Citation
Montbello and Green Valley Ranch neighborhood plans

Material Information

Title:
Montbello and Green Valley Ranch neighborhood plans
Creator:
Community Planning and Development, City and County of Denver
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
City and County of Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Neighborhood plans
Community planning
City planning
Spatial Coverage:
Denver -- Montbello

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Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain.

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Full Text
M ONTBELLO
N E IGHBORHOOD PLAN
GREEN VALLEY RANCH
N E IGHBORHOOD PLAN
PLANNING AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OFFICE
CITY AND COUNTY 0 F DENVER
FEBRUARY 1991




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AC K NOVVIJ: 1)G KM ENTS
Mayor of Denver
Wellington E. Webb
Bemie Jones
Debra Gallegos
Tom Foster
Marilyn Stokes
Denver Planning Board
Ruth Falkenberg, Chair
Gilbert F. McNeish
Rick Pederson
Jeanne Lubuda
Philip Milstein
Marilee Utter
Daniel R Guimond
Denver Planning and Community Development Office
Jennifer Moulton, Director of Planning and Development
Doug Wheeler, Neighborhood Planner and Project Manager
Ellen Crain-Jordan, Urban Designer and Urban Design Report Author
David Becker, Senior Planner and Retail Business Development Report Author
Jodi Adkins, Program Specialist
Ken Barkema
Karl Haberman
Mark Hess
Sandra Jackson
Carolyn Moore
The Plan Steering Committee, Subcommittees, and Neighborhood Planning Meeting
Participants
Councilwoman Happy Haynes
Chairperson Bill Brown
Secretary Dixie Witcher
Charles Allen Isabella Allen Alberta Alston
Claudette Anderson John Andrews Morris Augusta
Samuel Batey Dawn Benjamin Helen Bradley
Connie Brigham Dean Brown Tina Burls
Diane Buell F. D. Carter Mrs. F. D. Carter
Difk Chandler Joe Charleston Marilyn Cobbs
Antoinette Coleman Paula Cottingham Gwen Crapps
Marvin Crayton Michael Crisp Barbara Crosby
Lucheryl Crunpler Gary Dahl Sid Davidson
Don Davis Doris Dempsey Ron Durr
Barbara Dwight Elaine Eggart Athena Eisenm an
Julia Ellington Sheryl Essie William Fields
Mrs. William Fields Jacqueline Farrell Jamie Fowler
Keith Fowler Mike Freeman Diana Gadison
Gregory Gonzales Harriet Gonzales Bruce Gray
Homer Grinde Artie Grisby Michael Guggenheim
Rev. Hugh Harris Pam Hammond Gwendolynn Harris


AGKN 0 W L E DC K MENTS"
J. T. Harrison Barbara Hatch Ronald Henry
Sue Hernandez Clarence Hiblett Fred Hicks
Lee Horst Phil Hough Emma Hunter
Phillip Hunter Maye Irvin Therese Jackson
Raymond Johnson Rod Juniel Lee Kaley
Rev. James Kane JeffKanost Tom Leek
Wanda Lenox Michelle Lockhart Jon Lohmer
Tim Macho Betty Martin Chris Martinez
Kevin McDonnell Robert Mosley L. J. Murzyn
Rev. Charles Nelms Estella Nelms Twila Norman
Thomas Owens Margaret Pacheco Clyde Page
Melvin Page Norma Paige Bob Parkam
Carmen Patterson Margaret Pearson Lyle Peterson
Luther Pleasant Trinny Pleasant Georgia Polk
Rex Pruitt Edna Rhambo Ruby Richard
Bill Roberts Judith Roberts A1 Roettger
Aleyda Rogers Rev. Rod Rogers Flossie Rollerson
Johnny Rollerson Susan Sanchez Morris Sanchez
Rev. John Sawyer Jeanne Scharfenberg Sandra Scott
Monica Sinkler Bill Slansky Elaine Smith
Eric Smith John Smith Marty Smith
Joseph Songy Charles Spratt Barbara Stallings
Jan Stenroos Jean Sutphen Ora Sutton
Gloria Taylor Landri Taylor Rev. Madlyn Tombs
Joe Turner Joe Uchiyama Bernadette Ukolowicz
Ray Vaughn Pat Vest Vickie Waits-Wolverton
Edith Walston Scott White Neil Wiegert
Barbara Williamson Ronald Williamson Gloria Wise
Steven Wolverton Jennifer Wright Charles Wong Darryl Wright
And many other residents who offered suggestions and ideas, whose participation we gratefully
acknowledge.
Our thanks to the residents of Montbello and Green Valley Ranch for the valuable input and
insight they provided. Theirs was the essential perspective needed in creating this plan.
Acknowledgement is also given to former members of the City Administration, Denver Planning
Board, and Denver Planning and Community Development Office who made the preparation and
approval of this plan possible, including Federico Pena, former mayor of Denver; Richard Deane,
former chair, and Jerome Nagle, John Maldanado, Martin Saiz, James Swanson, Robert Wright,
and David Hare all former members of the Denver Planning Board; Frank Gray, former


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
Director of the Denver Planning and Community Development Office; Billie Bramhall former
Deputy Director of the Denver Planning and Community Development Office; and Frances Burg,
former word processing specialist in the Denver Planning and Community Development Office.
A number of elements in the plan required special technical assistance. Bruce Leiser with the
Wastewater Management Division of Public Works attended numerous work sessions in
Montbello and took the lead in providing technical direction for developing the Irondale Gulch
plan. Paul Foster and Andy Mutz with the Parks and Recreation Department attended
neighborhood workshops and helped coordinate planning for improvements in the Irondale Gulch
street median areas. Tim Engels with the Parks and Recreation Department attended
neighborhood recreation workshops to develop the recreation plan. Lloyd Bimson with the
Transportation Division of Public Works provided on-going assistance with transportation
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planning.
The Montbello and Green Valley Ranch Neighborhoods Plan was approved by the Denver
Planning Board following a public hearing on December 12, 1990. Following a City Council
public hearing it was approved by the Denver City Council on February 25, 1991. It was signed
by the Mayor on February 26, 1991, at which time it became part of the Denver Comprehensive
Plan.


Mont&etto
Table of Contents
Page
I. Introduction
A. The Montbello Vision for the Future.................................... 1
B. The Green Valley Ranch Vision for the Future.......................... 1
C. Priority Planning Issues............................................... 1
D. Location and Description................................................. 2
E. Use of the Plan.......................................................... 2
F. History of the Neighborhoods............................................. 3
II. Land Use and Zoning Plan
A. Goals ................................................................. 5
B. Overview of Existing Land Use and Zoning .............................. 5
C. Montbello Land Use Plan
1. Existing Land Uses and Zoning................................... 5
2. Montbello Land Use and Zoning Recommendations..................... 8
D. Green Valley Ranch Land Use Plan
1. Existing Land Uses and Zoning.................................... 14
2. Green Valley Ranch Land Use and Zoning Recommendations........... 15
HI. Transportation Plan
A. Goals................................................................... 17
B. Overview of Existing Circulation, Transportation Systems, and Issues.... 17
C. Action Recommendations............................................... 23
IV. Housing Plan
A. Goals............................................................... 27
B. Overview of Existing Conditions and Issues............................. 27
C. Action Recommendations................................................ 30
V. Recreation Plan
A. Goals................................................................ 35
B. Overview of Existing Programs, Facilities, and Issues .................. 35
C. Action Recommendations................................................ 37
VI. Retail Business Development Plan
A. Goals............................................................... 41
B. Overview of Existing Conditions and Issues............................ 41
C. Action Recommendations................................................ 44


Table of Contents
VII. Urban Design Plan
A. Goals............................................................ 47
B. Overview of Existing Conditions and Issues.......................... 47
C. Action Recommendations............................................ 51
APPENDIX A
1. Neighborhood Planning in Denver.................................... A-l
2. Montbello/Green Valley Ranch Planning Process...................... A-l
APPENDIX B
Montbello Demographics
1. Population......................................................... B-l
2. Household Income................................................... B-l
3. Age Profile................................................... B-l
4. Ethnic Composition................................................. B-2
5 Household Profile.................................................. B-3
6. 1990 Census Tract Map.............................................. B-4
APPENDIX C
Green Valley Ranch Demographics
1. Population..........................................................C-l
2. Household Income....................................................C-l
3. Age Profile........................................................ C-l
4. Ethnic Composition................................................ C-2
5 Household Profile............................................ C-3
APPENDIX D
1. Montbello/Green Valley Ranch Housing Data..........................D-1
2. 1980 Census Tracts................................................ D-2
APPENDIX E
Gateway Regional Perspective........................................... E-l


List of Illustrations
Page
Figure 1 Vicinity Map
Figure 2 Existing Zoning Montbello
Figure 3 Land Use and Zoning Recommendations Montbello
Figure 4 Existing Zoning Green Valley Ranch
Figure 5 Land Use and Zoning' Recommendations Green Valley Ranch
Figure 6 1990 Traffic Volumes
Figure 7 Transportation Plan Recommendations
Figure 8 Bicycle Routes
Figure 9 Proposed Montbello Resource Centers
Figure 10 Proposed Green Valley Ranch Resource Center
Figure 11 Irondale Gulch Parkways Map
Figure 12 Irondale Gulch Parkways Design Concept
Figure 13 Urban Design Montbello
Figure 14 Urban Design Green Valley Ranch
i
6
7
12
13
21
22
26
39
40
52
53
57
59


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VICINITY MAP
MONTBELLO/GREEN VALLEY RANCH





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I. INTRODUCTION.
A. The Montbello Vision for the Future
The Montbello neighborhoods vision for the future is to preserve and enhance the following
positive qualities that make the neighborhood a unique place to live:
Diversity of people (ages, income, ethnic and cultural heritage, lifestyle choices).
Quiet, suburban "small town" environment with a sense of safety and friendliness.
Diversity of architectural styles, sizes, and selling prices of homes.
Excellence of neighborhood schools.
Physical features of the neighborhood, including mountain views, seven parks, and
parkways.
Convenience of location relative to transportation access to Downtown Denver,
shopping, the Denver Tech Center, parks and open space, nature areas, and mountain
recreation.
High quality new development and neighborhood economic benefits resulting from the
opening of Denver International Airport.
B. The Green Valley Ranch Vision for the Future
Green Valley Ranch is the newest of Denvers residential neighborhoods. Large areas of open
space are waiting for development within and adjacent to Green Valley Ranch. The
neighborhoods vision for the future is to preserve existing qualities and create new qualities as
the area develops:
Diversity of people, with an emphasis on family and children.
"Small town" atmosphere, with a sense of friendliness, safety, and interest in the
neighborhoods schools and recreation opportunities.
Development in harmony with the natural environment in order to protect mountain
views, streams, the High Line Canal, and wildlife areas.
High quality new development and neighborhood economic benefits resulting from the
opening of Denver International Airport.
C. Priority Planning Issues
Residents, business people, and city representatives who established these visions see tremendous
potential for Montbello and Green Valley Ranch as these neighborhoods build on these
characteristics. This plan addresses the following priority topics as established in the
neighborhood meetings:
zoning and land use
traffic and transportation
housing
recreation
business development
urban design
1


INTROIH ( HON
D. Location and Description
Denvers far northeast area includes four distinct neighborhood areas: the Stapleton
neighborhood (airport, offices, industrial), Montbello neighborhood (primarily residential),
Gateway area (residential, business, mixed use), and Green Valley Ranch neighborhood
(primarily residential). This plan will focus on the existing residential areas in Denvers far
northeast region: the Montbello neighborhood and Green Valley Ranch neighborhood.
Montbello is bounded by 1-70 on the south, 56th Avenue on the north, Peoria Street on the west,
and Chambers Road on the east. The neighborhood is residential in character, with slightly more
than 5,600 single family homes and 1,250 multi family units. Businesses generally are located in
the Peoria Street commercial area south of Albrook Drive and in the Chambers Place Shopping
Center at Chambers Road and 48th Avenue. A business and industrial area is immediately to the
west, Auroras Morris Heights neighborhood to the south, open space to the east, and open space
to the north. Distinctive features of the neighborhood are its suburban character, meandering
street system, and nearby natural open space areas. Montbello is the largest of Denvers
neighborhoods in both land area and population.
The portion of Green Valley Ranch that is thus far subdivided and built with homes is bounded
by 38th Avenue on the south, 48th Avenue on the north, Piccadilly Road on the east, and Tower
Road on the west. Slightly more than 1,100 single family homes have been built in the
neighborhood since 1981. There is a small retail center on Tower Road near 48th Avenue. The
undeveloped area north of 48th Avenue has been included in the Airport Gateway Plan along
with undeveloped open space to the west of Tower Road. A partially developed Aurora business
and industrial area is immediately to the south. Residential development is anticipated to the east
in Aurora. The most distinctive feature of Green Valley Ranch is the panoramic view of the
Front Range made possible by the surrounding large expanses of open space.
E. Use of the Plan
This plan presents the best thinking of the city and the neighborhoods and provides a
city-approved guide for the acceptable future physical development of the neighborhoods for use
by the Denver Planning Office, the Denver Planning Board, the Mayor, City Council,
governmental agencies, residents, property owners, business people, and private organizations
concerned with planning, development, and neighborhood improvement. The plan is neither an
official zone map nor does it imply or deny any implicit rights to a particular zone. Zone changes
that may be proposed by property owners as part of any plan must be initiated under a separate
procedure established under the City and County of Denver Municipal Code.
This plan is intended to promote patterns of land use, urban design, and circulation and services
that contribute to the economic, social, and physical health, safety, and welfare of the people who
2


INTRODUCTION
live and work in these neighborhoods. The plan addresses issues and opportunities at a scale that
is more refined and more responsive to specific needs than the citys Comprehensive Plan. The
plan serves as a component of that document.
F. History of the Neighborhoods
Montbello
The Italian word "Montbello" means literally "beautiful mountain." Spectacular views of Mount
Evans, Longs Peak, and the Continental Divide inspired developers to name Denvers new
neighborhood area "Montbello," after the picturesque mountain region in the Italian Alps with
that name.
Montbello was the first major annexation of privately owned land to the far northeast area of
Denver, taking place in September, 1965. Because the area annexed was large approximately
2,609 acres the City and developers worked out a master land use plan in conjunction with the
annexation agreement that addressed mutual obligations in the annexation area.
The annexation agreement included a master plan for the area to develop into a mixed use
community. The agreement basically dictated the general land use and densities and provided for
the necessary public land sites for parks, schools, and other public facilities.
Montbello started developing in 1966, with the bulk of growth taking place in the late 1960s and
early 1970s. At present, Montbello is 75%-80% developed.
Green Valley Ranch
Green Valley Ranch was annexed to Denver from Adams County in September 1973. This
original Green Valley Ranch annexation of 3,078 acres extended approximately from Tower
Road to Piccadilly Road and from 38th Avenue to a mile north of 56th Avenue between
Himalaya Road (extended) and Piccadilly Road (extended). The original annexation agreement
included a master plan comprising mixed land uses for the area. In 1978, a comprehensive
rezoning was adopted which generally changed the lower density residential uses to medium
density residential uses. The rezoning also reconfigured public land sites. In July of 1980 a
square mile of land (642 acres specifically) north of 56th Avenue and west of Piccadilly Road
(extended) was de-annexed from Denver and re-annexed to Adams County as part of a negotiated
settlement of a lawsuit brought against the City by Adams County. Development started in
Green Valley Ranch in 1981. It is currently about 15% developed.
3




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LAM) ISLAM) ZONING PLAN
A. Goals
Protect the existing residential character of the Montbello neighborhood and Green
Valley Ranch neighborhood.
Encourage good design in new business development and compatibility with adjacent
residential land uses.
B. Overview of Existing Land Use and Zoning
Montbello and Green Valley Ranch are unique among Denvers neighborhoods in that from the
time they were annexed into the City as open ranch land, their development has been guided by
respective large area master plans that have sought to assure compatibility of land uses, location
of business areas, provision of nearby employment, location of parks and schools, and design of
street layouts. Taken together, these neighborhoods encompass over 5,000 acres of land where a
rational basis for land uses and accompanying zoning of large areas has been in effect for
twenty-five years in Montbello and twelve years in Green Valley Ranch.
For the most part, land use patterns and accompanying zoning already in place continue to make
sense. But no plan benefits from a perfect crystal ball. With the passing of time, internal
changing conditions from within the neighborhoods and external changing conditions from
outside the neighborhoods (Aurora and Denvers adjacent Gateway and Stapleton areas) suggest
a need to review and modify land use planning and existing zoning.
C. Montbello Land Use Plan
1. Existing Land Uses and Zoning
All of the 5,600 single family homes in Montbello are in areas zoned R-l or R-2 (limited to
single family detached homes). The R-2 Planned Building Group process has been used in some
parts of Montbello to increase density for single family development by reducing lot sizes. There
is room for 1,600 additional single family homes on undeveloped land that is zoned R-l, R-2, and
0-2 (a holding zone pending application for residential zoning). Multi-family zoning (R-3 and
R-2-A) is located along Albrook Drive. Over the last twenty-five years 1,250 apartment units
have been constructed, with about 350 additional units permitted on undeveloped land along
Albrook Drive.
Zoning to the south of Albrook Drive and east of Peoria Street is B-8 and B-4 for commercial
development Montbello Plaza Shopping Center, a bank, hotel, several restaurants, convenience
store, car wash, and pre-school have developed on this site over the last 25 years. Zoning to the
west of Peoria Street is industrial (I-0,1-1,1-2) and intensive commercial (B-8). This is a major
Denver office and industrial employment center with attractively landscaped sites that make good
neighbors to the residential heart of Montbello. There are scattered undeveloped sites,
particularly at the north end of this Business and Industrial Park. Zoning to the south of 1-70 is
industrial (1-1 and 1-2), with a small retail business site (B-2) at the comer of Peoria Street and
Smith Road.
5


R-1 Single-Unit Detached Dwellings, Low Density. Density 7.3 dwelling untts/acre.
R-2 Single and Multi-Unit Dwellings, Low Density. Density 14.5 dwelling units/acre.
R-2-A Multi-Unit Dwellings, Medium Density.
R-3 Multi-Unit Dwellings, High Density. Maximum density is not specified and is
determined by the size of the units, bulk plane, parking, and open space
requirements,
R-5 Institutional District. Allows hospitals, colieges, schools, churches and other
institutional uses.
B-2 Neighborhood Business District. This district provides the retailing of
commodities classed as convenience goods," and the furnishing of certain personal
services, to satisfy the daily and weekly household or personal needs of the
residents of surrounding residential neighborhoods. The volume of pedestrian traffic
in proportion to vehicular traffic entering the district is much higher than in other retail
business districts.
B-4 General Business District. This district is intended to provide for and encourage
appropriate commercial uses adjacent to arterial streets, which are normally transit
routes, and abutting residential districts.
B-8 Intensive General Business/Very High Density Residential District. This very
intense district is designed to serve die entire metropolitan area as an alternative to
urban sprawl. Building floor area cannot exceed 4 times the site area plus floor area
premiums.
1-0 Light Industrial District. A transftional district between intensive industrial and
residential districts. ABows limited manufacturing, wholesale and retail activities,
offices, and motels.
1-1 General Industrial District. Allows many manufacturing, warehousing, wholesaling
activities, along with limited retail and service uses for the benefit of area employees.
1-2 Heavy Industrial District. Allows all manufacturing, warehousing.
0*1 Open Use District Allows recreational uses, parks, and other public and
semi-public uses housed in buildings.
0-2 Open Space District. Allows large tracts of open land utilized primarily for
agriculture or ranching activities.
PUD Planned Unit Development. PUD is a form of development generally
characterized by a unified site design for clustering buildings and providing common
open-space, density increases, and a mix of building types and land uses. It allows
maximum flexibility during the planning stage and maximum assurance that exactly
what is proposed will be developed.
EXISTING ZONING
February, 1991
MONTBELLO
6


Rezone for Retail
Business When 56th Avenue
Opens to Quebec Street
Open Space Nature Area
Neighborhood Focal Point
Encourage Community Service
and Retail Development
Open Space,
l Lake, New Park
Existing Shopping
Centers
Encourage Retail
Development
at Neighborhood
Entrance
Airport Gateway
) Development
Area
Chambers Place
Shopping Center
Town Square Focal
point
Enoourage Retail
i Development
Rezone to B-4
Encourage
Retail, Business,
Hotel
Development
LAND USE AND ZONING RECOMMENDATIONS
MONTBELLO
7


LAND USE
Retail business zoning is located in the following areas of Montbello:
Southeast comer of Peoria Street and Albrook Drive. Montbello Plaza (existing
shopping center). B-8 zoning.
Northwest comer of Peoria Street and Albrook Drive. Albrook Center (existing
shopping center). B-8 (waivers and conditions) zoning.
Southwest comer of Crown Boulevard and Albrook Drive. Undeveloped. B-4 (waivers
and conditions) zoning. Rezoned September 1990.
Northeast comer of Chambers Road and 48th Avenue. Chambers Place (existing
shopping center). P.U.D. (retail uses) zoning.
Southwest comer of Chambers Road and Andrews Drive. Undeveloped. B-4 zoning.
Southeast comer of Maxwell Place and Crown Boulevard. Vacant convenience store
building and undeveloped. B-2 zoning.
Northwest comer of Peoria Street and Smith Road. Existing restaurant and retail
commercial. B-2 zoning.
2. Montbello Land Use and Zoning
Recommendations
Implementing Agencies/Groups
LZM-1 Change zoning on 58 acres from B-8 to B-4 on the
northerly half of the undeveloped parcel east of Peoria
Street and south of Albrook Drive. Reduce the
permitted floor area ratio (F.A.R.) to .5:1. Prohibit
vehicle sales, adult businesses, billboards and uses
inappropriate at this major entry point to the residential
neighborhood. Encourage neighborhood serving retail
shops and attractive landscaping along Albrook Drive
street frontage. Encourage office, hotel (room
entrances from building interior),
wholesale/retail/warehouse outlets, and mixed
retail/fabrication/assembly uses at interior locations.
(Rezoned September 1990)
LZM-2 Change zoning from B-8, R-3, and R-2-A to 1-0 on 98
acres of undeveloped land generally located to the
north of 1-70 and to the south of the south property line
of the Fountain View Apartments. Prohibit vehicle
sales and uses with outdoor storage. Exterior building
materials on all buildings should be limited to
masonry, brick, brick veneer, or stucco. Attractive
landscaping treatment should be encouraged for new
development throughout this area that is so readily
visible from 1-70 and will give a first impression of
Denver to visitors arriving through Denver
International Airport A solid wood screening fence
and landscaping should be required on all developing
properties adjacent to a residential zone district.
(Rezoned September 1990)
Landowners
Neighborhood Groups
City Council
Landowners
Neighborhood Groups
City Council
8


LAND l/SE
LZM-3
LZM-4
LZM-5
LZM-6
Change R-2-A zoning on 15 acres along Albrook
Drive to limit the number of dwelling units to four
units per building and a maximum density of ten units
per acre. Encourage the development of elderly
housing and/or nursing homes in this area. (Rezoned
September 1990)
As development is proposed on the B-4 parcel at the
southwest comer of Chambers Road and Andrews
Drive, work with the developer to assure compatibility
with the adjacent residential area along Andrews
Drive.
Encourage good design and compatibility of new
development on the parcel at the southeast comer of
Maxwell Place and Crown Boulevard. Over the last
twenty-five years this site has remained vacant, except
for a convenience store on the south portion of the site.
Inspite of changes in shopping habits that make it
difficult for B-2 shopping areas to survive, there are
success stories in other parts of the city and planning in
the nearby Gateway area is for neighborhood
convenience shops and services around park-like town
squares. This suggests an opportunity to take a fresh
look at neighborhood shopping on this site. Use the
existing zoning to make sure this block long area, over
time, develops as a pleasant neighborhood focal point
with attractive landscaping and uses such as small
retail shops, preschool, church, and nursing care
center. This site should be monitored over the next ten
years and if no development occurs, a rezoning of the
northerly 2/3 of the site to an appropriate residential
zone district should be considered.
Explore rezoning from 1-2 to an appropriate zone
district for neighborhood-serving retail and personal
services in the vicinity of Smith Road and Peoria Street
where a future rail transit station may be located if a
northeast corridor rail transit line is constructed.
Feeder commuter buses and a park-n-ride suggest an
opportunity to develop retail shopping in this area.
Landowners
Neighborhood Groups
City Council
Landowners
Developers
Landowners
Developers
Landowners
City Council
9


1
D USE
LZM-7 Retain all current 1-0 zoning along the west side of
Peoria Street. 1-0 light industrial zoning allows for
offices, warehousing, limited manufacturing, hardware
sales, restaurants, and similar uses. This is intended as
a transition between intensive industrial areas and
residential areas. Zoning requirements for the parking
of trucks and trailers should be strictly enforced in the
industrial area along Peoria Street. Future retail
development is encouraged at nodes currently zoned
for retail uses, rather than strip commercial
development along Peoria Street. The
under-utilization of existing retail centers and the
present surplus of undeveloped land zoned for retail
uses, does not suggest a need for more retail zoning in
the neighborhood. One exception is the southwest
comer of Peoria Street and 56th Avenue: this site
should be evaluated for retail development (B-2 or
P.U.D. zoning) at the time 56th Avenue is opened west
to Quebec Street.
LZM-8 Encourage single family residential infill development
on vacant R-l zoned sites to the east of Peoria Street
and at scattered sites along Crown Boulevard and
Andrews Drive. Explore development of community
gardens as an interim use. Expansion of commercial
zoning should not be allowed along these streets.
LZM-9 Encourage the establishing of pre-schools located to
conveniently serve neighborhood families. Locations
in existing commercial zoning are supported. New
P.U.D. zoning for pre-schools on residential arterial or
collector streets should be evaluated on a case by case
basis for compatibility with present and future adjacent
residential areas.
LZM-10 Establish minimum building lot sizes in new
residential subdivisions. A trend over the last ten years
in Montbello has been to develop single family
housing with R-2 zoning. The advantage in doing this
is to gain slightly more density (reducing the land costs
for each home) and achieve flexibility from the fixed
R-1 land area requirement of 6,000 square feet per
unit. This should be supported in future rezoning
requests for undeveloped land, with the condition that
each subdivision lot contain a minimum of 5,000
square feet of land area and at least 3,000 square feet
of unobstructed open space. A language change in the
R-2 zone district regulations to accomplish this
objective should also be evaluated.
Landowners
City Council
Landowners
Home Builders
Neighborhood Groups
City Council
Pre-school owners
Landowners
City Council
Landowners
Developers
Zoning Administration
Planning Office
10



LAM) L'SE
LZM-11 Seek to attract a developer for a new recreation vehicle
(RV) commercial storage lot. Increasing numbers of
Montbello residents own recreation vehicles and
trailers. Zoning regulations limit their length to less
than twenty-two feet and restrict where they may be
parked on a residential property. An appeal for
flexibility may be made to the Board of
Adjustment-Zoning and a decision is then made on the
basis of compatibility, safety, and legal criteria. The
development of a privately owned and operated RV
storage area is needed in the Montbello area. Such a
storage area could be part of a general purpose
mini-warehouse/ storage business. A storage area
should not be located within the residential
neighborhood. Suggested locations to explore include
1-1 and 1-2 zoned areas adjacent to Montbello and the
Stapleton Airport site.
LZM-12 Develop a town square at the comer of Chambers
Road and 5 Ist/48th Avenue as one in a series of town
squares in the Gateway communities. The goal in the
town squares will be to create lively places sometimes
absent in suburban developments and avoid
unattractive retail and commercial strips.
Neighborhood retail shops and public buildings will be
clustered around a park-like square. A mixed use
P.U.D. is encouraged at this location, with the square
located adjacent to Chambers Road and across from
the existing shopping center. The P.U.D. rezoning
should incorporate design guidelines adopted for town
squares throughout the Gateway Area. The early
construction of 48th Avenue between Chambers Road
and Tower Road is a high priority to begin to link
together development in the new Gateway
communities, Green Valley Ranch, Montbello, and
future Aurora communities to the east of Piccadilly
Road.
Business Developers
Landowners
Developers
Planning Office
City Council
11


R-1 Single-Unit Detached Dwellings. Density 7,3 dwelling units/acre.
R-2 Single and Multi-Unit Dwellings, Low Density. Density 14.5 dwelling units/acre.
R-2-A Multi-Unit Dwellings, Medium Density. Density *21.8 dwelling units/acre (29
units/acre under PBG, depending on open-soace requirements).
B-2 Neighborhood Business District. This district provides the retailing of
commooities classed as 'convenience goods,* ard the furnishing of certain personal
services, to satisfy the daily and weekly household or personal needs of the
residents of surrounding residential neighborhoods. The volume of pedestrian traffic
in proportion to vehicular traffic entering the district is much higher than in other retail
business districts.
B-3 Shopping Center District This district is primarily to provide the retailing of most
commodities and the furnisrtmg of certain personal services, satisfying aJf household
and personal needs of the residents of surrounding residential communities. This
district is normally located on major arteriai streets at or near the intersection with
another major arterial street so that is has good vehicular accessibility.
B-4 General Business District. This district is intended to provide for and encourage
appropriate commercial uses adjacent to arteriai streets, and abutting residential
districts. Commercial uses include a wide variety of consumer and business services.
B-8 Intensive General Susiness/Very High Density Residential District. This district,
primarily for activity centers, provides the concentration of retailing, personal and
business servioes, as weil as residential and cultural ses at a necessary intensity to
efficiently be served by mass transit facies. This very intense district is destgned to
serve the entire metropolitan area as an alternative to urban sprawl. The regulations
are designed to permit a highly concentrated, intense development of the
enumerated facilities.
PUD Planned Unit Development. PUD is a form of development generally
characterized by a unified site design for clustering buid-ngs and providing common
open-space, density increases, and a mix of building types and land uses, it aHows
maximum flexibility during the planning stage ana maximum assurance that exactly
what is proposed will be developed.
EXISTING ZONING
February, 1991
GREEN VALLEY RANCH
12
PICCADILLY fi?P,


Airport Gateway Development Area
Unincorporated Adams County
Worn with Owners to Assure
Compatibility
Town Square Focal Point
Encourage Retail Development
Existing GVR
Shopping
Center
Encourage
Retail
Development
Encourage
Retail
Business
Development
Aurora
LAND USE AND ZONING RECOMMENDATIONS
GREEN VALLEY RANCH
13


LAIN!) US
D. Green Valley Ranch Land Use Plan
1. Existing Land Uses and Zoning
The westerly section of Green Valley Ranch that has thus far developed with single family homes
is zoned R-l and R-2. Neighborhood zoning to the east of Himalaya Road is R-2. Throughout
Green Valley Ranch, much of the existing R-2 zoning would allow multi-unit dwellings
(typically townhomes, duplexes, and triplexes), though only single family homes have been built.
The shoppette on Tower Road at 48th Avenue is part of a larger B-3 shopping center zone
district.
The undeveloped land of Green Valley Ranch includes additional large areas of R-2 zoning.
Higher density R-2-A multi-family zoning lies between Tower Road and Argonne Street, in
smaller areas at the south end of the neighborhood, and along 48th Avenue at Ensenada Way.
A large tract of intensive business zoning (B-8) is at the northeast comer of Tower Road and 48th
Avenue. This area is planned as a town center, with retail shopping and office-commercial
development. Additional undeveloped shopping center zoning is located at 48th Avenue and
Himalaya Road (B-3) and an area south along Piccadilly Road (B-2). A strip of restricted B-4
business park zoning runs along the southern portion of Green Valley Ranch abutting Auroras
business park.
An enclave of Adams County agriculturally-zoned land is located to the north of Martin Luther
King Middle School and serves the neighborhood as a recreation vehicle storage area. Zoning in
Aurora to the east of Piccadilly Road allows for single family attached and detached homes, with
retail business zoning at Piccadilly Road and 38th Avenue. Aurora zoning to the south allows
offices and light industry, with retail shopping in an area along Tower Road.
14


LAND USE
2.
LZGVR-1
LZGVR-2
LZGVR-3
LZGYR-4
Green Valley Ranch Land Use and
Zoning Recommendations
Encourage good design and compatibility of retail
development on B-3 and B-2 sites. As one in a series
of town squares in the Gateway communities, a town
square focal point should be encouraged in the B-3
zoning at the comer of Himalaya Road and 48th
Avenue. Although Green Valley Ranch zoning for
retail businesses is in three locations along major
arterial streets, actual development will continue to
compete with Aurora shopping to the south and east,
and will depend on creation of a sufficient population
base within convenient driving distances. The
completion of 48th Avenue from Chambers Road east
to E-470 is a top priority, in order to link together the
population base of Green Valley Ranch, Airport
Boulevard commuters, new Gateway communities,
Montbello, and new Aurora communities.
Monitor Green Valley Ranch R-2-A zoning over the
next ten years to determine if it continues to make
sense for the community. There are areas of
multi-family zoning not only within Green Valley
Ranch, but also in the adjacent future Aurora
communities and adjacent future Gateway
communities. If development does not occur, rezoning
to R-l or R-2 single family zoning should be
considered, with conditions for minimum subdivision
lot sizes and provision of open space.
The RV storage area located within the enclave of
Adams County will lose some of its openness and
security as Green Valley Ranch builds out in this area.
As development occurs near the lot, security and
buffering solutions will need to be found if the lot
remains at this location. Any future expansion of the
lot into Denver will require rezoning, with
consideration for security and buffering.
Work with land owners and Adams County to assure
the provision of public services and the continued
compatibility of land uses on the small Adams County
enclaves located at the northeast comer of Tower Road
and 48th Avenue, and the southwest comer of Flanders
Way and 48th Avenue. Explore alternatives, including
possible annexation to Denver.
Implementing Agencies/Groups
Landowners
Developers
Planning Office
Landowners
Planning Office
Landowners
Neighborhood Groups
Landowners
Planning Office
15





MmtBetto tyighBorhood mvr...-n
§rem *lM£ey $&ndi 9^pgh.BoThoo(C
Transportation Plan
A. Goals
Develop convenient and attractive alternatives to auto travel, including
pedestrian-friendly sidewalks, scenic bicycle trails, equestrian trails, upgraded RTD bus
service, and new commuter rail service.
Improve expressway and street access to and from Central and Downtown Denver.
Assure quiet local residential streets.
Maintain safe, attractive, and efficient arterial "main" streets at the edges of the
neighborhoods.
Provide convenient RTD bus transit service to all areas of Montbello and Green Valles
Ranch.
Develop attractive parkways along collector streets in Montbello.
Complete a bikeway system linking local neighborhood activities and Denvers
regional bikeway system.
B. Overview of Existing Circulation, Transportation Systems, and Issues
Montbello and Green Valley Ranch are both geographically located on the outer '
Denvers street, highway, rail, and bus transit networks. The expressway system (1-70,1 -22* *-
1-270) provides quick and easy access to Downtown Denver, Stapleton Airport, the Denver T '
Center, the Aurora Mall, Boulder, and mountain recreation. With this convenience of loe*.!-* -
the expressway system, these neighborhoods have developed primarily as quiet, peaerM
"bedroom" communities, away from the activity of the City.
Changes in transportation are coming to these communities. Among these changes will be the
opening of Denver International Airport, the widening of the 1-70 expressway, the construction of
Airport Boulevard from 1-70 to the new airport, the opening of 56th Avenue west to Quebec
Street, the future development of a new Smith Road, and the future construction of a commuter
rail line between Downtown Denver and the new airport. The Union Pacific Railroad will
continue to provide rail freight service to the region. Traffic volumes will increase on edge roads
such as 56th Avenue, 48th Avenue, Tower Road, Chambers Road, and Peoria Street. Over the
next three years, Montbello, new Gateway neighborhoods, and Green Valley Ranch will emerge
at the cross-roads of a transportation network serving the Denver region and the Rocky Mountain
West. These neighborhoods will continue to be quiet, good places to live, but no longer on the
"outskirts" of the City.
1-70 and 1-225 Expressways
The 1-70 expressway provides the most direct and fastest access to and from Central and
Downtown Denver. When expressway travel delays are experienced at the Stapleton Airport
tunnels, alternatives are limited to much slower routes using Montview Boulevard, Colfax
Avenue, or 13th/14th Avenue one-way streets. Improved access routes to and from Central and
Downtown Denver are needed.
17


'
In the future, the 1-70 expressway will be widened to 12 lanes and the I-70/I-225 interchan
expanded to handle new traffic to and from Denver International Airport. This expansion wsU
move expressway traffic closer to homes along the southern edge of the Concord area of
Montbello.
For travel to and from Aurora, Southeast Denver, and the Denver Tech Center, 1-225 normally
provides good travel times. This highway is scheduled to be widened first to six lanes and late?
to eight lanes. Chambers Road and Peoria Street serve as back-up routes for driving to and from
Aurora destinations.
Transit Service
RTD bus lines serve the Montbello
neighborhood with 188 trips per day on
Routes 44, 53, 121, and 47X. Ninety
percent of homes in Montbello are within
a three block walking distance of one of
these lines. Evening and Sunday bus
service is provided on all routes. A
Park-n-Ride is located at the Montbello
Plaza Shopping Center (Peoria Street at
Albrook Drive), with express bus service
provided between Montbello and
Downtown Denver during peak morning and evening rush hour times.
The Green Valley Ranch neighborhood is served by RTD Route 15 Ltd., with four trips into the
City each morning and five trips from the City each afternoon. This bus line runs along East
Colfax Avenue between Tower Road and Downtown. Mid-day, evening and Sunday service is
not available.
18


*1
I'RANSPORTATION
No RTD direct service is currently provided between the Montbello neighborhood and Green
Valley Ranch neighborhood. Very limited connecting service is possible by transferring between
routes on Colfax Avenue. A regional high school, indoor and outdoor public swimming pools,
recreation programs, and regional public library are located in Montbello. The regions middle
school is located in Green Valley Ranch. The absence of transit service between these
neighborhoods creates a hardship for transit-dependent residents.
Commuter rail transit is envisioned to reach the Montbello and Green Valley Ranch
neighborhoods when the final leg of a Downtown to Denver International Airport rail line is
constructed.
Bicycle Routes
The neighborhoods in far northeast
Denver will in the future be linked to the
Denver regional bikeway system. This
system consists of paved bike trails as
well as bike routes on streets. When this
bikeway system is complete, a cyclist will
be able to ride from Denver International
Airport, through the Gateway
neighborhoods, through Montbello, along
portions of Sand Creek, to Downtown
Denver and west on bike trails that cross
the Continental Divide to reach mountain
resort communities.
Emerald Strands is a new trail system master plan that will link the Montbello and Green Valley
Ranch neighborhoods with parks, nature areas, lakes, and open space throughout the northeast
metropolitan region.
In Montbello, perimeter streets now have separated bike paths (Peoria Street, Chambers Road,
and 56th Avenue). The system will need to find ways to expand to link homes, park areas,
shopping, schools, recreation, RTD park-n-rides, and work places within the neighborhood.
In Green Valley Ranch, bike paths are not yet developed. The High Line Canal, Western Gas
Company right-of-way, and Colorado Interstate Gas open space are possible locations for new
off-street bike trails.
19


TRANSPORTATION
Neighborhood Edge Arterial Streets
In both Montbello and Green Valley Ranch, curvilinear internal street layouts encourage
motorists to seek out the faster moving straight roads at the edges of the neighborhoods. These
are the arterial "main" streets and include Peoria Street, Chambers Road, Tower Road, 56th
Avenue, and 48th Avenue. As new development occurs in the region, these roads will receive
increased traffic. Picadilly Road and 40th Avenue will also become arterial streets in the future.
Internal Local Street System
Within the neighborhoods, a series of curvilinear collector streets provide access to and from
homes located on quiet side streets. Collector streets are not as heavily traveled as arterials, and
function to "collect" traffic and lead motorists to the arterial "main" streets. Albrook Drive,
Andrews Drive, Crown Boulevard, and 51st Avenue are examples of collector streets in
Montbello. Flanders Way, Himalaya Road, Malaya Street, and 45th Avenue are examples of
collector streets in Green Valley Ranch.
Pedestrian Sidewalks and Trails
All around Denver, new residential communities and new businesses are emphasizing convenient
pedestrian access. Sidewalks and pedestrian paths allow residents to walk to recreation facilities,
shopping, school, and bus stops. Sidewalks allow workers in business centers to walk to lunch
over the noon hour. Americans are walking for health and fitness, as well as to reduce reliance
on energy-wasting automobile trips.
Sidewalks are normally constructed on new residential blocks prior to the building of homes.
Sidewalks have also been incorporated into development of the Montbello Business Park to the
west of Peoria Street. Surprisingly, the Peoria Street commercial district between Smith Road
and Albrook Drive has developed with no planning for pedestrians. Montbello residents, office
employees in the Montbello Business Park, and hotel guests must walk on dirt paths along Peoria
Street to reach shopping, restaurants, and bus stops.
20


m
NOTE: All traffic volumes are expected to increase at the time of the Denver International Airport opening and
Develoment of Gateway Area.
SOURCE: Denver Transportation Department
1990 TRAFFIC VOLUMES
MONTBELLO/GREEN VALLEY RANCH
21
PtocadiyRd.


Parkway Development
Do not Bncroach onto
Linear Greenbdt
Construct
Detached
Sidewalks
TRANSPORTATION PLAN
MONTBELLO/GREEN VALLEY RANCH
22


1
C. Action Recommendations
Recommendations Regional
TR-1 Construct a roadway and open 56th Avenue between
Havana Street and Quebec Street to provide relief from
traffic bottle necks on the 1-70 expressway.
TR-2 Construct a roadway and open Smith Road across the
Stapleton Airport north/south runway after the opening
of Denver International Airport.
TR-3 Construct 48th Avenue between Chambers Road and
Tower Road to provide access to and from the new
Airport Boulevard interchange at 48th Avenue.
TR-4 Construct a communter rail line between Denver
International Airport, Green Valley Ranch, future
Gateway neighborhoods, Montbello, and Downtown
Denver. Station park-n-ride lots and feeder circulator
buses are recommended in Montbello and Green
Valley Ranch.
TR-5 Increase the frequency of snow removal on collector
and arterial streets to compensate for drifting
conditions that develop in open suburban areas such as
Montbello and Green Valley Ranch.
TR-6 Expand RTD bus line service to include convenient
service between Green Valley Ranch and Montbello
on weekdays and weekends, including through or
connecting service between Green Valley Ranch and
Downtown Denver.
TR-7 Establish new park-n-ride lots along Chambers Road in
Montbello and along Tower Road in Green Valley
Ranch.
Recommendations Montbello
TM-1 Construct 40th Avenue along the southern boundary of
the Montbello neighborhood adjacent to the 1-70
expressway. Use this street primarily for business
related traffic and do not open up access at the Durham
Court culde sac.
TRANSPORTATION
Implementing Agencies/Groups
Transportation Division
New Airport Office
Transportation Division
Transportation Division
Developers
Regional Transportation District
Transportation Division
Regional Transportation District
Regional Transportation District
Implementing Agencies/Groups
Transportation Division
Developers
23


TRANSPORTATION
TM-2
TM-3
TM-4
TM-5
TM-6
TM-7
TM-8 v
TM-9
TM-10
Construct attractive sound barriers and develop
landscaping, including trees, along the edge of the
Concord area of Montbello adjacent to the
reconstructed I-70/I-225 expressway interchange.
Explore the purchase of all homes located on the
Durham Court cul de sac and urban design guidelines
for the redevelopment of the cul de sac area.
Do not over-load internal collector streets with through
traffic. On streets such as Crown Boulevard and
Uvalda Street, explore the feasibility of installing stop
signs at new locations, and other strategies to
discourage speeding.
Eliminate the parking of semi rigs on residential
streets. Place weight limit signs on streets intersecting
Peoria Street, Chambers Road, and 56th Avenue. Seek
alternative parking areas for recreation vehicles and
tractor/trailers in nearby industrial areas.
Develop an on-street bikeway system within the
Montbello neighborhood to connect residential small
areas, schools, parks, recreation facilities, churches,
shopping areas, and the off-street bicycle trails.
Relieve Peoria Street congestion at the 1-70
expressway interchange by widening Peoria Street and
opening new Smith Road and 56th Avenue alternative
routes to Central Denver.
Explore developing an off-street bicycle trail along a
new 40th Avenue at the southern edge of Montbello,
completing the bicycle trail system on all sides of the
neighborhood.
As 56th Avenue expands to accommodate increased
traffic between Central Denver and Denver
International Airport, explore the construction of a
limited access parkway north of the present 56th
Avenue on Rocky Mountain Arsenal property. Do not
expand the present street to more than a six lane
roadway and do not encroach onto the existing linear
greenbelt along 56th Avenue.
Construct detached sidewalks (minimum five feet
space between curb and sidewalk) in all new
developing residential and commercial areas.
Construct detached sidewalks along Peoria Street
between Smith Road and Albrook Drive in all
locations where there are no pedestrian sidewalks.
Colorado Dept, of Highways
Transportation Division
Planning Office
Neighborhood Groups
Transportation Division
Police Department
Transportation Division
Police Department
Parks and Recreation
Transportation Division
Transportation Division
Colorado Dept, of Highways
Parks and Recreation
Transportation Division
Developers
Transportation Division
Developers
Transportation Division
Developers
Transportation Division
24


I
TRANSPORTATION
M-11 Determine where new or improved traffic signals and Transportation Division
lane improvements are needed to provide safe and
convenient traffic movements to and from the
Montbello residential area along Peoria Street,
Chambers Road, and 56th Avenue. Critical
intersections include Chambers Road/Andrews Drive,
Chambers/46th Avenue, Chambers/Bolling Drive,
Chambers/48th Avenue, Chambers/Maxwell Place,
Chambers/56th Avenue, Peoria Street/Albrook Drive,
Peoria/Andrews Drive, Peoria/51st Avenue,
Peoria/53rd Avenue, Peoria/56th Avenue, 56th
Avenue/Uvalda Street, and 56th Avenue/Crown
Boulevard.
TM-12 Redesign and rebuild Chambers Road north of the 1-70 Transportation Division
expressway interchange to eliminate a safety hazard
where seven lanes narrow to two lanes at the
Aurora/Denver city limits.
Recommendations GVR
Implementing Agencies/Groups
TGVR-1 Do not over-load internal, collector streets with through
traffic. On streets such as Flanders and 45th Avenue,
explore the feasibility of installing stop signs at new
locations and other strategies to discourage speeding.
TGVR-2 Develop off-street multi-use trails along the High Line
Canal and in the Western Gas Company and Colorado
Interstate Gas Company rights-of-way.
TGVR-3 Construct detached sidewalks (minimum five feet
space between curb and sidewalk) in all new
developing residential and commercial areas.
TGVR-4 Complete the construction of 40th Avenue in the
vicinity of Maramma Elementary School.
Transportation Division
Parks and Recreation
Transportation Division
Water Department
Gas Companies
Developers
Transportation Division
Transportation Division
Developers
25


TRANSPORTATION
TGVR-5 Widen Tower Road at 48th Avenue and 45th Avenue
for southbound left turns.
Transportation Division
Developers
TGVR-6 Explore the opening of Himalaya Road south from
Green Valley Ranch to Aurora.
Transportation Division
Developers
BICYCLE ROUTES
MONTBELLO/GREEN VALLEY RANCH
26


MimtBetto MsighborfioocC
§reen Valley %ynch 9&iyfiBorfwod i
^rrnn9triVW"

iv. hoisim; plan
A. Goals
Promote Montbello and Green Valley Ranch as great neighborhoods in which to live.
Encourage purchase of homes by families and individuals who will live in their home.
Encourage sound management and a mix of income levels in rental single family homes
and apartments.
Increase property values.
Reduce the number of new foreclosed properties.
Actively market housing in a manner that encourages the multi-ethnic "United Nation*'
character of the neighborhoods.
Continue the attractive showcase appearance of the neighborhoods.
Manage HUD, VA, and bank owned vacant properties in a manner that is positive to
the neighborhoods.
B. Overview of Existing Conditions and Issues
Single family homes in Denvers far northeast neighborhoods exemplify twenty-five \<\
changing architectural design, home construction techniques, and suburban life styles. Ur- -
ranch style, split level, and Mediterranean style homes are found in "Old Montbello,' r built by Perlmack to the highest construction
standards ever utilized in any subdivision in
the Denver area. Homes that are smaller, but
well built and inexpensively priced, were
constructed during the early 1970s in the north
central area of Montbello. The areas newest
homes, many with smaller lots, expanded floor
plans for more living space, and utilizing new
construction materials, are located in the
Concord neighborhood (Southeast Montbello)
and in the Green Valley Ranch neighborhood.
There are today in Montbello a total of 5,600 single family homes and 1,250 apartment units. In
Green Valley Ranch 1,100 single family homes have been constructed.
Housing in Denvers far northeast area is among the Citys newest, is suburban in character, and
is diverse in architectural styles, floor areas, and selling prices. People of all income levels have
chosen to live in Montbello and Green Valley Ranch for the excellent home values and the
desirable quality of life found in these neighborhoods.
Home Foreclosures
From 1986 to 1990, the Montbello and Green Valley Ranch neighborhoods, and much of the
Colorado Front Range, were affected by a sharp downturn in the Colorado economy. Families
27


lost their homes when they could no longer make their monthly payments. Some moved out of
state to find work. Throughout the Denver region during these years there were more houses for
sale than purchasers to buy them, which caused foreclosed homes to sit vacant in neighborhoods.
At the beginning of 1990, between 4% and 5% of all houses in the Montbello and Green Valley
Ranch neighborhoods were vacant and in foreclosure. Over a 12 month period, sales increased
dramatically. In Montbello alone the number of HUD properties dropped from 250 to 60
between January and November 1990.
Most homes that went into foreclosure have sold within several months. Attractive floor plans,
home upgrades, and reasonable list prices have been recognized by homeseekers to offer
exceptionally good values.
Selling Prices
When the economic downturn hit the
Colorado Front Range during the mid and iatc
1980s, it occurred at a time of high real estate
prices, escalating interest rates, and at a utne
that found many new homebuyers utilizing
3-2-1 buydowns and other "creative"
financing packages. In Montbello and Green
Valley Ranch (and throughout the Colorado
Front Range) the problem fed upon itself. As
selling prices dropped, there was more
motivation for homeowners to walk from their
mortgage payments, which in turn added
further to a decline in home values.
The over supply of housing and decline in housing prices especially affected those homes selling
for under $90,000 -- the selling price of many of the homes in Denvers far northeast
neighborhoods.
Single Family Housing: Owner and Renter Occupied
Citywide the percentage of occupied single family homes that are owner-occupied is 80.3%. In
Montbello, owner occupancy is 80.6% and in Green Valley Ranch the rate is 93.8%, based on the
1990 Census. Montbello is thus near the citywide norm and Green Valley Ranch is higher than
the city wide norm for proportion of occupied single family homes that are owner occupied.
28


HOUSING
Apartment Rental Housing
The Fountain View, Devonshire, Dunhill,
and Sandstone apartments in Montbello
contain 1,154 multi family rental units.
There are an additional 96 units individually
owned (condominiums) with many of these
units rented. Rents in early 1990 ranged
from $237 for a one bedroom apartment to
$600 for a townhouse. Extensive upgrading
and renovation work began in mid 1990 at
several of the apartment communities.
Housing for People of all Ethnic Groups
Among Denvers 68 neighborhoods, Montbello is one of the Citys largest multi-cultural "United
Nations" neighborhoods. Its population includes ethnic groups and cultures from all around the
world.
Nationwide, as many as twenty percent of all Americans move to a different home during any
given year. As this movement takes place in Montbello, the ethnic background of households
moving in and out of the neighborhood is slowly changing. Although people of all ethnic groups
and cultures move to and from Montbello each week, Anglo and Hispanic households have
moved out in slightly larger numbers than they have moved in, and Black and Asian households
have moved to Montbello in slightly larger numbers than they have moved out. Census data
show that between 1980 and 1990 the following population changes occurred: African American
7,345 (46.1%) to 10,188 (57.9%); Anglo American 5,962 (36.9%) to 4,464 (25.3%); Asian
American 436 (2.7%) to 532 (3.0%); Hispanic American 2,217 (13.8%) to 2,209 (12.6%); and
Native American 83 (.5%) to 111 (.6%).
Home and Property Maintenance
An attractive appearance in any neighborhood is important for the enjoyment of its residents, for
maintaining property values, and to discourage vandalism. To accomplish this, city ordinances
establish standards for the maintenance of residential property. Additionally, in Green Valley
Ranch private covenants have been enforced by the homeowners since the first houses were built.
These covenants set maintenance requirements not covered by city ordinances.
29


Future Build Out
In Montbello the last new homes were completed
in 1988. In Green Valley Ranch a small number
of new homes have continued to be built each year
by the Writer and Richmond companies. Several
new builders entered the Green Valley Ranch
market during 1990 and 1991. Construction of
Denver International Airport, development in the
Airport Gateway Area, and redevelopment of the
nearby Stapleton Airport site are expected to
gradually stimulate real estate sales in the region,
which will bring about a renewal of home
construction.
C. Action Recommendations
Recommendations
H-1 Spread the word that Montbello and Green Valley
Ranch are great places to live. Market housing in the
neighborhoods in conjunction wjth Denver
International Airport, Airport Gateway, and Stapleton
redevelopment.
H-2 Identify a neighborhood housing group to take the lead
in carrying out strategies in this plan. Membership
should include representation from homeowners, home
builders, apartment management, real estate
brokers/agents, insurance agents, owners of investment
properties, and renters.
H-3 Establish attractive Welcome Center(s) to serve
prospective homebuyers and renters. Provide an array
of information about Denver and the far northeast
neighborhoods, including schools, recreation and parks
programs, churches, nature areas, civic groups, and
airport development. Explore staffing with developer
assistance, Realtors, resident volunteers, or other
arrangements.
Implementing Agencies/Groups
Residents
Planning Office
New Airport Office
Mayors Office of
Economic Development
Neighborhood Housing Group
Realtors
Home Builders
Neighborhood Groups
Planning Office
Neighborhood Housing Group
Neighborhood Groups
Developers
Realtors
Apartment Management
Business Association
Planning Office
Denver Public Schools
30


HOUSING
H-4
H-5
H-6
H-7
H-8
H-9
H-10
Maintain a far northeast neighborhoods task force for
monitoring property up-keep and conditions, sales
trends, and disposal programs for HUD, VA and bank
owned properties. Do not allow block sales.
Coordinate with neighborhood groups, HUD, VA,
Realtors, and Denver Planning and Community
Development Office.
Develop an attractive neighborhood brochure for use
by Realtors, residents, apartment management, and
Denver and Aurora employers. Highlight
neighborhood services and amenities.
Market apartments and homes to all home seekers.
Focus special efforts to airport construction workers,
Denver International Airport employees, and airline
employees. Do not permit mobile homes in northeast
annexation area.
Develop an affirmative marketing code for real estate
brokers and agents listing homes in the far northeast
neighborhoods. Encourage use of participating brokers
and agents who agree to show homes to all ethnic
groups, specifically including homeseekers of
under-represented ethnic groups. Sponsor Realtor
training and recognition events.
Monitor and enforce laws governing illegal real estate
steering practices. Closely watch sales in areas with
concentrations of HUD and VA properties.
Publicize low interest Denver housing bond money
available for first time homebuyers. Explore a special
set-aside of single family housing bond money for
existing houses in Montbello and Green Valley Ranch
and/or for HUD, VA, and bank owned properties.
Host a Denver area Homebuyers Fair in a Montbello
hotel. Feature well known local or national
personalities (such as the Mayor, Governor, sports
figure, TV anchor). Provide speakers offering
purchase tips and booths set up by real estate
companies and lenders.
Neighborhood Groups
HUD
VA
Realtors
Planning Office
Neighborhood Groups
Planning Office
Realtors
Apartment Management
Realtors
Apartment Management
Airport Office
Planning Office
Zoning Administration
Neighborhood Housing Group
Non-profit Housing Advocacy
Groups
Realtors
Neighborhood Housing Group
Colorado State Civil Rights
Commission
Colorado State Real Estate
Commission
Non-profit Housing Advocacy
Groups
Planning Office
Realtors
Planning Office
Realtors
Non-profit Housing Advocacy
Groups
Realtors
Lenders
Neighborhood Housing Group
Planning Office
Non-profit Housing Advocacy
Groups
31


H-ll
H-12
H-13
H-14
H-15
H-16
H-17
Encourage major real estate companies to locate
offices in Denvers far northeast neighborhoods.
Form a rental property owners association to network
and assist members with tenant problems, marketing
ideas, and coordination with the Neighborhood
Housing Group. Develop strategies to attract middle
income tenants. Explore active marketing to airlines,
Lowry, Fitzsimmons, and Denver International Airport
personnel.
Develop a "Neighborhood Welcome" service for new
residents. Provide covenant information (GVR) and
zoning code regulations (GVR and Montbello).
Provide local business coupons and information about
neighborhood recreation, civic groups, and churches.
Sponsor several picnics or dinner events each year for
new residents.
Publicize and encourage use of foreclosure
assistance/prevention services.
Monitor HUD homeless initiative to assure
neighborhood compatibility, maintenance of
properties, and provision of support services by
non-profit group. Limit the number of homes to no
more than 5% of the HUD properties in each
neighborhood (Montbello and Green Valley Ranch),
and no more than one home on any face block.
Support and implement all existing Federal and
intergovernmental (City of Denver and Denver
Housing Authority) guidelines for the location of DHA
owned homes. Dispersed housing should only be
considered in neighborhoods not impacted by
concentrations of lower income households. Priority
should be given by DHA to purchase homes in
non-impacted areas.
Enforce City zoning and property maintenance codes
governing the use and appearance of residential and
business properties. Explore dividing the far northeast
neighborhoods into subareas, each with a group or
person responsible for monthly monitoring of
addresses with violations. Convene regular monthly
meetings with City enforcement staff for updating and
progress reports.
Neighborhood Housing Group
Planning Office
Real Estate Companies
Neighborhood Housing Group
Rental Property Owners
Planning Office
Neighborhood Housing Group
Neighborhood Groups
Business Association
Churches
Home Builders
Non-profit Housing Advocacy
Groups
Planning Office
HUD
Realtors
Neighborhood Housing Group
HUD
Planning Office
Denver Housing Authority
Neighborhood Groups
Neighborhood Support Service
Zoning Administration
Planning Office
32


1
IIOUSINC
H-18 Publish periodically in neighborhood newspapers and newsletters descriptions of zoning use and code maintenance regulations and phone numbers to call for assistance. Neighborhood Housing Group Neighborhood Groups
H-19 Promote the far northeast area with booths at real estate board activities, home shows, the annual Peoples Fair, and similar events. Neighborhood Groups Neighborhood Housing Group Realtors Home Builders
H-20 Market housing affirmatively in the metropolitan media through paid advertising. Realtors Apartment Management Home Builders
H-21 Manage the media image of the far northeast neighborhoods through special events, ribbon cuttings, grand openings, local celebrations, and other positive events. Meet with media representatives to assure fair presentation of news. Ask for assistance of public officials. Neighborhood Groups Neighborhood Schools Planning Office Realtors
H-22 Celebrate the people of Montbello and Green Valley Ranch with block parties and local neighborhood festivals, parades, picnics, and other events. Residents Neighborhood Groups Schools Churches Civic Groups
33




1
Mont&efto tytyhBorfiood
green Valley %anck VsfeigltBorfwod

V. RECREATION PLAN
A. Goals
Maintain strong recreation programs.
Provide programs that serve people of all ages.
Develop an array of recreation, education, fitness, hobby, personal growth, and leisure
time activities.
Provide family strengthening programs.
Provide convenient hours for recreation.
Make recreation opportunities accessible by walking or bicycling.
Utilize all community resources (parks system, recreation centers, churches,
Community School, schools).
Continue to maintain facilities in which people feel safe and comfortable in using
recreation programs.
Plan for new and expanded recreation facilities that will accommodate future
population growth and changing demographics.
Increase staffing and programming.
Develop broad-based funding sources.
6. Overview of Existing Conditions and Issues
Because the Montbello and Green Valley Ranch neighborhoods are isolated from recreation
facilities in other parts of the City, there is a need to develop new and creative models for
recreation and cultural programs that will serve both the 20,000 current residents as well as future
newcomers to the area. Evening education, fitness, and recreation activities are proposed in
neighborhood centers located within easy walking or bicycling distance for all residents. As
these programs are initiated, they will complement a new indoor swimming pool and an
expanded offering of Community School enrichment classes on the Montbello High School
campus and improved recreation programs at the existing Montbello Recreation Center. The goal
is to offer strong education, recreation, cultural, and personal growth opportunities for people of
all ages and interests, using both present facilities as well as new future expanded facilities.
Residents arc served by the Montbello
Recreation Center located on Albrook Drive at
Crown Boulevard. Center facilities provide
for weight lifting, basketball, wrestling,
aerobics, crafts, summer swimming, as well as
other activities. The center is immensely
popular with youth and adults in the
neighborhood. The need for recreation and
cultural activities is exceeding the present
capacity of the center.
35


RFCRIVHOX
Programs for youth are the top priority. An emerging need is for activities that serve senior
residents, particularly in the Montbello neighborhood that is now 25 years old and has a growing
population over the age of 55. There is also a continuing request to more closely match programs
with the interests of young adults and families. Finally, the 12,000 workers in the nearby
business parks may also be potential users of neighborhood recreation and cultural programs.
Seven parks are located in the Montbello neighborhood, including Central Park adjacent to
Montbello High School. Central Park has tennis courts and ball fields for shared use with the
high school campus. Two parks are located in the Green Valley Ranch neighborhood, including
the East Ranch Park with a newly opened swimming pool. Summer day camp programs for
youth are sponsored through the Denver Parks and Recreation Department in several of the parks.
Two new large parks are planned in the nearby Gateway area. Within these parks will be a lake,
jogging paths, picnic facilities, and nature areas. A new 18-hole golf course is planned to the
north of Green Valley Ranch and east of Montbello.
Four elementary schools are located in the Montbello neighborhoods: Amesse (adjacent to
Elmendorf Park), Barney Ford (adjacent to Ford Park), McGlone (across the street from Civic
Center Park), and Oakland. Maramma Elementary School and Martin Luther King Middle
School are schools in Green Valley Ranch. The facilities of these schools are the among the best
in any school district in the Denver
metropolitan area. Each has a gymnasium,
auditorium, multi-purpose lunch room, library,
and class rooms.
A Community School is located on the
Montbello High School campus. The
Community School concept is inclusive of
adult continuing education, adult personal
growth classes, college courses, evening youth
classes, and other educational enrichment
opportunities which residents may wish to
develop. There is a unique opportunity in the
Montbello and Green Valley Ranch
neighborhoods to create new recreation,
education, and cultural activities through the
involvement of area residents and businesses,
the Citys Parks and Recreation Department,
the Montbello Community School, and Denver
Public Schools.
36


B
J
RECREATION
Montbello currently has six churches that have their own building facilities. Green Valley Ranch
does not yet have a church with a building. Neighborhood churches are an additional resource
for facilities and varied education, recreation, and social programs.
Privately-operated commercial recreation (movie theaters, bowling, miniature golf, water slides,
swimming, and the like) are available nearby in Aurora and Commerce City. In addition, several
public recreation facilities in Aurora and Commerce City partially serve Montbello and Green
Valley Ranch residents. Golf and recreation are also accessible at Fitzsimmons Army Hospital
for active and retired military personnel.
C. Action Recommendations
Recommendations Regional
RR-1 Develop expanded day time/evening programs at the
Community School on the Montbello High School
campus. The new indoor swimming pool on campus
should be designed with outdoor patio access for
summer use. The pool, gym, lunch room, and other
campus areas should be available for evening
Community School, college courses, and special
interest classes.
RR-2 Develop a variety of senior service and recreation
programs.
RR-3 Encourage neighborhood residents to volunteer to
teach special interest classes through the Community
School and neighborhood recreation centers.
RR-4 To meet the recreation needs of population growth in
the far northeast area of Denver, explore establishing
new recreation center facilities in areas that can better
serve the existing communities and in areas where
population growth is occurring.
RR-5 Form a "Friends of Recreation" advisory board to work
with Parks and Recreation, Denver Public Schools, and
Montbello Community School, in coordinating
area-wide recreation, community education, and
cultural programs. "Friends of Recreation" could also
carry out special fundraising events to benefit
neighborhood recreation.
RR-6 Construct a new public golf course in the Gateway
Area.
Implementing Agencies/Groups
Montbello Community School
Parks and Recreation Dept.
Neighborhood Groups
Parks and Recreation Dept.
Montbello Community School
Neighborhood Churches
Parks and Recreation Dept.
Montbello Community School
Residents
Parks and Recreation Dept.
Neighborhood Groups
Residents
Parks and Recreation Dept.
Neighborhood Groups
Residents
Landowners
Parks and Recreation Dept.
37



RR-7
RR-8
RM-1
RM-2
RM-3
Develop new athletic playing fields for soccer and Landowners
other team sports in the Gateway and Stapleton Airport Parks and Recreation Dept.
development areas.
Determine the feasibility for new privately owned and
operated recreation businesses such as bowling,
theaters, roller skating, and indoor tennis.
Business Owners
Mayors Office of Economic
Development
Recommendations Montbello
Establish neighborhood family recreation and resource
centers at each of the four elementary schools. Centers
should include a variety of recreation and family
oriented programs and be open after school and
evenings. Utilize gymnasium, multi-purpose lunch
rooms, auditorium, and library facilities. Focus on
activities that are less equipment intensive, such as
soccer, basketball, aerobics, karate, family enrichment,
and cultural classes. Centers should be easily
accessible by walking or bicycling from home.
At the Montbello Recreation Center emphasize
programs requiring special equipment (weights,
outdoor swimming, crafts, wrestling, and the like),
senior programs, and specialized recreation activities.
Upgrade playground equipment at neighborhood parks.
Implementing Agencies/Groups
Parks and Recreation Dept.
Denver Public Schools
Neighborhood Groups
Parks and Recreation Dept.
Neighborhood Groups
Parks and Recreation Dept.
Parks People
38


RECREATION
Family Recreation/Resource Center
Community Recreation Center
Community School
RESOURCE
MONTBELLO
39


KKCRFATION
Recommendations Green Valiev Ranch
RGVR-1 Establish a neighborhood family recreation and
resource center at Martin Luther King Middle School.
The center should include a variety of programs for
families and youth and be open after school and
evenings. Utilize gymnasium, multi-purpose lunch
rooms, auditorium, and library facilities. Focus on
activities that are less equipment intensive, such as
soccer, basketball, aerobics, karate, family enrichment,
and cultural classes.
GREEN VALLEY RANCH
Implementing Agencies/Groups
Parks and Recreation Dept.
Denver Public Schools
Neighborhood Groups
40


fMontSetto tyighBoTfwod
Qreen Valley Rgnck 9{§,igh6or(wod
VI. RLTAIL DKVKLOPMIAT PLAN
A. Goals
Provide adequate, convenient, and competitive neighborhood retail goods and services
to the residents of far northeast Denver.
Provide employment and business opportunities to the residents of far northeast Denver.
Demonstrate neighborhood support of the retail businesses so as to enable them to be
successful in meeting neighborhood shopping needs and maximize occupancy rates.
B. Overview of Existing Conditions and Issues
The adequate and convenient provision of retail goods and services is another important
component of any residential neighborhood. The liveability and desirability of a neighborhood
depends not only on transportation, schools, parks, and other public facilities, but on available,
competitive, and attractive neighborhood retail shopping areas. The original master plans for
Montbello and Green Valley Ranch included retail centers, of various sizes and types, located
throughout the communities to meet the neighborhood shopping needs of the residents. A
number of retail centers and shopping areas, containing approximately 60 retail businesses, have
been built and have served the area for years.
Despite the presence of a number of neighborhood sized shopping areas, there is some
disappointment over the lack of larger stores and community sized or even regionally sized
shopping centers closer to Montbello and Green Valley Ranch. The reason private developers
and retailers have not located larger stores and centers in far northeast Denver is the lack of a
sufficient population base in the market area that would enable the stores to be successfully
supported. The physical isolation of the area (with little or no population to the west, east and
north) places far northeast Denver at the edge of a supportable market area. Developers of larger
retail stores and centers have located in Aurora (particularly the Aurora Mall area) because they
can draw from a much larger population base within a 3 to 4 mile radius of the centers.
Until the residential and employment growth stimulus occurs from the construction and operation
of the new Denver International Airport, and the adjacent Airport Gateway area, these market
realities will be relatively unchanged. Therefore, the emphasis of this plan must be to strengthen
the existing neighborhood shopping and employment areas while laying the foundation to secure
larger centers in the future as growth in the market area allows.
Retail development in Montbello and Green Valley Ranch has been mixed. While a number of
shopping centers and businesses have been built and succeeded in serving the residents
neighborhood shopping needs, there have been a variety of concerns and disappointments with
retail on the part of both the residential and business communities. Despite the needs and efforts
of residents and business people for a vital neighborhood serving retail business presence, the
community shopping centers continue to struggle with very high vacancy rates to the
neighborhoods detriment.
41


RETAIL
To address these concerns and provide possible solutions, the Denver Planning and Community
Development Office initiated, in October 1987, an investigation into the neighborhood shopping
centers at Chambers Road and 48th Avenue (Chambers Place), Albrook Drive and Peoria Street
(Montbello Plaza), Peoria Street and 47th Avenue (Albrook Center), and Tower Road and 48th
Avenue (Green Valley Ranch Center). Input was received from a variety of retail development
experts, property owners, merchants, city officials, and neighborhood residents. Demographic
data was obtained as was information on the history of the centers and the community, leasing
rates, tenant recruitment history, building design, and merchandising techniques.
The major findings of the 1987 study identified three problem areas:
1) The Montbello/Green Valley Ranch neighborhoods were not supporting existing
commercial areas. The centers had a functional vacancy rate of about 75%. Private
market studies estimated that 70% of all grocery sales and 95% of all other retail sales
occur outside Montbello, and indeed outside Denver. For example, Aurora shopping
(including Aurora Mall) is located within just a 4 to 10 minute drive of most Montbello
homes.
2) The commercial centers were not providing adequate support or service to the
community. This problem has several interrelated aspects. There is no obvious
economic incentive to lease or re-lease major portions of the existing centers. Current
lease rates were improperly priced for the target market. The target market population has
not been clearly defined, either by the shopping center owners or by the merchants.
Centers have experienced excessive turnover of tenants due in part to limited business
knowledge. Lastly, there are physical problems associated with the commercial/retail
spaces as they presently existproblems such as physical layout, signage, accessibility,
and age.
3) Far northeast Denver (specifically Montbello) is inaccurately understood and has an
internal as well as external image problem. External perceptions of the communitys
ethnic population, community facilities, zoning enforcement, crime, police protection,
average income, and family size do not reflect actual conditions. A sense of community
and self-pride is generally very weak.
The study report concluded with some initial recommendations to begin addressing the findings.
A high priority was to organize the business community so that their problems could be
undertaken more effectively as a group rather than individually. Together, the City, property
owners, and merchants have begun to implement the initial recommendations, including the
formation and incorporation of the Far Northeast Denver Business Association (FNDBA), the
publication and distribution of A Shopping Guide To Far Northeast Denver, FNDBAs financial
42


RETAIL.
support of several community organizations and causes, and FNDBAs educational forums for
the wider business community. In addition, the property owners and City have continued to
market the vacant spaces in the shopping centers with mixed success. The Montbello Plaza
Center has shown a dramatic rise in its occupancy rate between 1989 and 1990, going from 22%
to 75%.
Chambers Place has continued to struggle with a high vacancy rate (49%) despite lowering then-
lease rates to a realistic level. Green Valley Ranch Center has an occupancy rate of around 20%,
unchanged in the past several years. Albrook Center has an occupancy rate of 80%, up from only
20% in 1987.
Despite some progress and success, the basic
problems identified in the study remain.
Residents are still not supporting the businesses
in their area and much of their income for
neighborhood retail expenditures is still going
outside the neighborhood, particularly to
Aurora. The business community, despite the
formation of the FNDBA, needs to be much
more committed to solving their problems and
to providing more support and retail services to
the community. A good start has been made to
address the retail needs of far northeast Denver
but much remains to be done.
43


RETAIL
C. Action Recommendations
To address the challenges and opportunities in the existing and prospective shopping areas of
Montbello and Green Valley Ranch, an action plan of strategies is summarized below. These
strategies have evolved from the original commercial workshop study, were refined by the
FNDBA, and most recently were updated by business and residential representatives of the Retail
Development Subcommittee preparing this plan. The City, property owners, merchants, business
and neighborhood groups, and other responsible parties need to continue working together to
undertake these recommended actions and to develop and implement further strategies as
necessary. These recommendations are intended to focus upon existing retail areas as well as to
compliment efforts to attract new retail, office, warehouse, and other appropriate uses to
Montbello, Green Valley Ranch, and the future Gateway neighborhoods.
RD-1
RD-2
RD-3
RD-4
RD-5
Recommendations
Implementing Agencies/Grouns
Prepare marketing and public relations materials
(including a demographic profile) promoting the
positive image and attributes of Montbello and Green
Valley Ranch, each of the shopping areas, and the
community in general. Coordinate with the marketing
efforts of Denver International Airport, Greater Denver
Chamber of Commerce, and private companies.
Present marketing materials to prospective tenants,
developers, residents, and the media.
Provide technical assistance referral to existing and
future business owners and operators on such topics as
marketing, accounting, financing, personnel, business
planning, management, purchasing, and merchandising.
Regional Business Association
Neighborhood Groups
Planning Office
Mayors Office of Economic
Development
Property owners
Merchants
Business owners
Regional Business Association
Mayors Office of Economic
Development
Market the centers and available properties to
prospective feasible retail, service, non-profit, and
other appropriate users.
When additional designations become available,
designate Montbello and Green Valley Ranch as a City
"Neighborhood Business Revitalization Area" as soon
as feasible in order to receive focused and priority City
resources to implement these and related strategies.
Construct 48th Avenue (at least 2 lanes) between
Chambers Road and Tower Road to connect Montbello
and Green Valley Ranch with each other and with the
new Airport Boulevard interchange and future
Gateway neighborhoods.
Property owners
Leasing agents
Regional Business Association
Planning Office
Mayors Office of Economic
Development
Planning Office
Regional Business Association
Neighborhood Groups
Property owners
Transportation Division
Developers
44


RETAIL
RD-6
RD-7
RD-8
RD-9
RD-10
RD-11
RD-12
RD-13
Maintain an organized and pro-active business
association in the area through attention to
membership, work program implementation and
development, outreach to the business community with
informational meetings, assistance on technical
matters, participation in the development of marketing
plans, capturing new airport related business, and
active leadership in all business community activities.
In essence, the business association should function as
an area "Chamber of Commerce."
Seek assistance from the Mayors Office of Economic
Development in working with the merchants and
property owners to maintain and increase business
employment in the area.
Businesses (individually and through participation in a
regional business association) should become more
visibly involved in supporting community activities.
Shopping center owners should continue working with
the City, merchants, prospective tenants, regional
business association, and others to upgrade their
centers physical layout, appearance, accessibility,
signage, and to lease their space at realistic lease rates.
Work to make residents in the community more aware
of and supportive of existing merchants, possibly
through the increased use of promotions, incentives,
and special projects.
Improve and expand transportation connections to,
from, and through the Montbello and Green Valley
Ranch shopping areas. For example, the reuse of
Stapleton International Airport should permit the
extension of 56th Avenue west from Havana Street to
Commerce City and possibly Havana Street south into
Aurora.
Conduct a market study to identify the realistic target
market population as well as the types and sizes of
retail stores which the market can feasibly support.
Explore improving the availability of public services in
the area such as locations for motor vehicle
registration, drivers license renewal, and utilities bill
payment
Regional Business Association
Property owners
Merchants
Planning Office
Residents
Neighborhood Groups
Regional Business Association
Merchants
Property owners
Neighborhood Groups
Planning Office
Mayors Office of Economic
Development
Merchants
Property owners
Regional Business Associate
Shopping Center owners
Regional Business Association
Neighborhood Groups
Planning Office
Transportation Division
Surrounding Cities and
Counties
Mayors Office of
Economic Development
Planning Office
Regional Business Association
Mayors Office of Economic
Development
Planning Office
Regional Business Association
45


RETAIL
RD-14 Explore improving accessibility to emergency medical
services.
Department of Public Safety
Planning Office
Department of Health and
Hospitals
46


MmtBdlo ytyjfiBorfwod
§reen Vaftey %gnch 9^yft6arhood
VII. URBAN DESIGN PLAN
A. Goals
Knit together the design character of the existing neighborhoods with the surrounding
areas as they develop.
Link together the regional road network, drainage basins, trails, and park system.
Accentuate Irondale Gulch as a neighborhood amenity.
Develop attractive parkway landscaping including trees along major streets and
roadways.
Announce important street gateways with design techniques including distinctive
signage, landscaping, lighting, and other architectural elements.
Emphasize important views of Downtown Denver and vistas of the Continental Divide
in all public and private projects.
Create high quality commercial developments which emphasize pedestrian activity and
have continuity of character in form and materials.
Emphasize the High Line Canal as a neighborhood amenity.
B. Overview of Existing Conditions and Issues
Montbello and Green Valley Ranch are developing as master planned communities. The
neighborhoods are suburban in character, as evidenced by their meandering subdivision layouts
with curvilinear streets. Both communities enjoy spectacular mountain views and large natural
open space areas nearby.
The surrounding mostly vacant land and the location of Montbello and Green Valley Ranch in
the northeastern most portion of the City have contributed to their isolation from other Denver
neighborhoods. Many people perceive these communities not as a part of Denver, but as separate
suburbs or as part of Aurora. The challenge is to blend and integrate Denvers urban design
elements, such as street trees, parks, parkways, and gateways, into Montbello and Green Valley
Ranch.
47


URBAN DESIGN
The northeast area is entering into a time of growth and change. This growth presents an
exciting opportunity for Montbello and Green Valley Ranch to extend urban design plans and
considerations that will maintain and enhance the quality of development in the two
neighborhoods.
Irondale Gulch
Irondale Gulch is a thirty-two mile long natural watershed that begins in Aurora and continues
northwesterly through Denvers Gateway and Montbello areas, the Rocky Mountain Arsenal,
Commerce City, and Adams County to finally reach the South Platte River. For thousands of
years, the gulch (or creek) has flowed through this area. Because the land is nearly table-top flat,
the water in most places did not carve out a deep channel and the area that is now Montbello
became naturally lush grasslands after a heavy rainfall. There were scattered cottonwood trees
and native grasses, similar to what can today be viewed north of 56th Avenue at Uvalda Street, or
When the land that is now Montbello
was annexed into Denver in 1965, a
drainage solution needed to be found
to provide for the historic flow of
Irondale Gulch and to allow for new
building development. The relocation
of the gulch into concrete paved open
channels in the median of streets was
the solution chosen. This solution
became a part of the Citys 1965
annexation agreement.
This drainage solution of constructing a channel for a creek or gulch alongside a street was fairly
common around the country during the 1960s and 1970s. Locally in Colorado, similar
waterways are found in Aurora, Boulder, and Colorado Springs. Within Denver, gulches in new
subdivisions were usually kept behind houses or in a linear park. Goldsmith Gulch, Harvard
Gulch, Lakewood Gulch, and Weir Gulch are examples of this land development pattern:
waterway (sometimes concrete lined) located behind homes or in a landscaped park area. Cheny
Creek through Central Denver is most like Irondale Gulch in terms of location in the median of a
street.
The Irondale Gulch waterways are visually prominent to Montbello residents and visitors.
Twenty thousand to 30,000 view the waterways on a day to day basis as they traverse along the
gulch by auto, bicycle, or walking. The existing channels are constructed of concrete, with most
sections having irrigated grass or creeping junipers adjacent to the channel.
along First Creek to the north of Green Valley Ranch.
48


n
URBAN DESIGN
In new developing areas today, gulches are viewed as a natural amenity that should be
maintained in a natural state whenever possible. Thus, in the Airport Gateway Development
Area, drainage solutions emphasize detention ponds and maintaining the natural condition of
streams flowing through the area.
There is sometimes disappointment expressed in the Montbello neighborhood about the open
Irondale Gulch channels in the street medians, as allowed in the 1965 annexation agreement and
constructed by the developers. While it is impossible to undo 25 years of development, it may be
possible to transform the gulch into an attractive neighborhood focal point as has been done in
some other Denver neighborhoods.
High Line Canal
The High Line Canal is 71
miles long, beginning in South
Platte Canyon southwest of
Denver, and ending to the
north of Green Valley Ranch.
It was built between 1879 and
1883 by the South Platte Land
Company which sold land on
the eastern plains together
with the water rights. Today
under the ownership of the
Denver Water Board, the canal
runs primarily east/west
through Green Valley Ranch. It still exists in its natural state and carries water intermittently
throughout the year. The canal and the adjacent service road create a natural open space through
Green Valley Ranch.
Gas Pipeline
Western Gas Supply Company has an
underground natural gas line that runs
from the southeast to northwest
through the Green Valley Ranch
neighborhood. The gas company
mows the right-of-way three times a
year. Ground covering consists
mainly of native vegetation and is not
developed as a walking trail.
49


URBAN DESIGN
Design Standards in Business Zone Districts
Undeveloped land zoned for business (B-2, B-3, B-4, B-8) provides opportunities for creating
interesting neighborhood focal points and attractive business areas in the Montbello and Green
Valley Ranch neighborhoods. Strip suburban commercial development is strongly discouraged
in these areas. To encourage high quality development, all new construction should adhere to
design standards similar to those for town squares in the adjacent Airport Gateway Area. It is
recognized that site constraints may sometimes require modification of these design standards to
fit specific locations.
Commercial area general design guidelines are as follows:
X Orient buildings to face a street or landscaped public plaza.
X Locate parking to the rear of buildings or shops.
X Primary building entries should be from a street or plaza.
X Development should build to, or nearly to, the property line adjoining the street or plaza.
X Provide large rear setbacks to allow for and encourage parking and service to occur behind
the buildings.
X Tree plantings and solid screening fences should separate business zoned areas from
adjoining residential properties.
X Create street-level interest by requiring active ground floor uses with store windows facing
the plaza or street
X Limit building facade materials to masonry, brick, brick veneer, stone, or stucco.
Synthetic materials which imitate natural or traditional materials should be avoided.
X Visually link all business areas to nearby residential areas by pedestrian sidewalks and
bicycle paths.
X Public plazas should include trees, grass, flower beds, walkways, benches, and other
pedestrian amenities.
X Develop special street signage to emphasize neighborhood plazas.
Neighborhood Gateways and Welcome Signs
In many Denver and suburban neighborhoods there is interest in highlighting the gateway or
entrance to neighborhood areas. Landscaping features, monument signs, unique lighting, and
special paving are examples of gateway treatments. The Green Valley Ranch neighborhood has a
handsome brick monument sign surrounded by landscaping. The Concord small neighborhood
area within Montbello has two monument signs and landscaping on Chambers Road at 46th
50


r
URBAN DESIGN
Avenue. Peoria Street median landscaping north of 1-70 provides an inviting and attractive
gateway to Montbello.
Tree Planting
There is a growing appreciation for what trees contribute to our quality of life. Trees are good to
the environment as they reduce air pollution and create shade that cools nearby homes and
streets. Along major streets they give a distinctive identity and character to a neighborhood.
Trees increase property values as they beautify a shopping area, residential block, or individual
residential property.
Older areas of Montbello in the vicinity of Silverman Park, Elmendorf Park, Falcon Park, and
Ford Park have shade trees approaching maturity. Trees are sparse in newer areas. Some of the
parkways along the Irondale Gulch waterways have space for trees but no areas have yet been
planted with trees. In Green Valley Ranch, as new homes have been built trees have often been
included in the landscaping package provided by the builder. Key entry points into the Green
Valley Ranch neighborhoods have also had trees planted in the medians or along the edges of the
street.
C. Action Recommendations
Recommendations-Regional
UDR-1 Designate as parkways all edge streets, including
Peoria Street, Chambers Road, 56th Avenue,
Piccadilly Road, 48th Avenue, and streets along the
Irondale Gulch channels.
UDR-2 Landscape to enhance and preserve significant views
of mountains and Downtown Denver.
Implementing Agencies/Groups
Parks Department.
City Council
Parks Department
Developers
Planning Office
51


URBAN DESIGN
UDR-3
UDR-4
UDR-5
Develop and encourage use of design standards on
land zoned for business. These standards should be
compatible with those used in the adjacent Airport
Gateway Area.
Consider City wide requirements for planting a
specified number of trees for each home in new
residential subdivisions.
Develop site specifications in new subdivisions that
consider the operation of trash collection systems.
Landowners
Developers
Planning Office
Developers
Zoning Administration
Planning Office
City Council
Public Works
Zoning Administration

PARKWAY DEVELOPMENT BY SECTIONS
Existing lrondale Gulch channels
Parkway median development (existing irrigation)
/%S% Parkway median development (irrigation needed)
IZTS Parkway median development (irrigation needed and reconfiguration of channel)
1RONDALE GULCH PARKWAYS
MONTBELLO
52


53
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URBAN .DESIGN
Action Recommendations-
Montbelio Irondale Gulch
UDIG-1 Create scenic landscaped areas along Irondale Gulch
channels through planting of trees and other plant
materials.
UDIG-2 Plant trees and landscape the Irondale Gulch parkway
medians along Andrews Drive from Peoria Street to
Crown Boulevard; Tulsa Court between Albrook Drive
and Andrews; Uvalda Street between 51st Avenue and
56th Avenue; 51st Avenue between Uvalda and
Bolling Drive; Maxwell Place between Uvalda and
Sable Street; and 53rd Avenue between Durham Court
and Chambers Road. As channel side walls
deteriorate, evaluate new wall design possibilities for
wall replacement through the Wastewater
Departments annual channel maintenance program.
Develop detailed short and long term parkway design
specifications, including a standardized replacement
panel design that provides for trees and grass, and
addresses hydraulic considerations.
UDIG-3 Install irrigation and plant trees and landscape the
Irondale Gulch parkway medians on Andrews Drive
between Crown Boulevard and 46th Avenue, on 46th
Avenue between Andrews Drive and Eugene Way, and
on 51st Avenue between Bolling Drive and Durham
Court. As channel side walls deteriorate, evaluate new
wall design possibilities for wall replacement through
the Wastewater Departments annual channel
maintenance program. Develop detailed short and
long term parkway design specifications, including a
standardized replacement panel design that provides
for trees and grass, and addresses hydraulic
considerations.
Implementing Agencies/Groups
Parks Department
Wastewater Management
Transportation Division
Planning Office
Parks Department
Wastewater Management
Planning Office
Landowners
Developers
Parks Department
Wastewater Management
Planning Office
Landowners
Developers
54


mg
HB|
URBAN DESIGN
UDIG-4 Landscape along Irondale Gulch in the median of 46th
Avenue between Eugene Way and Chambers Road.
Reconstruct concrete channel walls (top section) with
landscaped sections integrally attached to the concrete
lower wall sections to avoid undermining and collapse.
Reconfiguration should take place as channel walls
and bottoms in the existing channels suffer from
damage or deterioration which may require restoration
and replacement Segment the channel improvement
areas from one bridge to the next, one at a time, as
areas become defective. Install irrigation and plant
trees and landscape. Develop detailed parkway design
specifications for this section of the Irondale Gulch,
including construction and maintenance costs.
Parks Department
Wastewater Management
Planning Office
Landowners
Developers
UDIG-5 Develop the Irondale Gulch channel along 51st
Avenue between Durham Court and Chambers Road
as a linear park along the gulch. Use gently sloping
grass areas, install irrigation, plant trees and
landscape. Minimize automobile bridges by
constructing them to connect streets on each side of the
gulch channel. Design of this portion of the gulch will
be subject to resolving legal questions and successful
negotiations with future developers who will pay for
these improvements.
UDIG-6 Study priority locations and construct new pedestrian
foot bridges across Irondale Gulch.
UDIG-7 Establish as highest priority for landscaping all
Irondale Gulch intersections with perimeter arterial
streets, starting with 46th Avenue at Chambers Road,
working west.
Parks Department
Wastewater Management
Planning Office
Landowners
Developers
Transportation Division
Design Engineering
WastewaterManagement
Planning Office
Parks Department
Parks Department
Wastewater Management
Planning Office
55


URBAN DESIGN
UDIG-8 Establish an Irondale Gulch maintenance program for frequent (monthly through the summer) removal of weeds growing in cracks and silt removal. Wastewater Management
UDIG-9 Replace existing Irondale Gulch bridge railing with uniform parkway railings of a Federal green color. Explore design attention to new bridge lighting and paving patterns and materials. Transportation Division Street Maintenance Department Design Engineering Planning Office
UD1G-10 Establish a "Friends of the Gulch" group to regularly pick up debris and adopt gulch beautification projects. Neighborhood Groups Montbello Community School Court Community Service Program
UDIG-11 Do not increase peak run-off levels of storm water to Montbello from upstream in the Irondale Gulch basin (east of Chambers Road), in conformance with the 1990 Irondale Gulch and Outfall Systems Storm Water Collection System Master Plan. Wastewater Management
56


I>RHAN DI SK,
57


Recommendations Montbello
Implementing Agencies/Groups
UDM-1 Create consistent landscaping treatment for Crown Boulevard by planting trees and flowers in the space between the sidewalk and curb. Planning Office Parks Department Neighborhood Groups Homeowners
UDM-2 Emphasize with special bridge and landscaping treatments the intersections where Crown Boulevard crosses Irondale Gulch. Parks Department Transportation Division Street Maintenance Department
UDM-3 Construct attractive gateway entrance signs to Montbello. Planning Office Parks Department Transportation Division
UDM-4 Complete Chambers Road linear park from the Denver City limits south of Andrews Drive, north to 53rd Avenue. Parks Department
UDM-5 Develop attractive median streetscape landscaping on Peoria Street between Albrook Drive and 56th Avenue. Planning Office Parks Department Transportation Division
UDM-6 Create attractive landscaping, including trees and wildflowers at the Peoria/I-70 interchange (Denver) and Chambers/I-70 interchange (Aurora). Colorado Department of Highways
UDM-7 Establish a minimum tree lawn spacing of five feet between street and sidewalk for all new subdivisions. Do not permit attached sidewalks. Developers Planning Office
UDM-8 Encourage homeowners to plant trees in front yards. Sponsor landscaping workshops in the Community School. Neighborhood Groups Montbello Community School
UDM-9 Construct attractive park name signs in each of Montbellos seven parks. Parks Department


Action Recommendations Green Valiev Ranch Imolementine Aeencies/Groups
UDGVR-1 Create improved trails along the High Line Canal for equestrian, bicycle, and pedestrian use. Separate the different uses for safety, aesthetic, and functional reasons. Use the existing service road for use as a trail, to minimize the amount of disturbed area. Parks Department Water Department Planning Office Neighborhood Groups
UDGVR-2 Plant trees, shrubs, and wildftowers along the High Line Canal to create shade and visual interest. (Tree locations to be approved by the Denver Water Department.) Parks Department Water Department Neighborhood Groups Adjacent Homeowners Planning Office
UDGVR-3 Explore development of pocket parks on the small parcels along the Western Gas Supply Company line near the crossing of the High Line Canal. Parks Department Planning Office Western Gas Supply Company Neighborhood Groups


URBAN. DESIGN
UDGVR-4 Emphasize pedestrian and automobile bridges across the High Line Canal with special landscaping and architectural treatments. Planning Office Transportation Division Parks Department Water Department
UDGVR-5 Place a pedestrian bridge across the High Line Canal to provide access to East Ranch Park and the new swimming pool. Explore placing other pedestrian bridges where easements exist. Water Department Planning Office Transportation Division Parks Department
UDGVR-6 Create trails along the Western Gas Supply Company right-of-way for equestrian, bicycle, and pedestrian use. Plant wildflowers and other acceptable plant materials along the right-of-way. Western Gas Supply Company Parks Department Planning Office Neighborhood Groups
UDGVR-7 Remove the dirt pile along the easement area between 43rd Avenue and 44th Avenue to reduce drainage problems in adjacent parcels. Developers Western Gas Supply Company
UDGVR-8 Construct sidewalks along 48th Avenue. Developers Transportation Division
UDGVR-9 Establish a "Friends of the Canal" group to regularly pick-up debris and adopt beautification projects, including coordination of the planting of trees along the High Line Canal. Neighborhood Groups Court Community Service
UDGVR-10 Establish a minimum tree lawn spacing of five feet between street and sidewalk for all new subdivisions. Do not permit attached sidewalks. Planning Office Developers
UDGVR-11 Encourage homeowners to plant trees in front yards. Sponsor landscaping workshops in the Community School. Neighborhood Groups
60


MmtBeflo VsfyighBorfwod
§reen *lMey tRgnck tyighBorhood
THE PLANNING PROCESS
1* Neighborhood Planning
Neighborhood planning is a collaborative process between the City, citizens, and
property owners of a particular area which actively solicits participation in the
formulation of a plan for that neighborhood. The process enunciates goals, identifies and
discusses issues, generates and tests alternative ways to achieve the desired ends,
proposes a plan for the area, and spells out policy changes and investments that should be
implemented to help realize that goal. It is a forum in which people initiate rather than
react to change, and in which the various interest groups within a neighborhood, who
may have different goals, work out their differences to arrive at a mutually satisfactory
plan. The private-public partnership is essential to the ultimate success of the venture.
2. Montbello and Green Valley Ranch Neighborhoods Planning Process
In early 1988, the Northeast Corridor Specific Area Plan was completed by the City of
Denver to anticipate growth that would result from the building of Denver International
Airport. This plan identified issues in the Stapleton neighborhood, Montbello
neighborhood, Green Valley Ranch neighborhood, and the Gateway area. When the plan
was completed, area residents, former Councilman Bill Roberts, and City staff said more
detailed attention was needed to the already established residential neighborhoods in the
area and requested that a study and plan be done for Montbello and Green Valley Ranch.
This plan is the result of that request.
The planning process used to develop this plan was open and interactive with residents in
the neighborhood. To start the process, a large public meeting was held in September
1989. Residents identified what they like about their neighborhood, what are the issues
they see, and what they would like to improve. A number of participants volunteered to
work with public agency representatives on a Plan Steering Committee to oversee
development of the Plan. These people, plus others who joined the project met bi-weekly
through the end of 1989 to draft plans for land use/zoning. During January and February
of 1990 the committee met weekly to develop a housing plan. Five neighborhood town
meetings were held in March and April to update residents and get more ideas.
Beginning in May and continuing through October committees held workshops and
developed draft plans for transportation, urban design, business development, and
recreation. Town meetings were held again in September and October to gain more input
and keep residents up to date on the plan. All meetings were open to the public and were
heavily advertised with school flyers, newspaper and newsletter notices, and church
bulletins and announcements. Coordination and technical assistance for plan
A-l


APPENDIX A
development was provided by the Neighborhood Planning Division of the Denver
Planning and Community Development Office.
More than fifty work sessions involving several hundred residents and business people
over the course of fifteen months led to preparation of drafts of the plan and this final
document.
The plan development process concluded with the Denver Planning Boards public
hearing on December 12,1990. The plan was adopted by Denver City Council on
February 25,1991.
A separate Executive Summary of this plan is available from the Denver Planning and
Community Development Office and was used extensively during the draft plans review
period to effectively inform interested neighborhood residents of the plans content.
A-2


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MONTBELLO DEMOGRAPHICS
APPENDIX 15
POPULATION
Total Population Total Households 17,582 5,534
Average Household Size Source: 1990 Census 3.17
HOUSEHOLD INCOME
Median Household Income 83.04 $34,704
By Census Tract 83.05 30,820
83.06 35,799
83.11 31,610
83.12 34,320
(Citywide $25,106)
Source: 1990 Census
AGE PROFILE
BY CENSUS TRACT

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mm 83.04 Census Tracts I 83.06
1 1 83.11 1 83.12

SOURCE: 1990 U.S. Census
B-l


APPKNDIX
sna
MONTBELLO
ETHNIC COMPOSITION BY CENSUS TRACT
1%
Total Population 17,582
Combined Census Tracts
Total Population 2,714
Census Tract 83.04
Total Population 3,004
Census Tract 83.05
Total Population 3,729
Census Tract 83.06
NATIVE AMERICAN 30
1%
Total Population 4,367 Total Population 3,768
Census Tract 83.11 Census Tract 83.12
Source: 1990 U.S. Census of Population and Housing Public Law File PL 94 -171 The categories Anglo, Black,
Asian, Native American, and Other are composed of people not of Hispanic origins.
B-2


HOUSEHOLD PROFILES
MONTBELLO
Combined All Census Tracts
TOTAL: 5,579
Married no children 21%
Married Couples w/Childern 44,496
Married Couples no/childern
Male Head Household w/children (MHH)
Female Head Household w/children (FHH)
Single or Nonfamily
Other
Source: 1990 U.S. Census


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APPENDIX
GREEN VALLEY RANCH DEMOGRAPHICS
POPULATION
Total Population 2,746
Total Households 922
Average Household Size 2.99
Source: 1990 Census
HOUSEHOLD INCOME
Median Household Income 83.03 $45,556
By Census Tract
(Citywide $25,106)
Source: 1990 Census
AGE PROFILE
BY CENSUS TRACT
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SOURCE: 1990 U.S. Census
Census Tract
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APPENDIX <
Source:
GREEN VALLEY RANCH
ETHNIC COMPOSITION
NATIVE AMERICAN 12
0%
HISPANIC 279
10%
ASIAN 99
4%
OTHER 10
0%
Total Population 2,746
Census Tract 83.03
1990 U.S. Census of Population and Housing Public Law File PL 94 -171 The categories Anglo,
Black, Asian, Native American, and Other are composed of people not of Hispanic origins.
C-2


APPENDIX l
HOUSEHOLD PROFILES
GREEN VALLEY RANCH
TOTAL: 925
Married w/children 51%
470
DENVER
TOTAL: 210,962
Single/nontamily 48%
HOUSEHOLD TYPES
Married Couples w/Childern
Married w/children 16%
33,229
Married no children 21%
44,496
Married Couples no/childern
Male Head Household w/children (MHH)
Female Head Household w/children (FHH)
Single or Nonfamily
other Source: 1990 U.S. Census
c-3




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HOUSING DATA
Green Valley Elmendorf Falcon Silverman Concord/Barney Ford
Ranch Park Park Park Park/Village East Park
C.T. 83.03* C.T. 83.04 C.T. 83.05 C.T. 83.06 C. T. 83.07*
Number Single Family Hones 1,055 869 980 1,003 2,701
Avg. Age of Homes 6yrs. 20yrs. 18 yrs. 20 yrs. 12 yrs.
Avg. Sq. Ft 1,278 1,008 960 1,343 1,053
2 Bedrooms 117 211 369 31 963
3 Bedrooms 477 569 548 697 1,296
4+Bedrooms 59 89 63 275 239
1 Story 128 716 948 409 1,044
2 Story 526 153 32 594 1,459
Number Sales
1982 0 81 94 48 408
1983 81 74 137 84 57
1984 285 92 112 69 423
1985 252 97 118 88 388
Avg, Sales Price (approximate)
1982 $54,900 $49,300 $62,800 $68,300
1983 $75,(XX) $49,500 $51,400 $66,100 $68,800
1984 $79,200 $53,200 $53,400 $65,300 $68,300
1985 $86,900 $58,100 $52,700 $68,600 $69,500
1986 $99,896 $57,210 $55305 $71,478 $64,633
1987 $90,471 $56,993 $50,723 $69,897 $66,034
1988 $83,328 $47,161 $45358 $61,930 $58,994
Number Apartments and Condo Units 0 0 0 768 482
* 1980 Census Tract, Does not include date for new homes constructed 1986-1968 (except total number homes and sales prices)
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Full Text

PAGE 1

MO T LLO NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN GREEN VALLEY RANCH NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN PLANNING AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OFFICE CITY AND COUNTY OF DENVER F E B R U A R Y 1 9 9 1

PAGE 3

9vlont6e{{o !J{jigli6orfwotf ljrun 'VaLley !l{ft:ndi Mayor of Denver Wellington E. Webb Denver Planning Board Ruth Falkenberg, Chair Gilbert F. McNeish Rick Pederson Jeanne Lubuda Bernie Jones Debra Gallegos Tom Foster Marilyn Stokes Denver Planning and Community Development Office Jennifer Moulton, Director of Planning and Development Doug Wheeler, Neighborhood Planner and Project Manager Ellen Crain-Jordan, Urban Designer and Urban Design Report Author Philip Milstein Marilee Utter Daniel R Guimond David Becker, Senior Planner and Retail Business Development Report Author Jodi Adkins, Program Specialist KenBarkema Karl Haberman Mark Hess Sandra Jackson Carolyn Moore The Plan Steering Committee, Subcommittees, and Neighborhood Planning Meeting Participants Councilwoman Happy Haynes Chairperson Bill Brown Secretary Dixie Witcher Charles Allen Isabella Allen Alberta Alston Claudette Anderson John Andrews Morris Augusta Samuel Batey Dawn Benjamin Helen Bradley Connie Brigham Dean Brown Tina Burls Diane Buell F. D. Carter Mrs. F. D. Carter Dirk Chandler Joe Charleston Marilyn Cobbs Antoinette Coleman Paula Cottingham Gwen Crapps Mruvin Crayton Michael Crisp Barbara Crosby Lucheryl Crunpler Gary Dahl Sid Davidson Don Davis Doris Dempsey RonDurr Barbara Dwight Elaine Eggart Athena Eisenman Julia Ellington Shery 1 Essie William Fields Mrs. William Fields Jacqueline Farrell Jamie Fowler Keith Fowler Mike Freeman Diana Gadison Gregory Gonzales Harriet Gonzales Bruce Gray Homer Grinde Artie Grisby Michael Guggenheim Rev. Hugh Harris Pam Hammond Gwendolynn Harris

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ACKNOWLEDGE1\1ENTS J. T. Harrison Barbara Hatch Ronald Henry Sue Hernandez Clarence Hiblett Fred Hicks Lee Horst Phil Hough Emma Hunter Phillip Hunter Maye Irvin Therese Jackson Raymond Johnson Rod Juniel Lee Kaley Rev. James Kane JeffKanost Tom Leek Wanda Lenox Michelle Lockhart JonLohmer Tim Macho Betty Martin Chris Martinez Kevin McDonnell Robert Mosley L. J. Murzyn Rev. Charles Nelms Estella Nelms Twila Norman Thomas Owens Margaret Pacheco Clyde Page MelvmPage Norma Paige BobParkam Cannen Patterson Margaret Pearson Lyle Peterson Luther Pleasant Trinny Pleasant Georgia Polk Rex Pruitt EdnaRhambo Ruby Richard Bill Roberts Judith Roberts AI Roettger Aleyda Rogers Rev. Rod Rogers Flossie Rollerson Johnny Rollerson Susan Sanchez Morris Sanchez Rev. John Sawyer Jeanne Scharfenberg Sandra Scott Monica Sinkler Bill Slansky Elaine Smith Eric Smith JolmSmith Marty Smith Joseph Songy Charles Spratt Barbara Stallings Jan Stenroos Jean Sutphen Ora Sutton Gloria Taylor Landri Taylor Rev. Madlyn Tombs Joe Turner Joe Uchiyama Bernadette Ukolowicz Ray Vaughn Pat Vest Vickie WaitsWolverton Edith Walston Scott White Neil Wiegert Barbara Williamson Ronald Williamson Gloria Wise Steven Wolverton Charles Wong Darryl Wright Jennifer Wright And many other residents who offered suggestions and ideas, whose participation we gratefully acknowledge. Our thanks to the residents of Montbello and Green Valley Ranch for the valuable input and insight they provided. Theirs was the essential perspective needed in creating this plan. Acknowledgement is also given to former members of the City Administration, Denver Planning Board, and Denver Planning and Community Development Office who made the preparation and approval of this plan possible, including Federico Pefia, former mayor of Denver; Richard Deane, former chair, and Jerome Nagle, John Maldanado, Martin Saiz, James Swanson, Robert Wright, and David Hare --all fanner members of the Denver Planning Board; Frank Gray, former

PAGE 5

Director of the Denver Planning and Community Development Office; Billie Bramhall former Deputy Director of the Denver Planning and Community Development Office; and Frances Burg, former word processing specialist in the Denver Planning and Community Development Office. A number of elements in the plan required special technical assistance. Bruce Leiser with the Wastewater Management Division of Public Works attended numerous work sessions in Montbello and took the lead in providing technical direction for developing the Irondale Gulch plan. Paul Foster and Andy Mutz with the Parks and Recreation Department attended neighborhood workshops and helped coordinate planning for improvements in the Irondale Gulch street median areas. Tim Engels with the Parks and Recreation Depanment attended neighborhood recreation workshops to develop the recreation plan. Lloyd Bimson with the Transportation Division of Public Works provided on-going assistance with transportation planning. The Montbello and Green Valley Ranch Neighborhoods Plan was approved by the Denver Planning Board following a public hearing on December 12, 1990. Following a City Council public hearing it was approved by the Denver City Council on February 25, 1991. It was signed by the Mayor on February 26, 1991, at which time it became pan of the Denver Comprehensive Plan.

PAGE 6

Mont6e{{o t]reen 'llall'ey !Rflncli Table of Contents Page I. Introduction A. The Montbello Vision for the Future . . . . . . . . . 1 B. The Green Valley Ranch Vision for the Future . . . . . . . 1 C. Priority Planning Issues.. . . . . . . . . . . . 1 D. Location and Description . . . . . . . . . . . 2 E. Use of the Plan..................................................... 2 F. History of the Neighborhoods . . . . . . . . . . 3 II. Land Use and Zoning Plan A. Goals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 B. Overview of Existing Land Use and Zoning . . . . . . . 5 C. Montbello Land Use Plan 1. Existing Land Uses and Zoning . . . . . . . . 5 2. Mont bello Land Use and Zoning Recommendations . . . . 8 D. Green Valley Ranch Land Use Plan 1. Existing Land Uses and Zoning . . . . . . . . 14 2. Green Valley Ranch Land Use and Zoning Recommendations.......... 15 III. Transportation Plan A. Goals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 B. Overview of Existing Circulation, Transportation Systems, and Issues . . 17 C. Action Recommendations ........................ ; . . . . 23 IV. Housing Plan A. Goals ............................................................. 27 B. Overview of Existing Conditions and Issues . . . . . . . 27 C. Action Recommendations . . . . . . . . . . . 30 V. Recreation Plan A. Goals ............................................................. 35 B. Overview of Existing Programs, Facilities, and Issues . . . . . 35 C. Action Recommendations ............................................. 37 VI. Retail Business Development Plan A. Goals ............................................................. 41 B. Overview of Existing Conditions and Issues .............................. 41 C. Action Recommendations . . . . . . . . . . . 44

PAGE 7

VII. Urban Design Plan A. Goals ............................................................. 47 B. Overview of Existing Conditions and Issues .............................. 47 C. Action Recommendations . . . . . . . . . . . 51 APPENDIX A 1. Neighborhood Planning in Denver ..................................... A-1 2. Montbello/Green Valley Ranch Planning Process......................... A-1 APPENDIXB Mont bello Demographics 1. Population . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-1 2. Household Income. . . . . . . . . . . . . B-1 3. Age Profile. . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-1 4. Ethnic Composition . . . . . . . . . . . . B-2 5 Household Profile . . . . . . . . . . . . B3 6. 1990 Census Tract Map . . . . . . . . . . . B-4 APPENDIXC Green Valley Ranch Demographics 1. Population . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-1 2. Household Income . . . . . . . . . . . . C-1 3. Age Profile . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-1 4. Ethnic Composition . . . . . . . . . . . . C-2 5 Household Profile . . . . . . . . . . . . C-3 APPENDIXD 1. Montbello/Green Valley Ranch Housing Data . . . . . . . D-1 2. 1980 Census Tracts ................................................. D-2 APPENDIXE Gateway Regional Perspective . . . . . . . . . . . E-1

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-List of Illustrations Page Figure 1 Vicinity Map i Figure 2 Existing Zoning Montbello 6 Figure 3 Land Use and Zoning Recommendations Montbello 7 Figure 4 Existing Zoning Green Valley Ranch 12 Figure 5 Land Use and Zoning Recommendations Green Valley Ranch 13 Figure 6 1990 Traffic Volumes 21 Figure 7 Transportation Plan Recommendations 22 Figure 8 Bicycle Routes 26 Figure 9 Proposed Montbello Resource Centers 39 l, Figure 10 Proposed Green Valley Ranch Resource Center 40 Figure 11 Irondale Gulch Parkways Map 52 Figure 12 Irondale Gulch Parkways Design Concept 53 Figure 13 Urban Design Montbello 57 Figure 14 Urban Design Green Valley Ranch 59

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!Mont6effo Nf,igli6orfwoi (jreen o/affey !J{fmdi i ,--" '-----------, i i NEil-l AtaP_ORT GREEN VALLEY RANCH VICINITY MAP MONTBELLO/GREEN VALLEY RANCH i

PAGE 10

-

PAGE 11

!Mont6eflo !!{,igli6orfwoa (jreen 'llalky 9{r;igli6orftooa A. The Montbello Vision for the Future The Montbello neighborhood's vision for the future is to preserve and enhance the following positive qualities that make the neighborhood a unique place to live: Diversity of people (ages, income, ethnic and cultural heritage, lifestyle choices). Quiet, suburban "small town" environment with a sense of safety and friendliness. Diversity of architectural styles, sizes, and selling prices of homes. Excellence of neighborhood schools. Physical features of the neighborhood, including mountain views, seven parks, and parkways. Convenience of location relative to transportation access to Downtown Denver, shopping, the Denver Tech Center, parks and open space, nature areas, and mountain recreation. High quality new development and neighborhood economic benefits resulting from the opening of Denver International Airport. B. The Green Valley Ranch Vision for the Future Green Valley Ranch is the newest of Denver's residential neighborhoods. Large areas of open space are waiting for development within and adjacent to Green Valley Ranch. The neighborhood's vision for the future is to preserve existing qualities and create new qualities as the area develops: Diversity of people, with an emphasis on family and children. "Small town" atmosphere, with a sense of friendliness, safety, and interest in the neighborhood's schools and recreation opportunities. Development in harmony with the natural environment in order to protect mountain views, streams, the High Line Canal, and wildlife areas. High quality new development and neighborhood economic benefits resulting from the opening of Denver International Airport. C. Priority Planning Issues Residents, business people, and city representatives who established these visions see tremendous potential for Montbello and Green Valley Ranch as these neighborhoods build on these characteristics. This plan addresses the following priority topics as established in the neighborhood meetings: zoning and land use traffic and transportation housing recreation business development urban design 1

PAGE 12

INTRC U>l r( :TION D. Location and Description Denver's far northeast area includes four distinct neighborhood areas: the Stapleton neighborhood (airport, offices, industrial), Montbello neighborhood (primarily residential), Gateway area (residential, business, mixed use), and Green Valley Ranch neighborhood (primarily residential). This plan will focus on the existing residential areas in Denver's far northeast region: the Montbello neighborhood and Green Valley Ranch neighborhood. Montbello is bounded by 1-70 on the south, 56th Avenue on the north, Peoria Street on the west, and Chambers Road on the east. The neighborhood is residential in character, with slightly more than 5,600 single family homes and 1,250 multi family units. Businesses generally are located in the Peoria Street commercial area south of Albrook Drive and in the Chambers Place Shopping Center at Chambers Road and 48th A venue. A business and industrial area is immediately to the west, Aurora's Morris Heights to the south, open space to the east, and open space to the north. Distinctive features of the neighborhood are its suburban character, meandering street system, and nearby natural open space areas. Montbello is the largest of Denver's neighborhoods in both land area and population. The portion of Green Valley Ranch that is thus far subdivided and built with homes is bounded by 38th A venue on the south, 48th A venue on the north, Piccadilly Road on the east, and Tower Road on the west. Slightly more than 1, 100 single family homes have been built in the neighborhood since 1981. There is a small retail center on Tower Road near 48th A venue. The undeveloped area north of 48th A venue has been included in the Airport Gateway Plan along with undeveloped open space to the west of Tower Road. A partially developed Aurora business and industrial area is immediately to the south. Residential development is anticipated to the east in Aurora. The most distinctive feature of Green Valley Ranch is the panoramic view of the Front Range made possible by the surrounding large expanses of open space. E. Use of the Plan This plan presents the best thinking of the city and the neighborhoods and provides a city-approved guide for the acceptable future physical development of the neighborhoods for use by the Denver Planning Office, the Denver Planning Board, the Mayor, City Council, governmental agencies, residents, property owners, business people, and private organizations concerned with planning, development, and neighborhood improvement. The plan is neither an official zone map nor does it imply or deny any implicit rights to a particular zone. Zone changes that may be proposed by property owners as part of any plan must be initiated under a separate procedure established under the City and County of Denver Municipal Code. This plan is intended to promote patterns of land use, urban design, and circulation and services that contribute to the economic, social, and physical health, safety, and welfare of the people who 2 -

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live and work in these neighborhoods. The plan addresses issues and opportunities at a scale that is more refined and more responsive to specific needs than the city's Comprehensive Plan. The plan serves as a component of that document. F. History of the Neighborhoods Montbello The Italian word "Montbello" means literally "beautiful mountain." Spectacular views of Mount Evans, Long's Peak, and the Continental Divide inspired developers to name Denver's new neighborhood area "Montbello," after the picturesque mountain region in the Italian Alps with that name. Montbello was the first major annexation of privately owned land to the far northeast area of Denver, taking place in September, 1965. Because the area annexed was large-approximately 2,609 acres the City and developers worked out a master land use plan in conjunction with the annexation agreement that addressed mutual obligations in the annexation area. The annexation agreement included a master plan for the area to develop into a mixed use community. The agreement basically dictated the general land use and densities and provided for the necessary public land sites for parks, schools, and other public facilities. Montbello started developing in 1966, with the bulk of growth taking place in the late 1960's and early 1970's. At present, Montbello is 75%-80% developed. Green Valley Ranch Green Valley Ranch was annexed to Denver from Adams County in September 1973. This original Green Valley Ranch annexation of 3,078 acres extended approximately from Tower Road to Piccadilly Road and from 38th A venue to a mile north of 56th A venue between Himalaya Road (extended) and Piccadilly Road (extended). The original annexation agreement included a master plan comprising mixed land uses for the area. In 1978, a comprehensive rezoning was adopted which generally changed the lower density residential uses to medium density residential uses. The rezoning also reconfigured public land sites. In July of 1980 a square mile of land (642 acres specifically) north of 56th Avenue and west of Piccadilly Road (extended) was de-annexed from Denver and re-annexed to Adams County as part of a negotiated settlement of a lawsuit brought against the City by Adams County. Development started in Green Valley Ranch in 1981. It is currently about 15% developed. 3

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I !Montoelfo fjreen rrlalley !l(ftncft A. Goals Protect the existing residential character of the Montbello neighborhood and Green Valley Ranch neighborhood. Encourage good design in new business development and compatibility with adjacent residential land uses. B. Overview of Existing Land Use and Zoning Montbello and Green Valley Ranch are unique among Denver's neighborhoods in that from the time they were annexed into the City as open ranch land, their development has been guided by respective large area master plans that have sought to assure compatibility of land uses, location of business areas, provision of nearby employment, location of parks and schools, and design of street layouts. Taken together, these neighborhoods encompass over 5,000 acres of land where a rational basis for land uses and accompanying zoning of large areas has been in effect for twentyfive years in Montbello and twelve years in Green Valley Ranch. For the most part, land use patterns and accompanying zoning already in place continue to make sense. But no plan benefits from a perfect crystal ball. With the passing of time, internal changing conditions from within the neighborhoods and external changing conditions from outside the neighborhoods (Aurora and Denver's adjacent Gateway and Stapleton areas) suggest a need to review and modify land use planning and existing zoning. C. Montbello Land Use Plan 1. Existing Land Uses and Zoning All of the 5,600 single family homes in Montbello are in areas zoned R-1 or R-2 (limited to single family detached homes). The R-2 Planned Building Group process has been used in some parts of Montbello to increase density for single family development by reducing lot sizes. There is room for 1,600 additional single family homes on undeveloped land that is zoned R-1, R-2, and 0-2 (a holding zone pending application for residential zoning). Multi-family zoning (R-3 and R-2-A) is located along Albrook Drive. Over the last twenty-five years 1,250 apartment units have been constructed, with about 350 additional units permitted on undeveloped land along Albrook Drive. Zoning to the south of Albrook Drive and east of Peoria Street is B-8 and B-4 for commercial development. Montbello Plaza Shopping Center, a bank, hotel, several restaurants, convenience store, car wash, and pre-school have developed on this site over the last 25 years. Zoning to the west of Peoria Street is industrial (1-0, 1-1, 1-2) and intensive commercial (B-8). This is a major Denver office and industrial employment center with attractively landscaped sites that make good neighbors to the residential heart of Montbello. There are scattered undeveloped sites, particularly at the north end of this Business and Industrial Park. Zoning to the south of 1-70 is industrial (I-1 and 1), with a small retail business site (B-2) at the corner of Peoria Street and Smith Road. 5

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R Single-Unit Oetact\00 Dwellings, Low Density. 7.3 dwelfing units/acre. R Single and Multi-Unit DweiHngs, Low Density. Density .. 14.5 dweiUng units/acre. RA MukiUnit Dwellings, Medium Density. R-3 Multi-Unit DweUings, High Density, Maximum is not specified and is determined by the size of the units, bulk plane, parking, and space requirements. R-5 Institutional District. Allows colleges, schools, churches and other uses. B-2 Neighborhood Business Oistrid. This district provides the retailing of classed as "conwnience goods, and the furnishing of certain personal services, to satisfy the daily and weekly household or personal needs of the residents of surrounding residential neighborhoods. The volume of pedestrian traffic in proportion to vehicular traffic entering the district is much higher than in other retail business districts. 84 General Business District. This district is intended to provide for and encourage appropriate commercial uses adjacent to arterial streets, which are normally transit routea, and abutting residential districts. B-6 lntensiw General Business/Very High Residential District. This wry intense district is designed to serve the entire metropolitan area as an alternative to urban sprawl. Building floor area cannot exceed 41imes the site area plus floor area premiums. 1..(1 Light Industrial District. A transitional district between intensive industrial and residential distrids. AUows limited manufacturing, wholesale and retail activities, offices, and motels. 1 General Industrial Distrid. AHows many manufacturing, warehousing, wholesaling adivities, along with limited retail and service uses for the benefit of area efTllloyees. 1-2 Heavy Industrial Distrid. Allows all manufacturing, warehousing. 0.1 Open Use Distriot. Allows recreational uses, parks, and other public and semi-pubijc uses housed in buildings. 0.2 Open Space Distrid. Allows large tracts of open land utHized primarily for agriculture or ranching activities. PUD Planned Unit Development. PUD is a form of development generally characterized by a unified site design for clustering buildings and providing common open-space, density increases, and a mix of building types and land uses. It allcms maximum flexibility during the planning stage and maximum assurance that exactly what is proposed will be developed. 6 EXISTING ZONING February, 1991 MONTBELLO -

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Rezone fer Retaii Business When 56th Avenue Opens to Queoec Street Open Space Nature Area Neighborhood FocaJ Point Encourage Community Sentice and Retail Development Existing Shopping Centers Encourage Retail Development at Neighborhood Rezone to B-4 Encourage Retail, Business, Hotel Development < C:l o Aurora w a... Multi Family Residential Lower Density Rezone to 1-0 Encourage Office/Business Park, Light Industrial, and Hotel Development Open Space, Lake, New Park Airport Gateway Development Area Chambers Place Shopping Center Town Square Focal point Encourage Retail Development LAND USE ZONING RECOMMENDATIONS MONTBELLO 7

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LAND lJSE Retail business zoning is located in the following areas of Montbello: Southeast corner of Peoria Street and Albrook Drive. Montbello Plaza (existing shopping center). B-8 zoning. Northwest comer of Peoria Street and Albrook Drive. Albrook Center (existing shopping center). B-8 (waivers and conditions) zoning. Southwest corner of Crown Boulevard and Albrook Drive. Undeveloped. B-4 (waivers and conditions) zoning. Rezoned September 1990. Northeast corner of Chambers Road and 48th Avenue. Chambers Place (existing shopping center). P.U.D. (retail uses) zoning. Southwest corner of Chambers Road and Andrews Drive. Undeveloped. B-4 zoning. Southeast comer of Maxwell Place and Crown Boulevard. Vacant convenience store building and undeveloped. B-2 zoning. Northwest comer of Peoria Street and Smith Road. Existing restaurant and retail commercial. B-2 zoning. 2. Mont bello Land Use and Zoning Recommendations Implementing Agencies/Groups LZM-1 LZM-2 Change zoning on 58 acres from B-8 to B-4 on the northerly half of the undeveloped parcel east of Peoria Street and south of Albrook Drive. Reduce the permitted floor area ratio (F.A.R.) to .5:1. Prohibit vehicle sales, adult businesses, billboards and uses inappropriate at this major entry 'point to the residential neighborhood. Encourage neighborhood serving retail shops and attractive landscaping along Albrook Drive street frontage. Encourage office, hotel (room entrances from building interior), wholesale/retail/warehouse outlets, and mixed retail/fabrication/assembly uses at interior locations. (Rezoned September 1990) Change zoning from B-8, R-3, and R-2-A to I-0 on 98 acres of undeveloped land generally located to the north of I70 and to the south of the south property line of the Fountain View Apartments. Prohibit vehicle sales and uses with outdoor storage. Exterior building materials on all buildings should be limited to masonry, brick, brick veneer, or stucco. Attractive landscaping treatment should be encouraged for new development throughout this area that is so readily visible from I70 and will give a first impression of Denver to visitors arriving through Denver International Airport. A solid wood screening fence and landscaping should be required on all developing properties adjacent to a residential zone district. (Rezoned September 1990) 8 Landowners Neighborhood Groups City Council Landowners Neighborhood Groups City Council -I

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LZM-3 LZM-4 LZM-5 LZM-6 Change R-2-A zoning on 15 acres along Albrook Drive to limit the number of dwelling units to four units per building and a maximwn density of ten units per acre. Encourage the development of elderly housing and/or nursing homes in this area. (Rezoned September 1990) As development is proposed on the B-4 parcel at the southwest comer of Chambers Road and Andrews Drive, work with the developer to assure compatibility with the adjacent residential area along Andrews Drive. Encourage good design and compatibility of new development on the parcel at the southeast comer of Maxwell Place and Crown Boulevard. Over the last twenty-five years this site has remained vacant, except for a convenience store on the south portion of the site. lnspite of changes in shopping habits that make it difficult for B-2 shopping areas to survive, there are success stories in other parts of the city and planning in the nearby Gateway area is for neighborhood convenience shops and services around park-like town squares. This suggests an opportunity to take a fresh look at neighborhood shopping on this site. Use the existing zoning to make sure this block long area, over time, develops as a pleasant neighborhood focal point with attractive landscaping and uses such as small retail shops, preschool, church, and nursing care center. This site should be monitored over the next ten years and if no development occurs, a rezoning of the northerly 2/3 of the site to an appropriate residential zone district should be considered. Explore rezoning from 1-2 to an appropriate zone district for neighborhood-serving retail and personal services in the vicinity of Smith Road and Peoria Street where a future rail transit station may be located if a northeast corridor rail transit line is constructed. Feeder commuter buses and a park-n-ride suggest an opportunity to develop retail shopping in this area. 9 Landowners Neighborhood Groups City Council Landowners Developers Landowners Developers Landowners City Council

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LZM-7 LZM-8 LZM-9 LZM-10 Retain all current I-0 zoning along the west side of Peoria Street. I-0 light industrial zoning allows for offices, warehousing, limited manufacturing, hardware sales, restaurants, and similar uses. This is intended as a transition between intensive industrial areas and residential areas. Zoning requirements for the parking of trucks and trailers should be strictly enforced in the industrial area along Peoria Street. Future retail development is encouraged at nodes currently zoned for retail uses, rather than strip commercial development along Peoria Street. The under-utilization of existing retail centers and the present surplus of undeveloped land zoned for retail uses, does not suggest a need for more retail zoning in the neighborhood. One exception is the southwest comer of Peoria Street and 56th A venue: this site should be evaluated for retail development (B-2 or P.U.D. zoning) at the time 56th Avenue is opened west to Quebec Street. Encourage single family residential infill development on wned sites to the east ofPeoria Street and at scattered sites along Crown Boulevard and Andrews Drive. Explore development of community gardens as an interim use. Expansion of commercial zoning should not be allowed along these streets. Encourage the establishing of pre-schools located to conveniently serve neighborhooo families. Locations in existing commercial zoning are supported. New P. U.D. zoning for pre-schools on residential arterial or collector streets should be evaluated on a case by case basis for compatibility with present and future adjacent residential areas. Establish minimum building lot sizes in new residential subdivisions. A trend over the last ten years in Montbello has been to develop single family housing with R-2 zoning. The advantage in doing this is to gain slightly more density (reducing the land costs for each home) and achieve flexibility from the fixed R-lland area requirement of 6,000 square feet per unit. This should be supported in future rezoning requests for undeveloped land, with the condition that each subdivision lot contain a minimum of 5,000 square feet of land area and at least 3,000 square feet of unobstructed open space. A language change in the R-2 zone district regulations to accomplish this objective should also be evaluated. 10 Landowners City Council Landowners Home Builders Neighborhood Groups City Council Pre-school owners Landowners City Council Landowners Developers Zoning Administration Planning Office ..,

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I LZM-11 LZM-12 Seek to attract a developer for a new recreation vehicle (RV) commercial storage lot. Increasing numbers of Montbello residents own recreation vehicles and trailers. Zoning regulations limit their length to less than twenty-two feet and restrict where they may be parked on a residential property. An appeal for flexibility may be made to the Board of Adjustment-Zoning and a decision is then made on the basis of compatibility, safety, and legal criteria. The development of a privately owned and operated RV storage area is needed in the Montbello area. Such a storage area could be part of a general purpose mini-warehouse/ storage business. A storage area should not be located within the residential neighborhood. Suggested locations to explore include 1-1 and 1-2 zoned areas adjacent to Montbello and the Stapleton Airport site. Develop a town square at the comer of Chambers Road and 51st/48th Avenue as one in a series of town squares in the Gateway communities. The goal in the town squares will be to create lively places sometimes absent in suburban developments and avoid unattractive retail and commercial strips. Neighborhood retail shops and public buildings will be clustered around a park-like square. A mixed use P.U.D. is encouraged at this location, with the square located adjacent to Chambers Road and across from the existing shopping center. The P.U.D. rezoning should incorporate design guidelines adopted for town squares throughout the Gateway Area. The early construction of 48th A venue between Chambers Road and Tower Road is a high priority to begin to link together development in the new Gateway communities, Green Valley Ranch, Montbello, and future Aurora communities to the east of Piccadilly Road. 11 Business Developers Landowners Developers Planning Office City Council

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: il 'ii j; :i 'i's..c4 !ll : ......... I I I B-4 R-1 Single-Una Detached Dwellings, Density .. 7.3 dwelling unitsiacre. R-2 Single and Multi-Unit Dwellings, Low Density. Density. 14.5 dwelling units/acre. R-2-A Murti-Unit Dwellings, Medium Dens1ty. Density" .8 dwelling unitsiacre {29 unrts/acre under PSG, depending on ope11-soace reqUirements). B-2 Ne1ghborhood Busin6$S District This district prov1des the retailing of commodrt1es classed as "convenience goods.' and the furnishing of certain personal services, to satisfy the daily am:J weekly household or personal needs of the residents of surrounding residential neighborhooos. The volume of pedestrian traffic in proportion to vehicular traffic entering the district is mvc:h higher than in other retail business districts. 8-3 Shooping Center District. This district is primarily to provide the retailing of most commodrti;,s and the furniShing of certain personal serviOH, satisfying all household and personal needs of the residents of surrounding residential communities. This diStrict 15 normally located on major arterial streets at or near the intersection with another maJOr arterial street so that is has good veh;cuiar accessibility. 8-4 General Business District. This district is intended to provide tor and encourage appropriate uses adjacent to artenal streets. and abutting residential d1stricts. Commercial uses inClude a wide variety of consumer and business services. 8-8 Intensive Generai 8us1nessNery H1gh Density Residential District. This district, primarily for activity centers, prov1des the concentration of retailing, personal and business services, as well as residential and cw!tura: -.ses at a necessary to efficiently be served by mass transrt This very ,ntense d1stnct 1S designed to serve the entire metropolitan area as an alternative to urban sprawL The regulations are des1gned to perm! a highly concentrated, ;ntensa development of the enumerated faciiit1es. PUD Planned Unit Deveiopment. PUD is a form ot development generally characterized by a unifieo site design for clwstenng ouiid1ngs and providing common open-space, density
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--.. co::; C,) """" < ,_ .-::= c.. ..2 C,) > ,...., >. ('l) ...... 0 t: 0 .5-< Unincorporated Adams County Work with Owners to Assure Compatibility Existing GVn Shopping Center Encourage Retail Development Town Square Focal Point Encourage Retail Deveiopment Aurora Encourage Retail Business Development Aurora LAND USE AND ZONING RECOMMENDATIONS GREEN VALLEY RANCH 13

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D. Green Valley Ranch Land Use Plan 1. Existing Land Uses and Zoning The westerly section of Green Valley Ranch that has thus far developed with single family homes is zoned R-1 and R-2. Neighborhood zoning to the east of Himalaya Road is R-2. Throughout Green Valley Ranch, much of the existing R-2 zoning would allow multi-unit dwellings (typically townhomes, duplexes, and triplexes), though only single family homes have been built. The shoppette on Tower Road at 48th A venue is part of a larger B3 shopping center zone district. The undeveloped land of Green Valley Ranch includes additional large areas of R-2 zoning. Higher density R-2-A multi-family zoning lies between Tower Road and Argonne Street, in smaller areas at the south end of the neighborhood, and along 48th Avenue at Ensenada Way. A large tract of intensive business zoning (B-8) is at the northeast comer of Tower Road and 48th A venue. This area is planned as a town center, with retail shopping and office-commercial development. Additional undeveloped shopping center zoning is located at 48th A venue and Himalaya Road (B-3) and an area south along Piccadilly Road (B-2). A strip of restricted B-4 business park zoning runs along the southern portion of Green Valley Ranch abutting Aurora's business park. An enclave of Adams County agriculturally-zoned land is located to the north of Martin Luther King Middle School and serves the neighborhood as a recreation vehicle storage area. Zoning in Aurora to the east of Piccadilly Road allows for single family attached and detached homes, with retail business zoning at Piccadilly Road and 38th A venue. Aurora zoning to the south allows offices and light industry, with retail shopping in an area along Tower Road. 14

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I 2. Green Valley Ranch Land Use and Zoning Recommendations LZGVR-1 Encourage good design and compatibility of retail development on B-3 and B-2 sites. As one in a series of town squares in the Gateway communities, a town square focal point should be encouraged in the B-3 zoning at the corner of Himalaya Road and 48th Avenue. Although Green Valley Ranch zoning for retail businesses is in three locations along major arterial streets, actual development will continue to compete with Aurora shopping to the south and east, and will depend on creation of a sufficient population base within convenient driving distances. The completion of 48th Avenue from Chambers Road east to E-470 is a top priority, in order to link together the population base of Green Valley Ranch, Airport Boulevard commuters, new Gateway communities, Montbello, and new Aurora communities. LZGVR-2 Monitor Green Valley Ranch R-2-A zoning over the next ten years to determine if it continues to make sense for the community. There are areas of multi-family zoning not only within Green Valley Ranch, but also in the adjacent future Aurora communities and adjacent future Gateway communities. If development does not occur, rezoning to R-1 or R-2 single family zoning should be considered, with conditions for minimum subdivision lot sizes and provision of open space. LZGVR-3 The RV storage area located within the enclave of Adams County will lose some of its openness and security as Green Valley Ranch builds out in this area. As development occurs near the lot, security and buffering solutions will need to be found if the lot remains at this location. Any future expansion of the lot into Denver will require rezoning, with consideration for security and buffering. LZGVR -4 Work with land owners and Adams County to assure the provision of public services and the continued compatibility of land uses on the small Adams County enclaves located at the northeast corner of Tower Road and 48th Avenue, and the southwest comer of Flanders Way and 48th Avenue. Explore alternatives, including possible annexation to Denver. 15 Implementing Agencies/Groups Landowners Developers Planning Office Landowners Planning Office Landowners Neighborhood Groups Landowners Planning Office

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II Mont6e{[o !J\[s.igfi6orfwot (jreen o/a{{ey !l(p,nc/i ', ," , Plan 1 A. Goals Develop convenient and attractive alternatives to auto travel, including pedestrian-friendly sidewalks, scenic bicycle trails, equestrian trails, upgraded RTD bus service, and new commuter rail service. Improve expressway and street access to and from Central and Downtown Denver. Assure quiet local residential streets. Maintain safe, attractive, efficient arterial "main'' streets at the edges of the neighborhoods. Provide convenient RTD bus transit service to all areas ofMontbello and Green Valk} Ranch. Develop attractive parkways along collector streets in Montbello. Complete a bikeway system linking local neighborhood activities and Denver's regional bikeway system. B. Overview of Existing Circulation, Transportation Systems, and Issues Montbello and Green Valley Ranch are both geographically located on the outer Denver's street, highway, rail, and bus transit networks. The expressway system (1-70. I I-270) provides quick and easy access to Downtown Denver, Stapleton Airport, the Den\t'f '1 Center, the Aurora Mall, Boulder, and mountain recreation. With this convenience of the expressway system, these neighborhoods have developed primarily as quiet. "bedroom'' communities, away from the activity of the City. Changes in transportation are coming to these communities. Among these changes will be the opening of Denver International Airport, the widening of the I-70 expressway, the construction of Airport Boulevard from I-70 to the new airport, the opening of 56th Avenue west to Quebec Street, the future development of a new Smith Road, and the future construction of a commuter rail line between Downtown Denver and the new airport. The Union Pacific Railroad will continue to provide rail freight service to the region. Traffic volumes will increase on edge roads such as 56th Avenue, 48th Avenue, Tower Road, Chambers Road, and Peoria Street. Over the next three years, Mont bello, new Gateway neighborhoods, and Green Valley Ranch will emerge at the cross-roads of a transportation network serving the Denver region and the Rocky Mountain West. These neighborhoods will continue to be quiet, good places to live, but no longer on the "outskirts" of the City. I-70 and I-225 Expressways The l-70 expressway provides the most direct and fastest access to and from Central and Downtown Denver. When expressway travel delays are experienced at the Stapleton Airport tunnels, alternatives are limited to much slower routes using Montview Boulevard, Colfax Avenue, or 13th/14th Avenue one-way streets. Improved access routes to and from Central and Downtown Denver are needed. 17

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In the future, the I-70 expressway will be widened to 12 lanes and the 1-70/1-225 interchanpt> expanded to handle new traffic to and from Denver International Airport. This expansion "' move expressway traffic closer to homes along the southern edge of the Concord area Montbello. For travel to and from Aurora, Southeast Denver, and the Denver Tech Center, 1-225 provides good travel times. This highway is scheduled to be widened ftrst to six lanes and to eight lanes. Chambers Road and Peoria Street serve as back-up routes for driving to and fnJt1': Aurora destinations. Transit Service R TD bus lines serve the Montbello neighborhood with 188 trips per day on Routes 44, 53, 121, and 47X. Ninety percent of homes in Montbello are within a three block walking distance of one of these lines. Evening and Sunday bus service is provided on all routes. A Park-n-Ride is located at the Montbello Plaza Shopping Center (Peoria Street at Albrook Drive), with express bus service provided between Montbello and Downtown Denver during peak morning and evening rush hour times. The Green Valley Ranch neighborhood is served by RTD Route 15 Ltd., with four trips into the City each morning and ftve trips from the City each afternoon. This bus line runs along East Colfax Avenue between Tower Road and Downtown. Mid-day, evening and Sunday service is not available. 18

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TRANSPORTATION No RID direct service is currently provided between the Montbello neighborhood and Green Valley Ranch neighborhood. Very limited connecting service is possible by transferring between routes on Colfax A venue. A regional high school, indoor and outdoor public swimming pools, recreation programs, and regional public library are located in Montbello. The region's middle school is located in Green Valley Ranch. The absence of transit service between these neighborhoods creates a hardship for transit-dependent residents. Commuter rail transit is envisioned to reach the Montbello and Green Valley Ranch neighborhoods when the final leg of a Downtown to Denver International Airport rail line is constructed. Bicycle Routes The neighborhoods in far northeast Denver will in the future be linked to the Denver regional bikeway system. This system consists of paved bike trails as well as bike routes on streets. When this bikeway system is complete, a cyclist will be able to ride from Denver International Airport, through the Gateway neighborhoods, through Montbello, along portions of Sand Creek, to Downtown Denver and west on bike trails that cross the Continental Divide to reach mountain resort communities. Emerald Strands is a new trail system master plan that will link the Montbello and Green Valley Ranch neighborhoods with parks, nature areas, lakes, and open space throughout the northeast metropolitan region. In Montbello, perimeter streets now have separated bike paths (Peoria Street, Chambers Road, and 56th Avenue). The system will need to find ways to expand to link homes, park areas, shopping, schools, recreation, RTD park-n-rides, and work places within the neighborhood. In Green Valley Ranch, bike paths are not yet developed. The High Line Canal, Western Gas Company right-of-way, and Colorado Interstate Gas open space are possible locations for new off-street bike trails. 19

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Neighborhood Edge Arterial Streets In both Mont bello and Green Valley Ranch, curvilinear internal street layouts encourage motorists to seek out the faster moving straight roads at the edges of the neighborhoods. These are the arterial "main" streets and include Peoria Street, Chambers Road, Tower Road, 56th A venue, and 48th Avenue. As new development occurs in the region, these roads will receive increased traffic. Picadilly Road and 40th A venue will also become arterial streets in the future. Internal Local Street System Within the neighborhoods, a series of curvilinear collector streets provide access to and from homes located on quiet side streets. Collector streets are not as heavily traveled as arterials, and function to "collect" traffic and lead motorists to the arterial "main" streets. Albrook Drive, Andrews Drive, Crown Boulevard, and 51st A venue are examples of collector streets in Montbello. Flanders Way, Himalaya Road, Malaya Street, and 45th A venue are examples of collector streets in Green Valley Ranch. Pedestrian Sidewalks and Trails All around Denver, new residential communities and new businesses are emphasizing convenient pedestrian access. Sidewalks and pedestrian paths allow residents to walk to recreation facilities, shopping, school, and bus stops. Sidewalks allow workers in business centers to walk to lunch over the noon hour. Americans are walking for health and fitness, as well as to reduce reliance on energy-wasting automobile trips. Sidewalks are normally constructed on new residential blocks prior to the building of homes. Sidewalks have also been incorporated into development of the Montbello Business Park to the west of Peoria Street. Surprisingly, the Peoria Street commercial district between Smith Road and Albrook Drive has developed with no planning for pedestrians. Montbello residents, office employees in the Montbello Business Park, and hotel guests must walk on dirt paths along Peoria Street to reach shopping, restaurants, and bus stops. 20

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i-n ..,.. NOTE: All traffic volumes are expected to increase at the time of the Denver International Airport opening and Develoment of Gateway Area. SOURCE: Denver Transportation Department 1990 TRAFFIC VOLUMES MONTBELLO/GREEN VALLEY RANCH 21

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Constroct Detached Parkway Development Do not Encroach onto Linear Greenbelt \ l New 48th A venue to connect with Airport Blvd. Interchange '--, .......... Tower Rd. S-outhbound tum Lanes \ (' I Protect Residential Character ______ ...,j'"'i'' TRANSPORTATION PLAN MONTBELLO/GREEN VALLEY RANCH 22 -

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C. Action Recommendations Recommendations Regional TR-1 TR-2 TR-3 TR-4 TR-5 TR-6 TR-7 Construct a roadway and open 56th Avenue between Havana Street and Quebec Street to provide relief from traffic bottle necks on the I-70 expressway. Construct a roadway and open Smith Road across the Stapleton Airport north/south runway after the opening of Denver International Airport. Construct 48th A venue between Chambers Road and Tower Road to provide access to and from the new Airport Boulevard interchange at 48th Avenue. Construct a communter rail line between Denver International Airport, Green Valley Ranch, future Gateway neighborhoods, Montbello, and Downtown Denver. Station lots and feeder circulator buses are recommended in Montbello and Green Valley Ranch. Increase the frequency of snow removal on collector and arterial streets to compensate for drifting conditions that develop in open suburban areas such as Montbello and Green Valley Ranch. Expand RTD bus line service to include convenient service between Green Valley Ranch and Montbello on weekdays and weekends, including through or connecting service between Green Valley Ranch and Downtown Denver. Establish new park-n-ride lots along Chambers Road in Montbello and along Tower Road in Green Valley Ranch. Recommendations Montbello TM-1 Construct 40th A venue along the southern boundary of the Montbello neighborhood adjacent to the 1-70 expressway. Use this street primarily for business related traffic and do not open up access at the Durham Court cui de sac. 23 Implementing Agencies/Groups Transportation Division New Airport Office Transportation Division Transportation Division Developers Regional Transportation District Transportation Division Regional Transportation District Regional Transportation District Implementing Agencies/Groups Transportation Division Developers

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TM-2 Construct attractive sound barriers and develop Colorado Dept. of Highways landscaping, including trees, along the edge of the Transportation Division Concord area of Montbello adjacent to the Planning Office reconstructed expressway interchange. Neighborhood Groups Explore the purchase of all homes located on the Durham Court cul de sac and urban design guidelines for the redevelopment of the cui de sac area. TM-3 Do not over-load internal collector streets with through Transportation Division traffic. On streets such as Crown Boulevard and Police Department Uvalda Street, explore the feasibility of installing stop signs at new locations, and other strategies to discourage speeding. TM-4 Eliminate the parking of semi rigs on residential Transportation Division streets. Place weight limit signs on streets intersecting Police Department Peoria Street, Chambers Road, and 56th A venue. Seek alternative parking areas for recreation vehicles and tractor/trailers in nearby industrial areas. TM-5 Develop an on-street bikeway system within the Parks and Recreation Montbello neighborhood to connect residential small Transportation Division areas, schools, parks, recreation facilities, churches, shopping areas, and the off-street bicycle trails. TM-6 Relieve Peoria Street congestion at the 1-70 Transportation Division expressway interchange by widening Peoria Street and Colorado Dept. of Highways opening new Smith Road and 56th Avenue alternative routes to Central Denver. TM-7 Explore developing an off-street bicycle trail along a Parks and Recreation new 40th A venue at the southern edge of Montbello, Transportation Division completing the bicycle trail system on all sides of the Developers neighborhood. TM-8 As 56th A venue expands to accommodate increased Transportation Division traffic between Central Denver and Denver International Airport, explore the construction of a limited access parkway north of the present 56th A venue on Rocky Mountain Arsenal property. Do not expand the present street to more than a six lane roadway and do not encroach onto the existing linear greenbelt along 56th Avenue. TM-9 Construct detached sidewalks (minimum five feet Developers space between curb and sidewalk) in all new Transportation Division developing residential and commercial areas. TM-10 Construct detached sidewalks along Peoria Street Developers between Smith Road and Albrook Drive in all Transportation Division locations where there are no pedestrian sidewalks. 24

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I M-11 TM-12 Determine where new or improved traffic signals and lane improvements are needed to provide safe and convenient traffic movements to and from the Montbello residential area along Peoria Street, Chambers Road, and 56th Avenue. Critical intersections include Chambers Road/ Andrews Drive, Chambers/46th Avenue, Chambers/Bolling Drive, Chambers/48th Avenue, Chambers/Maxwell Place, Chambers/56th Avenue, Peoria Street/Albrook Drive, Peoria/ Andrews Drive, Peoria/51st Avenue, Peoria/53rd Avenue, Peoria/56th Avenue, 56th Avenue/Uvalda Street, and 56th Avenue/Crown Boulevard. Redesign and rebuild Chambers Road north of the IM 70 expressway interchange to eliminate a safety hazard where seven lanes narrow to two lanes at the Aurora/Denver city limits. Recommendations .. GVR TGVR-1 TGVR-2 TGVR-3 Do not overMload internal, collector streets with through traffic. On streets such as Flanders and 45th Avenue, explore the feasibility of installing stop signs at new locations and other strategies to discourage speeding. Develop offstreet multiMuse trails along the High Line Canal and in the Western Gas Company and Colorado Interstate Gas Company rights-of-way. Construct detached sidewalks (minimum five feet space between curb and sidewalk) in all new developing residential and commercial areas. Complete the construction of 40th Avenue in the vicinity of Maramma Elementary School. 25 Transportation Division Transportation Division Implementing Agencies/GrouE! Transportation Division Parks and Recreation Transportation Division Water Department Gas Companies Developers Transportation Division Transportation Division Developers

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f}y{ont6effo (jreen 'T!affey !l(p,ndi A. Goals Promote Montbello and Green Valley Ranch as great neighborhoods in which to live. Encourage purchase of homes by families and individuals who will live in their home. Encourage sound management and a mix of income levels in rental single family homes and apartments. Increase property values. Reduce the number of new foreclosed properties. Actively market housing in a manner that encourages the multi-ethnic "United character of the neighborhoods. Continue the attractive showcase appearance of the neighborhoods. Manage HUD, VA, and bank owned vacant properties in a manner that is positi'e the neighborhoods. B. Overview of Existing Conditions and Issues Single family homes in Denver's far northeast neighborhoods exemplify \C' changing architectural design, home construction techniques, and suburban life styles. ranch style, split level, and Mediterranean style homes are found in "Old Montbello. built by Perlmack to the highest construction standards ever utilized in any subdivision in the Denver area. Homes that are smaller, but well built and inexpensively priced, were constructed during the early 1970s in the north central area of Montbello. The area's newest homes, many with smaller lots, expanded floor plans for more living space, and utilizing new construction materials, are located in the Concord neighborhood (Southeast Montbello) and in the Green Valley Ranch neighborhood. There are today in Montbello a total of 5,600 single family homes and 1,250 apartment units. In Green Valley Ranch 1,100 single family homes have been constructed. Housing in Denver's far northeast area is among the City's newest, is suburban in character, and is diverse in architectural styles, floor areas, and selling prices. People of all income levels have chosen to live in Montbello and Green Valley Ranch for the excellent home values and the desirable quality of life found in these neighborhoods. Home Foreclosures From 1986 to 1990, the Montbello and Green Valley Ranch neighborhoods, and much of the Colorado Front Range, were affected by a sharp downturn in the Colorado economy. Families 27

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lost their homes when they could no longer make their monthly payments. Some moved out of state to find work. Throughout the Denver region during these years there were more houses for sale than purchasers to buy them, which caused foreclosed homes to sit vacant in neighborhoods. At the beginning of 1990, between 4% and 5% of all houses in the Montbello and Green Valley Ranch neighborhoods were vacant and in foreclosure. Over a 12 month period, sales increased dramatically. In Montbello alone the number of HUD properties dropped from 250 to 60 between January and November 1990. Most homes that went into foreclosure have sold within several months. Attractive floor plans, home upgrades, and reasonable list prices have been recognized by homeseekers to offc.r exceptionally good values. Selling Prices When the economic downturn hit Colorado Front Range during the mid and late 1980's, it occurred at a time of high real prices, escalating interest rates, and at a tant' that found many new homebuyers utilinnJ 3-2-1 buydowns and other "creauve fmancing packages. In Montbello and Green Valley Ranch (and throughout the Colorado Front Range) the problem fed upon itself. selling prices dropped, there was more motivation for homeowners to walk from their mortgage payments, which in tum added further to a decline in home values. The over supply of housing and decline in housing prices especially affected those homes selling for under $90,000 --the selling price of many of the homes in Denver's far northeast neighborhoods. Single Family Housing: Owner and Renter Occupied Citywide the percentage of occupied single family homes that are owner-occupied is 80.3%. In Montbello, owner occupancy is 80.6o/o and in Green Valley Ranch the rate is 93.8%, based on the 1990 Census. Mont bello is thus near the citywide norm and Green Valley Ranch is higher than the citywide norm for proportion of occupied single family homes that are owner occupied. 28

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Apartment Rental Housing The Fountain View, Devonshire, Dunhill, and Sandstone apartments in Montbello contain 1,154 multi family rental units. There are an additional 96 units individually owned (condominiums) with many of these units rented. Rents in early 1990 ranged from $237 for a one bedroom apartment to $600 for a townhouse. Extensive upgrading and renovation work began in mid 1990 at several of the apartment communities. Housing for People of all Ethnic Groups JI()IJSING Among Denver's 68 neighborhoods, Montbello is one of the City's largest multi-cultural"United Nations" neighborhoods. Its population includes ethnic groups and cultures from all around the world. Nationwide, as many as twenty percent of all Americans move to a different home during any given year. As this movement takes place in Montbello, the ethnic background of households moving in and out of the neighborhood is slowly changing. Although people of all ethnic groups and cultures move to and from Montbello each week, Anglo and Hispanic households have moved out in slightly larger numbers than they have moved in, and Black and Asian households have moved to Montbello in slightly larger numbers than they have moved out. Census data show that between 1980 and 1990 the following population changes occurred: African American 7,345 (46.1%) to 10,188 (57.9%); Anglo American 5,962 (36.9%) to 4,464 (25.3%); Asian American 436 (2.7%) to 532 (3.0%); Hispanic American 2,217 (13.8%) to 2,209 (12.6%); and Native American 83 (.5%) to 111 (.6%). Home and Property Maintenance An attractive appearance in any neighborhood is important for the enjoyment of its residents, for maintaining property values, and to discourage vandalism. To accomplish this, city ordinances establish standards for the maintenance of residential property. Additionally, in Green Valley Ranch private covenants have been enforced by the homeowners since the first houses were built. These covenants set maintenance requirements not covered by city ordinances. 29

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Future Build Out In Montbello the last new homes were completed in 1988. In Green Valley Ranch a small number of new homes have continued to be built each year by the Writer and Richmond companies. Several new builders entered the Green Valley Ranch market during 1990 and 1991. Construction of Denver International Airport, development in the Airport Gateway Area, and redevelopment of the nearby Stapleton Airport site are expected to gradually stimulate real estate sales in the region, which will bring about a renewal of home construction. C. Action Recommendations H-1 H-2 H-3 Recommendations Spread the word that Montbello and Green Valley Ranch are great places to live, Market housing in the neighborhoods in conjunction wjth Denver International Airport, Airport Gateway, and Stapleton redevelopment. Identify a neighborhood housing group to take the lead in carrying out strategies in this plan. Membership should include representation from homeowners, home builders, apartment management, real estate brokers/agents, insurance agents, owners of investment properties, and renters. Establish attractive Welcome Center(s) to serve prospective homebuyers and renters. Provide an array of infonnation about Denver and the far northeast neighborhoods, including schools, recreation and parks programs, churches, nature areas, civic groups, and airport development. Explore staffing with developer assistance, Realtors, resident volunteers, or other arrangements. 30 Implementing Agencies/Groups Residents Planning Office New Airport Office Mayor's Office of Economic Development Neighborhood Housing Group Realtors Home Builders Neighborhood Groups Planning Office Neighborhood Housing Group Neighborhood Groups Developers Realtors Apartment Management Business Association Planning Office Denver Public Schools -

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H()USING H-4 Maintain a far northeast neighborhoods task force for Neighborhood Groups monitoring property up-keep and conditions, sales HUD trends, and disposal programs for HUD, VA and bank VA owned properties. Do not allow block sales. Realtors Coordinate with neighborhood groups, HUD, VA, Planning Office Realtors, and Denver Planning and Community Development Office. H-5 Develop an attractive neighborhood brochure for use Neighborhood Groups by Realtors, residents, apartment management, and Planning Office Denver and Aurora employers. Highlight Realtors neighborhood services and amenities. Apartment Management H-6 Market apartments and homes to all horne seekers. Realtors Focus special efforts to airport construction workers, Apartment Management Denver International Airport employees, and airline Airport Office employees. Do not permit mobile homes in northeast Planning Office annexation area. Zoning Administration H-7 Develop an affmnative marketing code for real estate Neighborhood Housing Group brokers and agents listing homes in the far northeast Non-profit Housing Advocacy neighborhoods. Encourage use of participating brokers Groups and agents who agree to show homes to all ethnic Realtors groups, specifically including homeseekers of under-represented ethnic groups. Sponsor Realtor training and recognition events. H-8 Monitor and enforce laws governing illegal real estate Neighborhood Housing Group steering practices. Closely watch sales in areas with Colorado State Civil Rights concentrations of HUD and VA properties. Commission Colorado State Real Estate Commission Non-profit Housing Advocacy Groups Planning Office Realtors H-9 Publicize low interest Denver housing bond money Planning Office available for first time homebuyers. Explore a special Realtors set-aside of single family housing bond money for Non-profit Housing Advocacy existing houses in Montbello and Green Valley Ranch Groups and/or for HUD, VA, and bank owned properties. H-10 Host a Denver area Home buyers Fair in a Montbello Realtors hotel. Feature well known local or national Lenders personalities (such as the Mayor, Governor, sports Neighborhood Housing Group figure, TV anchor). Provide speakers offering Planning Office purchase tips and booths set up by real estate Non-profit Housing Advocacy companies and lenders. Groups 31

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HOUSING:, H-11 H-12 H-13 H-14 H-15 H-16 H-17 Encourage major real estate companies to locate offices in Denver's far northeast neighborhoods. Form a rental property owners association to network and assist members with tenant problems, marketing ideas, and coordination with the Neighborhood Housing Group. Develop strategies to attract middle income tenants. Explore active marketing to airlines, Lowry, Fitzsimmons, and Denver International Airport personnel. Develop a "Neighborhood Welcome" service for new residents. Provide covenant information (GVR) and zoning code regulations (GVR and Montbello). Provide local business coupons and information about neighborhood recreation, civic groups, and churches. Sponsor several picnics or dinner events each year for new residents. Publicize and encourage use of foreclosure assistance/prevention services. Monitor HUD homeless initiative to assure neighborhood compatibility, maintenance of properties, and provision of support services by non-profit group. Limit the number of homes to no more than 5% of the HUD properties in each neighborhood (Montbello and Green Valley Ranch), and no more than one home on any face block. Support and implement all existing Federal and intergovernmental (City of Denver and Denver Housing Authority) guidelines for the location of DHA owned homes. Dispersed housing should only be considered in neighborhoods not impacted by concentrations of lower income households. Priority should be given by DHA to purchase homes in non-impacted areas. Enforce City zoning and property maintenance codes governing the use and appearance of residential and business properties. Explore dividing the far northeast neighborhoods into subareas, each with a group or person responsible for monthly monitoring of addresses with violations. Convene regular monthly meetings with City enforcement staff for updating and progress reports. 32 Neighborhood Housing Group Planning Office Real Estate Companies Neighborhood Housing Group Rental Property Owners Planning Office Neighborhood Housing Group Neighborhood Groups Business Association Churches Home Builders Non-profit Housing Advocacy Groups Planning Office HUD Realtors Neighborhood Housing Group HUD Planning Office Denver Housing Authority Neighborhood Groups Neighborhood Support Service Zoning Administration Planning Office

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H-18 H-19 H-20 H-22 Publish periodically in neighborhood newspapers and newsletters descriptions of zoning use and code maintenance regulations and phone numbers to call for assistance. Promote the far northeast area with booths at real estate board activities, home shows, the annual People's Fair, and similar events. Market housing affirmatively in the metropolitan media through paid advertising. Manage the media image of the far northeast neighborhoods through special events, ribbon cuttings, grand openings, local celebrations, and other positive events. Meet with media representatives to assure fair presentation of news. Ask for assistance of public officials. Celebrate the people of Montbello and Green Valley Ranch with block parties and local neighborhood festivals, parades, picnics, and other events. 33 Neighborhood Housing Group Neighborhood Groups Neighborhood Groups Neighborhood Housing Group Realtors Home Builders Realtors Apartment Management Home Builders Neighborhood Groups Neighborhood Schools Planning Office Realtors Residents Neighborhood Groups Schools Churches Civic Groups

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, r Mont6eo fJ\{g,ign6orfwoa (jreen 'llalley !l(p.ncn A. Goals Maintain strong recreation programs. Provide programs that serve people of all ages. Develop an array of recreation, education, fitness, hobby, personal growth, and leisure time activities. Provide family strengthening programs. Provide convenient hours for recreation. Make recreation opportunities accessible by walking or bicycling. Utilize all community resources (parks system, recreation centers, churches, Community School, schools). Continue to maintain facilities in which people feel safe and comfortable in using recreation programs. Plan for new and expanded recreation facilities that will accommodate future population growth and changing demographics. Increase staffing and programming. Develop broad-based funding sources. B. Overview of Existing Conditions and Issues Because the Montbello and Green Valley Ranch neighborhoods are isolated from recreation facilities in other parts of the City, there is a need to develop new and creative models for recreation and cultural programs that will serve both the 20,000 current residents as well as future newcomers to the area. Evening education, fitness, and recreation activities are proposed in neighborhood centers located within easy walking or bicycling distance for all residents. As these programs are initiated, they will complement a new indoor swimming pool and an expanded offering of Community School enrichment classes on the Montbello High School campus and improved recreation programs at the existing Montbello Recreation Center. The goal is to offer strong education, recreation, cultural, and personal growth opportunities for people of all ages and interests, using both present facilities as well as new future expanded facilities. 35 Residents are served by the Montbello Recreation Center located on Albrook Drive at Crown Boulevard. Center facilities provide for weight lifting, basketball, wrestling, aerobics, crafts, summer swimming, as well as other activities. The center is immensely popular with youth and adults in the neighborhood. The need for recreation and cultural activities is exceeding the present capacity of the center.

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Programs for youth are the top priority. An emerging need is for activities that serve senior residents, particularly in the Montbello neighborhood that is now 25 years old and has a growing population over the age of 55. There is also a continuing request to more closely match programs with the interests of young adults and families. Finally, the 12,000 workers in the nearby business parks may also be potential users of neighborhood recreation and cultural programs. Seven parks are located in the Montbello neighborhood, including Central Park adjacent to Montbello High School. Central Park has tennis courts and ball fields for shared use with the high school campus. Two parks are located in the Green Valley Ranch neighborhood, including the East Ranch Park with a newly opened swimming pool. Summer day camp programs for youth are sponsored through the Denver Parks and Recreation Department in several of the parks. Two new large parks are planned in the nearby Gateway area. Within these parks will be a lake, jogging paths, picnic facilities, and nature areas. A new 18-hole golf course is planned to the north of Green Valley Ranch and east of Montbello. Four elementary schools are located in the Montbello neighborhoods: Amesse (adjacent to Elmendorf Park), Barney Ford (adjacent to Ford Park), McGlone (across the street from Civic Center Park), and Oakland. Maramma Elementary School and Martin Luther King Middle School are schools in Green Valley Ranch. The facilities of these schools are the among the best in any school district in the Denver metropolitan area. Each has a gymnasium, auditorium, multi-purpose lunch room, library, and class rooms. A Community School is located on the Montbello High School campus. The Community School concept is inclusive of adult continuing education, adult personal growth classes, college courses, evening youth classes, and other educational enrichment opportunities which residents may wish to develop. There is a unique opportunity in the Montbello and Green Valley Ranch neighborhoods to create new recreation, education, and cultural activities through the involvement of area residents and businesses, the City's Parks and Recreation Department, the Montbello Community School, and Denver Public Schools. 36 ...,

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I .J RECREATION Montbello currently has six churches that have their own building facilities. Green Valley Ranch does not yet have a church with a building. Neighborhood churches are an additional resource for facilities and varied education, recreation, and social programs. Privately-operated commercial recreation (movie theaters, bowling, miniature golf, water slides, swimming, and the like) are available nearby in Aurora and Commerce City. In addition, several public recreation facilities in Aurora and Commerce City partially serve Montbello and Green Valley Ranch residents. Golf and recreation are also accessible at Fitzsimmons Army Hospital for active and retired military personnel. C. Action Recommendations RR-1 RR-2 RR-3 RR-4 RR-5 RR-6 Recommendations Regional Develop expanded day time/evening programs at the Community School on the Montbello High School campus. The new indoor swimming pool on campus should be designed with outdoor patio access for summer use. The pool. gym, lunch room, and other campus areas should be available for evening Community School, college courses, and special interest classes. Develop a variety of senior service and recreation programs. Encourage neighborhood residents to volunteer to teach special interest classes through the Community School and neighborhood recreation centers. To meet the recreation needs of population growth in the far northeast area of Denver, explore establishing new recreation center facilities in areas that can better serve the existing communities and in areas where population growth is occurring. Form a "Friends of Recreation" advisory board to work with Parks and Recreation, Denver Public Schools, and Montbello Community School, in coordinating area. wide recreation. community education, and cultural programs. "Friends of Recreation" could also carry out special fundraising events to benefit neighborhood recreation. Construct a new public golf course in the Gateway Area. 37 Implementing Agencies/Groups Montbello Community School Parks and Recreation Dept. Neighborhood Groups Parks and Recreation Dept. Montbello Community School Neighborhood Churches Parks and Recreation Dept. Montbello Community School Residents Parks and Recreation Dept. Neighborhood Groups Residents Parks and Recreation Dept. Neighborhood Groups Residents Landowners Parks and Recreation Dept.

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RR-7 Develop new athletic playing fields for soccer and Landowners other team sports in the Gateway and Stapleton Airport Parks and Recreation Dept. development areas. RR-8 Determine the feasibility for new privately owned and Business Owners operated recreation businesses such as bowling, Mayor's Office of Economic theaters, roller skating, and indoor tennis. Development Recommendations Montbello lm.Qlementing AgenciesLGrou:gs rJ"'">RM-1 Establish neighborhood family recreation and resource Parks and Recreation Dept. centers at each of the four elementary schools. Centers Denver Public Schools should include a variety of recreation and family Neighborhood Groups oriented programs and be open after school and evenings. Utilize gymnasium, multi-purpose lunch rooms, auditorium, and library facilities. Focus on activities that are less equipment intensive, such as soccer, basketball, aerobics, karate, family enrichment, and cultural classes. Centers should be easily accessible by walking or bicycling from home. RM-2 At the Montbello Recreation Center emphasize Parks and Recreation Dept. programs requiring special equipment (weights, Neighborhood Groups outdoor swimming, crafts, wrestling, and the like), senior programs, and specialized recreation activities. RM-3 Upgrade playground equipment at neighborhood parks. Parks and Recreation Dept. Parks People 38

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I e Family Recreation/Resource Center A Community Recreation Center Community School RESOURCE CENTERS MONTBELLO 39

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RGVR-1 Recommendations Green Valley Ranch Establish a neighborhood family' recreation and resource center at Martin Luther King Middle School. The center should include a variety of programs for families and youth and be open after school and evenings. Utilize gymnasium, multi-purpose lunch roomst auditoriumt and library facilities. Focus on activities that are less equipment intensive, such as soccer, basketball, aerobics, karate, family enrichment, and cultural classes. I i MARTIN LUTHER KING MIDDLE SCHOOL Implementing Agencies/Groups Parks and Recreation Dept. Denver Public Schools Neighborhood Groups !----------------------------.. ----------------------.----------Family Recreation/Resource Center RESOURCE CENTERS GREEN VALLEY RANCH 40

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I !Mont6e({o !!{r,igli6orfwoa fjreen o/al'fey !RJmc{i !!{r,igli6orfiooa A. Goals Provide adequate, convenient, and competitive neighborhood retail goods and services to the residents of far northeast Denver. Provide employment and business opportunities to the residents of far northeast Denver. Demonstrate neighborhood support of the retail businesses so as to enable them to be successful in meeting neighborhood shopping needs and maximize occupancy rates. B. Overview of Existing Conditions and Issues The adequate and convenient provision of retail goods and services is another important component of any residential neighborhood. The liveability and desirability of a neighborhood depends not only on transportation, schools, parks, and other public facilities, but on available, competitive, and attractive neighborhood retail shopping areas. The original master plans for Montbello and Green Valley Ranch included retail centers, of various sizes and types, located throughout the communities to meet the neighborhood shopping needs of the residents. A number of retail centers and shopping areas, containing approximately 60 retail businesses, have been built and have served the area for years. Despite the presence of a number of neighborhood sized shopping areas, there is some disappointment over the lack of larger stores and community sized or even regionally sized shopping centers closer to Montbello and Green Valley Ranch. The reason private developers and retailers have not located larger stores and centers in far northeast Denver is the lack of a sufficient population base in the market area that would enable the stores to be successfully supported. The physical isolation of the area (with little or no population to the west, east and north) places far northeast Denver at the edge of a supportable market area. Developers of larger retail stores and centers have located in Aurora (particularly the Aurora Mall area) because they can draw from a much larger population base within a 3 to 4 mile radius of the centers. Until the residential and employment growth stimulus occurs from the construction and operation of the new Denver International Airport, and the adjacent Airport Gateway area, these market realities will be relatively unchanged. Therefore, the emphasis of this plan must be to strengthen the existing neighborhood shopping and employment areas while laying the foundation to secure larger centers in the future as growth in the market area allows. Retail development in Mont bello and Green Valley Ranch has been mixed. While a number of shopping centers and businesses have been built and succeeded in serving the residents' neighborhood shopping needs, there have been a variety of concerns and disappointments with retail on the part of both the residential and business communities. Despite the needs and efforts of residents and business people for a vital neighborhood serving retail business presence, the community shopping centers continue to struggle with very high vacancy rates -to the neighborhoods' detriment. 41

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RETAIU,, ," To address these concerns and provide possible solutions, the Denver Planning and Community Development Office initiated, in October 1987, an investigation into the neighborhood shopping centers at Chambers Road and 48th Avenue (Chambers Place), Albrook Drive and Peoria Street (Montbello Plaza), Peoria Street and 47th Avenue (Albrook Center), and Tower Road and 48th A venue (Green Valley Ranch Center). Input was received from a variety of retail development experts, property owners, merchants, city officials, and neighborhood residents. Demographic data was obtained as was information on the history of the centers and the community, leasing rates, tenant recruitment history, building design, and merchandising techniques. The major findings of the 1987 study identified three problem areas: 1) The Mont bello/Green Valley Ranch neighborhoods were not supporting existing commercial areas. The centers had a functional vacancy rate of about 75%. Private market studies estimated that 70% of all grocery sales and 95% of all other retail sales occur outside Montbello, and indeed outside Denver. For example, Aurora shopping (including Aurora Mall) is located within just a 4 to 10 minute drive of most Montbello homes. 2) The commercial centers were not providing adequate support or service to the community. This problem has several interrelated aspects. There is no obvious economic incentive to lease or re-lease major portions of the existing centers. Current lease rates were improperly priced for the target market. The target market population has not been clearly defined, either by the shopping center owners or by the merchants. Centers have experienced excessive turnover of tenants due in part to limited business knowledge. Lastly, there are physical problems associated with the commerciaVretail spaces as they presently exist--problems such as physical layout, signage, accessibility, and age. 3) Far northeast Denver (specifically Montbello) is inaccurately understood and has an internal as well as external image problem. External perceptions of the community's ethnic population, community facilities, zoning enforcement, crime, police protection, average income, and family size do not reflect actual conditions. A sense of community and self-pride is generally very w.eak. The study report concluded with some initial recommendations to begin addressing the findings. A high priority was to organize the business community so that their problems could be undertaken more effectively as a group rather than individually. Together, the City, property owners, and merchants have begun to implement the initial recommendations, including the formation and incorporation of the Far Northeast Denver Business Association (FNDBA), the publication and distribution of A Shopping Guide To Far Northeast Denver, FNDBA's financial 42

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II RETAIL. support of several community organizations and causes, and FNDBA' s educational forums for the wider business community. In addition, the property owners and City have continued to market the vacant spaces in the shopping centers -with mixed success. The Montbello Plaza Center has shown a dramatic rise in its occupancy rate between 1989 and 1990, going from 22% to 75%. Chambers Place has continued to struggle with a high vacancy rate ( 49%) despite lowering their lease rates to a realistic level. Green Valley Ranch Center has an occupancy rate of around 20%, unchanged in the past several years. Albrook Center has an occupancy rate of 80%, up from only .20% in 1987. Despite some progress and success, the basic problems identified in the study remain. Residents are still not supporting the businesses in their area and much of their income for neighborhood retail expenditures is still going outside the neighborhood, particularly to Aurora. The business community, despite the formation of the FNDBA, needs to be much more committed to solving their problems and to providing more support and retail services to the community. A good start has been made to address the retail needs of far northeast Denver but much remains to be done. 43

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C. Action Recommendations To address the challenges and opportunities in the existing and prospective shopping areas of Montbello and Green Valley Ranch, an action plan of strategies is summarized below. These strategies have evolved from the original commercial workshop study, were refined by the FNDBA, and most recently were updated by business and residential representatives of the Retail Development Subcommittee preparing this plan. The City, property owners, merchants, business and neighborhood groups, and other responsible parties need to continue working together to undertake these recommended actions and to develop and implement further strategies as necessary. These recommendations are intended to focus upon existing retail areas as well as to compliment efforts to attract new retail, office, warehouse, and other appropriate uses to Montbello, Green Valley Ranch, and the future Gateway neighborhoods. RD-1 RD-2 RD-3 RD-4 RD-5 Recommendations Prepare marketing and public relations materials (including a demographic profile) promoting the positive image and attributes of Montbello and Green Valley Ranch, each of the shopping areas, and the community in general. Coordinate with the marketing efforts of Denver International Airport, Greater Denver Chamber of Commerce, and private companies. Present marketing materials to prospective tenants, developers, residents, and the media. Provide technical assistance referral to existing and future business owners and operators on such topics as marketing, accounting, financing, personnel, business planning, management, purchasing, and merchandising. Market the centers and available properties to prospective feasible retail, service, non-profit, and other appropriate users. When additional designations become available, designate Montbello and Green Valley Ranch as a City "Neighborhood Business Revitalization Area" as soon as feasible in order to receive focused and priority City resources to implement these and related strategies. Construct 48th Avenue (at least 2lanes) between Chambers Road and Tower Road to connect Montbello and Green Valley Ranch with each other and with the new Airport Boulevard interchange and future Gateway neighborhoods. 44 Implementing Agencies/Groups Regional Business Association Neighborhood Groups Planning Office Mayor's Office of Economic Development Property owners Merchants Business owners Regional Business Association Mayor's Office of Economic Development Property owners Leasing agents Regional Business Association Planning Office Mayor's Office of Economic Development Planning Office Regional Business Association Neighborhood Groups Property owners Transportation Division Developers

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RD-6 Maintain an organized and pro-active business Regional Business Association association in the area through attention to Property owners membership, work program implementation and Merchants development, outreach to the business community with Planning Office informational meetings, assistance on technical Residents matters, participation in the development of marketing Neighborhood Groups plans, capturing new airport related business, and active leadership in all business community activities. In essence, the business association should function as an area "Chamber of Coil,lmerce." RD-7 Seek assistance from the Mayor's Office of Economic Regional Business Association Development in working with the merchants and Merchants property owners to maintain and increase business Property owners employment in the area. Neighborhood Groups Planning Office Mayor's Office Development RD-8 Businesses (individually and through participation in a Merchants regional business association) should become more Property owners visibly involved in supporting community activities. Regional Business RD-9 Shopping center owners should continue working with Shopping Center owners the City. merchants, prospective tenants, regional business association, and others to upgrade their center's physical layout, appearance, accessibility, signage, and to lease their space at realistic lease rates. RD-10 Work to make residents in the community more aware Regional Business Association of and supportive of existing merchants, possibly Neighborhood Groups through the increased use of promotions, incentives, and special projects. RD-11 Improve and expand transportation connections to, Planning Office from, and through the Montbello and Green Valley Transportation Division Ranch shopping areas. For example, the reuse of Surrounding Cities and Stapleton International Airport should permit the Counties extension of 56th Avenue west from Havana Street to Commerce City and possibly Havana Street south into Aurora. RD-12 Conduct a market study to identify the realistic target Mayor's Office of market population as well as the types and sizes of Economic Development retail stores which the market can feasibly support. Planning Office Regional Business Association RD-13 Explore improving the availability of public services in Mayor's Office of Economic the area such as locations for motor vehicle Development registration, drivers' license renewal, and utilities bill Planning Office payment. Regional Business Association 45

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RD-14 Explore improving accessibility to emergency medical services. 46 Department of Public Safety Planning Office Department of Health and Hospitals

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... !Mont6elt'o !N!igfi6orfwoa qreen o/affey !l{p;nc./i 9{jigli6orfwoa A. Goals Knit together the design character of the existing neighborhoods with the surrounding areas as they develop. Link together the regional road network, drainage basins, trails, and park system. Accentuate Irondale Gulch as a neighborhood amenity. Develop attractive parkway landscaping including trees along major streets and roadways. Announce important street gateways with design techniques including distinctive signage, landscaping, lighting, and other architectural elements. Emphasize important views of Downtown Denver and vistas of the Continental Divide in all public and private projects. Create high quality comniercial developments which emphasize pedestrian activity and have continuity of character in form and materials. Emphasize the High Line Canal as a neighborhood amenity. B. Overview of Existing Conditions and Issues Montbello and Green Valley Ranch are developing as master planned communttles. The neighborhoods are suburban in character, as evidenced by their meandering subdivision layouts with curvilinear streets. Both communities enjoy spectacular mountain views and large natural open space areas nearby. The surrounding mostly vacant land and the location of Montbello and Green Valley Ranch in the northeastern most portion of the City have contributed to their isolation from other Denver neighborhoods. Many people perceive these communities not as a part of Denver, but as separate suburbs or as part of Aurora. The challenge is to blend and integrate Denver's urban design elements, such as street trees, parks, parkways, and gateways, into Montbello and Green Valley Ranch 47

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The northeast area is entering into a time of growth and change. This growth presents an exciting opportunity for Mont bello and Green Valley Ranch to extend urban design plans and considerations that will maintain and enhance the quality of development in the two neighborhoods. Irondale Gulch Irondale Gulch is a thirty-two mile long natural watershed that begins in Aurora and continues northwesterly through Denver's Gateway and Mont bello areas, the Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Commerce City, and Adams County to finally reach the South Platte River. For thousands of years, the gulch (or creek) has flowed through this area. Because the land is nearly table-top flat, the water in most places did not carve out a deep channel and the area that is now Montbello became naturally lush grasslands after a heavy rainfall. There were scattered cottonwood trees and native grasses, similar to what can today be viewed north of 56th Avenue at Uvalda Street, or along First Creek to the north of Green Valley Ranch. When the land that is now Montbello was annexed into Denver in 1965, a drainage solution needed to be found to provide for the historic flow of Irondale Gulch and to allow for new building development. The relocation of the gulch into concrete paved open channels in the median of streets was the solution chosen. This solution became a part of the City's 1965 annexation agreement. This drainage solution of constructing a channel for a creek or gulch alongside a street was fairly common around the country during the 1960's and 1970's. Locally in Colorado, similar waterways are found in Aurora, and Colorado Springs. Within Denver, gulches in new subdivisions were usually kept behind houses or in a linear park. Goldsmith Gulch, Harvard Gulch, Lakewood Gulch, and Weir Gulch are examples of this land development pattern: waterway (sometimes concrete lined) located behind homes or in a landscaped park area. Cherry Creek through Central Denver is most like Irondale Gulch in terms of location in the median of a street. The Irondale Gulch waterways are visually prominent to Montbello residents and visitors. Twenty thousand to 30,000 view the waterways on a day to day basis as they traverse along the gulch by auto, bicycle, or walking. The existing channels are constructed of concrete, with most sections having irrigated grass or creeping junipers adjacent to the channel. 48

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URBAN DESIGN In new developing areas today, gulches are viewed as a natural amenity that should be maintained in a natural state whenever possible. Thus, in the Airport Gateway Development Area, drainage solutions emphasize detention ponds and maintaining the natural condition of streams flowing through the area. There is sometimes disappointment expressed in the Montbello neighborhood about the open Irondale Gulch channels in the street medians, as allowed in the 1965 annexation agreement and constructed by the developers. While it is impossible to undo 25 years of development, it may be possible to transform the gulch into an attractive neighborhood focal point as has been done in some other Denver neighborhoods. High Line Canal The High Line Canal is 71 miles long, beginning in South Platte Canyon southwest of Denver, and ending to the north of Green Valley Ranch. It was built between 1879 and 1883 by the South Platte Land Company which sold land on the eastern plains together with the water rights. Today under the ownership of the Denver Water Board, the canal runs primarily east/west through Green Valley Ranch. It still exists in its natural state and carries water intermittently throughout the year. The canal and the adjacent service road create a natural open space through Green Valley Ranch. Gas Pipeline Western Gas Supply Company has an underground natural gas line that runs from the southeast to northwest through the Green Valley Ranch neighborhood. The gas company mows the right-ofway three times a year. Ground covering consists mainly of native vegetation and is not developed as a walking trail. 49

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URBAN DESIGN Design Standards in Business Zone Districts Undeveloped land zoned for business (B-2, B-3, B-4, B-8) provides opportunities for creating interesting neighborhood focal points and attractive business areas in the Montbello and Green Valley Ranch neighborhoods. Strip suburban commercial development is strongly discouraged in these areas. To encourage high quality development, all new construction should adhere to design standards similar to those for town squares in the adjacent Airport Gateway Area. It is recognized that site constraints may sometimes require modification of these design standards to fit specific locations. Commercial area general design guidelines are as follows: X Orient buildings to face a street or landscaped public plaza. X Locate parking to the rear of buildings or shops. X Primary building entries should be from a street or plaza. 1 Development should build to, or nearly to, the property line adjoining the street or plaza. Provide large rear setbacks to allow for and encourage parking and service to occur behind the buildings. X Tree plantings and solid screening fences should separate business zoned areas from adjoining residential properties. X Create street-level interest by requiring active ground floor uses with store windows facing the plaza or street. X Limit building facade materials to masonry, brick, brick veneer, stone, or stucco. Synthetic materials which imitate natural or traditional materials should be avoided. X Visually link all business areas to nearby residential areas by pedestrian sidewalks and bicycle paths. X Public plazas should include trees, grass, flower beds, walkways, benches, and other pedestrian amenities. X Develop special street signage to emphasize neighborhood plazas. Neighborhood Gateways and Welcome Signs In many Denver and suburban neighborhoods there is interest in highlighting the gateway or entrance to neighborhood areas. Landscaping features, monument signs, unique lighting, and special paving are examples of gateway treatments. The Green Valley Ranch neighborhood has a handsome brick monument sign surrounded by landscaping. The Concord small neighborhood area within Montbello has two monument signs and landscaping on Chambers Road at 46th 50 -

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[jRBi\.N DESIGN Avenue. Peoria Street median landscaping north of I-70 provides an inviting and attractive gateway to Montbello. Tree Planting There is a growing appreciation for what trees contribute to our quality of life. Trees are good to the environment as they reduce air pollution and create shade that cools nearby homes and streets. Along major streets they give a distinctive identity and character to a neighborhood. Trees increase property values as they beautify a shopping area, residential block, or individual residential property. Older areas of Montbello in the vicinity of Silverman Park, Elmendorf Park, Falcon Park, and Ford Park have shade trees approaching maturity. Trees are sparse in newer areas. Some of the parkways along the Irondale Gulch waterways have space for trees but no areas have yet been planted with trees. In Green Valley Ranch, as new homes have been built trees have often been included in the landscaping package provided by the builder. Key entry points into the Green Valley Ranch neighborhoods have also had trees planted in the medians or along the edges of the street. C. Action Recommendations UDR-1 UDR-2 RecommendationsRegional Designate as parkways all edge streets, including Peoria Street, Chambers Road, 56th Avenue, Piccadilly Road, 48th Avenue, and streets along the Irondale Gulch channels. Landscape to enhance and preserve significant views of mountains and Downt<;>wn Denver. 51 Implementing Agencies/Groups Parks Department. City Council Parks Department Developers Planning Office

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UDR-3 UDR-5 Develop and encourage use of design standards on land zoned for business. These standards should be compatible with those used in the adjacent Airport Gateway Area. Consider Citywide requirements for planting a specified number of trees for each home in new residential subdivisions. Develop site specifications in new subdivisions that consider the operation of trash collection systems. Exlstlog Irondale Gulch c:b8llllels *: Parkway median development (existing inigation) Parkway median development (irrigation needed) 1111. Parkway median development (irrigation needed and reconfiguralion of channel) 52 Landowners Developers Planning Office Developers Zoning Administration Planning Office City Council Public Works Zoning Administration IRONDALE GULCH PARKWAYS MONTBELLO

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-.fo 'i i! "ij) !" l 1
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UDIG-2 UDIG-3 Action Recommendations Montbello Irondale Gulch Create scenic landscaped areas along Irondale Gulch channels through planting of trees and other plant materials. Plant trees and landscape the Irondale Gulch parkway medians along Andrews Drive from Peoria Street to Crown Boulevard; Tulsa Court between Albrook Drive and Andrews; Uvalda Street between 51st Avenue and 56th Avenue; 51st Avenue between Uvalda and Bolling Drive; Maxwell Place between Uvalda and Sable Street; and 53rd Avenue between Durham Court and Chambers Road. As channel side walls deteriorate, evaluate new wall design possibilities for wall replacement through the Wastewater Department's annual channel maintenance program. Develop detailed short and long tenn parkway design specifications, including a standardized replacement panel design that provides for trees and grass, and addresses hydraulic considerations. Install irrigation and plant trees and landscape the Irondale Gulch parkway medians on Andrews Drive between Crown Boulevard and 46th A venue, on 46th Avenue between Andrews Drive and Eugene Way, and on 51st Avenue between Bolling Drive and Durham Court. As channel side walls deteriorate, evaluate new wall design possibilities for wall replacement through the Wastewater Department's annual channel maintenance program. Develop detailed short and long term parkway design specifications, including a standardized replacement panel design that provides for trees and grass. and addresses hydraulic considerations. 54 Implementing Agencies/Groups Parks Department Wastewater Management Transportation Division Planning Office Parks Department Wastewater Management Planning Office Landowners Developers Parks Department Wastewater Management Planning Office Landowners Developers -

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UDIG-4 Landscape along Irondale Gulch in the median of 46th Avenue between Eugene Way and Chambers Road. Reconstruct concrete channel wa1ls (top section) with landscaped sections integrally attached to the concrete lower wa1l sections to avoid undermining and collapse. Reconfiguration should take place as channel walls and bottoms in the existing channels suffer from damage or deterioration which may require restoration and replacement Segment the channel improvement areas from one bridge to the next. one at a time. as areas become defective. lnstall irrigation and plant trees and landscape. Develop detailed parkway design specifications for this section of the Irondale Gulch, including construction and maintenance costs. URBAN DESIGN Parks Department Wastewater Management Planning Office Landowners Developers === 5fREET Tt A-,,--,-5fREE-T ::: PRECAST CONCRETE ---?f...___ __ I UDIG-5 UDIG-6 UDIG-7 SECTIONS LANDSCAPING CHANNEL LANDSCAPING Develop the Irondale Gulch channel along 51st Avenue between Durham Court and Chambers Road as a linear park along the gulch. Use gently sloping grass areas, install irrigation, plant trees and landscape. Minimize automobile bridges by constructing them to connect streets on each side of the gulch channel. Design of this portion of the gulch will be subject to resolving lega1 questions and successful negotiations with future developers who will pay for these improvements. Study priority locations and construct new pedestrian foot bridges across Irondale Gulch. Establish as highest priority for landscaping all Irondale Gulch intersections with perimeter arteria1 streets, starting with 46th Avenue at Chambers Road, working west. 55 Parks Department Wastewater Management Planning Office Landowners Developers Transportation Division Design Engineering Wastewater Management Planning Office Parks Department Parks Department Wastewater Management Planning Office

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UDIG-8 UDIG-9 UDIG-10 UDIG-11 Establish an Irondale Gulch maintenance program for frequent (monthly through the summer) removal of weeds growing in cracks and silt removal. Replace existing Irondale Gulch bridge railing with uniform parkway railings of a Federal green color. Explore design attention to new bridge lighting and paving patterns and materials. Establish a "Friends of the Gulch" group to regularly pick up debris and adopt gulch beautification projects. Do not increase peak run-off levels of storm water to Montbello from upstream in the Irondale Gulch basin (east of Chambers Road), in conformance with the 1990 Irondale Gulch and Outfall Systems Storm Water Collection System Master Plan. 56 Wastewater Management Transportation Division Street Maintenance Department Design Engineering Planning Office Neighborhood Groups Montbello Community School Court Community Service Program Wastewater Management

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c t = COMMERCIAL AREA TO HAVE DESIGN GUIDELINES ftli PEDESTRIANCONNEcnONS *$ FUTUR.E PARKWAY WITH ENHANCED CHANNEL LANDSCAPING URBAN DESIGN MONTBELLO 57

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URBAN DESIGN Recommendations Montbello UDM-1 UDM-2 UDM-3 UDM-4 UDM-5 UDM-6 UDM-7 UDM-8 UDM-9 Create consistent landscaping treatment for Crown Boulevard by planting trees and flowers in the space between the sidewalk and curb. Emphasize with special bridge and landscaping treatments the intersections where Crown Boulevard crosses Irondale Gulch. Construct attractive gateway entrance signs to Montbello. Complete Chambers Road linear park from the Denver City limits south of Andrews Drive, north to 53rd Avenue. Develop attractive median streetscape landscaping on Peoria Street between Albrook Drive and 56th Avenue. Create attractive landscaping, including trees and wildflowers at the Peoria/1-70 interchange (Denver) and Chambers/1-70 interchange (Aurora). Establish a minimum tree lawn spacing of five feet between street and sidewalk for all new subdivisions. Do not permit attached sidewalks. Encourage homeowners to plant trees in front yards. Sponsor landscaping workshops in the Community School. Construct attractive park name signs in each of Montbello's seven parks. 58 Implementing Agencies/Groups Planning Office Parks Department Neighborhood Groups Homeowners Parks Department Transportation Division Street Maintenance Department Planning Office Parks Department Transportation Division Parks Department Planning Office Parks Department Transportation Division Colorado Department of Highways Developers Planning Office Neighborhood Groups Montbello Community School Parks Department -

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I' I I MARTIN LUTHER KING j i M I DOLE SCHOOL i URBAN DESIGN $* OPEN SPACE TRAIL CORRIDOR e e e HIGH LINE CANAL OPEN SPACE TRAIL CORRIDOR URBAN DESIGN URBAN DESIGN IJU PEDESTRIAN CONNECTIONS/BRIDGES SPECIAL LANDSCAPED TREATMENTS GREEN VALLEY RANCH Action Recommendations Green Valley Ranch UDGVR -1 Create improved trails along the High Line Canal for equestrian, bicycle, and pedestrian use. Separate the different uses for safety, aesthetic, and functional reasons. Use the existing service road for use as a trail. to minimize the amount of disturbed area. UDGVR-2 Plant trees, shrubs, and wildflowers along the High Line Canal to create shade and visual interest. (Tree locations to be approved by the Denver Water Department.) UDGVR-3 Explore development of pocket parks on the small parcels along the Western Gas Supply Company line near the crossing of the High Line Canal. 59 Implementing Agencies/Groups Parks Department Water Deparunent Planning Office Neighborhood Groups Parks Department Water Department Neighborhood Groups Adjacent Homeowners Planning Office Parks Department Planning Office Western Gas Supply Company Neighborhood Groups

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URBAN DESIGN UDGVR-4 Emphasize pedestrian and automobile bridges across the High Line Canal with special landscaping and architectural treatments. UDGVR-5 Place a pedestrian bridge across the High Line Canal to provide access to East Ranch Park and the new swimming pool. Explore placing other pedestrian bridges where easements exist. UDGVR-6 Create trails along the Western Gas Supply Company right-of-way for equestrian, bicycle, and pedestrian use. Plant wildflowers and other acceptable plant materials along the right-of-way. UDGVR -7 Remove the dirt pile along the easement area between 43rd Avenue and 44th Avenue to reduce drainage problems in adjacent parcels. UDGVR-8 Construct sidewalks along 48th Avenue. UDGVR-9 Establish a "Friends of the Canal" group to regularly pick8up debris and adopt beautification projects, including coordination of the planting of trees along the High Line Canal. UDGVR-10 Establish a minimum tree lawn spacing of five feet between street and sidewalk for all new subdivisions. Do not pennit attached sidewalks. UDGVR-11 Encourage homeowners to plant trees in front yards. Sponsor landscaping workshops in the Community School. 60 Planning Office Transportation Division Parks Department Water Department Water Department Planning Office Transportation Division Parks Department Western Gas Supply Company Parks Department Planning Office Neighborhood Groups Developers Western Gas Supply Company Developers Transportation Division Neighborhood Groups Court Community Service Planning Office Developers Neighborhood Groups

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Mont6elfo (jreen 'Valley !l{p:ndi THE PLANNING PROCESS 1. Neighborhood Planning Neighborhood planning is a collaborative process between the City, citizens, and property owners of a particular area which actively solicits participation in the formulation of a plan for that neighborhood. The process enunciates goals, identifies and discusses issues, generates and tests alternative ways to achieve the desired ends, proposes a plan for the area, and spells out policy changes and investments that should be implemented to help realize that goal. It is a forum in which people initiate rather than react to change, and in which the various interest groups within a neighborhood, who may have different goals, 'York out their differences to arrive at a mutually satisfactory plan. The private-public partnership is essential to the ultimate success of the venture. 2. Montbello and Green Valley Ranch Neighborhoods Planning Process In early 1988, the Northeast Corridor Specific Area Plan was completed by the City of Denver to anticipate growth that would result from the building of Denver International Airport. This plan identified issues in the Stapleton neighborhood, Montbello neighborhood, Green Valley Ranch neighborhood, and the Gateway area. When the plan was completed, area residents, former Councilman Bill Roberts, and City staff said more detailed attention was needed to the already established residential neighborhoods in the area and requested that a study and plan be done for Montbello and Green Valley Ranch. This plan is the result of that request. The planning process used to develop this plan was open and interactive with residents in the neighborhood. To start the process, a large public meeting was held in September 1989. Residents identified what they like about their neighborhood, what are the issues they see, and what they would like to improve. A number of participants volunteered to work with public agency representatives on a Plan Steering Committee to oversee development of the Plan. These people, plus others who joined the project met bi-weekly through the end of 1989 to draft plans for land use/zoning. During January and February of 1990 the committee met weekly to develop a housing plan. Five neighborhood town meetings were held in March and April to update residents and get more ideas. Beginning in May and continuing through October committees held workshops and developed draft plans for transportation, urban design, business development, and recreation. Town meetings were held again in September and October to gain more input and keep residents up to date on the plan. All meetings were open to the public and were heavily advertised with school flyers, newspaper and newsletter notices, and church bulletins and announcements. Coordination and technical assistance for plan A-1

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development was provided by the Neighborhood Planning Division of the Denver Planning and Community Development Office. More than fifty work sessions involving several hundred residents and business people over the course of fifteen months led to preparation of drafts of the plan and this final document. The plan development process concluded with the Denver Planning Board's public hearing on December 12, 1990. The plan was adopted by Denver City Council on February 25, 1991. A separate Executive Summary of this plan is available from the Denver Planning and Community Development Office and was used extensively during the draft plan's review period to effectively inform interested neighborhood residents of the plan's content. A-2

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!Mont6e{[o fjreen o/a/Iey !1\p,ncft ?{igfi6orfwoa MONTBELLO DEMOGRAPHICS POPULATION Total Population Total Households Average Household Size Source: 1990 Census 17,582 5,534 3.17 HOUSEHOLD INCOME Median Household Income By Census Tract (Citywide $25,1 06) 83.04 83.05 83.06 83.11 83.12 Source: 1990 Census $34,704 30,820 35,799 31,610 34,320 AGE PROFILE "'-' = (L) ..... (L) ,:X::: -0 .... (L) ..c s = z 1000 800 600 400 200 0 BY CENSUS TRACT Under 5 5-13 14-17 18-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65 + AGE 83.04 c=J 83.11 Census Tracts 83.05 83.12 83.06 SOURCE: 1990 U.S. Census B-1

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MONTBELLO ETHNIC COMPOSITION BY CENSUS TRACT BLACK 58% NATIVE AMERICAN 111 1% HISPANIC 2,200 13% ANGL04,464 25% Total Population 17,582 Combined Census Tracts BLACK 1,449 48% BLACK 2,352 54% ANGL0916 30% Total Population 3,004 Census Tract 83.05 HISPANIC 603 14% NAllVE AMERICAN 20 Oo/o Total Population 4,367 Census Tract 83.11 BLACK 1,449 53"'/o HISPANIC 421 16% OTHER20 1% NATIVE AMERICAN 23 1% ANGL0691 25"/o 8LACK2,716 73% Total Population 2,714 Census Tract 83.04 HISPANIC 315 8"/o A e ANGL0591 16% Total Population 3,729 Census Tract 83.06 HISPANIC 359 10o/o NAllVE AMERICAN 30 1% Total Population 3, 768 Census Tract 83.12 Source: 1990 U.S. Census of Population and Housing Public Law File PL94 171 The categories Anglo, Black, Asian, Native American, and Other are composed of people not of Hispanic origins. B-2 -

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HOUSEHOLD PROFILES MONTBELLO Combined All Census Tracts Married w/children 35% 1,927 Married no children 1 9% 1,039 TOTAL: 5,579 Single/nonfamily 22% 1,248 Other 6% 308 FHH w/children 15% 847 MHH w/children 4% 210 Married w/chlldren 16'% 33,229 HOUSEHOLD TYPES APPENDIX B DENVER TOTAL: 210,962 Slngletnonfamlly 48% 101,915 Other 5% 11,222 FHH w/chlldren 8% 16,366 MHH w/chlldren 2% 3,724 Married Couples w/Childern Married Couples no/childern Marrted no children 21% 44,496 Male Head Household w/children (MHH) Female Head Household w/children (FHH) Single or Nonfamily Other Source: 1990 U.S. Census B-3

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.,. NEW AIRPORT 83.13 tt1 I 1990 CENSUS TRACTS c rw---, 0 112 tB PREI'J TilE [ 'l,ANN

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Mont6etlo fN!,igli6orfwoi fireen o/ailey !f{ftncli 9{f,igli6orfwoa GREEN VALLEY RANCH DEMOGRAPHICS POPULATION Total Population 2,746 Total Households 922 Average Household Size 2.99 Source: 1990 Census HOUSEHOLD INCOME Median Household Income By Census Tract (Citywide$25,106) 83.03 Source: 1990 Census AGE PROFILE $45,556 BY CENSUS 'TRACT' 800 Ill .w Cl "'C1 iti 600 4.) .... 0 "" ) 400 ,.Q a :I z 200 UNDER. 5 5-13 14-17 18-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65 + AGE Census Tract rnlllllll 8 3 .03 SOURCE: 1990 U.S. Census C-1

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Source: GREEN VALLEY RANCH ETHNIC COMPOSITION BLACK 586 21% NATIVE AMERICAN 12 0% Total Population 2,746 Census Tract 83.03 HISPANIC 279 10% ASIAN99 4% OTHER 10 0"/o 1990 U.S. Census of Population and Housing Public Law File PL94-171 The categories Anglo, Black, Asian, Native American, and Other are composed of people not of Hispanic origins. C-2

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HOUSEHOLD PROFILES GREEN VALLEY RANCH TOTAL: 925 Married w/children 51% 470 Single/nonfamily 17% 159 Other 2% 15 FHH w/chlldren 4% 36 MHH w/children 2% 17 Married no children 25% 228 Married wtchildren 16% 33,229 DENVER TOTAL: 210,962 HOUSEHOLD TYPES Married Couples w/Childern Married Couples no/childern Married no children 21% 44,496 Male Head Household w/children (MHH) Female Head Household w/children (FHH) Single or Nonfamily OtherS% 11,222 FHH w/children 8% 16,366 MHH w/children 3,724 Other Source: 1990 U.S. Census C-3

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IIOUSING DATA 1Wf Green Valley Elmendorf Falcon Silverman Concord/Barney Ford Ranch Park Park Park Park/Village East Park C.T. 83.03* C.T. 83.04 C.T. 83.05 C.T.83.06 C. T. 83.07* Number Single Family Homes 1,055 869 980 1,003 2,701 Avg. Age of Homes 6yrs. 20yrs. 18 yrs. 20 yrs. 12 yrs. Avg.Sq.Ft 1,278 1,008 960 1,343 1,053 2Bedrooms 117 211 369 31 963 3 Bedrooms 477 569 548 697 1,296 f 4+Bedrooms 59 89 63 275 239 Q 1 Story 128 716 948 409 1,044 0 2 Story 526 153 32 594 1,459 I Number Sales 1982 0 81 94 48 408 1983 81 74 137 84 57 1984 285 92 112 69 423 1985 252 97 118 88 388 Avg. Sales Price (approximate) 1982 --$54,900 $49,300 $62,800 $68,300 1983 $75,000 $49,500 $51,400 $66,100 $68,800 1984 $79,200 $53,200 $53,400 $65,300 $68,300 1985 $86,900 $58JOO $52,700 $68,600 $69,500 1986 $99,896 $57,210 $55,305 $71,478 $64,633 1987 $90,471 $56,993 $50,723 $69,897 $66,034 1988 $83,328 $47,161 $45,258 $61,930 $58,994 Number Apartments and Condo Units 0 0 0 768 482 1980 Census Tract,Does not include data for new homes constructed 1986-1988 (except total number homes and sales prices)

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1980 CEn/U/ TRACT/ 4 north scale: 1 .. = Ji.ooo January 1980

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ADAMS COUNTY I COMMERCE CITY ArnORA I ADAMS COUNTY 1ST CREEK RECREATION I NATURE AREA ROCKY MTN. ARSENAL -...... ... I) I_; AN LOOKING NORTHEAST "' I I itS I