Citation
Northeast Downtown neighborhoods plan

Material Information

Title:
Northeast Downtown neighborhoods plan
Creator:
Community Planning and Development, City and County of Denver
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
City and County of Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
City planning
Neighborhood plans
Community planning
Spatial Coverage:
Denver -- Northeast Downtown

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
NORTHEAST
DOWNTOWN
NEIGHBORHOODS
PLAN
DENVER
THE MILE HIGH CITY
Adopted
May 23, 2011


Acknowledgements
Mayor Guillermo"Bill"Vidal
DENVER CITY COUNCIL
District 1- Paula E. Sandoval
District 2- Jeanne Faatz
District 3- Paul D. Lopez
District 4- Peggy Lehmann, President Pro Tern
District 5- Marcia Johnson
District 6- Charlie Brown
District 7- Chris Nevitt President
District 8- Carla Madison
District 9- Judy Montero
District 10-Jeanne Robb
District 11- Michael Hancock
At-Large- Carol Boigon
At-Large- Doug Linkhart
DENVER PLANNING BOARD
Plan Approved May 4,2011
Brad Buchanan, Chairman
Laura E. Aldrete
Andy Baldyga
Richard Delanoy
Shannon Gifford
Kenneth Ho
Anna Jones
Judith Martinez
Brittany Morris
Sharon Nunnally
Dave Webster
COMMUNITY PLANNING &
DEVELOPMENT
Peter J. Park, Manager
Steve Gordon, Comprehensive Planning
Manager
Courtland Hyser, Project Manager
Ellen Ittelson
David Gaspers
Steve Nalley
Caryn Wenzara
Andrea Santoro
Carolyne Janssen
PUBLIC WORKS
George Delaney, Manager
Crissy Fanganello, Policy and Planning
Director
Karen Good
Emily Snyder
Cindy Patton
Mike Anderson
Brian Schat
Brian Mitchell
Justin Schmitz
Bob Kochevar
PARKS & RECREATION
Scott Robson, Manager
Gordon Robertson, Park Planning, Design and
Construction Director
Devon Buckels
OFFICE OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
Jeff Romine
Bo Martinez
OTHER CITY AGENCIES
Gretchen Hollrah, BMO
Andrew Johnston,Treasury
Amber Callender, Denver's Road Home
DOWNTOWN DENVER PARTNERSHIP
John Desmond
OTHER AGENCIES
Wil Alston, Five Points Business District Office
Bill Sirois, RTD
Mark Baudermann, RTD
Mike Turner, RTD
Cameron Bertron, DURA
Grant Bennett, DURA
CONSULTANTTEAM
AECOM
EnviroHealth Consulting
JVA Consulting
KHO Consulting
Sky to Ground, LLC
National Charrette Institute
DEDICATED TO THE MEMORY OF CARLA MADISON IN RECOGNITION OF HER VISION, LEADERSHIP, AND CONTRIBUTION TO
THE CONTENTS OF THIS PLAN.


Table of Contents
Introduction..................................1
Planning Process............................2
Planning Context............................4
How to use this Plan........................5
Strategy Framework............................7
Accomplishments, Challenges, Opportunities..8
Vision, Guiding Principles.................10
Overall Plan Concept.......................12
A. Neighborhood Connections and Character..14
B. Mobility................................22
C. Economic and Development Opportunity....30
D. Livability and Public Realm ............34
Transformative Concepts......................39
21st Street................................40
Curtis Street..............................42
Broadway...................................44
Connecting River North.....................48
New Park...................................50
Social Services............................52
Streetcar..................................54
Transit Oriented Development...............58
Neighborhood Strategies......................61
Arapahoe Square............................62
Ballpark, River North......................72
Curtis Park................................76
Downing/Welton Corridor....................82
Enterprise Hill, San Rafael................88
Moving Forward...............................91
Implementation Framework...................92




Introduction
Northeast Downtown Denver is a diverse part of the greater Denver community, and is com-
prised of many unique neighborhoods. A majority of the study area is within the boundaries
of the Five Points Statistical Neighborhood, and includes the neighborhoods of Arapahoe
Square, Ballpark, Curtis Park, and San Rafael, as well as the Upper Larimer portion of the River
North neighborhood, the Enterprise Hill area near Benedict Fountain Park, and the western
most blocks of Cole and Whittier. The Welton and Downing corridors are also addressed in
this plan. These neighborhoods, with a location near the Central Business District and Lower
Downtown were some of the first areas of the City to be urbanized. This advantageous loca-
tion still plays a major role in the future of this area. The abbreviation"NEDN"will be used
throughout this plan to refer to the Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods.
There are many different areas within the study area.
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Introduction
1


Planning Process
The public process forthe Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan (The Plan) kicked off in
March, 2010. Over the course of the following year, community members worked together
with City staff and the consultant team to articulate opportunities, develop a vision and craft
strategies to achieve the vision. Regular public meetings and neighborhood working group
meetings helped shape content throughout the process. Briefings and public hearings with
City Council, Denver Planning Board and interagency City staff were also crucial to the pro-
cess. In addition, the process involved collaboration between the City and County of Denver's
Community Planning and Development Department, Public Works Department, the Depart-
ment of Parks and Recreation, Finance and Treasury, the Office of Economic Development, the
Five Points Business District Office, and the Denver Urban Renewal Authority. The Downtown
Denver Partnership was a funding partner and equal contributor to the Arapahoe Square
component of this plan.
PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT PROCESS:
The planning process utilized a multi-tiered strategy for collecting public input to inform the
identification of issues and resulting concepts and recommendations:
Focus Groups A series of small group discussions held neighborhood-by-neighbor-
hood with stakeholders early in the planning process to learn about the study area and
begin identifying issues for the plan to address.
Individual Stakeholder Meetings Field on an as-needed basis throughout the plan-
ning process.
Working Groups Groups of stakeholders, from the neighborhoods listed below, who
convened at different times throughout the planning process to hold in-depth discus-
sions on issues and inform plan content.
Arapahoe Square
Welton/Downing
Curtis Park
Ballpark/River North
2
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Introduction


Arapahoe Square Charrette A week-long intensive urban design workshop held for
Arapahoe Square in January, 2011.
Public Meetings A series of four meetings held at key points in the planning process to
solicit public input and guidance.
Kickoff-March 11,2010
Visioning-July 20,2010
Concept Review-February 10,2011
Draft Plan Review-April 13,2011
COORDINATION WITH CONCURRENT PLANNING EFFORTS:
Over the course of the planning process, there were several other efforts underway within the
study area. The NEDNTeam coordinated with each of these efforts to maximize resources and
to help ensure consistency with each:
New Zoning Code (Denver Community Planning and Development)
Central Corridor Extension Environmental Evaluation (Regional Transportation District)
38th & Blake Next Steps Study (Denver Public Works)
Arapahoe Square Blight Study (Denver Urban Renewal Authority)
Welton/Five Points Sustainable Mainstreet Initiative (Five Points Business District Office)
Denver Moves (Denver Public Works/Parks and Recreation)
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Introduction
3


Planning Context
Downtown Area Plan, 2007
^^DCNYER DENVER'S
NEIGHBORHOOD
MARKETPLACE
INITIATIVE
Five points district development plan
GROWDENVER
The Ofte of Economc DevefoemerH
Five Points District Development Plan, 2009
This plan represents the land use, urban form, and transportation vision for the Northeast
Downtown Neighborhoods area. It updates and incorporates recommendations of earlier
plans. Planning documents that are relevant to this area include:
Welton-Downing Triangle Plan (1986)
Curtis Park Neighborhood Plan (1987)
Ballpark Neighborhood Influence Study (1992)
Northeast Downtown Plan (1995)
Cole Planning Report (1998)
Denver Comprehensive Plan (2000)
Whittier Neighborhood Plan (2000)
Bicycle Master Plan (2001)
Blueprint Denver (2002)
Denver Parks and Recreation Game Plan (2002)
River North Plan (2003)
Pedestrian Master Plan (2004)
Water Quality Management Plan (2004)
Downtown Multimodal Access Plan (2005)
TOD Strategic Plan (2006)
Greenprint Denver (2006)
Downtown Area Plan (2007)
Curtis Park Neighborhood Assessment (2007)
Strategic Transportation Plan (2008)
38th & Blake Station Area Plan (2009)
Denver Neighborhood Marketplace Initiative forWelton/ Five Points (2009)
Storm Drainage Master Plan (2009)
Sanitary Sewer Master Plan (2009)
Strategic Parking Plan (2010)
Five Points Sustainable Main Streets Initiative Vision Plan and Final Report (2010)
These documents have been reviewed and relevant material has been incorporated in the
development of this plan. This and all other neighborhood plans supplement the City's
Comprehensive Plan.The Comprehensive Plan presents a citywide perspective, while each
neighborhood plan provides more specific guidance both for the allocation of City resources
and for the location and design of private development.
4
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Introduction


How to use this Plan
The Plan establishes a long range vision and guiding principles for the development and
future of Northeast Downtown. The elements of this plan will direct the neighborhoods of
Northeast Downtown towards a vision as a community where people live, work, play, and
celebrate the neighborhood's diverse heritage.
Public and private agencies and organizations will use this plan in coming years for many
purposes and actions that affect the form and function of Northeast Downtown. The Plan
provides city-adopted policy direction to guide decision-making and prioritization related to
development opportunities, transportation, partnerships, additional study and analysis, fund-
ing and public investments.
In some cases, as identified in this plan, recommendations will require multiple steps before
moving forward with implementation. For example, transportation and infrastructure
concepts will require further analysis. In addition, zone district changes may be necessary to
implement development concepts.
The plan structure has four major components:
Strategy Framework: This section presents content that generally applies to the plan
area as a whole. Existing conditions, plan concepts, and recommendations are presented
for the entire plan area and are organized into four categories:
Neighborhood Connections and Character
Mobility
Economic and Development Opportunity
Livability and the Public Realm
Transformative Concepts: These are big ideas that, if implemented, could help to cata-
lyze private investment.
Neighborhood Strategies: This section summarizes the existing conditions within in-
dividual neighborhood subareas, and presents concepts and recommendations for land
use, building form, and any additional recommendations specific to the neighborhood
that aren't already covered in the Strategy Framework.
Moving Forward: This section addresses the implementation framework for the plan.
All of the plan recommendations from previous chapters are listed in the implementa-
tion matrix, which also categorizes each recommendation in terms of timing, type, and
potential funding sources.
Efforts were made to eliminate redundancies in plan recommendations. Therefore, recom-
mendations appear once in the plan and although they may be referenced in other chapters,
they are not repeated as recommendations in multiple chapters. For example, each of the
neighborhood chapters contains a list of recommendations from the strategy framework
and the transformative concepts that are applicable to the neighborhood, but only recom-
mendations that are unique to the neighborhood appear as new recommendations in those
chapters.
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Introduction
5




Strategy Framework
Northeast Downtown is a complex collection of neighborhoods that possess their own
unique qualities and opportunities. This plan chapter begins with identifying key Accom-
plishments, Challenges and Opportunities within this planning area.These were important
considerations in understanding what needs protection, enhancement and transformation.
The Overall Plan Concept, Vision and Guiding Principles establish a concise snapshot of the
Strategy Framework. As a method to evaluate the concepts of this plan, four evaluation crite-
ria evolved from the Vision and Guiding Principles:
Neighborhood Connections and Character
Mobility
Economic and Development Opportunity
Livability and Public Realm
These four criteria are the keystones of this plan and ensure a certain synergy between all the
recommendations of the plan. With each of the criteria, there are four to six detailed concepts
that all work together to benefit the overall planning area.
The success of contributing to the overall vibrancy of the larger Downtown Area will depend
on the city's ability to capitalize on the opportunities described in the following section and
to implement the vision outlined in this chapter.
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Strategy Framework
7


Accomplishments, Challenges, Opportunities
Coors Field is a regional attaction
RTD light rail
ACCOMPLISHMENTS
Light rail service was introduced to this area in 1994 as part of RTD's original 5.3-mile
long light rail system. That system has expanded greatly since then, and a much more
ambitious multimodal future expansion is planned as part of the FasTracks program.
Coors Field, which opened in 1995, is a regional amenity that is recognized as one of the
best-designed ballparks in Major League Baseball. The stadium has helped to stimulate
the redevelopment of many properties in the Ballpark Neighborhood.
This area grew by 45% by adding approximately 4,000 residents between 2000 and 2010.
This dramatic population growth followed on the heels of several decades of population
decline.
Many mobility improvements have occurred to the benefit of this area, including the
conversion of Lawrence and California from one-way to two-way, and the addition of
on-street bike lanes on sections of Larimer, Lawrence, Arapahoe, Champa, and Stout. In
2011, Larimer is scheduled to be converted from one-way to two-way, with existing bike
lanes being maintained in both directions.
Broadway improvements, including the replacement of the viaduct and reconstruction
of the street north ofWelton, improved the connection to Brighton Boulevard/l-70 and
added targeted improvements at intersections, respectively.
The Denver Flousing Authority redeveloped East Village into Benedict Park Place.
The Denver Flousing Authority rebuilt several hundred housing units between Lawrence
and Arapahoe as part of the Villages at Curtis Park redevelopment.
Several Landmark FHistoric Districts have been established to protect the area's historic
building stock: Clements (1975), Curtis Park (various districts 1995-2010), Ballpark (2002)
and Welton Street (2002).
The Denver Zoning Code was updated in 2010 to a new form and context based format
replacing the outdated 1950's code that addressed many long standing zoning issues. In
Northeast Downtown, this was especially applicable to Curtis Park.
Significant private and public investment has occurred in and around the plan area. This
investment has included capital investments for affordable housing and business devel-
opment. The Five Points Business Development Office was established in 2010.
Parking lots are prominent in the study area and are considered a challenge.
8
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Strategy Framework


CHALLENGES
High concentration of social service providers impacts public spaces, especially in Arapa-
hoe Square and Ballpark.
High land prices affect the affordability of individual residential and commercial devel-
opment; in Arapahoe Square where development prices are perceived to be higher than
other neighborhoods surrounding Downtown, little new development has occurred.
The area's public image has not kept pace with recent revitalization. Not all Denverites
are aware that the area is rebounding; many still think of it as an area in decline.
Surface parking lots, which are especially prominent in Arapahoe Square, contribute
to blight, an inconsistent environment, and a lack of destinations and attractions. This
increases the sense of isolation from the Downtown Core and adjacent neighborhoods.
Abrupt transitions existing at some locations between neighborhoods.
There are mobility challenges in this area including; irregular intersections, especially on
Broadway, Downing, and Welton, an incomplete sidewalk network, one-way streets in
residential areas, and significant barriers such as the Union Pacific right of way
OPPORTUNITIES
Three FasTracks projects will directly benefit this area: the East Corridor, the Central Cor-
ridor Extension, and the Downtown Circulator.
Locational advantage: this area is very close to downtown, regional transportation
routes, and major amenities including the South Platte River and Coors Field.
The neighborhoods in this area are among the oldest in Denver and have a collection of
Victorian-era buildings dating back to the 1860's that is unmatched in the city.
Main Street opportunities exist on Welton, Downing, and Larimer.
Welton Street is an historic main street with a rich history that could make it a
regional cultural destination, especially north of 24th Street. South of 24th Street,
a predominance of vacant lots presents significant redevelopment opportunity to
create a dense, urban, mixed use area along Welton.
Downing has the opportunity to attract transit-oriented development between the
existing 30th & Downing station and the future 38th and Blake station. Two new
stations will be added on Downing at 33rd Avenue and 35th Avenue as part of the
Central Corridor Extension.
Larimer is an emerging commercial corridor that has become increasingly vibrant in
recent years, especially south of Park Avenue in the vicinity of Coors Field. North of
Park Avenue, Larimer Street features an eclectic mix of bars, restaurants, office space,
retail, and other uses.
The RiNo Arts District has established itself as a major player in the Denver arts scene.
Coors Field draws millions of visitors, both local and from outside Denver, to the area.
The neighborhoods of Northeast Downtown have a wide array of redevelopment op-
portunities ranging from small residential infill to large undeveloped parcels and surface
parking lots.
Each neighborhood has a unique set of characteristics, which could be enhanced by ap-
propriate transitions that strengthen the overall connectivity of the study area.
Parking lots located in Arapahoe Square add to the
neighborhood's inconsistent environment.
One of many galleries in the RiNo Arts District
Northeast Downtown's historic Victorian-era building
stock.
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Strategy Framework
9


Vision, Guiding
Northeast Downtown's proximity to the Central
Business District emphasizes the need for successful
transitions.
Rail transit is one component of a multimodal
transportation system.
Principles
Early in the planning process, stakeholders participated in the development of a vision state-
ment and guiding principles for the Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods area. These two
items were undertaken as early tasks so they could guide the remainder of the plan develop-
ment process. The vision describes the area as it could be twenty to thirty years in the future
(some plan concepts may potentially be even longer range), while the guiding principles
establish specific elements that this plan should strive to achieve.
VISION STATEMENT
The Northeast Downtown area will remain a diverse collection of urban neighborhoods with
unique and distinct character. Transitions between neighborhoods will be seamless and
promote the unique character of each area. Excellent street connectivity, an enhanced public
realm, and good access to transit will make this an area of choice for residents, businesses,
and services.
GUIDING PRINCIPLES
Enhance multimodal connectivity
Complete and enhance the public realm
Enhance and support existing retail corridors
Create a development-friendly atmosphere
Protect neighborhood fabric
Create appropriate transitions between neighborhoods
Increase open space access
Fill gaps in neighborhood services
Capitalize on transit
Promote diversity
CONCEPT EVALUATION CRITERIA
In addition to the vision and guiding principles, this plan makes extensive use of four criteria
for evaluating each of the concepts that are contained in this document. The four criteria
are used as a measuring stickto assess the degree to which any given plan concept helps to
promote or achieve a broad array of goals. In this way, the four evaluation criteria are both an
organizing element for the plan and a means by which to evaluate its content.
Neighborhood Connections and Character: Maintaining the unique character of each
neighborhood in Northeast Downtown, and ensuring that new development on neigh-
10
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Strategy Framework


borhood edges contributes to the successful transition between areas.
Mobility: Enhancing the multimodal transportation system to balance the needs of
all users and modes, including automobiles, pedestrians, bicyclists, transit, freight, and
delivery vehicles.
Economic and Development Opportunity: Encouraging new investment by attracting
new businesses, supporting the growth of existing businesses, encouraging the reuse of
existing structures, attracting new development, and increasing employment opportu-
nities. Housing development opportunities should expand the range of housing types
and price ranges.
Livability and Public Realm: Ensuring that the various elements comprising the public
realm (streets, sidewalks, parks, plazas, transit stops/stations, landmarks, housing, open
spaces) positively contribute to the quality of life for residents, businesses, and visitors
alike.
HOWTHE GUIDING PRINCIPLES FIT WITHINTHE FRAMEWORKOFTHE CON-
CEPT EVALUATION CRITERIA:
Neighborhood Connections and Character
- Protect neighborhood fabric
Create appropriate transitions between neighborhoods
Mobility
Enhance multimodal connectivity
Economic and Development Opportunity
- Enhance and support existing retail corridors
Establish a development-friendly atmosphere
Fill gaps in neighborhood services
Capitalize on transit
Livability and Public Realm
Enhance the public realm
Increase open space access
Promote diversity
unleadedgroup
New businesses are critical to Northeast Downtown's
future.
High quality public spaces are needed in a thriving
urban environment.
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Strategy Framework
11


Overall Plan Concept
The Northeast Downtown area will remain a diverse collection of ur-
ban neighborhoods with unique and distinct character. Transitions
between neighborhoods will be seamless and promote the unique
character of each area. Excellent street connectivity, an enhanced
public realm, and good access to transit will make this an area of
choice for residents, businesses, and services.
Strategy Framework
Recommendations that are generally applicable to area as a whole
A. NEIGHBORHOOD CONNECTIONS AND
CHARACTER
A.1 High Intensity Development Near Downtown,Transit
Stations and Along Key Streets
A.2 Moderate Intensity DevelopmentTransitioning to
Neighborhoods
A.3 Low Intensity Development in Residential
Neighborhoods
A.4 Adaptive Reuse and Historic Preservation
B. MOBILITY
B.1 Undertake a Downtown StrategicTransportation Plan
Travelshed Analysis
B.2 Evaluate Potential One-Way to Two-Way Conversions
B.3 Consider New or Modified Transit Routes
B.4 Consider an Arapahoe Square Rail Station on Welton
B.5 In Short-term, Undertake a Broadway Intersections
Improvement Study
Transformative Concepts
These concepts represent"big ideas"for positively transforming Northeast Downtown
21 ST STREET
Make 21st Street a focal point
for Northeast Downtown
neighborhoods by promoting its
role as an important pedestrian
and bicycle route and community
gathering place.
CURTIS STREET
Use Curtis Street to create a
preferred pedestrian route con-
necting the Central Business
District to Arapahoe Square and
Curtis Park.
BROADWAY
Study Broadway and the
intersecting street network to
determine which Grand Boule-
vard concept that will advance as
a long-range vision for the future.
CONNECTING RIVER
NORTH
Improve connections in River
North between Northeast
Downtown and the South Platte
River corridor.
Neighborhood Strategies Recommendations that are specific to individual neighborhoods
ARAPAHOE SQUARE
N.1 Encourage Development of
Parking Lots
N.2 Enhance Urban Design
N.3 Building Form
N.4 Land Use
N.5 Conduct Form Based Zoning *
Study
N.6 Promote Transit Oriented
Development
N.7 Re-use Existing Buildings
N.8 Establish Business Development
Office
N.9 Improve Arapahoe Square's Brand
N.10 Establish Urban Renewal Area
BALLPARK, RIVER NORTH
N.11 Building Form
N.12 Land Use
N.13 Complete Sidewalk Network
N.14 Evaluate Potential One-way to
Two-way Conversions
N.15 Consider Future of Coors Field
Overflow Parking
12
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Strategy Framework


C. ECONOMIC AND DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITY
C.1 Strengthen Retail Corridors
C.2 Promote Economic and Housing Diversity
C.3 Encourage Housing Density
C.4 Establish and Support Business Development Offices
C.5 Establish Urban Renewal Areas
C.6 Utilize OED Lending programs
D. LIVABILITY AND PUBLIC REALM
D.1 Promote Access to HealthyTransportation
D.2 Promote Access to Healthy Foods
D.3 Invest in Park Improvements
D.4 Study Connecting Parks to Destination Areas
D.5 Identify Funding for Stormwater Improvements and
Promote Water Quality Through Best Practices
NEW PARK
Establish a new park in the North-
east Downtown area that could
provide valuable open space and
recreation amenities for new and
existing residents for years to
come.
SOCIAL SERVICES
Better manage the provision of
social services and provide more
appropriate facilities in order
to improve the development
climate, connectivity, and safety.
STREETCAR
Enhance current transit service,
economic development oppor-
tunities, and access to neighbor-
hood businesses while improving
the walkable character of the
Welton/Downing Corridor and
adjacent Northeast Downtown
neighborhoods.
TOD
Promote Transit Oriented
Development in Northeast
Downtown at appropriate
locations to encourage walkable,
urban neighborhoods that have
easy access to daily needs and
amenities.
CURTIS PARK
N.16 Building Form
N.17 Land Use
N.18 Stout and Champa Reclassification
N.19 Identify Traffic Calming
Opportunities
N.20 Accommodate Adaptive Reuse
DOWNING/WELTON CORRIDOR
N.21 Building Form
N.22 Land Use
N.23 Support Work of Five Points
Business District Office
N.24 Establish Urban Renewal Area
N.25 Evaluate Short One-Way Street
Segments
N26 Orientation of Outdoor Active Uses
ENTERPRISE HILL, SAN RAFAEL
N.27 Building Form
N.28 Land Use
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Strategy Framework
13


A. Neighborhood Connections and Character
GOAL STATEMENT
Reinforce the unique character of
each neighborhood within Northeast
Downtown while also successfully
transitioning land use and building
forms between neighborhoods.
WHY ARE NEIGHBORHOOD CONNECTIONS AND CHARACTER IMPORTANTTO
NORTHEAST DOWNTOWN?
The study area is comprised of many neighborhoods, each with their own character. Main-
taining the character that makes each neighborhood unique is of central importance to
stakeholders and is reflected in the Vision Statement for this plan. A key aspect of maintain-
ing and enhancing neighborhood character is ensuring that each neighborhood connects,
or transitions, to adjacent neighborhoods in a way that benefits the community. It is a central
urban design challenge for the Northeast Downtown area to successfully transition between
each of these areas that range from higher intensity commercial and mixed-use districts to
lower intensity and historic single-family neighborhoods while also acknowledging the area's
significant transit connections to Downtown and the rest of the region.
SUMMARY OF EXISTING CONDITIONS
Each neighborhood in Northeast Downtown has its own unique character. As a result, there
is a wide variety of land uses and building forms present within the overall study area. A brief
summary of the existing conditions in each neighborhood subarea is provided below:
Ballpark: The opening of Coors Field in 1995 resulted in a considerable amount of in-
vestment in the Ballpark Neighborhood, which is now home to numerous residential loft
developments, mixed use buildings, and trendy bars and restaurants. Larimer between
20th Street and Park Avenue serves as a main street for the neighborhood. The Ballpark
Historic District was established in 2002 to protect the warehouse character of historic
buildings in the neighborhood.
Arapahoe Square: Arapahoe Square is an urban area along the edge of Downtown
that is currently characterized by its lack of development. Over one-third of the land
in Arapahoe Square consists of vacant lots or surface parking lots. Because of this
underutilization of land, Arapahoe Square is considered to be a major redevelopment
opportunity.There are many small businesses in Arapahoe Square, as well as examples of
adaptive reuse of older structures, and a collection of buildings that may have historical
significance. Arapahoe Square's existing building stock is concentrated in the blocks
generally bounded by 21st, 24th, Stout, and Lawrence. Much of the remainder of the
neighborhood is dominated by surface parking lots.
Curtis Park: Curtis Park is Denver's oldest residential neighborhood. Curtis Park has a
large collection of historic homes, and a variety of other uses distributed throughout
the neighborhood. Beginning in 1995, Curtis Park began establishing historic districts to
protect its historic building stock. To date, seven historic districts have been established,
encompassing most of the neighborhood.
River North (RiNo): RiNo, which comprises most of the western edge of the study area,
was historically an industrial area and many industrial uses remain today, especially on
Walnut Street. This industrial heritage is considered to be an asset, as is the eclectic mix
14
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Strategy Framework


of land uses, building forms, and development patterns. RiNo is an emerging arts district
that benefits from its long history of industrial uses. There are many examples within the
neighborhood of adaptive reuse, innovative infill development projects, and business
incubator activity. Blake Street has experienced a shift in land use patterns in recent
years, as residential development has migrated north from the Ballpark Neighborhood.
A station serving the East and Central corridors will be constructed at 38th and Blake,
raising opportunities for future transit-oriented development at the northern end of the
neighborhood.
Welton: Welton Street has two different character areas within Northeast Downtown.
North of 24th Street, Welton isa main street corridor atthe heart of the Five Points
community. The name "Five Points" comes from the five-pointed intersection of Welton,
Washington, 26th Avenue, and 27th Street The area is known for its history of jazz and
African-American culture. The Welton Street Cultural Historic District was established in
2002 in recognition of the rich culture and history of Five Points. South of 24th Street,
Welton Street flows through Arapahoe Square, and is characterized by a prevalence of
vacant lots and surface parking. The D-Line (light rail) has operated on Welton Street
since 1994.
Downing: Downing Street forms the seam between the angular downtown street grid
and the adjacent north/south east/west neighborhood grid. The western edges of the
Cole and Whittier neighborhoods are located along Downing within the study area.
Downing has some main street qualities, but also has several blocks of single family
residential homes. As part of FasTracks, the Central Corridor, which currently ends at
30th and Downing, will be extended along Downing to the 38th and Blake Station on
the East Corridor and two new stations will be added, introducing the potential for new
transit-oriented development in the future. At the time of this writing, funding has not
yet been identified for this extension, meaning that the timing of this project is also cur-
rently unknown.
San Rafael: San Rafael is a residential neighborhood characterized by single family land
use patterns, but with a variety of multifamily, institutional, and commercial uses also
distributed throughout the neighborhood. San Rafael has a large collection of historic
buildings and is on the National Register of Historic Places, although there is no local
landmark historic district established for the neighborhood.
Enterprise Hill: Enterprise Flill is a predominantly residential area with urban character.
This area has long been the site of public housing, and is in the latter stages of being
transformed by the Denver Flousing Authority's Benedict Place redevelopment, a mixed-
income project with over 800 units of housing. The Clements Historic District, estab-
lished in 1975 and located across the street from Benedict Fountain Park, is also located
in this area. Enterprise Flill consists mostly of low-rise buildings immediately adjacent to
the Downtown core, which gives it a unique character.
San Rafael is on the National Register of Historic
Places
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Strategy Framework
15


LAND USE CONCEPTS
Mixed Use
Mixed Use/Industrial
Transit Oriented Development
Blueprint Denver established land use types based on a framework of "building blocks"- Dis-
tricts, Residential Areas, Centers, and Corridors. Each category has individual land use types
and describes a particular character and scale that is desired in the future but does not neces-
sarily reflect existing conditions. The Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan uses this as
the basis of its recommended land use map. One additional land use. Mixed Use Industrial,
has been added to reflect the specific conditions in Northeast Downtown. The Blueprint
Denver Plan map will be amended as needed based on this plan.
Mixed Use: These areas have both a sizable employment base as well as a variety of
mid to high density housing options. Intensity is higher in mixed-use areas than in
predominantly residential areas. Land uses can be, but are not necessarily, mixed in each
building, development, or block. Pedestrian access is of importance within the area, with
residential and non-residential uses always within short walking distance of one another.
Mixed Use / Industrial: Similar to Mixed Use, but with recognition that light industrial
uses, such as light manufacturing and smaller warehouses are compatible with urban
residential housing types. These areas have both a sizable employment base as well as
a variety of mid-to-high density housing options. Land uses can be, but are not neces-
sarily, mixed in each building, development, or block. Pedestrian access is of importance
within the area, with residential and non-residential uses always within walking distance
of one another.
Transit Oriented Development: Transit-oriented developments have land uses with a
direct correlation to the function of a mass transit system. These development sites are
located at stations or stops along mass transit lines, especially rail lines. Transit-oriented
developments provide housing, services, and employment opportunities for a diverse
population in a configuration that facilitates pedestrian and transit access. Within North-
east Downtown,TOD occurs at several different scales, reacting to the amount and type
of transit service and the context of the existing adjacent neighborhoods.
Urban Residential: Urban residential neighborhoods are higher density and primarily
residential but may include a noteworthy number of complementary commercial uses.
In Northeast Downtown, urban residential uses tend to be located in areas that transition
from historic residential neighborhoods to more intense mixed use neighborhoods. A
mixture of housing types is present, including historic single-family houses, townhouses,
small multi-family apartments and sometimes mid to high-rise residential structures.
Single Family Rowhouse: Single family rowhouse residential areas are moderately
dense areas that are primarily residential but with some complementary, small-scale
commercial uses. There is a mixture of housing types, including single-family houses,
duplexes, rowhouses, and small apartment buildings. This land use concept is called
Single Family/Duplex in BluePrint Denver, but is Single Family/Rowhouse in this plan to
better represent the more diverse range of building forms found in Northeast Down-
town.
Single Family Residential: Neighborhoods of single family houses in Northeast Down-
town represent older, residential neighborhoods that do not have a significant mix of
housing types. Commercial uses are limited to small buildings providing neighborhood
services.
16
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Strategy Framework


Single Family Residential
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Strategy Framework
17


High intensity development oriented towards transit
Live-work units assist in the transition between resi-
dential areas and commercial areas
NEIGHBORHOOD CONNECTIONS AND CHARACTER CONCEPTS
AND RECOMMENDATIONS
A.1 High Intensity Development Near Downtown,Transit Stations
In areas with existing urban character, along the edge of Downtown, within Arapahoe
Square, and in the 38th & Blake station area:
Allow taller general, shopfront and apartment building forms with higher densities.
Site building forms at the street with parking and access in the rear/off the alley.
Promote the use of design elements that link the building directly to the street
environment, such as ground story activation, transparent window openings and
doorways at the street.
Make use of design elements such as upper story setbacks, as necessary, at the
street to maintain a comfortable pedestrian scale.
Allow a mix of uses within the area and within buildings.
Make use of streetscape elements that reinforce urban character and promote high
levels of pedestrian and bicycle use, such as wide sidewalks, bike racks, public trash
cans, and tree wells.
A.2 Moderate Intensity Development Transitioning to Residential Neighborhoods
Where higher intensity development transitions to residential neighborhoods, and along
main street corridors (Welton, Downing, and Larimer):
Allow a moderate and mixed scale of general, shopfront, apartment and rowhouse
building forms.
Site building forms in a context sensitive manner with emphasis on orienting to the
street with parking and access in the rear/off the alley.
Promote the use of design elements that link the building directly to the street
environment, such as ground story activation, transparent window openings and
doorways at the street.
Make use of design elements, such as upper story setbacks, as necessary, to mini-
mize massing adjacent to residential areas.
Allow a mix of uses within the area and within buildings.
EncourageTOD along transit corridors with sensible transitions to adjacent residen-
tial neighborhoods.
Make use of streetscape elements that support and promote pedestrian and bicycle
use, such as wide sidewalks, bike racks, public trash cans, pedestrian scale lighting,
and tree wells or tree lawns.
18
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Strategy Framework


Concept Height Map
2.5 Stories
3 Stories
5 Stories
8 Stories
12* Stories
20* Stories
Coors Field
Context Area
MAXIMUM HEIGHT
RECOMMENDATIONS:
Fora detailed discussion and analysis of
the recommended maximum heights,
please see the individual neighborhood
strategies section of the plan.
POINT TOWERS:
To encourage higher density develop-
ment where appropriate, specific areas
have been identified as locations for a
podium and point tower building form.
The recommended maximum height of
point towers in Arapahoe Square are as
follows:
Standard Building Height: 12 stories =
Point Tower Height: 20 stories
Standard Building Height: 20 stories =
Point Tower Height: 30 stories
HEIGHT DATUM LINE:
A five-story height datum line, or
maximum street frontage height, for
upper story setbacks and point towers
is recommended to produce the effect
that each new building reads as no
more than five stories from street level.
A height datum line is an urban design
concept that allows taller buildings to
relate to a pedestrian scale along the
street and to smaller nearby buildings
such as those in Arapahoe Square,
Ballparkand Curtis Park. The five-story
datum line applies to both standard and
point tower buildings.
COORS FIELD CONTEXT AREA
Within this area it is recommended
that building heights not be allowed
to exceed the height of the Coors Field
stands.
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Strategy Framework
19


A.3 Low Intensity Development in Residential Neighborhoods
Infill development compatible with residential
character
In areas with established residential neighborhood character, including Curtis Park, San
Rafael, and the neighborhood edge east of Downing Street (Cole and Whittier):
Maintain the current mix of low scale building forms such as urban house, duplex
and rowhouse.
Allow new development to replicate existing development patterns, including small
lots, shallow setbacks and high building coverage with parking and access in the
rear/off the alley.
Make use of entry features that connect the building and front yards to the street.
Allow a mix of land uses consisting primarily of residential uses with limited
neighborhood-serving commercial.
Encourage the use of streetscape elements that promote residential character and
pedestrian and bicycle use, such as detached sidewalks, pedestrian scale lighting,
and tree lawns.
Denver Landmark Structures
National Register Structures
... .... Landmark Districts
Parks / Open Space
+Eh Existing Light/Commuter Rail and Stations
H3" Proposed Light/Commuter Rail and Stations
20
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Strategy Framework


A.4 Adaptive Reuse and Historic Preservation
Throughout the planning area, adaptive reuse of existing building stock and preserva-
tion of historic structures are critically important to maintaining and enhancing the
unique character of each neighborhood.
Promote the reuse of existing buildings. Existing buildings, whether historic or not,
are important character-defining elements throughout the Northeast Downtown
Neighborhoods.
Support historic preservation within existing historic districts and by identifying ad-
ditional potential landmark structures and districts.
Preserve sandstone sidewalks as a historic resource within Northeast Downtown.
Sandstone sidewalk
Asphalt
Concrete
Flagstone
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Strategy Framework
21


B. Mobility
GOAL STATEMENT
Promote walkability, biking, and tran-
sit while balancing local and regional
vehicular transportation demand,
deliveries and emergency response
safely and efficiently throughout the
study area.
Park Avenue West
The HOVlane on 20th Street is one available
connection to Interstate 25.
Main Corridor
Highway Corridor
Existing Bus Route
Existing Light Rail
Park
Study Area
WHY IS MOBILITY IMPORTANTTO NORTHEAST DOWNTOWN?
"Mobility" refers to the movement of people and goods. People use many modes of trans-
portation to achieve their mobility: automobiles, public transit, walking, bicycling, and other
means. How those different modes interact is a function of many things, including street
connectivity, destination areas, and travel patterns. The mobility framework presented here
articulates an overall strategy for accommodating all transportation modes within the North-
east Downtown area and balancing their needs so that people can navigate effectively and
safely regardless of their modal choice. The strategy takes into account connections, destina-
tions, and travel patterns within the planning area and its relation to the region.
Transportation has a vital connection to adjacent land uses. The type, amount, and quality of
transportation modes affect how property owners choose to development and use their land.
Conversely, the adjacent land uses and form of buildings impacts how transportation modes
operate as a network at a local and regional scale. A high degree of mobility in the Northeast
Downtown neighborhoods should help attract development projects that are looking to take
advantage of exceptional multi-modal movement of people and goods.
SUMMARY OF EXISTING CONDITIONS AND ISSUES
The road network in Northeast Downtown connects to a larger regional network of interstates
and major arterials. 20th Street, 22nd Street, and Park Avenue provide direct connectivity to
and from 1-25. Broadway connects to Brighton Boulevard north of the study area to provide a
22
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Strategy Framework


direct route to and from 1-70, and connects southward to Colfax Avenue, Civic Center, and the
South Broadway commercial district.
Unlike most other neighborhoods in Denver, the local street network in the Northeast Down-
town Neighborhoods is built on an extension of the downtown grid. When the downtown
streets were converted to one-way in the early 1950s, many of the streets in this area were
also converted and remain one-way today. There are some streets where one-ways are
necessary to accommodate traffic volumes or street-fronting loading docks associated with
historic warehouse buildings. Over time, land use and travel patterns have changed on some
streets in Northeast Downtown, resulting in an opportunity to re-evaluate cross sections and
one-way street directions within the study area. In conducting this evaluation it is important
to consider where the transition from one-way operations in the Central Business District to
two-way operations in Northeast Downtown should occur. In most instances this plan does
not prescribe the exact location of this transition from one-way to two-way, as this may vary
from one street to the next depending on mobility and land use considerations at the time of
conversion.
Broadway is an important arterial that serves both local and regional transportation needs,
including local transit routes. The street was constructed in the early 1920's to connect North
Denver to the Civic Center. The introduction of Broadway through this area resulted in the
roadway bisecting the downtown street grid, creating unusual geometry at intersections that
sometimes lengthens the crossing distance for pedestrians. Broadway's bisection of the grid
IrO E'RANDOLPH
Existing Sidewalks
Important connections to the regional transportation
network occur in or near Northeast Downtown.
Gaps in the sidewalk network exist in some areas
where properties that have redeveloped are adjacent
to properties that have not.
Sidewalk
No Sidewalk
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Strategy Framework
23


ITiffl'
Sidewalk gaps contribute to a poor pedestrian
experience.
BikeSharrow on 21st Street
RTD Bus on Broadway
also means that intersections occur more frequently, resulting in some unsignalized intersec-
tions that add additional challenges for cross-traffic of all modes.
Although sidewalks are present on most streets in Northeast Downtown, network gaps exist
in portions of RiNo and Ballpark, largely because of the long industrial history of those neigh-
borhoods that continues to this day. Gaps in the sidewalk networkare most pronounced
along Blake and Walnut between 28th and 38th Streets where many industrial uses are lo-
cated. Handicap accessibility of pedestrian facilities is also an issue, as Northeast Downtown
is one of the oldest areas of the City. City ordinance requires the installation of sidewalks and
ADA curb ramps in conjunction with development, redevelopment and major street construc-
tion or maintenance efforts. Additionally, the City has a curb ramp program that provides a
small amount of annual funding in response to requests.
A good network of on-street bikeways currently exists, with bike routes providing service
through much of the study area. Bikeway facilities are a mix of painted on-street bike lanes,
designated routes (no physical bike lane), and painted shared lane arrows ("sharrows"). Major
northwest and southeast routes converge on 21 st St, which has sharrows, emphasizing the
importance of that street for cyclists. Many of the routes in this area intersect with Broadway,
but only Champa provides an on-street bike lane across Broadway. Denver Moves, a mobility
plan sponsored by Denver Public Works and Parks and Recreation that is focused on bicycle
and pedestrian connections, is in-process at the time of this writing.
The overall transportation network in Northeast Downtown currently has limited abilities to
access the South Platte River greenway due to the Union Pacific right of way bisecting the
River North neighborhood. There are no connections to Brighton Boulevard and the South
Platte River from Northeast Downtown between Broadway and 38th Street. One of those two
connections, the underpass at 38th Street, is very narrow. Other access points are 20th Street
and Park Avenue.
Transit service in Northeast Downtown features RTD bus routes distributed evenly throughout
the study area. The main bus routes serving this area include the 12 on Downing Street, the
38 on Stout/California, the 44 on Lawrence/Larimer, and the 48 on Broadway. Several other
routes also run through portions of the study area. The D Line provides light rail service on
Welton Street, beginning at the 30th/Downing station and continuing to the southern termi-
nus in Littleton. The planned Central Corridor Extension, which is currently unfunded, would
extend service along Downing Street to the future 38th and Blake commuter rail station
(scheduled to open in 2016) and discontinue direct service to destinations beyond the Down-
town transit loop, such as the Auraria campus and DenverTech Center. Passengers traveling
beyond Downtown loop would require a transfer.
Regional and long distance bus service is available via Greyhound, located just outside of the
study area at 19th and Curtis, and several other bus lines offering service to destinations in
Mexico. As the area redevelops and densities, it is anticipated that regional bus services will
relocate elsewhere to areas with fewer operational constraints and to take advantage of lower
land prices. When this occurs, many large properties will become available for redevelopment.
MOBILITY FRAMEWORK CONCEPTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS
B.1 Undertake a Downtown Strategic Transportation PlanTravelshed Analysis
Conduct a series of studies to analyze the complex transportation needs of Downtown
Denver and adjacent neighborhoods:
Traffic Modeling for local and regional movement, existing and future demand
Pedestrian and bike network connectivity and functionality
24
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Strategy Framework


Transit Elements: Downtown Circulator operations on 18th/19th/Broadway/Lincoln,
E. Colfax transit alternatives study and how that service could penetrate downtown
and connect to the 16th Street Mall shuttle, the Downtown light rail system, pos-
sible 38th & Blake to Auraria transit service. Union Station, and Civic Center Station.
As part of its scope, this study may also incorporate other mobility recommenda-
tions identified in this plan.
B.2 Evaluate Potential One-Way to Two-Way Conversions
Promote neighborhood connections through the evaluation of selective conversion of
one-way streets to two-way when appropriate based on land uses and traffic patterns.
When considering one-way to two-way conversions, an evaluation of the positives of
two-way streets (improved pedestrian experience, additional access to store fronts)
should be weighed against potential drawbacks (reduced on-street parking, loss of exist-
ing bike lanes, turning access).
Larimer Programmed for two-way conversion between Broadway and 35th Street
in Summer, 2011. Larimer will have on-street bike lanes in both directions. It is an-
ticipated that two-way operations will help support this emerging retail corridor.
22nd Evaluate the potential to convert to two-way east of Champa. 22nd currently
transitions from one-way to two-way traffic at Stout. Transitioning at Champa would
promote a more cohesive neighborhood character east of Broadway.
Blake Blake Street has seen a significant amount of residential development and
infill, but still also has some active industrial properties. Two-way operations could
support the emerging residential character of the street. Evaluate conversion to
two-way in the short-to-medium timeframe or at such time as land use changes
along the corridor warrants.
Curtis Curtis Street is currently one-way west of Broadway and two-way east of
Broadway. Converting the segment west of Broadway to two-way operations would
help to reinforce a strong pedestrian connection to downtown. The intersection at
Broadway is a major obstacle for implementing two way operations on Curtis. The
geometry and traffic movements at this intersection are complicated, and would
require a significant amount of study and analysis to determine a solution.
Welton Two-way operations may help support the main street character of this
corridor. Conversion of Welton would be necessary to support any future two-way
streetcar operations and is contingent on that project and the associated removal of
the current light rail infrastructure.
Walnut Evaluate conversion of Walnut contingent on significant redevelopment
along this street that eliminates most of the existing loading docks. This recommen-
dation is long-term and reliant on land use changes.
California Evaluate conversion of California south of Park Avenue to reinforce the
pedestrian connection to the Central Business District. Note: it may be preferable
to keep this segment one-way under any scenario where future streetcar service
utilizes California and Welton as a couplet.
Stout/Champa couplet Evaluate the conversion of both streets, as a couplet or
separately, in the long-term. Because of its narrow cross section, which would likely
mean losing the existing bike lane under a two-way scenario, Champa will need
to remain one way for the foreseeable future. Stout is a wider street and it may be
appropriate to consider two way operations after the RTD Central Corridor improve-
ments are in place on Downing Street. In the short term, evaluate traffic calming
measures for both streets as part of a Next Steps Transportation Operations Study
for Northeast Downtown.
Welton and22ndStreet: Currently, there are no light
rail stations between 20th and 25th streets on Welton
38 AND BLAKE
STATION AREA PLAN
The 38th & Blake station area plan
recommended many changes to the
street network in the vicinity of the
station. These recommendations were
evaluated by the 38th & Blake Next Steps
Traffic Operational Study, and most were
deemed feasible. However, funding
has not been programmed for these
projects and many are in the long-range
timeframe. Rather than assume that all
of the roadway network changes from
the station area plan will be realized, this
plan presents the existing roadway net-
work and defers to the 38th & Blake Sta-
tion Area Plan and the Next Steps Study
regarding the advisability and phasing
of specific roadway network changes in
the vicinity of the station.
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Strategy Framework
25


Connect 31st Street
Broadway & Larimer
organize intersection
future intersection
reconfiguration to improve
multimodal operations
Broadway & Lawrence/
Arapahoe/Curtis
organize intersection to
enhance pedestrian and
bicycle connectivity

Enhanced Street
- 21st from Blake to 20th Ave

Broadway & 21st
add median for pedestrian
refuge/enhance
pedestrian & bike crossing

Potential Alternative
Broadway Modifications

Potential Future Street
Conversion from 1 way
to 2 way
Blake
Walnut
Larimer
Champa
Stout
California (south of Park)
Welton (north of Park)
Curtis
Lincoln/Welton
Potential for future double
left from Welton to Park
22nd from
Champa to Stout
change to 2 Way
Lincoln
potential future intersection
reconfiguration to improve
multimodal operations
26
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Strategy Framework


/

x
/VC
&



s'
/Y,
%

. *.
..****
V
* V -


K
.
.*
: 4
A:
' Wi
\ .t'' \ *.j
V/ v
V .***
,.*\

I I-'
Bru Rindolf
I >
4*' .**


1 Martin Luthe
| 31St
\ V *sr
% \ j#
# //
; y\ Jv
v v!-
.A
King
!*<

f
I
I
I
I
I
I
_ J
.* V
/ /\ /
/ V

\ / . a s / *
>: .* V** \*fii /
/ .-* V .A. /\ I /
/ a V >. sli
/v \ hv^V
VfiTf .-** .y .* \ '*. l|J \ y,\

.V....
29th
28th
27th
24th
23rd
21st
*
* ,** / * V S 5
V S S Vi : I :

Recommended Framework Changes Bicycle and Pedestrian
Mj Bridge over Railroad
' Ped and Bike only
(2) Bridge over Railroad
All Modes
Bike path to River
Bridge over Railroad
Ped and Bike only
Connect 31st Street
Add Crossing Signal
Extend Bike Lane
Broadway & Lawrence/
Arapahoe/Curtis
organize intersection to
enhance pedestrian and
bicycle connectivity
\ Enhanced Street
- 21st from Blake to 20th Ave
*|q\ Broadway & 21 st
add median for pedestrian
refuge / pedestrian
activated crossing signal
1 1) Potential Alternative
Broadway Modifications
1 Potential Alternative
Broadway Modifications
Enhanced Street
...** Existing Bike Lane/Sharrow
........ Proposed Bike Lane/Sharrow
# .**
Key Pedestrian Routes
Existing Bridge
Proposed Bridge
Study Area
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Strategy Framework 27




Blake or Larimer Enhanced Street New Station: Relocate existing bus
- New transit connection - 21st from Blake to 20th 38th & Blake route to California
serving 38th & Blake Station, Auraria West Potential Alternative New Station: Options for new
Station, and points Broadway Modifications 35th & Downing Arapahoe Square
in between Proposed Downtown New Station: LRT/Streetcar Station
Circulator 33rd & Downing
28
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Strategy Framework


B.3 Consider New or Modified Transit Routes
In tandem with already-executed or future two-way conversions, work with RTD to con-
solidate bus operations to a single street or a sole one-way couplet.
On the west side of the study area, regional bus routes currently on Blake and Mar-
ket/Walnut and originating/terminating at Market Street Station will be re-routed
outside of the study area to the new Denver Union Station.
Local buses will run on Blake, Larimer (inbound) and Lawrence (outbound).
On event days requiring Blake Street closures, such as Coors Field game days
and the St Patrick's Day parade, Blake Street buses will be rerouted to Larimer
via 19th and Park Avenue.
Consistent with recommendations in the Downtown Area Plan and the 38th &
Blake Station Area Plan, a future transit route, mode to be determined, would
run on Blake Street or parallel street from the 38th and Blake and potentially
National Western Stock Show commuter rail stations and create shuttle-style
connectivity between the study area and the Auraria Campus and Auraria West
Station.
On the east side of the study area, separate bicycle and bus routes by relocating
inbound buses from Stout to California.
Splitting buses on Stoutand California appears to be'leftover'from when
Stout and California formed a one-way couplet. With California already a two-
way street, having both inbound and outbound buses on the same street cre-
ates a more intuitive system for bus riders, and decreases bus-bicycle conflict
by removing buses from Stout (which has a striped bike lane).
Provide a new transit route (Streetcar, BRT, enhanced bus) along a corridor that
could connect 38th & Blake Station to Ballpark, LoDo, Auraria Campus, and Auraria
West Station. The Downtown Area Plan identifies Larimer and Lawrence streets
and the 38th and Blake Station Area Plan identifies Blake Street for this potential
alignment. Either street may be a good choice depending on the circumstances
and opportunities at the time of implementation. As a main street corridor, Larimer
would benefit from this additional service, while streetcar serving the 38/Blake sta-
tion could most easily be extended to Blake Street.
B.4 Consider an Arapahoe Square Rail Station on Welton
Evaluate a new rail station for Arapahoe Square located between 21 st Street and Park
Avenue. Current LRT station spacing along the Welton corridor locates stations approxi-
mately every 2 blocks, with the exception of the segment between 20th and 25th. A
new stop in Arapahoe Square could provide improved connections to Park Avenue, the
enhanced 21st Street, Welton businesses, Coors Field, and other destinations.
B.5 In Short-Term, Undertake a Broadway Intersections Improvements Study
Conduct further study to identify potential short-term improvements to Broadway
intersections
Evaluate potential improvements at the Broadway/Larimer intersection for in-
creased multimodal connectivity.
Evaluate the opportunity to enhance pedestrian connectivity and promote pedes-
trian priority at the intersections of Broadway and Lawrence/Arapahoe/Curtis/21st.
Located in the center of the study area, these intersections play an important role
in completing direct access across Broadway. Modifications should be studied to
minimize required out-of-direction travel by pedestrians, and emphasize pedestrian
priority through median island refuge areas in Broadway, closure of alleys and curb
cut access to parking areas.
STRATEGIC PARKING PLAN
As the Northeast Downtown Neighbor-
hoods evolve over time, new parking
conditions and opportunities may
arise. As needed, parking and parking
management should be evaluated in
accordance with the vision and process
set forth in the City's Strategic Parking
Plan (SPP).
The SPP is a comprehensive, citywide
framework that helps articulate and
clarify the vision and approach for
parking management in the City. The
SPP explores innovative strategies and
parking values from a variety of user per-
spectives so the implementation tools
can achieve the best balance possible.
Specifically the Strategic Parking Plan
Vision is to:
Acknowledge a variety of land use
patterns and contexts
Manage parking as an asset
Encourage an integrated approach to
parking management
The plan recommends a comprehensive
process to yield a customized set of
management tools that allow parking to
support healthy thriving communities.
The process begins with defining the
community, collecting data and identify-
ing parking conditions and issues. The
process also involves developing area
specific parking goals and developing
a management program best suited to
the area. To ensure a comprehensive
program, potential tools encompass
strategies relative to demand, location,
time and price.
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Strategy Framework
29


C. Economic and Development Opportunity
GOAL STATEMENT
Northeast Downtown will be a collec-
tion of visually interesting, diverse,
and prosperous neighborhoods with
increasing economic and develop-
ment activity that includes small and
creative businesses, a wide variety of
housing types and prices, and vital
retail corridors.
The Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Study
Area is located in the Platte River and Capitol Hill
commercial real estate markets
WHY IS ECONOMIC AND DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITY IMPORTANT TO
NORTHEAST DOWNTOWN?
Northeast Downtown consists of both areas of change and areas of stability. Areas of change
are those that are benefitting or will benefit from reinvestment, increased population and
employment, and new, more intense development. The areas of changeArapahoe Square,
Ballpark/River North, Downing, Welton/Five Pointsare at various stages of redevelopment
and revitalization.
Economic development is typically defined as "the process of creating wealth through the
mobilization of human, financial, capital, physical and natural resources to generate market-
able goods and services" (American Economic Development Council). In many cases, the pri-
vate sector, through an individual developer or business, amasses the necessary resources to
advance a project. In other cases, the public sector has a responsibility to bring resources and
leadership to generate the private sector interest. Private development has been leading the
revitalization of Ballpark and RiNo. A Business Development Office is providing the leader-
ship resources to spur desired development in Five Points. The Central Corridor Extension and
StreetcarTransformative Concept will provide the public infrastructure investment to attract
private development for the TOD areas. Taking advantage of the economic and development
opportunities of Arapahoe Square will require a broader range of integrated strategies to
overcome the present development conditions.
30
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Strategy Framework


SUMMARY OF EXISTING CONDITIONS
Northeast Downtown has considerable commercial activity that includes office, industrial,
warehouse, arts, and retail uses. The area has and will continue to benefit from proximity to
Downtown, Coors Field, and public transportation investments. Each of the areas of change is
developing distinctive character based in part on its historical uses and location.
Ballpark is a designated Landmark district that has also experienced extensive redevelopment
since Coors Field opened in 1995. Much of the building reuse and new construction has been
for housing with a variety of types, prices, and tenancy. Larimer Street, especially between
20th Street and Park Avenue, supports a variety of retail and small restaurants. Blake Street
has a mix of residential, office and retail uses, as well as a few remaining industrial uses. Wal-
nut retains many of its industrial uses.
RiNo has long served as a backbone of the industrial activities on the edge of Downtown Den-
ver, with a large number of warehouse, industrial, and support businesses. The River North
Art District reflects the growing community of artist studios and galleries. Recently, additional
businesses (such as professional services, creative businesses, and others) and housing devel-
opments have "discovered" the locational advantage and affordability of RiNo.
Today the Downing/Welton Corridor is identified with the D-Line Light Rail and FasTracks
Central Corridor Extension. The Five Points Business District Office and Five Points community
are seeking to re-establish the historic Five Points neighborhood. Sometimes called the"Har-
lem of the West", Five Points, which is Colorado's only designated historic cultural landmark
district, has a rich jazz history and has served as the heart of the African-American community
in Denver since at least the 1930's. After World War II, the corridor has continually struggled
to maintain its previous vibrancy and economic success. Small-scale storefronts spread north
and south from the Five Points intersection create a developing node of neighborhood-
serving retail. Additional development opportunities exist related to existing and proposed
transit stops along Downing and Welton.
Curtis Park, Enterprise Hill, and San Rafael are residential neighborhoods with scattered small
lot infill opportunities. Large scale redevelopment opportunities also exist in the form of larg-
er vacant lots, particularly in the southernmost blocks of Curtis Parkapproaching Arapahoe
Square. Adaptive reuse of vacant historic structures, such as the Epworth Church, the Curtis
Park Community Center, and Temple Emmanuel, present an additional set of opportunities.
Immediately adjacent to the Central Business District, Arapahoe Square has the potential to
be the most urban of the Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods. Bounded by Park Avenue,
20th Street, the alley between Welton and Glenarm, and the alley between Larimer and
Lawrence, Arapahoe Square will seta critical character transition between Downtown and
the residential neighborhoods. At present, Arapahoe Square is visually dominated by surface
parking lots and a clustering of social service providers. The parking lots serve downtown
employees and Coors Field patrons. A more hidden asset is the collection of existing build-
ings that house a variety of small businesses, both emerging and established. There are also
a handful of residential units, mostly in newer buildings of apartment or rowhouse building
forms.
One Lincoln Park (foreground): High density residen-
tial development adjacent to Northeast Downtown
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Strategy Framework
31


FRAMEWORK CONCEPTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS
C.1 Strengthen Retail Corridors
The plan area has two emerging retail corridors, Welton Street and Larimer Street, as well
as a potential future TOD corridor in Downing Street. Retail strategies should strengthen
these corridors by developing viable retail clusters, tenant mix and product and service
offerings for those who live, work and visit the area. The area has two full service grocery
stores. Additional retail opportunities will emerge to meet the needs of the growing
population. Retail strategies for the three areas should aim at reinforcing the distinctive
character of each and serve complementary retail market niches.
C.2 Promote Economic and Housing Diversity
The concept is to maintain the characteristic household and economic diversity of the
Plan Area, In areas of stability, retaining the existing housing stockand reinforcing
existing character through appropriate new development should continue. In areas of
change, a wider variety of multiple unit building forms should be encouraged as part of
these mixed-use neighborhoods. Future zoning should support varied residential forms
and remove barriers to promote products that serve households at different socioeco-
nomic levels. Adding more housing is important to forwarding the plan vision; however,
housing development is driven by private developers and investors. The public sector
can assist with removing regulatory barriers and providing subsidy when warranted.
C.3 Encourage Housing Density
Higher density housing requires structured parking, which is a costly component of any
building and is likely to be required given the densities proposed in the plan. Multi-unit
developments are currently viable because of specially subsidized financing vehicles and
favorable capital markets conditions. Market conditions will need to improve, subsidies
provided, or alternative parking solutions identified in order to justify apartment or con-
dominium development in the future.
C.4 Establish and Support Business Development Offices
The goal of dedicated Business Development Offices (BDO) located within the Study
Area would be to decrease the barriers to economic development. The BDO would serve
as an advocate for new and existing businesses, gather information regarding financing
programs, properties for sale, contact information for building and property owners and
serve as a one-stop shop for those interested in investing or locating in a particular area.
The BDO could develop marketing materials and serve as a facilitator to match property
owners with prospective tenants and/or help with assemblages based on client needs.
Because of the different character and business mix of the three areas, it is recommend-
ed that each one Arapahoe Square, Five Points/Welton, and Ballpark/RiNo could be
the focus for such an effort. A Business Development Office for Five Points was estab-
lished in 2010.
32
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Strategy Framework


C.5 Establish Urban Renewal Areas
Urban Renewal Areas (URA) are created to help effect the redevelopment of blighted ar-
eas. URAs are created by the City through the adoption of Urban Redevelopment Plans
which lay out the objectives of the plan (such as elimination of blight) and authorize the
Denver Urban Renewal Authority (DURA) to carry out those objectives. DURA's primary
tool for effecting redevelopment is tax increment financing (TIF). TIF can be used to
assist in the financing of projects that are consistent with the Denver Comprehensive
Plan and all relevant plan supplements. Elsewhere in Denver,TIF has been used in a wide
variety of ways including public infrastructure projects, subsidizing private develop-
ment, and resolving site constraints such as environmental remediation and fragmented
ownership. A Blight Study has been completed for Arapahoe Square confirming that
blighting conditions exist, and a study of the Welton corridor is expected to be under-
taken. A recommended early action is the creation of urban renewal areas for Arapahoe
Square and the Welton corridor.
C.6 Utilize OED Lending programs
An essential economic development concept is expanding the number and range of
businesses within the Plan Area. The Office of Economic Development (OED) offers a
wide variety of services and referrals to assist existing and new businesses with their
financing, labor, space, and market needs. These services have proven to be essential
components of financing fora number of successful businesses in the area. Existing
and new businesses should take full advantage of OED's existing and future lending
programs and OED should encourage their clients to consider locations in the Northeast
Downtown Plan Area.
Arapahoe Square has potential for an Urban Renewal
Area
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Strategy Framework
33


D. Livability and Public Realm
GOAL STATEMENT
Provide an appealing and safe
physical environment, and increase
the amount of appropriately pro-
grammed, maintained, and accessible
public open space for the health,
economic success, and livability of the
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods.
16th Street Mall is lauded nation-wide for its high
quality public realm.
Denver has many examples of neighborhood
commerical districts, such as 32nd and Zuni in the
Highland Neighborhood.
WHY ARE LIVABILITY AND THE PUBLIC REALM IMPORTANTTO NORTHEAST
DOWNTOWN?
In an urban neighborhood, life happens between buildings. The public realm, the space be-
tween buildings in an urban environment, such as the parks, plazas, sidewalks, and streets
and how we perceive that space is critical to the livability of that environment. A thriving
urban neighborhood needs streets that are safe, green space to let residents breathe, parks to
play in, trees that provide shade, and squares and plazas to meet one another. A neighbor-
hood should provide services, amenities, and a healthy environment to live, work, and play for
people of all ages. The sense that you are somewhere, the sense that there is a "there" at all,
evolves from how much importance people place on the shared public realm.
The quality of the public realm is essential to the health of any environment, but not all
environments are the same. The public realm in an urban environment should provide places
that feel safe, promote multiple modes of travel especially walking and support the overall
vibrancy and sense of community of the neighborhood. A walkable, urban neighborhood is a
place that realizes the importance of the common space that all people experience.
The neighborhoods of Northeast Downtown were developed early in Denver's history, when
walking was the primary mode of travel. This is true of many of Denver's close-in neighbor-
hoods such as Highlands, La Alma/Lincoln Park, and Capitol Hill. The streets, sidewalks, and
public spaces were shared by the residents, business owners, employees, and customers that
experienced the neighborhood with their feet.
SUMMARY OF EXISTING CONDITIONS
Many of the attributes of Northeast Downtown that made it thrive as a livable community in
the late 19th and early 20th centuries had deteriorated in the latter half of the 20th century.
The historic residential neighborhoods in the area, such as Curtis Park and San Rafael, have
more recently rediscovered the many qualities of great places. Ballpark and River North
have seen development and infrastructure improvements that have greatly improved the
public realm. Elsewhere the quality of the public realm remains fragmented, and as a result,
the livability of the entire Northeast Downtown Plan area is diminished. Real and perceived
concerns about personal safety and crime are exacerbated with the presence of homeless-
ness, fragmented building fabric, minimally maintained parking lots, and poorly maintained
sidewalks and tree lawns. In addition to the quality of the public realm, other components of
livable neighborhoods include public health and safety, access to parks and recreation facili-
ties, access to healthy food, and sustainable infrastructure.
Public Health Key components of a healthy neighborhood are convenient access to
active transportation (walking, biking, and public transportation), parks and recreation
facilities, and healthy food. For the most part. Northeast Downtown has those funda-
mental elements; however, perceptions of crime, impact of homelessness, high-traffic
streets, and spotty quality of the urban fabric may hinder use of these assets. A Health
Impact Assessment (HIA) was conducted in the summer and fall of 2010 to provide a
summary of existing conditions and recommendations for improving public health
in the plan area. For purposes of the HIA, health is defined as both the promotion of
healthy behaviors and the prevention of disease. The HIA conducted for a plan such as
this is, by necessity, an overview of conditions that may contribute to improved health or
the converse.
34
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Strategy Framework


Public Safety Concerns about safety pervade Northeast Downtown. This perception
is related to a lack of "eyes on the street", a high concentration of social service providers,
and open-air drug deals and criminal activity. These real and perceived safety concerns
affect potential development and residents'willingness to walk and bike in high crime
areas.
Homelessness The impact and visibility of the homeless on public streets and parks is
a detriment to promoting the area as a walkable, urban neighborhood. The impacts are
most evident at Eddie Maestas Park and the streets adjoining the Denver Rescue Mission.
The Denver community has focused its efforts to address the homeless issue through
Denver's Road Home (DRH), established in 2005. The 10-Year goal is to end homeless-
ness in Denver as we know it. This means that our community will have provided
adequate housing and services to the chronically homeless population. These efforts
have already reduced the homelessness population by 66% over the first half of the 10-
year plan. The 10-year Plan to End Homelessness has many components that have vastly
improved the delivery of services, understanding of issues and quality of life for the
residents, providers, consumers and businesses in the Northeast Downtown area.
As part of Denver's Road Home, a collaborative of outreach staff work daily to
connect vulnerable and homeless individuals and families to critical services and
housing. The Denver Police Department is part of this outreach team. In addition to
dealing with criminal activity. Police District 6 officers respond to community issues.
At the end often years, Denver will have in place a strong service delivery system
that works to prevent homelessness in the first place, and very quickly works to get
those who fall into homelessness back into stable lives. The need for emergency
shelter should be reduced drastically, and resources should be readily available for
those in need.
Denver's Road Home is a stakeholder in decisions around the use and programming
at Eddie Maestas Park and other parcels in the area, and is committed to ongoing
engagement towards solutions that create safe, positive spaces for the area.
Parks-The City and County of Denver is in the fortunate position of being a very desir-
able city in which to live, work and play, offering a quality of life that has resulted in a
consistently growing population, even as other cities around the nation are declining.
Denver's continued success depends on its ability to continue providing the same or
greater level of amenities and basic infrastructure to support a vibrant and economically
healthy city. Some of the most visible elements ofan urban area are the public spaces,
such as parks, plazas and bikeways or trails. These elements provide numerous public
health and environmental benefits for recreation, exercise, connectivity and transporta-
tion, air pollution removal, tourism, rainwater retention, and natural beauty. As with
other infrastructure systems, the public park system must continue to evolve to meet the
increasing expectations and demands of the growing population. The major park facili-
ties in Northeast Downtown are Sonny Lawson Park (2.5 acres), Benedict Fountain Park
(2.8 acres), and Mestizo-Curtis Park (8.5 acres).
The Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods study area has a 2010 estimated population
of 12,710. Both Blueprint Denver and the Denver Regional Council of Governments
expect a significant increase in the residential population of Northeast Downtown and
the adjacent Downtown core in the next 15 to 20 years, triggering a need for additional
park amenities that vary in character and scale. As described in the Game Plan, the Parks
Department's master plan, the Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods themselves are
dramatically under served by parks, even for the existing population. With only 1.26
acres of parks for every 1,000 residents compared to a citywide average of 7.14 acres per
Homeless congregate in Eddie Maestas Park.
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Strategy Framework
35


Benedict Fountain Park
1,000 people this low acreage is even lower than other dense urban neighborhoods in
the city such as Union Station and Lincoln Park.
One of the primary determinants of the marketability and the livability of a vibrant
urban area is access to parks, open spaces and trails for health, mobility, community
and environmental benefits as well as property value enhancement. The lack of existing
infrastructure and public amenities contribute to the area's blighted appearance, and
is likely one of the most significant inhibitors to private investment and development.
If the existing park deficiency is not addressed, the deficiency of amenities needed for
a healthy, active, urban lifestyle will hamper its redevelopment potential. As the city is
expecting and planning for dense, urban development in central areas, including this
study area, the park system will need improvements to accommodate the increased
population growth and park system use. In future years as this plan is implemented, the
addition of new parks, investments in existing parks, and new and improved connectivity
will be critical to this area's success.
Stormwater The standard level of storm protection in the City is to plan, design, and
construct storm sewers to convey storm runoff from a 2-year storm event in residen-
tial areas, and a 5-year event in commercial and industrial areas in underground storm
drains. For larger storm events, the public right-of-way conveys the excess runoff, up to
one foot deep in the gutter. The City has required water quality detention for all new
developments greater than one-half acre in size since the early 1990s and stormwater
detention since at least the 1970s. Additionally, the finished ground floor or any point of
stormwater entry to any new development is required to be at least one foot higher than
the 100-year storm flood level. New development must accommodate on-site 10-year
detention and water quality.
The City's Storm Drainage Master Plan (2009) identified areas of potential ponding or po-
tential flooding greater than 18 inches deep in a major storm event at several locations
within Northeast Downtown. These locations include:
Broadway/Stout/20th/21st
Bla ke Street from 29th Street to 31 st Street
Portions of the Coors Field players'parking lot adjacent to the UPRR railroad tracks
The area generally bounded by 30th Street on the south, California Street on the
east, and Arapahoe Street on the west
The area north of 36th Street and 37th Avenue
Additional analysis being conducted as part of the FasTracks East Corridor project has
identified ponding greater than 18 inches in a major storm event at 26th and Blake, and
confirmed flow depths greater than 18 inches in a major storm in the area bounded by
35th Street, Larimer, Downing, and the UPRR railroad tracks.
FRAMEWORK CONCEPTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS
Several of the plans concepts and recommendations will positively contribute to livability and
the public realm directly and indirectly. The following specific concepts stand alone as impor-
tant strategies for livability and an improved public realm in Northeast Downtown.
D.1 Promote Access to Healthy Transportation
Expand opportunities for active transportation choices for people of all ages and
abilities.
36
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Strategy Framework


Improve pedestrian crossings of major streets (Park Avenue, Broadway, and 20th)
with bulb-outs and other improvements.
Reinstall missing tree lawn or amenity zone segments as part of new development
or public infrastructure projects.
Use the 21st Street, Curtis Street, RiNo bridges, and StreetcarTransformative Con-
cepts as the framework for implementation of healthy transportation strategies.
D. 2. Promote Access to Healthy Foods
Encourage healthy food choices by neighborhood residents through urban agricul-
ture (Denver Urban Gardens) and other programs identified by the Sustainable Food
Policy Council.
D.3 Invest in Park Improvements
Invest in park improvements and programming to encourage residents to use existing
and new parks for active and passive recreation.
D.4 Study Connecting Parks to Destination Areas
Study opportunities for improved connections to Downtown and existing parks such as
Skyline Park, Riverfront Park, Sonny Lawson Park, Benedict Fountain Park, Mestizo-Curtis
Park, City of Cuernavaca Park, and the South Platte River greenway.
D.5 Identify Funding for Stormwater Improvements and Promote Water Quality
through Best Practices
The need for additional storm drainage improvements throughout the Northeast Down-
town Area has been previously identified in the adopted 2009 Storm Drainage Master
Plan. These improvements include four major storm drainage improvement projects
that are currently not funded or programmed due to financial constraints and an identi-
fied $1 billion city-wide need in storm drainage improvements:
27th Street improvements (includes the 27th and Welton intersection)
31 st Street outfall
36th Street outfall
Upper end of the Stout Street outfall
Sustainable stormwater technologies, that could be applicable in Northeast Downtown
and should be considered whenever stormwater improvements are needed, include but
are not limited to:
Bio-swales
Permeable Pavers
Infiltration Tree Wells
Sub-regional Detention Ponds (in conjunction with new open space)
Low-Impact Development Techniques
Regional water quality
Incorporate sustainable stormwater improvements in 21 st Street
THE PARKS GAME PLAN (2002)
identifies the following goals and recom-
mendations for park space:
Performance Goals:
Provide at least V2 acre of public
open space within one-half mile
of every resident's home that can
be reached without crossing a
major barrier.
Provide 8 to 10 acres of parkland
for every 1,000 residents
Parks Game Plan Recommendations
for Equitable and Generous Park Land:
Bring areas of the city that are
significantly below the desired
acreage goal up to par within 10
years;
Plan for growth while address-
ing the uneven distribution of
parkland;
Work with CPD to ensure that
redevelopment, especially within
areas of change, provides neigh-
borhood parkland at the recom-
mended level of service;
Strengthen partnerships with
DPS, private colleges and schools,
and other institutions to seek
shared-use agreements and
identify long-lead acquisition and
redevelopment opportunities;
Strengthen partnerships with
nonprofits working to increase
types and availability of open
space;
Strengthen relationships with
potential funding partners, such
as Great Outdoors Colorado and
foundations.
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Strategy Framework
37




Transformative
Concepts
This chapter presents eight different development concepts that, if constructed, would likely
have a catalytic effect on stimulating additional investment in the Northeast Downtown
Neighborhoods area. These concepts represent"big ideas"for positively transforming North-
east Downtown.
21 st Street
Curtis Street
Broadway
Connecting River North
New Park
Social Services
Streetcar
Transit Oriented Development
Each concept is presented and then evaluated against the four criteria that are the organizing
element for this plan:
Neighborhood Connections and Character
Mobility
Development Opportunity
Livability and the Public Realm
In some cases concepts may not be implemented as shown in this plan because of the interre-
lationships between them. Opportunities may arise to implement some concepts earlier than
others, which would then inform and refine the implementation of the remaining concepts.
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Transformative Concepts
39


21st Street
WHAT IS IT?
GOAL STATEMENT
Make 21st Street a focal point for the
Northeast Downtown neighborhoods
by promoting its role as an important
pedestrian and bicycle route and com-
munity gathering place.
Bioswales use vegetation to detain and purify
stormwater.
The Right-of-way of Festival Streets can be designed
for flexibility of use.
Early in the planning process, 21 st Street was identified as a potential transformative location
for the Northeast Downtown neighborhoods. Three major concepts a Bike Boulevard, a
Festival Street, and innovative stormwater management evolved during the Arapahoe
Square charrette in January, 2011. The street is a two-way, low traffic volume street that en-
joys two neighborhood landmarks as bookends: Coors Field to the west and Benedict Foun-
tain Park to the east. Coors Field in particular acts as a strong terminating vista for the street
and is a valuable asset for any future development on 21st. The low-level of traffic when
compared to other streets in the area makes 21 st Street a favorite for pedestrians and bicy-
clists. Bike sharrows are already on 21st street and many people utilize the street as a primary
walking route on game days to the first base entrance at Coors Field. This pedestrian friendly
character of the street was recognized when planning for Coors Field occurred in the 1990's,
resulting in enhanced streetscaping being installed between Blake and Arapahoe Streets.
Two major concepts for improvements on 21 st Street, the Bike Boulevard and the Festival
Street, if implemented, would respond to these initial ideas of the street being a place with an
enhanced public realm and prioritizing pedestrians and bicyclists. Another opportunity for
21st Street, since it is located at the ridge of two stormwater basins, is for it to be a potential
testing ground for innovative, environmentally friendly stormwater management techniques
new to the Denver area. Finally, much of the land along 21 st Street today is devoid of build-
ings and often used as surface parking, which is in high demand on Rockies game days. In
the short-term, these parking lots will most likely remain, but in the long-term land assembly
and proximity to Downtown make 21 st in Ballpark and Arapahoe Square an excellent location
for mixed-use and high density residential development. Any streetscape improvement may
require the establishment of a local maintenance district and should be coordinated with the
existing Consolidated Larimer Street Local Maintenance District.
The section of 21st Street nearest to Coors Field already has wide sidewalks and street trees. New development
could help to activate the street and a redesign could transform it into a Festival Street.
40
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Transformative Concepts


HOW DOES IT ADDRESS NEIGHBORHOOD CONNECTIONS AND CHARACTER?
21stSTREET RECOMMENDATIONS:
Becomes a focal point for the entire Northeast Downtown area, connecting the activities
near Coors Field to the redevelopment opportunities in Arapahoe Square and the named
north-south streets that intersect it.
HOW DOES IT ADDRESS MOBILITY?
Prioritizes the right of way for use by pedestrians and bicyclists, while still accommodat-
ing vehicular traffic.
Provides bicyclists with enhanced connectivity to other bike routes.
HOW DOES IT ADDRESS DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITY?
The high quality multi-modal environment of a Bike Boulevard and Festival Street may
act as a catalyst for the reuse of existing buildings and redevelopment of under-utilized
or vacant parcels.
The enhanced public realm along 21 st Street may attract private investment to respond
to the street.
HOW DOES IT ADDRESS LIVABILITY AND THE PUBLIC REALM?
Promotes active uses along the street
Promotes potential new development that would begin to frame the street into a com-
fortable, human-scaled environment
Improved multi-modal capacity increases access to neighborhood amenities for pedes-
trians and cyclists.
Develop 21 st Street as a Bike Bou-
levard: Evaluate cross section to
prioritize bicycle movement as a bike
boulevard as conceptualized in Den-
ver Moves
Develop 21st Street as "Festival Street":
Evaluate cross section to include im-
provements in support of potentially
closing street for events and accom-
modating wide sidewalks, on street
parking, one lane of travel in each
direction, bike lanes, and streetscape
improvements. This concept should
be first considered on a short portion
of the street, such as Blake to Larimer,
before considering extending the
treatment along the corridor. The
term Festival Street is flexible and
should include the Bike Boulevard
concept identified previously.
Identify 21 st Street as a potential test-
ing location for several of the sustain-
able stormwater technologies due to
its location at the ridge of two storm-
water basins. Explore integration of
stormwater technologies into other
projects on 21 st street such as future
development activity, streetscape
improvements. Festival Street, Bike
Boulevard, etc.
Bio-swales
Permeable Pavers
Infiltration Tree Wells
Sub-regional Detention Ponds
(in conjunction with new open
space)
Low-Impact Development Tech-
niques
Encourage the addition of standard
railings along the 21 st Street parking
lots to improve the visual quality of
the street and acknowledge its short
term function for parking by promot-
ing the Denver PublicWorks and
Downtown Denver Partnership park-
ing program to parking lot owners.
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Transformative Concepts
41


Curtis Street
GOAL STATEMENT
Use Curtis Street to create a preferred
pedestrian route connecting the
Central Business District to Arapahoe
Square and Curtis Park.
WHAT IS IT?
Curtis Street represents an opportunity to create a strong pedestrian linkage from the Com-
mercial Core through Arapahoe Square, and into Curtis Park. This builds upon the Downtown
Multimodal Access Plan, which identified Curtis as a street that could potentially be con-
verted to two-way operations, and the Downtown Area Plan, which identified Curtis Street
as a pedestrian-priority linkage. Curtis terminates at the south end at the Denver Performing
Arts Center, and at the north end at Mestizo-Curtis Park, so it is not a major through route for
automobile traffic.
Within the Central Business District, Curtis'curb-to-curb width is about 40 feet south of 16th,
but widens to about 55 feet between 16th and 20th, presenting a good opportunity to nar-
row the street and widen the sidewalks to emphasize the pedestrian realm. One challenge is
that the pedestrian environment on Curtis between 18th and 20th is particularly weak as a
result of block-long blank walls and an absence of street-activating uses in that area. Redevel-
opment of the Greyhound Bus Station located on the block bounded by Curtis, 20th, Arapa-
hoe and 19th would do much to improve the quality of the pedestrian experience.
HOW DOES IT ADDRESS NEIGHBORHOOD CONNECTIONS AND CHARACTER?
Curtis Street would become a pedestrian spine connecting three neighborhoods: Down-
town, Arapahoe Square, and Curtis Park.
The intersection of 21 st Street and Curtis gains importance, and becomes a place to
focus on establishing an identity for Arapahoe Square.
42
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Transformative Concepts


HOW DOES IT ADDRESS MOBILITY?
CURTIS STREET
RECOMMENDATIONS:
Provides a preferred route for pedestrians through Arapahoe Square and connects the
CBD and Curtis Park
Provides a potential location for a strengthened pedestrian crossing of Broadway.
HOW DOES IT ADDRESS DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITY?
Curtis connects directly into the middle of the portion of Arapahoe Square that currently
has the most intact urban fabric. If Curtis were successful in attracting more pedestrian
activity, additional redevelopment could follow.
HOW DOES IT ADDRESS THE LIVABILITY AND THE PUBLIC REALM?
Expands the public realm within the Central Business District by repurposing a portion of
the roadway for sidewalks.
Curtis Street serves pedestrian axis connecting Curtis Park, Arapahoe Square, and Downtown.
Recognize the vision and concepts for
Curtis Street identified in the Downtown
Multimodal Access Plan (2005) and the
Downtown Area Plan (DAP, 2007):
The Downtown Multimodal Ac-
cess Plan (2005) identified a hand-
ful of named streets, namely Curtis,
Tremont, and Court, which potentially
could be converted to two-way while
maintaining the efficiency and effec-
tiveness of the one-way street system
for moving traffic.
The Downtown Area Plan (2007) iden-
tifies "Putting Pedestrians First"and
"An outstanding pedestrian environ-
ment"as key elements of the vision for
Downtown. Specially, Larimer, Curtis,
California and Tremont are identified
as the start of the effort to improve the
pedestrian environment on named
streets. Furthermore, DAP identifies
"Embracing Adjacent Neighborhoods"
as a "Transformative Project"and
identifies the streets that connect
Downtown to its neighbors on all
sides. Curtis is identified as one such
street because it connects the Down-
town districts of Auraria, Downtown,
Arapahoe Square, and Curtis Park.
Maintain the existing two-way segment
of Curtis north of 22nd Street.
Place a visual focal point, such as a
statue or other landmark, where Curtis
Street terminates at Mestizo-Curtis Park.
Evaluate opportunities to move the
Greyhound bus terminal (located just
outside of the study area) and associated
vehicle maintenance facilities in Curtis
Park and redevelop those properties.
Explore opportunities to widen side-
walks, improve pedestrian crossings at
major intersections (20th Street, Broad-
way, and Park Avenue), and provide
streetscape amenities and pedestrian-
scale lighting throughout the corridor.
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Transformative Concepts
43


Broadway
GOAL STATEMENT
Implement the vision of Broadway
as a "Grand Boulevard" in Northeast
Downtown.
%
%
WHAT IS IT?
Broadway is identified as a "Grand Boulevard" in the 2007 Downtown Area Plan. Cutting
diagonally through the Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan study area, Broadway
was overlaid into this section of the City's vehicular infrastructure in the 1920s, long after the
establishment of the downtown grid. As one of three major vehicular entry points into down-
town from the north, Broadway's high traffic volumes and multi-legged intersections make
this roadway a neighborhood divide that serves regional and local transportation needs. The
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan examines three conceptual approaches to the
long-term future of Broadway as a Grand Boulevard. These concepts are meant to balance
local and regional needs, supporting regional vehicular mobility while also providing for safe,
efficient pedestrian and bicycle movement. Two of the concepts in particular. Celebrating
Broadway and Bridging Broadway, would result in dramatic changes to the street and the way
that it functions. A significant amount of study and analysis is required before either of those
concepts could be deemed feasible.
Preserving
%
%
* ^
y

Celebrating


%
^ %
/V-

\
Bridging
Each of the Broadway concepts would have different
impacts on mobility.
Broadway Options:
"Preserving Broadway" maintains the current street cross section while introducing
short-term, targeted improvements to intersections to facilitate pedestrian and bike
crossings. Additional improvements may be identified in the long-term to enhance the
public realm within the existing right-of-way for multiple mode choices. A core feature
of this option is that it retains Broadway as a direct vehicle and pedestrian link between
North Denver and the Civic Center Area. This Grand Boulevard approach would maintain
Broadway's current role as a major regional arterial roadway while striving to improve
the public realm and overall multi-modal functionality of the street.
"Celebrating Broadway" proposes a 'road diet'for the segment of Broadway between
Park Avenue and Welton Street. Within this section, Broadway would incur a lane reduc-
tion. Right-of-way width recaptured from the roadway would be used to create ameni-
ties that enhance the public realm, such as planted medians, wider sidewalks populated
with street trees, street furnishings and even the potential for outdoor retail or restaurant
areas. This Grand Boulevard approach would treat Broadway as an important functional
and aesthetic gateway into the downtown core while emphasizing the pedestrian aspect
of the public realm. The timeframe for implementing a Celebrating Broadway concept
could be 30 years or more into the future.
"Bridging Broadway" proposes the complete removal of Broadway between Park
Avenue and Welton Street, with the vacated roadway right-of-way reverting to adjacent
parcels and becoming developable or being maintained as a non-auto thoroughfare
for pedestrians and bicyclists. Under this concept, the Downtown rectilinear street grid
would be reinstated, with traffic redistributed throughout the grid. Arapahoe and Wel-
ton (south of Park) would be maintained as one-way streets to help accommodate traffic
volumes. Arapahoe would redirect traffic to 19th or other downtown streets, while Wel-
ton could feature a double left at Park Avenue to help distribute traffic. Additional con-
nections to the regional transportation network, including the possibility of new streets,
may be necessary to avoid unintended impacts, such as reduced air quality, to the larger
Denver area. This Grand Boulevard approach is the most dramatic interpretation of the
Downtown Area Plan's recommendation and may display the greatest ability to recon-
nect Northeast Downtown to the Downtown Core. The timeframe for implementing a
Bridging Broadway concept could be 20 to 30 years or more into the future.
44
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Transformative Concepts


HOW DOES IT ADDRESS NEIGHBORHOOD CONNECTIONS AND CHARACTER?
BROADWAY AS A
Preserving Broadway
Targeted improvements at intersections would facilitate pedestrian and bicycle
crossings.
Provides direct connections to River North, Civic Center, and 1-70.
Celebrating Broadway
An enhanced public realm could establish a place for pedestrians and encourages
use of Broadway as an integrated part of the neighborhood, rather than a barrier.
Decreased curb-to-curb width and lowered traffic volumes would promote pedes-
trian and bicycle movement between neighborhoods east and west of Broadway.
Bridging Broadway
Reintroduction of a traditional grid would allow a high level of pedestrian and bike
connectivity.
Reintroduction of a traditional grid offers the opportunity for adjacent neighbor-
hoods to integrate as a single urban neighborhood, or to develop separate identities
that transition into each other rather than being split by the roadway alignment.
HOW DOES IT ADDRESS MOBILITY?
Preserving Broadway
Maintains current level of service and traffic patterns for vehicles.
Enhances pedestrian and bicycle movements by introducing targeted pedestrian/
bike improvements at intersections.
Builds upon significant infrastructure improvements with the Broadway/Brighton
underpass and Park Avenue viaduct.
Provides direct connection between River North and Downtown, Civic Center, and
the freeway system.
Celebrating Broadway
Redirects a significant portion of existing Broadway vehicular traffic between Park
Avenue and 20th Street. Arapahoe (inbound traffic) and Welton (outbound traffic)
as well as several other nearby roadways are designated as possible alternate routes
into and out of the CBD. Additional study is needed to determine how this would
affect overall traffic flows, congestion, air quality, and access to regional roadways.
Reducing the number of lanes on Broadway and expanding the pedestrian realm
narrows the crossing distance for pedestrians and cyclists.
Enhances pedestrian and bicycle crossing movements by reducing the number of
lanes along Broadway at multi-legged intersections.
Provides opportunities for wider sidewalks for pedestrians.
Bridging Broadway
Removes Broadway between Park Avenue and Welton Street. Vehicular traffic would
be redirected and dispersed across remaining Downtown and Northeast Downtown
street grid. Additional study is needed to determine how this would affect overall
traffic flows, congestion, air quality, and access to regional roadways.
Arapahoe and Welton (south of Park Avenue) would be kept as higher-volume, one-
"GRAND BOULEVARD"
The Downtown Area Plan (2007) articu-
lates the goal for Grand Boulevards:
"Transform Speer Boulevard, Colfax
Avenue, Broadway, ParkAvenue.and Au-
raria Parkway into celebrated, multimod-
al boulevards to overcome the physical
and perceptual barriers of these major
thoroughfares." The Downtown Area
Plan recommends that Broadway north
of 20th be established as a green boule-
vard as recommended in the Downtown
Multimodal Access Plan. The Downtown
Area Plan also recognizes that each
Grand Boulevard will need future study
so that the design can respond to the
unique context and environment of each
street.
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Transformative Concepts
45


Pre-Broadway 1904
£
/
/

/
/
/
/4?+ *''V
/'
' V? ^
/'
^ < < >
^ /x /"
-y'
Broadway 2011
way roadways in order to facilitate inbound and outbound movement, respectively.
Additional vehicular traffic on Arapahoe may affect the existing bike lane.
Enhances pedestrian and bicycle movement by eliminating Broadway as a street to
cross.
Reverting to a traditional grid system allows an enhanced pedestrian and bicycle
crossing at 21st Street, supporting transformation of this street into a festival street
and enhancing the utility of the street's designation as an important bicycle route.
HOW DOES IT ADDRESS DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITY?
Preserving Broadway
Maintains access to parcels currently fronting Broadway.
Maintains direct vehicular connection to regional roadways including Brighton
Boulevard, Park Avenue, Interstate 70, and Interstate 25.
Maintains direct vehicular and pedestrian access to and from the Civic Center area.
Intersection improvements and additional facilities for pedestrian and bicycle move-
ment could increase foot traffic to businesses.
Celebrating Broadway
Decreased curb-to-curb width promotes slower traffic speeds and a more pedes-
trian-friendly environment, an advantage for existing and future commercial, retail
and residential uses.
Decreased curb-to-curb width allows a widened public realm, which could include
spaces for outdoor retail or restaurant spaces.
Maintains access to parcels currently fronting Broadway.
Existing public and private utilities may require relocation.
Bridging Broadway
Upon vacation, existing Broadway right-of-way would revert to adjacent parcels.
Increased parcel size and/or modified parcel geometry may allow for redevel-
opment, new development, or building re-use with different land uses.
In some cases (public parcels, triangle parks), enlarged parcels may enhance a
park's function as a public amenity or ability to act as a development catalyst.
Vacation of Broadway could encourage integration of neighborhoods to the east
and west of Broadway's existing alignment, creating opportunity fora more attrac-
tive, varied urban neighborhood in Arapahoe Square.
In the interim between nowand when the concept could possibly be implemented.
BROADWAY HISTORY
The extension of Broadway was first proposed in 1907 as part of a series of civic improve-
ments by Mayor Robert Speer. Broadway was finally extended from Welton Street to
Blake Street in the 1920's with the intention to increase access, improve mobility, spur
economic development, and provide a direct connection to the Civic Center. Since
Broadway is part of the city street grid and was extended into an area built on the down-
town grid, blocks were split into triangular shapes, often leaving small, irregular parcels.
Broadway's orientation against the downtown grid also created intersections with more
vehicular, bike, and pedestrian movements than a typical four-way intersection.
46
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Transformative Concepts


\\/'
would cause uncertainty for existing and potential future development fronting
Broadway.
Existing public and private utilities may require relocation.
HOW DOES IT ADDRESS LIVABILITY AND THE PUBLIC REALM?
Preserving Broadway
Preserves and enhances the public realm as it exists today.
Potential improvements to the triangle parks could enhance the public realm.
Celebrating Broadway
Decreased curb-to-curb width could allow a widened public realm, with space for
street trees, furnishings and other amenities such as outdoor retail or restaurant
spaces.
Decreased curb-to-curb width and more consistent on-street parking could provide
a traffic-calming effect, creating a more pedestrian-friendly environment.
BROADWAY RECOMMENDATIONS:
Conduct a study of Broadway as part
of the series of studies identified in the
Mobility Framework as the Down-
town StrategicTransportation Plan
Travelshed Analysis and the Northeast
Downtown street network to deter-
mine the most appropriate and fea-
sible way to advance the long-range
vision for Broadway, including study of
the three transformative concepts:
Preserving
Celebrating
Bridging
Bridging Broadway
Stakeholders have identified Broadway as a barrier that divides adjacent neighbor-
hoods into two distinct areas. Removal of this divide could promote the natural
evolution and development of a true urban neighborhood.
Use the NEDN Next Steps Study to
look at short-term improvements for
pedestrians and bicyclists to cross
Broadway, especially at 21 st Street.
The 'Bridging Broadway' concept illustrated looking north from the intersection of Broadway and 19th streets. New development occurs in the former Right-of-way to
stitch the blocks back together. Image produced by the Urban Design Committee of the Colorado Chapter ofAIA.
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Transformative Concepts
47


Connecting River North
GOAL STATEMENT
Improve connections in River North
between Northeast Downtown and
the South Platte River corridor.
31st, 33rd, and 36th streets present the best
opportunities to create new connections across the
railroad tracks in River North.
WHAT IS IT?
Much of Northeast Downtown is in close proximity to the South Platte River, yet access to this
natural amenity is challenging due to the Union Pacific railroad tracks stretching from south-
west to northeast through the Ballpark and River North neighborhoods. This creates two
distinct sides to River North, the portion north of the railroad tracks along Brighton Boulevard,
and the portion south of the railroad tracks along Blake and Walnut streets. Presently there
are only two routes connecting River North: the 38th Street underpass at the northern tip of
the neighborhood, and the Broadway viaduct at the southern end. Three new connections
31 st Street, 33rd Street, and 36th/38th streets would connect both sides of the River
North neighborhood and provide invaluable access to the green space and trail system of the
South Platte River corridor for all of Northeast Downtown. The bridges would potentially in-
crease access to a possible enhanced transit service on Blake, Larimer, or Brighton that would
provide connections to Lower Downtown, Auraria, and multiple transit stations. The bridges
have the challenge of crossing two barriers: the Coors Field parking lot, and the railroad right
of way, including the existing freight tracks and future East Corridor commuter rail tracks.
One potential bridge location at 36th or 38th Street would provide access to the future com-
muter rail station at 38th and Blake. Further study is needed to understand how the proposed
bridges and any necessary approaches would affect adjacent private property. The bridges
would be a significant capital expense and the potential positive and negative impacts on
adjacent properties should be considered.
36th/38th Street: A pedestrian and bicycle bridge at either 36th or 38th Street will be
constructed as part of the FasTracks 38th and Blake East Corridor Commuter Rail Station.
The East Corridor EIS located the bridge at 38th Street, but the 38th & Blake Station Area
Plan recommended relocating it to 36th Street to improve neighborhood connectivity
and pedestrian access to the station. Moving the bridge to 36th Street creates a spine
of activity in both directions from the station that connects with redevelopment efforts
along Brighton Boulevard and Blake/Walnut/Larimer streets. The 38th & Blake Next Steps
Study identified the relocation of the bridge to 36th as being highly important to the
station area, but also acknowledged that it is a complicated issue that would require a
high degree of cooperation between the City, RTD, and the Union Pacific Railroad. If the
FasTracks bridge is constructed at 38th Street, an additional bridge should be construct-
ed at 35th or 36th Street as it would best serve the River North, Curtis Park, Whittier, and
Cole neighborhoods at that location.
31 st Street: A pedestrian and bicycle only bridge at 31 st Street would provide the short-
est route to the river. In combination with becoming a bicycle route and pedestrian
priority path, this street would provide an excellent connection between Northeast
Downtown neighborhood amenities, such as the 30th and Downing light rail station and
Metizo-Curtis Park to the South Platte River corridor.
33rd Street: A bridge accommodating all modes of traffic spanning the Union Pacific
right of way at 33rd Street would not only improve access to the river, it would also
increase overall mobility for the entire River North neighborhood.
BRIDGE TIMING AND PRIORITY
Funding opportunities should be pursued for planning, designing, and construction
of any or all of the River North connections. The 36th Street connection does have the
greatest urgency due to the planned 2016 opening date for the FasTracks East Corridor.
The 31 st Street connection, due to its designation as a pedestrian priority, and the 33rd
Street connection as a multimodal connection, should follow in priority.
48
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Transformative Concepts


HOW DOES IT ADDRESS NEIGHBORHOOD CONNECTIONS AND CHARACTER
The new bridges would create a stronger connection between the burgeoning eclectic arts
scene in River North and the rest of Northeast Downtown while creating a larger and more
diverse community.
HOW DOES IT ADDRESS MOBILITY?
The new bridges would increase access to the River North neighborhood on both sides of the
railroad tracks and improve connections to the South Platte River Greenway.
HOW DOES IT ADDRESS DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITY?
The increased mobility in River North, stronger connections to the river corridor and im-
proved access to commuter rail transit would be seen as an amenity for new employers and
residents throughout Northeast Downtown.
HOW DOES IT ADDRESS THE LIVABILITY AND THE PUBLIC REALM?
Northeast Downtown neighborhoods would have greater access to community open space
and natural amenities along the South Platte River corridor, as well as various arts and cultural
destinations.
This sketch shows a potential pedestrian/bike bridge over the railroad tracks at 31st Street. If the Coors Field overflow parking ever became available for re-use in this area,
new development and park space could be located on the site.
CONNECTING RIVER NORTH
RECOMMENDATIONS:
Evaluate the potential to improve con-
nections in the River North neighbor-
hood and provide additional access to
the South Platte River corridor via:
Pedestrian and bicycle bridges or
underpasses across the Union Pacific
Railroad right of way at 31st Street and
36th Street
Multi-modal bridge or underpass in-
cluding bicycle, pedestrian, and auto-
mobile travel across the Union Pacific
Railroad right of way at 33rd Street.
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Transformative Concepts
49


New Park
WHAT IS IT?
GOAL STATEMENT
Establish a new park in the Northeast
Downtown area that could provide
valuable open space and recreation
amenities for new and existing resi-
dents for years to come.
Northeast Downtown is generally under served by parks compared to the city as a whole.
There are currently 1.26 acres of park per 1000 residents, compared to the citywide aver-
age of 7.14. Expected population increases will further the need for more parks. If properly
designed, located, and programmed, a new park would not only assist in meeting open space
needs, but could also help to energize and attract activity to the surrounding area.
Although a desired amenity, parks can become areas where illegal activities occur. There
is concern on the part of residents and other stakeholders that a new park could become
overrun with nuisances and illegal activities, thereby negating the benefits. For this reason, if
a new major parkis pursued, a strategy to ensure that the park remains an amenity must be
developed.
Conceptual sketch of a new park located along a revitalized "Festival Street" on 21st.
50
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Transformative Concepts


HOW DOES IT ADDRESS NEIGHBORHOOD CONNECTIONS AND CHARACTER?
NEW PARK RECOMMENDATIONS:
A new park, if properly designed and programmed, would be a major enhancement to the
community character of the neighborhood in which it was located.
HOW DOES IT ADDRESS MOBILITY?
In the short-term, identify possible lo-
cations and funding sources to initially
acquire land for a new park.
Pedestrians and cyclists can make direct use of paths and sidewalks in and around parks,
often walking through them as a short cut to another destination.
HOW DOES IT ADDRESS DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITY?
A new park would be a major amenity that could help attract development to nearby proper-
ties.
HOW DOES IT ADDRESS THE LIVABILITY AND THE PUBLIC REALM?
A new park directly enhances the public realm by providing new space for people to congre-
gate, recreate, and engage in activities.
Locate the park on land that is cur-
rently vacant or underutilized
Locate the park close to existing resi-
dential development
Locate the park in an under served
area
Provide the park in conjunction with
new, adjacent development
Provide programming, or dedicate the
park to an active use
Improve and activate existing parks
in conjunction with the provision of a
new park
Incorporate stormwater detention and
water quality features into the park
design, if practicable.
Commons Park: providing new park space in conjunction with redevelopment is a proven strategy in Denver.
m Seek partners for the financing, devel-
opment, programming and mainte-
nance of new park amenities
Legend
^ ^ ^ Study Area
Park
3 Blocks Distance
6 Blocks Distance
This map shows properties that are within 3 and
6 blocks of a major Northeast Downtown park
(Benedict Fountain, Sonny Lawson, or Mestizo-Curtis).
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Transformative Concepts
51


Social Services
GOAL STATEMENT
Better manage the provision of social
services and provide more appropri-
ate facilities in order to improve the
development climate, connectivity,
and safety.
The Triangle Parks Coordinating Dis-
trict was formed In 2011 as a metropoli-
tan district for the purpose of address-
ing the impact of the homeless and
other urban social conditions on these
particular park spaces. The metropolitan
district, though technically a govern-
ment entity, is a good example of the
type of public-private partnerships that
will be increasingly important as the city
moves forward with planned improve-
ments in this area. The District, whose
board is composed of stakeholders in
the Arapahoe Square and Ballpark areas,
will work with the City and other part-
ners to develop and implement physical,
programmatic, and service provision im-
provements. The Denver Rescue Mission
and Parks and Recreation Department
are formulating a stewardship agree-
ment specific to Maestas Park.
Courtyard building form
At the Arapahoe Square Charrette in
January, 2011, attendees identified the
impacts of social services as being the
most immediate need to address within
Arapahoe Square.
WHAT IS IT?
There is a concentration of social service providers in this area which serve a critical role for
the greater Denver region, by housing and feeding homeless and low income individuals and
providing wrap around services such as drug rehabilitation, job training and counseling. The
main providers in this area include the Denver Rescue Mission, Catholic Charities Samaritan
House, the Urban Peak, Saint Francis Center, and the Colorado Coalition for the Homeless's
Stout Street Clinic. The concentration of social service providers leads to activities that are
considered a major impediment to promoting a safe and enjoyable public realm in Arapahoe
Square and hinders development in the neighborhood.
The impact and visibility of the homeless on public streets and parks is a detriment to pro-
moting the area as a walkable, urban neighborhood, most evident at Eddie Maestas Park.
The panhandling and loitering associated with the clients of the social service organizations
contribute to Arapahoe Square's negative reputation and perceived safety issues. While the
populations served by the social service organizations rarely commit crimes, they are often
victims of it. It is widely known that criminals and drug-dealers use the congregations of
homeless individuals in theTriangle Parks as"human camouf1age"for illicit and illegal activi-
ties. This perceived and real barrier is centered on Lawrence, Broadway and Park Avenue and
discourages residents of Curtis Park from walking or biking to Downtown. This all contributes
to Arapahoe Square's image problem and discourages developers from making investments
in the area.
The zoning code sets spacing, density, site, and other limitations on homeless shelters to
reduce their impact on surrounding neighborhoods. Specifically these include, but are not
limited to, a 2,000ft spacing requirement between shelters, a limitation that no more than 2
shelters be allowed within a 4,000ft radius of a proposed new shelter, as well as a limitation
that no more than 200 beds can be located in any one shelter (350 for shelters having a legal
zoning permit as of January 1,2005), and no more than 950 beds can be located in any one
council district. There is also a spacing requirement of 500 feet from a school, meeting the
compulsory education laws of the state.
Given that social service providers are not expected to leave the area, new strategies related
to effective social service management and other alternatives need further exploration:
Courtyard Building Form: Encourage development of courtyards or semi-private open
space for social service queuing, feeding and congregating to replace such activities
currently occurring in theTriangle Parks and on sidewalks. This need may be met by
identifying existing privately owned land adjoining a social service facility, obtaining
additional land, or moving service providers to more suitable locations within Arapa-
hoe Square, or elsewhere in the metropolitan area. Courtyard-style buildings provide
outdoor space that is defensible because of its limited access from the street, private
maintenance and security/surveillance. Courtyards also can provide visual and actual
relief from monolithic building forms. Although the Courtyard development form
was suggested as a general development form for Arapahoe Square, this proposal has
proven to be particularly popular when suggested as a tool to improve the management
of social service providers. At the Arapahoe Square Charrette, this concept was specifi-
cally modeled for the Denver Rescue Mission (DRM). Currently many of DRM's clients
congregate on Maestes Park during the day. In a courtyard development, the DRM could
have a private, outdoor space that would be monitored and controlled by DRM staff. The
homeless population they serve could have a safe place to congregate while not being
housed or provisioned by DRM.
SRO Pilot Project: Develop a pilot single-room occupancy (SRO) project to provide ad-
52
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Transformative Concepts


ditional housing to alleviate the burden on temporary shelters. This building should be
of high quality that contributes to an improved built environment in Arapahoe Square.
Working Group: Establish a working group to refine the concepts described above,
identify the most appropriate entity or entities to pursue their implementation, identify
potential funding and partners including foundations, and determine the roles for the
Community Coordinating District. The following and likely others should be included
in the working group; the Denver's Road Home, Denver Office of Economic Develop-
ment, the State Division of Housing, property owners, and housing and social service
providers. New strategies related to effective and efficient management and develop-
ment alternatives need to be explored. For example, further research is needed for the
courtyards concept or other semi-private open space for social service queuing, feeding
and congregating.
HOW DOES IT ADDRESS NEIGHBORHOOD CONNECTIONS AND CHARACTER?
Effective management of social services would promote movement between Northeast
Downtown neighborhoods, including better access to Downtown Denver's employment,
cultural, and recreational amenities, and create a healthy, safe environment for all.
HOW DOES IT ADDRESS MOBILITY?
Providing courtyards or semi-private open spaces for queuing, feeding and congregating in a
safe environment could significantly increased space and comfort in parks and on sidewalks
thus increasing mobility in and through Northeast Downtown.
HOW DOES IT ADDRESS DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITY?
SOCIAL SERVICES
RECOMMENDATIONS:
Establish a working group to refine
concepts, identify the most appropri-
ate entity or entities to pursue their
implementation, identify potential
funding and partners including foun-
dations, and determine the roles for
the Community Coordinating District.
Encourage development of courtyards
or semi-private open space for social
service queuing, feeding and congre-
gating to replace such activities cur-
rently occurring in theTriangle Parks
and on sidewalks.
Develop a pilot single-room occupan-
cy (SRO) project to provide additional
housing to alleviate the burden on
temporary shelters. This building
should be of high quality that contrib-
utes to an improved built environment
in Arapahoe Square.
Improving the operations of social service providers in Northeast Downtown would remove
an impediment for development in Northeast Downtown.
HOW DOES IT ADDRESS THE LIVABILITY AND THE PUBLIC REALM?
The overall health and safety of Northeast Downtown residents, business owners, and cus-
tomers would be increased by improved management of social services. Improved manage-
ment would also benefit the social service clients.
Northeast Downtown residents, business owners, and customers would enjoy more frequent
use of safe and accommodating streets, sidewalks, plazas, and parks. Improved social services
management extends the delivery of this important community service for residents.
Develop and study alternatives for
repurposing of theTriangle Parks
predicated on creating semi-private
open space. Potential options may
include using theTriangle Parks for
water quality treatment or storm
detention, re-designing and limiting
access, or de-designating the parks
which takes a vote of the people. The
Denver Rescue Mission and the Com-
munity Coordinating Metropolitan
District should be involved.
Denver's Road Home is the principal
citywide effort to address homeless-
ness by providing services and housing.
At the time of this writing, the City is
mid-way through the Road Home effort,
which has the goal of ending homeless-
ness as we know it.
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Transformative Concepts
53


Streetcar
WHAT IS IT?
GOAL STATEMENT
Enhance current transit service, eco-
nomic development opportunities,
and access to neighborhood business-
es while improving the walkable char-
acter of the Welton/Downing Corridor
and adjacent Northeast Downtown
neighborhoods.
Pearl District, Portland, Oregon Low floor streetcar
vehicles provide easy accessibility for all users and
streetcar stops integrate well into the urban environ-
ment.
Streetcars operate in mixed traffic with other vehicles
and are smaller and more nimble than light rail.
A transit rich neighborhood has long been a tradition in Northeast Denver. Curtis Park was
Denver's first streetcar suburb when in 1871 a horse drawn streetcar was installed on Champa
Street connecting the neighborhood to Downtown. Welton Street has hosted several incarna-
tions of in-street rail service, including horse drawn, cable car, and electric streetcar. When
urban rail passenger service returned to Denver in 1994, Northeast Downtown led the way
again when the RTD Central Corridor light rail line reached 30th and Downing along Welton
Street. This transit investment was expected to bring economic development to the corridor
and assist in the revitalization of the Five Points neighborhood. Even though some develop-
ment has occurred in response to the light rail stations on Welton, significant transformation
has not occurred.
As part of the current RTD FasTracks expansion program, the Central Corridor is proposed to
be extended along Downing Street to connect to the future East Corridor Commuter Rail sta-
tion at 38th and Blake. The current RTD plan maintains the existing light rail infrastructure on
Welton Street, which utilizes a separated right of way, while introducing streetcar-like service,
with vehicles operating in mixed traffic lanes, on the new Downing Street segment. The route
would connect to the downtown transit loop and return. This is different from the current
service, which extends to the Mineral Station in Littleton.
The vision for the Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan streetcar concept is a streetcar
system featuring a modern streetcar vehicle operating on rails in mixed traffic for the length
of the route. The conversion of Welton to two way operations between 24th Street and
Downing Street is likely required, with the existing light rail infrastructure being removed
or modified to allow streetcar vehicles to run in mixed traffic. This would include removal of
the high platforms for boarding at existing stations and could provide more right of way for
wider sidewalks. The streetcar could potentially utilize California Street as a couplet to Welton
Street south of 24th Street, allowing Welton to remain one-way south for that portion of the
alignment. Various options to connect to the regional rail transit system, such as connecting
to Civic Center Station or Denver Union Station, require further exploration. The streetcar
concept provides the opportunity to improve the pedestrian experience along Welton Street,
potentially increase the level of service, and provide additional stops that could meet the vi-
sion of the neighborhood.
It is clear from the previous experience of introducing rail transit onto Welton in the 1990's
that the investment of transit infrastructure alone will not result in development. Each cor-
ridor or station is unique in its opportunities and constraints for transit oriented development
(TOD). Neighborhoods that have or appear ready to a have a market for walkable, mixed use,
urban style development are more likely to experience TOD. The characteristics of streetcar
systems in the United States mixed traffic operations, smaller vehicles, simple stations,
short routes through redevelopment opportunity areas may capitalize on a ready real
estate market to promote walkable, urban neighborhoods more so than light rail systems.
Streetcars have demonstrated success in being an organizing element for large scale urban
redevelopment in U.S. cities such as Portland, Little Rock, and Seattle.
The opportunities forTOD on Welton and Downing Streets vary greatly depending on the lo-
cation. Much of the corridor consists of existing main street shopfronts and is located in close
54
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Transformative Concepts


proximity to historic neighborhoods. Any reinvestment in these properties or development
of appropriately scaled in-fill development may depend on the streetcar by-product of an im-
proved pedestrian experience as much as the potential for improved transit service itself. The
38th and Blake commuter rail station area and large assembled parcels closer to Downtown,
between 24th and 20th streets, have the greatest potential for significant redevelopment.
These locations could support in-fill projects at much higher densities more typically associ-
ated with TOD than the rest of the corridor.
A thorough analysis of the streetcar concept, including an inclusive public engagement pro-
cess, is necessary to understand the impact on adjacent neighborhoods and historic proper-
ties, city-wide transit services, pedestrian access, automobile traffic, and side street move-
ments, as well as overall feasibility and cost. The options for a streetcar maintenance facility
location, either in the corridor or elsewhere, would also need further exploration. The location
would greatly depend on the potential streetcar vehicle compatibility with existing RTD light
rail vehicles and future potential streetcar service in other urban corridors.
If streetcar replaced light rail on Welton, the dedicated
right of way and high block platforms could be
removed and used to enhance the pedestrian relam.
Concept Streetcar Map: This map shows a streetcar concept including a possible rerouting to the Civic Center.
This should not be construed as a locally preferred alternative, but as an option for further study.
A modern streetar operating in mixed traffic in
Portland.
Existing Stop
New Stop (Conceptual)
Downtown Circulator
East Corridor Alignment
Option for Streetcar Alignment
Central Corridor RTD Proposal
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Transformative Concepts
55


A streetcar stop in Portland's Pearl District.
A modern streetcar in Vienna, Austria.
Streetcars and streetcar stops work well in dense,
urban environments, serving as a "pedestrian accel-
erator for neighborhood.
HOW DOES IT ADDRESS NEIGHBORHOOD CONNECTIONS AND CHARACTER?
Streetcars tend to encourage development in a more linear fashion, which could distrib-
ute infill development throughout the corridor.
The streetcar could be a unifying element for the neighborhoods and return actual
streetcar service to a historic area of Denver that was built when streetcars were a pri-
mary mode of travel and the population in adjacent neighborhoods was much greater
than it is today.
HOW DOES IT ADDRESS MOBILITY?
Connects to East Corridor Commuter Rail service at 38th and Blake Station with ser-
vice to Denver International Airport and Denver Union Station, similar to the currently
planned FasTracks Central Corridor Extension
Potential opportunity to improve access to Downtown with increased service frequency
due to introduction of two-way operations on Welton Street. A two way streetcar on
Welton provides greater transit flexibility, as the current existing single track segment be-
tween 24th Street and 30th Street imposes an operational constraint that limits service
frequency to one train every 15 minutes.
Has the potential to connect to Civic Center Station to provide intermodal connections
to local bus, mall shuttle, and potential future fixed guideway service on East Colfax and
South Broadway
Low floor vehicles improve access for all users and decrease the dwell time at each stop.
HOW DOES IT ADDRESS DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITY?
The combination of new stations, a potential increase in service frequency, and wider
sidewalks/pedestrian amenity zone may act as a development catalyst.
Proposed new stations on Welton and California streets between 20th and 25th
could provide better access to transit for large redevelopment parcels.
Frequent headways would be desired to shorten the perceived distance from Down-
town and improve the access to Welton and Downing businesses for Downtown
residents and workers.
Wider sidewalks on Welton Street could be possible with a comprehensive street
redesign that makes use of the existing light rail right-of-way. Improving the pedes-
trian realm would enhance the main street character along Welton and encourage
an increase in active uses that provide outdoor seating.
Based on property records, there are eight acres of vacant land within a quarter-mile of
the proposed 33rd and 35th Street stations and an additional 32 acres within a half-mile
radius. These vacant parcels are primarily zoned for residential and industrial uses and
many of them are currently used as parking lots.
56
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Transformative Concepts


HOW DOES IT ADDRESS THE LIVABILITY AND THE PUBLIC REALM?
Streetcars:
Use smaller, more nimble vehicles appropriate for use in urban environments.
Act as a "pedestrian accelerator" in a corridor, improving access to storefronts, parks
and other destinations.
Operate in mixed traffic, providing the opportunity to reclaim the existing light rail
right-of-way and repurpose it for wider sidewalks, an enhanced pedestrian realm, on
street parking, or other amenities.
Can be designed to accommodate on-street parking between travel lanes and the
sidewalk, buffering pedestrians from moving vehicles.
STREETCAR RECOMMENDATIONS:
Recommend the use of modern streetcar vehicles, in place of the existing RTD light rail
transit (LRT) vehicles for the segment of the Central Corridor that is in Northeast Down-
town. The streetcar vehicles should be shorter and narrower than the RTD LRT cars,
provide for a shorter turning radius, and have a low floor for improved ADA access.
Downing Corridor Support RTD's current plan to implement rail transit service on
Downing in mixed-traffic. Recommend RTD consider terminating the Central Corridor
at 36th and Blake to facilitate TOD and preserve the option for future streetcar service
on Blake Street,as recommended in the 38th and Blake Station Area Plan.
Welton Corridor Recommend further study to examine feasibility of converting the
existing LRT service to streetcar service operating in two-way, mixed traffic on Welton
(between 30th and 24th or Park)
Specific items to study include the impact of converting Welton to a two-way
street on turning movements, signal timing, on-street parking, side street traffic
movements,and pedestrian safety.
Welton/California Couplet Recommend further study to examine whether a streetcar
couplet on Welton and California between 24th and Broadway is feasible or advisable.
Downtown Intermodal Connection Recommend further study to examine feasibility
of various alignment options for connections to existing and future downtown transit
service at locations including, but not limited to: Civic Center Station, Auraria Campus,
Auraria West Station, and Denver Union Station. This study should consider ease of
transfer to other transit modes including the downtown circulator and the light rail
transit loop on Stout and California.
Denver Streetcar System Concept Plan Consider, when appropriate, the development
of a streetcar system concept plan that establishes a long range vision for streetcar
service for Denver's neighborhoods including but not limited to criteria for corridor
selection, appropriate neighborhood form and context, and funding opportunities.
A modern streetcar in Melbourne, Australia.
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Transformative Concepts
57


Transit Oriented Development
GOAL STATEMENT
Promote Transit Oriented Develop-
ment in Northeast Downtown at
appropriate locations to encourage
walkable, urban neighborhoods that
have easy access to daily needs and
amenities.
WHAT IS IT?
Transit Oriented Development (TOD) is more than simply development near transit. Suc-
cessful TOD creates vibrant, walkable neighborhoods that provide housing, shopping, and
employment opportunities for a wide array of people. TOD has a mix of uses at various densi-
ties within a half-mile radius, or walking distance, of a transit stop, creating specific areas that
integrate transit into neighborhoods and help support lively and vital communities. The TOD
Strategic Plan defines TOD in Denver and establishes strategies for implementation. In order
to succeed,TOD should address these guiding principles:
Place-making: Create secure, comfortable, varied and attractive station areas with a
distinct identity.
Union Station, Denver
The Point, Denver
m Rich Mix of Choices: Provide housing, employment, transportation and shopping
choices for people of all ages, household types, incomes and lifestyles.
Location Efficiency: Place homes, jobs, shopping, entertainment, parks and other ameni-
ties close to the station to promote walking, biking and transit use.
Value Capture: Encourage all stakeholders residents, business owners, RTD and the
City to take full economic advantage of the amenity of enhanced transit services.
Portal to the Region: Understand and maximize the station's role as an entry to the
regional transit network and as a safe and pleasant place to live.
Northeast Downtown has a great opportunity for TOD at three specific scales that capitalize
on the regional rail transit network:
38th & Blake: The FasTracks East Corridor Commuter Rail line connecting Denver Union
Station and Denver International Airport will have a stop at 38th and Blake Streets. This
station, located on an important regional rail transit corridor, will act as a new gateway
into Northeast Downtown and builds upon the momentum of recent mixed-use and
residential development nearby.
Central Corridor Extension: The FasTracks Central Corridor Extension will extend street-
car style light rail service along Downing Street. Two new stations, at 33rd and 35th
streets will be located on this line that connects the existing 30th and Downing light rail
station with the new 38th and Blake commuter rail station. Development near these two
stations needs to promote a linear, main street environment on Downing that is sensitive
to the adjacent neighborhoods and compliments the existing businesses and overall
character ofWelton Street.
New Arapahoe Square Station: A concept for a new station located between 21 st Street
and Park Avenue in Arapahoe Square provides foryet anotherTOD opportunity. If
streetcar service was established on a Welton and California couplet as proposed in the
StreetcarTransformative Concept, this station would expand development opportunities
for high density, mixed-use projects along the corridor and boost access to Arapahoe
Square and destinations along a potentially improved 21 st street that terminates at
Coors Field.
58
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Transformative Concepts


HOW DOES IT ADDRESS NEIGHBORHOOD CONNECTIONS AND CHARACTER?
TOD promotes a distinct area identity of a walkable, transit-rich community and serves as a
unifying element for Northeast Downtown neighborhoods
HOW DOES IT ADDRESS MOBILITY?
TOD RECOMMENDATIONS:
Promote Transit Oriented Development
of an appropriate scale at three loca-
tions:
TOD promotes walkable, urban neighborhoods that provide residents easy access to many
of their daily needs without the use of an automobile. This can have an impact on the traffic
congestion of the regional transportation networkand associated air quality issues.
HOW DOES IT ADDRESS DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITY?
Development potential of a property correlates with the transportation network's ability to
provide adequate access to the site. An enhanced regional and local transit system increases
the development potential in Northeast Downtown, encourages higher density develop-
ment at transit-rich, urban in-fill locations, and impacts the region's growth pattern. A transit
station serves as a portal to the region and allows property owners to capture the enhanced
value of their land due to the proximity to transit service. TOD provides excellent opportuni-
ties for affordable housing by providing a lower cost transportation option and by connecting
residents to employment centers.
HOW DOES IT ADDRESS THE LIVABILITY AND THE PUBLIC REALM?
TOD creates neighborhoods that:
Mid-rise, high density, mixed-use -
38th and Blake Commuter Rail Station
Neighborhood serving, main street re-
tail and mixed use -Welton-Downing
Corridor between 25th and Welton
and 38th and Blake
High density residential and mixed-
use between 20th Street and Park
Avenue at Welton and California
Funding should be sought for the Cen-
tral Corridor Extension and establish a
goal to complete the extension as close
to the completion of the East Corridor
commuter rail line (projected comple-
tion in 2016) as possible.
Become highly walkable and vibrant, with a mix of active uses on main street corridors
and station area locations;
Provide a mix of housing choices;
Access daily amenities and services;
Promote healthy, active lifestyle choices.
The East Corridor Commuter Rail project, as depicted here, will provide significant opportunities for TOD at the
38th and Blake Station.
South Waterfront, Portland
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Transformative Concepts
59




Neighborhood
Strategies
Northeast Downtown has a strong mix of neighborhoods that possess their own unique char-
acteristics. This plan chapter focuses on specific recommendations for each of the neighbor-
hoods, while highlighting the key framework recommendations and transformative concepts
applicable to each. Several neighborhoods, such as River North and Ballpark, are treated as
one area to reduce duplication. Since many of the neighborhoods'individual boundaries
overlap one another, the neighborhood maps intentionally include duplicate blocks. The
neighborhoods are as follows:
Arapahoe Square
Ballpark/River North
Curtis Park
Downing/Welton Corridor
Enterprise Hill/San Rafael
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Neighborhood Strategies 61


Arapahoe Square
INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY OF EXISTING CONDITIONS:
Immediately adjacent to the Central Business District, Arapahoe Square has the potential to
be the most urban of the Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods. Bounded by Park Avenue,
20th Street, the alley between Welton and Glenarm, and the alley between Larimer and
Lawrence, Arapahoe Square will seta critical character transition between'downtown'and
'neighborhood'.
At present, Arapahoe Square is visually dominated by surface parking lots and a clustering
of social service providers. The most visible aspect of the service providers are the homeless
individuals that congregate in public spaces. The parking lots serve downtown employees
and events at Coors Field. A more hidden asset is the collection of existing buildings that
house a variety of small businesses, both emerging and established. There are also a handful
of residential units, mostly in newer buildings of apartment or rowhouse building forms. An
additional challenge to the area is the diagonal alignment of Broadway; cutting through the
grid at an angle. Broadway's prime function as a regional access corridor into and out of the
downtown core should be balanced with local multimodal transportation needs.
Surface parking lots are a major land use in Arapahoe
Square.
TRANSFORMATIVE CONCEPTS AFFECTING ARAPAHOE SQUARE
Many of the transformative concepts identified in this plan have a direct impact on
Arapahoe Square and are the core of the key recommendations for the area. A list of the
transformative concepts that affect Arapahoe Square follows:
Streetcar A streetcar system featuring a true modern streetcar vehicle operating in
mixed traffic for the length of the Downing/Welton Corridor. In Arapahoe Square, the
streetcar could potentially utilize California Street as a couplet to Welton Street, in-
creasing access and development opportunity between Park Avenue and 20th Street.
21st Street -Three interconnected ideas a Bike Boulevard, a Festival Street, and in-
novative stormwater management develop this concept to make 21 st an organizing
element of Arapahoe Square. 21st provides opportunity to test various "Best Manage-
ment Practices" because it is located on the ridge between the two drainage basins.
Curtis Street An opportunity to create a strong pedestrian linkage from theCentral
Business District through Arapahoe Square, and into Curtis Park.
Broadway-Three conceptual approaches Preserving, Celebrating, and Bridging
to the long-term future of Broadway that are meant to balance local and regional
needs, supporting regional, vehicular mobility while also providing for safe, efficient
pedestrian and bicycle movement.
New Park-A new park, if properly designed, located, and programmed, would not
only assist in meeting open space needs, but could also help to energize and attract
activity to the surrounding area. Portions of Arapahoe Square meet the criteria for
locating and developing a new park in Northeast Downtown as identified in the New
ParkTransformative Concept.
Social Services Multiple approaches to better manage the provision of social
services and provide more appropriate facilities in order to improve the development
climate, connectivity, and safety of Arapahoe Square and the greater Northeast Down-
town neighborhood.
Transit Oriented Development Focusing appropriately scaled development that is
oriented towards the transit investment on Welton Street that encourages walkable,
urban neighborhoods that have easy access to daily needs and amenities.
62
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Neighborhood Strategies


The 2007 Downtown Area Plan (DAP) identified Arapahoe Square as one of seven transforma-
tive projects for Downtown Denver. The DAP envisions Arapahoe Square as a cutting edge,
densely populated, mixed-use area that provides a range of housing types and a center for
innovative businesses. Thus, the primary goal for Arapahoe Square is, quite simply, to catalyze
development. A vibrant Arapahoe Square is a goal in its own right, and also one that will en-
hance neighborhoods on all sides by providing safe, attractive connectivity to the downtown
core and other destinations. Particular issues that must be resolved include pedestrian and
bicycle access across Broadway, investment risk of'pioneering'in an under-developed area of
the city, and negative perceptions associated with clustering of social services. Beyond these
'big picture'issues, finer grain details will need attention as well, including urban form, allow-
able height, neighborhood character, density, and open space.
ISSUES IN ARAPAHOE SQUARE
Arapahoe Square is not a homogenous area; it is comprised of several smaller areas that need
to interact and support each other to overcome a set of shared issues. Central to this theme
is the need to improve the safety and security (real and perceived) through improved design,
increased amenities, and general beautification of the neighborhood. Several issues help
define the opportunities and constraints to meeting the aspirations set out in the Downtown
Area Plan and this plan.
Social Services As described in the Social Services Transformative Concept, the con-
centration of social service providers and their clients have a significant impact on Arapa-
hoe Square. For example, they dominate the visible public spaces such as the sidewalks,
streets, alleys, and parks, especially the Triangle Parks. The impacts of these social issues
have real and perceived impacts on safety, walkability, and development potential. Pub-
lic private partnerships will continue to be the most effective approach to marshalling
the public and private resources necessary to deal with the homeless population and its
impacts.
The zoning code sets spacing, density, site, and other limitations on homeless shelters to
reduce their impact on surrounding neighborhoods. Specifically these include, but are
not limited to, a 2,000 ft spacing requirement between shelters, a limitation that no more
than 2 shelters be allowed within a 4,000 ft radius of a proposed new shelter, as well as a
limitation that no more than 200 beds can be located in any one shelter (350 for shelters
having a legal zoning permit as of January 1,2005), and no more than 950 beds can be
located in any one council district. There is also a spacing requirement of 500 feet from
a school, meeting the compulsory education laws of the state.
Surface parking in Arapahoe Square serves commut-
ers working in the Downtown Core as well as ball
games at Coors Field.
Arapahoe Square is home to a wide variety of unique
businesses.
Plan recommendations focus on addressing social services issues through public private
partnerships and innovative housing concepts:
Arapahoe Square Social Services Working Group
Courtyard Development Concept
Single Room Occupancy housing
Repurpose BroadwayTriangles
Surface Parking Lots Surface parking lots and vacant parcels are a dominant land use
and drive the economics of development in Arapahoe Square. Parking lots can have
a blighting influence because they are often unimproved, poorly maintained, poorly
lighted, and provide additional space for indigent individuals to congregate. They do
represent an asset as a land bank for future development and provide an affordable
parking reservoir to downtown employees and Rockies fans attending baseball games at
Coors Field.
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Neighborhood Strategies 63


Denver Rescue Mission
Alternative revenue streams, such as parking and
billboards, partially drive the disconnect between
asking land prices and what the actual real estate
market will bear.
While there have been a number of land transactions in the area over the past several
years; few new developments have proven financially feasible for a variety of reasons
including high land costs, availability of investment capital, market conditions, and the
risk/reward for Arapahoe Square compared to the development opportunities that are
available in other neighborhoods near Downtown. There is a perception that parking
lot owners are obstructing redevelopment because they are asking for above-market
pricing for their land. Instead, potential alternative revenue streams (i.e. parking and
billboards) that are available to land owners establish land values based on the revenue
that can be generated.
Currently, parking lot managers provide a multi-year ground lease to parking lot own-
ers, which provide a guaranteed income stream regardless of market conditions. These
leases typically include all maintenance and operational expenses on the lot including
snow removal, landscaping, enforcement, operating the payment machine, resurfacing
and restriping. In calculating the appropriate ground lease rate, the parking lot manag-
ers charge between $2 and $6 per day on normal weekdays and can typically charge
between $3 and $20 per day when the Rockies have a home game. Parking managers
anticipate occupancy rates of 95% and above based on current rates and also generate
revenue through citations and evening and weekend rates.
Based on current ground leases provided by parking management companies, net of
property taxes, each parking space in Arapahoe Square can be worth between $750
and $1,750 annually to its owner. These ground leases are generally multi-yearand are
largely insensitive to the overall health of the macro real estate market. Assuming a
standard parking space of 320 square feet (many in Arapahoe Square are smaller), that
puts the annual net operating income from a parking space of between $2.35 and $5.50
per square foot. Assuming a 5% capitalization rate, the parking income stream is valued
between $50 and $110 per land square foot based on today's revenue projections. This
is consistent with both the appraised value of the land in Arapahoe Square and could be
the basis for pricing expectations for land owners.
Lack of Demand A significant challenge facing Arapahoe Square and Downtown
Denver as a whole is insufficient demand for commercial or residential development and
competition from other areas in and around Downtown. There is a significant supply of
developable land in and around Downtown Denver in areas such as the Central Platte
Valley, Union Station, Golden Triangle, and the Highlands. These areas generally demand
higher land prices given their location, buyer preferences, and the presence of ameni-
ties and neighborhood services. In order to encourage developers to invest in Arapahoe
Square, there needs to be a sufficient discount to development to compensate for the
riskofa pioneering development area.
Zoning and small area plans can create a public policy framework that is supportive
of development, but the actual development will be driven by market demand and
individual developer vision, access to capital and underlying fundamentals (i.e., the cost
of development compared with the anticipated revenues) relative to the amount of risk
associated with any project. Arapahoe Square is particularly challenged because, as
mentioned earlier, parking revenues distort land values relative to development risk in a
pioneering area such as Arapahoe Square.
Property Ownership Property ownership in Arapahoe Square is generally fragmented
with few large parcels under single ownership. There are 273 different ownership parcels
over a total of 42 blocks or partial blocks; several blocks have more than 15 individual
parcels. The time required to assemble sufficient land area to construct market-viable
64
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Neighborhood Strategies


footprints for commercial or residential development and complexity involved in ad-
dressing the differing expectations of multiple parcel owners will affect the pace of
redevelopment in the area. Assembled parcels tend to be located on the periphery
of Arapahoe Square, especially along Welton, 20th, and Lawrence streets. Elsewhere,
smaller parcels are interspersed with existing buildings. These parcels support smaller
development projects which can be more compatible with existing buildings and more
viable in a down economy.
Building Re-use Some serviceable building stock exists in Arapahoe Square, especially
in the blocks bounded by 21 st and 24th Streets and Stout and Lawrence streets. While
many of these buildings have unimpressive exteriors, their interior warehouse space and
low rental rate serve their tenants, who often need a combination of flexible industrial
space with ancillary office spaces. The buildings are important assets to the community
representing space that can be affordably retrofitted for companies looking for low
overhead costs with proximity to Downtown Denver. Encouraging the re-use of existing
buildings is an important business development and retention strategy for the area. It is
important to note that a few of the existing buildings are of landmark quality, so preser-
vation efforts are appropriate.
Economic and Business Development The prevalence of social services and lack of
development creates perceived market risks that discourage development at current
land prices. The success of small start-up businesses is generally unknown. The lack
of a positive identity or"brand"exacerbates the negative perceptions. A rebranding of
the area focusing on its affordability and "edgy" character could increase demand and
decrease the perceived risk in the area.
Equally important to business development is housing development to expand the
diversity of the neighborhood through a variety of housing types, prices, and tenancy. A
considerable amount of housing development, mid-rise apartments and row houses, has
occurred in Arapahoe Square; however, it is scattered through the area and not resulted
in a sense of neighborhood.
Stormwater Arapahoe Square, along with other parts of Northeast Downtown, is
subject to occasional flooding. Stormwater improvements are planned in and around
Arapahoe Square, and conditions will improve with these investments. 21 st Street di-
vides two drainage basins. The part of the Arapahoe Square area northeast of 21st Street
is in an area referred to by the adopted 2009 Storm Drainage Master Plan as the Lower
Platte Valley (Basin 0062-01) that flows to the South Platte River. In this area, most of the
drainage outfalls through a network of storm drains which ultimately discharge runoff
into the South Platte River at 36th Street. In general, this storm drainage network has
less than a 1-year storm capacity.
The Arapahoe Square area southwest of 21st Street is a part of the area referred to by the
Stormwater Master Plan as the Central Business District (Basin 4600-01). Currently, drain-
age systems in 20th Street starting at Curtis Street flow to the South Platte River and the
remaining drainage systems convey storm runoff to Cherry Creek and then to the South
Platte River. The existing drainage system in 20th Street meets current City and County
of Denver storm drainage criteria while the remaining drainage systems flowing towards
Cherry Creek need to be enlarged to meet current City and County of Denver drainage
criteria. Without these improvements, there is the threat of flooding for existing build-
ings and additional costs for new development.
Sonny Lawson Park
Arapahoe Square faces stiff competition for urban
development from nearby neighborhoods such as the
Central Platte Valley.
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Neighborhood Strategies
65


This series of sketches illustrates how new develop-
ment relates to the five story datum. Above the 5
story datum, all new structures would be required to
step back. Point towers step back further in exchange
for additional building height.
Urban Design Arapahoe Square's urban design needs to create an identifiable charac-
ter and successfully transition between areas that range from high intensity commercial
and mixed-use districts to lower intensity and historic single-family neighborhoods.
Arapahoe Square is situated between several other neighborhoods and districts, each of
which has its own unique character and development patterns.
Downtown 20th Street is the edge between Arapahoe Square and Downtown
Denver.
Ballpark-The transition between Arapahoe Square and the Ballpark neighborhood
occurs at the alley between Larimer and Lawrence.
Curtis Park Park Avenue West forms the edge between Arapahoe Square and
Curtis Park.
Welton and Clements -The eastern edge of Arapahoe Square includes Welton
Street, and the transition to the Clements Historic District on Glenarm.
Much of the area is zoned D-AS, based on the previous B-8-A zoning. Basically, this
mixed-use zoning has a 4:1 Floor Area Ratio (FAR) with premiums for certain uses and
design review allowing a maximum FAR of 7:1. The maximum height is 200 feet with
transition areas reduced to 80 feet. All new buildings are subject to design review based
on adopted design standards and guidelines that focus on design elements that activate
street-facing elevations.
NEIGHBORHOOD CONCEPTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS
There are a number of strategies which could improve conditions and promote housing and
business development. Arapahoe Square is a short walkaway from Denver's Central Busi-
ness District, Ballpark and Lower Downtown. In the absence of a major, catalyzing public
investment in the area such as a park, festival street, or Broadway reformatting, this section
describes some strategies that can be pursued in the interim.
N.1 Encourage Development of Parking Lots: The economics of parking lots and lack
of demand for real estate development indicate that parking lots may remain a signifi-
cant land use for some time to come. Making interim improvements such as installing
a standard railing and perimeter landscaping to screen and define the lots and encour-
aging operators to join the Denver PublicWorks/Downtown Denver Partnership's "Park
Now"program could reduce the negative visual impacts of this use.
The disconnect between asking land prices and what the real estate market will bear
will change only when parking and other revenue streams become less viable, when
market demand increases, or when sufficient community investment and economic
development occurs. Changes to revenue streams will come only with citywide regula-
tory changes to parking lots or billboards or cultural and economic shifts in transporta-
tion choice. At some point in the future market conditions will make development the
economical choice, as has happened in other downtown districts. Because property
taxes are one of the major costs to parking lot owners, an increase or decrease in taxes
changes the economics. A downzoning could have the unintended consequence of
lowering property taxes, thereby increasing the net revenue to parking lot owners.
N.2 Enhance Urban Design: Arapahoe Square is an organic mix of existing and new
buildings that are of strong urban character. A continuance of this mix will assure Arapa-
hoe Square remains a visually interesting neighborhood. The mix of building forms in
Arapahoe Square should include the podium and point tower, apartment, courtyard
apartmentand general building types. All buildings should add visual interestand
66
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Neighborhood Strategies


pedestrian scale to the public realm, especially streets and public spaces. The intersec-
tion of 21 stand Curtis streets, two Transformative Concepts described previously, should
serve as an early opportunity to implement plan recommendations.
N.3 Building Form: The form recommendations support Arapahoe Square as an organi-
cally evolving district with a broad range of existing buildings and future mid to high-rise
buildings. A wide variety of building forms are appropriate in the district.
Height Building height will be highly varied depending on location, form and use
of buildings.
A five-story height datum line, or maximum street frontage height, for upper
story setbacks is recommended for all structures in Arapahoe Square over five
stories to produce the effect that each new building reads as no more than
five stories from street level. A height datum line is an urban design concept
that allows taller buildings to relate to a pedestrian scale along the street and
to smaller nearby buildings such as those in Arapahoe Square or Ballpark and
Curtis Park. Five stories is a maximum for this datum line; two or three stories
would also appropriate. This urban design concept is most effective when
uses in the lower stories are active and provide "eyes on the street".
Height variations should be based on form alternatives rather than use pre-
miums. For example a narrow point tower could be considerably taller than a
more standard apartment or office building.
*POINT TOWERS:
To encourage higher density develop-
ment where appropriate, specific areas
in Arapahoe Square have been identi-
fied as locations for a podium and point
tower building form. The recommended
maximum height of point towers in
Arapahoe Square are as follows:
Standard Building Height: 12 stories =
Point Tower Height: 20 stories
Standard Building Height: 20 stories =
Point Tower Height: 30 stories
*HEIGHT DATUM LINE:
A five-story height datum line, or
maximum street frontage height, for
upper story setbacks and point towers
is recommended to produce the effect
that each new building reads as no
more than five stories from street level.
A height datum line is an urban design
concept that allows taller buildings to
relate to a pedestrian scale along the
street and to smaller nearby buildings
such as those in Arapahoe Square,
Ballparkand Curtis Park. The five-story
datum line applies to both standard and
point tower buildings.
2.5 Stories
3 Stories
5 Stories
8 Stories
12* Stories
20* Stories
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Neighborhood Strategies 67


A possible building form in Arapahoe Square is the
podium and point tower found in locations such as
the South Waterfront District in Portland
Where height transitions are mapped mid-block, such as between 21 st and
22nd streets, the exact location of this step down (whether mid-block or other-
wise) should be determined as part of a follow-up zoning study.
Siting Promote urban character by minimizing setbacks to provide a consistent
street edge and to support pedestrian activity. Reinforce the character and quality
of public streets with buildings that provide consistent siting, pedestrian orienta-
tion, and access to the street. Minimize the visual impacts of parking by structuring
it within the development, or by locating surface lots to the rear or side of buildings.
Design Elements Give prominence to the pedestrian realm as a defining element
of neighborhood character. Locate commercial uses on the ground floors to activate
buildings and the street. Provide transparency and street facing entries to help
activate and improve safety on the street. Create visually interesting and human-
scaled facades, and encourage variation in building form to provide opportunities
for architectural scale relationships. Along neighborhood edges, arrange the height
and scale of buildings to provide transitions to adjoining areas.
N.4 Land Use: Arapahoe Square is a mixed use neighborhood with a distinctly urban
character. It is comprised of commercial and mixed-use buildings, multi-family residen-
tial, and some light industrial buildings. This is reflected in the future land use map by
the "mixed use" land use category. Land uses can be, but are not necessarily, mixed in
Concept Land Use Map
68
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Neighborhood Strategies


each building, development, or block. Pedestrian access is of importance within Arapa-
hoe Square, with residential and non-residential uses always within walking distance of
one another.
N.5 Conduct Form-Based Zoning Study: Conduct a follow-up study to determine
the appropriate zoning districts to implement the vision for Arapahoe Square that is
presented in this plan. Key elements to address in the study include: land use, building
height, building form, necessary transitions to adjacent neighborhoods, implementation
of the five story datum line, and whether or not to continue to require design review for
new construction within Arapahoe Square. The concept building height map makes use
of mid-block transitions between 21st and 22nd streets as well as Park Avenue and 24th
Street to step down building heights. This is intended to depict that the height transi-
tion should occur somewhere in the block between the identified streets, but the exact
location of this step down (whether mid-block or otherwise) should be determined as
part of the scope of this follow-up zoning study.
N.6 Promote Transit-Oriented Development: The Northeast Downtown Neighbor-
hoods Area has a number of opportunities for transit-oriented development in both the
short and long term. In the short-term, the 38th and Blake Station Area on the East Line
and the Central Corridor Extension on Downing will provide new transit service that
can help stimulate new development. Longer-term, the proposal to convert the Welton
light rail to streetcar, as described in the Transformative Concept, has the potential to
stimulate Main Street type development in Five Points and higher intensity mixed-use
development associated with a new station between 21st Street and Park Avenue.
N.7 Re-use Existing Buildings: Unfortunately, most of Arapahoe Square's building
stock was demolished in the 1960's and 70's; however, some serviceable buildings re-
main, especially in the blocks bounded by 21 st and 24th streets and Stout and Lawrence
California and 22nd Street Conceptual sketch of
redevelopment in Arapahoe Square
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Neighborhood Strategies 69


streets (57% building coverage). A number of existing buildings house start-up busi-
nesses and design firms that value inexpensive rent and proximity to Downtown while
enjoying the "edginess" of the neighborhood. While many of these buildings have un-
impressive exteriors, their interior warehouse space suits their tenants, who often need
a combination of flexible industrial space with ancillary office spaces. The buildings are
important assets to the community representing space that can be affordably retrofit-
ted for companies looking for low-overhead costs with proximity to Downtown Denver.
Encouraging the re-use of existing buildings is an important business development and
retention strategy for the area.
N.8 Establish Business Development Office: The goal of a dedicated Business De-
velopment Office (BDO) located within the Arapahoe Square would be to decrease the
THE ARAPAHOE SQUARE COMMUNITY IDENTIFIED TEN MAJOR ISSUES:
1. Concentration of service providers and homelessness The concentration of social
service providers and congregating homeless individuals are factors, both real and
perceived, that hinder new investment, degrade the pedestrian experience, and diminish
personal safety and security.
2. Mobility Arapahoe Square can be a difficult place to navigate, though the mul-
timodal choices exist. Complicating factors include one-way streets, interface of the
Downtown and neighborhood street systems and Broadway.
3. Predominance of surface parking Over one-third of the land is surface parking or
undeveloped. The uninviting character of these parking lots and vacant land discour-
ages pedestrian activity.
4. Urban Design -. Contributing to the lack of urban character are the lack of street
definition with buildings and treelawns. Current zoning establishes dramatic height
transitions from Downtown to Curtis Park. Historically, buildings have faced the named
streets with few entries facing the numbered streets or Broadway.
5. Parks and Open Space Parks and open space are notably deficient and located on
the perimeter of Arapahoe Square. Park land in Arapahoe Square itself is limited to the
BroadwayTriangles.
6. Stormwater Infrastructure Stormwater infrastructure is aging and inadequate.
System improvements in and around Arapahoe Square have been identified, but not
funded.
7. Building re-use-The stock of existing buildings provides opportunity for inexpensive
space for small businesses and small scale infill development.
8. Property ownership patterns Property is primarily held in small parcels, which adds
the complexity of assembling property for larger scale, potentially catalytic projects. On
the other hand, many assembled properties remain undeveloped.
9. Economic development opportunities-The area has a real or perceived lack of
development. The major impediment for new development is lack of market.
10. Market competition Other Downtown neighborhoods compete with Arapahoe
Square for new development
70
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Neighborhood Strategies


barriers to economic and business development. The BDO would advocate for the area,
gather information regarding financing programs, properties for sale, contact informa-
tion for building and property owners and serve as a one-stop shop for those interested
in investing or locating in a particular area. The BDO could develop marketing materials
and serve as a facilitator to match property owners with prospective tenants and/or help
with assemblages based on client needs. Initial efforts should focus on reuse of existing
buildings.
N.9 Improve Arapahoe Square's Brand: One of the major issues facing Arapahoe
Square is the overall brand of the area. The prevalence of social services and lack of
development creates perceived market risks that prevent development at current land
prices. A rebranding of the area, perhaps focusing on its affordability and "edgy" charac-
ter, could increase demand and decreasing the perceived risk in the area. A central clear-
inghouse for information regarding business opportunities in the area, such as a BDO,
could help to market the area and provide information on investment funding available
for businesses and developers looking to invest in the area.
N.10 Establish Urban Renewal Area: Tax Increment Financing (TIF) can be used
towards projects that create a public benefit such as public improvements or certain
development projects. The first step is to adopt an Urban Redevelopment Plan that
incorporates recommendations of this plan.
Broadway, Stout, 21st Street Conceptual sketch of redevelopment in Arapahoe Square
KEY FRAMEWORK CONCEPTS AND
RECOMMENDATIONS FOR ARAPA-
HOE SQUARE:
A.1 High Intensity Development Near Downtown,Transit Stations and Along Key Streets
A.2 Moderate Intensity Development Transitioning to Neighborhoods
A.4 Adaptive Reuse and Historic Preservation
B.1 Undertake a Downtown Strategic Transportation PlanTravelshed Analysis
B.2 Evaluate Potential One-Way to Two-Way Conversions
B.3 Consider New or Modified Transit Routes
B.4 Consider an Arapahoe Square Rail Station onWelton
B.5 In Short-Term, Undertake a Broadway Intersections Improvement Study
C.2 Promote Economic and Flousing Diversity
C.3 Encourage Flousing Density
C.4 Establish and Support Business Development Offices
C.5 Establish Urban Renewal Areas
C.6 Utilize OED Lending Programs
D.1 Promote Access to Healthy Transportation
D.2 Promote Access to Healthy Foods
D.3 Invest in Park Improvements
D.4 Study Connecting Parks to Desti- nation Areas
D.5 Identify Funding for Stormwater Improvements and Promote Water Quality through Best Practices
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Neighborhood Strategies
71


Ballpark, River North
TRANSFORMATIVE CONCEPTS
AFFECTING BALLPARK, RINO
21st Street-The festival street
concept would be a direct benefit
to the Ballpark neighborhood. The
concept would likely be implemented
incrementally overtime,and under
that scenario it's very likely that the
portion of 21st within the Ballpark
neighborhood would be the site of the
initial investment, since the concept
of activating the street is based on
proximity to Coors Field.
New Park-No major city parks are
located in either Ballpark or RiNo,
meaning that either neighborhood is
a good candidate for any future park
space that may be developed within
Northeast Downtown.
Social Services Although many
of the large social service providers
in this area are located in Arapahoe
Square, adjacent neighborhoods like
Ballpark bear many of the negative
impacts.
INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY OF EXISTING CONDITIONS:
The Ballpark and River North (RiNo) neighborhoods occupy the study area's western bound-
ary. The Ballpark district, north of 20th Street, falls wholly within the study area, while RiNo
continues outside the boundary to the Northwest and towards the South Platte River. Before
becoming a part of River North, the portion of the RiNo neighborhood that lies within the
study area was formerly referred to as the Upper Larimer neighborhood.
The Ballpark neighborhood is home to Coors Field, and sees high visitor traffic on Rockies'
home game days. Successful retail, interspersed with surface parking, lines Larimer Street
from 20th to Park Avenue, and supports game day and neighborhood functions, with addi-
tional small eateries and bars scattered throughout the neighborhood. Ballpark is a desig-
nated historic district, but has also experienced extensive redevelopment since Coors Field
opened in 1995.
RiNo has long served as a backbone of the business activities on the edge of Downtown Den-
ver, with a large number of warehouse, industrial, and support businesses. This is due to the
close proximity to Downtown and has made RiNo integral to the City's economy. Recently,
additional businesses (such as professional services, creative businesses, and others) have
"discovered" the locational advantage and affordability of RiNo. This new market awareness,
along with housing demand, is putting stress on the existing businesses in the area. RiNo
represents a key opportunity for all of these uses to coexist in a true industrial mixed use com-
munity. RiNo is an emerging arts district that benefits from its long history of industrial uses.
The eclectic mix of warehouses, loading dock store fronts, roadside businesses and historic
industrial buildings provide for a unique character for the area that is perfect for its new
identity. Blake Street has seen numerous lofts and apartments converted from former indus-
trial buildings as well as infill projects that mimic that aesthetic. Walnut Street still has many
buildings that have docks along the street and Larimer has recently been seen as an emerging
retail corridor with new shops and restaurants in both Ballpark and RiNo.
Transit Oriented Development -
At the 38th & Blake station, transit
oriented development is envisioned
on the blocks that are adjacent to the
station platform. TOD areas seek to
promote pedestrian traffic and com-
mercial activity. Realizing this vision
will require the extensive redevelop-
ment of properties in the TOD area, as
the existing building stock is low-rise
industrial, which is not well-suited for
this change in use.
Connecting River North-All of the
connection points identified by this
concept are in River North. Currently,
the only routes across the tracks are
the 38th Street underpass at one end
of the neighborhood, and the Broad-
way viaduct at the other. This concept
would add additional connections at
31 st, 33rd, and 36th, greatly enhanc-
ing mobility.
Flousing, both affordable and market-rate, is a relatively new element in the mix of land activi-
ties in Ballpark and River North. In recent years, a number of new or adaptive reuse projects
have created significant amounts of new housing units in this area. Additional housing
development is desired in the community, and care should be taken to ensure that the type
Within the Ballpark Neighborhood, 21st Street features pedestrian amenities including wide sidewalks and
street trees. Low traffic counts on 21st also contribute to the pedestrian orientation of the street.
72
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Neighborhood Strategies


and intensity of future residential development compliments the many existing and emerging
businesses, industrial uses, and arts-related activities that are also located in this area.
Architecture in these neighborhoods tends towards modern rowhouses and lofts, a style
which coexist with active light industrial and class-B office space. RiNo stakeholders in par-
ticular are happy with this urban mix of uses, and like variety of uses, including artist spaces
that this architectural mix allows.
In contrast to lower density, more family-oriented neighborhood like Curtis Park and San
Rafael, Ballpark and RiNo are favored by young, urban singles and couples, as well as empty-
nesters, and are seen as two of the city's new, hip neighborhoods. The community's primary
concerns focus on multi-modal access across the existing freight rail tracks and to the Platte
River, as well as streetscape on Brighton Boulevard. The community is also interested in
potential structuring of Coors Field surface parking and potential uses on the land that would
then become available for development.
NEIGHBORHOOD CONCEPTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS
N.11 Building Form: Building form types range between industrial, general and apart-
ment.
Mixed use projects featuring apartments and ground
floor retail bays have been constructed in the Ballpark
Neighborhood.
Height Maximum building heights in Ballparkand River North range from three to
eight stories. The eight story heights are located in the area's two nodes of density:
in the Ballpark neighborhood between 20th and 24th, and at the future TOD area
at the 38th & Blake station. The three and five story areas are located generally
between 24th and 35th, with Blake and Walnut supporting 5 stories and Larimer
supporting three to aid in the transition between RiNo and Curtis Park.
RiNo has become known as a neighborhood where
"funky", "eclectic", and "creative" businesses are
welcome.
COORS FIELD CONTEXT AREA
Within this area it is recommended
that building heights not be allowed
to exceed the height of the Coors Field
stands.
3 Stories
5 Stories
8 Stories
Coors Field Context Area
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Neighborhood Strategies
73


Innovative residential infill development
Mixed Use Industrial
Mixed Use
TOD
Siting Promote urban character with a build-to line to provide a consistent street
edge and to support pedestrian activity. Reinforce the character and quality of
public streets with buildings that provide consistent siting, pedestrian orientation,
and access to the street. Minimize the visual impacts of parking by structuring it
within the development, or by locating surface lots to the rear or side of buildings
with access to/from the alley.
Design Elements Give prominence to the pedestrian realm as a defining element
of neighborhood character. Maintain required ground story activation such as
window transparency and street facing entrances. Locate commercial uses on the
ground floors to activate buildings and the street, especially in the Ballpark neigh-
borhood and in the 38th/BlakeTOD area. Create visually interesting and human-
scaled facades, and encourage variation in building form to provide opportunities
for architectural scale relationships.
Coors Field Context Area For Ballpark, reinforcing Coors Field as the neighbor-
hood landmark is important. The scale and character of the neighborhood is set by
this iconic structure, and as such any nearby buildings should respect the stadium's
prominence and work collectively to promote a cohesive urban experience. Special
attention should be given to the public realm along Blake Street, where many Rock-
ies fans initially experience the game day atmosphere. To accomplish these urban
design objectives, the height map shows a Coors Field Context Area wherein it is
recommended that building heights not be allowed to exceed the height of the
Coors Field stands.
74
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Neighborhood Strategies


N.12 Land Use: Ballpark is a mixed use neighborhood with a distinctly urban character.
It is comprised of commercial and mixed-use buildings, multi-family residential, and a
collection of historic warehouse buildings.This is reflected in the future land use map
by the "mixed use" land use category. As one travels from Ballpark to the northeast into
RiNo, the land use mix changes and becomes much more industrial and eclectic. This
is especially true northeast of 24th Street. In this area, the future land use map shows
"mixed use-industrial"as the predominant land use category for RiNo. Northeast of 35th
Street, the future land use designation is "transit oriented development", in support of
the commuter and light rail station that is planned at 38th & Blake.
N.13 Complete Sidewalk Network: Nearly all of the existing gaps in the Northeast
Downtown sidewalk network are in RiNo. Blake and Walnut have the highest frequency
of gaps, while some of the numbered streets intersecting Blake and Walnut also lack
sidewalks. City regulations require that sidewalks be provided in conjunction with
redevelopment. This is a strategy that is helping to gradually fill in the sidewalk network,
but in a piecemeal way, as new sidewalks adjacent to a redeveloped property may have
nothing to connect to until neighboring properties also redevelop. It is recommended
that staff workto identify funding opportunities to fill in gaps in the sidewalk network.
N.14 Evaluate Potential One-way to Two-way Conversions: Several current one-way
streets within this area should be considered for conversion to two-way. These include
the sections of Blake, Walnut, and Larimer.
Larimer Larimer Street, east of Broadway, is scheduled for two-way conversion in
2011, which should help support this emerging retail corridor.
Blake Much of the multifamily residential construction and adaptive reuse that this
area is known for has occurred on Blake Street. The land use mix continues to shift,
and the street has become increasingly residential. Evaluate conversion to two-way
in the short-to-medium timeframe or at such time as land use changes along the
corridor warrants.
Walnut Converting Walnut Street to two-way operations is a long-range proposal.
Although land uses have gone through a transition on Blake and Larimer, Walnut
remains a very industrial street. Conversion to two-way would only be advisable if, in
the future. Walnut experiences significant amounts of redevelopment that elimi-
nates most of the loading docks that are found along the street.
N. 15 Consider Future of Coors Field Overflow Parking: In the future, if the footprint
of the Coors Field overflow parking between the railroad right-of-way and Blake Street is
reduced, consider a combination of redevelopment and park space on the site.
KEY FRAMEWORK CONCEPTS AND
RECOMMENDATIONS FOR RINO/
BALLPARK:
A.1 High Intensity Development Near Downtown,Transit Stations and Along Key Streets
A.4 Adaptive Reuse and Historic Preservation
B.1 Undertake a Downtown Strategic Transportation PlanTravelshed Analysis
B.2 Evaluate Potential One-way to Two-Way Conversions
B.3 Consider New or Modified Transit Routes
B.5 In Short-Term, undertake a Broadway Intersections Improvement Study
C.1 Strengthen Retail Corridors
C.2 Promote Economic and Housing Diversity
C.3 Encourage Housing Density
D.1 Promote Access to Healthy Transportation
D.2 Promote Access to Healthy Foods
D.3 Invest in Park Improvements
D.4 Study Connecting Parks to Destination Areas
%
Coors Field is an iconic building in the Ballpark Neighborhood.
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Neighborhood Strategies
75


Curtis Park
TRANSFORMATIVE CONCEPTS
AFFECTING CURTIS PARK
Connecting River North Currently,
the only routes across the railroad
tracks within Northeast Downtown
are the 38th Street underpass and the
Broadway viaduct. This concept would
add additional connections at 31 st,
33rd, and 36th, greatly enhancing
mobility options to the west for Curtis
Park.
Curtis Street Curtis Street is central-
ly located in the middle of the Curtis
Park Neighborhood. Already a good
street for walking within Curtis Park,
enhancing Curtis Street as a pedes-
trian connection through Arapahoe
Square and into Downtown would
create a pedestrian-priority corridor
that would improve connectivity for all
three neighborhoods.
Transit Oriented Development -
Welton and Downing are identified
in this plan asTOD corridors. Both
of these streets are located on the
edge of Curtis Park, and as such any
TOD that occurs along these corridors
would directly serve the neighbor-
hood.
Streetcar As a neighborhood served
by the streetcar, Curtis Park would
benefit from the mobility and TOD
advantages that are associated with
streetcar service.
Social Services Although many
of the large social service providers
in this area are located in Arapahoe
Square, adjacent neighborhoods like
Curtis Park bear many of the negative
impacts.
INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY OF EXISTING CONDITIONS:
Curtis Park is one of Denver's oldest residential neighborhoods, boasting some of the City's
most historic homes as well as the City's first official park, Mestizo-Curtis Park. The majority of
the neighborhood lies within designated historic districts, and offers urban design elements
such as period lighting and sandstone sidewalks. Curtis Park is a true urban neighborhood
both architecturally and demographically, with homes ranging from large Victorians to mod-
ern rowhouses, and long-time residents to new urban dwellers looking for a true neighbor-
hood feel within walking distance of the downtown core.
Curtis Park residents are well-organized and take pride in their neighborhood. Their top
priorities for neighborhood enhancement include conversion of one-way streets to two-way,
connectivity to the river, connectivity to the downtown core, historic preservation, design
review for new construction, and ensuring appropriate architectural and height transition
between Curtis Park and adjacent neighborhoods. Residents are particularly interested in the
north-south transition between their neighborhood and the yet-to-be-developed Arapahoe
Square district which lies between Curtis Park and the downtown business core.
The vast majority of the Curtis Park neighborhood is an area of stability, as identified by Blue-
print Denver. Development policies in areas of stability should promote the continuation of
existing land use patterns, building forms, and development densities. Curtis Park is desig-
nated by several historic landmark districts, further reinforcing the importance of preserving
the existing character elements of the neighborhood.
Throughout the planning process, the idea of converting Stout and Champa to two way was
frequently raised. This plan recommends that Stout and Champa be maintained as a one-way
couplet at least until after the RTD Central Corridor improvements are in place on Downing
Street. At that time, it may be appropriate to consider two way operations on Stout Street,
which is wide enough to accommodate a travel lane in each direction, on-street parking
Curtis park has some of the oldest residential structures in Denver, such as this 1880s Italianate-style home
76
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Neighborhood Strategies


on both sides of the street, and one bike lane. Two-way operations on Champa are more
challenging because of the street's narrower cross section, which would likely mean losing
the existing bike lane. For this reason, Champa will need to remain a one-way street for the
foreseeable future, until such time that this issue can be sufficiently addressed. The long-
range vision of this plan is for all streets within Curtis Parkto be two-way, but in the interim
it is recommended that the Stout/Champa couplet be maintained and that traffic calming
measures to reduce travel speeds be identified and studied as part of a comprehensive Next
Steps Transportation Operations Study for Northeast Downtown.
The emphasis of Curtis Street as a pedestrian priority street is identified as a transformative
concept by this plan. Establishing a clear pedestrian connection from Curtis Park through
Arapahoe Square and to the Central Business District will help to connect these neighbor-
hoods together. The designation of 31 st Street as another pedestrian priority street creates
complimentary opportunities for the Curtis Park neighborhood. Both Curtis Street and 31 st
Street feed directly into Mestizo-Curtis Park, creating a "T-shaped" pedestrian priority area
that bisects the Curtis Park neighborhood in two directions, providing connectivity that is
anchored by destination areas in all directions. To the west, a proposed pedestrian bridge
over the railroad tracks at 31 st provides connectivity to the River North neighborhood and the
South Platte River. To the east, 31 st Street terminates at the 30th & Downing transit station
and the TOD areas along Welton and Downing. Meanwhile Curtis Street itself is interrupted at
Mestizo-Curtis Park, and provides a pedestrian priority connection southward to Downtown.
CURTIS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD GOALS:
Continued mix of housing types and affordability
Protection of neighborhood historic structures, and design review of infill for compat-
ibility
Installation of period street lighting and pedestrian lighting
Reuse of vacant historic structures such as the Epworth church, the Curtis Park Com-
munity Center,Temple Emmanuel, and some individual residences
Development of vacant land, including both large properties and interior neighbor-
hood vacant lots
Reuse or redevelopment of unoccupied non-historic structures such as the Denver
Enterprise Center, the community center's mid-block buildings, and the former Nest
Fresh factory on Lawrence Street
Removal of unnecessary curb cuts and prohibition of additional curb cuts where alley
access is available
Achieve calm neighborhood traffic patterns
Eventually convert all one-way streets within the neighborhood to two-way
Preserve and foster increased pedestrian and bicycle connectivity to Downtown and
the South Platte River
Customize the zoning code's accessory dwelling unit form standards to work better
with Curtis Park's narrow residential lots
City assistance with abandoned and neglected properties and structures
Remove all non-conforming billboards
Improve and activate parks
Single family residence in Curtis Park.
The Denver Housing Authority has constructed multi-
family residential homes compatible with the historic
scale of Curtis Park.
Denser housing types are also located within the
neighborhood.
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Neighborhood Strategies
77


HISTORIC SIDEWALKS:
NEIGHBORHOOD CONCEPTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS
Curtis Park has a sizable collection of
sandstone (sometimes referred to as
"flagstone") sidewalks and curbs.These
facilities contribute greatly to the
historic character of the neighborhood.
Sandstone is a permissible sidewalk
material that meets City standards, but
the cost is much greater than standard
concrete sidewalks, and so many prop-
erty owners elect to replace sidewalks
with concrete rather than pay the cost
of repairing damaged sandstone. A
strategy for preserving these resources
needs to be identified. There currently is
no regulatory mechanism to require the
preservation of sandstone sidewalks and
curbs.
Historic flagstone sidewalks in Curtis Park
N.16 Building Form: The majority of the neighborhood should continue it's tradition of
urban house, duplex and row house building forms.
Height -The recommended height map shows a majority of the Curtis Park neigh-
borhood at 2.5 stories, a maximum height that reinforces the existing zoning within
the neighborhood. Of key importance is how the maximum heights of adjacent
areas, which are generally higher, transition to the 2.5 stories found in Curtis Park.
Southern Edge Curtis Park meets Arapahoe Square at Park Ave West. The
strategy for transitioning from the much higher building heights in Arapahoe
Square is to limit development to 5 stories along Park Ave, and then step down
to a three story maximum approaching 24th Street.
Eastern Edge Maximum building heights along Welton Street in Historic Five
Points are proposed to be 8 stories between Park Ave and 27th Street, and
5 stories north of 27th Street. The presence of an alley between Welton and
California helps to transition building heights downward to Curtis Park, as
do protected district development standards within the zoning code that set
maximum height limits and require building setbacks for properties located
on Welton and adjacent to the Curtis Park neighborhood.
Northern Edge Downing Street is the seam between the downtown street
grid and the Denver neighborhood grid. This results in angled intersections
along Downing and triangle-shaped parcels along the Curtis Park edge.
Because alleys do not help to buffer commercial development along Down-
ing from adjacent residential structures, the maximum height for main street
development along Downing is proposed to be three stories.
Western Edge Building heights transition upward to three stories at Arapa-
hoe in recognition of the denser development patterns found in Denver Hous-
ing Authority's Villages at Curtis Park, where apartment forms are permitted.
Siting Siting of new residential forms should be consistent with the existing, his-
toric development patterns within the neighborhood. These elements include con-
sistent front yard setbacks, small zone lots, high lot coverage comparable to historic
patterns, and locating garages and accessory dwelling units at the rear of the lot.
Design Elements -Give prominence to the pedestrian realm as a defining element
of neighborhood character. Emphasize a positive relationship to the street by ensur-
ing that building access, orientation, and placement are consistent with established
patterns. Create visually interesting and human-scaled facades. Along the edges of
the neighborhood, arrange the height and scale of buildings to provide transitions
to adjoining areas.
78
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Neighborhood Strategies


Concept Building Heights Map
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Neighborhood Strategies
79



Urban Residential infill in Curtis Park
Apartment buildings are being retrofitted into for-sale
condominiums
m N.17 Land Use: Single family residential is the predominant use within Curtis Park, buta
mix of attached housing types are also present throughout the neighborhood. This mix
of residential types is reflected in the future land use map by the single family/rowhouse
designation that is used for most of the neighborhood. The blocks between Lawrence
and Arapahoe have a designation of urban residential to reflect the more dense residen-
tial land uses that comprise the Villages at Curtis Park development.
N.18 Stout and Champa Reclassification: Reclassify Stout and Champa in the Blueprint
Denver transportation framework from "residential arterial" to "residential collector"
streets to reflect how the streets are used today within the Curtis Park neighborhood.
N.19 Identify Traffic Calming Opportunities: Study traffic calming opportunities for
the neighborhood, but especially for Champa and Stout, as part of an overall Next Steps
Transportation Study for Northeast Downtown.
N.20 Accommodate Adaptive Reuse: Part of Curtis Park's unique character comes from
the presence of imbedded commercial structures within the neighborhood, typically
located on corners. In some cases, these structures are in active commercial use, but in
many other cases the buildings are vacant. More often than not, these properties have
residential zoning and as such the establishment of new commercial uses would be
precluded. Such a situation would not be in the best interest of the neighborhood. The
reuse of existing commercial buildings for commercial purposes should be accommo-
dated on a case-by-case basis, in consultation with the neighborhood.
80
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Neighborhood Strategies


Concept Land Use Map
KEY FRAMEWORK CONCEPTS AND
RECOMMENDATIONS FOR CURTIS
PARK:
A.2
A.3
A.4
B.1
B.2
B.3
C.2
D.1
D.2
D.3
D.4
Moderate Intensity Development
Transitioning to Neighborhoods
Low Intensity Development in
Residential Neighborhoods
Adaptive Reuse and Historic
Preservation
Undertake a Downtown Strategic
Transportation PlanTravelshed
Analysis:
Evaluate Potential One-way to
Two-way Conversions
Consider New or Modified Transit
Routes
Promote Economic and Housing
Diversity
Promote Access to Healthy
Transportation
Promote Access to Healthy Foods
Invest in Park Improvements
Study Connecting Parks to
Destination Areas
Single Family/Row House
Urban Residential
Mixed Use
TOD
Park
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Neighborhood Strategies 81


Downing/Welton Corridor
The Rossonion Hotel is a historic landmark at the Five
Points intersection.
TRANSFORMATIVE CONCEPTS
AFFECTING DOWNING/WELTON
Streetcar The NEDN Streetcar Con-
cept features a true modern streetcar
vehicle operating in mixed traffic for
the length of the Downing/Welton
Corridor. This would benefit the
Welton corridor, in particular, because
the right-of-way that is currently
devoted to light rail operations could
be repurposed for wider sidewalks and
a pedestrian amenity zone.
21st Street-The festival street con-
cept intersects Welton at 21 st Street. A
new light rail/streetcar stop between
21st Street and Park Avenue would
serve the festival street and cyclists/
pedestrians utilizing that route to get
to Coors Field.
Transit Oriented Development
- Focusing appropriately scaled
development that is oriented towards
the transit investment on Welton and
Downing encourages walkable, urban
neighborhoods that have easy access
to daily needs and amenities.
INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY OF EXISTING CONDITIONS:
The Downing/Welton Corridor is essential to Denver's historic Five Points neighborhood.
Sometimes called the'Flarlem of the West', Five Points, which is Colorado's only designated
historic cultural landmark, has a rich jazz history and has served as the heart of the African-
American community in Denver since at least the 1930's. Although many of these historic
venues have since disappeared, the historic Rossonian Building situated at the actual'five
points'intersection (Welton, Washington, 26th Avenue, and 27th Street) remains an important
anchor for the neighborhood and the corridor. After World War II, the corridor has continually
struggled to maintain its previous vibrancy and economic success. Small-scale storefronts
spread north and south from the Five Points intersection, creating a developing node of
neighborhood-serving retail.
The Downing/Welton corridor is bordered closely by the Curtis Park, Enterprise Hill, Whittier,
and Cole neighborhoods, which consist of predominately historic single family homes and
townhouses. The Glenarm Recreation Center is located just to the southeast of Welton on
28th Street. Two parks serve the corridor; Quick Park, a small pocket park with picnic tables,
a playground and a basketball court, and Sonny Lawson Park, a 2.5 acre neighborhood park
with a softball field, basketball court, playground and restrooms. Also in the corridor is the
Five Points Business Development Office, located on Washington Street, just south ofWelton.
The neighborhood benefits from a high degree of connectivity to the downtown core, as well
as future connections to points east due to the RTD FasTracks Central Corridor Extension. The
project has identified Downing Street as the connection between the current end of line sta-
tion at 30th Street and the new East Corridor Commuter Rail station at 38th and Blake, which
is scheduled to open in 2016 and will connect Denver Union Station to Denver International
Airport. Two new stations will open on Downing with light rail vehicles operating in mixed
traffic between 30th Avenue and the commuter rail station as part of FasTracks, but funding is
not currently available for this extension.
Five Points has attracted significant private and public investments over the past two decades.
The City has supported and funded a number of public improvements and provided invest-
ment capital for business development. The most significant private investment has been
made by hundreds of individual homeowners in the surrounding neighborhoods. These
purchase and rehab investments have changed the character of the area into a multi-racial,
multi-cultural, and mixed income area. The greatest opportunity for further renewal and revi-
talization rests with building on these past and present-day investments to sustain additional
investment along Welton and Downing.
As part of the Colorado Sustainable Main Streets Initiative, the Five Points Business District
developed the Five Points Sustainable Main Street Vision Plan and Final Report in December
2010. Many key ideas from that report informed the Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods
Plan process for the Welton and Downing Corridors. Stakeholder interests center on enhanc-
ing the neighborhood's existing assets, particularly in rebuilding and strengthening retail
along Welton and Downing Streets. The prominent concept from the Vision Plan is the desire
to turn Five Points into a vibrant, mixed use marketplace that supports local businesses, capi-
talizes on cultural and educational opportunities, and encourages the health and wellness of
residents.
Welton Street is envisioned as a neighborhood-serving commercial corridor that is an attrac-
tion with regional appeal. As a cultural destination, the corridor will achieve a balance of au-
tomobile, pedestrian, bicycle, and transit mobility with active ground-floor retail and a mix of
82
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Neighborhood Strategies


upper floor uses, including residential. Widened sidewalks will give businesses a visible street
presence as well as places for art, social gatherings, and streetscape amenities. Health, well-
ness, sustainability, and tourism will be integral to the buildout and development of the area.
Enhancing the pedestrian experience of Welton Street is critical to achieving the goal of creat-
ing a "Five Points Marketplace". An important step would be the adaptation of the existing
light rail service to mixed traffic streetcar service, as identified in the Transformative Concepts
chapter. A modern streetcar operating in mixed traffic on Downing and Welton; which would
need to be converted to two way operations between 24th and 30th streets, would allow for
a redistribution of the existing right of way. Under this streetcar concept, the existing light
rail infrastructure, currently configured within a designated right-of-way would be removed
or modified, freeing up valuable right-of-way for enhanced pedestrian amenities and on-
street parking. In the current condition, retail interests have been shown to suffer, by some
accounts, due to the rail location as little as ten feet from building facades in some places. An
analysis of this concept is necessary to understand the impact on the neighborhood, city-
wide transit services, and automobile traffic.
If accomplished, the streetcar would be a unifying element for the neighborhoods and act as
a "pedestrian accelerator"in the corridor, improving access to storefronts and activating the
street. Development on the alignment would be more equally distributed throughout the
corridor and more easily fit into the community vision. Closer to Downtown, where large par-
cels have been assembled for redevelopment, the streetcar could encourage a walkable, high
density neighborhood with a rich mix of uses including a range of housing types to promote a
diverse population in the corridor.
Homes along commercial corridors can be reused as
retail storefronts. Homes facing Downing Street could
be utilized in a similar manner as these homes in the
Nob Hill neighborhood of Portland.
The light rail on Welton Street operates in its own
dedica ted righ t of way.
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Neighborhood Strategies 83


NEIGHBORHOOD CONCEPTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS
The Nob Hill District of Portland is an example of a
neighborhood that has benefited from the addition
of streetcar service to its urban character.
N.21 Building Form:
Height The recommended height map shows a range of heights for the corridor,
generally promoting a main street feel for Downing and Welton Streets that capital-
izes on transit service, while respecting nearby historic neighborhoods. An eight-
story height maximum was utilized from Park Avenue to 27th Street as a step-down
from the taller building heights that are proposed for Arapahoe Square. A five story
maximum was then utilized north of 27th Street and along Downing where a paral-
lel alley was available to provide al transition to adjacent residential neighborhoods.
Where alleys are not parallel to the corridor, such as the western edge of Downing
adjacent to Curtis Park, a three story height was applied. To the north and west
ends of the corridor, greater heights are allowed in response to additional transit
options; the commuter rail station at 38th and Blake and the multiple transit modes
in Downtown. The combination of development opportunity near transit, desire for
a main street character, and adjacency to historic neighborhoods makes appropriate
transitions critical to the Downing/Welton Corridor.
Siting The desired street character of Welton and Downing is a main street feel
that acknowledges the important presence of high quality transit service in the
corridor. Buildings in the corridor should maintain the build-to line to provide a
consistent street edge and promote pedestrian activity. Buildings should be placed
to best assist with transitions to adjacent neighborhoods. The visual impacts of
parking should be minimized by being located atthe rearofthe building.
Design Elements Building scale should promote a main street character and
be oriented towards either Downing or Welton, with prominent main entrances
situated for pedestrian access. A high level of transparency on the ground floor is
desired.
Transition to Adjacent Residential Neighborhoods Within the study area, large
segments of both Welton and Downing are adjacent to low-scale residential neigh-
borhoods. Where this condition exists, it is recommended that zoning standards
pertaining to height, setbacks, building sculpting and upper story setbacks, and
other design elements, as appropriate, be utilized along the adjacent edge to cre-
ate a transition between infill development along the main street corridor and the
residential neighborhood.
84
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Neighborhood Strategies


Concept Building Heights Map
Vacant parcels and surface parking lots dominate the
landscape along We/ton near 22nd Street.
2.5 Stories
3 Stories
5 Stories
8 Stories
12* Stories
20* Stories
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Neighborhood Strategies 85


TOD ON WELTON ARAPAHOE
SQUARE STATION
The most promising opportunity for
development in the corridor is located
between 20th and 24th streets on Wel-
ton, where multiple parcels have already
been assembled for redevelopment. To
help facilitate TOD at this location, a new
station between 21 st Street and Park Av-
enue is recommended to provide better
access to these parcels. A new station, in
combination with the conversion of light
rail to a streetcar couplet on Welton and
California would expand the area where
TOD could occur.
N.22 Land Use: The Downing/Welton Corridor is identified as transit-oriented develop-
ment (TOD) in the concept land use map. Transit-oriented developments have land uses
with a direct correlation to the function of a mass transit system. These development
sites are located at stations or stops along bus or rail lines within a mass transit network.
Transit-oriented developments provide housing, services, and employment opportuni-
ties for a diverse population in a configuration that facilitates pedestrian and transit ac-
cess. Along the Welton/Downing corridor.TOD occurs at several different scales, reacting
to the amount and type of transit service and the context of the existing neighborhood.
Higher density development should be focused near Downtown and between 35th and
38th street at the Commuter Rail station. Lower density development should be focused
adjacent to historic neighborhoods.
N.23 Support Work of Five Points Business District Office: Continuation of marketing
and business support activities are necessary to create a sustainable commercial district.
The Five Points Business District Office, with key partners, should identify opportunities
to focus on a key redevelopment project or major private investment that could serve as
a catalyst for attracting more investment to the area.
N.24 Establish Urban Renewal Area: To assist with this plan's implementation or to at-
tract reinvestment in the corridor, it is recommended that an Urban Renewal Area for all
or parts of the Welton/Downing Corridor be examined.
N.25 Evaluate Short One-way Street Segments: As part of a Next Steps transportation
operations study, evaluate the possible two-way conversion of several short one-way
street segments that connect to Welton and Downing:
27th St. between California and Welton
28th St. between Welton and Glenarm
Glenarm between 29th St. and Downing
N.26 Orientation of Outdoor Active Uses: So as to minimize negative impacts on
adjacent residential neighborhoods, orient outdoor dining and rooftop terraces of com-
mercial structures such that they face Welton/Downing and not the alley.
86
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Neighborhood Strategies


Broadway
Concept Land Use Map
KEY CONCEPTS AND
RECOMMENDATIONS FORTHE
WELTON/DOWNING CORRIDOR:
A.1 High Intensity Development Near Downtown,Transit Stations and Along Key Streets
A.2 Moderate Intensity Development Transitioning to Neighborhoods
A.4 Adaptive Reuse and Historic Preservation
B.1 Undertake a Downtown Strategic Transportation PlanTravelshed Analysis
B.2 Evaluate Potential One-way to Two-Way Conversions
B.3 Consider New or Modified Transit Routes
B.4 Consider an Arapahoe Square Rail Station onWelton
C.1 Strengthen Retail Corridors
C.2 Promote Economic and Housing Diversity
C.3 Encourage Housing Density
C.4 Establish and Support Business Development Offices
C.5 Establish Urban Renewal Areas
C.6 Utilize OED Lending Programs
D.1 Promote Access to HealthyTrans portation
D.2 Promote Access to Healthy Foods
Single Family
Single Family/Row House
TOD
Park
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Neighborhood Strategies 87


Enterprise Hill, San Rafael
The Clements Historic District
Benedict Fountain Park
INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY OF EXISTING CONDITIONS:
Enterprise Hill and San Rafael are located in the southeast corner of the studyarea. Like Curtis
Parkand Five Points, Enterprise Hill and San Rafael are among Denver's oldest neighborhoods.
They boast a rich collection of historic homes that are an architectural testament to the area's
history. Residents characterize Enterprise Hill and San Rafael as family-oriented urban neigh-
borhoods.
San Rafael has a large collection of historic homes dating from the late 19th and early 20th
centuries. Although the neighborhood would certainly be eligible for historic designation, the
establishment of local historic districts is a community-driven activity, and to date no local
landmark historic district has been established for San Rafael. Like Curtis Park, San Rafael has
a large collection of sandstone sidewalks and curbs that contributes to the historic character
of the neighborhood. San Rafael is notable within Northeast Downtown because it is the only
neighborhood within the study area that is built on the north/south east/west grid rather
than the angled downtown grid. The Safeway at 20th Avenue and Washington is the only
modern full service grocery store in Northeast Downtown, and as such is a major destination
for residents within the entire study area.
Enterprise Hill is an interesting mix of old and new. Many grand and historic homes are locat-
ed along Glenarm and Tremont, including the Clements Historic District. Clements is located
across the street from Benedict Fountain Park, a 2.8 acre passive recreation park that is a major
amenity for the neighborhood. But Enterprise Hill has also long been the location of public
housing, and a large portion of the neighborhood is in the process of being transformed by
DHA's Park Avenue redevelopment project, a mixed-income development with over 800 units
of housing.
Stakeholders' primary concerns center on supporting and enhancing the neighborhood's ex-
isting character. Residents are comfortable with the area's current mix of housing types, and
are interested in the types of uses which will be allowed as vacant and underutilized parcels at
the neighborhood's western edge near Downtown and Arapahoe Square begin to redevelop.
TRANSFORMATIVE CONCEPTS NEIGHBORHOOD CONCEPTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS
21st Street If fully realized, the bike
boulevard/festival street concept for
21 st Street could eventually extend
from Coors Field all the way to Bene-
dict Fountain Park, forming a strong
pedestrian and bike connection serv-
ing Ballpark, Arapahoe Square,and
Enterprise Hill.
N.27 Building Form: The mixed height and forms offer diversity ranging from urban
houses, accessory dwelling units, duplexes, rowhouses, and apartment buildings.
Height Proposed building heights in this area range from 2.5 to 8 stories. This is
intended to reinforce existing development patterns by maintaining the scale of
development that is found in the area currently. To reinforce the desired character
along Washington Street and to mitigate the impact of more intensive uses adjacent
to residential uses in the neighborhood, it is recommended that the existing DO-2
design overlay remain in place.
Streetcar Locating a new transit
stop between 21 st Street and Park
Avenue would build on the improved
connectivity offered by the bike
boulevard on 21 st and greatly improve
access to transit for Enterprise Hill.
Transit Oriented Development -
New transit-oriented development
along the edges of the neighborhood
would benefit residents and business
owners alike.
Siting In historic areas, including San Rafael, Clements, and some portions of
Enterprise Hill, the siting of new residential structures should be consistent with the
existing, historic development patterns found within the neighborhood including
consistent front yard setbacks, lot coverage comparable to historic patterns, and
locating garages and accessory dwelling units at the rear of the lot. In non-historic
areas, reinforce the character and quality of public streets with buildings that pro-
vide consistent siting, pedestrian orientation, and access to the street. Minimize the
visual impacts of parking areas on streets and adjoining property.
Design Elements Give prominence to the pedestrian realm as a defining element
of neighborhood character. In historic areas, emphasize a positive relationship to
the street by ensuring that building access, orientation, and placement are consis-
tent with established patterns. In non-historic areas, create visually interesting and
88
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Neighborhood Strategies


Broadway
human-scaled facades, and encourage variation in building form to provide oppor-
tunities for architectural scale relationships. Along the edges of the neighborhood,
arrange the height and scale of buildings to provide transitions to adjoining areas.
N.28 Land Use: San Rafael is a residential neighborhood characterized by single family
land use patterns, but with a variety of multifamily, institutional, and commercial uses
distributed throughout the neighborhood. Single family residential tends to be located
mid-block on the named streets, while attached housing types are more typical on the
corners and facing the numbered streets. This results in the unique striping pattern
shown in the future land use map.
The future land use map for Enterprise Hill makes use of a variety of residential land use
categories. The urban residential land use category is used on denser residential blocks
characterized by multifamily and other attached residential housing types. This includes
the land within the Denver Housing Authority's Park Avenue redevelopment. The Cle-
ments Historic District is mapped single family/row house. The neighborhood southeast
of Welton Street, along Glenarm and Tremont, is also mapped single family/row house.
Concept Building Heights Map
KEY CONCEPTS AND RECOMMEN-
DATIONS FOR ENTERPRISE HILL/
SAN RAFAEL:
A.3 Low Intensity Development in Residential Neighborhoods
A.4 Adaptive Reuse and Historic Preservation
B.4 Consider an Arapahoe Square Rail Station on Welton
C.1 Strengthen Retail Corridors
C.2 Promote Economic and Housing Diversity
C.3 Encourage Housing Density
D.1 Promote Access to Healthy Transportation
D.2 Promote Access to Healthy Foods
D.3 Invest in Park Improvements
D.4 Study Connecting Parks to Destination Areas
2.5 Stories
3 Stories
5 Stories
8 Stories
12* Stories
20* Stories
Single Family
Single Family/Row House
Urban Residential
Mixed Use
TOD
Park
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Neighborhood Strategies 89




Moving
Forward
Implementation of a plan fora large area such as the Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods
is accomplished incrementally over many years through the efforts of the City government,
residents, business owners, property owners, and nonprofit organizations. The plan provides
a picture into the future of what the community wants Northeast Downtown to become. As
a result, the image of "what we want" is clear. The "how we are going to get there" will be the
responsibility of the numerous studies and project planning that will be developed to forward
specific objectives and projects within the context of city-wide priorities and resource avail-
ability.
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Moving Forward
91


Implementation Framework
IMPLEMENTATION OPPORTUNITIES AND PRIORITIES
An important, immediate implementation opportunity is the Northeast Downtown Neighbor-
hoods Plan Next Steps Study, a grant to the City from Denver Regional Council of Govern-
ments to further the public transportation recommendations of this plan. Potential compo-
nents of this study include:
21 st Streetbike boulevard, sustainable Best Management Practices (BMP), streetscape
design,and 21 stand Broadway crossing
Downtown Travelshed StrategicTransportation Plan-Phase 1
Welton Streetcar Service
Pedestrian and bike improvements for crossing Broadway
Two-way Blake Street (east of Broadway)
Curtis Park two-way segments
Social Services Working Group to be convened by Denver's Road Home will develop and
advance management strategies and housing options that reduce the impact of the home-
less on public streets and parks. Participants may include City agencies (Parks & Recreation,
Human Services, and Office of Economic Development), State Division of Housing, homeless
service and shelter providers.Triangle Park Community Coordinating District, and nonprofit
housing providers.
The goal of dedicated Business Development Offices for Arapahoe Square and Ballpark/
River North would be to decrease the barriers to economic development. The BDOs would
serve as an advocate for new and existing businesses, gather information regarding financing
programs, properties for sale, contact information for building and property owners and serve
as a one-stop shop for those interested in investing or locating in a particular area. The BDOs
could develop marketing materials and serve as a facilitator to match property owners with
prospective tenants and/or help with assemblages based on client needs.
Form-Based Zoning Approach for Arapahoe Square would address urban design based ap-
proaches to high-density development currently allowed in the D-AS zone district. Significant
involvement from stakeholders and property owners would be the first step in developing a
revised zoning approach.
Park Avenue Corridor Rezoning addresses the important transition from the high densities
found in Arapahoe Square to the lower densities in Curtis Park. The area of focus should be
Park Avenue to 24th Street between Arapahoe and California streets. Significant involvement
from stakeholders, neighborhood residents, and property owners would be the first step in
developing a revised zoning approach.
Arapahoe Square and Welton Street have been identified as potential urban renewal areas.
Urban Renewal Areas (URA) are created to help effect the redevelopment of blighted areas
and are created by the City through the adoption of Urban Redevelopment Plans which
lay out the objectives of the plan (such as elimination of blight). An adopted Urban Rede-
velopment Plan authorizes the Denver Urban Renewal Authority (DURA) to carry out those
objectives. DURA's primary tool for effecting redevelopment is tax increment financing (TIF).
TIF can be used to assist in the financing of projects that are consistent with the Denver
Comprehensive Plan and all relevant plan supplements. A Blight Study has been completed
for Arapahoe Square confirming that blighting conditions exist. An early action should be to
create the Urban Redevelopment Plan. A blight study for the Welton corridor is pending and
once blighting conditions are confirmed, an Urban Redevelopment Plan will follow.
92
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Moving Forward


PLAN IMPLEMENTATION
The implementation matrix that concludes this chapter summarizes the recommended
strategies, associated with the Plan Framework.Transformative Concepts, and Neighborhood
Strategies. Each one is further defined by type, timeframe, funding source, and lead entity.
IMPLEMENTATION TYPES
Blueprint Denver identifies three types of implementation activities: regulatory or policy,
public investment, and partnership. The NEDN plan also recognizes the importance of private
development and business investment in realizing the plan.
Regulatory and policy strategies change City codes or regulations to affect desired out-
comes. Typical examples include Denver Zoning Code text and map amendments. Pub-
lic Works requirements for infrastructure improvements associated with development
projects, and Parks and Recreation requirements regarding open space and plantings.
Public investment strategies are those involving public funding of public infrastructure.
Examples include street reconstruction, bike lanes, new transit lines, park improvements,
or new or expanded recreation centers. The City takes the lead in designing, construct-
ing, and funding these projects and may use a variety of public funding sources such
as the annual Capital Improvements Program, bond funds, or state or federal grant
programs.
The Commons is the result of implementation of a
long range vision for a neighborhood.
m Partnership strategies represent the most diverse category. Public-private partnership
(PPP) activity has expanded exponentially and has gone well beyond public subsidy of a
private development project. Increasingly public-private partnerships are being used to
fund public infrastructure projects. Denver Union Station and RTD's East and Gold Lines
are among the largest PPP projects in the country. Another example is reconstruction
of 14th Street as the Ambassador Street using City Bond funds and a property-owner
approved General Improvement District.
In several cases, public transportation projects are identified as studies because the
impacts and consequences of a particular improvement on the Downtown transporta-
tion system is so complex that the broader system must be examined to determine the
feasible options to meet the intent.
Any successful project requires a champion: a developer will seek needed rezoning or subsidy
from the public sector; a neighborhood will seek Landmark designation; a community organi-
zation such as the Downtown Denver Partnership or neighborhood association will convene
property owners to fund specific public improvements; or, a public agency will seek private
financing partners.
IMPLEMENTATION TIMEFRAMES
Timeframes recognize both the order in which certain strategies must be undertaken and the
feasibility of undertaking them given known resources. As a result, the timeframes provide
guidance for expectations and initial efforts. Every opportunity to advance a plan should be
taken, regardless of the suggested timing.
This plan recognizes four time-frames:
Short-term
Medium-term
Long-term
On-going
one to three years
four to ten years
beyond ten years
continuing application/utilization
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Moving Forward 93


FUNDING SOURCES
The Implementation Framework identifies possible funding sources for public improvements
and studies. The Plan is a forward-looking document which contemplates a vision for future
development. Funding sources available to public and private entities are continually evolv-
ing based on economic, political, legal and neighborhood objectives. Though the names and
purposes of funding sources change overtime, they fall into three distinct categories.
Tax Base Support: Tax base supported sources are characterized by the involvement of
the local sales and property taxing authorities. The most common tax base support is
through the City's annual budget, especially the annual Capital Improvements Program
(CIP). Periodically, the City requests its voters to approve a tax increase to pay for specific
public improvements. For instance, the citizens of Denver voted in 2007 to raise their
property taxes in a specific amount to support the issuance of over $500 million Better
Denver Bonds whose proceeds funded 290 specific public improvements.
Tax Increment Finance is another means of tax-base support most typically associ-
ated with an Urban Renewal Area. Once created by the City Council and Denver Urban
Renewal Authority (DURA), property and sales tax over and above the base year are paid
to DURA to be used to pay for eligible public improvements or to fund financing gaps for
private development.
Grants: Grants come from public or private organizations that are interested in en-
couraging a specific outcome and these grants typically include specific conditions and
requirements as to how the funds may be deployed. For instance, a state or federal
transportation grant will need to be used for street, mass transit, or regional mobil-
ity studies or projects. The Office of Economic Development receives federal funds to
support certain types of housing projects. Additionally, foundations provide grants for
projects orientated with the organization's goals, such as green spaces or social services.
Special Districts: The City Charter and State Statute enable various types of districts to
be created. Examples of special districts include Business Improvement Districts, Met-
ropolitan Districts, Local Improvement or Maintenance Districts, and General Improve-
ment Districts. The districts are classified as special because they are typically created by
a localized group of citizens who want to achieve specific outcomes in their locality and
are willing to pool their economic resources in order to implement identified projects.
For example, if a majority of business owners desire to improve the streetscape of the
street in which they operate, the businesses could organize a Business Improvement
District which would assess the participants an amount of money sufficient to pay for
the project. Special districts are a useful tool when a localized population desire and are
willing to pay for an enhanced level of public improvement. District revenues can be
used to pay for improvements on a "pay-as-you-go basis", for ongoing operations and
maintenance, or to support payment of bonds.
Quite a number of Local Maintenance Districts have been established in the plan area
to maintain streetscape improvements installed as part of major infrastructure projects
such as the Broadway Viaduct Replacement, 20th Street FIOV, Park Avenue Viaduct, and
Coors Field.
Lead Entity: The implementation matrix identifies a lead entity that the plan recom-
mends for having primary responsibility for undertaking the implementation recom-
mendation. The entities are recommendations only. Other public and private entities
may have roles to initiate, undertake, or participate in these efforts.
94
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Moving Forward


The implementation matrix identifies the recommended strategies, organized paral- lel with the plan itself: Framework strategies. Transformative Concept strategies and Neighborhood strategies. Each one is further defined by type and timeframe. TIMING TYPE POTENTIAL FUNDING LEAD
FRAMEWORK STRATEGIES NEIGHBORHOOD CONNECTIONS AND CHARACTER
A.1 High intensity development near Downtown and transit stations On-going Private Private Private
A.2 Moderate intensity development transitioning to residential neighbor- hoods On-going Private Private Private
A.3 Low intensity development in residential neighborhoods On-going Private Private Private
A.4 Adaptive reuse and historic preservation On-going Private Private Private
MOBILITY
B.1 Undertake a Downtown StrategicTransportation PlanTravelshed Analysis Short-Medium Study CIP, DRCOG City
B.2 Evaluate Potential One-way to Two-way Conversions
Larimer (east of Broadway) Short Public investment CIP City
Larimer (west of Broadway) Medium-Long Public investment CIP City
22nd (east of Champa) Medium-Long Public investment CIP City
Blake (east of Broadway) Short-Medium Public investment CIP City
Blake (west of Broadway) Medium-Long Public investment CIP City
Curtis (west of Broadway) Long Public Investment CIP City
Welton (also see Welton Streetcar) Medium-Long Public investment CIP, FasTracks City
Walnut Medium-Long Public investment CIP City
California (between Broadway and Park Avenue) Short-Medium Public investment CIP City
Stout (east of Broadway) Long Public investment CIP City
Champa (east of Broadway) Long Public investment CIP City
B.3 Consider New or Modified Transit Routes
Consolidate bus routes Short-Medium Study/Regulatory RTD RTD
Establish transit service connecting Auraria West and 38th & Blake Medium-Long Study CIP, DRCOG, RTD, Auraria RTD
B.4 Consider an Arapahoe Square Rail Station on Welton Medium-Long Public investment RTD, CIP,TIF RTD
B.5 Undertake a Broadway Intersections Improvement Study Short Study Next Steps City
ECONOMIC AND DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITY
C.1 Strengthen Retail Corridors On-going Private/partnership Private Private
C.2 Promote Economic and Housing Diversity On-going Private/partnership Private Private
C.3 Encourage Housing Density On-going Private/partnership Private Private
C.4 Establish and Support Business Development Offices Short-Medium Private/partnership Private, OED City
C.5 Establish Urban Renewal Areas Short Private/partnership Private, TIF DURA
C.6 Utilize OED Lending Programs On-going Partnership Private, OED Private OED
LIVABILITY AND PUBLIC REALM
D.1 Promote Access to HealthyTransportation On-going Private Private Private
D.2 Promote Access to Healthy Foods On-going Private Private Private
D.3 Invest in Park Improvements On-going Public investment CIP City
D.4 Study Connecting Parks to Destination Areas Short-Medium Study CIP City
D.5 Identify Funding for Stormwater Improvements and Promote Water Quality through Best Practices Medium-Long Public/private investment CIP, grants, district City
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Moving Forward
95


The implementation matrix identifies the recommended strategies, organized paral- lel with the plan itself: Framework strategies. Transformative Concept strategies and Neighborhood strategies. Each one is further defined by type and timeframe. TIMING TYPE POTENTIAL FUNDING LEAD
TRANSFORMATIVE CONCEPT STRATEGIES 21st STREET
Establish cross-section to accommodate bike boulevard Short Study Next Steps City
Design and construct festival street adjacent to Coors Field Medium Partnership District, CIP -
Explore the use of sustainable BMPs on 21 st Street Medium Public/private investment CIP, grants, district City
Improve appearance of surface parking lots Short-Medium Private Private Private
CURTIS STREET
Establish Curtis as a pedestrian connection between Curtis Park and Denver Performing Arts Center Medium Public investment CIP, DDBID, district -
Place visual element at terminus in Mestizo-Curtis Park Long Private Private Private
Redevelop Greyhound Facilities Medium Private/partnership Private Private
Improve pedestrian conditions with improved crossings and wider sidewalks Medium Private/partnership Private, dis- trict, CIP -
BROADWAY
Study the Broadway options between Arapahoe and Welton Medium Study CIP City
Explore opportunities to improve bike and pedestrian crossings Short Study Next Steps City
CONNECTING RIVER NORTH
31 st Street ped/bike bridge Long Public investment CIP, bonds City
33rd Street multimodal bridge Long Public investment CIP, bonds City
36th Street ped/bike bridge Short-Medium Public investment RTD RTD
NEW PARK
Establish new park space Long Public investment CIP, bonds City
Continue to improve and activate existing parks On-going Public investment CIP City
SOCIAL SERVICES
Convene a working group to devise and forward homeless service strategies Short Study/Pa rtnership - DRH
Develop courtyard-style housing Medium Private/partnership Private.TIF Private
Develop a pilot single room occupancy housing Medium Private/partnership Private.TIF Private
Study options for repurposing the Broadway Triangles Medium Study CIP, district City
STREETCAR
Open Central Corridor Extension with East Line and 38th/Blake Station Short-Medium Public investment RTD RTD
Re-examine Central Corridor terminus, alignment, and vehicle type Short Study RTD RTD
Develop streetcar system concept plan Medium-Long Study City, RTD City
TRANSIT ORIENTED DEVELOPMENT
Develop neighborhood-serving, main street development on Welton and Downing Medium Private/partnership Private Private
Anchor Central Corridor with TOD at 38th and Blake Station Medium Private/partnership Private Private
Anchor Central Corridor with TOD at New Arapahoe Square Station Medium-Long Private/partnership Private Private
96
Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Moving Forward


Full Text

PAGE 1

NORTHEAST DOWNTOWN NEIGHBORHOODS PLANAdopted May 23, 2011

PAGE 2

Acknowledgements Mayor Guillermo Bill VidalDENVER CITY COUNCILDistrict 1Paula E. Sandoval District 2Jeanne Faatz District 3Paul D. Lpez District 4Peggy Lehmann, President Pro Tem District 5Marcia Johnson District 6Charlie Brown District 7Chris Nevitt President District 8Carla Madison District 9Judy Montero District 10Jeanne Robb District 11Michael Hancock At-LargeCarol Boigon At-LargeDoug LinkhartDENVER PLANNING BOARDPlan Approved May 4, 2011 Brad Buchanan, Chairman Laura E. Aldrete Andy Baldyga Richard Delanoy Shannon Gi ord Kenneth Ho Anna Jones Judith Martinez Brittany Morris Sharon Nunnally Dave WebsterCOMMUNITY PLANNING & DEVELOPMENTPeter J. Park, Manager Steve Gordon, Comprehensive Planning Manager Courtland Hyser, Project Manager Ellen Ittelson David Gaspers Steve Nalley Caryn Wenzara Andrea Santoro Carolyne JanssenPUBLIC WORKSGeorge Delaney, Manager Crissy Fanganello, Policy and Planning Director Karen Good Emily Snyder Cindy Patton Mike Anderson Brian Schat Brian Mitchell Justin Schmitz Bob KochevarPARKS & RECREATIONScott Robson, Manager Gordon Robertson, Park Planning, Design and Construction Director Devon BuckelsOFFICE OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENTJe Romine Bo MartinezOTHER CITY AGENCIESGretchen Hollrah, BMO Andrew Johnston, Treasury Amber Callender, Denvers Road HomeDOWNTOWN DENVER PARTNERSHIPJohn DesmondOTHER AGENCIESWil Alston, Five Points Business District O ce Bill Sirois, RTD Mark Baudermann, RTD Mike Turner, RTD Cameron Bertron, DURA Grant Bennett, DURACONSULTANT TEAMAECOM EnviroHealth Consulting JVA Consulting KHO Consulting Sky to Ground, LLC National Charrette InstituteDEDICATED TO THE MEMORY OF CARLA MADISON IN RECOGNITION OF HER VISION, LEADERSHIP, AND CONTRIBUTION TO THE CONTENTS OF THIS PLAN.

PAGE 3

Table of ContentsIntroduction ..................................................1Planning Process ...............................................................................2 Planning Context ...............................................................................4 How to use this Plan .........................................................................5Strategy Framework .....................................7Accomplishments, Challenges, Opportunities .......................8 Vision, Guiding Principles .............................................................10 Overall Plan Concept .....................................................................12 A. Neighborhood Connections and Character .....................14 B. Mobility ..........................................................................................22 C. Economic and Development Opportunity .......................30 D. Livability and Public Realm ...................................................34Transformative Concepts ...........................3921st Street ...........................................................................................40 Curtis Street .......................................................................................42 Broadway ...........................................................................................44 Connecting River North ................................................................48 New Park .............................................................................................50 Social Services ..................................................................................52 Streetcar .............................................................................................54 Transit Oriented Development ..................................................58Neighborhood Strategies ..........................61Arapahoe Square .............................................................................62 Ballpark, River North ......................................................................72 Curtis Park ..........................................................................................76 Downing/Welton Corridor ...........................................................82 Enterprise Hill, San Rafael .............................................................88Moving Forward .........................................91Implementation Framework .......................................................92

PAGE 5

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Introduction 1Northeast Downtown Denver is a diverse part of the greater Denver community, and is comprised of many unique neighborhoods. A majority of the study area is within the boundaries of the Five Points Statistical Neighborhood, and includes the neighborhoods of Arapahoe Square, Ballpark, Curtis Park, and San Rafael, as well as the Upper Larimer portion of the River North neighborhood, the Enterprise Hill area near Benedict Fountain Park, and the western most blocks of Cole and Whittier. The Welton and Downing corridors are also addressed in this plan. These neighborhoods, with a location near the Central Business District and Lower Downtown were some of the rst areas of the City to be urbanized. This advantageous location still plays a major role in the future of this area. The abbreviation NEDN will be used throughout this plan to refer to the Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods. Introduction There are many di erent areas within the study area.

PAGE 6

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Introduction 2The public process for the Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan (The Plan) kicked o in March, 2010. Over the course of the following year, community members worked together with City sta and the consultant team to articulate opportunities, develop a vision and craft strategies to achieve the vision. Regular public meetings and neighborhood working group meetings helped shape content throughout the process. Brie ngs and public hearings with City Council, Denver Planning Board and interagency City sta were also crucial to the process. In addition, the process involved collaboration between the City and County of Denvers Community Planning and Development Department, Public Works Department, the Department of Parks and Recreation, Finance and Treasury, the O ce of Economic Development, the Five Points Business District O ce, and the Denver Urban Renewal Authority. The Downtown Denver Partnership was a funding partner and equal contributor to the Arapahoe Square component of this plan. PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT PROCESS:The planning process utilized a multi-tiered strategy for collecting public input to inform the identi cation of issues and resulting concepts and recommendations: Focus Groups A series of small group discussions held neighborhood-by-neighborhood with stakeholders early in the planning process to learn about the study area and begin identifying issues for the plan to address. Individual Stakeholder Meetings Held on an as-needed basis throughout the planning process. Working Groups Groups of stakeholders, from the neighborhoods listed below, who convened at di erent times throughout the planning process to hold in-depth discussions on issues and inform plan content. Arapahoe Square Welton/Downing Curtis Park Ballpark/River NorthPlanning Process

PAGE 7

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Introduction 3 Arapahoe Square Charrette A week-long intensive urban design workshop held for Arapahoe Square in January, 2011. Public Meetings A series of four meetings held at key points in the planning process to solicit public input and guidance. Kicko March 11, 2010 VisioningJuly 20, 2010 Concept ReviewFebruary 10, 2011 Draft Plan ReviewApril 13, 2011COORDINATION WITH CONCURRENT PLANNING EFFORTS:Over the course of the planning process, there were several other e orts underway within the study area. The NEDN Team coordinated with each of these e orts to maximize resources and to help ensure consistency with each: New Zoning Code (Denver Community Planning and Development) Central Corridor Extension Environmental Evaluation (Regional Transportation District) 38th & Blake Next Steps Study (Denver Public Works) Arapahoe Square Blight Study (Denver Urban Renewal Authority) Welton/Five Points Sustainable Mainstreet Initiative (Five Points Business District O ce) Denver Moves (Denver Public Works/Parks and Recreation)

PAGE 8

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Introduction 4This plan represents the land use, urban form, and transportation vision for the Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods area. It updates and incorporates recommendations of earlier plans. Planning documents that are relevant to this area include: Welton-Downing Triangle Plan (1986) Curtis Park Neighborhood Plan (1987) Ballpark Neighborhood In uence Study (1992) Northeast Downtown Plan (1995) Cole Planning Report (1998) Denver Comprehensive Plan (2000) Whittier Neighborhood Plan (2000) Bicycle Master Plan (2001) Blueprint Denver (2002) Denver Parks and Recreation Game Plan (2002) River North Plan (2003) Pedestrian Master Plan (2004) Water Quality Management Plan (2004) Downtown Multimodal Access Plan (2005) TOD Strategic Plan (2006) Greenprint Denver (2006) Downtown Area Plan (2007) Curtis Park Neighborhood Assessment (2007) Strategic Transportation Plan (2008) 38th & Blake Station Area Plan (2009) Denver Neighborhood Marketplace Initiative for Welton/ Five Points (2009) Storm Drainage Master Plan (2009) Sanitary Sewer Master Plan (2009) Strategic Parking Plan (2010) Five Points Sustainable Main Streets Initiative Vision Plan and Final Report (2010) These documents have been reviewed and relevant material has been incorporated in the development of this plan. This and all other neighborhood plans supplement the Citys Comprehensive Plan. The Comprehensive Plan presents a citywide perspective, while each neighborhood plan provides more speci c guidance both for the allocation of City resources and for the location and design of private development.Planning Context Five Points District Development Plan, 2009 Downtown Area Plan, 2007

PAGE 9

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Introduction 5The Plan establishes a long range vision and guiding principles for the development and future of Northeast Downtown. The elements of this plan will direct the neighborhoods of Northeast Downtown towards a vision as a community where people live, work, play, and celebrate the neighborhoods diverse heritage. Public and private agencies and organizations will use this plan in coming years for many purposes and actions that a ect the form and function of Northeast Downtown. The Plan provides city-adopted policy direction to guide decision-making and prioritization related to development opportunities, transportation, partnerships, additional study and analysis, funding and public investments. In some cases, as identi ed in this plan, recommendations will require multiple steps before moving forward with implementation. For example, transportation and infrastructure concepts will require further analysis. In addition, zone district changes may be necessary to implement development concepts. The plan structure has four major components: Strategy Framework: This section presents content that generally applies to the plan area as a whole. Existing conditions, plan concepts, and recommendations are presented for the entire plan area and are organized into four categories: Neighborhood Connections and Character Mobility Economic and Development Opportunity Livability and the Public Realm Transformative Concepts: These are big ideas that, if implemented, could help to catalyze private investment. Neighborhood Strategies: This section summarizes the existing conditions within individual neighborhood subareas, and presents concepts and recommendations for land use, building form, and any additional recommendations speci c to the neighborhood that arent already covered in the Strategy Framework. Moving Forward: This section addresses the implementation framework for the plan. All of the plan recommendations from previous chapters are listed in the implementation matrix, which also categorizes each recommendation in terms of timing, type, and potential funding sources. E orts were made to eliminate redundancies in plan recommendations. Therefore, recommendations appear once in the plan and although they may be referenced in other chapters, they are not repeated as recommendations in multiple chapters. For example, each of the neighborhood chapters contains a list of recommendations from the strategy framework and the transformative concepts that are applicable to the neighborhood, but only recommendations that are unique to the neighborhood appear as new recommendations in those chapters.How to use this Plan

PAGE 11

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Strategy Framework 7Northeast Downtown is a complex collection of neighborhoods that possess their own unique qualities and opportunities. This plan chapter begins with identifying key Accomplishments, Challenges and Opportunities within this planning area. These were important considerations in understanding what needs protec tion, enhancement and transformation. The Overall Plan Concept, Vision and Guiding Principles establish a concise snapshot of the Strategy Framework. As a method to evaluate the concepts of this plan, four evaluation criteria evolved from the Vision and Guiding Principles: Neighborhood Connections and Character Mobility Economic and Development Opportunity Livability and Public Realm These four criteria are the keystones of this plan and ensure a certain synergy between all the recommendations of the plan. With each of the criteria, there are four to six detailed concepts that all work together to bene t the overall planning area. The success of contributing to the overall vibrancy of the larger Downtown Area will depend on the citys ability to capitalize on the opportunities described in the following section and to implement the vision outlined in this chapter. Strategy Framework

PAGE 12

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Strategy Framework 8Accomplishments, Challenges, OpportunitiesACCOMPLISHMENTS Light rail service was introduced to this area in 1994 as part of RTDs original 5.3-mile long light rail system. That system has expanded greatly since then, and a much more ambitious multimodal future expansion is planned as part of the FasTracks program. Coors Field, which opened in 1995, is a regional amenity that is recognized as one of the best-designed ballparks in Major League Baseball. The stadium has helped to stimulate the redevelopment of many properties in the Ballpark Neighborhood. This area grew by 45% by adding approximately 4,000 residents between 2000 and 2010. This dramatic population growth follow ed on the heels of several decades of population decline. Many mobility improvements have occurred to the bene t of this area, including the conversion of Lawrence and California from one-way to two-way, and the addition of on-street bike lanes on sections of Larimer, Lawrence, Arapahoe, Champa, and Stout. In 2011, Larimer is scheduled to be converted from one-way to two-way, with existing bike lanes being maintained in both directions. Broadway improvements, including the replacement of the viaduct and reconstruction of the street north of Welton, improved the connection to Brighton Boulevard/I-70 and added targeted improvements at intersections, respectively. The Denver Housing Authority redeveloped East Village into Benedict Park Place. The Denver Housing Authority rebuilt several hundred housing units between Lawrence and Arapahoe as part of the Villages at Curtis Park redevelopment. Several Landmark Historic Districts have been established to protect the areas historic building stock: Clements (1975), Curtis Park (various districts 1995-2010), Ballpark (2002) and Welton Street (2002). The Denver Zoning Code was updated in 2010 to a new form and context based format replacing the outdated 1950s code that addressed many long standing zoning issues. In Northeast Downtown, this was especially applicable to Curtis Park. Signi cant private and public investment has occurred in and around the plan area. This investment has included capital investments for a ordable housing and business development. The Five Points Business Development O ce was established in 2010. Parking lots are prominent in the study area and are considered a challenge. RTD light rail Coors Field is a regional attaction

PAGE 13

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Strategy Framework 9CHALLENGES High concentration of social service providers impacts public spaces, especially in Arapahoe Square and Ballpark. High land prices a ect the a ordability of individual residential and commercial development; in Arapahoe Square where development prices are perceived to be higher than other neighborhoods surrounding Downtown, little new development has occurred. The areas public image has not kept pace with recent revitalization. Not all Denverites are aware that the area is rebounding; many still think of it as an area in decline. Surface parking lots, which are especially prominent in Arapahoe Square, contribute to blight, an inconsistent environment, and a lack of destinations and attractions. This increases the sense of isolation from the Downtown Core and adjacent neighborhoods. Abrupt transitions existing at some locations between neighborhoods. There are mobility challenges in this area including; irregular intersections, especially on Broadway, Downing, and Welton, an incomplete sidewalk network, one-way streets in residential areas, and signi cant barriers such as the Union Paci c right of wayOPPORTUNITIES Three FasTracks projects will directly bene t this area: the East Corridor, the Central Corridor Extension, and the Downtown Circulator. Locational advantage: this area is very close to downtown, regional transportation routes, and major amenities including the South Platte River and Coors Field. The neighborhoods in this area are among the oldest in Denver and have a collection of Victorian-era buildings dating back to the 1860s that is unmatched in the city. Main Street opportunities exist on Welton, Downing, and Larimer. Welton Street is an historic main street with a rich history that could make it a regional cultural destination, especially north of 24th Street. South of 24th Street, a predominance of vacant lots presents signi cant redevelopment opportunity to create a dense, urban, mixed use area along Welton. Downing has the opportunity to attract tr ansit-oriented development between the existing 30th & Downing station and the future 38th and Blake station. Two new stations will be added on Downing at 33rd Avenue and 35th Avenue as part of the Central Corridor Extension. Larimer is an emerging commercial corridor that has become increasingly vibrant in recent years, especially south of Park Avenue in the vicinity of Coors Field. North of Park Avenue, Larimer Street features an eclectic mix of bars, restaurants, o ce space, retail, and other uses. The RiNo Arts District has established itself as a major player in the Denver arts scene. Coors Field draws millions of visitors, both local and from outside Denver, to the area. The neighborhoods of Northeast Downtown have a wide array of redevelopment opportunities ranging from small residential in ll to large undeveloped parcels and surface parking lots. Each neighborhood has a unique set of characteristics, which could be enhanced by appropriate transitions that strengthen the overall connectivity of the study area. One of many galleries in the RiNo Arts District Parking lots located in Arapahoe Square add to the neighborhoods inconsistent environment. Northeast Downtowns historic Victorian-era building stock.

PAGE 14

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Strategy Framework 10Vision, Guiding PrinciplesEarly in the planning process, stakeholders participated in the development of a vision statement and guiding principles for the Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods area. These two items were undertaken as early tasks so they could guide the remainder of the plan development process. The vision describes the area as it could be twenty to thirty years in the future (some plan concepts may potentially be even longer range), while the guiding principles establish speci c elements that this plan should strive to achieve.VISION STATEMENTThe Northeast Downtown area will remain a diverse collection of urban neighborhoods with unique and distinct character. Transitions between neighborhoods will be seamless and promote the unique character of each area. Excellent street connectivity, an enhanced public realm, and good access to transit will make this an area of choice for residents, businesses, and services. GUIDING PRINCIPLES Enhance multimodal connectivity Complete and enhance the public realm Enhance and support existing retail corridors Create a development-friendly atmosphere Protect neighborhood fabric Create appropriate transitions between neighborhoods Increase open space access Fill gaps in neighborhood services Capitalize on transit Promote diversityCONCEPT EVALUATION CRITERIAIn addition to the vision and guiding principles, this plan makes extensive use of four criteria for evaluating each of the concepts that are contained in this document. The four criteria are used as a measuring stick to assess the degree to which any given plan concept helps to promote or achieve a broad array of goals. In this way, the four evaluation criteria are both an organizing element for the plan and a means by which to evaluate its content. Neighborhood Connections and Character: Maintaining the unique character of each neighborhood in Northeast Downtown, and ensuring that new development on neighNortheast Downtowns proximity to the Central Business District emphasizes the need for successful transitions. Rail transit is one component of a multimodal transportation system.

PAGE 15

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Strategy Framework 11 HOW THE GUIDING PRINCIPLES FIT WITHIN THE FRAMEWORK OF THE CON CEPT EVALUATION CRITERIA: Neighborhood Connections and Character Protect neighborhood fabric Create appropriate transitions between neighborhoods Mobility Enhance multimodal connectivity Economic and Development Opportunity Enhance and support existing retail corridors Establish a development-friendly atmosphere Fill gaps in neighborhood services Capitalize on transit Livability and Public Realm Enhance the public realm Increase open space access Promote diversity borhood edges contributes to the successful transition between areas. Mobility: Enhancing the multimodal transportation system to balance the needs of all users and modes, including automobiles, pedestrians, bicyclists, transit, freight, and delivery vehicles. Economic and Development Opportunity: Encouraging new investment by attracting new businesses, supporting the growth of existing businesses, encouraging the reuse of existing structures, attracting new development, and increasing employment opportunities. Housing development opportunities should expand the range of housing types and price ranges. Livability and Public Realm: Ensuring that the various elements comprising the public realm (streets, sidewalks, parks, plazas, transit stops/stations, landmarks, housing, open spaces) positively contribute to the quality of life for residents, businesses, and visitors alike. New businesses are critical to Northeast Downtowns future. High quality public spaces are needed in a thriving urban environment.

PAGE 16

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Strategy Framework 12 Overall Plan ConceptThe Northeast Downtown area will remain a diverse collection of urban neighborhoods with unique and distinct character. Transitions between neighborhoods will be seamless and promote the unique character of each area. Excellent street connectivity, an enhanced public realm, and good access to transit will make this an area of choice for residents, businesses, and services. Strategy Framework Recommendations that are generally applicable to area as a whole Transformative Concepts These concepts represent big ideas for positively transforming Northeast Downtown Neighborhood Strategies Recommendations that are speci c to individual neighborhoodsA. NEIGHBORHOOD CONNECTIONS AND CHARACTER A.1 High Intensity Development Near Downtown, Transit Stations and Along Key Streets A.2 Moderate Intensity Development Transitioning to Neighborhoods A.3 Low Intensity Development in Residential Neighborhoods A.4 Adaptive Reuse and Historic PreservationB. MOBILITY B.1 Undertake a Downtown Strategic Transportation Plan Travelshed Analysis B.2 Evaluate Potential One-Way to Two-Way Conversions B.3 Consider New or Modi ed Transit Routes B.4 Consider an Arapahoe Square Rail Station on Welton B.5 In Short-term, Undertake a Broadway Intersections Improvement Study 21ST STREETMake 21st Street a focal point for Northeast Downtown neighborhoods by promoting its role as an important pedestrian and bicycle route and community gathering place.CURTIS STREETUse Curtis Street to create a preferred pedestrian route connecting the Central Business District to Arapahoe Square and Curtis Park.BROADWAYStudy Broadway and the intersecting street network to determine which Grand Boulevard concept that will advance as a long-range vision for the future.CONNECTING RIVER NORTHImprove connections in River North between Northeast Downtown and the South Platte River corridor.BALLPARK, RIVER NORTH N.11 Building Form N.12 Land Use N.13 Complete Sidewalk Network N.14 Evaluate Potential One-way to Two-way Conversions N.15 Consider Future of Coors Field Over ow ParkingARAPAHOE SQUARE N.1 Encourage Development of Parking Lots N.2 Enhance Urban Design N.3 Building Form N.4 Land Use N.5 Conduct Form Based Zoning Study N.6 Promote Transit Oriented Development N.7 Re-use Existing Buildings N.8 Establish Business Development O ce N.9 Improve Arapahoe Squares Brand N.10 Establish Urban Renewal Area

PAGE 17

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Strategy Framework 13 C. ECONOMIC AND DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITY C.1 Strengthen Retail Corridors C.2 Promote Economic and Housing Diversity C.3 Encourage Housing Density C.4 Establish and Support Business Development O ces C.5 Establish Urban Renewal Areas C.6 Utilize OED Lending programsD. LIVABILITY AND PUBLIC REALM D.1 Promote Access to Healthy Transportation D.2 Promote Access to Healthy Foods D.3 Invest in Park Improvements D.4 Study Connecting Parks to Destination Areas D.5 Identify Funding for Stormwater Improvements and Promote Water Quality Through Best Practices STREETCAREnhance current transit service, economic development opportunities, and access to neighborhood businesses while improving the walkable character of the Welton/Downing Corridor and adjacent Northeast Downtown neighborhoods.NEW PARKEstablish a new park in the Northeast Downtown area that could provide valuable open space and recreation amenities for new and existing residents for years to come.SOCIAL SERVICESBetter manage the provision of social services and provide more appropriate facilities in order to improve the development climate, connectivity, and safety.TODPromote Transit Oriented Development in Northeast Downtown at appropriate locations to encourage walkable, urban neighborhoods that have easy access to daily needs and amenities.CURTIS PARK N.16 Building Form N.17 Land Use N.18 Stout and Champa Reclassi cation N.19 Identify Tra c Calming Opportunities N.20 Accommodate Adaptive ReuseENTERPRISE HILL, SAN RAFAEL N.27 Building Form N.28 Land UseDOWNING/WELTON CORRIDOR N.21 Building Form N.22 Land Use N.23 Support Work of Five Points Business District O ce N.24 Establish Urban Renewal Area N.25 Evaluate Short One-Way Street Segments N26 Orientation of Outdoor Active Uses

PAGE 18

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Strategy Framework 14A. Neighborhood Connections and Character GOAL STATEMENTReinforce the unique character of each neighborhood within Northeast Downtown while also successfully transitioning land use and building forms between neighborhoods.WHY ARE NEIGHBORHOOD CONNECTIONS AND CHARACTER IMPORTANT TO NORTHEAST DO WNTOWN?The study area is comprised of many neighborhoods, each with their own character. Maintaining the character that makes each neighborhood unique is of central importance to stakeholders and is re ected in the Vision Statement for this plan. A key aspect of maintaining and enhancing neighborhood character is ensuring that each neighborhood connects, or transitions, to adjacent neighborhoods in a way that bene ts the community. It is a central urban design challenge for the Northeast Downtown area to successfully transition between each of these areas that range from higher intensity commercial and mixed-use districts to lower intensity and historic single-family neighborhoods while also acknowledging the areas signi cant transit connections to Downtown and the rest of the region.SUMMARY OF EXISTING CONDITIONSEach neighborhood in Northeast Downtown has its own unique character. As a result, there is a wide variety of land uses and building forms present within the overall study area. A brief summary of the existing conditions in each neighborhood subarea is provided below: Ballpark: The opening of Coors Field in 1995 resulted in a considerable amount of investment in the Ballpark Neighborhood, which is now home to numerous residential loft developments, mixed use buildings, and trendy bars and restaurants. Larimer between 20th Street and Park Avenue serves as a main street for the neighborhood. The Ballpark Historic District was established in 2002 to protect the warehouse character of historic buildings in the neighborhood. Arapahoe Square: Arapahoe Square is an urban area along the edge of Downtown that is currently characterized by its lack of development. Over one-third of the land in Arapahoe Square consists of vacant lots or surface parking lots. Because of this underutilization of land, Arapahoe Square is considered to be a major redevelopment opportunity. There are many small businesses in Arapahoe Square, as well as examples of adaptive reuse of older structures, and a collection of buildings that may have historical signi cance. Arapahoe Squares existing building stock is concentrated in the blocks generally bounded by 21st, 24th, Stout, and Lawrence. Much of the remainder of the neighborhood is dominated by surface parking lots. Curtis Park: Curtis Park is Denvers oldest residential neighborhood. Curtis Park has a large collection of historic homes, and a variety of other uses distributed throughout the neighborhood. Beginning in 1995, Curtis Park began establishing historic districts to protect its historic building stock. To date, seven historic districts have been established, encompassing most of the neighborhood. River North (RiNo): RiNo, which comprises most of the western edge of the study area, was historically an industrial area and many industrial uses remain today, especially on Walnut Street. This industrial heritage is considered to be an asset, as is the eclectic mix Neighborhood Reference Map

PAGE 19

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Strategy Framework 15of land uses, building forms, and development patterns. RiNo is an emerging arts district that bene ts from its long history of industrial uses. There are many examples within the neighborhood of adaptive reuse, innovative in ll development projects, and business incubator activity. Blake Street has experienced a shift in land use patterns in recent years, as residential development has migrated north from the Ballpark Neighborhood. A station serving the East and Central corridors will be constructed at 38th and Blake, raising opportunities for future transit-orient ed development at the northern end of the neighborhood. Welton: Welton Street has two di erent character areas within Northeast Downtown. North of 24th Street, Welton is a main street corridor at the heart of the Five Points community. The name Five Points comes from the ve-pointed intersection of Welton, Washington, 26th Avenue, and 27th Street The area is known for its history of jazz and African-American culture. The Welton Street Cultural Historic District was established in 2002 in recognition of the rich culture and history of Five Points. South of 24th Street, Welton Street ows through Arapahoe Square, and is characterized by a prevalence of vacant lots and surface parking. The D-Line (light rail) has operated on Welton Street since 1994. Downing: Downing Street forms the seam between the angular downtown street grid and the adjacent north/south east/west neighborhood grid. The western edges of the Cole and Whittier neighborhoods are located along Downing within the study area. Downing has some main street qualities, but also has several blocks of single family residential homes. As part of FasTracks, the Central Corridor, which currently ends at 30th and Downing, will be extended along Downing to the 38th and Blake Station on the East Corridor and two new stations will be added, introducing the potential for new transit-oriented development in the future. At the time of this writing, funding has not yet been identi ed for this extension, meaning that the timing of this project is also currently unknown. San Rafael: San Rafael is a residential neighborhood characterized by single family land use patterns, but with a variety of multifamily, institutional, and commercial uses also distributed throughout the neighborhood. San Rafael has a large collection of historic buildings and is on the National Register of Historic Places, although there is no local landmark historic district established for the neighborhood. Enterprise Hill: Enterprise Hill is a predominantly residential area with urban character. This area has long been the site of public housing, and is in the latter stages of being transformed by the Denver Housing Authoritys Benedict Place redevelopment, a mixedincome project with over 800 units of housing. The Clements Historic District, established in 1975 and located across the street from Benedict Fountain Park, is also located in this area. Enterprise Hill consists mostly of low-rise buildings immediately adjacent to the Downtown core, which gives it a unique character. Welton Street is a Main Street Corridor San Rafael is on the National Register of Historic Places

PAGE 20

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Strategy Framework 16LAND USE CONCEPTSBlueprint Denver established land use types based on a framework of building blocks Districts, Residential Areas, Centers, and Corridors. Each category has individual land use types and describes a particular character and scale that is desired in the future but does not necessarily re ect existing conditions. The Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan uses this as the basis of its recommended land use map. One additional land use, Mixed Use Industrial, has been added to re ect the speci c conditions in Northeast Downtown. The Blueprint Denver Plan map will be amended as needed based on this plan. Mixed Use: These areas have both a sizable employment base as well as a variety of mid to high density housing options. Intensity is higher in mixed-use areas than in predominantly residential areas. Land uses can be, but are not necessarily, mixed in each building, development, or block. Pedestrian access is of importance within the area, with residential and non-residential uses always within short walking distance of one another. Mixed Use / Industrial: Similar to Mixed Use, but with recognition that light industrial uses, such as light manufacturing and smaller warehouses are compatible with urban residential housing types. These areas have both a sizable employment base as well as a variety of mid-to-high density housing options. Land uses can be, but are not necessarily, mixed in each building, development, or block. Pedestrian access is of importance within the area, with residential and non-residential uses always within walking distance of one another. Transit Oriented Development: Transit-oriented developments have land uses with a direct correlation to the function of a mass transit system. These development sites are located at stations or stops along mass transit lines, especially rail lines. Transit-oriented developments provide housing, services, and employment opportunities for a diverse population in a con guration that facilitates pedestrian and transit access. Within Northeast Downtown, TOD occurs at several di erent scales, reacting to the amount and type of transit service and the context of the existing adjacent neighborhoods. Urban Residential: Urban residential neighborhoods are higher density and primarily residential but may include a noteworthy number of complementary commercial uses. In Northeast Downtown, urban residential uses t end to be located in areas that transition from historic residential neighborhoods to more intense mixed use neighborhoods. A mixture of housing types is present, including historic single-family houses, townhouses, small multi-family apartments and sometimes mid to high-rise residential structures. Single Family Rowhouse: Single family rowhouse residential areas are moderately dense areas that are primarily residential but with some complementary, small-scale commercial uses. There is a mixture of housing types, including single-family houses, duplexes, rowhouses, and small apartment buildings. This land use concept is called Single Family/Duplex in BluePrint Denver, but is Single Family/Rowhouse in this plan to better represent the more diverse range of building forms found in Northeast Downtown. Single Family Residential: Neighborhoods of single family houses in Northeast Downtown represent older, residential neighborhoods that do not have a signi cant mix of housing types. Commercial uses are limited to small buildings providing neighborhood services. Mixed Use Mixed Use / Industrial Transit Oriented Development

PAGE 21

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Strategy Framework 17 Future Land Use Map Single Family Residential Single Family / Row house Urban Residential 1st 31st 1st 0th 30th 0th 9th 29th 9th 27th 33rd 33rd 33rd nd 32nd nd 4th 34th 4th Blake Blake Blake Mixed Use TOD Single Family/Row House Single Family Urban Residential Park Mixed Use Industrial

PAGE 22

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Strategy Framework 18NEIGHBORHOOD CONNECTIONS AND CHARACTER CONCEPTS AND REC OMMENDATIONS A.1 High Intensity Development Near Downtown, Transit Stations In areas with existing urban character, along the edge of Downtown, within Arapahoe Square, and in the 38th & Blake station area: Allow taller general, shopfront and apartment building forms with higher densities. Site building forms at the street with parking and access in the rear/o the alley. Promote the use of design elements that link the building directly to the street environment, such as ground story activation, transparent window openings and doorways at the street. Make use of design elements such as upper story setbacks, as necessary, at the street to maintain a comfortable pedestrian scale. Allow a mix of uses within the area and within buildings. Make use of streetscape elements that reinforce urban character and promote high levels of pedestrian and bicycle use, such as wide sidewalks, bike racks, public trash cans, and tree wells. A.2 Moderate Intensity Development Transitioning to Residential Neighborhoods Where higher intensity development tr ansitions to residential neighborhoods, and along main street corridors (Welton, Downing, and Larimer): Allow a moderate and mixed scale of general, shopfront, apartment and rowhouse building forms. Site building forms in a context sensitive manner with emphasis on orienting to the street with parking and access in the rear/o the alley. Promote the use of design elements that link the building directly to the street environment, such as ground story activation, transparent window openings and doorways at the street. Make use of design elements, such as upper story setbacks, as necessary, to minimize massing adjacent to residential areas. Allow a mix of uses within the area and within buildings. Encourage TOD along transit corridors with sensible transitions to adjacent residential neighborhoods. Make use of streetscape elements that support and promote pedestrian and bicycle use, such as wide sidewalks, bike racks, public trash cans, pedestrian scale lighting, and tree wells or tree lawns. High intensity development oriented towards transit Live-work units assist in the transition between residential areas and commercial areas

PAGE 23

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Strategy Framework 19 Concept Height Map 1st 31st 1st 0th 30th 0th 9th 29th 9th 27th 33rd 33rd 33rd nd 32nd nd 4th 34th 4th Blake Blake Blake 3 Stories 2.5 Stories 5 Stories 8 Stories 12* Stories 20* Stories Coors Field Context Area MAXIMUM HEIGHT RECOMMENDATIONS: For a detailed discussion and analysis of the recommended maximum heights, please see the individual neighborhood strategies section of the plan. *HEIGHT DATUM LINE :A ve-story height datum line, or maximum street frontage height, for upper story setbacks and point towers is recommended to produce the e ect that each new building reads as no more than ve stories from street level. A height datum line is an urban design concept that allows taller buildings to relate to a pedestrian scale along the street and to smaller nearby buildings such as those in Arapahoe Square, Ballpark and Curtis Park. The ve-story datum line applies to both standard and point tower buildings. *POINT TOWERS:To encourage higher density development where appropriate, speci c areas have been identi ed as locations for a podium and point tower building form. The recommended maximum height of point towers in Arapahoe Square are as follows: Standard Building Height: 12 stories = Point Tower Height: 20 stories Standard Building Height: 20 stories = Point Tower Height: 30 stories COORS FIELD CONTEXT AREAWithin this area it is recommended that building heights not be allowed to exceed the height of the Coors Field stands.

PAGE 24

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Strategy Framework 20 Historic Districts and Structures Map#Existing Light/Commuter Rail and Stations "Proposed Light/Commuter Rail and Stations Landmark Districts Denver Landmark Structures" )Parks / Open Space National Register Structures A.3 Low Intensity Development in Residential Neighborhoods In areas with established residential neighborhood character, including Curtis Park, San Rafael, and the neighborhood edge east of Downing Street (Cole and Whittier): Maintain the current mix of low scale building forms such as urban house, duplex and rowhouse. Allow new development to replicate existing development patterns, including small lots, shallow setbacks and high building coverage with parking and access in the rear/o the alley. Make use of entry features that connect the building and front yards to the street. Allow a mix of land uses consisting primarily of residential uses with limited neighborhood-serving commercial. Encourage the use of streetscape elements that promote residential character and pedestrian and bicycle use, such as detached sidewalks, pedestrian scale lighting, and tree lawns. In ll development compatible with residential character

PAGE 25

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Strategy Framework 21 Existing Sidewalk Surface Material Map Asphalt Concrete Flagstone A.4 Adaptive Reuse and Historic Preservation Throughout the planning area, adaptive reuse of existing building stock and preservation of historic structures are critically important to maintaining and enhancing the unique character of each neighborhood. Promote the reuse of existing buildings. Existing buildings, whether historic or not, are important character-de ning elements throughout the Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods. Support historic preservation within existing historic districts and by identifying additional potential landmark structures and districts. Preserve sandstone sidewalks as a historic resource within Northeast Downtown. Sandstone sidewalk

PAGE 26

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Strategy Framework 22B. Mobility GOAL STATEMENTPromote walkability, biking, and transit while balancing local and regional vehicular transportation demand, deliveries and emergency response safely and e ciently throughout the study area.WHY IS MOBILITY IMPORTANT TO NORTHEAST DOWNTOWN?Mobility refers to the movement of people and goods. People use many modes of transportation to achieve their mobility: automobiles, public transit, walking, bicycling, and other means. How those di erent modes interact is a function of many things, including street connectivity, destination areas, and travel patter ns. The mobility framework presented here articulates an overall strategy for accommodating all transportation modes within the Northeast Downtown area and balancing their needs so that people can navigate e ectively and safely regardless of their modal choice. The strategy takes into account connections, destinations, and travel patterns within the planning area and its relation to the region. Transportation has a vital connection to adjacent land uses. The type, amount, and quality of transportation modes a ect how property owners choose to development and use their land. Conversely, the adjacent land uses and form of buildings impacts how transportation modes operate as a network at a local and regional scale. A high degree of mobility in the Northeast Downtown neighborhoods should help attract developmen t projects that are looking to take advantage of exceptional multi-modal movement of people and goods.SUMMARY OF EXISTING CONDITIONS AND ISSUESThe road network in Northeast Downtown connects to a larger regional network of interstates and major arterials. 20th Street, 22nd Street, and Park Avenue provide direct connectivity to and from I-25. Broadway connects to Brighton Boulevard north of the study area to provide a N Welton California Stout ChampaParkYork31st 30th 29th 24th 33rd 32nd 34th 35th 22nd 21st 20th 19thCurtis Arapahoe Lawrence Larimer Walnut BlakeBroadwayBrighton BlvdBroadway Lincoln Sherman Grant22nd 23rd 21st 24th 25th 26th 27th 28th 29th 30th 31st 33rdBruce RandolfInterstate 70Interstate 25Speer Blvd.Colfax Ave.Martin Luther King35th 36th 37th 38th 40thDowning Park Avenue West The HOV lane on 20th Street is one available connection to Interstate 25.Study Area Existing Light Rail Existing Bus Route Main Corridor Highway Corridor Park Existing Regional Mobility

PAGE 27

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Strategy Framework 23direct route to and from I-70, and connects southward to Colfax Avenue, Civic Center, and the South Broadway commercial district. Unlike most other neighborhoods in Denver, the local street network in the Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods is built on an extension of the downtown grid. When the downtown streets were converted to one-way in the early 1950s, many of the streets in this area were also converted and remain one-way today. There are some streets where one-ways are necessary to accommodate tra c volumes or street-fronting loading docks associated with historic warehouse buildings. Over time, land use and travel patterns have changed on some streets in Northeast Downtown, resulting in an opportunity to re-evaluate cross sections and one-way street directions within the study area. In conducting this evaluation it is important to consider where the transition from one-way operations in the Central Business District to two-way operations in Northeast Downtown should occur. In most instances this plan does not prescribe the exact location of this transition from one-way to two-way, as this may vary from one street to the next depending on mobility and land use considerations at the time of conversion. Broadway is an important arterial that serves both local and regional transportation needs, including local transit routes. The street was constructed in the early 1920s to connect North Denver to the Civic Center. The introduction of Broadway through this area resulted in the roadway bisecting the downtown street grid, creating unusual geometry at intersections that sometimes lengthens the crossing distance for pedestrians. Broadways bisection of the grid Existing Sidewalks Important connections to the regional transportation network occur in or near Northeast Downtown. Gaps in the sidewalk network exist in some areas where properties that have redeveloped are adjacent to properties that have not. Sidewalk No Sidewalk

PAGE 28

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Strategy Framework 24also means that intersections occur more frequently, resulting in some unsignalized intersections that add additional challenges for cross-tra c of all modes. Although sidewalks are present on most streets in Northeast Downtown, network gaps exist in portions of RiNo and Ballpark, largely because of the long industrial history of those neighborhoods that continues to this day. Gaps in the sidewalk network are most pronounced along Blake and Walnut between 28th and 38th Streets where many industrial uses are located. Handicap accessibility of pedestrian facilities is also an issue, as Northeast Downtown is one of the oldest areas of the City. City ordinance requires the installation of sidewalks and ADA curb ramps in conjunction with development, redevelopment and major street construction or maintenance e orts. Additionally, the City has a curb ramp program that provides a small amount of annual funding in response to requests. A good network of on-street bikeways currently exists, with bike routes providing service through much of the study area. Bikeway facilities are a mix of painted on-street bike lanes, designated routes (no physical bike lane), and painted shared lane arrows (sharrows). Major northwest and southeast routes converge on 21st St, which has sharrows, emphasizing the importance of that street for cyclists. Many of the routes in this area intersect with Broadway, but only Champa provides an on-street bike lane across Broadway. Denver Moves, a mobility plan sponsored by Denver Public Works and Parks and Recreation that is focused on bicycle and pedestrian connections, is in-process at the time of this writing. The overall transportation network in Nor theast Downtown currently has limited abilities to access the South Platte River greenway due to the Union Paci c right of way bisecting the River North neighborhood. There are no connections to Brighton Boulevard and the South Platte River from Northeast Downtown between Broadway and 38th Street. One of those two connections, the underpass at 38th Street, is very narrow. Other access points are 20th Street and Park Avenue. Transit service in Northeast Downtown features RTD bus routes distributed evenly throughout the study area. The main bus routes serving this area include the 12 on Downing Street, the 38 on Stout/California, the 44 on Lawrence/Larimer, and the 48 on Broadway. Several other routes also run through portions of the study area. The D Line provides light rail service on Welton Street, beginning at the 30th/Downing station and continuing to the southern terminus in Littleton. The planned Central Corridor Extension, which is currently unfunded, would extend service along Downing Street to the future 38th and Blake commuter rail station (scheduled to open in 2016) and discontinue direct service to destinations beyond the Downtown transit loop, such as the Auraria campus and Denver Tech Center. Passengers traveling beyond Downtown loop would require a transfer. Regional and long distance bus service is available via Greyhound, located just outside of the study area at 19th and Curtis, and several other bus lines o ering service to destinations in Mexico. As the area redevelops and densi es, it is anticipated that regional bus services will relocate elsewhere to areas with fewer operational constraints and to take advantage of lower land prices. When this occurs, many large properties will become available for redevelopment.MOBILITY FRAMEWORK CONCEPTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS B.1 Undertake a Downtown Strategic Transportation Plan Travelshed Analysis Conduct a series of studies to analyze the complex transportation needs of Downtown Denver and adjacent neighborhoods: Tra c Modeling for local and regional movement, existing and future demand Pedestrian and bike network connectivity and functionality Bike Sharrow on 21st Street RTD Bus on Broadway Sidewalk gaps contribute to a poor pedestrian experience.

PAGE 29

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Strategy Framework 25 Transit Elements: Downtown Circula tor operations on 18th/19th/Broadway/Lincoln, E. Colfax transit alternatives study and how that service could penetrate downtown and connect to the 16th Street Mall shuttle, the Downtown light rail system, possible 38th & Blake to Auraria transit service, Union Station, and Civic Center Station. As part of its scope, this study may also incorporate other mobility recommendations identi ed in this plan. B.2 Evaluate Potential One-Way to Two-Way Conversions Promote neighborhood connections through the evaluation of selective conversion of one-way streets to two-way when appropriate based on land uses and tra c patterns. When considering one-way to two-way conversions, an evaluation of the positives of two-way streets (improved pedestrian experience, additional access to store fronts) should be weighed against potential drawbacks (reduced on-street parking, loss of existing bike lanes, turning access). Larimer Programmed for two-way conversion between Broadway and 35th Street in Summer, 2011. Larimer will have on-street bike lanes in both directions. It is anticipated that two-way operations will help support this emerging retail corridor. 22nd Evaluate the potential to convert to two-way east of Champa. 22nd currently transitions from one-way to two-way tra c at Stout. Transitioning at Champa would promote a more cohesive neighborhood character east of Broadway. Blake Blake Street has seen a signi cant amount of residential development and in ll, but still also has some active industrial properties. Two-way operations could support the emerging residential character of the street. Evaluate conversion to two-way in the short-to-medium timeframe or at such time as land use changes along the corridor warrants. Curtis Curtis Street is currently one-way west of Broadway and two-way east of Broadway. Converting the segment west of Broadway to two-way operations would help to reinforce a strong pedestrian connection to downtown. The intersection at Broadway is a major obstacle for implementing two way operations on Curtis. The geometry and tra c movements at this intersection are complicated, and would require a signi cant amount of study and analysis to determine a solution. Welton Two-way operations may help support the main street character of this corridor. Conversion of Welton would be necessary to support any future two-way streetcar operations and is contingent on tha t project and the associated removal of the current light rail infrastructure. Walnut Evaluate conversion of Walnut contingent on signi cant redevelopment along this street that eliminates most of the existing loading docks. This recommendation is long-term and reliant on land use changes. California Evaluate conversion of California south of Park Avenue to reinforce the pedestrian connection to the Central Business District. Note: it may be preferable to keep this segment one-way under any scenario where future streetcar service utilizes California and Welton as a couplet. Stout/Champa couplet Evaluate the conversion of both streets, as a couplet or separately, in the long-term. Because of its narrow cross section, which would likely mean losing the existing bike lane under a two-way scenario, Champa will need to remain one way for the foreseeable future. Stout is a wider street and it may be appropriate to consider two way operations after the RTD Central Corridor improvements are in place on Downing Street. In the short term, evaluate tra c calming measures for both streets as part of a Next Steps Transportation Operations Study for Northeast Downtown. 38TH AND BLAKE STATION AREA PLAN The 38th & Blake station area plan recommended many changes to the street network in the vicinity of the station. These recommendations were evaluated by the 38th & Blake Next Steps Tra c Operational Study, and most were deemed feasible. However, funding has not been programmed for these projects and many are in the long-range timeframe. Rather than assume that all of the roadway network changes from the station area plan will be realized, this plan presents the existing roadway network and defers to the 38th & Blake Station Area Plan and the Next Steps Study regarding the advisability and phasing of speci c roadway network changes in the vicinity of the station. Welton and 22nd Street: Currently, there are no light rail stations between 20th and 25th streets on Welton

PAGE 30

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Strategy Framework 26 Recommended Framework Changes Street Network Enhanced Street Study Area Potential Alternative Broadway Modications Two Way Street Two Way Street (Potential Convert) One Way Street Broadway & 21st add median for pedestrian refuge / enhance pedestrian & bike crossing Enhanced Street 21st from Blake to 20th Ave Broadway & Larimer organize intersection future intersection reconguration to improve multimodal operations Broadway & Lawrence/ Arapahoe/Curtis organize intersection to enhance pedestrian and bicycle connectivity Potential Alternative Broadway Modications Connect 31st Street Lincoln potential future intersection reconguration to improve multimodal operations Lincoln/Welton Potential for future double left from Welton to Park Potential Future Street Conversion from 1 way to 2 way Blake Walnut Larimer Champa Stout California (south of Park) Welton (north of Park) Curtis 22nd from Champa to Stout change to 2 Way 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

PAGE 31

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Strategy Framework 27 Recommended Framework Changes Bicycle and PedestrianEnhanced Street Study Area Potential Alternative Broadway Modications Existing Bike Lane/Sharrow Proposed Bike Lane/Sharrow Key Pedestrian Routes Existing Bridge Proposed Bridge 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11Broadway & 21st add median for pedestrian refuge / pedestrian activated crossing signal Broadway & Lawrence/ Arapahoe/Curtis organize intersection to enhance pedestrian and bicycle connectivity Potential Alternative Broadway Modications Bike path to River Connect 31st Street Bridge over Railroad Ped and Bike only Bridge over Railroad Ped and Bike only Bridge over Railroad All Modes Add Crossing Signal Enhanced Street 21st from Blake to 20th Ave Extend Bike Lane

PAGE 32

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Strategy Framework 28 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9New Station: 38th & Blake Potential Alternative Broadway Modications Proposed Downtown Circulator Enhanced Street 21st from Blake to 20th Blake or Larimer New transit connection serving 38th & Blake Station, Auraria West Station, and points in between Relocate existing bus route to California New Station: 35th & Downing New Station: 33rd & Downing Options for new Arapahoe Square LRT/Streetcar Station Commuter Rail Future LRT/Streetcar Existing New Route Proposed Bus Route Removed Bus Route Existing Enhanced Street Potential Alternative Broadway Modications LRT/Streetcar Future Recommended Framework Changes Public Transportation

PAGE 33

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Strategy Framework 29 B.3 Consider New or Modi ed Transit Routes In tandem with already-executed or future two-way conversions, work with RTD to consolidate bus operations to a single street or a sole one-way couplet. On the west side of the study area, regional bus routes currently on Blake and Market/Walnut and originating/terminating at Market Street Station will be re-routed outside of the study area to the new Denver Union Station. Local buses will run on Blake, Larimer (inbound) and Lawrence (outbound). On event days requiring Blake Street closures, such as Coors Field game days and the St Patricks Day parade, Blake Street buses will be rerouted to Larimer via 19th and Park Avenue. Consistent with recommendations in the Downtown Area Plan and the 38th & Blake Station Area Plan, a future transit route, mode to be determined, would run on Blake Street or parallel street from the 38th and Blake and potentially National Western Stock Show commuter rail stations and create shuttle-style connectivity between the study area and the Auraria Campus and Auraria West Station. On the east side of the study area, separate bicycle and bus routes by relocating inbound buses from Stout to California. Splitting buses on Stout and California appears to be leftover from when Stout and California formed a one-way couplet. With California already a twoway street, having both inbound and outbound buses on the same street creates a more intuitive system for bus riders, and decreases bus-bicycle con ict by removing buses from Stout (which has a striped bike lane). Provide a new transit route (Streetcar, BRT, enhanced bus) along a corridor that could connect 38th & Blake Station to Ballpark, LoDo, Auraria Campus, and Auraria West Station. The Downtown Area Plan identi es Larimer and Lawrence streets and the 38th and Blake Station Area Plan identi es Blake Street for this potential alignment. Either street may be a good choice depending on the circumstances and opportunities at the time of implementation. As a main street corridor, Larimer would bene t from this additional service, while streetcar serving the 38/Blake station could most easily be extended to Blake Street. B.4 Consider an Arapahoe Square Rail Station on Welton Evaluate a new rail station for Arapahoe Squar e located between 21st Street and Park Avenue. Current LRT station spacing along the Welton corridor locates stations approximately every 2 blocks, with the exception of the segment between 20th and 25th. A new stop in Arapahoe Square could provide improved connections to Park Avenue, the enhanced 21st Street, Welton businesses, Coors Field, and other destinations. B.5 In Short-Term, Undertake a Broadway Intersections Improvements Study Conduct further study to identify potential short-term improvements to Broadway intersections Evaluate potential improvements at the Broadway/Larimer intersection for increased multimodal connectivity. Evaluate the opportunity to enhance pedestrian connectivity and promote pedestrian priority at the intersections of Broadway and Lawrence/Arapahoe/Curtis/21st. Located in the center of the study area, these intersections play an important role in completing direct access across Broadway. Modi cations should be studied to minimize required out-of-direction travel by pedestrians, and emphasize pedestrian priority through median island refuge areas in Broadway, closure of alleys and curb cut access to parking areas. STRATEGIC PARKING PLANAs the Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods evolve over time, new parking conditions and opportunities may arise. As needed, parking and parking management should be evaluated in accordance with the vision and process set forth in the Citys Strategic Parking Plan (SPP). The SPP is a comprehensive, citywide framework that helps articulate and clarify the vision and approach for parking management in the City. The SPP explores innovative strategies and parking values from a variety of user perspectives so the implementation tools can achieve the best balance possible. Speci cally the Strategic Parking Plan Vision is to: Acknowledge a variety of land use patterns and contexts Manage parking as an asset Encourage an integrated approach to parking management The plan recommends a comprehensive process to yield a customized set of management tools that allow parking to support healthy thriving communities. The process begins with de ning the community, collecting data and identifying parking conditions and issues. The process also involves developing area speci c parking goals and developing a management program best suited to the area. To ensure a comprehensive program, potential tools encompass strategies relative to demand, location, time and price.

PAGE 34

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Strategy Framework 30C. Economic and Development Opportunity GOAL STATEMENTNortheast Downtown will be a collection of visually interesting, diverse, and prosperous neighborhoods with increasing economic and development activity that includes small and creative businesses, a wide variety of housing types and prices, and vital retail corridors. WHY IS ECONOMIC AND DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITY IMPORTANT TO NORTHEAST DO WNTOWN?Northeast Downtown consists of both areas of change and areas of stability. Areas of change are those that are bene tting or will bene t from reinvestment, increased population and employment, and new, more intense development. The areas of changeArapahoe Square, Ballpark/River North, Downing, Welton/Five Pointsare at various stages of redevelopment and revitalization. Economic development is typically de ned as the process of creating wealth through the mobilization of human, nancial, capital, physical and natural resources to generate marketable goods and services (American Economic Development Council). In many cases, the private sector, through an individual developer or business, amasses the necessary resources to advance a project. In other cases, the public sector has a responsibility to bring resources and leadership to generate the private sector interest. Private development has been leading the revitalization of Ballpark and RiNo. A Business Development O ce is providing the leadership resources to spur desired development in Five Points. The Central Corridor Extension and Streetcar Transformative Concept will provide the public infrastructure investment to attract private development for the TOD areas. Taking advantage of the economic and development opportunities of Arapahoe Square will require a broader range of integrated strategies to overcome the present development conditions. The Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Study Area is located in the Platte River and Capitol Hill commercial real estate markets

PAGE 35

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Strategy Framework 31SUMMARY OF EXISTING CONDITIONSNortheast Downtown has considerable commercial activity that includes o ce, industrial, warehouse, arts, and retail uses. The area has and will continue to bene t from proximity to Downtown, Coors Field, and public transportation investments. Each of the areas of change is developing distinctive character based in part on its historical uses and location. Ballpark is a designated Landmark district that has also experienced extensive redevelopment since Coors Field opened in 1995. Much of the building reuse and new construction has been for housing with a variety of types, prices, and tenancy. Larimer Street, especially between 20th Street and Park Avenue, supports a variety of retail and small restaurants. Blake Street has a mix of residential, o ce and retail uses, as well as a few remaining industrial uses. Walnut retains many of its industrial uses. RiNo has long served as a backbone of the industrial activities on the edge of Downtown Denver, with a large number of warehouse, industrial, and support businesses. The River North Art District re ects the growing community of artist studios and galleries. Recently, additional businesses (such as professional services, creative businesses, and others) and housing developments have discovered the locational advantage and a ordability of RiNo. Today the Downing/Welton Corridor is identi ed with the D-Line Light Rail and FasTracks Central Corridor Extension. The Five Points Business District O ce and Five Points community are seeking to re-establish the historic Five Points neighborhood. Sometimes called the Harlem of the West, Five Points, which is Colorados only designated historic cultural landmark district, has a rich jazz history and has served as the heart of the African-American community in Denver since at least the 1930s. After World War II, the corridor has continually struggled to maintain its previous vibrancy and economic success. Small-scale storefronts spread north and south from the Five Points intersection create a developing node of neighborhoodserving retail. Additional development opportunities exist related to existing and proposed transit stops along Downing and Welton. Curtis Park, Enterprise Hill, and San Rafael are residential neighborhoods with scattered small lot in ll opportunities. Large scale redevelopment opportunities also exist in the form of larger vacant lots, particularly in the southernmost blocks of Curtis Park approaching Arapahoe Square. Adaptive reuse of vacant historic structures, such as the Epworth Church, the Curtis Park Community Center, and Temple Emmanuel, present an additional set of opportunities. Immediately adjacent to the Central Business District, Arapahoe Square has the potential to be the most urban of the Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods. Bounded by Park Avenue, 20th Street, the alley between Welton and Glenarm, and the alley between Larimer and Lawrence, Arapahoe Square will set a critical character transition between Downtown and the residential neighborhoods. At present, Arapahoe Square is visually dominated by surface parking lots and a clustering of social service providers. The parking lots serve downtown employees and Coors Field patrons. A more hidden asset is the collection of existing buildings that house a variety of small businesses, both emerging and established. There are also a handful of residential units, mostly in newer buildings of apartment or rowhouse building forms. One Lincoln Park (foreground): High density residential development adjacent to Northeast Downtown

PAGE 36

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Strategy Framework 32FRAMEWORK CONCEPTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS C.1 Strengthen Retail Corridors The plan area has two emerging retail corridors, Welton Street and Larimer Street, as well as a potential future TOD corridor in Downing Street. Retail strategies should strengthen these corridors by developing viable retail clusters, tenant mix and product and service o erings for those who live, work and visit the area. The area has two full service grocery stores. Additional retail opportunities will emerge to meet the needs of the growing population. Retail strategies for the three areas should aim at reinforcing the distinctive character of each and serve complementary retail market niches. C.2 Promote Economic and Housing Diversity The concept is to maintain the characteristic household and economic diversity of the Plan Area, In areas of stability, retaining the existing housing stock and reinforcing existing character through appropriate new development should continue. In areas of change, a wider variety of multiple unit building forms should be encouraged as part of these mixed-use neighborhoods. Future zoning should support varied residential forms and remove barriers to promote products that serve households at di erent socioeconomic levels. Adding more housing is important to forwarding the plan vision; however, housing development is driven by private developers and investors. The public sector can assist with removing regulatory barriers and providing subsidy when warranted. C.3 Encourage Housing Density Higher density housing requires structured parking, which is a costly component of any building and is likely to be required given the densities proposed in the plan. Multi-unit developments are currently viable because of specially subsidized nancing vehicles and favorable capital markets conditions. Market conditions will need to improve, subsidies provided, or alternative parking solutions identi ed in order to justify apartment or condominium development in the future. C.4 Establish and Support Business Development O ces The goal of dedicated Business Development O ces (BDO) located within the Study Area would be to decrease the barriers to economic development. The BDO would serve as an advocate for new and existing businesses, gather information regarding nancing programs, properties for sale, contact information for building and property owners and serve as a one-stop shop for those interested in investing or locating in a particular area. The BDO could develop marketing materials and serve as a facilitator to match property owners with prospective tenants and/or help with assemblages based on client needs. Because of the di erent character and business mix of the three areas, it is recommended that each one Arapahoe Square, Five Points/Welton, and Ballpark/RiNo could be the focus for such an e ort. A Business Development O ce for Five Points was established in 2010. Five Points Business District O ce

PAGE 37

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Strategy Framework 33 C.5 Establish Urban Renewal Areas Urban Renewal Areas (URA) are created to help e ect the redevelopment of blighted areas. URAs are created by the City through the adoption of Urban Redevelopment Plans which lay out the objectives of the plan (such as elimination of blight) and authorize the Denver Urban Renewal Authority (DURA) to carry out those objectives. DURAs primary tool for e ecting redevelopment is tax increment nancing (TIF). TIF can be used to assist in the nancing of projects that are consistent with the Denver Comprehensive Plan and all relevant plan supplements. Elsewhere in Denver, TIF has been used in a wide variety of ways including public infrastructure projects, subsidizing private development, and resolving site constraints such as environmental remediation and fragmented ownership. A Blight Study has been completed for Arapahoe Square con rming that blighting conditions exist, and a study of the Welton corridor is expected to be undertaken. A recommended early action is the creation of urban renewal areas for Arapahoe Square and the Welton corridor. C.6 Utilize OED Lending programs An essential economic development concept is expanding the number and range of businesses within the Plan Area. The O ce of Economic Development (OED) o ers a wide variety of services and referrals to assist existing and new businesses with their nancing, labor, space, and market needs. These services have proven to be essential components of nancing for a number of successful businesses in the area. Existing and new businesses should take full advantage of OEDs existing and future lending programs and OED should encourage their clients to consider locations in the Northeast Downtown Plan Area. Arapahoe Square has potential for an Urban Renewal Area

PAGE 38

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Strategy Framework 34D. Livability and Public Realm WHY ARE LIVABILITY AND THE PUBLIC REALM IMPORTANT TO NORTHEAST DOWNT OWN? In an urban neighborhood, life happens between buildings. The public realm, the space between buildings in an urban environment, such as the parks, plazas, sidewalks, and streets and how we perceive that space is critical to the livability of that environment. A thriving urban neighborhood needs streets that are safe, green space to let residents breathe, parks to play in, trees that provide shade, and squares and plazas to meet one another. A neighborhood should provide services, amenities, and a healthy environment to live, work, and play for people of all ages. The sense that you are somewhere, the sense that there is a there at all, evolves from how much importance people place on the shared public realm. The quality of the public realm is essential to the health of any environment, but not all environments are the same. The public realm in an urban environment should provide places that feel safe, promote multiple modes of travel especially walking and support the overall vibrancy and sense of community of the neighborhood. A walkable, urban neighborhood is a place that realizes the importance of the common space that all people experience. The neighborhoods of Northeast Downtown were developed early in Denvers history, when walking was the primary mode of travel. This is true of many of Denvers close-in neighborhoods such as Highlands, La Alma/Lincoln Park, and Capitol Hill. The streets, sidewalks, and public spaces were shared by the residents, business owners, employees, and customers that experienced the neighborhood with their feet.SUMMARY OF EXISTING CONDITIONSMany of the attributes of Northeast Downtown that made it thrive as a livable community in the late 19th and early 20th centuries had deteriorated in the latter half of the 20th century. The historic residential neighborhoods in the area, such as Curtis Park and San Rafael, have more recently rediscovered the many qualities of great places. Ballpark and River North have seen development and infrastructure improvements that have greatly improved the public realm. Elsewhere the quality of the public realm remains fragmented, and as a result, the livability of the entire Northeast Downtown Plan area is diminished. Real and perceived concerns about personal safety and crime are exacerbated with the presence of homelessness, fragmented building fabric, minimally maintained parking lots, and poorly maintained sidewalks and tree lawns. In addition to the quality of the public realm, other components of livable neighborhoods include public health and safety, access to parks and recreation facilities, access to healthy food, and sustainable infrastructure. Public Health Key components of a healthy neighborhood are convenient access to active transportation (walking, biking, and public transportation), parks and recreation facilities, and healthy food. For the most part, Northeast Downtown has those fundamental elements; however, perceptions of crime, impact of homelessness, high-tra c streets, and spotty quality of the urban fabric may hinder use of these assets. A Health Impact Assessment (HIA) was conducted in the summer and fall of 2010 to provide a summary of existing conditions and recommendations for improving public health in the plan area. For purposes of the HIA, health is de ned as both the promotion of healthy behaviors and the prevention of disease. The HIA conducted for a plan such as this is, by necessity, an overview of conditions that may contribute to improved health or the converse. GOAL STATEMENTProvide an appealing and safe physical environment, and increase the amount of appropriately programmed, maintained, and accessible public open space for the health, economic success, and livability of the Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods. 16th Street Mall is lauded nation-wide for its high quality public realm. Denver has many examples of neighborhood commerical districts, such as 32nd and Zuni in the Highland Neighborhood.

PAGE 39

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Strategy Framework 35 Public Safety Concerns about safety pervade Northeast Downtown. This perception is related to a lack of eyes on the street, a high concentration of social service providers, and open-air drug deals and criminal activity. These real and perceived safety concerns a ect potential development and residents willingness to walk and bike in high crime areas. Homelessness The impact and visibility of the homeless on public streets and parks is a detriment to promoting the area as a walkable, urban neighborhood. The impacts are most evident at Eddie Maestas Park and the streets adjoining the Denver Rescue Mission. The Denver community has focused its e orts to address the homeless issue through Denvers Road Home (DRH), established in 2005. The 10-Year goal is to end homelessness in Denver as we know it. This means that our community will have provided adequate housing and services to the chronically homeless population. These e orts have already reduced the homelessness population by 66% over the rst half of the 10year plan. The 10-year Plan to End Homelessness has many components that have vastly improved the delivery of services, understanding of issues and quality of life for the residents, providers, consumers and businesses in the Northeast Downtown area. As part of Denvers Road Home, a collaborative of outreach sta work daily to connect vulnerable and homeless individuals and families to critical services and housing. The Denver Police Department is part of this outreach team. In addition to dealing with criminal activity, Police District 6 o cers respond to community issues. At the end of ten years, Denver will have in place a strong service delivery system that works to prevent homelessness in the rst place, and very quickly works to get those who fall into homelessness back into stable lives. The need for emergency shelter should be reduced drastically, and resources should be readily available for those in need. Denvers Road Home is a stakeholder in decisions around the use and programming at Eddie Maestas Park and other parcels in the area, and is committed to ongoing engagement towards solutions that create safe, positive spaces for the area. Parks The City and County of Denver is in the fortunate position of being a very desirable city in which to live, work and play, o ering a quality of life that has resulted in a consistently growing population, even as other cities around the nation are declining. Denvers continued success depends on its ability to continue providing the same or greater level of amenities and basic infrastructure to support a vibrant and economically healthy city. Some of the most visible elements of an urban area are the public spaces, such as parks, plazas and bikeways or trails. These elements provide numerous public health and environmental bene ts for recreation, exercise, connectivity and transportation, air pollution removal, tourism, rainwater retention, and natural beauty. As with other infrastructure systems, the public park system must continue to evolve to meet the increasing expectations and demands of the growing population. The major park facilities in Northeast Downtown are Sonny Lawson Park (2.5 acres), Benedict Fountain Park (2.8 acres), and Mestizo-Curtis Park (8.5 acres). The Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods study area has a 2010 estimated population of 12,710. Both Blueprint Denver and the Denver Regional Council of Governments expect a signi cant increase in the residential population of Northeast Downtown and the adjacent Downtown core in the next 15 to 20 years, triggering a need for additional park amenities that vary in character and scale. As described in the Game Plan, the Parks Departments master plan, the Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods themselves are dramatically under served by parks, even for the existing population. With only 1.26 acres of parks for every 1,000 residents compared to a citywide average of 7.14 acres per Eddie Maestas Park Homeless congregate in Eddie Maestas Park.

PAGE 40

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Strategy Framework 361,000 people this low acreage is even lower than other dense urban neighborhoods in the city such as Union Station and Lincoln Park. One of the primary determinants of the marketability and the livability of a vibrant urban area is access to parks, open spaces and trails for health, mobility, community and environmental bene ts as well as property value enhancement. The lack of existing infrastructure and public amenities contribute to the areas blighted appearance, and is likely one of the most signi cant inhibitors to private investment and development. If the existing park de ciency is not addressed, the de ciency of amenities needed for a healthy, active, urban lifestyle will hamper its redevelopment potential. As the city is expecting and planning for dense, urban development in central areas, including this study area, the park system will need improvements to accommodate the increased population growth and park system use. In future years as this plan is implemented, the addition of new parks, investments in existing parks, and new and improved connectivity will be critical to this areas success. Stormwater The standard level of storm protection in the City is to plan, design, and construct storm sewers to convey storm runo from a 2-year storm event in residential areas, and a 5-year event in commercial and industrial areas in underground storm drains. For larger storm events, the public right-of-way conveys the excess runo up to one foot deep in the gutter. The City has required water quality detention for all new developments greater than one-half acre in size since the early 1990s and stormwater detention since at least the 1970s. Additionally, the nished ground oor or any point of stormwater entry to any new development is required to be at least one foot higher than the 100-year storm ood level. New development must accommodate on-site 10-year detention and water quality. The Citys Storm Drainage Master Plan (2009) identi ed areas of potential ponding or potential ooding greater than 18 inches deep in a major storm event at several locations within Northeast Downtown. These locations include: Broadway/Stout/20th/21st Blake Street from 29th Street to 31st Street Portions of the Coors Field players parking lot adjacent to the UPRR railroad tracks The area generally bounded by 30th Street on the south, California Street on the east, and Arapahoe Street on the west The area north of 36th Street and 37th Avenue Additional analysis being conducted as part of the FasTracks East Corridor project has identi ed ponding greater than 18 inches in a major storm event at 26th and Blake, and con rmed ow depths greater than 18 inches in a major storm in the area bounded by 35th Street, Larimer, Downing, and the UPRR railroad tracks.FRAMEWORK CONCEPTS AND RECOMMENDATIONSSeveral of the plans concepts and recommendations will positively contribute to livability and the public realm directly and indirectly. The following speci c concepts stand alone as important strategies for livability and an improved public realm in Northeast Downtown. D.1 Promote Access to Healthy Transportation Expand opportunities for active transportation choices for people of all ages and abilities. Benedict Fountain Park

PAGE 41

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Strategy Framework 37 Improve pedestrian crossings of major streets (Park Avenue, Broadway, and 20th) with bulb-outs and other improvements. Reinstall missing tree lawn or amenity zone segments as part of new development or public infrastructure projects. Use the 21st Street, Curtis Street, RiNo bridges, and Streetcar Transformative Concepts as the framework for implementation of healthy transportation strategies. D. 2. Promote Access to Healthy Foods Encourage healthy food choices by neighborhood residents through urban agriculture (Denver Urban Gardens) and other programs identi ed by the Sustainable Food Policy Council. D.3 Invest in Park Improvements Invest in park improvements and programming to encourage residents to use existing and new parks for active and passive recreation. D.4 Study Connecting Parks to Destination Areas Study opportunities for improved connections to Downtown and existing parks such as Skyline Park, Riverfront Park, Sonny Lawson Park, Benedict Fountain Park, Mestizo-Curtis Park, City of Cuernavaca Park, and the South Platte River greenway. D.5 Identify Funding for Stormwater I mprovements and Promote Water Quality through Best Practices The need for additional storm drainage improvements throughout the Northeast Downtown Area has been previously identi ed in the adopted 2009 Storm Drainage Master Plan. These improvements include four major storm drainage improvement projects that are currently not funded or programmed due to nancial constraints and an identied $1 billion city-wide need in storm drainage improvements: 27th Street improvements (includes the 27th and Welton intersection) 31st Street outfall 36th Street outfall Upper end of the Stout Street outfall Sustainable stormwater technologies, that could be applicable in Northeast Downtown and should be considered whenever stormwater improvements are needed, include but are not limited to: Bio-swales Permeable Pavers In ltration Tree Wells Sub-regional Detention Ponds (in conjunction with new open space) Low-Impact Development Techniques Regional water quality Incorporate sustainable stormwater improvements in 21st Street THE PARKS GAME PLAN 2002 identi es the following goals and recommendations for park space: Performance Goals: Provide at least acre of public open space within one-half mile of every residents home that can be reached without crossing a major barrier. Provide 8 to 10 acres of parkland for every 1,000 residents Parks Game Plan Recommendations for Equitable and Generous Park Land: Bring areas of the city that are signi cantly below the desired acreage goal up to par within 10 years; Plan for growth while addressing the uneven distribution of parkland; Work with CPD to ensure that redevelopment, especially within areas of change, provides neighborhood parkland at the recommended level of service; Strengthen partnerships with DPS, private colleges and schools, and other institutions to seek shared-use agreements and identify long-lead acquisition and redevelopment opportunities; Strengthen partnerships with nonpro ts working to increase types and availability of open space; Strengthen relationships with potential funding partners, such as Great Outdoors Colorado and foundations.

PAGE 43

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Transformative Concepts 39This chapter presents eight di erent development concepts that, if constructed, would likely have a catalytic e ect on stimulating additional investment in the Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods area. These concepts represent big ideas for positively transforming Northeast Downtown. 21st Street Curtis Street Broadway Connecting River North New Park Social Services Streetcar Transit Oriented Development Each concept is presented and then evaluated against the four criteria that are the organizing element for this plan: Neighborhood Connections and Character Mobility Development Opportunity Livability and the Public Realm In some cases concepts may not be implemented as shown in this plan because of the interrelationships between them. Opportunities may arise to implement some concepts earlier than others, which would then inform and re ne the implementation of the remaining concepts. Transformative Concepts

PAGE 44

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Transformative Concepts 4021st Street GOAL STATEMENTMake 21st Street a focal point for the Northeast Downtown neighborhoods by promoting its role as an important pedestrian and bicycle route and community gathering place.WHAT IS IT?Early in the planning process, 21st Street was identi ed as a potential transformative location for the Northeast Downtown neighborhoods. Three major concepts a Bike Boulevard, a Festival Street, and innovative stormwater management evolved during the Arapahoe Square charrette in January, 2011. The street is a two-way, low tra c volume street that enjoys two neighborhood landmarks as bookends: Coors Field to the west and Benedict Fountain Park to the east. Coors Field in particular acts as a strong terminating vista for the street and is a valuable asset for any future development on 21st. The low-level of tra c when compared to other streets in the area makes 21st Street a favorite for pedestrians and bicyclists. Bike sharrows are already on 21st street and many people utilize the street as a primary walking route on game days to the rst base entrance at Coors Field. This pedestrian friendly character of the street was recognized when planning for Coors Field occurred in the 1990s, resulting in enhanced streetscaping being installed between Blake and Arapahoe Streets. Two major concepts for improvements on 21st Street, the Bike Boulevard and the Festival Street, if implemented, would respond to these initial ideas of the street being a place with an enhanced public realm and prioritizing pedestrians and bicyclists. Another opportunity for 21st Street, since it is located at the ridge of two stormwater basins, is for it to be a potential testing ground for innovative, environmentally friendly stormwater management techniques new to the Denver area. Finally, much of the land along 21st Street today is devoid of buildings and often used as surface parking, which is in high demand on Rockies game days. In the short-term, these parking lots will most likely remain, but in the long-term land assembly and proximity to Downtown make 21st in Ballpark and Arapahoe Square an excellent location for mixed-use and high density residential development. Any streetscape improvement may require the establishment of a local maintenance district and should be coordinated with the existing Consolidated Larimer Street Local Maintenance District. Bike boulevards devote large sections of the ROW for bicycles while also accommodating other modes. Bioswales use vegetation to detain and purify stormwater. The Right-of-way of Festival Streets can be designed for exibility of use. The section of 21st Street nearest to Coors Field already has wide sidewalks and street trees. New development could help to activate the street and a redesign could transform it into a Festival Street.

PAGE 45

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Transformative Concepts 41HOW DOES IT ADDRESS NEIGHBORHOOD CONNECTIONS AND CHARACTER? Becomes a focal point for the entire Northeast Downtown area, connecting the activities near Coors Field to the redevelopment opportunities in Arapahoe Square and the named north-south streets that intersect it.HOW DOES IT ADDRESS MOBILITY? Prioritizes the right of way for use by pedestrians and bicyclists, while still accommodating vehicular tra c. Provides bicyclists with enhanced connectivity to other bike routes.HOW DOES IT ADDRESS DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITY? The high quality multi-modal environment of a Bike Boulevard and Festival Street may act as a catalyst for the reuse of existing buildings and redevelopment of under-utilized or vacant parcels. The enhanced public realm along 21st Street may attract private investment to respond to the street.HOW DOES IT ADDRESS LIVABILITY AND THE PUBLIC REALM? Promotes active uses along the street Promotes potential new development that would begin to frame the street into a comfortable, human-scaled environment Improved multi-modal capacity increases access to neighborhood amenities for pedestrians and cyclists. 21ST STREET RECOMMENDATIONS: Develop 21st Street as a Bike Boulevard: Evaluate cross section to prioritize bicycle movement as a bike boulevard as conceptualized in Denver Moves Develop 21st Street as Festival Street: Evaluate cross section to include improvements in support of potentially closing street for events and accommodating wide sidewalks, on street parking, one lane of travel in each direction, bike lanes, and streetscape improvements. This concept should be rst considered on a short portion of the street, such as Blake to Larimer, before considering extending the treatment along the corridor. The term Festival Street is exible and should include the Bike Boulevard concept identi ed previously. Identify 21st Street as a potential testing location for several of the sustainable stormwater technologies due to its location at the ridge of two stormwater basins. Explore integration of stormwater technologies into other projects on 21st street such as future development activity, streetscape improvements, Festival Street, Bike Boulevard, etc. Bio-swales Permeable Pavers In ltration Tree Wells Sub-regional Detention Ponds (in conjunction with new open space) Low-Impact Development Techniques Encourage the addition of standard railings along the 21st Street parking lots to improve the visual quality of the street and acknowledge its short term function for parking by promoting the Denver Public Works and Downtown Denver Partnership parking program to parking lot owners. Bike Sharrows on 21st Street

PAGE 46

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Transformative Concepts 42Curtis Street GOAL STATEMENTUse Curtis Street to create a preferred pedestrian route connecting the Central Business District to Arapahoe Square and Curtis Park.WHAT IS IT?Curtis Street represents an opportunity to create a strong pedestrian linkage from the Commercial Core through Arapahoe Square, and into Curtis Park. This builds upon the Downtown Multimodal Access Plan, which identi ed Curtis as a street that could potentially be converted to two-way operations, and the Downtown Area Plan, which identi ed Curtis Street as a pedestrian-priority linkage. Curtis terminates at the south end at the Denver Performing Arts Center, and at the north end at Mestizo-Curtis Park, so it is not a major through route for automobile tra c. Within the Central Business District, Curtis curb-to-curb width is about 40 feet south of 16th, but widens to about 55 feet between 16th and 20th, presenting a good opportunity to narrow the street and widen the sidewalks to emphasize the pedestrian realm. One challenge is that the pedestrian environment on Curtis between 18th and 20th is particularly weak as a result of block-long blank walls and an absence of street-activating uses in that area. Redevelopment of the Greyhound Bus Station located on the block bounded by Curtis, 20th, Arapahoe and 19th would do much to improve the quality of the pedestrian experience.HOW DOES IT ADDRESS NEIGHBORHOOD CONNECTIONS AND CHARACTER? Curtis Street would become a pedestrian spine connecting three neighborhoods: Downtown, Arapahoe Square, and Curtis Park. The intersection of 21st Street and Curtis gains importance, and becomes a place to focus on establishing an identity for Arapahoe Square. Conceptual sketch of Curtis Street at 20th Street, enhanced for pedestrians.

PAGE 47

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Transformative Concepts 43HOW DOES IT ADDRESS MOBILITY? Provides a preferred route for pedestrians through Arapahoe Square and connects the CBD and Curtis Park Provides a potential location for a strengthened pedestrian crossing of Broadway.HOW DOES IT ADDRESS DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITY? Curtis connects directly into the middle of the portion of Arapahoe Square that currently has the most intact urban fabric. If Curtis were successful in attracting more pedestrian activity, additional redevelopment could follow.HOW DOES IT ADDRESS THE LIVABILITY AND THE PUBLIC REALM? Expands the public realm within the Central Business District by repurposing a portion of the roadway for sidewalks. CURTIS STREET RECOMMENDATIONS:Recognize the vision and concepts for Curtis Street identi ed in the Downtown Multimodal Access Plan (2005) and the Downtown Area Plan (DAP, 2007): The Downtown Multimodal Access Plan (2005) identi ed a handful of named streets, namely Curtis, Tremont, and Court, which potentially could be converted to two-way while maintaining the e ciency and e ectiveness of the one-way street system for moving tra c. The Downtown Area Plan (2007) identi es Putting Pedestrians First and An outstanding pedestrian environment as key elements of the vision for Downtown. Specially, Larimer, Curtis, California and Tremont are identi ed as the start of the e ort to improve the pedestrian environment on named streets. Furthermore, DAP identi es Embracing Adjacent Neighborhoods as a Transformative Project and identi es the streets that connect Downtown to its neighbors on all sides. Curtis is identi ed as one such street because it connects the Downtown districts of Auraria, Downtown, Arapahoe Square, and Curtis Park. Maintain the existing two-way segment of Curtis north of 22nd Street. Place a visual focal point, such as a statue or other landmark, where Curtis Street terminates at Mestizo-Curtis Park. Evaluate opportunities to move the Greyhound bus terminal (located just outside of the study area) and associated vehicle maintenance facilities in Curtis Park and redevelop those properties. Explore opportunities to widen sidewalks, improve pedestrian crossings at major intersections (20th Street, Broadway, and Park Avenue), and provide streetscape amenities and pedestrianscale lighting throughout the corridor.Curtis Street serves pedestrian axis connecting Curtis Park, Arapahoe Square, and Downtown. Welton W Welton W Welton Stout tout tout Champa C hampa C hampa 3 31st th 30th th th 29th th th 28th th 27th 25th th 24th 2 Park P Park 22nd n 2 21st 20th 0th 2 0th 2 20th 33rd rd d 32nd d tis Curtis Arapahoe A apahoe A rapahoe Lawrence awrence awrence Larimer imer arimer Walnut Walnut Walnut Blake Blake Blake Bl Broadway y Broad y Broad Downing g g i 24th 24 h h 24 25th 2 h 25 h Central Business District Arapahoe Square Arapahoe Square Curtis Park Curtis Park

PAGE 48

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Transformative Concepts 44BroadwayWHAT IS IT?Broadway is identi ed as a Grand Boulevard in the 2007 Downtown Area Plan. Cutting diagonally through the Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan study area, Broadway was overlaid into this section of the Citys vehicular infrastructure in the 1920s, long after the establishment of the downtown grid. As one of three major vehicular entry points into downtown from the north, Broadways high tra c volumes and multi-legged intersections make this roadway a neighborhood divide that serves regional and local transportation needs. The Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan examines three conceptual approaches to the long-term future of Broadway as a Grand Boulevard. These concepts are meant to balance local and regional needs, supporting regional vehicular mobility while also providing for safe, e cient pedestrian and bicycle movement. Two of the concepts in particular, Celebrating Broadway and Bridging Broadway, would result in dramatic changes to the street and the way that it functions. A signi cant amount of study and analysis is required before either of those concepts could be deemed feasible. Broadway Options: Preserving Broadway maintains the current street cross section while introducing short-term, targeted improvements to intersections to facilitate pedestrian and bike crossings. Additional improvements may be identi ed in the long-term to enhance the public realm within the existing right-of-way for multiple mode choices. A core feature of this option is that it retains Broadway as a direct vehicle and pedestrian link between North Denver and the Civic Center Area. This Grand Boulevard approach would maintain Broadways current role as a major regional arterial roadway while striving to improve the public realm and overall multi-modal functionality of the street. Celebrating Broadway proposes a road diet for the segment of Broadway between Park Avenue and Welton Street. Within this section, Broadway would incur a lane reduction. Right-of-way width recaptured from the roadway would be used to create amenities that enhance the public realm, such as planted medians, wider sidewalks populated with street trees, street furnishings and even the potential for outdoor retail or restaurant areas. This Grand Boulevard approach would treat Broadway as an important functional and aesthetic gateway into the downtown core while emphasizing the pedestrian aspect of the public realm. The timeframe for implemen ting a Celebrating Broadway concept could be 30 years or more into the future. Bridging Broadway proposes the complete removal of Broadway between Park Avenue and Welton Street, with the vacated roadw ay right-of-way reverting to adjacent parcels and becoming developable or being maintained as a non-auto thoroughfare for pedestrians and bicyclists. Under this concept, the Downtown rectilinear street grid would be reinstated, with tra c redistributed throughout the grid. Arapahoe and Welton (south of Park) would be maintained as one-way streets to help accommodate tra c volumes. Arapahoe would redirect tra c to 19th or other downtown streets, while Welton could feature a double left at Park Avenue to help distribute tra c. Additional connections to the regional transportation network, including the possibility of new streets, may be necessary to avoid unintended impacts, such as reduced air quality, to the larger Denver area. This Grand Boulevard appr oach is the most dramatic interpretation of the Downtown Area Plans recommendation and may display the greatest ability to reconnect Northeast Downtown to the Downtown Core. The timeframe for implementing a Bridging Broadway concept could be 20 to 30 years or more into the future. GOAL STATEMENTImplement the vision of Broadway as a Grand Boulevard in Northeast Downtown. Preserving Celebrating Bridging Each of the Broadway concepts would have di erent impacts on mobility.

PAGE 49

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Transformative Concepts 45HOW DOES IT ADDRESS NEIGHBORHOOD CONNECTIONS AND CHARACTER? Preserving Broadway Targeted improvements at intersections would facilitate pedestrian and bicycle crossings. Provides direct connections to River North, Civic Center, and I-70. Celebrating Broadway An enhanced public realm could establish a place for pedestrians and encourages use of Broadway as an integrated part of the neighborhood, rather than a barrier. Decreased curb-to-curb width and lowered tra c volumes would promote pedestrian and bicycle movement between neighborhoods east and west of Broadway. Bridging Broadway Reintroduction of a traditional grid would allow a high level of pedestrian and bike connectivity. Reintroduction of a traditional grid o ers the opportunity for adjacent neighborhoods to integrate as a single urban neighborhood, or to develop separate identities that transition into each other rather than being split by the roadway alignment.HOW DOES IT ADDRESS MOBILITY? Preserving Broadway Maintains current level of service and tra c patterns for vehicles. Enhances pedestrian and bicycle movements by introducing targeted pedestrian/ bike improvements at intersections. Builds upon signi cant infrastructure improvements with the Broadway/Brighton underpass and Park Avenue viaduct. Provides direct connection between River North and Downtown, Civic Center, and the freeway system. Celebrating Broadway Redirects a signi cant portion of existing Broadway vehicular tra c between Park Avenue and 20th Street. Arapahoe (inbound tra c) and Welton (outbound tra c) as well as several other nearby roadways are designated as possible alternate routes into and out of the CBD. Additional study is needed to determine how this would a ect overall tra c ows, congestion, air quality, and access to regional roadways. Reducing the number of lanes on Broadway and expanding the pedestrian realm narrows the crossing distance for pedestrians and cyclists. Enhances pedestrian and bicycle crossing movements by reducing the number of lanes along Broadway at multi-legged intersections. Provides opportunities for wider sidewalks for pedestrians. Bridging Broadway Removes Broadway between Park Avenue and Welton Street. Vehicular tra c would be redirected and dispersed across remaining Downtown and Northeast Downtown street grid. Additional study is needed to determine how this would a ect overall tra c ows, congestion, air quality, and access to regional roadways. Arapahoe and Welton (south of Park Avenue) would be kept as higher-volume, oneBROADWAY AS A GRAND BOULEVARD The Downtown Area Plan (2007) articulates the goal for Grand Boulevards: Transform Speer Boulevard, Colfax Avenue, Broadway, Park Avenue, and Auraria Parkway into celebrated, multimodal boulevards to overcome the physical and perceptual barriers of these major thoroughfares. The Downtown Area Plan recommends that Broadway north of 20th be established as a green boulevard as recommended in the Downtown Multimodal Access Plan. The Downtown Area Plan also recognizes that each Grand Boulevard will need future study so that the design can respond to the unique context and environment of each street.

PAGE 50

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Transformative Concepts 46way roadways in order to facilitate inbound and outbound movement, respectively. Additional vehicular tra c on Arapahoe may a ect the existing bike lane. Enhances pedestrian and bicycle movement by eliminating Broadway as a street to cross. Reverting to a traditional grid system allows an enhanced pedestrian and bicycle crossing at 21st Street, supporting transformation of this street into a festival street and enhancing the utility of the streets designation as an important bicycle route.HOW DOES IT ADDRESS DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITY? Preserving Broadway Maintains access to parcels currently fronting Broadway. Maintains direct vehicular connection to regional roadways including Brighton Boulevard, Park Avenue, Interstate 70, and Interstate 25. Maintains direct vehicular and pedestrian access to and from the Civic Center area. Intersection improvements and additional facilities for pedestrian and bicycle movement could increase foot tra c to businesses. Celebrating Broadway Decreased curb-to-curb width promotes slower tra c speeds and a more pedestrian-friendly environment, an advantage for existing and future commercial, retail and residential uses. Decreased curb-to-curb width allows a widened public realm, which could include spaces for outdoor retail or restaurant spaces. Maintains access to parcels currently fronting Broadway. Existing public and private utilities may require relocation. Bridging Broadway Upon vacation, existing Broadway right-of-way would revert to adjacent parcels. Increased parcel size and/or modi ed parcel geometry may allow for redevelopment, new development, or building re-use with di erent land uses. In some cases (public parcels, triangle parks), enlarged parcels may enhance a parks function as a public amenity or ability to act as a development catalyst. Vacation of Broadway could encourage integration of neighborhoods to the east and west of Broadways existing alignment, creating opportunity for a more attractive, varied urban neighborhood in Arapahoe Square. In the interim between now and when the concept could possibly be implemented, BROADWAY HISTORY The extension of Broadway was rst proposed in 1907 as part of a series of civic improvements by Mayor Robert Speer. Broadway was nally extended from Welton Street to Blake Street in the 1920s with the intention to increase access, improve mobility, spur economic development, and provide a direct connection to the Civic Center. Since Broadway is part of the city street grid and was extended into an area built on the downtown grid, blocks were split into triangular shapes, often leaving small, irregular parcels. Broadways orientation against the downtown grid also created intersections with more vehicular, bike, and pedestrian movements than a typical four-way intersection.Pre-Broadway 1904 Broadway 2011

PAGE 51

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Transformative Concepts 47would cause uncertainty for existing and potential future development fronting Broadway. Existing public and private utilities may require relocation.HOW DOES IT ADDRESS LIVABILITY AND THE PUBLIC REALM? Preserving Broadway Preserves and enhances the public realm as it exists today. Potential improvements to the triangle parks could enhance the public realm. Celebrating Broadway Decreased curb-to-curb width could allow a widened public realm, with space for street trees, furnishings and other amenities such as outdoor retail or restaurant spaces. Decreased curb-to-curb width and more consistent on-street parking could provide a tra c-calming e ect, creating a more pedestrian-friendly environment. Bridging Broadway Stakeholders have identi ed Broadway as a barrier that divides adjacent neighborhoods into two distinct areas. Removal of this divide could promote the natural evolution and development of a true urban neighborhood. BROADWAY RECOMMENDATIONS: Conduct a study of Broadway as part of the series of studies identi ed in the Mobility Framework as the Downtown Strategic Transportation Plan Travelshed Analysis and the Northeast Downtown street network to determine the most appropriate and feasible way to advance the long-range vision for Broadway, including study of the three transformative concepts: Preserving Celebrating Bridging Use the NEDN Next Steps Study to look at short-term improvements for pedestrians and bicyclists to cross Broadway, especially at 21st Street. EXISTING BUILDINGS NEW BUILDINGS BroadwayCaliforniaStoutWeltonChampa Curtis20th21st22ndParkLincolnThe Bridging Broadway concept illustrated looking north from the intersection of Broadway and 19th streets. New development occurs in the former Right-of-way to stitch the blocks back together. Image produced by the Urban Design Committee of the Colorado Chapter of AIA.

PAGE 52

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Transformative Concepts 48Connecting River NorthWHAT IS IT?Much of Northeast Downtown is in close proximity to the South Platte River, yet access to this natural amenity is challenging due to the Union Paci c railroad tracks stretching from southwest to northeast through the Ballpark and River North neighborhoods. This creates two distinct sides to River North, the portion north of the railroad tracks along Brighton Boulevard, and the portion south of the railroad tracks along Blake and Walnut streets. Presently there are only two routes connecting River North: the 38th Street underpass at the northern tip of the neighborhood, and the Broadway viaduct at the southern end. Three new connections 31st Street, 33rd Street, and 36th/38th streets would connect both sides of the River North neighborhood and provide invaluable access to the green space and trail system of the South Platte River corridor for all of Northeast Downtown. The bridges would potentially increase access to a possible enhanced transit service on Blake, Larimer, or Brighton that would provide connections to Lower Downtown, Auraria, and multiple transit stations. The bridges have the challenge of crossing two barriers: the Coors Field parking lot, and the railroad right of way, including the existing freight tracks and futur e East Corridor commuter rail tracks. One potential bridge location at 36th or 38th Street would provide access to the future commuter rail station at 38th and Blake. Further study is needed to understand how the proposed bridges and any necessary approaches would a ect adjacent private property. The bridges would be a signi cant capital expense and the potential positive and negative impacts on adjacent properties should be considered. 36th/38th Street: A pedestrian and bicycle bridge at either 36th or 38th Street will be constructed as part of the FasTracks 38th and Blake East Corridor Commuter Rail Station. The East Corridor EIS located the bridge at 38th Street, but the 38th & Blake Station Area Plan recommended relocating it to 36th Street to improve neighborhood connectivity and pedestrian access to the station. Moving the bridge to 36th Street creates a spine of activity in both directions from the station that connects with redevelopment e orts along Brighton Boulevard and Blake/Walnut/Larimer streets. The 38th & Blake Next Steps Study identi ed the relocation of the bridge to 36th as being highly important to the station area, but also acknowledged that it is a complicated issue that would require a high degree of cooperation between the City, RTD, and the Union Paci c Railroad. If the FasTracks bridge is constructed at 38th Street, an additional bridge should be constructed at 35th or 36th Street as it would best serve the River North, Curtis Park, Whittier, and Cole neighborhoods at that location. 31st Street: A pedestrian and bicycle only bridge at 31st Street would provide the shortest route to the river. In combination with becoming a bicycle route and pedestrian priority path, this street would provide an excellent connection between Northeast Downtown neighborhood amenities, such as the 30th and Downing light rail station and Metizo-Curtis Park to the South Platte River corridor. 33rd Street: A bridge accommodating all modes of tra c spanning the Union Paci c right of way at 33rd Street would not only improve access to the river, it would also increase overall mobility for the entire River North neighborhood. GOAL STATEMENTImprove connections in River North between Northeast Downtown and the South Platte River corridor. BRIDGE TIMING AND PRIORITYFunding opportunities should be pursued for planning, designing, and construction of any or all of the River North connections. The 36th Street connection does have the greatest urgency due to the planned 2016 opening date for the FasTracks East Corridor. The 31st Street connection, due to its designation as a pedestrian priority, and the 33rd Street connection as a multimodal connection, should follow in priority. A series of pedestrian bridges connecting Downtown to Highland have been crucial to the success of redevelopment e orts in the Central Platte Valley. 31st, 33rd, and 36th streets present the best opportunities to create new connections across the railroad tracks in River North. La Lawrence La La La Arap pah p p Arap Arapahoe Arap Arap Arap L a La Larimer L rimer La L arimer th h h 29th 9th 9th 29 29 h h h 3 3 3 4th 34th th 34 4th th 34 B B B B B B Blake Blake Blake B Bl g g g i i D i g g Downing ing D Do ing wning Do D

PAGE 53

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Transformative Concepts 49HOW DOES IT ADDRESS NEIGHBORHOOD CONNECTIONS AND CHARACTERThe new bridges would create a stronger connection between the burgeoning eclectic arts scene in River North and the rest of Northeast Downtown while creating a larger and more diverse community.HOW DOES IT ADDRESS MOBILITY?The new bridges would increase access to the River North neighborhood on both sides of the railroad tracks and improve connections to the South Platte River Greenway.HOW DOES IT ADDRESS DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITY?The increased mobility in River North, stronger connections to the river corridor and improved access to commuter rail transit would be seen as an amenity for new employers and residents throughout Northeast Downtown.HOW DOES IT ADDRESS THE LIVABILITY AND THE PUBLIC REALM?Northeast Downtown neighborhoods would have greater access to community open space and natural amenities along the South Platte River corridor, as well as various arts and cultural destinations. CONNECTING RIVER NORTH RECOMMENDATIONS:Evaluate the potential to improve connections in the River North neighborhood and provide additional access to the South Platte River corridor via: Pedestrian and bicycle bridges or underpasses across the Union Paci c Railroad right of way at 31st Street and 36th Street Multi-modal bridge or underpass including bicycle, pedestrian, and automobile travel across the Union Paci c Railroad right of way at 33rd Street. This sketch shows a potential pedestrian/bike bridge over the railroad tracks at 31st Street. If the Coors Field over ow park ing ever became available for re-use in this area, new development and park space could be located on the site.

PAGE 54

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Transformative Concepts 50New ParkWHAT IS IT?Northeast Downtown is generally under served by parks compared to the city as a whole. There are currently 1.26 acres of park per 1000 residents, compared to the citywide average of 7.14. Expected population increases will further the need for more parks. If properly designed, located, and programmed, a new park would not only assist in meeting open space needs, but could also help to energize and attract activity to the surrounding area. Although a desired amenity, parks can become areas where illegal activities occur. There is concern on the part of residents and other stakeholders that a new park could become overrun with nuisances and illegal activities, thereby negating the bene ts. For this reason, if a new major park is pursued, a strategy to ensure that the park remains an amenity must be developed. GOAL STATEMENTEstablish a new park in the Northeast Downtown area that could provide valuable open space and recreation amenities for new and existing residents for years to come. Conceptual sketch of a new park located along a revitalized Festival Street on 21st.

PAGE 55

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Transformative Concepts 51 NEW PARK RECOMMENDATIONS: In the short-term, identify possible locations and funding sources to initially acquire land for a new park. Locate the park on land that is currently vacant or underutilized Locate the park close to existing residential development Locate the park in an under served area Provide the park in conjunction with new, adjacent development Provide programming, or dedicate the park to an active use Improve and activate existing parks in conjunction with the provision of a new park Incorporate stormwater detention and water quality features into the park design, if practicable. Seek partners for the nancing, development, programming and maintenance of new park amenitiesThis map shows properties that are within 3 and 6 blocks of a major Northeast Downtown park (Benedict Fountain, Sonny Lawson, or Mestizo-Curtis). Welton California Stout ChampaPark 31st 30th 29th 28th 24th 33rd 32nd 34th 35 th 22nd 21st 20th 19thCurtis Arapahoe Lawrence Larimer Walnut BlakeBroadway22nd 23rd 21st 24th 25th 26th 27th 28th 29th 30th 31st 33rdBruce Ran d Martin Lut h 35th 36th 37thDowning LegendStudy Area Park 3 Blocks Distance 6 Blocks Distance HOW DOES IT ADDRESS NEIGHBORHOOD CONNECTIONS AND CHARACTER?A new park, if properly designed and programmed, would be a major enhancement to the community character of the neighborhood in which it was located.HOW DOES IT ADDRESS MOBILITY?Pedestrians and cyclists can make direct use of paths and sidewalks in and around parks, often walking through them as a short cut to another destination.HOW DOES IT ADDRESS DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITY?A new park would be a major amenity that could help attract development to nearby properties.HOW DOES IT ADDRESS THE LIVABILITY AND THE PUBLIC REALM?A new park directly enhances the public realm by providing new space for people to congregate, recreate, and engage in activities.Commons Park: providing new park space in conjunction with redevelopment is a proven strategy in Denver.

PAGE 56

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Transformative Concepts 52Social Services GOAL STATEMENTBetter manage the provision of social services and provide more appropriate facilities in order to improve the development climate, connectivity, and safety.WHAT IS IT? There is a concentration of social service providers in this area which serve a critical role for the greater Denver region, by housing and feeding homeless and low income individuals and providing wrap around services such as drug rehabilitation, job training and counseling. The main providers in this area include the Denver Rescue Mission, Catholic Charities Samaritan House, the Urban Peak, Saint Francis Center, and the Colorado Coalition for the Homelesss Stout Street Clinic. The concentration of social service providers leads to activities that are considered a major impediment to promoting a safe and enjoyable public realm in Arapahoe Square and hinders development in the neighborhood. The impact and visibility of the homeless on public streets and parks is a detriment to promoting the area as a walkable, urban neighborhood, most evident at Eddie Maestas Park. The panhandling and loitering associated with the clients of the social service organizations contribute to Arapahoe Squares negative reputation and perceived safety issues. While the populations served by the social service organizations rarely commit crimes, they are often victims of it. It is widely known that criminals and drug-dealers use the congregations of homeless individuals in the Triangle Parks as human camou age for illicit and illegal activities. This perceived and real barrier is centered on Lawrence, Broadway and Park Avenue and discourages residents of Curtis Park from walking or biking to Downtown. This all contributes to Arapahoe Squares image problem and discourages developers from making investments in the area. The zoning code sets spacing, density, site, and other limitations on homeless shelters to reduce their impact on surrounding neighborhoods. Speci cally these include, but are not limited to, a 2,000ft spacing requirement between shelters, a limitation that no more than 2 shelters be allowed within a 4,000ft radius of a proposed new shelter, as well as a limitation that no more than 200 beds can be located in any one shelter (350 for shelters having a legal zoning permit as of January 1, 2005), and no more than 950 beds can be located in any one council district. There is also a spacing requirement of 500 feet from a school, meeting the compulsory education laws of the state. Given that social service providers are not expected to leave the area, new strategies related to e ective social service management and other alternatives need further exploration: Courtyard Building Form: Encourage development of courtyards or semi-private open space for social service queuing, feeding and congregating to replace such activities currently occurring in the Triangle Parks and on sidewalks. This need may be met by identifying existing privately owned land adjoining a social service facility, obtaining additional land, or moving service providers to more suitable locations within Arapahoe Square, or elsewhere in the metropolitan area. Courtyard-style buildings provide outdoor space that is defensible because of its limited access from the street, private maintenance and security/surveillance. Courtyards also can provide visual and actual relief from monolithic building forms. Although the Courtyard development form was suggested as a general development form for Arapahoe Square, this proposal has proven to be particularly popular when suggested as a tool to improve the management of social service providers. At the Arapahoe Square Charrette, this concept was speci cally modeled for the Denver Rescue Mission (DRM). Currently many of DRMs clients congregate on Maestes Park during the day. In a courtyard development, the DRM could have a private, outdoor space that would be monitored and controlled by DRM sta The homeless population they serve could have a safe place to congregate while not being housed or provisioned by DRM. SRO Pilot Project: Develop a pilot single-room occupancy (SRO) project to provide adThe Triangle Parks Coordinating District was formed In 2011 as a metropolitan district for the purpose of addressing the impact of the homeless and other urban social conditions on these particular park spaces. The metropolitan district, though technically a government entity, is a good example of the type of public-private partnerships that will be increasingly important as the city moves forward with planned improvements in this area. The District, whose board is composed of stakeholders in the Arapahoe Square and Ballpark areas, will work with the City and other partners to develop and implement physical, programmatic, and service provision improvements. The Denver Rescue Mission and Parks and Recreation Department are formulating a stewardship agreement speci c to Maestas Park. Courtyard building form At the Arapahoe Square Charrette in January, 2011, attendees identi ed the impacts of social services as being the most immediate need to address within Arapahoe Square.

PAGE 57

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Transformative Concepts 53ditional housing to alleviate the burden on temporary shelters. This building should be of high quality that contributes to an improved built environment in Arapahoe Square. Working Group: Establish a working group to re ne the concepts described above, identify the most appropriate entity or entities to pursue their implementation, identify potential funding and partners including foundations, and determine the roles for the Community Coordinating District. The following and likely others should be included in the working group; the Denvers Road Home, Denver O ce of Economic Development, the State Division of Housing, property owners, and housing and social service providers. New strategies related to e ective and e cient management and development alternatives need to be explored. For example, further research is needed for the courtyards concept or other semi-private open space for social service queuing, feeding and congregating. HOW DOES IT ADDRESS NEIGHBORHOOD CONNECTIONS AND CHARACTER?E ective management of social services would promote movement between Northeast Downtown neighborhoods, including better access to Downtown Denvers employment, cultural, and recreational amenities, and create a healthy, safe environment for all.HOW DOES IT ADDRESS MOBILITY?Providing courtyards or semi-private open spaces for queuing, feeding and congregating in a safe environment could signi cantly increased space and comfort in parks and on sidewalks thus increasing mobility in and through Northeast Downtown. HOW DOES IT ADDRESS DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITY?Improving the operations of social service providers in Northeast Downtown would remove an impediment for development in Northeast Downtown. HOW DOES IT ADDRESS THE LIVABILITY AND THE PUBLIC REALM?The overall health and safety of Northeast Downtown residents, business owners, and customers would be increased by improved management of social services. Improved management would also bene t the social service clients. Northeast Downtown residents, business owners, and customers would enjoy more frequent use of safe and accommodating streets, sidewalks, plazas, and parks. Improved social services management extends the delivery of this important community service for residents. SOCIAL SERVICES RECOMMENDATIONS: Establish a working group to re ne concepts, identify the most appropriate entity or entities to pursue their implementation, identify potential funding and partners including foundations, and determine the roles for the Community Coordinating District. Encourage development of courtyards or semi-private open space for social service queuing, feeding and congregating to replace such activities currently occurring in the Triangle Parks and on sidewalks. Develop a pilot single-room occupancy (SRO) project to provide additional housing to alleviate the burden on temporary shelters. This building should be of high quality that contributes to an improved built environment in Arapahoe Square. Develop and study alternatives for repurposing of the Triangle Parks predicated on creating semi-private open space. Potential options may include using the Triangle Parks for water quality treatment or storm detention, re-designing and limiting access, or de-designating the parks which takes a vote of the people. The Denver Rescue Mission and the Community Coordinating Metropolitan District should be involved. Denvers Road Home is the principal citywide e ort to address homelessness by providing services and housing. At the time of this writing, the City is mid-way through the Road Home e ort, which has the goal of ending homelessness as we know it. Courtyard or semi-private open space concept

PAGE 58

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Transformative Concepts 54WHAT IS IT?A transit rich neighborhood has long been a tradition in Northeast Denver. Curtis Park was Denvers rst streetcar suburb when in 1871 a horse drawn streetcar was installed on Champa Street connecting the neighborhood to Downtown. Welton Street has hosted several incarnations of in-street rail service, including horse drawn, cable car, and electric streetcar. When urban rail passenger service returned to Denver in 1994, Northeast Downtown led the way again when the RTD Central Corridor light rail line reached 30th and Downing along Welton Street. This transit investment was expec ted to bring economic development to the corridor and assist in the revitalization of the Five Points neighborhood. Even though some development has occurred in response to the light rail stations on Welton, signi cant transformation has not occurred. As part of the current RTD FasTracks expansion program, the Central Corridor is proposed to be extended along Downing Street to connect to the future East Corridor Commuter Rail station at 38th and Blake. The current RTD plan maintains the existing light rail infrastructure on Welton Street, which utilizes a separated right of way, while introducing streetcar-like service, with vehicles operating in mixed tra c lanes, on the new Downing Street segment. The route would connect to the downtown transit loop and return. This is di erent from the current service, which extends to the Mineral Station in Littleton. The vision for the Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan streetcar concept is a streetcar system featuring a modern streetcar vehicle operating on rails in mixed tra c for the length of the route. The conversion of Welton to two way operations between 24th Street and Downing Street is likely required, with the existing light rail infrastructure being removed or modi ed to allow streetcar vehicles to run in mixed tra c. This would include removal of the high platforms for boarding at existing stations and could provide more right of way for wider sidewalks. The streetcar could potentially utilize California Street as a couplet to Welton Street south of 24th Street, allowing Welton to remain one-way south for that portion of the alignment. Various options to connect to the regional rail transit system, such as connecting to Civic Center Station or Denver Union Station, require further exploration. The streetcar concept provides the opportunity to improve the pedestrian experience along Welton Street, potentially increase the level of service, and provide additional stops that could meet the vision of the neighborhood. It is clear from the previous experience of introducing rail transit onto Welton in the 1990s that the investment of transit infrastructure alone will not result in development. Each corridor or station is unique in its opportunities and constr aints for transit oriented development (TOD). Neighborhoods that have or appear ready to a have a market for walkable, mixed use, urban style development are more likely to experience TOD. The characteristics of streetcar systems in the United States mixed tra c operations, smaller vehicles, simple stations, short routes through redevelopment opportunity areas may capitalize on a ready real estate market to promote walkable, urban neighborhoods more so than light rail systems. Streetcars have demonstrated success in being an organizing element for large scale urban redevelopment in U.S. cities such as Portland, Little Rock, and Seattle. The opportunities for TOD on Welton and Downing Streets vary greatly depending on the location. Much of the corridor consists of existing main street shopfronts and is located in close Streetcar Pearl District, Portland, Oregon Low oor streetcar vehicles provide easy accessibility for all users and streetcar stops integrate well into the urban environment. Streetcars operate in mixed tra c with other vehicles and are smaller and more nimble than light rail. GOAL STATEMENTEnhance current transit service, economic development opportunities, and access to neighborhood businesses while improving the walkable character of the Welton/Downing Corridor and adjacent Northeast Downtown neighborhoods.

PAGE 59

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Transformative Concepts 55proximity to historic neighborhoods. Any reinvestment in these properties or development of appropriately scaled inll development may depend on the streetcar by-product of an improved pedestrian experience as much as the potential for improved transit service itself. The 38th and Blake commuter rail station area and large assembled parcels closer to Downtown, between 24th and 20th streets, have the greatest potential for signi cant redevelopment. These locations could support inll projects at much higher densities more typically associated with TOD than the rest of the corridor. A thorough analysis of the streetcar concept, including an inclusive public engagement process, is necessary to understand the impact on adjacent neighborhoods and historic properties, city-wide transit services, pedestrian access, automobile tra c, and side street movements, as well as overall feasibility and cost. The options for a streetcar maintenance facility location, either in the corridor or elsewhere, would also need further exploration. The location would greatly depend on the potential streetcar vehicle compatibility with existing RTD light rail vehicles and future potential streetcar service in other urban corridors. Concept Streetcar Map: This map shows a streetcar concept including a possible rerouting to the Civic Center. This should not be construed as a locally preferred alternative, but as an option for further study. Cherry Creek STOUT ST COURT PL 15TH ST OGDEN ST 21ST ST 20TH ST 16TH ST MALL 26TH ST 27TH ST 29TH ST 30TH ST 28TH ST 25TH ST 38TH ST 14TH ST 24TH ST 22ND ST WALNUT ST MARION ST TREMONT PL 19TH AVE 18TH AVE 16TH AVE 17TH AVE DOWNING ST 20TH AVE GLENARM PL 24TH AVE 25TH AVE 22ND AVE 23RD AVE LAFAYETTE ST COURT PL TREMONT PL BLAKE ST GLENARM PL WASHINGTON ST COLFAX AVECURTIS STCHAMPA STARAPAHOE STLARIMER STLAWRENCE STBROADWAY Future East Corridor AlignmentUnion Station 38th/Blake StationConnection to East CorridorCivic CenterExisting Light Rail BUS RAMPWYNKOOP STWAZEE STBLAKE STMARKET ST T T T E S S ES ES ES EST T ST T ST ST ST SRA ST ST S AMP ST T S S S S T T WELTON ST CALIFORNIA ST Existing Stop New Stop (Conceptual) Downtown Circulator East Corridor Alignment Option for Streetcar Alignment Central Corridor RTD Proposal If streetcar replaced light rail on Welton, the dedicated right of way and high block platforms could be removed and used to enhance the pedestrian relam. A modern streetar operating in mixed tra c in Portland.

PAGE 60

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Transformative Concepts 56HOW DOES IT ADDRESS NEIGHBORHOOD CONNECTIONS AND CHARACTER? Streetcars tend to encourage development in a more linear fashion, which could distribute in ll development throughout the corridor. The streetcar could be a unifying element for the neighborhoods and return actual streetcar service to a historic area of Denver that was built when streetcars were a primary mode of travel and the population in adjacent neighborhoods was much greater than it is today.HOW DOES IT ADDRESS MOBILITY? Connects to East Corridor Commuter Rail service at 38th and Blake Station with service to Denver International Airport and Denver Union Station, similar to the currently planned FasTracks Central Corridor Extension Potential opportunity to improve access to Downtown with increased service frequency due to introduction of two-way operations on Welton Street. A two way streetcar on Welton provides greater transit exibility, as the current existing single track segment between 24th Street and 30th Street imposes an operational constraint that limits service frequency to one train every 15 minutes. Has the potential to connect to Civic Center Station to provide intermodal connections to local bus, mall shuttle, and potential future xed guideway service on East Colfax and South Broadway Low oor vehicles improve access for all users and decrease the dwell time at each stop.HOW DOES IT ADDRESS DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITY? The combination of new stations, a potential increase in service frequency, and wider sidewalks/pedestrian amenity zone may act as a development catalyst. Proposed new stations on Welton and California streets between 20th and 25th could provide better access to transit for large redevelopment parcels. Frequent headways would be desired to shorten the perceived distance from Downtown and improve the access to Welton and Downing businesses for Downtown residents and workers. Wider sidewalks on Welton Street could be possible with a comprehensive street redesign that makes use of the existing light rail right-of-way. Improving the pedestrian realm would enhance the main street character along Welton and encourage an increase in active uses that provide outdoor seating. Based on property records, there are eight acres of vacant land within a quarter-mile of the proposed 33rd and 35th Street stations and an additional 32 acres within a half-mile radius. These vacant parcels are primarily zoned for residential and industrial uses and many of them are currently used as parking lots. A streetcar stop in Portlands Pearl District. A modern streetcar in Vienna, Austria. Streetcars and streetcar stops work well in dense, urban environments, serving as a pedestrian accelerator for neighborhood.

PAGE 61

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Transformative Concepts 57HOW DOES IT ADDRESS THE LIVABILITY AND THE PUBLIC REALM? Streetcars: Use smaller, more nimble vehicles appropriate for use in urban environments. Act as a pedestrian accelerator in a corridor, improving access to storefronts, parks and other destinations. Operate in mixed tra c, providing the opportunity to reclaim the existing light rail right-of-way and repurpose it for wider sidewalks, an enhanced pedestrian realm, on street parking, or other amenities. Can be designed to accommodate on-street parking between travel lanes and the sidewalk, bu ering pedestrians from moving vehicles. STREETCAR RECOMMENDATIONS: Recommend the use of modern streetcar vehicles, in place of the existing RTD light rail transit (LRT) vehicles for the segment of the Central Corridor that is in Northeast Downtown. The streetcar vehicles should be shorter and narrower than the RTD LRT cars, provide for a shorter turning radius, and have a low oor for improved ADA access. Downing Corridor Support RTDs current plan to implement rail transit service on Downing in mixed-tra c. Recommend RTD consider terminating the Central Corridor at 36th and Blake to facilitate TOD and preserve the option for future streetcar service on Blake Street, as recommended in the 38th and Blake Station Area Plan. Welton Corridor Recommend further study to examine feasibility of converting the existing LRT service to streetcar service operating in two-way, mixed tra c on Welton (between 30th and 24th or Park) Speci c items to study include the impact of converting Welton to a two-way street on turning movements, signal timing, on-street parking, side street tra c movements, and pedestrian safety. Welton/California Couplet Recommend further study to examine whether a streetcar couplet on Welton and California between 24th and Broadway is feasible or advisable. Downtown Intermodal Connection Recommend further study to examine feasibility of various alignment options for connections to existing and future downtown transit service at locations including, but not limited to: Civic Center Station, Auraria Campus, Auraria West Station, and Denver Union Station. This study should consider ease of transfer to other transit modes including the down town circulator and the light rail transit loop on Stout and California. Denver Streetcar System Concept Plan Consider, when appropriate, the development of a streetcar system concept plan that establishes a long range vision for streetcar service for Denvers neighborhoods including but not limited to criteria for corridor selection, appropriate neighborhood form and context, and funding opportunities. The South Waterfront a new TOD neighborhood in Portland. A modern streetcar in Melbourne, Australia.

PAGE 62

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Transformative Concepts 58Transit Oriented DevelopmentWHAT IS IT?Transit Oriented Development (TOD) is more than simply development near transit. Successful TOD creates vibrant, walkable neighborhoods that provide housing, shopping, and employment opportunities for a wide array of people. TOD has a mix of uses at various densities within a half-mile radius, or walking distance, of a transit stop, creating speci c areas that integrate transit into neighborhoods and help support lively and vital communities. The TOD Strategic Plan de nes TOD in Denver and establishes strategies for implementation. In order to succeed, TOD should address these guiding principles: Place-making: Create secure, comfortable, varied and attractive station areas with a distinct identity. Rich Mix of Choices: Provide housing, employment, transportation and shopping choices for people of all ages, household types, incomes and lifestyles. Location E ciency: Place homes, jobs, shopping, entertainment, parks and other amenities close to the station to promote walking, biking and transit use. Value Capture: Encourage all stakeholders residents, business owners, RTD and the City to take full economic advantage of the amenity of enhanced transit services. Portal to the Region: Understand and maximize the stations role as an entry to the regional transit network and as a safe and pleasant place to live. Northeast Downtown has a great opportunity for TOD at three speci c scales that capitalize on the regional rail transit network: 38th & Blake: The FasTracks East Corridor Commuter Rail line connecting Denver Union Station and Denver International Airport will have a stop at 38th and Blake Streets. This station, located on an important regional rail tr ansit corridor, will act as a new gateway into Northeast Downtown and builds upon the momentum of recent mixed-use and residential development nearby. Central Corridor Extension: The FasTracks Central Corridor Extension will extend streetcar style light rail service along Downing Street. Two new stations, at 33rd and 35th streets will be located on this line that connects the existing 30th and Downing light rail station with the new 38th and Blake commuter rail station. Development near these two stations needs to promote a linear, main street environment on Downing that is sensitive to the adjacent neighborhoods and compliments the existing businesses and overall character of Welton Street. New Arapahoe Square Station: A concept for a new station located between 21st Street and Park Avenue in Arapahoe Square provides for yet another TOD opportunity. If streetcar service was established on a Welton and California couplet as proposed in the Streetcar Transformative Concept, this station would expand development opportunities for high density, mixed-use projects along the corridor and boost access to Arapahoe Square and destinations along a potentially improved 21st street that terminates at Coors Field. GOAL STATEMENTPromote Transit Oriented Development in Northeast Downtown at appropriate locations to encourage walkable, urban neighborhoods that have easy access to daily needs and amenities. Union Station, Denver The Point, Denver

PAGE 63

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Transformative Concepts 59HOW DOES IT ADDRESS NEIGHBORHOOD CONNECTIONS AND CHARACTER?TOD promotes a distinct area identity of a walkable, transit-rich community and serves as a unifying element for Northeast Downtown neighborhoodsHOW DOES IT ADDRESS MOBILITY?TOD promotes walkable, urban neighborhoods that provide residents easy access to many of their daily needs without the use of an automobile. This can have an impact on the tra c congestion of the regional transportation network and associated air quality issues.HOW DOES IT ADDRESS DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITY?Development potential of a property correlates with the transportation networks ability to provide adequate access to the site. An enhanced regional and local transit system increases the development potential in Northeast Downtown, encourages higher density development at transit-rich, urban inll locations, and impacts the regions growth pattern. A transit station serves as a portal to the region and allows property owners to capture the enhanced value of their land due to the proximity to transit service. TOD provides excellent opportunities for a ordable housing by providing a lower cost transportation option and by connecting residents to employment centers.HOW DOES IT ADDRESS THE LIVABILITY AND THE PUBLIC REALM?TOD creates neighborhoods that: Become highly walkable and vibrant, with a mix of active uses on main street corridors and station area locations; Provide a mix of housing choices; Access daily amenities and services; Promote healthy, active lifestyle choices. TOD RECOMMENDATIONS:Promote Transit Oriented Development of an appropriate scale at three locations: Mid-rise, high density, mixed-use 38th and Blake Commuter Rail Station Neighborhood serving, main street retail and mixed use Welton-Downing Corridor between 25th and Welton and 38th and Blake High density residential and mixeduse between 20th Street and Park Avenue at Welton and California Funding should be sought for the Central Corridor Extension and establish a goal to complete the extension as close to the completion of the East Corridor commuter rail line (projected completion in 2016) as possible. South Waterfront, Portland The East Corridor Commuter Rail pr oject, as depicted here, will provide signi cant opportunities for TOD at the 38th and Blake Station.

PAGE 65

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Neighborhood Strategies 61Northeast Downtown has a strong mix of neighborhoods that possess their own unique characteristics. This plan chapter focuses on speci c recommendations for each of the neighborhoods, while highlighting the key framework rec ommendations and transformative concepts applicable to each. Several neighborhoods, such as River North and Ballpark, are treated as one area to reduce duplication. Since many of the neighborhoods individual boundaries overlap one another, the neighborhood maps intentionally include duplicate blocks. The neighborhoods are as follows: Arapahoe Square Ballpark/River North Curtis Park Downing/Welton Corridor Enterprise Hill/San Rafael Neighborhood Strategies

PAGE 66

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Neighborhood Strategies 62Arapahoe SquareINTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY OF EXISTING CONDITIONS:Immediately adjacent to the Central Business District, Arapahoe Square has the potential to be the most urban of the Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods. Bounded by Park Avenue, 20th Street, the alley between Welton and Glenarm, and the alley between Larimer and Lawrence, Arapahoe Square will set a critical character transition between downtown and neighborhood. At present, Arapahoe Square is visually dominated by surface parking lots and a clustering of social service providers. The most visible aspect of the service providers are the homeless individuals that congregate in public spaces. The parking lots serve downtown employees and events at Coors Field. A more hidden asset is the collection of existing buildings that house a variety of small businesses, both emerging and established. There are also a handful of residential units, mostly in newer buildings of apartment or rowhouse building forms. An additional challenge to the area is the diagonal alignment of Broadway; cutting through the grid at an angle. Broadways prime function as a regional access corridor into and out of the downtown core should be balanced with local multimodal transportation needs. Surface parking lots are a major land use in Arapahoe Square. Vacant parcels are common in Arapahoe Square. TRANSFORMATIVE CONCEPTS AFFECTING ARAPAHOE SQUAREMany of the transformative concepts identi ed in this plan have a direct impact on Arapahoe Square and are the core of the key recommendations for the area. A list of the transformative concepts that a ect Arapahoe Square follows: Streetcar A streetcar system featuring a true modern streetcar vehicle operating in mixed tra c for the length of the Downing/Welton Corridor. In Arapahoe Square, the streetcar could potentially utilize California Street as a couplet to Welton Street, increasing access and development opportunity between Park Avenue and 20th Street. 21st Street Three interconnected ideas a Bike Boulevard, a Festival Street, and innovative stormwater management develop this concept to make 21st an organizing element of Arapahoe Square. 21st provides opportunity to test various Best Management Practices because it is located on the ridge between the two drainage basins. Curtis Street An opportunity to create a strong pedestrian linkage from theCentral Business District through Arapahoe Square, and into Curtis Park. Broadway Three conceptual approaches Preserving, Celebrating, and Bridging to the long-term future of Broadway that are meant to balance local and regional needs, supporting regional, vehicular mobility while also providing for safe, e cient pedestrian and bicycle movement. New Park A new park, if properly designed, located, and programmed, would not only assist in meeting open space needs, but could also help to energize and attract activity to the surrounding area. Portions of Arapahoe Square meet the criteria for locating and developing a new park in Northeast Downtown as identi ed in the New Park Transformative Concept. Social Services Multiple approaches to better manage the provision of social services and provide more appropriate facilities in order to improve the development climate, connectivity, and safety of Arapahoe Square and the greater Northeast Downtown neighborhood. Transit Oriented Development Focusing appropriately scaled development that is oriented towards the transit investment on Welton Street that encourages walkable, urban neighborhoods that have easy access to daily needs and amenities.

PAGE 67

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Neighborhood Strategies 63The 2007 Downtown Area Plan (DAP) identi ed Arapahoe Square as one of seven transformative projects for Downtown Denver. The DAP envisions Arapahoe Square as a cutting edge, densely populated, mixed-use area that provides a range of housing types and a center for innovative businesses. Thus, the primary goal for Arapahoe Square is, quite simply, to catalyze development. A vibrant Arapahoe Square is a goal in its own right, and also one that will enhance neighborhoods on all sides by providing safe, attractive connectivity to the downtown core and other destinations. Particular issues that must be resolved include pedestrian and bicycle access across Broadway, investment risk of pioneering in an under-developed area of the city, and negative perceptions associated with clustering of social services. Beyond these big picture issues, ner grain details will need attention as well, including urban form, allowable height, neighborhood character, density, and open space. ISSUES IN ARAPAHOE SQUAREArapahoe Square is not a homogenous area; it is comprised of several smaller areas that need to interact and support each other to overcome a set of shared issues. Central to this theme is the need to improve the safety and security (real and perceived) through improved design, increased amenities, and general beauti cation of the neighborhood. Several issues help de ne the opportunities and constraints to meeting the aspirations set out in the Downtown Area Plan and this plan. Social Services As described in the Social Services Transformative Concept, the concentration of social service providers and their clients have a signi cant impact on Arapahoe Square. For example, they dominate the visible public spaces such as the sidewalks, streets, alleys, and parks, especially the Triangle Parks. The impacts of these social issues have real and perceived impacts on safety, walkability, and development potential. Public private partnerships will continue to be the most e ective approach to marshalling the public and private resources necessary to deal with the homeless population and its impacts. The zoning code sets spacing, density, site, and other limitations on homeless shelters to reduce their impact on surrounding neighborhoods. Speci cally these include, but are not limited to, a 2,000 ft spacing requirement between shelters, a limitation that no more than 2 shelters be allowed within a 4,000 ft radius of a proposed new shelter, as well as a limitation that no more than 200 beds can be located in any one shelter (350 for shelters having a legal zoning permit as of January 1, 2005), and no more than 950 beds can be located in any one council district. There is also a spacing requirement of 500 feet from a school, meeting the compulsory education laws of the state. Plan recommendations focus on addressing social services issues through public private partnerships and innovative housing concepts: Arapahoe Square Social Services Working Group Courtyard Development Concept Single Room Occupancy housing Repurpose Broadway Triangles Surface Parking Lots Surface parking lots and vacant parcels are a dominant land use and drive the economics of development in Arapahoe Square. Parking lots can have a blighting in uence because they are often unimproved, poorly maintained, poorly lighted, and provide additional space for indigent individuals to congregate. They do represent an asset as a land bank for future development and provide an a ordable parking reservoir to downtown employees and Rockies fans attending baseball games at Coors Field. Surface parking in Arapahoe Square serves commuters working in the Downtown Core as well as ball games at Coors Field. Arapahoe Square is home to a wide variety of unique businesses. A parking lot near Welton Street.

PAGE 68

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Neighborhood Strategies 64While there have been a number of land transactions in the area over the past several years; few new developments have proven nancially feasible for a variety of reasons including high land costs, availability of investment capital, market conditions, and the risk/reward for Arapahoe Square compared to the development opportunities that are available in other neighborhoods near Downtown. There is a perception that parking lot owners are obstructing redevelopment because they are asking for above-market pricing for their land. Instead, potential alternative revenue streams (i.e. parking and billboards) that are available to land owners establish land values based on the revenue that can be generated. Currently, parking lot managers provide a multi-year ground lease to parking lot owners, which provide a guaranteed income stream regardless of market conditions. These leases typically include all maintenance and operational expenses on the lot including snow removal, landscaping, enforcement, operating the payment machine, resurfacing and restriping. In calculating the appropriate ground lease rate, the parking lot managers charge between $2 and $6 per day on normal weekdays and can typically charge between $3 and $20 per day when the Rockies have a home game. Parking managers anticipate occupancy rates of 95% and above based on current rates and also generate revenue through citations and evening and weekend rates. Based on current ground leases provided by parking management companies, net of property taxes, each parking space in Arapahoe Square can be worth between $750 and $1,750 annually to its owner. These ground leases are generally multi-year and are largely insensitive to the overall health of the macro real estate market. Assuming a standard parking space of 320 square feet (many in Arapahoe Square are smaller), that puts the annual net operating income from a parking space of between $2.35 and $5.50 per square foot. Assuming a 5% capitalization rate, the parking income stream is valued between $50 and $110 per land square foot based on todays revenue projections. This is consistent with both the appraised value of the land in Arapahoe Square and could be the basis for pricing expectations for land owners. Lack of Demand A signi cant challenge facing Arapahoe Square and Downtown Denver as a whole is insu cient demand for commercial or residential development and competition from other areas in and around Downtown. There is a signi cant supply of developable land in and around Downtown Denver in areas such as the Central Platte Valley, Union Station, Golden Triangle, and the Highlands. These areas generally demand higher land prices given their location, buyer preferences, and the presence of amenities and neighborhood services. In order to encourage developers to invest in Arapahoe Square, there needs to be a su cient discount to development to compensate for the risk of a pioneering development area. Zoning and small area plans can create a public policy framework that is supportive of development, but the actual development will be driven by market demand and individual developer vision, access to capital and underlying fundamentals (i.e., the cost of development compared with the anticipated revenues) relative to the amount of risk associated with any project. Arapahoe Square is particularly challenged because, as mentioned earlier, parking revenues distort land values relative to development risk in a pioneering area such as Arapahoe Square. Property Ownership Property ownership in Arapahoe Square is generally fragmented with few large parcels under single ownership. There are 273 di erent ownership parcels over a total of 42 blocks or partial blocks; several blocks have more than 15 individual parcels. The time required to assemble su cient land area to construct market-viable Denver Rescue Mission Alternative revenue streams, such as parking and billboards, partially drive the disconnect between asking land prices and what the actual real estate market will bear.

PAGE 69

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Neighborhood Strategies 65footprints for commercial or residential development and complexity involved in addressing the di ering expectations of multiple parcel owners will a ect the pace of redevelopment in the area. Assembled parcels tend to be located on the periphery of Arapahoe Square, especially along Welton, 20th, and Lawrence streets. Elsewhere, smaller parcels are interspersed with existing buildings. These parcels support smaller development projects which can be more compatible with existing buildings and more viable in a down economy. Building Re-use Some serviceable building stock exists in Arapahoe Square, especially in the blocks bounded by 21st and 24th Streets and Stout and Lawrence streets. While many of these buildings have unimpressive exteriors, their interior warehouse space and low rental rate serve their tenants, who often need a combination of exible industrial space with ancillary o ce spaces. The buildings are important assets to the community representing space that can be a ordably retro tted for companies looking for low overhead costs with proximity to Downtown Denver. Encouraging the re-use of existing buildings is an important business development and retention strategy for the area. It is important to note that a few of the existing buildings are of landmark quality, so preservation e orts are appropriate. Economic and Business Development The prevalence of social services and lack of development creates perceived market risks that discourage development at current land prices. The success of small start-up businesses is generally unknown. The lack of a positive identity or brand exacerbates the negative perceptions. A rebranding of the area focusing on its a ordability and edgy character could increase demand and decrease the perceived risk in the area. Equally important to business development is housing development to expand the diversity of the neighborhood through a variety of housing types, prices, and tenancy. A considerable amount of housing development, mid-rise apartments and row houses, has occurred in Arapahoe Square; however, it is scattered through the area and not resulted in a sense of neighborhood. Stormwater Arapahoe Square, along with other parts of Northeast Downtown, is subject to occasional ooding. Stormwater improvements are planned in and around Arapahoe Square, and conditions will improve with these investments. 21st Street divides two drainage basins. The part of the Arapahoe Square area northeast of 21st Street is in an area referred to by the adopted 2009 Storm Drainage Master Plan as the Lower Platte Valley (Basin 0062-01) that ows to the South Platte River. In this area, most of the drainage outfalls through a network of storm drains which ultimately discharge runo into the South Platte River at 36th Street. In general, this storm drainage network has less than a 1-year storm capacity. The Arapahoe Square area southwest of 21st Street is a part of the area referred to by the Stormwater Master Plan as the Central Business District (Basin 4600-01). Currently, drainage systems in 20th Street starting at Curtis Street ow to the South Platte River and the remaining drainage systems convey storm runo to Cherry Creek and then to the South Platte River. The existing drainage system in 20th Street meets current City and County of Denver storm drainage criteria while the remaining drainage systems owing towards Cherry Creek need to be enlarged to meet current City and County of Denver drainage criteria. Without these improvements, there is the threat of ooding for existing buildings and additional costs for new development. Sonny Lawson Park Arapahoe Square faces sti competition for urban development from nearby neighborhoods such as the Central Platte Valley.

PAGE 70

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Neighborhood Strategies 66 Urban Design Arapahoe Squares urban design needs to create an identi able character and successfully transition between areas that range from high intensity commercial and mixed-use districts to lower intensity and historic single-family neighborhoods. Arapahoe Square is situated between several other neighborhoods and districts, each of which has its own unique character and development patterns. Downtown 20th Street is the edge between Arapahoe Square and Downtown Denver. Ballpark The transition between Arapahoe Square and the Ballpark neighborhood occurs at the alley between Larimer and Lawrence. Curtis Park Park Avenue West forms the edge between Arapahoe Square and Curtis Park. Welton and Clements The eastern edge of Arapahoe Square includes Welton Street, and the transition to the Clements Historic District on Glenarm. Much of the area is zoned D-AS, based on the previous B-8-A zoning. Basically, this mixed-use zoning has a 4:1 Floor Area Ratio (FAR) with premiums for certain uses and design review allowing a maximum FAR of 7:1. The maximum height is 200 feet with transition areas reduced to 80 feet. All new buildings are subject to design review based on adopted design standards and guidelines that focus on design elements that activate street-facing elevations.NEIGHBORHOOD CONCEPTS AND RECOMMENDATIONSThere are a number of strategies which could improve conditions and promote housing and business development. Arapahoe Square is a short walk away from Denvers Central Business District, Ballpark and Lower Downtown. In the absence of a major, catalyzing public investment in the area such as a park, festival street, or Broadway reformatting, this section describes some strategies that can be pursued in the interim. N.1 Encourage Development of Parking Lots: The economics of parking lots and lack of demand for real estate development indicate that parking lots may remain a signi cant land use for some time to come. Making interim improvements such as installing a standard railing and perimeter landscaping to screen and de ne the lots and encouraging operators to join the Denver Public Works/Downtown Denver Partnerships Park Now program could reduce the negative visual impacts of this use. The disconnect between asking land prices and what the real estate market will bear will change only when parking and other revenue streams become less viable, when market demand increases, or when su cient community investment and economic development occurs. Changes to revenue streams will come only with citywide regulatory changes to parking lots or billboards or cultural and economic shifts in transportation choice. At some point in the future market conditions will make development the economical choice, as has happened in other downtown districts. Because property taxes are one of the major costs to parking lot owners, an increase or decrease in taxes changes the economics. A downzoning could have the unintended consequence of lowering property taxes, thereby increasing the net revenue to parking lot owners. N.2 Enhance Urban Design: Arapahoe Square is an organic mix of existing and new buildings that are of strong urban character. A continuance of this mix will assure Arapahoe Square remains a visually interesting neighborhood. The mix of building forms in Arapahoe Square should include the podium and point tower, apartment, courtyard apartment and general building types. All buildings should add visual interest and This series of sketches illustrates how new development relates to the ve story datum. Above the 5 story datum, all new structures would be required to step back. Point towers step back further in exchange for additional building height.

PAGE 71

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Neighborhood Strategies 67pedestrian scale to the public realm, especially streets and public spaces. The intersection of 21st and Curtis streets, two Transformative Concepts described previously, should serve as an early opportunity to implement plan recommendations. N.3 Building Form: The form recommendations support Arapahoe Square as an organically evolving district with a broad range of existing buildings and future mid to high-rise buildings. A wide variety of building forms are appropriate in the district. Height Building height will be highly varied depending on location, form and use of buildings. A ve-story height datum line, or maximum street frontage height, for upper story setbacks is recommended for all structures in Arapahoe Square over ve stories to produce the e ect that each new building reads as no more than ve stories from street level. A height datum line is an urban design concept that allows taller buildings to relate to a pedestrian scale along the street and to smaller nearby buildings such as those in Arapahoe Square or Ballpark and Curtis Park. Five stories is a maximum for this datum line; two or three stories would also appropriate. This urban design concept is most e ective when uses in the lower stories are active and provide eyes on the street. Height variations should be based on form alternatives rather than use premiums. For example a narrow point tower could be considerably taller than a more standard apartment or o ce building. Pennsylvani Pennsylvani Pennsylvani Broadway Welton Welton Welton California California California Stout Champa Cha hampa Champ Champa Park Park P Park P 22nd 2nd 22 2nd 22 21st 1st 2 1st 2 20th 20th 20th 0th 0th 2 Curtis Arapahoe Arapahoe Arapahoe Lincoln l Sherman h Sh Grant Gt Gt Logan L L Pearl Pl Pearl 3 Stories 2.5 Stories 5 Stories 8 Stories 12* Stories 20* Stories Concept Building Heights Map *POINT TOWERS:To encourage higher density development where appropriate, speci c areas in Arapahoe Square have been identied as locations for a podium and point tower building form. The recommended maximum height of point towers in Arapahoe Square are as follows: Standard Building Height: 12 stories = Point Tower Height: 20 stories Standard Building Height: 20 stories = Point Tower Height: 30 stories *HEIGHT DATUM LINE :A ve-story height datum line, or maximum street frontage height, for upper story setbacks and point towers is recommended to produce the e ect that each new building reads as no more than ve stories from street level. A height datum line is an urban design concept that allows taller buildings to relate to a pedestrian scale along the street and to smaller nearby buildings such as those in Arapahoe Square, Ballpark and Curtis Park. The ve-story datum line applies to both standard and point tower buildings.

PAGE 72

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Neighborhood Strategies 68 Where height transitions are mapped mid-block, such as between 21st and 22nd streets, the exact location of this step down (whether mid-block or otherwise) should be determined as part of a follow-up zoning study. Siting Promote urban character by minimizing setbacks to provide a consistent street edge and to support pedestrian activity. Reinforce the character and quality of public streets with buildings that provide consistent siting, pedestrian orientation, and access to the street. Minimize the visual impacts of parking by structuring it within the development, or by locating surface lots to the rear or side of buildings. Design Elements Give prominence to the pedestrian realm as a de ning element of neighborhood character. Locate commercial uses on the ground oors to activate buildings and the street. Provide transparency and street facing entries to help activate and improve safety on the street. Create visually interesting and humanscaled facades, and encourage variation in building form to provide opportunities for architectural scale relationships. Along neighborhood edges, arrange the height and scale of buildings to provide transitions to adjoining areas. N.4 Land Use: Arapahoe Square is a mixed use neighborhood with a distinctly urban character. It is comprised of commercial and mixed-use buildings, multi-family residential, and some light industrial buildings. This is re ected in the future land use map by the mixed use land use category. Land uses can be, but are not necessarily, mixed in Pennsylvani Pl y Pli Broadway Welton Welton Welton California California California Stout Champa hampa Champa Park Park 22nd 2nd 2nd 2 21st 20th 20th 20th Curtis Arapahoe oe A hoe Lincoln Sherman Grant Logan g g Pearl Mixed Use TOD Single Family/Row House Urban Residential Park Concept Land Use Map A possible building form in Arapahoe Square is the podium and point tower found in locations such as the South Waterfront District in Portland

PAGE 73

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Neighborhood Strategies 69each building, development, or block. Pedestrian access is of importance within Arapahoe Square, with residential and non-residential uses always within walking distance of one another. N.5 Conduct Form-Based Zoning Study: Conduct a follow-up study to determine the appropriate zoning districts to implement the vision for Arapahoe Square that is presented in this plan. Key elements to address in the study include: land use, building height, building form, necessary transitions to adjacent neighborhoods, implementation of the ve story datum line, and whether or not to continue to require design review for new construction within Arapahoe Square. The concept building height map makes use of mid-block transitions between 21st and 22nd streets as well as Park Avenue and 24th Street to step down building heights. This is intended to depict that the height transition should occur somewhere in the block between the identi ed streets, but the exact location of this step down (whether mid-block or otherwise) should be determined as part of the scope of this follow-up zoning study. N.6 Promote Transit-Oriented Development: The Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Area has a number of opportunities for transit-oriented development in both the short and long term. In the short-term, the 38th and Blake Station Area on the East Line and the Central Corridor Extension on Downing will provide new transit service that can help stimulate new development. Longer-term, the proposal to convert the Welton light rail to streetcar, as described in the Transformative Concept, has the potential to stimulate Main Street type development in Five Points and higher intensity mixed-use development associated with a new station between 21st Street and Park Avenue. N.7 Re-use Existing Buildings: Unfortunately, most of Arapahoe Squares building stock was demolished in the 1960s and 70s; however, some serviceable buildings remain, especially in the blocks bounded by 21st and 24th streets and Stout and Lawrence California and 22nd Street Conceptual sketch of redevelopment in Arapahoe Square The Paris Hotel is an example of Arapahoe Squares historic building stock.

PAGE 74

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Neighborhood Strategies 70streets (57% building coverage). A number of existing buildings house start-up businesses and design rms that value inexpensive rent and proximity to Downtown while enjoying the edginess of the neighborhood. While many of these buildings have unimpressive exteriors, their interior warehouse space suits their tenants, who often need a combination of exible industrial space with ancillary o ce spaces. The buildings are important assets to the community representing space that can be a ordably retro tted for companies looking for low-overhead costs with proximity to Downtown Denver. Encouraging the re-use of existing buildings is an important business development and retention strategy for the area. N.8 Establish Business Development O ce: The goal of a dedicated Business Development O ce (BDO) located within the Arapahoe Square would be to decrease the THE ARAPAHOE SQUARE COMMUNITY IDENTIFIED TEN MAJOR ISSUES:1. Concentration of service providers and homelessness The concentration of social service providers and congregating homeless individuals are factors, both real and perceived, that hinder new investment, degrade the pedestrian experience, and diminish personal safety and security. 2. Mobility Arapahoe Square can be a di cult place to navigate, though the multimodal choices exist. Complicating factors include one-way streets, interface of the Downtown and neighborhood street systems and Broadway. 3. Predominance of surface parking Over one-third of the land is surface parking or undeveloped. The uninviting character of these parking lots and vacant land discourages pedestrian activity. 4. Urban Design Contributing to the lack of urban character are the lack of street de nition with buildings and treelawns. Current zoning establishes dramatic height transitions from Downtown to Curtis Park. Historically, buildings have faced the named streets with few entries facing the numbered streets or Broadway. 5. Parks and Open Space Parks and open space are notably de cient and located on the perimeter of Arapahoe Square. Park land in Arapahoe Square itself is limited to the Broadway Triangles. 6. Stormwater Infrastructure Stormwater infrastructure is aging and inadequate. System improvements in and around Arapahoe Square have been identi ed, but not funded. 7. Building re-use The stock of existing buildings provides opportunity for inexpensive space for small businesses and small scale in ll development. 8. Property ownership patterns Property is primarily held in small parcels, which adds the complexity of assembling property for larger scale, potentially catalytic projects. On the other hand, many assembled properties remain undeveloped. 9. Economic development opportunities The area has a real or perceived lack of development. The major impediment for new development is lack of market. 10. Market competition Other Downtown neighborhoods compete with Arapahoe Square for new development

PAGE 75

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Neighborhood Strategies 71barriers to economic and business development. The BDO would advocate for the area, gather information regarding nancing programs, properties for sale, contact information for building and property owners and serve as a one-stop shop for those interested in investing or locating in a particular area. The BDO could develop marketing materials and serve as a facilitator to match property owners with prospective tenants and/or help with assemblages based on client needs. Initial e orts should focus on reuse of existing buildings. N.9 Improve Arapahoe Squares Brand: One of the major issues facing Arapahoe Square is the overall brand of the area. The prevalence of social services and lack of development creates perceived market risks that prevent development at current land prices. A rebranding of the area, perhaps focusing on its a ordability and edgy character, could increase demand and decreasing the perceived risk in the area. A central clearinghouse for information regarding business opportunities in the area, such as a BDO, could help to market the area and provide information on investment funding available for businesses and developers looking to invest in the area. N.10 Establish Urban Renewal Area: Tax Increment Financing (TIF) can be used towards projects that create a public bene t such as public improvements or certain development projects. The rst step is to adopt an Urban Redevelopment Plan that incorporates recommendations of this plan. KEY FRAMEWORK CONCEPTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS FOR ARAPA HOE SQUARE:A.1 High Intensity Development Near Downtown, Transit Stations and Along Key Streets A.2 Moderate Intensity Development Transitioning to Neighborhoods A.4 Adaptive Reuse and Historic Preservation B.1 Undertake a Downtown Strategic Transportation Plan Travelshed Analysis B.2 Evaluate Potential One-Way to Two-Way Conversions B.3 Consider New or Modi ed Transit Routes B.4 Consider an Arapahoe Square Rail Station on Welton B.5 In Short-Term, Undertake a Broadway Intersections Improvement Study C.2 Promote Economic and Housing Diversity C.3 Encourage Housing Density C.4 Establish and Support Business Development O ces C.5 Establish Urban Renewal Areas C.6 Utilize OED Lending Programs D.1 Promote Access to Healthy Transportation D.2 Promote Access to Healthy Foods D.3 Invest in Park Improvements D.4 Study Connecting Parks to Destination Areas D.5 Identify Funding for Stormwater Improvements and Promote Water Quality through Best Practices Broadway, Stout, 21st Street Conceptual sketch of redevelopment in Arapahoe Square

PAGE 76

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Neighborhood Strategies 72Ballpark, River NorthINTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY OF EXISTING CONDITIONS:The Ballpark and River North (RiNo) neighborhoods occupy the study areas western boundary. The Ballpark district, north of 20th Street, falls wholly within the study area, while RiNo continues outside the boundary to the Northwest and towards the South Platte River. Before becoming a part of River North, the portion of the RiNo neighborhood that lies within the study area was formerly referred to as the Upper Larimer neighborhood. The Ballpark neighborhood is home to Coors Field, and sees high visitor tra c on Rockies home game days. Successful retail, interspersed with surface parking, lines Larimer Street from 20th to Park Avenue, and supports game day and neighborhood functions, with additional small eateries and bars scattered throughout the neighborhood. Ballpark is a designated historic district, but has also experienced extensive redevelopment since Coors Field opened in 1995. RiNo has long served as a backbone of the business activities on the edge of Downtown Denver, with a large number of warehouse, industrial, and support businesses. This is due to the close proximity to Downtown and has made RiNo integral to the Citys economy. Recently, additional businesses (such as professional services, creative businesses, and others) have discovered the locational advantage and a ordability of RiNo. This new market awareness, along with housing demand, is putting stress on the existing businesses in the area. RiNo represents a key opportunity for all of these uses to coexist in a true industrial mixed use community. RiNo is an emerging arts district that bene ts from its long history of industrial uses. The eclectic mix of warehouses, loading dock store fronts, roadside businesses and historic industrial buildings provide for a unique character for the area that is perfect for its new identity. Blake Street has seen numerous lofts and apartments converted from former industrial buildings as well as in ll projects that mimic that aesthetic. Walnut Street still has many buildings that have docks along the street and Larimer has recently been seen as an emerging retail corridor with new shops and restaurants in both Ballpark and RiNo. Housing, both a ordable and market-rate, is a relatively new element in the mix of land activities in Ballpark and River North. In recent years, a number of new or adaptive reuse projects have created signi cant amounts of new housing units in this area. Additional housing development is desired in the community, and care should be taken to ensure that the type TRANSFORMATIVE CONCEPTS AFFECTING BALLPARK, RINO 21st Street The festival street concept would be a direct bene t to the Ballpark neighborhood. The concept would likely be implemented incrementally over time, and under that scenario its very likely that the portion of 21st within the Ballpark neighborhood would be the site of the initial investment, since the concept of activating the street is based on proximity to Coors Field. New Park No major city parks are located in either Ballpark or RiNo, meaning that either neighborhood is a good candidate for any future park space that may be developed within Northeast Downtown. Social Services Although many of the large social service providers in this area are located in Arapahoe Square, adjacent neighborhoods like Ballpark bear many of the negative impacts. Transit Oriented Development At the 38th & Blake station, transit oriented development is envisioned on the blocks that are adjacent to the station platform. TOD areas seek to promote pedestrian tra c and commercial activity. Realizing this vision will require the extensive redevelopment of properties in the TOD area, as the existing building stock is low-rise industrial, which is not well-suited for this change in use. Connecting River North All of the connection points identi ed by this concept are in River North. Currently, the only routes across the tracks are the 38th Street underpass at one end of the neighborhood, and the Broadway viaduct at the other. This concept would add additional connections at 31st, 33rd, and 36th, greatly enhancing mobility. Within the Ballpark Neighborhood, 21st Street features pedestrian amenities including wide sidewalks and street trees. Low tra c counts on 21st also contribute to the pedestrian orientation of the street.

PAGE 77

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Neighborhood Strategies 73and intensity of future residential development compliments the many existing and emerging businesses, industrial uses, and arts-related activities that are also located in this area. Architecture in these neighborhoods tends towards modern rowhouses and lofts, a style which coexist with active light industrial and class-B o ce space. RiNo stakeholders in particular are happy with this urban mix of uses, and like variety of uses, including artist spaces that this architectural mix allows. In contrast to lower density, more family-oriented neighborhood like Curtis Park and San Rafael, Ballpark and RiNo are favored by young, urban singles and couples, as well as emptynesters, and are seen as two of the citys new, hip neighborhoods. The communitys primary concerns focus on multi-modal access across the existing freight rail tracks and to the Platte River, as well as streetscape on Brighton Boulevard. The community is also interested in potential structuring of Coors Field surface parking and potential uses on the land that would then become available for development.NEIGHBORHOOD CONCEPTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS N.11 Building Form: Building form types range between industrial, general and apartment. Height Maximum building heights in Ballpark and River North range from three to eight stories. The eight story heights are located in the areas two nodes of density: in the Ballpark neighborhood between 20th and 24th, and at the future TOD area at the 38th & Blake station. The three and ve story areas are located generally between 24th and 35th, with Blake and Walnut supporting 5 stories and Larimer supporting three to aid in the transition between RiNo and Curtis Park. 27th roadway B Broadway Bro Bro adway adway st 1st 31st 1st th 0th 30th 0th th 9th 29th 9th th 8th 28th 8th th h h h 24th 24th 24th 4th 4th d 33rd 33rd 33rd nd nd 32nd 2nd h 34 4th 34th 4th e B Blake Blake Blake lake B lake Welton Mixed use projects featuring apartments and ground oor retail bays have been constructed in the Ballpark Neighborhood. RiNo has become known as a neighborhood where funky, eclectic, and creative businesses are welcome. Concept Building Heights Map COORS FIELD CONTEXT AREAWithin this area it is recommended that building heights not be allowed to exceed the height of the Coors Field stands.3 Stories 5 Stories 8 Stories Coors Field Context Area

PAGE 78

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Neighborhood Strategies 74 Siting Promote urban character with a build-to line to provide a consistent street edge and to support pedestrian activity. Reinforce the character and quality of public streets with buildings that provide consistent siting, pedestrian orientation, and access to the street. Minimize the visual impacts of parking by structuring it within the development, or by locating surface lots to the rear or side of buildings with access to/from the alley. Design Elements Give prominence to the pedestrian realm as a de ning element of neighborhood character. Maintain required ground story activation such as window transparency and street facing entrances. Locate commercial uses on the ground oors to activate buildings and the street, especially in the Ballpark neighborhood and in the 38th/Blake TOD area. Create visually interesting and humanscaled facades, and encourage variation in building form to provide opportunities for architectural scale relationships. Coors Field Context Area For Ballpark, reinforcing Coors Field as the neighborhood landmark is important. The scale and character of the neighborhood is set by this iconic structure, and as such any nearby buildings should respect the stadiums prominence and work collectively to promote a cohesive urban experience. Special attention should be given to the public realm along Blake Street, where many Rockies fans initially experience the game day atmosphere. To accomplish these urban design objectives, the height map shows a Coors Field Context Area wherein it is recommended that building heights not be allowed to exceed the height of the Coors Field stands. 27th st 1st 31st 1st h th h h 9th 29th 9th h h h h h h 24th h 24th 24 24 24th 24 24 h 24th h 24th 24th 24th d d d 33rd 33rd 33rd d d nd 2nd 32nd 2nd 34 4th 34th 4th ke B Blake ke lake B Mixed Use TOD Mixed Use Industrial Historic commercial frontage on Larimer Street Innovative residential in ll development Concept Land Use Map

PAGE 79

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Neighborhood Strategies 75 N.12 Land Use: Ballpark is a mixed use neighborhood with a distinctly urban character. It is comprised of commercial and mixed-use buildings, multi-family residential, and a collection of historic warehouse buildings. This is re ected in the future land use map by the mixed use land use category. As one travels from Ballpark to the northeast into RiNo, the land use mix changes and becomes much more industrial and eclectic. This is especially true northeast of 24th Street. In this area, the future land use map shows mixed use-industrial as the predominant land use category for RiNo. Northeast of 35th Street, the future land use designation is transit oriented development, in support of the commuter and light rail station that is planned at 38th & Blake. N.13 Complete Sidewalk Network: Nearly all of the existing gaps in the Northeast Downtown sidewalk network are in RiNo. Blake and Walnut have the highest frequency of gaps, while some of the numbered streets intersecting Blake and Walnut also lack sidewalks. City regulations require that sidewalks be provided in conjunction with redevelopment. This is a strategy that is helping to gradually ll in the sidewalk network, but in a piecemeal way, as new sidewalks adjacent to a redeveloped property may have nothing to connect to until neighboring properties also redevelop. It is recommended that sta work to identify funding opportunities to ll in gaps in the sidewalk network. N.14 Evaluate Potential One-way to Two-way Conversions: Several current one-way streets within this area should be considered for conversion to two-way. These include the sections of Blake, Walnut, and Larimer. Larimer Larimer Street, east of Broadway, is scheduled for two-way conversion in 2011, which should help support this emerging retail corridor. Blake Much of the multifamily residential construction and adaptive reuse that this area is known for has occurred on Blake Street. The land use mix continues to shift, and the street has become increasingly residential. Evaluate conversion to two-way in the short-to-medium timeframe or at such time as land use changes along the corridor warrants. Walnut Converting Walnut Street to two-way operations is a long-range proposal. Although land uses have gone through a transition on Blake and Larimer, Walnut remains a very industrial street. Conversion to two-way would only be advisable if, in the future, Walnut experiences signi cant amounts of redevelopment that eliminates most of the loading docks that are found along the street. N. 15 Consider Future of Coors Field Over ow Parking: In the future, if the footprint of the Coors Field over ow parking between the railroad right-of-way and Blake Street is reduced, consider a combination of redevelopment and park space on the site. KEY FRAMEWORK CONCEPTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS FOR RINO/ BALLPARK:A.1 High Intensity Development Near Downtown, Transit Stations and Along Key Streets A.4 Adaptive Reuse and Historic Preservation B.1 Undertake a Downtown Strategic Transportation Plan Travelshed Analysis B.2 Evaluate Potential One-way to Two-Way Conversions B.3 Consider New or Modi ed Transit Routes B.5 In Short-Term, undertake a Broadway Intersections Improvement Study C.1 Strengthen Retail Corridors C.2 Promote Economic and Housing Diversity C.3 Encourage Housing Density D.1 Promote Access to Healthy Transportation D.2 Promote Access to Healthy Foods D.3 Invest in Park Improvements D.4 Study Connecting Parks to Destination Areas Coors Field is an iconic building in the Ballpark Neighborhood.

PAGE 80

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Neighborhood Strategies 76Curtis ParkINTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY OF EXISTING CONDITIONS:Curtis Park is one of Denvers oldest residential neighborhoods, boasting some of the Citys most historic homes as well as the Citys rst o cial park, Mestizo-Curtis Park. The majority of the neighborhood lies within designated historic districts, and o ers urban design elements such as period lighting and sandstone sidewalks. Curtis Park is a true urban neighborhood both architecturally and demographically, with homes ranging from large Victorians to modern rowhouses, and long-time residents to new urban dwellers looking for a true neighborhood feel within walking distance of the downtown core. Curtis Park residents are well-organized and take pride in their neighborhood. Their top priorities for neighborhood enhancement include conversion of one-way streets to two-way, connectivity to the river, connectivity to the downtown core, historic preservation, design review for new construction, and ensuring appropriate architectural and height transition between Curtis Park and adjacent neighborhoods. Residents are particularly interested in the north-south transition between their neighborhood and the yet-to-be-developed Arapahoe Square district which lies between Curtis Park and the downtown business core. The vast majority of the Curtis Park neighborhood is an area of stability, as identi ed by Blueprint Denver. Development policies in areas of stability should promote the continuation of existing land use patterns, building forms, and development densities. Curtis Park is designated by several historic landmark districts, further reinforcing the importance of preserving the existing character elements of the neighborhood. Throughout the planning process, the idea of converting Stout and Champa to two way was frequently raised. This plan recommends that Stout and Champa be maintained as a one-way couplet at least until after the RTD Central Corridor improvements are in place on Downing Street. At that time, it may be appropriate to consider two way operations on Stout Street, which is wide enough to accommodate a travel lane in each direction, on-street parking TRANSFORMATIVE CONCEPTS AFFECTING CURTIS PARK Connecting River North Currently, the only routes across the railroad tracks within Northeast Downtown are the 38th Street underpass and the Broadway viaduct. This concept would add additional connections at 31st, 33rd, and 36th, greatly enhancing mobility options to the west for Curtis Park. Curtis Street Curtis Street is centrally located in the middle of the Curtis Park Neighborhood. Already a good street for walking within Curtis Park, enhancing Curtis Street as a pedestrian connection through Arapahoe Square and into Downtown would create a pedestrian-priority corridor that would improve connectivity for all three neighborhoods. Transit Oriented Development Welton and Downing are identi ed in this plan as TOD corridors. Both of these streets are located on the edge of Curtis Park, and as such any TOD that occurs along these corridors would directly serve the neighborhood. Streetcar As a neighborhood served by the streetcar, Curtis Park would bene t from the mobility and TOD advantages that are associated with streetcar service. Social Services Although many of the large social service providers in this area are located in Arapahoe Square, adjacent neighborhoods like Curtis Park bear many of the negative impacts. Curtis park has some of the oldest residential structures in Denver, such as this 1880s Italianate-style home

PAGE 81

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Neighborhood Strategies 77on both sides of the street, and one bike lane. Two-way operations on Champa are more challenging because of the streets narrower cross section, which would likely mean losing the existing bike lane. For this reason, Champa will need to remain a one-way street for the foreseeable future, until such time that this issue can be su ciently addressed. The longrange vision of this plan is for all streets within Curtis Park to be two-way, but in the interim it is recommended that the Stout/Champa couplet be maintained and that tra c calming measures to reduce travel speeds be identi ed and studied as part of a comprehensive Next Steps Transportation Operations Study for Northeast Downtown. The emphasis of Curtis Street as a pedestrian priority street is identi ed as a transformative concept by this plan. Establishing a clear pedestrian connection from Curtis Park through Arapahoe Square and to the Central Business District will help to connect these neighborhoods together. The designation of 31st Street as another pedestrian priority street creates complimentary opportunities for the Curtis Park neighborhood. Both Curtis Street and 31st Street feed directly into Mestizo-Curtis Park, creating a T-shaped pedestrian priority area that bisects the Curtis Park neighborhood in two directions, providing connectivity that is anchored by destination areas in all directions. To the west, a proposed pedestrian bridge over the railroad tracks at 31st provides connectivity to the River North neighborhood and the South Platte River. To the east, 31st Street terminates at the 30th & Downing transit station and the TOD areas along Welton and Downing. Meanwhile Curtis Street itself is interrupted at Mestizo-Curtis Park, and provides a pedestrian priority connection southward to Downtown. CURTIS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD GOALS: Continued mix of housing types and a ordability Protection of neighborhood historic structures, and design review of in ll for compatibility Installation of period street lighting and pedestrian lighting Reuse of vacant historic structures such as the Epworth church, the Curtis Park Community Center, Temple Emmanuel, and some individual residences Development of vacant land, including both large properties and interior neighborhood vacant lots Reuse or redevelopment of unoccupied non-historic structures such as the Denver Enterprise Center, the community centers mid-block buildings, and the former Nest Fresh factory on Lawrence Street Removal of unnecessary curb cuts and prohibition of additional curb cuts where alley access is available Achieve calm neighborhood tra c patterns Eventually convert all one-way streets within the neighborhood to two-way Preserve and foster increased pedestrian and bicycle connectivity to Downtown and the South Platte River Customize the zoning codes accessory dwelling unit form standards to work better with Curtis Parks narrow residential lots City assistance with abandoned and neglected properties and structures Remove all non-conforming billboards Improve and activate parks Denser housing types are also located within the neighborhood. Single family residence in Curtis Park. The Denver Housing Authority has constructed multifamily residential homes compatible with the historic scale of Curtis Park.

PAGE 82

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Neighborhood Strategies 78NEIGHBORHOOD CONCEPTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS N.16 Building Form: The majority of the neighborhood should continue its tradition of urban house, duplex and row house building forms. Height The recommended height map shows a majority of the Curtis Park neighborhood at 2.5 stories, a maximum height that reinforces the existing zoning within the neighborhood. Of key importance is how the maximum heights of adjacent areas, which are generally higher, transition to the 2.5 stories found in Curtis Park. Southern Edge Curtis Park meets Arapahoe Square at Park Ave West. The strategy for transitioning from the much higher building heights in Arapahoe Square is to limit development to 5 stories along Park Ave, and then step down to a three story maximum approaching 24th Street. Eastern Edge Maximum building heights along Welton Street in Historic Five Points are proposed to be 8 stories between Park Ave and 27th Street, and 5 stories north of 27th Street. The presence of an alley between Welton and California helps to transition building heights downward to Curtis Park, as do protected district development standards within the zoning code that set maximum height limits and require building setbacks for properties located on Welton and adjacent to the Curtis Park neighborhood. Northern Edge Downing Street is the seam between the downtown street grid and the Denver neighborhood grid. This results in angled intersections along Downing and triangle-shaped parcels along the Curtis Park edge. Because alleys do not help to bu er commercial development along Downing from adjacent residential structures, the maximum height for main street development along Downing is proposed to be three stories. Western Edge Building heights transition upward to three stories at Arapahoe in recognition of the denser development patterns found in Denver Housing Authoritys Villages at Curtis Park, where apartment forms are permitted. Siting Siting of new residential forms should be consistent with the existing, historic development patterns within the neighborhood. These elements include consistent front yard setbacks, small zone lots, high lot coverage comparable to historic patterns, and locating garages and accessory dwelling units at the rear of the lot. Design Elements Give prominence to the pedestrian realm as a de ning element of neighborhood character. Emphasize a positive relationship to the street by ensuring that building access, orientation, and placement are consistent with established patterns. Create visually interesting and human-scaled facades. Along the edges of the neighborhood, arrange the height and scale of buildings to provide transitions to adjoining areas. HISTORIC SIDEWALKS: Curtis Park has a sizable collection of sandstone (sometimes referred to as agstone) sidewalks and curbs. These facilities contribute greatly to the historic character of the neighborhood. Sandstone is a permissible sidewalk material that meets City standards, but the cost is much greater than standard concrete sidewalks, and so many property owners elect to replace sidewalks with concrete rather than pay the cost of repairing damaged sandstone. A strategy for preserving these resources needs to be identi ed. There currently is no regulatory mechanism to require the preservation of sandstone sidewalks and curbs.Historic agstone sidewalks in Curtis Park

PAGE 83

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Neighborhood Strategies 793 Stories 2.5 Stories 5 Stories 8 Stories Welton Welton elton elton n Welton Welton W W W W W We We We California C lifornia C C li lifornia Stout ut S out Champa ampa ampa C C ampa hampa st 31st st th 30th th th 29th th 28th 27th 26th 25th 24th Park 33rd d 32nd d th 34th th Curtis urtis urtis Arapahoe apahoe apahoe Arapahoe A ap A apa Arapahoe Arapahoe Arapahoe Lawrence rence w wrence Larimer arim arime Walnut Blake Broadway Broa y Broad Downing 24th 25th An urban rowhouse in Curtis Park. Many historic homes in Curtis Park are two and a half stories Concept Building Heights Map

PAGE 84

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Neighborhood Strategies 80 N.17 Land Use: Single family residential is the predominant use within Curtis Park, but a mix of attached housing types are also present throughout the neighborhood. This mix of residential types is re ected in the future land use map by the single family/rowhouse designation that is used for most of the neighborhood. The blocks between Lawrence and Arapahoe have a designation of urban residential to re ect the more dense residential land uses that comprise the Villages at Curtis Park development. N.18 Stout and Champa Reclassi cation: Reclassify Stout and Champa in the Blueprint Denver transportation framework from residential arterial to residential collector streets to re ect how the streets are used today within the Curtis Park neighborhood. N.19 Identify Tra c Calming Opportunities: Study tra c calming opportunities for the neighborhood, but especially for Champa and Stout, as part of an overall Next Steps Transportation Study for Northeast Downtown. N.20 Accommodate Adaptive Reuse: Part of Curtis Parks unique character comes from the presence of imbedded commercial structures within the neighborhood, typically located on corners. In some cases, these structures are in active commercial use, but in many other cases the buildings are vacant. More often than not, these properties have residential zoning and as such the establishment of new commercial uses would be precluded. Such a situation would not be in the best interest of the neighborhood. The reuse of existing commercial buildings for commercial purposes should be accommodated on a case-by-case basis, in consultation with the neighborhood. Urban Residential in ll in Curtis Park Apartment buildings are being retro tted into for-sale condominiums Mestizo-Curtis Park

PAGE 85

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Neighborhood Strategies 81Mixed Use TOD Single Family/Row House Urban Residential Park Welton Welton W elton W Welton Welton Welton California C C lifornia C C al lifornia Stout tout S tout Champa C hampa hampa C C hampa hampa 31st st 31 st 31 30th th 30 th 30 29th th 29t th 29t 28th th 28 th 28 33rd 33 33 32nd nd 32n nd 32n 34th h Curtis urtis urtis Ar A apahoe A apaho Arapahoe A ap A apah Arapahoe Ar apahoe apahoe Arapahoe pahoe apahoe Lawrence wrence L aw wrence Larimer arim arime Walnut ut nut Blake Broadway y Broa y Broa Downing 24th 25th 26th 26 26t 27th 26th 25th 25th 25th 24th 24t 24t Park rk P rk P KEY FRAMEWORK CONCEPTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS FOR CURTIS PARK:A.2 Moderate Intensity Development Transitioning to Neighborhoods A.3 Low Intensity Development in Residential Neighborhoods A.4 Adaptive Reuse and Historic Preservation B.1 Undertake a Downtown Strategic Transportation Plan Travelshed Analysis: B.2 Evaluate Potential One-way to Two-way Conversions B.3 Consider New or Modi ed Transit Routes C.2 Promote Economic and Housing Diversity D.1 Promote Access to Healthy Transportation D.2 Promote Access to Healthy Foods D.3 Invest in Park Improvements D.4 Study Connecting Parks to Destination AreasConcept Land Use Map

PAGE 86

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Neighborhood Strategies 82Downing/Welton CorridorINTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY OF EXISTING CONDITIONS:The Downing/Welton Corridor is essential to Denvers historic Five Points neighborhood. Sometimes called the Harlem of the West, Five Points, which is Colorados only designated historic cultural landmark, has a rich jazz history and has served as the heart of the AfricanAmerican community in Denver since at least the 1930s. Although many of these historic venues have since disappeared, the historic Rossonian Building situated at the actual ve points intersection (Welton, Washington, 26th Avenue, and 27th Street) remains an important anchor for the neighborhood and the corridor. After World War II, the corridor has continually struggled to maintain its previous vibrancy and economic success. Small-scale storefronts spread north and south from the Five Points intersection, creating a developing node of neighborhood-serving retail. The Downing/Welton corridor is bordered closely by the Curtis Park, Enterprise Hill, Whittier, and Cole neighborhoods, which consist of predominately historic single family homes and townhouses. The Glenarm Recreation Center is located just to the southeast of Welton on 28th Street. Two parks serve the corridor; Quick Park, a small pocket park with picnic tables, a playground and a basketball court, and Sonny Lawson Park, a 2.5 acre neighborhood park with a softball eld, basketball court, playground and restrooms. Also in the corridor is the Five Points Business Development O ce, located on Washington Street, just south of Welton. The neighborhood bene ts from a high degree of connectivity to the downtown core, as well as future connections to points east due to the RTD FasTracks Central Corridor Extension. The project has identi ed Downing Street as the connection between the current end of line station at 30th Street and the new East Corridor Commuter Rail station at 38th and Blake, which is scheduled to open in 2016 and will connect Denver Union Station to Denver International Airport. Two new stations will open on Do wning with light rail vehicles operating in mixed tra c between 30th Avenue and the commuter rail station as part of FasTracks, but funding is not currently available for this extension. Five Points has attracted signi cant private and public investments over the past two decades. The City has supported and funded a number of public improvements and provided investment capital for business development. The most signi cant private investment has been made by hundreds of individual homeowners in the surrounding neighborhoods. These purchase and rehab investments have changed the character of the area into a multi-racial, multi-cultural, and mixed income area. The greatest opportunity for further renewal and revitalization rests with building on these past and present-day investments to sustain additional investment along Welton and Downing. As part of the Colorado Sustainable Main Streets Initiative, the Five Points Business District developed the Five Points Sustainable Main Street Vision Plan and Final Report in December 2010. Many key ideas from that report informed the Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan process for the Welton and Downing Corridors. Stakeholder interests center on enhancing the neighborhoods existing assets, particularly in rebuilding and strengthening retail along Welton and Downing Streets. The prominent concept from the Vision Plan is the desire to turn Five Points into a vibrant, mixed use marketplace that supports local businesses, capitalizes on cultural and educational opportunities, and encourages the health and wellness of residents. Welton Street is envisioned as a neighborhood-serving commercial corridor that is an attraction with regional appeal. As a cultural destination, the corridor will achieve a balance of automobile, pedestrian, bicycle, and transit mobility with active groundoor retail and a mix of TRANSFORMATIVE CONCEPTS AFFECTING DOWNING/WELTON Streetcar The NEDN Streetcar Concept features a true modern streetcar vehicle operating in mixed tra c for the length of the Downing/Welton Corridor. This would bene t the Welton corridor, in particular, because the right-of-way that is currently devoted to light rail operations could be repurposed for wider sidewalks and a pedestrian amenity zone. 21st Street The festival street concept intersects Welton at 21st Street. A new light rail/streetcar stop between 21st Street and Park Avenue would serve the festival street and cyclists/ pedestrians utilizing that route to get to Coors Field. Transit Oriented Development Focusing appropriately scaled development that is oriented towards the transit investment on Welton and Downing encourages walkable, urban neighborhoods that have easy access to daily needs and amenities. The Rossonion Hotel is a historic landmark at the Five Points intersection.

PAGE 87

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Neighborhood Strategies 83upper oor uses, including residential. Widened sidewalks will give businesses a visible street presence as well as places for art, social gatherings, and streetscape amenities. Health, wellness, sustainability, and tourism will be integral to the buildout and development of the area. Enhancing the pedestrian experience of Welton Street is critical to achieving the goal of creating a Five Points Marketplace. An important step would be the adaptation of the existing light rail service to mixed tra c streetcar service, as identi ed in the Transformative Concepts chapter. A modern streetcar operating in mixed tra c on Downing and Welton; which would need to be converted to two way operations between 24th and 30th streets, would allow for a redistribution of the existing right of way. Under this streetcar concept, the existing light rail infrastructure, currently con gured within a designated right-of-way would be removed or modi ed, freeing up valuable right-of-way for enhanced pedestrian amenities and onstreet parking. In the current condition, retail interests have been shown to su er, by some accounts, due to the rail location as little as ten feet from building facades in some places. An analysis of this concept is necessary to understand the impact on the neighborhood, citywide transit services, and automobile tra c. If accomplished, the streetcar would be a unifying element for the neighborhoods and act as a pedestrian accelerator in the corridor, improving access to storefronts and activating the street. Development on the alignment would be more equally distributed throughout the corridor and more easily t into the community vision. Closer to Downtown, where large parcels have been assembled for redevelopment, the streetcar could encourage a walkable, high density neighborhood with a rich mix of uses including a range of housing types to promote a diverse population in the corridor. The light rail on Welton Street operates in its own dedicated right of way. Homes along commercial corridors can be reused as retail storefronts. Homes facing Downing Street could be utilized in a similar manner as these homes in the Nob Hill neighborhood of Portland.

PAGE 88

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Neighborhood Strategies 84NEIGHBORHOOD CONCEPTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS N.21 Building Form: Height The recommended height map shows a range of heights for the corridor, generally promoting a main street feel for Downing and Welton Streets that capitalizes on transit service, while respecting nearby historic neighborhoods. An eightstory height maximum was utilized from Park Avenue to 27th Street as a step-down from the taller building heights that are proposed for Arapahoe Square. A ve story maximum was then utilized north of 27th Street and along Downing where a parallel alley was available to provide al transition to adjacent residential neighborhoods. Where alleys are not parallel to the corridor, such as the western edge of Downing adjacent to Curtis Park, a three story height was applied. To the north and west ends of the corridor, greater heights are allowed in response to additional transit options; the commuter rail station at 38th and Blake and the multiple transit modes in Downtown. The combination of development opportunity near transit, desire for a main street character, and adjacency to historic neighborhoods makes appropriate transitions critical to the Downing/Welton Corridor. Siting The desired street character of Welton and Downing is a main street feel that acknowledges the important presence of high quality transit service in the corridor. Buildings in the corridor should maintain the build-to line to provide a consistent street edge and promote pedestrian activity. Buildings should be placed to best assist with transitions to adjacent neighborhoods. The visual impacts of parking should be minimized by being located at the rear of the building. Design Elements Building scale should promote a main street character and be oriented towards either Downing or Welton, with prominent main entrances situated for pedestrian access. A high level of transparency on the ground oor is desired. Transition to Adjacent Residential Neighborhoods Within the study area, large segments of both Welton and Downing are adjacent to low-scale residential neighborhoods. Where this condition exists, it is recommended that zoning standards pertaining to height, setbacks, building sculpting and upper story setbacks, and other design elements, as appropriate, be utilized along the adjacent edge to create a transition between in ll development along the main street corridor and the residential neighborhood. The Nob Hill District of Portland is an example of a neighborhood that has bene tted from the addition of streetcar service to its urban character.

PAGE 89

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Neighborhood Strategies 853 Stories 2.5 Stories 5 Stories 8 Stories 12* Stories 20* Stories California Ca Ca 22nd 2 23rd 2 3d 24th t 25th 31st 31st 31st t t 30th 30th 30th h h 9th 29th 29th h 8th 28th 8th 33rd 33 33 d d 2nd 32nd 2nd d d 34th 34th 34th h h h 35th 35th 35th h Lawrence wrence L wrence Larimer arim arimer Walnut Wa Waln Blake lake lake B Broadway Boad Boad Downing Downing Downin Downin Downing Vacant parcels and surface parking lots dominate the landscape along Welton near 22nd Street. Concept Building Heights Map

PAGE 90

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Neighborhood Strategies 86 N.22 Land Use: The Downing/Welton Corridor is identi ed as transit-oriented development (TOD) in the concept land use map. Transit-oriented developments have land uses with a direct correlation to the function of a mass transit system. These development sites are located at stations or stops along bus or rail lines within a mass transit network. Transit-oriented developments provide housing, services, and employment opportunities for a diverse population in a con guration that facilitat es pedestrian and transit access. Along the Welton/Downing corridor, TOD occurs at several di erent scales, reacting to the amount and type of transit service and the context of the existing neighborhood. Higher density development should be focused near Downtown and between 35th and 38th street at the Commuter Rail station. Lower density development should be focused adjacent to historic neighborhoods. N.23 Support Work of Five Points Business District O ce: Continuation of marketing and business support activities are necessary to create a sustainable commercial district. The Five Points Business District O ce, with key partners, should identify opportunities to focus on a key redevelopment project or major private investment that could serve as a catalyst for attracting more investment to the area. N.24 Establish Urban Renewal Area: To assist with this plans implementation or to attract reinvestment in the corridor, it is recommended that an Urban Renewal Area for all or parts of the Welton/Downing Corridor be examined. N.25 Evaluate Short One-way Street Segments: As part of a Next Steps transportation operations study, evaluate the possible two-wa y conversion of several short one-way street segments that connect to Welton and Downing: 27th St. between California and Welton 28th St. between Welton and Glenarm Glenarm between 29th St. and Downing N.26 Orientation of Outdoor Active Uses: So as to minimize negative impacts on adjacent residential neighborhoods, orient outdoor dining and rooftop terraces of commercial structures such that they face Welton/Downing and not the alley. TOD ON WELTON ARAPAHOE SQUARE STATIONThe most promising opportunity for development in the corridor is located between 20th and 24th streets on Welton, where multiple parcels have already been assembled for redevelopment. To help facilitate TOD at this location, a new station between 21st Street and Park Avenue is recommended to provide better access to these parcels. A new station, in combination with the conversion of light rail to a streetcar couplet on Welton and California would expand the area where TOD could occur.

PAGE 91

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Neighborhood Strategies 87TOD Single Family/Row House Single Family Park California Ca Ca 22nd 2 23rd 2 3d 24th t 25th 31st 31st 31st t t 30th 30th 30th h h 9th 29th 29th h 8th 28th 8th 33rd 33 33 d d 2nd 32nd 2nd d d 34th 34th 34th h h Lawrence wrence L wrence Larimer arim arimer Walnut Wa Waln Blake lake lake Downing Downing Di Di Downing g g h 5th 35t 35t h 5th 35 5 5th 35 5t 27th 26th 25th th 25 th 25 21st st st KEY CONCEPTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS FOR THE WELTON/DOWNING CORRIDOR:A.1 High Intensity Development Near Downtown, Transit Stations and Along Key Streets A.2 Moderate Intensity Development Transitioning to Neighborhoods A.4 Adaptive Reuse and Historic Preservation B.1 Undertake a Downtown Strategic Transportation Plan Travelshed Analysis B.2 Evaluate Potential One-way to Two-Way Conversions B.3 Consider New or Modi ed Transit Routes B.4 Consider an Arapahoe Square Rail Station on Welton C.1 Strengthen Retail Corridors C.2 Promote Economic and Housing Diversity C.3 Encourage Housing Density C.4 Establish and Support Business Development O ces C.5 Establish Urban Renewal Areas C.6 Utilize OED Lending Programs D.1 Promote Access to Healthy Trans portation D.2 Promote Access to Healthy FoodsConcept Land Use Map

PAGE 92

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Neighborhood Strategies 88Enterprise Hill, San RafaelINTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY OF EXISTING CONDITIONS:Enterprise Hill and San Rafael are located in the southeast corner of the study area. Like Curtis Park and Five Points, Enterprise Hill and San Rafael are among Denvers oldest neighborhoods. They boast a rich collection of historic homes that are an architectural testament to the areas history. Residents characterize Enterprise Hill and San Rafael as family-oriented urban neighborhoods. San Rafael has a large collection of historic homes dating from the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Although the neighborhood would certainly be eligible for historic designation, the establishment of local historic districts is a community-driven activity, and to date no local landmark historic district has been established for San Rafael. Like Curtis Park, San Rafael has a large collection of sandstone sidewalks and curbs that contributes to the historic character of the neighborhood. San Rafael is notable within Northeast Downtown because it is the only neighborhood within the study area that is built on the north/south east/west grid rather than the angled downtown grid. The Safeway at 20th Avenue and Washington is the only modern full service grocery store in Northeast Downtown, and as such is a major destination for residents within the entire study area. Enterprise Hill is an interesting mix of old and new. Many grand and historic homes are located along Glenarm and Tremont, including the Clements Historic District. Clements is located across the street from Benedict Fountain Park, a 2.8 acre passive recreation park that is a major amenity for the neighborhood. But Enterprise Hill has also long been the location of public housing, and a large portion of the neighborhood is in the process of being transformed by DHAs Park Avenue redevelopment project, a mixed-income development with over 800 units of housing. Stakeholders primary concerns center on supporting and enhancing the neighborhoods existing character. Residents are comfortable with the areas current mix of housing types, and are interested in the types of uses which will be allowed as vacant and underutilized parcels at the neighborhoods western edge near Downtown and Arapahoe Square begin to redevelop. NEIGHBORHOOD CONCEPTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS N.27 Building Form: The mixed height and forms o er diversity ranging from urban houses, accessory dwelling units, duplexes, rowhouses, and apartment buildings. Height Proposed building heights in this area range from 2.5 to 8 stories. This is intended to reinforce existing development patterns by maintaining the scale of development that is found in the area currently. To reinforce the desired character along Washington Street and to mitigate the impact of more intensive uses adjacent to residential uses in the neighborhood, it is recommended that the existing DO-2 design overlay remain in place. Siting In historic areas, including San Rafael, Clements, and some portions of Enterprise Hill, the siting of new residential structures should be consistent with the existing, historic development patterns found within the neighborhood including consistent front yard setbacks, lot cover age comparable to historic patterns, and locating garages and accessory dwelling units at the rear of the lot. In non-historic areas, reinforce the character and quality of public streets with buildings that provide consistent siting, pedestrian orientation, and access to the street. Minimize the visual impacts of parking areas on streets and adjoining property. Design Elements Give prominence to the pedestrian realm as a de ning element of neighborhood character. In historic areas, emphasize a positive relationship to the street by ensuring that building access, orientation, and placement are consistent with established patterns. In non-historic areas, create visually interesting and TRANSFORMATIVE CONCEPTS 21st Street If fully realized, the bike boulevard/festival street concept for 21st Street could eventually extend from Coors Field all the way to Benedict Fountain Park, forming a strong pedestrian and bike connection serving Ballpark, Arapahoe Square, and Enterprise Hill. Streetcar Locating a new transit stop between 21st Street and Park Avenue would build on the improved connectivity o ered by the bike boulevard on 21st and greatly improve access to transit for Enterprise Hill. Transit Oriented Development New transit-oriented development along the edges of the neighborhood would bene t residents and business owners alike. The Clements Historic District Benedict Fountain Park

PAGE 93

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Neighborhood Strategies 89human-scaled facades, and encourage variation in building form to provide opportunities for architectural scale relationships. Along the edges of the neighborhood, arrange the height and scale of buildings to provide transitions to adjoining areas. N.28 Land Use: San Rafael is a residential neighborhood characterized by single family land use patterns, but with a variety of multifamily, institutional, and commercial uses distributed throughout the neighborhood. Single family residential tends to be located mid-block on the named streets, while attached housing types are more typical on the corners and facing the numbered streets. This results in the unique striping pattern shown in the future land use map. The future land use map for Enterprise Hill makes use of a variety of residential land use categories. The urban residential land use category is used on denser residential blocks characterized by multifamily and other attached residential housing types. This includes the land within the Denver Housing Authoritys Park Avenue redevelopment. The Clements Historic District is mapped single family/row house. The neighborhood southeast of Welton Street, along Glenarm and Tremont, is also mapped single family/row house. KEY CONCEPTS AND RECOMMEN DATIONS FOR ENTERPRISE HILL/ SAN RAFAEL:A.3 Low Intensity Development in Residential Neighborhoods A.4 Adaptive Reuse and Historic Preservation B.4 Consider an Arapahoe Square Rail Station on Welton C.1 Strengthen Retail Corridors C.2 Promote Economic and Housing Diversity C.3 Encourage Housing Density D.1 Promote Access to Healthy Transportation D.2 Promote Access to Healthy Foods D.3 Invest in Park Improvements D.4 Study Connecting Parks to Destination Areas3 Stories 2.5 Stories 5 Stories 8 Stories 12* Stories 20* Stories Mixed Use TOD Single Family/Row House Single Family Urban Residential Park Downing Downing Downing Downing California ia Welton n Welton W We Welton Welton Stout S ut Champa Champa hampa Champa Champa Curtis is Cur Curtis Broadway B B 22nd 22 d 22 23rd 24th h 24 25th h 26th 26th 26th California Califo Californi S Stout St Champa Champa Champa Broadway 22nd 22 d 22 23rd 24th h 24 25th 26th 26th 26th Doni Di Di Downing g g Downing Downing Curtis Curtis Curtis Welton n Welt W We Welton Welton Concept Land Use Map Concept Building Heights Map

PAGE 95

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Moving Forward 91Implementation of a plan for a large area such as the Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods is accomplished incrementally over many years through the e orts of the City government, residents, business owners, property owners, and nonpro t organizations. The plan provides a picture into the future of what the community wants Northeast Downtown to become. As a result, the image of what we want is clear. The how we are going to get there will be the responsibility of the numerous studies and project planning that will be developed to forward speci c objectives and projects within the context of city-wide priorities and resource availability. Moving Forward

PAGE 96

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Moving Forward 92Implementation FrameworkIMPLEMENTATION OPPORTUNITIES AND PRIORITIESAn important, immediate implementation oppor tunity is the Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Next Steps Study, a grant to the City from Denver Regional Council of Governments to further the public transportation recommendations of this plan. Potential components of this study include: 21st Streetbike boulevard, sustainable Best Management Practices (BMP), streetscape design, and 21st and Broadway crossing Downtown Travelshed Strategic Transportation Plan-Phase 1 Welton Streetcar Service Pedestrian and bike improvements for crossing Broadway Two-way Blake Street (east of Broadway) Curtis Park two-way segments Social Services Working Group to be convened by Denvers Road Home will develop and advance management strategies and housing options that reduce the impact of the homeless on public streets and parks. Participants may include City agencies (Parks & Recreation, Human Services, and O ce of Economic Development), State Division of Housing, homeless service and shelter providers, Triangle Park Community Coordinating District, and nonpro t housing providers. The goal of dedicated Business Development O ces for Arapahoe Square and Ballpark/ River North would be to decrease the barriers to economic development. The BDOs would serve as an advocate for new and existing businesses, gather information regarding nancing programs, properties for sale, contact information for building and property owners and serve as a one-stop shop for those interested in investing or locating in a particular area. The BDOs could develop marketing materials and serve as a facilitator to match property owners with prospective tenants and/or help with assemblages based on client needs. Form-Based Zoning Approach for Arapahoe Square would address urban design based approaches to high-density development currently allowed in the D-AS zone district. Signi cant involvement from stakeholders and property owners would be the rst step in developing a revised zoning approach. Park Avenue Corridor Rezoning addresses the important transition from the high densities found in Arapahoe Square to the lower densities in Curtis Park. The area of focus should be Park Avenue to 24th Street between Arapahoe and California streets. Signi cant involvement from stakeholders, neighborhood residents, and property owners would be the rst step in developing a revised zoning approach. Arapahoe Square and Welton Street have been identi ed as potential urban renewal areas. Urban Renewal Areas (URA) are created to help e ect the redevelopment of blighted areas and are created by the City through the adoption of Urban Redevelopment Plans which lay out the objectives of the plan (such as elimination of blight). An adopted Urban Redevelopment Plan authorizes the Denver Urban Renew al Authority (DURA) to carry out those objectives. DURAs primary tool for e ecting redevelopment is tax increment nancing (TIF). TIF can be used to assist in the nancing of projects that are consistent with the Denver Comprehensive Plan and all relevant plan supplemen ts. A Blight Study has been completed for Arapahoe Square con rming that blighting conditions exist. An early action should be to create the Urban Redevelopment Plan. A blight study for the Welton corridor is pending and once blighting conditions are con rmed, an Urban Redevelopment Plan will follow. Coors Field has been a catalyst for development in the Ballpark and LoDo neighborhoods.

PAGE 97

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Moving Forward 93PLAN IMPLEMENTATIONThe implementation matrix that concludes this chapter summarizes the recommended strategies, associated with the Plan Framework, Transformative Concepts, and Neighborhood Strategies. Each one is further de ned by type, timeframe, funding source, and lead entity. IMPLEMENTATION TYPESBlueprint Denver identi es three types of implementation activities: regulatory or policy, public investment, and partnership. The NEDN plan also recognizes the importance of private development and business investment in realizing the plan. Regulatory and policy strategies change City codes or regulations to a ect desired outcomes. Typical examples include Denver Zoning Code text and map amendments, Public Works requirements for infrastructure improvements associated with development projects, and Parks and Recreation requirements regarding open space and plantings. Public investment strategies are those involving public funding of public infrastructure. Examples include street reconstruction, bike lanes, new transit lines, park improvements, or new or expanded recreation centers. The City takes the lead in designing, constructing, and funding these projects and may use a variety of public funding sources such as the annual Capital Improvements Program, bond funds, or state or federal grant programs. Partnership strategies represent the most diverse category. Public-private partnership (PPP) activity has expanded exponentially and has gone well beyond public subsidy of a private development project. Increasingly public-private partnerships are being used to fund public infrastructure projects. Denver Union Station and RTDs East and Gold Lines are among the largest PPP projects in the country. Another example is reconstruction of 14th Street as the Ambassador Street using City Bond funds and a property-owner approved General Improvement District. In several cases, public transportation projects are identi ed as studies because the impacts and consequences of a particular improvement on the Downtown transportation system is so complex that the broader system must be examined to determine the feasible options to meet the intent. Any successful project requires a champion: a developer will seek needed rezoning or subsidy from the public sector; a neighborhood will seek Landmark designation; a community organization such as the Downtown Denver Partnership or neighborhood association will convene property owners to fund speci c public improvements; or, a public agency will seek private nancing partners. IMPLEMENTATION TIMEFRAMES Timeframes recognize both the order in which certain strategies must be undertaken and the feasibility of undertaking them given known resources. As a result, the timeframes provide guidance for expectations and initial e orts. Every opportunity to advance a plan should be taken, regardless of the suggested timing. This plan recognizes four time-frames: Short-term one to three years Medium-term four to ten years Long-term beyond ten years On-going continuing application/utilization The Commons is the result of implementation of a long range vision for a neighborhood.

PAGE 98

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Moving Forward 94FUNDING SOURCESThe Implementation Framework identi es possible funding sources for public improvements and studies. The Plan is a forward-looking document which contemplates a vision for future development. Funding sources available to public and private entities are continually evolving based on economic, political, legal and neighborhood objectives. Though the names and purposes of funding sources change over time, they fall into three distinct categories. Tax Base Support: Tax base supported sources are characterized by the involvement of the local sales and property taxing authorities. The most common tax base support is through the Citys annual budget, especially the annual Capital Improvements Program (CIP). Periodically, the City requests its voters to approve a tax increase to pay for speci c public improvements. For instance, the citizens of Denver voted in 2007 to raise their property taxes in a speci c amount to support the issuance of over $500 million Better Denver Bonds whose proceeds funded 290 speci c public improvements. Tax Increment Finance is another means of tax-base support most typically associated with an Urban Renewal Area. Once created by the City Council and Denver Urban Renewal Authority (DURA), property and sales tax over and above the base year are paid to DURA to be used to pay for eligible public improvements or to fund nancing gaps for private development. Grants: Grants come from public or private organizations that are interested in encouraging a speci c outcome and these grants typically include speci c conditions and requirements as to how the funds may be deployed. For instance, a state or federal transportation grant will need to be used for street, mass transit, or regional mobility studies or projects. The O ce of Economic Development receives federal funds to support certain types of housing projects. Additionally, foundations provide grants for projects orientated with the organizations goals, such as green spaces or social services. Special Districts: The City Charter and State Statute enable various types of districts to be created. Examples of special districts include Business Improvement Districts, Metropolitan Districts, Local Improvement or Maintenance Districts, and General Improvement Districts. The districts are classi ed as special because they are typically created by a localized group of citizens who want to achieve speci c outcomes in their locality and are willing to pool their economic resources in order to implement identi ed projects. For example, if a majority of business owners desire to improve the streetscape of the street in which they operate, the businesses could organize a Business Improvement District which would assess the participants an amount of money su cient to pay for the project. Special districts are a useful tool when a localized population desire and are willing to pay for an enhanced level of public improvement. District revenues can be used to pay for improvements on a pay-as-you-go basis, for ongoing operations and maintenance, or to support payment of bonds. Quite a number of Local Maintenance Districts have been established in the plan area to maintain streetscape improvements installed as part of major infrastructure projects such as the Broadway Viaduct Replacement, 20th Street HOV, Park Avenue Viaduct, and Coors Field. Lead Entity: The implementation matrix identi es a lead entity that the plan recommends for having primary responsibility for undertaking the implementation recommendation. The entities are recommendations only. Other public and private entities may have roles to initiate, undertake, or participate in these e orts. The RTD light rail program is an example of largescale public investment with long-term bene ts to the region.

PAGE 99

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Moving Forward 95 The implementation matrix identi es the recommended strategies, organized parallel with the plan itself: Framework strategies Transformative Concept strategies and Neighborhood strategies Each one is further de ned by type and timeframe. TIMINGTYPE POTENTIAL FUNDING LEADFRAMEWORK STRATEGIESNEIGHBORHOOD CONNECTIONS AND CHARACTER A.1 High intensity development near Downtown and transit stationsOn-goingPrivatePrivatePrivate A.2 Moderate intensity dev elopment transitioning to residential neighborhoods On-goingPrivatePrivatePrivate A.3 Low intensity development in residential neighborhoodsOn-goingPrivatePrivatePrivate A.4 Adaptive reuse and historic preservationOn-goingPrivatePrivatePrivateMOBILITY B.1 Undertake a Downtown Strategic Transportation P lan Travelshed AnalysisShort-MediumStudyCIP, DRCOGCity B.2 Evaluate Potential One-way to Two-way Conversions Larimer (east of Broadway)ShortPublic investmentCIPCity Larimer (west of Broadway)Medium-LongPublic investmentCIPCity 22nd (east of Champa)Medium-LongPublic investmentCIPCity Blake (east of Broadway)Short-MediumPublic investmentCIPCity Blake (west of Broadway)Medium-LongPublic investmentCIPCity Curtis (west of Broadway)LongPublic InvestmentCIPCity Welton (also see Welton Streetcar)Medium-LongPublic investmentCIP, FasTracksCity WalnutMedium-LongPublic investmentCIPCity California (between Broadway and Park Avenue)Short-MediumPublic investmentCIPCity Stout (east of Broadway)LongPublic investmentCIPCity Champa (east of Broadway)LongPublic investmentCIPCity B.3 Consider New or Modi ed Transit Routes Consolidate bus routesShort-MediumStudy/RegulatoryRTDRTD Establish transit service connecting Auraria West and 38th & BlakeMedium-LongStudy CIP, DRCOG, RTD, Auraria RTD B.4 Consider an Arapahoe Square Rail Station on WeltonMedium-LongPublic investmentRTD, CIP, TIFRTD B.5 Undertake a Broadway Intersections Improvement StudyShortStudyNext StepsCityECONOMIC AND DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITY C.1 Strengthen Retail CorridorsOn-goingPrivate/partnershipPrivatePrivate C.2 Promote Economic and Housing DiversityOn-goingPrivate/partnershipPrivatePrivate C.3 Encourage Housing DensityOn-goingPrivate/partnershipPrivatePrivate C.4 Establish and Support Business Development O cesShort-MediumPrivate/partnershipPrivate, OEDCity C.5 Establish Urban Renewal AreasShortPrivate/partnershipPrivate, TIFDURA C.6 Utilize OED Lending ProgramsOn-goingPartnershipPrivate, OED Private OEDLIVABILITY AND PUBLIC REALM D.1 Promote Access to Healthy TransportationOn-goingPrivatePrivatePrivate D.2 Promote Access to Healthy FoodsOn-goingPrivatePrivatePrivate D.3 Invest in Park ImprovementsOn-goingPublic investmentCIPCity D.4 Study Connecting Parks to Destination AreasShort-MediumStudyCIPCity D.5 Identify Funding for Stormwater Improvements and Promote Water Quality through Best Practices Medium-Long Public/private investment CIP, grants, district City

PAGE 100

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Moving Forward 96 The implementation matrix identi es the recommended strategies, organized parallel with the plan itself: Framework strategies Transformative Concept strategies and Neighborhood strategies Each one is further de ned by type and timeframe. TIMINGTYPE POTENTIAL FUNDING LEADTRANSFORMATIVE CONCEPT STRATEGIES21ST STREET Establish cross-section to accommodate bike boulevardShortStudyNext StepsCity Design and construct festival street adjacent to Coors FieldMediumPartnershipDistrict, CIP-Explore the use of sustainable BMPs on 21st StreetMedium Public/private investment CIP, grants, district City Improve appearance of surface parking lots Short-MediumPrivatePrivatePrivateCURTIS STREET Establish Curtis as a pedestrian connection between Curtis Park and Denver Performing Arts Center MediumPublic investment CIP, DDBID, district -Place visual element at terminus in Mestizo-Curtis ParkLongPrivatePrivatePrivate Redevelop Greyhound FacilitiesMediumPrivate/partnershipPrivatePrivate Improve pedestrian conditions with improved crossings and wider sidewalksMediumPrivate/partnership Private, district, CIP --BROADWAY Study the Broadway options between Arapahoe and WeltonMediumStudyCIPCity Explore opportunities to improve bike and pedestrian crossingsShortStudyNext StepsCityCONNECTING RIVER NORTH 31st Street ped/bike bridgeLongPublic investmentCIP, bondsCity 33rd Street multimodal bridgeLongPublic investmentCIP, bondsCity 36th Street ped/bike bridgeShort-MediumPublic investmentRTDRTDNEW PARK Establish new park spaceLongPublic investmentCIP, bondsCity Continue to improve and activate existing parksOn-goingPublic investmentCIPCitySOCIAL SERVICES Convene a working group to devise and forward homeless service strategiesShortStudy/Partnership--DRH Develop courtyard-style housing MediumPrivate/partnershipPrivate, TIFPrivate Develop a pilot single room occupancy housingMediumPrivate/partnershipPrivate, TIFPrivate Study options for repurposing the Broadway TrianglesMediumStudyCIP, districtCitySTREETCAR Open Central Corridor Extension with East Line and 38th/Blake StationShort-MediumPublic investmentRTDRTD Re-examine Central Corridor terminus, alignment, and vehicle typeShortStudyRTDRTD Develop streetcar system concept planMedium-LongStudyCity, RTDCityTRANSIT ORIENTED DEVELOPMENT Develop neighborhood-serving, main street development on Welton and Downing MediumPrivate/partnershipPrivatePrivate Anchor Central Corridor with TOD at 38th and Blake StationMediumPrivate/partnershipPrivatePrivate Anchor Central Corridor with TOD at New Arapahoe Square StationMedium-LongPrivate/partnershipPrivatePrivate

PAGE 101

Northeast Downtown Neighborhoods Plan Moving Forward 97 The implementation matrix identi es the recommended strategies, organized parallel with the plan itself: Framework strategies Transformative Concept strategies and Neighborhood strategies Each one is further de ned by type and timeframe. TIMINGTYPE POTENTIAL FUNDING LEADNEIGHBORHOOD STRATEGIESARAPAHOE SQUARE N.1 Encourage Development of Parking LotsShort-MediumPrivate Private, district Private N.2 Enhance Urban DesignOn-goingPrivatePrivatePrivate N.3 Building Form: height, siting, design elementsOn-goingPrivatePrivatePrivate N.4 Land useOn-goingPrivatePrivatePrivate N.5 Conduct Form-Based Zoning StudyShortRegulatory--City N.6 Promote Transit-Oriented DevelopmentLongPrivate/partnershipPrivatePrivate N.7 Reuse existing buildings On-goingPrivate/partnershipPrivatePrivate N.8 Establish Business Development O ceShortPartnershipOED, privateCity N.9 Improve Arapahoe Square's brandMediumPartnershipOED, private-N.10 Establish Urban Renewal AreaShortRegulatory--DURARIVER NORTH AND BALLPARK N.11 Building Form: height, siting, design elementsOn-goingPrivatePrivatePrivate N.12 Land UseOn-goingPrivatePrivatePrivate N.13 Complete Sidewalk NetworkOn-goingPrivate/partnershipPrivatePrivate N.14 Evaluate Potential One-way to Two-way ConversionsShort-LongPublic investmentCIPCity N.15 Consider Future of Coors Field Over ow ParkingLongPrivate/partnership Stadium District PrivateCURTIS PARK N.16 Building Form: height, siting, design elementsShortRegulatory--City N.17 Land UseOn-goingPrivatePrivatePrivate N.18 Stout and Champa Reclassi cationShortRegulatory--City N.19 Identify Tra c Calming OpportunitiesShortStudyCIPCity N.20 Accommodate Adaptive ReuseOn-goingPrivatePrivatePrivateDOWNING/WELTON CORRIDOR N.21 Building Form: height, siting, design elementsOn-goingPrivatePrivatePrivate N.22 Land UseOn-goingPrivatePrivatePrivate N.23 Support work of Five Points Business District O ceMediumPrivate/partnershipPartnershipCity N.24 Establish Urban Renewal AreaShortRegulatory--DURA N.25 Evaluate Short One-way Street SegmentsShortStudyCIPCity N.26 Orientation of Outdoor Active UsesOn-goingPrivatePrivatePrivateENTERPRISE HILL AND SAN RAFAEL N.27 Building Form: height, siting, design elementsOn-goingPrivatePrivatePrivate N.28 Land UseOn-goingPrivatePrivatePrivate