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Denver Union Station-Cherry Creek-Glendale corridor feasibility study, 2014

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Denver Union Station-Cherry Creek-Glendale corridor feasibility study, 2014
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Regional Transportation District
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Regional Transportation District
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Transportation planning
Public transit
City planning

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Full Text
Denver Union Station-Cherry Creek-Glendale
Corridor Feasibility Study
Recommendations Report
January 2014


Contents
Study Purpose 4
Data Sources 5
Existing Conditions 5
Market Conditions 5
Cherry Creek 5
City of Glendale 6
Downtown Denver 7
Market Opportunities and the Role of Transit 8
Current Transit Service 8
Bus to Bus Connection 8
Bus to Rail Connection 14
Stakeholder Input and Data 17
Stakeholder Outreach 17
Key Discussion Points 17
Additional Stakeholder Data 18
Cherry Creek North Survey 18
Future Impacts to Transit 19
Future Market Conditions 19
Future Service Impacts 20
Future Opportunities and the Role of Transit 21
Transit Alternatives 22
No Change 22
New Shuttle Route 22
Enhanced Transit Corridor 23
Recommendation 23
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Alternative 1: Enhanced Transit Corridor (Preferred)
25
Service Elements 25
Alignment 25
Frequency and Service Span 26
Branding 26
Cost Projections 26
Alternative 2: New Shuttle Route 28
Service Elements 28
Alignment 28
Frequency and Service Span 29
Branding 29
Cost Projections 29
Stakeholder Feedback to Recommendations 30
Conclusion 33
Appendix 34
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Study Purpose
The connection between Denver Union Station (DUS), Cherry Creek, and Glendale is a critical link for
local and regional travel. The corridor connecting these areas provides access to key activity centers and
employment hubs. Regional Transportation District (RTD) has commissioned a feasibility study to
identify and evaluate options for transit service improvements within the study area bounded by DUS to
the northwest and the City of Glendale to the southeast. The study will analyze current and future
market opportunities for transit, the performance of existing services, as well as stakeholder input to
identify effective transit alternatives for the corridor. Transportation Solutions, a nonprofit
transportation management association that serves the Southeast Denver area, provided financial and
direct technical assistance for this study.
Map 1: Project Study Corridor
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Data Sources
The following data sources were utilized to inform the study:
ART Shuttle in Englewood
Cherry Creek North Visitor Survey (2011)
Cherry Creek North BID Cumulative Traffic Study (2013)
Cherry Creek Area Plan (2012)
City of Denver Speer/Leetsdale Travel Shed
Cultural Connection Trolley Services
Denver Strategic Transportation Plan (2008)
Downtown Denver Circulator (2010)
Downtown Denver Mobility and Access Plan
Shuttle & Circulator Services Review & Evaluation (2008)
Stakeholder Meeting (July 2013 and December 2013)
RTD Ridership
Regional travel demand data was not available for analysis.
Existing Conditions
Market Conditions
Market factors such as population and employment density, development patterns, and proximity to
popular destinations affect the demand for transit service and are critical considerations for transit
planning. Together they identify what is necessary for transit to succeed within a market context and
will be used to create a composite picture of where service is most likely to generate ridership.
Analyzing local market conditions will help with determining opportunities for transit, designing a
service with an effective route alignment, and determining appropriate service levels to meet projected
demand. Based on current market conditions, the study corridor presents a number of positive
opportunities for transit. It plays a pivotal role in facilitating mobility throughout the metropolitan area,
connecting the region to a number of popular destinations, employment hubs, and residential centers.
Cherry Creek
Cherry Creek, located about 3'A miles southeast of downtown Denver, hosts a number of retail,
residential, and commercial destinations (see Map 2). The Cherry Creek Area Plan outlines strategies for
continuing to shape Cherry Creek into a more vibrant and livable community that supports multi-modal
mobility. The plan divides Cherry Creek into four sub-areas: Cherry Creek East, Cherry Creek North
Neighborhood, Cherry Creek Shopping District, and Cherry Creek Triangle. The Cherry Creek Shopping
District features two of the region's retail attractions: Cherry Creek North shopping district and Cherry
DUS/Cherry Creek/Glendale Corridor Feasibility Study
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Creek Shopping Center. These upscale retail centers attract over 1.3 million visitors per month and
contribute to the more than 14,000 jobs in the community. These larger developments are contiguous
to existing higher frequency transit service located on 1st Avenue, a key mixed-use corridor that serves
Cherry Creek as well as the region (becoming Speer Boulevard to the west).
Map 2: Cherry Creek Land Use
Cherry Creek Land Use
E 6^ Ave
Low Density Residentail
| Medium Density Residential
| High Density Residential
Open Space
[ Retail
Other Commercial
Parking
Planned Use Development
m* o <=
City of Glendale
The City of Glendale contains a number of commercial establishments and houses Infinity Park, a world
class rugby facility and events center. The park is about Vz mile from Colorado Boulevard, a primary
gateway into Glendale. The city is also planning to develop the Riverwalk, a 1 million square foot
entertainment district that aims to become a local, regional, and international destination. The project
will include retail, hospitality, and entertainment space as well as multi-modal enhancements in the
form of a bicycle and pedestrian path. In addition to generating additional tourism, the city is projected
to experience a 50 percent growth in employment over the next 20 years.
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Map 3: Glendale Land Use
Glendale Land Use
Other Retail and Commercial IRSD O £
0.1
M
Downtown Denver
Downtown Denver is a high density employment hub in the metropolitan region, accounting for over
110,000 jobs. The current residential population in downtown Denver is 12,000 people, but this number
is expected to grow by 100 percent within the next 20 years. In addition to traditional retail, dining, and
commercial space, downtown Denver attracts visitors to destinations such as Coors Stadium, Denver
Convention Center, Denver Botanic Gardens, Elitch Gardens, Golden Triangle Museum District, Kirkland
Museum of Fine and Decorative Art, Molly Brown House Museum, Pepsi Center, and University of
Colorado Denver. Local residents, tourists, and employees have access to Denver Union Station, Market
Street Station1, and Civic Center Station for their transit mobility solutions, which are connected by the
16th Street Free MallRide and the upcoming Free MetroRide.
1 Market Street Station will be replaced by the new Denver Union Station bus center.
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Market Opportunities and the Role of Transit
The scale of development and the concentrated distribution of employment, housing, and activity
centers within the three communities make a large portion of the study corridor sustainable.
Sustainable communities allow people to reach their residential, occupational, and recreational
destinations with a decreased dependence on the automobile. Transit will play a critical role in making
active modes of transportation a sustainable lifestyle choice along the corridor as Glendale, Cherry
Creek, and downtown Denver continue to intensify.
Transit plays an equally important role in supporting local economic activity throughout the corridor as
evidenced by RTD's current commute-based service towards downtown Denver. However, the corridor
also contains important commercial, retail, and entertainment venues in Cherry Creek and Glendale that
are not well served by this commute focused transit. Transit can help customers, visitors, and employees
arrive at these other destinations without the use of a private vehicle, reducing the impact on parking
requirements and increasing the flexibility of local land uses. The importance of transit is emphasized
even more during peak retail periods where parking becomes a constraint. In order for transit to
succeed in this role, all-day service to and from the retail centers and other hubs of economic activity
will need to be of greater emphasis.
Current Transit Service
While RTD operates a number of routes that vary in alignment and service level throughout the corridor,
there is currently no single-seat ride connecting Cherry Creek or Glendale with Denver Union Station.
That said, transit patrons do have one-seat access to Civic Center Station where they transfer to the very
frequent Free MallRide and upcoming Free MetroRide to Union Station. A key question for this study
will be whether a "one-seat" ride to DUS is necessary to support significantly increased transit riding.
Bus to Bus Connection
Routes 83L, 79L, and 3L offer passengers a direct connection from Cherry Creek and Glendale to
downtown Denver with service to Civic Center Station (see Map 4). Once at Civic Center Station,
passengers can complete their trip and connect to Denver Union Station using the FREE 16th Street
MallRide, a frequent service operating as often as every VA minutes and the upcoming FREE MetroRide
operating every 6 minutes during peak periods (see Map 5).
Service Design Decisions
The following service characteristics, alignment and frequency, are important design factors that impact
service performance and how passengers utilize transit. The study describes the current service design
decisions along the corridor and evaluates how they affect passengers and their experience on transit.
Alignment
The alignment of a route is the path that it takes to reach its destination. Direct alignments decrease
travel times which improves the passenger experience and reduces operating costs. Routes 83L, 79L,
and 3L travel along the same, linear corridor between Glendale and Civic Center Station in downtown
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Denver. This is an effective corridor segment that provides direct service between key activity centers
with minimal deviations.
The three routes branch out at Alameda Avenue/Leetsdale Drive. Although these routes share the same
alignment for a significant length, they are branded as separate services. However, RTD does market
Route 79L with Route 83L. Route 83L is an all-day service that operates between the study corridor and
Nine Mile Station. Route 79L, a commute-oriented, peak period service, duplicates Route 83L's
alignment outside of the segment between Quebec Street and Nine Mile Station. Route 3L is also a peak
period service and serves Aurora via Alameda Avenue. The FREE 16th Street MallRide connects the rest
of the corridor from Civic Center Station to Denver Union Station along 16th Street.
Map 4: Bus to Bus Connections
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Map 5: Free 16th Street Mall Ride2
Frequency
Frequency refers to how often a bus operates. Spontaneous-use services that operate every 15 minutes
or better reduce out-of-vehicle wait time and allow passengers to arrive at a bus stop without consulting
a schedule. At these service levels, transit becomes more attractive and a more viable mobility solution
in sustainable communities. Table 1 summarizes the current service levels of the three corridor routes
terminating at Civic Center Station. Route 83L is the only route that serves the corridor all day. The
other two routes are commute-based services operating during the peaks. Individually, the routes do
not operate at spontaneous-use frequencies other than Route 83L in one peak direction. Routes 79L and
83L are coordinated for 15 minute reverse peak headways. 2
Table 1: Bus to Bus Service Levels
Route Peak Off-peak Span
Inbound Outbound Inbound Outbound Start End
83 L 15 20 30 30 5:00 AM 11:45 PM
79L 30 30 - - 5:15 AM 7:15 PM
3L 20 30 - - 5:45 AM 7:15 PM
2 Source: RTD.com
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Passenger Experience
This section details how the current design factors affect the passenger experience along the corridor
between downtown Denver, Cherry Creek, and Glendale.
Combined Peak Service Levels
Routes 3L and 79L supplement 83L during the peak, adding between 2 and 6 additional trips along the
corridor. Although no individual route operates better than every 15 minutes, the combined level of
peak service on the corridor averages to be as much as every 7 to 8 minutes if services are evenly
spaced. Figure 1 provides an example of the current peak frequencies for the three routes. A 7 to 8
minute peak frequency on the corridor is a high level of service, but the frequency is most effective
when passengers understand that it exists. The current service design distributes the frequency across
three separately branded routes and does not communicate the combined service levels along the
corridor. Passengers who wish to utilize the frequent service to travel within the corridor will have to
understand how the three routes supplement each other.
Additionally, the combined services on the corridor are inconsistently spaced. The service levels average
to a trip every 7 to 8 minutes on the corridor, but the routes are not coordinated to arrive at even
intervals. The Coordinated Schedule in Figure 1 shows how improved synchronization between the
three routes can benefit service on the corridor without additional investments.
Figure 1: AM Westbound Frequency Comparison3
AM Peak Westbound
Frequency Comparison
o o o o o o o
o m o m o m o
u6 u6 66 66 cn
Commute-Oriented Service
Figure 2 highlights the change in frequency between the peak and off-peak. Route 83L currently
provides 30 minute off-peak frequency and is the only route operating during this period of time. This
3 Frequency comparison evaluated the frequency of buses by route at the 1st Ave and University Blvd bus stop
DUS/Cherry Creek/Glendale Corridor Feasibility Study
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drop in off-peak frequency combined with additional service towards downtown Denver in the morning
and outbound in the afternoon show the commute-oriented configuration of the current transit services
along the corridor. The service is not positioned to effectively connect destinations in Cherry Creek and
Glendale that generate demand for transit throughout the day. As the communities in the study area
continue to develop in density and sustainability, the demand for all-day, bi-directional transit will
increase. The feasibility study will incorporate findings from the analysis of current and future market
conditions with the service performance data to identify the appropriate level of off-peak service.
Figure 2: Combined Peak and Off-Peak Frequency
83L
79 L
3L
Combined
Service Level
Peak vs. Off-Peak
Frequency Comparison


t------------------------1------------------------1-----------------------1-----------------------1------------------------r

< < < < < < <
o o o o o o o
o m o 01 o m
66 66 cn cn o o
Performance
The following sections summarize the key findings from the individual route level analysis. Route profiles
that provide additional details about individual routes are located in the appendix.
Table 2: Bus to Bus Route Performance
Route Revenue Hours Boardings Passengers per Revenue Hour
83 L 69 3,741 55
79L 23 765 34
3L 13 646 49
Route 83L
Route 83L is the most productive route of the three services connecting to Civic Center, generating 55
passenger boardings per revenue hour. About 36 percent of Route 83L's total boardings and alightings
occur between downtown Denver (Civic Center) and Cherry Creek (1st Ave/Fillmore Plaza). The route's
productivity is well above the system average which indicates a higher demand for service than is
currently being supplied. Additionally, the route consistently attracts a high number of passengers
during the midday, reinforcing the importance of off-peak service through the corridor.
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Routes 79L
Route 79L achieves below average productivity while serving 765 passengers per weekday. The resulting
performance may be due to the route's duplicative alignment with 83L, the more frequent, all-day
service. The unique segment of Route 79L does not generate enough ridership to increase its
productivity to the route group average. About 45 percent of Route 79L passenger activity occurs
between the Civic Center Station and Glendale along the study corridor.
Route 3L
Route 3L connects with park and ride facilities as well as transfer hubs. While 3L has the 10th highest
productivity in the RTD bus network, it requires a high subsidy per passenger due to the peak directional
orientation of the service. It runs few trips, so the number of boardings is small relative to a route such
as 83L.
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Bus to Rail Connection
Passengers wishing to connect between downtown Denver, Cherry Creek, and Glendale can also use a
combination of bus and rail services to access the corridor. RTD bus Routes 3, 40, and 46 connect
directly to light rail at Colorado or Alameda Stations.
Service Design
Alignment
Routes 40 and 46 serve the Colorado station which is 2Vz miles south of the Speer/lst/Leetsdale corridor.
Passengers with origins or destinations along Colorado Boulevard or connecting to other transit routes
will most likely use Route 40 over Route 46 due to its direct alignment to or from the station. Route 46
does serve the major destinations in both Glendale and Cherry Creek, but via a slow, circuitous route
alignment. Regardless of choosing either Route 40 or 46 from rail, only travelers coming from the
southeast Metro region would use this rail to bus connection to Glendale or Cherry Creek due to the
much longer travel times from elsewhere in the region (e.g., DUS).
Route 3 offers limited, hourly direct service between Glendale, Cherry Creek, and Alameda Station via its
long line alignment. Alameda Station is about 2Vz miles south of Civic Center Station but require less out-
of-direction travel for most regional travelers. Passengers at Alameda Station can use Light Rail Lines C
and E to reach DUS and complete their trip.
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Map 6: Bus to Rail Connections
Bus to Rail Connections
Routes
Route 46
Route 40
Route 3
------ BusRoutes
O Light Rail Station
Light Rail Line
Colorado
Rail Station
ii
o
0 0.25
1 I mile
U
GLENDALE


Frequency
The three routes serving rail stations run all day at fairly consistent service levels. Route 40's service
levels drop during the off-peak but the route still operates at a spontaenous-use frequency. Route 3
runs as often as every 15 minutes during the peak, but will only serve the study corridor about once an
hour (see Table 3).
Table 3: Bus to Rail Service Levels
Peak Off-peak Span
Route Northbound/ Eastbound Southbound/ Westbound Northbound/ Eastbound Southbound/ Westbound Start End
40 10 min 10 min 15 min 15 min 4:15 AM 12:30 AM
46 30 30 30 30 4:30 AM 10:00 PM
3* 60 60 60 60 4:30 AM 10:00 PM
*Route 3 operates different trip patterns. The pattern that serves Cherry Creek and Glendale runs once
an hour.
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Passenger Experience
Route 40 versus Route 46
The two routes are currently branded separately but their service areas overlap between Cherry Creek
and the rail station along Colorado Boulveard. Most passengers will use Route 40 to connect to Colorado
LRT Station due to the higher frequency, direct alignment, and quicker travel times. The transit market
that is unique to Route 46 is much more limited despite its connections to both Glendale and Cherry
Creek.
Connecting into Alameda Station
The total travel time from Glendale to Denver Union Station via Route 3 and LRT Lines C or E at the
Alameda Station is short, however, the Route 3 60 minute frequency limits the viability of this option
when passengers have access to more frequent service options.
Using Rail or FREE MallRide into DUS
The estimated travel times for riding the corridor via bus or rail services are listed in the appendix. The
overall times for connecting into DUS via corridor bus and the FREE MallRide is as fast or faster than the
times for travelling via rail. The MallRide runs often enough to make the free transfer at Civic Center
Station almost seamless.
Performance
Route 40
Route 40 operates on Colorado Boulevard, a key spine in the RTD network. The route's importance to
the overall transit network is reflected in its 6,000 daily boardings, the 6th highest in the system, and
productivity of 46 passengers per revenue hour. Within the study area, Route 40 generates a significant
amount of ridership in Glendale. The route attracts fewer riders in Cherry Creek which may be due to
the community's distance from Colorado Station, a key destination for the route. Passengers in Cherry
Creek may pursue other transit alternatives to connect into downtown.
Route 46
A large amount of the Route 46's total passenger activity, over 28 percent, occurs at Colorado Station.
However, the route still performs below the system average because Route 40 often presents the more
convenient alternative for passengers looking to connect into the rail lines at Colorado Station.
Route 3
Route 3 only provides 60 minute service to Cherry Creek and Glendale during the week. Overall Route 3
performs at an above average level, but the large majority of its ridership is generated outside of the
study area. The segment through Cherry Creek and Glendale accounts for just 25 percent of the route's
passenger activity and primarily serves as a regional connection into the Centerpoint and Sable Transfer
Center.
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Stakeholder Input and Data
Stakeholder Outreach
A stakeholder meeting was held in Denver in July 2013 to discuss the feasibility study. The purpose of
the meeting was to go over project objectives, solicit feedback, and identify additional data sources for
conducting the study analysis. The following organizations were represented:
Regional Transportation District
Transportation Solutions
Capitol Hill United Neighborhoods
Charter Realty Group
Cherry Creek Steering Committee
City of Denver
Denver Department of Public Works
Downtown Denver Partnership
Golden Triangle Museum District
History Colorado
The Oxford Hotel
Visit Denver
Key Discussion Points
In order to design a service, it will be important to understand who the target customer is.
Transit can be designed to attract different market segments of customers based on passenger
amenities, service alignment, and frequency. The current service is designed to target work
commutes. Stakeholders brought up the importance of tourists and finding a way to make
transit appeal to them.
Where do passengers want to go? Employees/residents and tourists have different mobility
needs. Stakeholders emphasized how regional visitors arrive into DUS wanting a one seat ride to
Cherry Creek and Glendale. Is there one solution for both? Is there overlap between the market
segments?
The last mile problem: How to get passengers to their final destination after taking transit?
This was raised as an issue for a number of potential destinations and origins like the Museum
District, Infinity Park, and the Convention Center.
What should the connection into DUS be, bus or rail? Stakeholders discussed travel times
between taking the bus, light rail, and driving. Stakeholders felt that public transit was fairly
competitive with the private automobile with respect to travel times. The bus was discussed
more often as an alternative for transit. Although Routes 83L and 46 operate in Cherry Creek
and Glendale, the two routes fill different roles within the market.
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Cherry Creek lacks a transit hub. Cherry Creek is not connected to FasTraks and lacks an
identifiable hub for transit.
The current service is not branded. Branding makes tourists and other passengers aware of the
options that are out there. The possible options are to brand the vehicle or the corridor,
creating a gateway for transit in Cherry Creek and Glendale.
RTD's previous experience with a branded shuttle service was not successful. RTD created a
branded shuttle 10 years ago. The agency bought rubber-tired trolleys that ran every hour. It
wasn't frequent, lacked marketing, generated little ridership and was not considered successful.
Current service does not have frequency. Frequency is a very important issue for passengers.
The current 83L service is not frequent enough and used to run more often.
Attracting families to transit will be difficult. Transit is cost prohibitive for families. Driving and
paying for parking is often the more affordable alternative.
Stakeholders want information on costs. The costs for each alternative need to be provided.
Data needs for the feasibility study. The feasibility study will benefit from data that details
tourist and local travel behavior. Zip code data from stores, major retailers, or cultural
destinations.
Additional Stakeholder Data
Cherry Creek North Survey
RRC Associates conducted a visitor survey for Cherry Creek North in Fall 2011. Survey respondents
answered questions that dealt with issues such as trip purpose, trip origin, as well as mode of
transportation (see Figure 3). Of the 1,400 visitors who completed a survey, more than 25 percent of
them arrived at Cherry Creek by bicycle, bus, or walking. The high share of arrivals via sustainable travel
modes is a positive indicator for Cherry Creek's commitment to sustainability and the potential response
to improved transit options.
Figure 3: Cherry Creek North Mode Access
Cherry Creek North Mode of Access
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The majority of visitors, 89 percent, lived within the Denver Metro area and more than 60 percent were
from the City of Denver (see Table 4). Not surprisingly, local residents frequented Cherry Creek North
more often than non-local residents (see Table 5). In order to increase the number of trips by transit to
destinations in Cherry Creek and Glendale, it will be just as important to understand the mobility needs
of local residents as it is to understand the needs of non-local visitors. Local residents make up a
significant share of the retail customers in Cherry Creek, and their proximity to the area make them a
key market for transit. This also emphasizes the importance of Speer Boulevard and 1st Avenue, key
corridors that will connect downtown Denver with the key destinations in Glendale and Cherry Creek as
well as the Alameda corridor connecting Aurora to the east.
Table 4: Primary Residence of Cherry Creek North Visitors
City within the State of Colorado
Denver 822 64%
Aurora 222 17%
All Other 116 9%
Centennial 43 3%
Cherry Hills 21 2%
Evergreen 19 2%
Arvada 15 1%
Boulder 15 1%
Littleton 15 1%
Total responses 1,289 100%
Table 5: Median Number of visitors to Cherry Creek per Month
Median Number of Trips to
Cherry Creek North per Month
Local resident 5
Colorado resident 2
Overall 4
Future Impacts to Transit
Future Market Conditions
Future development over the next 10 years will bring over 4 million square feet of new commercial,
retail, and residential uses along the study corridor. The study will highlight key developments in
downtown Denver, Golden Triangle Museum District, Cherry Creek, and Glendale. Identifying these
investments will be critical for understanding how the future market conditions will impact the demand
for transit.
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Denver Union Station and Downtown
Denver Union Station is currently under construction and is slated to open in 2014. The development
will be a multimodal hub for Amtrak, FasTracks, and RTD services. It will feature a 22 bay bus complex
that integrates local, regional, and express bus services. DUS will also include up to 2 million square feet
of transit-oriented, mixed-use development in the form of residential, office, retail, and recreational
space. The sustainable development supporting the DUS renovation will help increase transit's role in
local as well as regional mobility.
Golden Triangle Museum District
Located in the southern portion of downtown Denver, the Golden Triangle Museum District hosts the
nationally recognized Denver Art Museum, high-rise condominium units, and civic establishments such
as the central Denver Public Library and Lindsey-Flanigan Courthouse. The Golden Triangle Museum
District will continue to build upon its housing density. The most notable residential infill projects are
located at 1000 Speer Boulevard (20 stories) and 8th Street /Lincoln Street (7 stories).
Cherry Creek
Cherry Creek is set to add an additional one million square feet of development, namely in the Cherry
Creek North Business Improvement District (BID). Eight projects have been approved and are under
construction or close to groundbreaking with an additional eight more in the planning stages. Some of
the plans include 250 Columbine, a mixed-use development which will house business space and
residential units, the relocation of the Adolph Coors Foundation headquarters to Cherry Creek, and
multiple high rise complexes that offer retail and commercial uses on the ground floor. All planned
developments are within a half mile of the Speer/Leetsdale corridor, the walking distance range
attracted to high quality bus or rail transit.
City of Glendale
The City of Glendale has an economic development project underway called the Glendale RiverWalk
Master Plan (GRMP), which will add over one million square feet of entertainment, retail, restaurant,
hotel, and concert space. This development is projected to become a regional, national, and
international destination. The Glendale RiverWalk development further emphasizes the need and
opportunity for transit that is bi-directionally focused along the corridor.
Future Service Impacts
18th/19th Street Free Metro Ride
RTD will begin operating the Free MetroRide in Spring 2014. The previously named Downtown Denver
Circulator provides another connection between Civic Center Station and Denver Union Station (see
Map 7). It will operate as a peak-based service that parallels the current FREE MallRide along 18th and
19th Streets. This new service will increase connectivity between Civic Center and DUS, which will benefit
passengers who use 83L, 79L, and 3L to access DUS and other locations in downtown Denver.
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Map 7: Free Mall Ride and Free MetroRide
Future Opportunities and the Role of Transit
The study area is expected to experience significant sustainable community growth in the future with
over 4 million square feet of planned development occurring on or near the corridor. This higher density
housing, mixed-use developments and regional attractors in downtown Denver, Cherry Creek, and
Glendale will require that the transit focus shift away from a commute, downtown-based service to all-
day, high frequency transit serving all trip types and consumers.
Transit will also continue to evolve in downtown Denver. In addition to the new Denver Union Station
(DUS), RTD will initiate a second downtown shuttle, Free MetroRide, reinforcing the connection
between DUS and Civic Center Station. Passengers who use Routes 83L, 79L, or 3L to connect into Civic
Center Station will have more frequent service to DUS during the peak, making these services more
attractive options for travelling the corridor. Two free high frequency connectors between Civic Center
Station and DUS will offer an almost seamless "second seat" for persons traveling between downtown
Denver and Cherry Creek/Glendale and do it in a high quality community "place."
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T ransit Alternatives
This section of the feasibility study evaluates transit alternatives for addressing the current and
projected transit needs between Cherry Creek/Glendale and downtown Denver. The following set of
transit alternatives are developed based on stakeholder input and performance analysis.4
1. No Change
2. New Shuttle Route
3. Enhanced Transit Corridor
The alternatives aim to create a more integrated and comprehensive transit experience along the
Speer/Leetsdale corridor that, first meets that needs of the Cherry Creek and Glendale communities,
and, second serves the mobility needs of Denver Metro residents, visitors, and commuters. Alternatives
were developed that respond to the need for an affirmative transit experience for a broad range of
consumers:
Create a corridor that is easy to use and understand
Support spontaneous use and a positive wait experience
Establish fast and reliable travel times
Connect service into a sustainable community experience
No Change
The first option maintains current service levels and alignment with minor changes in scheduling to
provide the service more effectively. Routes 3L, 79L, and 83L combine to provide spontaneous-use
frequencies during the peak, but the current timing between trips is not consistent. The minor
adjustments in the low investment, no change alternative include establishing a more consistent
frequency along the Speer/Leetsdale corridor. This would improve peak-period, peak-direction service
on the corridor, but transit would still not be in the position to serve the growing demand for bi-
directional service in Glendale and Cherry Creek. In addition, this alternative maintains the current off-
peak frequencies which would keep transit commute-focused and limit its viability as an all-day mobility
solution.
New Shuttle Route
The New Shuttle Route alternative creates a one seat ride between DUS, Glendale, and Cherry Creek.
This alternative is focused on the non-peak, non-commute service. The market for the new shuttle is
oriented to very specific groups or transit non-users such as regional visitors, convention attendees, as
well as residents and visitors from the Golden Triangle.
4 There are no recommended improvements for the connections to LRT. First, traveling from downtown Denver to
either Cherry Creek or Glendale via LRT connecting to bus was not competitive with the more direct route via
Speer/lst. Second, existing Route 40 on Colorado Boulevard is a spontaneous-use bus service that efficiently and
effectively connects LRT to the study area for patrons from the Southeast Metro Region.
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Being a fully separate shuttle brand, this alternative will have limited synergy with the existing RTD
transit network. Its service connection duplicates two key services in Route 83L and the FREE MallRide.
However, the shuttle's duplicative alignment is not likely to decrease the productivity and effectiveness
of existing Routes 3L, 79L, 83L, and MallRide, but rather reach a new audience for transit. Although the
current service configuration forces a transfer in order to travel the entire corridor, the benefit of a one
seat ride is minimized when the current transfer is made seamless via high frequency connections at
Civic Center Station. The new shuttle will have to generate a high level ridership from its unique market
segments in order to be cost-effective.
Enhanced Transit Corridor
The Enhanced Transit Corridor option establishes a branded corridor along Speer Boulevard and 1st
Avenue. The services along the Speer/Leetsdale corridor offer the most direct alignment and maximize
connectivity at Civic Center Station, where passengers can access DUS via two free, high frequency
shuttles. In the Enhanced Transit Corridor alternative, the focus will be on the corridor and less on
individual routes much like an arterial version of the US 36 BRT corridor. RTD will be able to run multiple
services on the corridor and unify them through branding along the corridor. Branded shelters, pylons,
or information kiosks act as signals for a high quality experience and inform passengers that they will be
able to take any service on this corridor and reach the same destinations between Glendale and
downtown Denver.
The Enhanced Transit Corridor leverages the existing network and ridership base, providing scalable,
incremental change that does not exclude other enhancements on the corridor. The objective of this
alternative is to invest in the corridor and coordinate services in order to achieve spontaneous-use
frequencies. The high service levels and ease of use support sustainable development and attract
passengers from a broad cross-section of market segments. The Enhanced Transit Corridor alternative
does not limit expanding the brand onto other streets such as Leetsdale Drive as part of future
scalability.
Recommendation
The Speer/Leetsdale corridor between downtown Denver, Cherry Creek, and Glendale offers transit
service that must be designed to meet the varying needs of an increasingly diverse customer base. Three
alternatives were considered for improving service along the study corridor. Based on analysis, the
Enhanced Transit Corridor is the preferred transit alternative. This alternative addresses many of the
issues with the current service configuration while positioning transit to successfully meet the future
demand. However, the preferred Enhanced Transit Corridor alternative need not be the only
improvement.
While it is not the preferred alternative, the New Shuttle can also serve, albeit in a more limited role,
augmenting the Enhanced Transit Corridor. This more limited role would involve a private sector
initiative (RTD funding is recommended only for the Enhanced Transit Corridor) that focuses on small
market segments that have special mobility needs and opportunities. These can include Convention
DUS/Cherry Creek/Glendale Corridor Feasibility Study
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Center activities or other special events that Cherry Creek and Glendale wish to leverage or special
seasonal demand that generates enough demand to support the shuttle costs. The study will outline a
pilot shuttle route using private funding as a second alternative for the corridor.
DUS/Cherry Creek/Glendale Corridor Feasibility Study
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Alternative 1: Enhanced Transit Corridor (Preferred)
Service Elements
Alignment
The proposed corridor for enhancement is the one that the routes 83L and 79L currently operate on
between Glendale, Cherry Creek, and Civic Center Station: starting in Glendale where Leetsdale and
Alameda converge, following Alameda Avenue, Cherry Creek North Drive, 1st Avenue, Speer Boulevard,
and Lincoln/Broadway to Civic Center Station (see Map 8). A terminal for short line routes (Civic Center
Station to Glendale) could be located behind the Glendale Target providing transit connections to Route
1, with nearby on-street connections to Routes 40 and 46.
Map 8: Enhanced Transit Corridor Route Alignment
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Frequency and Service Span
The frequency should be set to a level that is consistent with sustainable, urban living standards. A 1'A
minute peak frequency and 15 minute off-peak frequency will be established in both directions. Daily
service operations would be consistent with the current 83L service span from 5:00am to 11:45pm.
Branding
Enhanced branding along the corridor will make transit
easier to use. Branding focuses customer attention on
the corridor and the high frequency connection
between Glendale, Cherry Creek, and downtown Denver
rather than individual routes. RTD, along with
stakeholder input, will need to develop a branding
scheme that compliments the local communities.
While a new RTD enhanced service brand needs to be
on all of the passenger facilities to communicate with
customers, those facilities can be tailored to enhance
individual community "placemaking." Branded
infrastructure and improvements can include enhanced
shelters with next trip displays, information pylons,
bicycle storage, pavement and sidewalk markings, and
priority treatments like transit-only lanes and transit
signal priority technology.
RTD should also explore the idea of rebranding the
three routes on the corridor to unify them. Routes 83L,
79L, and 3L share similar alignments but they are branded as separate routes. Passengers will have to
work to understand their similarities. Branding the routes with a similar prefix will continue to shift the
customer focus onto the corridor. As an example, the three routes can be branded as 83P (Parker), 83Q
(Quebec), and 83A (Alameda). Under this scheme passengers will know that route with an 83 will
provide them the same service between Glendale and downtown Denver. Passengers who wish to
travel outside of the corridor will not have to learn any more information than passengers utilizing the
existing service configuration.
Cost Projections
The projected operating costs for this preferred alternative will cost approximately $960,000 annually
without capital improvements. This total is in addition to the cost of running the existing service levels.
Cost estimates are based on an $80 per hour cost for directly operated bus service. Transit priority
investments can improve bus operating speeds enough so that the time savings can be re-invested to
run the additional service and offset some of the costs. Additional fare revenue from increased ridership
DUS/Cherry Creek/Glendale Corridor Feasibility Study
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is also expected to offset part of the new expenses.5 RTD has also discussed repurposing funds from
existing, under-productive routes such as Route 46 to fund the service investments.
Table 6: Enhanced Transit Corridor WEEKDAY COST
Time Period Additional Buses Hours of Service Revenue Hours Operating Cost6
Peak 1 6 6 $480
Midday 3 6 18 $1,440
Evening 3 3 9 $720
Daily 33 $2,640
Table 7: Enhanced Transit Corridor WEEKEND COST
Day Additional Hours Revenue Operating
Type Buses of Service Hours Cost
Saturday 3 11 33 $2,640
Sunday 3 11 33 $2,640
Table 8: Enhanced Transit Corridor ANNUAL COST
Day Additional Revenue Operating
Type Buses Hours Cost
Weekday 3 8,415 $673,200
Weekend 3 3,630 $290,400
Annual 3 12,045 $963,600
5 If the additional revenue hours are half as productive (i.e., 50% frequency elasticity), this proposed route would
generate approximately $240,000 at today's average fare.
6 All Enhanced Transit Corridor operating costs calculated at $80 per revenue hour for direct operation.
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Alternative 2: New Shuttle Route
Service Elements
Alignment
The New Shuttle Route alternative provides a one-seat ride from DUS to Cherry Creek and Glendale. The
new shuttle shares its alignment with services along the enhanced transit corridor east of Broadway and
Lincoln Street. Although the shuttle can arrive at DUS via different alignments, the study proposes two
possible routes. Alternative A uses Speer Boulevard to connect with DUS which minimizes duplication
with existing RTD services. Alternative B provides service along Broadway and Lincoln Street before
travelling into and out of downtown via one way couplets, 14th and 15th Streets, which provide direct
access to the Convention Center.
Map 9: New Shuttle Route Alignment
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Frequency and Service Span
The dedicated new shuttle route targets non-commuters during the off-peak and PM peak hours. The
suggested minimum level of service for this travel market would be every 30 minutes. The suggested
operating hours are from 9:00AM to 9:00PM daily in order to provide service to the retail, dining, and
entertainment destinations.
Branding
The shuttle branding will be an opportunity to represent the
parties who fund the shuttle and the communities it serves. The
shuttle vehicle will typically be smaller than standard local buses.
Cost Projections
The 30 minute service levels would require 2 vehicles to operate. The project annual operating cost for
the dedicated route would total $438,000 a year or $36,500 a month at a contracted hourly rate of $50
per hour. A potential pilot service could be implemented during the holiday season to target the higher
levels of retail activity or during a series of large conventions. Funding from external sources such as
local businesses and other organizations that benefit from providing a shuttle would be needed to
operate the service. Farebox revenue is not expected due to the target market audience for this route.
Table 9: New Shuttle Route Cost
Vehicle Requirement Hours of Service Revenue Hours Cost
Daily 2 12 24 $1,200
Monthly 2 360 720 $36,000
Annually 2 4,380 8,760 $438,000
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Stakeholder Feedback to Recommendations
The findings and draft recommendations were presented to stakeholders in November 2013. The
stakeholders had an overall positive response to the recommendations. The subsequents comments
were provided during the meeting and through e-mail in response to the draft recommendations.
Relevant responses follow the stakeholder comments. The following organizations were in attendance:
Regional Transportation District
Transportation Solutions
Capitol Hill United Neighborhoods
Cherry Creek East
Cherry Creek North
Cherry Creek Steering Committee
Cherry Creek Shopping Center
City of Denver
City of Glendale
Denver Department of Public Works
Downtown Denver Partnership
Golden Triangle Museum District
INC
Visit Denver
General Feedback
Comments
It will be important to understand the purpose of the service enhancements. What is the
objective: to address a mobility need, an economic development need, or serve a specific
market?
The existing service currently does a good job serving commuters but misses the other markets.
Responses
The current service configuration is commute-oriented. However, the development patterns
along the study corridor are generating new mobility needs and opportunities for transit as well
as walking and biking. The demand for high frequency, all-day transit service will increase as
this type of development continues to shape the corridor.
Enhanced Transit Corridor
Comments
Branding Broadway is not feasible because many other routes operate on it. However, there is
the potential to brand it as the Golden Triangle.
Communication is critical for the success of the service and its branding.
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There is an opportunity to integrate the branded shelters with the community aesthetic.
This alternative will allow people to travel both ways.
Branding the trunk of the corridor through unified route names is an excellent idea.
The alternative will be successful if it makes transit simple for other people to use.
The alternative makes sense, especially for more frequent off-peak service. A pilot should be
developed to determine feasibility. Prior to the pilot, the following steps should be taken:
- Civic Center Station should be more recognizable. The signage is poor at the station. There
should be a next trip display at the loop where people get off the shuttle which would
include information for trips to the Cherry Creek-Glendale corridor.
- Consider a stop at Grant Street and Washington Street. Evaluate the stop at Speer and
Lafayette.
- Consider a short line route that travels between Civic Center and Glendale or Cherry Creek.
The concept of a branded corridor will create opportunities for a public-private partnership that
pairs high-quality, frequent transit service with high quality stops. The ability to create
incremental change makes for short and long term actions that can better service an expanding
market for transit.
Responses
Branding the Broadway/Lincoln segment of the corridor as the Golden Triangle is a good idea for
further discussion. If the community supports the concept, branded kiosks or pylons can provide
relevant transit and wayfinding information.
Appropriate information about service to Cherry Creek and Glendale should be provided at the
Civic Center Station.
A short line segment between Civic Center and Glendale was considered. The current enhanced
transit corridor recommendation can achieve I'A minute service during the peak without a short
line route, however, it remains a scalable future option if needed.
New Shuttle Route
Comments
The proposed alignment on 14th and 15th Streets features high levels of density.
DUS is the logical destination for the private shuttle.
Regional visitors who travel to DUS usually go to destinations such as the Denver Convention
Center. They go to Cherry Creek Mall on the second day of their visit.
If private parties fund the shuttle, then they will control where the shuttle stops. This will
require extra coordination with RTD to ensure compatibility with RTD stops.
Local organizations are currently in discussions to develop a privately funded shuttle.
The emphasis for this alternative is to get riders from DUS to Cherry Creek or Glendale, but it is
doubtful that riders arriving at DUS will be interested in going directly to Cherry Creek. It is more
likely that they will be going to the Convention Center, hotels, or other cultural attractions. The
same goes for the reverse direction. Riders originating in Cherry Creek or Glendale are unlikely
headed directly to DUS but to destinations short of DUS.
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Speed is not an emphasis as non-commuters are not concerned about making connections.
Many of the target riders are not familiar with the RTD system and will need a unique service
that takes them to their destination. These passengers will not be concerned with speed but
with making sure that they reach their destination.
Use 14th and 15th Street to travel to and from DUS. The route includes Convention Center, the
Plex, major hotels, the cultural center, the Museum of Contemporary Art, and shopping. Denver
has invested in both 14th and 15th Streets which are becoming more important corridors.
Running the shuttle on these streets can also help attract the Convention Center and Visitor
Center as sponsors.
Consider connecting downtown, Cherry Creek, and Glendale via some more dense residential
areas rather than Speer Boulevard.
Consider using smaller, distinctive vehicles similar to those used by San Antonio or Georgetown.
Smaller vehicles are less intimidating.
The concept of a private shuttle service is promising.
Responses
The final alignment and stop list of a privately funded shuttle will require a discussion with the
funders and RTD. 14th and 15th Streets have positive market conditions. The service coverage
overlap with the FREE MallRide would likely have a negative effect on ridership for the new
shuttle within downtown.
A majority of regional passengers arriving into DUS will not connect into Cherry Creek and
Glendale as their first destination. The market for a one-seat ride between DUS, Cherry Creek,
and Glendale is limited and is best served via private entities.
An enhanced transit corridor can make transit service as easy to use as a one-seat shuttle ride.
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Conclusion
The Denver Union Station/Cherry Creek/Glendale transit corridor plays a key role in facilitating local and
regional mobility. The corridor hosts a number of civic establishments, employment hubs, retail centers,
and entertainment destinations that generate millions of visits per year. The development patterns and
concentration of key destinations within the three communities make the corridor a good candidate for
enhanced transit. In this environment, transit can play a key role in supporting centers of economic
activity and promoting sustainable lifestyles. However, the current transit service within the corridor is
focused around the work commute towards downtown Denver. Regional Transportation District (RTD)
commissioned a feasibility study to evaluate the current service configuration and identify opportunities
for improvements.
After evaluating existing and future market conditions, service performance, and stakeholder feedback,
the study proposed three alternatives: No Change, New Shuttle Route, and Enhanced Transit Corridor.
Of the three, the Enhanced Transit Corridor was identified as the preferred alternative. This alternative
creates a branded corridor where passengers can connect to downtown Denver and Glendale every I'A
and 15 minutes during the peak and off-peak, respectively. The targeted transit enhancements make the
service easier to use and understand, making transit a more attractive option for all-day travel between
the communities. The preferred alternative addresses short-term mobility needs while positioning the
corridor to successfully meet long-term demand through scalable improvement.
The New Shuttle Route serves a limited market, but is recommended for consideration as a privately
funded service. The one-seat ride between DUS and Glendale is designed to attract non-commuters and
regional visitors who arrive into DUS. While the service is projected to generate lower levels of ridership
due to duplication with existing RTD services and limited demand for the connection, a pilot project can
be implemented during the holiday season to capture the demand for service to the retail centers along
the corridor. The shuttle's performance during this time should be used to determine the feasibility of a
year-round or seasonal service.
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Appendix
Existing Travel Time
The following tables provide a representative sample of alternative travel options to DUS from Cherry
Creek and Glendale. Once passengers board a route, it will should take them between 30 to 40 minutes
to travel the length of the project corridor. The scheduled speeds on the corridor are about 15 miles per
hour.
Current Bus to Bus Routing Options7
Running Time AM Peak Inbound Glendale to DUS
Running Time Transfer Total Travel
Route 1st Route 2nd Route Time (mins) Time (mins)
83L to MallRide 16 14.5 0.75 31.25
79L to MallRide 16 14.5 0.75 31.25
3Lto MallRide 16 14.5 0.75 31.25
Running Time PM Peak Outbound DUS to Glendale
Running Time Transfer Total Travel
Route 1st Route 2nd Route Time (mins) Time (mins)
MallRide to 83L 14.5 23 7.5 45
MallRide to 79L 14.5 23 15 52.5
MallRide to 3L 14.5 23 15 52.5
Current Bus to Rail Routing Options
Running Time AM Peak Inbound Glendale to DUS
Running Time Transfer Total Travel
Route 1st Route 2nd Route Time (mins) Time (mins)
40 to LRT 16 20 15 51
46 to LRT 19 20 15 54
3 to LRT 16 12 10 38
Running Time PM Peak Outbound DUS to Glendale
Running Time Transfer Total Travel
Route 1st Route 2nd Route Time (mins) Time (mins)
LRT to 40 20 14 5 37
LRT to 46 20 20 15 43
LRT to 3 11 25 30 66
7 Trip is calculated based on in-vehicle time for the first and second routes plus the average wait time to transfer
('A of the second route frequency).
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Route Profiles
The following pages include detailed route profiles and boarding maps that provide further insight into
the operation and performance of individual routes.
DUS/Cherry Creek/Glendale Corridor Feasibility Study
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ROUTE 83L
Cherry Creek Parker Road
Service every 20 minutes peak and 30 minutes off-peak
Hours of operation: 5:00 AM -11:45 PM
Route JB3|L
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ROUTE 83L
Cherry Creek Parker Road
PERFORMANCE
Boardings
Service every 20 minutes peak and 30 minutes off-peak
Hours of operation: 5:00 AM -11:45 PM
Productivity
3,741
Weekday Boardings
Local and Limited Routes
SystemAveragesfLocal/Limited Routes): 2,531 Boardings
PASSENGER ACTIVITY
By Region
1,200
1,000
800 n
600 j
400 j
200
0
By Trip Time
100
Boardings per Trip
Max Load per Trip
80
60
40
20
AM Peak
PM Peak
1,000 -o
800 §
600 %
400 5
200

5:07 AM
Westbound Trips
10:25 PM
100
80
CO
&Dcn j
C 60 -
ro 40
O
m
20
0
Boardings per Trip
Max Load per Trip
AM Peak
PM Peak
5:32 AM
Eastbound Trips
11:10 PM
Findings
* Highly productive route, exceeds 150 percent of system average making it a candidate for enhancement
* 63% of total passenger activity occurs between Downtown and Cherry Creek
* Off-peak trips account for 50 percent of total passenger activity
DUS/Cherry Creek/Glendale Corridor Feasibility Study
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ROUTE 79L
Cherry Creek Dayton
Service every 30 minutes peak
Hours of operation: 5:15 AM 7:15 PM
DUS/Cherry Creek/Glendale Corridor Feasibility Study
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ROUTE 79L
Cherry Creek Dayton
PERFORMANCE
Boardings
15,000
Service every 30 minutes
Hours of operation: 5:15 AM 7:15 PM
10,000
5,000 -
0
765
Weekday Boardings
Average
llllll.......
791
Local and Limited Routes
System Averages(Local/Limited Routes): 2,531 Boardings
PASSENGER ACTIVITY
Productivity
80
60
40
20
0
Average ygL
34
Passengers per Revenue Hour
Local and Limited Routes
System Average (local/Limited Routes): 36 Passengers per Revenue Hour
By Region
250 -|
200 - Weekday Activity
Boarding
150 - Alighting
GO c Load
=2 100 -
50 -
0 - IL ^
Nine
Mile
300 250
250 200
200 150
150ro GO c
o 1 100
100* rc
50 5 O co 50
Weekday Activity
Boarding
Alighting
------ Load
By Trip Time
Westbound
Boardings per Trip
--- Max Load per Trip
Eastbound
Nine
Mile
Boardings per Trip
Max Load per Trip
100
80
60
40
20
AM Peak
PM Peak
vtltmfhifH
100
80
60
40
20
AM Peak
PM Peak
5:23AM WestboundTrips 5:41PM 6:13AM
Findings
* Peak only service with lower than average boardings and productivity
* 47% of passenger activity occurs between Civic Center and Glendale utilizing only 21% of total revenue hours
Eastbound Trips
6:32 PM
DUS/Cherry Creek/Glendale Corridor Feasibility Study
Page | 39


ROUTE 3L
East Alameda
Service every 20 minutes peak
Hours of operation: 5:45 AM 7:15 PM
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ROUTE 3L
East Alameda
PERFORMANCE
Service every 20 minutes peak
Hours of operation: 5:45 AM-7:15 PM
Boardings
PASSENGER ACTIVITY
By Region
Westbound
300
250
200
150
100
50
0
-50
By Trip Time
Boardings per Trip
Max Load per Trip
Productivity
Eastbound
Boardings per Trip
Max Load per Trip
80
> 60
S 40
20
1 80 1
AM Peak PM Peak
H ¥ 60 -
t t llf n
5:48 AM
WestboundTrips
7:51AM
3:35 PM
Eastbound Trips
6:20 PM
Findings
* Peak only service capturing 51% of passenger activity at four major transit nodes such as P&R's or transfer centers
* Averages 8 boardings per trip during AM and PM peak service
* Overall low system wide boardings
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ROUTE 40
Colorado Boulevard
Service every 10 minutes peak and 15 minutes off-peak
Hours of operation: 4:30 AM 1:00 PM
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ROUTE 40
Colorado Boulevard
PERFORMANCE
Boardings
15,000 -|
Service every 10 minutes peak and 15 minutes off-peak
Hours of operation: 4:30 AM 1:00 AM
Productivity
10,000 -
5,000 -
0
6,034 Weekday Boardings
40
1111111111111111111 i....
Local and Limited Routes
System Averages(Local/Limited Routes): 2,531 Boardings
PASSENGER ACTIVITY
By Region
Station Station
By Trip Time
80
AM Peak
60 -
i
40
Ave
Boardings per Trip
Max Load per Trip
PM Peak
0 J
4:03 AM
| 4 - |
80
60
40
20
i Boardings per Trip
MaxLoad per Trip
AM Peak
NorthboundTrips
12:08 AM
0
4:20 AM
llIM
PM Peak
Southbound Trips
12:12 AM
Findings
Highly productive route obtaining the 6th most boardings of the entire RTD transit system
* Shortline service from the Colorado Station to Bruce Randolph Avenue is most productive capturing 80% of all boardings
* Midday trips account for 37% of total boarding activity
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ROUTE 46
South Dahlia
0D
Inbound
r?*-
CHERRY CREEK
Service every 30 minutes
Hours of operation: 5:00 AM 9:00 PM
Passenger
Boarding & Alighting
Weekday
---- RTD Bus Network
CCD rtd tight Rail
-L K. u
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ROUTE 46
South Dahlia
PERFORMANCE
Boardings
15.000 -|
10.000 -
5,000 -
0 -
Service every 30 minutes
Hours of operation: 5:00 AM -9:00 PM
1,206 Weekday Boardings
Average
46
llllllllliinii
n I I I I I I n
Local and Limited Routes
System Averages(Local/Limited Routes): 2,531 Boardings
PASSENGER ACTIVITY
By Region
Productivity
80
60
40
20
0
Average
22
Passengers per Revenue Hour
300 300
250 250
200 T3 ro i/i oo 200
150 O c p 150
100 ro ro O CO 100
50 50
0 0
Local and Limited Routes
System Average (Local/Limited Routes): 36 Passengers per Revenue Hour
Southbound
Nine
Mile
By Trip Time
Boardings per Trip
Max Load per Trip
Boardings per Trip
Max Load per Trip
60
£ 40
20
AM Peak
PM Peak
4LUtL444tWtllHthm.
60
40 -
20 -
AM Peak
PM Peak
M
.1.
I I I I I
imiiiiiiiifiimi
Httn
Southbound Trips
5:37 AM NorthboundTrips 8:22 PM 5:03 AM
Findings
* Regional trip activity is heavily destination oriented with Colorado Station obtaining 28% of total passenger activity
* Overall performance is far below the system wide average offering 30 minute service
* Route 40 operates in close proximity providing 10 minute peak and 15 minute off-peak frequencies
8:01PM
DUS/Cherry Creek/Glendale Corridor Feasibility Study
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ROUTE 3
Alameda Avenue
Service every 60 minutes*
Hours of operation: 4:30 AM 1:00 AM
* Service levels reference
Cherry Creek area long line
service, with shortline
frequencies achieving 30
minute frequency ending
at the Alameda rail station.
DUS/Cherry Creek/Glendale Corridor Feasibility Study
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ROUTE 3
Alameda Avenue
PERFORMANCE
Boardings
15.000 -|
10.000 -
5,000 -
0 -
Service every 60 minutes*
Hours of operation: 4:30 AM -1:00 AM
Productivity
4,445 Weekday Boardings
Average
iiiiiiiiiiiin

Local and Limited Routes
System Averages(Local/Limited Routes): 2,531 Boardings
PASSENGER ACTIVITY
By Region
By Trip Time
150
AM Peak
, 100
50
Boardings per Trip
Max Load per Trip
150 n
PM Peak
rll iJtldtlt 14fr tht ittttUWh
0
4:58 AM
100
50
Boardings per Trip
Max Load per Trip
AM Peak
PM Peak
WestboundTrips
12:01AM
0
4:27 AM
rttt ttr th t+1t"
Eastbound Trips
12:15 AM
Findings
* Higher than average boardings and productivity
* Shortline service from the Federal Station to Alameda Station is most productive capturing 75% of all passenger activity
* Midday trips account for 37% of total boarding activity
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Boardings
Total boardings by individual route provides an important performance measurement, but overall ridership helps to evaluate performance on
the. The map below provides the total weekday combined boardings by direction for Routes 3L, 79L and 83L. Offering peak commute only
service, Routes 3L and 79L are much smaller in total boardings than 83L. The majority of service boardings occur along Route 83L due to all day
service spans and increased service levels.
DUS/Cherry Creek/Glendale Corridor Feasibility Study
Page
48


Combined Bda'rbin^:
DUS/Cherry Creek/Glendale Corridor Feasibility Study
Page | 49


Full Text

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D ENVER U NION S TATION C HERRY C REEK G LENDALE C ORRIDOR F EASIBILITY S TUDY R ECOMMENDATIONS R EPORT January 201 4 P hoto credit: City of Denver

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DUS/Cherry Creek/Glendale Corridor Feasibility Study Page | 2 C ONTENTS Study Purpose 4 Data Sources 5 Existing Conditions 5 Market Conditions 5 Cherry Creek 5 City of Glendale 6 Downtown Denver 7 Market Opportunities and the Role of Transit 8 Current Transit Service 8 Bus to Bus Connection 8 Bus to Rail Connection 14 Stakeholder Input and Data 17 St akeholder Outreach 17 Key Discussion Points 17 Additional Stakeholder Data 18 Cherry Creek North Survey 18 Future Impacts to Transit 19 Future Market Conditions 19 Future Service Impacts 20 Future Opportunities and the Role of Transit 21 Transit Alternatives 22 No Change 22 New Shuttle Route 22 Enhanced T ransit Corridor 23 Recommendation 23

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DUS/Cherry Creek/Glendale Corridor Feasibility Study Page | 3 Alternative 1: Enhanced Transit Corridor (Preferred) 25 Service Elements 25 Alignment 25 Frequency and Service Span 26 Branding 26 Cost Projections 26 Alternative 2: New Shuttle Route 28 Service Elements 28 Alignment 28 Frequency and Service Span 29 Branding 29 Cost Projections 29 Stakeholder Feedback to Recommendations 30 Conclusion 33 Appendix 34

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DUS/Cherry Creek/Glendale Corridor Feasibility Study Page | 4 S TUDY P URPOSE The connection between Denver Union Station (DUS), Cherry Creek, and Glendale is a critical link for local and regional travel The corridor connecting these area s provide s access to key activity centers and employment hubs. Regional Transportation District (RTD) has commissioned a feasibility study to identify and evaluate options for transit service improvements within the study area bounded by DUS to the northwest and the City of Glendale to the southeast. T he study will analyze current and future market opportunities for transit, the performance of existing services, as well as stakeholder input to identify effective transit alternatives for the corridor. Transportation Solutions, a nonprofit transportation management association that serves the Southeast Denver area, provided financial and direct technical assistance for this study. M AP 1: P ROJECT S TUDY C ORRIDOR

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DUS/Cherry Creek/Glendale Corridor Feasibility Study Page | 5 D ATA S OURCES The following data sources were utilized to inform the study: ART Shuttle in Englewood Cherry Creek North Visitor Survey (2011) Cherry Creek North BID Cumulative Traffic Study (2013) Cherry Creek Area Plan (2012) City of Denver Speer/Leetsdale Travel Shed Cultural Connection Trolley Services Denver Strategic Transportation Plan (2008) Downtown Denver Circulator (2010) Downtown Denver Mobility and Access Plan Shuttle & Circulator Services Review & Evaluation (2008) Stakeholder Meeting (July 2013 and December 2013 ) RTD Ridership Regional t ravel demand data was not available for analysis. E XISTING C ONDITIONS Market Conditions Market factors such as population and employment density, development patterns, and proximity to pop ular destinations affect the dem and for tran sit service and are critical considerations for transit planning Together they identify what is necessary for transit to succeed within a market context and will be used to create a composite picture of where se rvice is most likely to generate ridership. Analyzing local m arket conditions will help with determining opportunities for transit, designing a serv ice with an effective route alignment, and determining appropriate service levels to meet projected demand Based on current market conditions, t he study corridor present s a number of positive opportunities for transit. It plays a pivotal role in facilitating mobility throughout the metropolitan area connecting the region to a number of popular destinations employment hubs, and residential centers C HERRY C REEK Cherry Creek l ocated about 3 miles southeast of downtown Denver hosts a number of retail, residential and commercial destinations (see Map 2) T he Cherry Creek Area Plan outlines strategies for continuing to shape Cherry Creek into a more vibrant and livable community that support s multi modal mobility The plan divides Cherry Creek into four sub areas : Cherry Creek East, Cherry Creek North Neighborhood, Cherry Creek Shopping District, and Cherry Creek Triangle. T he Cherry Creek Shopping District : Cherry Creek North shopping district and Cherry

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DUS/Cherry Creek/Glendale Corridor Feasibility Study Page | 6 Creek Shopping Center These upscale retail centers attract over 1.3 million visitors per month and contrib ute to the more than 14,000 jobs in the community These larger development s are contiguous to existing high er frequency transit service located on 1 st Avenue, a key mixed use corridor that serves Cherry Creek as well as the region (becoming Speer Boulevard to the west) Map 2: Cherry Creek Land Use C ITY OF G LENDALE T he City of Glendale contains a number of commercial establishments and houses Infinity Park, a world class rugby facility and events center The park is about mile from Colorado Boulevard, a primary gateway into Glendale. The city is also planning to develop t he Riverwalk a 1 million square foot entertainment district that aim s to become a local, regional, and international destination The project will include reta il, hospitality, and entertainment space as well as multi modal enhancements in the form of a bicycle and pedestrian path. In addition to generating additional tourism, the city is projected to experience a 50 percent growth in employment over the next 20 years.

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DUS/Cherry Creek/Glendale Corridor Feasibility Study Page | 7 Map 3: Glendale Land Use D OWNTOWN D ENVER Downtown Denver is a high density employment hub in the metropolitan region accounting for over 110,000 jobs. The current residential population in downtown Denver is 12,000 people, but this number is expected to grow by 100 percent within the next 20 years. In addition to traditional retail, dining, and commercial space downtown Denver attracts visitors to destinat ions such as Coors Stadium, Denver Convention Center, Denver Botanic Gardens, Elitch Gardens, Golden Triangle Museum District, Kirkland Museum of Fine and Decorative Art, Molly Brown House Museum, Pepsi Center, and University of Colorado Denver. Local resi dents, tourists and employees have access to Denver Union Station Market Street Station 1 and Civic Center Station for their transit mobility solutions which are connected by the 16 th Street Free Mall Ride and the upcoming Free MetroRide 1 Market Street Station will be replaced by the new Denver Union Station bus center.

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DUS/Cherry Creek/Glendale Corridor Feasibility Study Page | 8 M ARKET O PPORTUNITIES AND THE R OLE OF T RANSIT The scale of development and the concentrated distribution of employment, housing, and activity centers within the three communities make a large portion of the study corridor sustainable. Sustainable communiti es allow people to reach their residential, occupational, and recreational destinations with a decreased dependence on the automobile. T ransit will play a critical role in making active modes of transportation a sustainable lifestyle choice along the corri dor a s Glendale, Cherry Creek, and downtown Denver continue to intensify Transit plays an equally important role in supporting local economic activity throughout the corridor as evidenced by RTD current commute based service towards downtown Denver However, the corridor also contains important commercial, retail and entertainment venues in Cherry Creek and Glendale that are not well served by this commute focused transit Transit can help customers, visitors, and employees arrive at these other dest inations without the use of a private vehicle, reducing the impact on parking requirements and increasing the flexibility of local land uses. The importance of transit is emphasized even more during peak retail periods where parking becomes a constraint. I n order for transit to succeed in this role, all day service to and from the retail centers and other hubs of economic activity will need to be of greater emphasis. C URRENT T RANSIT S ERVICE While RTD operates a number of routes that vary in alignment and service level throughout the corridor, there is currently no single seat ride connecting Cherry Creek or Glendale with Denver Union Station That said, t ransit patrons do have one seat access to Civic Center Station where they transfer to t he very frequen t Free MallRide and upcoming Free MetroRide to Union Station. A key question for this study B US TO B US C ONNECTION Routes 83L, 79L, and 3L offer passengers a direct connection from Cherry Creek and Glendale to downtown Denver with service to Civic Center Station (see Map 4) Once at Civic Center Station passengers can complete their trip and connect to Denver Union St ation using the FREE 16th Street Mal l Ride a frequent service operating as often as every 1 minutes and the upcoming FREE MetroRide operating every 6 minutes during peak periods (see Map 5) S ER VICE D ESIGN D ECISIONS The following service characteristics a lignment and frequency are important design factors that impact service performance and how passengers utilize transit. The study describes the current service design decisions along the corridor and evaluates how they affect passengers and their exper ience on transit. Alig n ment The alignment of a route is the path that it takes to reach its destination. Direct alignments decrease travel time s which improves the passenger experience and reduces operating costs. Routes 83L, 79L, and 3L travel along the same, linear corridor between Glendale and Civic Center Station in downtown

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DUS/Cherry Creek/Glendale Corridor Feasibility Study Page | 9 Denver This is an effective corridor segment that provides direct service between key activity centers with minimal deviations The three routes branch out at Alameda Avenue/ Leetsdale Drive. Although these routes share the same alignment for a significant length, they are branded as separate services. However, RTD does market Route 79L with Route 83L. R oute 83L is an all day service that operates between the study corridor and Nine Mile Station. Route 79L a commute oriented, peak period service, duplicates alignment outside of the segment between Quebec Street and Nine Mile Station. Route 3L is also a peak period service and serves Aurora via Alameda Avenue. T he F REE 16 th Street MallRide connects the rest of the corridor from Civic Center Stat ion to Denver Union Station along 16 th Street. M AP 4 : B US TO B US C ONNECTIONS

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DUS/Cherry Creek/Glendale Corridor Feasibility Study Page | 10 M AP 5 : F REE 16 TH S TREET M ALL R IDE 2 Frequency Frequency refers to how often a bus operates. Spontaneous use services that operate every 15 minutes or better reduce out of vehicle wait time and allow passengers to arrive at a bus stop without consult ing a schedule At these service levels, transit becomes more attractive and a more viable mobility solution in sustainable communities. Table 1 summarizes the current service levels of the three corridor routes terminat ing at Civic Center Station. Route 83L is the only route that serves the corridor al l day. The other two routes are commute based services operating during the peaks. Individually, the routes do not operate at spontaneous use frequencies other than R oute 83L in one peak direction Routes 79L and 83L are coordinated for 15 minute reverse p eak headways. T ABLE 1: B US TO B US S ERVICE L EVELS Route Peak Off peak Span Inbound Outbound Inbound Outbound Start End 83L 15 20 30 30 5:00 AM 11:45 PM 79L 30 30 5:15 AM 7:15 PM 3L 20 30 5:45 AM 7:15 PM 2 Source: RTD.com

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DUS/Cherry Creek/Glendale Corridor Feasibility Study Page | 11 P ASSENGER E XPERIENCE This section details how the current design factors affect the passenger experience along the corridor between downtown Denver, Cherry Creek, and Glendale. Combined Peak Service Levels Routes 3L and 79L supplement 83L during the peak, adding between 2 an d 6 additional trips along the corridor. Although no individual route operates better than every 15 minutes, the combined level of peak service on the corridor averages to be as much as every 7 to 8 minutes if services are evenly spaced Figure 1 provides an example of the current peak frequencies for the three routes A 7 to 8 minute peak frequency on the corridor is a high level of service, but the frequency is most effective when passengers understand that it exists. The current service design distribute s the frequency across three separately branded routes and does not communicate the combined service levels along the corridor Passengers who wish to utilize the frequent service to travel within the corridor will have to understand how the three routes s upplement each other. Additionally, the combined services on the corridor are inconsistently space d The service levels average to a trip every 7 to 8 minutes on the corridor but the routes are not coordinated to arrive at even intervals. The Coordinated Schedule in Figure 1 shows how improved synchronization between the three routes can benefit service on the corridor without additional investments F IGURE 1: AM W ESTBOUND F REQUENCY C OMPARISON 3 Commute Oriented Service Figure 2 highlights the change in frequency between the peak and off peak. Route 83L currently provides 30 minute off peak frequency and is the only route operating during this period of time This 3 Frequency comparison evaluated the frequency of buses by route at the 1 st Ave and University Blvd bus stop 0.00 0.50 1.00 1.50 2.00 2.50 3.00 6:00 AM 6:30 AM 7:00 AM 7:30 AM 8:00 AM 8:30 AM 9:00 AM AM Peak Westbound Frequency Comparison 83L (20 Min) 79L (30 Min) 3L (20 Min) Coordinated Schedule (8 Min) Combined Schedule (8 Min Average)

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DUS/Cherry Creek/Glendale Corridor Feasibility Study Page | 12 drop in off peak frequency combined with additional service towards downtown Denver in the morning and outbound in the afternoon show the commute oriented configuration of the current transit services along the corridor. The service is not positioned to effectively connect destinations in Cherry Creek and Glendale that ge nerate demand for transit throughout the day. As the communities in the study area continue to develop in density and sustainability, the demand for all day, bi directional transit will increase. The feasibility study will incorporate findings from the an alysis of current and future market conditions with the service performance data to identify the appropriate level of off peak service. F IGURE 2: C OMBINED P EAK AND O FF P EAK F REQUENCY P ERFORMANCE The following sections summarize the key findings from the individual route level analysis. R oute profiles that provide additional details about individual route s are located in the appendix. T ABLE 2 : B US TO B US R OUTE P ERFORMANCE Route Revenue Hours Boar dings Passengers per Revenue Hour 83L 69 3 741 55 79L 23 765 34 3L 13 646 49 Route 83L Route 83L i s the most productive route of the three services connect ing to Civic Center, generating 55 passenger boardings per revenue hour. About 36 percent of R occur between downtown Denver (Civic Center) and Cherry Creek (1 st Ave/Fillmore Plaza) productivity is well above the system average which indicat es a higher demand for service than is currently being supplied Additionally, t he route consistently attracts a high number of passengers during t he midday reinforc ing the importance of off peak service through the corridor. 0.00 0.50 1.00 1.50 2.00 2.50 7:30 AM 8:00 AM 8:30 AM 9:00 AM 9:30 AM 10:00 AM 10:30 AM Peak vs. Off Peak Frequency Comparison Combined Service Level 83L 79L 3L

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DUS/Cherry Creek/Glendale Corridor Feasibility Study Page | 13 Routes 79L Route 79L a chieves below average productivity while serving 765 passengers per weekday The resulting performance may be due to duplicative alignment with 83L the more frequent, all day service The unique segment of Route 79L does not generate enough ridership to increase its productivity to the route gro up average. About 45 percent of R oute 79L passenger activity occurs between the Civic Center Station and Glendale a long the study corridor Route 3L Route 3L c onnects with park and ride facilities as well as transfer hubs. While 3L has the 10 th highest productivity in the RTD bus network it requires a high su bsidy per passenger due to the peak directional orientation of the service. I t runs few trips, so the number of boardings is small relative to a route such as 83L.

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DUS/Cherry Creek/Glendale Corridor Feasibility Study Page | 14 B US T O R AIL C ONNECTION Passengers wishing to connect between downtown Denver, Cherry Creek and Glendale can also use a combination of bus and rail service s to access the corridor. RTD bus R outes 3, 40, and 46 connect directly to light rail at Colorado or Alameda Stations S ER VICE D ESIGN Alignment Routes 40 and 46 serve t he Colorado station which is 2 miles south of the Speer/ 1 st / Leetsdale corridor. Passengers with origins or destinations along Colorado Boulevard or connecting to other transit routes will most likely use Route 40 over Route 46 due to its direct alignment to or from the station Route 46 does serve the major destinations in both Glendale and Cherry Creek, but via a s l ow, circuitous route alignment. Regardless of choosing either Route 40 or 46 from rail, only t ravelers coming from the southeast Metro region would use this rail to bus connection to Glendale or Cherry Creek due to the much longer travel times from elsewhere in the region (e.g., DUS). Route 3 offers limited, hourly direct service between Glendale, Cherry Creek, and Alameda Station via its long line alignment Alameda Station is about 2 mile s south of Civic Center Station but require less out of direction travel for most regional travelers Passengers at Alameda Station can use Light Rail Lines C an d E to reach DUS and complete their trip.

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DUS/Cherry Creek/Glendale Corridor Feasibility Study Page | 15 M AP 6 : B US TO R AIL C ONNECTIONS Frequency levels drop during the off peak but the route still operates at a spontaenous use frequency. Route 3 runs as often as every 15 minutes during the pea k, but will only serve the study corridor about once an hour (see Table 3) T ABLE 3: B US TO R AIL S ERVICE L EVELS Route Peak Off peak Span Northbound/ Eastbound Southbound/ Westbound Northbound/ Eastbound Southbound/ Westbound Start End 40 10 min 10 min 15 min 15 min 4:15 AM 12:30 AM 46 30 30 30 30 4:30 AM 10:00 PM 3 60 60 60 60 4:30 AM 10:00 PM *Route 3 operates different trip patterns. The pattern that serves Cherry Creek and Glendale runs onc e an hour

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DUS/Cherry Creek/Glendale Corridor Feasibility Study Page | 16 P ASSENGER E XPERIENCE Route 40 versus Route 46 The two routes are currently branded separately but their service areas overlap between Cherry Creek and the rail station along Colorado Boulveard. Most passengers will use Route 40 to connect to Colorado LRT Station due to the higher frequency, direct alignment, and quicker travel time s The transit market that is unique to Route 46 is much more limited despite its connections to both Glendale and Cherry Creek Connecting into Alameda Station The total travel time from Glendale to Denver Union St ation via Route 3 and LRT Line s C or E at the Alameda Station is short h owever, the R oute 3 60 minute frequency limit s the viability of this option when passengers have access to more frequent service options. Using Rail or FREE MallRide into DUS The est imated travel times for riding the corridor via bus or rail services are listed in the appendix. The overall times for connecting into DUS via corridor bus and the FREE MallRide is as fast or faster than the times for travelling via rail. The MallRide runs often enough to make the free transfer at Civic Center Station almost sea mless. P ERFORMANCE Route 40 Route 40 o perates on Colorado Boulevard, a key spine in the RTD network. The route s importan ce to the overall transit network is reflected in its 6,000 daily boardings the 6 th highest in the system and productivity of 46 passengers per revenue hour. Within the study area, Route 40 generates a significant amount of ridership in Glendale The rou te attracts fewer riders in Cherry Creek which may be due to Creek may pursue other transit alternatives to connect into downtown. Route 46 A large amo unt of the total passenger activity, over 28 percent occurs at Colorado Station However, the route still performs below the system average because Route 40 often presents the more convenient alternative for passengers looking to connect into the rail lines at Colorado S tation. Route 3 Route 3 only provides 60 minute service to Cherry Creek and Glendale during the week Overall Route 3 performs at an above average level, but the large majority of its ridership is generated outside of the study area. The segment through Cherry Creek and Glendale accounts for just 25 percent of passenger activity and primarily serves as a regional connection into the Centerpoint and Sable Transfer Center.

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DUS/Cherry Creek/Glendale Corridor Feasibility Study Page | 17 S TAKEHOLDER I NPUT AND D ATA S TAKEHOLDER O UTREACH A stakeholder meeting was held in Denver i n July 2013 to discuss the feasibility study The purpose of the meeting was to go over proje ct objectives solicit feedback, and identify additional data sources for conducting the study analysis The following organizations were represented: Regional Transportation District Transportation Solutions Capitol Hill United Neighborhoods Charter Realty Group Cherry Creek Steering Committee City of Denver Denver Department of Public Works Downtown Denver Partnership Golden Triangle Museum District History Colorado The Oxford Hotel Visit Denver K EY D ISCUSSION P OINTS In order to design a service, it will be important to understand who the target customer is Transit can be designed to attract different market segments of customers based on passenger amenities, service alignment, and frequency. The current service is de signed to target work commutes. S takeholders brought up the importance of tourists and finding a way to make transit appeal to them. Where do passengers want to go? Employees/residents and tourists have different mobility needs. Stakeholders emphasized ho w regional visitors arrive into DUS wanting a one seat ride to Cherry Creek and Glendale. Is there one solution for both? Is there overlap between the market segments? The last mile problem: How to get passengers to their final destination after taking tr ansit? This was raised as an issue for a number of potential destinations and origins like the Museum District, Infinity Park, and the Convention Center. What should the connection into DUS be, bus or rail? Stakeholders discussed travel times between taki ng the bus, light rail, and driving. Stakeholders felt that p ublic transit was fairly competitive with the private automobile with respect to travel times. The bus was discussed more often as an alternative for transit. Although Routes 83L and 46 operate i n Cherry Creek and Glendale, the two routes fill different roles within the market.

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DUS/Cherry Creek/Glendale Corridor Feasibility Study Page | 18 Cherry Creek lacks a transit hub Cherry Creek is not connected to FasTraks and lacks an identifiable hub for transit. The c urrent service is not branded Branding makes tourists and other passengers aware of the options that are out there. The possible options are to brand the vehicle or the corridor, creat ing a gateway for transit in Cherry Creek and Glendale. branded shutt le service was not successful. RTD created a branded shuttle 10 years ago. The agency bough t rubber tired trolleys that ran every hour. It and was not considered successful. Current service doe s not have frequency Frequency is a very important issue for passengers. The current 83L service is not frequent enough and used to run more often. Attracting families to transit will be difficult. Transit is cost prohibitive for families. Driving and pa ying for parking is often the more affordable alternative. Stakeholders want information on costs. The costs for each alternative need to be provided. Data needs for the feasibility study. The feasibility study will benefit from data that details tourist and local travel behavior. Zip code data from stores, major retailers, or cultural destinations. A DDITIONAL S TAKEHOLDER D ATA C HERRY C REEK N ORTH S URVEY RRC Associates conducted a visitor sur vey for Cherry Creek North in F all 2011 S urvey respondents answered questions that dealt with issues such as trip purpose, trip origin, as well as mode of transportation (see Figure 3) Of the 1,400 visitors who completed a survey, more than 25 percent of the m arrived at Cherry Creek by bicycle, bus, or walking The high share of arrivals via sustainable travel and the potential response to improved transit options F IGURE 3 : C HERRY C REEK N ORTH M ODE A CCESS 72% 3% 3% 1% 19% 2% Cherry Creek North Mode of Access Automobile Bus Bicycle B-Cycle Program Walk Other

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DUS/Cherry Creek/Glendale Corridor Feasibility Study Page | 19 The majority of visitors 8 9 percent, lived within the Denver Metro area and more than 60 percent were from the City of Denver (see Table 4) Not surprisingly, local residents frequented Cherry Creek North more often than non local residents (see Table 5) In order to increase the number of trips by transit to destinations in Cherry Creek and Glendale it will be just as important to understand the mobility need s of local residents as it is to understand the needs of non local visitors Local residents make up a significant share of the retail customers in Cherry Creek, and their proximity to the area make them a key market for transit. This also emphasizes the i mportance of Speer Boulevard and 1 st Avenue, key corridors that will connect downtown Denver with the key destinations in Glendale and Cherry Creek as well as the Alameda corridor connecting Aurora to the east T ABLE 4 : P RIMARY R ESIDENCE OF C HERRY C REEK N ORTH V ISITORS City within the State of Colorado Denver 822 64% Aurora 222 17% All Other 116 9% Centennial 43 3% Cherry Hills 21 2% Evergreen 19 2% Arvada 15 1% Boulder 15 1% Littleton 15 1% Total responses 1,289 100% T ABLE 5 : M EDIAN N UMBER OF VISITORS TO C HERRY C REEK PER M ONTH Median Number of Trips to Cherry Creek North per Month Local resident 5 Colorado resident 2 Overall 4 F UTURE I MPACTS TO T RANSIT F UTURE M ARKET C ONDITIONS F uture development over the next 10 years will bring over 4 million square feet of new commercial, retail and residential uses along the study corridor. The study will highlight key developments in downtown Denver, Golden Triangle Museum District, Cherry C reek, and Glendale. Identifying these investments will be critical for understanding how the future market conditions will impact the demand for transit

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DUS/Cherry Creek/Glendale Corridor Feasibility Study Page | 20 D ENVER U NION S TATION AND D OWNTOWN Denver Union Station is currently under construction and is slated to open in 2014. The development will be a multimodal hub for Amtrak, FasTracks and RTD services It will feature a 22 bay bus complex that integrates local, regional, and express bus services. DUS will also include up to 2 million square feet of transit oriented, mixed use development in the form of residential, office, retail, and recreation al space. The sustainable development supporting the DUS renovation local as well as regi onal mobility. G OLDEN T RIANGLE M USEUM D ISTRICT Located in the southern portion of downtown Denver, the Golden Triangle Museum District hosts the nationally recognized Denver Art Museum high rise condominium units and civic establishments such as th e central Denver Public Library and Lindsey Flanigan Courthouse The Golden Triangle Museum District will continu e to build upon its housing density. The most notable residential infill projects are located at 1000 Speer Boulevard (20 stories) and 8 th Stre et / Lincoln Street (7 stories). C HERRY C REEK Cherry Creek is set to add an additional one million square feet of development, namely in the Cherry Creek North Business Improvement District (BID). E ight projects have been approved and are under constructi on or close to groundbreaking with an additional eight more in the planning stages. Some of t he plans include 250 Columbine a mixed use development which will house business space and residential units the relocation of the Adolph Coors Foundation headqu arters to Cherry Creek and multiple high r ise complexes that offer retail and commercial uses on the ground floor All planned developments are within a half mile of the Speer/Leetsdale corridor the walking distance range attracted to high quality bus or rail transit C ITY OF G LENDALE T he City of Glendale has an economic development project underway called the Glendale River W alk Master Plan (GRMP) which will add over one million square feet of entertainment, retail, restaurant, hotel and concert space. This development is projected to become a regional, national, and international destination The Glendale RiverWalk development further emphasize s the need and opportunity for transit that is bi directionally focused along the corridor. F UTURE S ERVICE I MPACTS 18 TH /19 TH S TREET F REE M ETRO R IDE RTD will begin operating the Free MetroRide in Spring 2014. The previously n amed Downtown Denver Circulator provides another connection between Civic Center Station and Denver Union Station (see Map 7) It will operate as a peak based service that parallels the current FREE MallRide along 18 th and 19 th Street s This new service will increase connectivity between Civic Center and DUS which will benefit passengers who use 83L, 79L, and 3L to access DUS and other locations in downtown Denver

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DUS/Cherry Creek/Glendale Corridor Feasibility Study Page | 21 M AP 7 : F REE M ALL R IDE AND F REE M ETRO R IDE F UTURE O PPORTUNITIES AND THE R OLE OF T RANSIT The study area is expecte d to experience significant sustainable community growth in the future with o ver 4 million square feet of planned development occurring on or near the corridor. Th is h igher density housing, mixed use developments and regional attractors in downtown Denver, Cherry Creek, and Glendale will require that the transit focus shift away from a commute, downtown based service to all day, high frequency transit serving all trip types and consumers Transit will also continue to evolve in downtown Denv er. In addition to the new Denver Union Station (DUS), RTD will initiate a second downtown shuttle, Free MetroRide reinforc ing the connection between DUS and Civic Center Station Passengers who use Routes 83L, 79L, or 3L to connect into Civic Center Sta tion will have more frequent service to DUS during the peak, making these services more attractive options for travelling the corridor. Two free high frequency connectors between Civic Center persons traveling between downtown FREE MallRide 1.5 3 min all day frequencies Free MetroRide 6 minute peak only frequencies

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DUS/Cherry Creek/Glendale Corridor Feasibility Study Page | 22 T RANSIT A LTERNATIVES This section of the feasibility study evaluate s t ransit alternatives for addressing the current and projected transit needs between Cherry Creek/Glendale and downtown Denver The following set of transit alternatives are developed b ased on stakeholder input and performance analysis. 4 1. No Change 2. New Shuttle Route 3. Enhanced Transit Corri dor The alte rnatives aim to create a more integrated and comprehensive transit experience along the Speer/Leetsdale corridor that first meets that needs of the Cherry Creek and Glendale communities, and, second serves the mobility needs of Denver Metro resident s visitors, and commuters A lternatives were developed that respond to the need for an affirmative transit experience for a broad range of consumers : Create a corridor that is easy to use and understand Support spontaneous use and a positive wait experience Establish fast and reliable travel times Connect service into a sustainable community experience N O C HANGE T he first option maintain s current service levels and alignment with minor changes in scheduling to provide the service more effectively Routes 3L, 79L, and 83L combine to provide spontaneous use frequencies during the peak, but the current timing between trips is not consistent. The m inor adjustments in the low investment no change alternative include establishing a more consistent frequency along the Speer/Leetsdale corridor This would improve peak period, peak direction service on the corridor, but transit would still not be in the position to serve the growing demand for bi directional service in Glendale and Cherry Cr eek In addition, this alternative maintain s the current off peak frequencies which would keep transit commute focused and limit its viability as an all day mobility solution N EW S HUTTLE R OUTE The New Shuttle Route alternative creat es a one seat ride bet ween DUS Glendale, and Cherry Creek This alternative is focused on the non peak, non commute service. T he market for the new shuttle is oriented to very specific groups or transit non users such as regional visitors, convention attendees, as well as resi dents and visitors from the Golden Triangle. 4 There are no recommended improvements for the connections to LRT. First, traveling from downtown Denver to either Cherry Creek or Glendale via LRT connecting to bus was not competitive with the more direct route via Spe er/1 st Second, existing Route 40 on Colorado Boulevard is a spontaneous use bus service that efficiently and effectively connects LRT to the study area for patrons from the Southeast Metro Region.

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DUS/Cherry Creek/Glendale Corridor Feasibility Study Page | 23 Being a fully separate shuttle brand, t h is alternative will have limited synergy with the existing RTD transit network. I t s service connection duplicates two key services in Route 83L and the FREE MallRide. How ever, t is not likely to decrease the productivity and effectiveness of existing R outes 3L, 79L 83L and MallRide, but rather reach a new audience for transit Although the current service configuration forces a transfer in order to travel the entire corridor, the benefit of a one seat ride is minimized when the current transfer is made seamless via high frequency connections at Civic Center Station The new shu ttle will have to generate a high level ridership from its unique market segments in order to be cost effective E NHANCED T RANSIT C ORRIDOR T h e E nhanced T ransit C orridor option establishes a branded corridor along Speer Boulevard and 1 ST Avenue The servi ces along the Speer/Leetsdale corridor offer the most direct alignment and maximize connectivity at Civic Center Station where passengers can access DUS via two free, high frequency shuttles. In the Enhanced Transit Corridor alternative, the focus will be on the corridor and less on individual routes much like an arterial version of the US 36 BRT corridor R TD will be able to run multiple services on the corridor and unify them through branding along the corridor. Branded shelters, pylons, or information kiosks act as signal s for a high quality experience and inform passengers that they will be able to take a ny service on this corridor and reach the same destination s between Glendale and downtown D e n ver The Enhanced Transit Corridor leverages the existing network and ridership base providing scalable, incremental change that does not exclude other enhanceme nts on the corridor. The objective of this alternative is to invest in the corridor and coordinate services in order to achieve spontaneous use frequencies. The high service levels and ease of use support sustainable development and attract passengers from a broad cross section of market segments. The Enhanced Transit Corridor alternative does not limit expanding the brand onto other streets such as Leetsdale Drive as part of future scalability R ECOMMENDATION The Speer/Leetsdale corridor between d owntown Denver Cherry Creek and Glendale offers transit service that must be designed to meet the varying needs of a n increasingly diverse customer base Three alternatives were considered for improving service along the study corridor. Based on analysis the Enhanced Transit Corridor is the preferred transit alternative. This alternative addresses many of the issues with the current service configuration while position ing transit to successfully meet the future demand. However, the preferred Enhanced Transit Corridor alternative need not be the only improvement. While it is not the preferred alternative, the New Shuttle can also serve, albeit in a more limited role, augmenting the Enhanced Transit Corridor. This more limited role would involve a private sector initiative (RTD funding is recommended only for the Enhanced Transit Corridor) that focuses on small market segments that have special mobility needs and opportunities. These can include Convention

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DUS/Cherry Creek/Glendale Corridor Feasibility Study Page | 24 Center activities or other special events that Cherry Cr eek and Glendale wish to leverage or special seasonal demand that generates enough demand to support the shuttle costs. The study will outline a pilot shuttle route using private funding as a second alternative for the corridor.

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DUS/Cherry Creek/Glendale Corridor Feasibility Study Page | 25 A LTERNATIVE 1 : E NHANCE D T RANSIT C ORRIDOR (P REFERRED ) S ERVICE E LEMENTS A LIGNMENT The proposed corridor for enhancement is the one that the routes 83L and 79L currently operate on between Glendale Cherry Creek, and Civic Center Station : starting in Glendale where Leetsdale and Alameda converge, following Alameda Avenue Cherry Creek North Drive 1st Avenue S peer Boulevard and Lincoln /Broadway to Civic Center Station (see Map 8) A termi nal for short line routes (Civic Center Station to Glendale) could be located behind the Glendale Target providing transit connections to Route 1, with nearby on street connections to Routes 40 and 46. M AP 8 : E NHANCED T RANSIT C ORRIDOR R OUT E A LIGNMENT

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DUS/Cherry Creek/Glendale Corridor Feasibility Study Page | 26 F REQUENCY AND S ERVICE S PAN The frequency should be set to a level that is consistent with sustainable, urban living standards. A 7 minute peak frequency and 15 minute off peak frequency will be established in both directions Daily service operations would be consistent with the curre nt 83L service span from 5:00am to 11:45pm B RANDING Enhanced branding along the corridor will make transit easier to use. B rand ing focuses customer attention on the corridor and the high frequency connection between Glendale Cherry Creek, and downtown Denver rather than individual routes RTD, along with stakeholder input, will need to d evelop a branding scheme that compliment s the local communities While a new RTD enhanced service brand needs to be on all of the passenger facili ties to communicate with customers, those facilities can be tailored to enhance Branded i nfrastructure and improvements can include enhanced shelters with next trip displays, information pylons, bicycle storage, pavement and sidewalk markings and priority treatments like transit only lanes and transit signal priority technology RTD should al so explore the idea of rebranding the three routes on the corridor to unify them. Routes 83L, 79L, and 3L share similar alignment s but they are branded as separate routes. Passengers will have to work to understand their similarities. Branding the routes with a similar prefix will continue to shift the customer focus onto the corridor. As an example, the three routes can be branded as 83P (Parker), 83Q (Quebec), and 83A (Alameda). Under this scheme passengers will know that route with an 83 will provide them the same service between Glendale and downtown Denver. Passengers who wish to travel outside of the corridor will not have to learn any more information than passengers utilizing the existing service configuration. C OST P ROJECTIONS The projected operating costs for this preferred alternative will cost approximately $ 960,000 annually without capital improvements This total is in addition to the cost of running the existing service levels. Cost estimates are based on an $80 per hour cost for directly operated bus service. T ransit priority investments can improve bus operating speeds enough so that the time savings can be re invested to run the additional service and offset some of the costs. Additional fare revenue from increased ridership

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DUS/Cherry Creek/Glendale Corridor Feasibility Study Page | 27 is also expected to offset part of the new expenses. 5 RTD has also discussed repurposing funds from existing, u n der productive routes such as Route 46 to fund the service investments. Table 6: Enhanced Transit Corridor WEEKDAY COST Time Period Additional Buses Hours of Service Revenue Hours Operating Cost 6 Peak 1 6 6 $480 Midday 3 6 18 $1,440 Evening 3 3 9 $720 Daily 33 $2,640 Table 7: Enhanced Transit Corridor WEEKEND COST Day Type Additional Buses Hours of Service Revenue Hours Operating Cost Saturday 3 11 33 $2,640 Sunday 3 11 33 $2,640 Table 8: Enhanced Transit Corridor ANNUAL COST Day Type Additional Buses Revenue Hours Operating Cost Weekday 3 8,415 $673,200 Weekend 3 3,630 $290,400 Annual 3 12,045 $ 963,6 00 5 If the additional revenue hours are half as productive (i.e., 50% frequency elasticity), this proposed route would 6 All Enhanced Transit Corridor operating costs calculated at $80 per revenue hour for direct operation.

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DUS/Cherry Creek/Glendale Corridor Feasibility Study Page | 28 A LTERNATIVE 2: N EW S HUTTLE R OUTE S ERVICE E LEMENTS A LIGNMENT The New Shuttle Route alternative provide s a one seat ride from DUS to Cherry Creek and Glendale. The new shuttle shares its alignment with services along the enhanced transit corridor east of Broadway and Lincoln Street. Although the shuttle can arrive at DUS via different alignments t he study proposes two possible routes Alternative A uses S peer Boulevard to connect with DUS which minimizes duplication with existing RTD services Alternative B provides service along Broadway and Lincoln Street before travelling into and out of downtown via one way cou plets, 14 th and 15 th Streets which provide direct access to the Convention Center M AP 9 : N EW S HUTTLE R OUTE A LIGNMENT

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DUS/Cherry Creek/Glendale Corridor Feasibility Study Page | 29 F REQUENCY AND S ERVICE S PAN The dedicated new shuttle route targets non commuters during the off peak and PM peak hours. The suggested minimum level of service for this travel market would be every 30 minute s The suggested operating hours are fro m 9:00 AM to 9:00 PM daily in order to provide service to the retail, dining, and entertainment destinations. B RANDING The shuttle branding will be an opportunity to represent the parties who fund the shuttle and the communities it serves The shuttle vehicle will typically b e sm aller than standard local buses. C OST P ROJECTIONS The 30 minute service l evels would require 2 vehicles to operate T he project annual operating cost for the dedicated route would total $438,000 a year or $36,500 a month at a contracted hourly rate of $50 per hour. A potential pilot service could be implemented during the holiday season to target the higher levels of retail activity or during a series of large conventions Funding from external sources such as local businesses and other organizations that benefit from providing a shuttle would be needed to operate the servi ce F arebox r evenue is not expected due to the target market audience for this route. Table 9: New Shuttle Route Cost Vehicle Requirement Hours of Service Revenue Hours Cost Daily 2 12 24 $1,200 Monthly 2 360 720 $36, 000 Annually 2 4,3 8 0 8, 760 $438,000 at Miami In l Mall

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DUS/Cherry Creek/Glendale Corridor Feasibility Study Page | 30 S TAKEHOLDER F EEDBACK TO R ECOMMENDATIONS The findings and draft recommendations were presented to stakeholders in November 2013. T he stakeholders had a n overall positive response to the recommendations. The subsequents comments were provided dur ing the meeting and through e mail in response to the draft recommendations Relevant responses follow the stak eholder comments. The following organizations were in attendance : Regional Transportation District Transportation Solutions Capitol Hill United Neighborhoods Cherry Creek East Cherry Creek North Cherry Creek Steering Committee Cherry Creek Shopping Center City of Denver City of Glendale Denver Department of Public Works Downtown Denver Partnership Golden Triangle Museum District INC Visit Denver General Feedback Comments It will be important to understand the purpose of the service enhancements. What is the objective: to address a mobility need, an economic development need, or serve a specific market? The existing service currently does a good job serving commuters but misses the other markets. Responses The current service configuration is commute oriented. However, t he development patterns along the study corridor are generating new mobility needs and opportunities for transit as well as walking and biking. The demand for high frequency, all day transit service will increase as this type of development continues to shape the corridor. Enhanced Transit Corridor Comments Branding Broadway is not feasib le because many other routes operate on it However, t here is the potential to brand it as the Golden Triangle. Communication is critical for the success of the service and its branding.

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DUS/Cherry Creek/Glendale Corridor Feasibility Study Page | 31 There is an o pportunity to integrate the branded shelters with the community aesthetic. This alternative will allow people to travel both ways. Branding the trunk of the corridor through unified route names is an excellent idea. The alternative will be successful if it m ake s transit simple for other people to use. The alternative makes sense, especially for more frequent off peak service. A pilot should be developed to determine feasibility. Prior to the pilot, the following steps should be taken: Civic Center Station should be more recognizable. The signage is poor at the station. There should be a next trip display at the loop where people get off the shuttle which would include information for trips to the Cherry Creek Glendale corridor. Conside r a stop at Grant Street and Washington Street. Evaluate the stop at Speer and Lafayette. Consider a short line route that travels between Civic Center and Glendale or Cherry Creek The concept of a branded corridor will create opportunities for a public private partnership that pairs high quality, frequent transit service with high quality stops. The ability to create incremental change makes for short and long term actions that can better service an expanding market for transit. Responses Branding the B roadway/Lincoln segment of the corridor as the Golden Triangle is a good idea for further discussion. If the community supports the concept, branded kiosks or pylons can provide relevant transit and wayfinding information. Appropriate information about se rvice to Cherry Creek and Glendale should be provided at the Civic Center Station. A short line segment between Civic Center and Glendale was considered. The current enhanced transit corridor recommendation can achieve 7 minute service during the peak wi thout a short line route however, it remains a scalable future option if needed New Shuttle Route Comments The proposed alignment on 14 th and 15 th Streets features h igh levels of density DUS is the logical destination for the private shuttle Regional visitors who travel to DUS usually go to destinations such as the Denver Convention Center They go to Cherry Creek Mall on the second day of their visit. If private parties fund the shuttle, then they will control where the shuttle stops. This will require extra coordination with RTD to ensure compatibility with RTD stops. Local organizations are currently in discussions to develop a private ly funded shutt le. The emphasis for this alternative is to get riders from DUS to Cherry Creek or Glendale, but it is doubtful that riders arriving at DUS will be interested in going directly to Cherry Creek. It is more likely that they will be going to the Convention C enter, hotels, or other cultural attractions. The same goes for the reverse direction. Riders originating in Cherry Creek or Glendale are unlikely headed directly to DUS but to destinations short of DUS.

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DUS/Cherry Creek/Glendale Corridor Feasibility Study Page | 32 Speed is not an emphasis as non commuters are not concerned about making connections. Many of the target riders are not familiar with the RTD system and will need a unique service that takes them to their destination. These passengers will not be concerned with speed but w ith making sure that they reach their destination. Use 14 th and 15 th Street to travel to and from DUS. The route includes Convention Center, the Plex, major hotels, the cultural center, the Museum of Contemporary Art, and shopping. Denve r has invested in both 14 th and 15 th Streets which are becoming more important corridors Running the shuttle on these streets can also help attract the Convention Center and Visitor Center as sponsors. Consider connecting downtown, Cherry Creek, and Glen dale via some more dense residential areas rather than Speer Boul e vard. Consider using smaller, distinctive vehicles similar to those used by San Antonio or Georgetown. Smaller vehicles are less intimidating. The concept of a private shuttle service is p romising. Responses The final alignment and stop list of a privately funded shuttle will require a discussion with the funders and RTD. 14 th and 15 th Streets have positive market conditions The service coverage overlap with the FREE MallRide would likel y have a negative e ffect on ridership for the new shuttle within downtown. A majority of regional passengers arriving into DUS will not connect into Cherry Creek and Glendale as their first destination. The market for a one seat ride between DUS, Cherry C reek, and Glendale is limited and is best served via private entities. An enhanced transit corridor can make transit service as easy to use as a one seat shuttle ride.

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DUS/Cherry Creek/Glendale Corridor Feasibility Study Page | 33 C ONCLUSION The Denver Union Station/Cherry Creek/Glendale transit corridor plays a key role in facilitating local and regional mobility. The corridor hosts a number of civic establishments, employment hubs, retail centers, and entertainment destinations that generate millions of visits per year. The development patterns and concentration o f key destinations within the three communities make the corridor a good candidate for enhanced transit In this environment, transit can play a key role in supporting centers of eco nomic activity and promoting sustainable lifestyles. However, t he c urrent transit service within the corridor is focused around the work commute towards downtown Denver Regional Transportation District (RTD) commissioned a feasibility study to evaluate th e current service configuration and identify opportunities for improvements. After evaluating existing and future market conditions, service performance, and stakeholder feedback, t he study proposed three alternatives: No Change, New Shuttle Route, and Enh anced Transit Corridor. Of the three, the Enhanced Transit Corridor was identified as the preferred alternative. This alternative creates a branded corridor where passengers can connect to downtown Denver and Glendale every 7 and 15 minutes during the pea k and off peak respectively The targeted transit enhancements make the service easier to use and understand making t ransit a more attractive option for all day travel between the communities. The preferred alternative addresses short term mobility needs while positioning the corridor to successfully meet long term demand through scalable improvement The New Shuttle Route serves a limited market, but is recommended for consideration as a privately funded service The one seat ride between DUS and Glenda le is designed to attract non commuters and regional visitors who arrive into DUS. While the service is projected to generate lower levels of ridership due to duplication with existing RTD services and limited demand for the connection, a pilot project can be implemented during the holiday season to capture the demand for service to the retail centers along year round or seasonal service.

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DUS/Cherry Creek/Glendale Corridor Feasibility Study Page | 34 A PPENDIX Existing Travel Time The following table s provide a representative sample of alternative travel options to DUS from Cherry Creek and Glendale. Once passengers board a route, it will should take them between 30 to 40 minutes to travel the length of the pro ject corridor. The scheduled speeds on the corridor are about 15 miles per hour. C URRENT B US TO B US R OUTING O PTIONS 7 Running Time AM Peak Inbound Glendale to DUS Running Time Transfer Time (mins) Total Travel Time (mins) Route 1st Route 2nd Route 83L to MallRide 16 14.5 0.75 3 1.25 79L to MallRide 16 14.5 0.75 3 1.25 3L to MallRide 16 14.5 0.75 3 1.25 Running Time PM Peak Outbound DUS to Glendale Running Time Transfer Time (mins) Total Travel Time (mins) Route 1st Route 2nd Route MallRide to 83L 14.5 23 7.5 45 MallRide to 79L 14.5 23 15 52.5 MallRide to 3L 14.5 23 15 52.5 C URRENT B US TO R AIL R OUTING O PTIONS Running Time AM Peak Inbound Glendale to DUS Running Time Transfer Time (mins) Total Travel Time (mins) Route 1st Route 2nd Route 40 to LRT 16 20 15 51 46 to LRT 19 20 15 54 3 to LRT 16 12 10 3 8 Running Time PM Peak Outbound DUS to Glendale Running Time Transfer Time (mins) Total Travel Time (mins) Route 1st Route 2nd Route LRT to 40 20 14 5 3 7 LRT to 46 20 20 15 4 3 LRT to 3 11 25 30 6 6 7 Trip is calculated based on in vehicle time for the first and second routes plus the average wait time to transfer ( of the second route frequency).

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DUS/Cherry Creek/Glendale Corridor Feasibility Study Page | 35 Route Profiles The following pages include d etailed route profiles and boarding maps that provide further insight into the operation and performance of individual route s.

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DUS/Cherry Creek/Glendale Corridor Feasibility Study Page | 48 Boardings Total boardings by individual route provides an important performance measurement, but overall ridership helps to evaluate performance on the The map below provides the total weekday combined boardings by direction for Routes 3L, 79L and 83L. Offering peak commute only service, Routes 3L and 79L are much smaller in total boardings than 83L. The majority of service boardings occur along Route 83L due to all day service spans and increased service levels

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