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La Alma / Lincoln Park neighborhood plan

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Title:
La Alma / Lincoln Park neighborhood plan
Creator:
Community Planning and Development, City and County of Denver
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Denver, CO
Publisher:
City and County of Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English

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Neighborhood plans
Community planning

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Full Text
DENVER
Community
Planning &
Development
September 20,2010
La Alma/
Lincoln Park
Neighborhood Plan
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September 20, 2010


IV


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan -Table of Contents
Table of Contents
Acknowledgements 1
Executive Summary 3
Introduction 9
Vision and Goals 13
Framework Plan 19
Character Area Plans 37
Implementation and Next Steps 67
Supporting Documentation 75
v


VI


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Acknowledgements
1


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Acknowledgements
Mayor John Hickenlooper
Denver City Council
Jeanne Robb, Council President, District 10
Rick Garcia, District 1
Jeanne Faatz, District 2
Paul Lopez, District 3
Peggy Lehmann, District 4
Marcia Johnson, District 5
Charlie Brown, District 6
Chris Nevitt, District 7
Carla Madison, District 8
Judy Montero, District 9
Michael Hancock, District 11
Carol Boigon, At-Large
Doug Linkhart, At-Large
Denver Planning Board
Brad Buchanan, Chair
Laura E. Aldrete
Richard Delanoy
Shannon Gifford
Anna Jones
Judith Martinez
Sharon Nunnally
Kenneth Ho
Karen Perez
Jeffrey Walker
Dave Webster
Community Planning & Development
Peter J. Park, Director
Steve Gordon, Comprehensive Planning Manager
Caryn Wenzara, Principal City Planner
Kristin Krasnove, Project Manager
Thomas Hoaglund, Senior City Planner
Barbara Frommell, Senior City Planner
Steve Nalley, Associate City Planner
Eric McClelland, Senior CIS Analyst
Andrea Santoro, CIS Analyst
Carolyne Janssen, Graphic Design
Jim Ottenstein, Graphic Design
Public Works
Karen Good
Eric Osmundsen
Jim Turner
Justin Schmitz
Crissy Fanganello
Parks and Recreation
Scott Robson, Deputy Manager
Gordon Robertson, Planning Manager
Office of Economic Development
Andre Pettigrew, Executive Director
Cec Ortiz, Deputy Director
Michael Miera
Department of Environmental Health
Gene Hook
Stacey McConlogue
Department of Cultural Affairs
Ginger White
Denver Housing Authority
Chris Parr
Kimball Crangle
Ismael Guerrero
Regional Transportation District
Bill Sirois
Consultant Team
Crandall Arambula
Carter and Burgess
Fehr and Peers
Hartwig and Associates
Basile Baumann Probst Cole and Associates
Community Stakeholders
2


'ri
La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Executive Summary
3


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Executive Summary
Executive Summary
La Alma Lincoln Park is a dynamic, mixed-use
neighborhood at the heart of Denver. It ben-
efits from its variety of housing types, diversity
of land uses, historic resources, proximity to
downtown, presence of a transit station, strong
job base within the neighborhood and in close
proximity to it, the Santa Fe Arts district, nice
parks, and its broad range of cultural and public
facilities. At the same time La Alma Lincoln
Park faces challenges in terms of its older hous-
ing stock, changes in land use, low percentage of
home ownership, changing demographics, con-
siderable number of persons in poverty, limited
transportation connections from the east to the
west and within the industrial area, and needed
improvements to the pedestrian environment.
Given the range of issues and opportunities, the
development of a clear vision for the future of the
neighborhood is an important step through this
Neighborhood Plan.
The neighborhood is bounded by West Colfax
Avenue on the north, Speer Boulevard on the
east, West Sixth Avenue on the south, and the
South Platte River on the west. This area will be
referred to as Lincoln Park or La Alma/Lincoln
Park through this plan.
This Neighborhood Plan incorporates a Sta-
tion Area Plan for the 1 Oth and Osage light rail
station in the Transit Oriented Development
Character Area Chapter. The 1 Oth and Osage
station is located on RTDs Central Corridor and
functions as a neighborhood walk-up station.
The existing land uses surrounding the station in-
clude medium density public housing to the east,
a park and recreation center, small scale commer-
cial (Buckhorn Exchange restaurant), and Union
Pacifics Burnham Yard, a freight train engine
maintenance facility, to the west.
Sustainable Transit-Oriented Development
Forecasts estimate that Denvers population will
grow by 132,000 people, and that the metro-
region will grow by 800,000 people, over the
next twenty years. In response to the anticipated
growth, Blueprint Denver, the citys award win-
ning plan to integrate land use and transporta-
tion, identified Areas of Change where the City
should direct growth in order to connect people
to jobs, housing and the transportation system.
Blueprint Denver defines an Area of Change as a
place where growth and redevelopment are either
desired or underway. The plan identified the
1 Oth and Osage Station Area together with the
industrial land west of the Central Corridor light
rail line as Areas of Change for several reasons
related to latent land development potential, ac-
cess to and demand for enhanced transit, proxim-
ity to downtown and Auraria Higher Education
Center, opportunity to supply more housing and
ability to stimulate economic development, as
well as reinvestment in historic resources.
The planning, design, construction and opening
of the expanded FasTracks transit corridors are
a source of pride and excitement for neighbor-
hoods and businesses in Denver. Opportunities
for land use, design, and mobility exist at each
station. Through the planning process, com-
munity members, City staff and the station area
planning team worked together to identify these
opportunities and develop strategies for the sta-
tion area.
The unique qualities of the 1 Oth and Osage sta-
tion area substantially contribute to the potential
for successful TOD at this station. Realizing this
vision will depend on the ability to overcome
distinct challenges and capitalize on the strengths
and opportunities identified in this plan.
Plan Components
Vision & Goals
The vision describes La Alma/Lincoln Park in the
future, as an end result, with current issues resolved
and goals met.
Framework Plan
The framework plan identifies the overall land use and
transportation goals. The framework plan presents the
issues that are relevant to the entire neighborhood and
recommendations that tie the neighborhood together.
Character Area Plans
The plan establishes six subareas that have distinct
characteristic and uses. The subarea plans present is-
sues and recommendation that are more specific than
those presented in the framework plan.
Implementation Plan
The implementation plan consists of specific actions
that can be taken to achieve the recommendations
contained in the framework and subarea plans.
Supporting Documentation
The assessment describes the physical conditions and
regulations of the neighborhood as it currently exists.
4


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Executive Summary
Goals
The Plan establishes long range goals and objec-
tives for the development and stabilization of the
neighborhood. From discussions with the stake-
holders and through a series or public meetings,
a series of goals were established for the plan.
These goals formed the basis of the specific land
use concepts and recommendations for the plan.
I Redevelopment focused in three areas:
I 10th and Osage station
I Santa Fe corridor
I 13 th Ave corridor west of Osage Street
I Stability improved within residential neighborhood.
I Increased circulation and connectivity.
I Neighborhood support systems are improved.
I Local services are maintained.
I History and cultural diversity are preserved
and celebrated.
Although the Plan incorporates many additional
recommendations, the key ones from each chapter
are highlighted for the purpose of this summary.
The Framework Plan: Land Use and
Urban Design
I Attract development to Areas of Change.
I Utilize mixed use, main street, and small lot
residential zoning.
I Encourage a mixture of uses that support a
successful neighborhood.
I Support greater heights at the station and
key intersections.
I Explore shared parking.
I Support public art in the community.
The Framework Plan: Mobility
and Infrastructure
I Improve pedestrian and bicycle connections
throughout the neighborhood.
I Expand bus service to provide direct access to
the station.
I Extend Osage Street south.
I Re-open 11th between Kalamath and Lipan.
I Implement bike lanes on 13th Avenue.
I Support a 10th Avenue shuttle.
I Consider traffic calming measures for Santa Fe
and Kalamath.
The Framework Plan: Parks and Preservation
I Ensure the La Alma Rec Center continues to
operate and serve the residents of the community.
I Tree preservation.
I Explore historic designation.
I Enhance trail connections (Cherry Creek and
Platte River).
I Enhance the S. Platte River as an amenity.
I Maintain and preserve landmark structures,
including Byers Library, as a public amenity.
The Framework Plan: Economic Development
I Promote local programs that support
small businesses.
I Promote gap financing programs available
through OED.
I Establish appropriate controls to reinforce
historic character.
I Promote adaptive reuse.
I Improve infrastructure and parking management.
I Increase graffiti removal.
I Educate residents about Home
Rehabilitation programs.
I Ensure continuation of Denvers HOME Program
to help fund affordable housing.
I Utilize CDBG money in La Alma Lincoln Park.
I Continue workforce development.
The Framework Plan: Public Health
I Incorporate safe streetscape amenities.
I Incorporate low impact development stormwater
management.
I Reduce automobile use and VMT.
I Replace dead or dying trees.
I Add bike lanes where bicycle connections
are needed.
I Partner with B-Cycle to explore an additional bike
sharing station in the neighborhood.
I Build wider sidewalk in high pedestrian areas.
I Ensure existing urban gardens continue.
I Improve connectivity and access to healthy foods.
5


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Executive Summary
Character Areas
| | Mixed-Use
Main Street Corridor
| | Industrial
Institutional
Residential Area
Transit Oriented Development
I Lincoln Park Neighborhood Boundary
Light Rail Station
Existing Light Rail
Character Areas include
(see graphic above):
I Mixed Use
I Main Street
I Institutional
I Residential
I Transit-Oriented Development (10th and
Osage Station Area Plan)
Character Areas: Main Street Corridor
Encourage mixed use development with a
diversity of uses.
Promote multi-stories mixed use buildings.
Support ecelectic mix of architectural forms that
respect historic architecture.
Provide directional signage, lighting and
landscaping along corridor.
Preserve historic structures.
Character Area Recommendations
Character Areas: Mixed Use
I Support local businesses.
I Construct gateway elements at key entry points.
Character Areas: Institutional
I Tie to surrounding areas with appropriate scale
and uses.
I Preserve historic character.
I Support Denver Health in current location.
I Mitigate undesirable impacts.
I Improve access.
Character Areas: Residential
Preserve valued attributes.
Enhance character and quality of life.
Maintain current density.
Remove nonconforming uses.
Support diverse population.
Encourage homeownership.
Maintain urban neighborhood context.
Character Area: Transit Oriented Development
(TOD, 10th an Osage Station)
I Create density to support transit.
I Enhance pedestrian connections.
I Manage parking strategically.
I Include new community gathering spaces.
I Provide a variety of housing options.
I Attract community-supportive businesses.
I Improve Bike/Pedestrian access.
I Focus on sustainable development.
6


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Executive Summary
Implementation and Next Steps
The Implementation for the La Alma Lincoln
Park Neighborhood and 1 Oth and Osage Station
Area covers a series of actions:
I Specific recommendations
I Strategies for implementation
I Implementation timing
I Citywide Neighborhood and TOD
implementation evaluation
Specific recommendations are listed in tables in
the Implementation section. The most immedi-
ate steps include plan adoption followed by Blue-
print Denver updates that provide the regulatory
framework to implement the recommendations.
Rezonings have occurred with the recent adop-
tion of the Denver Zoning Code Update; how-
ever, future rezonings that further the goals of
this Plan will continue to be needed. New zone
districts are now available that are better suited to
the unique character of this neighborhood.
Another immediate step includes the scoping
of infrastructure projects and identification of
potential funding sources to implement the in-
frastructure needed in the neighborhood. These
infrastructure improvements should be pursued.
First Tier Implementation and Timing
It is important to have the city set up the station
area as development ready. Development ready
includes:
I Getting new zoning in place (complete
June 2010).
I Identifying an implementation toolbox both
financial and regulatory.
Putting in place the partnerships with other agen-
cies and departments Community Planning and
Development (CPD), Public Works, (PW), Office of
Economic Development (OED), Denver Housing
Authority (DHA), and the Regional Transportation
District (RTD).
Catalyst Projects
Several projects will act as catalysts to lead the charge
toward Neighborhood Plan implementation:
I Public plazas and green spaces are built along
10th Avenue and within the DHA property and
10th Avenue is reconstructed as a Signature Street
from Osage to Mariposa.
I Osage Street is extended south to 9th Avenue.
I DHA implements the senior housing project
1099 Osage Street (planned for construction Fall
2010). The 90 units of senior affordable housing
are the first step in initiating the redevelopment of
the South Lincoln project.
I Denvers New Zoning Code is used to implement
this plans recommendations.
Implementation Strategies
The tables included in the Implementation section
include all of the strategies for the neighborhood and
station area. The table is organized by Regulatory
Tools, Public Infrastructure Tools and Partnership
tools. Each implementation strategy includes a gen-
eral timeframe and key responsibilities. Timeframes
are organized by short term (1-5 years), medium
(5-10) or long (10-20 years) term. This plan does not
require these timeframes if opportunities arise sooner
than predicted.
7


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Introduction
8




9


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Introduction
Introduction
La Alma/Lincoln Park is a diverse and changing
neighborhood at the heart of Denver. It is one of
Denvers oldest and most complex neighborhoods.
It is a mixed-use neighborhood near the Central
Business District and the Auraria Higher Education
Center (AHEC). The neighborhood is bounded by
West Colfax Avenue on the north, Speer Boulevard
on the east, West Sixth Avenue on the south and the
South Platte River on the west. This area comprises
census tract 18 and the southern portion of census
tract 19. This area will be referred to as Lincoln Park
or La Alma/Lincoln Park throughout this plan. This
plan will not focus on the Auraria Higher Education
Center (AHEC).
Purpose of The Plan
The Plan establishes long range goals and objec-
tives for the development and stabilization of the
neighborhood. It provides a framework and estab-
lishes implementation strategies which will direct
the neighborhood towards a vision as a community
where people live, work, play, and celebrate the
neighborhoods rich cultural heritage. It is primarily a
plan for land use, transportation and urban form.
The Plan provides a neighborhood and city-approved
guide to the acceptable future development of Lin-
coln Park. It is intended for use by Denvers Com-
munity Planning and Development Agency, Depart-
ment of Public Works, Department of Parks and
Recreation, Police Department, other City Agencies,
Denver Planning Board, the Mayor, City Council,
other public and quasi-public agencies, neighborhood
associations, Denver Housing Authority, AHEC, resi-
dents, property owners, business owners, and private
organizations concerned with planning, community
development and neighborhood improvement.
The Plan is intended to promote patterns of land use,
urban design, circulation and services that contribute
to the economic, social, and physical health, safety,
and welfare of the people who live and work in the
neighborhood. The Neighborhood Plan addresses is-
sues and opportunities at a scale that is more refined
and more responsive to specific needs than the Citys
Comprehensive Plan.
The Plan is neither an official zone map, nor does it
create or deny any rights. Zone district changes that
may be proposed as part of development must be ini-
tiated under a separate procedure established under
the Revised Municipal Code.
10


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Introduction
Project Partners
The Denver Community Planning and Development
(CPD) Department completed a Neighborhood As-
sessment for Lincoln Park in 2006. The Assessment
determined the need for a Neighborhood Plan to
address the unique issues and opportunities of the
neighborhood. In an effort to prioritize planning
and implementation activities related to transit and
transit-oriented development (TOD), the City also
prepared the TOD Strategic Plan in 2006. Expand-
ing on the goals and policies identified in the TOD
Strategic Plan, the city initiated a station area plan for
the 10th and Osage light rail station to be developed
along with the La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood
Plan. The 10th and Osage station is located on the
Central Corridor and provides a significant opportu-
nity for transit-oriented development within the La
Alma/Lincoln Park neighborhood.
In addition, in 2002 the City adopted Blueprint
Denver An Integrated Land Use and Transporta-
tion Plan, to further the goals identified in Com-
prehensive Plan 2000 and promote more efficient
use of transportation systems, expanded transporta-
tion choices, and appropriate and mixed land uses.
Blueprint Denver identifies Areas of Change where
growth should be directed and Areas of Stability
where change should be limited. When voters passed
the FasTracks ballot measure in 2004, Denver was
poised to take a leadership role in implementing
Blueprint Denver and focusing growth near transit
stations. This agenda was furthered by the adoption
of Greenprint Denver in 2006. The Greenprint agen-
da promotes transit-oriented development (TOD) by
setting a goal of increasing new development located
within Vi mile of existing transit stations by 2011 and
decreasing reliance on automobiles through public
transit and access.
Plan Process
Over a course of four years, community members
worked together with City staff and the station area
planning team to articulate opportunities, develop a
vision and craft strategies to achieve the vision. With
the strong foundation of our adopted plans, stake-
holders focused on the vision for creating a stronger
sense of culture and community connections in the
La Alma Lincoln Park Neighborhood and at the
10th & Osage Station. Regular public meetings and
stakeholder work sessions shaped plan contents for
both the neighborhood planning and the station area
planning. Briefings and public hearings with City
Council, Denver Planning Board and interagency
city staff were also crucial to the process. The working
group engaged in this process.
The community members represented residents, artists,
businesses and community organizations in the area.
The planning area is within Council District 9. In ad-
dition, the process involved collaboration between the
City and County of Denvers Community Planning
and Development Department and Public Works De-
partment, with support from the Department of Parks
and Recreation and Office of Economic Development
and the Denver Housing Authority.
The Denver Housing Authority completed a Master
Plan for the redevelopment of their property at South
Lincoln Park homes in January 2010. The Master
Plan seeks to revitalize this community by enabling
residents the opportunity to enjoy the unique ad-
vantages of a holistic, transit-oriented development
11


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Introduction
realized through the core attributes established during
the design process: a highly green mixed-use commu-
nity, focused on a healthy lifestyle, increased non-auto
mobility, an integration of the resource conservation
and management systems, and a diverse mix of new
and existing residents.
La Alma/Lincoln Park History
La Alma/Lincoln Park is among the Citys oldest
neighborhoods. La Alma/Lincoln Park dates from
the settlement of the Auraria City where the Auraria
Higher Education Center is presently located. What
is known today as the La Alma/Lincoln Park neigh-
borhood was annexed to Auraria city (the area of the
Original Congressional Grant) under the Territo-
rial Sessions Laws of 1874 and 1883. Ninety-three
percent of the residential blocks were half or more
developed before 1900, and the remaining 7 percent
developed between 1900 and 1914. Although most
of the original structures were lost to floods along
Cherry Creek, the neighborhoods character today is
still shaped by the age of its homes. Many were built
over 100 years ago.
Twenty structures within the neighborhood are listed
in the 1986 Denver Inventory as sites qualified for
designation as a structure for preservation under
the provision of Chapter 30, Denver Revised Code.
Additionally, the neighborhood has a residential
district, the Westside Neighborhood, on the National
Register of Historic Places. That district, located on
Kalamath, Lipan, and Mariposa streets between West
13th Avenue and Colfax Avenue, is an example of
early Denvers working class neighborhoods. La Alma/
Lincoln Park also has one locally designated landmark,
the Buckhorn Exchange Restaurant at 1000 Osage
Street. This Victorian commercial structure was built
in 1885. The Byers Branch Library at 7th Avenue and
Santa Fe was a Carnegie Library completed in 1918
and is a designated landmark. The building still oper-
ates as a library and is a community focal point.
Built on the southwest corner of Speer Boulevard and
Colfax Avenue in 1922, the West Side Court Building
is a local landmark structure that reflects decades of ju-
dicial history. The building was preserved with fund-
ing from the State Historical Fund and was reopened
as the Bernard Valdez Hispanic Heritage Center.
Plan Components
Vision & Goals
The vision describes La Alma/Lincoln Park in the
future, as an end result, with current issues resolved
and goals met.
Framework Plan
The framework plan identifies the overall land use and
transportation goals. The framework plan presents the
issues that are relevant to the entire neighborhood and
recommendations that tie the neighborhood together.
Character Area Plans
The plan establishes six subareas that have distinct
characteristic and uses. The subarea plans present is-
sues and recommendation that are more specific than
those presented in the framework plan.
Implementation Plan
The implementation plan consists of specific actions
that can be taken to achieve the recommendations
contained in the framework and subarea plans.
Supporting Documentation
The assessment describes the physical conditions and
regulations of the neighborhood as it currently exists.
12


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Vision and Goals
Vision &
Goals


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Vision and Goals
Achieving the Vision
Plan visions are just that a collective picture of a
more desirable future. There are few if any circum-
stances in the complex milieu of neighborhoods
and cities in which the planning, design, ownership,
financing, and political resources align to implement
a plans visions and goals quickly and simultaneously
As a result, by necessity, plans are implemented incre-
mentally with the vision and goals providing com-
mon direction to the multitude of public and private
undertakings. Part of the City process is to evaluate
each of these large and small, public and private un-
dertakings in light of the plans vision and goals, the
current situation, and the available resources. Despite
this imperfect situation, plans have proven to have
substantial influence on the future direction of a plan
area over a period of five, 10 or 20 years.
Previous Plans
This plan represents the land use, transportation and
urban design vision for the Lincoln Park Neighbor-
hood. It updates and incorporates recommendations
of earlier plans. Previously adopted planning docu-
ments that are relevant to the Lincoln Park Neigh-
borhood are:
I Westside Neighborhood Tract Analysis, 1972
I Westside Neighborhood Plan, 1981
I Light Rail Station Development Program, 1997
I South Platte River Management Plan, 2000
I Bicycle Master Plan Update, 2001
I Blueprint Denver: An Integrated Land Use and
Transportation Plan, 2002
I Denver Parks and Recreation Game Plan, 2002
I Pedestrian Master Plan, 2004
I TOD Strategic Plan, 2006
I Strategic Transportation Plan, 2008
I River South Greenway Master Plan, 2010
These documents have been reviewed and relevant
material has been incorporated in the development
of this plan. This and all other neighborhood plans
supplement the Citys Comprehensive Plan. The
Comprehensive Plan presents a citywide perspective,
while each neighborhood plan provides more specific
guidance both for the allocation of City resources and
for the location and design of private development.
Neighborhood Vision and Goals
At the outset of the planning process, stakeholders
used the SWOT analysis to prepare ideal visions for
the look, feel and function of the Lincoln Park neigh-
borhood and 10th and Osage Station Area in twenty
years. City staff melded these visions into a cohesive
vision statement that the stakeholders then approved:
La Alma Lincoln Park in 2020 will be a stable, mixed
income residential neighborhood, with the Santa Fe
corridor providing a vital core of arts and commercial
uses that provide connections to surrounding neigh-
borhoods, Downtown and the Auraria campus. The
neighborhood has multi-modal connections to the
light rail corridor and encourages walking, biking and
Fundamental Concept Diagram
14


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Vision and Goals
transit use. Transit oriented development in the 10th
& Osage station area provides mixed income housing
and neighborhood serving commercial uses with con-
nection to the industrial area to the west. The neigh-
borhood is known throughout the City for its arts
district, parks and historic homes. The schools serve
as community centers with special arts and education
programs that link to the Santa Fe Arts District and
Auraria campus. Jobs are provided within the neigh-
borhood by both commercial and office uses along
the revitalized Santa Fe and Colfax corridors as well
as industrial uses in the western portion of the neigh-
borhood. The neighborhood has capitalized upon the
proximity to Downtown which brings people into the
neighborhood and benefits the local commercial, arts
and entertainment venues.
La Alma Lincoln Park is a diverse neighborhood that
maintains its Latino cultural identity and provides
homes, jobs and services for a wide variety of ages,
lifestyles, economic circumstances, ethnic groups and
family types. La Alma Lincoln Park is mixed commu-
nity with residential and light industrial areas provid-
ing homes and jobs, supporting the arts and artists
and providing amenities for families.
Overall Goals
I Redevelopment is focused in three areas; the
10th and Osage Station area, along Santa Fe
corridor and along 13th Avenue corridor west
of Osage.
I Future land uses in the redevelopment focus
areas are studied specifically the station and along
13th Avenue, currently zoned Industrial.
I Stability is improved within existing residential
areas, and supported by zoning within establ-
ished residential character areas.
I Increased circulation and connectivity is pro-
vided, both within the neighborhood and to
adjoining areas.
I Neighborhood support systems are focused
on schools and home ownership opportunities.
I The public services of Denver Flealth, Byers
Library and the La Alma Recreation Center are
maintained.
I The history and cultural diversity of the neigh-
borhood are preserved and celebrated.
Key Plan Elements
The plans objectives will be realized through the fol-
lowing key elements described here.
I Flighest density housing is located immediately
adjacent to the station with commercial ground-
floor uses near the platform and along 10th Avenue.
I Connections are created and improved from the
station to the Santa Fe Arts and Business
Corridor.
I Access in the neighborhood is improved by
extending Osage Street south and reopening
11th Avenue between Kalamath and Lipan.
Character Areas
Main Street Vision and Goals
I Mixed use with a diversity of businesses with
more restaurants and shops to support them.
I Multi-storied, mixed-use buildings with active
ground floor uses characterize the Santa Fe
corridor, existing historic structures are respected
as infill development occurs.
I Urban design integrates an eclectic mix of
architectural forms and sustainable building
materials which respect the surrounding
historic architecture.
I Directional signage is provided to parking,
local points of interest and connecting into
other neighborhoods.
I Lighting and landscaping reinforce the street
building line, enhance building facades as archi-
tectural features, and promote a pedestrian
oriented environment.
I Flistorically significant structures have been
preserved and adaptively reused.
Residential Vision and Goals
I Valued neighborhood attributes are preserved.
I Enhanced character of the residential area and
quality of life for residents.
I The current residential density in Areas
of Stability are maintained.
I Existing nonconforming uses in the
residential areas are removed.
I A diverse population is supported by providing
support services such as childcare facilities, trans-
it, and a variety of housing opportunities.
I Fdome ownership opportunities are encouraged
through job creation in adjoining areas.
I The context of the residential character remains
Urban Neighborhood based on its regular grid
15


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Vision and Goals
Character Areas
| | Mixed-Use
Main Street Corridor
| | Industrial
Institutional
Residential Area
Transit Oriented Development
I Lincoln Park Neighborhood Boundary
Light Rail Station
. Existing Light Rail
Designated Character Areas
16


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Vision and Goals
and alley block pattern and predominant single-
family pattern with duplex and other multi-
family uses mixed in.
Institutional Vision and Goals
I The Institutional Character Area is tied to the
surrounding neighborhood with complimen-
tary land uses including denser residential and
active retail.
I The historic character of West High School
and early buildings within the Denver Health
Medical Center are used to inspire improve-
ments to the area.
I Denver Health is supported in its current loca-
tion and allowed needed expansion in the future.
I Undesirable impacts of parking surrounding the
Denver Health Medical Center are reduced.
I Transit access to both Denver Health Medical
Center and West High School is promoted.
I Proximity to the Cherry Creek Trail and Speer
Boulevard Parkway are capitalized upon.
I Pedestrian and bicycle access to West High
School, Sunken Gardens Park and Denver
Health Medical Center is improved.
I Clear and direct circulation through the
Denver Health Medical Center and connectivity
to surrounding neighborhoods is provided.
TOD Vision and Goals
I Housing density supports transit and sustain-
able urban growth.
I Enhanced pedestrian connections between the
light rail station, downtown, the Santa Fe
Corridor and the Auraria campus.
I Shared structured parking in the vicinity of the
arts corridor, enticing pedestrian amenities, and
plentiful bike racks.
I New community gathering spaces, plazas, and a
promenade along 10th Avenue.
I Housing options include a range of types for a
variety of incomes.
I Locally-based, community-supportive entrepre-
neurial businesses are encouraged.
Mixed Use Vision and Goals
I Business opportunities for local businesses and
entrepreneurs are supported.
I Gateway elements are constructed at key entry
points such as along Colfax, 6th Avenue, 8th
Avenue and Speer Boulevard.
I Colfax Avenue includes neighborhood and student-
serving uses with a strong pedestrian orientation.
Industrial Vision and Goals
I Heavy industrial land uses in this area continue
to be supported for the long term.
I Industrial zoning is retained and a strong
city policy against housing in the heavy industrial
area during review of zoning and development
applications is maintained.
I The overall appearance and walkability
of the area is improved through well designed
and maintained buildings, streets, and sidewalks.
I Mixed land uses are supported in adjacent char-
acter areas, including industrial, commercial and
some residential on 13th, to give employees access
to commercial uses within walking distance.
I When opportunities arise, work with property
owners to break down the scale of large indus-
trial blocks by providing through streets, mid-
block alleys, courtyards and other design ele-
ments.
I Property owners are encouraged to build to the
lot line at the street frontage, unless a pattern of
building set-backs exists, in which case the
prevailing set-back pattern should be respected.
Consider new design standards for industrial
buildings and streets that are friendly to both
businesses and pedestrians.
I New infill developments are encouraged to
utilize innovative, green materials and design
that enrich the architectural character of indus-
trial buildings.
I Loading and parking facilities are developed
in the rear of lots which can be accessed through
an alley or secondary street.
I Create neighborhood identity and celebrate
proximity to the Santa Fe Arts District by incor-
porating public art into the Industrial/Employ-
ment character area, such as sculptures or murals
depicting industrial themes.
17


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Framework Plan
18


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Framework Plan
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19


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Framework Plan
The Framework Plan
The framework plan provides a broad perspective and
overall concepts that will guide neighborhood devel-
opment. It addresses core issues and provides basic
recommendations for the entire neighborhood.
Blueprint Denver sets the framework for small area
and neighborhood plans. The La Alma/Lincoln Park
neighborhood meets the main criteria for requiring a
neighborhood plan including:
I Evidence of disinvestment, deteriorating housing
and high vacancy and unemployment rates.
I Significant change is both occurring and anticipated
I Public facilities and physical improvements need
to be addressed.
I Opportunities for substantial infill and redevel-
opment are present.
I Opportunities to influence the development of
large activity generators.
I Opportunity for development in conjunction
with a transit station.
The framework plan specifically addresses goals of
Blueprint Denver including:
I Creating opportunities for appropriate develop-
ment in Areas of Change.
I Stabilizing conditions in Areas of Stability.
I Promoting public investment and
transportation choice.
The La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood contains
both Areas of Stability and Areas of Change as de-
fined by Blueprint Denver. The Areas of Change in
Lincoln Park include the Santa Fe Corridor and the
TOD area adjacent to the station while the northern
and southern residential character areas in La Alma/
Lincoln Park are designated Areas of Stability.
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Concept Land Use |2002|
Mixed Use
Commercial Corridor
Single Family Duplex
Urban Residential
Campus
HH Park
Employment
Industrial
Lincoln Park
Neighborhood Boundary
1=1 Light Rail Station
Existing Light Rail
Planned Light Rail
Railroad
Blueprint Denver Concept Land Use
20


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Framework Plan
Blueprint Denver establishes strategies for Areas of Change
and stability as follows:
I Areas of Change. The purpose of Areas of Change is
to channel growth where it will be beneficial and can
best improve access to jobs, housing and services with
fewer and shorter auto trips. A major goal is to increase
economic activity in the area to benefit existing residents
and businesses, and where necessary, provide the stimu-
lus to redevelop. New investment in these areas should
encourage the retention of low-income residents and
ensure diverse development that benefits all residents of
the city.
I Areas of Stability. The goal for Areas of Stability is
to identify and maintain the character of an area
while accommodating some new development and
redevelopment. Tools to enhance the unique quality
of one of Denvers oldest neighborhoods should focus on
preserving neighborhood character and quality of life.
The framework plan is divided into five over-arching com-
ponents encompassing both Areas of Change and Stability.
These components are:
I Land use and urban design
I Mobility and infrastructure
I Parks and preservation
I Economic development
I Public health
Each is described in detail in this section.
Blueprint
Denver
Blueprint Denver and the TOD Strategic Plan
provide guidance for neighborhood planning
and planning for TOD Areas
21


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Framework Plan
Land Use and Urban Design
La Alma/Lincoln Park is an urban neighborhood with
a variety of land uses residential at a variety of scale
and densities, commercial, industrial, and institutional
- that generally co-exist successfully but also lead to
strains on both residents and businesses. The neighbor-
hood is centrally located and near major transportation
corridors including the Central Corridor Light Rail,
1-25, 6th Avenue, Colfax Avenue and Speer Boulevard.
The neighborhood enjoys access to various recreational
and open space amenities including: Lincoln Park
(recreation center, playground, amphitheater, outdoor
pool, horseshoe pits, multi-purpose field, tennis court,
volleyball court); Sunken Gardens Park (benches,
playground, picnic tables, basketball court); and the
Cherry Creek Trail (bicycle and pedestrian path and
natural area). These spaces provide the community
with public areas to gather and recreate.
Lincoln Park also includes many employment, re-
tail, and cultural assets. These include Byers Library,
West High School, Greenlee Elementary School, the
Denver Health and Hospital Main Campus, La Alma
Recreation Center, the Denver Civic Theater, Phoenix
Theater and Museo de las Americas, Aztlan Theater,
Acadamia Internacional de Arte, the Buckhorn Ex-
change, and the Santa Fe Arts District. A successful land
use framework incorporates these diverse land uses while
planning for the optimal relationship among them.
Priority Issues and Opportunities
Lincoln Park contains all the important components
of a cohesive and walkable neighborhood with single-
family and multi-family housing, schools, parks, health
care services, grocery store, library, arts and culture, jobs,
and retail. Each of these uses should be accessible and
supported to ensure Lincoln Park continues to be an
integrated and successful traditional neighborhood.
In order to indicate a sense of arrival at the neighbor-
hood, Arts District, and 10th and Osage Station,
landmarks, gateways, wayfinding signage and public
art should be used. Each element can offer a variety of
uses including providing visual interest, neighborhood
identity, wayfinding and locating access points. They
can occur at the station, major intersections, building
facades, public plazas, open spaces, or along primary
vehicular and pedestrian/bike routes.
In the La Alma Lincoln Park Neighborhood, these
should celebrate the cultural and historical character of
the community. There should be a sense of consistency
within the landmark, gateway, and public art elements
to reinforce the place with a common theme. For
example, all wayfinding signs should have a consistent
look and be easily recognized as belonging uniquely in
the Lincoln Park neighborhood.
Recommendations
Economic Development
I Create opportunities for economically rewarding
development.
I Assist in paying for local improvements to spur
development in Areas of Change.
Zoning and Land Use
I Apply mixed use zoning to Areas of Change.
I Apply main street zoning to the Santa Fe corri-
dor.
I Apply appropriate small lot residential zoning
in residential Areas of Stability to maintain the
character of the neighborhood while allowing
moderate infill and density.
22


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Framework Plan
Single Family/Duplex
Townhouse
Multi-Family
Industrial
Mixed Use Retail
Mixed Use Commercial
Institutional
Parks, Open Space, Recreation
Historic Landmark Structure
Community Gardens
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La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Framework Plan
The 10th and Osage light rail station provides convenient
access via the Central Corridor
The at-grade crossing at West 13th Avenue will be improved
with the construction of the Burnham Lead
I Encourage a mixture of uses that assure the
availability of neighborhood services and ameni-
ties that reinforce the role, identity and needs of
the neighborhood, as appropriate to the subarea.
I Within the industrial and industrial-commercial
areas, locate more intense industrial uses away
from the residential areas.
I Protect the industrial character of the western
neighborhood, the residential character of the
central neighborhood and the main street and
commercial corridors with blended transitions
between subareas. Use regulatory and infrastruc-
ture resources to accommodate the changes.
I Applicants proposing a zoning change to a more
intense or different uses must substantially
mitigate negative impacts on existing uses and
demonstrate that new projects substantially
further the neighborhood goals and vision.
The land use categories for the neighborhood should
include: Single-Family/Duplex; Townhouse; Multi-
Family; Industrial; Mixed Use Retail; Mixed Use
Commercial; Institutional, and Parks, Open Space
and Recreation.
I Building heights should:
I Range from a minimum of 3-12 stories
adjacent to the 10th and Osage station.
I Range from 3-8 stories in the remainder
of the station area and transition down to
3 stories along Mariposa.
I Be limited to 1-2 stories in the northern
residential area and 1-3 stories in the south-
ern residential neighborhood.
I Range from 2-5 stories along the office/
employment corridor on 13th Avenue.
I Should range from 3-5 stories along Santa Fe
from 6th to 11th Avenue and 3-8 stories
from 11th to 14th Avenue.
Parking
I Explore parking management opportunities to
better utilize the existing supply.
Public Art
I Within the Lincoln Park Neighborhood pursue
additional public art funding through alternative
sources.
I Parks and public plazas within the neighbor
hood are priority locations for public art.
Possible locations should include the Santa Fe
corridor, 10th Avenue promenade, Lincoln Park,
and the Station Plaza.
I Public art in the neighborhood should reflect La
Alma/Lincoln Park history and diversity.
I A neighborhood public art fund could help
provide funding for Lincoln Park public art
projects and should be explored for this unique
and artistic neighborhood.
24


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Framework Plan
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Up to 3 Stories
Up to 5 Stories
Up to 8 Stories
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Parks, Open Space, Recreation
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La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Framework Plan
Traffic and street improvements are needed, especially along
the truck route of 13th Avenue.
Minimal sidewalk width and high traffic volumes give Santa
Fe an auto-oriented feel.
Mobility and Infrastructure
Lincoln Park is well-served by a variety of transpor-
tation options, including light rail and bus service
for mass transportation. The major east-west and
north-south arteries also provide fast connections to
the entire metro area and to central Denver. Quiet
residential streets are maintained by using four-way
stops at intersections and by providing a system
of one-way streets for easy traffic movement. Syn-
chronized traffic signals also assist traffic movement
through the neighborhood.
Light rail stations are located at 1 Oth and Osage and at
Colfax and Lipan. The Central Corridor line parallels
the Consolidated Main Line heavy rail tracks through
the center of the Lincoln Park neighborhood. The
light rail line connects the neighborhood with down-
town Denver, the southern suburbs, and the Denver
Tech Center. RTDs West Corridor is under construc-
tion and slated for completion in 2013 which will
connect the neighborhood with the Auraria campus,
west Denver, Lakewood, and Golden, paralleling
Lakewood Gulch.
Lincoln Park has bicycle routes that connect to both
downtown Denver and the South Platte River Green-
way, as well as the Cherry Creek Trail. The on-street
bike system connects from Mariposa to the west to the
South Platte River Trail via 8th and 13th Avenues and
along 11th Avenue linking to the Cherry Creek Trail
and across Speer Boulevard into the Golden Triangle.
Priority Issues and Opportunities
Despite being well-served by major thoroughfares,
there are various barriers in the neighborhood that
cause significant connectivity constraints. In most cas-
es the thoroughfares are barriers themselves (8th Av-
enue, Santa Fe, Kalamath, 6th Avenue). The Consoli-
dated Main Line, LRT Tracks, and Speer Boulevard all
have limited crossings that disrupt the neighborhood
grid. Currently Colfax, 13th Avenue, 8th Avenue and
6th Avenue are the only east-west connections across
Speer, all of the rail lines, and the South Platte River.
In addition many of the existing streets are missing
adequate sidewalks.
The framework plan includes recommendations for
auto and bus circulation, pedestrian and bicycle circu-
lation, parking, and traffic, street, and utility infra-
structure improvements.
Enhanced Bus Transit Corridors are defined in Blue-
print Denver, the Citys land use and transportation
plan, as a tool to improve the operation of transit
travel in congested areas by using priority green
phases, exclusive bus lanes and special bus stops that
decrease passenger loading times and improve the
ability of the bus to reenter the traffic stream. The
enhanced bus transit corridors are critical routes in the
pedestrian route network.
Denvers Pedestrian Master Plan identified areas
throughout the City that have the best potential for
significant pedestrian activity. The Pedestrian Master
Plan recommends that all major transportation cor-
ridors, especially if they are designated as an enhanced
bus transit corridor, be required to meet the highest
level of pedestrian need as defined in the Level of
Quality section of the Pedestrian Master Plan. The
Plan also recommends improving pedestrian connec-
tions across corridors such as railroads, natural features
i.e. Cherry Creek and the S. Platte River, major
arterials and highways.
26


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Framework Plan
Community Resource
Existing Bus Route
Primary Auto Circulation
Traffic Signal
} Streets Crossing Speer Blvd.
Proposed Shuttle
Auto and Bus Circulation
27


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Framework Plan
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La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Framework Plan
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29


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Framework Plan
Strong, established businesses in both the industrial and
commercial sections provide primary economic jobs for local
residents and for the region
Recommendations
Sidewalk, Pedestrian, and Bicycle Improvements
I Sidewalks and pedestrian facilities are integral
components of the transportations system.
New roads and transit facilities must be designed
to include pedestrian facilities and when existing
arterials are reconstructed they should be
furnished with sidewalks and pedestrian access
to neighborhoods.
I Improve pedestrian connections across
high volume streets that create barriers to/within
the neighborhood.
I Implement bike lanes on 13th Avenue per the
recommended cross section. This bicycle connec-
tion is critical to improving connectivity to the
Platte River Trail.
I Improve pedestrian treatments at intersections to
address pedestrian/vehicle conflicts.
I Improve vehicular, pedestrian, bicycle and
bus access to the 10th and Osage Station.
I Direct bicycle access should continue to be
provided to the station which should also be
equipped with high quality bicycle parking.
I Work with Denvers B-Cycle program to have a
station located at or near the 10th and Osage
light rail station.
Traffic and Street Improvements
I Extend Osage to 9th Avenue upon redevelop-
ment of S. Lincoln Park Homes and to 8th
Avenue in the longer term.
I Maintain designated truck routes that reduce the
impacts of noise, vibration and exhaust from
industrial traffic on residential areas.
I Re-open 11th Avenue between Kalamath and
Lipan to reinstitute the grid (planned for con-
struction summer 2010 with TOD bond).
I Improve the at-grade crossing at West 13th
Avenue where multiple sets of train tracks
limit access to and within the industrial area.
When improvements are made, bicycles and
pedestrians should be accommodated and the
tracks should be grade separated.
I Add pavement, curb and gutter to the unim-
proved streets and alleys in the neighborhood,
especially in the industrial area.
I Focus street enhancements to 10th, 11th, 13th
Avenues, Mariposa Street, Santa Fe Drive, and Na-
vajo Street as indicated on the New and Enhanced
Streets Diagram (TOD Character Area).
I Study the future potential of converting the
one-way couplets of Santa Fe and Kalamath to
two-way streets.
I Consider traffic calming measures to address high
speeds along Santa Fe and Kalamath during
non-peak hours. Any roadway improvements in
this area should also focus on making the cor-
ridors more pedestrian friendly.
Bus and Transit Improvements
I Improve bus stops and sidewalks in industrial
areas to mitigate safety concerns created by the
lack of clear pedestrian routes and minimal
separation from vehicular traffic.
I Support the creation of quiet zones along the
freight rail tracks to address neighborhood
impacts from freight train horns.
30


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Framework Plan
I Expand bus service to provide direct access to
the 10th and Osage station.
I Support the development of a shuttle along 10th
Avenue from the Station to Santa Fe Drive.
Infrastructure Improvements
I Improve utility capacity including aging
pipes and power lines that may limit future
development.
I As DHA begins redeveloping South Lincoln
and increasing the density around the station,
upgrade of the stormwater drainage system
should be prioritized in the Citys Wastewater
Management Plan.
I Work with RTD to address the flooding on their
property surrounding the 10th and Osage station
using best practices and green stormwater design.
Parks and Preservation
Parkways, Parks and Open Space
A system of open spaces, is a critical component
of classic urban neighborhoods. Not limited to
publicly owned spaces such as Lincoln Park and La
Alma Recreation Center, Sunken Gardens Park and
Frog Flollow Park, the neighborhoods open spaces
include tree lawns and street trees and other func-
tional, aggregated open spaces, such as courtyards,
patios or plazas. Careful attention must be paid to
preserving these open spaces through appropriate
regulatory tools, as well as organized community
efforts to promote open space acquisition and tree
canopy preservation.
Trails
As part of its trail system, La Alma/Lincoln Park pos-
sesses two north-south trails: the Cherry Creek Trail
and the Platte River Trail.
The Cherry Creek Trail provides an important con-
nection to major destinations including the Auraria
Campus, Downtown and Lo-Do, Confluence Park,
and the employment and retail of the Cherry Creek
Neighborhood. The access points to/from the Cherry
Creek Trail are located along Speer Boulevard at
Colfax, 14th Avenue, 11th Avenue, and 10th Avenue.
These access points are crucial to the framework of
the Denver bike system.
The Platte River Trail connects to suburban commu-
nities to the north and south and provides an impor-
tant regional recreation and commuting option. Both
trails could be enhanced with improved bicycle and
pedestrian connections on east-west streets includ-
ing 13th Avenue, 11th Avenue and 8th Avenue.
Despite the status of the Platte River Trail as valu-
Public Health is positively impacted by the availability of
convenient recreational facilities and health services
31


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Framework Plan
able open space, more needs to be done to improve its
safety and aesthetics through changes in the abutting
land use along the trail. The primary east-west access
to the Platte River Trail is via 13th Avenue. The cur-
rent at-grade crossing of 13th is being improved with
completion of the West Corridor and Lakewood Gulch
construction. These improvements will include a grade
separated crossing that will improve the safety and con-
nectivity of the Platte River Trail in Lincoln Park.
Historic Places
La Alma/Lincoln Park is rich in historic legacies
within both the built and natural environments. These
include public and private structures and landscapes
throughout the neighborhood. The La Alma/Lincoln
Park Neighborhood contains four Denver Historic
Landmark structures, a designated Historic Parkway,
and a historic district and a park designated by the
National Register of Historic Places:
I The Buckhorn Exchange, 1000 Osage Street,
(also on the National Register of Historic Places)
I Byers Library, 675 Santa Fe Drive
I West High School
I Westside Court Building at 924 W Colfax Avenue
(also on National Register of Historic Places)
I Speer Boulevard Historic Parkway
I Westside Neighborhood District, which in-
cludes the blocks from West Colfax Avenue
south to 13th Avenue and Kalamath Street west
to Mariposa Street
I Sunken Gardens Park
The 2006 La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood As-
sessment also identified the following sections of the
neighborhood and individual buildings that may be
eligible for historic designation:
I The area immediately south of the Westside Dis-
trict, from West 13th Avenue to West 8th Avenue
I South of 9th Avenue, between Delaware Street
and Santa Fe Drive
I The west side of the 800 block of Delaware Street
I Denver Inner City Parish Chapel,
910 Galapago Street
I 841 Galapago Street
I 705 W. 8th Avenue
I 1021 W. 8th Avenue
I Operating Engineers Local #9,
990 Kalamath Street
I Laborers International Union, Local 720,
875 Elati Street
National Register Structures include:
I Midwest Steel and Iron Works Company
Complex, 25 Larimer Street
I St. Josephs Roman Catholic Church of Denver,
600 Galapago Street
Recommendations:
I Ensure the La Alma Recreation Center and pool
continues to operate and serve the residents of
the community.
I Tree preservation is an aesthetic, environmental
and historic preservation issue. Tree preservation
should be encouraged through:
I Support of new regulatory tools to preserve
the tree canopy, extension of tree protection
granted to public right-of-way trees to front
setbacks; enforcement of the existing Tree
Protection Ordinance; and addressing tree
protection prior to the beginning of con-
struction projects.
I Improving tree care and protection by
residents and businesses through education
opportunities including resources available
through Denver Forestry, horticultural
organizations, and university extension
programs, and neighborhood schools.
I Pursuing a street-tree planting program
for the neighborhood. Identify opportunities
for additions to the tree canopy, including
street trees and plantings on public properties.
I Explore historic designation of potentially
eligible buildings and districts.
I Enhance Cherry Creek Trail and Platte River Trail
connections to neighborhood bicycle and
pedestrian routes.
I Promote land uses that will generate activity and
eyes on the park near Sunken Gardens Park
and the Cherry Creek Trail.
I Enhance and protect the South Platte River as a
neighborhood and citywide amenity.
I Maintain and preserve historic landmark struct-
ures, including Byers Library, as a public amenity.
32


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Framework Plan
Economic Development
The La Alma/Lincoln Park neighborhood provides an
employment base for the city with high-end service
sector jobs and commercial and industrial services.
Strong, established businesses in both the industrial
and commercial sections provide primary economic
jobs for local residents and for the region. Santa Fe
Drive has an emerging identity as an arts and culture
district with a Latino character that provides a unique
cultural opportunity.
Institutional uses that are significant regional employ-
ers include Denver Health Medical Center, the RTD
Maintenance Facility, Denver Water, Denver Public
Schools, and the nearby Auraria Campus.
Priority Issues and Opportunities
The completion of FasTracks promises to bring the Den-
ver region unprecedented opportunity to promote and
facilitate higher-density, mixed-use residential and com-
mercial development. The 10th and Osage Station in the
La Alma Lincoln Park Neighborhood is positioned to see
some of the greatest benefits from transit oriented devel-
opment due to its location on the Central Corridor and
very frequent transit service. The proximity of the 10th
and Osage Station to the Auraria Campus and Down-
town, and direct connections to the employment centers
of the Southeast Corridor will make it an attractive loca-
tion for businesses, residents and regional services.
However, the realization ofTOD will require a com-
bination of near and long term efforts and the use of
innovative strategies. Future economic development will
be most effective if carried out under a broad framework
that establishes strategies to promote economic develop-
ment in neighborhoods surrounding transit stations.
Recommendations:
I Ensure businesses looking to locate (or already
located) in Lincoln Park are educated about
OEDs Small Business Lending Group that offers
gap financing to eligible start-up and expanding
businesses.
I Promote the two gap financing programs available
to businesses in the Lincoln Park neighborhood:
I Denvers Revolving Loan Fund (RLF)
program
I Neighborhood Business Revitalization (NBR)
loan program.
The goals of the RLF and NBR programs are to
create jobs in Denvers targeted industrial and
commercial business areas and stimulate the revitaliza-
tion of neighborhood retail districts. La Alma Lincoln
Park neighborhood is part of the RLF area and Santa
Fe Drive is a NBR corridor.
I Increase community policing and youth services
to reduce crime and improve perceptions of safety
in order to attract new businesses and residents.
I Establish appropriate development controls
to reinforce the historic character of retail and
bolster the attractiveness of the Santa Fe Arts
District.
I Promote adaptive reuse of vacant structures.
I Improve infrastructure and parking management
through special districts.
I Increase graffiti removal to attract continued
investment in the community.
I Continue the Down payment and Home
Ownership Counseling program developed by
OEDs Business and Housing Services Division.
OED has partnered with non-profit organiza-
tions to help provide Denver area residents with
down payment and homeownership counseling
assistance toward the purchase of an affordably
priced home.
I Work with the Office of Economic Develop-
ment to promote their Rental and Senior Housing
Assistance Programs in Lincoln Park. The pro-
grams provides referrals and resources to renters
and lower-income elderly.
I Educate residents about Denvers Single Family
Rehabilitation Programs. Rehabilitation of homes
adds much needed value for homeowners and the
surrounding neighborhood. Programs include:
Home Rehabilitation Repair and Emergency
Home Repair.
I Ensure continuation of the HOME Program.
OED administers the federal Housing and Urban
Developments HOME Program (HOME).
HOME partially funds affordable housing
33


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Framework Plan
THE MILE HIGH
MILLION
IN -
Mayor John Hickenlooper initiated an ambitious tree plant-
ing program with a goal of adding one million new trees In
metropolitan Denver by the year2025. Lincoln Park should take
advantage of this program to enhance the streetscapes
Access to fresh fruit and vegetables can Improve public health In
the neighborhood
development projects throughout targeted areas
of the City which includes the La Alma Lincoln
Park neighborhood. The soon to be South
Lincoln Development Senior Citizen residence
and the La Villa de Barela on 10th and Santa Fe
are examples of projects funded through the
HOME Program.
Utilize Community Development Block Grant
money in La Alma/Lincoln Park. Through
HUDs Community Development Block Grants
OED funds neighborhood improvements and
neighborhood services in the Lincoln Park neigh-
borhood. These improvements can include
infrastructure such as sidewalks and right-of-way
improvements as well as acquisition and renova-
tion of non-profit buildings. In addition, non-
profits can get assistance with operational and
program related expenses.
Continue workforce development in the neigh-
borhood. Lincoln Park residents can go to the
Denver Workforce Center at 1391 North Speer
Blvd. Suite 500 (in the Parkway Professional
Building above King Soopers) for placement,
training, or resume assistance. The Workforce
Center can also assist employers to find employ-
ees. By helping people build their careers and by
helping companies meet their employment needs,
the Workforce Center helps make Lincoln Park a
better place to do business.
Public Health
In September of 2009, DHA produced a health im-
pact assessment (HIA) for the South Lincoln Homes
neighborhood. The City provided information and
insight into the HIA process. The conclusions and
recommendations in the HIA document helped guide
the Master Planning efforts for South Lincoln and are
also a useful reference for this Neighborhood Plan.
An HIA process assesses the impacts of policies,
redevelopment projects and programs on popula-
tion health. The HIA examined the influences and
solutions to public health that can be affected by
home design, urban form, layout and architecture
of buildings, provision of services and economic op-
portunities.
The HIA included information on nationwide evi-
dence showing that decisions about how we use land
and build our environment have significant impacts
on individual and population health, safety and well
being. The built environment can impact injury rates
because of pedestrian and vehicular accidents due to
roadway design. In addition, zoning ordinances that
have separated uses, restricted development density,
and required auto-oriented design through parking
requirements, have helped create a built environment
where daily travel for work and shopping require an
automobile eliminating opportunities to exercise by
walking as part of daily routines. This has contributed
to the growing epidemic of obesity and associated
increased rates of cardiovascular diseases and diabetes.
Research cited in the HIA documents that, all else
being equal, residents of walkable communities drive
less, are more physically active and are less likely to
be obese with reduced traffic collision risk and less
air pollution.
34


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Framework Plan
The HIA notes that the La Alma/Lincoln Park Neigh-
borhood has significantly higher poverty rates and lower
education rates than Denver as a whole. In addition, a
health survey conducted by Denver Health found that
77 percent of South Lincoln Park Homes residents have
above normal blood pressure, 55 percent are obese or
overweight, 40 percent smoked, and only 28 percent
exercised aerobically three or more times a week. These
results indicate a population at high risk for many seri-
ous health problems and a need to address health issues
to the greatest extent possible through changes to the
built environment.
The HIA included several recommendations for
improving neighborhood health that can be carried
forward as recommendations of this plan. The HIA
can be found in the Supporting Documentation.
Recommendations:
I Incorporate attractive and safe streetscape
amenities such as benches, game tables, and
decorative pedestrian level lighting. Many public
improvements, such as pedestrian street lights,
require the formation of an improvement district.
I Incorporate low impact development storm
water management techniques to improve
water quality while providing an attractive
natural amenity.
I Reduce automobile use and VMT in new
development by reducing parking demand
through unbundled parking (charging for
parking separate from residential and commercial
property prices and rents) and making parking
costs transparent and optional.
I Reduce the parking footprint through
parking management.
I Replace dead or dying trees through the Mile
High Million Tree Initiative and allow for
additional drought-resistant trees that will shade
pedestrians and enhance air quality.
I Implement mitigation measures that reduce
greenhouse gas emissions and vehicle miles
traveled.
I Add 5-foot wide connected bike lanes as an
environmental tool that not only encourages
physical activity but improves safety. Bike lanes
along with cars parked along a wide road such as
Mariposa are important to slow vehicle speeds so
it can be safe for all users.
I Identify walking routes in collaboration
with the Santa Fe Arts District and Auraria
Campus Students.
I Partner with the Denver B-Cycle program to
explore bike sharing opportunities in the neigh-
borhood.
I Work with RTD to integrate more bus stops and
routes within the neighborhood and provide
direct bus access to the 1 Oth and Osage light rail
station via 9th and 11th Avenues.
I Provide wider sidewalks in high pedestrian
activity areas, such as 10th Avenue.
I Improve opportunities to access fruits and
vegetables at grocery stores, including pedestrian
improvements on neighborhood routes con-
necting to the supermarket located at 1331 Speer
Boulevard (13th and Speer).
I Ensure there continue to be urban gardens (al-
though these gardens do not exist in perpetu-
ity, currently location include Court House
Square Garden, Elati Garden, Greenlee School
Garden, South Lincoln Park Garden), continue to
operate and serve the neighborhood.
I Provide incentives to assist neighborhood small
grocers to expand fruit and vegetable offerings.
I Pursue Colorado Safe Routes to School funds for
education and infrastructure.
I Increase the visibility of pedestrians through
signal-phasing, improved crosswalks, pedes-
trian refuge islands, and increased roadway
lighting. Use zebra striping and countdown
meters at pedestrian crosswalks located at all
intersections with a traffic signal.
I Work closely with Denvers Department of
Public Works to promote special paving patterns
to alert drivers to pedestrian crossings at
key locations.
I Improve connectivity and access to key destina-
tions such as Denver Water.
35


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Framework Plan
36


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Character Area Plans
37


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Character Area Plans
Character Area Plans
The La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan es-
tablishes character areas which have distinct charac-
teristics. The districts are characterized by their land
use functions, locations, and distinct urban form.
Although the boundaries are not absolute and some
characteristics overlap district boundaries, the neigh-
rood character areas are: *
Main Street Corridor % %
Mixed Use Area d
Residential Area
Institutional f
Industrial i
ZT1
Transit-Oriented Development
Character areas do not represent zoning, nor do they
convey or deny any rights. Zone changes that may be
proposed as part of any development must be initi-
ated under a separate procedure established under
the City and County of Denvers Revised Municipal
Code. The character areas provide policy guidance
regarding the appropriate character of sub-areas and
should be used when evaluating potential land use
changes and infrastructure investments.
Character Areas
| | Mixed-Use
Main Street Corridor
| | Industrial
Institutional
I I Residential Area
I I Transit Oriented Development
I I Lincoln Park Neighborhood Boundary
Light Rail Station
Existing Light Rail

Designated Character Areas
The overall intent of this section is to define the
character of La Alma/Lincoln Parks unique districts.
By so doing, it serves to infuse the areas with a sense
of place that can be enhanced and carried into the
future. With a single vision for each of the districts,
residents, businesses, and developers will enjoy
greater certainty and will know what to expect as
development and redevelopment occurs over time.
38


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Character Area Plans
Main Street Corridors
Santa Fe Drive from 6th Avenue to 14th Avenue and
8th Avenue from Mariposa to Fox Street generally are
corridors that have historically supported commerce
and have a primarily commercial character. His-
torically, many commercial corridors were pleasant
tree-lined streets with smaller scale neighborhood-
oriented retail shops. They were easily accessible by
foot, car, or transit, usually trolley or bus.
The intent for these corridors is to recapture the
pedestrian and transit-friendly character of the streets
with traditional development patterns and enhanced
streetscaping while accommodating vehicular traffic,
parking, and new uses, including residential, com-
mercial and art gallery uses.
The Santa Fe corridor between 6th and 11th Avenues
has a variety of arts related businesses intermixed with
retail development, residential and some offices. The
emerging identity along Santa Fe Drive as an arts
and culture district with a Latino character provides a
unique sense of place along the corridor. This distinct
character should be supported and continued as devel-
opment and redevelopment continues.
Land Use and Urban Design
Primary Issues
I Undesirable uses and building forms interrupt
the cohesive business environment.
I Impacts of arts district events may affect
adjacent residences.
I Automobile-oriented development may
undermine the traditional development
patterns and pedestrian-friendly design of the
commercial areas.
I Character-defining historic buildings are
threatened with demolition.
I Challenge of parking for large events such as
First Fridays Art Walk.
I Narrow sidewalk width along portions of
Santa Fe Drive.
Primary Opportunities
I Santa Fe Arts District identity is strengthening
and attracting retailers.
I Relationship to Kalamath can be complimentary
in terms of uses and scale.
I Rehabilitation of the Denver Civic Theater at
721 Santa Fe Drive.
Goals
I Appropriate mix of uses that support a diversity
of businesses and allow more restaurants and
shops to accommodate them.
I Commercial operations are managed to avoid
negative impacts from lighting, hours of operat-
ion, noise, trash removal, etc.
I The viability of multi-family residential,
live-work, and commercial uses are maintained
and enhanced.
I Adequate, well-planned parking to support
customers, residents, and employees is provided
through strategic parking approaches.
I Destination development along the corridors
is expanded.
I A consistent visual identity is created for the
Santa Fe Arts District.
39


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Character Area Plans
I Zoning is established that promotes safe, active,
and pedestrian-scaled commercial form and uses.
I Context-sensitive development is supported.
I The retail corridor is spatially defined with
thoughtful urban design that considers scale,
vistas and landmarks.
Recommendations
I Support infill development of retail, office, live-
work and residential uses. Mixed-uses projects,
with commercial, artist, or public uses on the
ground floor and residential uses on upper levels
are especially appropriate (e.g., 910 Santa Fe Drive).
I Buildings with nonconforming or inappropriate
uses should be adaptively re-used or replaced.
I Industrial buildings that do not address the street
are inappropriate. Existing industrial develop-
ments are encouraged to be redeveloped, restruc-
tured, and landscaped to take advantage of
market opportunities.
I Adjacent residential areas should be protected
from the activities of commercial areas by
adequate buffering and by ensuring that adequate
off-street parking and circulation is provided.
Buffering methods may include: locating traffic,
noise, light and activities away from the residen-
tial uses; using attractive fencing and landscap-
ing to buffer adjacent residences and transitions
from commercial uses to residential uses through
consistent sidewalks, treelawns, setbacks, and
architectural treatments.
I Develop vacant land in a manner that is
consistent with surrounding land uses in terms
of character and use.
I Promote commercial districts along Santa Fe
as a destination for locally owned shops, restau-
rants and artist venues.
I Protect the architectural character of Santa Fe as
a defining feature of the community and preserve
the historic integrity.
I Zoning for Santa Fe and portions of 8th Avenue
should ensure that buildings are oriented to the
street to form a consistent street wall, the ground
floor is activated with retail, pedestrian entries,
and display windows; and a mix of uses are
provided including live/work, light industrial,
neighborhood serving commercial and services,
and residential options (e.g., C-MS-5)
I Destination uses such as art galleries and theaters
are supported by complimentary land uses.
I 1-5 stories of development are supported with
the greatest intensity focused to the intersection
of enhanced transit corridors.
I Parking is located in the rear of sites, under-
ground or in structures wrapped with commer-
cial and or residential uses to minimize the visual
impact of parking facilities. Use side streets and
alleys for parking access wherever possible.
I Integrate distinctive benches, lighting and
maintenance into the overall streetscape plan,
adding to what has been achieved by the Santa
Fe Maintenance District.
I Include trees as part of the streetscape both as
an amenity providing shade and as a separation
between pedestrians and street traffic.
I Recommend masonry or stucco as preferred
building materials (example Museo de
las Americas).
I Maintain the viability of the Byers library
structure as a community resource and ensure
Denver Public Libraries continues to operate a
library in the neighborhood.
Mobility and Infrastructure
Primary Issues
I Parking is poorly located and designed, undermining
a pedestrian-friendly environment and unattractive
for new businesses. At peak times parking is chal-
lenging for customers and employees, creating a
general perception of inadequate parking.
I Sidewalks and pedestrian amenities are inconsis-
tent throughout the character area. Pedestrian
crossings are challenging.
I Residents identified bus stops as uncomfortable
and unsafe.
I The one-way couplets of Santa Fe and Kalamath
have high traffic volume at peak hours and
high speeds at non-park hours creating bar-
riers to pedestrians and bicyclists.
40


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Character Area Plans
Primary Opportunities
I High volume transportation corridors offer
opportunities for economic development,
increased density, and increased transit use.
Goals
I A stable, attractive pedestrian-oriented corridor
with a mix of uses.
I The function and appearance of Santa Fe Drive
is improved to enhance the convenience, ease
and enjoyment of transit, walking, shopping, and
public gathering.
I Sidewalks and pedestrian amenities are added
and improved in conjunction with business
revitalization.
I Bus and light rail service is enhanced to be
efficient, comfortable, and convenient.
I Connection to the 10th and Osage light rail
station is provided with bus, shuttle, and
improved pedestrian amenities.
Recommendations
I Minimize curb cuts, and remove curb cuts when
not needed and encourage any new curb cut,
drive aisle, or ramp to parking structures to
be perpendicular to the public street and other
public right of way.
I Explore options for expanding sidewalks and
adding street trees along Santa Fe and 8th
Avenue, which may require narrowing already
sub-standard lanes, removing traffic lanes, or
acquiring additional right-of-way to accom-
modate pedestrians.
I Ensure the implementation of the Citys new
standards for pedestrian crossing times to ensure
adequate time for pedestrian crossings at traffic
signals along busy corridors.
Maintain on-street parking on Santa Fe Drive
and 8th Avenue.
Any displaced street parking should be recap-
tured in centralized and shared-use parking lots
and structures. Parking facilities must comply
with the urban design goals and standards for the
area.
Explore mechanisms to tap potential locations
for shared parking especially in peak times.
Consider mechanism to develop shared parking
such as through a district.
I Work with Public Works and CDOT to ensure
Santa Fe and Kalamath accommodate pedestrians
and bicyclists in addition to vehicles when road
maintenance and/or reconstruction occurs.
I In coordination with the Department of Public
Works conduct a Feasibility Study of Pedestrian
Crossing Improvements of Santa Fe and Kalamath
from 9th to 13th Avenue (using 2011 CIP fund-
ing) to determine how to improve multi-modal
connectivity from the station to Santa Fe and
the greater neighborhood. Special focus should
be given to bike/ped access to the existing super
market at 1331 Speer Boulevard and direct connec-
tivity along 10th Avenue.
41


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Character Area Plans
Mixed Use Area
The Mixed Use character area extends through the
northern part of the neighborhood along 13 th as
it passes under 1-25 and over the freight and light
rail tracks to Osage Street. It continues north along
Osage and east again along Colfax and south along
the west side of Speer to 11th. High-rise apartments
(the Parkway) some of which are being converted to
condominiums are located along Speer Boulevard
and the edge of Cherry Creek.
There are many opportunities in this area to improve
urban form and connections between the La Alma/
Lincoln Park Neighborhood and the S. Platte River,
Cheery Creek Trail, and the AHEC Campus. Many
of these were identified in the Auraria West Station
Area Plan (adopted June 2009). The recommenda-
tions for the Mixed Use Character Area in this Plan
are consistent with those found in the Auraria West
Station Area Plan.
As a result of FasTracks, many infrastructure changes
are occurring in this character area that will impact
land use and mobility. Currently, freight trains access
the Burnham Yard from a track that parallels the cen-
tral corridor light rail alignment, which passes under
the Colfax viaduct and continues south between Rio
Court and Osage Street. As part of the FasTracks
project, this track, known as the Burnham Lead,
will be relocated to the west. Heading north, after
crossing 13th Avenue it will jog northwest and cross
Rio Court at grade. It will continue west behind the
commercial properties on 13th, cross Shoshone Street
and then head north to run parallel to the Southern
Pacific Railroad alignment. AHEC has recently pur-
chased 13-5 acres of the property north of the new
Burnham Lead alignment to develop recreation fields
to meet their growing demand for athletic facilities.
AHEC will be working to improve the connection to
the fields from the campus.
Land Use and Urban Design
Primary Issues
I Vacant and underutilized properties mixed with
viable industrial and commercial businesses.
I Lack of identity or sense of connection to the La
Alma/Lincoln Park neighborhood or to AHEC.
Primary Opportunities
I Moderate to large parcel sizes provides the op-
portunity for some mixed use redevelopment.
I AHECs future recreation fields will attract many
people to this area.
I Plenty of residential uses within walking
distance to support local businesses and
provide workforce.
I Most buildings on 13th have entrances facing
the street.
Goals
I Transition from heavy industrial to mixed use.
I A comfortable, convenient connection for
students, employees and residents is provided
between AHEC and residential areas of La Alma/
Lincoln Park.
I Jobs, retail and services are provided to
local residents.
I Mixed income housing is provided.
42


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Character Area Plans
Recommendations
I Office-Employment along 13th Both horizon-
tal and vertical mixed use is encouraged along
13th. Employment uses may include office and/
or light-industrial uses. Family wage jobs (suf-
ficient to support a spouse and children), nontra-
ditional employment and live/work opportuni-
ties are encouraged. Utilize Denvers new zoning
code to support this transition (e.g., I-MX-5
along 13th Avenue).
I Commercial and Retail on Osage and Colfax -
Pedestrian-oriented commercial and retail are
encouraged on the west side of Osage and on the
south side of Colfax with the goal of serving the
daily needs of the neighborhood and students.
Office or residential may also be supported on
upper stories along these streets.
I Active edges Create active building frontages
along 13th, Osage and Colfax as properties
redevelop. Building entrances should orient to
these streets and a minimum of 60 percent trans-
parent glass or screens along ground-floor facades
is recommended.
Mobility and Infrastructure
Primary Issues
I Portions ofW. 13th Avenue and Osage Street
lack curb and gutter, sidewalks and pedestrian
amenities.
I Truck route and bicycle designation on 13th
Avenue can cause conflicts where bicycle
infrastructure is lacking.
I Bikes, automobiles, pedestrians and trucks have
to share the road.
I Challenging pedestrian access to Colfax at
Auraria light rail station and supermarket at
1331 Speer Boulevard.
Primary Opportunities
I 13th Avenue is the primary east-west pedestrian
and bicycle connection in this neighborhood.
I 13th Avenue is a bike route and therefore sees a
lot of bicycle activity.
Goals
I Transition from auto- and truck-oriented streets
to multi-modal corridors that also accommodate
pedestrians and bikes.
I Provide jobs, retail and services to local residents.
Recommendations
I Where lacking, install curb, gutter and sidewalks
along 13th and the west side of Osage upon
private development.
I Install bicycle signage and a bicycle lane along
13th marking the D-10 route.
I Implement the approved cross section for 13th
Avenue that includes bike lanes, detached side
walks and a new center turn lane (See TOD
Section)
I Enhance connections between AHEC and east
side of La Alma/Lincoln Park via 5th Rio Court
and 13 th.
I Improve pedestrian connection along Santa Fe
to supermarket at 1331 Speer Boulevard.
I Determine measures to improve pedestrian
connections to/from Colfax at Auraria light rail
station (Lipan and Colfax intersection).
i
43


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Character Area Plans
Residential Area
La Alma/Lincoln Park has an emerging identity as
a historically-significant and culturally-rich neigh-
borhood. The northern area is roughly bounded by
Mariposa and North Osage to the west, West Colfax
Avenue to the north, the alley between North Kal-
amath and Santa Fe to the east and 8th Avenue to the
south. The southern portion of the residential area
includes the residential area north of 6th to 11th and
generally from Inca to Elati (excluding West High
School and Denver Health). The Residential area of
the La Alma/Lincoln Park neighborhood is a vi-
brant urban community. The housing stock provides
diversity of size, style, and affordability. The popula-
tion density (based on small lot development) allows
neighborhood-serving businesses to prosper. Resi-
dents have access to public transportation, services
and shopping.
These characteristics make Lincoln Park attractive to
other homeowners and the neighborhood appears
to be undergoing some transition with a pattern of
more affluent people moving into a traditionally
lower-income neighborhood. However, some of the
homes are not well maintained which could impact
their long-term viability given the age of most of
the homes.
The Lincoln Park neighborhood is 11% single-family
and 10% multi-family. The northern residential
character area is designated in Blueprint Denver an
Area of Stability Single-Family Duplex and includes
a housing stock with diversity of size, style and af-
fordability with Two-Unit zoning. The southern area
is also designated an Area of Stability Single-Family
Duplex also with a mix of housing stock; however,
this area was zoned R-3 and R-4 under Denvers for-
mer zoning code creating conflict between the zoning
and Blueprints Area of Stability designation. The
southern area has been designated Rowhouse (U-RH-
3A) with the recent Code Update.
There is a mix of small-lot single-family units, du-
plexes, rowhouses, and small apartment buildings.
The residential character of the neighborhood is
varied. There are smaller, older Victorian houses in
the more northerly part, west of Santa Fe, some hav-
ing porches, and many on small lots. Mid-sized two
story 1930 homes were built between 8th and 11th
and Kalamath and Mariposa, having larger lot sizes
over all and alley access. Some have brick facades.
Most housing is affordable at a variety of levels
ranging from subsidized housing to middle level
market rate. Low-density detached dwelling units
and duplexes throughout the neighborhood are
small wood frame and brick homes on small lots.
Redeveloped housing is single unit and multi-unit
privately owned or rented condos and town homes.
The unique character of Denvers downtown neigh-
borhoods are desirable for individuals, families and
businesses. Lincoln Parks residential area provides
the opportunity for individuals and families to re-
side in historic homes with downtown proximity.
Land Use and Urban Design
Primary Issues
I Neighborhood Character/Neighborhood
stability.
I Nonconforming lots the predominant pattern
of 3,000 sf lots in the residential area did not
meet the minimum lot size in the historic
residential zoning districts prior to the Zoning
Code Update.
44


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Character Area Plans
I The former R-3 zoning between Inca and
Delaware, south of 9th was not appropriate for
predominantly single dwelling units, duplexes
and townhouses there today, especially since
Blueprint Denver classifies this as an Area
of Stability
I The former R-4 zoning (West 9th Ave to West
6th Ave, Delaware to the alley between Elati
and fox) was inappropriate and includes single
family and low density mulit-family housing, a
few offices and churches. Also designated an Area
of Stability
I High percentage of absentee landowners and a
correspondingly low rate of owner-occupancy.
I Conflict between maintaining goal of affordable
housing and wanting improved maintenance
and livability.
I Future of DPS Elementary Schools. Because
DPS no longer operates Del Pueblo (4.3 acres
located in the southern residential character area)
as a school, the future land use designation of the
site needs to be consistent with the surrounding
neighborhood.
I Few of the historic homes and none of the
districts have local Historic Landmark designa-
tion, leaving them vulnerable to demolition and
neglect. Without designation property owners
cannot take advantage of tax credit and
funding opportunities for rehabilitation. In
previous neighborhood meetings, residents
indicated that they valued the neighborhoods
historic and architectural heritage, but there was
a lack of broad-based support for pursuing local
historic district designations.
Primary Opportunities
I Historic homes.
I Affordable housing opportunities.
I Unique downtown neighborhood attributes.
Goals
I Neighborhood character is preserved.
I Enhance the valued attributes of the residential
area and quality of life for residents.
I Maintain the current residential density.
I Remove existing nonconforming uses in
the residential area.
I Support a diverse population by providing
support services such as childcare facilities,
transit, and a variety of housing opportunities.
I Home ownership opportunities are encouraged
through job creation in adjoining areas.
Recommendations
I Safeguard the character of established neigh-
borhoods that contain an intact inventory of
buildings characteristic of a particular construc-
tion era such as Victorian, Craftsman, or mid-
Century Modern.
I The context of the residential character area is
Urban Neighborhood based on its regular grid
and alley block pattern and predominant single-
family pattern with duplex and other multi-
family uses mixed in. Within the Urban
Neighborhood context, the residential zone
district should promote existing development
potential in compact forms acceptable to the
community at large and further smart growth
45


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Character Area Plans
Residential Area Continued
outcomes. The future development intensities
should help sustain transit, as well as nearby
retail and services.
I Utilize Denvers new Zoning Code to ensure the
small lot size that characterizes the residential
area is supported. Existing small lot single-family
and multi-family development should be
legalized and allowed to continue, and the con-
text should remain urban neighborhood.
I The recommended zone district for the northern
residential area is a two-unit district allowing
urban houses and duplexes a with a minimum lot
area of 3,000 square feet. Detached accessory
dwelling units should also be allowed (e.g.,
U-TU-B).
I The southern residential character area is roughly
bounded by Inca Street to the west, 9th Avenue
to the north, Delaware to the east and 6th
Avenue to the south. The southern residential
area should be zoned an urban neighborhood
rowhouse district that allows up to two and a half
story rowhouses, and apartments up to three
stories on certain corner lots (e.g., U-RH-3A).
I To promote stability within the neighborhood
the 4.3 acre Del Pueblo School site should have
the same zoning as the surrounding residential
area (e.g., U-RH-3A).
I Implement a rowhouse zoning district on the
west side of Kalamath up to two and a half
stories from 11th to 14th Avenue to recognize
current conditions and promote a better transi-
tion from the main street corridor to the residen-
tial neighborhood (e.g., U-RH-2.5).
I Update the Concept Land Use on the Blueprint
Denver Map for the east side of Kalamath from
8th to 14th Avenue from Commercial Corridor
to Urban Residential.
I The greatest vertical intensity of development
should be directed to major intersections, along
10th Avenue, and in closest proximity to the
10th and Osage light rail station.
I Use Denvers Historic Resource Survey (pilot
program in 2013) to inform potential land-
mark designations and preservation strategies in
the neighborhood.
I Educate residents and property owners
about the home maintenance, finding
options, City regulations and requirements,
and historic preservation.
Mobility and Infrastructure
Primary Issues
I Parking along Santa Fe.
I Kalamath Street is an arterial street with high
traffic volume and speed, but the adjacent land
use is primarily residential at the north end of
the neighborhood.
I Bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure needs
improvement throughout neighborhood
(including sidewalks).
Primary Opportunities
I Proximity to downtown, Auraria Campus
and transit.
Goals
I Neighborhood development that supports
increased transit ridership and reduced
automobile dependency.
I Key community resources are well connected and
accessible for cars, pedestrians, and bicyclists.
I Overflow parking from the commercial areas
does not negatively impact the residential areas.
Recommendations
I To help reduce conflict between the commercial
corridors, light rail transit riders, and neighbor-
hood residents, better management of parking
should be explored. Implement tools from the
Strategic Parking Plan that mitigate and balance
the impact of multiple parking user groups.
I Improve multi-modal connections improve
access to the area, complete the street grid across
barriers where feasible and make critical connec-
tions to light rail, bus service and bike routes.
46


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Character Area Plans
Institutional Area
The Institutional Character Area is bordered by Dela-
ware and Galapago Streets to the west, 11th Avenue
to the north, Speer Boulevard to the east and 6th
Avenue to the south.
Institutional uses are included in Blueprint Denvers
recommendations for campus areas. These areas are
typically dominated by a single, large institutional
user. However, the Lincoln Park Institutional Char-
acter Area contains two institutional uses: the Denver
Health Medical Center and West High School. It also
contains the Sunken Gardens Park.
The Denver Health Medical Center is located at ap-
proximately 8th Avenue and Bannock Street. Denver
Health is Colorados primary safety net institution
providing care for the uninsured. In 2008 more than
40 percent of the care that Denver Health provided
was to uninsured patients. Denver Health provides
care to twenty-five percent of all Denver residents,
or approximately 150,000 individuals. The Denver
Health Medical Center includes Denver Healths
500-bed main hospital and Rocky Mountain Region-
al Level 1 Trauma Center, the only Level 1 Trauma
Center in the area.
Denver Health continues to be a national model for
an integrated health care system. It is also a major
employer for the City and County of Denver. Denver
Healths mission has been impacted by the reloca-
tion of three hospitals in recent years, St. Anthonys
(scheduled 2011), Childrens Hospital and University
Hospital, which has lead to Denver Health reevaluat-
ing its future space needs to ensure that healthcare
services for Denver residents are sufficiently met.
Any future needs space precipitating expansion of the
campus will require a collaborative master planning
process with the Lincoln Park Neighborhood and any
other affected neighborhood organizations.
According to the Piton Foundation, West High
School was at 45 percent capacity with 890 students
enrolled in 2009. The student body is 87 percent
Hispanic/Latino and 14 percent are Spanish speaking
English language learners. 80 percent of the students
are eligible for free or reduced lunch. On the 2008
CSAP proficiency test, only 23 percent of West High
Students were proficient in reading, 9 percent in writ-
ing, and 7 percent in math. Compared to other Den-
ver schools, West High School has a proportionately
higher percentage of Hispanic/Latino students and
students in poverty, and lower rates of proficiency in
reading, writing and math.
Sunken Gardens Park is an 11 acre park that features
benches and picnic tables, a playground and basket-
ball court. The park suffers from perceptions of a lack
of safety and security. The park is not highly visible
from the buildings in the surrounding area and is
bordered by streets with fast-moving traffic and high-
vehicle volumes.
Land Use and Urban Design
Primary Issues
I Sunken Gardens Park provides important green
space and recreational amenities. However, it is
not heavily used by area residents and suffers
from perceptions of crime.
I The demand on Denver Health continues to
increase with the closure of local hospitals and
the increased need for public health providers in
the area causing the need for expansion and
upgrade of the current campus.
47


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Character Area Plans
Institutional Area Continued
I Denver Health provides the only Level I Trauma
Center in the region and the need to maintain
the center in its current location is increasingly
important to the residents of Denver.
I There are a significant number of surface parking
lots in the neighborhoods surrounding the
Denver Health Medical Center that create dead-
space and contribute to a lack of pedestrian activity
Primary Opportunities
I Denver Health and West High School are
institutions that serve high-need populations in
the neighborhood and the city
I West High School is a historic structure that
adds significant character to the area, includes
many community facilities, and provides a
highly-visible gateway to the neighborhood.
I Denver Health Medical Center provides many
high-paying jobs and could draw new residents
and businesses to the area.
Goals
I Tie the Institutional Character Area to
the surrounding neighborhood with compli-
mentary land uses including denser residential
and active retail.
I Use the historic character ofWest High School
and early buildings within the Denver Health
Medical Center to inspire improvements to
the area.
I Support Denver Health in its current location.
I Reduce the undesirable impacts of parking sur-
rounding the Denver Health Medical Center.
Recommendations
I Work with Denver Heath to incorporate Master
Plan elements.
I Support Denver Health at its current location by
allowing needed infill and expansion in the future.
I Design gateway element around Sunken Gardens
Park for those entering neighborhood from the
Golden Triangle along 8th Avenue.
I Promote West High Schools role as a community
center with more cooperation between the
school, neighborhood and business groups, and
the City and County of Denver.
I Improve maintenance, lighting and police
monitoring in Sunken Gardens Parks.
Mobility and Infrastructure
Primary Issues
I Transportation access for transit-dependent
populations is critical for the users of both the
hospital and the school.
I The West High School and Denver Health
Medical Center campuses and Sunken Garden
Park interrupt the local street grid.
Primary Opportunities
I The area is potentially well served by the Cherry
Creek multi-use trail but lacks adequate access
across Speer Boulevard.
I Greenlee Elementary School (K-5) is a turn-
around school with 3 years of federal funding to
help improve performance.
Goals
I Promote transit access to both Denver Health
Medical Center and West High School.
I Promote walking and bicycle access to West High
School, Sunken Gardens Park and Denver
Health Medical Center.
I Provide circulation through the Denver Health
Medical Center and connectivity to surrounding
neighborhoods.
Recommendations
I Make improvements to bus facilities serving the
institutional character including improves stops
and shelters, maps and schedule information,
and way-finding.
I Provide improved sidewalks meeting the stan-
dards of Denvers pedestrian master plan within
the institutional character area tying to improve-
ments in the adjacent neighborhood.
I Provide way-finding and improved access to
the Cherry Creek Trail.
I Improve intersections and cross-walks on Speer
Boulevard, 8th Avenue and 6th Avenue to pro-
vide more frequent and safer pedestrian crossings.
I Improve pedestrian connections through and
along the perimeter of Sunken Gardens Park.
48


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Character Area Plans
Industrial Area
The Industrial Character Area is roughly bounded
by 1-25 to the west, 12th Avenue to the north, the
Union Pacific Railroad (UPRR) and RTD Cen-
tral Light Rail (LRT) Corridor to the east and 6th
Avenue to the south. A pocket of the character area
crosses to the east side of the LRT corridor, between
8th Avenue and 6th Avenue and continues east to the
alley between Kalamath and Santa Fe. Another pock-
et at 1-25 and Myrtle is expected to remain industrial
while development along 13th Avenue is considered
part of the Mixed Use Character Area.
West of the LRT, this area is an intact industrial
island, comprised of large industrial parcels with few
non-conforming uses. The area is largely dominated
by rail facilities: RTDs Central LRT Corridor which
parallels Union Pacifics Burnham repair yard (Burn-
ham Yard) and the Burlington Northern Railroad
mainline along Tejon Street, including a spur line
that feeds the Burnham Yard from the north.
In conjunction with RTDs FasTracks program, UPRR
has in the recent past considered relocating the Burn-
ham Yard, triggering a consideration for this property
as an opportunity for TOD. Though the UPRR has
since decided not to relocate the Burnham Yard, a vi-
sion for this property is included in the TOD Charac-
ter Area ; however, until the Burnham Yard relocation
occurs, this property will be considered part of the
Industrial/Employment Character Area.
This character area represents a key component of
Denvers economic and employment base, employ-
ing an estimated 3,200 people, or approximately 28%
of the jobs available within the LALP neighborhood.
Major employers include Denver Water, LaFarge
Corporation and dozens of manufacturing, warehous-
ing, distribution and wholesale trade businesses that
provide a vital contribution to the citys economy.
Guidance from Blueprint Denver suggests that this
area will remain a major industrial/employment base,
although change is welcome in terms of creating bet-
ter and multi-modal transportation connections, im-
proving urban design and encouraging new industrial
infill development.
Land Use and Urban Design
Primary Issues
I Small lot sizes available in this area are not
desirable for many industries looking to relocate
to or within Denver.
I Buildings and streets are not designed to encour-
age pedestrian activity.
I In this neighborhood dominated by industrial
land uses, employees do not have walkable access
to restaurants and services during the work day.
Primary Opportunities
I This area acts as an island of industrial zoning
that is fundamentally non-residential, allowing
industrial businesses to operate efficiently with
few direct impacts on residential neighborhoods.
I Vacant and underutilized properties offer
opportunities for business expansion and
infill development.
Goals
I Continue to support heavy industrial land uses
in this area for the long term.
49


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Character Area Plans
I Improve the overall appearance and walkability
of the area through well designed and maintained
buildings and streets.
Recommendations
I Retain industrial zoning and maintain a strong
city policy against housing in the core industrial
area (zoned I-A, I-B) during review of zoning
and development applications.
I Support mixed land uses, including industrial,
commercial and some residential on 13th (e.g.,
I-MX), to diversify land uses in the character area
and give employees access to commercial uses
within walking distance.
I When opportunities arise, work with property
owners and Public Works to break down the
scale of large industrial blocks by providing
through streets, mid-block alleys, courtyards
and other design elements.
I Encourage property owners to build to the lot
line at the street frontage, unless a pattern of
building set-backs exists, in which case the
prevailing set-back pattern should be respected.
I Consider new design standards for industrial
buildings and streets that are friendly to both
businesses and pedestrians.
I Encourage new infill developments to utilize in-
novative, green materials and design that enrich
the architectural character of industrial buildings.
I Provide loading and parking facilities in the rear
of lots which can be accessed through an alley or
secondary street.
I Create neighborhood identity and celebrate
proximity to the Santa Fe Arts District by incor-
porating public art into the Industrial/Employ-
ment character area, such as sculptures or murals
depicting industrial themes.
I Work with property owners, Denver Housing
Authority and UPRR to pursue a quiet zone in
this area.
Mobility and Infrastructure
Primary Issues
I An incomplete street grid and limited crossings
of rail lines, 1-25, Colfax and 6th Avenue make
the area very difficult to access from adjacent
neighborhoods and navigate.
I The merge onto 1-25 North at Mulberry Place/
Yuma Street is too short, especially for trucks.
I A lack of pedestrian and bicycle connections to
bus stops and light rail stations, despite their
close proximity, make it inconvenient for
employees to use alternative modes of transporta-
tion for commuting.
I Unimproved streets and alleys and the lack of
sidewalks create conflicts between pedestrian,
bicycle, vehicle and truck traffic.
Primary Opportunities
I The character area is located within close
proximity to freight, 1-25, 1-70, major arterials
and downtown.
I Four designated maximum weight truck routes
serve the area: Speer Boulevard, Santa Fe Drive/
Kalamath, Colfax Avenue and the 6th/8th
Avenue couplet.
Recommendations
I Improve multi-modal connections improve
access to the area, complete the street grid across
barriers where feasible and make critical connec-
tions to light rail, bus service and bike routes.
I Restore the street grid as properties redevelop
and as opportunities arise. Connections to be
considered include Umatilla/Tejon, Wyandot,
Quivas, 8th from Wyandot to Quivas, 12th,
14th. (See the Framework Plan Mobility &
Infrastructure).
I Reconstruct industrial streets according to
standards set forth in Blueprint Denver.
I Maintain existing truck routes and consider need
for another truck route as opportunities arise to
re-establish a grid street pattern.
50


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Character Area Plans
Transit Oriented Development
(TOD) Area
In an effort to prioritize planning and implementa-
tion activities related to transit and TOD, the City
prepared the Transit Oriented Development Strategic
Plan in 2006. Expanding on the goals and poli-
cies identified in the TOD Strategic Plan, the TOD
Character Area (10th and Osage Station Area Plan)
provides a sound policy basis for citywide decision-
making and guiding positive change to the built
environment. This section establishes a foundation
of essential objectives and provides strategies on how
to realize the vision.
The 10th and Osage light rail station is located in
RTDs Central Corridor at the west side Lincoln
Parks residential neighborhood. It is currently lo-
cated adjacent to the Buckhorn Exchange Restaurant
and the Denver Housing Authoritys South Lincoln
Park Homes property. There is additional vacant
land adjacent to the station purchased by the City
from RTD to help catalyze TOD at this location.
The City and County of Denver is poised to take a
significant leadership role in implementing the new
transit lines and focusing growth into neighbor-
hoods and areas near almost 40 transit stations. This
section begins with the established TOD principles
for the City of Denver. The unique qualities of the
10th & Osage Station area substantially contribute
to this effort. Realizing this vision will depend on the
ability to overcome distinct challenges and capital-
ize on strengths and opportunities described in this
section. This section establishes the specific vision for
the 10th & Osage Station. Next, the primary TOD
objectives for 10th & Osage Station are described.
Developing a vision begins with establishing the un-
derlying principles of transit-oriented development.
Transit-oriented development is a mix of uses at
various densities within a half-mile radius, or walking
distance, of a transit stop. TOD should create specific
areas that integrate transit into neighborhoods and
help support lively and vital communities. The TOD
Strategic Plan defines TOD in Denver and establishes
strategies for implementation.
In order to succeed, TOD should address these five
guiding principles:
I Place-making: Create safe, comfortable, varied
and attractive station areas with a distinct identity.
I Rich Mix of Choices: Provide housing, employ-
ment, transportation and shopping choices for
people of all ages, household types, incomes
and lifestyles.
I Location Efficiency: Place homes, jobs, shopping,
entertainment, parks and other amenities close to
the station to promote walking, biking and
transit use.
I Value Capture: Encourage all stakeholders
residents, business owners, RTD and the city
to take full economic advantage of the amenity
of enhanced transit services.
I Portal to the Region: Understand and maximize
the stations role as an entry to the regional
transit network and as a safe pleasant and private
place to live.
The fundamental concept for the 10th and Osage
Station Area includes the following key features:
I Highest density housing located immediately
adjacent to the station.
51


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Character Area Plans
I New promenade and open spaces that serve
as a central organizing feature and link to the
existing La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood
and Santa Fe Arts & Business corridor.
I An east-west commercial hub surrounding parks
and open spaces.
I New or improved station access roads: Quivas
Street (long term) and Osage Street (short term).
Denver Housing Authority S. Lincoln Master Plan
After participating in the 10th and Osage station
area planning effort, the Denver Housing Authority
initiated their redevelopment of South Lincoln Park
Homes (S. Lincoln) by retaining a Master Planning
Team. The team completed a Master Plan for the site
in January of 2010 that carries forward the goals and
recommendations included in this TOD Character
Area (10th and Osage Station Area Plan) section.
The overall concept of the Master Plan creates pe-
destrian zones throughout the community that focus
density within a mixed use environment, integrate
natural and built features, provide a variety of passive
and active open spaces, celebrate culture and
community art and organize transportation and water
management systems. The emphasis is on green
streets with new tree plantings along with tree preser-
vation and comfortable sidewalk widths to encourage
walking, making it easier to meet neighbors and pro-
vide better access to community amenities. Designated
bike routes are delineated, providing access to the
Cherry Creek Trail and the Platte River Trail.
The Denver Housing Authoritys design team worked
toward a plan that met their various constituents
needs. Open community meetings we held in con-
junction with the Steering Committee meetings. At
these events, the residents and the community were
invited to learn about the progress of the plan and to
provide feedback on all aspects of the design.
Along with the traditional outreach efforts, the
design team conducted a Cultural Audit to gain
insight into the DNA of the area. This process reaches
out to residents and the community through one-
on-one intercept interviews and scheduled interviews
with local leaders and interested individuals. Those
who could not participate in the community meet-
ings, due to work schedule, or lack of interest in the
public process, were given this opportunity to share
their ideas and concerns.
Feedback, comments and concerns were documented
and posted at the project office, located on the South
Lincoln property, and on the DHA website. Cultual
Audit feedback was gathered and assembled in an
audiovisual piece shared with the community at the
first public meeting.
The Denver Housing Authority supplemented these
goals further with specific areas of concern for the
development of a potential HOPE VI application.
Key Recommendations
The key recommendations for the 10th and Osage
Station Area (including S. Lincoln) include:
Create an amenity for TOD housing:
I The TOD is primarily composed of high-density
housing with retail and commercial ground-floor
uses near the station platform.
I New open spaces, a promenade along 10th Ave-
nue and proximity to light rail transit combine
to build an amenity package that will support
market rate housing in the station area.
I New green space is intended to link and
strengthen the existing Lincoln Park.
Increase exposure and visibility:
I Connections are created and improved from the
station to the Santa Fe Arts & Business Corridor
along the 10th Avenue Promenade.
I Access to the station is increased by extending
Osage Street south to 8th Avenue and Quivas
Street south to 6th Avenue (long term). The new
connections produce adequate amounts of drive-
by traffic to support retail and commercial uses.
I The station remains visible and continues to
function as a neighborhood walk-up station.
Create an active transit-oriented environment:
I Retail and commercial ground floor uses near the
station platform complement the residential land
uses to activate the station area.
I Housing options include a range of types for a
variety of income groups and ages.
I Incubator spaces for locally-based, comm-
unity-supportive entrepreneurial businesses
are encouraged.
I Live/work opportunities are introduced along
the 10th Avenue Promenade and potentially
along station access roads.
I The Denver Housing Authoritys (DHAs)
S. Lincoln property should be designated an
urban center context with mixed use zoning to
take advantage of the proximity to transit and
allow increased density and an appropriate scale
52


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Character Area Plans
of uses. Heights should range from 12 stories
at the station to 5 stories along Mariposa (e.g.,
C-MX-12, C-MX-8, and C-RX-5).
I To encourage ground floor activity in the station
area, allow some non-residential uses to occur
on the ground floor of residential buildings such
as library, daycare, and other neighborhood-
serving commercial or office uses. Encourage
more intense uses to locate in nearby commercial
districts that serve the neighborhood.
Land Use
Primary Issues
I Phasing of redevelopment and complications of
relocation for public housing residents.
Primary Opportunities
I Surrounding neighborhood of Lincoln Park is a
stable, vital neighborhood because of the char-
acter, quality and proximity to downtown and
other regional destinations and transportation.
I Strength and success of Santa Fe Arts District.
I Close proximity of stable neighborhoods creates
need for transition and special edge treatment.
I The 1 Oth and Osage Station has excellent
potential as Denvers model TOD because of the
interest of the Denver Housing Authority and
the City to develop underutilized properties
surrounding the station.
Goals
I Support locally owned and local-serving businesses.
I Encourage sustainable development.
I Provide a community gathering place.
I Opportunities for local entrepreneurs.
TOD Study Area
53


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Character Area Plans
-tOWAX Mi
Note: Redevelopment ot the Burnham Yard is
considered to be long term and beyond the horizon
of this Plan. Redevelopment is shown for visionary
purposes only.
I Create a destination to serve as the areas
culture identity.
I Provide opportunities for a mixed-use, mixed-
income neighborhood that maintains/sustains
low-income and affordable housing.
I Provide opportunities for local job training
and education.
I Maximize short- and long-term land-use oppor-
tunities in the station area, including a broad mix
of residential, employment and retail uses.
I Maximize housing opportunities for a range of
income levels.
Recommendations
The land use framework illustrates new development
within a 1/2-mile radius of the station. Major parcels
that are envisioned for transit-oriented redevelopment
include the DHA owned South Lincoln Park Homes
property east of the track alignment (short term) and
the Burnham Yard parcel west of the alignment (long
term). The primary land use within the station area is
residential. Commercial, employment and open space
uses are also suggested. The focus for recommenda-
tions in the Station Area does not include the Burn-
ham Yard west of the tracks. Although a long term
vision was developed for this area it is anticipated that
if and when the Burnham Yard were to become avail-
able for redevelopment, a separate planning exercise
would be necessary.
Residential
The 10th & Osage Station area offers a key opportu-
nity to provide significant amount of transit-oriented
housing. The housing framework suggested should
meet a market niche for those wishing to live within
close proximity to the downtown core, but are unable
54


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Character Area Plans
to afford higher cost areas such as the Central Platte
Valley or Lower Downtown. The redevelopment of
DHAs S. Lincoln Park Homes should increase the
amount and quality of public housing that currently
exists in the neighborhood. The project should create
a mixed-income neighborhood that seamlessly inte-
grates market-rate and affordable housing and infuses
additional market-rate housing into the station area.
Retail
Only a limited amount of ground floor retail land use
is suggested for the station area (see the urban design
section for specific ground floor locations).
Retail is generally intended to be local serving and
support and complement the existing Santa Fe cor-
ridor. All new retail should be should be pedestrian
oriented and existing uses such as the Buckhorn Ex-
change should be preserved and strengthened.
Commercial
Regional destination commercial development is
suggested for parcels between 6th Avenue and 8th
Avenue; (pending long term redevelopment of the
Burnham Yard). These areas may include large floor
plate auto-oriented uses. However, they should have
a strong pedestrian bias. The uses should anchor and
strengthen main street style pedestrian oriented retail
along the corridors. In addition, commercial services
that support and strengthen the station area neighbor-
hood, but are not reliant on proximity to the station
area, are most appropriate south of 8th Avenue.
Office/Employment
Employment uses may include office and/or light-
industrial uses and are recommended to be generally
consolidated along 13th Avenue. Jobs, especially
family-wage jobs, nontraditional employment,
and live/work opportunities should be encouraged
throughout the station area. A Learning and Infor-
mation Center should be incorporated into the first
phase of the South Lincoln redevelopment to deliver
resident services and enhance local job training. The
Learning and Information Center could compliment
the existing Byers Library services by providing larger
more modern space that better serves the needs of
the community.
Private Open Space
Private open spaces include courtyards, small plazas
and retention/detention areas for stormwater. Court-
yards are generally located within each block and
should be maintained by private owners
Parking
All parking is generally located on site. Parking should
be consolidated, provided below grade or within a
ground floor podium
Urban Design
Ground-floor retail and commercial uses are an es-
sential component of an active and vital station area.
The ground- floor uses framework identifies the
critical locations for these uses. The suggested loca-
tions support economic viability because they front
major circulation routes (10th Avenue, Osage Street,
and Santa Fe Drive) and activate primary pedestrian
routes along the 10th Avenue Promenade. These loca-
tions also provide services to light rail passengers and
activate the station platform. Other locations within
the study area may include retail or commercial uses;
however, they are not priority areas.
Retail Ground-Floor Use Definitions
Retail uses are defined as businesses that engage in the
sale of merchandise. Primary permitted uses should
be limited to eating and drinking establishments and
merchandise sales.
Configuration of merchandise sales should include
continuous edge-to-edge storefronts. Commercial
uses such as banks and real estate offices should not be
permitted in retail locations.
Commercial Ground-Floor Definitions
Commercial uses are defined as businesses that engage
in the sale of services. Primary permitted uses should be
limited to financial services, real estate services, insur-
ance services, and lodging. Commercial storefront use
configuration may be interrupted by office, housing or
retail uses. Live/sell or Live/work home occupation uses
are also appropriate along commercial frontages.
Active Edges
Active edges are characterized as building front-
ages with direct entries from the sidewalk and a
high degree of transparency. This increases visual
and physical interaction between people inside and
outside of the buildings, creating a safe and vibrant
pedestrian environment.
Recommendations
Active edges should be located along the following
streets in the study area:
I Existing north-south Osage Street.
I Mariposa Street and Santa Fe Drive.
I Existing east-west 13th, 11th, 10th, and
9th Avenues.
I New north-south and east-west streets
as indicated in the New and Enhanced.
Streets Diagram.
55


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Character Area Plans
\
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LEGEND:
Light Rail Station
Light Rail Alignment
Active Edges
| | Redevelopment Parcel
| | Santa Fe Corridor
|jjj§lll Stormwater Retention
Proposed Park/Plaza
| | Existing Open Space
Existing Building
Existing Parcel
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Recommended Active Edges
56
I Primary entrances to all ground floor uses
should be oriented to the public right-of-way
The following active edge criteria should be met for
all other uses:
I Primary entrances must be oriented toward
the street. Quasi-public terraces, stoops or
porches are appropriate, but not essential.
I Windows should be provided along facades,
but no minimum percentage of transparency
should be required.
I Art walls, flower booths, new stands or other
activating uses are appropriate throughout.
Build To Lines
Build-to lines are identified in the same locations
where ground-floor commercial uses are recom-
mended. This will establish a continuous street wall,
framing these pedestrian oriented streets.
Recommendations
Build-to lines should be located along the following
streets in the study area:
I Quivas Street between the proposed open space
and the 8th Avenue viaduct (pending redevelop-
ment of Burnham Yard long term).
I Osage Street between 11th and 9th Avenues.
I 10th Avenue between Osage and Mariposa
Streets.
I 11th Avenue from Osage to Mariposa.
The build-to lines framework identifies locations
where ground-floor building facades must be built
directly to the property line. A build-to line can also
be described as a zero-foot building setback from the


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Character Area Plans
property line where the sidewalk is built directly up to
the facade.
Build-to lines should be located along the entire block
length where indicated on the diagram. The build-to
lines framework identifies only the essential building
frontages. Other building frontages may have ground-
floor facades built up to the property line, but are
not priority areas. The following build-to line criteria
should be met:
I Ground-floor entrances to buildings may be
recessed up to five feet behind the build-to line.
I Windows and walls may be recessed up to 18
inches from the build-to line to accommodate
columns or other architectural elements that
engage the build-to line.
I Build-to lines should only be interrupted for ac-
cess points to courtyards or other private spaces.
Building Heights
Building heights should maximize transit-oriented
development opportunities, while remaining consis-
tent with existing view plane ordinances. They should
also respect and not overwhelm the scale and mass-
ing of adjacent neighborhoods. The building heights
framework indicates minimum and maximum build-
ing height recommendations that respect the adjacent
neighborhood.
Recommendations
I Building heights should transition away from
established small-scale buildings along and east
of Mariposa Street.
I Building heights range from one to twelve floors
throughout the station area.
57


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Character Area Plans
I The tallest buildings are located in close proxim-
ity to the station platform and park amenities.
I Two- to four- and four- to eight floor build
ings are located near the station platform and
along the proposed employment/office corridor
on 13 th Avenue.
I One- to three- and two- to three floor buildings
are generally located in the transition zone near
adjacent neighborhoods.
Mobility and Infrastructure
Mobility choices and connectivity are key ingredients
to a livable station area environment because it in-
creases access to jobs, conserves convenient and attrac-
tive connections. The street grid offers essential routes
for auto and bus traffic to maintain regional mobility.
Primary Issues and Opportunities
I River, trail and nearby recreation amenities.
I Continuing increasing ridership at the station
since its opening in 1994.
I Existing bus routes in station area but lack direct
access to the station.
I Access to significant regional transportation
routes of 1-25, Santa Fe, and 6th Avenue.
I Need for significant infrastructure investment in
terms of street improvements, stormwater and
utilities.
I West side of the station area is cut off by rail
yard, river and 1-25.
I Flooding at and around the station.
Goals
I Plan for multi-modal station connectivity and
pedestrian friendly environment.
I Envision potential integration of Union Pacific
rail yard properties.
I Enhance connections between 10th & Osage
station and Santa Fe corridor.
I Enhance transit ridership.
I Maximize pedestrian and bicycle access between
land uses.
I Establish a comfortable, attractive and vibrant
public realm.
I Extend the street grid through the station area.
I Improve the aging infrastructure.
Primary Auto anti Bus Circulation
The intent of the auto and bus framework is to iden-
tify primary circulation routes that need to be added
or improved to enhance connectivity and ventilate
additional traffic resulting from new development.
The proposed land use framework suggests a consider-
Community Resource
Existing Bus Route
Primary Auto Circulation
Proposed Bus Route
Traffic Signal
Streets Crossing Speer Blvd.
Proposed Shuttle
j^irr § ;
UEl.IriBI
!.m;
Primary Auto and Bus Circulation Framework
58


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Character Area Plans
able amount of new development within the station
area that will increase traffic on existing streets unless
transportation improvements are made. Furthermore,
the current 10th & Osage Station suffers from poor
connectivity to major auto and truck transportation
corridors as well as RTDs current bus system.
Auto. Primary auto circulation routes are critical road-
ways that are necessary for improved station accessibil-
ity. These include the following considerations:
I Primary north-south automobile access shall be
maintained or established along Quivas Street
(long term), Osage Street, Mariposa Street, Kal-
amath Street and Santa Fe Drive.
I Osage Street is extended south to 9th Avenue
(short term) and connects to the existing 8th
Avenue viaduct via a new ramp (long term).
I The proposed ramp should be ADA compliant
at a grade of no greater than 5%. In order to
make this new connection, improvements to
adjacent streets and intersections will likely
be necessary.
I The anticipated increase in average daily vehicle
trips, based on proposed development in the
station area is identified in the Supporting Docu-
mentation.
Bus. Existing and proposed bus routes include the
following attributes:
I Improved bus circulation that creates feeder
routes to compliment the light rail system.
I Bus circulation that completes the station access
grid with connections to major east-west arterials.
I New bus routes along Osage Street and 11th.
I A proposed 10th Avenue shuttle bus that provides
service between the station and the Santa Fe Arts
& Business Corridor.
Primary Pedestrian Circulation
The primary pedestrian circulation system is intended
to provide safe, direct, convenient and attractive con-
nections for pedestrians moving to and from the station
area, adjacent neighborhoods, and nearby destinations
and attractions. The hierarchy of key pedestrian routes
is identified in the graphic below. These include en-
hanced sidewalk routes, special off-street routes, and a
pedestrian/bicycle bridge to connect to the west side of
the tracks if the Burnham Yard were to redevelop.
Pedestrian Routes, Santa Fe Drive, Osage Street, 10th
Avenue, 11th Avenue, and 13th Avenue. Premium
pedestrian treatments are recommended for sidewalks
and intersections adjacent to retail and commercial
ground floor uses along Santa Fe Drive.
Special off-street routes are recommended along Osage
Street, 13th Avenue and 10th Avenue. 10th avenue
should include a promenade treatment. Off-street
pedestrian routes should be adjacent to but separated
from bicycle routes. Striping signage (preferably in
the paved surface) or physical curb or paving material
should be used as separating elements.
Long Term Recommendations
(pending Burnham Yard redevelopment)
I Pedestrian Bridge. A shared pedestrian/bicycle
bridge is recommended to provide access to the
light rail station from the west of the track
alignment.
I Quivas Street. Quivas Street is extended from
the south to restore the grid on the west of
the alignment.
59


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Character Area Plans
Primary Bicycle Circulation
The primary bicycle circulation framework is intended
to provide safe, direct, convenient and attractive con-
nections for bicyclists moving to and from the TOD
station area, adjacent neighborhoods, and neighboring
light rail stations.
On-street bicycle travel lanes, identified with strip-
ing or sharrows and located within the roadway, are
recommended on 13th Avenue, Mariposa Street, 9th
Avenue, and Osage street south of 10th Avenue.
Other important considerations for the bicycle
routes include:
I Upgraded bicycle facilities are recommended at
the station.
I Cyclist-activated crossing signals should be
considered for major intersections, including
Kalamath, Mariposa, and Osage Streets where
applicable.
I Intersections should be improved with surface
treatments at major roadway intersections.
m
Community Resource
Primary Pedestrian Routes
Primary Bicycle Routes
Primary Bicycle Routes
with Bike Lanes
Primary Bicycle Routes
On Sidewalk
(3 Trail Access Onramp
mi Proposed Bicycle Routes
Proposed Pedestrian Routes
Sl^rSBE
III L! *4 Is n
:s ant
Bicycle and Pedestrian Framework
The most critical bicycle route is the primary bicycle
access route on 13th Avenue. This route links the 10th
and Osage Station, Auraria West Campus and Federal
light rail stations and the downtown core. This bicycle
route should be designed to create a safe and efficient
route designed for both recreational and commuter
bicyclists.
13th Avenue. The bicycle facilities along 13th Av-
enue should include five to six foot striped bike lanes
(or sharrows where the right-of-way is constrained)
and continue to be a designated bicycle route. 13th
Avenue should also include signs that clearly signal
shared and equal use of roadway travel lanes for both
cyclists and vehicles.
Osage Street and 11th Avenue. The connection from
the station to the Santa Fe Arts & Business Corridor,
West High School and the Cherry Creek Trail should
be designed to accommodate low to moderate volumes
of auto traffic; allow cyclists to share travel lanes; and
include bold, large roadway surface signs that clearly
signals shared and equal use of roadway travel lanes for
both cyclists and motor vehicles.
60


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Character Area Plans
Infrastructure
Essential infrastructure investments are needed to
ensure a successful station area. These projects provide
a balance that leverages private investment, ensures
infrastructure capacity and enhances the character of
the station area.
Stormwater. Work to mitigate the flooding at the
10th and Osage Station using LID stormwater man-
agement techniques.
New Streets. Recommendations for new streets vary
depending on location, however all new streets must:
I Provide sidewalk curb extensions or bulb-
outs where curbside parking is located to
minimize pedestrian street-crossing distances
where possible.
I Comply with ADA standards for all new public
sidewalks and bridges.
I Be a sustainable street that (1) apply widely
accepted sustainable design principles, including
stormwater infiltration and permeable surface
treatments (2) promote least polluting ways to
connect people and goods to their destinations,
and (3) make transportation facilities and service
part of a livable community.
Enhanced Streets. Enhanced streets are indicated
in the figure on the following page. Enhanced streets
may include the following:
I Sidewalk curb extensions or bulbouts where
curbside parking is located to minimize pedes-
trian street-crossing distances where possible
(constraints may include right-of-way and
drainage issues).
I Wider, or enhanced sidewalk area all of which
must be ADA compliant.
I Sidewalk curb extensions to reduce pedestrian
crossing distance.
I Enhanced pedestrian/bicycle amenities
where appropriate.
I On-street parking.
I Pedestrian-scaled lighting and street furniture.
I Bus stop shelters.
I Sustainable street features.
Street Categories
New and enhanced streets can be further separated
into two categories:
I Typical streets
I Signature streets
61


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Character Area Plans
Typical streets are intimate, neighborhood-serving, and
have low traffic volumes. Signature streets provide key
connections to and from the 1 Oth & Osage Station and
have enhanced special treatments. Typical and Signa-
ture streets are detailed in the following pages.
Typical neighborhood streets
Typical neighborhood streets are intended to comple-
ment adjacent land uses and accommodate multiple
transportation modes pedestrians, bicycles and
motorized vehicles without compromising safety or
function. These streets are generally designed to ac-
commodate low vehicle traffic volumes.
Typical neighborhood streets are places for public in-
teraction and environmental enhancement more than
simple transportation corridors.
The cross section for typical neighborhood streets
is 64 feet, measured from building edge to building
edge. Typical Street design includes the following
minimum elements:
I Thirteen-foot sidewalks or a combination of
eight-foot sidewalks, and five-foot landscaped
areas with trees, turf and ground cover between
the sidewalks and the curbs.
I Two directional travel.
I Eight-foot curb side parallel parking lanes on
both sides of the roadway.
I Landscaped curb extensions at each street corner.
I Green street design principles such as storm
water infiltration and permeable surface treat-
ments are encouraged.
Enhanced Streets 13th Avenue, Mariposa Street
The treatment of Mariposa Street is critical to the way
the South Lincoln Homes redevelopment transitions
to the existing neighborhood. The large right of way
should be strategically designed to slow traffic and make
it a more comfortable street for cyclists and pedestrians.
Toward this end, American Recovery and Reinvestment
Act (ARRA) funds were used to stripe bike lanes from
Colfax to 8th Avenue in Fall 2009.
Enhancements to 13th Avenue improve regional
circulation and reduce traffic congestion by providing
transportation opportunities that include pedestrian,
bicycle and auto. 13th Avenue is an important link be-
tween Federal light rail station, Auraria West campus,
and 10th and Osage station. Enhancements for 13th
Avenue should be made west of Osage.
Signature Streets Osage Street, 10th Avenue
Signature streets are intended to improve station area
access to and from adjacent and nearby districts and
regional corridors. They are also intended to provide
primary access to and from the station area for mul-
tiple transportation modes and establish or improve
neighborhood identity. Signature street should also
ensure economic viability for commercial and live/
work ground floor uses.
Signature streets may require additional width (build-
ing edge to building edge) to accommodate motor ve-
hicles, and pedestrian and bicycle circulation enhance-
ments. Signature streets include new streets as well as
enhancements and extensions of existing streets.
Existing streets that should be enhanced or extended
to become signature streets include:
I Osage Street enhanced from 13th Avenue to 9th
Avenue (short term) and 8th Avenue (long term)
up to the existing 8th Avenue viaduct.
I 1 Oth Avenue enhanced from Osage Street to
Santa Fe Drive.
Signature Street Osage Street
The enhancement and extension of Osage Street im-
proves regional and nearby district access to and from
the station and creates an economically viable environ-
ment that will support transit-supportive commercial
uses by providing necessary drive-by traffic.
Recommendations
I Existing street enhancements should be made
from 10th Avenue to 13th Avenue.
I A new southern extension of Osage Street should
be provided to 9th Avenue (short term) and 8th
Avenue (long term).
I Osage Street should provide two way directional
travel and have a typical cross section of 64 feet
from 8th Avenue to 13th Avenue.
I A new ramp should be introduced connecting
Osage Street to the 8th Avenue Viaduct, begin-
ning south of 9th Avenue (long term).
I Turn lanes and traffic signals may be required at
the new Osage Street and 8th Avenue intersection.
I At a minimum, on-street parking lanes should be
provided from 9th Avenue to 11th Avenue.
I Osage Street should accommodate bicycle traffic
through bicycle routing and adequate space
for cyclists on or off the roadway.
I The street should be designed to accommodate
feeder bus routes, bus transfer and drop-off
locations shelters.
62


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Character Area Plans
Signature Street 10th Avenue
The existing ROW promenade on 10th Avenue,
between Osage and Mariposa Street, features special
pedestrian enhancements, decorative paving, and on-
street parking. Enhancements to 10th Avenue main-
tain the existing 80-foot ROW The design includes
the following minimum elements:
I A 20-foot sidewalk/amenity area on north and
south side; eight-foot parallel parking lanes on
north and south side, two ten foot travel lanes
(one in each direction), and four foot decorative
paving (narrow unplanted median) in the center;
and Curb extensions at each street corner. This
section of 10th should be reconstructed with
the Denver Housing Authority redevelopment.
Future improvements to 10th Avenue east of
Mariposa Street should also be considered in the
long term.
20
Sidewalk / Urban
Design
(South Side of
Street)

8
Parking'
Lane
10
Travel
Lane
7*"
4
10
Travel
Lane
, 8
Parking'
Lane
7^
Decorative Paving
36

Existing Curb to Curb
80
20
Sidewalk / Urban
Design
(North Side of
Street)
-7*-

Right of Way
10th Avenue Promenade
Proposed Cross Section for 10th Avenue
Using the existing 80 right-of-way this recommended cross section includes two 20 pedestrian and amenity
zones, two 8 parking lanes, two 10 travel lanes and a 4 center decorative paving. This recommendation should
promote slower vehicular traffic and improved pedestrian and bicycle conditions.
63


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Character Area Plans

4CURBTOCURB-
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64
Approved Cross Section for 13th Avenue: Quivas to
Osage (80 right-of-way)
Using the existing 80right-of-way this approved cross
section includes two directional auto travel (IT travel
lanes) with a 10 shared center left turn lane, six foot
bike lanes in both direction, and a 10 tree lawn on
both sides with an 8 detached sidewalk. The Depart-
ment of Public Works and Community Planning and
Development collaborated to develop this cross sec-
tion design. The implementation will be dependent
on private investment and redevelopment along W
13 th Avenue.
Approved Cross Section for 13th Avenue: Decatur
to Quivas (70 right-of-way).
Using the existing 70 right-of-way this approved cross
section includes two directional auto travel (11 travel
lanes) with a 10 shared center left turn lane, six foot
bike lanes in both direction, and a 8 tree lawn on
both sides with an 5 detached sidewalk. The Depart-
ment of Public Works and Community Planning and
Development collaborated to develop this cross section
design. The implementation will be dependent on
private investment and redevelopment along W 13th
Avenue.


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Character Area Plans
Townhouse'
Units
£._§!_
Stoop
-?*
6
Walk

18
Proposed Water
Quality
8
Parking
Lane
A Bike^
Lane
11

11
Travel Lane Travel Lane
48

Bike
Lane
8
Parking
Lane
18
Existing Tree
Lawn
y 5 y
Walk
Existing *
Residential

Existing Curb to Curb
96
Right of Way

Proposed Cross Section for Mariposa Street
Using the existing 96 right-of-way this recommended cross section includes a new 18 water quality area on the west side between the 8 park-
ing lane and the 6 sidewalk. The curb to curb recommendation includes maintaining two 8 parking lanes, two existing 5 bike lanes, and two
11 travel lanes. The existing 5 detached sidewalk should remain on the east side of the street. In order to achieve on-site stormwater detention
for the South Lincoln Homes redevelopment, water quality may be provided within the right-of-way along Mariposa. An example is provided
here; however, details of the water quality detention will need to be addressed at the time of development.
65


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Character Area Plans
66


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Implementation and Next Steps
Implementation
& Next Steps
67


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Implementation and Next Steps
Implementation
This section discusses phasing of the plans imple-
mentation and identifies the essential action items
necessary to accomplish the La Alma/Lincoln Park
Neighborhood Plan recommendations.
Phasing
The plan recommendations strive to direct appro-
priate change to the area over a period of 20 years.
While the city will influence implementation of the
plan through regulatory means, investments in infra-
structure and partnerships, much of the change will
be implemented by private property owners incre-
mentally over a number of years or decades. Several
factors influence the extent and the phasing of this
plans implementation:
Investment in Infrastructure Infrastructure
projects will likely facilitate an influx of private
investment and development in the area. As private
money flows into the area, the La Alma/Lincoln Park
Neighborhood will emerge as a place with a unique
identity a place where people (residents, businesses,
investors) want to be. Other major infrastructure
improvements will occur over time as redevelopment
occurs or as funding becomes available.
Land Assemblage Realization of plan recommenda-
tions in areas of change depend largely on property
ownership. In portions of the station area where a
single property owner has purchased several proper-
ties, evidence of change will come more quickly,
likely in the next five years (including the Denver
Housing Authoritys South Lincoln Park Homes).
In parts of the station area where there are many indi-
vidual property owners, we will not likely see much
change until market conditions support the type of
development and reinvestment described in this plan.
Zoning The New Zoning Code has facilitated
implementation of this plan through context-based
and form-based regulations that encourage mixed
use development and an urban form. As part of
the New Code adoption, many vacant and under-
utilized properties in the areas of change have been
rezoned to mixed use districts with property owner
support. Where viable industrial businesses exist,
rezoning in order to implement the plan will occur
more slowly, as the market dictates, allowing for
more gradual change.
Business recruitment and retention As change
comes to the La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood,
the city must balance the needs of both new and cur-
rent residents and businesses. The recommendations
in this plan are intended to be flexible enough to
allow change to occur as the market dictates.
Catalyst Projects
Several projects will act as catalysts to lead the charge
toward neighborhood plan implementation:
I Public plazas and green spaces are built along
10th Avenue (Osage to Mariposa) and 10th
Avenue is reconstructed as a Signature
Street.
I Osage Street is extended south to 9th Avenue.
I DHA implements the senior housing project at
1099 Osage (plans completed and construction
scheduled for Fall 2010). The 90 units of senior
affordable housing is the first step in initiating
the redevelopment of S. Lincoln.
I Denvers New Zoning Code is used to imple-
ment this plans recommendations.
South Lincoln Park Homes
The DHA redevelopment strategy incorporated in
their Master Plan includes:
I Relocating all 270 existing DHA housing units
on site in a higher density and mixed use con
figuration.
I Providing for the phased relocation of existing
DHA tenants to new housing.
Implementation Strategies
The following tables describe Implementation Strate-
gies for the neighborhood and station area. The table
is organized by Regulatory Tools, Public Infrastruc-
ture Tools and Partnership tools. Each implementa-
tion strategy includes a general timeframe and key
responsibilities. The Plan recommendations are
abbreviated for each section: 1) LU/UD = Land Use
and Urban Design; 2) MO/IN = Mobility and Infra-
structure; and 3) ECON = Economic Opportunities.
Timeframes are organized by short term (1-5 years),
medium (5-10) or long (10-20 years) term. This plan
does not require these timeframes if opportunities
arise sooner than predicted.
68


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Implementation and Next Steps
Regulatory Tools
Recommendations Implementation Strategy Timeframe Key Responsibility
LU/UD Support Rezoning Rezone or support rezoning application within the Station Area to allow for a future mixed-use neighborhood and residential development aligning with this Plan's Vision and recommendations. New zoning districts should promote diverse housing choice, integrated with employment and neighborhood serving uses. Districts that permit appropriate development intensities and building forms addressing active edges, build-to lines, and transitions between contexts should be considered in accordance with this Plan. Ongoing CPD, property owners
LU/UD Incentivize Active Ground Floor Uses in the Station Area. Explore opportunities for economically rewarding development. Short-Long CPD, private property owners, City Council; RNO, OED
LU/UD Areas of Stability. Apply appropriate small lot residential zoning in areas of stability to maintain the character of the neighborhood while allowing moderate infill and density. Achieved with Zoning Code Update, 2010 CPD, private property owners
LU/UD Santa Fe Corridor. Apply Main Street zoning to the Santa Fe corridor. Achieved with Zoning Code Update, 2010 CPD
LU/UD Mixed Use Zoning. Apply mixed use zoning to the South Lincoln Park homes property and the Colfax and 13th Avenue Corridors. Achieved with Zoning Code Update, 2010 CPD
LU/UD Industrial Zoning. Focus heavier industrial zoning west of the freight rail line and south of 13th Avenue. The 13th Avenue corridor should have industrial mixed-use zoning to limit heavy industrial uses and allow for greater combination of uses. Immediate. Mostly achieved with Zoning Code Update, 2010 CPD
LU/UD Respect Neighborhood Transitions. As properties backing to residential are expanded and redeveloped along Santa Fe, Colfax, and 8th Avenue, carefully consider transitions between the neighborhood and new mixed-use projects by encouraging parking in the rear, landscape buffers, and a gradual transition of building heights using stepbacks to reduce the overall bulk of buildings toward the back of the lot. Short CPD
P/OS Create Public Open Space. Develop a regulatory strategy for creation of public open space and plazas to link and strengthen the existing Lincoln Park.This could include requiring a General Development Plan or coordination with the New Zoning Code to incorporate flexibility in mixed use districts for aggregation of open space. DHA's Master Plan for South Lincoln Park Homes includes pocket parks and plazas along 10th Avenue. Work with DHAto ensure these are implemented. Short-Medium Parks and Rec., Land Owners, District 9, CPD, DHA
69


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Implementation and Next Steps
MO/IN Reduced Parking. Reduce parking requirements in mixed use zoning districts adjacent to transit stations and further reduce parking requirements for affordable housing. Increase ways to meet minimum parking requirements. Incentivize structured and shared parking adjacent to transit stations. Short-Medium CPD, PW
LU/UD Facilitate Sustainability. Eliminate regulatory barriers to sustainable building and development practices. Short-Long CPD, Greenprint Denver
MO/IN Develop New Street Standards. Work with PW, Fire Department and the Living Streets Initiative on developing and enforcing new street cross section standards that are context- sensitive, guided by adopted plans and accommodate vehicle, bike, pedestrian and bus mobility. Medium PW, CPD, FIRE
Infrastructure Tools
Recommendations Implementation Strategy Timeframe Key Responsibility
MO/IN Extend Osage Street to 9th Avenue in the short term and further south to 8th Avenue in the longer term or pending redevelopment of the Burnham Yard. Property acquisition will be required. Short-Long PW,CIP
MO/IN Reopen 11th Avenue between Kalamathand Lipan using TOD bond funding. Eliminate the parking lot and reinstitute the grid with a street and detached sidewalks and a 4-way traffic signal at 11th and Kalamath. Underway, Scheduled Completion Fall 2010 PW, TOD Bond
MO/IN Ensure 10th Avenue and Osage Street are developed as Signature Streets. Work with the Denver Housing Authority and Public Works to ensure plazas are constructed and the recommended cross section is implemented along 10th Avenue from Osage to Mariposa upon road reconstruction. Short-Long CPD, PW
MO/IN Improve Mariposa Street to create slower traffic and improve the pedestrian environment. Water quality may be provided within the right of way for green stormwater retention opportunities. Medium PW, DHA
MO/IN Conduct a Feasibilty Study of Pedestrian Crossing Improvements of Santa Fe and Kalamath from 9th to 13th Avenue to determine howto improve multi-modal connectivity from the station to Santa Fe and the greater community. Short Funded 2011 CIP PW,CIP
MO/IN Stripe Bike Lanes. Install bike lanes along Mariposa using ARRA funding. Completed 2009 PW
70


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Implementation and Next Steps
MO/IN Consider Bicvde/Pedestrian Infrastructure. Ensure all new streets and transit facilities in the neighborhood are designed to include pedestrian facilities. Ongoing PW,CPD, DHA
MO/IN Implement the 13th Avenue Cross Section. Install curb, gutter, sidewalk and bike lanes along 13th Avenue per the approved cross section. Medium PW,CIP
MO/IN Fund Improvements. Seek funding to assist in paying for local improvements to attract development in areas focused around the 10th and Osage station. Short-Long CPD, PW, CIP
MO/IN Bike Improvements. Install high quality bicycle parking at the station and work with Denver's B-cyde program to have a station located at the 10th and Osage Station (or adjacent property). Medium CPD, PW, B-Cycle
MO/IN Improve 13th Avenue Crossing. Improve the at-grade freight.crossing at W. 13th Avenue and support a grade separation for the light rail tracks in the long term. Short-long PW, RTD
MO/IN Update Aging Stormwaterjnfrastructure. Prioritize upgrade of stormwater drainage system for the neighborhood. Medium Wastewater Management Department
P/OS River Access. Improve access to and appearance of South Platte River in coordination with the River South Greenway planing efforts. Underway Parks, CPD, PW
MO/IN Improve.sidewalks and street trees on 8th Avenue. Medium-Long Parks, PW
MO/IN Improve Bus Stops. Make bus stops in the neighborhood more comfortable and safe with adequate separation from vehicular traffic as well as benches, shade, lighting, and signage. Medium PW, RTD
MO/IN Improve Lighting. Increase use of street, pedestrian, and bus stop lighting to increase safety throughout the neighborhood. Maintenance districts are required for any new pedestrian lighting. Short RTD, Bond issues
MO/IN Mitigate Station Flooding. Work to mitigate the flooding at the 10th and Osage station using LID stormwater management techniques. Short-Medium RTD, PW
P/OS Tree Planting Program. Pursue a tree planting program for the neighborhood and work to improve education abut tree care and protection. Medium CPD, OED, PW, DPR, Greenprint Denver
P/OS Replace dead or dying trees through the Mike High Million Tree Initiative and allow for additional drought-resistant trees that will shade pedestrians and enhance air quality. Ongoing Community Development Block Grants, property owners, neighborhood organizations
LU/UD Public Art. Within the Lincoln Park neighborhood pursue additional public art funding through alternative sources. Short DOCA
71


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Implementation and Next Steps
MO/IN Walking Routes. Identify and develop walking routes in collaboration with the Santa Fe Arts District and Auraria campus students. Short-Medium PW, DOCA, Santa Fe Arts District, AHEC
MO/IN Supermarket Access. Enhance the pedestrian connections to the supermarket located at 1331 Speer Boulevard (13th and Speer) to improve local opportunities to access fruits and vegetables. Short-Medium PW
MO/IN Denver Water Access. Improve the connectivity and access to Denver Water, so employees are better connected to the greater neighborhood. Medium PW
Partnership Tools
Recommendations Implementation Strategy Timeframe Key Responsibility
ECON Increase graffiti removal. Ongoing PW, property owners, neighborhood organizations, Council district 9
Business Relocation Utilize OED for Appropriate Business Relocation. As the station area redevelops there are existing industrial uses that are not consistent with the plan's land use recommendations. In addition, as the built environment changes over the years it may not be conducive for successful business operation. Office of Economic Development (OED) can play a pro-active role in assisting these businesses in relocating to a more desirable location in the city. Short OED, CPD
All Coordinate. Most recommendations in this plan require coordination with other city departments and regional agencies. As these recommendations move forward, coordinate with the appropriate agencies to maximize potential for successful plan implementation. Short CPD, Parks, PW, Greenprint Denver, BMO, DOCA, OED
All Active Community Engagement. Continue existing neighborhood communications, meetings and city processes to keep the community updated and engaged on the plan implementation and the neighborhood's roles/responsibilities. Short-Long CPD, neighborhood organization, District 9, Parks and Recreation
LU/UD Coordinate with RTD (Wayfinding and Station Identification). Install wayfinding signage at gateway locations. Short-Medium CPD, Parks, RTD, PW
MO/IN Study Santa Fe and Kalamath Traffic Corridors. Coordinate with RTD and CDOT to study the future potential of converting Santa Feand Kalamath couplets to two-way streets or implementing other traffic calming measures. Med-Long CPD,PW, CDOT
72


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Implementation and Next Steps
MO/IN Quiet Zone. Work with property owners, Union Pacific Railroad (UPRR) and RTD to implement a"quietzone"along the freight linein Lincoln Park. Short-Medium PW, RTD, UPRR, property owners
MO/IN Pedestrian Study for Colfax. In partnership with AHECand Public Works, consider pursuing funding for a pedestrian study for the stretch of Colfax Avenue that bounds Lincoln Park to the north and AHEC to the south due to the heavy student and pedestrian traffic in this area. Medium PW, AHEC
ECON Promote Economic Programs. Work with the Office of Economic Development to promote the various programs available to Lincoln Park residents and business owners. Short CPD, OED
MO/IN 10th Avenue Shuttle. Coordinate with DHA, Santa Fe Arts District, PW, and RTD to develop a regular shuttle along 10th Avenue from the 10th and Osage Station to the Santa Fe Arts and Business District. Medium RTD, DHA, RTD, Santa Fe Arts District
P/OS Maintain La Alma Rec Center. Coordinate with Department of Parks and Recreation and Council District 9 to maintain community serving operations at the La Alma Recreation Center. Short PR, Council District 9, OED
MO/IN Safe Routes to School. Collaborate with Public Works and Denver Public Schools (DPS) to pursue Safe Routes to School funds for education and infrastructure in the neighborhood. Medium CPD, PW, DPS
MO/IN Shared Parking. Work with Public Works and local business districts to develop a mechanism for shared parking along the Main Street and Mixed Use corridors. Medium CPD, PW, Maintenance Districts
Preservation Landmark Preservation. Coordinate with Denver's Landmark and Preservation Division and Historic Denver, Inc. to use Denver's Historic Resource Survey (scheduled completion 2013) to inform potential landmark designations and preservation strategies in the neighborhood. Medium CPD-Landmark, Historic Denver, Inc.
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La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Implementation and Next Steps
74


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Supporting Documentation


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Supporting Documentation
Neighborhood Location and Overview
La Alma/Lincoln Park is a dynamic, mixed use
neighborhood that extends east from the South Platte
River to Speer Boulevard and north from 6th Avenue
to East Colfax Avenue. In close proximity to Auraria
Campus, the Central Business District and Civic
Center, La Alma/Lincoln Park benefits from a variety
of diverse influences that help create one of Denvers
most complex neighborhoods.
Population and Housing Characteristics
In the last three decades La Alma/Lincoln Parks
population has remained relatively stable and cur-
rently is estimated at approximately 6,300 6,700
people. Accurate population counts at the neighbor-
hood level will not be available until the 2010 census.
The neighborhood experienced a sharp population
decline between 1950 and 1980 largely due to loss of
housing as the Auraria campus was developed.
Racial and ethnic diversity characterize the La Alma/
Lincoln Park neighborhood. The 2000 Census
indicated that 2% of the population are Native
American, 4% Asian, 7% Black, 35% Non-Latino
White, 53% Latino, and 2% reported having more
than one race. Birth data from the Colorado Depart-
ment of Public Health and Environment reveal a
decline in the overall percentage of Latino births in
the neighborhood over the last decade. In the same
time period, the percentage of Non-Latino White
and African American births have been on the rise,
indicating that the overall neighborhood demograph-
ics may be shifting in this direction as well.
76


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Supporting Documentation
Total Population
1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2007
Year
Source: U.S. Census 0 950-2000); 2007 Estimates from ESR! and Denver CPD
La Alma/Lincoln Park Population by Age (2007
a>
ai
<
85+
75-84
65-74
55-64
45-54
35-44
25-34
20-24
15-19
10-14
5-9
0-4
0 250 500 750 1000 1250 1500 1750 20'
Population
SourceiESRi Business Analyst Online (2
Population by Race and Ethnicity
La Alma/Linclon Park (2000)
Source: Census 2000 via Piton Foundation
Births by Ethnicity
La Alma/Lincoln Park (1996-2000)
1996 2000 2006
Households by Income
La Alma/Lincoln Park (2007)
Income Range
Source: ESBI Business Analyst Online (2007)
A median income level of approximately $34,000
(compared to $54,400 in Denver as a whole) reflects
the presence of a large low-income population in La
Alma/Lincoln Park. More than 700 households earn
less than $15,000 per year. Likewise, poverty levels
have historically been higher among Lincoln Park
residents than the city as a whole. For instance, in
2000 the neighborhood had 37.7% persons in pov-
erty compared to 14.3% in Denver.
77


Total Population
La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Supporting Documentation
The number of dwelling units in Lincoln Park has
swung wildly over the years. Between 1950 and 1980
the neighborhood lost over 2,000 units. At this time,
the area that is now the Auraria campus was consid-
ered to be part of the Lincoln Park neighborhood, and
much of this loss in housing resulted from the develop-
ment of the Auraria Higher Education Center in the
1970 s. The U.S. Census estimated slightly over 2,900
housing units in 2000, and Denvers Assessors Data
indicates that this number is slightly lower in 2007 at
2,202 units. Multi-family low rise structures and single
family homes dominate the housing types available
in the area. An estimated 39% of dwelling units are
owner-occupied. MLS data between the 4th quarter
2006 and 3rd quarter 2007, during which time 40
homes were sold, reveal that the average single fam-
ily home value in La Alma/Lincoln Park is $183,000
(Your Castle Real Estate, 2007).
Total Housing Units
La Alma/Lincoln Park (1950 2007)
Year
Source: U.S. Census 11950 2000), Denver Assessor's Office (2007)
La Alma/Lincoln Park is one of Denvers oldest
neighborhoods. Though no historic residential dis-
tricts are in place, at least 1,058 (38%) of the neigh-
borhoods dwelling units were built before 1940, and
at least 706 (25%) of dwelling units were built before
1900. Housing built before 1900 consists primarily
of small single family homes and some duplexes.
Disrtibution of Housing Units by Structure Type
La Alma/Lincoln Park (2008)
Multi-Family
Mid Rise
High Rise: 8+ stories Souize/DenverCoininimityPlamiggand Development, 2008
Percentage of Housing Units that are
Owner-Occupied
La Alma/Lincoln Park (2008)
78


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Supporting Documentation
Existing Land Use
The La Alma/Lincoln Park neighborhood is centrally
located within Denver just west of Civic Center and
southwest of the Central Business District. Several
major corridors that border or transect the neighbor-
hood have impacted land uses throughout the neigh-
borhood. East-West corridors include Colfax Avenue
and 6th Avenue. North-South corridors include the
Platte River, 1-25, Burlington Northern Railroad,
Southern Pacific Railroad, the RTD Central Corridor
light rail, Santa Fe commercial corridor and arts dis-
trict, Speer Boulevard and Cherry Creek. With large
amounts of acreage dedicated to industrial and Trans-
portation, Communication and Utilities (TCU) uses,
Lincoln Parks development reflects the abundance of
transportation assets in the neighborhood.
Distribution of Existing Land Use
and Housing Type by Acrage
La Alma/Lincoln Park (2007)
Existing Land Use
Other/Unknown%
Land Use by Parcel
Mid Rise Multi-Family High Rise Multi-Family
<1% 6%
79


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Supporting Documentation
'//, Areas of Change Single Family Duplex Employment |j| Light Rail Station
Blueprint Denver Urban Residential ; Industrial t Existing Light Rail
Concept Land Use (2002) Campus Lincoln Park * Planned Light Rail
Mixed Use Park Neighborhood Boundary 1 Railroad
Commercial Corridor
Blueprint Denver Conceptual Land Use
80


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Supporting Documentation
Denver Zoning Code Acreage Percent
C-MS-5 26.1 4.6%
C-MS-8 6.5 1.2%
C-MX-12 16.3 2.9%
C-MX-16 1.9 0.3%
C-MX-3 2.6 0.5%
C-MX-5 19.2 3.4%
C-MX-8 10.9 1.9%
C-RX-5 2.8 0.5%
CMP-EI 14.8 2.6%
CMP-H 23.0 4.1%
CMP-H2 1.7 0.3%
G-MS-3 0.4 0.1%
G-MU-12 2.4 0.4%
G-MU-3 10.9 1.9%
G-MX-3 3.1 0.5%
G-RX-5 2.5 0.5%
I-A 70.2 12.5%
I-B 171.4 30.6%
I-MX-5 33.8 6.0%
OS-A 28.2 5.0%
OS-C 0.7 0.1%
U-MX-2X 0.2 0.0%
U-MX-3 0.4 0.1%
U-RH-2.5 6.2 1.1%
U-RH-3A 34.6 6.2%
U-TU-B 37.4 6.7%
Zone Districts | | Open Space Parks (OS-A) | | Former Chapter 59
1 1 Two Unit (TU) ^3 Open Space Conservation (OS-C) l/Hawe/s, Conditions, PUDs, PBGs
1 1 Multi-Unit (MU, RH. RO, TH) 1 I Industrial Commercial (l-A) El Light Rail Station
I//1 Residential Mixed Use (RX) 1 | Industrial General (l-B) Existing Light Rail
Mixed use (MX) 1//l Industrial Mixed Use (l-MX. M-IMX) >- Planned Light Rail
WM Main Street (MS) 1 1 Campus (El. EI2, ENT. H. H2) 1 Railroad
Zone Districts
81


La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan Supporting Documentation
Former Chapter 59 Acreage Percent
PUD 2.2 0.4%
B-2 0.4 0.1%
B-4 4.9 0.9%
B-8 5.4 1.0%
R-3 12.1 2.2%
R-MU-20 4.4 0.8%
R-MU-30 3.3 0.6%
The west side of the neighborhood (west of the
Southern Pacific Railroad and RTD light rail) con-
tains nearly 145 acres of industrial, 105 acres ofTCU
and 55 acres of vacant land.
East of the Southern Pacific Railroad and RTD light
rail a mixture of land uses have developed to create a
much different neighborhood character. Commercial
and mixed use buildings line major streets such as San-
ta Fe, 6th and 8th Avenue. A mix of residential types
dominated by single family and low rise multi-family
structures pervades throughout the neighborhood.
Denver Health and several Denver Public Schools
facilities constitute public or quasi-public land uses,
primarily in the southeast corner of the neighborhood.
Blueprint Denver Land Use
Blueprint Denver: An Integrated Land Use and
Transportation Plan was adopted in 2002 and places
a city-wide priority on land use, transportation, hous-
ing, environmental sustainability and protection of
Denvers historic legacies. Blueprint Denver identifies
Areas of Stability and Areas of Change throughout
the city with the goal of directing new developments
and infill project toward Areas of Change in order
to preserve Denvers stable neighborhoods. I also
establishes citywide concept land use and concept
street classifications. Blueprint identifies the eastern
portions of Lincoln Park as Areas of Stability includ-
ing the two primary residential enclaves
(but excluding Lincoln Park Homes) and the Denver
Health facilities. The largely industrial western half of
the neighborhood is considered an Area of Change,
as is the land between the RTD light rail and Mari-
posa Street and 6th, 7th and 8th Avenues between
Mariposa and Inca.
Existing Zoning
The following is a list of existing zone districts, both
from the Denver Zoning Code and Former Chapter
59, in the La Alma/Lincoln Park neighborhood:
Share of Employment and
Number of Establishments by Sector
La Alma/Lincoln Park (2006)
* FIRE = finance, Insurance and Real Estate
**TICU transportation, Information, Communication, Utilities
Market Profile
Business mix and employment share were originally
included in the Supporting Documentation The
Community template, but now that we are includ-
ing a Market Profile, these may belong here. We are
collecting this data for State of the Neighborhood, so
I included it here anyway.
La Alma/Lincoln Parks economy is driven by the Ser-
vices sector, which provides over half of the jobs and
characterizes half of the establishments in the neigh-
borhood. Wholesale trade, construction, and services
sectors provide greater share of jobs in La Alma/Lin-
coln Park than these sectors do in the city as a whole,
whereas FIRE, government, and retail trade sectors
provide a smaller percentage of jobs in this neighbor-
hood compared with the rest of the city.
Services and retail trade comprise the largest busi-
ness sectors in La Alma-Lincoln Park. The most well
known neighborhood businesses are located within
the Santa Fe Arts District, which extends along Santa
Fe Drive north of 6th Avenue to Colfax and is lined
with art galleries, coffee shops and restaurants. The
wholesale trade, construction and manufacturing sec-
tors encompass a large share (23%) of this neighbor-
hoods economy compared with these sectors share
(13%) of the citys economy as a whole.
82


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