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Lowry reuse plan

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Lowry reuse plan
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Lowry Economic Recovery Project
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Denver, CO
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Lowry Economic Recovery Project
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English

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City planning
Land use planning
Reuse
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Denver -- Lowry

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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LOWRY REUSE PLAN
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Lowry Economic Recovery Project
Lowry Air Force Base, Colorado
November 1993


LOWRY REUSE PLAN
Lowry Economic Recovery Project
Lowry Air Force Base, Colorado


TABLE OF CONTENTS
Introduction
1. BACKGROUND 1-1
2. MARKET AND ECONOMIC OVERVIEW 2-1
3. LAND USE 3-1
4. URBAN DESIGN 4-1
5. HOUSING 5-1
6. TRANSPORTATION 6-1
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INTRODUCTION
This document presents the conclusions of the community reuse planning effort undertaken for
Lowry Air Force Base. It has been prepared on behalf of the Executive Committee of the Aurora-
Denver Lowry Economic Recovery Project (LERP), with advice and input from the Lowry
Economic Adjustment Committee (LEAC).
This document presents, in a summary form, the results of a comprehensive 18 month long
community-wide planning effort. It is supplemented by the Recommended Lowrv Disposition
Plan (November 1993), which is being submitted concurrently to the Air Force and by the Master
Water. Sanitary Sewer and Storm Sewer Study on Lowrv Air Force Base, prepared by Merrick
and Company, Engineers (November 1993), which is being submitted as a supporting document.
The purpose of this report is to document the Lowry Reuse Plan for presentation to the Air Force,
the community and the Department of Defense Office of Economic Adjustment. This Reuse Plan
is a refinement of the Preferred Reuse Plan which was presented to the Air Force in April 1993. It
represents a culmination of previous studies, evaluations and plan refinements relative to land use,
infrastructure, transportation and market potential, as well as continued public input concerning
community preferences.
Additional background information and interim work products relative to the reuse and disposition
planning effort are available separately. These include the Reuse Plan Alternatives Report
(November 1992) and the Reuse Plan Alternatives Report Chapter 9 (April 1993), which were
both submitted to the Air Force as part of the EIS process and document the process leading up to
the conclusions in this document.
Implementation activities which are planned to follow this Reuse Plan include on-going
coordination with the Air Force, detailed phasing and transition planning and creation of an
implementation entity for the conveyance, marketing, financing and management of the site.
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1.BACKGROUND
Development of the Lowry Reuse Plan was guided by the following Reuse Planning Goals, which
were developed by LEAC early in the planning process:
REUSE PLANNING GOALS
1. The Plan should demonstrate the highest community and urban design standards.
2. The Plan should facilitate local and regional economic development, including local
tax base expansion, education and training, job development and business
opportunity, in a complementary relationship to other regional development efforts.
3. The Plan should serve neighborhood, local and regional community facility and
service needs, which include:
Recreation/Open Space Social Services
Education/Training Arts/Culture
Housing Public Safety
4. The Plan should build upon, sustain and enhance the existing assets of the
surrounding area, which include:
Regional open space, trail systems and parkways
Established residential neighborhoods serving a variety of income groups
Established neighborhood commercial areas
5. The Plan should capitalize on specific site assets, which include:
Central location in the metropolitan area
Proximity to surrounding amenities, employment centers and regional
transportation system
Suitable existing infrastructure, buildings and facilities
Historic facilities and sites
Existing open space and recreation opportunities
Urban wildlife habitat
Established history and identity
6. The Plan should provide for multiple uses which are diverse, balanced and well-
integrated, and that minimize negative impacts on surrounding neighborhoods.
7. The Plan should be based on a sound understanding of economic and market related
jurisdictions and the private market.
8. The Plan should become an extension of and supporting element for the
Comprehensive Plans of the Cities of Aurora and Denver, including land use, open
space, transportation, urban design and economic development components.
9. The Plan shall promote the health of the local environment and inhabitants.
10. The Plan should include short and intermediate term strategies that are consistent
with the long term objectives for reuse of the site.
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2. MARKET AND ECONOMIC OVERVIEW
While recent economic activity in the Denver area indicates that the environment for
redevelopment of Lowry may be better than was initially anticipated, economic professionals
familiar with local business and development strengths and constraints are only cautiously
optimistic. Denver's economy has recovered and is growing. However, a reduction in current
growth rates is anticipated as several large transportation and construction projects are
completed. Furthermore, a surplus of commercial property and new development parcels of
significant size around the Denver Metro Area all indicate that demand for employers,
developers and residents still exceeds supply.
Lowry's environment for redevelopment activity and financing will be extremely competitive.
The overall economic and market conditions in Denver and the Metro Area will influence the
potential for successful redevelopment of Lowry, as will price and quality competition from the
Denver Airport Gateway and other development projects. Finally, the recent economic strength
and the favorable interest rate environment have encouraged developer activity on a large
number of projects elsewhere in the Denver Metro Area. The additional supply of residential
development (for example) that will become available at the time of Lowry's closure could
potentially have a negative influence on Lowry's redevelopment.
BACKGROUND
Over the past several months, the Denver economy has gained national attention. National
economic data, several business and popular publications and residential property sales all point
to Denver as one of the top ten cities in the U.S. for population and economic growth in 1993.
Lowrys redevelopment could benefit from such market strength; however, the length and vigor
of the current expansion are still far from certain. Likewise, the economic growth rates
experienced in the cities of Denver and Aurora may well vary from state and regional levels.
POPULATION
The 1993 population for the six-county Denver Metro Area is currently estimated at 1,997,200.
This is up 39,650 people from 1992, an increase of 2.0 percent. This rate is higher than was
previously expected: as recently as September 1992, Denver Regional Council of Governments
estimated that the Denver County populations annual growth would be 1.36 percent, but this
figure has now been revised to 2.25 percent. While the final counts may indicate a still different
rate of growth, the revisions reflect higher than anticipated population growth, particularly from
people moving to the state (in-migration). Table 1 below details the projections for the Denver
Metro Area through the year 2000.
Table 1.
Denver Population Projections
Age Group 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000
0 to 19 563,774 573,800 583,900 594,000 592,400 598p00 604,700 610,900 617,100
20 to 64 1.209.766 1.234300 1.258.900 1.283.500 1.286.000 1303.200 1320.400 1 337.700 1354.900
Total 0 to 64 1,773,540 1,808,100 1342,800 1,877,500 1,878,400 1,901,700 1,925,100 1,948,600 1,972,000
65 and Over 184,010 189,100 194300 199,400 203,100 207300 212300 217,100 221,800
Total 1,957,550 1,997,200 2,037,100 2,076,900 2,081,500 2,109,500 2,137,600 2,165,700 2,196,000
Source: Colorado Division of Local Government, 1993; Includes Adams, Arapahoe, Boulder, Denver, Douglas and Jefferson counties.
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In-migration, which began to be positive for the State in 1991, is currently estimated to cause a
net gain of 68,000 people across the state in 1993 (measured from August 1992 through August
1993). The rate of in-migration is expected to decrease in 1994 and 1995 (although it will still be
positive), when the construction of the Denver International Airport (DIA) and other major
public projects is completed. By the year 2000, net in-migration is expected to drop to 20,000
people per year. At the present time, the relative strength of the Colorado economy is seen as the
primary attraction for people migrating to Colorado.
Projections for the years 2000-2010 are for significantly slower growth. The State
Demographers Office is estimating that the population for the Denver area will be 2.4 million
people in the year 2010. This represents a growth rate of less than 1 percent from the year 2000
to 2010.
EMPLOYMENT
The unemployment rate in the Denver area is estimated at 5.4 percent for 1993. Despite the
completion of DIA and other projects, the next eight years are expected to witness continued
growth in job creation. Although unemployment is expected to reach 6 percent in 1995, the total
number of jobs is projected to grow at over 2 percent throughout this period. Denver area labor
projections are detailed in Table 2.
Table 2.
Denver Labor Projections
1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000
Civilian Labor Force 1,080,300 1,103,300 1,126,300 1,149,300 1,167,600 1,186,000 1,204,300 1,222,700 1,241,000
Employed Persons 1,025,000 1,043,500 1,062,000 1,080,500 1,100,400 1,120,300 1,140,100 1,160,000 1,179,900
Self-Employed 56,500 57,500 58,500 59,600 60,700 61,800 62,800 63,900 65,000
Remaining Employed 968,500 986,000 1,003,500 1,020,900 1,039,700 1,058,500 1,077,300 1,096,100 1,114,900
Unemployment Rate 5.1% 5.4% 5.7% 6.0% 5.8% 5.5% 5.3% 5.1% 4.9%
Source: Colorado Employment and Labor Force Projections, Summary Table Employment and Labor Force by Region, Region 3, p. 31 (1990,1995 and 2000); BBC
interpolations for remaining years; Includes Adams, Arapahoe, Boulder, Denver, Douglas and Jeffereori counties.
The strength of the local economy is expected to be due in part to steady growth in the number of
employers. New small businesses (those with fewer than 50 employees) are expected to grow 14
percent between now and the year 2000. The rate of creation of all new businesses is detailed in
Table 3 that follows.
Table 3.
Employers by Size of Firm, Denver Metro Area
Size of Firm 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000
1,000 + Employees 77 77 77 78 78 78 78 79 79
500 to 999 Employees 91 92 93 94 94 95 96 97 98
250 to 499 Employees 223 229 236 242 249 256 263 270 276
100 to 249 Employees 967 982 996 1,011 1,026 1,042 1,057 1,072 1,087
50 to 99 Employees 1,628 1,713 1,797 1,881 1,973 2,064 2,156 2,247 2,339
Under 50 Employees 50.054 50.906 51.760 52.601 53.510 54.419 55.329 56.238 57.147
Total 53,040 53,999 54,960 55,906 56,930 57,954 58,978 60,002 61,026
Source: Colorado Department of Labor, March 1992 Employment Figures; BBC estimates.
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The rate of increase in employment growth, like population growth, is expected to decline in the
years 2000-2010. According to the Center for Business and Economic forecasting, employment
in the Denver area will grow at rate of 1.1 percent between 2000 and 2010. In addition, the
economic development community indicates that job growth projections hide shifts in the quality
and types of jobs available. For example, while 1992 saw 20,000 new jobs created, 12,000
durable manufacturing jobs were lost. There is also concern that the new jobs are more
temporary in nature, implying lower wages and frequently fewer benefits, this adds to the lack of
confidence that the current economic strength will be sustainable.
REAL ESTATE MARKETS
Denver area residential markets had a strong year. Sales volume increased dramatically relative
to recent years, with number of sales transactions reaching levels not seen since the early 1980s.
Sale prices have never been higher. Table 4 summarizes this recent residential real estate
activity.
Table 4.
Denver Area Home Sales
1991 1992 1993
Sale Prices Median $89,500 $94,900 $104,500
Mean 109,321 114,600 125,172
Percent Increase in Median Sales Price from Prior Year 6% 10%
Percent Increase in Mean Sales Price from Prior Year 5% 9%
Number of Homes Sold Jan.-Sept. 16,213 19,486 22,266
Percent Increase in Sales from Prior Year 20% - 14%
Source: Colorado Association of Realtors.
Another indication of the strength of the Denver economy is the number of foreclosures. As
noted in Table 5, there was a 50 percent reduction in foreclosure activity in 1993 from 1991.
Table 5.
Denver Foreclosures
Year No. Foreclosures
X498
1,692
1,288
* Projected for year.
Source: Public Trustee's Office
1991
1992
1993*
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Commercial real estate markets have also strengthened but lease rates are still substantially
below replacement costs. Office space vacancy across the metro area dropped below 20 percent
for the first time since 1987, near the beginning of the savings and loan troubles. The remaining
inventory tends to be smaller class B or C space. Construction costs have increased substantially
over the past two years and minimal new construction is anticipated in the near term. Retail sales,
have been strong, with several new projects presently under construction or consideration.
CONCLUSIONS
The economic environment for redevelopment of Lowry is generally positive although
expectations are for the relative attractiveness of Denver to fade, with related implications for
population migration, employment and real estate activity. Strong population growth offers a
positive environment for residential development at the base, and the recent economic strength
offers Lowry redevelopment better prospects than were originally anticipated. Not-withstanding
this general optimism, Lowry's competition for residents and jobs from other development sites
will be fierce.
The past years residential property boom has stimulated new construction of single and multi-
family homes, and Lowrys success in attracting developers and residents will depend on
pressing its location and proximity to jobs advantage and on the promotion of high quality,
physically attractive development at all price levels. In addition, local experts still anticipate that
the completion of the construction of the Denver International Airport and other public projects,
as well as the closing of Lowry, will cause a minor downturn in the Denver area economy. The
short term effects of slower economic activity will force Lowry to compete with the rest of the
Denver Metro Area for residents and jobs, rather than allowing the base to attract people and
businesses moving to the area. Over a longer period of time, the Business and Training Center
Area (BTC) in the Community Reuse Plan is expected to attract corporate tenants from a pool
that extends beyond Denvers boundaries.
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3. LAND USE
INTRODUCTION
The purpose of this section is to describe the overall land use concepts for the reuse and
redevelopment of the Lowry site. It presents the recommendations of the reuse planning effort as
well as appropriate explanatory and background information. The reader is referred to the
Recommended Lowrv Disposition Plan for more detailed information on parcelization and
disposition recommendations for the site, which reflect the recommendations in this document
Lowry Air Force Base is located in an urban area and is surrounded by residential neighborhoods.
The land use concepts in the Reuse Plan were developed in recognition of the relationship of the
site to the surrounding community; existing site features, assets and facilities; current and
projected market and economic conditions and community needs and preferences. The concepts
are presented in terms of dominant reuse themes for the site, with a summary of land use areas and
definitions of primary land use categories. This chapter concludes with a more detailed description
of the site in terms of development planning areas.
PLANNING ASSUMPTIONS
The following assumptions concerning land use and facilities underlie the planning effort and
Lowry Reuse Plan recommendations:
Existing zoning on the Lowry site will not allow all of the uses envisioned in this
document. Future reuse of the site in accordance with the Reuse Plan will require
obtaining the necessary zoning changes from Aurora and Denver.
Interim use of existing facilities can contribute to the ultimate land use on the site. With
this in mind, short term use may occur within the framework of the long-range vision
illustrated in the Reuse Plan. This would allow the communities to meet short-term
needs, help defray operation and maintenance costs, and generate activity on-site at an
early stage.
Existing buildings are to be reused wherever feasible. However, demolition of
structures is recommended in some cases, and is reflected on the base maps and plans
in this document. Recommendations for demolition were based upon the condition or
use of the structure (as reflected in Air Force studies) or to provide for access or
parking in accordance with the Reuse Plan. Specific data relative to demolition is
contained in previous reports.
The Defense Finance Accounting Service and Air Reserve Personnel Center
(DFAS/ARPC) and the 21st Space Command Squadron will continue to operate in
cantonment facilities at Lowry after closure of the base.
REUSE THEMES
This Lowry Reuse Plan incorporates a balance of business training and educational activities,
residential development, open space and recreational uses, and supporting community services
uses. The community envisions development of several reuse themes on the site, each with a
dominant type of development or land use (for example, education and training) which is
supported by secondary types of development or land use (for example, residential). The overall
concept is that the uses would reinforce the community's goals for the site, from both a land use
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and economic development perspective, while being flexible to respond to market conditions and
opportunities.
Education and Business Training
The basic character and identity of the 1,866 site will be established by areas devoted to education
and business and training uses, located in the northeast and southwest quadrants of the site. The
focus of the education and business training core concept is to utilize existing facilities to provide
educational and retraining opportunities, create a trained work force, replace lost jobs, and invest in
long-term job creation and economic development for Denver and Aurora.
The Education Campus in the northeast quadrant would provide facilities and sites for a variety of
education and training activities. The concept of the Education Campus is to provide a wide range
of career training/retraining experiences for the new and displaced worker. The concept envisions
facilities for students with various educational and training requirements, which might range from
full training in business and vocational trades to achieving a graduate degree. Other compatible and
related uses would also be encouraged.
The Business and Training Center in the southwestern portion of the site would serve the needs of
corporate and/or other private or public organizations for business and training uses. The site's
architecturally significant structures, tree-lined streets, and variety of excellent office and classroom
buildings make this area an attractive location for private-sector corporate interests. The
site's proximity to high-end housing, and easy accessibility to the metropolitan area make it
attractive for business-related uses.
Residential Development
Another major theme of the Lowry Reuse Plan is residential development, which will serve as a
transition to adjacent surrounding neighborhoods and enhance the attractiveness of the site and
surrounding area to business uses. Residential development will make use of existing dormitory
and family residential facilities as well as new development sites, which included parcels fronting
the parks, regional open space and golf course.
A variety of residential building types are anticipated for the site, including single family detached
dwellings, town houses and medium-rise apartments, based upon an overall gross density of 4.5
units per acre for new development. Residential development could occur in several ways. The
first is as a primary use in a predominantly residential area. Although residential will be the
primary use, the planning concept envisions the creation of true residential neighborhoods, which
means that a variety of secondary uses, such as parks and neighborhood scale retail, would be
encouraged.
This approach will allow for supporting uses within primary residential areas such as parks, open
space and neighborhood-scale commercial and retail. This is particularly important on the larger
development sites (such as the northwest and southwest quadrants and the golf course area), in
which development needs to have a sense of identity and needs to provide common support
facilities which build upon and reinforce the residential character of the surrounding
neighborhoods.
The second means by which residential development can occur is as a secondary use on sites for
other primary uses (for example in the education and training core). In this case, residential
development is envisioned to support the other uses on site, such as residential development in the
form of dormitories, hotels or family housing would to support business training and education.
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LOWRY REUSE PLAN

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Community Services/Education Campus/Residential
The Lowry Reuse Plan envisions that on-site uses and adjacent residential neighborhoods would
be supported by a mixed-use area, located in the interior of the site near the proposed intersection
of 6th Avenue and Yosemite Street. Because of its important location on major streets and
accessibility to both the Business Training Center and the Education Campus, this area could
incorporate a variety of uses (Community Services, Education and Residential) and serve as a
major focal point for the site. The ultimate mixture of uses will depend upon market demand.
Open Space and Recreation
The Lowry Reuse Plan includes an open space system comprised of the existing and proposed re-
configuration of the golf course, community-scale parks, and a significant regional-scale open
space in the central portion of the site. The open space system will provide a value-enhancing
amenity for the site as well as meet some of the regional open space and recreational needs.
Existing regional flood control areas would be maintained in a manner which would contribute to
the overall open space concept
Regional linkages will also be developed to connect the site with surrounding parks, open space,
trail systems and parkways, and will provide functional linkages to off-site open space and trail
systems. The primary open space system will be supplemented by a secondary open space system
that will be implemented on specific parcels as development occurs.
LAND USE AREA SUMMARY
Following is a summary of land use areas recommended for the entire Lowry site, based upon the
community's Reuse Plan.
Land Use Category
Area
Residential
Education Campus
Business and Training Center
DFAS/ARPC Cantonment Area
Community Services/Education Campus/Residential
Community Services
538 Acres
187
185
73
28
9
Flood Control
Golf
203
246
121
71
62
35
Regional Open Space
Park
Regional Open Space/Golf
Active Recreation
Right-of-Wav *
IQS
TOTAL
1,866 Acres
* The area shown for right-of-way includes only major on-site streets (6th Avenue, Yosemite, Lowry
Boulevard. Quebec, Fairmount and Uinta), as well as additional right-of-way for bordering streets
(First Avenue (east), Quebec, 11th and Dayton).
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LAND USE CATEGORIES
The following Land Use Categories summarize specific land uses shown on the Lowry Reuse Plan
that support the reuse themes described above. Identified uses apply to public, private and not-for-
profit entities, including McKinney Act homeless providers.
Business and Training Center and Education Campus:
Classrooms
Laboratories
Office or Administrative Space
Light Industrial (not warehouse/distribution or "smokestacks")
Research -- Labs and Development Space
Supporting Commercial Space (retail, entertainment, business services)
Residential Development:
Single Family Homes
Multi-Family Single Family Attached Homes, Townhomes
Multi-Family Low or Medium-rise Apartments
Retirement Housing
Managed Care Facilities
Community Services:
Offices
Entertainment Activities
Retail Establishments, Restaurants
Medical/Dental Offices
Churches
Museum/Cultural facilities
Day Care
Public Services Facilities (police, fire)
Open Space and Recreation:
Active Recreation Areas -- Outdoor and Indoor Facilities
Youth and/or Senior Center, Museum, Cultural Facilities
Passive Recreation Parks, Open Space, Flood Control
Urban Wildlife Area on Flood Control Area
Golf Course
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DEVELOPMENT PLANNING AREAS
The Lowry Reuse Plan divides Lowry into six Development Planning Areas, in addition to the
open space and flood control areas which are located in the central portion of the site. The
Development Planning Areas are defined by their geographic proximity (illustrated in the following
diagram) and reflect the reuse themes described previously. The following describes each area in
terms of its predominant and supporting land character, existing facilities, site data and contribution
to the Lowry reuse concept.
Development Planning Area Summary
Development Planning Area______________________Area______% of Lowry
1. Education Campus 232 Acres * 12 %
2. Mixed Use/Active Recreation 72 4
3. Golf Course/Residential 361 19
4. Southwest Quadrant 352 19
5. Business and Training Center 196 11
6. Northwest Ou adrant 233 13
Subtotal of Development Planning Areas 1,446 78 %
Regional Open Space and Flood Control
Total for Lowry Site
420 Acres * 22 %
1,866 Acres 100 %
The areas shown are gross acreages, and do not separate out land for existing or proposed
right-of-way.
Development Planning Area Descriptions
Development Plannine Area 1 Education Campus
Boundaries:
Development Planning Area 1 is bounded on the north by 11th Avenue; on the east by Dayton
Street; on the south by 6th Avenue; and on the west by regional open space and the Kelley Dam
flood control area.
Description:
The area comprises 232 acres on both sides of the proposed alignment of Yosemite. It includes
modem classrooms and training facilities (Buildings 752,758, 859, for example), dormitories,
community support facilities (such as the Base Chapel, Base Theater and Commissary) and
recreational facilities (including a park in the northeast comer).
This area is envisioned to be reused and redeveloped as an Education Campus, which would
include a wide variety of direct training/retraining activities and employment opportunities, as well
as community uses. These include traditional office, research and development, business
incubators, corporate training and administration. New construction is envisioned in addition to
reuse of existing structures In addition, a major community park is proposed for the northeast
comer of the site. This will continue the current open space use, supplement the areas park and
recreation assets and provide a transition from on-base development to surrounding residential
neighborhoods.
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DEVELOPMENT PLANNING AREAS

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Development Planning Area 2 Mixed Use/Active Recreation
Boundaries:
Development Planning Area 2 is in the center of the site, on both sides of Lowry Boulevard. It is
bounded on the north side by regional open space and the Education Campus; on the east by the
golf course residential are; on the south by the regional open space; and on the west by the
Business and Training Center.
Description:
This area comprises 71 acres and includes existing dormitories, a large hangar (Building 1499),
child care center (Building 964) and a cold storage facility (Building 1002).
The western portion of this area is envisioned for active recreation, consistent with the regional
open space and recreational uses planned for the north and south, which could provide supporting
facilities for public or private recreational activities.
The eastern portion is designated for mixed use, which includes Community Services/Education
Campus/Residential. The intent for this area is to allow flexibility to respond to market demand,
within a range of acceptable land uses. New construction is envisioned in addition to reuse of
existing structures. Future development might capitalize upon the sites greater visibility and access
resulting from its location at the intersection of Yosemite and 6th Avenue. Uses are to be limited to
those which are small-scale in character.
Development Planning Area 3- Golf Course Residential
Boundaries:
Development Planning Area 3 is bounded on the north by the Mixed Use/Active Recreation area
and Education Campus; on the east by Dayton Street, 1st Avenue and Havana Street; on the south
by Alameda Parkway; and on the west by the regional open space and Westerly Creek flood
control area
Description:
This area comprises 362 acres and includes the existing 18-hole golf course and undeveloped area
north of the Westerly Creek dam.
The intended use for this area is a combined golf course and residential development. This would
require re-configuration of the existing golf course but would have a number of very positive
benefits. It would create value for the entire Lowry site by creating significant golf course
development frontage, create an opportunity for a golf course residential housing product, increase
the total land available for residential development and accelerate development of the area north of
the dam.
The golf course/residential configuration shown on the Reuse Plan is a result of numerous
alternative layouts which were studied. Future refinement of the development plan for this area
needs to occur, with additional input concerning site conditions, market demand, financial
feasibility, access and phasing. Should a market for this housing product not materialize within
the next three years, the cities will reevaluate this development plan to consider other marketable
uses. The two cities shall proceed as expeditously as possible to implement a new development
plan based upon then-existing market conditions.
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Development Planning Area 4 Southwest Quadrant
Boundaries:
This area is bounded on the north by the off-base Mayfair Park neighborhood and the Business
and Training Center, on the east by the regional open space and Westerly Creek flood control areas;
on the south by Alameda Avenue and on the west by off-site Crestmoor Downs, Monaco Street
and the Mayfair Park neighborhood
Description:
This area covers 352 acres and includes existing family housing (Aspen Terrace and Sunset
Village) and proposed residential areas, existing prefabricated dormitories, the DFAS/ARPC
facility, and a proposed park on Fairmount Drive.
The Reuse Plan for Development Planning Area 4 proposes a mix of single-family detached and
attached housing units supported by open space, parks, and recreation areas as well as possible
neighborhood-scale retail and community services. The existing prefabricated dormitory complex
(Buildings 410 420) is planned to be relocated or demolished.
Existing family housing is to be retained and new residential development is planned for the
remaining vacant land. Residential uses will provide an appropriate transition to the surrounding
off-site residential areas and can take advantage of the open space amenities which border the site.
New residential development will also help to buffer existing neighborhoods from non-residential
uses in the Business and Training Center.
The Reuse Plan envisions an extension of Quebec through the site which will help to define the
DFAS/ARPC cantonment, which provides a major anchor for the Lowry site and is strongly
supported by the community.
Development Planning Area 5 Business and Training Center
Boundaries:
Development Planning Area 5 is bounded on the north by proposed residential development
adjacent to 6th Avenue and the Officers' Housing area; on the west by the regional open space; on
the south by proposed residential; and on the west by Quebec Street. \
Description:
JA*?

This area consists of 196 acres and includes the historic core of the original base, which was the
Agnes Memorial Sanitarium. It includes the most developed part of the base and contains several
unusual building and facility resources. There are over 1.1 million gross square feet of existing
administrative or office facilities, including the Headquarters Building (Building 349), workshops,
training facilities, industrial buildings and modem classrooms, as well as several dormitories. The
Visiting Officer Quarters (Building 397), Officers' Club (Building 24) and two of the original base
hangars (Buildings 401 and 402) are located in this area and present unique opportunities for
educational, cultural and/or recreational uses.
This area is envisioned to be developed as a Business and Training Center, which would offer an
opportunity for private and public entities to locate facilities which complement the activities of the
Educational Campus proposed for the northeast quadrant. New construction is envisioned in
addition to reuse of existing structures. Although no significant private users have yet been
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identified for this area, future marketing plans and implementation efforts will focus on identifying
and targeting potential users.
Currently, the 21st Space Command Squadron plans to remain in its current facility as a
cantonment area, which is located in the eastern portion of the Business and Training Center. In
addition, the community supports the request by DFAS to accommodate its existing space needs
with facilities on base, in addition to their current cantonment area in the westernmost portion of
Lowry. Both of these uses are consistent with the Business and Training Center concept
Development Planning Area 6 Northwest Quadrant
Boundaries:
Development Planning Area 6 is in the northeast quadrant. It is bounded on the north by 11th
Avenue; on the east by the regional open space; on the south by the Business and Training Center,
and on the west by Quebec Street
Description:
This area consists of 233 acres and includes existing family housing (Officers' Housing, Blue
Spruce Meadows and Columbine Park), Transient Quarters, the Base Exchange (Building 667),
NCO Club (Building 600), mobile home park, ball fields, warehouses and shops. The existing
mobile home park and several warehouses are expected to be demolished and the Transient
Quarters could be relocated.
The Reuse Plan for Development Planning Area 6 proposes a mix of single-family detached and
attached housing units supported by open space, parks, and recreation areas as well as possible
neighborhood-scale retail and community services, which are compatible with off-site retail and
services. Existing housing is to be retained and new residential development is planned to occur
on the remaining vacant land. The existing Base Exchange facility is anticipated to be reused with a
community service use that is compatible with the predominant residential character of the area.
The residential character and density of this proposed neighborhood must be sensitive to both on-
site and off-site conditions, and reflect an extension and enhancement of existing surrounding
residential neighborhoods. Identified as primarily residential, this area represent a considerable
opportunity to build upon the adjacent residential character of the area.
The large open space and flood control area adjacent to this area will also serve as a transition and
buffer between residential development and the Education Campus to the east
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4. URBAN DESIGN
INTRODUCTION
Lowry's existing physical assets, location and surrounding context significantly influence the
opportunities for defining a special character and identity for the public realm of the 1,866-acre
site. As is illustrated on the following diagram, Lowry presents unique opportunities to establish
linkages to the surrounding developed areas, which are primarily residential.
The purpose of this section is to describe the urban design concepts and recommendations
envisioned for Lowry and how they will contribute to the character of the site and help to
physically integrate Lowry with the surrounding neighborhoods. Specifically, this section
addresses how this can be done through the design of the fabric of the site, including open space
systems, streets and existing and proposed development on the site.
The urban design framework, builds upon Lowry's existing built features (including buildings,
roads, dams, infrastructure and other facilities), existing natural and site features (such as
topography, vegetation, trees, and drainages) and anticipated uses, to define and communicate a
vision for development of the public realm which can be implemented as redevelopment occurs
over time.
URBAN DESIGN GOALS
The overall purpose of the urban design framework is to establish a common system of open'
spaces, gateways, edge treatments and other appropriate elements for the Lowry site. This
Framework will provide structure and organization to the site as a whole, as well as to specific land
use areas or neighborhoods within the site. It will also help the site better fit with the surrounding
neighborhoods, which have historically been separate from Lowry, as redevelopment occurs over
time. Specific goals which guide the development of the urban design concepts for Lowry are the
following:
1. Lowry should be developed as an integral and identifiable portion of Aurora and
Denver but should "meld" with the neighborhood, with multiple points of
connection to the surrounding street and open space networks.
2. On-site open space should be linked into the regional, community, and
neighborhood open space and park systems. It should be used as an amenity and to
structure and organize land use and development.
3. On-site flood control and drainage areas should be connected to form an integrated
open space system, with linkages to on-site and surrounding open spaces, parks,
and amenities.
4. Appropriate transitions, seams and edges should be developed between Lowry and
the surrounding neighborhoods. Each condition should be carefully examined.
Seams and edges should be clarified through landscape treatment, buffers, access,
scale and orientation of new development, and the integration or separation of uses,
as appropriate.
5. Major points of entry into the site, or "gateways", should be clearly identified and
developed.
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URBAN DESIGN CONTEXT
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6. The character of urban design and open space elements should reflect and/or be
compatible with the surrounding context, including both formal and informal
treatments. Major streets should be planned with a "parkway" character and should
blend with the character of streets of Aurora and Denver.
7. Significant natural vegetation, views and visually sensitive or unique areas (such as
places of special environmental or historical character) should be considered for
preservation or special treatment
8. Significant historic buildings should be preserved and adaptively reused. They
include Building 349 (Barracks Building, also referred to as the Headquarters
Building), Building 380 (Original Air School Headquarters), Building 379
(Original Armament School), Building 251 (Base Commander's House), Buildings
401 and 402 (hangars) and the Eisenhower Chapel (Denver Landmark and National
Register).
9. Special consideration should be given to eliminating or mitigating negative visual
impacts associated with reuse, such as automobile parking.
10. Transit and related transportation planning and design should be priority
considerations of the overall urban design framework.
11. Thematic elements, such as streetscape, parks, parkways, should be incorporated
where appropriate.
ANALYSIS
Concurrent with the development of the reuse and transportation concepts for the site, an analysis
was conducted to identify the physical design opportunities and constraints which might influence
the Urban Design Framework. It is presented on the Urban Design Analysis diagram, which
follows. A key finding of the analysis is that a well-developed system of open space and
circulation linkages extends to all sides of the site, however, these linkages have remained
discontinuous because of Lowry's isolation as a secured military facility.
Future redevelopment presents a rare opportunity to establish and/or reestablish these linkages and
provide public access to the open spaces and natural amenities on Lowry. This change, which will
be accomplished through the conversion of the base to civilian uses and related market
development, will be of great benefit to future users of the site as well as residents of the
surrounding region. Following are definitions of the terms depicted graphically on the Urban
Design Analysis diagram:
Gateway: Visually perceived point of entry into particular area.
Focal Point: Visual termination of a circulation path or axis, which can can be a man- made form or natural features. Focal points are opportunities for special treatment and designed or natural focus.
Paths: Channels along which the observer customarily, occasionally or potentially moves. These may be streets, walkways, transit lines or bike paths.
Edge: Linear element that breaks continuity and may act as a boundary between individual use areas or larger-scale regions. Edges are barriers, though not impenetrable, that close one region off from another.
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Seam: Linear element along which two areas or regions are related and joined
together. Seams serve to separate, but still are intended to encourage
connection and crossing.
Edges and seams are important organizing features that play a role of
holding together generalized areas and giving them definable image and
identity.
View: Site lines or man-made vistas that have a high visual appeal, or provide a
unique orientation to objects on the site.
URBAN DESIGN FRAMEWORK
The urban design framework is a key component of the Lowry Reuse Plan. It identifies common
thematic elements which will help to establish an overall image for the Lowry site while providing
flexibility for specific areas, such as the Business and Training Center, to develop more
individualized characters. The framework is intended to provide organization, identity, character
and purpose to the overall development of the site, and applies to development on both public and
private property.
The key elements of the urban design framework include the primary and secondary open space
systems and character of major parkways and streets on and around the site. It is anticipated that
these Framework elements will be implemented as development occurs, through public and/or
private efforts and resources.
Open Space Systems
The primary open space system envisioned for Lowry is comprised of several discrete but
contiguous areas: flood control retention facilities, a proposed re-configured golf course, regional
open space areas and three community parks. It is intended to provide an amenity for the entire site
while helping to structure the adjacent land use areas.
The redevelopment of Lowry provides a major opportunity to establish key regional open space
and trail linkages which are currently missing, between the Highline Canal to the south and the
Stapleton Airport site to the north. These linkages would provide for on-site trails, bikeways and
other non-vehicular linkages, and facilitate access to off-site recreational assets of the Highline
Canal, Del Mar Park, 6th Avenue and Monaco Parkways, and Crestmoor Park. The primary open
space system will be established through the integrated planning and design of landscaping and
recreational improvements in the regional open spaces, drainage and flood control areas, and
community parks.
A secondary open space system is also envisioned for the site, which includes privately-developed
open space in the key thematic reuse areas. The purpose of this secondary open space is to refine
the circulation and visual linkages on the site in a manner that the surrounding development areas
and primary open spaces are linked together with bikeways, parkways and neighborhood-scale
parks and open spaces. Future improvements which would help to implement this vision include
the design of private open spaces on development parcels, parks, pedestrian/bike trails, lighting,
signing and street furnishings.
The following Urban Design Framework diagram illustrates both the primary and secondary open
space systems. While the delineation of the regional open space, flood control and community
parks is intended to be specific and is consistent with the Recommended Lowry Disposition Plan,
the characterization of secondary open space in the Education Campus, Business and Training
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J | if MONACO PKWY
URBAN DESIGN FRAMEWORK

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Center, west-side residential areas and golf course/residential areas is much more conceptual.
These concepts are expected to be refined as part of the development planning process.
Streetscape
The integrated design of streets and associated elements located within the right-of-way, such as
sidewalks, utility structures, trees, landscaping, signing and pedestrian amenities (referred to as the
"streetscape") is a second key element of the urban design framework. The existing system of
parkways on major.streets in both Denver and Aurora is an important amenity and can provide
functional and visual linkages between the site and the surrounding neighborhoods.
The appearance of major streets at Lowry is envisioned to be formal and parklike in character,
reflecting the surrounding area as well as the significant road improvements that are already in
place. Typical street section illustrations of streets are included in the Transportation section of this
document, and illustrate pedestrian improvements as well as landscaping.
Major on-site streets are envisioned as parkways, with medians in most cases, detached sidewalks,
turf and street trees ("tree lawns"), coordinated street lighting and enhanced landscaping and street
furnishings. These include 2nd Avenue, 5th Avenue, 6th Avenue, Lowry Boulevard, Fairmount
Drive, Uinta Street, and Yosemite Street. The character of streets bordering the perimeter of
Lowry is also important, particularly along Quebec, 11th Avenue, Dayton and 1st. These streets
are are anticipated to be improved as development occurs.
Secondary streets within individual developments are also envisioned to have a high-quality
character and meet city technical standards, but the specific character of streetscapes is less defined
and is expected to be closely coordinated with on-site development The implementation of these
improvements on secondary streets will also occur as development takes place on specific parcels.
Historic Buildings
Lowry Air Force Base is significant because of its influence on the development of Denver and
Aurora and its association with technical training during World War II and the Cold War. In 1935,
Denver purchased the Agnes Memorial Sanitarium, which was established in 1905, to provide land
for the new Army Air Corps base. In addition to demonstrating two factors important to the
development of Denver and Aurora (the sanitariums and the military), several important events
took place at Lowry Air Force Base:
The base served as the Summer White House for President Dwight D. Eisenhower
from 1953 to 1955.
The National Security Council met at the Lowry Officers' Club in 1954.
Lowry was the first home of the U.S. Air Force Academy, which was dedicated at
the base in 1955.
Several buildings have architectural significance as well as historical associations to the base as a
whole:
Building 349, Barracks Building or "Buckingham Palace", said to be the largest
barracks building in the world when constructed (also referred to as the
Headquarters Building).
Eisenhower Chapel, designated as a Denver landmark and on the National Register
of Historic Places.
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Building 380, Original Air School Headquarters.
Building 379, Original Armament School.
Building 251, Base Commander's house, the only building remaining from the
1905 Agnes Memorial Sanitarium.
Buildings 401 and 402, large hangars.
Additionally, the Officers' Housing to the south of the Commander's house contributes to a sub-
district. The preservation of these individual buildings can be supplemented with an interpretive
program that tells the story of the base, including both its role in the development of Aurora and
Denver and its role in World War II and the Cold War. An interpretive trail program, along with
some exhibits, could be developed to establish a theme and unique identity for Lowry as it moves
into its third development phase, that of re-integration into the Aurora and Denver communities.
URBAN DESIGN CHARACTER
An additional factor which will influence the overall image and character of Lowry is the urban
design character of key development areas of the site the Education Campus, Business and
Training Center, and residential areas. Each of these areas have existing characteristics which must
be recognized and which will influence the urban design character. Following is a summary of key
urban design concepts for these areas:
Education Campus
The existing character of this area reflects its military use as the primary training area on Lowry.
The internal street grid is set at a diagonal to the off-site street system, which helps to define it as a
distinct area. Existing buildings include dormitories, classrooms training facilities and some
community support buildings. The general character is open and low density, with buildings
isolated by large amounts of open space and parking areas.
The urban design concept for this area is to create a "campus quadrangle", comprised of a formal
central open space surrounded by landscaping and existing and future buildings. The quadrangle
would also provide a link between the regional open space in the center of the site, the Yosemite
Street landscaped parkway and the public park in the northeast comer of the site.
The quadrangle concept would also encourage pedestrian activity on the campus, by concentrating
existing and future buildings in a central area with a common orientation to the open space. The
internal road loop in the Education Campus would reinforce this concept by providing vehicular
and transit access to the perimeter of the quadrangle. Further refinements would include
recommendations relative to building location, massing and character.
A portion of the Education Campus has historical association with the early years of the Air Force
Academy. Additionally, the H-shaped temporary classrooms are of interest as an unusual plan for
contemporary buildings. Consideration should be given to preserving and reusing one of these
temporary buildings and incorporating it into the interpretive trail system
Business and Training Center
The Business and Training Center will derive much of its character from the existing buildings and
site improvements. A significant portion of the area has been determined eligible for listing in the
National Register of Historic Places. Additionally as identified above, several buildings have
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architectural significance and should be preserved and reused as vital parts of the Business and
Training Center. The existing Officers' Housing, Commander's House and related streetscape
treatment can likewise create the core of a new neighborhood with strong historical and
architectural associations with the base and Agnes Memorial Sanitarium.
The urban design concept for the Business and Training Center is to build off the existing site
attributes, wherever possible. There is a significant opportunity to reuse existing buildings as well
as develop new building infill, which is architecturally compatible with the existing structures. The
existing Officers' Club (Building 24) and nearby Visiting Officers' Quarters (VOQ, Building 397)
are excellent facilities which should be worked into the reuse activities and themes.
Utilizing the existing pattern of buildings and streets to develop a formal and somewhat "urban"
setting is also an important part of the urban design concept. Specific elements include formal
parkway streetscapes on perimeter and internal streets and parkway linkages (such as 2nd and 5th
Avenues) between public parks and important landmarks, such as the Headquarters Building
(Building 397).
Mixed Use/Active Recreation Area
The character of this area is dominated by existing structures and facilities, including dormitories,
a large hangar (Building 1499), cold storage facility (Building 1002) and other support buildings,
as well as Lowry Boulevard, which divides it north and south. This area, however has key
importance to reuse and redevelopment of Lowry because it can serve as a major focal point for
on-site activities. It is located at a mid point within the regional open space system and is
equidistant to the Education Campus and the Business and Training Center.
The urban design concept for this area will have to evolve out of the use that develops here,
(whether it be residential, community services or education), which will depend upon market
demand. However, development of the site must occur with a strong recognition of its strategic
location in the center of Lowry with access to key circulation and open space systems proposed in
the Lowry Reuse Plan.
Residential Areas
Both new and existing residential areas represent opportunities to develop true neighborhoods in
the sense that they have distinct identities and contribute to a sense of community for the residents.
This is a distinct challenge at Lowry, given the variety of existing housing that exists on site, its
relationship to future residential development areas, and the character, scale and type of off-site
residential neighborhoods. As part of the reuse planning process, specific housing
recommendations were prepared relative to new and existing housing. They are presented in the
Housing section of this document and include recommendations concerning building type, market
considerations and site development.
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5. HOUSING
INTRODUCTION
The purpose of this section is to present recommendations for the use and development of housing
at Lowry, within the context of reuse and redevelopment of the site. The recommendations result
from the efforts of the Lowry Housing Work Group (LHWG), Lowry Economic Adjustment
Committee (LEAC) and the Executive Committee.
The Lowry Reuse Plan stresses economic development and education and sets aside considerable
land for a business and training center, a campus, areas designated for commercial or residential
uses, and land for residential use. In addition to the 867 family units and dormitories with a
capacity of 5,000 currently on the base, there is considerable vacant land that is suitable for new
residential development.
After a description of the Lowry housing planning process and presentation of the Housing Goals,
this section presents descriptions and recommendations for potential residential areas as well as
existing housing.
PROCESS
The Lowry Housing Work Group was established as a subcommittee of the Lowry Economic
Adjustment Committee (LEAC) with the concurrence of the Executive Committee. Its purpose was
to address issues relating to housing which could be used to refine the community's Preferred
Reuse Plan, which was submitted to the Air Force earlier this year. The Housing Work Group
consisted of neighborhood representatives, some of whom are members of the LEAC, other LEAC
members, representatives from the Lowry Housing Committee (one of whom is on the LEAC),
and non-voting persons with housing expertise.
The recommendations of the Housing Work Group were passed on to the LEAC. The LEAC
added sections on existing housing and McKinney housing and transmitted recommendations to
the Executive Committee. The Executive Committee made changes which are incorporated in this
document. The Housing Working Group worked with the goals and criteria which were adopted
by the LEAC, which are presented earlier in this document (Chapter 1. Background).
ISSUES
The Housing Working Group identified the following issues related to existing and future housing:
How much land should be set aside for housing?
What types and densities are most appropriate and marketable?
How should housing relate to and take advantage of open space and parkways?
How can the preferences given under the McKinney Homeless Act to homeless
providers be best accommodated?
How can existing and new housing at Lowry meld in with the surrounding
neighborhoods?
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VISION
A new image must be created for Lowry quickly so that it does not retain the look of an abandoned
military compound. Land designated for residential development is important in establishing a new
image. Successfully changing the image and creating desirable, new housing and upgrading the
existing housing areas will help attract compatible employment opportunities to Lowry and increase
the tax base. This new image can be best provided by creating housing and an urban design
framework that will enable residential land on Lowry to be developed and absorbed quickly.
Housing on Lowry should include a variety of types including single-family and multi-family. It
should meet a wide spectrum of the housing market ranging from affordable to expensive and from
those desiring large yards to those desiring low maintenance. It should be attractive and well-
constructed. At build-out there would be approximately 1,768 new units at an average gross
density of 4.5 units per acre.
This overall urban design of the housing areas should bring the positive aspects of the
surrounding neighborhoods and their urban fabric onto the Lowry site. Some key elements of the
urban fabric are the parkway system, mature landscaping, and fine residential neighborhoods. In
addition to these urban design elements, other positive aspects of surrounding neighborhoods
should be emphasized in new residential development.
It is recommended that existing and future amenities on the base, namely the golf course and open
space, be developed in such a way that premium home sites are created. Mature landscaping on the
base should be kept, breaks in existing landscaping should be filled in, new streets should be tree
lined while protecting views and have sidewalks, xeriscaping should be considered where
appropriate,-and new open space should be created. These treatments will establish a positive
image enabling residentially designated land on Lowry to be developed into attractive residential
neighborhoods.
NEW RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT
Following are the goals developed for new residential development:
1. There is an opportunity to create a highly liveable and desirable environment at
Lowry by protecting mountain views and limiting heights, placing utilities
underground, saving and adding indigenous trees, cleaning up environmental
hazards (including asbestos), incorporating avariety of uses, and enhancing the
surrounding neighborhoods.
2. The density of new, single-family housing development on Lowry should be
comparable to or lower than the density of adjacent, single-family, residential areas. 3 4 5
3. Representatives of the surrounding neighborhoods must be given the opportunity to
participate in the planning, zoning and PUD processes.
4. Most land available for new housing should be developed as "for sale" housing.
5. Market considerations must be taken into account. Transitional housing for families
meeting the definition of the McKinney Act should be accommodated in such a way
that the marketability of existing single-family homes in adjacent neighborhoods is
maintained at or exceeds current resale values. The ability of developers to build
medium and high end housing on sites at Lowry should also be maintained.
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6. New housing development on Lowry must enhance the well-being of surrounding
neighborhoods.
7. The edges between Lowry and adjacent residential neighborhoods must be treated
sensitively to assure that adjacent neighborhoods are enhanced. This will require a
variety of actions including architectural treatment, landscaping, setbacks,
buffering, fencing, and good urban design treatment.
1
8. Most of the land in areas designated for residential development should be
developed for single-family, owner-occupied housing in a timely manner.
9. All new residential housing should utilize high quality materials on the exterior.
Brick, stone, and stucco are preferred to wood or metal siding. The areas with a
potential for new residential development are addressed below. The overall
suggested density is 4.5 units per acre for these new development areas which
would mean a total of 1,768 new dwelling units.
NEW HOUSING AT LOWRY
Existing housing conditions both on-base and off-base were studied by the Housing Working
Group. These conditions are documented on the Existing Housing Densities diagram.
Descriptions and recommendations for the new housing areas at Lowry are provided below.
These areas are illustrated on the Existing and Proposed Residential Areas diagram, which also
follows.
Area E
This area includes the existing 31 units of Officers' Housing and'the land in the general vicinity
this housing and 5th Avenue. It is recommended to be developed as "for sale" housing. The area
to the east of the Officers' Housing should be made available as sites for new, single-family,
detached homes. There is a total of 25 acres. Following are the recommendations:
Extend the residential area east from the Officers' Housing, as shown on the Reuse
Plan.
Add housing sites along Roslyn Street
Develop housing along the Fifth Avenue Parkway creating premium residential sites
on each side.
Add sites on the south side of and along the 5th Avenue Parkway north of the
Officers' Club.
Area F
This area runs along Alameda between the off-site Crestmoor Downs residential development and
Aspen Terrace. It is about 22 acres. Following are the recommendations:
The most immediate potential for this site is for multi-family housing with
predominantly 2 and 3-story buildings.
A fancy entry way should be created into this new development. It most likely
would be created on Alameda Avenue at Quebec Street
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EXISTING HOUSING DENSITIES

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EXISTING AND PROPOSED RESIDENTIAL AREAS

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Areas G and H
Area G is west of proposed Fairmount Drive and north of the Aspen Terrace family housing area.
It is 65 acres in area. Area H is east of proposed Fairmount Drive and next to the southern flood
control area. It is 63 acres in area. Following are the recommendations:
Areas G and H should be developed as "for sale," patio homes and single-family
attached dwellings. The open space would be owned and maintained in common
by the condominium or homeowner's association.
The open space should be planned to create value for the residential sites. A large
park will be developed, in the future, north of this site which could be lined with
homes on the south. The planned open space connection from this large park south
to Alameda should be configured in order to create premium home sites. The open
space could either be publicly owned and maintained or privately owned and
maintained with easements allowing public access.
The appearance of the dam should be improved in a manner which does not harm
its flood control capabilities.
The tennis and basketball courts at Lowry Boulevard and Archer Place might be
best incorporated into the residential development
Area I
This area is in the southeast comer of Lowry and includes the land devoted to the existing golf
course and vacant land north of Westerly Creek Dam. The Reuse Plan proposes to re-configure the
golf course in this area, in conjunction with residential development. Based upon preliminary
studies, the resulting residential area would be a minimum of 91 acres. Following are the
recommendations:
The golf course should be re-configured to create premium home sites along it.
A linkage should be created between the golf course and Area I. It is possible to
incorporate the spillway into the golf course and serve as this linkage.
The relocation of up to nine holes to area I should be explored to create premium
home sites in the area of the existing golf course as well as in area I.
Ways of taking advantage of the views from this highest portion of the base should
be developed.
A lake should be created behind the dam (so long as it does not adversely affect
flood control) in order to create a positive water feature which will enhance this
entire portion of the base and improve its image.
The housing type should be primarily single-family, detached homes. The housing
should be "for sale" housing.
The child development center along 6th Avenue should be retained in its present use
and could serve as an amenity for employees and residents of the area.
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Area J
Area J is located in the northwest quadrant of Lowry, between the Blue Spruce
Meadows/Columbine Park family housing areas and the north central flood control area. It is
approximately 122 acres. Following are the recommendations:
This area should be developed for single-family, detached houses.
The landscaping from 6th to 11th along Quebec and extending along Columbine
Park should be extended to the eastern edge of Area J.
The barbed wire fence should be taken down when redevelopment occurs.
The child development center along Tamarac Street should be preserved for use as a
day care facility and could serve as an amenity for employees and residents of the
area.
There is a ballfield, craft building, and the NCO Club in the southeast comer of this
site which might be incorporated into the development or operated as a community
center to serve the surrounding neighborhoods.
EXISTING HOUSING AT LOWRY
Based on an analysis of rents around Lowry, estimates of operating expenses, and a capitalization
rate of 10%, the existing units appear to have value as rental units remembering that the questions
of asbestos and lead-based paint hazards remain. Currently, this value appears to be greater than
the land value less demolition costs. The Air Force may discover that demolition of these units
may add value to this land. The following descriptions are written for the scenario that these units
will be purchased with the purpose of continuing their use as housing.
Area A: Columbine Park
Columbine Park is located in the northeall quadrant of Lowry and at the comer of Quebec Street
and 11th Avenue. This family housing area consists of 7 buildings with 8 units in each building
for a total of 56 units. In the near term, it may be used as rental housing. Over the longer term,
there may be the potential to convert it to "for sale" housing or to redevelop all or a portion of it.
Following are the recommendations:
The units should be treated on the front to break them up and make them more
appealing. The landscaping already gives them some street appeal and the
landscaping should be retained.
There are deep, private back lawns divided by cyclone fencing. Private patios with
enclosed storage should be created behind each unit with a gate onto a common
landscaped area with a shared playground. The metal cyclone fencing should be
replaced with wood fencing to create more privacy and a better appearance.
The barbed wire fencing along Quebec and 11th Avenue should be replaced with a
wall or fencing appropriate for a residential area.
Landscaping should be upgraded, enhanced, and emphasized at 10th and Quebec
and any entry points to the neighborhood.
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Area B: Blue Spruce Meadows
Blue Spruce is located in the northeast quadrant of Lowry and fronts onto Quebec Street. This
family housing area is a 216 unit project In the near term, it may be used as rental housing. Over
the longer term, there may be the potential to convert it to "for sale" housing or to redevelop all or a
portion of it. Following are the recommendations:
The barbed wire fencing along Quebec should be eliminated or replaced with a wall
or fence appropriate for a residential neighborhood.
The landscaping should be enhanced and emphasized at key nodes (see urban
design section).
Buildings which have not been rehabilitated and which will remain should be
rehabilitated in a fashion similar to those that have already been rehabilitated
Area C: Sunset Village
Sunset Village is located off-base, on a site north of 1st Avenue and west of Quebec Street. This
area is different than the other family housing areas because it backs directly onto the backyards of
homes in the Mayfair Park neighborhood. The remainder of the family housing is separated from
surrounding neighborhoods by streets. It is recommended that up to 16 units might be demolished
and 28 to 32 of the 4-bedroom duplexes could be converted to "for sale" housing.
In the near term, the remainder of the family units may be used as rental housing. Over the longer
term, there may be the potential to convert it to "for sale" housing or to redevelop all or a portion of
it The dormitories on the eastern edge of Sunset Village should be demolished and replaced with
new residential development and a park. Following are the recommendations:
Create a row of "for sale," owner-occupied housing on either side of 3rd Avenue.
The duplexes along 3rd Avenue bordering the Mayfair Park neighborhood should
be converted to "for sale" housing (28 to 32 units).
These units would need to be rehabilitated including exterior architectural features to
give them a less institutional character. Garages may need to be added in order to
make them marketable. This concept is subject to identifying an interested
developer and a market for this housing.
Create a beautifully landscaped entry way on Quebec. This may require demolition
of the 8-plex at the northwest comer of 3rd and Quebec. Features need to be added
at entrances along 1st Avenue as well to give the project a positive image.
Landscape the area around 3rd Avenue between Orange and Oneida streets.
Those 4 and 8 unit buildings, which have not yet been rehabilitated, should be
rehabilitated in a manner similar to those that have already been rehabilitated.
The housing units could be made more marketable and the aesthetics could be
improved by creating private patios and storage areas behind each unit with gates to
common open space. This would make it possible to remove the metal storage
sheds behind some of the units.
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If additional storage and off-street parking is needed, the second building north of
1st Avenue on the western edge should be demolished. This building is only 15
feet from the property line and has not been rehabilitated.
The dormitories on the eastern edge of Sunset Park should be demolished. The
land, about 10 acres, should be developed into a park and into new housing. The
park should serve Sunset Village and be from 2 to 5 acres.
The new .housing should be at a density not exceeding 6 units per acre and could be
marketed with the duplexes along 3rd Avenue. If all the housing at Sunset Village
is demolished, new residential development should be at an average density of 4.5
units per acre.
Until the property is occupied, the barbed wire fencing around Sunset Village
should remain. Once occupied, it should be replaced with appropriate fencing.
The overhead wires should be buried underground.
If providers of housing for the homeless apply to the Department of Health and
Human Services for units at Sunset, the units should be located primarily toward
the southeast comer.
Area D: Aspen Terrace
Aspen Terrace is located in the southwest quadrant of Lowry, north of Alameda Avenue. This
family housing area has 300 units of housing, of which 200 units are 4-bedroom duplexes and 100
units are in 25 stacked flat 4-plex buildings. Aspen Terrace has approximately 74 acresand has
high visibility because of its placement along Alameda and is developed at 4 units per acre. Aspen
Terrace is adjacent to three potential residential development areas (F, G, and H). In the near term,
it may be used as rental housing. Over the longer term, there may be the potential to redevelop all
or a portion of it. Following are the recommendations:
Encourage the re-design of the building exteriors to make them more appealing.
Landscaping should be enhanced along Alameda.
There are sixteen units west of Quebec of which four are stacked flats. There are
eighteen units east of Quebec of which 12 are stacked flats. The reuse plan calls for
Quebec to go through which may necessitate the demolition of some or all of these
34 units.
Since these units are the only units on the base that are one story and, therefore,
accessible to the handicapped, these units should be marketed to the disabled
community.
McKinney housing for the homeless at lowry
Introduction
The McKinney Act gives the providers of homeless housing a priority in using surplus Federal
property. Providers of homeless housing and services must apply to the U.S. Department of
Health and Human Services (HHS) and demonstrate their experience in providing housing and/or
services to the homeless and their financial capability to take on the proposed project. Proposals
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deemed approvable by HHS are passed on to the Air Force and they must be addressed in the
Record of Decision stating how disposition of Lowry will occur.
There are providers of housing for the homeless who are interested in leasing or acquiring property
at Lowry, some of which have already requested applications. Assuming that some or all
McKinney applicants will be approved for receipt of Lowry land or facilities, this
recommendations addresses how to best accommodate McKinney housing in the context of overall
residential reuse and development at Lowry.
Number of McKinney Units
The LEAC recognizes the need for supportive housing for homeless families and individuals. The
LEAC was not in agreement on the difficult issue of determining the number of units for homeless
families that are appropriate at Lowry. However, a majority favored 86 family units which
represents 10% of the existing family units on Lowry. The Executive Committee agreed to 86
family units as the proposed community recommendation to the Air Force.
The community is extremely concerned about the appropriateness of housing homeless individuals
at Lowry. It is concerned in terms of compatibility with existing neighborhoods which surround
the base as well as with the proposed land uses on the base. The community is particularly
concerned about the compound impact of both family and individual homeless housing on the
ability of the community to realize its reuse plan.
However, recognizing that providers of services and housing to homeless individuals may apply
and be approved for facilities at Lowry, the community would strongly encourage the Department "
of Health and Human Sendees and the Air Force Base Conversion Agency to take the following :
community recommendations into account:
1. Dormitory #963 located on Lowry Boulevard south of 6th Avenue: appears to be the only
Suitable location for housing homeless individuals. The dormitory has 87 rooms. The
community strongly recommends that no more that 87 homeless individuals be housed in
this facility (one individual to a room) and that on-site 24 hour social work and counseling
services be provided. Presumably, kitchen or food service would need to be provided as
2. The City of Denver's group home zoning provisions governing supported independent
living facilities would specifically preclude using the nearby buildings 960, 961 and 962
for like use. Denver's ordinance prohibits such facilities from being located within 2,000
feet of each other.
3. Buildings 405 and 406 and the Transient Housing Complex of 40 units near Blue Spruce
Housing should not be awarded for individual McKinney providers. These units are all
proximate to existing housing areas which will already be impacted with McKinney units
for families. 4
4. None of the five large 1,000 man dormitories should be awarded for McKinney use.
While they are likely too large to be economically feasible for such a use, other reasons
compel the community to recommend against this. The community believes that it is ill-
advised to congregate this many individuals in a single facility both from the standpoint of
the community and the social welfare of the individuals. Also, the community believes
these large dormitories are a unique site asset and provide opportunities to enhance the
training and education focus of the reuse plan. These potential uses should not be
compromised.
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5. Finally, the community will oppose any uses which are operated as temporary shelters or
housing for homeless individuals without supportive services. As stated previously, such
supportive counseling and social services should be provided on-site. Homeless
individuals should not be required to travel off the base to receive these supportive
services.
6. If there are approved requests for other facilities not addressed in this plan, the community
requests the opportunity to analyze their suitability.
It is recognized that the McKinney homeless units in applications may be higher than the number
acceptable to residents of surrounding neighborhoods. The McKinney Act is a Federal Law.
Although the Air Force is required to consider the community's Preferred Reuse Plan, Federal
agencies may take actions that do not follow recommendations set forth here.
The responsibility for providing services to the homeless has fallen almost exclusively on the City
and County of Denver, and to a lesser degree, on the City of Aurora. Further, the protection of the
surrounding neighborhoods can only be assured and redevelopment of Lowry will only be
successful if the number of units owned and operated by homeless providers is limited to the
number stated above. The cities oppose the use of Lowry facilities by providers who do not have
an established history of providing homeless services within the jurisdictions of Denver and
Aurora. The Cities of Denver and Aurora should work with approved McKinney providers, the
Denver Regional Council of Governments, the Metro Homeless Families Coalition, and the State
of Colorado to identify strategies for dispersing housing for the homeless throughout the Denver
Metropolitan Area including approved applications for Lowry in excess of 86 family units and 87
rooms for individuals.
Dispersion
In order to maximize the prospects of attracting new development to Lowry; and enhancing
surrounding neighborhoods, transitional housing for homeless families should be dispersed as
much as possible and in a manner that makes it difficult to identify any building as a homeless
project. This pre-supposes the management concept described below. In any event, no existing
housing development should have more than 15% of its units rented by homeless families.
Phasing for Homeless Families
McKinney homeless families accommodated in the existing family housing at Lowry should be
phased in as market rate units are occupied. The development of market rate units at Lowry should
be expedited.
Management
It is recommended that there should be one property management company responsible for
property management of all four of the existing housing developments or one each for Aspen;
Sunset; and Blue Spruce and Columbine. All units in these developments including those owned
by McKinney providers or leased from HHS would be placed under contract with the same
management company jointly chosen by all the owners and the McKinney providers.
The McKinney providers would be responsible for selecting and providing services to their
clientele who would have to participate in and be meeting the goals of a self-sufficiency program.
Elements of such a program would be setting goals, regular contact with a caseworker,
employment or active participation in job training or education, and the provision of services.
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Any units provided to individuals (as distinguished from homeless families) in a residential care
setting should be subject to Denver and Aurora ordinances concerning placement of shelters and
group homes. Any such housing should be in a carefully supervised program by an experienced
provider.
Future Development
Given the uncertainty of future housing demands at Lowry or future needs for housing for the
homeless, flexibility should be maintained to allow McKinney providers to sell off housing
obtained under the McKinney Act and use the proceeds from the sale to serve the homeless
elsewhere on the base or preferably off of Lowry. If this is not prohibited by law, HHS should be
requested to provide for this in their deed restrictions and to seek waivers of any regulatory
requirements that inhibit such future sales.
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6. TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM
Introduction
The purpose of this chapter is to describe the Transportation System envisioned for the Lowry
Reuse Plan. It presents the conclusions and recommendations of the transportation planning
effort, as well as appropriate background information. Considerable' analysis has occurred in the
development of the transportation concepts, which is documented separately.
The Transportation System was developed with a recognition of the need to balance potential
impact of traffic on surrounding neighborhoods with the requirement of creating a system which
will serve the site and foster successful reuse and redevelopment. It is presented in terms of
overall objectives and key findings of the analysis phase, description of the transportation system
elements and policies for implementation. It concludes with a summary of current unresolved
issues which need to addressed in the near future. Following are the specific sections:
Planning Process
Traffic and Transportation Performance Guidelines
Transportation Findings
Transportation Network
Alternative Modes
Street Character
Transportation Demand Management Guidelines
Phasing Considerations
Unresolved Issues
Planning Process
In recognition of the importance of traffic and transportation impacts on the surrounding
neighborhoods, the Executive Committee established the Traffic and Transportation Working
Group (TTWG) early in the planning process to provide community input on traffic and
transportation issues. Specifically, the TTWG served as a sounding board for community
concerns, provided feedback on transportation concepts and guidelines and prepared comments
and recommendations to the Lowry Economic Adjustment Committee (LEAC) and the Executive
Committee in the area of traffic and transportation for Lowry reuse. The conclusions and
recommendations contained within this section have been endorsed by the TTWG.
Traffic and Transportation Performance Guidelines
The Traffic and Transportation Performance Guidelines developed by the TTWG and adopted by
the LEAC and Executive Committee are listed below. They were used as planning objectives and
evaluation criteria in developing the transportation network for the Lowry Reuse Plan.
1. Traffic should be distributed through appropriate land use and reuse planning and
by providing multiple points of access.
2. Balance the provision of improved internal and external mobility and site access
with the need to preserve and enhance surrounding community character. 3
3. Lowry land use and transportation network planning should account for Stapleton
redevelopment and infrastructure changes.
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4. Emphasize non-automobile (bike, pedestrian and public transit travel) to and within
the area.
5. Interim roadway and reuse plans and development phasing should be compatible
with long-term goals and guidelines for Lowry reuse.
6. Reuse and redevelopment should pay their fair share of on-site infrastructure
improvement costs.
7. Potential adverse traffic impacts should be identified and mitigated wherever
possible.
Transportation Findings
Based upon traffic analysis and forecasting conducted through the Environmental Impact Statement
(EIS) process and by the local community, the following key findings influenced the development
of the Transportation Network:
In terms of 2010 regional traffic patterns, increases in traffic are primarily due to
regional growth and not Lowry redevelopment.
The projected land use of the Lowry Reuse Plan will result in approximately 70,000
daily trips to or from the site in the year 2010, compared with 40,000 trips today
(Lowry operating as a restricted-access military facility).
Adjustments to on-site traffic networks will not significantly alter regional traffic
patterns (e.g. IIiff Avenue or Interstate 70). However, they can influence the
distribution of traffic near the Lowry site.
Impedance of through traffic on the site may be required in the early stages of
development, if continuous linkages to existing streets are established. The impact
of through traffic on the site diminishes over time as Lowry redevelops and street
capacity is used by site-generated traffic.
Through trip potential (those trips whose route either through or around Lowry can
be most influenced by configuration of the road network) is much greater in the
north/south direction than in the east/west direction. This means that multiple
avenues of north/south travel should be provided, while east/west avenues are less
important.
There is currently significant and increasing traffic congestion on Monaco Street
and Holly Street near Lowry. Extension of Quebec through the site as a 2-lane
connection would provide some immediate relief to Monaco and Holly. As a 4-lane
connection, Quebec can provide substantial relief to Monaco and Holly, while
providing access to support Lowry redevelopment
Configurations of Quebec Street that create jogs and turns for north/south traffic
were found to create significant traffic operational problems, while generating only
minor reductions in traffic on Quebec north and south of Lowry.
In the year 2010, east-west through trips are a small component of total traffic west
of Lowry. A large proportion of through trips that would use 6th or 8th west of
Lowry travel to or from the Colorado Boulevard health care district or the
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residential neighborhoods west of Lowry. As a result, the total traffic using 6th or
8th is relatively similar for different street network configurations.
However, configurations that create similar continuity and accessibility for both 6th
and 8th Avenues create the best balance between 6th and 8th (most of the
eastbound through traffic using 6th, most of the westbound traffic and traffic to and
from the Health Care District using 8th).
Transportation Network
The Transportation Network is intended to serve on-site reuse and development, establish linkages
to neighboring streets and disperse traffic impacts on the surrounding streets. The network makes
use of existing streets wherever feasible (including upgrading them as required) but also envisions
the construction of new roads in some locations in order to serve the anticipated pattern of reuse
and address specific off-site mobility needs. It is illustrated on the Transportation Network
diagram, which follows. This diagram is conceptual in nature and subject to refinement, as reuse
and redevelopment occur.
Primary and secondary access to the site is provided from all four sides in order to optimize access
while distributing traffic impacts. A central feature of the street system is an internal circulator
loop, consisting of segments of Yosemite Street, Lowry Boulevard, Uinta Street and 7th Avenue.
This feature facilitates on-site circulation (particularly transit), provides impedance to discourage
east/west regional through traffic from travelling through the center of the site and serves to
delineate development areas from the central open space.
The alignment of Yosemite Street illustrated on the diagram is one of several alternative
configurations which were studied. This alignment, particularly relative to the intersection with 6th
Avenue and the relationship to the Education Campus, may be subject to future refinement
The internal street system consists of the following north/south streets: Quebec Street, Syracuse
Street, Uinta Street, Fairmount Street, Yosemite Street and a portion of Lowry Boulevard. Streets
running east/west include: 8th and 7th Avenues, 6th Avenue and the west segment of Lowry
Boulevard.
The scale of these streets ranges from classifications of minor arterials to collectors. They may
have from two to four travel lanes, depending upon the volumes anticipated and other design
criteria. In addition, access points for local and collector streets have been studied and are
indicated. The precise alignment of these streets would depend upon how and when development
occurs. These streets typically have two travel lanes. A more detailed description of the character
of these streets is included in a later section of this chapter.
Alternative Modes
Encouraging the development of alternative modes of transportation is an important feature of the
Lowry Reuse Plan, and reinforces earlier recommendations of the Southeast Quadrant Land Use
and Transportation Study. Specific alternative mode measures related to Lowry include planning
for bus transit to and within the site, developing a workable system of on-street bike lanes and
bikeways and providing for convenient and safe pedestrian movement.
1. Transit
The transit concept for the site is to adapt the existing system of Regional Transportation
District (RTD) bus routes around and through the redeveloped site in order to serve the
proposed land uses as they develop, supported by a central transfer point and shuttle.
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TRANSIT CENTER
REFINEMENTS TO TRANSPORTATION NETWORK
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Initially, the bus transit system would be comprised of realigned RTD routes to serve the
site but eventually it could involve additional routes, such as a potential Yosemite route,
which could be developed to link Lowry with the redeveloping Stapleton site, as well as
points north and south via new street linkages. The proposed transit routes are shown on
the Transit Concept diagram. Please note that this diagram is conceptual in nature and does
not yet have the endorsement of the RTD.
An important feature of the transit concept is the identification of a potential high-visibility
transit center in the central western portion of the Education Campus. This is an ideal
location for a facility which could serve as a transfer point for regional and local bus service
which passes near or through the Lowry site. In addition, the proposed transit center could
serve as an inter-modal transfer point for an on-site shuttle system, which could eventually
serve the Education Campus, Business and Training Center, and possible off-site users
such as the Colorado Boulevard health care district
The transit concept would be reinforced at the individual site scale by well-located bus
stops, convenient pedestrian linkages and other provisions which can encourage the use of
transit to and within the site, thereby reducing the use of single occupancy vehicles. The
features of this approach are presented in greater detail in the Transportation Demand
Management (TDM) Guidelines which are presented later in this section.
2. Bike Lanes, Bikeways and Trails
Because of Lowry's "in-fill" site character and central location, redevelopment presents an
ideal opportunity to establish new bicycle linkages which serve the site as well as
surrounding community. These bicycle facilities are envisioned to include the following:
bike lanes, bikeways and hiker/biker trails. The planned locations of these routes are
illustrated on the Bicycle Routes and Trails Concept diagram.
Bike Lanes are intended for commuting and are planned for 6th Avenue (west), Yosemite
Street, Uinta Street, Syracuse Street, 8th Avenue, 7th Avenue Crossing and residential
collector streets. On these streets, outside vehicular travel lanes in both directions should be
a minimum of 15 feet wide to accommodate bicycles. Where on-street parking is allowed
on these streets, the parking lanes are to be separated by an approximately one foot buffer
between the travel lane and the parking lane. Bike lanes are considered to be part of the
public roadway and would be maintained as part of the street system.
Bikeways are located off-street and are also intended for commuting. They are planned for
Lowry Boulevard and 6th Avenue (east), portions of Quebec Street, Fairmount Street, 11th
Avenue, Dayton Street and 1st Avenue (east and west). Typically, these facilities are to
serve pedestrians separate from bicyclists. They consist of a detached pavement,
approximately 12 feet wide and located on one side of a public street. Depending upon the
availability of land, they may be within the public right-of-way or on adjacent private land.
Maintenance responsibility for bikeways varies with the particular situation.
Hiker/biker trails are primarily recreational in nature and are intended to link with the
surrounding regional open space and trail system. As a result, they are usually located
within an open space area or corridor and are maintained as part of that system.
Hiker/biker trails are planned to run through the Lowry site, in particular the central open
space system, with off-site linkages to the Highline Canal on the south and east, the City of
Aurora bike trail on 6th Avenue (east), and Westerly Creek to the north. These trails are a
minimum of 12 feet wide in order to allow two directions of bicycle traffic as well as
pedestrians.
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TRANSIT ROUTES

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REFINEMENTS TO TRAILS / BIKE ROUTES
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The coordination and linkage of bike and pedestrian trails on the site is key to their
functioning effectively. This will enhance mobility on and near the site while reducing the
use of single occupant vehicles. The phasing of these improvements and creation of a
"backbone" system of bike and pedestrian trails at an early stage should be a primary goal
of on-site transit and park development.
3. Sidewalks
In order to to create a pedestrian-friendly environment at Lowry (hereby reducing reliance
on automobiles and encouraging the use of transit), a comprehensive system of sidewalks
is essential. Fortunately, there is already in place in the existing administrative and campus
areas an extensive system of sidewalks (primarily detached). This system needs to be
upgraded and expanded as reuse and development occurs, with particular attention given to
developing linkages with proposed pedestrian and bicycle trails. Future development of
other portions of the Lowry site must also include sidewalks as a mandatory site feature.
Street Character
The physical design character of existing and proposed streets is key to providing for functional
circulation on the site while at the same time contributing to a physical image of Lowry that is
enduring, high quality and well integrated with the surrounding community. In conjunction with
the open space space system, streets are the primary physical element on the site which structures
the "public realm" and provides the framework for development of the Education Campus,
Business and Training Center, residential areas and other supporting uses on the site. Following
is a summary of core planning and design concepts for street character at Lowry:
1. Provide for the transportation elements and facilities as illustrated in the
Transportation Network, Transit Concept and Bicycle Routes and Trails Concept.
These elements include automobile and transit travel lanes, bike lanes, bikeways,
trails and on-street parking.
2. Develop a "backbone" system of landscaped parkways with landscaped medians,
which reflects the concepts in the Lowry Reuse Plan.
3. Provide for landscape treatments consisting of landscaped edge treatments (referred
to as "tree lawns") with detached sidewalks.
4. Use existing street pavements wherever feasible, particularly in the early phases of
reuse and development
5. Plan for the future upgrading of streets to current Aurora and Denver standards in
terms of pavement width, curb and gutter, sidewalks, lighting, drainage, etc.
6. Delineate sufficient right-of-way to allow for future improvements and meet current
Aurora and Denver standards.
7. Account for special or unique site conditions such as available right-of-way,
existing buildings and improvements, access patterns and adjoining land use.
The following Typical Street Character Sections illustrate in preliminary detail the intended
character for major on-site streets as well as affected streets in the Lowry area. They represent the
integration of the core planning and design concepts described above with the urban design, land
use and transportation concepts for the site.
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Design criteria used in the preparation of the typical sections include the following standards. The
dimensions shown are for planning purposes and are subject to future refinement., including
coordination with current requirements for both cities:
11 foot wide through travel lanes
10 foot wide auxiliary left turn, right turn and bus stop lanes
8 foot wide on-street parking lanes
6 foot wide on-street bicycle lanes
12 foot wide bikeways and trails
8 foot wide sidewalks on major streets
5 foot wide sidewalks on minor streets (unless more width is needed for major
pedestrian flows)
All lane widths exclude the street gutters
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Quebec (Leetsdale to Exposition)
Looking North
&


Typical Section
Existing Conditions Proposed Conditions
30' wide street and 75 min. R.O.W.
2 througli lanes witii left tum lanes at
selected locations.
Drainage ditches on each side.
No sidewalks or curb and gutter.
4 tit rough lanes with center left tum lane.
Attached sidewalk on east side.
Detached sidewalk on west side.
Note: Street is 62' wide with attached
sidewalks and double left tum lanes on
approach to Leetsdale.
Existing Conditions
Typical Section
Proposed Conditions
30' wide street and 60' R.O.W.
2 through lanes with left tum lanes at
selected locations.
Drainage ditches on east side.
No sidewalks or curb and gutter.
Additional right-of-way required near
Alameda for auxiliary lanes.
4 through lanes.
"No left tum" regulations may be
necessary at some locations in future years.
Attached sidewalks on both sides.
Trees in covered tree wells on west side.
18" concrete wall for tree and splash
protection on west side.
New wood barrier fence on west side.
Concrete retaining wall on west side, where
necessary to match backyard elevations.
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Quebec (Alameda to 1st Ave.)
125' R.O.W.
Typical Section
Existing Conditions
Proposed Conditions
* Not applicable
Requires 125' of right-of-way from
Lowry site.
4 through lanes with auxiliary lanes at
major intersections.
Off-street bike path on east side.
Detached sidewalk on west side.
28' wide landscaped median.
Quebec (1st. Ave. to 4th. Ave.)
Looking North
Typical Section
Existing Conditions
66' wide street and 100' wide R.O.W.
2 through lanes with left turn lane.
9' wide attached sidewalk next to Lowry fence.
Proposed Conditions
Requires 10' of additional right-of-way
from Lowry site.
4 through lanes and auxiliary lanes at major
intersections.
Retrofit with landscaped medians.
Detached sidewalk on west side.
12' wide detached sidewalk on east side to
accommodate bikes.
Lowry Reuse Plan Report
HOHIBBC
6-11
November 1993



Quebec (4(h. Ave. to 6tli Ave.)
Typical Section
Existing Conditions
Proposed Conditions
66' street/150' R.O.W with separate
frontage road.
2 through lanes witli left turn lane.
9 attached sidewalk next to Lowry fence.
Requires 15' of additional right-of-way
from Lowry site.
Auxiliary lanes at major intersections.
Retrofit existing street with landscaped median.
Detached sidewalk on west side.
12' wide detached sidewalks on east side to
accommodate bikes.
Quebec (6th Ave. to 12th Ave.)
Looking North
&
Typical Section
Existing Conditions
30' to 40' wide street and 55' to 60' R.O.W.
2 through lanes witli left turn lanes at
some locations.
On-street parking permitted in some areas.
Partial curb and gutter.
Proposed Conditions
Requires 40' to 45' of additional right-of-way
from Lowry site.
4 through lanes with auxiliary lanes at
major intersections.
Parking on west side.
Attached sidewalks on both sides.
Trees in tree wells.
18" concrete wall for tree and splash
protection.
16' wide landscaped median
Custom hardscape design on east side.
Lowry Reuse Plan Report
HOHIBBC
6-12
November 1993


>
1B2' to 190' R.O.W,
Typical Section
Existing Conditions
30' wide street and 60' R.O.W. at
some locations.
On-street parking on one side permitted
in some areas.
2 through lanes with left turn lane.
.Partial curb and gutter.
Proposed Conditions
Requires 122' to 130' additional right-of-way
36' to 44' wide landscaped median.
4 through lanes with auxiliary lanes at
major intersections.
Detached sidewalks with double tree lawn on
both sides.
Syracuse Street.(6lli Ave. to 11th Ave.)
Looking North


0
V
3
*
90' R.O.W,

Existing Conditions
Not applicable
Typical Section
Proposed Conditions
2 through lanes wilh parking and on-
street bike lane on both sides.
Detached sidewalk and treelawn on both
sides
Lowry Reuse Plan Report
HOHIBBC
6-13
November 1993


Uinta (Lowry Blvd. to lltli Ave.)
Looking North
90 R.O.W.
Existing Conditions
Typical Section
Proposed Conditions
4 tiirough lanes with tum lanes.
Reduce to 2 lanes with center left turn
lane utilizing existing lanes on the east
side of die street.
On-street parking both sides.
On-street bike lanes on both sides.
Detached sidewalks and tree lawn both
sides.
Yosemile Street (Lowry Blvd. to 11th Ave.)
Looking North
Existing Conditions
Typical Section
Proposed Conditions
Some existing streets in place.
May use portions of existing streets for proposed
alignment.
4 through lanes with bike lanes both sides.
Auxiliary lanes at major intersections.
24' wide landscaped median.
Detached sidewalks and trcclawn on both sides.
Lowry Reuse Plan Report
HOHIBBC
6-14
November 1993


Fairmount Drive (Alameda to North of Lowry Blvd.)
Looking.North
Typical Section
Existing Conditions Proposed Conditions
Not applicable 2 through lanes with center left tum lane.
Parking and on-slrcct bike lane on both sides.
Detached sidewalk and treclawn both sides.
Enlarge cast sidewalk to 12' wide to allow bikes.
Enhanced border landscaping to create parkway.
Lowry Boulevard (6th Ave. to Quebec)
Looking Southwest
t2o n.o.w.
Typical Section
Existing Conditions
Proposed Conditions
4 through lanes with landscaped
median, attached sidewalks.
4 through lanes with tum lanes.
Auxiliary lanes at major intersections
24' wide landscaped median.
Detached 12'wide sidewalk for bikes and
pedestrians on the north side.
Detached sidewalk on south side and treclawn
both sides.

Lowry Reuse Plan Report
HOHt BBC
6-15
November 1993


Dayton Street (11th Ave. to 1st Ave.)
Looking North
Existing Conditions
2 through lanes with turn lane.
Partial curb and gutter
Typical Section
Proposed Conditions
30' of additional R.OAV. required from Lowry site.
2 through lanes with center left turn lane
Parking on both sides.
Detached 12' wide sidewalk on west side
for pedestrians and bikes. Sidewalk on east
side.
Treclawn on both sides where possible.
1st Avenue (Quebec to Monaco)
Looking West
Typical Section
Existing Conditions
38' wide street, 60' R.O.W.
5' detached sidewalk on north side.
7' attached sidewalk on south side.
2 llirough lanes with center left turn
lane.
Proposed Conditions
2 through lanes with center left turn lane.
Parking and on street bike lanes on both
sides.
Detached sidewalk and trcelawn on both
sides.
35' of additional R.O.W. required from
Lowry.
Widen the south side of road 26'.
Lowry Reuse Plan Report
HO HI BBC
6-16
November 1993


1st Avenue (Havana to Dayton)
Looking West
Existing Conditions
1 lane westbound, 2 lanes cast-
bound.
Partial curb and gutter.
Typical Section
Proposed Conditions
2 through lanes with center left turn lane and
parking on botli sides.
Auxiliary lanes at major intersections.
Detached 12'sidewalk on soutii side for
pedestrians and bikes. Sidewalk on north
side with treelawn on both sides.
Bike lanes on both sides.
6th Avenue (Uinta to Quebec)
Looking West
Typical Section
Existing Conditions Proposed Conditions
4 through lanes with turn lane, attached 2 through lanes with parking, and bike lane on both
sidewalk, curb and gutter. sides.
38' wide landscaped parkway median.
Building setbacks required for new construction.
No driveway access to parkway
Detached sidewalks and treelawn on both sides.
Preserve officer's housing area on south.
> Comply with National Historic Register
Guidelines and Southeast Quadrant study.
Lowry Reuse Plan Report
HOHIBBC
6-17
November 1993


6th Avenue (Dayton to Lowry Blvd.)
Looking West
Typical Section
Existing Conditions
4 through lanes with turn lane, attached
sidewalk, curb and gutter.
Proposed Conditions
4 through lanes with turn lane.
Auxiliary lanes at major intersections.
24wide landscaped median.
Detached 12 wide sidewalk for
pedestrians and bikes on north side.
Detached sidewalk on south side and
trcclawn on both sides.
7th Ave. Open Space Crossing and Transit Connector(Yosemile to Uinta)
Looking West
Existing Conditions
Not applicable
Typical Section
Proposed Conditions
2 through lanes with on-slrcct bike lane on
both sides.
Detached sidewalk and trcclawn on both sides.
November 1993
Lowry Reuse Plan Report
HOHIBBC
6-18


8th Ave. (Quebec to Colorado)
Looking West
Typical Section
Existing .Conditions
2 through lanes except near Colorado and
Hale Pkwy. where there are 3 through
lanes.
Left turn lanes at selected locations.
Sloping curb with narrow sidewalks
in most areas.
Proposed Conditions
2 west bound and 1 east bound through
lanes.
Parking on south side.
Left turn lanes at selected locations
Rebuild curb and gutter to 6" vertical curb
where necessary.
Street trees in tree wells.
18" concrete wall for splash and tree
protection.
8th Avenue (Uinta to Quebec)
Looking West
sj&
e
3*

V-
90 R.O.W.

Typical Section
Existing Conditions Proposed Conditions
Not applicable 2 through lanes with parking and on-
street bike lane on both sides.
Detached sidewalk and trcclawn on both
sides.
Lowry Reuse Plan Report
HOHIBBC
6-19
November 1993


lltli Avenue (Dayton to Quebec)
Looking West
24' I 54' I 12' |
90 R.O.W.
Typical Section
Proposed Conditions
30' of additional R.O.W. required from
Lowry site.
2 through lanes with turn lane.
Parking or auxiliary lanes on both sides.
Detached 12 wide sidewalk on south side
for pedestrians and bikes.
Existing Conditions
2 through lanes with turn lane.
Parking on north side.
Partial curb and gutter.
Existing Conditions
Not applicable
Typical Section
Proposed Conditions
2 through lanes with parking on both sides.
SidewaLk and landscape will vary.
Lowry Reuse Plan Report
HO HI BBC
6-20
November 1993


Transportation Demand Management (TDM) Guidelines
Future Lowry activity center workers and students will be encouraged to use alternatives to single
occupant autos (SOV). Alternative choices will include "ride-sharing" (carpool, vanpool), public
transit (RTD), bike, and walk. To help achieve this, redevelopment will incorporate the following
Transportation Demand Management (TDM) Guidelines:
1. Exceed the 1990 regional average vehicle occupancy for work trips by 15% to
achieve a 1.25 AVO level for Lowry work trips (level in 1959 was 1.24 and has
declined to 1.09).
2. Double Auraria's student transit mode use to achieve a 10% transit travel mode for
future Lowry commuter students.
3. Exceed by 50% the current portion of Southeast Denver subarea home-based work
trips using transit to achieve 10.8% of future Lowry activity center work trips via
public transit.
4. Exceed the Denver Bicycle Master Plan goals for all commuters using bicycles
(employees and students) of 2% by 1995 and 3% by 2000.
TDM Action Plan
A number of actions can be instituted during Lowry reuse to help realize or exceed the reductions
in single occupancy auto use described above.
1. Design redeveloped sites to give preferential parking for registered carpools,
vanpools, bicycles and alternative fuel vehicles.
2. Integrate future pedestrian trails, bikeways, sidewalks and bus stops into
redevelopment plans to provide direct, convenient linkages to on-site parcels as well
as off-site uses and activity centers, such as the Colorado Boulevard Health Care
District and the Stapleton redevelopment.
3. Provide amenities for transit patrons including passenger shelters, benches, and all-
weather, paved waiting areas.
4. Work with the private sector to set up a private, non-profit Transportation
Management Association (TMA) for the Lowry activity center. The TMA would
facilitate "ride-sharing" coordination with DRCOG, fund an on-site shuttle bus
operation, and coordinate matters of transit access, service levels and passenger
amenities with RTD. Membership in the TMA would include representatives of the
Business and Training Center, the Community College alliance, DFAS and other
major employers that may emerge, and, representatives from affected
neighborhoods.
These actions could be administered in joint fashion by the respective land use review entities of
Denver and Aurora.
Lowry Reuse Plan Report
HOH/BBC
6-21
November 1993


Phasing Considerations
Phasing of transportation and street improvements at Lowry will be in response to market demand
as well as the means and timing for disposition of various parcels and other improvements by the
Air Force. As a result, a precise timetable for phasing of transportation improvements has not yet
been established.
However, in acknowledgement of community concerns relative to traffic and other potential
impacts, the following preliminary Phasing Guidelines have been developed. They will be
supplemented and refined as the disposition and management of the Lowry site is better defined:
1. Management of short-term access to Lowry, security and the operation of external
gates must be done in a manner that protects the neighborhoods around and within
Lowry. This is particularly important in the period immediately following the
September 1994 closure date, the commencement of "Caretaker Status" and the
early phase of reuse which follows.
2. The surrounding community must have input into the planning for and
implementation of "Caretaker Status", particularly with respect to security and
traffic issues. A plan for interim controls, phasing and management that addresses
community concerns needs to be in place well before Lowry closes.
3. Construction of Quebec Street through the site and widening of Quebec north of the
site would be done with adequate right-of-way, landscaped medians and
appropriate setbacks. Specifically, widening of Quebec north of 11th Avenue
would require acquisition of additional right-of-way on one or both sides of the
street. Widening of Quebec between Alameda and Leetsdale would not require
significant right-of-way except for approach lanes at the intersection with Alameda.
Initial construction improvements in this segment would include sound fences on
the west, landscaping and sidewalks.
Unresolved Issues
The community recognizes that this Transportation section is primarily long-range in focus and
needs further refinement, particularly relative to interim activities and phasing. However, this
refinement needs to occur in coordination with the Air Force, local community and other parties,
and within the context of decisions that will be made relative to the disposition and management of
the site. Following is a summary of specific transportation-related issues to be addressed in
subsequent activities:
1. Development of a "Caretaker Program" for Lowry which satisfactory addresses
community concerns relative to access to all or portions of Lowry, security, traffic
patterns, and impacts on the surrounding neighborhoods.
2. Development of a satisfactory short-term traffic control and management system
which is responsive to on-site users as well as the surrounding community.
3. Identification of critical "triggers" and "safety valves" for instituting traffic control
measures and transportation improvements (on and off-site) as development occurs
(eg: 6th Avenue, 8th Avenue, Quebec Street and Yosemite Street). 4
4. When the 6th Avenue gate is opened to unrestricted traffic, the interruption of 6th
Avenue between Uinta Street and Yosemite Street must have occurred. The Denver
Comprehensive Plan (as amended) calls for specific improvements on 6th Avenue
Lowry Reuse Plan Report
HOH/BBC
6-22
November 1993


to be in place when the 6th Avenue (west) gate is opened. The implementation of
the traffic network on and through Lowry in a timely fashion is desired by both
Denver and Aurora to assist in the redevelopment of the base. The timing of making
the improvements on 6th and 8th Avenues shall be a priority and will be addressed
in the next phase of the Lowry redevelopment process.
5. Assessment of the impact of Lowry-related capacity improvements on the
conformance of the Denver Regional Transportation Plan to federally-mandated air
quality requirements. (This needs to be addressed as part of DRCOG 2020
Transportation analysis, which is occurring during the next 18 months).
6. Coordination of the proposed Lowry transportation system with the on-going
planning for Stapleton redevelopment.
7. Monitoring of actual traffic volumes on and around Lowry compared to forecasted
traffic volumes, followed by the appropriate evaluation and revision to the traffic
and transportation programs and plans.
8. Identification of appropriate mitigation measures for traffic impacts related to Lowry
reuse and redevelopment.
Lowry Reuse Plan Report
HO H!BBC
6-23
November 1993


RECOMMENDED LOWRY
DISPOSITION PLAN
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Lowry Air Force Base, Colorado
November 1993


RECOMMENDED LOWRY DISPOSITION PLAN
Lowry Economic Recovery Project
Lowry Air Force Base, Colorado


RECOMMENDED LOWRY DISPOSITION PLAN
INTRODUCTION
The purpose of this document is to present to the Air Force the communitys
recommendations for disposition of the 1,866-acre Lowry Air Force Base property. It reflects the
work of Denver and Aurora elected officials, city staff, concerned citizens, Lowry Economic
Recovery Project (LERP) staff, the Lowry military and civilian community, and technical advisors.
Through a variety of forums, these participants have refined the community's concepts and visions
for reuse of the site to better reflect market and economic conditions, requirements for public
services and facilities and community concerns about development impacts.
This Recommended Lowry Disposition Plan is a companion document to the Lowrv Reuse
Plan, which is presented separately. Both documents represent refinements to the community's
Preferred Reuse Plan, which was presented to the Air Force in April, 1993.
This Disposition Plan first summarizes the community's objectives for Lowry's
redevelopment and the thinking behind the proposed disposition. It then presents the recommended
disposition on a parcel-by-parcel basis and discusses conveyance conditions related to the utility
and street systems and other matters.
The November, 1993 Lowrv Reuse Plan presents a more detailed discussion of the
community's vision for reuse of the base. It includes a market and economic overview and
chapters on land use, urban design, housing and transportation.
REUSE AND REDEVELOPMENT APPROACH
The Lowrv Reuse Plan reflects the community's desire for a balance of reuse activities and
development and the importance of the surrounding neighborhood and community context.
Activities and land use allocations have also been developed with consideration to public services
requirements and environmental concerns (primarily traffic and transportation). The map and chart
which follow (Exhibits 1 and 2) depict and summarize the program of uses proposed in the Lowry
Reuse Plan.
The Denver and Aurora communities have two primary objectives in redeveloping the
Lowry site. First, they wish to replace jobs lost through base closure, and second, they wish to
extend their community of residential neighborhoods and supporting uses and facilities onto
Lowry.
The primary focus of economic recovery for the community that affects base re-use is the
encouragement of occupational training, technical training, and educational activities, which
maximize the value of Lowry's existing facilities. While non-residential areas will likely include
general business and corporate uses, the training theme is seen as dominating non-residential
development on the site. The Education Campus proposed for the northeast quadrant of the site
and the Business and Training Center in the central western area will both serve as intermediate and
long-term economic generators.
Redevelopment goals for Lowry also include the development of true neighborhoods,
which are intended to include residential development with appropriately-scaled supporting uses,
such as parks and retail. Planned residential areas approach one-third of the total site and a variety
of densities and types of homes is envisioned for these areas. The existing housing on the site is
HOHIBBC
Recommended Lowry Disposition Plan
1
November 1993


configured to provide a sense of community and new residential development is expected to
expand and enhance this theme.
The Lowry Economic Recovery Project (LERP) acknowledges the requirements of the
federal McKinney Act and has worked with homeless housing providers, neighborhood groups,
citizen representatives, and real estate and development professionals to develop housing
recommendations.
Based upon input from these groups, the LERP Executive Committee recommends that the -
Air Force grant no more than 86 family housing units and no more than 87 rooms to homeless -
providers under the McKinney Act, with the conditions outlined below and in the Housing chapter
of the Lowry Reuse Plan. This recommendation acknowledges concerns about negative impacts of
homeless housing on neighborhoods near Lowry, and is a balanced approach which meets the
need for homeless housing and preserves the economic viability of market rate development of the
site.
The community recommends that family housing or individual rooms be leased or deeded
under the McKinney Act only to providers of supportive housing programs, with self-sufficiency
goals. Further, the community recommends that McKinney housing for families should be
dispersed in existing housing areas so that McKinney units are no more than 15% of the family
housing units in any one housing area (Aspen Terrace, Sunset Village, Blue Spruce/Columbine).
McKinney housing for individuals should be located toward the interior of the Lowry site, as
defined in this document. McKinney units for families should be phased in as market-rate units are -
occupied, and. a single property management organization should manage all family units,; -
including McKinney units, in existing housing areas on site. The cities oppose the use of Lowry
facilities by providers who do not have an established history of providing homeless services' *
within the jurisdictions of Denver and Aurora:
Significant parcels of land at Lowry already serve as regional flood control facilities. The
community sees the location of this present use as an opportunity to create regional city and
neighborhood parks that will tie the site together through urban design features and link the site '
with off-base open spaces, parks and trail systems. Assuming they are well maintained, these
open space areas can enhance the value of other on-site development
Recommended Lowry Disposition Plan
2
HOHIBBC
November 1993


p tito
Exhibit 1: LOWRY REUSE PLAN
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Recommended Lowry Disposition Plan
3
HO H! BBC
November 1993
>*'**>*01!


Exhibit 2: LAND USE PROGRAM
Land Use Area Description Acreage Allocations Parcels
Education Campus Advanced and application- oriented training and employ- ment emphasis; primarily using existing facilities with potential for new development. 204 acres A, B, C
Business Training Center Corporate office, training and research uses; primarily using existing buildings with potential for new development; incorporates some federal users. 196 acres D, E, F, EE, FF, GG, CA-2
Residential Neighborhood/community development emphasis; average density of 4.5 dwelling units per gross acre for new development; reuse of most existing housing with new development on vacant or underutilized land. 485 acres G, H, I, J, K, L, M, N, 0, p,n
Parks, Regional Open Space, Active Recreation Multiple types of active and passive recreation to meet local and regional open space and recreation needs. 238 acres T, u, V, w, X, Y, DD
Golf/Residential Public golf course and adjacent residential development. 360 acres Q
Flood Control Existing regional flood control facilities need to be retained. 201 acres Z, AA
Recommended Lowry Disposition Plan HO HIBBC November 1993
4


Exhibit 2: LAND USE PROGRAM (Cont'd)
Land Use Area Description Acreage Allocations Parcel
Community Services Local neighborhood-serving emphasis; low density development; incorporates some federal use; use of existing facilities with potential for new development. 11 acres S, HH
Mixed Use Local neighborhood-serving emphasis; mix of education campus, residential or community services uses; low density development; use of existing facilities with potential for new development. 32 acres R, CC
Regional Open Space/Golf Currently an environ- mental clean-up site; potential open space or golf course use when fully remediated. 61 acres BB
DFAS/ARPC Current uses in existing facilities. 78 acres CA-1
Total 1,866 acres
Recommended Lowry Disposition Plan
5
HOHIBBC
November 1993


COMMUNITY IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY
The communities of Denver and Aurora have determined that the best way to assure
successful redevelopment of the Lowry site is to set up a local organization (Local Entity) that
would work with the Air Force in property disposition. It is anticipated that the Local Entity would
have representation from and accountability to both cities; however, final form and membership of
this entity is in the process of being determined.
This Recommended Lowrv Disposition Plan assumes that the Air Force would enter into a
partnership with the Local Entity whereby the Air Force would assume a share of the financial risk
of redevelopment but also share in the proceeds or profits to be gained when the community's
reuse plan is realized (similar to the Department of the Navy's partnership with the City of Tustin,
The partnership arrangement envisions that the Air Force would dispose of some parts of
the base immediately through the normal processes of federal transfer and public benefit transfer.
For the remainder of the base, the community (represented by the Local Entity) and the Air Force
would agree on a plan for disposing of the remaining parcels by releasing them when the market is
ready, through the Local Entity. This disposition approach is illustrated in the following diagram.
California).
Exhibit 3: DISPOSITION PROCESS
Air Force Owns property
Maintains property
Transfers parcels to Local Entity
(when market is ready)
Local
Markets property (finds buyer/lessee)
Coordinates redevelopment
Coordinates infrastructure improvements
Acquires parcels from Air Force
Passes parcels through to buyer/lessee
Market
(Buyer or Lessee)
Purchases/leases parcels from Local Entity
Develops/uses parcels and facilities
Recommended Lowry Disposition Plan
6
HOHIBBC
November 1993


Under the Air Force/Local Entity partnership approach, the Local Entity would facilitate the
achievement of an integrated redevelopment plan and be responsible for the following:
1. Aggressively marketing the pre-planned land parcels to take maximum advantage of
current and future market conditions.
2. Facilitating the sale of parcels through efforts in the areas of city zoning and local
development processes.
3. Approving and monitoring short-term or interim use of existing facilities consistent
with the Reuse Plan. It is anticipated that any net proceeds from these leases would be
applied to redevelopment costs, which include marketing and infrastructure
improvements. Both the Air Force and the community would benefit from the sale of
property with infrastructure improvements in place or readily available.
4. Coordinating the development of infrastructure to allow for timed, cost-effective
redevelopment.
It is assumed that the Air Force would continue to be responsible for the caretaking of
undisposed parcels and facilities. The responsibility might be met by contract with the cities or
with another contractor.
The Air Force/Local Entity partnership will enable the release of property to the private
market in a manner that ensures quality development and does not saturate the market (which could
depress the value of the property). While the Denver real estate market has improved and the-
outlook is good, at present, many comparable off-site non-residential properties are still selling at
well below replacement cost
The local community believes that the ultimate value of the property will be maximized for
the Air Force under the Air Force/Local Entity partnership approach. The Air Force stands to gain
more by temporarily holding development parcels (in order to allow for their phased release to a
more competitive market) than by attempting to dispose of the property immediately. This
approach also assumes that the Local Entity would package and market the parcels in a manner that
enhances their marketability and value while meeting the reuse and economic development
objectives for the site.
While it is the community's recommendation to sell existing housing to the market through
the Local Entity/Air Force partnership, it is anticipated that the housing could be leased for a period
of time from the Air Force through a Protection and Maintenance Agreement (under 10 U.S. Code
2667) or pursuant to provisions of the Pryor Amendment. This would allow for civilian
occupancy of the units prior to and after base closure and would generate interim rents and lease
revenues which could be applied to the costs of maintenance and property improvements.
The implementation strategy described above assumes the passage of the Pryor
Amendment, which among other things, provides a mechanism for the Air Force to convey
property at low or no-cost to the local community.
In summary, the community recommends the Air Force transfer title of selected parcels to
the Local Entity i at no cost, for disposition by the Local Entity to the market. The community also
proposes that this pass-through occur in a phased manner and that the Air Force participate in a
revenue-sharing arrangement with the Local Entity, after coverage of the site improvement costs.
Recommended Lowry Disposition Plan HO HI BBC November 1993
1


The community assumes that Caretaker revenues will be contributed by the Air Force for the
overall site maintenance of parcels until such time as property title transfer is completed.
"CONVEYANCE CONDITIONS
The Parcelization Plan (Exhibit 5) and Disposition Plan (Exhibit 6) delineate specific
parcels with the understanding that rights-of-way and easements for public streets or utilities will
be established as part of the disposition process. Specific right-of-way requirements anticipated
for individual streets on-base and bordering the base are documented in the Transportation chapter
of the Lowrv Reuse Plan. Rights-of-way or easements for utilities, whichever is required, are
also assumed to be established through the disposition process.
The cities believe that the timing of conveyance of right-of-way and easements may vary
from parcel to parcel, depending upon the requirements for access, condition of improvements
within the right-of-way and demand for specific parcels. In the meantime, arrangements need to be
made which will assure that access is provided to interim users and for the servicing of streets and
utilities.
The community recommends that all property transfers, including public benefit
conveyances, include a provision for conveying property at no cost to the appropriate local
jurisdictions, including utilities, streets and their associated rights-of-way and easements. The
community also recommends that long-term infrastructure, property maintenance and land use
covenants (including cost allocation provisions), be negotiated between the Local Entity and/or
local jurisdiction and public benefit and federal users.
Residential development will be subject to land dedication requirements for public schools
and parks. Under Colorado State law, a "good and sufficient" plat is required to convey property.
Preparation of plats is normally the responsibility of the seller.
Following is a Disposition Summary (Exhibit 4) which groups parcels by disposition
method, a Parcelization Plan (Exhibit 5) and a Disposition Plan (Exhibit 6) which graphically
depict tiie disposition parcels. The section after these exhibits discusses each of the parcels
individually and in greater detail.
Recommended Lowry Disposition Plan
8
HO H!BBC
November 1993


Exhibit 4: DISPOSITION SUMMARY
Disposition to federal agencies Parcels F, G, S, GG, FF; (total of 35 acres)
Cantonment Areas (remain federal property) Parcels CA-1 and CA-2; (total of 85 acres)
Disposition to McKinney providers for the homeless Portions of Parcels I, J, K (86 units for families in supportive programs); Building 963 on Parcel R (87 rooms for individuals in supportive programs)
Disposition via Public Benefit Conveyance through:
Department of Education - Parcels A, DD; (total of 175 acres)
Department of Health and Human Services Parcel C, EE, HH;. (total of 16 acres)
Department of Interior Parcels E, T, U, V, W, X, CC, H; (total of 204 acres)
Disposition to Local Entity Parcels B, D, H, I, J, K, L, M, N, 0, P, Q, R, Y; (total of 1,088 acres)
Parcels held by the Air Force until recipient identified Parcels Z, AA, BB; (total of 263 acres)
Total 1,866 acres
Recommended Lowry Disposition Plan
9
HOHIBBC
November 1993


Exhibit 5: PARCELIZATION PLAN
;; i. ;-r n -v

Recommended Lowry Disposition Plan
HOHIBBC
10
November 1993


Exhibit 6: DISPOSITION PLAN
>
0
DISPOSITION VIA
AIR FORCE PARTNERSHIP
RETAINED BY AIR FORCE
Recommended Lowry Disposition Plan HOHIBBC November 1993
11


PARCEL DISPOSITION RECOMMENDATIONS
The following parcel disposition recommendations represent the community's preferred
disposition. The letter designations correspond to the those shown on the Parcelization Plan
(Exhibit 5). In addition to the recommendations described below, the community has
recommended against any reuse with a detention or secured treatment component. In cases where
the community recommends that the Air Force hold the property in its partnership with the Local
Entity, the community intends that the Local Entity will facilitate disposition to the market at as
early a date as possible. If any of the Public Benefit Conveyances (PBC) fail to materialize, the
community recommends that the Air Force temporarily hold the subject property in its partnership
with the Local Entity.
Cantonment Areas
Two areas shown on the Parcelization Plan are Cantonment Areas (not a part of Lowry Air
Force Base closure) and are designated CA-1 and CA-2. The first of these, CA-1, is comprised of
78 acres and is the site of the Defense Finance and Accounting and Service (DFAS) and the Air
Reserve Personnel Center (ARPC), which are anticipated to remain at Lowry after the base closes.
The second parcel, CA-2, is comprised of 7 acres and is occupied by the 21st Space Command
Squadron, which is also anticipated to remain at Lowry.
Potential Amendments to the Recommended Disposition Plan
The community anticipates that there will be a need to supplement and amend this:
Recommended Lowrv Disposition Plan after submittal to the Air Force in November 1993, as
reuse requests are refined and McKinney applications are received and evaluated by the Air Force.
. New reuse requests may also emerge, some as a result of the Air Force Base.Conversion Agency's
recent: screening for federal uses. The community, will want to evaluate and make
recommendations regarding these new requests.
In addition, the community would expect to be involved in discussions with the Air Force during
its development of disposition recommendations, particularly with respect to McKinney Housing
for the Homeless. Following is a summary of requests which may be addressed through
amendments to this Disposition Plan:
The University of Colorado Health Sciences Center has expressed interest in facilities
on-base, and the community continues to work with them regarding their request.
The Asian-Pacific Development Center has expressed interest in public benefit transfer
of 20 acres on-base for health care and senior housing, and the community endorses
this request, subject to finding a mutually acceptable location.
Others, to be determined.
Parcel A: 167 acres
Description. Parcel A is the northeast (excluding the northeast park) quadrant of the
site. This area contains classrooms, dormitories, administrative facilities and other facilities
suitable for training and related uses.
HOH/BBC
Recommended Lowry Disposition Plan
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November 1993


Proposed Use. The community recommends that this parcel be developed as an
Education Campus. It is sought by the State of Colorado Community College and Occupational
Education System (CCCOES) for use of the facilities and property as an education and training
center. A alliance of local education entities, lead by the Community College of Aurora and
including the Community College of Denver, the University of Colorado at Denver, Metropolitan
State College, the University of Northern Colorado and other education providers, intends to
provide education and training programs in the Education Campus.
Recommended Disposition. The community recommends that Parcel A be transferred
from the Air Force via public benefit conveyance through the Department of Education to CCCOES
for use by the alliance of education providers. The community college system has proposed a
cooperative use of facilities and other resources for a variety of education and training opportunities
for technical training, occupational, undergraduate and graduate students.
The community supports this alliance and sees the proposed use as a critical component of
the communitys economic development and economic recovery efforts.
Parcel B: 29 acres
Description. Parcel B is in the north central portion of the site and west of Parcel A. It
includes Buildings 771, 773,775,769,777 and 779.
Proposed Use. There is not currently a reuse request for this parcel, although there are
a variety of activities which could occur on the parcel which could reinforce the Education Campus
theme in the area
Recommended Disposition. The community recommends that Parcel D be held
temporarily by the Air Force in partnership with the Local Entity. The community will continue to
seek users or buyers for this parcel which are consistent with economic development and reuse
objectives for Lowry.
Parcel C: 9 acres
Description. Parcel C is currently the site of the Base Commissary (Building 640) and
includes a portion of the parking area for this building.
Proposed Use. The Belle Bonfils Memorial Blood Center non-profit organization has
requested the facility on Parcel C for education, research and blood product distribution.
Recommended Disposition. The community recommends that Parcel C be transferred
from the Air Force via public benefit conveyance through the Department of Health and Human
Services to the Belle Bonfils Memorial Blood Center for their use of the property as a blood bank
and research center.
This disposition contributes to achievement of the community's economic development and
reuse objectives and is supported by the community.
Parcel D: 158 acres
Description. Parcel D includes the core of the site that has been designated for the
Business and Training Center (BTC). This parcel includes a variety of buildings which are
suitable for this use, including the Headquarters Building (Building 349), Visiting Officers
HOH/BBC
Recommended Lowry Disposition Plan
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November 1993


Quarters (Building 397 VOQ), Officers' Club (Building 24), and multiple administrative and
classroom buildings.
In addition, there are several requests for facilities within the area of the BTC which the
community supports, including facilities for DFAS (Buildings 402, 408, 404 and 385), the
Department of Energy (Building 1433) and the large hangar (Building 401, for use as a museum).
In addition, the 21st Space Command Squadron is planning to remain in its current facility
(Building 1432). These uses have been delineated on the Parcehzation Plan as separate parcels (E,
F, FF, GG and CA-2).
Proposed Use. The community recommends.that this parcel be developed as a Business
and Training Center. Throughout the plan refinement process, this area has been conceived as the
portion of the site where business offices, research and training-related uses, support accessory
uses and residential uses might occur. Development could include reuse of existing buildings as
well as new construction.
Recommended Disposition. The community recommends that Parcel D be held
temporarily by the Air Force in its partnership with the Local Entity. While it is anticipated that
private businesses will be interested in this area, marketing has not occurred and no tenants have
yet been identified. In addition, recommendations from developers and local community leaders
are to allow the facilities in Parcel D to respond to the requirements of tenants in the other portions
of the Lowry site. For example, the VOQ and Officers' Club facilities could be shared by multiple
users for lodging and conferences.
This use is fundamental to achieving the community's economic development and reuse
objectives, particularly in terms of creating new jobs and enhancing the overall value of the Lowry
site. It is strongly supported by the community.
Parcel E: 7 acres
Description. Parcel E includes an historic hangar (Building 401).
Proposed Use. The community would like to have the existing hangar reused by the
Lowry Heritage Museum.
Recommended Disposition. The community recommends that Parcel E be transferred
via public benefit conveyance from the Department of die Interior to the City and County of Denver
for use by the Lowry Heritage Museum. The museum use will provide an immediate attraction and
generate activity for this portion of the site, provide general economic benefit to the community
through tourism and help to communicate the history of Lowry to the public.
Parcel F: 10 acres
Description. Parcel F includes an historic hangar (Building 402) and Building 408.
Proposed Use. The Defense Finance Accounting Services (DFAS) has requested use of
these facilities for storage and office uses.
Recommended Disposition. The community recommends that Parcel F be retained by
DoD for use by DFAS.
HOH/BBC
Recommended Lowry Disposition Plan
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November 1993


This will provide for additional space for DFAS, which is the key anchor user in the
southwest quadrant of Lowry. This use is consistent with the Business and Training Center theme.
and is supported by the community.
Parcel G: 7 acres
Description. Parcel G is currently used as a parking lot.
Proposed Use. The Defense Finance Accounting Services (DFAS) has requested use of
this parking lot.
Recommended Disposition. The community recommends that Parcel G be retained by
DoD for use by DFAS, which is the key anchor user in the southwest quadrant of Lowry. If
DFAS determines that it does not have a need for this additional parking, the community
recommends that Parcel G be held temporarily by the Air Force in its partnership with the Local
Entity.
Parcel H: 18 acres
Description. Parcel H contains the existing Officers Housing southeast of the
intersection of 6th Avenue and Quebec Street.
Proposed Use. The community recommends continued residential use in this parcel. It
believes that existing housing should remain intact and that selective infill development could yield
additional high-end single family homes.
Recommended Disposition. The community recommends that Parcel H be held
temporarily by the Air Force in partnership with the Local Entity. With its existing stock of high
quality duplexes and surrounding landscaping, Parcel H is anticipated to be in high demand for
early re-sale to the private sector and could bring early, high quality redevelopment activity to the
site.
Parcel I: 36 acres
Description. Parcel I includes the family housing areas known as Blue. Spruce
Meadows and Columbine Park, located east of Quebec Street The Blue Spruce area contains over
200 units of mostly three bedroom units, with some two and four bedroom units. Columbine Park
is comprised of 56 three bedroom units.
Proposed Use. The community recommends that this parcel be developed in residential
use. The north and west portions of the base are surrounded by off-site residential development,
with some supporting commercial. The communitys recommended land use for this area is
residential. The existing housing on this parcel is in good condition and is recommended to be
maintained.
It is anticipated that organizations providing housing for homeless families will be
requesting some of these units under the McKinney Act. The community recommends that
McKinney units for families be dispersed within Parcel I, and among the existing housing areas in
Parcels I, J and K. No more than 15 percent (41 units) of the family housing on Parcel I should be
used to comply with the McKinney Act (and no more than a total of 86 units on the entire Lowry
site). In addition, the community recommends that McKinney units should be phased-in as
HOHIBBC
Recommended Lowry Disposition Plan
15
November 1993


market-rate units are occupied, and that all units on the parcel be managed by a single property
management organization.
Recommended Disposition. The community recommends that Parcel I be temporarily
held by the Air Force in partnership with the Local Entity, in anticipation of ultimate disposition by
the Local Entity to the local private market. Refer to recommendations for McKinney Housing
dispersal that are described in the paragraph above.
It is anticipated that the existing housing would be leased from the Air Force under a
Protection and Maintenance Agreement (under 10 U.S. Code 2667) or other lease arrangement and
that interim rents and lease revenues would be applied to the costs of maintenance and property
improvements. When it is' determined that the most favorable selling environment exists, the parcel
would be sold through the Local Entity to the market with proceeds conveyed to the Air Force-
Local Entity partnership.
Parcel J: 38 acres
Description. Parcel J includes the Sunset Village housing area northwest of Quebec
Street and 1st Avenue. This mixed family and dormitory housing area is in an off-base compound
that extends into the Mayfair Park neighborhood. It includes 28 acres of attached single unit
homes (264 units) and 10 acres of dormitories.
Proposed Use. The community recommends that this parcel remain in residential use.
Sunset Village is a unique area at Lowry in that it is already off-base and borders an existing
residential neighborhood. The existing family housing is in good condition and should be
maintained and improved in the short term. The dormitory buildings limit the sites attractiveness
and marketability. It is envisioned that the dormitory buildings would be demolished and replaced
with a park and/or additional housing of a lower density.
It is anticipated that organizations providing housing for homeless families will be
requesting some of these units under the McKinney Act. The community recommends that
McKinney units for families be dispersed within Parcel J, and among the existing housing areas in
Parcels I, J and K. No more than 15 percent (40 units) of the family housing on Parcel J should
be used to comply with the McKinney Act (and no more than a total of 86 units on the entire
Lowry site). In addition, the community recommends that McKinney units should be phased-in
as market-rate units are occupied, and that all units on the parcel be managed by a single property
management organization.
Recommended Disposition. The community recommends that Parcel J be temporarily
held by the Air Force in partnership with the Local Entity, in anticipation of ultimate disposition by
the Local Entity to the local private market. Refer to recommendations for McKinney Housing
dispersal that are described in the paragraph above.
It is anticipated that the existing housing would be leased from the Air Force under a
Protection and Maintenance Agreement (under 10 U.S. Code 2667) or other lease arrangement
and that interim rents and lease revenues would be applied to the costs of maintenance and property
improvements. When it is determined that the most favorable selling environment exists, the parcel
would be sold through the Local Entity to the market with proceeds conveyed to the Air Force-
Local Entity partnership.
Parcel K: 75 acres
HO HI BBC
Recommended Lowry Disposition Plan
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November 1993


Description. Parcel K is the existing residential development known as Aspen Terrace.
It is in the southwest portion of the site and is bounded by Alameda Avenue to the south, an
undeveloped Parcel N to the west, by Archer Street to the north and by undeveloped land to the
east, near the existing Alameda Gate. The parcel is to be bisected by the proposed extension of
Quebec Street through Lowry. The area includes approximately 300 units of attached single family
dwellings, in duplexes and stacked flat fourplexes.
Proposed Use. The community recommends that this parcel continue in residential use.
There has been significant community interest in these units, by developers, property managers
and McKinney providers. Most of the existing housing is in good condition and should be
maintained and improved in the short term. A small number of these homes would need to be
demolished to make way for the proposed roadway extension of Quebec.
It is anticipated that organizations providing housing for homeless families will be
requesting some of these units under the McKinney Act. The community recommends that
McKinney units for families be dispersed within Parcel K, and among the existing housing areas in
Parcels I, J and K. No more than 15 percent (45 units) of the family housing on Parcel K should
be used to comply with the McKinney Act (and no more than a total of 86 units on the entire
Lowry site). In addition, the community recommends that McKinney units should be phased-in
as market-rate units are occupied, and that all units on the parcel be managed by a single property
management organization.
Recommended Disposition. The community recommends that Parcel K be
temporarily held by the Air Force in partnership with the Local Entity, in anticipation of ultimate
disposition by the Local Entity to the local private market. Refer to recommendations for
McKinney Housing dispersal that are described in the paragraph above.
It is anticipated that the existing housing would be leased from the Air Force under a
Protection and Maintenance Agreement (under 10 U.S. Code 2667) or other lease arrangement and
that interim rents and lease revenues would be applied to the costs of maintenance and property
improvements. When it is determined that the most favorable selling environment exists, the parcel
would be sold through the Local Entity to the market with proceeds conveyed to the Air Force-
Local Entity partnership.
Infrastructure, open space and other improvements may increase the value of the site and
surrounding property if this work is completed prior to release of the property to the market.
Parcel L: 138 acres
Description. Parcel L includes most of the northwest quadrant, bordered on the north
by 11th Avenue, on the east by the northern flood control area, on the south by 6th Avenue and on
the west by the Blue Spruce and Columbine Park family housing areas. The parcel includes a
mobile home park (to be demolished), transient quarters, ball fields, NCO Club (Building 600),
child day care center (Building 670), credit union and several commercial businesses. The general
area also includes the Base Exchange (Building 667), which is delineated separately (Parcel S).
Proposed Use. Parcel L is recommended for new residential neighborhood
development. The community recommends that the day care center remain (with an operator who
would offer services to all site residents and tenants) and that other structures would be reused or
phased out as redevelopment occurs. The community also recommends against the reuse of the
transient quarters within this parcel by McKinney homeless providers. The buildings, however,
might be reused at another location on or off-site.
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Recommended Lowry Disposition Plan
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November 1993


Recommended Disposition. The community recommends that Parcel L be held
temporarily by the Air Force in partnership with the Local Entity until such time as the
improvements, market conditions, and adjacent site development are determined to offer the most
favorable selling environment.
Parcel M: 13 acres
Definition. Parcel M extends along the south side of 6th Avenue between a proposed
park (Parcel T) and Uinta Street
Proposed Use. The community recommends residential development in this parcel,
reflecting the character of 6th Avenue to the west and the existing officer's housing in Parcel J.
The character envisioned includes a landscaped 6th Avenue parkway and larger lots and homes.
Recommended Disposition. The community recommends that Parcel M be held
temporarily by the Air Force in partnership with the Local Entity. The planned improvements and
landscaping will greatly enhance the value of this parcel and the western portion of the Lowry site.
If marketed properly, Parcel M could bring early, high quality redevelopment activity to the site.
Parcel N: 25 acres
Definition. Parcel N is the area west of Aspen Terrace in the southwest comer of the
site. The parcel is presently undeveloped.
Proposed Use. The community recommends residential uses for Parcel N. Off-site
development is primarily residential, with a mix of densities and building types.
Recommended Disposition. There has been private market interest in the area
designated as Parcel N. The community recommends that Parcel N be held temporarily by the Air
Force in partnership with the Local Entity. It is anticipated that this could be among the earliest
parcels sold.
Parcel O: 65 acres
Description. Parcel O is the area north and east of Aspen Terrace, west of the southern
flood control area. The parcel presently includes a complex of pre-fabricated dormitories
(Buildings 410 420), parking lots, streets and abandoned runways. These improvements are
recommended to be removed or demolished.
Proposed Use. The community recommends residential use for Parcel O, at a variety of
densities.
Recommended Disposition. The community recommends that Parcel O be held
temporarily by the Air Force in partnership with the Local Entity until site improvements, market
conditions, and adjacent site development are determined to offer the most favorable selling
environment. Timely coordination of infrastructure and the careful planning of adjacent parcels
could enhance the value of this and adjacent parcels.
Parcel P: 70 acres
HOHIBBC
Recommended Lowry Disposition Plan
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November 1993


Description. Parcel P is the area west and south of the southern flood control facility
(Parcel AA). The parcel is currently undeveloped, although a portion of it is being used for
environmental remediation activities.
Proposed Use. The community recommends residential uses as most appropriate for
Parcel P. The adjacent regional open space and open space corridor planned along Fairmount
Drive are significant amenities which will increase the value of the site, and offer opportunities to
develop a variety of residential products.
Recommended Disposition. The community recommends that Parcel P be held
temporarily by the Air Force in partnership with the Local Entity. Timely coordination of
infrastructure, conclusion of environmental remediation activities, and careful planning of adjacent
parcels could enhance the value of this parcel.
Parcel Q: 360 acres
Description. Parcel Q includes the existing golf course and adjacent area to the north.
Aside from the existing golf course, this area is largely undeveloped.
Proposed Use. At the present time, the cities of Denver and Aurora are involved in
negotiations with the Air Force for a two to three year lease for operation of the existing golf
course as a public course. Over the longer term, the two cities recommend that the existing 18-hole
golf course be re-configured to include the northern portion of Parcel Q, and possibly expanded to -
Parcel BB..
This proposed re-configuration would result in the creation of high-value development
areas adjacent to the fairways which are suitablefor high-end homes. Not only would this enable v
the community to improve the existing, golf facility,, but it would allow the proposed Air.
Force/Local Entity partnership to maximize value in this area and accelerate development in the r
entire southeastern quadrant of the site.
Recommended Disposition. The community recommends that Parcel Q be held by the
Air Force in its partnership with the Local Entity, in order to maximize the ultimate value of the
parcel and the entire Lowry site. During this time the course could be operated under an interim
lease by Denver and Aurora, and it is anticipated that the Local Entity would actively seek a
developer for the golf course/residential project (a product of great demand in metro Denver) which
would provide for continued operation of the golf course, as a facility open to the general public.
Once a developer has been identified, Parcel Q could be transferred to the Local Entity for
disposition to the developer.
Parcel R: 30 acres
Description. Parcel R is south of Lowry Boulevard and the Education Campus in the
northeast quadrant, at the intersection of Lowry Boulevard and the proposed realignment of
Yosemite Street. The site includes dormitories and a day care facility.
Proposed Use. Parcel R is designated for residential, community services uses, and/or
Education Campus uses. Due to the central location of this parcel, it is designated for land uses
that allow a maximum amount of flexibility so that the development that occurs can respond to
market and site-driven needs. It is anticipated that small neighborhood-serving retail services and
possibly some townhouse, apartment or other multi-family development might occur at this site.
HO HI BBC
Recommended Lowry Disposition Plan
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November 1993


McKinney housing for individuals in supportive programs might also be accommodated in Parcel
R.
If Education Campus needs exceed the property capacity in the northeast quadrant, some of this
parcel may be absorbed for training or related uses.
Recommended Disposition. The community recommends that Parcel R be held
temporarily by the Air Force in its partnership with the Local Entity. This will enable the Local
Entity to remain flexible with the development of this parcel, acquiring and selling the property
when the highest and best use of this location has been determined by the market and other
development on the site.
Parcel S: 10 acres
Description. Parcel S is the site of the Base Exchange ((Building 667), and is located
between Parcel L and the northern flood control facility (Parcel Z).
Proposed Use. The Defense Finance Accounting Services (DFAS) has requested use of
this facility.
Recommended Disposition. The community recommends that Parcel S be retained by
DoD for use by DFAS.
Parcel T: 17 acres
Description. Parcel T is a proposed park near the Officers' Housing. The area is
adjacent to 6th Avenue and contains mature trees and landscaping. In addition, a youth center
(Building 293) is located on the eastern end of the parcel.
Proposed Use. The Denver Parks Department has requested Parcel T for use as a
community park. Parcel T adds to the visual character and open space amenities of the site and is
seen as enhancing the attractiveness of the adjacent residential areas and the BTC area.
Recommended Disposition. The community recommends that Parcel T be transferred
from the Air Force via public benefit conveyance through the Department of the Interior to the
Denver Parks Department for their use of the property as a community park.
Parcel U: 26 acres
Description. Parcel U is a proposed park near the south of the BTC area. The area is
south of Lowry Boulevard.
Proposed Use. The Denver Parks Department has requested Parcel U for use as a
community park. Parcel U adds to the visual character and open space amenities of the site and is
seen as enhancing the attractiveness of the adjacent residential areas and the BTC area.
Recommended Disposition. The community recommends that Parcel U be transferred
from the Air Force via public benefit conveyance of parks and recreation through the Department of
the Interior to the Denver Parks Department for their use of the property as a community park.
Parcel V: 26 acres
HOH/BBC
Recommended Lowry Disposition Plan
20
November 1993


Description. Parcel V is a park in the northeast comer of the site.
Proposed Use. The Aurora Parks Department has requested Parcel Y for use as a
community park. Parcel V adds to the visual character and open space amenities of the site and is
seen as enhancing the attractiveness of the adjacent Education Campus and off-site neighborhoods.
Recommended Disposition. The community recommends that Parcel V be transferred
from the Air Force via public benefit conveyance of parks and recreation through the Department of
the Interior to the Aurora Parks Department for their use of the property as a community park.
Parcels W and X: 52 acres and 73 acres
Description. Parcels W and X include major portions of the regional open space system
that extends through the center of the site from north to south and which connects the two flood
control areas on the Lowry site.
Proposed Use. The area in Parcels W and X is expected to be maintained as part of a
regional open space system. Parcels W and X will link Lowry to the rest of the regional open
space system that has been developed in the Denver Metro Area and will take advantage of natural
site assets such as Westerly Creek. This open space component is seen by the community as
critical to the creation of high quality development throughout Lowry and is expected to enhance
the value and marketability of adjacent and nearby residential and non-residential developments.
Recommended Disposition. The community is in agreement about the importance of
Parcels W and X to regional and on-site open space and has strong indications of demand for such
use. However, an appropriate entity to own and operate these parcels has not yet been identified.
The community is committed to the concept of regional open space on the site as depicted in
Parcels W and X because of the value it brings to the Lowry site as well as benefits to the
surrounding community. Therefore, the community recommends that Parcels W and X be
transferred from the. Air Force via public benefit conveyance of parks and recreation through the
Department of the Interior to an "appropriate entity" for use of the parcels as a regional park, once
that "appropriate entity" has been identified.
Parcel Y: 33 acres
Description. Parcel Y is located in the center of the site, straddling both sides of
Lowry Boulevard. This parcel contains a recreation facility a classroom building and a dormitory.
Proposed Use. The community recommends that this parcel be used for active
recreation uses. Active recreation uses could include active sports programs, camps and
tournaments (tennis, baseball, softball, soccer, football and others) for which it has been
established that there is significant local demand.
Recommended Disposition. The community recommends that the Air Force
temporarily hold this parcel until the Local Entity can identify a private or public operator of active
recreation facilities and programs.
Parcels Z and AA: 53 acres and 148 acres
Definition. Parcels Z and AA are the northern and southern flood control areas.
Recommended Lowry Disposition Plan
21
HOHIBBC
November 1993


Proposed Use. Both Parcels Z and AA are part of the regional flood control system and
are expected to remain as such. However, a local utility responsible for the ownership of these
two flood control facilities has not yet been determined.
Recommended Disposition. The community recommends that the Air Force identify
the appropriate public agency to receive and own the flood control facilities, subject to the review
and approval by the cities of Aurora and Denver.
Parcel BB: 62 acres
Definition. Parcel BB is the former household landfill south of the southern flood
control area, which has been identified as an environmental clean-up site in the Air Force's
Management Action Plan (MAP).
Proposed Use. This parcel is presently an environmental clean-up site, but once
completely remediated could serve as regional park space or for expansion of the sites golf
facilities.
Recommended Disposition. The community is extremely concerned about the
environmental cleanup of this parcel and does not expect this parcel to be disposed until it has been
remediated to a level suitable for development. Both cities are unwilling to extend golf uses into
this area until it is clear that the cleanup would prevent landfill leaching or other problems from
occurring.
The community recommends that this parcel not be disposed until clean up is complete, at
which time the community would be willing to negotiate the disposition Of this parcel. It is
recommended that the Air Force clean up this site within two to three years so that it can be
considered for golf expansion.
Parcel CC: 2 acres
Description. Parcel CC is located southeast of Parcel R.
Proposed Use. This facility (Building 1002) has been requested by the Colorado
Historical Society, for storage of museum artifacts and records.
Recommended Disposition. The community recommends that Parcel CC be
transferred from the Air Force via public benefit conveyance through the Department of the Interior
to the Colorado Historical Society for their use of the property as a storage facility.
This disposition meets a community need, utilizes the cold storage capabilities of the
requested facility and is supported by the community.
Parcel DD: 8 acres
Description. Parcel DD includes hangar 1499, located south of Lowry Boulevard and
Parcel R.
Proposed Use. This facility (Building 1499) has been requested by the Emily Griffith
Opportunity School for aircraft maintenance training.
HO HI BBC
Recommended Lowry Disposition Plan
22
November 1993


Recommended Disposition. The community recommends that Parcel DD be
transferred from the Air Force via public benefit conveyance through the Department of Education
to the Denver Public Schools for use by the Emily Griffith Opportunity School for aircraft
maintenance training.
This disposition is an appropriate use of the facility, responds to a community need,
contributes to achievement of the community's economic development and reuse objectives, and is
supported by the community.
Parcel EE: 6 acres
Description. Parcel EE includes Building 1307, located south of Lowry Boulevard and
west of Parcel U.
Proposed Use. This facility has been requested by the Colorado Department of Health
for use as a laboratory.
Recommended Disposition. The community recommends that Parcel EE be
transferred from the Air Force via public benefit conveyance through the Department of Health and
Human Services to the Colorado Department of Health.
This disposition is an appropriate use of the facility, contributes to achievement of the
community's economic development and reuse objectives, and is supported by the community.
Parcel FF: 3 acres
Description. Parcel FF includes Buildings 385 and 404.
Proposed Use. The Defense Finance Accounting Services (DFAS) has requested use of
these facilities for storage and office uses.
Recommended Disposition. The community recommends that Parcel FF be retained
by DoD for use by DFAS.
This will provide for additional space for DFAS, which is the key anchor user in the
southwest quadrant of Lowry. This use is consistent with the Business and Training Center theme
and is supported by the community.
Parcel GG: 5 acres
Description. Parcel GG includes Building 1433.
Proposed Use. The Department of Energy has requested this facility for training and
office uses.
Recommended Disposition. The community recommends that Parcel GG be
conveyed to the Department of Energy for use as a training and office facility.
This use is consistent with the Business and Training Center theme and is supported by the
community.
Parcel HH: 1 acre
HOH!BBC
Recommended Lowry Disposition Plan
23
November 1993


Description. Parcel HH includes a building ownedby the American Red Cross.
Proposed Use. The American Red Cross has requested this parcel for continuation of
their current operations.
Recommended Disposition. The community recommends that Parcel HH be
conveyed to the American Red Cross via public benefit conveyance, or other method at no cost to
the American Red Cross.
Parcel II: 1 acre
Description. Parcel II includes Building 629, a crafts center.
Proposed Use. The Denver Parks Department has requested this facility for recreation
uses.
Recommended Disposition. The community recommends that Parcel II be transferred
from the Air Force via public benefit conveyance through the Department of the Interior to the
Denver Parks Department for their use of the property as a recreation facility.
HO HI BBC
Recommended Lowry Disposition Plan
24
November 1993


ECONOMIC OBJECTIVES
In November, 1993, the Lowry Economic Recovery Project submitted
to the Air Force the Lowry Reuse Plan. A key goal of the Reuse
Plan is to facilitate "local and regional economic development,
including local tax base expansion, education and training, job
development, and business opportunity." To meet this goal, the
Reuse Plan specifies a mixed use approach to redevelopment.
Specific development objectives include:
Job Creation: Creation of 3,800 jobs by the end of 1995 and
13,000 permanent direct jobs plus 34,000 indirect jobs by
the year 2010.
Business: Establishment of a Business & Training Center area
to attract a variety of tax and job-generating employers.
Education: Creation of a 10,000-student campus to educate
the current and future work force and provide training and
support for on and off-site businesses.
Housing: Development of a full range of housing
opportunities in an urban mixed use community setting to
serve on and off-site companies plus accommodation of a
federally mandated program for homeless housing needs.
Recreation: Expansion and development of parks and other
recreational amenities to serve the region, plus residents
and businesses in the Lowry Neighborhood.
To accomplish these objectives the cities have created an
intergovernmental authority, the Lowry Economic Redevelopment
Authority (LERA) to implement the Lowry Reuse Plan with the
Economic Development Conveyance (EDC) request as an integral
part.
This EDC request calls for approximately 1,088 acres to be
conveyed to the LERA without initial payment to the Air Force.
However, the LERA plan shares the net income with the Air Force
from the disposition of the 1,088 acres through the year 2010.
The EDC is the central element of the Lowry Reuse Plan. The
1,088 acres contains all of plan elements except the community
college campus, the public benefit conveyances and the regional
flood plain. The LERA is currently pursuing the addition of the
regional flood control area through a Public Benefit Conveyance
(PBC) or the EDC to aid future planning and development.
1


ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CONVEYANCE
APPLICATION
This Economic Development Conveyance (EDC) request is made
pursuant to Section 91.7(e) of the interim rules implementing the
Pryor Amendment to Title XXIX of the 1994 National Defense
Authorization Act. As required by paragraph (e)5 of that
section, we provide the following information:
1. Property to be conveyed Approximately 1,088 acres in a
phased conveyance as described in the November, 1993
Recommended Lowry Disposition Plan, as amended. The
requested conveyance includes land use areas designated for
residential, golf/residential, and business uses. As
recommended in the interim regulations, the requested
properties are a package of marketable, revenue-producing
properties, properties that will be more difficult to market
and develop, and properties where liabilities exceed value.
2. Statement of the local redevelopment authority's legal
authority to acquire and dispose of property under the laws
of the governing state The City and County of Denver and
City of Aurora have entered into an intergovernmental
agreement to establish the Lowry Economic Redevelopment
Authority (LERA) with an effective date of July 15, 1994.
As allowed by Colorado law, the Authority is empowered by
the intergovernmental agreement to acquire and dispose of
real property and perform a full range of related
redevelopment activities marketing, coordination and
financing of infrastructure and other site improvements, and
facilitation of zoning and development review.
3. Redevelopment plan that includes economic development and
job creation -- In November, 1993, the Lowry Economic
Recovery Project submitted to the Air Force the Lowry Reuse
Plan.1 A key goal of the Reuse Plan is to facilitate "local
and regional economic development, including local tax base
expansion, education and training, job development, and
business opportunity." To meet this goal, the Reuse Plan
specifies a mix of interdependent uses, which function
together to create a healthy new Lowry Neighborhood
conducive to economic development.
1 HOH Associates and Browne, Bortz and Coddington, "Lowry
Reuse Plan and Recommended Lowry Disposition Plan," report
prepared for Lowry Economic Recovery Project, Denver, CO
(November, 1993).
2


The cornerstone of private-sector economic development is
the 185-acre Business & Training Center (BTC) in the
southwestern portion of the Lowry neighborhood.
The Lowry Reuse Plan envisions a complementary relationship
between the BTC and community-recommended public benefit
conveyances, including the college consortium that has
applied for public benefit conveyance of the planned
Education Campus area. Likewise, the housing section of the
Reuse Plan states that "successfully changing the image and
creating desirable, new housing and upgrading the existing
housing areas will help attract compatible employment
opportunities to Lowry and increase the tax base."
4. Why existing public benefit conveyance authorities are not
appropriate -- In general, the Lowry Reuse Plan calls for
ultimate conveyance of residential areas, golf/residential
areas, and the BTC to private, tax-generating entities,
which are not eligible for public benefit conveyances, and
are not expected to meet "public purpose" criteria for
transfers through sponsoring federal agencies. The Lowry
Disposition Plan does recommend public benefit conveyances
when appropriate, including parcels for an education campus,
a public laboratory, community services, schools, parks and
recreation, and a museum.
Economic development conveyance of the requested property is
appropriate. An EDC is both consistent with the intent of
the Pryor amendment and critical to the successful
redevelopment of the Lowry site. Specifically, the EDC is
appropriate and necessary for the following reasons:
Control of the requested area will allow an integrated
approach to redevelopment. With an EDC at no initial cost,
the LERA can act as a master developer of the site, ensuring
a coordinated approach to redevelopment and achievement of
reuse plan objectives, including maximizing job creation
opportunities. A focus group including developers and
builders2 and an advisory group of investment bankers,
economic development professionals, bond counsel, and senior
city planning staff3 both recommended a local authority
2 City and County of Denver Mayor's Office of Economic
Development, "Summary of Proceedings: Lowry Economic Development
Focus Group,"(January, 1993).
3 Browne, Bortz, and Coddington, "Lowry Redevelopment
Implementation Options and Financial Implications," working paper
submitted on behalf of Lowry Implementation Advisory Group
(September, 1993).
3


control the reconveyance of Air Force property and create an
environment of certainty for the development community.
The Lowry redevelopment must be largely self-sustaining.
Competing demands, budget constraints, and Amendment 1,
Colorado's tax and spending limitation, preclude substantial
local public investment in the redevelopment of Lowry. The
City and County of Denver is simultaneously addressing the
redevelopment of Stapleton Airport (closing in 1994) and the
Central Platte Valley, and with the City of Aurora is facing
demand for new development associated with the opening of
Denver International Airport. With the jump-start of an EDC
at no initial cost, the LERA can accomplish economic
development goals funded by site-generated revenues.
An EDC will allow the LERA to apply all initial revenues to
redevelopment expenses. This will accelerate and maximize
economic development and add value to the site. Net
proceeds will be shared with the Air Force over a fifteen
year time frame, through the year 2010.
The synergistic benefits of the new Lowry Neighborhood come from
the combination of business, training, education, recreation and
residential uses. The accelerated development of the EDC area
will be the major catalyst to jobs creation and the success of
the education campus and public benefit conveyances.
The following subsections cover each of the major concepts of the
Economic Development Conveyance (EDC) and its essential
relationship to the overall Lowry Reuse Plan. Several of the
detailed studies which lead to the conclusions of these
subsections are attached as exhibits:
JOBS CREATION OPPORTUNITIES
BUSINESS & TRAINING CENTER
EDUCATION INDUSTRY
SERVICE SECTOR
CONSTRUCTION
LOWRY REUSE PLAN CONCEPT/MISSION STATEMENT
REUSE PLAN DETAILS
LEASE AND SALE OF EXISTING HOUSING UNITS
SALE OF RESIDENTIAL LOTS
LEASE AND SALE OF BUSINESS & TRAINING CENTER
CREATION OF REGIONAL PARKS SYSTEM
COLORADO A DIVERSE ECONOMY AND IDEAL MODEL
SHORT TERM PROBLEMS LONG TERM OPPORTUNITIES
4


JOBS CREATION OPPORTUNITIES
Jobs creation within the Lowry Neighborhood comes from multiple
sources. These jobs include temporary construction and planning
related jobs as well as permanent, long term jobs.
In the face of the recent changes in the world political scene
and the related Lowry AFB closure, the Reuse Plan gives equal
weight to jobs retention plus education and training of the
current and future work force as it does to jobs creation. This
jobs retention is centered in the Community College educational
campus and the training aspects of the Business & Training
Center.
The LERA will target four major jobs centers to attract short
term and long term jobs to the Lowry Neighborhood:
. Business & Training Center
. Education Center
. Services
. Construction
The retention of DFAS/ARPC within the Lowry neighborhood means
jobs retention of over 3,000 jobs plus a probable expansion over
the next 15 years to 4,000-4,500 total jobs. DFAS is a prime
example to other financial services companies about the viability
of Lowry as a business location.
The NCCC location into the Lowry neighborhood has a direct impact
of 300 jobs in the first year and provides a potential labor pool
for companies moving into the Business & Training Center.
The following table shows the projected Jobs Creation activities
in the Lowry Neighborhood in 1995 and, at maturity, in 2010 as
originally proposed in the HOH/BBC study dated April 1993 and as
modified in various submissions between November 1993 and May
1994 .
CATEGORY 1995 MIDPOINT 2010
Construction 100 400 -0-
Education 100 800 1,900
Business & Training Ctr 100 1,500 5,300
Services 50 150 500
PBX 100 200 300
DFAS/ARPC 3,000 3,500 4,500
NCCC 350 400 500
TOTAL 3,800 6,950 13,000 4
4 HOH Associates, Inc. BBC, Inc., "Reuse Plan Alternatives
Report," (November 1992)
5


In addition to the 13,000 direct jobs created in the Lowry
Neighborhood two additional factors will add to the economic
impact of the plan at maturity
. The student population at the Community College campus
is projected to peak at 10,000 students prior to the
year 2010 as an additional economic generator in the
Lowry neighborhood.
Using a multiplier for the direct Jobs Creation adds
between 25,500 to 34,750 jobs depending on the
multiplier used (2.1:1 or 2.86:l)5
TOTAL JOBS CREATED INCLUDING DIRECT AND INDIRECT JOBS, RANGES
BETWEEN 27,300 AND 37,200 BY THE YEAR 2010.
BUSINESS & TRAINING CENTER JOBS CREATION
The three anchors for Jobs Creation within the Lowry Neighborhood
include the Education Campus, DFAS/ARPC and the proposed Business
& Training Center. Lowry is fortunate to start with two anchors
in place which will aid the third, the Business & Training
Center, in achieving its goals. The Business & Training Center
will be the largest single jobs creation center for the Lowry
Neighborhood, followed closely by DFAS/ARPC.
The LERA will employ a multi-faceted marketing campaign to
attract other businesses to the Lowry neighborhood for the
Business & Training Center as well as the residential
neighborhoods and education campus.
First, The Business & Training Center will target five industries
to fill the 1,233,000 sq. ft. of building space proposed for the
Center. One-third to one-half of this space will come from
existing buildings renovated to market conditions. The initially
targeted industries include:
. Telecommunications
. Bio-Medical
. Computer Software
. Educational Training
. Financial Services
Second, the LERA has ongoing negotiations with key companies in
each targeted industry to act as magnets to attract other related
5 The lower ratio is from the Denver Chamber of Commerce,
the higher ratio is from the "Governor's Office of State Planning
and Budgeting."
6


companies to the Lowry neighborhood. Several of these magnet
companies are in the business to directly recruit other related
companies to the Lowry neighborhood. Others, such as
Telecommunications Inc. (TCI) will attract other companies
because of its size and need for related service companies.
Third, the LERA will prepare presentation formats for each
targeted industry to present marketing materials at professional
meetings for these industries, national real estate meetings such
as ULI and NAIOP, and the regional real estate broker network.
In the Telecommunications field, the LERA has entered into
negotiations with a firm, Industrial Construction Services,
Inc.(ICS), to create a public/private telecommunications center
in the Lowry Neighborhood. ICS would be a tenant at Lowry with
15-30 employees. They propose to create a state-of-the-art
inter-active telecommunications system within the Business &
Training Center, including a private fiber optic loop, to help
attract other clients in the Business & Training Center.-
In the biomedical field, the LERA has entered into negotiations
with a biomedical firm, Colorado BioMedical Venture Center
(CBVC), to facilitate the start up of biomedical incubator
companies for research at the Lowry Business & Training Center.
They would create 30-40 immediate staff jobs. CBVC anticipates
that it will draw 3-5 incubator companies to Lowry each year
which will become users of space in the Business & Training
Center and creators of new 10-30 initial jobs per company.
In the educational training field, the LERA is in negotiations
with Telecommunications Inc. (TCI), the nation's largest cable
service provider to establish a teacher training facility in the
Lowry neighborhood to bring educators from around the region to
teach them to use telecommunications equipment. They would
generate 20-30 immediate staff jobs and over 500 jobs by the year
2010.
In the financial services field, the LERA plans to use the DFAS
organization as a magnet to bring other 'back office' financial
service companies to Lowry. With the ability to provide the
large parking requirements that these users employee count
demand, Lowry is more than competitive with private, stand alone
business areas.
By targeting specific industries which are known to be interested
in the Denver Region; pre-locating magnet firms within these
industries in the early stages of the Lowry Reuse Plan; and
aggressive marketing within the real estate industry, the LERA
hopes to accelerate the jobs creation in the Lowry Neighborhood.
SEE COMPLETE CLIENT LIST AT THE END OF THIS SUBSECTION
7


EDUCATION JOBS CREATION
The bulk of the jobs creation in the Education area comes from
employees proposed for the Community College Campus in the North
East quadrant of the site. The original estimates are for 1,200
employees which relate to a 10,000 student campus.
The focus of the consortium of colleges is on professional and
vocational training both at undergraduate and at graduate levels.
This market focus was created to avoid duplication among the
various campuses, but has the effect to help supply a work force
for companies moving into the Business & Training Center.
The Business & Training Center itself has education and training
as one of its other major thrusts in addition to pure business
uses. It is estimated that 500-700 of the projected 5,300 BTC
total employees will be in the education and training field.
Two specific clients have approached the LERA with written
proposals for immediate educational related space in the Business
& Training Center:
1. A joint venture of Interstate Hotels and R. Hanafi
Fraval wants to convert building #397 into a hotel and
conference center. They propose to employ 31 people
initially and 91 people at their peak. They intend to
build an additional structure south of #397.6
2. A private school, Stanley British Primary, wants to
locate at the Officer's club and five residential
houses. They also train teachers for the Denver Public
School System. They propose to employ 25-30 people
plus 40 new teaching interns, annually.
The Logan School, a Public Benefit Conveyance, plans to open in
1995 adjacent to the Community College campus as a primary
education school with 35-40 total employees.
These immediate, multiple educational uses will attract other
education oriented clients to the Lowry neighborhood. In
addition, the presence of the private schools will enhance the
marketability of housing tracts.
SEE COMPLETE CLIENT LIST AT THE END OF THIS SUBSECTION
6 Interstate Hotels operates 89 hotels in 23 states. It is
the largest franchise partner of Marriott.
8


SERVICES JOBS CREATION
Within the Lowry Neighborhood, community support services will
increase over time as the Campus, Residential areas, and Business
& Training Center require services.
Targeted companies will include service retail and primary
services such as banks, dry cleaning, child care, health care and
fast food. For instance, DFAS has identified a built-in
clientele of more than 100 employees for a market rate child care
facility.
Five specific clients or needs have been identified with
proposals for immediate occupancy in the Lowry Neighborhood:
1. Amerinvest, which has major holdings at Chanute AFB,
has proposed to house a senior congregate living center
in Building #1400 with an immediate $2M rennovation
project and creation of over 100 jobs.
2. Space Age Credit Union currently serves the DFAS
employees from within the DFAS building. This firm
plans to expand its charter and would like to locate in
the Colorado National Bank building for immediate
occupancy with 15-20 jobs created.
3. Dominos Pizza would like to open a retail outlet in the
Lowry Neighborhood as well as a commissary for stocking
other outlets in the area with 10-25 jobs created.
4. The LERA is soliciting proposals from four market rate
child care facilities to use the DFAS client base as a
reason for opening a market rate facility on site to
complement the PBC below-market rate facility.
5. A minority-owned dry cleaning, Supreme Dry Cleaners,
establishment has contacted the LERA through the
Governor's Office of Minority Affairs to open
negotiations for a facility on site as soon as possible
after October 1, 1994.
SEE COMPLETE CLIENT LIST AT THE END OF THIS SUBSECTION
9


CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY JOBS CREATION
During the first 36 months of development of the Lowry Reuse Plan
construction jobs will be created which will have the added
impact of replacing some of those lost jobs relating to the
completion of DIA and the Coors Field construction projects.7
A limited marketing plan will be implemented by the Executive
Director to national and regional builders looking for infill
lots in large and small scale platted lots sales. Past dealings
with the following national builders will be one initial
marketing plan direction:
Kaufman & Broad
Centex
U.S. Homes
Melody Homes
Initial Jobs Creation will include the field personnel for the
Caretaker Agreement totalling 15-20 people.
Jobs Creation and jobs retention will include the following site
work categories employed directly by or contracted with the LERA
in the first 18 months of the Reuse Plan.
Planners & Engineers 15
Demolition 15
Piped Underground Utilities 15
Wire Utilities 10
Road Systems 2 0
TOTAL 75
The following categories of jobs will be created during months
#24-60 by residential builders and developers. An average of
five builders will be working at the Lowry Neighborhood at any
one time.
Engineers 15
Site Development Personnel 25
Construction Subtrades 200
Supervisary Personnel 10
Administrative Staff 10
TOTAL 260
SEE COMPLETE CLIENT LIST AT THE END OF THIS SUBSECTION
7 "Grubb & Ellis Real Estate Forecast" (February 1994)
10


The following are additional clients with which there are current
negotiations or active contacts concerning specific locations
within the Lowry Business & Training Center or other areas within
the EDC.
. Acme Distribution Center
. Almaz Corporation
. Artreach
. Asian Pacific Development Center
. Barnum Center
. Biomed Instrumentation Organization
. CD Rom, Inc.
. Colorado Dental Association
. Colorado Digital Labs
. Colorado Innovation Foundation
. Colorado Indoor Soccer Association
. Colorado Tennis Association
. Cyber-Con Corporation
. Denver Instrument Company
. Denver Urban Gardens
. David French
. Eaglefirst International Inc.
. Eastern Rockies Rugby Football Union
. EquiVentures, Inc.
. Frances J. Cole Foundation
. Independence Institute
. Institute of International Education
. International Museum for Children
. Invesco Realty Advisors
. Judy Stevenson & Assciates
. Murata Outland Association
. Navigationi Technologies
. National Institute of Nutritional Education
. ProServe
. Rexco Manufacturer's
. Rocky Mountain Institute of Pastoral Healthcare
. Security Capital
. Sports Marketing Group
. Taylor Management Technologies
. Volunteers of America
. Westbrook Development Companies
Attached as exhibits "B" and "C" are two studies which show
companies which moved to Denver in 1993 and current companies
which wish to have their search kept confidential. The first
list shows the type of companies on which the Lowry Reuse Plan
hopes to draw. The second list are companies which the LERA will
contact through the Chamber of Commerce economic development
office.
Companies moving to Denver in 1993
Confidential MDN Prospect Activity Report 6/20/94
11


Full Text

PAGE 1

LOWRY REUSE PLAN Lowry Economic Recovery Project Lowry Air Force Base, Colorado November 1993

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LOWRY REUSE PLAN Lowry Economic Recovery Project Lowry Air Force Base, Colorado

PAGE 3

TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction 1. BACKGROUND 1-1 2. MARKET AND ECONOMIC OVERVIEW 2-1 3. LAND USE 3-1 4. URBAN DESIGN 4-1 5. HOUSING 5-1 6. TRANSPORTATION 6-1 Lowry Reuse Pian Report HOH/BBC November 1993

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INTRODUCTION This document presents the conclusions of the community reuse planning effort undertaken for Lowry Air Force Base. It has been prepared on behalf of the Executive Committee of the Aurora Denver Lowry Economic Recovery Project (LERP), with advice and input from the Lowry Economic Adjustment Committee (LEAC). This document presents, in a summary form, the results of a comprehensive 18 month long community-wide planning effort. It is supplemented by the Recommended Lowry Disposition Plan (November 1993), which is being submitted concurrently to the Air Force and by the Master Water, Sanitary Sewer and Storm Sewer Study on Lowry Air Force Base, prepared by Merrick and Company, Engineers (November 1993), which is being submitted as a supporting document. The purpose of this report is to document the Lowry Reuse Plan for presentation to the Air Force, the community and the Department of Defense Office of Economic Adjustment. This Reuse Plan is a rermement of the Preferred Reuse Plan which was presented to the Air Force in April1993. It represents a culmination of previous studies, evaluations and plan refmements relative to land use, infrastructure, transportation and market potential, as well as continued public input concerning community preferences. Additional background information and interim work products relative to the reuse and disposition planning effort are available separately. These include the Reuse Plan Alternatives Report (November 1992) and the Reuse Plan Alternatives ReportChapter 9 (April1993), which were both submitted to the Air Force as part of the EIS process and document the process leading up to the conclusions in this document. Implementation activities which are planned to follow this Reuse Plan include on-going coordination with the Air Force, detailed phasing and transition planning and creation of an implementation entity for the conveyance, marketing, financing and management of the site. Lowry Reuse Plan Report HOH/BBC November 1993

PAGE 5

1. BACKGROUND Development of the Lowry Reuse Plan was guided by the following Reuse Planning Goals, which were developed by LEAC early in the planning process: REUSE PLANNING GOALS 1. The Plan should demonstrate the highest community and urban design standards. 2. The Plan should facilitate local and regional economic development, including local tax base expansion, education and training, job development and business opportunity, in a complementary relationship to other regional development efforts. 3. The Plan should serve neighborhood, local and regional community facility and service needs, which include: Recreation/Open Space Housing Social Services Arts/Culture Public Safety 4. The Plan should build upon, sustain and enhance the existing assets of the surrounding area, which include: Regional open space, trail systems and parkways Established residential neighborhoods serving a variety of income groups Established neighborhood commercial areas 5. The Plan should capitalize on specific site assets, which include: Central location in the metropolitan area Proximity to surrounding amenities, employment centers and regional transportation system Suitable existing infrastructure; buildings and facilities Historic facilities and sites Existing open space and recreation opportunities Urban wildlife habitat Established history and identity 6. The Plan should provide for multiple uses which are diverse, balanced and well integrated, and that minimize negative impacts on surrounding neighborhoods. 7 The Plan should be based on a sound understanding of economic and market related jurisdictions and the private market. 8. The Plan should become an extension of and supporting element for the Comprehensive Plans of the Cities of Aurora and Denver, including land use, open space, transportation, urban design and economic development components. 9. The Plan shall promote the health of the local environment and inhabitants. 10. The Plan should include short and intermediate term strategies that are consistent with the long term objectives for reuse of the site. Lowry Reuse Plan Report HOH/BBC 1-1 November 1993

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2. MARKET AND ECONOMIC OVERVIEW While recent economic activity in the Denver area indicates that the environment for redevelopment of Lowry may be better than was initially anticipated, economic professionals familiar with local business and development strengths and constraints are only cautiously optimistic. Denver's economy has recovered and is growing. However, a reduction in current growth rates is anticipated as several large transportation and construction projects are completed. Furthermore, a surplus of commercial property and new development parcels of significant size around the Denver Metro Area all indicate that demand for employers, developers and residents still exceeds supply. Lowry's environment for redevelopment activity and financing will be extremely competitive. The overall economic and market conditions in Denver and the Metro Area will influence the potential for successful redevelopment of Lowry, as will price and quality competition from the Denver Airport Gateway and other development projects. Finally, the recent economic strength and the favorable interest rate environment have encouraged developer activity on a large number of projects elsewhere in the Denver Metro Area. The additional supply of residential development (for example) that will become available at the time of Lowry's closure could potentially have a negative influence on Lowry's redevelopment. BACKGROUND Over the past several months, the Denver economy has gained national attention, National economic data, several business and popular publications and residential property sales all point to Denver as one of the top ten cities in the U.S. for population and economic growth in 1993. Lowry's redevelopment could benefit from such market strength; however, the length and vigor of the current expansion are still far from certain. Likewise, the economic growth rates experienced in the cities of Denver and Aurora may well vary from state and regional levels. POPULATION The 1993 population for the six-county Denver Metro Area is currently estimated at 1,997,200. This is up 39,650 people from 1992, an increase of 2.0 percent. This rate is higher than was previously expected: as recently as September 1992, Denver Regional Council of Governments estimated that the Denver County population's annual growth would be 1.36 percent, but this figure has now been revised to 2.25 percent. While the final counts may indicate a still different rate of growth, the revisions reflect higher than anticipated population growth, particularly from people moving to the state (in-migration). Table 1 below details the projections for the Denver Metro Area through the year 2000. Table 1. Denver Population Projections 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 0 to 19 563,774 573,800 583,900 594,000 592,400 598,500 604,700 610,900 617,100 20 to 64 1,209,766 1,234:200 1,258,900 1,283,500 1,286,000 1:203,200 1.,220.400 1337.700 1.,254,900 Total 0 to 64 1,773,.540 1,808,100 1,842,800 1,877,500 1,878,400 1,901,700 1,925,100 1,948,600 1,972,000 65 and Over 184,010 189,100 194,300 199,400 203,100 207,800 212,500 217,100 221,800 Total 1,957,550 1,997,200 2,037,100 2,076,900 2,081,500 2,109,500 2,137,600 2,165,700 2,196,000 Source: Colorado Division of Ux:al Government. 1993; Includes Adanu, Arapahoe, Boulder, Denver, Douglas and jefferson counties. Lowry Reuse Pian Repon HOH!BBC 2-1 November 1993

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In-migration, which began to be positive for the State in 1991, is currently estimated to cause a net gain of 68,000 people across the state in 1993 (measured from August 1992 through August 1993). The raie of in-migration is expected to decrease in 1994 and 1995 (although it will still be positive), when the construction of the Denver International Airport (DIA) and other major public projects is completed. By the year 2000, net in-migration is expected to drop to 20,000 people per year. At the present time, the relative strength of the Colorado economy is seen as the primary attraction for people migrating to Colorado. Projections for the years 2000-2010 are for significantly slower growth. The State Demographer's Office is estimating that the population for the Denver area will be 2.4 million people in the year 2010. This represents a growth rate of less than 1 percent from the year 2000 to 2010 EMPLOYMENT The unemployment rate in the Denver area is estimated at 5.4 percent for 1993. Despite the completion of DIA and other projects, the next eight years are expected to witness continued growth in job creation. Although unemployment is expected to reach 6 percent in 1995, the total number of jobs is projected to grow at over 2 percent throughout this period. Denver area labor projections are detailed in Table 2. Table 2. Denver Labor Projections 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 CivYian Labor Force 1,080,300 1,103,300 1,126,300 1,149,300 1,167,600 1,186,000 1,204,300 1,222,700 1,241,000 Employed Persons 1,025,000 1,043,500 1,062,000 1,080,500 1,100,400 1,120,300 1,140,100 1,160,000 1,179,900 Self-Employed 56,500 57,500 58,500 59,600 60,700 61,800 62,800 63,900 65,000 Remaining Employed 968,500 986,000 1,003,500 1,020,900 1,039,700 1,058,500 1,077,300 1,096,100 1,114,900 Unemployment Rate 5.1 '7o 5.4% 5.7% 6.0% 5.8% 5.5% 5.3% 5.1% 4.9% Source: Colorado Employment and Labor For<:e Projections, Summary Table Employment and Labor Force by Region, Region 3, p. 31 (1990, 1995 and 2000); llllC interpolations for remaining years; Includes Adams, Arapahoe, Boulder, Denver, Douglas and Jefferson counties. The strength of the local economy is expected to be due in part to steady growth in the number of employers. New small businesses (those with fewer than 50 employees) are expected to grow 14 percent between now and the year 2000. The rate of creation of all new businesses is detailed in Table 3 that follows. Table3. Employers by Size of Firm, Denver Metro Area Size of Firm 1992 1993 1994 1995 1,000 +Employees 77 77 77 78 500 to 999 Employees 91 92 93 94 250 to 499 Employees 223 229 236 242 100 to249 Employees 967 982 996 1,011 SO to 99 Employees 1,628 1,713 1,797 1,881 Under SO Employees 50,054 50,906 51,760 52,601 Total 53,040 53,999 54,960 55,906 Source: Colorado Department of Labor, March 1992 Employment Figures; BBC estimates. Lowry Reuse Pian Report HOHIBBC 2-2 1996 1997 78 78 94 95 249 256 1,026 1,042 1,973 2,064 53.510 54,419 56,930 57,954 1998 1999 2000 78 79 79 96 97 98 263 270 276 1,057 1,072 1,087 2,156 2,247 2,339 55,329 56,238 57147 58,978 60,002 61,026 November 1993

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The rate of increase in employment growth, like population growth, is expected to decline in the years 2000-2010. According to the Center for Business and Economic forecasting, employment in the Denver area will grow at rate of 1.1 percent between 2000 and 2010. In addition, the economic development community indicates that job growth projections hide shifts in the quality and types of jobs available. For example, while 1992 saw 20,000 new jobs created, 12,000 durable manufacturing jobs were lost. There is also concern that the new. jobs are more temporary in nature, implying lower wages and frequently fewer benefits, this adds to the lack of confidence that the current economic strength will be sustainable. REAL ESTATE MARKETS Denver area residential markets had a strong year. Sales volume increased dramatically relative to recent years, with number of sales transactions reaching levels not seen since the early 1980s. Sale prices have never been higher. Table 4 summarizes this recent residential real estate activity. Table Denver Area Home Sales 1991 1992 1993 Sale Prices Median $89,500 $94,900 $104,500 Mean 109,321 114,600 125,172 Percent Increase in Median Sales Price from Prior Year 6% 10% Percent Increase in Mean Sales Price from Prior Year 5% 9% Number of Homes Sold Jan.-Sept. 16,213 19,486 22,266 Percent Increase in Sales from Prior Year 20% 14% Source: Colorado Association of Realtors. Another indication of the strength of the Denver economy is the number of foreclosures. As noted in Table 5, there was a 50 percent reduction in foreclosure activity in 1993 from 1991. TableS. Denver Foreclosures Year 1991 1992 1993* *Projected for year. Source: Public Trustee's Office Lowry Reuse Pian Report HOHIBBC 2-3 No. Foreclosures 2,498 1,692 1,288 November 1993

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Commercial real estate markets have also strengthened but lease rates are still substantially below replacement costs. Office space vacancy across the metro area dropped below 20 percent for the first time since 1987, near the beginning of the savings and loan troubles. The remaining inventory tends to be smaller class B or C space. Construction costs have increased substantially over the past two years and minimal new construction is anticipated in the near term. Retail sales have been strong, with several new projects presently under construction or consideration. CONCLUSIONS The economic environment for redevelopment of Lowry is generally positive although expectations are for the relative attractiveness of Denver to fade, with related implications for population migration, employment and real estate activity. Strong population growth offers a positive environment for residential development at the base, and the recent economic strength offers Lowry redevelopment better prospects than were originally anticipated. Not-withstanding this general. optimism, Lowry's competition for residents and jobs from other development sites will be fierce. The past year's residential property boom has stimulated new construction of single and multi family homes, and Lowry's success in attracting developers and residents will depend on pressing its location and proximity to jobs advantage and on the promotion of high quality, physically attractive development at all price levels. In addition, local experts still a,nticipate that the completion of the construction of the Denver International Airport and other public projects, as well as the closing of Lowry, will cause a minor downturn in the Denver area economy. The short term effects of slower economic activity will force Lowry to compete with the rest of the Denver Metro Area for residents and jobs, rather than allowing the base to attract people and businesses moving to the area. Over a longer period of time, the Business and Training Center Area (BTC) in the Community Reuse Plan is expected to attract corporate tenants from a pool that extends beyond Denver's boundaries. Lowry Reuse Plan Repon HOH/BBC 2-4 November 1993

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3. LAND USE INTRODUCTION The purpose of this section is to describe the overall land use concepts for the reuse and redevelopment of the Lowry site. It presents the recommendations of the reuse planning effort as well as appropriate explanatory and background information. The reader is referred to the Recommended Lowry Disposition Plan for more detailed information on parcelization and disposition recommendations for the site, which reflect the recommendations in this document Lowry Air Force Base is located in an urban area and is surrounded by residential neighborhoods. The land use concepts in the Reuse Plan were developed in recognition of the relationship of the site to the surrounding community; existing site features, assets and facilities; current and projected market and economic conditions and community needs and preferences. The concepts are presented in terms of dominant reuse themes for the site, with a summary of land use areas and definitions of primary land use categories. This chapter concludes with a more detailed description of the site in terms of development planning areas. PLANNING ASSUMPTIONS The following assumptions concerning land use and facilities underlie the planning effort and Lowry Reuse Plan recommendations: Existing zoning on the Lowry site will not allow all of the uses envisioned in this document. Future reuse of the site in accordance with the Reuse Plan will require obtaining the necessary zoning changes from Aurora and Denver. Interim use of eXisting facilities can contribute to the ultimate land use on the site. With this in mind, short term use may occur within the framework of the long-range vision illustrated in the Reuse Plan. This would allow the communities to meet short-term needs, help defray operation and maintenance costs, and generate activity on-site at an early stage. Existing buildings are to be reused wherever feasible. However, demolition of structures is recommended in some cases, and is reflected on the base maps and plans in this document. Recommendations for demolition were based upon the condition or use of the structure (as reflected in Air Force studies) or to provide for access or parking in accordance with the Reuse Plan. Specific data relative to demolition is contained in previous The Defense Finance Accounting Service and Air Reserve Personnel Center (DFAS/ARPC) and the 21st Space Command Squadron will continue to operate in cantonment facilities at Lowry after closure of the base. REUSE THEMES This Lowry Reuse Plan incorporates a balance of business training and educational activities, residential development, open space and recreational uses, and supporting community services uses. The community envisions development of several reuse themes on the site, each with a dominant type of development or land use (for example, education and training) which is supported by secondary types of development or land use (for example, residential). The overall concept is that the uses would reinforce the community's goals for the site, from both a land use Lowry Reuse Plan Report HOH/BBC 3-1 November 1993

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and economic development perspective, while being flexible to respond to market conditions and opportunities. Education and Business Training The basic character and identity of the 1,866 site will be established by areas devoted to education and business and training uses, located in the northeast and southwest quadrants of the site. The focus of the education and business training core concept is to utilize existing facilities to provide educational and retraining opportunities, create a trained work force, replace lost jobs, and invest in long-termjob creation and economic development for Denver and Aurora. The Education Campus in the northeast quadrant would provide facilities and sites for a variety of education and training activities. The concept of the Education Campus is to provide a wide range of career training/retraining experiences for the new and displaced worker. The concept envisions facilities for students with various educational and training requirements, which might range from full training in business and vocational trades to achieving a graduate degree. Other compatible and related uses would also be encouraged. The Business and Training Center in the southwestern portion of the site would serve the needs of corporate and/or other private or public organizations for business and training uses. The site's architecturally significant structures, tree-lined streets, and variety of excellent office and classroom buildings make this area an attractive location for private-sector corporate interests. The site's proximity to high-end housing, and easy accessibility to the metropolitan area make it attractive for business-related uses. Residential Development Another major theme of the Lowry Reuse Plan is residential development, which will serve as a transition to adjacent surrounding neighborhoods and enhance the attractiveness of the site and surrounding area to business uses. Residential development will make use of existing dormitory and family residential facilities as well as new development sites, which included parcels fronting the parks, regional open space and golf course. A variety of residential building types are anticipated for the site, including single family detached dwellings, town houses and medium-rise apartments, based upon an overall gross density of 4.5 units per acre for new development. Residential development could occur in several ways. The first is as a primary use in a predominantly residential area. Although residential will be the primary use, the planning concept envisions the creation of true residential neighborhoods, which means that a variety of secondary uses, such as parks and neighborhood scale retail, would be encouraged. This approach will allow for supporting uses within primary residential areas such as parks, open space and neighborhood-scale commercial and retail. This is particularly important on the larger development sites (such as the northwest and southwest quadrants and the golf course area), in which development needs to have a sense of identity and needs to provide common support facilities which build upon and reinforce the residential character of the surrounding neighborhoods. The second means by which residential development can occur is as a secondary use on sites for other primary uses (for example in the education and training core). In this case, residential development is envisioned to support the other uses on site, such as residential development in the form of dormitories, hotels or family housing would to support business training and education. Lowry Reuse Plan Report HOH/BBC 3-2 November 1993

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Lowry Reuse Plan Report LOWRY REUSE PLAN HOH!BBC 3-3

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Community Services/Education Campus/Residential The Lowry Reuse Plan envisions that on-site uses and adjacent residential neighborhoods would be supported by a mixed-use area, located in the interior of the site near the proposed intersection of 6th A venue and Yosemite Street. Because of its important location on major streets and accessibility to both the Business Training Center and the Education Campus, this area could incorporate a variety of uses (Community Services, Education and Residential) and serve as a major focal point for the site. The ultimate mixture of uses will depend upon market demand. Open Space and Recreation The Lowry Reuse Plan includes an open space system comprised of the existing and proposed re configuration of the golf course, community-scale parks, and a significant regional-scale open space in the central portion of the site. The open space system will provide a value-enhancing amenity for the site as well as meet some of the regional open space and recreational needs. Existing regional flood control areas would be maintained in a manner which would contribute to the overall open space concept. Regional linkages will also be developed to connect the site with surrounding parks, open space, trail systems and parkways, and will provide functional linkages to off-site open space and trail systems. The primary open space system will be supplemented by a secondary open space system that will be implemented on specific parcels as development occurs. LAND USE AREA SUMMARY Following is a summary of land use areas recommended for the entire Lowry site, based upon the community's Reuse Plan. Land Use Cate2ory Residential Education Campus Business and Training Center DFAS/ARPC Cantonment Area Community Services/Education Campus/Residential Community Services Flood Control Golf Regional Open Space Park Regional Open Space/Golf Active Recreation TOTAL Area 538 Acres 187 185 73 28 9 203 246 121 71 62 35 108 1,866 Acres The area shown for right-of-way includes only major on-site streets (6th Avenue, Yosemite, Lowry Boulevard. Quebec, Fairmount and Uinta), as well as additional right-of-way for bordering streets (First Avenue (east), Quebec, 11th and Dayton). Lowry Reuse Plan Report HOH/BBC 3-4 November 1993

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LAND USE CATEGORIES The following Land Use Categories summarize specific land uses shown on the Lowry Reuse Plan that support the reuse themes described above. Identified uses apply to public, private and not-for profit entities, including McKinney Act homeless providers. Business and Center and Education Campus: Classrooms Laboratories Office or Administrative Space Light Industrial (not warehouse/distribution or "smokestacks") Research -Labs and Development Space Supporting Commercial Space (retail, entertainment, business services) Residential Develqpment: Single Family Homes Multi-Family -Single Family Attached Homes, Townhomes Multi-Family--Low or Medium-rise Apartments Retirement Housing Managed Care Facilities Community Services: Offices Entertainment Activities Retail Establishments, Restaurants Medical/Dental Offices Churches Museum/Cultural facilities Day Care Public Services Facilities (police, fire) Open Space and Recreation: Active Recreation Areas -Outdoor and Indoor Facilities Youth and/or Senior Center, Museum, Cultural Facilities Passive Recreation -Parks, Open Space, Flood Control Urban Wildlife Area on Flood Control Area Golf Course Lowry Reuse Plan Report HOH/BBC 3-5 November 1993

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DEVELOPMENT PLANNING AREAS The Lowry Reuse Plan divides Lowry into six Development Planning Areas, in addition to the open space and flood control areas which are located in the central portion of the site. The Development Planning Areas are defined by their geographic proximity (illustrated in the following diagram) and reflect the reuse themes described previously. The following describes each area in terms of its predominant and supporting land character, existing facilities, site data and contribution to the Lowry reuse concept. Development Planning Area Summary Development Area Area %of Lowry 1. Education Campus 232 Acres* 12 % 2. Mixed Use/Active Recreation 72 4 3. Golf Course/Residential 361 19 4. Southwest Quadrant 352 19 5. Business and Training Center 196 11 6. Oyadrsnt 2:.1:.1 1:.1 Subtotal of Development Planning Areas 1,446 78 % Open snd Flood CQntr.Ql 42Q 22 % Total for Lowry Site 1,866 Acres* 100 % The areas shown are gross and do not separate out land for existing or proposed right-of-way. Development Planning Area Descriptions Development Planning Area 1 Education Campus Boundaries: Development Planning Area 1 is bounded on the north by 11th A venue; on the east by Dayton Street; on the south by 6th Avenue; and on the west by regional open space and the Kelley Dam flood control area. Description: The area comprises 232 acres on both sides of the proposed alignment of Yosemite. It includes modern classrooms and training facilities (Buildings 752,758, 859, for example), dormitories, community support facilities (such as the Base Chapel, Base Theater and Commissary) and recreational facilities (including a park in the northeast corner). This area is envisioned to be reused and redeveloped as an Education Campus, which would include a wide variety of direct training/retraining activities and employment opportunities, as well as community uses. These include traditional office, research and development, business incubators, corporate training and administration. New construction is envisioned in addition to reuse of existing structures In addition, a major community park is proposed for the northeast corner of the site. This will continue the current open space use, supplement the area's park and recreation assets and provide a transition from on-base development to surrounding residential neighborhoods. Lowry Reuse Plan Report HOH/BBC 3-6 November 1993

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> ;: :.: c.. 0 u ._J ; : ,_,; '.: :. --' ... ALAMEDA AVE. ..: "' "' .. ,_ .. ; 0 II-!I Rood Control 1 Regional Open Space DEVELOPMENT PLANNING AREAS Lowry Reuse Plan Report HOH/BBC 3-7. @ r.-..-'" II Olin. November 1993

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Development Area 2-Mixed Use/Active Recreation Boundaries: Development Planning Area 2 is in the center of the site, on both sides of Lowry Boulevard. It is bounded on the north side by regional open space and the Education Campus; on the east by the golf course residential are; on the south by the regional open space; and on the west by the Business and Training Center. Description: This area comprises 71 acres and includes existing dormitories, a large hangar (Building 1499), child care center (Building 964) and a cold storage facility (Building 1002). The western portion of this area is envisioned for active recreation, consistent with the regional open space and recreational uses planned for the north and south, which could provide supporting facilities for public or private recreational activities. The eastern portion is designated for mixed use, which includes Community Services/Education Campus/Residential. The intent for this area is to allow flexibility to respond to market demand, within a range of acceptable land uses. New construction is envisioned in addition to reuse of existing structures. Future development might capitalize upon the site's greater visibility and access resulting from its location at the intersection of Yosemite and 6th Avenue. Uses are to be limited to those which are small-scale in character. Development Area 3Golf Course Residential Boundaries: Development Planning Area 3 is bounded on the north by the Mixed Use/Active Recreation area and Education Campus; on the east by Dayton Street, st A venue and Havana Street; on the south by Alameda Parkway; and on the west by the regional open space and Westerly Creek flood control area. Description: This area comprises 362 acres and includes the existing 18-hole golf course and undeveloped area north of the Westerly Creek dam. The intended use for this area is a combined golf course and residential development. This would require re-configuration of the existing golf course but would have a number of very positive benefits. It would create value for the entire Lowry site by creating significant golf course development frontage, create an opportunity for a golf course residential housing product, increase the total land available for residential development and accelerate development of the area north of the dam. The golf course/residential configuration shown on the Reuse Plan is a result of numerous alternative layouts which were studied. Future refmement of the development plan for this area needs to occur, with additional input concerning site conditions, market demand, financial feasibility, access and phasing. Should a market for this housing product not materialize within the next three years, the cities will reevaluate this development plan to consider other marketable uses. The two cities shall proceed as expeditously as possible to implement a new development plan based upon then-existing market conditions. Lowry Reuse Plan Report HOH/BBC 3-8 November 1993

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Development Area 4-Southwest Quadrant Boundaries: This area is bounded on the north by the off-base Mayfair Park neighborhood and the Business and Training Center; on the east by the regional open space and Westerly Creek flood control areas; on the south by Alameda Avenue and on the west by off-site Crestmoor Downs, Monaco Street and the Mayfair Park neighborhood. Description: This area covers 352 acres and includes existing family housing (Aspen Terrace and Sunset Village) and proposed residential areas, existing prefabricated dormitories, the DFAS/ARPC facility, and a proposed park on Fairmount Drive. The Reuse Plan for Development Planning Area 4 proposes a mix of single-family detached and attached housing units supported by open space, parks, and recreation areas as well as possible neighborhood-scale retail and community services. The existing prefabricated dormitory complex (Buildings 410-420) is planned to be relocated or demolished. Existing family housing is to be retained and new residential development is planned for the remaining vacant land. Residential uses will provide an appropriate transition to the surrounding off-site residential areas and can take advantage of the open space amenities which border the site. New residential development will also help to buffer existing neighborhoods from non-residential uses in the Business and Training Center. The Reuse Plan envisions an extension of Quebec through the site which will help to define the DFAS/ARPC cantonment, which provides a major anchor for the Lowry site and is strongly supported by the community. Development Area 5 -Business and Center Boundaries: Development Planning Area 5 is bounded on the north by proposed residential development adjacent to 6th A venue and the Officers' Housing area; on the west cby the regional open space; on the south by proposed residential; and on the west by Quebec Street.''c-""\ Description: This area consists of 196 acres and includes the historic core of the original base, which was the Agnes Memorial Sanitarium. It includes the most developed part of the base and contains several unusual building and facility resources. There are over 1.1 million gross square feet of existing administrative or office facilities, including the Headquarters Building (Building 349), workshops, training facilities, industrial buildings and modem classrooms, as well as several dormitories. The Visiting Officer Quarters (Building 397), Officers' Club (Building 24) and two of the original base hangars (Buildings 401 and 402) are located in this area and present unique opportunities for educational, cultural and/or recreational uses. This area is envisioned to be developed as a Business and Training Center, which would offer an opportunity for private and public entities to locate facilities which complement the activities of the Educational Campus proposed for the northeast quadrant. New construction is envisioned in addition to reuse of existing structures. Although no significant private users have yet been Lowry Reuse Plan Report HOH/BBC 3-9 November 1993

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identified for this area, future marketing plans and implementation efforts will focus on identifying and targeting potential users. Currently, the 21st Space Command Squadron plans to remain in its current facility as a cantonment area, which is located in the eastern portion of the Business and Training Center. In addition, the community supports the request by DF AS to accommodate its existing space needs with facilities on base, in addition to their current cantonment area in the westernmost portion of Lowry. Both of these uses are consistent with the Business and Training Center concept Develo.pment Area 6 Northwest Quadrant Boundaries: Development Planning Area 6 is in the northeast quadrant. It is bounded on the north by 11th Avenue; on the east by the regional open space; on the south by the Business and Training Center; and on the west by Quebec Street Description: This area consists of 233 acres and includes existing family housing (Officers' Housing, Blue Spruce Meadows and Columbine Park), Transient Quarters, the Base Exchange (Building 667), NCO Club (Building 600), mobile home park, ball fields, warehouses and shops. The existing mobile home park and several warehouses are expected to be demolished and the Transient Quarters could be relocated. The Reuse Plan for Development Planning Area 6 proposes a miX of single-family detached and attached housing units supported by open space, parks, and recreation areas as well as possible neighborhood-scale retail and community services, which are compatible with off-site retail and services. Existing housing is to be retained and new residential development is planned to occur on the remaining vacant land. The existing Base Exchange facility is anticipated to be reused with a community service use that is compatible with the predominant residential character of the area. The residential character and density of this proposed neighborhood must be sensitive to both on site and .off-site conditions, and reflect an extension and enhancement of existing surrounding residential neighborhoods. Identified as primarily residential, this area represent a considerable opportunity to build upon the adjacent residential character of the area. The large open space and flood control area adjacent to this area will also serve as a transition and buffer between residential development and the Education Campus to the east Lowry Reuse Plan Report HOH!BBC 3-10 November 1993

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4. URBAN DESIGN INTRODUCTION Lowry's existing physical assets, location and surrounding context significantly influence the opportunities for defining a special character and identity for the public realm of the 1,866-acre site. As is illustrated on the following diagram, Lowry presents unique opportunities to establish linkages to the surrounding developed areas, which are primarily residential. The purpose of this section is to describe the urban desigu .concepts and recommendations envisioned for Lowry and how they will contribute to the character of the site and help to physically integrate Lowry with the surrounding neighborhoods. Specifically, this section addresses how this can be done through the design of the fabric of the site, including open space systems, streets and existing and proposed development on the site. The urban design framework. builds upon Lowry's existing built features (including buildings, roads, dams, infrastructure and other facilities), existing natural and site features (such as topography, vegetation, trees, and drainages) and anticipated uses, to define and communicate a vision for development of the public realm which can be implemented as redevelopment occurs overtime. URBAN DESIGN GOALS The overall purpose of the urban design framework is to establish a common system of open spaces, gateways, edge treatments and other appropriate elements for the Lowry site. This Framework will provide structure and organization to the site as a whole, as well as to specific land use areas or neighborhoods within the site. It will also help the site better fit with the surrounding neighborhoods, which have historically been separate from Lowry, as redevelopment occurs over time. Specific goals which guide the development of the urban design concepts for Lowry are the following: 1. Lowry should be developed as an integral and identifiable portion of Aurora and Denver but should "meld" with the neighborhood, with multiple points of connection to the surrounding street and open space networks. 2. On-site open space should be linked into the regional, community, and neighborhood open space and park systems. It should be used as an amenity and to structure and organize land use and development. 3. On-site flood control and drainage areas should be connected to form an integrated open space system, with linkages to on-site and surrounding open spaces, parks, and amenities. 4. Appropriate transitions, seams and edges should be developed between Lowry and the surrounding neighborhoods. Each condition should be carefully examined. Seams and edges should be clarified through landscape treatment, buffers, access, scale and orientation of new development, and the integration or separation of uses, as appropriate. 5. Major points of entry into the site, or "gateways", should be clearly identified and developed. Lowry Reuse Plan Report HOH/BBC 4-1 November 1993

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Lowry Reuse Pian Report URBAN DESIGN CONTEXT HOHIBBC 4-2 November 1993

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6. The character-of urban design and open space elements should reflect and/or be compatible with the surrounding context, including both formal and informal treatments. Major streets should be planned with a "parkway" character and should blend with the character of streets of Aurora and Denver. 7. Significant natural vegetation, views and visually sensitive or unique areas (such as places of special environmental or historical character) should be considered for preservation or special treatment 8. Significant historic buildings should be preserved and adaptively reused. They include Building 349 (Barracks Building, also referred to as the Headquarters Building), Building 380 (Original Air School Headquarters), Building 379 (Original Armament School), Building 251 (Base Commander's House), Buildings 401 and 402 (hangars) and the Eisenhower Chapel (Denver Landmark and National Register). 9. Special consideration should be given to eliminating or mitigating negative visual impacts associated with reuse, such as automobile parking. 10. Transit and related transportation planning and design should be priority considerations of the overall urban design framework. 11. Thematic elements, such as streetscape, parks, parkways, should be incorporated where appropriate. ANALYSIS Concurrent with the development of the reuse and transportation concepts for the site, an analysis was conducted to identify the physical design opportunities and constraints which might influence the Urban Design Framework. It is presented on the Urban Design Analysis diagram, which follows. A key finding of the analysis is that a well-developed system of open space and circulation linkages extends to all sides of the site, however, these linkages have remained discontinuous because of Lowry's isolation as a secured military facility. Future redevelopment presents a rare opportunity to establish and/or reestablish these linkages and provide public access to the open spaces and natural amenities on Lowry. This change, which will be accomplished through the conversion of the base to civilian uses and related market development, will be of great benefit to future users of the site as well as residents of the surrounding region. Following are definitions of the terms depicted graphically on the Urban Design Analysis diagram: Gateway: Visually perceived point of entry into particular area. Focal Point: Visual termination of a circulation path or axis, which can can be a man made form or natural features. Focal points are opportunities for special treatment and designed or natural focus. Paths: Channels along which the observer customarily, occasionally or potentially moves. These may be streets, walkways, transit lines or bike paths. Edge: Linear element that breaks continuity and may act as a boundary between individual use areas or larger-scale regions. Edges are barriers, though not impenetrable, that close one region off from another. Lowry Reuse Plan Report HOHIBBC 4-3 November 1993

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Lowry Reuse Plan Report URBAN DESIGN ANALYSIS HOH!BBC 4-4 IIOIITOI November 1993

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Seam: View: Linear element along which tWo areas or regions are related and joined together. Seams serve to separate, but still are intended to encourage connection and crossing. Edges and seams are jmportant organizing features that play a role of holding together generalized areas and giving them definable image and identity. Site lines or man-made vistas that have a high visual appeal, or provide a unique orientation to objects on the site. URBAN DESIGN FRAMEWORK The urban design framework is a key component of the Lowry Reuse Plan. It identifies common thematic elements which will help to establish an overall image for the Lowry site while providing flexibility for specific areas, such as the Business and Training Center, to develop more individualized characters. The framework is intended to provide organization, identity, character and purpose to the overall development of the site, and applies to development on both public and private property. The key elements of the urban design framework include the primary and secondary open space systems and character of major parkways and streets on and around the site. It is anticipated that these Framework elements will be implemented as development occurs, through public and/or private efforts and resources. Open Space Systems The primary open space system envisioned for. Lowry is comprised of several discrete but contiguous areas: flood control retention facilities, a proposed re-configured golf course, regional open space areas and three community parks. It is intended to provide an amenity for the entire site while helping to structure the adjacent land use areas. The redevelopment of Lowry provides a major opportunity to establish key regional open space and trail linkages which are currently missing, between the Highline Canal to the south and the Stapleton Airport site to the north. These linkages would provide for on-site trails, bikeways and other non-vehicular linkages, and facilitate access to off-site recreational assets of the Highline Canal, Del Mar Park, 6th A venue and Monaco Parkways, and Crestmoor Park. The primary open space system will be established through the integrated planning and design of landscaping and recreational improvements in the regional open spaces, drainage and flood control areas, and community parks. A secondary open space system is also envisioned for the site, which includes privately-developed open space in the key thematic reuse areas. The purpose of this secondary open space is to refine the circulation and visual linkages on the site in a manner that the surrounding development areas and primary open spaces are linked together with bikeways, parkways and neighborhood-scale parks and open spaces. Future improvements which would help to implement this vision include the design of private open spaces on development parcels, parks, pedestrian/bike trails, lighting, signing and street furnishings. The following Urban Design Framework diagram illustrates both the primary and secondary open space systems. While the delineation of the regional open space, flood control and community parks is intended to be specific and is consistent with the Recommended Lowry Disposition Plan, the characterization of secondary open space in the Education Campus, Business and Training Lowry Reuse Plan Report HOH!BBC 4-5 November 1993

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., . .. :. :; ..: ., URBAN DESIGN FRAMEWORK Lowry Reuse Plan Report HOH/BBC 4-6 ;_ r LEGEND Ei] OPEN SPACE November 1993

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Center, west-side residential areas and golf course/residential areas is much more conceptual. These concepts are expected to be refined as part of the development planning process. Streetscape The integrated design of streets and associated elements located within the right-of-way, such as sidewalks, utility structures, trees, landscaping, signing and pedestrian amenities (referred to as the "streetscape") is a second key element of the urban design framework. The existing system of parkways on major.str.eets in both Denver and Aurora is an important amenity and can provide functional and visual linkages between the site and the surrounding neighborhoods. The appearance of major streets at Lowry is envisioned to be formal and parklike in character, reflecting the surrounding area as well as the significant road improvements that are already in place. Typical street section illustrations of streets are included in the Transportation section of this document, and illustrate pedestrian improvements as well as landscaping. Major on-site streets are envisioned as parkways, with medians in most cases, detached sidewalks, turf and street trees ("tree lawns"), coordinated street lighting and enhanced landscaping and street furnishings. These include 2nd Avenue, 5th Avenue, 6th Avenue, Lowry Boulevard, Fairmount Drive, Uinta Street, and Yosemite Street. The character of streets bordering the perimeter of Lowry is also important, particularly along Quebec, 11th Avenue, Dayton and 1st. These streets are are anticipated to be improved as development occurs. Secondary streets within individual developments are also envisioned to have a high-quality character and meet city technical standards, but the specific character of streetscapes is less defined and is expected to be closely coordinated with on-site development The implementation of these on secondary streets will also occur as development takes place on specific Historic Buildings Lowry Air Force Base is significant because of its influence on the development of Denver and Aurora and its association with technical training during World War II and the Cold War. In 1935, Denver purchased the Agnes Memorial Sanitarium, which was established in 1905, to provide land for the new Army Air Corps base. In addition to demonstrating two factors important to the development of Denver and Aurora (the sanitariums and the military), several important events took place at Lowry Air Force Base: The base served as the Summer White House for President Dwight D. Eisenhower from 1953 to 1955. The National Security Council met at the Lowry Officers' Club in 1954. Lowry was the first home of the U.S. Air Force Academy, which was dedicated at the base in 1955. Several buildings have architectural significance as well as histqrical associations to the base as a whole: Building 349, Barracks Building or "Buckingham Palace", said to be the largest barracks building in the world when constructed (also referred to as the Headquarters Building). Eisenhower Chapel, designated as a Denver landmark and on the National Register of Historic Places. Lowry Reuse Plan Report HOH/BBC 4-7 November 1993

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Building 380, Original Air School Headquarters. Building 379, Original Armament School. Building 251, Base Commander's house, the only building remaining from the 1905 Agnes Memorial Sanitarium. Buildings 401 and 402, large hangars. Additionally, the Officers' Housing to the south of the Commander's house contributes to a sub district. The preservation of these individual buildings can be supplemented with an interpretive program that tells the story of the base, including both its role in the development of Aurora and Denver and its role in World War II and the Cold War. An interpretive trail program, along with some exhibits, could be developed to establish a theme and unique identity for Lowry as it moves into its third development phase, that of re-integration into the Aurora and Denver communities. URBAN DESIGN CHARACTER An additional factor which will influence the overall image and character of Lowry is the urban design character of key development areas of the site -the Education Campus, Business and Training Center, and residential areas. Each of these areas have existing characteristics which must be recognized and which will influence the urban design character. Following is a summary of key urban design concepts for these areas: Education Campus The existing character of this area reflects its military use as the primary training area on Lowry. The internal street grid is set at a diagonal to the off-site street system, which helps to defme it as a distinct area. Existing buildings include dormitories, classrooms training facilities and some community support buildings. The general character is open and low density, with buildings isolated by large amounts of open space and parking areas. The urban design concept for this area is to create a "campus quadrangle", comprised of a formal central open space surrounded by landscaping and existing and future buildings. The quadrangle would also provide a link between the regional open space in the center of the site, the Yosemite Street landscaped parkway and the public park in the northeast corner of the site. The quadrangle concept would also encourage pedestrian activity on the campus, by concentrating existing and future buildings in a central area with a common orientation to the open space. The internal road loop in the Education Campus would reinforce this concept by providing vehicular and transit access to the perimeter of the quadrangle. Further refinements would include recommendations relative to building location, massing and character. A portion of the Education Campus has historical association with the early years of the Air Force Academy. Additionally, the H-shaped temporary classrooms are of interest as an unusual plan for contemporary buildings. Consideration should be given to preserving and reusing one of these temporary buildings and incorporating it into the interpretive trail system. Business and Training Center The Business and Training Center will derive much of its character from the existing buildings and site improvements. A significant portion of the area has been determined eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places. Additionally as identified above, several buildings have Lowry Reuse Plan Report HOH!BBC 4-8 November 1993

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architectural significance and should be preserved and reused as vital parts of the Business and Training Center. The existing Officers' Housing, Commander's House and related streetscape treatment can likewise create the core of a new neighborhood with strong historical an.d architectural associations with the base and Agnes Memorial Sanitarium. The urban design concept for the Business and Training Center is to build off the existing site attributes, wherever possible. There is a significant opportunity to reuse existing buildings as well as develop new building infill, which is architecturally compatible with the existing structures. The existing Officers'Club (Building 24) and nearby Visiting Officers' Quarters (VOQ, Building 397) are excellent facilities which should be worked into the reuse activities and themes. Utilizing the existing pattern of buildings and streets to develop a formal and somewhat "urban" setting is also an important part of the urban design concept. Specific elements include formal parkway streetscapes on perimeter and internal streets and parkway linkages (such as 2nd and 5th Avenues) between public parks and important landmarks, such as the Headquarters Building (Building 397). Mixed Use/Active Recreation Area The character of this area is dominated by existing structures and facilities, including dormitories, a large hangar (Building 1499), cold storage facility (Building 1002) and other support buildings, as well as Lowry Boulevard, which divides it north and south. This area, however has key importance to reuse and redevelopment of Lowry because it can serve as a major focal point for on-site activities. It is located at a mid point within the regional open space system and is equidistant to the Education Campus and the Business and Training Center. The urban design concept for this area will have to evolve out of the use that develops here, (whether it be residential, community services or education), which will depend upon market demand. However, development of the site must occur with a strong recognition of its strategic location in the center of Lowry with access to key circulation and open space systems proposed in the Lowry Reuse Plan. Residential Areas -Both new and existing residential areas represent opportunities to develop true neighborhoods in the sense that they have distinct identities and contribute to a sense of community for the residents. This is a distinct challenge at Lowry, given the variety of existing housing that exists on site, its relationship to future residential development areas, and the character, scale and type of off-site residential neighborhoods. As part of the reuse planning process, specific housing recommendations were prepared relative to new and existing housing. They are presented in the Housing section of this document and include recommendations concerning building type, market considerations and site development. Lowry Reuse Plan Report HOH!BBC 4-9 November 1993

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5. HOUSING INTRODUCTION The purpose of this section is to present recommendations for the use and development of housing at Lowry, within the context of reuse and redevelopment of the site. The recommendations result from the efforts of the Lowry Housing Work Group (LHWG), Lowry Economic Adjustment Committee (LEA C) and the Executive Committee. The Lowry Reuse Plan stresses economic development and education and sets aside considerable land for a business and training center, a campus, areas designated for commercial or residential uses, and land for residential use. In addition to the 867 family units and dormitories with a capacity of 5,000 currently on the base, there is considerable vacant land that is suitable for new residential development. After a description of the Lowry housing planning process and presentation of the Housing Goals, this section presents descriptions and recommendations for potential residential areas as well as existing housing. PROCESS The Lowry Housing Work Group was established as a subcommittee of the Lowry Economic Adjustment Committee (LEAC) with the concurrence of the Executive Committee. Its purpose was to address .issues relating to housing which could be used to refme the community's Preferred Reuse Plan, which was submitted to the Air Force earlier this year. The Housing Work Group consisted of neighborhood representatives, some of whom are members of the LEAC, other LEAC members, representatives from the Lowry Housing <:;ommittee (one of whom is on the LEAC), and non-voting persons with housing expertise. The recommendations of the Housing Work Group were passed on to the LEAC. The LEAC added sections on existing housing and McKinney housing and transmitted recommendations to the Executive Committee. The Executive Committee made changes which are incorporated in this document. The Housing Working Group worked with the goals and criteria which were adopted by the LEAC, which are presented earlier in this document (Chapter 1. Background). ISSUES The Housing Working Group identified the following issues related to existing and future housing: How much land should be set aside for housing? What types and densities are most appropriate and marketable? How should housing relate to and take advantage of open space and parkways? How can the preferences given under the McKinney Homeless Act to homeless providers be best accommodated? How can existing and new housing at Lowry meld in with the surrounding neighborhoods? Lowry Reuse Plan Report HOH/BBC 5-1 November 1993

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VISION A new image must be created for Lowry quickly so that it does not retain the look of an abandoned military compound. Land designated for residential development is important in establishing a new image. Successfully changing the image and creating desirable, new housing and upgrading the existing housing areas will help attract compatible employment opportunities to Lowry and increase the tax base. This new image can be best provided by creating housing and an urban design framework that will enable residential land on Lowry to be developed and absorbed quickly. Housing on Lowry should include a variety of types including single-family and It should meet a wide spectrum of the housing market ranging from affordable to expensive and from those desiring large yards to those desiring low maintenance. It should be attractive and well constructed. At build-out there would be approximately 1,768 new units at an average gross density of 4.5 units per acre. This overall urban design of the housing areas should bring the positive aspects of the surrounding neighborhoods and their urban fabric onto the Lowry site. Some key elements of the urban fabric are the parkway system, mature landscaping, and fine residential neighborhoods. In addition to these urban design elements, other positive aspects of surrounding neighborhoods should be emphasized in new residential development. It is recommended that existing and future amenities on the base, namely the golf course and open space, be developed in such a way that premium home sites are created. Mature landscaping on the base should be kept, breaks in existing landscaping should be filled in, new streets should be tree lined while protecting views and have sidewalks, xeriscaping should be considered where appropriate, and new open space should be created. These treatments will establish a positive image enabling residentially designated land on Lowry to be developed into attractive residential neighborhoods. NEW RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT Following are the goals developed for new residential development: 1. There is an opportunity to create. a highly liveable and desirable environment at Lowry by protecting mountain views and limiting heights, placing utilities underground, saving and adding indigenous trees, cleaning up environmental hazards (including asbestos), incorporating a' variety of uses, and enhancing the surrounding neighborhoods. 2. The density of new, single-family housing development on Lowry should be comparable to or lower than the density of adjacent, single-family, residential areas. 3. Representatives of the surrounding neighborhoods must be given the opportunity to participate in the planning, zoning and PUD processes. 4. Most land available for new housing should be developed as "for sale" housing. 5. Market considerations must be taken into account. Transitional housing for families meeting the defmition of the McKinney Act should be accommodated in such a way that the marketability of existing single-family homes in adjacent neighborhoods is maintained at or exceeds current resale values. The ability of developers to build medium and high end housing on sites at Lowry should also be maintained. Lowry Reuse Plan Report HOHIBBC 5-2 November 1993

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6. New housing development on Lowry must enhance the well-being of surrounding neighborhoods. 7. The edges between Lowry and adjacent residential neighborhoods must be treated sensitively to assure that adjacent neighborhoods are enhanced. This will require a variety of actions including architectural treatment, landscaping, setbacks, buffering, fencing, and good urban design treatment. 8. Most of the land in areas designated for residential development should be developed for single-family, owner-occupied housing in a timely manner. 9. All new residential housing should utilize high quality materials on the exterior. Brick, stone, and stucco are preferred to wood or metal siding. The areas with a potential for new residential development are addressed below. The overall suggested density is 4.5 units per acre for these new development areas which would mean a total of 1,768 new dwelling units. NEW HOUSING AT LOWRY Existing housing conditions both on-base and off-base were studied by the Housing Working Group. These conditions are documented on the Existing Housing Densities diagram. Descriptions and recommendations for the new housing areas at Lowry are provided below. These areas are illustrated on the Existing and Proposed Residential Areas diagram, which also follows. Area E This area includes the existing 31 units of Officers' Housing and'the land in the general vicinity this housing and 5th Avenue. It is recommende4 to be developed as "for sale" housing. The area to the east of the Officers' Housing should be made available as sites for new, single-family, detached homes. There is a total of 25 acres. Following are the recommendations: Extend the residential area east from the Officers' Housing, as shown on the Reuse Plan. Add housing sites along Roslyn Street Develop housing along the Fifth A venue Parkway creating premium residential sites on each side. Add sites on the south side of and along the 5th A venue Parkway north of the Officers' Club. Area F This area runs along Alameda between the off-site Crestmoor Downs residential development and Aspen Terrace. It is about 22 acres. Following are the recommendations: The most immediate potential for this site is for multi-family housing with predominantly 2 and 3-story buildings. A fancy entry way should be created into this new development. It most likely would be created on Alameda Avenue at Quebec Street Lowry Reuse Plan Report HOHIBBC 5-3 November 1993

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. .. -;. WINSTON .3.1 OU./AC EAST COLFAX. DU./Ac: ln GARDEN COURT .0 OU./AC.. ALAMEDA AVE. Flood Control 1 Regional Open Space t;; 5 DEL MAR EXISTING HOUSING DENSITIES Lowry Reuse Plan Report HOHIBBC 5-4 November 1993

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> ;: "'" n. EXISTING AND PROPOSED RESIDENTIAL AREAS Lowry Reuse Plan Report HOH/BBC 5-5 November 1993

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Areas G and H Area G is west of proposed Fairmount Drive and north of the Aspen Terrace family housing area. It is 65 acres in area. Area H is east of proposed Fairmount Drive and next to the southern flood control area. It is 63 acres in area. Following are the recommendations: Area I Areas G and H should be developed as "for sale," patio homes and single-family attached dwellings. The open space would be owned and maintained in common by the condominium or homeowner's association. The open space should be planned to create value for the residential sites. A large park will be developed, in the future, north of this site which could be lined with homes on the south. The planned open space connection from this large park south to Alameda should be configured in order to create premium home sites. The open space could either be publicly owned and maintained or privately owned and maintained with easements allowing public access. The appearance of the dam should be improved in a manner which does not harm its flood control capabilities. The tennis and basketball courts at Lowry Boulevard and Archer Place might be best incorporated into the residential development This area is in the southeast corner of Lowry and includes the land devoted to the existing golf course and vacant land north of Westerly Creek Dam. The Reuse Plan proposes to re-configure the golf course in this area, in conjunction with residential development. Based upon preliminary studies, the resulting residential area would be a minimum of 91 acres. Following are the recommendations: The golf course should be re-configured to create premium home sites along it. A linkage should be created between the golf course and Area I. It is possible to incorporate the spillway into the golf course and serve as this linkage. The relocation of up to nine holes to area I should be explored to create premium home sites in the area of the existing golf course as well as in area I. Ways of taking advantage of the views from this highest portion of the base should be developed. A lake should be created behind the dam (so long as it does not adversely affect flood control) in order to create a positive water feature which will enhance this entire portion of the base and improve its image. The housing type should be primarily single-family, detached homes. The housing should be "for sale" housing. The child development center along 6th Avenue should be retained in its present use and could serve as an amenity for employees and residents of the area. Lowry Reuse Plan Report HOHIBBC 5-6 November 1993

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Area J Area J is located in the northwest quadrant of Lowry, between the Blue Spruce Meadows/Columbine Park family housing areas and the north central flood control area. It is approximately 122 acres. Following are the recommendations: This area should be developed for single-family, detached houses. The landscaping from 6th to 11th along Quebec and extending along Columbine Park should be extended to the eastern edge of Area J. The barbed wire fence should be taken down when redevelopment occurs. The child development center along Tamarac Street should be preserved for use as a day care facility and could serve as an amenity for employees and residents of the area. There is a ballfield, craft building, and the NCO Club in the southeast corner of this site which might be incorporated into the development or operated as a community center to serve the surrounding neighborhoods. EXISTING HOUSING AT LOWRY Based on an analysis of rents around Lowry, estimates of operating expenses, and a capitalization rate of 10%, the existing units appear to have value as rental units remembering that the questions of asbestos and lead-based paint hazards remain. Currently, this value appears to be greater than the land value less demolition costs. The Air Force may discover that demolition of these units may add value to this land. The following descriptions are written for the scenario that these units will be purchased with the purpose of continuing their use as housing. Area A: Columbine Park Columbine Park is located in the of Lowry and at. the comer of Street and 11th A venue. This family housing area consists of 7 buildings with 8 units in each building for a total of 56 units. In the near term, it may be used as rental housing. Over the longer term, there may be the potential to convert it to "for sale" housing or to redevelop all or a portion of it. Following are the recommendations: The units should be treated on the front to break them up and make them more appealing. The landscaping already gives them some street appeal and the landscaping should be retained. There are deep, private back lawns divided by cyclone fencing. Private patios with enclosed storage should be created behind each unit with a gate onto a common landscaped area with a shared playground. The metal cyclone fencing should be replaced with wood fencing to create more privacy and a better appearance. The barbed wire fencing along Quebec and 11th A venue should be replaced with a wall or fencing appropriate for a residential area. Landscaping should be upgraded, enhanced, and emphasized at lOth and Quebec and any entry points to the neighborhood. Lowry Reuse Plan Report HOH!BBC 5-7 November 1993

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Area B: Blue Spruce Meadows Blue Spruce is located in the nort.Masrquadrant of Lowry and fronts onto Quebec Street. This family housing area is a 216 unit project In the near term, it may be used as rental housing. Over the longer term, there may be the potential to convert it to "for sale" housing or to redevelop all or a portion of it. Following are the recommendations: The barbed wire fencing along Quebec should be eliminated or replaced with a wall or fence-appropriate for a residential neighborhood. The landscaping should be enhanced and emphasized at key nodes (see urban design section). Buildings which have not been rehabilitated and which will remain should be rehabilitated in a fashion similar to those that have already been rehabilitated. Area C: Sunset Village Sunset Village is located off-base, on a site north of 1st Avenue and west of Quebec Street. This area is different than the other family housing areas because it backs directly onto the backyards of homes in the Mayfair Park neighborhood. The remainder of the family housing is separated from surrounding neighborhoods by streets. It is recommended that up to 16 units might be demolished and 28 to 32 of the 4-bedroom duplexes could be converted to "for sale" housing. In the near term, the remainder of the family units may be used as rental housing. Over the longer term, there may be the potential to convert it to "for sale" housing or to redevelop all or a portion of it The dormitories on the eastern edge of Sunset Village should be demolished and replaced wi$ new residential development and a park. Following are the recommendations: Create a row of "for sale," owner-occupied housing on either side .of 3rd A venue. The duplexes along 3rd A venue bordering the Mayfair Park neighborhood should be converted to "for sale" housing (28 to 32 units). These units would need to be rehabilitated including exterior architectUral features to give them a less institutional character. Garages may need to be added in order to make them marketable. This concept is subject to identifying an interested developer and a market for this housing. Create a beautifully landscaped entry way on Quebec. This may require demolition of the 8-plex at the northwest comer of 3rd and Quebec. Features need to be added at entrances along 1st Avenue as well to give the project a positive image. the area around 3rd A venue between Orange and Oneida streets. Those 4 and 8 unit buildings, which have not yet been rehabilitated, should be rehabilitated in a manner similar to those that have already been rehabilitated. The housing units could be made more marketable and the aesthetics could be improved by creating private patios and storage areas behind each unit with gates to common open space. This would make it possible to remove the metal storage sheds behind some of the units. Lowry Reuse Plan Report HOH!BBC 5-8 November 1993

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If additional storage and off-street parking is needed, the second building north of 1st Avenue on the western edge should be demolished. This building is only 15 feet from the property line and has not been rehabilitated. The dormitories on the eastern edge of Sunset Park should be demolished. The land, about 10 acres, should be developed into a park and into new housing. The park should serve Sunset Village and be from 2 to 5 acres. The newllousing.should be at a density not exceeding.6 units per acre and could be marketed with the duplexes along 3rd A venue. If all the housing at Sunset Village is demolished, new residential development should be at an average density of 4.5 units per acre. Until the property is occupied, the barbed wire fencing around Sunset Village should remain. Once occupied, it should be replaced with appropriate fencing. The overhead wires should be buried underground. If providers of housing for the homeless apply to the Department of Health and Human Services for units at Sunset, the units should be located primarily toward the southeast corner. Area D: Aspen Terrace Aspen Terrace is located in the southwest quadrant of Lowry, north of Alameda Avenue. This family housing area has 300 units of housing, of which 200 units are 4-bedroom duplexes and 100 units are in 25 stacked flat 4-plex buildings. Aspen Terrace has approximately 74 acres.and has high visibility because of its placement along Alameda and is developed at 4 units per acre. Aspen Terrace is adjacent to three potential residential development areas (F, G; and H): In the near term, it may be used as rental housing. Over the longer term, there may be the potential to redevelop all or a portion of it. Following are the recommendations: Encourage the re-design of the building exteriors to make them more appealing. Landscaping should be enhanced along Alameda There are sixteen units west of Quebec of which four are stacked flats. There are eighteen units east of Quebec of which 12 are stacked flats. The reuse plan calls for Quebec to go through which may necessitate the demolition of some or all of these 34 units. Since these units are the only units on the base that are one story and, therefore, accessible to the handicapped, these units should be marketed to the disabled community. McKINNEY HOUSING FOR THE HOMELESS AT LOWRY Introduction The McKinney Act gives the providers of homeless housing a prioritY in using surplus Federal property. Providers of homeless housing and services must apply to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and demonstrate their experience in providing housing and/or services to the homeless and their financial capability to take on the proposed project. Proposals Lowry Reuse Plan Report HOH!BBC 5-9 November 1993

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deemed approvable by HHS are passed on to the Air Force and they must be addressed in the Record of Decision stating how disposition of Lowry will occur. There are providers of housing for the homeless who are interested in leasing or acquiring property at Lowry, some of which have already requested applications. Assuming that some or all McKinney applicants will be approved for receipt of Lowry land or facilities, this recommendations addresses how to best accommodate McKinney housing in the context of overall residential reuse and development at Lowry. Number of McKinney Units The LEAC recognizes the need for supportive housing for homeless families and individuals. The LEAC was not in agreement on the difficult issue of determining the number of units for homeless families that are appropriate at Lowry. However, a majority favored 86 family units which represents 10% of the existing family units on Lowry. The Executive Committee agreed to 86 family units as the proposed community recommendation to the Air Force. The community is extremely concerned about the appropriateness of housing homeless individuals at Lowry. It is concerned in terms of compatibility with existing neighborhoods which surround the base as well as with the proposed land uses on the base. The community is particularly concerned about the compound impact of both family and individual homeless housing on the ability of the community to realize its reuse plan. However, recognizing that providers of services and housing to homeless individuals may apply and be approved for facilities at Lowry, the community would strongly encourage the Departrnenv of Health and Human Services and the Air Force Base Conversion Agency to take the following community recommendations into account:. 1. Dormitory #963 located on Lowry Boulevard south of 6th A appears to be the only suitable location for housing homeless individuals. The dormitory has 87 rooms. The community strongly recommends that no more that 87 homeless individuals be housed in this facility (one individual to a room) and that on-site 24 hour social work and counseling services be provided. Presumably, kitchen or food service would need to be provided as well. 2. The City of Denver's group horne zoning provisions governing supported independent living facilities would specifically preclude using the nearby buildings 960, 961 and 962 for like use. Denver's ordinance prohibits such facilities from being located within 2,000 feet of each other. 3. Buildings 405 and 406 and the Transient Housing Complex of 40 units near Blue Spruce Housing should not be awarded for individual McKinney providers. These units are all proximate to existing housing areas which will already be impacted with McKinney units for families. 4. None of the five large 1,000 man dormitories should be awarded for McKinney use. While they are likely too large to be economically feasible for such a use, other reasons compel the community to recommend against this. The community believes that it is ill advised to congregate this many individuals in a single facility both from the standpoint of the community and the social welfare of the individuals. Also, the community believes these large dormitories are a unique site asset and provide opportunities to enhance the training and education focus of the reuse plan. These potential uses should not be compromised. Lowry Reuse Plan Report HOH!BBC 5-10 November 1993

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5. Finally, the community will oppose any uses which are operated as temporary shelters or housing for homeless individuals without supportive services. As stated previously, such supportive counseling and social services should be provided on-site. Homeless individuals should not be required to travel off the base to receive these supportive services. 6. If there are approved requests for other facilities not. addressed in this plan, the community requests the opportunity to analyze their. suitability. It is recognized that the McKinney homeless units in applications may be higher than the number acceptable to residents of surrounding neighborhoods. The McKinney Act is a Federal Law. Although the Air Force is required to consider the community's Preferred Reuse Plan, Federal agencies may take actions that do not follow recommendations set forth here. The responsibility for providing services to the homeless has fallen almost exclusively on the City and County of Denver, and to a lesser degree, on the City of Aurora. Further, the protection of the surrounding neighborhoods can only be assured and redevelopment of Lowry will only be successful if the number of units owned and operated by homeless providers is limited to the number stated above. The cities oppose the use of Lmvry facilities by providers who do not have an established history of providing homeless services within the jurisdictions of Denver and Aurora. The Cities of Denver and Aurora should work with approved McKinney providers, the Denver Regional Council of Governments, the Metro Homeless Families Coalition, and the State of Colorado to identify strategies for dispersing housing for the homeless throughout the Denver Metropolitan Area including approved applications for Lowry in excess of 86 family units and 87 rooms for individuals. Dispersion In order to maximize the prospects of attracting new development to Lowry and enhancing surrounding neighborhoods, transitional housing for homeless families should ;be dispersed as much as possible and in a manner that makes it difficult to identify any building as a homeless project. This pre-supposes the management concept described below. In any event, no existing housing development should have more than 15% of its units rented by homeless families. Phasing for Homeless Families McKinney homeless families accommodated in the existing family housing at Lowry should be phased in as market rate units are occupied. The development of market rate units at Lowry should be expedited. Management It is recommended that there should be one property management company responsible for property management of all four of the existing housing developments or one each for Aspen; Sunset; and Blue Spruce and Columbine. All units in these developments including those owned by McKinney providers or leased from HHS would be placed under contract with the same management company jointly chosen by all the owners and the McKinney providers. The McKinney providers would be responsible for selecting and providing services to their clientele who would have to participate in and be meeting the goals of a self-sufficiency program. Elements of such a program would be setting goals, regular contact with a caseworker, employment or active participation in job training or education, and the provision of services. Lowry Reuse Plan Report HOH/BBC 5-11 November 1993

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Any units provided to individuals (as distinguished from homeless families) in a residential care setting should be subject to Denver and Aurora ordinances concerning placement of shelters and group homes. Any such housing should be in a carefully supervised program by an experienced provider. Future Development Given the uncertainty of future housing demands at Lowry or future needs for housing for the homeless, flexibility should be maintained to allow McKinney providers to sell off housing obtained under the McKinney Act and use the proceeds from the sale to serve the homeless elsewhere on the base or preferably off of Lowry. If this is not prohibited by law, HHS should be requested to provide for this in their deed restrictions and to seek waivers of any regulatory requirements that inhibit such future sales. Lowry Reuse Plan Report HOH!BBC 5-12 November 1993

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6. TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM Introduction The purpose of this chapter is to describe the Transportation System envisioned for the Lowry Reuse Plan. It presents the conclusions and recommendations of the transportation planning effort, as well as appropriate background information. Considerable analysis has occurred in the development of the transportation concepts, which is documented separately. The Transportation System was developed with a recognition of the need to balance potential impact of traffic on surrounding neighborhoods with the requirement of creating a system which will serve the site and foster successful reuse and redevelopment. It is presented in terms of overall objectives and key findings of the analysis phase, description of the transportation system elements and policies for implementation. It concludes with a summary of current unresolved issues which need to addressed in the near future. Following are the specific sections: Planning Process Traffic and Transportation Performance Guidelines Transportation Findings Transportation Network Alternative Mcxies Street Character Transportation Demand Management Guidelines Phasing Considerations Unresolved Issues Planning Process In recognition of the importance of traffic and transportation impacts on the surrounding neighborhoods, the Executive Committee established the Traffic and Transportation Working Group (TTWG) early in the planning process to provide community input on traffic and transportation issues. Specifically, the TTWG served as a sounding board for community concerns, provided feedback on transportation concepts and guidelines and prepared comments and recommendations to the Lowry Economic Adjustment Committee (LEAC) and the Executive Committee in the area of traffic andtransportation for Lowry reuse. The conclusions and recommendations contained within this section have been endorsed by the TTWG. Traffic and Transportation Performance Guidelines The Traffic and Transportation Performance Guidelines developed by the TTWG and adopted by the LEAC and Executive Committee are listed below. They were used as planning objectives and evaluation criteria in developing the transportation network for the Lowry .Reuse Plan. 1 Traffic should be distributed through appropriate land use and reuse planning and by providing multiple points of access. 2. Balance the provision of improved internal and external mobility and site access with the need to preserve and enhance surrounding community character. 3. Lowry land use and transportation network planning should account for Stapleton redevelopment and infrastructure changes. Lowry Reuse Plan Report HOH!BBC 6-1 November 1993

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4. Emphasize non-automobile (bike, pedestrian and public transit travel) to and within the area. 5. Interim roadway and reuse plans and development phasing should be compatible with long-term goals and guidelines for Lowry reuse. 6. Reuse and redevelopment should pay their fair share of on-site infrastructure improvement costs. 7 Potential adverse traffic impacts should be identified and mitigated wherever possible. Transportation Findings Based upon traffic analysis and forecasting conducte:
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residential neighborhoods west of Lowry. As a result, the total traffic using 6th or 8th is relatively similar for different street network configurations. However, configurations that create similar continuity and accessibility for both 6th and 8th A venues create the best balance between 6th and 8th (most of the eastbound through traffic using 6th, most of the westbound traffic and traffic to and from the Health Care District using 8th). Transportation Network The Transportation Network is intended to serve on-site reuse and development, establish linkages to neighboring streets and disperse traffic impacts on the surrounding streets. The network makes use of existing streets wherever feasible (including upgrading them as required) but also envisions the construction of new roads in some locations in order to serve the anticipated pattern of reuse and address specific off-site mobility needs. It is illustrated on the Transportation Network diagram, which follows. This diagram is conceptual in nature and subject to refinement, as reuse and redevelopment occur. Primary and secondary access to the site is provided from all four sides in order to optimize access while distributing traffic impacts. A central feature of the street system is an internal circulator loop, consisting of segments of Yosemite Street, Lowry Boulevard, Uinta Street and 7th Avenue. This feature facilitates on-site circulation (particularly transit), provides impedance to discourage east/west regional through traffic from travelling through the center of the site and serves to delineate development areas from the central open space. The alignment of Yosemite Street illustrated on the diagram is one of several alternative configurations which were studied. This alignment, particularly relative to the intersection with 6th A venue and the relationship to the Education Campus, may be subject to future refmement The internal street system consists of the following north/south streets: Quebec Street, Syracuse Street, Uinta Street, Fairmount Street, Yosemite Street and a portion of Lowry Boulevard. Streets running east/west include: 8th and 7th Avenues, 6th Avenue and the west segment of Lowry Boulevard. The scale of these streets ranges from classifications of minor arterials to collectors. They may have from two to four travel lanes, depending upon the volumes anticipated and other design criteria. In addition, access points for local and collector streets have been studied and are indicated. The precise alignment of these streets would depend upon how and when development occurs. These streets typically have two travel lanes. A more detailed description of the character of these streets is included in a later section of this chapter. Alternative Modes Encouraging the development of alternative modes of transportation is an important feature of the Lowry Reuse Plan, and reinforces earlier recommendations of the Southeast Quadrant Land Use and Transportation Study. Specific alternative mode measures related to Lowry include planning for bus transit to and within the site, developing a workable system of on-street bike lanes and bikeways and providing for convenient and safe pedestrian movement. 1. Transit The transit concept for the site is to adapt the existing system of Regional Transportation District (RTD) bus routes around and through the redeveloped site in order to serve the proposed land uses as they develop, supported by a central transfer point and shuttle. Lowry Reuse Plan Report HOHIBBC 6-3 November 1993

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>i 3:, -lsi l:.: I DFAS!ARPC / J( jl I I< .. ... I : . : _.,"-o1 "l."'lC! em :o oo rntineC suppor.r.a of carr.ous 6t1'\ AVE. Community Service/ Education Campus 1 Residential Res. ...: C/) < z < > < :r LEGEND MAJOR ARTERIAL MINOR ARTERIAL -COLLECTOR LOCAL STREET TRANSIT CENTER REFINEMENTS TO TRANSPORTATION NETWORK Lowry Reuse Plan Report HOH/BBC 6-4 November 1993

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Initially, the bus transit system would be comprised of realigned RTD routes to serve the site but eventually it could involve additional routes, such as a potential Yosemite route, which could be developed to link Lowry with the redeveloping Stapleton site, as well as points north and south via new street linkages. The proposed transit routes are shown on the Transit Concept diagram. Please note that this diagram is conceptual in nature and does not yet have the endorsement of the RTD. An important feature of the transit concept is the identification of a potential high-visibility transit. center .in the. central. western portion of the Education Campus. This is an ideal location for a facility which could serve as a transfer point for regional and local bus service which passes near or through the Lowry site. In addition, the proposed transit center could serve as an inter-modal transfer point for an on-site shuttle system, which could eventually serve the Education Campus, Business and Training Center, and possible off-site users such as the Colorado Boulevard health care district The transit concept would be reinforced at the individual site scale by well-located bus stops, convenient pedestrian linkages and other provisions which can encourage the use of transit to and within the site, thereby reducing the use of single occupanc'y vehicles. The features of this approach are presented in greater detail in the Transportation Demand Management (TDM) Guidelines which are presented later in this section. 2 Bike Lanes, Bikeways and Trails Because of Lowry's "in-fill" site character and central location, redevelopment presents an ideal opportunity to establish new bicycle linkages which serve the site as well as surrounding community. These bicycle facilities are envisioned to include the following: bike lanes, bikeways and hiker/biker trails. The planned locations of these routes are illustrated on the Bicycle Routes and Trails Concept diagram. Bike Lanes are intended for commuting and are planned for 6th Avenue (west), Yosemite Street, Uinta Street, Syracuse Street, 8th A venue, 7th A venue Crossing and residential collector streets. On these streets, outside vehicular travel lanes in both directions should be a minimum of 15 feet wide to accommodate bicycles. Where on-street parking is allowed on these streets, the parking lanes are to be separated by an approximately one foot buffer between the travel lane and the parking lane. Bike lanes are considered to be part of the public roadway and would be maintained as part of the street system. Bikeways are located off-street and are also intended for commuting. They are planned for Lowry Boulevard and 6th Avenue (east), portions of Quebec Street, Fairmount Street, 11th Avenue, Dayton Street and 1st Avenue (east and west). Typically, these facilities are to serve pedestrians separate from bicyclists. They consist of a detached pavement, approximately 12 feet wide and located on one side of a public street. Depending upon the availability of land, they may be within the public right-of-way or on adjacent private land. Maintenance responsibility for bikeways varies with the particular situation. Hiker/biker trails are primarily recreational in nature and are intended to link with the surrounding regional open space and trail system. As a result, they are usually located within an open space area or corridor and are maintained as part of that system. Hiker/biker trails are planned to run through the Lowry site, in particular the central open space system, with off-site linkages to the Highline Canal on the south and east, the City of Aurora bike trail on 6th Avenue (east), and Westerly Creek to the north. These trails are a minimum of 12 feet wide in order to allow two directions of bicycle traffic as well as pedestrians. Lowry Reuse Plan Report HOH!BBC 6-5 November 1993

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Lowry Reuse Pian Report TRANSIT ROUTES HOH/BBC 6-6 November 1993

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ALAMEDA AVE. LEGEND PROPOSED TRAIL ------ON-STREET BIKE LANE -OFF-STREET BIKE WAY REFINEMENTS TO TRAILS I BIKE ROUTES Lowry Reuse Plan Report HOH/BBC 6-7 November 1993

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The coordination and linkage of bike and pedestrian trails on the site is key to their functioning effectively. This will enhance mobility on and near the site while reducing the use of single occupant vehicles. The phasing of these improvements and creation of a "backbone" system of bike and pedestrian trails at an early stage should be a primary goal of on-site transit and park development. 3. Sidewalks In order to to create a pedestrian-friendly environment at Lowry (hereby reducing reliance on automobiles and encouraging the use of transit), a comprehensive system of sidewalks is essential. Fortunately, there is already in place in the existing administrative and campus areas an extensive system of sidewalks (primarily detached). This system needs to be upgraded and expanded as reuse and development occurs, with particular attention given to developing linkages with proposed pedestrian and bicycle trails. Future development of other portions of the Lowry site must also include sidewalks as a mandatory site feature. Street Character The physical design character of existing and proposed streets is key to providing for functional circulation on the site while at the same time contributing to a physical image of Lowry that is enduring, high quality and well integrated with the surrounding community. In conjunction with the open space space system, streets are the primary physical element on the site which structures the "public realm" and provides the framework for development of the Education Campus, Business and Training Center, residential areas and other supporting uses on the site. Following is a summary of core planning and design concepts for street character at Lowry: 1. Provide for the transportation elements and facilities as illustrated in the Transportation Network, Transit Concept and Bicycle Routes and Trails Concept. These elements include automobile and transit travel lanes, bike lanes, bikeways, trails and on-street parking. 2. Develop a "backbone" system of landscaped parkways with landscaped medians, which reflects the concepts in the Lowry Reuse Plan. 3. Provide for landscape treatments consisting of landscaped edge treatments (referred to as "tree lawns") with detached sidewalks. 4. Use existing street pavements wherever feasible, particularly in the early phases of reuse and development 5. Plan for the future upgrading of streets to current Aurora and Denver standards in terms of pavement width, curb and gutter, sidewalks, lighting, drainage, etc. 6. Delineate sufficient right-of-way to allow for future improvements and meet current Aurora and Denver standards. 7. Account for special or unique site conditions such as available right-of-way, existing buildings and improvements, access patterns and adjoining land use. The following Typical Street Character Sections illustrate in preliminary detail the intended character for major on-site streets as well as affected streets in the Lowry area. They represent the integration of the core planning and design concepts described above with the urban design, land use and transportation concepts for the site. Lowry Reuse Plan Report HOH/BBC 6-8 November 1993

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Design criteria used in the preparation of the typical sections include the following standards. The dimensions shown are for planning purposes and are subject to future refinement., including coordination with current requirements for both cities: 11 foot wide through travel lanes 10 foot wide auxiliary left turn, right turn and bus stop lanes 8 foot wide on-street parking lanes 6 foot wide on-street bicycle lanes 12 foot wide bikeways and trails 8 foot wide sidewalks on major streets 5 foot wide sidewalks on minor streets (unless more width is needed for major pedestrian flows) All lane widths exclude the street gutters Lowry Reuse Plan Report HOH/BBC 6-9 November 1993

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I .. Quebec (Leetsdale to Exposition) Existing Conditions 30' wide street and 75' min. R.O.W. 2 through lanes with left tum lanes at selected locations. Drainage ditches on each side. No sidewalks or curb and gutter. Looking North 75' R.O.W. Typical Section Proposed Conditions 4 through lanes with center left tum Jane. Attached sidewalk on east side. Detached sidewalk on west side. Nole: Street is 62' wide with attached sidewalks and double left tum lanes on approach to Leetsdale. Quebec (Exposition to Alameda) Looking North-(off site condition) Existing Conditions 30' wide street and 60' R.O.W. 2 through Janes with left tum lanes at selected locations. Drainage ditches on east side. No sidewalks or curb nnd gutter. Lowry Reuse Plan Report Typical Section Proposed Conditions Additional right-of-way required near Alameda for auxiliary lanes. 4 through lanes. "No left tum" regulations may be necessary at some locations in future years. Attached sidewalks on both sides. Trees in covered tree wells on west side. 18" concrete wall for tree and splash protection on west side. New wood barrier fence on west side. Conciete retaining wall on west side, where necessary to match backyard elevations. HOH!BBC 6-10 November 1993

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Quebec (Alameda to 1st Looldng North Lv 8tJl' $t> 2 Ave.) ... rExisting Conditions Not applicable Typical Section l)roposed Conditions Requires 125' of right-of-way from Lowry site. 4 through lanes with auxiliary lanes at major intersections. Off-street bike path on east side. Detached sidewalk on west side. 28' wide landscaped median. Quebec (1st. Ave. to 4th. Ave.) Existing Conditions 66' wide street and 100' wide R.O.W. 2 through Janes with left turn lane. Looking North 110' R.O.W. Typical Section l'rOJ)Osed Conditions Requires 10' of additional right-of-way from Lowry site. 9' wide attached sidewalk next to Lowry fence. 4 through Janes and auxiliary Janes at major intersections. Lowry Reuse Plan Report HOHIBBC 6-11 Retrofit with landscaped medians Detached sidewalk on west side 12' wide detached sidewalk on east side to accommodate bikes. November 1993

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Quebec (4th. Ave. to 6th Ave.) Existing Conditions 66' street/150' R.O.W with separate frontage road. 2 through Janes with left turn Jane. Looking North 165' R.O.W. Typical Section Proposed Conditions Requires 15' of additional right-of-way from Lowry site. Auxiliary lanes at major intersections. Retrofit existing street with landscaped median. 9' attached sidewalk next to Lowry fence. l I Detached sidewalk on west side. 12' wide detached sidewalks on east side to accommodate bikes. Quebec (6th Ave. to 12th Ave.) Looking North \ R.O.W. Typical Section Existing Conditions 30' to 40' wide street and 55' to 60' R.O.W. 2 through lanes with left turn lanes at some locations. On-street parking pennitted in some areas. Partial curb and gutter. Proposed Conditions Requires 40' to 45' of additional right-of-way from Lowry site. 4 through lanes with auxiliary lanes at major intersections. Parking on west side. Attached sidewalks on both sides. Trees in tree wells. 18" concrete wall for tree and splash protection. 16' wide landscaped median Custom hardscape design on east side. _Lo __ 6-12

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Existing Conditions 30' wide street and 60' R.O.W. at some locations. On-street parking on one side permitted in some areas. 2 through lanes with left tum lane. .Partial curb and gutter. 182' to 190' R.O.W. Typical Section Proposed Conditions Requires 122' to 130' additional right-of-way 36' to 44' wide landscaped median. 4 through lanes with auxiliary lanes at major intersections. Detached sidewalks with double tree lawn on both sides. Syracuse Street. (6th Ave. to 11th Ave.) Looking North Existing Conditions Not applicable Lowry Reuse Plan Report Typical Section Proposed Conditions 2 lanes wilh parking and ons!Icct b1kc lane 011 both sides. Detached sidewalk and !Ieelawn 011 both sides HOH!BBC 6-13 November 1993

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Existing Conditions Uinta (Lowry Dlvd. to 11th Ave.) Looking No11h 9Q' R.O.W. Typical Section Ptoposed Conditions .. 'l 4 through Janes with tum Janes. Reduce to 2 lanes with center left tum Jane utilizing existing lanes on the east side of the street. On-street parking both sides. On-street bike lanes on both sides. Detached sidewalks and tree lawn both sides. Yosemite Street (Lowry Dlvd. to 11th Ave.) Looking North Existing Conditions Some existing streets in place. Lowry Reuse Plan Report 130' R.O.W. 'l Typical Section Proposed Conditions May usc portions of existing streets for proposed alignment. 4 through Janes wiUt bike lanes both sides. Auxiliary lanes at major intersections. 24' wide landscaped median. Detached sidewalks and trcclnwn on both sides. HOHIBBC 6-14 November 1993

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.. Fairmount Drive (Alameda to North of Lowry Dlvd.) Looking .North Existing Conditions Not applicable 120' R.O.W. Typical Section Proposed Conditions 2 through lanes with center left tum lane. Parking and on-street bike lane on both sides. Detached sidewalk and trcelawn both sides. Enlarge cast sidewalk to 12' wide to allow bikes. Enhanced border landscaping to create parkway. Lowry Boulevard (6th Ave. to Quebec) Existing Conditions 4 through lanes with landscaped median, attached sidewalks. Lowry Reuse Plan Report Looking Southwest 1 120' R.O.W. Typical Section Proposed Conditions 4 through lanes with tum lanes. Auxiliary lanes at major intersections 24' wide landscaped median. Detached 12' wide sidewalk for bikes and pedestrians on the north side. Detached sidewalk on south side and treclawn both sides. HOH/BBC 6-15 November 1993

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Dayton Street ( ll th Ave. to 1st Ave.) Looking North Existing Conditions 2lhrough Janes with turn lane. Partial curb and guller Typical Section Proposed Conditions 30' of additional R.O.W. required from Lowry site. 2 through Janes with center Jefi tum Jane Parking on both sides. Detached 12' wide sidewalk on west side for pedestrians.and bikes. Sidewalk on cast side. Treelawn on both sides where possible. 1st A venue (Quebec to Monaco) Looking West Existing Conditions 38' wide street, 60' R.O.W. 5' detached sidewalk on north side. 7' allached sidewalk on soulh side. 2 through lanes with center left tum lane. Lowry Reuse Plan Report 95' R.O.W. Typical Section Proposed Conditions 2through Innes with center lcfi turn lane. Parking and on street bike lanes on both sides. Detached sidewalk and treelawn on both sides. 35' of additional R.O.W. required from Lowry. Widen the south side of road 26'. HOH!BBC 6-16 November 1993

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1st Avenue (Havana to Dayton) Looking West BS' R.O.W. Typical Section Existing Conditions Proposed Conditions 1 lane westbound, 2 lanes cast bound. Partial curb and gutter. 2 through Janes with center left tum lane and parking on both sides. Auxiliary lanes at mnjor intersections Detached 12' sidewalk on south side for pedestrians and bikes. Sidewalk on north side with Lreclawn on both sides. Bike lanes on both sides. 6th Avenue (Uinta to Quebec) Looking West l Existing Conditions 4 through Janes with tum lane, attached sidewalk, curb and gutter. Lowry Reuse Plan Report t\t *) ........ 150' R.O.W. Typlcnl Section Jlroposcd Conditions 2 through lanes with parking, and bike lane on both sides. 38' wide landscaped parkway median. Building setbacks required for new construction. No driveway access to parkwny Detached sidewalks and trcclawn on both sides. Preserve oflicer's housing area on south. Comply with National Historic Register Guidelines and Southeast Qundrant study. HOH!BBC 6-17 November 1993

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6th Avenue (Dayton to Lowry Dlvd.) Looking West Existing Conditions 4 through lanes with tum lane, attached sidewalk, curb and gutter. 120' R.O.W. Typical Section Proposed Conditions 4 through Janes with turn lane. Auxiliary lanes at major intersections. 24' wide landscaped median. Detached 12' wide sidewalk for pedestrians and bikes on north side. Detached sidewalk on south side and lreclawn on both sides. 7th Ave. Open Space Crossing and Transit Conneclur(Yosemile to Uinta) Looking West Existing Conditions Not applicable Lowry Reuse Plan Report 38' 80' R.O.W. Typical Section Proposed Conditions 2 through lanes with on-street bike lane on boUt sides. Detached sidewalk and treclawn on both sides. HOHIBBC 6-18 November 1993

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8th Ave. (Quebec to Colorado) Looking West eo R.O.W. Typical Section Existing 2 through lanes except near Colorado and Hale Pkwy. where there are 3 through lanes. Left tum lanes at selected locations. Sloping curb with narrow sidewalks in most areas. Propo.sed Conditions 2 west bound and 1 east bound through lanes. Parking on south side. Left tum lanes at selected locations Rebuild curb and gutter to 6" vertical curb where necessary. Street trees in tree wells. 18" concrete wall for splash and tree protection. 8th Avenue (Uinta to Quebec) Existing Conditions Not applicable Lowry Reuse Plan Report Looking West 90' R.O.W. Typlcnl Section Proposed Conditions 2 through lanes with parking and on street bike Jane on both sides. Detached sidewalk and trcclawn on both sides. HOHIBBC 6-19 November 1993

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Existing Conditions 2 through lanes wilh turn lane. Parking on north side. Partial curb and guller. Existing Conditions Not applic:,tb]e Lowry Reuse Plan Report 11th Avenue (Dayton to Quebec) Looking West Typical Section Proposed Conditions .. 30' of additional R.O.W. required from Lowry site. 2 through lanes with tum Jane. Parking or auxiliary lanes on both sides. Detached 12' wide sidewalk on south side for pedestrians and bikes. Residen tlal Collectors Typical Section Proposed Conditions 2 through lanes with parking on both sides. Sidewalk. and landscape will vary. HOHIBBC 6-20 November 1993

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Transportation Demand Management (TDM) Guidelines Future Lowry activity center workers and students will be encouraged to use alternatives to single occupant autos (SOV). Alternative choices will include "ride-sharing" (carpool, vanpool), public transit (RTD), bike, and walk. To help achieve this, redevelopment will incorporate the following Transportation Demand Management (TDM) Guidelines: 1. Exceed the 1990 regional average vehicle occupancy for work trips by 15% to achieve a 1.25 AVO level for Lowry work trips (level in 1959 was 1.24 and has declined to 1.09). 2. Double Auraria's student transit mode use to achieve a 10% transit travel mode for future Lowry commuter students. 3. Exceed by 50% the current portion of Southeast Denver subarea home-based work trips using transit to achieve 10.8% of future Lowry activity center work trips via public transit. 4. Exceed the Denver Bicycle Master Plan goals for all commuters using bicycles (employees and students) of2% by 1995 and 3% by 2000. TDM Action Plan A number of actions can be instituted during Lowry reuse to help realize or exceed the reductions in single occupancy auto use described above. 1. Design redeveloped sites to give preferential parking for registered carpools, vanpools, bicycles and alternative fuel vehicles. 2. Integrate future pedestrian trails, bikeways, sidewalks and bus stops into redevelopment plans to provide direct, convenient linkages to on-site parcels as well as off-site uses and activity centers, such as the Colorado Boulevard Health Care District and the Stapleton redevelopment. 3. Provide amenities for transit patrons including passenger shelters, benches, and all weather, paved waiting areas. 4. Work with the private sector to set up a private, non-profit Transportation Management Association (TMA) for the Lowry activity center. The TMA would facilitate "ride-sharing" coordination with DRCOG, fund an on-site shuttle bus operation, and coordinate matters of tra)1sit access, service levels and passenger amenities with RTD. Membership in the TMA would include representatives of the Business and Training Center, the Community College alliance, DFAS and other major employers that may emerge, and, representatives from affected neighborhoods. These actions could be administered in joint fashion by the respective land use review entities of Denver and Aurora. Lowry Reuse Plan Report HOHIBBC 6-21 November 1993

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Phasing Considerations Phasing of transportation and street improvements at Lowry will be in response to market demand as well as the means and timing for disposition of various parcels and other improvements by the Air Force. As a result, a precise timetable for phasing of transportation improvements has not yet been established. However, in acknowledgement of community concerns relative to traffic and other potential impacts, the following preliminary Phasing Guidelines have been developed. They will be supplemented and refined as the disposition and management of the Lowry site is better defined: 1. Management of short-term access to Lowry, security and the operation of external gates must be done in a manner that protects the neighborhoods around and within Lowry. This is particularly important in the period immediately following the September 1994 closure date, the commencement of "Caretaker Status" and the early phase of reuse which follows. 2. The surrounding community must have input into the planning for and implementation of "Caretaker Status", particularly with respect to security and traffic issues. A plan for interim controls, phasing and management that addresses community concerns needs to be in place well before Lowry closes. 3. Construction of Quebec Street through the site and widening of Quebec north of the site would be done with adequate right-of-way, landscaped medians and appropriate setbacks. Specifically, widening of Quebec north of 11th Avenue would require acquisition of additional right-of-way on one or both sides of the street. Widening of Quebec between Alameda and Leetsdale would not require significant right-of-way except for approach lanes at the intersection with Alameda. Initial construction improvements in this segment would include sound fenc;:es on the west, landscaping and sidewalks. Unresolved Issues The community recognizes that this Transportation section is primarily long-range in focus and needs further refinement, particularly relative to interim activities and phasing. However, this refinement needs to occur in coordination with the Air Force, local community and other parties, and within the context of decisions that will be made relative to the disposition and management of the site. Following is a summary of specific transportation-related issues to be addressed in subsequent activities: 1. Development of a "Caretaker Program" for Lowry which satisfactory addresses community concerns relative to access to all or portions of Lowry, security, traffic patterns, and impacts on the surrounding neighborhoods. 2. Development of a satisfactory short-term traffic control and management system which is responsive to on-site users as well as the surrounding community. 3. Identification of critical "triggers" and "safety valves" for instituting traffic control measures and transportation improvements (on and off-site) as development occurs (eg: 6th Avenue, 8th Avenue, Quebec Street and Yosemite Street). 4. When the 6th Avenue gate is opened to unrestricted traffic, the interruption of 6th Avenue between Uinta Street and Yosemite Street must have occurred. The Denver Comprehensive Plan (as amended) calls for specific improvements on 6th Avenue Lowry Reuse Plan Report HOHIBBC 6-22 November 1993

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to be in place when the 6th Avenue (west) gate is opened. The implementation of the traffic network ODand through Lowry in a timely fashion is desired by both Denver and Aurora to assist in the redevelopment of the base. The timing of making the improvements on 6th and 8th A venues shall be a priority and will be addressed in the next phase of the Lowry redevelopment process. 5. Assessment of the impact of Lowry-related capacity improvements on the conformance of the Denver Regional Transportation Plan to federally-mandated air quality requirements. (This needs to be addressed as part of DR COG 2020 Transportation analysis, which is occurring during the next 18 months). 6. Coordination of the proposed Lowry transportation system with the on-going planning for Stapleton redevelopment. 7. Monitoring of actual traffic volumes on and around Lowry compared to forecasted traffic volumes, followed by the appropriate evaluation and revision to the traffic and transportation programs and plans. 8. Identification of appropriate mitigation measures for traffic impacts related to Lowry reuse and redevelopment. Lowry Reuse Plan Report HOH/BBC 6-23 November 1993

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RECOMMENDED LOWRY DISPOSITION PLAN Lowry Economic Recovery Project Lowry Air Force Base, Colorado November 1993 -.--. ci:Q {1 I 'J : lr

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RECOMMENDED LOWRY DISPOSITION PLAN Lowry Economic Recovery Project Lowry Air Force Base, Colorado

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RECOMMENDED LOWRY DISPOSITION PLAN INTRODUCTION The purpose of this document is to present to the Air Force the community's recommendations for disposition of the 1,866-acre Lowry Air Force Base property. It reflects the work of Denver and Aurora elected officials, city staff, concerned citizens, Lowry Economic Recovery Project (LERP) staff, the Lowry military and civilian community, and technical advisors. Through a variety of forums, these participants have refmed the community's concepts and visions for reuse of the site to better reflect market and economic conditions, requirements for public services and facilities and community concerns about development impacts. This Recommended Lowry Disposition Plan is a companion document to the Lowry Reuse Plan, which is presented separately. Both documents represent refinements to the community's Preferred Reuse Plan, which was presented to the Air Force in April, 1993. This Disposition Plan first summarizes the community's objectives for Lowry's redevelopment and the thinking behind the proposed disposition. It then presents the recommended disposition on a parcel-by-parcel basis and discusses conveyance conditions related to the utility and street systems and other matters. The November, 1993 Lowry Reuse Plan presents a more detailed discussion of the community's vision for reuse of the base. It includes a market and economic overview and chapters on land use, urban design, housing and transportation. REUSE AND REDEVELOPMENT APPROACH. The Lowry Reuse Plan reflects the community's desire for a balance of reuse activities and development and the importance of the surrounding neighborhood and community context. Activities and land use allocations have also been developed with consideration to public services requirements and environmental concerns (primarily traffic and transportation). The map and chart which follow (Exhibits 1 and 2) depict and summarize the program of uses proposed in the Lowry Reuse Plan. The Denver" and Aurora communities have two primary objectives in redeveloping the Lowry site. First, they wish to replace jobs lost through base closure, and second, they wish to extend their community of residential neighborhoods and supporting uses and facilities onto Lowry. The primary focus of economic recovery for the community that affects base re-use is the encouragement of occupational training, technical training, and educational activities, which maximize the value of Lowry's existing facilities. While non-residential areas will likely include general business and corporate uses, the training theme is seen as dominating non-resjdential development on the site. The Education Campus proposed for the northeast quadrant of the site and the Business and Training Center in the central western area will both serve as intermediate and long-term economic generators. Redevelopment goals for Lowry also include the development of true neighborhoods, which are intended to include residential development with appropriately-scaled supporting uses, such as parks and retail. Planned residential areas approach one-third of the total site and a variety of densities and types of homes is envisioned for these areas. The existing housing on the site is Recommended Lowry Disposition Plan HOH/BBC November 1993 I

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configured to provide a sense of community and new residential development is expected to expand and enhance this theme. The Lowry Economic Recovery Project (LERP) acknowledges the requirements of the federal McKinney Act and has worked with homeless housing providers, neighborhood groups, citizen representatives, and real estate and development professionals to develop housing recommendations. Based upon input from these groups, the LERP Executive Committee recommends that the. Air Force grant no more than 86 housing units and no more than 87 rooms to homeless providers under the McKinney Act, with the conditions outlined below and in the Housing chapter of the Lowry Reuse Plan. This recommendation acknowledges concerns about negative impacts of homeless housing on neighborhoods near Lowry, and is a balanced approach which meets the need for homeless housing and preserves the economic viability of market rate development of the site. The community recommends that family housing or individual rooms be leased or deeded under the McKinney Act only to providers of supportive housing programs, with self-sufficiency goals. Further, the community recommends that McKinney housing for families should be dispersed in existing housing areas so that McKinney units are no more than 15% of the family housing units in any one housing area (Aspen Terrace, Sunset Village, Blue Spruce/Columbine). McKinney housing for individuals should be located toward the interior of the Lowry site, as def'med in this document. McKinney units for families should be phased in as market-rate units are occupied; and. a single property management organization should .. manage. all. family units,: including McKinney units, in existing housing areas on site. The cities oppose the use of Lowry>' facilities by providers who do not havean established history of providing homeless services' !. within the jurisdictions of Denver and Aurora: Significant parcels of land at Lowry already serve as regional flood control facilities. The community sees the location of this present use as an opportunity to create regional city and : neighborhood parks that will tie the site together through urban design features and link the site with off-base open spaces, parks and trail systems. Assuming they are well maintained, these open space areas can enhance the value of other on-site development Recommended Lowry Disposition Plan HOH/BBC November 1993 2

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Exhibit 1: LOWRY REUSE PLAN Recommended Lowry Disposition Plan HOH!BBC 3 -:.\_ D [E) ;;;' I, :.[ill] I= COMMUNITY SERVICE mJ DFAS/ARPC [j GOLF 0 PARK/ACTIVE RECREATION EJ REGIONAL OPEN SPACE 0 FLOOD CONTROL November 1993

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Exhibit 2: LAND USE PROGRAM Acreage Land Use Area Description Allocations Parcels Education Campus Advanced and application204 acres A,B,C oriented training and employment emphasis; primarily using existing facilities with potential for new development. Business Training Corporate office, training 196 acres D,E,F, Center and research uses; EE, FF, primarily using existing GG, CA-2 buildings with potential for new development; incorporates some federal users. Residential Neighborhood/community 485 acres G, H, I, development emphasis; J, K, L, average density of 4.5 dwelling M,N,O, units per gross acre for new P,IT development; reuse of most existing housing with new development on vacant or underutilized land. Parks, Regional Multiple types of active 238 acres T, U, V, Open Space, Active and passive recreation to W, X, Y, Recreation meet local and regional DD open space and recreation needs. Golf/Residential Public golf course and adjacent 360 acres Q residential development. Flood Control Existing regional flood control 201 acres Z,AA facilities need to be retained. Recommended Lowry Disposition Plan HOH/BBC November 1993 4

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Exhibit 2: LAND USE PROGRAM (Cont'd) Acreage Land Use Area Description Allocations Parcel Community Local neighborhood-serving 11 acres S, HH Services emphasis; low density development; incorporates some federal use; use of existing facilities with potential for new development. Mixed Use Local neighborhood-serving 32 acres R,CC emphasis; mix of education campus, residential or community services uses; low density development; use of existing facilities with potential for new development. Regional Open Currently an environ-61 acres BB Space/Golf mental clean-up site; potential open space or golf course use when fully remediated. DFAS/ARPC Current uses in 78 acres CA-l existing facilities. Total 1,866 acres Recommended Lowry Disposition Plan HOH!BBC November 1993 5

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COMMUNITY IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY The communities of Denver and Aurora have determined that the best way to assure successful redevelopment of the Lowry site is to set up a local organization ("Local Entity") that would work with the Air Force in property disposition. It is-anticipated that the Local Entity would have representation from and accountability to both cities; however, fmal form and membership of this entity is in the process of being determined. This Recommended Lowry Disposition Plan assumes that the Air Force would enter into a partnership with the Local Entity whereby the Air Force would assume a share of the financial risk of redevelopment but also share in the proceeds or profits to be gained when the community's reuse plan is realized {similar to the Department of the Navy's partnership with the City of Tustin, California). The partnership arrangement envisions that the Air Force would dispose of some parts of the base immediately through the normal processes of federal transfer and public benefit transfer. For the remainder of the base, the community (represented by the Local Entity) and the Air Force would agree on a plan for disposing of the remaining parcels by releasing them when the market is ready, through the Local Entity. This disposition approach is illustrated in the following diagram. -Exhibit 3: DISPOSITION PROCESS Air Force J,. Local Entity Market (Buyer or Lessee) Recommended Lowry Disposition Plan Owns property Maintains property Transfers parcels to Local Entity (when market is ready) Markets property (fmds buyer/lessee) Coordinates redevelopment Coordinates infrastructure improvements Acquires parcels from Air Force Passes parcels through to buyer/lessee Purchases/leases parcels from Local Entity Develops/uses parcels and facilities HOH!BBC November 1993 6

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Under the Air Force/Local Entity partnership approach, the Local Entity would facilitate the achievement of an integrated redevelopment plan and be responsible for the following: 1. Aggressively marketing the pre-planned land parcels to take maximum advantage of current and future market conditions. 2. Facilitating the sale of parcels through efforts in the areas of city zoning and local development processes. 3. Approving and monitoring short-term or interim use of existing facilities consistent with the Reuse Plan. It is anticipated that any net proceeds from these leases would be applied to redevelopment costs, which include marketing and infrastructure improvements. Both the Air Force and the community would benefit from the sale of property with infrastructure improvements in place or readily available. 4. Coordinating the development of infrastructure to allow for timed, cost-effective redevelopment. It is assumed that the Air Force would continue to be responsible for the caretaking of undisposed parcels and facilities. The responsibility might be met by contract with the cities or with another contractor. The Air Force/Local Entity partnership will enable the release of property to the private market in a manner that ensures quality development and does not saturate the market (which could depress the value of the property). While the Denver real estate market has improved and the outlook is good, at present, many comparable off-site non-residential properties are still selling at well below replacement cost The local community believes that the ultimate value of the property will be maximized for the Air Force under the Air Force/Local Entity partnership approach. The Air Force stands to gain more by temporarily holding development parcels (in order to allow for their phased release to a more competitive market) than by attempting to dispose of the property immediately. This approach also assumes that the Local Entity would package and market the parcels in a manner that enhances their marketability and value while meeting the reuse and economic development objectives for the site. While it is the community's recommendation to sell existing housing to the market through the Local Entity/ Air Force partnership, it is anticipated that the housing could be leased for a period of time from the Air Force through a Protection and Maintenance Agreement (under 10 U.S. Code 2667) or pursuant to provisions of the Pryor Amendment. This would allow for civilian occupancy of the units prior to and after base closure and would generate interim rents and lease revenues which could be applied to the costs of maintenance and property improvements. The implementation strategy described above assumes the passage of the Pryor Amendment, which among other things, provides a mechanism for the Air Force to convey property at low or no-cost to the local community. In summ_ary, the community recommends the Air Force transfer title of selected parcels to the Local Entity, at no cost, for disposition by the Local Entity to the market. The community also proposes that this pass-through occur in a phased manner and that the Air Force participate in a revenue-sharing arrangement with the Local Entity, after coverage of the site improvement costs. Recommended Lowry Disposition Plan HOH!BBC November 1993 7

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The community assumes that Caretaker revenues will be contributed by the Air Force for the overall site maintenance of parcels until such time as property title transfer is completed. __ -cONVEYANCE CONDITIONS The Parcelization Plan (Exhibit 5) and Disposition Plan (Exhibit 6) delineate specific parcels with the understanding that rights-of-way and easements for public streets or utilities will be established as part of the disposition process. Specific right-of-way requirements anticipated for individual streets on-base and bordering the base are documented in the Transportation chapter of the Lowry Reuse Plan. Rights-of-way or easements for utilities, whichever is required, are also assumed to be established through the disposition process. The cities believe that the timing of conveyance of right-of-way and easements may vary from parcel to parcel, depending upon the requirements for access, condition of improvements within the right-of-way and demand for specific parcels. In the meantime, arrangements need to be made which will assure that access is provided to interim users and for the servicing of streets and utilities. The community recommends that all property transfers, including public benefit conveyances, include a provision for conveying property at no cost to the appropriate local jurisdictions, including utilities, streets and their associated rights-of-way and easements. The community also recommends that long-term infrastructure, property maintenance and land use covenants (including cost allocation provisions), be negotiated between the Local Entity and/or local jurisdiction and public benefit and federal users. Residential development will be subject to land dedication requirements for public schools and parks. Under Colorado State law, a "good and sufficient" plat is required to convey property. Preparation of plats is normally the responsibility of the seller. Following is a Disposition Summary (Exhibit 4) which groups parcels by disposition method, a Parcelization Plan (Exhibit 5) and a Disposition Plan (Exhibit 6) which graphically depict the disposition parcels. The section after these exhibits discusses each of the parcels individually and in greater detail. Recommended Lowry Disposition Plan HOH/BBC November 1993 8

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Exhibit 4: Disposition to federal agencies Cantonment Areas (remain federal property) Disposition to McKinney providers for the homeless Disposition via Public Benefit Conveyance through: 1: Department of Education Department of Health and Human Services Department of Interior Disposition to Local Entity Parcels held by the Air Force until recipient identified Total Recommended Lowry Disposition Plan DISPOSITION SUMMARY 9 Parcels F, G, S, GO, FF; (total of 35 acres) Parcels CA-l and CA-2; (total of 85 acres) Portions of Parcels I, J, K (86 units for families in supportive programs); Building 963 on Parcel R (87 rooms for individuals in supportive programs) Parcels A, DD;. (total of 175 acres) Parcel C, EE, HH; (total of 16 acres) Parcels E, T, U, V, W, X, CC, II; (total of 204 acres) Parcels B, D, H, I, J, K,L,M,N,O,P,Q,R,Y; (total of 1,088 acres) Parcels Z, AA, BB; (total of263 acres) 1,866 acres HOH!BBC November 1993

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. .. ,, ..! ;; .::> 1' ''I _, ... :.-, ... :: .. -:; __ --; .\. ; ;, :; CA-l ,. Exhibit 5: "; -:; :_:i ,. .. ,JKtr .. .,:J, I .. .,,. -1"""' I_::.... 1 -.-.., -.................... ........................ .. j Recommended Lowry Disposition Plan PARCELIZATION PLAN ; -;-f : .. .,.. .. ;: i -: f -' II ._ HOH!BBC 10 Q ..., ;; :.: ... =: ::HH / .. November 1993

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Exhibit 6: DISPOSITION PLAN LEGEND [lJ FEDERAL PUBLIC BENEFIT v::::l o : P71 DISPOSITION VIA : : ILJ AIR FORCE PARTNERSHIP [I@ RETAINED BY AIR FORCE ..,.,.. IUU r--Recommended Lowry Disposition Plan HOH/BBC November 1993 11

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PARCEL DISPOSITION RECOMMENDATIONS The following parcel disposition recommendations represent the comi:nunity's preferred disposition. The letter designations correspond to the those shown on the Parcelization Plan (Exhibit 5). In addition to the recommendations described below, the community has recommended against any reuse with a detention or secured treatment component. In cases where the community recommends that the Air Force hold the property in its partnership with the Local Entity, the community intends that the Local Entity will facilitate disposition to the market at as early a date as possible. If any of the Public Benefit Conveyances CPBC) fail to materialize. the community recommends that the Air Force temporarily hold the subject property in its partnership. with the Local Entity. Cantonment Areas Two areas shown on the Parcelization Plan are Cantonment Areas (not a part of Lowry Air Force Base closure) and are designated CA-l and CA-2. The first of these, CA-l, is comprised of 78 acres and is the site of the Defense Finance and Accounting and Service (DFAS) and the Air Reserve Personnel Center (ARPC), which are anticipated to remain at Lowry after the base closes. The second parcel, CA2, is comprised of 7 acres and is occupied by the 21st Space Command Squadron, which is also anticipated to remain at Lowry. Potential Amendments to the Recommended Disposition Plan The community anticipates that there will be a need to supplement and amend this Recommended Lowrv Disposition Plan after submittal to the Air Force in November 1993, as reuse requests are refined and McKinneyapplications are received and evaluated: by the: Air Force.:. New reuse requests may also emerge, some as a result of the Air Force Base Conversion Agency's .. recent: screening for federal uses. The community will want to evaluate and make. recommendations regarding these new requests. In addition, the community would expect to be involved in discussions with the Air Force during its development of disposition recommendations, particularly with respect to McKinney Housing fOl' -the Homeless. Following is a summary of requests which may be addressed through amendments to this Disposition Plan: The University of Colorado Health Sciences Center has expressed interest in facilities on-base, and the community continues to work with them regarding their request. The Asian-Pacific Development Center has expressed interest in public benefit transfer of 20 acres on-base for health care and senior housing, and the community endorses this request, subject to finding a mutually acceptable location. Others, to be determined. Parcel A: 167 acres Description. Parcel A is the northeast (excluding the northeast park) quadrant of the site. This area contains classrooms, dormitories, administrative facilities and other facilities suitable for training and related uses. Recommended Lowry Disposition Plan HOH!BBC November 1993 12

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Proposed Use. The community recommends that this parcel be developed as an Education Campus. It is sought by the State of Colorado Community College and Occupational Education System (CCCOES) for use of the facilities and property as an education and training center. A alliance of local education entities, lead by the Community College of Aurora and including the Community College of Denver, the University of Colorado at Denver, Metropolitan State College, the University of Northern Colorado and other education providers, intends to provide education and training programs in the Education Campus. Recommended Disposition. The community recommends that Parcel A be transferred from the Air Force via public benefit conveyance through the Department of Education to CCCOES for use by the alliance of education providers. The community college system has proposed a cooperative use of facilities and other resources for a variety of education and training opportunities for technical training, occupational, undergraduate and graduate students. The community supports this alliance and sees the proposed use as a critical component of the community's economic development and economic recovery efforts. Parcel B: 29 acres Description. Parcel B is in the north central portion of the site and west of Parcel A. It includes Buildings 771, 773, 775, 769, 777 and. Proposed Use. There is not currently a reuse request for this parcel, although there are a variety of activities which could occur on the parcel which could reinforce the Education Campus theme in the area Recommended Disposition. The community recommends that Parcel D be held temporarily by the Air Force in partnership with the Local Entity. The community will continue to seek users or buyers for this parcel which are consistent with economic development and reuse objectives for Lowry. Parcel C: 9 acres Description. Parcel C is currently the site of the Base Commissary (Building 640) and includes a portion of the parking area for this building. Proposed Use. The Belle Bonfils Memorial Blood Center non-profit organization has requested the facility on Parcel C for education, research and blood product distribution. Recommended Disposition. The community recommends that Parcel C be transferred from the Air Force via public benefit conveyance through the Department of Health and Human Services to the Belle Bonfils Memorial Blood Center for their use of the property as a blood bank and research center. This disposition contributes to achievement of the community's economic development and reuse objectives and is supported by the community. Parcel D: 158 acres Description. Parcel D includes the core of the site that has been designated for the Business and Training Center (BTC). This parcel includes a variety of buildings which are suitable for this use, including the Headquarters Building (Building 349), Visiting Officers Recommended Lowry Disposition Plan HOH/BBC November 1993 13

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Quarters (Building 397 VOQ), Officers' Club (Building 24), and multiple administrative and classroom buildings. In addition, there are several requests for facilities within the area of the BTC which the community supports, including facilities for DFAS (Buildings 402, 408, 404 and 385), the Department of Energy (Building 1433) and the large hangar (Building 401, for use as a museum). In addition, the 21st Space Command Squadron is planning to remain in its current facility (Building 1432). These uses have been delineated on the Parcelization Plan as separate parcels (E, F, FF, GG and CA-2). Proposed Use. The community recommends. that this parcel be developed as a Business and Training Center. Tirroughout the plan refinement process, this area has been conceived as the portion of the site where business offices, research and training-related uses, support accessory uses and residential uses might occur. Development could include reuse of existing buildings as well as new construction. Recommended Disposition. The community recommends that Parcel D be held temporarily by the Air Force in its partnership with the Local Entity. While it is anticipated that private businesses will be interested in this area, marketing has not occurred and no tenants have yet been identified. In addition, recommendations from developers and local community leaders are to allow the facilities in Parcel D to respond to the requirements of tenants in the other portions of the Lowry site. For example, the VOQ and Officers' Club facilities could be shared by multiple users for lodging and conferences. This use is fundamental to achieving the community's economic development and reuse objectives, particularly in terms of creating new jobs and enhancing the overall value of the Lowry site. It is strongly supported by the community. Parcel E: 7 acres Description. Parcel E includes an historic hangar (Building 401). Proposed Use. The community would like to have the existing hangar reused by the Lowry Heritage Museum. Recommended Disposition. The community recommends that Parcel E be transferred via public benefit conveyance from the Department of the Interior to the City and County of Denver for use by the Lowry Heritage Museum. The museum use will provide an immediate attraction and generate activity for this portion of the site, provide general economic benefit to the community through tourism and help to communicate the history of Lowry to the public. Parcel F: 10 acres Description. Parcel F includes an historic hangar (Building 402) and Building 408. Proposed Use. The Defense Finance Accounting Services (DFAS) has requested use of these facilities for storage and office uses. Recommended Disposition. The community recommends that Parcel F be retained by DoD for use by DFAS. Recommended Lowry Disposition Plan HOHIBBC November 1993 14

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This will provide for additional space for DFAS, which is the key anchor user in the southwest quadrant of Lowry. This use is consistent with the Business and Training Center theme .. and is supported by the community. Parcel G: 7 acres Description. Parcel G is currently used as a parking lot. Proposed Use. The Defense Finance Accounting Services (DFAS) has requested use of this parking lot. Recommended Disposition. The community recommends thatParcel G be retained by DoD for use by DFAS, which is the key anchor user in the southwest quadrant of Lowry. If DFAS determines that it does not have a need for this additional parking, the community recommends that Parcel G be held temporarily by the Air Force in its partnership with the Local Entity. Parcel H: 18 acres Description. Parcel H contains the existing Officers' Housing southeast of the intersection of 6th A venue-and Quebec Street. Proposed Use. The community recommends continued residential use in this parcel. It believes that existing housing should remain intact and that selective infill development could yield additional high-end single family homes. Recommended Disposition. The community recommends that Parcel H be held temporarily by the Air Force in partnership with the Local Entity. With its existing stock of high quality duplexes and surrounding landscaping, Parcel H is anticipated to be in high demand for early re-sale to the private sector and could bring early, high quality redevelopment activity to the site. Parcel 1: 36 acres Description. Parcel I includes the family housing areas known as Blue_ Spruce Meadows and Columbine Park, located east of Quebec Street The Blue Spruce area contains over 200 units of mostly three bedroom units, with some two and four bedroom units. Columbine Park is comprised of 56 three bedroom units. Proposed Use. The community recommends that this parcel be developed in residential use. The north and west portions of the base are surrounded by off-site residential development, with some supporting commercial. The community's recommended land use for this area is residential. The existing housing on this parcel is in good condition and is recommended to be maintained. It is anticipated that organizations providing housing for homeless families will be requesting some of these units under the McKinney Act. The community recommends that McKinney units for families be dispersed within Parcel I, and among the existing housing areas in Parcels I, J and K. No more than 15 percent (41 units) of the family housing on Parcel I should be used to comply with the McKinney Act (and no more than a total of 86 units on the entire Lowry site). In addition, the community recommends that McKinney units should be phased-in as Recommended Lowry Disposition Plan HOHIBBC November 1993 15

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market-rate units are occupied, and that all units on the parcel be managed by a single property management organization. Recommended Disposition. The community recommends that Parcel I be temporarily held by the Air Force in partnership with the Local Entity, in anticipation of ultimate disposition by the Local Entity to the local private market. Refer to recommendations for McKinney Housing dispersal that are described in the paragraph above. It is anticipated that the existing housing would be leased from the Air Force under a Protection and Maintenance Agreement (under 10 U.S. Code 2667) or other lease arrangement and that interim rents and lease revenues would be applied to the costs of maintenance and property improvements. When it is determined that the most favorable selling environment exists, the parcel would be sold through the Local Entity to the market with proceeds conveyed to the Air Force Local Entity partnership. Parcel J: 38 acres Description. Parcel J includes the Sunset Village housing area northwest of Quebec Street and 1st Avenue. This mixed family and dormitory housing area is in an off-base compound that extends into the Mayfair Park neighborhood. It includes 28 acres of attached single unit homes (264 units) and 10 acres of dormitories. Proposed Use. The community recommends that this parcel remain in residential use. Sunset Village is a unique area at Lowry in that it is already off-base and borders an existing residential neighborhood. The existing family housing is in good condition and should be maintained and improved in the short term. The dormitory buildings limit the site's attractiveness and marketability. It is envisioned that the dormitory buildings would be demolished and replaced with a park and/or additional housing of a lower density. It is anticipated that organizations providing housing for homeless families will be requesting some of these units under the McKinney Act. The community recommends that McKinney units for families be dispersed within Parcel J, and among the existing housing areas in Parcels I, J and K. No more than 15 percent (40 units) of the family housing on Parcel J should be used to comply with the McKinney Act (and no more than a total of 86 units on the entire Lowry site). In addition, the community recommends that McKinney units should be phased-in as market-rate units are occupied, and that all units on the parcel be managed by a single property management organization. Recommended Disposition. The community recommends that Parcel J be temporarily held by the Air Force in partnership with the Local Entity, in anticipation of ultimate disposition by the Local Entity to the local private market. Refer to recommendations for McKinney Housing dispersal that are described in the paragraph above. It is anticipated that the existing housing would be leased from the Air Force under a Protection and Maintenance Agreement (under 10 U.S. Code 2667) or other lease arrangement and that interim rents and lease revenues would be applied to the costs of maintenance and property improvements. When it is determined that the most favorable selling environment exists, the parcel would be sold through the Local Entity to the market with proceeds conveyed to the Air Force Local Entity partnership. Parcel K: 75 acres Recommended Lowry Disposition Plan HOH/BBC November 1993 16

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Description. Parcel K is the existing residential development known as Aspen Terrace. It is in the southwest portion of the site and is bounded by Alameda A venue to the south, an undeveloped Parcel N to the west, by Archer Street to the north and by undeveloped land to the east, near the existing Alameda Gate. The parcel is to be bisected by the proposed extension of Quebec Street through Lowry. The area includes approximately 300 units of attached single family dwellings, in duplexes and stacked flat fourplexes. Proposed Use. The community recommends that this parcel continue in residential use. There has been significant community interest in these units, by developers, property managers and McKinney providers. Most of the existing housing is in good condition and should be maintained and improved in the short term. A small number of these homes would need to be demolished to make way for the proposed roadway extension of Quebec. It is anticipated that organizations providing housing for homeless families will be requesting some of these units under the McKinney Act. The community recommends that McKinney units for families be dispersed within Parcel K, and among the existing housing areas in Parcels I, J and K. No more than 15 percent ( 45 units) of the family housing on Parcel K should be used to comply with the McKinney Act (and no more than a total of 86 units on the entire Lowry site). In addition, the community recommends that McKinney units should be phased:..in as market-rate units are occupied, and that all units on the parcel be managed by a single property management organization. Recommended Disposition. The community recommends that Parcel K be temporarily held by the Air Force in partnership with the Local Entity, in anticipation of ultimate disposition by the Local Entity to the local private market. Refer to recommendations for McKinney Housing dispersal that are described in the paragraph above. It is anticipated that the existing housing would be leased from the Air Force under a Protection and Maintenance Agreement (under 10 U.S. Code 2667) or other lease arrangement and that interim rents and lease revenues would be applied to the costs of maintenance and property improvements. When it is determined that the most favorable selling environment exists, the parcel would be sold through the Local Entity to the market with proceeds conveyed to the Air Force Local Entity partnership. Infrastructure, open space and other improvements may increase the value of the site and surrounding property if this work is completed prior to release of the property to the market. Parcel L: 138 acres Description. ParcelL includes most of the northwest quadrant, bordered on the north by 11th A venue, on the east by the northern flood control area, on the south by 6th A venue and on the west by the Blue Spruce and Columbine Park family housing areas. The parcel includes a mobile home park (to be demolished), transient quarters, ball fields, NCO Club (Building 600), child day care center (Building 670), credit union and several commercial businesses. The general area also includes the Base Exchange (Building 667), which is delineated separately (ParcelS). Proposed Use. Parcel L is recommended for new residential neighborhood development. The community recommends that the day care center remain (with an operator who would offer services to all site residents and tenants) and that other structures would be reused or phased out as redevelopment occurs. The community also recommends against the reuse of the transient quarters within this parcel by McKinney homeless providers. The buildings, however, might be reused at another location on or off-site. Recommended Lowry Disposition Plan HOH!BBC November 1993 17

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Recommended Disposition. The community recommends that Parcel L be held temporarily by the Air Force in partnership with the Local Entity until such time as the improvements, market conditions, and adjacent site development are determined to offer the most favorable selling environment. Parcel M: 13 acres Definition. Parcel M extends along the south side of 6th Avenue between a proposed park (Parcel T) and Uinta Street. Proposed Use. The community recommends residential development in this parcel, reflecting the character of 6th Avenue to the west and the existing officer's housing in Parcel J. The character envisioned includes a landscaped 6th A venue parkway and larger lots and homes. Recommended Disposition. The community recommends that Parcel M be held temporarily by the Air Force in partnership with the Local Entity. The planned improvements and landscaping will greatly enhance the value of this parcel and the western portion of the Lowry site. If marketed properly, Parcel M could bring early, high quality redevelopment activity to the Parcel N: 25 acres Definition. Parcel N is the area west of Aspen Terrace in the southwest comer of the site. The parcel is presently undeveloped. Proposed Use. The community recommends residential uses for Parcel N. Off-site development is primarily residential, with a mix of densities and building types. Recommended Disposition. There has been private market interest in the area designated as Parcel N. The community recommends that Parcel N be held temporarily by the Air Force in partnership with the Local Entity. It is anticipated that this could be among the earliest parcels sold. Parcel 0: 65 acres Description. Parcel 0 is the area north and east of Aspen Terrace, west of the southern flood control area. The parcel presently includes a complex of pre-fabricated dormitories (Buildings 410 420), parking lots, streets and abandoned runways. These improvements are recommended to be removed or demolished. Proposed Use. The community recommends residential use for Parcel 0, at a variety of densities. Recommended Disposition. The community recommends that Parcel 0 be held temporarily by the Air Force in partnership with the Local Entity until site improvements, market conditions, and adjacent site development are determined to offer the most favorable selling environment. Timely coordination of infrastructure and the careful planning of adjacent parcels could enhance the value of this and adjacent parcels. Parcel P: 70 acres Recommended Lowry Disposition Plan HOH!BBC November 1993 18

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Description. Parcel P is the area west and south of the southern flood control facility (Parcel AA). The parcel is currently undeveloped, although a portion of it is being used for environmental remediation activities. Proposed Use. The community recommends residential uses as most appropriate for Parcel P. The adjacent regional open space and open space corridor planned along Fairmount Drive are significant amenities which will increase the value of the site, and offer opportunities to develop a variety of residential products. Recommended Disposition. The community recommends that Parcel P be held temporarily by the Air Force in partnership with the Local Entity. Timely coordination of infrastructure, conclusion of environmental remediation activities, and careful planning of adjacent parcels could enhance the value of this parcel. Parcel Q: 360 acres Description. Parcel Q includes the existing golf course and adjacent area to the north. Aside from the existing golf course, this area is largely undeveloped. Proposed Use. At the present time, the cities of Denver and Aurora are involved in negotiations with the Air Force for a two to three year lease for operation of the existing golf course as a public course. Over the longer term, the two cities recommend that the existing 18-hole golf course be re-configured to include the northern portion of Parcel Q, and possibly expanded to ParcelBB .. This proposed re-configuration would result in the creation of high-value development areas adjacent to the fairways which are suitableJor high-end homes;Not only would this enable .' the community to improve the existing" golf facility,. but it would allow the proposed' Aic Force/Local Entity partnership to maximize value in this area and accelerate development in the c entire southeastern quadrant of the site. Recommended Disposition. The community recommends that Parcel Q be held by the Air Force in its partnership with the Local Entity, in order to maximize the ultimate value of the parcel and the entire Lowry site. During this time the course could be operated under an interim lease by Denver and Aurora, and it is anticipated that the Local Entity would actively seek a developer for the golf course/residential project (a product of great demand in metro Denver) which would provide for continued operation of the golf course, as a facility open to the general public. Once a developer has been identified, Parcel Q could be transferred to the Local Entity for disposition to the developer. Parcel R: 30 acres Description. Parcel R is south of Lowry Boulevard and the Education Campus in the northeast quadrant, at the intersection of Lowry Boulevard and the proposed realignment of Yosemite Street. The site includes dormitories and a day care facility. Proposed Use. Parcel R is designated for residential, community services uses, and/or Education Campus uses. Due to the central location of this parcel, it is designated for land uses that allow a maximum amount of flexibility so that the development that occurs can respond to market and site-driven needs. It is anticipated that small neighborhood-serving retail services and possibly some townhouse, apartment or other multi-family development might occur at this site. Recommended Lowry Disposition Plan HOH/BBC November 1993 19

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McKinney housing for individuals in supportive programs might also be accommodated in Parcel R. ;: ... If Education Campus needs exceed the property capacity in the northeast quadrant, some of this parcel may be absorbed for training or related uses. Recommended Disposition. The community recommends that Parcel R be held temporarily by the Air Force in its partnership with the Local Entity. This will enable the Local Entity to remain flexible with the development of this parcel, acquiring and selling the property when the highest and best use of this location has been determined by the market and other development on the site. Parcel S: 10 acres Description. Parcel S is the site of the Base Exchange ((Building 667), and is located between Parcel Land the northern flood control facility (Parcel Z). Proposed Use. The Defense Finance Accounting Services (DFAS) has requested use of this facility. Recommended Disposition. The community recommends that Parcel S be retained by DoD for use by DFAS. Parcel T: 17 acres Description. Parcel T is a proposed park near the Officers' Housing. The area is adjacent to 6th Avenue and contains mature trees and landscaping. In addition, a youth center (Building 293) is located on the eastern end of the parcel. Proposed Use. The Denver Parks Department has requested Parcel T for use as a community park. Parcel T adds to the visual character and open space amenities of the site and is .seen as enhancing the attractiveness of the adjacent residential areas and the BTC area. Recommended Disposition. The community recommends that Parcel T be transferred from the Air Force via public benefit conveyance through the Department of the Interior to the Denver Parks Department for their use of the property as a community park. Parcel U: 26 acres Description. Parcel U is a proposed park near the south of the BTC area. The area is south of Lowry Boulevard. Proposed Use. -The Denver Parks Department has requested Parcel U for use as a community park. Parcel U adds to the visual character and open space amenities of the site and is seen as enhancing the attractiveness of the adjacent residential areas and the BTC area. Recommended Disposition. The community recommends that Parcel U be transferred from the Air Force via public benefit conveyance of parks and recreation through the Department of the Interior to the Denver Parks Department for their use of the property as a community park. Parcel V: 26 acres Recommended Lowry Disposition Pian HOHIBBC November 1993 20

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Description. Parcel Vis a park in the northeast corner of the site. Proposed Use. The Aurora Parks Department has requested Parcel V for use as a community park. Parcel V adds to the visual character and open space amenities of the site and is seen as enhancing the attractiveness of the adjacent Education Campus and off-site neighborhoods. Recommended Disposition. The community recommends that Parcel V be transferred from the Air Force via public benefit conveyance of parks and recreation through the Department of the Interior to the Aurora Parks Department for their use of the property as a community park. Parcels W and X: 52 acres and 73 acres Description. Parcels Wand X include major portions of the regional open space system that extends through the center of the site from north to south and which connects the two flood control areas on the Lowry site. Proposed Use. The area in Parcels W and X is expected to be maintained as part of a regional open space system. Parcels W and X will link Lowry to the rest of the regional open space system that has been developed in the Denver Metro Area and will take advantage of natural site assets such as Westerly Creek. This open space component is seen by the community as critical to the creation of high quality development throughout Lowry and is expected to enhance the value and marketability of adjacent and nearby residential and non-residential developments. Recommended Disposition. The community is in agreement about the importance of Parcels W and X to regional and on-site open space and has strong indications of demand for such use. However, an appropriate entity to own and operate these parcels has not yet been identified. The community is committed to the concept of regional open space on the site as depicted in Parcels W and X because of the value it brings to the Lowry site as well as benefits to the surrounding community. Therefore, the community recommends that Parcels W and X be transferred from the.Air Force via public benefit conveyance of parks and recreation through the Department of the Interior to an "appropriate entity" for use of the parcels as a regional park, once that "appropriate entity" has been identified. Parcel Y: 33 acres Description. Parcel Y is located in the center of the site, straddling both sides of Lowry Boulevard. This parcel contains a recreation facility a classroom building and a dormitory. Proposed Use. The community recommends that this parcel be used for active recreation uses. Active recreation uses could include active sports programs, camps and tournaments (tennis, baseball, softball, soccer, football and others) for which it has been established that there is significant local demand. Recommended Disposition. The community recommends that the Air Force temporarily hold this parcel until the Local Entity can identify a private or public operator of active recreation facilities and programs. Parcels Z and AA: 53 acres and 148 acres Definition. Parcels Z and AA are the northern and southern flood control areas. Recommended Lowry Disposition Plan HOH/BBC November 1993 21

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Proposed Use. Both Parcels Z and AA are part of the regional flood control system and are expected to remain as such. However, a local utility responsible for the ownership of these two flood control facilities has not yet been determined. Recommended Disposition. The community recommends that the Air Force identify the appropriate public agency to receive and own the flood control facilities, subject to the review and approval by the cities of Aurora and Denver. Parcel BB: 62 acres Definition. Parcel BB is the former household landfill south of the southern flood control area, which has been identified as an environmental clean-up site in the Air Force's Management Action Plan (MAP). Proposed Use. This parcel is presently an environmental clean-up site, but once completely remediated could serve as regional park space or for expansion of the site's golf facilities. Recommended Disposition. The community is extremely concerned about the environmental cleanup of this parcel and does not expect this parcel to be disposed until it has been remediated to a level suitable for development. Both cities are unwilling to extend golf uses into this area until it is clear that the cleanup would prevent landfill leaching or other problems from occurring. The community recommends that this parcel not be disposed until clean up is complete, at which time the community would be willing to negotiate the disposition of this parceL It is recommended that the Air Force clean up this site within two to three years so that it can be considered for golf expansion. Parcel CC: 2 acres Description. Parcel CC is located southeast of Parcel R. Proposed Use. This facility (Building 1002) has been requested by the Colorado Historical Society, for storage of museum artifacts and records. Recommended Disposition. The community recommends that Parcel CC be transferred from the Air Force via public benefit conveyance through the Department of the Interior to the Colorado Historical Society for their use of the property as a storage facility. This disposition meets a community need, utilizes the cold storage capabilities of the requested facility and is supported by the community. Parcel DD: 8 acres Description. Parcel DD includes hangar 1499, located south of Lowry Boulevard and Parcel R. Proposed Use. This facility (Building 1499) has been requested by the Emily Griffith Opportunity School for aircraft maintenance training. Recommended Lowry Disposition Plan HOH!BBC November 1993 22

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Recommended Disposition. The community recommends that Parcel DD be transferred from the Air Force via public benefit conveyance through the Department of Education to the Denver Public Schools for use by the Emily Griffith Opportunity School for aircraft maintenance training. This disposition is an appropriate use of the facility, responds to a community need, contributes to achievement of the community's economic development and reuse objectives, and is supported by the community. Parcel EE: 6 acres Description. Parcel EE includes Building 1307, located south of Lowry Boulevard and west of Parcel U. Proposed Use. This facility has been requested by the Colorado Department of Health for use as a laboratory. Recommended Disposition. The community recommends that Parcel EE be transferred from the Air Force via public benefit conveyance through the Department of Health and Human Services to the Colorado Department of Health. This disposition is an appropriate use of the facility, contributes to achievement of the community's economic development and reuse objectives, and is supported by the community. Parcel FF: 3 acres Description. Parcel FF includes Buildings 385 and 404. Proposed Use. The Defense Finance Accounting Services (DFAS) has requested use of these facilities for storage and office uses. Recommended Disposition. The community recommends that Parcel FF be retained by DoD for use by DFAS. This will provide for additional space for DFAS, which is the key anchor user in the southwest quadrant of Lowry. This use is consistent with the Business and Training Center theme and is supported by the community. Parcel GG: 5 acres Description. Parcel GG includes Building 1433. Proposed Use. The Department of Energy has requested this facility for training and office uses. Recommended Disposition. The community recommends that Parcel GG be conveyed to the Department of Energy for use as a training and office facility. This use is consistent with the Business and Training Center theme and is supported by the community. Parcel HH: 1 acre Recommended Lowry Disposition Plan HOH!BBC November 1993 23

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Description. Parcel HH includes a building owned-by the American Red Cross. Proposed Use. The American Red Cross has requested this parcel for continuation of their current operations. Recommended Disposition. The community recommends that Parcel HH be conveyed to the American Red Cross via public benefit conveyance, or other method at no cost to the American Red Cross. Parcel ll: 1 acre Description. Parcel II includes Building 629, a crafts center. Proposed Use. The Denver Parks Department has requested this facility for recreation uses. Recommended Disposition. The community recommends that Parcel II be transferred from the Air Force via public benefit conveyance through the Department of the Interior to the Denver Parks Department for their use of the property as a recreation facility. Recommended Lowry Disposition Plan HOHIBBC November 1993 24

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ECONOMIC OBJECTIVES In November, 1993, the Lowry Economic Recovery Project submitted to the Air Force the Lowry Reuse Plan. A key goal of the Reuse Plan is to facilitate "local and regional economic development, including local tax base expansion, education and training, job development, and business opportunity." To meet this goal, the Reuse Plan specifies a mixed use approach to redevelopment. Specific development objectives include: Job Creation: creation of 3,800 jobs by the end of 1995 and 13,000 permanent direct jobs plus 34,000 indirect jobs by the year 2010. Business: Establishment of a Business & Training center area to attract a variety of tax and job-generating employers. Education: creation of a 10,000-student campus to educate the current and future work force and provide training and support for on and off-site businesses. Housing: Development of a full range of housing opportunities in an urban mixed use community setting to serve on and off-site companies plus accommodation of a federally mandated program for homeless housing needs. Recreation: Expansion and development of parks and other recreational amenities to serve the region, plus residents and businesses in the Lowry Neighborhood. To accomplish these objectives the cities have created an intergovernmental authority, the Lowry Economic Redevelopment Authority (LERA) to implement the Lowry Reuse Plan with the Economic Development Conveyance (EDC) request as an integral part. This EDC request calls for approximately 1,088 acres to be conveyed to the LERA without initial payment to the Air Force. However, the LERA plan shares the net income with the Air Force from the disposition of the 1,088 acres through the year 2010. The EDC is the central element of the Lowry Reuse Plan. The 1,088 acres contains all of plan elements except the community college campus, the public benefit conveyances and the regional flood plain. The LERA is currently pursuing the addition of the regional flood control area through a Public Benefit Conveyance (PBC) or the EDC to aid future planning and development. 1

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ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CONVEYANCE APPLICATION This Economic Development Conveyance (EDC) request is made pursuant to Section 91.7(e) of the interim rules implementing the Pryor Amendment to Title XXIX of the 1994 National Defense Authorization Act. As required by paragraph (e)5 of that section, we provide the following information: 1. Property to be conveyed --Approximately 1,088 acres in a phased conveyance as described in the November, 1993 Recommended Lowry Disposition Plan, as amended. The requested conveyance includes land use areas designated for residential, golf/residential, and business uses. As recommended in the interim regulations, the requested properties are a package of marketable, revenue-producing properties, properties that will be more difficult to market and develop, and properties where liabilities exceed value. 2. statement of the local redevelopment authority's legal authority to acquire and dispose of property under the laws of the governing state --The City and County of Denver and City of Aurora have entered into an intergovernmental agreement to establish the Lowry Economic Redevelopment Authority (LERA) with an effective date of July 15, 1994. As allowed by Colorado law, the Authority is empowered by the intergovernmental agreement to acquire and dispose of real property and perform a full range of related redevelopment activities --marketing, coordination and financing of infrastructure and other site improvements, and facilitation of zoning and development review. 3. Redevelopment plan that includes economic development and job creation--In November, 1993, the Lowry Economic Recovery Project submitted to the Air Force the Lowry Reuse Plan.1 A key goal of the Reuse Plan is to facilitate "local and regional economic development, including local tax base expansion, education and training, job development, and business opportunity." To meet this goal, the Reuse Plan specifies a mix of interdependent uses, which function together to create a healthy new Lowry Neighborhood conducive to economic development. 1 HOH Associates and Browne, Bortz and Coddington, "Lowry Reuse Plan and Recommended Lowry Disposition Plan," report prepared for Lowry Economic Recovery Project, Denver, co (November, 1993). 2

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The cornerstone of private-sector economic development is the 185-acre Business & Training Center (ETC) in the southwestern portion of the Lowry neighborhood. The Lowry Reuse Plan envisions a complementary relationship between the BTC and community-recommended public benefit conveyances, including the college consortium that has applied for public benefit conveyance of the planned Education Campus area. Likewise, the housing section of the Reuse Plan states that "successfully changing the image and creating desirable, new housing and upgrading the existing housing areas will help attract compatible employment opportunities to Lowry and increase the tax base." 4. Why existing public benefit conveyance authorities are not appropriate --In general, the Lowry Reuse Plan calls for ultimate conveyance of residential areas, golf/residential areas, and the BTC to private, tax-generating entities, which are not eligible for public benefit conveyances, and are not expected to meet "public purpose" criteria for transfers through sponsoring federal agencies. The Lowry Disposition Plan does recommend public benefit conveyances when appropriate, including parcels for an education campus, a public laboratory, community services, schools, parks and recreation, and a museum. Economic development conveyance of the requested property is appropriate. An EDC is both consistent with the intent of the Pryor amendment and critical to the successful redevelopment of the Lowry site. Specifically, the EDC is appropriate and necessary for the following reasons: Control of the requested area will allow an integrated approach to redevelopment. With an EDC at no initial cost, the LERA can act as a master developer of the site, ensuring a coordinated approach to redevelopment and achievement of reuse plan objectives, including maximizing job creation opportunities. A focus group including developers and builders2 and an advisory group of investment bankers, economic development professionals, bond counsel, and senior city planning staff3 both recommended a local authority 2 city and County of Denver Mayor's Office of Economic Development, "Summary of Proceedings: Lowry Economic Development Focus Group,"(January, 1993). 3 Browne, Bortz, and Coddington, "Lowry Redevelopment Implementation Options and Financial Implications," working paper submitted on behalf of Lowry Implementation Advisory Group (September, 1993). 3

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control the reconveyance of Air Force property and create an environment of certainty for the development community. The Lowry redevelopment must be largely self-sustaining. Competing demands, budget constraints, and Amendment 1, Colorado's tax and spending limitation, preclude substantial local public investment in the redevelopment of Lowry. The City and County of Denver is simultaneously addressing the redevelopment of Stapleton Airport (closing in 1994) and the Central Platte Valley, and with the City of Aurora is facing demand for new development associated with the opening of Denver International Airport. With the jump-start of an EDC at no initial cost, the LERA can accomplish economic development goals funded by site-generated revenues. An EDC will allow the LERA to apply all initial revenues to redevelopment expenses. This will accelerate and maximize economic development and add value to the site. Net proceeds will be shared with the Air Force over a fifteen year time frame, through the year 2010. The synergistic benefits of the new Lowry Neighborhood come from the combination of business, training, education, recreation and residential uses. The accelerated development of the EDC area will be the major catalyst to jobs creation and the success of the education campus and public benefit conveyances. The following subsections cover each of the major concepts of the Economic Development Conveyance (EDC) and its essential relationship to the overall Lowry Reuse Plan. Several of the detailed studies which lead to the conclusions of these subsections are attached as exhibits: JOBS CREATION OPPORTUNITIES BUSINESS & TRAINING CENTER EDUCATION INDUSTRY SERVICE SECTOR CONSTRUCTION LOWRY REUSE PLAN CONCEPT/MISSION STATEMENT REUSE PLAN DETAILS LEASE AND SALE OF EXISTING HOUSING UNITS SALE OF RESIDENTIAL LOTS LEASE AND SALE OF BUSINESS & TRAINING CENTER CREATION OF REGIONAL PARKS SYSTEM COLORADO A DIVERSE ECONOMY AND IDEAL MODEL SHORT TERM PROBLEMS LONG TERM OPPORTUNITIES 4

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JOBS CREATION OPPORTUNITIES Jobs creation within the Lowry Neighborhood comes from multiple sources. These jobs include temporary construction and planning related jobs as well as permanent, long term jobs. In the face of the recent changes in the world political scene and the related Lowry AFB closure, the Reuse Plan gives equal weight to jobs retention plus education and training of the current and future work force as it does to jobs creation. This jobs retention is centered in the Community College educational campus and the training aspects of the Business & Training Center. The LERA will target four major jobs centers to attract short term and long term jobs to the Lowry Neighborhood: Business & Training Center Education center Services construction The retention of DFAS/ARPC within the Lowry neighborhood means jobs retention of over 3,000 jobs plus a probable expansion over the next 15 years to 4,000-4,500 total jobs. DFAS is a prime example to other financial services companies about the viability of Lowry as a business location. The NCCC location into the Lowry neighborhood has a direct impact of 300 jobs in the first year and provides a potential labor pool for companies moving into the Business & Training Center. The following table shows the projected Jobs Creation activities in the Lowry Neighborhood in 1995 and, at maturity, in 2010 as originally proposed in the HOH/BBC study dated April 1993 and as modified in various submissions between November 1993 and May 1994. CATEGORY 1995 MIDPOINT 2010 Construction 100 400 -0Education 100 800 1,900 Business & Training ctr. 100 1,500 5,300 Services 50 150 500 PBX 100 200 300 DFAS/ARPC 3,000 3,500 4,500 NCCC 350 400 500 TOTAL 3,800 6,950 13,000 4 4 HOH Associates, Inc. BBC, Inc., "Reuse Plan Alternatives Report," (November 1992) 5

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In addition to the 13,000 direct jobs created in the Lowry Neighborhood two additional factors will add to the economic impact of the plan at maturity The student population at the Community College campus is projected to peak at 10,000 students prior to the year 2010 as an additional economic generator the Lowry neighborhood. Using a multiplier for the direct Jobs creation adds between 25,500 to 34,750 jobs depending on the multiplier used (2.1:1 or 2.86:1)5 TOTAL JOBS CREATED INCLUDING DIRECT AND INDIRECT JOBS, RANGES BETWEEN 27,300 AND 37,200 BY THE YEAR 2010. BUSINESS & TRAINING CENTER JOBS CREATION The three anchors for Jobs Creation within the Lowry Neighborhood include the Education Campus, DFAS/ARPC and the proposed Business & Training Center. Lowry is fortunate to start with two anchors in place which will aid the third, the Business & Training Center, in achieving its goals. The Business & Training Center will be the largest single jobs creation center for the Lowry Neighborhood, followed closely by DFAS/ARPC. The LERA will employ a multi-faceted marketing campaign to attract other businesses to the Lowry neighborhood for the Business & Training Center as well as the residential neighborhoods and education campus. First, The Business & Training Center will target five industries to fill the 1,233,000 sq. ft. of building space proposed for the Center. One-third to one-half of this space will come from existing buildings renovated to market conditions. The initially targeted industries include: Telecommunications Bio-Medical Computer Software Educational Training Financial Services Second, the LERA has ongoing negotiations with key companies in each targeted industry to act as magnets to attract other related 5 The lower ratio is from the Denver Chamber of Commerce. the higher ratio is from the "Governor's Office of State Planning and Budgeting." 6

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companies to the Lowry neighborhood. Several of these magnet companies are in the business to directly recruit other related companies to the Lowry neighborhood. Others, such as Telecommunications Inc. (TCI) will attract other companies because of its size and need for related service companies. Third, the LERA will prepare presentation formats for each targeted industry to present marketing materials at professional meetings for these industries, national real estate meetings such as ULI and NAIOP, and the regional real estate broker network. In the Telecommunications field, the LERA has entered into negotiations with a firm, Industrial Construction Services, Inc. (ICS), to create a public/private telecommunications center in the Lowry Neighborhood. res would be a tenant at Lowry with 15-30 employees. They propose to create a state-of-the-art inter-active telecommunications system within the Business & Training Center, including a private fiber optic loop, to help attract other clients in the Business & Training Center. In the biomedical field, the LERA has entered into negotiations with a biomedical firm, Colorado BioMedical Venture Center (CBVC), to facilitate the start up of biomedical incubator companies for research at the Lowry Business & Training Center. They would create 30-40 immediate staff jobs. CBVC anticipates that it will draw 3-5 incubator companies to Lowry each year which will become users of space in the Business & Training Center and creators of new 10-30 initial jobs per company. In the educational training field, the LERA is in negotiations with Telecommunications Inc. (TCI), the nation's largest cable service provider to establish a teacher training facility in the Lowry neighborhood to bring educators from around the region to teach them to use telecommunications equipment. They would generate 20-30 staff jobs and over 500 jobs by the year 2010. In the financial services field, the LERA plans to use the DFAS organization as a magnet to bring other 'back office' financial service companies to Lowry. With the ability to provide the large parking requirements that these users employee count demand, Lowry is more than competitive with private, stand alone business areas. By targeting specific industries which are known to be interested in the Denver Region; pre-locating magnet firms within these industries in the early stages of the Lowry Reuse Plan; and aggressive marketing within the real estate industry, the LERA hopes to accelerate the jobs creation in the Lowry Neighborhood. SEE COMPLETE CLIENT LIST AT THE END OF THIS SUBSECTION 7

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EDUCATION JOBS CREATION The bulk of the jobs creation in the Education area comes from employees proposed for the Community College Campus in the North East quadrant of the site. The original estimates are for 1,200 employees which relate to a 10,000 student campus. The focus of the consortium of colleges is on professional and vocational training both at undergraduate and at graduate levels. This market focus was created to avoid duplication among the various campuses, but has the effect to help supply a work force for companies moving into the Business & Training Center. The Business & Training Center itself has education and training as one of its other major thrusts in addition to pure business uses. It is estimated that 500-700 of the projected 5,300 BTC total employees will be in the education and training field. Two specific clients have approached the LERA with written proposals for immediate educational related space in the Business & Training Center: 1. A joint venture of Interstate Hotels and R. Hanafi Fraval wants to convert building #397 into a hotel and conference center. They propose to employ 31 people initially and 91 people at their peak. They intend to build an additional structure south of #397.6 2. A private school, stanley British Primary, wants to locate at the Officer's club and five residential houses. They also train teachers for the Denver Public School system. They propose to employ 25-30 people plus 40 new teaching interns, annually. The Logan School, a Public Benefit Conveyance, plans to open in 1995 adjacent to the Community College campus as a primary education school with 35-40 total employees. These immediate, multiple educational uses will attract other education oriented clients to the Lowry neighborhood. In addition, the presence of the private schools will enhance the marketability of housing tracts. SEE COMPLETE CLIENT LIST AT THE END OF THIS SUBSECTION 6 Interstate Hotels operates 89 hotels in 23 states. the largest franchise partner of Marriott. 8 It is

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SERVICES JOBS CREATION Within the Lowry Neighborhood, community support services will increase over time as the Campus, Residential areas, and Business & Training Center require services. Targeted companies will include service retail and primary services such as banks, dry cleaning, child care, health care and fast food. For instance, DFAS has identified a built-in clientele of more than 100 employees for a market rate child care facility. Five specific clients or needs have been identified with proposals for immediate occupancy in the Lowry Neighborhood: 1. Amerinvest, which has major holdings at Chanute AFB, has proposed to house a senior congregate living center in Building #1400 with an immediate $2M rennovation project and creation of over 100 jobs. 2. Space Age credit Union currently serves the DFAS employees from within the DFAS building. This firm plans to expand its charter and would like to locate in the Colorado National Bank building for immediate occupancy with 15-20 jobs created. 3. Dominos Pizza would like to open a retail outlet in the Lowry Neighborhood as well as a commissary for stocking other outlets in the area with 10-25 jobs created. 4. The LERA is soliciting proposals from four market rate child care facilities to use the DFAS client base as a reason for opening a market rate facility on site to complement the PBC below-market rate facility. s. A minority-owned dry cleaning, supreme Dry Cleaners, establishment has contacted the LERA through the Governor's Office of Minority Affairs to open negotiations for a facility on site as soon as possible after October 1, 1994. SEE COMPLETE CLIENT LIST AT THE END OF THIS SUBSECTION 9

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CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY JOBS CREATION During the first 36 months of development of the Lowry Reuse Plan construction jobs will be created which will have the added impact of replacing some of those lost jobs relating to the completion of DIA and the Coors Field construction projects.7 A limited marketing plan will be implemented by the Executive Director to national and regional builders looking for infill lots in large and small scale platted lots sales. Past dealings with the following national builders will be one initial marketing plan direction: Kaufman & Broad cent ex u.s. Homes Melody Homes Initial Jobs Creation will include the field personnel for the Caretaker Agreement totalling 15-20 people. Jobs Creation and jobs retention will include the following site work categories employed directly by or contracted with the LERA in the first 18 months of the Reuse Plan. Planners & Engineers Demolition Piped Underground Utilities Wire Utilities Road Systems TOTAL 15 15 15 10 _Q_ 75 The following categories of jobs will be created during months #24-60 by residential builders and developers. An average of five builders will be working at the Lowry Neighborhood at any one time. Engineers site Development Personnel construction subtrades Supervisary Personnel Administrative Staff TOTAL 15 25 200 10 10 260 SEE COMPLETE CLIENT LIST AT THE END OF THIS SUBSECTION 7 "Grubb & Ellis Real Estate Forecast" (February 1994) 10

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The following are additional clients with which there are current negotiations or active contacts concerning specific locations within the Lowry Business & Training Center or other areas within the EDC. Acme Distribution Center Almaz Corporation Artreach Asian Pacific Development Center Barnum Center Biomed Instrumentation Organization CD Rom, Inc. Colorado Dental Association Colorado Digital Labs Colorado Innovation Foundation Colorado Indoor Soccer Association Colorado Tennis Association Cyber-con Corporation Denver Instrument Company Denver Urban Gardens David French Eaglefirst International Inc. Eastern Rockies Rugby Football Union EquiVentures, Inc. Frances J. Cole Foundation Independence Institute Institute of International Education International Museum for Children Invesco Realty Advisors Judy Stevenson & Assciates Murata Outland Association Navigationi Technologies National Institute of Nutritional Education Pro serve Rexco Manufacturer's Rocky Mountain Institute of Pastoral Healthcare Security Capital Sports Marketing Group Taylor Management Technologies Volunteers of America Westbrook Development companies Attached as exhibits "B" and "C'' are two studies which show companies which moved to Denver in 1993 and current companies which wish to have their search kept confidential. The first list shows the type of companies on which the Lowry Reuse Plan hopes to draw. The second list are companies which the LERA will contact through the Chamber of Commerce economic development office. Companies moving to Denver in 1993 Confidential MDN Prospect Activity Report -6/20/94 11

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LOWRY REUSE PLAN CONCEPT/MISSION STATEMENT The Lowry Ecomomic Redevelopment Authority (LERA) is charged with implementation of the reuse plan for Lowry AFB as submitted to the Air Force in November of 1993 after two years of public planning procedures. This reuse plan is based on the elements of jobs creation, education, business & training and regional open space with the goal of assisting the replacement of jobs lost by the closure OF Lowry AFB. The LERA'S Mission rests on four major functions: 1. Interim lease and sale of existing housing units. Sale of residential lots for near term creation of construction jobs and revenue creation for development. 2. use of net residential lots proceeds to accelerate the construction of the Lowry neighborhood infrastructure and to accelerate creation of the Business & Training Center areas for long term jobs creation. 3. Use of Lowry Neighborhood and Business & Training center net proceeds to enhance the planning, construction and operations of the regional park drainage system at the Lowry neighborhood. 4. A complimentary association with the Community College of Aurora's education campus to promote a unified, mixed use Lowry Neighborhood. The Reuse Plan has several areas of emphasis: Jobs creation, in the near term and long term. Education and training to aid jobs retention and training for the current and next generation's work force. creation of a well planned, urban, mixed-use community that minimizes the impact on surrounding neighborhoods. Separate sections specify the number of jobs created for each element of the plan as well as the timing of conveyance and P&M costs transition. 12

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LEASE AND SALE OF EXISTING HOUSING UNITS Of the 867 existing housing units, the LERA plans to lease all 867 units from the Air Force through an interim protection & maintenance lease document which will have a master lease date of October 1, 1994 and which will call for phased-in effective dates between October 1, 1994 and September 1, 1995. october 1, 1994 81 units November 1, 1994 so units December 1, 1994 75 units January 1, 1995 111 units February 1, 1995 130 units March 1, 1995 52 units April 1, 1995 124 units May 1, 1995 124 units August 1, 1995 32 units September 1, 1995 88 units TOTAL UNITS 867 UNITS Of the 867 existing units, 196 have been designated approveable for McKinney Provider groups. A separate plan sponsored by HUD, the state of Colorado, and five metro counties will lower this number of McKinney family units on Lowry AFB to a maximum number of 86. The LERA plans to sublease as many as 700 of the 867 units to individuals at market rates during the interim lease period. Those units which are substandard will be held off the market for extensive renovation, or demolition, when funds permit. Revenues from interim subleases will be used for operational expenses and to pay for costs of renovation of the marketable units which are meant to be sold after conveyance. Economic consultants have estimated that costs of operations may equal revenues in the short term when required costs of renovation and periodic repairs are factored into the expenses. When AFBCA is able to convey existing housing units by deed, the LERA plans to impliment a sales program to sell all marketable non-McKinney units at market rates over a period of 18-36 months. The timing of sale will depend upon market conditions at the time of conveyance to the LERA. The Officers' housing will be targeted to individuals. The Aspen Terrace duplex units and four-plex units may be marketed to individuals and larger developer groups. Blocks of eight-plex units in Blue Spruce and Sunset Village will be targeted to developers. Net proceeds from the sale of units, after reductions for capital expenditures, operational costs, and direct and indirect expenses will be shared between the LERA and the Air Force in the ratio of 60% to 40% of net income to LERA and the Air Force, respectively. 13

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SALE OF RESIDENTIAL LOTS A major element of the Lowry Reuse Plan is the addition of residential housing areas to complete the Lowry Neighborhood as a mixed use, urban, master planned community. The concept of combining housing, education, business and recreation areas into one neighborhood creates a plan which invites new businesses and jobs into the Lowry Neighborhood rather than in traditional competitive business areas. Business owners can find areas for senior management housing as well as employee housing within Lowry. Employers and employees can enjoy nominal commute times and alternative commuting methods by living in the neighborhood in which they work. Education and recreation is provided for employees and families within the Lowry Neighborhood. The LERA will take all residential tracts through planning, zoning and platting in order to sell groups of zoned, platted lots to developers and builders. The advantages include: Increased revenues available from zoned, platted lots. Increased lot sales to builders because they can avoid zoning risks and land banking. Accelerated lot sales by segmentation of lot types to simultaneously attract different builders for different price points. Better control over quality and quantity of homes within individual neighborhood tracts through zoning restrictions and recorded CC&Rs written by LERA. The timing of lot sales for all residential tracts will be 36-60 months depending on the market conditions at the time of sale: Conceptual Master Planning -October 94 to March 95 Platting initial tracts -December 94 to June 95 Sales negotiations begin -December 94 Conveyance of Tracts to LERA -June 95 to october 95 First lot sales closings -June 95 to October 95 The various residential tracts will be sold in the order that they are conveyed and as determined by the marketplace. At present the following are the probable order of lot sales: NW quadrant lots -North of 6th Avenue 1995 Officers' Housing lots -south of 6th Avenue 1995 SW quadrant lots -North of Alameda Avenue 1996-97 Golf course lots -West of Havana Street 1997-99 14

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LEASING AND SALE OF BUSINESS & TRAINING CENTER BUILDINGS The Business & Training Center will take 7-15 years to reach maximum capacity of 1.4M sq. ft. of improved building space. marketing approach of target industries and magnet companies been discussed. its The has Transactions in the Business & Training Center will vary widely depending on the building, the strength of the client and the timing of the transaction. However, most transacations will fall into the category of leases, sales or ventures. During the first 36 months, while infrastructure is being completed and demolition of functionally obsolete buildings occurs, most transactions will involve leases of existing structures. Difficult structures such as the Headquarters building will require innovative financial structures. The LERA might place Building #349 into the hands of a strong development partner without initial cost in exchange for a complete interior renovation plan paid by the developer and for a share of profits from sale of the structure upon full occupancy. Most building sales will occur in the later stages of the Business & Training Center development, between the year 2000 and 2010. Of 1.4M sq. ft. of building space in the Business & Training Center, 30-50% of the building space will be in existing structures. These buildings will be leased or sold at lower than market rates to attract initial tenants or clients and to encourage capital expenditures to upgrade the buildings. Office vacancies have halved in the past three years from a peak of over 26% to under 15% in the second quarter of 1994.8 This lowered vacancy and a lack of new construction will open opportunities for Build-to-Suit opportunities by developers at the Business & Training Center. The LERA will seek to join strong developers with clients looking for Build-to-Suit opportunities in this mixed use, urban setting. One source of immediate construction in the Business & Training Center is the Inter-State Hotels/Fravell joint venture. They hope to expand their proposed conference center with a new building structure within 24-36 months from opening. 8 Rocky Mountain News, "Office Vacancies Plunge," (July 5, 1994) 15

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COLORADO A DIVERSE ECONOMY AND IDEAL MODEL Colorado's diverse economy and commitment to minority businesses and incubator corporate growth make it ideal for jobs creation. The proposed regional solution to Homeless issues strikes a good balance between the McKinney Act which focuses on Lowry AFB and the sound planning practice of dispersal of Homeless Providers' units throughout the metropolitan area. 9 10 11 12 13 over 40% of Colorado's net employment increase was in businesses with less than 20 employees and 83% was in businesses with less than 100 employees.9 Denver is the health care center for the Rocky Mountain West and has the potential to become one of the greatest health care centers in the nation.10 The Denver areas has the highest rate of female entrepreneurship in the nation.11 "Denver has also.P.roven attractive to many black professionals .. '2 In 1993, the state of Colorado was ranked the third most diverse economy in the nation by the Corporation for Enterprise Development.13 "The Denver area will receive $5 million from the federal government to help provide 395 units of housing and other services for homeless people1 HUD Secretary Henry Cisneros announced yesterday .. 1114 CHAFA study, 1993 MOED, "Overall Economic Development Plan" (1992) "Lessions from CHAFA Study pertaining to Denver." (1993) Black Enterprise -May 1994. "The 1994 Development Report Card for The States" (1994) 14 The Denver Post, "$5 million grant to aid homeless" (June 26, 1994) 16

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"'Today, Denver is setting a national model' for its wise conversion of a military base, said Cisneros. 1115 "Federal leaders have awarded Denver $5 million to shift the burden of housing hundreds of homeless people from Lowry AFB to the surrounding suburbs. With the help of the federal money, local advocates for the homeless have agreed to scale back the number of homeless people at Lowry in exchange for hundreds of others throughout the metro area.16 "'They worked together in a way we don't see around the country,' Cisneros said .... 'Today, Denver is becoming a national model for developing transitional and permanent housing. n17 "'It provides a great opportunity for a win-win solution for the problem at Lowry, and it essentially gives us the resources to double the number of units across the metro areas' said John Parvensky, executive director for the Colorado Coalition for the Homeless. "18 Metropolitan Denver is a diverse economy that has experienced strong growth over the past three years, but this growth pattern will slow substantially over the next 12-24 months due, in part, to the closure of the Technical Training Center at Lowry AFB. To overcome the short term problems and to maximize the long term opportunities for Lowry AFB, Denver and Aurora, the two most affected cities, have proposed that the Air Force convey a major portion of Lowry AFB via an Economic Development Conveyance (EDC) to LERA. 15 Same 16 Rocky Mountain News. (July 26, 1994) 17 Same 18 Same 17

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SHORT TERM PROBLEI\1S The short term problems associated with the base closure range from obvious job losses to infrastructure and environmental issues which must be solved in a short span of time. 19 ... the closing of Lowry AFB at year-end 1994, will have a negative impact on apartment occupancy rates, and will cause rent increases to taper slightly1119 "Due to the completion of DIA and the closing of the Technical Training Center at Lowry AFB as well as layoffs by defense related companies, job growth in 1994 is forecast to be less than 1%20 "Are there enough areas of strength to offset the impending losses in airport construction and at Lowry AFB, which will be deactivated over the course of the year?" 21 "There are several areas (of roads) that would not meet the municipal criteria of Aurora and Denver." A MUDS study in 1989 identified significant deficiencies in the storm sewer system. With the exception of two lines, all of the sanitary sewer systems were built prior to WWII. Many underground sewer conduits do not follow the existing street rights-of-way.22 "Grubb & Ellis Economic Forecast." February 1994 20 Denver Chamber of Commerce. "The 1994 Denver Area Forecast" (January 1994) 21 Colorado National Bank. 111994 Economic Forecast" (September 1993) 22 Merrick & Co. "Preliminary Infrastructure Report and Strategy" (May 1993) 18

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LONG TERM OPPORTUNITIES The long term opportunities for the Lowry Neighborhood are strong based upon the overall Colorado Economy and the recent growth in Denver. Once the hit from the closure of Stapleton Airport and Lowry AFB is absorbed by the local economy, the new Lowry Neighborhood should gain from the health and diversity of the local and state economy. Forecasted employment levels for 1998 represent an increase of 143,100 over the base level for 1993. The service sector is expected to continue its supremacy as the generator of the largest number of new positions, accounting for 57% of the state's growth.n We are also supporting redevelopment efforts at AFB and economic conversion projects at Rocky flats. 4 First, the state significantly reduced its excess inventories during the 1980s, particularly in the construction industry. Thus, for the most part, the state's real estate markets are in equilibrium and any new demand for real estate is met with new construction. 25 Denver remains the regional transportation and communications hub and a center of government, business services and health care.u Unemployment is 5.2%, 12th in Nation. Average Earnings is $25,040, 16th in Nation Crime Rate is 5,958/100,000 population, 39th in Nation27 "Overall tax burdens in Colorado and metro Denver B Governor Roy Romer. (January 1994) "A strategic Agenda for Colorado. II 24 Same 25 Focus Colorado: Revenue and Economic Forecast -June 1994. 26 CB Commercial. ''Forecast 199411 (1994) 27 CFED 11The 1994 Development Report Card for the States11 (1994) 19

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generally rank among the lowest in nation. 1128 A healthy and vibrant housing market will continue for the Denver metro area through 1996. Apartment vacancies dropped from 14% in 1987 to 4.4% in 1993. Average rents increased from $433 in 1991 to $502 in 1993.N Apartments remained the investment of choice for most Colorado real estate buyers in 1993. Vacancies dropped below 4% across metro-Denver in the third quarter of 19 93.30 Governor Roy Romer. "A strategic Agenda for Colorado"(January 1994) 29 The Apartment Association of Metro Denver. "Denver Metro Apartment Vacancy and Rent Survey" (1994) 3 CB commercial. "Forecast 1994" (1994) 20

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Bibliography BBC Research and Consulting, Leigh Scott and Cleary and The Rocky Flats Local Impacts Initiative. Summary Socioeconomic Impacts of the Change from Production to Cleanup at Rocky Flats. (May 1994). Bischak, Greg and James Raffel. Successful Conversion Experiences, Briefing Paper Fourteen (Revised). (Washington, D.C.: National Commission for Economic Conversion and Disarmament, May 1992) Browne, Bortz, and Coddington. Financing and Redevelopment Options for Lowry Reuse: Discussion Materials for the August 4 Meeting of the Lowry Implementation Committee. CB Commercial Real Estate Group. Forecast 1994: The Denver Metro Commercial Real Estate Market. (Denver, Colorado: 1993). Clarke, Marianne K. A Governor's Guide to Economic Conversion. (Washington, D.C.: National Governor's Association, 1992). Colorado National Bank. 1994 Economic Forecast. (Colorado: CNB; September 23, 1994). Corash, Kristin M. The 1994 Denver Area Forecast. (Denver, Colorado: Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce, January 1994). Corporation for Enterprise Development. The 1994 Development Report Card for the States, Eighth ed. (Washington, D.C.: Corporation for Enterprise Development, 1994). Cushman and Wakefield of Colorado, Inc. Denver Office Market Report: First Quarter 1994. (Denver, Colorado: 1994). Denver Metro Apartment Vacancy and Rent Survey: Fourth Quarter. 1993. (Apartment Association of Metro Denver, 1994). Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce. Business Barometers. Division of Employment and Training, Colorado Department of Labor and Employment. Occupational Employment Outlook: 1993-1998. (Denver, Colorado: Colorado Department of Labor and Employment, December 1993). The Governor's Office of State Planning and Budgeting. Impact of Defense on the Colorado Economy: Update. (Colorado: State of Colorado, November 1993). 21

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The Governor's Office of State Planning and Budgeting. Impact of Defense on the Colorado Economy: Update. (Colorado: State of Colorado, November 1993). Grubb and Ellis Company. Denver Real Estate Forecast 1994. (Denver, Colorado: Grubb and Ellis Company, 1994). Lowry Economic Recovery Project with HOH Associates, Inc. and Browne, Bortz and Coddington. Reuse Plan Alternatives Report. (Lowry Air Force Base, Colorado: Lowry Economic Recovery Project, November 1992). Lowry Economic Recovery Project with HOH Consultants and BBC Research and Consulting. Lowrv Reuse Plan. (Lowry Air Force Base, Colorado: Lowry Economic Recovery Project, November 1993). Lowry Economic Recovery Project with HOH Consultants and Merrick & Company. Preliminary Infrastructure Report and Strategv. (Lowry Air Force Base, Colorado: Lowry Economic Recovery Project, May 1993). Lowry Hotels, Inc. Lowry Hotel Proposal. (Denver, Colorado: Interstate Hotels Corporation and R. Hanafi Fraval; June 4, 1994). Lowry Implementation Advisory Group. Draft Working Paper: Lowry Redevelopment Implementation Options and Financial Implications. (September 13, 1993). Mayor's Office of Economic Development. Overall Economic Development Plan. (Denver, Colorado: City and County of Denver, 1992). Mayor's Office of Economic Development. Summary of Proceedings: Lowry Economic Development Focus Group. (Denver, Colorado: City and County of Denver; January 6, 1993). Merrick Engineers and Associates. Executive Summary: Master Water. Sanitary Sewer and Storm Sewer Study on Lowry Air Force Base. (Denver, Colorado: September 30, 1993). Romer, Governor Roy. A Strategic Agenda for Colorado. (Colorado: State of Colorado, January 1994). Washington State Community Diversification Program. II 1993 Annual Report: Washington State Community Diversification Program, II in Defense Industry Cutbacks: Communities in Transition, ed. Office of Economic Adjustment. (Arlington, Virginia: April 6-7, 1994). 22

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.. Bibliography BBC Research and Consulting, Leigh Scott and Cleary and The Rocky Flats Local Impacts Initiative. Summary Socioeconomic Impacts of the Change from Production to Cleanup at Rocky Flats. (May 1994). Bischak, Greg and James Raffel. Successful Conversion Experiences, Briefing Paper Fourteen (Revised). (Washington, D.C.: National Commission for Economic Conversion and Disarmament, May 1992) Browne, Bortz, and Coddington. Financing and Redevelopment Options for Lowrv Reuse: Discussion Materials for the August 4 Meeting of the Lowrv Implementation Committee. CB Commercial Real Estate Group. Forecast 1994: The Denver Metro Commercial Real Estate Market. (Denver, Colorado: 1993). Clarke, Marianne K. A Governor's Guide to Economic Conversion. (Washington, D.C.: National Governor's Association, 1992). Colorado National Bank. 1994 Economic Forecast. (Colorado: CNB; September 23, 1994). Corash, Kristin M. The 1994 Denver Area Forecast. (Denver, Colorado: Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce, January 1994). Corporation for Enterprise Development. The 1994 Development Report Card for the States, Eighth ed. (Washington, D.C.: Corporation for Enterprise Development, 1994). Cushman and Wakefield of Colorado, Inc. Denver Office Market Reoort: First Quarter 1994. (Denver, Colorado: 1994). Denver Metro Apartment Vacancv and Rent Survey: Fourth Quarter, 1993. (Apartment Association of Metro Denver, 1994). Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce. Business Barometers Division of Employment and Training, Colorado Department of Labor and Employment. Occupational Employment Outlook: 1993-1998. (Denver, Colorado: Colorado Department of Labor and Employment, December 1993). The Governor's Office of State Planning and Budgeting. Impact of Defense on the Colorado Economy: Update. (Colorado: State of Colorado, November 1993). 21

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.. The Governor's Office of State Planning and Budgeting. Impact of Defense on the Colorado Economy: Update. (Colorado: State of Colorado, November 1993). Grubb and Ellis Company. Denver Real Estate Forecast 1994. (Denver, Colorado: Grubb and Ellis Company, 1994). Lowry Economic Recovery Project with HOH Associates, Inc. and Browne, Bortz and Coddington. Reuse Plan Alternatives Reoort. (Lowry Air Force Base, Colorado: Lowry Economic Recovery Project, November 1992). Lowry Economic Recovery Project with HOH Consultants and BBC Research and Consulting. Lowry Reuse Plan. (Lowry Air Force Base, Colorado: Lowry Economic Recovery Project, November 1993). Lowry Economic Recovery Project with HOH Consultants and Merrick & Company. Preliminary Infrastructure Report and Stratee:v. (Lowry Air Force Base, Colorado: Lowry Economic Recovery Project, May 1993). Lowry Hotels, Inc. Lowry Hotel Proposal. (Denver, Colorado: Interstate Hotels Corporation and R. Hanafi Fraval; June 4, 1994). Lowry Implementation Advisory Group. Draft Working Paper: Lowry Redevelopment Implementation Options and Financial Implications. (September 13, 1993). Mayor's Office of Economic Development. Overall Economic Development Plan. (Denver, Colorado: City and County of Denver, 1992). Mayor's Office of Economic Development. Summarv of Proceedings: Lowry Economic Development Focus Grouo. (Denver, Colorado: City and County of Denver; January 6, 1993). Merrick Engineers and Associates. Executive Summary: Master Water, Sanitary Sewer and Storm Sewer Studv on Lowrv Air Force Base. (Denver, Colorado: September 30, 1993). Romer, Governor Roy. A Strategic Agenda for Colorado. (Colorado: State of Colorado, January 1994) Washington State Community Diversification Program. ''1993 Annual Report: Washington State Community Diversification Program," in Defense Industry Cutbacks: Communities in Transition, ed. Office of Economic Adjustment. (Arlington, Virginia: April 6-7, 1994). 22