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Golden Triangle neighborhood plan

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Title:
Golden Triangle neighborhood plan
Creator:
Community Planning and Development, City and County of Denver
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
City and County of Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English

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City planning
Neighborhood plans
Community planning
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Denver -- Golden Triangle

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Full Text
DENVER




golden triangle
NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
Adopted
November 10,2014
Iv| DENVER
| THE MILE HIGH CITY


Acknowledgements
MAYOR Michael B. Hancock
DENVER CITY COUNCIL
District 1 Susan Shepherd
District 2 Jeanne Faatz
District 3 Paul D. Lopez
District 4 Peggy Lehmann
District 5 Mary Beth Susman
District 6 Charlie Brown
District 7 Chris Nevitt
District 8 Albus Brooks
District 9 Judy Montero
District 10 Jeanne Robb
District 11 Christopher Herndon
(President)
At-Large Robin Kniech
At-Large Deborah Ortega
DENVER PLANNING BOARD
Andy Baldyga
Jim Bershof
Shannon Gifford
Renee Martinez-Stone
Brittany Morris Saunders
Joel Noble
Susan Pearce
ArleenTaniwaki
Julie Underdahl
Frank Schultz
Chris Smith
COMMUNITY PLANNING AND
DEVELOPMENT
Brad Buchanan, Executive Director
Steve Gordon, Planning Services
Director
Caryn Champine
Sarah Showalter
Chris Gleissner
Steve Chester
OFFICE OF ECONOMIC
DEVELOPMENT
Paul Washington, Executive Director
Jeff Romine
PUBLIC WORKS
Jose Cornejo, Manager
Crissy Fanganello, Transportation
Director
Cindy Patton
Justin Schmitz
Emily Snyder
PARKS AND RECREATION
Lauri Dannemiller, Manager
Gordon Roberston, Parks Director
Mark Bernstein
ARTS AND VENUES
Kent Rice, Executive Director
Ginger White-Brunetti, Deputy
Director
OFFICE OF ECONOMIC
DEVELOPMENT
Paul Washington, Executive Director
John Lucero, Deputy Director
Seneca Holmes
REGIONAL TRANSPORTATION
DISTRICT
Patrick McLaughlin
Doug Monroe
Lacy Bell
STAKEHOLDER ADVISORY GROUP
Page Bolin State Land Board
Will Bright (Alternate: Dick
Kisseberth) CHUN
Chris Crosby Landowner
Michael Eber Evans School
Andrea Kalivas Fulton Denver Art
Museum
Rhonda Knop Golden Triangle
Association
Jim Kroll Denver Public Library
Lindy Eichenbaum Lent Civic
Center Conservancy
Carol Lewis State of Colorado
Anne Lindsey Golden Triangle
Association
Judy Morton Balustrade HOA
John Olson Historic Denver
Brian Phetteplace Downtown
Denver Partnership
Joan Prusse -Clyfford Still Museum
Robin Riddel-Lima Golden
Triangle Museum District
Councilwoman Jeanne Robb City
Council District 10
Margie Valdez Cultural Arts
Residential Organization (CARO)
Elbra Wedgeworth Denver Health
Bill Wenk- Business Owner
CONSULTANT TEAM
Daniel lacofano, MIG Principal-in-
Charge
Chris Beynon, MIG Project
Manager
Jeff Liljegren, MIG
Ben Caldwell, MIG
Marissa Reilly, MIG
Lillian Jacobson, MIG
Carlos Hernandez, FoxTuttle
Abe Barge, Winter and Company
Matthew Prosser, EPS
Andrew Knudtsen, EPS
Amanda O'Connor, EPS
Nanci Kerr, Sky to Ground
Katie Angell, Sky to Ground


Table of Contents
introduction 6
Plan Purpose 9
Setting and Context 11
Assets, Challenges, Opportunities 15
Planning Process 24
Plan Goals 26
Plan Overview 27
vision framework 28
Vision Framework 30
Strategy Diagram 32
A: eclectic 34
An Urban Mosaic 36
Contextual Design 37
Catalytic Development 42
B: connected 44
Robust Mobility 46
Grand Boulevards 52
Dynamic Parking 65
C: creative 68
Innovation Economy 70
Cultivation of Arts and Culture 71
Arts and Culture Trail 74
D: livable 78
Connected Open Space 80
Acoma Neighborhood Greenway 86
Safe and Clean 91
implementation 92
Regulatory Actions and Policy Strategies 95
Partnerships 102
Investment Strategies 105




introduction
World-class museums and a vibrant arts scene.
Hip bistros and bars.
An international destination and the center of culture
and civics in Denver.
Families cruising on their bikes down the Cherry Creek
Greenway; residents walking their dogs down tree-lined
streets.
Tech entrepreneurs working on the next awesome app.
Great civic spaces where the whole city celebrates the
Broncos Super Bowl victory.
Historic brick structures and gleaming glass towers.
Visitors from Highlands Ranch to the Highlands of
Scotland.
People building a new product, learning a new skill,
exploring a new block...
The Golden Triangle indeed has a mix of urbanity,
vitality and setting like no other neighborhood
in Denver and it has yet to achieve its full
potential.


introduction
The Golden Triangle Neighborhood Plan outlines a vision, goals, plan
framework, and implementation strategies for evolution and change. It
builds on the area's rich and storied past while setting the course for an
even brighter future. This plan proposes bold new catalytic projects, as well
as tactical "quick wins"that can be accomplished cost-effectively and in the
near term. The plan sets forth a comprehensive, holistic approach, weaving
together a nuanced set of strategies that collectively will foster an Eclectic,
Connected, Creative, and Livable Golden Triangle.
Importantly, it will take a concerted and collaborative alignment of resources
for the neighborhood to attain its vision. The City and County of Denver,
relevant local and State government agencies, institutional stakeholders,
residents, business and property owners, and other key parties must all be
strong partners in moving the neighborhood forward.
This Introduction chapter includes the following major sections:
A Plan Purpose that outlines major project goals and charges for plan
development
A Setting and Context section, which highlights the Golden Triangle's
physical location and economic, social, cultural and environmental
functions within the City of Denver and broader region
An overview of key Assets, Challenges and Opportunities that
form the basis for the development of plan strategies and projects
A description of the Planning Process conducted with the community
to build the plan and its various elements
A Plan Overview that outlines the remaining chapters in the document
8 golden triangle neighborhood plan


introduction
Plan Purpose
Much has changed since the original 1998 Golden Triangle Neighborhood
Plan. Metro regions across the country have experienced a huge acceleration
of people, resources and energy back toward their urban cores, reversing
the decades-old trend of suburbanization. Building on the pioneering LoDo
district of the 1990s and early 2000s, Downtown Denver has become more
"urban" with numerous additional venues, activities and residents.The
Denver Union Station area is brimming with construction and new transit
investments. And, over the last decade, nearby neighborhoods such as RiNo,
Highlands, and Lincoln Park have experienced a rate of development and
change not seen since the early 20th century.
The charge of this plan update is to respond to these broader market
and social forces and ensure a viable, prosperous future for the
district. Specifically, the Golden Triangle Neighborhood Plan:
Responds to extensive community input and incorporates specific ideas,
recommendations and strategies that build upon that input.
References existing plan policy documents and frameworks for the
immediate neighborhood and larger citywide context.
Addresses current issues and opportunities related to land use, urban
design, parks and open space, economic development, transportation,
infrastructure, and community and cultural investments.
Provides a concise set of policies, projects and programs for achieving
tangible change.
Builds upon the mission statement from the 1998 Golden Triangle
Neighborhood Plan: "The Golden Triangle will become an urban village:
a mixed use neighborhood with diverse uses and users
a walkable community with lively public spaces
an identifiable neighborhood with a strong sense of place
a unique neighborhood in which to live, work, and play"
golden triangle neighborhood plan 9


introduction
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10 golden triangle neighborhood plan


introduction
Setting and Context
locations, activities and uses
The Golden Triangle is located between the Cherry Creek Greenway, the
Downtown business district, Capitol Hill and La Alma/Lincoln Park in the urban
core of Denver (see image below and Planning Area map on previous page).
The major corridors of Speer Boulevard to the west, Colfax Avenue to the north,
and Broadway/Lincoln Avenue to the east form the "triangle" of the district.
The Golden Triangle is a mid- to high-density, mixed-use neighborhood that
encompasses such landmarks as Civic Center Park, the State Capitol, Denver
City and County Building, Denver Art Museum, History Colorado Center,
Denver Public Library, Byers-Evans House Museum, Clyfford Still Museum, and
several other arts and cultural destinations. The district also contains a range of
other uses and activities, including housing (with more than 2,100 residents),
restaurants, bars, cafes, retail services, office buildings, and more than 20
art studios and galleries. This eclectic mix helps to create a unique, vibrant
neighborhood in the heart of the city.
The Golden Triangle is centrally located in the
heart of Denver and benefits from proximity
to multiple destinations just beyond its
borders, including Downtown, Civic Center
Station, Auraria campus and light rail station,
and Capitol Hill
golden triangle neighborhood plan 11


introduction
Automobile Row thrived along Broadway
and Lincoln Avenue in the middle of the 20th
century
Housing development has increased
dramatically in recent years
history
Steeped in history and culture, the Golden Triangle started as a part of the
growing Denver settlement in the mid to late 1800s. Historic landmarks from
this era include the Byers-Evans House (1883), Evans School (1904), St. Marks
Parish Church (1889), Ten-Winkel Towers (1893), and U.S. Mint (1906). The
State Capitol was built in the late 1890s. Major planning and construction of
new government and cultural facilities followed during the "City Beautiful"
movement of the early 20th century as part of the Civic Center Master Plan
at the crossroads of Colfax Avenue and Broadway. Large concerts and events
were held in Civic Center Park, down the street from a mix of proud Victorian
homes, ramshackle dwellings, and a variety of retail and industrial uses.
During this time, Speer Boulevard was also constructed on the west edge of
the district along Cherry Creek.
This period of infrastructure investment was followed by the creation of
"Automobile Row"along Broadway and Lincoln Avenue during the middle
decades of the 20th century. These auto dealerships fostered a range
of service stations and other automobile-oriented uses, with bustling
commerce and activity.
By the 1970s and 80s, however, many of these uses left for the suburbs
as disinvestment impacted the Golden Triangle and much of Downtown
Denver. Many properties sat vacant or were demolished to make room for
surface parking lots to serve the Downtown business district.
Beginning in the 1990s and into the early 2000s, interest was renewed in
the Golden Triangle. Civic, cultural and justice facilities experienced a new
wave of investment, including expansion of the Denver Public Library and
Denver Art Museum. The neighborhood attracted an array of residential
redevelopment, design offices, art galleries, restaurants, cafes and retail
services, creating a neighborhood with rich architectural diversity.The
previous Golden Triangle Neighborhood Plan, adopted in 1998, guided many
of these investments and activities.
12 golden triangle neighborhood plan


introduction
The Great Recession that began in 2008 slowed development activity, but
today new residences, office expansions, and other developments are now
being built at a rapid pace. Tenants and owners are drawn to the Golden
Triangle's urban vibe as well as its proximity to the range of Downtown
workplaces, entertainment and sporting venues, cultural facilities, recreational
resources, and nearby neighborhoods.
what is a neighborhood plan?
A Neighborhood Plan is a policy document that provides guidance to City and
County of Denver officials and staff, addresses a community's unique issues,
sets the course for future change, and provides a vision for future policy,
decisions and regulations. It is a tool to enhance the economic vibrancy,
character, and overall health and quality of a neighborhood.
The City's Comprehensive Plan provides guidance for the development of
all Neighborhood Plans, which help to implement community objectives to
help protect Denver's legacy. Plan policy direction particularly relevant to the
Golden Triangle includes:
Comprehensive Plan 2000 Vision
"Denver believes historic preservation of significant structures, features and
landscapes contributes to its distinctive character, environment, culture,
economy and quality of neighborhoods."
"Preservation and respectful urban design will reinforce the distinctive
identities of Denver's historic neighborhoods, including structures,
landscapes and views."
Comprehensive Plan 2000 Strategies
"Preserve Denver's architectural and design legacies while allowing new
ones to evolve."
"Use the neighborhood planning process to uncover an area's cultural
values and take steps to honor their significance."
The Golden Triangle Neighborhood Plan, which replaces the 1998 Golden
Triangle Neighborhood Plan, builds upon this direction while providing
detailed, neighborhood-specific strategies to help the area evolve in response
to changing conditions.The Plan supplements and refines the vision for the
Golden Triangle from the 20007 Downtown Denver Area Plan.
Denver's Comprehensive Plan sets the
high-level policy guidance for the city
and the Golden Triangle. Other plans
that informed the development of the
Neighborhood Plan include Blueprint
Denver, Game Plan, Civic Center
District Master Plan, Downtown
Denver Area Plan, and Imagine 2020.
The Golden Triangle Neighborhood
Plan builds upon the vision and key
recommendations for the Golden
Triangle from the Downtown Denver
Area Plan, adopted in 2007.
golden triangle neighborhood plan 13


introduction
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14 golden triangle neighborhood plan


introduction
Assets, Challenges, Opportunities
Following are several existing assets, current challenges, and potential
opportunities for the Golden Triangle. These underlying conditions form the
foundation for development of the Plan Strategies and Projects
outlined in Chapter 3. For more information, see the Existing Conditions
Report on the City's website at: www.denvergov.org/goldentriangle.
land uses
The Golden Triangle is a mid- to high-density mixed-use neighborhood
A mix of high-rise residential buildings, offices,
that has substantial office, residential, and hospitality uses, as well as retaM and commercial services, and surface
cultural and government facilities (see Existing Land Use diagram on the parking lots characterize the neighborhood
previous page).
Moderate concentrations of retail, dining and entertainment uses in the
neighborhood
The concentration of government facilities located in the northern end
of the Golden Triangle creates a void of activity after weekday work hours
and on weekends.
There is a significant concentration of bail bond uses in the northern
part of the neighborhood, with many occupying formerly residential
buildings.
Many sites are relatively underutilized with surface parking lots or
one-story structures.
golden triangle neighborhood plan 15


introduction
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Height Limits
Capitol Mountain
View Plane
16 golden triangle neighborhood plan


introduction
zoning
The Golden Triangle's existing zoning districts (see Existing Zoning diagram
on the previous page) include:
Downtown Golden Triangle (D-GT), covers most of the neighborhood.
When the Denver Zoning Code was created in 2010, the D-GT zone
district was created. It retained most of the standards from the 1994
B-8-G zoning since the 1998 Golden Triangle Neighborhood Plan did
not provide the guidance desired to create a new context-based zoning
for the Golden Triangle. The D-GT zone district does benefit from many
elements of the 2010 Denver Zoning Code, including updated off-street
parking ratios.
Downtown Civic (D-CV), which covers Civic Center buildings and was a
part of the 2010 Code Update.
Open Space (OS-A and OS-C), which covers Civic Center Park and the
Cherry Creek Greenway.
Planned Unit Development (PUD), which covers the Denver Justice
Center. Note: PUD and B-8-G zoning with Planning Building Groups
(PBGs) are not part of the 2010 Denver Zoning Code, and are subject to
Former Chapter 59.
B-8-G with PBGs, which covers a portion of the Denver Art Museum
complex south of 13th Avenue and a small area along Cherokee Street
between 10th and 11th avenues.
A key concern expressed by community
members is the impact of bail bonds uses on
the surrounding neighborhood
Key standards in the D-GT district currently include guidelines related to
minimum open space per unit, maximum building setbacks, maximum
building heights (175 feet as measured from Broadway approximately 16
residential or 15 commercial stories), and maximum Floor Area Ratio.Building
heights vary throughout the district.
golden triangle neighborhood plan 17


introduction
The Byers-Evans house is one of the
neighborhood's several significant historic
structures
Art and green commingle in many spaces
around the Civic Center Cultural Complex
design standards and guidelines
The 2002 Design Guidelines for the Golden Triangle/B-8-G Zone District
(the pre-2010 zoning designation for most of the neighborhood)
currently apply to the neighborhood. They address:
Site planning, including the street grid, pedestrian circulation,
building placement, private open spaces and landscaping.
Building form, including massing, facades and materials
Neighborhood subareas, including Broadway/Lincoln Avenue,
Acoma and Speer Boulevard
Design review premiums (Floor Area Ratio incentives for voluntary
design review)
Public art premiums (Floor Area Ratio incentives to promote public
art)
neighborhood history and landmarks
The Golden Triangle contains several historic buildings and districts.
Many potential resources are not currently designated as historic
landmarks.
Limited protection exists for buildings that are not designated.
Historic rehabilitation projects are often specialized and require specific
project experience for successful redevelopment.
Historic interior layouts can be limited and less flexible than what some
current businesses desire.
Rehabilitations can require additional investment to bring properties
up to market standards. Financing tools, such as historic tax credits, are
available to help cover the costs of historic rehabilitation.
18 golden triangle neighborhood plan


introduction
urban design and community character
The Golden Triangle exhibits a variety of architectural styles, patterns and
vernaculars.
The Civic Center Cultural Complex sets a dramatic design tone for the
northern part of the Golden Triangle.
Building heights vary from two to 17 stories throughout the district.
Multiple surface parking lots are underutilized and do not actively
contribute to a high quality urban pedestrian environment, forming
"missing teeth"in the urban fabric.
There is a general lack of pedestrian amenities, including pedestrian-
scale lighting and furnishings, enhanced intersections, accessible and
widened sidewalks with ADA compliant ramps, wayfinding and signage,
and attractive transit stop treatments.
There is a lack of "green"character to the neighborhood, including
inconsistent street trees/canopy and sidewalk plantings.
The neighborhood does not have many centralized places for
community gathering.
A range of building heights is found
throughout the Golden Triangle
The Civic Center Cultural Complex sets a bold,
modern design tone
Portions of the neighborhood have a poor
quality pedestrian environment
golden triangle neighborhood plan 19


introduction
The Golden Triangle is a popular route and
destination for bicyclists
There are many surface parking lots in the
Golden Triangle, particularly in the northern
part of the neighborhood
mobility and parking
The Golden Triangle enjoys high-frequency transit service on Broadway/
Lincoln that can be accessed within a five minute walk from most
destinations in the neighborhood. In addition RTD has 17 routes in and
adjacent to the neighborhood, as well as the Colfax at Auraria light rail
station, just west of Golden Triangle's northwest corner.
Many Golden Triangle residents walk to work, shopping, services, and
other transportation modes.
Residents, workers and visitors ride bicycles for multiple reasons,
including transportation and recreation; some use nearby B-Cycle bike-
share facilities.
There are four miles of existing Denver Moves bicycle facilities in the
neighborhood.
The neighborhood has an interconnected street grid that is integrated
with an extensive system of alleys and sidewalks. At Colfax, the
neighborhood street grid intersects with the Downtown street grid.
Automobile traffic in the neighborhood core illustrates relatively low
volumes and speeds.
Automobile traffic counts on the edges of the neighborhood, including
Speer Boulevard, Colfax Avenue, and Broadway/Lincoln Avenue, show
patterns of higher volumes and speeds.
Most of the surface public parking lots are in the north end of the
neighborhood, serving adjacent government institutions, cultural
facilities and the Downtown business district.
Private carsharing is available from a range of providers offering different
service models.
While some areas have strong pedestrian facilities with clearly marked
pedestrian crossings and bulbouts, many areas need enhanced
intersections to improve safety and comfort for all users.
20 golden triangle neighborhood plan


introduction
parks and open space
The Golden Triangle's Civic Center Park, Cherry Creek Greenway, Sunken
Gardens Park and various public plazas provide green and open spaces
for the neighborhood.
Civic Center Park is a City Beautiful-designed park that showcases various
amenities such as an amphitheater, war memorial and formal gardens. It
hosts many of the region's most important cultural and civic events.
The Cherry Creek Greenway is a highly utilized 40-mile multi-use
trail that connects Confluence Park in Downtown Denver to Cherry
Creek Reservoir and beyond. A stretch of the Green way comprises the
neighborhood's western edge.
Pedestrians and bicyclists frequent the Cherry Creek Greenway, which
provides a green respite in the middle of Speer Boulevard, but can be
challenging and uncomfortable to access from the Golden Triangle.
There is also a need for new, safe access points at locations where
connections to the trail do not currently exist.
Game Plan, Denver's Parks strategic plan highlights four main values:
sustainability, equity, engagement and sound economics.
Several plaza spaces, both public and private, are found in the northern
portion of the neighborhood.
Sunken Gardens Park and Zeckendorf Plaza sit along the southern and
western edges of the neighborhood and are connected by the Cherry
Creek Greenway. However, these resources are disconnected from much
of the neighborhood due to the expanse of Speer Boulevard.
Social issues, crime and safety are concerns, as well as the lack of smaller,
neighborhood-oriented spaces to serve area residents.
The portion of the neighborhood south of 12th Avenue lacks parks or
usable space tailored to local needs.
Civic Center Park is a major asset that hosts a
variety of cultural and civic events
golden triangle neighborhood plan 21


introduction
A range of housing types has been built in
recent years
economic development
Recent development within the Golden Triangle has resulted in varied and
eclectic architectural styles integrating a wide variety of uses throughout
the neighborhood.
New development since 2000 has been predominantly public office
buildings, cultural attractions and multi-family residential buildings.
The majority of new retail or office space has been incorporated into larger
residential mixed-use buildings, with a very limited amount of stand-alone
retail or office development.
Commercial uses are primarily clustered along Broadway, Lincoln, and 11th
Avenue.
There is little vacant land within the Golden Triangle; however, there are
many surface parking lots and parcels with buildings valued at less than
half of the value of the land they are on, presenting some opportunities for
redevelopment.
Office and retail spaces are less valuable and rent for lower rates than
property in the greater Downtown area. However, the value of the land in
the neighborhood is about the same as the rest of the Downtown area.
The Golden Triangle is beginning to attract
greater numbers of restaurants, cafes and
bars
22 golden triangle neighborhood plan


introduction
civic, arts and culture uses
The Golden Triangle has a high concentration of cultural and arts-related
amenities, businesses, and attractions. In many ways, these uses and
activities characterize much of the Golden Triangle as an arts district or
museum district. Within the Downtown area, the Golden Triangle plays a
vital role as a center for civic and cultural destinations.
Public and cultural uses are the predominant uses along 13th and 14th
avenues.
The range of arts-related uses includes the Denver Art Museum, Clyfford
Still Museum, other art museums, art galleries, design services employers,
visual arts related businesses, performing arts studios and offices, theaters,
media outlets and two art schools.
infrastructure
Denver's District Steam System is located underground and partially
within the Golden Triangle. An engineering assessment by Public
Service Company of Colorado in 2013 stated that the system is regularly
maintained and in overall good condition.
Some of the area's electrical system has been relocated underground,
although portions remain overhead.
Due to its location at the downstream end of a major basin, the undersized
clay pipe system is overwhelmed and rendered useless during major storm
events. The Denver Storm Drainage Masterplan recommends these systems
to be replaced and upsized to carry minor storm drainage and alleviate
flooding during a major storm.
Minimal on-site stormwater treatment exists in the neighborhood. As
shown in the City of Denver Sanitary Sewer Plat Maps, the vast majority of
the system is clay pipe that may be over a century old, therefore making it
difficult to rate the overall condition of the existing system.
Minimal on-site water quality stormwater treatment was provided with
previously developed properties.
In areas where ponding occurs, storm drainage storage may be able to be
integrated into a landscaped area, providing opportunities for rain gardens
and other water quality features.
In addition to the myriad arts venues,
programs such as art walks and tours enhance
the neighborhood
golden triangle neighborhood plan
23


introduction
The community articulated numerous goals,
concerns and ideas during public workshops
Planning Process
From its inception in summer 2013, the Golden Triangle Neighborhood
Plan was built from the extensive, thoughtful input of the Golden Triangle
community. A range of ideas, concepts and visions was expressed during
the planning process by a wide variety of stakeholders, including Golden
Triangle residents, employers, workers and visitors. This plan coalesces the
major points of community direction and inspiration, coupled
with technical analysis and recommendations. It outlines key policy
direction and strategies, while using an array of graphics and illustrations to
visualize future improvements.
I DENVER
udp me find Neighborhood SeoiVes Business Services
Community Planning and Development
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The City's website is a valuable tool for
engaging the community
The project included extensive community input opportunities and outreach
tools to keep people informed, including:
Community-wide workshops
Project website
Intercept surveys, conducted at Civic Center Eats and Taste of Colorado
events
Developer forum
Community open house
Public meetings and hearings
Email updates
Press releases
SUMMER 2013
Existing Conditions and
Visioning
FALL 2013
Concepts and Alternatives
WINTER2013-SPRING2014
Preliminary Framework Plan
SPRING-FALL 2014
Draft and Final
Neighborhood Plan
The planning process included four major phases
24 golden triangle neighborhood plan


introduction
A special aspect of the planning process was a pop-up demonstration event
called "Triangle Transformations", which took place in September 2013.
This workshop engaged community members in the right-of-way of Acoma
Street between 11th and 12th avenues. Participants interacted with a series
of pilot project ideas, including new configurations to the street design,
as well as poster boards and other displays. Music, outdoor activities, and
food wereall part of the event.TriangleTransformations attracted people
from the neighborhood and its surroundings, as well as many national and
international visitors who simply happened upon this unique experience.
Two advisory groups also shaped the plan and process. A Stakeholder
Advisory Group representing key community, institutional and
government partners steered development of the plan concepts over several
meetings. In addition, a Staff Working Group comprised of City and
County of Denver staff and agency partners provided technical expertise and
direction over the course of the plan. These groups and their members are
listed in the Acknowledgments at the beginning of the document.
For more information, see the Community Engagement and Outreach Input
Summary on the City's website at: www.denvergov.org/goldentriangle.
Triangle Transformations included several
interactive demonstrations and input
exercises
Community members expressed what they
value most about the Golden Triangle
Community forums attracted residents, workers, property and business owners, developers and other community members
golden triangle neighborhood plan 25


introduction
Plan Goals
The Golden Triangle Neighborhood Plan is guided by several important goals that were developed from the
extensive community input during the planning process. As the plan strategies are implemented, they should be
measured and monitored in how they achieve these goals. While each strategy does not respond to every goal equally, they
all work together to establish a common vision and direction. In no particular order, the goals are:
GOAL 1:
Ensure an economically vibrant,
diverse and sustainable Golden
Triangle that incorporates a range
of users, including residents, workers
and visitors
GOAL 5:
Foster strong connections
through improved access and
circulation for all modes, including
pedestrian, bicyclists, transit and
automobiles
GOAL 2:
Capitalize on development
opportunities and ensure
appropriate land use mix, zoning
and urban design
GOAL 6:
Increase mobility options that
link the neighborhood internally
and to surrounding destinations
and leverage the near and long
term transit services catalyzed by
Civic Center improvements
GOAL 3:
Leverage opportunities with
the area's major public and
civic facilities and address
associated impacts that affect the
neighborhood
GOAL 7:
Enhance neighborhood edges
of Broadway, Lincoln, Colfax
and Speer Boulevard to improve
multimodal connectivity, support
economic development, and
enhance livability and the
environment
GOAL 4:
Establish a parks and open space
hierarchy that supports a livable
neighborhood, including ways to
improve Civic Center Park
GOAL 8:
Maintain and enhance the
established arts community to
foster a creative and connected
culture within the neighborhood
26 golden triangle neighborhood plan


introduction
Plan Overview
The Golden Triangle Neighborhood Plan is a strategic, action-oriented
document. It provides a range of implementation actions and provides a
sound policy basis for future decision-making. Each plan section helps tell
the story of the Golden Triangle and how it will become an even better place
in the years ahead.
Following this Introduction chapter, the remainder of the Golden Triangle
Neighborhood Plan consists of the following:
Vision Framework
This chapter establishes the high-level vision for the neighborhood's future,
including several important plan goals. It introduces four Vision Elements,
which are supported by 12 main Strategies and four Transformative Projects.
It also includes a Strategy Diagram, which highlights important physical
improvement opportunities in the Golden Triangle.
Plan Strategies and Projects
These chapters expands upon the Vision Elements, Strategies and
Transformative Projects. They identify key policies, projects and programs for
each Vision Element: Eclectic, Connected, Creative, Livable, including
technical information and numerous graphics, illustrations and photos to
give life to each idea and concept.
Implementation
This chapter outlines the major actions and ongoing commitment required
to implement the plan and realize the vision for the Golden Triangle.
golden triangle neighborhood plan 27


vision framework


vision framework
The Vision Framework establishes the blueprint for
how the Golden Triangle neighborhood will grow
and evolve over the next decade and beyond.
It provides answers to questions such as: What are
our goals as a community? How do those goals
translate to a commonly held vision for the future?
What should the physical character of the Golden
Triangle look and feel like? And how should the
district function, so that it is an attractive place that
also makes neighborhood residents, workers and
visitors engaged, healthy and productive?


vision framework
Vision Framework
The Vision Framework reflects community input collected
throughout the planning and design process, as well as previous
plans and existing policies that help shape the neighborhood and
its surrounding context. Guided by this framework, the remainder
of the Golden Triangle Neighborhood Plan articulates a range
of strategies and concepts. This chapter includes two major
components: a Vision Framework Diagram and a Strategy
Diagram.
VISION ELEMENTS
vision framework diagram
The Vision Framework Diagram is a one-stop "plan on a page"
that illustrates the key building blocks of the Golden Triangle
Neighborhood Plan.The diagram includes three major
components that will bolster the Golden Triangle as a vital, healthy STRATEGIES
neighborhood and bring about tangible change:
Vision Elements: The four Vision Elements Eclectic,
Connected, Creative and Livable build on the existing
character of the Golden Triangle while setting a course for
a dynamic, interconnected mosaic of people, places and
activities. Each of the elements work together to form a
cohesive, long-term vision for the neighborhood.


Strategies: An array of strategies, ranging from short-term
"quick win"improvements to mid- and long-term investments,
is outlined in the categories under each Vision Element.
Transformative Projects: Including opportunities and
partnerships both for the public and private sectors, these
signature projects embody bold ideas that implement more
than one plan recommendation and that will have great impact
on the Golden Triangle in the coming years.
TRANSFORMATIVE
PROJECTS
Together, the Vision Elements, Strategies and Transformative Projects
are the most critical steps to advance the Golden Triangle's future. These
components are outlined in full detail in the following chapters.
A. Eclectic
A unique mix of land
uses and character
A3. Catalytic Development
30 golden triangle neighborhood plan


vision framework
B. Connected
Walkable, bikeable
neighborhood with great transit
B1. Robust Mobility
I
B2. Grand Boulevards
I
B3. Dynamic Parking
B2. Grand Boulevards
C. Creative
World class hub of arts, culture and
economic innovation
Cl. Innovation Economy
I
C2. Cultivation of Arts and
Culture
I
C3. Arts and Culture Trail
C3. Arts and CultureTrail
D. Livable
Attractive, safe place for social
gathering, recreation and living
D1. Connected Open Spaces
D2. Acoma Neighborhood Green way
D3. Safe and Clean

D2. Acoma Neighborhood
Green way
golden triangle neighborhood plan 31


vision framework
strategy diagram
The Strategy Diagram (see following page) illustrates in map form the physical concepts and strategies that will
continue the Golden Triangle's evolution. The neighborhood already has numerous assets Civic Center Park, premier
civic and cultural facilities, the Cherry Creek Greenway, a network of walkable streets, a strategic and central location. The
improvements in the Strategy Diagram build upon these unique features to create a fully interconnected, vibrant and
well-designed urban fabric with multiple opportunities for community enhancement and investment. Key elements of
the Strategy Diagram include:
grand boulevards
Colfax Avenue, Speer Boulevard
and Broadway/Lincoln Avenue are
re-envisioned as "Grand Boulevards'
with improved pedestrian and bike
facilities, enhanced transit, and
placemaking (see pages 52-64).

key streets
Several streets internal to the
neighborhood play important roles in
strengthening corridors focused on
housing, arts and culture, and retail
(see page 83).
open spaces
Existing open spaces will continue
to provide opportunities for active
and passive recreation, community
experiences, and a connection to
nature (see pages 80-85).
Q A new open spaces
There are numerous opportunities
to expand the existing network of
open spaces, especially through
spaces that are are privately owned
and maintained. These spaces can
range from neighborhood gathering
spaces to temporary or permanent
transformations of "Speer Triangles"
(see pages 80-85).
acoma neighborhood
greeenway
With an array of design, land use, and
programmatic interventions, Acoma
Street can transform into a "green
street" that connects key destinations
and fosters a unique sense of identity
(see pages 86-90).
catalytic development
Underutilized parcels are opportune
spaces for catalytic development.
These transformative projects will
activate key locations and enhance the
neighborhood's economic health and
social vibrancy (see pages 42 and 43).
civic and office/medical
institutional services
r arts and j creative mixed-
culture use and residential
While a mix of uses is encouraged
throughout the Golden Triangle,
several general hubs of activity
provide opportunities for clustering
like uses, supporting economic
development, and creating brand
identity.
arts and culture trail
The Golden Triangle abounds with
a rich collection of arts and culture
facilities, venues and programs.The
potential Arts and Culture Trail will
link these attractions, bring life and
vitality to the streets, and extend
outward to surrounding Downtown
districts (see pages 74-77). Note: the
route shown is for iiiustrative purposes only.
32 golden triangle neighborhood plan


SANTA FE DR
introduction
golden triangle neighborhood plan 33


t jjj I'Wilis'1!
lAttW-
(MUM

. an eclectic Golden Triangle


a. eclectic
The Golden Triangle is largely defined by its unique mix of land uses and
character.
Modern museums abut historic schools, civic and industrial buildings.
Single-family homes sit across the street from neighborhood coffee shops
and funky boutiques, just down the way from glass-framed offices and
destination civic facilities. Building heights flow from low to high to low
again, and everything in between. Surface parking lots form "missing
teeth"in the landscape, impacting the area's walkability but also offering
opportunities for new development. And through it all the grand sweeps of
Civic Center Park and the Cherry Creek Greenway provide green, appealing
respites from the bustle of activity.
It is this patchwork of uses and places a rich, textured urban mosaic that
makes the Golden Triangle a truly distinct neighborhood in the Denver
region.
With a focus on the interplay between land use, urban design, and economic
vitality, several strategies are required to maintain and enhance the qualities
of this Eclectic neighborhood. These include:
A1. An Urban Mosaic
A2. Contextual Design
A3. Catalytic Development


A: eclectic
A1. An Urban Mosaic
Part of the neighborhood's unique strength
and vibe comes from its many land uses
Small neighborhood-serving retail shops and
services are part of the urban mosaic
goal
Continue and enhance the patchwork of diverse land uses, places and
spaces that provide creative energy, a distinctive neighborhood identity, and
vibrant street activity.
why it's important
The Golden Triangle's eclectic character is a strength to be built upon, not a
liability to be cast aside in the search for a new, more uniform identity. The
neighborhood's diversity of large- and small-scale land uses from offices,
civic facilities, and cultural venues to restaurants, shops and housing is
one of its best assets. This mix provides an authentic identity and creative
culture that distinguish the neighborhood and enhance its appeal to a
broad population of residents and users. Strengthening and enhancing
this "urban mosaic" in future growth and development is key to making the
Golden Triangle an even better place in the years ahead. The Golden Triangle
is designated as an Area of Change in Blueprint Denver. It will remain as
an Area of Change designation that will support continued growth and
evolution into a unique mixed-use neighborhood.
projects, policies and programs
Ala. Maintain zoning that allows fora range of land use types, thereby encouraging
a variety of development types.
A1 b. Encourage and support development that fosters a broad range of housing
opportunities for existing and new residents.
Aid. Allow for and promote a range of arts-related land uses, to preserve the
distinctive artistic character and cultivate a new"creative class" of artists to enrich the
neighborhood.
Ale. Consider a range of office development and business incubation incentives
to provide flexible and attractive space for the innovation economy to thrive in the
GoldenTriangle.
36 golden triangle neighborhood plan


A: eclectic
A2. Contextual Design
goal
Promote redevelopment that brings new residents and activities to the
neighborhood while reinforcing its eclectic design context and pedestrian-
oriented character
why it's important
The Golden Triangle includes historic houses, commercial buildings,
large new apartment or condominium buildings and other structures
with a diverse range of scale and design. Redevelopment that fits
the neighborhood's eclectic context will promote a unique identity
while providing opportunities for new businesses and residents. New
development, as well as any changes to the zoning and design guidelines,
should recognize the unique mixed-use, pedestrian-oriented character that
makes the Golden Triangle part of the Downtown Neighborhood Context in
the Denver Zoning Code.
projects, policies and programs
A2a. Update the zoning and design guidelines to promote a high quality pedestrian
experience.
Implement tools to promote pedestrian-friendly street level design, including
transparency, consistent build-to requirements for buildings, entrance location,
fagade articulation and height at the sidewalk edge.
Promote pedestrian connections through larger new developments to access
public space, parking areas, the Cherry Creek Greenway, the Acoma Greenway
oran established Artsand Culture Trail.
New zoning and design guidelines must
promote a walkable, attractive and inviting
environment for pedestrians
Public plazas and parks should be designed
to relate well with the adjacent buildings and
context
Encourage the provision of privately owned public gathering spaces that
are designed to be actively used while highlighting pedestrian connections,
primary building entrances, public art, stops on an established Arts and Culture
Trail, or views to historic and civic buildings.
Require pedestrian-active uses, such as retail, restaurants, and galleries, at the
ground level of new development.
A2b. Update the zoning and design guidelines to ensure that the height and overall
mass of new development preserves the neighborhood's design context and is
compatible with adjacent, smaller-scale buildings.
golden triangle neighborhood plan 37


A: eclectic
A2. Contextual Design
A zoning requirement for upper-story setbacks
from the street would help create a high-
quality pedestrian experience and preserve
access to sunlight and views
Design standards and guidelines for facade
articulation would promote variations in the
building plane, such as wall offsets, pilasters,
or other features that reduce monotony and
create patterns of light and shadow
Continue to allow a maximum building height of 16-18 stories throughoutthe
Golden Triangle.
Introduce a range of options, including upper-story setbacks and fagade
articulation tools, to ensure that the overall building mass of new development
is compatible with the existing diverse range of building scales.
Implement tools to preserve access to views and sunlight, such as upper-story
mass reduction.
A2c. Encourage the reuse of existing buildings to preserve the neighborhood's varied
design context while providing affordable opportunities for startup businesses,
galleries, artists and new residents.
Consider parking exceptions or exemptions for renovation or reuse of existing
buildings (including historic structures). Such parking reductions should be
coordinated with existing Denver Zoning Code exceptions for historic structures.
Evaluate regulatory tools, including building code requirements, that could be
revised to encourage the reuse of existing structures.
Analyze the effectiveness of Transfer of Development Rights (TDR), a tool in the
existing zoning, and consider how it or a similar tool could be utilized in the
updated zoning to encourage the reuse of existing structures.
A2d. Promote preservation of the Golden Triangle's diverse historic resources to
maintain neighborhood identity.
Consider exceptions to zoning requirements, such as building height or mass
reduction, for projects that include preservation of historic structures.
Update the inventory of historic resources, especially buildings with the
potential for historic designation, as part of the Discover Denver citywide
historic survey.
Identify historic buildings that may be at riskfor demolition and ensure that
owners are aware of incentives and benefits related to historic designation.
A2e. Transition the D-GT zone district to the Denver Zoning Code context- and form-
based approach to streamline the development process and increase predictability.


38 golden triangle neighborhood plan
Organize updated zoning by building form.
Allow a diverse range of building forms and standards to support the
neighborhood's eclectic design context.


A: eclectic
A2. Contextual Design
Shift current floor area ratio (FAR) regulations to form-based tools (see A2a. and
A2b. above).
Adjust height measurement to be consistent with the 2010 Denver Zoning
Code, which measures the height of a building from the elevation of its site, as
opposed to the current D-GT zone district, which measures building height from
the elevation of Broadway.
Consider transitioning existing floor area ratio premiums to updated form-based
zoning incentives for affordable housing, public art, and/or arts, entertainment,
and cultural facilities.The updated zoning should also considertools to
encourage the provision of privately-owned public spaces on private property.
A2f. Update the existing design guidelines to help shape new development that is
consistent with the plan vision.
The varying scale and rhythm of the
neighborhood's buildings should continue to
be strengthened
Identify where the existing design guidelines do not adequately promote
current design objectives, ensuring that the guidelines build on new form-based
tools.
Coordinate the design guidelines with updated zoning regulations.
Illustrate development strategies that are consistent with plan objectives, such
as incorporating existing buildings into new development or creating strong
pedestrian connections.
Provide context-sensitive design guidance for neighborhood subareas such as
the Broadway/Lincoln Avenue frontage, the southern tip of the neighborhood
and the neighborhood core.
New development should respect and
integrate with historic buildings
The Denver Zoning Code provides the basic requirements for development on all properties throughout the city. In some
unique areas, such as the Golden Triangle, the city has also adopted Design Standards and Guidelines to help shape
context-sensitive development.
Zoning provides specific requirements, such as maximum heights or minimum building setbacks. Design guidelines may
address more detailed considerations of building design or relationship to context on a case-by-case basis. While zoning
requirements provide predictable outcomes, design guidelines typically offer a higher level of flexibility.
golden triangle neighborhood plan 39


A: eclectic
A2. Contextual Design
The table below contains recommended tools to promote context-sensitive design. Building off of the Contextual Design content
described on pages 37-39, this table articulates proposed zoning requirements and updated design standards and guidelines for
potential development scenarios within the Golden Triangle.
Scenario Zoning Requirements Design Standards & Guidelines
New development throughout the neighborhood High-quality pedestrian experience - Building placement at the sidewalk edge (build-to requirements) -Encourage privately-owned public gathering spaces - Ground floor facade articulation - Ground floor transparency - Entrance location - Require active ground floor uses - Upper-story setbacks from the street for taller building elements' Access to views and sunlight - Maximum height - Upper-story setbacks from the street for taller building elementsl - Upper-story mass reduction High-quality pedestrian experience - Encourage privately owned public spaces on private properties to be located and designed in a way that promotes active use by pedestrians - Require active ground floor uses - Require cohesive streetscaping
New development adjoins the Cherry Creek Greenway, Acoma Greenway, an established Arts and Culture Trail, or an active alley Access to views and sunlight Increased upper-story setbacks (for greenways only) Enhanced pedestrian experience Encourage privately-owned spaces to be located adjacent to a greenway, trail or alley
New development adjoins a Grand Boulevard High-quality pedestrian experience - Enhanced building placement at the sidewalk edge (build-to requirements) - Enhanced ground floor transparency
New development abuts an ex- isting small-scale building that has been identified as an historic resource for the neighborhood through the Discover Denver survey Incentives/exceptions for incorporating existing buildings Incentives/exceptions to encourage height transitions, such as greater setbacks or increased upper-story mass reduction Compatible height relationships - Encourage context-sensitive upper-story setbacks' - Encourage privately-owned public spaces to be located adjacent to existing small scale buildings
1 May include exceptions or flexibility. For example, development projects that reuse existing structures may have
reduced requirements to incentivize this type of development
40 golden triangle neighborhood plan


A: eclectic
A2. Contextual Design
The Golden Triangle currently has a mix of building heights and sizes throughout the neighborhood
Plan policies and strategies focus on maintaining the pattern of varied building heights and sizes, while accommodating potential infill
development (shown here for illustrative purposes only) that is sensitive to its surroundings. NOTE: this image illustrates the concept
for future development to continue the pattern of varied building height. It is not intended to depict actual future development.
golden triangle neighborhood plan 41


A: eclectic
A3. Catalytic Development
goal
Establish a new benchmark for development in the Golden Triangle by
identifying and advancing Catalytic Development projects that reinforce the
vision for the neighborhood.
why it's important
Recent development in the Golden Triangle has mainly consisted of
residential and civic projects.The neighborhood faces the possibility of
diminishing its vibrant mosaic of uses unless demand for other types
of development is reinforced. Places to work, shop and gather are the
primary missing ingredients. Catalytic Development projects will create the
opportunity for the City and private sector partners to guide and prove the
market for private development, as well as support strategies to bolster the
innovation economy. The neighborhood could be home to uses unique to
the entire region, such as consulates, international companies, world-class
educational institutions,.
projects, policies and programs
A3a. Identify potential sites and development partners for Catalytic Development.
A3b. Ensure that plan elements, such as innovation economy workspace. Arts and
Culture Trail, and Acoma Neighborhood Greenway are incorporated into future
Catalytic Development projects.
A3c. Ensure that any public financing tools or organizational entities are available
and ready to be implemented in order to facilitate projects.
The Catalytic Development Sites (see diagram on following page)
highlight potential areas for the realization of transformative projects.
These recommendations are generated from analysis of building to
land value ratios, existence of vacant land and surface parking lots, and
proximity of neighborhood amenities. While further site-specific analysis
should be done, these sites represent near term opportunity for mixed-
use housing, office and commercial development.
42 golden triangle neighborhood plan


A: eclectic
>>
Auraria
Downtown
<#
J>
North
Capitol
Hill
W COLFAX AVE
E COLFAX AVE
* W14TH AVE ^ '
V WJmH
3ft Hr
|?f>ir|rs0i*Ss
. 12,11. *Msr
La Alma/
Lincoln Park
L.
3|H'i_ li I
m _I__ E10THAVE -
Capitol
Hill
W6TH AVENUE FWY
Baker
Catalytic Development Sites (Potential)
0
0 200 400 600 feet
Planning Area
Roadway
Open Space
\_ j
O Catalytic Development Sites (Potential)
0 to 0.5 Building to Land Value Ratio
0.5 to 1.0 Building to Land Value Ratio
golden triangle neighborhood plan 43




b. connected
The Golden Triangle's prosperity and health is intimately linked to cultivating
a walkable, bikeable neighborhood with great transit.
The scale and orientation of the neighborhood's blocks provide different
routes to stroll at lunchtime, take the dog for a walk, or hop on the
Cherry Creek Greenway for an invigorating bike ride. Plaza spaces and
walkways offer attractive ways for museum visitors to branch out into the
neighborhood. Transit connections with more on the horizon will help
residents and workers quickly reach other Downtown neighborhoods and
points beyond. New parking technologies and infrastructure promise to help
foster meeting parking needs while fostering better neighborhood design.
And though often daunting for pedestrians and bicyclists to navigate, the
major roadways of Speer Boulevard, Colfax Avenue and Broadway/Lincoln
afford opportunities to create "Grand Boulevards" that can weave together
the urban fabric and provide places for gateways, art and culture.
Building from its strategic location in the heart of Denver, the Golden
Triangle should take the next step in creating a pedestrian and bicycle
oriented neighborhood like no other.
With a focus on safely, efficiently and conveniently linking people to
places by a variety of means, several strategies are required to bolster this
Connected neighborhood.These include:
B1. Robust Mobility
B2. Grand Boulevards
B3. Dynamic Parking


B:connected
B1. Robust Mobility
RTD's Free MetroRide opened in May
2014. The plan calls for extending the Free
MetroRide into the Golden Triangle
goal
Increase transit, walking, and bicycling mobility within and beyond the
Golden Triangle based on the goals outlined in Denver Moves and the
Strategic Transportation Plan.
why it's important
The Golden Triangle has a unique mix of retail, office, cultural and residential
uses located within a 10-minute walk or five-minute bike ride of each other.
The neighborhood is also adjacent to current and planned RTD services
that will link to Denver Union Station, Civic Center Station, the FasTracks
system, and Denver International Airport. New transportation options will
be supported by the compact nature of the neighborhood, existing street
grid, and changing demographics of Denver's urban core. Encouraging
physical activity, supporting the City's economic development strategies,
and reducing transportation costs are all important components of building
a robust mobility network in the Golden Triangle.
transit projects, policies and programs
Bla. Encourage the bold re-imagining of Civic Center Station as a vibrant multi-
modal hub for the Golden Triangle, Civic Center, and Downtown.
B1 b. Improve connections to Civic Center Station through wayfinding and improved
pedestrian and bicycle infrastructure. Explore treatments such as enhanced
crosswalks and priority pedestrian signals at major intersections that connect to the
station, such as Broadway and Colfax Avenue.
Blc. Construct the "first and final mile" connections to and from enhanced transit
stops that are identified in the Colfax Corridors Connection project.
Bid. Collaborate with businesses or civic uses to plan for and implement a private
shuttle connection between Denver Union Station and Cherry Creek, which would
help to bring visitors to and throughout the neighborhood.
Ble. Conduct a feasibility study with RTD to determine the requirements and
funding options to introduce an RTD Smart Card a reloadable transit card program
for the Golden Triangle. Encourage employers in the neighborhood to subsidize the
smart cards for employees.
46 golden triangle neighborhood plan


B: connected
Blf. Implement recommended changes to Broadway and Lincoln (see B2. Grand
Boulevards), including a dedicated lane for transit, to increase the quality and
frequency of transit along this important corridor.
Big. Identify funding partnerships between Downtown Denver Partnership, Denver
Art Museum, RTD, DRCOG, private property owners, local businesses, and the City and
County of Denver to extend RTD's Free MetroRide service into the Golden Triangle.
The extension could utilize the enhanced transit lanes and "super stops" proposed for
Broadway and Lincoln (see B2. Grand Boulevards).
The original route planned for the Free MetroRide included a
connection to the Golden Triangle. The plan calls for extending
the existing route, which runs between Denver Union Station
and Civic Center Station, along Broadway/Lincoln into the
Golden Triangle area. The Implementation Chapter suggests
potential public-private funding options to help fund the Free
MetroRide extension.
(
Triangle Neighborhood
golden triangle neighborhood plan 47


B:connected
B1. Robust Mobility
Robust mobility includes efficient, safe
connections to the Cherry Creek Greenway
bicycle projects, policies and programs
B1 h. Complete the bicycle network plan, as informed by Denver Moves and public
input, and offer a variety of bicycle facilities that encourage new bicycle trips for a
wide-range of novice and experienced bicyclists.
Update the Denver Moves network to include bicycle facilities on 13th Avenue
and Delaware Street.This would include removing the existing bike lanes on
Cherokee Street.
Improve connections between the Golden Triangle neighborhood and existing
and planned bicycle facilities Downtown, including the existing protected bike
lane on 15th Street.
B1 i. Enhance connections to the Cherry Creek Greenway, including clearly marked
crossing for bicyclists across Speer Boulevard, especially at 11th Avenue.
Blj. Expand the total number of neighborhood employees, residents, and visitor
using the Denver B-Cycle system by requesting that developers or management
companies include new memberships and additional B-Cycle stations as part of
redevelopment or infill development projects.
The Proposed Bicycle and Pedestrian Network Plan (see diagram on
next page) shows both existing and proposed bicycle facilities, which
will create an interconnected neighborhood easily navigated and
traversed by bicycle. This plan illustrates the consolidated input from
the Golden Triangle planning process in addition to Denver Moves. In
the map "Bike Routes"are designated bike routes that do not contain a
striped bike lane or protected bikeway.
Note: proposed bike facilities require additional study for feasibility and
facility type.
48 golden triangle neighborhood plan


B:connected
Proposed Bicycle and :=: £'raeaning Bike Route Proposed Bike Route 4 ^ Acoma Neighborhood ^ ~ Greenway
Pedestrian Network Roadway Bike Lane Proposed Bike Lane Q BCyde station Proposed Protected Bike Way (cycle track, buffer, path)
N CD 0 200 400 600 feet Open Space Protected Bikeway
Cherry Creek Entrance Improvement Priority Bicycle and Pedestrian Intersection Improvements
golden triangle neighborhood plan 49


B:connected
B1. Robust Mobility
The Golden Triangle must be a place where
bicyclists and pedestrians are safe and
comfortable
pedestrian projects, policies and programs
B1 k. Enhance pedestrian travel and safety within the neighborhood and to
important destinations including Civic Center Station, Downtown, and Auraria's
campus and light rail station.
Apply pedestrian-oriented, context-sensitive design solutions to all new capital
improvement and maintenance projects based on the safety and mobility
goals identified in the Strategic Transportation Plan, Denver Moves, the City's
Living Streets Initiative, and Public Works'Complete Streets policy. Consider
the implementation of tools and programs to calm and slow traffic on the
neighborhood's internal streets.
Repair and enhance the existing network of sidewalks and amenity zones
network in the neighborhood in conjunction with redevelopment projects,
capital bond projects, utility upgrades, or other shared-cost opportunities.
Implement the "Pedestrian Priority Intersection lmprovements"identified
on the Proposed Pedestrian and Bicycle Facility Network Map. Intersection
improvements would include a "toolbox" of options such as:
Pedestrian crosswalks, which should be considered for intersections with
heavier pedestrian traffic and in locations where pedestrians connect to major
destinations, such as the cultural institutions along 13th and 12th avenues.
Bulbouts, which should be added at any intersection with on-street parking to
minimize the crossing distance for pedestrians.
Pedestrian-scaled lighting, which should be considered for all
intersections.
Integrate design elements such as art, signage and wayfinding, both within
the neighborhood and to important destinations nearby (including Civic
Center Station and Downtown), to promote walking within and around the
neighborhood.
50 golden triangle neighborhood plan


B: connected
B1. Robust Mobility
all modes projects, policies and programs
B11. Complement the vision for 11 th Avenue as a pedestrian-oriented retail street
by redesigning the corridor to incorporate bike lanes, enhanced streetscapes, and
pedestrian facilities (see Street Character Diagram, page 83).
B1 m. Implement the Acoma Neighborhood Greenway concept as a north-south
connection for walking, bicycling, and neighborhood placemaking (see D2. Acoma
Neighborhood Greenway).
B1 n. Implement the Arts and Culture Trail (see C3. Arts and Culture Trail) to
encourage and enhance walking and biking between neighborhood destinations,
nearby districts, and greater Downtown Denver.
Bio. Utilize existing organizations in the Golden Triangle, as well as existing
Transportation Management Organizations (TMOs) that cover the neighborhood, to
monitor the neighborhood's mobility vision and encourage modal shifts to transit,
cycling, and other alternative modes..
The re-design of 11th Avenue will include
enhanced streetscapes and pedestrian
facilities
B1 p. Identify funding options to support on-going maintenance and capital
improvements of existing and proposed improvements within the neighborhood and
special districts.
golden triangle neighborhood plan 51


B:connected
B2. Grand Boulevards
goal
Create "Grand Boulevards"at the neighborhood's edges to accommodate all
travel modes, beautify the streets, connect to contextual neighborhoods and
bolster economic vitality. They should build on the vision identified in the
Denver Downtown Area Plan while also providing connectivity to adjacent
neighborhoods through safe intersection crossings for all modes of travel.
why it's important
The arterial corridors surrounding the neighborhood (Colfax Avenue,
the Broadway/Lincoln couplet, and Speer Boulevard) serve diverse
transportation, economic, recreation, and placemaking functions. City and
County of Denver plans identify these roadways as Grand Boulevards that
will facilitate multimodal travel and contribute to placemaking. These streets
should be re-envisioned to increase person-trip capacity, reduce accidents,
better serve neighborhoods, support existing businesses, and create a
strong sense of entry and identity. Transforming these streets is key to
building a prosperous future for the Golden Triangle.
The subsequent content of this chapter is divided into three sections, each
addressing a specific Grand Boulevard:
Broadway/Lincoln
Speer Boulevard
Colfax Avenue
Note that proposed boulevard concepts are potential solutions only. Further
study and analysis will be needed as a part of the implementation process.
52 golden triangle neighborhood plan


B: connected
B2. Grand Boulevards Broadway/Lincoln
projects, policies and programs
Broadway and Lincoln, which run along the eastern edge of the Golden
Triangle, are major thoroughfares that are proposed to become multimodal
corridors with inviting and lively pedestrian environments.
B2a. Enhance the current configuration of the Broadway/Lincoln couplet by
introducing new streetscapes,"parklet"spaces, enhancements and mobility
improvements that create a unified Grand Boulevard.
Strengthen the connection between the Golden Triangle and Capitol Hill.
Implement transit "super stops," defined as transit stops that have a unique
branding, special lighting, expanded passenger waiting areas, and longer
boarding areas to accommodate multiple transit routes. "Super stops" could be
located on routes beyond the Broadway and Lincoln corridor as warranted by
new transit services.
Conduct additional study of new transit circulation and capacity in an enhanced
transit lane, including more frequent service. An enhanced transit lane could
include full time bus service, intersection priority, and/or dedicated transit
services. In the future, it could accommodate new transit services such as
streetcar.
Introduce protected bicycle facilities to complement economic development
efforts in the neighborhood.
Rebuild the current intersections as attractive, well-marked mobility hubs for
all modes of travel. Mobility hubs are located at intersections that allow safe
transfers between walking, bicycling, and riding transit.
Parklets can be integrated to provide space
for dining and social gathering
Grand Boulevards promote safe, efficient
travel for all modes
golden triangle neighborhood plan 53


B:connected
B2. Grand Boulevards Broadway/Lincoln
Potential improvements to intersections along Broadway
and Lincoln include:
Enhanced Transit"Super Stops"
Intersection Improvements (including special
paving and colored crosswalks)
Bicycle Facilities
Pedestrian Amenities (street
furniture, parklets, etc.)
Note: any implementation of the proposed conditions will
require further study to ensure feasibility.
The image below illustrates a set of potential
prototypical improvements along Broadway and
Lincoln. RTD's Free MetroRide, local buses and regional
routes would use the proposed bus lanes to access Civic
Center Station. The proposed bicycle cycletrack along
Broadway would provide a direct connection from
the Cherry Creek Regional Trail to Civic Center Station.
These improvements will foster stronger neighborhood
connectivity and provide Golden Triangle residents,
employees, and visitors with seamless access to and
from Civic Center Station and points beyond
54 golden triangle neighborhood plan


B: connected
B2. Grand Boulevards Broadway/Lincoln
lincoln: existing section looking south
10' 19' y 10' y 10' L. 10' 91 ,. 8'
Sidewalk 1 Amenity'1 Zone Flex Lane 'T Travel Lane Travel Lane * Travel Lane n Parking'1 Lane Sidewalk'1 Outdoor' Seatina
90' ROW
The existing condition of Lincoln includes 15'sidewalks on either side of the right of way with an adjacent 7'parking lane to the west,
three travel lanes, and an 18"'flex lane" that accommodates a travel lane for transit with space for parking along the east curb. Note:
dimensions are approximate. Any implementation of the proposed conditions will require further study to ensure feasibility.
lincoln: proposed section looking south
Enhanced Transit
Super Stop
'-tLV
5?
Parklet
*r
, 10' y T y 8' y IT y 10' k 10' k 10' u 7' i/ 9'
Sidewalk ' Amenity'1 Flex Lane'1 Zone with Transit Lane ' Travel Lane ' Travel Lane Travel Lane '*Flex Lane '* with Sidewalk ' Outdoor Seatina ,
Parking
90' ROW
Parking
The potential concept for Lincoln includes a dedicated transit lane, a "flex lane" with enhanced transit stops and on-street parking,
streetscape beautification, and parklet spaces (as appropriate, mixed in with on-street parking spaces). In the future, the transit lane
could accommodate fixed guideway transit such as streetcar. Note: dimensions are approximate. Any implementation of the proposed
conditions will require further study to ensure feasibility.
golden triangle neighborhood plan 55


B:connected
B2. Grand Boulevards Broadway/Lincoln
The potential concept for Broadway (shown in the sections below and the photosimulations on the following page) includes
reconfiguration of the street from four lanes of automobile travel to three lanes with a two-way cycle track; a bike share station/
parking lane (labeled as"flex lane"in the section below); and dedicated transit lane with enhanced "super stops" in the adjacent
parking lane. In the future, the transit lane could accommodate fixed guideway transit such as streetcar. Parking lanes are also
potential opportunities for additional street trees and parklets where appropriate. Note: dimensions are approximate. Any
implementation of the proposed conditions will require further study to ensure feasibility.
broadway: existing section looking south
broadway: proposed section looking south
56 golden triangle neighborhood plan


B: connected
B2. Grand Boulevards Broadway/Lincoln
broadway at 11th avenue: existing view looking south
broadway at 11th avenue: potential improvements
golden triangle neighborhood plan 57


B:connected
B2. Grand Boulevards Speer Boulevard
Activating spaces through creative
placemaking can help bring life into the
streets
projects, policies and programs
Speer Boulevard is re-envisioned as a dynamic boulevard with improved
intersections connecting pedestrians and cyclists to the Cherry Creek
Greenway. Activated "SpeerTriangles" will add vibrancy through art
installations and placemaking features.
B2b. Preserve and respect the historic character and quality of Speer Boulevard by
supporting adjacent placemaking opportunities, managing access points to the
Cherry Creek Greenway, and building sustainable infrastructure that is safe for all
modes of travel.
Provide new bicycle and pedestrian capacity along Speer Boulevard to support
"first and final"access to destinations within the Golden Triangle from the Cherry
Creek Regional Trail.
Reclaim underutilized portions of the intersecting streets for SpeerTriangles
that will foster placemaking, art, open space and economic development
opportunities (see D1. Connected Open Spaces).
Safely manage access to and from the Cherry Creek Regional Trail at signalized
intersections for all abilities and ages. This includes relocated access points to
Cherry Creek Regional Trail at intersections along Speer Boulevard, including
relocating the bicycle crossing at 12th Avenue to 11th Avenue.
Increase person trip capacity by planning for future transit services within the
existing travel lanes.
58 golden triangle neighborhood plan


B: connected
B2. Grand Boulevards Speer Boulevard
speer boulevard at colfax and 14th avenue
Potential improvements at Speer Boulevard and Colfax Avenue. The "Speer Triangles" offer many opportunities for creative change. See
D1. Connected Open Spaces for more detail.
golden triangle neighborhood plan 59


B:connected
B2. Grand Boulevards Speer Boulevard
speer boulevard at 11th avenue
This diagram illustrates potential improved access points and intersection enhancements that are critical along Speer Boulevard at
11th Avenue and Delaware Street. With improved intersections, automobiles, transit and bicycles will be able to navigate the area
more efficiently, mitigating traffic congestion and reducing the potential for accidents.
Potential improvements along Speer Boulevard include:
Bicycle Facilities, including a designated bicycle crossing at 11th Avenue
Intersection Improvements (such as special paving and colored crosswalks)
Pedestrian Amenities (street furniture, parklets, etc.)
Note: any implementation of the proposed conditions will require further study to ensure feasibility.
60 golden triangle neighborhood plan


B: connected
B2. Grand Boulevards Speer Boulevard
In the short-term, Speer Boulevard improvements will enhance visibility and predictability to and from the Cherry CreekTrail at signalized
intersections along the roadway. The intersection will allow pedestrians, bicyclists and motor vehicles to navigate the area more efficiently.
Features include protected bike lanes, colored crosswalks, and lane markings that will mitigate traffic congestion and reduce the potential
for accidents. SpeerTriangle spaces also offer opportunities for placemaking and pop-up uses that are accessible to the neighborhood by
walking and riding. Additional concepts for Speer Boulevard include increasing walking and bicycling trip capacity by adding an at-grade
multi-use pathway. Note: dimensions are approximate. Any implementation of the proposed conditions will require further study to ensure
feasibility.
existing section looking north
.-j'N
potential short-term concept
The potential short-term concept for Speer Boulevard includes landscape enhancements and activation of "Speer Triangle" spaces with
pop-up uses
golden triangle neighborhood plan 61


B:connected
B2. Grand Boulevards Speer Boulevard
There are several potential long-term options for redesigning Speer to achieve multimodal goals; the illustrations below show two possible
options. At top, the concept includes a reduction in travel lanes and a multi-use path on the west side of the street. This option would allow
for the possibility for one travel lane to become a dedicated transit lane. At bottom, the concept includes a multiway boulevard with local
road access, fostering long term development. Although this option accommodates local road access, a potential drawback is that it would
notallow fora dedicated transit lane since there are only two lanes. Note: dimensions are approximate. Any implementation of the proposed
conditions will require further study to ensure feasibility.
potential long-term concept 1
potential long-term concept 2
Note: for illustrative purposes only. Speer Boulevard can be designed with a range of treatments depending on available right-of-way
width between Broadway and Colfax Avenue.
62 golden triangle neighborhood plan


B: connected
B2. Grand Boulevards Colfax Avenue
projects, policies and programs
Colfax Avenue will serve as a gateway to the Golden Triangle while providing
stronger connections to Downtown through improved pedestrian facilities
and attractive environments.
B2c. Strengthen connectivity along Colfax Avenue between Downtown Denver and
the Golden Triangle, as suggested in the East & West Colfax Plans.
Support new person trip capacity by expanding the Free Metro Ride in the
Broadway and Lincoln corridors.
Improve visibility for all roadway users at intersections.
Introduce new median treatments that identify the entrances into Downtown
Denver.
New enhancements will augment existing
intersection improvements along Colfax
Avenue
Complete sidewalk buffers, wayfinding, and urban design improvements west of
Fox Street with redevelopment projects on both sides of the corridor.
Implement the first phase of the Arts and Culture Trail with striping and signage
across Colfax Avenue.
Integrate "first and final mile" mobility improvements that result from the Colfax
Corridor Connections project (the "first and final mile" is the walking or wheeling
portion of a trip that occurs to and from the transit stops in the Colfax corridor).
The potential concept on Colfax Avenue includes activation of a triangle at the corner of Speer Boulevard, potential lane and median
modifications, and branding opportunities.
golden triangle neighborhood plan 63


B:connected
B2. Grand Boulevards Colfax Avenue
The Colfax concept provides sidewalk buffers from traffic, and locations for gateway features into Downtown and the neighborhood.
Narrowing crossing distances for pedestrians and providing colored crosswalks is also important. See D1. Connected Open Spaces for
more details. Note: dimensions are approximate. Any implementation of the proposed conditions will require further study to ensure
feasibility.
colfax avenue: existing section looking west
if i f If £5 ^
10' . 8 |. 1?' |. 10' |. 10' |. 10' t 10' |. 10' |. 10' |. 10' |. 19' t 8' 95'
Setback Sidewalk' Travel 1 Travel 1 Travel 1 LeftTurn' LeftTurn 1 Travel 1 Travel 1 Travel 1 RightTurn Sidewalk Lane Lane Lane Lane Lane Lane Lane Lane Lane Setback tor Fire Station
11 O' ROW
colfax avenue: potential improvements
11 O' ROW
64 golden triangle neighborhood plan


B: connected
B3. Dynamic Parking
goal
In the short term, manage on-street parking contextually by utilizing the
management strategies and tools identified in Denver's Strategic Parking
Plan (SPP). In the long term, manage on and off-street parking assets more
actively so that they intentionally support the various activities and user
groups in the Golden Triangle and align with other neighborhood mobility
goals.
why it's important
Parking is an important asset that needs to be managed actively in order
to maximize its ability to support a variety of activities in the Golden
Triangle neighborhood. Denver's Strategic Parking Plan (SPP) identifies a
framework vision, management tools, and implementation steps that can
help maximize available on and off-street parking assets and complement
the multimodal transportation goals identified in Denver's Strategic
Transportation Plan. The parking management toolbox and strategies
outlined in the SPP are compatible with the other goals outlined in this
plan and several are particularly relevant to the neighborhood. There is
tremendous opportunity in the Golden Triangle to maximize available
parking inventory through shifting existing parking demand to other
modes of transportation; providing robust wayfinding or other types
of communication to direct visitors to new and underutilized locations;
adjusting time limits or pricing as appropriate to maximize turnover for
existing on-street parking supply; and strategically considering the addition
of new off-street parking supplies through partnerships as redevelopment
occurs.
Existing surface parking should transition to
new development and parking structures over
time
projects, policies and programs
short-term
B3a. Manage available public parking supplies utilizing the tools and strategies
identified in Denver's Strategic Parking Plan (SPP).
B3b. Explore opportunities to introduce new parking options that serve a variety
of stay duration needs, including demand during special events. Work with both
public and private off-street providers to offer a mid-term stay of three to five hours
to serve visitors who do not wish to stay for a full day. This may also help create more
on-street availability for true short-term stays in the neighborhood. golden triangle neighborhood plan 65


B:connected
B3. Dynamic Parking
B3c. Extend the on-street overnight parking program to cover all or
portions of the Golden Triangle as activity increases in the neighborhood.
B3d. Consider repurposing some on-street parking spaces at strategic locations
for bike corrals and parklets in conjunction with other economic, placemaking, and
neighborhood transformations.
long-term
B3e. Promote a "park once" environment.
Locate new inventory at gateway locations or on the edge of the neighborhood
to capture vehicles and then facilitate multiple walking trips internally.
Place a premium on on-street parking to facilitate shorter-term stays with
spaces that turnover to support adjacent activities. On-street pricing should be
set to encourage mid or long-term parking to occur off-street.
B3f. Introduce a comprehensive parking wayfinding system with new signage
placed at gateway locations to help visitors to the Golden Triangle quickly locate
public parking opportunities.
New wayfinding programs should be easily understood by residents, workers,
and visitors to help motorists find off-street parking facilities and then serve to
direct visitors to find civic or cultural destinations on foot.
New signage should be multimodal in nature, providing information on
automobile parking, bicycle parking, and other modes of non-motorized
transportation like B-Cycle stations.
B3g. Construct a "landmark" parking facility as needed and as activities and
densities incresae.The facility would serve the needs of the Golden Triangle's
residents, workers and visitors.
New developments built with parking facilities at the ground floor should
be wrapped with residential, office or other uses, to provide active uses.
Any new parking facilities should be designed to integrate with the eclectic
neighborhood character (see A2).
New public parking supplies should be built in gateway locations that supports
a transition from driving to exploring the neighborhood by foot..
New public parking supplies should be built in gateway locations that supports
a transition from driving to exploring the neighborhood by foot.
66 golden triangle neighborhood plan


B: connected
B3. Dynamic Parking
B3h. Explore opportunities to create a universally managed parking system so that
all on and off-street inventory works together as a system. Integrate various time
duration and pricing strategies to provide short, mid, and long-term stay options. This
management system could support and maximize remote parking opportunities that
allow developers to meet all of some of their parking requirements off-site.
Continue to make parking available for purchase for mid- and longer-term daily
stays and provide monthly rates in facilities.
Evaluate parking patterns and residential needs within the neighborhood as
development occurs to ensure a proper balance of supply and demand for
different users.
Pursue "right sized" off-street parking supplies for residents and employees in the
district as development occurs.
Parking structures can be bold and artistic
to play off of the creative image of the
neighborhood
golden triangle neighborhood plan 67


c. a creative Golden


c. creative
The Golden Triangle is a thriving hub of arts, culture and economic
innovation that will continue to flourish as new venues, activities, events
and businesses are attracted to the neighborhood.
The Civic Center is a nationally-renowned place of arts and culture. An
eclectic mix of museums, galleries, public art, and education amenities
creates an unparalleled destination. Food truck and art walk events attract
everyone from the suburban family to the urban hipster. Creative enterprise
abounds throughout the Golden Triangle, whether someone is making
original art, crafting cuisine, or developing an app at a local incubator space.
Entrepreneurs are pushing beyond the established paradigms of business
development, building environments of innovation, collaboration and
creativity but still much more can happen here.
This exciting combination of people and places fuels the spirit and identity of
the Golden Triangle.
Understanding that the fusion of arts, cultural and economy is intrinsic to
the area's success, several strategies are required to advance this Creative
neighborhood.These include:
Cl. Innovation Economy
C2. Cultivation of Arts and Culture
C3. Arts and Culture Trail


C: creative
Cl. Innovation Economy
The innovation economy requires collaborative,
flexible environments
Unconventional workspaces are a hallmark of
the new economy
goal
Foster the growth of the innovation economy and creative industries within
the Golden Triangle.
why it's important
The Golden Triangle has the opportunity to capitalize on its design and
technology oriented businesses, creative talents, and cultural attractions to
make the neighborhood a major destination for the innovation economy.
Workers and businesses in the new economy require non-traditional office
locations, flexible workspaces, shared amenities, and places for formal
and informal collaboration. They desire proximity to Downtown, cultural
amenities, entertainment venues and gathering spaces, as well as a range of
alternative transportation options.
projects, policies and programs
Cla. Leverage existing neighborhood assets, such as Galvanize, galleries, museums
and creative employers, to attract additional businesses.
Cl b. Create innovation economy workspaces and/or leasing programs with new
Catalytic Development projects.
Clc. Integrate arts and technology into public spaces and amenities.
Incorporate publicartand outdoor"workspaces"intostreetscapeand park
improvements, as well as district-wide Wi-Fi access.
Provide innovative transportation and parking solutions using technology.
Cl d. Develop a program to collectively market and lease art and workspaces.
Explore the creation of a master leasing entity to attract businesses.
Reduce barriers to entry for new small businesses to create demand for
underutilized commercial spaces by identifying ways to reduce length of
lease agreements, marketing existing grant funding or loan options for small
business formation.
Explore the expansion of Denver's Shared Space Program to include innovation
economy and arts/culture startup businesses.
70 golden triangle neighborhood plan
Cle. Build on Denver's Cultural Plan, Imagine 2020, to fuel the development of art
and creative districts.


C: creative
C2. Cultivation of Arts and Culture
goal
Promote and cultivate a dynamic array of arts and culture facilities, programs
and events, taking full advantage of the Golden Triangle's role as a nationally
recognized destination for arts and culture in Denver.
why it's important
Arts and culture are fundamental to the Golden Triangle's identity and
essential to the health and vitality of all Denverites. Promoting arts and
culture in the neighborhood will help ensure the continued success of
important institutions and invite new arts- and culture-related uses to
co-locate in the area, as outlined in Denver's Cultural Plan, Imagine 2020.
From small-scale artists to fledgling theatre companies to new cutting-
edge galleries and museums, arts and culture drive the Golden Triangle.
Supporting arts and culture of all types and formats will help ensure a
continuous energy that provides a special spark to an already creative and
urbane neighborhood.
projects, policies and programs
C2a. Leverage existing arts and culture programming and activities, such as Denver
Art Museum tours, to help introduce visitors and tourists to the neighborhood and
connect it to neighborhood arts and culture organizations.
C2b. Promote First Friday Art Walks with extended gallery and museum hours;
connect the Art Walks with the Art Bus.
C2c. Promote the outdoor film series in the Civic Center Park, community art and
educational classes, and events at the Central Library.

Extending the breadth and reach of First
Friday Art Walks will generate greater visibility
for arts and culture
Film nights, "pop-up" temporary art, festivals
and more should all be a part of this vital
neighborhood
C2d. Create a connection between the Golden Triangle and Sante Fe Arts District
through events and activities.
C2e. Incorporate public art into the SpeerTriangles to help define the cultural
identity of the GoldenTriangle.
C2f. Encourage the creative reuse of the Evans School as a space for arts and culture
programming.
golden triangle neighborhood plan
71


C: creative
C2. Cultivation of Arts and Culture
Street art should be encouraged, in both
festival events and ad hoc form
C2g. Explore opportunities to extend arts and culture programming and activities by
extending museum programming onto streets and into the public right-of-way such
as rotating art on the SpeerTriangles.
C2h. Through partnerships with the Office of Economic Development and Arts and
Venues, explore economic incentives to encourage creative and arts-based uses,
including galleries, throughout the Golden Triangle.
C2i. Create permanent and temporary outdoor art exhibits, as well as festivals,
particularly along Acoma Street (see D2. Acoma Neighborhood Greenway).
C2j.Take advantage of the Arts and Culture Trail (see C3. Arts and Culture Trail) as
a way to connect venues, institutions, organizations and people throughout the
neighborhood, and to inform and direct users to arts and culture points of interest.
Arts and culture in the Golden Triangle
go far beyond the main museums
and galleries. Additional arts-related
uses include design companies, media
outlets, and art supply vendors.This
richness is located throughout the
neighborhood (see diagram on the
following page) and is a major force in
business and economic development, as
well as the creative culture of the Golden
Triangle.
72 golden triangle neighborhood plan


KALAMATH ST
vision framework

Convention
Center ^
Downtown

Auraria

&
* ,<
North
Capitol
Hill
W COLFAX AVE
liiri
'V
\\ 1
W COLFAX AVE
jncsey- Van Cd
"anigSn Slmon^t
iusticis Del
tent
vein '--V
Slmonat
tepntion
(fen te|
U.S. W Cij^&tounty
Mint p building
I'lfil*
T

Capitol
Hill
Sunken \ X \
High School Gap^kns \Y>V
\ V \ k
I d
' Jl ll
Denver Health
Medical Center
Zeckendorf
Plaza Park
V
W6TH AVENUE FWY
ss'
\_ J
Baker
Arts, Culture and Civic Uses

0 200 400 600 feet
Planning Area
Roadway
Arts and Culture
Civic and Government
golden triangle neighborhood plan 73


C: creative
C3. Arts and CultureTrail
goal
Create a world-class pedestrian and bicycle pathway that connects the
places and spaces of the Golden Triangle and points beyond while
bolstering artistic expression, health and fun.
why it's important
The Golden Triangle has a rich diversity of artistic and cultural institutions,
major civic destinations, businesses and programs. While some of what's in
the buildings "spills out" into surrounding spaces such as the Denver Art
Museum plaza more can be done to infuse arts and culture throughout
the neighborhood, as well as connect the various venues. An exciting,
high-profile and well-designed Arts and CultureTrail will help visitors and
residents alike discover the Golden Triangle's wealth of arts and culture.
It will also provide a safe, active and recreation-oriented transportation
pathwayfor users of all ages and abilities, similarto Indianapolis's landmark
Cultural Trail. The Arts and Culture Trail should also extend to other key
destinations in Downtown Denver, creating an attraction that could
eventually become well known nationally, similar to the 16th Street Mall.
projects, policies and programs
C3a. Work with arts and cultural institutions and stakeholders, residents, business
owners, artists, developers, and the City to design and create a new pathway to
connect the neighborhood's civic facilities, historic sites, museums, theaters, galleries,
arts schools and related uses.
C3b. Encourage big, bold thinking in the trail's design and implementation beyond
just signage and marked routes along a street to create permanent infrastructure
that would support a world-class and iconic pathway.
C3c. Provide public art and sculpture projects along the route, as well as pavement
markings, interpretive signage, integrated landscaping, cutting-edge stormwater
design features, and enhanced bicycle and pedestrian facilities.
74 golden triangle neighborhood plan


C: creative
C3. Arts and Cultural Trail
C3d. Ensure that the new pathway connects to facilities and venues the in Golden
Triangle as well as outside the neighborhood, such as the Santa Fe Arts District, 16th
Street Mall, 14th Street cultural corridor, Denver Union Station, LoDo, Central Platte
Valley, Capitol Hill and more.
C3e. Develop branding and marketing campaigns and materials to promote the
Golden Triangle, and to make the Arts and Culture Trail a popular destination.
C3f. Consider a range of names, such as the Arts and Culture "Trail,""Walk,""Path" or
other unique moniker.
The Indianapolis Cultural Trail is a good
example of a route that links key destinations
along an extensive, well-marked, attractively
designed walking and biking pathway
golden triangle neighborhood plan 75


C: creative
C3. Arts and CultureTrail
The sections below show potential applications of the Arts and Cultural Trail along a prototypical Golden Triangle street. In the short term.
Arts and Cultural Trail elements can be implemented along sidewalks, bulbouts and various smaller spaces in the public and private realms.
In the long term, permanent infrastructure can be implemented as resources and funding become available. Note: any implementation of
the proposed conditions will require further study to ensure feasibility.
short-term improvements
-life + Parking Lane Lane Lane Lane Lane walk
Zone
-4----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------4
long-term improvements
A
76 golden triangle neighborhood plan


C: creative
C3. Arts and Cultural Trail
existing conditions
long-term improvements
Long term improvements could entail a permanent, dedicated path that would strengthen the brand image, include additional
sculpture art, and help catalyze adjacent development.
golden triangle neighborhood plan 77


c. a livable Golden Triangle


d. livable
The Golden Triangle is an attractive, safe place for social gathering,
recreation and living that will be further enhanced as the neighborhood
evolves.
Residents meet and chat over coffee, conduct clean up campaigns, and
gather for neighborhood wine tastings. People from throughout the region
come down the Cherry Creek Greenway by bike to check out the latest
sculpture exhibit or sample a Taste of Colorado in Civic Center Park. Art and
culture spill out of nearby museums and plazas onto area streets, creating a
neighborhood that is colorful, lively and inventive. Views of the Rockies or
the Downtown skyline bring an element of surprise and wonder at many a
turn. Several streets and spaces are leafy and pleasant, though more can be
done to ensure attractive, active and safe streets and a range of activated
park spaces that engage everyone.
The mix of these places, green spaces and activities brings the heart and soul
to the Golden Triangle.
With an emphasis on enhancing the area's street and open space networks,
several strategies are required to create a Livable neighborhood. These
include:
D1. Connected Open Spaces
D2. Acoma Neighborhood Greenway
D3. Safe and Clean


D: livable
D1. Connected Open Spaces
goal
Create an interconnected network of open spaces, many of which will be
privately owned and maintained, linked by attractive, green and navigable
streets and paths.
why it's important
The Golden Triangle enjoys many open space assets, including the grand
sweep of Civic Center Park and the green ribbon of the Cherry Creek
Greenway. It also has several smaller hardscape plazas and open spaces.
What's missing is a stronger, interconnected hierarchy of open spaces,
including privately owned public spaces, that forms a cohesive whole
and meets the variety of neighborhood needs. This includes a central
neighborhood gathering space, small and intimate spaces, more play areas
for kids, and green corridors to connect pedestrians and bicyclists from space
to space. Existing and future spaces, in particular Civic Center Park, must also
be environments in which all users feel comfortable and safe.
projects, policies and programs
Dla. Identify a location, design program, and funding sources, including partnerships
with the private sector, to create a neighborhood gathering space(s) in the heart of
the GoldenTriangle.
Target a strategic location(s) in the neighborhood core.
Capitalize on nearby active uses to draw many users and create "eyes on the
space."
Include hardscape and softscape features.
Support a range of activities from social gathering and festivals to informal
recreation and kid-friendly features.
Incorporate movable furniture, benches, tables and water elements.
Include infrastructure that can transform to accommodate a variety of activities,
such as a farmers market, informal recreation and classes, and community
events.
Integrate temporary or seasonal uses and activities.
Apply a "less is more" approach to size to ensure a maximum sense of activation.
A central place to gather, socialize and relax
is a great desire of the Golden Triangle
community
A neighborhood gathering space could
include hard and/or softscape features
Outdoor cafe dining and movable furniture
help to activate public plazas and parks
80 golden triangle neighborhood plan


D: livable
North
Capitol
Auraria
La Alma/
Lincoln Park
W6TH AVENUE FWY
Baker
HJ
Open Space Strategies

Existing Open Space Proposed Green Space
0 200 400 600 feet
Planning Area
Roadway
I Plazas
[ Parks and Trails
| Open Space
I Gathering Space
I Green Corridors
I SpeerTriangles
l Weekend
Closure
I Cherry Creek
Entrance
I Improvement
golden triangle neighborhood plan 81


D: livable
D1. Connected Open Spaces
Spaces and streets at the Speer Triangles can
be transformed in a temporary to permanent
manner and can include art, activities, retail
kiosks and more
Parklets can be installed along commercial or
residential streets
Beaux-arts inspired public spaces can
integrate play features without disrupting
their design integrity
82 golden triangle neighborhood plan
D1 b. Foster the development of small, intimate spaces throughout the Golden
Triangle that are privately owned and/or maintained.
Encourage small-scale, cozy"pocket parks" that serve a wide range of users,
including kid-friendly areas and dog parks.
Allow for a range of elements such as movable furniture, temporary/rotating
art, play features and urban agriculture.
Encourage the creation of privately-owned public spaces adjacent to existing or
new development to ensure "eyes on the space."
lncorporate"parklets", which transform parking spaces into mini parks, along
identified green corridors and retail streets.
Die. Focus on the "Speer Triangles" as potential places for creation of usable open
space (see images on pages 84-85).
Did. Establish landscaped green corridors along key streets to connect and provide
safe passage between open spaces, neighborhood destinations, and areas outside of
the Golden Triangle.
Begin with an initial focus on Acoma Street and 12th Avenue.
Provide shade trees, native plantings, and natural stormwater drainage.
Identify opportunities to incorporate art, signage and wayfinding, urban
agriculture, and gathering spaces such as parklets.
Improve and redesign intersections accessing Cherry Creek Greenway to create
safer connections for pedestrians and cyclists.
Die. Enhance Civic Center Park while respecting its City Beautiful history and design.
Create a safe and clean environment for residents, workers and tourists.
Activate the space through low-cost, small-scale, innovative projects ("tactical
urbanism") that attract new users. Consider the incorporation of temporary
seating, plantings, and play features for children that will draw users of all types to
the park.
Explore weekend closure of 14th Avenue to connect the park to active uses to the
south, including the Denver Art Museum and public library.
Commission art installations to engage local artists and create a connection
between the Civic Center and Arts and Culture Trail. Note: all art should comply
with the Civic Center Design Guidelines adopted in 2009.
Dlf. Utilize regulatory tools, such as zoning requirements for landscaping and
pedestrian lighting, that will encourage the "greening" of surface parking lots.


D: livable
D1. Connected Open Spaces
internal street network
The Golden Triangle's internal streets (see diagram below) are generally slower, narrower roads that fit the neighborhood
scale. While all streets are important, certain key streets play important roles in connecting to surrounding land uses,
promoting a walkable and bikeable place, and cultivating a sense of image and purpose (see also A1. Urban
Mosaic). Key street types include:
Downtown
La Alma/
Lincholn Park
residential and mixed-use streets
With their existing concentrations of housing
- and opportunities for additional mixed-use
development these streets can foster an even
more neighborhood-oriented character. Street
furniture, pocket parks, linear parks or promenades,
specially marked intersections, and a leafy tree
canopy are all potential enhancements.
commercial/retail streets
Centrally located as north-south and east-west
spines, these streets have existing retail shops,
cafes, and restaurants that can be further leveraged
as neighborhood-serving commercial blocks.
Additional stores and dining establishments should
be part of the land use mix, along with street
furniture dining-oriented parklets, bike facilities,
public art, banners, wayfinding and signage, and
other features that foster walking and shopping.
green streets
While all streets in the neighborhood should
integrate green components, these roads
should enhance the neighborhood character by
incorporating potential features such as pocket
parks, parklets, community gardens, educational
elements, natural stormwater drainage, and a leafy
tree canopy.
arts and culture streets
These streets should draw upon the energy of the
existing arts and cultural institutions, incorporate
public realm design features, and connect other
arts-related uses throughout the neighborhood.
Potential elements could include additional
galleries, venues and arts-oriented businesses,
temporary and permanent public art, bike facilities.
Arts Walk events, and other programs with the Arts
and Culture Trail (see C3).
golden triangle neighborhood plan 83


D: livable
D1. Connected Open Spaces
speer triangles: existing conditions
The oddly shaped, leftover spaces of the Speer Triangles (above, at 14th Avenue) offer opportunities for creative open space design.
A short-term change could include movable plantings and furniture and a shade structure to encourage social
gathering. Such changes will likely require investment and maintenance by private partners.
Note: any future changes to the Speer Triangles should be evaluated for compliance with Speer Boulevard's designation as an historic district.
84 golden triangle neighborhood plan


D: livable
D1. Connected Open Spaces
short-term improvements option 2
Short-term change could include art and sculpture to activate the space. Such changes will likely require investment and maintenance
by private partners.
long-term improvements
Ultimately, permanent plaza infrastructure, water elements, outdoor dining, art, adjacent development and other features could be a
part of this Speer Triangle. Such changes will require investment and maintenance by private partners.
golden triangle neighborhood plan 85


D: livable
D2. Acoma Neighborhood Greenway
goal
Create a green, attractive, dynamic and multi-use street that is a community
social space and neighborhood identifier.
why it's important
Acoma Street is an important street for the future of the Golden Triangle.
Its quiet, calm character and short four-block length offer the potential
to create a special "slow"street designed for pleasant, easy walking and
biking for everyone. The Acoma Neighborhood Greenway will create a
new neighborhood "spine"and defining place for the community that will
complement other streets and open spaces. Gracious street trees, vibrant
sidewalk gardens, and cutting-edge design features will remake Acoma
into a true greenway. The central location of the greenway will create an
important connection between the southern end of the neighborhood to
the museums and civic buildings.This one-of-a-kind street will provide space
for quiet reflection and neighborly contact, welcome a wide range of users,
support special uses such as urban gardens, and even serve as an improved
habitat corridor for city wildlife.
projects, policies and programs
D2a. Create a specially-designed, green,"slow" street that prioritizes active
transportation enhancements such as bulb-outs, improved intersections, and bike
facilities for safe, pleasant, easy walking and biking along its length.
D2b. Encourage bold and forward-thinking design for the Greenway, using best
practices and including the most advanced and innovative features available,
potentially including:
Parklets and pocket parks
New plaza space in the right-of-way
Community gardens
Pavement features that are flush with street, creating a curbless environment
Swales, rain gardens, and other advanced stormwater management design
features
86 golden triangle neighborhood plan


D: livable
D2. Acoma Neighborhood Greenway
Programmed activities such as art festivals and farmers markets
A portion of the Arts and Culture Trail, including permanent and/or temporary
art
D2c. Capitalize on the opportunity to linkand activate the street's mix of residential,
retail, dining, small offices, neighborhood-oriented goods and services, and arts and
culture facilities.
D2d. Use the Greenway as the catalyst for a new community focal point and space
for both formal, programmed events and informal gathering.
D2e. Leverage public investment to boost private development on potential
Catalytic Development Sites along and near the Greenway.
The Acoma Neighborhood Greenway could
include promenade-like features
D2f. Create a flexible design that respond uniquely to current programmed uses and
evolves as new uses and development occurs.
D2g. Consider two bold alternatives on the section of Acoma between 9th and 10th
avenues, including:
Alternative 1: a green linear park down the middle of a slow-speed roadway
Alternative 2: a boardwalk-like promenade facilitating safe and graceful
pedestrian travel along the west side of the street
Acoma Street could incorporate flush-curb,
slow street concepts to promote play and
activity
golden triangle neighborhood plan 87


D: livable
D2. Acoma Neighborhood Greenway
Three unique blocks along Acoma Street from 9th Avenue to 12th Avenue have the opportunity to create distinct identities. Potential
concepts include from 11th to 12th avenues, a "festival street" that could be closed to automobile traffic during events; from 10th
to 11th, opportunities for art, gardens, parklets and other improvements; and from 9th to 10th, a neighborhood linear park with
cafe seating, plaza space and a dog park in conjunction with new catalytic development. Note: dimensions are approximate. Any
implementation of the proposed conditions will require further study to ensure feasibility.
11 th to 12th Avenues
10th to 12th Avenues
9thth to 10th Avenues
88 golden triangle neighborhood plan


D: livable
D2. Acoma Neighborhood Greenway
Concepts for Acoma Street between 11th and 12th avenues introduce new landscaping elements such as bulbouts, public art and
street furniture to be implemented along the existing sidewalk, buffer and parking lane. Parking lanes are potential opportunities
for additional street trees and parklets. An occasional street closure could offer opportunities for temporary events such as farmers
markets and festivals.
existing acoma street between 11th and 12th avenues

Zone Lane Lane Lane Lane Zone
70' ROW
small-scale changes to the landscape, buffer and parking lane
temporary closings for art and food festivals
golden triangle neighborhood plan 89


D: livable
D2. Acoma Neighborhood Greenway
Acoma Street between 9th and 10th avenues could offer an opportunity to create a unique type of neighborhood park space in the
southern portion of Golden Triangle. The proposed design below would only work as a private street (a public street would require
significant modifications to meet public works and fire standards). Note: dimensions are approximate. Any implementation of the
proposed conditions will require further study to ensure feasibility.
existing acoma street between 9th and 10th avenues
potential linear park
Setback/Acquired ROW
90 golden triangle neighborhood plan


D: livable
D3. Safe and Clean
goal
Ensure that the Golden Triangle is safe and clean with well-maintained
amenities that foster a livable, productive and attractive environment for
residents, workers and visitors.
why it's important
The urban mosaic of uses and users in the Golden Triangle requires the
provision of a variety of amenities and services to allow this dynamic
environment to function properly. The perception of safety is paramount,
and providing and maintaining amenities is essential to creating a lively,
vibrant public realm in which all users feel comfortable and secure. In turn,
the neighborhood's active streets and opens spaces will allow residents,
businesses and visitor attractions to prosper.
The Golden Triangle will not achieve its full
potential until crime and safety concerns are
addressed
projects, policies and programs
D3a. Establish a Golden Triangle Neighborhood advisory committee to explore
the next steps for creating organizational and funding mechanisms to support the
construction, operations and maintenance of planned improvements and programs
(see Implementation Chapter).
D3b. Establish a plan for addressing safety concerns, with clear roles and
responsibilities to guide the creation of any new or additional services or entities.
D3c. Work with utility providers to explore the feasibility of relocating overhead utility
wires to underground locations.
D3d. Consider regulatory tools, potentially through the updated zoning for the
Golden Triangle, that will require existing surface parking lots to meet minimum
standards for lighting and landscaping.
D3e. Explore tools, such as a special district, to install and maintain a consistent
network of pedestrian lighting to provide visibility and safety in evening hours.
D3f. Encourage the application for becoming a Colorado Creative District and
support its application effort.
Designation as a Colorado Creative District will make the Golden Triangle eligible
for grants and technical assistance to aid in design and creation of the Arts and
Culture Trail or other cultural amenities.
golden triangle neighborhood plan 91


\\w]


implementation
The Golden Triangle Neighborhood Plan is
designed to be implemented over time by a
broad spectrum of residents, business and
property owners, institutional stakeholders,
nonprofit organizations, City planners,
and elected and appointed officials. It is a
community-driven plan that offers realistic,
common-sense and "quick win" solutions to the
main concerns identified by stakeholders.
This does not mean, however, that the plan
thinks small, or avoids addressing the most
pressing, complex or resource-scarce issues.
On the contrary, this plan tackles the biggest
challenges head on. While some actions will be
straightforward and relatively easy to achieve,
others will demand significant investment of
time and money and will require steadfast
commitment on numerous levels.


implementation
To be successful, implementation of the broad range of goals in the Golden
Triangle Neighborhood Plan will require the implementation of numerous
strategies. In some cases, regulatory action and policy strategies may be the
best ways to facilitate implementation. In other instances, significant public,
private, or joint public-private investment may be required. As always, good
working collaboration between key stakeholders will be crucial,
and where gaps in partnerships exist, the formation of new partnerships will
be needed.
This Implementation chapter includes the following major sections:
A set of Regulatory Actions and Policy Strategies that outlines
initiatives the public sector can undertake to set the course for change
Guiding direction for a series of Partnerships that can help steer the
course for implementation
A compilation of Investment Strategies that will help in financing
plan actions and strategies
Note: these categories are intended as guides only; in reality, many goals in
this plan will require actions and strategies in more than one and perhaps
all three categories for their implementation to ultimately prove successful.
94 golden triangle neighborhood plan


implementation
regulatory actions and policy
strategies
Regulatory and policy strategies are a critical first step in creating
an effective pathway to positive change over time.
Small changes in regulations and policies can have big impacts, both
in the short-term and over the accrual of many years worth of policy
implementation. Strong and actively-managed regulations are critical in
assuring that the Golden Triangle preserves what it wants to preserve and
grows the way it wants to grow.
On the other hand, policy flexibility is important to enable and encourage
new, creative approaches to solving enduring problems that existing policies
and regulations may not have been able to fix, or may even have made
worse. Supporting this policy creativity is especially important in the Golden
Triangle, because it is a hub of creativity, arts, culture, and new energy within
Denver. Doing so will help ensure that local government is a partner rather
than an impediment to the new approaches, ideas and solutions that the
neighborhood demands.
The policy and regulation recommendations that follow offer common-sense
regulatory changes and proven policy solutions. They seek to offer steadfast
support to preserve and strengthen the best things going for the Golden
Triangle, while remaining flexible in approach and intent to help encourage
and make possible a wide range of new directions to come.
Zoning Code Updates
Urban Design Guidelines
Changes
Public Realm and Public Art
Guidelines and Requirements
Parking Policies
Green Infrastructure Policies
Any plan without the force of policy and law behind it risks sitting on a shelf,
ineffective and unused. It is therefore critical for the City of Denver to adopt
the simple change of making the Golden Triangle Neighborhood Plan itself
into a policy, requiring that all future development and change be consistent
with the goals, policies, and strategies set forth within this plan. It is especially
crucial that all plan elements are incorporated into any future Catalytic
Development project encouraged in this plan.
Recommended Regulatory Actions and Policy Strategies are shown at right
and described in detail on the following pages.
golden triangle neighborhood plan 95


implementation
key next steps
Update D-GTzoning to the Denver
Zoning Code context-based and form-
based approach.
Shift current floor area ratio (FAR)
regulations to form-based tools, such
as flexible fagade articulation and
upper-story step backs (see strategies
A2a. and A2b.).
Explore tools to encourage the reuse
of existing buildings.
Evaluate the required vehicle
parking ratios appropriate for the
neighborhood given its placement
in the Downtown Neighborhood
Context.
Incorporate minimum standards
for parking lot landscaping and
pedestrian lighting and explore ways
for existing parking lots to comply.
zoning code updates
Denver's Zoning Code, recently updated in 2010, sets forth many forward-
thinking zoning policies and regulations that can be used effectively in
advancing the goals of the Golden Triangle Plan. The regulations and policies
contained within the Denver Zoning Code are intended to provide clear
guidance and a context-based approach to regulation, and should be used as
tools to help promote the goals of the Golden Triangle. The Golden Triangle
will retain its designation in Blueprint Denver as an Area of Change, as well as
the Blueprint Denver concept land use designations.
Aligning and updating the Golden Triangle's existing regulations with
the Denver Zoning Code's context-based and form-based approach is an
important first implementation step. This will help increase predictability,
and ensure building form requirements that clarify and support the
neighborhood's design context. The updated D-GT zoning would remain in
the Downtown Neighborhood Context in the Denver Zoning Code.
The revised D-GT zoning should incorporate the recommended zoning
strategies under A2. This includes tools such as requiring pedestrian-active
uses at the ground floor to ensure a quality pedestrian experience, as well as
tools such as an upper-story mass reduction and/or upper-story setbacks to
encourage access to views and sunlight. The updated zoning should include
requirements for parking lot landscaping and pedestrian lighting and explore
ways for existing parking lots to comply.
An important goal for the new zoning should be to ensure the continued
stewardship of the Golden Triangle's diverse historic resources and to
maintain neighborhood identity. Regulatory tools that encourage and enable
the reuse of existing buildings, such as parking reductions and the Transfer
of Development Rights (TDR), should be evaluated as effective means
for preserving the neighborhood's varied design context while providing
affordable opportunities for startup businesses, galleries, artists and new
residents. The updated zoning should also explore tools to encourage the
provision of privately-owned public gathering spaces, such as parklets and
plazas, as part of new development.
96 golden triangle neighborhood plan


implementation
urban design guideline updates
With its rich culture and vibrant creative arts sector, the Golden Triangle
has unique needs and goals that demand a sensitive approach to design.
The approach must be one that holds design and development to a
high standard and at the same time flexible enough to enable and even
encourage the unexpected and unknown.
Carefully crafted and thoughtfully implemented urban design guidelines will
create the conditions for both big, bold new Catalytic Development of the
highest design quality, as well as small, unique and artistic changes to the
public and private realms even whimsical, unplanned events, and "tactical
urbanism" interventions (tactical urbanism is loosely defined as inexpensive,
small-scale projects that increase livability and inspire long-term change to
the built environment). Guidelines crafted in such a way will create conditions
such that visitors may find a world-class art museum on the same block as
a one-of-a-kind neighborhood bike corral designed by a local merchant,
welded by local metal artisans, and "yarn-bombed" by the neighbors.
Existing design guidelines should be updated to work with the updated
D-GT zoning to ensure that the height and overall mass of new development
preserves the neighborhood's diverse design context, considers area
landmarks, and is compatible with adjacent, smaller-scale buildings. At the
same time, design guidelines should introduce a range of options, including
flexible facade articulation, upper-story step-backs and other tools. These will
help ensure that the overall building mass of new development is compatible
with the diverse range of existing building scales.
It is also crucial to update the existing design guidelines in key areas to help
shape new development so it is consistent with the vision for an Eclectic,
Connected, Creative and Livable neighborhood.
Existing design guidelines should be coordinated with updated zoning
regulations, and any areas in the guidelines that do not adequately promote
current design objectives should be addressed. In particular, guidelines that
ensure pedestrian-oriented, context-sensitive design solutions applied to
all new public capital improvement and maintenance projects should be
adopted.
key next steps
Update outdated design guidelines
within the Design Guidelines for
Golden Triangle Zone District
(adopted in 2002) that are not
consistent with the Neighborhood
Plan vision and do not promote the
goals of the neighborhood. Key areas
for improvement include ensuring
a quality pedestrian experience and
encouraging new development to
respond to the surrounding context,
including cultural landmarks and
historic assets.
golden triangle neighborhood plan 97


implementation
Context-sensitive design guidance should be provided for particular and
unique neighborhood subareas such as the Broadway/Lincoln Avenue
frontage, the southern tip of the neighborhood, and the neighborhood core.
Development strategies that are consistent with Plan objectives should also
be illustrated. Urban design tools that address the street level design of new
development, including transparency, entrance location, facade articulation
and height at the sidewalk edge, are critical to ensuring a vibrant public
realm. Pedestrian connections through larger new developments should be
promoted and, whenever appropriate, required, to improve accessibility to
open space, parking areas, the Cherry Creek Greenway, and other potential
new neighborhood amenities such as the Acoma Neighborhood Greenway
and the Arts and CultureTrail.
Finally, to ensure safety and enhance crime prevention, streets, parks, plazas
and open spaces should be designed using design principles, to ensure
that buildings provide "eyes"on the space through placement of windows,
doorways and active uses, and include appropriate landscape design,
adequate lighting, and active programming.
98 golden triangle neighborhood plan


implementation
public realm and public art guidelines and
requirements
Many of the Neighborhood Plan's recommendations for enhanced public
spaces, including new public gathering spaces and pocket parks, will require
private partners for implementation. Existing entities such as business
owners, property developers ,and cultural institutions as well as new
entities, such as a special district that may form in the future, will be the best
actors to implement and maintain quality public spaces over time. At the
same time, the City should evaluate and revise policies, rules, and regulations
that relate to the public realm and public art in order to allow and promote
investment in enhanced public spaces.
Through the updated design guidelines, privately-owned public spaces on
private property should be encouraged to accommodate active uses and
to highlight pedestrian connections, primary building entrances, public art,
stops on the Arts and CultureTrail, or views to historic and civic buildings.
key next steps
Identify opportunities for private
partners, including business owners,
property developers, cultural
institutions, and future special
districts, to fund and maintain public
spaces including plazas, parklets, and
public art.
Update existing regulations, including
PublicWorks Rules and Regulations,
the City's Public Art Program, and
Design Guidelines for the Golden
Triangle and Civic Center, that are
specific to public space and public
art to make them consistent with the
vision and goals.
Public Works Rules and Regulations should be updated, as needed, to enable
the bold rethinking of the public realm that is called for in many of the
Neighborhood Plan's goals. Parklets, adding new arts and cultural elements
to the public right-of-way, and "closing" street stubs to cars in order to
"re-open" them as new open space (as identified for the SpeerTriangles), are
among the bold, transformative goals intended to foster civic engagement
and rethink use of the public realm. Existing rules and regulations may need
to be rethought to make the most efficient transition of these spaces to the
proposed new uses.
Policies that encourage or require the incorporation of public art into
development, streetscape and park improvements should likewise be
examined to assure they promote public art to the greatest extent possible
in all Golden Triangle development. Public art should be integrated into both
public and private development, not as an afterthought but as a central and
important part of any new project.
Update and streamline existing public
event, block party, and temporary
street closure regulations and
permitting to encourage arts and
culture programming and activities on
streets and in the public right-of-way.
Revise PublicWorks regulations, as
needed, to permit parklets in the
right-of-way across from businesses.
Create a City Parklet Guide to inform
development of parklet spaces.
golden triangle neighborhood plan 99


implementation
key next steps
Evaluate all parking policies to ensure
they align with and contribute to the
multi-modal travel goals in the City's
StrategicTransportation Plan.
Manage available public parking
supplies by utilizing the tools and
strategies identified in Denver's
Strategic Parking Plan (SPP)
Introduce new parking options that
serve a variety of stay-duration needs
and different modes.
Promote a "park once" environment
by creating a universally managed,
intuitive parking system so that all on-
and off-street parking inventory works
together as a system.
Construct a landmark parking facility
as needed with area partners as
demand and activity increases in the
neighborhood.
parking policies
Policies to guide the supply and utilization of on- and off-street parking
are among the most critical aspects of ensuring that the Golden Triangle
continues to transform into a vibrant neighborhood and prevents it from
simply becoming the "parking lot"for Downtown.
Large gaps currently exist in the urban fabric from the many large parcels
being used as surface parking lots today.These surface parking lots consume
substantial, valuable land within the neighborhood and can often contribute
to a poor environment for pedestrians due to a lack of investment, absence of
streetscape amenities, and low street activation. Smart parking management
policy decisions, as well as active and forward-thinking management
strategies, will play a crucial role in repairing and transforming the urban
fabric.
Parking policies should be implemented with the overarching goal of
managing on-street and off-street public parking supplies to best support
the adjacent activities and overall quality of life in the Golden Triangle. They
should also be designed to help support the multi-modal travel goals in
Denver's StrategicTransportation Plan.
To achieve the plan's goals the management tools in the City's Strategic
Parking Plan should be utilized to achieve the identified economic, social,
placemaking and design goals in this plan.
100 golden triangle neighborhood plan


Full Text

PAGE 1

NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Adopted November 10, 2014

PAGE 3

NEIGHBORHOOD PLANAdopted November 10, 2014

PAGE 4

MAYOR Michael B. Hancock DENVER CITY COUNCIL District 1 Susan Shepherd District 2 Jeanne Faatz District 3 Paul D. Lopez District 4 Peggy Lehmann District 5 Mary Beth Susman District 6 Charlie Brown District 7 Chris Nevitt District 8 Albus Brooks District 9 Judy Montero District 10 Jeanne Robb District 11 Christopher Herndon (President) At-Large Robin Kniech At-Large Deborah Ortega DENVER PLANNING BOARD Andy Baldyga Jim Bershof Shannon Giord Renee Martinez-Stone Brittany Morris Saunders Joel Noble Susan Pearce Arleen Taniwaki Julie Underdahl Frank Schultz Chris Smith COMMUNITY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT Brad Buchanan, Executive Director Steve Gordon, Planning Services Director Caryn Champine Sarah Showalter Chris Gleissner Steve Chester OFFICE OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Paul Washington, Executive Director Je Romine PUBLIC WORKS Jose Cornejo, Manager Crissy Fanganello, Transportation Director Cindy Patton Justin Schmitz Emily Snyder PARKS AND RECREATION Lauri Dannemiller, Manager Gordon Roberston, Parks Director Mark Bernstein ARTS AND VENUES Kent Rice, Executive Director Ginger White-Brunetti, Deputy Director OFFICE OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Paul Washington, Executive Director John Lucero, Deputy Director Seneca Holmes REGIONAL TRANSPORTATION DISTRICT Patrick McLaughlin Doug Monroe Lacy Bell STAKEHOLDER ADVISORY GROUP Page Bolin State Land Board Will Bright (Alternate: Dick Kisseberth) CHUN Chris Crosby Landowner Michael Eber Evans School Andrea Kalivas Fulton Denver Art Museum Rhonda Knop Golden Triangle Association Jim Kroll Denver Public Library Lindy Eichenbaum Lent Civic Center Conservancy Carol Lewis State of Colorado Anne Lindsey Golden Triangle Association Judy Morton Balustrade HOA John Olson Historic Denver Brian Phetteplace Downtown Denver Partnership Joan Prusse Clyord Still Museum Robin Riddel-Lima Golden Triangle Museum District Councilwoman Jeanne Robb City Council District 10 Margie Valdez Cultural Arts Residential Organization (CARO) Elbra Wedgeworth Denver Health Bill Wenk Business Owner CONSULTANT TEAM Daniel Iacofano, MIG Principal-inCharge Chris Beynon, MIG Project Manager Je Liljegren, MIG Ben Caldwell, MIG Marissa Reilly, MIG Lillian Jacobson, MIG Carlos Hernandez, Fox Tuttle Abe Barge, Winter and Company Matthew Prosser, EPS Andrew Knudtsen, EPS Amanda OConnor, EPS Nanci Kerr, Sky to Ground Katie Angell, Sky to GroundAcknowledgements

PAGE 5

Table of Contents introduction 6 Plan Purpose 9 Setting and Context 11 Assets, Challenges, Opportunities 15 Planning Process 24 Plan Goals 26 Plan Overview 27 vision framework 2 8Vision Framework 30 Strategy Diagram 32 A: eclectic 3 4 An Urban Mosaic 36 Contextual Design 37 Catalytic Development 42 B: connected 44Robust Mobility 46 Grand Boulevards 52 Dynamic Parking 65 C: creative 68Innovation Economy 70 Cultivation of Arts and Culture 71 Arts and Culture Trail 74 D: livable 78 Connected Open Space 80 Acoma Neighborhood Greenway 86 Safe and Clean 91implementation 92 Regulatory Actions and Policy Strategies 95 Partnerships 102 Investment Strategies 105

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6 golden triangle neighborhood plan chapter1: introduction introduction

PAGE 7

introduction World-class museums and a vibrant arts scene. Hip bistros and bars. An international destination and the center of culture and civics in Denver. Families cruising on their bikes down the Cherry Creek Greenway; residents walking their dogs down tree-lined streets. Tech entrepreneurs working on the next awesome app. Great civic spaces where the whole city celebrates the Broncos Super Bowl victory. Historic brick structures and gleaming glass towers. Visitors from Highlands Ranch to the Highlands of Scotland People building a new product, learning a new skill, exploring a new block The Golden Triangle indeed has a mix of urbanity, vitality and setting like no other neighborhood in Denver and it has yet to achieve its full potential.

PAGE 8

8 golden triangle neighborhood plan The Golden Triangle Neighborhood Plan outlines a vision, goals, plan framework, and implementation strategies for evolution and change. It builds on the areas rich and storied past while setting the course for an even brighter future. This plan proposes bold new catalytic projects, as well as tactical quick wins that can be accomplished cost-eectively and in the near term. The plan sets forth a comprehensive, holistic approach, weaving together a nuanced set of strategies that collectively will foster an Eclectic, Connected, Creative, and Livable Golden Triangle. Importantly, it will take a concerted and collaborative alignment of resources for the neighborhood to attain its vision. The City and County of Denver, relevant local and State government agencies, institutional stakeholders, residents, business and property owners, and other key parties must all be strong partners in moving the neighborhood forward. This Introduction chapter includes the following major sections: % en A Plan Purpose that outlines major project goals and charges for plan development % en A Setting and Context section, which highlights the Golden Triangles physical location and economic, social, cultural and environmental functions within the City of Denver and broader region % en An overview of key Assets, Challenges and Opportunities that form the basis for the development of plan strategies and projects % en A description of the Planning Process conducted with the community to build the plan and its various elements % en A Plan Overview that outlines the remaining chapters in the document

PAGE 9

golden triangle neighborhood plan 9 Plan PurposeMuch has changed since the original 1998 Golden Triangle Neighborhood Plan. Metro regions across the country have experienced a huge acceleration of people, resources and energy back toward their urban cores, reversing the decades-old trend of suburbanization. Building on the pioneering LoDo district of the 1990s and early 2000s, Downtown Denver has become more urban with numerous additional venues, activities and residents. The Denver Union Station area is brimming with construction and new transit investments. And, over the last decade, nearby neighborhoods such as RiNo, Highlands, and Lincoln Park have experienced a rate of development and change not seen since the early 20th century. The charge of this plan update is to respond to these broader market and social forces and ensure a viable, prosperous future for the district. Specically, the Golden Triangle Neighborhood Plan: % en Responds to extensive community input and incorporates specic ideas, recommendations and strategies that build upon that input. % en References existing plan policy documents and frameworks for the immediate neighborhood and larger citywide context. % en Addresses current issues and opportunities related to land use, urban design, parks and open space, economic development, transportation, infrastructure, and community and cultural investments. % en Provides a concise set of policies, projects and programs for achieving tangible change. % en Builds upon the mission statement from the 1998 Golden Triangle Neighborhood Plan: The Golden Triangle will become an urban village:en a mixed use neighborhood with diverse uses and usersen a walkable community with lively public spacesen an identiable neighborhood with a strong sense of placeen a unique neighborhood in which to live, work, and play

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10 golden triangle neighborhood plan LA ALMA/ LINCOLN PARK BAKER CAPITOL HILLGOLDEN TRIANGLENORTH CAPITOL HILL DOWNTOWNConvention Center U.S. Mint West High School Civic Center Park Sunken Gardens Park State Capitol Civic Center Station City & County Building Denver Art MuseumCherry Creek GreenwayDenver Library History Colorado Center Denver Health Medical Center LindseyFlanigan Justice Center Van CiseSimonet Detention Center Clyord Still Museum Ralph Carr State Justice Center Denver Art Museum Cesar E Chavez Federal Building Zeckendorf Plaza ParkN SHERMAN STE 6TH AVEE 7TH AVEE 8TH AVEE 9TH AVEE 11TH AVEE 14TH AVEE 16TH AVE E 10TH AVE E 13TH AVE W 7TH AVE COURT PL WELTON STE COLFAX AVE TREMONT PL GLENARM PL 16TH ST 13TH STW 6TH AVENUE FWY 12TH STW 12TH AVEW 8TH AVE W 9TH AVE W 10TH AVE W 11TH AVE W 12TH AVE W 12TH AVE W 13TH AVE W COLFAX AVE W 14TH AVE 14TH ST 15TH STGALAPAGO ST FOX ST ELATI ST INCA ST SANTA FE DR KALAMATH ST DELAWARE ST BANNOCK ST ACOMA ST BROADWAY LINCOLN ST BROADWAY LINCOLN STN GRANT STDELAWARE ST CHEROKEE ST BANNOCK ST ACOMA ST ELATI ST FOX ST GALAPAGO STN SPEER BLVDN SPEER BLVDW 13TH AVESANTA FE DRKALAMATH ST GALAPAGO ST Planning Area Planning Area T rans porta tion M edical/He althcare Civic Sch ool/I nstitu tion Park/Open Space Roadway 0200100 400

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golden triangle neighborhood plan 11 Setting and Contextlocations, activities and usesThe Golden Triangle is located between the Cherry Creek Greenway, the Downtown business district, Capitol Hill and La Alma/Lincoln Park in the urban core of Denver (see image below and Planning Area map on previous page). The major corridors of Speer Boulevard to the west, Colfax Avenue to the north, and Broadway/Lincoln Avenue to the east form the triangle of the district. The Golden Triangle is a midto high-density, mixed-use neighborhood that encompasses such landmarks as Civic Center Park, the State Capitol, Denver City and County Building, Denver Art Museum, History Colorado Center, Denver Public Library, Byers-Evans House Museum, Clyord Still Museum, and several other arts and cultural destinations. The district also contains a range of other uses and activities, including housing (with more than 2,100 residents), restaurants, bars, cafes, retail services, oce buildings, and more than 20 art studios and galleries. This eclectic mix helps to create a unique, vibrant neighborhood in the heart of the city. The Golden Triangle is centrally located in the heart of Denver and benets from proximity to multiple destinations just beyond its borders, including Downtown, Civic Center Station, Auraria campus and light rail station, and Capitol Hill Colfax at Auraria 10th & Osage ( 1/4 Mile 1/4 Mile 1/2 Mile 1/2 Mile State Capitol Civic Center Station West High School Denver HealthCheery Creek Convention CenterLincoln Park Civic Center Park Sunken Gardens Park Governors Park Capitol Hill Downtown Auraria La Alma/ Lincoln Park Baker Uptown City Park West Cheesman Park Colfax 16th Ave 14th Ave 13th Ave 12th Ave 11th Ave 10th Ave 9th Ave 8th Ave 6th Ave Lincoln BroadwaySpeer Blvd

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12 golden triangle neighborhood plan historySteeped in history and culture, the Golden Triangle started as a part of the growing Denver settlement in the mid to late 1800s. Historic landmarks from this era include the Byers-Evans House (1883), Evans School (1904), St. Marks Parish Church (1889), Ten-Winkel Towers (1893), and U.S. Mint (1906). The State Capitol was built in the late 1890s. Major planning and construction of new government and cultural facilities followed during the City Beautiful movement of the early 20th century as part of the Civic Center Master Plan at the crossroads of Colfax Avenue and Broadway. Large concerts and events were held in Civic Center Park, down the street from a mix of proud Victorian homes, ramshackle dwellings, and a variety of retail and industrial uses. During this time, Speer Boulevard was also constructed on the west edge of the district along Cherry Creek. This period of infrastructure investment was followed by the creation of Automobile Row along Broadway and Lincoln Avenue during the middle decades of the 20th century. These auto dealerships fostered a range of service stations and other automobile-oriented uses, with bustling commerce and activity. By the 1970s and 80s, however, many of these uses left for the suburbs as disinvestment impacted the Golden Triangle and much of Downtown Denver. Many properties sat vacant or were demolished to make room for surface parking lots to serve the Downtown business district. Beginning in the 1990s and into the early 2000s, interest was renewed in the Golden Triangle. Civic, cultural and justice facilities experienced a new wave of investment, including expansion of the Denver Public Library and Denver Art Museum. The neighborhood attracted an array of residential redevelopment, design oces, art galleries, restaurants, cafes and retail services, creating a neighborhood with rich architectural diversity. The previous Golden Triangle Neighborhood Plan, adopted in 1998, guided many of these investments and activities. Civic Center Park is the historic anchor of Denvers major civic and cultural facilities Automobile Row thrived along Broadway and Lincoln Avenue in the middle of the 20th century Housing development has increased dramatically in recent years

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golden triangle neighborhood plan 13 The Great Recession that began in 2008 slowed development activity, but today new residences, oce expansions, and other developments are now being built at a rapid pace. Tenants and owners are drawn to the Golden Triangles urban vibe as well as its proximity to the range of Downtown workplaces, entertainment and sporting venues, cultural facilities, recreational resources, and nearby neighborhoods.what is a neighborhood plan?A Neighborhood Plan is a policy document that provides guidance to City and County of Denver ocials and sta, addresses a communitys unique issues, sets the course for future change, and provides a vision for future policy, decisions and regulations. It is a tool to enhance the economic vibrancy, character, and overall health and quality of a neighborhood. The Citys Comprehensive Plan provides guidance for the development of all Neighborhood Plans, which help to implement community objectives to help protect Denvers legacy. Plan policy direction particularly relevant to the Golden Triangle includes: Comprehensive Plan 2000 Vision % en Denver believes historic preservation of signicant structures, features and landscapes contributes to its distinctive character, environment, culture, economy and quality of neighborhoods. % en Preservation and respectful urban design will reinforce the distinctive identities of Denvers historic neighborhoods, including structures, landscapes and views. Comprehensive Plan 2000 Strategies % en Preserve Denvers architectural and design legacies while allowing new ones to evolve. % en Use the neighborhood planning process to uncover an areas cultural values and take steps to honor their signicance. The Golden Triangle Neighborhood Plan, which replaces the 1998 Golden Triangle Neighborhood Plan, builds upon this direction while providing detailed, neighborhood-specic strategies to help the area evolve in response to changing conditions. The Plan supplements and renes the vision for the Golden Triangle from the 20007 Downtown Denver Area Plan. Denvers Comprehensive Plan sets the high-level policy guidance for the city and the Golden Triangle. Other plans that informed the development of the Neighborhood Plan include Blueprint Denver, Game Plan, Civic Center District Master Plan, Downtown Denver Area Plan, and Imagine 2020. The Golden Triangle Neighborhood Plan builds upon the vision and key recommendations for the Golden Triangle from the Downtown Denver Area Plan, adopted in 2007.

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14 golden triangle neighborhood plan LA ALMA/ LINCOLN PARK BAKER CAPITOL HILLGOLDEN TRIANGLENORTH CAPITOL HILL DOWNTOWNConvention Center U.S. Mint West High School Civic Center Park Sunken Gardens Park State Capitol Civic Center Station City & County BuildingCherry Creek GreenwayDenver Library History Colorado Center Denver Health Medical Center LindseyFlanigan Justice Center Van CiseSimonet Detention Center Clyord Still Museum Ralph Carr State Justice Center Denver Art Museum Cesar E Chavez Federal Building Zeckendorf Plaza ParkN SHERMAN STE 6TH AVEE 7TH AVEE 8TH AVEE 9TH AVEE 11TH AVEE 14TH AVEE 16TH AVE E 10TH AVE E 13TH AVE W 7TH AVE COURT PL WELTON STE COLFAX AVE TREMONT PL GLENARM PL 16TH ST 13TH STW 6TH AVENUE FWY 12TH STW 12TH AVEW 8TH AVE W 9TH AVE W 10TH AVE W 11TH AVE W 12TH AVE W 12TH AVE W 13TH AVE W COLFAX AVE W 14TH AVE 14TH ST 15TH STGALAPAGO ST FOX ST ELATI ST INCA ST SANTA FE DR KALAMATH ST DELAWARE ST BANNOCK ST ACOMA ST BROADWAY LINCOLN ST BROADWAY LINCOLN STN GRANT STDELAWARE ST CHEROKEE ST BANNOCK ST ACOMA ST ELATI ST FOX ST GALAPAGO STN SPEER BLVDN SPEER BLVDW 13TH AVESANTA FE DRKALAMATH ST GALAPAGO STW COLFAX AVE Auraria Garage/Carport Single-Family Multi-Family Parking Garage Public/Quasi-Public Parks/Recreation Entertainment-Cultural Industrial Mixed USe Commercial/Retail Oce TCU (Transportation, Communication, Utilities) 0200100 400Existing Land Use

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golden triangle neighborhood plan 15 Assets, Challenges, OpportunitiesFollowing are several existing assets, current challenges, and potential opportunities for the Golden Triangle. These underlying conditions form the foundation for development of the Plan Strategies and Projects outlined in Chapter 3. For more information, see the Existing Conditions Report on the Citys website at: www.denvergov.org/goldentriangle.land uses % en The Golden Triangle is a midto high-density mixed-use neighborhood that has substantial oce, residential, and hospitality uses, as well as cultural and government facilities (see Existing Land Use diagram on the previous page). % en Moderate concentrations of retail, dining and entertainment uses in the neighborhood % en The concentration of government facilities located in the northern end of the Golden Triangle creates a void of activity after weekday work hours and on weekends. % en There is a signicant concentration of bail bond uses in the northern part of the neighborhood, with many occupying formerly residential buildings. % en Many sites are relatively underutilized with surface parking lots or one-story structures. A mix of high-rise residential buildings, oces, retail and commercial services, and surface parking lots characterize the neighborhood

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16 golden triangle neighborhood plan Golden TriangleCapitol Hill North Capitol Hill Speer Baker La Alma/ Lincoln ParkConvention Center U.S. Mint West High School Civic Center Park Sunken Gardens Park State Capitol Civic Center Station City & County Building Denver Art MuseumCherry Creek GreenwayDenver Library History Colorado Center Denver Health Medical Center LindseyFlanigan Justice Center Van CiseSimonet Detention Center Clyord Still Museum Ralph Carr State Justice Center Cesar E Chavez Federal Building Zeckendorf Plaza ParkCULTURAL CORE COMMERCIAL COREN SHERMAN STE 6TH AVEE 7TH AVEE 8TH AVEE 9TH AVEE 11TH AVEE 14TH AVE E 16TH AVE E 10TH AVE E 13TH AVE W 7TH AVE COURT PL WELTON STE COLFAX AVE TREMONT PL GLENARM PL 16TH ST 13TH STW 6TH AVENUE FWY 12TH STW 12TH AVEW 8TH AVE W 9TH AVE W 10TH AVE W 11TH AVE W 12TH AVE W 12TH AVE W 13TH AVE W COLFAX AVE W 14TH AVE 14TH ST 15TH STGALAPAGO ST FOX ST ELATI ST INCA ST SANTA FE DR KALAMATH ST DELAWARE ST BANNOCK ST ACOMA ST BROADWAY LINCOLN ST BROADWAY LINCOLN STN GRANT STDELAWARE ST CHEROKEE ST BANNOCK ST ACOMA ST ELATI ST FOX ST GALAPAGO STN SPEER BLVDN SPEER BLVDW 13TH AVE W 14TH AVESANTA FE DRKALAMATH ST GALAPAGO STW COLFAX AVE Auraria D-GT District D-CV District OS Districts Planned Unit Development Civic Center Height Limits Capitol Mountain View Plane Planning Area Roadway Existing Zoning 0200100 400

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golden triangle neighborhood plan 17 zoningThe Golden Triangles existing zoning districts (see Existing Zoning diagram on the previous page) include: % enDowntown Golden Triangle (D-GT), covers most of the neighborhood. When the Denver Zoning Code was created in 2010, the D-GT zone district was created. It retained most of the standards from the 1994 B-8-G zoning since the 1998 Golden Triangle Neighborhood Plan did not provide the guidance desired to create a new context-based zoning for the Golden Triangle. The D-GT zone district does benet from many elements of the 2010 Denver Zoning Code, including updated o-street parking ratios. % enDowntown Civic (D-CV), which covers Civic Center buildings and was a part of the 2010 Code Update. % enOpen Space (OS-A and OS-C), which covers Civic Center Park and the Cherry Creek Greenway. % enPlanned Unit Development (PUD), which covers the Denver Justice Center. Note: PUD and B-8-G zoning with Planning Building Groups (PBGs) are not part of the 2010 Denver Zoning Code, and are subject to Former Chapter 59. % enB-8-G with PBGs, which covers a portion of the Denver Art Museum complex south of 13th Avenue and a small area along Cherokee Street between 10th and 11th avenues. Key standards in the D-GT district currently include guidelines related to minimum open space per unit, maximum building setbacks, maximum building heights (175 feet as measured from Broadway approximately 16 residential or 15 commercial stories), and maximum Floor Area Ratio.Building heights vary throughout the district. A key concern expressed by community members is the impact of bail bonds uses on the surrounding neighborhood

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18 golden triangle neighborhood plan The Byers-Evans house is one of the neighborhoods several signicant historic structuresdesign standards and guidelines % en The 2002 Design Guidelines for the Golden Triangle/B-8-G Zone District (the pre-2010 zoning designation for most of the neighborhood) currently apply to the neighborhood. They address: % en Site planning, including the street grid, pedestrian circulation, building placement, private open spaces and landscaping. % en Building form, including massing, faades and materials % en Neighborhood subareas, including Broadway/Lincoln Avenue, Acoma and Speer Boulevard % en Design review premiums (Floor Area Ratio incentives for voluntary design review) % en Public art premiums (Floor Area Ratio incentives to promote public art)neighborhood history and landmarks % en The Golden Triangle contains several historic buildings and districts. % en Many potential resources are not currently designated as historic landmarks. % en Limited protection exists for buildings that are not designated. % en Historic rehabilitation projects are often specialized and require specic project experience for successful redevelopment. % en Historic interior layouts can be limited and less exible than what some current businesses desire. % en Rehabilitations can require additional investment to bring properties up to market standards. Financing tools, such as historic tax credits, are available to help cover the costs of historic rehabilitation. Art and green commingle in many spaces around the Civic Center Cultural Complex

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golden triangle neighborhood plan 19 A range of building heights is found throughout the Golden Triangle urban design and community character % en The Golden Triangle exhibits a variety of architectural styles, patterns and vernaculars. % en The Civic Center Cultural Complex sets a dramatic design tone for the northern part of the Golden Triangle. % en Building heights vary from two to 17 stories throughout the district. % en Multiple surface parking lots are underutilized and do not actively contribute to a high quality urban pedestrian environment, forming missing teeth in the urban fabric. % en There is a general lack of pedestrian amenities, including pedestrianscale lighting and furnishings, enhanced intersections, accessible and widened sidewalks with ADA compliant ramps, waynding and signage, and attractive transit stop treatments. % en There is a lack of green character to the neighborhood, including inconsistent street trees/canopy and sidewalk plantings. % en The neighborhood does not have many centralized places for community gathering.The Civic Center Cultural Complex sets a bold, modern design tone Portions of the neighborhood have a poor quality pedestrian environment

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20 golden triangle neighborhood plan The Golden Triangle is a popular route and destination for bicyclistsmobility and parking % en The Golden Triangle enjoys high-frequency transit service on Broadway/ Lincoln that can be accessed within a ve minute walk from most destinations in the neighborhood. In addition RTD has 17 routes in and adjacent to the neighborhood, as well as the Colfax at Auraria light rail station, just west of Golden Triangles northwest corner. % en Many Golden Triangle residents walk to work, shopping, services, and other transportation modes. % en Residents, workers and visitors ride bicycles for multiple reasons, including transportation and recreation; some use nearby B-Cycle bikeshare facilities. % en There are four miles of existing Denver Moves bicycle facilities in the neighborhood. % en The neighborhood has an interconnected street grid that is integrated with an extensive system of alleys and sidewalks. At Colfax, the neighborhood street grid intersects with the Downtown street grid. % en Automobile trac in the neighborhood core illustrates relatively low volumes and speeds. % en Automobile trac counts on the edges of the neighborhood, including Speer Boulevard, Colfax Avenue, and Broadway/Lincoln Avenue, show patterns of higher volumes and speeds. % en Most of the surface public parking lots are in the north end of the neighborhood, serving adjacent government institutions, cultural facilities and the Downtown business district. % en Private carsharing is available from a range of providers oering dierent service models. % en While some areas have strong pedestrian facilities with clearly marked pedestrian crossings and bulbouts, many areas need enhanced intersections to improve safety and comfort for all users. There are many surface parking lots in the Golden Triangle, particularly in the northern part of the neighborhood

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golden triangle neighborhood plan 21 parks and open space % en The Golden Triangles Civic Center Park, Cherry Creek Greenway, Sunken Gardens Park and various public plazas provide green and open spaces for the neighborhood. % en Civic Center Park is a City Beautiful-designed park that showcases various amenities such as an amphitheater, war memorial and formal gardens. It hosts many of the regions most important cultural and civic events. % en The Cherry Creek Greenway is a highly utilized 40-mile multi-use trail that connects Conuence Park in Downtown Denver to Cherry Creek Reservoir and beyond. A stretch of the Greenway comprises the neighborhoods western edge. % en Pedestrians and bicyclists frequent the Cherry Creek Greenway, which provides a green respite in the middle of Speer Boulevard, but can be challenging and uncomfortable to access from the Golden Triangle. There is also a need for new, safe access points at locations where connections to the trail do not currently exist. % en Game Plan, Denvers Parks strategic plan highlights four main values: sustainability, equity, engagement and sound economics. % en Several plaza spaces, both public and private, are found in the northern portion of the neighborhood. % en Sunken Gardens Park and Zeckendorf Plaza sit along the southern and western edges of the neighborhood and are connected by the Cherry Creek Greenway. However, these resources are disconnected from much of the neighborhood due to the expanse of Speer Boulevard. % en Social issues, crime and safety are concerns, as well as the lack of smaller, neighborhood-oriented spaces to serve area residents. % en The portion of the neighborhood south of 12th Avenue lacks parks or usable space tailored to local needs.The Cherry Creek Greenway is a beautiful green buer on the neighborhoods western edge Civic Center Park is a major asset that hosts a variety of cultural and civic events

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22 golden triangle neighborhood plan A range of housing types has been built in recent years The Golden Triangle is beginning to attract greater numbers of restaurants, cafes and bars economic development % en Recent development within the Golden Triangle has resulted in varied and eclectic architectural styles integrating a wide variety of uses throughout the neighborhood. % en New development since 2000 has been predominantly public oce buildings, cultural attractions and multi-family residential buildings. % en The majority of new retail or oce space has been incorporated into larger residential mixed-use buildings, with a very limited amount of stand-alone retail or oce development. % en Commercial uses are primarily clustered along Broadway, Lincoln, and 11th Avenue. % en There is little vacant land within the Golden Triangle; however, there are many surface parking lots and parcels with buildings valued at less than half of the value of the land they are on, presenting some opportunities for redevelopment. % en Oce and retail spaces are less valuable and rent for lower rates than property in the greater Downtown area. However, the value of the land in the neighborhood is about the same as the rest of the Downtown area.

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golden triangle neighborhood plan 23 In addition to the myriad arts venues, programs such as art walks and tours enhance the neighborhoodcivic, arts and culture uses % en The Golden Triangle has a high concentration of cultural and arts-related amenities, businesses, and attractions. In many ways, these uses and activities characterize much of the Golden Triangle as an arts district or museum district. Within the Downtown area, the Golden Triangle plays a vital role as a center for civic and cultural destinations. % en Public and cultural uses are the predominant uses along 13th and 14th avenues. % en The range of arts-related uses includes the Denver Art Museum, Clyord Still Museum, other art museums, art galleries, design services employers, visual arts related businesses, performing arts studios and oces, theaters, media outlets and two art schools.infrastructure % en Denvers District Steam System is located underground and partially within the Golden Triangle. An engineering assessment by Public Service Company of Colorado in 2013 stated that the system is regularly maintained and in overall good condition. % en Some of the areas electrical system has been relocated underground, although portions remain overhead. % en Due to its location at the downstream end of a major basin, the undersized clay pipe system is overwhelmed and rendered useless during major storm events. The Denver Storm Drainage Masterplan recommends these systems to be replaced and upsized to carry minor storm drainage and alleviate ooding during a major storm. % en Minimal on-site stormwater treatment exists in the neighborhood. As shown in the City of Denver Sanitary Sewer Plat Maps, the vast majority of the system is clay pipe that may be over a century old, therefore making it dicult to rate the overall condition of the existing system. % en Minimal on-site water quality stormwater treatment was provided with previously developed properties. % en In areas where ponding occurs, storm drainage storage may be able to be integrated into a landscaped area, providing opportunities for rain gardens and other water quality features.

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24 golden triangle neighborhood plan Planning ProcessFrom its inception in summer 2013, the Golden Triangle Neighborhood Plan was built from the extensive, thoughtful input of the Golden Triangle community. A range of ideas, concepts and visions was expressed during the planning process by a wide variety of stakeholders, including Golden Triangle residents, employers, workers and visitors. This plan coalesces the major points of community direction and inspiration, coupled with technical analysis and recommendations. It outlines key policy direction and strategies, while using an array of graphics and illustrations to visualize future improvements. The project included extensive community input opportunities and outreach tools to keep people informed, including: % en Community-wide workshops % en Project website % en Intercept surveys, conducted at Civic Center Eats and Taste of Colorado events % en Developer forum % en Community open house % en Public meetings and hearings % en Email updates % en Press releases SUMMER 2013 Existing Conditions and Visioning FALL 2013 Concepts and Alternatives WINTER 2013 SPRING 2014 Preliminary Framework Plan SPRING FALL 2014 Draft and Final Neighborhood Plan The community articulated numerous goals, concerns and ideas during public workshops The Citys website is a valuable tool for engaging the community The planning process included four major phases

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golden triangle neighborhood plan 25 A special aspect of the planning process was a pop-up demonstration event called Triangle Transformations, which took place in September 2013. This workshop engaged community members in the right-of-way of Acoma Street between 11th and 12th avenues. Participants interacted with a series of pilot project ideas, including new congurations to the street design, as well as poster boards and other displays. Music, outdoor activities, and food were all part of the event. Triangle Transformations attracted people from the neighborhood and its surroundings, as well as many national and international visitors who simply happened upon this unique experience. Two advisory groups also shaped the plan and process. A Stakeholder Advisory Group representing key community, institutional and government partners steered development of the plan concepts over several meetings. In addition, a Sta Working Group comprised of City and County of Denver sta and agency partners provided technical expertise and direction over the course of the plan. These groups and their members are listed in the Acknowledgments at the beginning of the document. For more information, see the Community Engagement and Outreach Input Summary on the Citys website at: www.denvergov.org/goldentriangle. Triangle Transformations included several interactive demonstrations and input exercises Community members expressed what they value most about the Golden Triangle Community forums attracted residents, workers, property and business owners, developers and other community members

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26 golden triangle neighborhood plan Plan Goals The Golden Triangle Neighborhood Plan is guided by several important goals that were developed from the extensive community input during the planning process. As the plan strategies are implemented, they should be measured and monitored in how they achieve these goals. While each strategy does not respond to every goal equally, they all work together to establish a common vision and direction. In no particular order, the goals are: GOAL 2: Capitalize on development opportunities and ensure appropriate land use mix, zoning and urban design GOAL 6: Increase mobility options that link the neighborhood internally and to surrounding destinations and leverage the near and long term transit services catalyzed by Civic Center improvements GOAL 4: Establish a parks and open space hierarchy that supports a livable neighborhood, including ways to improve Civic Center Park GOAL 8: Maintain and enhance the established arts community to foster a creative and connected culture within the neighborhood GOAL 3: Leverage opportunities with the areas major public and civic facilities and address associated impacts that aect the neighborhood GOAL 7: Enhance neighborhood edges of Broadway, Lincoln, Colfax and Speer Boulevard to improve multimodal connectivity, support economic development, and enhance livability and the environment GOAL 1: Ensure an economically vibrant, diverse and sustainable Golden Triangle that incorporates a range of users, including residents, workers and visitors GOAL 5: Foster strong connections through improved access and circulation for all modes, including pedestrian, bicyclists, transit and automobiles

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golden triangle neighborhood plan 27 Plan OverviewThe Golden Triangle Neighborhood Plan is a strategic, action-oriented document. It provides a range of implementation actions and provides a sound policy basis for future decision-making. Each plan section helps tell the story of the Golden Triangle and how it will become an even better place in the years ahead. Following this Introduction chapter, the remainder of the Golden Triangle Neighborhood Plan consists of the following:Vision FrameworkThis chapter establishes the high-level vision for the neighborhoods future, including several important plan goals. It introduces four Vision Elements, which are supported by 12 main Strategies and four Transformative Projects. It also includes a Strategy Diagram, which highlights important physical improvement opportunities in the Golden Triangle. Plan Strategies and ProjectsThese chapters expands upon the Vision Elements, Strategies and Transformative Projects. They identify key policies, projects and programs for each Vision Element: Eclectic, Connected, Creative, Livable, including technical information and numerous graphics, illustrations and photos to give life to each idea and concept. ImplementationThis chapter outlines the major actions and ongoing commitment required to implement the plan and realize the vision for the Golden Triangle.

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28 golden triangle neighborhood plan vision framework

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vision framework The Vision Framework establishes the blueprint for how the Golden Triangle neighborhood will grow and evolve over the next decade and beyond. It provides answers to questions such as: What are our goals as a community? How do those goals translate to a commonly held vision for the future? What should the physical character of the Golden Triangle look and feel like? And how should the district function, so that it is an attractive place that also makes neighborhood residents, workers and visitors engaged, healthy and productive?

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30 golden triangle neighborhood plan Vision Framework The Vision Framework reects community input collected throughout the planning and design process, as well as previous plans and existing policies that help shape the neighborhood and its surrounding context. Guided by this framework, the remainder of the Golden Triangle Neighborhood Plan articulates a range of strategies and concepts. This chapter includes two major components: a Vision Framework Diagram and a Strategy Diagram. vision framework diagramThe Vision Framework Diagram is a one-stop plan on a page that illustrates the key building blocks of the Golden Triangle Neighborhood Plan. The diagram includes three major components that will bolster the Golden Triangle as a vital, healthy neighborhood and bring about tangible change: % enVision Elements: The four Vision Elements Eclectic, Connected, Creative and Livable build on the existing character of the Golden Triangle while setting a course for a dynamic, interconnected mosaic of people, places and activities. Each of the elements work together to form a cohesive, long-term vision for the neighborhood. % enStrategies: An array of strategies, ranging from short-term quick win improvements to midand long-term investments, is outlined in the categories under each Vision Element. % enTransformative Projects: Including opportunities and partnerships both for the public and private sectors, these signature projects embody bold ideas that implement more than one plan recommendation and that will have great impact on the Golden Triangle in the coming years. A unique mix of land uses and characterA. EclecticA1. An Urban Mosaic A2. Contextual Design A3. Catalytic DevelopmentVISION ELEMENTS STRATEGIES TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECTSA1. An Urban Mosaic A2. Contextual Design A3. Catalytic Development A3. Catalytic Development T S O A1. Urban Mosaic A2. Conte xtual Design A3. Catalytic Development Together, the Vision Elements, Strategies and Transformative Projects are the most critical steps to advance the Golden Triangles future. These components are outlined in full detail in the following chapters.

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golden triangle neighborhood plan 31 B. Connected Walkable, bikeable neighborhood with great transitC. Creative D. LivableWorld class hub of arts, culture and economic innovation Attractive, safe place for social gathering, recreation and living B1. Robust Mobility B2. Grand Boulevards B3. Dynamic Parking C1. Innovation Economy C2. Cultivation of Arts and Culture C3. Arts and Culture Trail D1. Connected Open Spaces D2. Acoma Neighborhood Greenway D3. Safe and Clean C3. Arts and Culture Trail D2. Acoma Neighborhood Greenway B2. Grand Boulevards ACOMA ST ACOMA ST Golden Triangle Learning Center Metropolitan Lofts La Rumba Denver HealthACOMA ST ACOMA ST W 12TH AVE W 10TH AVE W 9TH AVEACOMA ST Evans School Family Flex Curious Theatre Company Golden Triangle Learning Center Denver Art Museum Extension Metropolitan Lofts La Rumba Catalytic Development Site Catalytic Development Site Catalytic Development Site Catalytic Development Site Urban Roots Denver Health Catalytic Development Site

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32 golden triangle neighborhood plan While a mix of uses is encouraged throughout the Golden Triangle, several general hubs of activity provide opportunities for clustering like uses, supporting economic development, and creating brand identity. The Golden Triangle abounds with a rich collection of arts and culture facilities, venues and programs. The potential Arts and Culture Trail will link these attractions, bring life and vitality to the streets, and extend outward to surrounding Downtown districts (see pages 74-77). Note: the route shown is for illustrative purposes only. Colfax Avenue, Speer Boulevard and Broadway/Lincoln Avenue are re-envisioned as Grand Boulevards with improved pedestrian and bike facilities, enhanced transit, and placemaking (see pages 52-64). Several streets internal to the neighborhood play important roles in strengthening corridors focused on housing, arts and culture, and retail (see page 83). Existing open spaces will continue to provide opportunities for active and passive recreation, community experiences, and a connection to nature (see pages 80-85). strategy diagram The Strategy Diagram (see following page) illustrates in map form the physical concepts and strategies that will continue the Golden Triangles evolution. The neighborhood already has numerous assets Civic Center Park, premier civic and cultural facilities, the Cherry Creek Greenway, a network of walkable streets, a strategic and central location. The improvements in the Strategy Diagram build upon these unique features to create a fully interconnected, vibrant and well-designed urban fabric with multiple opportunities for community enhancement and investment. Key elements of the Strategy Diagram include:catalytic development new open spaces grand boulevards acoma neighborhood greeenway key streets There are numerous opportunities to expand the existing network of open spaces, especially through spaces that are are privately owned and maintained. These spaces can range from neighborhood gathering spaces to temporary or permanent transformations of Speer Triangles (see pages 80-85). With an array of design, land use, and programmatic interventions, Acoma Street can transform into a green street that connects key destinations and fosters a unique sense of identity (see pages 86-90). Underutilized parcels are opportune spaces for catalytic development. These transformative projects will activate key locations and enhance the neighborhoods economic health and social vibrancy (see pages 42 and 43). open spaces arts and culture trail civic and institutional arts and culture creative mixeduse and residential oce/medical services

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golden triangle neighborhood plan 33 Arts and Culture Trail Strategy DiagramRoadway Parcel golden triangle neighborhood planPlanning Area Priority Intersection ImprovementsGreen Corridors0 400400 200 600 feetN Open SpaceBike Facility Potenial Park Spaces Catalytic Developments Grand BoulevardRoadwayCreative Mixed-Use Arts and Culture Trail Civic Center Park Sunken Gardens ParkCherry Creek GreenwayE 6TH AVEE 8TH AVEE 9TH AVEE 10TH AVE W 7TH AVE E 7TH AVEE COLFAX AVEW 6TH AVENUE FWYW 8TH AVE W 9TH AVE W 10TH AVEW 12TH AVE W 11TH AVEW 12TH AVEW 13TH AVE W COLFAX AVEFOX ST ELATI ST INCA ST DELAWARE ST ACOMA STLINCOLN ST BROADWAY LINCOLN ST BROADWAYN GRANT STELATI ST FOX STN SPEER BLVD W 14TH AVE SANTA FE DR KALAMATH ST DELAWARE ST CHEROKEE ST BANNOCK ST ACOMA STN SPEER BLVD Civic and Institutional Arts and Culture Creative Mixed-Use and Residential Oce/Medical Service

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a. an eclectic Golden Triangle

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a. eclectic The Golden Triangle is largely dened by its unique mix of land uses and character. Modern museums abut historic schools, civic and industrial buildings. Single-family homes sit across the street from neighborhood coee shops and funky boutiques, just down the way from glass-framed oces and destination civic facilities. Building heights ow from low to high to low again, and everything in between. Surface parking lots form missing teeth in the landscape, impacting the areas walkability but also oering opportunities for new development. And through it all the grand sweeps of Civic Center Park and the Cherry Creek Greenway provide green, appealing respites from the bustle of activity. It is this patchwork of uses and places a rich, textured urban mosaic that makes the Golden Triangle a truly distinct neighborhood in the Denver region. With a focus on the interplay between land use, urban design, and economic vitality, several strategies are required to maintain and enhance the qualities of this Eclectic neighborhood. These include: A1. An Urban Mosaic A2. Contextual Design A3. Catalytic Development

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36 golden triangle neighborhood plan goalContinue and enhance the patchwork of diverse land uses, places and spaces that provide creative energy, a distinctive neighborhood identity, and vibrant street activity.why its importantThe Golden Triangles eclectic character is a strength to be built upon, not a liability to be cast aside in the search for a new, more uniform identity. The neighborhoods diversity of largeand small-scale land uses from oces, civic facilities, and cultural venues to restaurants, shops and housing is one of its best assets. This mix provides an authentic identity and creative culture that distinguish the neighborhood and enhance its appeal to a broad population of residents and users. Strengthening and enhancing this urban mosaic in future growth and development is key to making the Golden Triangle an even better place in the years ahead. The Golden Triangle is designated as an Area of Change in Blueprint Denver. It will remain as an Area of Change designation that will support continued growth and evolution into a unique mixed-use neighborhood.projects, policies and programsA1a. Maintain zoning that allows for a range of land use types, thereby encouraging a variety of development types.A1b. Encourage and support development that fosters a broad range of housing opportunities for existing and new residents.A1d. Allow for and promote a range of arts-related land uses, to preserve the distinctive artistic character and cultivate a new creative class of artists to enrich the neighborhood.A1e. Consider a range of office development and business incubation incentives to provide flexible and attractive space for the innovation economy to thrive in the Golden Triangle. A1. An Urban Mosaic Part of the neighborhoods unique strength and vibe comes from its many land uses Small neighborhood-serving retail shops and services are part of the urban mosaic

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golden triangle neighborhood plan 37 A2. Contextual DesignNew zoning and design guidelines must promote a walkable, attractive and inviting environment for pedestrians Public plazas and parks should be designed to relate well with the adjacent buildings and context goalPromote redevelopment that brings new residents and activities to the neighborhood while reinforcing its eclectic design context and pedestrianoriented character why its importantThe Golden Triangle includes historic houses, commercial buildings, large new apartment or condominium buildings and other structures with a diverse range of scale and design. Redevelopment that ts the neighborhoods eclectic context will promote a unique identity while providing opportunities for new businesses and residents. New development, as well as any changes to the zoning and design guidelines, should recognize the unique mixed-use, pedestrian-oriented character that makes the Golden Triangle part of the Downtown Neighborhood Context in the Denver Zoning Code.projects, policies and programsA2a. Update the zoning and design guidelines to promote a high quality pedestrian experience. % en Implement tools to promote pedestrian-friendly street level design, including transparency, consistent build-to requirements for buildings, entrance location, faade articulation and height at the sidewalk edge. % en Promote pedestrian connections through larger new developments to access public space, parking areas, the Cherry Creek Greenway, the Acoma Greenway or an established Arts and Culture Trail. % en Encourage the provision of privately owned public gathering spaces that are designed to be actively used while highlighting pedestrian connections, primary building entrances, public art, stops on an established Arts and Culture Trail, or views to historic and civic buildings. % en Require pedestrian-active uses, such as retail, restaurants, and galleries, at the ground level of new development.A2b. Update the zoning and design guidelines to ensure that the height and overall mass of new development preserves the neighborhoods design context and is compatible with adjacent, smaller-scale buildings.

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38 golden triangle neighborhood plan A2. Contextual Design % en Continue to allow a maximum building height of 16-18 stories throughout the Golden Triangle. % en Introduce a range of options, including upper-story setbacks and faade articulation tools, to ensure that the overall building mass of new development is compatible with the existing diverse range of building scales. % en Implement tools to preserve access to views and sunlight, such as upper-story mass reduction.A2c. Encourage the reuse of existing buildings to preserve the neighborhoods varied design context while providing affordable opportunities for startup businesses, galleries, artists and new residents. % en Consider parking exceptions or exemptions for renovation or reuse of existing buildings (including historic structures). Such parking reductions should be coordinated with existing Denver Zoning Code exceptions for historic structures. % en Evaluate regulatory tools, including building code requirements, that could be revised to encourage the reuse of existing structures. % en Analyze the effectiveness of Transfer of Development Rights (TDR), a tool in the existing zoning, and consider how it or a similar tool could be utilized in the updated zoning to encourage the reuse of existing structures.A2d. Promote preservation of the Golden Triangles diverse historic resources to maintain neighborhood identity. % en Consider exceptions to zoning requirements, such as building height or mass reduction, for projects that include preservation of historic structures. % en Update the inventory of historic resources, especially buildings with the potential for historic designation, as part of the Discover Denver citywide historic survey. % en Identify historic buildings that may be at risk for demolition and ensure that owners are aware of incentives and benefits related to historic designation.A2e. Transition the D-GT zone district to the Denver Zoning Code contextand formbased approach to streamline the development process and increase predictability. % en Organize updated zoning by building form. % en Allow a diverse range of building forms and standards to support the neighborhoods eclectic design context. Design standards and guidelines for faade articulation would promote variations in the building plane, such as wall osets, pilasters, or other features that reduce monotony and create patterns of light and shadow A zoning requirement for upper-story setbacks from the street would help create a highquality pedestrian experience and preserve access to sunlight and views

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golden triangle neighborhood plan 39 The varying scale and rhythm of the neighborhoods buildings should continue to be strengthened A2. Contextual Design % en Shift current floor area ratio (FAR) regulations to form-based tools (see A2a. and A2b. above). % en Adjust height measurement to be consistent with the 2010 Denver Zoning Code, which measures the height of a building from the elevation of its site, as opposed to the current D-GT zone district, which measures building height from the elevation of Broadway. % en Consider transitioning existing floor area ratio premiums to updated form-based zoning incentives for affordable housing, public art, and/or arts, entertainment, and cultural facilities. The updated zoning should also consider tools to encourage the provision of privately-owned public spaces on private property.A2f. Update the existing design guidelines to help shape new development that is consistent with the plan vision. % en Identify where the existing design guidelines do not adequately promote current design objectives, ensuring that the guidelines build on new form-based tools. % en Coordinate the design guidelines with updated zoning regulations. % en Illustrate development strategies that are consistent with plan objectives, such as incorporating existing buildings into new development or creating strong pedestrian connections. % en Provide context-sensitive design guidance for neighborhood subareas such as the Broadway/Lincoln Avenue frontage, the southern tip of the neighborhood and the neighborhood core. New development should respect and integrate with historic buildings The Denver Zoning Code provides the basic requirements for development on all properties throughout the city. In some unique areas, such as the Golden Triangle, the city has also adopted Design Standards and Guidelines to help shape context-sensitive development. Zoning provides specic requirements, such as maximum heights or minimum building setbacks. Design guidelines may address more detailed considerations of building design or relationship to context on a case-by-case basis. While zoning requirements provide predictable outcomes, design guidelines typically oer a higher level of exibility.

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40 golden triangle neighborhood plan A2. Performance-Based Design A2. Contextual Design Scenario Zoning Requirements Design Standards & Guidelines New development throughout the neighborhood enBuilding placement at the sidewalk edge (build-to requirements) enEncourage privately-owned public gathering spaces enGround oor faade articulation enGround oor transparency enEntrance location enRequire active ground oor uses enUpper-story setbacks from the street for taller building elements1 enMaximum height enUpper-story setbacks from the street for taller building elements1 enUpper-story mass reduction enEncourage privately owned public spaces on private properties to be located and designed in a way that promotes active use by pedestrians enRequire active ground oor uses enRequire cohesive streetscapingNew development adjoins the Cherry Creek Greenway, Acoma Greenway, an established Arts and Culture Trail, or an active alley enIncreased upper-story setbacks (for greenways only) enEncourage privately-owned spaces to be located adjacent to a greenway, trail or alleyNew development adjoins a Grand Boulevard enEnhanced building placement at the sidewalk edge (build-to requirements) enEnhanced ground oor transparencyNew development abuts an ex isting small-scale building that has been identied as an historic resource for the neighborhood through the Discover Denver survey existing buildings enIncentives/exceptions to encourage height transitions, such as greater setbacks or increased upper-story mass reduction enEncourage context-sensitive upper-story setbacks1 enEncourage privately-owned public spaces to be located adjacent to existing small scale buildings 1 May include exceptions or exibility. For example, development projects that reuse existing structures may have reduced requirements to incentivize this type of developmentThe table below contains recommended tools to promote context-sensitive design. Building o of the Contextual Design content described on pages 37-39, this table articulates proposed zoning requirements and updated design standards and guidelines for potential development scenarios within the Golden Triangle.

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golden triangle neighborhood plan 41 A2. Contextual Design Plan policies and strategies focus on maintaining the pattern of varied building heights and sizes, while accommodating potential inll development (shown here for illustrative purposes only) that is sensitive to its surroundings. NOTE: this image illustrates the concept for future development to continue the pattern of varied building height. It is not intended to depict actual future development. The Golden Triangle currently has a mix of building heights and sizes throughout the neighborhood

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42 golden triangle neighborhood plan A3. Catalytic Development goalEstablish a new benchmark for development in the Golden Triangle by identifying and advancing Catalytic Development projects that reinforce the vision for the neighborhood.why its importantRecent development in the Golden Triangle has mainly consisted of residential and civic projects. The neighborhood faces the possibility of diminishing its vibrant mosaic of uses unless demand for other types of development is reinforced. Places to work, shop and gather are the primary missing ingredients. Catalytic Development projects will create the opportunity for the City and private sector partners to guide and prove the market for private development, as well as support strategies to bolster the innovation economy. The neighborhood could be home to uses unique to the entire region, such as consulates, international companies, world-class educational institutions,.projects, policies and programsA3a. Identify potential sites and development partners for Catalytic Development.A3b. Ensure that plan elements, such as innovation economy workspace, Arts and Culture Trail, and Acoma Neighborhood Greenway are incorporated into future Catalytic Development projects. A3c. Ensure that any public financing tools or organizational entities are available and ready to be implemented in order to facilitate projects. The Catalytic Development Sites (see diagram on following page) highlight potential areas for the realization of transformative projects. These recommendations are generated from analysis of building to land value ratios, existence of vacant land and surface parking lots, and proximity of neighborhood amenities. While further site-specic analysis should be done, these sites represent near term opportunity for mixeduse housing, oce and commercial development.

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golden triangle neighborhood plan 43 Catalytic Development Sites (Potential) La Alma/ Lincoln ParkGolden TriangleCapitol Hill Auraria North Capitol Hill Downtown BakerCivic CenterTS NAMREHS NE 6TH AVEE 7TH AVEE 8TH AVEE 9TH AVEE 11TH AVEE 14TH AVEE 10TH AVE E 13TH AVE W 7TH AVE COURT PL WELTON STE COLFAX AVE TREMONT PL GLENARM PL 16TH ST 13TH STW 6TH AVENUE FWY 12TH STW 12TH AVEW 8TH AVE W 9TH AVE W 10TH AVE W 11TH AVE W 12TH AVE W 12TH AVE W 13TH AVE W COLFAX AVE W 14TH AVE 14TH ST 15TH STTS OGAPALAG TS XOF TS ITALE INCA ST RD EF ATNAS TS HTAMALAK TS ERAWALED TS KCONNAB ACOMA ST BROADWAY LINCOLN ST YAWDAORB LINCOLN STN GRANT STTS ERAWALED TS EEKOREHC TS KCONNAB ACOMA ST TS ITALE TS XOF TS OGAPALAGN SPEER BLVDN SPEER BLVDW 13TH AVE W 14TH AVESANTA FE DRTS HTAMALAK TS OGAPALAGW COLFAX AVE Cata lytic De vel opment Si tes (P otential) 0 to 0.5 Build ing to Land Val ue Ratio 0.5 to 1.0 Bu ild ing to Lan d Val ue RatioSunken GardensCherry Creek GreenwayOpen Space 0 400400 200 600 feet Roadway Planning Area

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b. a connected Golden Triangle

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b. connectedThe Golden Triangles prosperity and health is intimately linked to cultivating a walkable, bikeable neighborhood with great transit.The scale and orientation of the neighborhoods blocks provide dierent routes to stroll at lunchtime, take the dog for a walk, or hop on the Cherry Creek Greenway for an invigorating bike ride. Plaza spaces and walkways oer attractive ways for museum visitors to branch out into the neighborhood. Transit connections with more on the horizon will help residents and workers quickly reach other Downtown neighborhoods and points beyond. New parking technologies and infrastructure promise to help foster meeting parking needs while fostering better neighborhood design. And though often daunting for pedestrians and bicyclists to navigate, the major roadways of Speer Boulevard, Colfax Avenue and Broadway/Lincoln aord opportunities to create Grand Boulevards that can weave together the urban fabric and provide places for gateways, art and culture. Building from its strategic location in the heart of Denver, the Golden Triangle should take the next step in creating a pedestrian and bicycle oriented neighborhood like no other. With a focus on safely, eciently and conveniently linking people to places by a variety of means, several strategies are required to bolster this Connected neighborhood. These include: B1. Robust Mobility B2. Grand Boulevards B3. Dynamic Parking

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46 golden triangle neighborhood plan goalIncrease transit, walking, and bicycling mobility within and beyond the Golden Triangle based on the goals outlined in Denver Moves and the Strategic Transportation Plan. why its importantThe Golden Triangle has a unique mix of retail, oce, cultural and residential uses located within a 10-minute walk or ve-minute bike ride of each other. The neighborhood is also adjacent to current and planned RTD services that will link to Denver Union Station, Civic Center Station, the FasTracks system, and Denver International Airport. New transportation options will be supported by the compact nature of the neighborhood, existing street grid, and changing demographics of Denvers urban core. Encouraging physical activity, supporting the Citys economic development strategies, and reducing transportation costs are all important components of building a robust mobility network in the Golden Triangle. transit projects, policies and programsB1a. Encourage the bold re-imagining of Civic Center Station as a vibrant multimodal hub for the Golden Triangle, Civic Center, and Downtown.B1b. Improve connections to Civic Center Station through wayfinding and improved pedestrian and bicycle infrastructure. Explore treatments such as enhanced crosswalks and priority pedestrian signals at major intersections that connect to the station, such as Broadway and Colfax Avenue.B1c. Construct the first and final mile connections to and from enhanced transit stops that are identified in the Colfax Corridors Connection project.B1d. Collaborate with businesses or civic uses to plan for and implement a private shuttle connection between Denver Union Station and Cherry Creek, which would help to bring visitors to and throughout the neighborhood.B1e. Conduct a feasibility study with RTD to determine the requirements and funding options to introduce an RTD Smart Card a reloadable transit card program for the Golden Triangle. Encourage employers in the neighborhood to subsidize the smart cards for employees B1. Robust MobilityRTDs Free MetroRide opened in May 2014. The plan calls for extending the Free MetroRide into the Golden Triangle

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golden triangle neighborhood plan 47 B1f. Implement recommended changes to Broadway and Lincoln (see B2. Grand Boulevards), including a dedicated lane for transit, to increase the quality and frequency of transit along this important corridor.B1g. Identify funding partnerships between Downtown Denver Partnership, Denver Art Museum, RTD, DRCOG, private property owners, local businesses, and the City and County of Denver to extend RTDs Free MetroRide service into the Golden Triangle. The extension could utilize the enhanced transit lanes and super stops proposed for Broadway and Lincoln (see B2. Grand Boulevards). B1. Robust Mobility Extension to Golden Triangle NeighborhoodCivic Center The original route planned for the Free MetroRide included a connection to the Golden Triangle. The plan calls for extending the existing route, which runs between Denver Union Station and Civic Center Station, along Broadway/Lincoln into the Golden Triangle area. The Implementation Chapter suggests potential public-private funding options to help fund the Free MetroRide extension.

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48 golden triangle neighborhood plan bicycle projects, policies and programsB1h. Complete the bicycle network plan, as informed by Denver Moves and public input, and offer a variety of bicycle facilities that encourage new bicycle trips for a wide-range of novice and experienced bicyclists. % en Update the Denver Moves network to include bicycle facilities on 13th Avenue and Delaware Street. This would include removing the existing bike lanes on Cherokee Street. % en Improve connections between the Golden Triangle neighborhood and existing and planned bicycle facilities Downtown, including the existing protected bike lane on 15th Street.B1i. Enhance connections to the Cherry Creek Greenway, including clearly marked crossing for bicyclists across Speer Boulevard, especially at 11th Avenue.B1j. Expand the total number of neighborhood employees, residents, and visitor using the Denver B-Cycle system by requesting that developers or management companies include new memberships and additional B-Cycle stations as part of redevelopment or infill development projects. B1. Robust MobilityRobust mobility includes ecient, safe connections to the Cherry Creek Greenway The Proposed Bicycle and Pedestrian Network Plan (see diagram on next page) shows both existing and proposed bicycle facilities, which will create an interconnected neighborhood easily navigated and traversed by bicycle. This plan illustrates the consolidated input from the Golden Triangle planning process in addition to Denver Moves. In the map Bike Routes are designated bike routes that do not contain a striped bike lane or protected bikeway.Note: proposed bike facilities require additional study for feasibility and facility type. Robust mobility includes ecient, safe connections to the Cherry Creek Greenway

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golden triangle neighborhood plan 49 13TH ST 12TH ST WELTON ST GLENARM PL 14TH ST COURT PL TREMONT PL Proposed Bicycle and Pedestrian Network Roadway Protec ted Bikeway Bike Route Plan ning Area Priority Bicycle and Pedestrian Intersection ImprovementsAcoma Neighborhood GreenwayBCycle Station 0 400400 200 600 feet N Open Space Cherry Creek Entrance Improvement Bike Lane Pro posed Bike Lane Pro posed Bike Ro utePr oposed P r ote cted Bike Way(c ycle track, buer p ath) Civic CenterSunken Gardens Park8TH AVE9TH AVE10TH AVE 13TH AVE 7TH AVE COLFAX AVE 6TH AVENUE 8TH AVE 9TH AVE W 10TH AVE 12TH AVE 12TH AVE COLFAX AVETS XOF TS ITALE INCA ST RD EF ATNAS TS HTAMALAK TS ERAWALED ACOMA ST LINCOLN ST LINCOLN ST GRANT STTS ITALE TS XOF 14TH AVESANTA FE DRTS HTAMALAKCOLFAX AVETS ERAWALED11TH AVE14TH AVE7TH AVE16TH AVE 11TH AVETS OGAPALAGTS KCONNABTS OGAPALAG13TH AVETS OGAPALAG14TH AVEBROADWAY TS EEKOREHC TS KCONNAB ACOMA STN SPEER BLVDCherry Creek GreenwayBROADWAY TS NAMREHS 15TH STLa Alma/ Lincoln Park Capitol Hill Auraria North Capitol Hill Baker Civic Center Station Convention CenterGolden Triangle

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50 golden triangle neighborhood plan pedestrian projects, policies and programs B1k. Enhance pedestrian travel and safety within the neighborhood and to important destinations including Civic Center Station, Downtown, and Aurarias campus and light rail station. % en Apply pedestrian-oriented, context-sensitive design solutions to all new capital improvement and maintenance projects based on the safety and mobility goals identified in the Strategic Transportation Plan, Denver Moves, the Citys Living Streets Initiative, and Public Works Complete Streets policy. Consider the implementation of tools and programs to calm and slow traffic on the neighborhoods internal streets. % en Repair and enhance the existing network of sidewalks and amenity zones network in the neighborhood in conjunction with redevelopment projects, capital bond projects, utility upgrades, or other shared-cost opportunities. % en Implement the Pedestrian Priority Intersection Improvements identified on the Proposed Pedestrian and Bicycle Facility Network Map. Intersection improvements would include a toolbox of options such as: enPedestrian crosswalks, which should be considered for intersections with heavier pedestrian trac and in locations where pedestrians connect to major destinations, such as the cultural institutions along 13th and 12th avenues. enBulbouts, which should be added at any intersection with on-street parking to minimize the crossing distance for pedestrians. enPedestrian-scaled lighting, which should be considered for all intersections. % en Integrate design elements such as art, signage and wayfinding, both within the neighborhood and to important destinations nearby (including Civic Center Station and Downtown), to promote walking within and around the neighborhood. The Golden Triangle must be a place where bicyclists and pedestrians are safe and comfortable B1. Robust Mobility

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golden triangle neighborhood plan 51 B1. Robust Mobility all modes projects, policies and programsB1l. Complement the vision for 11th Avenue as a pedestrian-oriented retail street by redesigning the corridor to incorporate bike lanes, enhanced streetscapes, and pedestrian facilities (see Street Character Diagram, page 83).B1m. Implement the Acoma Neighborhood Greenway concept as a north-south connection for walking, bicycling, and neighborhood placemaking (see D2. Acoma Neighborhood Greenway).B1n. Implement the Arts and Culture Trail (see C3. Arts and Culture Trail) to encourage and enhance walking and biking between neighborhood destinations, nearby districts, and greater Downtown Denver.B1o. Utilize existing organizations in the Golden Triangle, as well as existing Transportation Management Organizations (TMOs) that cover the neighborhood, to monitor the neighborhoods mobility vision and encourage modal shifts to transit, cycling, and other alternative modes. .B1p. Identify funding options to support on-going maintenance and capital improvements of existing and proposed improvements within the neighborhood and special districts. The re-design of 11th Avenue will include enhanced streetscapes and pedestrian facilities

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52 golden triangle neighborhood plan A2. Performance-Based Design B2. Grand Boulevards goalCreate Grand Boulevards at the neighborhoods edges to accommodate all travel modes, beautify the streets, connect to contextual neighborhoods and bolster economic vitality. They should build on the vision identied in the Denver Downtown Area Plan while also providing connectivity to adjacent neighborhoods through safe intersection crossings for all modes of travel. why its importantThe arterial corridors surrounding the neighborhood (Colfax Avenue, the Broadway/Lincoln couplet, and Speer Boulevard) serve diverse transportation, economic, recreation, and placemaking functions. City and County of Denver plans identify these roadways as Grand Boulevards that will facilitate multimodal travel and contribute to placemaking. These streets should be re-envisioned to increase person-trip capacity, reduce accidents, better serve neighborhoods, support existing businesses, and create a strong sense of entry and identity. Transforming these streets is key to building a prosperous future for the Golden Triangle. The subsequent content of this chapter is divided into three sections, each addressing a specic Grand Boulevard: % enBroadway/Lincoln % enSpeer Boulevard % enColfax AvenueNote that proposed boulevard concepts are potential solutions only. Further study and analysis will be needed as a part of the implementation process.

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golden triangle neighborhood plan 53 B2. Grand Boulevards Broadway/Lincoln projects, policies and programsBroadway and Lincoln, which run along the eastern edge of the Golden Triangle, are major thoroughfares that are proposed to become multimodal corridors with inviting and lively pedestrian environments. B2a. Enhance the current conguration of the Broadway/Lincoln couplet by introducing new streetscapes, parklet spaces, enhancements and mobility improvements that create a unied Grand Boulevard. % en Strengthen the connection between the Golden Triangle and Capitol Hill. % en Implement transit super stops, defined as transit stops that have a unique branding, special lighting, expanded passenger waiting areas, and longer boarding areas to accommodate multiple transit routes. Super stops could be located on routes beyond the Broadway and Lincoln corridor as warranted by new transit services. % en Conduct additional study of new transit circulation and capacity in an enhanced transit lane, including more frequent service. An enhanced transit lane could include full time bus service, intersection priority, and/or dedicated transit services. In the future, it could accommodate new transit services such as streetcar. % en Introduce protected bicycle facilities to complement economic development efforts in the neighborhood. % en Rebuild the current intersections as attractive, well-marked mobility hubs for all modes of travel. Mobility hubs are located at intersections that allow safe transfers between walking, bicycling, and riding transit. Parklets can be integrated to provide space for dining and social gathering Grand Boulevards promote safe, ecient travel for all modes Enhanced super stops can provide attractive, artistic places for boarding transit

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54 golden triangle neighborhood plan ONLY ONLY BUSONLY W 11TH AVE W 10TH AVE Colorado Historical Museum Sports Authority BeauvallonMelita's Greek Cafe & Market Stoney's Bar & Grill 11th Avenue Hotel and Motel BUS AND ONLY BUS BUSONLY BUS ANDONLY BUS ANDONLYBUSONLYBUSONLYBUS ANDONLY BUS ANDONLY BUS EUNEVA NLOCNIL EUNEVA YAWDAORB EUNEVA YAWDAORB Potential improvements to intersections along Broadway and Lincoln include: Enhanced Transit Super Stops Intersection Improvements (including special paving and colored crosswalks) Bicy cle Facilities Pedestrian Amenities (street furniture, parklets, etc.)Note: any implementation of the proposed conditions will require further study to ensure feasibility. B2. Grand Boulevards Broadway/Lincoln c a b a b c d d The image below illustrates a set of potential prototypical improvements along Broadway and Lincoln. RTDs Free MetroRide, local buses and regional routes would use the proposed bus lanes to access Civic Center Station. The proposed bicycle cycletrack along Broadway would provide a direct connection from the Cherry Creek Regional Trail to Civic Center Station. These improvements will foster stronger neighborhood connectivity and provide Golden Triangle residents, employees, and visitors with seamless access to and from Civic Center Station and points beyond

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golden triangle neighborhood plan 55 90' ROW 10' Travel Lane 10' Travel Lane 8' Outdoor Seating Restaurant The Chancery Building 10' Sidewalk 7' Parking Lane 9' Sidewalk 10' Travel Lane 7' Amenity Zone 19' Flex Lane B2. Grand Boulevards Broadway/Lincolnlincoln: existing section looking south lincoln: proposed section looking south The potential concept for Lincoln includes a dedicated transit lane, a ex lane with enhanced transit stops and on-street parking, streetscape beautication, and parklet spaces (as appropriate, mixed in with on-street parking spaces). In the future, the transit lane could accommodate xed guideway transit such as streetcar. Note: dimensions are approximate. Any implementation of the proposed conditions will require further study to ensure feasibility. The existing condition of Lincoln includes 15 sidewalks on either side of the right of way with an adjacent 7 parking lane to the west, three travel lanes, and an 18 ex lane that accommodates a travel lane for transit with space for parking along the east curb. Note: dimensions are approximate. Any implementation of the proposed conditions will require further study to ensure feasibility. 90' ROW Restaurant The Chancery Building 10' Travel Lane 10' Travel Lane 8' Outdoor Seating 10' Sidewalk Enhanced Transit Super Stop Parklet 8' Flex Lane 9' Sidewalk 10' Travel Lane 7' Amenity Zone 11' Transit Lane 7' Flex Lane with Parking with Parking

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56 golden triangle neighborhood plan Floyds Barbershop Arbys 8' Flex Lane with Parking 8' Flex Lane with Parking 100' ROW Relocated Bike Share StationBike Share Station Enhanced Transit Super Stop 7' Sidewalk 7' Buer 11' Transit Lane 10' Travel Lane 10' Travel Lane 10' Travel Lane 12' Cycle Track 14' Sidewalk 3' Broadway Avenue Looking South (south of 11th Avenue) Proposed B2. Grand Boulevards Broadway/LincolnThe potential concept for Broadway (shown in the sections below and the photosimulations on the following page) includes reconguration of the street from four lanes of automobile travel to three lanes with a two-way cycle track; a bike share station/ parking lane (labeled as ex lane in the section below); and dedicated transit lane with enhanced super stops in the adjacent parking lane. In the future, the transit lane could accommodate xed guideway transit such as streetcar. Parking lanes are also potential opportunities for additional street trees and parklets where appropriate. Note: dimensions are approximate. Any implementation of the proposed conditions will require further study to ensure feasibility. 100' ROW 10' Travel Lane 10' Travel Lane 7' Sidewalk 7' Buffer 21' Flex Lane 10' Travel Lane 8' Parking Lane 13' Travel Lane 14' Sidewalk Existing Bike Share Station Existing Bus Stop Bike Share StationFloyds Barbershop Arbys Broadway Avenue Looking South (south of 11th Avenue) broadway: existing section looking south broadway: proposed section looking south

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golden triangle neighborhood plan 57 B2. Grand Boulevards Broadway/Lincolnbroadway at 11th avenue: potential improvements broadway at 11th avenue: existing view looking south

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58 golden triangle neighborhood plan B2. Grand Boulevards Speer Boulevard projects, policies and programsSpeer Boulevard is re-envisioned as a dynamic boulevard with improved intersections connecting pedestrians and cyclists to the Cherry Creek Greenway. Activated Speer Triangles will add vibrancy through art installations and placemaking features. B2b. Preserve and respect the historic character and quality of Speer Boulevard by supporting adjacent placemaking opportunities, managing access points to the Cherry Creek Greenway, and building sustainable infrastructure that is safe for all modes of travel. % en Provide new bicycle and pedestrian capacity along Speer Boulevard to support first and final access to destinations within the Golden Triangle from the Cherry Creek Regional Trail. % en Reclaim underutilized portions of the intersecting streets for Speer Triangles that will foster placemaking, art, open space and economic development opportunities (see D1. Connected Open Spaces). % en Safely manage access to and from the Cherry Creek Regional Trail at signalized intersections for all abilities and ages. This includes relocated access points to Cherry Creek Regional Trail at intersections along Speer Boulevard, including relocating the bicycle crossing at 12th Avenue to 11th Avenue. % en Increase person trip capacity by planning for future transit services within the existing travel lanes. Activating spaces through creative placemaking can help bring life into the streets

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golden triangle neighborhood plan 59 ONLY Speer & Colfax-14th Plangolden triangle neighborhood plan0 406080 20 100 feet N W 14TH AVEW COLFAX AVECATALYTIC DEVELOPMENT SITE CATALYTIC DEVELOPMENT SITETS OGAPALAGN SPEER BLVDCATALYTIC DEVELOPMENT SITESurface trail to Cherry Creek Trail connection possible Potential improvements at Speer Boulevard and Colfax Avenue. The Speer Triangles oer many opportunities for creative change. See D1. Connected Open Spaces for more detail. B2. Grand Boulevards Speer Boulevard b a c speer boulevard at colfax and 14th avenue

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60 golden triangle neighborhood plan B2. Grand Boulevards Speer Boulevard ONLYAHEAD MERGE BIKEONLYONLY ONLYONLYONLY ONLYONLY ONLY W 11TH AVEDELAWARE STN SPEER BLVD 11th & Delaware-Speer Plan golden triangle neighborhood plan 0 406080 20 100 feet N This diagram illustrates potential improved access points and intersection enhancements that are critical along Speer Boulevard at 11th Avenue and Delaware Street. With improved intersections, automobiles, transit and bicycles will be able to navigate the area more eciently, mitigating trac congestion and reducing the potential for accidents. speer boulevard at 11th avenue Potential improvements along Speer Boulevard include: Bicy cle Facilities, including a designated bicycle crossing at 11th Avenue Intersection Improvements (such as special paving and colored crosswalks) Pedestrian Amenities (street furniture, parklets, etc.) Note: any implementation of the proposed conditions will require further study to ensure feasibility. c a b a b c

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golden triangle neighborhood plan 61 68' ROW Creek Bank Pop-up/Flex Space 8' Parking w/stormwater swale/ planter 5' Sidewalk 10' Multiuse Path 2' 2' 10' Travel Lane 10' Travel Lane 10' Travel Lane 11' Travel Lane Cherry Creek Cherry Creek Trail Speer | Looking North | Short-term Option: Activated Edges Flood Wall B2. Grand Boulevards Speer Boulevardpotential short-term concept 68' ROW Creek Bank 8' Buffer/Surface Parking Parking 5' Sidewalk 6' Side -walk 4' Buffer +/-4' 10' Travel Lane 10' Travel Lane 10' Travel Lane 11' Travel Lane Cherry Creek Cherry Creek Trail Flood Wall Speer | Looking North | Existing existing section looking north The potential short-term concept for Speer Boulevard includes landscape enhancements and activation of Speer Triangle spaces with pop-up uses In the short-term, Speer Boulevard improvements will enhance visibility and predictability to and from the Cherry Creek Trail at signalized intersections along the roadway. The intersection will allow pedestrians, bicyclists and motor vehicles to navigate the area more eciently. Features include protected bike lanes, colored crosswalks, and lane markings that will mitigate trac congestion and reduce the potential for accidents. Speer Triangle spaces also oer opportunities for placemaking and pop-up uses that are accessible to the neighborhood by walking and riding. Additional concepts for Speer Boulevard include increasing walking and bicycling trip capacity by adding an at-grade multi-use pathway. Note: dimensions are approximate. Any implementation of the proposed conditions will require further study to ensure feasibility.

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62 golden triangle neighborhood plan WELCOME! WELCOME! Stormwater swale/planterFlood Wall 68' ROW Creek Bank Pop-up/Flex Space 8' 10' Sidewalk 10' Multiuse Path 4' Seating 4' 10' Travel Lane 10' Travel Lane 11' Travel Lane Cherry Creek Cherry Creek Trail Speer | Looking North | Alternative Option: Gracious Edges Stormwater swale/ planter Parking w/ stormwater swale/planter WELCOME!WELCOME!WELCOME!WELCOME!68' ROW Creek Bank Residential/ Mixed-use Development 7' 10' Sidewalk 10' Multiuse Path 2' Seating 4' 10' Travel Lane 10' Travel Lane 5' Stormwater Stormwater Median swale10' Local Lane Cherry Creek Cherry Creek Trail Speer | Looking North | Alternative Option: Boulevard Flood Wall B2. Grand Boulevards Speer Boulevard There are several potential long-term options for redesigning Speer to achieve multimodal goals; the illustrations below show two possible options. At top, the concept includes a reduction in travel lanes and a multi-use path on the west side of the street. This option would allow for the possibility for one travel lane to become a dedicated transit lane. At bottom, the concept includes a multiway boulevard with local road access, fostering long term development. Although this option accommodates local road access, a potential drawback is that it would not allow for a dedicated transit lane since there are only two lanes. Note: dimensions are approximate. Any implementation of the proposed conditions will require further study to ensure feasibility. potential long-term concept 2 potential long-term concept 1Note: for illustrative purposes only. Speer Boulevard can be designed with a range of treatments depending on available right-of-way width between Broadway and Colfax Avenue.

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golden triangle neighborhood plan 63 B2. Grand Boulevards Colfax Avenue projects, policies and programsColfax Avenue will serve as a gateway to the Golden Triangle while providing stronger connections to Downtown through improved pedestrian facilities and attractive environments. B2c. Strengthen connectivity along Colfax Avenue between Downtown Denver and the Golden Triangle, as suggested in the East & West Colfax Plans. % en Support new person trip capacity by expanding the Free Metro Ride in the Broadway and Lincoln corridors. % en Improve visibility for all roadway users at intersections. % en Introduce new median treatments that identify the entrances into Downtown Denver. % en Complete sidewalk buffers, wayfinding, and urban design improvements west of Fox Street with redevelopment projects on both sides of the corridor. % en Implement the first phase of the Arts and Culture Trail with striping and signage across Colfax Avenue. % en Integrate first and final mile mobility improvements that result from the Colfax Corridor Connections project (the first and final mile is the walking or wheeling portion of a trip that occurs to and from the transit stops in the Colfax corridor). ONLY Speer & Colfax-14th Plan golden triangle neighborhood plan 0 406080 20 100 feet N W 14TH AVEW COLFAX AVECATALYTIC DEVELOPMENT SITE CATALYTIC DEVELOPMENT SITETS OGAPALAGN SPEER BLVDCATALYTIC DEVELOPMENT SITE Surface trail to Cherry Creek Trail connection possible The potential concept on Colfax Avenue includes activation of a triangle at the corner of Speer Boulevard, potential lane and median modications, and branding opportunities. New enhancements will augment existing intersection improvements along Colfax Avenue

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64 golden triangle neighborhood plan B2. Grand Boulevards Colfax Avenue RESTAUR ANT D ENVERDi ner Colfax Avenue Looking West between Galapago & Speer Existing 10' 10' 8' 8' 10' 25 12' 10' 12' 10' 10' 10' 10' Setback for Fire Station Sidewalk Right Turn Lane Left Turn Lane Left Turn Lane Travel Lane Travel Lane Travel Lane Travel Lane Travel Lane Travel Lane Sidewalk Setback 110' ROW RESTAUR ANT D ENVERDi ner WELCOME! WELCOME! WELCOME! WELCOME! Colfax Avenue Looking West between Galapago & Speer Proposed Sidewalk 110' ROW 15' Median/ Left Turn Lane 10' Travel Lane 10' Sidewalk 8' 6' Stormwater swale 10' Seating Area 25 Setback for Fire Station 11' Travel Lane 10' Travel Lane 10' Stormwater Swale 10' Travel Lane 10' Travel Lane 10' Travel Lane colfax avenue: existing section looking west colfax avenue: potential improvements The Colfax concept provides sidewalk buers from trac, and locations for gateway features into Downtown and the neighborhood. Narrowing crossing distances for pedestrians and providing colored crosswalks is also important. See D1. Connected Open Spaces for more details. Note: dimensions are approximate. Any implementation of the proposed conditions will require further study to ensure feasibility.

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golden triangle neighborhood plan 65 B3. Dynamic Parking goalIn the short term, manage on-street parking contextually by utilizing the management strategies and tools identied in Denvers Strategic Parking Plan (SPP). In the long term, manage on and o-street parking assets more actively so that they intentionally support the various activities and user groups in the Golden Triangle and align with other neighborhood mobility goals.why its importantParking is an important asset that needs to be managed actively in order to maximize its ability to support a variety of activities in the Golden Triangle neighborhood. Denvers Strategic Parking Plan (SPP) identies a framework vision, management tools, and implementation steps that can help maximize available on and o-street parking assets and complement the multimodal transportation goals identied in Denvers Strategic Transportation Plan. The parking management toolbox and strategies outlined in the SPP are compatible with the other goals outlined in this plan and several are particularly relevant to the neighborhood. There is tremendous opportunity in the Golden Triangle to maximize available parking inventory through shifting existing parking demand to other modes of transportation; providing robust waynding or other types of communication to direct visitors to new and underutilized locations; adjusting time limits or pricing as appropriate to maximize turnover for existing on-street parking supply; and strategically considering the addition of new o-street parking supplies through partnerships as redevelopment occurs. projects, policies and programsshort-term B3a. Manage available public parking supplies utilizing the tools and strategies identified in Denvers Strategic Parking Plan (SPP).B3b. Explore opportunities to introduce new parking options that serve a variety of stay duration needs, including demand during special events. Work with both public and private off-street providers to offer a mid-term stay of three to five hours to serve visitors who do not wish to stay for a full day. This may also help create more on-street availability for true short-term stays in the neighborhood. Existing surface parking should transition to new development and parking structures over time Clear, consistent signage and waynding is key to strong parking programs

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66 golden triangle neighborhood plan B3c. Extend the on-street overnight parking program to cover all or portions of the Golden Triangle as activity increases in the neighborhood.B3d. Consider repurposing some on-street parking spaces at strategic locations for bike corrals and parklets in conjunction with other economic, placemaking, and neighborhood transformations.long-termB3e. Promote a park once environment. % en Locate new inventory at gateway locations or on the edge of the neighborhood to capture vehicles and then facilitate multiple walking trips internally. % en Place a premium on on-street parking to facilitate shorter-term stays with spaces that turnover to support adjacent activities. On-street pricing should be set to encourage mid or long-term parking to occur off-street.B3f. Introduce a comprehensive parking wayfinding system with new signage placed at gateway locations to help visitors to the Golden Triangle quickly locate public parking opportunities. % en New wayfinding programs should be easily understood by residents, workers, and visitors to help motorists find off-street parking facilities and then serve to direct visitors to find civic or cultural destinations on foot. % en New signage should be multimodal in nature, providing information on automobile parking, bicycle parking, and other modes of non-motorized transportation like B-Cycle stations.B3g. Construct a landmark parking facility as needed and as activities and densities incresae. The facility would serve the needs of the Golden Triangles residents, workers and visitors. % en New developments built with parking facilities at the ground floor should be wrapped with residential, office or other uses, to provide active uses. Any new parking facilities should be designed to integrate with the eclectic neighborhood character (see A2). % en New public parking supplies should be built in gateway locations that supports a transition from driving to exploring the neighborhood by foot.. % en New public parking supplies should be built in gateway locations that supports a transition from driving to exploring the neighborhood by foot. New parking structures should be mixed-use and developed with active ground oor uses B3. Dynamic Parking

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golden triangle neighborhood plan 67 B3h. Explore opportunities to create a universally managed parking system so that all on and off-street inventory works together as a system. Integrate various time duration and pricing strategies to provide short, mid, and long-term stay options. This management system could support and maximize remote parking opportunities that allow developers to meet all of some of their parking requirements off-site. % en Continue to make parking available for purchase for midand longer-term daily stays and provide monthly rates in facilities. % en Evaluate parking patterns and residential needs within the neighborhood as development occurs to ensure a proper balance of supply and demand for different users. % en Pursue right sized off-street parking supplies for residents and employees in the district as development occurs. Parking structures can be bold and artistic to play o of the creative image of the neighborhood B3. Dynamic Parking

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c. a creative Golden Triangle

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c. creativeThe Golden Triangle is a thriving hub of arts, culture and economic innovation that will continue to ourish as new venues, activities, events and businesses are attracted to the neighborhood. The Civic Center is a nationally-renowned place of arts and culture. An eclectic mix of museums, galleries, public art, and education amenities creates an unparalleled destination. Food truck and art walk events attract everyone from the suburban family to the urban hipster. Creative enterprise abounds throughout the Golden Triangle, whether someone is making original art, crafting cuisine, or developing an app at a local incubator space. Entrepreneurs are pushing beyond the established paradigms of business development, building environments of innovation, collaboration and creativity but still much more can happen here. This exciting combination of people and places fuels the spirit and identity of the Golden Triangle. Understanding that the fusion of arts, cultural and economy is intrinsic to the areas success, several strategies are required to advance this Creative neighborhood. These include: C1. Innovation Economy C2. Cultivation of Arts and Culture C3. Arts and Culture Trail

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70 golden triangle neighborhood plan goalFoster the growth of the innovation economy and creative industries within the Golden Triangle. why its importantThe Golden Triangle has the opportunity to capitalize on its design and technology oriented businesses, creative talents, and cultural attractions to make the neighborhood a major destination for the innovation economy. Workers and businesses in the new economy require non-traditional oce locations, exible workspaces, shared amenities, and places for formal and informal collaboration. They desire proximity to Downtown, cultural amenities, entertainment venues and gathering spaces, as well as a range of alternative transportation options. projects, policies and programsC1a. Leverage existing neighborhood assets, such as Galvanize, galleries, museums and creative employers, to attract additional businesses.C1b. Create innovation economy workspaces and/or leasing programs with new Catalytic Development projects.C1c. Integrate arts and technology into public spaces and amenities. % en Incorporate public art and outdoor workspaces into streetscape and park improvements, as well as district-wide Wi-Fi access. % en Provide innovative transportation and parking solutions using technology.C1d. Develop a program to collectively market and lease art and workspaces. % en Explore the creation of a master leasing entity to attract businesses. % en Reduce barriers to entry for new small businesses to create demand for underutilized commercial spaces by identifying ways to reduce length of lease agreements, marketing existing grant funding or loan options for small business formation. % en Explore the expansion of Denvers Shared Space Program to include innovation economy and arts/culture startup businesses.C1e. Build on Denvers Cultural Plan, Imagine 2020, to fuel the development of art and creative districts. The innovation economy requires collaborative, exible environments Unconventional workspaces are a hallmark of the new economy C1. Innovation Economy

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golden triangle neighborhood plan 71 goalPromote and cultivate a dynamic array of arts and culture facilities, programs and events, taking full advantage of the Golden Triangles role as a nationally recognized destination for arts and culture in Denver.why its importantArts and culture are fundamental to the Golden Triangles identity and essential to the health and vitality of all Denverites. Promoting arts and culture in the neighborhood will help ensure the continued success of important institutions and invite new artsand culture-related uses to co-locate in the area, as outlined in Denvers Cultural Plan, Imagine 2020. From small-scale artists to edgling theatre companies to new cuttingedge galleries and museums, arts and culture drive the Golden Triangle. Supporting arts and culture of all types and formats will help ensure a continuous energy that provides a special spark to an already creative and urbane neighborhood.projects, policies and programsC2a. Leverage existing arts and culture programming and activities, such as Denver Art Museum tours, to help introduce visitors and tourists to the neighborhood and connect it to neighborhood arts and culture organizations.C2b. Promote First Friday Art Walks with extended gallery and museum hours; connect the Art Walks with the Art Bus.C2c. Promote the outdoor film series in the Civic Center Park, community art and educational classes, and events at the Central Library.C2d. Create a connection between the Golden Triangle and Sante Fe Arts District through events and activities.C2e. Incorporate public art into the Speer Triangles to help define the cultural identity of the Golden Triangle.C2f. Encourage the creative reuse of the Evans School as a space for arts and culture programming. Extending the breadth and reach of First Friday Art Walks will generate greater visibility for arts and culture Film nights, pop-up temporary art, festivals and more should all be a part of this vital neighborhood C2. Cultivation of Arts and Culture

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72 golden triangle neighborhood plan C2. Cultivation of Arts and Culture C2g. Explore opportunities to extend arts and culture programming and activities by extending museum programming onto streets and into the public right-of-way such as rotating art on the Speer Triangles. C2h. Through partnerships with the Office of Economic Development and Arts and Venues, explore economic incentives to encourage creative and arts-based uses, including galleries, throughout the Golden Triangle.C2i. Create permanent and temporary outdoor art exhibits, as well as festivals, particularly along Acoma Street (see D2. Acoma Neighborhood Greenway).C2j. Take advantage of the Arts and Culture Trail (see C3. Arts and Culture Trail) as a way to connect venues, institutions, organizations and people throughout the neighborhood, and to inform and direct users to arts and culture points of interest. Arts and culture in the Golden Triangle go far beyond the main museums and galleries. Additional arts-related uses include design companies, media outlets, and art supply vendors. This richness is located throughout the neighborhood (see diagram on the following page) and is a major force in business and economic development, as well as the creative culture of the Golden Triangle.Street art should be encouraged, in both festival events and ad hoc form

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golden triangle neighborhood plan 73 Golden TriangleCapitol Hill North Capitol Hill Downtown BakerConvention Center U.S. Mint West High School Civic Center Park Sunken Gardens Park State Capitol Civic Center Station City & County Building Denver Art MuseumCherry Creek GreenwayDenver Health Medical Center LindseyFlanigan Justice Center Van CiseSimonet Detention Center Ralph Carr State Justice Center Cesar E Chavez Federal Building Zeckendorf Plaza ParkTS NAMREHS NE 6TH AVEE 7TH AVEE 8TH AVEE 9TH AVEE 11TH AVEE 14TH AVEE 10TH AVE E 13TH AVE W 7TH AVE COURT PL WELTON STE COLFAX AVE TREMONT PL GLENARM PL 16TH ST 13TH STW 6TH AVENUE FWY 12TH STW 12TH AVEW 8TH AVE W 9TH AVE W 10TH AVE W 11TH AVE W 12TH AVE W 12TH AVE W 13TH AVE W COLFAX AVE W 14TH AVE 14TH ST 15TH STTS OGAPALAG TS XOF TS ITALE INCA ST RD EF ATNAS TS HTAMALAK TS ERAWALED TS KCONNAB ACOMA ST BROADWAY LINCOLN ST YAWDAORB LINCOLN STN GRANT STTS ERAWALED TS EEKOREHC TS KCONNAB ACOMA ST TS ITALE TS XOF TS OGAPALAGN SPEER BLVDN SPEER BLVDW 13TH AVE W 14TH AVESANTA FE DRTS HTAMALAK TS OGAPALAGW COLFAX AVE Auraria Arts, Culture and Civic Uses Roadway Planning Area Civic and Government Arts and Culture 0 400400 200 600 feet N Clyord Still Museum Denver Library History Colorado Center

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74 golden triangle neighborhood plan C3. Arts and Culture Trail goalCreate a world-class pedestrian and bicycle pathway that connects the places and spaces of the Golden Triangle and points beyond while bolstering artistic expression, health and fun. why its importantThe Golden Triangle has a rich diversity of artistic and cultural institutions, major civic destinations, businesses and programs. While some of whats in the buildings spills out into surrounding spaces such as the Denver Art Museum plaza more can be done to infuse arts and culture throughout the neighborhood, as well as connect the various venues. An exciting, high-prole and well-designed Arts and Culture Trail will help visitors and residents alike discover the Golden Triangles wealth of arts and culture. It will also provide a safe, active and recreation-oriented transportation pathway for users of all ages and abilities, similar to Indianapoliss landmark Cultural Trail. The Arts and Culture Trail should also extend to other key destinations in Downtown Denver, creating an attraction that could eventually become well known nationally, similar to the 16th Street Mall.projects, policies and programsC3a. Work with arts and cultural institutions and stakeholders, residents, business owners, artists, developers, and the City to design and create a new pathway to connect the neighborhoods civic facilities, historic sites, museums, theaters, galleries, arts schools and related uses.C3b. Encourage big, bold thinking in the trails design and implementation beyond just signage and marked routes along a street to create permanent infrastructure that would support a world-class and iconic pathway.C3c. Provide public art and sculpture projects along the route, as well as pavement markings, interpretive signage, integrated landscaping, cutting-edge stormwater design features, and enhanced bicycle and pedestrian facilities.

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golden triangle neighborhood plan 75 C3. Arts and Cultural TrailThe Indianapolis Cultural Trail is a good example of a route that links key destinations along an extensive, well-marked, attractively designed walking and biking pathway C3d. Ensure that the new pathway connects to facilities and venues the in Golden Triangle as well as outside the neighborhood, such as the Santa Fe Arts District, 16th Street Mall, 14th Street cultural corridor, Denver Union Station, LoDo, Central Platte Valley, Capitol Hill and more.C3e. Develop branding and marketing campaigns and materials to promote the Golden Triangle, and to make the Arts and Culture Trail a popular destination.C3f. Consider a range of names, such as the Arts and Culture Trail, Walk, Path or other unique moniker.

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76 golden triangle neighborhood plan C3. Arts and Culture Trail The sections below show potential applications of the Arts and Cultural Trail along a prototypical Golden Triangle street. In the short term, Arts and Cultural Trail elements can be implemented along sidewalks, bulbouts and various smaller spaces in the public and private realms. In the long term, permanent infrastructure can be implemented as resources and funding become available. Note: any implementation of the proposed conditions will require further study to ensure feasibility. 7 Buffer 10' Sidewalk 11' Travel Lane 6' Sidewalk 5' Street -life Zone 8' Parklet + Parking 11' Travel Lane 5' Bike Lane 5' Bike Lane 8' Parking Lane 76' ROW Typical Section, Arts + Culture Trail | Phase 2 5' Buffer 10' Sidewalk 11' Travel Lane 6' Sidewalk 10' Arts+ Culture Trail 5' Street -life Zone 7' Parklet + Parking 11' Travel Lane 4' Storm -water Swale 7' Permeable Parking Lane 76' ROW Typical Section, Arts + Culture Trail | Phase 2 short-term improvements long-term improvements

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golden triangle neighborhood plan 77 C3. Arts and Cultural TrailBannock Street, shown here in its current state, is one place where the Arts and Culture Trail could be implemented. existing conditions Long term improvements could entail a permanent, dedicated path that would strengthen the brand image, include additional sculpture art, and help catalyze adjacent development.long-term improvements

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c. a livable Golden Triangle

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d. livable The Golden Triangle is an attractive, safe place for social gathering, recreation and living that will be further enhanced as the neighborhood evolves. Residents meet and chat over coee, conduct clean up campaigns, and gather for neighborhood wine tastings. People from throughout the region come down the Cherry Creek Greenway by bike to check out the latest sculpture exhibit or sample a Taste of Colorado in Civic Center Park. Art and culture spill out of nearby museums and plazas onto area streets, creating a neighborhood that is colorful, lively and inventive. Views of the Rockies or the Downtown skyline bring an element of surprise and wonder at many a turn. Several streets and spaces are leafy and pleasant, though more can be done to ensure attractive, active and safe streets and a range of activated park spaces that engage everyone. The mix of these places, green spaces and activities brings the heart and soul to the Golden Triangle. With an emphasis on enhancing the areas street and open space networks, several strategies are required to create a Livable neighborhood. These include: D1. Connected Open Spaces D2. Acoma Neighborhood Greenway D3. Safe and Clean

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80 golden triangle neighborhood plan D1. Connected Open Spaces goalCreate an interconnected network of open spaces, many of which will be privately owned and maintained, linked by attractive, green and navigable streets and paths.why its importantThe Golden Triangle enjoys many open space assets, including the grand sweep of Civic Center Park and the green ribbon of the Cherry Creek Greenway. It also has several smaller hardscape plazas and open spaces. Whats missing is a stronger, interconnected hierarchy of open spaces, including privately owned public spaces, that forms a cohesive whole and meets the variety of neighborhood needs. This includes a central neighborhood gathering space, small and intimate spaces, more play areas for kids, and green corridors to connect pedestrians and bicyclists from space to space. Existing and future spaces, in particular Civic Center Park, must also be environments in which all users feel comfortable and safe.projects, policies and programsD1a. Identify a location, design program, and funding sources, including partnerships with the private sector, to create a neighborhood gathering space(s) in the heart of the Golden Triangle. % en Target a strategic location(s) in the neighborhood core. % en Capitalize on nearby active uses to draw many users and create eyes on the space. % en Include hardscape and softscape features. % en Support a range of activities from social gathering and festivals to informal recreation and kid-friendly features. % en Incorporate movable furniture, benches, tables and water elements. % en Include infrastructure that can transform to accommodate a variety of activities, such as a farmers market, informal recreation and classes, and community events. % en Integrate temporary or seasonal uses and activities. % en Apply a less is more approach to size to ensure a maximum sense of activation. A central place to gather, socialize and relax is a great desire of the Golden Triangle community A neighborhood gathering space could include hard and/or softscape features Outdoor cafe dining and movable furniture help to activate public plazas and parks

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golden triangle neighborhood plan 81 La Alma/ Lincoln Park Golden TriangleNorth Capitol Hill Baker Capitol HillConvention Center U.S. Mint West High School Civic Center Park Sunken Gardens Park State Capitol Civic Center Station City & County Building Denver Art MuseumCherry Creek GreenwayDenver Library History Colorado Center Denver Health Medical Center LindseyFlanigan Justice Center Van CiseSimonet Detention Center Clyord Still Museum Ralph Carr State Justice Center Cesar E Chavez Federal Building Zeckendorf Plaza Park Denver HealthE 6TH AVEE 8TH AVEE 9TH AVEE 10TH AVE E 13TH AVE W 7TH AVE E COLFAX AVE 13TH STW 6TH AVENUE FWY 12TH STW 8TH AVE W 9TH AVE W 10TH AVE W 12TH AVE W 13TH AVE W COLFAX AVE 15TH STTS OGAPALAG TS XOF TS ITALE INCA ST RD EF ATNAS TS HTAMALAK TS ERAWALED ACOMA ST LINCOLN ST LINCOLN STN GRANT STACOMA ST TS ITALE TS XOFN SPEER BLVDW 13TH AVE W 14TH AVESANTA FE DRTS HTAMALAK TS OGAPALAGW COLFAX AVEE 11TH AVEE 14TH AVEW 12TH AVEE 7TH AVE COURT PL WELTON ST GLENARM PLW 11TH AVE 14TH STTS KCONNAB TS OGAPALAGW 14TH AVEBROADWAY TS EEKOREHC TS KCONNABN SPEER BLVDBROADWAY TS NAMREHS N TREMONT PL Auraria 0 400400 200 600 feet Parks and Trails Open Space Plazas Existing Open Space Gathering Space Proposed Green Space Green Corridors Speer Triangles Weekend Closure Cherry Creek Entrance Improvement Open Space Strategies Roadway Planning Area

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82 golden triangle neighborhood plan D1b. Foster the development of small, intimate spaces throughout the Golden Triangle that are privately owned and/or maintained. % en Encourage small-scale, cozy pocket parks that serve a wide range of users, including kid-friendly areas and dog parks. % en Allow for a range of elements such as movable furniture, temporary/rotating art, play features and urban agriculture. % en Encourage the creation of privately-owned public spaces adjacent to existing or new development to ensure eyes on the space. % en Incorporate parklets, which transform parking spaces into mini parks, along identified green corridors and retail streets.D1c. Focus on the Speer Triangles as potential places for creation of usable open space (see images on pages 84-85). D1d. Establish landscaped green corridors along key streets to connect and provide safe passage between open spaces, neighborhood destinations, and areas outside of the Golden Triangle. % en Begin with an initial focus on Acoma Street and 12th Avenue. % en Provide shade trees, native plantings, and natural stormwater drainage. % en Identify opportunities to incorporate art, signage and wayfinding, urban agriculture, and gathering spaces such as parklets. % en Improve and redesign intersections accessing Cherry Creek Greenway to create safer connections for pedestrians and cyclists.D1e. Enhance Civic Center Park while respecting its City Beautiful history and design. % en Create a safe and clean environment for residents, workers and tourists. % en Activate the space through low-cost, small-scale, innovative projects (tactical urbanism) that attract new users. Consider the incorporation of temporary seating, plantings, and play features for children that will draw users of all types to the park. % en Explore weekend closure of 14th Avenue to connect the park to active uses to the south, including the Denver Art Museum and public library. % en Commission art installations to engage local artists and create a connection between the Civic Center and Arts and Culture Trail. Note: all art should comply with the Civic Center Design Guidelines adopted in 2009.D1f. Utilize regulatory tools, such as zoning requirements for landscaping and pedestrian lighting, that will encourage the greening of surface parking lots. Spaces and streets at the Speer Triangles can be transformed in a temporary to permanent manner and can include art, activities, retail kiosks and more Parklets can be installed along commercial or residential streets D1. Connected Open SpacesBeaux-arts inspired public spaces can integrate play features without disrupting their design integrity

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golden triangle neighborhood plan 83 D: livable D1. Connected Open Spaces internal street networkThe Golden Triangles internal streets (see diagram below) are generally slower, narrower roads that t the neighborhood scale. While all streets are important, certain key streets play important roles in connecting to surrounding land uses, promoting a walkable and bikeable place, and cultivating a sense of image and purpose (see also A1. Urban Mosaic). Key street types include: residential and mixed-use streets With their existing concentrations of housing and opportunities for additional mixed-use development these streets can foster an even more neighborhood-oriented character. Street furniture, pocket parks, linear parks or promenades, specially marked intersections, and a leafy tree canopy are all potential enhancements. commercial/retail streets Centrally located as north-south and east-west spines, these streets have existing retail shops, cafes, and restaurants that can be further leveraged as neighborhood-serving commercial blocks. Additional stores and dining establishments should be part of the land use mix, along with street furniture dining-oriented parklets, bike facilities, public art, banners, waynding and signage, and other features that foster walking and shopping. green streets While all streets in the neighborhood should integrate green components, these roads should enhance the neighborhood character by incorporating potential features such as pocket parks, parklets, community gardens, educational elements, natural stormwater drainage, and a leafy tree canopy. arts and culture streets These streets should draw upon the energy of the existing arts and cultural institutions, incorporate public realm design features, and connect other arts-related uses throughout the neighborhood. Potential elements could include additional galleries, venues and arts-oriented businesses, temporary and permanent public art, bike facilities, Arts Walk events, and other programs with the Arts and Culture Trail (see C3). La Alma/ Lincholn Park Capitol Hill Downtown13th AVE 12th AVE 11th AVECHEROKEE ST BANNOCK ST ACOMA STCivic Center Park Sunken Gardens ParkCherry Creek Greenway

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84 golden triangle neighborhood plan D1. Connected Open Spacesspeer triangles: existing conditions short-term improvements option 1 A short-term change could include movable plantings and furniture and a shade structure to encourage social gathering. Such changes will likely require investment and maintenance by private partners. The oddly shaped, leftover spaces of the Speer Triangles (above, at 14th Avenue) oer opportunities for creative open space design. Note: any future changes to the Speer Triangles should be evaluated for compliance with Speer Boulevards designation as an historic district.

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golden triangle neighborhood plan 85 D1. Connected Open Spaces Short-term change could include art and sculpture to activate the space. Such changes will likely require investment and maintenance by private partners. Ultimately, permanent plaza infrastructure, water elements, outdoor dining, art, adjacent development and other features could be a part of this Speer Triangle. Such changes will require investment and maintenance by private partners.short-term improvements option 2 long-term improvements

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86 golden triangle neighborhood plan D2. Acoma Neighborhood Greenway ACOMA ST ACOMA ST Golden Triangle Learning Center Metropolitan Lofts La Rumba Denver HealthACOMA ST ACOMA ST W 12TH AVE W 10TH AVE W 9TH AVEACOMA ST Evans School Family Flex Curious Theatre Company Golden Triangle Learning Center Denver Art Museum Extension Metropolitan Lofts La Rumba Catalytic Development Site Catalytic Development Site Catalytic Development Site Catalytic Development Site Urban Roots Denver Health Catalytic Development Site goalCreate a green, attractive, dynamic and multi-use street that is a community social space and neighborhood identier.why its importantAcoma Street is an important street for the future of the Golden Triangle. Its quiet, calm character and short four-block length oer the potential to create a special slow street designed for pleasant, easy walking and biking for everyone. The Acoma Neighborhood Greenway will create a new neighborhood spine and dening place for the community that will complement other streets and open spaces. Gracious street trees, vibrant sidewalk gardens, and cutting-edge design features will remake Acoma into a true greenway. The central location of the greenway will create an important connection between the southern end of the neighborhood to the museums and civic buildings. This one-of-a-kind street will provide space for quiet reection and neighborly contact, welcome a wide range of users, support special uses such as urban gardens, and even serve as an improved habitat corridor for city wildlife. projects, policies and programsD2a. Create a specially-designed, green, slow street that prioritizes active transportation enhancements such as bulb-outs, improved intersections, and bike facilities for safe, pleasant, easy walking and biking along its length.D2b. Encourage bold and forward-thinking design for the Greenway, using best practices and including the most advanced and innovative features available, potentially including: % en Parklets and pocket parks % en New plaza space in the right-of-way % en Community gardens % en Pavement features that are flush with street, creating a curbless environment % en Swales, rain gardens, and other advanced stormwater management design features

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golden triangle neighborhood plan 87 D2. Acoma Neighborhood Greenway % en Programmed activities such as art festivals and farmers markets % en A portion of the Arts and Culture Trail, including permanent and/or temporary artD2c. Capitalize on the opportunity to link and activate the streets mix of residential, retail, dining, small offices, neighborhood-oriented goods and services, and arts and culture facilities.D2d. Use the Greenway as the catalyst for a new community focal point and space for both formal, programmed events and informal gathering.D2e. Leverage public investment to boost private development on potential Catalytic Development Sites along and near the Greenway. D2f. Create a flexible design that respond uniquely to current programmed uses and evolves as new uses and development occurs.D2g. Consider two bold alternatives on the section of Acoma between 9th and 10th avenues, including: % en Alternative 1: a green linear park down the middle of a slow-speed roadway % en Alternative 2: a boardwalk-like promenade facilitating safe and graceful pedestrian travel along the west side of the street The Acoma Neighborhood Greenway could include promenade-like features Acoma Street could incorporate ush-curb, slow street concepts to promote play and activity

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88 golden triangle neighborhood plan D2. Acoma Neighborhood Greenway ACOMA ACOMA ST La Rumba Denver HealthACOMA ACOMA Cafe w/ outdoor seating Park plaza w/ fountain Linear park Dog park Pedestrian intersection improvements Bulbout/ parklet Bulbout and mid-block crossing Childrens learning garden Urban Roots Rain Garden Pedestrian intersection improvements Shade tree Bollards for temporary street closure Bulbout and mid-block crossing Public Art Trafc calming striping Accent tree 12TH AVE 11TH AVE 10TH AVE 9TH AVEACOMA Evans School Denver Credit Union Family Flex Curious Theatre Company Denver Art Museum Extension La Rumba Catalytic Development Site Catalytic Development Site Urban Roots Denver Health Catalytic Development Site Golden Triangle Learning Center Metropolitan Lofts ACOMA ACOMA ST La Rumba Denver HealthACOMA ACOMA Cafe w/ outdoor seating Park plaza w/ fountain Linear park Dog park Pedestrian intersection improvements Bulbout/ parklet Bulbout and mid-block crossing Childrens learning garden Urban Roots Rain Garden Pedestrian intersection improvements Shade tree Bollards for temporary street closure Bulbout and mid-block crossing Public Art Trafc calming striping Accent tree 12TH AVE 11TH AVE 10TH AVE 9TH AVEACOMA Evans School Denver Credit Union Family Flex Curious Theatre Company Denver Art Museum Extension La Rumba Catalytic Development Site Catalytic Development Site Urban Roots Denver Health Catalytic Development Site Golden Triangle Learning Center Metropolitan Lofts ACOMA ACOMA ST La Rumba Denver Health ACOMA ACOMA Cafe w/ outdoor seating Park plaza w/ fountain Linear park Dog park Pedestrian intersection improvements Bulbout/ parklet Bulbout and mid-block crossing Childrens learning garden Urban Roots Rain Garden Pedestrian intersection improvements Shade tree Bollards for temporary street closure Bulbout and mid-block crossing Public Art Trafc calming striping Accent tree 12TH AVE 11TH AVE 10TH AVE 9TH AVEACOMA Evans School Denver Credit Union Family Flex Curious Theatre Company Denver Art Museum Extension La Rumba Catalytic Development Site Catalytic Development Site Urban Roots Denver Health Catalytic Development Site Golden Triangle Learning Center Metropolitan Lofts Three unique blocks along Acoma Street from 9th Avenue to 12th Avenue have the opportunity to create distinct identities. Potential concepts include from 11th to 12th avenues, a festival street that could be closed to automobile trac during events; from 10th to 11th, opportunities for art, gardens, parklets and other improvements; and from 9th to 10th, a neighborhood linear park with cafe seating, plaza space and a dog park in conjunction with new catalytic development. Note: dimensions are approximate. Any implementation of the proposed conditions will require further study to ensure feasibility. 11th to 12th Avenues 10th to 12th Avenues 9thth to 10th Avenues

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golden triangle neighborhood plan 89 Evans SchoolCatalytic Development Site 70' ROW 7' Parking Lane 11' Travel Lane 6' Sidewalk 1' 8' 9 Sidewalk 8' Amenity Zone 11' Travel Lane 10' Amenity Zone 7' Parking Lane D2. Acoma Neighborhood Greenway Evans SchoolCatalytic Development Site 70' ROW 7' Parking Lane w/ Bulbout 11' Travel Lane 6' Sidewalk 1' 8' 9 Sidewalk 8' Amenity Zone Street Furniture 11' Travel Lane 10' Amenity Zone 7' Parking Lane w/ Bulbout Shade/ Accent Trees in Bulbout Bulbout Public Art Evans SchoolCatalytic Development Site 70' ROW 6' Sidewalk 1' 8' 9' Sidewalk 8' Amenity Zone 36' Festival Street 10' Amenity Zone Bollards Outdoor Seating + Food Vendors Farmers Market Public Art existing acoma street between 11th and 12th avenues small-scale changes to the landscape, buffer and parking lane temporary closings for art and food festivals Concepts for Acoma Street between 11th and 12th avenues introduce new landscaping elements such as bulbouts, public art and street furniture to be implemented along the existing sidewalk, buer and parking lane. Parking lanes are potential opportunities for additional street trees and parklets. An occasional street closure could oer opportunities for temporary events such as farmers markets and festivals.

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90 golden triangle neighborhood plan D2. Acoma Neighborhood Greenway 70' ROW 7' Parking Lane 11' Travel Lane 6' Sidewalk Surface Parking 1' 8' 9' Sidewalk 8' Amenity Zone 11' Travel Lane 10' Amenity Zone 7' Parking Lane Catalytic Development Site 70' ROW Setback / Acquired ROW 10' Shared Travel/ Bike Lane 15' Planted Fire Lane 10' Shared Travel/ Bike Lane 8' Amenity Zone 5' Sidewalk Setback (Varies) Amenity Zone 8' 9' Sidewalk Setback 8' Amenity Zone 28' Acoma Neighborhood Greenway Park Flush Curb Turf Paving Shade / Accent Tree Public Art Pedestrian Amenities and Street Furniture Acoma Street between 9th and 10th avenues could oer an opportunity to create a unique type of neighborhood park space in the southern portion of Golden Triangle. The proposed design below would only work as a private street (a public street would require signicant modications to meet public works and re standards). Note: dimensions are approximate. Any implementation of the proposed conditions will require further study to ensure feasibility. existing acoma street between 9th and 10th avenues potential linear park

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golden triangle neighborhood plan 91 D3. Safe and Clean goalEnsure that the Golden Triangle is safe and clean with well-maintained amenities that foster a livable, productive and attractive environment for residents, workers and visitors. why its importantThe urban mosaic of uses and users in the Golden Triangle requires the provision of a variety of amenities and services to allow this dynamic environment to function properly. The perception of safety is paramount, and providing and maintaining amenities is essential to creating a lively, vibrant public realm in which all users feel comfortable and secure. In turn, the neighborhoods active streets and opens spaces will allow residents, businesses and visitor attractions to prosper. projects, policies and programsD3a. Establish a Golden Triangle Neighborhood advisory committee to explore the next steps for creating organizational and funding mechanisms to support the construction, operations and maintenance of planned improvements and programs (see Implementation Chapter).D3b. Establish a plan for addressing safety concerns, with clear roles and responsibilities to guide the creation of any new or additional services or entities.D3c. Work with utility providers to explore the feasibility of relocating overhead utility wires to underground locations.D3d. Consider regulatory tools, potentially through the updated zoning for the Golden Triangle, that will require existing surface parking lots to meet minimum standards for lighting and landscaping.D3e. Explore tools, such as a special district, to install and maintain a consistent network of pedestrian lighting to provide visibility and safety in evening hours.D3f. Encourage the application for becoming a Colorado Creative District and support its application effort. % en Designation as a Colorado Creative District will make the Golden Triangle eligible for grants and technical assistance to aid in design and creation of the Arts and Culture Trail or other cultural amenities. The Golden Triangle will not achieve its full potential until crime and safety concerns are addressed

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implementation

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implementation The Golden Triangle Neighborhood Plan is designed to be implemented over time by a broad spectrum of residents, business and property owners, institutional stakeholders, nonprot organizations, City planners, and elected and appointed ocials. It is a community-driven plan that oers realistic, common-sense and quick win solutions to the main concerns identied by stakeholders. This does not mean, however, that the plan thinks small, or avoids addressing the most pressing, complex or resource-scarce issues. On the contrary, this plan tackles the biggest challenges head on. While some actions will be straightforward and relatively easy to achieve, others will demand signicant investment of time and money and will require steadfast commitment on numerous levels.

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94 golden triangle neighborhood plan To be successful, implementation of the broad range of goals in the Golden Triangle Neighborhood Plan will require the implementation of numerous strategies. In some cases, regulatory action and policy strategies may be the best ways to facilitate implementation. In other instances, signicant public, private, or joint public-private investment may be required. As always, good working collaboration between key stakeholders will be crucial, and where gaps in partnerships exist, the formation of new partnerships will be needed. This Implementation chapter includes the following major sections: % en A set of Regulatory Actions and Policy Strategies that outlines initiatives the public sector can undertake to set the course for change % en Guiding direction for a series of Partnerships that can help steer the course for implementation % en A compilation of Investment Strategies that will help in nancing plan actions and strategies Note: these categories are intended as guides only; in reality, many goals in this plan will require actions and strategies in more than one and perhaps all three categories for their implementation to ultimately prove successful.

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golden triangle neighborhood plan 95 regulatory actions and policy strategiesRegulatory and policy strategies are a critical rst step in creating an eective pathway to positive change over time. Small changes in regulations and policies can have big impacts, both in the short-term and over the accrual of many years worth of policy implementation. Strong and actively-managed regulations are critical in assuring that the Golden Triangle preserves what it wants to preserve and grows the way it wants to grow. On the other hand, policy exibility is important to enable and encourage new, creative approaches to solving enduring problems that existing policies and regulations may not have been able to x, or may even have made worse. Supporting this policy creativity is especially important in the Golden Triangle, because it is a hub of creativity, arts, culture, and new energy within Denver. Doing so will help ensure that local government is a partner rather than an impediment to the new approaches, ideas and solutions that the neighborhood demands. The policy and regulation recommendations that follow oer common-sense regulatory changes and proven policy solutions. They seek to oer steadfast support to preserve and strengthen the best things going for the Golden Triangle, while remaining exible in approach and intent to help encourage and make possible a wide range of new directions to come. Any plan without the force of policy and law behind it risks sitting on a shelf, ineective and unused. It is therefore critical for the City of Denver to adopt the simple change of making the Golden Triangle Neighborhood Plan itself into a policy, requiring that all future development and change be consistent with the goals, policies, and strategies set forth within this plan. It is especially crucial that all plan elements are incorporated into any future Catalytic Development project encouraged in this plan. Recommended Regulatory Actions and Policy Strategies are shown at right and described in detail on the following pages. Zoning Code Updates Parking Policies Urban Design Guidelines Changes Green Infrastructure Policies Public Realm and Public Art Guidelines and Requirements

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96 golden triangle neighborhood plan zoning code updates Denvers Zoning Code, recently updated in 2010, sets forth many forwardthinking zoning policies and regulations that can be used eectively in advancing the goals of the Golden Triangle Plan. The regulations and policies contained within the Denver Zoning Code are intended to provide clear guidance and a context-based approach to regulation, and should be used as tools to help promote the goals of the Golden Triangle. The Golden Triangle will retain its designation in Blueprint Denver as an Area of Change, as well as the Blueprint Denver concept land use designations. Aligning and updating the Golden Triangles existing regulations with the Denver Zoning Codes context-based and form-based approach is an important rst implementation step. This will help increase predictability, and ensure building form requirements that clarify and support the neighborhoods design context. The updated D-GT zoning would remain in the Downtown Neighborhood Context in the Denver Zoning Code. The revised D-GT zoning should incorporate the recommended zoning strategies under A2. This includes tools such as requiring pedestrian-active uses at the ground oor to ensure a quality pedestrian experience, as well as tools such as an upper-story mass reduction and/or upper-story setbacks to encourage access to views and sunlight. The updated zoning should include requirements for parking lot landscaping and pedestrian lighting and explore ways for existing parking lots to comply. An important goal for the new zoning should be to ensure the continued stewardship of the Golden Triangles diverse historic resources and to maintain neighborhood identity. Regulatory tools that encourage and enable the reuse of existing buildings, such as parking reductions and the Transfer of Development Rights (TDR), should be evaluated as eective means for preserving the neighborhoods varied design context while providing aordable opportunities for startup businesses, galleries, artists and new residents. The updated zoning should also explore tools to encourage the provision of privately-owned public gathering spaces, such as parklets and plazas, as part of new development. key next steps % en Update D-GT zoning to the Denver Zoning Code context-based and formbased approach. % en Shift current floor area ratio (FAR) regulations to form-based tools, such as flexible faade articulation and upper-story step backs (see strategies A2a. and A2b.). % en Explore tools to encourage the reuse of existing buildings. % en Evaluate the required vehicle parking ratios appropriate for the neighborhood given its placement in the Downtown Neighborhood Context. % en Incorporate minimum standards for parking lot landscaping and pedestrian lighting and explore ways for existing parking lots to comply.

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golden triangle neighborhood plan 97 urban design guideline updatesWith its rich culture and vibrant creative arts sector, the Golden Triangle has unique needs and goals that demand a sensitive approach to design. The approach must be one that holds design and development to a high standard and at the same time exible enough to enable and even encourage the unexpected and unknown. Carefully crafted and thoughtfully implemented urban design guidelines will create the conditions for both big, bold new Catalytic Development of the highest design quality, as well as small, unique and artistic changes to the public and private realms even whimsical, unplanned events, and tactical urbanism interventions (tactical urbanism is loosely dened as inexpensive, small-scale projects that increase livability and inspire long-term change to the built environment). Guidelines crafted in such a way will create conditions such that visitors may nd a world-class art museum on the same block as a one-of-a-kind neighborhood bike corral designed by a local merchant, welded by local metal artisans, and yarn-bombed by the neighbors. Existing design guidelines should be updated to work with the updated D-GT zoning to ensure that the height and overall mass of new development preserves the neighborhoods diverse design context, considers area landmarks, and is compatible with adjacent, smaller-scale buildings. At the same time, design guidelines should introduce a range of options, including exible faade articulation, upper-story step-backs and other tools. These will help ensure that the overall building mass of new development is compatible with the diverse range of existing building scales. It is also crucial to update the existing design guidelines in key areas to help shape new development so it is consistent with the vision for an Eclectic, Connected, Creative and Livable neighborhood. Existing design guidelines should be coordinated with updated zoning regulations, and any areas in the guidelines that do not adequately promote current design objectives should be addressed. In particular, guidelines that ensure pedestrian-oriented, context-sensitive design solutions applied to all new public capital improvement and maintenance projects should be adopted. key next steps % en Update outdated design guidelines within the Design Guidelines for Golden Triangle Zone District (adopted in 2002) that are not consistent with the Neighborhood Plan vision and do not promote the goals of the neighborhood. Key areas for improvement include ensuring a quality pedestrian experience and encouraging new development to respond to the surrounding context, including cultural landmarks and historic assets.

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98 golden triangle neighborhood plan Context-sensitive design guidance should be provided for particular and unique neighborhood subareas such as the Broadway/Lincoln Avenue frontage, the southern tip of the neighborhood, and the neighborhood core. Development strategies that are consistent with Plan objectives should also be illustrated. Urban design tools that address the street level design of new development, including transparency, entrance location, faade articulation and height at the sidewalk edge, are critical to ensuring a vibrant public realm. Pedestrian connections through larger new developments should be promoted and, whenever appropriate, required, to improve accessibility to open space, parking areas, the Cherry Creek Greenway, and other potential new neighborhood amenities such as the Acoma Neighborhood Greenway and the Arts and Culture Trail. Finally, to ensure safety and enhance crime prevention, streets, parks, plazas and open spaces should be designed using design principles, to ensure that buildings provide eyes on the space through placement of windows, doorways and active uses, and include appropriate landscape design, adequate lighting, and active programming.

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golden triangle neighborhood plan 99 key next steps % en Identify opportunities for private partners, including business owners, property developers, cultural institutions, and future special districts, to fund and maintain public spaces including plazas, parklets, and public art. % en Update existing regulations, including Public Works Rules and Regulations, the Citys Public Art Program, and Design Guidelines for the Golden Triangle and Civic Center, that are specific to public space and public art to make them consistent with the vision and goals. % en Update and streamline existing public event, block party, and temporary street closure regulations and permitting to encourage arts and culture programming and activities on streets and in the public right-of-way. % en Revise Public Works regulations, as needed, to permit parklets in the right-of-way across from businesses. % en Create a City Parklet Guide to inform development of parklet spaces.public realm and public art guidelines and requirementsMany of the Neighborhood Plans recommendations for enhanced public spaces, including new public gathering spaces and pocket parks, will require private partners for implementation. Existing entities such as business owners, property developers ,and cultural institutions as well as new entities, such as a special district that may form in the future, will be the best actors to implement and maintain quality public spaces over time. At the same time, the City should evaluate and revise policies, rules, and regulations that relate to the public realm and public art in order to allow and promote investment in enhanced public spaces. Through the updated design guidelines, privately-owned public spaces on private property should be encouraged to accommodate active uses and to highlight pedestrian connections, primary building entrances, public art, stops on the Arts and Culture Trail, or views to historic and civic buildings. Public Works Rules and Regulations should be updated, as needed, to enable the bold rethinking of the public realm that is called for in many of the Neighborhood Plans goals. Parklets, adding new arts and cultural elements to the public right-of-way, and closing street stubs to cars in order to re-open them as new open space (as identied for the Speer Triangles), are among the bold, transformative goals intended to foster civic engagement and rethink use of the public realm. Existing rules and regulations may need to be rethought to make the most ecient transition of these spaces to the proposed new uses. Policies that encourage or require the incorporation of public art into development, streetscape and park improvements should likewise be examined to assure they promote public art to the greatest extent possible in all Golden Triangle development. Public art should be integrated into both public and private development, not as an afterthought but as a central and important part of any new project.

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100 golden triangle neighborhood plan parking policiesPolicies to guide the supply and utilization of onand o-street parking are among the most critical aspects of ensuring that the Golden Triangle continues to transform into a vibrant neighborhood and prevents it from simply becoming the parking lot for Downtown. Large gaps currently exist in the urban fabric from the many large parcels being used as surface parking lots today. These surface parking lots consume substantial, valuable land within the neighborhood and can often contribute to a poor environment for pedestrians due to a lack of investment, absence of streetscape amenities, and low street activation. Smart parking management policy decisions, as well as active and forward-thinking management strategies, will play a crucial role in repairing and transforming the urban fabric. Parking policies should be implemented with the overarching goal of managing on-street and o-street public parking supplies to best support the adjacent activities and overall quality of life in the Golden Triangle. They should also be designed to help support the multi-modal travel goals in Denvers Strategic Transportation Plan. To achieve the plans goals the management tools in the Citys Strategic Parking Plan should be utilized to achieve the identied economic, social, placemaking and design goals in this plan. key next steps % en Evaluate all parking policies to ensure they align with and contribute to the multi-modal travel goals in the Citys Strategic Transportation Plan. % en Manage available public parking supplies by utilizing the tools and strategies identified in Denvers Strategic Parking Plan (SPP) % en Introduce new parking options that serve a variety of stay-duration needs and different modes. % en Promote a park once environment by creating a universally managed, intuitive parking system so that all onand off-street parking inventory works together as a system. % en Construct a landmark parking facility as needed with area partners as demand and activity increases in the neighborhood.

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golden triangle neighborhood plan 101 green infrastructure policiesSeveral corridors within the Golden Triangle are identied as key green streets, including 12th Street and Acoma Street, the latter of which has a special identication as the major Neighborhood Greenway. Designating streets as green streets is a worthy goal, but too often the idea is used without real understanding or specic criteria. This Neighborhood Plan aims to encourage policy changes that will help ensure green street designations in Denver have clear expectations and specic intent for the particular streets selected. It is the goal of this plan that its green streets designations are implemented by policy guidelines that will ensure the development of green streets into unique roadways that are distinct from standard streets. Green streets policies should detail the specic goals of green streets in Denver. Green streets can take advantage of worldwide best practices and the latest innovations in green infrastructure, sustainable energy use, stormwater management, and green street design, among other key ideas. key next steps % en Adopt green streets policies to ensure that they are held to a high standard, with clear aims and measurable goals, and innovative ideas from best practices around the world. % en Designate 12th Street and Acoma Street as green streets, to open all potential new incentive programs to owners and ensure all future development is held to the green street standard. % en Explore the formation of a Special Improvement District in the Golden Triangle, which would charge a special assessment on property. Revenue generated could help finance streetscape improvements.

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102 golden triangle neighborhood plan partnerships The best plans are the product of extensive feedback and input from a variety of groups working toward collective goals and aims. Long after a plan is adopted, partnerships formed during the plan process can remain among the best new assets for which a plan can claim responsibility. Partnerships can play key roles in accomplishing and implementing particular plan goals, and indeed in some cases may be the only realistic or feasible way to solve a problem or implement a policy. The Golden Triangle Neighborhood Plan encourages the strengthening of all existing partnerships that contributed to the creation of the plan. Key new partnerships have been identied in this plan and will be critical to ensuring success on several important fronts. Recommended partnerships strategies are shown at left and described in detail on the following pages. Golden Triangle Neighborhood Advisory Committee New Colorado Creative District Transit Partnerships Arts and Culture Trail Partnership

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golden triangle neighborhood plan 103 golden triangle neighborhood advisory committee This plan calls for the creation of a new Golden Triangle Neighborhood Advisory Committee (GTNAC). This critical step will keep the momentum moving forward on all aspects of this plan, and will help strengthen the bonds formed between stakeholders during its creation. After formation, the committee can continue to work collaboratively to explore the next steps for creating organizational and funding mechanisms to support the construction, operations and maintenance of planned improvements and programs within the Golden Triangle (see strategy D3). A priority task for the Committee would be to explore potential organizational structures, such as a Business Improvement District or other special district, that could help to fund and maintain key plan recommendations in the future. The special district would need to cover all or most of the neighborhood and could play an essential role in funding and maintaining public improvements including pedestrian lighting, street and streetscape improvements, and public art. key next steps % en Create a new Golden Triangle Neighborhood Advisory Committee, and select members to serve on Committee. % en Define Committee charge, goals and priorities. % en Through the Committee, explore future organizational and funding mechanisms, such as a Business Improvement District, that could implement key plan recommendations.transit partnershipsExtending RTDs Free MetroRide into the Golden Triangle is an essential plan recommendation. Implementation will require partnerships between RTD, DRCOG, and the City and County of Denver, and key private sector partners such as the Downtown Denver Partnership, the Denver Art Museum, private property owners, local business owners, and any future special district that might be formed in the Golden Triangle. See more on page 106 for potential public-private funding sources. Golden Triangle stakeholders should also explore partnerships with businesses, residents, landowners, and civic associations in the Cherry Creek area to continue work on a private shuttle connection between Denver Union Station and Cherry Creek, which would help to bring visitors to and throughout the Golden Triangle. key next steps % en Identify joint-funding partnerships to extend RTDs Free MetroRide service into the Golden Triangle neighborhood, utilizing the new bus lanes on Broadway and Lincoln Avenue. % en Partner with Cherry Creek area stakeholders to explore a potential private shuttle, or circulator, connection between Denver Union Station and Cherry Creek.

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104 golden triangle neighborhood plan arts and culture trail partnership This plan calls for the creation of a new Arts and Culture Trail to connect the areas many arts and cultural facilities. Making this creative vision a reality will depend on the work of many dierent stakeholders. It will demand a strong lead organization, with funding from both the private and public sectors, which has access to resources and represents the interests of the collective stakeholders. A new Arts and Cultural Trail Partnership could serve as the lead organization dedicated to building and maintaining the trail. This organization will oversee all aspects of trail development, fundraising, management, and maintenance, and ensure that the new pathway aligns with the neighborhood vision and goals. The Partnership will ensure that the path connects to facilities and venues within the Golden Triangle as well as outside the neighborhood, such as the Sante Fe Arts District, 16th Street Mall, 14th Street cultural corridor, Denver Union Station, LoDo, Central Platte Valley, and Capitol Hill. key next steps % en Encourage local arts and cultural institutions to spearhead the organization of a new Arts and Culture Trail Partnership. This organization should work with stakeholders, residents, business owners, artists, developers, and the City to design and create a new pathway to connect the neighborhoods civic facilities, historic sites, museums, theaters, galleries, and related uses. % en Implement the Arts and Culture Trail to encourage and enhance walking and biking between neighborhood destinations, nearby districts, and greater Downtown Denver. Explore potential funding sources that connect art and placemaking such as the National Endowment for the Arts Our Town Grant.golden triangle museum district: a new colorado creative district This plan calls for the City and stakeholders to encourage and support the Golden Triangle Museum District in pursuing designation as a Colorado Creative District. A designation will align with the Neighborhood Plans many goals related to its unique identity as a place for the creative arts. Designation as a Colorado Creative District will also make the Golden Triangle Museum District eligible for grants and technical assistance to aid in design and creation of the Arts and Culture Trail, as well as other arts and cultural amenities. Additionally, a Colorado Creative District designation oers the potential to further brand the Golden Triangle as a creative district located in the heart of Denver. Even prior to designation, the Golden Triangle Museum District can play a key role in implementing plan recommendations related to arts, culture, and creativity. key next steps % en Support the Golden Triangle Museum District in its application to become a Colorado Creative District. % en Engage Civic Center Conservatory in recommendations to continue the improvement of Civic Center Park

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golden triangle neighborhood plan 105 investment strategies The range of new infrastructure development outlined in the Golden Triangle Neighborhood Plan will require signicant investment in both capital cost and ongoing maintenance. Signicant public investment will be needed to redesign and upgrade outdated streets, parks, and other infrastructure to achieve plan goals. Key investment strategies are needed to secure funding sources that will cover the capital and ongoing costs of new and current investments. Public-private partnerships will be critical for other needs and plan goals. Private investment will be important in helping to shape the public and private realms to the standards the plan sets forth. Recommended Investment Strategies are shown at right and described in detail on the following pages. New and Ongoing Funding Sources Corridor-level Investment: Acoma Neighborhood Greenway Public-private Partnerships Corridor-level Investment: Speer Boulevard Corridor-level Investment: Broadway-Lincoln Couplet Network-level Public Investment

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106 golden triangle neighborhood plan new and ongoing funding sourcesMore than one new funding mechanism may be needed to ensure that civic users, residential and commercial property owners, renters, and visitors collectively and equitably contribute to, and benet from, the investment called for in this plan. Potential mechanisms include a Community Coordinating District, General Improvement District, Business Improvement District, master home owner/renter association, Metropolitan District, and Parking Benet District. The Plan recommends exploring all options on the table and pursuing those found to be most benecial. A jointfunding partnership with local businesses and museums could use Public Improvement Fees (PIFs) or Retail Sales Fees (RSFs). Through PIFS and RSFs, businesses and museums who would benet from the Free Metro Ride extension, could contribute to the fund through existing sales to customers. The newly-formed Golden Triangle Neighborhood Advisory Committee (GTNAC) can be instrumental in guiding the decision-making process for all new and future funding opportunities. Any new district formed would need to include commitment and nancial contribution from tax-exempt landowners, including the City of Denver. key next steps % en Identify district funding options to support ongoing maintenance and capital improvements of existing and proposed enhancements within the neighborhood. % en Identify and implement a public financing funding mechanism(s) to raise revenue to build and/or maintain planned neighborhood amenities such as streetscape, parks and plazas, parking, and safety services. % en Identify joint-funding partnerships to extend RTDs Free MetroRide service into the Golden Triangle neighborhood, utilizing the new bus lanes on Broadway and Lincoln Avenue. % en Explore funding opportunities through organizations such as the National Endowment for the Arts, to finance placemaking through art programs and projects.

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golden triangle neighborhood plan 107 public-private partnerships Public-private partnerships are an important tool in advancing development goals while sharing the burden of upfront capital and maintenance costs. The Neighborhood Plan identies several particular areas where public-private partnerships are likely to have the greatest success. It encourages creative thinking in forging other new public-private relationships as needed to achieve the plans overall goals. Public-private partnerships are recommended as the best strategy to facilitate incremental change to Colfax Avenue west of Fox Street over time, building upon recent considerable investments. A mix of funding from public sources as well as from future development along this section of Colfax should be used to achieve plan goals. These include strategies that will support new person-trip capacity by enhancing transit service; improve visibility for all roadway users at intersections; introduce new median treatments that identify the entrances into Downtown Denver; and complete the sidewalk buers, waynding, and urban design improvements west of Fox Street with redevelopment projects on both sides of the corridor. Public-private partnerships for building new creative workspaces should also be encouraged to assure a steady supply of reasonably-priced space and increase the variety of spaces for an array of uses. The construction and operation of a new parking structure is another possible opportunity to leverage public-private partnership investment opportunities. key next steps % en Identify the preferred funding source for shortand long-term improvements to Colfax Avenue. % en Develop a program to collectively market and lease art and workspaces, by exploring the creation of a master leasing entity to attract innovation businesses to existing properties and/or create a program to similar to Denvers Shared Space program for non-profits. % en Solicit an RFP to build a joint venture landmark parking facility with one existing surface parking lot owner in the neighborhood. % en Develop an investment in a cash-inlieu system to pay for parks, plazas and open space development and maintenance.

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108 golden triangle neighborhood plan network-level public investmentSpecic long-term public investment strategies are needed to achieve the goals of the plan that are best addressed on a network level. These strategies are closely related to corridor-level investment strategies, but are broader in scope and are often citywide network projects that have segments within the Golden Triangle. One key network-level investment includes the citywide goal of completing the bicycle network plan, as identied in the Denver Moves Plan. Completing those segments of the bicycle network that are within the Golden Triangle aligns with the goals of the Neighborhood Plan, which seeks to increase trips and encourage new trips for interested but concerned bicyclists. For this plan, bicycle network-level investment aects improvements called for on 11th Avenue, Bannock Street, Delaware Street, 13th Avenue, Broadway and Speer Boulevard. The Colfax Corridors Connection project applies to a smaller network project, but a similar goal applies of addressing all rst and nal mile connections to and from enhanced transit stops within the Golden Triangle. key next steps % en Leverage investment strategies and funding sources identified by the Denver Moves Plan to fund improvements to complete the bicycle network on streets within the Golden Triangle, including 11th Avenue and Bannock Street. % en Identify funding for the construction of first and final mile connections to and from enhanced transit stops that are identified in the Colfax Corridors Connection project.

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golden triangle neighborhood plan 109 corridor-level public investment: acoma neighborhood greenway Signicant public investment strategies are needed to achieve the goals of the Plan related to key corridors in the Golden Triangle. This includes Acoma Street, which is highlighted for major improvements that will eect its transformation into a major new Neighborhood Greenway. The Plan seeks to leverage public investment to create a specially-designed, green, slow street that prioritizes active transportation enhancements such as bulb-outs, improved intersections, and next-generation bike facilities for safe, pleasant, easy walking and biking along its length. The Plan promotes a vision for a transformative new design, oering two bold alternatives design concepts on the section of Acoma between 9th and 10th avenues. The Plan also calls for leveraging private investment to encourage and stimulate additional investment at key Catalytic Development Sites along the Acoma Street corridor that will complement public investment in the Greenway itself. Through the implementation of a general improvement district (GID), funds could be generated by additional property taxes. Similarly, a special improvement district (SID) could charge a special assessment on all properties, including those that are tax exempt, for a specied amount of time to nance improvements. The SID assessment can be varied based on the proximity to improvements. Both the GID and SID places the pressure on property owners to nance investments along the corridors and at key Catalytic Development Sites. An alternative strategy is the implementation of a public improvement fee or retail sales fee, where local retailers collectively agree to charge a fee that emulates a sale tax. This strategy helps to alleviate the burden of costs o of the residents and property owners. key next steps % en Implement the Acoma Neighborhood Greenway concept as a north-south connection for walking, bicycling, and neighborhood placemaking (see D2. Acoma Neighborhood Greenway). % en Leverage public investment to boost private development on potential Catalytic Development Sites along and near the Greenway. % en Coordinate with all Green Streets policies to assure the Acoma Neighborhood Greenway aligns with and is designed to Green Streets standards.

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110 golden triangle neighborhood plan corridor-level public investment: speer boulevardThe Speer Boulevard corridor is also targeted for signicant public investment to achieve the goals of the plan, specically those that apply to the Grand Boulevards. Placemaking opportunities, managing access points to the Cherry Creek Greenway, and building sustainable infrastructure that is safe for all modes should all be enhanced along Speer Boulevard. Short-term safety improvements and reclaimed pop-up parks are envisioned to oer new public space and lay the groundwork for more long-term investment. Other long-term investments to be studied further include (1) increasing person trip capacity by planning for future transit services within the existing travel lanes and (2) planning for long-term design changes such as trac lane reductions and right-of-way reallocation that will calm trac on Speer Boulevard, give it more gracious edges, improve trac ow and potential transit operations, and make it a safer, more livable street. key next steps % en Implement traffic calming and control measures to safely manage access to and from the Cherry Creek Regional Trail at signalized intersections for non-motorized users of all abilities and ages. % en Reclaim underutilized portions of the intersecting streets for Speer Triangles that will foster placemaking, art, open space and economic development opportunities (see D1. Connected Open Spaces). % en Provide new bicycle and pedestrian capacity along Speer Boulevard to support first and final access to destinations within the Golden Triangle from the Cherry Creek Regional Trail. % en Plan for long-term interventions at the unsignalized intersections of Cherokee Street, 10th Street and 12th Street, that will enhance these open space connections and improve safety for all users. % en Initiate a long-term planning and study process for Speer Boulevard north of Broadway.

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golden triangle neighborhood plan 111 corridor-level public investment: broadway-lincoln coupletThe vision for the Broadway/Lincoln Avenue corridor includes investments that will enhance the current conguration by introducing new streetscapes, safety features, and mobility improvements that create a unied Grand Boulevard. These investments should seek to ensure the removal of perceived and real physical barriers of Broadway and Lincoln Avenue between the Golden Triangle and Capitol Hill neighborhoods. The plan recommends rebuilding the current intersections as attractive, well-marked mobility hubs for all modes of travel. New transit super stops will allow RTDs Free MetroRide and other local routes to more eectively serve the area. The introduction of innovative protected bicycle facilities is also recommended to complement economic development eorts. key next steps % en Fund, plan and initiate appropriate corridor-level studies and plans for the Broadway/Lincoln Avenue corridor, such as traffic and transit studies, cycle track design study, and a community streetscape design and implementation plan.