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Evans station area plan

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Evans station area plan
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Community Planning and Development, City and County of Denver
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Denver, Co
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City and County of Denver
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English

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Full Text
Evans
Station Area Plan
Community
Planning &
Development
Approved August 19,2009




Table of Contents
Acknowledgements...............................................................v
Executive Summary............................................................vii
Introduction...................................................................1
Vision & Goals.................................................................7
Land Use and Urban Design.....................................................11
Mobility & Infrastructure.....................................................29
Economic Opportunity..........................................................39
Implementation................................................................43
The Community.................................................................49
Public Engagement.............................................................63
Relevant Plans................................................................67
Acronyms......................................................................71
Figures, Maps & Charts
Figure 1. Southwest Light Rail Corridor Map....................................2
Figure 2. Transit System Map...................................................3
Figure 3. Evans Station Area...................................................3
Figure 4. Land Use Plan.......................................................13
Figure 5. Comprehensive Open Space Plan.......................................19
Figure 6. Active Edges and Ground Floor Commercial Plan.......................23
Figure 7. Building Heights Plan...............................................25
Figure 8. Transit and Automobile Circulation Plan.............................31
Figure 9. Proposed Cross Section for South Delaware...........................32
Figure 10. Proposed Typical Broadway Section at Left Turn Lane................32
Figure 11. Proposed Cross Section for Jewell..................................33
Figure 12. Pedestrian Circulation Plan........................................35
Figure 13. Bicycle Circulation Plan...........................................37
Figure 14. Aerial Image.......................................................50
Figure 15. Existing Light Rail................................................51
Figure 16. Population and Housing.............................................52
Figure 17. Neighborhoood Population...........................................52
Figure 18. Household Income...................................................52
Figure 19. Neighborhood Race and Ethnicity....................................53
Figure 20. Births by Ethnicity................................................53
Figure 21. Housing Distribution by Type.......................................53
Figure 22. Age Distribution...................................................53
Figure 23. Harvard Gulch and South Platte River Flood Plains..................54
Figure 24. Existing Land Use..................................................55
Figure 25. Existing Land Use Distribution.....................................56
Figure 26. Existing Zoning....................................................57
Figure 27. View Plane Ordinances..............................................58
Figure 28. Blueprint Denver Concept Land Use.........................59
Figure 29. Existing Transit Service...........................................61


IV


Evans Station Area Plan Acknowledgements
Acknowledgements
v


Evans Station Area Plan Acknowledgements
Acknowledgements
Mayor John W Hickenlooper
Denver City Council
District 1 Rick Garcia
District 2 Jeanne Faatz
District 3 Paul D. Lopez
District 4 Peggy Lehmann
District 5 Marcia Johnson
District 6 Charlie Brown
District 7 Chris Nevitt
District 8 Carla Madison
District 9 Judy Montero
District 10 Jeanne Robb President
District 11 Michael Hancock
At-Large Carol Boigon
At-Large Doug Linkhart
Community Planning & Development
Peter J. Park, AICP, Manager
Steve Gordon, Comprehensive Planning Manager
Barbara Frommell, Project Manager
Caryn Wenzara, AICP
Chris Gleissner
Steve Nalley
Kristin Krasnove, AICP
Tom Hoaglund, AICP
Michelle Pyle
Eric McClelland
Andrea Santoro
Jim Ottenstein
Carolyne Janssen
Denver Planning Board
Brad Buchanan, Chairman
Laura E. Aldrete
Richard Delanoy
Shannon Gifford
Kenneth Ho
Anna Jones
Judith Martinez
Sharon Nunnally
Karen Perez
Jeffrey Walker
Dave Webster
Public Works
Guillermo Bill Vidal, Manager
Crissy Fanganello, AICP, Manager, Planning and Policy
Karen Good, AICP, Planning and Policy
Jennifer Hillhouse, Planning and Policy
Eric Osmundsen, Development Engineering Services
Kim Blair, Development Engineering Services
Justin Schmitz, Traffic Engineering Services
Frank Kemme, CMP
Mike Anderson
Dennis Ohlrogge
Parks & Recreation
Scott Robson, Deputy Manager
Gordon Robertson, Planning Director
David Marquardt
Jill Wuertz
Dick Gannon
Office of Economic Development
Andre Pettigrew, Executive Director
Cec Ortiz, Deputy Director
Terrence Ware
Tim Martinez
Will Kralovec
Department of Cultural Affairs
Ginger White Brunetti
Regional Transportation District
Bill Sirois, TOD Program Manager
Denver Urban Renewal Authority
Consultant Team
PB Placemaking
Fehr & Peers
Nelso n\Nygaard
Basile Baumann Prost Cole & Associates
ArLand LandUse Economics
Community Stakeholders
Councilman Chris Nevitt, District 7
Jennifer Redies, District 7 Legislative Aide
Valerie Kerns, District 7 Legislative Aide
Evans Station Area Plan Steering Committee (see page 64)
Overland Neighborhood Association
Platt Park Peoples Association
Platt Park Residents Coalition
West University Community Association
Rosedale Neighborhood Asssociation
VI


Evans Station Area Plan Executive Summary
Executive
Summary
VII


Evans Station Area Plan Executive Summary
Introduction
Denvers commitment to investing in an expansive and
comprehensive transit system is a source of pride and excite-
ment for the region and an opportunity for reinvestment in
neighborhoods that have access to light rail. A result of an
18 month public process, this plan documents the unique
qualities of and opportunities near the Evans light rail station
in several ways:
A long-term vision for the station area and set of
overarching goals
Clear recommendations on land use and urban design,
mobility and infrastructure, and economic opportunities
Implementation strategies necessary for achieving the
plan recommendations and the communitys vision
Evans Station Area


Evans Station Area Plan Executive Summary
Evans is a neighborhood walk-up station with a small park-
and-Ride located near the intersection of South Santa Fe
Drive and Evans Avenue. Access to the station is on Dela-
ware Street. Built in 2000 during the construction of RTDs
southwest light rail corridor, Evans Station is the first stop
in Denver as the train heads north into the city from Engle-
wood. Broadway station and the Gates redevelopment site
are located two miles to the north of Evans.
The Purpose of the Plan
The Evans Station Area Plan will be used to guide decisions
regarding appropriate public and private investment within
1/2 mile of the Evans light rail station. The Denver Compre-
hensive Plan 2000, Blueprint Denver and other citywide plans
including the Strategic Transportation Plan (STP) and Parks and
Recreation Game Plan act as a starting point for recommenda-
tions contained in this Plan. With a thorough and up-to-date
analysis focused on the Evans Station neighborhoods, this Plan
serves to supplement the Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000 and
updates Blueprint Denver within this planning area.
The Vision
Transit-oriented development (TOD) creates vibrant, sus-
tainable communities with a diverse mix of land uses at vari-
ous densities within a 10-minute walk, or about a half-mile,
of a transit station. The vision statement for the Evans Sta-
tion Area uses fundamental principles ofTOD as a founda-
tion and will contribute to Denvers success in implementing
the 2006 Transit-Oriented Development Strategic Plan:
Enhance the Evans Station areas sense of place by creating a
vibrant and sustainable urban neighborhood that encourages
people to live and work; invites businesses to thrive; allows
people to comfortably walk, bike, or use transit to access
local services and attractions; and maintains the residential
character of the surrounding community.
A core set of goals set forth in this Plan for the Evans Station
Area suggest how this vision ofTOD might be achieved:
Bring most activities of daily living within walking
distance by encouraging a mixture of land uses.
Improve streets and streetscapes to increase mobil-
ity choice providing walkable and bikeable connectivity
throughout the area.
Encourage reinvestment and redevelopment of
industrial areas while maintaining and creating diverse
employment opportunities.
Maintain the residential character of surrounding
communities and encourage development of a full range
of housing types and housing price points.
Use urban design to respect the scale and character of
an Urban Neighborhood as defined in the TOD
Strategic Plan.
Celebrate the areas history, ties to the South Platte River
and access to open space and recreation opportunities.
Encourage environmentally sustainable or green
building construction and the use of quality materials
to create buildings of lasting value.
The Evans Station Area Plan supplemen ts Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000, updates Blueprint Denver and uses
these adopted policies plus those expressed in the Transit Oriented Development Strategic Plan as a starting point.
IX


Evans Station Area Plan Executive Summary
The Plan: Land Use and Urban Design
The land use recommendations in this Plan seek to reinforce
the vision for the Evans Station Area. They update and
refine the recommendations made for this neighborhood in
Blueprint Denver based on a current and detailed analysis of
opportunities, strengths and challenges in this neighborhood.
Key Land Use and Urban Design recommendations include:
Diversify land uses on Delaware Encourage Delaware
Street to evolve from an industrial area to a walkable and
bikeable mixed-use street supporting creative industries as
well as commercial and residential uses.
Create a main street on Broadway Facilitate the transfor-
mation of South Broadway from an automobile-dominated
commercial corridor to a pedestrian-friendly main street sup-
porting retail, residential and office uses.
Connect the station to Broadway Improve connections
between Broadway and the station along Evans by encourag-
ing higher intensity development along Evans and by design-
ing a better pedestrian environment.
Redevelop underutilized industrial areas Support the
transformation of vacant and underutilized industrial
properties north of Evans and west of Broadway into a new
mixed-use, transit-oriented urban center with diverse housing
opportunities.
Respect character in existing neighborhoods Acknow-
ledge the unique character in residential areas surrounding
the Evans Station and maintain this character while support-
ing diverse housing types.
Create a comprehensive open space system Provide access
to existing regional open space with new east-west connec-
tions and create pockets of urban open space such as a plaza
at the transit station.
The Plan: Mobility and Infrastructure
Mobility and infrastructure recommendations primarily
address the need to make the station area more suitable for
mixed-use, pedestrian oriented and bicycle friendly develop-
ment. Key recommendations include:
Three new east-west connections Creating improved
bicycle/pedestrian connections across Santa Fe and the tracks
at Evans, Jewell and Iliff will reconnect the east and west
sides of the Overland Park Neighborhood, provide access to
the station and complete missing links to the South Platte
River Greenway and Trail.
Harvard Gulch improvements Investing in drainage
improvements to Flarvard Gulch to effectively remove the
floodplain would facilitate redevelopment along Broadway,
Delaware and north of Evans.
Multi-modal streets Improvements to the public right-of-
way (such as curb and gutter, detached sidewalks and street
trees) throughout the station area are essential to achieving
the plan vision. Priority streets for pedestrian and bicycle
improvements include Evans, Broadway, Delaware, Jewell,
Warren and Asbury.
The Plan: Economic Opportunity
A TOD market study revealed that the Evans Station has
the capacity to absorb additional residential, office and retail
development. Obtaining financing and/or funding for
critical capital improvement projects and urban infrastruc-
ture elements is a key challenge in creating transit oriented
development. Innovative strategies will be necessary. Key
recommendations include:
Special Assessment Districts Consider special assessment
districts as part of the South Broadway reconstruction and
for funding neighborhood improvements, amenities and
public art to implement the communitys vision for improv-
ing neighborhood identity and creating unique and well
utilized public spaces.
Creative Industries Niche Take advantage of an existing
niche market for music, art and design-related businesses
already present in the station area and throughout South
Denver.
Neighborhood Marketplace Initiative Work with the
Denver Office of Economic Development and the Neigh-
borhood Marketplace Initiative to develop market profiles
for South Broadway and the Evans Station area to call
attention to the lifestyle, businesses and amenities available
in this neighborhood.
Public-Private Partnerships Pursue public-private partner-
ships and other innovative strategies for carrying out the rec-
ommendations in this plan for critical infrastructure projects
and urban plazas/open spaces.
X


Evans Station Area Plan Executive Summary
LEGEND
Mixed-Use Main Street
Mixed-Use Residential
Urban Residential
Single Family-Duplex WMMM
Single Family
Mixed-Use Employment
Public/Quasi-Public
Transit Plaza
Priority Pedestrian / Bike Streetscape Improvements
Secondary Pedestrian / Bike Streetscape Improvements
Plaza/Pedestrian Bridge
Potential Urban Garden Site
/=( Bicycle/Pedestrian Bridge
o Transit Parking
o Transit Station
* Station Tower/Vertical Pedestrian Connection
lllllllll SW Corridor
Existing Parks
1,200
ZH Feet
Evans Station Illustrative Plan
XI


Evans Station Area Plan Executive Summary
Delaware Street will transition
from an industrial area to a
street that supports "creative in-
dustries", research and develop-
ment, office and residential uses.
1 7.5' Sidewalk/Amenity Zone 13' Travel Lane IT Travel Lane 12' Turn Lane 4' Median 12' Travel Lane 13' Travel Lane 17.5' Sidewaik/AmenityZone

lOtrR.O.W.
South Broadway will transform
into a main street that invites
a mixture of commercial and
residential uses and a vibrant
pedestrian environment.
XII


Evans Station Area Plan Executive Summary
Jewell Avenue will bean active,
mixed-use street with ground
floor commercial supported by
residential or office on upper
floors. This "arm" off South
Broadway will terminate with
a bicycie/pedestrian bridge
reaching westoverS. Santa Fe
Drive toward Overland Park Golf
Course and the South Platte
River Trail.
Implementation and Next Steps
The Evans Station Area Plan provides a framework for accom-
plishing the recommendations with a series of implementation
strategies organized by timeframe and key responsibility The
most immediate step includes updating the Blueprint Denver
Concept Land Use for the Evans Station Area to reflect the
policies adopted in this Plan. Adopting the New Zoning Code
and rezoning property in the station area is critical to provid-
ing the regulatory framework necessary to implement the
Plans land use and urban design recommendations.
Another immediate step includes the scoping of infrastruc-
ture projects and the identification of potential funding
sources to implement the infrastruture needed in the station
area. These infrastructure improvements should be pursued
through public-private partnerships between the city, busi-
nesses, property owners and the development community as
well as public-public partnerships between local, regional,
state and federal agencies.
Several projects will act as catalysts for transforming the
station area:
South Broadway and Evans Avenue reconstruction
Pedestrian/bicycle feasibility study and improvements
along Evans
A mixed use residential development north of Evans
along South Broadway or Jewell
Pedestrian/Bicycle Bridge across South Santa Fe Drive,
RTD light rail and the railroad tracks at Jewell
Harvard Gulch improvements project
Additional strategies are listed in the implementation section
of this plan.
XIII


Evans Station Area Plan Executive Summary
XIV


Evans Station Area Plan Introduction
1


Evans Station Area Plan Introduction
Introduction
Over the course of approximately 18 months community
members near the Evans light rail Station worked with the
citys station area planning team to articulate opportunities,
address constraints, develop a vision and craft strategies to
achieve the vision. These community members represented
businesses, property owners and residents in the area. The
process involved collaboration between the City and County
of Denvers Community Planning and Development Depart-
ment (CPD), Department of Public Works (DPW), Office
of Economic Development (OED), Department of Parks
and Recreation (DPR) as well as the Regional Transportation
District (RTD).
Regular public meetings and stakeholder work sessions
shaped the plan concepts and recommendations. Briefings
with City Council and Denver Planning Board occured at
critical plan milestones. Inter-agency city staff provided es-
sential technical input throughout the process. Additional
details regarding the planning process can be found in the
Public Engagement section of this plan.
Evans Station Area Context
Location Within the Transit Corridor and System
Evans Station is the first stop in Denver on the southwest
light rail corridor as you head north into the Central Busi-
ness District from Englewood. Built in 2000, Evans Sta-
tion is framed by Broadway Station to the north, where the
Southwest and Southeast light rail corridors converge, and
Englewood Station to the south (Figure 1).
Evans is one of the Denver regions existing 34 light rail
stations, which includes a total of 6 transit lines equating to
35 miles of track (Figure 2). The RTD FasTracks program,
approved by voters in 2004, will expand the existing system
with an unprecedented transit investment including 122
miles of new rail, more than 50 new transit stations and 18
Figure 1. Southwest Light Rail Corridor Map
Lighl Rail Station
m Existing Lghl Rail
4 ^ Station Butlor
M r.^ awl 1/2 w*
2


Evans Station Area Plan Introduction
The Evans Avenue bridge frames the downtown skyline as it spans over
the Evans light rail station and South Delaware St.
Figure 3. Evans Station Area
3


Evans Station Area Plan Introduction
miles of bus rapid transit (BRT). Integrating several transit
modes and other programs into a comprehensive regionwide
system, FasTracks will improve accessibility, quality of life
and commuting times throughout the region.
Neighborhood Context
The Evans Station is located in the Overland statistical neigh-
borhood. Access to Evans Station is on South Delaware Street,
a small-scale commercial and industrial street just south of the
Evans Avenue bridge over South Santa Fe Drive. The station
area is defined as a half mile radius (approximately 10 minute
walk) from the station (Figure 3). This boundary extends
north to Colorado Avenue, south to Fiarvard Avenue, west to
Lipan Street and east to Grant Street. The station area covers
much of the Overland neighborhood and touches portions of
Platt Park, Rosedale and College View/South Platte neighbor-
hoods.
The planning area is divided into quadrants by S. Santa Fe
Drive, a highway operated by CDOT, and Evans Avenue, a
major east-west arterial. The station area includes a mixture
of light industrial and established residential neighborhoods
as well as commercial uses along the South Broadway corri-
dor, located four blocks east of the station. The South Platte
River and associated greenway is a dominant natural and
recreational feature on the west side of the station area. An
overview of existing conditions within the planning area is
included in The Community section of this plan.
Planning Context
Denvers adopted plans provided the basis for the Evans Sta-
tion Area Plan and represent official policy adopted by elect-
ed representatives with public input. It is essential to ensure
consistency with the goals, objectives and recommendations
of these plans. An overview of all documents considered
during this planning process is found in The Community
section. The over-riding principles of these plans are:
Promote urban infill and compact, mixed-use develop-
ment patterns that use resources more efficiently
Offer housing choices for Denvers diverse
household types
Create multi-modal streets that facilitate
transportation choice
Provide parks, schools and other civic uses that are safely
accessible
Denvers Transit Oriented Development Strategic Plan defines
the Evans Stations typology as Urban Neighborhood, a walk-
up station easily accessed by a medium-density neighbor-
hood that provides a rich mix of housing and transportation
choices in addition to locally serving retail.
Market Context
To identify, leverage, and maximize TOD opportunities, the
city commissioned a TOD Economic Analysis and Market
Study. The primary goal of the study was to provide the city
with an assessment ofTOD potential at the regional, cor-
ridor, and station area levels through analysis of short- and
long-term demand (e.g. demand in 2015 and 2030). Con-
ducted in coordination with station area planning efforts, the
market study helped to better align station plans with market
4


Evans Station Area Plan Introduction
realities and dynamics. The overall objectives of the TOD
Economic Analysis and Market Study were to forge a better
understanding of the economic context in which the city
may plan for TOD, and to develop specific recommenda-
tions regarding the amount, type, mix, and intensity of uses
appropriate for selected station areas. The study established
key projections and findings which provide a framework for
economic opportunities in Denver:
The build-out of FasTracks will create a comprehensive
transit system and should place the region in a better
competitive position to attract new growth compared to
other regions without full transit systems.
The region should experience relatively high rates of
household and employment growth in the next 20 years.
There is a demonstrated market interest in higher
intensity development.
The City and County of Denver has taken a proactive
role in planning for transit and other transit-supportive
public policies.
Current development activity near existing transit stations
in the region far exceeds DRCOG growth projections.
Station areas are attracting (capturing) new development
at a rate of 25%-40% depending on the development
type (residential, retail, or office).
Purpose of the Plan
This Plan articulates a long-term vision which will be used
to guide decisions regarding appropriate public and private
investment within 1/2 mile of the Evans light rail station.
The Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000, Blueprint Denver and
other citywide plans including the Strategic Transportation
Plan (STP), Pedestrian Master Plan, Bicycle Master Plan and
Parks and Recreation Game Plan act as a starting point for
recommendations contained in this Plan. Informed by an
extensive public process and an analysis of current issues and
opportunties, the Evans Station Area Plan supplements the
Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000 and updates Blueprint
Denver. This plan is not an official zoning map; it is a docu-
ment created to guide decision-making. It does not create or
deny any rights.
Property owners, elected officials, neighborhood organiza-
tions, and city departments will use the Evans Station Area
Plan for many purposes. Primary uses throughout the life of
the plan include:
Neighborhood Resource: The plan documents the
neighborhoods vision and a qualitative and quantita-
tive analysis of existing conditions for the planning
area in an easy-to-reference document. This resource
can guide neighborhood activities over the coming
years.
Reinvestment Guidance: The plan guides public and
private decision-making and investment in the plan-
ning area over the coming years as it relates to land
use, urban design, mobility and economic develop-
ment.
Zoning Amendments: The plan does not convey or
deny any zoning entitlement but is an essential tool
used by the city to evaluate re-zoning applications.
Capital Improvements: A plan can provide the
justification for the allocation of funding from the
citys capital improvement and maintenance program
budgets.
Funding and Partnership Opportunities:
Implementation of plans requires a collaborative effort
between neighborhoods, businesses, elected officials,
city departments and neighboring jurisdictions. This
plan identifies partnerships and suggests ways to lever-
age resources to implement the communitys vision.
Update to Citywide Plans: The station area plan will
update existing citywide plans and will inform future
citywide planning processes.
Planning Process
Over a course of 18 months, community members worked
together with city staff and the station areas planning team to
articulate the opportunities and constraints, vision and goals,
and to craft strategies to achieve that vision. The community
members involved with station area planning represented
business owners, property owners and residents in the plan-
ning area and surrounding neighborhoods. The process in-
volved collaboration between the City and County of Denver
5


Evans Station Area Plan Introduction
and RTD. Regular public meetings shaped the contents of
the plan. Concepts were reviewed by agency staff, the Den-
ver Planning Board and City Council. The overall process
included the following steps:
Existing conditions analysis
Identify opportunities and constraints
Development of Plan Vision and Goals
Develop and analyze alternative land use and
mobility concepts
Technical review of plan concepts
Public review of plan concepts
Development of preferred plan concepts
Create a Draft Station Area Plan
Technical Review of Draft Station Area Plan
Public Review of Draft Station Area Plan
Refine Plan
Planning Board review and approval
Plan adoption by City Council
City staff, residents, business owners and property owners within the
Evans Station area will use this plan to guide decision-making about
appropriate public and private investment in the community.
6


Evans Station Area Plan Vision and Goals
7


Evans Station Area Plan Vision and Goals
Station areas should be safe, pleasant and attractive and should capture
the value of having access to transit.
Using TOD Principles as a Foundation
Denver is poised to take a significant leadership role in
implementing its vision for transit oriented development as
described in the TOD Strategic Plan. The unique qualities
of the Evans Station area will substantially contribute to this
effort. Each of Denvers station areas has a unique vision
and set of goals, but all are grounded in the established TOD
principles for the city of Denver.
A mix of uses at various densities within walking distance of
a transit station, TOD integrates transit into neighborhoods
and creates lively and vital communities. The TOD Strategic
Plan defines TOD in Denver and establishes strategies for
implementation. In order to succeed, TOD should address
these five guiding principles:
Place-making: Create safe, pleasant, varied and
attractive station areas with a distinct identity.
Rich Mix of Choices: Provide housing, employment,
transportation and shopping choices for people of all
ages, household types, incomes and lifestyles.
Location Efficiency: Place homes, jobs, shopping,
entertainment, parks and other amenities close to the
station to promote walking, biking and transit use.
Value Capture: Take full economic advantage of the
amenities associated with enhanced transit services.
Portal to the Region: Understand and maximize the
stations role as an entry point to the regional transit
network and as a safe, pleasant and private place to live.
TOD and Sustainability
Defined by the Brundtland commission, sustainable develop-
ment meets the needs of the present without compromising
the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.
TOD addresses the three Es of sustainability: environment,
economy, and social equity and furthers the climate objec-
tives set forth by Greenprint Denver.
Environment Carbon monoxide emissions from mobile
sources in urban areas can be as high as 90% of all emissions.
While increases in automobile use far exceed population
growth, TOD supports public transit and enables additional
transportation choices. For every passenger mile traveled,
public transportation is twice as efficient as private automo-
biles.
Economy The average working American drives 396 hours
each year, the equivalent of 10 workweeks. More than one-
fourth of this time is spent commuting to and from work.
Transit-oriented and mixed-use development can convey
substantial fiscal and economic benefits for workers by mak-
ing commutes shorter and more productive. In addition,
businesses recognize that TOD encourages a variety of local
employment opportunities, and helps attract new businesses
and industries.
Equity The cost of buying, maintaining, and operating
vehicles is the largest source of personal debt after home
mortgages. TOD offers a framework to build truly afford-
able communities. It does this through providing housing
and transportation choices, urban green spaces, accessible
recreational and cultural attractions, and mixed use neighbor-
hoods accessible for all household types.
8


Evans Station Area Plan Vision and Goals
The Evans Avenue bridge frames views of downtown.
Evans Station Area Strengths, Opportunities
and Challenges
To successfully uphold the citys TOD principles and adopted
policies, we must have a full understanding of the strengths,
opportunities and challenges of the Evans Station area.
Existing strengths, or assets, within the station area set the
stage for the plans vision and add value to the station area.
The primary strengths of the Evans Station area include:
Surrounding residential areas (Overland, Rosedale, Platt
Park) are stable, vital neighborhoods
Light rail and bus service offers immediate transit access
to Denvers Central Business District (approximately 16
minutes via light rail to 16th and California Station) and
the metro region
Success of established South Broadway businesses and
support from surrounding communities for Broadway to
transform into a main street
Existing environmental and recreation amenities of the
South Platte River, South Platte River Trail and adjoin-
ing park and greenway system
Established employment base from existing industrial
and commercial uses
Unique employment/market niche includes prevalence
of creative industries industrial arts (e.g. woodworking),
music, research and development, design/architecture
Great views of downtown Denver and the mountains
Music and other creative industries are prevalent on South Broadway
and throughout the Evans station area.
Emerging opportunities, as listed below, create energy and
excitement for the station area and present unprecedented
resources and potential partnerships to evolve the built
environment.
Public investment has and will continue to benefit
the area with the reconstruction of South Broadway,
Asbury Avenue drainage improvements and Ruby Hill
Master Plan implementation.
Underutilized and vacant parcels have sparked the
interest of private investors, resulting in aggregation of
properties and increased opportunities for large-scale re-
development within an industrial area that Blueprint
Denver deems an Area of Change.
A strong market for residential development along transit
lines and a community that supports a variety of housing
types will translate into a supply of diverse housing
options within the station area.
Extension and connections to the citys bike route
system, especially across major barriers such as
S. Santa Fe Dr.
Creating neighborhood identity through public spaces,
destinations and good urban design
Partnership opportunities with emerging business
organizations
Despite a strong foundation of significant strengths and
opportunities, challenges remain. The Evans Station Area
Plan objectives and recommendations seek to overcome the
following obstacles in particular:
9


Evans Station Area Plan Vision and Goals
Significant physical barriers (South Santa Fe Drive,
Evans Avenue) split the station area into discon-
nected quadrants
High traffic volumes, lack of adequate sidewalks, light-
ing and wayfinding create a poor pedestrian environment
throughout the station area
Single use development pattern inhibits location
efficiency and further perpetuates auto dependency
Lack of placemaking elements that promote gathering
of people and neighborhood identity
The Harvard Gulch 100-year floodplain triggers
additional development requirements for redevelopment
along South Delaware, parts of South Broadway and the
industrial properties north of Evans.
Shortcomings of zoning districts present in the
Evans Station area (1-0, I-1, B-4 along S. Broadway)
constrain opportunities for mixed-use, pedestrian-
friendly development.
Evans Station Area Plan Vision and Objectives
Vision Statement
At the outset of the planning process, stakeholders used the
assessment of Strengths, Opportunities and Challenges to
prepare ideal visions for the look, feel and function of the
Evans Station Area in twenty years. City staff melded these
visions into a cohesive vision statement that the stakeholders
then approved:
Enhance the Evans Station areas sense of place by creating a
vibrant and sustainable urban neighborhood that encourages
people to live and work; invites businesses to thrive; allows
people to comfortably walk, bike, or use transit to access
local services and attractions; and maintains the residential
character of the surrounding community.
Plan Goals:
Bring most activities of daily living within walking
distance by encouraging a mixture of land uses.
Improve streetscape to increase mobility choice; provide
walkable and bikeable connectivity throughout the area.
Encourage reinvestment in and/or redevelopment of
industrial areas while maintaining and creating diverse
employment opportunities.
Maintain residential character of surrounding communi-
ties and encourage development of a full range of hous-
ing types and housing price points.
Use urban design to respect the scale and character of
an Urban Neighborhood as defined in the TOD
Strategic Plan.
Celebrate the areas history, ties to the S. Platte River and
access to open space and recreation opportunities.
Encourage environmentally sustainable or green build-
ing construction and the use of quality materials to
create buildings of lasting value.
The Evans Station area will become a vibrant, mixed-use community that offers a variety of residential and employment options.
10


Evans Station Area Plan Land Use and Urban Design
11


Evans Station Area Plan Land Use and Urban Design
Land Use and Urban Design Overview
Land use near transit is considered very carefully because
TODs behave differently than conventional development.
People living and working in TODs walk more, use transit
more and own fewer cars than the rest of the region. TOD
households are twice as likely to not own a car. Those that
do own cars, own roughly half as many as the average house-
hold. People who live in a TOD are five times more likely
to commute by transit than other residents. As such, TOD
residents produce half as much vehicle traffic as conventional
development. The travel behaviors exhibited by residents
living near transit translate into a compact development pat-
tern that is designed to accomodate pedestrians and bicyclists
as well as automobiles.
A successful TOD aligns transit investments with a com-
munitys vision for how it wants to grow. The land use
recommendations in the Evans Station Area Plan seek to do
just that: reinforce the vision for the Evans Station area and
support transit by having sufficient residential densities and
mix of uses to reduce walking distances between residences
and other destinations such as neighborhood retail, services,
parks, and transit.
In conjunction with the land uses, urban design will guide
the physical qualities of new development in the Evans Sta-
tion area, complementing and preserving existing neighbor-
hood character. The urban design recommendations provide
the detail to create a pedestrian-friendly environment. They
consider how the land uses will physically fit together on
each block and within the larger neighborhood, and how the
entire station area will be interconnected. Recommendations
for active edges and ground floor retail and commercial
are a means to address the way buildings and front entrances
connect to the sidewalk.
In addition to the development intensity, specific land use
types and urban form, there are several other elements re-
quired, such as civic places, public safety, public service facili-
ties, parks and open spaces, and affordable housing, to create
a place. These elements are often referred to as the urban
living infrastructure and are what gives a place character and
makes it a place where people want to live. Land use desig-
nations and urban design requirements can be the same in
two places, but urban living infrastructure elements provide
the character and feel of the place. These elements are ad-
dressed in the land use and urban design recommendations.
Many of these recommendations build off the existing
character in the neighborhood. For example, the Evans
planning process revealed a significant presence of creative
industries in this part of Denver including woodwork-
ing shops, design and production studios, research and
development businesses, and a strong presence of retail and
commercial uses related to the music industry. The plan
acknowledges the presence of this niche creative industries
community and recommends land uses that can accommo-
date creative industries in a variety of ways.
The mix of land uses recommended for the Evans Station
(Figure 4) area provides a foundation for a diverse and dy-
namic community, organized around walkable streets and ac-
cess to transit. It builds future residential density, establishes
retail, encourages creative industries and offers parks and
open space amenities within the Vi mile radius of the station,
while building strong connections to the existing communi-
ties and transit. One of many existing and future transit sta-
tions in Denver, the Evans station area will emerge over time
as a neighborhood with its own sense of place and identity.
Aligning recommendations on land use, urban design and mobility will
allow the Evans Station area to emerge over time as a neighborhood
with its own sense of place and identity.
1 Arrington, G and Cervero, R, TCRP Report 128: Effects of TOD on Housing,
Parking, and Travel. Transportation Research Board of the National Academies,
Washington, D.C. 2008.
12


Evans Station Area Plan Land Use and Urban Design
LEGEND Mixed-Use Main Street Mixed-Use Employment o Transit Station
Mixed-Use Residential Public/Quasi-Public Plaza/Pedestrian Bridge
Urban Residential Transit Plaza * Station Tower/Vertical Pedestrian Connection
Single Family-Duplex >=< Bicycle/Pedestrian Bridge lllllllll SW Corridor
Single Family o Transit Parking Existing Parks
Figure 4. Land Use Plan
13


Evans Station Area Plan Land Use and Urban Design
Land Use and Urban Design
Recommendation 1:
Residential Opportunities and Form
The majority of development within the Evans Station area
will be residential in nature. This plan encourages new resi-
dential infill development while respecting the existing block
configuration, lot sizes and building forms within established
neighborhoods. The future built environment near Evans
Station will provide a variety of housing stock for home own-
ers of different lifestyle interests and income levels, including
affordable housing which is addressed specifically on Page
17. A range of housing types and densities offer options for
people who want to live in close proximity to transit, Broad-
way businesses and the abundant open space amenities in
the neighborhood. The Plan recommends five land uses that
support residential development:
la. Mixed-use Main Street Support infill development
along South Broadway (Colorado to Harvard) to create a vi-
brant mixed-use main street. Encourage a mixture of urban
residential and office uses, especially within mixed-use build-
ings that support commercial or civic uses on the ground
floor. This will create more eyes on the street and add to the
18 hour activities dynamic desired for Broadway. Create
a contiguous street wall comprised primarily of mixed-use
buildings with parking accessed from the alley to reinforce a
Main Street character.
South Broadway would be more vibrant if it supported residential uses
above ground floor commercial.
lb. Mixed use Residential Support the transforma-
tion of industrial and commercial property to an active,
pedestrian-oriented mixed-use community. The primary use
is intended to be residential, but office and retail may also be
supported. This transformation is facilitated by the aggrega-
tion of vacant and underutilized industrial property that has
already occurred in this part of the station area. Properties
with viable industrial businesses will evolve more slowly and
may continue to support industrial flex land uses for some
time, adding to the eclectic feel of this mixed-use neighbor-
hood.
Encourage a mixture of housing types and density including
but not limited to: row houses, stacked flats, live-work, low-
rise apartments or multi-family condos. Active ground floors
throughout the district should include residential amenities,
leasing lobbies, workout facilities, parking entrances and
convenience retail at strategic locations that reinforce the
overall connectivity and access plans for the station. High lot
coverage, zero to shallow setbacks, alley loaded parking, and
an urban form is appropriate for this district. This land use
is recommended for the following areas:
Redevelopment area north of Evans and west of Broadway
East side of Delaware directly across from the station
East side of South Platte River, both north and south
of Evans
The Mixed-Use Residential districtwill support a variety of housing types
and businesses.
14


Evans Station Area Plan Land Use and Urban Design
lc. Urban Residential This land use is consistent with
the Urban Residential designation in Blueprint Denver, but
recommends less intensity and lower building heights (1-2
1/2 stories) than mixed use residential, to complement the
existing neighborhood context. It encourages a mix of low
and medium-density housing types including single fam-
ily houses, accessory dwelling units (ADUs), duplexes and
row houses. New development should reflect the existing
character small single family lots (4,500 sf minimum),
medium lot coverage, shallow to moderate setbacks, detached
sidewalks with tree lawns and garages/parking accessed from
the alley. Commercial uses to serve daily needs may be sup-
ported on arterials, such as Evans. Urban Residential land
use applies to the following areas:
Rosedale Neighborhood between Evans and Harvard
and between the alley east of Broadway and Logan
Overland Neighborhood along Evans as a transition
between busy arterials and the interior of the existing
neighborhoods
Row houses are an appropriate transition between busy streets and
existing neighborhoods
Id. Single Family/Duplex Residential Encourage re-
investment in existing residential neighborhoods adjacent
to the station. Allow a mixture of housing types including
single family houses, duplexes and carriage houses, but main-
tain the character of these neighborhoods by encouraging
new development consistent with existing conditions small
single family lots (4,500 sf minimum), moderate lot cover-
age, shallow to moderate setbacks, detached sidewalks and
alley loaded garages consistent with an urban neighborhood.
Typical densities are between 10 and 20 housing units per
acre area-wide. This land use is consistent with the single
family/duplex residential designation in Blueprint Denver. It
applies to:
Overland Neighborhood (East) between the Broadway
and Delaware alleys;
Overland Neighborhood (West) between Santa Fe and
the South Platte River. Any new development that
occurs on the CDOT properties adjacent to Santa Fe
should be consistent with an urban neighborhood station
area and should not allow for auto-oriented uses.
Duplexes should be built with a form that respects the residential charac-
ter in Overland.
le. Single Family Residential Maintain residential
character in the Platt Park neighborhood near the Evans
station as reinvestment occurs. Single family homes are the
predominant residential type. Encourage small single family
lots (4,500 sf minimum), moderate to high lot coverage, de-
tached sidewalks and alley loaded garages consistent with an
urban neighborhood. ADUs are also encouraged. This land
use is consistent with the single family residential designation
in Blueprint Denver.
Highly consistent residential building form in the Platt Park neighbor-
hood should be respected as reinvestment occurs.
15


Evans Station Area Plan Land Use and Urban Design
Land Use and Urban Design
Recommendation 2:
Broadway as a "Main Street'
Land Use and Urban Design
Recommendation 3:
South Delaware Employment
This plan reaffirms Broadways future as a multi-modal, com-
mercial and residential main street that serves as an active,
vibrant spine connecting south Denver neighborhoods to
downtown. Broadways designation as a Mixed-use Main
Street encourages a healthy mix of housing, office, and com-
mercial uses with form standards that reinforce the urban
context associated with main streets and respects the adjacent
residential neighborhoods. This land use proposal is similar
in scale and intent to the legislative Main Street rezoning
along the Colfax corridor.
Using sound urban design to integrate the streetscape with
proposed land uses is critical to transforming South Broad-
way from an auto-oriented commercial corridor to a pedestri-
an-friendly mixed use main street, creating both a neighbor-
hood amenity and a destination corridor. Building upon the
creative and music industries already present in the station
area will create 18 hours of activity and add to the corridors
vibrancy. The character of S. Broadway should clearly define
and activate the public realm by designing buildings, en-
trances and windows in a way that creates an active and invit-
ing pedestrian environment. Streetscape design is addressed
in the Mobility and Infrastructure section on Page 29.
South Broadway will become an active, inviting place.
South Delaware adjacent to the Evans Station is recommend-
ed to retain employment opportunities, evolve into a more
urban form, and become more flexible in terms of allowed
land use. A Mixed-Use Employment land use will attract
and accommodate cutting-edge industries providing employ-
ment opportunities adjacent to the station and transform
South Delaware Street into a safer and more inviting place
to work and live. Recommended uses include: research and
development, creative industries, light industrial, offices,
incubator business, arts/cultural uses, and compatible recre-
ational uses. Residential uses in the mixed-use employment
designation primarily allow live/work opportunities. New
infill development should be compatible with the other rec-
ommended uses near the station area in terms of both form
and use. Vehicular access should be well defined for delivery
trucks and maintenance services.
The Table on page 17 summarizes key Land Use attributes
based on Recommendations 1-3.
16


Evans Station Area Plan Land Use and Urban Design
Land Use and Urban Design
Recommendation 4: Affordable Housing
Denvers large public investment in transit provides an
unprecedented opportunity to address the Citys affordable
housing shortfall. Growing the supply of housing and the
diversity of housing types near transit is the first step to-
ward addressing this shortfall. While the average household
spends 19% of its income on transportation, households
with good access to transit spend just 9%.2 Providing hous-
ing opportunities near transit therefore offers true affordabil-
ity where households benefit from both lower housing and
lower transportation costs. Denver has adopted a policy to
increase the supply of affordable housing and mixed-income
housing in close proximity to transit stations. Additionally,
recent (2008) recommendations made by a City of Denver
affordable housing task force include locating 50% of new
city-subsidized housing for low and moderate income house-
holds in bus and rail transit corridors.
The Evans planning process revealed that community mem-
bers share an interest in keeping housing affordable near the
station. Specific plan recommendations include:
4a. Increase the supply of housing including for sale and
rental housing of varying types and at a variety of price
points.
4b. Seek funding and partnerships (e.g. land trusts) to facili-
tate affordable housing developments within the station area.
4c. Eliminate regulatory barriers to affordable housing and
incorporate effective affordable housing triggers into
financing and other requirements within Vi mile of the
station area.
4d. Create an Affordable and Mixed-Income Housing
Strategy for TOD consistent with the TOD Strategic
Plan, Chapter 6 (City-wide Policy and Action Recom-
mendations).
Evans Station Area Land Use Attributes
Location Residential Density Mix of Uses Building Form Residential Typology
Mixed-Use Employment Delaware 0 to 20 DUA, Creative industries; light indus- trial, R&D, retail, residential, and office Pedestrian-scaled; 0-10 foot setbacks; High lot coverage Live/Work, Flats, or artist lofts
Mixed-Use Main Street S. Broadway 0 to 50 DUA, some- times higher Office, retail & entertainment uses mixed with residential horizontal & vertical mix Pedestrian-scaled; ac- tive ground floor; high transparency; Build-to lines (0-5 ft setback); High lot coverage Mixed-Use, Ground Floor Retail with Office or Residential Above.
Mixed-use Residential North of Ev- ans and near the South Platte River 20 to 50 DUA Primarily multi-family resi- dential with retail and office horizontal & vertical mix Pedestrian-scaled; 0-12 foot front setbacks; High lot coverage Midrise residential and mixed-use structures, stacked fiats, town- houses
Urban Residential Along major arterials 10 to 30 DUA Single Family, Duplex, ADUs and Row Plouses; some low- scale neighborhood commer- cial Block-sensitive set- backs; Entry porches; Alley loaded garages Single family. Duplexes, ADUs, Row houses; Multi-family may be in pockets
Single Family/ Duplex Residential Overland neighbor- hood 10-20 DUA Primarily residential with moderate levels of small-scale retail uses Block-sensitive set- backs; Entry porches; Alley loaded garages Single family houses, duplexes, and Accessory Dwelling Units
Single Family Residential Platte Park Neighbor- hood Fewer than 10 DUA neighborhood-wide Primarily residential with peri- odic small-scale retail uses Entry porches; Alley loaded garages Single family houses and Accessory Dwelling Units
2 Center for Transit-Oriented Development Transportation and Center for Neighborhood Technology, "The Affordability Index: A New Tool for Measuring the True Afford-
ability of a Housing Choice," Brookings Institute: 2006
17


Evans Station Area Plan Land Use and Urban Design
Land Use and Urban Design
Recommendation 5:
Comprehensive Open Space System
Four regional open spaces exist within or just beyond the Vi
mile Evans Station Area Overland Golf Course, Ruby Hill
Park, Harvard Gulch Park and the South Platte River Gre-
enway. The Overland Neighborhood is also served by two
small neighborhood parks/playgrounds located on the east
side of the S. Platte River: Pasquinels Landing and Grant-
Frontier Park. Together these regional and neighborhood
parks offer a wide range of active and passive recreational
opportunities. These opportunities will be greatly expanded
as Ruby Hill Park undergoes a $15 million improvement, the
first phase of which is scheduled for construction in 2009.
Despite the close proximity of these amenities, many station
area residents cannot easily access them by foot or bicycle
due to the barriers of South Santa Fe Drive, the freight and
light rail lines, Broadway and Evans Avenue. As the indus-
trial property on Delaware and north of Evans redevelops,
the need for additional accessible open space in the form of
neighborhood parks and/or plazas will arise in order to meet
the Game Plan and Playground Master Plan goals.
South Denver neighborhoods will benefit from a $15 million renovation
to Ruby H Hi Park including a new pool, playground, natural ampitheatre
and a xeriscape demonstration garden.
This Plan builds upon existing park acreage by recommend-
ing a comprehensive open space system for the station area
that serves to 1.) link residents to existing open space and 2.)
create small neighborhood-serving open spaces according to
Game Plan and Playground Master Plan objectives (Figure 5).
5a. Link to Existing Parks and Open Space. Create con-
nections across Santa Fe Drive on Evans and both north
and south of Evans Avenue to adequately link the station
area neighborhoods with regional open space destinations.
Specific recommendations include the following and are cross
referenced to Mobility and Infrastructure recommendations:
Improve the bicycle and pedestrian environment on the
Evans Bridge (see Mobility and Infrastructure Recom-
mendation 4) to better link the Evans Station and the
South Platte River Trail.
Construct a bike/ped bridge at Jewell across Santa Fe (see
Mobility and Infrastructure Recommendation 5) to
better link the redevelopment area and Platt Park neigh-
borhood with the Overland Golf Course, South Platte
River and Ruby Hill Park, via a bridge over the
South Platte proposed in the Ruby Hill Park Plan.
Construct a bike/ped bridge at Iliff across Santa Fe (see
Mobility and Infrastructure Recommendation 6) to link
Rosedale and Overland neighborhood residents to the
South Platte River Trail and residents west of Santa Fe to
Rosedale Park and Harvard Gulch Park.
Evans Station Area Jewell Pedestrian Bridge and Plaza Concept
Bike/ped bridges on Jewell and Iliff will provide residents east of Santa Fe
Drive access to the South Piatte River Trail, Ruby FI ill Park and Overland
Golf Course. A bridge plaza at Jewell and Cherokee would serve as a new
urban amenity and focal point.
18


Evans Station Area Plan Land Use and Urban Design
LEGEND
Mixed-Use Main Street
Mixed-Use Residential
Urban Residential
Single Family-Duplex WMMM
Single Family
Mixed-Use Employment
Public/Quasi-Public
Transit Plaza
Priority Pedestrian / Bike Streetscape Improvements
Secondary Pedestrian / Bike Streetscape Improvements
Plaza/Pedestrian Bridge
Potential Urban Garden Site
/=( Bicycle/Pedestrian Bridge
o Transit Parking
o Transit Station
* Station Tower/Vertical Pedestrian Connection
lllllllll SW Corridor
Existing Parks
Figure 5. Comprehensive Open Space Plan
1,200
ZH Feet
19


Evans Station Area Plan Land Use and Urban Design
5b Create new urban neighborhood open space Small
urban neighborhood open spaces such as pocket parks and
plazas create a sense of arrival, enforce strong visual connec-
tions, give urban neighborhoods accessible green breathing
space, build a sense of community, and add value to the
surrounding development. Given the increased residential
density expected on the east side of the station area, at least
10% of the developable area north of Evans Avenue between
Broadway and the RTD tracks and along South Delaware
Street near the station should be set aside for one or more
publicly accessible open space(s). This equates to approxi-
mately 4 acres of land in total.
New open spaces should be designed, sized, located and
programmed to best meet the requirements of the Game
Plan and the Playground Master Plan as well as the follow-
ing specific objectives revealed during the Evans Station Area
planning process:
Create focal points that complement the surrounding
development and provide visual connections between
Evans Station, Jewell, and Broadway.
Design innovative open spaces that incorporate public
art, and reflects the areas history as the regions first
settlement along the South Platte River.
\
The Evans Station RTD parking lot could transform Into
an active plaza serving residents as well as transit riders.
Offer unique experiences compared with those offered at
Ruby Hill Park, Harvard Gulch Park, Pasquinels Landing
Park and Grant-Frontier Park.
Program the open spaces to meet the needs of the
residents in both existing and newly developed neighbor-
hoods. This could include picnicking, playgrounds,
art plazas, fountains, community gardens, skate parks
or basketball courts.
The Comprehensive Open Space Plan (Figure 5) identifies
various specific opportunities for new urban neighborhood
open space. The size, shape, ownership, maintenance and pro-
gramming of these new open spaces as shown in the plan are
conceptual and will be determined as the plan is implemented.
Evans Station Plaza An active transit/neighborhood
plaza is recommended to replace the current RTD
surface parking lot, if the opportunity arises for RTD
to partner with a private entity to provide shared
structured parking elsewhere in the station area. The
plaza should be designed to contribute to station and
neighborhood identity, offer transit riders a sense of
arrival and facilitate wayfinding to other destinations
within the station area (e.g. S. Broadway).
The Jewell Bridge Plaza would be an urban amenity defined by the bridge
and the surrounding buildings.
20


Evans Station Area Plan Land Use and Urban Design
Jewell Bridge Plaza Located where Jewell Avenue
meets the proposed Jewell Avenue pedestrian bridge, this
neighborhood plaza would be defined by the surround-
ing new buildings and bridge while taking up little more
space than the existing right-of-way. It creates a suitable
terminus for Jewell Avenue from Broadway and a focal
point from the Station along Delaware Street.
Active Use Under the Bridge Active use of the under
utilized parcel under the Evans Bridge adjacent to
Delaware Street would improve the stations visibility and
help create community identity. One idea for active use
supported by the community a public art garden.
Allow local artists to use this space as a platform to test
their ideas in the public domain, a la New York Citys
Art Under the Bridge project. Denvers Office of
Cultural Affairs has generated an Urban Arts Fund to
help create positive community space with public art.
Neighborhood Park A neighborhood park located to
act as an organizing element within the redevelopment
area north of Evans is meant to have an intimate neigh-
borhood feel while being large enough to walk your dog,
meet your neighbor, or sit and read a book. The park
should have ample seating areas, shade trees, and could
feature a small lawn.
Public art installments such as these eclectic vases make under-bridge
pedestrian connections more comfortable.
Neighborhood Greenway This common area is a
natural or landscape public right of way that is typically
linear in configuration. It often links a series of public
places by acting as a pedestrian connection. One possibil-
ity for this type of improvement could be the existing rail
spur right of way just west of the Delaware and Cherokee
right of ways that could create another pedestrian conec-
tion from the north to the light rail station.
Community Gardens CDOT owns several remnant
parcels west of Santa Fe Drive. These spaces could be
used for urban agricultural use/community gardens.
If ownership changes, any new development should be
consistent with a single family duplex land use described
in this plan.
Every urban neighborhood should have accessible green
"breathing space".
21


Evans Station Area Plan Land Use and Urban Design
Land Use and Urban Design
Recommendation 6.
Active Edges and Ground Floor Commercial
Active edges are characterized as building entry features with
direct entries from the sidewalk and a high degree of transpar-
ency and pedestrian interest. This increases visual and physical
interaction between people inside and outside of the buildings,
creating a safer and more vibrant pedestrian environment.
Active edges are recommended in all mixed-use districts within
the station area (Figure 6). Buildings on blocks identified as
an active edge should be designed with the following consider-
ations in mind:
Building entries should be visible from the street and
directly accessible from the sidewalk. They should be
given architectural emphasis through articulation of the
fapade, interesting canopies or porches and a high degree
of transparency from the inside to the street.
The finished floor level of ground-floor residential should
be constructed to provide a sense of privacy for the resi-
dential units. Vehicle access for residential units should
be from the alley, and garages should not be visible from
the street.
Residential windows facing the street should be transpar-
ent and large enough to provide views onto the street.
Visibility from the ground and upper floors provides eyes
on the street increasing the sense of security on the street.
Residential buildings along the riverfront should have
windows that take advantage of views of the river and
open space.
Lighting should compliment building architecture, be
focused on creating safe and inviting building entries
and highlighting building identification without project-
ing light pollution onto neighboring properties, residential
windows, or into the night sky. External or indirect
lighting of the undersides of entry canopies, and on
building identification signage is encouraged.
Building service zones, such as loading and garbage, shall
not occur along active ground floor retail streets, but may
be accessed by service drives including parking access.
Service zones should be screened or not visible from active
frontage streets. Access to service zones should be a maxi-
mum of 2 lanes wide.
Ground-floor parking within the structure may face an
active frontage street provided pedestrian-scaled windows
or ornamental grillwork provide transparent or semi-trans-
parent views into and out of the building.
Building entries for employment and residential uses along
Delaware should be visible from the street and directly
accessible from the sidewalk. Clear, pedestrian-scaled
signage should be located at the entry.
Areas recommended for Ground Floor Commercial include
Broadway, Jewell, and Delaware at the station. These are
active edges characterized by continuous commercial uses or
storefronts that open directly on to the sidewalk and feature
inviting pedestrian scaled facades. Since it is difficult to deter-
mine specifically where retail versus commercial uses should
be located, this plan focuses on recommending a building
form that allows flexibility of use so that properties can adjust
to market conditions without destroying the intended active
pedestrian environment.
Design considerations for Ground Floor Commercial include
all those listed under Active Edges as well as the following:
Build -to Lines Ground floor facades should be built
directly to the property line in order to frame pedestrian-
oriented streets with a continuous street wall.
Transparency A high degree of building transparency
is recommended from both on the street as well as within
the building. Storefronts should have unobstructed win-
dows for at least 50 percent of the wall area.
Signage Signs should compliment the building architec-
ture, be pedestrian-scaled with consistent and distinct
graphics. Plastic backlit or overly bright signs should be
discouraged. Projecting signs increase shopfront visibility
and the pedestrian environment.
Lighting A special assessment district is recommended
to pay for pedestrian lighting. The style of pedestrian
lighting should be uniform and consistent with lighting
on northern segments of Broadway.
Pedestrian comfort Pedestrian amenities such as shelter,
lights, benches, trash recepticals and trees should be
placed consistently along the sidewalks.
22


Evans Station Area Plan Land Use and Urban Design
LEGEND
Mixed-Use Main Street Mixed-Use Employment >=< Bicyde/Pedestrian Bridge
Mixed-Use Residential Public/Quasi Public Plaza
Urban Residential Transit Plaza o Transit Parking
Single Family-Duplex Ground Floor Commercial o Transit Station
Single Family Active Edges * Station Tower/Vertical Pedestrian Connection
..... SW Corridor
Figure 6. Active Edges and Ground Floor Commercial Plan
23


Evans Station Area Plan Land Use and Urban Design
Land Use and Urban Design
Recommendation 7. Building Heights and
Transition to Neighborhoods
Building heights for the Evans Station area include a range of
heights for each land use. The tallest building heights (up to
8 stories) are permitted in the redevelopment area north of
Evans and west of Broadway. Existing residential areas have a
maximum of 2.5 stories to help maintain the character of the
neighborhood. The range of heights ensures compliance with
the Washington Park and Harvard Gulch view plane ordi-
nances, incorporates transitions to adjacent neighborhoods
and encourages reinvestment in the station area by allowing
for variations in building type and market conditions. Figure
7 shows the maximum number of stories recommended.
7a. Stable existing residential neighborhoods (1-2.5
stories; 3 stories along Evans) Reinvestment in the form
of additions to existing homes or new low density residential
infill development should fit with the character of existing
neighborhoods. Taller buildings up to 3 stories are supported
along Evans.
7b. Mixed Use Residential area north of Evans (2-5
stories; 8 in strategic locations) With many acres of land
north of Evans held by a single landowner and community
support for higher residential densities in Areas of Change,
this area represents an opportunity to develop taller build-
ings. Buildings will range from 2-5 stories primarily. How-
ever, buildings as tall as 8 stories are recommended in strate-
gic locations, such as adjacent to the tracks. This higher level
of intensity may also be considered for prominent buildings
or intersections within a redevelopment project that exceeds
the expectations of our TOD principles, listed on page 8.
7c. S. Broadway (1-3 stories / 2-5 stories) Much of
Broadway will remain 1-3 stories to complement the existing
adjacent neighborhoods. Taller buildings (up to 5 stories) are
recommended along the west side of S. Broadway, north of
Evans to encourage a transition between the residential mixed
use district to the west and the existing neighborhoods east of
Broadway. A maximum of five stories is also recommended
for buildings or portions of buildings within 125 feet of key
intersections along Broadway to frame gateways and major
crossroads within the station area.
7d. S. Delaware at Evans Station (2-5 stories) Proximity
to the station and few property owners create an opportu-
nity for taller, higher density development to support transit
along Delaware between Warren and Evans.
7e. S. Delaware Employment (1-3 stories) Allowing up
to 3 stories on S. Delaware provides the flexibility needed for
reinvestment and mixed-use buildings.
7f. South Platte River (2-5 stories) Taller, higher density
development along the South Platte River, just south of Ev-
ans can take advantage of the river views.
Easing Transitions Through Good Design
This plan is sensitive to buffering existing stable neighbor-
hoods from development intensities recommended in Areas
of Change and traffic intensities along major arterials. For
instance, development along Broadway is intended to buf-
fer the intensity of activity on this street from the adjacent
neighborhoods. This main street also serves as a transition
from the development intensity west of Broadway and north
of Evans to the existing stable neighborhoods east of the
corridor. Taller buildings that back to existing residential
neighborhoods, such as those along Broadway and Delaware,
should be designed to ease transitions to the adjacent neigh-
borhoods, using the following considerations:
Placement of Buildings along Broadway and
Delaware Street will have zero to shallow setbacks.
Parking to the rear or side of the building will provide
increased distance between new development and
existing neighborhoods.
Stepbacks of any structure taller than three stories and
adjacent to low scale residential areas should be
designed to step back 20-25 feet on the upper floors
toward the front of the building and away from the
residential area, creating a more gradual transition in
building heights.
Buffering Elements such as vegetated buffers,
screening walls and fences ease the transition between
side/rear parking lots and adjacent residential properties.
Similar elements can be designed into each site to keep
service or delivery areas screened from residential uses.
Consider shared parking to create contiguous parking
behind buildings with a singular aesthetic treatment.
Higher density housing along Evans in the form of
attached townhouses creates a buffer to the adjacent
predominantly single family homes while maintaining a
compatible neighborhood scale.
24


Evans Station Area Plan Land Use and Urban Design
\|2X0^§-
Colorado Ave.
LEGEND
Harvard Ave.
Figure 7. Building Heights Plan
8 stories Public/Quasi-Public
5 stories ( Bicycle/Pedestrian Bridge
3 stories Q Transit Parking
1-2.5 stories O Transit Station
Plaza / Pedestrian Bridge Station Tower/Vertical Pedestrian Connection
Transit Plaza .... SW Corridor

200 400
25


Evans Station Area Plan Land Use and Urban Design
Land Use and Urban Design
Recommendation 8.
Parking
Right-sizing parking (i.e., providing no more and no less
parking space than needed to support the uses it serves) is
key to reaping many advantages of a TOD. Walkable access
to transit and a variety of land uses within the neigbhorhood
will reduce residents and employees need to use automobiles
for every trip and, consequently, the need to find a parking
spot for every trip. Parking within the Evans Station Area
should be treated as a common resource for adjacent land
uses, rather than as a requirement of each building. An
organized approach of parking management, consolidation
and design is necessary to ensure a successful parking system.
Parking recommendations in this plan attempt to strike a
balance to ensure the Evans Station area has the appropriate
amount of parking serving the transit station and the sur-
rounding land uses.
8a. Shared Parking To meet market demands within the
station area, specifically along Broadway, Delaware and the
redevelopment area north of Evans, property owners should
provide shared above-grade structured parking. Above-grade
parking structures should be wrapped with active uses.
Public on-street parking should be available along neighbor-
hood residential and retail streets. Parking management
will be important to minimize overflow into the adjoining
neighborhoods.
8b. RTD Park and Ride The Evans Station park-and-ride
should continue to accommodate the current number of
parking spaces. If the opportunity arises for a joint develo-
ment project within the constraints of RTDs enabling leg-
islation, consider relocating the RTD parking into a shared
parking structure north of the Evans bridge. This would
allow development of the property adjacent to the station
into a public amenity, such as a plaza and/or retail serving the
neighborhood and transit riders.
8c. Parking Policy Blueprint Denver recommends elimi-
nating or reducing parking minimums and/or establishing
parking maximums in districts around transit in order to
reduce the amount of land required for parking and thereby
allow for more intensive development. Around transit
stations, property owners should be able to meet parking
requirements through a variety of means, including provid-
ing shared, tandem, remote, valet or bicycle parking. Zoning
should provide parking exceptions for historic properties,
affordable housing, and small lots.
8d. Residential Parking Parking for residents should be
placed in parking structures, tuck under or surface parking
behind buildings. Unbundled parking should be considered
by property owners to keep development costs and housing
costs low near the transit station.
Land Use and Urban Design
Recommendation 9.
Evans Bridge Improvements
Throughout the course of the planning process, the com-
munity identified concerns about safety and aesthetics of the
neighborhood particularly on and around the Evans bridge
and the light rail station. Issues identified include poor
bridge upkeep and aesthetics, sidewalks of insufficient width
on the bridge, a lack of pedestrian lighting, lack of bicycle fa-
cilities and lack of well-maintained and contiguous sidewalks
under the bridge. Vandalism, graffiti and the unsightly Evans
Bridge contribute to a feeling of discomfort for pedestrians.
The bridge is not slated to be replaced within the horizon of
this plans recommendations. Still, improving the bridges
maintenance, aesthetics and bike/ped access are critical to
implementing this plan. Many cities use public art on and
around major bridges to add comfort and interest (see Land
Use and Urban Design Recommendation 10b). Several addi-
tional short and long-term solutions to improving the Evans
Bridge are addressed in the Mobility and Infrastructure sec-
tion (Recommendation 4). In addition to public investment,
reinvestment and redevelopment of the properties along
Evans will help address some of these concerns through im-
proved building orientation, streetscapes and urban design.
Land Use and Urban Design
Recommendation 10.
Landmarks, Gateways, Wayfinding Signage
and Public Art
Landmarks, gateways, wayfinding signage and public art
are important in identifying a place and should be used to
indicate a sense of arrival at the Evans Station. Each element
26


Evans Station Area Plan Land Use and Urban Design
can offer a variety of uses including providing visual inter-
est, neighborhood identity, way finding and locating access
points. They can occur at the station, major intersections,
building facades, public plazas, open spaces, or along primary
vehicular and pedestrian/bike routes.
In the Evans Station Area, these should celebrate the cultural
and historical character of this community. There should
be a sense of consistency within the landmark, gateway and
public art elements as to reinforce the place with a common
theme. For example, wayfinding signs should look the same
and be easily recognized as belonging uniquely in the Evans
Station area.
Specific opportunities include:
Clear wayfinding signage, consistent pedestrian lighting and public art
are critical elements in creating a sense of place.
10a. Way finding and Neighborhood Identification -
Clear wayfinding signage and consistent pedestrian lighting
is essential in assisting residents and visitors to and from
the station platform. Design and placement of wayfind-
ing signage should be coordinated with pedestrian lighting,
banners, and other elements that create identity within the
neighborhood. (See Mobility and Infrastructure Recom-
mendation 7.) To improve awareness of the Evans Station,
engage RTD and the neighborhoods in a discussion regard-
ing whether or not the name of the light rail station could
be changed to to the Evans Station at Overland Park, or
something similar.
10b. Public Art All new construction within the public
right of way should dedicate at least 2% of the total construc-
tion cost towards a comprehensive public art system for the
station area. Parks and public plazas within the station area
are priority locations for public art. Possible locations in-
clude the Station Plaza, underneath the Evans Bridge, Jewell
Bridge Plaza, and the Broadway and Evans intersection.
10c. Iconic Station Tower To help increase the station
visibility from Evans Ave., S. Santa Fe Drive and S. Broad-
way, a vertical element, perhaps constructed as part of a
signature building along Delaware, can assist transit patrons
to the station location and can be designed to identify the
character of the community.
An iconic tower would announce the station and contribute to the neigh-
borhood's identity.
27


Evans Station Area Plan Land Use and Urban Design
Land Use and Urban Design
Recommendation 11.
Sustainable Development
Fundamentally, TOD is one of the best sustainable practices
that can be implemented by this plan. The Evans Station
Area Plan sets out a vision for improved air quality, energy
conservation, green architecture / infrastructure and en-
hanced people environments through the application of
TOD. National studies have shown that TOD reduces rates
of vehicle miles traveled (VMT). Nationally, vehicle travel
has been increasing faster than population growth. TOD has
been proven to lower annual household rates of driving by
20 to 40 percent for those living, working, and/or shopping
within transit station areas. Recent TOD research shows that
automobile ownership in TOD is approximately one half the
national average. By providing safe and easy pedestrian ac-
cess to transit, TOD reduces greenhouse gas emissions by 2.5
to 3-7 tons per year per household.
Creating a sustainable place should also include cultural
and economic sustainability strategies that address equity,
stewardship, and public and private cooperation. Strate-
gies should build on existing Denver plans (i.e. Greenprint
Denver, Comprehensive Plan 2000, small area plans, and
citywide plans) and plans by regional agencies (i.e RTD
CDOT DRCOG) and combine best practice principles to
achieve the comprehensive and collaborative studies that can
be implemented over time.
11a. Green Building/ Green Infrastructure Evans Station
area has the opportunity to be an incubator for sustainable
development because of the assembly of large brownfield
sites and single land ownership on the Shattock site. New
projects built in this station area should be energy efficient,
well connected into existing communities and offer a mix of
uses to encourage walkable and safe environments for local
residents and visitors. In addition, green building design, as
encouraged through the Leadership in Energy and Environ-
mental Design (LEED) certification program, reduces energy
consumption. New development should be encouraged to
meet LEED and/or Energy Star standards.
lib. Coordination with the Mayors Greenprint Denver
Initiative Greenprint Denver builds the foundation for sus-
tainability goals and strategies in the City. The Greenprint
Denver Action Agenda prioritizes reduction of vehicle miles
traveled through multi-modal transportation and mixed-use
development projects. One of the major goals of Greenprint
Denver is to locate 41% of Denvers job growth (70,000
jobs) and 30% of Denvers population growth (22,000
households) within transit station areas by 2030. Greenprint
Denver will be a key asset and advocate for the implementa-
tion of TOD in the Evans Station Area.
11c. Transportation Demand Management programs -
In conjunction with aggressive compact redevelopment,
Transportation Demand Management (TDM) programs to
address commuting options are also critical to achieve VMT
reduction goals. Some programs may include carpooling, car
sharing, workplace commuting, and others.
New projects in the Evans Station Area and on South Broadway have been built "green" through energy-efficient building technigues and adaptive
re-use of buildings and materials. Many Evans Station Area property owners are Interested In green building technologies.
28


Evans Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure
Infrastructure
29


Evans Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure
Mobility and Infrastructure
Offering a variety of convenient transportation options is
one of Denvers fundamental citywide policies as set forth in
Blueprint Denver, the Greenprint Denver Plan and the Strate-
gic Transportation Plan. It is also a key ingredient to creating
a livable neighborhood. Providing mobility choices increases
access to jobs, conserves energy, relieves congestion, supports
public safety and encourages social and economic activity
People at various stages of life and households of diverse
income levels share these benefits.
Mobility recommendations in this section focus on improv-
ing multi-modal circulation between the Evans Station,
surrounding residential areas, businesses, open space and
neighborhood destinations. This section also addresses the
basic infrastructure requirements necessary for redevelop-
ment to occur.
Transit and Auto Circulation Recommendations
With a state highway and two major arterials dissecting the
station area, a major challenge at Evans Station is to reduce
the feeling of vehicular domination. These transit and auto
circulation recommendations accommodate transit riders and
vehicles as they move to and from the station, within and
through the neighborhood while balancing the needs of the
car, transit rider, walker and bicyclist.
Mobility and Infrastructure Recommendation 1:
Hierarchy of Enhanced Streets
Creating a comfortable, convenient and safe mobility envi-
ronment throughout the station area starts with developing
a framework of enhanced streets. The Evans Station Transit
and Automobile Circulation Plan (Figure 8) depicts several
types of enhanced streets including Arterials, Local Station
Connector Streets and Neighborhood Streets. Typical design
considerations of enhanced streets are based on the Citys
Rules and Regulations for Standard Right-of-Way Cross Sections.
Bike lanes, sharrows and other recommended enhancements
to the City standards are proposed where relevant.
Arterial Street Arterial Streets must balance regional
traffic, transit riders, pedestrians, bicyclists and serve land
uses along the corridor. Typical design includes two
travel lanes in each direction, on street parking, and a
left turn lane at intersections. A median divides the road
to provide a pedestrian refuge. City standards for arterials
include a 21 minimum pedestrian/amenity zone includ-
ing a tree lawn and detached sidewalk. This allows for
walkability and neighborhood amenities such as planter
boxes, benches, lighting and seating for neighborhood
restaurants. The Citys Rules and Regulations for arterials
should be updated to include design standards for bulb-
outs and attached/detached bike lanes. These should be
integrated into the Evans Station arterials as appropriate.
Local Station Connector Street Based on the Citys
standards for a local or collector street (depending on
adjacent land use) these important streets should clearly
direct travelers to the station. One travel/parking lane
in each direction is sufficient. Continuous fourteen foot
detached sidewalks on both sides of the street allow
comfortable and safe pedestrian connections. The Citys
Rules and Regulations should be updated to include
design standards for bike lanes/sharrows, bulb-outs and
to recognize Fire Code Standards on this type of street.
These elements should be implemented into the Evans
Station Area as appropriate.
Neighborhood Street Based on the Citys Local Street
typical section, neighborhood streets serve local traffic
while creating a comfortable atmosphere for residents.
Traffic should be encouraged to move slowly through the
neighborhood. Additional traffic calming techniques
should be considered if needed for the safety of the
community. Two travel/parking lanes (one in each
direction) are sufficient. Continuous sidewalks with tree
plantings, on-street parking and lighting are recom-
mended throughout. With lower traffic volumes and
speeds on neighborhood streets, bike lanes and sharrows
are unnecessary. The Citys Rules and Regulations
should be updated to include bulb-outs and to align with
Fire Code Standards on this type of street.
It is important to note that given the realities of funding limita-
tions and right-of-way constraints in urban areas, not every
street can meet this vision for enhanced street design in the short
term. The South Broadway Reconstruction Project (underway)
provides an example the project must be designed within the
existing 100 feet of right-of-way, and therefore suitable com-
promises must be made to traffic lane and sidewalk dimentions.
Figures 9, 10 and 11 depict cross sections for three key streets in
the station area Delaware Street, South Broadway and Jewell
Avenue. As properties redevelop on these streets, the City should
request that additional right-of-way be dedicated in order to
meet enhanced street standards recommended in this plan.
30


Evans Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure
Mixed Use -Main Street (2-5 Stories) Transit Plaza iiiiiiiiii SW Corridor Light Rail
Mixed Use Residential Arterial Streets 1/4and 1/2 Mile WalkRadius
Urban Residential , . Local Station Collector Streets Existing Parks
Single Family-Duplex Bus Routes: 0, 0L( 21 and 51 Station Gateways
Single Family o Transit Parking Existing Traffic Signal
Mixed-Use- Employment o Evans Light Rail Station 0 Proposed Relocated Traffic Signal
Public/Quasi Public Pedestrian Bridge Plaza
* Station Tower/Vertical Pedestrian Connection
Figure 8. Transit and Automobile Circulation Plan
31


Evans Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure
Figure 9. Proposed Cross Sec-
tion for South Delaware
Recommended South Delaware
Cross Section near Evans Sta-
tion. Given the limited right of
way along Delaware to accom-
modate this recommended cross
section, additional right-of-way
should be dedicated as proper-
ties redevelop to meet the 14-
foot pedestrian zone standard
for this street. Incorporate bike
lanes or sharrows according to
City standards.
100'R.O.W.
Figure 10. Proposed Typical
Broadway Section at Left
Turn Lane
Recommended Typical Broadway
cross section, using the existing
100'right-of-way. Given the lim-
ited right of way along Broadway
to accommodate multi-modal
transportation regulrements,
additional right of way should be
dedicated as properties redevelop
to meet the 21-footpedestrian
zone standard for an arterial
street. In the future, incorporate
bike lanes or sharrows according
to City standards. Note: Traffic
operations may reguire additional
turn lanes at some intersections,
such as at Evans.
32


Evans Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure
Figure 11. Proposed Cross
Section for Jewell
Recommended Jewell Avenue
Cross Section A t Broadway Look-
ing West. The existing right-
of-way will accommodate this
recommended cross section. In-
corporate bike lanes or sharrows
according to City standards.
Mobility and Infrastructure Recommendation 2: Street
and Intersection Improvements to Broadway and Evans
(Enhanced Transit Corridors). Blueprint Denver and the
Strategic Transportation Plan identify Broadway and Evans
as enhanced transit corridors which are both intended to be
multi-modal streets.
2a. Design Enhanced Transit Corridors Redesign South
Broadway and Evans to balance the needs of traffic opera-
tions, safety and comfort of pedestrians and transit riders,
and considerations for economic opportunities along these
corridors. Reconstruction should include key streetscape,
transit infrastructure (bus shelters, signs, trash recepticles),
and bike and pedestrian improvements according to adopted
design standards for enhanced transit corridors.
2b. South Broadway as Main Street Wide attached or
detached sidewalks, street trees, curb extensions and on-street
parking are necessary to realize the vision of South Broadway
becoming a vibrant, pedestrian friendly main street.
2c. Evans Bridge Address aesthetic and operational needs
on the Evans Bridge in the short term. Study the feasibility
of retrofitting the existing bridge to accommodate pedestri-
ans and bicycles (see Recommendation 4a). When replace-
ment of the bridge becomes a priority, an emphasis should be
placed on balancing pedestrian/bicycle safety and Evans Sta-
tion access with traffic operations. Future bridge reconstruc-
tion should provide at least 8 wide sidewalks on each side of
the bridge. At that time, a vertical connection (elevator and
stairs) from the Evans Bridge to the light rail station should
be considered.
Mobility and Infrastructure Recommendation 3.
Relocate traffic signal on Broadway from Colorado to
Jewell Avenue Intersection A traffic signal at Jewell should
be considered as the area redevelops to allow for easier con-
nections to the proposed new pedestrian bridge at Jewell
and easier access to the new development along Jewell and
the area north of Evans. The traffic signal would need to
be warrented and studied and approved by the Citys Traffic
Engineering Services (TES) Division.
Bicycle and Pedestrian Circulation Recommendations
Creating east-west bicycle and pedestrian connections is of
highest priority in the Evans Station area (see Land Use and
Urban Design Recommendation 5a). Residents west of South
Santa Fe Drive and the tracks cannot comfortably walk or bike
to the Evans Station, and residents east of this barrier cannot
walk or bike to the South Platte River Greenway. Recommen-
dations in this plan focus on making this neighborhood whole
again by reintroducing these connections.
33


Evans Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure
Mobility and Infrastructure Recommendation 4. Pedes-
trian Improvements along Evans from South Broadway to
the South Platte River These east-west improvements are
critical for better pedestrian/bike connectivity to and from
the Evans Station.
4a. Evans Bridge Improvements Short Term Create a
safer, more inviting pedestrian and bicycle environment on,
under and adjacent to the Evans Bridge. Short-term improve-
ments may involve retrofitting the bridge to address safety,
maintenance, bridge aesthetics, and station access and visibility.
Study the feasibility of retrofitting the Evans Bridge to
better accommodate pedestrians and bicyclists. The study
should consider improvements to bridge crosswalks and
pedestrian signals, access to the station from the bridge,
pedestrian lighting, and narrowing, altering or eliminating
traffic lanes or expanding sidewalks to accommodate
pedestrians and bicyclists.
Paint bridge columns and structure in an attractive color
palette complementary to the station colors to indicate the
underside of the bridge as part of the station environment.
Install pedestrian scaled lighting, either freestanding or
attached to the bridge structure, to create a safe level of
light under the bridge without producing excessive glare.
On the Evans service roads between Delaware and
Bannock, and along Evans between Bannock and Broad
way, construct a detached sidewalk/amenity zone of 16-
2T. Some of this will be constructed as part of the Evans
operational improvements project, and the remaining
segments should be constructed as redevelopment of pri-
vate property occurs via dedication of public right-of-way.
Activate the space under the bridge with a public use, such
as an art garden.
4b. Evans Bridge Replacement Long Term The Evans
bridge is not scheduled to be replaced within the 20 year
horizon of this plan. However, if and when the Evans Bridge
is replaced, design the new bridge to accommodate pedestri-
ans and bicyclists comfortably in addition to accommodating
traffic operations.
4c. Evans and Broadway Pedestrian improvements at this
busy intersection need to be balanced with traffic operations
improvements. Intersection design should consider person
trips and impacts to the pedestrian environment. An attempt
should be made to decrease the pedestrian cross distance and
increase the size of the pedestrian/amenity zone to the stan-
dard 2T for a major arterial.
4d. Evans To the South Platte River Pedestrian im-
provements are needed at the intersection of Galapago and
Evans. As riverfront property redevelops along Evans, a
more detailed pedestrian, bike and vehicular analysis should
be done to evaluate and design access to S. Santa Fe Drive,
the local street network, the Evans Station, and the South
Platte River Greenway.
Enhanced, multi-modal streets are necessary throughout the station area
in order to truly provide transportation choice.
34


Evans Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure
Mixed Use -Main Street
Mixed Use Residential
Urban Residential
Single Family-Duplex
Single Family
Mixed-Use- Employment
' 1 Priority Connections llllllllll SW Corridor Light Rail
<=> Secondary Connections 1/4and 1/2 Mile Walk Radius
Existing Bike Routes Existing Parks
o Bicycle/Pedestrian Bridge J Station Gateways
Transit Parking
o Transit Station !
Public/Quasi Public
Transit Plaza
Pedestrian Bridge Plaza
Station Tower/Vertical Pedestrian Connection
800 1,200
200
Feet
Figure 12. Pedestrian Circulation Plan
35


Evans Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure
Mobility and Infrastructure Recommendation 5.
Bicycle/Pedestrian bridge at Jewell Avenue and connec-
tion to the South Platte River Greenway Together with
the Evans bridge, this proposed bridge at Jewell is the priority
pedestrian and bicycle crossing to tie together the neighbor-
hoods on the east and west side of S. Santa Fe Drive. In
addition to making critical multi-modal connections, the
Jewell Avenue Bike/Pedestrian Bridge should be designed to
serve as a focal point and public plaza at the west end of the
Jewell Avenue redevelopment area. Once the bridge is built,
appropriate connections to regional bike routes from Jewell
will be necessary, including the South Platte River Greenway
Trail and the D-9 bike route on Sherman.
5a. Connection to the South Platte River Greenway Trail -
West of S. Santa Fe Drive, this new bike/ped connection will
continue on Jewell along the south side of the Overland Golf
Course. The route will connect to the South Platte River
Trail via Huron St. at the existing Pasquinels Landing Park at
Asbury. A proposed recreational path bridge at Jewell across
the South Platte would serve to complete this connection to
Ruby Hill Park.
5b. Connection to the D-9 bike route East of the Jewell
bike/ped bridge, connection across S. Broadway would occur
at either Jewell or Colorado, depending on traffic signals, to
link with the D-9 bicycle route on Sherman.
Mobility and Infrastructure Recommendation 6. Bicycle
/ Pedestrian bridge at Iliff Avenue This bridge is con-
sidered a major missing link in the Bicycle Master Plan.
Convenient bike/ped connections to and from the South Platte River Trail
are critical to making the Evans Station Area complete.
Improvements to the Evans Bridge and construction of a
bike/ped bridge at Jewell, recommended in this Evans plan,
may provide sufficient east-west connectivity. If not, a bike/
ped crossing at Iliff to complete the D-20 bike route should
also be considered to tie together the neighborhoods south of
Evans and on the east and west side of S. Santa Fe Drive.
Mobility and Infrastructure Recommendation 7.
Neighborhood Bicycle and Pedestrian Improvements -
Create better pedestrian and bicycle connections throughout
the station area specifically between the Evans Station, South
Broadway and existing parks. In addition to improvemetns
to Evans addressed in Recommendation 4, recommendations
include:
7a. Pedestrian improvements Build/repair station area
sidewalks to City standards, including pedestrian lighting
and street trees. Priority streets include: Delaware between
Asbury and Iliff including underneath the Evans bridge; War-
ren and Iliff. Pedestrian improvements on local streets north
of Evans will occur with redevelopment.
7b. Abandonment of Existing Rail Spur north of Evans
and on Jewell Work with the Atchison Topeka and Santa
Fe railroad to remove the existing unused rail spur that runs
between the light rail tracks and Delaware and then con-
nects up to Jewell. The City should consider acquiring this
property to use as a greenway connection between Jewell
and Asbury, thereby providing a direct pedestrian connec-
tion between the station and the Jewell Bridge and plaza (See
Recommendation 5).
|
The Vision for Jewell Avenue Includes a blcycle/pedestrlan bridge con-
necting the redevelopment area across Santa Fe to the South Platte River
Trail.
36


Evans Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure
Mixed Use -Main Street (2-5 Stories)
Mixed Use-Main Street (1-3 Stories)
Mixed Use Residential
Urban Residential
Single Family-Duplex
Single Family
Mixed-Use- Employment
Public/Quasi Public
Transit Plaza
Proposed Bike Routes
Existing Bike Routes
Bicycle/Pedestrian Bridge
Transit Parking
Station Tower/Vertical Pedestrian Connection
Pedestrian Bridge Plaza
Station Tower/Vertical Pedestrian Connection
..... SW Corridor Light Rail
1/4and 1/2 Mile WalkRadius
Existing Parks
Station Gateways
0 200 400
Figure 13. Bicycle Circulation Plan
,200
I Feet
37


Evans Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure
7c. Bike routes on Delaware, Jewell and Iliff Extend the
bike route on Delaware north from Iliff to Jewell. Create a
new bike route on Jewell when the bike/ped bridge is con-
structed. The Jewell Route should connect across Broadway to
the D-9 route on Sherman and potentially along Acoma north
to the D-18 route on Iowa. Complete the connection with
signage and bike infrastructure on the D-20 route along Iliff.
Mobility and Infrastructure Recommendation 8. Station
Gateways at Jewell, Asbury, Evans, Warren, and Iliff A
system of gateways and signage at key locations along Broad-
way and main pedestrian and bike routes will provide clear
direction to the transit station. Conversely, the signage at the
station should offer information about other primary desti-
nation within the TOD area. Priority locations of signage
directing people to the station include:
Broadway at Jewell, Asbury, Evans, Warren, and Iliff
Delaware at Iliff and Asbury
Cherokee at Jewell and Asbury.
Drainage Improvement Recommendations
The Harvard Gulch floodplain triggers additional develop-
ment requirements in portions of the station area, such as
along Broadway, Delaware and Asbury (See Page 54). Rede-
velopment in areas of change can be facilitated by construct-
ing stormwater improvements that essentially remove the
floodplain from private properties. Future private develop-
ment and new construction of public infrastructure should
apply Low Impact Development (LID) strategies for storm
water management and water quality.
Mobility and Infrastructure Recommendation 9.
Construct Stormwater Improvements identified in the
Storm Drainage Master Plan Two key stormwater proj-
ects would improve the drainage system in the Evans Station
Area.
9a. Asbury outfall and Broadway stormwater improve-
ments As part of the improvements for the South Broad-
way Reconstruction project and the Denver Storm Drain-
age Master Plan, stormwater improvements will be made
along Asbury Avenue between Broadway and the South
Platte River in accordance with the Citys design standards
for storm drain construction and street flow-depth criteria.
These improvements will not remove the 100-year floodplain
designation.
9b. Drainage Improvements to Harvard Gulch The city
of Denver is in the process of evaluating the feasibility and
constructability of new stormwater improvements to the
Harvard Gulch basin west of Logan. These potential im-
provements are intended to ultimately remove the 100 year
floodplain and may also include a detention pond or drain-
age amenity at Rosedale Park, east of the station area.
38


Evans Station Area Plan Economic Opportunity
39


Evans Station Area Plan Economic Opportunity
Economic Opportunity
FasTracks promises to bring the Denver region an unprece-
dented opportunity to promote and facilitate transit-oriented
higher density, mixed-use residential and commercial devel-
opment. To identify, leverage, and maximize these opportu-
nities, the city commissioned a TOD Economic Analysis and
Market Study completed by Basile Baumann Prost Cole &
Associates (BBPC). The overall objectives of the study were
to forge a better understanding of the economic context in
which the city may plan for TOD, and to develop specific
recommendations regarding the amount, type, mix, and
intensity of uses appropriate for selected station areas.
While the amount, type and mix of uses within the transit
station area and corridor influences market potential, the
presence of undeveloped and underutilized land can be
a source of the greatest economic opportunity. Generally
speaking, prospects for redevelopment are stronger when sta-
tion areas feature:
Relatively high levels of undeveloped and under-
utilized land
Fewer landowners such that land is concentrated in
fewer hands
Underutilized land consolidated into fewer parcels,
therefore requiring less land assembly to facilitate
redevelopment
Residential, Office and Retail Market
According to the BBPC market study, the Evans Station area
contains approximately 69.3 acres of underutilized land. Of
this land, there are many parcels and property owners spread
throughout the station area. Multiple acres north of Evans
and west of Broadway have been assembled by a single prop-
erty owner, escalating the potential for large scale redevelop-
ment in this part of the station area.
Over the next twenty years, the Evans Station Area is envi-
sioned to expand and reinforce its identity as a predominately
residential urban neighborhood. With 69.3 acres of under-
utilized land, there is potential for the expansion of residen-
tial units, office space, and community-oriented retail uses.
Three redevelopment scenarios have been projected for pos-
sible net new development in the 1/2 mile radius around the
platform based on market trends and land capacity. The first
two scenarios, Modest and Moderate, are based on projected
market conditions over the next 15-20 years. The third,
Capacity, is based on development of underutilized sites to
their maximum allowable square footage. The following is a
breakdown of the three development scenarios:
Future Redevelopment
Scenarios Net square
feet of development Residential Office Retail
Modest 850,000 160,000 100,000
Moderate 1,000,000 190,000 170,000
Capacity 1,960,000 300,000 450,000
Existing square feet of
development 1,065,000 36,453 119,279
Source: BBPC Market Study, 2007
In addition to the Market Study, the Evans Station planning
process revealed a potential market niche in the Evans Station
area of creative industries. Music instruction and retail, inte-
rior design, industrial design, film, woodworking, industrial
arts and research and development are all prevalent indus-
try types in the Evans Station area. Factors that contribute
to this niche include a prevalence of small properties with
industrial zoning ideal for industrial arts, location of two folk
music schools (Swallow Hill and Denver Folklore Center),
and the proximity of Antique Row and the Denver Design
District further north on Broadway.
Economic Strategies
The realization of TOD will require a combination of near
and long term efforts and the use of best practices and in-
novative strategies. An ongoing regional dialogue is critical to
address the challenges inherent in implementation ofTOD.
The City should continue its communication with regional
entities (e.g. Denver Regional Council of Governments, Ur-
ban Land Institute, RTD) and surrounding jurisdictions to
investigate regional approaches to shared obstacles. Imple-
mentation will be most effective if carried out under a broad
framework that establishes strategies to advance TOD at the
system level. These system-wide strategies will in turn sup-
port individual efforts undertaken at the corridor and station
area levels.
The City & County of Denver presently offers a broad array
of programs that could be used to effectuate transit-support-
40


Evans Station Area Plan Economic Opportunity
ive development. Rather than providing an exhaustive list of
programs already available in Denver, the following are key
existing programs that could be focused or expanded to help
facilitate positive reinvestment in the Evans Station area.
Regulations, guidelines and development of Memoran-
dums of Understanding Formalizing standards for transit-
oriented development whether through local regulations
and ordinances, guidelines, or memorandum of understand-
ing is a key first step in facilitating the type of development
that will support transit service.
Direct and indirect financial incentives In addition
to direct financial incentives to facilitate transit-oriented
development, regulations can provide a number of indirect
financial incentives. Indirect incentives often used to facili-
tate development include flexible zoning provisions, while
direct incentives include reduced development fees, expedited
development review, and team inspections to streamline and
reduce the total costs of the review and permitting process.
Financing/Funding methods Transit-oriented develop-
ment often occurs as infill development in established areas
or through redevelopment of sometimes contaminated sites.
In these types of developments, the level of infrastructure
required may include extensive reconstruction of the street
network (or introduction of new streets), installation of
structured parking, addition of pedestrian enhancements
and public plazas, and stormwater infrastructure. Obtain-
ing financing and/or funding for these critical infrastructure
enhancements can be a key challenge in effectuating transit
oriented development. The success of future expansion efforts
in the Evans Station Area is partly contingent on the invest-
ment in improved pedestrian and transportation linkages
particularly between the station and the Broadway Corridor.
Special Assessment District Develop a special assessment
district as part of the South Broadway reconstruction and
potentially elsewhere in the station area. Consider other cre-
ative mechanisms for funding neighborhood improvements,
amenities and public art to implement the communitys
vision for improving neighborhood identity and creating
unique and well utilized public spaces.
Small Business and Technical Assistance Community
members in many of the selected Denver station areas have
cited a desire for local entrepreneurship opportunities and jobs
within their station areas. Small businesses can be encouraged
through multiple methods, including the Main Street Program
approach, business incubation, and small business support
programs (including loans and technical assistance). Denver
Office of Cultural Affairs Create Denver revolving loan fund
is a great resource for creative small business development.
Neighborhood Marketplace Initiative Work with the
Denver Office of Economic Development and the Neigh-
borhood Marketplace Initiative to develop market profiles
for South Broadway and the Evans Station Area to call at-
tention to the lifestyle, businesses and amenities available in
this neighborhood.
The Office of Economic Development and the Denver Office of Cultural Affairs provide resources for business retention and
creative small business development.
41


Evans Station Area Plan Economic Opportunity
42


Evans Station Area Plan Implementation
43


Evans Station Area Plan Implementation
Implementation
This section discusses phasing of the plans implementation
and identifies the essential action items necessary to accom-
plish the Evans Station Area Plan recommendations.
Phasing
The plan recommendations strive to direct appropriate
change to the area over a period of 20 years. While the city
will influence implementation of the plan through regulatory
means, investments in infrastructure and partnerships, much
of the change will be implemented by private property own-
ers incrementally over a number of years or decades. Several
factors influence the extent and the phasing of this plans
implementation:
Investment in Infrastructure Reconstruction of South
Broadway and Evans (as well as investment into Ruby Hill
Park, the Platte River Greenway and Aqua Golf) will likely
facilitate an influx of private investment and development in
the area. As private money flows into the area, South Broad-
way and the Evans Station Area will emerge as a place with a
unique identity a place where people (residents, businesses,
investors) want to be. The effects of both public and private
investment along South Broadway will be apparent by 2011.
Other major infrastructure improvements in the station area
will occur over time as redevelopment occurs (in the case of
sidewalks) or as funding becomes available (in the case of
bike/ped bridges).
Land Assemblage Realization of plan recommendations
in areas of change depend largely on property ownership. In
portions of the station area where a single property owner has
purchased several properties, evidence of change will come
more quickly, likely in the next five years. In parts of the sta-
tion area where there are many individual property owners,
we will not likely see much change until market conditions
support the type of development and reinvestment described
in this plan.
Zoning The New Zoning Code will facilitate implementa-
tion of this plan through context-based and form-based regu-
lations that encourage mixed use development and an urban
form. As part of the New Code adoption, many vacant
and underutilized properties in the areas of change will be
rezoned to mixed use districts with property owner support.
Where viable industrial businesses exist, rezoning in order
to implement the plan will occur more slowly, as the market
dictates, allowing for more gradual change.
Business recruitment and retention As change comes to
the Evans Station Area, the city must balance goals of rec-
truiting new businesses, retaining existing businesses within
the city and creating walkable, mixed use neighborhoods
near transit stations. The recommendations in this plan are
intended to be flexible enough to allow change to occur as
the market dictates. However, some proactive measures for
retaining existing small businesses and recruiting new ones
may be necessary.
Catalyst Projects
Several projects will act as catalysts to lead the charge toward
station area plan implementation:
South Broadway and Evans Avenue Reconstruction
Adoption of the New Zoning Code and rezoning
properties appropriately in the Evans Station Area
Evans Pedestrian / Bicycle Feasibility Study and
associated improvements
New mixed use residential development north of Evans
along S. Broadway or Jewell and on Delaware across
from the station
Jewell Pedestrian/Bicycle Bridge
Harvard Gulch Improvements Project
Implementation Strategies
The following tables describe Implementation Strategies for
the Station Area. The table is organized by Regulatory Tools,
Public Infrastructure Tools and Partnership tools. Each
Implementation Strategy includes reference to the numbered
Plan Recommendation(s) it implements, a general timeframe
and key responsibilities. The Plan recommendations are ab-
breviated for each section: 1) LU/UD = Land Use and Urban
Design; 2) MOB/INF = Mobility and Infrastructure; and 3)
ECON = Economic Opportunities. Timeframes are orga-
nized by short term (1-5 years), medium (5-10) or long (10-
20 years) term. This plan does not require these timeframes
if opportunities arise sooner than predicted.
44


Evans Station Area Plan Implementation
Regulatory Tools
Recommendations Implementation Strategy Timeframe Key Responsibility
LU/UD 1 3 Adopt New Zoning Code Adopt and Implement a New Zoning Code with context- and form-based regulations that facilitate redevelopment in Areas of Change and respect the character of the existing established neighborhoods. Short CPD, City Council
LU/UD1 -4,6,7 Support Rezoning Rezone or support rezoning applications within the Evans Station Area to allow for a future mixed-use neighborhood and residential development aligning with this Plan's Vision and recommendations. New zoning districts should promote diverse housing choice integrated with employment and shopping opportunities. Districts that permit appropriate development intensities and building forms addressing active edges, build-to lines, and transitions between contexts should be considered in accordance with this Plan. Short-Long CPD, Private Property Owners, City Council; RNOs
LU/UD 1-3,6 Incentivize Ground Floor Retail -The existing zoning code does not offer incentives or mandates for mixing uses or required ground floor commercial or retail. Concentrating and allocating commercial and retail in the Evans station area as recommended in this plan is essential to creating a vibrant, successful TOD. Coordinate with the New Zoning Code to create such incentives. Short-Medium CPD
LU/UD 11 Facilitate Sustainability Eliminate regulatory barriers to sustainable building and development practicies in the New Code. Short CPD, Greenprint Denver
MOB 1 Develop New Street Standards-Work with PW,the Fire Department and the Living Streets initiative on developing and enforcing new street cross section design standards that are context-sensitive, guided by adopted plans and accommodate vehicle, bike, pedestrian and bus mobility. Short Public Works, CPD, Fire Department
LU/UD 1-3 Respect Neighborhood Transitions As properties backing to existing residential are redeveloped along Broadway and Delaware, carefully consider transitions between the neighborhood and new mixed-use projects by encouraging parking in the rear, landscape buffers, and a gradual transition of building heights using step backs to reduce the overall bulk of mixed use buildings toward the back of the lot. Short-Long CPD, Private Developers
LU/UD 4 Update Inclusionary Housing Ordinance (IHO) Reconsider policies in the City's Inclusionary Housing Ordinance (IHO) to better respond to the needs at TOD stations. Possibly remove in lieu fees /or increase IHO requirements in station areas. Explore a mechanism for requiring that a percentage of new rental housing be made affordable. Medium OED, CPD
LU/UD 5 Create Public Open Space Develop a regulatory strategy for creation of public open space for new development north of Evans. This could include requiring a General Development Plan or coordination with the New Zoning Code to incorporate flexibility in mixed use districts for aggregation of open space. Short-Medium Parks and Rec., Land Owners, District 7, CPD
LU/UD 8,4 Reduce parking requirements in mixed use zoning districts adjacent to transit stations and further reduce parking requirements for affordable housing. Increase ways to meet minimum parking requirements. Incentivize structured and shared parking adjacent to transit stations. Inform the Strategic Parking Plan and TOD Strategic Plan with the parking strategies identified in this plan. Short-Medium CPD
45


Evans Station Area Plan Implementation
Infrastructure Tools
Recommendations Implementation Strategy Timeframe Key Responsibility
MOB/INF1-2, LU/UD 2 Transform South Broadway into a Main Street. Reconstruct South Broadway according to adopted policies and design guidelines for Enhanced Transit Corridors. Together with main street regulations, an enhanced streetscape design including 21 'detached sidewalks, street trees, curb extensions and on-street parking should be implemented as development occurs to realize the vision of South Broadway becoming a vibrant, pedestrian friendly main street. Short PublicWorks
MOB/INF 2a and 2c, LU/UD 9 Improve Pedestrlan/BIcyde Environment on Evans Bridge. Conduct a feasibility study for retrofitting the Evans Bridge to improve the bicycle and pedestrian environment. Study feasibility and cost of expanding the Evans Bridge or attaching a pre-fabricated walk/bike way to the existing bridge to accommodate pedestrians and cyclers on the bridge; Consider feasibility of a vertical connection between the bridge and Delaware; Improve railings and painted surfaces; Install pedestrian countdown signals Short CPD, CDOT, Public Works, RTD
MOB/INF 2c and 4a, LU/UD 9 and 10 Improve Evans Bridge Aesthetics (under and over). Assess interest in creating a special assessment district in order to add pedestrian lighting under the Evans Bridge along Delaware. Paint bridge elements (or replace with attractive and durable materials) to help improve the visual appeal of the area. Increase clean-up and maintenance around the bridge and abutments. Create an active public use under the bridge, such as an art garden. Any improvements must not interfere with inspection and routine maintenance of the Evans bridge. Short Public Works, CDOT, DOCA, Council District 7, Neighborhood Organizations
MOB/INF 8, LU/UD 10a Install Wayfinding Signage at gateways (on Broadway at Jewell, Asbury, Evans, Warren and lliff) to direct people toward the Evans Station. Short RTD
LU/UD 5a, MOB/INF 5 Construct Pedestrian Bridge at Jewell Avenue and bicycle/pedestrian improvements and connection to the South Platte River Greenway. This pedestrian bridge is the priority crossing for the area to create better pedestrian and bicycle access east/west and to help support development of the new mixed-use district north of Evans. Short-Medium CPD, PublicWorks, Private Developers
MOB/INF 7b Acquire Atchison Topeka & Sante Fe railroad spur right of way near the intersection of Cherokee Street and Jewell Avenue for a public plaza that will anchor the Jewell Pedestrian Bridge and complete the pedestrian connection between Jewell and the Evans Station. Short-Medium CDP, PublicWorks, Parks and Rec., Office of Management and Budget
MOB/INF 1 Create enhanced streets throughout the station area as redevelopment occurs. Some streets such as Delaware and Cherokee have narrow right of ways (Delaware 50', Cherokee 44'). Property owners may be requested to dedicate additional right of way if current street and fire clearance standards are enforced. Coordinate with PublicWorks and the Fire Department to develop new enhanced multi-modal street design standards.. Short-Long CPD, CDOT, PublicWorks, Fire Department
46


Evans Station Area Plan Implementation
Infrastructure Tools
Recommendations Implementation Strategy Timeframe Key Responsibility
MOB/INF4,7 Station Area Pedestrian Improvements Secure funding for building/repairing sidewalks on priority pedestrian streets where redevelopment is not anticipated. Sidewalks should be repaired/ built to meet city standards, including pedestrian lighting and street trees. These may require creation of a special assesment district. Priority locations include Evans between Delaware and Bannock; Evans from the South Platte River to the Evans Bridge; Delaware between Asbury and lliff; Warren between Delaware and S. Broadway; Jewell between Cherokee and S. Broadway; lliff between Delaware and S. Broadway; Galapagos and Evans intersection. Short-Long CPD,CDOT, Public Works
LU 10c Public Art. Develop a comprehensive public art system for the station area using 2% of construction fees for projects in the area and through creative funding available through Denver Office of Cultural Affairs. Short-Long Council District 7, CPD, DOCA, RNOs
MOB/INF5b,6,7c Extend/create new neighborhood bike routes. Incorporate new bike routes into the Multi-modal Access and Connectivity Plan. Install proper signage, bike lanes and/or"sharrows(according to Public Works' standards) along the new and extended bicycle routes recommended in this plan. Locations include Delaware between lliff and Jewell, Jewell between Huron and Sherman, Huron between Jewell and Asbury/Platte River Trail, and potentially Acoma between Jewell and Iowa Medium Public Works
MOB/INF 9, LU/UD1 Remove Harvard Gulch Floodplain. Construct Harvard Gulch storm improvements. Construct Asbury storm improvements to implement the Storm Drainage Master Plan. Coordinate improvements with future density and redevelopment in the area so as not to preclude future growth around the station. Medium Long CPD, Public Works, Urban Drainage, Parks and Rec., Private Developers
LU/UD 5a, MOB/INF 6 Construct Pedestrian Bridge at lliff to complete the D-20 bike route. This pedestrian bridge is considered a "critical missing link in the Bicycle Master Plan and, together with connections across Evans and Jewell, would complete the neighborhood in terms of connectivity and access to the Platte River Greenway and to the Evans Station. Long Public Works, CPD
MOB/INF 1,4b Replace Evans Bridge. Eventual reconstruction of the Evans bridge with the full array of pedestrian/bicycle improvements on both sides of the structure, including vertical circulation from the bridge to the light rail station. Long Public Works
Partnership Tools
Recommendations Implementation Strategy Timeframe Key Responsibility
LU/UD 4 Expand Affordable Housing. Utilize the recently established TOD Fund to strategically invest in properties in order to preserve and expand the amount of affordable housing at transit stations. Promote the use of CDBG, HOME, Multi-family Revenue Bond allocations and Low Income Housing Tax Credits for affordable housing projects in close proximity to transit. Short- Long CPD, OED, Enterprise Community Partners, Urban Land Conservancy, Private Developers
All Interdepartmental Coordination. Most recommendations in this plan require coordination with other city departments and regional agencies. As these recommendations move forward, coordinate with the appropriate agencies to maximize potential for successful plan implementation. Short CPD, Parks, Public Works, Greenprint Denver, BMO, DOCA, Office of Economic Development
47


Evans Station Area Plan Implementation
Partnership Tools (cont.)
Recommendations Implementation Strategy Timeframe Key Responsibility
All Active Community Engagement. Continue existing neighborhood communications, meetings and city processes to keep the community updated and engaged on the station area implementation and the neighborhood's roles/responsibilities. Short-Long CPD, RNOs, Council District 7
MOB/INF 1,2,4c, LU/UD 2, ECON Develop a special assessment district as part of the South Broadway reconstruction and potentially elsewhere within the station area. Consider other creative mechanisms for funding neighborhood improvements, amenities and public art to implement the community's vision for improving neighborhood identity and creating unique and well utilized public spaces. Short South Broadway Business Owners, Public Works, CPD, Council District 7, RNOs/ Neighborhood Residents
LU/UD10, MOB/INF 1,2 Coordinate with RTD (Wayfinding and Station Identification). Install wayfinding signage at gateway locations recommended in this plan. Consider renaming the station to"Evans Station at Overland Park or something similar. Short CPD/RTD/Public Works
LU 1-3 Leverage redevelopment opportunities (private developers and land owners). Continue communication with land owners to organize redevelopment opportunities. Work with developers and land owners for a catalyst project to realize the type of development proposed and ensure it meets the goals of this plan and theTOD Strategic Plan Short CPD, Private Property Owners, Council District 7
LU/UD 1-3, ECON Business Relocation/Retention. As the built environment changes over the years it may not be conducive for heavy industrial business operation. On the other hand, smaller, light industrial businesses and "creative industries that are consistent with this plan's recommendations may feel pushed out by rising property values. OED can play a pro-active role in assisting with business retention and relocation as necessary. Short-Long OED
LU 4 Community Partnerships for Flousing. Establish private-public partnerships with both non-profit community organizations, community development corporation (CDC's), and for-profit development companies to preserve housing affordability in the area. Short-Medium OED, CPD, Urban Land Conservancy
LU/UD 3, ECON Creative Industries. Engage OED, DOCA and the industrial, arts/music/design community within close proximity to Evans Station and South Broadway to discuss mechanisms for marketing this area as a niche market for creative industries. Short-Medium Council District 7, CPD, OED, DOCA
LU 5 Open Space. Partner with Parks, private property owners, and land conservancy organizations to acquire/dedicate land necessary to implement this plan's open space recommendations. Medium Parks, CPD, Private Property Owners, Non-Profit Associations
LU 8b Coordinate with RTD (Relocate Parking). Working within the constraints of RTD's enabling legislation, actively partner with RTD and private partners to relocate the Evans Park and Ride to a shared parking structure and redevelop the existing surface lot into a transit/neighborhood plaza. Long CPD/RTD/Public Works, Private Property Owners
48


Evans Station Area Plan The Community
49


Evans Station Area Plan The Community
Study Area Location and Overview
The Evans Station is the southernmost light rail station in
Denver on the Southwest Corridor, which extends southwest
from Broadway Station and continues along Santa Fe Drive.
A small RTD park-n-ride with 99 spaces is located on the
east side of the Evans platform.
Adjacent stations along the line include Englewood Station
to the south and Broadway Station to the north. The Broad-
way Station is planned to become a major urban center,
making it an employment and entertainment destination.
The park-n-ride adjacent to the station has a total capacity of
1,251 vehicles. The Englewood Station is characterized as an
urban neighborhood and is similar to the Evans Station in
scale. It is adjacent to a mixed-use development with moder-
ate density residential, retail, and office space. With 910
spaces in the Englewood park and ride, and additional spaces
planned, this station serves regional commuter traffic.
As characterized by the Denver Transit-Oriented Development
Strategic Plan, the station area typology is urban neighbor-
hood. This typology indicates that the Evans Station will be
a walkup station surrounded by mixed-use residential and
local-serving retail. The recommended height range of build-
ings in the urban neighborhood station areas is two to seven
stories according to the TOD Strategic Plan.
The half mile Evans Station area extends from Colorado Ave-
nue to the north, Grant Street to the east, Harvard Avenue to
Figure 14. Aerial Image
Aerial Imagery, April 2008

Ughtrail Station
Existing lightrail
- Railroad
// -S Station Buffer
^ and 1/2 Mile
50


Evans Station Area Plan The Community
the south and Lipan Street to the west. This area constitues a
half-mile, or approximately 10 minute walk from the station.
The station area incorporates portions of the Overland Park,
Platt Park, Rosedale, and College View/South Platte statisti-
cal neighborhoods.
The area is very rich in history. Denvers first white settle-
ment, known as Montana City, was organized in a 12-square
block area on the east side of the S. Platte River between
Evans, Iliff, the river and the Santa Fe railroad tracks. It is
now commemorated with Frontier Park on South Fox Street.
Overland Golf Course is famous as being the first golf course
west of the Mississippi.
The Evans Station area has several infrastructure components
that make it a valuable yet challenging location for TOD:
adjacency to of a major cross-town corridor, Evans Avenue
and a state highway, Santa Fe Drive; proximity to South
Broadway, a major commercial corridor; and within biking
distance of regional trails and green space along the South
Platte River.
Figure IS. Existing Light Rail
[*] Liyhl Rail Station
Exi&ling Light Rail
6 ^ Station Butter
^ i* and
51


Evans Station Area Plan The Community
Population and Housing Characteristics
The Evans Station Area includes portions of four of Denvers
Statistical neighborhoods: Overland, Platt Park, Rosedale and
the industrial side of College View / South Platte neighbor-
hood. Over the past 50 years, all three residential neighbor-
hoods in the station area have experienced a decline in popu-
lation. After hitting a low point in 1990, however, these
neighborhoods have seen moderate population increases.
The area is predominantly non-latino white. In the year
2000, latinos were the largest minority at 30% of the popula-
tion, followed distantly by African Americans at 2%. Birth
rate data between 2000 and 2006 shows an increase in latino
births by and a decrease in white non-latino births. The
Overland neighborhood is composed primarily of working-
age adults. In 2007, 69% of the population was between the
ages of 18 and 64.
According to 2008 data from the City of Denver, the total
population of the station area is 2,218 residents. The 766
single-family housing units in the station area make up 71
percent of the areas total housing. Low rise multi-family
structures, mostly in the form of duplexes and town houses,
make up 28 percent of the housing stock and only .5 percent
of residential units are in mixed-use buildings. The majority
(68%) of these homes are owner-occupied.
Household income is highest in the Platt Park neighborhood,
with the majority of households falling into one of three in-
come ranges: $50,000 to $75,000, $75,000 to $100,000, or
$100,000 to $150,000. In Overland, most households fall
into an income range of $50,000 to $75,000.
Figure 16. Population and Housing
Evans Station Area Population and Housing (2008)
Total Population 2,218
Group Quarters Population 0
Residential Population 2,218
Total Housing Units 957
Group Quarters Units 0
Residential Units 957
Vacancy Rate (residential units only) 5%
# Persons Per Household (residential units only) 2.43
% Housing Units Owner Occupied 68%
Figure 17. Neighborhoood Population
Total Population (1950-2007)
Overland, Platt Park and Rosedale
Neighborhoods
Figure 18. Household Income
Household Income
Overland, Platt Parkand Rosedale Neighborhoods (2007)
2
o
o
z
300
250
200
S 150
.Q
E
z ioo
50
Overland Platt Park Rosedale
1
J
it
m m
hti i m
<515,000 515,000- 525,000- 535,000- 550,000- 575,000- 5100,000- 5150,000- 5250,000- >5500,000
525,000 535,000 550,000 575,000 5100,000 5150,000 5250,000 5500,000
Income Range
Source: Claritas, 2007
52


Evans Station Area Plan The Community
Figure 19. Neighborhood Race and Ethnicity Figure 20. Births by Ethnicity
Population by Race and Ethnicity
Overland Neighborhood (2000)
Naitive American
Asian/Pacific Islander
Non-Latino White
Latino
African American
Other Race
2 or More Races
Births by Ethnicity
Overland Neighborhood (1996,2000,2006)
1996 2000 2006
Latino H Non-Latino White
Source: CDPHE via Piton Foundation (2007)
Figure 21. Elousing Distribution by Type
Figure 22. Age Distribution
Housing Type Distribution (2008)
Evans Station Area
Multi-Family Single-Family Mixed
Low Rise Use
Housing Type
Source: Assessors Data,CPD
Age Distribution (2000 & 2007)
Overland Neighborhood
2000
Source: Claritas (2007)
53


Evans Station Area Plan The Community
Drainage
Much of the redevelopment area near Evans Station is within
the Harvard Gulch floodplain (Figure 20), including proper-
ties along South Broadway, on Delaware both north and south
of Evans, and north of Evans along Cherokee and Asbury. The
presence of the floodplain places additional requirements on
new development because in order to comply with City and
County of Denver standards, building finish floor elevations
(and/or lowest point of potential water entry into bldg) must
be a minimum of 12 above 100-yr flood elevation in adjacent
street or a minimum of 2 feet above adjacent street flowline.
All garage entry elevations are required be minimum of 12
inches above adjacent street flowline, and a minimum of 8
inches above adjacent alley flowline elevations. Deviation from
this criteria will require approval from Public Works DES-
Wastewater. Building finish floor elevations and existing street/
alley flowline elevations will be shown on Site Plan submittal
for each phase.
Jewell Ave.
Asbury Ave.
^VANSAVE
7arren Ave.
Aerial Imagery. April 2008
FEMA Flooplain
1::' :'.V/] 100-year Floodplain
\//\ 500-year Floodplain
Parks / Open Space / Golf Course
Lightrail Station
I Existing Lightrail
i Railroad
ft ^ Station Buffer
1J 1/4 and 1/2 Mile
Figure 23. Harvard Gulch and South Platte River Floodplains.
54


Evans Station Area Plan The Community
Land Use
Zoning
Land use in the station area is quite segregated between
residential neighborhoods, industrial areas along the railroad
tracks and river and commercial along South Broadway (Fig-
ure 21). The current residential land use in the station area is
a mixture of single-family and low-rise multi-family build-
ings. Approximately 22% of the station area is used for light
and moderate intensity industrial uses. Between the South
Platte River, the Overland Golf Course, and Rosedale and
Harvard Gulch Parks, the Evans Station Area has a wealth of
green space. Approximately 16% of the land area is public
space with uses such as public parks or open space. Vacant
buildings and surface parking comprise 5% of the land area.
There are currently 13 zone districts in the Evans Station
Area (Figure 22). Residential neighborhoods include an
R-l area west of the station, while neighborhoods east of the
station and east of Broadway are zoned R-2. Commercial
development is concentrated along Broadway Boulevard
east of the station, primarily with B-4 zoning. Santa Fe
Drive west of the station has several CDOT-owned remnant
parcels zoned for commercial use, though these are all vacant
at this time. Industrial zones in the station area are located
along Santa Fe Drive or generally along the west bank of the
South Platte River. The majority are zoned general indus-
trial district, 1-1, as a moderate intensity industry usage and

Land Use by Parcel Office Relail Commercial I Mixnd-Usc H Industrial Entertainment-Cultural Public'OiinRi-Piiblin Single-Family | 1 Multi-Family Low Rise Multi-Family Mid Rise Mulli-Family High Rise Park/Open Space Tiunsporlulion, Couwiuiiiuiilion. Utility (TCU) i ROW,'Road Parking (Surface or Slructure) Other/Unknown Vacant Ligh trail Station Existing Lightratl Railroad ^ Station Buttai < Ward 1/2Mtfe
Figure 24. Existing Land Use
55


Evans Station Area Plan The Community
35%
~o
£
(0
O
0)
Ui
(0
£
0)
u
0)
o.
30% -
25%
20%
15%
10%
5%
0%
i
11
111
1111
Single Industrial Parks,
Family Open
Space
TCU Multi- Retail Vacant Surface Public/ Mixed Comm- Office Parking Un-
Family Water Quasi- Use ercial known/
Low Public Other
Rise
Figure 25. Existing Land Use Distribution
Land Use
employment area. The Shattuck property on Jewell, a former
Superfund Site that has been cleaned up by the EPA, is zoned
for high intensity Commercial Mixed Use.
The following are descriptions of the existing zone districts in
the Evans Station Area.
Business and Mixed-Use Districts
B-4 General Business District: This district is intended to
provide for and encourage appropriate commercial uses adja-
cent to arterial streets, which are normally transit routes. Uses
include a wide variety of consumer and business services and
retail establishments that serve other business activities, and
local transit-dependent residents within the district as well
as residents throughout the city. The regulations generally
allow a moderate intensity of use and concentration for the
purpose of achieving compatibility between the wide vari-
ety of uses permitted in the district. Building height is not
controlled by bulk standards unless there is a property line to
property line abutment with a residential use. Building floor
area cannot exceed twice the site area.
CMU-10 Commercial Mixed-Use District: This zone is the
most restrictive of the commercial mixed-use districts, with
the shortest list of allowed uses. The purpose of the district
is to concentrate higher density commercial uses, spatially
define streets, encourage higher site standards, and create a
more attractive pedestrian environment. Although residential
uses are permitted in this zone, it is expected that these uses
will be responsible for buffering themselves from nonresiden-
tial uses adjacent to their property. Building floor areas are
not allowed to exceed twice the size of their site area.
CMU-30 Commercial Mixed-Use District: This zone gives
property owners flexibility by providing for a wide range of
commercial, office, retail, industrial, and residential uses.
Although residential uses are permitted in this zone, it is
expected that these uses will be responsible for buffering
themselves from nonresidential uses adjacent to their prop-
erty. Building floor areas are not allowed to exceed the size of
their site area.
56


Evans Station Area Plan The Community
Zone Districts
I |B-1
I I b-2
1' I B4
C-MU-1D
C-MU-30
I |m
HU"
I l<-2
I I o-i
I I p-i
n PUD
I I B-1
I I R-2
13
LightraM Station
Existing Ughtrail
Railroad
+ ^ Station Butter
^ $ f.-W and 1/2 iWe
Residential Districts
R-l Single Unit Detached Dwellings District. This resi-
dential zone district is a low density residential district that
accommodates single family homes and certain limited ancil-
lary uses. The current required minimum lot size is 6,000
square feet, which translates to a gross density of 7-3 dwelling
units per acre. As shown on the Zoning Map, all of the R-l
zoning is west of Santa Fe Drive.
R-2 Multi-Unit Dwellings, Moderate Density District.
This zone typically includes a mix of single-family, duplexes
and multi-family structures. The size of the parcel, parking
and other development regulations dictate the number of al-
lowable units. The required minimum lot size is 6,000 square
feet for each duplex structure with an additional 3,000
square feet required for each additional unit. This yields a
maximum density of approximately 14.5 units per acre for
the R-2 district.
Industrial Districts
1-0 Light Industrial/Office Zone District: This zone is in-
tended to be an employment area containing offices and light
industrial uses that are compatible with residential uses. Gen-
erally, an 1-0 area serves as a buffer between a residential area
and a more intensive industrial area. Development in this
district is guided by bulk, setback, and landscaping standards.
1-1 General Industrial District: This zone is an employment
area containing industrial uses that are more intensive than
those in the 1-0 zone. Development in this district is guided
by bulk, setback, and landscaping standards. Building floor
areas are not allowed to exceed twice the size of the site area.
Some uses allowed in this district are conditional uses.
Other Districts
0-1 Open Space District This zone allows airports,
recreation uses, parks, cemeteries, reservoirs, community
correctional facilities, and other public and semi-public uses
housed in buildings. Setback requirements apply to the loca-
tion of structures.
57


Evans Station Area Plan The Community
P-1 Off-Street Parking District: This district allows only
parking lots and structures with bulk and setback regulations
applying to structures. This zone allows business parking with-
out the expansion of the business zone. There are requirements
for visual screening when adjacent to residential uses.
PUD Planned Unit Development District: The PUD
district is an alternative to conventional land use regulations,
combining use, density and site plan considerations into a
single process. The PUD district is specifically intended to
encourage diversification in the use of land and flexibility in
site design with respect to spacing, heights and setbacks of
buildings, densities, open space and circulation elements; in-
novation in residential development that results in the avail-
ability of adequate housing opportunities for varying income
levels; more efficient use of land and energy through smaller
utility and circulation networks; pedestrian considerations;
and development patterns in harmony with nearby areas and
with the goals and objectives of the comprehensive plan for
the city.
Figure 27. View Plane Ordinances
View Planes
In designated areas, limitations on construction are instituted
in order to preserve panoramic mountain views in various
parks and public places. Two such view plane ordinances af-
fect the Evans Station Area. The Washington Park View Plane
originates out ofWashington Park and the State Home Park
View Plane originates in Harvard Gulch Park. In these view
planes, structures cannot exceed heights relative to reference
points as shown on the View Plane Map.
+ Points in Washington Park View Pane
1 | Stale Home Park View Plane
| I VYadiington Park View Flane
Parks/Open Space/Golt
|jjjj Lighrail Staton
Existing Lightrail
Railroad
+ Station Buffer
^ / i/4ar\ 58


Evans Station Area Plan The Community
'/// Arwjis ol Chfinflij
Blueprint Denver
Concept Land Use (2002)
Tran&iL Orienled DevelufMient
Mixed Use
Single Family Dupta
Single Family Residential
Employment
Industtul
Park
r^pi GulfCuiiistr
Ughhaii station
Exl&leig LigNiAil
i Railroad
. ^ Station Butfei
Figure 28. Blueprint Denver Concept Land Use
/J/// Areas ot Change
Blueprint Denver
Concept Land Use (2002)
Transit Oriented Development
Mixed Use
Sngte Family Duplex
Sngle Family Residential
Employment
IncliiKlrtil
Park
Golf Courw

LighEiai Slalnn
Existing lighlraril
Rairoed
# ^ Station BuHei
+ 9 ), Blueprint Denver Land Uses
Blueprint Denver designates the Evans Station as a transit
oriented development Area of Change. The area immediately
surrounding the station as well as the industrial land adjacent
to the Platte River are identified as having redevelopment
potential. The commercial corridor along South Broadway
Boulevard is recommended for mixed-use development with
pedestrian focused activities at key intersections. The major
intersection at Evans Street and South Broadway Boulevard,
located within the Evans Station Area, will be a key node in
the transit oriented development.
Blueprint Denver identifies several objectives for the transit ori-
ented development areas surrounding light rail transit stations:
A balance of mixed uses
Compact mid- to high-density development
Reduced emphasis on auto parking
Attractive multi-story buildings
A variety of housing types and prices
Access to open space and recreation amenities
A high degree of connectivity between the station area
and surrounding neighborhoods
The Evans Station transit oriented development will embody
these objectives as the station links multi-modal transit ele-
ments with existing and developing residential and commer-
cial elements in this Area of Change.
59


Evans Station Area Plan The Community
Transportation
Light Rail Ridership
In 2007, Evans Station ranked 19 out of 34 stations in terms
of ridership, with an average of 1,911 boardings and alight-
ings per weekday. Tucked away underneath the Evans bridge,
few signs point drivers or pedestrians to the station, and ac-
cess by car, bike and foot is not intuitive or easy
According to RTD, modes of transportation used to access
light rail stations on the southwest corridor are essentially
split three ways between driving alone, bus transfer and walk-
ing. The percentage of riders accessing the station by foot is
on the rise, while a smaller portion of riders are driving alone
to the station than when the southwest line was first built.
SW Corridor
Access Mode 2001 2006
Drove alone 48% 35%
RTD bus 29% 29%
Walked 12% 28%
Carpooled 7% -
Bicycle 2% 3%
call-n-Ride n/a -
Dropped off n/a 5%
Other 2% -
Source: RTD Transit Access Guidelines, 2009
Vehicular Access Broadway and Evans are major arterials
that each support over 15,000 cars per day, with 1,000 to
1,500 cars during peak commuting hours in any given direc-
tion. Vehicles access the Evans park-n-ride from Delaware
just south of the Evans bridge. They can reach Delaware
either off the west bound Evans Bridge ramp or by driving
through the existing residential or industrial areas north or
south of Evans. The Evans park-n-ride has a capacity of 99
spaces in a surface lot and is at 97% utilization rate. RTD
plans on building no additional parking at Evans Station.
Businesses along Delaware and some residents complain
about overflow parking in the neighborhood. Maximum
walking distance from Evans Station parking is 700 feet, which
is well within RTD s design criteria.
Pedestrian Access Factors that contribute to walkability
of a station area include a continuous network of streets and
sidewalks, pedestrian safety and security, mixture of land
uses, residential density, and pedestrian lighting. The street
network on the east side of the Evans Station area is a con-
sistent grid pattern, broken only in a couple of places by the
Evans bridge. Other than at the station itself, sidewalks are
either nonexistent or substandard. There is no direct line of
site between Broadway and the station.
The grid pattern is cut off at Santa Fe, resulting in a major
constraint for pedestrians trying to access the station from
the east side of Santa Fe. The only option is for pedestrians
to walk over the Evans bridge which has substandard side-
walks and many pedestrian/auto conflicts at the crossings of
access ramps on/off Santa Fe.
Bus Access Over 20% of transit riders boarding at Evans
Station accessed the station by bus. The bus stop is located
along a sidewalk that emerges directly north of the ticket ki-
osks and station waiting area. It provides a bench for waiting
pedestrians, and but no shelter other than the Evans bridge
overhead. The bus stop is well integrated into the light rail
station by an art display highlighting the history of the area;
it contiguously spans the sidewalk connecting the stop to the
station and park-n-ride.
Two bus routes make stops at the Evans Station: Route 21
and Route 51L. During peak weekday hours, Route 21 bus-
ses run every 15 minutes, and at night this frequency drops
to every 60 minutes. It enters the station area from the west
along Evans Avenue. It turns north onto Bannock and then
loops back to the transit station via Asbury and then Dela-
ware. The bus stops on Delaware under the Evans Bridge
and then heads east again along Evans via an on-ramp from
Delaware. This route complies with RTDs access design
E , _ *
Sidewalks throughout the station area are inexistent, inconsistent or
sub-standard.
60


Evans Station Area Plan The Community
9 Bus Stop
RTD Limited Bus Route
RTD Local Bus Route
Existing Bike Route
Proposed Bike Route
Bike Trail (Off Street)
Green Streets
Enhanced Transit Corridors

Parks/Qpen Space/Golf
Ugh trail Station
Existing Lightrail
i Railroad
0 ^ Station Buffer
^ / 1/4 and 1/2 Mif9
Evans Station Bus Service 2008
Source: RTD 2008 August 08 Runboard
Route Weekday Peak Frequency Average Daily Load 2008
21 15 min 1,026
51L 30 min 8
0 15 min 1,302
0L 30 min 232
guidelines and standards, which recommends an on-street
configuration where practicable. The 51L busses make two
trips in the morning and three trips in the evening on week-
days about 30 minutes apart. On average, 1,071 passengers
board and alight daily at the Evans Station bus stop.
Two more bus routes serve the station area but do not stop at
Evans Station. Route 0 and Route 0L make stops at the inter-
section of Broadway Boulevard and Evans Avenue, the closest
bus stop on Broadway to the station. During peak weekday
hours, Route 0 busses run every 15 minutes, and at night the
frequency drops to every 30 minutes. Route 0L runs every 30
minutes only during peak weekday hours. On average, 350
passengers board and alight daily at this intersection.
Bicycle Access Nearby Denver bicycle routes include D-7
along the South Platte River, D-20 along Iliff Avenue, and
D-9 along Sherman Street, but it is difficult to access any of
these from the station due to lack of connectivity and bicycle
infrastructure. The Denver Bicycle Master Plan Update (2001)
recommends a future connection between D-20 and D-7 by
building an overpass aligned with Iliff Avenue across the rail-
road and Santa Fe Drive. Bicycle infrastructure at the station
includes two bicycle lockers at the platform which hold two
bicycles each and one U bicycle rack.
61


Evans Station Area Plan The Community
62


Evans Station Area Plan Public Engagement
63


Evans Station Area Plan Public Engagement
Public Engagement
The goal of the public outreach process was to provide fair,
open and effective engagement with the community in the
development of the plan for the Evans Station Area. Out-
reach objectives included:
Receive meaningful and useful input from residents and
community interests
Directly engage a broad representation of residents and
community interests by using several different methods
of community outreach
Ensure openness in communication of all aspects of the
plan and make relevant information freely available
Ensure fairness in consideration of all opinions and ideas
from community members and interest groups within
the context of City and regional objectives and the
framework of the planning process
Four public workshops and four focus group meetings were
held as part of the planning process. These interactive meet-
ings included a brief presentation on the planning process,
schedule, concepts and key issues followed by interactive and
often hands-on sessions aimed at soliciting feedback on plan
concepts. The public and focus group meetings occurred at
the following plan milestones:
Existing Conditions Analysis / Plan Visioning
Development of Alternative Concepts
Plan Recommendations and Implementation /
Residential Character Exercise
Draft Plan Review (scheduled for July 2009)
In addition, planning staff attended numerous meetings with
stakeholders throughout the process including registered
neighborhood associations and other interest groups. Public
meetings for related projects such as the South Broadway Re-
construction and the New Zoning Code were also attended
by Evans planning staff.
Outreach methods
City staff worked with City Council District 7 to ensure
members of the public were notified and kept informed
throughout the planning process. An initial mailing went
out in November 2007 to all residential, commercial and
industrial property owners within Vi mile of the Evans Sta-
tion to notify them of the planning process. RNOs were
also notified at this time. The planning staff reached out to
businesses and major employers in the area with phone calls
and individual meetings. Public meeting announcements
were posted in City Council District 7 newsletters, the Wash-
ington Park Profile and the Denver Post. Public meeting
presentations and summaries were posted online and sent to
stakeholders, including RNO leaders to keep their members
informed.
Public Meetings
Evans Public Workshop #1 Strengths, Weaknesses,
Opportunities and Threats; Visioning. January 24,
2008. John Collins Church. 100 attendees.
Evans Focus Group #1 Visioning and Alternatives
Analysis. March 19, 2008. John Collins Church.
25 attendees.
Evans Public Workshop #2 Alternatives Analysis.
May 6, 2008. John Collins Church. 70 attendees.
Evans Focus Group #2 Draft Plan Concepts /
Residential Character. September 30, 2008.
Burton Showroom. 25 attendees.
Evans Focus Group #3 Residential Character Exercise.
October 16, 2008. John Collins Church. 25 attendees.
Evans Public Workshop #3 Plan Recommendations /
Residential Character Exercise. November 13, 2008.
50 attendees.
Evans Public Meeting #4 Draft Plan Review.
July 23, 2009. John Collins Church. 30 attendees.
Evans Focus Group #4 Draft Plan Comments Review.
July 30, 2009. John Collins Church. 25 attendees.
64


Evans Station Area Plan Public Engagement
Additional Group Meetings and Presentations
Platt Park Neighborhood Association
West University Community Association
Ruby Hill Neighborhood Association
Godsman Neighborhood Association
South Broadway Reconstruction Public Meeting
Wesley to Yale
South Broadway Reconstruction Public Meeting Iowa
to Wesley
New Code District 7 Neighborhood Meeting
Platt Park #1
New Code District 7 Neighborhood Meeting
Platt Park #2
New Code District 7 Neighborhood Meeting
Rosedale #1
New Code District 7 Neighborhood Meeting
Rosedale #2
New Code District 7 Neighborhood Meeting
Overland
Steering Committee Members
Catherine Sandy, resident, property owner, business owner
John Damiano, property and business owner
Kevin Dickson, property owner
Dominique Cook, business and property owner
Jerry Dokken, business and property owner
Ray Ehrenstein, resident and property owner
Belin Fieldson, resident and property owner
Mike Hastings, business and property owner
JC Helmstaedter, business and property owner
Jack Hopkins, business and property owner
Richard Chapman, property owner
Eric Jacobson, resident and property owner
Kat Lovato, resident and property owner
JP Malik, resident and property owner
Vicki Pearson, resident and property owner
Jennifer Pollack, resident and property owner
Jennifer Tomeny, resident and property owner
New Code District 7 Neighborhood Meeting
College View
65


Evans Station Area Plan Public Engagement
66


Evans Station Area Plan Relevant Plans
67


Evans Station Area Plan Relevant Plans
Relevant Plans
The Evans Station Area Plan builds upon a solid foundation
of existing documents and guiding principles. This section
provides a review of the applicable content of adopted city-
wide plans. The Evans Station Area Plan provides specific rec-
ommendations for the planning area that, in case of conflict,
supersede general recommendations from existing plans
Comprehensive Plan, 2000
The City Council adopted Denver Comprehensive Plan in
2000. Plan 2000 provides the planning and policy frame-
work for development of Denvers human and physical en-
vironment. The key subjects of Plan 2000 that relate to this
Station Plan are land use, mobility, legacies, and housing.
Land Use: Land use recommendations promote new invest-
ment that accommodates new residents, improves economic
vitality and enhances the citys aesthetics and livability. In ad-
dition, Plan 2000 supports sustainable development patterns
by promoting walking, biking and transit use.
Mobility: Plan 2000 emphasizes planning for multiple
modes of transportation walking, biking, transit and cars.
Key concepts include expanding mobility choices for com-
muters and regional cooperation in transit system planning.
Plan 2000 also promotes compact, mixed-use development
in transit rich places (like station areas).
Legacies: Plan 2000 prioritizes planning for park, open space
and recreation systems. Historic building preservation and
respect for traditional patterns of development in established
areas are also key tenets of Plan 2000. To this end, Plan
2000 places a high value on maintenance of streets, trails,
and parkways that link destinations within the community.
Ensuring that new buildings, infrastructure and open spaces
create attractive, beauti- fill places is the foundation of the
legacies chapter.
Housing: Plan 2000 recognizes that access to housing is a ba-
sic need for Denver citizens. Thus, Plan 2000 emphasizes pres-
ervation and maintenance of the existing housing stock and
expanding housing options. Providing a variety of unit types
and costs, in addition to housing development in transit rich
places are fundamental tenets of Plan 2000. This will ensure a
sustainable balance of jobs and housing as the city matures.
Blueprint Denver: An Integrated Land Use and
Transportation Plan, 2002
Plan 2000 recommended that the city create a plan to inte-
grate land use and transportation planning. Blueprint Denver
is the implementation plan that recognizes this relationship
and describes the building blocks and tools necessary to
achieve the vision outlined in Plan 2000.
Areas of Change and Stability: Blueprint Denver divides the
city into areas of change and areas of stability. Over time,
all areas of the city will fluctuate between change and stabil-
ity. The goal for areas of stability is to identify and maintain
the character of an area while accommodating new develop-
ment and redevelopment. The goal for areas of change is
to channel growth where it will be beneficial and can best
improve access to jobs, housing and services. Blueprint Denver
describes two types of areas of stability: committed areas
and reinvestment areas. Committed areas are stable neigh-
borhoods that may benefit from the stabilizing effects of
small, individual lot infill development rather than large-scale
land assembly and redevelopment. Reinvestment areas are
neighborhoods with a character that is desirable to maintain
but would benefit from reinvestment and modest infill. This
reinvestment, however, is more limited in comparison to that
of areas of change.
Transportation: The transportation component of Blueprint
Denver provides transportation building blocks and tools that
promote multimodal and intermodal connections. Elements
of connection include the street system, bus transit system,
bicycle system, and pedestrian system. These components
must work together to realize the guiding principles of Blue-
print Denver.
New Zoning Code (in development)
Denver citizens called for reform of the Citys Zoning Code
in the 1989 Comprehensive Plan and again in the Denver Com-
prehensive Plan 2000. Blueprint Denver (2002) provided the
vision and initial strategy to begin this effort.
The current zoning code was established in the 1950s and as-
sumes an automobile oriented land use development pattern.
Further, the complexity of the current zoning code makes it
difficult for property owners to easily identify what is allowed
to be built on a given property. That complexity can make
doing quality development more difficult and raises the cost
68


Evans Station Area Plan Relevant Plans
of doing business in Denver by requiring lengthy study of
our unique and cumbersome zoning code.
As the Evans plan is adopted, Denver is on the verge of
adopting a new Zoning Code. The New Code will better
reflect the vision of Blueprint Denver by promoting proper
development in areas of change while enhancing neighbor-
hood character in areas of stability. Regulatory recomen-
dations in the Evans Plan are informed by New Code drafts
and are made with the intent of being implemented under
the New Code.
Transit Oriented Development Strategic Plan, 2006
The Transit Oriented Development (TOD) Strategic Plan
prioritizes the citys planning and implementation efforts
related to the transit system and station area development.
TOD Defined: The TOD Strategic Plan defines TOD as de-
velopment near transit that creates beautiful, vital, walkable
neighborhoods; provides housing, shopping, and transporta-
tion choices; generates lasting value; and provides access to
the region via transit.
TOD Typologies: The TOD Strategic Plan establishes TOD
typologies for every transit station in the city. Typologies es-
tablish a framework to distinguish the types of places linked
by the transit system. The typologies frame expectations
about the land use mix and intensity of development at each
of the stations.
Station Area Planning: While providing an important
planning framework, the TOD Strategic Plan calls for more
detailed station area plans. Such plans offer specific direction
for appropriate development, needed infrastructure invest-
ments and economic development strategies.
Strategic Transportation Plan, 2008
Denver Public Works drafted the Strategic Transportation
Plan (STP). The STP is a primary implementation tool for
Blueprint Denver and Plan 2000. The objective of the STP
is to determine needed transportation investments. The STP
process will (1) provide education concerning options for
transportation alternatives; (2) reach consensus on transpor-
tation strategies along transportation corridors through a
collaborative process; and (3) build stakeholder support.
The STP represents a new approach to transportation plan-
ning in Denver. Instead of forecasting future auto travel on
Denver streets, the STP forecasts person-trips to evaluate
the magnitude of transportation impacts caused by all types
of travel. This person-trip data provides the ability to plan
for bikes, pedestrians, transit, and street improvements. The
STP is the first step in identifying the needs for every major
travel corridor in the city. The STP creates concepts for how
to meet transportation needs, including a prioritization of
corridor improvements.
Greenprint Denver Plan, 2006
Greenprint Denver is an effort to fully integrate sustainability
as a core value and operating principle in Denver city govern-
ment. The Greenprint Denver Action Agenda for 2006 charts
the citys course over the next five. Included in Greenprint
Denver Action Agenda are specific actions that relate directly
to the Citys ambitious station area planning effort. For
example, this plan directs the City to decrease reliance on au-
tomobiles through public transit use and access, and promote
transit-oriented development, as well as bike and pedestrian
enhancements, and increase by 20% the new development
located within Vi mile of existing transit stations by 2011.
Greenprint Denver Climate Action Plan, 2008
The Greenprint Denver Climate Action Plan prepares Den-
ver to take decisive steps toward reducing local contributions
to greenhouse gas emissions. It analyzes Denvers carbon
footprint, including an inventory from three main sectors: 1)
Transportation, 2) Residential-Commercial-Industrial Energy
Use, and 3) Use of Key Urban Materials. The Plan sets forth
a 25% emissions reduction target essentially below 1990
emissions levels by 2020. Climate action strategies toward
achieving this goal include supporting population growth
around transit and supporting more pedestrian-, bicycle-,
and transit-friendly neighborhoods that will reduce the de-
mand for motorized personal transport.
69


Evans Station Area Plan Relevant Plans
Pedestrian Master Plan, 2004
The Pedestrian Master Plan serves as a framework for imple-
mentation of city policies that place an emphasis on pedestri-
an mobility in planning. The plan considers safety, accessibil-
ity, education, connectivity, streetscape, land use, and public
health as it relates to the creation of a citywide pedestrian
circulation system. Plan 2000 and Blueprint Denver recom-
mended preparation of this plan. The plan establishes street
classifications for the pedestrian network to highlight routes
that require greater emphasis on the pedestrian.
Parks and Recreation Game Plan, 2002
The Game Plan is a master plan for the citys park, open
space and recreation system. A primary principle is to cre-
ate greener neighborhoods. Game Plan establishes a street
tree and tree canopy goal of 15-18% for the entire city. The
plan also establishes a parkland acreage target of 8-10 acres
per 1,000 residents. Tools to accomplish these goals include
promoting green streets and parkways, which indicate routes
that require greater emphasis and additions to the landscape.
Storm Drainage Master Plan (2005) and Sanitary Sewer
Master Plan (2006)
The Storm Drainage Master Plan and the Sanitary Sewer
Master Plan evaluates adequacy of the existing systems as-
suming the future land uses identified in Blueprint Denver.
The Storm Drainage Master Plan determines the amount
of imperviousness resulting from future land development
and the subsequent runoff. The Sanitary Sewer Master Plan
identifies needed sanitary sewer improvements to respond to
the forecasted development.
Shattuck District Plan, 2002
Funded through an EPA Superfund Redevelopment Initiative
Pilot grant, the Shattuck District Plan describes three rede-
velopment scenarios for the Shattuck Site (former Superfund
site at Jewell and Cherokee) and neighboring industrial prop-
erties. Redevelopment scenarios included light-industrial,
multi-tenant industrial-flex, and residential industrial lofts.
The Multi-tenant Industrial-flex scenario (a hybrid commer-
cial real estate product that features complementary aspects
of industrial and office space) would result in the greatest
economic benefit to the city, according to the Plan. The
Residential Industrial Lofts (live-work spaces) would, how-
ever, best meet the steering committees goals of improving
the social and economic welfare of the community. Jewell
Avenue west of Broadway is envisioned as supporting com-
mercial store-front buildings with retail on the first floor and
residential units above and then transitioning into live/work
units along Jewell and the southern portion of the Shattuck
Site. North of Jewell, the Plan envisions the Shattuck site
supporting light industrial or industrial-flex space.
S. Broadway Corridor Study, 2001
The South Broadway Corridor examined the existing condi-
tions on South Broadway and created a vision for the cor-
ridors future primarily in terms of transportation and urban
design of the street and public right-of-way. The Study rec-
ommends a Kit of Parts including urban design elements
that can be used in various combinations along the corridor.
Specific recommendations are made within Urban Design
Zones along South Broadway. The South Broadway Recon-
struction Project, in design during the Evans station planning
process, will implement the South Broadway Corridor Study
through complete roadway and sidewalk reconstruction using
concrete pavement, drainage improvements, realignment and
reprofiling where necessary, new curb, gutter, sidewalk, and
ADA compliant pedestrian ramps, a raised median and new
storm sewer.
Industrial Land Study, 2005
The findings of Denvers Industrial Land Study indicate
relatively little demand for industrial land in the City and a
considerable amount of industrially-zoned land that is vacant
or underutilized. According to the study, the employment
density of industrially zoned land in the city was estimated at
approximately 11.7 employees per acre. This pales in compari-
son to the 55 employees per acre in the Denver Tech Center
and 73.2 employees per acre in the Cherry Creek area. Given
the imbalance between industrial land supply and demand
and the market trends for industrial businesses, this study
concluded that there is little concern about the recent pattern
of rezoning industrial land north of downtown to residential
zoning districts, and only slight concern about rezoning land
south of downtown from industrial to other uses. The Ev-
ans Station Area Plan addresses this reality by supporting the
transformation of vacant and underutilized industrial land over
time to allow more flexibility in land use and a more urban
form. Compatible industrial uses are included in the recom-
mended mix in redevelopment areas.
70


Evans Station Area Plan Acronyms
/
71


Evans Station Area Plan Acronyms
Acronyms
ADA Americans with Disabilities Act (1990)
AIA American Institute of Architects
AVR Average Vehicle Ridership
BID Business Improvement District
CBD Central Business District
CBO Community Based organizations
CCD City and County of Denver
CDBG Community Development Block Grant
CDC Community Development Corporation
CDFI Community Development Financial Institution
CDOT Colorado Department ofTransportation
CFdFA Colorado Flousing Finance Agency
CIP Capital Improvements Plan (or Program)
COP Shop Community Organized Policing
CPD Community Planning & Development
DFdA Denver Flousing Authority
DFdND Division of Flousing and Neighborhood Develop-
ment
DOCA Denver Office of Cultural Affairs
DPD Denver Police Department
DPR Parks & Recreation
DPS Denver Public Schools
DPW Public Works
DRCOG Denver Council of Regional Governments
DURA Denver Urban Renewal Authority
EMU Electric Motor Unit
EPA Environmental Protection Agency
FAR Floor Area Ratio
FFiA Federal Fiousing Administration
LEED Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design
LRT Light Rail Technology
MBD Micro business Development
MC-Denver Making Connections Denver
NEPA National Environmental Policy Act
OED Office of Economic Development
OMB Office of Management and Budget
RAC Resident Advisory Committee
RNO Registered Neighborhood Organization
RTD Regional Transportation District
TAZ Traffic Analysis Zone
TIF Tax Increment Financing
TIP Transportation Improvement Program
TDM Transportation Demand Management
TOD Transit Oriented Development
72


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Evans Station Area Plan Executive Summaryi Community Planning & DevelopmentApproved August 19, 2009 EvansStation Area Plan

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Evans Station Area Plan Executive Summary ii

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Evans Station Area Plan Executive SummaryiiiTable of ContentsAcknowledgements ................................................................................................................................................... v Ex ecutive Summary ................................................................................................................................................. vii I ntroduction .................................................................................................................................................................... 1 V ision & Goals ................................................................................................................................................................. 7 Land Use and Ur ban Design...............................................................................................................................11 Mobility & Infrastructure ....................................................................................................................................... 29 E conomic Opportunity .......................................................................................................................................... 39 I mplementation ......................................................................................................................................................... 43 T he Community ......................................................................................................................................................... 49 P ublic Engagement..................................................................................................................................................63 Relevant Plans .............................................................................................................................................................. 67 A cronyms ........................................................................................................................................................................ 71 Figures, Maps & ChartsFigure 1. Southwest Light Rail Corridor Map ............................................................................................2 F igure 2. Transit System Map ...............................................................................................................................3 F igure 3. Evans Station Area.................................................................................................................................3 Figure 4. Land Use Plan.........................................................................................................................................13 Figure 5. Comprehensive Open Space Plan ............................................................................................19 F igure 6 Active Edges and Ground Floor Commercial Plan ........................................................23 F igure 7. Building Heights Plan ........................................................................................................................25 F igure 8. Transit and Automobile Circulation Plan ..............................................................................31 F igure 9. Proposed Cross Section for South Delaware ......................................................................32 F igure 10. Proposed Typical Broadway Section at Left Turn Lane ..............................................32 F igure 11. Proposed Cross Section for Jewell .........................................................................................33 F igure 12. Pedestrian Circulation Plan .........................................................................................................35 F igure 13. Bicycle Circulation Plan .................................................................................................................37 F igure 14. Aerial Image ......................................................................................................................................... 50 F igure 15. Existing Light Rail ..............................................................................................................................51 F igure 16. Population and Housing ..............................................................................................................52 F igure 17. Neighborhoood Population ......................................................................................................52 F igure 18. Household Income ..........................................................................................................................52 F igure 19. Neighborhood Race and Ethnicity ........................................................................................53 F igure 20. Births by Ethnicity .............................................................................................................................53 F igure 21. Housing Distribution by Type ...................................................................................................53 F igure 22. Age Distribution ................................................................................................................................ 53 F igure 23. Harvard Gulch and South Platte River Flood Plains. ....................................................54 F igure 24. Existing Land Use ..............................................................................................................................55 F igure 25. Existing Land Use Distribution ...................................................................................................56 F igure 26. Existing Zoning .................................................................................................................................. 57 F igure 27. View Plane Ordinances ..................................................................................................................58 F igure 28. Blueprint Denver Concept Land Use ....................................................................................59 F igure 29. Existing Transit Service ..................................................................................................................61

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Evans Station Area Plan Executive Summary iv Acknowledgements

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Evans Station Area Plan Acknowledgementsv Acknowledgements

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Evans Station Area Plan Acknowledgements viAcknowledgementsMayor John W. Hickenlooper Denver City Council District 1 Rick Garcia District 2 Jeanne Faatz District 3 Paul D. Lpez District 4 Peggy Lehmann District 5 Marcia Johnson District 6 Charlie Brown District 7 Chris Nevitt District 8 Carla Madison District 9 Judy Montero District 10 Jeanne Robb President District 11 Michael Hancock At-Large Carol Boigon At-Large Doug Linkhart Community Planning & Development Peter J. Park, AICP, Manager Steve Gordon, Comprehensive Planning Manager Barbara Frommell, Project Manager Caryn Wenzara, AICP Chris Gleissner Steve Nalley Kristin Krasnove, AICP Tom Hoaglund, AICP Michelle Pyle Eric McClelland Andrea Santoro Jim Ottenstein Carolyne Janssen Denver Planning Board Brad Buchanan, Chairman Laura E. Aldrete Richard Delanoy Shannon Giord Kenneth Ho Anna Jones Judith Martinez Sharon Nunnally Karen Perez Jerey Walker Dave Webster Public Works Guillermo Bill Vidal, Manager Crissy Fanganello, AICP, Manager, Planning and Policy Karen Good, AICP, Planning and Policy Jennifer Hillhouse, Planning and Policy Eric Osmundsen, Development Engineering Services Kim Blair, Development Engineering Services Justin Schmitz, Trac Engineering Services Frank Kemme, CMP Mike Anderson Dennis Ohlrogge Parks & Recreation Scott Robson, Deputy Manager Gordon Robertson, Planning Director David Marquardt Jill Wuertz Dick Gannon Oce of Economic Development Andre Pettigrew, Executive Director Cec Ortiz, Deputy Director Terrence Ware Tim Martinez Will Kralovec Department of Cultural Aairs Ginger White Brunetti Regional Transportation District Bill Sirois, TOD Program Manager Denver Urban Renewal Authority Consultant Team PB Placemaking Fehr & Peers Nelson\Nygaard Basile Baumann Prost Cole & Associates ArLand LandUse Economics Community Stakeholders Councilman Chris Nevitt, District 7 Jennifer Redies, District 7 Legislative Aide Valerie Kerns, District 7 Legislative Aide Evans Station Area Plan Steering Committee (see page 64) Overland Neighborhood Association Platt Park Peoples Association Platt Park Residents Coalition West University Community Association Rosedale Neighborhood Asssociation

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Evans Station Area Plan Executive Summaryvii Executive Summary

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Evans Station Area Plan Executive Summary viiiIntroductionDenvers commitment to investing in an expansive and comprehensive transit system is a source of pride and excitement for the region and an opportunity for reinvestment in neighborhoods that have access to light rail. A result of an 18 month public process, this plan documents the unique qualities of and opportunities near the Evans light rail station in several ways: A long-term vision for the station ar ea and set of o verarching goals Clear recommendations on land use and urban design, m obility and infrastructure, and economic opportunities Implementation strategies necessary for achieving the plan r ecommendations and the communitys vision Evans Station Area

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Evans Station Area Plan Executive SummaryixEvans is a neighborhood walk-up station with a small parkand-Ride located near the intersection of South Santa Fe Drive and Evans Avenue. Access to the station is on Delaware Street. Built in 2000 during the construction of RTDs southwest light rail corridor, Evans Station is the rst stop in Denver as the train heads north into the city from Englewood. Broadway station and the Gates redevelopment site are located two miles to the north of Evans. The Purpose of the Plan e Evans Station Area Plan will be used to guide decisions regarding appropriate public and private investment within 1/2 mile of the Evans light rail station. e Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000 Blueprint Denver and other citywide plans including the Strategic Transportation Plan (STP) and Parks and Recreation Game Plan act as a starting point for recommendations contained in this Plan. With a thorough and up-to-date analysis focused on the Evans Station neighborhoods, this Plan serves to supplement the Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000 and updates Blueprint Denver within this planning area. The Vision Transit-oriented development (TOD) creates vibrant, sustainable communities with a diverse mix of land uses at various densities within a 10-minute walk, or about a half-mile, of a transit station. e vision statement for the Evans Station Area uses fundamental principles of TOD as a foundation and will contribute to Denvers success in implementing the 2006 Transit-Oriented Development Strategic Plan: Enhance the Evans Station areas sense of place by creating a vibrant and sustainable urban neighborhood that encourages people to live and work; invites businesses to thrive; allows people to comfortably walk, bike, or use transit to access local services and attractions; and maintains the residential character of the surrounding community. A core set of goals set forth in this Plan for the Evans Station Area suggest how this vision of TOD might be achieved: Bring most activities of daily living within walking distance b y encouraging a mixture of land uses. Improve streets and streetscapes to increase mobil ity choice pr oviding walkable and bikeable connectivity thr oughout the area. Encourage reinvestment and redevelopment of industrial ar eas while maintaining and creating diverse emplo yment opportunities. Maintain the residential character of surrounding communities and encourage dev elopment of a full range of housing types and housing price points. Use urban design to respect the scale and character of an U rban Neighborhood as dened in the TOD S trategic Plan. Celebrate the ar eas history, ties to the South Platte River and access to open space and r ecreation opportunities. Encourage environmentally sustainable or green building constr uction and the use of quality materials to cr eate buildings of lasting value. The Evans Station Area Plan supplements Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000, updates Blueprint Denver and uses these adopted policies plus those expressed in the Transit Oriented Development Strategic Plan as a starting point.

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Evans Station Area Plan Executive Summary x The Plan: Land Use and Urban Design e land use recommendations in this Plan seek to reinforce the vision for the Evans Station Area. ey update and rene the recommendations made for this neighborhood in Blueprint Denver based on a current and detailed analysis of opportunities, strengths and challenges in this neighborhood. Key Land Use and Urban Design recommendations include: Diversify land uses on Delaware Encourage Delaware Street to evolve from an industrial area to a walkable and bikeable mixed-use street supporting creative industries as well as commercial and residential uses. Create a main street on Broadway Facilitate the transformation of South Broadway from an automobile-dominated commercial corridor to a pedestrian-friendly main street supporting retail, residential and oce uses. Connect the station to Broadway Improve connections between Broadway and the station along Evans by encouraging higher intensity development along Evans and by designing a better pedestrian environment. Redevelop underutilized industrial areas Support the transformation of vacant and underutilized industrial properties north of Evans and west of Broadway into a new mixed-use, transit-oriented urban center with diverse housing opportunities. Respect character in existing neighborhoods Acknowledge the unique character in residential areas surrounding the Evans Station and maintain this character while supporting diverse housing types. Create a comprehensive open space system Provide access to existing regional open space with new east-west connections and create pockets of urban open space such as a plaza at the transit station. The Plan: Mobility and Infrastructure Mobility and infrastructure recommendations primarily address the need to make the station area more suitable for mixed-use, pedestrian oriented and bicycle friendly development. Key recommendations include: ree new east-west connections Creating improved bicycle/pedestrian connections across Santa Fe and the tracks at Evans, Jewell and Ili will reconnect the east and west sides of the Overland Park Neighborhood, provide access to the station and complete missing links to the South Platte River Greenway and Trail. Harvard Gulch improvements Investing in drainage improvements to Harvard Gulch to eectively remove the oodplain would facilitate redevelopment along Broadway, Delaware and north of Evans. Multi-modal streets Improvements to the public right-ofway (such as curb and gutter, detached sidewalks and street trees) throughout the station area are essential to achieving the plan vision. Priority streets for pedestrian and bicycle improvements include Evans, Broadway, Delaware, Jewell, Warren and Asbury. The Plan: Economic Opportunity A TOD market study revealed that the Evans Station has the capacity to absorb additional residential, oce and retail development. Obtaining nancing and/or funding for critical capital improvement projects and urban infrastructure elements is a key challenge in creating transit oriented development. Innovative strategies will be necessary. Key recommendations include: Special Assessment Districts Consider special assessment districts as part of the South Broadway reconstruction and for funding neighborhood improvements, amenities and public art to implement the communitys vision for improving neighborhood identity and creating unique and well utilized public spaces. Creative Industries Niche Take advantage of an existing niche market for music, art and design-related businesses already present in the station area and throughout South Denver. Neighborhood Marketplace Initiative Work with the Denver Oce of Economic Development and the Neighborhood Marketplace Initiative to develop market proles for South Broadway and the Evans Station area to call attention to the lifestyle, businesses and amenities available in this neighborhood. Public-Private Partnerships Pursue public-private partnerships and other innovative strategies for carrying out the recommendations in this plan for critical infrastructure projects and urban plazas/open spaces.

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Evans Station Area Plan Executive SummaryxiEvans Station Illustrative Plan Pasquinels Landing Park 1/2 mile1/4 mile Mixed-Use Main Street Mixed-Use Residential Urban Residential Single Family-Duplex Single Family Mixed-Use Employment Public / Quasi-Public Transit Plaza Priority Pedestrian / Bike Streetscape Improvements Secondary Pedestrian / Bike Streetscape Improvements Plaza/Pedestrian Bridge Potential Urban Garden Site Bicycle/Pedestrian BridgeTransit Parking Transit Station Station Tower/Vertical Pedestrian Connection SW Corridor LEGEND P POverland Golf Course Ruby Hill ParkGrant Frontier Park Harvard Gulch ParkRosedale Park Ili Ave.Delaware St. BroadwayS. Santa Fe Dr.Cherokee St. Bannock St. Acoma St. T South Platte River 0 400 800 1,200 200 FeetColorado Ave.Existing Parks T Huron St. Asbury Ave. Jewell Ave. Warren Ave. Wesley Ave. Fox St. Galapago St. De Evans Ave. Harvard Ave. Huron St.

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Evans Station Area Plan Executive Summary xii Pedestrian/Amenity Zone Pedestrian/Amenity Zone 20 68 20 14 14Travel / Parking Lane Travel / Parking Lane Delaware Street will transition from an industrial area to a street that supports creative industries, research and development, oce and residential uses. South Broadway will transform into a main street that invites a mixture of commercial and residential uses and a vibrant pedestrian environment. 17.5Sidewalk/Amenity Zone 17.5Sidewalk/Amenity Zone 13Travel Lane 13Travel Lane 12Travel Lane 11Travel Lane 12Turn Lane 4Median 100 R.O.W.

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Evans Station Area Plan Executive Summaryxiii Pedestrian/Amenity Zone Pedestrian/Amenity Zone Travel / Parking Lane Travel / Parking Lane 20 68 20 14 14Jewell Avenue will be an active, mixed-use street with ground oor commercial supported by residential or oce on upper oors. This arm o South Broadway will terminate with a bicycle/pedestrian bridge reaching west over S. Santa Fe Drive toward Overland Park Golf Course and the South Platte River Trail.Implementation and Next Steps e Evans Station Area Plan provides a framework for accomplishing the recommendations with a series of implementation strategies organized by timeframe and key responsibility. e most immediate step includes updating the Blueprint Denver Concept Land Use for the Evans Station Area to reect the policies adopted in this Plan. Adopting the New Zoning Code and rezoning property in the station area is critical to providing the regulatory framework necessary to implement the Plans land use and urban design recommendations. Another immediate step includes the scoping of infrastructure projects and the identication of potential funding sources to implement the infrastruture needed in the station area. ese infrastructure improvements should be pursued through public-private partnerships between the city, businesses, property owners and the development community as well as public-public partnerships between local, regional, state and federal agencies. Several projects will act as catalysts for transforming the station area: South Broadway and Evans Avenue reconstruction Pedestrian/bicycle feasibility study and improvements along E vans A mixed use residential development north of Evans along S outh Broadway or Jewell Pedestrian/Bicycle Bridge across South Santa Fe Drive, R TD light rail and the railroad tracks at Jewell Harvard Gulch improvements project Additional strategies are listed in the implementation section of this plan.

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Evans Station Area Plan Executive Summary xiv

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Evans Station Area Plan Introduction1 Introduction

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Evans Station Area Plan Introduction 2IntroductionOver the course of approximately 18 months community members near the Evans light rail Station worked with the citys station area planning team to articulate opportunities, address constraints, develop a vision and craft strategies to achieve the vision. ese community members represented businesses, property owners and residents in the area. e process involved collaboration between the City and County of Denvers Community Planning and Development Department (CPD), Department of Public Works (DPW), Oce of Economic Development (OED), Department of Parks and Recreation (DPR) as well as the Regional Transportation District (RTD). Regular public meetings and stakeholder work sessions shaped the plan concepts and recommendations. Briengs with City Council and Denver Planning Board occured at critical plan milestones. Inter-agency city sta provided essential technical input throughout the process. Additional details regarding the planning process can be found in the Public Engagement section of this plan.Evans Station Area ContextLocation Within the Transit Corridor and System Evans Station is the rst stop in Denver on the southwest light rail corridor as you head north into the Central Business District from Englewood. Built in 2000, Evans Station is framed by Broadway Station to the north, where the Southwest and Southeast light rail corridors converge, and Englewood Station to the south (Figure 1). Evans is one of the Denver regions existing 34 light rail stations, which includes a total of 6 transit lines equating to 35 miles of track (Figure 2). e RTD FasTracks program, approved by voters in 2004, will expand the existing system with an unprecedented transit investment including 122 miles of new rail, more than 50 new transit stations and 18 Figure 1. Southwest Light Rail Corridor Map

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Evans Station Area Plan Introduction3 The Evans Avenue bridge frames the downtown skyline as it spans over the Evans light rail station and South Delaware St. Figure 2. Transit System Map Figure 3. Evans Station Area

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Evans Station Area Plan Introduction 4 miles of bus rapid transit (BRT). Integrating several transit modes and other programs into a comprehensive regionwide system, FasTracks will improve accessibility, quality of life and commuting times throughout the region. Neighborhood Context e Evans Station is located in the Overland statistical neighborhood. Access to Evans Station is on South Delaware Street, a small-scale commercial and industrial street just south of the Evans Avenue bridge over South Santa Fe Drive. e station area is dened as a half mile radius (approximately 10 minute walk) from the station (Figure 3). is boundary extends north to Colorado Avenue, south to Harvard Avenue, west to Lipan Street and east to Grant Street. e station area covers much of the Overland neighborhood and touches portions of Platt Park, Rosedale and College View/South Platte neighborhoods. e planning area is divided into quadrants by S. Santa Fe Drive, a highway operated by CDOT, and Evans Avenue, a major east-west arterial. e station area includes a mixture of light industrial and established residential neighborhoods as well as commercial uses along the South Broadway corridor, located four blocks east of the station. e South Platte River and associated greenway is a dominant natural and recreational feature on the west side of the station area. An overview of existing conditions within the planning area is included in e Community section of this plan. Planning Context Denvers adopted plans provided the basis for the Evans Station Area Plan and represent ocial policy adopted by elected representatives with public input. It is essential to ensure consistency with the goals, objectives and recommendations of these plans. An overview of all documents considered during this planning process is found in e Community section. e over-riding principles of these plans are: Promote urban inll and compact, mixed-use develop ment patterns that use r esources more eciently Oer housing choices for D envers diverse household types Create multi-modal streets that facilitate transpor tation choice Provide parks, schools and other civic uses that are safely accessible D envers Transit Oriented Development Strategic Plan denes the Evans Stations typology as Urban Neighborhood, a walkup station easily accessed by a medium-density neighborhood that provides a rich mix of housing and transportation choices in addition to locally serving retail. Market Context To identify, leverage, and maximize TOD opportunities, the city commissioned a TOD Economic Analysis and Market Study. e primary goal of the study was to provide the city with an assessment of TOD potential at the regional, corridor, and station area levels through analysis of shortand long-term demand (e.g. demand in 2015 and 2030). Conducted in coordination with station area planning eorts, the market study helped to better align station plans with market The Evans Station neighborhood context includes (from left to right) industrial/commercial uses, established residential areas, the South Platte River greenway and the South Broadway commercial corridor.

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Evans Station Area Plan Introduction5realities and dynamics. e overall objectives of the TOD Economic Analysis and Market Study were to forge a better understanding of the economic context in which the city may plan for TOD, and to develop specic recommendations regarding the amount, type, mix, and intensity of uses appropriate for selected station areas. e study established key projections and ndings which provide a framework for economic opportunities in Denver: e build-out of F asTracks will create a comprehensive transit system and should place the r egion in a better competitiv e position to attract new growth compared to other r egions without full transit systems. e region should experience relatively high rates of household and emplo yment growth in the next 20 years. ere is a demonstrated market interest in higher intensity dev elopment. e City and County of D enver has taken a proactive r ole in planning for transit and other transit-supportive public policies. Current development activity near existing transit stations i n the region far exceeds DRCOG growth projections. Station areas are attracting (capturing) new development at a rate of 25%-40% depending on the dev elopment type (r esidential, retail, or oce).Purpose of the Planis Plan articulates a long-term vision which will be used to guide decisions regarding appropriate public and private investment within 1/2 mile of the Evans light rail station. e Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000, Blueprint Denver and other citywide plans including the Strategic Transportation Plan (STP), Pedestrian Master Plan, Bicycle Master Plan and Parks and Recreation Game Plan act as a starting point for recommendations contained in this Plan. Informed by an extensive public process and an analysis of current issues and opportunties, the Evans Station Area Plan supplements the Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000 and updates Blueprint Denver. is plan is not an ocial zoning map; it is a document created to guide decision-making. It does not create or deny any rights. Property owners, elected ocials, neighborhood organizations, and city departments will use the Evans Station Area Plan for many purposes. Primary uses throughout the life of the plan include: Neighborhood Resource: e plan documents the neighborhood s vision and a qualitative and quantita tiv e analysis of existing conditions for the planning ar ea in an easy-to-reference document. is resource can guide neighborhood activities o ver the coming y ears. Reinvestment Guidance: e plan guides public and priv ate decision-making and investment in the plan ning ar ea over the coming years as it relates to land use, urban design, mobility and economic dev elop ment. Zoning Amendments: e plan does not convey or deny any z oning entitlement but is an essential tool used b y the city to evaluate re-zoning applications. Capital Improvements: A plan can provide the justication for the allocation of funding fr om the city s capital improvement and maintenance program budgets. Funding and Partnership Opportunities: I mplementation of plans requires a collaborative eort betw een neighborhoods, businesses, elected ocials, city depar tments and neighboring jurisdictions. is plan identies par tnerships and suggests ways to lever age r esources to implement the communitys vision. Update to Citywide Plans: e station area plan will update existing citywide plans and will inform futur e citywide planning pr ocesses. Planning ProcessOver a course of 18 months, community members worked together with city sta and the station areas planning team to articulate the opportunities and constraints, vision and goals, and to craft strategies to achieve that vision. e community members involved with station area planning represented business owners, property owners and residents in the planning area and surrounding neighborhoods. e process involved collaboration between the City and County of Denver

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Evans Station Area Plan Introduction 6 City sta, residents, business owners and property owners within the Evans Station area will use this plan to guide decision-making about appropriate public and private investment in the community. and RTD. Regular public meetings shaped the contents of the plan. Concepts were reviewed by agency sta, the Denver Planning Board and City Council. e overall process included the following steps: Existing conditions analysis Identify opportunities and constraints Development of Plan Vision and Goals Develop and analyze alternative land use and mobility concepts Technical review of plan concepts Public review of plan concepts Development of preferred plan concepts Create a Draft Station Area Plan Technical Review of Draft Station Area Plan Public Review of Draft Station Area Plan Rene Plan Planning Board review and approval Plan adoption by City Council

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Evans Station Area Plan Vision and Goals7 Vision and Goals

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Evans Station Area Plan Vision and Goals 8Using TOD Principles as a FoundationDenver is poised to take a signicant leadership role in implementing its vision for transit oriented development as described in the TOD Strategic Plan. e unique qualities of the Evans Station area will substantially contribute to this eort. Each of Denvers station areas has a unique vision and set of goals, but all are grounded in the established TOD principles for the city of Denver. A mix of uses at various densities within walking distance of a transit station, TOD integrates transit into neighborhoods and creates lively and vital communities. e TOD Strategic Plan denes TOD in Denver and establishes strategies for implementation. In order to succeed, TOD should address these ve guiding principles: Place-making: Create safe, pleasant, varied and attractiv e station areas with a distinct identity. Rich Mix of Choices: Provide housing, employment, transpor tation and shopping choices for people of all ages, household types, incomes and lifestyles. Location Eciency: Place homes, jobs, shopping, enter tainment, parks and other amenities close to the station to pr omote walking, biking and transit use. Value Capture: Take full economic advantage of the amenities associated with enhanced transit ser vices. Portal to the Region: Understand and maximize the station s role as an entry point to the regional transit networ k and as a safe, pleasant and private place to live.TOD and SustainabilityDened by the Brundtland commission, sustainable development meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. TOD addresses the three Es of sustainability: environment, economy, and social equity and furthers the climate objectives set forth by Greenprint Denver. Environment Carbon monoxide emissions from mobile sources in urban areas can be as high as 90% of all emissions. While increases in automobile use far exceed population growth, TOD supports public transit and enables additional transportation choices. For every passenger mile traveled, public transportation is twice as ecient as private automobiles. Economy e average working American drives 396 hours each year, the equivalent of 10 workweeks. More than onefourth of this time is spent commuting to and from work. Transit-oriented and mixed-use development can convey substantial scal and economic benets for workers by making commutes shorter and more productive. In addition, businesses recognize that TOD encourages a variety of local employment opportunities, and helps attract new businesses and industries. Equity e cost of buying, maintaining, and operating vehicles is the largest source of personal debt after home mortgages. TOD oers a framework to build truly aordable communities. It does this through providing housing and transportation choices, urban green spaces, accessible recreational and cultural attractions, and mixed use neighborhoods accessible for all household types.Insert Image Housing and Transportation Choice Station areas should be safe, pleasant and attractive and should capture the value of having access to transit. Transit oriented development places homes, jobs, shopping, entertainment and parks within walking distance of transit stops.

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Evans Station Area Plan Vision and Goals9Evans Station Area Strengths, Opportunities and ChallengesTo successfully uphold the citys TOD principles and adopted policies, we must have a full understanding of the strengths, opportunities and challenges of the Evans Station area. Existing strengths, or assets, within the station area set the stage for the plans vision and add value to the station area. e primary strengths of the Evans Station area include: Surrounding residential areas (Overland, Rosedale, Platt P ark) are stable, vital neighborhoods Light rail and bus ser vice oers immediate transit access to D envers Central Business District (approximately 16 m inutes via light rail to 16th and California Station) and the metr o region Success of established South Broadway businesses and s upport from surrounding communities for Broadway to transform into a main str eet Existing environmental and recreation amenities of the S outh Platte River, South Platte River Trail and adjoin ing par k and greenway system Established emplo yment base from existing industrial and commer cial uses Unique employment/market niche includes prevalence of creative industries industrial arts (e.g. woodworking), music, r esearch and development, design/architecture Great views of downtown Denver and the mountains Emerging opportunities as listed below, create energy and excitement for the station area and present unprecedented resources and potential partnerships to evolve the built environment. Public investment has and will continue to benet the ar ea with the reconstruction of South Broadway, Asbur y Avenue drainage improvements and Ruby Hill M aster Plan implementation. Underutilized and vacant parcels have sparked the inter est of private investors, resulting in aggregation of pr operties and increased opportunities for large-scale re dev elopment within an industrial area that Blueprint D enver deems an Area of Change. A strong market for residential development along transit lines and a community that suppor ts a variety of housing types will translate into a supply of div erse housing options within the station ar ea. Extension and connections to the citys bike route system, especially acr oss major barriers such as S. S anta Fe Dr. Creating neighborhood identity through public spaces, destinations and good urban design Partnership opportunities with emerging business organizations D espite a strong foundation of signicant strengths and opportunities, challenges remain. e Evans Station Area Plan objectives and recommendations seek to overcome the following obstacles in particular: The Evans Avenue bridge frames views of downtown. Music and other creative industries are prevalent on South Broadway and throughout the Evans station area.

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Evans Station Area Plan Vision and Goals 10 Signicant physical barriers (South Santa Fe Drive, E vans Avenue) split the station area into discon nected quadrants High trac volumes, lack of adequate sidewalks, light i ng and waynding create a poor pedestrian environment thr oughout the station area Single use development pattern inhibits location eciency and fur ther perpetuates auto dependency Lack of placemaking elements that pr omote gathering of people and neighborhood identity e Harvard Gulch 100-year oodplain triggers additional dev elopment requirements for redevelopment along S outh Delaware, parts of South Broadway and the industrial pr operties north of Evans. Shortcomings of zoning districts present in the E vans Station area (I-0, I-1, B-4 along S. Broadway) constrain oppor tunities for mixed-use, pedestrian friendly dev elopment. Evans Station Area Plan Vision and ObjectivesVision Statement At the outset of the planning process, stakeholders used the assessment of Strengths, Opportunities and Challenges to prepare ideal visions for the look, feel and function of the Evans Station Area in twenty years. City sta melded these visions into a cohesive vision statement that the stakeholders then approved: Enhance the Evans Station areas sense of place by creating a vibrant and sustainable urban neighborhood that encourages people to live and work; invites businesses to thrive; allows people to comfortably walk, bike, or use transit to access local services and attractions; and maintains the residential character of the surrounding community. Plan Goals: Bring most activities of daily living within walking distance b y encouraging a mixture of land uses. Improve streetscape to increase mobility choice; provide w alkable and bikeable connectivity throughout the area. Encourage reinvestment in and/or redevelopment of industrial ar eas while maintaining and creating diverse emplo yment opportunities. Maintain residential character of surrounding communi ties and encourage dev elopment of a full range of hous ing types and housing price points. Use urban design to respect the scale and character of an U rban Neighborhood as dened in the TOD S trategic Plan. Celebrate the areas history, ties to the S. Platte River and access to open space and r ecreation opportunities. Encourage environmentally sustainable or green build ing constr uction and the use of quality materials to cr eate buildings of lasting value.The Evans Station area will become a vibrant, mixed-use community that oers a variety of residential and employment options.

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Evans Station Area Plan Land Use and Urban Design11 Land Use and Urban Design

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Evans Station Area Plan Land Use and Urban Design 12Land Use and Urban Design OverviewLand use near transit is considered very carefully because TODs behave dierently than conventional development. People living and working in TODs walk more, use transit more and own fewer cars than the rest of the region. TOD households are twice as likely to not own a car. ose that do own cars, own roughly half as many as the average household. People who live in a TOD are ve times more likely to commute by transit than other residents. As such, TOD residents produce half as much vehicle trac as conventional development.1 e travel behaviors exhibited by residents living near transit translate into a compact development pattern that is designed to accomodate pedestrians and bicyclists as well as automobiles. A successful TOD aligns transit investments with a communitys vision for how it wants to grow. e land use recommendations in the Evans Station Area Plan seek to do just that: reinforce the vision for the Evans Station area and support transit by having sucient residential densities and mix of uses to reduce walking distances between residences and other destinations such as neighborhood retail, services, parks, and transit. In conjunction with the land uses, urban design will guide the physical qualities of new development in the Evans Station area, complementing and preserving existing neighborhood character. e urban design recommendations provide the detail to create a pedestrian-friendly environment. ey consider how the land uses will physically t together on each block and within the larger neighborhood, and how the entire station area will be interconnected. Recommendations for active edges and ground oor retail and commercial are a means to address the way buildings and front entrances connect to the sidewalk. In addition to the development intensity, specic land use types and urban form, there are several other elements required, such as civic places, public safety, public service facilities, parks and open spaces, and aordable housing, to create a place. ese elements are often referred to as the urban living infrastructure and are what gives a place character and makes it a place where people want to live. Land use designations and urban design requirements can be the same in two places, but urban living infrastructure elements provide the character and feel of the place. ese elements are addressed in the land use and urban design recommendations. Many of these recommendations build o the existing character in the neighborhood. For example, the Evans planning process revealed a signicant presence of creative industries in this part of Denver including woodworking shops, design and production studios, research and development businesses, and a strong presence of retail and commercial uses related to the music industry. e plan acknowledges the presence of this niche creative industries community and recommends land uses that can accommodate creative industries in a variety of ways. e mix of land uses recommended for the Evans Station (Figure 4) area provides a foundation for a diverse and dynamic community, organized around walkable streets and access to transit. It builds future residential density, establishes retail, encourages creative industries and oers parks and open space amenities within the mile radius of the station, while building strong connections to the existing communities and transit. One of many existing and future transit stations in Denver, the Evans station area will emerge over time as a neighborhood with its own sense of place and identity. Aligning recommendations on land use, urban design and mobility will allow the Evans Station area to emerge over time as a neighborhood with its own sense of place and identity.1 Arrington, G and Cervero, R, TCRP Report 128: Eects of TOD on Housing, Parking, and Travel. Transportation Research Board of the National Academies, Washington, D.C. 2008.

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Evans Station Area Plan Land Use and Urban Design13 Huron St. 1/2 mile1/4 mile POverland Golf Course Ruby Hill ParkGrant Frontier Park Harvard Gulch ParkRosedale Park Ili Ave.Delaware St.S. Santa Fe Dr.Harvard Ave.Cherokee St. Bannock St. Acoma St. South Platte River200 0 400 800 1,200 FeetPasquinels Landing Park Mixed-Use Main Street Mixed-Use Residential Urban Residential Single Family-Duplex Single Family Mixed-Use Employment Public / Quasi-Public Transit Plaza Bicycle/Pedestrian Bridge Transit Parking Transit Station Plaza/Pedestrian Bridge Station Tower/Vertical Pedestrian Connection SW Corridor Existing Parks LEGEND P T Wesley Ave.BroadwayEvans Ave. Asbury Ave. Warren Ave. Jewell Ave. Colorado Ave. Galapago St. Huron St. Fox St. T Figure 4. Land Use Plan

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Evans Station Area Plan Land Use and Urban Design 14Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 1: Residential Opportunities and Forme majority of development within the Evans Station area will be residential in nature. is plan encourages new residential inll development while respecting the existing block conguration, lot sizes and building forms within established neighborhoods. e future built environment near Evans Station will provide a variety of housing stock for home owners of dierent lifestyle interests and income levels, including aordable housing which is addressed specically on Page 17. A range of housing types and densities oer options for people who want to live in close proximity to transit, Broadway businesses and the abundant open space amenities in the neighborhood. e Plan recommends ve land uses that support residential development: 1a. Mixed-use Main Street Support inll development along South Broadway (Colorado to Harvard) to create a vibrant mixed-use main street. Encourage a mixture of urban residential and oce uses, especially within mixed-use buildings that support commercial or civic uses on the ground oor. is will create more eyes on the street and add to the 18 hour activities dynamic desired for Broadway. Create a contiguous street wall comprised primarily of mixed-use buildings with parking accessed from the alley to reinforce a Main Street character. South Broadway would be more vibrant if it supported residential uses above ground oor commercial.1b. Mixed use Residential Support the transformation of industrial and commercial property to an active, pedestrian-oriented mixed-use community. e primary use is intended to be residential, but oce and retail may also be supported. is transformation is facilitated by the aggregation of vacant and underutilized industrial property that has already occurred in this part of the station area. Properties with viable industrial businesses will evolve more slowly and may continue to support industrial ex land uses for some time, adding to the eclectic feel of this mixed-use neighborhood. Encourage a mixture of housing types and density including but not limited to: row houses, stacked ats, live-work, lowrise apartments or multi-family condos. Active ground oors throughout the district should include residential amenities, leasing lobbies, workout facilities, parking entrances and convenience retail at strategic locations that reinforce the overall connectivity and access plans for the station. High lot coverage, zero to shallow setbacks, alley loaded parking, and an urban form is appropriate for this district. is land use is recommended for the following areas: Redevelopment area north of Evans and west of Broadway East side of D elaware directly across from the station East side of S outh Platte River, both north and south of E vans The Mixed-Use Residential district will support a variety of housing types and businesses.

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Evans Station Area Plan Land Use and Urban Design151c. Urban Residential is land use is consistent with the Urban Residential designation in Blueprint Denver, but recommends less intensity and lower building heights (1-2 1/2 stories) than mixed use residential, to complement the existing neighborhood context. It encourages a mix of low and medium-density housing types including single family houses, accessory dwelling units (ADUs), duplexes and row houses. New development should reect the existing character small single family lots (4,500 sf minimum), medium lot coverage, shallow to moderate setbacks, detached sidewalks with tree lawns and garages/parking accessed from the alley. Commercial uses to serve daily needs may be supported on arterials, such as Evans. Urban Residential land use applies to the following areas: Rosedale Neighborhood between Evans and Harvard and betw een the alley east of Broadway and Logan Overland Neighborhood along Evans as a transition betw een busy arterials and the interior of the existing neighborhoods Overland Neighborhood (East) between the Broadway and D elaware alleys; Overland Neighborhood (West) between Santa Fe and the S outh Platte River. Any new development that occurs on the CDO T properties adjacent to Santa Fe s hould be consistent with an urban neighborhood station ar ea and should not allow for auto-oriented uses. Row houses are an appropriate transition between busy streets and existing neighborhoods Highly consistent residential building form in the Platt Park neighborhood should be respected as reinvestment occurs.1d. Single Family/Duplex Residential Encourage reinvestment in existing residential neighborhoods adjacent to the station. Allow a mixture of housing types including single family houses, duplexes and carriage houses, but maintain the character of these neighborhoods by encouraging new development consistent with existing conditions small single family lots (4,500 sf minimum), moderate lot coverage, shallow to moderate setbacks, detached sidewalks and alley loaded garages consistent with an urban neighborhood. Typical densities are between 10 and 20 housing units per acre area-wide. is land use is consistent with the single family/duplex residential designation in Blueprint Denver. It applies to:Duplexes should be built with a form that respects the residential character in Overland.1e. Single Family Residential Maintain residential character in the Platt Park neighborhood near the Evans station as reinvestment occurs. Single family homes are the predominant residential type. Encourage small single family lots (4,500 sf minimum), moderate to high lot coverage, detached sidewalks and alley loaded garages consistent with an urban neighborhood. ADUs are also encouraged. is land use is consistent with the single family residential designation in Blueprint Denver.

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Evans Station Area Plan Land Use and Urban Design 16Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 2: Broadway as a Main Streetis plan rearms Broadways future as a multi-modal, commercial and residential main street that serves as an active, vibrant spine connecting south Denver neighborhoods to downtown. Broadways designation as a Mixed-use Main Street encourages a healthy mix of housing, oce, and commercial uses with form standards that reinforce the urban context associated with main streets and respects the adjacent residential neighborhoods. is land use proposal is similar in scale and intent to the legislative Main Street rezoning along the Colfax corridor. Using sound urban design to integrate the streetscape with proposed land uses is critical to transforming South Broadway from an auto-oriented commercial corridor to a pedestrian-friendly mixed use main street, creating both a neighborhood amenity and a destination corridor. Building upon the creative and music industries already present in the station area will create 18 hours of activity and add to the corridors vibrancy. e character of S. Broadway should clearly dene and activate the public realm by designing buildings, entrances and windows in a way that creates an active and inviting pedestrian environment. Streetscape design is addressed in the Mobility and Infrastructure section on Page 29.Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 3: South Delaware EmploymentSouth Delaware adjacent to the Evans Station is recommended to retain employment opportunities, evolve into a more urban form, and become more exible in terms of allowed land use. A Mixed-Use Employment land use will attract and accommodate cutting-edge industries providing employment opportunities adjacent to the station and transform South Delaware Street into a safer and more inviting place to work and live. Recommended uses include: research and development, creative industries, light industrial, oces, incubator business, arts/cultural uses, and compatible recreational uses. Residential uses in the mixed-use employment designation primarily allow live/work opportunities. New inll development should be compatible with the other recommended uses near the station area in terms of both form and use. Vehicular access should be well dened for delivery trucks and maintenance services. e Table on page 17 summarizes key Land Use attributes based on Recommendations 1-3. South Broadway will become an active, inviting place. Land uses permitted on South Delaware will be exible to include light industrial, oce and residential. Creative industries are encouraged.

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Evans Station Area Plan Land Use and Urban Design17Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 4: Aordable HousingDenvers large public investment in transit provides an unprecedented opportunity to address the Citys aordable housing shortfall. Growing the supply of housing and the diversity of housing types near transit is the rst step toward addressing this shortfall. While the average household spends 19% of its income on transportation, households with good access to transit spend just 9%.2 Providing housing opportunities near transit therefore oers true aordability where households benet from both lower housing and lower transportation costs. Denver has adopted a policy to increase the supply of aordable housing and mixed-income housing in close proximity to transit stations. Additionally, recent (2008) recommendations made by a City of Denver aordable housing task force include locating 50% of new city-subsidized housing for low and moderate income households in bus and rail transit corridors. e Evans planning process revealed that community members share an interest in keeping housing aordable near the station. Specic plan recommendations include: 4a. Increase the supply of housing including for sale and r ental housing of varying types and at a variety of price points. 4b. Seek funding and partnerships (e.g. land trusts) to facili t ate aordable housing developments within the station area. 4c. Eliminate regulatory barriers to aordable housing and incorporate eectiv e aordable housing triggers into nancing and other r equirements within mile of the station ar ea. 4d. Create an Aordable and Mixed-Income Housing S trategy for TOD consistent with the TOD Strategic P lan, Chapter 6 (City-wide Policy and Action Recom mendations). 2 Center for Transit-Oriented Development Transportation and Center for Neighborhood Technology, The Aordability Index: A New Tool for Measuring the True Aordability of a Housing Choice, Brookings Institute: 2006 Evans Station Area Land Use Attributes LocationResidential Density Mix of Uses Building FormResidential Typology Mixed-Use Employment Delaware0 to 20 DUA, Creative industries; light industrial, R&D, retail, residential, and o ce Pedestrian-scaled; 0-10 foot setbacks; High lot coverage Live/Work, Flats, or artist lofts Mixed-Use Main Street S. Broadway0 to 50 DUA, sometimes higher O ce, retail & entertainment uses mixed with residential horizontal & vertical mix Pedestrian-scaled; active ground oor; high transparency; Build-to lines (0-5 ft setback); High lot coverage Mixed-Use, Ground Floor Retail with O ce or Residential Above. Mixed-use Residential North of Evans and near the South Platte River 20 to 50 DUAPrimarily multi-family residential with retail and o ce horizontal & vertical mix Pedestrian-scaled; 0-12 foot front setbacks; High lot coverage Midrise residential and mixed-use structures, stacked ats, townhouses Urban Residential Along major arterials 10 to 30 DUA Single Family, Duplex, ADUs and Row Houses; some lowscale neighborhood commercial Block-sensitive setbacks; Entry porches; Alley loaded garages Single family, Duplexes, ADUs, Row houses; Multi-family may be in pockets Single Family / Duplex Residential Overland neighborhood 10-20 DUAPrimarily residential with moderate levels of small-scale retail uses Block-sensitive setbacks; Entry porches; Alley loaded garages Single family houses, duplexes, and Accessory Dwelling Units Single Family Residential Platte Park Neighborhood Fewer than 10 DUA neighborhood-wide Primarily residential with periodic small-scale retail uses Entry porches; Alley loaded garages Single family houses and Accessory Dwelling Units

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Evans Station Area Plan Land Use and Urban Design 18Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 5: Comprehensive Open Space System Four regional open spaces exist within or just beyond the mile Evans Station Area Overland Golf Course, Ruby Hill Park, Harvard Gulch Park and the South Platte River Greenway. e Overland Neighborhood is also served by two small neighborhood parks/playgrounds located on the east side of the S. Platte River: Pasquinels Landing and GrantFrontier Park. Together these regional and neighborhood parks oer a wide range of active and passive recreational opportunities. ese opportunities will be greatly expanded as Ruby Hill Park undergoes a $15 million improvement, the rst phase of which is scheduled for construction in 2009. Despite the close proximity of these amenities, many station area residents cannot easily access them by foot or bicycle due to the barriers of South Santa Fe Drive, the freight and light rail lines, Broadway and Evans Avenue. As the industrial property on Delaware and north of Evans redevelops, the need for additional accessible open space in the form of neighborhood parks and/or plazas will arise in order to meet the Game Plan and Playground Master Plan goals. is Plan builds upon existing park acreage by recommending a comprehensive open space system for the station area that serves to 1.) link residents to existing open space and 2.) create small neighborhood-serving open spaces according to Game Plan and Playground Master Plan objectives (Figure 5). 5a. Link to Existing Parks and Open Space. Create connections across Santa Fe Drive on Evans and both north and south of Evans Avenue to adequately link the station area neighborhoods with regional open space destinations. Specic recommendations include the following and are cross referenced to Mobility and Infrastructure recommendations: Improve the bicycle and pedestrian environment on the E vans Bridge (see Mobility and Infrastructure Recom mendation 4) to better link the E vans Station and the S outh Platte River Trail. Construct a bike/ped bridge at Jewell across Santa Fe (see M obility and Infrastructure Recommendation 5) to better link the r edevelopment area and Platt Park neigh borhood with the Ov erland Golf Course, South Platte Riv er and Ruby Hill Park, via a bridge over the S outh Platte proposed in the Ruby Hill Park Plan. Construct a bike/ped bridge at Ili across Santa Fe (see M obility and Infrastructure Recommendation 6) to link R osedale and Overland neighborhood residents to the S outh Platte River Trail and residents west of Santa Fe to R osedale Park and Harvard Gulch Park. Evans Station Area Jewell Pedestrian Bridge and Plaza ConceptDraft 8.29.08Plan View RUBY HILL PARK 114 east oak st, fort collins, colorado 80524 p: 970.484.8855 www.russellmillsstudios.comrussell+mills studios 50 100 200 0 AUGUST 6, 2008CONCEPTUAL PLAN PLATTE RIVEROVERLAND PARK GOLF COURSEPLATTE RIVER GREENWAY TRAILW. MEXICO AVE JEWELL AVE FLORIDA AVES. NAVAJO ST S. OSAGE ST S. MARIPOSA ST S LIPAN ST S. QUIVAS STS. PLATTE RIVER DR XERIC DEMONSTRATION GARDENS UPGRADE EXISTING BALLFIELDS SKATE SKILLS & INLINE AREA LOOPED TRAIL SYSTEM SIGNATURE OVERLOOK SIGNATURE PARK PAVILION & RESTROOM GREAT LAWN PICNIC AREA PROMONTORY GRAND PROMENADE PLAY AREA PUBLIC GARDEN SPRAY PARK NEW POOL FACILITY BASKETBALL & SAND VOLLEYBALL LOOPED TRAIL SYSTEM DEMONSTRATION PLAZA & STAGE NATURAL AMPHITHEATER ACCESSIBLE TRAIL CONNECTION NATIVE GRASSES WINTER RAILYARD SLEDDING HILL PARK ID PROPOSED BRIDGE CONNECTION TO GREENWAY TRAIL PROPOSED BRIDGE CONNECTION TO GREENWAY TRAIL EXISTING DPR FACILITY PARKING FOR BALLFIELDS AND GARDENS PARK ID PARK ID MAIN ENTRY MAIN ENTRY NEIGHBORHOOD ENTRY GRAND PROMENADERAILROAD RE-ALIGNED ENTRY ROAD South Denver neighborhoods will benet from a $15 million renovation to Ruby Hill Park including a new pool, playground, natural ampitheatre and a xeriscape demonstration garden. Bike/ped bridges on Jewell and Ili will provide residents east of Santa Fe Drive access to the South Platte River Trail, Ruby Hill Park and Overland Golf Course. A bridge plaza at Jewell and Cherokee would serve as a new urban amenity and focal point.

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Evans Station Area Plan Land Use and Urban Design19 Pasquinels Landing Park 1/2 mile1/4 mile Mixed-Use Main Street Mixed-Use Residential Urban Residential Single Family-Duplex Single Family Mixed-Use Employment Public / Quasi-Public Transit Plaza Priority Pedestrian / Bike Streetscape Improvements Secondary Pedestrian / Bike Streetscape Improvements Plaza/Pedestrian Bridge Potential Urban Garden Site Bicycle/Pedestrian BridgeTransit Parking Transit Station Station Tower/Vertical Pedestrian Connection SW Corridor LEGEND P POverland Golf Course Ruby Hill ParkGrant Frontier Park Harvard Gulch ParkRosedale Park Ili Ave.Delaware St. BroadwayS. Santa Fe Dr.Cherokee St. Bannock St. Acoma St. T South Platte River 0 400 800 1,200 200 FeetColorado Ave.Existing Parks T Huron St. Asbury Ave. Jewell Ave. Warren Ave. Wesley Ave. Fox St. Galapago St. De Evans Ave. Harvard Ave. Huron St. Figure 5. Comprehensive Open Space Plan

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Evans Station Area Plan Land Use and Urban Design 20 5b Create new urban neighborhood open space Small urban neighborhood open spaces such as pocket parks and plazas create a sense of arrival, enforce strong visual connections, give urban neighborhoods accessible green breathing space, build a sense of community, and add value to the surrounding development. Given the increased residential density expected on the east side of the station area, at least 10% of the developable area north of Evans Avenue between Broadway and the RTD tracks and along South Delaware Street near the station should be set aside for one or more publicly accessible open space(s). is equates to approximately 4 acres of land in total. New open spaces should be designed, sized, located and programmed to best meet the requirements of the Game Plan and the Playground Master Plan as well as the following specic objectives revealed during the Evans Station Area planning process: Create focal points that complement the surrounding dev elopment and provide visual connections between E vans Station, Jewell, and Broadway. Design innovative open spaces that incorporate public ar t, and reects the areas history as the regions rst settlement along the S outh Platte River. Oer unique experiences compared with those oered at Ruby Hill Park, Harvard Gulch Park, Pasquinels Landing Park and Grant-Frontier Park. Program the open spaces to meet the needs of the r esidents in both existing and newly developed neighbor hoods. is could include picnicking, playgr ounds, ar t plazas, fountains, community gardens, skate parks or basketball cour ts. e Comprehensive Open Space Plan (Figure 5) identies various specic opportunities for new urban neighborhood open space. e size, shape, ownership, maintenance and programming of these new open spaces as shown in the plan are conceptual and will be determined as the plan is implemented. Evans Station Plaza An active transit/neighborhood plaza is r ecommended to replace the current RTD sur face parking lot, if the opportunity arises for RTD to par tner with a private entity to provide shared str uctured parking elsewhere in the station area. e plaza should be designed to contribute to station and neighborhood identity oer transit riders a sense of arriv al and facilitate waynding to other destinations within the station ar ea (e.g. S. Broadway). The Evans Station RTD parking lot could transform into an active plaza serving residents as well as transit riders. The Jewell Bridge Plaza would be an urban amenity dened by the bridge and the surrounding buildings.

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Evans Station Area Plan Land Use and Urban Design21 Jewell Bridge Plaza Located where Jewell Avenue meets the pr oposed Jewell Avenue pedestrian bridge, this neighborhood plaza would be dened b y the surround ing ne w buildings and bridge while taking up little more space than the existing right-of-way It creates a suitable terminus for J ewell Avenue from Broadway and a focal point fr om the Station along Delaware Street. Active Use Under the Bridge Active use of the under utiliz ed parcel under the Evans Bridge adjacent to D elaware Street would improve the stations visibility and help cr eate community identity. One idea for active use suppor ted by the community a public art garden. Allo w local artists to use this space as a platform to test their ideas in the public domain, a la N ew York Citys Ar t Under the Bridge project. Denvers Oce of C ultural Aairs has generated an Urban Arts Fund to help cr eate positive community space with public art. Neighborhood Park A neighborhood park located to act as an organizing element within the r edevelopment ar ea north of Evans is meant to have an intimate neigh borhood feel while being large enough to walk y our dog, meet y our neighbor, or sit and read a book. e park should hav e ample seating areas, shade trees, and could featur e a small lawn. Neighborhood Greenway is common area is a n atural or landscape public right of way that is typically l inear in conguration. It often links a series of public p laces by acting as a pedestrian connection. One possibil i ty for this type of improvement could be the existing rail s pur right of way just west of the Delaware and Cherokee r ight of ways that could create another pedestrian conec t ion from the north to the light rail station. Community G ardens CDOT owns several remnant par cels west of Santa Fe Drive. ese spaces could be used for urban agricultural use/community gar dens. I f ownership changes, any new development should be consistent with a single family duplex land use described in this plan. Public art installments such as these eclectic vases make under-bridge pedestrian connections more comfortable. Every urban neighborhood should have accessible green breathing space.

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Evans Station Area Plan Land Use and Urban Design 22Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 6. Active Edges and Ground Floor CommercialActive edges are characterized as building entry features with direct entries from the sidewalk and a high degree of transparency and pedestrian interest. is increases visual and physical interaction between people inside and outside of the buildings, creating a safer and more vibrant pedestrian environment. Active edges are recommended in all mixed-use districts within the station area (Figure 6). Buildings on blocks identied as an active edge should be designed with the following considerations in mind: Building entries should be visible from the street and d irectly accessible from the sidewalk. ey should be g iven architectural emphasis through articulation of the f aade, interesting canopies or porches and a high degree o f transparency from the inside to the street. e nished oor level of ground-oor residential should b e constructed to provide a sense of privacy for the resi d ential units. Vehicle access for residential units should b e from the alley, and garages should not be visible from t he street. Residential windows facing the street should be transpar e nt and large enough to provide views onto the street. V isibility from the ground and upper oors provides eyes o n the street increasing the sense of security on the street. R esidential buildings along the riverfront should have w indows that take advantage of views of the river and o pen space. Lighting should compliment building architecture, be f ocused on creating safe and inviting building entries a nd highlighting building identication without project i ng light pollution onto neighboring properties, residential w indows, or into the night sky. External or indirect l ighting of the undersides of entry canopies, and on b uilding identication signage is encouraged. Building service zones, such as loading and garbage, shall n ot occur along active ground oor retail streets, but may b e accessed by service drives including parking access. S ervice zones should be screened or not visible from active f rontage streets. Access to service zones should be a maxi m um of 2 lanes wide. Ground-oor parking within the structure may face an a ctive frontage street provided pedestrian-scaled windows o r ornamental grillwork provide transparent or semi-trans p arent views into and out of the building. Building entries for employment and residential uses along D elaware should be visible from the street and directly a ccessible from the sidewalk. Clear, pedestrian-scaled s ignage should be located at the entry. Areas recommended for Ground Floor Commercial include Broadway, Jewell, and Delaware at the station. ese are active edges characterized by continuous commercial uses or storefronts that open directly on to the sidewalk and feature inviting pedestrian scaled facades. Since it is dicult to determine specically where retail versus commercial uses should be located, this plan focuses on recommending a building form that allows exibility of use so that properties can adjust to market conditions without destroying the intended active pedestrian environment. Design considerations for Ground Floor Commercial include all those listed under Active Edges as well as the following: Build-to Lines Ground oor facades should be built d irectly to the property line in order to frame pedestrian o riented streets with a continuous street wall. Transparency A high degree of building transparency i s recommended from both on the street as well as within t he building. Storefronts should have unobstructed win d ows for at least 50 percent of the wall area. Signage Signs should compliment the building architec t ure, be pedestrian-scaled with consistent and distinct g raphics. Plastic backlit or overly bright signs should be d iscouraged. Projecting signs increase shopfront visibility a nd the pedestrian environment. Lighting A special assessment district is recommended t o pay for pedestrian lighting. e style of pedestrian l ighting should be uniform and consistent with lighting o n northern segments of Broadway. Pedestrian comfort Pedestrian amenities such as shelter, l ights, benches, trash recepticals and trees should be p laced consistently along the sidewalks.

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Evans Station Area Plan Land Use and Urban Design23 1/2 mile 1/4 mile 0 400 800 1,200 200 Feet POverland Golf Course Ruby Hill ParkGrant Frontier Park Harvard Gulch ParkRosedale Park Evans Ave. Asbury Ave. Jewell Ave. Warren Ave. Ili Ave. Wesley Ave.Delaware St. Broadway Galapago St.S. Santa Fe Dr.Harvard Ave.Cherokee St. Banncock St. Acoma St. Fox St.South Platte River Colorado Ave. Pasquinels Landing ParkSW Corridor Mixed-Use Main Street Mixed-Use Residential Urban Residential Single Family-Duplex Single Family Mixed-Use Employment Public / Quasi Public Transit Plaza Ground Floor Commercial Active Edges Bicycle/Pedestrian Bridge Plaza Transit Parking Transit Station Station Tower/Vertical Pedestrian Connection LEGEND P T Huron St. T Figure 6. Active Edges and Ground Floor Commercial Plan

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Evans Station Area Plan Land Use and Urban Design 24Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 7. Building Heights and Transition to NeighborhoodsBuilding heights for the Evans Station area include a range of heights for each land use. e tallest building heights (up to 8 stories) are permitted in the redevelopment area north of Evans and west of Broadway. Existing residential areas have a maximum of 2.5 stories to help maintain the character of the neighborhood. e range of heights ensures compliance with the Washington Park and Harvard Gulch view plane ordinances, incorporates transitions to adjacent neighborhoods and encourages reinvestment in the station area by allowing for variations in building type and market conditions. Figure 7 shows the maximum number of stories recommended. 7a. Stable existing residential neighborhoods (1-2.5 stories; 3 stories along Evans) Reinvestment in the form of additions to existing homes or new low density residential inll development should t with the character of existing neighborhoods. Taller buildings up to 3 stories are supported along Evans. 7b. Mixed Use Residential area north of Evans (2-5 stories; 8 in strategic locations) With many acres of land north of Evans held by a single landowner and community support for higher residential densities in Areas of Change, this area represents an opportunity to develop taller buildings. Buildings will range from 2-5 stories primarily. However, buildings as tall as 8 stories are recommended in strategic locations, such as adjacent to the tracks. is higher level of intensity may also be considered for prominent buildings or intersections within a redevelopment project that exceeds the expectations of our TOD principles, listed on page 8. 7c. S. Broadway (1-3 stories / 2-5 stories) Much of Broadway will remain 1-3 stories to complement the existing adjacent neighborhoods. Taller buildings (up to 5 stories) are recommended along the west side of S. Broadway, north of Evans to encourage a transition between the residential mixed use district to the west and the existing neighborhoods east of Broadway. A maximum of ve stories is also recommended for buildings or portions of buildings within 125 feet of key intersections along Broadway to frame gateways and major crossroads within the station area. 7d. S. Delaware at Evans Station (2-5 stories) Proximity to the station and few property owners create an opportunity for taller, higher density development to support transit along Delaware between Warren and Evans. 7e. S. Delaware Employment (1-3 stories) Allowing up to 3 stories on S. Delaware provides the exibility needed for reinvestment and mixed-use buildings. 7f. South Platte River (2-5 stories) Taller, higher density development along the South Platte River, just south of Evans can take advantage of the river views. Easing Transitions rough Good Design is plan is sensitive to buering existing stable neighborhoods from development intensities recommended in Areas of Change and trac intensities along major arterials. For instance, development along Broadway is intended to buffer the intensity of activity on this street from the adjacent neighborhoods. is main street also serves as a transition from the development intensity west of Broadway and north of Evans to the existing stable neighborhoods east of the corridor. Taller buildings that back to existing residential neighborhoods, such as those along Broadway and Delaware, should be designed to ease transitions to the adjacent neighborhoods, using the following considerations: Placement of Buildings along Broadway and D elaware Street will have zero to shallow setbacks. P arking to the rear or side of the building will provide incr eased distance between new development and existing neighborhoods. Stepbacks of any structure taller than three stories and adjacent to lo w scale residential areas should be designed to step back 20-25 feet on the upper oors to ward the front of the building and away from the r esidential area, creating a more gradual transition in building heights. Buering Elements such as vegetated buers, scr eening walls and fences ease the transition between side/r ear parking lots and adjacent residential properties. S imilar elements can be designed into each site to keep ser vice or delivery areas screened from residential uses. Consider shar ed parking to create contiguous parking behind buildings with a singular aesthetic tr eatment. Higher density housing along Evans in the form of attached to wnhouses creates a buer to the adjacent pr edominantly single family homes while maintaining a compatible neighborhood scale.

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Evans Station Area Plan Land Use and Urban Design25 8 stories 5 stories 3 stories 1-2.5 stories Plaza / Pedestrian Bridge Transit Plaza Public/Quasi-Public Bicycle/Pedestrian Bridge Transit Parking Transit Station Station Tower/Vertical Pedestrian Connection SW Corridor LEGEND PEvans Station Area Max. Building Height Plan Final 5.18.09AreaofInuence 1/2MileRadiusfromStation POverland Golf Course Ruby Hill ParkGrant Frontier Park Harvard Gulch ParkRosedale Park Evans Ave. Asbury Ave. Jewell Ave. Warren Ave. Ili Ave. Wesley Ave.Delaware St. Broadway Galapago St.S. Santa Fe Dr.Harvard Ave.Cherokee St. Banncock St. Acoma St. T Fox St.South Platte River Huron St. 0 400 800 1,200 200 FeetColorado Ave. Pasquinels Landing Park1/2 mile T Figure 7. Building Heights Plan 8 stories 5 stories 3 stories 1-2.5 stories Plaza / Pedestrian Bridge Transit Plaza Public/Quasi-Public Bicycle/Pedestrian Bridge Transit Parking Transit Station Station Tower/Vertical Pedestrian Connection SW Corridor LEGEND P Evans Station Area Max. Building Height Plan Final 5.18.09AreaofInuence 1/2MileRadiusfromStation POverland Golf Course Ruby Hill ParkGrant Frontier Park Harvard Gulch ParkRosedale Park Evans Ave. Asbury Ave. Jewell Ave. Warren Ave. Ili Ave. Wesley Ave.Delaware St. Broadway Galapago St.S. Santa Fe Dr.Harvard Ave.Cherokee St. Banncock St. Acoma St. T Fox St.South Platte RiverHuron St. 0 400 800 1,200 200 FeetColorado Ave. Pasquinels Landing Park1/2 mile T

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Evans Station Area Plan Land Use and Urban Design 26Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 8. ParkingRight-sizing parking (i.e., providing no more and no less parking space than needed to support the uses it serves) is key to reaping many advantages of a TOD. Walkable access to transit and a variety of land uses within the neigbhorhood will reduce residents and employees need to use automobiles for every trip and, consequently, the need to nd a parking spot for every trip. Parking within the Evans Station Area should be treated as a common resource for adjacent land uses, rather than as a requirement of each building. An organized approach of parking management, consolidation and design is necessary to ensure a successful parking system. Parking recommendations in this plan attempt to strike a balance to ensure the Evans Station area has the appropriate amount of parking serving the transit station and the surrounding land uses. 8a. Shared Parking To meet market demands within the station area, specically along Broadway, Delaware and the redevelopment area north of Evans, property owners should provide shared above-grade structured parking. Above-grade parking structures should be wrapped with active uses. Public on-street parking should be available along neighborhood residential and retail streets. Parking management will be important to minimize overow into the adjoining neighborhoods. 8b. RTD Park and Ride e Evans Station park-and-ride should continue to accommodate the current number of parking spaces. If the opportunity arises for a joint develoment project within the constraints of RTDs enabling legislation, consider relocating the RTD parking into a shared parking structure north of the Evans bridge. is would allow development of the property adjacent to the station into a public amenity, such as a plaza and/or retail serving the neighborhood and transit riders. 8c. Parking Policy Blueprint Denver recommends eliminating or reducing parking minimums and/or establishing parking maximums in districts around transit in order to reduce the amount of land required for parking and thereby allow for more intensive development. Around transit stations, property owners should be able to meet parking requirements through a variety of means, including providing shared, tandem, remote, valet or bicycle parking. Zoning should provide parking exceptions for historic properties, aordable housing, and small lots. 8d. Residential Parking Parking for residents should be placed in parking structures, tuck under or surface parking behind buildings. Unbundled parking should be considered by property owners to keep development costs and housing costs low near the transit station. Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 9. Evans Bridge Improvementsroughout the course of the planning process, the community identied concerns about safety and aesthetics of the neighborhood particularly on and around the Evans bridge and the light rail station. Issues identied include poor bridge upkeep and aesthetics, sidewalks of insucient width on the bridge, a lack of pedestrian lighting, lack of bicycle facilities and lack of well-maintained and contiguous sidewalks under the bridge. Vandalism, grati and the unsightly Evans Bridge contribute to a feeling of discomfort for pedestrians. e bridge is not slated to be replaced within the horizon of this plans recommendations. Still, improving the bridges maintenance, aesthetics and bike/ped access are critical to implementing this plan. Many cities use public art on and around major bridges to add comfort and interest (see Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 10b). Several additional short and long-term solutions to improving the Evans Bridge are addressed in the Mobility and Infrastructure section (Recommendation 4). In addition to public investment, reinvestment and redevelopment of the properties along Evans will help address some of these concerns through improved building orientation, streetscapes and urban design. Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 10. Landmarks, Gateways, Waynding Signage and Public ArtLandmarks, gateways, waynding signage and public art are important in identifying a place and should be used to indicate a sense of arrival at the Evans Station. Each element

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Evans Station Area Plan Land Use and Urban Design27 An iconic tower would announce the station and contribute to the neighborhoods identity. Clear waynding signage, consistent pedestrian lighting and public art are critical elements in creating a sense of place. can oer a variety of uses including providing visual interest, neighborhood identity, way nding and locating access points. ey can occur at the station, major intersections, building facades, public plazas, open spaces, or along primary vehicular and pedestrian/bike routes. In the Evans Station Area, these should celebrate the cultural and historical character of this community. ere should be a sense of consistency within the landmark, gateway and public art elements as to reinforce the place with a common theme. For example, waynding signs should look the same and be easily recognized as belonging uniquely in the Evans Station area. Specic opportunities include: 10a. Way nding and Neighborhood Identication Clear waynding signage and consistent pedestrian lighting is essential in assisting residents and visitors to and from the station platform. Design and placement of waynding signage should be coordinated with pedestrian lighting, banners, and other elements that create identity within the neighborhood. (See Mobility and Infrastructure Recommendation 7.) To improve awareness of the Evans Station, engage RTD and the neighborhoods in a discussion regarding whether or not the name of the light rail station could be changed to to the Evans Station at Overland Park, or something similar. 10b. Public Art All new construction within the public right of way should dedicate at least 2% of the total construction cost towards a comprehensive public art system for the station area. Parks and public plazas within the station area are priority locations for public art. Possible locations include the Station Plaza, underneath the Evans Bridge, Jewell Bridge Plaza, and the Broadway and Evans intersection. 10c. Iconic Station Tower To help increase the station visibility from Evans Ave., S. Santa Fe Drive and S. Broadway, a vertical element, perhaps constructed as part of a signature building along Delaware, can assist transit patrons to the station location and can be designed to identify the character of the community.

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Evans Station Area Plan Land Use and Urban Design 28Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 11. Sustainable DevelopmentFundamentally, TOD is one of the best sustainable practices that can be implemented by this plan. e Evans Station Area Plan sets out a vision for improved air quality, energy conservation, green architecture / infrastructure and enhanced people environments through the application of TOD. National studies have shown that TOD reduces rates of vehicle miles traveled (VMT). Nationally, vehicle travel has been increasing faster than population growth. TOD has been proven to lower annual household rates of driving by 20 to 40 percent for those living, working, and/or shopping within transit station areas. Recent TOD research shows that automobile ownership in TOD is approximately one half the national average. By providing safe and easy pedestrian access to transit, TOD reduces greenhouse gas emissions by 2.5 to 3.7 tons per year per household. Creating a sustainable place should also include cultural and economic sustainability strategies that address equity, stewardship, and public and private cooperation. Strategies should build on existing Denver plans (i.e. Greenprint Denver, Comprehensive Plan 2000, small area plans, and citywide plans) and plans by regional agencies (i.e RTD CDOT DRCOG) and combine best practice principles to achieve the comprehensive and collaborative studies that can be implemented over time. 11a. Green Building/ Green Infrastructure Evans Station area has the opportunity to be an incubator for sustainable development because of the assembly of large browneld sites and single land ownership on the Shattock site. New projects built in this station area should be energy ecient, well connected into existing communities and oer a mix of uses to encourage walkable and safe environments for local residents and visitors. In addition, green building design, as encouraged through the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certication program, reduces energy consumption. New development should be encouraged to meet LEED and/or Energy Star standards. 11b. Coordination with the Mayors Greenprint Denver Initiative Greenprint Denver builds the foundation for sustainability goals and strategies in the City. e Greenprint Denver Action Agenda prioritizes reduction of vehicle miles traveled through multi-modal transportation and mixed-use development projects. One of the major goals of Greenprint Denver is to locate 41% of Denvers job growth (70,000 jobs) and 30% of Denvers population growth (22,000 households) within transit station areas by 2030. Greenprint Denver will be a key asset and advocate for the implementation of TOD in the Evans Station Area. 11c. Transportation Demand Management programs In conjunction with aggressive compact redevelopment, Transportation Demand Management (TDM) programs to address commuting options are also critical to achieve VMT reduction goals. Some programs may include carpooling, car sharing, workplace commuting, and others. New projects in the Evans Station Area and on South Broadway have been built green through energy-ecient building techniques and adaptive re-use of buildings and materials. Many Evans Station Area property owners are interested in green building technologies.

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Evans Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure29 Mobility and Infrastructure

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Evans Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure 30Mobility and InfrastructureOering a variety of convenient transportation options is one of Denvers fundamental citywide policies as set forth in Blueprint Denver, the Greenprint Denver Plan and the Strategic Transportation Plan. It is also a key ingredient to creating a livable neighborhood. Providing mobility choices increases access to jobs, conserves energy, relieves congestion, supports public safety and encourages social and economic activity. People at various stages of life and households of diverse income levels share these benets. Mobility recommendations in this section focus on improving multi-modal circulation between the Evans Station, surrounding residential areas, businesses, open space and neighborhood destinations. is section also addresses the basic infrastructure requirements necessary for redevelopment to occur. Transit and Auto Circulation Recommendations With a state highway and two major arterials dissecting the station area, a major challenge at Evans Station is to reduce the feeling of vehicular domination. ese transit and auto circulation recommendations accommodate transit riders and vehicles as they move to and from the station, within and through the neighborhood while balancing the needs of the car, transit rider, walker and bicyclist. Mobility and Infrastructure Recommendation 1: Hierarchy of Enhanced Streets Creating a comfortable, convenient and safe mobility environment throughout the station area starts with developing a framework of enhanced streets. e Evans Station Transit and Automobile Circulation Plan (Figure 8) depicts several types of enhanced streets including Arterials, Local Station Connector Streets and Neighborhood Streets. Typical design considerations of enhanced streets are based on the Citys Rules and Regulations for Standard Right-of-Way Cross Sections. Bike lanes, sharrows and other recommended enhancements to the City standards are proposed where relevant. Arterial Street Arterial Streets must balance regional trac, transit riders, pedestrians, bicy clists and serve land uses along the corridor Typical design includes two trav el lanes in each direction, on street parking, and a l eft turn lane at intersections. A median divides the road to provide a pedestrian refuge. City standards for arterials include a 21 minimum pedestrian/amenity z one includ ing a tr ee lawn and detached sidewalk. is allows for walkability and neighborhood amenities such as planter bo xes, benches, lighting and seating for neighborhood r estaurants. e Citys Rules and Regulations for arterials should be updated to include design standar ds for bulb outs and attached/detached bike lanes. ese should be integrated into the E vans Station arterials as appropriate. Local Station Connector Street Based on the Citys standar ds for a local or collector street (depending on adjacent land use) these impor tant streets should clearly dir ect travelers to the station. One travel/parking lane in each dir ection is sucient. Continuous fourteen foot detached side walks on both sides of the street allow comfor table and safe pedestrian connections. e Citys R ules and Regulations should be updated to include design standar ds for bike lanes/sharrows, bulb-outs and to r ecognize Fire Code Standards on this type of street. ese elements should be implemented into the E vans S tation Area as appropriate. Neighborhood Street Based on the Citys Local Street typical section, neighborhood str eets serve local trac while cr eating a comfortable atmosphere for residents. T rac should be encouraged to move slowly through the neighborhood. A dditional trac calming techniques should be consider ed if needed for the safety of the community Two travel/parking lanes (one in each dir ection) are sucient. Continuous sidewalks with tree plantings, on-str eet parking and lighting are recom mended thr oughout. With lower trac volumes and speeds on neighborhood str eets, bike lanes and sharrows ar e unnecessary. e Citys Rules and Regulations s hould be updated to include bulb-outs and to align with F ire Code Standards on this type of street. It is important to note that given the realities of funding limitations and right-of-way constraints in urban areas, not every street can meet this vision for enhanced street design in the short term. e South Broadway Reconstruction Project (underway) provides an example the project must be designed within the existing 100 feet of right-of-way, and therefore suitable compromises must be made to trac lane and sidewalk dimentions. Figures 9, 10 and 11 depict cross sections for three key streets in the station area Delaware Street, South Broadway and Jewell Avenue. As properties redevelop on these streets, the City should request that additional right-of-way be dedicated in order to meet enhanced street standards recommended in this plan.

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Evans Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure31 21 51 0 0L 1/2 mile1/4 mile POverland Golf Course Ruby Hill ParkGrant Frontier Park Harvard Gulch ParkRosedale Park Kunming Park Evans Ave. Asbury Ave. Jewell Ave. Colorado Ave. Mexico Ave. Warren Ave. Ili Ave.Delaware St. Galapago St.S. Santa Fe Dr.Harvard Ave.Cherokee St. Bannock St. Acoma St. Huron St. South Platte River Evans Light Rail Station Pedestrian Bridge Plaza Station Gateways Existing Trac Signal Proposed Relocated Trac Signal Single Family-Duplex Single Family Mixed-UseEmployment Bus Routes: 0, 0L, 21 and 51 Transit Parking P T Public/ Quasi Public Station Tower/Vertical Pedestrian Connection 0 400 800 1,200 200 Feet Mixed Use -Main Street (2 5 Stories) Mixed Use Residential Urban Residential LEGEND Arterial Streets Local Station Collector Streets Existing Parks 1/4 and 1/2 Mile Walk Radius Transit Plaza SW Corridor Light Rail Fox St. T Broadway Wesley Ave. Figure 8. Transit and Automobile Circulation Plan

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Evans Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure 32 Pedestrian/Amenity Zone Pedestrian/Amenity Zone 20 68 20 14 14Travel / Parking Lane Travel / Parking Lane Recommended South Delaware Cross Section near Evans Station. Given the limited right of way along Delaware to accommodate this recommended cross section, additional right-of-way should be dedicated as properties redevelop to meet the 14foot pedestrian zone standard for this street. Incorporate bike lanes or sharrows according to City standards. Figure 9. Proposed Cross Section for South Delaware Recommended Typical Broadway cross section, using the existing 100 right-of-way. Given the limited right of way along Broadway to accommodate multi-modal transportation requirements, additional right of way should be dedicated as properties redevelop to meet the 21-foot pedestrian zone standard for an arterial street. In the future, incorporate bike lanes or sharrows according to City standards. Note: Trac operations may require additional turn lanes at some intersections, such as at Evans. 17.5Sidewalk/Amenity Zone 17.5Sidewalk/Amenity Zone 13Travel Lane 13Travel Lane 12Travel Lane 11Travel Lane 12Turn Lane 4Median 100 R.O.W. Figure 10. Proposed Typical Broadway Section at Left Turn Lane

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Evans Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure33Mobility and Infrastructure Recommendation 2: Street and Intersection Improvements to Broadway and Evans (Enhanced Transit Corridors). Blueprint Denver and the Strategic Transportation Plan identify Broadway and Evans as enhanced transit corridors which are both intended to be multi-modal streets. 2a. Design Enhanced Transit Corridors Redesign South Broadway and Evans to balance the needs of trac operations, safety and comfort of pedestrians and transit riders, and considerations for economic opportunities along these corridors. Reconstruction should include key streetscape, transit infrastructure (bus shelters, signs, trash recepticles), and bike and pedestrian improvements according to adopted design standards for enhanced transit corridors. 2b. South Broadway as Main Street Wide attached or detached sidewalks, street trees, curb extensions and on-street parking are necessary to realize the vision of South Broadway becoming a vibrant, pedestrian friendly main street. 2c. Evans Bridge Address aesthetic and operational needs on the Evans Bridge in the short term. Study the feasibility of retrotting the existing bridge to accommodate pedestrians and bicycles (see Recommendation 4a). When replacement of the bridge becomes a priority, an emphasis should be placed on balancing pedestrian/bicycle safety and Evans Station access with trac operations. Future bridge reconstruction should provide at least 8 wide sidewalks on each side of the bridge. At that time, a vertical connection (elevator and stairs) from the Evans Bridge to the light rail station should be considered. Mobility and Infrastructure Recommendation 3. R elocate trac signal on Broadway from Colorado to Jewell Avenue Intersection A trac signal at Jewell should be considered as the area redevelops to allow for easier connections to the proposed new pedestrian bridge at Jewell and easier access to the new development along Jewell and the area north of Evans. e trac signal would need to be warrented and studied and approved by the Citys Trac Engineering Services (TES) Division. Bicycle and Pedestrian Circulation Recommendations Creating east-west bicycle and pedestrian connections is of highest priority in the Evans Station area (see Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation 5a). Residents west of South Santa Fe Drive and the tracks cannot comfortably walk or bike to the Evans Station, and residents east of this barrier cannot walk or bike to the South Platte River Greenway. Recommendations in this plan focus on making this neighborhood whole again by reintroducing these connections. Pedestrian/Amenity Zone Pedestrian/Amenity Zone Travel / Parking Lane Travel / Parking Lane 20 68 20 14 14 Recommended Jewell Avenue Cross Section At Broadway Looking West. The existing rightof-way will accommodate this recommended cross section. Incorporate bike lanes or sharrows according to City standards. Figure 11. Proposed Cross Section for Jewell

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Evans Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure 34 Mobility and Infrastructure Recommendation 4. Pedestrian Improvements along Evans from South Broadway to the South Platte River ese east-west improvements are critical for better pedestrian/bike connectivity to and from the Evans Station. 4a. Evans Bridge Improvements Short Term Create a safer, more inviting pedestrian and bicycle environment on, under and adjacent to the Evans Bridge. Short-term improvements may involve retrotting the bridge to address safety, maintenance, bridge aesthetics, and station access and visibility. Study the feasibility of retrotting the Evans Bridge to b etter accommodate pedestrians and bicyclists. e study s hould consider improvements to bridge crosswalks and p edestrian signals, access to the station from the bridge, p edestrian lighting, and narrowing, altering or eliminating t rac lanes or expanding sidewalks to accommodate p edestrians and bicyclists. Paint bridge columns and structure in an attractive color p alette complementary to the station colors to indicate the u nderside of the bridge as part of the station environment. Install pedestrian scaled lighting, either freestanding or a ttached to the bridge structure, to create a safe level of l ight under the bridge without producing excessive glare. On the Evans service roads between Delaware and B annock, and along Evans between Bannock and Broad w ay, construct a detached sidewalk/amenity zone of 16 2 1. Some of this will be constructed as part of the Evans o perational improvements project, and the remaining s egments should be constructed as redevelopment of pri v ate property occurs via dedication of public right-of-way. Activate the space under the bridge with a public use, such a s an art garden. 4b. Evans Bridge Replacement Long Term e Evans bridge is not scheduled to be replaced within the 20 year horizon of this plan. However, if and when the Evans Bridge is replaced, design the new bridge to accommodate pedestrians and bicyclists comfortably in addition to accommodating trac operations. 4c. Evans and Broadway Pedestrian improvements at this busy intersection need to be balanced with trac operations improvements. Intersection design should consider person trips and impacts to the pedestrian environment. An attempt should be made to decrease the pedestrian cross distance and increase the size of the pedestrian/amenity zone to the standard 21 for a major arterial. 4d. Evans To the South Platte River Pedestrian improvements are needed at the intersection of Galapago and Evans. As riverfront property redevelops along Evans, a more detailed pedestrian, bike and vehicular analysis should be done to evaluate and design access to S. Santa Fe Drive, the local street network, the Evans Station, and the South Platte River Greenway. Wide sidewalks, plantings, painted bridge surfaces and park benches create a comfortable pedestrian link along this bridge. Enhanced, multi-modal streets are necessary throughout the station area in order to truly provide transportation choice.

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Evans Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure35 1/2 mile1/4 mile POverland Golf Course Ruby Hill ParkGrant Frontier ParkRosedale Park Evans Ave. Asbury Ave. Jewell Ave. Colorado Ave. Warren Ave. Ili Ave. Wesley Ave.Delaware St. Broadway Galapago St.S. Santa Fe Dr.Cherokee St. Bannock St. Acoma St. Fox St. Huron St.South Platte River TSW Corridor Light Rail Transit Station Pedestrian Bridge Plaza Existing Parks Station Gateways Transit Plaza 1/4 and 1/2 Mile Walk Radius Mixed Use -Main Street Mixed Use Residential Urban Residential Single Family-Duplex Single Family Mixed-UseEmployment Secondary Connections Existing Bike Routes Bicycle/Pedestrian Bridge Transit Parking LEGEND P T Priority Connections Public/ Quasi Public Station Tower/Vertical Pedestrian Connection 0 400 800 1,200 200 Feet T Harvard Ave.Harvard Gulch Park Kunming Park Figure 12. Pedestrian Circulation Plan

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Evans Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure 36 Mobility and Infrastructure Recommendation 5. B icycle/Pedestrian bridge at Jewell Avenue and connection to the South Platte River Greenway Together with the Evans bridge, this proposed bridge at Jewell is the priority pedestrian and bicycle crossing to tie together the neighborhoods on the east and west side of S. Santa Fe Drive. In addition to making critical multi-modal connections, the Jewell Avenue Bike/Pedestrian Bridge should be designed to serve as a focal point and public plaza at the west end of the Jewell Avenue redevelopment area. Once the bridge is built, appropriate connections to regional bike routes from Jewell will be necessary, including the South Platte River Greenway Trail and the D-9 bike route on Sherman. 5a. Connection to the South Platte River Greenway Trail West of S. Santa Fe Drive, this new bike/ped connection will continue on Jewell along the south side of the Overland Golf Course. e route will connect to the South Platte River Trail via Huron St. at the existing Pasquinels Landing Park at Asbury. A proposed recreational path bridge at Jewell across the South Platte would serve to complete this connection to Ruby Hill Park. 5b. Connection to the D-9 bike route East of the Jewell bike/ped bridge, connection across S. Broadway would occur at either Jewell or Colorado, depending on trac signals, to link with the D-9 bicycle route on Sherman. Mobility and Infrastructure Recommendation 6. Bicycle / Pedestrian bridge at Ili Avenue is bridge is considered a major missing link in the Bicycle Master Plan. Improvements to the Evans Bridge and construction of a bike/ped bridge at Jewell, recommended in this Evans plan, may provide sucient east-west connectivity. If not, a bike/ ped crossing at Ili to complete the D-20 bike route should also be considered to tie together the neighborhoods south of Evans and on the east and west side of S. Santa Fe Drive. Mobility and Infrastructure Recommendation 7. N eighborhood Bicycle and Pedestrian Improvements Create better pedestrian and bicycle connections throughout the station area specically between the Evans Station, South Broadway and existing parks. In addition to improvemetns to Evans addressed in Recommendation 4, recommendations include: 7a. Pedestrian improvements Build/repair station area sidewalks to City standards, including pedestrian lighting and street trees. Priority streets include: Delaware between Asbury and Ili including underneath the Evans bridge; Warren and Ili. Pedestrian improvements on local streets north of Evans will occur with redevelopment. 7b. Abandonment of Existing Rail Spur north of Evans and on Jewell Work with the Atchison Topeka and Santa Fe railroad to remove the existing unused rail spur that runs between the light rail tracks and Delaware and then connects up to Jewell. e City should consider acquiring this property to use as a greenway connection between Jewell and Asbury, thereby providing a direct pedestrian connection between the station and the Jewell Bridge and plaza (See Recommendation 5). Convenient bike/ped connections to and from the South Platte River Trail are critical to making the Evans Station Area complete. The Vision for Jewell Avenue includes a bicycle/pedestrian bridge connecting the redevelopment area across Santa Fe to the South Platte River Trail.

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Evans Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure37Figure 13. Bicycle Circulation Plan 200 0 400 800 1,200 Feet 1/2 mile1/4 mile POverland Golf Course Ruby Hill ParkGrant Frontier Park Harvard Gulch ParkRosedale Park Kunming Park Evans Ave. Asbury Ave. Jewell Ave. Colorado Ave. Mexico Ave. Warren Ave. Ili Ave. Wesley Ave.Delaware St. Galapago St.S. Santa Fe Dr.Harvard Ave.Cherokee St. Bannock St. Acoma St. Fox St. Huron St. Sherman St.South Platte River TBroadwaySW Corridor Light Rail Station Tower/Vertical Pedestrian Connection Pedestrian Bridge Plaza Existing Parks Station Gateways 1/4 and 1/2 Mile Walk Radius Mixed Use -Main Street (2 5 Stories) Mixed Use-Main Street (1-3 Stories) Mixed Use Residential Urban Residential Single Family-Duplex Single Family Mixed-UseEmployment Proposed Bike Routes Existing Bike Routes Bicycle/Pedestrian Bridge Transit Parking LEGEND P T Transit Plaza Public/ Quasi Public Station Tower/Vertical Pedestrian Connection D-9 D-7 D-20 y Bro

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Evans Station Area Plan Mobility and Infrastructure 38 7c. Bike routes on Delaware, Jewell and Ili Extend the bike route on Delaware north from Ili to Jewell. Create a new bike route on Jewell when the bike/ped bridge is constructed. e Jewell Route should connect across Broadway to the D-9 route on Sherman and potentially along Acoma north to the D-18 route on Iowa. Complete the connection with signage and bike infrastructure on the D-20 route along Ili. Mobility and Infrastructure Recommendation 8. Station Gateways at Jewell, Asbury, Evans, Warren, and Ili A system of gateways and signage at key locations along Broadway and main pedestrian and bike routes will provide clear direction to the transit station. Conversely, the signage at the station should oer information about other primary destination within the TOD area. Priority locations of signage directing people to the station include: Broadway at Jewell, Asbury, Evans, Warren, and Ili Delaware at Ili and Asbury Cherokee at Jewell and Asbury. Drainage Improvement Recommendations e Harvard Gulch oodplain triggers additional development requirements in portions of the station area, such as along Broadway, Delaware and Asbury (See Page 54). Redevelopment in areas of change can be facilitated by constructing stormwater improvements that essentially remove the oodplain from private properties. Future private development and new construction of public infrastructure should apply Low Impact Development (LID) strategies for storm water management and water quality. Mobility and Infrastructure Recommendation 9. Construct Stormwater Improvements identied in the Storm Drainage Master Plan Two key stormwater projects would improve the drainage system in the Evans Station Area. 9a. Asbury outfall and Broadway stormwater improvements As part of the improvements for the South Broadway Reconstruction project and the Denver Storm Drainage Master Plan, stormwater improvements will be made along Asbury Avenue between Broadway and the South Platte River in accordance with the Citys design standards for storm drain construction and street ow-depth criteria. ese improvements will not remove the 100-year oodplain designation. 9b. Drainage Improvements to Harvard Gulch e city of Denver is in the process of evaluating the feasibility and constructability of new stormwater improvements to the Harvard Gulch basin west of Logan. ese potential improvements are intended to ultimately remove the 100 year oodplain and may also include a detention pond or drainage amenity at Rosedale Park, east of the station area.

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Evans Station Area Plan Economic Opportunity39 Economic Opportunity

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Evans Station Area Plan Economic Opportunity 40Economic OpportunityFasTracks promises to bring the Denver region an unprecedented opportunity to promote and facilitate transit-oriented higher density, mixed-use residential and commercial development. To identify, leverage, and maximize these opportunities, the city commissioned a TOD Economic Analysis and Market Study completed by Basile Baumann Prost Cole & Associates (BBPC). e overall objectives of the study were to forge a better understanding of the economic context in which the city may plan for TOD, and to develop specic recommendations regarding the amount, type, mix, and intensity of uses appropriate for selected station areas. While the amount, type and mix of uses within the transit station area and corridor inuences market potential, the presence of undeveloped and underutilized land can be a source of the greatest economic opportunity. Generally speaking, prospects for redevelopment are stronger when station areas feature:Relatively high levels of undeveloped and under utiliz ed landFewer landowners such that land is concentrated in fe wer handsUnderutilized land consolidated into fewer parcels, ther efore requiring less land assembly to facilitate r edevelopment Residential, Oce and Retail Market According to the BBPC market study, the Evans Station area contains approximately 69.3 acres of underutilized land. Of this land, there are many parcels and property owners spread throughout the station area. Multiple acres north of Evans and west of Broadway have been assembled by a single property owner, escalating the potential for large scale redevelopment in this part of the station area. Over the next twenty years, the Evans Station Area is envisioned to expand and reinforce its identity as a predominately residential urban neighborhood. With 69.3 acres of underutilized land, there is potential for the expansion of residential units, oce space, and community-oriented retail uses. ree redevelopment scenarios have been projected for possible net new development in the 1/2 mile radius around the platform based on market trends and land capacity. e rst two scenarios, Modest and Moderate, are based on projected market conditions over the next 15-20 years. e third, Capacity, is based on development of underutilized sites to their maximum allowable square footage. e following is a breakdown of the three development scenarios: Future Redevelopment Scenarios Net square feet of development Residential Office Retail Modest 850,000160,000100,000 Moderate 1,000,000190,000170,000 Capacity 1,960,000300,000450,000 Existing square feet of development 1,065,00036,453119,279Source: BBPC Market Study, 2007In addition to the Market Study, the Evans Station planning process revealed a potential market niche in the Evans Station area of creative industries. Music instruction and retail, interior design, industrial design, lm, woodworking, industrial arts and research and development are all prevalent industry types in the Evans Station area. Factors that contribute to this niche include a prevalence of small properties with industrial zoning ideal for industrial arts, location of two folk music schools (Swallow Hill and Denver Folklore Center), and the proximity of Antique Row and the Denver Design District further north on Broadway.Economic Strategiese realization of TOD will require a combination of near and long term eorts and the use of best practices and innovative strategies. An ongoing regional dialogue is critical to address the challenges inherent in implementation of TOD. e City should continue its communication with regional entities (e.g. Denver Regional Council of Governments, Urban Land Institute, RTD) and surrounding jurisdictions to investigate regional approaches to shared obstacles. Implementation will be most eective if carried out under a broad framework that establishes strategies to advance TOD at the system level. ese system-wide strategies will in turn support individual eorts undertaken at the corridor and station area levels. e City & County of Denver presently oers a broad array of programs that could be used to eectuate transit-support-

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Evans Station Area Plan Economic Opportunity41ive development. Rather than providing an exhaustive list of programs already available in Denver, the following are key existing programs that could be focused or expanded to help facilitate positive reinvestment in the Evans Station area. Regulations, guidelines and development of Memorandums of Understanding Formalizing standards for transitoriented development whether through local regulations and ordinances, guidelines, or memorandum of understanding is a key rst step in facilitating the type of development that will support transit service. Direct and indirect nancial incentives In addition to direct nancial incentives to facilitate transit-oriented development, regulations can provide a number of indirect nancial incentives. Indirect incentives often used to facilitate development include exible zoning provisions, while direct incentives include reduced development fees, expedited development review, and team inspections to streamline and reduce the total costs of the review and permitting process. Financing/Funding methods Transit-oriented development often occurs as inll development in established areas or through redevelopment of sometimes contaminated sites. In these types of developments, the level of infrastructure required may include extensive reconstruction of the street network (or introduction of new streets), installation of structured parking, addition of pedestrian enhancements and public plazas, and stormwater infrastructure. Obtaining nancing and/or funding for these critical infrastructure enhancements can be a key challenge in eectuating transit oriented development. e success of future expansion eorts in the Evans Station Area is partly contingent on the investment in improved pedestrian and transportation linkages particularly between the station and the Broadway Corridor. Special Assessment District Develop a special assessment district as part of the South Broadway reconstruction and potentially elsewhere in the station area. Consider other creative mechanisms for funding neighborhood improvements, amenities and public art to implement the communitys vision for improving neighborhood identity and creating unique and well utilized public spaces. Small Business and Technical Assistance Community members in many of the selected Denver station areas have cited a desire for local entrepreneurship opportunities and jobs within their station areas. Small businesses can be encouraged through multiple methods, including the Main Street Program approach, business incubation, and small business support programs (including loans and technical assistance). Denver Oce of Cultural Aairs Create Denver revolving loan fund is a great resource for creative small business development. Neighborhood Marketplace Initiative Work with the Denver Oce of Economic Development and the Neighborhood Marketplace Initiative to develop market proles for South Broadway and the Evans Station Area to call attention to the lifestyle, businesses and amenities available in this neighborhood. The Oce of Economic Development and the Denver Oce of Cultural Aairs provide resources for business retention and creative small business development.

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Evans Station Area Plan Economic Opportunity 42

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Evans Station Area Plan Implementation43 Implementation

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Evans Station Area Plan Implementation 44Implementationis section discusses phasing of the plans implementation and identies the essential action items necessary to accomplish the Evans Station Area Plan recommendations. Phasing e plan recommendations strive to direct appropriate change to the area over a period of 20 years. While the city will inuence implementation of the plan through regulatory means, investments in infrastructure and partnerships, much of the change will be implemented by private property owners incrementally over a number of years or decades. Several factors inuence the extent and the phasing of this plans implementation: Investment in Infrastructure Reconstruction of South Broadway and Evans (as well as investment into Ruby Hill Park, the Platte River Greenway and Aqua Golf) will likely facilitate an inux of private investment and development in the area. As private money ows into the area, South Broadway and the Evans Station Area will emerge as a place with a unique identity a place where people (residents, businesses, investors) want to be. e eects of both public and private investment along South Broadway will be apparent by 2011. Other major infrastructure improvements in the station area will occur over time as redevelopment occurs (in the case of sidewalks) or as funding becomes available (in the case of bike/ped bridges). Land Assemblage Realization of plan recommendations in areas of change depend largely on property ownership. In portions of the station area where a single property owner has purchased several properties, evidence of change will come more quickly, likely in the next ve years. In parts of the station area where there are many individual property owners, we will not likely see much change until market conditions support the type of development and reinvestment described in this plan. Zoning e New Zoning Code will facilitate implementation of this plan through context-based and form-based regulations that encourage mixed use development and an urban form. As part of the New Code adoption, many vacant and underutilized properties in the areas of change will be rezoned to mixed use districts with property owner support. Where viable industrial businesses exist, rezoning in order to implement the plan will occur more slowly, as the market dictates, allowing for more gradual change. Business recruitment and retention As change comes to the Evans Station Area, the city must balance goals of rectruiting new businesses, retaining existing businesses within the city and creating walkable, mixed use neighborhoods near transit stations. e recommendations in this plan are intended to be exible enough to allow change to occur as the market dictates. However, some proactive measures for retaining existing small businesses and recruiting new ones may be necessary. Catalyst Projects Several projects will act as catalysts to lead the charge toward station area plan implementation: South Broadway and Evans Avenue Reconstruction Adoption of the New Zoning Code and rezoning pr operties appropriately in the Evans Station Area Evans Pedestrian / Bicycle Feasibility Study and associated impr ovements New mixed use residential development north of Evans along S. B roadway or Jewell and on Delaware across fr om the station Jewell Pedestrian/Bicycle Bridge Harvard Gulch Improvements Project Implementation Strategies e following tables describe Implementation Strategies for the Station Area. e table is organized by Regulatory Tools, Public Infrastructure Tools and Partnership tools. Each Implementation Strategy includes reference to the numbered Plan Recommendation(s) it implements, a general timeframe and key responsibilities. e Plan recommendations are abbreviated for each section: 1) LU/UD = Land Use and Urban Design; 2) MOB/INF = Mobility and Infrastructure; and 3) ECON = Economic Opportunities. Timeframes are organized by short term (1-5 years), medium (5-10) or long (1020 years) term. is plan does not require these timeframes if opportunities arise sooner than predicted.

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Evans Station Area Plan Implementation45 Regulatory ToolsRecommendations Implementation Strategy TimeframeKey ResponsibilityLU/UD 1 3 Adopt New Zoning Code Adopt and Implement a New Zoning Code with contextand form-based regulations that facilitate redevelopment in Areas of Change and respect the character of the existing established neighborhoods. Short CPD, City Council LU/UD 1 4, 6, 7 Support Rezoning Rezone or support rezoning applications within the Evans Station Area to allow for a future mixed-use neighborhood and residential development aligning with this Plans Vision and recommendations. New zoning districts should promote diverse housing choice integrated with employment and shopping opportunities. Districts that permit appropriate development intensities and building forms addressing active edges, build-to lines, and transitions between contexts should be considered in accordance with this Plan. Short-Long CPD, Private Property Owners, City Council; RNOs LU/UD 1 3, 6 Incentivize Ground Floor Retail The existing zoning code does not offer incentives or mandates for mixing uses or required ground floor commercial or retail. Concentrating and allocating commercial and retail in the Evans station area as recommended in this plan is essential to creating a vibrant, successful TOD. Coordinate with the New Zoning Code to create such incentives. Short Medium CPD LU/UD 11 Facilitate Sustainability Eliminate regulatory barriers to sustainable building and development practicies in the New Code. ShortCPD, Greenprint Denver MOB 1 Develop New Street Standards Work with PW, the Fire Department and the Living Streets initiative on developing and enforcing new street cross section design standards that are context-sensitive, guided by adopted plans and accommodate vehicle, bike, pedestrian and bus mobility. Short Public Works, CPD, Fire Department LU/UD 1-3 Respect Neighborhood Transitions As properties backing to existing residential are redeveloped along Broadway and Delaware, carefully consider transitions between the neighborhood and new mixed-use projects by encouraging parking in the rear, landscape buffers, and a gradual transition of building heights using step backs to reduce the overall bulk of mixed use buildings toward the back of the lot. Short-LongCPD, Private Developers LU/UD 4 Update Inclusionary Housing Ordinance (IHO) Reconsider policies in the Citys Inclusionary Housing Ordinance (IHO) to better respond to the needs at TOD stations. Possibly remove in lieu fees /or increase IHO requirements in station areas. Explore a mechanism for requiring that a percentage of new rental housing be made affordable. Medium OED, CPD LU/UD 5 Create Public Open Space Develop a regulatory strategy for creation of public open space for new development north of Evans. This could include requiring a General Development Plan or coordination with the New Zoning Code to incorporate flexibility in mixed use districts for aggregation of open space. Short-Medium Parks and Rec., Land Owners, DIstrict 7, CPD LU/UD 8, 4 Reduce parking requirements in mixed use zoning districts adjacent to transit stations and further reduce parking requirements for affordable housing. Increase ways to meet minimum parking requirements. Incentivize structured and shared parking adjacent to transit stations. Inform the Strategic Parking Plan and TOD Strategic Plan with the parking strategies identified in this plan. Short-Medium CPD

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Evans Station Area Plan Implementation 46 Infrastructure ToolsRecommendations Implementation Strategy TimeframeKey ResponsibilityMOB/INF 1-2, LU/UD 2 Transform South Broadway into a Main Street. Reconstruct South Broadway according to adopted policies and design guidelines for Enhanced Transit Corridors. Together with main street regulations, an enhanced streetscape design including 21 detached sidewalks, street trees, curb extensions and on-street parking should be implemented as development occurs to realize the vision of South Broadway becoming a vibrant, pedestrian friendly main street. Short Public Works MOB/INF 2a and 2c, LU/UD 9 Improve Pedestrian/Bicycle Environment on Evans Bridge. Conduct a feasibility study for retrofitting the Evans Bridge to improve the bicycle and pedestrian environment. Study feasibility and cost of expanding the Evans Bridge or attaching a pre-fabricated walk/bike way to the existing bridge to accommodate pedestrians and cyclers on the bridge; Consider feasibility of a vertical connection between the bridge and Delaware; Improve railings and painted surfaces; Install pedestrian countdown signals ShortCPD, CDOT, Public Works, RTD MOB/INF 2c and 4a, LU/UD 9 and 10 Improve Evans Bridge Aesthetics (under and over). Assess interest in creating a special assessment district in order to add pedestrian lighting under the Evans Bridge along Delaware. Paint bridge elements (or replace with attractive and durable materials) to help improve the visual appeal of the area. Increase clean-up and maintenance around the bridge and abutments. Create an active public use under the bridge, such as an art garden. Any improvements must not interfere with inspection and routine maintenance of the Evans bridge. Short Public Works, CDOT, DOCA, Council District 7, Neighborhood Organizations MOB/INF 8, LU/UD 10a Install Wayfinding Signage at gateways (on Broadway at Jewell, Asbury, Evans, Warren and Iliff) to direct people toward the Evans Station. Short RTD LU/UD 5a, MOB/INF 5 Construct Pedestrian Bridge at Jewell Avenue and bicycle/pedestrian improvements and connection to the South Platte River Greenway. This pedestrian bridge is the priority crossing for the area to create better pedestrian and bicycle access east/west and to help support development of the new mixed-use district north of Evans. Short-Medium CPD, Public Works, Private Developers MOB/INF 7b Acquire Atchison Topeka & Sante Fe railroad spur right of way near the intersection of Cherokee Street and Jewell Avenue for a public plaza that will anchor the Jewell Pedestrian Bridge and complete the pedestrian connection between Jewell and the Evans Station. Short-Medium CDP, Public Works, Parks and Rec., Office of Management and Budget MOB/INF 1 Create enhanced streets throughout the station area as redevelopment occurs. Some streets such as Delaware and Cherokee have narrow right of ways (Delaware 50, Cherokee 44). Property owners may be requested to dedicate additional right of way if current street and fire clearance standards are enforced. Coordinate with Public Works and the Fire Department to develop new enhanced multi-modal street design standards.. Short Long CPD, CDOT, Public Works, FIre Department

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Evans Station Area Plan Implementation47 MOB/INF 4, 7 Station Area Pedestrian Improvements Secure funding for building/repairing sidewalks on priority pedestrian streets where redevelopment is not anticipated. Sidewalks should be repaired/ built to meet city standards, including pedestrian lighting and street trees. These may require creation of a special assesment district. Priority locations include Evans between Delaware and Bannock; Evans from the South Platte River to the Evans Bridge; Delaware between Asbury and Iliff; Warren between Delaware and S. Broadway; Jewell between Cherokee and S. Broadway; Iliff between Delaware and S. Broadway; Galapagos and Evans intersection. Short LongCPD, CDOT, Public Works LU 10c Public Art. Develop a comprehensive public art system for the station area using 2% of construction fees for projects in the area and through creative funding available through Denver Office of Cultural Affairs. Short-Long Council District 7, CPD, DOCA, RNOs MOB/INF 5b, 6, 7c Extend/create new neighborhood bike routes. Incorporate new bike routes into the Multi-modal Access and Connectivity Plan. Install proper signage, bike lanes and/or sharrows (according to Public Works standards) along the new and extended bicycle routes recommended in this plan. Locations include Delaware between Iliff and Jewell, Jewell between Huron and Sherman, Huron between Jewell and Asbury/Platte River Trail, and potentially Acoma between Jewell and Iowa Medium Public Works MOB/INF 9, LU/UD 1 Remove Harvard Gulch Floodplain. Construct Harvard Gulch storm improvements. Construct Asbury storm improvements to implement the Storm Drainage Master Plan. Coordinate improvements with future density and redevelopment in the area so as not to preclude future growth around the station. Medium Long CPD, Public Works, Urban Drainage, Parks and Rec., Private Developers LU/UD 5a, MOB/INF 6 Construct Pedestrian Bridge at Iliff to complete the D-20 bike route. This pedestrian bridge is considered a critical missing link in the Bicycle Master Plan and, together with connections across Evans and Jewell, would complete the neighborhood in terms of connectivity and access to the Platte River Greenway and to the Evans Station. Long Public Works, CPD MOB/INF 1, 4b Replace Evans Bridge. Eventual reconstruction of the Evans bridge with the full array of pedestrian/bicycle improvements on both sides of the structure, including vertical circulation from the bridge to the light rail station. Long Public Works Infrastructure ToolsRecommendations Implementation Strategy TimeframeKey Responsibility Partnership ToolsRecommendations Implementation Strategy TimeframeKey ResponsibilityLU/UD 4 Expand Affordable Housing. Utilize the recently established TOD Fund to strategically invest in properties in order to preserve and expand the amount of affordable housing at transit stations. Promote the use of CDBG, HOME, Multi-family Revenue Bond allocations and Low Income Housing Tax Credits for affordable housing projects in close proximity to transit. ShortLong CPD, OED, Enterprise Community Partners, Urban Land Conservancy, Private DevelopersAll Interdepartmental Coordination. Most recommendations in this plan require coordination with other city departments and regional agencies. As these recommendations move forward, coordinate with the appropriate agencies to maximize potential for successful plan implementation. Short CPD, Parks, Public Works, Greenprint Denver, BMO, DOCA, Office of Economic Development

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Evans Station Area Plan Implementation 48 Partnership Tools (cont.)Recommendations Implementation Strategy TimeframeKey ResponsibilityAll Active Community Engagement. Continue existing neighborhood communications, meetings and city processes to keep the community updated and engaged on the station area implementation and the neighborhoods roles/responsibilities. Short-LongCPD, RNOs, Council District 7 MOB/INF 1, 2, 4c, LU/UD 2, ECON Develop a special assessment district as part of the South Broadway reconstruction and potentially elsewhere within the station area. Consider other creative mechanisms for funding neighborhood improvements, amenities and public art to implement the communitys vision for improving neighborhood identity and creating unique and well utilized public spaces. Short South Broadway Business Owners, Public Works, CPD, Council District 7, RNOs/ Neighborhood Residents LU/UD 10, MOB/INF 1, 2 Coordinate with RTD (Wayfinding and Station Identification). Install wayfinding signage at gateway locations recommended in this plan. Consider renaming the station to Evans Station at Overland Park, or something similar. Short CPD/RTD/Public Works LU 1-3 Leverage redevelopment opportunities (private developers and land owners). Continue communication with land owners to organize redevelopment opportunities. Work with developers and land owners for a catalyst project to realize the type of development proposed and ensure it meets the goals of this plan and the TOD Strategic Plan Short CPD, Private Property Owners, Council District 7 LU/UD 1-3, ECON Business Relocation/Retention. As the built environment changes over the years it may not be conducive for heavy industrial business operation. On the other hand, smaller, light industrial businesses and creative industries that are consistent with this plans recommendations may feel pushed out by rising property values. OED can play a pro-active role in assisting with business retention and relocation as necessary. Short-Long OED LU 4 Community Partnerships for Housing. Establish private-public partnerships with both non-profit community organizations, community development corporation (CDCs), and forprofit development companies to preserve housing affordability in the area. Short-Medium OED, CPD, Urban Land Conservancy LU/UD 3, ECON Creative Industries. Engage OED, DOCA and the industrial, arts/music/design community within close proximity to Evans Station and South Broadway to discuss mechanisms for marketing this area as a niche market for creative industries. Short-Medium Council District 7, CPD, OED, DOCA LU 5 Open Space. Partner with Parks, private property owners, and land conservancy organizations to acquire/dedicate land necessary to implement this plans open space recommendations. Medium Parks, CPD, Private Property Owners, Non-Profit Associations LU 8b Coordinate with RTD (Relocate Parking). Working within the constraints of RTDs enabling legislation, actively partner with RTD and private partners to relocate the Evans Park and Ride to a shared parking structure and redevelop the existing surface lot into a transit/neighborhood plaza. Long CPD/RTD/Public Works, Private Property Owners

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Evans Station Area Plan The Community49 The Community

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Evans Station Area Plan The Community 50Study Area Location and Overviewe Evans Station is the southernmost light rail station in Denver on the Southwest Corridor, which extends southwest from Broadway Station and continues along Santa Fe Drive. A small RTD park-n-ride with 99 spaces is located on the east side of the Evans platform. Adjacent stations along the line include Englewood Station to the south and Broadway Station to the north. e Broadway Station is planned to become a major urban center, making it an employment and entertainment destination. e park-n-ride adjacent to the station has a total capacity of 1,251 vehicles. e Englewood Station is characterized as an urban neighborhood and is similar to the Evans Station in scale. It is adjacent to a mixed-use development with moderate density residential, retail, and oce space. With 910 spaces in the Englewood park and ride, and additional spaces planned, this station serves regional commuter trac. As characterized by the Denver Transit-Oriented Development Strategic Plan, the station area typology is urban neighborhood. is typology indicates that the Evans Station will be a walkup station surrounded by mixed-use residential and local-serving retail. e recommended height range of buildings in the urban neighborhood station areas is two to seven stories according to the TOD Strategic Plan. e half mile Evans Station area extends from Colorado Avenue to the north, Grant Street to the east, Harvard Avenue to Figure 14. Aerial Image

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Evans Station Area Plan The Community51 the south and Lipan Street to the west. is area constitues a half-mile, or approximately 10 minute walk from the station. e station area incorporates portions of the Overland Park, Platt Park, Rosedale, and College View/South Platte statistical neighborhoods. e area is very rich in history. Denvers rst white settlement, known as Montana City, was organized in a 12-square block area on the east side of the S. Platte River between Evans, Ili, the river and the Santa Fe railroad tracks. It is now commemorated with Frontier Park on South Fox Street. Overland Golf Course is famous as being the rst golf course west of the Mississippi. e Evans Station area has several infrastructure components that make it a valuable yet challenging location for TOD: adjacency to of a major cross-town corridor, Evans Avenue and a state highway, Santa Fe Drive; proximity to South Broadway, a major commercial corridor; and within biking distance of regional trails and green space along the South Platte River. Figure 15. Existing Light Rail

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Evans Station Area Plan The Community 52Population and Housing Characteristicse Evans Station Area includes portions of four of Denvers Statistical neighborhoods: Overland, Platt Park, Rosedale and the industrial side of College View / South Platte neighborhood. Over the past 50 years, all three residential neighborhoods in the station area have experienced a decline in population. After hitting a low point in 1990, however, these neighborhoods have seen moderate population increases. e area is predominantly non-latino white. In the year 2000, latinos were the largest minority at 30% of the population, followed distantly by African Americans at 2%. Birth rate data between 2000 and 2006 shows an increase in latino births by and a decrease in white non-latino births. e Overland neighborhood is composed primarily of workingage adults. In 2007, 69% of the population was between the ages of 18 and 64. According to 2008 data from the City of Denver, the total population of the station area is 2,218 residents. e 766 single-family housing units in the station area make up 71 percent of the areas total housing. Low rise multi-family structures, mostly in the form of duplexes and town houses, make up 28 percent of the housing stock and only .5 percent of residential units are in mixed-use buildings. e majority (68%) of these homes are owner-occupied. Household income is highest in the Platt Park neighborhood, with the majority of households falling into one of three income ranges: $50,000 to $75,000, $75,000 to $100,000, or $100,000 to $150,000. In Overland, most households fall into an income range of $50,000 to $75,000. Figure 17. Neighborhoood Population Figure 18. Household Income Evans Station Area Population and Housing (2008) Total Population 2,218 Total Housing Units 957 Vacancy Rate (residential units only) 5% % Housing Units Owner Occupied 68% Group Quarters Population 0 Residential Population 2,218 Group Quarters Units 0 Residential Units 957 # Persons Per Household (residential units only) 2.43 1950 0 1,000 2,000 3,000 5,000 4,000 6,000 7,000 8,000 9,000 1960 Total Population 1970 1980 Year 1990Source: U.S. Census (1950-2000); Denver CPD (2007) 2000 2007 2,164 2,743 3,077 3,903 8,480 3,576 3,574 8,070 3,181 3,372 7,187 5,647 5,236 5,310 5,699 2,449 1,958 2,255 2,483 2,689 2,081 Total Population (1950-2007) Overland, Platt Park and Rosedale Neighborhoods Overland Platt Park Rosedale <$15,000$15,000$25,000 $25,000$35,000 $35,000$50,000 $50,000$75,000 $75,000$100,000 $100,000$150,000 $150,000$250,000 $250,000$500,000 >$500,0000 50 100 150 300 200 250 Number of Households Income RangeSource: Claritas, 2007Household Income Overland, Platt Parkand Rosedale Neighborhoods (2007) Platt Park Rosedale Overland Figure 16. Population and Housing

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Evans Station Area Plan The Community53Figure 19. Neighborhood Race and Ethnicity Figure 20. Births by Ethnicity Figure 21. Housing Distribution by Type Figure 22. Age Distribution Population by Race and Ethnicity Overland Neighborhood (2000)Naitive American Asian/Pacific Islander Non-Latino White Latino African American Other Race 2 or More Races 30% 64% 2%1% 1% 2% Births by Ethnicity Overland Neighborhood (1996, 2000, 2006) 199665.4% 46.4% 51.4% 46.4% 53.8% 23.5%2000Latino Non-Latino White2006 Source: CDPHE via Piton Foundation (2007) Multi-Family Low Rise306 units0 100 200 300 500 400 700 600 800 Single-Family766 unitsMixed Use6 units Number of Units Housing TypeSource: Assessors Data, CPDHousing Type Distribution (2008) Evans Station Area Age Distribution (2000 & 2007) Overland Neighborhood 65+ 18-64 5-17 <52000 2007Source: Claritas (2007)6.7% 6% 16% 7.8% 9% 14.7% 70.8% 69%

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Evans Station Area Plan The Community 54 DrainageMuch of the redevelopment area near Evans Station is within the Harvard Gulch oodplain (Figure 20), including properties along South Broadway, on Delaware both north and south of Evans, and north of Evans along Cherokee and Asbury. e presence of the oodplain places additional requirements on new development because in order to comply with City and County of Denver standards, building nish oor elevations (and/or lowest point of potential water entry into bldg) must be a minimum of 12 above 100-yr ood elevation in adjacent street or a minimum of 2 feet above adjacent street owline. All garage entry elevations are required be minimum of 12 inches above adjacent street owline, and a minimum of 8 inches above adjacent alley owline elevations. Deviation from this criteria will require approval from Public Works DESWastewater. Building nish oor elevations and existing street/ alley owline elevations will be shown on Site Plan submittal for each phase. Figure 23. Harvard Gulch and South Platte River Floodplains.EVANS AVEBROADWAY ASBURY AVE. JEWELL AVE.W WaARREN AVE. ILiIFF AVE.DELaAWaARE SST. CHEROKEE SST.B BaANNOcCK SST. AcCOMaA SST.L LiINcCOLN SST.S SHERMaAN SST.L LOGaAN SST.

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Evans Station Area Plan The Community55Land UseLand use in the station area is quite segregated between residential neighborhoods, industrial areas along the railroad tracks and river and commercial along South Broadway (Figure 21). e current residential land use in the station area is a mixture of single-family and low-rise multi-family buildings. Approximately 22% of the station area is used for light and moderate intensity industrial uses. Between the South Platte River, the Overland Golf Course, and Rosedale and Harvard Gulch Parks, the Evans Station Area has a wealth of green space. Approximately 16% of the land area is public space with uses such as public parks or open space. Vacant buildings and surface parking comprise 5% of the land area. Figure 24. Existing Land UseZoningere are currently 13 zone districts in the Evans Station Area (Figure 22). Residential neighborhoods include an R-1 area west of the station, while neighborhoods east of the station and east of Broadway are zoned R-2. Commercial development is concentrated along Broadway Boulevard east of the station, primarily with B-4 zoning. Santa Fe Drive west of the station has several CDOT-owned remnant parcels zoned for commercial use, though these are all vacant at this time. Industrial zones in the station area are located along Santa Fe Drive or generally along the west bank of the South Platte River. e majority are zoned general industrial district, I-1, as a moderate intensity industry usage and

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Evans Station Area Plan The Community 56 employment area. e Shattuck property on Jewell, a former Superfund Site that has been cleaned up by the EPA, is zoned for high intensity Commercial Mixed Use. e following are descriptions of the existing zone districts in the Evans Station Area. Business and Mixed-Use Districts B-4 General Business District: is district is intended to provide for and encourage appropriate commercial uses adjacent to arterial streets, which are normally transit routes. Uses include a wide variety of consumer and business services and retail establishments that serve other business activities, and local transit-dependent residents within the district as well as residents throughout the city. e regulations generally allow a moderate intensity of use and concentration for the purpose of achieving compatibility between the wide variety of uses permitted in the district. Building height is not controlled by bulk standards unless there is a property line to property line abutment with a residential use. Building oor area cannot exceed twice the site area. CMU-10 Commercial Mixed-Use District: is zone is the most restrictive of the commercial mixed-use districts, with the shortest list of allowed uses. e purpose of the district is to concentrate higher density commercial uses, spatially dene streets, encourage higher site standards, and create a more attractive pedestrian environment. Although residential uses are permitted in this zone, it is expected that these uses will be responsible for buering themselves from nonresidential uses adjacent to their property. Building oor areas are not allowed to exceed twice the size of their site area. CMU-30 Commercial Mixed-Use District: is zone gives property owners exibility by providing for a wide range of commercial, oce, retail, industrial, and residential uses. Although residential uses are permitted in this zone, it is expected that these uses will be responsible for buering themselves from nonresidential uses adjacent to their property. Building oor areas are not allowed to exceed the size of their site area. Single Family 0% 5% 10% 15% 25% 20% 30% 35% Industrial Parks, Open Space Retail TCU Surface Water MultiFamily Low Rise Vacant Commercial Office Mixed Use Public/ QuasiPublic Unknown/ Other Parking Percentage of Land Land Use Evans Station Area Land Use Distribution (2008) Figure 25. Existing Land Use Distribution

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Evans Station Area Plan The Community57Residential Districts R-1 Single Unit Detached Dwellings District. is residential zone district is a low density residential district that accommodates single family homes and certain limited ancillary uses. e current required minimum lot size is 6,000 square feet, which translates to a gross density of 7.3 dwelling units per acre. As shown on the Zoning Map, all of the R-1 zoning is west of Santa Fe Drive. R-2 Multi-Unit Dwellings, Moderate Density District. is zone typically includes a mix of single-family, duplexes and multi-family structures. e size of the parcel, parking and other development regulations dictate the number of allowable units. e required minimum lot size is 6,000 square feet for each duplex structure with an additional 3,000 square feet required for each additional unit. is yields a maximum density of approximately 14.5 units per acre for the R-2 district. Industrial Districts I-0 Light Industrial/Oce Zone District: is zone is intended to be an employment area containing oces and light industrial uses that are compatible with residential uses. Generally, an I-0 area serves as a buer between a residential area and a more intensive industrial area. Development in this district is guided by bulk, setback, and landscaping standards. I-1 General Industrial District: is zone is an employment area containing industrial uses that are more intensive than those in the I-0 zone. Development in this district is guided by bulk, setback, and landscaping standards. Building oor areas are not allowed to exceed twice the size of the site area. Some uses allowed in this district are conditional uses. Other Districts O-1 Open Space District: is zone allows airports, recreation uses, parks, cemeteries, reservoirs, community correctional facilities, and other public and semi-public uses housed in buildings. Setback requirements apply to the location of structures. Figure 26. Existing Zoning

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Evans Station Area Plan The Community 58 P-1 O-Street Parking District: is district allows only parking lots and structures with bulk and setback regulations applying to structures. is zone allows business parking without the expansion of the business zone. ere are requirements for visual screening when adjacent to residential uses. PUD Planned Unit Development District: e PUD district is an alternative to conventional land use regulations, combining use, density and site plan considerations into a single process. e PUD district is specically intended to encourage diversication in the use of land and exibility in site design with respect to spacing, heights and setbacks of buildings, densities, open space and circulation elements; innovation in residential development that results in the availability of adequate housing opportunities for varying income levels; more ecient use of land and energy through smaller utility and circulation networks; pedestrian considerations; and development patterns in harmony with nearby areas and with the goals and objectives of the comprehensive plan for the city.View PlanesIn designated areas, limitations on construction are instituted in order to preserve panoramic mountain views in various parks and public places. Two such view plane ordinances affect the Evans Station Area. e Washington Park View Plane originates out of Washington Park and the State Home Park View Plane originates in Harvard Gulch Park. In these view planes, structures cannot exceed heights relative to reference points as shown on the View Plane Map. Figure 27. View Plane Ordinances

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Evans Station Area Plan The Community59 Blueprint Denver Land UsesBlueprint Denver designates the Evans Station as a transit oriented development Area of Change. e area immediately surrounding the station as well as the industrial land adjacent to the Platte River are identied as having redevelopment potential. e commercial corridor along South Broadway Boulevard is recommended for mixed-use development with pedestrian focused activities at key intersections. e major intersection at Evans Street and South Broadway Boulevard, located within the Evans Station Area, will be a key node in the transit oriented development. Blueprint Denver identies several objectives for the transit oriented development areas surrounding light rail transit stations: A balance of mix ed uses Compact midto high-density dev elopment Reduced emphasis on auto parking Attractive multi-story buildings A variety of housing types and prices Access to open space and recreation amenities A high degr ee of connectivity between the station area and surr ounding neighborhoods e Evans Station transit oriented development will embody these objectives as the station links multi-modal transit elements with existing and developing residential and commercial elements in this Area of Change.Figure 28. Blueprint Denver Concept Land Use

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Evans Station Area Plan The Community 60TransportationLight Rail Ridership In 2007, Evans Station ranked 19 out of 34 stations in terms of ridership, with an average of 1,911 boardings and alightings per weekday. Tucked away underneath the Evans bridge, few signs point drivers or pedestrians to the station, and access by car, bike and foot is not intuitive or easy. According to RTD, modes of transportation used to access light rail stations on the southwest corridor are essentially split three ways between driving alone, bus transfer and walking. e percentage of riders accessing the station by foot is on the rise, while a smaller portion of riders are driving alone to the station than when the southwest line was rst built. uses, residential density, and pedestrian lighting. e street network on the east side of the Evans Station area is a consistent grid pattern, broken only in a couple of places by the Evans bridge. Other than at the station itself, sidewalks are either nonexistent or substandard. ere is no direct line of site between Broadway and the station. e grid pattern is cut o at Santa Fe, resulting in a major constraint for pedestrians trying to access the station from the east side of Santa Fe. e only option is for pedestrians to walk over the Evans bridge which has substandard sidewalks and many pedestrian/auto conicts at the crossings of access ramps on/o Santa Fe. Bus Access Over 20% of transit riders boarding at Evans Station accessed the station by bus. e bus stop is located along a sidewalk that emerges directly north of the ticket kiosks and station waiting area. It provides a bench for waiting pedestrians, and but no shelter other than the Evans bridge overhead. e bus stop is well integrated into the light rail station by an art display highlighting the history of the area; it contiguously spans the sidewalk connecting the stop to the station and park-n-ride. Two bus routes make stops at the Evans Station: Route 21 and Route 51L. During peak weekday hours, Route 21 busses run every 15 minutes, and at night this frequency drops to every 60 minutes. It enters the station area from the west along Evans Avenue. It turns north onto Bannock and then loops back to the transit station via Asbury and then Delaware. e bus stops on Delaware under the Evans Bridge and then heads east again along Evans via an on-ramp from Delaware. is route complies with RTDs access design Sidewalks throughout the station area are inexistent, inconsistent or sub-standard. Transit Access Guidelines Version 2.4 Section 2 1 June 2008 SECTION 2 ACCESS RESEARCH & OBSERVED BEHAVIOR 2.1 Travel Characteristics of RTD Patrons The key function of a rail station is to provide access to transit for its users. The mix of access options offered for rail stations is highly dependent on the characteristics of a particular location and is determined by projected parking demand, frequency and extent of feeder bus service, degree that adjacent development is transit supportive and pedestrian oriented, and level of connections to bicycle paths and networks, among nonaccess considerations such as available land, construction and maintenance costs, engineering feasibility, and environmental impacts. In 2006, the majority of light rail passengers (56%) rode RTD for commuting to/from work. A significant percentage of the light rail passengers (15%) were commuting to school/college.11 Driving to park-n-Rides comprises the greatest share of transit access modes (45% on the Southeast Corridor and 35% on the Southwest Corridoralthough the Southwest park-n-Ride share dropped by 20 percentage points from 2001 to 2006, while the share of those walking to these stations increased by 16 percentage points over the same period).12 See Table 2-1 below for an access mode breakdown by corridor. TABLE 2-1: LRT Access Mode Share Weekday SW Corridor SE Corridor Access Mode 2001 2006 2007 Drove alone 48% 35% 40% RTD bus 29% 29% 21% Walked 12% 28% 25% Carpooled 7% 5% Bicycle 2% 3% 1% call-n-Ride n/a 3% Dropped off n/a 5% 5% Other 2% n/a Such destinations and access mode shares are not unexpected based on the existing rail transit system, which provides service from suburban park-n-Rides in the southwest and southeast portions of the metro area to a concentration of jobs and educational facilities in downtown Denver and the southeast suburban-based Denver Tech Center. As FasTracks is built out and more regional destinations such as Denver International Airport and Boulder are added to the system and new regional TOD destinations are constructed along the lines such as the Gates redevelopment, the share of work destination trips is likely to be smaller, which should result in more off-peak ridership. This trend is already underway: 11 RTD Spring 2006 Light Rail Customer Satisfaction & Trip Characteristics, July 2006 12 RTD Customer Satisfaction Survey, 2001, 2006 and 2007 Source: RTD Transit Access Guidelines, 2009Vehicular Access Broadway and Evans are major arterials that each support over 15,000 cars per day, with 1,000 to 1,500 cars during peak commuting hours in any given direction. Vehicles access the Evans park-n-ride from Delaware just south of the Evans bridge. ey can reach Delaware either o the west bound Evans Bridge ramp or by driving through the existing residential or industrial areas north or south of Evans. e Evans park-n-ride has a capacity of 99 spaces in a surface lot and is at 97% utilization rate. RTD plans on building no additional parking at Evans Station. Businesses along Delaware and some residents complain about overow parking in the neighborhood. Maximum walking distance from Evans Station parking is 700 feet, which is well within RTDs design criteria. Pedestrian Access Factors that contribute to walkability of a station area include a continuous network of streets and sidewalks, pedestrian safety and security, mixture of land

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Evans Station Area Plan The Community61 guidelines and standards, which recommends an on-street conguration where practicable. e 51L busses make two trips in the morning and three trips in the evening on weekdays about 30 minutes apart. On average, 1,071 passengers board and alight daily at the Evans Station bus stop. Two more bus routes serve the station area but do not stop at Evans Station. Route 0 and Route 0L make stops at the inter-Figure 29. Existing Transit Servicesection of Broadway Boulevard and Evans Avenue, the closest bus stop on Broadway to the station. During peak weekday hours, Route 0 busses run every 15 minutes, and at night the frequency drops to every 30 minutes. Route 0L runs every 30 minutes only during peak weekday hours. On average, 350 passengers board and alight daily at this intersection. Bicycle Access Nearby Denver bicycle routes include D-7 along the South Platte River, D-20 along Ili Avenue, and D-9 along Sherman Street, but it is dicult to access any of these from the station due to lack of connectivity and bicycle infrastructure. e Denver Bicycle Master Plan Update (2001) recommends a future connection between D-20 and D-7 by building an overpass aligned with Ili Avenue across the railroad and Santa Fe Drive. Bicycle infrastructure at the station includes two bicycle lockers at the platform which hold two bicycles each and one U bicycle rack. Evans Station Bus Service 2008Source: RTD 2008 August 08 Runboard Route Weekday Peak Frequency Average Daily Load 2008 21 15 min 1,026 51L 30 min 8 0 15 min 1,302 0L 30 min 232

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Evans Station Area Plan The Community 62

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Evans Station Area Plan Public Engagement63 Public Engagement

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Evans Station Area Plan Public Engagement 64Public Engagemente goal of the public outreach process was to provide fair, open and eective engagement with the community in the development of the plan for the Evans Station Area. Outreach objectives included: R eceive meaningful and useful input from residents and community inter ests D irectly engage a broad representation of residents and community inter ests by using several dierent methods of community outr each E nsure openness in communication of all aspects of the plan and make r elevant information freely available E nsure fairness in consideration of all opinions and ideas fr om community members and interest groups within the context of City and r egional objectives and the frame work of the planning process Four public workshops and four focus group meetings were held as part of the planning process. ese interactive meetings included a brief presentation on the planning process, schedule, concepts and key issues followed by interactive and often hands-on sessions aimed at soliciting feedback on plan concepts. e public and focus group meetings occurred at the following plan milestones: E xisting Conditions Analysis / Plan Visioning D evelopment of Alternative Concepts P lan Recommendations and Implementation / R esidential Character Exercise D raft Plan Review (scheduled for July 2009) In addition, planning sta attended numerous meetings with stakeholders throughout the process including registered neighborhood associations and other interest groups. Public meetings for related projects such as the South Broadway Reconstruction and the New Zoning Code were also attended by Evans planning sta. Outreach methods City sta worked with City Council District 7 to ensure members of the public were notied and kept informed throughout the planning process. An initial mailing went out in November 2007 to all residential, commercial and industrial property owners within mile of the Evans Station to notify them of the planning process. RNOs were also notied at this time. e planning sta reached out to businesses and major employers in the area with phone calls and individual meetings. Public meeting announcements were posted in City Council District 7 newsletters, the Washington Park Prole and the Denver Post. Public meeting presentations and summaries were posted online and sent to stakeholders, including RNO leaders to keep their members informed. Public Meetings E vans Public Workshop #1 Strengths, Weaknesses, O pportunities and reats; Visioning. January 24, 2008. J ohn Collins Church. 100 attendees. E vans Focus Group #1 Visioning and Alternatives Analysis. M arch 19, 2008. John Collins Church. 25 attendees. E vans Public Workshop #2 Alternatives Analysis. M ay 6, 2008. John Collins Church. 70 attendees. E vans Focus Group #2 Draft Plan Concepts / R esidential Character. September 30, 2008. B urton Showroom. 25 attendees. E vans Focus Group #3 Residential Character Exercise. O ctober 16, 2008. John Collins Church. 25 attendees. E vans Public Workshop #3 Plan Recommendations / R esidential Character Exercise. November 13, 2008. 50 attendees. E vans Public Meeting #4 Draft Plan Review. J uly 23, 2009. John Collins Church. 30 attendees. E vans Focus Group #4 Draft Plan Comments Review. J uly 30, 2009. John Collins Church. 25 attendees.

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Evans Station Area Plan Public Engagement65Additional Group Meetings and Presentations P latt Park Neighborhood Association W est University Community Association R uby Hill Neighborhood Association G odsman Neighborhood Association S outh Broadway Reconstruction Public Meeting W esley to Yale S outh Broadway Reconstruction Public Meeting Iowa to Wesley N ew Code District 7 Neighborhood Meeting P latt Park #1 N ew Code District 7 Neighborhood Meeting P latt Park #2 N ew Code District 7 Neighborhood Meeting R osedale #1 N ew Code District 7 Neighborhood Meeting R osedale #2 N ew Code District 7 Neighborhood Meeting Ov erland N ew Code District 7 Neighborhood Meeting College View Steering Committee Members Catherine Sandy, resident, property owner, business owner John Damiano, property and business owner Kevin Dickson, property owner Dominique Cook, business and property owner Jerry Dokken, business and property owner Ray Ehrenstein, resident and property owner Belin Fieldson, resident and property owner Mike Hastings, business and property owner JC Helmstaedter, business and property owner Jack Hopkins, business and property owner Richard Chapman, property owner Eric Jacobson, resident and property owner Kat Lovato, resident and property owner JP Malik, resident and property owner Vicki Pearson, resident and property owner Jennifer Pollack, resident and property owner Jennifer Tomeny, resident and property owner

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Evans Station Area Plan Public Engagement 66

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Evans Station Area Plan Relevant Plans67 Relevant Plans

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Evans Station Area Plan Relevant Plans 68Relevant Planse Evans Station Area Plan builds upon a solid foundation of existing documents and guiding principles. is section provides a review of the applicable content of adopted citywide plans. e Evans Station Area Plan provides specic recommendations for the planning area that, in case of conict, supersede general recommendations from existing plans Comprehensive Plan, 2000 e City Council adopted Denver Comprehensive Plan in 2000. Plan 2000 provides the planning and policy framework for development of Denvers human and physical environment. e key subjects of Plan 2000 that relate to this Station Plan are land use, mobility, legacies, and housing. Land Use: Land use recommendations promote new investment that accommodates new residents, improves economic vitality and enhances the citys aesthetics and livability. In addition, Plan 2000 supports sustainable development patterns by promoting walking, biking and transit use. Mobility: Plan 2000 emphasizes planning for multiple modes of transportation walking, biking, transit and cars. Key concepts include expanding mobility choices for commuters and regional cooperation in transit system planning. Plan 2000 also promotes compact, mixed-use development in transit rich places (like station areas). Legacies: Plan 2000 prioritizes planning for park, open space and recreation systems. Historic building preservation and respect for traditional patterns of development in established areas are also key tenets of Plan 2000. To this end, Plan 2000 places a high value on maintenance of streets, trails, and parkways that link destinations within the community. Ensuring that new buildings, infrastructure and open spaces create attractive, beautiful places is the foundation of the legacies chapter. Housing: Plan 2000 recognizes that access to housing is a basic need for Denver citizens. us, Plan 2000 emphasizes preservation and maintenance of the existing housing stock and expanding housing options. Providing a variety of unit types and costs, in addition to housing development in transit rich places are fundamental tenets of Plan 2000 is will ensure a sustainable balance of jobs and housing as the city matures. Blueprint Denver: An Integrated Land Use and Transportation Plan, 2002 Plan 2000 recommended that the city create a plan to integrate land use and transportation planning. Blueprint Denver is the implementation plan that recognizes this relationship and describes the building blocks and tools necessary to achieve the vision outlined in Plan 2000 Areas of Change and Stability: Blueprint Denver divides the city into areas of change and areas of stability. Over time, all areas of the city will uctuate between change and stability. e goal for areas of stability is to identify and maintain the character of an area while accommodating new development and redevelopment. e goal for areas of change is to channel growth where it will be benecial and can best improve access to jobs, housing and services. Blueprint Denver describes two types of areas of stability: committed areas and reinvestment areas. Committed areas are stable neighborhoods that may benet from the stabilizing eects of small, individual lot inll development rather than large-scale land assembly and redevelopment. Reinvestment areas are neighborhoods with a character that is desirable to maintain but would benet from reinvestment and modest inll. is reinvestment, however, is more limited in comparison to that of areas of change. Transportation: e transportation component of Blueprint Denver provides transportation building blocks and tools that promote multimodal and intermodal connections. Elements of connection include the street system, bus transit system, bicycle system, and pedestrian system. ese components must work together to realize the guiding principles of Blueprint Denver. New Zoning Code (in development) Denver citizens called for reform of the Citys Zoning Code in the 1989 Comprehensive Plan and again in the Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000 Blueprint Denver (2002) provided the vision and initial strategy to begin this eort. e current zoning code was established in the 1950s and assumes an automobile oriented land use development pattern. Further, the complexity of the current zoning code makes it dicult for property owners to easily identify what is allowed to be built on a given property. at complexity can make doing quality development more dicult and raises the cost

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Evans Station Area Plan Relevant Plans69of doing business in Denver by requiring lengthy study of our unique and cumbersome zoning code. As the Evans plan is adopted, Denver is on the verge of adopting a new Zoning Code. e New Code will better reect the vision of Blueprint Denver by promoting proper development in areas of change while enhancing neighborhood character in areas of stability. Regulatory recomendations in the Evans Plan are informed by New Code drafts and are made with the intent of being implemented under the New Code. Transit Oriented Development Strategic Plan, 2006 e Transit Oriented Development (TOD) Strategic Plan prioritizes the citys planning and implementation eorts related to the transit system and station area development. TOD Dened: e TOD Strategic Plan denes TOD as development near transit that creates beautiful, vital, walkable neighborhoods; provides housing, shopping, and transportation choices; generates lasting value; and provides access to the region via transit. TOD Typologies: e TOD Strategic Plan establishes TOD typologies for every transit station in the city. Typologies establish a framework to distinguish the types of places linked by the transit system. e typologies frame expectations about the land use mix and intensity of development at each of the stations. Station Area Planning: While providing an important planning framework, the TOD Strategic Plan calls for more detailed station area plans. Such plans oer specic direction for appropriate development, needed infrastructure investments and economic development strategies. Strategic Transportation Plan, 2008 Denver Public Works drafted the Strategic Transportation Plan (STP). e STP is a primary implementation tool for Blueprint Denver and Plan 2000. e objective of the STP is to determine needed transportation investments. e STP process will (1) provide education concerning options for transportation alternatives; (2) reach consensus on transportation strategies along transportation corridors through a collaborative process; and (3) build stakeholder support. e STP represents a new approach to transportation planning in Denver. Instead of forecasting future auto travel on Denver streets, the STP forecasts person-trips to evaluate the magnitude of transportation impacts caused by all types of travel. is person-trip data provides the ability to plan for bikes, pedestrians, transit, and street improvements. e STP is the rst step in identifying the needs for every major travel corridor in the city. e STP creates concepts for how to meet transportation needs, including a prioritization of corridor improvements. Greenprint Denver Plan, 2006 Greenprint Denver is an eort to fully integrate sustainability as a core value and operating principle in Denver city government. e Greenprint Denver Action Agenda for 2006 charts the citys course over the next ve. Included in Greenprint Denver Action Agenda are specic actions that relate directly to the Citys ambitious station area planning eort. For example, this plan directs the City to decrease reliance on automobiles through public transit use and access, and promote transit-oriented development, as well as bike and pedestrian enhancements, and increase by 20% the new development located within mile of existing transit stations by 2011. Greenprint Denver Climate Action Plan, 2008 e Greenprint Denver Climate Action Plan prepares Denver to take decisive steps toward reducing local contributions to greenhouse gas emissions. It analyzes Denvers carbon footprint, including an inventory from three main sectors: 1) Transportation, 2) Residential-Commercial-Industrial Energy Use, and 3) Use of Key Urban Materials. e Plan sets forth a 25% emissions reduction target essentially below 1990 emissions levels by 2020. Climate action strategies toward achieving this goal include supporting population growth around transit and supporting more pedestrian-, bicycle-, and transit-friendly neighborhoods that will reduce the demand for motorized personal transport. Greenprint Denver and the Strategic Transportation Plan

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Evans Station Area Plan Relevant Plans 70 Pedestrian Master Plan, 2004 e Pedestrian Master Plan serves as a framework for implementation of city policies that place an emphasis on pedestrian mobility in planning. e plan considers safety, accessibility, education, connectivity, streetscape, land use, and public health as it relates to the creation of a citywide pedestrian circulation system. Plan 2000 and Blueprint Denver recommended preparation of this plan. e plan establishes street classications for the pedestrian network to highlight routes that require greater emphasis on the pedestrian. Parks and Recreation Game Plan, 2002 e Game Plan is a master plan for the citys park, open space and recreation system. A primary principle is to create greener neighborhoods. Game Plan establishes a street tree and tree canopy goal of 15-18% for the entire city. e plan also establishes a parkland acreage target of 8-10 acres per 1,000 residents. Tools to accomplish these goals include promoting green streets and parkways, which indicate routes that require greater emphasis and additions to the landscape. Storm Drainage Master Plan (2005) and Sanitary Sewer Master Plan (2006) e Storm Drainage Master Plan and the Sanitary Sewer Master Plan evaluates adequacy of the existing systems assuming the future land uses identied in Blueprint Denver. e Storm Drainage Master Plan determines the amount of imperviousness resulting from future land development and the subsequent runo. e Sanitary Sewer Master Plan identies needed sanitary sewer improvements to respond to the forecasted development. Shattuck District Plan, 2002 Funded through an EPA Superfund Redevelopment Initiative Pilot grant, the Shattuck District Plan describes three redevelopment scenarios for the Shattuck Site (former Superfund site at Jewell and Cherokee) and neighboring industrial properties. Redevelopment scenarios included light-industrial, multi-tenant industrial-ex, and residential industrial lofts. e Multi-tenant Industrial-ex scenario (a hybrid commercial real estate product that features complementary aspects of industrial and oce space) would result in the greatest economic benet to the city, according to the Plan. e Residential Industrial Lofts (live-work spaces) would, however, best meet the steering committees goals of improving the social and economic welfare of the community. Jewell Avenue west of Broadway is envisioned as supporting commercial store-front buildings with retail on the rst oor and residential units above and then transitioning into live/work units along Jewell and the southern portion of the Shattuck Site. North of Jewell, the Plan envisions the Shattuck site supporting light industrial or industrial-ex space. S. Broadway Corridor Study, 2001 e South Broadway Corridor examined the existing conditions on South Broadway and created a vision for the corridors future primarily in terms of transportation and urban design of the street and public right-of-way. e Study recommends a Kit of Parts including urban design elements that can be used in various combinations along the corridor. Specic recommendations are made within Urban Design Zones along South Broadway. e South Broadway Reconstruction Project, in design during the Evans station planning process, will implement the South Broadway Corridor Study through complete roadway and sidewalk reconstruction using concrete pavement, drainage improvements, realignment and reproling where necessary, new curb, gutter, sidewalk, and ADA compliant pedestrian ramps, a raised median and new storm sewer. Industrial Land Study, 2005 e ndings of Denvers Industrial Land Study indicate relatively little demand for industrial land in the City and a considerable amount of industrially-zoned land that is vacant or underutilized. According to the study, the employment density of industrially zoned land in the city was estimated at approximately 11.7 employees per acre. is pales in comparison to the 55 employees per acre in the Denver Tech Center and 73.2 employees per acre in the Cherry Creek area. Given the imbalance between industrial land supply and demand and the market trends for industrial businesses, this study concluded that there is little concern about the recent pattern of rezoning industrial land north of downtown to residential zoning districts, and only slight concern about rezoning land south of downtown from industrial to other uses. e Evans Station Area Plan addresses this reality by supporting the transformation of vacant and underutilized industrial land over time to allow more exibility in land use and a more urban form. Compatible industrial uses are included in the recommended mix in redevelopment areas.

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Evans Station Area Plan Acronyms71 Acronyms

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Evans Station Area Plan Acronyms 72AcronymsADA Americans with Disabilities Act (1990) AIA American Institute of Architects AVR Average Vehicle Ridership BID Business Improvement District CBD Central Business District CBO Community Based organizations CCD City and County of Denver CDBG Community Development Block Grant CDC Community Development Corporation CDFI Community Development Financial Institution CDOT Colorado Department of Transportation CHFA Colorado Housing Finance Agency CIP Capital Improvements Plan (or Program) COP Shop Community Organized Policing CPD Community Planning & Development DHA Denver Housing Authority DHND Division of Housing and Neighborhood Development DOCA Denver Oce of Cultural Aairs DPD Denver Police Department DPR Parks & Recreation DPS Denver Public Schools DPW Public Works DRCOG Denver Council of Regional Governments DURA Denver Urban Renewal Authority EMU Electric Motor Unit EPA Environmental Protection Agency FAR Floor Area Ratio FHA Federal Housing Administration LEED Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design LRT Light Rail Technology MBD Micro business Development MC-Denver Making Connections Denver NEPA National Environmental Policy Act OED Oce of Economic Development OMB Oce of Management and Budget RAC Resident Advisory Committee RNO Registered Neighborhood Organization RTD Regional Transportation District TAZ Trac Analysis Zone TIF Tax Increment Financing TIP Transportation Improvement Program TDM Transportation Demand Management TOD Transit Oriented Development