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National Western Center master plan, 2014

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National Western Center master plan, 2014
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City and County of Denver
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Denver, CO
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City and County of Denver
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English

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National Western Stock Show
City planning

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Auraria Library
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Full Text
NATIONAL WESTERN CENTER
Master Plan
Denver, Colorado
December 2014
DRAFT FOR PUBLIC REVIEW
December 18, 2014




LETTER FROM COUNCIL MEMBER JUDY MONTERO




LETTER FROM MAYOR HANCOCK




This land at the South Platte River is where people settled,
worked, grew crops, built homes and an industry of agriculture
emerged. Denver grew from this place. Denver grew from
this history.
The National Western Center extends this history into a promising
future, bringing the National Western Stock Show, Colorado State
University, Denver Museum of Nature and Science and Histoy
Colorado into partnership with the City and County of Denver
to create a bold vision of education, commerce, competition,
tourism and entertainment for the next 10 Oy ears.
The National Western Center will become the catalyst to bind
Globeville, Elyria, and Swansea neighborhoods with a revitalized
South Platte River and tell the story of our frontiering spirit
through strong partnerships, a celebration of our western heritage
and pioneering opportunities for the future.




National Western Center
Table of Contents
Executive Summary
Introduction
Site Orientation and Character
Master Plan Big Ideas
Acknowledgments
Introduction
Site History
Setting and Context
National Western Center
Partnerships
Corridor of Opportunity
and the North Denver
Cornerstone Collaborative
Assets, Challenges
and Opportunities
Stakeholder Engagement
and Public Involvement
National Western Center Vision
Vision
Guiding Principles
Sustainability and
Regeneration Framework
Master Plan Components
Introduction to the Master Plan
Integrated Facilities Program
Campus Design Character
Character Areas
River, Parks and Public Space
Site Circulation
Infrastructure
Historic Resources
105
Implementation
Planning Principles
Phasing
Moving Forward
Appendices
Reference Documents


^ Ifjou re ridin ahead of the herd,
take a look back every now and then
to make sure its still there.)) win Rogers


National Western Center
Executive Summary
Executive Summary
Introduction
Site Orientation and Character
Master Plan Big Ideas
Acknowledgments
Introduction
Site History
Setting and Context
National Western Center
Partnerships
Corridor of Opportunity
and the North Denver
Cornerstone Collaborative
Assets, Challenges
and Opportunities
Stakeholder Engagement
and Public Involvement
National Western Center Vision
Vision
Guiding Principles
Sustainability and
Regeneration Framework
Master Plan Components
Introduction to the Master Plan
Integrated Facilities Program
Campus Design Character
Character Areas
River, Parks and Public Space
Site Circulation
Infrastructure
Historic Resources
Implementation
Planning Principles
Phasing
Moving Forward
Appendices
Reference Documents
Executive Summary | I




National Western Center
Introduction
The National Western Complex, Denver Coliseum and
National Western Stock Show are at a crossroads.
The site is old, antiquated and has seen no significant
investment since the 1990s. At the same time, younger
generations are very much aware of and concerned
with what we might term great global challenges. Theirs
are the generations that will have to feed more than 9
billion people, solve the issue of fresh water shortages
and respond to climate change. At the intersection
of these issues lies a rare and precious opportunity in
the transformation of the National Western Complex
and Denver Coliseum into the National Western
Center. While honoring the National Western Stock
Show (NWSS) 100-year history, five partnersColorado
State University, Denver Museum of Nature and Science,
History Colorado, Western Stock Show Association and
the City and County of Denverare singularly focused on
the opportunity to reinvent the site for the next 100 years.
The National Western Center Master Plan (herein referred
to as The Plan), which represents the next critical
step in the preparing a roadmap for this region of the
City, establishes a long range Vision, Guiding Principles
and Goals for the redevelopment of the National
Western Complex and Denver Coliseum, including the
basic framework for the location of the major program
elements. At its core, the Plan sets out to accomplish the
advancement of four broad objectives:
The Plan plays a key role in reconnecting Globeville,
Elyria and Swansea through new and improved multi-
modal connections;
The Plan advances the Citys intent to secure and
grow the National Western Stock Show for the
next 100 years as the states largest agriculture
convention;
The Plan sets in motion the creation of a year round
destination to promote new out-of-state tourism in
partnership with new and existing partners such
as Visit Denver, Western Stock Show Association,
Colorado State University, the Denver Museum of
Nature & Science and History Colorado; and
The Plan begins to position Denver as a global
player in 21st century agricultural issues that will help
advance, through new public/private partnerships, our
knowledge around food production, safety and the
expansion of healthy foods at an international scale.
The Plan envisions a place that responds to the
global challenges around food, water, energy and the
environment, represents partnerships between the
public and private sectors, and blurs the line between
entertainment, competition, education, and industry. The
plan also calls for a full rehabilitation of the site, one that
repairs the long term damage from years of industrial
uses and creates a new series of green and healthy
spaces that that help to launch a new era for the National
Western complex and the adjoining neighborhoods. The
Vision, Guiding Principles and Goals were developed
through an open, iterative public process and in
conjunction with the Globeville and Elyria/ Swansea
neighborhood planning efforts.
The Plan will be used by public agencies, private
entities and the community as a guide to the integrated
development of the site. The Plan also outlines the
physical organization and critical adjacencies for the
development of a dynamic, year-round campus that
celebrates our Western Heritage, integrates with the
community, provides new educational opportunities
(including research and development), and engages the
South Platte River. The Plan outlines the potential uses
and program elements, describes the general design
character ofthe proposed facilities and site, provides
a regeneration framework and goals, and provides
a logical implementation strategy to phase the sites
redevelopment, recognizing that the National Western
Stock Show needs to remain in operation during the
sites redevelopment.
Executive Summary | 3


National Western Center
4 | Executive Summary


National Western Center
The Plan is intended to be a flexible planning document
to allow for changes in funding, timing of improvements
and changes to the stated program, including new
opportunities that may emerge during the sites
redevelopment. Specifically, it allows opportunities for
additional partners to be added to the NWC at any time
to address the needs of the NWC or help the community
to fulfill the Vision. Through the on-going involvement of
the National Western Citizens Advisory Committee and
the dedication of the NWC Partners, the opportunity for
further input and direction will be available as the site
develops overtime.
National Western Center Vision
and Guiding Principles
The NWC Partners have established a Vision for the
National Western Center Campus (NWCC) and nine
Guiding Principles identified by the founding NWC
Partners and the community:
Community and Neighborhood Integration
Engage the River and Nature
Celebrate Western Heritage
Inspire Health and Wellness
Build Cultural Crossroads
Be Pioneering: Break Trail and Foster Innovation
Create Fun and Entertaining Experiences
Grow Local, Regional, and Global Intelligence
Embrace an Ethic of Regeneration
National Western Center Vision Statement
The National Western Center celebrates the pioneering spirit and promise of
the West throughyear-round experiential life-long learning, the arts, entertainment,
competition and commerce.
The following pages summarize the key ways in which
the Vision and Guiding Principles will be fulfilled.
Executive Summary | 5


National Western Center
NATIONAL WESTERN CENTER
Site Orientation and Character
Vision
The National Western Center celebrates the pioneering spirit and promise
of the West through year-round experiential life-long learning, the arts,
entertainment, competition and commerce.
Guiding Principles
Community and Neighborhood Integration
Engage the River and Nature
Celebrate Western Heritage
Inspire Health and Wellness
Build Cultural Crossroads
Be Pioneering: Break Trail and Foster Innovation
Create Fun and Entertaining Experiences
Grow Local, Regional, and Global Intelligence
Embrace an Ethic of Regeneration
6 | Executive Summary


National Western Center
Key Site Elements
O Water Resources Center and
South Platte Riverfront
Stockyards/Event Pavilion
CSU Equine Sports Medicine Clinic
Equestrian Center
Livestock Center
NWC Transit Station
Shared Use/TOD Parking Structure
Livestock Exchange
Building/Flex Space
Trade Show/Exhibition Hall
New Arena
0 CSU Center
Colorado Commons
Stadium Arena Market
o Coliseum Redevelopment
Forney Transportation Museum
National Western Center Partners

A'CIOUAL a
/E5.TEEU?
Illustrative Master Plan
DENVER*
THE MILE HISH CITY
nv Muslim or
IP NATURES.
^SCIENCE
For more information on the National Western Center please visit: Denvergov.org/NDCC
Executive Summary |


National Western Center
NATIONAL WESTERN CENTER
Master Plan Big Ideas
Improve Access to and Health of the South Platte River
Move rail from rivers edge and consolidate to center
of site
Bury or move the Delgany Interceptor sewer lines
Relocate National Western Drive to allow for better river
and Event Pavilion access
Improve river habitat and health
Create recreational trails and educational areas along
the river
Flexible, Year-Round Programs to Drive New Tourism
Create flexible, efficient, vibrant indoor and outdoor
spaces that allow various uses throughout the year,
including markets, offices, restaurants, retail, festivals,
and the Stock Show
Provide a variety of programseducational,
recreational, commercial, competitions, entertainment,
visual and performing artsfor neighbors and local to
global visitors
Provide hands-on, informal and formal educational
programs for families, students, and life-long learners
Build off the history and heritage of the site, while
highlighting innovation, particularly in food, energy, and
water use
Pursue long-term opportunities to create new programs,
spaces, and partnerships
Executive Summary


National Western Center
Provide New Connections
Provide Partnership Opportunities
Create two new connections across the river between
Washington Street and National Western Drive at
49th Avenue and 51st Avenue
Connect Washington Street and Brighton Boulevard with
a new complete/green street
Provide an elevated walkway connection to provide
access to the RTD Rail Station
Improve pedestrian and bicycle facilities throughout
the NWCC
Increase active transportation options with improved
pedestrian and bicycle facilities on all new and
existing streets
Lower 46th Avenue under I-70 viaduct to allow easier
movement between the NWCC and the Denver Coliseum
Improve Brighton Boulevard to accommodate change
in land use and improved streetscape that integrates
green infrastructure
Redevelop the area south of i-70, including Coliseum,
for complementary uses to the NWCC
Build off the history and heritage of and secure the
future of the National Western Stock Show
Increase year-round program opportunities for
education, food and food production, art, agriculture
and livestock, water resources, and recreational
activities through collaboration
Provide flexibility for long term opportunities to add
additional partners with complementary vision and goals
Redevelop Coliseum site south of i-70 for
complementary uses and new partners
For more information on the National Western Center please visit: Denvergov.org/NDCC
Executive Summary | Q


National Western Center


National Western Center
Acknowledgments
Executive Summary
Introduction
Site Orientation and Character
Master Plan Big Ideas
Acknowledgments
Introduction
Site History
Setting and Context
National Western Center
Partnerships
Corridor of Opportunity
and the North Denver
Cornerstone Collaborative
Assets, Challenges
and Opportunities
Stakeholder Engagement
and Public Involvement
National Western Center Vision
Vision
Guiding Principles
Sustainability and
Regeneration Framework
Master Plan Components
Introduction to the Master Plan
Integrated Facilities Program
Campus Design Character
Character Areas
River, Parks and Public Space
Site Circulation
Infrastructure
Historic Resources
Implementation
Planning Principles
Phasing
Moving Forward
Appendices
Reference Documents
Acknowledgements
II


M Courage is being scared to death,
but saddling up anyway. ^ John Wayne


National Western Center
MAYOR MICHAEL B. HANCOCK
District 1 Susan Shepherd District 6 Charlie Brown District 2 Jeanne Faatz District 7 Chris Nevitt District 3 Paul D. Lopez District 8 Aldus Brooks District 4 Peggy Lehmann District 9 Judy H. Montero, Pro Tern District 5 Mary Beth Susman District 10 Jeanne Robb NATIONAL WESTERN CENTER MOU PARTNERS District 11 Christopher Herndon, President At-Large Robin Kniech At-Large Deborah Ortega
Western Stock Show Association Board Western Stock Show Association Staff
Ron Williams, Chairman Pete Coors Kyle Baun
Paul Andrews, President and CEO Justin Cumming Jeff Childs
Pat Grant Doug Jones John Ellis
Sue Anschutz-Rodgers Gail Klapper Marshall Ernst
Buck Hutchison Leslie Lange Audrey Hall
Mark Gustafson Guy McEndaffer Ron Rohr
Don Elliman Tracy Ringolsby
Thomas Bradbury Terrance Carroll Ben R. Houston, Chairman Emeritus
National Western Center Bucket Committees
Land and Build-Out Plan Education/Clinical/Food Production VISIT Denver & Denver Arts and Venues
Jerry Glick and Bill Mosher, Chairs Tony Frank and Rick Pederson, Chairs Bruce Alexander, Chair
Nancy Tuor Steve McCarthy Bill Mosher
Rick Pederson Cathy Carpenter Dea Richard Scharf
Pat Grant Ray Baker Kent Rice
Ron Williams Federico Pena Nancy Tuor
Paul Andrews Steve Bangert Kelly Brough
Don Kortz Tim Schultz Tami Door
Don Elliman Mark Gustafson Joey Freund
Gail Klapper George Sparks Lem Smith
Tom Gougeon Ed Nichols Ron Williams
Mark Smith Mark Gustafson Amy Parsons Paul Andrews
Polly Jessen History, Art, Exploritorium Coordinate with Neighborhood
Ray Baker George Sparks, Ed Nichols, Interests/City Plan
Mark Smith, Chairs Terrance Carroll, Chair
Transportation and Access
(RTD and CDOT)
Tom Gougeon, Chair
Jerry Glick
Don Kortz
Tami Door
Ray Baker
Finance: Fundraising and City/State/
Federal Revenue
Steve McCarthy and Rus Heise, Chairs
Tim Schultz
Bill Mosher
Cathy Carpenter Dea
Sue Anschutz-Rodgers
Don Elliman
Gail Klapper
Ron Williams
Dawn Bookhardt
J.J. Ament
Tracy Huggins
Maria Garcia Berry
Maria Garcia Berry-Advisor
Jack Green
Ron Montoya
Doug Jones
Art Bosworth
Tami Door
Michael Long
Patti Limerick
Cathy Dea
Rose Fredrick
Sue Anschutz-Rogers
Pat Grant
Amy Parsons
Christoph Heinrich
Jeff Shoemaker
Ron Montoya
Tami Door
Mark Smith
Tracy Huggins
Maria Garcia Berry-Advisor
Acknowledgements I 13


National Western Center
NATIONAL WESTERN CENTER MOU PARTNERS continued
Colorado State University__________________________________
Tony Frank, President
Amy Parsons, Vice President for University Operations
Jocelyn Hittle, Denver Operational Initiatives
Per Hogestad, Facilities Management
Kyle Flenley, External Relations
Brian Dunbar, Institute for the Built Environment
Mark Stetter, College of Veterinary Medicine and
Biomedical Sciences
Chris Kawcak, College of Veterinary Medicine and
Biomedical Sciences
Flenry Thompson, College of Agricultural Sciences
Dr. Temple Grandin, Professor, Department of Animal Sciences
Denver Museum of Nature and Science________________________
George Sparks, President and CEO
Ed Scholz
Nancy Walsh
Bridget Coughlin
Michele Koons
History Colorado___________________________________________
Ed Nichols, President/CEO, State Elistoric Preservation Officer
Steve Turner
City & County of Denver_______________________________
Mayors Office
Janice Sinden, Chief of Staff
Evan Dreyer, Deputy Chief of Staff
Diane Barrett, Chief Projects Officer
Skye Stuart, Council Liaison
Emily Liff Elauber, Deputy Legislative Director
Rowenia Algeria, Communications Director
Amber Miller, Communications
Mike Stout, Communications
Michael Sapp, Neighborhood Liaison
Anthony Graves, Regional Director
* Paul Ryan, Regional Affairs Director
North Denver Cornerstone Collaborative (NDCC)
Kelly Leid, Executive Director
Lotte Lieb Dulla, Capital Stack and RTA Project Lead
Todd Wenskoski, Deputy Director
Erika Martinez, Communications & Community Outreach
Celia Vanderloop, Environmental Services Project Manager
Community Planning & Development
Brad Buchanan, Executive Director
Evelyn Baker
Jill Jennings-Golich
Steve Gordon
Caryn Champine
Steve Nalley, Deputy NWCC Project Manager
Courtland Elyser
Samantha Suter
Tim Watkins
Andrea Santoro
Andrea Burns
Barbara Stocklin-Steeley
Public Works
Jose Cornejo, Executive Director
Lesley Thomas, Deputy Director
Jennifer Elillhouse, NWCC Project Manager
Peter Baertlein
Kent Grissom
Cindy Patton
Sean Mackin
Justin Schmitz
Selena Klosowski
Mike Anderson
Sarah Anderson
Brian Schat
*Paul loved the National Western Stock Show and played an
Important role for Mayor Hancock in the early conversations
between the City and the NWSS that helped lead to the NWSS
staying in Denver. We lost Paul on April 20, 2013, but we all
know he would be smiling about the vision the NWC Partners
have committed to paper. We all miss you Paul.
14* I Acknowledgments


National Western Center
NATIONAL WESTERN CENTER MOU PARTNERS continued
City & County of Denver continued_______________________
Department of Environmental Health
Doug Linkhart, Executive Director Gretchen Armijo
Gene Hook
Dave Erickson
Parks & Recreation
Lauri Dannemiller, Executive Director
Scott Gilmore, Deputy Director
Gordon Robertson
David Marquardt
Courtney Levingston
Department of Finance
Cary Kennedy, Executive Director
Gretchen Hollrah, Deputy Director
Brendan Hanlon, Budget Director
Laura Perry
Andrew Johnston
Brad Dodson
Office of Economic Development
Paul Washington, Executive Director
John Lucero, Deputy Director
Jeff Romine
Michael Miera
Beth Truby
Department of Real Estate
Jeff Steinberg
Arts & Venues
Kent Rice, Executive Director
Ginger White, Deputy Director
Tad Bowman
City Attorneys Office
Scott Martinez, City Attorney
Cristal DeHerrera, Deputy City Attorney
Shaun Sullivan
Jennifer Welbourn
Dan Slatterly
Karen Aviles
Josh Roberts
Mayors Office of Sustainability
Jerry Tinianow, Executive Director
Sonrisa Lucero
Jessica Fischer
Development Services
Steve Ferris
Walt Hime
Alan Sorrel
Eric Osmundsen
David Clark
Denver City Council District 9 Staff
Nola Miguel
Benjamin Roldan-Rojas
Denver Planning Board
Julie Underdahl, Chair
Andy Baldyga, Vice Chair
Jim Bershof
Shannon Gifford
Renee Martinez-Stone
Brittany Morris Saunders
Joel Noble
Susan Pearce
Arleen Taniwaki
Frank Schultz
Chris Smith
VISIT Denver
Richard Scharf, President & CEO
Rachel Benedick
Rich Grant
Denver Urban Renewal Authority
Tracy Huggins, Executive Director
Mark Tompkins
Acknowledgments I 15


National Western Center
COMMITTEES AND CONSULTANT TEAMS______
National Western Citizens Advisory Committee
Armando Payan, Globeville Resident
AE, Globeville Resident
David Oletski, Globeville Resident
John Zapien, Globeville Resident
Drew Dutcher, Elyria-Swansea Resident
Bettie Cram, Elyria-Swansea Resident
Liliana Flores Amaro, Elyria-Swansea Resident
Juan Veloz, Elyria-Swansea Resident
Patricia Carmody, Historic Riverside Cemetery
Heather Lafferty, Habitat for Humanity of Metro Denver
(Katie McKenna, alternate member)
Steven Moss, Focus Points Family Resource Center
(Stuart Steers, alternate member)
Tangier Barnes, Groundwork Denver
Mickey Zeppelin, Taxi
Vernon Hill, JJJ Properties
Anne Hayes, Westfield Company
Marina Chotzinoff, Where Wood Meets Steel
Larry Burgess, Elyria-Swansea-Globeville Business Association
Annie Levinsky, Historic Denver (John Olson, alternate member)
Tracy Weil, RiNo Arts District
Coby Gould, The GrowHaus
Carrie Atiyeh, VISIT Denver
Tony Curcio, Family Environmental (former member)
Ben Rifkin, Denver Cutthroats (former member)
Robert Escamilla, Globeville Resident (former member)
Tom Anthony, Elyria-Swansea Resident (former member)
National Western Citizens Advisory Committee Resources
Council Member Judy Montero, District 9
NWC Partners
Terrance Carroll, Co-Facilitator Maria Garcia Berry, Co-Facilitator Round Up Retreat Participants Kim Kucera, CRL Associates Jin Tsuchiya, CRL Associates
Eric Anderson Don Elliman Tracy Huggins Steven McCarthy George Sparks
Paul Andrews Tony Frank Mark Johnson Bill Mosher Henry Thompson
Javier Barrios Hillary Fulton Chris Kawcak Steve Nalley Steve Turner
Brad Buchanan Maria Garcia Berry Cary Kennedy Ed Nichols Rick Pederson
Cathy Carpenter Dea Scott Gillmore Victoria Keziah David Oletski Chris Waugh
Terrance Carroll Tom Gougeon Gail Klapper Amy Parsons Kriss Wittman
Kim Day Pat Grant Kim Kucera Kent Rice Tim Wohlgenant
Tami Door Jennifer Hillhouse ' Sandra Kulli Charity Sevian Ron Williams
Drew Dutcher Jocelyn Hittle Kelly Leid Mark Stetter Mickey Zeppelin
National Western Center Sustainabilitv Task Force
Laura Aldrete Devon Buckels Helene Gotthelf Conor Merrigan Jerry Tinianow
Susan Aldretti Catherine Cox-Blair Tom Gougeon Nola Miguel Steve Turner
Eric Anderson Colin Day Elaine Harkins Steve Nalley Celia VanderLoop
Sarah Anderson Shadana Dickerson- Jenn Hillhouse John Olson Reagan Waskom
Gretchen Armijo Sultana Jocelyn Hittle George Pond Ellen Wohl
Sheela Bachen Carol Dollard Dominique Jackson Josh Radoff Tim Wohlgenant
Tangier Barnes Brian Dunbar Pete Jefferson Chad Riley Anna Zawisza
David Basich Drew Dutcher Kelly Leid Ron Rohr
Tad Bowman Terry Freeman Angela Loder Paul Schmiechen
Adam Brock Hillary Fulton Sonrisa Lucero Jeff Shoemaker
Brad Buchanan Andrea Garcia David Marquardt Critter Thompson
CONSULTANT TEAM SUPPORT
Parsons Brinckerhoff ME Engineers
Civitas Peter J. Rickershauser
Populous, Inc. Seven G
OV Consultants, LLC SlaterPaull
J. F. Sato Associates CRL Associates
Anderson Hallas Sll LLC
Walker Parking First Southwest Disclaimer
Sustainable Strategies Group, LLC Strategic Advisory Group All graphics and illustrations in this
Shine SEH Master Plan are intended for planning
Kiewit Martin & Martin purposes only to show general intent
Terracon of the Plan and are conceptual.
16 I Acknowledgments


National Western Center
Introduction
Executive Summary
Introduction
Site Orientation and Character
Master Plan Big Ideas
Acknowledgments
Introduction
Site History
Setting and Context
National Western Center
Partnerships
Corridor of Opportunity
and the North Denver
Cornerstone Collaborative
Assets, Challenges
and Opportunities
Stakeholder Engagement
and Public Involvement
National Western Center Vision
Vision
Guiding Principles
Sustainability and
Regeneration Framework
Master Plan Components
Introduction to the Master Plan
Integrated Facilities Program
Campus Design Character
Character Areas
River, Parks and Public Space
Site Circulation
Infrastructure
Historic Resources
105
Implementation
Planning Principles
Phasing
Moving Forward
Appendices
Reference Documents
Introduction | I


MLettin the cat outta the bag
is a whole lot easier n puttin it back


National Western Center
Reimaging the National Western Center Campus (NWCC) is an opportunity to
shape North Denver in dramatic new ways. Since the NWCC sits at the center of
multiple projects in the area and has tremendous historic significance, it is important
to understand the context in which this project evolved.
Site History
The NWCC has its roots in the Denver Union Stock
Yard Company founded in 1881 and the opening of the
stockyards five years later. The location for the stockyards
was not accidental, given its location proximal to adjacent
rail lines and the South Platte River. Other industries,
such as an ore smelter on the present day Denver
Coliseum site and the Holden Smelter were already
nearby. The stockyards grew steadily as herds of cattle
soon began arriving by rail. The construction of stock
pens, an elevated viewing walkway, an animal transport
bridge across the South Platte River, and other accessory
structures were built to accommodate the burgeoning
cattle industry at this location. Meat processing and
packing plants also set up shop by the early 1890s,
adding to the sites rise as the center of Denvers cattle
and agricultural industry.
In 1898, the first portion of the current Denver Union
Stock Yard Exchange Building was constructed, with
subseguent additions in 1916 and 1919. Facing the
railroad tracks and originally surrounded by cattle pens,
this prominent four-story brick and stone building was
the center of stockyard and stock show operations. The
building housed the offices of the Denver Union Stock
Show Company, the primary force behind the National
Western Stock Show, as well as a newspaper, restaurant,
bank, the Colorado State Farm Bureau, and the local
office of the U.S. Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Finished in the Beaux Arts Classical style, the building
presented a grandiose formality and was highly visible
from adjoining areas. The buildings colossal entry
columns and decorative parapet, combined with its
permanent brick and stone construction, announced the
livestock industrys wealth and stature in the community.
In 1906, the Denver Fivestock Exchange hosted its first
official Western Fivestock Show under a circus big top
tent. These annual events were wildly successful, leading
to the construction of a permanent Arena (or National
Amphitheater and Fivestock Pavilion) in 1909. The large
structure was a marvel of its time, with its interior steel
columns and long girders providing a large open arena
seating up to 6,000 people. The brick Neoclassical
style building, with its decorative masonry patterns and
corner towers, announced its permanence and physical
presence to the community.
The expanding stockyard complex attracted the
construction of several meat packing plants beginning
in the early 1890s. The largest, Colorado Packing
and Provisions Company, became the Armour Packing
Company, expanding rapidly north ofthe sheep barns.
While the complex was razed in 1987, the old Armour Office
Building, constructed in 1917, and water tower remain.
By the post-World War II era, stock show events had
outgrown the original arena. Work began on a larger
Coliseum in 1949. Completed in 1951, the concrete barrel
vault structure designed by architect Roland Finder, was
modern in style, again exuding confidence in the Stock
Table of Contents I IQ


National Western Center
Shows future. An enclosed concrete walkway structure
over East 46th Avenue was constructed concurrent with
the Coliseum to connect it to the remainder of the Stock
Show facilities to the north.
Neighborhood History
The early stockyard uses at what is today known as
the National Western Center were located in an area
attractive to other railroad-reliant industries, such as
ore smelters. Communities such as Elyria, Swansea and
Globeville (formerly Holdenville) arose to house and
accommodate immigrant industrial and meatpacking
workers. The communities of Elyria and Swansea were
established east of the National Western Center site.
Immediately to the east of the stockyards was Elyria,
incorporated in 1890, with Swansea, on the east side of
York Street, founded in 1870. Slavic immigrants moved
into these settlements, located within walking distance
to jobs along the railway, and built schools, churches and
neighborhood stores to serve their growing communities.
Globeville, on the west side of the South Platte River, was
originally established in 1891 to provide workers for the
Holden Smelter, attracting many Polish immigrants in its
early years.
Together, the stockyards, meatpacking plants and
smelters created a strong and bustling economic center,
enabling the vibrant and resilient surrounding residential
communities to grow and flourish. The communities
faced challenges as the meatpacking industry become
more automated and moved elsewhere, other industries
located in the area, and the physical landscape changed
with construction of Interstate 70 in 1964. Population
shifts brought more diversification and a strong Latino
population to the area after World War II.
While the historical agricultural and industrial uses of the
area may not be entirely compatible with the surrounding
residential enclaves of Globeville, Elyria, and Swansea,
the industrial, agricultural and residential history and
evolution of the area is deeply inter-connected. Stockyard
and meat processing workers who lived in the
surrounding neighborhoods had an intimate familiarity
and strong economic connection to and reliance on the
Denver Union Stock Yard Company and its related uses.
The historic buildings and features that remain on the
NWCC site directly tell the story of the stockyard and
show uses. These same buildings and features are also
longstanding landmarks and orienting features for the
surrounding residential neighborhoods.
Recent History
In June of 2011, the National Western Stock Show (NWSS)
announced that they were interested in partnering with
the new Gaylord Development in Aurora and to move
the stock show to that location. The new location would
have new facilities for the NWSS and would provide them
additional space for their programming and for future
expansion.
The inauguration of a new Mayor and this identification
of a potential relocation out of Denver was the catalyst
for a renewed study that looked at the existing National
Western Complex site to identify both its shortcomings
and its potential. In December 2011, the NWSS released
a business plan that was then reviewed by the
Denver Urban Renewal Authority. The business plan
and subseguent review by DURA provide important
guidance as to the strategic planning regarding the
NWSS, providing a baseline understanding ofthe current
operations ofthe Western Stock Show Association, the
facilities necessary to support the production ofthe
annual NWSS and financial implications related to the
proposed relocation and improvements of these facilities.
Additionally, the report integrated the Citys desired
outcomes for redevelopment ofthe current Complex.
Following DURAs review, in November of 2012, the
National Western Stock Show announced their intention
to remain in Denver. Shortly after that announcement,
the NWSS assembled a number of committees to begin
to develop their program needs for a new NWSS at the
current location, referred to as the Bucket Committee.
Members are identified in the Acknowledgments section
ofthe Master Plan.
20 Introduction


National Western Center
In May of 2014, Visit Denver, Western Stock Show
Association and Denver Arts and Venues released the
Denver Feasibility Study, conducted by the Strategic
Advisory Group. The intent of this study was to better
understand the best long-term positioning for the
National Western Stock Show, National Western Complex,
Denver Coliseum, and the Colorado Convention Center.
The Feasibility Study identified the National Western
Stock Show as the Super Bowl of stock shows a
premier livestock industry event. The study identifies
the potential to re-establish the historic and iconic Stock
Show for the next 100 years, for it to remain at current
site, re-master plan the entire site, build a new Arena
integral to the site (north of I-70), and to re-purpose the
Denver Coliseum site and other select facilities to create
a dynamic, fully aligned campus, at the gateway into
downtown Denver. The findings of this study became the
basis for the overall program for the National Western
Center Campus (NWCC).
Introduction 21


National Western Center
Site History
1859
Colorado part of the
Jefferson Territory
1810-1845
Fur Traders In the area

1000-1450
Ancestral Pawnee
In the area
1500-1600
Ancestral Plains Apache
In the area
1600
Ancestral Comanche
In the area
Early 1700s
Spanish Explorers
1700
Historical Kiowa, Arapaho
and Cheyenne In the area
1870
First rail
lines In Denver 1899
Globe Smelting
and Mining
becomes American
Smelting and
Refining Company
(ASARCO)
1881
Elyria Lots for
sale by Archie Fisk
for $20 to $40
1882
Omaha and
Grant Smelter
moves to
Coliseum site
1886
Holden Smelter
opens at 51st and
Washington
1902
Globevllle Annexed
to City of Denver
1903
Omaha and Grant
Smelter closes
1904
Elyria Annexed
to City of Denver
Western Packlng/Swlft Packing
Company built along river
Blayney-Murphy/Cudahy/
Slgman/ Bar-S Packing
Company built at 48th
and Brighton
1906
First National Western
Stock Show
CSU wins the first Grand
National Steer prize
1909
National Amphitheater
(Stadium Arena) first
permanent structure
at NWSS
-oooo--o-666-
1858-1860
Colorado Gold Rush
1889
Globe Smelting
and Mining Co.
purchases
Holden Smelter
1898
Original Livestock
Exchange Building
1916
1892 Livestock
Colorado Packing Exchange
and Provisions/ Building
Armour Packing Opens
built along river
1891 1919
Town of Globevllle Smelting
Incorporated Operations
stop at
1890 ASARCO
Town of Elryrla
Incorporated
22 I Introduction


National Western Center
1973
Hall of Education,
Beef Palace, and
National Western
Center Club open
1952
Denver Coliseum
Dedicated I-70
Constructed
Yards Auction Arena
1964
Construction
ofl-70
1991
Expo Hall
and Stadium
Hall open
2013
Mayor Hancock
announces the
creation of the North
Denver Cornerstone
Collaborative (NDCC),
of which the National
Western Center
project Is Included as
one of the six major
projects In the region
National Western
Center Memorandum
Of Understanding
signed by City and
County of Denver,
Western Stock Show
Association, Colorado
State University,
Denver Museum of
Nature and Science
and History Colorado

wnouM. ^
'HOS'iS
1989
Voters approved
bond Issue for
NWSS
2006
Centennial of
National Western
Stock Show
Late
2014
National
Western
Center
(draft)
Master
Plan
released
publlcally
-6-
-6-
o-
a-o-o-o-o-
1931
National Western adds
a Rodeo to the show
2012
National Western
Stock Show
announces
they are staying
In Denver
1995
National Western
Events Center,
paddock and Horse
Barn Open
April 2014
National Western
Center Master
Plan process
started
March
2015
National Western
Center Master
Plan approved
2000
Elevated I 70 and 46th Avenue
reconstructed west of Brighton Blvd.
Introduction | 23


National Western Center
The National Western Center contains approximately 2SO acres and is located in North Denver surrounded by the Gloveville and Elyria
Neighborhoods. The site has good regional access from I-?0 and I-%5 and has nearby access to four different commuter rails stations.
Setting and Context
The NWCC is located in north Denver in the Elyria
Neighborhood. The study area is bounded by Washington
Street on the west, Brighton Boulevard on the east, Race
Court to the north and 38th Street to the south. It includes
approximately 250 acres, which includes the National
Western Stock Show (95 acres) and Denver Coliseum
(30 acres). The Globeville Neighborhood is located
to the west across the South Platte River. The area is
surrounded by industrial uses to the north and west, and
the Elyria residential neighborhood to the east.
The location is significant in that it is located along the
Corridor of Opportunity between Denver Union Station
and Denver International Airport, one of the most
compelling commercial investment opportunities in the
world. The Corridor of Opportunity along Interstate 70
and Brighton Boulevard will continue to be developed
into integrated job centers for the logistics, transportation
and warehousing industries. The study area contains two
interchanges at Washington Street and Brighton Boulevard.
The South Platte River runs through the west side of the
study area and has over a mile of river frontage at the
NWCC. To revive the river and enhance its
natural amenities, Denver recently began a series of
transformational projects that will create recreational
and development opportunities to improve river access,
and better use the entire corridor, through a mix of retail,
residential, hotel, industrial and office real estate. With
investment in remediation and shallower banks in this
segment, the river corridor will come to life with open
space and a waterfront park for recreational use, as well
as a range of new housing options with views of the
Rocky Mountains and Downtown.
The site has been the home of the National Western Stock
Show since 1906. The National Western Stock Show is a
501(c)(3) charitable organization that provides college and
graduate level scholarships in agriculture and medicine
for practice in rural areas. National Western prides itself
on its ability to educate Denvers urban community about
the importance of agriculture during the Stock Show. It
is also their mission to serve producers and consumers
throughout the world by being the premier Stock Show,
Rodeo, Horse Show and center for year-round events.
The 16-day show also serves as an entertainment
arena, hosting one of the worlds richest regular season
professional rodeos, largest horse show and Colorados
largest tradeshow. The National Western Stock Show is
noted for hosting the worlds only carload and pen
2 4* I Introduction


National Western Center
cattle show, held in the historic Denver Union Stockyards.
Overall total attendance for the Stock Show in 2014 was
640,022. The attendance record was set during the Stock
Shows 100th anniversary in 2006 at 726,972.
More than 15,000 head of horses, cattle, sheep, swine,
goats, llamas, alpacas, bison, yak, poultry and rabbits step
foot on the grounds of the National Western Stock Show
each year. More than 350 vendors fill the show grounds
with a variety of food and shopping opportunities. The
National Western Trade Show offers a variety of products
including fine art and jewelry, clothing, household items
and agricultural products and eguipment.
The study area is surrounded by the Globeville, Elyria
and Swansea neighborhoods. These neighborhoods
were developed in the early 1900s and housed the
primary workforce for the smelters, meat packing
plants and stockyards that were historically on this site.
Today, they provide a mix of residential and industrial
uses. The neighborhoods have recently completed
their neighborhood plans, and the development of the
National Western Center Campus reflects the goals and
objectives of those plans.
Planning Context
The Denver Comprehensive Plan provides the vision for
the entire city. Citywide and small area plans are adopted
as supplements to the Comprehensive Plan to provide
additional direction for a certain topic or area. Once
adopted, the National Western Center Master Plan will
guide and influence the decisions that affect the future of
the area. The Comprehensive Plan and its supplements
are adopted by City Council ordinance based on a
recommendation of approval from the Denver Planning
Board. Planning Boards criteria for approval of supplements
are: a long term view, inclusive public process, and
consistency with the Denver Comprehensive Plan.
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Roundub Retreat Strategic Illustration
National Western Center Partnerships
One of the NWCCs unique features is its collaborative
spirit and strong Partnerships are the key to making
the NWCC a reality. Throughout the NWCC Master Plan
process the NWC Partners have collaborated on a wide
variety of topics including programming, circulation,
design and public engagement. The partners have been
instrumental in moving the Vision forward reaching this
project milestone. As the project moves forward, new
partners will be added to help implement the Vision and
Guiding Principles.
As a key aspect of the State of the City Address by Mayor
Michael B. Hancock in June 2013, the Mayor used the
backdrop of the Forney Transportation Museum to outline
his vision for the North Denver Cornerstone Collaborative,
which included the idea of a new National Western
Complex at the current site, in collaboration with five key
Introduction | 25


National Western Center
partners who were prepared to release a seminal document
to articulate how this group would work together to envision
the future of the site for the next 100 years.
On July 22, 2013 Colorado State University (CSU), the
Denver Museum of Nature and Science (DMNS), History
Colorado (HC), the City and County of Denver (CCD) and
the Western Stock Show Association (WSSA) signed a
Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), attached herein
as Appendix A, expressing their intention to collaborate
on the creation of the National Western Center. From the
outset, the partners envisioned the NWCC as a year-round
destination, strategically aligning education, economic
development, tourism, and entertainment uses in one
location that celebrate and honor our Western heritage.
Areas of shared focus were site planning, a venue
feasibility study in partnership with Visit Denver, Denver
Arts and Venues and the Western Stock Show Association,
RTDs North Metro Line, needed land assemblage, project
due diligence, staff resources, and project funding. The
desired outcome was the development of a long-range
master plan and a shared commitment to substantially
advance the vision by the end of 2014.
Participants in the "Roundup Retreat
Collaborative Vision and Guiding Principles
To launch the master planning effort, CSU hosted the
Roundup Retreat, a day and a half where representatives
of each NWC Partner, members of the National Western
Citizens Advisory Committee, and outside experts came
together to articulate a shared vision. As part of this
exercise, each partner outlined their respective strategic
direction and goals, and described internal and external
forces shaping the organizations direction. The Roundup
Retreat report and strategic illustration graphics are
included in Appendix B. The strategic direction and goals
of the NWC Partners helped identify complementary
interests, collaborative opportunities, and a joint Vision
for the NWCC. A summary of the Retreat participants and
NWCC Partners strategic goals include:
City & County of Denver
The NWCC is one of six major project portfolios that
are being strategically aligned through the Mayors
North Denver Cornerstone Collaborative (NDCC).
The City and County of Denver sees this as a chance
to secure the long-term success of the NWSS and
to help significantly reconnect and re-energize the
surrounding communities.
Western Stock Show Association
The WSSA desires a blueprint for the next 100 years
that sets in motion a vibrant and sustainable future
through new facilities and programming for the
National Western Stock Show.
Colorado State University
The States land grant university, CSU envisions world
class learning opportunities in the fields of veterinary
medicine, agri-business and natural resource
stewardship.
Denver Museum of Nature & Science
DMNS imagines a world where everyone loves and
protects our natural environment.
History Colorado
As a steward of Colorados artifacts, History Colorado
envisions a center to celebrate our proud past and
help inform an even better future.
Neighborhoods
As part of the Globeville and Elyria-Swansea (GES)
neighborhood planning process, the communities
would like to see the NWCC integrate key guiding
principles connected, strong, unique and healthy
neighborhoodsinto the master planning process.
26 I Introduction


National Western Center
Another major goal of the NWCC is the potential to
stimulate and grow tourism and visitors to the region. The
NWCC has the potential to increase tourism and increase
economic impact to local hotels, restaurants, retailers,
ground transportation companies and other tourism-
related businesses. Some specific areas include:
Heritage Tourism: the NWCC will be the centerpiece
of heritage tourism in Denver and a celebration of
the American cowboy and Denvers rich historic
association with ranching. The site will also preserve
some of the citys most historic and architecturally
significant buildings.
Agri-Tourism. The NWCC will play an important role
in this rapidly growing tourism segment, celebrating
and showcasing Colorado food products and the
ranching industry.
Recreational Tourism. The redeveloped South Platte
River will provide more opportunities for hiking and
biking along the river and water sports in it, including
the potential of a river park for outdoor events.
Cultural Tourism. The National Western Stock Show
is one of Denvers largest and most popular events.
The Master Plan will allow the NWSS to thrive and
possibly expand extra days in the future. There
is the potential of attracting numerous additional
eguestrian events, concerts and shows that would
attract out of town participants, exhibitors, and
visitors.
Conventions and Trade Shows. The new NWCC can
serve as an additional site for meetings, banguets,
conventions and trade shows, adding to Denvers
ability to grow this $650 million industry.
The Corridor of Opportunity and North Denver Cornerstone Collaborative
Working Together to Transform a Region
The Corridor of Opportunity runs from Denver Union Station to Denver International Airport. The NWC is located at the Brighton Interchange
with I pO and is the Gateway to downtown on the Corridor.
Introduction | <2f]


National Western Center
The NWC is one of six integrated projects of the North Denver Cornerstone Collaborative.
The City & County of Denver continues to strengthen its
progressive, visionary reputation with several exciting
redevelopment and infrastructure projects underway.
Named the Corridor of Opportunity, this nearly 23-
mile corridor of highway and commuter rail between
a reactivated Denver Union Station (DUS) and Denver
International Airport (DIA) is one of the most compelling
investment opportunities in the world, with thousands of
developable acres. The redeveloped NWCC and Brighton
Boulevard Corridor will provide a more inspiring front
door to Denver for the millions of tourists and convention
delegates who arrive at DIA and travel to downtown
through this area, either by ground transportation at
present or by rail in the future.
Within this corridor are the dynamic, historically rich
neighborhoods of Globeville, Elyria and Swansea (GES).
There are currently six significant redevelopment projects
in the NDCC that provide unprecedented opportunities to
connect GES communities to one another and provide an
energized gateway to downtown Denver. In January 2013,
Mayor Michael B. Hancock aligned these efforts under
one coordinated vision in pursuit of creating a world-class
city. The North Denver Cornerstone Collaborative (NDCC)
is an effort to ensure integrated, efficient planning and
implementation to create deliberate connections among
these converging projects. The six major projects of the
NDCC are:
O National Western Center
Through a visionary transformation, the National Western
Center will become a next generation must-see destination
with sustainable, year-round programming. Educational
opportunities, entertainment, and community amenities will
be bolstered by innovative partnerships with Colorado State
University, Denver Museum of Nature & Science and History
Colorado and others that will join forces with the original
NWC Partners in the months and years to come, making
this new campus a catalytic anchor for North Denver. The
NWCC Vision and emerging programming for this center
will showcase sustainability principles and celebrate the
South Platte River and attract new residents and visitors to
discover the heart of the west.
28 I Introduction


National Western Center
The Brighton Boulevard Corridor Redevelopment plans to make
Brighton Boulevard one of Denvers most unique streets with
significant multi-modal improvements.
The I-70 East project will be reconstructed between Brighton
Boulevard and Colorado Boulevard with a lowered segment of
the highway. A new covered park is proposed at Swansea School.
Brighton Boulevard Corridor Redevelopment
Paving a warm welcome to our city means energizing
Brighton Boulevard, a major gateway to and from downtown
Denver, with significant multi-modal improvements.
The second phase of planning for this corridor focuses
on potential streetscape design elements, as well as
additional amenities and mobility improvements. Public
and private investment partnerships will build a new
energy and encourage innovative collaborations to further
development that mixes the old with the new, making this
one of Denvers most unique streets.
River North
This vibrant community with the South Platte River at its
center also known as RiNo, is home to a remarkable
range of creative businesses. Radiating this progressive
energy out to the rest of the city is key to the next phase
of development as the region continues to attract an
eclectic mix of millennials, the creative class and artists.
Plans call for innovative uses ofthe South Platte River as
the focal point for future development and recreation.
RiNos evolution is expected to continue over the next
20 years thanks to transit-oriented development at the
nearby 38th and Blake Station, with direct connections to
the neighborhood, and other mixed-use development in
the area.
O Interstate 70 East Reconstruction
Lowering a highway below grade is the bold move
proposed by the Colorado Department of Transportation
(CDOT) in the 1-70 East Environmental Impact Statement
(EIS) for the reconstruction area located between
Brighton Boulevard and Colorado Boulevard. Swansea
Elementary School will gain four acres of community
space from the interstate cover that will also provide new
connections within the neighborhood. Just imagine how
people, places and neighborhoods in the area will be
reenergized and rediscovered with this significant and
exciting restructuring of 1-70 East.
RTD Station Development
Transit opens up new options for residents to move
throughout the region and boosts the economic viability
of neighborhoods. As the cornerstone ofthe Corridor
of Opportunity, Globeville, Elyria and Swansea are in a
unique location that will be home to four RTD stations
and the commuter rail maintenance facility. Home to
stations on the East, Gold and North Metro rail lines, the
community will enjoy enhanced connections to other
parts ofthe city and vital access to and from Denver
Union Station, DIA, the National Western Center, Arvada
and the north Front Range.
Surrounding Neighborhoods
The NWCC is located within the Elyria neighborhood and
at the edge ofthe Globeville neighborhood. There is a
great opportunity to make the NWCC Campus and new
development an integrated part of these communities.
The Globeville and Elyria/Swansea Neighborhood Plans
each identify the need to provide connections to the
river and the Globeville plan calls for new river-oriented
development and improved connections to help activate
the river and provide mixed use growth within the
neighborhood. The neighborhood plans also help to
identify connection points across the river that work best
to support a strong and healthy community and provided
needed access to the NWCC site. These locations are
identified at 49th Avenue and at 51st Avenue from the
Washington Street side ofthe study area. Ongoing
coordination between the Globeville Neighborhood Plan
Elyria and Swansea Neighborhoods Plan and the NWCC
Master Plan is vital to inform more detailed planning
and implementation efforts. Each neighborhood plan is
guided by four key principles:
Connected
Strong
Unique
Sustainable
Introduction | 2,Q


National Western Center
The importance of this coordination stems from the fact
that all three planning efforts have a shared boundary
along the South Platte River, and all three emphasize
the importance of enhanced connections between their
respective planning areas in order to realize the goals of
each specific planning effort. These planning documents
all point towards an increase in residential and mixed
use populations within the areas near the Coliseum
property. The influence of those development patterns is
favorable for increased population, economic purchasing
power, and retail demand within the area over time.
Assets, Challenges,
and Opportunities
In addition to understanding the surrounding context, it is
necessary to focus on the NWCC site Assets, Challenges
and Opportunities. The National Western Center site
includes a number of opportunities and challenges that
help shape the Master Plan.
1-70 and the Corridor of Opportunity
The NWCC site is located directly north of 1-70 within the
Corridor of Opportunity between the downtown core and
Denver International Airport and is vital to the success of
the NWCC. 1-70 is the major access highway for tourists
and visitors coming to the NWCC and provides critical
circulation to the NWCC site and is the primary gateway
to downtown. There are two existing interchanges along
1-70 that provide access opportunities for the NWCC,
at Brighton Boulevard and at Washington Street. The
Brighton Boulevard and 1-70 interchange has acted as the
front door to the National Western Stock Show since 1-70
was built in 1964. This is the perceived access point for
most people that have attended events at the complex.
It also serves as the gateway into downtown Denver.
The Brighton Boulevard interchange provides easy
access into both downtown Denver and into the new
NWCC, with opportunities to dramatically improve this
gateway. Washington Street currently only connects to
the National Western site at 46th Avenue, but additional
planned connections across the South Platte River will
allow for better access to the NWCC site from Washington
Street and generate new activation opportunities for
Washington Street and the Globeville neighborhood.
46th Avenue and the area under I-JO is currently a barrier between
the Denver Coliseum and the NWC.
Railroads
There are currently three freight railroads and one
planned passenger rail line in the NWCC study area.
Union Pacific
The Union Pacific Railroad has one spur line that
accesses the south portion of the NWCC site just south of
I-70 crossing Brighton Boulevard and 44th Street with an
at-grade crossing. This spur line serves the Pepsi Bottling
Company located at 38th Avenue and Brighton Boulevard
and has a low volume of rail traffic.
Burlington Northern Santa Fe (BNSF)
The BNSF railroad cuts diagonally through the center of
the NWCC site and is a major east/west barrier for access
across the site. The BNSF Brush Subdivision mainline
runs roughly northeasterly through the site and connects
directly to the Globeville Yards located just southwest
of the NWCC study area. This is a high volume traffic
line (average 32 trains/day) that includes large freight
and coal trains and also includes Amtrak California
Zephyr intercity passenger service. There are currently
four crossings of this line in the study area at i-70, 46th
Avenue (overpass), 47th Avenue/Marion Street (overpass),
and at Race Court (overpass). Currently, only one track
exists as the rail crosses over the 47th Avenue/Marion
Street underpass, but the BNSF is in the planning and
design phases of increasing the number of tracks through
the site to as many as four tracks within the near future.
These additional tracks, along with the new RTD North
Metro track, will allow for the opportunity to construct a
wider underpass at 47th/Marion, increasing pedestrian
and vehicular capacity under this currently substandard
structure.
BNSF also has one local inter-terminal freight transfer
line, the Jersey Cutoff that turns west out of the north
end of the Globeville yard just north of i-70 and crosses
the South Platte River. This line has at-grade crossings at
National Western Drive and Washington Street.
30
Introduction


National Western Center
There are three freight rail companies that operate in the NWC Legend
study area: The BNSF, the Union Pacific, and the Denver and h RTD North Metro Line
Rock Island Railroad. The existing railroads create numerous h BNSF
barriers throughout the area. H Denver & Rock Island
M Union Pacific
Streets
Commuter Rail Station
RTD North Metro Line
Denver and Rock Island (DRI)
The DRI is a local freight short haul line that serves
customers throughout the north Denver area. The line
has approximately 25 miles of rail and has two corridors
which run through the NWCC site, one along the South
Platte River and one along the east side of National
Western Drive, that come together at approximately
Franklin Street and Race Court. The line carries two trains
per day in each direction and switching movements for
local businesses. These lines provide limited places to
cross east/west through the site and create an additional
barrier to the South Platte River. DRI also has its only
freight interchange point with BNSF at the north end
of the Globeville yards just north of 1-70. BNSF/DRIR
interchange occurs using both the River and National
Western Drive corridors. The through service for DRI to
serve other customers north and east of NWCC must
remain intact for the DRI to operate. DRI also has a
maintenance facility located along the river line just south
of Race Court. The DRI has seven customers within the
study area ofthe National Western Center.
RTD North Metro Line
RTD is currently constructing the North Metro Line which
will run commuter rail passenger service between Denver
Union Station and 124th and Colorado in Thornton with
future plans to extend to 162nd in Thornton. There will be
a rail station at the National Western Center on this line.
The North Metro Line is part of a larger system of new
public transportation options, further connecting Denver
through DUS to other parts ofthe Front Range.
Other nearby RTD Lines
There are three other RTD commuter rail stations within
a two-mile radius ofthe NWCC. The 41 st and Fox station
in south Globeville is located on the Gold Line, and the
38th and Blake and 40th and Colorado stations are
located on the East Line. All these stations provide great
opportunities to increase accessibility to the NWCC
and surrounding neighborhoods like never before and
collectively serve as a key component of an over-arching
multi-modal transit system to bring visitors from across
the Front Range to the NWCC site on a year-round basis.
Introduction | 31


National Western Center
The Delgany Interceptor sanitary sewer lines run for almost 25
miles and is above ground along the NWC river frontage, creating a
barrier between the NWC and the South Platte River.
Delgany Interceptors
The Delgany Interceptor and the Delgany Common
Interceptor are two of the largest sanitary sewer lines in
Denver. The twin pipes run a circuitous route through the
NWCC study area, underground through the west side of
the Denver Coliseum site, under 1-70 and adjacent to the
1909 Stadium Arena, under the BNSF tracks and south of
the Livestock Exchange building. The pipes then daylight
along the east side of the South Platte River. The pipes
enter a siphon at approximately 50th Avenue, and then
continue north on the west side of the river underground
to the Metro Wastewater Reclamation District plant in the
City of Commerce City.
Where the pipes are exposed on the east side of the river,
they vary in height above the ground from 4 at the south
to 12 at the north and pose a significant barrier to the river
from the east side. Their position directly on the top of the
east bank of the river does not allow for easy access to the
river or the ability to pull the river bank back to create an
active river edge or increased riparian habitat.
Area Connectivity and Access
Due to the large areas of the NWCC that historically have
been livestock yards, there have been very limited east/
west connections through the site between 46th Avenue
and Race Court, Brighton Boulevard and Washington
Street. The railroads also create significant deterrent to
east/west connection with a limited number of crossing
points. There are also only two vehicular/ pedestrian
crossings of the South Platte River in this area, at 46th
Avenue and at Franklin Street just north of Race Court.
The lack of east-west connectivity and private property
ownership creates a barrier for both motorists and
pedestrians wanting to connect between the Globeville,
Elyria and Swansea neighborhoods and limits river access
from the neighborhoods. With the imminent construction
of the new RTD North Metro line and a station at the
NWCC, it is important to create this east/west connection
to provide an opportunity to for better circulation as part
of the NWCC redevelopment.
lgi y Armour Administration Building
Brighton Boulevard and Washington Street are the main
north/south arterials and truck routes serving the area.
National Western Drive (Packing Flouse Road) is a local
north/south street serving a number of industrial uses
between 46th Avenue and Race Court. National Western
Drive turns into Franklin Street north of Race Court and
ties to 58th Avenue which has connections to west with
I-25. Both Brighton Boulevard and Washington Street
have a limited existing right of way width of 60. The
Globeville Area Neighborhood Plan offers options for
the widening of Washington Street to provide basic
pedestrian/bike amenities and on street parking. Brighton
Boulevard will be widened to the west along the NWCC
site to provide new pedestrian/bike amenities and
increased width for better circulation at the NWCC site
and to the neighborhood to the east. Improvements will
also be made along Brighton Boulevard as part of the I-70
East improvements at the interchange.
The existing street network within the stuff area is disconnected due
to the longterm industrial and meatpacking uses on the site.
32 I Introduction


National Western Center
NWCC. Key historic buildings include the original 1909
Stadium Arena, which was the first permanent building
at the National Western Stock Show, the 1919 Livestock
Exchange Building and the two structures immediately
to the west, the 1917 Armour Administration Building,
and the 1952 Denver Coliseum on the south side of I-70.
Each of these buildings has significant reuse potential
for the National Western Center or future development
associated with NWCC. There is also a large array of
other historic elements including the Armour water
tower, the historic Yards, and many smaller contributing
elements. Specific recommendations of the Historic
Preservation Study are located in Appendix G.
Key Historic Assets
A Historic Preservation Study for the National Western
area was completed in August 2014 is identified as one
of the reference documents for NWCC. This assessment
conducted preliminary research and provides an
assessment of the historic preservation issues that may
affect the National Western Center.
The surrounding neighborhoods of Globeville, Elyria and
Swansea also have a strong history and a rich culture
that is a great opportunity that can be reflected at the
NWCC. The story of the neighborhoods needs to be told
throughout the NWCC through interpretation, display
of historic assets, art, and active use of the site by
surrounding neighborhoods.
There is a rich history throughout the study area and
adjacent neighborhoods. Within the study area, the
National Western Historic Assessment has identified a
number of buildings that are either eligible for historic
designation or are contributing to the historic area around
Legend
Livestock Transport Bridge
Armour Water Tower
Armour Administration Building
Livestock Exchange Building
(5) 1909 Stadium Building
(§) Denver Coliseum
Stockyards
Streets
Commuter Rail Station
The connections and layout of the NWC are strongly influenced
by the planning work for the Globeville, Elyria and Swansea
Neighborhood Plans.
Introduction | 33


National Western Center
Denver Coliseum
The City and County of Denver owns and operates
approximately 30 acres of land south of 1-70 that is home
to the Denver Coliseum. The Coliseum was constructed
in 1952 as a major event venue for the City, hosting
thousands of local events and has been the home of
the National Western Stock Show Rodeo. Prior to the
Coliseums development, the site housed the Omaha
and Grant Smelter, and then was a landfill. The site
contains a number of environmental contaminants
and is part of Operable Unit 2 of the Vasquez and I-70
Superfund site.
Given the proximity to i-70 and Brighton Boulevard the
site has good potential for redevelopment for uses that
can support the NWCC program, the neighborhoods and
the region. These uses could be agricultural, educational
or research and development opportunities that could
both support and benefit the NWCC overall program and
its Vision. Additionally, its location offers opportunities
for possible retail and /or other mixed uses that can add
to the flavor of the growing arts district and River North.
Specific NWCC program uses for the larger elements (e.g.,
Equestrian, Livestock, Exposition Hall) were explored
for the site, but are difficult to fit due to the shape and
access to the parcel. A specific reuse of the Coliseum
building itself has not been identified as part of the Master
Plan process, but the NDCC should continue to look at
redevelopment and reuse options for the structure once
the New Arena becomes operational.
Regional Drainage Improvements
The National Western Center sits at the lower end of two
of the largest drainage basins in Denver, the Montclair
Basin and the Upper Park Hill Basin. There have been
relatively few major drainage improvements in the region,
which is subject to flooding during larger rainfall events.
With the upcoming North Metro and East Corridor RTD
rail improvements, and the i-70 East partially lowered
highway alternative, major drainage improvements are
being coordinated by the City and County of Denver,
Urban Drainage, RTD and CDOT to address the regional
drainage needs of the area. Several drainage alternatives
are being explored to offer opportunities for connecting
the area, providing connections to the South Platte River,
to create new amenities that help to improve water
quality in the river, and to increase the level of wellness in
the community.
1952 Denver Coliseum
341 I Introduction


National Western Center
Environmental Issues and Remediation
Environmental quality has been a concern in areas
surrounding the NWCC for many years due to historical
metal smelting, heavy industry, waste disposal in low
areas along the river, two major highways, and railroad
yards. These activities have impacted air, water, and land
quality and created odors and noise. Given the history
of the area, it is likely that contaminated soils and/or
groundwater will be encountered during redevelopment.
Additional environmental investigations will be
needed as a part of redevelopment to further refine
contaminated areas and manage cleanup. For the most
part, environmental issues that impact the broader
area surrounding the NWCC are expected to remain
throughout and after redevelopment of the site,
while potential human health concerns due to land
contamination issues can be addressed as a part of
redevelopment.
The Primary environmental issues are identified below.
For more detail into each of these issues, please refer to
Appendix F.
Air Quality
Odors
Noise
Surface Water and Sediments
Groundwater Contamination
Soils Contamination
Natural Environment and Habitat
The Denver Coliseum has numerous environmental issues that will
need to be addressed prior to redevelopment.
South Platte River
The South Platte River is one of the great untapped
opportunities in North Denver and at the NWCC. The
study area has 6,500 linear feet of riverfront on the
east side of the river. Although most of this frontage is
currently inaccessible due to the railroad lines, Delgany
Interceptors and industrial uses, the removal of these
barriers and the implementation of an active river
program in this area can rehabilitate and connect the
river to the surrounding communities and the NWCC.
The South Platte River is one of the great untapped resources in North Denver.
Introduction | 35


National Western Center
There are two designated city parks that front on the
river within the study area. Globeville Landing Park is at
the south end of the study area and is located directly
adjacent to the Denver Coliseum site. Northside Park is in
the Globeville neighborhood and is located at the north
end of the study area on the west side of the river. Both
of these existing park spaces are under-utilized due to
their isolated location near industrial uses, perceived
unsafe environment and lack of easy, direct access from
the neighborhoods. The South Platte River Bikeway runs
along the west side of the river through the study area
with a trail crossing over to the east side of the river at
Globeville Landing Park. This trail is part of a much larger
regional trail network that connects to downtown, Cherry
Creek Trail and connections north through Adams County
and Commerce City to Sand Creek.
The South Platte River offers a wide variety of opportunities
to provide active uses and recurring opportunities for
social activity, increased educational opportunities
throughout the length of the corridor, and restoration
of the river habitat to one that approximates the rivers
natural state and improves the long term health of
the river. The potential to maximize open space and
river engagement in this area is a primary factor in the
redevelopment of the NWCC.
The City of Denver and the US Army Corps of Engineers
(USACE) have partnered to develop a plan for the north
areas of the South Platte River through the River North,
Globeville and Elyria neighborhoods. As part of the future
habitat restoration and floodplain mitigation projects, the
USACE will look for opportunities to enhance visibility and
access of the river corridor. The corridor of focus includes
20th Street to the city limits. The study is developing
alternatives for the area that will be reviewed in the
spring of 2015, with the final study completed in 2017. Any
bridges and river improvements identified in the Master
Plan will need to address the floodplain hydraulic and
freeboard requirements and the existing regional bikeway
and the Globeville levee on the west side of the river.
Stakeholder Engagement
and Public Involvement
The public process for the NWCC Master Plan began in
August of 2013 with the kick-off of the National Western
Citizens Advisory Committee. Members of the Committee
and community worked together with city staff and the
project team to envision a new and integrated National
Western site and develop master plan recommendations
36 | Introduction


National Western Center
consistent with the community interests identified through
the Globeville and Elyria Swansea Neighborhood Plans.
A multi-tiered public involvement approach was
developed in partnership with the North Denver
Cornerstone Collaborative. The outreach approach
included the involvement of the Partners and area citizens
through the Citizens Advisory Committee, four community
meetings, three NDCC Town Halls, community support
activities and local stakeholder meetings, as well as the
development of a project website and online comment
form. The outreach approach was designed to create a
convenient, comfortable and transparent communication
process with the Partners, citizens and area businesses
throughout the development of the master plan.
National Western Citizens Advisory Committee
The NDCC and Councilwoman Judy Montero co-hosted a
Community Conversation event in August of 2013 with
the Globeville, Elyria and Swansea neighborhoods. The
event showcased the NWCC project to the community,
introduced the NWC Partners, and publically introduced
the creation of the National Western Center Advisory
Committee (NWCAC). The NWCAC was created to
strengthen the engagement of the NWC development
with the Globeville, Elyria, Swansea neighborhoods
and the six NDCC projects and enrich the relationship
between the NWSS and the neighbors. The NWCAC was
formed after numerous community stakeholders applied
to be on the Committee, and all were accepted. The
NWCAC represents all walks of life in the Globeville, Elyria
Swansea Neighborhoods and in North Denver. The first
NWCAC meeting was held in October of 2013. The 21
members of the committee and representatives of the
NWC Partners attended regular monthly meetings and
in-depth breakout sessions were held in the summer and
fall of 2014 to address specific elements of the Master
Plan and to receive additional feedback on the Master
Plan in-development. See the Acknowledgments for a
list of members of this committee. They participated in a
community-focused vision exercise and attended work
sessions around plan alternatives and recommendations.
The NWCAC was instrumental in identifying community
concerns, provided feedback during the planning
process, and keeping consistent the recommendations
of the NWCC master plan and neighborhood plans.
The NWCAC will continue to provide input into the
implementation of the NWCC throughout the design,
construction and operational phases of the project.
NWC Partners
Project Leadership Committee (PLC)
The Project Leadership Committee served as the
management group for the NWC Partners. The Partners
and project team convened every two weeks in
support of plan development. The Partners reviewed
plan progress, assisted in development of plan
recommendations and guided decision-making especially
in regards to site layout and programming needs.
Globeville and Elyria Swansea Neighborhood Plans
Throughout the NWCC planning process, the Globeville
and Elyria Swansea Neighborhood planning processes
were also underway. City staff and project team
management attended the Globeville and Elyria Swansea
Steering Committee meetings and coordinated with
community members. Several NWCAC members also
served as members of the neighborhood plan Steering
Committees and helped to ensure consistency between
the recommendations of the concurrent planning efforts.
The Neighborhood plans can be accessed on the City of
Denver NDCC web site at: www.denvergov.org/NDCC
NWC Public Meetings
Four public meetings were held in the community to
gather input and garner support for the planning process.
These meetings were held in conjunction with project
milestones and scheduled in the evenings at locations
convenient to the community. They included:
Community Conversation,
Initial Project Kick Off Meeting
August 22, 2013
Vision, Analysis and Program Meeting
August 26, 2014
Master Plan Alternatives and Initial
Recommendations Meeting
September 30, 2014
Final Recommendations and Draft Plan
January 15, 2015
Introduction | 37


National Western Center
NWCPublic meeting #2, August 26, 2014
Community Support Activities
Saturday August 9, 2014 the project team supported
the Globeville and Elyria Swansea neighborhoods
through their participation in Denver Days Neighborhood
Beautification and Clean-up. The team worked along-side
residents of the area in cleaning up neighborhood streets
and beautifying Argo Park.
Project team members also coordinated local outreach
opportunities with Swansea Elementary, Valdez-Perry
Library, Swansea Recreation Center, Stapleton Recreation
Center, Focus Points and GrowElaus. These meetings
were designed to ensure that plan recommendations
were shared with the broader community.
City staff held office hours at the NWCC Complex in
January of 2015 so that residents, business owners,
property owners and other interested persons could have
their guestions about plan recommendations addressed
personally by project staff.
NWC Public meeting #2, August 26, 2014
Council and Planning Board Process
Council and Planning Board briefings and approvals
were crucial to the plan development and process. City
Council was briefed in full when the Master Planning
process kicked-off and the National Western Stock Show
City Council Committee remained in place until June of
2014. Thereafter, Council members received briefings
on the status of the Master Plan and the NWCAC on a
monthly basis and remaining Council members received
individual briefings from project team members and city
staff, as needed. Council members also participated
in the NWCAC meetings and public meetings and
communicated regularly with community members. The
Denver Planning Board received three informational
briefings during the planning process:
August 2014 Planning process, Vision, Guiding Principles
October 2014 Master Plan Framework Plans
January 2015 Review of Draft Master Plan
38
Introduction


National Western Center
National Western Center
Vision
Executive Summary
Introduction
Site Orientation and Character
Master Plan Big Ideas
Acknowledgments
Introduction
Site History
Setting and Context
National Western Center
Partnerships
Corridor of Opportunity
and the North Denver
Cornerstone Collaborative
Assets, Challenges
and Opportunities
Stakeholder Engagement
and Public Involvement
National Western Center Vision
Vision
Guiding Principles
Sustainability and
Regeneration Framework
Master Plan Components
Introduction to the Master Plan
Integrated Facilities Program
Campus Design Character
Character Areas
River, Parks and Public Space
Site Circulation
Infrastructure
Historic Resources
105
Implementation
Planning Principles
Phasing
Moving Forward
Appendices
Reference Documents
National Western Center Vision
39


M You only live once,
but ifyou do it right, once is enough. ^
Mae West


National Western Center
Vision
The National Western Center Campus presents a once in
a lifetime opportunity to honor and celebrate the Stock
Shows 109 year history, while also showcasing the spirit of
the West for the next 100 years, focused on entertainment,
food, agriculture, rodeo, livestock, eguestrian, animal
health and performance, water, energy, the environment
and the growth of a well-established tourism destination.
The younger generations are very much concerned with
what we might term great global challenges. Theirs is
the generation that will have to feed nine billion people,
solve fresh water shortages and respond to climate
change. At the interface of all of these issues lies a rare
and precious opportunity for the NWCC. These issues
are incredibly important to all of us even as many
traditional labels fail to resonate. The NWCC needs to
fully engage current and future generations by adapting
our programs, facilities, and messages in ways that all
generations can connect to.
The NWC Master Plan envisions a campus or
community dedicated to addressing the challenges of
food, water, energy and the environment, representing
partnerships between the public and private sectors, and
blurring the line between entertainment, competition,
education and industry. It envisions a center helping
to apply best practices for immediate benefit to our
community and society, and simultaneously creating an
exciting life-long educational center impacting the pre-
school through college population, as well as lifelong
learners throughout Colorado and the Rocky Mountain
region. The NWCC benefits the local neighborhoods,
the Denver metropolitan area, the P-12 school system,
our interwoven network of higher education and cultural
institutions and the state of Colorado all while
delivering outcomes that can be broadly applied and
scaled to address similar challenges globally.
The intent is for the NWCC to become an international
model for a synergistic educational, business,
entertainment, and research and development community,
adapted to the evolving definitions for these sectors.
For these reasons, the founding NWC Partners are all
committed to using the depth and breadth ofthe resources
they have, now and in the future, to assure successful
attainment ofthe shared vision.
The Vision Statement and Guiding Principles for the
NWCC were developed with input from the NWC Partners,
community leaders, inspirational guests, and community
members from the National Western Citizens Advisory
Committee at the Roundup Retreat, held in April of 2014.
The Vision, Guiding Principles and Guidelines were
then refined with additional input from all parties to the
visionary statements listed below. These statements help
provide direction for activity at the NWCC, in both the
short and long term.
The following pages showcase the potential that the
Master Plan has to offer with a fully redeveloped site that
helps to support the vision and guiding principles.
National Western Center Vision Statement
The National Western Center celebrates the pioneering spirit and promise of
the West throughyear-round experiential life-long learning, the arts, entertainment,
competition and commerce.
National Western Center Vision |


National Western Center
42 I National Western Center Vision


National Western Center
Colorado Commons with the renovated 1909 Stadium Arena Market and the New CSU Center on
another busy Saturday-looking Northwest. The plaza will include small retail spaces, areas for
events and exhibits, test and research growing plots, community gardens, and a small urban farm.
National Western Center Vision | ^3


National Western Center
4*4* | National Western Center Vision


National Western Center
9
47th Avenue Festival Street and Elyria Plaza at the front door to the new Trade Show/Exhibition
Hall looking Northwest during a future National Western Stock Show.
National Western Center Vision | ^5


National Western Center
National Western Center Vision


National Western Center
The new Water Resources Center along the renovated South Platte River waterfront and an event
underway at the Stockyards/Event Pavilion with the new Livestock Center serving as the backdrop.
Bettie Cram Drive connects over the river and to the east all the way to Brighton Boulevard through
the site-looking East.
National Western Center Vision | ^7


National Western Center
48
National Western Center Vision


fTif
National Western Center
* *
The National Western Center Transit Plaza at 49th Avenue and Brighton Boulevard will be one of the
major front doors to the new National Western Center. New pedestrian connections will tie the station
to the new Livestock and Equestrian facilities and to the Globeville Neighborhood-looking west.
National Western Center Vision | 4*9


National Western Center
w
i**.
50 I National Western Center Vision


National Western Center
Another busy day at the Stockyards during a future Stock Show. The Stockyards Auction Arena
and Show Arena becomes the central focus point of the yards. The Livestock Center is in the
background-looking Southeast.
National Western Center Vision


National Western Center
Guiding Principles and Guidelines
The following is a list of Guiding Principles and Guidelines
for the NWCC, organized by the nine values or Guiding
Principles identified by the NWC Partners and the
neighborhoods.
Community and Neighborhood Integration
The City and County of Denver undertook a neighborhood
planning process for the Globeville and Elyria/Swansea
Neighborhoods, beginning in 2012. Throughout both the
neighborhood planning process and the National Western
Center Master Plan process, the connection of the
neighborhoods to the river and connection to each other
has been a strong common theme that is reflected in the
NWCC Master Plan. The National Western Center will:
Create a welcoming and open campus to the
adjacent communities.
Provide critical multi-modal connections and access
points to the adjacent communities to engage the
river, access transit and promote a healthy lifestyle.
Establish a positive community benefit.
Engage the River and Nature
The importance of embracing the South Platte River
with its historic and ecological attributes creates a key
framework for how people will experience the NWCC.
The National Western Center will:
Recognize the historic, ecological, and future value
of the sites proximity to the South Platte River as a
key component of the NWCC experience.
Celebrate and respect the natural world by
promoting the restoration of the rivers ecosystem,
water guality and animal habitat.
Build on current successes and recreational
activity along the river, establishing a river-focused
urban environment that is healthy, habitable and
connected.
Enhance the safety of the river corridor and the
surrounding region, serving as an integral connector
of the adjacent neighborhoods.
Serve as one of several new gateways into and out
of the NWCC.
Celebrate Western Heritage
The strong tradition and the rich history of the site help
to create a unifying theme throughout the NWCC. This
history celebrates the land, the people and the western
way of life. The National Western Center will:
Reflect, respect, and celebrate the meaning of the
Western way of life and its unigue influence on
culture, competition, and commerce.
Celebrate the Wests pioneering past and desire for
continual discovery, while pointing visitors toward
the future of how life in the West is evolving.
Solidify and sustain the NWSS as the top stock show
and rodeo in the world.
Create a world class eguestrian facility to attract the
highest level of competition in eguestrian events.
Creates an outstanding eguestrian health and
rehabilitation facility used as a teaching/learning
opportunity for students and continuing education for
the community.
Elonorthe connection between land and people, and
how the Western landscape has shaped different
generations and cultures.
Create the opportunity to tell the story of all the
people and communities that have lived and worked
on this land, including Native Americans, early
settlers and the Globeville, Elyria and Swansea
neighborhoods.
Inspire Health and Wellness
Inspiring and supporting healthy lifestyles is an important
role of the NWCC. The National Western Center will:
In conjunction with surrounding neighborhoods,
inspire a healthy and vibrant way of life locally,
regionally and nationally through a demonstrated
mix of housing, parks and open space, jobs and
range of services, all of which consider active design
principles.
Promote recreational opportunities, multi-model
connections and access to healthy food for all
populations.
Use assets at the NWCC to teach about human and
animal health.
52
National Western Center Vision


National Western Center
Build Cultural Crossroads
The history of the site and the multiple connections that
run through the site create a platform to learn about all
the cultures that will interact at the National Western
Center. The National Western Center will:
Educate the public on the importance of this site
to human beings for the last 10,000 years. This site
was shaped by our countrys native population and
pioneers; it helped create the unigue culture of
Denver and Colorado.
Foster the crossing of cultures locally, regionally,
nationally and globally.
Serve as a gathering place where ideas and diverse
cultures can be exchanged in this hub of the west.
Celebrate local, regional, national and international
artistic and creative talent.
Integrate the arts, in all its various forms, into the
site and provides a platform that is inclusive of a
broad range of cultural expressions.
Create a unigue region of the City that celebrates
the past, but focuses on a mutually beneficial shared
future through the combination of neighborhood,
commercial and cultural experiences.
Be Pioneering: Break Trail and Foster Innovation
The National Western Center will be a place of innovation
for business, job creation and cutting edge research and
development. The National Western Center will:
Foster global linkages to advance cutting edge R&D,
product development and services in the agricultural
industry, including but not limited to fields of study
in food production and safety, nutritional health,
technology, animal husbandry, and public policy.
Embrace innovation, independence and ingenuity.
Encourage breaking trail as our founding charter
and forward-looking spirit.
Embrace new ideas that serve as long term catalysts
for job creation, neighborhood entrepreneurialism,
ongoing public and private capital investment and a
sustainable business model for the National Western
Stock Show, new eguestrian events, and the NWC
Partners.
Create Fun and Entertaining Experiences
Building off the long time entertainment programs
at the Center, a new tradition of events, venues and
entertainment will be developed that create a thriving
365 day-a-year venue for new out-of-state visitors and
residents. The National Western Center will:
Be an interactive and engaging site for the
community, patrons, visitors, exhibitors and
performers.
Establish, for young and old visitors alike, memorable
and enjoyable experiences that encourage them to
return to the campus.
Provide a broad range of year-round entertainment,
competition, and educational programming.
Grow Local, Regional, and Global Intelligence
The National Western Center will be a place to stimulate,
educate and cultivate life-long learning. The National
Western Center will:
Stimulate pre-school through post-secondary
experiential education and cultivates new
partnerships for life-long learning around the issues
of agriculture, food systems, land and livestock
management, veterinary medicine, history, ecology,
business, the arts, and design.
Create a spirit of engaged learning by investing in
local and regional intelligence, linked to an ever-
expanding global knowledge base.
Serve as a key Corridor of Opportunity gateway,
linking downtown Denver and the local
neighborhoods from Denver Union Station to Denver
International Airport through new multi-modal
connections.
National Western Center Vision | 53


National Western Center
Embrace an Ethic of Regeneration
The long-term regeneration of the site is a core element
that will take advantage of the natural systems, restore
the area, and create new places that improve our
environment. The National Western Center will:
Celebrate interdependence of natural, social and
economic systems.
Restore regional healthy habitats and ecosystems.
Improve the soil, including addressing the smelting
and landfill legacies, so that the NWCC is clean
enough to grow healthy food, if desired.
Use building remodeling and new construction to
improve the site and regional environmental guality,
while creating healthy work spaces.
Create measurable positive impacts on the
community and the region in terms of water guality,
air guality and other environmental components.
Sustainability and
Regeneration Framework
Imagine a NWCC that celebrates the interdependence
of natural, social and economic systems. Imagine the
redevelopment of this area restoring regional healthy
habitats and ecosystems, linked by bicycle paths.
Imagine eating food grown on the land and seeing
clean water flow into the river. There are exciting
opportunities to honor the historic context of the
surrounding neighborhoods and industrial past, while
creating healthy work spaces and job opportunities, and
making innovation and education a site-wide priority.
Using a comprehensive and inclusive approach to site
and community redevelopment can create regenerative
systems that create abundance for current and future
generations at the NWCC.
The State of Colorado, and the Front Range in particular,
has developed a reputation for progressive approaches
to sustainability in redevelopment projects. In Denver, a
number of developments, notably Stapleton, Lowry, and
Mariposa, have demonstrated the cutting edge in thinking
on sustainable design and eguitable development.
CSUs campus in Fort Collins has been ranked the most
sustainable campus in the country by the Association for
the Advancement of Sustainability in Fligher Education.
The proliferation of green technology firms, advanced
energy companies, sustainable agricultural businesses,
and our proximity to the National Renewable Energy Lab
have created an ethic of innovation and regeneration,
rooted in the love of the natural resources that make
Colorado and the West attractive to visitors, businesses,
professionals, and families.
These examples emphasize the value that the region, and
indeed much of the West, places on innovative, cutting-
edge approaches to economic, social, and environmental
sustainability. The NWCC provides a unigue opportunity
to go beyond sustainability to adopt a regenerative
approach to redevelopment by improving, restoring, and
enhancing the site and its surroundings ecologically,
economically, and socially.
In order to realize this vision and leverage the expertise
and commitment within the Front Range to best-in-
class regenerative practices, CSUs Institute for the
Built Environment and Division of University Operations
convened a volunteer National Western Center
Sustainability Task Force to create clear sustainability
goals for the NWCC. The Task Force was made up of City
staff, sustainability practitioners, technical and cultural
experts, and other stakeholders. The full list of NWC
Sustainability Task Force members is identified in the
Acknowledgments section of this plan.
The Goals below were created to fit within the NWCC
Guiding Principles framework (although many of them
address multiple Principles) and describe outcomes and
ongoing activities from the design phase to construction
to operations and programming. The Goals were also
designed to align with City 2020 Sustainability Goals,
the Globeville-Elyria-Swansea Flealth Impact Assessment
goals, and with categories within a number of different
sustainability rating systems.
The large scale of the NWCC and the possibility of central
management of many large facilities and grounds make
it ideal for district-scale approaches. Therefore, these
Goals apply to the full NWCC study area, including all
partnerships and joint ventures within the site, while
allowing flexibility in how the Goals are reached. A
detailed matrix of the Goals, with associated example
implementation strategies, metrics for measuring impact,
and suggested scales and timing is in Appendix D.
54* I National Western Center Vision


National Western Center
Engage the River and Nature (ERN)
ERN 1: Create safe, intentional connections to the
river and natural areas
ERN 1.1: Provide diverse yet focused visual and
physical access to nature and the river
ERN 1.2: Create series of green spaces on site that
connect to one another and to nearby green spaces,
trails, parks
ERN 2: Use nationally or internationally recognized
rating system for landscape design and maintenance,
favor the use of native plants, and integrate with
water use goals (EER 3)
ERN 3: Replace or integrate physical infrastructure
with natural systems and/or incorporate functional
biomimicry and biophilic (green infrastructure) design
principles wherever possible
ERN 3.1: Treat stormwater onsite, using various
methods throughout the site, to create net zero
or net positive impact on stormwater guality and
guantity entering the South Platte River
ERN 4: Provide education and outreach on site
related to the Platte River and its watershed
and include educational components in water
guality features, wastewater treatment, and water
conservation measures
ERN 5: Consider impacts to the Platte River
watershed during all stages of decision making
(design, construction, operations, etc.) to support the
river containing swimmable, fishable water
ERN 6: Habitats along the river meet key diversity
and health indicators and provide appropriate
biological corridors linking to other habitats in
surrounding areas
Inspire Health and Wellness (IHW)
IHW 1: Promote healthy food options, food security,
and locally sourced foods
IHW 1.1: Increase availability of healthy, affordable,
culturally appropriate food sources, ideally
year-round, either on site or in partnership with
surrounding businesses and organizations.
IHW 1.2: Support evidence-based models that
increase food security for community members,
either onsite or in partnership with surrounding
businesses and organizations
IHW 1.3: Promote year-round availability of locally
sourced foods, either onsite or in partnership with
surrounding businesses and organizations
IHW 2: Promote active transportation, active
lifestyles, and access to nature for all site users
to increase physical activity and promote mental
wellbeing
IHW 2.1: Provide multi-modal transportation
connections, particularly to major transit stops,
neighborhoods, employment centers, parks, and
other destinations
IHW 2.2: Design the site for extensive active use
(e.g., biking, recreation, walking)
IHW 2.3: Improve connectivity to natural areas and
places of respite, including the South Platte River
IHW 3: Design buildings to maximize physical and
mental health of occupants
IHW 4: Establish and meet or exceed guality of life
indicators (odor, noise, light pollution, traffic, etc.) for
visitors and neighbors
IHW 5: Reduce and/or mitigate heat island effect to
reduce its impact on health, energy use, etc.
National Western Center Vision | (5 5


National Western Center
Embrace an Ethic of Regeneration (EER)
EER 1: Integrate high performance sustainable design
and operations in all buildings
EER 1.1: Design all buildings to meet a nationally or
internationally recognized rating systems (e.g., LEED)
Gold level or higher, or current City and partner
reguirements, and design for efficient adaptive reuse
overtime
EER 1.2: Train all staff working in buildings and/or
on grounds in behaviors that maximize the efficacy
of sustainable design and will be accountable for
seeing that such behaviors are practiced
EER 1.3: Guide visitors, through appropriate defaults
and instructions, in behaviors on site that maximize
the efficacy of sustainable design and to similar
behaviors they can practice at home and at work
EER 2: Design and operate facilities to maximize
efficiency of facilities and resources per user
EER 3: Create net zero or closed loop systems for
energy, waste, and water
EER 3.1: Create a net zero energy district,
prioritizing technical and behavioral strategies to
increase efficiency and using on-site renewable
energy sources (by 5 years after full build-out)
EER 3.2: Create a net zero or closed loop district
for waste streams and apply relevant technigues
and training during operations (by 5 years after full
build-out)
EER 3.3: Create a net zero district for water use,
use zero potable water for landscaping, and apply
relevant technigues and training during operations
(by 5 years after full build-out).
EER 4: Divert at least 90% of allowable waste from landfill
during all site manipulation and demolition processes
EER 5: Maintain or reduce greenhouse gas (GHG)
emissions levels, including transportation, at or
below 2015 emissions and strive for continuous
reduction overtime
EER 6: Explore using a district scale rating system,
such as EcoDistricts, LEED-ND, etc.
Community and Neighborhood Integration (CNI)
CN11: Create porous district boundaries and physical,
spatial, and psychological connections
CN11.1: Ensure access for neighbors and visitors
to public transportation stops, NWCC venues, and
amenities; increase connectivity and mobility overall
CN11.2: Blend the boundary between site and
surrounding neighborhoods while allowing for
efficient event operations and ticketing
CN11.3: Design site to a human scale for optimal user
experience
CNI 2: Continue relationship building,
communication, and interaction with surrounding
communities and Denver metro region, including
culturally relevant engagement methods, to address
community needs and reduce uncertainty
CNI 3: Create programming that supports
neighborhood identity, the local economy, and
economic development through training, local
business incubation, fostering entrepreneurship,
local partnerships, etc.
56 | National Western Center Vision


National Western Center
Build Cultural Crossroads (BCC)
BCC 1: Provide physical and programmatic space for
cultural and artistic activity
BCC 1.1: Highlight current cultural and artistic
activities locally, regionally, nationally, globally
BCC 1.2: Foster new forms of cultural and artistic
expression, particularly as these activities relate to
the American West
BCC 2: Create a virtual and physical global cultural
destination that fosters the crossing of cultures
locally, regionally, nationally or globally
BCC 2.1: Provide physical and programmatic
space for innovation to emerge from the crossing
of cultures (e.g., local entrepreneurs and global
businesses, US and overseas companies, etc.)
BCC 3: Practice inclusiveness and consider multiple
cultural viewpoints at all decision-making stages,
including design, construction, operations, events, etc.
Celebrate Western Heritage (CWH)
CWH 1: Ensure that the NWCC has world-class,
multi-purpose stock show, rodeo, eguestrian, and
event facilities that support diverse year-round
programming and a sustainability business model for
the NWSS
CWH 2: Support and promote culturally sensitive
and diverse events and social gathering places that
highlight the history and present of the American
West
CWH 3: Honor the authenticity and origins of the
site, preserving architecture and features that have
historic and cultural merit, while efficiently reusing
them and integrating with new facilities
CWH 4: Offer robust educational programming and
features that provide a balanced presentation about
the natural, geological, agricultural, and cultural
history of the American West
CWH 5: Honor the historic significance of human/
animal relationships and continue to use best-in-
class animal treatment and care


National Western Center
Be Pioneering and Foster Innovation (BPFI)
BPF11: Advance the state of the art using site
and facility design, operations, and events as
experimental and educational Living Labs
BPFI 2: Foster entrepreneurship and innovation,
particularly around food and food systems, water,
energy, entertainment, livestock management,
etc. through partnerships, research, training, and
outreach
BPFI 3: Showcase relevant innovation at the NWSS
event each year
BPFI 4: Use virtual and physical space to host cross-
sector and cross-discipline conversations, speaker
series, demonstrations, conferences, etc.
BPFI 5: Establish adaptive management processes
in operations and maintenance that drive continual
improvement, measurement, monitoring and
adaptation
Create Fun and Entertaining Experiences (CFE)
CFE 1: Create programming that emphasizes health
(e.g., NWCC 5K Run)
CFE 2: Ensure design and operations allow for safe
interactivity and hands-on learning
CFE 3: Create outdoor activity spaces to provide
flexible uses and a variety of experiences related to
food, agriculture, livestock, energy, water, etc.
CFE 4: Integrate local and regional visual and
performing art and artists into the site design,
programming, and operations
Grow Local, Regional, and Global Intelligence (CLRGI)
GLRG11: Provide programming that complements
local and regional education, including (but not
limited to) topics of agriculture, food systems, land
and livestock management, veterinary medicine,
history, ecology, business, the arts, and engineering
GLRGI 2: Work with local and regional schools to
provide on- and off-site educational opportunities and
pathways for life-long learning for students of all ages
GLRGI 3: Use infrastructure, natural systems,
buildings, animal care, crop production, operations,
monitoring, etc. as public, formal, and informal
educational opportunities, including (but not limited
to) Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics
(STEM) subjects
GLRGI 4: Create or extend existing programs to support
mentorships, training, and internships at the NWCC
GLRGI 4: Use the NWCC platform, both physical
and virtual, to convene discussions that inform and
improve the state of the art, including (but not limited
to) topics of agriculture, food systems, land and
livestock management, veterinary medicine, history,
ecology, business, the arts, and engineering
58
National Western Center Vision


National Western Center
Master Plan Components
Executive Summary
Introduction
Site Orientation and Character
Master Plan Big Ideas
Acknowledgments
Introduction
Site History
Setting and Context
National Western Center
Partnerships
Corridor of Opportunity
and the North Denver
Cornerstone Collaborative
Assets, Challenges
and Opportunities
Stakeholder Engagement
and Public Involvement
National Western Center Vision
Vision
Guiding Principles
Sustainability and
Regeneration Framework
Master Plan Components
Introduction to the Master Plan
Integrated Facilities Program
Campus Design Character
Character Areas
River, Parks and Public Space
Site Circulation
Infrastructure
Historic Resources
Implementation
Planning Principles
Phasing
Moving Forward
Appendices
Reference Documents
Master Plan Components | 59


M Tomorrow hopes
we have learned something fr omj ester day.^ John Wayne


National Western Center
Introduction to the Master Plan
The National Western Center Master Plan is based on
the overall Vision and Guiding Principles set by the NWC
Partners and the community. The Master Plan sets the
framework for a new and revitalized destination in Denver
that builds off the culture and heritage of the place, brings
activity to river, provides new connections, inspires a new
ethic in health and wellness, and embraces site regeneration.
The new NWCC will revitalize a large area of the city by
being an active destination; by connecting neighborhoods
to one another; by bringing the life back to the river; and
by becoming a new kind of district that celebrates the best
of our natural, cultural and agricultural history and future.
When we think of the site area today we think of industry,
trucks and trains but in the future we will experience a
vibrant event and educational district unified with a natural
setting. The plan is framed around the following concepts:
Improving Access to and Health of the river, Providing New
Connections, Providing Flexible, Year-round Programs, and
Fostering Partnership and Collaboration.
The National Western Stock Show (NWSS) has been held
on this site for over 100 years. What drew people to
this site were the connected cattle trails, rail lines, and
river access, making it a good place to meet, exchange
knowledge, do business, hold livestock and horses, and
put on a grand show for the community. Those same
attributes the river and rail and road access led to
the development of major heavy industry on the site. The
original asset of the site, the South Platte River, became
forgotten. Now it is time for the NWSS to revitalize itself
by starting with river revitalization and becoming a
grander, expanded and multi-use site.
The NWCC and surrounding areas sit within the historic
floodplain, part of the inspiration for having the river as
the core of the Plan. It is almost certain that before the
National Western was established, and the area was
urbanized, much of this land was occupied by native
cottonwood galleries or forests that followed old river
channels and the sandy soils and groundwater of the
lower terraces that flank the river. The character of the
original landscape ofthe National Western was rural,
combining grasslands, riparian shrublands, and towering
cottonwoods. Over time, this regime was replaced with
pavement and plants from other regions. Replacing the
ecological function of these terraces is not fully possible,
but the Plan envisions restoring natural functions by a
strong emphasis on natural stormwater conveyance,
cleansing and infiltration into the ground; greatly
expanding the range and extent of native cottonwood and
riparian plantings; and envisioning the National Western
Center as once again in a setting that is urban and evokes
its rural past. This means an enhanced corridor of natural
habitats, expanded public access, improved water guality,
and more room for the river to breathe.
The Master Plan also emphasizes connections:
connections of people to people, people to river, and city
to nature. The land along the river will be expanded into
a wider corridor that will be linked into Globeville and
Elyria/Swansea through new street, pedestrian, bike and
green connections. These new connections will support
neighbors, visitors, vendors, competitors, and employees
365 days a year with access to residences, amenities
and the venues ofthe National Western Center itself. The
Master Plan includes a range of substantial public plazas
and connections that will support daily activity, special
events, and gathering and staging during the Stock Show
and other events. The different areas ofthe Center have
their own public space or spaces, providing relief from
the large scale ofthe buildings that make up the center,
but also providing room for people to gather and access
events as a whole during Stock Show or individual events
at each major facility.
The design of these spaces will build on and express the
idea that the Center is a place about both the past and
the future. Western heritage and its place in our future
will be a recurring theme in materials, details and symbols
that are used in the design but this will not be a place
that is about the past. At its core, the NWCC is about the
innovative future ofthe West and the many ways in which
nature, culture, and agriculture continue to develop and
change with new technologies, methods, and ever-
increasing international opportunities and connections
to our local communities. The design ofthe NWCC will
also be ofthe present, using the latest in sustainable
technologies and materials appropriate to the New West.
The Plan outlines key facility adjacencies, basic physical
layout and frameworks to help guide future development
ofthe site over a phased redevelopment. The Plan
identifies a unique place in the Denver region that
allows for a wide variety of uses throughout the year and
provides access to the neighborhoods and key natural
resources. The Plan includes primary physical program
elements, site access and circulation, major infrastructure
anticipated for the event and educational venues, and
sustainability principles and goals to ensure the site has a
positive social, economic, and environmental impact.
Master Plan Components I 6l




National Western Center
The National Western Center
Master Plan sets the framework for
a new and revitalized destination
in Denver that builds off the culture
and heritage of the place, brings
activity to the river, provides new
connections, inspires a new ethic in
health and wellness, and embraces
site regeneration.
The new National Western Center
will revitalize a large area of the
city by being an active destination;
by connecting neighborhoods to one
another; by bringing the life back
to the river; and by becoming a
new kind of district that celebrates
the best of our natural, cultural and
agricultural history and future.
Master Plan Components
63


National Western Center
Caption
Legend
H Partner Facilities
H Flexible Use Facilities
H Livestock Center
H Equestrian Center
Commuter Rail Station
Integrated Facilities Program (IFP)
The NWC Integrated Facilities Program (IFP) is one of the
key documents developed as part of the Master Plan
to help identify the physical programming needs of the
NWCC. The IFP identifies new and adaptively reused
facilities that can be home to a broad range of different
uses and activities. The IFP stresses the importance
of providing flexible destination facilities that can be
used by many different users to activate the facilities and
the site 365 days a year, that attract a broader range of
tourist activity.
The IFP is based, in part, on the Denver Feasibility Study
(released May 2014), commissioned by Visit Denver,
Denver Arts and Venues and the Western Stock Show
Association to better understand the best long-term
positioning for the NWSS, National Western Complex,
Denver Coliseum, and the Colorado Convention Center.
The Feasibility Study is identified as a reference
document to this plan.
The Feasibility Study identified the NWSS as the Super
Bowl of stock shows a premier livestock industry
event. The study identifies the potential to re-establish
the historic and iconic Stock Show for the next 100 years,
for it to remain at the current site, re-master plan the
entire site, build a new Arena integral to the site (north
of I-70), and to re-purpose the Denver Coliseum site and
other select facilities to create a dynamic, fully aligned
campus, at the gateway into downtown Denver.
The IFP identifies the full build out of the programs
identified in the Denver Feasibility Study, and the Master
Plan shows the approximate footprint of these full facilities.
Although the full program is identified to determine
the ultimate build out, the program is intended to be a
flexible document that can be adjusted depending on
changes in programming, future yet unknown needs,
available funding and phasing. A more detailed program
summary is located in Appendix C.
64 | Master Plan Components


National Western Center
The IFP groups the new facilities into major use categories:
New CSU and Partner Areas
Food Innovation Center and Conservatory
Denver Urban Extension Center
Food demonstration plots
Water Resources Center
Classrooms, laboratory, office space
Center for Performing Arts/Lecture Flail
Art, music and dance studios
Conference and meeting space
Food and Western Artisan market
Retail uses and flexible pavilion space in plazas
Flexible gallery/exhibit space
Permanent Coors Western Art Gallery
Community use space
Possible short term living space for students
and faculty
New Arena
10,000 fixed seat arena
Additional retractable seating for hockey, basketball
or concerts
Ice capability for hockey, family shows and a possible
Winter Olympics bid
Premium Seating
140x260 show ring
Administrative offices
Multiple Locker rooms
Back of house facilities for service, storage and event
operation uses
Restaurant(s)
Retail uses along Brighton Boulevard Blvd. frontage
Outdoor exhibit and concessions space
New Trade Show/Exhibition Hall
350,000 NSF of exhibit space
Flexible event and ballroom space
Coors Western Art
Lower level parking/flex space
Accommodates potential for Olympic long track
speed skating oval
Master Plan Components | 6 5


National Western Center
New Livestock Center and Stockyards
5,000 seat Livestock Stadium Arena
700 seat Livestock Hall Auction Arena
Livestock Hall
Stockyards/Event Pavilion
1,000 seat Stock Yard Show Arena
1,000 seat Livestock Center Auction Arena
Cattle tie areas
Outdoor exhibit and concessions space
New Equestrian Center
4,500 seat Equestrian Events Center
500 seat Equestrian Arena
Horse Stall Barn
Enclosed warm up buildings (2)
Open air warm up buildings (2)
CSU Equine Sport Medicine Facility
CSU Community Outreach Clinic
CSU Clinical Trials Center
Other Facilities
Maintenance facility
Outdoor and covered storage
Equipment storage
Service, loading, marshaling and unloading areas
Site surface and structured parking
Neighborhood Program Elements
The adjoining neighborhoods of Globeville, Elyria and
Swansea are important partners in the development of
this Plan including how the site is implemented and how
it functions now and in the future.
The general program needs ofthe neighborhoods mesh
well with the overall goals, program, and facilities ofthe
NWCC and create abundant opportunities for the NWCC to
engage with the neighborhoods. The neighborhood goals
of a Unique, Strong, Connected and Healthy community
are in alignment with the NWCC plan and evident in
the following subset ofthe full Guiding Principles for
NWCC Refer to Appendix E for a listing of all the program
elements identified by the Citizens Advisory Committee.
Neighborhood Integration
There is a strong desire from the neighborhoods that the
NWCC provide critical east/west connections through the
site, linking the river, the new rail station, and the heart of
each neighborhood. These connections include new river
and rail crossings that will enable neighborhood residents
to access parks, trails and the river corridor.
Engage the River and Nature
The neighborhoods have identified the need to increase
access to public space and to develop new public
spaces along the river at the NWCC that reflects the
character and interests ofthe neighborhoods, including
gathering places, walking paths, neighborhood related
programming, and celebration ofthe site history through
visual markers throughout the site. Access to the River is
also identified as a key community goal.
Inspire Health and Wellness
Health and Wellness opportunities, such as improved
facilities for walking, biking and active recreation, access
to healthy foods and local markets, and increased
community programming and education for health
and wellness, are an important part of integrating the
community and NWCC.
Local, Regional and Global Intelligence
The NWCC has a strong goal to grow local, regional and
global intelligence. The neighborhoods have identified a
number of program needs to help educate children and to
teach people about the relationship between agriculture,
animals, water, energy, and growing healthy food.
Be Pioneering: Break Trail and Foster Innovation
Growing local business knowledge is an identified
neighborhood need. NWCC can be a place for local
support of business, artists and entrepreneurs by
providing incubator space, enterprise market space and
a collaborative environment. The NWCC can also help
provide work force development and on-site job training
to local residents.
Create Fun and Entertaining Experiences
The NWCC site will provide many opportunities for local
entertainment, events and gallery spaces, along with
fresh food, restaurants and commercial/retail spaces
that will activate the neighborhood and support local
opportunities for entertainment.
66 I Master Plan Components


National Western Center
Urban Garden
Expanded Program Opportunities
CSU Proposed Programming
The NWC Partners are in initial phases of creating
collaborative programs that could be held throughout
the site and would make use of both indoor and outdoor
spaces, and various site assets and characteristics.
The Guiding Principles and Goals will help shape
programming as it evolves, but some potential programs
have been proposed:
Collaborative Education Programs
Creating a hands-on learning center and
conservatory focusing on food systems (global to
local, seed to compost) and its connection to various
topics like energy, water, transportation, genetics,
engineering, health, etc.
Providing a CSU Urban Extension Center with classroom
and outdoor educational opportunities and hands-on
demonstrations of agriculture, food production, animal
care, etc. specific to an urban setting. (Primarily CSU,
with collaboration from partners)
Urban Extension Center
Creating a Water Resources Center that takes
advantage of the sites adjacency to the South
Platte River and provides research, laboratory, and
educational opportunities for K-20 students and the
public (e.g., aguaria with native species, water play
tables, interactive hydrology exhibits, etc.).
Water Resources Center
Collaborative programming of outdoor spaces
and shared gallery spaces for structured and
unstructured educational experiences (e.g., using
catwalks and bridges as interpretive walks, river
talks, etc.)
Working with P-12 institutions and environmental
education programs to teach about food systems,
animal care, urban sustainability, water, and other
subjects via hands-on activities that the NWCC is
uniguely suited to provide.
Using outdoor spaces, included rooftops, plazas,
and vertical surfaces to showcase urban agricultural
innovation and support NWCC sustainability goals.
Creating a live archeological site that showcases
both archeological methods and uncovers the sites
history. Artifacts and items from the dig could then be
displayed in interior gallery/exhibition space.
Nature Center
Master Plan Components | 6 *~]


National Western Center
Hosting neighborhood tours (walking, biking, etc.)
that discuss natural and human history and link back
to the NWCC.
Sidewalk Markers
Creating mobile applications to allow visitors to
have interpretive and interactive experiences that
change on a regular basis, and encourage visiting
the entire site.
Collaborative Services and Amenities
Supporting the creation of a food and artisan market
that provides spaces for community members,
students, and others to test and market new and
existing food products and art. The market can
promote Colorado products from around the state,
meet local needs, carry items of local interest,
support local entrepreneurs, and support shared
economy and net positive economy goals.
Partnering with private restaurant to create an
on-site farm-to-table restaurant, which could provide
hands-on opportunities for students (e.g., CSU
Hospitality, Business, etc.).
Developing a culinary teaching kitchen that can
hold courses on nutrition, cooking classes, and the
science and history of food, and provide space for
food preparation for the onsite market and food
business incubation.
Urban Gardens
68 | Master Plan Components
Providing an Eguine Sports Medicine facilities and a
collaborative Community Outreach Clinic that provide
treatment and education for CSU students and the
general public. Facilities will demonstrate CSUs
best-in-class research and treatment technigues and
educate on connections between human and animal
health. (Primarily CSU)
Equine Facility
Creating a Clinical Trials Center that will collaborate
with other health institutions, provide the ability for
more convenient diagnostic testing, clinical trial
monitoring, and research services that also connect
with human health. (Primarily CSU, with collaboration
from other partners).
Using auditorium space for small performing
arts events, particularly where CSU students are
providing support as a learning opportunity.
Shared art studio space between partners and
community groups. This space might also be used by
an artist in residence program and workshops.
Collaborative Training, Business Incubation,
and Conferences
Hosting/co-hosting conferences and meetings that
benefit from the NWCC setting and facilities (e.g.,
conferences for livestock associations, global food
sustainability and innovation, urban sustainability, etc.)
Creating an ongoing speaker series, university-
business connections, and peer connections for
agribusinesses
Provide collaborative business incubator and
entrepreneurial business support and space to assist
small and new businesses in marketing, sales, and
finance.
Provide work force training and resources in jobs
related to agriculture, water resources, food, animal
care, facilities management, etc.
Establishing mentorship and internship programs that
support students of various ages.


National Western Center
Program Post-Master-Plan Next Steps
In order to further developing programming ideas and
to support DMNSs Community Voices initiative, DMNS,
HC, CSU and CCD should consider using empathetic
interviews to better understand the programming desires
of surrounding communities, Denver, and outside visitors.
The results of these interviews should then shape more
detailed proposed programming to inform exactly
which facilities house which programs, and specific
facility needs during the design phase. In particular,
archeological site location is critical to identify before
widespread site disruption.
Campus Design Character
The NWCC will be a distinctive and unique district in north
Denver. To support this uniqueness, the site and architecture
should have an overall character that supports the
pioneering vison; one that celebrates the past, but clearly
points to the future. The character of both buildings and
open space should reflect the American West by considering
the landscape, the river, the prairie and the agricultural
heritage while inspiring new design ideas for the future.
neighborhoods. It is not the intent of the overall character
to reestablish older west or industrial buildings, but to
design buildings that reflect the general character of
the past while integrating a more modern aesthetic that
embraces the value of the pioneering spirit.
New West Architecture
H Signature Architecture
H Industrial Architecture
Streets
Commuter Rail Station
Architectural Character
There are three separate character areas within
the NWCC Campus that will have a unique, yet
complementary, architectural character. The architectural
character identified reflects the uses of the buildings,
their location on the site, their function within the
overall site, and their relationship to adjacent uses and
New West Architecture
The New West character area includes all the facilities
west of the BNSF railroad line and includes the new
Livestock Stadium Arena, Livestock Hall, Equestrian
Events Center, Horse Barn, Equestrian Arena, and the
CSU Equine Sports Medicine Clinic. The Livestock Center
contains over 350,000 SF and the Equestrian Center
includes over 530,000 SF of facilities. These two centers
stretch for over 1/2 mile north/south along the rail tracks
and are adjacent to the new stockyards/events pavilion.
The New West architectural character is based on buildings
that are specifically related to agricultural purposes and
mimic the forms, colors and materials that reflect the
vernacular architecture of the region. The buildings reflect
simple forms with pitched roofs, use materials such as
metal, wood and muted earth tone colors and include
arcades and galleries. These buildings should have limited
architectural ornament, with detail shown in the functional
building elements of roof, rafter tails, ridge beams,
overhangs, struts, lanterns, clerestories, exposed columns
and exposed foundations.
Building facades should be broken up to reflect a series of
buildings, rather than one large structure through breaks
in the roof line and facade, highlighted entryways and
doorways and functional overhangs. These buildings should
also incorporate functional accessory structures including
silos, water tanks, feed and storage bins and composting
areas to add variety and provide integrated educational
opportunities throughout the site as part of the MOU
Partners commitment to experiential, life-long learning.
Master Plan Components | 6Q


National Western Center
(3
Industrial architecture
Industrial Architecture
The industrial character area includes the new Trade Show
and Exposition Hall and is intended to reflect the industrial
and meat packing uses that once dominated the site.
This building should have simple, rectangular lines with a
strong horizontal reference. This architectural character
highlights the large spaces that the building provides while
including elements that help to scale down the building
fagade at street level through lower height entrances,
glass doors and large windows that allow for views into
pre-function areas. The roof character is generally flat, but
can include saw tooth skylights and clerestory windows
to break up the roof line and create architectural interest.
Main entries should have a tower element that can be
used as wayfinding throughout the site and highlight the
primary public entries of the building.
Industrial architecture
Signature Architecture
The NWCC has two signature buildings on the campus,
the New Arena, the new CSU Center and the Water
Resources Center. Each ofthese buildings provides
the opportunity to have signature, iconic architecture
that reflects the public use of the facilities and instills a
sense of pride in the neighborhoods. The iconic nature
ofthese two building will also play a key role in creating
the inviting entry into the site and also serve as important
gateway features for visitors as they exit 1-70 onto
Brighton Boulevard Blvd, welcoming them to the campus.
Unlike the New West and Industrial character, the
Signature character is one that looks to the future and
uses modern materials of glass and steel to create a truly
unique facility. While this character style should be more
modern, special attention should be paid to ensure the
aesthetic is respectful to the history and adjacent building
character. For example, a roof assembly such as a barrel
roof can help to merge the history of the place with a
more modern facade of glass and steel.
Signature architecture
Historic industrial architecture
7 O | Master Plan Components


National Western Center
Key architectural facades will
help to identify building entries.
Legend
H Important Facades
Streets
Commuter Rail Station
Historic Architecture and Historic Artifacts
There is a wealth of historic architecture and artifacts on
the site that can be used to develop an overall design
language. These design elements can be pulled from
the architecture, rail, stock pens, paving and other
existing site components. Elements like stone, brick,
steel and wood all have a place in creating a unigue and
authentic character. This character can be expressed in
signage and wayfinding, pedestrian scaled elements,
common building materials, lighting and ground plane
improvements.
Master Plan Components I 71


National Western Center
Public Space Character
The NWCC has over 26% of the site as
plaza and public space. There are six
character areas for the sites landscape
that relate to their location and use.
The landscape character is inspired
by five components of the West the
river, cottonwood galleries, history,
the prairie and agriculture. Each one of
these components plays a role in the
design of the space and is based off
Colorados natural historic ecosystems
and timeline of development in the
Rocky Mountain West.
Legend
H Industrial Architecture
Streets
Commuter Rail Station
(D South Platte River
(2) Stockyards
Livestock Center
@ NWCC Transit Station Plaza
New Arena and Trade Show/
Exposition Hall Plazas
Colorado Commons
O South Platte River
The South Platte River runs along the west side of the
NWCC. One ofthe primary goals of the project is to
engage the river and nature. Removing invasive species
and allowing the river to take back its banks will soften
its currently hard edges and allow for a more natural
and more visually pleasing river bank. Reestablishing
cottonwood trees along the river and allowing native
species to regain their territory will establish an open
space that is a respite from the City. Active areas will be
integrated within the natural areas to engage nature and
allow for a range of educational opportunities. With over
one-mile of river bank, an appropriate mix of natural and
active areas should be considered to allow for successful
habitat corridors and restoration areas.
The Stockyards
The livestock pens at the Stock Show are an integral
piece ofthe history of this place, along with the prairie
that the livestock would graze in outside ofthe pens.
The new Stockyards should embrace that history by
integrating historic artifacts ofthe Stock Show and
meat-packing industry, creating historic plaques and
monuments and integrating pavement color or markings
throughout the Stockyards that tell the story about its
history and its importance to Denver and the region.
Where possible, prairie grasses should be integrated into
the site to break up the large space, soften its character,
integrate stormwater and make it more habitable for
people as well as livestock.
Livestock and Equestrian Centers
Historically homesteads were built along rivers near
cottonwood galleries for protection from the elements.
Therefore, along the Livestock and Equestrian Centers,
the landscape will mimic that homesteading character
with elements such as pavement markings that hint at
the river banks and with groupings of cottonwood trees
along the way to provide shelter from the sun and wind to
visitors. Prairie grasses should also be included to soften
the paved areas, while still allowing for appropriately sized
event spaces. During smaller event days there is potential
to bring in various outdoor furnishings and planters to
create more intimate spaces within the plaza areas for a
broad array of event activities throughout the year.
NWCC Transit Station Plaza
Moving across the BNSF tracks via an overhead walkway
to the new RTD Transit Station, the experience stepping
off the walkway or the train will be like stepping into the
West in a way that celebrates the past, but is modern
and useable, while speaking to the prairie and the tree
galleries dispersed throughout. The plaza will be filled
with a canopy of trees with an assortment of mounds
filled with prairie grasses, areas of usable mown turf,
public art and pathways in between. A small retail space
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The planned elevated walkway and Stockyard catwalks will be one of
the defining features of the new NWC.
will help to activate the plaza and provide a space with
potential mixed use development above to overlook the
activities of the transit station and various NWCC events.
New Arena and Trade Show/Exposition Hall Plazas
As you transition south along Brighton Boulevard you
will come to a smaller version of the character of the
Transit Station Plaza with areas of seating and mounds of
prairie grasses mixed into the continued canopy of trees.
With these two plazas being the larger event plazas,
the design of these spaces will need to accommodate
a large amount of people, but also be a pleasant space
for community use on non-event days. Therefore special
attention should be paid to the balance of seating,
landscape and paved areas to ensure the space is usable
year round and compliments the industrial and signature
architectural character of the buildings.
Colorado Commons
The New Arena plaza will transition across Bettie Cram
Drive into Colorado Commons on a historical timeline
of short grass prairie growing into modern agriculture.
Landscape elements such as windrows, which are
agricultural plantings to protect fields, orchards and
homesteads, should be considered to break up the space
and provide shade. Colorado Commons will also offer
a turf area and a series of smaller spaces to allow for,
not only the Arena plaza activity to flow into this town
center type plaza, but also for a series of year round
events associated with the 1909 Stadium Arena Market
and entrepreneurial pop-up spaces to occur. To the west,
this space transitions into full agriculture with the CSU
research and production plots and community garden
plots west of the Stadium Arena Market and a small urban
(homesteading) farm.
Legend
# Locations for Iconic
Monuments and Structures
Streets
Commuter Rail Station
Public Art
A key component of the site architectural character
and open space will be the integration of public art
into the facilities. The site will include larger pieces of
signature art and a mix of smaller installations that will
be incorporated through all the public facilities and open
spaces. The public art program for the NWCC is intended
to be site specific, include the public in its selection and
location, and be a collaborative learning experience
for the audience that will view and enjoy the pieces. As
the development of the site occurs, a robust program
for the incorporation of public art needs to be a part of
the overall implementation. Public art will create a more
diverse and interesting site and can be used to attract
additional tourism, used in education, and enjoyed by
all. The site will also be a great location for traveling art
pieces, either outside or within one of the many facilities
in the new NWCC. The site will also house the Coors
Western Art permanent collection in the CSU Center
which is focused on western art and artists.
There is a great opportunity to provide a wide variety of art at the NWC.
There are many opportunities to
develop a series of iconic markers that
help users orient themselves to the large
site and to provide unique architectural
and site elements.
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National Western Center
Western Heritage
The last component of the NWCC design character is the
development of a new western heritage program that
will be integrated throughout the site and within the new
event venues. The intent of this program is to create a
diverse year-round sustainable program related to our
western heritage and culture. The program would include
the great historic architecture and artifacts of the site and
could include displays of western heritage artifacts and
educational pieces from the collections of the National
Western Stock Show and their 109 year history and from
History Colorado and the Denver Museum of Nature and
Science. These displays will create an educational path
through the site from building to building, each with
their own unigue story of our western heritage and our
diverse cultural history. This program would be used for
education about all aspects of the American West and
celebrate both human and animal relationships.
Northside Park
Character Area 1
Globeville Neighborhood/Washington Street
Character Area 1 is between Washington Street and the South Platte
River in the Globeville Neighborhood.
Area Description
The Globeville/Washington Street area is located at
the west side of the study area between Washington
Street and the South Platte River in the Globeville
Neighborhood. This area is currently characterized by
large blocks of underutilized industrial land and lacks the
basic infrastructure for good connections to the river and
the Northside Park area. The Globeville Neighborhood
plan recommends this area for mixed-use redevelopment
by improving the access and circulation and creating an
active edge along the west side of the river.
Intended Uses and Character Description
The intended uses for this area are for an evolution
over time from the existing industrial uses to mixed use
development including employment and mid- to high-
density housing options with building heights up to five
stories. The NWCC can help to spur new mixed-use
development and act as a catalyst for making positive
changes in the neighborhood.
Character Areas
The plan is divided into nine character areas based on
their geographic location and the proposed uses.
Facilities
No specific NWCC facilities or program elements are
anticipated in this area, but there is potential to attract
new businesses related to agriculture and education that
can be synergistic with the program at NWCC. This area
allows for future growth of these supporting industries
and can help to provide more jobs in the neighborhood.
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Public Space
There are two key public spaces in this character area.
South Platte River
The Globeville Neighborhood plan calls for the creation
of a waterfront destination that will provide a diverse
activities and events throughout the year and the
potential for a waterfront plaza that can tie to the events
that will occur at the NWCC.
Regional Open Space/Northside Park and Heron Pond
The area contains approximately 80 acres of publically
owned land associated with Heron Pond, Heller Open
Space, Northside Park and land intended as regional
drainage. This area is being envisioned as a natural area
with native plantings, and a trail network to walk, bike or
ride a horse that would be unigue in the Denver region
due to its native habitat potential and river to prairie focus.
Access and Circulation
Both the Globeville Neighborhood Plan and the NWCC
Master Plan identify two key connection points from
Washington Street to NWCC.
O Bettie Cram Drive (49th Avenue)
The first connection is at Bettie Cram Drive with a
new vehicular and bicycle bridge over the South
Platte River. This street will be the major east/west
connector street for the neighborhoods and NWCC
and will continue through the NWCC site to the east
and connect to Brighton Boulevard at both 47th
Avenue, north of 1-70 and 44th Street via Humboldt
Street, south of 1-70. This new street will be a
multimodal gateway and access point into the NWCC
and will be a two lane street with bike lanes and
walkways that will connect to the relocated National
Western Drive on the east side of the river.
51st Avenue
The second connection from Washington Street is at
51st Avenue. This street will provide better access
to the Northside Park area and provide vehicular,
pedestrian and bicycle connections across the South
Platte River to the new relocated National Western
Drive. This connection continues to the east for
pedestrian and bicycles on a new, elevated walkway
over the Stockyards and connecting to the NWCC
Rail Station at 49th Avenue and Brighton Boulevard.
Key Relationships and Adjacencies
The South Platte River, Northside Park/Heron Pond and
Washington Street are key adjacencies in the area.
Character Area 2
South Platte River
Character Area 2 includes more than one mile of riverfront along
the South Platte River.
Area Description
The South Platte River character area runs for
approximately 1.3 miles from Globeville Landing Park to
Northside Park along the western edge of the NWCC site
and contains approximately 12 acres. Today, the river is
largely inaccessible from the west due to the Globeville
Levee and from the east due to the Delgany Interceptor
sanitary sewer lines and the Denver Rock Island
Railroad (DRI) lines. This area is a prime opportunity
to create a series of spaces and activities to allow the
neighborhoods and the users of the NWCC to engage
the river. By consolidating the railroad to the center of
the NWCC site and by either relocating or burying the
Delgany Interceptors, the Plan provides increased public
river access and visibility.
Intended Uses and Character Description
The primary uses in this area are educational and
recreational uses that can benefit from being adjacent
to this great asset. There will be a system of trails on
each side of the river that will connect key activity nodes
throughout the frontage. The addition of accessible green
space along the river will provide opportunities for river
education, river access, viewing and restoration of native
riparian habitat. The area is intended to be mostly passive
uses with areas of focused activity.
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Facilities
The primary NWCC facility located in this area is the Water
Resources Center, located at the corner of Bettie Cram
Drive and National Western Drive. This 15,000 SF facility
will house a collaborative Water Resources Center that
will focus on water/river research, water/ river education
and outreach. The facility will provide opportunities for
public education about the river, interpretive center flexible
space to be used by all Partners, small events space, and
facilities to teach and collaborate on critical relationship
between water, natural ecosystems, food and livestock.
Public Space
The area between the river and relocated National
Western Drive provides many opportunities to engage
with the river. This area will be a mix of active, manicured
spaces and natural river habitat that will give users a
wide range of experiences along the length of the river.
This area offers the opportunity to be able to experience
the river in many different ways, through interpretive
landscapes, growing fields, small plazas, outdoor
classrooms, lawn area, and places to touch and interact
directly with the river.
Access and Circulation
The primary access and circulation street for the river is
the new relocated National Western Drive. This new two
lane street with on-street parking, pedestrian and bicycle
facilities offers the opportunity for public access along
the length of the river at the NWCC site. National Western
Drive is designed to be a slower speed street with great
amenities such as on street parking, detached cycle
track, street trees and detached sidewalks that create an
active, accessible edge to the river area while providing
needed access for the NWCC.
This area will also have two new river crossings for
vehicles, pedestrians and bicycles at 49th Avenue (Bettie
Cram Drive) and at 51st Avenue. These new connections
across the river provide needed access from the west
and allow users to access the river on both sides. The new
bridges will need to be designed to address the hydraulic
reguirements of the river, the Delgany Interceptors, the
Globeville Levee and existing South Platte River Trail on
the west side as well as ecological concerns.
The Animal Transport Bridge is a remnant of the full
bridge that crosses the river at approximately 50th
Avenue. While it is no longer usable, the bridge could
be rehabilitated to provide river viewing, interpretive
opportunities or become another pedestrian crossing
in this area. The bridge would need to have a structural
assessment and vertical circulation would need to be
added on each side to provide access to the bridge.
Key Relationships and Adjacencies
Key relationships in this area are the neighborhood and
NWCC connections to the river, and the direct access
between the Water Resources Center and the river. These
important connections will allow full access to the river
for both recreational and learning opportunities. There is
also an important relationship between the river and the
new event pavilion space at The Stockyards at NWCC.
This connection will help to enhance the event space by
providing opportunities for access and celebration at the
river.
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Character Area 3
Elyria Neighborhood TOD and NWCC Station
Character Area 3 includes the new NWC Transit Station and new
TOD redevelopment in the Elyria Neighborhood.
Area Description
The Elyria Neighborhood TOD and NWCC Station area
will be a prime entry point into the neighborhood and the
NWCC from the new RTD commuter rail station located at
49th Avenue and Brighton Boulevard (expected to open
in 2018). Today, the area is largely underutilized industrial
land that has a large potential for redevelopment in the
northern part of Elyria.
Intended Uses and Character Description
This character area provides great growth potential
for additional residential uses within the Elyria
Neighborhood, focused on the new commuter rail
station. The neighborhood plan calls for redevelopment
of the industrial uses adjacent to the station to mixed
use with a five story height limit as defined in the Elyria
Neighborhood Plan.
The new RTD North Metro Line commuter rail station
is a two track, side platform station with capacity for a
four-car train. The immediate station area at 49th Avenue
at the west side of Brighton Boulevard will provide a
gateway into both the neighborhood and the NWCC.
Facilities
To help support both the mixed use development of the
neighborhood and to support the NWCC parking needs,
an 800-1000 space mixed use parking structure is
proposed on half of the Denver Public Schools (DPS) site
located at 48th Avenue and Brighton Boulevard This
location is the old Denver Public Schools bus storage
and maintenance site and prior to that was a landfill.
This property will reguire environmental remediation
prior to placing new uses on the site. This new facility is
encouraged to have retail/commercial uses on the ground
floor facing Brighton Boulevard, and could also have a
vertical greenhouse on the south face of the building,
creating a green welcoming fagade to the building. The
parking structure would be 4-5 stories high. This mixed
use facility could act as a catalyst in the neighborhood to
spur on redevelopment around the station.
Historic Elyria school
Public Space
The new NWCC Station Plaza is a 3.5 acre gathering
place that will provide a welcoming character to the
neighborhood and NWCC by providing a place where
visitors arriving by train will step into the new western
landscape character at NWCC. This landscape character
will be a dense riparian canopy that highlights the NWCC
as a special and unigue place. The plaza is also large
enough to allow for TOD supporting retail/commercial
uses adjacent to the station. The station is connected to
the west via a new elevated walkway and bridge over the
BNSF/RTD rail tracks.
The NWCC Transit Station will have large planting areas, a dense
tree canopy, and public art.
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National Western Center
Access and Circulation
Access and circulation improvements in this area
are based on the recommendations in the Elyria
Neighborhood Plan. The plan proposes that 49th
Avenue connect through the DPS site between Brighton
Boulevard and High Street and a new extension of
Williams Street between 48th Avenue and 49th Avenue
through the DPS site. A new pedestrian bridge connection
is also planned over the BNSF/RTD tracks to the west.
Careful attention will need to be made in the design of
the plaza and the close interaction of the Trade Show/
Exposition Hall and its needed parking and service drive
access to provide a safe crossing for pedestrians to and
from the rail station.
Key Relationships and Adjacencies
The new NWCC station is a key connection point for
the entire neighborhood and NWCC. It is connected
to the site through wide walkways and a bicycle track
connecting to the new Trade Show/Exhibition Hall and
by a new pedestrian bridge over the RTD and BNSF
tracks to the west, with connections to the Globeville
Neighborhood via the new, elevated walkway.
Character Area 4
New Arena and Trade Show/ Exhibition Hall
Character Area 4 includes the core of the new entertainment venues at
NWC including the New Arena and New trade Show/Exhibition Hall.
Area Description
The New Arena and Trade Show/Exhibition Hall area is
approximately 27 acres and is located in the southeast
guadrant of the NWCC, north of 1-70 and west of Brighton
Boulevard. The area currently includes the Events Center,
surface parking, and a few smaller commercial and
residential buildings.
Intended Uses and Character Description
The New Arena and Trade Show/Exhibition Hall area is
the primary events and entertainment destination at the
NWCC. During events at these facilities, this area will
be welcoming and active and provides a front door to
the NWCC from Brighton Boulevard. This area is also a
key connection point into the Elyria Neighborhood and
provides a public plaza on Brighton Boulevard that can be
used for community events.
Facilities
This area contains two major event venues for the NWCC,
the New Arena and the new Trade Show/Exhibition Hall.
These two facilities work in unison with each other and
provide the signature entertainment venues for the NWCC.
New Arena
The New Arena is the NWCC flagship building that replaces
the uses currently existing at the Denver Coliseum.
This new facility has 10,000 fixed seats and serves as
the main performance facility at NWCC. It provides
space for the NWSS Rodeo, concerts, circus events,
Expo shows, sporting events, ice hockey, ice shows,
basketball, volleyball and other multi-function, year- round
events. It includes box seating, office space for tenants,
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National Western Center
administrative offices, animal holding areas, service docks,
restaurant space, locker rooms and flexible retail space
inside the facility. The facility also has neighborhood retail/
commercial space on the Brighton Boulevard frontage
to help scale the building down and to provide an active
edge along the street. The New Arena will also house the
NWCC and NWSS administrative offices.
The architectural character of this signature building will
be modern and open, with glass facades, welcoming
entrances, and building elements that will help with site
wayfinding and NWCC visibility from 1-70. Total building
Square Footage: "300,000 Gross Square Feet (GSF)
Trade Show/Exposition FIall
The new Trade Show/Exhibition Flail is a multi-purpose,
year-round facility that provides 350,000 SF of flexible
exhibit space and is a three- level facility. The lower level
will be approximately 600-900 parking spaces with lower
level access from 49th Avenue at Brighton Boulevard.
The Brighton Boulevard street level is the main exhibit
hall and entry lobby, and the upper level will include
ballrooms and additional flexible space for events and
potential restaurant space. The main floor is designed to
accommodate the clear-span space for an Olympic large
track speed skating oval. This facility is also designed
to accommodate overflow and local events currently
associated with the Colorado Convention Center. Local
events like the Garden and Flome Show, Denver Auto
Show and the State Volleyball Championships can occur
here, giving additional opportunities for larger convention
events at the Convention Center. The Trade Show/
Exhibition Flail is also connected via skywalks to the New
Arena (across 47th Avenue) and to the Livestock Flail
(across the BNSF/RTD tracks). These connections offer
great views to the west and provide a secure/on-grounds
connection between facilities during larger events. Total
building Square Footage: "460,000 GSF
Public Space
There are two primary public spaces within the character
area.
Elyria Plaza
Elyria Plaza is the ceremonial front door to the NWCC
from Brighton Boulevard and the primary gateway into
the site. It contains approximately 2.3 acres of public
space and provides opportunities for exhibit, gathering,
event pre-function, markets and small retail sales kiosks.
Arena Square
Arena Square is the primary outdoor exhibit plaza at
NWCC. Its 2.3 acres will be the same character and
work in tandem with Elyria Plaza. This plaza will have
larger areas for exhibit and pre-function use due to the
nature of the events in the New Arena and is designed to
provide flexibility for many different types of activity.
Access and Circulation
The primary access street for this area is Brighton
Boulevard, which will be designed to be a four-lane street
during large events to serve the parking and access
needs of the area, and be a three-lane street during the
remainder of the year to function as a local street to the
neighborhood and provide convenient access to 1-70.
47th Avenue from Brighton Boulevard to Bettie Cram
Drive will be a new two-lane festival street with roll curbs,
wide sidewalks, bicycle facilities, lighting and wayfinding.
During larger events in the New Arena and Trade Show/
Exposition Flail, this street will be closed to traffic and
function as an additional events space for NWCC. This
street, along with Elyria Plaza, can be used for farmers
markets, neighborhood events, displays and exhibits.
Service access for the Trade Show/Exhibition Flail is from
Brighton Boulevard at 48th Avenue and runs along the
west side of the facility at the main floor level adjacent to
the rail tracks. Service for the New Arena is from Brighton
Boulevard and 47th Avenue at the northeast corner of
the facility.
Key Relationships and Adjacencies
The New Arena and the Trade Show/Exposition Flail can
work individually or together for events. The Trade Show
Flail offers a large amount of flexible space that can serve
overflow needs at the New Arena or from other on-site
facilities. To maximize the visitor experience, an adequate
amount of surface and structured parking needs to
be close to these two major facilities. The NWCC Rail
Station is also a key adjacency to these major venues. The
two venues are connected with an above street bridge
connection for on-grounds access during the NWSS, and
for easy access between the facilities during larger events.
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National Western Center
Character Area 5
Colorado Commons
Character Area $ includes the home for CSU, the renovated
Stadium Arena Market, and the Colorado Commons, the sites
largest public space.
Area Description
Colorado Commons is located north of 1-70, and east
of the BNSF/RTD rail lines. This area currently contains
the NWSS Administration Building/Hall of Education,
Exposition Hall, Livestock Hall, Stadium Hall and the 1909
Stadium Arena. This area is currently the hub of the NWSS.
Intended Uses and Character Description
The Master Plan calls for a total transformation of this
area by renovating and restoring the 1909 Stadium Arena
for new uses, and removing the other existing stock show
facilities. This area will become the home for the primary
CSU/NWCC Partner facilities and be the neighborhood
and public center for the NWCC year-round.
Facilities
1909 Stadium Arena
The 1909 Stadium Arena was the first permanent structure
built at the stock show and is a wonderful example of
turn-of-the-century architecture in Denver. Its brick fagade
and large open arena give it a truly unigue character that
is worth preserving for future generations. The Master
Plan calls for this building to take on a new role, one
that can be used and enjoyed by the public through a
variety of possible new uses that may include an active
public market, a commercial/ teaching kitchen that can
be used by the community, and a multi-use events space
in the main arena. This space is also being assessed
as a possible center for entrepreneurial business and
art at NWCC and will include incubator business space,
and retail uses for goods and services that showcase
Western Heritage and food. The plan calls for removing
the stadium seating and adding a mezzanine level to
increase the building capacity to approximately 90,000
SF. The CSU Denver Urban Extension Center will probably
also be located in this facility on a temporary basis until it
can be permanently located in the new CSU Building.
The CSU Building
The new CSU Building facility will be the primary address
of CSU on the NWCC site. The multi-level facility will
be approximately 80-100,000 SF with new educational
facilities. This facility is planned to house the CSU Denver
Urban Extension Center, a Food Systems Center and
Conservatory, the Coors Western Art Collection, event
spaces, offices and business center, small scale research
offices and facilities on topics including agriculture
innovation and Science, Technology, Engineering, and
Mathematics (STEM) programs, laboratory space for
teaching and research, multi use classrooms and flexible
space, conference space, an auditorium/performance
space/ lecture hall, performing and visual arts studio
spaces for students and the community, and space for
a portion of the National Western Stock Show Heritage
collection. This space can also be used for day camps,
small events, art openings and exhibits.
i aces. (Images courtesy of Li, Long, CSU Graduate Student)
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National Western Center
Parking Structure
A new 540-720 space parking structure is planned
for the northern portion of the site, with the CSU
Building wrapping the southeast and southwest faces.
This structure will be used for the CSU and Colorado
Commons activities, and will also serve the New Arena
and Stock Show parking needs.
Future Expansion Space
Colorado Commons provides the potential for future
educational, agricultural or retail/commercial growth on
the NWCC campus for uses that support the overall vision.
Colorado Commons provides flexible public space for a variety of
uses throughout thejear.
Public Space
Colorado Commons
Colorado Commons is the largest public space at the
NWCC (5 acres) and provides a variety of educational and
passive recreational uses. The plaza also has an additional
1.8 acres of test and research growing plots, community
gardens, a small urban farm space (perhaps with animals),
a community gathering space, small outdoor performing
spaces, small flexible pavilions for retail sales or small
events, space for outdoor markets and exhibits, public
art, and flexible multi-use open space to accommodate
larger events. This space could also be used as trade and
agricultural industry exhibit space during the Stock Show
and other on-site agricultural-related events.
Character Area 6
Livestock Center and Stockyards
Character Area 6 includes the new Stockyards/Event Pavilion and
the Livestock Center, the NWCs most flexible venue space.
Area Description
The Livestock Center and Stockyards are located north of
Bettie Cram Drive and west of the BNSF/RTD rail corridor.
This area is currently the livestock yards for NWSS and
also includes surface parking lots and some industrial uses.
The site area is approximately 30 acres.
Intended Uses and Character Description
The new Livestock Center will be the hub of all livestock
activities during the Stock Show and provide multi-use
flexible indoor and outdoor facilities year round. These
buildings are intended to be the most versatile and
flexible buildings at the NWCC. The design character of
the facilities will be similar to the Eguestrian Center with
simple building forms that reflect our western culture with
a simple yet contemporary material palette.
Access and Circulation
Primary pedestrian and bicycle access to Colorado Commons
is from Bettie Cram Drive. Access for service and parking is
from 46th Avenue. Neighborhood access from the east will
be along 47th Avenue. Bus and shuttle access will be south
of the Stadium Arena Market along 46th Avenue.
Key Relationships and Adjacencies
As the public center for the NWCC, the key Colorado
Commons adjacencies are to the neighborhoods with good
connections both east and west through the site. This area will
also be the primary daily use area for students and the public
to learn about the NWCC and to learn about water, food and
agriculture. The CSU Building and Extension Center need to be
adjacent to research test, teaching, and growing plots.
The new stockyards will replace the existing, non-movable pens with
new, removable pens that allow for flexible use of the stockyards.
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National Western Center
Facilities
Livestock Stadium Arena
The new Livestock Stadium Arena is a 5,000 seat (2,500
fixed, 2,500 fold out), 135,000 GSF arena facility that will
house livestock shows, family shows, conventions,
banquet hall, lecture space, sporting and entertainment
events year round. This space will also have the ability to
hold smaller attendance ice shows and events.
Livestock Hall
The Livestock Hall is a 230,000 GSF multipurpose
livestock facility and highly flexible events venue. This
building is intended to be one of the most flexible use
buildings at the NWCC. The venue will function to hold
livestock during the Stock Show and be able to support
a wide range ofyear round uses including livestock
sales, animal shows, indoor festivals, sporting events,
conventions, trade and equipment shows and farmers
markets. It can also be used as support facilities and
vendor space for larger festivals held in the Stockyards.
The facility will also serve as overflow horse stalls for the
Equestrian Center during larger horse events.
Stockyards/Events Pavilion
The Stockyards is a 20-acre space that is envisioned to
function as an 800 pen stockyard during the Stock Show
and be a multi-use festival, event space, and destination
the remainder of the year. The Stockyards will be a
unique event space for the Denver region allowing the
potential for larger concerts, events and festivals to occur
at a site that is designed to accommodate them. During
the Stock Show, the space will have cattle pens with
removable fencing and will house the livestock-related
outdoor programs needed to maintain the Stock Show as
the Super Bowl of livestock events. The Stockyards also
include space for the Herd Sire, Heifer Mart and Stock
Dog areas during the Stock Show, included in the overall
20 acres.
When the pens are removed, a 20-acre hard surface
flexible space is created allowing for a variety of events
including concerts, exhibits, car shows, livestock and hay
sales, festivals, RV and car sales, flea markets, outdoor
sporting events, farm equipment shows, summer stock
shows, and Denver County Fair. It can also provide non-
stock show parking for up to 2,700 vehicles.
Livestock Hall Auction Arena
The Livestock Hall Auction Arena is a 700 seat, 9,500
GSF livestock sales and lecture space attached to the
Livestock Hall.
Livestock Center Auction Arena
The Livestock Center Auction Arena is a 1,000 seat,
15,000 GSF terraced seating arena used for livestock
sales, classroom space and possible performing arts
events. This arena is located adjacent to the Stockyard
Show Arena in the Stockyards.
Stockyard Show Arena
The Stockyard Show Arena is located in the center of
the stockyards adjacent to the Livestock Center Auction
Arena and is used for livestock shows and sales during
the Stock Show and is the support building for the year-
round Events Pavilion in the Stockyards. It is a 20,000
GSF facility with 1,000 bleacher seats.
1917 Armour & Company Meat Packing Plant Office
and Water Tower
The 1917 Armour & Company Meat Packing Plant Office is
located at the east side of the stockyards at the center of
the site. This two story historic building is recommended
to be nominated as a Denver Historic Landmark. At
present, the property serves as a private residence, but
should it become available, its reuse potential includes
offices, Livestock Center business center with conference
rooms and small offices, as the Events Pavilion offices, or
other livestock/equestrian uses.
The water tower will remain in the new Stockyards and
be an integral part of the new elevated walkway between
National Western Drive and the new Rail Station.
tf
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Public Space
Livestock Center Plaza
The Livestock Center Plaza is a 3.8-acre plaza on the
west side of the Livestock Hall. This plaza is used for
outdoor displays, vendor booths, displays and exhibits.
This space is also the primary north/south pedestrian
access to the Equestrian Center. The primary feature
of this plaza is the lowered plaza that connects the
Livestock Hall with the Stockyards. This plaza is below
the DRI railroad tracks and is 200 feet wide, allowing for
free flow and clear visual connection between these two
major event venues. The Livestock Center Plaza and the
Equestrian Plaza will incorporate some of the historic
pens and brick paving materials into these plazas.
The elevated walkway could take on many different design
characters, and will be an iconic component of the NWCC.
Elevated Walkway
One of the key connecting elements of the Master Plan
is the elevated walkway. This new elevated walkway
will run east/west and span the Stockyards, rail tracks,
and the area between the Livestock Center and the
Equestrian Center. This elevated catwalk will be a truly
unique and site defining feature that will connect National
Western Drive at 51st Avenue to the new Rail Station at
49th Avenue and Brighton Boulevard. This walkway will
have an industrial look and feel in its design and vary in
width from 15 to 20. It will visually connect through the
site past the historic Armour water tower and provide
great views into the site and of the mountains. The
elevated walkway will also have bicycle ramps at each
end for easy bicycle access and have vertical circulation
points at regular intervals throughout its length for easy
access to the NWCC. This elevated walkway would be
open year-round to the public to provide access to and
from the rail station from the west.
The High Line in New York City is a good example of a successful
elevated public space.
Catwalks
Along with the elevated walkway, there will also be
catwalks that run north/south through the Stockyards
and have a similar use to the existing catwalk that is in
the yards today. This catwalk would have an industrial
look and feel and be used to view the Stockyards and
provide easy north/south access through the yards. The
intent of this catwalk would be that it would be closed to
the public during events in the Stockyards and during the
National Western Stock Show and be available for use by
attendees of those events.
Access and Circulation
Primary access to the Livestock Center is from National
Western Drive and Bettie Cram Drive. Service access
is from Bettie Cram Drive and along the south side of
the Livestock Stadium Arena and the west side of the
Livestock Hall.
Key Relationships and Adjacencies
The Livestock Hall is a true multi-use facility, with the ability
for use as a flexible space for overflow from the Trade
Show/Exhibition Hall, the Equestrian Center and an events
building during concerts and exhibits in the Stockyards.
Its central location allows it to function for a multitude of
events throughout the year.
Master Plan Components
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National Western Center
Character Area is home to the New Equestrian Center and the
CSUEquine Sports Medicine Facility.
Equestrian Arena
The Equestrian Arena is a 500 seat arena for equine,
livestock and smaller entertainment events including
horse shows, lectures, horse and livestock sales, animal
shows and indoor festivals. The building is approximately
86,500 GSF with a dirt floor show ring.
Horse Barn
The horse barn is a 1,000 stall, 220,000 GSF facility with
permanent 10 x 10 horse stalls. Service access to both
sides of this facility is critical due to its size for loading
and unloading.
CSU Equine Sports Medicine Facility
The CSU Equine Sports Medicine Facility is a 78,600 GSF
state of the art clinic facility dedicated to equine sports
medicine and education and is directly adjacent to the
Equestrian Center along Race Court. The facility will have
exam rooms, indoor pens, Eurociser, water treadmill
and salt water spa. The facility will also house the CSU
Community Outreach Clinic and the Clinical Trials Facility.
The facility has approximately 35,000 SF of outdoor pens
and exercise area and surface parking for staff and clients.
Area Description
The Equestrian Center is located south of Race Court
and west of the BNSF/RTD rail tracks. The site contains
approximately 26.5 acres and includes 464,000 GSF of
enclosed equestrian facilities and 48,000 SF of covered,
open air practice arenas. The site is currently industrial
and warehouse uses with some freight rail access.
Intended Uses and Character Description
The new Equestrian Center is dedicated to providing
quality space for year-round horse shows and events.
The facilities can also house the Denver Police Equestrian
unit, CSU Equine Sports Medicine Clinic, Community
Outreach Clinic, Clinical Trials Facility and the potential for
year round horse access for recreation, rehabilitation and
educational uses. The design character of the facilities
will be similar to the Livestock Center with simple building
forms that reflect our western culture with a simple yet
contemporary material palette.
Facilities
Equestrian Events Center
The Equestrian Events Center is a 2,500 fixed seat and
2,000 pull out seat multi-use arena to house equine and
livestock events and entertainment functions throughout
the year. The space is large enough to hold concerts,
motor sports, indoor festivals, conferences and meetings,
banquets, horse and livestock sales. The facility also
includes indoor space for exhibits and vendors. The
building is approximately 109,000 GSF.
The Equestrian Center will hold a variety of horse shows throughout
thejear.
Enclosed Practice Areas
There are two 24,000 SF enclosed practice areas, one
directly attached to each of the arenas and with direct
connection to the horse barn. These practice areas serve
as staging and pre-function for activities in the arenas
and consist of a 120 x 200 show ring and a dirt floor.
Covered Practice Areas
There are two 20,000 SF outdoor Covered Practice
Arenas that will be used for horse exercise and small
outdoor events that need a covered space.
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Public Space
The primary public space for the Equestrian Center is
the 2.6 acre Equestrian Plaza located on the south and
west corner of the Events Center. This plaza is at the
main entry to the Events Center and provides space for
exhibits, vendors, and small events.
The Equestrian Plaza will be the main gathering space for equestrian
events.
Access and Circulation
The primary access to the Equestrian Center is from Race
Court. There are service aisles on the east and west
sides of the facility that provide loading and unloading of
the horse barn from two different sides, decreasing the
loading/unloading times of this facility and for the two
event arenas and enclosed practice areas.
Key Relationships and Adjacencies
Key relationships for this area include direct, covered
access to the horse barn for all equestrian facilities, and
the potential to use the Livestock Hall as overflow space
for larger events and horse shows. The CSU Equine
Sports Medicine Facility is connected to the Equestrian
Center to allow for easy access to services provided
by CSU on a daily and event basis. The Livestock Hall
provides adjacent overflow stalling potential for larger
equestrian events.
Character Area 8
Livestock Exchange
Character Area 8 is focused on the historic Livestock Exchange
Building.
Area Description
The Livestock Exchange area is located south of Bettie
Cram Drive and west of the BNSF/RTD rail tracks. This
area contains the three buildings associated with the
Livestock Exchange built between 1898 and 1919 and
contains approximately 6.5 acres.
Intended Uses and Character Description
The primary use of this area will be agri-business, site
maintenance, and future program growth for the NWCC.
While the Livestock Exchange is privately owned, the
NWC Partners should collaborate with the owners of the
building to look at co-development options that provide
uses that are complimentary to the NWCC.
Facilities
Livestock Exchange Building
The Livestock Exchange Building (also known as the
Denver Union Stockyards Building), is an important
historic resource for the NWCC and can serve as a critical
link along Bettie Cram Drive. The building contains
approximately 54,000 SF of office space that can be used
for agri-business and supporting commercial space to
complement the uses at NWCC. The building is currently
privately owned. The Livestock Exchange is also the
home to the Stockyards Bar and Restaurant.
Master Plan Components | 8 5


National Western Center
Maintenance and Operations Facility
The Maintenance and Operations Facility is located just
south and west of the Livestock Exchange Building and
includes 44,000 SF of operations and service space to
support the NWCC. This area also includes space for
eguipment storage and dirt/footing mix storage.
Future Growth
The area along the east side of National Western
Drive, south of Bettie Cram Drive is dedicated to future
program growth at NWCC. This area could be additional
educational facilities, agricultural-related business, or
supportive mixed use.
Public Space
Livestock Exchange Plaza
The Livestock Exchange Plaza is located at the east side
of the Livestock Exchange Building is a 0.4 acre space
and is intended as a ceremonial space that reflects the
historic character and importance of the building. The
space can be used for small special events, outdoor
markets, displays and exhibits.
NWC will have a series of smaller event spaces spread throughout
the site.
Access and Circulation
Primary access to the Livestock Exchange is from Bettie
Cram Drive. Other area access is provided from National
Western Drive.
Character Area 9
Denver Coliseum
Character Area g provides guidance for the redevelopment of the
Denver Coliseum site to make it an integral component to the overall
NWC Campus.
Area Description
The Denver Coliseum site is located south of 1-70 and
West of Brighton Boulevard and includes 30.4 acres. The
site currently houses the Denver Coliseum, an attached
horse barn for rodeo events, and 2,240 surface parking
spaces. While the Master Plan does not identify specific
uses for the Denver Coliseum site, it is considered a
critical component of the NWCC overall planning effort
and as such should redevelop with uses that complement
the overall vision and goals of the NWCC.
Intended Uses and Character Description
The Master Plan identifies the development framework
that will help to shape the new development on the
site. Due to overall NWCC phasing and environmental
clean-up of the site, a specific development layout is not
provided in the plan. The following design principles have
been identified to help guide future development that is
complementary to the NWCC and takes advantages of
the sites opportunities.
Key Relationships and Adjacencies
The central location of the Maintenance Facility is
important for servicing of all the facilities at NWCC.
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National Western Center
The proposed redevelopment of the Denver Coliseum will be an integral component to the overall NWC Campus. New connections under
I-pO via walkways and plazas and the lowering of46th Avenue will create a much more accessible and friendly atmosphere under I-pO. The
proposed regional drainage channel and the extension of the Globeville Landing Park to the north along the tracks increases the amount of open
space in this area.
Design Principles for the Denver Coliseum Site
Provide a through connection between 44th Street
and Arkins Court
Study possibility of a new access point to 46th Avenue
Provide a new access point into the site from
Brighton Boulevard along the High Street drainage
easement (approx. 41st Street)
Allow for visibility through the site from eastbound
I-70, 44th and Brighton Boulevard intersection, and
from 38th Street at Arkins Court
Provide multiple connections (vehicular and pedestrian)
under I-70 to 46th Avenue and the NWCC to the north
Provide opportunities for activated space under i-70
that reinforce north/south connections
Provide bicycle/pedestrian connections from Brighton
Boulevard to Globeville Landing Park, the South
Platte River, and from NWCC Colorado Commons to
the river and park through a greenway connection
Maintain direct river access through Globeville
Landing Park
Provide easy and clear access to Globeville Landing
Park and support adjacent uses that provide eyes on
the river and park
Provide flexibility for active educational and
recreational uses within the park
Create a green buffer along the BNSF/RTD rail corridor
that extends Globeville Landing Park to the north
Provide opportunities to use the regional drainage as
a site and open space enhancement
Maintain the potential for the site to be used as
parking inventory for the NWCC event venues
All Guiding Principles and Goals of the Master Plan
apply to this area
Master Plan Components | 8 7


National Western Center
Existing Facilities
The Denver Coliseum opened in 1952 as Denvers premier
entertainment venue. The building includes 170,400 SF
of space and has had a number of renovations over its
life span, with the last one occurring in 2001/2002. As
an entertainment venue for the City, the building lacks
some of the needed amenities to draw year-round
events and maintain the Stock Shows world class status.
These shortfalls include inadeguate ventilation, poor
guest circulation space, lack of box suites or premium
seating, inadeguate lighting and sound systems and lack
of overall venue flexibility. The Master Plan does not use
the Coliseum site for any new programmed uses, but the
building may hold some potential as a reuse building for
a larger tenant or group of smaller tenants looking for
a good visible location, easy access to the highway, the
NWCC, and to downtown Denver.
the Denver Coliseum is a potential facility for reuse to support the NWC.
Public Space
Globeville Landing Park will offer a direct access point to the river
and be connected to the Elyria Neighborhood and the NWC site
through new pedestrian and bicycle linkages.
Globeville Landing Park
and South Platte River Access
Globeville Landing Park is located at the southwest
corner of the Denver Coliseum site and provides direct
access to the South Platter River. This park is currently
underutilized and provides a good open space asset
adjacent to new development on the Coliseum site. The
Master Plan provides trail connections to the park from
NWCC and identifies the potential for an outdoor plaza
and classrooms, play areas and for direct access to the
river. Other City goals for the park include:
Increase opportunities to create a river gateway
Create a key regional destination
Create ecological buffers between development and
the river to include native tree and shrub species
Improve the guality of human life and wildlife
There is ongoing study being done by Denver Parks
and Recreation to look at ways to activate this park.
The South Platte River Trail runs through Globeville
Landing Park. The trail continues south into downtown
and Confluence Park/Cherry Creek Trail. The trail crosses
to the west side of the river at the park and goes north,
connecting to Northside Park/Heron Pond and into Adams
County, with connections to Sand Creek. Today, Globeville
Landing Park offers the only opportunity to gain direct
access to the river from the east side between 38th Street
and Franklin Street.
88 I Master Plan Components


National Western Center
Coliseum Plaza and Under 1-70
When new development occurs at the Denver Coliseum
site, public space will be a critical component to help to
tie the site with the NWCC under 1-70. The area fronting
onto Bettie Cram Drive and the area directly north of the
Coliseum under 1-70 should be a continuation of the Colorado
Commons public space and provide additional opportunities
for small events and unique uses and events that require
larger areas of covered, hard surface area. This special use
area should also occur under 1-70 at the west end of the
viaduct where the pedestrian connection between Colorado
Commons and Globeville Landing Park occurs.
Regional Drainage Channel
The City of Denver in conjunction with Urban Drainage,
RTD and CDOT are studying the potential to have an
open channel drainage outfall through a portion of the
Coliseum site and through Globeville Landing Park to
address regional drainage requirements for the Montclair
Basin. The channel picks up surface storm drainage from
the High Street Outfall and from the 1-70 East project.
The open channel would be 150 wide with an additional
30 buffer on each side for a total corridor width of 210.
Other alternatives such as piping this drainage are being
explored by Urban Drainage and Flood Control and the
City and County of Denver. All options studied for the
Coliseum site should have a component that addresses
water quality and have an open feel.
Access and Circulation
Brighton Boulevard
Brighton Boulevard is the main north/south arterial
street on the east side of the Coliseum site. Brighton
Boulevard is part of the Mayors Corridor of Opportunity
and is the envisioned to be an enhanced gateway into
downtown Denver from DIA to Denver Union Station. The
street is being redesigned into a multimodal complete
street with four lanes, dedicated bicycle lanes, tree
lawn, detached sidewalks and green infrastructure.
Redevelopment potential is high along the street with a
number of urban infill parcels adjacent to the Coliseum
site, providing a unique opportunity to meet the desired
needs of the GES neighborhoods, as well as regional
interests given it location.
Properties along Brighton Boulevard are experiencing
significant revitalization including adaptive reuse of
existing industrial structures and the development of new
commercial and residential buildings. In addition to private
investment, significant public investment is happening
with respect to the Brighton Boulevard Redevelopment
Project. With a committed $25.7 million from the City
as part of the Mayors 2015 budget, this infrastructure
project will establish public multi-modal right-of-way
improvements including travel and turn lanes, curbs and
medians, sidewalks and bike facilities, as well as additional
amenities and mobility improvements.
44th Street (Bettie Cram Drive)
44th Street is located at the northeast end corner of the
Coliseum site and is currently the main access point for
parking and events from Brighton Boulevard and I-70. The
Master Plan calls for this street to continue through the
NWCC site to the west and connect to Washington Street.
46th Avenue
46th Avenue runs east/west under I-70 between
Washington Street and Bettie Cram Drive. The street is
currently elevated above the Coliseum site to allow for
a pedestrian underpass between the Coliseum and the
National Western Stock Show to the north. The pedestrian
underpass is approximately 50 wide. The Master Plan
calls for this underpass to be removed and the grade of
46th Avenue lowered to the Coliseum level to create a
continuous ground plane and improved sight lines and
movement between the Coliseum and the rest of the NWCC.
The area under I- JO offers many opportunities to create unique
public space opportunities and new connections between the Denver
Coliseum and the NWC.
Arkins Court
Arkins Court runs north from 38th Street into the
Coliseum site. This two lane street provides access
to Globeville Landing Park and access for trucks and
deliveries to the Pepsi Bottling Company. Plans being
prepared by the City call for portions of Arkins Court to
be transformed into a new South Platte River Promenade
south of 38th Street, helping to activate the South Platte
River from Cuernavaca Park to the County Line. Arkins
Court becomes an important access street to the Denver
Coliseum site with easy connections to 38th Street.
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National Western Center
Key Relationships and Adjacencies
The connection between the Coliseum site and the new
NWCC as one fully integrated campus is an important
component to the overall neighborhood connectivity and
provides an opportunity for the uses on each side of the
highway to be synergistic and support each other as a
regional destination. Another key relationship is between
the site and Globeville Landing Park and the river.
By way of example, the area under 1-70 is currently 100%
paved and used for parking, circulation, service and
46th Avenue. This five acre area is a good opportunity to
provide much needed north/south bicycle and pedestrian
connections and create interesting uses and spaces
that can use the covered area for weather protection
and create a more urban and hospitable place that can
be activated as part of the overall NWCC program. By
lowering 46th Avenue, the grade barrier can be removed
and the area can become more walkable and accessible
from both directions, creating a large volume of space
under the viaduct.
The future uses at the Denver Coliseum site need to
help reinforce the Vision for the Corridor of Opportunity
and the NWCC, providing complementary residential,
retail, office or commercial uses that fit the theme of the
overall NWCC plan and help to support the needs of the
neighborhoods and the City as a whole. The site also has
significant environmental issues that would need to be
remediated before development can occur.
River, Parks and Public Space
New space will be proved along the east side of the South Platte River
to help to improve the river habitat and create new open space.
South Platte River
The reach of the South Platte River that runs through
the NWCC is highly modified from its natural condition.
The river has been channelized, with bank conditions
that are almost certainly far steeper and straighter than
they were in a pre-settlement condition. Only two miles
downstream, the river contains gravel bars, riparian
terraces, and a braiding of sandbars and multiple
channels. Within the project site area however, the river
is constrained within a narrow channel by the Globeville
Levee and the Delgany Interceptors with banks that are
almost too steep to climb. The water itself is controlled
as well, with numerous control structures upstream and a
significant control structure on-site near the intersection
of Franklin Street and Race Court. These modifications
have led to the presence of many invasive or non-native
species, reduced river velocity and meander, and a lack
of public access to the water itself.
These conditions are not likely to change significantly, as
the flow controls are a part of a larger river management
condition, and the banks are now constrained by the
presence of multiple, major sanitary sewer pipes on both
sides. The Master Plan calls for more room for the river
corridor at the top of bank on the east side however,
by establishing a new location of National Western
Drive along the river corridor and set back a minimum
of 110 feet from the river bank. This additional land will
make room for the development of new upland habitats
for wildlife and the potential for natural stormwater
conveyance, water guality and detention basins as well
as paths and educational interpretive features. Continued
involvement from the South Platte River Greenway
Foundation and additional studies may also indicate the
ability to reconfigure the bank structure on the east side of
the river for shallower bank angles. Overall, the river also
needs invasive species removed and habitat restoration.
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Full Text

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rMaster Plan DRAFT FOR PUBLIC REVIEW December 18, 2014

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LETTER FROM COUNCIL MEMBER JUDY MONTERO

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LETTER FROM MAYOR HANCOCK

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Table of Contents Executive Summary Introduction Site Orientation and Character Master Plan Big Ideas Acknowledgments Introduction Site History Setting and Context National Western Center Partnerships Corridor of Opportunity and the North Denver Cornerstone Collaborative Assets, Challenges and Opportunities Stakeholder Engagement and Public Involvement National Western Center Vision Vision Guiding Principles Sustainability and Regeneration Framework Master Plan Components Introduction to the Master Plan Integrated Facilities Program Campus Design Character Character Areas River, Parks and Public Space Site Circulation Infrastructure Historic Resources Implementation Planning Principles Phasing Moving Forward Appendices Reference Documents rfrrr 1 en en 11 17 39 59 105

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Executive Summary Introduction Site Orientation and Character Master Plan Big Ideas Acknowledgments Introduction Site History Setting and Context National Western Center Partnerships Corridor of Opportunity and the North Denver Cornerstone Collaborative Assets, Challenges and Opportunities Stakeholder Engagement and Public Involvement National Western Center Vision Vision Guiding Principles Sustainability and Regeneration Framework Master Plan Components Introduction to the Master Plan Integrated Facilities Program Campus Design Character Character Areas River, Parks and Public Space Site Circulation Infrastructure Historic Resources Implementation Planning Principles Phasing Moving Forward Appendices Reference Documents rfrrr nrtbrb Executive Summary 1 en en 11 17 39 59 105

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rfrrr nrtbrb IntroductionThe National Western Complex, Denver Coliseum and National Western Stock Show are at a crossroads. The site is old, antiquated and has seen no signicant investment since the 1990s. At the same time, younger generations are very much aware of and concerned with what we might term great global challenges. Theirs are the generations that will have to feed more than 9 billion people, solve the issue of fresh water shortages and respond to climate change. At the intersection of these issues lies a rare and precious opportunity in the transformation of the National Western Complex and Denver Coliseum into the National Western Center.While honoring the National Western Stock Show (NWSS) 100-year history, ve partnersColorado State University, Denver Museum of Nature and Science, History Colorado, Western Stock Show Association and the City and County of Denverare singularly focused on the opportunity to reinvent the site for the next 100 years. The National Western Center Master Plan (herein referred to as The Plan), which represents the next critical step in the preparing a roadmap for this region of the City, establishes a long range Vision, Guiding Principles and Goals for the redevelopment of the National Western Complex and Denver Coliseum, including the basic framework for the location of the major program elements. At its core, the Plan sets out to accomplish the advancement of four broad objectives: en The Plan plays a key role in reconnecting Globeville, Elyria and Swansea through new and improved multimodal connections; en The Plan advances the Citys intent to secure and grow the National Western Stock Show for the next 100 years as the states largest agriculture convention; en The Plan sets in motion the creation of a year round destination to promote new out-of-state tourism in partnership with new and existing partners such as Visit Denver, Western Stock Show Association, Colorado State University, the Denver Museum of Nature & Science and History Colorado; and en The Plan begins to position Denver as a global player in 21st century agricultural issues that will help advance, through new public/private partnerships, our knowledge around food production, safety and the expansion of healthy foods at an international scale. The Plan envisions a place that responds to the global challenges around food, water, energy and the environment, represents partnerships between the public and private sectors, and blurs the line between entertainment, competition, education, and industry. The plan also calls for a full rehabilitation of the site, one that repairs the long term damage from years of industrial uses and creates a new series of green and healthy spaces that that help to launch a new era for the National Western complex and the adjoining neighborhoods. The Vision, Guiding Principles and Goals were developed through an open, iterative public process and in conjunction with the Globeville and Elyria/ Swansea neighborhood planning eorts. The Plan will be used by public agencies, private entities and the community as a guide to the integrated development of the site. The Plan also outlines the physical organization and critical adjacencies for the development of a dynamic, year-round campus that celebrates our Western Heritage, integrates with the community, provides new educational opportunities (including research and development), and engages the South Platte River. The Plan outlines the potential uses and program elements, describes the general design character of the proposed facilities and site, provides a regeneration framework and goals, and provides a logical implementation strategy to phase the sites redevelopment, recognizing that the National Western Stock Show needs to remain in operation during the sites redevelopment.

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rfrrr nrtbrb The Plan is intended to be a exible planning document to allow for changes in funding, timing of improvements and changes to the stated program, including new opportunities that may emerge during the sites redevelopment. Specically, it allows opportunities for additional partners to be added to the NWC at any time to address the needs of the NWC or help the community to fulll the Vision. Through the on-going involvement of the National Western Citizens Advisory Committee and the dedication of the NWC Partners, the opportunity for further input and direction will be available as the site develops over time. National Western Center Vision and Guiding Principles The NWC Partners have established a Vision for the National Western Center Campus (NWCC) and nine Guiding Principles identied by the founding NWC Partners and the community: en Community and Neighborhood Integration en Engage the River and Nature en Celebrate Western Heritage en Inspire Health and Wellness en Build Cultural Crossroads en Be Pioneering: Break Trail and Foster Innovation en Create Fun and Entertaining Experiences en Grow Local, Regional, and Global Intelligence en Embrace an Ethic of Regeneration The following pages summarize the key ways in which the Vision and Guiding Principles will be fullled. National Western Center Vision Statementfbntbbbtbnntnnbnt btbbnbnnnbbtbbnb bnbn

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rfrrr nrtbrb Vision The National Western Center celebrates the pioneering spirit and promise of the West through year-round experiential life-long learning, the arts, entertainment, competition and commerce. Guiding Principles en Community and Neighborhood Integration en Engage the River and Nature en Celebrate Western Heritage en Inspire Health and Wellness en Build Cultural Crossroads en Be Pioneering: Break Trail and Foster Innovation en Create Fun and Entertaining Experiences en Grow Local, Regional, and Global Intelligence en Embrace an Ethic of Regeneration Site Orientation and Character

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rfrrr nrtbrb Key Site ElementsNational Western Center Partners For more information on the National Western Center please visit: Denvergov.org/NDCC Water Resources Center and South Platte Riverfront 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Stockyards/Event PavilionCSU Equine Sports Medicine ClinicEquestrian Center Livestock Center NWC Transit Station Shared Use/TOD Parking Structure Livestock Exchange Building/Flex Space Trade Show/Exhibition Hall New Arena CSU Center Colorado Commons Stadium Arena Market Coliseum Redevelopment Forney Transportation Museum 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Illustrative Master Plan 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Vicinity Map Washington Street Brighton Boulevard I-70 South Platte River

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rfrrr nrtbrb Master Plan Big Ideas Improve Access to and Health of the South Platte River en Move rail from rivers edge and consolidate to center of site en Bury or move the Delgany Interceptor sewer lines en Relocate National Western Drive to allow for better river and Event Pavilion access en Improve river habitat and health en Create recreational trails and educational areas along the river Flexible, Year-Round Programs to Drive New Tourism en Create exible, ecient, vibrant indoor and outdoor spaces that allow various uses throughout the year, including markets, oces, restaurants, retail, festivals, and the Stock Show en Provide a variety of programseducational, recreational, commercial, competitions, entertainment, visual and performing artsfor neighbors and local to global visitors en Provide hands-on, informal and formal educational programs for families, students, and life-long learners en Build o the history and heritage of the site, while highlighting innovation, particularly in food, energy, and water use en Pursue long-term opportunities to create new programs, spaces, and partnerships

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rfrrr nrtbrb Provide New Connections en Create two new connections across the river between Washington Street and National Western Drive at 49th Avenue and 51st Avenue en Connect Washington Street and Brighton Boulevard with a new complete/green street en Provide an elevated walkway connection to provide access to the RTD Rail Station en Improve pedestrian and bicycle facilities throughout the NWCC en Increase active transportation options with improved pedestrian and bicycle facilities on all new and existing streets en Lower 46th Avenue under I-70 viaduct to allow easier movement between the NWCC and the Denver Coliseum en Improve Brighton Boulevard to accommodate change in land use and improved streetscape that integrates green infrastructure en Redevelop the area south of I-70, including Coliseum, for complementary uses to the NWCC Provide Partnership Opportunities en Build o the history and heritage of and secure the future of the National Western Stock Show en Increase year-round program opportunities for education, food and food production, art, agriculture and livestock, water resources, and recreational activities through collaboration en Provide exibility for long term opportunities to add additional partners with complementary vision and goals en Redevelop Coliseum site south of I-70 for complementary uses and new partners For more information on the National Western Center please visit: Denvergov.org/NDCC

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rfrrr trrrf Executive Summary Introduction Site Orientation and Character Master Plan Big Ideas Acknowledgments Introduction Site History Setting and Context National Western Center Partnerships Corridor of Opportunity and the North Denver Cornerstone Collaborative Assets, Challenges and Opportunities Stakeholder Engagement and Public Involvement National Western Center Vision Vision Guiding Principles Sustainability and Regeneration Framework Master Plan Components Introduction to the Master Plan Integrated Facilities Program Campus Design Character Character Areas River, Parks and Public Space Site Circulation Infrastructure Historic Resources Implementation Planning Principles Phasing Moving Forward Appendices Reference Documents Acknowledgments 1 en en 11 17 39 59 105

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rfrrr trrrf Denver City Council District 1 Susan Shepherd District 2 Jeanne Faatz District 3 Paul D. Lopez District 4 Peggy Lehmann District 5 Mary Beth Susman District 6 Charlie Brown District 7 Chris Nevitt District 8 Albus Brooks District 9 Judy H. Montero, Pro Tem District 10 Jeanne RobbDistrict 11 Christopher Herndon, PresidentAt-Large Robin Kniech At-Large Deborah Ortega MAYOR MICHAEL B. HANCOCK NATIONAL WESTERN CENTER MOU PARTNERS Land and Build-Out Plan Jerry Glick and Bill Mosher, Chairs Nancy Tuor Rick Pederson Pat Grant Ron Williams Paul Andrews Don Kortz Don Elliman Gail Klapper Tom Gougeon Mark Smith Mark Gustafson Polly Jessen Ray Baker Transportation and Access (RTD and CDOT) Tom Gougeon, Chair Jerry Glick Don Kortz Tami Door Ray Baker Finance: Fundraising and City/State/ Federal Revenue Steve McCarthy and Rus Heise, Chairs Tim Schultz Bill Mosher Cathy Carpenter Dea Sue Anschutz-Rodgers Don Elliman Gail Klapper Ron Williams Dawn Bookhardt J.J. Ament Tracy Huggins Maria Garcia Berry Education/Clinical/Food Production Tony Frank and Rick Pederson, Chairs Steve McCarthy Cathy Carpenter Dea Ray Baker Federico Pena Steve Bangert Tim Schultz Mark Gustafson George Sparks Ed Nichols Amy Parsons History, Art, Exploritorium George Sparks, Ed Nichols, Mark Smith, Chairs Maria Garcia Berry-Advisor Jack Green Ron Montoya Doug Jones Art Bosworth Tami Door Michael Long Patti Limerick Cathy Dea Rose Fredrick Sue Anschutz-Rogers Pat Grant Amy Parsons Christoph Heinrich Je ShoemakerVISIT Denver & Denver Arts and VenuesBruce Alexander, Chair Bill Mosher Richard Scharf Kent Rice Nancy Tuor Kelly Brough Tami Door Joey Freund Lem Smith Ron Williams Paul Andrews Coordinate with Neighborhood Interests/City Plan Terrance Carroll, Chair Ron Montoya Tami Door Mark Smith Tracy Huggins Maria Garcia Berry-Advisor National Western Center Bucket Committees Ron Williams, Chairman Paul Andrews, President and CEO Pat Grant Sue Anschutz-Rodgers Buck Hutchison Mark Gustafson Don Elliman Thomas Bradbury Terrance Carroll Pete Coors Justin Cumming Doug Jones Gail Klapper Leslie Lange Guy McEndaer Tracy Ringolsby Ben R. Houston, Chairman Emeritus Western Stock Show Association Sta Kyle Baun Je Childs John Ellis Marshall Ernst Audrey Hall Ron Rohr Western Stock Show Association Board

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rfrrr trrf Colorado State University Tony Frank, President Amy Parsons, Vice President for University Operations Jocelyn Hittle, Denver Operational Initiatives Per Hogestad, Facilities Management Kyle Henley, External Relations Brian Dunbar, Institute for the Built Environment Mark Stetter, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences Chris Kawcak, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences Henry Thompson, College of Agricultural Sciences Dr. Temple Grandin, Professor, Department of Animal Sciences Denver Museum of Nature and Science George Sparks, President and CEO Ed Scholz Nancy Walsh Bridget Coughlin Michele Koons History Colorado Ed Nichols, President/CEO, State Historic Preservation Ocer Steve Turner City & County of Denver Mayors Oce Janice Sinden, Chief of Sta Evan Dreyer, Deputy Chief of Sta Diane Barrett, Chief Projects Ocer Skye Stuart, Council Liaison Emily Li Hauber, Deputy Legislative Director Rowenia Algeria, Communications Director Amber Miller, Communications Mike Stout, Communications Michael Sapp, Neighborhood Liaison Anthony Graves, Regional Director Paul Ryan, Regional Aairs Director North Denver Cornerstone Collaborative (NDCC) Kelly Leid, Executive Director Lotte Lieb Dulla, Capital Stack and RTA Project Lead Todd Wenskoski, Deputy Director Erika Martinez, Communications & Community Outreach Celia Vanderloop, Environmental Services Project Manager Community Planning & Development Brad Buchanan, Executive Director Evelyn Baker Jill Jennings-Golich Steve Gordon Caryn Champine Steve Nalley, Deputy NWCC Project Manager Courtland Hyser Samantha Suter Tim Watkins Andrea Santoro Andrea Burns Barbara Stocklin-Steeley Public Works Jose Cornejo, Executive Director Lesley Thomas, Deputy Director Jennifer Hillhouse, NWCC Project Manager Peter Baertlein Kent Grissom Cindy Patton Sean Mackin Justin Schmitz Selena Klosowski Mike Anderson Sarah Anderson Brian Schat Paul loved the National Western Stock Show and played an important role for Mayor Hancock in the early conversations between the City and the NWSS that helped lead to the NWSS staying in Denver. We lost Paul on April 20, 2013, but we all know he would be smiling about the vision the NWC Partners have committed to paper. We all miss you Paul. NATIONAL WESTERN CENTER MOU PARTNERS continued*

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rfrrr trrf Department of Environmental Health Doug Linkhart, Executive Director Gretchen Armijo Gene Hook Dave Erickson Parks & Recreation Lauri Dannemiller, Executive Director Scott Gilmore, Deputy Director Gordon Robertson David Marquardt Courtney Levingston Department of Finance Cary Kennedy, Executive Director Gretchen Hollrah, Deputy Director Brendan Hanlon, Budget Director Laura Perry Andrew Johnston Brad Dodson Oce of Economic Development Paul Washington, Executive Director John Lucero, Deputy Director Je Romine Michael Miera Beth Truby Department of Real Estate Je Steinberg Arts & Venues Kent Rice, Executive Director Ginger White, Deputy Director Tad Bowman City Attorneys Oce Scott Martinez, City Attorney Cristal DeHerrera, Deputy City Attorney Shaun Sullivan Jennifer Welbourn Dan Slatterly Karen Aviles Josh Roberts Mayors Oce of Sustainability Jerry Tinianow, Executive Director Sonrisa Lucero Jessica Fischer Development Services Steve Ferris Walt Hime Alan Sorrel Eric Osmundsen David Clark Denver City Council District 9 Sta Nola Miguel Benjamin Roldan-Rojas Denver Planning Board Julie Underdahl, Chair Andy Baldyga, Vice Chair Jim Bershof Shannon Giord Renee Martinez-Stone Brittany Morris Saunders Joel Noble Susan Pearce Arleen Taniwaki Frank Schultz Chris Smith VISIT Denver Richard Scharf, President & CEO Rachel Benedick Rich Grant Denver Urban Renewal Authority Tracy Huggins, Executive Director Mark Tompkins NATIONAL WESTERN CENTER MOU PARTNERS continued City & County of Denver continued

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rfrrr trrfArmando Payan, Globeville Resident AE, Globeville Resident David Oletski, Globeville Resident John Zapien, Globeville Resident Drew Dutcher, Elyria-Swansea Resident Bettie Cram, Elyria-Swansea Resident Liliana Flores Amaro, Elyria-Swansea Resident Juan Veloz, Elyria-Swansea Resident Patricia Carmody, Historic Riverside Cemetery Heather Laerty, Habitat for Humanity of Metro Denver (Katie McKenna, alternate member) Steven Moss, Focus Points Family Resource Center (Stuart Steers, alternate member) Tangier Barnes, Groundwork Denver Mickey Zeppelin, Taxi Vernon Hill, JJJ Properties Anne Hayes, Westeld Company Marina Chotzino, Where Wood Meets SteelLarry Burgess, Elyria-Swansea-Globeville Business Association Annie Levinsky, Historic Denver (John Olson, alternate member)Tracy Weil, RiNo Arts District Coby Gould, The GrowHaus Carrie Atiyeh, VISIT Denver Tony Curcio, Family Environmental (former member) Ben Riin, Denver Cutthroats (former member) Robert Escamilla, Globeville Resident (former member) Tom Anthony, Elyria-Swansea Resident (former member) COMMITTEES AND CONSULTANT TEAMS Eric Anderson Paul Andrews Javier Barrios Brad Buchanan Cathy Carpenter Dea Terrance Carroll Kim Day Tami Door Drew Dutcher Don Elliman Tony Frank Hillary Fulton Maria Garcia Berry Scott Gillmore Tom Gougeon Pat Grant Jennifer Hillhouse Jocelyn Hittle Tracy Huggins Mark Johnson Chris Kawcak Cary Kennedy Victoria Keziah Gail Klapper Kim Kucera Sandra Kulli Kelly Leid Steven McCarthy Bill Mosher Steve Nalley Ed Nichols David Oletski Amy Parsons Kent Rice Charity Sevian Mark Stetter George Sparks Henry Thompson Steve Turner Rick Pederson Chris Waugh Kriss Wittman Tim Wohlgenant Ron Williams Mickey Zeppelin Disclaimer All graphics and illustrations in this Master Plan are intended for planning purposes only to show general intent of the Plan and are conceptual. Council Member Judy Montero, District 9 Terrance Carroll, Co-Facilitator Maria Garcia Berry, Co-Facilitator NWC Partners Kim Kucera, CRL Associates Jin Tsuchiya, CRL Associates National Western Citizens Advisory Committee National Western Citizens Advisory Committee Resources Parsons Brinckerho Civitas Populous, Inc. OV Consultants, LLC J. F. Sato Associates Anderson Hallas Walker Parking Sustainable Strategies Group, LLC Shine Kiewit Terracon ME Engineers Peter J. Rickershauser Seven G SlaterPaull CRL Associates SII LLC First Southwest Strategic Advisory Group SEH Martin & Martin Laura Aldrete Susan Aldretti Eric Anderson Sarah Anderson Gretchen Armijo Sheela Bachen Tangier Barnes David Basich Tad Bowman Adam Brock Brad Buchanan Devon Buckels Catherine Cox-Blair Colin Day Shadana DickersonSultana Carol Dollard Brian Dunbar Drew Dutcher Terry Freeman Hillary Fulton Andrea Garcia Helene Gotthelf Tom Gougeon Elaine Harkins Jenn Hillhouse Jocelyn Hittle Dominique Jackson Pete Jeerson Kelly Leid Angela Loder Sonrisa Lucero David Marquardt Conor Merrigan Nola Miguel Steve Nalley John Olson George Pond Josh Rado Chad Riley Ron Rohr Paul Schmiechen Je Shoemaker Critter Thompson Jerry Tinianow Steve Turner Celia VanderLoop Reagan Waskom Ellen Wohl Tim Wohlgenant Anna Zawisza Round Up Retreat Participants National Western Center Sustainability Task Force CONSULTANT TEAM SUPPORT

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rfrrr bt Executive Summary Introduction Site Orientation and Character Master Plan Big Ideas Acknowledgments Introduction Site History Setting and Context National Western Center Partnerships Corridor of Opportunity and the North Denver Cornerstone Collaborative Assets, Challenges and Opportunities Stakeholder Engagement and Public Involvement National Western Center Vision Vision Guiding Principles Sustainability and Regeneration Framework Master Plan Components Introduction to the Master Plan Integrated Facilities Program Campus Design Character Character Areas River, Parks and Public Space Site Circulation Infrastructure Historic Resources Implementation Planning Principles Phasing Moving Forward Appendices Reference Documents Introduction 1 en en 11 17 39 59 105

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rfrrr rrf nnbbntbbtntbnbb tbnbntnbtnbtbbb bnbtnbtbtntbntnnnbntnbb btbbbbnnbntb Site HistoryThe NWCC has its roots in the Denver Union Stock Yard Company founded in 1881 and the opening of the stockyards ve years later. The location for the stockyards was not accidental, given its location proximal to adjacent rail lines and the South Platte River. Other industries, such as an ore smelter on the present day Denver Coliseum site and the Holden Smelter were already nearby. The stockyards grew steadily as herds of cattle soon began arriving by rail. The construction of stock pens, an elevated viewing walkway, an animal transport bridge across the South Platte River, and other accessory structures were built to accommodate the burgeoning cattle industry at this location. Meat processing and packing plants also set up shop by the early 1890s, adding to the sites rise as the center of Denvers cattle and agricultural industry. In 1898, the rst portion of the current Denver Union Stock Yard Exchange Building was constructed, with subsequent additions in 1916 and 1919. Facing the railroad tracks and originally surrounded by cattle pens, this prominent four-story brick and stone building was the center of stockyard and stock show operations. The building housed the oces of the Denver Union Stock Show Company, the primary force behind the National Western Stock Show, as well as a newspaper, restaurant, bank, the Colorado State Farm Bureau, and the local oce of the U.S. Bureau of Agricultural Economics. Finished in the Beaux Arts Classical style, the building presented a grandiose formality and was highly visible from adjoining areas. The buildings colossal entry columns and decorative parapet, combined with its permanent brick and stone construction, announced the livestock industrys wealth and stature in the community. In 1906, the Denver Livestock Exchange hosted its rst ocial Western Livestock Show under a circus big top tent. These annual events were wildly successful, leading to the construction of a permanent Arena (or National Amphitheater and Livestock Pavilion) in 1909. The large structure was a marvel of its time, with its interior steel columns and long girders providing a large open arena seating up to 6,000 people. The brick Neoclassical style building, with its decorative masonry patterns and corner towers, announced its permanence and physical presence to the community. The expanding stockyard complex attracted the construction of several meat packing plants beginning in the early 1890s. The largest, Colorado Packing and Provisions Company, became the Armour Packing Company, expanding rapidly north of the sheep barns. While the complex was razed in 1987, the old Armour Oce Building, constructed in 1917, and water tower remain.By the post-World War II era, stock show events had outgrown the original arena. Work began on a larger Coliseum in 1949. Completed in 1951, the concrete barrel vault structure designed by architect Roland Linder, was modern in style, again exuding condence in the Stock

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rfrrr bt Shows future. An enclosed concrete walkway structure over East 46th Avenue was constructed concurrent with the Coliseum to connect it to the remainder of the Stock Show facilities to the north. Neighborhood History The early stockyard uses at what is today known as the National Western Center were located in an area attractive to other railroad-reliant industries, such as ore smelters. Communities such as Elyria, Swansea and Globeville (formerly Holdenville) arose to house and accommodate immigrant industrial and meatpacking workers. The communities of Elyria and Swansea were established east of the National Western Center site. Immediately to the east of the stockyards was Elyria, incorporated in 1890, with Swansea, on the east side of York Street, founded in 1870. Slavic immigrants moved into these settlements, located within walking distance to jobs along the railway, and built schools, churches and neighborhood stores to serve their growing communities. Globeville, on the west side of the South Platte River, was originally established in 1891 to provide workers for the Holden Smelter, attracting many Polish immigrants in its early years. Together, the stockyards, meatpacking plants and smelters created a strong and bustling economic center, enabling the vibrant and resilient surrounding residential communities to grow and ourish. The communities faced challenges as the meatpacking industry become more automated and moved elsewhere, other industries located in the area, and the physical landscape changed with construction of Interstate 70 in 1964. Population shifts brought more diversication and a strong Latino population to the area after World War II. While the historical agricultural and industrial uses of the area may not be entirely compatible with the surrounding residential enclaves of Globeville, Elyria, and Swansea, the industrial, agricultural and residential history and evolution of the area is deeply inter-connected. Stockyard and meat processing workers who lived in the surrounding neighborhoods had an intimate familiarity and strong economic connection to and reliance on the Denver Union Stock Yard Company and its related uses. The historic buildings and features that remain on the NWCC site directly tell the story of the stockyard and show uses. These same buildings and features are also longstanding landmarks and orienting features for the surrounding residential neighborhoods. Recent History In June of 2011, the National Western Stock Show (NWSS) announced that they were interested in partnering with the new Gaylord Development in Aurora and to move the stock show to that location. The new location would have new facilities for the NWSS and would provide them additional space for their programming and for future expansion. The inauguration of a new Mayor and this identication of a potential relocation out of Denver was the catalyst for a renewed study that looked at the existing National Western Complex site to identify both its shortcomings and its potential. In December 2011, the NWSS released a business plan that was then reviewed by the Denver Urban Renewal Authority. The business plan and subsequent review by DURA provide important guidance as to the strategic planning regarding the NWSS, providing a baseline understanding of the current operations of the Western Stock Show Association, the facilities necessary to support the production of the annual NWSS and nancial implications related to the proposed relocation and improvements of these facilities. Additionally, the report integrated the Citys desired outcomes for redevelopment of the current Complex. Following DURAs review, in November of 2012, the National Western Stock Show announced their intention to remain in Denver. Shortly after that announcement, the NWSS assembled a number of committees to begin to develop their program needs for a new NWSS at the current location, referred to as the Bucket Committee. Members are identied in the Acknowledgments section of the Master Plan.

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rfrrr bt In May of 2014, Visit Denver, Western Stock Show Association and Denver Arts and Venues released the Denver Feasibility Study, conducted by the Strategic Advisory Group. The intent of this study was to better understand the best long-term positioning for the National Western Stock Show, National Western Complex, Denver Coliseum, and the Colorado Convention Center. The Feasibility Study identied the National Western Stock Show as the Super Bowl of stock shows a premier livestock industry event. The study identies the potential to re-establish the historic and iconic Stock Show for the next 100 years, for it to remain at current site, re-master plan the entire site, build a new Arena integral to the site (north of I-70), and to re-purpose the Denver Coliseum site and other select facilities to create a dynamic, fully aligned campus, at the gateway into downtown Denver. The ndings of this study became the basis for the overall program for the National Western Center Campus (NWCC).

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rfrrr bt Site History 1882 Omaha and Grant Smelter moves to Coliseum site 1881 Elyria Lots for sale by Archie Fisk for $20 to $40 1000-1450 Ancestral Pawnee in the area 1500-1600 Ancestral Plains Apache in the area 1600 Ancestral Comanche in the area Early 1700s Spanish Explorers 1700 Historical Kiowa, Arapaho and Cheyenne in the area 1810-1845 Fur Traders in the area 1859 Colorado part of the Jeerson Territory 1870 First rail lines in Denver 1886 Holden Smelter opens at 51st and Washington 1889 Globe Smelting and Mining Co. purchases Holden Smelter 1892 Colorado Packing and Provisions/ Armour Packing built along river 1899 Globe Smelting and Mining becomes American Smelting and Rening Company (ASARCO) 1891 Town of Globeville Incorporated 1902 Globeville Annexed to City of Denver 1903 Omaha and Grant Smelter closes 1904 Elyria Annexed to City of Denver Western Packing/Swift Packing Company built along river Blayney-Murphy/Cudahy/ Sigman/ Bar-S Packing Company built at 48th and Brighton 1906 First National Western Stock Show CSU wins the rst Grand National Steer prize 1909 National Amphitheater (Stadium Arena) rst permanent structure at NWSS 1916 Livestock Exchange Building Opens 1919 Smelting Operations stop at ASARCO 1890 Town of Elryria Incorporated 1858-1860 Colorado Gold Rush 1898 Original Livestock Exchange Building

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rfrrr bt 2013 Mayor Hancock announces the creation of the North Denver Cornerstone Collaborative (NDCC), of which the National Western Center project is included as one of the six major projects in the region National Western Center Memorandum Of Understanding signed by City and County of Denver, Western Stock Show Association, Colorado State University, Denver Museum of Nature and Science and History Colorado 1931 National Western adds a Rodeo to the show 1952 Denver Coliseum Dedicated I-70 Constructed Yards Auction Arena 1973 Hall of Education, Beef Palace, and National Western Center Club open 1991 Expo Hall and Stadium Hall open 1995 National Western Events Center, paddock and Horse Barn Open 2000 Elevated I 70 and 46th Avenue reconstructed west of Brighton Blvd. 2006 Centennial of National Western Stock Show 2012 National Western Stock Show announces they are staying in Denver March 2015 National Western Center Master Plan approved April 2014 National Western Center Master Plan process started Late 2014 National Western Center (draft) Master Plan released publically 1964 Construction of I-70 1989 Voters approved bond issue for NWSS

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rfrrr Setting and ContextThe NWCC is located in north Denver in the Elyria Neighborhood. The study area is bounded by Washington Street on the west, Brighton Boulevard on the east, Race Court to the north and 38th Street to the south. It includes approximately 250 acres, which includes the National Western Stock Show (95 acres) and Denver Coliseum (30 acres). The Globeville Neighborhood is located to the west across the South Platte River. The area is surrounded by industrial uses to the north and west, and the Elyria residential neighborhood to the east. The location is signicant in that it is located along the Corridor of Opportunity between Denver Union Station and Denver International Airport, one of the most compelling commercial investment opportunities in the world. The Corridor of Opportunity along Interstate 70 and Brighton Boulevard will continue to be developed into integrated job centers for the logistics, transportation and warehousing industries. The study area contains two interchanges at Washington Street and Brighton Boulevard.The South Platte River runs through the west side of the study area and has over a mile of river frontage at the NWCC. To revive the river and enhance its natural amenities, Denver recently began a series of transformational projects that will create recreational and development opportunities to improve river access, and better use the entire corridor, through a mix of retail, residential, hotel, industrial and oce real estate. With investment in remediation and shallower banks in this segment, the river corridor will come to life with open space and a waterfront park for recreational use, as well as a range of new housing options with views of the Rocky Mountains and Downtown.The site has been the home of the National Western Stock Show since 1906. The National Western Stock Show is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization that provides college and graduate level scholarships in agriculture and medicine for practice in rural areas. National Western prides itself on its ability to educate Denvers urban community about the importance of agriculture during the Stock Show. It is also their mission to serve producers and consumers throughout the world by being the premier Stock Show, Rodeo, Horse Show and center for year-round events. The 16-day show also serves as an entertainment arena, hosting one of the worlds richest regular season professional rodeos, largest horse show and Colorados largest tradeshow. The National Western Stock Show is noted for hosting the worlds only carload and pen bt I-25 I-270Colorado Blvd. I-70 RTD East Corridor South Platte River RTD North Metro CorridorRTD Gold Line CorridorElyria Neighborhood 41st and Fox Transit Station 38th and Blake Transit Station Riverside Cemetery Cole Neighborhood Clayton Neighborhood Swansea Neighborhood RiNo National Western Center Transit Station 40th and Colorado Transit Station Globeville NeighborhoodNWC fbntbbbntnbtntbnbtbnn ntftnbtntttttbnbbnttbbnt

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6 Summary and Report bbbbntbbn rfrrr bt cattle show, held in the historic Denver Union Stockyards. Overall total attendance for the Stock Show in 2014 was 640,022. The attendance record was set during the Stock Shows 100th anniversary in 2006 at 726,972. More than 15,000 head of horses, cattle, sheep, swine, goats, llamas, alpacas, bison, yak, poultry and rabbits step foot on the grounds of the National Western Stock Show each year. More than 350 vendors ll the show grounds with a variety of food and shopping opportunities. The National Western Trade Show oers a variety of products including ne art and jewelry, clothing, household items and agricultural products and equipment.The study area is surrounded by the Globeville, Elyria and Swansea neighborhoods. These neighborhoods were developed in the early 1900s and housed the primary workforce for the smelters, meat packing plants and stockyards that were historically on this site. Today, they provide a mix of residential and industrial uses. The neighborhoods have recently completed their neighborhood plans, and the development of the National Western Center Campus reects the goals and objectives of those plans. Planning Context The Denver Comprehensive Plan provides the vision for the entire city. Citywide and small area plans are adopted as supplements to the Comprehensive Plan to provide additional direction for a certain topic or area. Once adopted, the National Western Center Master Plan will guide and inuence the decisions that aect the future of the area. The Comprehensive Plan and its supplements are adopted by City Council ordinance based on a recommendation of approval from the Denver Planning Board. Planning Boards criteria for approval of supplements are: a long term view, inclusive public process, and consistency with the Denver Comprehensive Plan. National Western Center Partnerships One of the NWCCs unique features is its collaborative spirit and strong Partnerships are the key to making the NWCC a reality. Throughout the NWCC Master Plan process the NWC Partners have collaborated on a wide variety of topics including programming, circulation, design and public engagement. The partners have been instrumental in moving the Vision forward reaching this project milestone. As the project moves forward, new partners will be added to help implement the Vision and Guiding Principles. As a key aspect of the State of the City Address by Mayor Michael B. Hancock in June 2013, the Mayor used the backdrop of the Forney Transportation Museum to outline his vision for the North Denver Cornerstone Collaborative, which included the idea of a new National Western Complex at the current site, in collaboration with ve key

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rfrrr bt partners who were prepared to release a seminal document to articulate how this group would work together to envision the future of the site for the next 100 years.On July 22, 2013 Colorado State University (CSU), the Denver Museum of Nature and Science (DMNS), History Colorado (HC), the City and County of Denver (CCD) and the Western Stock Show Association (WSSA) signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), attached herein as Appendix A expressing their intention to collaborate on the creation of the National Western Center. From the outset, the partners envisioned the NWCC as a year-round destination, strategically aligning education, economic development, tourism, and entertainment uses in one location that celebrate and honor our Western heritage.Areas of shared focus were site planning, a venue feasibility study in partnership with Visit Denver, Denver Arts and Venues and the Western Stock Show Association, RTDs North Metro Line, needed land assemblage, project due diligence, sta resources, and project funding. The desired outcome was the development of a long-range master plan and a shared commitment to substantially advance the vision by the end of 2014. Collaborative Vision and Guiding Principles To launch the master planning eort, CSU hosted the Roundup Retreat, a day and a half where representatives en of each NWC Partner, members of the National Western Citizens Advisory Committee, and outside experts came together to articulate a shared vision. As part of this exercise, each partner outlined their respective strategic direction and goals, and described internal and external forces shaping the organizations direction. The Roundup Retreat report and strategic illustration graphics are included in Appendix B. The strategic direction and goals of the NWC Partners helped identify complementary interests, collaborative opportunities, and a joint Vision for the NWCC. A summary of the Retreat participants and NWCC Partners strategic goals include: City & County of Denver en The NWCC is one of six major project portfolios that are being strategically aligned through the Mayors North Denver Cornerstone Collaborative (NDCC). en The City and County of Denver sees this as a chance to secure the long-term success of the NWSS and to help signicantly reconnect and re-energize the surrounding communities. Western Stock Show Association en The WSSA desires a blueprint for the next 100 years that sets in motion a vibrant and sustainable future through new facilities and programming for the National Western Stock Show. Colorado State University en The States land grant university, CSU envisions world class learning opportunities in the elds of veterinary medicine, agri-business and natural resource stewardship. Denver Museum of Nature & Science en DMNS imagines a world where everyone loves and protects our natural environment. History Colorado en As a steward of Colorados artifacts, History Colorado envisions a center to celebrate our proud past and help inform an even better future. Neighborhoods en As part of the Globeville and Elyria-Swansea (GES) neighborhood planning process, the communities would like to see the NWCC integrate key guiding principles connected, strong, unique and healthy neighborhoodsinto the master planning process. bnnbtnbbb

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rfrrr bt Another major goal of the NWCC is the potential to stimulate and grow tourism and visitors to the region. The NWCC has the potential to increase tourism and increase economic impact to local hotels, restaurants, retailers, ground transportation companies and other tourismrelated businesses. Some specic areas include: en Heritage Tourism: the NWCC will be the centerpiece of heritage tourism in Denver and a celebration of the American cowboy and Denvers rich historic association with ranching. The site will also preserve some of the citys most historic and architecturally signicant buildings. en Agri-Tourism. The NWCC will play an important role in this rapidly growing tourism segment, celebrating and showcasing Colorado food products and the ranching industry. en Recreational Tourism. The redeveloped South Platte River will provide more opportunities for hiking and biking along the river and water sports in it, including the potential of a river park for outdoor events. en Cultural Tourism. The National Western Stock Show is one of Denvers largest and most popular events. The Master Plan will allow the NWSS to thrive and possibly expand extra days in the future. There is the potential of attracting numerous additional equestrian events, concerts and shows that would attract out of town participants, exhibitors, and visitors. en Conventions and Trade Shows. The new NWCC can serve as an additional site for meetings, banquets, conventions and trade shows, adding to Denvers ability to grow this $650 million industry. fnbnbtnbbnbbbnnbfntbbbnbb nbntbbbbbnThe Corridor of Opportunity and North Denver Cornerstone Collaborative Working Together to Transform a Region

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rfrrr bt The City & County of Denver continues to strengthen its progressive, visionary reputation with several exciting redevelopment and infrastructure projects underway. Named the Corridor of Opportunity, this nearly 23mile corridor of highway and commuter rail between a reactivated Denver Union Station (DUS) and Denver International Airport (DIA) is one of the most compelling investment opportunities in the world, with thousands of developable acres. The redeveloped NWCC and Brighton Boulevard Corridor will provide a more inspiring front door to Denver for the millions of tourists and convention delegates who arrive at DIA and travel to downtown through this area, either by ground transportation at present or by rail in the future. Within this corridor are the dynamic, historically rich neighborhoods of Globeville, Elyria and Swansea (GES). There are currently six signicant redevelopment projects in the NDCC that provide unprecedented opportunities to connect GES communities to one another and provide an energized gateway to downtown Denver. In January 2013, Mayor Michael B. Hancock aligned these eorts under one coordinated vision in pursuit of creating a world-class city. The North Denver Cornerstone Collaborative (NDCC) is an eort to ensure integrated, ecient planning and implementation to create deliberate connections among these converging projects. The six major projects of the NDCC are: National Western CenterThrough a visionary transformation, the National Western Center will become a next generation must-see destination with sustainable, year-round programming. Educational opportunities, entertainment, and community amenities will be bolstered by innovative partnerships with Colorado State University, Denver Museum of Nature & Science and History Colorado and others that will join forces with the original NWC Partners in the months and years to come, making this new campus a catalytic anchor for North Denver. The NWCC Vision and emerging programming for this center will showcase sustainability principles and celebrate the South Platte River and attract new residents and visitors to discover the heart of the west. fnttnnbbbtbbtbbn 2 3 4 5 5 5 6 6 5 1

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rfrrr bt Brighton Boulevard Corridor Redevelopment Paving a warm welcome to our city means energizing Brighton Boulevard, a major gateway to and from downtown Denver, with signicant multi-modal improvements. The second phase of planning for this corridor focuses on potential streetscape design elements, as well as additional amenities and mobility improvements. Public and private investment partnerships will build a new energy and encourage innovative collaborations to further development that mixes the old with the new, making this one of Denvers most unique streets. River North This vibrant community with the South Platte River at its center also known as RiNo, is home to a remarkable range of creative businesses. Radiating this progressive energy out to the rest of the city is key to the next phase of development as the region continues to attract an eclectic mix of millennials, the creative class and artists. Plans call for innovative uses of the South Platte River as the focal point for future development and recreation. RiNos evolution is expected to continue over the next 20 years thanks to transit-oriented development at the nearby 38th and Blake Station, with direct connections to the neighborhood, and other mixed-use development in the area. Interstate 70 East Reconstruction Lowering a highway below grade is the bold move proposed by the Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT) in the I-70 East Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the reconstruction area located between Brighton Boulevard and Colorado Boulevard. Swansea Elementary School will gain four acres of community space from the interstate cover that will also provide new connections within the neighborhood. Just imagine how people, places and neighborhoods in the area will be reenergized and rediscovered with this signicant and exciting restructuring of I-70 East. RTD Station Development Transit opens up new options for residents to move throughout the region and boosts the economic viability of neighborhoods. As the cornerstone of the Corridor of Opportunity, Globeville, Elyria and Swansea are in a unique location that will be home to four RTD stations and the commuter rail maintenance facility. Home to stations on the East, Gold and North Metro rail lines, the community will enjoy enhanced connections to other parts of the city and vital access to and from Denver Union Station, DIA, the National Western Center, Arvada and the north Front Range. Surrounding Neighborhoods The NWCC is located within the Elyria neighborhood and at the edge of the Globeville neighborhood. There is a great opportunity to make the NWCC Campus and new development an integrated part of these communities. The Globeville and Elyria/Swansea Neighborhood Plans each identify the need to provide connections to the river and the Globeville plan calls for new river-oriented development and improved connections to help activate the river and provide mixed use growth within the neighborhood. The neighborhood plans also help to identify connection points across the river that work best to support a strong and healthy community and provided needed access to the NWCC site. These locations are identied at 49th Avenue and at 51st Avenue from the Washington Street side of the study area. Ongoing coordination between the Globeville Neighborhood Plan Elyria and Swansea Neighborhoods Plan and the NWCC Master Plan is vital to inform more detailed planning and implementation eorts. Each neighborhood plan is guided by four key principles: en Connected en Strong en Unique en Sustainable ftbbntbbbnb nbtb bnnttbt fnbnbtb nbttbntbbtnb tnnbbnnbt

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rfrrr bt The importance of this coordination stems from the fact that all three planning eorts have a shared boundary along the South Platte River, and all three emphasize the importance of enhanced connections between their respective planning areas in order to realize the goals of each specic planning eort. These planning documents all point towards an increase in residential and mixed use populations within the areas near the Coliseum property. The inuence of those development patterns is favorable for increased population, economic purchasing power, and retail demand within the area over time.Assets, Challenges, and OpportunitiesIn addition to understanding the surrounding context, it is necessary to focus on the NWCC site Assets, Challenges and Opportunities. The National Western Center site includes a number of opportunities and challenges that help shape the Master Plan. I-70 and the Corridor of Opportunity The NWCC site is located directly north of I-70 within the Corridor of Opportunity between the downtown core and Denver International Airport and is vital to the success of the NWCC. I-70 is the major access highway for tourists and visitors coming to the NWCC and provides critical circulation to the NWCC site and is the primary gateway to downtown. There are two existing interchanges along I-70 that provide access opportunities for the NWCC, at Brighton Boulevard and at Washington Street. The Brighton Boulevard and I-70 interchange has acted as the front door to the National Western Stock Show since I-70 was built in 1964. This is the perceived access point for most people that have attended events at the complex. It also serves as the gateway into downtown Denver. The Brighton Boulevard interchange provides easy access into both downtown Denver and into the new NWCC, with opportunities to dramatically improve this gateway. Washington Street currently only connects to the National Western site at 46th Avenue, but additional planned connections across the South Platte River will allow for better access to the NWCC site from Washington Street and generate new activation opportunities for Washington Street and the Globeville neighborhood. Railroads There are currently three freight railroads and one planned passenger rail line in the NWCC study area. U P The Union Pacic Railroad has one spur line that accesses the south portion of the NWCC site just south of I-70 crossing Brighton Boulevard and 44th Street with an at-grade crossing. This spur line serves the Pepsi Bottling Company located at 38th Avenue and Brighton Boulevard and has a low volume of rail trac. B Nr S Fr (BNSF) The BNSF railroad cuts diagonally through the center of the NWCC site and is a major east/west barrier for access across the site. The BNSF Brush Subdivision mainline runs roughly northeasterly through the site and connects directly to the Globeville Yards located just southwest of the NWCC study area. This is a high volume trac line (average 32 trains/day) that includes large freight and coal trains and also includes Amtrak California Zephyr intercity passenger service. There are currently four crossings of this line in the study area at I-70, 46th Avenue (overpass), 47th Avenue/Marion Street (overpass), and at Race Court (overpass). Currently, only one track exists as the rail crosses over the 47th Avenue/Marion Street underpass, but the BNSF is in the planning and design phases of increasing the number of tracks through the site to as many as four tracks within the near future. These additional tracks, along with the new RTD North Metro track, will allow for the opportunity to construct a wider underpass at 47th/Marion, increasing pedestrian and vehicular capacity under this currently substandard structure. BNSF also has one local inter-terminal freight transfer line, the Jersey Cuto that turns west out of the north end of the Globeville yard just north of I-70 and crosses the South Platte River. This line has at-grade crossings at National Western Drive and Washington Street. rbbntbnb bntb

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rfrrr bt Drfr Rn It (DRI) The DRI is a local freight short haul line that serves customers throughout the north Denver area. The line has approximately 25 miles of rail and has two corridors which run through the NWCC site, one along the South Platte River and one along the east side of National Western Drive, that come together at approximately Franklin Street and Race Court. The line carries two trains per day in each direction and switching movements for local businesses. These lines provide limited places to cross east/west through the site and create an additional barrier to the South Platte River. DRI also has its only freight interchange point with BNSF at the north end of the Globeville yards just north of I-70. BNSF/DRIR interchange occurs using both the River and National Western Drive corridors. The through service for DRI to serve other customers north and east of NWCC must remain intact for the DRI to operate. DRI also has a maintenance facility located along the river line just south of Race Court. The DRI has seven customers within the study area of the National Western Center. RTD N Mr Lr RTD is currently constructing the North Metro Line which will run commuter rail passenger service between Denver Union Station and 124th and Colorado in Thornton with future plans to extend to 162nd in Thornton. There will be a rail station at the National Western Center on this line. The North Metro Line is part of a larger system of new public transportation options, further connecting Denver through DUS to other parts of the Front Range. Or rb RTD Lrt There are three other RTD commuter rail stations within a two-mile radius of the NWCC. The 41st and Fox station in south Globeville is located on the Gold Line, and the 38th and Blake and 40th and Colorado stations are located on the East Line. All these stations provide great opportunities to increase accessibility to the NWCC and surrounding neighborhoods like never before and collectively serve as a key component of an over-arching multi-modal transit system to bring visitors from across the Front Range to the NWCC site on a year-round basis. rfntbnS.Platte River T fbnbnntbbbnb tbfbnnb tnfntbnntbt ntbbb fbbn TRTD North Metro LineBNSFDenver & Rock Island Union Pa cic S treets Commuter Rail St ation Legend

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Delgany Interceptors The Delgany Interceptor and the Delgany Common Interceptor are two of the largest sanitary sewer lines in Denver. The twin pipes run a circuitous route through the NWCC study area, underground through the west side of the Denver Coliseum site, under I-70 and adjacent to the 1909 Stadium Arena, under the BNSF tracks and south of the Livestock Exchange building. The pipes then daylight along the east side of the South Platte River. The pipes enter a siphon at approximately 50th Avenue, and then continue north on the west side of the river underground to the Metro Wastewater Reclamation District plant in the City of Commerce City.Where the pipes are exposed on the east side of the river, they vary in height above the ground from 4 at the south to 12 at the north and pose a signicant barrier to the river from the east side. Their position directly on the top of the east bank of the river does not allow for easy access to the river or the ability to pull the river bank back to create an active river edge or increased riparian habitat.Area Connectivity and Access Due to the large areas of the NWCC that historically have been livestock yards, there have been very limited east/ west connections through the site between 46th Avenue and Race Court, Brighton Boulevard and Washington Street. The railroads also create signicant deterrent to east/west connection with a limited number of crossing points. There are also only two vehicular/ pedestrian crossings of the South Platte River in this area, at 46th Avenue and at Franklin Street just north of Race Court. The lack of east-west connectivity and private property ownership creates a barrier for both motorists and pedestrians wanting to connect between the Globeville, Elyria and Swansea neighborhoods and limits river access from the neighborhoods. With the imminent construction of the new RTD North Metro line and a station at the NWCC, it is important to create this east/west connection to provide an opportunity to for better circulation as part of the NWCC redevelopment. Brighton Boulevard and Washington Street are the main north/south arterials and truck routes serving the area. National Western Drive (Packing House Road) is a local north/south street serving a number of industrial uses between 46th Avenue and Race Court. National Western Drive turns into Franklin Street north of Race Court and ties to 58th Avenue which has connections to west with I-25. Both Brighton Boulevard and Washington Street have a limited existing right of way width of 60. The Globeville Area Neighborhood Plan oers options for the widening of Washington Street to provide basic pedestrian/bike amenities and on street parking. Brighton Boulevard will be widened to the west along the NWCC site to provide new pedestrian/bike amenities and increased width for better circulation at the NWCC site and to the neighborhood to the east. Improvements will also be made along Brighton Boulevard as part of the I-70 East improvements at the interchange.rfrrr bt fbbtnbtnttb ntntbnbbn nbbbbbbn nntbbnnn rfntbnS.Platte River T fntbntbbbnbnbtbntntb bbbntbnbnttbtnb

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rfrrr bt Key Historic Assets A Historic Preservation Study for the National Western area was completed in August 2014 is identied as one of the reference documents for NWCC. This assessment conducted preliminary research and provides an assessment of the historic preservation issues that may aect the National Western Center. There is a rich history throughout the study area and adjacent neighborhoods. Within the study area, the National Western Historic Assessment has identied a number of buildings that are either eligible for historic designation or are contributing to the historic area around NWCC. Key historic buildings include the original 1909 Stadium Arena, which was the rst permanent building at the National Western Stock Show, the 1919 Livestock Exchange Building and the two structures immediately to the west, the 1917 Armour Administration Building, and the 1952 Denver Coliseum on the south side of I-70. Each of these buildings has signicant reuse potential for the National Western Center or future development associated with NWCC. There is also a large array of other historic elements including the Armour water tower, the historic Yards, and many smaller contributing elements. Specic recommendations of the Historic Preservation Study are located in Appendix G. The surrounding neighborhoods of Globeville, Elyria and Swansea also have a strong history and a rich culture that is a great opportunity that can be reected at the NWCC. The story of the neighborhoods needs to be told throughout the NWCC through interpretation, display of historic assets, art, and active use of the site by surrounding neighborhoods. S.Platte River rfnrtb b fbntbbtbn bnbnnt nt rfntbnS.Platte River T 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 fnbbntbnttbtbbbtb nnnnttnbbt fbf T Livestock Transport BridgeArmour Water Tower Armour Administration BuildingLivestock Exchange Building 1909 Stadium Building Denver Coliseum Stockyards Streets Commuter Rail St ation Legend 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 T Livestock Transport BridgeArmour Water Tower Armour Administration BuildingLivestock Exchange Building 1909 Stadium Building Denver Coliseum Stockyards Streets Commuter Rail St ation Legend 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Legend

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rfrrr bt Denver Coliseum The City and County of Denver owns and operates approximately 30 acres of land south of I-70 that is home to the Denver Coliseum. The Coliseum was constructed in 1952 as a major event venue for the City, hosting thousands of local events and has been the home of the National Western Stock Show Rodeo. Prior to the Coliseums development, the site housed the Omaha and Grant Smelter, and then was a landll. The site contains a number of environmental contaminants and is part of Operable Unit 2 of the Vasquez and I-70 Superfund site. Given the proximity to I-70 and Brighton Boulevard the site has good potential for redevelopment for uses that can support the NWCC program, the neighborhoods and the region. These uses could be agricultural, educational or research and development opportunities that could both support and benet the NWCC overall program and its Vision. Additionally, its location oers opportunities for possible retail and /or other mixed uses that can add to the avor of the growing arts district and River North. Specic NWCC program uses for the larger elements (e.g., Equestrian, Livestock, Exposition Hall) were explored en for the site, but are dicult to t due to the shape and access to the parcel. A specic reuse of the Coliseum building itself has not been identied as part of the Master Plan process, but the NDCC should continue to look at redevelopment and reuse options for the structure once the New Arena becomes operational. Regional Drainage Improvements The National Western Center sits at the lower end of two of the largest drainage basins in Denver, the Montclair Basin and the Upper Park Hill Basin. There have been relatively few major drainage improvements in the region, which is subject to ooding during larger rainfall events. With the upcoming North Metro and East Corridor RTD rail improvements, and the I-70 East partially lowered highway alternative, major drainage improvements are being coordinated by the City and County of Denver, Urban Drainage, RTD and CDOT to address the regional drainage needs of the area. Several drainage alternatives are being explored to oer opportunities for connecting the area, providing connections to the South Platte River, to create new amenities that help to improve water quality in the river, and to increase the level of wellness in the community.fntttntbttttttbbbbn tbb nt

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rfrrr bt Environmental Issues and Remediation Environmental quality has been a concern in areas surrounding the NWCC for many years due to historical metal smelting, heavy industry, waste disposal in low areas along the river, two major highways, and railroad yards. These activities have impacted air, water, and land quality and created odors and noise. Given the history of the area, it is likely that contaminated soils and/or groundwater will be encountered during redevelopment. Additional environmental investigations will be needed as a part of redevelopment to further rene contaminated areas and manage cleanup. For the most part, environmental issues that impact the broader area surrounding the NWCC are expected to remain throughout and after redevelopment of the site, while potential human health concerns due to land contamination issues can be addressed as a part of redevelopment. The Primary environmental issues are identied below. For more detail into each of these issues, please refer to Appendix F. en Air Quality en Odors en Noise en Surface Water and Sediments en Groundwater Contamination en Soils Contamination en Natural Environment and Habitat South Platte River The South Platte River is one of the great untapped opportunities in North Denver and at the NWCC. The study area has 6,500 linear feet of riverfront on the east side of the river. Although most of this frontage is currently inaccessible due to the railroad lines, Delgany Interceptors and industrial uses, the removal of these barriers and the implementation of an active river program in this area can rehabilitate and connect the river to the surrounding communities and the NWCC. fbbbnntbbbttnb fntttnbntttbbn bttnbb

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rfrrr bt There are two designated city parks that front on the river within the study area. Globeville Landing Park is at the south end of the study area and is located directly adjacent to the Denver Coliseum site. Northside Park is in the Globeville neighborhood and is located at the north end of the study area on the west side of the river. Both of these existing park spaces are under-utilized due to their isolated location near industrial uses, perceived unsafe environment and lack of easy, direct access from the neighborhoods. The South Platte River Bikeway runs along the west side of the river through the study area with a trail crossing over to the east side of the river at Globeville Landing Park. This trail is part of a much larger regional trail network that connects to downtown, Cherry Creek Trail and connections north through Adams County and Commerce City to Sand Creek.The South Platte River oers a wide variety of opportunities en to provide active uses and recurring opportunities for social activity, increased educational opportunities throughout the length of the corridor, and restoration of the river habitat to one that approximates the rivers natural state and improves the long term health of the river. The potential to maximize open space and river engagement in this area is a primary factor in the redevelopment of the NWCC. The City of Denver and the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) have partnered to develop a plan for the north areas of the South Platte River through the River North, Globeville and Elyria neighborhoods. As part of the future habitat restoration and oodplain mitigation projects, the USACE will look for opportunities to enhance visibility and access of the river corridor. The corridor of focus includes 20th Street to the city limits. The study is developing alternatives for the area that will be reviewed in the spring of 2015, with the nal study completed in 2017. Any bridges and river improvements identied in the Master Plan will need to address the oodplain hydraulic and freeboard requirements and the existing regional bikeway and the Globeville levee on the west side of the river.Stakeholder Engagement and Public InvolvementThe public process for the NWCC Master Plan began in August of 2013 with the kick-o of the National Western Citizens Advisory Committee. Members of the Committee and community worked together with city sta and the project team to envision a new and integrated National Western site and develop master plan recommendations ftbbnbbbtnttttbbbbn Northside Park/ Heron Pond Riverside Cemetery NWC Argo Park Globeville Landing Park River North Park City of Cuernavaca Park

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rfrrr bt consistent with the community interests identied through the Globeville and Elyria Swansea Neighborhood Plans. A multi-tiered public involvement approach was developed in partnership with the North Denver Cornerstone Collaborative. The outreach approach included the involvement of the Partners and area citizens through the Citizens Advisory Committee, four community meetings, three NDCC Town Halls, community support activities and local stakeholder meetings, as well as the development of a project website and online comment form. The outreach approach was designed to create a convenient, comfortable and transparent communication process with the Partners, citizens and area businesses throughout the development of the master plan. National Western Citizens Advisory Committee The NDCC and Councilwoman Judy Montero co-hosted a Community Conversation event in August of 2013 with the Globeville, Elyria and Swansea neighborhoods. The event showcased the NWCC project to the community, introduced the NWC Partners, and publically introduced the creation of the National Western Center Advisory Committee (NWCAC). The NWCAC was created to strengthen the engagement of the NWC development with the Globeville, Elyria, Swansea neighborhoods and the six NDCC projects and enrich the relationship between the NWSS and the neighbors. The NWCAC was formed after numerous community stakeholders applied to be on the Committee, and all were accepted. The NWCAC represents all walks of life in the Globeville, Elyria Swansea Neighborhoods and in North Denver. The rst NWCAC meeting was held in October of 2013. The 21 members of the committee and representatives of the NWC Partners attended regular monthly meetings and in-depth breakout sessions were held in the summer and fall of 2014 to address specic elements of the Master Plan and to receive additional feedback on the Master Plan in-development. See the Acknowledgments for a list of members of this committee. They participated in a community-focused vision exercise and attended work sessions around plan alternatives and recommendations. The NWCAC was instrumental in identifying community concerns, provided feedback during the planning process, and keeping consistent the recommendations of the NWCC master plan and neighborhood plans. The NWCAC will continue to provide input into the implementation of the NWCC throughout the design, construction and operational phases of the project. NWC Partners Project Leadership Committee (PLC) The Project Leadership Committee served as the management group for the NWC Partners. The Partners and project team convened every two weeks in support of plan development. The Partners reviewed plan progress, assisted in development of plan recommendations and guided decision-making especially in regards to site layout and programming needs. Globeville and Elyria Swansea Neighborhood Plans Throughout the NWCC planning process, the Globeville and Elyria Swansea Neighborhood planning processes were also underway. City sta and project team management attended the Globeville and Elyria Swansea Steering Committee meetings and coordinated with community members. Several NWCAC members also served as members of the neighborhood plan Steering Committees and helped to ensure consistency between the recommendations of the concurrent planning eorts. The Neighborhood plans can be accessed on the City of Denver NDCC web site at : www.denvergov.org/NDCC NWC Public Meetings Four public meetings were held in the community to gather input and garner support for the planning process. These meetings were held in conjunction with project milestones and scheduled in the evenings at locations convenient to the community. They included: en Community Conversation, Initial Project Kick O Meeting August 22, 2013 en Vision, Analysis and Program Meeting August 26, 2014 en Master Plan Alternatives and Initial Recommendations Meeting September 30, 2014 en Final Recommendations and Draft Plan January 15, 2015 bbnnbbr tbtb

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rfrrr bt Community Support Activities Saturday August 9, 2014 the project team supported the Globeville and Elyria Swansea neighborhoods through their participation in Denver Days Neighborhood Beautication and Clean-up. The team worked along-side residents of the area in cleaning up neighborhood streets and beautifying Argo Park. Project team members also coordinated local outreach opportunities with Swansea Elementary, Valdez-Perry Library, Swansea Recreation Center, Stapleton Recreation Center, Focus Points and GrowHaus. These meetings were designed to ensure that plan recommendations were shared with the broader community. City sta held oce hours at the NWCC Complex in January of 2015 so that residents, business owners, property owners and other interested persons could have their questions about plan recommendations addressed personally by project sta. Council and Planning Board Process Council and Planning Board briengs and approvals were crucial to the plan development and process. City Council was briefed in full when the Master Planning process kicked-o and the National Western Stock Show City Council Committee remained in place until June of 2014. Thereafter, Council members received briengs on the status of the Master Plan and the NWCAC on a monthly basis and remaining Council members received individual briengs from project team members and city sta, as needed. Council members also participated in the NWCAC meetings and public meetings and communicated regularly with community members. The Denver Planning Board received three informational briengs during the planning process:August 2014 Planning process, Vision, Guiding PrinciplesOctober 2014 Master Plan Framework Plans January 2015 Review of Draft Master Plan nbntbr nbntbr

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rfrrr rfrrrf Executive Summary Introduction Site Orientation and Character Master Plan Big Ideas Acknowledgments Introduction Site History Setting and Context National Western Center Partnerships Corridor of Opportunity and the North Denver Cornerstone Collaborative Assets, Challenges and Opportunities Stakeholder Engagement and Public Involvement National Western Center Vision Vision Guiding Principles Sustainability and Regeneration Framework Master Plan Components Introduction to the Master Plan Integrated Facilities Program Campus Design Character Character Areas River, Parks and Public Space Site Circulation Infrastructure Historic Resources Implementation Planning Principles Phasing Moving Forward Appendices Reference Documents National Western Center Vision 1 11 17 39 59 105

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rfrrr rfrrrf VisionThe National Western Center Campus presents a once in a lifetime opportunity to honor and celebrate the Stock Shows 109 year history, while also showcasing the spirit of the West for the next 100 years, focused on entertainment, food, agriculture, rodeo, livestock, equestrian, animal health and performance, water, energy, the environment and the growth of a well-established tourism destination. The younger generations are very much concerned with what we might term great global challenges. Theirs is the generation that will have to feed nine billion people, solve fresh water shortages and respond to climate change. At the interface of all of these issues lies a rare and precious opportunity for the NWCC. These issues are incredibly important to all of us even as many traditional labels fail to resonate. The NWCC needs to fully engage current and future generations by adapting our programs, facilities, and messages in ways that all generations can connect to. The NWC Master Plan envisions a campus or community dedicated to addressing the challenges of food, water, energy and the environment, representing partnerships between the public and private sectors, and blurring the line between entertainment, competition, education and industry. It envisions a center helping to apply best practices for immediate benet to our community and society, and simultaneously creating an exciting life-long educational center impacting the preschool through college population, as well as lifelong learners throughout Colorado and the Rocky Mountain region. The NWCC benets the local neighborhoods, the Denver metropolitan area, the P-12 school system, our interwoven network of higher education and cultural institutions and the state of Colorado all while delivering outcomes that can be broadly applied and scaled to address similar challenges globally. The intent is for the NWCC to become an international model for a synergistic educational, business, entertainment, and research and development community, adapted to the evolving denitions for these sectors. For these reasons, the founding NWC Partners are all committed to using the depth and breadth of the resources they have, now and in the future, to assure successful attainment of the shared vision. The Vision Statement and Guiding Principles for the NWCC were developed with input from the NWC Partners, community leaders, inspirational guests, and community members from the National Western Citizens Advisory Committee at the Roundup Retreat, held in April of 2014. The Vision, Guiding Principles and Guidelines were then rened with additional input from all parties to the visionary statements listed below. These statements help provide direction for activity at the NWCC, in both the short and long term. The following pages showcase the potential that the Master Plan has to oer with a fully redeveloped site that helps to support the vision and guiding principles. National Western Center Vision Statementfbntbbbtbnntnnbnt btbbnbnnnbbtbbnb bnbn

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rfrrr rfrrrf Colorado Commons with the renovated 1909 Stadium Arena Market and the New CSU Center on another busy Saturday-looking Northwest. The plaza will include small retail spaces, areas for events and exhibits, test and research growing plots, community gardens, and a small urban farm.

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rfrrr rfrrrf 47th Avenue Festival Street and Elyria Plaza at the front door to the new Trade Show/Exhibition Hall looking Northwest during a future National Western Stock Show.

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rfrrr rfrrrf The new Water Resources Center along the renovated South Platte River waterfront and an event underway at the Stockyards/Event Pavilion with the new Livestock Center serving as the backdrop. Bettie Cram Drive connects over the river and to the east all the way to Brighton Boulevard through the site-looking East.

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rfrrr rfrrrf The National Western Center Transit Plaza at 49th Avenue and Brighton Boulevard will be one of the major front doors to the new National Western Center. New pedestrian connections will tie the station to the new Livestock and Equestrian facilities and to the Globeville Neighborhood-looking west.

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rfrrr rfrrrf Another busy day at the Stockyards during a future Stock Show. The Stockyards Auction Arena and Show Arena becomes the central focus point of the yards. The Livestock Center is in the background-looking Southeast.

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rfrrr rfrrrf Guiding Principles and GuidelinesThe following is a list of Guiding Principles and Guidelines for the NWCC, organized by the nine values or Guiding Principles identied by the NWC Partners and the neighborhoods. Community and Neighborhood Integration The City and County of Denver undertook a neighborhood planning process for the Globeville and Elyria/Swansea Neighborhoods, beginning in 2012. Throughout both the neighborhood planning process and the National Western Center Master Plan process, the connection of the neighborhoods to the river and connection to each other has been a strong common theme that is reected in the NWCC Master Plan. The National Western Center will: en Create a welcoming and open campus to the adjacent communities. en Provide critical multi-modal connections and access points to the adjacent communities to engage the river, access transit and promote a healthy lifestyle. en Establish a positive community benet. Engage the River and Nature The importance of embracing the South Platte River with its historic and ecological attributes creates a key framework for how people will experience the NWCC. The National Western Center will: en Recognize the historic, ecological, and future value of the sites proximity to the South Platte River as a key component of the NWCC experience. en Celebrate and respect the natural world by promoting the restoration of the rivers ecosystem, water quality and animal habitat. en Build on current successes and recreational activity along the river, establishing a river-focused urban environment that is healthy, habitable and connected. en Enhance the safety of the river corridor and the surrounding region, serving as an integral connector of the adjacent neighborhoods. en Serve as one of several new gateways into and out of the NWCC. Celebrate Western Heritage The strong tradition and the rich history of the site help to create a unifying theme throughout the NWCC. This history celebrates the land, the people and the western way of life. The National Western Center will: en Reect, respect, and celebrate the meaning of the Western way of life and its unique inuence on culture, competition, and commerce. en Celebrate the Wests pioneering past and desire for continual discovery, while pointing visitors toward the future of how life in the West is evolving. en Solidify and sustain the NWSS as the top stock show and rodeo in the world. en Create a world class equestrian facility to attract the highest level of competition in equestrian events. en Creates an outstanding equestrian health and rehabilitation facility used as a teaching/learning opportunity for students and continuing education for the community. en Honor the connection between land and people, and how the Western landscape has shaped dierent generations and cultures. en Create the opportunity to tell the story of all the people and communities that have lived and worked on this land, including Native Americans, early settlers and the Globeville, Elyria and Swansea neighborhoods. Inspire Health and Wellness Inspiring and supporting healthy lifestyles is an important role of the NWCC. The National Western Center will: en In conjunction with surrounding neighborhoods, inspire a healthy and vibrant way of life locally, regionally and nationally through a demonstrated mix of housing, parks and open space, jobs and range of services, all of which consider active design principles. en Promote recreational opportunities, multi-model connections and access to healthy food for all populations. en Use assets at the NWCC to teach about human and animal health.

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rfrrr rfrrrf Build Cultural Crossroads The history of the site and the multiple connections that run through the site create a platform to learn about all the cultures that will interact at the National Western Center. The National Western Center will: en Educate the public on the importance of this site to human beings for the last 10,000 years. This site was shaped by our countrys native population and pioneers; it helped create the unique culture of Denver and Colorado. en Foster the crossing of cultures locally, regionally, nationally and globally. en Serve as a gathering place where ideas and diverse cultures can be exchanged in this hub of the west. en Celebrate local, regional, national and international artistic and creative talent. en Integrate the arts, in all its various forms, into the site and provides a platform that is inclusive of a broad range of cultural expressions. en Create a unique region of the City that celebrates the past, but focuses on a mutually benecial shared future through the combination of neighborhood, commercial and cultural experiences. Be Pioneering: Break Trail and Foster Innovation The National Western Center will be a place of innovation for business, job creation and cutting edge research and development. The National Western Center will: en Foster global linkages to advance cutting edge R&D, product development and services in the agricultural industry, including but not limited to elds of study in food production and safety, nutritional health, technology, animal husbandry, and public policy. en Embrace innovation, independence and ingenuity. en Encourage breaking trail as our founding charter and forward-looking spirit. en Embrace new ideas that serve as long term catalysts for job creation, neighborhood entrepreneurialism, ongoing public and private capital investment and a sustainable business model for the National Western Stock Show, new equestrian events, and the NWC Partners. Create Fun and Entertaining Experiences Building o the long time entertainment programs at the Center, a new tradition of events, venues and entertainment will be developed that create a thriving 365 day-a-year venue for new out-of-state visitors and residents. The National Western Center will: en Be an interactive and engaging site for the community, patrons, visitors, exhibitors and performers. en Establish, for young and old visitors alike, memorable and enjoyable experiences that encourage them to return to the campus. en Provide a broad range of year-round entertainment, competition, and educational programming. Grow Local, Regional, and Global Intelligence The National Western Center will be a place to stimulate, educate and cultivate life-long learning. The National Western Center will: en Stimulate pre-school through post-secondary experiential education and cultivates new partnerships for life-long learning around the issues of agriculture, food systems, land and livestock management, veterinary medicine, history, ecology, business, the arts, and design. en Create a spirit of engaged learning by investing in local and regional intelligence, linked to an everexpanding global knowledge base. en Serve as a key Corridor of Opportunity gateway, linking downtown Denver and the local neighborhoods from Denver Union Station to Denver International Airport through new multi-modal connections.

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rfrrr rfrrrf Embrace an Ethic of Regeneration The long-term regeneration of the site is a core element that will take advantage of the natural systems, restore the area, and create new places that improve our environment. The National Western Center will: en Celebrate interdependence of natural, social and economic systems. en Restore regional healthy habitats and ecosystems. en Improve the soil, including addressing the smelting and landll legacies, so that the NWCC is clean enough to grow healthy food, if desired. en Use building remodeling and new construction to improve the site and regional environmental quality, while creating healthy work spaces. en Create measurable positive impacts on the community and the region in terms of water quality, air quality and other environmental components.Sustainability and Regeneration Framework Imagine a NWCC that celebrates the interdependence of natural, social and economic systems. Imagine the redevelopment of this area restoring regional healthy habitats and ecosystems, linked by bicycle paths. Imagine eating food grown on the land and seeing clean water ow into the river. There are exciting opportunities to honor the historic context of the surrounding neighborhoods and industrial past, while creating healthy work spaces and job opportunities, and making innovation and education a site-wide priority. Using a comprehensive and inclusive approach to site and community redevelopment can create regenerative systems that create abundance for current and future generations at the NWCC. The State of Colorado, and the Front Range in particular, has developed a reputation for progressive approaches to sustainability in redevelopment projects. In Denver, a number of developments, notably Stapleton, Lowry, and Mariposa, have demonstrated the cutting edge in thinking on sustainable design and equitable development. CSUs campus in Fort Collins has been ranked the most sustainable campus in the country by the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education. The proliferation of green technology rms, advanced energy companies, sustainable agricultural businesses, and our proximity to the National Renewable Energy Lab have created an ethic of innovation and regeneration, rooted in the love of the natural resources that make Colorado and the West attractive to visitors, businesses, professionals, and families. These examples emphasize the value that the region, and indeed much of the West, places on innovative, cuttingedge approaches to economic, social, and environmental sustainability. The NWCC provides a unique opportunity to go beyond sustainability to adopt a regenerative approach to redevelopment by improving, restoring, and enhancing the site and its surroundings ecologically, economically, and socially. In order to realize this vision and leverage the expertise and commitment within the Front Range to best-inclass regenerative practices, CSUs Institute for the Built Environment and Division of University Operations convened a volunteer National Western Center Sustainability Task Force to create clear sustainability goals for the NWCC. The Task Force was made up of City sta, sustainability practitioners, technical and cultural experts, and other stakeholders. The full list of NWC Sustainability Task Force members is identied in the Acknowledgments section of this plan. The Goals below were created to t within the NWCC Guiding Principles framework (although many of them address multiple Principles) and describe outcomes and ongoing activities from the design phase to construction to operations and programming. The Goals were also designed to align with City 2020 Sustainability Goals, the Globeville-Elyria-Swansea Health Impact Assessment goals, and with categories within a number of dierent sustainability rating systems. The large scale of the NWCC and the possibility of central management of many large facilities and grounds make it ideal for district-scale approaches. Therefore, these Goals apply to the full NWCC study area, including all partnerships and joint ventures within the site, while allowing exibility in how the Goals are reached. A detailed matrix of the Goals, with associated example implementation strategies, metrics for measuring impact, and suggested scales and timing is in Appendix D.

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Engage the River and Nature (ERN) en ERN 1: Create safe, intentional connections to the river and natural areas en ERN 1.1: Provide diverse yet focused visual and physical access to nature and the river en ERN 1.2: Create series of green spaces on site that connect to one another and to nearby green spaces, trails, parks en ERN 2: Use nationally or internationally recognized rating system for landscape design and maintenance, favor the use of native plants, and integrate with water use goals (EER 3) en ERN 3: Replace or integrate physical infrastructure with natural systems and/or incorporate functional biomimicry and biophilic (green infrastructure) design principles wherever possible en ERN 3.1: Treat stormwater onsite, using various methods throughout the site, to create net zero or net positive impact on stormwater quality and quantity entering the South Platte River en ERN 4: Provide education and outreach on site related to the Platte River and its watershed and include educational components in water quality features, wastewater treatment, and water conservation measures en ERN 5: Consider impacts to the Platte River watershed during all stages of decision making (design, construction, operations, etc.) to support the river containing swimmable, shable water en ERN 6: Habitats along the river meet key diversity and health indicators and provide appropriate biological corridors linking to other habitats in surrounding areas Inspire Health and Wellness (IHW) en IHW 1: Promote healthy food options, food security, and locally sourced foods en IHW 1.1: Increase availability of healthy, aordable, culturally appropriate food sources, ideally year-round, either on site or in partnership with surrounding businesses and organizations. en IHW 1.2: Support evidence-based models that increase food security for community members, either onsite or in partnership with surrounding businesses and organizations en IHW 1.3: Promote year-round availability of locally sourced foods, either onsite or in partnership with surrounding businesses and organizations en IHW 2: Promote active transportation, active lifestyles, and access to nature for all site users to increase physical activity and promote mental wellbeing en IHW 2.1: Provide multi-modal transportation connections, particularly to major transit stops, neighborhoods, employment centers, parks, and other destinations en IHW 2.2: Design the site for extensive active use en (e.g., biking, recreation, walking) en IHW 2.3: Improve connectivity to natural areas and places of respite, including the South Platte River en IHW 3: Design buildings to maximize physical and mental health of occupants en IHW 4: Establish and meet or exceed quality of life indicators (odor, noise, light pollution, trac, etc.) for visitors and neighbors en IHW 5: Reduce and/or mitigate heat island eect to reduce its impact on health, energy use, etc. rfrrr rfrrrf

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rfrrr rfrrrf Embrace an Ethic of Regeneration (EER) en EER 1: Integrate high performance sustainable design and operations in all buildings en EER 1.1: Design all buildings to meet a nationally or internationally recognized rating systems (e.g., LEED) Gold level or higher, or current City and partner requirements, and design for ecient adaptive reuse over time en EER 1.2: Train all sta working in buildings and/or on grounds in behaviors that maximize the ecacy of sustainable design and will be accountable for seeing that such behaviors are practiced en EER 1.3: Guide visitors, through appropriate defaults and instructions, in behaviors on site that maximize the ecacy of sustainable design and to similar behaviors they can practice at home and at work en EER 2: Design and operate facilities to maximize eciency of facilities and resources per user en EER 3: Create net zero or closed loop systems for energy, waste, and water en EER 3.1: Create a net zero energy district, prioritizing technical and behavioral strategies to increase eciency and using on-site renewable energy sources (by 5 years after full build-out) en EER 3.2: Create a net zero or closed loop district for waste streams and apply relevant techniques and training during operations (by 5 years after full build-out) en EER 3.3: Create a net zero district for water use, use zero potable water for landscaping, and apply relevant techniques and training during operations (by 5 years after full build-out). en EER 4: Divert at least 90% of allowable waste from landll during all site manipulation and demolition processes en EER 5: Maintain or reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions levels, including transportation, at or below 2015 emissions and strive for continuous reduction over time en EER 6: Explore using a district scale rating system, such as EcoDistricts, LEED-ND, etc. Community and Neighborhood Integration (CNI) en CNI 1: Create porous district boundaries and physical, spatial, and psychological connections en CNI 1.1: Ensure access for neighbors and visitors to public transportation stops, NWCC venues, and amenities; increase connectivity and mobility overall en CNI 1.2: Blend the boundary between site and surrounding neighborhoods while allowing for ecient event operations and ticketing en CNI 1.3: Design site to a human scale for optimal user experience en CNI 2: Continue relationship building, communication, and interaction with surrounding communities and Denver metro region, including culturally relevant engagement methods, to address community needs and reduce uncertainty en CNI 3: Create programming that supports neighborhood identity, the local economy, and economic development through training, local business incubation, fostering entrepreneurship, local partnerships, etc.

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rfrrr rfrrrf Build Cultural Crossroads (BCC) en BCC 1: Provide physical and programmatic space for cultural and artistic activity en BCC 1.1: Highlight current cultural and artistic activities locally, regionally, nationally, globally en BCC 1.2: Foster new forms of cultural and artistic expression, particularly as these activities relate to the American West en BCC 2: Create a virtual and physical global cultural destination that fosters the crossing of cultures locally, regionally, nationally or globally en BCC 2.1: Provide physical and programmatic space for innovation to emerge from the crossing of cultures (e.g., local entrepreneurs and global businesses, US and overseas companies, etc.) en BCC 3: Practice inclusiveness and consider multiple cultural viewpoints at all decision-making stages, including design, construction, operations, events, etc.Celebrate Western Heritage (CWH) en CWH 1: Ensure that the NWCC has world-class, multi-purpose stock show, rodeo, equestrian, and event facilities that support diverse year-round programming and a sustainability business model for the NWSS en CWH 2: Support and promote culturally sensitive and diverse events and social gathering places that highlight the history and present of the American West en CWH 3: Honor the authenticity and origins of the site, preserving architecture and features that have historic and cultural merit, while eciently reusing them and integrating with new facilities en CWH 4: Oer robust educational programming and features that provide a balanced presentation about the natural, geological, agricultural, and cultural history of the American West en CWH 5: Honor the historic signicance of human/ animal relationships and continue to use best-inclass animal treatment and care

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rfrrr rfrrrf Be Pioneering and Foster Innovation (BPFI) en BPFI 1: Advance the state of the art using site and facility design, operations, and events as experimental and educational Living Labs en BPFI 2: Foster entrepreneurship and innovation, particularly around food and food systems, water, energy, entertainment, livestock management, etc. through partnerships, research, training, and outreach en BPFI 3: Showcase relevant innovation at the NWSS event each year en BPFI 4: Use virtual and physical space to host crosssector and cross-discipline conversations, speaker series, demonstrations, conferences, etc. en BPFI 5: Establish adaptive management processes in operations and maintenance that drive continual improvement, measurement, monitoring and adaptation Create Fun and Entertaining Experiences (CFE) en CFE 1: Create programming that emphasizes health (e.g., NWCC 5K Run) en CFE 2: Ensure design and operations allow for safe interactivity and hands-on learning en CFE 3: Create outdoor activity spaces to provide exible uses and a variety of experiences related to food, agriculture, livestock, energy, water, etc. en CFE 4: Integrate local and regional visual and performing art and artists into the site design, programming, and operationsGrow Local, Regional, and Global Intelligence (CLRGI) en GLRGI 1: Provide programming that complements local and regional education, including (but not limited to) topics of agriculture, food systems, land and livestock management, veterinary medicine, history, ecology, business, the arts, and engineering en GLRGI 2: Work with local and regional schools to provide onand o-site educational opportunities and pathways for life-long learning for students of all ages en GLRGI 3: Use infrastructure, natural systems, buildings, animal care, crop production, operations, monitoring, etc. as public, formal, and informal educational opportunities, including (but not limited to) Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) subjects en GLRGI 4: Create or extend existing programs to support mentorships, training, and internships at the NWCC en GLRGI 4: Use the NWCC platform, both physical and virtual, to convene discussions that inform and improve the state of the art, including (but not limited to) topics of agriculture, food systems, land and livestock management, veterinary medicine, history, ecology, business, the arts, and engineering

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rfrrr frrf Executive Summary Introduction Site Orientation and Character Master Plan Big Ideas Acknowledgments Introduction Site History Setting and Context National Western Center Partnerships Corridor of Opportunity and the North Denver Cornerstone Collaborative Assets, Challenges and Opportunities Stakeholder Engagement and Public Involvement National Western Center Vision Vision Guiding Principles Sustainability and Regeneration FrameworkMaster Plan Components Introduction to the Master Plan Integrated Facilities Program Campus Design Character Character Areas River, Parks and Public Space Site Circulation Infrastructure Historic Resources Implementation Planning Principles Phasing Moving Forward Appendices Reference Documents Master Plan Components 1 11 17 39 59 105

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rfrrr frrf Introduction to the Master PlanThe National Western Center Master Plan is based on the overall Vision and Guiding Principles set by the NWC Partners and the community. The Master Plan sets the framework for a new and revitalized destination in Denver that builds o the culture and heritage of the place, brings activity to river, provides new connections, inspires a new ethic in health and wellness, and embraces site regeneration. The new NWCC will revitalize a large area of the city by being an active destination; by connecting neighborhoods to one another; by bringing the life back to the river; and by becoming a new kind of district that celebrates the best of our natural, cultural and agricultural history and future. When we think of the site area today we think of industry, trucks and trains but in the future we will experience a vibrant event and educational district unied with a natural setting. The plan is framed around the following concepts: Improving Access to and Health of the river, Providing New Connections, Providing Flexible, Year-round Programs, and Fostering Partnership and Collaboration.The National Western Stock Show (NWSS) has been held on this site for over 100 years. What drew people to this site were the connected cattle trails, rail lines, and river access, making it a good place to meet, exchange knowledge, do business, hold livestock and horses, and put on a grand show for the community. Those same attributes the river and rail and road access led to the development of major heavy industry on the site. The original asset of the site, the South Platte River, became forgotten. Now it is time for the NWSS to revitalize itself by starting with river revitalization and becoming a grander, expanded and multi-use site. The NWCC and surrounding areas sit within the historic oodplain, part of the inspiration for having the river as the core of the Plan. It is almost certain that before the National Western was established, and the area was urbanized, much of this land was occupied by native cottonwood galleries or forests that followed old river channels and the sandy soils and groundwater of the lower terraces that ank the river. The character of the original landscape of the National Western was rural, combining grasslands, riparian shrublands, and towering cottonwoods. Over time, this regime was replaced with pavement and plants from other regions. Replacing the ecological function of these terraces is not fully possible, but the Plan envisions restoring natural functions by a strong emphasis on natural stormwater conveyance, cleansing and inltration into the ground; greatly expanding the range and extent of native cottonwood and riparian plantings; and envisioning the National Western Center as once again in a setting that is urban and evokes its rural past. This means an enhanced corridor of natural habitats, expanded public access, improved water quality, and more room for the river to breathe. The Master Plan also emphasizes connections: connections of people to people, people to river, and city to nature. The land along the river will be expanded into a wider corridor that will be linked into Globeville and Elyria/Swansea through new street, pedestrian, bike and green connections. These new connections will support neighbors, visitors, vendors, competitors, and employees 365 days a year with access to residences, amenities and the venues of the National Western Center itself. The Master Plan includes a range of substantial public plazas and connections that will support daily activity, special events, and gathering and staging during the Stock Show and other events. The dierent areas of the Center have their own public space or spaces, providing relief from the large scale of the buildings that make up the center, but also providing room for people to gather and access events as a whole during Stock Show or individual events at each major facility. The design of these spaces will build on and express the idea that the Center is a place about both the past and the future. Western heritage and its place in our future will be a recurring theme in materials, details and symbols that are used in the design but this will not be a place that is about the past. At its core, the NWCC is about the innovative future of the West and the many ways in which nature, culture, and agriculture continue to develop and change with new technologies, methods, and everincreasing international opportunities and connections to our local communities. The design of the NWCC will also be of the present, using the latest in sustainable technologies and materials appropriate to the New West. The Plan outlines key facility adjacencies, basic physical layout and frameworks to help guide future development of the site over a phased redevelopment. The Plan identies a unique place in the Denver region that allows for a wide variety of uses throughout the year and provides access to the neighborhoods and key natural resources. The Plan includes primary physical program elements, site access and circulation, major infrastructure anticipated for the event and educational venues, and sustainability principles and goals to ensure the site has a positive social, economic, and environmental impact.

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rfrrr frrf Integrated Facilities Program (IFP)The NWC Integrated Facilities Program (IFP) is one of the key documents developed as part of the Master Plan to help identify the physical programming needs of the NWCC. The IFP identies new and adaptively reused facilities that can be home to a broad range of dierent uses and activities. The IFP stresses the importance of providing exible destination facilities that can be used by many dierent users to activate the facilities and the site 365 days a year, that attract a broader range of tourist activity. The IFP is based, in part, on the Denver Feasibility Study (released May 2014), commissioned by Visit Denver, Denver Arts and Venues and the Western Stock Show Association to better understand the best long-term positioning for the NWSS, National Western Complex, Denver Coliseum, and the Colorado Convention Center. The Feasibility Study is identied as a reference document to this plan. The Feasibility Study identied the NWSS as the Super Bowl of stock shows a premier livestock industry event. The study identies the potential to re-establish the historic and iconic Stock Show for the next 100 years, for it to remain at the current site, re-master plan the entire site, build a new Arena integral to the site (north of I-70), and to re-purpose the Denver Coliseum site and other select facilities to create a dynamic, fully aligned campus, at the gateway into downtown Denver. The IFP identies the full build out of the programs identied in the Denver Feasibility Study, and the Master Plan shows the approximate footprint of these full facilities. en Although the full program is identied to determine the ultimate build out, the program is intended to be a exible document that can be adjusted depending on changes in programming, future yet unknown needs, available funding and phasing. A more detailed program summary is located in Appendix C. rfntbnS.Platte River T bn TPartner FacilitiesFlexible Use FacilitiesLivestock Center Equestrian Center Commuter Rail St ation Legend

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rfrrr frrf The IFP groups the new facilities into major use categories:New CSU and Partner Areas en Food Innovation Center and Conservatory en Denver Urban Extension Center en Food demonstration plots en Water Resources Center en Classrooms, laboratory, oce space en Center for Performing Arts/Lecture Hall en Art, music and dance studios en Conference and meeting space en Food and Western Artisan market en Retail uses and exible pavilion space in plazas en Flexible gallery/exhibit space en Permanent Coors Western Art Gallery en Community use space en Possible short term living space for students and faculty New Arena en 10,000 xed seat arena en Additional retractable seating for hockey, basketball or concerts en Ice capability for hockey, family shows and a possible en Winter Olympics bid en Premium Seating en 140x260 show ring en Administrative oces en Multiple Locker rooms en Back of house facilities for service, storage and event operation uses en Restaurant(s) en Retail uses along Brighton Boulevard Blvd. frontage en Outdoor exhibit and concessions space New Trade Show/Exhibition Hall en 350,000 NSF of exhibit space en Flexible event and ballroom space en Coors Western Art en Lower level parking/ex space en Accommodates potential for Olympic long track speed skating oval

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rfrrr frrf New Livestock Center and Stockyards en 5,000 seat Livestock Stadium Arena en 700 seat Livestock Hall Auction Arena en Livestock Hall en Stockyards/Event Pavilion en 1,000 seat Stock Yard Show Arena en 1,000 seat Livestock Center Auction Arena en Cattle tie areas en Outdoor exhibit and concessions space New Equestrian Center en 4,500 seat Equestrian Events Center en 500 seat Equestrian Arena en Horse Stall Barn en Enclosed warm up buildings (2) en Open air warm up buildings (2) en CSU Equine Sport Medicine Facility en CSU Community Outreach Clinic en CSU Clinical Trials Center Other Facilities en Maintenance facility en Outdoor and covered storage en Equipment storage en Service, loading, marshaling and unloading areas en Site surface and structured parking Neighborhood Program Elements The adjoining neighborhoods of Globeville, Elyria and Swansea are important partners in the development of this Plan including how the site is implemented and how it functions now and in the future.The general program needs of the neighborhoods mesh well with the overall goals, program, and facilities of the NWCC and create abundant opportunities for the NWCC to engage with the neighborhoods. The neighborhood goals of a Unique, Strong, Connected and Healthy community are in alignment with the NWCC plan and evident in the following subset of the full Guiding Principles for NWCC Refer to Appendix E for a listing of all the program elements identied by the Citizens Advisory Committee.Neighborhood Integration There is a strong desire from the neighborhoods that the NWCC provide critical east/west connections through the site, linking the river, the new rail station, and the heart of each neighborhood. These connections include new river and rail crossings that will enable neighborhood residents to access parks, trails and the river corridor. Engage the River and Nature The neighborhoods have identied the need to increase access to public space and to develop new public spaces along the river at the NWCC that reects the character and interests of the neighborhoods, including gathering places, walking paths, neighborhood related programming, and celebration of the site history through visual markers throughout the site. Access to the River is also identied as a key community goal. Inspire Health and Wellness Health and Wellness opportunities, such as improved facilities for walking, biking and active recreation, access to healthy foods and local markets, and increased community programming and education for health and wellness, are an important part of integrating the community and NWCC. Local, Regional and Global Intelligence The NWCC has a strong goal to grow local, regional and global intelligence. The neighborhoods have identied a number of program needs to help educate children and to teach people about the relationship between agriculture, animals, water, energy, and growing healthy food.Be Pioneering: Break Trail and Foster Innovation Growing local business knowledge is an identied neighborhood need. NWCC can be a place for local support of business, artists and entrepreneurs by providing incubator space, enterprise market space and a collaborative environment. The NWCC can also help provide work force development and on-site job training to local residents. Create Fun and Entertaining Experiences The NWCC site will provide many opportunities for local entertainment, events and gallery spaces, along with fresh food, restaurants and commercial/retail spaces that will activate the neighborhood and support local opportunities for entertainment.

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rfrrr frrf Expanded Program Opportunities CSU Proposed Programming The NWC Partners are in initial phases of creating collaborative programs that could be held throughout the site and would make use of both indoor and outdoor spaces, and various site assets and characteristics. The Guiding Principles and Goals will help shape programming as it evolves, but some potential programs have been proposed: Cbfr E Pt en Creating a hands-on learning center and conservatory focusing on food systems (global to local, seed to compost) and its connection to various topics like energy, water, transportation, genetics, engineering, health, etc. en Providing a CSU Urban Extension Center with classroom and outdoor educational opportunities and hands-on demonstrations of agriculture, food production, animal care, etc. specic to an urban setting. (Primarily CSU, with collaboration from partners) en Creating a Water Resources Center that takes advantage of the sites adjacency to the South Platte River and provides research, laboratory, and educational opportunities for K-20 students and the public (e.g., aquaria with native species, water play tables, interactive hydrology exhibits, etc.). en Collaborative programming of outdoor spaces and shared gallery spaces for structured and unstructured educational experiences (e.g., using catwalks and bridges as interpretive walks, river talks, etc.) en Working with P-12 institutions and environmental education programs to teach about food systems, animal care, urban sustainability, water, and other subjects via hands-on activities that the NWCC is uniquely suited to provide. en Using outdoor spaces, included rooftops, plazas, and vertical surfaces to showcase urban agricultural innovation and support NWCC sustainability goals. en Creating a live archeological site that showcases both archeological methods and uncovers the sites history. Artifacts and items from the dig could then be displayed in interior gallery/exhibition space. bttb btnb bb

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rfrrr frrf en Hosting neighborhood tours (walking, biking, etc.) that discuss natural and human history and link back to the NWCC. en Creating mobile applications to allow visitors to have interpretive and interactive experiences that change on a regular basis, and encourage visiting the entire site. Cbfr Srfrt Arrt en Supporting the creation of a food and artisan market that provides spaces for community members, students, and others to test and market new and existing food products and art. The market can promote Colorado products from around the state, meet local needs, carry items of local interest, support local entrepreneurs, and support shared economy and net positive economy goals. en Partnering with private restaurant to create an on-site farm-to-table restaurant, which could provide hands-on opportunities for students (e.g., CSU Hospitality, Business, etc.). en Developing a culinary teaching kitchen that can hold courses on nutrition, cooking classes, and the science and history of food, and provide space for food preparation for the onsite market and food business incubation. en Providing an Equine Sports Medicine facilities and a collaborative Community Outreach Clinic that provide treatment and education for CSU students and the general public. Facilities will demonstrate CSUs best-in-class research and treatment techniques and educate on connections between human and animal health. (Primarily CSU) en Creating a Clinical Trials Center that will collaborate with other health institutions, provide the ability for more convenient diagnostic testing, clinical trial monitoring, and research services that also connect with human health. (Primarily CSU, with collaboration from other partners). en Using auditorium space for small performing arts events, particularly where CSU students are providing support as a learning opportunity. en Shared art studio space between partners and community groups. This space might also be used by an artist in residence program and workshops. Cbfr T, Btrtt Ib, Crrrt en Hosting/co-hosting conferences and meetings that benet from the NWCC setting and facilities (e.g., conferences for livestock associations, global food sustainability and innovation, urban sustainability, etc.) en Creating an ongoing speaker series, universitybusiness connections, and peer connections for agribusinesses en Provide collaborative business incubator and entrepreneurial business support and space to assist small and new businesses in marketing, sales, and nance. en Provide work force training and resources in jobs related to agriculture, water resources, food, animal care, facilities management, etc. en Establishing mentorship and internship programs that support students of various ages. nnnb t nt

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rfrrr frrf Program Post-Master-Plan Next Steps In order to further developing programming ideas and to support DMNSs Community Voices initiative, DMNS, HC, CSU and CCD should consider using empathetic interviews to better understand the programming desires of surrounding communities, Denver, and outside visitors.The results of these interviews should then shape more detailed proposed programming to inform exactly which facilities house which programs, and specic facility needs during the design phase. In particular, archeological site location is critical to identify before widespread site disruption.Campus Design CharacterThe NWCC will be a distinctive and unique district in north Denver. To support this uniqueness, the site and architecture should have an overall character that supports the pioneering vison; one that celebrates the past, but clearly points to the future. The character of both buildings and open space should reect the American West by considering the landscape, the river, the prairie and the agricultural heritage while inspiring new design ideas for the future. Architectural Character There are three separate character areas within the NWCC Campus that will have a unique, yet complementary, architectural character. The architectural character identied reects the uses of the buildings, their location on the site, their function within the overall site, and their relationship to adjacent uses and neighborhoods. It is not the intent of the overall character to reestablish older west or industrial buildings, but to design buildings that reect the general character of the past while integrating a more modern aesthetic that embraces the value of the pioneering spirit. New West Architecture The New West character area includes all the facilities west of the BNSF railroad line and includes the new Livestock Stadium Arena, Livestock Hall, Equestrian Events Center, Horse Barn, Equestrian Arena, and the CSU Equine Sports Medicine Clinic. The Livestock Center contains over 350,000 SF and the Equestrian Center includes over 530,000 SF of facilities. These two centers stretch for over 1/2 mile north/south along the rail tracks and are adjacent to the new stockyards/events pavilion.The New West architectural character is based on buildings that are specically related to agricultural purposes and mimic the forms, colors and materials that reect the vernacular architecture of the region. The buildings reect simple forms with pitched roofs, use materials such as metal, wood and muted earth tone colors and include arcades and galleries. These buildings should have limited architectural ornament, with detail shown in the functional building elements of roof, rafter tails, ridge beams, overhangs, struts, lanterns, clerestories, exposed columns and exposed foundations.Building facades should be broken up to reect a series of buildings, rather than one large structure through breaks in the roof line and facade, highlighted entryways and doorways and functional overhangs. These buildings should also incorporate functional accessory structures including silos, water tanks, feed and storage bins and composting areas to add variety and provide integrated educational opportunities throughout the site as part of the MOU Partners commitment to experiential, life-long learning. tbnbb rfntbnS.Platte River T TNew West Architecture Signature Architecture Industrial Architecture Streets Commuter Rail St ation Legend nbbb

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rfrrr frrf Industrial ArchitectureThe industrial character area includes the new Trade Show and Exposition Hall and is intended to reect the industrial and meat packing uses that once dominated the site. This building should have simple, rectangular lines with a strong horizontal reference. This architectural character highlights the large spaces that the building provides while including elements that help to scale down the building faade at street level through lower height entrances, glass doors and large windows that allow for views into pre-function areas. The roof character is generally at, but can include saw tooth skylights and clerestory windows to break up the roof line and create architectural interest. Main entries should have a tower element that can be used as waynding throughout the site and highlight the primary public entries of the building.Signature Architecture The NWCC has two signature buildings on the campus, the New Arena, the new CSU Center and the Water Resources Center. Each of these buildings provides the opportunity to have signature, iconic architecture that reects the public use of the facilities and instills a sense of pride in the neighborhoods. The iconic nature of these two building will also play a key role in creating the inviting entry into the site and also serve as important gateway features for visitors as they exit I-70 onto Brighton Boulevard Blvd, welcoming them to the campus. Unlike the New West and Industrial character, the Signature character is one that looks to the future and uses modern materials of glass and steel to create a truly unique facility. While this character style should be more modern, special attention should be paid to ensure the aesthetic is respectful to the history and adjacent building character. For example, a roof assembly such as a barrel roof can help to merge the history of the place with a more modern facade of glass and steel. tbnnbb tbnnbb nbnbb ntbnntbnnbb

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rfrrr frrf Historic Architecture and Historic Artifacts There is a wealth of historic architecture and artifacts on the site that can be used to develop an overall design language. These design elements can be pulled from the architecture, rail, stock pens, paving and other existing site components. Elements like stone, brick, steel and wood all have a place in creating a unique and authentic character. This character can be expressed in signage and waynding, pedestrian scaled elements, common building materials, lighting and ground plane improvements. rfntbnS.Platte River T TImportant Facades S treets Commuter Rail St ation L egend nbbtn bnbnnnbnt ntbnnt

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rfrrr frrf S Pr Rfr The South Platte River runs along the west side of the NWCC. One of the primary goals of the project is to engage the river and nature. Removing invasive species and allowing the river to take back its banks will soften its currently hard edges and allow for a more natural and more visually pleasing river bank. Reestablishing cottonwood trees along the river and allowing native species to regain their territory will establish an open space that is a respite from the City. Active areas will be integrated within the natural areas to engage nature and allow for a range of educational opportunities. With over one-mile of river bank, an appropriate mix of natural and active areas should be considered to allow for successful habitat corridors and restoration areas. Tr Snt The livestock pens at the Stock Show are an integral piece of the history of this place, along with the prairie that the livestock would graze in outside of the pens. The new Stockyards should embrace that history by integrating historic artifacts of the Stock Show and meat-packing industry, creating historic plaques and monuments and integrating pavement color or markings throughout the Stockyards that tell the story about its history and its importance to Denver and the region. Where possible, prairie grasses should be integrated into the site to break up the large space, soften its character, integrate stormwater and make it more habitable for people as well as livestock. Lfrtn Ert Crrt Historically homesteads were built along rivers near cottonwood galleries for protection from the elements. Therefore, along the Livestock and Equestrian Centers, the landscape will mimic that homesteading character with elements such as pavement markings that hint at the river banks and with groupings of cottonwood trees along the way to provide shelter from the sun and wind to visitors. Prairie grasses should also be included to soften the paved areas, while still allowing for appropriately sized event spaces. During smaller event days there is potential to bring in various outdoor furnishings and planters to create more intimate spaces within the plaza areas for a broad array of event activities throughout the year. NWCC Tt S P Moving across the BNSF tracks via an overhead walkway to the new RTD Transit Station, the experience stepping o the walkway or the train will be like stepping into the West in a way that celebrates the past, but is modern and useable, while speaking to the prairie and the tree galleries dispersed throughout. The plaza will be lled with a canopy of trees with an assortment of mounds lled with prairie grasses, areas of usable mown turf, public art and pathways in between. A small retail space rfntbnS.Platte River T Public Space CharacterThe NWCC has over 26% of the site as plaza and public space. There are six character areas for the sites landscape that relate to their location and use. The landscape character is inspired by ve components of the West the river, cottonwood galleries, history, the prairie and agriculture. Each one of these components plays a role in the design of the space and is based o Colorados natural historic ecosystems and timeline of development in the Rocky Mountain West. South Platte River Stockyards Livestock Center NWCC Tr ansit St ation Plaza New Arena and Tr ade Show/ Exposition Hall Plazas Colorado Commons 1 2 3 5 6 4 TIndustrial Architecture Streets Commuter Rail St ation Legend

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will help to activate the plaza and provide a space with potential mixed use development above to overlook the activities of the transit station and various NWCC events. Nr Ar Tr S/Et H Pt As you transition south along Brighton Boulevard you will come to a smaller version of the character of the Transit Station Plaza with areas of seating and mounds of prairie grasses mixed into the continued canopy of trees. With these two plazas being the larger event plazas, the design of these spaces will need to accommodate a large amount of people, but also be a pleasant space for community use on non-event days. Therefore special attention should be paid to the balance of seating, landscape and paved areas to ensure the space is usable year round and compliments the industrial and signature architectural character of the buildings. C Ct The New Arena plaza will transition across Bettie Cram Drive into Colorado Commons on a historical timeline of short grass prairie growing into modern agriculture. Landscape elements such as windrows, which are agricultural plantings to protect elds, orchards and homesteads, should be considered to break up the space and provide shade. Colorado Commons will also oer a turf area and a series of smaller spaces to allow for, not only the Arena plaza activity to ow into this town center type plaza, but also for a series of year round events associated with the 1909 Stadium Arena Market and entrepreneurial pop-up spaces to occur. To the west, this space transitions into full agriculture with the CSU research and production plots and community garden plots west of the Stadium Arena Market and a small urban (homesteading) farm. Public Art A key component of the site architectural character and open space will be the integration of public art into the facilities. The site will include larger pieces of signature art and a mix of smaller installations that will be incorporated through all the public facilities and open spaces. The public art program for the NWCC is intended to be site specic, include the public in its selection and location, and be a collaborative learning experience for the audience that will view and enjoy the pieces. As the development of the site occurs, a robust program for the incorporation of public art needs to be a part of the overall implementation. Public art will create a more diverse and interesting site and can be used to attract additional tourism, used in education, and enjoyed by all. The site will also be a great location for traveling art pieces, either outside or within one of the many facilities in the new NWCC. The site will also house the Coors Western Art permanent collection in the CSU Center which is focused on western art and artists. rfrrr frrf fbbbtn bnbtb rfntbnS.Platte River T fntbbnbbnnnbbbbfbnbntb tntnntbb ttnbbttbb tnbbnnnbb tnbbt TL ocations for Iconic Monuments and St ructures S treets Commuter Rail St ation Legend

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rfrrr frrf Western Heritage The last component of the NWCC design character is the development of a new western heritage program that will be integrated throughout the site and within the new event venues. The intent of this program is to create a diverse year-round sustainable program related to our western heritage and culture. The program would include the great historic architecture and artifacts of the site and could include displays of western heritage artifacts and educational pieces from the collections of the National Western Stock Show and their 109 year history and from History Colorado and the Denver Museum of Nature and Science. These displays will create an educational path through the site from building to building, each with their own unique story of our western heritage and our diverse cultural history. This program would be used for education about all aspects of the American West and celebrate both human and animal relationships. Character Areas The plan is divided into nine character areas based on their geographic location and the proposed uses. Area Description The Globeville/Washington Street area is located at the west side of the study area between Washington Street and the South Platte River in the Globeville Neighborhood. This area is currently characterized by large blocks of underutilized industrial land and lacks the basic infrastructure for good connections to the river and the Northside Park area. The Globeville Neighborhood plan recommends this area for mixed-use redevelopment by improving the access and circulation and creating an active edge along the west side of the river. Intended Uses and Character Description The intended uses for this area are for an evolution over time from the existing industrial uses to mixed use development including employment and midto highdensity housing options with building heights up to ve stories. The NWCC can help to spur new mixed-use development and act as a catalyst for making positive changes in the neighborhood. Frt No specic NWCC facilities or program elements are anticipated in this area, but there is potential to attract new businesses related to agriculture and education that can be synergistic with the program at NWCC. This area allows for future growth of these supporting industries and can help to provide more jobs in the neighborhood. rfntbnS.Platte River T bn btn Character Area 1 Globeville Neighborhood/Washington Street bntbtnbbbbbbb nnbnn

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rfrrr frrf Public Space There are two key public spaces in this character area. S Pr Rfr The Globeville Neighborhood plan calls for the creation of a waterfront destination that will provide a diverse activities and events throughout the year and the potential for a waterfront plaza that can tie to the events that will occur at the NWCC. Rr Or Sr/Ntr Pn Hr P The area contains approximately 80 acres of publically owned land associated with Heron Pond, Heller Open Space, Northside Park and land intended as regional drainage. This area is being envisioned as a natural area with native plantings, and a trail network to walk, bike or ride a horse that would be unique in the Denver region due to its native habitat potential and river to prairie focus.Access and Circulation Both the Globeville Neighborhood Plan and the NWCC Master Plan identify two key connection points from Washington Street to NWCC. en Brr C Dfr (49 Afrr) The rst connection is at Bettie Cram Drive with a new vehicular and bicycle bridge over the South Platte River. This street will be the major east/west connector street for the neighborhoods and NWCC and will continue through the NWCC site to the east and connect to Brighton Boulevard at both 47th Avenue, north of I-70 and 44th Street via Humboldt Street, south of I-70. This new street will be a multimodal gateway and access point into the NWCC and will be a two lane street with bike lanes and walkways that will connect to the relocated National Western Drive on the east side of the river. en 51t Afrr The second connection from Washington Street is at 51st Avenue. This street will provide better access to the Northside Park area and provide vehicular, pedestrian and bicycle connections across the South Platte River to the new relocated National Western Drive. This connection continues to the east for pedestrian and bicycles on a new, elevated walkway over the Stockyards and connecting to the NWCC Rail Station at 49th Avenue and Brighton Boulevard. Key Relationships and Adjacencies The South Platte River, Northside Park/Heron Pond and Washington Street are key adjacencies in the area. Character Area 2 South Platte River Area Description The South Platte River character area runs for approximately 1.3 miles from Globeville Landing Park to Northside Park along the western edge of the NWCC site and contains approximately 12 acres. Today, the river is largely inaccessible from the west due to the Globeville Levee and from the east due to the Delgany Interceptor sanitary sewer lines and the Denver Rock Island Railroad (DRI) lines. This area is a prime opportunity to create a series of spaces and activities to allow the neighborhoods and the users of the NWCC to engage the river. By consolidating the railroad to the center of the NWCC site and by either relocating or burying the Delgany Interceptors, the Plan provides increased public river access and visibility. Intended Uses and Character Description The primary uses in this area are educational and recreational uses that can benet from being adjacent to this great asset. There will be a system of trails on each side of the river that will connect key activity nodes throughout the frontage. The addition of accessible green space along the river will provide opportunities for river education, river access, viewing and restoration of native riparian habitat. The area is intended to be mostly passive uses with areas of focused activity. rfntrbS.Platte River T bntbnnb bbbbn

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rfrrr frrf Facilities The primary NWCC facility located in this area is the Water Resources Center, located at the corner of Bettie Cram Drive and National Western Drive. This 15,000 SF facility will house a collaborative Water Resources Center that will focus on water/river research, water/ river education and outreach. The facility will provide opportunities for public education about the river, interpretive center exible space to be used by all Partners, small events space, and facilities to teach and collaborate on critical relationship between water, natural ecosystems, food and livestock. Public Space The area between the river and relocated National Western Drive provides many opportunities to engage with the river. This area will be a mix of active, manicured spaces and natural river habitat that will give users a wide range of experiences along the length of the river. This area oers the opportunity to be able to experience the river in many dierent ways, through interpretive landscapes, growing elds, small plazas, outdoor classrooms, lawn area, and places to touch and interact directly with the river. Access and Circulation The primary access and circulation street for the river is the new relocated National Western Drive. This new two lane street with on-street parking, pedestrian and bicycle facilities oers the opportunity for public access along the length of the river at the NWCC site. National Western Drive is designed to be a slower speed street with great amenities such as on street parking, detached cycle track, street trees and detached sidewalks that create an active, accessible edge to the river area while providing needed access for the NWCC. This area will also have two new river crossings for vehicles, pedestrians and bicycles at 49th Avenue (Bettie Cram Drive) and at 51st Avenue. These new connections across the river provide needed access from the west and allow users to access the river on both sides. The new bridges will need to be designed to address the hydraulic requirements of the river, the Delgany Interceptors, the Globeville Levee and existing South Platte River Trail on the west side as well as ecological concerns. The Animal Transport Bridge is a remnant of the full bridge that crosses the river at approximately 50th Avenue. While it is no longer usable, the bridge could be rehabilitated to provide river viewing, interpretive opportunities or become another pedestrian crossing in this area. The bridge would need to have a structural assessment and vertical circulation would need to be added on each side to provide access to the bridge. Key Relationships and Adjacencies Key relationships in this area are the neighborhood and NWCC connections to the river, and the direct access between the Water Resources Center and the river. These important connections will allow full access to the river for both recreational and learning opportunities. There is also an important relationship between the river and the new event pavilion space at The Stockyards at NWCC. This connection will help to enhance the event space by providing opportunities for access and celebration at the river.

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rfrrr frrf Character Area 3 Elyria Neighborhood TOD and NWCC Station Area Description The Elyria Neighborhood TOD and NWCC Station area will be a prime entry point into the neighborhood and the NWCC from the new RTD commuter rail station located at 49th Avenue and Brighton Boulevard (expected to open in 2018). Today, the area is largely underutilized industrial land that has a large potential for redevelopment in the northern part of Elyria. Intended Uses and Character Description This character area provides great growth potential for additional residential uses within the Elyria Neighborhood, focused on the new commuter rail station. The neighborhood plan calls for redevelopment of the industrial uses adjacent to the station to mixed use with a ve story height limit as dened in the Elyria Neighborhood Plan. The new RTD North Metro Line commuter rail station is a two track, side platform station with capacity for a four-car train. The immediate station area at 49th Avenue at the west side of Brighton Boulevard will provide a gateway into both the neighborhood and the NWCC. Facilities To help support both the mixed use development of the neighborhood and to support the NWCC parking needs, an 8001000 space mixed use parking structure is proposed on half of the Denver Public Schools (DPS) site located at 48th Avenue and Brighton Boulevard This location is the old Denver Public Schools bus storage and maintenance site and prior to that was a landll. This property will require environmental remediation prior to placing new uses on the site. This new facility is encouraged to have retail/commercial uses on the ground oor facing Brighton Boulevard, and could also have a vertical greenhouse on the south face of the building, creating a green welcoming faade to the building. The parking structure would be 4-5 stories high. This mixed use facility could act as a catalyst in the neighborhood to spur on redevelopment around the station. Public Space The new NWCC Station Plaza is a 3.5 acre gathering place that will provide a welcoming character to the neighborhood and NWCC by providing a place where visitors arriving by train will step into the new western landscape character at NWCC. This landscape character will be a dense riparian canopy that highlights the NWCC as a special and unique place. The plaza is also large enough to allow for TOD supporting retail/commercial uses adjacent to the station. The station is connected to the west via a new elevated walkway and bridge over the BNSF/RTD rail tracks. rfntbnS.Platte River T bntbftnbbbn fbnbnn ntbnnt fftnbbbnnbntt bnb

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rfrrr frrf Access and Circulation Access and circulation improvements in this area are based on the recommendations in the Elyria Neighborhood Plan. The plan proposes that 49th Avenue connect through the DPS site between Brighton Boulevard and High Street and a new extension of Williams Street between 48th Avenue and 49th Avenue through the DPS site. A new pedestrian bridge connection is also planned over the BNSF/RTD tracks to the west. Careful attention will need to be made in the design of the plaza and the close interaction of the Trade Show/ Exposition Hall and its needed parking and service drive access to provide a safe crossing for pedestrians to and from the rail station. Key Relationships and Adjacencies The new NWCC station is a key connection point for the entire neighborhood and NWCC. It is connected to the site through wide walkways and a bicycle track connecting to the new Trade Show/Exhibition Hall and by a new pedestrian bridge over the RTD and BNSF tracks to the west, with connections to the Globeville Neighborhood via the new, elevated walkway. Character Area 4 New Arena and Trade Show/ Exhibition Hall Area Description The New Arena and Trade Show/Exhibition Hall area is approximately 27 acres and is located in the southeast quadrant of the NWCC, north of I-70 and west of Brighton Boulevard. The area currently includes the Events Center, surface parking, and a few smaller commercial and residential buildings. Intended Uses and Character Description The New Arena and Trade Show/Exhibition Hall area is the primary events and entertainment destination at the NWCC. During events at these facilities, this area will be welcoming and active and provides a front door to the NWCC from Brighton Boulevard. This area is also a key connection point into the Elyria Neighborhood and provides a public plaza on Brighton Boulevard that can be used for community events. Facilities This area contains two major event venues for the NWCC, the New Arena and the new Trade Show/Exhibition Hall. These two facilities work in unison with each other and provide the signature entertainment venues for the NWCC.Nr ArThe New Arena is the NWCC agship building that replaces the uses currently existing at the Denver Coliseum. This new facility has 10,000 xed seats and serves as the main performance facility at NWCC. It provides space for the NWSS Rodeo, concerts, circus events, Expo shows, sporting events, ice hockey, ice shows, basketball, volleyball and other multi-function, yearround events. It includes box seating, oce space for tenants, rfntbnS.Platte River T brntbbbbnbtb nnbfnnbn

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rfrrr frrf administrative oces, animal holding areas, service docks, restaurant space, locker rooms and exible retail space inside the facility. The facility also has neighborhood retail/ commercial space on the Brighton Boulevard frontage to help scale the building down and to provide an active edge along the street. The New Arena will also house the NWCC and NWSS administrative oces.The architectural character of this signature building will be modern and open, with glass facades, welcoming entrances, and building elements that will help with site waynding and NWCC visibility from I-70. Total building Square Footage: ~300,000 Gross Square Feet (GSF) Tr S/Et H The new Trade Show/Exhibition Hall is a multi-purpose, year-round facility that provides 350,000 SF of exible exhibit space and is a threelevel facility. The lower level will be approximately 600-900 parking spaces with lower level access from 49th Avenue at Brighton Boulevard. The Brighton Boulevard street level is the main exhibit hall and entry lobby, and the upper level will include ballrooms and additional exible space for events and potential restaurant space. The main oor is designed to accommodate the clear-span space for an Olympic large track speed skating oval. This facility is also designed to accommodate overow and local events currently associated with the Colorado Convention Center. Local events like the Garden and Home Show, Denver Auto Show and the State Volleyball Championships can occur here, giving additional opportunities for larger convention events at the Convention Center. The Trade Show/ Exhibition Hall is also connected via skywalks to the New Arena (across 47th Avenue) and to the Livestock Hall (across the BNSF/RTD tracks). These connections oer great views to the west and provide a secure/on-grounds connection between facilities during larger events. Total building Square Footage: ~460,000 GSF Public Space There are two primary public spaces within the character area. E P Elyria Plaza is the ceremonial front door to the NWCC from Brighton Boulevard and the primary gateway into the site. It contains approximately 2.3 acres of public space and provides opportunities for exhibit, gathering, event pre-function, markets and small retail sales kiosks. Ar Sr Arena Square is the primary outdoor exhibit plaza at NWCC. Its 2.3 acres will be the same character and work in tandem with Elyria Plaza. This plaza will have larger areas for exhibit and pre-function use due to the nature of the events in the New Arena and is designed to provide exibility for many dierent types of activity. Access and Circulation The primary access street for this area is Brighton Boulevard, which will be designed to be a four-lane street during large events to serve the parking and access needs of the area, and be a three-lane street during the remainder of the year to function as a local street to the neighborhood and provide convenient access to I-70. 47th Avenue from Brighton Boulevard to Bettie Cram Drive will be a new two-lane festival street with roll curbs, wide sidewalks, bicycle facilities, lighting and waynding. During larger events in the New Arena and Trade Show/ Exposition Hall, this street will be closed to trac and function as an additional events space for NWCC. This street, along with Elyria Plaza, can be used for farmers markets, neighborhood events, displays and exhibits. Service access for the Trade Show/Exhibition Hall is from Brighton Boulevard at 48th Avenue and runs along the west side of the facility at the main oor level adjacent to the rail tracks. Service for the New Arena is from Brighton Boulevard and 47th Avenue at the northeast corner of the facility. Key Relationships and Adjacencies The New Arena and the Trade Show/Exposition Hall can work individually or together for events. The Trade Show Hall oers a large amount of exible space that can serve overow needs at the New Arena or from other on-site facilities. To maximize the visitor experience, an adequate amount of surface and structured parking needs to be close to these two major facilities. The NWCC Rail Station is also a key adjacency to these major venues. The two venues are connected with an above street bridge connection for on-grounds access during the NWSS, and for easy access between the facilities during larger events.

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rfrrr frrf Character Area 5 Colorado Commons Area Description Colorado Commons is located north of I-70, and east of the BNSF/RTD rail lines. This area currently contains the NWSS Administration Building/Hall of Education, Exposition Hall, Livestock Hall, Stadium Hall and the 1909 Stadium Arena. This area is currently the hub of the NWSS.Intended Uses and Character Description The Master Plan calls for a total transformation of this area by renovating and restoring the 1909 Stadium Arena for new uses, and removing the other existing stock show facilities. This area will become the home for the primary CSU/NWCC Partner facilities and be the neighborhood and public center for the NWCC year-round. Facilities 1909 S Ar The 1909 Stadium Arena was the rst permanent structure built at the stock show and is a wonderful example of turn-of-the-century architecture in Denver. Its brick faade and large open arena give it a truly unique character that is worth preserving for future generations. The Master Plan calls for this building to take on a new role, one that can be used and enjoyed by the public through a variety of possible new uses that may include an active public market, a commercial/ teaching kitchen that can be used by the community, and a multi-use events space in the main arena. This space is also being assessed as a possible center for entrepreneurial business and art at NWCC and will include incubator business space, and retail uses for goods and services that showcase Western Heritage and food. The plan calls for removing the stadium seating and adding a mezzanine level to increase the building capacity to approximately 90,000 SF. The CSU Denver Urban Extension Center will probably also be located in this facility on a temporary basis until it can be permanently located in the new CSU Building. Tr CSU B The new CSU Building facility will be the primary address of CSU on the NWCC site. The multi-level facility will be approximately 80-100,000 SF with new educational facilities. This facility is planned to house the CSU Denver Urban Extension Center, a Food Systems Center and Conservatory, the Coors Western Art Collection, event spaces, oces and business center, small scale research oces and facilities on topics including agriculture innovation and Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) programs, laboratory space for teaching and research, multi use classrooms and exible space, conference space, an auditorium/performance space/ lecture hall, performing and visual arts studio spaces for students and the community, and space for a portion of the National Western Stock Show Heritage collection. This space can also be used for day camps, small events, art openings and exhibits. rfntbnS.Platte River T bntbbb bnbbtbtnbt tbnt fbnbnnntttbtnbbb CONSERVATORY December 8, 2014 CONSERVATORY December 8, 2014

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rfrrr frrf Pn Sr A new 540-720 space parking structure is planned for the northern portion of the site, with the CSU Building wrapping the southeast and southwest faces. This structure will be used for the CSU and Colorado Commons activities, and will also serve the New Arena and Stock Show parking needs. Fr Et Sr Colorado Commons provides the potential for future educational, agricultural or retail/commercial growth on the NWCC campus for uses that support the overall vision. Public Space C CtColorado Commons is the largest public space at the NWCC (5 acres) and provides a variety of educational and passive recreational uses. The plaza also has an additional 1.8 acres of test and research growing plots, community gardens, a small urban farm space (perhaps with animals), a community gathering space, small outdoor performing spaces, small exible pavilions for retail sales or small events, space for outdoor markets and exhibits, public art, and exible multi-use open space to accommodate larger events. This space could also be used as trade and agricultural industry exhibit space during the Stock Show and other on-site agricultural-related events.Access and CirculationPrimary pedestrian and bicycle access to Colorado Commons is from Bettie Cram Drive. Access for service and parking is from 46th Avenue. Neighborhood access from the east will be along 47th Avenue. Bus and shuttle access will be south of the Stadium Arena Market along 46th Avenue.Key Relationships and AdjacenciesAs the public center for the NWCC, the key Colorado Commons adjacencies are to the neighborhoods with good connections both east and west through the site. This area will also be the primary daily use area for students and the public to learn about the NWCC and to learn about water, food and agriculture. The CSU Building and Extension Center need to be adjacent to research test, teaching, and growing plots.Character Area 6 Livestock Center and Stockyards Area Description The Livestock Center and Stockyards are located north of Bettie Cram Drive and west of the BNSF/RTD rail corridor. This area is currently the livestock yards for NWSS and also includes surface parking lots and some industrial uses. en The site area is approximately 30 acres. Intended Uses and Character Description The new Livestock Center will be the hub of all livestock activities during the Stock Show and provide multi-use exible indoor and outdoor facilities year round. These buildings are intended to be the most versatile and exible buildings at the NWCC. The design character of the facilities will be similar to the Equestrian Center with simple building forms that reect our western culture with a simple yet contemporary material palette. rfntbnS.Platte River T bntbbtbnn bntbbbttbnt ftbtnbntbntnb tbbntbtbt tntnntnb ttbbb

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rfrrr frrf Facilities Lfrtn S Ar The new Livestock Stadium Arena is a 5,000 seat (2,500 xed, 2,500 fold out), 135,000 GSF arena facility that will house livestock shows, family shows, conventions, banquet hall, lecture space, sporting and entertainment events year round. This space will also have the ability to hold smaller attendance ice shows and events. Lfrtn H The Livestock Hall is a 230,000 GSF multipurpose livestock facility and highly exible events venue. This building is intended to be one of the most exible use buildings at the NWCC. The venue will function to hold livestock during the Stock Show and be able to support a wide range of year round uses including livestock sales, animal shows, indoor festivals, sporting events, conventions, trade and equipment shows and farmers markets. It can also be used as support facilities and vendor space for larger festivals held in the Stockyards. The facility will also serve as overow horse stalls for the Equestrian Center during larger horse events. Snt/Efrt Pf The Stockyards is a 20-acre space that is envisioned to function as an 800 pen stockyard during the Stock Show and be a multi-use festival, event space, and destination the remainder of the year. The Stockyards will be a unique event space for the Denver region allowing the potential for larger concerts, events and festivals to occur at a site that is designed to accommodate them. During the Stock Show, the space will have cattle pens with removable fencing and will house the livestock-related outdoor programs needed to maintain the Stock Show as the Super Bowl of livestock events. The Stockyards also include space for the Herd Sire, Heifer Mart and Stock Dog areas during the Stock Show, included in the overall 20 acres. When the pens are removed, a 20-acre hard surface exible space is created allowing for a variety of events including concerts, exhibits, car shows, livestock and hay sales, festivals, RV and car sales, ea markets, outdoor sporting events, farm equipment shows, summer stock shows, and Denver County Fair. It can also provide nonstock show parking for up to 2,700 vehicles. Lfrtn H A Ar The Livestock Hall Auction Arena is a 700 seat, 9,500 GSF livestock sales and lecture space attached to the Livestock Hall. Lfrtn Crr A Ar The Livestock Center Auction Arena is a 1,000 seat, 15,000 GSF terraced seating arena used for livestock sales, classroom space and possible performing arts events. This arena is located adjacent to the Stockyard Show Arena in the Stockyards. Sn S Ar The Stockyard Show Arena is located in the center of the stockyards adjacent to the Livestock Center Auction Arena and is used for livestock shows and sales during the Stock Show and is the support building for the yearround Events Pavilion in the Stockyards. It is a 20,000 GSF facility with 1,000 bleacher seats. 1917 A & C Mr Pn P Or Wr Tr The 1917 Armour & Company Meat Packing Plant Oce is located at the east side of the stockyards at the center of the site. This two story historic building is recommended to be nominated as a Denver Historic Landmark. At present, the property serves as a private residence, but should it become available, its reuse potential includes oces, Livestock Center business center with conference rooms and small oces, as the Events Pavilion oces, or other livestock/equestrian uses. The water tower will remain in the new Stockyards and be an integral part of the new elevated walkway between National Western Drive and the new Rail Station.

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rfrrr frrf Public Space Lfrtn Crr P The Livestock Center Plaza is a 3.8-acre plaza on the west side of the Livestock Hall. This plaza is used for outdoor displays, vendor booths, displays and exhibits. This space is also the primary north/south pedestrian access to the Equestrian Center. The primary feature of this plaza is the lowered plaza that connects the Livestock Hall with the Stockyards. This plaza is below the DRI railroad tracks and is 200 feet wide, allowing for free ow and clear visual connection between these two major event venues. The Livestock Center Plaza and the Equestrian Plaza will incorporate some of the historic pens and brick paving materials into these plazas. Erfr Wn One of the key connecting elements of the Master Plan is the elevated walkway. This new elevated walkway will run east/west and span the Stockyards, rail tracks, and the area between the Livestock Center and the Equestrian Center. This elevated catwalk will be a truly unique and site dening feature that will connect National Western Drive at 51st Avenue to the new Rail Station at 49th Avenue and Brighton Boulevard. This walkway will have an industrial look and feel in its design and vary in width from 15 to 20. It will visually connect through the site past the historic Armour water tower and provide great views into the site and of the mountains. The elevated walkway will also have bicycle ramps at each end for easy bicycle access and have vertical circulation points at regular intervals throughout its length for easy access to the NWCC. This elevated walkway would be open year-round to the public to provide access to and from the rail station from the west. Cnt Along with the elevated walkway, there will also be catwalks that run north/south through the Stockyards and have a similar use to the existing catwalk that is in the yards today. This catwalk would have an industrial look and feel and be used to view the Stockyards and provide easy north/south access through the yards. The intent of this catwalk would be that it would be closed to the public during events in the Stockyards and during the National Western Stock Show and be available for use by attendees of those events. Access and Circulation Primary access to the Livestock Center is from National Western Drive and Bettie Cram Drive. Service access is from Bettie Cram Drive and along the south side of the Livestock Stadium Arena and the west side of the Livestock Hall. Key Relationships and AdjacenciesThe Livestock Hall is a true multi-use facility, with the ability for use as a exible space for overow from the Trade Show/Exhibition Hall, the Equestrian Center and an events building during concerts and exhibits in the Stockyards. Its central location allows it to function for a multitude of events throughout the year. fbbnbtn btnnnbb fnnnnbntttt bnt

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rfrrr frrf Character Area 7 Equestrian Center Area Description The Equestrian Center is located south of Race Court and west of the BNSF/RTD rail tracks. The site contains approximately 26.5 acres and includes 464,000 GSF of enclosed equestrian facilities and 48,000 SF of covered, open air practice arenas. The site is currently industrial and warehouse uses with some freight rail access. Intended Uses and Character Description The new Equestrian Center is dedicated to providing quality space for year-round horse shows and events. The facilities can also house the Denver Police Equestrian unit, CSU Equine Sports Medicine Clinic, Community Outreach Clinic, Clinical Trials Facility and the potential for year round horse access for recreation, rehabilitation and educational uses. The design character of the facilities will be similar to the Livestock Center with simple building forms that reect our western culture with a simple yet contemporary material palette. Facilities Ert Efrt Crr The Equestrian Events Center is a 2,500 xed seat and 2,000 pull out seat multi-use arena to house equine and livestock events and entertainment functions throughout the year. The space is large enough to hold concerts, motor sports, indoor festivals, conferences and meetings, banquets, horse and livestock sales. The facility also includes indoor space for exhibits and vendors. The building is approximately 109,000 GSF. Ert Ar The Equestrian Arena is a 500 seat arena for equine, livestock and smaller entertainment events including horse shows, lectures, horse and livestock sales, animal shows and indoor festivals. The building is approximately 86,500 GSF with a dirt oor show ring. Htr B The horse barn is a 1,000 stall, 220,000 GSF facility with permanent 10 x 10 horse stalls. Service access to both sides of this facility is critical due to its size for loading and unloading. CSU Er St Mrr F The CSU Equine Sports Medicine Facility is a 78,600 GSF state of the art clinic facility dedicated to equine sports medicine and education and is directly adjacent to the Equestrian Center along Race Court. The facility will have exam rooms, indoor pens, Eurociser, water treadmill and salt water spa. The facility will also house the CSU Community Outreach Clinic and the Clinical Trials Facility. The facility has approximately 35,000 SF of outdoor pens and exercise area and surface parking for sta and clients. Etr Pr Art There are two 24,000 SF enclosed practice areas, one directly attached to each of the arenas and with direct connection to the horse barn. These practice areas serve as staging and pre-function for activities in the arenas and consist of a 120 x 200 show ring and a dirt oor. Cfrr Pr Art There are two 20,000 SF outdoor Covered Practice Arenas that will be used for horse exercise and small outdoor events that need a covered space. rfntbnS.Platte River T bntbbtbnbb nbtnnnnb ftbnbnnbtttbb b

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rfrrr frrf Public Space The primary public space for the Equestrian Center is the 2.6 acre Equestrian Plaza located on the south and west corner of the Events Center. This plaza is at the main entry to the Events Center and provides space for exhibits, vendors, and small events. Access and Circulation The primary access to the Equestrian Center is from Race Court. There are service aisles on the east and west sides of the facility that provide loading and unloading of the horse barn from two dierent sides, decreasing the loading/unloading times of this facility and for the two event arenas and enclosed practice areas. Key Relationships and Adjacencies Key relationships for this area include direct, covered access to the horse barn for all equestrian facilities, and the potential to use the Livestock Hall as overow space for larger events and horse shows. The CSU Equine Sports Medicine Facility is connected to the Equestrian Center to allow for easy access to services provided by CSU on a daily and event basis. The Livestock Hall provides adjacent overow stalling potential for larger equestrian events. Character Area 8 Livestock Exchange Area Description The Livestock Exchange area is located south of Bettie Cram Drive and west of the BNSF/RTD rail tracks. This area contains the three buildings associated with the Livestock Exchange built between 1898 and 1919 and contains approximately 6.5 acres. Intended Uses and Character Description The primary use of this area will be agri-business, site maintenance, and future program growth for the NWCC. While the Livestock Exchange is privately owned, the NWC Partners should collaborate with the owners of the building to look at co-development options that provide uses that are complimentary to the NWCC. Facilities Lfrtn Er B The Livestock Exchange Building (also known as the Denver Union Stockyards Building), is an important historic resource for the NWCC and can serve as a critical link along Bettie Cram Drive. The building contains approximately 54,000 SF of oce space that can be used for agri-business and supporting commercial space to complement the uses at NWCC. The building is currently privately owned. The Livestock Exchange is also the home to the Stockyards Bar and Restaurant. rfntbnS.Platte River T bnttbntbnntb nn ftbnnbnbnttbn bt

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rfrrr frrf Mrr Ort F The Maintenance and Operations Facility is located just south and west of the Livestock Exchange Building and includes 44,000 SF of operations and service space to support the NWCC. This area also includes space for equipment storage and dirt/footing mix storage. Fr G The area along the east side of National Western Drive, south of Bettie Cram Drive is dedicated to future program growth at NWCC. This area could be additional educational facilities, agricultural-related business, or supportive mixed use. Public Space Lfrtn Er P The Livestock Exchange Plaza is located at the east side of the Livestock Exchange Building is a 0.4 acre space and is intended as a ceremonial space that reects the historic character and importance of the building. The space can be used for small special events, outdoor markets, displays and exhibits. Access and Circulation Primary access to the Livestock Exchange is from Bettie Cram Drive. Other area access is provided from National Western Drive. Key Relationships and Adjacencies The central location of the Maintenance Facility is important for servicing of all the facilities at NWCC. Character Area 9 Denver Coliseum Area Description The Denver Coliseum site is located south of I-70 and West of Brighton Boulevard and includes 30.4 acres. The site currently houses the Denver Coliseum, an attached horse barn for rodeo events, and 2,240 surface parking spaces. While the Master Plan does not identify specic uses for the Denver Coliseum site, it is considered a critical component of the NWCC overall planning eort and as such should redevelop with uses that complement the overall vision and goals of the NWCC. Intended Uses and Character Description The Master Plan identies the development framework that will help to shape the new development on the site. Due to overall NWCC phasing and environmental clean-up of the site, a specic development layout is not provided in the plan. The following design principles have been identied to help guide future development that is complementary to the NWCC and takes advantages of the sites opportunities. rfntbnS.Platte River T bntnbbb nttnbbnbnbbbb t ntnttbtttbb btnb

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rfrrr frrf Design Principles for the Denver Coliseum Site en Provide a through connection between 44th Street and Arkins Court en Study possibility of a new access point to 46th Avenue en Provide a new access point into the site from Brighton Boulevard along the High Street drainage easement (approx. 41st Street) en Allow for visibility through the site from eastbound en I-70, 44th and Brighton Boulevard intersection, and from 38th Street at Arkins Court en Provide multiple connections (vehicular and pedestrian) under I-70 to 46th Avenue and the NWCC to the north en Provide opportunities for activated space under I-70 that reinforce north/south connections en Provide bicycle/pedestrian connections from Brighton Boulevard to Globeville Landing Park, the South Platte River, and from NWCC Colorado Commons to the river and park through a greenway connection en en Maintain direct river access through Globeville Landing Park en Provide easy and clear access to Globeville Landing Park and support adjacent uses that provide eyes on the river and park en Provide exibility for active educational and recreational uses within the park en Create a green buer along the BNSF/RTD rail corridor that extends Globeville Landing Park to the north en Provide opportunities to use the regional drainage as a site and open space enhancement en Maintain the potential for the site to be used as parking inventory for the NWCC event venues en All Guiding Principles and Goals of the Master Plan apply to this area ftbbntnnbbbbtbnt nttbnrbnbttnnbtf tnnbbtnbnnbbbbbtnttbb tnbnt

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rfrrr frrf Existing FacilitiesThe Denver Coliseum opened in 1952 as Denvers premier entertainment venue. The building includes 170,400 SF of space and has had a number of renovations over its life span, with the last one occurring in 2001/2002. As an entertainment venue for the City, the building lacks some of the needed amenities to draw year-round events and maintain the Stock Shows world class status. These shortfalls include inadequate ventilation, poor guest circulation space, lack of box suites or premium seating, inadequate lighting and sound systems and lack of overall venue exibility. The Master Plan does not use the Coliseum site for any new programmed uses, but the building may hold some potential as a reuse building for a larger tenant or group of smaller tenants looking for a good visible location, easy access to the highway, the NWCC, and to downtown Denver. Public Space Gbrfr L Pn S Pr Rfr Artt Globeville Landing Park is located at the southwest corner of the Denver Coliseum site and provides direct access to the South Platter River. This park is currently underutilized and provides a good open space asset adjacent to new development on the Coliseum site. The Master Plan provides trail connections to the park from NWCC and identies the potential for an outdoor plaza and classrooms, play areas and for direct access to the river. Other City goals for the park include: en Increase opportunities to create a river gateway en Create a key regional destination en Create ecological buers between development and the river to include native tree and shrub species en Improve the quality of human life and wildlife en There is ongoing study being done by Denver Parks and Recreation to look at ways to activate this park. The South Platte River Trail runs through Globeville Landing Park. The trail continues south into downtown and Conuence Park/Cherry Creek Trail. The trail crosses to the west side of the river at the park and goes north, connecting to Northside Park/Heron Pond and into Adams County, with connections to Sand Creek. Today, Globeville Landing Park oers the only opportunity to gain direct access to the river from the east side between 38th Street and Franklin Street. nnnnbttnbbbn bbbnnbtnb btbnnnt fntntbbnnnbtbtbb

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rfrrr frrf Ctr P Ur I-70 When new development occurs at the Denver Coliseum site, public space will be a critical component to help to tie the site with the NWCC under I-70. The area fronting onto Bettie Cram Drive and the area directly north of the Coliseum under I-70 should be a continuation of the Colorado Commons public space and provide additional opportunities for small events and unique uses and events that require larger areas of covered, hard surface area. This special use area should also occur under I-70 at the west end of the viaduct where the pedestrian connection between Colorado Commons and Globeville Landing Park occurs.Regional Drainage Channel The City of Denver in conjunction with Urban Drainage, RTD and CDOT are studying the potential to have an open channel drainage outfall through a portion of the Coliseum site and through Globeville Landing Park to address regional drainage requirements for the Montclair Basin. The channel picks up surface storm drainage from the High Street Outfall and from the I-70 East project. The open channel would be 150 wide with an additional 30 buer on each side for a total corridor width of 210. Other alternatives such as piping this drainage are being explored by Urban Drainage and Flood Control and the City and County of Denver. All options studied for the Coliseum site should have a component that addresses water quality and have an open feel. Access and Circulation B Brf Brighton Boulevard is the main north/south arterial street on the east side of the Coliseum site. Brighton Boulevard is part of the Mayors Corridor of Opportunity and is the envisioned to be an enhanced gateway into downtown Denver from DIA to Denver Union Station. The street is being redesigned into a multimodal complete street with four lanes, dedicated bicycle lanes, tree lawn, detached sidewalks and green infrastructure. Redevelopment potential is high along the street with a number of urban inll parcels adjacent to the Coliseum site, providing a unique opportunity to meet the desired needs of the GES neighborhoods, as well as regional interests given it location. Properties along Brighton Boulevard are experiencing signicant revitalization including adaptive reuse of existing industrial structures and the development of new commercial and residential buildings. In addition to private investment, signicant public investment is happening with respect to the Brighton Boulevard Redevelopment Project. With a committed $25.7 million from the City as part of the Mayors 2015 budget, this infrastructure project will establish public multi-modal right-of-way improvements including travel and turn lanes, curbs and medians, sidewalks and bike facilities, as well as additional amenities and mobility improvements.44 Srr (Brr C Dfr) 44th Street is located at the northeast end corner of the Coliseum site and is currently the main access point for parking and events from Brighton Boulevard and I-70. The Master Plan calls for this street to continue through the NWCC site to the west and connect to Washington Street. 46 Afrr 46th Avenue runs east/west under I-70 between Washington Street and Bettie Cram Drive. The street is currently elevated above the Coliseum site to allow for a pedestrian underpass between the Coliseum and the National Western Stock Show to the north. The pedestrian underpass is approximately 50 wide. The Master Plan calls for this underpass to be removed and the grade of 46th Avenue lowered to the Coliseum level to create a continuous ground plane and improved sight lines and movement between the Coliseum and the rest of the NWCC. Ant C Arkins Court runs north from 38th Street into the Coliseum site. This two lane street provides access to Globeville Landing Park and access for trucks and deliveries to the Pepsi Bottling Company. Plans being prepared by the City call for portions of Arkins Court to be transformed into a new South Platte River Promenade south of 38th Street, helping to activate the South Platte River from Cuernavaca Park to the County Line. Arkins Court becomes an important access street to the Denver Coliseum site with easy connections to 38th Street. ftbnbntbbn ntbnbntbntbb ntb

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rfrrr frrf Key Relationships and Adjacencies The connection between the Coliseum site and the new NWCC as one fully integrated campus is an important component to the overall neighborhood connectivity and provides an opportunity for the uses on each side of the highway to be synergistic and support each other as a regional destination. Another key relationship is between the site and Globeville Landing Park and the river. By way of example, the area under I-70 is currently 100% paved and used for parking, circulation, service and 46th Avenue. This ve acre area is a good opportunity to provide much needed north/south bicycle and pedestrian connections and create interesting uses and spaces that can use the covered area for weather protection and create a more urban and hospitable place that can be activated as part of the overall NWCC program. By lowering 46th Avenue, the grade barrier can be removed and the area can become more walkable and accessible from both directions, creating a large volume of space under the viaduct. The future uses at the Denver Coliseum site need to help reinforce the Vision for the Corridor of Opportunity and the NWCC, providing complementary residential, retail, oce or commercial uses that t the theme of the overall NWCC plan and help to support the needs of the neighborhoods and the City as a whole. The site also has signicant environmental issues that would need to be remediated before development can occur.River, Parks and Public SpaceS Pr Rfr The reach of the South Platte River that runs through the NWCC is highly modied from its natural condition. The river has been channelized, with bank conditions that are almost certainly far steeper and straighter than they were in a pre-settlement condition. Only two miles downstream, the river contains gravel bars, riparian terraces, and a braiding of sandbars and multiple channels. Within the project site area however, the river is constrained within a narrow channel by the Globeville Levee and the Delgany Interceptors with banks that are almost too steep to climb. The water itself is controlled as well, with numerous control structures upstream and a signicant control structure on-site near the intersection of Franklin Street and Race Court. These modications have led to the presence of many invasive or non-native species, reduced river velocity and meander, and a lack of public access to the water itself. These conditions are not likely to change signicantly, as the ow controls are a part of a larger river management condition, and the banks are now constrained by the presence of multiple, major sanitary sewer pipes on both sides. The Master Plan calls for more room for the river corridor at the top of bank on the east side however, by establishing a new location of National Western Drive along the river corridor and set back a minimum of 110 feet from the river bank. This additional land will make room for the development of new upland habitats for wildlife and the potential for natural stormwater conveyance, water quality and detention basins as well as paths and educational interpretive features. Continued involvement from the South Platte River Greenway Foundation and additional studies may also indicate the ability to recongure the bank structure on the east side of the river for shallower bank angles. Overall, the river also needs invasive species removed and habitat restoration. tnbtbtnbbbbn bbnbnnbbbt

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rfrrr frrf Ntr Pn/Hr P /Hrr Or Sr Northside Park, located on the west side of the river, north of 51st Avenue is an underutilized park. The industrial character of the surrounding land deters users from the park, creating a vacant open space that feels unsafe. Northside Park is physically isolated from the residential neighborhood of Globeville and separated from active uses. It has enormous potential to become a neighborhood-serving park, a regional amenity, and to be integrated with proposed mixed use development identied in the Neighborhood Plan. A regional water quality facility is proposed to integrate seamlessly with Northside Park and Heron Pond/Heller Open Space. This provides the opportunity to treat industrial, commercial, and residential runo in the neighborhood that would otherwise go untreated. This improves the health of the river system and connects people to nature through educational opportunities. For the NWCC, this area provides a dierent habitat area that can be used by the Water Resources Center and all Partners for water education and activities as well as an integrated horse trail to exercise horses. The new 51st Avenue river bridge connection will allow for easy access. This area has also been discussed for the potential of both pedestrian and horse trails in the area. Pb Sr NWCC The NWCC oers the opportunity to drastically change the character of the existing National Western site through a series of interconnected public spaces that allow for a wide range of both public and event based activities. The public spaces are themed around the broader themes of the river, history of the site, the native prairie, innovation, and agriculture. There are ten major public spaces identied in the Master Plan totaling almost 46 acres in the NWCC (26% of campus) and along with Northside Park/Heron Pond, Globeville Landing Park and the river frontage form the backbone of a new landscape and create a much more green and healthy environment at NWCC. The specic public spaces are identied in more detail in the Character Area descriptions above. Public Space at the National Western Center en NWC Station Plaza: 3.5 acres en Elyria Plaza: 2.3 acres en Arena Square: 2.3 acres en Colorado Commons: 5 acres + 1.8 acres of growing plots en Stockyards Events Pavilion: 12 acres en Livestock Center Plaza: 3.8 acres en Lower Stockyards/Livestock Center Connection Plaza: 0.5 acres en Equestrian Center Plaza: 2.6 acres en Livestock Exchange Plaza: 0.4 acres en South Platte River Frontage: 12.4 acres en Northside Park/Heron Pond/Heller Open Space: 80 acres en Globeville Landing Park: 5.5 acresThe public spaces, ranging from 0.4-5 acres are signicant spaces that will allow for a wide variety of uses and activities. These spaces need to be designed to be exible to allow for both small and large activities and to provide the basic services (water, power) to hold events and to allow for exhibits, markets, displays, festivals and daily use. fbtnnb nbbbbtttbn bnnbnbnbnbnt

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rfrrr frrf Brighton Blvd.47th Ave. I-70Race Ct.Washington St.S.Platte River National Western Ce nter Master PlanRail Consolidation Diagram DRAFT11.06.201 1=200 @ 34 x 34N 02004006001200 r f r r n t b tr r n T Co mmuter Ra il Statio n TNew Streets / Streets With Improvements Existing Streets 1 2 3 3 4 5 6 7 3 9 9 1 7 3 TNew StreetsExisting StreetsS treets With Improvements Commuter Rail St ation Legend fbbttbnbbbntn ttbfntnbntbbnbtbbtttbnt tnnbbb

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rfrrr frrf I-70 (Artt NWCC) I-70 will continue to be the primary access highway into the NWCC and vital to its success. The highway will play an even bigger role as the Centers front door, with the main he connection at Brighton Boulevard. This connection is the main gateway to both the NWCC and to downtown Denver along the Corridor of Opportunity between Denver Union Station and Denver International Airport. A secondary access point is at Washington Street allowing access to local streets (51st Ave and Bettie Cram Drive) across the South Platte River to the west side of the site. The I-70 East project will improve the interchange at Brighton Boulevard to simplify trac movements by removing 46th Avenue west of Brighton Boulevard to Humboldt Street. Wt Srr Washington Street has been envisioned as being improved in the Globeville Neighborhood Plan. This plan does not investigate the cross section beyond what was presented in the Neighborhood Plan. The existing 60-foot right of way limits the capacity of the street and the ability to add improvements like on-street parking, bicycle lanes, street trees and wider sidewalks. The plan identies three dierent cross sections ranging from the existing 60-, 80and 110-foot widths. B Brf (44 Srr Rr C) Brighton Boulevard will be improved to a three-lane section (two travel lanes and center turn lane) north of 47th Avenue with a exible parking lane on the east side that can become a fourth lane during events to increase capacity of the street. The street will be widened to the west into the NWCC site to increase the right of way from 60 feet to 77 feet wide. Brighton Boulevard will be a complete street with new sidewalks, bicycle lanes on the west side, and amenity zones on each side for street trees and street furniture.Site CirculationIntegration with the surrounding neighborhoods is one of the NWCC Guiding Principles. The Master Plan provides for a new set of connections and public spaces that can be used by the neighborhoods to create a better neighborhood experience, stronger neighborhoods, and access opportunities to improve health and wellness and gain access to business and educational opportunities provided at the NWCC. The Master Plan provides opportunities for more porous edges that allow access through the site and provide neighborhood opportunities to reach into the NWCC site and become an integral part of the new campus. Without these connections, the full potential benet of the NWCC to the adjoining communities, and vice versa, will not be realized. Street Network The new street network for the NWCC includes the rehabilitation of existing streets as well as new streets through the Campus. All new streets will incorporate water quality, stormwater management and green infrastructure. New street and bicycle pedestrian connections help to achieve the above Goals. Travel La nes P arking La ne P arking/ Flex La ne Amenity/ T ree La wn Pedestrian Shared Use Path Cycle Track/ Bike Lane Legend Brighton Boulevard

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rfrrr frrf 46 Afrr (Brr C Dfr Wt Srr)46th Avenue provides important access and capacity to serve as an east/west connector and to serve the additional circulation needs of the NWCC. The plan recommends the lowering of 46th Avenue just west of Bettie Cram Drive under I-70 to eliminate the raised street barrier between the NWCC site and the Denver Coliseum. The street will be two travel lanes with new bicycle and pedestrian improvements. The existing crossing at the rail as well as the bridge at the South Platte River will remain. The street will also act as the bus circulator street during the largest days of the Stock Show, creating a new arrival point to the NWCC site. 47 Afrr (B Brf Brr C Dfr) 47th Avenue between Bettie Cram Drive and Brighton Boulevard will be improved to be the new festival street at NWCC. This street will have two travel lanes, a bicycle lane on the north side of the street, and wide walks and amenity zones to provide space for markets, festivals and special events. Rr C (B Brf Fn Srr) Race Court is the northern boundary of the plan and will be the front door street to the new Equestrian Center. This street will be improved to a three-lane section (two travel lanes and a center turn lane) with bicycle and pedestrian facilities. Major improvements to the existing rail underpass and the intersection with Brighton Boulevard are also recommended. The Franklin Street bridge structure crossing the Platte River will remain. 47th Avenue festival street, Brighton Boulevard to Humboldt Street Race Court BNSF to Franklin Street 46th Avenue at BNSF Underpass 46th Avenue under I-70 looking West

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rfrrr frrf New Street Network Brr C Dfr (B Brf Wt Srr) Bettie Cram Drive, named after one of the neighborhoods greatest activists, will be the new Main Street for the NWCC. This street connects between Washington Street and Brighton Boulevard and provides access to almost all of the major venues at NWCC. The new river crossing at this street will be a new gateway into NWCC from the west. This will be a two-lane street with continuous bicycle and pedestrian facilities end to end. The existing Marion Street crossing of the rail will be widened to a 50-foot opening with a 14 height, to match the North Metro Rail underpass that is currently under design. A structure will also need to be constructed to cross the river and connect to the Washington Street and the Globeville Neighborhood. 51t Afrr (N Wrtr Dfr Wt Srr) 51st Avenue will connect between Washington Street and National Western Drive and serves as an access street for the Northside Park area and the South Platte River. This two-lane street will include new bicycle and pedestrian facilities and will also act as a frontage street for new development planned as part of the Globeville Neighborhood Plan. A bridge structure will be constructed at the South Platte River crossing. N Wrtr Dfr (Brr C Dfr Fn Srr) National Western Drive will be relocated to the west to create a new public access street to the South Platte River from the east. This street will be two travel lanes with on-street parking and a new bicycle tracks on the west side. Since the street is intended to be slower speed street while providing access to the NWCC, methods for trac calming will need to be incorporated into the nal design. During large events at the Stockyards, this street could be closed between Bettie Cram Drive and 51st Avenue to provide additional event space and direct access to the river from NWCC. 51st Avenue between Washington Street and the South Platte River National Western Drive North of 51st Avenue National Western Drive South of 51st Avenue Bettie Cram Drive, Brighton to Humboldt Bettie Cram Drive bridge over South Platte River

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rfrrr frrf New Bicycle and Pedestrian Facilities The plan provides for a comprehensive bicycle and pedestrian network that provides many new opportunities for connections between the neighborhoods, regional trail connections and NWCC and addresses several plan Goals. All new streets will include bicycle and pedestrian facilities, and new bicycle and pedestrian facilities will be added to the existing street network adjacent to the project.The main east/west connection through NWCC will be along Bettie Cram Drive from Washington Street to Brighton Boulevard connecting the project to the Elyria and Globeville neighborhoods. This two-lane street will be designed to allow for year-round pedestrian and bicycle movements through the site and will connect to the South Platte River trail on the west side of the river, to new bicycle facilities on National Western Drive, and to the new north/south bicycle facilities being planned for Brighton Boulevard.Where Bettie Cram Drive intersects with 47th Avenue, a new bicycle track will be provided to connect to the Brighton Boulevard bicycle network; this will also serve as the bicycle pedestrian connection for Brighton Boulevard north and south around the future interchange. A new elevated bicycle/pedestrian facility will also be created along the 51st Avenue corridor extended, connecting Washington Street to the NWCC Commuter Rail Station and to Brighton Boulevard. This unique connection will be provided on an elevated walkway structure over the Stockyards, across the BNSF/RTD rail lines and connect directly to the new rail station at 49th and Brighton Boulevard. Because of the vertical separation of the new connection and the NWCC grounds, this High Line like experience will be able to be open year round without interruption during the Stock Show event. The structure will vary in width between 15 feet and 20 feet and have multiple access points throughout the length of the bridge. The elevated structure will need to be designed to meet all clearance requirements by the BNSF and RTD and meet ADA requirements.Washington Street to Bettie Cram Drive. Race Court will be upgraded between Franklin Street/National Western Drive to Brighton Boulevard with pedestrian and bicycle facilities.North/south bicycle pedestrian connections will be provided along National Western Drive from 46th Avenue to Franklin Street with a new bicycle track on the west side of the street. A new bicycle track will also be provided on the west side of Brighton Boulevard from 47th Avenue to Race Court. Pedestrians and bicycles will be circulated through the site via 47th Avenue and Bettie Cram Drive, connecting Brighton Boulevard north and south of the interchange.A new interior site bicycle/pedestrian path will also be provided to connect Colorado Commons to Globeville Landing Park and the South Platte River Trail along the west side of the Denver Coliseum site. rfntbnS.Platte River T TProposed and Existing St reetsSeparated T woWa y Cycle T rack Neighborhood Bike Ro utes Separated In-Roadway Bike L anes S. Platte River Trail Bike and Pedestrian Connection Commuter Rail St ation Legend tbnnbnt nnbntbn tbbtnbbb ntbnnbnttbbbbnt bbntbbbb nfn

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rfrrr frrf Rail and Bus Transit The new rail lines being constructed as part of RTDs FasTracks system are a great opportunity for regional connections to and from the NWCC and address the Master Plan Goals. The North Metro line stop at NWCC provides direct rail access to the NWCC campus and the neighborhoods. Other nearby stations include the 41st and Fox Station located in Globeville providing access to the Gold Line, and there are two stations on the East Corridor lineat 38th and Blake and 40th and Colorado that provide access points to the neighborhoods. Additional connections to NWCC through connecting circulator buses during larger events to all of these rail stations needs to be further studied to help increase the transit mode split at NWCC. There may also be an emerging opportunity to collaborate with the RiNo Arts District to develop some type of circulator bus or shuttle system for the area to leverage available parking. There are currently three bus routes that connect with NWCC area. In Globeville, Route 12 runs north/south on Washington Street and the Route 8 runs along Lincoln Street, and in Elyria, Route 48 runs along Brighton Boulevard and on 47th Avenue with a stop at National Western Complex. These routes will likely be adjusted when the Gold Line, East Corridor and North Metro rail lines open. A service plan for the rail line is not yet available from RTD. rfntbnS.Platte River T Freight Rail lines S treets R TD North Metro Commuter Ra il Line National Western Commuter Ra il S tation P ossible Bus R outing to New St ation R TD Bus R outes R TD Bus St ops Legend T ffbbn tbbbnbbn bnbbn

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rfrrr frrf Parking The ultimate parking program for NWCC is one that will rely on both onsite and o-site parking locations and a mix of surface and structured parking. Because the parking requirements will change during each phase of the build out of NWCC, the Master Plan identies a range of parking spaces to meet the parking demand and recommends further study to rene the ultimate parking numbers and locations. Daily Use Parking The daily use for parking at NWCC requires adequate parking to park the major venues of the New Arena, Trade Show/Exposition Hall and Livestock Center and Equestrian Center without the need to provide outlying o-site parking. Parking needed for these venues ranges from 8,500 to 11,000 spaces. As part of urbanizing the site, part of the parking is accommodated in parking structures at the CSU Center/Colorado Commons, Trade Show/Exposition Hall and the Denver Public School Site (2,000-3,000 spaces) and at the various surface lots scattered throughout the site (1,000-2,000 spaces). For the Master Plan, the Denver Coliseum is calculated as 2,200 surface parking spaces, but a structure could be built on that site depending on the future redevelopment. The surface parking also uses locations like the Stockyards and cattle tie out areas that cannot be used for parking during the National Western Stock Show (additional 2,500 spaces). There are also close by o-site locations that have been identied for another 2,0003,000 spaces. O-site private parking will also be used. National Western Stock Show Parking The National Western Stock Show requires a dierent level of parking due to the large number of visitors, vendors, exhibitors and employees that attend the event. On the largest days of the Stock Show, up to 85,000 people are expected to visit the site. This large number of people and the unique user characteristics of extended site stays (four hours average), large trucks and trailers, and visitors coming from all portions of the region requires parking for up to 18,850 spaces at peak times. The goal of the parking management plan is to be able to get people o the site after big events within 30 minutes. To accomplish this level of eciency, a larger number of close by and o-site parking spaces will need to be available with adequate shuttle and circulator service to easily connect people to the site. Transit Mode Split To help address the large parking need, the transit mode spit was studied to identify ways that people can get to the site via transit. Every 5% of transit usage that can be provided equates to roughly 1,000 parking spaces. Brighton Blvd. 47th Ave. I-70Race Ct.Washington St.S.Platte River National Western Ce nter Master PlanRail Consolidation Diagram DRAFT11.06.201 1=200 @ 34 x 34N 02004006001200 r f r r n t b tr r n Pr oposed Surf ace Pa rk ing & Drives Stru ct ured Pa rk ing On-Street Pa rk ing Co mmuter Ra il Statio n T T Existing Street s New Streets / Streets Wi th Improvements fnnttbb nbtnbbbb bn TNew Streets/Streets With Improvements Existing S treets Proposed Surface Pa rking & Drives S tructured Pa rking On-Street Pa rking Commuter Rail St ation Legend

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rfrrr frrf NWCC is the rst rail station out of Denver Union Station in Downtown Denver on the North Metro line. The North Metro service is a 20 minute peak and 30 minute opeak service. When the line opens in 2018, it will run twocar trains, each with a maximum capacity of 200 people/ car. The NWCC Station will be designed to accommodate four-car trains for events, which will increase the capacity. At the time of this plan, RTD had yet to complete the operating plan for the North Metro line and to determine how a special event service might work at the NWCC. Additional capacity will be limited by the single track line north and south of the NWCC station, but additional special event trains need to be pursued by the NWC Partners to increase the number of people coming to the site by train. The NWCC project oers a truly unique opportunity to create a modern parking system solution that signicantly reduces project costs and leverages substantial investments already made in parking within the City, as well as new transit infrastructure, including but not limited to DUS and FasTracks. To that end, a NWCC Parking Management Study will be conducted by the City and County of Denver in 2015/2016. The purpose of the study will be solely focused on narrowing the proposed parking range through a detailed evaluation of future multimodal opportunities, management strategies, capital investments, and user (both existing and future) behavior. Throughout this study, close coordination will be paramount by and among the City, NWSS, NWC Partners, and the Community Advisory Committee. Data will be collected during the 2015 NWSS to better understand operational needs and user behavior and to inform assumptions in the NWC Parking Management Study. Infrastructure This section addresses the infrastructure that will be required as part of the overall redevelopment including key connections to the adjacent communities. Due to the nature of this master plan, infrastructure sizing and capacity will need to be readdressed in future phases of planning. The IMP follows the programming and layout of the Master Plan. Guiding principles for the design of the infrastructure that were implemented in this document include: en Provide multi-modal connectivity through the site for pedestrians, bicycles, and vehicles, providing access to neighborhoods, the river, and transit en Promote sustainable design for the site and do not be prescriptive with recommendations understanding the standards and technologies will change en Provide infrastructure that supports the development as programmed en Incorporate existing key infrastructure into the plan TNew Streets/Streets With ImprovementsExisting StreetsFlexible Non-Stock Show P arking Areas Commuter Rail St ation Legend tbtnbbt nnbbftt nbbbntb tntn rfntbnS.Platte River Tr r tn

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rfrrr frrf Site InfrastructureTransportation Transportation is key to moving people to, through and around the NWCC. Understanding and planning how vehicles, pedestrians, and bicycles interact with the river, the neighborhoods and the proposed plan provides a framework plan that establishes how these connections are made. It is also important to understand the transportation operation and requirements of an entrainment complex. An important part of the Master Plan is access to the North Metro Rail Line (NMRL) and the proposed station near Brighton Boulevard and 49th Avenue. Access to the commuter rail line provides access to Denver Union Station to the south and 124th Avenue to the north. Design has currently started on the project with opening slated for 2018. The proposed transportation system is also about reestablishing connections to the river and the Elyria Swansea and Globeville Neighborhoods and providing access to the new uses at the NWCC. The street system and improvements are identied earlier in this section. Since the site also has a goal to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, the transportation system will be analyzed and managed to achieve this goal. Site Service and Operations A large portion of the site plan is dedicated to providing service areas to all of the major venues. Each venue has specic needs for the type and size of vehicle (and trailer) that will access the facility. During nal design of the facilities, each service area will need to be sized to allow for utility easements, re lanes, loading/unloading, through and turning movements. The layout of the site and the large facilities oers a variety of ways to service the buildings to help spread out the vehicles for patrons, exhibitors, vendors and the public by providing dierent access points to each of the major groupings of buildings. Legend rfntbnS.Platte River Existing S treets Service Circulation Service Areas Maintenance Facilities Legend fbbt bnttnnbb nbtbbb

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rfrrr frrf Water Distribution System Improvements to the potable water system will need to be made internal to the site to provide necessary service to the new facilities. Connections will be made to the existing system located in Brighton Boulevard Washington Street, 46th Avenue and Race Court. The proposed internal system will consist of 8-inch and 12-inch lines, with 6-inch to 8-inch service / re loops constructed around the major buildings. All proposed water lines will need to be designed and constructed to meet the requirements of Denver Water and must meet all re code as adapted by the City and County of Denver. Wastewater Collection System The site is served by two major sanitary sewer interceptors, the Metro Wastewater Reclamation District (MWRD) Delgany interceptors on the west side of the site and the 54-inch Denver Wastewater Management Division interceptor on the north side of the site. Connections to either interceptor will need to be limited and should occur at existing connection locations. A proposed system will be required to convey existing ows from the Elyria Swansea neighborhood through the site as well as collect ows from proposed buildings. It is anticipated that the size of the proposed sanitary sewer will vary from 8-inch to 12-inch. All proposed sanitary sewer will be conveyed via gravity ow to the interceptor connection points. Opportunities to look at grey water reuse for the project should be investigated as regulations within CDPHE continue to change to allow for reuse. rfntbnS.Platte River T TStreetsExisting Sanitary LineProposed Sanitary Line Commuter Rail St ation Legend fnbtbntt btbnnbntbnnbb ntbnttbtbbbn

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rfrrr frrf Drainage Proximity to the South Platte River and the lower reach of the Montclair Basin creates a responsibility to properly convey and treat storm water runo from the site prior to discharging into the river. Expectations are that the Colorado Department of Transportation I-70 East project and related drainage works will intercept the major storm event south of I-70, and drastically reduce the ows tributary to the site as compared to the anticipated ows in the CCD 2010 Drainage Master Plan. The City and County of Denver and Urban Drainage and Flood Control (UDFCD) are currently working on an update to the CCD Drainage Master Plan and Outfall System Plan (OSP) for the Montclair Basin. Layout of the major drainage outfall through the middle of the site and Race Court are based on the preliminary submittal of the Montclair Basin OSP. Due to the proximity of the site to the South Platte River the site will not be required to provide 100-year detention, but the excess urban runo volume (EURV) will need to be accounted for on the project. Since 100-year detention is not required, a major storm conveyance will be required for the basin. Grading of the site will generally follow existing patterns, conveying ow from the southeast to the northwest. Internal to the site the 100-year storm should be conveyed to the river, osite basins from the Elyria Swansea neighborhood will be conveyed through the proposed major outfalls as well as overland via Race Court. Drainage Water Quality The project will need to provide treatment of stormwater quality to meet or exceed water quality standards in accordance with the water quality criteria in eect at the time of development. Currently, water quality is envisioned to be provided through the excess urban runo volume (EURV) standards as required by UDFCD. Implementation of a complete system for treatment of the runo, including both end of pipe treatment as well as decentralized low impact development (LID) techniques should be utilized. Technology and methods for implementation for water quality treatment will continue to evolve throughout the design and construction of the project so suggestions in this document are general and not prescriptive. As design continues to move forward the treatment of the storm water will be reevaluated to ensure best practices for net zero or net positive impact to stormwater quality/quantity entering the river. rfntbnS.Platte River T TStreetsExisting and Proposed S torm MainProposed EURV Po nd or Decentralized LID R egional Drainage Channel Commuter Rail St ation Legend nbnbn nbbbnb bnbtnbnnb tbbbnbnt

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rfrrr frrf Freight Rail ConsolidationOne of the key elements of the NWCC is to consolidate the Denver and Rock Island Railroad (DRI) tracks through the site to be able to provide better access to the east side of the river. DRI currently has two sets of tracks that run through the site (one line along the river and another line along National Western Drive) with a key interchange connection point with the BNSF just north of I-70. This connection point is a critical need for the DRI and must remain. The DRI is a local freight short haul rail line that serves customers throughout the north Denver area. The DRI has approximately 25 miles of rail and has two corridors that run through the NWCC site, one along the South Platte River and one along the east side of National Western Drive. The two rail corridors come together at approximately Franklin Street and Race Court. The DRI operates two trains per day in each direction plus switching movements to deliver and pick up rail cars at local businesses. The line along National Western Drive has only a limited number of locations to cross east/west through the site and the line along the river creates an additional barrier in accessing the South Platte River. DRI also has its only freight interchange point with BNSF at the north end of the Globeville yards just north of I-70. BNSF/DRI interchange operation currently uses both its river corridor and National Western Drive corridor. The DRI operates through the NWCC to serve other customers north and east of NWCC and one line through the NWCC must remain intact for the DRI to continue to operate. DRI also has a maintenance facility located along the river corridor line just south of Race Court. The DRI has seven customers within the study area of the National Western Center.The rail consolidation study for NWCC looked at the operational needs of the DRI and their local customer base at the NWCC site. To provide better public access to the river, and to create better developable space within the NWCC, two alternatives were studied to consolidate the DRI tracks. The rst alternative looked at consolidating the tracks along the existing National Western Drive alignment, and the second alternative looked at consolidating the DRI tracks along the west side of the BNSF Brush Sub mainline. Following a number of studies, site visits and meetings with DRI, it was determined that the alignment along National Western Drive was the most advantageous for the following reasons: en Maintains direct DRI connection to BNSF en Maintains ability for DRI to serve existing customers en Provides larger developable areas at NWCC site without breaking the yards in half en Provides larger developable areas to allow good connections between the Livestock Center and the Equestrian Center without crossing the railroad T rfntb n nrS.Platte River rf n New Streets/ Existing Streets Commuter Rail St ation Ra il Line Ra il Re -A lignment Corridor R TD North Corridor Ra il Line Legend T ftnbnb tnbb bbtnbntb bntb nbb rfntbnS.Platte River T ntbntnbnt TRTD North Metro LineBNSFDenver & Rock Island Union Pa cic S treets Commuter Rail St ation Legend

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rfrrr frrf Specic Recommendations for Rail Consolidation include: en Remove the DRI tracks along the river and consolidate the rail to the existing National Western Drive alignment en Maintain DRI connection to BNSF en Provide through-tracks for DRI through the NWCC site to serve industries to the north en Develop a Memorandum of Understanding between the DRI and City and County of Denver and continue discussions related to track realignment, track design and DRI maintenance facility relocation en Develop safe vehicular and pedestrian crossings of the DRI tracks, working closely with the Public Utilities Commission en Identify any track and maintenance facility replacement needs for DRI o site, within the City and County of Denver, with the goal to maintain the DRIs existing through track and rail car storage capacityHistoric ResourcesHistoric Preservation Study Recognizing the rich history of the National Western Center and the surrounding neighborhoods, the City and County of Denver commissioned the National Western Historic Preservation Study in 2014 to help inform the National Western Center Master Plan eort. The report, prepared by SlaterPaull Architects, compiles information on historic properties within the primary Master Plan study area, focusing on prior historical studies such as the I-70 East Draft Environmental Impact Statement (especially Appendix D: Historic Preservation, dated November 2008), information from History Colorados online cultural database, aerial photos, other previous studies and records on the areas, and on-site observations by the consultants. The report summarizes the history of the National Western Center, documents the known historic signicance of buildings and site features located within the primary Master Plan study area, and provides recommendations for honoring and interpreting that history for future generations. The primary study area of the National Western Center Master Plan includes an area rich in the history of the Colorado cattle and meat packing industries. Previous historic survey eorts completed have recommended the nomination of a National Western Historic District. The proposed district includes an area previously occupied by the Denver Union Stock Yard Company and the packing industries associated with it. The proposed district also includes the Denver Coliseum and properties associated with the National Western Stock Show. The following strategies and recommendations regarding the National Western Center historic resources are further outlined in Appendix G. 1. Pursue and fund a National Register of Historic Places listing for a National Western Stock Show District. 2. Resolve the historic signicance of all properties identied in the report. 3. Pursue individual Denver landmark designation for the most signicant historic properties. 4. Document and investigate how existing key site elements can be represented in the sites documentation and future development. 5. Develop and implement a public interpretation strategy for documenting and conveying the history and signicance of the National Western Stock Show district. 6. Work with the local communities and neighborhoods adjacent to the National Western Center to survey, document and potentially designate historic and culturally signicant properties and areas. fntnbntbntnbbntbn bnbbbntnb

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rfrrr rr Executive Summary Introduction Site Orientation and Character Master Plan Big Ideas Acknowledgments Introduction Site History Setting and Context National Western Center Partnerships Corridor of Opportunity and the North Denver Cornerstone Collaborative Assets, Challenges and Opportunities Stakeholder Engagement and Public Involvement National Western Center Vision Vision Guiding Principles Sustainability and Regeneration Framework Master Plan Components Introduction to the Master Plan Integrated Facilities Program Campus Design Character Character Areas River, Parks and Public Space Site Circulation Infrastructure Historic Resources Implementation Planning Principles Phasing Moving Forward Appendices Reference Documents Implementation 1 11 17 39 59 101

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Planning Principles The Master Plan process revealed a series of site planning principles that are intended to guide the detailed design of NWCC.These principles were developed throughout the process by balancing the variety of needs for the NWCC to create the Vision established by the Partners.The needs of the site were discovered by analysis of the ecology of the site and its relationship to the Region, the Integrated Facilities Program, community input, adjacent neighborhood needs and planning processes, and the Historic Preservation Study. Provide new Complete Streets connections over the river at 47th and 51st Avenues. Provide a Complete Streets connection (Bettie Cram Drive) from Washington Street to Brighton Boulevard. Consolidate DRI rail lines to open up access along the river. Locate rail alignment to allow for a minimum distance for Livestock and Equestrian facilities, and their respective service areas, to be placed between the BNSF rail and the consolidated DRI rail corridors. rfrrrrr

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rfrrr rr Provide a north/south Complete Streets connection (National Western Drive) through the site that can remain open during NWCC Events, allows for river access and provides service access for the Stockyards. Locate this street a minimum distance of 110 from the top of the river bank and at a distance from the consolidated DRI rail that allows for the Stockyards program. Locate any new streets in the Denver Coliseum redevelopment area a minimum of 110 from the river. Improve the Race Court existing street and provide an improved connection to Brighton Boulevard Improve the existing 46th Avenue, lower to the same grade as the Stadium Arena under the viaduct to allow for an at grade street crossing under Interstate 70 and realign to address the NWCC bus drop-o and Colorado Commons. Connect Brighton Boulevard at 47th Avenue to the new Bettie Cram Drive and allow for this street to be closed during larger NWCC Events. Create a series of dispersed open spaces at a variety of scales and typologies to allow for a multitude of events to occur throughout the year. Provide a series of linkages between these open spaces to make them pedestrian and bicycle friendly, as well as ADA accessible, and to provide recreation, ecosystem connections and habitat.

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rfrrrrr PhasingThis phasing overview identies one possible way to phase the implementation of the NWCC. The phasing plan identies constructible portions of the overall plan that are reasonable components that could be built together while allowing for the National Western Stock Show to operate during the implementation of each phase which is a key consideration regardless of how the site is phased. Depending on funding and other partner opportunities, the phasing could be adjusted. The nal phasing and schedule will depend on a variety of elements: en Timing and amount of available funding en Construction feasibility/ methodology en Property purchase and available land en Existing site and building environmental remediation en Demolition and site preparation en New facilities construction en New site work/core infrastructure needed en Move-in times en Temporary facilities en Parking availability en Stock Show every January (Keeping NWSS functional during construction) en Neighborhood connections, streets and access en Partner implementation schedule and funding (programming readiness) Prior to any site construction taking place, the following elements will need to be addressed and impact all phases of construction: en Land Acquisition en Environmental remediation of buildings en Environmental remediation of ground en Demolition of existing structures The National Western Center implementation is divided into eight dierent phases. rf n t b S.Platte River Neighborhood Connections, River Edges Access and Stockyards Livestock Center and Equestrian Center 1909 St adium Arena Restoration and Market Trade Show / Exposition Hall and River Center New Arena CSU Center / Colorado Commons River Edge / National Western Drive Coliseum Redevelopment 1 2 3 5 7 8 6 4 Legendfbnbtnbbnnbbtfntnbnt ttntnbbn

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rfrrr rr Frt en Stockyards Auction and Show Arenas en Stockyards Event Pavilion/Outdoor Event Space Srrt en 51st Avenue and river bridge en Bettie Cram Drive between Washington Street and National Western Drive and river bridge en National Western Drive (new) en Rail Consolidation (relocate o river) en Temporary NWD connection from Bettie Cram Drive to 46th Avenue en 49th Avenue between Brighton Boulevard and High Street en Temporary access to existing stockyards during construction Or Sr Errt en River edge on east side en Property purchase and temporary surface parking at New Arena site en New shared use/TOD parking structure at DPS site with retail TOD, temporary NWCC/CSU Welcome center with interim surface parking en Storm sewer improvements en Bury Delgany Interceptors Ct D en 18-24 months Sr Ct en Water Resources Center could be built at any time. Earthwork and site preparation would occur in Phase 1. Frt en Livestock Stadium Arena en Livestock Hall en Equestrian Events Center en Horse Barn en Equestrian Arena en CSU Equine Sports Medicine Facility en CSU Community Outreach Clinic en CSU Clinical Trials Center en Enclosed Equestrian Warm Up en Covered Equestrian Warm up en Maintenance Facility en Cattle Ties Srrt en Elevated Walkway (NWD to RTD Station) Portion of Bettie Cram Drive to BNSF Race Court en Brighton Boulevard Blvd., 44th Street to 50th Avenue en Race Court en Portion of Bettie Cram Drive from National Western Drive to BNSF (maintain access to new Stockyards during construction) Or Sr Errt en Brighton Boulevard/Race improvements could be a dierent phase en Public Space at Livestock and Equestrian Centers (all or portions) Ct D en 24 to 30 months Sr Ct en Phase cant start until stockyards is complete en Building Livestock Center rst could provide earlier access to Stadium Arena in Phase 3 Phase I Neighborhood Connectivity, River Edge Access and Stockyards rfntbnS.Platte River nnt n rfntb rnb brfbS.Platte River f Phase 2 Livestock Center and Equestrian Center

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rfrrrrr Frt en Renovation of both interior and exterior of the 1909 Stadium Arena (CSU/Partner space, temporary use) Srrt en None Or Sr Errt en Temporary enclosure of existing Expo Hall where connector building (to be demolished) between Expo Hall and Stadium Arena is currently to be able to rehabilitate the exterior of the Stadium Arena Ct D en 18 to 24 months Sr Ct en This phase could also occur in conjunction with Phase 6 en Phase can start as soon as the new Livestock Center is complete Frt en Trade Show Exhibition Hall en Underground Parking en Water Resources Center Srrt en None Or Sr Errt en Public Space at Transit Station and Elyria Plaza Ct D en 24-30 months Sr Ct en Phase cant start until new Equestrian Center is complete due to location of existing Events Center en Phase could also occur after Phase 5 en Southwest portion of parking structure cant be completed until existing Expo Hall is demolished en Need to maintain access to RTD Station during construction en Demolition of Phase 6 existing buildings could occur at the end of this phase to speed up implementation of the CSU Center. Phase 3 1909 Stadium Arena Restoration and Market rfntbnS.Platte River n nnt n rfntbn n nnt n Phase 4 Trade Show/Exposition Hall

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rfrrr rr Frt en New Arena Srrt en Bettie Cram Drive completion (after demolition of existing Hall of Education and Expo Hall) en 47th Avenue, Brighton Boulevard to Bettie Cram Drive Or Sr rrrt en Public Space at Exhibit Plaza Ct D en 24-30 months Sr Ct en Phase could switch with Phase 4 except for Bettie Cram Drive en New Arena could start at any time after property purchase. Bettie Cram Drive would need to wait until Trade show/Exposition Hall is complete. en Phase could also occur before Phase 4 Frt en CSU Center Retail Pavilions en Parking Structure Srrt en 46th Avenue lowering and connection to Washington Street Or Sr Errt en Colorado Commons en Research, Production, Demonstration and Growing Plots/Community Gardens Ct D en 18-24 months Sr Ct en Phase cant start until new Trade Show/Exhibition Hall is complete en Phase could be concurrent with Phase 7 Phase 5 New Arena rfntbn n Brighton Blvd. 47th Ave. I-70Race Ct.Washington St. Interm Parking / TOD Prep Phase 6 CSU Center and Colorado Commons

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rfrrrrr Frt en None Srrt en Completion of National Western Drive Or Sr Errt en River frontage park en New rail crossing at Jersey Cuto Ct D en 12-18 months Sr Ct en Phase can start at any time after property purchase. Frt en Coliseum site redevelopment Srrt en Arkins Court/McFarland Drive en Connector streets to 46th Avenue Or Sr Errt en Globeville Landing Park Sr Ct en Phase cant start until site remediation and New Arena are complete. Phase 7 River Frontage/National Western Drive Completion Brighton Blvd. 47th Ave. I-70Race Ct.Washington St. Interm Parking / TOD Prep Brighton Blvd. 47th Ave. I-70Race Ct.Washington St. Interm Parking / TOD Prep Phase 8 Denver Coliseum Redevelopment

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rfrrr rr Moving ForwardRealizing the Vision This Master Plan sets forth a vision for the future of the National Western Stock Show Complex and Denver Coliseum, which includes strategically aligned planning eorts with the adjoining neighborhoods, the South Platte River, RTD, I-70, and Brighton Boulevard and contains numerous recommendations aimed at achieving that vision. The Master Plan implementation will take place over many years and is the result of large and small actions by the public and private sectors, sometimes in partnership. Its understood that the future will bring unforeseen opportunities and challenges. The recommendations in this Master Plan are intended to provide direction for future actions in route to achieving the plans shared vision. Types of Implementation Activities Blueprint Denver identies three types of implementation activities: regulatory/policy, public investment, and partnerships. These activities focus on public sector actions, many of which create a positive environment that enables actions by other groups, such as property owners, developers, neighborhood organizations, districts or homeowners. While public actions can help set the stage, in most cases it is private actions (such as constructing new buildings and houses, opening new businesses, and attracting new residents) that are the most critical elements to achieving a the plans vision. Additionally, given this Plans unique public entertainment and education components, it also includes more detailed planning as an important strategy in helping advance the plans vision. en Regulatory and Policy Strategies. Regulatory and policy strategies change City codes or regulations to aect desired outcomes. Typical examples include Denver Zoning Code text and map amendments, Public Works requirements for infrastructure improvements associated with development projects, and Parks and Recreation requirements regarding open space and plantings. Regulatory and policy implementation priorities for the NWC include, but are not limited to the following: en Ensure that zoning regulations and design guidelines align with the plan vision, including strategies for establishing transit-oriented development near rail stations. en Improve connectivity and safety for all modes of transportation. en Public Investment Strategies. Public investment strategies are those involving public funding of public infrastructure or public spaces. Examples include public investment in street reconstruction, bike lane installation, new transit lines, park improvements, or new or expanded recreation centers. The City takes the lead in designing, constructing, and funding these projects and may use a variety of public funding sources such as the annual Capital Improvements Program, bond funds, or state or federal grant programs. ftbttbbrbbbnbntn nbfntbtbbntnb ntbtt

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rfrrrrr In some cases this Plan identies public transportation projects as studies because the impacts and consequences of a particular improvement on the transportation system are so complex that the broader system must be examined to determine the feasible options to meet the intent. Extensive study may also be needed to meet eligibility criteria to apply for federal funding. Public Investment Implementation priorities for the NWCC include, but are not limited to: en Conduct a more detailed study of the Race Court/Brighton Boulevard intersection, along with related improvements to the railroad bridges, for better access to the future Equestrian Center and local businesses. en Pursue implementation of the two new recommended connections across the South Platte River to National Western Drive (Bettie Cram Drive and 51st Avenue), and one new connection through the National Western Center (Bettie Cram Drive). en Address trac and event operations in and around the campus, along with associated mitigation strategies, for reducing neighborhood impacts from the largest events. en Detailed study of the consolidation of the Denver and Rock Island Railroad to relocate their tracks away from the South Platte River. en Partnership Strategies. Partnership strategies represent the most diverse category of implementation activities. Public-private partnership (PPP or P3) activity has expanded greatly in recent years and has gone well beyond its roots of public subsidies of private development projects. Increasingly, public-private partnerships are being used to fund infrastructure projects. Denver Union Station and RTDs East and North Metro commuter rail lines are among the largest P3 projects in the country. Another local example is the reconstruction of 14th Street in Downtown Denver using a combination of City bond funds and a propertyowner approved General Improvement District. Partnership Implementation priorities for NWC Campus Plan include, but are not limited to: en Assist in the development of new neighborhood access to goods and services. en Partner with NDCC to implement the Master Plan vision for the rail station, River North, I-70 and Brighton Boulevard. en Additional partnership opportunities that can grow from the combination of the NWC Partners and the new partners. en Planning Strategies. Given the scope and scale of the NWC Campus, more detailed planning will be required to advance each phase of the plan. Further study, new industry practices, programming modications, new opportunities, cost constraints, etc. could result in adjustments to the Plan. Since none of the new or adaptively reused buildings have been fully design, additional planning shall play an important role in advancing the nal program. The NDCC Projects Oce, in collaboration with other City agencies and external partners, will advance an annual planning eort for the NWCC. Champions and Advocates Once a plan is adopted as a supplement to the Comprehensive Plan, the City has the necessary direction to begin implementing the plan. Given the number of adopted plans, competing interests in the City, and the budget limitations at all levels of government, little plan implementation is undertaken without champions for certain actions and advocates for the neighborhood. Typically registered neighborhood organizations work with the Mayor and their City Council representatives to promote certain actions and outcomes. Membership organizations such as merchant associations, business partnerships, and nonprots do the same for business areas. The NWC Partners will also help to champion future implementation. Public Funding Sources and Strategies Funding sources available to public and private entities are continually evolving based on economic, political, legal and neighborhood objectives. Though the names and purposes of specic funding sources can change over time, the following (abbreviated) list represents potential funding opportunities: Tax Base Support. Tax base supported sources are characterized by the involvement of the local sales and property taxing authorities. Annual Budget. The most common tax base support is through the Citys annual budget, especially the annual Capital Improvements Program (CIP). Available CIP funds are typically limited to a few million dollars a year. Bonds. Periodically, the City requests its voters to approve a tax increase to pay for specic public improvements. For instance, the citizens of Denver voted in 2007 to raise their property taxes in a specic amount to support the issuance of over $500 million of Better Denver Bonds whose proceeds subsequently funded hundreds of specic public improvement projects. Future bond issuances could potentially provide an opportunity to secure funding for some Elyria and Swansea Neighborhood Plan recommendations.

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rfrrr rr Tax Increment Finance (TIF). TIF is another means of tax-base support most typically associated with an Urban Renewal Area. Once created by the City Council and Denver Urban Renewal Authority (DURA), property and sales tax over and above the base year are paid to DURA to fund eligible public improvements or nancing gaps for private development. To qualify for tax increment nancing through urban renewal, an area must rst meet certain criteria to establish the presence of blight, as dened in state statute. Grants. Grants funding opportunities come from public and private entities. Public entities are typically interested in encouraging a specic outcome and these grants typically include specic conditions and requirements as to how the funds may be deployed. For instance, a state or federal transportation grant will need to be used for street, mass transit, or regional mobility studies or projects. The Oce of Economic Development receives federal funds to support housing and other types of projects. Additionally, private entities provide grants for projects aligned with the organizations goals, such as green spaces, creative enterprises or social services. Special Districts. The city charter and state statute enable various types of districts to be created. Examples of special districts include business improvement districts, general improvement districts, metropolitan districts, and local improvement or maintenance districts. These districts are often created by a localized group of citizens who want to achieve specic outcomes in their locality and are willing to pool their economic resources in order to implement identied projects. For example, if a majority of business owners desire to improve the streetscape of the street in which they operate, the businesses could organize a business improvement district which would assess the participants an amount of money sucient to pay for the project. Special districts are a useful tool when a local population both desires and is willing to pay for an enhanced level of public improvement. District revenues can be used to pay for improvements on a pay-as-you-go basis, for ongoing operations and maintenance, or to support repayment of bonds. In order to be established, special districts typically require the approval of Denver City Council and a vote of the electorate within the area. Partnership Tools In addition to public funding sources, a variety of public-private partnerships or private organizations will be instrumental in plan implementation. As states and communities reduce the use of public funds for improvements, some of these other organizational types will come into broader, more innovative use. Some examples of these organizations include: community development corporations, membership organizations, nonprots or foundations, and transportation management organizations. Implementation of the Plan will require the coordinated involvement of many dierent organizations in pursuing a variety of activities with existing and new funding sources. Specically for this region of the City, Mayor Hancock created the North Denver Cornerstone Collaborative (NDCC) in 2013 in order to ensure alignment and eective coordination of the many inter-related plans and projects that are taking place in Globeville, Elyria, and Swansea. Part of this eort includes strategic thinking on the implementation and funding of projects, which presents the National Western Center, Globeville, and Elyria-Swansea communities with a unique partnership opportunity to implement elements of these respective Plans.Appendices Appendix A NW C Partners Memorandum of Understanding, August 21, 2013 Appendix B R oundup Retreat Summary, April 21-22, 2014 Appendix C NW C Integrated Facilities Program Summary Appendix D NW C Regeneration Frameworks, November 24, 2014 Appendix E Neighborhood Program Summary Appendix F Environmental Issues Summary Appendix G Historic Preservation R ecommendations Reference Documents Reference documents are intended to provide a reference and guidance for future implementation actions, but are not adopted as part of the National Western Center Master Plan. en Denver Feasibility Study, May 2014 en National Western Historic Preservation Study, August 25, 2014 en How Neighborhood Planning Aects Health in Globeville and Elyria Swansea, September 2014 en Public Space Character CAC Presentation, October 30, 2014 en NWC Public Meeting Summaries en National Western Center Citizens Advisory Committee Meeting Summaries

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