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Globeville neighborhood plan

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Globeville neighborhood plan
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Community Planning and Development, City and County of Denver
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Denver, CO
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City and County of Denver
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English

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Subjects / Keywords:
Globeville (Denver, Colo.)
Community planning
Neighborhood plans
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Denver -- Globeville

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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DENVER
THE MILE HIGH CITY
Adopted December 1,2014


Acknowledgments
MAYOR MICHAEL B. HANCOCK
DENVER CITY COUNCIL
District 1 Susan Shepherd
District 2 Jeanne Faatz
District3- Paul D. Lopez
District 4 Peggy Lehmann
District 5 Mary Beth Susman
District 6 Charlie Brown
District 7 Chris Nevitt
District 8 Albus Brooks
District 9 -Judy H. Montero,
President Pro-Tem
District 10 Jeanne Robb
District 11 Christopher Herndon,
President
At- Large- Robin Kniech
At-Large Deborah Ortega
DENVER PLANNING BOARD
Julie Underdahl, Chair
Andy Baldyga, Vice Chair
Jim Bershof
Shannon Gifford
Renee Martinez-Stone
Brittany Morris Saunders
Joel Noble
Susan Pearce
ArleenTaniwaki
Frank Schultz
Chris Smith
COMMUNITY PLANNING AND
DEVELOPMENT
Brad Buchanan, Executive Director
Evelyn Baker
Jill Jennings-Golich
Steve Ferris
Steve Gordon
Caryn Champine
Courtland Hyser, Project Manager
Michelle Pyle, Project Manager
Steve Nalley
Tim Watkins
Andrea Burns
Samantha Suter
Andrea Santoro
PUBLIC WORKS
Jose Cornejo, Executive Director
Lesley Thomas
Emily Silverman
Emily Snyder
Justin Schmitz
Mike Anderson
Sarah Anderson
Jennifer Hillhouse
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL
HEALTH
Doug Linkhart, Executive Director
Robin Valdez
Gretchen Armijo
Gene Hook
Dave Erickson
Stacey McConlogue
PARKS AND RECREATION
Lauri Dannemiller, Executive Director
Scott Gilmore
Gordon Robertson
David Marquardt
Courtney Levingston
OFFICE OF ECONOMIC
DEVELOPMENT
Paul Washington, Executive Director
Jeff Romine
Michael Miera
Beth Truby
CITY ATTORNEY'S OFFICE
Karen Aviles
Lori Strand
NORTH DENVER CORNERSTONE
COLLABORATIVE (NDCC)
Kelly Leid, Executive Director
Todd Wenskoski
Erika Martinez
Celia VanDerLoop
DENVER CITY COUNCIL DISTRICT 9
OFFICE
Nola Miguel
Benjamin Roldan-Rojas
SPECIAL THANKS TO THE
MEMBERS OF THE GLOBEVILLE
NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN STEERING
COMMITTEE:
A dedicated volunteer committee of
Globeville residents, business owners,
and neighborhood advocates.


Table of Contents
INTRODUCTION
Planning Process........................................................2
Planning Context........................................................4
Planning Area Overview..................................................5
Study Area Overview.....................................................8
How to Use this Plan....................................................9
Public Input Summary...................................................10
Guiding Principles.....................................................12
Plan Concept ("Plan on a Page")........................................14
GUIDING PRINCIPLES CHAPTERS
A Unique Globeville....................................................16
A Strong Globeville....................................................26
A Connected Globeville.................................................48
A Healthy Globeville...................................................70
CHARACTER AREAS AND TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECTS
Residential Neighborhood Core..........................................84
Historic 45th Avenue Main Street
Washington Street Corridor and the Riverfront..........................90
Improve Washington Street
Enhance the Street Grid in the Riverfront
Connect to the National Western Center
41 st and Fox Station Area............................................110
Industrial Edges......................................................112
Redevelop the ASARCO Site
MOVING FORWARD
Realizing the Vision..................................................119
Types of Implementation Activities....................................119
Champions and Advocates...............................................120
Public Funding Sources and Strategies.................................120
PartnershipTools......................................................121


emj^p
SMicAael S&mimcA
Mayor
Office of the Mayor
City and County Building
Denver, CO 80202-5390
Telephone: (720) 865-9090 Fax: (720) 865-8787
TTY/TTD: (720)865-9010
Dear Globeville Residents:
I'm thrilled to celebrate with you the completion of the Globeville Neighborhood Plan. This plan is a
testament to our collective commitment toward creating a neighborhood that is strong, connected,
healthy and unique.
For the past 125 years, the vibrant community of Globeville a family friendly neighborhood
exemplified by culture and pride has made fundamental contributions to Denver. The Globeville
Neighborhood Plan is a significant milestone that will build on the strength of the neighborhood and
have a lasting positive impact on the residents of Globeville and the city as a whole. Through significant
community outreach, your creative ideas and common sense recommendations are now part of a plan
that will help Globeville continue to thrive.
The City and County of Denver has already begun working with community partners to address
challenges you have identified. In Globeville, two transit stations will re-energize this cornerstone by
increasing access to other parts of the city. In addition, we are investing in infrastructure to provide a
safe, multimodal corridor on Brighton Boulevard. And the National Western Center master planning
team is exploring the potential of the site and thinking creatively about the role the neighborhoods play
in its future.
In 2013,1 formed the North Denver Cornerstone Collaborative (NDCC) to strategically align six key
planning efforts, including the National Western and the Globeville, Elyria and Swansea neighborhoods.
These catalytic projects will not only better connect the neighborhoods and their residents to resources
and opportunities, they will transform a gateway into our city and a cornerstone of our community.
These projects play a major role in the advancement of Denver and its neighborhoods, and I am proud
to have made the NDCC one of my top priorities.
I would like to thank Councilwoman Judy Montero for her dedication to advance North Denver and its
residents. In addition, I appreciate the many neighbors, community organizations and business
representatives who were instrumental in the planning process. Your involvement in creating a vision
for your neighborhood is democracy in action.
Respectfully,
Michael B. Hancock
Mayor
IV
Globeville Neighborhood Plan | INTRODUCTION


Dear Denverites,
Globeville is a neighborhood full of strong people with tenacious spirits and deep
roots in the community. Since 1889, Globeville has had its name and identity and has
thrived and suffered with the strong presence of industry, including smelter, meat
packing and large scale factories. Globeville has always been a tight knit community
where people know each other well, and take care of each other. Immigrants
from many different countries have called Globeville their home, yet regardless of
differences they create a vibrant common neighborhood culture in the day to day
life in Globeville's churches, shops and schools. I believe this Globeville culture will
continue through the direction of this neighborhood plan, which is a product of time
and effort of so many neighborhood leaders and efforts.
It's an exciting time in Globeville, with new rail stations coming in at 41 st/Fox and
38th/Blake, rail will start to serve people in the neighborhood instead of just passing
through with freight. With new and rehabilitated homes from Habitat for Humanity
projects and new developments like TAXI, Globeville is getting new residents and
new life. There are 6 catalytic projects in Mayor Hancock's North Denver Cornerstone
Collaborative initiative, and the Globeville Neighborhood Plan will be the first of
these to come to fruition. The master planning of the National Western Complex is
also in process, directly East of Globeville, and opportunities abound. Yet change
and progress must move forward with the health and wellbeing of the surrounding
neighbors at their center. This is why the Globeville Plan is so critical for our city to
have at this point in time.
I am honored to have fought alongside Globeville leaders to finally get this
neighborhood plan started and finished. It has been so important to me to make sure
that the plan not only discussed land use, but really adhered to values that include
environmental and social justice, economic vitalization, cultural and historic relevancy
and health. Without the lens of these values, you can't even start to talk about how
land should be used in the neighborhood.
We have had great accomplishments already during this planning process, including
a strong steering committee of leaders, new murals and neighborhood signs, and
new bike paths and improvements to our parks and green space in the area. There
is new housing, new economic development, and a new vision for the riverfront that
is creating a dynamic way forward. We also have a Health Impact Assessment that
informs the neighborhood plan and will be a tool for future residents and leaders to
improve their community.
If you are reading this, I hope that you will listen carefully to this plan, and to the
neighborhood residents; honor the stories of the past and help realize this plan for
the future of Globeville.
It has been a great honor to serve the Globeville neighborhood residents,
\XovXtA
o
Councilwoman Judy H. Montero, Denver City Council District 9
INTRODUCTION | Globeville Neighborhood Plan
V


Globeville Neighborhood Plan | INTRODUCTION


Introduction
Globeville is located along the western bank of the South Platte River in
North Central Denver. In addition to the river, major physical landmarks in
the neighborhood include 1-25 and 1-70. Historically, the neighborhood was
home to large industry, especially smelting and meat packing. In Globeville's
early years, immigrants settled in the area and worked in the local industries.
As time passed and the economic structure of Denver evolved, the industries
in the neighborhood changed. Although the smelters are now gone and
the meatpacking industry is much-diminished, a strong industrial presence
remains today, as does an established residential community.
Strong community ties and civic pride bolster the neighborhood, even in
the face of environmental, economic, educational, and infrastructure issues
that cause challenges for quality of life. Many important changes are on the
neighborhood's immediate horizon, including new commuter rail transit, the
1-70 East project in nearby Elyria and Swansea, and an expanding vision for
the National Western Stock Show just across the river to the east.
INTRODUCTION | Globeville Neighborhood Plan
1


Planning Process
The public process for the Globeville Neighborhood Plan kicked off in June
2012. Over the course of the next two years, community members worked
together with City staff to identify issues and opportunities, develop a vision,
and create recommendations and strategies for achieving the vision. Public
meetings and neighborhood steering committee meetings helped shape Ian
content throughout the planning process, as did ongoing interdepartmental
coordination between Denver's departments of Community Planning and
Development, Public Works, Environmental Health, Parks and Recreation, and
the Office of Economic Development.
The planning process used a multi-tiered strategy for collecting public input
to identify assets and issues and to inform the development of Plan concepts
and recommendations:
Globeville Neighborhood Plan Steering Committee. The steering
committee for the Globeville Neighborhood Plan met regularly to deal with
the details of the plan development process. At key points in the process,
joint meetings were held with the steering committee for the Elyria
and Swansea Neighborhoods Plan to ensure that both planning efforts
were effectively coordinated. At the beginning of the planning process,
Globeville Steering Committee members successfully won a grant from
the Denver Foundation that allowed all meetings to feature food, child
care, and Spanish language interpretive services.
Public Meetings. The planning process featured a series of seven
meetings to seek input and guidance from the general public:
Kickoff Meeting and Listening Session- June 28,2012
Development of Vision and Guiding Principles- September 25,2012
A Strong Globeville- February 13, 2013
A Connected Globeville- July 18,2013
A Healthy Globeville, Elyria, and Swansea (Health Impact Assessment
Joint Neighborhood Meeting)- January 8,2014
A Unique Globeville-April 15,2014
Draft Plan Review- October 7,2014
Community Asset Mapping. Councilwoman Judy Montero led a
detailed effort to identify community assets in Globeville, Elyria, and
Swansea. This effort included work sessions with City staff, local non-
profits, faith-based institutions, and the general public.
Individual Stakeholder Meetings. One-on-one meetings were held
with individual stakeholders or groups on an as-needed basis throughout
the planning process.
Targeted Community Outreach. Special meetings were held on an as-
needed basis to engage specific stakeholder groups:
Youth Meeting- Issue and opportunity identification with youth at the
2
Globeville Neighborhood Plan | INTRODUCTION


into English on February 6,2013.
Industrial Stakeholders- engaged as part of an industrial lands study
Street Kidz recreation center on January 28,2013.
Spanish Language Meeting- A meeting led in Spanish and interpreted
in December, 2013.
3
National Western Center Master Plan Public Meetings-The Globeville
planning team attended public meetings for the National Western
Center Master Plan to engage participants in that process.
Oral History Project. As a parallel effort to the ongoing planning effort
in the neighborhood, Councilwoman Judy Montero led an oral history
project. This project resulted in the creation of the 30 minute video
Globeville Elyria Swansea: Then and Now, as well as a photo exhibit at the
Denver Central Library that was on display in the spring and summer of
2014.
>
Health Impact Assessment. A detailed Health Impact Assessment,
How Neighborhood Planning Affects Health in Globeville and Elyria
Swansea, (HIA) was conducted for the Globeville, Elyria, and Swansea
neighborhoods parallel to and as a component of the neighborhood I ^
planning process. The resulting HIA recommendations have been '
Throughout the planning process, there were several related efforts underway
National Western Center Master Plan (National Western Stock Show and
City of Denver)
Brighton Boulevard Corridor Study (Denver Public Works)
T70 Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Statement (Colorado
Department ofTransportation)
Gold Corridor Sustainable Communities Initiative (Denver Regional
Council of Governments)
Globeville Utah Junction Outfall Systems Plan (Denver Public Works)
COORDINATION WITH CONCURRENT PLANNING
EFFORTS
integrated directly into this Plan.

within or adjacent to the study area. The planning team coordinated with
each of these efforts to help ensure consistency:
Health Impact Assessment (Denver Department of Environmental Health,
City Council District 9, and North Denver Cornerstone Collaborative)
Elyria and Swansea Neighborhoods Plan (Denver Community Planning and
Development)
INTRODUCTION | Globeville Neighborhood Plan 3


Planning Context
Denver Comprehensive Plan and Supplements. The Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000 provides the vision for the
entire city. Citywide and small area plans are adopted as supplements Comprehensive Plan 2000 to provide additional
direction for certain topics or areas.
This section explains the applicability and relationship of existing citywide and small area plans to the Globeville
Neighborhood Plan (2014).
Citywide Plans: The following citywide Plans offer a higher level framework than the Globeville Neighborhood
Plan (2014) to guide and influence decisions that affect the future of the city. They are used as a foundation for the
more specific vision, recommendations and strategies contained in the Globeville Neighborhood Plan:
Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000
Denver Bicycle Master Plan (2001)
Blueprint Denver: An Integrated Land Use and Transportation Plan (2002)
Denver Parks and Recreation Game Plan (2002)
Pedestrian Master Plan (2004)
Small Area Plans: Small area plans set specific visions, recommendations, and strategies for an area. Within
the boundary of the Globeville statistical neighborhood, there are three existing small area Plans. This Globeville
Neighborhood Plan (2014) relates to and affects these small area Plans as follows:
Globeville Neighborhood Plan (1989 readopted in 2000): This Globeville Neighborhood Plan (2014)
supersedes and rescinds the Globeville Neighborhood Plan (1989 readopted in 2000). As such, the Globeville
Neighborhood Plan (1989 readopted in 2000) will no longer be used to inform decisions that affect this area
of the city.
River North Plan (2003): This Globeville Neighborhood Plan (2014) overlaps with a portion of the boundaries
of the River North Plan (2003). The area of overlap is generally the area between the consolidated rail lines
and the South Platte River. Within the area of overlap, this Globeville Neighborhood Plan (2014) supersedes
the River North Plan (2003). As such, the River North Plan will no longer be used to inform decisions that affect
the area of overlap.
41 st and Fox Station Area Plan (2009): This Globeville Neighborhood Plan (2014) overlaps with the
boundaries of the 41st and Fox Station Area Plan generally east of the railroad tracks, west of 1-25, and south
of 1-70. This Globeville Neighborhood Plan (2014) reinforces the recommendations of the 41st and Fox Station
Area Plan with respect to the Station Area Plan's boundaries. As such, within the area of overlap, both Plans
should be used to inform decisions that affect this area of the city.
Implementation Plans. City agencies prepare implementation plans to guide their policies and work programs.
Although these plans are not adopted as supplements to Comprehensive Plan 2000, they provide important
guidance to the City and its agencies for implementing Comprehensive Plan 2000 and its supplements.
Greenprint Denver (2006)
Strategic Transportation Plan (2008)
Sanitary Sewer Master Plan (2009)
Strategic Parking Plan (2010)
Denver Moves (2011)
Storm Drainage Master Plan (2014)
4
Globeville Neighborhood Plan | INTRODUCTION


Planning Area Overview North Denver
THE ROLE OF THE GLOBEVILLE NEIGHBORHOOD
PLAN WITHIN THE NORTH DENVER CORNERSTONE
COLLABORATIVE
Denver has several major redevelopment and infrastructure projects taking
place that provide a connection from Denver Union Station to Denver
International Airport. Named the Corridor of Opportunity, the nearly 23-mile
stretch is one of the most compelling commercial investment opportunities
in the world, with thousands of developable acres. Within the Corridor of
Opportunity is a vibrant community consisting of the Globeville, Elyria, and
Swansea neighborhoods that have a rich history of making fundamental
contributions to the city. Currently, there are six different redevelopment
projects in this cornerstone that provide a unique and historic opportunity
to rebuild a connected community and energize a gateway to downtown
Denver.
"What we build today will
create Denver's tomorrow.
Signature development projects
will strengthen our economy,
create jobs and improve
neighborhoods."
Mayor Michael B. Hancock
INTRODUCTION | Globeville Neighborhood Plan
5


Planning Area Overview North Denver
In early 2013, Mayor Michael B. Hancock recognized the need to align all
of these efforts under one coordinated vision as part of creating a world-
class city. The resulting North Denver Cornerstone Collaborative (NDCC) is a
coordinated effort to ensure integrated planning and deliberate connections
among the converging projects that are taking place. Each of the six projects
is unique and plays a significant role in rebuilding our neighborhoods.
Globeville and Elyria and Swansea Neighborhood Plans. The NDCC
is helping to ensure that the Globeville Neighborhood Plan and the Elyria
and Swansea Neighborhood Plan are aligned with each other and that
the future Plans support the needs of a diverse and historic community.
Globeville's neighborhood planning process was initiated the year prior
to the creation of the NDCC and is one of the first NDCC projects to be
completed.
National Western Center. In partnership with the National Western
Association, Colorado State University, Museum of Nature and Science,
History Colorado, and the City and County of Denver, this project is
focused on creating a year round destination centered on education,
economic development, tourism, and entertainment. As a first step, a
comprehensive National Western Center Master Plan was in development
concurrent with the planning processes for the Globeville Neighborhood
Plan and the Elyria and Swansea Neighborhoods Plan.
Brighton Boulevard Corridor Redevelopment. The NDCC is overseeing
the effective public infrastructure improvement to the Boulevard and
continuing the momentum of reinvestment that is beginning to emerge
and energize this gateway to downtown Denver from I-70.
River North. This project is focused on reclaiming the South Platte
River via greenway and transportation improvements and identifying
sustainable development opportunities along the riverfront.
Interstate 70 Reconstruction. Collaborating with the Colorado
Department of Transportation and area stakeholders is a key component
to ensuring that smart improvements are made to I-70 between Colorado
and Brighton Boulevards that will help reconnect Denver neighborhoods.
Regional Transportation District Station Development. Working
with the Regional Transportation District (RTD) and City and County of
Denver agencies to coordinate the planning and implementation of the
new East, North, and Gold Rail Lines is essential to creating connected
neighborhoods. These lines will connect downtown to the National
Western Stock Show and Denver International Airport with several
stations in the Globeville, Elyria, and Swansea neighborhoods.
6
Globeville Neighborhood Plan | INTRODUCTION


Planning Area Overview North Denver
HOWTHE GLOBEVILLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN RELATES
TO THE ELYRIA AND SWANSEA NEIGHBORHOODS PLAN
AND THE NATIONAL WESTERN CENTER MASTER PLAN
As stated previously, the content of the Globeville Neighborhood Plan was
coordinated with numerous other plans, studies, and projects. Of these,
detailed and ongoing coordination was especially critical between this Plan
and the concurrent Elyria and Swansea Neighborhoods Plan and the National
Western Center Master Plan. The importance of this coordination stems from
the fact that all three planning efforts have a shared boundary along the
South Platte River, and all three emphasize the importance of enhanced
connections between their respective planning areas in order to realize the
goals of each specific planning effort.
The role of the neighborhood Plans is to establish the vision for their
respective neighborhoods and to identify recommended implementation
actions to achieve their visions. The neighborhood Plans have been closely
coordinated to ensure that they are complimentary and do not provide
conflicting or contradictory guidance. The National Western Center Master
Plan is responsive to the guidance of the surrounding neighborhood Plans,
and its role is to help implement the vision that is set by those Plans.
INTRODUCTION | Globeville Neighborhood Plan
7


Study Area Overview Globeville
The future success of the Globeville neighborhood as a whole depends, in
part, on the inter-related health of the various component areas within the
neighborhood, referred to in this plan as "Character Areas." Each of these
Areas has its own distinct characteristics as a result of differences in land use,
connectivity, development patterns, opportunities, and other factors. A key
goal is to maintain and enhance the distinct identity of each Character Area
while improving the transitions and connections between them. This Plan
identifies four distinct Character Areas within Globeville:
Residential Neighborhood Core
Washington Street Corridor and the Riverfront
41st and Fox Station Area
Industrial Edges
/
8
Globeville Neighborhood Plan | INTRODUCTION


How to Use this Plan
This Plan establishes near-term aspirations for Globeville as well as a long-
range vision and guiding principles for the development and future of the
neighborhood. The elements of this Plan will direct the community toward
achieving the vision for a unique, strong, connected, and healthy Globeville.
Public agencies and private entities will use this Plan in coming years for many
purposes and actions that will affect the form and function of Globeville. The
Plan provides City-adopted policy direction to guide decision-making related
to development opportunities, transportation, partnerships, and many others.
Many of the recommendations will require multiple steps over several years
by a variety of participants.
The Plan provides a sound policy basis for a thriving Globeville. The Plan is
intended to give the latitude needed to pursue unforeseen opportunities that
will arise and to respond to new challenges over the coming years.
The Plan structure has three major components in addition to this
introduction:
The Guiding Principle chapters provide content that generally applies
to the entire Plan area and provides the background to support the
recommendations for a Unique, Strong, Connected, and Healthy
Globeville.
The Character Areas chapter presents four subareas within Globeville:
Residential Neighborhood Core, Washington Street Corridor and
the Riverfront, 41 st and Fox Station Area, and Industrial Edges. Each
Character Area is described in greater detail and has its own specific
recommendations. Some of the recommended projects are identified as
"transformative," meaning that their implementation would be catalytic
in transforming the area and achieving major components of the Plan's
vision over the next 20 years.
The Moving Forward chapter describes Plan implementation activities,
priorities, and potential funding sources.
As with the Comprehensive Plan 2000 and its supplements, Plan
recommendations provide guidance. Future implementation actions such
as official map amendments, text amendments to the Denver Zoning Code,
capital improvements, and public-private partnerships will require specific
actions on the part of the City and County of Denver.
INTRODUCTION | Globeville Neighborhood Plan
9


What do You Like About Globeville?
What People Like about Globeville and What They Want to Change.
At the beginning of the planning process, City staff engaged the
community in a conversation aimed at identifying the key issues within
the neighborhood. These key issues are presented as responses from the
community to two questions:
1. What do you like about your neighborhood?
2. What would you like to change?
What people like about Globeville:
People who live in the neighborhood
Multi-generational
People here have been here for a long time
Stable neighborhood with high home ownership
Affordable home ownership opportunities
"Sweet community"- the way people treat one another
Habitat for Humanity is working in the neighborhood
Proximity to downtown
Housing diversity and character of existing housing
Calmness lots of quiet streets
Globeville is an old neighborhood that helped build Denver
River trail and potential development along the river
The neighborhood already has some great assets and amenities:
churches, parks, playgrounds, local businesses
Things are already improving
Infrastructure improvements that have been made
Opportunity to bring our history forward into a sustainable world
10
Globeville Neighborhood Plan | INTRODUCTION


What Would You Want to Change?
What people would like to change about Globeville:
Need for Globeville, Elyria, and Swansea to coordinate and have a bigger
voice
Connect on the neighborhood's terms, not just reacting to other projects
Highways and railroads are barriers that make Globeville like an island
It's hard to get around. There are a lot of dead-end streets
Incomplete curb, gutter, and sidewalk network
I want installation, improvement and maintenance of sidewalks, including
on Washington Street
I want better access, including landscaping, to the South Platte River Trail
Absentee landowners
Lack of code enforcement overgrown weeds and junk cars
Lack of access to jobs, the library, and education
Lack of healthy food options within Globeville
Alleys need to be cleaned up maintenance, garbage, lighting
I want benches and waste cans at bus stops, and improved transit
frequency
I want a sidewalk around the perimeter of Argo Park and through the park
at 48th Avenue between Logan Street and Pearl Street
Environmental issues: contaminated industrial sites, air and waterborne
pollution, soil contamination, and odors
Noise from interstates and freight trains
Need more basic services: grocery store, pharmacy, local restaurants, civic
uses
Globeville built Denver, now Denver needs to build up Globeville
INTRODUCTION | Globeville Neighborhood Plan 11


Guiding Principles
Using the conversation about what people like about Globeville and what they would like to change as a starting
point, City staff worked with the community to develop guiding principles for the planning effort. The guiding
principles are intended to be the measuring stick for Plan recommendations: each Plan recommendation or concept
within the Plan must contribute to achieving at least one of the guiding principles. The four guiding principles are:
A Unique Globeville. Globeville is a neighborhood unlike any other
in Denver. The combination of its rich historical context, vibrant
residential community, and the industrial landscape set it apart
from the rest of the city, and even from most neighborhoods around
the country. Being unique also means transforming challenges
into opportunities and reimagining elements that may divide the
neighborhood into elements that will unite the neighborhood.
The Vision for Unique: A neighborhood rich with destinations that
celebrates its history and uniqueness and overcomes challenges to
create a brighter future.
A Strong Globeville. Participants in the planning process came to
define "Strong" as a combination of inter-related qualities. It means
having a neighborhood where the land uses are laid out in a rational
way that meets the needs of residents, businesses, and industry. It
means meeting the community's storm drainage needs. It means
having access to a vibrant system of parks within the neighborhood,
quality jobs, affordable and diverse housing options, a variety of
services, and education.
The Vision for Strong: Globeville is a neighborhood where diverse
land uses are present and are located such that the needs of residents,
businesses, and industry are met equitably. The neighborhood
has a complete and accessible system of parks that encourages
physical activity, social interaction, and environmental responsibility.
Residential and employment opportunities are diverse and accessible
with services in place to support the wellbeing of the local population.
12
Globeville Neighborhood Plan | INTRODUCTION


A Connected Globeville. Being connected means identifying strategies
for providing safe, multi-modal, sustainable connections within the
neighborhood, to adjacent neighborhoods, and to the region. It means
accommodating all transportation modes within the neighborhood while
balancing the unique needs of each so they can navigate effectively and
safely.
The Vision for Connected: A mobility network that provides a full array of
transportation choices and balances the needs of pedestrians, bicyclists,
drivers, trucks, rail, and transit.
A Healthy Globeville. In recent years, there has been a growing
understanding of the connection between how communities are
designed and the impact they have on human health. Well-designed
neighborhoods can improve health, and poorly-designed communities
can harm health.
The Vision for Healthy: Globeville is a healthy and safe neighborhood
where residents, workers, and visitors alike experience mental and
physical wellbeing as a result of good environmental quality, a well-
connected multi-modal street network, and convenient access to goods
and services.
INTRODUCTION | Globeville Neighborhood Plan 13


THE VISION FORGLOBEVILLE
Globeville is a Unique, Strong, Connected and Healthy Neighborhood.

v <
1. Showcase the History of Globeville
2. Embrace Globeville's Unique
Physical Attributes
3. Reinforce and Enhance Globeville's I*
Unique Sense of Place
Character Areas
RESIDENTIAL NEIGHBORHOOD CORE
VISION: Maintain the single family residential
character of the neighborhood core while improving
internal circulation and enhancing 45th Avenue as a
neighborhood-serving main street.
TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECT:
Historic 45th Avenue Main Street
1. A Land Use Plan that Balances the
Needs of Residents, Commerce,
and Industry
2. Effective Storm Drainage and
Water Quality Management
3. An Integrated, Complete, and
Diverse Park System
4. Improve Access to Jobs, Housing,
Neighborhood Services, and
Education
WASHINGTON STREET AND THE RIVERFRONT
VISION: The area is transformed into a mixed-use
riverfront destination area that capitalizes on its
adjacency to the South Platte River, a revitalized
Washington Street, reinvented green space, and direct
connections across the river to the National Western
Center.
TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECTS:
Improve Washington Street
Enhance the Street Grid in the Riverfront Area
Connect to the National Western Center
14
Globeville Neighborhood Plan | INTRODUCTION


L
5. Address Traffic Operations and
Roadway Maintenance Issues
J
1. Improve Environmental Quality
2. Improve Multi-Modal Connectivity
3. Increase Access to Goods and
Services
4. Enhance Community Safety
5. Improve Mental Health and
Wellbeing
6. Implement All Remaining HIA
Strategies
41 ST AND FOX STATION AREA
VISION: The 41 st and Fox Station will develop over the
coming decades into the focal point of a diverse, transit-
supportive, and environmentally sustainable urban
center. Many new residents and businesses will be drawn
to the convenient location close to downtown and near
some of Denver's most vibrant urban neighborhoods.
INDUSTRIAL EDGES
VISION: Maintain stable industrial and employment
areas within Globeville while enhancing compatibility
with nearby non-industrial uses.
TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECT:
Redevelop the ASARCO Site
INTRODUCTION | Globeville Neighborhood Plan 15


16 Globeville Neighborhood Plan | UNIQUE


WHY IS UNIQUENESS IMPORTANT TO GLOBEVILLE?
Globeville is a neighborhood unlike any other in Denver. The combination
of its rich historical context, vibrant residential community, and the
industrial landscape set it apart from the rest of the city, and even from
most neighborhoods around the country. Throughout the planning
process, the community consistently expressed a strong desire to embrace
its past while improving the conditions of the neighborhood, and in
doing so, create neighborhood and regional destinations in areas that are
currently underutilized. This Plan aims to maintain the current aspects
of Globeville that make it unique while enhancing how it functions as a
neighborhood.
THE HISTORY OF GLOBEVILLE
Globeville was incorporated as a town in 1891 and was annexed into the City and
County of Denver in 1902. Originally called Holdenville, Globeville got its name
when the Holden Smelter became the Globe Smelter. This large employment center
established a residential village to the south, and Globeville was truly its own self-
sufficient community. The stockyards, meat packing businesses, and smelters created a
strong and bustling economic center, which enabled the vibrant and resilient residential
neighborhood to flourish. In its early days, Globeville was made up mainly of eastern
European immigrants. There was a strong Polish population, and many other people of
varying ethnicities settled in Globeville, creating a melting pot community.
This culturally-rich, self-sufficient, and vibrant community faced challenges when
the meatpacking industry became more automated. The local economy and the
community around it began to decline. The physical landscape was also drastically
altered when Interstates 25 and 70 were constructed through the neighborhood in the
1950s and 1960s. The community that once was so connected physically, socially, and
economically became fragmented by the new infrastructure. While the interstates were
important to the regional transportation network, their presence in Globeville has been
a factor in stifling the neighborhood.
RECOMMENDATIONS:
1. SHOWCASE THE HISTORY OF GLOBEVILLE
2. EMBRACE GLOBEVILLE'S UNIQUE PHYSICAL ATTRIBUTES
3. REINFORCE AND ENHANCE GLOBEVILLE'S UNIQUE SENSE OF PLACE
UNIQUE | Globeville Neighborhood Plan 17


KEY ISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIES:
Historical Assets. Many structures from the early days of
Globeville still exist today. Historic churches, commercial
buildings, and houses are sprinkled throughout
Globeville and add charm to the neighborhood. Laradon
Hall is the only locally-designated historic landmark
structure in Globeville, although more buildings are listed
on the National Register of Historic Places. It's likely that
other individual buildings and possibly even districts
within the neighborhood would be eligible for local
designation.
A Strong Sense of Community. Residents of Globeville
are proud of their community's history and describe the
neighborhood as socially cohesive despite the presence
of physical barriers. The current population is majority
Latino, and the neighborhood has high rates of home
ownership.
The Impact of Physical Barriers on the Built
Environment. A significant number of physical barriers
are located in Globeville. These barriers include freeway
infrastructure as well as freight rail spurs, lines, and
yards. In addition to interrupting the local street network
and limiting mobility choices, these facilities can have
negative impacts on the attractiveness and quality of the
built environment. Some of these facilities place blank
walls throughout the neighborhood, while others create
oddly-shaped "leftover"spaces that often sit vacant and
unmaintained.
Unique Physical Attributes. Mostly a result of the
interaction of various barriers with the local street
grid and adjacent land, Globeville has a collection of
unique physical features not commonly found in other
neighborhoods:
Blank Walls and Terminated Views. The interstates,
freight rail, and large industrial sites disrupt the
street network and create dead-end streets and
terminated views. These termination points can
be good locations for visual focal points such as
murals, landscaping, ornamental planting beds, and
sculptures.
The Mousetrap. The 1-25 and 1-70 interchange,
commonly known by locals as "the mousetrap,"
allows for the continuous flow of vehicles between
1-70 and 1-25. This large piece of infrastructure
consumes nearly 60 acres of land in the middle of
the neighborhood. With few exceptions, this area
18 Globeville Neighborhood Plan | UNIQUE


"The Globeville, Elyria, and
Swansea neighborhoods are
some of the most culturally-
rich, diverse, and historic areas
in the City of Denver. For
decades, people from these
communities in the north part
of town thrived because they
were connected to each other;
they could walk to community
gathering places, schools,
grocery stores, creameries,
businesses and local jobs at
the nearby packing houses. In
essence, they were the shining
example of the sustainable
communities we are aiming to
build today."
- Councilwoman Judy Montero in the
opening narrative of the Globeville, Elyria,
Swansea Legacy Project.
is impassible using the local street network, making
it difficult to travel from one part of Globeville to
another.
Oddly-Shaped, Left-Over Spaces. Another
impact of regional transportation infrastructure is
the "leftover spaces" that were created when the
infrastructure was introduced. These properties tend
to have an irregular shape, are generally small in size,
and are typically undevelopable either due to their
shape and size or because of other factors such as
limited access, slope, or adjacency to transportation
operations.
Alley-Streets. A few streets in Globeville, including
Clark Place and portions of Leaf Court, blend the
characteristics of City streets and alleys. These
alley-streets tend to be narrower than City streets,
but wider than alleys. They have street signs and
sidewalks like City streets, but are fronted by garages
and rear property lines like alleys. Few, if any,
structures on these blocks face the alley-street.
A Harsh Edge Between Industrial and Residential
Uses. Globeville grew up in the industrial age, when
houses were built adjacent to industry for easy access to
jobs, and industry was located along railroads and the
river. Globeville's landscape is still representative of this
industrial heritage, and there are many examples within
the neighborhood where residential uses are located
directly across a street or alley from industrial uses. The
result is a harsh edge between stable industrial uses and
stable residential uses.
Art and Culture. Globeville is a creative and artistic
community with large murals located at the Argo Park
Swimming Pool and at points of access under the
1-70 viaduct. Old Globeville Days is an annual festival
celebrating the neighborhood's culture with food and
music.
UNIQUE | Globeville Neighborhood Plan 19


RECOMMENDATION 1: Showcase the History of Globeville
A1. PRESERVE GLOBEVILLE'S IDENTITY AND UNIQUE
CHARACTER.
Historic Resources Survey. Conduct a survey to identify character-
defining buildings throughout the neighborhood. Use the results of this
study to evaluate character-defining buildings for their suitability for
designation as Denver landmark structures or as part of a larger Denver
landmark historic district.
Adaptive Reuse. Promote the adaptive reuse of existing buildings,
especially character-defining buildings.
A2. PROMOTE THE USE OF INTERPRETIVE SIGNS AND
HISTORICAL MARKERS.
As redevelopment occurs, use the cleanup of contaminated sites and
adaptive reuse of buildings as opportunities to provide signage telling the
story of the property and what used to be there. Plaques, historical markers,
and educational signage are appropriate ways to convey this information.
A3. RESPECTTHE INDUSTRIAL HISTORY.
As new buildings are constructed in industrial areas or as older industrial
buildings are adaptively reused, look for opportunities to reflect the
neighborhood's industrial heritage in the architectural and site design choices
that are made for these projects.
Interpretive signs, historical markers, plaques,
and other types of signs can be used to help
teii the story of a place and define its unique
qualities.
20 Globeville Neighborhood Plan | UNIQUE


RECOMMENDATION 1: Showcase the History of Globeville
Globeville has always been geographically
separated from much of the rest of Denver.
Prior to modern transportation, this separation
meant that neighborhood-serving retail needed
to be located within the neighborhood.
UNIQUE | Globeville Neighborhood Plan 21


RECOMMENDATION 2: Embrace Globeville's Unique Physical Attributes
These examples from other cities illustrate how
relatively modest, low-cost improvements can
beautify and transform spaces that would
otherwise be wasted and unutiiized. The large
infrastructure that is prevalent in Globeville
means that opportunities to create places from
underutilized space are also prevalent.
A4. BEAUTIFY TERMINATING VIEWS.
Terminating views are opportunities for focal points, which can showcase
unique murals, landscaping, sculptures, and even community message
boards. The premier opportunity for this strategy within Globeville is the
long, blank concrete wall of 1-70 along 46th Avenue.
A.5 TRANSFORM "LEFTOVER" AREAS INTO
NEIGHBORHOOD ASSETS.
Turn forgotten areas such as leftover right-of way, small abandoned spaces,
oddly shaped, or otherwise undevelopable sites into neighborhood assets.
Rails to Trails. If, at a future date, any of the various rail lines or rail
spurs within the neighborhood are abandoned, explore the feasibility of
converting the railroad right-of-way into off-street pedestrian and bicycle
trails.
Pocket Parks. Where leftover spaces exist, such as at the curve near
the mousetrap where Broadway and 46th Avenue meet, explore the
feasibility of transforming these areas into pocket parks.
Convey to Adjacent Owners. Where creating public spaces like trails
or parks is infeasible or inadvisable, explore conveying leftover land to
adjacent property owners to establish a caretaker for the property and
possibly to make it developable by combining it with adjacent land.
A6. EXPLORE THE OPPORTUNITIES OF THE
MOUSETRAP.
Other cities are taking control of the wasted landscapes surrounding large
infrastructure. Study potential modifications to the mousetrap to celebrate its
uniqueness and, where possible, to create benefits to Globeville.
Explore the potential to create pedestrian and bicycle access through the
mousetrap using bridges, tunnels, and the leftover land within the facility.
Plant trees to beautify the space and to filter particulates from the air.
Explore underutilized land on the edges of the mousetrap that could be
enhanced to create additional greenspace or other community-serving
amenities.
Beautify the existing concrete pillars and infrastructure potentially
through installation of deliberate night-time lighting design.
A7. ENHANCE ALLEY-STREETS.
Explore partnerships with organizations to implement an alley beautification
program in Globeville. Where alley-streets exist, the additional width could be
used to showcase sustainable streetscape design utilizing green infrastructure
and stormwater management techniques. Alternatively, alleys could become
neighborhood gathering places and destination areas by showcasing
community art, adaptive reuse of materials, or other unique qualities.
22
Globeville Neighborhood Plan | UNIQUE


I'i
RECOMMENDATION 2: Embrace Globeville's Unique Physical Attributes
The 1-25 and T70 interchange, better known as
"the mousetrap," consumes about 60 acres of
land in the middle ofGlobeville (see images to
the left). In 1933 (top left) the residential streets
ofGlobeville formed a continuous network. In
the 1956 aerial (middle left) the interchange is
shown as it existed prior to the construction of
1-70. Garden Place Academy is highlighted in all
three images to provide a point of reference.
UNIQUE | Globeville Neighborhood Plan 23


RECOMMENDATION 3: Reinforce and Enhance Globeville's Unique Sense of
Place.
An Integrated Strategy for
Improving Residential and
Industrial Compatibility.
Currently, Globeville's residential
core is adjacent to industrial uses,
while most goods, services, and
cultural destinations are located
outside of the neighborhood
and often far away. This Plan's
land use strategies (see Strong
Chapter) strive to buffer
the residential core of the
neighborhood from industrial
impacts, while also introducing
mixed-use development at key
locations within Globeville. The
urban design recommendations
presented in the Unique Chapter
are intended to compliment this
land use strategy and further
enhance industrial and residential
compatibility.
A8. SOFTEN THE EDGE BETWEEN INDUSTRIAL AND
RESIDENTIAL USES.
Maintain the presence of industry within the neighborhood while
implementing design-based strategies to make it more compatible with
adjacent residential uses.
Improve Compatibility through Urban Design. To enhance
compatibility, consider establishing additional urban design requirements
on new development or redevelopment along streets where industrial
and residential uses have a shared edge:
Avoid creating long, blank, unarticulated walls and surfaces.
Ensure that industrial uses are rear-loaded, wherever possible.
For industrial uses with an office or retail component, locate non-
industrial uses at the street edge with industrial uses to the rear of the
structure.
Design the street-facing facades of industrial buildings to be
compatible with the pedestrian scale of adjacent non-industrial uses.
Explore and support opportunities for shared truck access that serves
multiple businesses, such as through shared easements and parking
areas. This can help to limit truck traffic to a single point of access that
serves multiple industrial users.
Design Review Guidelines and Process. Consider establishing design
guidelines and an associated review process as a tool for achieving the
design objectives listed above.
A9. CREATE A FACADE IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM FOR
INDUSTRIAL PROPERTIES.
For existing industrial buildings that are not being redeveloped, incentivize
updating the buildings with new facades.
Offer grants or low-interest loans for business owners to update their
building facades.
Consider allowing the funds to also be used to install new landscaping.
Strive to create a pedestrian scale in the new facade.
Emphasize the use of high quality, human-scaled materials, such as
masonry.
24 Globeville Neighborhood Plan | UNIQUE


RECOMMENDATION 3: Reinforce and Enhance Globeville's Unique Sense of
Place.
A10. CULTIVATE ART, CREATIVITY, AND CULTURE.
Foster community expression, ownership, and pride through a combination
of complementary strategies:
Support Public Art. Public Art serves as a tool for economic
revitalization and helps contribute to a community's identity. When used
correctly, public art can help foster neighborhood pride and bring people
together. Also, public art can attract people to a community who bring
a broad array of talents and experiences. Ideally, public art should help
bring the community together while honoring the neighborhood's past.
Integrate Art into Daily Life. Encourage unconventional expression of
art and creativity in the public realm. Strive to beautify common objects
in daily life, such as bus shelters and fences.
Support Community Events and Celebrations. Public festivals, such
as Old Globeville Days, bring the community together while raising
the neighborhood's profile to the greater Denver region. Support the
continuation of existing cultural events, and look for opportunities to
establish more.
All. CREATE UNIQUE NEIGHBORHOOD DESTINATION
AREAS.
Reinforce and strengthen existing areas and take advantage of opportunities
to create new places. This plan promotes the creation of several new or
enhanced neighborhood destination areas. The Character Areas and
Transformative Projects Chapter offer specific details and recommendations
for each area.
Key Areas to Strengthen and Enhance:
Residential Neighborhood Core
Historic 45th Avenue Main Street
Industrial Edges
Key Areas to Transform and Create New Places:
Washington Street Corridor
New Riverfront Destination Area
41st and Fox Station Area
Examples of art integrated into daily life include
bus stops as art, intersection art, creative
fencing materials, and lighting design for
concrete infrastructure.
UNIQUE | Globeville Neighborhood Plan 25


VISION: Globeville is a neighborhood where diverse land
uses are present and are located such that the needs of
residents, businesses, and industry are met equitably. The
neighborhood has a complete and accessible system of
parks that encourages physical activity, social interaction,
and environmental responsibility. Residential and
employment opportunities are diverse and accessible
with services in place to support the wellbeing of the local
population.

26
Globeville Neighborhood Plan | STRONG


WHY IS A STRONG COMMUNITY IMPORTANTTO GLOBEVILLE?
In the early stages of the planning process, one of the guiding principles
that emerged from neighborhood discussions was the desire for a
Strong Community. Participants in the planning process came to define
"Strong" as a combination of inter-related qualities. It means having
a neighborhood where the land uses are laid out in a rational way that
meets the needs of residents, businesses, and industry. It means meeting
the community's storm drainage needs. It means having access to a
vibrant system of parks within the neighborhood, and also having access
to quality jobs, affordable and diverse housing options, and a variety of
services.
This chapter addresses each of the components of a Strong Community:
Land Use
Storm Drainage and Water Quality
Parks
Jobs
Housing
Services
Education
RECOMMENDATIONS:
1. A LAND USE PLAN THAT BALANCES THE NEEDS OF RESIDENTS,
COMMERCE, AND INDUSTRY
2. EFFECTIVE STORM DRAINAGE AND WATER QUALITY MANAGEMENT
3. AN INTEGRATED, COMPLETE, AND DIVERSE PARK SYSTEM
4. IMPROVE ACCESS TO JOBS, HOUSING, NEIGHBORHOOD SERVICES, AND
EDUCATION
STRONG | Globeville Neighborhood Plan 27


Globeville Townhomes
KEY ISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIES
Diverse Land Use. Globeville is a neighborhood with
diverse land uses spanning the range from single
family homes to commercial businesses and industry.
These different land uses exist in close proximity to
each other within the neighborhood, a condition that
necessitates a strong land use plan to ensure that the
needs of residents, commerce, and industry are met
in an equitable, balanced way.
The System of Parks is a Mix of Successful and
Underutilized Spaces. A wide variety of parks and
recreational facilities are located within Globeville
including Heron Pond, Denver's first designated
natural area, and Stapleton Recreation Center,
which provides a variety of recreational services.
Globeville's park facilities range significantly in
type and purpose and are a major asset for the
neighborhood. While Argo Park and the Stapleton
Recreation Center are successful community spaces,
other open space facilities, including Northside Park,
Heron Pond, and the South Platte River Trail remain
underutilized by Globeville residents. By addressing
the factors contributing to this underutilization, such
as physical disconnection, park design, and adjacent
land use, safety concerns can be addressed, and the
facilities can better-serve the neighborhood.
Difficult and Non-lntuitive Entry Points to the
South Platte River Trail. The South Platte River Trail
is a regional amenity that is located within Globeville,
yet entry points to the trail can be hard to find and
difficult to access.
Stormwater Needs. The Globeville neighborhood
is located within the Globeville-Utah Junction Basin.
Drainage in the basin is predominately west to east
with outfalls at the South Platte River. Drainage and
flooding problems in the Globeville-Utah Junction
watershed are primarily caused by undersized
infrastructure and a lack of drainage infrastructure.
The existing drainage systems are typically
undersized for a two-year storm event.
High Rate of Home Ownership. The single family
housing stock in Globeville is relatively affordable
compared to many other Denver neighborhoods
and to the city as a whole. This lower price point
means that home ownership is attainable for lower
income households, and as a result, Globeville's home
ownership rate is higher than the Denver average
even though its household incomes are lower. A
continued supply of affordable housing is necessary
for the neighborhood to continue its trend of high
28
Globeville Neighborhood Plan | STRONG


home ownership rates in the future. The variety of
housing options and housing types are limited within
the neighborhood with single family homes being
the most prominent and other housing types being
relatively uncommon.
Limited Employment Opportunities. The presence
of industry means that there are many jobs located
in Globeville, yet residents report that they lack the
necessary skills, resources, or education to compete
for these jobs. The community has expressed a desire
for more diverse industry, including high tech and
clean tech, as well as retail, administrative, hospitality,
and other jobs.
Lack of Neighborhood Services. While there are
a number of well-established community-serving
institutions within the neighborhood, including
churches and recreation centers, Globeville lacks
access to many basic neighborhood services. Part
of the problem is that many important services do
not exist within the neighborhood or nearby, such as
mental health services or a full-service grocery store.
Another challenge is that limited mobility options
can make it difficult for residents to access existing
services, possibly leading to their underutilization.
Educational Needs and Opportunities. Globeville
is home to an elementary school, Garden Place
Academy, but educational opportunities for older
residents are limited. In addition to supporting
the existing school, there is a need to create
educational pathways for all ages. There is also a
unique opportunity to collaborate with Colorado
State University through establishing educational
programs in the area in partnership with the National
Western Center.
STRONG | Globeville Neighborhood Plan 29


RECOMMENDATION 1: A Land Use Plan that Balances the Needs of Residents,
Commerce, and Industry
Single Family Residential
Urban Residential
Mixed Use
AREAS OF CHANGE AND AREAS OF STABILITY
Blueprint Denver, the City's integrated land use and transportation plan,
introduced the concept of Areas of Change and Areas of Stability. The
purpose of Areas of Change is to channel growth where it is desirable and
would be the most beneficial. The purpose of Areas of Stability is to maintain
the character of an area while also accommodating a more limited amount
of new development and redevelopment. Areas of Change are identified on
the Globeville Neighborhood Plan's Concept Land Use and Areas of Change
Map. Any areas not identified as an Area of Change on that map should be
construed to be an Area of Stability.
CONCEPT LAND USE DESIGNATIONS
Blueprint Denver establishes concept land use designations that describe
the particular character and scale that is desired in the future. The
Globeville Neighborhood Plan uses these categories as the foundation for its
recommended Concept Land Use and Areas of Change Map. Two additional
concept land use designations, Industrial Mixed Use and Single Family with
Accessory Dwelling Unit, have been added to reflect land use strategies that
are specific to Globeville. The Blueprint Denver Concept Land Use Map will be
amended as needed based on this plan.
Single Family with Accessory Dwelling Unit (ADU): Single family
homes are the predominant residential type in these areas. An Accessory
swelling unit is an additional residential unit that is located on the same
lot as a single family home. Accessory dwelling units enable aging in
place, multi-generational houses, and additional income through rentals
and may be within the main house (e.g. basement apartment) or within a
separate accessory structure.
Urban Residential: Urban residential areas are higher density and
primarily residential but may include complementary commercial uses.
A mixture of housing types is present, including single family houses,
townhouses, small multifamily apartments, and sometimes mid to high-
rise residential structures.
Mixed Use: These areas have both a sizable employment base as well
as a variety of mid to high-density housing options. Intensity is higher
in mixed-use areas than in predominantly residential areas. Land uses
may be, but are not necessarily, mixed in each building, development, or
block. Pedestrian access is important within these areas, with residential
and non-residential uses always within short walking distance of one
another.
Transit-Oriented Development (TOD): Transit-oriented developments
have land uses with a direct correlation to the function of a mass transit
system. These development sites are typically located within a half mile
walking distance of a transit station. Transit-oriented developments
30
Globeville Neighborhood Plan | STRONG


RECOMMENDATION 1: A Land Use Plan that Balances the Needs of Residents,
Commerce, and Industry
provide housing, services, and employment opportunities for a diverse
population in a configuration that facilitates pedestrian and transit
access. Within Globeville,TOD is located in the 41st and Fox Station Area.
Industrial Mixed Use: These are mixed-use areas with light
industrial uses that are compatible with residential uses, such as light
manufacturing and smaller warehouses. These areas have both a sizable
employment base as well as a variety of mid-density housing options.
Land uses may be, but are not necessarily, mixed in each building,
development, or block. Pedestrian access is important within these areas,
with residential and non-residential uses always within walking distance
of one another.
Industrial: These are active industrial areas that typically require access
to major arterials or interstates. Heavy rail facilities also are often adjacent
to industrial areas. Streets in these areas must be able to accommodate
heavy trucks. Special attention to design, screening, and buffering is
necessary where industrial areas abut areas that include residential uses.
Employment: Employment areas contain office, warehousing, light
industrial, light manufacturing, and high tech uses such as information
technology. Sometimes big-box retail is found in these areas. These
areas are distinguished from mixed-use centers in that they have few
residences and typically have more extensive commercial and some
industrial activity. Employment areas require access to major arterials or
interstates. Those areas with manufacturing and warehousing uses must
be able to accommodate extensive truck traffic and rail in some instances.
Due to these special transportation requirements, attention to design,
screening, and buffering is necessary along the street edge and where
employment areas abut other districts that include residential uses.
Campus: A campus is a special area that typically is dominated by a
single, large institutional user. Universities, medical centers, and large
research facilities are examples. Campuses are usually large, contiguous
areas that contain a variety of buildings and uses geared toward a
primary purpose. In addition to institutional uses, some large companies
organize their headquarters as a campus. Often specialized retail will
locate near or within these areas to meet the needs of those on campus.
If present, residential tends to be limited to dormitory-type facilities.
Park: Parks and open spaces range from active neighborhood and
community parks with recreation fields and centers to larger preserves of
natural open areas that provide space for wildlife habitat. A"greenway"
is a linear park or open space developed along a stream, canal, or other
natural or man-made feature. They enhance nearby neighborhoods
by providing park space and frequently off-street bicycle paths. Local
examples include the Platte River Greenway, Argo Park, Northside Park,
and Heron Pond.
Industrial Mixed Use
Campus/lnstitutional
Park
STRONG | Globeville Neighborhood Plan 31


RECOMMENDATION 1: A Land Use Plan that Balances the Needs of Residents,
Commerce, and Industry
EXISTING LAND USE
0
0.5
HI Miles
Regional Connections
Railroad
Rail Transit
Existing Land Use by Parcel
Office
Commercial/Retail
Mixed-Use
H Industrial
^^B Entertainment-Cultural
^^B Public/Quasi-Public
Single Family
Multi-Family Low Rise
Multi-Family Mid Rise
Multi-Family High Rise
Park-Open Space-Recreation
Transportation, Communication, Utility (TCU)
Parking {Surface or Structure)
Vacant
32
Globeville Neighborhood Plan | STRONG


RECOMMENDATION 1: A Land Use Plan that Balances the Needs of Residents,
Commerce, and Industry
CONCEPT LAND USE AND AREAS OF CHANGE
Existing Park/Open Space
Industrial Mixed Use
Proposed Par k 'Open Space
Regional Connections
Railroad
Single Family with ADU
Urban Residential
Employment
Industrial
Campus
STRONG | Globeville Neighborhood Plan 33


RECOMMENDATION 1: A Land Use Plan that Balances the Needs of Residents,
Commerce, and Industry
Concept Land Use and Building
Height in the 41 st and Fox
Station Area Plan.
The concept land use and building
height recommendations in this plan
are intended to be fully consistent
with the 41 st and Fox Station Area Plan.
Should any inconsistencies be found,
please refer to the adopted Station
Area Plan for the official Plan guidance.
B1. MAINTAIN STABILITY IN THE RESIDENTIAL
NEIGHBORHOOD CORE CHARACTER AREA.
In areas identified with Single Family with ADUs Concept Land Use:
Maintain the current mix of low-scale residential building forms
consisting predominantly of single unit dwellings with occasional
duplexes or multi-unit structures.
Allow accessory dwelling units to enable aging in place, additional
income through rentals, and to increase the population density of the
neighborhood without altering its character.
Promote existing development patterns, including relatively small lots,
shallow setbacks, and moderate building coverage, with parking and
vehicle access in the rear and serviced by alleys.
Encourage the use of streetscape elements that promote residential
character, walking, and bicycle use, including detached sidewalks,
pedestrian scale lighting, limited curb cuts, and tree lawns.
B2. MAINTAIN STABILITY IN INDUSTRIAL AREAS.
In areas identified as Industrial Concept Land Use:
Allow general flexibility in siting and building form for new industrial uses
while improving the attractiveness of the site design overall and along
the street edge in particular.
B3. IMPROVE COMPATIBILITY BETWEEN INDUSTRIAL
AND RESIDENTIAL USES.
Improve compatibility where these uses coexist in close proximity by using
the following strategies:
Reduce industrial use intensity when adjacent to residential. Ensure that
industrial uses that most heavily impact residential areas, such as salvage
yards, recycling centers, and automobile towing, observe separation and
screening requirements as established by zoning.
Use Industrial Mixed Use Concept Land Use as a buffer. Where industrial
uses are immediately adjacent to residential uses, improve the transition
through the use of Industrial Mixed Use Concept Land Use.
Use urban design solutions to more effectively buffer industrial and
residential uses (see recommendations A8 and A9 in the Unique Chapter).
34
Globeville Neighborhood Plan | STRONG


RECOMMENDATION 1: A Land Use Plan that Balances the Needs of Residents,
Commerce, and Industry
B4. TRANSITION KEY PROPERTIES FROM INDUSTRIAL
TO EMPLOYMENT.
Identify key large, underutilized industrial properties with access off of major
through streets to transition to Employment Concept Land Use
Allow new uses in employment areas to be generally flexible in siting
and building form, however new development should help create a
more attractive street edge, especially along Washington Street and 51st
Avenue.
Ensure that the uses that are allowed in employment areas are non-
polluting and do not produce noxious odors, excessive noise, truck traffic,
or light pollution.
Work to attract labor-intensive industries that produce a large number of
good-paying jobs relative to the size of the facility.
The Relationship between
Future Development and
Infrastructure
Public utility upgrades may be
necessary to meet the needs of
future development recommended
by this Plan. Substations and other
potentially necessary infrastructure
should be sited and designed to fit
within the neighborhood context
defined by this Plan, and should work
to minimize visual impacts, subject to
operational and other constraints.
B5. REVITALIZE THROUGH MIXED-USE DEVELOPMENT.
In areas recommended for Mixed Use Concept Land Use, including portions of
Washington Street, 45th Avenue, and the Riverfront:
Site building forms at the street with parking and access in the rear or off
the alley, where possible.
Promote the use of design elements that link the building directly to the
street environment, such as ground story activation, transparent window
openings, and doorways at the street.
Allow a mix of uses within the area and within individual buildings.
Make use of streetscape elements that reinforce urban character and
promote high levels of walking and bicycles use, such as wide sidewalks,
bicycle racks, public trash cans, and tree wells.
B6. ESTABLISH MAXIMUM RECOMMENDED BUILDING
HEIGHTS.
Establish maximum building heights consistent with the Maximum
Recommended Building Heights map to accomplish the following objectives:
Preserve the low-rise building heights characteristic of the single family
character in Globeville's Residential Neighborhood Core Character Area.
Accommodate mid-rise redevelopment generally east of Washington
Street and along the riverfront.
Accommodate mid-to-high rise redevelopment in the 41st and Fox
Station Area consistent with the recommendations of the 41st and Fox
Station Area Plan.
STRONG | Globeville Neighborhood Plan 35


RECOMMENDATION 1: A Land Use Plan that Balances the Needs of Residents,
Commerce, and Industry
MAXIMUM RECOMMENDED BUILDING HEIGHTS
36
Globeville Neighborhood Plan | STRONG


RECOMMENDATION 1: A Land Use Plan that Balances the Needs of Residents,
Commerce, and Industry
B7. STRATEGICALLY USE CITY COUNCIL OR
COUNCILMEMBER-INITIATED REZONING TO
IMPLEMENT THE LAND USE VISION.
City Council or Councilmember-initiated rezoning is a tool by which City
Council or a member of City Council can propose a zone map amendment
for a specific area at no cost to landowners. Specific situations where this
strategy may be appropriate include:
Where industrial properties are adjacent to stable residential uses and are
proposed by this Plan to transition to Industrial Mixed Use Concept Land
Use.
The industrial area along Washington Street and eastward to the South
Platte River that is proposed to transition to Mixed Use Concept Land Use.
All areas designated on the Concept Land Use and Areas of Change Map
as Single Family with ADUs that currently have residential zoning that
does not allow ADUs.
HIA STRATEGIES
RELATED TO THIS
RECOMMENDATION:
D1. Improve Industrial and
Residential Compatibility. Minimize
negative environmental impacts
on residential neighborhoods from
industrial uses through methods
such as a change in concept land use
designation, zoning, buffering, or
other means.
D5. Address the Odor Impacts
of the Marijuana Industry.
Mitigate the odors and emissions
from marijuana grow facilities on
residential neighborhoods through
methods such as a change in concept
land use designation, siting, buffering,
or other means.
D20. Use Mixed-Use Development
to Improve Access to Goods and
Services. Promote mixed-use
development to support a variety of
commercial and retail businesses and
services throughout the community
and around new rail stations.
STRONG | Globeville Neighborhood Plan 37


RECOMMENDATION 2: Effective Storm Drainage and Water Quality
Management
HIA STRATEGIES
RELATED TO THIS
RECOMMENDATION:
D7. Increase the Use of Low
Impact Development and Green
Infrastructure. Encourage
developers to use low impact
development and green infrastructure
techniques in new development and
redevelopment in the Globeville,
Elyria, and Swansea neighborhoods
to enhance water quality in each
basin. Examples include use of
bioretention (rain gardens), bioswales,
or vegetated buffer strips to minimize
directly connected impervious areas.
Roadway and alley projects should
include "green street" techniques such
as stormwater planters, stormwater
curb extensions, tree trenches, and
permeable pavers.
D8. Incorporate Water Quality in
Open Space Design. Implement
recommendations from the River
North Greenway Master Plan to
improve water quality. Where
possible, use existing park areas
without affecting existing uses to
incorporate water quality treatment
features, such as wetlands, to restore
wildlife habitat along the river or in
Heron Pond.
MAP OF THE GLOBEVILLE-UTAH JUNCTION DRAINAGE BASIN.
O
2.000
4.000
3 Feet
Globeville-Utah Watershed Boundary
Most of the Globeville neighborhood is located within the Globeville-Utah Junction
Drainage Basin.
The project recommendations in this section are informed by two recent
studies, the 2013 Globeville-Utah Junction Outfall Systems Planning Study, a
detailed study by the Urban Drainage and Flood Control District focused on
the watershed where the neighborhood of Globeville is located, and the City's
2014 Storm Drainage Master Plan, a city-wide plan that is updated every five
years that recommends specific storm drainage improvement projects. For
more detailed information, please refer to those documents.
38
Globeville Neighborhood Plan | STRONG


RECOMMENDATION 2: Effective Storm Drainage and Water Quality
Management
B8. IDENTIFY FUNDING FOR STORM DRAINAGE
IMPROVEMENTS.
The 2014 Storm Drainage Master Plan identifies several storm drainage
improvement projects for the Globeville-Utah Junction basin. These projects
are not currently funded or programmed due to financial constraints, but
have been proposed by the Storm Drainage Master Plan to better meet
Denver's standard levels of storm protection and reduce flooding:
48th Avenue Outfall (3 projects)
51st Avenue Collection System
I-70 Outfall
49th Avenue and Grant Street Detention Basin
B9. PROMOTE WATER QUALITY THROUGH BEST
PRACTICES.
Water quality can be addressed through an array of sustainable technologies.
Some of these can be implemented in public rights-of-way and others can be
integrated with individual projects or developments.
Employ Green Infrastructure on Public Land and Rights-of-Way.
Publicly-owned land such as parks and streets present an opportunity
to integrate water quality facilities with the overall design. Impervious
surfaces, and streets in particular, are one of the largest contributors of
pollutants in Denver's urban streams. However, streets also represent one
of the greatest opportunities for the use of green infrastructure. As new
street connections are made or existing streets are reconstructed, look for
opportunities to incorporate green street strategies in the street design.
Green street strategies include permeable pavers, streetside stormwater
planters, curb extensions, tree trenches, and grass swales.
Promote the Use of Low Impact Design Strategies on Private
Property. Wherever possible, green infrastructure and low impact design
strategies should be incorporated into private redevelopment projects in
Globeville. This includes minimizing directly connected impervious areas
and introducing rain gardens, filter strips, grass swales, and permeable
pavers.
These images show examples of green
infrastructure and low impact design strategies
that have been implemented on both public
and private land.
STRONG | Globeville Neighborhood Plan 39


RECOMMENDATION 3: An Integrated, Complete, and Diverse Park System
The South Platte River Trail
Diagram showing a potential large, regional
open space that is integrated with Heller Open
Space, Heron Pond, and portions ofNorthside
Park. New development fronts 51st Avenue,
with the northern parcel adjacent to the open
space being reserved for a community-serving
use.
BIO. EMBRACE THE SOUTH PLATTE RIVER.
By embracing the South Platte River, Globeville can maximize the benefits of
many of its existing green space assets.
B10A. Create a Waterfront Destination. Create a waterfront
destination along the South Platte River that reflects the community
and its unique character, provides a diversity of activities and events
throughout the year, and is welcoming and safe.
B10B. An Activated Waterfront Plaza. Consider creating a waterfront
plaza amenity close to the South Platte River for year-round activities with
opportunities for synergy with the proposed National Western Center.
Ensure that the plaza is well-connected to nearby green space, the South
Platte River Trail, and the local street network.
B10C. Integrate Regional, Sub-Regional, and On-Site Water Quality
and Green Infrastructure. To ensure that the South Platte River and
amenities along the river are safe for the public and support habitat,
water quality facilities should be incorporated into new parks.
B10D. Create a Regional Open Space Amenity. Create a large, regional,
and consolidated park amenity by integrating Heller Open Space, Heron
Pond, portions of Northside Park, and a portion of new acreage known as
52nd Avenue and Emerson Street and re-designing the area primarily as a
natural area with educational and passive recreational activities.
Respect and enhance the natural area designation with natural and
native plantings and soft trails, etc.
Integrate stormwater management facilities with the park design.
Increase "eyes on the park" by surrounding it with a mixture of uses,
including mixed-use development along the southern edge of the
52nd Avenue and Emerson Street site fronting 51st Avenue. Ensure
that future development on this portion of the site benefits the
neighborhood by restricting its sale to a community-serving user such
as a senior housing provider, education or recreation center, or other
uses to be defined with neighborhood input at a later date.
Connect this new regional open space amenity to the proposed
Mixed Use Concept Land Use redevelopment area to the south.
Look for opportunities to create synergy and capitalize on proximity
to the proposed National Western Center.
Enhance the routes to the park from Washington Street and the South
Platte River.
Engage with the community in creating the specific integrated park
design moving forward.
B10E. Enhance the South Platte River Trail Access Points. Improve
awareness of and accessibility to the South Platte River Trail through a
40
Globeville Neighborhood Plan | STRONG


RECOMMENDATION 3: An Integrated, Complete, and Diverse Park System
combination of strategies:
Provide clear and well-marked signage along streets that lead to the
point of access.
Consider providing identifiable gateway structures to indicate the
point of access.
Ensure that all trail access points are accessible to people of all ages
and physical abilities.
Incorporate surrounding land uses and site design to better announce
and celebrate the trail access points.
Create new publicly-accessible trail access points in conjunction with
new development, or as opportunities arise.
B11. STRENGTHEN EXISTING PARK AND RECREATIONAL
ASSETS.
Enhance existing parks and recreational facilities throughout Globeville to
provide a vibrant system of parks and recreation centers, each with its own
identity and service niche.
B11A. Argo Park. This park is located in the center of Globeville and is
highly valued by residents as a neighborhood destination and gathering
place. Continue to explore enhancements to the park, including but not
limited to:
Stapleton Recreation Center
Argo Park
Walking and biking paths to provide improved circulation around and
through the park.
Organized events in addition to those already occurring such as Old
Globeville Days.
A community message board for the public posting of events and
flyers. This amenity would provide a new outlet for grassroots
communication and further solidify Argo Parkas the heart of the
neighborhood.
Other amenities that may be deemed appropriate for the park subject
to additional public input and discussion.
B11B. Stapleton Recreation Center and Broadway Park. This is
Globeville's City-run recreation center. The adjacent small park features a
playground. Recommendations include, but are not limited to:
Consider changing the name of the Stapleton Recreation Center to a
different name. The name "Stapleton Recreation Center" is confusing
as the name "Stapleton" is now more commonly known as a new
neighborhood in east Denver with some 17,000 residents.
Explore facilities planning and funding opportunities to improve and
update the amenities and services that are provided at the Center.
HIA STRATEGIES
RELATED TO THIS
RECOMMENDATION:
D8. Incorporate Water Quality in
Open Space Design. Implement
recommendations from the River
North Green way Master Plan to
improve water quality. Where
possible, use existing park areas
without affecting existing uses to
incorporate water quality treatment
features, such as wetlands, to restore
wildlife habitat along the river or in
Heron Pond.
D13. Connect to Greenspace.
Improve connectivity to parks, trails
and recreation, especially to the
South Platte River trails and parks.
STRONG | Globeville Neighborhood Plan 41


RECOMMENDATION 3: An Integrated, Complete, and Diverse Park System
Vision for Platte Farm Open Space
Platte Farm Open Space in its current state
B11C. Globeville Recreation Center. This City-owned facility located at
4496 Grant Street was originally constructed as a City recreation center,
but in recent years, the facility has been run by non-profit organizations.
At the time of this writing, the contract with Street Kidz has expired and
the property is in need of a new administrator. Work to identify a new
contractor for the facility to ensure its continued operation and service to
the residents of the neighborhood.
B12. CREATE NEW PARKS, OPEN SPACES, AND
RECREATIONAL FACILITIES.
Capitalize on opportunities to create new parks, open spaces, and recreational
facilities.
B12A. Platte Farm Open Space. Platte Farm Open Space is a
community-created vision to transform 5.5 acres of neglected land into
an open space where all ages and abilities can recreate, exercise and
connect with nature. Currently, the space is undeveloped, apart from
high-voltage power lines that traverse the space. The site is prone to
flooding and illegal dumping is commonplace. A public planning process
led by Groundwork Denver and the Platte Farm Open Space Resident
Steering Committee has resulted in a conceptual open space vision for
the site. Implementing Platte Farm Open Space would transform a large
area that is currently perceived as blighted into an amenity.
B12B. 41 st and Fox Station Area Open Space. The portion of the 41st
and Fox Station Area within Globeville is envisioned for mixed-use and
high-density development. The 41 st and Fox Station Area Plan envisions
new parks and public spaces in response to the conversion of industrial
uses to higher density residential. Possible routes to implementation
include, but are not limited to, public purchase of property through
bond funds, grants, or the capital improvements budget, or through
consolidation of required open space through the City's General
Development Plan process.
B12C. Privately-Owned Public Space. Explore opportunities to
introduce privately-owned public open space as a component of larger
redevelopments, such as those envisioned along the South Platte River,
in the 41st and Fox Station Area, or at the National Western Center.
Opportunities could include plazas, outdoor seating areas, playgrounds,
and public art.
B12D. Support Other Recreational Needs. Support public health
by finding opportunities to introduce new recreational amenities
either within Globeville or in nearby neighborhoods such as Elyria and
Swansea. Desired amenities that emerged from the neighborhood
planning process include a dog park, indoor pool, and a modern regional
recreation center. Work with the community on the location and design
of future facilities and engage them in identifying any additional facility
types.
42
Globeville Neighborhood Plan | STRONG


RECOMMENDATION 3: An Integrated, Complete, and Diverse Park System
SYSTEM OF PARKS AND OPEN SPACE
0
0.5
ID Miles
South Platte River Trail
-----Off-Street Bike Trail
or Connector
d Community Facility
Existing Trail Access Point
Existing Parks and Open Space
Recommended Parks or Open Space
STRONG | Globeville Neighborhood Plan 43


RECOMMENDATION 4: Improve Access to Jobs, Housing, Neighborhood
Services, and Education
HIA STRATEGIES
RELATED TO THIS
RECOMMENDATION:
D17. Attract Key Retail and
Services. Incentivize development
of retail goods and services,
including a grocery store.
D18. Increase Food Access at the
National Western Center. Promote
new sources of healthy foods within
the redeveloped National Western
Center, such as grocery stores,
farmers markets, and community
gardens.
D19. Improve Healthy Food Access
at Existing Retailers. Implement a
"healthy corner store retail program"
in the neighborhood, similar to the
Philadelphia model, to add healthy
foods to existing convenience and
corner stores.
D20. Use Mixed-Use Development
to Improve Access to Goods and
Services. Promote mixed-use
development to support a variety
of commercial and retail businesses
and services throughout the
community and around new rail
stations.
D21. Create Neighborhood-
Focused Flex Space. Develop
a flexible market space that can
support a variety of neighborhood
goods and services and culturally-
relevant activities.
B13. IMPROVE ACCESS TO JOBS.
B13A. Expand Job Growth within Globeville. Support the expansion
of employment opportunities within the neighborhood using a variety of
complimentary strategies:
Work to reinforce and revitalize existing businesses.
Support the redevelopment of the ASARCO site for manufacturing,
distribution, and Class A industrial tenants. Promote the site with the
intention of attracting job-rich uses.
Conduct a study to evaluate industrial and commercial land
within the neighborhood with the goal of using the results to
match the needs of potential employers to specific vacant or
underutilized properties. The study could evaluate and identify
specific improvements that may be needed to attract the desired
reinvestment.
Recruit new cutting-edge industry, such as high tech and clean tech,
to industrial and employment areas within the neighborhood.
Create a broad base of new jobs in diverse economic sectors by
redeveloping opportunity sites throughout the neighborhood,
including the transformation of Washington Street and the South
Platte riverfront into a mixed-use area; the enhancement of retail
and services along 45th Avenue in alignment with recommendations
to establish a more prominent main street; and the promotion
of transit-oriented development in the 41 st and Fox Station Area
(see the Character Areas Chapter for additional details on the
recommendations for these areas).
B13B. Provide Job Training and Workforce Development. Provide the
necessary facilities and programs to assist local residents with education,
training, and job placement.
Connect residents to existing programs that assist in job training,
such as those provided by trade schools, community colleges, non-
profits, state-level programs, and the Denver Office of Economic
Development's Workforce Centers.
Consider adding or expanding job training programs in existing
facilities within the neighborhood, such as recreation centers, or
nearby, such as at the Valdez-Perry Library in Elyria.
Consider targeting job training at local industries with the greatest
employment needs and/or the biggest skills gaps, such as health care,
information technology, and manufacturing.
B13C. Keep Industry and Jobs in Denver. Provide relocation assistance
to businesses that choose to leave the neighborhood with the goal
44
Globeville Neighborhood Plan | STRONG


RECOMMENDATION 4: Improve Access to Jobs, Housing, Neighborhood
Services, and Education
of keeping those jobs in Denver. For existing industrial uses that are
located in areas proposed to transition to Mixed Use Concept Land Use,
relocation assistance can be used to direct these businesses to nearby
areas identified as Industrial Concept Land Use, Areas of Stability within
Globeville, or to other north Denver neighborhoods.
B13D. Jump Start the Local Economy. Support the Denver Office of
Economic Development's Jump Start initiative. The following strategies
are specific to Globeville and included in lump Start 2014:
Support small business advocacy efforts that will create an
environment to help small business thrive through collaboration
between public, private, and non-profit sectors.
Establish a public-private, small business loan fund that focuses
on business lending in the healthcare, manufacturing and logistics
industries; and increasing economic and employment opportunities
in Denver's revitalizing neighborhoods such as Sun Valley, Elyria,
Swansea, Globeville, and River North areas.
Provide technical assistance, business and community outreach, and
prioritize resources to maximize business opportunities, housing
development, and neighborhood services to the I-70 corridor
neighborhoods of Globeville, Elyria, and Swansea.
Create a business development strategy for Globeville, Elyria, and
Swansea with North Denver Cornerstone Collaborative leadership.
EMPLOYMENT CLUSTERS
RELATIVE TO RESIDENTIAL
AREAS
Employees per acre*
n 1 or Less
I I 2-5
I I 6-10
I 11 -15
16-20
21 27
Residential Buildings
* Data shown to 1/2 mile
of study area boundary
B14. IMPROVE ACCESS TO HOUSING
B14A. Provide a Broad Range of Housing Types and Price Levels.
Incorporating this Plan's proposed concept land use recommendations
will allow for a more diverse range of housing types within the
neighborhood, including:
Accessory Dwelling Units within the single family areas
Multifamily and attached residential building types in Mixed Use,TOD,
and Urban Residential Concept Land Use areas.
Live/work and a variety of other residential types in Industrial Mixed
Use areas.
B14B. Connect People to Existing Housing Resources. Work to
increase awareness of existing programs that can help people establish or
maintain homeownership:
Connect people to existing resources that cultivate home ownership,
such as Habitat for Humanity.
Connect low-income homeowners with programs to assist with
property taxes if there is an increase in valuation to allow them to stay
STRONG | Globeville Neighborhood Plan 45


RECOMMENDATION 4: Improve Access to Jobs, Housing, Neighborhood
Services, and Education
Desired Programming and
Services at the National
Western Center
As part of the master planning
process for the National Western
Center, the National Western Citizens
Advisory Committee developed a
detailed list of programming and
services that they would like to see
on the site. The desired facilities
fall within the broad categories of
public spaces, education, culinary
arts, business activities, sports
and recreation, and art. Specific
facilities that were identified by the
committee include a state-of-the-art
recreation center, a wellness center,
a new education center for all ages,
and reintroducing horses into the
community through education
and trail use. There is community
support for locating many of these
desired services and activities within
the Globeville neighborhood if they
can not be accommodated on the
National Western site.
46 Globeville Neighborhood Plan | STRONG
in their homes.
Connect residents to existing programs that assist low-income
households with maintaining and repairing their homes, such
as Groundwork Denver, Habitat for Humanity's Critical Repair
program, and the Denver Urban Renewal Authority's Single Family
Rehabilitation and Emergency Home Repair program.
B14C. Develop a Land Banking Strategy for Affordable Housing.
Work with non-profit partners, such as the Urban Land Conservancy,
to strategically and proactively acquire and preserve land for future
affordable housing. This strategy may be particularly effective in the 41st
and Fox Station Area, where the recommended development intensity
greatly exceeds existing conditions on the ground.
B14D. Build More Housing Units. Support the efforts of organizations
such as Habitat for Humanity, Denver Housing Authority, and other
affordable housing providers in building new homes within Globeville.
Ensure that new affordable housing construction in Globeville's
Residential Neighborhood Core Character Area reflects the character
of the surrounding neighborhood.
Pursue opportunities for adaptive reuse of existing buildings as an
affordable housing strategy for the neighborhood.
B15. IMPROVE NEIGHBORHOOD SERVICES.
B15A. Use Redevelopment Areas to Attract Desired Retail and
Services. Broaden the market for retail and services by increasing the
population of the neighborhood through mixed-use and transit-oriented
development and providing space for new retail in the following areas:
Washington Street and the South Platte riverfront
The enhancement of retail and services along 45th Avenue
Mixed-use, transit-oriented development in the 41st and Fox Station
Area
B15B. Recruit Needed Services and Amenities. Work with businesses,
non-profits, and service providers to attract the following needed
facilities to Globeville:
Increased access to healthy foods through the development of
multiple small-format food retail outlets, a full-service grocery store,
or both.
Increased access to retail and services that meet basic needs, such
as pharmacies, hardware and auto parts stores, clothing stores, and
banking.


RECOMMENDATION 4: Improve Access to Jobs, Housing, Neighborhood
Services, and Education
Increased access to medical facilities, including physicians, dental,
vision, and mental health services.
Increased access to technology. Providing free or low-cost computer
and internet access at other facilities, such as recreation centers,
schools, churches, and libraries could meet this need without
providing a dedicated facility.
A modem library, or alternatively, improvements and enhancements
to the existing Valdez-Perry Library in Elyria.
B15C. Provide Better Access to Community Resources in
Surrounding Neighborhoods. Ensure that there is safe, accessible,
all-age, multi-modal access to the following key facilities in surrounding
neighborhoods:
Valdez-Perry Library
National Western Center
Schools
Parks and recreation centers
Retail and entertainment destinations
B15D. Cultivate Partnerships to Broaden Services. Develop a formal
and ongoing collaboration between the neighborhood, the National
Western Center, and its partners, including Colorado State University, to
enhance access to healthy food, gardening, and agriculture.
B16. IMPROVE EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES.
B16A. Support Existing Schools. Support improvements to existing
schools serving the Globeville neighborhood to ensure that each child
receives a high quality public education.
B16B. Create Educational Pathways for All Ages. Ensure that all
residents, regardless of age, have access to education by creating
and supporting early childhood centers, conventional schools, adult
education centers, and other educational facilities.
B16C. Partner with National Western Center and Colorado State
University. Take advantage of National Western's partnership with
Colorado State University to collaborate with Denver Public Schools
on new approaches to education, including the possible creation of a
magnet school or other new educational facility.
STRONG | Globeville Neighborhood Plan 47


VISION: A mobility network that provides a full array of
transportation choices and balances the needs of pedestrians,
bicyclists, drivers, trucks, rail, and transit.
<
48
Globeville Neighborhood Plan | CONNECTED


WHY IS CONNECTIVITY IMPORTANT TO GLOBEVILLE?
Globeville is a neighborhood divided by major road and railway
infrastructure. Two major interstates run through Globeville, 1-70 and
1-25, and the interchange between the two is located in the center of
the neighborhood. Railroad tracks are prevalent throughout the area
and constitute major barriers along the western and southern edges of
the neighborhood. In the coming years, three new rail transit stations
will begin service in or near Globeville, but connecting to these stations
is a challenge, especially for pedestrians and bicyclists. The Globeville
Neighborhood Plan identifies strategies for providing safe, multi-
modal, sustainable connections within the neighborhood, to adjacent
neighborhoods, and to the region.
The Connected chapter presents a mobility and connectivity framework
for Globeville. It is a strategy that aims to accommodate all transportation
modes within the neighborhood while balancing the unique needs of each
so they can navigate effectively and safely. The connectivity framework
addresses multiple transportation modes, including pedestrians, bicyclists,
vehicles, trucks, rail, and transit. The connectivity framework takes
into account connections, destinations, and travel patterns within the
neighborhood, to surrounding areas, and to the larger region.
RECOMMENDATIONS:
1. UPDATE KEY TRANSPORTATION POLICIES AFFECTING GLOBEVILLE
2. A CONNECTED STREET NETWORK
3. A WALKABLE, BIKEABLE GLOBEVILLE
4. A TRANSIT-RICH GLOBEVILLE
5. ADDRESS TRAFFIC OPERATIONS AND ROADWAY MAINTENANCE ISSUES
CONNECTED | Globeville Neighborhood Plan 49


Truck traffic on 45th Avenue
KEY ISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIES
The Local Impacts of Freeway Infrastructure.
Globeville's direct access to 1-70 and 1-25 is an important
asset for the businesses and residents within the
neighborhood. However, the interstates also disrupt
circulation by cutting off local streets, making travel
within the neighborhood challenging. Where streets
do connect across the interstates, they make use of
underpasses and bridges. These facilities typically
provide a route for pedestrians and bicyclists, but are
lacking the necessary amenities to make the experience
comfortable and welcoming.
Freight Rail Impacts. Freight rail has a significant
presence in Globeville, with major yards located along the
western and southern edges of the neighborhood. These
rail yards occupy significant acreage and, similar to the
interstates, disrupt the street grid such that most streets
fail to connect across them. Additionally, freight rail lines
and spurs run through the neighborhood, and street
crossings at these locations are frequently challenging
for all other modes. Several railroad crossings within the
neighborhood are in need of improvement and repair.
Truck Traffic on Local Streets. Truck traffic
is commonplace within Globeville, due to the
neighborhood's location along the South Platte River
and 1-70 industrial corridors, adjacency to Adams County
industrial areas, and the many industrial businesses that
are located within the neighborhood itself. The lack
of internal circulation routes within the neighborhood
concentrates truck traffic on the few streets that do
connect through. In some cases, these are streets with
residential uses and character where truck traffic can be
disruptive.
Quiet Residential Streets. Local streets make up
Globeville's Residential Neighborhood Core Character
Area, but most streets do not extend beyond this area,
stopping at 1-70,1-25, Washington Street, or railroad
tracks. There is general consensus among residents that
these local roads should be quiet, have low speed limits,
and should carry relatively low amounts of traffic.
Limited Pedestrian Network. Many of the streets in
Globeville are missing sidewalks, making it difficult for
50
Globeville Neighborhood Plan | CONNECTED


The view of Downtown Denver from the 44th Avenue Bridge over T25.
people to access amenities and services without a car.
Limited Street Infrastructure. Streets in Globeville
that are missing sidewalks are frequently also lacking in
other basic street infrastructure, most commonly curb
and gutter. This affects not only circulation, but also
storm drainage. Throughout the neighborhood planning
process, specific issues related to traffic operations and
roadway maintenance were frequently raised.
Limited Bicycle Network. The South Platte River Trail
is one of the region's premiere greenspace assets, but
despite its close proximity to Globeville, it is difficult to
access from the neighborhood due to physical barriers
and other navigational challenges between the river
and the rest of Globeville. Additional bicycle facilities
connecting Globeville, the greenway, and adjacent
neighborhoods are needed.
Access to Transit. Most of Globeville is within a quarter
mile walk of a bus stop. However, an inventory of existing
conditions at bus stops within Globeville, Elyria, and
Swansea conducted as part of this planning process
revealed that the conditions of many bus stops are
suboptimal, and in some cases, sidewalks are missing
along key pedestrian routes to the bus stops. In coming
years, Globeville will be served by three commuter rail
stations on three different lines: 41st and Fox on the
Gold Line, 38th and Blake on the East Line, and National
Western Center on the North Metro Line. Similar to
bus stops, when commuter rail begins serving the
neighborhood in the years ahead, many employees and
residents in Globeville may find it difficult to access the
new stations if pedestrian and bicycle connectivity is not
improved from current levels.
Connectivity Between Washington Street and the
River. Currently, the area between Washington Street
and the river lacks street connectivity and much of the
land is amassed in "mega blocks" that preclude north-
south movements other than on Washington Street or
the South Platte River Trail.
CONNECTED | Globeville Neighborhood Plan 51


RECOMMENDATION 1: Update Key Transportation Policies Affecting
Globeville
Cl. CONDUCT ATRAVELSHED ANALYSIS.
Update Denver's Strategic Transportation Plan (STP) to include a Travelshed
Analysis for this area. The STP identified that the travelshed in which the
eastern portion of Globeville is located would be studied as part of the
environmental impact process for the 1-70 reconstruction project. The
analysis will need to be provided through other means as it is not included in
the scope of the 1-70 process.
C2. UPDATE BLUEPRINT DENVER STREET
CLASSIFICATIONS.
Update the Future Street Classifications Map in Blueprint Denver to be
consistent with the street classifications recommended on the Proposed
Update to Blueprint Denver Street Classifications Map. The hierarchy of
the proposed transportation network balances mobility with access so that
Globeville streets are well-equipped to move people, not just cars. Blueprint
Denver street classifications are best used to describe not only the function of
streets, but how their function relates to adjacent land uses.
C3. UPDATE DENVER MOVES.
The bicycle facility improvements recommended in this Plan were developed
in conjunction with the general public and Denver Public Works staff with the
intent that Denver Moves, which guides decision-making regarding bicycle
and multi-use connections, would be updated at a later date to be consistent
with this Plan.
*
HIA STRATEGIES
RELATED TO THIS
RECOMMENDATION:
D4. Mitigate the Health Impacts
of Freight Rail. Explore solutions to
reduce the health impacts from trains.
These could include "Quiet Zones"
(intersections specifically designed
so that trains do not have to sound
horns), or grade separation of trains
from other modes of transportation
(i.e., roads constructed over or under
tracks to eliminate the need for trains
to sound horns at these crossings and
to aid in the prevention of people and
trains crossing paths).
D14. Address the Impacts of
Trucks. Review truck routes in
the neighborhood to improve
environmental quality, safety and
connectivity. Examine current
truck routes, particularly adjacent
to schools; explore potential
modifications as necessary; and make
any needed changes to City truck
route ordinance for consistency with
state regulations.
52
Globeville Neighborhood Plan | CONNECTED


RECOMMENDATION 1: Update Key Transportation Policies Affecting
Globeville
PROPOSED UPDATE TO BLUEPRINT DENVER STREET CLASSIFICATIONS
j
0
0.25
0.5
Miles
Blueprint Denver Street Classifications
u Industrial Arterial
Industrial Collector
m Main-Arterial
i Main Collector
Mixed Use Arterial
Mixed Use Collector
Residential Collector
'All other streets are Undesignated Local
CONNECTED | Globeville Neighborhood Plan 53


RECOMMENDATION 2: A Connected Street Network
New Street Connections in the
41 st and Fox Station Area Plan
The 41st and Fox Station Area Plan
(2009) recommended extensive
changes to the street network in the
vicinity of the station. This plan does
not update the recommendations
of the 41 st and Fox Station Area
Plan. Rather than attempting to
summarize or re-characterize those
recommendations, this Plan presents
the existing roadway network
within the station area and defers
to the 41st and Fox Station Area
Plan regarding the advisability and
phasing of specific roadway network
improvements.
HIA STRATEGIES
RELATED TO THIS
RECOMMENDATION:
D12. Improve Street Connectivity.
Implement new street connections as
identified in this Plan (see Connected
and Character Area Chapters).
D13. Connect to Greenspace.
Improve connectivity to parks, trails
and recreation, especially to the
South Platte River trails and parks.
D15. Connect to the National
Western Center. Improve access
and connectivity to and through
residential neighborhoods and the
redeveloped National Western Center.
C4. NEW STREET SEGMENTS AT 49TH AND 50TH
AVENUES.
Introduce new street segments at 49th Avenue and 50th Avenue from Pearl
Street to the railroad tracks to provide improved access to the proposed
mixed-use area west of Washington Street. Introduce pedestrian and bicycle
crossings over the railroad tracks to the new streets. Given space constraints,
at-grade rail crossings would be preferred, as grade-separated crossings
would add cost to the project and likely negatively impact the development
potential of adjacent land. The fact that the rail line is active introduces
an element of complexity to implementation as new at-grade crossings
would need to be approved by the affected railroad. Both proposed street
extensions should be designed to accommodate pedestrians, bicycles, and
vehicles in order to improve overall mobility within the neighborhood.
C5. INTRODUCE A STREET GRID BETWEEN
WASHINGTON STREET AND THE SOUTH PLATTE RIVER.
Introduce new connections to this area to increase internal circulation
between Washington Street and the river and to help bring about the
transformation of this area into a mixed-use, riverfront-oriented destination
area. One or more new north-south streets are needed within this Enhanced
Connectivity Area in order to support redevelopment goals and to
facilitate the movement of people within and along the riverfront area (see
Washington Street Corridor and the Riverfront in the Character Areas Chapter
for alternative street grid scenarios and other details).
54
Globeville Neighborhood Plan | CONNECTED


RECOMMENDATION 2: A Connected Street Network
PROPOSED STREET NETWORK WITH NEW CONNECTIONS

0.25
0.5
I Miles
Regional Connections
Railroad
Rail Transit
^jjir Key Nodes
Existing Multimodal Route
Potential Multimodal Connections
Platte River Trail
sX Area of Enhanced Connectivity
o Potential Ped/Bike Connection
Note: this map is referred to as the "Street Grid Connectivity Map" in the Globeville Elyria Swansea Health Impact Assessment..
CONNECTED | Globeville Neighborhood Plan 55


RECOMMENDATION 2: A Connected Street Network
C6. INTRODUCE NEW MULTI-MODAL CONNECTIONS
OVER THE RIVER TO THE NATIONAL WESTERN CENTER.
Introduce new multi-modal connections over the river and into the
National Western Center (NWC) to enhance the catalytic impact potential
on the Globeville, Elyria, and Swansea Neighborhoods and to stitch the
neighborhoods together. In identifying specific alignment and design for the
new connections across the river, important considerations include:
Accommodate vehicles, pedestrians, and bicycles.
Locate the multi-modal connections along existing street alignments in
Globeville. This Plan identifies 49th and 51st Avenues as the preferred
locations for these connections.
Provide more direct access from Globeville to the future NWC commuter
rail station than exists today.
Design and locate the bridges so as to facilitate riverfront development
opportunities on the Globeville side of the river (see Connecting to the
National Western Stock Show Transformative Project for more details).
Maximize efficiencies that improve water quality and stormwater
conveyance as well as connectivity.
C7. EMPLOY GREEN STREET STRATEGIES.
As new street connections are made or existing streets are reconstructed, look
for opportunities to incorporate green street strategies in the street design.
Green street strategies include permeable pavers, streetside stormwater
planters, curb extensions, tree trenches, and grass swales.
56
Globeville Neighborhood Plan | CONNECTED


RECOMMENDATION 2: A Connected Street Network
CONNECTIVITY OPTIONS OVER THE SOUTH
PLATTE RIVER AND TO THE NATIONAL
WESTERN CENTER
1 52ND

0.25
I Miles
Existing Multimodal Route
i u Potential Multimodal Connections
Rail Transit
Area of Enhanced Connectivity
O Potential Ped/Bike Connection
Priority of Connectivity Options Over
the South Platte River and to the
National Western Center
1. 49th Avenue- 49th Avenue is the top priority
for a new connection over the river because of its
location in the middle of the proposed riverfront
redevelopment area, the regular shape of
adjacent blocks, and the even spacing between
the existing connection at 47th Avenue and the
second-priority connection at 51st Avenue.
2. 51st Avenue-This street is the second-
highest priority for a new connection over the
river because of its location at the north end of
the proposed riverfront redevelopment area, the
opportunity to draw activity to the Northside
Park area, the underutilization of adjacent
blocks, and the opportunity to meet broader
connectivity goa Is by virtue of the fact that 51 st
Avenue connects across Washington Street and
to the west. If constructed, this connection
would likely become the preferred route for
Globeville residents to access the future National
Western Center commuter rail station.
3. 50th Avenue- If either of the two preferred
connectivity options proves infeasible, 50th
Avenue would be the next-best choice. It is
somewhat less desirable than the first two due
to a lack of spacing from both 49th and 51st
Avenues. Additionally, although 50th Avenue
connects across Washington Street, it currently
fails to connect to the existing street grid to the
west.
4. 48th Avenue- Although this connection
would work, it is identified as a lower priority
than the other options because of its close
proximity to a freight rail spur, the limited
redevelopment opportunity of the resulting
odd-shaped parcel, and its close proximity to an
existing connection at 47th Avenue.
For additional details, please refer to the Connect to
the National Western Center transformative project
in the Character Areas chapter.
CONNECTED | Globeville Neighborhood Plan 57


RECOMMENDATION 3: AWalkable, BikeableGlobeville
HIA STRATEGIES
RELATED TO THIS
RECOMMENDATION:
Dll. Improve Street Infrastructure.
Prioritize street infrastructure
improvements, including sidewalks,
bicycle lanes, bus stop furnishings,
and intersection crossings to achieve
the goals of the 2014 City Council
Priorities, Denver Moves (2011) and
the Strategic Transportation Plan
(2008).
D16. Create Complete Streets.
Implement "Complete Streets,"
including sidewalks for all new and
redesigned streets, to provide safe
and convenient access for all users
(per existing City Policy #26, adopted
May 2011).
D22. Improve Key Intersections to
Reduce Crashes. Explore measures
to reduce the incidence of pedestrian
and bicycle injury crashes at locations
where multiple crashes have
occurred. Such locations may include
"gateway intersections"'such as 45th
Avenue and Washington Street and
51st Avenue and Washington Street in
Globeville.
D23. Improve Connectivity
and Safety in School Zones.
Improvements could include
analyzing current School Zones
and making modifications as
necessary, including Safe Routes
to School best practices. Improve
education and outreach about
safety in School Zones to residents,
drivers, and schoolchildren,
particularly in alignment with the 1-70
reconstruction.
C8. BUILD SIDEWALKS.
Improve the pedestrian network by building sidewalks where none currently
exist. Target initial sidewalk construction in high-priority areas, including
routes to the elementary school, parks, bus stops, and rail transit stations.
Identify appropriate grants or other funds for the construction.
C9. DESIGN STREETS TO ACCOMMODATE PEDESTRIANS
AND BICYCLES.
Where feasible, introduce the following streetscape elements to support
biking and walking in the neighborhood:
Introduce tree lawns by replacing attached sidewalks with detached
sidewalks.
Work with property owners to plant trees, grass, and other landscaping in
the tree lawn.
Provide gates and pedestrian facilities at railroad crossings.
Replace highway-style "cobra head" lights with pedestrian-scaled lights
on local streets.
Provide crosswalks at stop-controlled intersections.
Provide ADA compliant ramps connecting to the sidewalk at
intersections. Replace existing single ramps with bi-directional ramps,
where applicable.
CIO. EXPLORE NEW PEDESTRIAN AND BICYCLE
CONNECTIONS.
To enhance pedestrian and bicycle connectivity, explore the possibility of
creating new connections in the form of bridges or tunnels across major
barriers. Where possible, these facilities should be designed to allow bicyclists
to cross without dismounting. Candidates for these connections would need
to integrate into the overall pedestrian and bicycle network, as applicable, in
Globeville, the National Western Center, and along the South Platte River.
Explore opportunities to connect across the South Platte River from
Ringsby Court to the proposed River North Park at 35th Avenue and
Arkins Court and from Washington Street to the National Western Center.
Explore the possibility of connecting across 1-70 with a safe and clean
pedestrian and bicycle facility located between Lincoln Street and
Washington Street.
Explore opportunities to more directly connect the neighborhood to the
South Platte RiverTrail, including improvements to existing routes and
possible new connections to include 44th Avenue.
C11. IMPROVE KEY INTERSECTIONS TO BETTER
ACCOMMODATE BICYCLES AND PEDESTRIANS.
58
Globeville Neighborhood Plan | CONNECTED


RECOMMENDATION 3: AWalkable, BikeableGlobeville
Enhancements should be made to several intersections along major streets
in Globeville to facilitate crossing for bicyclists and pedestrians. Intersections
are listed in order of priority based on their ability to link bicyclists and
pedestrians to key destinations and to the greater multi-modal transportation
network.
47th Avenue and Washington Street. Improve access between the
Neighborhood Residential Core, a South Platte River Trail access point,
and the Elyria Neighborhood.
51st Avenue and Washington Street. Improve access between the
Neighborhood Residential Core and Northside Park. Correct the off-
set, if possible, to simplify traffic movements and create a more direct
connection to the river.
45th Avenue and Washington Street. Improve access to the Historic
45th Avenue Main Street and the South Platte River Trail access point.
Fox Street and 38th Avenue. Improve bicycle facilities to connect to
the 41st and Fox station to the north, the Highland neighborhood to the
west, and the South Platte River Trail and Downtown to the south.
48th Avenue and Bannock Street. Evaluate the possibility of
modifying the intersection geometry to shorten the crossing distance for
pedestrians. Potential treatments could include pedestrian bump-outs.
49th Avenue and Washington Street. At such time that a new road
connection is made across the South Platte River at 49th, the pedestrian
and bicycle use of this intersection will be much higher. Improvements
should be made accordingly.
C12. COMPLETETHE BICYCLE NETWORK.
Complete an integrated system of bicycle routes within the neighborhood
that links intuitively to the citywide bicycle network and to major
destinations, including rail transit stations, parks, recreation centers, and
South Platte River Trail access points. The recommended bicycle facility
network is shown in the Existing and Proposed Bicycle Facilities Map.
C13. EXPAND THE B-CYCLE PROGRAM INTO
GLOBEVILLE.
Support the expansion of the B-Cycle bicycle sharing program into Globeville.
The neighborhood is well-positioned for this expansion, due to its adjacency
to the South Platte River Trail, which is one of the most prominent bikeway
facilities in the entire metro region. Expansion locations for B-Cycle stations
should include South Platte River Trail access points, future commuter rail
stations, parks and recreation centers, and destinations such as the Taxi
development and the National Western Center. Work with the B-Cycle
organization to identify and overcome socio-economic barriers of access to
the program.
Shared Parking Lane
Sharrow
^Images taken from Denver Moves
CONNECTED | Globeville Neighborhood Plan 59


RECOMMENDATION 3: AWalkable, BikeableGlobeville
NEEDED SIDEWALKS AND INTERSECTION IMPROVEMENTS
0
0.25
0.5
! Miles
Regional Connections
Railroad
Rail Transit
Missing Sidewalk
Sidewalk
Potential Connection
Key Bike/Ped Intersection
60
Globeville Neighborhood Plan | CONNECTED


RECOMMENDATION 3: AWalkable, BikeableGlobeville
EXISTING AND PROPOSED BICYCLE FACILITIES

0 0.25
0.5
Miles
Platte River Trail
-----Off-Street Bike Trail
or Connector
Existing Trail Access Points
Existing Shared Parking Lane
Existing Bike Lane
Recommended Bike Facility
Bike Blvd
Bike Lane
Sharrow
Potential Future Bike Facility*
..... Needs Further Study
Based on infrastructure improvements
recommended in this plan
CONNECTED | Globeville Neighborhood Plan 61


RECOMMENDATION 4: A Transit-Rich Globeville
C14. BUILD AND CONNECTTO COMMUTER RAIL.
The usability of rail transit is greatly enhanced when people can easily walk,
bicycle, or bus to the station. Ensure that sidewalks, bicycle facilities, and bus
routes effectively connect Globeville to all three future commuter rail stations.
C15. INSTALL WAYFINDING AND SIGNAGE AT RAIL
TRANSIT STATIONS.
Create an intuitive and consistent wayfinding system at commuter rail
stations to establish clear and comfortable connections between the platform
and nearby landmarks and destinations, including routes to neighborhoods,
retail areas, parks, and recreational facilities. Signs should be geared towards
pedestrians and possibly list walking times to destinations rather than
distances to help encourage active transportation.
C16. COORDINATE BUS ROUTES WITH NEW RAIL
SERVICE.
Work with RTD to coordinate bus operations to work in tandem with new rail
service. Priorities include:
Coordinate bus headways and routes with new transit stations.
Route buses to stop at new rail stations.
Coordinate bus arrival times to facilitate transfers to rail, and vice-versa.
Provide bus service to the various rail stations in and near the
neighborhood, including 41st and Fox, 38th and Blake, and National
Western Center, to allow for transfers between lines without requiring
out-of-direction travel to Union Station.
C17. IMPROVE BUS STOP FACILITIES.
Work with RTD to identify and construct bus stop enhancements within
Globeville. At a minimum, all bus stops should be located on a paved surface
and have direct and adequate sidewalk access. Beyond this, benches, bus
shelters, street lights, and other amenities can be provided at bus stops to
create a comfortable experience. Consider giving initial priority for bus stop
improvements to the stops with the highest ridership numbers or with the
most challenging existing streetscape conditions.
62
Globeville Neighborhood Plan | CONNECTED


RECOMMENDATION 4: A Transit-Rich Globeville
TRANSIT SYSTEMS
0.5
I Miles
Bus Stops
Local Bus Routes
O Stations
Planned Rail Transit
Half Mile Walksheds and Routes
Based on Proposed Pedestrian Network
Half Mile Walksheds and Routes
Based on Existing Pedestrian Network
CONNECTED | Globeville Neighborhood Plan 63


RECOMMENDATION 5: Address Traffic Operations and Roadway Maintenance
Issues
C18. IMPROVE RAILROAD CROSSINGS.
48th Avenue and Broadway. Repair the vehicular travel lane over the
tracks and complete the sidewalk network on Broadway.
48th Avenue and Lincoln Street. Create a controlled crossing by
installing railroad crossing gates.
48th Avenue and Washington Street. Repair the vehicular travel lane
over the tracks and complete the sidewalk network on Washington Street.
C19. INTRODUCE TRAFFIC CALMING MEASURES.
Study traffic calming measures that may be appropriate for each of the
following streets:
46th Avenue between Broadway and Washington Street
47th Avenue between Broadway and Washington Street
Lincoln Street between 43rd and 50th Avenues
Potential options include adding stop signs along these travel routes,
modifying streets to reduce travel lane width by adding bicycle lanes or
defining parking areas, and introducing aesthetic improvements like planted
tree lawns or streetside stormwater planters. Look for opportunities for
individual projects to accomplish multiple objectives for the neighborhood.
For example, both this Plan and Denver Moves recommend a bike boulevard
for Lincoln Street which, pending further analysis, may be determined to also
accomplish the traffic calming goals for that street.

HIA STRATEGIES
RELATED TO THIS
RECOMMENDATION:
D2. Mitigate Noise Impacts
to Residential Areas. Noise in
residential areas and schools near
major roadways and highways should
be mitigated to no more than 55
decibels, where feasible.
D3. Mitigate Noise Impacts Along
Major Roads. Sound walls or other
noise mitigation measures are
recommended along major roadways
and highways where sound levels at
schools and homes are expected to
increase by 5 decibels or more, where
exterior noise levels are expected to
be 55 decibels or greater, or where
interior noise levels are expected to
be 45 decibels or greater. Community
preferences regarding aesthetic
qualities of sound mitigation should
be considered.
D22. Improve Key Intersections to
Reduce Crashes. Explore measures
to reduce the incidence of pedestrian
and bicycle injury crashes at locations
where multiple crashes have
occurred. Such locations may include
"gateway intersections"'such as 45th
Avenue and Washington Street and
51st Avenue and Washington Street
in Globeville.
64
Globeville Neighborhood Plan | CONNECTED


RECOMMENDATION 5: Address Traffic Operations and Roadway Maintenance
Issues
IMPROVEMENTS DIAGRAM

0.25
0.5
I Miles
Regional Connections
Railroad
Rail Transit
Potential Future Ped/Bike Railroad Crossing
Existing Multi-modal Railroad Crossing
^ Existing Railroad Crossing in Need of Improvement
llllllll Underpasses and Bridges
Traffic Calming Areas
CONNECTED | Globeville Neighborhood Plan 65


RECOMMENDATION 5: Address Traffic Operations and Roadway Maintenance
Issues
C20. IMPROVE UNDERPASSES AND BRIDGES FOR
PEDESTRIANS AND CYCLISTS.
The following proposed improvements affect both the local street network
and two interstates. Coordination with both the City of Denver and the State
of Colorado would be necessary prior to implementation.
Explore opportunities to improve the pedestrian and bicycle experience
along the following facilities using lighting, public art, physical buffering,
beautification, or other strategies.
Underpasses
Washington Street under 1-70. Improve this underpass to enhance
the user's experience traveling into and out of Globeville. Cities
around the world are experimenting with improving tunnels and
underpasses by implementing innovative lighting displays. Some
of the most exciting tunnels feature interactive elements and
audio enhancements. Innovative lighting can greatly improve the
Washington Street Underpass.
Lincoln Street under 1-70. Strategies to improve this underpass
include removing the wing walls to increase the size of the sidewalks,
expanding murals to include art inside the tunnel, and improving
lighting to create round-the-clock brightness. Additionally, cross
walks should be added on both sides of the underpass to create safer
street crossings.
48th Avenue under 1-25. Strategies to improve this underpass
include reducing the size of the wing wall to increase the sidewalk
width, adding bicycle lanes, providing further separation between
the street and the freight rail, and enhancing the planting beds
surrounding the underpass.
Bridges
47th Avenue over the South Platte River
44th Avenue over 1-25
48th Avenue over the BNSF Railroad Yard
66
Globeville Neighborhood Plan | CONNECTED


RECOMMENDATION 5: Address Traffic Operations and Roadway Maintenance
Issues
WASHINGTON STREET UNDER 1-70 EXISTING CONDITIONS
POTENTIAL IMPROVEMENT IDEAS
Chicago lights a sidewalk with purple and blue lights
to further delineate the pedestrian realm from the
vehicular realm.
CONNECTED | Globeville Neighborhood Plan 67


RECOMMENDATION 5: Address Traffic Operations and Roadway Maintenance
Issues
LINCOLN STREET UNDER 1-70 EXISTING CONDITIONS
LINCOLN STREET UNDER 1-70 POTENTIAL IMPROVEMENT
The existing conditions of the Lincoln Street underpass is shown in the top image; the rendering (directly above) shows the plan recommendations.
68
Globeville Neighborhood Plan | CONNECTED


RECOMMENDATION 5: Address Traffic Operations and Roadway Maintenance
Issues
48TH AVENUE UNDER 1-25 EXISTING CONDITIONS
I I I 1 /If H I IJJJJJLL I I I! I f I
48TH AVENUE UNDER 1-25 POTENTIAL IMPROVEMENT
1 m

The existing conditions of the 48th Avenue underpass is shown in the top image; the rendering (directly above) shows the plan recommendations.
CONNECTED | Globeville Neighborhood Plan 69


70 Globeville Neighborhood Plan | HEALTHY


WHY IS HEALTH IMPORTANT TO GLOBEVILLE?
Globeville, Elyria, and Swansea are three of Denver's oldest neighborhoods, settled in the 1880s by
Central and Eastern European ethnic communities who came for jobs in the railroad yards and heavy
industries like metals smelting. Over the decades, the neighborhoods continued to attract large
industrial operations, which provided jobs but also produced decades of negative environmental
impacts on air quality, water, and soil. Many industrial uses exist in the neighborhood to this day.
The construction of Interstates 25 and 70 in the 1950s and 1960s restricted physical access to the
neighborhoods and produced more air pollution. At the time, little consideration was given to the
health problems associated with such development.
In recent years, there has been a growing understanding of the connection between how
communities are designed and the impact on human health. Health is defined as"a state of
complete physical, mental and social wellbeing and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity."1
Research has revealed a strong relationship between our physical environment, physical activity,
and nutrition. Environments that do not provide people with choices to support healthy lifestyles
can lead to chronic diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and obesity2. Well-designed
neighborhoods can improve health, and poorly-designed communities can harm health.
As part of the neighborhood planning process, a Health Impact Assessment (HIA) entitled
How Neighborhood Planning Affects Health in Globeville and Elyria Swansea was conducted for
Globeville and the nearby neighborhoods of Elyria and Swansea. The HIA was conducted by
Denver Environmental Health with support from the Council District 9 office and the North Denver
Cornerstone Collaborative. An HIA is a process to incorporate health considerations into a plan,
project, or policy. HIA provides a framework for collaboration among interdisciplinary partners to
better understand how environmental, physical, economic, and social conditions determine health
in order to inform public policy and decision making. The Globeville and Elyria Swansea HIA was
developed in conjunction with the neighborhood planning process. The recommendations in the HIA
were designed to inform and strengthen the recommendations of the Globeville Neighborhood Plan
and Elyria and Swansea Neighborhoods Plan by adding community health as a consideration for the
future vision, design, and development of the neighborhoods. The recommendations and strategies
in this chapter are consistent with the HIA, and additional detail and supporting analysis on all of the
health-related topics addressed here can be found in that document.
1 Official Records of the World Health Organization, no. 2, p. 100, www.who.org
2 NACCHO Statement of Policy, Healthy Community Design http://www.naccho.org/advocacy/positions/upload/03-02-
Healthy-Community-Design-2.pdf
RECOMMENDATIONS:
1. IMPROVE ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY
2. IMPROVE MULTI-MODAL CONNECTIVITY
3. INCREASE ACCESS TO GOODS AND SERVICES
4. ENHANCE COMMUNITY SAFETY
5. IMPROVE MENTAL HEALTH AND WELLBEING
6. IMPLEMENT ALL REMAINING HIA STRATEGIES
HEALTHY | Globeville Neighborhood Plan 71


The South Platte River Trail
KEY ISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIES:
Environmental Impacts. Globeville experiences
noise and odors on a regular basis and poor air quality
periodically. These impacts are a result of a combination
of factors, including industrial operations, heavy truck
traffic, freight trains, as well as the highways which
carry over 400,000 cars daily. The marijuana industry,
which is relatively new, has a growing presence in the
neighborhood and is an additional source of impacts.
Environmental Quality. There are four primary
components to environmental quality:
Air Quality- Air quality is affected by the presence
of pollutants and nuisance odors. Pollutants are
measurable concentrations of potentially harmful
substances in the air, whereas nuisance odors do not
necessarily cause direct toxic effects but may affect
wellbeing by reducing the desire to go outdoors or
by causing stress.
Noise- Excessive noise can damage health depending
on its intensity, duration, type, and source. Long-
term exposure to moderate levels of noise can
adversely affect sleep, school, and work performance,
and increase risk of cardiovascular disease. Sources
of noise in Globeville include trains and train
crossings, industrial operations, and traffic on
roadways.
Water Quality- Exposure to pollution in surface water
occurs either by ingestion or through skin contact
with the water. The South Platte River often has poor
water quality.
Soil Quality- Globeville's industrial history resulted
in soil contamination with potentially cancerous
metals, including arsenic, cadmium, and lead. The
most common way that people are exposed to
metals in soil is through incidental ingestion. To
date, the Globeville neighborhood has had two
large soil remediation efforts that have largely been
completed.
Human Health Impacts. The residents of Globeville,
the majority of whom are Hispanic families with young
children, suffer from some of the highest rates of
cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity, and asthma in
the city. These chronic diseases are associated with poor
diet and lack of exercise, among other factors.
Impacts to Daily Living. Deficient pedestrian and
bicycle infrastructure and a lack of sources of healthy,
affordable food impact daily living.
Obstacles to Physical Activity. Opportunities for
outdoor physical activity are limited in the neighborhood
due to disconnected streets and sidewalks, lack of local
retail goods and services, and concerns about crime and
safety.
Opportunity for Improvements through
Neighborhood Planning. The built environment has the
potential to be improved through the implementation of
this Plan's recommendations, which are intended to be
72
Globeville Neighborhood Plan | HEALTHY


How Implementation of the Globeville Neighborhood Plan Can Improve Health:
Separating land uses or using other means to buffer existing and future impacts of industrial uses from
residents can reduce many environmental health impacts, including air quality, odors, and noise.
Reconnecting streets, building and repairing sidewalks, and creating connections to the new transit rail
stations and other destinations can promote physical activity and a safe pedestrian environment.
Adding neighborhood retail goods and services can increase walking, decrease driving, boost the local
economy, and increase social interaction with more "eyes on the street." Strengthening the connections to
parks and trails and the safety of those places can offer more opportunities for physical activity.
Enhanced street lighting, increased crime reporting, and traffic intersection analysis to reduce the frequency
of injury crashes can improve actual and perceived safety.
Addressing environmental and physical challenges in the neighborhood can lead to reductions in the chronic
stress that residents now experience from existing conditions and improve overall mental and physical
wellbeing. Bilingual and culturally-appropriate outreach to residents about the many upcoming infrastructure
and redevelopment projects will also serve to reduce the uncertainty about the significant changes coming to
the neighborhood.
representative of the community's desires for the future
of the neighborhood.
Limited Connectivity. Connectivity within the
neighborhood is limited due to multiple railroad tracks,
disconnected roads, and limited sidewalks and bus stops,
isolating Globeville residents within their neighborhood
and away from other places. This limited connectivity
also hinders access to physical activity and recreation
opportunities. Better overall connectivity and mobility
through improved bicycle, pedestrian, and transit
infrastructure could positively impact health in Globeville
by increasing physical exercise, reducing chronic disease
rates and obesity, and increasing the likelihood that
residents can access neighborhood retail and other
services.
Key Retail and Services. Retail and services such as
food stores, banks, pharmacies, and child care centers
are important to meet residents'daily needs. Civic
resources such as churches, libraries, schools and parks
are equally critical. Lack of access to goods and services
may be contributing to negative impacts on Globeville
residents'health. Limited access to healthy food can
lead to diet-related chronic diseases such as diabetes
and obesity, which Globeville residents suffer from
disproportionately compared to residents of many other
neighborhoods. The necessity of traveling outside of the
neighborhood to find basic services increases driving,
decreases walking, and results in fewer social interactions
and "eyes on the street." Prioritizing the development of
more neighborhood goods and services and providing
universal access, multi-modal transportation, and
Complete Streets will likely increase walking and physical
activity in the neighborhood. The ability of residents
and workers to walk, bicycle, or use transit to shop, work,
recreate, and gather as a community can also result in
improved health.
Community Safety. Community safety includes traffic,
pedestrian and cyclist safety, crime and fear of crime,
and personal safety. Elements that impact community
safety include street and pedestrian conditions, lighting,
graffiti, and tolerance of illegal activities. Improvements
in the physical environment to include street design
and lighting, as well as increased crime reporting, can
improve community safety.
HEALTHY | Globeville Neighborhood Plan 73


RECOMMENDATION 1: Improve Environmental Quality
Green Infrastructure improves water
quality by filtering pollutants out of
stormwater before it travels off-site.
Educating the younger generation
about gardening can empower youth
to choose healthy food, teaches them
about responsibility, and fosters a deeper
connection to nature.
OTHER HIA STRATEGIES THAT
ADDRESS ENVIRONMENTAL
QUALITY:
D14. Address the Impacts of
Trucks.
HIA RECOMMENDATIONS THAT DIRECTLY ADDRESS
ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY:
D1. Improve Industrial and Residential Compatibility. Minimize negative
environmental impacts from industrial uses on residential areas through
methods such as a change in concept land use designation, zoning, buffering,
or other means.
D2. Mitigate Noise Impacts to Residential Areas. Noise in residential areas
and at schools near major roadways and highways should be mitigated to no
more than 55 decibels, where feasible.1
D3. Mitigate Noise Impacts Along Major Roads. Sound walls or other
noise mitigation measures are recommended along major roadways and
highways where sound levels at schools2 and homes3 are expected to increase
by 5 decibels or more, or exterior noise levels are expected to be 55 decibels
or greater, or interior noise levels are expected to be 45 decibels or greater.4
Community preferences regarding aesthetic qualities of sound mitigation
should be considered.
D4. Mitigate the Health Impacts of Freight Rail. Explore solutions to
reduce the health impacts from trains. These could include "Quiet Zones"
(intersections specifically designed so that trains do not have to sound horns),
or grade separation of trains from other modes of transportation (i.e., roads
constructed over or under tracks to eliminate the need for trains to sound
horns at these crossings and to aid in the prevention of people and trains
crossing paths).
D5. Address the Odor Impacts of the Marijuana Industry. Mitigate the
odors and emissions from marijuana growing facilities on residential areas
through methods such as a change in concept land use designation, siting,
buffering, or other means.
D6. Increase Tree Cover. Increase the tree canopy cover in the
neighborhood as prioritized in the Denver Urban Forestry Program and the
Game Plan through planting street trees to provide an inviting and temperate
outdoor environment for physical activity.
D7. Increase the Use of Low Impact Development and Green
Infrastructure. Encourage developers to use low impact development and
green infrastructure techniques in new development and redevelopment in
the Globeville, Elyria, and Swansea neighborhoods to enhance water quality
in each basin. Examples include use of bioretention, rain gardens, bioswales,
or vegetated buffer strips to minimize directly connected impervious areas.
1 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, http://www.nonoise.org/library/levels/levels.
htm#summary
2 Schools are classified as CDOT"Category C" receptors, http://www.coloradodot.info/
programs/environmental/noise/guidelines-policies/final-cdot-noise-guidance-2013, p. 15.
3 Residential uses are classified as CDOT"Category B" receptors. http://www.coloradodot.
info/programs/environmental/noise/guidelines-policies/final-cdot-noise-guidance-2013, p. 15.
4 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, http://www.nonoise.org/library/levels/levels.
htm#summary
74
Globeville Neighborhood Plan | HEALTHY


Roadway and alley projects should include "green street"'techniques such
as stormwater planters, stormwater curb extensions, tree trenches, and
permeable pavers.
D8. Incorporate Water Quality in Open Space Design. Implement
recommendations from the River North Green way Master Plan to improve
water quality. Where possible, use existing park areas without affecting
existing uses to incorporate water quality treatment features, such as
wetlands, to restore wildlife habitat along the river or in Heron Pond.
D9. Provide Gardening Education. Work with community partners to
provide education to residents about best practices for backyard gardening.
DIO. Involve the Department of Environmental Health with Major
Projects. DEH staff should continue to participate in public sector
development projects in Globeville, Elyria, and Swansea, including the 1-70
reconstruction and the National Western Center, to help anticipate health and
environmental conditions of concern such as those identified in this Plan and
the HIA.
TREE COVERAGE MAP
Statistical Neighborhood Boundaries
Percent Tree Cover by Block Group
| 15 23
| 24-31
| 32 -40
1 14
Tree cover in Globeville is among the lowest of all Denver neighborhoods.
HEALTHY | Globeville Neighborhood Plan 75


RECOMMENDATION 2: Improve Multi-Modal Connectivity
OTHER HIA STRATEGIES THAT
ADDRESS MULTI-MODAL
CONNECTIVITY:
D22. Improve Key Intersections to
Reduce Crashes.
D23. Improve Connectivity and
Safety in School Zones.
HIA RECOMMENDATIONS THAT DIRECTLY ADDRESS
MULTI-MODAL CONNECTIVITY:
D11. Improve Street Infrastructure. Prioritize street infrastructure
improvements, including sidewalks, bicycle lanes, bus stop furnishings, and
intersection crossings, to achieve the goals of the 2014 City Council Priorities,
Denver Moves (2011) and the Strategic Transportation Plan (2008).
D12. Improve Street Connectivity. Implement new street connections as
identified in this Plan (see Connected and Character Area Chapters).
D13. Connect to Greenspace. Improve connectivity to parks, trails, and
recreation, especially to the South Platte River trails and parks.
D14. Address the Impacts of Trucks. Review truck routes in the
neighborhoods to improve environmental quality, safety, and connectivity.
Examine current truck routes, particularly adjacent to schools, explore
potential modifications as necessary, and make any needed changes to the
City truck route ordinance for consistency with state regulations.
D15. Connect to the National Western Center. Improve access and
connectivity to and through residential neighborhoods and the redeveloped
National Western Center.
D16. Create Complete Streets. Implement Complete Streets, including
sidewalks for all new and redesigned streets, to provide safe and convenient
access for all users (per existing City Policy #26, adopted May 2011).
BLOCK SIZE MAP
Block size is a metric for walkability, as smaller blocks are generally associated with
a more highly connected street network. While some parts ofGlobeville have high
and moderately high walkability, much of the neighborhood ranks low and/or has an
incomplete network of blocks.
76
Globeville Neighborhood Plan | HEALTHY


RECOMMENDATION 3: Increase Access to Goods and Services
HIA RECOMMENDATIONS THAT DIRECTLY ADDRESS
ACCESS TO GOODS AND SERVICES:
D17. Attract Key Retail and Services. Incentivize development of retail
goods and services, including a grocery store.
D18. Increase Food Access at the National Western Center. Promote new
sources of healthy foods within the redeveloped National Western Center,
such as grocery stores, farmers markets, and community gardens.
D19. Improve Healthy Food Access at Existing Retailers. Implement
a "healthy corner store retail program" in the neighborhood, similar
Philadelphia or other models, to add healthy foods to existing convenience
and corner stores.1
D20. Use Mixed-Use Development to Improve Access to Goods and
Services. Promote mixed-use development to support a variety of
commercial and retail businesses and services throughout the community
and around new rail stations.
D21. Create Neighborhood-Focused Flex Space. Develop a flexible market
space that can support a variety of neighborhood goods and services and
culturally-relevant activities.
1 h ttp://www. heal thy corn ers tores.org/
DISTANCE TO GROCERY STORES
OTHER HIA STRATEGIES THAT
ADDRESS ACCESS TO GOODS
AND SERVICES:
Dll. Improve Street Infrastructure.
D13. Connect to Greenspace.
D16. Create Complete Streets.
Statistical Neighborhood Boundaries
Suparcenter
Supermarkel
Warehouse Club
Oistance to Nearest Full Service Grocery Stoi
From Residential Blocks (In Miles)
O.Ot 0.25
0 26 0.50
0 51-1.00
1.01-2.22
Globeville residents need to travel significant distances outside of the neighborhood to
access a full service grocery store.
HEALTHY | Globeville Neighborhood Plan 77


RECOMMENDATION 4: Enhance Community Safety
D4. Mitigate the Health Impacts of
Freight Rail.
D14. Address the Impacts of
Trucks.
HIA STRATEGIES THAT DIRECTLY ADDRESS
COMMUNITY SAFETY:
D22. Improve Key Intersections to Reduce Crashes. Explore measures to
reduce the incidence of pedestrian and bicycle injury crashes at locations
where multiple crashes have occurred. Such locations may include "gateway
intersections"such as 45th Avenue and Washington Street and 51st Avenue
and Washington Street in Globeville.
D23. Improve Connectivity and Safety in School Zones. Improvements
could include analyzing current School Zones and making modifications
as necessary, including Safe Routes to School best practices. Improve
education and outreach about safety in School Zones to residents, drivers and
schoolchildren, particularly in alignment with the I-70 reconstruction.
D24. Improve Street Lighting. Install new or upgraded street lighting per
the recommendations of the Denver Police Department lighting survey,
particularly along new sidewalks, to increase safety and reduce crime.
Encourage residents' use of porch lights at night with education and outreach
efforts.
D25. Enforce Existing Laws. Enforce regulations regarding graffiti,
vandalism, public drug use, stray animals, and property maintenance to
increase safety.
D26. Provide Pedestrian Safety Education. Increase education and
outreach to citizens about pedestrian safety in anticipation of increased
pedestrian activity with the redevelopment of the National Western Center
and other projects.
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Globeville Neighborhood Plan | HEALTHY


RECOMMENDATION 5: Improve Mental Health and Wellbeing
When a neighborhood seems unsafe due to physical conditions such as
disconnectedness, pollution, vandalism, darkness, or neglect, this can lead
to feelings of irritability, anxiety, distress, and mental fatigue. Improvements
to street connectivity and sidewalks, increased lighting, crime prevention,
the addition of retail goods and services, and mitigation of noise and odor
pollution can lead to improvements in residents'mental wellbeing.
HIA STRATEGIES THAT DIRECTLY ADDRESS MENTAL
HEALTH AND WELLBEING:
Mental health and wellbeing are affected by the sum total of many other
factors. As such, furtherance of the recommendations in this chapter will also
improve the mental health of residents and of the neighborhood as a whole.
OTHER HIA STRATEGIES THAT
ADDRESS MENTAL HEALTH
AND WELLBEING:
D1. Improve Industrial and
Residential Compatibility.
D4. Mitigate the Health Impacts of
Freight Rail.
Dll. Improve Street Infrastructure.
D12. Improve Street Connectivity.
D24. Improve Street Lighting.
HEALTHY | Globeville Neighborhood Plan 79


RECOMMENDATION 6: Implement All Remaining HIA Strategies
REMAINING HIA STRATEGIES:
D27. Mitigate the Impacts of 1-70 Reconstruction. In advance of the 1-70
reconstruction project through Globeville, Elyria, and Swansea:
DEH should work with CDOT and CDPHE to define types of air
pollution monitoring that can be done to determine a community
baseline.
DEH should work with CDOT and other stakeholders to recommend
air quality mitigation measures that may be required during the
reconstruction of 1-70, including upgrading the heating, ventilation,
and air conditioning (HVAC) system at Swansea Elementary School to
improve indoor air quality.
The City should work with CDOT to mitigate noise impacts of the 1-70
reconstruction during the construction period.
D28. Explore Environmental Plan Review. Explore the feasibility of an
environmental plan review process prior to approval of future development
applications in order to minimize conflicts between industrial and residential
uses.
D29. Improve Air Quality. Continue to improve the City's air quality through
specific actions, including:
DEH should update its community air pollution modeling assessment
to a 2011 baseline and make projections for a future year (such as
2025).
DEH should work with CDPHE and EPA to establish an additional air
quality monitoring station in Globeville, Elyria, or Swansea by 2015
with a goal of quantifying near-highway pollution separately from the
I-70 project.
D30. Study the Odor Impacts of Marijuana Grow Facilities. Analyze
the distribution of current marijuana growing facilities and determine any
excessive odor burdens generated by such facilities in Globeville, Elyria, and
Swansea, and make recommendations to mitigate odor impacts as needed,
including best management practices and technologies.
D31. Study the Human Health Impacts of Marijuana Growing Facilities.
Advocate for further research on the potential human health impacts from
marijuana growing facilities, as such impacts are unknown. Concerns include
emissions to air, odors, mold, and discharges to the water system.
D32. Address Nuisance Odors. Address nuisance odors through specific
actions, including:
DEH should work with City agencies, other government, non-profit,
community, and industry partners to form a long-term steering
committee to implement solutions to reduce odors, potentially
including recommendations for local and state policy changes.
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Globeville Neighborhood Plan | HEALTHY


RECOMMENDATION 6: Implement All Remaining HIA Strategies
DEH should create and lead a community partnership of interested
organizations to pursue funding for research on manufacturing
processes that produce odors and odor monitoring technologies to
address nuisance odors in Globeville and Elyria Swansea.
DEH should continue its work with the Northeast Metro Pollution
Prevention Alliance (NEMPPA) to cooperate on potential solutions for
odor reduction from industries located outside of City boundaries.
D33. Improve Water Quality Education and Outreach. DEH should partner
with other agencies and organizations to improve education and outreach
to businesses and residents related to water quality in Globeville, Elyria,
and Swansea, including providing information to developers about City
regulations for stormwater runoff and fugitive dust and dirt.
D34. Update Superfund. DEH should work with the EPA to continue to take
steps to remove the residential portion DEH/EPA (Operable Unit 1) ofVB/l-70
from the Superfund site (i.e., de-list OU1) as the remedy has been completed.
D35. Use Environmental Design Principles to Improve Safety. The City
and private developers should work together to encourage crime prevention
and safety through the use of environmental design principles for new
development, including large projects such as the National Western Center.
D36. Strengthen Outreach on Development Projects. The City, private
developers, and community partners should continue and strengthen
bilingual and culturally-appropriate outreach and communication with
residents about upcoming construction and development projects as these
communities have historically experienced negative environmental impacts
from previous decisions.
HEALTHY | Globeville Neighborhood Plan 81


Globeville Neighborhood Plan | CHARACTER AREAS & TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECTS


This chapter applies the strategies and vision from the four Guiding
Principles chapters to specific Character Areas of Globeville, showing how
the previous recommendations are layered to create a Unique, Strong,
Connected, and Healthy Globeville. Each character area applies the vision
already established in the plan and goes into greater detail.
There are one or more transformative projects, in bullet points below,
located within most of the Character Areas. It is anticipated that each
of these projects, if implemented, would have a positive, catalytic, and
transformative effect on the neighborhood. Each transformative project
is presented and then evaluated against the four guiding principles of this
plan.
CHARACTER AREAS AND THEIR ASSOCIATED
TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECTS:
Residential Neighborhood Core
Historic 45th Avenue Main Street
Washington Street Corridor and the Riverfront
Improve Washington Street
Enhance the Street Grid in the Riverfront Area
Connect to the National Western Center
41 st and Fox Station Area
Industrial Edges
Redevelop the ASARCO Site
CHARACTER AREAS & TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECTS | Globeville Neighborhood Plan 83


Globeville's Residential
Neiahborhood Core
VISION: Maintain the single family residential character of the
neighborhood core while improving internal circulation and
enhancing 45th Avenue as a neighborhood-serving main street.
KEY ISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIES:
Stable Neighborhood. The Strong chapter recommends
a land use designation of Single Family Residential with
Accessory Dwelling Units throughout the Residential
Neighborhood Core in order to preserve Globeville's
existing residential character while also promoting
affordable housing and infill development. Many of
Globeville's residents express pride in the relatively high
rates of home ownership, which gives people a stake
in the community and fosters a sense of pride in one's
property and the neighborhood as a whole. There is an
opportunity to refine the zoning within the Residential
Neighborhood Core to maintain the stable character and
meet the vision of this Plan.
Safety and Security. Globeville residents expressed
concerns about inadequate lighting, walking and
biking conditions for school children, property
maintenance, litter, graffiti, and the lack of an established
neighborhood watch program.
Historic Main Street. 45th Avenue runs through the
southern portion of the Residential Neighborhood
Core and serves as Globeville's historic main street.
The businesses that are located along 45th are small
and directly serve the adjacent neighborhood. Today,
commercial buildings tend to be clustered at key
intersections along the street with residential uses
located in-between. Some of these residential properties
are zoned residential and are often oriented away from
45th Avenue and towards a side street. This orientation
creates a challenge in creating a cohesive neighborhood
main street as the residential uses break up the activity
along the corridor.
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Globeville Neighborhood Plan | CHARACTER AREAS & TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECTS


RESIDENTIAL NEIGHBORHOOD CORE
Urban Residential and Institutional uses like churches and schools can be found alongside
single-family homes in Globeville's Residential Neighborhood Core.
The Lincoln Street Underpass is dark.
CHARACTER AREAS & TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECTS | Globeville Neighborhood Plan 85


RESIDENTIAL NEIGHBORHOOD CORE
HIA STRATEGIES RELATED
TO THE RESIDENTIAL
NEIGHBORHOOD CORE:
D2. Mitigate Noise Impacts
to Residential Areas. Noise in
residential areas and schools near
major roadways and highways
should be mitigated to no more than
55 decibels where feasible.
D24. Improve Street Lighting.
Install new or upgraded street
lighting per the recommendations
of the Denver Police Department
lighting survey, particularly along
new sidewalks, to increase safety and
reduce crime. Encourage residents'
use of porch lights at night with
education and outreach efforts.
D25. Enforce Existing Laws.
Enforce regulations regarding
graffiti, vandalism, public drug
use, stray animals, and property
maintenance to increase safety.
STRATEGIES UNIQUE TO THE RESIDENTIAL
NEIGHBORHOOD CORE:
El. Update the Neighborhood Context. The Denver Zoning Code's Urban
Neighborhood Context, as opposed to the currently-mapped Urban Edge
Context, better reflects the use of alleys, limiting or prohibiting curb cuts for
street access, and the continuation of detached sidewalks where possible.
E2. Tailor Minimum Zone Lot Sizes. In areas where the existing zoning
requires a 4,500 square foot minimum zone lot size, a future zone district
should maintain the 4,500 square foot zone lot minimum. In areas where the
existing zoning requires a 6,000 square foot minimum zone lot size, a future
zone district should have a 5,500 square foot zone lot minimum.
E3. Ensure a Safe and Secure Residential Community. Use a combination
of complementary strategies to increase safety and security within the
Residential Neighborhood Core:
Explore the creation of a neighborhood watch program.
Work with the Safe Routes to School program to create a safe route to
Garden Place Academy.
Support the efforts of United Community Action Network (UCAN Metro
Denver) and other active organizations within the neighborhood to
organize neighborhood clean-up and anti-graffiti efforts.
Collaborate with the City's 311 and Neighborhood Inspections Services
with respect to private property and neighborhood maintenance issues.
Implement the recommendations of the Denver Police Department's
2014 lighting survey.
A rendering of 47th Avenue demonstrating how bike lanes, recommended in the Connected chapter, could be accommodated on the
street.
86
Globeville Neighborhood Plan | CHARACTER AREAS & TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECTS


RESIDENTIAL NEIGHBORHOOD CORE
0 0.25 0.5
Land Use Concept
Single Family with ADU
Urban Residential
Campus
Mixed Use
Park or Open Space
Existing Route
mm Potential Connection
yv Key Intersection
Regional Connections
Railroad
mw Rail Transit
CHARACTER AREAS & TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECTS | Globeville Neighborhood Plan 87


TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECT: Historic 45th Avenue Main Street
Small improvements to the 45th Avenue streetscape could do a lot to reinforce its main street character.
WHAT IS IT? 45TH AVENUE STRATEGIES:
45th Avenue currently functions
as Globeville's historic main street
with its collection of neighborhood-
serving businesses. More could be
done to increase the street's vitality
and prominence. 45th Avenue
should be a mix of uses arranged
along a linear pattern, scaled to be
compatible with the surrounding
residential neighborhood, and with
a focus on pedestrian and bicycle-
friendly urban design.
GOAL STATEMENT:
Reinforce 45th Avenue as
a unique neighborhood
destination with small-
scale retail, restaurants,
and services.
E4. Enhance 45th Avenue.
E4A. Enhance the Public Streetscape.
Create a gateway treatment at the corner of 45th Avenue and
Washington Street to attract people to the 45th Avenue main street.
Enhance the public realm.
Preserve and maintain the existing pedestrian-scaled street lamps.
Preserve and maintain the street's bike facilities.
Encourage the use of banners and signage to create a recognizable
brand for 45th Avenue as Globeville's neighborhood main street.
Consider introducing "parklets,"small green spaces extending from
the sidewalk and commonly the size of one or more parking spaces,
to activate the street and to create a unique amenity not commonly
found elsewhere in Denver. Parklets can also be designed to double
as water quality features and include such practices as streetside
stormwater planters, curb extensions, and tree trenches.
Consider establishing a special district along 45th Avenue to fund the
construction and maintenance of these improvements.
E4B. Mixed-Use and Commercial Properties.
Maintain required ground-story activation such as window
transparency and street entrances facing 45th Avenue.
Locate active uses on the ground floors to create interest and
engagement on 45th Avenue.
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Globeville Neighborhood Plan | CHARACTER AREAS & TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECTS


TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECT: Historic 45th Avenue Main Street
Minimize surface parking and locate it to the side and rear of
buildings with building entrances facing the sidewalk.
E4C. Residential Properties.
For residential properties fronting 45th that are zoned residential,
consider allowing "Live/Work" uses where an office or shop can open
in addition to containing a dwelling.
Single Family properties adjacent to 45th Ave but that front another
street should be encouraged to maintain the property's residential
use while incorporating elements that acknowledge their presence on
a neighborhood main street.
Encourage porches to "wrap" the side of the house that is facing 45th
Avenue.
Encourage side yards facing 45th Avenue to engage in residential
food sales.
Promote side yard fencing along 45th Avenue to be no taller than 4
feet.
HOW DOES IT ADDRESS UNIQUE?
Today, 45th Avenue plays a less prominent role in the daily lives of Globeville
residents than it once did, when people could go there to fulfill more of their
daily shopping needs. Enhancing the street will help return it to its former
prominence, which in turn reinforces the unique character and history of the
neighborhood.
HOW DOES IT ADDRESS STRONG?
Enhancing the main street prominence of 45th Avenue increases accessibility
to retail, services, and jobs, while reducing the need for residents to travel
outside of the neighborhood to meet these needs. Encouraging commerce
along the street will stimulate interest in diversifying the neighborhood's
economy through the creation of new small businesses.
HOW DOES IT ADDRESS CONNECTED?
Because it connects to Washington Street and across 1-25,45th Avenue is
already a major through-street for Globeville. The concept presented here
reinforces 45th Avenue as a destination street, as well.
HOW DOES IT ADDRESS HEALTHY?
Neighborhood main streets promote walkable, urban communities that
provide residents with easy access to many of their daily needs without
requiring the use of an automobile. This makes neighborhoods more livable
and safer and can improve traffic congestion and associated air quality issues.
CHARACTER AREAS & TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECTS | Globeville Neighborhood Plan 89


Washington Street Corridor
and the Riverfront
VISION: The area is transformed into a mixed-use riverfront
destination area that capitalizes on its adjacency to the South
Platte River, a revitalized Washington Street, reinvented
greenspace, and direct connections across the river to the
National Western Center.
KEY ISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIES
A Key River-Oriented Development and Connectivity
Opportunity. A consistent theme heard throughout the
planning process was a desire to maximize the potential
of this area and the many opportunities that are present
here, including:
The opportunity to develop underutilized properties
including large vacant lots, surface parking, and
warehouses into mixed-use, infill projects.
The opportunity to better and more directly connect
to the National Western Center, National Western
Center Station, and destinations within the Elyria and
Swansea neighborhoods.
The opportunity to activate the large but
underutilized Northside Park, Heron Pond, and Heller
Open Space areas.
The opportunity to transform Washington Street into
an attractive, vital, multi-modal, main street.
The opportunity to integrate connectivity with water
quality and storm water conveyance.
Underutilized River Frontage. Globeville lacks easy
access to the South Platte River. The large industrial
parcels between Washington and the river limit the flow
of people within the riverfront area. As such, the river is
underutilized, perceived by some as dangerous, and lacks
a community presence.
National Western Center Redevelopment. A master
plan for the National Western Center (NWC) is being
90
Globeville Neighborhood Plan | CHARACTER AREAS & TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECTS


WASHINGTON STREET CORRIDOR AND THE RIVERFRONT
Storage lots and industrial uses are common in the Riverfront area.
developed with the goal of creating a major year-
round destination directly across the river. Connecting
to the NWC provides an opportunity for mixed-use
development to provide supportive services to meet the
needs of NWC visitors such as hotels, restaurants, and
shops, and to enhance the overall NWC experience. The
synergy between NWC and the Washington Street and
Riverfront area cannot be ignored; this relationship can
have a catalytic effect on both Globeville and NWC.
Washington Street. Washington Street within
Globeville is primarily an industrial corridor, although it
also has a sizable number of commercial uses. Current
development along the street lacks active uses and
discourages destinations that attract people, resulting in
an incohesive sense of place.
Major Arterial. Washington is a major through-
street connecting for miles to the north and carrying
significant amounts of traffic.
Narrow Right of Way. North of 47th Avenue,
Washington is a narrow street with numerous
businesses located directly adjacent to the right of
way. At just 60 feet, Washington Street does not have
the width of a typical arterial, and multiple travel
lanes are not possible within the existing right-of-
way.
Suboptimal Pedestrian Realm. The sidewalk
network along Washington is incomplete, and
where sidewalks do exist they are generally in
poor condition. The street itself lacks continuous
pedestrian and bike facilities. Street furnishings
such as pedestrian-scale street lights, benches, and
street trees are minimal to non-existent. Despite a
few restaurants and commercial uses and the close
proximity to the river and parks, there is a lack of
destinations and active uses along the corridor that
are attractive to pedestrians.
Gateway into Denver from Adams County.
Washington Street is a primary connection from
Adams County into Downtown Denver.
An Important Connection. Washington is the
only through-street in Globeville aside from 1-25
and 1-70, meaning that it both enters and exits the
neighborhood. As such, it provides several critical
points of access for the neighborhood where key
local streets intersect with Washington Street. These
intersections provide "gateway" opportunities for the
neighborhood. Washington Street is a parallel route
to 1-25 and is one of the first arterial streets to fill up
with cars when 1-25 becomes congested.
CHARACTER AREAS & TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECTS | Globeville Neighborhood Plan 91


WASHINGTON STREET CORRIDOR AND THE RIVERFRONT
TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECTS
IN THE WASHINGTON
STREET CORRIDOR AND THE
RIVERFRONT CHARACTER
AREA:
Improve Washington Street
Enhance the Street Grid in
the Riverfront Area
Connect to the National
Western Center
STRATEGIES UNIQUE TO WASHINGTON STREET AND
THE RIVERFRONT:
E5. Assist the Transition to Mixed-Use. The following strategies will help to
promote this character area's transition from Industrial to Mixed-Use:
Establish a relocation assistance program for industrial uses. Try to keep
businesses in the area by identifying stable industrial receiving areas in
Globeville, Elyria, or Swansea.
As industrial uses leave this area, do not allow new industrial uses to be
established. Rezoning this area to mixed-use zone districts would achieve
this strategy.
E6. Create Neighborhood Gateways at Key Intersections on Washington.
Further enhance the sense of place and make it easier for people to flow
between the neighborhood, Washington Street, and the river. Gateways
have unique treatments that send a clear message to travelers that they have
entered a new, distinctive place. Strategies include:
Prominent entrances, monuments, building features, or special signage
Improve the auto-oriented nature of intersections with stronger urban
design
Create clear views to a specific destination area
Design structures such that they create a unique identifying character
There are several gateway opportunities located along Washington Street in
Globeville. High priority intersections are identified below along with specific
opportunities or treatments associated with each.
The 45th Avenue and Washington Street intersection is the primary
gateway into Globeville's historic main street, 45th Avenue. Providing a
gateway treatment that directs people to the neighborhood businesses
on 45th Avenue is a primary economic development strategy. East of
Washington Street, 45th Avenue is also a gateway to a South Platte River
Trail access point. A gateway at this location should provide clear visibility
and visual cues to announce one's arrival at both destinations.
The 47th Avenue and Washington Street intersection is a key gateway to
Globeville's Residential Neighborhood Core as well as other destinations
including churches and Argo Park. To the east, 47th Avenue provides
one of Globeville's few street connections across the South Platte River
to destinations in the Elyria neighborhood, including the National
Western Center and the Valdez-Perry Library. A gateway at 47th Avenue
and Washington Street should facilitate safe circulation and crossing for
pedestrians, cyclists, and vehicles.
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WASHINGTON STREET CORRIDOR AND THE RIVERFRONT
49th Avenue and Washington Street, while not currently a gateway
intersection, has the potential to become one if the recommended
connection is made at 49th Avenue across the South Platte River to
the National Western Center (NWC). This connection should become
an additional "front door" to the NWC, and a special treatment at this
intersection should be designed to announce one's arrival to a major
destination street.
51st Avenue and Washington Street is a gateway into Globeville from
Adams County to the north. 51st Avenue provides access to the ASARCO
employment area, as well as other key institutions including Laradon Hall
and the Stapleton Recreation Center. To the east, 51st Avenue provides
access to Northside Park and the South Platte River Trail. The intersection
currently is off-set, which creates a navigation challenge for drivers in
particular. Correcting the offset becomes particularly important if 51st
Avenue is selected as a new multi-modal connection across the river and to
the revitalized National Western Center.
E7. Identify Appropriate Implementation Tools. Implementing this Plan's
ambitious vision for the riverfront will require a creative and strategic approach
to funding infrastructure and attracting new investment. Because of this area's
strong relationship to the NWC, it would be appropriate for the North Denver
Cornerstone Collaborative to take on a coordinating role in implementing
this Plan's vision for Washington Street and the Riverfront. Depending on
the specific approach that is selected, appropriate implementation tools
may include developing a General Development Plan for the area, creating a
general improvement district or other special districts, establishing an urban
redevelopment area, or issuing bonds, among other strategies.
Existing Route
..... Potential Connection
Key intersection
Regional Connections
Railroad
... Rail Transit
Land Use Concept
Industrial
Mixed Use
Employment
Park or Open Space
CHARACTER AREAS & TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECTS | Globeville Neighborhood Plan 93


TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECT: Improve Washington Street
Washington Street has the potential to become a pedestrian and bike-friendly destination.
GOAL STATEMENT:
Make Washington Street
an attractive corridor
that creates a positive
sense of place, attracts
private reinvestment, and
better accommodates all
transportation modes.
WHAT IS IT?
Concepts for transforming Washington Street are presented here. Each
option has different tradeoffs that must be weighed against the benefits.
At this time, there is not a preferred or recommended cross-section for
Washington Street. Further study is needed to identify the appropriate width
of the future right of way, as well as the specific details of the cross-section for
the street.
Creating a strong sense of place on segments of Washington Street is a
key component of creating an economically feasible mixed-use area. The
streetscape must be designed to balance the needs of regional traffic demand
with the pedestrian realm. Reconstructed and beautified, a new Washington
Street streetscape will attract new development interest to the corridor.
To the extent possible, the design for Washington Street that is ultimately
selected should strive to meet the following priorities that were identified by
the community through the planning process:
Provide sufficient travel lanes to accommodate vehicular and truck
traffic, recognizing Washington Street's importance in the regional
transportation network.
Provide on-street parking. On-street parking is an important component
of the street design if Washington Street is to become a successful mixed-
use corridor as envisioned by this Plan.
Provide a high-quality pedestrian realm:
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Full Text

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Adopted December 1, 2014 GLOBEVILLENEIGHBORHOOD PLAN

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AcknowledgmentsMAYOR MICHAEL B. HANCOCK DENVER CITY COUNCIL District 1 Susan Shepherd District 2 Jeanne Faatz District 3 Paul D. Lopez District 4 Peggy Lehmann District 5 Mary Beth Susman District 6 Charlie Brown District 7 Chris Nevitt District 8 Albus Brooks District 9 Judy H. Montero, President Pro-Tem District 10 Jeanne Robb District 11 Christopher Herndon, President AtLargeRobin Kniech At-Large Deborah Ortega DENVER PLANNING BOARD Julie Underdahl, Chair Andy Baldyga, Vice Chair Jim Bershof Shannon Giord Renee Martinez-Stone Brittany Morris Saunders Joel Noble Susan Pearce Arleen Taniwaki Frank Schultz Chris Smith COMMUNITY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT Brad Buchanan, Executive Director Evelyn Baker Jill Jennings-Golich Steve Ferris Steve Gordon Caryn Champine Courtland Hyser, Project Manager Michelle Pyle, Project Manager Steve Nalley Tim Watkins Andrea Burns Samantha Suter Andrea Santoro PUBLIC WORKS Jose Cornejo, Executive Director Lesley Thomas Emily Silverman Emily Snyder Justin Schmitz Mike Anderson Sarah Anderson Jennifer Hillhouse DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH Doug Linkhart, Executive Director Robin Valdez Gretchen Armijo Gene Hook Dave Erickson Stacey McConlogue PARKS AND RECREATION Lauri Dannemiller, Executive Director Scott Gilmore Gordon Robertson David Marquardt Courtney Levingston OFFICE OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Paul Washington, Executive Director Je Romine Michael Miera Beth Truby CITY ATTORNEYS OFFICE Karen Aviles Lori Strand NORTH DENVER CORNERSTONE COLLABORATIVE (NDCC) Kelly Leid, Executive Director Todd Wenskoski Erika Martinez Celia VanDerLoop DENVER CITY COUNCIL DISTRICT 9 OFFICE Nola Miguel Benjamin Roldan-Rojas SPECIAL THANKS TO THE MEMBERS OF THE GLOBEVILLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN STEERING COMMITTEE: A dedicated volunteer committee of Globeville residents, business owners, and neighborhood advocates.

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Table of ContentsINTRODUCTION Planning Process .................................................................................................................................2 Planning Context ................................................................................................................................4 Planning Area Overview....................................................................................................................5 Study Area Overview..........................................................................................................................8 How to Use this Plan..........................................................................................................................9 Public Input Summary.....................................................................................................................10 Guiding Principles..............................................................................................................................12 Plan Concept (Plan on a Page)...................................................................................................14 GUIDING PRINCIPLES CHAPTERS A Unique Globeville ........................................................................................................................16 A Strong Globeville .........................................................................................................................26 A Connected Globeville ..................................................................................................................48 A Healthy Globeville .......................................................................................................................70 CHARACTER AREAS AND TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECTS Residential Neighborhood Core.................................................................................................84 Historic 45th Avenue Main Street Washington Street Corridor and the Riverfront.....................................................................90 Improve Washington Street Enhance the S treet Grid in the Riverfront Connect to the National Western Center 41st and Fox Station Area............................................................................................................110 Industrial Edges...............................................................................................................................112 Redevelop the ASARCO Site MOVING FORWARD Realizing the Vision........................................................................................................................119 Types of Implementation Activities.........................................................................................119 Champions and Advocates.........................................................................................................120 Public Funding Sources and Strategies..................................................................................120 Partnership Tools.............................................................................................................................121

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iv O FFICE OF THE M AYOR CITY AND COUNTY BUILDING DENVER, CO 80202 5390 TELEPHONE: (720) 865 9090 FAX: (720) 865 8787 TTY/ TTD: (720) 8659010 Mayor Dear Globeville Residents: the completion of the Globeville N eighborhood Plan This plan is a testament to our collective commitment toward creating a neighborhood that is strong connected, healthy and unique. For the past 125 years, the vibrant community of Globeville a family friendly neighborhood exemplified by culture and pride has made fundamental contributions to Denver. Th e Globeville Neighborhood Plan is a significant milestone that will build on the strength of the neighborhood and have a lasting positive impact on the residents of Globeville and the city as a whole. Through significant community outreach, your creative i deas and common sense recommendations are now part of a plan that will help Globeville continue to thrive. The City and County of Denver has already begun working with community partners to address challenges you have identified. In Globeville, two transit stations will re-energize this cornerstone by increasing access to other parts of the city. In addition, we are investing in infrastructure to provide a safe, multimodal corridor on Brighton Boulevard. And the National Western Center master pl an ning team is exploring the potential of the site and thinking creatively about the role the neighborhoods play in its future. In 2013, I formed the North Denver Cornerstone Collaborative (NDCC) to strategically align six key planning efforts including the National Western and the Globeville, Elyria and Swansea neighborhoods These catalytic projects will not only better connect the neighborhoods and their residents to resources and opportunities, they will transform a gateway into our city and a corner stone of our community. These projects play a major role in the advancement of Denver and its neighborhoods, and I am proud to have made the NDCC one of my top priorities. I would like to thank Councilwoman Judy Montero for her dedication to advance Nort h Denver and its residents. In addition, I appreciate the many neighbors community organizations and business representatives who were instrumental in the planning process. Your involvement in creating a vision for your neighborhood is democracy in action. Respectfully, Michael B. Hancock Mayor

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v Dear Denverites, Globeville is a neighborhood full of strong people with tenacious spirits and deep roots in the community. Since 1889, Globeville has had its name and identity and has thrived and suered with the strong presence of industry, including smelter, meat packing and large scale factories. Globeville has always been a tight knit community where people know each other well, and take care of each other. Immigrants from many dierent countries have called Globeville their home, yet regardless of dierences they create a vibrant common neighborhood culture in the day to day life in Globevilles churches, shops and schools. I believe this Globeville culture will continue through the direction of this neighborhood plan, which is a product of time and eort of so many neighborhood leaders and eorts. Its an exciting time in Globeville, with new rail stations coming in at 41st/Fox and 38th/Blake, rail will start to serve people in the neighborhood instead of just passing through with freight. With new and rehabilitated homes from Habitat for Humanity projects and new developments like TAXI, Globeville is getting new residents and new life. There are 6 catalytic projects in Mayor Hancocks North Denver Cornerstone Collaborative initiative, and the Globeville Neighborhood Plan will be the rst of these to come to fruition. The master planning of the National Western Complex is also in process, directly East of Globeville, and opportunities abound. Yet change and progress must move forward with the health and wellbeing of the surrounding neighbors at their center. This is why the Globeville Plan is so critical for our city to have at this point in time. I am honored to have fought alongside Globeville leaders to nally get this neighborhood plan started and nished. It has been so important to me to make sure that the plan not only discussed land use, but really adhered to values that include environmental and social justice, economic vitalization, cultural and historic relevancy and health. Without the lens of these values, you cant even start to talk about how land should be used in the neighborhood. We have had great accomplishments already during this planning process, including a strong steering committee of leaders, new murals and neighborhood signs, and new bike paths and improvements to our parks and green space in the area. There is new housing, new economic development, and a new vision for the riverfront that is creating a dynamic way forward. We also have a Health Impact Assessment that informs the neighborhood plan and will be a tool for future residents and leaders to improve their community. If you are reading this, I hope that you will listen carefully to this plan, and to the neighborhood residents; honor the stories of the past and help realize this plan for the future of Globeville. It has been a great honor to serve the Globeville neighborhood residents, Councilwoman Judy H. Montero, Denver City Council District 9

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1 Introduction Globeville is located along the western bank of the South Platte River in North Central Denver. In addition to the river, major physical landmarks in the neighborhood include I-25 and I-70. Historically, the neighborhood was home to large industry, especially smelting and meat packing. In Globevilles early years, immigrants settled in the area and worked in the local industries. As time passed and the economic structure of Denver evolved, the industries in the neighborhood changed. Although the smelters are now gone and the meatpacking industry is much-diminished, a strong industrial presence remains today, as does an established residential community. Strong community ties and civic pride bolster the neighborhood, even in the face of environmental, economic, educational, and infrastructure issues that cause challenges for quality of life. Many important changes are on the neighborhoods immediate horizon, including new commuter rail transit, the I-70 East project in nearby Elyria and Swansea, and an expanding vision for the National Western Stock Show just across the river to the east.

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2 Planning ProcessThe public process for the Globeville Neighborhood Plan kicked o in June 2012. Over the course of the next two years, community members worked together with City sta to identify issues and opportunities, develop a vision, and create recommendations and strategies for achieving the vision. Public meetings and neighborhood steering committee meetings helped shape lan content throughout the planning process, as did ongoing interdepartmental coordination between Denvers departments of Community Planning and Development, Public Works, Environmental Health, Parks and Recreation, and the Oce of Economic Development. The planning process used a multi-tiered strategy for collecting public input to identify assets and issues and to inform the development of Plan concepts and recommendations: %  en Globeville Neighborhood Plan Steering Committee. The steering committee for the Globeville Neighborhood Plan met regularly to deal with the details of the plan development process. At key points in the process, joint meetings were held with the steering committee for the Elyria and Swansea Neighborhoods Plan to ensure that both planning eorts were eectively coordinated. At the beginning of the planning process, Globeville Steering Committee members successfully won a grant from the Denver Foundation that allowed all meetings to feature food, child care, and Spanish language interpretive services. %  en Public Meetings. The planning process featured a series of seven meetings to seek input and guidance from the general public: Kicko Meeting and Listening SessionJune 28, 2012 Development of Vision and Guiding PrinciplesSeptember 25, 2012 A Strong GlobevilleFebruary 13, 2013 A Connected GlobevilleJuly 18, 2013 A Healthy Globeville, Elyria, and Swansea ( Health Impact Assessment Joint Neighborhood Meeting)January 8, 2014 A Unique GlobevilleA pril 15, 2014 Draft Plan ReviewOctober 7, 2014 %  en Community Asset Mapping. Councilwoman Judy Montero led a detailed eort to identify community assets in Globeville, Elyria, and Swansea. This eort included work sessions with City sta, local nonprots, faith-based institutions, and the general public. %  en Individual Stakeholder Meetings. One-on-one meetings were held with individual stakeholders or groups on an as-needed basis throughout the planning process. %  en Targeted Community Outreach. Special meetings were held on an asneeded basis to engage specic stakeholder groups: Youth MeetingIssue and opportunity identication with youth at the

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3 Street Kidz recreation center on January 28, 2013. Spanish Language MeetingA meeting led in Spanish and in terpreted into English on February 6, 2013. Industrial Stakeholdersengaged as part of an industrial lands study in December, 2013. National Western Center Master Plan Public MeetingsThe Globeville planning team attended public meetings for the National Western Center Master Plan to engage participants in that process. %  en Oral History Project. As a parallel eort to the ongoing planning eort in the neighborhood, Councilwoman Judy Montero led an oral history project. This project resulted in the creation of the 30 minute video Globeville Elyria Swansea: Then and Now, as well as a photo exhibit at the Denver Central Library that was on display in the spring and summer of 2014. %  en Health Impact Assessment. A detailed Health Impact Assessment, How Neighborhood Planning Aects Health in Globeville and Elyria Swansea, (HIA) was conducted for the Globeville, Elyria, and Swansea neighborhoods parallel to and as a component of the neighborhood planning process. The resulting HIA recommendations have been integrated directly into this Plan.COORDINATION WITH CONCURRENT PLANNING EFFORTSThroughout the planning process, there were several related eorts underway within or adjacent to the study area. The planning team coordinated with each of these eorts to help ensure consistency: %  en Elyria and Swansea Neighborhoods Plan (Denver Community Planning and Development) %  en Health Impact Assessment (Denver Department of Environmental Health, City Council District 9, and North Denver Cornerstone Collaborative) %  en National Western Center Master Plan (National Western Stock Show and City of Denver) %  en Brighton Boulevard Corridor Study (Denver Public Works) %  en I-70 Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Statement (Colorado Department of Transportation) %  en Gold Corridor Sustainable Communities Initiative (Denver Regional Council of Governments) %  en Globeville Utah Junction Outfall Systems Plan (Denver Public Works)

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4 Planning ContextDenver Comprehensive Plan and Supplements. The Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000 provides the vision for the entire city. Citywide and small area plans are adopted as supplements Comprehensive Plan 2000 to provide additional direction for certain topics or areas. This section explains the applicability and relationship of existing citywide and small area plans to the Globeville Neighborhood Plan (2014). %  en Citywide Plans: The following citywide Plans oer a higher level framework than the Globeville Neighborhood Plan (2014) to guide and inuence decisions that aect the future of the city. They are used as a foundation for the more specic vision, recommendations and strategies contained in the Globeville Neighborhood Plan: % en Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000 % en Denver Bicycle Master Plan (2001) % en Blueprint Denver: An Integrated Land Use and Transportation Plan (2002) % en Denver Parks and Recreation Game Plan (2002) % en Pedestrian Master Plan (2004) %  en Small Area Plans: Small area plans set specic visions, recommendations, and strategies for an area. Within the boundary of the Globeville statistical neighborhood, there are three existing small area Plans. This Globeville Neighborhood Plan (2014) relates to and aects these small area Plans as follows: % en Globeville Neighborhood Plan (1989 readopted in 2000): This Globeville Neighborhood Plan (2014) supersedes and rescinds the Globeville Neighborhood Plan (1989 readopted in 2000). As such, the Globeville Neighborhood Plan (1989 readopted in 2000) will no longer be used to inform decisions that aect this area of the city. % en River North Plan (2003): This Globeville Neighborhood Plan (2014) overlaps with a portion of the boundaries of the River North Plan (2003). The area of overlap is generally the area between the consolidated rail lines and the South Platte River. Within the area of overlap, this Globeville Neighborhood Plan (2014) supersedes the River North Plan (2003). As such, the River North Plan will no longer be used to inform decisions that aect the area of overlap. % en 41st and Fox Station Area Plan (2009): This Globeville Neighborhood Plan (2014) overlaps with the boundaries of the 41st and Fox Station Area Plan generally east of the railroad tracks, west of I-25, and south of I-70. This Globeville Neighborhood Plan (2014) reinforces the recommendations of the 41st and Fox Station Area Plan with respect to the Station Area Plans boundaries. As such, within the area of overlap, both Plans should be used to inform decisions that aect this area of the city. %  en Implementation Plans. City agencies prepare implementation plans to guide their policies and work programs. Although these plans are not adopted as supplements to Comprehensive Plan 2000, they provide important guidance to the City and its agencies for implementing Comprehensive Plan 2000 and its supplements. % en Greenprint Denver (2006) % en Strategic Transportation Plan (2008) % en Sanitary Sewer Master Plan (2009) % en Strategic Parking Plan (2010) % en Denver Moves (2011) % en Storm Drainage Master Plan (2014)

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5 Planning Area Overview North DenverTHE ROLE OF THE GLOBEVILLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN WITHIN THE NORTH DENVER CORNERSTONE COLLABORATIVEDenver has several major redevelopment and infrastructure projects taking place that provide a connection from Denver Union Station to Denver International Airport. Named the Corridor of Opportunity, the nearly 23-mile stretch is one of the most compelling commercial investment opportunities in the world, with thousands of developable acres. Within the Corridor of Opportunity is a vibrant community consisting of the Globeville, Elyria, and Swansea neighborhoods that have a rich history of making fundamental contributions to the city. Currently, there are six dierent redevelopment projects in this cornerstone that provide a unique and historic opportunity to rebuild a connected community and energize a gateway to downtown Denver. What we build today will create Denvers tomorrow. Signature development projects will strengthen our economy, create jobs and improve neighborhoods. Mayor Michael B. Hancock

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6 In early 2013, Mayor Michael B. Hancock recognized the need to align all of these eorts under one coordinated vision as part of creating a worldclass city. The resulting North Denver Cornerstone Collaborative (NDCC) is a coordinated eort to ensure integrated planning and deliberate connections among the converging projects that are taking place. Each of the six projects is unique and plays a signicant role in rebuilding our neighborhoods. %  en Globeville and Elyria and Swansea Neighborhood Plans. The NDCC is helping to ensure that the Globeville Neighborhood Plan and the Elyria and Swansea Neighborhood Plan are aligned with each other and that the future Plans support the needs of a diverse and historic community. Globevilles neighborhood planning process was initiated the year prior to the creation of the NDCC and is one of the rst NDCC projects to be completed. %  en National Western Center. In partnership with the National Western Association, Colorado State University, Museum of Nature and Science, History Colorado, and the City and County of Denver, this project is focused on creating a year round destination centered on education, economic development, tourism, and entertainment. As a rst step, a comprehensive National Western Center Master Plan was in development concurrent with the planning processes for the Globeville Neighborhood Plan and the Elyria and Swansea Neighborhoods Plan. %  en Brighton Boulevard Corridor Redevelopment. The NDCC is overseeing the eective public infrastructure improvement to the Boulevard and continuing the momentum of reinvestment that is beginning to emerge and energize this gateway to downtown Denver from I-70. %  en River North. This project is focused on reclaiming the South Platte River via greenway and transportation improvements and identifying sustainable development opportunities along the riverfront. %  en Interstate 70 Reconstruction. Collaborating with the Colorado Department of Transportation and area stakeholders is a key component to ensuring that smart improvements are made to I-70 between Colorado and Brighton Boulevards that will help reconnect Denver neighborhoods. %  en Regional Transportation District Station Development. Working with the Regional Transportation District (RTD) and City and County of Denver agencies to coordinate the planning and implementation of the new East, North, and Gold Rail Lines is essential to creating connected neighborhoods. These lines will connect downtown to the National Western Stock Show and Denver International Airport with several stations in the Globeville, Elyria, and Swansea neighborhoods. Planning Area Overview North Denver

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7 HOW THE GLOBEVILLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN RELATES TO THE ELYRIA AND SWANSEA NEIGHBORHOODS PLAN AND THE NATIONAL WESTERN CENTER MASTER PLAN As stated previously, the content of the Globeville Neighborhood Plan was coordinated with numerous other plans, studies, and projects. Of these, detailed and ongoing coordination was especially critical between this Plan and the concurrent Elyria and Swansea Neighborhoods Plan and the National Western Center Master Plan. The importance of this coordination stems from the fact that all three planning eorts have a shared boundary along the South Platte River, and all three emphasize the importance of enhanced connections between their respective planning areas in order to realize the goals of each specic planning eort. The role of the neighborhood Plans is to establish the vision for their respective neighborhoods and to identify recommended implementation actions to achieve their visions. The neighborhood Plans have been closely coordinated to ensure that they are complimentary and do not provide conicting or contradictory guidance. The National Western Center Master Plan is responsive to the guidance of the surrounding neighborhood Plans, and its role is to help implement the vision that is set by those Plans. Planning Area Overview North Denver

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8 Study Area Overview GlobevilleThe future success of the Globeville neighborhood as a whole depends, in part, on the inter-related health of the various component areas within the neighborhood, referred to in this plan as Character Areas. Each of these Areas has its own distinct characteristics as a result of dierences in land use, connectivity, development patterns, opportunities, and other factors. A key goal is to maintain and enhance the distinct identity of each Character Area while improving the transitions and connections between them. This Plan identies four distinct Character Areas within Globeville: %  en Residential Neighborhood Core %  en Washington Street Corridor and the Riverfront %  en 41st and Fox Station Area %  en Industrial Edges

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9 How to Use this PlanThis Plan establishes near-term aspirations for Globeville as well as a longrange vision and guiding principles for the development and future of the neighborhood. The elements of this Plan will direct the community toward achieving the vision for a unique, strong, connected, and healthy Globeville. Public agencies and private entities will use this Plan in coming years for many purposes and actions that will aect the form and function of Globeville. The Plan provides City-adopted policy direction to guide decision-making related to development opportunities, transportation, partnerships, and many others. Many of the recommendations will require multiple steps over several years by a variety of participants. The Plan provides a sound policy basis for a thriving Globeville. The Plan is intended to give the latitude needed to pursue unforeseen opportunities that will arise and to respond to new challenges over the coming years. The Plan structure has three major components in addition to this introduction: %  en The Guiding Principle chapters provide content that generally applies to the entire Plan area and provides the background to support the recommendations for a Unique, Strong, Connected, and Healthy Globeville. %  en The Character Areas chapter presents four subareas within Globeville: Residential Neighborhood Core, Washington Street Corridor and the Riverfront, 41st and Fox Station Area, and Industrial Edges. Each Character Area is described in greater detail and has its own specic recommendations. Some of the recommended projects are identied as transformative, meaning that their implementation would be catalytic in transforming the area and achieving major components of the Plans vision over the next 20 years. %  en The Moving Forward chapter describes Plan implementation activities, priorities, and potential funding sources. As with the Comprehensive Plan 2000 and its supplements, Plan recommendations provide guidance. Future implementation actions such as ocial map amendments, text amendments to the Denver Zoning Code, capital improvements, and public-private partnerships will require specic actions on the part of the City and County of Denver.

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10 What do You Like About Globeville? What People Like about Globeville and What They Want to Change. At the beginning of the planning process, City sta engaged the community in a conversation aimed at identifying the key issues within the neighborhood. These key issues are presented as responses from the community to two questions: 1. What do you like about your neighborhood? 2. What would you like to change? What people like about Globeville: %  en People who live in the neighborhood %  en Multi-generational %  en People here have been here for a long time %  en Stable neighborhood with high home ownership %  en Aordable home ownership opportunities %  en Sweet community the way people treat one another %  en Habitat for Humanity is working in the neighborhood %  en Proximity to downtown %  en Housing diversity and character of existing housing %  en Calmness lots of quiet streets %  en Globeville is an old neighborhood that helped build Denver %  en River trail and potential development along the river %  en The neighborhood already has some great assets and amenities: churches, parks, playgrounds, local businesses %  en Things are already improving %  en Infrastructure improvements that have been made %  en Opportunity to bring our history forward into a sustainable world

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11 What people would like to change about Globeville: %  en Need for Globeville, Elyria, and Swansea to coordinate and have a bigger voice %  en Connect on the neighborhoods terms, not just reacting to other projects %  en Highways and railroads are barriers that make Globeville like an island %  en Its hard to get around. There are a lot of dead-end streets %  en Incomplete curb, gutter, and sidewalk network %  en I want installation, improvement and maintenance of sidewalks, including on Washington Street %  en I want better access, including landscaping, to the South Platte River Trail %  en Absentee landowners %  en Lack of code enforcement overgrown weeds and junk cars %  en Lack of access to jobs, the library, and education %  en Lack of healthy food options within Globeville %  en Alleys need to be cleaned up maintenance, garbage, lighting %  en I want benches and waste cans at bus stops, and improved transit frequency %  en I want a sidewalk around the perimeter of Argo Park and through the park at 48th Avenue between Logan Street and Pearl Street %  en Environmental issues: contaminated industrial sites, air and waterborne pollution, soil contamination, and odors %  en Noise from interstates and freight trains %  en Need more basic services: grocery store, pharmacy, local restaurants, civic uses %  en Globeville built Denver, now Denver needs to build up Globeville What Would You Want to Change?

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12 Guiding Principles %  en A Unique Globeville. Globeville is a neighborhood unlike any other in Denver. The combination of its rich historical context, vibrant residential community, and the industrial landscape set it apart from the rest of the city, and even from most neighborhoods around the country. Being unique also means transforming challenges into opportunities and reimagining elements that may divide the neighborhood into elements that will unite the neighborhood. The Vision for Unique: A neighborhood rich with destinations that celebrates its history and uniqueness and overcomes challenges to create a brighter future. %  en A Strong Globeville. Participants in the planning process came to dene Strong as a combination of inter-related qualities. It means having a neighborhood where the land uses are laid out in a rational way that meets the needs of residents, businesses, and industry. It means meeting the communitys storm drainage needs. It means having access to a vibrant system of parks within the neighborhood, quality jobs, aordable and diverse housing options, a variety of services, and education. The Vision for Strong: Globeville is a neighborhood where diverse land uses are present and are located such that the needs of residents, businesses, and industry are met equitably. The neighborhood has a complete and accessible system of parks that encourages physical activity, social interaction, and environmental responsibility. Residential and employment opportunities are diverse and accessible with services in place to support the wellbeing of the local population. Using the conversation about what people like about Globeville and what they would like to change as a starting point, City sta worked with the community to develop guiding principles for the planning eort. The guiding principles are intended to be the measuring stick for Plan recommendations: each Plan recommendation or concept within the Plan must contribute to achieving at least one of the guiding principles. The four guiding principles are:

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13 %  en A Connected Globeville. Being connected means identifying strategies for providing safe, multi-modal, sustainable connections within the neighborhood, to adjacent neighborhoods, and to the region. It means accommodating all transportation modes within the neighborhood while balancing the unique needs of each so they can navigate eectively and safely. The Vision for Connected: A mobility network that provides a full array of transportation choices and balances the needs of pedestrians, bicyclists, drivers, trucks, rail, and transit. %  en A Healthy Globeville. In recent years, there has been a growing understanding of the connection between how communities are designed and the impact they have on human health. Well-designed neighborhoods can improve health, and poorly-designed communities can harm health. The Vision for Healthy: Globeville is a healthy and safe neighborhood where residents, workers, and visitors alike experience mental and physical wellbeing as a result of good environmental quality, a wellconnected multi-modal street network, and convenient access to goods and services.

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14 VISION: Maintain the single family residential character of the neighborhood core while improving internal circulation and enhancing 45th Avenue as a neighborhood-serving main street. VISION: The area is transformed into a mixed-use riverfront destination area that capitalizes on its adjacency to the South Platte River, a revitalized Washington Street, reinvented green space, and direct connections across the river to the National Western Center. THE VISION FOR GLOBEVILLE: B. A STRONG GLOBEVILLEA. A UNIQUE GLOBEVILLE Character Areas RESIDENTIAL NEIGHBORHOOD CORE WASHINGTON STREET AND THE RIVERFRONTGlobeville is a Unique, Strong, Connected and Healthy Neighborhood. 1. A Land Use Plan that Balances the Needs of Residents, Commerce, and Industry 3. An Integrated, Complete, and Diverse Park System 4. Improve Access to Jobs, Housing, Neighborhood Services, and Education 2. Eective Storm Drainage and Water Quality Management 1. Showcase the History of Globeville 2. Embrace Globevilles Unique Physical Attributes 3. Reinforce and Enhance Globevilles Unique Sense of PlaceTRANSFORMATIVE PROJECTS: %  en Improve Washington Street %  en Enhance the Street Grid in the Riverfront Area %  en Connect to the National Western Center TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECT: %  en Historic 45th Avenue Main Street

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15 C. A CONNECTED GLOBEVILLE 41ST AND FOX STATION AREA INDUSTRIAL EDGESVISION: The 41st and Fox Station will develop over the coming decades into the focal point of a diverse, transitsupportive, and environmentally sustainable urban center. Many new residents and businesses will be drawn to the convenient location close to downtown and near some of Denvers most vibrant urban neighborhoods. VISION: Maintain stable industrial and employment areas within Globeville while enhancing compatibility with nearby non-industrial uses. D. A HEALTHY GLOBEVILLE 1. Improve Environmental Quality 2. Improve Multi-Modal Connectivity 3. Increase Access to Goods and Services 4. Enhance Community Safety 5. Improve Mental Health and Wellbeing 2. A Connected Street Network 3. A Walkable, Bikeable Globeville 4. A Transit-Rich Globeville 5. Address Trac Operations and Roadway Maintenance Issues TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECT: %  en Redevelop the ASARCO Site 6. Implement All Remaining HIA Strategies 1. Update Key Transportation Policies Aecting Globeville

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16 a Globeville UNIQUE VISION : A neighborhood rich with destinations that celebrates its history and uniqueness and overcomes challenges to create a brighter future.

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17 WHY IS UNIQUENESS IMPORTANT TO GLOBEVILLE? Globeville is a neighborhood unlike any other in Denver. The combination of its rich historical context, vibrant residential community, and the industrial landscape set it apart from the rest of the city, and even from most neighborhoods around the country. Throughout the planning process, the community consistently expressed a strong desire to embrace its past while improving the conditions of the neighborhood, and in doing so, create neighborhood and regional destinations in areas that are currently underutilized. This Plan aims to maintain the current aspects of Globeville that make it unique while enhancing how it functions as a neighborhood. THE HISTORY OF GLOBEVILLEGlobeville was incorporated as a town in 1891 and was annexed into the City and County of Denver in 1902. Originally called Holdenville, Globeville got its name when the Holden Smelter became the Globe Smelter. This large employment center established a residential village to the south, and Globeville was truly its own selfsucient community. The stockyards, meat packing businesses, and smelters created a strong and bustling economic center, which enabled the vibrant and resilient residential neighborhood to ourish. In its early days, Globeville was made up mainly of eastern European immigrants. There was a strong Polish population, and many other people of varying ethnicities settled in Globeville, creating a melting pot community. This culturally-rich, self-sucient, and vibrant community faced challenges when the meatpacking industry became more automated. The local economy and the community around it began to decline. The physical landscape was also drastically altered when Interstates 25 and 70 were constructed through the neighborhood in the 1950s and 1960s. The community that once was so connected physically, socially, and economically became fragmented by the new infrastructure. While the interstates were important to the regional transportation network, their presence in Globeville has been a factor in stiing the neighborhood. RECOMMENDATIONS: 1. SHOWCASE THE HISTORY OF GLOBEVILLE 2. EMBRACE GLOBEVILLES UNIQUE PHYSICAL ATTRIBUTES 3. REINFORCE AND ENHANCE GLOBEVILLES UNIQUE SENSE OF PLACE

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18 KEY ISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIES: Historical Assets. Many structures from the early days of Globeville still exist today. Historic churches, commercial buildings, and houses are sprinkled throughout Globeville and add charm to the neighborhood. Laradon Hall is the only locally-designated historic landmark structure in Globeville, although more buildings are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Its likely that other individual buildings and possibly even districts within the neighborhood would be eligible for local designation. A Strong Sense of Community. Residents of Globeville are proud of their communitys history and describe the neighborhood as socially cohesive despite the presence of physical barriers. The current population is majority Latino, and the neighborhood has high rates of home ownership. The Impact of Physical Barriers on the Built Environment. A signicant number of physical barriers are located in Globeville. These barriers include freeway infrastructure as well as freight rail spurs, lines, and yards. In addition to interrupting the local street network and limiting mobility choices, these facilities can have negative impacts on the attractiveness and quality of the built environment. Some of these facilities place blank walls throughout the neighborhood, while others create oddly-shaped leftover spaces that often sit vacant and unmaintained. Unique Physical Attributes. Mostly a result of the interaction of various barriers with the local street grid and adjacent land, Globeville has a collection of unique physical features not commonly found in other neighborhoods: %  en Blank Walls and Terminated Views. The interstates, freight rail, and large industrial sites disrupt the street network and create dead-end streets and terminated views. These termination points can be good locations for visual focal points such as murals, landscaping, ornamental planting beds, and sculptures. %  en The Mousetrap. The I-25 and I-70 interchange, commonly known by locals as the mousetrap, allows for the continuous ow of vehicles between I-70 and I-25. This large piece of infrastructure consumes nearly 60 acres of land in the middle of the neighborhood. With few exceptions, this area

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19 The Globeville, Elyria, and Swansea neighborhoods are some of the most culturallyrich, diverse, and historic areas in the City of Denver. For decades, people from these communities in the north part of town thrived because they were connected to each other; they could walk to community gathering places, schools, grocery stores, creameries, businesses and local jobs at the nearby packing houses. In essence, they were the shining example of the sustainable communities we are aiming to build today. Councilwoman Judy Montero in the opening narrative of the Globeville, Elyria, Swansea Legacy Project.is impassible using the local street network, making it dicult to travel from one part of Globeville to another. %  en Oddly-Shaped, Left-Over Spaces. Another impact of regional transportation infrastructure is the leftover spaces that were created when the infrastructure was introduced. These properties tend to have an irregular shape, are generally small in size, and are typically undevelopable either due to their shape and size or because of other factors such as limited access, slope, or adjacency to transportation operations. %  en Alley-Streets. A few streets in Globeville, including Clark Place and portions of Leaf Court, blend the characteristics of City streets and alleys. These alley-streets tend to be narrower than City streets, but wider than alleys. They have street signs and sidewalks like City streets, but are fronted by garages and rear property lines like alleys. Few, if any, structures on these blocks face the alley-street. A Harsh Edge Between Industrial and Residential Uses. Globeville grew up in the industrial age, when houses were built adjacent to industry for easy access to jobs, and industry was located along railroads and the river. Globevilles landscape is still representative of this industrial heritage, and there are many examples within the neighborhood where residential uses are located directly across a street or alley from industrial uses. The result is a harsh edge between stable industrial uses and stable residential uses. Art and Culture. Globeville is a creative and artistic community with large murals located at the Argo Park Swimming Pool and at points of access under the I-70 viaduct. Old Globeville Days is an annual festival celebrating the neighborhoods culture with food and music.

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20 A1. PRESERVE GLOBEVILLES IDENTITY AND UNIQUE CHARACTER. %  en Historic Resources Survey. Conduct a survey to identify characterdening buildings throughout the neighborhood. Use the results of this study to evaluate character-dening buildings for their suitability for designation as Denver landmark structures or as part of a larger Denver landmark historic district. %  en Adaptive Reuse. Promote the adaptive reuse of existing buildings, especially character-dening buildings.A2. PROMOTE THE USE OF INTERPRETIVE SIGNS AND HISTORICAL MARKERS. As redevelopment occurs, use the cleanup of contaminated sites and adaptive reuse of buildings as opportunities to provide signage telling the story of the property and what used to be there. Plaques, historical markers, and educational signage are appropriate ways to convey this information. A3. RESPECT THE INDUSTRIAL HISTORY. As new buildings are constructed in industrial areas or as older industrial buildings are adaptively reused, look for opportunities to reect the neighborhoods industrial heritage in the architectural and site design choices that are made for these projects. Interpretive signs, historical markers, plaques, and other types of signs can be used to help tell the story of a place and dene its unique qualities. RECOMMENDATION 1: Showcase the History of Globeville

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21 Globeville has several churches sprinkled throughout the neighborhoods residential core. Globeville has always been geographically separated from much of the rest of Denver. Prior to modern transportation, this separation meant that neighborhood-serving retail needed to be located within the neighborhood. The smokestack of the Globe smelter.

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22 A4. BEAUTIFY TERMINATING VIEWS. Terminating views are opportunities for focal points, which can showcase unique murals, landscaping, sculptures, and even community message boards. The premier opportunity for this strategy within Globeville is the long, blank concrete wall of I-70 along 46th Avenue.A.5 TRANSFORM LEFTOVER AREAS INTO NEIGHBORHOOD ASSETS. Turn forgotten areas such as leftover right-of way, small abandoned spaces, oddly shaped, or otherwise undevelopable sites into neighborhood assets. %  en Rails to Trails. If, at a future date, any of the various rail lines or rail spurs within the neighborhood are abandoned, explore the feasibility of converting the railroad right-of-way into o-street pedestrian and bicycle trails. %  en Pocket Parks. Where leftover spaces exist, such as at the curve near the mousetrap where Broadway and 46th Avenue meet, explore the feasibility of transforming these areas into pocket parks. %  en Convey to Adjacent Owners. Where creating public spaces like trails or parks is infeasible or inadvisable, explore conveying leftover land to adjacent property owners to establish a caretaker for the property and possibly to make it developable by combining it with adjacent land. A6. EXPLORE THE OPPORTUNITIES OF THE MOUSETRAP. Other cities are taking control of the wasted landscapes surrounding large infrastructure. Study potential modications to the mousetrap to celebrate its uniqueness and, where possible, to create benets to Globeville. %  en Explore the potential to create pedestrian and bicycle access through the mousetrap using bridges, tunnels, and the leftover land within the facility. %  en Plant trees to beautify the space and to lter particulates from the air. %  en Explore underutilized land on the edges of the mousetrap that could be enhanced to create additional greenspace or other community-serving amenities. %  en Beautify the existing concrete pillars and infrastructure potentially through installation of deliberate night-time lighting design.A7. ENHANCE ALLEYSTREETS. Explore partnerships with organizations to implement an alley beautication program in Globeville. Where alley-streets exist, the additional width could be used to showcase sustainable streetscape design utilizing green infrastructure and stormwater management techniques. Alternatively, alleys could become neighborhood gathering places and destination areas by showcasing community art, adaptive reuse of materials, or other unique qualities. RECOMMENDATION 2: Embrace Globevilles Unique Physical Attributes These examples from other cities illustrate how relatively modest, low-cost improvements can beautify and transform spaces that would otherwise be wasted and unutilized. The large infrastructure that is prevalent in Globeville means that opportunities to create places from underutilized space are also prevalent.

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23 The I-25 and I-70 interchange, better known as the mousetrap, consumes about 60 acres of land in the middle of Globeville (see images to the left). In 1933 (top left) the residential streets of Globeville formed a continuous network. In the 1956 aerial (middle left) the interchange is shown as it existed prior to the construction of I-70. Garden Place Academy is highlighted in all three images to provide a point of reference. 44th Avenue 47th Avenue Broadway St. Garden Place Academy 1933 44th Avenue 47th Avenue Broadway St. Garden Place Academy 1956 feet meters 2000 700 44th Avenue 47th Avenue Broadway St. 2014 Garden Place Academy

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24 A8. SOFTEN THE EDGE BETWEEN INDUSTRIAL AND RESIDENTIAL USES. Maintain the presence of industry within the neighborhood while implementing design-based strategies to make it more compatible with adjacent residential uses. %  en Improve Compatibility through Urban Design. To enhance compatibility, consider establishing additional urban design requirements on new development or redevelopment along streets where industrial and residential uses have a shared edge: Avoid creating long, blank, unarticulated walls and surfaces. Ensure that industrial uses are rear-loaded, wherever possible. For industrial uses with an oce or retail component, locate nonindustrial uses at the street edge with industrial uses to the rear of the structure. Design the street-facing facades of industrial buildings to be compatible with the pedestrian scale of adjacent non-industrial uses. Explore and support opportunities for shared truck access that serves multiple businesses, such as through shared easements and parking areas. This can help to limit truck trac to a single point of access that serves multiple industrial users. %  en Design Review Guidelines and Process. Consider establishing design guidelines and an associated review process as a tool for achieving the design objectives listed above.A9. CREATE A FAADE IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM FOR INDUSTRIAL PROPERTIES. For existing industrial buildings that are not being redeveloped, incentivize updating the buildings with new facades. %  en Oer grants or low-interest loans for business owners to update their building facades. %  en Consider allowing the funds to also be used to install new landscaping. %  en Strive to create a pedestrian scale in the new faade. %  en Emphasize the use of high quality, human-scaled materials, such as masonry. RECOMMENDATION 3: Reinforce and Enhance Globevilles Unique Sense of Place. An Integrated Strategy for Improving Residential and Industrial Compatibility. Currently, Globevilles residential core is adjacent to industrial uses, while most goods, services, and cultural destinations are located outside of the neighborhood and often far away. This Plans land use strategies (see Strong Chapter) strive to buer the residential core of the neighborhood from industrial impacts, while also introducing mixed-use development at key locations within Globeville. The urban design recommendations presented in the Unique Chapter are intended to compliment this land use strategy and further enhance industrial and residential compatibility.

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25 A10. CULTIVATE ART, CREATIVITY, AND CULTURE. Foster community expression, ownership, and pride through a combination of complementary strategies: %  en Support Public Art. Public Art serves as a tool for economic revitalization and helps contribute to a communitys identity. When used correctly, public art can help foster neighborhood pride and bring people together. Also, public art can attract people to a community who bring a broad array of talents and experiences. Ideally, public art should help bring the community together while honoring the neighborhoods past. %  en Integrate Art into Daily Life. Encourage unconventional expression of art and creativity in the public realm. Strive to beautify common objects in daily life, such as bus shelters and fences. %  en Support Community Events and Celebrations. Public festivals, such as Old Globeville Days, bring the community together while raising the neighborhoods prole to the greater Denver region. Support the continuation of existing cultural events, and look for opportunities to establish more.A11. CREATE UNIQUE NEIGHBORHOOD DESTINATION AREAS. Reinforce and strengthen existing areas and take advantage of opportunities to create new places. This plan promotes the creation of several new or enhanced neighborhood destination areas. The Character Areas and Transformative Projects Chapter oer specic details and recommendations for each area. %  en Key Areas to Strengthen and Enhance: Residential Neighborhood Core Historic 45th Avenue Main Street Industrial Edges %  en Key Areas to Transform and Create New Places: Washington Street Corridor New Riverfront Destination Area 41st and Fox Station Area Examples of art integrated into daily life include bus stops as art intersection art, creative fencing materials, and lighting design for concrete infrastructure.

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26 STRONG a Globeville VISION : Globeville is a neighborhood where diverse land uses are present and are located such that the needs of residents, businesses, and industry are met equitably. The neighborhood has a complete and accessible system of parks that encourages physical activity, social interaction, and environmental responsibility. Residential and employment opportunities are diverse and accessible with services in place to support the wellbeing of the local population.

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27 WHY IS A STRONG COMMUNITY IMPORTANT TO GLOBEVILLE? In the early stages of the planning process, one of the guiding principles that emerged from neighborhood discussions was the desire for a Strong Community. Participants in the planning process came to dene Strong as a combination of inter-related qualities. It means having a neighborhood where the land uses are laid out in a rational way that meets the needs of residents, businesses, and industry. It means meeting the communitys storm drainage needs. It means having access to a vibrant system of parks within the neighborhood, and also having access to quality jobs, aordable and diverse housing options, and a variety of services. This chapter addresses each of the components of a Strong Community: %  en Land Use %  en Storm Drainage and Water Quality %  en Parks %  en Jobs %  en Housing %  en Services %  en Education RECOMMENDATIONS: 1. A LAND USE PLAN THAT BALANCES THE NEEDS OF RESIDENTS, COMMERCE, AND INDUSTRY 2. EFFECTIVE STORM DRAINAGE AND WATER QUALITY MANAGEMENT 3. AN INTEGRATED, COMPLETE, AND DIVERSE PARK SYSTEM 4. IMPROVE ACCESS TO JOBS, HOUSING, NEIGHBORHOOD SERVICES, AND EDUCATION

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28 KEY ISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIES %  en Diverse Land Use. Globeville is a neighborhood with diverse land uses spanning the range from single family homes to commercial businesses and industry. These dierent land uses exist in close proximity to each other within the neighborhood, a condition that necessitates a strong land use plan to ensure that the needs of residents, commerce, and industry are met in an equitable, balanced way. %  en The System of Parks is a Mix of Successful and Underutilized Spaces. A wide variety of parks and recreational facilities are located within Globeville including Heron Pond, Denvers rst designated natural area, and Stapleton Recreation Center, which provides a variety of recreational services. Globevilles park facilities range signicantly in type and purpose and are a major asset for the neighborhood. While Argo Park and the Stapleton Recreation Center are successful community spaces, other open space facilities, including Northside Park, Heron Pond, and the South Platte River Trail remain underutilized by Globeville residents. By addressing the factors contributing to this underutilization, such as physical disconnection, park design, and adjacent land use, safety concerns can be addressed, and the facilities can better-serve the neighborhood. %  en Dicult and Non-Intuitive Entry Points to the South Platte River Trail. The South Platte River Trail is a regional amenity that is located within Globeville, yet entry points to the trail can be hard to nd and dicult to access. %  en Stormwater Needs. The Globeville neighborhood is located within the Globeville-Utah Junction Basin. Drainage in the basin is predominately west to east with outfalls at the South Platte River. Drainage and ooding problems in the GlobevilleUtah Junction watershed are primarily caused by undersized infrastructure and a lack of drainage infrastructure. The existing drainage systems are typically undersized for a two-year storm event. %  en High Rate of Home Ownership. The single family housing stock in Globeville is relatively aordable compared to many other Denver neighborhoods and to the city as a whole. This lower price point means that home ownership is attainable for lower income households, and as a result, Globevilles home ownership rate is higher than the Denver average even though its household incomes are lower. A continued supply of aordable housing is necessary for the neighborhood to continue its trend of high Globeville Townhomes

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29 home ownership rates in the future. The variety of housing options and housing types are limited within the neighborhood with single family homes being the most prominent and other housing types being relatively uncommon. %  en Limited Employment Opportunities. The presence of industry means that there are many jobs located in Globeville, yet residents report that they lack the necessary skills, resources, or education to compete for these jobs. The community has expressed a desire for more diverse industry, including high tech and clean tech, as well as retail, administrative, hospitality, and other jobs. %  en Lack of Neighborhood Services. While there are a number of well-established community-serving institutions within the neighborhood, including churches and recreation centers, Globeville lacks access to many basic neighborhood services. Part of the problem is that many important services do not exist within the neighborhood or nearby, such as mental health services or a full-service grocery store. Another challenge is that limited mobility options can make it dicult for residents to access existing services, possibly leading to their underutilization. %  en Educational Needs and Opportunities. Globeville is home to an elementary school, Garden Place Academy, but educational opportunities for older residents are limited. In addition to supporting the existing school, there is a need to create educational pathways for all ages. There is also a unique opportunity to collaborate with Colorado State University through establishing educational programs in the area in partnership with the National Western Center. Argo Park Holy Transguration of Christ Church

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30 AREAS OF CHANGE AND AREAS OF STABILITYBlueprint Denver, the Citys integrated land use and transportation plan, introduced the concept of Areas of Change and Areas of Stability. The purpose of Areas of Change is to channel growth where it is desirable and would be the most benecial. The purpose of Areas of Stability is to maintain the character of an area while also accommodating a more limited amount of new development and redevelopment. Areas of Change are identied on the Globeville Neighborhood Plans Concept Land Use and Areas of Change Map. Any areas not identied as an Area of Change on that map should be construed to be an Area of Stability.CONCEPT LAND USE DESIGNATIONSBlueprint Denver establishes concept land use designations that describe the particular character and scale that is desired in the future. The Globeville Neighborhood Plan uses these categories as the foundation for its recommended Concept Land Use and Areas of Change Map. Two additional concept land use designations, Industrial Mixed Use and Single Family with Accessory Dwelling Unit, have been added to reect land use strategies that are specic to Globeville. The Blueprint Denver Concept Land Use Map will be amended as needed based on this plan. %  en Single Family with Accessory Dwelling Unit (ADU): Single family homes are the predominant residential type in these areas. An Accessory swelling unit is an additional residential unit that is located on the same lot as a single family home. Accessory dwelling units enable aging in place, multi-generational houses, and additional income through rentals and may be within the main house (e.g. basement apartment) or within a separate accessory structure. %  en Urban Residential: Urban residential areas are higher density and primarily residential but may include complementary commercial uses. A mixture of housing types is present, including single family houses, townhouses, small multifamily apartments, and sometimes mid to highrise residential structures. %  en Mixed Use: These areas have both a sizable employment base as well as a variety of mid to high-density housing options. Intensity is higher in mixed-use areas than in predominantly residential areas. Land uses may be, but are not necessarily, mixed in each building, development, or block. Pedestrian access is important within these areas, with residential and non-residential uses always within short walking distance of one another. %  en Transit-Oriented Development (TOD): Transit-oriented developments have land uses with a direct correlation to the function of a mass transit system. These development sites are typically located within a half mile walking distance of a transit station. Transit-oriented developments Single Family Residential Urban Residential Mixed Use RECOMMENDATION 1: A Land Use Plan that Balances the Needs of Residents, Commerce, and Industry

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31 RECOMMENDATION 1: A Land Use Plan that Balances the Needs of Residents, Commerce, and Industryprovide housing, services, and employment opportunities for a diverse population in a conguration that facilitates pedestrian and transit access. Within Globeville, TOD is located in the 41st and Fox Station Area. %  en Industrial Mixed Use: These are mixed-use areas with light industrial uses that are compatible with residential uses, such as light manufacturing and smaller warehouses. These areas have both a sizable employment base as well as a variety of mid-density housing options. Land uses may be, but are not necessarily, mixed in each building, development, or block. Pedestrian access is important within these areas, with residential and non-residential uses always within walking distance of one another. %  en Industrial: These are active industrial areas that typically require access to major arterials or interstates. Heavy rail facilities also are often adjacent to industrial areas. Streets in these areas must be able to accommodate heavy trucks. Special attention to design, screening, and buering is necessary where industrial areas abut areas that include residential uses. %  en Employment: Employment areas contain oce, warehousing, light industrial, light manufacturing, and high tech uses such as information technology. Sometimes big-box retail is found in these areas. These areas are distinguished from mixed-use centers in that they have few residences and typically have more extensive commercial and some industrial activity. Employment areas require access to major arterials or interstates. Those areas with manufacturing and warehousing uses must be able to accommodate extensive truck trac and rail in some instances. Due to these special transportation requirements, attention to design, screening, and buering is necessary along the street edge and where employment areas abut other districts that include residential uses. %  en Campus: A campus is a special area that typically is dominated by a single, large institutional user. Universities, medical centers, and large research facilities are examples. Campuses are usually large, contiguous areas that contain a variety of buildings and uses geared toward a primary purpose. In addition to institutional uses, some large companies organize their headquarters as a campus. Often specialized retail will locate near or within these areas to meet the needs of those on campus. If present, residential tends to be limited to dormitory-type facilities. %  en Park: Parks and open spaces range from active neighborhood and community parks with recreation elds and centers to larger preserves of natural open areas that provide space for wildlife habitat. A greenway is a linear park or open space developed along a stream, canal, or other natural or man-made feature. They enhance nearby neighborhoods by providing park space and frequently o-street bicycle paths. Local examples include the Platte River Greenway, Argo Park, Northside Park, and Heron Pond. Industrial Campus/Institutional Park Industrial Mixed Use

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32 RECOMMENDATION 1: A Land Use Plan that Balances the Needs of Residents, Commerce, and Industry EXISTING LAND USE

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33 RECOMMENDATION 1: A Land Use Plan that Balances the Needs of Residents, Commerce, and Industry CONCEPT LAND USE AND AREAS OF CHANGE

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34 Concept Land Use and Building Height in the 41st and Fox Station Area Plan.The concept land use and building height recommendations in this plan are intended to be fully consistent with the 41st and Fox Station Area Plan. Should any inconsistencies be found, please refer to the adopted Station Area Plan for the ocial Plan guidance.B1. MAINTAIN STABILITY IN THE RESIDENTIAL NEIGHBORHOOD CORE CHARACTER AREA. In areas identied with Single Family with ADUs Concept Land Use: %  en Maintain the current mix of low-scale residential building forms consisting predominantly of single unit dwellings with occasional duplexes or multi-unit structures. %  en Allow accessory dwelling units to enable aging in place, additional income through rentals, and to increase the population density of the neighborhood without altering its character. %  en Promote existing development patterns, including relatively small lots, shallow setbacks, and moderate building coverage, with parking and vehicle access in the rear and serviced by alleys. %  en Encourage the use of streetscape elements that promote residential character, walking, and bicycle use, including detached sidewalks, pedestrian scale lighting, limited curb cuts, and tree lawns.B2. MAINTAIN STABILITY IN INDUSTRIAL AREAS. In areas identied as Industrial Concept Land Use: %  en Allow general exibility in siting and building form for new industrial uses while improving the attractiveness of the site design overall and along the street edge in particular.B3. IMPROVE COMPATIBILITY BETWEEN INDUSTRIAL AND RESIDENTIAL USES. Improve compatibility where these uses coexist in close proximity by using the following strategies: %  en Reduce industrial use intensity when adjacent to residential. Ensure that industrial uses that most heavily impact residential areas, such as salvage yards, recycling centers, and automobile towing, observe separation and screening requirements as established by zoning. %  en Use Industrial Mixed Use Concept Land Use as a buer. Where industrial uses are immediately adjacent to residential uses, improve the transition through the use of Industrial Mixed Use Concept Land Use. %  en Use urban design solutions to more eectively buer industrial and residential uses (see recommendations A8 and A9 in the Unique Chapter). RECOMMENDATION 1: A Land Use Plan that Balances the Needs of Residents, Commerce, and Industry

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35 RECOMMENDATION 1: A Land Use Plan that Balances the Needs of Residents, Commerce, and Industry B4. TRANSITION KEY PROPERTIES FROM INDUSTRIAL TO EMPLOYMENT. Identify key large, underutilized industrial properties with access o of major through streets to transition to Employment Concept Land Use %  en Allow new uses in employment areas to be generally exible in siting and building form, however new development should help create a more attractive street edge, especially along Washington Street and 51st Avenue. %  en Ensure that the uses that are allowed in employment areas are nonpolluting and do not produce noxious odors, excessive noise, truck trac, or light pollution. %  en Work to attract labor-intensive industries that produce a large number of good-paying jobs relative to the size of the facility.B5. REVITALIZE THROUGH MIXEDUSE DEVELOPMENT. In areas recommended for Mixed Use Concept Land Use, including portions of Washington Street, 45th Avenue, and the Riverfront: %  en Site building forms at the street with parking and access in the rear or o the alley, where possible. %  en Promote the use of design elements that link the building directly to the street environment, such as ground story activation, transparent window openings, and doorways at the street. %  en Allow a mix of uses within the area and within individual buildings. %  en Make use of streetscape elements that reinforce urban character and promote high levels of walking and bicycles use, such as wide sidewalks, bicycle racks, public trash cans, and tree wells.B6. ESTABLISH MAXIMUM RECOMMENDED BUILDING HEIGHTS. Establish maximum building heights consistent with the Maximum Recommended Building Heights map to accomplish the following objectives: %  en Preserve the low-rise building heights characteristic of the single family character in Globevilles Residential Neighborhood Core Character Area. %  en Accommodate mid-rise redevelopment generally east of Washington Street and along the riverfront. %  en Accommodate mid-to-high rise redevelopment in the 41st and Fox Station Area consistent with the recommendations of the 41st and Fox Station Area Plan. The Relationship between Future Development and InfrastructurePublic utility upgrades may be necessary to meet the needs of future development recommended by this Plan. Substations and other potentially necessary infrastructure should be sited and designed to t within the neighborhood context dened by this Plan, and should work to minimize visual impacts, subject to operational and other constraints.

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36 RECOMMENDATION 1: A Land Use Plan that Balances the Needs of Residents, Commerce, and Industry MAXIMUM RECOMMENDED BUILDING HEIGHTS

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37 RECOMMENDATION 1: A Land Use Plan that Balances the Needs of Residents, Commerce, and Industry B7. STRATEGICALLY USE CITY COUNCIL OR COUNCILMEMBERINITIATED REZONING TO IMPLEMENT THE LAND USE VISION. City Council or Councilmember-initiated rezoning is a tool by which City Council or a member of City Council can propose a zone map amendment for a specic area at no cost to landowners. Specic situations where this strategy may be appropriate include: %  en Where industrial properties are adjacent to stable residential uses and are proposed by this Plan to transition to Industrial Mixed Use Concept Land Use. %  en The industrial area along Washington Street and eastward to the South Platte River that is proposed to transition to Mixed Use Concept Land Use. %  en All areas designated on the Concept Land Use and Areas of Change Map as Single Family with ADUs that currently have residential zoning that does not allow ADUs. D1. Improve Industrial and Residential Compatibility. Minimize negative environmental impacts on residential neighborhoods from industrial uses through methods such as a change in concept land use designation, zoning, buering, or other means. D5. Address the Odor Impacts of the Marijuana Industry. Mitigate the odors and emissions from marijuana grow facilities on residential neighborhoods through methods such as a change in concept land use designation, siting, buering, or other means. D20. Use Mixed-Use Development to Improve Access to Goods and Services. Promote mixed-use development to support a variety of commercial and retail businesses and services throughout the community and around new rail stations. HIA STRATEGIES RELATED TO THIS RECOMMENDATION:

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38 RECOMMENDATION 2: Eective Storm Drainage and Water Quality Management Most of the Globeville neighborhood is located within the Globeville-Utah Junction Drainage Basin.MAP OF THE GLOBEVILLEUTAH JUNCTION DRAINAGE BASIN.The project recommendations in this section are informed by two recent studies, the 2013 Globeville-Utah Junction Outfall Systems Planning Study, a detailed study by the Urban Drainage and Flood Control District focused on the watershed where the neighborhood of Globeville is located, and the Citys 2014 Storm Drainage Master Plan, a city-wide plan that is updated every ve years that recommends specic storm drainage improvement projects. For more detailed information, please refer to those documents. D7. Increase the Use of Low Impact Development and Green Infrastructure. Encourage developers to use low impact development and green infrastructure techniques in new development and redevelopment in the Globeville, Elyria, and Swansea neighborhoods to enhance water quality in each basin. Examples include use of bioretention (rain gardens), bioswales, or vegetated buer strips to minimize directly connected impervious areas. Roadway and alley projects should include green street techniques such as stormwater planters, stormwater curb extensions, tree trenches, and permeable pavers. D8. Incorporate Water Quality in Open Space Design. Implement recommendations from the River North Greenway Master Plan to improve water quality. Where possible, use existing park areas without aecting existing uses to incorporate water quality treatment features, such as wetlands, to restore wildlife habitat along the river or in Heron Pond. HIA STRATEGIES RELATED TO THIS RECOMMENDATION:

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39 RECOMMENDATION 2: Eective Storm Drainage and Water Quality Management B8. IDENTIFY FUNDING FOR STORM DRAINAGE IMPROVEMENTS. The 2014 Storm Drainage Master Plan identies several storm drainage improvement projects for the Globeville-Utah Junction basin. These projects are not currently funded or programmed due to nancial constraints, but have been proposed by the Storm Drainage Master Plan to better meet Denvers standard levels of storm protection and reduce ooding: %  en 48th Avenue Outfall (3 projects) %  en 51st Avenue Collection System %  en I-70 Outfall %  en 49th Avenue and Grant Street Detention BasinB9. PROMOTE WATER QUALITY THROUGH BEST PRACTICES.Water quality can be addressed through an array of sustainable technologies. Some of these can be implemented in public rights-of-way and others can be integrated with individual projects or developments. %  en Employ Green Infrastructure on Public Land and Rights-of-Way. Publicly-owned land such as parks and streets present an opportunity to integrate water quality facilities with the overall design. Impervious surfaces, and streets in particular, are one of the largest contributors of pollutants in Denvers urban streams. However, streets also represent one of the greatest opportunities for the use of green infrastructure. As new street connections are made or existing streets are reconstructed, look for opportunities to incorporate green street strategies in the street design. Green street strategies include permeable pavers, streetside stormwater planters, curb extensions, tree trenches, and grass swales. %  en Promote the Use of Low Impact Design Strategies on Private Property. Wherever possible, green infrastructure and low impact design strategies should be incorporated into private redevelopment projects in Globeville. This includes minimizing directly connected impervious areas and introducing rain gardens, lter strips, grass swales, and permeable pavers. These images show examples of green infrastructure and low impact design strategies that have been implemented on both public and private land.

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40 The South Platte River Trail Northside Park Diagram showing a potential large, regional open space that is integrated with Heller Open Space, Heron Pond, and portions of Northside Park. New development fronts 51st Avenue, with the northern parcel adjacent to the open space being reserved for a community-serving use.B10. EMBRACE THE SOUTH PLATTE RIVER. By embracing the South Platte River, Globeville can maximize the benets of many of its existing green space assets. %  en B10A. Create a Waterfront Destination. Create a waterfront destination along the South Platte River that reects the community and its unique character, provides a diversity of activities and events throughout the year, and is welcoming and safe. %  en B10B. An Activated Waterfront Plaza. Consider creating a waterfront plaza amenity close to the South Platte River for year-round activities with opportunities for synergy with the proposed National Western Center. Ensure that the plaza is well-connected to nearby green space, the South Platte River Trail, and the local street network. %  en B10C. Integrate Regional, Sub-Regional, and On-Site Water Quality and Green Infrastructure. To ensure that the South Platte River and amenities along the river are safe for the public and support habitat, water quality facilities should be incorporated into new parks. %  en B10D. Create a Regional Open Space Amenity. Create a large, regional, and consolidated park amenity by integrating Heller Open Space, Heron Pond, portions of Northside Park, and a portion of new acreage known as 52nd Avenue and Emerson Street and re-designing the area primarily as a natural area with educational and passive recreational activities. Respect and enhance the natural area designation with natural and native plantings and soft trails, etc. Integrate stormwater management facilities with the park design. Increase eyes on the park by surrounding it with a mixture of uses, including mixed-use development along the southern edge of the 52nd Avenue and Emerson Street site fronting 51st Avenue. Ensure that future development on this portion of the site benets the neighborhood by restricting its sale to a community-serving user such as a senior housing provider, education or recreation center, or other uses to be dened with neighborhood input at a later date. Connect this new regional open space amenity to the proposed Mixed Use Concept Land Use redevelopment area to the south. Look for opportunities to create synergy and capitalize on proximity to the proposed National Western Center. Enhance the routes to the park from Washington Street and the South Platte River. Engage with the communit y in creating the specic integrated park design moving forward. %  en B10E. Enhance the South Platte River Trail Access Points. Improve awareness of and accessibility to the South Platte River Trail through a RECOMMENDATION 3: An Integrated, Complete, and Diverse Park System

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41 Stapleton Recreation Center Argo Parkcombination of strategies: Provide clear and well-marked signage along streets that lead to the point of access. Consider providing identiable gateway structures to indicate the point of access. Ensure that all trail access points are accessible to people of all ages and physical abilities. Incorporate surrounding land uses and site design to better announce and celebrate the trail access points. Create new publicly-accessible trail access points in conjunction with new development, or as opportunities arise.B11. STRENGTHEN EXISTING PARK AND RECREATIONAL ASSETS. Enhance existing parks and recreational facilities throughout Globeville to provide a vibrant system of parks and recreation centers, each with its own identity and service niche. %  en B11A. Argo Park. This park is located in the center of Globeville and is highly valued by residents as a neighborhood destination and gathering place. Continue to explore enhancements to the park, including but not limited to: Walking and biking paths to provide improved circulation around and through the park. Organized events in addition to those already occurring such as Old Globeville Days. A community message board for the public posting of events and yers. This amenity would provide a new outlet for grassroots communication and further solidify Argo Park as the heart of the neighborhood. Other amenities that may be deemed appropriate for the park subject to additional public input and discussion. %  en B11B. Stapleton Recreation Center and Broadway Park. This is Globevilles City-run recreation center. The adjacent small park features a playground. Recommendations include, but are not limited to: Consider changing the name of the Stapleton Recreation Center to a dierent name. The name Stapleton Recreation Center is confusing as the name Stapleton is now more commonly known as a new neighborhood in east Denver with some 17,000 residents. Explore facilities planning and funding opportunities to improve and update the amenities and services that are provided at the Center. RECOMMENDATION 3: An Integrated, Complete, and Diverse Park System D8. Incorporate Water Quality in Open Space Design. Implement recommendations from the River North Greenway Master Plan to improve water quality. Where possible, use existing park areas without aecting existing uses to incorporate water quality treatment features, such as wetlands, to restore wildlife habitat along the river or in Heron Pond. D13. Connect to Greenspace. Improve connectivity to parks, trails and recreation, especially to the South Platte River trails and parks. HIA STRATEGIES RELATED TO THIS RECOMMENDATION:

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42 %  en B11C. Globeville Recreation Center. This City-owned facility located at 4496 Grant Street was originally constructed as a City recreation center, but in recent years, the facility has been run by non-prot organizations. At the time of this writing, the contract with Street Kidz has expired and the property is in need of a new administrator. Work to identify a new contractor for the facility to ensure its continued operation and service to the residents of the neighborhood.B12. CREATE NEW PARKS, OPEN SPACES, AND RECREATIONAL FACILITIES. Capitalize on opportunities to create new parks, open spaces, and recreational facilities. %  en B12A. Platte Farm Open Space. Platte Farm Open Space is a community-created vision to transform 5.5 acres of neglected land into an open space where all ages and abilities can recreate, exercise and connect with nature. Currently, the space is undeveloped, apart from high-voltage power lines that traverse the space. The site is prone to ooding and illegal dumping is commonplace. A public planning process led by Groundwork Denver and the Platte Farm Open Space Resident Steering Committee has resulted in a conceptual open space vision for the site. Implementing Platte Farm Open Space would transform a large area that is currently perceived as blighted into an amenity. %  en B12B. 41st and Fox Station Area Open Space. The portion of the 41st and Fox Station Area within Globeville is envisioned for mixed-use and high-density development. The 41st and Fox Station Area Plan envisions new parks and public spaces in response to the conversion of industrial uses to higher density residential. Possible routes to implementation include, but are not limited to, public purchase of property through bond funds, grants, or the capital improvements budget, or through consolidation of required open space through the Citys General Development Plan process. %  en B12C. Privately-Owned Public Space. Explore opportunities to introduce privately-owned public open space as a component of larger redevelopments, such as those envisioned along the South Platte River, in the 41st and Fox Station Area, or at the National Western Center. Opportunities could include plazas, outdoor seating areas, playgrounds, and public art. %  en B12D. Support Other Recreational Needs. Support public health by nding opportunities to introduce new recreational amenities either within Globeville or in nearby neighborhoods such as Elyria and Swansea. Desired amenities that emerged from the neighborhood planning process include a dog park, indoor pool, and a modern regional recreation center. Work with the community on the location and design of future facilities and engage them in identifying any additional facility types. Existing Trees Existing Trees New Shrub Planting New Tree 50th Ave. Crusher Fines Path Emergency Access Turn-Around Emergency Access Turn-Around Main Entrance New Shrub Planting Rail Road Tracks Rail Road Tracks PLATTE FARM OPEN SPACEPROJECT OVERVIEW Bus Stop with Small Solar ShelterArgo ParkCrusher Fines Path Crusher Fines Pull O for Utility Service Existing Trees Existing Trees New Tree New Shrub Planting Accessible Play Space New Tree Existing Cottonwood Existing Cottonwood Toadstools Large Solar Shelter EXISTING CONDITIONS: VIEWS EAST FROM 49TH AVENUE PERSPECTIVE SKETCH OF NORTH END OF PLATTE PARK OPEN SPACE (LOOKING SOUTH) Fitness Station Fitness StationGrant St. Logan St.49th Ave. RECOMMENDATION 3: An Integrated, Complete, and Diverse Park SystemVision for Platte Farm Open Space Platte Farm Open Space in its current state

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43 RECOMMENDATION 3: An Integrated, Complete, and Diverse Park System SYSTEM OF PARKS AND OPEN SPACE

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44 B13. IMPROVE ACCESS TO JOBS. %  en B13A. Expand Job Growth within Globeville. Support the expansion of employment opportunities within the neighborhood using a variety of complimentary strategies: Work to reinforce and revitalize existing businesses. Support the redevelopment of the ASARCO site for manufacturing, distribution, and Class A industrial tenants. Promote the site with the intention of attracting job-rich uses. Conduct a study to evaluate industrial and commercial land within the neighborhood with the goal of using the results to match the needs of potential employers to specic vacant or underutilized properties. The study could evaluate and identify specic improvements that may be needed to attract the desired reinvestment. Recruit new cutting-edge industry, such as high tech and clean tech, to industrial and employment areas within the neighborhood. Create a broad base of new jobs in diverse economic sectors by redeveloping opportunity sites throughout the neighborhood, including the transformation of Washington Street and the South Platte riverfront into a mixed-use area; the enhancement of retail and services along 45th Avenue in alignment with recommendations to establish a more prominent main street; and the promotion of transit-oriented development in the 41st and Fox Station Area (see the Character Areas Chapter for additional details on the recommendations for these areas). %  en B13B. Provide Job Training and Workforce Development. Provide the necessary facilities and programs to assist local residents with education, training, and job placement. Connect residents to existing programs that assist in job training, such as those provided by trade schools, community colleges, nonprots, state-level programs, and the Denver Oce of Economic Developments Workforce Centers. Consider adding or expanding job training programs in existing facilities within the neighborhood, such as recreation centers, or nearby, such as at the Valdez-Perry Library in Elyria. Consider targeting job training at local industries with the greatest employment needs and/or the biggest skills gaps, such as health care, information technology, and manufacturing. %  en B13C. Keep Industry and Jobs in Denver. Provide relocation assistance to businesses that choose to leave the neighborhood with the goal RECOMMENDATION 4: Improve Access to Jobs, Housing, Neighborhood Services, and Education HIA STRATEGIES RELATED TO THIS RECOMMENDATION: D17. Attract Key Retail and Services. Incentivize development of retail goods and services, including a grocery store. D18. Increase Food Access at the National Western Center. Promote new sources of healthy foods within the redeveloped National Western Center, such as grocery stores, farmers markets, and community gardens. D19. Improve Healthy Food Access at Existing Retailers. Implement a healthy corner store retail program in the neighborhood, similar to the Philadelphia model, to add healthy foods to existing convenience and corner stores. D20. Use Mixed-Use Development to Improve Access to Goods and Services. Promote mixed-use development to support a variety of commercial and retail businesses and services throughout the community and around new rail stations. D21. Create NeighborhoodFocused Flex Space. Develop a exible market space that can support a variety of neighborhood goods and services and culturallyrelevant activities.

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45 of keeping those jobs in Denver. For existing industrial uses that are located in areas proposed to transition to Mixed Use Concept Land Use, relocation assistance can be used to direct these businesses to nearby areas identied as Industrial Concept Land Use, Areas of Stability within Globeville, or to other north Denver neighborhoods. %  en B13D. Jump Start the Local Economy. Support the Denver Oce of Economic Developments Jump Start initiative. The following strategies are specic to Globeville and included in Jump Start 2014: Support small business advocacy eorts that will create an environment to help small business thrive through collaboration between public, private, and non-prot sectors. Establish a public-pr ivate, small business loan fund that focuses on business lending in the healthcare, manufacturing and logistics industries; and increasing economic and employment opportunities in Denvers revitalizing neighborhoods such as Sun Valley, Elyria, Swansea, Globeville, and River North areas. Provide technical assistance, business and community outreach, and prioritize resources to maximize business opportunities, housing development, and neighborhood services to the I-70 corridor neighborhoods of Globeville, Elyria, and Swansea. Create a business development strategy for Globeville, Elyria, and Swansea with North Denver Cornerstone Collaborative leadership.B14. IMPROVE ACCESS TO HOUSING %  en B14A. Provide a Broad Range of Housing Types and Price Levels. Incorporating this Plans proposed concept land use recommendations will allow for a more diverse range of housing types within the neighborhood, including: Accessory Dwelling Units within the single family areas Multifamily and attached residential building types in Mixed Use, TOD, and Urban Residential Concept Land Use areas. Live/work and a variety of other residential types in Industrial Mixed Use areas. %  en B14B. Connect People to Existing Housing Resources. Work to increase awareness of existing programs that can help people establish or maintain homeownership: Connect people to existing resources that cultivate home ownership, such as Habitat for Humanity. Connect low-income homeowners with programs to assist with property taxes if there is an increase in valuation to allow them to stay RECOMMENDATION 4: Improve Access to Jobs, Housing, Neighborhood Services, and Education EMPLOYMENT CLUSTERS RELATIVE TO RESIDENTIAL AREAS

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46 in their homes. Connect residents to existing programs that assist low-income households with maintaining and repairing their homes, such as Groundwork Denver, Habitat for Humanitys Critical Repair program, and the Denver Urban Renewal Authoritys Single Family Rehabilitation and Emergency Home Repair program. %  en B14C. Develop a Land Banking Strategy for Aordable Housing. Work with non-prot partners, such as the Urban Land Conservancy, to strategically and proactively acquire and preserve land for future aordable housing. This strategy may be particularly eective in the 41st and Fox Station Area, where the recommended development intensity greatly exceeds existing conditions on the ground. %  en B14D. Build More Housing Units. Support the eorts of organizations such as Habitat for Humanity, Denver Housing Authority, and other aordable housing providers in building new homes within Globeville. Ensure that new aordable housing construction in Globevilles Residential Neighborhood Core Character Area reects the character of the surrounding neighborhood. Pursue opportunities for adaptive reuse of existing buildings as an aordable housing strategy for the neighborhood.B15. IMPROVE NEIGHBORHOOD SERVICES. %  en B15A. Use Redevelopment Areas to Attract Desired Retail and Services. Broaden the market for retail and services by increasing the population of the neighborhood through mixed-use and transit-oriented development and providing space for new retail in the following areas: Washington Street and the South Platte riverfront The enhancement of retail and services along 45th Avenue Mixed-use, transit-oriented development in the 41st and Fox Station Area %  en B15B. Recruit Needed Services and Amenities. Work with businesses, non-prots, and service providers to attract the following needed facilities to Globeville: Increased access to healthy foods through the development of multiple small-format food retail outlets, a full-service grocery store, or both. Increased access to retail and services that meet basic needs, such as pharmacies, hardware and auto parts stores, clothing stores, and banking. RECOMMENDATION 4: Improve Access to Jobs, Housing, Neighborhood Services, and Education Desired Programming and Services at the National Western CenterAs part of the master planning process for the National Western Center, the National Western Citizens Advisory Committee developed a detailed list of programming and services that they would like to see on the site. The desired facilities fall within the broad categories of public spaces, education, culinary arts, business activities, sports and recreation, and art. Specic facilities that were identied by the committee include a state-of-the-art recreation center, a wellness center, a new education center for all ages, and reintroducing horses into the community through education and trail use. There is community support for locating many of these desired services and activities within the Globeville neighborhood if they can not be accommodated on the National Western site.

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47 RECOMMENDATION 4: Improve Access to Jobs, Housing, Neighborhood Services, and Education Increased access to medical facilities, including physicians, dental, vision, and mental health services. Increased access to technology. Providing free or low-cost computer and internet access at other facilities, such as recreation centers, schools, churches, and libraries could meet this need without providing a dedicated facility. A modern library, or alternatively, improvements and enhancements to the existing Valdez-Perry Library in Elyria. %  en B15C. Provide Better Access to Community Resources in Surrounding Neighborhoods. Ensure that there is safe, accessible, all-age, multi-modal access to the following key facilities in surrounding neighborhoods: Valdez-Perry Library National Western Center Schools Parks and recreation centers Retail and entertainment destinations %  en B15D. Cultivate Partnerships to Broaden Services. Develop a formal and ongoing collaboration between the neighborhood, the National Western Center, and its partners, including Colorado State University, to enhance access to healthy food, gardening, and agriculture.B16. IMPROVE EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES. %  en B16A. Support Existing Schools. Support improvements to existing schools serving the Globeville neighborhood to ensure that each child receives a high quality public education. %  en B16B. Create Educational Pathways for All Ages. Ensure that all residents, regardless of age, have access to education by creating and supporting early childhood centers, conventional schools, adult education centers, and other educational facilities. %  en B16C. Partner with National Western Center and Colorado State University. Take advantage of National Westerns partnership with Colorado State University to collaborate with Denver Public Schools on new approaches to education, including the possible creation of a magnet school or other new educational facility.

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48 CONNECTED a Globeville VISION : A mobility network that provides a full array of transportation choices and balances the needs of pedestrians, bicyclists, drivers, trucks, rail, and transit.

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49 WHY IS CONNECTIVITY IMPORTANT TO GLOBEVILLE? Globeville is a neighborhood divided by major road and railway infrastructure. Two major interstates run through Globeville, I-70 and I-25, and the interchange between the two is located in the center of the neighborhood. Railroad tracks are prevalent throughout the area and constitute major barriers along the western and southern edges of the neighborhood. In the coming years, three new rail transit stations will begin service in or near Globeville, but connecting to these stations is a challenge, especially for pedestrians and bicyclists. The Globeville Neighborhood Plan identies strategies for providing safe, multimodal, sustainable connections within the neighborhood, to adjacent neighborhoods, and to the region. The Connected chapter presents a mobility and connectivity framework for Globeville. It is a strategy that aims to accommodate all transportation modes within the neighborhood while balancing the unique needs of each so they can navigate eectively and safely. The connectivity framework addresses multiple transportation modes, including pedestrians, bicyclists, vehicles, trucks, rail, and transit. The connectivity framework takes into account connections, destinations, and travel patterns within the neighborhood, to surrounding areas, and to the larger region. RECOMMENDATIONS: 1. UPDATE KEY TRANSPORTATION POLICIES AFFECTING GLOBEVILLE 2. A CONNECTED STREET NETWORK 3. A WALKABLE, BIKEABLE GLOBEVILLE 4. A TRANSITRICH GLOBEVILLE 5. ADDRESS TRAFFIC OPERATIONS AND ROADWAY MAINTENANCE ISSUES

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50 KEY ISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIES The Local Impacts of Freeway Infrastructure. Globevilles direct access to I-70 and I-25 is an important asset for the businesses and residents within the neighborhood. However, the interstates also disrupt circulation by cutting o local streets, making travel within the neighborhood challenging. Where streets do connect across the interstates, they make use of underpasses and bridges. These facilities typically provide a route for pedestrians and bicyclists, but are lacking the necessary amenities to make the experience comfortable and welcoming. Freight Rail Impacts. Freight rail has a signicant presence in Globeville, with major yards located along the western and southern edges of the neighborhood. These rail yards occupy signicant acreage and, similar to the interstates, disrupt the street grid such that most streets fail to connect across them. Additionally, freight rail lines and spurs run through the neighborhood, and street crossings at these locations are frequently challenging for all other modes. Several railroad crossings within the neighborhood are in need of improvement and repair. Truck Trac on Local Streets. Truck trac is commonplace within Globeville, due to the neighborhoods location along the South Platte River and I-70 industrial corridors, adjacency to Adams County industrial areas, and the many industrial businesses that are located within the neighborhood itself. The lack of internal circulation routes within the neighborhood concentrates truck trac on the few streets that do connect through. In some cases, these are streets with residential uses and character where truck trac can be disruptive. Quiet Residential Streets. Local streets make up Globevilles Residential Neighborhood Core Character Area, but most streets do not extend beyond this area, stopping at I-70, I-25, Washington Street, or railroad tracks. There is general consensus among residents that these local roads should be quiet, have low speed limits, and should carry relatively low amounts of trac. Limited Pedestrian Network. Many of the streets in Globeville are missing sidewalks, making it dicult for Truck trac on 45th Avenue

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51 people to access amenities and services without a car. Limited Street Infrastructure. Streets in Globeville that are missing sidewalks are frequently also lacking in other basic street infrastructure, most commonly curb and gutter. This aects not only circulation, but also storm drainage. Throughout the neighborhood planning process, specic issues related to trac operations and roadway maintenance were frequently raised. Limited Bicycle Network. The South Platte River Trail is one of the regions premiere greenspace assets, but despite its close proximity to Globeville, it is dicult to access from the neighborhood due to physical barriers and other navigational challenges between the river and the rest of Globeville. Additional bicycle facilities connecting Globeville, the greenway, and adjacent neighborhoods are needed. Access to Transit. Most of Globeville is within a quarter mile walk of a bus stop. However, an inventory of existing conditions at bus stops within Globeville, Elyria, and Swansea conducted as part of this planning process revealed that the conditions of many bus stops are suboptimal, and in some cases, sidewalks are missing along key pedestrian routes to the bus stops. In coming years, Globeville will be served by three commuter rail stations on three dierent lines: 41st and Fox on the Gold Line, 38th and Blake on the East Line, and National Western Center on the North Metro Line. Similar to bus stops, when commuter rail begins serving the neighborhood in the years ahead, many employees and residents in Globeville may nd it dicult to access the new stations if pedestrian and bicycle connectivity is not improved from current levels. Connectivity Between Washington Street and the River. Currently, the area between Washington Street and the river lacks street connectivity and much of the land is amassed in mega blocks that preclude northsouth movements other than on Washington Street or the South Platte River Trail. The view of Downtown Denver from the 44th Avenue Bridge over I-25.

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52 C1. CONDUCT A TRAVELSHED ANALYSIS. Update Denvers Strategic Transportation Plan (STP) to include a Travelshed Analysis for this area. The STP identied that the travelshed in which the eastern portion of Globeville is located would be studied as part of the environmental impact process for the I-70 reconstruction project. The analysis will need to be provided through other means as it is not included in the scope of the I-70 process.C2. UPDATE BLUEPRINT DENVER STREET CLASSIFICATIONS. Update the Future Street Classications Map in Blueprint Denver to be consistent with the street classications recommended on the Proposed Update to Blueprint Denver Street Classications Map. The hierarchy of the proposed transportation network balances mobility with access so that Globeville streets are well-equipped to move people, not just cars. Blueprint Denver street classications are best used to describe not only the function of streets, but how their function relates to adjacent land uses.C3. UPDATE DENVER MOVES. The bicycle facility improvements recommended in this Plan were developed in conjunction with the general public and Denver Public Works sta with the intent that Denver Moves, which guides decision-making regarding bicycle and multi-use connections, would be updated at a later date to be consistent with this Plan. RECOMMENDATION 1: Update Key Transportation Policies Aecting Globeville HIA STRATEGIES RELATED TO THIS RECOMMENDATION: D4. Mitigate the Health Impacts of Freight Rail. Explore solutions to reduce the health impacts from trains. These could include Quiet Zones (intersections specically designed so that trains do not have to sound horns), or grade separation of trains from other modes of transportation (i.e., roads constructed over or under tracks to eliminate the need for trains to sound horns at these crossings and to aid in the prevention of people and trains crossing paths). D14. Address the Impacts of Trucks. Review truck routes in the neighborhood to improve environmental quality, safety and connectivity. Examine current truck routes, particularly adjacent to schools; explore potential modications as necessary; and make any needed changes to City truck route ordinance for consistency with state regulations.

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53 PROPOSED UPDATE TO BLUEPRINT DENVER STREET CLASSIFICATIONS RECOMMENDATION 1: Update Key Transportation Policies Aecting Globeville

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54 C4. NEW STREET SEGMENTS AT 49TH AND 50TH AVENUES. Introduce new street segments at 49th Avenue and 50th Avenue from Pearl Street to the railroad tracks to provide improved access to the proposed mixed-use area west of Washington Street. Introduce pedestrian and bicycle crossings over the railroad tracks to the new streets. Given space constraints, at-grade rail crossings would be preferred, as grade-separated crossings would add cost to the project and likely negatively impact the development potential of adjacent land. The fact that the rail line is active introduces an element of complexity to implementation as new at-grade crossings would need to be approved by the aected railroad. Both proposed street extensions should be designed to accommodate pedestrians, bicycles, and vehicles in order to improve overall mobility within the neighborhood. C5. INTRODUCE A STREET GRID BETWEEN WASHINGTON STREET AND THE SOUTH PLATTE RIVER. Introduce new connections to this area to increase internal circulation between Washington Street and the river and to help bring about the transformation of this area into a mixed-use, riverfront-oriented destination area. One or more new north-south streets are needed within this Enhanced Connectivity Area in order to support redevelopment goals and to facilitate the movement of people within and along the riverfront area (see Washington Street Corridor and the Riverfront in the Character Areas Chapter for alternative street grid scenarios and other details). RECOMMENDATION 2: A Connected Street Network New Street Connections in the 41st and Fox Station Area PlanThe 41st and Fox Station Area Plan (2009) recommended extensive changes to the street network in the vicinity of the station. This plan does not update the recommendations of the 41st and Fox Station Area Plan. Rather than attempting to summarize or re-characterize those recommendations, this Plan presents the existing roadway network within the station area and defers to the 41st and Fox Station Area Plan regarding the advisability and phasing of specic roadway network improvements. HIA STRATEGIES RELATED TO THIS RECOMMENDATION: D12. Improve Street Connectivity. Implement new street connections as identied in this Plan (see Connected and Character Area Chapters). D13. Connect to Greenspace. Improve connectivity to parks, trails and recreation, especially to the South Platte River trails and parks. D15. Connect to the National Western Center. Improve access and connectivity to and through residential neighborhoods and the redeveloped National Western Center.

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55 PROPOSED STREET NETWORK WITH NEW CONNECTIONS RECOMMENDATION 2: A Connected Street NetworkNote: this map is referred to as the Street Grid Connectivity Map in the Globeville Elyria Swansea Health Impact Assessment..

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56 C6. INTRODUCE NEW MULTIMODAL CONNECTIONS OVER THE RIVER TO THE NATIONAL WESTERN CENTER. Introduce new multi-modal connections over the river and into the National Western Center (NWC) to enhance the catalytic impact potential on the Globeville, Elyria, and Swansea Neighborhoods and to stitch the neighborhoods together. In identifying specic alignment and design for the new connections across the river, important considerations include: %  en Accommodate vehicles, pedestrians, and bicycles. %  en Locate the multi-modal connections along existing street alignments in Globeville. This Plan identies 49th and 51st Avenues as the preferred locations for these connections. %  en Provide more direct access from Globeville to the future NWC commuter rail station than exists today. %  en Design and locate the bridges so as to facilitate riverfront development opportunities on the Globeville side of the river (see Connecting to the National Western Stock Show Transformative Project for more details). %  en Maximize eciencies that improve water quality and stormwater conveyance as well as connectivity.C7. EMPLOY GREEN STREET STRATEGIES. As new street connections are made or existing streets are reconstructed, look for opportunities to incorporate green street strategies in the street design. Green street strategies include permeable pavers, streetside stormwater planters, curb extensions, tree trenches, and grass swales. RECOMMENDATION 2: A Connected Street Network

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57 Priority of Connectivity Options Over the South Platte River and to the National Western Center1. 49th Avenue49th Avenue is the top priority for a new connection over the river because of its location in the middle of the proposed riverfront redevelopment area, the regular shape of adjacent blocks, and the even spacing between the existing connection at 47th Avenue and the second-priority connection at 51st Avenue. 2. 51st AvenueThis street is the secondhighest priority for a new connection over the river because of its location at the north end of the proposed riverfront redevelopment area, the opportunity to draw activity to the Northside Park area, the underutilization of adjacent blocks, and the opportunity to meet broader connectivity goals by virtue of the fact that 51st Avenue connects across Washington Street and to the west. If constructed, this connection would likely become the preferred route for Globeville residents to access the future National Western Center commuter rail station. 3. 50th AvenueIf either of the two preferred connectivity options proves infeasible, 50th Avenue would be the next-best choice. It is somewhat less desirable than the rst two due to a lack of spacing from both 49th and 51st Avenues. Additionally, although 50th Avenue connects across Washington Street, it currently fails to connect to the existing street grid to the west. 4. 48th AvenueAlthough this connection would work, it is identied as a lower priority than the other options because of its close proximity to a freight rail spur, the limited redevelopment opportunity of the resulting odd-shaped parcel, and its close proximity to an existing connection at 47th Avenue. For additional details, please refer to the Connect to the National Western Center transformative project in the Character Areas chapter. RECOMMENDATION 2: A Connected Street Network CONNECTIVITY OPTIONS OVER THE SOUTH PLATTE RIVER AND TO THE NATIONAL WESTERN CENTER

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58 C8. BUILD SIDEWALKS. Improve the pedestrian network by building sidewalks where none currently exist. Target initial sidewalk construction in high-priority areas, including routes to the elementary school, parks, bus stops, and rail transit stations. Identify appropriate grants or other funds for the construction.C9. DESIGN STREETS TO ACCOMMODATE PEDESTRIANS AND BICYCLES. Where feasible, introduce the following streetscape elements to support biking and walking in the neighborhood: %  en Introduce tree lawns by replacing attached sidewalks with detached sidewalks. %  en Work with property owners to plant trees, grass, and other landscaping in the tree lawn. %  en Provide gates and pedestrian facilities at railroad crossings. %  en Replace highway-style cobra head lights with pedestrian-scaled lights on local streets. %  en Provide crosswalks at stop-controlled intersections. %  en Provide ADA compliant ramps connecting to the sidewalk at intersections. Replace existing single ramps with bi-directional ramps, where applicable.C10. EXPLORE NEW PEDESTRIAN AND BICYCLE CONNECTIONS. To enhance pedestrian and bicycle connectivity, explore the possibility of creating new connections in the form of bridges or tunnels across major barriers. Where possible, these facilities should be designed to allow bicyclists to cross without dismounting. Candidates for these connections would need to integrate into the overall pedestrian and bicycle network, as applicable, in Globeville, the National Western Center, and along the South Platte River. %  en Explore opportunities to connect across the South Platte River from Ringsby Court to the proposed River North Park at 35th Avenue and Arkins Court and from Washington Street to the National Western Center. %  en Explore the possibility of connecting across I-70 with a safe and clean pedestrian and bicycle facility located between Lincoln Street and Washington Street. %  en Explore opportunities to more directly connect the neighborhood to the South Platte River Trail, including improvements to existing routes and possible new connections to include 44th Avenue.C11. IMPROVE KEY INTERSECTIONS TO BETTER ACCOMMODATE BICYCLES AND PEDESTRIANS. RECOMMENDATION 3: A Walkable, Bikeable Globeville HIA STRATEGIES RELATED TO THIS RECOMMENDATION: D11. Improve Street Infrastructure. Prioritize street infrastructure improvements, including sidewalks, bicycle lanes, bus stop furnishings, and intersection crossings to achieve the goals of the 2014 City Council Priorities, Denver Moves (2011) and the Strategic Transportation Plan (2008). D16. Create Complete Streets. Implement Complete Streets, including sidewalks for all new and redesigned streets, to provide safe and convenient access for all users (per existing City Policy #26, adopted May 2011). D22. Improve Key Intersections to Reduce Crashes. Explore measures to reduce the incidence of pedestrian and bicycle injury crashes at locations where multiple crashes have occurred. Such locations may include gateway intersectionssuch as 45th Avenue and Washington Street and 51st Avenue and Washington Street in Globeville. D23. Improve Connectivity and Safety in School Zones. Improvements could include analyzing current School Zones and making modications as necessary, including Safe Routes to School best practices. Improve education and outreach about safety in School Zones to residents, drivers, and schoolchildren, particularly in alignment with the I-70 reconstruction.

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59 Enhancements should be made to several intersections along major streets in Globeville to facilitate crossing for bicyclists and pedestrians. Intersections are listed in order of priority based on their ability to link bicyclists and pedestrians to key destinations and to the greater multi-modal transportation network. %  en 47th Avenue and Washington Street. Improve access between the Neighborhood Residential Core, a South Platte River Trail access point, and the Elyria Neighborhood. %  en 51st Avenue and Washington Street. Improve access between the Neighborhood Residential Core and Northside Park. Correct the oset, if possible, to simplify trac movements and create a more direct connection to the river. %  en 45th Avenue and Washington Street. Improve access to the Historic 45th Avenue Main Street and the South Platte River Trail access point. %  en Fox Street and 38th Avenue. Improve bicycle facilities to connect to the 41st and Fox station to the north, the Highland neighborhood to the west, and the South Platte River Trail and Downtown to the south. %  en 48th Avenue and Bannock Street. Evaluate the possibility of modifying the intersection geometry to shorten the crossing distance for pedestrians. Potential treatments could include pedestrian bump-outs. %  en 49th Avenue and Washington Street. At such time that a new road connection is made across the South Platte River at 49th, the pedestrian and bicycle use of this intersection will be much higher. Improvements should be made accordingly. C12. COMPLETE THE BICYCLE NETWORK. Complete an integrated system of bicycle routes within the neighborhood that links intuitively to the citywide bicycle network and to major destinations, including rail transit stations, parks, recreation centers, and South Platte River Trail access points. The recommended bicycle facility network is shown in the Existing and Proposed Bicycle Facilities Map.C13. EXPAND THE BCYCLE PROGRAM INTO GLOBEVILLE. Support the expansion of the B-Cycle bicycle sharing program into Globeville. The neighborhood is well-positioned for this expansion, due to its adjacency to the South Platte River Trail, which is one of the most prominent bikeway facilities in the entire metro region. Expansion locations for B-Cycle stations should include South Platte River Trail access points, future commuter rail stations, parks and recreation centers, and destinations such as the Taxi development and the National Western Center. Work with the B-Cycle organization to identify and overcome socio-economic barriers of access to the program. RECOMMENDATION 3: A Walkable, Bikeable Globeville Regional Trail Bike Boulevard Sharrow Shared Parking Lane Bicycle Lane *Images taken from Denver Moves

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60 NEEDED SIDEWALKS AND INTERSECTION IMPROVEMENTS RECOMMENDATION 3: A Walkable, Bikeable Globeville

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61 EXISTING AND PROPOSED BICYCLE FACILITIES RECOMMENDATION 3: A Walkable, Bikeable Globeville

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62 C14. BUILD AND CONNECT TO COMMUTER RAIL. The usability of rail transit is greatly enhanced when people can easily walk, bicycle, or bus to the station. Ensure that sidewalks, bicycle facilities, and bus routes eectively connect Globeville to all three future commuter rail stations. C15. INSTALL WAYFINDING AND SIGNAGE AT RAIL TRANSIT STATIONS. Create an intuitive and consistent waynding system at commuter rail stations to establish clear and comfortable connections between the platform and nearby landmarks and destinations, including routes to neighborhoods, retail areas, parks, and recreational facilities. Signs should be geared towards pedestrians and possibly list walking times to destinations rather than distances to help encourage active transportation.C16. COORDINATE BUS ROUTES WITH NEW RAIL SERVICE.Work with RTD to coordinate bus operations to work in tandem with new rail service. Priorities include: %  en Coordinate bus headways and routes with new transit stations. %  en Route buses to stop at new rail stations. %  en Coordinate bus arrival times to facilitate transfers to rail, and vice-versa. %  en Provide bus service to the various rail stations in and near the neighborhood, including 41st and Fox, 38th and Blake, and National Western Center, to allow for transfers between lines without requiring out-of-direction travel to Union Station.C17. IMPROVE BUS STOP FACILITIES. Work with RTD to identify and construct bus stop enhancements within Globeville. At a minimum, all bus stops should be located on a paved surface and have direct and adequate sidewalk access. Beyond this, benches, bus shelters, street lights, and other amenities can be provided at bus stops to create a comfortable experience. Consider giving initial priority for bus stop improvements to the stops with the highest ridership numbers or with the most challenging existing streetscape conditions. RECOMMENDATION 4: A Transit-Rich Globeville

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63 RECOMMENDATION 4: A Transit-Rich Globeville TRANSIT SYSTEMS

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64 C18. IMPROVE RAILROAD CROSSINGS. %  en 48th Avenue and Broadway. Repair the vehicular travel lane over the tracks and complete the sidewalk network on Broadway. %  en 48th Avenue and Lincoln Street. Create a controlled crossing by installing railroad crossing gates. %  en 48th Avenue and Washington Street. Repair the vehicular travel lane over the tracks and complete the sidewalk network on Washington Street.C19. INTRODUCE TRAFFIC CALMING MEASURES. Study trac calming measures that may be appropriate for each of the following streets: %  en 46th Avenue between Broadway and Washington Street %  en 47th Avenue between Broadway and Washington Street %  en Lincoln Street between 43rd and 50th Avenues Potential options include adding stop signs along these travel routes, modifying streets to reduce travel lane width by adding bicycle lanes or dening parking areas, and introducing aesthetic improvements like planted tree lawns or streetside stormwater planters. Look for opportunities for individual projects to accomplish multiple objectives for the neighborhood. For example, both this Plan and Denver Moves recommend a bike boulevard for Lincoln Street which, pending further analysis, may be determined to also accomplish the trac calming goals for that street. RECOMMENDATION 5: Address Trac Operations and Roadway Maintenance Issues HIA STRATEGIES RELATED TO THIS RECOMMENDATION: D2. Mitigate Noise Impacts to Residential Areas. Noise in residential areas and schools near major roadways and highways should be mitigated to no more than 55 decibels, where feasible. D3. Mitigate Noise Impacts Along Major Roads. Sound walls or other noise mitigation measures are recommended along major roadways and highways where sound levels at schools and homes are expected to increase by 5 decibels or more, where exterior noise levels are expected to be 55 decibels or greater, or where interior noise levels are expected to be 45 decibels or greater. Community preferences regarding aesthetic qualities of sound mitigation should be considered. D22. Improve Key Intersections to Reduce Crashes. Explore measures to reduce the incidence of pedestrian and bicycle injury crashes at locations where multiple crashes have occurred. Such locations may include gateway intersectionssuch as 45th Avenue and Washington Street and 51st Avenue and Washington Street in Globeville.

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65 RECOMMENDATION 5: Address Trac Operations and Roadway Maintenance Issues IMPROVEMENTS DIAGRAM

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66 RECOMMENDATION 5: Address Trac Operations and Roadway Maintenance Issues C20. IMPROVE UNDERPASSES AND BRIDGES FOR PEDESTRIANS AND CYCLISTS. The following proposed improvements aect both the local street network and two interstates. Coordination with both the City of Denver and the State of Colorado would be necessary prior to implementation. Explore opportunities to improve the pedestrian and bicycle experience along the following facilities using lighting, public art, physical buering, beautication, or other strategies. %  en Underpasses Washington Street under I-70. Improve this underpass to enhance the users experience traveling into and out of Globeville. Cities around the world are experimenting with improving tunnels and underpasses by implementing innovative lighting displays. Some of the most exciting tunnels feature interactive elements and audio enhancements. Innovative lighting can greatly improve the Washington Street Underpass. Lincoln Street under I-70. Strategies to improve this underpass include removing the wing walls to increase the size of the sidewalks, expanding murals to include art inside the tunnel, and improving lighting to create round-the-clock brightness. Additionally, cross walks should be added on both sides of the underpass to create safer street crossings. 48th Avenue under I-25. Strategies to improve this underpass include reducing the size of the wing wall to increase the sidewalk width, adding bicycle lanes, providing further separation between the street and the freight rail, and enhancing the planting beds surrounding the underpass. %  en Bridges 47th Avenue over the South Platte River 44th Avenue over I-25 48th Avenue over the BNSF Railroad Yard

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67 RECOMMENDATION 5: Address Trac Operations and Roadway Maintenance Issues WASHINGTON STREET UNDER I70 EXISTING CONDITIONS POTENTIAL IMPROVEMENT IDEAS Chicago lights a sidewalk with purple and blue lights to further delineate the pedestrian realm from the vehicular realm. Sandnes Sentrum, Norway activates a pedestrian tunnel with an LED wall that turns shadows into a light display.

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68 LINCOLN STREET UNDER I70 EXISTING CONDITIONS LINCOLN STREET UNDER I70 POTENTIAL IMPROVEMENT RECOMMENDATION 5: Address Trac Operations and Roadway Maintenance IssuesThe existing conditions of the Lincoln Street underpass is shown in the top image; the rendering (directly above) shows the plan recommendations.

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69 48TH AVENUE UNDER I25 EXISTING CONDITIONS 48TH AVENUE UNDER I25 POTENTIAL IMPROVEMENT RECOMMENDATION 5: Address Trac Operations and Roadway Maintenance IssuesThe existing conditions of the 48th Avenue underpass is shown in the top image; the rendering (directly above) shows the plan recommendations.

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70 HEALTHY Globeville a VISION : Globeville is a healthy and safe neighborhood where residents, workers, and visitors alike experience mental, social, and physical wellbeing as a result of good environmental quality, a well-connected multi-modal street network, and convenient access to goods and services.

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71 WHY IS HEALTH IMPORTANT TO GLOBEVILLE? Globeville, Elyria, and Swansea are three of Denvers oldest neighborhoods, settled in the 1880s by Central and Eastern European ethnic communities who came for jobs in the railroad yards and heavy industries like metals smelting. Over the decades, the neighborhoods continued to attract large industrial operations, which provided jobs but also produced decades of negative environmental impacts on air quality, water, and soil. Many industrial uses exist in the neighborhood to this day. The construction of Interstates 25 and 70 in the 1950s and 1960s restricted physical access to the neighborhoods and produced more air pollution. At the time, little consideration was given to the health problems associated with such development. In recent years, there has been a growing understanding of the connection between how communities are designed and the impact on human health. Health is dened as a state of complete physical, mental and social wellbeing and not merely the absence of disease or inrmity.1 Research has revealed a strong relationship between our physical environment, physical activity, and nutrition. Environments that do not provide people with choices to support healthy lifestyles can lead to chronic diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and obesity 2. Well-designed neighborhoods can improve health, and poorly-designed communities can harm health. As part of the neighborhood planning process, a Health Impact Assessment (HIA) entitled How Neighborhood Planning Aects Health in Globeville and Elyria Swansea was conducted for Globeville and the nearby neighborhoods of Elyria and Swansea. The HIA was conducted by Denver Environmental Health with support from the Council District 9 oce and the North Denver Cornerstone Collaborative. An HIA is a process to incorporate health considerations into a plan, project, or policy. HIA provides a framework for collaboration among interdisciplinary partners to better understand how environmental, physical, economic, and social conditions determine health in order to inform public policy and decision making. The Globeville and Elyria Swansea HIA was developed in conjunction with the neighborhood planning process. The recommendations in the HIA were designed to inform and strengthen the recommendations of the Globeville Neighborhood Plan and Elyria and Swansea Neighborhoods Plan by adding community health as a consideration for the future vision, design, and development of the neighborhoods. The recommendations and strategies in this chapter are consistent with the HIA, and additional detail and supporting analysis on all of the health-related topics addressed here can be found in that document. 1 Ocial Records of the World Health Organization, no. 2, p. 100, www.who.org 2 NACCHO Statement of Policy, Healthy Community Design http://www.naccho.org/advocacy/positions/upload/03-02Healthy-Community-Design-2.pdf RECOMMENDATIONS: 1. IMPROVE ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY 2. IMPROVE MULTIMODAL CONNECTIVITY 3. INCREASE ACCESS TO GOODS AND SERVICES 4. ENHANCE COMMUNITY SAFETY 5. IMPROVE MENTAL HEALTH AND WELLBEING 6. IMPLEMENT ALL REMAINING HIA STRATEGIES

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72 KEY ISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIES: Environmental Impacts. Globeville experiences noise and odors on a regular basis and poor air quality periodically. These impacts are a result of a combination of factors, including industrial operations, heavy truck trac, freight trains, as well as the highways which carry over 400,000 cars daily. The marijuana industry, which is relatively new, has a growing presence in the neighborhood and is an additional source of impacts. Environmental Quality. There are four primary components to environmental quality: %  en Air QualityAir quality is aected by the presence of pollutants and nuisance odors. Pollutants are measurable concentrations of potentially harmful substances in the air, whereas nuisance odors do not necessarily cause direct toxic eects but may aect wellbeing by reducing the desire to go outdoors or by causing stress. %  en NoiseExcessive noise can damage health depending on its intensity, duration, type, and source. Longterm exposure to moderate levels of noise can adversely aect sleep, school, and work performance, and increase risk of cardiovascular disease. Sources of noise in Globeville include trains and train crossings, industrial operations, and trac on roadways. %  en Water QualityExposure to pollution in surface water occurs either by ingestion or through skin contact with the water. The South Platte River often has poor water quality. %  en Soil QualityGlobevilles industrial history resulted in soil contamination with potentially cancerous metals, including arsenic, cadmium, and lead. The most common way that people are exposed to metals in soil is through incidental ingestion. To date, the Globeville neighborhood has had two large soil remediation eorts that have largely been completed. Human Health Impacts. The residents of Globeville, the majority of whom are Hispanic families with young children, suer from some of the highest rates of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity, and asthma in the city. These chronic diseases are associated with poor diet and lack of exercise, among other factors. Impacts to Daily Living. Decient pedestrian and bicycle infrastructure and a lack of sources of healthy, aordable food impact daily living. Obstacles to Physical Activity. Opportunities for outdoor physical activity are limited in the neighborhood due to disconnected streets and sidewalks, lack of local retail goods and services, and concerns about crime and safety. Opportunity for Improvements through Neighborhood Planning. The built environment has the potential to be improved through the implementation of this Plans recommendations, which are intended to be The South Platte River Trail

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73 How Implementation of the Globeville Neighborhood Plan Can Improve Health: Separating land uses or using other means to buer existing and future impacts of industrial uses from residents can reduce many environmental health impacts, including air quality, odors, and noise. Reconnecting streets, building and repairing sidewalks, and creating connections to the new transit rail stations and other destinations can promote physical activity and a safe pedestrian environment. Adding neighborhood retail goods and services can increase walking, decrease driving, boost the local economy, and increase social interaction with more eyes on the street. Strengthening the connections to parks and trails and the safety of those places can oer more opportunities for physical activity. Enhanced street lighting, increased crime reporting, and trac intersection analysis to reduce the frequency of injury crashes can improve actual and perceived safety. Addressing environmental and physical challenges in the neighborhood can lead to reductions in the chronic stress that residents now experience from existing conditions and improve overall mental and physical wellbeing. Bilingual and culturally-appropriate outreach to residents about the many upcoming infrastructure and redevelopment projects will also serve to reduce the uncertainty about the signicant changes coming to the neighborhood. representative of the communitys desires for the future of the neighborhood. Limited Connectivity. Connectivity within the neighborhood is limited due to multiple railroad tracks, disconnected roads, and limited sidewalks and bus stops, isolating Globeville residents within their neighborhood and away from other places. This limited connectivity also hinders access to physical activity and recreation opportunities. Better overall connectivity and mobility through improved bicycle, pedestrian, and transit infrastructure could positively impact health in Globeville by increasing physical exercise, reducing chronic disease rates and obesity, and increasing the likelihood that residents can access neighborhood retail and other services. Key Retail and Services. Retail and services such as food stores, banks, pharmacies, and child care centers are important to meet residents daily needs. Civic resources such as churches, libraries, schools and parks are equally critical. Lack of access to goods and services may be contributing to negative impacts on Globeville residents health. Limited access to healthy food can lead to diet-related chronic diseases such as diabetes and obesity, which Globeville residents suer from disproportionately compared to residents of many other neighborhoods. The necessity of traveling outside of the neighborhood to nd basic services increases driving, decreases walking, and results in fewer social interactions and eyes on the street. Prioritizing the development of more neighborhood goods and services and providing universal access, multi-modal transportation, and Complete Streets will likely increase walking and physical activity in the neighborhood. The ability of residents and workers to walk, bicycle, or use transit to shop, work, recreate, and gather as a community can also result in improved health. Community Safety. Community safety includes trac, pedestrian and cyclist safety, crime and fear of crime, and personal safety. Elements that impact community safety include street and pedestrian conditions, lighting, grati, and tolerance of illegal activities. Improvements in the physical environment to include street design and lighting, as well as increased crime reporting, can improve community safety.

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74 HIA RECOMMENDATIONS THAT DIRECTLY ADDRESS ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY:D1. Improve Industrial and Residential Compatibility. Minimize negative environmental impacts from industrial uses on residential areas through methods such as a change in concept land use designation, zoning, buering, or other means. D2. Mitigate Noise Impacts to Residential Areas. Noise in residential areas and at schools near major roadways and highways should be mitigated to no more than 55 decibels, where feasible.1 D3. Mitigate Noise Impacts Along Major Roads. Sound walls or other noise mitigation measures are recommended along major roadways and highways where sound levels at schools2 and homes3 are expected to increase by 5 decibels or more, or exterior noise levels are expected to be 55 decibels or greater, or interior noise levels are expected to be 45 decibels or greater.4 Community preferences regarding aesthetic qualities of sound mitigation should be considered. D4. Mitigate the Health Impacts of Freight Rail. Explore solutions to reduce the health impacts from trains. These could include Quiet Zones (intersections specically designed so that trains do not have to sound horns), or grade separation of trains from other modes of transportation (i.e., roads constructed over or under tracks to eliminate the need for trains to sound horns at these crossings and to aid in the prevention of people and trains crossing paths). D5. Address the Odor Impacts of the Marijuana Industry. Mitigate the odors and emissions from marijuana growing facilities on residential areas through methods such as a change in concept land use designation, siting, buering, or other means. D6. Increase Tree Cover. Increase the tree canopy cover in the neighborhood as prioritized in the Denver Urban Forestry Program and the Game Plan through planting street trees to provide an inviting and temperate outdoor environment for physical activity. D7. Increase the Use of Low Impact Development and Green Infrastructure. Encourage developers to use low impact development and green infrastructure techniques in new development and redevelopment in the Globeville, Elyria, and Swansea neighborhoods to enhance water quality in each basin. Examples include use of bioretention, rain gardens, bioswales, or vegetated buer strips to minimize directly connected impervious areas. 1 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, http://www.nonoise.org/library/levels/levels. htm#summary 2 Schools are classied as CDOT Category C receptors, http://www.coloradodot.info/ programs/environmental/noise/guidelines-policies/nal-cdot-noise-guidance-2013, p. 15. 3 Residential uses are classied as CDOT Category B receptors. http://www.coloradodot. info/programs/environmental/noise/guidelines-policies/nal-cdot-noise-guidance-2013, p. 15. 4 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, http://www.nonoise.org/library/levels/levels. htm#summary RECOMMENDATION 1: Improve Environmental Quality Educating the younger generation about gardening can empower youth to choose healthy food, teaches them about responsibility, and fosters a deeper connection to nature. Green Infrastructure improves water quality by ltering pollutants out of stormwater before it travels o-site. OTHER HIA STRATEGIES THAT ADDRESS ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY:D14. Address the Impacts of Trucks.

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75 TREE COVERAGE MAP Tree cover in Globeville is among the lowest of all Denver neighborhoods.Roadway and alley projects should include green streettechniques such as stormwater planters, stormwater curb extensions, tree trenches, and permeable pavers. D8. Incorporate Water Quality in Open Space Design. Implement recommendations from the River North Greenway Master Plan to improve water quality. Where possible, use existing park areas without aecting existing uses to incorporate water quality treatment features, such as wetlands, to restore wildlife habitat along the river or in Heron Pond. D9. Provide Gardening Education. Work with community partners to provide education to residents about best practices for backyard gardening. D10. Involve the Department of Environmental Health with Major Projects. DEH sta should continue to participate in public sector development projects in Globeville, Elyria, and Swansea, including the I-70 reconstruction and the National Western Center, to help anticipate health and environmental conditions of concern such as those identied in this Plan and the HIA. RECOMMENDATION 1: Improve Environmental Quality

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76 HIA RECOMMENDATIONS THAT DIRECTLY ADDRESS MULTIMODAL CONNECTIVITY:D11. Improve Street Infrastructure. Prioritize street infrastructure improvements, including sidewalks, bicycle lanes, bus stop furnishings, and intersection crossings, to achieve the goals of the 2014 City Council Priorities, Denver Moves (2011) and the Strategic Transportation Plan (2008). D12. Improve Street Connectivity. Implement new street connections as identied in this Plan (see Connected and Character Area Chapters). D13. Connect to Greenspace. Improve connectivity to parks, trails, and recreation, especially to the South Platte River trails and parks. D14. Address the Impacts of Trucks. Review truck routes in the neighborhoods to improve environmental quality, safety, and connectivity. Examine current truck routes, particularly adjacent to schools, explore potential modications as necessary, and make any needed changes to the City truck route ordinance for consistency with state regulations. D15. Connect to the National Western Center. Improve access and connectivity to and through residential neighborhoods and the redeveloped National Western Center. D16. Create Complete Streets. Implement Complete Streets, including sidewalks for all new and redesigned streets, to provide safe and convenient access for all users (per existing City Policy #26, adopted May 2011). Block size is a metric for walkability, as smaller blocks are generally associated with a more highly connected street network. While some parts of Globeville have high and moderately high walkability, much of the neighborhood ranks low and/or has an incomplete network of blocks. RECOMMENDATION 2: Improve Multi-Modal Connectivity OTHER HIA STRATEGIES THAT ADDRESS MULTIMODAL CONNECTIVITY:D22. Improve Key Intersections to Reduce Crashes. D23. Improve Connectivity and Safety in School Zones. BLOCK SIZE MAP

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77 HIA RECOMMENDATIONS THAT DIRECTLY ADDRESS ACCESS TO GOODS AND SERVICES:D17. Attract Key Retail and Services. Incentivize development of retail goods and services, including a grocery store. D18. Increase Food Access at the National Western Center. Promote new sources of healthy foods within the redeveloped National Western Center, such as grocery stores, farmers markets, and community gardens. D19. Improve Healthy Food Access at Existing Retailers. Implement a healthy corner store retail program in the neighborhood, similar Philadelphia or other models, to add healthy foods to existing convenience and corner stores.1D20. Use Mixed-Use Development to Improve Access to Goods and Services. Promote mixed-use development to support a variety of commercial and retail businesses and services throughout the community and around new rail stations. D21. Create Neighborhood-Focused Flex Space. Develop a exible market space that can support a variety of neighborhood goods and services and culturally-relevant activities. 1 http://www.healthycornerstores.org/Globeville residents need to travel signicant distances outside of the neighborhood to access a full service grocery store.DISTANCE TO GROCERY STORES RECOMMENDATION 3: Increase Access to Goods and Services OTHER HIA STRATEGIES THAT ADDRESS ACCESS TO GOODS AND SERVICES:D11. Improve Street Infrastructure. D13. Connect to Greenspace. D16. Create Complete Streets.

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78 HIA STRATEGIES THAT DIRECTLY ADDRESS COMMUNITY SAFETY:D22. Improve Key Intersections to Reduce Crashes. Explore measures to reduce the incidence of pedestrian and bicycle injury crashes at locations where multiple crashes have occurred. Such locations may include gateway intersections such as 45th Avenue and Washington Street and 51st Avenue and Washington Street in Globeville. D23. Improve Connectivity and Safety in School Zones. Improvements could include analyzing current School Zones and making modications as necessary, including Safe Routes to School best practices. Improve education and outreach about safety in School Zones to residents, drivers and schoolchildren, particularly in alignment with the I-70 reconstruction. D24. Improve Street Lighting. Install new or upgraded street lighting per the recommendations of the Denver Police Department lighting survey, particularly along new sidewalks, to increase safety and reduce crime. Encourage residents use of porch lights at night with education and outreach eorts. D25. Enforce Existing Laws. Enforce regulations regarding grati, vandalism, public drug use, stray animals, and property maintenance to increase safety. D26. Provide Pedestrian Safety Education. Increase education and outreach to citizens about pedestrian safety in anticipation of increased pedestrian activity with the redevelopment of the National Western Center and other projects. RECOMMENDATION 4: Enhance Community Safety OTHER HIA STRATEGIES THAT ADDRESS COMMUNITY SAFETY:D4. Mitigate the Health Impacts of Freight Rail. D14. Address the Impacts of Trucks.

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79 When a neighborhood seems unsafe due to physical conditions such as disconnectedness, pollution, vandalism, darkness, or neglect, this can lead to feelings of irritability, anxiety, distress, and mental fatigue. Improvements to street connectivity and sidewalks, increased lighting, crime prevention, the addition of retail goods and services, and mitigation of noise and odor pollution can lead to improvements in residents mental wellbeing. HIA STRATEGIES THAT DIRECTLY ADDRESS MENTAL HEALTH AND WELLBEING:Mental health and wellbeing are aected by the sum total of many other factors. As such, furtherance of the recommendations in this chapter will also improve the mental health of residents and of the neighborhood as a whole. RECOMMENDATION 5: Improve Mental Health and Wellbeing OTHER HIA STRATEGIES THAT ADDRESS MENTAL HEALTH AND WELLBEING:D1. Improve Industrial and Residential Compatibility. D4. Mitigate the Health Impacts of Freight Rail. D11. Improve Street Infrastructure. D12. Improve Street Connectivity. D24. Improve Street Lighting.

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80 REMAINING HIA STRATEGIES:D27. Mitigate the Impacts of I-70 Reconstruction. In advance of the I-70 reconstruction project through Globeville, Elyria, and Swansea: DEH should wor k with CDOT and CDPHE to dene types of air pollution monitoring that can be done to determine a community baseline. DEH should wor k with CDOT and other stakeholders to recommend air quality mitigation measures that may be required during the reconstruction of I-70, including upgrading the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system at Swansea Elementary School to improve indoor air quality. The City should work with CDOT to mitigate noise impacts of the I-70 reconstruction during the construction period. D28. Explore Environmental Plan Review. Explore the feasibility of an environmental plan review process prior to approval of future development applications in order to minimize conicts between industrial and residential uses. D29. Improve Air Quality. Continue to improve the Citys air quality through specic actions, including: DEH should updat e its community air pollution modeling assessment to a 2011 baseline and make projections for a future year (such as 2025). DEH should wor k with CDPHE and EPA to establish an additional air quality monitoring station in Globeville, Elyria, or Swansea by 2015 with a goal of quantifying near-highway pollution separately from the I-70 project. D30. Study the Odor Impacts of Marijuana Grow Facilities. Analyze the distribution of current marijuana growing facilities and determine any excessive odor burdens generated by such facilities in Globeville, Elyria, and Swansea, and make recommendations to mitigate odor impacts as needed, including best management practices and technologies. D31. Study the Human Health Impacts of Marijuana Growing Facilities. Advocate for further research on the potential human health impacts from marijuana growing facilities, as such impacts are unknown. Concerns include emissions to air, odors, mold, and discharges to the water system. D32. Address Nuisance Odors. Address nuisance odors through specic actions, including: DEH should wor k with City agencies, other government, non-prot, community, and industry partners to form a long-term steering committee to implement solutions to reduce odors, potentially including recommendations for local and state policy changes. RECOMMENDATION 6: Implement All Remaining HIA Strategies

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81 DEH should crea te and lead a community partnership of interested organizations to pursue funding for research on manufacturing processes that produce odors and odor monitoring technologies to address nuisance odors in Globeville and Elyria Swansea. DEH should con tinue its work with the Northeast Metro Pollution Prevention Alliance (NEMPPA) to cooperate on potential solutions for odor reduction from industries located outside of City boundaries. D33. Improve Water Quality Education and Outreach. DEH should partner with other agencies and organizations to improve education and outreach to businesses and residents related to water quality in Globeville, Elyria, and Swansea, including providing information to developers about City regulations for stormwater runo and fugitive dust and dirt. D34. Update Superfund. DEH should work with the EPA to continue to take steps to remove the residential portion DEH/EPA (Operable Unit 1) of VB/I-70 from the Superfund site (i.e., de-list OU1) as the remedy has been completed. D35. Use Environmental Design Principles to Improve Safety. The City and private developers should work together to encourage crime prevention and safety through the use of environmental design principles for new development, including large projects such as the National Western Center. D36. Strengthen Outreach on Development Projects. The City, private developers, and community partners should continue and strengthen bilingual and culturally-appropriate outreach and communication with residents about upcoming construction and development projects as these communities have historically experienced negative environmental impacts from previous decisions. RECOMMENDATION 6: Implement All Remaining HIA Strategies

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CHARACTER AREAS & Transformative Projects

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83 CHARACTER AREAS AND THEIR ASSOCIATED TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECTS: Residential Neighborhood Core %  en Historic 45th Avenue Main Street Washington Street Corridor and the Riverfront %  en Improve Washington Street %  en Enhance the Street Grid in the Riverfront Area %  en Connect to the National Western Center 41st and Fox Station Area Industrial Edges %  en Redevelop the ASARCO Site This chapter applies the strategies and vision from the four Guiding Principles chapters to specic Character Areas of Globeville, showing how the previous recommendations are layered to create a Unique, Strong, Connected, and Healthy Globeville. Each character area applies the vision already established in the plan and goes into greater detail. There are one or more transformative projects, in bullet points below, located within most of the Character Areas. It is anticipated that each of these projects, if implemented, would have a positive, catalytic, and transformative eect on the neighborhood. Each transformative project is presented and then evaluated against the four guiding principles of this plan.

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84 Globevilles Residential Neighborhood Core VISION : Maintain the single family residential character of the neighborhood core while improving internal circulation and enhancing 45th Avenue as a neighborhood-serving main street.KEY ISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIES: Stable Neighborhood. The Strong chapter recommends a land use designation of Single Family Residential with Accessory Dwelling Units throughout the Residential Neighborhood Core in order to preserve Globevilles existing residential character while also promoting aordable housing and inll development. Many of Globevilles residents express pride in the relatively high rates of home ownership, which gives people a stake in the community and fosters a sense of pride in ones property and the neighborhood as a whole. There is an opportunity to rene the zoning within the Residential Neighborhood Core to maintain the stable character and meet the vision of this Plan. Safety and Security. Globeville residents expressed concerns about inadequate lighting, walking and biking conditions for school children, property maintenance, litter, grati, and the lack of an established neighborhood watch program. Historic Main Street. 45th Avenue runs through the southern portion of the Residential Neighborhood Core and serves as Globevilles historic main street. The businesses that are located along 45th are small and directly serve the adjacent neighborhood. Today, commercial buildings tend to be clustered at key intersections along the street with residential uses located in-between. Some of these residential properties are zoned residential and are often oriented away from 45th Avenue and towards a side street. This orientation creates a challenge in creating a cohesive neighborhood main street as the residential uses break up the activity along the corridor.

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85 Urban Residential and Institutional uses like churches and schools can be found alongside single-family homes in Globevilles Residential Neighborhood Core. The Lincoln Street Underpass is dark. RESIDENTIAL NEIGHBORHOOD CORE

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86 RESIDENTIAL NEIGHBORHOOD CORE STRATEGIES UNIQUE TO THE RESIDENTIAL NEIGHBORHOOD CORE:E1. Update the Neighborhood Context. The Denver Zoning Codes Urban Neighborhood Context, as opposed to the currently-mapped Urban Edge Context, better reects the use of alleys, limiting or prohibiting curb cuts for street access, and the continuation of detached sidewalks where possible. E2. Tailor Minimum Zone Lot Sizes. In areas where the existing zoning requires a 4,500 square foot minimum zone lot size, a future zone district should maintain the 4,500 square foot zone lot minimum. In areas where the existing zoning requires a 6,000 square foot minimum zone lot size, a future zone district should have a 5,500 square foot zone lot minimum. E3. Ensure a Safe and Secure Residential Community. Use a combination of complementary strategies to increase safety and security within the Residential Neighborhood Core: %  en Explore the creation of a neighborhood watch program. %  en Work with the Safe Routes to School program to create a safe route to Garden Place Academy. %  en Support the eorts of United Community Action Network (UCAN Metro Denver) and other active organizations within the neighborhood to organize neighborhood clean-up and anti-grati eorts. %  en Collaborate with the Citys 311 and Neighborhood Inspections Services with respect to private property and neighborhood maintenance issues. %  en Implement the recommendations of the Denver Police Departments 2014 lighting survey. HIA STRATEGIES RELATED TO THE RESIDENTIAL NEIGHBORHOOD CORE: D2. Mitigate Noise Impacts to Residential Areas. Noise in residential areas and schools near major roadways and highways should be mitigated to no more than 55 decibels where feasible. D24. Improve Street Lighting. Install new or upgraded street lighting per the recommendations of the Denver Police Department lighting survey, particularly along new sidewalks, to increase safety and reduce crime. Encourage residents use of porch lights at night with education and outreach eorts. D25. Enforce Existing Laws. Enforce regulations regarding grati, vandalism, public drug use, stray animals, and property maintenance to increase safety. A rendering of 47th Avenue demonstrating how bike lanes, recommended in the Connected chapter, could be accommodated on the street.

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87 RESIDENTIAL NEIGHBORHOOD CORE

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88 45TH AVENUE STRATEGIES:E4. Enhance 45th Avenue. %  en E4A. Enhance the Public Streetscape. % en Create a gateway treatment at the corner of 45th Avenue and Washington Street to attract people to the 45th Avenue main street. % en Enhance the public realm. % en Preserve and maintain the existing pedestrian-scaled street lamps. % en Preserve and maintain the streets bike facilities. % en Encourage the use of banners and signage to create a recognizable brand for 45th Avenue as Globevilles neighborhood main street. % en Consider introducing parklets, small green spaces extending from the sidewalk and commonly the size of one or more parking spaces, to activate the street and to create a unique amenity not commonly found elsewhere in Denver. Parklets can also be designed to double as water quality features and include such practices as streetside stormwater planters, curb extensions, and tree trenches. % en Consider establishing a special district along 45th Avenue to fund the construction and maintenance of these improvements. %  en E4B. Mixed-Use and Commercial Properties. % en Maintain required ground-story activation such as window transparency and street entrances facing 45th Avenue. % en Locate active uses on the ground oors to create interest and engagement on 45th Avenue. GOAL STATEMENT: Reinforce 45th Avenue as a unique neighborhood destination with smallscale retail, restaurants, and services. Small improvements to the 45th Avenue streetscape could do a lot to reinforce its main street character. TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECT: Historic 45th Avenue Main StreetWHAT IS IT?45th Avenue currently functions as Globevilles historic main street with its collection of neighborhoodserving businesses. More could be done to increase the streets vitality and prominence. 45th Avenue should be a mix of uses arranged along a linear pattern, scaled to be compatible with the surrounding residential neighborhood, and with a focus on pedestrian and bicyclefriendly urban design.

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89 % en Minimize surface parking and locate it to the side and rear of buildings with building entrances facing the sidewalk. %  en E4C. Residential Properties. % en For residential properties fronting 45th that are zoned residential, consider allowing Live/Work uses where an oce or shop can open in addition to containing a dwelling. % en Single Family properties adjacent to 45th Ave but that front another street should be encouraged to maintain the propertys residential use while incorporating elements that acknowledge their presence on a neighborhood main street. % en Encourage porches to wrap the side of the house that is facing 45th Avenue. % en Encourage side yards facing 45th Avenue to engage in residential food sales. % en Promote side yard fencing along 45th Avenue to be no taller than 4 feet.HOW DOES IT ADDRESS UNIQUE?Today, 45th Avenue plays a less prominent role in the daily lives of Globeville residents than it once did, when people could go there to fulll more of their daily shopping needs. Enhancing the street will help return it to its former prominence, which in turn reinforces the unique character and history of the neighborhood.HOW DOES IT ADDRESS STRONG?Enhancing the main street prominence of 45th Avenue increases accessibility to retail, services, and jobs, while reducing the need for residents to travel outside of the neighborhood to meet these needs. Encouraging commerce along the street will stimulate interest in diversifying the neighborhoods economy through the creation of new small businesses.HOW DOES IT ADDRESS CONNECTED?Because it connects to Washington Street and across I-25, 45th Avenue is already a major through-street for Globeville. The concept presented here reinforces 45th Avenue as a destination street, as well.HOW DOES IT ADDRESS HEALTHY?Neighborhood main streets promote walkable, urban communities that provide residents with easy access to many of their daily needs without requiring the use of an automobile. This makes neighborhoods more livable and safer and can improve trac congestion and associated air quality issues. TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECT: Historic 45th Avenue Main Street

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90 VISION : The area is transformed into a mixed-use riverfront destination area that capitalizes on its adjacency to the South Platte River, a revitalized Washington Street, reinvented greenspace, and direct connections across the river to the National Western Center.Washington Street Corridor and the RiverfrontKEY ISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIESA Key River-Oriented Development and Connectivity Opportunity. A consistent theme heard throughout the planning process was a desire to maximize the potential of this area and the many opportunities that are present here, including: %  en The opportunity to develop underutilized properties including large vacant lots, surface parking, and warehouses into mixed-use, inll projects. %  en The opportunity to better and more directly connect to the National Western Center, National Western Center Station, and destinations within the Elyria and Swansea neighborhoods. %  en The opportunity to activate the large but underutilized Northside Park, Heron Pond, and Heller Open Space areas. %  en The opportunity to transform Washington Street into an attractive, vital, multi-modal, main street. %  en The opportunity to integrate connectivity with water quality and storm water conveyance. Underutilized River Frontage. Globeville lacks easy access to the South Platte River. The large industrial parcels between Washington and the river limit the ow of people within the riverfront area. As such, the river is underutilized, perceived by some as dangerous, and lacks a community presence. National Western Center Redevelopment. A master plan for the National Western Center (NWC) is being

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91 developed with the goal of creating a major yearround destination directly across the river. Connecting to the NWC provides an opportunity for mixed-use development to provide supportive services to meet the needs of NWC visitors such as hotels, restaurants, and shops, and to enhance the overall NWC experience. The synergy between NWC and the Washington Street and Riverfront area cannot be ignored; this relationship can have a catalytic eect on both Globeville and NWC. Washington Street. Washington Street within Globeville is primarily an industrial corridor, although it also has a sizable number of commercial uses. Current development along the street lacks active uses and discourages destinations that attract people, resulting in an incohesive sense of place. %  en Major Arterial. Washington is a major throughstreet connecting for miles to the north and carrying signicant amounts of trac. %  en Narrow Right of Way. North of 47th Avenue, Washington is a narrow street with numerous businesses located directly adjacent to the right of way. At just 60 feet, Washington Street does not have the width of a typical arterial, and multiple travel lanes are not possible within the existing right-ofway. %  en Suboptimal Pedestrian Realm. The sidewalk network along Washington is incomplete, and where sidewalks do exist they are generally in poor condition. The street itself lacks continuous pedestrian and bike facilities. Street furnishings such as pedestrian-scale street lights, benches, and street trees are minimal to non-existent. Despite a few restaurants and commercial uses and the close proximity to the river and parks, there is a lack of destinations and active uses along the corridor that are attractive to pedestrians. %  en Gateway into Denver from Adams County. Washington Street is a primary connection from Adams County into Downtown Denver. %  en An Important Connection. Washington is the only through-street in Globeville aside from I-25 and I-70, meaning that it both enters and exits the neighborhood. As such, it provides several critical points of access for the neighborhood where key local streets intersect with Washington Street. These intersections provide gateway opportunities for the neighborhood. Washington Street is a parallel route to I-25 and is one of the rst arterial streets to ll up with cars when I-25 becomes congested. WASHINGTON STREET CORRIDOR AND THE RIVERFRONTStorage lots and industrial uses are common in the Riverfront area. An unimproved street in the Riverfront.

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92 STRATEGIES UNIQUE TO WASHINGTON STREET AND THE RIVERFRONT:E5. Assist the Transition to Mixed-Use. The following strategies will help to promote this character areas transition from Industrial to Mixed-Use: %  en Establish a relocation assistance program for industrial uses. Try to keep businesses in the area by identifying stable industrial receiving areas in Globeville, Elyria, or Swansea. %  en As industrial uses leave this area, do not allow new industrial uses to be established. Rezoning this area to mixed-use zone districts would achieve this strategy. E6. Create Neighborhood Gateways at Key Intersections on Washington. Further enhance the sense of place and make it easier for people to ow between the neighborhood, Washington Street, and the river. Gateways have unique treatments that send a clear message to travelers that they have entered a new, distinctive place. Strategies include: %  en Prominent entrances, monuments, building features, or special signage %  en Improve the auto-oriented nature of intersections with stronger urban design %  en Create clear views to a specic destination area %  en Design structures such that they create a unique identifying character There are several gateway opportunities located along Washington Street in Globeville. High priority intersections are identied below along with specic opportunities or treatments associated with each. %  en The 45th Avenue and Washington Street intersection is the primary gateway into Globevilles historic main street, 45th Avenue. Providing a gateway treatment that directs people to the neighborhood businesses on 45th Avenue is a primary economic development strategy. East of Washington Street, 45th Avenue is also a gateway to a South Platte River Trail access point. A gateway at this location should provide clear visibility and visual cues to announce ones arrival at both destinations. %  en The 47th Avenue and Washington Street intersection is a key gateway to Globevilles Residential Neighborhood Core as well as other destinations including churches and Argo Park. To the east, 47th Avenue provides one of Globevilles few street connections across the South Platte River to destinations in the Elyria neighborhood, including the National Western Center and the Valdez-Perry Library. A gateway at 47th Avenue and Washington Street should facilitate safe circulation and crossing for pedestrians, cyclists, and vehicles. WASHINGTON STREET CORRIDOR AND THE RIVERFRONT TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECTS IN THE WASHINGTON STREET CORRIDOR AND THE RIVERFRONT CHARACTER AREA: %  en Improve Washington Street %  en Enhance the Street Grid in the Riverfront Area %  en Connect to the National Western Center

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93 WASHINGTON STREET CORRIDOR AND THE RIVERFRONT %  en 49th Avenue and Washington Street, while not currently a gateway intersection, has the potential to become one if the recommended connection is made at 49th Avenue across the South Platte River to the National Western Center (NWC). This connection should become an additional front door to the NWC, and a special treatment at this intersection should be designed to announce ones arrival to a major destination street. %  en 51st Avenue and Washington Street is a gateway into Globeville from Adams County to the north. 51st Avenue provides access to the ASARCO employment area, as well as other key institutions including Laradon Hall and the Stapleton Recreation Center. To the east, 51st Avenue provides access to Northside Park and the South Platte River Trail. The intersection currently is o-set, which creates a navigation challenge for drivers in particular. Correcting the oset becomes particularly important if 51st Avenue is selected as a new multi-modal connection across the river and to the revitalized National Western Center. E7. Identify Appropriate Implementation Tools. Implementing this Plans ambitious vision for the riverfront will require a creative and strategic approach to funding infrastructure and attracting new investment. Because of this areas strong relationship to the NWC, it would be appropriate for the North Denver Cornerstone Collaborative to take on a coordinating role in implementing this Plans vision for Washington Street and the Riverfront. Depending on the specic approach that is selected, appropriate implementation tools may include developing a General Development Plan for the area, creating a general improvement district or other special districts, establishing an urban redevelopment area, or issuing bonds, among other strategies.

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94 WHAT IS IT?Concepts for transforming Washington Street are presented here. Each option has dierent tradeos that must be weighed against the benets. At this time, there is not a preferred or recommended cross-section for Washington Street. Further study is needed to identify the appropriate width of the future right of way, as well as the specic details of the cross-section for the street. Creating a strong sense of place on segments of Washington Street is a key component of creating an economically feasible mixed-use area. The streetscape must be designed to balance the needs of regional trac demand with the pedestrian realm. Reconstructed and beautied, a new Washington Street streetscape will attract new development interest to the corridor. To the extent possible, the design for Washington Street that is ultimately selected should strive to meet the following priorities that were identied by the community through the planning process: %  en Provide sucient travel lanes to accommodate vehicular and truck trac, recognizing Washington Streets importance in the regional transportation network. %  en Provide on-street parking. On-street parking is an important component of the street design if Washington Street is to become a successful mixeduse corridor as envisioned by this Plan. %  en Provide a high-quality pedestrian realm: GOAL STATEMENT: Make Washington Street an attractive corridor that creates a positive sense of place, attracts private reinvestment, and better accommodates all transportation modes. TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECT: Improve Washington Street Washington Street has the potential to become a pedestrian and bike-friendly destination.

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95 TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECT: Improve Washington Street % en Provide sidewalks on both sides of the street. Wide sidewalks and detached sidewalks are preferred to reinforce the vision of Washington Street as a walkable mixed-use corridor. % en To the extent practicable, limit curb cuts along the street to further enhance the pedestrian experience. %  en Provide a vegetative buer with street trees to beautify the street while also providing water quality and a comfortable, shaded environment for pedestrians. %  en Explore the opportunity for a north-south enhanced bicycle facility in the vicinity of Washington Street, either providing a link on Washington Street or on adjacent streets. %  en Minimize impacts to existing businesses. This Plan presents three scenarios for improving Washington Street. The streetscapes shown are intended to demonstrate how the communitys priorities for the street could be met within the middle and northern sections of the street, but are potential solutions only. Further study and analysis will be needed as a part of the implementation process.WASHINGTON STREET STRATEGIES:E8. Conduct a Follow-Up Study for Washington. Conduct a follow-up study in the short term with community input to identify a preferred street design for Washington Street that addresses the priorities described by this Plan. The study should consider the alternative scenarios presented here as well as other ideas that are generated as part of the process. If it is determined that a wider right of way is needed on Washington: %  en The study should provide an analysis of pros and cons to support decision-makers in implementing the appropriate strategy for the preferred design. %  en The study should identify design alternatives that minimize the impacts to adjacent properties, such as by acquiring dierent amounts of property from each side of the street. %  en The study should consider phasing the installation of infrastructure so as to minimize the use of temporary throwaway infrastructure.

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96 TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECT: Improve Washington StreetWASHINGTON STREET SUBAREAS:1 Southern Section This section of Washington Street was previously improved when I-70 within Globeville was reconstructed in the early 2000s. This is the widest section of Washington Street within Globeville, featuring a minimum of two travel lanes in each direction as well as turn lanes, I-70 on and oramps, and sidewalks. 2 Middle Section Washington Street narrows signicantly north of 47th Avenue. Typical right of way in this section is just 60 feet and features one travel lane in each direction with turning lanes at some intersections and on-street parking on some blocks. Attached sidewalks are present on some blocks and absent on others. Many buildings along this section of Washington Street have shallow setbacks and are located close to the street, especially on the west side of the street. 3 Northern Section Washington Street remains narrow north of 51st Avenue to the Adams County line. This section of Washington Street will need to transition to the future Adams County crosssection for the street, which at the time of this writing is anticipated to feature one travel lane in each direction with a center turn lane. 1 2 3

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97 The middle section of Washington Street is narrow, and the facilities that are provided vary from one block to the next. The block shown here between 50th and 51st Avenues features two travel lanes, a turn lane, and attached sidewalks. Many businesses are located close to the right of way. The Southern section of Washington Street was previously improved and is much wider than the more highly-constrained sections to the north. The Northern section of Washington Street is narrow and will need to be designed to eectively transition to the future Adams County cross-section. TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECT: Improve Washington StreetWASHINGTON STREET EXISTING CONDITIONS:

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98 TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECT: Improve Washington StreetNote: any implementation of the conditions shown will require further study to ensure feasibility.SCENARIO 1: IMPROVE WASHINGTON STREET WITHIN THE EXISTING 60 RIGHT OF WAY The alternative shown here features two travel lanes and on-street parking that is swapped for turn lanes at the corners, a standard-width sidewalk, and a vegetative buer that addresses water quality needs. If properly designed and planted, the vegetative buer would be transformative in beautifying the corridor, creating a sense of place, and ultimately attracting private reinvestment to the area. Priorities Met by this Scenario: %  en Minimal impact to adjacent property owners %  en On-street parking %  en Vegetative buer with stormwater treatment %  en Improved pedestrian realm Trade-Os Associated with this Scenario: %  en Working within the existing right of way limits the amount of property that would need to be obtained from adjacent landowners, but it also means that only a limited number of facilities will t within the right of way. % en No dedicated bicycle facilities % en No additional travel lanes % en Relatively narrow sidewalks and vegetative buer

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99 Note: any implementation of the conditions shown will require further study to ensure feasibility. SCENARIO 2: EXPAND THE RIGHT OF WAY TO ACCOMMODATE MORE OF THE COMMUNITYS PRIORITIES Accommodating more of the communitys priorities within the street would likely require expanding the right of way. This would potentially impact several existing buildings. The cross section shown here shows how the additional right of way could be used to provide additional travel lanes, but it must be noted that the additional space could instead be used to meet other community priorities, such as dedicated bicycle facilities or a wider pedestrian zone. Priorities Met by this Scenario: %  en Additional travel lanes provide more capacity %  en On-street parking %  en Vegetative buer with stormwater treatment %  en Improved pedestrian realm Trade-Os Associated with this Scenario: %  en Increasing the right of way allows for four travel lanes, but requires additional land that may directly impact some of the buildings along the corridor. %  en If the right of way is expanded as shown to accommodate additional travel lanes, not all of the communitys identied priorities will t within the street. % en No dedicated bicycle facilities % en Relatively narrow sidewalks and vegetative buer TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECT: Improve Washington Street

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100 Note: any implementation of the conditions shown will require further study to ensure feasibility. SCENARIO 3: FURTHER EXPAND THE RIGHT OF WAY TO ACCOMMODATE ALL OF THE COMMUNITYS PRIORITIES Accommodating all of the communitys priorities within the street would require further expanding the right of way. Doing so would increase the impacts to adjacent property owners along the corridor, but would allow the street to have it all. Because of Washington Streets importance in the regional transportation network, as well as its status as a major trucking route, if bicycle facilities are provided on Washington Street instead of on a parallel street, additional measures may be necessary to ensure a comfortable bicycling experience. A buered bike lane is shown in response to this condition. Priorities Met by this Scenario: %  en Protected bike lanes %  en Additional travel lanes provide more capacity %  en On-street parking %  en Wide vegetative buer with stormwater treatment %  en Wide sidewalks Trade-Os Associated with this Scenario: %  en Greater impacts to adjacent property owners %  en Long crossing distances for pedestrians TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECT: Improve Washington Street

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101 HOW DOES IT ADDRESS UNIQUE?Transforming Washington Street into an attractive street will greatly improve perceptions of both the street itself and the neighborhood. These improvements represent a place-making opportunity that could help transform the riverfront area.HOW DOES IT ADDRESS STRONG?Its unlikely that substantial amounts of new commercial, residential, and mixed-use development will be attracted to this corridor and Globevilles riverfront if Washington Street is not improved. This directly impacts accessibility to housing, jobs, and services that are envisioned to be created as a result of this new investment.HOW DOES IT ADDRESS CONNECTED?Apart from the interstates, Washington Street is the most prominent street in Globeville. Improving the infrastructure on Washington Street consistent with the priorities outlined here will make it a multi-modal street that accommodates pedestrians and cyclists as well as vehicles, greatly enhancing its usability.HOW DOES IT ADDRESS HEALTHY?Better accommodating pedestrians and cyclists on Washington Street improves safety and creates more opportunities for active living within the neighborhood. Treating road runo through green street strategies improves the health of the river, reduces the urban heat island eect, and improves air quality. TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECT: Improve Washington Street

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102 The Globeville riverfront has the potential to be transformed into a vibrant mixed-use area. TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECT: Enhance the Street Grid in the Riverfront Area GOAL STATEMENT: Assist in creating a mixeduse destination area along Globevilles riverfront by introducing a street grid between Washington Street and the South Platte River. WHAT IS IT?The Connected chapter recommends that a street grid be introduced between Washington Street and the South Platte River. The purpose of this is to allow people to ow through the area by introducing small, walkable, and developable blocks. Doing so will help to catalyze private reinvestment and assist in transforming Globevilles riverfront into a destination area.ENHANCE THE STREET GRID STRATEGIES:E9. Conduct an Enhanced Connectivity and Urban Design Study for the Area between Washington Street and the South Platte River. Overall urban design of the riverfront area, including the street network, is critical to the success of its redevelopment. A study should be conducted during the design phases of the National Western Center to strategically align the future opportunities on both sides of the South Platte River. With respect to the strategy of creating a street grid, the study should consider: %  en Locations and strategies for introducing one or more new north-south streets in this area. %  en Opportunities for creating smaller redevelopable blocks out of the industrial superblocks. %  en Ways to facilitate the movement of people within and along the riverfront area. %  en Strategies for creating an active edge along the river.

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103 Little Raven Street is an example of a well-designed street that is integrated with a park. 5th Avenue in New York City is an example of an edge treatment that responds to the adjacent greenspace. TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECT: Enhance the Street Grid in the Riverfront Area Characteristics to Promote if a New Road is Introduced Along the River: %  en Design the road to provide a special and unique experience that is complementary to any adjacent park or green spaces, such as a parkway. %  en Strive for a slow and meandering parkway with a natural alignment that provides a variety of user experiences and views. %  en The road and its edge treatment should provide an extension and interface with adjacent development on one side. A pedestrian edge treatment that eectively transitions to adjacent green space and the river on the other side should be provided.

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104 TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECT: Enhance the Street Grid in the Riverfront Area Private Industrial Area River and BankThe area between Washington Street and the river is made up of large blocks that lack basic pedestrian infrastructure, making it dicult for people to connect to the river from elsewhere in the neighborhood. The industrial uses in this area discourage people from spending time here, despite its adjacency to the river. Large trucks frequent the roads between Washington Street and the river, contributing to an environment unfriendly to pedestrians, especially since there are no sidewalks to clearly delineate the pedestrian realm. Industrial development on private land directly abuts the South Platte River Trail and associated green space. If connectivity and access issues are left unaddressed, the existing condition presents little opportunity for the riverfront revitalization that is envisioned by this Plan. Existing roads, such as 50th and 51st Avenues, bring users to the edge of the river, but nowhere else. They end in cul-de-sacs, failing to connect across the river or to nearby streets. In addition to needing to be improved so that they meet basic infrastructure needs, including sidewalks, curbs, gutters and drainage, these isolated street segments need to be connected together in order to make the area supportive of mixed-use redevelopment.The street grid is incomplete along the riverfront. A lack of north-south connectivity precludes the movement of people through the area, except for on Washington Street or the South Platte River Trail. In the existing condition, industrial development directly abuts the South Platte River Trail.EXISTING CONDITIONS

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105 TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECT: Enhance the Street Grid in the Riverfront AreaSCENARIO 1 This scenario extends the existing street network and lls in missing segments to create smaller, walkable, and pedestrian-scale blocks that are conducive for mixed-use redevelopment. These new connections establish the street network as a public space and encourage people to walk, bike, or drive to and across the river. By creating a new river-fronting street based on the Emerson Street alignment and extending a new north-south street on the Clarkson Street alignment, the resulting block pattern lends itself to development that can front both the river and Washington Street, greatly contributing to the success of this new mixed-use district. Benets Associated with this scenario: %  en A high number of new street connections creates a negrained block pattern that maximizes redevelopment potential. %  en The presence of two new north-south streets between Washington Street and the river allows new development to front both Washington Street and the river. %  en Strong and direct street connections to Northside Park %  en Increased perception of safety along the river associated with a high level of activity and increased eyes on the street and greenway. Trade-Os Associated with this scenario: %  en Locating a new street along the river limits the amount of new green space that can be created along the river bank. %  en Smaller blocks may not fully meet the needs of uses with very large building footprints and can make it more challenging to accommodate o-street parking.Note: any implementation of the conditions shown will require further study to ensure feasibility. Public Right of Way River and Bank Private Development The enhanced street grid presented in this scenario supports redevelopment by greatly improving the ow of people through the riverfront area. Introducing a street along the river creates a public edge between the river and private development. It also creates the strongest opportunity for new redevelopment to directly face the river.

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106 TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECT: Enhance the Street Grid in the Riverfront Area This scenario pulls the street further away from the river, resulting in a greater buer between new development and the river corridor. It allows for the creation of new green space along the river, with the greatest potential to open up the river and create community and recreation spaces between the river and the mixed-use redevelopment area. Bringing the road to the west reduces the redevelopment area and results in only one new north-south connection between Washington Street and the river. To boost riverfront activity and ensure the success of new green spaces along the river, development in this scenario should face both Washington Street and the river. Benets Associated with this scenario: %  en Removal of the river-fronting road shown in Scenario 1 creates the opportunity for larger and enhanced green, public space along the river that can be integrated with the existing South Platte River Trail %  en Additional green space can be designed to help meet water quality objectives. Trade-Os Associated with this Scenario: %  en Large blocks may only be attractive to large uses. %  en Introducing only one new north-south street makes it more dicult to ensure that both Washington Street and the river are fronted by active uses. %  en Providing signicant amounts of new public green space along the river reduces the amount of developable land and likely increases the cost of implementation.Note: any implementation of the conditions shown will require further study to ensure feasibility.SCENARIO 2 Private Development River and Bank Buer between river and road Public Right of Way The street grid presented in this scenario is less robust than the grid in scenario 1, but still accomplishes similar mobility goals. Pulling back the road from the river introduces more opportunity to create additional public green space along the river. The primary benet of this scenario is that it creates the opportunity for wider green space along the river.

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107 TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECT: Enhance the Street Grid in the Riverfront AreaHOW DOES IT ADDRESS UNIQUE?The opportunity to transform Globevilles riverfront into a unique destination area hinges upon the concept of connecting the streets together. Without these connections, the transformation will not happen as it is envisioned in this Plan. HOW DOES IT ADDRESS STRONG?Its unlikely that substantial amounts of new commercial, residential, and mixed-use development will be attracted to Globevilles riverfront if the areas disconnected street grid is not addressed. This directly impacts accessibility to housing, jobs, and services that are envisioned to be created as a result of transforming the riverfront area.HOW DOES IT ADDRESS CONNECTED?Connecting the streets in this area to create a grid will allow people to ow north and south through the area, something not possible today except on Washington Street or the South Platte River Trail.HOW DOES IT ADDRESS HEALTHY?Enhancing the street grid in this area will greatly increase public access to the South Platte River and Trail, allowing for increased opportunities for active living. Introducing mixed-use development in this area will also allow more people to access goods and services locally within the neighborhood.

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108 WHAT IS IT? Connecting to the National Western Center (NWC) is an integral component of the revitalization strategy for Globevilles riverfront and Washington Street corridor. New connections will greatly shorten travel distance to Globeville, allowing the area to attract spino development associated with the NWC to Washington Street and the Globeville riverfront, including retail, hotels, or other services. The NWC site is highly constrained, so attracting NWC facilities on the Globeville side of the river is a possibility. Without new connections, substantial reinvestment west of the river related to the NWC is not likely. Two new multi-modal connections across the river are recommended: one at 49th Avenue and the other at 51st Avenue. Other options for the connections include 48th and 50th Avenues, but these are less desirable due to physical constraints. A connection at 49th Avenue is central to the riverfront area in Globeville and directly fronts some of the more underdeveloped land in the area. The 51st Avenue connection creates the opportunity to draw users to the regional open space amenity that is envisioned in the Northside Park area. Additionally, 51st Avenue connects across Washington Street and into Globeville to destinations including the anticipated ASARCO employment area. When considered alongside the existing connection at 47th Avenue, establishing new connections at 49th and 51st Avenues results in approximately even spacing along the riverfront in Globeville. This is good for overall connectivity as well as for maximizing opportunities for economic redevelopment on the Globeville side of the river. The connections themselves would likely be a challenge to design and construct as they need to cross multiple barriers, including the South Platte GOAL STATEMENT: Capitalize on economic development opportunities to enhance the waterfront and the Washington Street corridor by connecting over the South Platte River to a revitalized National Western Center.A rendering of the potential view at the corner of Washington Street and 49th Avenue, looking east towards a new bridge to the NWC. TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECT: Connect to National Western Center HIA STRATEGIES RELATED TO THIS TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECT: D12. Improve Street Connectivity. Implement new street connections as identied in this Plan. D15. Connect to the National Western Center. Improve access and connectivity to and through residential neighborhoods and the redeveloped National Western Center.

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109 River, the Metro wastewater pipe, and freight rail lines, as well as avoiding existing or planned structures. These constraints will inuence where the connections can be located and landed, and the precise details are not known at this time. In addition to these constraints, the following objectives should also be considered so as to maximize the benets of the project. %  en Connect to and through the NWC, so that the connection is useful to all users. %  en Reduce the travel distance between Globeville and the NWC. %  en Attract NWC facilities or development related to the NWC to the Globeville side of the river. %  en Create access for Globeville residents and employees to the NWC commuter rail station. %  en Design the connection to have the character of a local street that accommodates vehicles, pedestrians, and bicyclists. %  en Provide access for NWC patrons to amenities in Globeville, including the riverfront destination area, Northside Park, the Platte River trail, and the Washington Street mixed-use corridor. %  en Help improve the overall lack of east-west connectivity in Globeville and Elyria. %  en Where the connections land will become activity nodes for the riverfront area and Washington Street. Spacing the connections will help to spread activity throughout the riverfront area and along Washington Street. %  en Maximize eciencies when providing infrastructure for stormwater and green street design to promote beautication and water quality. %  en Provide a decorative arch or other gateway treatment along these new routes to announce ones arrival to the National Western Center.HOW DOES IT ADDRESS UNIQUE?The opportunity to transform Globevilles riverfront into a unique destination area hinges upon creating new connections across the river to the National Western Center. Without these connections, the transformation will not happen as it is envisioned in this Plan. HOW DOES IT ADDRESS STRONG?By aiding in the transformation of the riverfront area, connecting to the National Western Center benets each of the components of a Strong community by improving land use, introducing new users, increasing access to parks, creating jobs and housing via new mixed-use development, and improving access to services and amenities.HOW DOES IT ADDRESS CONNECTED?Providing new connections across the river will help solve the east-west connectivity issue in Globeville and Elyria. It also provides a more direct connection to the NWC commuter rail station for Globeville residents and employees.HOW DOES IT ADDRESS HEALTHY?Because the new connections are envisioned as multi-modal, they will provide increased opportunities for pedestrians and cyclists to access the river and amenities to the east, which may include neighborhood goods and services, jobs, and education. TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECT: Connect to National Western Center

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110 41st and Fox Station Area Plan Plan Concept 24 Along 41st Avenue, a pedestrian plaza will connect the station platform to Fox Street and Elati Street to the east. This pedestrian plaza should include decorative pavers or pavement, benches, trees and planters, pedestrian-scale lighting, outdoor seating, and room for street carts and vendors. 41st and Fox Station Area VISION : The 41st and Fox Station will develop over the coming decades into the focal point of a diverse, transit supportive and environmentally sustainable urban center. Many new residents and businesses will be drawn to the convenient location close to Downtown near some of Denvers most vibrant urban neighborhoods. 41st and Fox Station Area Plan, 2009KEY ISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIES: The 41st and Fox Station Area completed a planning process in 2009 with the adoption of the 41st and Fox Station Area Plan. For the portions of the station area within Globeville, the 2009 adopted Plan envisioned a Pedestrian Shopping District concept with building heights up to 8 stories, Urban Residential areas with varying heights, and Mixed-Use Oce/Residential areas with building heights up to 20 stories. The Globeville Neighborhood Plan does not update the recommendations of the 41st and Fox Station Area Plan. The important additional factor in ensuring a successful station area, beyond what is already contained in the 41st and Fox Station Area Plan, is improving connectivity from the Globeville Residential Neighborhood Core to this area.

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111 41ST AND FOX STATION AREA STRATEGIES UNIQUE TO THE 41ST AND FOX STATION AREA:E10. Improve the 44th Avenue Bridge over I-25. This facility features two lanes of trac with a Jersey barrier on the south side of the bridge separating pedestrians from the rest of the road. Bike lanes were recently introduced on the bridge that connect to shared parking and bike lanes on 45th Avenue. Enhanced design and street lighting on the bridge and completion of the sidewalk network leading to the station at 41st and Fox will better-connect Globevilles Residential Neighborhood Core to the station. E11. Formalize the Social Path. East of I-25, where the 44th Avenue bridge lands and turns to descend in elevation, pedestrians have created a direct path down the hill to the corner of 44th Avenue and Broadway. These types of routes are sometimes referred to as social paths or desire lines because they indicate where people want to walk. Building stairs down the hill will connect the bridge to the crosswalk at 44th Avenue and Broadway. If possible, provide a wheel well adjacent to the stairs to allow people to easily push a bicycle up the hill. Because of the steep grades, ADA accessibility would likely need to continue to be provided by the existing sidewalk on 44th Avenue as it descends the hill to merge with 45th Avenue. Bike lanes were recently introduced on the 44th Avenue bridge over I-25. Additional improvements to the 44th Avenue Bridge can better connect Globeville residents to the future 41st and Fox commuter rail station. Pedestrians have created a social path from the intersection of 44th Avenue and Broadway to avoid walking down to 45th Avenue to access the bridge over the interstate. The Millennium Bridge in the Central Platte Valley features a wheel well for cyclist ease. A similar approach could be used to formalize the social path at the corner of 44th Avenue and Broadway.

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112 Industrial Edges VISION : Maintain industrial and employment areas within Globeville while enhancing compatibility with nearby nonindustrial uses.KEY ISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIESNorthwest and Northeast Corners. The industrial areas in the vicinity of 48th Avenue and Fox Street and 54th Avenue and Franklin Street are home to a variety of large-scale, stable, heavy industrial uses. These industrial centers are well-separated from residential neighborhoods, and there is an opportunity for theses areas to remain industrial. Major industrial reinvestment along Fox Street is currently underway along with the ongoing construction of RTDs commuter rail maintenance facility. North Acoma Street and North Broadway. This light industrial area is located adjacent to I-25 along Acoma Street and Broadway and shares its eastern edge with single family uses. There are no sound walls or other buers between this area and I-25, and as such, the light industrial uses along the western edge have direct visibility from I-25 and act as a de facto buer from the interstate for the residential neighborhood to the east. Some of the blocks within this area have Light Industrial zoning, while others have Industrial Mixed Use zoning. The ASARCO Site. This site is envisioned by this Plan to transition to a future employment center. Development plans consistent with this vision are already underway (see the ASARCO transformative project). South Globeville Industrial Areas. A large industrial area is located along the southern edge of Globeville, generally along the South Platte River from Park Avenue to Washington Street. This is a diverse area where conditions and opportunities vary signicantly from one property to the next.

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113 INDUSTRIAL EDGES

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114 STRATEGIES UNIQUE TO INDUSTRIAL EDGES:E12. Pursue a Detailed Land Use Strategy for Industrial Edges. Pursue a variety of strategies for properties located in the Industrial Edges Character Area, as detailed below: %  en E12A. Preserve Stable Industrial in the Northwest and Northeast Corners. This Plans Concept Land Use and Areas of Change Map identies the areas in the northwest and northeast corners of the neighborhood as stable industrial. %  en E12B: Preserve Jobs while Enhancing Compatibility Along the North Acoma Street and North Broadway Edge. This Plans Concept Land Use and Areas of Change Map recommends a future land use designation of Industrial Mixed Use for the entire area. The intent of this recommendation is to preserve the existing job base while also ensuring that future uses are more compatible with the adjacent residential neighborhood. %  en E12C. Redevelop the ASARCO Site. Create a new employment center INDUSTRIAL EDGES

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115 north of 51st Avenue and Washington Street at the former ASARCO site (see transformative project for more details). %  en E12D. Introduce a Land Use Buer Along the South Neighborhood Edge. This light industrial area is located along Globeville Road and 44th Avenue and shares an edge with the residential neighborhood. To increase compatibility, an Industrial Mixed Use designation is recommended for the light industrial parcels along this shared edge. The purpose of this change is to create a buer between the neighborhood and other, more intensive industrial uses in the immediate vicinity (see #1 on map at right). %  en E12E. Promote Mixed-Use Redevelopment Along the River Near Taxi. Northeast of the RTD bus maintenance facility on Ringsby Court is a former industrial area that in recent years has transformed into a successful mixed-use development called Taxi. A land use designation of Mixed Use has been mapped along Ringsby Court from Taxi up to Washington Street to reect the opportunity to continue this successful development model along the riverfront (see #2 on map at right). %  en E12F. Transition to Industrial Mixed Use in the 31st Avenue and Ringsby Court Area. RTDs bus maintenance facility is located in this area, alongside a few smaller industrial users (see #3 on map at right). Industrial Mixed Use is recommended in this area to acknowledge the mixed-use character that is emerging along this portion of the South Platte River, both next door at Taxi and nearby along Brighton Boulevard and in the Denargo Market area. %  en E12G. Two Types of Mixed Use at Park Ave & Globeville Road. Although most of this area is zoned for general industry, it no longer has industrial character as the Railyard Marketplace and other commercial uses have been developed near the intersection of Park Avenue and Globeville Road. Visibility from Park Avenue and the I-25 interchange make this area more desirable for commercial uses than industrial uses. This Plans Concept Land Use and Areas of Change Map recommends Mixed Use for the properties east of Park Avenue, and Industrial Mixed Use west of Park Avenue to reect this change in land use and overall character (see #4 on map at right). %  en E12H. Maintain Stable Industry Along Globeville Road. The BNSF rail yard and other uses along Globeville Road are recommended to remain industrial (see #5 on map at right). HIA STRATEGIES RELATED TO THE INDUSTRIAL EDGES: D1. Improve Industrial/Residential Compatibility. Minimize negative environmental impacts on residential neighborhoods from industrial uses through methods such as land use designation, zoning, buering, or other means. INDUSTRIAL EDGES

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116 WHAT IS IT?The ASARCO site is located at the northern edge of Globeville, near the corner of 51st Avenue and Washington Street. Although the site is nearly 80 acres in size, only about 20 percent of it is located in Globeville; the remainder is located in Adams County. The site was the original home of the Globe Smelter, with which the neighborhood of Globeville shares a name. The Globe Smelter rened precious metals from its founding in 1886 and continued various other metallurgical and manufacturing processes under ASARCO until the plant was closed in 2006. For the past several years, the site has been undergoing environmental remediation to make it reusable for non-residential uses. An employment center is now envisioned for the site, and land may be made available for sale and development as early as 2015. GOAL STATEMENT: Create a major employment center featuring light industrial, light manufacturing, high-tech, and other labor-intensive uses that are compliant with the reuse limitations associated with the environmental cleanup agreement for the site. TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECT: Redevelop the ASARCO Site

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117 HOW DOES IT ADDRESS UNIQUE?The Globe Smelter was an important part of the history of the neighborhood. The redevelopment of the former smelter site is an opportunity to reconnect the neighborhood to the site, which has sat vacant for almost 10 years.HOW DOES IT ADDRESS STRONG?Developing an employment center on the site is anticipated to be a major job generator for the neighborhood.HOW DOES IT ADDRESS CONNECTED?The development concept for the site will incorporate a variety of internal connections. Redevelopment of the site will likely also trigger improvements for Washington Street and 51st Avenue, which will feature entrances to the site.HOW DOES IT ADDRESS HEALTHY?The environmental remediation of the ASARCO site will satisfy the terms of the cleanup agreement and return the property to active use, providing jobs and local goods and services for residents. THE HISTORY OF ASARCO: 1886 smelting began 1901 ASARCO purchased the smelter, converted it to lead-only 1919 transitioned from lead to arsenic trioxide (insecticides, medicines, glass) 1926 cadmium production (protective coatings for iron and steel) December 1983 Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment sued ASARCO for damages to natural resources using EPAs Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA, commonly known as Superfund). 1987 CDPHE and ASARCO entered into an agreementto conduct joint studies to determine the extent and nature of the site-related contamination. May 1993 EPA proposed the site for its National Priorities List November 2006 Globe Plant closed. 2014 Environmental remediation completed. 2015Letter of No Further Action (NFA) anticipated TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECT: Redevelop the ASARCO SiteSources: http://www2.epa.gov/region8/asarco-inc-globeplant); http://www.colorado.gov/cs/Satellite/CDPHE-HM/ CBON/1251615987556

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118 Moving Forward REALIZING THE VISION TYPES OF IMPLEMENTATION ACTIVITIES CHAMPIONS AND ADVOCATES PUBLIC FUNDING SOURCES AND STRATEGIES PARTNERSHIP TOOLS

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119 REALIZING THE VISIONThis Plan sets forth a vision for the future of the Globeville neighborhood and contains numerous recommendations aimed at achieving that vision. Plan implementation takes place over many years and is the result of large and small actions by the public sector and the private sector, sometimes in partnership. Its understood that the future will bring unforeseen opportunities and challenges. The recommendations in this Plan are intended to provide direction for future actions en route to achieving the Plans vision. TYPES OF IMPLEMENTATION ACTIVITIESBlueprint Denver identies three types of implementation activities: regulatory/policy, public investment, and partnerships. These activities focus on public sector actions, many of which create a positive environment that enables actions by other groups, such as property owners, developers, neighborhood organizations, districts, or homeowners. While public actions can help set the stage, in most cases, it is private actions (such as constructing new buildings and houses, opening new businesses, and attracting new residents) that are the most critical elements to achieving a plans vision. Regulatory and Policy Strategies. Regulatory and policy strategies change City codes or regulations to aect desired outcomes. Typical examples include Denver Zoning Code text and map amendments, Public Works requirements for infrastructure improvements associated with development projects, and Parks and Recreation requirements regarding open space and plantings. %  en Regulatory and Policy Implementation Priorities for Globeville: % en Implement recommendations aimed at improving residential and industrial compatibility. % en Ensure that zoning regulations align with the Plan vision, including: en Implementing recommendations to allow Accessory Dwelling Units in Single Family residential areas. en Creating a mixed-use destination area on Washington Street and eastward to the South Platte Riverfront. Public Investment Strategies. Public investment strategies are those involving public funding of public infrastructure. Examples include street reconstruction, bike lane installation, new transit lines, park improvements, or new or expanded recreation centers. The City takes the lead in designing, constructing, and funding these projects and may use a variety of public funding sources such as the annual Capital Improvements Program, bond funds, or state or federal grant programs. In some cases, this Plan identies public transportation projects as studies because the impacts and consequences of a particular improvement on the transportation system are so complex that the broader system must be examined to determine the feasible options to meet the intent. Extensive study may also be needed to meet eligibility criteria to apply for federal funding. %  en Public Investment Implementation Priorities for Globeville: % en Conduct a follow-up study for Washington Street to identify a preferred and implementable street design. % en Pursue implementation of the two recommended connections across the South MOVING FORWARD

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120 Platte River to the National Western Center. % en Address trac operations and roadway maintenance issues throughout the neighborhood. Partnership Strategies. Partnership strategies represent the most diverse category of implementation activities. Public-private partnership (PPP or P3) activity has expanded greatly in recent years and has gone well beyond its roots of public subsidies of private development projects. Increasingly, public-private partnerships are being used to fund infrastructure projects. Denver Union Station and RTDs East and Gold commuter rail lines are among the largest P3 projects in the country. Another local example is the reconstruction of 14th Street in Downtown Denver using a combination of City bond funds and a property-owner approved General Improvement District. %  en Partnership Implementation Priorities for Globeville: % en Increase the neighborhoods access to goods and services. % en Make use of NDCC as a partnership-building entity to implement the Plan vision for Washington Street and the Riverfront.CHAMPIONS AND ADVOCATES Once a plan is adopted as a supplement to the Comprehensive Plan, the City has the necessary direction to begin implementing the plan. Given the number of adopted plans, competing interests in the city, and the budget limitations at all levels of government, little plan implementation is undertaken without champions for certain actions and advocates for the neighborhood. Typically, Registered Neighborhood Organizations work with the Mayor and their City Council representatives to promote certain actions and outcomes. Membership organizations such as merchant associations, business partnerships, and non-prots do the same for business areas. PUBLIC FUNDING SOURCES AND STRATEGIESFunding sources available to public and private entities are continually evolving based on economic, political, legal, and neighborhood objectives. Though the names and purposes of specic funding sources can change over time, the following list represents potential funding opportunities: %  en Tax Base Support. Tax base supported sources are characterized by the involvement of the local sales and property taxing authorities. en Annual Budget. The most common tax base support is through the Citys annual budget, especially the annual Capital Improvements Program (CIP). Available CIP funds are typically limited to a few million dollars a year.en Bonds. Periodically, the City requests that its voters to approve a tax increase to pay for specic public improvements. For instance, the citizens of Denver voted in 2007 to raise their property taxes in a specic amount to support the issuance of over $500 million Better Denver Bonds whose proceeds subsequently funded hundreds of specic public improvement projects. Future bond issuances represent an opportunity to secure funding for some Globeville Neighborhood Plan recommendations. en Tax Increment Finance (TIF). TIF is another means of tax-base support most typically associated with an Urban Renewal Area. Once created by the City Council and Denver Urban Renewal Authority (DURA), property and sales MOVING FORWARD

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121 tax over and above the base year are paid to DURA to fund eligible public improvements or nancing gaps for private development. To qualify for tax increment nancing through urban renewal, an area must rst meet certain criteria to establish the presence of blight, as dened in state statute. %  en Grants. Grants come from public agencies that are interested in encouraging a specic outcome, and these grants typically include specic conditions and requirements as to how the funds may be deployed. For instance, a state or federal transportation grant will need to be used for street, mass transit, or regional mobility studies or projects. The Oce of Economic Development receives federal funds to support certain types of housing projects. Additionally, foundations provide grants for projects aligned with the organizations goals, such as green spaces, creative enterprises, or social services. %  en Special Districts. The City Charter and Colorado State Statutes enable various types of districts to be created. Examples of special districts include business improvement districts, general improvement districts, metropolitan districts, and local improvement or maintenance districts. These districts are often created by a localized group of citizens who want to achieve specic outcomes in their locality and are willing to pool their economic resources in order to implement identied projects. For example, if a majority of business owners desire to improve the streetscape of the street in which they operate, the businesses could organize a business improvement district which would assess the participants an amount of money sucient to pay for the project. Special districts are a useful tool when a local population both desires and is willing to pay for an enhanced level of public improvement. District revenues can be used to pay for improvements on a pay-asyou-go basis, for ongoing operations and maintenance, or to support repayment of bonds. In order to be established, special districts typically require the approval of Denver City Council and a vote of the electorate within the area. PARTNERSHIP TOOLS In addition to public funding sources, a variety of public-private partnerships or private organizations will be instrumental in Plan implementation. As states and communities reduce the use of public funds for improvements, some of these other organizational types will come into broader, more innovative use. Some examples of these organizations include: community development corporations, membership organizations, non-prots or foundations, and transportation management organizations. Implementation of the Globeville Neighborhood Plan will require the coordinated involvement of many dierent organizations in pursuing a variety of activities with existing and new funding sources. %  en North Denver Cornerstone Collaborative (NDCC). Mayor Hancock created the NDCC in 2013 in order to ensure alignment and eective coordination of the many inter-related plans and projects that are taking place in Globeville, Elyria, and Swansea. Part of this eort includes strategic thinking on the implementation and funding of projects, which presents the Globeville community with a unique partnership opportunity to implement elements of this plan. MOVING FORWARD


TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECT: Redevelop the ASARCO Site
GOAL STATEMENT:
Create a major
employment center
featuring light industrial,
light manufacturing,
high-tech, and other
labor-intensive uses that
are compliant with the re-
use limitations associated
with the environmental
cleanup agreement for
the site.
WHAT IS IT?
The ASARCO site is located at the northern edge of Globeville, near the
corner of 51st Avenue and Washington Street. Although the site is nearly
80 acres in size, only about 20 percent of it is located in Globeville; the
remainder is located in Adams County. The site was the original home of the
Globe Smelter, with which the neighborhood of Globeville shares a name.
The Globe Smelter refined precious metals from its founding in 1886 and
continued various other metallurgical and manufacturing processes under
ASARCO until the plant was closed in 2006.
For the past several years, the site has been undergoing environmental
remediation to make it reusable for non-residential uses. An employment
center is now envisioned for the site, and land may be made available for sale
and development as early as 2015.
116 Globeville Neighborhood Plan | CHARACTER AREAS & TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECTS


TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECT: Redevelop the ASARCO Site
THE HISTORY OF ASARCO:
1886 smelting began
1901 ASARCO purchased the smelter, converted it to
lead-only
1919 transitioned from lead to arsenic trioxide
(insecticides, medicines, glass)
1926-cadmium production (protective coatings for
iron and steel)
December 1983 "Colorado Department of Public
Health and Environment sued ASARCO for damages
to natural resources using EPA's Comprehensive
Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability
Act (CERCLA, commonly known as Superfund)."
1987 -"CDPHE and ASARCO entered into an
agreement... to conduct joint studies to determine the
extent and nature of the site-related contamination."
May 1993 -"EPA proposed the site for its National
Priorities List"
November 2006 Globe Plant closed.
2014 Environmental remediation completed.
2015- Letter of No Further Action (NFA) anticipated
Sources: http://www2.epa.gov/region8/asarco-inc-globe-
plant); http://www.colorado.gov/cs/Satellite/CDPHE-HM/
CBON/1251615987556
HOW DOES IT ADDRESS UNIQUE?
The Globe Smelter was an important part of the history of the neighborhood. The redevelopment of the former
smelter site is an opportunity to reconnect the neighborhood to the site, which has sat vacant for almost 10 years.
HOW DOES IT ADDRESS STRONG?
Developing an employment center on the site is anticipated to be a major job generator for the neighborhood.
HOW DOES IT ADDRESS CONNECTED?
The development concept for the site will incorporate a variety of internal connections. Redevelopment of the site
will likely also trigger improvements for Washington Street and 51st Avenue, which will feature entrances to the site.
HOW DOES IT ADDRESS HEALTHY?
The environmental remediation of the ASARCO site will satisfy the terms of the cleanup agreement and return the
property to active use, providing jobs and local goods and services for residents.
CHARACTER AREAS & TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECTS | Globeville Neighborhood Plan 117


REALIZING THE VISION
TYPES OF IMPLEMENTATION ACTIVITIES
CHAMPIONS AND ADVOCATES
PUBLIC FUNDING SOURCES AND STRATEGIES
PARTNERSHIP TOOLS
118 Globeville Neighborhood Plan | MOVING FORWARD


MOVING FORWARD
REALIZING THE VISION
This Plan sets forth a vision for the future of the Globeville neighborhood and contains
numerous recommendations aimed at achieving that vision. Plan implementation takes
place over many years and is the result of large and small actions by the public sector
and the private sector, sometimes in partnership. It's understood that the future will
bring unforeseen opportunities and challenges. The recommendations in this Plan are
intended to provide direction for future actions en route to achieving the Plan's vision.
TYPES OF IMPLEMENTATION ACTIVITIES
Blueprint Denver identifies three types of implementation activities: regulatory/policy,
public investment, and partnerships. These activities focus on public sector actions,
many of which create a positive environment that enables actions by other groups, such
as property owners, developers, neighborhood organizations, districts, or homeowners.
While public actions can help set the stage, in most cases, it is private actions (such as
constructing new buildings and houses, opening new businesses, and attracting new
residents) that are the most critical elements to achieving a plan's vision.
Regulatory and Policy Strategies. Regulatory and policy strategies change City codes
or regulations to affect desired outcomes. Typical examples include Denver Zoning Code
text and map amendments, Public Works requirements for infrastructure improvements
associated with development projects, and Parks and Recreation requirements regarding
open space and plantings.
Regulatory and Policy Implementation Priorities for Globeville:
Implement recommendations aimed at improving residential and industrial
compatibility.
Ensure that zoning regulations align with the Plan vision, including:
Implementing recommendations to allow Accessory Dwelling Units in
Single Family residential areas.
Creating a mixed-use destination area on Washington Street and eastward
to the South Platte Riverfront.
Public Investment Strategies. Public investment strategies are those involving
public funding of public infrastructure. Examples include street reconstruction, bike
lane installation, new transit lines, park improvements, or new or expanded recreation
centers. The City takes the lead in designing, constructing, and funding these
projects and may use a variety of public funding sources such as the annual Capital
Improvements Program, bond funds, or state or federal grant programs.
In some cases, this Plan identifies public transportation projects as studies because the
impacts and consequences of a particular improvement on the transportation system
are so complex that the broader system must be examined to determine the feasible
options to meet the intent. Extensive study may also be needed to meet eligibility
criteria to apply for federal funding.
Public Investment Implementation Priorities for Globeville:
Conduct a follow-up study for Washington Street to identify a preferred and
implementable street design.
Pursue implementation of the two recommended connections across the South
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Platte River to the National Western Center.
Address traffic operations and roadway maintenance issues throughout the
neighborhood.
Partnership Strategies. Partnership strategies represent the most diverse category of
implementation activities. Public-private partnership (PPP or P3) activity has expanded
greatly in recent years and has gone well beyond its roots of public subsidies of private
development projects. Increasingly, public-private partnerships are being used to fund
infrastructure projects. Denver Union Station and RTD's East and Gold commuter rail
lines are among the largest P3 projects in the country. Another local example is the
reconstruction of 14th Street in Downtown Denver using a combination of City bond
funds and a property-owner approved General Improvement District.
Partnership Implementation Priorities for Globeville:
Increase the neighborhood's access to goods and services.
Make use of NDCC as a partnership-building entity to implement the Plan vision
for Washington Street and the Riverfront.
CHAMPIONS AND ADVOCATES
Once a plan is adopted as a supplement to the Comprehensive Plan, the City has the
necessary direction to begin implementing the plan. Given the number of adopted
plans, competing interests in the city, and the budget limitations at all levels of
government, little plan implementation is undertaken without champions for certain
actions and advocates for the neighborhood. Typically, Registered Neighborhood
Organizations work with the Mayor and their City Council representatives to promote
certain actions and outcomes. Membership organizations such as merchant
associations, business partnerships, and non-profits do the same for business areas.
PUBLIC FUNDING SOURCES AND STRATEGIES
Funding sources available to public and private entities are continually evolving based
on economic, political, legal, and neighborhood objectives. Though the names and
purposes of specific funding sources can change over time, the following list represents
potential funding opportunities:
Tax Base Support. Tax base supported sources are characterized by the
involvement of the local sales and property taxing authorities.
Annual Budget. The most common tax base support is through the City's
annual budget, especially the annual Capital Improvements Program (CIP).
Available CIP funds are typically limited to a few million dollars a year.
Bonds. Periodically, the City requests that its voters to approve a tax increase to
pay for specific public improvements. For instance, the citizens of Denver voted
in 2007 to raise their property taxes in a specific amount to support the issuance
of over $500 million Better Denver Bonds whose proceeds subsequently funded
hundreds of specific public improvement projects. Future bond issuances
represent an opportunity to secure funding for some Globeville Neighborhood
Plan recommendations.
Tax Increment Finance (TIF). TIF is another means of tax-base support most
typically associated with an Urban Renewal Area. Once created by the City
Council and Denver Urban Renewal Authority (DURA), property and sales
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tax over and above the base year are paid to DURA to fund eligible public
improvements or financing gaps for private development. To qualify for tax
increment financing through urban renewal, an area must first meet certain
criteria to establish the presence of"blight,"as defined in state statute.
Grants. Grants come from public agencies that are interested in encouraging
a specific outcome, and these grants typically include specific conditions and
requirements as to how the funds may be deployed. For instance, a state or federal
transportation grant will need to be used for street, mass transit, or regional mobility
studies or projects. The Office of Economic Development receives federal funds to
support certain types of housing projects. Additionally, foundations provide grants
for projects aligned with the organization's goals, such as green spaces, creative
enterprises, or social services.
Special Districts. The City Charter and Colorado State Statutes enable various
types of districts to be created. Examples of special districts include business
improvement districts, general improvement districts, metropolitan districts, and
local improvement or maintenance districts. These districts are often created by a
localized group of citizens who want to achieve specific outcomes in their locality
and are willing to pool their economic resources in order to implement identified
projects. For example, if a majority of business owners desire to improve the
streetscape of the street in which they operate, the businesses could organize a
business improvement district which would assess the participants an amount of
money sufficient to pay for the project. Special districts are a useful tool when a
local population both desires and is willing to pay for an enhanced level of public
improvement. District revenues can be used to pay for improvements on a "pay-as-
you-go" basis, for ongoing operations and maintenance, or to support repayment of
bonds. In order to be established, special districts typically require the approval of
Denver City Council and a vote of the electorate within the area.
PARTNERSHIP TOOLS
In addition to public funding sources, a variety of public-private partnerships or
private organizations will be instrumental in Plan implementation. As states and
communities reduce the use of public funds for improvements, some of these other
organizational types will come into broader, more innovative use. Some examples
of these organizations include: community development corporations, membership
organizations, non-profits or foundations, and transportation management
organizations. Implementation of the Globeville Neighborhood Plan will require the
coordinated involvement of many different organizations in pursuing a variety of
activities with existing and new funding sources.
North Denver Cornerstone Collaborative (NDCC). Mayor Flancock created
the NDCC in 2013 in order to ensure alignment and effective coordination of the
many inter-related plans and projects that are taking place in Globeville, Elyria,
and Swansea. Part of this effort includes strategic thinking on the implementation
and funding of projects, which presents the Globeville community with a unique
partnership opportunity to implement elements of this plan.
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