
transportation options such as walking
How does the Colfax/Federal Interchange contribute to INNOVATIVE?
An interchange requiring a smaller footprint could allow for additional TOD
opportunities near the station
Goals of Colfax/Federal Interchange
Study*:
1. Maximize Economic and
Development Potential
2. Enhance Multi-Modal Connectivity
3. Improve Placemaking and the
Public Realm
4. Create InnovativeTransportation
Solutions while Ensuring
Compliance with Transportation
Engineering Standards
How does the Colfax/Federal Interchange contribute to HEALTHY?
Improving access and multi-modal opportunities in the area encourages
an environment for a more active lifestyle and increases the vitality of
neighborhood businesses.
5. Maintain or Improve
Environmental Conditions
*For more detail on goals please see the Colfax/
Federal Interchange Study
POTENTIAL INTERCHANGE ALTERNATIVES
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"Green = Green." Environmental improvements,
time and again, prove to be the best investment a
community can make in its economic development.
The renaissance of downtown Denver and other
neighborhoods adjacent to the South Platte River
are object proof.
Jeff Shoemaker // Executive Director, Greenway Foundation
When redevelopment occurs we need to reach out
to the youth and say 'this is not the end of the rope.'
Now that we're looking at the future of Sun Valley,
we're looking out for the children ten years down
the line. We need to move forward with our goals
focusing on the success of these children.
Angelo Crowell // Sun Valley Homes Resident
St ----15*
North of the stadium has grown with townhomes
and lofts. We need new residential on the south
side of the stadium for the neighborhood to work.
I think more density around the transit station with
apartments above and retail on the first floor is just
what the area needs.
Dave Keefe // Owner, Brooklyn's Restaurant
Sun Valley's infrastructure needs are substantial.
Improvements should include creating a connected
street grid, developing a South Platte River park(J
improving east-west connections along 13th Ave
to Auraria and the Federal corridor and improving
connections between the neighborhood and the
Decatur-Federal Light Rail Station.
Urban Land Institute //Technical Advisory Panel ^
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moving forward
realizing the vision for sun valley
Implementation of the Decatur-Federal Station Area Plan will occur incrementally
over many years through the efforts of area property owners, the City, residents,
business owners and nonprofit organizations. The Plan provides a vision for the
future what we want Sun Valley to become. The question of "how we get there"
will be answered over time. It will largely depend on market readiness, political will,
strength of leadership and availability of resources.
The "Moving Forward" section provides guidance on getting started with the
implementation of the Station Area Plan. It is organized by the three main
approaches to plan implementation, as identified and described in Blueprint Denver:
1. Regulatory and policy strategies These strategies result in changes to City
codes, regulations, processes or design guidelines to affect desired outcomes.
Common examples include map or text changes to the Denver Zoning Code.
2. Partnerships Partnerships represent the most diverse approach to
implementation and can take on many forms. The City will rely on other public,
non-profit and private partners to help implement many recommendations in
this Plan.
3. Investment Strategies The new infrastructure and large scale
redevelopment called for in this Plan will require creative "financial engineering".
A variety of public and private sources of funding and financing may be
appropriate for the Sun Valley area.
This section also discusses the relative timing and order of implementation
activities.
SUN VALLEY IMPLEMENTATION GOALS
Several goals have been identified to guide implementation of this Plan:
1. Work toward the vision of a celebrated, connected, innovative and healthy Sun
Valley as defined in this Plan.
2. Streamline the decision making process regarding public and private investment
in the area.
3. Take strategic steps that help attract private sector investment into Sun Valley.
4. Maintain open communication between the city, property owners, developers,
residents and businesses and other area stakeholders.
A COLLABORATIVE APPROACH
Achieving the Vision for Sun Valley will take concerted, sustained effort among all
stakeholders to tackle these initiatives in this Plan and set the course for success. The
City, Metropolitan Football Stadium District, Broncos, DHA and RTD share the primary
responsibility for plan implementation. To facilitate the coordinated effort and
sustained commitment, it is critical that these entities form a standing partnership to
champion redevelopment efforts and continue to collaborate with area stakeholders
toward success.
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MOVING FORWARD
REGULATORY AND POLICY STRATEGIES
One way of implementing the desired character of redevelopment in Sun Valley
is through regulatory or policy strategies that result in changes to city codes,
regulations, processes or design guidelines to affect desired outcomes.
UPDATE BLUEPRINT DENVER MAP
Blueprint Denver, the City's integrated land use and transportation plan adopted in
2002, identifies Areas of Change and Areas of Stability throughout the City with the
goal of directing new development toward places in the city that have a high degree
of multimodal transportation access. Much of Sun Valley was considered an Area
of Change in 2002. This Plan updates the Area of Change to more accurately reflect
redevelopment opportunities within walking distance of the Decatur-Federal light rail
station area.
Blueprint Denver established land use types that describe a particular character and
scale desired in the future. The Decatur-Federal Station Area Plan uses the Blueprint
Denver Land Use Map as the basis of its recommended future land uses. This Plan
serves to update the 2002 Blueprint Denver Map, based on a more recent analysis of
existing conditions and the City's and community's vision for Sun Valley as reflected in
this Plan's recommendations.
GENERAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN
General Development Plans (GDPs) establish a framework for large or phased
projects. An approved GDP provides a master plan for coordinating development,
infrastructure improvements, and regulatory decisions as development proceeds
within the subject area. GDPs entail a higher level of design than an area plan,
and they identify, at an early stage, the development's relationship with public
infrastructure improvements such as major multi-modal facilities and connections
thereto, major utility facilities, and publicly accessible parks and open spaces.
A GDP is recommended in Sun Valley due to several large-scale, phased, and
multi-owner developments, as well as major infrastructure network and system
improvements recommended in this plan (e.g. 13th Avenue, new riverfront park, new
internal circulation streets).
Sun Valley's GDP should cover, at a minimum, redevelopment of stadium properties,
Lower Colfax area, DHA's Sun Valley Homes parcel, riverfront properties, the
13th Avenue corridor, and proposed DHA redevelopment sites. Given the large
geographic coverage, multiple property owners, and lack of identified developer, the
City should consider being an applicant for the GDP.
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BLUE PRINT DENVER- CONCEPT LAND USES AND AREAS OF CHANGE
EXISTING____ PROPOSED
H Transit Oriented Development H Mixed Use ^ Entertainment, Cultural, H Urban Residential Industrial
Exhibition ___
Employment-TOD (New) H Commercial Corridor Employment Single Family Residential Park
ca Area of Change
tfesssnsysc| i m.
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ZONING
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Denver's Zoning Code, adopted in 2010, provides many appropriate tools for
implementing this Plan's recommendations regarding land use, urban form and
design. The Denver Zoning Code is organized by Neighborhood Contexts that are
used to describe existing and desired characteristics for the purposes of zoning. This
context-based regulatory approach provides a range of Zone Districts and building
form standards that pave the way for compatible development to implement
adopted city plans.
This plan's recommendations for the four character areas envisioned for Sun Valley
(found in the Innovative section) align with specific Neighborhood Contexts, each
with its own menu of Zone Districts that may apply. In order to move forward with
implementing the Plan recommendations through regulatory means, a series of
amendments to the Zoning Code Map or text will be necessary, as described below.
Zone map amendments may be initiated by property owners or their authorized
agents, Denver City Council or the Manager of Community Planning and
Development. Map amendment applications are reviewed by the CPD Manager and
Denver Planning Board before going to Denver City Council for final action.
Zone text amendments are initiated by the Manager of Community Planning and
Development. Text amendments are reviewed by the CPD Manager and Denver
Planning Board before going to Denver City Council for final action.
Below is a summary of regulatory implementation considerations for each land use
character area recommended in the Plan:
PRIMARY STREET

Stadium Entertainment Destination
Plan vision- A walkable mixed use entertainment and commercial destination with
vibrant public spaces and streets; pedestrian-oriented connections to transit; shared
and structured parking. Given the size and ownership of property, this vision will be
implemented through large scale, phased development.
Neighborhood Context-This vision corresponds to the intent of the Campus
Context in the Denver Zoning Code, but also contains elements of the Urban Center
Neighborhood Context.
Zoning Analysis- Stadium properties are zoned C-MU-30 with waivers and conditions
that address parking requirements and generally require a special use permit for
most uses. While the vision for the Stadium Entertainment Destination described
in this plan could technically occur under existing zoning, the C-MU-30 zone district
alone does not include building form standards or design guidelines that guarantee
a predictable development outcome. The Campus Context zone district allows for
similar flexibility as the C-MU-30 and also would not by itself result in a predictable
development character for this large, phased project.
Implementation Strategy- In combination with a General Development Plan and
urban design guidelines, either the C-MU-30 or a Campus Context zone district may
be appropriate to implement the Stadium Entertainment Destination vision.
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82


Transit Oriented Development
Plan vision- Highest intensity of development and mixture of multifamily residential,
office and commercial land uses concentrated in a very walkable compact
neighborhood with great access to transit and amenities.
Neighborhood Context-This vision corresponds to the Urban Center Neighborhood
Context. The General Urban Neighborhood Context may also apply.
Zoning Analysis- Several properties planned for TOD have industrial (l-A) zoning.
Land uses permitted in the l-A district do not align with those recommended for
the TOD area. The l-A district will not implement the uses, form, building heights or
character envisioned for the TOD area.
Implementation Strategy-The menu of zone districts offered within the Urban
Center Neighborhood Context and the General Urban Neighborhood Context are
better suited to implement the vision for the TOD area.
Employment TOD
Plan Vision- Mixture of light industrial, commercial, and multi-family residential in a
walkable urban form that facilitates pedestrian access to the transit station and helps
activate public spaces such as the South Platte Greenway.
Neighborhood Context- This vision contains elements of both the Urban Center
Neighborhood Context (in terms of desired urban form) and the Industrial Context (in
terms of desired land uses).
Zoning Analysis- Much of the Employment TOD area is zoned residential mixed
use (C-RX) which would achieve the appropriate walkable urban form desired but
falls short in achieving the desired mix of land uses for this area. The C-RX requires
multifamily residential uses and limits employment uses. The C-RX properties
also allow for eight stories, whereas the Plan recommends a maximum of five
stories. Along the east side of the riverfront, several properties are zoned for heavy
industrial uses (l-B). The l-B zone district does not allow for the appropriate mix of
uses recommended in the Employment-TOD area, nor will it result in the pedestrian-
oriented urban form called for in the TOD area.
Implementation Strategy- Currently the Denver Zoning Code does not offer a
zone district that implements the vision for Employment TOD as recommended in
this plan. The Industrial Mixed Use (l-MX) zone district comes close, but does not
prescribe a predictable and consistent pedestrian-oriented urban form. The menu
of zone districts offered within the Urban Center Neighborhood Context also come
close, but do not allow light industrial land uses. The City may need to consider text
amendments to the Zoning Code that can implement the desired Employment TOD
character in Sun Valley.
Industrial
Plan vision- Mixture of light industrial with some commercial uses. Generally flexible
in urban form, however new development should help create a more attractive and
vibrant South Platte Greenway and Federal Boulevard.
Neighborhood Context-This vision is consistent with the Industrial Context.
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Zoning Analysis-The area is zoned l-A, which is the appropriate zone district to
implement the vision. However, the l-A zone district does not contain form standards
that will result in a predictable and consistent development pattern along Federal
Boulevard and the South Platte River Greenway to help improve the attractiveness of
these corridors.
Implementation Strategy- Maintain the l-A zone district in the area. Mixed use
districts may be appropriate along Federal Boulevard in order to achieve the desired
building frontage and pedestrian access. Design Standards and Guidelines are a
method of achieving desired character along the South Platte River, as zoning does
not address this.
URBAN DESIGN STANDARDS AND GUIDELINES
Design standards and guidelines establish Rules and Regulations for a specific
geographic area or development in order to implement a desired character through
the design and construction of sites, buildings, streetscapes, lighting, signage
and outdoor spaces. Design standards and Guidelines address a higher level of
design that is not already covered in the Denver Zoning Code or existing Rules and
Regulations. They are tailored to the individual needs of a particular geographic area
and therefore can help establish an identity that is unique to that place.
Design Standards may be an appropriate tool to implement several Plan
recommendations, where zoning or other rules and regulations fall short:
Streetscape design recommendations that go above and beyond implementing
the typical cross section or the Streetscape Design Manual. This applies, for
instance, to recommended Pedestrian Priority Streets such as 14th Avenue,
Lower Colfax, the stadium festival street, 10th Avenue and the Riverfront Drive.
Coordinated signage, landscaping, lighting and other features recommended in
the Stadium Entertainment Destination or along Lower Colfax
Addressing riverfront or greenway adjacent development, especially in the
industrial and employment areas and where private property directly abuts the
green way
Design Guidelines are frequently established during or subsequent to the General
Development Plan process. In the case of Sun Valley, the General Development Plan
will provide guidance regarding the need for Design Guidelines and triggers for their
creation.
Subdivision occurs when a parcel of land is divided into two or more parcels, lots,
blocks tracts or sites. Subdivision may be necessary in Sun Valley to implement this
plan's recommendations on several properties:
DHA Sun Valley Homes
Properties north of Lakewood Gulch
Stadium-district owned properties
DHA and Xcel riverfront properties to implement the riverfront park and adjacent
development
SUBDIVISION
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EXISTING ZONING
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MOVING FORWARD
PARTNERSHIPS
Once a plan is adopted by City Council as a supplement to the Comprehensive Plan,
the City, property owners, and stakeholders use the plan as a guide for decision
making. With many neighborhoods and programs in the City competing for
limited resources, attracting public and private investment to the area even with
an adopted plan will require the dedication and resourcefulness of champions.
Champions of plans typically include neighborhood organizations, property owners,
business districts, council members, developers or non-profits.
In the case of Sun Valley and the Decatur-Federal Station Area, over 80 acres of
potentially developable land is owned by five major property owners. These entities
- including the City and County of Denver, the Metropolitan Football Stadium District,
RTD, Xcel and DHA therefore, have the primary responsibility for the implementation
of this Plan. An effective partnership among major property owners and continued
collaboration with community stakeholders are both critical to the success of Sun
Valley. Many non-profit partners will engage to implement recommendations
from this Plan. More formal partnerships among residents, business owners, small
property owners and advocacy groups will be necessary as well to ensure that all
stakeholder perspectives are considered implementation of this plan moves forward.
IMPLEMENTING PARTNERSHIP
An Implementation Partnership needs to be established that will "champion" the
redevelopment efforts in the area. At a minimum, this partnership would need to
bring together major governmental, quasi-governmental and private landholders in
Sun Valley, which could include the City, Stadium District, DHA, RTD and Xcel. With
much of the developable land being held under government or quasi-government
ownership, one of the first tasks the partnership faces is determining how to bring the
private sector to the table by nurturing relationships with:
Local businesses and business districts
Philanthropic community
Private developers
The partnership would need to identify a clear approach to continued outreach to the
community. Responsibilities of this Partnership would include:
Working with the City to prioritize and oversee completion of implementation
activities
Coordinating development activities
Continued community outreach
Speaking with one voice to market Sun Valley to potential investors
Working with the City to ensure that appropriate entitlements, infrastructure and
agreements are in place to support the vision for the area
Function as the central point of contact for organizing and facilitating strategic
public-private partnerships
Preparing and issuing Requests For Proposals (RFPs) for development partners on
property controlled by the Implementation Partnership's members
The specific structure and composition of the Implementation Partnership is yet to be
determined. It is critical that the Implementation Partnership have sufficient authority
to make decisions required for redevelopment. It is also recommended that the
Implementation Partnership have dedicated staff and may be prudent to ultimately
appoint some form of governing board made up of public and private stakeholders.


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STAKEHOLDER COALITIONS
In addition to a large "umbrella" partnership overseeing large scale redevelopment
in Sun Valley, continued involvement of one or more stakeholder coalitions will
benefit the Sun Valley community. Primary roles for stakeholder coalitions in the
implementation of a neighborhood plan include keeping everyone informed and
advocating for the community's needs. Stakeholder coalitions can be informal
(such as the existing Sun Valley Stakeholders group) or more formally created as a
non-profit organization (such as the Federal Boulevard Partnership). As the Plan's
implementation progresses, stakeholder coalitions will be important to ensure that
all community and business members stay informed of changes in the area and that
stakeholder perspectives are actively considered.
PARTNERS
The City and Sun Valley community will rely on partnerships with many public, non-
profit and private entities to ensure the successful implementation of the Plan. Key
partners will include:
B-Cycle Great Outdoors Colorado (GOCO)
Bike Denver
Bicycle Colorado
Colfax Business Improvement
District
Creative placemaking entities
Denver Health
Denver Public Schools
Denver Regional Council of
Governments
Denver Tramway Heritage Society
Denver Urban Gardens
Federal Boulevard Partnership
FRESC
Colorado Housing and Finance
Authority (CHFA)
Enterprise Community Partners
Healthy food access community
Mile High Connects
National Endowment of the Arts
Registered Neighborhood
Organizations
State of Colorado (CDOT, DOLA, etc)
The Greenway Foundation
Urban Drainage and Flood Control
District
U.S. Department of Housing and
Urban Development
U.S. Department of Transportation
U.S. Environmental Protection
Agency
Urban Land Conservancy
Zocalo Community Development
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MOVING FORWARD
PUBLIC INFRASTRUCTURE AND PARKS
Realizing the vision for Sun Valley will require considerable public and private
investments. While many of the Plan's recommendations are likely to be
implemented through a public/private partnership, the City should take early action
on projects that will significantly improve livability, multi-modal connectivity and
catalyze additional public and private investment in Sun Valley. City General Fund
or Capital Improvement Program funds could be allocated toward infrastructure
improvements, often as matches for other public or private grant funds. Suggested
process for moving forward on priority public investment is described below:
13th Avenue reconstruction and realignment
Next steps include performing a feasibility study on the realignment
recommendation and 30% design of the street from Mariposa to Federal (or to
Decatur, if the realignment is deemed infeasible). These are funded and will take
place in 2013. After 30% design, seek funding to design and implement the full
reconstruction. As design moves forward, several goals are important to keep
in mind: maintaining access to existing 13th Avenue properties east of Decatur,
connecting to the new riverfront drive and park, pedestrian and bicycle connections
to regional trails, squaring off the intersection at Decatur, and implementing the
proposed cross section in this Plan.
Riverfront Park and park drive including integrated stormwater solutions
Real estate transactions between DHA, the City and Xcel are necessary to assemble
land for the new riverfront park and drive and adjacent developable property. A
master plan will need to be created for the park and for DHA redevelopment. As DHA
relocates and property becomes available for implementing the park, the city can
move forward with design and construction of the park. This mayor may not happen
in partnership with developers.
Real Estate Transactions
Implementing the plan is contingent upon several key parcels becoming available
for redevelopment early in the implementation process. The Xcel fuel tank parcel,
parcels north of Lakewood Gulch owned by the City and County of Denver, DHA's
Sun Valley Homes property and Stadium District parking lots are all critical to
implementing this Plan's recommendations. The City should take the lead on
convening discussions among these property owners to coordinate necessary land
swaps, purchase and sale, and/or joint ventures to facilitate a coordinated and
complimentary redevelopment effort.
MIXED INCOME HOUSING DEVELOPMENT
DHA has slated Sun Valley as next in its work plan for mixed income housing
redevelopment and will get started as early as 2014. Other affordable and mixed
income housing developments are also underway or proposed in the station
area. Funding for affordable housing is often pulled together from a variety of city,
state, federal and even private sources. Strong city leadership regarding mixed
income housing development near the Decatur-Federal Light Rail Station is critical
to implementing this Plan's vision of creating permanent affordable units near
transit. The City's leadership toward this goal is necessary to attract state or federal
investment to Sun Valley. Specific sources such as the Denver TOD Fund, low-income
housing tax credit (LIHTC) and Federal Housing and Urban Development (HUD) funds
(e.g., Choice Neighborhoods, CDBG, HOME, SBA, Section 106, Revolving Loan Funds)
could be used to support housing development in Sun Valley.
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PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS
Public-private partnerships come in many forms. They require an investment from
the City, property owners, a private developer or development project, or all of the
above. Common examples include tax increment financing (TIF), New Market Tax
Credits (NMTC), and Special Districts (such as a Metropolitan District or a Business
Improvement District). Some of these tools, such as TIF and NMTC, require the area
to be declared eligible through determinations of blight or census tract poverty
levels, respectively. Sun Valley may be a likely candidate for such tools.
A key issue with public-private financing tools is that a private development partner
must be willing to invest a considerable amount of private money upfront in order
to harvest the benefit from them. In order for them to work, the developer must
feel that the risks associated with the investment are sufficiently outweighed by the
potential returns generated by the investment. The public sector can help to reduce
risks by implementing many of the strategies described in this plan, such as:
1. A clear vision for the redevelopment of the area
2. Streamlined and clear decision-making that supports that vision
3. Public investments in infrastructure
4. Land assemblage, ideally offering large land parcels at attractive prices
5. Flexible entitlements that allow the developer to respond to changes in
market conditions
Several catalytic developments included in this Plan's recommendations may be
candidates for public-private partnerships for large scale or phased redevelopment.
These include:
Stadium District property (Lots M and N south of Colfax, Stadium Festival Street
area north of Colfax)
Parkside redevelopment
DHA mixed income housing development
Properties along the Lower Colfax area main street
DHA Sun Valley Homes existing site redevelopment into a mixed use-
employment area
RTD property at the light rail station
Several recommendations in this Plan are likely candidates for implementation by
special districts.
These include:
Integrated stormwater and water quality
Lower Colfax Main Street
Stadium entertainment destinations
14th Avenue streetscape improvements
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MOVING FORWARD
PHASING
TIMEFRAME / PHASING
The chart below is a rough outline of the major tasks involved with implementing the
Plan. The chart is not meant to provide a step-by-step approach to implementation.
Each task contains a multitude of additional steps related to successful
implementation and many are hard to predict at this time and should be left to the
Implementing Partnership to determine priorities and manage detailed tasks. The
chart is meant to provide rough timeframes for implementation short-term (1 -2
years), medium term (2-5 years), and long term (5-10 years) and identify how certain
tasks are interrelated (i.e., one must be accomplished or started before moving on
to the next). The short term tasks are focused on establishing the public policy
infrastructure necessary to move forward with infrastructure development and
encourage the private sector to participate in Plan implementation.
IMPLEMENTATION PHASING
0 2 yrs
2 5 yrs
5 -10 yrs
General Development Plan
Urban Design Standards
Zoning
Subdivision
Property Owner Partnership/s
Stakeholder Coalition/s
13th Avenue Design/Construction
Riverfront Park / Drive
Real Estate Transactions
Mixed Income Housing Development
Public Private Partnerships

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Moving Forward | Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT 91


Glossary
Active edges- Priority pedestrian streets
and key intersections where buildings are
designed to help increase visual and physical
interaction between the public realm (street/
sidewalk) and private realm (inside the
building).
Active Recreation- Physical activity that
a person voluntarily undertakes in their
leisure time for the purpose of mental and/or
physical satisfaction.
Adaptive Reuse- The process of reusing
an old site or building for a purpose other
than which it was built or designed for.
Along with brownfield reclamation, adaptive
reuse is seen by many as a key factor in land
conservation and urban infill.
Area of Change Locations where Denver
intends to direct residential and employment
growth taking advantage of existing and
planned transit and infrastructure.
Area of Stability Locations that represent
an established character to enhance as
reinvestment and redevelopment occur.
Arterial Major roadway designed to provide
a high degree of mobility and serve longer
vehicle trips to, from, and within major
activity centers in Denver and the region.
Auraria Higher Education Campus- an
educational facility that houses facilities
of three separate universities and colleges:
the University of Colorado Denver (UCD),
Community College of Denver, and
Metropolitan State University of Denver. The
campus is located southwest of downtown,
nearthe site of the original Auraria mining
camp settlement of 1859.
Bicycle Facilities and Amenities Includes
bike routes, lanes and paths which are
interconnected, safe and attractive; bike
parking and storage (racks & lockers). These
efforts are further defined by Denver Moves.
This Plan recommend additions to Denver
Moves as well.
Blueprint Denver Denver's citywide land
use and transportation plan adopted in
2002. This plan defines areas of change and
stability.
Building frontages- Help frame the
streetscape by encouraging buildings to
be built close to the sidewalk with minimal
setbacks.
Built Environment- the human-made
surroundings that provide the setting
for human activity, ranging in scale from
buildings and parks or green space to
neighborhoods and cities that can often
include their supporting infrastructure, such
as water supply, or energy networks.
Capital Improvement Program Scheduled
infrastructure improvements as part of a city
budget.
Community Garden- a single piece of land
gardened collectively by a group of people.
They provide fresh produce and plants
as well as satisfying labor, neighborhood
improvement, sense of community and
connection to the environment.
Complete Streets The practice to promote
safe and convenient access for all users along
and across travelways.
Density also referred to as intensity. The
quantity of development as measured by
dwelling units or square feet on a certain
amount of land.
Denver Housing Authority (DHA)- A quasi-
municipal corporation with a portfolio of over
11.000 units and housing choice vouchers,
providing affordable housing to more than
26.000 very low, low and middle income
individuals representing over 10,000 families.
DHA has transformed public housing
in Denver creating vibrant, revitalized,
sustainable, transit oriented, and mixed-
income community of choice.
Green Streets Streets with additional
landscaping, often linking parks. Defined in
the Parks Game Plan.
Greenprint Denver-The City of Denver's
stainability policy focusing on Green Building
and Energy Conservation, Materials and
Waste Management, Water Conservation, and
Environmental Public Health policy.
Flex Space- A building that provides a
flexible configuration of office or showroom
space combined with, for example,
manufacturing, laboratory, warehouse,
distribution.
Food Hub- A centrally located facility with a
business management structure facilitating
the aggregation, storage, processing,
distribution, and/or marketing of locally/
regionally produced food products
Infill Development Development on
vacant properties in developed areas
Infrastructure Public improvements such
as roads and traffic signals, sidewalks and
bicycle paths, parks, water and sewer lines,
power and telecommunication lines.
Light Rail A rail system with vehicles
operating on a fixed track and powered by an
overhead electric power source.
Mixed-Use Development Mixes of
residential, commercial and office space
within the same buildings and districts.

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Multi-Modal Streets Streets that
accommodate multiple modes of travel
including rapid transit (bus and rail options),
bicycles, pedestrians, and vehicles.
Node- Focal points, intersections or loci
of activity of varying scales in a city or
neighborhood.
On-Street Parking Parking that is provided
within the right-of-way of a public street,
typically in designated parallel or diagonally
striped spaces adjacent to moving traffic
lanes.
Passive Recreation- An undeveloped
space or environmentally sensitive area that
requires minimal development. Entities such
as a parks department may maintain passive
recreation areas for the health and well-being
of the public and for the preservation of
wildlife and the environment.
Pedestrian-Friendly Street design that
facilitates safe, comfortable and attractive
pedestrian travel.
Pedestrian Realm Sidewalks, pedestrian
signals, crosswalks, benches and other
amenities designed to improve the
pedestrian friendly nature of both the mixed-
use and residential areas.
Public-Private Partnership An agreement
between a public agency (federal, state or
local) and a private sector entity through
which the skills and assets of each sector are
shared in delivering a service or facility for the
use of the general public.
Public Realm- Any publicly owned streets,
pathways, right of ways, parks, publicly
accessible open spaces and any public and
civic building and facilities.
Regional Transportation District (RTD) -
The regional public transportation agency for
the Denver metro area.
Scale-The relative proportion of the size of
different elements of the built environment
to one another; the measurement of the
relationship of one object to another.
Setback-The distance a building is set back
from the property line.
Streetscaping Physical amenities added
to the roadway and intersections, including
lighting, trees, landscaping, art, surface
textures and colors and street furniture.
Stormwater Improvements Facilities to
control surface runoff from precipitation;
alleys, curbs and gutters, and intersection
drainage ("cross-pans"), in addition to
underground pipes are components of the
system.
Structured Parking Parking that is
provided in a structure, either above or below
grade, as opposed to surface parking.
Sustainability-The long-term social,
economic and environmental health of a
community. A sustainable city survives today
without compromising the ability of future
generations to meet their needs.
Superblocks Large parcels with few
connected through-streets or often have
have curvilinear streets within them, limiting
connectivity
Tax Increment Financing (TIF)- a public
financing method that is used for subsidizing
redevelopment, infrastructure, and other
community-improvement projects. TIF is
a method to use future gains in taxes to
subsidize current improvements, which are
projected to create the conditions for said
gains.
Transit Public transportation by bus, rail, or
other conveyance.

-4r. V
Urban Design Involves the social,
economic, functional, environmental, and
aesthetic objectives that result in the plan or
structure of a city, in whole or in part.
Wayfinding- Signs, maps, and other graphic
or audible methods used to convey location
and directions to travelers.
Zoning Basic means of land use control
used by local governments. It divides the
community into districts (zones) and imposes
different land use controls on each district,
specifying the allowed uses of land and
buildings, the intensity or density of such
uses.and the bulkof buildings on the land
Zoning Code-The compilation of land use
regulations for the City. It includes definitions
and land use, and building size and location
requirements by zone district.
*
Moving Forward | Decatur Federal Station Area Plan DRAFT 93


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DECATURFEDERAL SUN VALLEY NEIGHBORHOOD STATION AREA PLANADOPTED BY CITY COUNCIL APRIL 22, 2013APPROVED BY PLANNING BOARD MARCH 6, 2013

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2 AcknowledgmentsMAYOR MICHAEL B. HANCOCKDENVER CITY COUNCIL District 1 Susan Shepherd District 2 Jeanne Faatz District 3 Paul D. Lopez District 4 Peggy Lehmann District 5 Mary Beth Susman (President) District 6 Charlie Brown District 7 Chris Nevitt District 8 Albus Brooks District 9 Judy H. Montero District 10 Jeanne Robb District 11 Christopher Herndon AtLargeRobin Kniech At-Large Deborah Ortega DENVER PLANNING BOARD Brad Buchanan, Chairman Andy Baldyga Shannon Giord Kenneth Ho Anna Jones Brittany Morris Saunders Sharon Nunnally Susan Pearce Arleen Taniwaki Julie Underdahl Dave Webster COMMUNITY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT Rocky Piro, Manager Molly Urbina, Deputy Manager Kelly Leid, Development Services Manager Steve Gordon, Planning Services Manager Barbara Frommell Steven Chester Todd Wenskoski Caryn Champine Andrea Burns DENVER HOUSING AUTHORITY Ismael Guerrero, Executive Director Chris Parr Melissa Rummel PUBLIC WORKS Jose Cornejo, Manager Crissy Fanganello, Policy and Planning Director Brian Mitchell, Trac Engineering Services Director Karen Good Emily Snyder Justin Schmitz Mike Anderson Ryan Billings DENVER HEALTH Jaclyn Cheves PARKS AND RECREATION Laura Dannemiller, Manager Gordon Robertson, Parks Director David Marquardt, Parks Planning Manager Mark Bernstein Jay Henke OFFICE OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Paul Washington John Lucero Je Romine Doug Smith RTD William Van Meter, AGM of Planning Kate Iverson Patrick McLaughlin CONSULTANT SUPPORT Design Workshop Fehr and Peers Sky to Ground, LLC Studio Completiva KHO Consulting ArLand Land Use Economics Martin/Martin Two HundredThe work that provided the basis for this publication was supported by funding under an award with the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Cooperative Agreement No. CCPO-0029-10 and Federal Transit Administration Cooperative Agreement No. CO-79-1000. The substance and ndings of the work are dedicated to the public. The author and publisher are solely responsible for the accuracy of the statements and interpretations contained in this publication. Any opinions, ndings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the Author(s) and do not necessarily reect the views of the Federal Government.

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3 Table of ContentsINTRODUCTION ..........................................................................................................4 Planning Area Overview ...................................................................................................................6 Planning Process .................................................................................................................................8 Planning Context .............................................................................................................................12 How to Use this Plan ........................................................................................................................13 Accomplishments, Challenges, Opportunities ......................................................................14 Development Concept ...................................................................................................................16 Vision For Sun Valley ........................................................................................................................18 A CELEBRATED SUN VALLEY .....................................................................................20 A CONNECTED SUN VALLEY .....................................................................................26 AN INNOVATIVE SUN VALLEY ...................................................................................38 A HEALTHY SUN VALLEY ...........................................................................................56 TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECTS ..................................................................................62 13th Avenue .......................................................................................................................................64 Riverfront Park ..................................................................................................................................66 Stadium, Entertainment & Culture ............................................................................................68 High Quality Residential Communities ....................................................................................70 Connect People with Jobs and Education ..............................................................................72 10th Avenue .......................................................................................................................................74 Federal/Colfax Interchange ..........................................................................................................76 MOVING FORWARD ..................................................................................................78 Regulatory and Policy Strategies ................................................................................................80 Partnerships .......................................................................................................................................86 Investment Strategies ....................................................................................................................88 Phasing ................................................................................................................................................90 GLOSSARY .................................................................................................................92

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The vision set forth by this plan and the willingness of residents, businesspeople, and property owners to work with the city toward that vision, charts a course for Sun Valley to evolve into a thriving, healthy and livable neighborhood that better serves everyone who lives, works, or plays in the community.Rocky Piro // Manager of Community Planning and Development // City and County of Denver The Denver Housing Authority is transforming public housing in Denver, creating vibrant, sustainable, aordable mixed-income communities. Sun Valley is next on DHAs list for mixed income development and presents tremendous potential for creating livable communities adjacent to light rail, downtown, regional trails, higher education, jobs and community amenities.Ismael Guerrero // Director, Denver Housing Authority Sports Authority Field at Mile High draws over 750,000 visitors a year. Providing more entertainment and shopping options near the stadium will heighten the experience for Broncos fans, help enliven the Sun Valley neighborhood, spread out event-related trac impacts and bring more jobs to West Denver. Malcolm Mac Freeman // Denver Broncos This plan is a culmination of years of work led by a culturally diverse group of residents, a creative city planning team, activists for sustainable communities, family-owned businesses, and Denver Housing Authority that will set a clear vision for balanced, healthy, and innovative development in Sun Valley.Councilwoman Judy Montero // District 9

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5 York St. Zuni St.1st Ave. Ili Ave.Holly St.6th Ave. Yale Ave.Steele St. Dahlia St.Pecos St.44th Ave. 17th Ave. 20th Ave. 26th Ave. 48th Ave. 38th Ave. 11th Ave. 10th Ave. 52nd Ave. 32nd Ave.Havana St.Union Ave. Jewell Ave. Florida Ave. Quincy Ave.Lowell Blvd. Tennyson St.COLFAX AVE.Federal Blvd.Alameda Ave. Kentucky Ave.Monaco PkwyLouisiana Ave.Sheridan Blvd. Colorado Blvd.Hampden Ave.Washington St.Montview Blvd. Mississippi Ave. Dartmouth Ave.University Blvd.Wadsworth Blvd.Dayton St.Mississippi Ave.Dahlia St. BROADWAYAlameda Ave. Ili Ave.Zuni St.6th Ave. COLFAX AVE. Jewell Ave. 1st Ave.Holly St. Federal Blvd. City Park City Park introduction Recently Denver has experienced a renaissance centered along the Platte River. Within the last thirty years the South Platte Greenway has become an amenity for the region and a boom to real estate values. The inuence of riverfront revitalization is expanding north and south from its origins at Conuence Park. Sun Valley is at the heart of this revitalization. For the Sun Valley neighborhood, this transformation couldnt be more welcome. Long known as the home to riverfront factories, public housing, football stadium surface parking, drainage ditches, and highway noise, the Sun Valley neighborhood has suered. Despite these challenges, Sun Valley residents and business owners share a sense of pride for this community and strong determination to help it rise up to meet its potential. Change is in the air. Recent improvements to the greenways and trails improve the safety and livability of the area and put Sun Valley on the map as an important crossroads for regional bicycle trails. April 2013 brings a pivotal moment, when the West Light Rail Line connecting downtown Denver, Lakewood and Golden opens, including the Decatur-Federal Station in Sun Valley. Sun Valley residents will have convenient transit access to downtown and to a region of opportunities. Light rail access also enhances Sun Valleys opportunities as a destination not just for football, but for a variety of entertainment or employment purposes. With tremendous potential for inll development to integrate with greenways, the light rail station, Sports Authority Field at Mile High, a high concentration of community amenities, and a thriving employment district, Sun Valley is about to experience its own renaissance. The Decatur-Federal Station Area Plan guides future growth and change near the light rail station and in the Sun Valley neighborhood over the next 20 years. Facilitating the transformation of Sun Valley into a place that is celebrated, connected, innovative and healthy is a critical element in Denvers mission to create a world class city where everyone matters. Planned/Under Construction Rail Transit Existing Rail Transit

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6 Planning Area Overview 1. SOUTH PLATTE GREENWAY Building on the success of the Central Platte Valley, a high degree of momentum exists for reclaiming the South Platte River and adjacent lands for parks, recreation, water quality and habitat enhancements. Potential phasing out of some Xcel utility operations heightens the potential for greenway enhancements in Sun Valley. 2. RTD WEST RAIL LINE The West Rail Line brings consistent and reliable transit service to Sun Valley and West Denver neighborhoods. The 12.1 mile light rail transit corridor connects Denver Union Station with West Denver, Lakewood, Golden and Jeerson County. 3. DECATURFEDERAL STATION Sun Valleys light rail station is the rst station on the West Rail Line outside of downtown and 4 stops from Union Station (11 minute ride to Union Station). Trains run every 5 minutes during peak times. 4. SPORTS AUTHORITY FIELD AT MILE HIGH Home of the Denver Broncos, the stadium is a major regional draw for the area. However, the activity created by the stadium is limited to game days. The opportunity exists to transform the stadium area to a district with activity throughout the year. 5. SUN VALLEY HOMES Sun Valley Homes, a 33 acre public housing site, is some of the oldest housing in DHAs portfolio. DHA has targeted Sun Valley as next on their list (after South Lincoln Homes) for development of livable and high quality mixed income communities near transit. 6. RUDE REC CENTER/PARK This regional Denver recreation center oers a variety of exercise programs and facilities a gym, indoor pool, and community meeting rooms. Adjacent Rude Park is an open space amenity featuring ballelds. 7. LAKEWOOD GULCH Recently opened up from a box culvert and enhanced with expanded open space, new trails, natural vegetation and a water feature, Lakewood Gulch is an important neighborhood and regional amenity. It is also the historic location of the Interurban Shortline Railway. 8. WEIR GULCH Denver Parks and Rec has undergone a visioning and design process for the revamping of Weir Gulch in order to increase the amenities and landscape character of the greenway. Improved safety and access will increase its value as a neighborhood amenity. 9. AURARIA CAMPUS The campus houses facilities of three separate universities: the University of Colorado Denver, Community College of Denver, and Metropolitan State College of Denver, with almost 40,000 students among them. There are currently limited student housing options near the campus. 10. DOWNTOWN DENVER The views of Downtown Denver from the station area are stunning, mainly because the close proximity this area enjoys to the employment and entertainment opportunities downtown has to oer. 11. LOWER COLFAX Prior to the construction of the existing Colfax viaduct, Lower Colfax was the main connection from west Denver to Downtown and was a commercial main street for the historic neighborhood. A few historic buildings remain but the main street character has been lost. 12. FAIRVIEW ELEMENTARY The school, located in the heart of the station area, is a vital community gathering place. Amenities included at the school are a community garden and a neighborhood park, frequented by Sun Valley Homes residents. 13. DENVER HUMAN SERVICES The main oce for DHS is a major employer and service provider in the neighborhood. DHS provides both assistance services and protection and prevention services to Denvers most vulnerable residents. 14. WESTSIDE HEALTH CENTER Established in 1969, the Westside Health Center is the largest clinic in Denver Healths CHS system and provides comprehensive primary and preventive care, including management of chronic diseases for patients of all ages. 15. 8TH AVENUE INDUSTRIAL AREA This Industrial area features a variety of employers with very low vacancy rates. While the area contains many jobs at dierent skill levels, few of them are lled by Sun Valley residents. STUDY AREA

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7 6 25 25Sanchez (Paco) Park Sanchez (Paco) Park Rude Park Rude Park Barnum North Park Barnum North Park Barnum Park Barnum Park Barnum East Park Barnum East Park 1 2 6 10 11 12 13 14 15 7 5 9 4 3 8

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8 Planning ProcessThis Plan was made possible by a 2011 federal grant from the Partnership for Sustainable Communities, specically the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and Department of Transportation (DOT). The Plan was comanaged by the City and County of Denver and the Housing Authority of Denver (DHA) under the umbrella of the Denver Livability Partnership, a coalition of organizations working to improve livability in west Denver neighborhoods. PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT PROCESSCreation of the Plan involved an extensive public process that engaged residents, business owners, property owners, several government agencies, Sun Valley area employees, non-prots, real estate development experts and anyone who expressed interest in participating. The public process kicked o in January 2012 with a public listening session and the convening of a Plan Steering Committee that would help guide the Plan process and content. A Public Engagement Strategy was written containing strategies from the Steering Committee and members of the public after input received from the rst round of meetings. The team set a goal of using creative approaches to public engagement in order to hear from members of the community who are typically hard-to-reach in planning processes. The eort paid o. The yearlong planning process oered approximately 30 stakeholder meetings, events, and/ or opportunities to participate in this planning eort. The total number of people reached by the process is approximated at 2,500. Plan Steering Committee Members of the Steering Committee were nominated by City Council Members in Districts 1, 3 and 9. Participants represented key Plan stakeholders and organizations. The Steering Committee helped craft the Plan goals, provided invaluable information regarding issues and opportunities, and gave advice regarding Plan process. Steering Committee members also helped get the word out about meetings and oered ways to get involved. A total of four full steering committee meetings were held over the course of the planning process. Additional check-ins with individual steering committee members and/or their organizations were scheduled throughout the process as needed. Sun Valley Homes Local Residents Council (LRC) Planning Team members attended these monthly meetings with Sun Valley Homes residents and gave updates on the Plan process and/or content. Approximately 25 residents attend these meetings monthly. Planning team held oce hours after these meetings for anyone wishing to stay longer and discuss the Plan. Sun Valley Children Over half of Sun Valleys population is under the age of 15. Since these kids are the future of Sun Valley, the planning team reached out to them to engage them in the process. The planning team included activities for kids in every public meeting, empowered the children to present their ideas for the community at public meetings, held childrens workshops and attended kid-focused community events such as the Harvest Festival. Sun Valley Stakeholders Meetings Planning Team members regularly attended these quarterly meetings to give Sun Valley stakeholders updates on the Plan and Plan process.

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9 Workshops Three workshops were held throughout the course of the planning process in order to focus on a specic issue or geographic area within the Plan. These include: %  en South Platte River Greenway Workshop (in conjunction with the South Platte River Brownelds Area Wide Plan) Approximately 40 stakeholders met to discuss the relationship between the river and any new development. Attendees were asked to describe their vision for the river and its surrounding uses in the Sun Valley area %  en Residential Communities Tour Several planning team members and stakeholders (primarily Sun Valley Homes residents) attended this half day tour of multi-family, mixed use and mixed income neighborhoods around Denver. Photos were taken along the tour of participants Likes and Dislikes to capture values and preferences regarding residential communities %  en Federal Boulevard This workshop focused primarily on opportunities to improve the pedestrian and business environment along Federal Boulevard. It was attended by a diverse mix of business owners, Federal Boulevard Partnership representatives and residents of nearby communities Public Meetings Public Meeting #1 Listening Session Attended by 97 participants, this kicko public meeting allowed stakeholders to do the talking and Planing team to do the listening. Questions to get people talking included: %  en What do you love about your community? %  en What businesses, services and jobs do you want in your community? %  en How do you want to get around? And where do you want to go? %  en How are the cultures of this community celebrated? Public Meeting #2 Neighborhood IdentityAttended by 88 participants, this meeting included a review of the Draft Plan Goals, a discussion of neighborhood identity and a presentation of the draft Plan framework. In addition to the public meeting, a Childrens Workshop was also held with activities such as city bingo and a Lego city building exercise. Approximately 60 children attended the workshop Public Meeting #3 Creating Places Attended by 57 participants gathered to view and comment on draft placemaking concepts for 3 areas of the planning area; the Neighborhood Mixed Use area, the Station Core, and the Riverfront. Comment cards with specic questions about the draft Plan concepts were collected and summarized. Public Meeting #4 A Brighter FutureAttended by 125 stakeholders, this meeting allowed for participants to view and comment on draft Plan concepts for the Station Area Plan. Concepts and recommendations were presented for the four chapters of the Plan, Celebrated, Connected, Innovative, and Healthy. Attendees were asked to gauge their comfort with a number of the ley draft Plan recommendations. Surveys Several surveys were created to give people a way to participate even if they could not attend the meetings. Organizations Represented on Plan Steering Committee %  en Council Districts 1,3,9 and 2 At-large %  en Denver Housing Authority %  en Denver Public Health %  en Denver Urban Gardens %  en Fairview Elementary %  en Federal Boulevard Corridor Improvement Partnership %  en Fresh Start Denver %  en Jeerson Park United Neighbors %  en LiveWell West Denver %  en Local Businesses %  en Mercy Housing / Decatur Place %  en Metropolitan Football Stadium District %  en Metropolitan Organizers of People %  en Prevention Before Infection %  en Rude Recreation Center %  en Sisters of Color United for Education %  en South Platte River Trolley %  en Sun Valley Coalition %  en Sun Valley Homeowners %  en Sun Valley Local Residents Council %  en Sun Valley Youth Center %  en Tha Myx Church %  en The Greenway Foundation %  en Urban Land Conservancy %  en Villa Park Neighborhood Association %  en WalkDenver %  en West Colfax Association of Neighbors %  en West Colfax Business Improvement District %  en Xcel

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10 Property Owners Meetings Several meetings were held with small Sun Valley property owners to ensure that they are engaged in the process, aware of the Plan status and have an understanding of how it will aect them. Business Community Outreach The team made a great eort to include the business community in this planning eort. Strategies such as yering businesses, holding public meetings during working hours and meeting with individual business owners on their time schedule brought a valuable perspective to the Plan process. Individual Stakeholder Outreach The planning team was available throughout the process to meet with any stakeholder expressing an interest in the Plan. The team also proactively interviewed individuals representing all stakeholder groups incorporate personal stories into the Plan. Plan Website and Social Media A Plan website has been frequently updated since the planning process begun. The website has been updated with public meeting and workshop announcements, materials presented at all public meetings, along with links to online surveys. Since the planning process begun the website has seen nearly 1,500 hits (page views). Urban Land Institute (ULI) Technical Assistance Panel (TAP) Nine months into the planning process, the team hired ULI panel to provide technical assistance to the Plan. Panelists included members of the development and nance community. The purpose of the panel was twofold: (1) provide constructive criticism on the draft Plan concepts, and (2) suggest critical rst steps toward implementing the Plan. The panels recommendations are included as a technical memo attached to this Plan and helped inform the Plan recommendations as well as the implementation strategies in the Moving Forward section.

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11 Public Meeting #2 Neighborhood Identity Childrens Workshop Public Meeting #3 Creating Places Public Meeting #1 Listening Session

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12 Planning Context EXISTING PLANS AND STUDIESThis Plan represents the land use, urban form, transportation and economic development vision for the Decatur-Federal station area and Sun Valley. Adoption of this Plan by Denver City Council updates the Denver comprehensive Plan and Blueprint Denver recommendations for this part of the City. This Plan incorporates or renes recommendations of previous Plans and studies for the station area and Sun Valley neighborhood. Any updates to the following Plans should incorporate and rene recommendations for Sun Valley based on this Plan: %  en Denver Comprehensive Plan (2000) %  en Blueprint Denver (2002) %  en Denver Parks and Recreation Game Plan (2003) %  en TOD Strategic Plan (2006) %  en Greenprint Denver (2006) %  en Strategic Transportation Plan (2008) %  en Storm Drainage Master Plan (2009) %  en Gulch Master Plan (2009) %  en Sanitary Sewer Master Plan (2009) %  en Strategic Parking Plan (2010) %  en Federal Boulevard Planning and Environmental Linkages Study 5th To Howard (2011) %  en Denver Moves (2011) %  en Denver Complete Streets Policy (2011) %  en Colfax and Federal Interchange Study (2012)CONCURRENT PLANNING EFFORTS AND STUDIESSeveral studies and planning eorts contributed to the Station Area planning process and overlapped geographically. The Decatur-Federal Station Area planning team coordinated with each of these eorts to ensure the most ecient use of resources and to help ensure consistency among Plan recommendations. Links to these documents are available online at www.denvergov.org/decaturfederal. %  en Decatur-Federal Station Area Plan Market Study %  en Colfax / Federal Health Impact Scoping %  en Colfax / Federal Interchange Study %  en South Platte River Brownelds Area Wide Plan %  en West Side Transit Enhancement Study %  en City Kitchen Model Business Plan %  en TOD Strategic Plan Update

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13 How to Use this PlanThis Plan establishes a long range vision and guiding principles for the development and future of the Decatur/Federal Station area. The elements of this Plan will direct the community toward a vision for a celebrated, connected, innovative and healthy Station Area. Public agencies and private entities will use this Plan in coming years for many purposes and actions that will aect the form and function of the Station Area. The Plan provides cityadopted policy direction to guide decision-making related to development opportunities, transportation, partnerships, and many others. Many of the recommendations will require multiple steps over several years by a variety of participants. The Plan provides a sound policy basis for a thriving Station Area. The recommendations identied in the Plan provide direction to guide day-to-day decision making related to land use, public investment, private development, and partnerships. The Plan is intended to give the latitude needed to pursue unforeseen opportunities that will arise and to respond to new challenges over the coming years. The Plan is divided into six sections in addition to this introduction: %  en The rst four chapters outline the Plans guiding principals and the recommendations to achieve a celebrated connected innovative and healthy station area %  en Highlighted in some recommendations are transformative projects which are identied in the fth chapter as being essential to achieving the Plan vision over the next 10 to 20 years %  en The nal section describes moving forward in terms of the types of implementation and priorities for the short and long term to ensure the success of the Plan. This chapter also highlights the multiple steps that may be necessary to work toward implementation of the transformative concepts As with the Comprehensive Plan and its supplements, this Area Plans recommendations provide guidance. This plan is not intended to, and does not, rezone any property, render any existing uses non-conforming, or pre-dispose the outcome of any permitting processes related to properties within the planning boundary. Future implementation actions such as zoning map or text amendments, capital improvements and public-private partnerships require specic actions on the part of the city, property owners and stakeholders.

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14 Accomplishments, Challenges, OpportunitiesACCOMPLISHMENTS %  en RTDs construction of the West Rail Line will bring consistent and reliable transit service to Sun Valley and west Denver neighborhoods. The Decatur-Federal Station is the rst stop on the West Rail Line outside of Downtown Denver and 4 stops from Union Station (11 minute ride to Union Station). Trains will run every 15 minutes, greatly increasing the convenience of transit for these communities %  en In a partnership between the City of Denver and the Urban Drainage and Flood Control District, Lakewood Gulch was opened up from a box culvert in 2012 and enhanced with expanded open space, new trails, natural vegetation and a trickling water feature. This project has also removed much of the 100 year oodplain from the neighborhood %  en Through the 2007 Better Denver Bond, Denver invested in new sidewalks, pedestrian lighting and security cameras in and around the Decatur-Federal Light Rail Station platform %  en A partnership between Denver Urban Gardens and Fairview Elementary School has continued to shine as a resource for hands-on learning, an important neighborhood focal point and a celebration of community and healthy food %  en The Denver Broncos have been a signicant component in the area. The fan base, and the teams frequent success provide football excitement throughout the region. %  en The River South Greenway Master Plan and more recent River Vision Implementation Plan have set a clear path for prioritized improvements along the South Platte River. %  en Denver Parks has successfully transitional Rude Recreation Center into a regional center bringing more resources and recreation programming to the neighborhood %  en The Housing Authority of Denver (DHA) has successfully transformed distressed public housing projects into high quality mixed income residential communities throughout Denver including Benedict Park Place and Mariposa (Formerly South Lincoln Homes)CHALLENGES %  en Sun Valley is Denvers poorest neighborhood. Over 90% of Sun Valleys 3000 residents live in subsidized housing, and the median household income in 2010 was only $8000 %  en Sun Valley Homes residents complain about their neighborhood and housing not being wheelchair accessible, having sporadic heat, too few bedrooms and bathrooms, and no laundry facilities %  en Sun Valley lacks a daily population of residents, employees and visitors sucient to support local businesses %  en Over its long history, Sun Valley has accumulated split personalities transportation crossroads, sports venue, residential neighborhood, public housing, river habitat, industrial area. In many ways, these multiple Sun Valleys have worked against each over time, rather than working together toward success %  en Street grid connections between Sun Valley, adjacent neighborhoods and downtown have become challenging over time due to infrastructure and natural features that inhibit mobility Decatur-Federal Station Sun Valley, 1947 Sun Valley Homes

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15 %  en East-West connectivity is especially challenging. Currently only three streets (the Colfax viaduct, 8th Avenue and 6th Avenue) connect across Federal Boulevard, the South Platte River and I-25. Due to their location and design, these streets do not serve Sun Valley residents, and do not adequately accommodate pedestrians and bicycles %  en Pedestrian and bicycle connections to the Decatur-Federal Light Rail Station may be challenging for West Colfax residents due to the Federal-Colfax interchange and limited places to cross Federal Boulevard and Colfax Avenue %  en Several vacant or underutilized industrial properties that are considered redevelopment opportunities are in need of environmental cleanup prior to redevelopment %  en Education levels and graduation rates are some of the lowest in the city %  en Sun Valley is in a food desert limited access to stores that sell fresh and healthy foods. %  en Sun Valley consistently ranks among the worst of Denvers neighborhoods for health indicators, such as access to healthy foods, preventative care, and income %  en Connections across Federal Boulevard and Colfax Avenue are challenging for residents of Sun Valley, West Colfax and Villa Park, as there are only a few streets that oer trac signals and crosswalks OPPORTUNITIES %  en Approximately 100 acres of land are or may be soon available for redevelopment within a mile radius of the Decatur-Federal Light Rail Station %  en DHA has targeted Sun Valley as next on their list (after South Lincoln Homes) for development of livable and high quality mixed income communities. This will improve the living condition for Sun Valley Homes residents and alleviate the symptoms of concentrated poverty in Sun Valley %  en Building on the success of the C entral Platte Valley, a high degree of momentum exists for reclaiming the South Platte River and adjacent lands for parks, recreation, water quality and habitat enhancements %  en The Broncos, Stadium District and RTD seem interested in joint development opportunities and making shared and structured parking work, opening up land for more ecient development patterns %  en Property owners recognize the opportunity to bring back Lower Colfax as the areas authentic main street and center for cultural activities %  en Rich cultural diversity exists in Sun Valley like few neighborhoods in Denver and could be celebrated to create an identity for the area %  en The average American family spends 19 percent of their household budget on transportation. Encouraging growth of a variety of housing types in a place like Sun Valley where walking, biking and transit will become the default modes used by residents to get where they are going greatly reduces this budgetary drain and makes living more aordable for all households %  en Nearby Auraria Higher Education Campus (AHEC) has a growing student population and little housing near campus. With great multi-modal connections, access to downtown, recreation amenities, low lease rates and a funky vibe, Sun Valley presents a great opportunity for student living Lakewood Gulch Sports Authority Filed at Mile High Stadium Decatur Street

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16 D evelopment Concept Sun Valleys Development Concept presents the broad, foundational components for development of a celebrated, connected, innovative and healthy Sun Valley. Physical assets and amenities anchor cities and neighborhoods. Natural features, a regional greenway, a stadium or entertainment destination, distinctive historic buildings, unique cultural facilities these are elements which people remember. The specic arrangement of the elements, the links among them, and their character distinguish a neighborhood and make it truly unique and desirable. Sun Valley is fortunate to have an abundance of assets, but the opportunity remains to create more, and to improve the links between them. Opening in 2013, the Decatur-Federal Station along the West Light Rail Line will eciently connect the area to Downtown and the rest of the region. The station and the connections it will provide will be a gateway between Sun Valley and the region. The neighborhood currently suers from a lack of connectivity to surrounding neighborhoods and destinations. This Plan provides the framework for better connectivity within the neighborhood, along with better connecting Sun Valley with the city and region. Key connections will serve to link the four neighborhood activity nodes: the New Riverfront Park, 10th Avenue, 17th and Federal and the new West Side Library and market. Key connections also connect the neighborhood with larger, regional activity nodes including the Station area, Lower Colfax/Stadium Entertainment, and the Auraria Campus. The future vision for the station area includes four, new unique character areas within the station area: %  en Stadium/Cultural Destination %  en Transit Oriented Development area %  en Employment TOD area %  en Industrial area Together, these elements create a framework to guide and foster a celebrated, connected, innovative, and healthy Sun Valley. Neighborhood Activity Node Light Rail LineStadium/Entertainment Destination Transit Oriented Development Employment TOD IndustrialLight Rail Station Key Multi-modal Connection Key Regional Connection Regional Activity Node

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17 Lower Colfax / Stadium Entertainment Station Area 10th Ave. Auraria Campus/Downtown Library/Market 17th and Federal 6 25 25Sanchez (Paco) Park Sanchez (Paco) Park Rude Park Rude Park Barnum North Park Barnum North Park Barnum Park Barnum Park Barnum East Park Barnum East Park

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18 THE VISION FOR SUN VALLEYA. A CELEBRATED SUN VALLEYB. A CONNECTED SUN VALLEY TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECTS A.1 Build upon Sun Valleys History and Assets B.1 Reknitting Neighborhoods A.2 Encourage Diversity B.4 Make Transit Convenient A.3 Celebrate Culture B.3 Enhance Walkability and Bikeability B.2 Integrated System of Parks and Public SpacesThe seven projects are identied as the most critical steps to positively transform the station area. Multi-layered and long-term in nature, these projects will take a concerted eort by both public and private sectors. All energy and resources should be harnessed toward making these a reality. Only through executing these projects can Sun Valley truly transform and achieve the vision of a celebrated, connected, innovative and healthy station area. 1. 13TH AVENUE 3. STADIUM, ENTERTAINMENT & CULTURE 2. RIVERFRONT PARK

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19 C. AN INNOVATIVE SUN VALLEYD. A HEALTHYSUN VALLEY C.1 Transit Oriented Development D.1 Healthy For People C.2 Stadium Entertainment Destination D.2 Healthy for the Environment C.3 Open For Business D3. Healthy for the Economy C.4 A Vibrant Corridor 6. 10TH AVE 7. FEDERAL/COLFAX INTERCHANGE 4. HIGH QUALITY RESIDENTIAL COMMUNITIES 5. CONNECT PEOPLE WITH JOBS AND EDUCATION

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Late 1800s Jewish immigrants settled in Sun Valley. Old Colfax Road was at the center of this boom. The building that is now Brooklyns was constructed in 1896.1917 Old Colfax Viaduct is constructed for cars and trolleys connecting downtown Denver and West Side neighborhoods.1920s City of Denver passed rst zoning law Sun Valley, especially around the South Platte River becomes an industrial zone.1936 Fairview Elementary School is built.1942 First public housing development, Las Casitas, opened. Included 184 units. Rent was $2.44 a room per month.1948 Denver Bears Stadium is constructed. The stadium holds 18,000 and would later become Mile High Stadium.1950s I-25, the Valley Highway, is constructed, as well as the Colfax/Federal Interchange.1952 The Denver Housing Authority constructs Sun Valley Homes a 330 unit barracksstyle aordable housing development.1960s Broncos become a staple of the community setting up shop in the old Mile High Stadium. At the time, the stadium had seating for 34,000.1999 Denver Human Services moved their oces to Sun Valley, building a new facility at Federal & Holden.2001 Sports Authority Field at Mile High opened. The new stadium seats 76,125. 2003 The new state-of-the-art Rude Recreation Center opened.2012 Lakewood Gulch undergoes extensive reconstruction to improve the safety of the area.2013 The Regional Transportation District (RTD) Decatur-Federal Station opensone of 13 stations along the new West Rail Line.HISTORY OF SUN VALLEY: I like that some of my friends dont look like me. That means I can learn about their culture and their family and they can learn about mine.Lawernce // 5th Grader // Sun Valley Homes ResidentI love my community. I love that I am close to the school for my kids. I dont have to go far to get to the community center. My neighbors are good. When I go to the clinic, it is not far and I dont have to take the bus.Beatrice Hwraa // Metro Adult ESL Program

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21 a. a celebrated sun valleycelebrating the history, diversity, and culture of Sun ValleyWhy is being celebrated important to Sun Valley? The area has a long and varied history dating back to the beginnings of Denver. Growth and development west of downtown radiated outward from Colfax Avenue connecting early Denver with settlements to the west. Denver Tramway streetcar lines built in the late 1800s along Colfax spurred this growth. Colfax served as a main street of commercial activity for nearby residential neighborhoods housing working class families in the late 1800s, Jewish families in the mid 1900s and Latino families in the late 1900s. West Colfax Avenue retains a signicant amount of its Jewish cultural history. Latino and Asian cultures currently thrive in the area, primarily along Federal Boulevard. Somali and Vietnamese immigrants and refugees are also very prominent in Sun Valley. Today, people know this part of Denver as a sports venue home of the Denver Broncos and Sports Authority Field at Mile High. The area is also frequented by users of the South Platte River Greenway Trail or the Lakewood Gulch trail primarily bikers, joggers, or tourists experiencing the greenway trails or riding the heritage Platte River Trolley. Just south of the stadium parking lots and west of the South Platte River is the poorest and most isolated neighborhood in the city remnants of a late 19th century working class neighborhood intertwined with public housing, heavy industry and government services. Further south toward 6th Avenue is Sun Valleys thriving light industrial district employing thousands of people, few of whom actually live in the neighborhood. In many ways the troubled history of the area is about these multiple Sun Valleys working against each other over time sports venue, neighborhood, infrastructure and industry. This Plan charts a new course of action that requires partnership among all of Sun Valleys stakeholders to achieve the vision for a brighter future. One path toward success involves better celebrating Sun Valleys assets. A celebrated Sun Valley builds upon the areas amenities, bright spots in history and hints of culture, creating a place that is aesthetically pleasing, culturally rich and full of activity. A celebrated Sun Valley is connected to its past; it inspires the present and will help shape the future. A.1 Build upon Sun Valleys History and Assets A.2 Encourage Diversity A.3 Celebrate Culture

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22 BUILD UPON SUN VALLEYS HISTORY AND ASSETS RECOMMENDATION A.1A.1.A. CREATE LOWER COLFAX MAIN STREET Bring back Lower Colfax as the main street it formerly was for the neighborhood. Encourage preservation or adaptive reuse of buildings along Lower Colfax with historic signicance, such as Brooklyns and the Ironworks Building, while improving the public realm. A.1.B. EXTEND PLATTE RIVER TROLLEYExtend the Platte River Trolley along Lower Colfax and to the Decatur-Federal Light Rail Station. While primarily serving a cultural and historic function, the Platte River Trolley does provide an important transportation function on game days. A.1.C. CAPTURE CULTURAL HISTORY Capture the areas ethnic and cultural history, as well as its history as an important transportation corridor. Support the creation of cultural venues, increased public art, aggressive business recruitment, and enhanced programming and community events.A.1.D. CELEBRATE SPORTS AND ENTERTAINMENT HISTORY Celebrate the area as the host for many of Denvers historic and existing professional sports teams and music events. Build upon this sports culture by including Commercial venues such as sports bar & grills, cultural venues such as an expanded Broncos Hall of Fame, business recruitment such as sports training centers, sportsbased programming and community events.A.1.E. FEATURE OUTDOOR RECREATION Celebrate Sun Valley as a paradise for bicycle and river recreation enthusiasts. Situated at the crossroads of two bicycle super-highways, Sun Valley provides immediate access to hundreds of miles of paved bicycle trails. For boaters, Sun Valley is one mile upstream from Denvers famed Conuence Park and kayak course. Outdoor recreation can be best celebrated through continued greenway improvements, public art, recreation-based business recruitment, programming and community events.A.1.F. INDUSTRY/INNOVATION Celebrate the areas history as an industrial employment area and a place of innovation. This theme can be captured in public art, architecture, business recruitment, innovation-themed programming and events. Encourage preservation or adaptive reuse of buildings with historic signicance related to industry in the area, such as the Zuni generation plant. A.1.G. SUPPORT INTERNATIONAL FOODBuild upon the areas current demand for international and ethnic foods and Sun Valley residents increasing interest in local food production. Capture food as a theme in public art, business recruitment, weekly markets and cultural venues and events.A.1.H. SUPPORT PUBLIC AMENITIESContinue to support existing public and cultural amenities such as Rude Recreation Center, Fairview Elementary School, Denver Human Services and West Denver Library.Denver Bears 1955-1992 Denver Broncos 1960 Denver Nuggets 1975-1999 Colorado Rockies (NHL) 1976-1982 Colorado Avalanche 1981-1982, 1995-1999 Colorado Rockies (MLB)1993-1995 Colorado Rapids 1996-2001 Colorado Outlaws 2006 SPORTS HISTORY IN THE STATION AREA:

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23 CULTURE MAP Iron Works Existing Buildings Brooklyns Fairview Elementary Sun Valley Youth Center Community Garden Sports Authority Field at Mile High Community Garden / Market Public Art / Plaza Education/Cultural Asset Sports Venue Adaptive Reuse Opportunity Active Recreation Proposed/Existing Locations for:

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24 ENCOURAGE DIVERSITY RECOMMENDATION A.2A.2.A. SUPPORT A MIXTURE OF INCOMES Sun Valley has historically supported lower income families and should continue to do so in a way that does not concentrate poverty and the symptoms of poverty into one isolated place. Encourage population growth, a mixture of residential options and a more seamless integration of low income, workforce and market rate residential choices. A.2.B. ACCOMMODATE ALL AGES & ABILITIES Continue to oer multiple convenient transportation choices, a high quality built environment and diverse neighborhood services and amenities so that people of all ages and abilities feel comfortable living and working in Sun Valley. If the built environment is accessible, usable, convenient and a pleasure to use, everyone benets. A.2.C. ATTRACT BUSINESSESAttract a diversity of large and small businesses to the area that serve the shopping, entertainment, services, training and employment needs of Sun Valley residents, employees and visitors. Attracting a mixture of businesses can add to the sense of place and neighborhood character of Sun Valley.

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25 CELEBRATE CULTURE RECOMMENDATION A.3A.3.A. UTILIZE PUBLIC SPACES AND GATHERING PLACESThe Sun Valley neighborhood is lacking in high quality, successful public spaces. Successful public spaces have four key qualities 1) the space is accessible to all 2)they are programed eectively and people are engaged in activities there 3)the space is comfortable and has a positive perception, and lastly 4) it is a sociable place, meaning a place where people can meet each other and take people when they come to visit. A.3.B. PROMOTE A CULTURAL CENTERA cultural center is an organization, building, or complex that promotes culture and the arts. Cultural centers can be neighborhood community arts organizations, private facilities, government sponsored, or activist run. The opportunity exists in Sun Valley for one or more of these institutions. A.3.C. CREATE FOOD VENUESFood is a vital component of many of the dierent cultures in Sun Valley. Additionally, Sun Valley is a food desert, meaning it lacks access to healthy foods. This plan recommends the creation of a number of food oriented destinations including: %  en Community gardens %  en International food co-op %  en International market %  en Food hubA.3.C. SUPPORT PUBLIC ARTPublic Art serves two primary roles, as a tool for economic revitalization and it helps contribute to a communitys identity. When used correctly, public art can represent a sense of community pride and help to bring people together. Also, public art can attract people to a community who bring a broad array of talents and experiences. Public Art will play an important role in the revitalization of Sun Valley and can help bring the community together while honoring the past. Locations for new public art have been identied in this Plan. A.3.D. SUPPORT COMMUNITY EVENTS AND CELEBRATIONSCreate places for community events and celebrations within Sun Valley. Public spaces should be designed in a way to accommodate larger events and gatherings. These events will bring the Sun Valley neighborhood closer together, along with expose the neighborhood to the greater Denver region. Public Art at Decatur-Federal Station Welton Jazz Festival La Pena Cultural CenterBerkeley, CA International Market

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I think I will like the changes in the neighborhood. The new light rail will make it easier for my family to go see my grandparents. I am very, very excited for this.David // 5th Grader // Sun Valley Homes ResidentWhen I go to King Soopers, I dont nd everything I need. So I take a bus to an African store in Aurora. I do not know how to drive. The bus takes a very long time. If the train can take me to an African store, I will be very happy.Beatrice Hwraa // Sun Valley Homes ResidentOne of Khadikas sons goes to South High School. He takes three buses and a train a 40 minute commute. When the light rail opens, he can board the train at DecaturFederal Station a short walk from home. Hell make one train transfer, and the trip will take 20 minutes or less.Khadika // Sun Valley Homes Resident Sun Valley is hidden, tucked away and has always had challenges with access. This plans recommendations for better street connections will signicantly improve the neighborhoods accessibility.Cindy Everett // Senior Associate, Urban Land Conservancy

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27 b. a connected sun valleyConnecting Sun Valley to the City and Region Why is being connected important to Sun Valley? A well connected place has many direct and convenient routes leading into, through and out of the community. Connections come in many forms: pedestrian friendly streets, bus routes, bike trails and routes, passenger rail lines and stations, and parks and public spaces. Places with many high quality physical connections to other places oer a host of advantages for residents, businesses and the cities in which they are located. Connected places allow people the choice to walk, bike, ride transit, or drive to where they need to go. A large and growing collection of research is nding that connectivity is associated with more walking, less driving, greater safety, less crime, better physical tness, greater private investment and lower per capita greenhouse gas emissions. Sun Valley benets from great highway access and regional trail connectivity. The transit system has also served Sun Valley residents well both with bus service and now the new West Rail service that stops at the Decatur-Federal Station. Nevertheless, Sun Valley is surrounded by infrastructure and natural features that isolate it from surrounding neighborhoods and downtown. Poor street grid connectivity to and through Sun Valleys residential areas has created a seemingly isolated, often forgotten community. Federal Boulevard and the elevated Colfax Avenue oer a challenging pedestrian environment and limited pedestrian crossing opportunities, further isolating Sun Valley from its neighbors. Once in Sun Valley, it is dicult to nd ones way due to dead ends, winding roads and unintuitive street connections. Sun Valley and the Decatur-Federal Station Area will truly be connected when walking, biking, taking the train or bus becomes the default choices for how residents and employees get around. A connected Sun Valley is a place people will want to live, locate their business, or visit and they have many convenient choices for how to get around. B.1 Reknitting Neighborhoods B.4 Make Transit Convenient B.3 Enhance Walkability and Bikeability B.2 Integrated Parks and Public Spaces

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28 REKNITTING NEIGHBORHOODS RECOMMENDATION B.1B.1.A. CONNECT SUN VALLEY WITH ITS SURROUNDINGSIncrease the number and quality of connections between Sun Valley, the DecaturFederal Station, adjacent neighborhoods, Auraria Campus and Downtown Denver by extending and/or reconstructing the following key multimodal streets: %  en 13th AvenueRealign 13th Avenue west of the S. Platte River to connect to Federal Boulevard. Reconstruct 13th Avenue to accommodate separated sidewalks, on-street parking and bike lanes, per this plans recommended cross section. More detail is in the Transformative Projects section of this Plan. %  en 10th AvenueAs redevelopment occurs, extend and enhance 10th Avenue eastward to create a direct multimodal connection from the Villa Park neighborhood, across Federal Boulevard to the S. Platte River Greenway. More detail is in the Transformative Projects section of this Plan. %  en Federal Boulevard Work with CDOT to reconstruct Federal Boulevard from 5th Avenue to 20th Avenue. An environmental review process in 2009 determined the preferred cross section for the reconstructed Federal Boulevard from 5th to Howard. Information can be found at Denvergov.org/FederalHoward. Complete the design and continue to look for funding opportunities to construct the project. As improvements are implemented, look for additional opportunities to improve pedestrian and/or bicycle crossing conditions at key intersections along Federal 17th, Colfax, 14th, Holden, 10th and 8th. Continue to study alternative designs for the Colfax/Federal intersection a Transformative Project of this Plan. %  en 8th Avenue Reconstruct 8th Avenue to improve pedestrian and bicycle facilities in addition to accommodating cars and trucks.B.1.B. IMPROVE INTERNAL CIRCULATIONAs redevelopment occurs, improve internal circulation in parts of Sun Valley that have large superblocks. Superblocks can create directional challenges, unnecessarily lengthen travel distances and give people a sense of being lost. Sun Valleys superblocks occur near the Stadium, on DHA property and in the industrial areas. %  en Stadium parking lots Construct new, landscaped streets on stadium property between the Stadium and Colfax based on the concept in this plan. This circulation concept will help organize new development and create a more green and inviting environment. %  en DHA Parcel and Riverfront As redevelopment occurs, recreate a street grid and pedestrian-friendly blocks on the DHA parcel (Sun Valley Homes property) and along the riverfront to help organize new development and provide better access to the proposed riverfront park. %  en Street grid extension Look for opportunities to extend the street grid or pedestrian connections into large parcels as they redevelop. Examples include the Stadiums Parking Lot M north of the Decatur-Federal Station and industrial properties to the south. 6 25 25 Sanchez (Paco) Park Sanchez (Paco) Park Rude Park Rude Park Barnum North Park Barnum North Park Barnum Park Barnum Park Barnum East Park Barnum East Park Internal Circulation New Streets Detail Proposed Street Removal Proposed New/Extended Street Potential Street Grid Extension

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29 6 25 25Sanchez (Paco) Park Sanchez (Paco) Park Rude Park Rude Park Barnum North Park Barnum North Park Barnum Park Barnum Park Barnum East Park Barnum East Park Sports Authority Field at Mile High Further Study KEY MOBILITY CONNECTIONSMultimodal Street Reconstruction Multimodal Street Enhancement Internal Circulation New Streets O street Bike/Ped Connection

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30 B.1.C. ENHANCE KEY MULTIMODAL STREETSLook for opportunities to implement approved cross sections and/or streetscape enhancements for the following key multi-modal streets as development occurs. %  en 14th AvenueA full array of streetscape enhancements is appropriate for this connector to the Light Rail Station and community amenities wide or separated sidewalks, pedestrian lighting, waynding signage, benches, special pavers, trash receptacles. Change the name Howard Place to th Avenue to provide consistency across Federal Boulevard and improve waynding. %  en Lower ColfaxConsidered part of the Stadium Entertainment and Culture Transformative Project in this plan, Lower Colfax is a main street witha wide range of streetscape enhancements that will balance pedestrian activity, bicycle trac, the South Platte River trolly extension and stadium event related trac. Further study is needed to identify an appropriate cross section and design. %  en Decatur Street As redevelopment occurs along this spine of Sun Valley, ensure that Decatur Street is improved to include detached sidewalks, on street parking and bike lanes, per this plans recommended cross section. Additional street enhancements could include pedestrian lighting and waynding signage.B.1.D. CREATE A INTUITIVE MULTIMODAL NETWORKThe recommendations in this plan, if fully implemented, will result in an intuitive multimodal network linked with adjacent land uses. The hierarchy of the transportation network proposed balances mobility with access so that Sun Valley streets are well equipped to move people, not just cars. Blueprint Denver street classications are best used to describe not only the function of streets, but how their function relates to adjacent land uses. The Proposed Blueprint Street Classications Map identies the following types of multimodal streets. This plan makes recommendations for cross sections of several streets. Blueprint Denver provides additional guidance on design elements for each multimodal street type at www. denvergov.org/blueprint. %  en Residential designed to primarily serve pedestrians, bicycles and provide property access %  en Mixed Use emphasizes a variety of travel choices to provide access to adjacent residential, commercial and employment uses %  en Main streets highest intensity retail streets with expanded pedestrian amenity zones designed to promote walking such as wide or separated sidewalks, pedestrian lighting, waynding signage, benches, special pavers, trash receptacles %  en Industrial designed to serve a high volume of large vehicles, such as trucks

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31 Mixed Use Arterial Mixed Use Collector Mixed Use Local Main Street Industrial Arterial Industrial Collector Residential Collector Bicycle/Pedestrian Only Undesignated 6 25 25Sanchez (Paco) Park Sanchez (Paco) Park Rude Park Rude Park Barnum North Park Barnum North Park Barnum Park Barnum Park Barnum East Park Barnum East Park Further StudySports Authority Field at Mile High UPDATED BLUEPRINT STREET CLASSIFICATIONS 2 2 2 3 4 1 1. Stadium Festival Street 2. 13th Street, Decatur Street, Zuni Street 3. Riverfront Drive w/ Water Quality 4. 10th Ave 14 75 14 14 48 14 14 53 12 14 38 14 PROPOSED STREET CROSS SECTIONS 14 14 14 14 36 38 48 48 park 16 N 14 14

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32 INTEGRATED SYSTEM OF PARKS AND PUBLIC SPACES RECOMMENDATION B.2B.2.A. ENHANCE REGIONAL GREENWAY AND TRAIL SYSTEM %  en Expand the vision laid out by the River South Greenway Master Plan (RISO) as it pertains to Sun Valley %  en New Riverfront Park Build a new park on the west side of the South Platte River between Weir Gulch and 13th Avenue, including well-lit trail connections, activity nodes and passive and active recreation opportunities %  en Provide more neighborhood connections to greenways through well designed streets and pedestrian walkways or publicly accessible spaces within private development. %  en As the property between Lakewood Gulch and Lower Colfax redevelops, consider the appropriateness of creating a publicly accessible pedestrian link between the Stadium Festival Street and Lakewood Gulch %  en Continue to maintain and enhance the existing parks, Rude Recreation Center and regional bike trails %  en Improve Weir Gulch Continue to look for opportunities to expand and enhance the gulch and provide better connectivity across Federal Boulevard and 8th Avenue to Barnum North Park %  en As redevelopment occurs on properties adjacent to the river, work with property owners to expand or improve the attractiveness of the greenway B.2.B. UTILIZE STREETS AS PUBLIC SPACESThe best neighborhoods have welcoming public space within 1/8th mile (700 feet) of all homes. Several opportunities exist in the Sun Valley neighborhood to create streets as public spaces. These include the Pedestrian Priority Streets of Stadium Festival Street, Lower Colfax, 10th Avenue and Park Drive. These pedestrian priority streets should include enhanced pedestrian amenity zones including sidewalk caf seating, pedestrian lighting, public plazas, and pedestrian-scaled signage. B.2.C. CREATE PLACES TO PLAY AND RECREATECreate a variety of places for residents and employees to play and recreate, including informal play, passive and active recreation and team activities. A water-based play area would be suitable at the conuence of the Lakewood Gulch and the South Platte River greenway to connect these two regional greenways.B.2.D. GREEN THE NEIGHBORHOOD Bring green areas into the community interior in the form of tree-lined streets, water quality features, community gardens, pocket parks, playgrounds and public plazas. Look for opportunities to expand community gardens. Several proposed sites are included in the Parks and Open Spaces concept. Continue to work with Parks Department and developers to nd sites for community gardens. B.2.E. REGIONAL STORMWATER QUALITY AND DETENTIONTake advantage of opportunities for providing regional detention and water quality in parks and along streets without sacricing the quality or usability of the park or open space.

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33 Further Study 6 25 25Sanchez (Paco) Park Sanchez (Paco) Park Rude Park Rude Park Barnum North Park Barnum North Park Barnum Park Barnum Park Barnum East Park Barnum East Park Active Recreation Meeting Plac e Community G ardens Playgrounds Plaza Regional T rails Pedestrian Priority Streets Concept ual Building Placement PARKS AND OPEN SPACESRiverfront Activation Existing Lakewood Gulch Improvements Active Public Space RIVERFRONT PARK AND DRIVE SECTION

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34 ENHANCE WALKABILITY AND BIKEABILITY RECOMMENDATION B.3Creating a walkable and bikeable neighborhood requires an integrated system of welldesigned street, park and public space connections. This allows the healthy choice of walking or biking to become the most convenient and comfortable choice for people. Increased walkability and bikeablity enhances public health, community livability (including community cohesion) as well as oering substantial environmental and equity benets.B.3.A. COMPLETE THE BICYCLE NETWORK %  en Complete an integrated system of bicycle routes within the neighborhood that links intuitively to the citywide bicycle network, transit, destinations and regional multipurpose trails. %  en Update the Denver Moves Plan to reect bicycle connections recommended in this plan. In some cases, this Plan species the type of bicycle facility (e.g. bike lanes) within the approved street cross section. In other cases, the type of facility is unspecied and left for DenverMoves to determine (e.g. bike connection). The Bicycle and Pedestrian Connections Map indicates existing bicycle connections, planned connections currently in DenverMoves, and new connections proposed by this plan as an update to DenverMoves. %  en Implement the DenverMoves plan for Sun Valley as opportunities arise or as redevelopment occurs. High priorities for implementation include bicycle connections along 13th Avenue, 14th Avenue and Lower Colfax. 8th Avenue needs further study due to constrained right of way and truck trac.B.3.B. IMPROVE THE PEDESTRIAN ENVIRONMENTWith great transit access and tremendous opportunity for compact urban residential and employment growth, a high quality pedestrian realm is crucial to Sun Valleys future. Pedestrian Priority StreetsWhile all streets in Sun Valley need to contribute to pedestrian safety and comfort, several streets are recommended as Pedestrian Priority. These streets should oer enhanced features that create an inviting and active public realm. These pedestrian priority streets largely occur in the vicinity of the Decatur-Federal Station, the stadium and along the riverfront park. Priority IntersectionsThese are highly utilized crossing locations by pedestrians or bicyclists, and therefore should be designed with the safety and comfort of pedestrians and riders in mind. Design enhancements that may be appropriate for priority intersections include:B.3.C. CONNECT WITH BIKE SHARING NETWORKExtend the network of bike sharing (B-Cycle) stations to Sun Valley to better serve the growing number of Sun Valley residents, employees and visitors. Since no B-Cycle stations currently exist in the area, stations should be placed accordingly to serve residential developments. Other destination locations for new bike stations may include but are not limited to: %  en Wide and well-marked crosswalks %  en Full ADA compliance %  en 4-Way stop control %  en Countdown pedestrian signals %  en Curb extensions %  en No right turn bypasses %  en Decatur-Federal light rail station %  en Sports Authority Filed at Mile High %  en Mile High Vista/ New Westside Library %  en New riverfront park

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35 6 25 25Sanchez (Paco) Park Sanchez (Paco) Park Rude Park Rude Park Barnum North Park Barnum North Park Barnum Park Barnum Park Barnum East Park Barnum East Park Further StudySports Authority Field at Mile High BICYCLE AND PEDESTRIAN CONNECTIONSExisting Bicycle Connection Existing Mulit-use Path Priority Intersection Planned Bicycle Connection (DenverMoves) Proposed Additions to DenverMoves Pedestrian Priority Street Complete Street Enhanced Intersection Kelowna, BC Pedestrian Priority StreetFillmore St, Denver

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36 MAKE TRANSIT CONVENIENT RECOMMENDATION B.4B.4.A. SUPPORT TRANSIT SERVICEWhile bus service is and will continue to be well-utilized by Sun Valley residents, new light rail service will be transformational in peoples daily lives. One study by Reconnecting America suggests that travel time on an average day for Sun Valley residents will decrease by half as a result of light rail access. %  en Ensure that light rail and bus service continues to be consistent, accessible and aordable so that it is the convenient mode of choice for people living and working in the Decatur-Federal station area %  en New developments should consider Community/Neighborhood RTD Eco-passes to lower the cost of transit, especially for aordable and mixed income housing residents %  en As growth in Sun Valley occurs, continue to improve bus routing and service as needed to accommodate new destinations and transit needs. Specically, growth of entertainment venues near the stadium may increase demand for weekend and late night transit service. Consider adding Call-n-Ride as recommended by the 2012 West Side Transit Enhancement Study to accommodate these additional service needs. %  en Ensure that bus-to-train connections are safe and convenient, with clear lines-ofsight and signage directing people to the train station and bus stopsB.4.A IMPROVE LAST MILE CONNECTIONSEvery transit trip is a multi-modal journey, as people need to either bike, walk, or drive to the station. Even if someone drives to the station, they must eventually walk to the rail platform. Getting people to and from the station is fundamentally important. Safe bike routes to transit hubs reduce the need for feeder transit service, potentially cutting bus costs. More residents bicycling can also relieve pressure on transit service during peak hours. Ensuring that the transit station is served by adequate pedestrian infrastructure is the minimum required to connect residents to transit. While the city and RTD have invested resources into new sidewalks, lighting and security cameras, more can be done to improve last mile connections to the light rail station. %  en Enhance the pedestrian and bicycle experience near the new light rail station and along routes to nearby destinations such as the West Side Library, the Stadium, and Rude Recreation Center %  en Pedestrian and bicycle connections to the station platform should be comfortable and convenient for all users, regardless of their ability %  en Connect bikeways to transit stops, add additional bicycle parking by these stops, and provide adequate sidewalk space to accommodate bicycle parking %  en Look for opportunities to implement streetscape improvements along 14th Ave and along Decatur Street, create a more direct pedestrian connection from the LRT station to Rude Recreation Center, and consider creating a mid-block crossing on Howard (14th Ave) between Federal and Decatur to connect with new development to the north.B.4.B CREATE WAYFINDING AND SIGNAGECreate intuitive and consistent waynding system such as signage and other graphic communication to establish clear and comfortable connections between the LRT platform and nearby landmarks and destinations, including Rude Rec Center, Sports Authority Field at Mile High Stadium, West Side Library, and Lower Colfax District. Signage should be geared toward pedestrians and possibly list walking times to neighborhood destinations rather than distances to help encourage active transportation. Signage should be incorporated and build upon Parks and Recreation signage currently present in Lakewood Gulch.

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37 Potential Intersection Improvements Priority Pedestrian ConnectionsWaynding in Downtown DenverPRIORITY PEDESTRIAN IMPROVEMENTSShared Sidewalk Time/Destination Based Signage Walk Raleigh BUS TRANSIT SERVICE 1 20 31 9 16 30L 30 6 25 25Sanchez (Paco) Park Sanchez (Paco) Park Rude Park Rude Park Barnum North Park Barnum North Park Barnum Park Barnum Park Barnum East Park Barnum East Park

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We love living in Sun Valley. We like the urban grittiness the industrial mix. We like how close we are to downtown without having to pay downtown prices. The light rail station was a key decision factor to buy a house in this area. And we like the stadium we are huge football fans.Seth and Erin McCarthy // First time homeowners Im all for growth. Im all for changes as long as it helps the community to grow. Look at the elementary kids ten years down the line, they will be in high school and Sun Valley will have transitioned. We need to make sure that these kids graduate and have opportunities to succeed.Angelo Crowell // Sun Valley Homes residentNorth of the stadium has grown with townhomes and lofts. We need new residential on the south side of the stadium for the neighborhood to work. I think more density around the transit station with apartments above and retail on the rst oor is just what the area needs.Dave Keefe // Owner, Brooklyns Restaurant Stable income is not common for Sun Valley residents. In all my years here, I have known very few people who have stayed in a job and climbed up the ladder. I would love to see Sun Valley kids and parents learning skills that will help them nd stable careers.Kris Rollerson // Sun Valley Youth Center

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39 c. an innovative sun valleyattracting jobs, investment, and diverse housing choices Why is being innovative important to Sun Valley? Cities across the country are experiencing a multi-generational demand for walkable, aordable neighborhoods that oer a rich mix of amenities, provide convenient access to education and jobs and facilitate active lifestyles. Sun Valley presents a tremendous opportunity for this type of eclectic urban lifestyle. This plans innovative approach to growth and development in Sun Valley will increase the number of residents, employees and visitors to the area while continuing to build a socially and economically inclusive place. The Sun Valley neighborhood has three distinct character areas that possess their own unique opportunities: Transit Oriented Development, Stadium Entertainment, and Employment (aka Open for Business). The South Platte River Greenway threads its way along the east side of each of these character areas, tying them together. This Innovative section of the plan addresses growth and development in each character area. Recommendations for growth and development along the South Platte are also organized within the three character areas. Federal Boulevard the spine of West Denver also connects Sun Valleys character areas and neighborhoods to the west. This commercial corridor provides its own unique challenges and opportunities. While Federal Boulevard is addressed in each character area, a compilation of recommendations covering the corridor from 6th Avenue to 17th Avenue is included in A Vibrant Boulevard. C.1 Transit Oriented Development C.2 Stadium Entertainment Destination C.3 Open for Business C.4 A Vibrant Corridor 6 25 25 Sanchez (Paco) Park Sanchez (Paco) Park Rude Park Rude Park Barnum North Park Barnum North Park Barnum Park Barnum Park Barnum East Park Barnum East Park STADIUM ENTERTAINMENT TRANSIT ORIENTED DEVELOPMENT EMPLOYMENT CHARACTER AREAS

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40 TRANSIT ORIENTED DEVELOPMENT RECOMMENDATION C.1C.1.A. CREATE A LIVABLE TOD COMMUNITY %  en Facilitate TOD near the Decatur-Federal Light Rail Station (per the TOD Area Map) that integrates private development with a vibrant public realm and provides great access to the transit system and greenways %  en Create compact development patterns with small blocks and consistent building frontages that spatially dene public streets and open spaces, creating a diverse, cohesive and walkable community %  en Encourage both a vertical and horizontal mix of land uses including multifamily residential, oce, commercial, and public uses %  en Attract high quality, mixed income residential communities within the TOD area (a transformative project in this Plan). Encourage housing development that meets the needs of families, young professionals, students and elderly households of various income levels. A variety of residential building forms appropriate for this TOD include row houses, low-, mid-, and high-rise multifamily, and live/work. %  en Concentrate commercial activity near the light rail station, on Lower Colfax and at intersections to serve transit riders and the community. Recognize Lower Colfax as a special opportunity to bring back a historic main street and commercial and cultural center. %  en Encourage shared, consolidated and/or structured parking with new developments (see page 50)C.1.B. FACILITATE HIGH QUALITY URBAN DESIGNNew development should utilize the following urban design principles to maximizing the quality of development and pedestrian amenities within the TOD. %  en Encourage a wide mix of building heights and variation in building forms to provide visual interest, needed sunlight, air circulation and natural view corridors. Respect maximum building heights of 5 to 12 stories, per the Maximum Building Heights Map %  en Arrange building heights and scaling devices to provide transitions to adjacent areas %  en Create visually interesting and human-scaled facades. Utilize doors, windows and articulation to establish scale, variation and patterns on building facades that provide visual interest and reect uses within the buildings Primary StreetsConsider identied Primary Streets (TOD Area Map) during zoning and site plan review to determine appropriate setbacks, building conguration, parking location and pedestrian access requirements for new development. All other Primary Streets required by zoning shall be determined at the time of Site Development Plan. Active edgesConsider identied Active Edges (TOD Area Map) during zoning and site plan review to guide decisions on siting active ground oor uses, such as retail, commercial, community space or residential lobbies. Active edges should have prominent, street facing entries, pedestrian-oriented signage and high degrees of ground-oor transparency

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41 Lower Colfax Main Street AURARIA/ DOWNTOWNWestside Health Clinc Denver Human Services Market (2013) Eagleton Elementary Fairview Elementary Rude Rec Center Decatur-Federal Station West Side Library (2013) 6 25 25 Sanchez (Paco) Park Sanchez (Paco) Park Rude Park Rude Park Barnum North Park Barnum North Park Barnum Park Barnum Park Barnum East Park Barnum East Park 6 25 25Sanchez (Paco) Park Sanchez (Paco) Park Rude Park Rude Park Barnum North Park Barnum North Park Barnum Park Barnum Park Barnum East Park Barnum East Park Transit Oriented Development Area Active Edges Primary Street 3 Stories 5 Stories 8 Stories 12 StoriesTOD AREA MAXIMUM BUILDING HEIGHTS

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42 C.1.C. ACTIVATE THE GREENWAYS %  en Ensure that new development in the TOD area helps activate the South Platte River Greenway and Lakewood Gulch to promote the safety and attractiveness of these greenways. %  en Orient buildings to provide entrances, attractive frontages and pedestrian access along greenways. %  en Multi-family residential uses are especially appropriate along greenways to provide residents immediate access to recreation opportunities and create day and evening activity in the parks. %  en Commercial or oce uses may also be appropriate if they include a publicly accessible use or are designed in a way that engages with and compliments the greenway. Commercial or oce uses fronting greenways should have a high degree of transparency and architectural interest as well as pedestrian access connecting to the greenway. C.1.D. IMPROVE THE VISUAL ENVIRONMENT New development in Sun Valleys TOD area is both dependent on and may oer opportunities for improving the visual environment with regards to energy infrastructure. %  en Transmission lines Work with stakeholders, developers, energy and regulatory companies to explore looking at underground options for large transmission lines, subject to operational and other constraints. %  en Substation Work with Xcel, area developers and partners to screen the 13th Avenue substation with new structures, vegetation or other measures to minimize visual impacts. %  en Zuni Power Plant Upon the pending (2016) decommissioning of this plant, look for opportunities to redevelop all or portions of this site in a way that activates the riverfront and 13th Avenue. Encourage adaptive reuse of appropriate or historically important portions of the plant to maintain a connection with Sun Valleys industrial past %  en Cooling Towers Encourage demolition of the large riverfront cooling towers south of 13th Avenue on the east side of South Platte River. Work toward redevelopment of this site that activates 13th Avenue and enhances the greenway The city acknowledges that properties owned by Xcel may become available for redevelopment only when and to the extent that Xcel determines that such properties are not needed for the purpose of providing energy to its customers and the Denver Community.

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43 FUTURE LAKEWOOD GULCH Substation Screening London, UK Substation Screening -Alameda Station, Denver

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44 C.1.E. UTILIZE CREATIVE STORMWATER SOLUTIONSClean waterways are precious amenities that connect land and water, provide important wildlife habitat, oer vibrant recreational and educational opportunities, and enhance livability and economic vitality of our neighborhoods (Greenprint 2020). Located on the S. Platte River, at the conuence of two gulch systems, Sun Valley presents a tremendous opportunity for strategic and innovative approaches to water quality systems. Sustainable development practices are encouraged throughout Sun Valley including water quality facilities that are of superior quality, are functional, protect environmental health, serve as a public amenity, and support public safety. Current city policy requires that water quality facilities be 1) safe, 2) meet treatment requirements (UDFCD Vol III technical criteria), 3) be aesthetically pleasing, and 4) will be maintained by an entity other than the City. Large scale development should consider incorporating consolidated water detention and water quality features. Consolidating stormwater features may reduce development costs by achieving economies of scale and facilitating more compact development patterns. Consolidated facilities would require signicant coordination between property owners, developers and the city. This Plan presents a concept for consolidated water quality features. Details of the water quality and detention will need to be addressed in a General Development Plan and at the time of development. In this Plans concept, properties west of Decatur would be responsible for on-site detention and water quality. Properties east of Decatur would utilize consolidated stormwater detention and water quality features. The consolidated stormwater concept includes the following elements: 1. Four dual-purpose stormwater detention / wildlife habitat areas integrated into the new riverfront park in an aesthetically pleasing manner that enhances the quality and usability of the park / open space that could also serve water quality functions and act as passive recreation areas (e.g. nature trails). 2. Three additional stormwater detention / water quality areas are proposed; One potential location is west of the Xcel substation north of 13th Avenue to act as a buer between adjacent development and the substation. Another location could be south of the stadium and west of the Comcast building. The third location could be on the play eld east of Fairview Elementary School and could serve a dual purpose of passive recreation or environmental education. 3. Roadside water quality features (e.g. bioswales) within the public right-of-way along the east side of Decatur Street and on the east side of Bryant. 4. Roadwide water quality feature within park boundaries along the east side of the riverside park drive. 5. Roadside bioswales typically need to be maintained by the property owner or a district, with the exception of the riverfront park bioswale, which could be maintained by the Citys Parks Department. Dual-purpose detention areas within the park would be maintained by a district or by the Parks Department.

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45 INTEGRATED DETENTION AND WATER QUALITY Pervious pavers for Water Quality Bioswale Integrated Water Quality Seattle, WA Integrated Water Detention Denver, CO Integrated Water Detention Denver, COWater Detention Water Quality

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46 STADIUM ENTERTAINMENT DESTINATION RECOMMENDATION C.2C.2.A. CREATE A YEAR-ROUND DESTINATION %  en Encourage growth of a stadium-oriented entertainment and commercial destination to create year-round shopping and entertainment opportunities, improve the vibrancy and attractiveness of the area and compliment entertainment options downtown and along the South Platte River. %  en Appropriate land uses include commercial, retail, entertainment, hotels and cultural uses. Multi-family residential and oce may also be appropriate within the mix of uses. %  en Recruit Commercial Anchors Two or three commercial, retail or cultural anchors are necessary to create a vibrant year-round destination. %  en Sports and Entertainment Niche Capitalize on the sports and recreation themes in the area by recruiting complimentary and synergistic businesses sportsthemed restaurants, museums, health clubs, training gyms, merchandise stores, and or related oce headquarters. %  en Incorporate an internal network of landscaped streets and public spaces such as the Stadium Festival Street. New streets and public spaces should break up expanses of parking, organize new development, oer priority to pedestrian movement and connect the stadium with light rail station bus routes. The Stadium Festival Street is a Transformative Project in this Plan. %  en Maintain adequate transit and vehicle access to the site. %  en Work with partners on activating the space underneath the Colfax Viaduct with public art and active uses, such as a proposed international / farmers market. %  en Work with the Platte River Trolley toward extension of the line to provide access to growing entertainment destinations near the stadium.C.2.B. FACILITATE HIGH QUALITY URBAN DESIGNOrient buildings and create a consistent street frontage along internal public spaces including the proposed Stadium Festival Street and outwardly toward Federal Boulevard and the intersection with 17th Avenue. Encourage a mix of building heights and variation in building forms to provide visual interest, needed sunlight, air circulation and natural view corridors. Recommended maximum building height is 5 stories, per the Maximum Building Heights Map in the TOD section of this Plan. Create visually interesting and human-scaled facades. Utilize doors, windows and articulation to establish scale, variation and patterns on building facades that provide visual interest and reect uses within the buildings Broncos Tailgate S. Platte River Trolly

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47 Lower Colfax Main Street 6 25 25 Sanchez (Paco) Park Sanchez (Paco) Park Rude Park Rude Park Barnum North Park Barnum North Park Barnum Park Barnum Park Barnum East Park Barnum East Park Stadium Fesitival Street Sports Authority Field at Mile High Primary Streets Consider identied Primary Streets (Stadium Entertainment Destination Map) during zoning and site plan review to determine appropriate setbacks, building conguration, parking location and pedestrian access requirements for new development. All other Primary Streets required by zoning shall be determined at the time of Site Development Plan. Active edges Consider identied Active Edges (Stadium Entertainment Destination Map) during zoning and site plan review to guide decisions on siting active ground oor uses, such as retail, commercial, community space or residential lobbies. Active edges should have prominent, street facing entries, pedestrian-oriented signage, high degrees of ground-oor transparency, and visually interesting and humanscaled facades. Stadium Entertainment Destination Active Edges Primary Street Platte River Trolley STADIUM ENTERTAINMENT DESTINATION

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48 C.2.C. SHARE AND CONSOLIDATE PARKINGConcentrating residents, employees and daily needs within walkable distance to transit typically reduces the need for people to use automobiles and nd a parking space for every trip. Consequently, TOD areas need less parking than places where the automobile is the primary form of transportation. As a result, parking in TOD areas is often treated as a common resource for adjacent land uses, rather than as a requirement of each building or land use. With an overabundance of Stadium District owned surface parking lots, Sun Valley presents a tremendous opportunity to consolidate and manage parking more eciently. With the opening of the light rail line in 2013, up to 1,900 parking spaces on stadium district owned lots will be shared with RTD so that transit riders from nearby neighborhoods can park and ride. As Sun Valley grows and attracts new development, physical constraints will drive the need for consolidated, structured and shared parking. An organized approach for parking consolidation, design and management is necessary to ensure a successful parking system that balances the needs of residents, employees, the stadium, transit riders and visitors. %  en Consider creating a parking Area Management Plan, as described in the citys Strategic Parking Plan, to analyze and document opportunities to consolidate and manage parking more eciently %  en Encourage shared and structured parking among RTD, the Stadium and new development, to maximize land available for development in the TOD area %  en RTD Park and Ride monitor utilization of RTDs 1900 parking spaces and look for opportunities to reduce the number of RTD parking spaces in the TOD area %  en Wrap structured parking with active street frontage where appropriate %  en Residential parking and aordability new residential developments should consider unbundling parking so that a resident can lease a unit with or without the extra cost of leasing a parking space. This approach provides more choices for residents and keeps costs down for both residents and developers %  en With new development, look for creative approaches to meet parking requirements including shared, tandem, remote or bicycle parking %  en Increase opportunities for bicycle parking and storage at key locations throughout the station area the Decatur-Federal Station platform, the stadium, along Lower Colfax, in parks, and at public facilities. RTDs oers bicycle lockers for rent at most Park-nRide stations for transit passengers who need regular, secure storage for their bike. Bicycle parking should also be provided for visitors to the station area as well.

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49 Garage w/ Active Street Frontage Bellmar, CO Covered Bike ParkingPARKING OPPORTUNITIES 6:00 AM12:00 PM 6:00 PM 12:00 AM Transit Oce Entertainment Stadium 6:00 AM12:00 PM 6:00 PM 12:00 AM Transit Oce Entertainment Stadium Parking Demand Weekday Parking Demand Gameday Opportunity for Shared/Structured Parking Opportunity for Shared Surface Parking

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50 OPEN FOR BUSINESS RECOMMENDATION C.3Build on the success of Sun Valleys existing industrial area in a way that increases job opportunities near transit and invites Sun Valley residents to work near where they live.C.3.A. SUPPORT EXISTING INDUSTRIAL BUSINESSES %  en Continue to support businesses in the existing industrial area from 6th Avenue to 9th Avenue and from Federal Boulevard to the South Platte River %  en Appropriate land uses in the existing industrial area include light industrial and ex space, with some commercial uses, especially along Federal Boulevard %  en Encourage existing businesses to stay and grow in Sun Valley by increasing business outreach and improving access to technical and capital resources %  en Work with businesses to attract and train a high quality workforce. This is a transformative project of this plan see Access to Jobs and Education %  en Identify opportunities for industrial inll development. Work with property owners toward more ecient use of underutilized land and opening up of land for new businesses %  en Continue to provide signed, intuitive truck access to the area o of I-25, 6th Avenue, 8th Avenue and Federal BoulevardC.3.B. ENCOURAGE EMPLOYMENT TOD %  en Create a new Employment TOD area north of the existing industrial district, south of 11th Avenue and east of Federal Boulevard. With DHA as the primary property owner, creation of this district would occur after DHA has developed new housing and relocated Sun Valley Homes residents to more livable and healthy living environment closer to transit and amenities (See High Quality Residential Communities Transformative Project). %  en Encourage a vertical and horizontal mix of land uses, including light industrial, small oce, institutional/vocational, commercial, ex and live/work. Multifamily residential may also be appropriate within a mix of land uses that includes employment %  en Create more compact development patterns with smaller blocks, a connected street grid and consistent building frontages that spatially dene streets and open spaces %  en Provide employees with both indoor and outdoor active collaborative spaces and great walkable access to the transit system and greenways %  en Concentrate commercial activity serving employees along 10th Avenue with nodes at Federal, Decatur and at the riverfront park, as well as 8th Avenue and DecaturC.3.C. FACILITATE HIGH QUALITY URBAN DESIGNNew development should utilize the following urban design principles to enhance the quality of development and pedestrian amenities Sun Valleys employment areas. %  en Respect maximum recommended building heights of 5 stories throughout the Employment TOD Area and a maximum of 3 stories in the existing industrial area. Encourage a mix of building heights and variation in building forms to provide visual interest, needed sunlight, and air circulation %  en In the Employment TOD Area, create visually interesting and human-scaled facades. Utilize doors, windows and articulation to establish scale and variation and reect uses within the buildings %  en In the Employment TOD Area, minimize the visual impact of parking and loading areas by locating them behind buildings and providing vehicle and truck access to properties o of alleys Primary Streets Consider Federal Boulevard, Decatur Street and 10th Avenue as recommended Primary Streets (Employment Area Map) during zoning and site plan review to determine appropriate setbacks, building conguration, parking location and pedestrian access requirements for new development. All other Primary Streets required by zoning shall be determined at the time of site plan development. New Belgium Brewery Fort Collins, CO Taxi Community, Denver Nestle Laboratory, Mexico City

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51 6 25 25 Sanchez (Paco) Park Sanchez (Paco) Park Rude Park Rude Park Barnum North Park Barnum North Park Barnum Park Barnum Park Barnum East Park Barnum East Park Employment TOD Freeway Access Existing Industrial Area Active Edges Primary Street EMPLOYMENT AREA Active edgesConsider recommended Active Edges (Employment Area Map) during zoning and site plan review to guide decisions on siting active ground oor uses, such as retail, commercial, or collaborative spaces serving employees. Active edges should have prominent, street facing entries, pedestrian-oriented signage and high degrees of ground-oor transparency. Greenways New development should contribute to the attractiveness and environmental quality of the South Platte River greenway and Weir Gulch. Any of the following design features are encouraged for new development adjacent to the greenway, as appropriate: landscaped buers, vegetative screen, water quality features, attractive building frontages with a high degree of transparency or architectural interest, locating a publicly accessible use (such as a showroom) toward the greenway, and pedestrian access connecting to the greenway.

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52 C.3.D. ACTIVELY RECRUIT INNOVATIVE BUSINESSES %  en Recruit new, growing, entrepreneurial and innovative businesses seeking to locate in a growing employment district. %  en Build upon existing themes of food production, sports/recreation, construction, and craft brewing. Targeted businesses for the community may also include light assembly and manufacturing, scientic and medical equipment, energy and information technology, small scale commercial distribution and wholesale, construction support, conference center and theater support services, catering and restaurant support, and arts/design businesses. %  en Seek to include specic industry clusters in which businesses will energize one another and can be marketed together. %  en Seek businesses that are willing to hire locally and provide training and professional development opportunities for nearby residents. C.3.E. CREATE SHARED SPACES %  en Encourage the development of tech-friendly shared spaces and collaborative work environments in order to: %  en Respond to the demand for a more creative, multidisciplinary collaborative culture in the work environment %  en Encourage entrepreneurial and start up activities and accommodate growing companies %  en Build on the success of creative or high tech co-oces and shared spaces in Denver like The Battery and Galvanize %  en Facilitate the growth and success of non-prot service providers, advocacy groups and other organizations trying to solve social or environmental problems %  en Work with the Mayors Oce of Strategic Partnerships Shared Spaces Initiative to facilitate the location of non-prot shared spaces in Sun Valley

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53 Galvanize SHARED OFFICE SPACESCube Building The Creative Farm Common Roots Denver Shared Oce Space Alliance Center Wazee Union Space Creators Laundry on Laurence Space Creators

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54 A VIBRANT CORRIDOR RECOMMENDATION C.4C.4.A. ENHANCE FEDERAL BOULEVARD AS THE SPINE OF WEST DENVEREncourage continued investment in public infrastructure and private property development along Federal Boulevard As Federal Boulevard is reconstructed, incorporate enhanced pedestrian amenities at priority intersections to improve the pedestrian crossing experience: 17th, Howard (proposed 14th Ave.) Holden (proposed 13th Ave.) 10th Ave, and 8th Avenue Look for ways to overcome challenges for commercial development along Federal these include high trac speeds, property access near the interchange and lack of onstreet parking. Overcoming these challenges may help attract more neighborhood serving commercial uses such as restaurants, coee shops, convenience and transitoriented retail, personal care and general merchandise. Incorporate high quality bus stop facilities, complete with shelters, maps, schedules, benches and trash receptacles Continue studying alternative congurations for the Federal and Colfax Interchange with the goal of improving pedestrian connectivity, access to private properties, and economic development opportunities while also accommodating vehicle and bus trac (for more detail, see Transformative Projects) Incorporate waynding signage to the Decatur-Federal light rail station, Lakewood Gulch, South Platte River Greenway and to other community destinations such as Rude Recreation Center and the West Side Library.C.4.B. FACILITATE HIGH QUALITY URBAN DESIGNAs new development occurs, look for opportunities to expand and enhance the pedestrian environment by setting buildings back from property lines to accommodate wider sidewalks, tree lawns, or other pedestrian amenities Identied as a Primary Street for zoning purposes in this Plan, new development should provide consistent building frontage along Federal Boulevard, with parking and property access located o of side streets or alleys. Curb cuts on Federal should be minimized. Consider Federal intersections with 17th Avenue, Howard (proposed 14th) and 10th Avenue as Active Edges during site plan review to guide decisions on siting active ground oor uses (retail, commercial or community spaces). Active edges should have prominent street facing entries, pedestrian-oriented signage and high degrees of ground-oor transparency. Such treatments of these intersections can also help them act as neighborhood gateways.

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55 Gateway Buildings at Corner Improved Crosswalks Pedestrian Friendly Sidewalk Active Corners and Ground Floor Improved Medians Improved Transit Stops FEDERAL BOULEVARD ENHANCEMENTS

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I think more and more about the importance of food in Sun Valley. Our neighbors have dierent religions, ethnic groups and backgrounds. Many of us are refugees. Unless people are eating food from their own culture, they dont feel like they are eating. If you give them a hamburger, they arent satised.Asnake Deferse // Sun Valley Homes Resident Sun Valley has a history as a food-based neighborhood with a small Jewish community and the Star Bakery that operated on Lower Colfax for more than half a century. Today Ready Foods that prepares Mexican food. We need to bring food back as something to celebrate the history of Sun Valley by living it, breathing it and even better eating it.David Zucker// Zocalo Community DevelopmentAs a partner of the Denver Housing Authority, Denver Health supports the development of Sun Valley. The new riverfront park contributes to health by promoting physical activity and relaxation. Parks, greenways and trails make it easier to choose walking or biking. Greenways support dedicated exercise programs and incidental exercise and decrease the number of cars on the road, reduce air pollution, and eliminate the stress of driving.Jaclyn Cheves // Project Director // Denver Public HealthIn terms of better health in Sun Valley, access to food is key. Youll see plenty of Sun Valley folks at the 7-11 on Federal especially the kids. There are no healthy alternatives for them. We also dont have enough ball elds. More parks with ball elds would allow us to expand programming for soccer, football, baseball and other activities.James Salinas // Manager, Rude Recreation Center

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57 d. a healthy sun valleyattracting jobs, investment, and diverse housing choices Why is being healthy important to Sun Valley? A combination of factors, including industrialization of the S. Platte River, construction of large infrastructure projects and concentration of public housing, have resulted in poor environmental, public and economic health conditions in Sun Valley. Sun Valley consistently ranks low compared to other Denver neighborhoods for health indicators. With over 50% of the population under the age of 15, household education levels are among the lowest in Denver and teen pregnancies are common. For years Sun Valley residents have lived in a food desert meaning they have limited access to supermarkets or grocery stores. Residents have a signicantly higher obesity rate (52%) than the average for Coloradans (19.1%). Despite being adjacent to downtown and an employment area, few residents have found job opportunities nearby -their commute times are the longest in the city. The lack of private investment has exacerbated these problems. A dearth of neighborhood-supporting businesses in the area means that residents have to travel to other parts of the city to buy food and fulll other daily needs. A brighter future seems possible. The opening of the West Light Rail line will improve residents access to education and job opportunities throughout the region and spark private investment in Sun Valley. Recent improvements to Lakewood Gulch and the South Platte River have improved the watersheds ability to handle stormwater ows and have shrunk the oodplain, opening up more land for redevelopment. DHA is planning for Sun Valley Homes redevelopment in the 2014-2017 timeframe, and DHA has a successful track record of creating very livable, mixed income communities that seamlessly integrate aordable units with market rate and workforce units. Entrepreneurial residents and business owners have ideas for creating food cooperatives, cultural centers and international markets. The future looks bright for public and private investment to ow into the area, making Sun Valley healthy for people, the environment and the economy. D.1 Healthy for People D.2 Healthy for the Environment D.3 Healthy for the Economy

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58 HEALTHY FOR PEOPLE RECOMMENDATION D.1D.1.A. INCREASE ACCESS TO DAILY NEEDSPeople who live and work in or visit Sun Valley should be able to walk to businesses where they can grab a bite to eat, get their hair cut, send a letter, have coee with a friend, or fulll other daily needs. %  en Allow for a greater mix of land uses in the neighborhood; mixed use zone districts are generally encouraged over those that allow single land uses %  en Encourage new development to include commercial spaces that support neighborhood-serving businesses. Likely locations for neighborhood serving businesses include Federal Boulevard, Colfax Avenue west of Federal Boulevard, Lower Colfax, Decatur Street, 14th Ave, 13th Avenue,10th Avenue and the riverfront park drive. %  en Work toward streetscape improvements along key pedestrian routes through the neighborhood; especially critical is the connection on 14th / Howard between Decatur and Irving, to connect Sun Valley residents with the new West Side Library and Mi Pueblo food marketD.1.B. INCORPORATE HEALTHY AND CULTURALLY APPROPRIATE FOOD AS A CONSISTENT THEME IN REDEVELOPMENT AND CULTURAL ACTIVITIES %  en Support the creation of seasonal open-air market under the Colfax viaduct %  en Encourage the opening of a year-long international food market / co-op %  en Consider the potential for incorporating a food hub into the area, as depicted in Denvers City Kitchen business plan %  en Encourage healthy food retailers and produce stands to locate near the light rail station to serve both the community and transit riders %  en Continue to support existing or new community gardens as a way to educate families about healthy food and share food culture D.1.C. IMPROVE THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT IN A WAY THAT HELPS WALKING, BIKING OR TAKING TRANSIT BECOME DEFAULT CHOICE FOR RESIDENTS AND EMPLOYEES %  en Implement bicycle and pedestrian improvements as recommended in this Plan and Denver Moves %  en Promote safe routes to schools and to higher education %  en Extend the network of bike sharing (B-Cycle) stations to Sun Valley (locations for new stations may include the Decatur-Federal Light Rail Station, the stadium, near residential developments and/or near the riverfront park)

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59 D.1.D. ENSURE ALL RESIDENTS (ESPECIALLY CHILDREN) AND EMPLOYEES HAVE ACCESS TO RECREATION %  en Create places to play team sports as well as unstructured activities %  en Implement the new riverfront park, as proposed by this plan, to provide a place for people to experience nature, engage in physical activity and relax. The park also promotes dedicated exercise programs as well as incidental exercise. %  en Continue to support Rude Recreation Center with funding to ensure the continuation and enhancement of recreation programming and community events. Look for ways to expand scholarship programs for low income families. %  en Work with partners to incorporate recreational and sports programming and events in the neighborhood such as the NFLs Play60 program. D.1.E. IMPROVE COMMUNITY HEALTH SERVICES AND SOCIAL SERVICESSun Valley is home to Denver Human Services and the Denver Health Sandos Westide Health Center. Denver Human Services provides assistance, protection and prevention programs for Denvers most vulnerable residents, while Denver Westside Health Center provides comprehensive and primary care to primarily west Denver patients. The location of these facilities in Sun Valley is very much appreciated by Sun Valley residents, many of whom greatly need the services but do not drive or have access to an automobile. %  en Implement the recommendations from the 2012 Denver Human Services Needs Assessment report. Recommendations address improving community members access to services, information about services and eectiveness of programs and services oered. A key recommendations includes strengthening collaboration between Denver Human Services and non-prot partners or local service providers. %  en As high growth neighborhoods such as Sun Valley attract more residents and employees, the demand for Denver Healths services will increase. Denver Health may want to consider expanding or enhancing health services to meet the needs of a growing and more diversied patient population.D.1.F. CONSIDER HEALTH AND PUBLIC SAFETY IMPACTS OF NEW DEVELOPMENT %  en Work with developers (such as DHA) to consider health impacts of new development in the area using tools such as Health Impact Assessment (HIA), Healthy Development Measurement Tools (HDMT) or other useful frameworks %  en Incorporate best practices for crime prevention through environmental design

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60 HEALTHY FOR THE ENVIRONMENT RECOMMENDATION D.2D.2.A. CLEAN UP RIVERFRONT HEAVY INDUSTRYHistoric industrialization of the S. Platte River remains very evident in Sun Valley. Xcel Energy owns various parcels along both sides of the riverfront. Operations of some utility properties may be phased out, subject to regulatory approval, while others will remain essential to providing energy to the Denver community. Xcel will continue to have a strong presence in Sun Valley, but these changes present opportunities to improve the riverfront environment.D.2.B. IMPROVE RIPARIAN HABITAT %  en Continue to rehabilitate the riparian habitats along the South Platte River and the Lakewood and Weir gulches %  en Look for opportunities to reduce riverbank slopes and pull banks back from the water %  en Incorporate new wetlands and riparian habitats into the greenway system that include self-sustaining native vegetation, increase wildlife habitat, increase the capacity for the river to accommodate storm ows and contribute toward water quality improvementsD.2.C. CREATE HIGH PERFORMING BUILDINGS AND NEIGHBORHOODS. %  en Encourage sustainable development that is energy and resource-ecient, using lessons learned from innovative work by the Rocky Mountain Institute, Alliance for Sustainable Colorado and Living City Block %  en Create communities that contribute toward meeting or exceeding Greenprint Denver citywide goals for decreased greenhouse gas emissions %  en Encourage developers to set goals for LEED, Enterprise Green Communities or other green building frameworks and develop high performing neighborhoods and buildings which are healthy for both the environment and people Healthy Housing Riverfront Housing Energy Ecient Building LEED for Neighborhood Development

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61 HEALTHY FOR THE ECONOMY RECOMMENDATION D.3D.3.A. CREATE NEW JOBS %  en Increase the number and diversity of jobs in the area by expanding the employment district, encouraging existing industrial property owners to utilize land more eciently and recruiting large and small employers to the area %  en Support existing businesses and businesses looking to locate in Sun Valley with strategic, capital and technical resources %  en Market the Sun Valley area for new business recruitmentD.3.B. INCREASE ACCESS TO JOBS AND JOB TRAINING %  en Encourage organizations providing job and small business training to locate in the area and focus eorts in Sun Valley %  en Improve job search tools so that low income residents can more easily access information about jobs in Sun Valley and near light rail stationsD.3.C. EXPAND THE ECONOMIC BENEFITS OF SPORTS AUTHORITY FIELD AT MILE HIGH STADIUM %  en Improve Denvers ability to attract large national and international events by enhancing the stadium experience and proactive recruiting %  en Provide more entertainment, cultural and retail destinations for visitors on nongame days and more reasons for visitors to extend their stays in the stadium area %  en Create more robust partnerships as well as physical and economic connections between the stadium and nearby neighborhoods so that area residents and employees benet from growth of the stadium entertainment destination

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The Platte River Trolley serves to connect Lower Colfax and the stadium to entertainment venues along the river to the north the Childrens Museum, Aquarium, REI and Conuence Park. The trolley is a historic cultural amenity that should be part of the redevelopment of the Lower Colfax main street and stadium entertainment area.Pete West // Denver Tramway Heritage SocietyI am thrilled about the possibility of bringing more arts and culture into Sun Valley. We would like to scrape our colorful buildings on Lower Colfax and rebuild a mixture of uses in the same location. Its ideal for an art complex where my family could share our art collection with the public.Adriana Abarca // Ready FoodsInvesting in Sun Valley makes sense for many reasons: proximity to the river and downtown, extensive developable land near the light rail station, public and private interest in continuing to serve those who live there now as well as expanding the community. Cindy Everett // Urban Land ConservancyThe southern portion of Sun Valley is most appropriate for light industrial, ex and employment spaces, while housing should be concentrated to the north near the light rail station, neighborhood amenities and the S. Platte River. DHA should consider residential development closer to the light rail station rather than on its current parcel.Urban Land Institute // Technical Advisory Panel

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63 1. 13th Avenue 2. New Riverfront Park 5. Connect People with Jobs and Education 3. Stadium, Entertainment & Culture 6. 10th Avenue 4. High Quality Residential Communities 7. Federal/Colfax Interchangetransformative projectsMulti-layered and long-termthe most critical steps Seven projects are identied as the most critical steps to positively transform the station area. Multi-layered and long-term in nature, these projects will take a concerted eort by both the public and private sectors. Partnerships and resources should be harnessed toward making these a reality. Only through executing these projects can Sun Valley be transformed and achieve the vision of a celebrated, connected, innovative and healthy part of Denver.

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64 13TH AVENUE TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECT 1 WHAT IS IT?13th Avenue is a major east-west connection linking Sun Valley to Downtown and neighborhoods to the east. To improve the east-west connectivity in Sun Valley, a realigned 13th Avenue will bring new investment into the area by establishing a new direct connection between Federal Boulevard and neighborhoods to the east. As a major connection, the Avenue will include a robust multi-modal facility, higher density mixed use development corridor, gateway elements highlighting the South Platte River connections and new riverfront park, and a strong pedestrian realm shaped by active street building frontages and improved streetscapes. The direct connection will provide greater connectivity and access to key assets, including Auraria Campus, Metro State Recreation Fields, Rude Rec Center, Denver Human Services, Lincoln Park Neighborhood and Downtown. 13th Avenue will transform Sun Valley by integrating it into the larger context south of Downtown. RECOMMENDATIONS %  en Realign 13th Avenue west of the river to create a direct connection from Federal Boulevard to Downtown along what is now Holden Place %  en Enhance multi-modal connectivity along 13th Avenue to accommodate bicyclists, pedestrians and motorists in a balanced transportation solution, including separated sidewalks, street trees, on-street parking and bike lanes %  en Celebrate the South Platte River crossing with gateway treatments such as, signage, plazas, direct river access and other public space improvements %  en Encourage active uses along the street and higher density mixed use reinvestment through the use of good urban design and placemaking principles %  en As design moves forward continue to maintain access to existing 13th Avenue properties east of Decatur, connect to the new riverfront drive, park, and regional trails %  en Evaluate the access impacts to Sun Valley of the at-grade crossings of the BNSF freight line and, if necessary, identify strategies to reduce those impacts. How does 13th Avenue contribute to CELEBRATED? %  en The realigned 13th Avenue will connect people to several important community amenities: Rude Recreation Center, Denver Human Services, the proposed riverfront park, Auraria Campus and Metro State Athletic Complex, Lincoln Park and the Cherry Creek Trail. How does 13th Avenue contribute to CONNECTED? %  en As a critical multi-modal connection linking Auraria Campus, Downtown, Lincoln Park to Sun Valley and Federal Boulevard, 13th Avenue provides safe and convenient access for pedestrian, bicyclists and motorists How does 13th Avenue contribute to INNOVATIVE? %  en The reinvestment along 13th Avenue will contribute to creating a walkable and connected area that encourages an eclectic urban lifestyle. The mixture of uses, multi-modal functions and accessibility to parks and neighborhoods will provide a major amenity for the area How does 13th Avenue contribute to HEALTHY? %  en With direct access to the South Platte River trail network, 13th Avenue creates a healthy built environment by promoting active walking and biking to and from the River and in between downtown neighborhoods

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65 Sanchez (Paco) Park Sanchez (Paco) Park Rude Park Rude Park Federal Blvd.Speer Blvd. 13th AveColfax Ave. Decatur Federal Decatur Federal Auraria Campus Proposed Metro State Athletic Complex Rude Rec Center Lincoln Park Sports Authority Field at Mile High Denver Human Services Downtown La Alma / Lincoln Park Sun Valley Westside Health Clinic 25 13 TH AVENUE PROPOSED ALIGNMENT 13 TH AVENUE FUTURE VISION

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66 NEW RIVERFRONT PARK TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECT 2 WHAT IS IT?Sun Valley sits at the conuence of three greenwaysLakewood Gulch, Weir Gulch and the South Platte River Trail. Signicant resources have been committed to ensure these facilities are valuable amenities for the city and the neighborhood. Partners including Parks, Public Works, Urban Drainage, RTD and Greenway Foundation have made signicant improvements in these areas in recent years. It is time to build upon this success and momentum. Currently, the greenway system functions as a way to move through Sun Valley rather than connect people to waterways. Since these amenities are primarily behind major land uses, they are not very visible and easily accessible. These challenges can also limit the ability to use these amenities as a draw for future residents, retail and jobs. A stronger statement is needed to unify these resources and oer opportunities for active engagement and connection along the South Platte River and the gulches. The construction of a new park on the west side of the South Platte River between Weir Gulch and 13th Avenue will help address these challenges. This new park must also have a new street along the frontage to oer public access and visibility. Essential elements of this project are described below.RECOMMENDATIONS New Riverfront Park %  en Widen the South Platte River greenway corridor between Weir Gulch and 13th Avenue to accommodate approximately 10 additional acres of parkland %  en Create a long, gradual slope or terracing leading down into the water to create usable park space separate from the water but also oer safe water access %  en Oer active and passive recreation opportunities consistent with the vision in the River South Master Plan such as environmental education, water feature play area, seating and gathering areas, cafs, active play elds and courts %  en Maintain and enhance the existing regional bike trail along the river for through trac as well as connections to gulch trails %  en Provide local connections for bike and pedestrian access to the neighborhood and activity areas within the park %  en Incorporate opportunities for regional storm water storage in riparian planting/ habitat areas without sacricing the quality or usability of the park %  en Maintain the current South Platte River Trail and greenway to link the new park to Lakewood Gulch New Riverfront Drive %  en Construct a parkside street along the frontage of the park %  en Incorporate a widened swale on the parkside of the road for regional water quality treatment and a soft transition from roadway to park %  en Design the street for bikes, pedestrians and cars operating at slow vehicle speeds %  en Incorporate streetscape enhancements and crosswalks that signal it is a gathering area for the neighborhood where pedestrians are the priority %  en Encourage commercial activity and other ground oor active uses along the west side of the street creating additional eyes on the park and retail and employment opportunities Kayak Launch Integrated Soccer Field Los Angeles, CA Development oriented to open space Denver, CO Planned improvements to Weir Gulch

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67 How does the Riverfront Park contribute to CELEBRATED? %  en Creates opportunity for new community assets including playgrounds, recreation, public art, markets, gardens %  en Oers neighborhood gathering space for dierent cultural events and activities How does the Riverfront Park contribute to CONNECTED? %  en Unies and integrates the system of parks and public spaces %  en Provides additional opportunities for multi-modal connections within the neighborhood How does the Riverfront Park contribute to INNOVATIVE? %  en Contributes to a livable community for existing and future residents and workers by embracing the River and regional trail system How does the Riverfront Park contribute to HEALTHY? %  en Creates opportunity for community gardens and active play areas %  en Will provide increased riparian habitat for the River %  en Create active commercial uses with a river/park focus at 10th Avenue on the edge of proposed public open space that integrates with the open space through strong public space design %  en Create a gateway at 13th Avenue and the South Platte River with a plaza and commercial /destination uses that activate and engage the street, the park and the river New Riverfront Park New Riverfront Park and Park Drive

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68 STADIUM, ENTERTAINMENT & CULTURE TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECT 3 WHAT IS IT?The intersection of Lower Colfax, Decatur Street and Mile High Drive is an essential convergence of important activity areas within the Sun Valley neighborhood that includes established businesses, the football stadium, the transit station and nearby Lakewood Gulch. For some time these functioned as independent components, each with their own history, challenges and opportunities. This Transformative Project brings those qualities together into a cohesive cultural and entertainment hub for Sun Valley. RECOMMENDATIONSStadium Festival Street The Festival Street connects Lower Colfax to the south side of the stadium. Special paving, wide sidewalks, on street parking, one lane of travel in each direction, bike connections, and streetscape improvements will create a festive environment. These improvements will allow the street to be programmed and closed to vehicular trac for game days and big events and allow active retail, restaurants and commercial uses to expand their outdoor seating area into the street. Signage and branding will compliment the street and embrace the heritage of sports in the neighborhood. Attract Anchor Tenants Part of the success of this project relies on the recruitment of two to three anchor tenants that provide year-round destinations. Anchor tenants could include a mix of retail, entertainment, and cultural facilities. In addition, recreation-based commercial, retail and restaurants will be targeted to compliment the stadium and recreation opportunities in the area. Lower Colfax Main Street Create an active main street along Lower Colfax. An active main street supports uses such as commercial, retail, small oce, residential or cultural. The opportunity exists to build on existing entertainment businesses such as Brooklyns, which compliment the stadium festival street and contribute to the vibrancy and authenticity of the cultural activities. Cultural and historic elements such as a museum, international marketplace, and other destinations will enhance the main street as will creating an active public realm with streetscape improvements and branding. The extension of the Platte River Trolley into the area along the street will further help to activate the main street.

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69 How does Stadium, Entertainment and Culture contribute to CELEBRATED? %  en Creates an opportunity for a street to become a vibrant public place for residents and visitors to connect %  en Showcases the rich heritage of long standing businesses, football, culture and recreation How does Stadium, Entertainment and Culture contribute to CONNECTED? %  en Connects stadium to LRT station and neighborhood while dispersing peak loads on transit service after/before games %  en Improves pedestrian connectivity between key destinations of station platform, football stadium, Lakewood Gulch and Lower Colfax How does Stadium, Entertainment and Culture contribute to INNOVATIVE? %  en Embraces the unique characteristics and heritage of Sun Valley that is not found elsewhere in the City %  en Oers new amenities such as the extension of the Platte River Trolley %  en Provides a cultural core that is desirable for a neighborhood and attracting jobs How does Stadium, Entertainment and Culture contribute to HEALTHY? %  en Supports an active lifestyle where bikes and pedestrians are given priority %  en Creates easier, more pleasant routes for walking and biking to important destinations such as the transit station and football stadiumLOWER COLFAX MAIN STREET FUTURE VISION STADIUM FESTIVAL STREET GAME DAY

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70 HIGH QUALITY RESIDENTIAL COMMUNITIES TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECT 4 WHAT IS IT? Sun Valley is and will continue to be a place where people from all walks of life have convenient access to high quality housing, transportation, great schools, secure jobs and opportunities for active lifestyles. An equitable approach to growth, by creating high quality residential communities, will be transformative for Sun Valley. Preserving opportunities for aordable living, and providing existing residents with an opportunity to remain and grow with the neighborhood are important goals of this Plan. Alleviating Sun Valleys isolation and concentrated poverty is also critically important if we are to succeed in addressing crime, economic distress and health discrepancies in the neighborhood. Area partners, such as the Denver Housing Authority and the Urban Land Conservancy, have achieved an appropriate balance between these sometimes conicting goals in other Denver communities by seamlessly integrating aordable units into mixed use and mixed-income communities. While residential uses will be permitted throughout the station area, the best locations for high quality mixed income development allow close proximity to the light rail station, regional greenway and trail system, West Side Library, market, Rude Recreation Center, Lower Colfax main street, Fairview Elementary School and the new riverfront park. RECOMMENDATIONSCreate a mixed income neighborhood %  en Target new multifamily residential development within the TOD area and along the riverfront to achieve greatest proximity to transit, parks, and neighborhood amenities %  en Encourage development of a variety of high quality and attainably priced residential options to meet the needs of families, young professionals, students and elderly households of various income levels %  en Encourage development of new high quality aordable housing units while seamlessly integrating them with workforce and market rate units %  en Use the most current best practices in sustainable development and architectural design to create attractive, healthy living environments Locate DHA Redevelopment closer to transit and neighborhood amenities %  en Provide opportunities for current Sun Valley Homes residents and future DHA residents to live in high quality mixed income communities %  en Consider several suitable sites north of 11th Avenue for DHA mixed income residential development to provide DHA residents with close access to transit and neighborhood amenities %  en Continue to actively engage Sun Valley Homes Residents in the design of mixed income communities Continue to create and enhance community amenities %  en Build upon existing assets such as Rude Recreation Center, Fairview Elementary, Denver Urban Gardens, greenways and regional trails %  en Incorporate public gathering spaces and play spaces into residential areas, parks and streetscapes to encourage community building and chance meetings with neighbors

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71 AURARIA/ DOWNTOWN Westside Health Clinc Denver Human Services Market (2013) Eagleton Elementary Fairview Elementary Rude Rec Center West Side Library (2014) 6 25 25Sanchez (Paco) Park Sanchez (Paco) Park Rude Park Rude Park Barnum North Park Barnum North Park Barnum Park Barnum Park Barnum East Park Barnum East Park How do High Quality Residential Communities contribute to CELEBRATED? %  en Many Denverites will soon discover Sun Valley as the next great place to live, work and play %  en As the population grows, and as Sun Valley improves, more people will have more reasons to celebrate the neighborhoods many assets %  en People of all walks of life will contribute their ideas, skills and cultural heritage toward shaping a new future for the neighborhood, giving the city even more reason to celebrate Sun Valley How do High Quality Residential Communities contribute to CONNECTED? %  en As the neighborhood grows and develops with a mixture of residences, oces, businesses, entertainment and recreation options, as well as great access to transit, more people will have easier walkable and transit access to their jobs and daily needs How do High Quality Residential Communities contribute to INNOVATIVE? %  en Growth of high quality residential communities within walking distance of transit, employment centers and recreation opportunities invites exible lifestyles, where the lines are blurred between life, learning and work How do High Quality Residential Communities contribute to HEALTHY? %  en Encouraging mixed income, mixed use development will alleviate many of the symptoms of poverty in Sun Valley and improve health indicators for the neighborhood %  en Less money and time spent by Sun Valley residents on transportation will increase time available for recreation, learning or to spend with family, and creates less strain on household budgets Existing Residential Neighborhoods Transit Oriented Development Area Opportunity Sites for DHA Residential Development Proposed/Existing Mixed-Income Developments Regional Trail MIXED INCOME COMMUNITY

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72 CONNECT PEOPLE WITH JOBS AND EDUCATION TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECT 5 WHAT IS IT?With the buildout of the regions passenger rail network, the majority of jobs oered in the Denver region will be accessible by transit. The West Rail Line will connect Sun Valley and west Denver residents with major oce centers, retail hubs, hospitals, schools, light industrial areas and other places that provide job opportunities. Light rail will also reduce signicantly the commute time of many Sun Valley residents. In addition to linking west Denver residents to regional jobs, the Decatur-Federal station oers a unique opportunity for job growth near transit. The neighborhood over time will grow to support commercial, entertainment, oce and light industrial or ex uses, all within a short walking distance to mixed-income and multi-family residential. This allows Sun Valley to oer the choice of living where you work. In order for Sun Valley residents to be prepared for the workforce, educational outcomes must improve. Sun Valley youth experience many unnecessary barriers to academic success, contributing to the cycle of poverty in this neighborhood. Gaining a better understanding of the factors inhibiting educational attainment and tackling those issues head on is one of the most transformative actions Denver can take toward improving the lives of Sun Valley residents.RECOMMENDATIONSImprove access to education %  en Educate Sun Valley youth on Safe Routes to School Ensure that Sun Valley youth and parents have up-to-date information on existing transportation options for getting to middle and high school safely. Provide residents with bicycle maps, transit maps and schedules. Discuss creative ways for improving travel to school, such as organizing bike to school groups, bus rider groups, or the like. %  en Make transit an aordable option for Sun Valley youth Sun Valley youth are not eligible for free RTD passes from Denver Public Schools, because they live within 3.5 miles of their neighborhood high school. Yet many Sun Valley families have no vehicle and cannot aord RTD passes for their kids. Identify programs to oer free transit passes to middle and high school students based on household income and/or other barriers to accessing middle and high neighborhood school (e.g. inability to walk or bike to school). %  en Perform a place-based K-12 education assessment Work with DPS, housing providers, Sun Valley youth and parents, and non-prot partners to analyze Sun Valleys existing education attainment levels. Identify key factors inhibiting educational attainment for Sun Valley kids. %  en Sun Valley Education Strategic Plan Identify a clear strategy for improving educational outcomes for Sun Valley kids, in response to ndings of the place-based education assessment %  en Consider expanding educational facilities Limited space exists in nearby DPS facilities. Work collaboratively with the community and DPS to forecast growth and assess the need to expand K-12 educational facilities to serve Sun Valleys growing population. Organize sources of funding to ll educational needs. Options may include traditional DPS programs, charter school programs and/or locating an online school in the neighborhood.Forge strong employer community connection %  en Encourage Sun Valleys existing and new businesses to forge a strong community connection %  en Encourage employers to oer transit passes to workers %  en As new employment development occurs, seek employers who will enact hire local programs, provide training and professional development opportunities for nearby residents Granville Island, Vancouver Taxi Community, Denver Fairview Elementary

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73 Connect Sun Valley residents to available job training and placement services %  en Educate Sun Valley residents on available workforce training and job placement resources. The Denver Oce of Economic Development (OED) oers full-service employment and training capabilities to help assist job seekers with gaining needed skills and securing sustainable employment. One of OEDs Workforce Centers is located in Sun Valley at the Denver Human Services Building at 1200 Federal Blvd. %  en RTD has formed a collaborative partnership with Community College of Denver, Denver Transit Partners and the Urban League of Metropolitan Denver to establish this innovative program. The WIN program oers employment training, assessment, and job placement in the transportation and construction industries (http://www.rtd-denver.com/WIN) %  en Hold regular workforce training / job fairs. Form partnerships between housing providers and workforce training programs Partner with Auraria Higher Education CampusAuraria campus one light rail stop away or a quick bike ride from the Decatur-Federal station is home to ve dierent institutions oering a wide range of technical and professional training. Auraria schools are growing rapidly, and Sun Valley may prove to be an ideal, attainably priced location for future expansion. Work with Auraria schools to locate new facilities in Sun Valley as part of Sun Valleys expanded employment district. Encourage the construction of new Auraria schools training facilities, conference facilities, co-oce space and classrooms for entrepreneurial training (e.g. CU Denvers Bard Center for Entrepreneurship). An ideal location would be on the riverfront park at 10th Avenue. Ensure that Sun Valley residents are aware of all that Auraria programs have to oer. Rude Park Rude Park Decatur-Federal LRT Station New Auraria Fields 8th Ave. 13th Ave.Mariposa St.Colfax Ave.Federal Ave.Walnut St. Old Colfax Ave. Auraria West LRT Station Auraria CampusUniversity of Colorado Denver Metro State University of Denver Community College of DenverSun Valley SUN VALLEY AURARIA CONNECTIONS How does Connecting Jobs to People contribute to CELEBRATED? %  en Target employers who can benet from the cultural diversity in the area %  en Less time commuting and more expendable household income will bring increased prosperity to neighborhood residents How does Connecting Jobs to People contribute to CONNECTED? %  en Reducing the commute time for Sun Valley residents will reduce household transportation costs along with the benets of reduced VMT %  en Bringing more jobs to the neighborhood will improve the jobs / housing balance of the area How does Connecting Jobs to People contribute to INNOVATIVE? %  en Targeting innovative job clusters which can have a unique downtown adjacent home in Sun Valley %  en Target jobs for low to middle skill workers as well has those for higher education levels How does Connecting Jobs to People contribute to HEALTHY? %  en Increased household income in directly correlated to improved healthLRT Connection Bus Connection Car Connection Bike Connection

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74 How does 10th Avenue contribute to CELEBRATED? %  en Will create a centerpiece for the community,celebrating its diverse history, deep cultural heritage and future vision as an innovative neighborhood How does 10th Avenue contribute to CONNECTED? %  en A direct public space connection from Federal Boulevard and the western neighborhoods to the new Riverfront Park increases community connectivity %  en Encourages multi-modal uses in the area How does 10th Avenue contribute to INNOVATIVE? %  en Will encouraging a broad mix of uses and activities that support entrepreneurial investment, knowledge sharing, and training within the area How does 10th Avenue contribute to HEALTHY? %  en 10th Avenue promotes a walkable, bikeable and pedestrian friendly neighborhood that benets from immediate proximity to the active recreational uses along the South Platte River 10TH AVENUE TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECT 6 WHAT IS IT?Envisioned as a unique type of main street, 10th Avenue will be the hub of activity and collaboration for a thriving employment district. It will bring together diverse residents with entrepreneurs, businesses ,and employees. The urban design of the street will support this vision by providing exible work spaces, spill out and open air commercial spaces, cafes, comfortable seating, trees and improved streetscapes. A primary public space will be established for Sun Valley by connecting Federal Boulevard and the western neighborhoods to the new Riverfront Park and greater South Platte River greenway network.RECOMMENDATIONS %  en Extend and enhance 10th Avenue to connect the neighborhoods west of Federal Boulevard to the river, including a public space or activity node at 10th and Decatur %  en Allow for active uses at 10th Avenue and the proposed park: commercial uses such as shared conferencing or shared oce; focus on uses and tenants/owners who will activate park edge %  en Enhance 10th Avenue with an expanded pedestrian amenity zone (for patio seating), separated sidewalks, on-street parking and street trees

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75 10th Ave 10th Ave CONNECTING THE RIVER TO FEDERAL BLVD. 10 TH AVENUE MAIN STREET FUTURE VISION

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76 COLFAX AND FEDERAL INTERCHANGE TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECT 7 WHAT IS IT?Colfax-Federal is a cloverleaf interchange of two urban arterials at the gateway of Downtown Denver and adjacent to a light rail station, a recreation center, a new library, Denvers professional football stadium and several established neighborhoods. The current interchange conguration covers a large infrastructure footprint approximately 29 acres of land to support free-owing, high speed vehicle trac. The current conguration limits pedestrian access across neighborhoods and to light rail, bus services, and adjacent businesses and community amenities such as Rude Recreation Center, Fairview Elementary School and the West Side Library. The Station Area planning process included a study of alternative congurations for the Federal and Colfax interchange to better understand the range of possibilities for the future of this intersection. The study considered a wide range of criteria for evaluating alternatives based on goals for the station area identied early in the process. Key criteria included economic development potential and multi-modal connectivity. The study also considered trac operations, engineering feasibility, phasing opportunities and costs. No single intersection of two arterials in Denver even those that support more daily trac has been designed as a cloverleaf interchange. Reconguring the interchange to a design that more appropriately ts its urban context could have tremendous benets for nearby residents, businesses, the stadium and the city as a whole. RECOMMENDATIONS %  en Work with CDOT to continue to study the interchange and identify an appropriate alternative design; an appropriate next study could be a Planning and Environmental Linkage from Howard to 20th that includes consideration of the interchange; studies should build o of the feasibility study and may include other alternatives such as a one-way couplet option %  en Ensure that pedestrian and bicycle connectivity, access to transit, access to adjacent properties and economic development potential are included as evaluation criteria in future studies %  en As new development is proposed on properties adjacent to the interchange, look for opportunities for public-private partnerships to help fund design/ construction of an alternative conguration while also expanding the footprint of developable property and improving pedestrian connections %  en As reconguration of the interchange occurs or redevelopment occurs in the area, adequate stormwater conveyance will need to be provided, given that the 100-year oodplain runs through this location; it is possible that additional storm sewer, open channels or other routing methods may be necessary to meet stormwater needs %  en Prioritize short term pedestrian and bicycle connectivity improvements in the vicinity of the interchange, as recommended by this plan and the Denver Moves Plan

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77 How does the Colfax/Federal Interchange contribute to CELEBRATED? %  en Provides the opportunity to create a gateway to the community strengthening its identity and celebrating its rich history How does the Colfax/Federal Interchange contribute to CONNECTED? %  en Improves access between neighborhoods and the station area. %  en Greater access and connectivity promotes the use of more multi-modal transportation options such as walking How does the Colfax/Federal Interchange contribute to INNOVATIVE? %  en An interchange requiring a smaller footprint could allow for additional TOD opportunities near the station How does the Colfax/Federal Interchange contribute to HEALTHY? %  en Improving access and multi-modal opportunities in the area encourages an environment for a more active lifestyle and increases the vitality of neighborhood businesses. Goals of Colfax/Federal Interchange Study*: 1. Maximize Economic and Development Potential 2. Enhance Multi-Modal Connectivity 3. Improve Placemaking and the Public Realm 4. Create Innovative Transportation Solutions while Ensuring Compliance with Transportation Engineering Standards 5. Maintain or Improve Environmental Conditions*For more detail on goals please see the Colfax/ Federal Interchange StudyAt-Grade Alternative Tight Diamond Alternative Re-Established Grid Alternative Partial Cloverleaf AlternativePOTENTIAL INTERCHANGE ALTERNATIVES

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Green = Green. Environmental improvements, time and again, prove to be the best investment a community can make in its economic development. The renaissance of downtown Denver and other neighborhoods adjacent to the South Platte River are object proof.Je Shoemaker // Executive Director, Greenway FoundationWhen redevelopment occurs we need to reach out to the youth and say this is not the end of the rope. Now that were looking at the future of Sun Valley, were looking out for the children ten years down the line. We need to move forward with our goals focusing on the success of these children.Angelo Crowell // Sun Valley Homes ResidentNorth of the stadium has grown with townhomes and lofts. We need new residential on the south side of the stadium for the neighborhood to work. I think more density around the transit station with apartments above and retail on the rst oor is just what the area needs.Dave Keefe // Owner, Brooklyns Restaurant Sun Valleys infrastructure needs are substantial. Improvements should include creating a connected street grid, developing a South Platte River park, improving east-west connections along 13th Ave to Auraria and the Federal corridor and improving connections between the neighborhood and the Decatur-Federal Light Rail Station.Urban Land Institute // Technical Advisory Panel

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79 moving forwardrealizing the vision for sun valleyImplementation of the Decatur-Federal Station Area Plan will occur incrementally over many years through the eorts of area property owners, the City, residents, business owners and nonprot organizations. The Plan provides a vision for the future what we want Sun Valley to become. The question of how we get there will be answered over time. It will largely depend on market readiness, political will, strength of leadership and availability of resources. The Moving Forward section provides guidance on getting started with the implementation of the Station Area Plan. It is organized by the three main approaches to plan implementation, as identied and described in Blueprint Denver: 1. Regulatory and policy strategies These strategies result in changes to City codes, regulations, processes or design guidelines to aect desired outcomes. Common examples include map or text changes to the Denver Zoning Code. 2. Partnerships Partnerships represent the most diverse approach to implementation and can take on many forms. The City will rely on other public, non-prot and private partners to help implement many recommendations in this Plan. 3. Investment Strategies The new infrastructure and large scale redevelopment called for in this Plan will require creative nancial engineering. A variety of public and private sources of funding and nancing may be appropriate for the Sun Valley area. This section also discusses the relative timing and order of implementation activities.SUN VALLEY IMPLEMENTATION GOALS Several goals have been identied to guide implementation of this Plan: 1. Work toward the vision of a celebrated, connected, innovative and healthy Sun Valley as dened in this Plan. 2. Streamline the decision making process regarding public and private investment in the area. 3. Take strategic steps that help attract private sector investment into Sun Valley. 4. Maintain open communication between the city, property owners, developers, residents and businesses and other area stakeholders.A COLLABORATIVE APPROACHAchieving the Vision for Sun Valley will take concerted, sustained eort among all stakeholders to tackle these initiatives in this Plan and set the course for success. The City, Metropolitan Football Stadium District, Broncos, DHA and RTD share the primary responsibility for plan implementation. To facilitate the coordinated eort and sustained commitment, it is critical that these entities form a standing partnership to champion redevelopment eorts and continue to collaborate with area stakeholders toward success.

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80 One way of implementing the desired character of redevelopment in Sun Valley is through regulatory or policy strategies that result in changes to city codes, regulations, processes or design guidelines to aect desired outcomes. UPDATE BLUEPRINT DENVER MAPBlueprint Denver, the Citys integrated land use and transportation plan adopted in 2002, identies Areas of Change and Areas of Stability throughout the City with the goal of directing new development toward places in the city that have a high degree of multimodal transportation access. Much of Sun Valley was considered an Area of Change in 2002. This Plan updates the Area of Change to more accurately reect redevelopment opportunities within walking distance of the Decatur-Federal light rail station area. Blueprint Denver established land use types that describe a particular character and scale desired in the future. The Decatur-Federal Station Area Plan uses the Blueprint Denver Land Use Map as the basis of its recommended future land uses. This Plan serves to update the 2002 Blueprint Denver Map, based on a more recent analysis of existing conditions and the Citys and communitys vision for Sun Valley as reected in this Plans recommendations.GENERAL DEVELOPMENT PLANGeneral Development Plans (GDPs) establish a framework for large or phased projects. An approved GDP provides a master plan for coordinating development, infrastructure improvements, and regulatory decisions as development proceeds within the subject area. GDPs entail a higher level of design than an area plan, and they identify, at an early stage, the developments relationship with public infrastructure improvements such as major multi-modal facilities and connections thereto, major utility facilities, and publicly accessible parks and open spaces. A GDP is recommended in Sun Valley due to several large-scale, phased, and multi-owner developments, as well as major infrastructure network and system improvements recommended in this plan (e.g. 13th Avenue, new riverfront park, new internal circulation streets). Sun Valleys GDP should cover, at a minimum, redevelopment of stadium properties, Lower Colfax area, DHAs Sun Valley Homes parcel, riverfront properties, the 13th Avenue corridor, and proposed DHA redevelopment sites. Given the large geographic coverage, multiple property owners, and lack of identied developer, the City should consider being an applicant for the GDP. REGULATORY AND POLICY STRATEGIES MOVING FORWARD

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81 6 25 25Sanchez (Paco) Park Sanchez (Paco) Park Rude Park Rude Park Barnum North Park Barnum North Park Barnum Park Barnum Park Barnum East Park Barnum East Park 6 25 25Sanchez (Paco) Park Sanchez (Paco) Park Rude Park Rude Park Barnum North Park Barnum North Park Barnum Park Barnum Park Barnum East Park Barnum East Park BLUE PRINT DENVER CONCEPT LAND USES AND AREAS OF CHANGE EXISTING PROPOSED Transit Oriented Development Urban Residential Industrial Employment Employment TOD (New) Single Family Residential Mixed Use Commercial Corridor Entertainment, Cultural, Exhibition Park Area of Change

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82 ZONINGDenvers Zoning Code, adopted in 2010, provides many appropriate tools for implementing this Plans recommendations regarding land use, urban form and design. The Denver Zoning Code is organized by Neighborhood Contexts that are used to describe existing and desired characteristics for the purposes of zoning. This context-based regulatory approach provides a range of Zone Districts and building form standards that pave the way for compatible development to implement adopted city plans. This plans recommendations for the four character areas envisioned for Sun Valley (found in the Innovative section) align with specic Neighborhood Contexts, each with its own menu of Zone Districts that may apply. In order to move forward with implementing the Plan recommendations through regulatory means, a series of amendments to the Zoning Code Map or text will be necessary, as described below. Zone map amendments may be initiated by property owners or their authorized agents, Denver City Council or the Manager of Community Planning and Development. Map amendment applications are reviewed by the CPD Manager and Denver Planning Board before going to Denver City Council for nal action. Zone text amendments are initiated by the Manager of Community Planning and Development. Text amendments are reviewed by the CPD Manager and Denver Planning Board before going to Denver City Council for nal action. Below is a summary of regulatory implementation considerations for each land use character area recommended in the Plan:Stadium Entertainment DestinationPlan visionA walkable mixed use entertainment and commercial destination with vibrant public spaces and streets; pedestrian-oriented connections to transit; shared and structured parking. Given the size and ownership of property, this vision will be implemented through large scale, phased development. Neighborhood ContextThis vision corresponds to the intent of the Campus Context in the Denver Zoning Code, but also contains elements of the Urban Center Neighborhood Context. Zoning AnalysisStadium properties are zoned C-MU-30 with waivers and conditions that address parking requirements and generally require a special use permit for most uses. While the vision for the Stadium Entertainment Destination described in this plan could technically occur under existing zoning, the C-MU-30 zone district alone does not include building form standards or design guidelines that guarantee a predictable development outcome. The Campus Context zone district allows for similar exibility as the C-MU-30 and also would not by itself result in a predictable development character for this large, phased project. Implementation StrategyIn combination with a General Development Plan and urban design guidelines, either the C-MU-30 or a Campus Context zone district may be appropriate to implement the Stadium Entertainment Destination vision.

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83 Transit Oriented DevelopmentPlan visionHighest intensity of development and mixture of multifamily residential, oce and commercial land uses concentrated in a very walkable compact neighborhood with great access to transit and amenities. Neighborhood ContextThis vision corresponds to the Urban Center Neighborhood Context. The General Urban Neighborhood Context may also apply. Zoning AnalysisSeveral properties planned for TOD have industrial (I-A) zoning. Land uses permitted in the I-A district do not align with those recommended for the TOD area. The I-A district will not implement the uses, form, building heights or character envisioned for the TOD area. Implementation StrategyThe menu of zone districts oered within the Urban Center Neighborhood Context and the General Urban Neighborhood Context are better suited to implement the vision for the TOD area. Employment TOD Plan VisionMixture of light industrial, commercial, and multi-family residential in a walkable urban form that facilitates pedestrian access to the transit station and helps activate public spaces such as the South Platte Greenway. Neighborhood ContextThis vision contains elements of both the Urban Center Neighborhood Context (in terms of desired urban form) and the Industrial Context (in terms of desired land uses). Zoning AnalysisMuch of the Employment TOD area is zoned residential mixed use (C-RX) which would achieve the appropriate walkable urban form desired but falls short in achieving the desired mix of land uses for this area. The C-RX requires multifamily residential uses and limits employment uses. The C-RX properties also allow for eight stories, whereas the Plan recommends a maximum of ve stories. Along the east side of the riverfront, several properties are zoned for heavy industrial uses (I-B). The I-B zone district does not allow for the appropriate mix of uses recommended in the Employment-TOD area, nor will it result in the pedestrianoriented urban form called for in the TOD area. Implementation StrategyCurrently the Denver Zoning Code does not oer a zone district that implements the vision for Employment TOD as recommended in this plan. The Industrial Mixed Use (I-MX) zone district comes close, but does not prescribe a predictable and consistent pedestrian-oriented urban form. The menu of zone districts oered within the Urban Center Neighborhood Context also come close, but do not allow light industrial land uses. The City may need to consider text amendments to the Zoning Code that can implement the desired Employment TOD character in Sun Valley.IndustrialPlan visionMixture of light industrial with some commercial uses. Generally exible in urban form, however new development should help create a more attractive and vibrant South Platte Greenway and Federal Boulevard. Neighborhood ContextThis vision is consistent with the Industrial Context.

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84 Zoning AnalysisThe area is zoned I-A, which is the appropriate zone district to implement the vision. However, the I-A zone district does not contain form standards that will result in a predictable and consistent development pattern along Federal Boulevard and the South Platte River Greenway to help improve the attractiveness of these corridors. Implementation StrategyMaintain the I-A zone district in the area. Mixed use districts may be appropriate along Federal Boulevard in order to achieve the desired building frontage and pedestrian access. Design Standards and Guidelines are a method of achieving desired character along the South Platte River, as zoning does not address this.URBAN DESIGN STANDARDS AND GUIDELINESDesign standards and guidelines establish Rules and Regulations for a specic geographic area or development in order to implement a desired character through the design and construction of sites, buildings, streetscapes, lighting, signage and outdoor spaces. Design standards and Guidelines address a higher level of design that is not already covered in the Denver Zoning Code or existing Rules and Regulations. They are tailored to the individual needs of a particular geographic area and therefore can help establish an identity that is unique to that place. %  en Design Standards may be an appropriate tool to implement several Plan recommendations, where zoning or other rules and regulations fall short: %  en Streetscape design recommendations that go above and beyond implementing the typical cross section or the Streetscape Design Manual. This applies, for instance, to recommended Pedestrian Priority Streets such as 14th Avenue, Lower Colfax, the stadium festival street, 10th Avenue and the Riverfront Drive. %  en Coordinated signage, landscaping, lighting and other features recommended in the Stadium Entertainment Destination or along Lower Colfax %  en Addressing riverfront or greenway adjacent development, especially in the industrial and employment areas and where private property directly abuts the greenway Design Guidelines are frequently established during or subsequent to the General Development Plan process. In the case of Sun Valley, the General Development Plan will provide guidance regarding the need for Design Guidelines and triggers for their creation.SUBDIVISIONSubdivision occurs when a parcel of land is divided into two or more parcels, lots, blocks tracts or sites. Subdivision may be necessary in Sun Valley to implement this plans recommendations on several properties: %  en DHA Sun Valley Homes %  en Properties north of Lakewood Gulch %  en Stadium-district owned properties %  en DHA and Xcel riverfront properties to implement the riverfront park and adjacent development

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85 I-A I-A I-B I-B C-MX-5 C-MX-5 G-MU-3 G-MU-3 C-MU-30 C-MU-30 I-A I-A C-RX-8 C-RX-8 R-3 R-3 PUD PUD C-MU-30 C-MU-30 E-MX-3 E-MX-3 C-MX-8 C-MX-8 C-MU-30 C-MU-30 C-MX-5 C-MX-5 C-MX-5 C-MX-5 I-MX-3 I-MX-3 I-MX-5 I-MX-5 C-MX-5 C-MX-5 I-A C-MX-12 C-MX-12 OS-A OS-A G-MU-3 G-MU-3 C-MX-5 C-MX-5 R-2-A R-2-A R-MU-30 R-MU-30 OS-A OS-A I-A I-A C-MX-5 C-MX-5 OS-A OS-A C-MU-30 I-A I-A C-MS-8 C-MS-8 OS-C OS-C C-MX-5 C-MX-5C-MU-30 C-MU-30C-MU-30 C-MU-30 E-TU-C E-TU-C I-A I-A E-CC-3 E-CC-3 OS-A OS-A OS-A OS-A 6 25 25Sanchez (Paco) Park Sanchez (Paco) Park Rude Park Rude Park Barnum North Park Barnum North Park Barnum Park Barnum Park Barnum East Park Barnum East Park EXISTING ZONING

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86 Once a plan is adopted by City Council as a supplement to the Comprehensive Plan, the City, property owners, and stakeholders use the plan as a guide for decision making. With many neighborhoods and programs in the City competing for limited resources, attracting public and private investment to the area even with an adopted plan will require the dedication and resourcefulness of champions. Champions of plans typically include neighborhood organizations, property owners, business districts, council members, developers or non-prots. In the case of Sun Valley and the Decatur-Federal Station Area, over 80 acres of potentially developable land is owned by ve major property owners. These entities including the City and County of Denver, the Metropolitan Football Stadium District, RTD, Xcel and DHA therefore, have the primary responsibility for the implementation of this Plan. An eective partnership among major property owners and continued collaboration with community stakeholders are both critical to the success of Sun Valley. Many non-prot partners will engage to implement recommendations from this Plan. More formal partnerships among residents, business owners, small property owners and advocacy groups will be necessary as well to ensure that all stakeholder perspectives are considered implementation of this plan moves forward.IMPLEMENTING PARTNERSHIPAn Implementation Partnership needs to be established that will champion the redevelopment eorts in the area. At a minimum, this partnership would need to bring together major governmental, quasi-governmental and private landholders in Sun Valley, which could include the City, Stadium District, DHA, RTD and Xcel. With much of the developable land being held under government or quasi-government ownership, one of the rst tasks the partnership faces is determining how to bring the private sector to the table by nurturing relationships with: %  en Local businesses and business districts %  en Philanthropic community %  en Private developers The partnership would need to identify a clear approach to continued outreach to the community. Responsibilities of this Partnership would include: %  en Working with the City to prioritize and oversee completion of implementation activities %  en Coordinating development activities %  en Continued community outreach %  en Speaking with one voice to market Sun Valley to potential investors %  en Working with the City to ensure that appropriate entitlements, infrastructure and agreements are in place to support the vision for the area %  en Function as the central point of contact for organizing and facilitating strategic public-private partnerships %  en Preparing and issuing Requests For Proposals (RFPs) for development partners on property controlled by the Implementation Partnerships members The specic structure and composition of the Implementation Partnership is yet to be determined. It is critical that the Implementation Partnership have sucient authority to make decisions required for redevelopment. It is also recommended that the Implementation Partnership have dedicated sta and may be prudent to ultimately appoint some form of governing board made up of public and private stakeholders. PARTNERSHIPS MOVING FORWARD

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87 STAKEHOLDER COALITIONSIn addition to a large umbrella partnership overseeing large scale redevelopment in Sun Valley, continued involvement of one or more stakeholder coalitions will benet the Sun Valley community. Primary roles for stakeholder coalitions in the implementation of a neighborhood plan include keeping everyone informed and advocating for the communitys needs. Stakeholder coalitions can be informal (such as the existing Sun Valley Stakeholders group) or more formally created as a non-prot organization (such as the Federal Boulevard Partnership). As the Plans implementation progresses, stakeholder coalitions will be important to ensure that all community and business members stay informed of changes in the area and that stakeholder perspectives are actively considered.PARTNERSThe City and Sun Valley community will rely on partnerships with many public, nonprot and private entities to ensure the successful implementation of the Plan. Key partners will include: %  en B-Cycle %  en Bike Denver %  en Bicycle Colorado %  en Colfax Business Improvement District %  en Creative placemaking entities %  en Denver Health %  en Denver Public Schools %  en Denver Regional Council of Governments %  en Denver Tramway Heritage Society %  en Denver Urban Gardens %  en Federal Boulevard Partnership %  en FRESC %  en Colorado Housing and Finance Authority (CHFA) %  en Enterprise Community Partners %  en Great Outdoors Colorado (GOCO) %  en Healthy food access community %  en Mile High Connects %  en National Endowment of the Arts %  en Registered Neighborhood Organizations %  en State of Colorado (CDOT, DOLA, etc) %  en The Greenway Foundation %  en Urban Drainage and Flood Control District %  en U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development %  en U.S. Department of Transportation %  en U.S. Environmental Protection Agency %  en Urban Land Conservancy %  en Zocalo Community Development

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88 PUBLIC INFRASTRUCTURE AND PARKSRealizing the vision for Sun Valley will require considerable public and private investments. While many of the Plans recommendations are likely to be implemented through a public/private partnership, the City should take early action on projects that will signicantly improve livability, multi-modal connectivity and catalyze additional public and private investment in Sun Valley. City General Fund or Capital Improvement Program funds could be allocated toward infrastructure improvements, often as matches for other public or private grant funds. Suggested process for moving forward on priority public investment is described below: 13th Avenue reconstruction and realignment Next steps include performing a feasibility study on the realignment recommendation and 30% design of the street from Mariposa to Federal (or to Decatur, if the realignment is deemed infeasible). These are funded and will take place in 2013. After 30% design, seek funding to design and implement the full reconstruction. As design moves forward, several goals are important to keep in mind: maintaining access to existing 13th Avenue properties east of Decatur, connecting to the new riverfront drive and park, pedestrian and bicycle connections to regional trails, squaring o the intersection at Decatur, and implementing the proposed cross section in this Plan. Riverfront Park and park drive including integrated stormwater solutions Real estate transactions between DHA, the City and Xcel are necessary to assemble land for the new riverfront park and drive and adjacent developable property. A master plan will need to be created for the park and for DHA redevelopment. As DHA relocates and property becomes available for implementing the park, the city can move forward with design and construction of the park. This may or may not happen in partnership with developers. Real Estate Transactions Implementing the plan is contingent upon several key parcels becoming available for redevelopment early in the implementation process. The Xcel fuel tank parcel, parcels north of Lakewood Gulch owned by the City and County of Denver, DHAs Sun Valley Homes property and Stadium District parking lots are all critical to implementing this Plans recommendations. The City should take the lead on convening discussions among these property owners to coordinate necessary land swaps, purchase and sale, and/or joint ventures to facilitate a coordinated and complimentary redevelopment eort. MIXED INCOME HOUSING DEVELOPMENT DHA has slated Sun Valley as next in its work plan for mixed income housing redevelopment and will get started as early as 2014. Other aordable and mixed income housing developments are also underway or proposed in the station area. Funding for aordable housing is often pulled together from a variety of city, state, federal and even private sources. Strong city leadership regarding mixed income housing development near the Decatur-Federal Light Rail Station is critical to implementing this Plans vision of creating permanent aordable units near transit. The Citys leadership toward this goal is necessary to attract state or federal investment to Sun Valley. Specic sources such as the Denver TOD Fund, low-income housing tax credit (LIHTC) and Federal Housing and Urban Development (HUD) funds (e.g., Choice Neighborhoods, CDBG, HOME, SBA, Section 106, Revolving Loan Funds) could be used to support housing development in Sun Valley. INVESTMENT STRATEGIES MOVING FORWARD

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89 PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS Public-private partnerships come in many forms. They require an investment from the City, property owners, a private developer or development project, or all of the above. Common examples include tax increment nancing (TIF), New Market Tax Credits (NMTC), and Special Districts (such as a Metropolitan District or a Business Improvement District). Some of these tools, such as TIF and NMTC, require the area to be declared eligible through determinations of blight or census tract poverty levels, respectively. Sun Valley may be a likely candidate for such tools. A key issue with public-private nancing tools is that a private development partner must be willing to invest a considerable amount of private money upfront in order to harvest the benet from them. In order for them to work, the developer must feel that the risks associated with the investment are suciently outweighed by the potential returns generated by the investment. The public sector can help to reduce risks by implementing many of the strategies described in this plan, such as: 1. A clear vision for the redevelopment of the area 2. Streamlined and clear decision-making that supports that vision 3. Public investments in infrastructure 4. Land assemblage, ideally oering large land parcels at attractive prices 5. Flexible entitlements that allow the developer to respond to changes in market conditions Several catalytic developments included in this Plans recommendations may be candidates for public-private partnerships for large scale or phased redevelopment. These include: %  en Stadium District property (Lots M and N south of Colfax, Stadium Festival Street area north of Colfax) %  en Parkside redevelopment %  en DHA mixed income housing development %  en Properties along the Lower Colfax area main street %  en DHA Sun Valley Homes existing site redevelopment into a mixed useemployment area %  en RTD property at the light rail station Several recommendations in this Plan are likely candidates for implementation by special districts. These include: %  en Integrated stormwater and water quality %  en Lower Colfax Main Street %  en Stadium entertainment destinations %  en 14th Avenue streetscape improvements

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90 TIMEFRAME / PHASING The chart below is a rough outline of the major tasks involved with implementing the Plan. The chart is not meant to provide a step-by-step approach to implementation. Each task contains a multitude of additional steps related to successful implementation and many are hard to predict at this time and should be left to the Implementing Partnership to determine priorities and manage detailed tasks. The chart is meant to provide rough timeframes for implementation short-term (1-2 years), medium term (2-5 years), and long term (5-10 years) and identify how certain tasks are interrelated (i.e., one must be accomplished or started before moving on to the next). The short term tasks are focused on establishing the public policy infrastructure necessary to move forward with infrastructure development and encourage the private sector to participate in Plan implementation. IMPLEMENTATION PHASING Real Estate Transactions Decatur / Federal Station Area Plan Implementation General Development Plan Property Owner Partnership/s Zoning Riverfront Park / DriveMixed Income Housing Development Public Private Partnerships 13th Avenue Design/Construction0 2 yrs 2 5 yrs 5 10 yrs Urban Design Standards Subdivision Stakeholder Coalition/s PHASING MOVING FORWARD

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92 Active edgesPriority pedestrian streets and key intersections where buildings are designed to help increase visual and physical interaction between the public realm (street/ sidewalk) and private realm (inside the building). en Active RecreationPhysical activity that a person voluntarily undertakes in their leisure time for the purpose of mental and/or physical satisfaction.en en Adaptive ReuseThe process of reusing an old site or building for a purpose other than which it was built or designed for. Along with browneld reclamation, adaptive reuse is seen by many as a key factor in land conservation and urban inll. en Area of Change Locations where Denver intends to direct residential and employment growth taking advantage of existing and planned transit and infrastructure. en Area of Stability Locations that represent an established character to enhance as reinvestment and redevelopment occur. en Arterial Major roadway designed to provide a high degree of mobility and serve longer vehicle trips to, from, and within major activity centers in Denver and the region. en Auraria Higher Education Campusan educational facility that houses facilities of three separate universities and colleges: the University of Colorado Denver (UCD), Community College of Denver, and Metropolitan State University of Denver. The campus is located southwest of downtown, near the site of the original Auraria mining camp settlement of 1859. en Bicycle Facilities and Amenities Includes bike routes, lanes and paths which are interconnected, safe and attractive; bike parking and storage (racks & lockers). These eorts are further dened by Denver Moves. This Plan recommend additions to Denver Moves as well. en Blueprint Denver Denvers citywide land use and transportation plan adopted in 2002. This plan denes areas of change and stability. en Building frontagesHelp frame the streetscape by encouraging buildings to be built close to the sidewalk with minimal setbacks. en Built Environmentthe human-made surroundings that provide the setting for human activity, ranging in scale from buildings and parks or green space to neighborhoods and cities that can often include their supporting infrastructure, such as water supply, or energy networks. en Capital Improvement Program Scheduled infrastructure improvements as part of a city budget. en Community Gardena single piece of land gardened collectively by a group of people. They provide fresh produce and plants as well as satisfying labor, neighborhood improvement, sense of community and connection to the environment.en en Complete Streets The practice to promote safe and convenient access for all users along and across travelways. en Density also referred to as intensity. The quantity of development as measured by dwelling units or square feet on a certain amount of land. Denver Housing Authority (DHA)A quasimunicipal corporation with a portfolio of over 11,000 units and housing choice vouchers, providing aordable housing to more than 26,000 very low, low and middle income individuals representing over 10,000 families. DHA has transformed public housing in Denver creating vibrant, revitalized, sustainable, transit oriented, and mixedincome community of choice. en Green Streets Streets with additional landscaping, often linking parks. Dened in the Parks Game Plan. en Greenprint DenverThe City of Denvers stainability policy focusing on Green Building and Energy Conservation, Materials and Waste Management, Water Conservation, and Environmental Public Health policy. en Flex SpaceA building that provides a exible conguration of oce or showroom space combined with, for example, manufacturing, laboratory, warehouse, distribution. en Food HubA centrally located facility with a business management structure facilitating the aggregation, storage, processing, distribution, and/or marketing of locally/ regionally produced food products en Inll Development Development on vacant properties in developed areas en Infrastructure Public improvements such as roads and trac signals, sidewalks and bicycle paths, parks, water and sewer lines, power and telecommunication lines. en Light Rail A rail system with vehicles operating on a xed track and powered by an overhead electric power source. en Mixed-Use Development Mixes of residential, commercial and oce space within the same buildings and districts. Glossary

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93 Multi-Modal Streets Streets that accommodate multiple modes of travel including rapid transit (bus and rail options), bicycles, pedestrians, and vehicles. en NodeFocal points, intersections or loci of activity of varying scales in a city or neighborhood. en On-Street Parking Parking that is provided within the right-of-way of a public street, typically in designated parallel or diagonally striped spaces adjacent to moving trac lanes. en Passive RecreationAn undeveloped space or environmentally sensitive area that requires minimal development. Entities such as a parks department may maintain passive recreation areas for the health and well-being of the public and for the preservation of wildlife and the environment. en Pedestrian-Friendly Street design that facilitates safe, comfortable and attractive pedestrian travel. en Pedestrian Realm Sidewalks, pedestrian signals, crosswalks, benches and other amenities designed to improve the pedestrian friendly nature of both the mixeduse and residential areas. en Public-Private Partnership An agreement between a public agency (federal, state or local) and a private sector entity through which the skills and assets of each sector are shared in delivering a service or facility for the use of the general public. en Public RealmAny publicly owned streets, pathways, right of ways, parks, publicly accessible open spaces and any public and civic building and facilities. en Regional Transportation District (RTD) The regional public transportation agency for the Denver metro area. Scale The relative proportion of the size of dierent elements of the built environment to one another; the measurement of the relationship of one object to another. en Setback The distance a building is set back from the property line. en Streetscaping Physical amenities added to the roadway and intersections, including lighting, trees, landscaping, art, surface textures and colors and street furniture. en Stormwater Improvements Facilities to control surface runo from precipitation; alleys, curbs and gutters, and intersection drainage (cross-pans), in addition to underground pipes are components of the system. en Structured Parking Parking that is provided in a structure, either above or below grade, as opposed to surface parking. en Sustainability The long-term social, economic and environmental health of a community. A sustainable city survives today without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs. en Superblocks Large parcels with few connected through-streets or often have have curvilinear streets within them, limiting connectivity Tax Increment Financing (TIF)a public nancing method that is used for subsidizing redevelopment, infrastructure, and other community-improvement projects. TIF is a method to use future gains in taxes to subsidize current improvements, which are projected to create the conditions for said gains. en Transit Public transportation by bus, rail, or other conveyance.en en Urban Design Involves the social, economic, functional, environmental, and aesthetic objectives that result in the plan or structure of a city, in whole or in part. WayndingSigns, maps, and other graphic or audible methods used to convey location and directions to travelers. en Zoning Basic means of land use control used by local governments. It divides the community into districts (zones) and imposes dierent land use controls on each district, specifying the allowed uses of land and buildings, the intensity or density of such uses, and the bulk of buildings on the land en Zoning Code The compilation of land use regulations for the City. It includes denitions and land use, and building size and location requirements by zone district.