Citation
East Montclair / East Colfax neighborhood plan

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Title:
East Montclair / East Colfax neighborhood plan
Creator:
Community Planning and Development, City and County of Denver
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
City and County of Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English

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Subjects / Keywords:
Colfax Avenue (Denver, Colo.)
Community planning
Neighborhood plans
Spatial Coverage:
Denver -- Montclair

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Full Text
PLATE 33
East Montclair / East Colfax Neighborhood Pun
PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT OFFICE
FEBRUARY CITY AND COUNTY OF DENVER 1994


East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Acknowledgements.............................................................. page 1
Introduction.................................................................... page 3
Vision for the Future
Priority Planning Issues
Location and Description
Neighborhood History
Map of Denver Neighborhoods
Use of the Plan................................................................. page 9
The Action Agenda
Means of Plan Implementation
Residents, Businesses, and Governmental Resources Working Together for Plan
Implementation
Urban Design.................................................................... page 13
Land Use and Zoning............................................................. page 25
Transportation.................................................................. page 33
Business Revitalization......................................................... page 43
Housing......................................................................... page 53
Public Safety and Crime Prevention.............................................. page 61
Community Facilities............................................................ page 65
Appendix A -Population.......................................................... page 72
Population
Income
Age Profile
Ethnic Composition
Appendix B -Housing............................................................. page 74
Housing Units
Owner/Renter Occupied
Household Profile
Housing Transaction Prices
Appendix C -Businesses.......................................................... page 76
Summary of Business Survey
Approved by the Denver Planning B oard November 3,1993
Approved by the Denver City Council January 31,1994
Effective date of Ordinance 58 (Series of 1994) is February 4,1994


East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
Mayor of Denver
Wellington E. Webb
Denver Planning Board
Ruth E. Falkenberg, Chair James Daniels Thomas H. Foster, Jr.
Daniel R. Guimond William H. Bill Hornby
Bemie Jones Gilbert F. McNeish
Jeanne Labuda Mary Beth Susman Marilyn M. Stokes
STEERING COMMITTEE PLANNING TEAM
City Council Representatives
Polly Flobeck, District 5
Allegra Happy Haynes, District 11
Neighborhood Resident Representatives
Joe DeBrower, Chair
Lee Coleman John Conway
Yvonne Dallison Laura Edler
Carol Keen Polly Kitchen
Gary Lasater Greg McAllister
DaleMcInemy Roxie McKinster
Jim Newman Ray Northcutt
Sharon Northcutt Kimberly Parke
Oneda Patterson Joyce Pecce
TomPoulson Christy Romano
Jody Romano Ray Sanford
Barbara Taylor Marvin Taylor
Kay Thompson Thomas Thompson
Rebecca Trampler DonilynWatley
Lewis Watts Curtis Young
Neighborhood Business Representatives
Colette Kolar Scott Kolar
DerekMcFadden Richard Munslow
Devon Ryan Robert Ryan
Bob West
Human Resource Plan Representatives
Evelyn Bryant Dick Clark
BonnaGayhart Noreen Mahon
Darlene Workman
i


East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
Neighborhood History Contributors
Dale Mclnemy
Don Bowman
Phyllis Garcia
Jim Hitch
Christy Romano
Bruce Cavanagh
Bonna Gayhart
George Konteresk
Scott Kolar
Dr. Wayne Sargent
Bob West
Marlin Wood
Norm Avery
Phyllis Dixon
Ken Harvey
Colette Kolar
Sally Pierce
Barbara Taylor
Jim Wood
Ladd Kolar
Irene Robbins
Gene Taylor
City of Aurora Representatives
Henry Jackson
Alan Nazarro
Barton Wong
City of Denver Agency and Department Representatives
Bob Dorroh, Public Works Transportation
Paul Foster, Deputy Manager Parks and Recreation
Darrell Jackson, Mayors Office of Economic Development
B alvino Martinez Chaves, Director Excise and Licenses
Terry Rosapep, Public Works Transportation
Tom Nelson, Public Works Wastewater Management
Neil Sperandeo, Parks and Recreation Long Range Planning
Elliot Sulsky, Public Works -Transportation
Wilma Taylor, Stapleton Development Office
Bonnie Turner, Mayors Office of Economic Development
Denver Planning and Development Office
Jennifer T. Moulton, Director Of Planning and Development
Dick Farley, Deputy Director for Urban Design
Ann Mitre, Former Deputy Director for Community Development
Dorothy Nepa, Deputy Director for Zoning Administration
Harriet Hogue, Planning Program Manager
Jerry Garcia, Community Development Program Manager
Doug Wheeler, Neighborhood Planner and Project Manager
Gordon Appell, Northeast Quadrant Land Use and Transportation
Ken B arkema, Graphic Artist
Allan Fredrick, Housing Programs
Steve Gordon, Planning Specialist for Housing
Manuel Maestas, Residential Neighborhoods Small Projects
Madie Martin, Urban Designer
Jay Meehl,Intern for Business Survey
Carolyn Moore, Word Processing Assistance
Phil Plienis, Demographic Specialist
Dawn Towle, Zoning Specialist
Beth Truby, Commercial Streetscape Projects
We gratefully acknowledge the more than 300 neighborhood residents and business people who
attended meetings and workshops, and provided advice, guidance, and ideas for this plan.
2


East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
INTRODUCTION
A. VISION FOR THE FUTURE
The East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood vision for the future is to preserve, nurture, and
enhance the following qualities that make the neighborhood a good place to live and do business:
* Community spirit: a strong sense of neighborhood pride and cooperation among residents
and business owners.
* High quality new businesses and expansion of existing businesses.
* Beauty and design excellence of parks, open space, streets, and commercial areas.
* Solid housing stock and affordable selling prices ideal for first time and long time home
owners.
* Diversity of people in ages, income, ethnic and cultural heritage.
* Quiet, safe, and friendly environment ideal for the enjoyment of families and children.
* Linkage to high quality new development and neighborhood economic benefits from
Lowry and Stapleton redevelopment.
* Creative partnerships involving residents, businesses, Denver City Government, Aurora
City Government, Lowry redevelopment, and Stapleton redevelopment.
B. PRIORITY PLANNING ISSUES
Residents, business people, and City representatives who established this vision see tremendous
potential as the East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood builds on these characteristics. The plan
addresses the following priority topics as established in the neighborhood meetings:
* urban design
* zoning and land use
* traffic and transportation
* business revitalization
* housing
* public safety
* community facilities
C. LOCATION AND DESCRIPTION
The East Colfax statistical neighborhood is the approximately one square mile of land located
between Lowry Air Force Base on the south and Stapleton International Airport on the north.
Boundaries for the study area are Yosemite Street on the east (also the Denver-Aurora City
limits), Quebec on the west, 11th Avenue on the south, and Montview Boulevard and 23rd
Avenue on the north. Boundaries coincide with U.S. Census Tract 44.01.
This Denver neighborhood will be affected more than any other by the closures of Stapleton
International Airport and Lowry Air Force Base. This plan is being developed to anticipate these
changes and also to address business and housing needs in the neighborhood.
3


East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
The names East Colfax
and East Montclair are
used interchangeably in
the plan. Previous City
reports and studies of the
area use the name East
Colfax and the
neighborhood business
association uses this
name to highlight their
location on Denvers
main street heritage
corridor. East
Montclair is the name
linked to early
development of the area
and is the name of the
community organization
serving residents of the
area.
STUDY AREA
D. NEIGHBORHOOD HISTORY
Neighborhood roots go back to the late 1850s when a branch of Smoky Hill Trail brought gold
seekers arriving by horse and wagon on what is today Colfax Avenue. Over time, farms and
houses appeared along the trail, which became known as the Kansas City Road, because it
connected the early village of Denver to the nearest big city to the east.
In 1888 the town of Montclair was
incorporated. The home of the towns
founder, Mathias Chochrane of Montclair,
New Jersey, still stands at 1304 Olive Street.
Montclairs guiding vision, as promoted in an
early speech by Baron von Richtofen, was for
a community in which only tasteful houses
of $1,000 will'be allowed...Colfax Avenue
will be graded and improved like
Broadway...shade trees will be planted
throughout...an artesian well will provide
water...light towers will be erected...the town ______
will be the pride of all Denver. 1304 olive Street.
By 1900 there were 88 homes in Montclair. The town also boasted a zoo, college, golf course, art
gallery, and private and public schools. St. Lukes Episcopal Church was built in 1890 and the
Stanley British Primary School in 1891. What is now Lowry Field was owned by the Episcopal
Church and included the Jarvis Hall Military School. Students at the military school marched
along a road that ran northwesterly from the school to St. Lukes Church on 13th Avenue. The
road can still be seen today on the short section of Richtofen Place between Quince and Roslyn
streets.
4


East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
After 14 years as a suburb, Montclair was annexed to Denver on December 1, 1902. This
annexation included the area east of Monaco Parkway and north of 6th Avenue Parkway, eastward
to Yosemite Street and northward to 26th Avenue. Denvers present neighborhoods of Montclair,
East Colfax, and Lowry Field became part of Denver through this annexation 92 years ago.
A Colfax Avenue streetcar line once extended east from Downtown through East Montclair to
Fletcher (Aurora today). In later years the line ended at a Poplar Street tum-a-round, and a bus
continued east on Colfax Avenue to Fitzsimons Hospital.
Development came slowly, especially in areas north or south of Colfax Avenue. As late as the
1930s, it was still possible to look to the east and see Fitzsimons Hospital. Neighborhood boys
hunted pheasant and rabbits in the open fields.
In 1922 the Greeters of America, a
national organization of hotel employees,
established a home for its members who
were indigent because of sickness or other
misfortune. Located on 5 acres of land, the
home was surrounded by orchards,
gardens, and chickens tended to by the
patients. The Greeters of America Home
was dissolved in the 1950s and converted
into two private residences. The home at
1740 Ulster Street was designated a
Historical Landmark in 1990.
The Ex-Patients Tubercular Home opened
in 1930 at 8000 Montview. Where the vacant
lot is now seen at 19th Avenue and Trenton Street was the homes cowbarn. The milk cows were
sold after there were problems with the cows getting loose and wandering into the yards and
flower gardens of nearby new homes. The home closed in 1966.
As the decades passed, technology and world events brought growth and change to the area. To
the north, Stapleton Field was opened in 1929 to accommodate air travel to and from Denver.
Until the late 1940s, Ulster Street led directly to the airport terminal.
In 1937, Lowry Air Force Base was
established to the south. Although there
was nearly constant sound of aircraft
landing and taking off on two sides,
residential development came to the
neighborhood to house workers from these
two closeby installations. Construction of
single family homes flourished after World
War II and continued into the 1950s.
Paved streets and houses soon infilled
around the older houses and rural farm
buildings. Stapleton 1929. Courtesy Colorado Historial Society.
1740 Ulster Street, Greeters of America Home.
5
Introduction


East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
To house Titan missile project construction workers in the early 1960s, apartment complexes
were built on Yosemite Street south of Colfax Avenue. Apartment construction continued at other
locations into the 1970s, in part as a response to a housing market for military and airline
personnel.
Over the years, businesses prospered along U.S. Highway 40 (Colfax Avenue). As Denvers
primary link to the east until Interstate 70 was completed in 1965, the avenue was lined with
restaurants, motels, gift shops, service stations, and garages to serve tourists coming to the Rocky
Mountain region.
Dating back to the early 1930s, Colfax Avenue between Ulster and Uinta functioned as a sort of
town center. For several decades there was a drug store, beauty shop, barber, hardware store,
dry goods store, and several grocery markets. The Davis Dry Goods Store closed in 1956 after 20
years in business and the building was tom down to make way for a new Italian restaurant known
asPaisans.
Lowry Air Force Base. Courtesy Colorado Historial
Society.
Early Lowry Air Force Base. Courtesy Colorado
Historial Society.
6


East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
A number of long time Colfax Avenue businesses continue to provide convenient shopping,
services, and employment for residents. Among the neighborhoods landmark businesses are
West Auto Body 46 years, Clean and Green Laundry and check cashing 46 years, Dairy
Queen 44 years, Dr. Cioeta Medical Office 39 years, PMM Western Wear 35 years, Don
Bowman TV and Appliance 21 years, Strasenbahn Motors 20 years, Montclair Animal
Clinic 18 years, and State-wide Lock and Safe 12 years.
The East Colfax/East Montclair neighborhood story is one of growth, change, and development
reaching back to the first gold seekers and continuing with todays residents and business people.
We remember this story in order to understand the communitys strengths and growing pains
today, and to see clearly our way into the future. As we define in this plan the neighborhood
vision and goals, we carry on the century-old vision of Baron Von Richtofen of a great and
enviable community.
Many residents and business people contributed to the recounting of this history. Please refer to
the acknowledgements on page 2.
Early Lowry Air Force Base.Courtesy Colorado Historial
Stapleton Airport. Courtesy Colorado Historial Society.
Stapleton Airport. Courtesy Coloado Historical Society
1
Introduction


8


East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
USE OF THE PLAN
The principal purpose for preparing this plan is to influence and guide the process of change in
East Colfax (East Montclair) to better meet the needs of residents and business people in the
neighborhood. This plan represents the consensus of the neighborhood in identifying and
analyzing neighborhood needs, issues, and opportunities.
The plan is intended to promote patterns of land use, urban design, circulation and services that
contribute to the economic, social, and physical health, safety, and welfare of the people who live
or do business in the East Colfax neighborhood. The plan addresses issues and opportunities at a
scale that is more refined and more responsive to specific needs than the Citys Comprehensive
Plan. The plan serves as a component of that document.
This plan presents the best thinking of the City and the neighborhood and provides a
city-approved guide for the acceptable future physical development of the neighborhood for use
by the Planning and Development Office, the Denver Planning Board, the Mayor, City Council,
governmental agencies, neighborhood associations, residents, property owners, business people,
and private organizations concerned with planning, development, and neighborhood improvement.
The plan is neither an official zone map nor does it imply or deny any implicit rights to a
particular zone. Zone changes that may be proposed by property owners as part of any plan must
be initiated under a separate procedure established under the City and County of Denver
Municipal Code.
A. PLAN IMPLEMENTATION: THE ACTION AGENDA
The seven elements of the plan (urban design, zoning and land use, traffic and transportation,
business revitalization, housing, public safety, and community facilities) each have an action
agenda section that lists specific recommendations, general time frames, potential funding sources,
and approximate costs. Some recommendations can be implemented quickly and at minimal
effort or cost. Other projects are expensive or multi-faceted and implementation is viewed as long
term. One benefit that comes from having an official neighborhood plan is being ready when an
unforseen implementation opportunity comes along. Costs are best guess and are provided only
for the purpose of distinguishing between inexpensive and big ticket projects. Implementation
agencies, groups, and other stakeholders are listed. They play varied roles in the decision making
process for each recommendation.
Each element of the plan references recommendations that the steering committee identified as
highest priority for implementation. As a living and evolving document, the neighborhood
associations and City representatives will from time to time need to review, update, and change
these priorities.
For the plan as a whole, the steering committee selected three projects as top priority for
implementation:
1) Complete a master plan and develop landscaping and other street and sidewalk
beautification improvements along Colfax Avenue between Quebec Street and Yosemite
Street. (Recommendation UD-14).
2) Link the neighborhood to high quality new Stapleton and Lowry development. To
accomplish this, improvements may be needed in the Quebec and Yosemite Street
corridors, including widening of streets, detached sidewalks, new streetscapes, and
adequate provision for street right-of-way and building setbacks. (Recommendation T-l)
9


East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
3) Conduct a workshop to develop marketing and/or reuse alternatives for the motels located
along Colfax Avenue. Address alternative reuse strategies, legal alternatives, financing
mechanisms for redevelopment, and economic development programs and tools.
(Recommendation B-27)
B. MEANS OF PLAN IMPLEMENTATION
The 130 Action Recommendations in this plan constitute an agenda with which to begin
implementation. But how do the Action Recommendations get implemented? Who is
responsible to carry them out? The means of implementing this plan are as numerous as the
individual proposals. However, the primary techniques of plan implementation are time and
human resource involvement of residents and businesses, expenditure of public funds, the
enactment and enforcement of public ordinances and regulations, and the use of the plan policies
by public bodies (e.g. City Council, Planning Board, etc.) in making decisions that affect East
Colfax.
The available funding sources for plan implementation are themselves varied. The Citys six year
Capital Improvements Program Plan (CIPP) targets available resources for capital project funding.
Action Recommendations that are appropriate for total or partial funding should be placed within
the CIPP. Although the competition for these limited funds is severe among Denvers
neighborhoods, every effort should be made to place as many projects as possible within the all
important first year of the CIPP (known as the CIP Capital Improvement Plan). These first
year projects actually receive funding whereas the projects in years two through six are future
promises.
Another important funding resource for moderate income neighborhoods such as East Colfax is
the federal Community Development Block Grant program (CDBG) as administered by the City.
CDBG is actually made up of several programs, including the Residential Neighborhood Small
Projects Program (RNSP), Commercial Streetscape Program (CSP), the Non-Profit Facility
Improvements Program (NFI), and the Alley and Street Improvement Program. East Montclair
should actively pursue these CDBG programs for funding selected projects. Some substantive
program areas, such as transportation and housing, have their own funding sources and these have
been listed in the Action Recommendations.
The East Montclair Neighborhood Plan will also be implemented through the enactment and
enforcement of City ordinances. Certain Action Recommendations will be carried forward
through the application of the Denver Zoning Ordinance, Vacant and Abandoned Housing
Ordinance, motel licensing requirements, and other city, state, and federal regulations.
Finally, some of the Action Recommendations are statements of public policy that will serve to
implement the plan. For example, designation of a parkway, collaboration between Denver and
Aurora on economic development strategies, future adjacent Stapleton zoning, and future adjacent
Lowry zoning are important techniques for maintaining and strengthening the neighborhood.
C. RESIDENTS, BUSINESSES, AND GOVERNMENTAL RESOURCES WORKING
TOGETHER FOR PLAN IMPLEMENTATION
The common denominator of all successful implementation work is people working together.
Accompanying each Action Recommendation is a list of Implementing Agencies/Groups who
are identified as the primary groups that, because of expertise, authority, and resources, are
responsible for carrying out the Action Recommendation, or for advocating it to those groups with
the authority and resources to carry it out. The three groups that are chiefly responsible for
10


East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
implementation of this plan are the City and County of Denver, East Colfax businesses, and the
East Montclair neighborhood residents. They are the major catalysts who will energize and
involve a wider range of other people in public and private organizations to carry out the Action
Recommendations.
The City and County of Denver is a major player in the plans preparation, adoption, and
implementation. When it was adopted by the Mayor and City Council, the plan became part of
the official Denver Comprehensive Plan. As such, it will help to influence city policies,
programs, and decisions that will be crucial in implementing the Action Recommendations. The
staff of the Planning and Development Office and the many other city agencies listed herein will
work with the neighborhood to articulate the plan proposals to the Denver Planning Board, City
Council, and all relevant city decision-making bodies. In addition to the plans guidance, city
staff will be available to assist the neighborhood as East Colfax seeks to influence city decisions
and actions on zoning requests, the evaluation of public and private development proposals, CIPP,
CDBG, and other funding requests and regulatory ordinances.
Although the citys expertise and resources are significant, the primary
energy, motivation, and responsibility for implementing the East
Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan must be the people of the
area. Strong and ongoing involvement of East Colfax businesses and
East Montclair residents will be necessary to take the leadership in
carrying out this plan, to refine it, and to keep it updated as time goes
on, and in branching out to address new neighborhood issues. An
ongoing neighborhood planning and decision-making process needs to
be established to spur the businesses and people of the area to actively
promote the general interests of their neighborhood. While this may
mean organizing from time to time to fight undesirable changes,
neighborhood leaders also need to inspire the neighborhood to be
pro-active to actively and effectively secure decisions that improve
East Colfax / East Montclair, and bring it closer to its long range vision
for itself.
Neighborhood Banner
11
Use of
the Plan


East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
URBAN DESIGN FRAMEWORK PLAN
STAPLETON INTERNATIONAL
AIRPORT
UONTVIEW BOULEVARD
19TN AVENUE
17TH AVENUE
unvERsrrr
Of DENVER
LAW SCHOOL
EAST COLFAX AVENUE
1ATH AVENUE
13TH AVENUE
12TH A VENUE
RICHTHOFEN PL.
11TH AVENUE
PLANNED RESIDENTIAL
LOWRY AIR FORCE BASE
key___________________
r--r
- Key Intersections f Commercial Nod*
Commercial District
Motel District
Gateway
..... Proposed Stnetacape
- Proposed Parkway
Proposed tree lawns and sidewalks
Proposed Open Specs A Trail System
UONTVIEW BOULEVARD
Remove fences A connect street grid with
new development at Stapleton Airport
Continue residential scale of the
neighborhood as new development occura
Encourage residential development on both
aides of MonMew
Continue perkwey treetment seat of Quebec;
Bukd detached sidewalks
Create a etreetaeape maatar plan tor
MonMew Boulevard
Evaluate MonMew as e designated parkway
1TTN AVENUE
Create e consistent sidewalk and tree lawn
treatment
EAST COLFAX AVENUE
Create a atreatacepe maatar plan
recommending landscape, paving, pedestrian
lights, cross walk treatment, signage, parking
placement and buffering
Create pedestrian oriented commercial nodes
at key intersections
Coordinate landscape on aU four comers
Encourage redevelopment of properties at
intersections with buildings aa dose to the
street as possible
Encourage creative signs; Protect existing
historic signs
Build more bus shakers
Htti Avenue
Construct detached stdewetr
Study two way conversion
Ititit Avenue
Construct detached sidewalk
Study two way conversion
11tit AVENUE
Rsmova fenesa A connect street grid with
new development at Lowry Air Force Barn
Create a welcoming gateway at YoaamMe and
11th for now community college campus end
entry Into each city
Maintain sense of openness through the use
of lowor scale buildings A lew Intensity uses
on both skies.
Enhance existing commercial nodes at
Intersections
Encourage pedestrian connections to
neighborhoods
YOSEEBTE STREET
Encourags perkwey landscaping
Create gateway at Beat Colfax
Croats a welcoming gateway at YoaemHe and
11th for now community college campus and
K entry Into each city.
lu Ui IS Deeignete me north south bike route
5 U> Ui Ui £ V] £ Ui Construct detached sidewalks
0 3 K. V) 3 £ Designate aa north south bike route
tc 2 1 IU Encourage parkway landscaping from Martin
5 Luther King Boulevard south to Alameda Parkway. Construct detached sidewalks
12


East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
URBAN DESIGN
DESCRIPTION AND ANALYSIS
The East Colfax neighborhood sits on the eastern edge of Denver at the Aurora city line. The
neighborhood has very distinct edges to the north and south as defined by the large, single
governmental users at Stapleton Field and Lowry Air Force Base. Surrounded by security fences,
these facilities to the north and south have allowed for very little pedestrian and vehicular access
from the neighborhood. The redevelopment of these two areas offers a prime opportunity to
sensitively transition, link, and integrate these large redevelopment areas with the East Montclair
neighborhood.
The neighborhood is clearly defined by higher volume streets at its edges. The commercial
Colfax corridor creates a north and south division of the neighborhoods residential areas.
Montview Boulevard in Park Hill
Montview Boulevard
Montview is an east-west arterial street on the northern edge of the neighborhood adj acent to
Stapleton Airport. This sector of Montview is built to carry two lanes of traffic in each direction,
provides for no on-street parking or bicycle lanes, and in places has narrow sidewalks that are part
of a Hollywood style curb. There are few areas with developed tree lawns. A sector of Montview
west of Monaco Parkway provides an example of the classic Denver boulevard and model for
developing new elements of Montview Boulevard in the East Colfax neighborhood in the future.
Wide treelawns and detached sidewalks, fronts of buildings facing the street, location of significant
institutional buildings that act as neighborhood gathering places, and few curb cuts/driveways to
the boulevard (access is from alley ways) are all elements that compose a beautiful street.
Quebec Street
Quebec is another cross-town arterial at the
neighborhood boundary and is an important link
between Stapleton and Lowry. It has consistent
single family residential scale and character
along its length, except for the traffic volumes
that it carries and the intersection at Colfax. The
strong block patterns along Quebec break down
south of 12th Avenue. There are no sidewalks
along many segments of Quebec Street.
Quebec Street.
13


East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
Yosemite Street
Y osemite Street is a collector street and the boundary between Denver and Aurora. It is one of the
three potential maj or north/south connections between Stapleton and Lowry. Its extension into
Lowry and Stapleton seems relatively easy. North of Colfax the street is bounded by single-family
residential with a consistent grain of development, similar lot and building size, and continuous
orientation of homes fronting onto the street. South of Colfax, the street character changes. There is
one block of single family residential, with the remainder being three to five story apartment
buildings. The apartment buildings in this area have no real order to their placement and some are in
disrepair with boarded up windows. The commercial node adj acent to the Lowry gate has no
consistent streetscaping treatment. Buildings are under utilized and do not relate to each other.
Eleventh Avenue
Eleventh Avenue is a collector street that runs
along the northern boundary of Lowry Air Force
Base. It carries more traffic than the one-way
streets to the north, 13th and 14th Avenues. The
existing character of the street is not clearly
defined as there is no consistent development
pattern, use or scale. There are vacant parcels on
both sides which are future development
opportunities and offer possibilities for
integration of the neighborhood with Lowry.
East 11th Avenue.
Syracuse Street
Syracuse is a wide residential collector street. It is the only existing intermediate connection north
and south between the Stapleton and Lowry redevelopment areas.
Colfax Avenue
Colfax Avenue is the longest commercial arterial street in the United States today. It has developed
over time from its humble beginnings in Denvers downtown, becoming the Main Street of the
metropolitan region that connects Aurora, Denver, and Lakewood. Depending on the time of day, it
takes 45 to 60 minutes to drive from one end to the other. The avenue has several districts through
which it passes, each with its own character. This section of East Colfax is perhaps one of the more
difficult to define in terms of physical character and image.
The section of Colfax within this neighborhood is 16 blocks in length and has blocks that are
oriented in a north/south direction. Alleys ran perpendicular to the street, with additional alleys
running parallel to Colfax from Ulster to Yosemite on the north, and Wabash to Yosemite on the
south. Access seems excessive with the two alley systems and the typical one or two curb cuts per
parcel or busines s.
A problem associated with the lack of an identifiable image on East Colfax Avenue is the small size
of parcels and individually built projects. These sites typically are individually focused with little
sense of cooperation between commercial neighbors or respect for adjacent homes. One reason for
this is the type of incubator small business development that the market supports in this area.
Typical of older arterial commercial corridors, parcel and zoning depth is shallow.
14


East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
In addition to the isolated nature of each
separate site, there is a mix of many different
types of businesses along the street. There
does not seem to be any consolidation or
critical massing of like kinds of uses.
Physical landmarks are not clear and in
general, there is a lack of order and
organization to the land use types. There is a
lack of direction in design as evidenced by
the inconsistency in building and parking lot
placement.
|§ Casual Contemporary Cuisine
9th Avenu(:i_S Lincoln

Parking lot placement contributes to lack of order of
land use on Colfax
Alternative Parking Lot Placements
L
imr
Alley
J L
imrnirigN
1 jUlllUiJ
Colfax Avenue
Parking in the Rear
J
Alley
piiiiimni (iiimimn
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Colfax Avenue
Parking With Screen Wall Buffer
There are two areas that share enough similar characteristics to be called districts along the corridor.
In addition, there are a series of highly visible intersections. An emphasis on these intersections and
districts can help to break up a very long, linear street into identifiable, understandable units.
Important Colfax Avenue Intersections
Special intersections occur at Quebec, Syracuse, Uinta, and Yosemite. Quebec and Syracuse are
important because they are main intersections and need emphasis. While Quebec is the entry into
the neighborhoods part of Colfax, it does not read as a gateway. There is limited opportunity for a
maj or announcement. It is better to build upon other locations which offer some physical reason
to demarcate a transition.
Uinta is a more locally oriented retail area which should be built upon as it redevelops. To the west
is the section of Colfax that has the mix of uses and no clustering of like kinds of businesses. To the
east is the portion of Colfax that is primarily motels. This motel subarea is discussed in more detail
below.
15
Urban Design


East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
Yosemiteis a Gateway into Denver
as well as the neighborhood and as
such should receive special emphasis.
On the eastern edge of the intersection,
Aurora has an attractive sign, lighting, _ ^ a
and landscaping within the median. ,
This transition on the Denver side
should be identified as well.
Tamarac to Uinta: Neighborhood
Oriented District
The district that has the most
pedestrian scale is the areabetween commerical Block Ulster to Uinta.
Tamarac and Uinta. It is the historic
area for neighborhood serving stores and services. Many of the buildings on the north side are built
close to the front property line and are consistently oriented to the street. A number of restaurants
are located in this district and generate pedestrian activity. Sidewalks are adequately sized and the
facades of the buildings have some sense of scale and character and are not generic chain store
designs. Other smaller areas with some of these same characteristics are at Quince and at Rosemary.
Motel District
The second district is one in transition. It is the area from Ulster to Yosemite where most of the
motels are clustered. Sidewalks are unusually narrow on some blocks within this district. Several
of the motels do not have sufficient on site parking areas. There are also motels across the city line
in Aurora.
New home of State-Wide Lock & Safe. Nearly 1,000 motel rooms are located on East Colfax
Avenue in Denver and Aurora.
VISION
* Build on the positive physical characteristics of the neighborhood.
* Create a more beautiful neighborhood in which to live or do business.
* Blend neighborhood development to aesthetically flow with the redevelopment of
Lowry and Stapleton.
16


East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
PLAN IMPLEMENTATION
The following action agenda contains recommendations made by neighborhood residents,
business owners or managers, City departments, and other public and private interests. Funding
for improvements will need both private and public investments. Examples of public funding
sources include Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) programs, the Citys General
Fund, The Citys Capital Improvements Plan (CIP), public and foundation grants, and future
Citywide bond issues. Examples of private sector funding sources include improvement districts,
building facade improvements, and sidewalk and parking lot landscaping. For public sector
funding, one or several possible funding sources are listed for each project, together with a very
general estimate of the cost. $ = less than $25,000. $$ = $25,000 to $250,000. $$$ = more than
$250,000.
Time frames for implementation are approximate. Short range means the action is projected to
commence in years 1 and 2 after adoption of the plan. Mid range refers to an action that should
begin in years 3 to 5. Long range means implementation is projected to begin 5 or more years
out. Certain action recommendations could be carried out quickly at little or no cost. Time
frames are best guess and will be altered with changing budget requirements, level of private
sector involvement, and other conditions.
POLICIES AND DEVELOPMENT GUIDELINES
UD-1. Remove the security fences along Montview Boulevard and Eleventh Avenue as new
development occurs at Stapleton and Lowry. Connect the street grid of the neighborhood with new
Stapleton and Lowry streets.
TIME: On-going project as development takes place.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Private Development, Stapleton Development,
Lowry Development.
UD-2. Continue the residential scale of Montview Boulevard as new development occurs. Avoid
the extension of incompatible development into the neighborhood when Stapleton closes.
Encourage residential development on both sides of Montview.
TIME: On-going project as development occurs.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Stapleton Development, Planning and Development
Office.
UD-3. Maintain a sense of openness along 11th Avenue through the use of lower scales, smaller
buildings, and low intensity uses. Integrate and create a transition to the residential development
on both sides of 11th Avenue.
TIME: On-going.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Private Development, Planning and Development
Office.
^PRIORITY FOR IMPLEMENTATION***
17
Urban Design


East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
UD-4. Extend and infill the existing street tree pattern of mature coniferous trees along the 11th
Avenue Lowry boundary. As a part of the Lowry planning process and in conjunction with the
Citywide parkway master planning, consider creating a unique parkway treatment of cedar, pine
and/or fir trees along both sides of 11th Avenue.
TIME: On-going project as development occurs.
COST: $$ Private Development, future bond issue, grants, CIP
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Private Development, Public Works
-Transportation, Parks and Recreation Department.
UD-5. Enhance the existing commercial activity at 11th Avenue and Syracuse, 11th Avenue and
Unita (near the Montclair Post Office), and 11th Avenue and Yosemite. These shopping areas
should encourage residents to walk or bicycle and should serve both the nearby East Montclair
neighborhood and new Lowry college campus and residential neighborhoods.
TIME: Medium to long range project
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP:. Private Development, Mayors Office of Economic
Development, Parks and Recreation, Public Works -Transportation, Planning and
Development Office.
Montclair Post Office on 11th Avenue. Commercial action on 11th Avenue at Yosemite.
UD-6. Over time encourage the redevelopment of properties at Colfax intersections, with buildings
as close to the street as possible, coordinated landscaping on all four comers, and more attention to
pedestrian crosswalks.
TIME: On-going project.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Private Development, Business Association,
Mayors Office of Economic Development, Planning and Development Office.
18


East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
Encourage redevelopment of properties at Colfax intesections
Hold buildings as close to the street as possible
Coordinate landscape on all four comers
Enhance pedestrian cross-walks
Buffer residential edge
19
Urban Design


East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
CAPITAL AND PHYSICAL IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS
UD-7. As soon as Stapleton Airport closes, set aside land for parks and open space adjacent to the
neighborhood. This should include expansion of Fred Thomas Park and land along Westerly Creek.
TIME: Short range project (land set aside), long range development project
COST:. $$$ CIP, future bond issue.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Parks and Recreation Department, Planning and
Development Office, Stapleton Redevelopment.
***PRIORITY FOR IMPLEMENTATION***
IJD-8. As soon as Lowry Air Force Base closes, set aside land for parks and open space. This
should include land around Kelly Dam and the spillway south of 11th Avenue.
TIME: Short range project (land set aside), long range development project.
TIME: $$$ CIP, future bond issue.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Lowry Redevelopment Authority, Parks and
Recreation Department, Planning and Development Office.
***PRIORITY FOR IMPLEMENTATION***
UD-9. Create a gateway at Colfax Avenue and Yosemite Street, which may include monuments,
signs, lighting, landscaping and/or other features at the city line.
TIME: Short to medium range project.
COST: $$ CIP, CDBG, Private.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Public Works-Transportation, Private Development,
Colorado Department of Transportation, Neighborhood Group, Business Association,
Planning and Development Office.
UD-10. On Montview Boulevard between Quebec and Yosemite Streets continue the streetscape
elements that currently exist between Colorado Boulevard and Quebec Street. Evaluate officially
designating Montview Boulevard through the neighborhood as part of the Denver Parks and
Parkways system. Include this evaluation in the Citywide parkways master planning process.
TIME: Medium to long range project.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Parks and Recreation Department, Stapleton Plan,
Stapleton Development, Planning and Development Office.
20


East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
UD-ll. Remove the Lowry gate at Yosemite
Street and develop an entry feature that creates
a positive, welcoming gateway at the comer of
11th Avenue. Coordinate with the new Lowry
college campus, Aurora and Denver and use
similar and consistent treatments on all
quadrants of the 11th Avenue and Yosemite
Street intersection.
TIME: Medium range project.
COST: $$ CIP, CDBG, grants
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP:
Lowry Air Force Base gate at Yosemite Street.
Lowry College Campus, Lowry Property
Owners. Lowry Redevelopment Authority, Planning and Development Ojfice, Public
Works-Transportation, City of Aurora.
***PRIORITY FOR IMPLEMENTATION***
UD-12. Develop a Westerly Creek Master Plan jointly with
Denver and Aurora. Westerly Creek is a critical link between
the existing High Line Canal recreation trail and the future
Sand Creek (Emerald Strands) open space and trail system.
The Master Plan should address drainage, landscaping, park,
and trail improvements in the area of Kelly Dam spillway and
along Westerly Creek as it flows to the north-northeast from
11th Avenue to Montview Boulvard. The Study should
determine feasibilty and opportunities for opening up
portions of the creek that now flow underground through
pipes. The study area should include Lowry, East Montclair,
Original Aurora, and Stapleton portions of the creek.
TIME: Medium to long range project.
COST: $$$ CIP, grants, future bond issue.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Parks and
Recreation Department, Public Works-Wastewater
Management, City of Aurora, Urban Drainage and
Flood Control District, Planning and Development
Ojfice, Lowry Development, Stapleton Development.
UD-13. Create along 17th Avenue a consistent sidewalk and treelawn treatment. Explore the
option of traditional detached walks with generous tree lawns in areas where there are no existing
sidewalks and in areas where redevelopment occurs. See map on page 12 for priority segments.
TIME: On-going project.
COST: $$ Private, Bond, CDBG.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Property Owners, Neighborhood Group, Bond
Program Trees, Denver Digs Trees, Planning and Development Office.
Westerly Creek
21
Urban Design


East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
RESEARCH, DESIGN, AND ANALYSIS
UD-14. Create a detailed streetscape master plan for East
Colfax Avenue between Quebec Street and Yosemite Street,
with special attention to three Districts: Tamarac to Uinta,
Rosemary to Syracuse, Ulster to Yosemite. Include in this
focus study locations where the commercial zoning extends
south one block into the neighborhood. The master plan
should make recommendations for uses and streetscape
treatment, including landscaping, paving, facade renovation
suggestions, pedestrian lighting, cross-walk treatment,
signage, parking lot size and placement, and buffering.
Create an integrated, phased and prioritized implementation
strategy. Implementation will require that property owners
enter into an agreement to maintain streetscape
improvements.
TIME: Short to medium range project.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Property
Owners, Business Owners, Business Association, New Colfax streetscape near Keamey Street.
Neighborhood Group, Planning and Development
Office, Public Works-Transportation.
* *PRIORIT Y FOR IMPLEMENTATION***
UD-15. Create a master landscaping plan for Montview Boulevard edges that will be implemented
incrementally as Stapleton builds out. Plan should include consistent sidewalks, treelawns, and
other elements.
TIME: Short to medium range project.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Stapleton Development, Parks and Recreation
Department, Planning and Development Office.
UD-16. Encourage parkway landscaping along Quebec and Yosemite Streets to establish a high
quality image for Stapleton and Lowry new development and for the adjacent neighborhoods.
Allow Quebec Street parkway landscaping to connect two major parkways in the City (Alameda
Parkway and Martin Luther King Boulevard). Address Quebec and Yosemite right-of-way
constraints.
TIME: Medium to long range project.
COST: $$$ Private Development, CLP, future bond issue.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Private Development, Public Works-Transportation,
Parks and Recreation Department, Planning and Development Office.
22


23


SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENTIAL
MULTI-FAMILY RESIDENTIAL
BUSINESS
[j£||l PARKS/OPEN SPACE
SCHOOL, CHURCHES & POST OFFICE
O 400 800 1,600
LAND USE
EASfMOlTCUm
24


East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
LAND USE AND ZONING
DESCRIPTION AND ANALYSIS
The total area of the East Montclair/East Colfax neighborhood is 684 acres. The net land area
(excluding streets, highways and alleys) is 466 acres. The following figure shows the acreage of
the neighborhoods various land uses.
As can be seen, residential land use
predominates. The next major land use
category is that of commercial and office,
which is found in Colfax Avenue development
and at several centers along East 11th Avenue.
Businesses generally tend to be smaller in
scale. Collectively they form a critical mass
that offers a wide range of products and
services. As a by-product of the many
allowable uses in the B-4 zone district, there
are a group of businesses that are more light
industrial than retail in nature. Clothing and
apparel manufacturing, cabinet making, and
wholesale beauty products are examples of
these uses.
ZONING AND LAND USE
BY LAND USE CATEGORY
350 300 250 200 150 100 50 327 321
111
ifll

It
11 64
111 11 ii 27 23 0 ,L- 5 4 28 1
Single Multi Commercia Residential 1 Office ZONED industrial Parks Vacant Recreation DEVELOPE
*VACANT LAND IS SCATTERED
THROUGHOUT ALL ZONE DISTRICTS
Commercial uses on East
Colfax Avenue appear to be
oriented more to the person
traveling on the street than
to residents of the
surrounding neighborhood.
Car sales, motels, and fast
food restaurants typify
auto-oriented uses.
Zoning corresponds closely
with land use.
Non-conforming uses are
few. Again, the residential
category dominates and the
largest acreage is in the R-l
zone which is restricted to
single detached units. Other
residential zones as shown
on the existing zoning map
include R-2, R-2-A, R-3-X,
and R-3 which provide
increasing degrees of density
in multi-units. Four other
zoning categories complete
25


East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
the zoning pattern in the neighborhood. They are 0-1 (Open Space), P-1 (Parking), and for
business, B-2 and B-4. P-1 is designed to buffer residential from commercial zones as well as
provide parking, and is located generally north and south of the B-4 on Colfax Avenue. B-2 is
designed for local shopping and service facilities to provide for the needs of the local residents,
and is located in the Syracuse Shoppette at 11th Avenue and Syracuse Street, the 1100 block of
Yosemite Street, and the area around the Montclair Post Office on 11th Avenue. The B-4
commercial and business district serves a much larger area and is found along Colfax Avenue.
COLFAX AVENUE REZONING STUDIES
COLFAX A VENUE
WIDEN SIDEWALK FACING
COIMX AVENUE TO 14" -O'
MINIMUM
Provide 10-0" landscape buffer at the alley to separate commercial and residential zones
Relocate the alley to create a T-junction at the alley intersections
Use the existing alley as entry to the parking lot and for services
Reduce the service road area by locating the loading docks in the commercial building
Define the commercial zone property with landscaping
Widen sidewalks facing Colfax Avenue by pulling back the building face
Introduce trees and landscape elements in the public right-of-way
Encourage streetscape at intersections
Maintain a continuous street character along Colfax Avenue and down the side streets
26


East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
COLFAX AVENUE REZONING STUDIES
COIJAX AVENUE
WIDEN SIDEWALK FACING
COLEAX AVENUE TO 14'O'
MINIMUM ,
EXISTING ALLEY
ENTRANCE TO SERVICES AND
PARKING FROM EXISTING ALLEY
' THE STREETSCAPE FROM f-y
COMMERCIAL INTO RESIDENTIAL 1 ycL
ZONE TO MAINTAIN CONTINUITY
AND DEVELOP STREET CHARA CTER
STREETSCAPEAT
INTERSCTIONS
Extend commercial zone to accommodate minimum parking requirements g
Provide a walkway with sufficient landscaping from the parking lot to the main entrance of
the commercial building wherever required
Provide 10-0" landscape buffer at the alley to separate commercial and residential zones
Relocate the alley to create a T-junction at the alley intersections
Use the existing alley as entry to the parking lot and for services
Reduce the service road area by locating the loading docks in the commercial building
Defind the commercial zone property with landscaping
Widen sidewalks facing Colfax Avenue by pulling back the building face
Introduce trees and landscape elements in the public right-of-way
Encourage streetscape at intersections
Maintain a continuous street character along Colfax Avenue and down the side streets
Rezonings in the neighborhood over the last ten years have generally been requests to rezone from
residential to business zoning in order to create deeper lots for business expansions along East
Colfax Avenue. Additionally, a 14 acre rezoning from R-2-A to B-2 (with waivers and
conditions) was approved in 1989 for the vacant land on which the Montclair Post Office was
built.
27
Land Use
and Zoning


East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
VISION
* Compatibility between residential and business land uses.
* A neighborhood attractively linked to new development and land uses at Lowry Air
Force Base and Stapleton Airport.
* Ample park and open space areas.
* Protection of the residential character of the neighborhood.
* Improve physical appearance of the Colfax Avenue business district.
PLAN IMPLEMENTATION
The following action agenda contains recommendations made by neighborhood residents,
businesses, City departments, and other public and private interests. Time frames for
implementation are approximate. Short range means the action is projected to commence in years
1 and 2 after adoption of the plan. Mid range means the action should begin in years 3 to 5. Long
range means implementation is likely to begin 5 or more years after adoption of the plan. Some
recommendations are understood to be on-going actions. Time frames are approximate and will
be altered with changing budget requirements and other conditions.
CAPITAL AND PHYSICAL IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS
LZ-1. Evaluate requests to expand B-4 zoning (or other commercial zone districts) along Colfax
Avenue, making sure criteria is met that will foster both a healthy business district and protection
of nearby residences. Rezonings should include waivers of incompatible uses, provisions for
buffering adjoining residential areas with landscaping and/or screening fences, and other provisions
that create a transition that will protect the residential character of adjacent properties. Both
neighborhood businesses and residents should give input to the decision-making process.
TIME: On-going, beginning in 1994.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Neighborhood Group, Businesses, Planning and
Development Office.
**PRIORITY FOR IMPLEMENTATION**
LZ-2. Monitor all zone change requests adjacent to the neighborhood on the Stapleton site and at
Lowry.
TIME: On-going, beginning in 1994.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Neighborhood Group, Planning and Development
Office.
LZ-3 Work with property owners to rezone the R-2-A and R-3 undeveloped areas between 11th
and 13th Avenues in the eastern part of the neighborhood to a zone district compatible with
existing surrounding development, including single family.
TIME: Short to medium range.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Property owners, Neighborhood Group, Planning
and Development Office.
28


East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan

LZ-4. Assess the existing condition of vacant
boarded up multi-family buildings and possible
re-use for preschools, elder homes, or offices.
TIME: Short range.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP:
Property Owner, Neighborhood Group,
Planning and Development Office.
LZ-5. Assure compatibility of land uses and create
connections between future Stapleton and Lowry Vacant apartment building could be reused.
development and the East Colfax neighborhood.
New development should be evaluated for how it complements existing land uses in the
neighborhood and fosters local employment and business prosperity. For example, supportive land
uses on Stapleton should include residential, parkland, cultural, tourism, retail, and commercial
development. Compatible land uses on Lowry should include residential, parkland, open space,
commercial, and educational uses.
TIME: Short range, mid range, long range.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Neighborhood Group,Stapleton Development, Lowry
Development, Planning and Development Office.
LZ-6. Explore creating a corridor over-lay zone that establishes special East Colfax Avenue
development standards for buffering the edges between business and residential zones, conditional
hours of business operations, and signage. Network with businesses and neighborhood
organizations along the entire Colfax corridor.
TIME: Mid-range.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Neighborhood Group, Neighborhood Businesses,
Planning and Development Office.
LZ-7. Whenever the opportunity arises, eliminate billboards in the neighborhood. Do not allow
billboards in the redevelopment of Lowry or Stapleton.
TIME: On-going.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP .'Property Owners,Staple ton Development, Lowry
Development, Neighborhood Group.
LZ-8. Network with business interests and other neighborhood organizations throughout the City
to study placing new limitations on operation hours for some types of businesses located adjacent
to residential zone districts.
TIME: Mid-range project.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP Neighborhood Group, Neighborhood Businesses,
Planning and Development Office.
29
Land Use
and Zoning


East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
CITY SERVICES AND ORDINANCE ENFORCEMENT
LZ-9. Continue the neighborhood trouble shooting task force for monitoring property up-keep
and compliance with City environmental ordinances concerning cutting weeds, parking of vehicles
on the lawns of homes, numbers of cars, outdoor storage of junk, home occupations, and similar
zoning and code enforcement matters. Explore dividing the neighborhood into subareas. Send
friendly letters notifying property owners of ordinance requirements and offering neighborhood
assistance. Meet monthly with City zoning and code enforcement officials to monitor progress.
TIME: On-going, beginning in 1994.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Neighborhood Group, Denver Zoning
Administration, Neighborhood Support Services.
**PRIORITY FOR IMPLEMENTATION**
LZ-10. Inform neighborhood residents concerning large item pick up schedules.
TIME: On-going, beginning in 1994.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Neighborhood Group, Neighborhood Support
Services.
LZ-1I. Encourage enforcement of City ordinance requirements for absentee landlords to have an
agent registered with the Assessment Division.
TIME: Short Range project.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Assessment Division, Denver Zoning
Administration, Neighborhood Support Services.
LZ-12. Encourage enforcement of City ordinance requirements for pet care, including numbers of
animals.
TIME: On-going, beginning in 1994.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Health and Hospitals -Animal Control, Denver
Zoning Administration.
30


East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
NEIGHBORHOOD COOPERATION AND
INVOLVEMENT
LZ-13. Identify historic sites in the neighborhood. Provide
information to owners regarding procedures for official City
designation as a historic structure for preservation. Research
and write a history of the East Montclair Neighborhood,
including in the publication photographs and a brief history of
significant landmark buildings, parks, and the U.S. Highway 40
heritage commercial district.
TIME: Short range project.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP-.Neighborhood
Group, Businesses, Planning and Development Office.
LZ-14. Stop illegal nuisance activities in the neighborhood.
Encourage the formation of a network of block captains
throughout the neighborhood to coordinate the Neighborhood
Watch program and disseminate information concerning various
neighborhood activities and community programs.
TIME: On-going, beginning in 1994.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Denver Police Department, Neighborhood Watch,
Neighborhood Group.
*PRIORITY FOR IMPLEMENTATION*
LZ-15. Publish periodically in neighborhood newsletters descriptions of zoning use and code
maintenance regulations and phone numbers for assistance.
TIME: On-going, beginning in 1994.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP Neighborhood Group, Schools.
LZ-16. Continue the neighborhood commercial area revitalization efforts. Bolster the existing
business association with continued input from City programs as well as increased interest in the
commercial area from residents of the surrounding area.
TIME: On-going, beginning in 1994.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Business Association, Neighborhood Groups,
Mayors Office of Economic Development, Planning and Development Office.
31
Land Use
and Zoning


32


East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
TRANSPORTATION
DESCRIPTION AND ANALYSIS
Streets are designated by the Denver Comprehensive Plan according to the following definitions:
Local Streets: Serve the function of providing direct access to adjacent properties and of carrying
low volumes of traffic (less than 2,000 vehicles per day) with an origin or destination within the
neighborhood. Examples of local streets are Xenia Street and 19th Avenue.
Collector Streets: Distribute traffic between arterial and local streets within the community and
link residential areas, local and community shopping, and other major community activity areas.
Collector streets have average volumes of5,000 to 12,000 vehicles per day. Examples of collector
streets are Syracuse Street and 11th Avenue.
Arterial Streets: Provide for through traffic on a continuous route. They serve as the primary link
between communities and major land use elements. The average traffic volumes typically range
from 10,000 to 50,000 vehicles per day. Examples of arterial streets are Colfax Avenue and Quebec
Street.
The Department of Public
Works classifies existing
streets. The map shows the
East Colfax neighborhood with
existing street classifications
and average daily traffic counts
from 1988 and 1992.
MAJOR STREETS
There are four streets that
cannot be looked at only from a
local view-point. These are
Colfax Avenue, Quebec Street,
Montview Boulevard, and
Yosemite Street.
Colfax Avenue
Colfax is the main street of
the Denver metropolitan
region. It is a major
transportation corridor
between Aurora, Denver, and
Lakewood. Commercial land
uses abut the corridor along its
entire length. These
businesses serve both the
metropolitan region and
immediate neighborhood, as
well as future new Stapleton
and Lowry neighborhoods.
Street Classifications & Traffic Volumes
3J1 w N § Arterials JL Collectors E 00 Average Daily Traffic s
000lZ 1 1 \
_n_
won lew
22,000

CD fl 0> 3 tN Ifax A i h Avtt.' 15th five =
2i > 2 hdo
6, WO 0 & 1 )00 5, 00'

6, wo 5 000 4, 100 1
-iicntncic r Oo u r
10,000 12,000
33


East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
Quebec Street
Quebec Street is an important north-south street corridor extending through the metropolitan region
from Commerce City at the north to Iliff Street and the Denver Tech Center at the south. A missing
segment on the Lowry Air Force B ase between First Avenue and Alameda Avenue prevents this
street from functioning as a through arterial. Between 11th and 23rd Avenues, Quebec Street forms
the western boundary of the East Colfax neighborhood. Further north, from 23rd Avenue to Martin
Luther King Boulevard, Quebec Street widens to four lanes. From Martin Luther King Boulevard
north to 1-70 it becomes a limited access roadway. For more than twenty years, proposals have at
different times been made by the City of Denver and others to acquire additional right-of-way and
widen Quebec to become a four lane street. This would allow Quebec Street to function as a
regional arterial north and south across the metropolitan region, similar to the way Monaco
Parkway, Colorado Boulevard, or York Street function presently.
The closure of Stapleton Airport and redevelopment of Lowry will, in the short term, reduce
somewhat travel demands in the corridor. Redevelopment of Stapleton and Lowry will, over time,
again create pressure to improve the Quebec Street corridor and better link together shopping,
employment centers, and residential neighborhoods in the northern and southeast areas of the
metropolitan region. As traffic volumes increase over time and the need to widen the street may
become more apparent, care will need to be taken with any proposed changes in the street and
should provide for additional community input, provide for adequate right-of-way, develop new
parkway landscaping, and protect the residential character of the area.
Montview Boulevard
Montview B oulevard is similar to Colfax Avenue in providing a connection between Denver and
Aurora, as well as between central Denver and neighborhoods on the Citys eastern edge.
Redevelopment of Stapleton Airport property on the north side of Montview will aid in defining
and constructing traffic, landscaping, and design improvements needed for the street.
Yosemite Street
Yosemite Street forms the official boundary between Denver and Aurora, and between residential
neighborhoods in the respective cities. Any proposed street improvements, changes in traffic
volumes and patterns, and traffic regulations will need to be coordinated between the two
jurisdictions.
TRAFFIC IMPACTS FROM CLOSURE OF STAPLETON AIRPORT AND CLOSURE
OF LOWRY AIR FORCE BASE
The closure of Stapleton Airport is expected to initially bring significant traffic reductions on
Quebec Street north of Montview, on Syracuse north of Montview, and on Montview Boulevard.
More modest, but significant, reductions are also expected on Quebec and Syracuse Street south
of Montview through the East Colfax neighborhood. The nature, timing, and intensity of future
development at Stapleton Airport will determine when traffic again reaches current traffic levels.
The closure of Lowry Air Force Base is also projected to bring short term traffic reductions on
arterial and collector streets, such as 11th Avenue and Quebec Street. When the fence comes
down that presently separates the neighborhood and Lowry, and streets are re-opened, traffic
volumes on collector and arterial streets south of Colfax Avenue will likely increase as new uses
are found for Lowry buildings.
34


East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
BUS TRANSIT SERVICE
The East Colfax neighborhood is served by
five bus lines. Lines on Montview
Boulevard are the Route 20 between
Auroras Southmoor area, Downtown
Denver, and Lakewood; and the Route 105
between the Martin Marietta plant (located
on the far southwest edge of the Denver
region) and Stapleton Airport. Colfax
Avenue is served by the Route 15
connecting Aurora and Downtown Denver.
The Colfax Route 15 is the only line in the
RTD system to operate 24 hours a day.
The Route 10 line is located on 11th
Avenue and connects Aurora with
Downtown Denver, via the University
Hospital area and the Auraria Campus.
BIKE ROUTES
Colfax bus line runs 24 hours a day
East-west bike routes through the neighborhood are located on 19th Avenue and 12th Avenue.
Syracuse and Poplar form a north and south bike route. New opportunities for developing
off-street bikeways will become possible as Stapleton Airport redevelops and as Lowry and the
East Montclair neighborhood are re-connected.
35
Transportation


East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
VISION
* Safe and uncongested traffic flow within and through the neighborhood.
* Quiet local residential streets.
* Landscaping and buffering that will protect adjacent residences along arterial streets.
* Convenient RTD bus transit service to all areas of the neighborhood.
* A neighborhood friendly to walking and bicycling.
PLAN IMPLEMENTATION
The following action agenda contains recommendations made by neighborhood residents,
businesses, City departments, and other public and private interests. Potential funding sources for
the various capital improvement projects include the Citys Capital Improvements Plan (CIP), the
Citys General Fund, 1989 and future Citywide bond issues, Regional Transportation District,
Colorado Department of Transportation, Federal grants, private development, and Community
Development Block Grant programs. One or several potential funding sources are listed for each
project, together with symbols ($) that indicate an estimate of the cost. $ = less than $25,000. $$
= $25,000 to $250,000. $$$ = more than $250,000.
Time frames for implementation are approximate. Projects are noted that are in progress even as
the plan is being developed. Short range means the action is projected to commence in years 1
and 2 after adoption of the plan. Mid range means the action should begin in years 3 to 5. Long
range means implementation is projected to begin 5 or more years out. Certain action
recommendations could be carried out at little or no cost. Time frames are best guess and will
be altered with changing budget requirements and other conditions.
CAPITAL AND PHYSICAL IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS
T-l Link the residential neighborhood to high quality new Stapleton and Lowry development. To
accomplish this, improvements may be needed in the Yosemite Street and Quebec Street corridors,
including widening of these streets, constructing sidewalks, and development of new streetscapes.
If Quebec Street is widened to four lanes in any area between Alameda and 23rd Avenue, its
improvement through the East Colfax neighborhood residential area should be accomplished with
adequate provision for street right-of-way, building setbacks, and landscaping design treatments.
TIME: Long range projects.
COST: $$$ Private Development, CIP.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Public Works Transportation, Aurora, Lowry
Development, Stapleton Development, Property Owners.
**PRIORITY FOR IMPLEMENTATION**
36


East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
T-2 Construct detached sidewalks along blocks with no pedestrian sidewalks. Highest priority
should be blocks along Quebec Street, Montview Boulevard, Syracuse Street, 11th Avenue, 13th
Avenue and 14th Avenue. Priority should also be given to streets located on bus lines, adjacent to
a park, or in proximity to Ashley School. Seek to gain participation of owners in sidewalk
construction projects. Explore funding on a block by block basis through CDBG Residential
Neighborhood Small Projects grants and other alternative funding sources.
TIME: On-going, short/medium range project.
COST: $$ Private, CDBG, CIP.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Neighborhood Group, Property Owners, Planning
and Development Office, Public Works-Transportation.

Pedestrian sidewalk along Syracuse Street. Foot path along Quebec Street.
T-3 Reconstruct Colfax Avenue through the neighborhood. Pave with concrete, improve drainage,
widen sidewalks where appropriate, and provide for street trees.
TIME: Medium or long range project.
COST: $$$ Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT).
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: CDOT, Public Works-Transportation.
T-4 Connect the street grid of the neighborhood with Stapleton and Lowry development as soon
as possible.
TIME: Medium or long range project.
COST: $$$ Private Development, CIP.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Public Works-Transportation, Stapleton
Development, Lowry Redevelopment Authority, Planning and Development Office.
T-5 Construct curb and gutter, and detached sidewalks along the south side of 11th Avenue
adjacent to Lowry. The most immediate need is areas near bus stops.
TIME: Medium range project.
COST $$ Private Development, CIP.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Public Works-Transportation, Planning and
Development Office, Lowry Development.
37
Transportation


East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
T-6 Pave public alleys with recycled asphalt.
Explore options for paving non-dedicated
alleys.
TIME: In progress/on-going project.
COST $ General Fund.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP:
Public Works-Construction
Engineering, Planning and
Development Office, City Council.
T-7 Construct handicap ramps at Colfax
Avenue intersections and at other street
intersections with substantial pedestrian
traffic.
TIME: In progress, short/medium range project.
COST: $$ General Fund.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Public Works-Transportation, Private Development.
T-8 Evaluate Colfax Avenue intersections
where beepers should be located to assist blind
persons in crossing the street.
TIME: Short range project.
COST: $CIP
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP:
Public Works-Transportation.
T-9 Work with the Regional Transportation
District to develop bus stop amenities along
streets served by transit lines, beginning with
the Colfax Route 15 line. Trash receptacles
should be located at bus stops, especially at stops near fast food restaurants.
30,000 vehicles per day use East Colfax Avenue.
TIME: Short range project.
COST: $$ RTD or Private.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: RTD, Neighborhood Businesses, Neighborhood
Group.
T-10 Encourage neighborhood businesses to provide bicycle parking near front entrances.
TIME: On-going project.
COST: $ Private, CDBG.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Neighborhood Businesses.
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East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
PUBLIC SERVICES
T-ll Increase the frequency of sweeping Colfax Avenue sidewalks.
TIME: In progress.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP Merchants.
T-12 Remove snow from residential sidewalks. Where possible, street snow plow crews should
plow snow into the middle of a street, rather onto attached sidewalks. Priority areas for snow
removal should be sidewalks in the vicinity of Ashley Elementary School.
TIME: Short range project
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Residents, Public Works -Street Maintenance,
Ashley School.
T-13 Organize block parties to clean alleyways and sidewalks.
TIME: Short range/medium range project.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Residents, Neighborhood Group,
T-14 Designate Syracuse Street as a new north-south bicycle route through the neighborhood,
providing a connection to future Stapleton and Lowry development. Install bike route signs.
Evaluate additional alternative neighborhood bicycle routes as development occurs in these nearby
areas.
TIME: Short range project.
COST $ Bond and CIP.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Public Works-Transportation.
T-15 Designate Yosemite Street as a new north-south bicycle route through the neighborhood,
connecting with a future Westerly Creek bicycle trail corridor across Stapleton to Sand Creek and
across Lowry to the High Line Canal. Ensure that as traffic increases on Yosemite Street, adequate
width and priority is maintained for bicyclists on this street. Bike lanes may be indicated.
Coordinate with Aurora on the possibility of additional access to Westerly Creek via 19th Avenue
and Montview Park. In the Westely Creek corridor, provide prominent and attractive bicycle and
pedestrian connections between Colfax Avenue and new Lowry and Stapleton neighborhoods.
TIME: Mid range project.
COST: $ Bond and CIP.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Public Works- Transportation.
T-16 Install bike route signs along 19th Avenue and 12th Avenue, as principal east-west bicycle
friendly streets serving East Denver and Aurora.
TIME: Short range project.
COST: $ Bond and CIP.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Public Works-Transportation.
39
Transportation


East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
T-17 Provide bicycle safety courses in schools serving neighborhood children. Encourage
students to bicycle to school, making use of designated routes.
TIME: Short range project.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Public Works Transportation, Denver Public
Schools.
T-18 Maintain a high quality of bus service to connect the neighborhood with Downtown Denver
and other destinations. Meet with Regional Transportation District representatives to discuss route
changes and new termination points necessary when Stapleton Airport and Lowry Air Force Base
close. .
TIME: Short range project.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: RTD.
RESEARCH, DESIGN, AND ANALYSIS -----------------------------------------
T-19 Study the feasibility of converting 13th and
14th Avenues to two-way traffic, between Quebec
and Yosemite Streets.
TIME: Short Range project.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP .-Public
Works-Transportation.
T-20 Determine street improvements needed to
implement recommendations in the Northeast
Quadrant and Southeast Quadrant Transportation
and Land Use Studies. Update the Southeast Quadrant Study to include changing conditions
resulting from Stapleton and Lowry closures and Northeast Quadrant Study recommendations.
This study should look at streets in both Denver and Aurora and should develop recommendations
for connecting Lowry and Stapleton in a manner that will not adversely impact Denver and Aurora
residential neighborhoods.
TIME: Short/medium range project.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Public Works-Transportation, Planning and
Development Office, Stapleton Planning, Aurora.
T-21 Evaluate providing new left turn arrows and
new signal timing on Quebec Street at Montview
Boulevard (southbound turning left and northbound
turning left) and on Quebec Street at Colfax Avenue
(northbound turning left, southbound turning left,
eastbound turning left).
TIME: Short/medium range project.
COST:$$ CIP, General Fund.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/
GROUP: Public Works-Transportation.
40
Quebec Street and Montview Boulevard.


East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
T-22 Encourage pedestrian and bicycle travel between residences and destinations within and near
the neighborhood in order to reduce automobile use, improve air quality, promote a sense of
neighborliness and encourage physical fitness.
TIME: In progress/on-going project.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Residents, Neighborhood Group, Neighborhood
Businesses, Public Works-Transportation.
T-23 Evaluate the designation of 17th Avenue as a collector street.
TIME: Medium/long range.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Public Works-Transportation.
T-24 Evaluate the need for north-south alleys on blocks where east-west alleys exist along Colfax
Avenue. Consider vacating north-south alleys in order to allow parcel consolidation.
TIME: Short range/on-going project.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Property Owners, Public Works-Transportation.
EAST COLFAX AVENUE
NORTH-SOUTH ALLEYS FRAGMENT BLOCKS
EAST COLFAX AVENUE
ELIMINATION OF NORTH-SOUTH ALLEYS TO ALLOW FOR THE
ASSEMBLING OF PARCELS FOR REDEVELOPMENT.
T-25 Inventory the condition of street curbs and publicize information concerning the Citys curb
replacement program.
TIME: In progress/on-going project.
COST: $$ General Fund.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Public Works-Street Maintenance, Neighborhood
Group.
41
Transportation


42


East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
BUSINESS REVITALIZATION
DESCRIPTION AND ANALYSIS
There are four business areas within the East Colfax neighborhood. Colfax Avenue between
Quebec and Yosemite Streets, an area sixteen blocks long, is the largest of the business districts.
Small shoppettes are located at 11th Avenue and Syracuse Street and 11th Avenue and Yosemite
Street. A largely undeveloped commercial area is located in the area of the Montclair Post Office.
Colfax Heritage Corridor: Denvers Main Street
Colfax Avenue is in many ways the main street of not only the neighborhood, but also Denver and
a metropolitan region with two million people. Stretching from the foothills of Golden to the plains
of Adams and Arapahoe County on the east, Colfax Avenue is the longest commercial street in
North America. It is also U.S. Route 40, which was the principle highway link between Denver and
KansasCityuntiltheconstructionofInterstateHighway70in 1965.
Regionally, the 30 mile long avenue is the address for more supermarkets, value stores, gas
stations, motels, fine restaurants, shopping centers, automobile sales, and retail specialty shops,
than any other single street in the Denver region. Businesses are largely oriented toward
automobile traffic and serve a mix of neighborhood residents, people from throughout the
metropolitan region, and out of state tourists.
From east to west, Colfax Avenue functions as a sort of linear mall for shopping and services. The
number of businesses located along the avenue exceeds Cherry Creek Mall, Southwest Plaza, and
Downtown Denver. In addition to the hundreds of strong businesses that prosper along Denvers
main street, Colfax Avenue is home to Colorados State Capitol and the Basilica of the
Immaculate Conception.
Denver, Lakewood, and Aurora continue to work to make the avenue an attractive placethrough
streetscape beautification projects, economic development strategies, and a Life Begins on U.S.
40" promotional campaign. State legislation in 1994 designated Colfax Avenue a state heritage
corridor.
Colfax Avenue: Neighborhood Business District
A1993 survey of Colfax Avenue between Quebec Street and Yosemite Street found a total of 81
business locations. More than 18 of the businesses provide to the neighborhood goods and services
such as accounting offices, laundromat, shoe store, auto parts, clothing store, beauty shops, medical
office, small grocery stores, gas
stations, appliance sales, liquor store,
furniture store, locksmith, and cabinet
shop. In addition to stores and offices,
the survey showed 13 restaurants, 14
motels, 8 vehicle or boat sales
businesses, 9 boat or auto repair
businesses, 4 bars and clubs, car wash,
and other miscellaneous businesses.
Within this 16 block long area, there
were only two vacant properties.
Colfax Businesses
Goods and Services
Restaurants 26%
1111 = III! = lill=Â¥v Vacant
P !iii = iin = mi mm liJtas mi = iiii=mi = 3%
Motels 1, 21% Night Clubs
Boat/Auto Sales 12% Boat/Auto Repair 13%
43


East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
Dairy Queen, Colfax Avenue landmark.
The Avenue is lined with many strong businesses. A
location onDenvers main street, good visibility,
and reasonable rental rates and land prices have made
this business district an attractive location for both
long time businesses and new business start-ups.
Auto Specialty Store.
Tourist related businesses, particularly motels, experienced abig drop in business whenI-70 was
constructed two miles north of the neighborhood. In order to survive, these businesses have had to
develop innovative marketing strategies. For example, some of the motels have specialized in
serving airline pilots, providing shuttle service to and from flights. Others have specialized in long
term room rentals to construction workers. Still others have catered to families of patients at area
hospitals.
The shut-down of both Stapleton Airport and Lowry Air Force B ase will impact the Colfax
business district once again and bring new challenges and opportunities as the market niche of these
businesses is modified.
11th Avenue Neighborhood Shopping Areas
The two small shopping centers located on 11th Avenue at Syracuse Street and 11th Avenue at
Yosemite Street are across the street from the Lowry Air Force Base. These neighborhood
shoppettes experienced severe declines in business when Lowry closed its Yosemite Street gate.
They have a high vacancy rate today.
The open land along 11th Avenue adj acent to the new Montclair Post Office is zoned for
neighborhood commercial retail development. This as yet undeveloped business district could
serve as a sort of north anchor area to future Lowry development.
Potential Lowry and Stapleton Shopping Areas
When Lowry Air Force Base is shut down in 1994, retail development requiring larger land parcels
may occur in the area approximately three blocks south from the 11 th Avenue Montclair Post
Office where the existing PX and commissary buildings could be converted to super market and
department store uses.
44


East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
When Stapleton Airport closes later in 1994, the Citys plan for redevelopment includes a
possibility for big box larger scale retail development on the Stapleton site.
In relationship to Lowry and Stapleton retail development, the role of Colfax Avenue may be to
continue to develop as the preferred location for smaller scale specialty stores, commercial
services, restaurants, and other small to medium sized businesses. If the Colfax Avenue business
area is to be revitalized, it will be important to have attractive and convenient street, sidewalk, and
bikeway access between the Colfax Avenue main street and new Lowry and Stapleton
neighborhoods.
Current Shopping Areas.
Residents presently have many choices in where to shop, both within the neighborhood and at
nearby shopping districts. These include the 14th and Krameria shopping district, Colfax Avenue
shopping areas, Downtown Denver, Cherry Creek, Buckingham Square, and Aurora Mall.
The broad over-all goal for retail and service oriented businesses in the East Colfax neighborhood is
the creation of a healthy business climate that will improve the economic viability of the area and
serve neighborhood residents as well as people from the wider Denver and Aurora region.
VISION
Improved and coordinated promotion of Colfax Avenue with Aurora, Lakewood, and
other Denver business areas.
Strategies to cushion neighborhood businesses from possible economic impacts from the
closures of Lowry Air Force Base and Stapleton Airport.
*
*
*
*
*
Improved image of East Colfax Avenue.
Increased employment opportunities for neighborhood residents.
A balanced business district, with a mix of business types.
Reduced anti-social activity.
A cleaner and more beautiful, inviting business district that will strengthen existing
businesses and attract new businesses to the area.
PLAN IMPLEMENTATION
The following action agenda contains recommendations made by business owners or managers,
neighborhood residents, City departments, and other public and private interests. Funding will
rely heavily on private investment. For some projects, there will be opportunities for
public-private partnerships. Examples of public funding sources include Community
Development Block Grant programs, the Citys General Fund, the Citys Capital Improvements
Plan (CIP), public and foundation grants, and future Citywide bond issues. For public sector
funding, one or several possible funding sources are listed for each project, together with symbols
($) that indicate an estimate of the cost. $ = less than $25,000. $$ = $25,000 to $250,000. $$$ =
more than $250,000.
Time frames for implementation are approximate. Projects are noted that were in progress even as
the plan was being developed. Short range means the action is projected to commence in years 1
45
Business Revitalization


East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
and 2 after adoption of the plan. Mid range refers to an action that should begin in years 3 to 5.
Long range means implementation is projected to begin 5 or more years out. Certain action
recommendations could be carried out at little or no cost. Time frames are best guess and will
be altered with changing budget requirements, level of business involvement, and other conditions.
POLICIES AND DEVELOPMENT GUIDELINES
B-l. Study the extension of the Enterprise Zone to include the East Colfax Avenue business
district.
TIME: Short range project,
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Businesses, Mayors Office of Economic
Development, Planning and Development Office, Business Owners.
B-2. Build new residential neighborhoods at Lowry and Stapleton in order to increase the
population that supports retail businesses along Colfax Avenue, Encourage residential
development, museum, cultural, tourism, and other uses on Stapleton that will complement and
strengthen East Colfax Avenue activity.
TIME: On-going project.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Stapleton Development, Lowry Development,
Planning and Development Office.
New Business on East Colfax Avenue. New Business opportunity on East Colfax Avenue.
B-3. Encourage attractive storefront business signs. Strictly enforce zoning regulations for signage.
Protect existing historic signs.
TIME: In progress/on-going project.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Business Owners/Managers, Zoning Administration.
B-4. Establish a process and form a group to meet jointly with Aurora businesses, residents, and
public officials to work on common issues.
TIME: Short range project.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: City Council representatives, Planning and
Development Office, Aurora and Denver Neighborhood and Business Groups.
46


East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
CAPITAL AND PHYSICAL IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS
B-5. Clean up the area. Sweep sidewalks.
TIME: In progress.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Businesses.
B-6. Upgrade maintenance of building fronts, including painting, sign improvements, awnings,
location of window and sidewalk flower boxes, and cleaning sidewalks and parking lots.
TIME: In progress/on-going.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Business Owners/Managers, Business Association.
B-7. Develop a coordinated streetscape program
along Colfax Avenue, including street trees, trash
containers, and improved pedestrian lighting.
TIME: Medium range / long range
project.
COST: $$$ CDBG, CIP, Private.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP:
Business Owners/Managers, Public Works
-Transportation, Denver Planning and
Development Office, Business Association.
B-8. Clean up Colfax Avenue street medians
(including sweeping of dirt and removal of weeds)
TIME: Short range project.
COST: $ General Fund.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Public Works -Street Maintenance.
B-9. Improve street lighting along Colfax Avenue. Explore undergrounding electrical utilities and
installation of new hockey puck street lights and median lights similar to in Aurora.
TIME: Mid range project.
COST: $$$CIP
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Public Works -Transportation, Public Service
Company, Business Owners/Managers.
B-10. Encourage RTD to put in additional bus shelters and trash receptacles along Colfax Avenue.
TIME: Short range project/in progress.
COST: $$ Private, RTD.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Neighborhood Group, Business Owners/Managers,
RTD.
47
Business Revitalization


East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
B-ll. Locate trash receptacles near bus stops and in the vicinity of fast food restaurants.
TIME: Short range project.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Businesses, RTD.
MARKETING
B-12. Coordinate Colfax Avenue promotion with Aurora, Denver, and Lakewood businesses,
organizations, and economic development agencies.
TIME: Short range project.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Businesses Owners/Managers, Mayors Office of
Economic Development, Planning and Development Office, City of Aurora, City of
Lakewood.
B-13. Encourage development of a unified marketing program for Colfax Avenue motels in Denver
and Aurora. Explore new shuttle service to Denver International Airport and mountain casinos.
Explore new marketing programs at Denver Union Railroad Station and the downtown Bus Depot.
Explore strategies such as providing lodging to families of patients at nearby area hospitals.
TIME: Short range project.
COST: $ Private, Public.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Motel Owners/Managers, Mayors Office of
Economic Development, Denver and Aurora Business Associations, City of Aurora.
B-14. Consider alternative retail development of
under utilized motel properties, such as
converting rooms to crafts studios, ethnic art
shops, antique dealer spaces, and similar uses
compatible with adjacent residential areas.
TIME: On-going.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP:
Property owners, Mayors Office of
Economic Development, Planning and
Development Office.
B-15. Develop a Colfax Avenue theme and
consider use of the theme on street banners, signage
TIME: Short range project.
COST: $ Private and Grants.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Business Owners/Managers, Neighborhood Group,
Business Association, Colorado Department of Transportation.
Motel converted to retail on Santa Fe Drive.
, and marketing programs.
48


East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
PUBLIC AND SUPPORT SERVICES
B-16. Publicize and use business support resources available through the Small Business Support
Office and Community College Center, located at 9905 East Colfax Avenue.
TIME: On-going
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Short range project. Business Owners/Managers,
Business Association, Mayors Office of Economic Development, Aurora -Colfax Avenue
Community College Center.
B-17. Provide information and encourage use of the Citys revolving loan program for businesses
in the neighborhood. Conduct an outreach program to inform business owners about loan
programs for renovation or expansion. Create other economic development assistance programs to
reduce the impacts of closing Stapleton Airport and Lowry Air Force Base.
TIME: In progress / short range project.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Business Owners/Managers, Mayors Office of
Economic Development, Planning and Development Office.
B-18. Establish a Business Support Office to provide technical assistance in applying for loans,
develop coordinated marketing strategies, inventory vacant properties, and promote the area.
TIME: Short to medium range project.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Business Owners/Managers, Mayors Office of
Economic Development.
NEIGHBORHOOD COOPERATION AND INVOLVEMENT
B-19. Organize a business association in the area that can function as a support network, identify
available resources for building front and streetscape improvements, develop a strategy to market
and promote Colfax, and work cooperatively on common interests.
TIME: In progress.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Business Owners/Managers, Property Owners,
Neighborhood Group, Denver Planning and Development Office, Mayors Office of
Economic Development.
B-20. Create employment opportunities for youth and people of all ages. Encourage neighborhood
businesses to hire neighborhood residents.
TIME: Short range project.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Business Owners/Managers, Mayors Office of
Economic Development, Schools, Neighborhood Group.
B-21. Give an annual award to the most civic minded neighborhood business and the business most
improved in appearance.
TIME: Short range project.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Neighborhood Group.
49
Business Revitalization


East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
B-22. Encourage collaboration between businesses and neighborhood residents. For example,
residents might promote patronage of local stores and services, and businesses might join the
neighborhood organization.
TIME: Short range project.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Business Association, Neighborhood Group, Schools.
B-23. Form a resident and merchants Colfax Walk group to daily walk along Colfax Avenue for
exercise and fitness, to support local businesses, and to assure continued law enforcement.
TIME: Short range project.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Businesses, Neighborhood Group.
RESEARCH, DESIGN, AND ANALYSIS
B-24. Survey the needs of businesses on Colfax Avenue. Coordinate with Aurora.
TIME: In progress.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Business Owners/Managers, Property Owners,
Mayors Ojfice of Economic Development, Neighborhood Group, Planning and
Development Office.
**PRIORITY FOR IMPLEMENTATION**
B-25. Inventory billboards along Colfax Avenue, noting spacing and size limitations prescribed by
ordinance and feasible alternatives.
TIME: Mid range project.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Neighborhood Group, Business Owners/Managers,
Zoning Administration.
B-26. Inventory Colfax Avenue and determine locations where sidewalk widening, repairs, and
handicap ramps are needed.
TIME: In-progress.
COST: $$ Private.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Business Owners/Managers, Neighborhood Group,
Public Works -Transportation Division.
B-27. Conduct an intensive workshop to develop marketing and/or reuse alternatives for the motels
located along Colfax Avenue. Address alternative reuse strategies, legal alternatives, financing
mechanisms for redevelopment, and economic development programs and tools. Include resource
people representing real estate, urban design, planning, business development, business owners and
managers, property owners, police, business licensing, housing experts, ethnic/cultural
representatives, and neighborhood residents.
TIME: Short range project.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Planning and Development Office, Mayors Office
of Economic Development, Business Owners/Managers, Neighborhood Group.
***PRIORITY FOR IMPLEMENTATION***
50


East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
INGREDIENTS FOR
BUSINESS REVITALIZATION
51
Business Revitalization


52


East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
HOUSING
DESCRIPTION AND ANALYSIS
The majority of land in the neighborhood is devoted to single family detached housing (2,122
homes). A nearly equal number of apartments are in the neighborhood (2,190 units). The
apartment homes are concentrated within a relatively small land area at several large apartment
communities and in two areas immediately to the north and south of Colfax Avenue where
duplexes and low density multi family housing are located.
Construction of Housing
Prior to 1940, today s East Montclair neighborhood consisted of farm land, a few houses, and
assorted businesses along U.S. highway 40 (Colfax Avenue). World War II brought expansion of
Lowry Air Force B ase and growth at nearby Stapleton Field, spurring construction of new homes.
The maj ority of single family residential units were built during the 1940 s and 1950 s. New
apartment construction occurred during the I960s and 1970s.
Regional Economy and Impacts on Housing
The 1980 s brought a downturn to the economy of Denver that resulted in a housing vacancy rate in
the East Montclair neighborhood of 21.8% by the end of the decade. Several apartment buildings, a
number of small multi-family buildings, and scattered single family homes became vacant and
boarded up. Selling prices for single family homes decreased. Vacancy rates increased at the
apartment complexes and among single family rental homes.
Families and individuals moved for a number of reasons. Some found they could no longer afford
their home due to loss of a job or a change in their income, while others found they could now afford
to buy or rent a larger reduced price home in another area. During the latter years of the 1980 s, the
Denver metropolitanregionexperiencedanetpopulationloss. From 1990 to 1994 the regions
population has been growing, a healthy economy has returned, and the stability of housing in the
neighborhood has improved.
Single Family Homes
There are 2,122 single family detached
homes in the East Montclair neighborhood
The 1990 U.S. Census found that among
occupied single family homes in the
neighborhood, 67.9% are owner occupied
and 32.1 % are renter occupied. This
compares to a City wide owner occupancy
rate of 80.3%.
A June 1992housing survey of the study area
found fourteen vacant repossessed single _________________________
family homes (HUD, VA, or bank owned). No Single Family Home in the neighborhood.
boarded up houses were found in the survey. A
small number of vacant lots located in ten areas around the neighborhood were identified. These
sites offer opportunities for new home construction.
53


East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
Home renovation and remodeling is taking place throughout the neighborhood. During 1991,303
permits were approved for alteration and remodeling work on single family homes. Work included
everything from major room additions and new garages, to electrical and plumbing upgrades and
new attic insulation.
Single family housing in the neighborhood. Single family housing in the neighborhood.
Appendix A illustrates the degree to which the gap between the average single family housing value
for Denver and that of the study area has widened over the years. This valuation does not reflect on
the condition of the housing stock or its desirability. It likely does reflect the average age (40 years)
and smaller floor areas of East Montclair homes built during the post-Korean W ar years, relative to
City wide housing.
Apartment Housing
There are 2,190 apartment units in the
neighborhood. Nearly half of these units
are located in just three complexes:
Evergreen Village (on Montview
Boulevard), Garden Court (on 11th
Avenue at Syracuse Street), and Heritage
Estates (on 12th Avenue at Uinta Street).
Moderate density apartment buildings
under separate ownership are also located
along Yosemite Street between 12th and
Colfax Avenues.
Other multi family construction is generally at a lower density, consisting of duplexes, triplexes,
and court apartments. These can be found on either side of Colfax Avenue between 14th and 16th
Avenues. A June 1992 survey found five of these low density apartment courts vacant and boarded
up. Citywide, similar low density court apartments have also experienced higher than would be
expected vacancy rates.
The June 1992 housing survey of the neighborhoods ten largest apartment communities containing
a total of 1,386 units found an occupancy rate of 91 %. The range of rental rates was between $250
for a one bedroom apartment and $650 for a three bedroom unit.
54


East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
Closure of Stapleton and Lowry
Stapleton International Airport closed and Denver International Airport opened in 1995. Lowry
Air Force B asel closed in October 1994. The Defense Finance and Accounting Service and Reserve
Personnel Center will continue in their present locations on the Lowry site. More than 20,000jobs
will be moving or be lost from Stapleton and Lowry.
A March 1993 survey showed that Lowry employees live all along the Colorado Front Range from
Ft. Collins to Boulder to Denver to Colorado Springs. Although there is some clustering in Denver
and Aurora neighborhoods adj acent to Lowry, the clustering is thin and the number of
neighborhood residents employed at Lowry is not large. The survey found that forty-four Lowry
employees live in the East Montclair neighborhood. Of these residents, 38 were military personnel
and 8 civilian employees. Those who are military personnel will be leaving the Denver area. The
civilian employees will have a choice to either stay in Denver (and find a new job) or relocate to a
military job in another part of the country. Residents employed at Lowry jobs that will likely be
leaving Denver represent only 1 % of neighborhood households.
The number of Stapleton Airport employees who reside in the East Colfax neighborhood is not
determined. The number is believed to be small, based on surveys at neighborhood meetings,
general observations reported by administrators at neighborhood schools, and indications from
several maj or Stapleton employers. Stapleton employees are believed to live throughout the
metropolitan region and Colorado Front Range. Whatever number of Stapleton employees live in
the neighborhood, their jobs will essentially remain the same. The only change will be in the
location where the j ob is performed. It is assumed that residents who work at Stapleton will not
immediately pickup and move to a closer house or apartment in Gateway, Montbello, or Green
V alley Ranch. As time passes, some movement will occur. Overall, the place of residence for
Denver International Airport employees is likely to continue to be spread throughout the
metropolitan region.
Because relatively few East Montclair residents work at either Lowry or Stapleton, the closure of
these facilities should have little impact on housing in the neighborhood.
VISION
* A strong and vital residential neighborhood.
* Increased rate of home ownership.
* Sound management and a mix of income levels in rental single family homes and
apartments.
* Renovated and well-maintained housing.
PLAN IMPLEMENTATION
The following action agenda contains recommendations made by residents (both home owners
and renters), apartment owners and managers, City departments, and other public and private
interests. Many recommendations require sweat equity, or rely heavily on people involvement
and organizing around a common objective. Some recommendations require focusing of an
existing program for example to publicize the Citys multi-family rehab program. A few
recommendations may need special funding, such as for a loan program, a grant to conduct a
study, or a marketing program. Funding sources include the private sector, foundation grants, and
Community Development Block Grant programs. For projects requiring public sector funding,
55
Housing


East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
one or several possible funding sources are listed, together with symbols ($) that indicate a very
generalized estimate of the cost. $ = less than $25,000. $$ = $25,000 to $250,000. $$$ = more
than $250,000.
Time frames for implementation are approximate. Projects are noted that were in progress even as
the plan was being developed. Short range means the action is projected to commence in years 1
and 2 after adoption of the plan. Mid range refers to an action that should begin in years 3 to 5.
Long range means implementation is projected to begin 5 or more years out. Certain action
recommendations could be carried out at little or no cost. Time frames are best guess and will
be altered with changing budget requirements, level of community involvement, and other
conditions.
HOUSING POLICIES
H-l. Encourage home ownership and purchase of single family homes by families and persons
who will live in the homes.
TIME: On-going project.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Realtors, Neighborhood Group, Planning and
Development Office.
HOUSING PHYSICAL IMPROVEMENTS PROJECTS
H-2. Provide to owners of small apartment courts information about rental rehab loan programs.
Explore strategies to convert one bedroom apartments to two or three bedroom apartments.
TIME: Short range project.
COST: $$ Private, CDBG, HOME.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Apartment Owners, Rental Property Owners,
Planning and Development Office.
H-3. Survey residents to determine those who
need assistance with home and yard
maintenance. Survey residents to determine
volunteers who can assist their neighbors.
Develop a tool lending library and provide how
to information on home improvements and
landscaping.
TIME: Short range project.
COST: $ Private, Grants.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP:
Neighborhood Group, Churches, Schools,
Merchants, Denver Water Department.
**PRIORITY FOR IMPLEMENTATION**
Early home built in East Montclair.
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East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
H-4. Identify residents interested in starting a community garden. Locate vacant land suitable for
the garden.
TIME: Short range project
COST $ CDBG.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Neighborhood Group, Churches, Schools, Planning
and Development Office.
H-5. Encourage upgrading and maintenance of rental properties by working with owners of
properties.
TIME: On-going project.
COST: $$ Private, CDBG.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Apartment Owners, Rental Property Owners,
Neighborhood Group, Planning and Development Office.
***PRIORITY FOR IMPLEMENTATION***
H-6. Familiarize residents with housing programs such as single family rehab loans, emergency
home repair, and low interest loan programs for first time homebuyers. Encourage homeowners to
add on additions and modernize single family homes. Utilize bank home equity loans, FHA Title
One loans, FHA 203(k) loans, and other loan programs for rehabilitating and completing home
upgrades.
TIME: On-going project.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Neighborhood Group, Planning and Development
Office, Denver Urban Renewal Authority, Lenders.
H-7. Make residents and landlords aware of City environmental ordinances, such as those related
to junk, dead cars, weeds, and number of people living in a housing unit. Develop and disseminate
a flyer concerning residential zoning and code enforcement requirements. Publicize scheduled days
for Large Item Pickup. Utilize neighborhood newsletters and school parent organizations.
TIME:On-going project.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Neighborhood Group, Schools, Public Works -
Neighborhood Support Services, Public Works Solid Waste Division, Zoning
Administration.
H-8. Organize an annual Alley Days event for residents to get acquainted and help each other
sweep and clean alleyways.
TIME: Short range project.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Neighborhood Group, Schools, Civic Groups.
57
Housing


East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
H-9. Encourage home owners to plant trees in
their front yards. Publicize Denver Digs Trees
and similar tree planting programs. Distribute
information about the Tree Amigo program that
assists lower income homeowners with dead tree
removal.
TIME: In progress / on-going project.
COST: $ Bond, Denver Digs Trees.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP:
Home Owners, Neighborhood Group, City
Forester.
New trees.
MARKETING
H-10. Spread the word that the East Montclair/East Colfax neighborhood is a great place to live.
Utilize promotion events, such as homebuyers fairs, picnics in neighborhood parks, concerts,
Colfax Avenue parades, and a Christmas lighting contest. Involve Realtors in community
activities. Explore development of a video for telling prospective home buyers about the
neighborhood.
TIME: Short range project.
COST: $ Private, Grants.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Neighborhood Group, Realtors, Schools, Churches,
Non-profit Housing Advocacy Group, Lenders.
H-ll. Work with the Denver Regional Apartment Association to facilitate a workshop for
apartment owners and managers in the neighborhood. Seek to develop a joint marketing program
and permanent organization through which apartment properties can network and address shared
interests and objectives.
TIME: In progress / on-going project.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Apartment Owners and Managers, Neighborhood
Group, Planning and Development Office.
H-12. Encourage investors to purchase vacant four to twelve unit multi-family structures.
Determine what amenities people want and what they are willing to pay for them. Look at
renovation opportunities that will make these units more marketable, such as creation of fenced
private courtyard space with each unit. Work with property owners to utilize the Citys Multi
Family Rental Rehabilitation Program to modernize apartments and use as a model for the
upgrading of similar properties.
TIME: Short range project.
COST: $$ Private, CDBG, HOME.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Investors, Realtors, Neighborhood Group, Planning
and Development Office.
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East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
RESEARCH, DESIGN, AND ANALYSIS
H-13. Participate in the Neighborhood Reinvestment Corporations planning process to study the
purchase of Garden Court and Heritage Estates apartments for development of mutual housing
(resident managed, long-term affordable housing).
TIME: In progress / on-going project.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROJJP: Neighborhood Reinvestment Corporation, Garden
Court and Heritage Estates Residents, Neighborhood Group, Planning and Development
Office.
*PRIORITY FOR IMPLEMENTATION*
H-14. Explore the possible conversion of the apartment buildings to offices on the 1400 block of
Yosemite Street.
TIME: Short range project.
COST $$ Private.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Property Owners, Zoning Administration.
H-15. Explore converting some of the Colfax Avenue motel properties to special needs housing,
such as for assisted living and elderly housing.
TIME: Short range project.
COST: $$ Special Funding to be Identified.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Motel Owners, Non-profit Housing Groups.
NEIGHBORHOOD COOPERATION AND INVOLVEMENT
H-16. Develop award/incentive programs to acknowledge neighbor participation.
TIME: Short range project.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Neighborhood Group.
H-17. Develop a network of block captains
throughout the neighborhood to coordinate the
Neighborhood Watch program, disseminate
information about community building programs
and activities, and generally encourage
neighborliness on each block.
TIME: In progress / short range project.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP:
Neighborhood Group, Schools.
H-18. As the City determines from current pilot
projects how to best implement a Citywide PeoPlemakeanei8llborhood.
recycling program, expand the program to serve
residents of the East Montclair neighborhood.
TIME: Short range to medium range project.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Public Works -Sanitary Services.
59
Housing


60


East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
PUBLIC SAFETY AND CRIME PREVENTION
Description and Analysis
Public safety and crime prevention are another area of concern to residents and businesses. In the
1993 Denver Neighborhood Crime Rates report, the East Colfax neighborhood was ranked 23rd
out of Denvers 72 neighborhoods. Crime decreased between 1992 and 1993.
In most city and suburban neighborhoods, the higher the population density and the more
businesses that are concentrated in an area, the higher will be the crime rate that can be expected.
For example, the Cherry Creek and Capitol Hill neighborhoods had higher rates of reported
crimes than the East Colfax neighborhood because they have more businesses and higher
residential densities.
Within the neighborhood, these areas are generally along East Colfax Avenue and on some
Yosemite Street blocks south of Colfax. Residents are faced with such problems as high crime rate
apartment buildings, boarded up buildings, prostitution, drug-related crimes, gang presence,
disturbances, and frequent police visits.
The north half of the neighborhood is served by Police District Two and the south half is served
by Police District Three. While there is a need to assure that police protection is well coordinated
between the two districts, a district boundary straddling Colfax Avenue assures more coverage,
more visibility of police cars, and better service than if a single district handled the area.
Crime prevention and a sense of safety are experienced primarily within and immediately around
a persons home or work place. The Neighborhood Watch program is active and is a helpful
resource, but should be expanded and strengthened on some blocks. Mid-block street lighting also
is a need in some areas.
VISION
* Increased sense of safety within the neighborhood.
* Reduced crime and 100% participation in the Neighborhood Watch Program.
* Coordinated police protection among Denver District Two, Denver District Three, and the
Aurora Police Department.
* Merchants, residents, and police officers educated in crime issues and crime prevention
needs.
PLAN IMPLEMENTATION
The following action agenda contains recommendations made by neighborhood residents,
businesses, City departments, and other public and private interests. Time frames for
implementation are approximate. Short range means the action is projected to commence in years
1 and 2 after adoption of the plan. Mid range means the action should begin in years 3 to 5. Long
range means implementation is likely to begin 5 or more years after adoption of the plan. Some
recommendations are understood to be on-going actions. Time frames are approximate and will
be altered with changing budget requirements and other conditions.
61


East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
DESIGN AND PHYSICAL IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS
PS-1. Install new alley and street lighting at mid-block locations on long residential blocks.
TIME: In progression-going project.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Public Works Street Lighting Section, Home
Owners.
*** PRIORITY FOR IMPLEMENTATION ***
PS-2. Where it is physically possible, locate outdoor eating areas on the sidewalk in front of
restaurants to create positive activity and a lively street atmosphere, and to discourage anti-social
activity through eyes on the street.
TIME: Short range/on-going project.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Restaurants, Public WorksRevocable Permits,
Colorado Department of Transportation, Zoning Administration.
PS-3. Discourage the locating of outdoor pay telephones along Colfax Avenue and make phones
for out-going calls only.
TIME: In progress project.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Businesses.
PS-4. Maintain security fences at Lowry and Stapleton until areas are redeveloped or occupied
with new uses. Security fences should be viewed as a short-term interim strategy to discourage
vandalism while buildings are vacant.
TIME: Short term project.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Stapleton Development, Lowry Redevelopment
Authority.
PUBLIC SERVICES
PS-5. Strictly enforce licensing requirements for Colfax Avenue businesses. Streamline police
department report referral to Excise and Licensing Department. Continue close monitoring of
business licensing.
TIME: Short range project.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Excise and Licensing, Police Department, Business
Owners/Managers, Neighborhood Group.
* PRIORITY FOR IMPLEMENTATION *
PS-6. Explore initiating neighborhood police foot, bicycle, or horse patrols along Colfax Avenue.
TIME: Short range project.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Police Department, Businesses, Neighborhood
Group.
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East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
PS-7. Coordinate Police law enforcement with Aurora.
TIME: In progress/ on-going project.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Police Department, Aurora Police Department.
PS-8. Assure coordination between Police Districts 2 and 3. In order to not reduce police
coverage, continue Colfax Avenue as the boundary between Police District 2 and Police District 3.
TIME: In progress/on-going project.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Police Department.
PS-9. Strictly enforce laws pertaining to excessive noise, disorderly conduct, and similar nuisance
activities in the neighborhood.
TIME: Short range/on-going project.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Residents, Businesses, Police Department,
Neighborhood Groups.
NEIGHBORHOOD COOPERATION AND INVOLVEMENT
PS-10. Support individual responsibility to clean up graffiti as well as forming groups to clean up
larger areas.
TIME: Short range/on-going project.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Neighborhood Group, Graffiti Hot Line.
PS-11. Educate and encourage awareness through neighborhood publications and meetings
stressing the rewards of getting involved and helping residents solve their ongoing situations.
TIME: In progress/on-going project.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Neighborhood Group, Police Department.
PS-12. Request that a monthly police report that includes locations and types of crimes be mailed
to registered neighborhood groups. Develop a mechanism for neighborhood crime reports to be
shared with the Neighborhood Watch block captains. Include a police report as a regular part of
the general meetings of the registered neighborhood groups.
TIME: Short range/on-going project.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Neighborhood Groups, Police Department.
PS-13. Network with other neighborhood organizations such as Original Aurora, Greater Park
Hill, Historic Montclair, and Inter Neighborhood Cooperation (INC) on crime prevention efforts.
TIME: On-going project.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Neighborhood Groups.
63
Public Safety/ Crime
Prevention


East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
PS-14. Educate citizens on crime prevention and the importance of calling 911, the crack hotline
(640-3080), and the crime line in each police district (District 2: 331-4076) (District 3: 698-3330).
TIME: On-going project.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Neighborhood Groups, Police Department.
PS-15. Expand and strengthen the network of Neighborhood Watch block captains. In addition to
crime prevention, develop and utilize this network to disseminate information concerning
neighborhood activities and community cooperation and involvement programs.
TIME: On-going project, beginning in 1994.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Neighborhood Groups, Schools, Police
Department, Neighborhood Watch.
PS-16. Keep clean and maintain the appearance
of neighborhood homes and Colfax Avenue
businesses. Seek to keep all homes, apartment
buildings, and commercial properties occupied.
Well cared for homes and businesses discourage
anti-social behavior.
TIME: In progress/on-going project.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP:
Neighborhood Group, Homeowners,
Businesses.
PS-17. Encourage tenant/landlord cooperation in
preventing crime and the forming of
Neighborhood Watch programs in apartment buildings.
TIME: Short range/on-going project.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Apartment Residents, Apartment Owners and
Managers, Neighborhood Watch, Police Department.
PS-18. Promote the use of existing services, such as home security surveys, citizen rider program,
and mid-block lighting request forms.
TIME: Short term/on-going project.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Neighborhood Group, Police Department.
64


East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
COMMUNITY FACILITIES
DESCRIPTION AND ANALYSIS
Most community facilities serving residents of the neighborhood are located either within the
boundaries of the neighborhood or close by in the broader Denver and adjacent Aurora
community. Many new facilities will also soon become available for public use when the nearby
Lowry Air Force Base is redeveloped.
Parks, Recreation, and Open Space
There are four Denverneighborhood parks serving residents ofEastMontclair/East Colfax. Two
are within the boundaries of the neighborhood, two are across the street but serve neighborhood
residents.
W.H. McNichols Park, located at 17th Avenue and Syracuse Street near Ashley Elementary
School, is situated on a four acre site acquired in 1950 and has two softball fields, two junior football
fields, picnic facilities, playground, shade trees, and attractive lawn areas. Renovation work was
recently completed at this park.
VerbenaPark, at 11th Avenue and Verbena Street, has a
picnic shelter, softball field, large open area, hike-bike path,
and pleasant shaded lawn areas.
Verbena Park.
Denison Park, located at 11th Avenue
and Quebec Street, has a playground area
and basketball court.
Fred Thomas Park, to the north of 23rd
Avenue between Quebec Street and
Syracuse Street, is one of Denvers
newest parks. Facilities include tennis
courts, playground, hike-bike path, large
open area, and ball fields for softball and
Fred Thomas Park.
Fred Thomas Park.
65


East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
football. There is an opportunity to enlarge this park and link it to other open space that is planned
for Stapletons redevelopment.
In addition to Denver parks, several Aurora parks also serve East Montclair residents with tennis
courts, picnic areas, basketball courts, ball fields, and hike-bike paths. City Park (9700 East 16th
Avenue), Montview Park (1901 Chester Street), and Fletcher Park (1100 Akron Street) are within
convenient walking distance for many residents.
Ashley Elementary School, located on Syracuse Street between 19th Avenue and Montview
Boulevard, has a playground, ball field, and basketball court used by neighborhood children.
An area that cannot be formally counted as neighborhood open space but that is used as a play area
by the neighborhood children is the vacant land found within the Westerly Creek Basin along the
east side of the 1100 block of Xanthia, the east side of the 1200 block of Xanthia, and the half block
area along 13th Avenue between Xanthia and Yosemite Streets. This undeveloped land owned by
the City and County of Denver has possibilities for recreation, pedestrian trails, and park
development.
A water reservoir site owned by the Denver Water Board is located on the west side of Quebec
Street at 11th Avenue, across from Denison Park. Ground above the subsurface reservoir is used by
reservation as a soccer playing field.
In addition to public parks
presently used by the
community, there are also
a number of parks and an
18 hole golf course located
on Lowry Air Force Base,
to the south of the
neighborhood.
In coming years, major
new open space areas will
be created at the Stapleton
site to the north of the
neighborhood. Natural
open space areas will
include trails and hiking
along Westerly Creek,
Sand Creek, and in the
vicinity of Bluff Lake. Approximately 600 acres of developed open space are also planned. This
will include trails, golf courses, tennis courts, ball fields, and new playground areas.
Golfing at Lowry.
66


East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
Schools
Ashley Elementary School is located at 1900
SyracuseStreetonasiteof3.38acres. An
officially designated landmark, Ashley School
was constructed in 1929, with an addition
completed in 1950 and another addition in
progress during 1993. The school contains an
auditorium, lunch room, and gymnasium that
make it an important resource for a wide variety of
neighborhood gatherings and activities.
Schools in the larger community that also serve
East Colfax residents include Montclair
Elementary School, Stanley British Primary School, St. James Catholic School, Smiley Middle
School, East High School, and Manual High School.
XMGftra REGISTRATION
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Ashley School
Colleges and Universities
The University of Denver is located to the
west of Quebec Street at Montview
Boulevard. Campus facilities include an
auditorium, fine arts center, tennis courts,
gyms, swimming pool, in addition to
university classrooms, labs, and halls.
The Emily Griffith Opportunity School offers
aircraft maintenance classes at nearby
Stapleton Airport.
A new college campus along Yosemite Street
south of 11th Avenue will become an anchor
in the development of the Lowry
neighborhood. A consortium of state funded
colleges and universities will be located on this campus. About 1,000 students will be on campus
during the Fall semester of 1994. Additional classes will startup in the Fall of 1995.
Recreation Centers
The nearest Denver recreation centers are more than 3 miles from the neighborhood: the Skyland
Center at 33rd Avenue and Holly Street and the Martin Luther King Center at 38th Avenue and
Newport Street. Two nearby Aurora centers partially serve neighborhood residents. They are the
Moorehead Recreation Center at 23rd Avenue and Havana Street and the Morning Star Senior
Center at Emporia Street and 16th Avenue.
Determining the location for a new recreation center approved in a 1989 bond issue has been
challenging, but worthwhile, for the East Montclair neighborhood. The initial planned location
was a site adj acent to the Montclair Post Office on East 11th Avenue. Following passage of the bond
issue, Lowry s closure was announced, which made available a number of already existing
recreation facilities on the Air Force B ase, including a 9,400 square feet Arts and Crafts building 2
1/2 blocks south of the Montclair Post Office. This option has been selected and can offer a variety
of recreation programs for senior adults, youth, and people of all ages.
67
Community Facilities


East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
Police and Fire Stations
The District 2 Police Station is located at 3355 Colorado B oulevard and serves the area north of
Colfax Avenue. South of Colfax Avenue is the responsibility of District 3 Police Station, based at
1625 South University Boulevard.
Fire protection is provided by Station 14, located at 1426 Oneida Street. Fire station buildings are
also located on Lowry Air Force Base and Stapleton Airport.
Libraries
Residents of the neighborhood have four libraries to choose from in obtaining library services. The
Montclair Library, a storefront service, is located at 9th Avenue and Jersey Street in the Jersey
Shoppette. The Dahlia Library, also a storefront service, is located at 33rd Avenue and Eudora
Street in the Dahlia Shopping Center. The Park Hill Library, located at Montview Boulevard and
Dahlia Street, offers the more extensive services of a branch library. A North Aurora branch library
is located at 14th Avenue and Peoria Street.
Churches
There are four churches within the East
Colfax neighborhood, and more than ten
additional churches within 6 blocks of the
neighborhood and located in Aurora,
Montclair, Park Hill, or on the Lowry Air
Force B ase. The church sponsored East
Denver Assistance Center is located on
Poplar Street south of Colfax Avenue and
provides help for families and individuals i
locating employment, food, clothing,
housing, support groups, and other human
services. Churches in the community provide Zion Temple-
residents with a variety of religious and
social programs.
Storm Drainage
Heavy rainfall and snowmelt are sometimes slow to drain from those streets in the neighborhood
that do not have storm sewers.
$1,416,000 in underground storm drainage improvements in the neighborhood have been
completed along Montview Boulevard (from the outfall at Westerly Creek near Boston Street to
Uinta Street), on Willow Street (Montview Boulevard tol9th Avenue), on Wabash Street (19th
Avenue to 17th Avenue), on 19th Avenue (Verbena Street to Willow Street), on 17th Avenue
(Roslyn Street to Unita Street, and Verbena Street to Willow Street), on Unita Street (Montview
Boulevard to 17th Avenue), on Trenton Street (17th Avenue to 16th Avenue), and on 16th Avenue
(Trenton Street to Tamarac Street).
Construction will continue in 1995 with another $450,000 in underground strom drainage
improvements on Syracuse Street (17th Avenue to Colfax Avenue), on Colfax Avenue (Syracuse
Street Street to Rosemary Street), and on Rosemary Street (Colfax Avenue to 14th Avenue).
68


East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
Improvements are also planned for storm drainage in the areabounded by 16th Avenue, 12th
Avenue, Roslyn Street, and Yosemite Street. Work in this area is tentatively scheduled to begin in
1998.
PLAN IMPLEMENTATION
The following action agenda contains recommendations made by residents, City departments, and
other public and private interests. Potential funding sources for the various capital improvement
projects include the Citys Capital Improvements Plan (CIP), Public Works Enterprise Funds,
grants, and 1989 and future Citywide bond issues. Funding sources each have different criteria
for projects and will change from year to year. One or several potential funding sources are listed
for each project, together with symbols ($) that indicate a very general estimate of cost. $ = less
than $25,000. $$ = $25,000 to $250,000. $$$ = more than $250,000.
Time frames for implementation are approximate. Projects are noted that were in progress as the
plan was being developed. Short range means the action is projected to commence in years 1 and
2 after adoption of the plan. Mid range means the action should begin in years 3 to 5. Long range
means implementation is projected to begin 5 or more years out. Certain action recommendations
could be carried out at little or no cost. Time frames are best guess and will be altered with
changing budget requirements and other conditions.
VISION
* Community public facilities that promote the health, safety, and general welfare of
residents and businesses.
* Community educational, cultural, parks, and recreation facilities for the use and enjoyment
of residents.
* Removal of real and perceived barriers to resources located in the surrounding Denver and
Aurora neighborhoods.
CAPITAL AND PHYSICAL IMPROVEMENTS
CF-1. Locate additional picnic tables at McNichols Park. Install irrigation automation.
TIME: Short range project.
COST: $$ Grants, CIP
IMPLEMENTING AGENCIES/GROUPS: Parks and Recreation Department.
CF-2. Rebuild and upgrade the childrens play area at Verbena Park. Place more picnic tables in
the park.
TIME: Mid range project.
COST: $$ CIP
IMPLEMENTING AGENCIES/GROUPS: Parks and Recreation Department.
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Community Facilities


East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
CF-3. Enlarge Fred Thomas Park by
expanding it onto the Stapleton Airport
property (located to the east and north) and
linking the park to open space in new
Stapleton neighborhoods.
TIME: Short range land dedication /
long range development project.
COST: $$$ Private Development,
CIP.
IMPLEMENTING
AGENCIES/GROUPS: Stapleton
Planning and Development, Parks and
Recreation Department, Private Development.
CF-4. Upgrade and improve bleachers at Fred Thomas Park.
TIME: Short range project.
COST: $$CIP
IMPLEMENTING AGENCIES/GROUPS: Parks and Recreation Department.
CF-5. Asphalt overlay the parking lot area at Denison Park.
TIME: Short range project.
COST: $CIP
IMPLEMENTING AGENCIES/GROUPS: Parks and Recreation Department.
CF-6. Develop a Westerly Creek Master Plan jointly with Denver and Aurora. Link the existing
High Line recreation trail and the future Sand Creek (Emerald Strands) open space and trail system.
The master plan should address drainage, landscaping, park, and trail amenities in the area of the
Kelly Dam spillway and along Westerly Creek as it flows to the north-northeast through Lowry,
the East Montclair neighborhood, Original Aurora neighborhood, and Stapleton to reach its
confluence at Sand Creek. The study should determine feasibility and opportunities for opening up
portions of the creek that now flow underground through pipes. Stapleton and Lowry land
dedications should occur soon after the closure of these facilities.
TIME: Short range land dedication, medium to long range development project.
COST: $$$ Private Development, CIP, future City wide bond project.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCIES/GROUPS: City of Aurora, Parks and Recreation
Department, Public Works Transportation, Lowry Redevelopment Authority, Public Works
- Wastewater Management, Urban Drainage and Flood Control District, Stapleton
Development, Planning and Development Office.
^PRIORITY FOR IMPLEMENTATION***
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East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
CF-7. Work with the Department of Parks and Recreation and adjacent property owners to
determine the feasibility of constructing along a proposed storm drainage channel a
pedestrian/bicycle trail connection to Verbena Park from properties to the west.
TIME: Mid range to long range project.
COST: $$CIP
IMPLEMENTING AGENCIES/GROUPS: Parks and Recreation Department.
CF-8. Create a link between Lowry open space at the Kelly Dam and East Montclair open space
along Westerly Creek. Identify other possible gateway areas where linkage should be created
between Stapleton open space and the East Montclair neighborhood and between Lowry open
space and the East Montclair neighborhood.
TIME: In progress through the Lowry and Stapleton planning processes. Long range
implementation.
COST: $$$ Urban Drainage and Flood Control Maintenance Funds, CIP, Private
Development.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCIES/GROUPS: Planning and Development Office, Parks and
Recreation Department, Lowry Redevelopment Authority, Stapleton Development Office,
Public Works Wastewater Management.
^PRIORITY FOR IMPLEMENTATION**
CF-9. Complete the construction of the 17th and Ulster and 13th and Ulster storm sewer projects.
Resurface arterial and collector streets after completion of storm sewer work.
TIME: In progress / mid range project.
COST: $$$ Public Works Enterprise Funds.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCIES/GROUPS: Public Works Wastewater Department, Public
Works -Transportation.
SERVICES AND PROGRAMS
CF-10. Parks and Recreation Department and neighborhood organizations work together to
establish summer youth programs in a neighborhood park.
TIME: Short range project.
COST: $ General Fund.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCIES/GROUPS: Neighborhood Organizations, Schools, Parks
and Recreation Department.
RESEARCH AND ANALYSIS
CF-11. Locate an outdoor swimming pool to serve east Denver neighborhoods. Among sites to
consider, explore a location for the pool at Fred Thomas Park.
TIME: Long range project.
COST: $$$ Future Citywide bond issue.
IMPLEMENTING AGENCIES/GROUPS: Parks and Recreation Department.
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Community Facilities


East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
APPENDIX A Population
Census Tract 44.01 Demographic
Population
Total Population 7,172
Total Households 3,298
Average Household Size (persons per Household) 2.17
Income
Median Household Income $20,389
(City wide $25,106)
Per Capita Income $11,328
(Citywide $15,590)
Persons Below Poverty Level 1,516
Number of Families 1,680
Families Below Poverty Level 336
Number of persons Under 18 Years 1,733
Number of Persons Under 18 Years Below Poverty 620
Age Profile
Number of
Residents
1800
1600 -----
1400 [l---
1200 (I---
1000 li---
800 11--
600 U_
400 11
200 tL
\
Source: 1990 Census
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East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
Ethnic Composition
Black 2361
32.9%
2.2%
Hispanic 731
10.2%
---Other 26
0.4%
Anglo 3824
53.3%
*Source: 1990 U.S. Census of Population and HousingPublic Law file Pl-94-171. The categories
Anglo, Black, Asian, Native American, and Other are composed of people not of Hispanic origan.
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East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
APPENDIX B Housing
Housing Units (Multi Family and Single Family Detached)
Total Housing Units* 4,260
Occupied Housing Units* 3,298
Vacant Housing Units* 962
Owner Occupied/Renter Occupied Single Family Detached Homes
Owner Occupied Single Family Detached 1,275
Renter Occupied Single Family Detached 604
(City Owner Occupied 80.3%)
Source: 1990 Census
Household Profile
Other 503
Married no Children 531 ;*
t
1
MHH w/Children 87
FHH w/Children 396
Single Person 1398
Household Tvnes L Married w/Children 453
Single Person Households
Married Couples w/Children
Married Couples no Children
Male Head Household w/ Children (MHH)
Female Head Household w/Children (FHH)
Other (non-family, non-related children, adults living together)
Source: 1990 Census
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East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
Transaction Price
Single Family Homes
City Average
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East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
APPENDIX C Business Survey
SUMMARY OF BUSINESS SURVEY RESULTS
During the Fall of 1992, a planner and intern from the Planning and Development Office drafted
and distributed a survey to all businesses located along the East Colfax Avenue business corridor
between Quebec and Yosemite Streets. The survey was a part of the East Colfax neighborhood
planning process. Its purposes were to:
* Learn which types of business activity are improving, declining, or remaining the same.
* Anticipate the impacts on businesses that will result from the closures of Stapleton Field
and the Lowry Air Force Base.
* Understand what types of improvements the business community recommends for the
corridor and measure their willingness to participate in financing the recommended
improvements.
* Obtain information regarding the trade areas served by various businesses.
SURVEY DESIGN AND ADMINISTRATION
A two page survey instrument was drafted by the City of Denver. It was designed specifically to
obtain information that was not available from secondary data sources.
A planner and intern from the Planning and Development Office hand delivered the survey to each
business in the East Colfax Avenue study area. The completed surveys were picked up at a later
time, returned by a self-addressed envelope, or filled out in a follow-up interview. These efforts
yielded51 surveys out of apossible 61 for aresponse of nearly 84%. Motels were not included in
the survey.
DESCRIPTIVE INFORMATION
( Categories. ofBusinesses)
Nearly 59% of respondents are engaged in retail trade or provision of business, personal, or
professional services. These include clothing and shoe stores, auto and boat repair, laundromat,
grocery and convenience stores, veterinarian, lock and safe shop, beauty supplies, and the like.
Just under 12% of respondents operate auto sales businesses. Sports cars, classic vehicles, and used
truck and car sales are among these businesses.
About 29% of respondents are engaged in restaurant, club, or bar businesses. Long time ethnic
eating and drinking places include African American, Chinese, Greek, Italian, Mexican, and Thai
establishments. Also located along Colfax Avenue are fast food and delivery restaurants, such as
Burger King, Wendys, and Little Caesars.
(Years in Business)
Each owner or manager indicated the number of years the business has been at its present location.
About 45 % of the responding businesses have been at their current location for 5 years or less; 20%
for6-10years; 12% for 11-15 years; 10% for 16-20years;andl6% for 20 years ormore. Clean and
Green (laundry and check cashing) has been in business at its present location for 46 years; West
Auto Body for 46 years; Dairy Queen for 44 years;Dr. Cioetafor 39 years; PMM Western Wear for
35 years; Montclair Animal Clinic for 30 years (18 years with Wayne Sargeant as owner); Don
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East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
Bowman TV and Appliance for 21 years; Strasenbahn Motors for 20 years; and State-wide Lock
and Safe for 12 years.
(Trade Area)
Most business respondents report their trade area is regional in scale. Only 10% reported most of
their customers come from the immediate neighborhood (within 1/2 mile). Forty-one percent said
their trade area includes the entire metropolitan area. Several businesses indicated most of their
customers come from outside of the Denver metropolitan area. Among restaurants and bars,
customers are more likely to come from closer in (within 2 to 4 miles).
(Number of Employees)
The 51 businesses that responded to the survey reported 309 full and part-time employees.
Restaurants employ 155 people; retail, personal, and business services 127; auto sales 14; and bars
13. Restaurants account for a significant number of employees. One fast food restaurant reported
having more than 30 employees. On the other end of the spectrum, a number of service businesses
reported having no employees other than the owner.
These numbers do not include eleven motels, three businesses that opened in late 1992, and ten
businesses that did not respond to the survey. When all businesses are included, the total number of
employees is likely between 350 and 400.
BUSINESS CONDITIONS
(Historic Business Activity)
Thirty-one percent report that their business activity has improved over the last three years, 27 %
report stable activity, 31 % report business activity has declined, and 11 % did not respond to this
question.
Businesses with improved activity attribute their condition to internal efforts such as aggressive
business practices, competitive pricing, increased advertising, and quality of service. Businesses
with declining activity attribute their condition to external events such as the economy, real or
perceived problems on Colfax Avenue, and increased competition.
(Best Locational Characteristics)
A majority of respondents made a direct or indirect reference to their street as their best locational
characteristic. An East Colfax Avenue address provides good accessibility, is easy to find, offers
high traffic counts, and is perceived to be a regional business location. Proximity to Stapleton
Field and Lowry Training Center is another strong point. For certain businesses, a location midway
between Downtown Denver and Aurora is an asset. Convenience grocery stores find the area to be
perfect because it is midway between large supermarkets in Aurora and Denver.
A number of businesses mentioned loyal customers in the neighborhood and proximity to similar
businesses as other pluses for their location. Several people referenced the reasonable rental rates
ideal for starting a new business.
(WorstLocational Characteristic)
Respondent remarks regarding the worst characteristics of their location centered on the real or
perceived problems of illegal activity on Colfax Avenue. Sixty-one percent of all respondents
mentioned the reputation of the street, crime, the people on the street, or a need for the police to be
more visible. Other less frequently given responses included: difficulty in getting bank loans,
government bureaucracy, snow and water in the gutters, no snow removal on side streets, and traffic
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East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
circulation and parking problems at specific locations. One respondent mentioned customers
gambling in the mountain casinos as a reason for a decline in business.
BUSINESS OUTLOOK
(Plans to Expand)
Forty-three percent of the respondents have no plans to expand their building or inventory. Nearly
22% plan to expand at their present location on Colfax Avenue. Ten percent will wait to see how the
Stapleton and Lowry closures impact business. Only 8 % are looking at expanding at another
location.
(Plans to Relocate)
A substantial proportion of the businesses have clear intentions to stay in their present location
(76%). This is an important indicator of the economic stability of this business area.
(Recommended Improvements)
Four types of improvements are recommended by more than 40 percent of the respondents. These
are, in frequency order: more visible police role, landscaping improvements, low-interest
expansion loans, and cooperative business promotion.
(Willingness to Finance Improvements)
Seventy-eight percent of respondents are unwilling to help finance any of the recommended
improvements. Several indicated a desire to participate in financing landscaping and sidewalk
improvements adj acent to their properties. Several businesses would help pay for a more visible
police presence or private security services. Several businesses would participate in cooperative
business promotion.
BUSINESS FROM STAPLETON FIELD
Respondents were asked what percentage of their business is related to Stapleton Field, and
specifically if this was from airport and airline personnel, passengers, or car rental/hotel employees.
- 8 % said none of their business is from Stapleton.
- 26% said less than 5% of their business is from Stapleton.
-16% said between 5% and 10% of their business is from Stapleton.
-18 % said between 11 % and 15 % of their business is from Stapleton.
-16% said between 16% and 20% of their business is from Stapleton.
-12% said more than 20% of their business is from Stapleton.
Restaurants and bars indicated the strongest ties to Stapleton. Among restaurant respondents
twenty-seven percent said 20% or more of their business is from Stapleton; forty-five percent said
between 10% and 20%, and twenty-seven percent said less than 10%.
Most of Stapletons approximately 10,000 employees work20 blocks or less from Colfax Avenue.
Employees are less than a five minute drive from lunch or breakfast at a Colfax Avenue restaurant,
an after work dinner or drink at a bar or restaurant, and convenient delivery and take-out food.
Some restaurants indicated they offer special discounts for Stapleton employees.
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East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
Other business categories that indicated ties to Stapleton were car rentals, filling stations
(customers gas up with reasonably priced gas before returning rental cars); auto repair garages
(customers have vehicles serviced while out of the City, pick up when return); and airport building
services (special trades and contractor services).
BUSINESS FROM LOWRY TRAINING CENTER
Respondents were asked what percentage of their business is related to the Lowry Air Force B ase.
- 8% said none of their business is from Lowry.
- 33% said less than 5% of their business is from Lowry.
- 24% said between 5% and 10% of their business is from Lowry.
-10% said between 10% and 15% of their business is from Lowry.
-10% said between 16% and 20% oftheir business is from Lowry.
- 4% said more than 20% of their business is from Lowry.
Among categories of businesses, restaurants, bars, car rental agencies, furniture and appliance
sales, and moving services reported the strongest ties to Lowry Training Center employees.
Nine percent of restaurant respondents indicated more than 20% of their business is from Lowry,
thirty-six percent between 11 % and 20%, and fifty- six percent under 10%. Restaurants with the
strongest connections mentioned Lowry advertising and special military discounts.
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East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan
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Full Text

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PLATE 33 II ..
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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN TABLE OF CONTENTS Acknowledgements ............................................................ ........ : .............. Introduction ............................................................................................... Vision for the Future Priority Planning Issues Location and Description Neighborhood History Map of Denver Neighborhoods Use of the Plan ......................................................................................... The Action Agenda Means of Plan Implementation Residents, Businesses, and Governmental Resources Working Together for Plan Implementation Urban Design ........................................................................................... Land Use and Zoning .............................................................................. Transportation ........................................................................................ Business Revitalization ........................................................................... Housing .................................................................................................... Public Safety and Crime Prevention ........................................................ Community Facilities .............................................................................. Appendix A -Population ........................................................................... Population Income Age Profile Ethnic Composition Appendix B -Housing ............................................................................... Housing Units Owner/Renter Occupied Household Profile Housing Transaction Prices Appendix C -Businesses ........................................................................ Summary ofBusiness Survey Approved by the Denver Planning Board November 3, 1993 Approved by the Denver City Council January 31, 1994 Effective date of Ordinance 58 (Series of 1994) is February 4, 1994 page 1 page 3 page9 page 13 page 25 page 33 page 43 page 53 page 61 page 65 page 72 page 74 page 76

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Mayor of Denver Wellington E. Webb Denver Planning Board Ruth E. Falkenberg, Chair James Daniels Daniel R. Guimond BernieJones Jeanne Labuda Mary Beth Susman Thomas H. Foster, Jr. William H. "Bill" Hornby Gilbert F. McNeish Marilyn M. Stokes STEERING COMMITTEE PLANNING TEAM City Council Representatives Polly Flo beck, District 5 Allegra "Happy" Haynes, District 11 Neighborhood Resident Representatives JoeDeBrower, Chair Lee Coleman Yvonne Dallison Carol Keen Gary Lasater Dale Mcinerny Jim Newman Sharon Northcutt Oneda Patterson Tom Poulson JodyRomano Barbara Taylor Kay Thompson Rebecca Trampler Lewis Watts Neighborhood Business Representatives Colette Kolar Derek McFadden Devon Ryan Bob West. Human Resource Plan Representatives Evelyn Bryant Bonna Gayhart Darlene Workman 1 John Conway Laura Edler Polly Kitchen Greg McAllister Roxie McKinster Ray Northcutt Kimberly Parke JoycePecce Christy Romano Ray Sanford Marvin Taylor Thomas Thompson Donilyn Watley Curtis Young Scott Kolar Richard Munslow Robert Ryan Dick Clark Noreen Mahon

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Neighborhood History Contributors Dale Mcinerny Don Bowman Phyllis Garcia Jim Hitch LaddKolar Irene Robbins Gene Taylor City of Aurora Representatives Henry Jackson Barton Wong Christy Romano Bruce Cavanagh Bonna Gayhart George Konteresk Scott Kolar Dr. Wayne Sargent Bob West Marlin Wood Alan Nazarro City of Denver Agency and Department Representatives Bob Dorroh, Public Works-Transportation Paul Foster, Deputy Manager Parks and Recreation Darrell Jackson, Mayor's Office ofEconomic Development B al vino Martinez Chaves, Director Excise and Licenses Terry Rosapep, Public Works-Transportation Tom Nelson, Public Works-Wastewater Management Neil Sperandeo, Parks and Recreation Long Range Planning Elliot Sulsky, Public Works -Transportation Wilma Taylor, Stapleton Development Office Bonnie Turner, Mayor's Office of Economic Development Denver Planning and Development Office JenniferT. Moulton, Director Of Planning and Development Dick Farley, Deputy Director for Urban Design Ann Mitre, Former Deputy Director for Community Development Dorothy Nepa, Deputy Director for Zoning Administration Harriet Hogue, Planning Program Manager Jerry Garcia, Community Development Program Manager Doug Wheeler, Neighborhood Planner and Project Manager Gordon Appell, Northeast Quadrant Land Use and Transportation Ken Barkema, Graphic Artist Allan Fredrick, Housing Programs Steve Gordon, Planning Specialist for Housing Manuel Maestas, Residential Neighborhoods Small Projects Madie Martin, Urban Designer Jay Meehl,Intem for Business Survey Carolyn Moore, Word Processing Assistance Phil Plienis, Demographic Specialist Dawn Towle, Zoning Specialist Beth Truby, Commercial Streetscape Projects Norm Avery Phyllis Dixon Ken Harvey Colette Kolar Sally Pierce Barbara Taylor Jim Wood We gratefully acknowledge the more than 300 neighborhood residents and business people who attended meetings and workshops, and provided advice, guidance, and ideas for this plan. 2

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN INTRODUCTION A. VISION FOR THE FUTURE The East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood vision for the future is to preserve, nurture, and enhance the following qualities that make the neighborhood a good place to live and do business: * * Community spirit: a strong sense of neighborhood pride and cooperation among residents and business owners. High quality new businesses and expansion of existing businesses. Beauty and design excellence of parks, open space, streets, and commercial areas. Solid housing stock and affordable selling prices ideal for first time and long time home owners. Diversity of people in ages, income, ethnic and cultural heritage. Quiet, safe, and friendly environment ideal for the enjoyment of families and children. Linkage to high quality new development and neighborhood economic benefits from Lowry and Stapleton redevelopment. Creative partnerships involving residents, businesses, Denver City Government, Aurora City Government, Lowry redevelopment, and Stapleton redevelopment. B. PRIORITY PLANNING ISSUES Residents, business people, and City representatives who established this vision see tremendous potential as the East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood builds on these characteristics. The plan addresses the following priority topics as established in the neighborhood meetings: urban design zoning and land use traffic and transportation business revitalizatio.n housing public safety community facilities C. LOCATION AND DESCRIPTION The East Colfax statistical neighborhood is the approximately one square mile of land located between Lowry Air Force Base on the south and Stapleton International Airport on the north. Boundaries for the study area are Yosemite Street on the east (also the Denver-Aurora City limits), Quebec on the west, 11th A venue on the south, and Montview Boulevard and 23rd Avenue on the north. Boundaries coincide with U.S. Census Tract 44.01. This Denver neighborhood will be affected more than any other by the closures of Stapleton International Airport and Lowry Air Force Base. This plan is being developed to anticipate these changes and also to address business and housing needs in the neighborhood. 3

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN The names "East Colfax" and "East Montclair" are used interchangeably in the plan. Previous City reports and studies of the area use the name "East Colfax" and the neighborhood business association uses this name to highlight their location on Denver's "main street" heritage corridor. "East Montclair" is the name linked to early development of the area and is the name of the community organization serving residents of the area. D. NEIGHBORHOOD IDSTORY STUDY AREA Miles Neighborhood roots go back to the late 1850's when a branch of Smoky Hill Trail brought gold seekers arriving by horse and wagon on what is today Colfax A venue. Over time, farms and houses appeared along the trail, which became known as the. Kansas City Road, because it connected the early village of Denver to the nearest big city to the east. In 1888 the town of Montclair was incorporated. The home of the town's founder, Mathias Chochrane of Montclair, New Jersey, still stands at 1304 Olive Street. Montclair's guiding vision, as promoted in an early speech by Baron von Richtofen, was for a community in which "only tasteful houses of $1,000 will" be allowed ... Colfax Avenue will be graded and improved like Broadway ... shade trees will be planted throughout...an artesian well will provide water .. .light towers will be erected ... the town will be the pride of all Denver." 1304 Olive Street. By 1900 there were 88 homes in Montclair. The town also boasted a zoo, college, golf course, art gallery, and private and public schools. St. Luke's Episcopal Church was built in 1890 and the Stanley British Primary School in 1891. What is now Lowry Field was owned by the Episcopal Church and included the Jarvis Hall Military School. Students at the military school marched along a road that ran northwesterly from the school to St. Luke's Church on 13th Avenue. The road can still be seen today on the short section of Richtofen Place between Quince and Roslyn streets. 4

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN After 14 years as a suburb, Montclair was annexed to Denver on December 1, 1902. This annexation included the area east of Monaco Parkway and north of 6th A venue Parkway, eastward to Yosemite Street and northward to 26th Avenue. Denver's present neighborhoods of Montclair, East Colfax, and Lowry Field became part of Denver through this annexation 92 years ago. A Colfax A venue streetcar line once extended east from Downtown through East Montclair to Fletcher (Aurora today). In later years the line ended at a Poplar Street tum-a-round, and a bus continued east on Colfax A venue to Fitzsimons Hospital. Development came slowly, especially in areas north or south of Colfax A venue. As late as the 1930's, it was still possible to look to the east and see Fitzsimons Hospital. Neighborhood boys hunted pheasant and rabbits in the open fields. In 1922 the "Greeters of America," a national organization of hotel employees, established a home for its members who were indigent because of sickness or other misfortune. Located on 5 acres of land, the home was surrounded by orchards, gardens, and chickens tended to by the patients. The Greeters of America Home was dissolved in the 1950's and converted into two private residences. The home at 17 40 Ulster Street was designated a Historical Landmark in 1990. The "Ex-Patients Tubercular Home" opened 1740 Ulster Street, Greeters of America Home. in 1930 at 8000 Montview. Where the vacant lot is now seen at 19th Avenue and Trenton Street was the home's cowbarn. The milk cows were sold after there were problems with the cows getting loose and wandering into the yards and flower gardens of nearby new homes. The home closed in 1966. As the decades passed, technology and world events brought growth and change to the area. To the north, Stapleton Field was opened in 1929 to accommodate air travel to and from Denver. Until the late 1940's, Ulster Street led directly to the airport terminal. In 1937, Lowry Air Force Base was established to the south. Although there was nearly constant sound of aircraft landing and taking off on two sides, residential development came to the neighborhood to house workers from these two closeby installations. Construction of single family homes flourished after World War II and continued into the 1950's. Paved streets and houses soon infilled around the older houses and rural farm buildings. Stapleton 1929. Courtesy Colorado Historial Society. 5

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN To house Titan missile project construction workers in the early 1960's, apartment complexes were built on Yosemite Street south of Colfax A venue. Apartment construction continued at other locations into the 1970's, in part as a response to a housing market for military and airline personnel. Over the years, businesses prospered along U.S. Highway 40 (Colfax Avenue). As Denver's primary link to the east until Interstate 70 was completed in 1965, the avenue was lined with restaurants, motels, gift shops, service stations, and garages to serve tourists coming to the Rocky Mountain region. Dating back to the early 1930's, Colfax Avenue between Ulster and Uinta functioned as a sort of "town center." For several decades there was a drug store, beauty shop, barber, hardware store, dry goods store, and several grocery markets. The Davis Dry Goods Store closed in 1956 after 20 years in business and the building was tom down to make way for a new Italian restaurant known as Paisan' s. 1936-56 Davis Dry Goods. Lowry Air Force Base. Courtesy Colorado Historial Society. 6 Early Lowry Air Force Base. Courtesy Colorado Historial Society.

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN A number of long time Colfax A venue businesses continue to provide convenient shopping, services, and employment for residents. Among the neighborhood's landmark businesses are West Auto Body-46 years, Clean and Green Laundry and check cashing-46 years, Dairy Queen-44 years, Dr. Cioeta Medical Office-39 years, PMM Western Wear-35 years, Don Bowman TV and Appliance-21 years, Strasenbahn Motors20 years, Montclair Animal Clinic-18 years, and State-wide Lock and Safe-12 years. The East Colfax/East Montclair neighborhood story is one of growth, change, and development reaching back to the first gold seekers and continuing with today' s residents and business people. We remember this story in order to understand the community's strengths and growing pains today, and to see clearly our way into the future. As we defme in this plan the neighborhood vision and goals, we carry on the century-old vision of Baron Von Richtofen of a great and enviable community. Many residents and business people contributed to the recounting of this history. Please refer to the acknowledgements on page 2. Stapleton Airport. Courtesy Colorado Historial Society. Stapleton Airport. Courtesy Coloado Historical Society 7 Early Lowry Air Force Base. Courtesy Colorado Historial Society.

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN USE OF THE PLAN The principal purpose for preparing this plan is to influence and guide the process of change in East Colfax (East Montclair) to better meet the needs of residents and business people in the neighborhood. This plan represents the consensus of the neighborhood in identifying and analyzing neighborhood needs, issues, and opportunities. The plan is intended to promote patterns of land use, urban design, circulation and services that contribute to the economic, social, and physical health, safety, and welfare of the people who live or do business in the East Colfax neighborhood. The plan addresses issues and opportunities at a scale that is more refined and more responsive to specific needs than the City's Comprehensive Plan. The plan serves as a component of that document. This plan presents the best thinking of the City and the neighborhood and provides a city-approved guide for the acceptable future physical development of the neighborhood for use by the Planning and Development Office, the Denver Planning Board, the Mayor, City Council, governmental agencies, neighborhood associations, residents, property owners, business people, and private organizations concerned with planning, development, and neighborhood improvement. The plan is neither an official zone map nor does it imply or deny any implicit rights to a particular zone. Zone changes that may be proposed by property owners as part of any plan must be initiated under a separate procedure established under the City and County of Denver Municipal Code. A. PLAN IMPLEMENTATION: THE ACTION AGENDA The seven elements of the plan (urban design, zoning and land use, traffic and transportation, business revitalization, housing, publicsafety, and community facilities) each have an action agenda section that lists specific recommendations, general time frames, potential funding sources, and approximate costs. Some recommendations can be implemented quickly and at minimal effort or cost. Other projects are expensive or multi-faceted and implementation is viewed as long term. One benefit that comes from having an official neighborhood plan is being ready when an unforseen implementation opportunity comes along. Costs are "best guess" and are provided only for the purpose of distinguishing between inexpensive and big ticket projects. Implementation agencies, groups, and other stakeholders are listed. They play varied roles in the decision making process for each recommendation. Each element of the plan references recommendations that the steering committee identified as highest priority for implementation. As a living and evolving document, the neighborhood associations and City representatives will from time to time need to review, update, and change these priorities. For the plan as a whole, the steering committee selected three projects as "top priority" for implementation: 1) Complete a master plan and develop landscaping and other street and sidewalk beautification improvements along Colfax A venue between Quebec Street and Yosemite Street. (Recommendation UD-14). 2) Link the neighborhood to high quality new Stapleton and Lowry development. To accomplish this, improvements may be needed in the Quebec and Y osernite Street corridors, including widening of streets, detached sidewalks, new streetscapes, and adequate provision for street right-of-way and building setbacks. (Recommendation T -1) 9

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 3) Conduct a workshop to develop marketing and/or reuse alternatives for the motels located along Colfax Avenue. Address alternative reuse strategies, legal alternatives, financing mechanisms for redevelopment, and economic development programs and tools. (Recommendation B27) B. MEANS OF PLAN IMPLEMENTATION The 130 Action Recommendations in this plan constitute an agenda with which to begin implementation. But how do the Action Recommendations get implemented? Who is responsible to carry them out? The means of implementing this plan are as numerous as the individual proposals. However, the primary techniques of plan implementation are time and human resource involvement of residents and businesses, expenditure of public funds, the enactment and enforcement of public ordinances and regulations, and the use of the plan policies by public bodies (e.g. City Council, Planning Board, etc.) in making decisions that affect East Colfax. The available funding sources for plan implementation are themselves varied. The City's six year Capital Improvements Program Plan (CIPP) targets available resources for capital project funding. Action Recommendations that are appropriate for total or partiai funding should be placed within the CIPP. Although the competition for these limited funds is severe among Denver's neighborhoods, every effort should be made to place as many projects as possible within the all important first year of the CIPP (known as the CIP Capital Improvement Plan). These first year projects actually receive funding whereas the projects in years two through six are future promises. Another important funding resource for moderate income neighborhoods such as East Colfax is the federal Community Development Block Grant program (CDBG) as administered by the City. CDBG is actually made up of several programs, including the Residential Neighborhood Small Projects Program (RNSP), Commercial Streetscape Program (CSP), the Non-Profit Facility Improvements Program (NFI), and the Alley and Street Improvement Program. East Montclair should actively pursue these CDBG programs for funding selected projects. Some substantive program areas, such as transportation and housing, have their own funding sources and these have been listed in the Action Recommendations. The East Montclair Neighborhood Plan will also be implemented through the enactment and enforcement of City ordinances. Certain Action Recommendations will be carried forward through the application of the Denver Zoning Ordinance, Vacant and Abandoned Housing Ordinance, motel licensing requirements, and other city, state, and federal regulations. Finally, some of the Action Recommendations are statements of public policy that will serve to implement the plan. For example, designation of a parkway, collaboration between Denver and Aurora on economic development strategies, future adjacent Stapleton zoning, and future adjacent Lowry zoning are important techniques for maintaining and strengthening the neighborhood. C. RESIDENTS, BUSINESSES, AND GOVERNMENTAL RESOURCES WORKING TOGETHER FOR PLAN IMPLEMENTATION The common denominator of all successful implementation work is people working together. Accompanying each Action Recommendation is a list of "Implementing Agencies/Groups" who are identified as the primary groups that, because of expertise, authority, and resources, are responsible for carrying out the Action Recommendation, or for advocating it to those groups with the authority and resources to carry it out. The three groups that are chiefly responsible for 10

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN implementation of this plan are the City and County of Denver, East Colfax businesses, and the East Montclair neighborhood residents. They are the major catalysts who will energize and involve a wider range of other people in public and private organizations to carry out the Action Recommendations. The City and County of Denver is a major player in the plan's preparation, adoption, and implementation. When it was adopted by the Mayor and City Council, the plan became part of the official Denver Comprehensive Plan. As such, it will help to influence city policies, programs, and decisions that will be crucial in implementing the Action Recommendations. The staff of the Planning and Development Office and the many other city agencies listed herein will work with the neighborhood to articulate the plan proposals to the Denver Planning Board, City Council, and all relevant city decision-making bodies. In addition to the plan's guidance, city staff will be available to assist the neighborhood as East Colfax seeks to influence city decisions and actions on zoning requests, the evaluation of public and private development proposals, CIPP, CDBG, and other funding requests and regulatory ordinances. Neighborhood Banner Although the city's expertise and resources are significant, the primary energy, motivation, and responsibility for implementing the East Montclair/East Colfax Neighborhood Plan must be the people of the area. Strong and ongoing involvement of East Colfax businesses and East Montclair residents will be necessary to take the leadership in carrying out this plan, to refine it, and to keep it updated as time goes on, and in branching out to address new neighborhood issues. An ongoing neighborhood planning and decision-making process needs to be established to spur the businesses and people of the area to actively promote the general interests of their neighborhood. While this may mean organizing from time to time to fight undesirable changes, neighborhood leaders also need to inspire the neighborhood to be pro-active -to actively and effectively secure decisions that improve East Colfax I East Montclair, and bring it closer to its long range vision for itself. 11

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IIONTVIEW 111TH AVENUE 17TH AVENUE 14TH AVENUE 13TH AVENUE 12TH AVENUE 11TH AVENUE EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN URBAN DESIGN FRAMEWORK PLAN P1..ANNED RESIDENTIAL --STAPLETON INTERNATIONAL AIIIPOIIT PABf(S AND of(N SfACE np.nd ,_. lpiiU into Stapleton eirport ,..,..rty"' Fred Tho'"" Pmc -n -lllong w .. t.ny c-1< Develop W_,y er.-,..,., pt.n EJtind open -into nelghborllood oround Kotly Oorn LOWRY AIR FORCE BASE KElLY DAM 12 KEY ,.-, a..-t .. Key Node {::::::::::::] llolol Dlrh:t ----y ::::: ,__ __ pe Jlff> ,.,__ Porlo-- ...,.._ .......... Encouroge -IIIII IM>elopmonf on -__ ,_ Con- flllrll-Y t,.,_,ot ---c, ,. a atrHtcp maater plln tor --EVOIUIIIO -N o '*"lflnotod ,.,.,._y rmtAVENLJE CNMO 0 r:oneJ.r.nt ol-11111-lrHIIIWn ,.. ...... EAST COLFAX AVENUE Cret treetacp maater plan ,.nd._, polling, poiMotriM light.. croN-Ir .,_ potldrlfl ,_,.nt-txltlwlrlfl CNIIIO,....,., orlontodconunon:""ot lry /n-Uona CorrlnoiO--on Ill/ lour-. Encou,.,. twtMwloptnMt of P'OJru. at Jnte,..ctJon with building N clo .. to ,,. .,.., .. Encour.,. crNtlve lgn; Pro,.ct xletlng ,.,_eigne B4llld ,_..bu.. IMII.,. ,.,,...,.,. Conoii'UctdotM:htHI-Study ,_ Y -t.tlt!I""'M CGMII'UctdotM:IttHI-...UC Sludy two -r COIIWIOion 11fttAVENUE R.,ove contMct atfHI QTid wllh -dewlopmonl ot L"""Y Air Fon:o Cruhl -om/ng ge-Y ot Y-lf11th tor -community t:<>llege comiJUOentry Into -h city llolnt./n-ol oponttON thnHigh the UN of /o_,-bulldlngo & lowlnton.llyon both __ Enhnc xlallltfl com,.rcll nod t /n-U-Ent:ourg ,.delrlan connection ID Mig-YQSEMlfSTRW flllrll-y -.c.plrlfl CNM ol Eoot CO/fox CTuto 110-Y ot Yooemn.-11th torcommunity college .....,..,. -*Jr Into MCh city. nth IJIIce rout SYRACUSE STREET Conoii'Ucl-al-111 north .outh bib rout QUEBfCSJllW Enc<>URge porl
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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN URBAN DESIGN DESCRIPTION AND ANALYSIS The East Colfax neighborhood sits on the eastern edge of Denver at the Aurora city line. The neighborhood has very distinct edges to the north and south as defined by the large, single governmental users at Stapleton Field and Lowry Air Force Base. Surrounded by security fences, these facilities to the north and south have allowed for very little pedestrian and vehicular access from the neighborhood. The redevelopment of these two areas offers a prime opportunity to sensitively transition, link, and integrate these large redevelopment areas with the East Montclair neighborhood. The neighborhood is clearly defined by higher volume streets at its edges. The commercial Colfax corridor creates a north and south division of the neighborhood's residential areas. Montview Boulevard in East Montclair. Montview Boulevard in Park Hill Montview Boulevard Montview is an eastwest arterial street on the northern edge of the neighborhood adjacent to Stapleton Airport. This sector ofMontview is built to carry two lanes of traffic in each direction, provides for no on-street parking or bicycle lanes, and in places has narrow sidewalks that are part of a "Hollywood" style curb. There are few areas with developed tree lawns. A sector ofMontview west of Monaco Parkway provides an example of the classic Denver boulevard and model for developing new elements ofMontview Boulevard in the East Colfax neighborhood in the future. Wide tree lawns and detached sidewalks, fronts ofbuildings facing the street, location of significant institutional buildings that act as neighborhood gathering places, and few curb cuts/driveways to the boulevard (access is from alley ways)-are all elements that compose a beautiful street. Quebec Street Quebec is another cross-town arterial at the neighborhood boundary and is an important link between Stapleton and Lowry. It has consistent single family residential scale and character along its length, except for the traffic volumes that it carries and the intersection at Colfax. The strong block patterns along Quebec break down south of 12th A venue. There are no sidewalks along many segments of Quebec Street. 13 Quebec Street.

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Yosemite Street Yosemite Street is a collector street and the boundary between Denver and Aurora. It is one of the three potential major north/south connections between Stapleton and Lowry. Its extension into Lowry and Stapleton seems relatively easy. North of Colfax the street is bounded by singlefamily residential with a consistent "grain" of development, similar lot and building size, and continuous orientation ofhomes fronting onto the street. South of Colfax, the street character changes. There is one block of single family residential, with the remainder being three to five story apartment buildings. The apartment buildings in this area have no real order to their placement and some are in disrepair with boarded up windows. The commercial node adjacent to the Lowry gate has no consistent streetscaping treatment. Buildings are under utilized and do not relate to each other. Eleventh A venue Eleventh A venue is a collector street that runs along the northern boundary of Lowry Air Force Base. It carries more traffic than the one-way streets to the north, 13th and 14th A venues. The existing character of the street is not clearly defined as there is no consistent development pattern, use or scale. There are vacant parcels on both sides which are future development opportunities and offer possibilities for integration of the neighborhood with Lowry. Syracuse Street East 1 Ith Avenue. Syracuse is a wide residential collector street. It is the only existing intermediate connection north and south between the Stapleton and Lowry redevelopment areas. Colfax A venue Colfax A venue is the longest commercial arterial street in the United States today. It has developed over time from its humble beginnings in Denver's downtown, becoming the "Main Street" of the metropolitan region that connects Aurora, Denver, and Lakewood. Depending on the time of day, it takes 45 to 60 minutes to drive from one end to the other. The avenue has several districts through which it passes, each with its own character. This section of East Colfax is perhaps one of the more difficult to define in terms of physical character and image. The section of Colfax within this neighborhood is 16 blocks in length and has blocks that are oriented in a north/south direction. Alleys run perpendicular to the street, with additional alleys running parallel to Colfax from Ulster toY osemite on the north, and Wabash to Yosemite on the south. Access seems excessive with the two alley systems and the typical one or two curb cuts per parcel or business. A problem associated with the lack of an identifiable image on East Colfax A venue is the small size of parcels and individually built projects. These sites typically are individually focused with little sense of cooperation between commercial neighbors or respect for adjacent homes. One reason for this is the type of "incubator" small business development that the market supports in this area. Typical of older arterial commercial corridors, parcel and zoning depth is shallow. 14

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN In addition to the isolated nature of each separate site, there is a mix of many different types ofbusinesses along the street. There does not seem to be any consolidation or critical massing of like kinds of uses. Physical landmarks are not clear and in general, there is a lack of order and organization to the land use types. There is a lack of direction in design as evidenced by the inconsistency in building and parking lot placement. Parking lot placement contributes to lack of order of land use on Colfax Alternative Parking Lot Placements Co1fax Avenue Parking in the Rear Co1fax Avenue Parking With Screen Wall Buffer There are two areas that share enough similar characteristics to be called districts along the corridor. In addition, there are a series ofhighly visible intersections. An emphasis on these intersections and districts can help to break up a very long, linear street into identifiable, understandable units. Important Colfax Avenue Intersections Special intersections occur at Quebec, Syracuse, Uinta, andY osemite. Quebec and Syracuse are important because they are main intersections and need emphasis. While Quebec is the entry into the neighborhood's part of Colfax, it does not read as a gateway. There is limited opportunity for a major "announcement." It is better to build upon other locations which offer some physical reason to demarcate a transition. Uinta is a more locally oriented retail area which should be built upon as it redevelops. To the west is the section of Colfax that has the mix of uses and no clustering oflike kinds ofbusinesses. To the east is the portion of Colfax that is primarily motels. This motel subarea is discussed in more detail below. 15

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Yosemite is a "Gateway" into Denver as well as the neighborhood and as such should receive special emphasis. On the eastern edge of the intersection, Aurora has an attractive sign, lighting, and landscaping within the median. This transition on the Denver side should be identified as well. Tamarac to Uinta: Neighborhood Oriented District The districtthathas the most pedestrian scale is the area between Tamarac and Uinta. It is the historic Commerical Block Ulster to Uinta. area for neighborhood serving stores and services. Many of the buildings on the north &ide are built close to the front property line and are consistently oriented to the street. A number of restaurants are located in this district and generate pedestrian activity. Sidewalks are adequately sized and the facades of the buildings have some sense of scale and character and are not "generic" chain store designs. Other smaller areas with some of these same characteristics are at Quince and at Rosemary. Motel District The second district is one in transition. It is the area from Ulster to Yosemite where most of the motels are clustered. Sidewalks are unusually narrow on some blocks within this district. Several of the motels do not have sufficient on site parking areas. There are also motels across the city line in Aurora. New home of State-Wide Lock & Safe. Nearly 1,000 motel rooms are located on East Colfax Avenue in Denver and Aurora. VISION Build on the positive physical characteristics of the neighborhood. Create a more beautiful neighborhood in which to live or do business. Blend neighborhood development to aesthetically flow with the redevelopment of Lowry and Stapleton. 16

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN PLAN IMPLEMENTATION The following action agenda contains recommendations made by neighborhood residents, business owners or managers, City departments, and other public and private interests. Funding for improvements will need both private and public investments. Examples of public funding sources include Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) programs, the City's General Fund, The City's Capital Improvements Plan (CIP), public and foundation grants, and future Citywide bond issues. Examples of private sector funding sources include improvement districts, building facade improvements, and sidewalk and parking lot landscaping. For public sector funding, one or several possible funding sources are listed for each project, together with a very general estimate of the cost. $=less than $25,000. $$ = $25,000 to $250,000. $$$=more than $250,000. Time frames for implementation are approximate. Short range means the action is projected to commence in years 1 and 2 after adoption of the plan. Mid range refers to an action that should begin in years 3 to 5. Long range means implementation is projected to begin 5 or more years out. Certain action recommendations could be carried out quickly at little or no cost. Time frames are "best guess" and will be altered with changing budget requirements, level of private sector involvement, and other conditions. POLICIES AND DEVELOPMENT GUIDELINES UD-1. Remove the security fences along Montview Boulevard and Eleventh Avenue as new development occurs at Stapleton and Lowry. Connect the street grid of the neighborhood with new Stapleton and Lowry streets. TIME: On-going project as development takes place. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Private Development, Stapleton Development, Lowry Development. UD-2. Continue the residential scale of Montview Boulevard as new development occurs. A void the extension of incompatible development into the neighborhood when Stapleton closes. Encourage residential development on both sides ofMontview. TIME: On-going project as development occurs. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Stapleton Development, Planning and Development Office. UD-3. Maintain a sense of openness along 11th Avenue through the use of lower scales, smaller buildings, and low intensity uses. Integrate and create a transition to the residential development on both sides of 11th A venue. TIME: On-going. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Private Development, Planning and Development Office. ***PRIORITY FOR IMPLEMENTATION*** 17

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN UD-4. Extend and infill the existing street tree pattern of mature coniferous trees along the 11th Avenue Lowry boundary. As a part of the Lowry planning process and in conjunction with the Citywide parkway master planning, consider creating a unique parkway treatment of cedar, pine and/or fir trees along both sides of 11th A venue. TIME: On-going project as development occurs. COST: $$Private Development, future bond issue, grants, CIP IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Private Development, Public Works -Transportation, Parks and Recreation Department. UD-5. Enhance the existing commercial activity at 11th Avenue and Syracuse, 11th Avenue and Unita (near the Montclair Post Office), and 11th Avenue and Yosemite. These shopping areas should encourage residents to walk or bicycle and should serve both the nearby East Montclair neighborhood and new Lowry college campus and residential neighborhoods. TIME: Medium to long range project IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP:. Private Development, Mayor's Office of Economic Development, Parks and Recreation, Public Works -Transportation, Planning and Development Office. Montclair Post Office on 11th Avenue. Commercial action on 11th Avenue at Yosemite. UD-6. Over time encourage the redevelopment of properties at Colfax intersections, with buildings as close to the street as possible, coordinated landscaping on all four corners, and more attention to pedestrian crosswalks. TIME: On-going project. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Private Development, Business Association; Mayor's Office of Economic Development, Planning and Development Office. 18

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN ALLEY ATLNTERSECTIONSANDALONG SIDEWALKS TO CRE4TE VISUAL CONTINUITY ALONG COLFAX CORRIDOR EAST COLFAX AVENUE WITH ALLEY ENTRANCE ALLEYQ p Q O I / 7 J7 Encourage redevelopment of properties at Colfax intesections Hold buildings as close to the street as possible Coordinate landscape on all four corners Enhance pedestrian cross-walks Buffer residential edge 19 Jl,?f?lJWI ALLEY

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN CAPITAL AND PHYSICAL IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS UD-7. As soon as Stapleton Airport closes, set aside land for parks and open space adjacent to the neighborhood. This should include expansion of Fred Thomas Park and land along Westerly Creek. TIME: Short range project (land set aside), long range development project COST:. $$$ CIP, future bond issue. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Parks and Recreation Department, Planning and Development Office, Stapleton Redevelopment. ***PRIORITY FOR IMPLEMENTATION*** UD-8. As soon as Lowry Air Force Base closes, set aside land for parks and open space. This should include land around Kelly Dam and the spillway south of 11th Avenue. TIME: Short range project (land set aside), long range development project. TIME: $$$ CIP, future bond issue. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Lowry Redevelopment Authority, Parks and Recreation Department, Planning and Development Office. ***PRIORITY FOR IMPLEMENTATION*** UD-9. Create a gateway at Colfax Avenue and Yosemite Street, which may include monuments, signs, lighting, landscaping and/or other features at the city line. TIME: Short to medium range project. COST: $$ CIP, CDBG, Private. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Public Works-Transportation, Private Development, Colorado Department of Transportation, Neighborhood Group, Business Association, Planning and Development Office. UD-10. On Montview Boulevard between Quebec and Yosemite Streets continue the streetscape elements that currently exist between Colorado Boulevard and Quebec Street. Evaluate officially designating Montview Boulevard through the neighborhood as part of the Denver Parks and Parkways system. Include this evaluation in the Citywide parkways master planning process. TIME: Medium to long range project. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Parks and Recreation Department, Stapleton Plan, Stapleton Development, Planning and Development Office. 20

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN UD-11. Remove the Lowry gate at Yosemite Street and develop an entry feature that creates a positive, welcoming gateway at the comer of 11th A venue. Coordinate with the new Lowry college campus, Aurora and Denver and use similar and consistent treatments on all quadrants of the 11th A venue and Yosemite Street intersection. TIME: Medium range project. COST: $$ CIP, CDBG, grants IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Lowry Air Force Base gate at Yosemite Street. Lowry College Campus, Lowry Property Owners. Lowry Redevelopment Authority, Planning and Development Office, Public WorksTransportation, City of Aurora. ***PRIORITY FOR IMPLEMENTATION*** UD-12. Develop a Westerly Creek Master Plan jointly with Denver and Aurora. Westerly Creek is a critical link between the existing High Line Canal recreation trail and the future Sand Creek (Eme:t;ald Strands) open space and trail system. The Master Plan should address drainage, landscaping, park, and trail improvements in the area of Kelly Dam spillway and along Westerly Creek as it flows to the north-northeast from 11th A venue to Montview Boulvard. The Study should determine feasibilty and opportunities for opening up portions of the creek that now flow underground through pipes. The study area should include Lowry, East Montclair, Original Aurora, and Stapleton portions of the creek. TIME: Medium to long range project. COST: $$$ CIP, grants, future bond issue. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Parks and Recreation Department, Public WorksWastewater Management, City of Aurora, Urban Drainage and Flood Control District, Planning and Development Office, Lowry Development, Stapleton Development. Westerly Creek UD-13. Create along 17th A venue a consistent sidewalk and treelawn treatment. Explore the option of traditional detached walks with generous tree lawns in areas where there are no existing sidewalks and in areas where redevelopment occurs. See map on page 12 for priority segments. TIME: On-going project. COST: $$Private, Bond, CDBG. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Property Owners, Neighborhood Group, Bond Program Trees, Denver Digs Trees, Planning and Development Office. 21

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN RESEARCH, DESIGN, AND ANALYSIS UD-14. Create a detailed streetscape master plan for East Colfax A venue between Quebec Street and Yosemite Street, with special attention to three Districts: Tamarac to Uinta, Rosemary to Syracuse, Ulster to Yosemite. Include in this focus study locations where the commercial zoning extends south one block into the neighborhood. The master plan should make recommendations for uses and streetscape treatment, including landscaping, paving, facade renovation suggestions, pedestrian lighting, cross-walk treatment, signage, parking lot size and placement, and buffering. Create an integrated, phased and prioritized implementation strategy. Implementation will require that property owners enter into an agreement to maintain streetscape improvements. TIME: Short to medium range project. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Property Owners, Business Owners, Business Association, New Colfax streetscape near Kearney Street. Neighborhood Group, Planning and Development Office, Public Works-Transportation. ***PRIORITY FOR IMPLEMENTATION*** UD-15. Create a master landscaping plan for Montview Boulevard edges that will be implemented incrementally as Stapleton builds out. Plan should include consistent sidewalks, treelawns, and other elements. TIME: Short to medium range project. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Stapleton Development, Parks and Recreation Department, Planning and Development Office. UD-16. Encourage parkway landscaping along Quebec and Yosemite Streets to establish a high quality image for Stapleton and Lowry new development and for the adjacent neighborhoods. Allow Quebec Street parkway landscaping to connect two major parkways in the City (Alameda Parkway and Martin Luther King Boulevard). Address Quebec and Yosemite right-of-way constraints. TIME: Medium to long range project. COST: $$$Private Development, CIP, future bond issue. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Private Development, Public Works-Transportation, Parks and Recreation Department, Planning and Development Office. 22

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23

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SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENTIAL MULTI-FAMILY RESIDENTIAL BUSINESS PARKS/OPEN SPACE SCHOOL, CHURCHES & POST OFFICE ----,-----.... ,_-------::> El 0 N n...r-1 0 400' 800' 1,600' $ LAND USE lAST IOITCLAII 24

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN LAND USE AND ZONING DESCRIPTION AND ANALYSIS The total area of the East Montclair/East Colfax neighborhood is 684 acres. The net land area (excluding streets, highways and alleys) is 466 acres. The following figure shows the acreage of the neighborhood's various land uses. As can be seen, residential land use predominates. The next major land use category is that of commercial and office, which is found in Colfax A venue development and at several centers along East 11th A venue. Businesses generally tend to be smaller in scale. Collectively they form a critical mass that offers a wide range of products and services. As a by-product of the many allowable uses in the B-4 zone district, there are a group of businesses that are more light industrial than retail in nature. Clothing and apparel manufacturing, cabinetmaking, and wholesale beauty products are examples of these uses. Commercial uses on East Colfax A venue appear to be oriented more to the person traveling on the street than to residents of the surrounding neighborhood. Car sales, motels, and fast food restaurants typify_ auto-oriented uses. Zoning corresponds closely with land use. Non-conforming uses are few. Again, the residential category dominates and the largest acreage is in the R-1 zone which is restricted to single detached units. Other residential zones as shown on the existing zoning map include R-2, R-2-A, R-3-X, and R-3 which provide increasing degrees of density in multi-units. Four other zoning categories complete 300 gJ 250 200 &i 150 100 50 ZONING AND LAND USE BY LAND USE CATEGORY ParksRecreation Vacant 11IMlli1 ZONED L__::: DEVELOPED 25 *VACANT LAND IS SCAITERED THROUGHOUT AU ZONE DISTRICTS ZONING JANUARY 1994 0-1

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN the zoning pattern in the neighborhood. They are 0-1 (Open Space), P-1 (Parking), and for business, B-2 and B-4. P-1 is designed to buffer residential from commercial zones as well as provide parking, and is located generally north and south of the B-4 on Colfax Avenue. B-2 is designed for local shopping and service facilities to provide for the needs of the local residents, and is located in the Syracuse Shoppette at 11th A venue and Syracuse Street, the 1100 block of Yosemite Street, and the area around the Montclair Post Office on 11th A venue. The B-4 commercial and business district serves a much larger area and is found along Colfax A venue. COLFAX A VENUE REZONING STUDIES COLFAX AVENUE ENTRANCETOSERVICEAND l..\. PARKING FROM EXISTING ALLEY C WIDEN SIDEWALK FACING COLFAX AVENUE TO 14" -0' MINIMUM THE STREETSCAPE FROM ZONE TO MAINTAIN CONTINUTIY ANDDEVELOPSTREETCHARACTER I ui / NEW ALLEY Extend commercial zone to accommodate minimum parking requirements Provide a walkway with sufficient landscaping from the parking lot to the main entrance of the commercial building wherever required Provide 10' -0" landscape buffer at the alley to separate commercial and residential zones Relocate the alley to create a T-junction at the alley intersections Use the existing alley as entry to the parking lot and for services Reduce the service road area by locating the loading docks in the commercial building Define the commercial zone property with landscaping Widen sidewalks facing Colfax A venue by pulling back the building face Introduce trees and landscape elements in the public right-of-way Encourage streetscape at intersections Maintain a continuous street character along Colfax Avenue and down the side streets 26

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN ENTRANCE TO SERVICES AND PARKING FROM EXISTING AUEY COLFAX A VENUE REZONING STUDIES COLFAX AVENUE STREEFSCAPEAT INTERSCTIONS t-=J 11 Extend commercial zone to accommodate minimum parking requirements Provide a walkway with sufficient landscaping from the parking lot to the main entrance of the commercial buildins wherever required Provide 10 '-0" landscape buffer at the alley to separate commercial and residential zones Relocate the alley to create a T-junction at the alley intersections Use the existing alley as entry to the parking lot and for services Reduce the service road area by locating the loading docks in the commercial building Defind the commercial zone property with landscaping Widen sidewalks facing Colfax Avenue by pulling back the building face Introduce trees and landscape elements in the public right-of-way Encourage streetscape at intersections Maintain a continuous street character along Colfax Avenue and down the side streets Rezonings in the neighborhood over the last ten years have generally been requests to rezone from residential to business zoning in order to create deeper lots for business expansions along East Colfax Avenue. Additionally, a 14 acre rezoning from R-2-A to B-2 (with waivers and conditions) was approved in 1989 for the vacant land on which the Montclair Post Office was built. 27

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN VISION * Compatibility between residential and business land uses. A neighborhood attractively linked to new development and land uses at Lowry Air Force Base and Stapleton Airport. Ample park and open space areas. Protection of the residential character of the neighborhood. Improve physical appearance of the Colfax A venue business district. PLAN IMPLEMENTATION The following action agenda contains recommendations made by neighborhood residents, businesses, City departments, and other public and private interests. Time frames for implementation are approximate. Short range means the action is projected to commence in years 1 and 2 after adoption of the plan. Mid range means the action should begin in years 3 to 5. Long range means implementation is likely to begin 5 or more years after adoption of the plan. Some recommendations are understood to be on-going actions. Time frames are approximate and will be altered with changing budget requirements and other conditions. CAPITAL AND PHYSICAL IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS LZ-1. Evaluate requests to expand B-4 zoning (or other commercial zone districts) along Colfax A venue, making sure criteria is met that will foster both a healthy business district and protection of nearby residences. Rezonings should include waivers of incompatible uses, provisions for buffering adjoining residential areas with landscaping and/or screening fences, and other provisions that create a transition that will protect the residential character of adjacent properties. Both neighborhood businesses and residents should give input to the decision-making process. TIME: On-going, beginning in 1994. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Neighborhood Group, Businesses, Planning and Development Office. **PRIORITY FOR IMPLEMENTATION** LZ-2. Monitor all zone change requests adjacent to the neighborhood on the Stapleton site and at Lowry. TIME: On-going, beginning in 1994. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Neighborhood Group, Planning and Development Office. LZ-3 Work with property owners to rezone the R-2-A and R-3 undeveloped areas between 11th and 13th A venues in the eastern part of the neighborhood to a zone district compatible with existing surrounding development, including single family. TIME: Short to medium range. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Property owners, Neighborhood Group, Planning and Development Office. 28

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN LZ-4. Assess the ex1stmg condition of vacant boarded up multi-family buildings and possible re-use for preschools, elder homes, or offices. TIME: Short range. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Property Owner, Neighborhood Group, Planning and Development Office. LZ-5. Assure compatibility of land uses and create connections between future Stapleton and Lowry Vacant apartment building could be reused. development and the East Colfax neighborhood. New development should be evaluated for how it complements existing land uses in the neighborhood and fosters local employment and business prosperity. For example, supportive land uses on Stapleton should include residential, parkland, cultural, tourism, retail, and commercial development. Compatible land uses on Lowry should ihclude residential, parkland, open space, commercial, and educational uses. TIME: Short range, mid range, long range. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Neighborhood Group, Stapleton Development, Lowry Development, Planning and Development Office. LZ-6. Explore creating a corridor over-lay zone that establishes special East Colfax Avenue development standards for buffering the edges between business and residential zones, conditional hours of business operations, and signage. Network with businesses and neighborhood organizations along the entire Colfax corridor. TIME: Mid-range. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Neighborhood Group, Neighborhood Businesses, Planning and Development Office. LZ-7. Whenever the opportunity arises, eliminate billboards in the neighborhood. Do not allow billboards in the redevelopment of Lowry or Stapleton. TIME: On-going. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY!GROUP:Property Owners, Stapleton Development, Lowry Development, Neighborhood Group. LZ-8. Network with business interests and other neighborhood organizations throughout the City to study placing new limitations on operation hours for some types of businesses located adjacent to residential zone districts. TIME: Mid-range project. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY!GROUP:Neighborhood Group, Neighborhood Businesses, Planning and Development Office. 29

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN CITY SERVICES AND ORDINANCE ENFORCEMENT LZ-9. Continue the neighborhood "trouble shooting" task force for monitoring property up-keep and compliance with City environmental ordinances concerning cutting weeds, parking of vehicles on the lawns of homes, numbers of cars, outdoor storage of junk, home occupations, and similar zoning and code enforcement matters. Explore dividing the neighborhood into subareas. Send friendly letters notifying property owners of ordinance requirements and offering neighborhood assistance. Meet monthly with City zoning and code enforcement officials to monitor progress. TIME: On-going, beginning in 1994. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Neighborhood Group, Denver Zoning Administration, Neighborhood Support Services. **PRIORITY FOR IMPLEMENTATION** LZ-10. Inform neighborhood residents concerning large item pick up schedules. TIME: On-going, beginning in 1994. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Neighborhood Group, Neighbt?rhood Support Services. LZ-11. Encourage enforcement of City ordinance requirements for absentee landlords to have an agent registered with the Assessment Division. TIME: Short Range project. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Assessment Division, Denver Zoning Administration, Neighborhood Support Services. LZ-12. Encourage enforcement of City ordinance requirements for pet care, including numbers of animals. TIME: On-going, beginning in 1994. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Health and Hospitals -Animal Control, Denver Zoning Administration. 30

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN NEIGHBORHOOD COOPERATION AND INVOLVEMENT LZ-13. Identify historic sites in the neighborhood. Provide information to owners regarding procedures for official City designation as a historic structure for preservation. Research and write a history of the East Montclair Neighborhood, including in the publication photographs and a brief history of significant landmark buildings, parks, and the U.S. Highway 40 heritage commercial district. TIME: Short range project. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP:Neighborhood Group, Businesses, Planning and Development Office. LZ-14. Stop illegal nuisance activities in the neighborhood. Encourage the formation of a network of block captains throughout the neighborhood to coordinate the Neighborhood Colorado Heritage Corridor. Watch program and disseminate information concerning various neighborhood activities and community programs. TIME: On-going, beginning in 1994. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Denver Police Department, Neighborhood Watch, Neighborhood Group. *PRIORITY FOR IMPLEMENTATION* LZ-15. Publish periodically in neighborhood newsletters descriptions of zoning use and code maintenance regulations and phone numbers for assistance. TIME: On-going, beginning in 1994. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP:Neighborhood Group, Schools. LZ-16. Continue the neighborhood commercial area revitalization efforts. Bolster the existing business association with continued input from City programs as well as increased interest in the commercial. area from residents of the surrounding area. TIME: On-going, beginning in 1994. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Business Association, Neighborhood Groups, Mayors Office of Economic Development, Planning and Development Office. 31

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN TRANSPORTATION DESCRIPTION AND ANALYSIS Streets are designated by the Denver Comprehensive Plan according to the following definitions: Local Streets: Serve the function of providing direct access to adjacent properties and of carrying low volumes of traffic (less than 2,000 vehicles per day) with an origin or destination within the neighborhood. Examples oflocal streets are Xenia Street and 19th A venue. Collector Streets: Distribute traffic between arterial and local streets within the community and link residential areas, local and community shopping, and other major community activity areas. Collector streets have average volumes of 5,000 to 12,000 vehicles per day. Examples of collector streets are Syracuse Street and 11th A venue. Arterial Streets: Provide for through traffic on a continuous route. They serve as the primary link between communities and major land use elements. The average traffic volumes typically range from 10,000 to 50,000 vehicles per day. Examples of arterial streets are Colfax A venue and Quebec Street. The Department of Public Works classifies existing streets. The map shows the East Colfax neighborhood with Street Classifications & Traffic Volumes existing street classifications ::::: and average daily traffic counts U U Arterials ....., 00 Average Daily Traffic from 1988 and 1992. [ ruEiJ --Collectors s MAJOR STREETS Montview There are four streets that D D D D D D D D D D D cannot be looked at only from a L_J local view-point. These are c-DODoDDDDDDDDDDD Colfax A venue, Quebec Street, Montview Boulevard, and ::;::.:: r OJDD0 D Colfax is the "main street" of lJ. D the Denver metropolitan colfax Ave B .. !.l 200 .o region. It is a major transportation corridor 6 00 6 00 5, oo J between Aurora, Denver, and : Lakewood. commercial land jtjoo "'DuD D D D D D D D 4 00 OD uses abut the corridor along its entire length. These L.-. businesses serve both the [ t nr I "" D D D D D metropolitan region and immediate neighborhood, as [ D D D D D well as future new Stapleton 111" m L io,ooo and Lowry neighborhoods. 12,000 33

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Quebec Street Quebec Street is an important north-south street corridor extending through the metropolitan region from Commerce City at the north to Iliff Street and the Denver Tech Center at the south. A missing segment on the Lowry Air Force Base between First A venue and Alameda A venue prevents this street from functioning as a through arterial. Between 11th and 23rd Avenues, Quebec Street forms the western boundary of the East Colfax neighborhood. Further north, from 23rd A venue to Martin Luther King Boulevard, Quebec Street widens to four lanes. From Martin Luther King Boulevard north to I-70 it becomes a limited access roadway. For more than twenty years, proposals have at different times been made by the City of Denver and others to acquire additional right-of-way and widen Quebec to become a four lane street. This would allow Quebec Street to function as a regional arterial north and south across the metropolitan region, similar to the way Monaco Parkway, Colorado Boulevard, or York Street function presently. The closure of Stapleton Airport and redevelopment of Lowry will, in the short term, reduce somewhat travel demands in the corridor. Redevelopment of Stapleton and Lowry will, over time, again create pressure to improve the Quebec Street corridor and better link together shopping, employment centers, and residential neighborhoods in the northern and southeast areas of the metropolitan region. As traffic volumes increase over time and the need to widen the street may become more apparent, care will need to be taken with any proposed changes in the street and should provide for additional community input, provide for adequate right-of-way, develop new parkway landscaping, and protect the residential character of the area. Montview Boulevard Montview Boulevard is similar to Colfax A venue in providing a connection between Denver and Aurora, as well as between central Denver and neighborhoods on the City's eastern edge. Redevelopment of Stapleton Airport property on the north side ofMontv:lew will aid in defining and constructing traffic, landscaping, and design improvements needed for the street. Yosemite Street Yosemite Street forms the official boundary between Denver and Aurora, and between residential neighborhoods in the respective cities. Any proposed street improvements, changes in traffic volumes and patterns, and traffic regulations will need to be coordinated between the two jurisdictions. TRAFFIC IMPACTS FROM CLOSURE OF STAPLETON AIRPORT AND CLOSURE OF LOWRY AIR FORCE BASE The closure of Stapleton Airport is expected to initially bring significant traffic reductions on Quebec Street north ofMontview, on Syracuse north ofMontview, and on Montview Boulevard. More modest, but significant, reductions are also expected on Quebec and Syracuse Street south of Montview through the East Colfax neighborhood. The nature, timing, and intensity of future development at Stapleton Airport will determine when traffic again reaches current traffic levels. The closure of Lowry Air Force Base is also projected to bring short term traffic reductions on arterial and collector streets, such as 11th A venue and Quebec Street. When the fence comes down that presently separates the neighborhood and Lowry, and streets are re-opened, traffic volumes on collector and arterial streets south of Colfax A venue will likely increase as new uses are found for Lowry buildings. 34

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN BUS TRANSIT SERVICE The East Colfax neighborhood is served by five bus lines. Lines on Montview Boulevard are the Route 20 between Aurora's Southmoor area, Downtown Denver, and Lakewood; and the Route 105 between the Martin Marietta plant (located on the far southwest edge of the Denver region) and Stapleton Airport. Colfax Avenue is served by the-Route 15 connecting Aurora and Downtown Denver. The Colfax Route 15 is the only line in the RTD system to operate 24 hours a day. The Route 10 line is located on 11th A venue and connects Aurora with Downtown Denver, via the University Hospital area and the Auraria Campus. BIKE ROUTES Colfax bus line runs 24 hours a day East-west bike routes through the neighborhood are located on 19th Avenue and 12th Avenue. Syracuse and Poplar form a north and south bike route. New opportunities for developing off-street bikeways will become possible as Stapleton Airport redevelops and as Lowry and the East Montclair neighborhood are re-connected. Bus and Bike Routes Bus Routes --Bike Routes 35 Bike route on East 12th Avenue. s

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN VISION * Safe and uncongested traffic flow within and through the neighborhood. Quiet local residential streets. Landscaping and buffering that will protect adjacent residences along arterial streets. Convenient R TD bus transit service to all areas of the neighborhood. A neighborhood friendly to walking and bicycling. PLAN IMPLEMENTATION The following action agenda contains recommendations made by neighborhood residents, businesses, City departments, and other public and private interests. Potential funding sourt:;es for the various capital improvement projects include the City's Capital Improvements Plan (CIP), the City's General Fund, 1989 and future Citywide bond issues, Regional Transportation District, Colorado Department of Transportation, Federal grants, private development, and Community Development Block Grant programs. One or several potential funding sources are listed for each project, together with symbols($) that indicate an estimate of the cost. $=less than $25,000. $$ = $25,000 to $250,000. $$$ =more than $250,000. Time frames for implementation are approximate. Projects are noted that are in progress even as the plan is being developed. Short range means the action is projected to commence in years 1 and 2 after adoption of the plan. Mid range means the action should begin in years 3 to 5. Long range means implementation is projected to begin 5 or more years out. Certain action recommendations could be carried out at little or no cost. Time frames are "best guess" and will be altered with changing budget requirements and other conditions. CAPITAL AND PHYSICAL IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS T -1 Link the residential neighborhood to high quality new Stapleton a:nd Lowry development. To accomplish this, improvements may be needed in the Yosemite Street and Quebec Street corridors, including widening of these streets, constructing sidewalks, and development of new streetscapes. If Quebec Street is widened to four lanes in any area between Alameda and 23rd A venue, its improvement through the East Colfax neighborhood residential area should be accomplished with adequate provision for street right-of-way, building setbacks, and landscaping design treatments. TIME: Long range projects. COST: $$$Private Development, CIP. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Public Works Transportation, Aurora, Lowry Development, Stapleton Development, Property Owners. **PRIORITY FOR IMPLEMENTATION** 36

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN T-2 Construct detached sidewalks along blocks with no pedestrian sidewalks. Highest priority should be blocks along Quebec Street, Montview Boulevard, Syracuse Street, 11th Avenue, 13th Avenue and 14th Avenue. Priority should also be given to streets located on bus lines, adjacent to a park, or in proximity to Ashley School. Seek to gain participation of owners in sidewalk construction projects. Explore funding on a block by block basis through CDBG Residential Neighborhood Small Projects grants and other alternative funding sources. TIME: On-going, short/medium range project. COST: $$ Private, CDBG, CIP. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Neighborhood Group, Property Owners, Planning and Development Office, Public Works-Transportation. Pedestrian sidewalk along Syracuse Street. Foot path along Quebec Street. T -3 Reconstruct Colfax A venue through the neighborhood. Pave with concrete, improve drainage, widen sidewalks where appropriate, and provide for street trees. TIME: Medium or long range project. COST: $$$Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT). IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: CDOT, Public Works-Transportation. T -4 Connect the street grid of the neighborhood with Stapleton and Lowry development as soon as possible. TIME: Medium or long range project. COST: $$$ Private Development, CIP. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Public Works-Transportation, Stapleton Development, Lowry Redevelopment Authority, Planning and Development Office. T-5 Construct curb and gutter, and detached sidewalks along the south side of 11th Avenue adjacent to Lowry. The most immediate need is areas near bus stops. TIME: Medium range project. COST $$ Private Development, CIP. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Public Works-Transportation, Planning and Development Office, Lowry Development. 37

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN T -6 Pave public alleys with recycled asphalt. Explore options for paving non-dedicated alleys. TIME: In progression-going project. COST $ General Fund. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Public Works-Construction Engineering, Planning and Development Office, City Council. T -7 Construct handicap ramps at Colfax A venue intersections and at other street intersections with substantial pedestrian traffic. Alley with recycled asphalt. TIME: In progress, short/medium range project. COST: $$ General Fund. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Public Works-Transportation, Private Development. T -8 Evaluate Colfax A venue intersections where beepers should be located to assist blind persons in crossing the street. TIME: Short range project. COST: $CIP IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Public W arksTransportation. T -9 Work with the Regional Transportation District to develop bus stop amenities along streets served by transit lines, beginning with 30,000 vehicles per day use East Colfax Avenue. the Colfax Route 15 line. Trash receptacles should be located at bus stops, especially at stops near fast food restaurants. TIME: Short range project. COST: $$ RTD or Private. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: RTD, Neighborhood Businesses, Neighborhood Group. T-10 Encourage neighborhood businesses to provide bicycle parking near front entrances. TIME: On-going project. COST: $Private, CDBG. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Neighborhood Businesses. 38

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN PUBLIC SERVICES T-11 Increase the frequency of sweeping Colfax Avenue sidewalks. TIME: In progress. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP:Merchants. T-12 Remove snow from residential sidewalks. Where possible, street snow plow crews should plow snow into the middle of a street, rather onto attached sidewalks. Priority areas for snow removal should be sidewalks in the vicinity of Ashley Elementary School. TIME: Short range project IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GRO[JP: Residents, Public Works -Street Maintenance, Ashley School. T -13 Organize block parties to clean alleyways and sidewalks. TIME: Short range/medium range project. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Residents, Neighborhood Group, T-14 Designate Syracuse Street as a new north-south bicycle route through the neighborhood, providing a connection to future Stapleton and Lowry development. Install bike route signs. Evaluate additional alternative neighborhood bicycle routes as development occurs in these nearby areas. TIME: Short range project. COST $ Bond and CIP. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Public Works-Transportation. T -15 Designate Yosemite Street as a new north-south bicycle route through the neighborhood, connecting with a future Westerly Creek bicycle trail corridor across Stapleton to Sand Creek and across Lowry to the High Line Canal. Ensure that as traffic increases on Yosemite Street, adequate width and priority is maintained for bicyclists on this street. Bike lanes may be indicated. Coordinate with Aurora on the possibility of additional access to Westerly Creek via 19th Avenue and Montview Park. In the Westely Creek corridor, provide prominent and attractive bicycle and pedestrian connections between Colfax A venue and new Lowry and Stapleton neighborhoods. TIME: Mid range project. COST: $ Bond and CIP. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Public WorksTransportation. T-16 Install bike route signs along 19th Avenue and 12th Avenue, as principal east-west bicycle friendly streets serving East Denver and Aurora. TIME: Short range project. COST: $Bond and CIP. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Public Works-Transportation. 39

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN T -17 Provide bicycle safety courses in schools serving neighborhood children. Encourage students to bicycle to school, making use of designated routes. TIME: Short range project. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Public Works Transportation, Denver Public Schools. T-18 Maintain a high quality of bus service to connect the neighborhood with Downtown Denver and other destinations. Meet with Regional Transportation District representatives to discuss route changes and new termination points necessary when Stapleton Airport and Lowry Air Force Base close. TIME: Short range project. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: RTD. RESEARCH, DESIGN, AND ANALYSIS T-19 Study the feasibility of converting 13th and 14th Avenues to two-way traffic, between Quebec and Yosemite Streets. TIME: Short Range project. IMPLEMENTING AGENCYIGROUP:Public WorksTransportation. T-20 Determine street improvements needed to implement recommendations in the Northeast Quadrant and Southeast Quadrant Transportation and Land Use Studies. Update the Southeast Quadrant Study to include changing conditions resulting from Stapleton and Lowry closures and Northeast Quadrant Study recommendations. This study should look at streets in both Denver and Aurora and should develop recommendations for connecting Lowry and Stapleton in a manner that will not adversely impact Denver and Aurora residential neighborhoods. TIME: Short/medium range project. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Public Works-Transportation, Planning and Development Office, Stapleton Planning, Aurora. T-21 Evaluate providing new left tum arrows and new signal timing on Quebec Street at Montview Boulevard (southbound turning left and northbound turning left) and on Quebec Street at Colfax Avenue (northbound turning left, southbound turning left, eastbound turning left). TIME: Short /medium range project. COST:$$ CIP, General Fund. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/ GROUP: Public WorksTransportation. 40 Quebec Street and Montview Boulevard.

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN T -22 Encourage pedestrian and bicycle travel between residences and destinations within and near the neighborhood in order to reduce automobile use, improve air quality, promote a sense of neighborliness and encourage physical fitness. TIME: In progression-going project. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Residents, Neighborhood Group, Neighborhood Businesses, Public WorksTransportation. T -23 Evaluate the designation of 17th Avenue as a collector street. TIME: Medium/long range. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Public Works-Transportation. T-24 Evaluate the need for north-south alleys on blocks where east-west alleys exist along Colfax A venue. Consider vacating north-south alleys in order to allow parcel consolidation. TIME: Short range/on-going project. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Property Owners, Public Works-Transportation. EAST COLFAX AVENUE NORTH-SOUTH ALLEYS FRAGMENT BLOCKS EAST COLFAX AVENUE ELIMINATION OF NORTH-SOUTH ALLEYS TO ALLOW FOR THE ASSEMBLING OF PARCELS FOR REDEVELOPMENT. T-25 Inventory the condition of street curbs and publicize information concerning the City's curb replacement program. TIME: In progression-going project. COST: $$ General Fund. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Public Works-Street Maintenance, Neighborhood Group. 41

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN BUSINESS REVITALIZATION DESCRIPTION AND ANALYSIS There are four business areas within the East Colfax neighborhood. Colfax A venue between Quebec and Yosemite Streets, an area sixteen blocks long, is the largest of the business districts. Small shoppettes are located at 11th A venue and Syracuse Street and 11th A venue and Yosemite Street. A largely undeveloped commercial area is located in the area of the Montclair Post Office. Colfax Heritage Corridor: Denver's "Main Street" Colfax A venue is in many ways the "main street" of not only the neighborhood, but also Denver and a metropolitan region with two million people. Stretching from the foothills of Golden to the plains of Adams and Arapahoe County on the east, Colfax A venue is the longest commercial street in North America. It is also U.S. Route 40, which was the principle high way link between Denver and Kansas City until the construction oflnterstate Highway 70 in 1965. Regionally, the 30 mile long avenue is the address for more supermarkets, value stores, gas stations, motels, fine restaurants, shopping centers, automobile sales, and retail specialty shops, than any other single street in the Denver region. Businesses are largely oriented toward automobile traffic and serve a mix of neighborhood residents, people from throughout the metropolitan region, and out of state tourists. From east to west, Colfax A venue functions as a sort oflinear mall for shopping and services. The number ofbusinesses located along the avenue exceeds Cherry Creek Mall, Southwest Plaza, and Downtown Denver. In addition to the hundreds of strong businesses that prosper along Denver's "main street," Colfax A venue is home to Colorado's State Capitol and the Basilica of the Immaculate Conception. Denver, Lakewood, and Aurora continue to work to make the avenue an attractive place-through streetscape "beautification" projects, economic development strategies, and a "Life Begins on U.S. 40" promotional campaign. State legislation in 1994 designated Colfax Avenue a state heritage corridor. Colfax Avenue: Neighborhood Business District A 1993 survey of Colfax A venue between Quebec Street andY osernite Street found a total of 81 business locations. More than 18 of the businesses provide to the neighborhood goods and services such as accounting offices, laundromat, shoe store, auto parts, clothing store, beauty shops, medical office, small grocery stores, gas stations, appliance sales, liquor store, furniture store, locksmith, and cabinet shop. In addition to stores and offices, the survey showed 13 restaurants, 14 motels, 8 vehicle or boat sales businesses, 9 boat or auto repair businesses, 4 bars and clubs, car wash, and other miscellaneous businesses. Within this 16 block long area, there were only two vacant properties. Colfax Businesses Restaurants 1 Motels 21% 43 Goods and Services 26% Vacant 3% Night Clubs 6% Boat/Auto Repair 13%

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Dairy Queen, Colfax Avenue klndmark. The A venue is lined with many strong businesses. A location on Denver's "main street," good visibility, and reasonable rental rates and land prices have made this business district an attractive location for both long time businesses and new business start-ups. Auto Specialty Store. Tourist related businesses, particularly motels, experienced a big drop in business when I-70 was constructed two miles north of the neighborhood. In order to survive, these businesses have had to develop innovative marketing strategies. For example, some of the motels have specialized in serving airline pilots, providing shuttle service to and from flights. Others have specialized in long term room rentals to construction workers. Still others have catered to families of patients at area hospitals. The shut -down of both Stapleton Airport and Lowry Air Force Base will impact the Colfax business district once again and bring new challenges and opportunities as the market niche of these businesses is modified. 11th Avenue Neighborhood Shopping Areas The two small shopping centers located on 11th A venue at Syracuse Street and 11th A venue at Yosemite Street are across the street from the Lowry Air Force Base. These neighborhood shoppettes experienced severe declines in business when Lowry closed its Yosemite Street gate. They have a high vacancy rate today. The open land along 11th A venue adj acentto the new Montclair Post Office is zoned for neighborhood commercial retail development. This as yet undeveloped business district could serve as a sort of north anchor area to future Lowry development. Potential Lowry and Stapleton Shopping Areas When Lowry Air Force Base is shut down in 1994, retail development requiring larger land parcels may occur in the area approximately three blocks south from the 11th A venue Montclair Post Office where the existing PX and commissary buildings could be converted to super market and department store uses. 44

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN When Stapleton Airport closes later in 1994, the City's plan for redevelopment includes a possibility for "big box" larger scale retail development on the Stapleton site. In relationship to Lowry and Stapleton retail development, the role of Colfax A venue may be to continue to develop as the preferred location for smaller scale specialty stores, commercial services, restaurants, and other small to medium sized businesses. If the Colfax A venue business area is to be revitalized, it will be important to have attractive and convenient street, sidewalk, and bikeway access between the Colfax A venue "main street" and new Lowry and Stapleton neighborhoods. Current Shopping Areas. Residents presently have many choices in where to shop, both within the neighborhood imd at nearby shopping districts. These include the 14th and Krameria shopping district, Colfax A venue shopping areas, Downtown Denver, Cherry Creek, Buckingham Square, and Aurora Mall. The broad over-all goal for retail and service oriented businesses in the East Colfax neighborhood is the creation of a healthy business climate that will improve the economic viability of the area and serve neighborhood residents as well as people from the wider Denver and Aurora region. VISION * Improved and coordinated promotion of Colfax A venue with Aurora, Lakewood, and other Denver business areas. Strategies to cushion neighborhood businesses from possible economic impacts from the closures of Lowry Air Force Base and Stapleton Airport. Improved image of East Colfax A venue. Increased employment opportunities for neighborhood residents. A balanced business district, with a mix of business types. Reduced anti-social activity. A cleaner and more beautiful, inviting business district that will strengthen existing businesses and attract new businesses to the area. PLAN IMPLEMENTATION The following action agenda contains recommendations made by business owners or managers, neighborhood residents, City departments, and other public and private interests. Funding will rely heavily on private investment. For some projects, there will be opportunities for public-private partnerships. Examples of public funding sources include Community Development Block Grant programs, the City's General Fund, the City's Capital Improvements Plan (CIP), public and foundation grants, and future Citywide bond issues. For public sector funding, one or several possible funding sources are listed for each project, together with symbols ($)that indicate an estimate of the cost. $=less than $25,000. $$ = $25,000 to $250,000. $$$ = more than $250,000. Time frames for implementation are approximate. Projects are noted that were in progress even as the plan was being developed. Short range means the action is projected to commence in years 1 45

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN and 2 after adoption of the plan. Mid range refers to an action that should begin in years 3 to 5. Long range means implementation is projected to begin 5 or more years out. Certain action recommendations could be carried out at little or no cost. Time frames are "best guess" and will be altered with changing budget requirements, level of business involvement, and other conditions. POLICIES AND DEVELOPMENT GUIDELINES B-1. Study the extension of the Enterprise Zone to include the East Colfax Avenue business district. TIME: Short range project. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Businesses, Mayor's Office of Economic Development, Planning and Development Office, Business Owners. B-2. Build new residential neighborhoods at Lowry and Stapleton in order to increase the population that supports retail businesses along Colfax A venue, Encourage residential development, museum, cultural, tourism, and other uses on Stapleton that will complement and strengthen East Colfax Avenue activity. TIME: On-going project. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Stapleton Development, Lowry Development, Planning and Development Office. New Business on East Colfax Avenue. New Business opportunity on East Colfax Avenue. B-3. Encourage attractive storefront business signs. Strictly enforce zoning regulations for signage. Protect existing historic signs. TIME: In progression-going project. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Business Owners/Managers, Zoning Administration. B-4. Establish a process and form a group to meet jointly with Aurora businesses, residents, and public officials to work on common issues. TIME: Short range project. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: City Council representatives, Planning and Development Office, Aurora and Denver Neighborhood and Business Groups. 46

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN CAPITAL AND PHYSICAL IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS B-5. Clean up the area. Sweep sidewalks. TIME: In progress. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Businesses. B-6. Upgrade maintenance of building fronts, including painting, sign improvements, awnings, location of window and sidewalk flower boxes, and cleaning sidewalks and parking lots. TIME: In progression-going. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Business Owners/Managers, Business Association. B-7. Develop a coordinated streetscape program,..----------.,..--., along Colfax A venue, including street trees, trash containers, and improved pedestrian lighting. TIME: Medium range I long range project. COST: $$$ CDBG, CIP, Private. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Business Owners/Managers, Public Works -Transportation, Denver Planning and Development Office, Business Association. B-8. Clean up Colfax A venue street medians Streetscape in Aurora. (including sweeping of dirt and removal of weeds). TIME: Short range project. COST: $ General Fund. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Public Works -Street Maintenance. Improve street lighting along Colfax Avenue. Explore undergrounding electrical utilities and installation of new ''hockey puck" street lights and median lights similar to in Aurora. TIME: Mid range project. COST: $$$ CIP IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Public Works -Transportation, Public Service Company, Business Owners/Managers. B-10. Encourage RTD to put in additional bus shelters and trash receptacles along Colfax Avenue. TIME: Short range project I in progress. COST: $$ Private, RTD. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Neighborhood Group, Business Owners/Managers, RTD. 47

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN B-11. Locate trash receptacles near bus stops and in the vicinity of fast food restaurants. TIME: Short range project. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Businesses, RTD. MARKETING B-12. Coordinate Colfax Avenue promotion with Aurora, Denver, and Lakewood businesses, organizations, and economic development agencies. TIME: Short range project. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Businesses Owners/Managers, Mayor's Office of Economic Development, Planning and Development Office, City of Aurora, City of Lakewood. B-13. Encourage development of a unified marketing program for Colfax Avenue motels in Denver and Aurora. Explore new shuttle service to Denver International Airport and mountain casinos. Explore new marketing programs at Denver Union Railroad Station and the downtown Bus Depot. Explore strategies such as providing lodging to families of patients at nearby area hospitals. TIME: Short range project. COST: $Private, Public. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Motel Owners/Managers, Mayor's Office of Economic Development, Denver and Aurora Business Associations, City of Aurora. B-14. Consider alternative retail development of under utilized motel properties, such as converting rooms to crafts studios, ethnic art shops, antique dealer spaces, and similar uses compatible with adjacent residential areas. TIME: On-going. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Property owners, Mayor's Office of Economic Development, Planning and Development Office. B-15. Develop a Colfax Avenue theme and Motel converted to retail on Santa Fe Drive. consider use of the theme on street banners, signage, and marketing programs. TIME: Short range project. COST: $ Private and Grants. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Business Owners/Managers, Neighborhood Group, Business Association, Colorado Department of Transportation. 48

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN PUBLIC AND SUPPORT SERVICES B-16. Publicize and use business support resources available through the Small Business Support Office and Community College Center, located at 9905 East Colfax Avenue. TIME: On-going IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Short range project. Business Owners/Managers, Business Association, Mayor's Office of Economic Development, Aurora -Colfax Avenue Community College Center. B-17. Provide information and encourage use of the City's revolving loan program for businesses in the neighborhood. Conduct an outreach program to inform business owners about loan programs for renovation or expansion. Create other economic development assistance programs to reduce the impacts of closing Stapleton Airport and Lowry Air Force Base. TIME: In progress I short range project. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Business Owners/Managers, Mayor's Office of Economic Development, Planning and Development Office. B-18. Establish a Business Support Office to provide technical assistance in applying for loans, develop coordinated marketing strategies, inventory vacant properties, and promote the area. TIME: Short to medium range project. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Business Owners/Managers, Mayor's Office of Economic Development. NEIGHBORHOOD COOPERATION AND INVOLVEMENT B-19. Organize a business association in the area that can function as a support network, identify available resources for building front and streetscape improvements, develop a strategy to market and promote Colfax, and work cooperatively on common interests. TIME: In progress. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Business Owners/Managers, Property Owners, Neighborhood Group, Denver Planning and Development Office, Mayor's Office of Economic Development. B-20. Create employment opportunities for youth and people of all ages. Encourage neighborhood businesses to hire neighborhood residents. TIME: Short range project. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Business Owners/Managers, Mayor's Office of Economic Development, Schools, Neighborhood Group. B-21. Give an annual award to the most civic minded neighborhood business and the business most improved in appearance. TIME: Short range project. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Neighborhood Group. 49

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN B-22. Encourage collaboration between businesses and neighborhood residents. For example, residents might promote patronage of local stores and services, and businesses might join the neighborhood organization. TIME: Short range project. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Business Association, Neighborhood Group, Schools. B-23. Form a resident and merchants' "Colfax Walk" group to daily walk along Colfax Avenue for exercise and fitness, to support local businesses, and to assure continued law enforcement. TIME: Short range project. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Businesses, Neighborhood Group. RESEARCH, DESIGN, AND ANALYSIS B-24. Survey the needs of businesses on Colfax Avenue. Coordinate with Aurora. TIME: In progress. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Business Owners/Managers, Property Owners, Mayor's Office of Economic Development, Neighborhood Group, Planning and Development Office. **PRIORITY FOR IMPLEMENTATION** B-25. Inventory billboards along Colfax Avenue, noting spacing and size limitations prescribed by ordinance and feasible alternatives. TIME: Mid range project. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Neighborhood Group, Business Owners/Managers, Zoning Administration. B-26. Inventory Colfax Avenue and determine locations where sidewalk widening, repairs, and handicap ramps are needed. TIME: In-progress. COST: $$Private. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Business Owners/Managers, Neighborhood Group, Public Works -Transportation Division. B-27. Conduct an intensive workshop to develop marketing and/or reuse alternatives for the motels located along Colfax Avenue. Address alternative reuse strategies, legal alternatives, financing mechanisms for redevelopment, and economic development programs and tools. Include resource people representing real estate, urban design, planning, business development, business owners and managers, property owners, police, business licensing, housing experts, ethnic/cultural representatives, and neighborhood residents. TIME: Short range project. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Planning and Development Office, Mayor's Office of Economic Development, Business Owners/Managers, Neighborhood Group. ***PRIORITY FOR IMPLEMENTATION*** 50

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN INGREDIENTS FOR BUSINESS REVITALIZATION 51

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN HOUSING DESCRIPTION AND ANALYSIS The majority of land in the neighborhood is devoted to single family detached housing (2,122 homes). A nearly equal number of apartments are in the neighborhood (2,190 units). The apartment homes are concentrated within a relatively small land area at several large apartment communities and in two areas immediately to the north and south of Colfax A venue where duplexes and low density multi family housing are located. Construction of Housing Prior to 1940, today' s East Montclair neighborhood consisted of farm land, a few houses, and assorted businesses along U.S. highway 40 (Colfax Avenue). World War II brought expansion of Lowry Air Force Base and growth at nearby Stapleton Field, spurring construction of new homes. The majority of single family residential units were built during the 1940's and 1950's. New apartment construction occurred during the 1960's and 1970's. Regional Economy and Impacts on Housing The 1980's brought a downturn to the economy of Denver that resulted in a housing vacancy rate in the East Montclairneighborhood of 21.8% by the end of the decade. Several apartment buildings, a number of small multi-family buildings, and scattered single family homes became vacant and boarded up. Selling prices for single family homes decreased. Vacancy rates increased at the apartment complexes and among single family rental homes. Families and individuals moved for a number of reasons. Some found they could no longer afford their home due to loss of a job or a change in their income, while others found they could now afford to buy or rent a larger reduced price home in another area. During the latter years of the 1980's, the Denver metropolitan region experienced a net population loss. From 1990 to 1994 the region's population has been growing, a healthy economy has returned, and the stability ofhousing in the neighborhood has improved. Single Family Homes There are 2, 122 single family detached homes in the East Montclair neighborhood. The 1990U.S. Census found that among occupied single family homes in the neighborhood, 67.9% are owner occupied and 32.1% are renter occupied. This compares to a Citywide owner occupancy rate of80.3%. A June 1992 housing survey of the study area found fourteen vacant repossessed single family homes (HUD, VA, or bank owned). No Single Family Home in the neighborhood. boarded up houses were found in the survey. A small number of vacant lots located in ten areas around the neighborhood were identified. These sites offer opportunities for new home construction. 53

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Home renovation and remodeling is taking place throughout the neighborhood. During 1991, 303 permits were approved for alteration and remodeling work on single family homes. Work included everything from major room additions and new garages, to electrical and plumbing upgrades and new attic insulation. Single family housing in the neighborhood. Single family housing in the neighborhood. Appendix A illustrates the degree to which the gap between the average single family housing value for Denver and that of the study area has widened over the years. This valuation does not reflect on the condition of the housing stock or its desirability. It likely does reflect the average age ( 40 years) and smaller floor areas of East Montclair homes built during the postKorean War years, relative to Citywide housing. Apartment Housing There are 2,190 apartment units in the neighborhood. Nearly half of these units are located in just three complexes: Evergreen Village (on Montview Boulevard), Garden Court (on 11th A venue at Syracuse Street), and Heritage Estates (on 12th Avenue at Uinta Street). Moderate density apartment buildings under separate ownership are also located along Yosemite Street between 12th and Colfax Avenues. Garden Court Apartments. Other multi family construction is generally at a lower density, consisting of duplexes, triplexes, and court apartments. These can be found on either side of Colfax A venue between 14th and 16th A venues. A June 1992 survey found five of these low density apartment courts vacant and boarded up. Citywide, similar low density court apartments have also experienced higher than would be expected vacancy rates. The June 1992 housing survey of the neighborhood's ten largest apartment communities containing a total of 1,386 units found an occupancy rate of91 %. The range of rental rates was between $250 for a one bedroom apartment and $650 for a three bedroom unit. 54

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Closure of Stapleton and Lowry Stapleton International Airport closed and Denver International Airport opened in 1995. Lowry Air Force Basel closed in October 1994. The Defense Finance and Accounting Service and Reserve Personnel Center will continue in their present locations on the Lowry site. More than 20,000 jobs will be moving or be lost from Stapleton and Lowry. A March 1993 survey showed that Lowry employees live all along the Colorado Front Range from Ft. Collins to Boulder to Denver to Colorado Springs. Although there is some clustering in Denver and Aurora neighborhoods adjacentto Lowry, the clustering is thin and the number of neighborhood residents employed at Lowry is not large. The survey found that forty-four Lowry employees live in the East Montclair neighborhood. Of these residents, 38 were military personnel and 8 civilian employees. Those who are military personnel will be leaving the Denver area. The civilian employees will have a choice to either stay in Denver (and find a new job) or relocate to a military job in another part of the country. Residents employed at Lowry jobs that will likely be leaving Denver represent only 1% of neighborhood households. The number of Stapleton Airport employees who reside in the East Colfax neighborhood is not determined. The number is believed to be small, based on surveys at neighborhood meetings, general observations reported by administrators at neighborhood schools, and indications from several major Stapleton employers. Stapleton employees are believed to live throughout the metropolitan region and Colorado Front Range. Whatever number of Stapleton employees live in the neighborhood, their jobs will essentially remain the same. The only change will be in the location where the job is performed. It is assumed that residents who work at Stapleton will not immediately pick up and move to a closer house or apartment in Gateway, Montbello, or Green Valley Ranch. As time passes, some movement will occur. Overall, the place of residence for Denver International Airport employees is likely to continue to be spread throughout the metropolitan region. Because relatively few East Montclair residents work at either Lowry or Stapleton, the closure of these facilities should have little impact on housing in the neighborhood. VISION * A strong and vital residential neighborhood. Increased rate of home ownership. Sound management and a mix of income levels in rental single family homes and apartments. Renovated and well-maintained housing. PLAN IMPLEMENTATION The following action agenda contains recormilendations made by residents (both home owners and renters), apartment owners and managers, City departments, and other public and private interests. Many recommendations require "sweat equity," or rely heavily on "people" involvement and organizing around a common objective. Some recommendations require focusing of an existing program-for example to publicize the City's multi-family rehab program. A few recommendations may need special funding, such as for a loan program, a grant to conduct a study, or a marketing program. Funding sources include the private sector, foundation grants, and Community Development Block Grant programs. For projects requiring public sector funding, 55

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN one or several possible funding sources are listed, together with symbols ($) that indicate a very generalized estimate of the cost. $ = less than $25,000. $$ = $25,000 to $250,000. $$$ = more than $250,000. Time frames for implementation are approximate. Projects are noted that were in progress even as the plan was being developed. Short range means the action is projected to commence in years 1 and 2 after adoption of the plan. Mid range refers to an action that should begin in years 3 to 5. Long range means implementation is projected to begin 5 or more years out. Certain action recommendations could be carried out at little or no cost. Time frames are "best guess" and will be altered with changing budget requirements, level of community involvement, and other conditions. HOUSING POLICIES H-1. Encourage home ownership and purchase of single family homes by families and persons who will live in the homes. TIME: On-going project. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Realtors, Neighborhood Group, Planning and Development Office. HOUSING PHYSICAL IMPROVEMENTS PROJECTS H-2. Provide to owners of small apartment courts information about rental rehab loan programs. Explore strategies to convert one bedroom apartments to two or three bedroom apartments. TIME: Short range project. COST: $$ Private, CDBG, HOME. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Apartment Owners, Rental Property Owners, Planning and Development Office. H-3. Survey residents to determine those who need assistance with home and yard maintenance. Survey residents to determine volunteers who can assist their neighbors. Develop a tool lending library and provide "how to" information on home improvements and landscaping. TIMK Short range project. COST: $ Private, Grants. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Neighborhood Group, Churches, Schools, Early home built in East Montclair. Merchants, Denver Water Department. **PRIORITY FOR IMPLEMENTATION** 56

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN H-4. Identify residents interested in starting a community garden. Locate vacant land suitable for the garden. TIME: Short range project COST. $ CDBG. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Neighborhood Group, Churches, Schools, Planning and Development Office. H-5. Encourage upgrading and maintenance of rental properties by working with owners of properties. TIME: On-going project. COST: $$ Private, CDBG. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Apartment Owners, Rental Property Owners, Neighborhood Group, Planning and Development Office. ***PRIORITY FOR IMPLEMENTATION*** H-6. Familiarize residents with housing programs such as single family rehab loans, emergency home repair, and low interest loan programs for first time homebuyers. Encourage homeowners to add on additions and modernize single family homes. Utilize bank home equity loans, FHA Title One loans, FHA 203(k) loans, and other loan programs for rehabilitating and completing home upgrades. TIME: On-going project. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Neighborhood Group, Planning and Development Office, Denver Urban Renewal Authority, Lenders. H-7. Make residents and landlords aware of City environmental ordinances, such as those related to junk, dead cars, weeds, and number of people living in a housing unit. Develop and disseminate a flyer concerning residential zoning and code enforcement requirements. Publicize scheduled days for Large Item Pickup. Utilize neighborhood newsletters and school parent organizations. TIME: On-going project. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Neighborhood Group, Schools, Public WorksNeighborhood Support Services, Public WorksSolid Waste Division, Zoning Administration. H-8. Organize an annual "Alley Days" event for residents to get acquainted and help each other sweep and clean alleyways. TIME: Short range project. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Neighborhood Group, Schools, Civic Groups. 57

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN H-9. Encourage home owners to plant trees in their front yards. Publicize Denver Digs Trees and similar tree planting programs. Distribute information about the Tree Amigo program that assists lower income homeowners with dead tree removal. TIME: In progress I on-going project. COST: $Bond, Denver Digs Trees. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Home Owners, Neighborhood Group, City Forester. MARKETING New trees. H-10. Spread the word that the East Montclair/East Colfax neighborhood is a great place to live. Utilize promotion events, such as homebuyers fairs, picnics in neighborhood parks, concerts, Colfax Avenue parades, and a Christmas lighting contest. Involve Realtors in community actlvitles. Explore development of a video for telling prospective home buyers about the neighborhood. TIME: Short range project. COST: $ Private, Grants. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Neighborhood Group, Realtors, Schools, Churches, Non-profit Housing Advocacy Group, Lenders. H-11. Work with the Denver Regional Apartment Association to facilitate a workshop for apartlnent owners and managers in the neighborhood. Seek to develop a joint marketing program and permanent organization through which apartment properties can network and address shared interests and objectives. TIME: In progress I on-going project. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Apartment Owners and Managers, Neighborhood Group, Planning and Development Office. H-12. Encourage investors to purchase vacant four to twelve unit multi-family structures. Determine what amenities people want and what they are willing to pay for them. Look at renovation opportunities that will make these units more marketable, such as creation of fenced private courtyard space with each unit. Work with property owners to utilize the City's Multi Family Rental Rehabilitation Program to modernize apartments and use as a model for the upgrading of similar properties. TIME: Short range project. COST: $$ Private, CDBG, HOME. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Investors, Realtors, Neighborhood Group, Planning and Development Office. 58

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN RESEARCH, DESIGN, AND ANALYSIS. H-13. Participate in the Neighborhood Reinvestment Corporation's planning process to study the purchase of Garden Court and Heritage Estates apartments for development of mutual housing (resident managed, long-term affordable housing). TIME: In progress I on-going project. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Neighborhood Reinvestment Corporation, Garden Court and Heritage Estates Residents, Neighborhood Group, Planning and Development Office. *PRIORITY FOR IMPLEMENTATION* H-14. Explore the possible conversion of the apartment buildings to offices on the 1400 block of Yosemite Street. TIME: Short range project. COST $$Private. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Property Owners, Zoning Administration. H-15. Explore converting some of the Colfax Avenue motel properties to special needs housing, such as for assisted living and elderly housing. TIME: Short range project. COST: $$ Special Funding to be Identified. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Motel Owners, Non-profit Housing Groups. NEIGHBORHOOD COOPERATION AND INVOLVEMENT H-16. Develop award/incentive programs to acknowledge neighbor participation. TIME: Short range project. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Neighborhood Group. H-17. Develop a network of block captains throughout the neighborhood to coordinate the Neighborhood Watch program, disseminate information about community building programs and actiVIties, and generally encourage "neighborliness" on each block. TIME: In progress I short range project. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Neighborhood Group, Schools. H-18. As the City determines from current pilot projects how to best implement a Citywide recycling program, expand the program to serve residents of the East Montclair neighborhood. People make a neighborhood. TIME: Short range to medium range project. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Public Works -Sanitary Services. 59

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN PUBLIC SAFETY AND CRIME PREVENTION Description and Analysis Public safety and crime prevention are another area of concern to residents and businesses. In the 1993 Denver Neighborhood Crime Rates report, the East Colfax neighborhood was ranked 23rd out of Denver's 72 neighborhoods. Crime decreased between 1992 and 1993. In most city and suburban neighborhoods, the higher the population density and the more businesses that are concentrated in an area, the higher will be the crime rate that can be expected. For example, the Cherry Creek and Capitol Hill neighborhoods had higher rates of reported crimes than the East Colfax neighborhood because they have more businesses and higher residential densities. Within the neighborhood, these areas are generally along East Colfax A venue and on some Yosemite Street blocks south of Colfax. Residents are faced with such problems as high crime rate apartment buildings, boarded up buildings, prostitution, drug-related crimes, gang presence, disturbances, and frequent police visits. The north half of the neighborhood is served by Police District Two and the south half is served by Police District Three. While there is a need to assure that police protection is well coordinated between the two districts, a district boundary straddling Colfax A venue assures more coverage, more visibility of police cars, and better service than if a single district handled the area. Crime prevention and a sense of safety are experienced primarily within and immediately around a person's home or work place. The Neighborhood Watch program is active and is a helpful resource, but should be expanded and strengthened on some blocks. Mid-block street lighting also is a need in some areas. VISION * Increased sense of safety within the neighborhood. Reduced crime and 100% participation in the Neighborhood Watch Program. Coordinated police protection among Denver District Two, Denver District Three, and the Aurora Police Department. Merchants, residents, and police officers educated in crime issues and crime prevention needs. PLAN IMPLEMENTATION The following action agenda contains recommendations made by neighborhood residents, businesses, City departments, and other public and private interests. Time frames for implementation are approximate. Short range means the action is projected to commence in years 1 and 2 after adoption of the plan. Mid range means the action should begin in years 3 to 5. Long range means implementation is likely to begin 5 or more years after adoption of the plan. Some recommendations are understood to be on-going actions. Time frames are approximate and will be altered with changing budget requirements and other conditions. 61

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN DESIGN AND PHYSICAL IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS PS-1. Install new alley and street lighting at mid-block locations on long residential blocks. TIME: In progression-going project. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Public Works-Street Lighting Section, Home Owners. ***PRIORITY FOR IMPLEMENTATION*** PS-2. Where it is physically possible, locate outdoor eating areas on the sidewalk in front of restaurants to create positive activity and a lively street atmosphere, and to discourage anti-social activity through "eyes on the street." TIME: Short range/on-going project. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Restaurants, Public Works -Revocable Permits, Colorado Department of Transportation, Zoning Administration. PS-3. Discourage the locating of outdoor pay telephones along Colfax A venue and make phones for out-going calls only. TIME: In progress project. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Businesses. PS-4. Maintain security fences at Lowry and Stapleton until areas are redeveloped or occupied with new uses. Security fences should be viewed as a short-term interim strategy to discourage vandalism while buildings are vacant. TIME: Short term project. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Stapleton Development, Lowry Redevelopment Authority. PUBLIC SERVICES PS-5. Strictly enforce licensing requirements for Colfax Avenue businesses. Streamline police department report referral to Excise and Licensing Department. Continue close monitoring of business licensing. TIME: Short range project. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Excise and Licensing, Police Department, Business Owners/Managers, Neighborhood Group. *PRIORITY FOR IMPLEMENTATION* PS-6. Explore initiating neighborhood police foot, bicycle, or horse patrols along Colfax A venue. TIME: Short range project. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Police Department, Businesses, Neighborhood Group. 62

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN PS-7. Coordinate Police law enforcement with Aurora. TIME: In progress/ on-going project. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Police Department, Aurora Police Department. PS-8. Assure coordination between Police Districts 2 and 3. In order to not reduce police coverage, continue Colfax Avenue as the boundary between Police District 2 and Police District 3. TIME: In progression-going project. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Police Department. PS-9. Strictly enforce laws pertaining to excessive noise, disorderly conduct, and similar nuisance activities in the neighborhood. TIME: Short range/on-going project. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Residents, Businesses, Police Department, Neighborhood Groups. NEIGHBORHOOD COOPERATION AND INVOLVEMENT PS-10. Support individual responsibility to clean up graffiti as well as forming groups to clean up larger areas. TIME: Short range/on-going project. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Neighborhood Group, Graffiti Hot Line. PS-11. Educate and encourage awareness through neighborhood publications and meetings stressing the rewards of getting involved and helping residents solve their ongoing situations. TIME: In progression-going project. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Neighborhood Group, Police Department. PS-12. Request that a monthly police report that includes locations and types of crimes be mailed to registered neighborhood groups. Develop a mechanism for neighborhood crime reports to be shared with the Neighborhood Watch block captains. Include a police report as a regular part of the general meetings of the registered neighborhood groups. TIME: Short range/on-going project. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Neighborhood Groups, Police Department. PS-13. Network with other neighborhood organizations such as Original Aurora, Greater Park Hill, Historic Montclair, and Inter Neighborhood Cooperation (INC) on crime prevention efforts. TIME: On-going project. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Neighborhood Groups. 63

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN PS-14. Educate citizens on crime prevention and the importance of calling 911, the crack hotline (640-3080), and the crime line in each police district (District 2: 331-4076) (District 3: 698-3330). TIME: On-going project. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Neighborhood Groups, Police Department. PS-15. Expand and strengthen the network of Neighborhood Watch block captains. In addition to crime prevention, develop and utilize this network to disseminate information concerning neighborhood activities and community cooperation and involvement programs. TIME: On-going project, beginning in 1994. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Neighborhood Groups, Schools, Police Department, Neighborhood Watch. PS-16. Keep clean and maintain the appearance of neighborhood homes and Colfax A venue businesses. Seek to keep all homes, apartment buildings, and commercial properties occupied. Well cared for homes and businesses discourage anti-social behavior. TIME: In progression-going project. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Neighborhood Group, Homeowners, Businesses. PS-17. Encourage tenant/landlord cooperation in preventing crime and the forming of Neighborhood Watch programs in apartment buildings. TIME: Short range/on-going project. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Apartment Residents, Apartment Owners and Managers, Neighborhood Watch, Police Department. PS-18. Promote the use of existing services, such as home security surveys, citizen rider program, and mid-block lighting request forms. TIME: Short term/on-going project. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY/GROUP: Neighborhood Group, Police Department. 64

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN COMMUNITY FACILITIES DESCRIPTION AND ANALYSIS Most community facilities serving residents of the neighborhood are located either within the boundaries of the neighborhood or close by in the broader Denver and adjacent Aurora community. Many new facilities will also soon become available for public use when the nearby Lowry Air Force Base is redeveloped. Parks, Recreation, and Open Space There are four Denver neighborhood parks serving residents ofEastMontclair/East Colfax. Two are within the boundaries of the neighborhood, two are across the street but serve neighborhood residents. W.H. McNichols Park, located at 17th A venue and Syracuse Street near Ashley Elementary School, is situated on a four acre site acquired in 1950 and has two softball fields, two junior football fields, picnic facilities, playground, shade trees, and attractive lawn areas. Renovation work was recently completed at this park. Fred Thomas Park. Verbena Park, at 11th A venue and Verbena Street, has a picnic shelter, softball field, large open area, hike-bike path, and pleasant shaded lawn areas. Fred Thomas Park. 65 Verbena Park. Denison Park, located at 11th A venue and Quebec Street, has a playground area and basketball court. Fred Thomas Park, to the north of 23rd A venue between Quebec Street and Syracuse Street, is one ofDenver' s newest parks. Facilities include tennis courts, playground, hike-bike path, large open area, and ball fields for softball and

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN football. There is an opportunity to enlarge this park and link it to other open space that is planned for Stapleton' s redevelopment. In addition to Denver parks, several Aurora parks also serve East Montclair residents with tennis courts, picnic areas, basketball courts, ball fields, and hike-bike paths. City Park (9700 East 16th A venue), Montview Park (190 1 Chester Street), and Fletcher Park (11 00 Akron Street) are within convenient walking distance for many residents. Ashley Elementary School, located on Syracuse Street between 19th A venue and Montview Boulevard, has a playground, ball field, and basketball court used by neighborhood children. An area that cannot be formally counted as neighborhood open space but that is used as a play area by the neighborhood children is the vacant land found within theW esterly Creek Basin along the east side of the 1100 block ofXanthia, the east side of the 1200 block ofXanthia, and the halfblock area along 13th Avenue between Xanthia and Yosemite Streets. This undeveloped land owned by the City and County ofDenver has possibilities for recreation, pedestrian trails, and park development. A water reservoir site owned by the Denver Water Board is located on the west side of Quebec Street at 11th A venue, across from Denison Park. Ground above the subsurface reservoir is used by reservation as a soccer playing field. In addition to public parks presently used by the community, there are also a number of parks and an 18 hole golf course located onLowry AirForceBase, to the south of the neighborhood. In coming years, major new open space areas will be created at the Stapleton site to the north of the neighborhood. Natural open space areas will include trails and hiking along Westerly Creek, Golfing at Lowry. Sand Creek, and in the vicinity ofBluffLake. Approximately 600 acres of developed open space are also planned. This will include trails, golf courses, tennis courts, ball fields, and new playground areas. 66

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Schools Ashley Elementary School is located at 1900 SyracuseStreetonasiteof3.38 acres. An officially designated landmark, Ashley School was constructed in 1929, with an addition completed in 1950 and another addition in progress during 1993. The school contains an auditorium, lunch room, and gymnasium that make it an important resource for a wide variety of neighborhood gatherings and activities. Schools in the larger community that also serve Ashley School East Colfax residents include Montclair Elementary School, Stanley British Primary School, St. James Catholic School, Smiley Middle School, East High School, and Manual High School. Colleges and Universities The University ofDenveris located to the west of Quebec Street at Montview Boulevard. Campus facilities include an auditorium, fine arts center, tennis courts, gyms, swimming pool, in addition to university classrooms, labs, and halls. The Emily Griffith Opportunity School offers aircraft maintenance classes at nearby Stapleton Airport. A new college campus along Yosemite Street south of 11th A venue will become an anchor in the development of the Lowry neighborhood. A consortium of state funded University of Denver colleges and universities will be located on this campus. About 1,000 students will be on campus during the Fall semester of 1994. Additional classes will start up in the Fall of 1995. Recreation Centers The nearest Denver recreation centers are more than 3 miles from the neighborhood: the Skyland Center at 33rd A venue and Holly Street and the Martin Luther King Center at 38th Avenue and Newport Street. Two nearby Aurora centers partially serve neighborhood residents. They are the Moorehead Recreation Center at 23rd A venue and Havana Street and the Morning Star Senior Center at Emporia Street and 16th A venue. Determining the location for a new recreation center approved in a 1989 bond issue has been challenging, but worthwhile, for the East Montclair neighborhood. The initial planned location was a site adjacentto the Montclair Post Office on East 11th A venue. Following passage of the bond issue, Lowry's closure was announced, which made available a number of already existing recreation facilities on the Air Force Base, including a 9,400 square feet Arts and Crafts building 2 112 blocks south of the Montclair Post Office. This option has been selected and can offer a variety of recreation programs for senior adults, youth, and people of all ages. 67

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Police and Fire Stations The District 2 Police Station is located at 3355 Colorado Boulevard and serves the area north of Colfax Avenue. South of Colfax A venue is the responsibility of District 3 Police Station, based at 1625 South University Boulevard. Fire protection is provided by Station 14, located at 1426 Oneida Street. Fire station buildings are also located on Lowry Air Force Base and Stapleton Airport. Libraries Residents of the neighborhood have four libraries to choose from in obtaining library services. The Montclair Library, a storefront service, is located at 9th A venue and Jersey Street in the Jersey Shoppette. The Dahlia Library, also a storefront service, is located at 33rd A venue and Eudora Street in the Dahlia Shopping Center. The Park Hill Library, located at Montview Boulevard and Dahlia Street, offers the more extensive services of a branch library. AN orth Aurora branch library is located at 14th A venue and Peoria Street. Churches There are four churches within the East Colfax neighborhood, and more than ten additional churches within 6 blocks of the neighborhood and located in Aurora, Montclair, ParkHill, or on the Lowry Air Force Bas e. The church sponsored East Denver Assistance Center is located on Poplar Street south of Colfax Avenue and provides help for families and individuals in locating employment, food, clothing, housing, support groups, and other human services. Churches in the community provide Zion Temple. residents with a variety of religious and social programs. Storm Drainage Heavy rainfall and snowmelt are sometimes slow to drain from those streets in the neighborhood that do not have storm sewers. $1,416,000 in underground storm drainage improvements in the neighborhood have been completed along Montview Boulevard (from the outfall at Westerly Creek near Boston Street to Uinta Street), on Willow Street (Montview Boulevard to 19th Avenue), on Wabash Street (19th A venue to 17th A venue), on 19th A venue (Verbena Street to Willow Street), on 17th A venue (Roslyn Street to Unita Street, and Verbena Street to Willow Street), on Unita Street (Montview Boulevard to 17th A venue), on Trenton Street (17th A venue to 16th A venue), and on 16th A venue (Trenton Street to Tamarac Street). Construction will continue in 1995 with another $450,000 in underground strom drainage improvements on Syracuse Street (17th A venue to Colfax A venue), on Colfax A venue (Syracuse Street Street to Rosemary Street), and on Rosemary Street (Colfax Avenue to 14th A venue). 68

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Improvements are also planned for storm drainage in the area bounded by 16th Avenue, 12th A venue, Roslyn Street, andY osemite Street. Work in this area is tentatively scheduled to begin in 1998. PLAN IMPLEMENTATION The following action agenda contains recommendations made by residents, City departments, and other public and private interests. Potential funding sources for the various capital improvement projects include the City's Capital Improvements Plan (CIP), Public Works Enterprise Funds, grants, and 1989 and future Citywide bond issues. Funding sources each have different criteria for projects and will change from year to year. One or several potential funding sources are listed for each project, together with symbols ($) that indicate a very general estimate of cost. $ = less than $25,000. $$ = $25,000 to $250,000. $$$=more than $250,000. Time frames for implementation are approximate. Projects are noted that were in progress as the plan was being developed. Short range means the action is projected to commence in years 1 and 2 after adoption of the plan. Mid range means the action should begin in years 3 to 5. Long range means implementation is projected to begin 5 or more years out. Certain action recommendations could be carried out at little or no cost. Time frames are "best guess" and will be altered with changing budget requirements and other conditions. VISION Community public facilities that promote the health, safety, and general welfare of residents and businesses. Community educational, cultural, parks, and recreation facilities for the use and enjoyment of residents. Removal of real and perceived barriers to resources located in the surrounding Denver and Aurora neighborhoods. CAPITAL AND PHYSICAL IMPROVEMENTS CF -1. Locate additional picnic tables at McNichols Park. Install irrigation automation. TIME: Short range project. COST: $$ Grants, CIP IMPLEMENTING AGENCIES/GROUPS: Parks and Recreation Department. CF-2. Rebuild and upgrade the children's play area at Verbena Park. Place more picnic tables in the park. TIME: Mid range project. COST: $$ CIP IMPLEMENTING AGENCIES/GROUPS: Parks and Recreation Department. 69

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN CF -3. Enlarge Fred Thomas Park by expanding it onto the Stapleton Airport property (located to the east and north) and linking the park to open space in new Stapleton neighborhoods. TIME: Short range land dedication I long range development project. COST: $$$ Private Development, CIP. IMPLEMENTING AGENCIES/GROUPS: Stapleton Planning and Development, Parks and Recreation Department, Private Development. CF-4. Upgrade and improve bleachers at Fred Thomas Park. TIME: Short range project. COST: $$CIP IMPLEMENTING AGENCIES/GROUPS: Parks and Recreation Department. CF -5. Asphalt overlay the parking lot area at Denison Park. TIME: Short range project. COST: $ CIP IMPLEMENTING AGENCIES/GROUPS: Parks and Recreation Department. CF -6. Develop a Westerly Creek Master Plan jointly with Denver and Aurora. Link the existing High Line recreation trail and the future Sand Creek (Emerald Strands) open space and trail system. The master plan should address drainage, landscaping, park, and trail amenities in the area of the Kelly Dam spillway and along Westerly Creek as it flows to the north-northeast through Lowry, the East Montclair neighborhood, Original Aurora neighborhood, and Stapleton to reach its confluence at Sand Creek. The study should determine feasibility and opportunities for opening up portions of the creek that now flow underground through pipes. Stapleton and Lowry land dedications should occur soon after the closure of these facilities. TIME: Short range land dedication, medium to long range development project. COST: $$$Private Development, CIP, future Citywide bond project. IMPLEMENTING AGENCIES/GROUPS: City of Aurora, Parks and Recreation Department, Public Works-Transportation, Lowry Redevelopment Authority, Public Works Wastewater Management, Urban Drainage and Flood Control District, Stapleton Development, Planning and Development Office. ***PRIORITY FOR IMPLEMENTATION*** 70

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN CF-7. \l{ork with the Department of Parks and Recreation and adjacent property owners to determine the feasibility of constructing along a proposed storm drainage channel a pedestrian/bicycle trail connection to Verbena Park from properties to the west. TIME: Mid range to long range project. COST: $$ CIP IMPLEMENTING AGENCIES/GROUPS: Parks and Recreation Department. CF -8. Create a link between Lowry open space at the Kelly Dam and East Montclair open space along Westerly Creek. Identify other poss1ble gateway areas where linkage should be created between Stapleton open space and the East Montclair neighborhood and between Lowry open space and the East Montclair neighborhood. TIME: In progress through the Lowry and Stapleton planning processes. Long range implementation. COST: $$$ Urban Drainage and Flood Control Maintenance Funds, CIP, Private Development. IMPLEMENTING AGENCIES/GROUPS: Planning and Development Office, Parks and Recreation Department, Lowry Redevelopment Authority, Stapleton Development Office, Public Works -Wastewater Management. **PRIORITY FOR IMPLEMENTATION** CF -9. Complete the construction of the 17th and Ulster and 13th and Ulster storm sewer projects. Resurface arterial and collector streets after completion of storm sewer work. TIME: In progress I mid range project. COST: $$$ Public Works Enterprise Funds. IMPLEMENTING AGENCIES/GROUPS: Public WorksWastewater Department, Public Works -Transportation. SERVICES AND PROGRAMS CF-10. Parks and Recreation Department and neighborhood organizations work together to establish summer youth programs in a neighborhood park. TIME: Short range project. COST: $ General Fund. IMPLEMENTING AGENCIES/GROUPS: Neighborhood Organizations, Schools, Parks and Recreation Department. RESEARCH AND ANALYSIS CF-11. Locate an outdoor swimming pool to serve east Denver neighborhoods. Among sites to consider, explore a location for the pool at Fred Thomas Park. TIME: Long range project. COST: $$$ Future Citywide bond issue. IMPLEMENTING AGENCIES/GROUPS: Parks and Recreation Department. 71

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN APPENDIX A Population Census Tract 44.01 Demographic Population Income Total Population 7,172 Total Households 3,298 Average Household Size (persons per Household) 2.17 Median Household Income $20,389 (Citywide $25,106) Per Capita Income $11,328 (Citywide $15,590) Persons Below Poverty Level 1,516 Number of Families 1,680 Families Below Poverty Level 336 Number of persons Under 18 Years 1,733 Number of Persons Under 18 Years Below Poverty 620 Age Profile Number of Residents 1600 1400 1000 800 600 400 200 45 54 55-64 65+ 25 34 35-44 18-24 -Source: 1990 Census 72

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Black-2361 32.9% Native American-7 1% Asian-159 2.2% Ethnic Composition -Hispanic-731 10.2% _----Other -26 0.4% -3824 53.3% *Source: 1990 U.S. Census of Population and HousingPublic Law file Pl-94-171. The categories Anglo, Black, Asian, Native American, and Other are composed of people not of Hispanic origan. 73

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN APPENDIX B Housing Housing Units (Multi Family and Single Family Detached) Total Housing Units* Occupied Housing Units* Vacant Housing Units* 4,260 3,298 962 Owner Occupied/Renter Occupied Single Family Detached Homes Owner Occupied Single Family Detached Renter Occupied Single Family Detached (City Owner Occupied 80.3%) Source: 1990 Census 1,275 604 Household Profile Other Married no Children 531 MHH wiChildren 87 FHH w I Children 396 Single Person Households Married Couples w I Children Married Couples no Children Male Head Household w I Children (MHH) Female Head Household w I Children (FHH) Single Person 1398 Married w I Children 453 Other (non-family, non-related children, adults living together) Source: 1990 Census 74

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Transaction Price Single Family Homes "' 60 "0 50 "' 40 E-<3Qf------20 10 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 year 19701988 Tract 44.01 -IJ -City Average 75

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN APPENDIX C Business Survey SUMMARY OF BUSINESS SURVEY RESULTS During the Fall of 1992, a planner and intern from the Planning and Development Office drafted and distributed a survey to all businesses located along the East Colfax Avenue business corridor between Quebec and Yosemite Streets. The survey was a part of the East Colfax neighborhood planning process. Its purposes were to: * Learn which types of business activity are improving, declining, or remaining the same. Anticipate the impacts on businesses that will result from the closures of Stapleton Field and the Lowry Air Force Base. Understand what types of improvements the business community recommends for the corridor and measure their willingness to participate in financing the recommended improvements. Obtain information regarding the trade areas served by various businesses. SURVEY DESIGN AND ADMINISTRATION A two page survey instrument was drafted by the City ofDenver. It was designed specifically to obtain information that was not available from secondary data sources. A planner and intern from the Planning and Development Office hand delivered the survey to each business in the East Colfax A venue study area. The completed surveys were picked up at a later time, returned by a self-addressed envelope, or filled out in a follow-up interview. These efforts yielded 51 surveys out of a possible 61 for a response of nearly 84%. Motels were not included in the survey. DESCRIPTIVE INFORMATION (Categories .of Businesses) Nearly 59% of respondents are engaged in retail trade or provision of business, personal, or professional services. These include clothing and shoe stores, auto and boat repair, laundromat, grocery and convenience stores, veterinarian, lock and safe shop, beauty supplies, and the like. Just under 12% of respondents operate auto sales businesses. Sports cars, classic vehicles, and used truck and car sales are among these businesses. About 29% of respondents are engaged in restaurant, club, or bar businesses. Long time ethnic eating and drinking places include African American, Chinese, Greek, Italian, Mexican, and Thai establishments. Also located along Colfax A venue are fast food and delivery restaurants, such as Burger King, Wendy's, and Little Caesar's. (Years in Business) Each owner or manager indicated the number of years the business has been at its present location. About 45% of the responding businesses have been attheir current location for 5 years or less; 20% for6-10years; 12% for 11-15 years; 10% for 16-20years; and 16% for20years or more. Clean and Green (laundry and check cashing) has been in business at its present location for 46 years; West Auto Body for 46 years; Dairy Queen for 44 years; Dr. Cioeta for 39 years; PMM Western Wear for 35 years; Montclair Animal Clinic for 30 years (18 years with Wayne Sargeant as owner); Don 76

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Bowman TV and Appliance for 21 years; Strasenbahn Motors for 20 years; and State-wide Lock and Safe for 12 years. (Trade Area) Most business respondents report their trade area is regional in scale. Only 10% reported most of their customers come from the immediate neighborhood (within 1/2 mile). Forty -one percent said their trade area includes the entire metropolitan area. Several businesses indicated most of their customers come from outside of the Denver metropolitan area. Among restaurants and bars, customers are more likely to come from closer in (within 2 to 4 miles). (Number of Employees) The 51businesses that responded to the survey reported 309 full and part-time employees. Restaurants employ 155 people; retail, personal, and business services 127; auto sales 14; and bars 13. Restaurants account for a significant number of employees. One fast food restaurant reported having more than 30 employees. On the other end of the spectrum, a number of service businesses reported having no employees other than the owner. These numbers do not include eleven motels, three businesses that opened in late 1992, and ten businesses that did not respond to the survey. When all businesses are included, the total number of employees is likely between 350 and 400. BUSINESS CONDITIONS (Historic Business Activity) Thirty-one percent report that their business activity has improved over the last three years, 27% report stable activity, 31% report business activity has declined, and 11% did not respond to this question. Businesses with improved activity attribute their condition to internal efforts such as aggressive business practices, competitive pricing, increased advertising, and quality of service. Businesses with declining activity attribute their condition to external events such as the economy, real or perceived problems on Colfax Avenue, and increased competition. (Best Locational Characteristics) A majority of respondents made a direct or indirect reference to their street as their best locational characteristic. An East Colfax Avenue address provides good accessibility, is easy to find, offers high traffic counts, and is perceived to be a "regional business location." Proximity to Stapleton Field and Lowry Training Center is another strong point. For certain businesses, a location midway between Downtown Denver and Aurora is an asset. Convenience grocery stores find the area to be perfect because it is midway between large supermarkets in Aurora and Denver. A number ofbusinesses mentioned loyal customers in the neighborhood and proximity to similar businesses as other pluses for their location. Several people referenced the reasonable rental rates ideal for starting a new business. (Worst Locational Characteristic) Respondent remarks regarding the worst characteristics of their location centered on the real or perceived problems of illegal activity on Colfax A venue. Sixty -one percent of all respondents mentioned the reputation of the street, crime, the people on the street, or a need for the police to be more visible. Other less frequently given responses included: difficulty in getting bank loans, government bureaucracy, snow and water in the gutters, no snow removal on side streets, and traffic 77

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN circulation and parking problems at specific locations. One respondent mentioned customers gambling in the mountain casinos as a reason for a decline in business. BUSINESS OUTLOOK (Plans to Expand) Forty-three percent of the respondents have no plans to expand their building or inventory. Nearly 22% plan to expand at their present location on Colfax A venue. Ten percent will wait to see how the Stapleton and Lowry closures impact business. Only 8% are looking at expanding at another location. (Plans to Relocate) A substantial proportion of the businesses have clear intentions to stay in their present location (76% ). This is an important indicator of the economic stability of this business area. (Recommended Improvements) Four types of improvements are recommended by more than 40 percent of the respondents. These are, in frequency order: more visible police role, landscaping improvements, low-interest expansion loans, and cooperative business promotion. (Willingness to Finance Improvements) Seventy -eight percent of respondents are unwilling to help finance any of the recommended improvements. Several indicated a desire to participate in financing landscaping and sidewalk improvements adjacent to their properties. Several businesses would help pay for a more visible police presence or private security services. Several businesses would participate in cooperative business promotion. BUSINESS FROM STAPLETON FIELD Respondents were asked what percentage of their business is related to Stapleton Field, and specifically if this was from airport and airline personnel, passengers, or car rental/hotel employees. 8% said none of their business is from Stapleton. 26% said less than 5% of their business is from Stapleton. 16% said between 5% and 10% of their business is from Stapleton. -18% said between 11% and 15% of their business is from Stapleton. 16% said between 16% and 20% of their business is from Stapleton. 12% said more than 20% of their business is from Stapleton. Restaurants and bars indicated the strongest ties to Stapleton. Among restaurant respondents twenty-seven percent said 20% or more of their business is from Stapleton; forty-five percent said between 10% and 20%, and twenty-seven percent said less than 10%. Most of Stapleton's approximate! y 1 0,000 employees work 20 blocks orless from Colfax A venue. Employees are less than a five minute drive from lunch or breakfast at a Colfax A venue restaurant, an after work dinner or drink at a bar or restaurant, and convenient delivery and take-out food. Some restaurants indicated they offer special discounts for Stapleton employees. 78

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EAST MONTCLAIR/EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Other business categories that indicated ties to Stapleton were car rentals, filling stations (customers gas up with reasonably priced gas before returning rental cars); auto repair garages (customers have vehicles serviced while out of the City, pick up when return); and airport building services (special trades and contractor services). BUSINESS FROM LOWRY TRAINING CENTER Respondents were asked what percentage of their business is related to the Lowry Air Force Bas e. 8% said none of their business is from Lowry. -33% said less than5% of their business is from Lowry. -24% said between5% and 10% of their business is from Lowry. -10% said between 10% and 15% oftheirbusinessisfromLowry. -10% said between 16% and20% of their business is from Lowry. -4% said more than 20% of their business is from Lowry. Among categories of businesses, restaurants, bars, car rental agencies, furniture and appliance sales, and moving services reported the strongest ties to Lowry Training Center employees. Nine percent of restaurant respondents indicated more than 20% of their business is from Lowry, thirty-six percent between 11% and 20%, and fifty-six percent under 10%. Restaurants with the strongest connections mentioned Lowry advertising and special military discounts. 79

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