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Overland neighborhood plan

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Title:
Overland neighborhood plan
Creator:
Community Planning and Development, City and County of Denver
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
City and County of Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English

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Subjects / Keywords:
Community planning
Neighborhood plans
City planning
Spatial Coverage:
Denver -- Overland

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Full Text
OVERLAND
NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
PLANNING AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OFFICE
CITY AND COUNTY OF DENVER
APRIL 12, 1993


TABLE OF CONTENTS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 1
l. VISION FOR OVERLANDS FUTURE 3
H. INTRODUCTION 5
A. Location and Description 5
B. Planning Process 5
C. Organization of the Plan 6
D. Use of the Plan 6
m. HISTORY 7
IV. DEMOGRAPHIC AND SOCIO-ECONOMIC PROFILES 9
A. Population and Households 9
B. Employment and Income 9
V. LAND USE AND ZONING 11
A. General 11
B. Neighborhood Character 11
C. Residential Land Uses 12
1. Residential Subarea a 12
2. Residential Subarea B 12
3. Residential Subarea C 12
D. Industrial Land Uses 12
E. Commercial Land Uses 12
F. Vacant Land 12
G. Parks and Open Space 13
H. Action Recommendations 13
VI. TRAFFIC AND TRANSPORTATION 15
A. Streets and Highways 15
1. Existing Street Classifications and Traffic Volumes
2. Truck Traffic, Movement and Designated Trucks Routes
B. Mass Transit 15
C. Linkages/PedestrianRoutes/Hike-Bike Routes 16
D. Action Recommendations 17
VH. HOUSING 23
A. Existing Housing Stock 23
B. Action Recommendations 23


land
VDI. URBAN DESIGN 25
A. The Role of Urban Design 25
B. Landmarks 25
C. Views 26
D. Streetscaping 26
E. Edges 26
F. Pedestrian Bridges 26
G. Action Recommendations 27
IX. NEIGHBORHOOD FACILITIES AND NEIGHBORHOOD IMPROVEMENTS 29
A. Parks and Open Space 29
B. Storm and Sanitary Sewers 30
C. Police Protection and Crime 30
D. Fire Protection 30
E. Schools 30
F. Recreation Centers 30
G. Action Recommendation 30
X. Environment 35
A. Topography and Floor Plain 35
B. Residential Environment 35
C. Pollution 35
D. Energy and Resource Conservation 35
E. Action Recommendation * 36
XL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 39
A. Overview of Existing Conditions 39
B. Action Recommendations 41
XH IMPLEMENTATION 43
A. Means of Plan Implementation 43
B. Human Resources of Plan Implementation 43
C. Action Recommendations 44
Appendix "A" 45
A. Street and Alley Recommendations


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
Mayor of Denver
Honorable Wellington E. Webb
Denver Planning Board
Ruth Falkenberg, Chair
Philip Milstein
Marilee Utter
Debra M. Gallegos
Daniel R. Guimond
Marilyn Stokes
Gilbert F. McNeish
Jeanne Labuda
Rick Pederson
Thomas Foster
Bemie Jones
Overland Neighborhood Steering Committee
Thanks to the many residents and business people that took time from their families and homes to
attend a series of evening meetings. Special thanks to Councilman Dave Doering and his assistant
Judy Rocciano for their support throughout the process.
Denver Planning and Community Development Office
Jennifer Moulton, Director of Planning and Development
Bob Werner, Deputy Director of Planning and Development
Lupe Herrera, Neighborhood Planner and Report Author
Marie Upshaw, Urban Designer
Ken Barkema, Report Graphics
Karl Haberman, Report Graphics
Acknowledgement is also given to Frank Gray, former Director of Denver Planning and Community
Development Office and Billie Bramhall, former Deputy Director of the Denver Planning and
Community Development Office who made the preparation of this plan possible.
Bob Dorroh, Chief Design Engineer, Transportation Engineering, Terry Rosapep, Director
Transportation Planning, James Mackay, Transportation Planning, Nelson Ho, Transportation
Planning, Elliot Sulsky, Transportation Planning, Myra Hipp, Housing Pogram Manager, Jerry
Garcia, PFI Program Manager, Phil Plienis, Senior City Planner, Dave Becker, Senior City Planner,
Jody Adkins, Environmental Review, Wiliam A. Veikest, Director, Design and Construction
Management Division, Henry VanFleet, Design and Construction Managemment Division
Bob Damerau, Landmark Preservation Commission, Neil Sperandeo, Director of Long Range
Planning, P & R
Jason Bardales
Margaret Bullock
Janet Diedrichs
Hazel M. Goumo
Bob Bergmire
Robert Butlox
Dawn Dutton
Agnes Hester
Moray Bowlig
Helene Coontz
Mary Lou Faberty
Pete Homan
Rose McKinney
Terry Rady
Clyde Schroeder
Irma Zimmerman
Shannon Jones
Oda Ostberg
Catherine Sandy
Hugh Shields
Marilyn J. Lesser
Elinor Pitts
Chuck Schissler
JackTroxell
1


YALE AVE.
k


I.
OVERLAND VISION STATEMENT
\&**d
The name Overland suggests a closeness to the land which is exemplified by the neighborhoods country
atmosphere in the middle of a busy city. The South Platte River is a prominent and daily reminder to the
neighborhood of this quiet, pastoral scene. Access to the river is available via bike paths and pedestrian
walkways through the expansive tree-lined green belt. Improvement of the physical environment has
created a reduction of noise pollution, visual pollution and air pollution.
The stable residential area has related well to the business community so a sense of harmony and unity is
present. South Broadway has been reclaimed as a bustling business area. Traffic has been separated from
the residential neighborhood which is well lit, and pedestrian friendly.
The City has helped to establish neighborhood facilities and services; (ie...senior center, walk-in schools,
churches, and mass transit). One sees a revitalized, clean, industrial area. All of this is highlighted by
concerned, hardworking people. It is a neighborhood that knows its history and appreciates it.
The neighborhood association underscores and provides a foundation for cooperating, caring, stable and
supportive neighborliness. This diversity and homogeneous nature is celebrated in annual fairs and
gatherings.
3


n. INTRODUCTION
A. Location and Description
The Overland Neighborhood is located on the southern boundary of Denver. It is influenced by several
major thoroughfares. The neighborhood is bounded on the north by Mississippi, on the south by Yale, on
the west by the South Platte River, and on the east by South Broadway. Overland is approximately 724
acres in size.
Existing residential land uses are located in three small enclaves separated by Evans and Santa Fe Drive
and surrounded by either industrial, business or park uses. Each enclave has its own identity within the
Overland neighborhood. The neighborhood is identified by the Overland Golf Course located on the
northwest side. Overland has about 155 acres of developed park land in addition to a 2 1/2 mile greenway
stretch along the South Platte River. Neighborhood retail uses have been maintained on Broadway. The
largest land use for the neighborhood is the industrial area. Industrial uses are located on the northeast side
of the neighborhood and along the railroad tracks to the southern boundary.
B. Planning Process
Early in 1991, residents and board members of the Overland Neighborhood Association asked Councilman
Dave Doering for assistance in preparing a neighborhood plan. The request came because of concerns
about transportation, zoning and the quality of life in the neighborhood.
A large community meeting was held in July 1991 at which time a Neighborhood Steering Committee of
Overland residents and business people was organized. City Councilman Dave Doering and Planning and
Community Development staff provided technical assistance to develop the plan. Input was solicited,
received and prioritized as to what the planning effort should address. The steering committee met with
Planning and Community Development staff and determined the time frame for the plan process, which
was structured from the beginning to expedite its work. The Steering Committee focused on five
neighborhood issues identified at the meeting: 1) Traffic and Transportation; 2) Neighborhood Facilities;
3) Neighborhood Environment; 4) Housing; and 5) Parks and Recreation.
Youth/Gangs, Land Use/Zoning, and Economic Development were other identified issues and they are
also addressed in the plan. The Steering Committee sponsored a second general meeting with the
neighborhood in January 1992. The meeting purpose was to discuss their findings and recommendations
at mid-point through the planning process.
A special effort to gather input from the industrial and commercial area businesses was initiated during the
month of March 1992. Since half of the land use in the Overland Neighborhood is industrial and
commercial it was concluded that their input was essential for the development of the Plan. The Steering
Committee formed a special task force. The task force interviewed approximately 30 area businesses. The
Commercial/Industrial area business concerns have been incorporated into the Overland Neighborhood
Plan.
5



C. Organization of the Plan
The Overland Neighborhood Plan begins with a Vision Statement developed by residents concerned for
the future of their community. This is followed by a brief histoiy of the neighborhood and a demographic
and socio-economic profile of its people. The body of the plan then covers both the focus areas and the
remaining sections. A brief overview and analysis of existing conditions for each focus area is followed
by the issues and action recommendations to address those issues.
D. Use of the Plan
The plan serves an an official city guide to the physical development and improvement of the
neighborhood. A city-approved plan serves as a guide for making decisions about the neighborhood. It is
the responsibility of the neighborhood organization(s) and assigned city staff to prioritize
recommendations as time, energy and resources allow. The plan becomes an official amendment to the
Citys Comprehensive Plan. City departments use the plan to guide recommendations and decisions based
on consensus prioritization between appropriate City departments and the neighborhood organization(s).
This plan is not an official zone map nor does it imply or deny any implicit rights to a particular zone.
Zone changes that may be proposed by property owners as part of any plan must be initiated under a
separate procedure established by the City and County of Denver Municipal Code.
This plan is intended to promote patterns of desired neighborhood improvements, urban design, housing,
business types, traffic and public services which encourage and contribute to the economic, social, and
physical health, safety and welfare of the people who live and work in Overland.
6


in. HISTORY
land
Overland is rich in history*. Denvers first white settlement was organized in a 12 square block area of the
present Overland Neighborhood. The settlement was called Montana City in 1857. The area was bounded
by West Evans Avenue on the north, West Iliff on the south, the South Platte River on the west and the
Santa Fe Railroad tracks on the east. It is now commemorated by Frontier Park on South Fox Street. The
site was abandoned and the people moved to Auraria in 1859 on the bank of the mouth of Cherry Creek
which became Denver a year later. In 1859, Rufus H. (Potato) Clark homesteaded the area that is now
known as the Overland Golf Course (approximately 160 acres in total). He operated a "Potato" farm from
1863 through 1873. Just south of his farm was Jim Beckworths farm. In 1883, the promoters of Denver
Circle Railroad bought the land and built a race track. They changed the name to Jewell Park after
Ex-Governor Charles A. Jewell of Connecticut, a stockholder in the railroad and park.
James A. Fleming was instrumental in organizing the town of South Denver in 1886 which was bounded
by West Alameda Avenue on the north (then the Denver southern boundary), Jewell Avenue on the south,
South Platte River on the west, and South Colorado Blvd. on the east. This entire area was annexed to
Denver eight years later in 1894.
In 1887, the park was sold to a group of Denver men looking for a site for their country club. The park
was so far out in the country that they named the park, Overland Park. It was Henry Wolcott who
eventually bought up all shares of the holding corporation. Wolcotts claim to fame was his introduction
of the game of golf to Denver. In 1896 Wolcott developed a nine-hole course circling the Overland Park
Race Track. Wolcott also rented the tracks, the links, and the clubhouse to organizations (ie... the
Overland Park Racing Association, Overland Park Riding and Driving Club, and the Overland Park Club).
In 1901 the Overland Country Club was incorporated into the Denver Country Club. The Denver Country
Club did not renew its lease at Overland Park at the end of 1902. Instead, The Denver Country Club
bought land along Cherry Creek, at their present site above Downing Street In 1919, the City and County
of Denver started to buy land for a park. It rented the race track and made a camp for motorists. In 1930,
Denver opened a nine-hole Overland Golf Course and expanded it to eighteen holes in 1957.
*Denver in Slices by Louisa Ward Aips provided much of the historical information. Special thanks to
Albert W. Scarffe, the Denver Public Library, Western History Department and the Colorado Historic
Society for assistance on the historical information.
7




IV. DEMOGRAPHIC AND
SOCIO-ECONOMIC PROFILE
A. Population and Housing Units
Population trends between 1950 and 1990 in Overland show a 49.8% loss in population. The largest loss
occurred between 1970 and 1980 when approximately 1190 people moved due to expansion of Santa Fe
Drive by the Colorado Department of Transportation, as well as the expansion of business and industrial
uses. There was a 33.2% loss in housing units between 1970 and 1990. Overlands 1990 housing units
totaled 931 housing units, a loss of 462 units from 1970.
Population Housing Units
B. Employment and Income
Employment is a socio-economic indicator which provides an understanding of an areas ability to sustain
itself. Overland provides employment related to commercial or industrial uses. Retail is located along the
Broadway business corridor. Wholesale, manufacturing and warehouse businesses are located along the
railroad, which cuts diagonally through the neighborhood. The northeast portion of the neighborhood is
predominantly industrial and commercial development with single-family enclaves scattered in three areas.
The neighborhoods median household income and personal income is a common measure of its relative
economic condition. A comparison of 1979 and 1989 median household incomes adjusted for inflation
(made by the Denver Planning and Community Development Office) shows a loss of median household
income for the neighborhood, but less of a loss than for the city as a whole. In 1979 the median household
income was $20,548 and in 1989 that amount dropped to $20,202. This was a 1.7% drop for the
neighborhood; the city dropped 3.4% during this same period. Table 1 below compares the changes that
occurred between 1979 and 1989:
Overland
City of Denver
Table 1: Median household income (in 1989 dollars).
1979 1989 % Change 1979-1989
$20,548 $20,202 -1.7%
$25,988 $25,106 -3.4%
The median household income estimates for the Overland Neighborhood are substantially below the
citywide figure of $25,106.
9



Overlands 1990 per capita income was estimated to be $10,498 compared to the city wide estimate of
$15,590.
Table 2: Employment in the Overland Neighborhood by Industry, 1983 and 1988:
1983 1988
Industry Jobs % of total Jobs % of total
Agriculture 2 0.1 20 0.6
Mining 0 0.0 6 0.2
Construction 558 24.4 394 11.3
Transportation 183 8.0 81 2.3
Manufacturing 639 28.0 960 27.5
Wholesaling 206 9.0 505 14.5
Retailing 84 3.7 703 20.1
Finance, Real 28 1.2 88 2.5
Estate, Ins. 84 3.7 703 20.1
Finance, Real Estate, Ins. 28 1.2 88 2.5
Services 473 20.7 632 18.1
Government 15 0.6 10 0.2
Other* 105 4.6 98 2.8
Total 2283 100.0 3492 100.0
Source: Denver Regional Council of Government
*Includes self-employed, unpaid family and domestic workers.
Percentages may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
This table reveals that between 1983 and 1988 there were increases in wholesaling and retailing jobs while
declines occurred in the construction and transportation jobs.
10


V.
LAND USE AND ZONING

A. General
The neighborhood includes a mixture of industrial, commercial, park and residential land uses. The
largest land use category is industrial. The second largest is parks and recreation. Located on the western
edge of the neighborhood are the Overland Golf Course, Frontier Park and the Platte River Greenway.
Between 1970 and 1990, the number of dwelling units dropped 33% and vacant land increased. EMWs
Carpet and Warehouse expansion at the southwest comer of Evans and Broadway is the most recent zone
change to occur in the neighborhood.
The EMW Planned Unit Development
(PUD) encompasses a total project area
of 3.45 acres. This expansion does not
cross streets, but is contained within
one block, one-half of which was
formerly residential. While this might
be considered an encroachment of
business into residential areas in the
strictest sense, the impact is mitigated
by the proposed landscape buffer and
screen on the western boundary.
B. Neighborhood Character *
The Platte River Greenway runs the entire length of the neighborhoods western boundary and contributes
significantly to its character, uniqueness and potential. The natural character of this river corridor is a
major asset to the neighborhood as well as the city in general. The corridor contains a major city-wide
water fowl area and walking, running and cycling opportunities are present on the bike path. It provides a
wildlife experience and observation opportunity and has the potential for educational uses as well.
The neighborhood is divided into five major components:
* Open space and parks include the Overland Golf Course, Overland Lake, Frontier Park, Pasquinels
Landing and the Platte River Greenway.
* Railroad and Transportation Corridor of South
* Santa Fe/Evans overpass and interchange.
* South Broadway Business Corridor
* Industrial Area
* Residential Area
Parks and open space are a major asset of the neighborhood and give it a distinctive character. The Platte
River Greenway with its natural character and water fowl habitat gives the open space its special quality.
One important goal is to expand the Platte River Greenway in its natural state.
11



C. Residential Land Uses
The single-family residential areas zoned R-l & R-2 allow single-family residences and duplexes and abut
0-1,1-0,1-1,1-2, B-4, B-2 and PUD zones. Residential land uses in Overland make up approximately
19% of the land use in the neighborhood. Residents generally take pride in the upkeep of their homes in
the residential areas. Single-family enclaves are scattered in three areas. For this study these three
sub-areas are described individually. Refer to the map at the end of the Urban Design chapter for a
graphic illustration.
Residential Subgroup "A"
Area "A" is located south of the Overland Golf Course in an R-l zone. The Golf Course, Santa Fe
Drive and Evans Avenue isolate this 6 1/2 square block area of single-family residences from the rest of
the neighborhood.
Residential Subgroup "B"
Boundaries for Area "B" are Evans Avenue to the north, Santa Fe Drive to the east, South Platte River
Drive to the west, and the city limits on the south. The separation between area "A" and "B" causes
some difficulty in maintaining a connection between both sub-group areas. The only pedestrian access
from Area "A" to Area "B" is through an underpass provided by the Evans Bridge or the South Platte
River Greenway. Area "B" is also zoned R-l with primarily single-family residences. There are 207
residential properties located in areas "A" and "B" combined.
Residential Subgroup C "
Area "C" is located on the east side of Santa Fe Drive and borders Englewoods northern boundary on
the south, the Broadway business district borders on the east, and industrial land uses on the north. The
residential use in Area "C" has developed at a lower than R-2 density. North of Evans Avenue is a
small pocket of single-family units surrounded by industrial uses. Area "C" has 423 residential
properties, 90% of which are single-family residences.
D. Industrial Land Uses
Industrial land uses comprise 42% of the total land area. There are 226 acres zoned for industrial uses,
located diagonally north to south along the railroad. The bulk of the industrial uses are concentrated in die
northeast half of the neighborhood.
E. Commercial (Retail) Land Uses
Commercial (retail) land uses are located along Broadway and the northern portion of South Santa Fe
Drive within the Overland boundaries. Commercial land uses make up 8% of the total land area.
F. Vacant Land
There are 16 acres (2%) of vacant land scattered throughout the neighborhood. The majority is located in
the industrial/ commercial zone areas.
12



G. Parks and Open Space
Open space and parks are a major contributor to the quality of the neighborhood. Thirty percent (30%) of
the land area is dedicated to parks and open space. A total of 163 acres are zoned for park and open space
uses. The Overland Golf Course is a large open space serving the neighborhood and the city. It is
considered a landmark for the neighborhood and the district.
H. Land Use and Zoning Action Recommendations
Action Recommendation
LZ-1 Encourage property owners in
residential areas to invest time and
necessary resources on the beautification
of their neighborhood.
LZ-2 Encourage commercial and
industrial businesses to invest in
beauti-fication programs for their own
businesses and also invest in
neighborhood clean-up programs.
LZ-3 Develop the remaining vacant land
in a maimer that is compatible with the
land use character and density of
surrounding land uses and existing
zoning.
LZ-4 Enforce the placement of
landscaping and buffers where industrial
development abuts residentially zoned
properties as required by the revised
industrial zoning regulations (Ordinance
#22,1991)
Implementing Groups
Neighborhood Organization
Zoning Administration
Neighborhood Support Services
Keep Denver Beautiful
Denver Department of Health and Hospitals (Animal
Control)
Office of Citizen Response
City Councilperson
Mayors Office of Economic Development
Denver Planning and Community Development
Keep Denver Beautiful
Public & Private Developers
Planning and Community Development Office
Zoning Administration
Planning and Community Development Office
Zoning Administration
13


Mississippi Ava.
EXISTING ZONING
R-1
Single-Unit Detached Dwellings, Low
Density. Density =7.3 dwelling units/acre.
R-2
Multi-Unit Dwellings, Low Density
Densitv=14.5 dwelling units/acre.
B-4
Gener Business District. This district is
intended to provide for and encourage
appropriate commercial uses adjacent to
arterial streets, which are normally transit
routes, and abutting residential districts.
Building floor area cannot exceed twice
the site area.
I-O
Light Industrial District. A transitional
district between intensive Industrial and
residential districts. Allows limited
manufacturing, wholesale and retail
activities, offices and motels.
1-1
General Industrial District. Allows many
manufacturing, warehousing and
wholesaling activities, along with limited
retail and service uses for the benefit of
area employees. Building floor area
cannot exceed 2 times the site area.
I-2
Heavy Industrial District. Allows all
manufacturing, warehousing, wholesaling
and mineral extraction activities. Limited
retail and service uses for the benefit of
area employees are permitted.
0-1
Open Use District, allows airports,
recreational uses, parks, cemeteries,
reservoirs, community correctional
facilities and other public and semi-public
uses housed in buildings.
PUD
Planned Unit Development. PUD is a
form of development generally
characterized by a unified site design for
clustering buildings and providing
common open-space, density increases,
and a mix of building types and land uses.
It allows maximum flexibility during the
planning stage and maximum assurance
that exactly what is proposed will be
developed.
e
14


VI. TRAFFIC AND TRANSPORTATION

Traffic and Transportation was selected as the number one focus issue by the Steering Committee. In its
recent history, the Overland Neighborhood has had to accommodate through traffic flow with the
widening of Santa Fe Drive, the widening of the Broadway and Evans Avenue intersection and the new
construction of the Evans/Santa Fe Drive overpass. Transportation modes consist of streets and highways,
bus service, hike-bike trails, and railroads. This section will identify the issues and provide
recommendations.
A. Streets and Highways
The City and County of Denver defines four categories of streets for the purpose of describing and
planning streets and highways. The criteria used for classification includes function, access, width,
volume of traffic and signalization.
Freeways have the function of permitting traffic to flow rapidly and unimpeded through and around the
metropolitan area (i.e... Interstate 25). Freeways typically carry over 100,000 vehicles per day. There are
no freeways in Overland.
Arterials have the function of permitting rapid and relatively unimpeded traffic movement through the
city and serving as a primary link between communities and major land use elements. Some arterials, such
as Evans Avenue and Santa Fe Drive (U.S. 85), are also state highways. Arterials typically carry up to
50.000 vehicles per day (i.e...Santa Fe Drive, Evans Avenue, Broadway, Yale Avenue, and Mississippi
Avenue).
Collector streets have the function of collecting and distributing traffic having an origin or destination
between arterial and local streets within the community, and linking neighborhood residential areas, local
and community shopping and service facilities, and employment areas. Collectors typically carry up to
15.000 vehicles per day (i.e...South Platte River Drive).
Local streets have the function of providing direct access to adjacent properties. They carry low volumes
of traffic (less than 5000 vehicles per day) with an origin or destination within the neighborhood (see map
at the end of the chapter for local street identification).
2. Truck Traffic, Movement and Designated Truck Routes
The only official designated truck routes are for hazardous material. Santa Fe Drive, Broadway and Evans
are so designated. The plan recommends that truck traffic from Broadway either turn on Evans or use
Yale Avenue to get to the businesses on Delaware. In the past, Iliff Avenue has been used as a truck route
by the industrial area businesses along Delaware. The truck route preferred by the residents in this
immediate area is Yale Avenue.
B. Mass Transit
Overland is served by several Regional Transportation District Routes. Routes 0, 11, 14, 19, 21, and 27
provide for southbound and northbound movement along Broadway. Routes 11 and 14 provide east/west
movement on Mississippi and routes 19 and 21 provide east/west movement on Evans Avenue. Route 27
15


la*k
goes eastbound on Yale Avenue. Routes 14, 19 and 27 are operated by private carriers. (Refer to map at
the end of chapter).
Light rail is Denvers modem version of yesteryear streetcars. The Metro areas first light rail project will
be the Metro Area Connection (MAC) which will extend from just south of Broadway/I-25 through
downtown to the Five Points Neighborhood. The Overland Neighborhood will be connected to MAC by
the proposed Southwest Corridor. The Southwest Corridor has been determined by the RTD and DRCOG
Boards to be the regions designated priority corridor after the MAC. First steps to obtain federal funding
are underway. A "transit envelope" has already been reserved along Santa Fe Drive in the Southwest
Corridor leading to its designation as the regions next priority corridor.
The neighborhood encourages noise buffering through landscaping and fencing between the railroad
right-of-way and the adjacent businesses and residents.
C. Linkages/Pedestrian Routes/Hike-Bike Routes
Linkages for pedestrians and bicyclists are a challenge in the development of this plan. In reviewing the
need to gain pedestrian access from the residential sub-area "C" across the Santa Fe Drive corridor to the
Platte River Greenway, the neighborhood is confronted with traffic obstacles. The Evans Avenue
overpass provides the only pedestrian access between the east and west side of the neighborhood, yet it
does not provide safe pedestrian access. During the winter months scheduled maintenance is needed; the
narrow walkway is covered with snow, making it difficult for elderly and young children to cross.
Methods need to be explored to make the Evans overpass more pedestrian friendly. Recommendation T-6
suggests a possible solution to the immediate problem.
There are two existing hike-bike trails in the neighborhood. The first one is located along the South Platte
River Greenway and provides access to Downtown Denver and Littleton. The other trail is located
north/south along Cherokee Street and then east on Iliff Avenue towards the Rosedale neighborhood and
the University of Denver.
A new bike/pedestrian bridge and off-street bikeway is being designed along Florida Avenue to provide an
extension of Sanderson Gulch Trail as part of the Ruby Hill/Washington Park Bond Project The
Mississippi Avenue bridge over the Platte River is currently being rebuilt to better accommodate bicyclists
and pedestrians.
Residents, pedestrians and cyclists will find a pleasant route to the east across Broadway along this
designated bicycle route. The stoplight at Iliff makes this a safer route. Three blocks east on Diff is the
connection to Harvard Gulch Park.
16



D. Traffic And Transportation Action Recommendations
Action Recommendations
T-l Study the possibility of improving
the safety of pedestrians crossing the
street at two locations: 1) Harvard
Avenue and Bannock Street and 2)
Warren Avenue and Bannock Street.
T-2 Study the possibility of converting
Asbury Avenue into a truck route
between Broadway and Delaware Street.
Traffic controls should be modified on
this section of Asbury Avenue to
encourage the smooth flow of truck
traffic along the street.
T-3 Enforce the existing speed limits on
Evans Avenue.
T-4 Study methods of improving
vehicular access out of and into the
neighborhood at the intersection of
Bannock and Evans. Also address
methods to improve pedestrian crossing
at Evans and Bannock. (Improved traffic
control could include installation of a
traffic signal.)
T-5 Propose wording change of traffic
sign at Broadway and Biff Avenue to:
"No turn on red when pedestrian and
children present."
T-6 Enhance the pedestrian connection
between the east side and the west side
of the neighborhood. Explore ways to
provide a safe and attractive pedestrian
connection along Evans Avenue across
Santa Fe Drive.
Implementing Group
Dept, of Public Works, Traffic Engineering
Dept, of Public Works, Traffic Engineering
Dept, of Public Works, Transportation Engineering
Dept, of Public Works Transportation Planning and
Traffic Engineering
Dept, of Public Works Transportation Planning and
Traffic Engineering
Colorado Department of Transportation
Denver Police Department
17



Maintenance Issues:
T-7 Request that street cleaners throw
salt and sand on sidewalks during winter
storm periods along the Evans viaduct
and Mississippi bridge and/or clean
snow from walkways in order to make
the overpass safer for pedestrians.
Regional Transportation District
Issues:
T-8 Explore the possibility of relocating
the bus stop on the NW comer of
Broadway and Evans Avenue to the NE
comer of Acoma Street and Evans
Avenue.
T-9 Explore the possibility of acquiring
the "Bundys" property for a major bus
transfer facility & Evans Avenue
expansion.
T-10 Support light rail in the southwest
corridor and promote neighborhood
access to it.
Railroad Traffic Issues:
T-l 1 To buffer sound on the east side of
the railroad tracks, request that a fence
be placed between the railroads and the
residential area.
T-l2 Request crossing gates at railroad
tracks underneath Evans Avenue and
west side of Delaware Street.
Street and Alley Closures:
T-l3 Study the possibility of closing
South Platte River Drive along Frontier
Park and moving the traffic over to the
west side of the river.
Dept, of Public Works, Street Maintenance Division
Dept, of Public Works, Transportation Planning and
Traffic Engineering,
Regional Transportation District
Regional Transportation District
Dept, of Public Works,
Transportation Planning and Traffic Engineering
Neighborhood Organization
Regional Transportation District
Neighborhood Organization
Railroad Companies
Dept, of Public Works
Neighborhood Organization
Railroad Companies
Dept of Public Works, Transportation Planning, Traffic
Engineering,
Parks and Recreation,
Planning and Community Development and
Neighborhood Organization
18


Truck Routes:
T-14 Review the need to limit track
access south of Evans Avenue. Post and
enforce the track route for the
neighborhood going from Broadway to
Yale Avenue to Delaware Street.
Parking:
T-15 Study the possi- bility of limited
1-2 hour parking on Acoma Street and
Delaware Street between the residences
and businesses.
Bike Paths:
T-16 Study the possi-bility of adding
off-street and/ or on-street bike access
from Acoma Street onto Iowa Avenue
over to the Overland Golf Course and
the Platte River bike-hike path.
Denver Police Department,
Dept, of Public Works, Traffic Engineering
Dept, of Public Works
Neighborhood Organization
Parking Management
Neighborhood Organization
Dept, of Public Works
Bicycle Advisory Committee
19


STREET
CLASSIFICATIONS
ARTERIAL
COLLECTOR
LoiMm Av*.
Colorado Ava.
20
0
nj-rj
o >O0'3OO' 400* *00'


nru
21


RUBY I
BIKE ROUTES
EXISTING/PROPOS ED
TRUCK ROUTES
HAZARDOUS MATERIALS
EXISTING/PROPOSED
RTD BUS ROUTES
0 SOUTH BROADWAY
11 EAST MISSISSIPPI
WEST FLORIDA
WEST JEWELL
EAST EVANS
YALE CROSSTOWN
14*
19*
21
27*
LIGHT RAIL (proposed)
SOUTHWEST CORRIDOR
o
PROPOSED TRANSIT
ACCESS POINT
* OPERATED BY
PRIVATE CARRIERS
u 27
22


VII. HOUSING

Overlands housing stock decreased by 33.2% from 1970 to 1990. A positive side to neighborhood
improvement can be seen in the increasing ratio of owner-occupied units to renter-occuplied units as
shown below:
A. Existing Housing Stock
Over 50% of the existing housing structures were
constructed before 1940. The average age of the
housing stock is 60 years. Overlands housing
stock is predominantly single-family,
owner-occupied, modestly valued, and in good
condition.
Owner Occupied
Renter Occupied
B. Housing Action Recommendations
Action Recommendations
H-l Continue to secure housipg
rehabilitation and improvement
assistance loans (e.g. Single Family
Rehabilitation, Rental Rehab,
Emergency Home Repair, Caretakers,
etc.) for owner and renter occupied
housing units where needed.
H-2 Address the vacant housing and
structurally unsafe housing problems
through enforcement of the abandoned
and vacant housing ordinance, the
zoning ordinance, and other available
means.
Implementing groups
Neighborhood Organization
Denver Urban Renewal Authority
Planning and Community Development Office
Neighborhood Organization
Building Department
City Attorney
Dept, of Public Works,
Neighborhood Support Services Division and Zoning
Administration
H-3 Encourage maintenance and upkeep
of exterior grounds in the residential area
of the neighborhood.
H-4 Study the feasibility of relocating
homes scheduled for demolition from
business and industrial zones to vacant
lots in the Overland Neighborhood.
Dept, of Public Works, Neighborhood Support Services
and Zoning Administration
Planning and Community Development Office
Denver Urban Renewal Authority
Neighborhood Organizations
Private Industry
H-5 Encourage home ownership by Planning and Community Development Office and
providing information on the availability Neighborhood Organization
of financing to renters of single family
homes.
23




VIII. URBAN DESIGN
land
A. The Role of Urban Design
Urban design is how a city or neighborhood is put together, how it looks, feels and functions. It involves
deliberate actions to create a physical environment that meets social, economic, functional, environmental
and aesthetic objectives. It can create a neighborhoods awareness of its unique and important role within
the city. Where urban design has occurred, the citizens continually value the result, sometimes not exactly
knowing why they like an area or why the area holds attraction.
Good urban design preserves the qualities of a neighborhood by considering changes and structuring them
so that they enhance these qualities rather than detract from them. It develops a clear neighborhood
character that people can recognize, understand, be proud of and remember.
Urban designs framework considers the physical structure of neighborhood elements (ie...streets,
pathways, spaces, views, buildings, focal points, and landmarks).
B. Landmarks
The Overland Golf Course is a major landmark and recreational resource in the neighborhood. It is
clearly visible from many areas of the neighborhood as well as the South Santa Fe transportation corridor.
The John Collins United Methodist Church, located at the southeast comer of Iliff and Bannock, is the
most significant building considered to be a landmark. The property was donated to the church by United
States Senator Wolcott of Colorado. The main sanctuary was constructed in 1900 at a cost of $6,000.00.
This well-maintained church is of appropriate scale to the single-family neighborhood and makes a strong,
simple and finely detailed architectural statement. The stone bell tower topped with a white wooden belfry
completes an architectural composition which says this is a community and spiritual gathering place. The
interior sanctuary space is nearly square in plan and graciously tall, capped by the gabled roof forms. This
elegant worship space has the feeling of a large chapel and is the reason many couples even from outside
the neighborhood have chosen to celebrate their marriage vows there.
25



C. Views
The neighborhood has three important views. All of them are views located within the neighborhood
looking through it to the downtown skyline. These views serve as orientation reference points and connect
the neighborhood within a citywide context.
The view at the South Platte River and West Jewell Avenue looking north along the Platte is the most
significant view. The reflection of the downtown skyline in the waters of the river make this a powerful
experience. Locating a pedestrian bridge at this site will make the view an even more dramatic experience.
The bridge needs to be wide enough to accommodate pedestrians, cyclists and viewers.
Views looking north on Bannock and north on Acoma between Wesley and Warren reveal the downtown
skyline.
D. Streetscaping
The residential area provides the best opportunity for streetscaping other than the South Broadway
business corridor. Residential sub-area "C" has the best potential in making an immediate visual impact.
There are tree lawns throughout this area which can sustain healthy tree growth, yet many tree lawns have
few or no trees. The street quality improves where there are rows of mature trees and this is apparent
within the neighborhood. (For a visual reference of the area refer to Overland Issues, Opportunities and
Recommendations Map at the end of this chapter).
E. Edges
An opportunity exists along the greenway to unify dissimilar edges and uses such as industrial, retail and
open parking lots. Utilizing street trees and other streetscaping to screen parking lots and industrial uses is
one idea for building continuity along the edge.
Attention should be given to the edge between the commercial retail on Broadway and adjacent residential
area. There is an opportunity for streetscaping, primarily trees and parking lot screening to buffer, the
dissimilar land uses.
F. Pedestrian Bridges
The three pedestrian bridges proposed for crossing the South Platte River will provide increased mobility
across the river. The bridges will allow both people from within and outside the neighborhood to have
access to both sides of the river. This arrangement will provide for a variety of "look" walks along the
river and increase the opportunity to experience the river. The bridge at Jewell Avenue will give residents
comfortable access to active recreational uses within Ruby Hill Park. The bridge at Harvard Gulch Park is
located at the southwestern tip of the neighborhood. This bridge will provide access west through the
pleasant linear Harvard Gulch Park all the way to Federal Boulevard.
26


G. Urban Design Action Recommendations
Action Recommendations
Implementing Groups
UD-1 Implement street tree planting
programs in commercial areas (ie...
Broadway Business District and
residential sub-areas "A" through "C")
UD-2 Maintain and enhance the views
within the river corridor, the strongest
view is looking north over the river
toward downtown where West Jewell
Avenue ends by the river edge. Build a
pedestrian/bike bridge at Jewell Avenue
over the South Platte River.
UD-3 Create an entry/welcoming area to
the Greenway and Overland Golf Course
Park. Develop adequate parking and
acquire land as required to create an
entry to this area.
UD-4 Maintain, improve and create
buffering of the South Santa Fe
transportation corridor. (ie.. noise
mitigation with walls and related
landscape design).
UD-5 Develop a linear park-like
environment on the residential side of
the sound wall within state-owned land
(housing sub-areas A & B). This park
should explore low maintenance
xeriscape landscaping to reduce
maintenance demands. Landscaping
should include large trees because they
contribute significantly to buffering
noise and air pollution.
Denver Planning and Community Development Office
Department of Parks and Recreation
Neighborhood Organization
Department of Public Works
Department of Parks and Recreation
Denver Planning and Community Development Office
Department of Parks and Recreation
Greenway Foundation
Department of Public Works
Denver Planning and Community Development Office
Department of Public Works, Traffic and Transportation
Railroad Companies
Colorado Department of Transportation
Denver Planning and Community Development Office
Neighborhood Organization
Department of Parks and Recreation
27



UD-6 Initiate a corridor study along
Broadway which will identify and define
sub-districts, address land use and
zoning problems, marketing, urban
design and transportation. The urban
design component should establish a
thematic character with a
complementary package of streetscape
elements. Include a coordinated signage
program and guidelines for business
improvements, modifications and
developments.
UD-7 Park features such as the Overland
Pond Park are encouraged along the full
length of the river corridor. Other
examples include, but are not limited to,
an educational walk, handicap accessible
fishing dock and ecological zones.
UD-8 Develop three pedestrian bridges
along the South Plate River at Florida
Avenue, Jewell Avenue, and across from
Harvard Gulch Park.
Denver Planning and Community Development Office
Mayors Office of Economic Development
Department of Public Works
Planning and Development
Greenway Foundation
Department of Parks and Recreation
Planning and Development
Greenway Foundation
Department of Parks and Recreation
28


IX. NEIGHBORHOOD FACILITIES AND
NEIGHBORHOOD IMPROVEMENTS
A. Parks and Open Space
Overlands history begins with parks and open space areas. Located in Overland are the Overland Pond
Educational Park and Golf Course, Overland Lake (leased for commercial use), Frontier Park, Pasquinels
Landing and a 2 1/2 mile stretch of the Platte River Greenway.
Overland Pond Educational Park and Golf Course
The Overland Pond Educational Park is one of two Denver parks that feature natural wild grasses in
addition to Kentucky blue grass and has been designed to feature the trees, shrubs, flowers and grasses of
five of Colorados ecological zones. A wheelchair-accessible nature trail winds its way through the park,
accenting several signs describing the "various planting areas. A fishing area doubling as a small outdoor
classroom borders the pond in the center of the park. The Overland Golf Course was initially privately
developed as a race track and later developed into a golf course. In 1930, Denver opened a nine-hole golf
course; the course was expanded to eighteen holes in 1957. Overland Golf Course consists of 134 Acres
of park developed land. Overland Lake, located north of the golf course on Florida Avenue and Platte
River, is leased as a commercial use.
Frontier Park
Located on both sides of the Platte River and connected by a wooden pedestrian bridge, this historic park
features a mining shack and other related equipment that are replicas of such facilities used during
Colorados gold rush era.
Pasquinels Landing
Named for the character in James Micheners best-seller Centennial, this park features a playground
structure that serves the neighborhood as well as the Greenway, and ties into the south end of Overland
Golf Course.
Ruby Hill Park
Ruby Hill Park is a favorite picnic spot which provides swimming facilities for adults and children during
the summer. Although this park is not located in the Overland neighborhood, it warrants mentioning
because of its proximity to the neighborhood and the proposed recommendation to install a pedestrian
bridge over the South Platte River between Overland Park Golf Course and Ruby Hill.
South Platte River Greenway
The Platte River is the most significant natural amenity for the Overland Neighborhood; it provides access
to the Greenway and 17 other park amenities where people can bicycle, jog, picnic, walk, fish, boat,
rollerskate, commute or just look at the beautiful downtown skyline.
29


w
B. Storm and Sanitary Sewers
Storm sewers are a problem during the winter months wherever streets and alleys are unpaved. The
Wastewater Management Division of the Department of Public Works installed a storm drainage system in
1989 that appears to work as long as the water flows from streets and alleys. The Department recognizes
the need to clean the storm drainage inlets when conditions warrant. The sanitary sewer system is in good
condition.
C. Police Protection and Crime
Overland is served by Police District Station #4 located at 2100 S. Clay Street. The Overland
neighborhood ranked 12th of the 68 neighborhoods in the 1990 Neighborhood Crime Rankings for total
offenses by crime rate. A concern raised during the planning process was the possibility of increased gang
activity in the Overland Neighborhorhood arising from concentrated police efforts to eliminate gang
activity from boardering neighborhoods. The Neighborhood Organization presently meets on a regular
basis with Police District 4, Community Relation Officers. This plan encourages the continued efforts to
educate both Officers and Community regarding crime issues.
D. Fire Protection
The Overland neighborhood is served by Fire Station #16, located at 1601 S. Ogden Street and #23,
located at 850 So. Federal Blvd.
E. Schools
No schools are located in Overland. Children from the neighborhood attend elementary, middle school,
and senior high school in adjacent neighborhoods or paired elementary schools as follows: Fairview
Elementary at 2715 W. 11th Avenue, Rosedale Elementary at 2330 S. Sherman Street, Grant Middle
School at 1751 S. Washington Street, and South High School at 1700 Louisiana Avenue.
F. Recreation Center
The nearest recreation center is located 1/2 mile outside of the neighborhoods eastern boundary at 2318 S.
Washington Street. Harvard Gulch Recreation Center will have a new swimming pool in 1993.
G. Neighborhood Facilities and Neighborhood Improvements Action Recommendations
Action Recommendations
NFI-1 Clean storm drainage sewer inlets
when conditions warrant.
NFI-2 Install dumpsters in paved alleys
north of Evans Avenue and west of
Broadway.
Implementing Groups
Dept, of Public Works
Wastewater Manaagement Division
Dept, of Public Works
30


NFI-3 Study the possibility of naturally
integrating Rosedale Elementary School
to provide a walk-in school.
Denver Planning and Community Development Office
Neighborhood Organization
Denver Public Schools
NFI-4 Encourage participation in the
residential street beautification programs
provided by the City for trees, sidewalk,
handicapped ramps, and entrywalks
(eg...Acoma Street between Iliff Avenue
& Wesley Avenue).
NFI-5 Enforce vandalism and trash
dumping violations by outside parties.
Denver Planning and Community Development Office
Dept, of Public Works,
Neighborhood Support Services
Neighborhood Organization
NFI-6 Replace floppy plastic lids on
trash dumpsters with more durable
plastic material.
NFI-7 Improve the physical appearance
of the neighborhood by removing
graffiti, trash, dead vegetation, and junk
cars; and by buffering junk yards from
adjacent, residentially-zoned properties.
NFI-8 Provide funding for a picnic area
and/or play area in Frontier Park.
NFI-9 Provide funding for a picnic area
inPasquinelPark.
NFI-10 Define the street edge along the
river corridor with curb & gutter on both
sides of the street.
NFI-11 Provide a pedestrian bridge
connection over the South Platte River
between Ruby Hill Park and Overland
Golf Course.
Dept, of Public Works,
Neighborhood Support Services
Dept, of Public Works, Neighborhood Support Services
Neighborhood Organization
Keep Denver Beautiful
Zoning Administration
Department of Parks and Recreation
Department of Parks and Recreation
Dept, of Public Works
Department of Parks and Recreation
Department of Parks and Recreation
The Greenway Foundation
31



NFI-12 Encourage neighborhood Denver Planning and Community Development
residents to become aware of available Neighborhood Organization
programs to pay for street and/or alley
improvement assessments for
low-to-moderate income homeowners.
NH-13 Pave, resurface and improve the Department of Public Works
alleys and streets listed in appendix "A"
at the end of this report.
NFI-14 Continue to promote relations Police Department
between Police, neighborhood Neighborhood Organization
businesses and residents with regard to Business Organization
education on crime concerns.
32


LEGEND

PLATTE PUJPR GREEN WAY
DRNVER FARK5
MAJOR str&tb/aptepialg
IMPORTANT VIEWS
LANDMARK'S
RESIDENTIAL-
COMMEEC/AL
!NDUG TRIAD : t-O, 1-1, l-Z
NEIGHBORHOOD BOUNDARY
BICYCLE ROUTE; EXISTING/PROPOSED
PEDESTRIAN ROUTE; EXIGTl5.[PROP
NEGATIVE EDGE
PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE
DGMUTOW
RT. EVANS ^ /A
DOWNTOWN, CMC CENTER PARK,
ART MUSEUM, MAIN LIBRARY 3 MILES
* Mississippi Av
5 O. SANTA FE
CORN DOR
BUSED
NATURAL HABITAT
'maintain R enhance
C 5 CP COLORADO'S 5COLC6U
ZONES .ARE PRESENT)
VIEWS
MAINTAIN 4EHANCI
l/TEWS
CAPITALIZE ON
PROPOSED NEWS
JEWELL AVE.
PASQU/NEL'S LANO/Nl
PARR. WITH PLAYGNP.
Pedestrian
ACCESS
'ADD PEDESTRIAN BRIDGES
KEY RIVER CROSSINGS
UTILIZE BRIDGES TO DEVELOP
TRIAEG ALONG RIVER
NATURAL RIVER SETTING/
OPEN SPACE
MAINTAIN, ENHANCE, RESTORE THE
FOLLOWING
NATURAL/ INDIGENOUS CHARACTER
W/LD LIFE EXPERIENCE 4 OBSERVATION
MAJOR C/TYWIDE WATERFOWL AREA
EDUCATIONAL USES
L/HIAR PARK EVJPFER DFYLMP/
LOW MAINTENANCE
EDGES
DEFINE RIVER CORRIDOR EDGE
HSl/ALiy UNIFY DISSIMILAR EDGES/
USES
. EMPLOY STREET TREES
SCREEN PARKING LOTS f INDUST-
RIAL USES
HARVARD GULCH,
£
YFUNDED BIKE-HIKE PATH
FOLLOW UP STVPIES
LoullfcmAve.REQ P. pQR
BEAUTIFICATION
POTENTIAL
EXPAND
Arkansas Av. GREENWAY
EXPLORE LOOP
DRIVE CLOSURE
. WASNmWN PARK-
~ 7 /.2 RULES
BDGEG
EXPLORE WEAVING/
MEANDERING EDGE.
INTO GOLF COURSE
PEP. ACCESS
EXPLORE DEVEIOP'G.
PED. OVERPASS
BROADWAY
CORRIDOR
FOLLOW UP
STUDIES REQ'P-
IDENTIFY f DEFINE
5U8DISTRIC TS, ETC.
HOUSING
MAINTAIN $ ENHANCE
SINGLE FAMILY
CHARACTER
r
ENTRIES
--- CREATE ENTRY,
WELCOMING TO
w"" GREENWAY '4 MIRKS
DEVELOP ADEQUATE
PARKING
ACQUIRE LAND
__\ HARVARD GUUTH PARK-
---7 0.2. MILES
EXPAND.
GREEN WAY
EXPLORE CLOSURE
OF S. PLATTE RIVER
PR--EAST(EVANS r
HARVARD). REROUTE
TRUCKS ONTO HAK/XRD.
PEP. ACCESS
EXPLORE DEVELOPS.
ACCESS ACROSS
SANTA FE DR-
CORRIDOR
DEVELOP ACCESS
INTO FRONTIER PARK
BUFFERING
MAINTAIN, IMPROVE,
CREATE BUFFERING
OF 5. SANTA FE
TRANGPORT'N
CORRIDOR
date; 3'//*92
ISSUES, OPPOP. TUN ITIES 4 RBCOMMBNDA TONS


)


X.
ENVIRONMENT

This section presents environmental topics and issues such as topography, flood plain, pollution, and
energy and resource conservation.
A. Topography and Flood Plain
The lowest elevation point of the neighborhood is the South Platte River as shown on the topographic map.
It slopes upwards towards the southeast portion of the neighborhood. The Flood Insurance Rate Map
(FIRM) shows the Overland Golf Course and much of the Overland Neighborhood located in the flood
plain area.
B. Residential Environment
The residential environment
consists mostly of single-family
residences with duplexes and
multifamily units randomly
dispersed throughout the
neighborhood. Residents take
pride in the upkeep and
maintenance of their properties,
although litter and dirt from the
pass-through traffic tend to
overwhelm the neighborhood.
C. Pollution
Much of the air and noise pollution
in the neighborhood comes from
automobile traffic that goes through the neighborhood. The Colorado Department of Transportation has
provided noise barrier fences along South Santa Fe Drive. There are large sections of state-owned vacant
land on the west side of South Santa Fe Drive. The plan encourages planting and maintaining large trees
in the state-owned vacant land. Trees would provide a noise buffer as well as help with the air pollution
problem in the neighborhood.
The Shattuck Chemical Company, located at 1805 South Bannock, is a part of the Denver Radium
Superfund site. EPA and the Colorado Department of Health have conducted thorough studies of the
Shattuck site to determine the extent of contamination and to evaluate various cleanup alternatives. The
perferred alternative for cleanup of the Shattuck Chemical Company is for the excavation of contaminated
soils and off-site disposal.
D. Energy and Resource Conservation
The neighborhood is interested in conserving energy and resources as well as recycling.
35


la#&4
E. Environment Action Recommendation
Action Recommendation
E-l Reduce the air pollution impact in
Overland by supporting city and state air
pollution control measures, including
biking, car pooling, public transit, street
sweeping, and wood burning restrictions.
E-2 Clean up, as necessary, the ground
contamination in any identified sites
(ie...Shattuck Chemical Company).
E-3 Although stabilization of the
Shattuck Chemical Company site was
the selected remedy, this plan
necessitates the excavation and removal
of the identified site contamination for
the purpose of potential land
redevelopment.
E-4 Support neighborhood energy
conservation programs. Promote energy
conservation in residential and
non-residential structures as follows:
-evaluate heating and cooling
alternatives
-encourage energy audits and
inventorying building characteristics
-promote retrofitting of existing
buildings and provide consumer
protection information on energy
matters.
E-5 Support and participate in
neighborhood and city programs in
recycling non-renewable resources (e.g.
aluminum, glass, paper, plastics, oil,
etc.) for the benefit of the neighborhood
and city.
E-6 Screen and "kid-proof' industrial/
commercial trash dumpsters which are
visible from adjacent residential areas.
Implementing Groups
Neighborhood Residents
Employers
Regional Transportation District
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Dept, of Public Works
U.S. Enviommental Protection Agency
Neighborhood Organization
Shattuck Chemical Company
Public Service Co.
Dept, of Public Works
Denver Recycles
Business Owners
Residents
36


"
FLOOD PLAIN
1/ 7 ZONE X'
L
/#

ZONEX
./$
7 ; OJ




m
XL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
A. Overview of Existing Conditions
Commercial and industrial businesses make up 50% of the land uses in the neighborhood. The businesses
in Overland are an important source of employment for the neighborhood as well as the city. Commercial
and industrial businesses have been grouped into sections/comdors to best define the areas.
The commercial business corridor on Broadway and the industrial area along Santa Fe and the railroad
tracks are grouped into four sub-areas (referenced in the Urban Design pull-out map). Broadway is the
dividing line between the Overland Neighborhood, Platt Park and Rosedale Neighborhoods. This plan
looks at both sides of Broadway in making its recommendations.
Business/Commercial Sub-area I
Sub-area I, known to the neighborhood as Antique
Row, is a quaint, thriving business community that
specializes in the sale of antiques. Antique Row has a
clear metro-wide identity and an international clientele.
The boundaries for Antique Row are Broadway
between Mississippi Avenue and Iowa Avenue. The
pride displayed by merchants on Antique Row in
maintaining their businesses create the type of
impression the neighborhood would like to see develop
along the entire Broadway corridor.
Business/Commercial Sub-area II
Sub-area II boundaries are from Iowa Avenue to Yale
Avenue.
This area has good access from Evans onto Broadway.
Neighborhood serving restaurants range from national
chain restaurants to family-owned businesses.
Long-term independent businesses have survived the
flood of 1965 and the tornado of 1988. Like many of
Denvers business strip developments, this area has
attracted used car lot dealers and absentee landowners -- -1
because of high volumes of traffic and inexpensive land costs. Prostitution, and drug and gang activities
have developed along the corridor, partly due to its proximity with the Denver/Englewood border. Several
bars that promote anti-social activity in and around their establishments present another troubling factor.
EMW Furniture, Bundys Restuarant, Onofrios Piano, Bills Collectables, and Revival Record are a few
of the businesses that have been in operation for over 20 years. Some of the newer businesses are
Alexandras Car Wash, Premier Furniture, Paulas 13 Mexican Restaurant, 7-11, Eurolite, and Performance
Cycles. The neighborhood encourages these types of businesses to remain and continue on the Broadway
business corridor. Although there is a major concern with regard to expansion into the residential area, the
39



business community as well as the residential community would like to have a sub-area study developed
for the Broadway business corridor and the industrial area north of Evans in order to identify and define
sub-districts, and address land use and zoning problems, marketing, urban design and transportation. In
addition, the study should establish a thematic character with a complementary package of streetscape
elements.
Business/Industrial Sub-area in
Sub-area III boundaries are Mississippi on the north, Evans Avenue on the south, South Platte River and
Santa Fe Drive on the west, and Acoma on the east This area is predominantly industrial. Much of the
vacant land available in the neighborhood is located in Sub-area in. There is a lot of potential for business
growth in this area without impacting the existing residential community. Newer businesses have moved
into the area in the past 5 years such as Clinic Care, Desk Inc., McDonalds, and Mile High Cable Vision.
The older businesses that have been able to survive through many changes are construction service
oriented businesses such as Flanigans, General Welding, Tools Unlimited and Kroonenberg Lumber
Company; mixed with such businesses as the Breakfast King, Pet City, and Sachs-Lawlor. There is some
potential for higher density residential and mixed-use development in Sub-area III once light rail comes
into this section of the neighborhood. Gates Rubber Company holds a large assemblage of land in
Sub-area III which is presently leased to smaller businesses in the area. Although their five-year plan does
not call for any major redevelopment, the potential is there for long range future planning.
Business/Industrial Sub-area IV
Sub-area IV boundaries are Evans Avenue on the north, Delaware Street on the east, Yale Avenue on the
south, and South Platte River Drive on the west A large industrial park runs between South Platte River
Drive and South Santa Fe Drive. The industrial uses located along Delaware Street are the neighborhoods
major concern. Although the need to work and live together is the neighborhoods goal, the expansion of
businesses into the residential community has made it difficult for residences to remain in the area.
Unfortunately, some of the business uses are higher density than the zoning allows as they have been
grandfathered in as an allowable use. There is a need to make this area pedestrian friendly by installing
curbs and sidewalks. Parking for employees and customers is essential to maintain good neighbor
relations. These businesses are also well established wholesale operations that have been in the
neighborhood for years. Truck traffic and resistance to neighborhood street improvements are the biggest
debates between the businesses and the residences in this area. Long term stable businesses in this area
include Barton, Denver Pottery, Martin Manufacturing and Katzke Paper. Some of the newer businesses
include Bobs Towing, Signs, Inc., and Statewide Wholesale.
The steering committee felt strongly that although the Overland Golf Course is not in an industrial zone, it
is a business and should be included in the Market/Urban Design Sub-area Study proposed in this plan. It
needs to be included as a viable business venture within the neighborhood.
40


B. Economic Development Action Recommendations
Action Recommendations
Implementing Groups
ED-1 Support the development of a
neighborhood business organization for
the business community.
Business/Property Owners
Mayors Office of Economic Development
Denver Planning and Community Development Office
ED-2 Support the expansion and
redevelopment of Antique Row on South
Broadway.
Business/Property Owners
Mayors Office of Economic Development
Denver Planning and Community Development Office
ED-3 Encourage an integrated business
signage program for the Broadway
business corridor.
ED-4 Support joint marketing efforts
within the business community.
Business/Property Owners
Zoning Administration
Mayors Office of Economic Development
Business/Property Owners
Mayors Office of Economic Development
ED-5 Secure funding for an Urban
Design Corridor Study for the Broadway
Business Corridor.
Business/Property Owners
Mayors Office of Economic Development
Denver Planning and Community Development Office
ED-6 Promote a summer employment Neighborhood Organization
program for youth in the neighborhood Business/Property Owners
as a "joint" effort between businesses
and residents.
41




XII. IMPLEMENTATION

A. Means of Plan Implementation
The adopted Overland Neighborhood Plan will serve as an official guide to the physical development of
the neighborhood. It becomes an official amendment to the Citys Comprehensive Plan.
It is the responsibility of residents, property owners, the Overland Neighborhood Association, various city
officials and elected officials to implement the plan. The plan is only worth the time, energy and resources
given to implement it.
The plan serves as a guide for making decisions about the neighborhood. City departments use the plan to
guide recommendations and decisions on the neighborhoods priorities for desired improvements, urban
design, housing, business types, traffic, and public services which encourage and contribute to the
economic, social, and physical health, safety and welfare of the people who live and work in Overland.
Some of the action recommendations that are presented at the end of each chapter are simple, require no
financial resources, and can be accomplished in a matter of months. Others are more difficult and require
years and a lot of money to complete. There are also recommendations that require study and more
discussion before they can be started and accomplished.
B. Human Resources of Plan Implementation
This plan represents many hours of volunteered time to walk and drive through the neighborhood,
interview businesses and meet with concern citizens of Overland in order to develop action
recommendations.
YOU, the concerned citizen, and all of US, the community, working together can make this plan
successful. Your involvement in the community and working with elected officials can make these
recommendations a reality. A suggested recommendation for plan implementation is an annual and/or
bi-annual list of priorities developed between the neighborhood organization, concerned citizens and the
city based on the neighborhood plans action recommendations.
The Denver Planning and Community Development Office has assigned a neighborhood planner to
provide technical assistance for the implementation of the plan. The neighborhood planner acts as a
liaison between residents, neighborhood organizations and the City Administration.
The City and County of Denver is a major player in the plans implementation. Once adopted the plan will
help influence city policies, programs, and decisions that will be crucial in implementing the action
recommendations. The staff of the Planning and Community Development Office and the many other city
agencies listed will work with the neighborhood to explain the plan proposals to the Denver Planning
Board, City Council, and all relevant city decision-making bodies. In addition to the plans guidance, city
staff will be available to assist the neighborhood to influence the city decisions and actions on zoning
requests; the evaluation of public and private development proposals; Capital Improvement Program
(CIP), Community Development Block Grant (CDBG), and other funding requests; and regulatory
ordinances.
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la.**d
C. ImplementationAction Recommendations
Action Recommendations Implementing Groups
1-1 Monitor and update the plan as Neighborhood Residents
needed. Denver Planning and Community Development Office
1-2 Request funding through the Capital Neighborhood Residents and Businesses
Improvement Budget, Community Denver Planning and Community Development Office
Development and other funding
resources to implement the plan.
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APPENDIX "A"
Overland Neighborhood Alley and Street Paving Recommendations
NORTH/SOUTH STREETS -ACOMA STREET.
1. On Acoma at Florida Florida Avenue needs to be resurfaced or completed.
2. Between Mexico & Iowa needs curb, gutter & walks.
3. Mexico Street needs gutter, curb & walks on both sides.
4. Between Colorado Avenue & Asbury Avenue needs curb, gutter & sidewalks.
5. Northwest comer of Acoma Street & Warren Avenue curb repair.
NORTH/SOUTH STREETS CHEROKEE STREET
1. At Asbury needs gutters at intersection
NORTH/SOUTH STREETS DELAWARE STREET
1. Between Yale & Evans Avenues entire street is paved, needs curb, gutter & walks must
accommodate business parking.
NORTH/SOUTH STREETS SOUTH PLATTE RIVER DRIVE
1. B etween Mississippi & Yale Avenues needs curb, gutter on pavement.
2. Between Evans & Yale Avenues cul-de-sac South Platte River Drive.
NORTH/SOUTH ALLEYS BETWEEN BROADWAY & ACOMA STREET
1. Beginning at Yale Avenue to Warren Avenue patch potholes.
2. Between Asbury, Jewell & Colorado Avenues resurface alley.
3. Between Colorado & Iowa Avenues sewer has been installed, resurface alley.
4. Between Iowa & Florida Avenues fill potholes.
NORTH/SOUTH ALLEYS BETWEEN ACOMA & BANNOCK STREETS
1. Between XLiff & Warren Avenues fill potholes.
2. Between Warren & Evans Avenues pave alley.
3. Between Asbury & Jewell Avenues pave "L" shaped alley.
4. Between Jewell & Colorado Avenues pave alley.
5. Between Colorado & Mexico Avenues pave alley.
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NORTH/SOUTH ALLEYS BETWEEN BANNOCK AND CHEROKEE STREETS.
1. Between Mississippi & Louisiana Avenues pave alley.
2. Between Arkansas & Florida Avenues pave alley.
3. Between Wesley & Harvard Avenues pave alley.
4. Between Evans & Warren Avenues pave alley.
NORTH/SOUTH ALLEYS BETWEEN CHEROKEE & DELAWARE STREETS
1. Between Florida & Arkansas Avenues fill potholes.
2. Between Arkansas & Mississippi Avenues alleys are closed gates.
3. Between Evans and Yale Avenues pave alley.
NORTH/SOUTH ALLEYS BETWEEN ELATI AND FOX STREETS
1. Between Jewell & Asbury Avenues pave alley.
NORTH/SOUTH ALLEYS BETWEEN FOX AND GALAPAGO STREETS
1. Between Jewell & Harvard Avenues pave alleys.
NORTH/SOUTH ALLEYS BETWEEN GALAPAGO & HURON STREETS
1. Between Jewell & Evans Avenues pave alleys.
2. Between Evans & Harvard abuts Frontier Park needs improvement to be an amenity for park.
EAST/WEST STREETS
1. Jewell Avenue needs improvement at Acoma Street.
2. Pave Vassar Avenue from Cherokee Street to Delaware Street.
3. Harvard Avenue, Wesley Avenue, Biff Avenue Between Cherokee Street and Delaware Street -
needs paving, curb, gutter & walks.
4. Biff & Warren Streets West of Delaware needs to be improved and create a cul-de-sac.
5. JeweB Avenue between Santa Fe Drive and Huron Street -pave street include curbs and gutters.
6. Asbury Avenue between Huron Street and Golf Course needs curbs and gutters.


Full Text

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OVERLAND NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN PLANNING AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OFFICE CITY AND COUNTY OF DENVER APRIL 12, 1993

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS I. VISION FOR OVERLAND'S FUTURE IT. INTRODUCTION A. Location and Description B. Planning Process C. Organization of the Plan D. Use of the Plan ID. HISTORY IV. DEMOGRAPHIC AND SOCIO-ECONOMIC PROFILES A. Population and Households B. Employment and Income V. LAND USE AND ZONING A. General B. Neighborhood Character C. Residential Land Uses 1. Residential Subarea a 2. Residential Subarea B 3. Residential Subarea C D. Industrial Land Uses E. Commercial Land Uses F. VacantLand G. Patks and Open Space H. Action Recommendations VI. TRAFFIC AND TRANSPORTATION A. Streets and Highways 1. Existing Street Classifications and Traffic Volumes TABLE OF CONTENTS 1 3 5 5 5 6 6 7 9 9 9 11 11 11 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 13 13 15 15 2. Truck Traffic, Movement and Designated Trucks Routes B. Mass Transit C. Linkages/Pedestrian Routes/Hike-Bike Routes D. ActionRecommendations Vll.HOUSING A. Existing Housing Stock B. ActionRecommendations 15 16 17 23 23 23

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Vlll. URBAN DESIGN 25 A. The Role of Urban Design 25 B. Landmarks 25 C. Views 26 D. Streetscaping 26 E. Edges 26 F. Pedestrian Bridges 26 G. ActionRecommendations 27 IX. NEIGHBORHOOD FACILITIES AND NEIGHBORHOOD IMPROVEMENTS 29 A. Parks and Open Space 29 B. Storm and Sanitary Sewers 30 C. Police Protection and Crime 30 D. Fire Protection 30 E. Schooffi 30 F. Recreation Centers 30 G. Action Recommendation 30 X. Environment 35 A. Topography and Floor Plain 35 B. ResidentialEnvironment 35 C. Pollution 35 D. Energy and Resource Consetvatian 35 E. Action Recommendation 36 XI. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 39 A. Overview of Existing Conditions 39 B. ActionRecommendations 41 XII IMPLEMENTATION 43 A. Means of Plan Implementation 43 B. Human Resources of Plan Implementation 43 C. Action Recommendations 44 Appendix "A" 45 A. Street and Alley Recommendations

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Mayor of Denver Honorable Wellington E. Webb Denver Planning Board Ruth Falkenberg, Chair Rick Pederson Thomas Foster Bernie Jones Philip Milstein Marilee Utter Debra M. Gallegos Daniel R. Guimond Overland Neighborhood Steering Committee ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Marilyn Stokes Gilbert F. McNeish Jeanne Labuda Thanks to the many residents and business people that took time from their families and homes to attend a series of evening meetings. Special thanks to Councilman Dave Doering and his assistant Judy Rocciano for their support throughout the process. Jason Bardales Bob Bergmire Margaret Bullock Robert Butlox Janet Diedrichs Dawn Dutton Hazel M. Goumo Agnes Hester Shannon Jones Marilyn J. Lesser Oda Ostberg Elinor Pitts Catherine Sandy Chuck Schissler Hugh Shields Jack Troxell Denver Planning and Community Development Office Jennifer Moulton, Director of Planning and Development Bob Werner, Deputy Director of Planning and Development Lupe Herrera, Neighborhood Planner and Report Author Mark Upshaw, Urban Designer Ken Barkema, Report Graphics Karl Haberman, Report Graphics Moray Bowlig Helene Coontz Mary Lou Faberty Pete Homan Rose McKinney TerryRady Clyde Schroeder Irma Zimmerman Acknowledgement is also given to Frank Gray, former Director of Denver Planning and Community Development Office and Billie Bramhall, former Deputy Director of the Denver Planning and Community Development Office who made the preparation of this plan possible. Bob Dorroh, Chief Design Engineer, Transprotation Engineering, Terry Rosapep, Director Transportation Planning, James Mackay, Transportation Planning, Nelson Ho, Transportation Planning, Elliot Sulsky, Transportation Planning, Myra Hipp, Housing Pogram Manager, Jerry Garcia, PFI Program Manager, Phil Plienis, Senior City Planner, Dave Becker, Senior City Planner, Jody Adkins, Environmental Review, Willam A. Verkest, Director, Design and Construction Management Division, Henry VanFleet, Design and Construction Managemment Division Bob Damerau, Landmark Preservation Commission, Neil Sperandeo, Director of Long Range Planning, P & R 1

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AEG:IS WiST HIG:HI..AI-10 WESTWOOD HARYiY PARK SVNNY110E RUBY MILL CLAYTON SICYLANO CITY PAlllC 2 NOA'TJ;AJT PAliK HILL NO 11TH PARI( HILL PAIIIC HILL MON'TlEU.O

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I. OVERLAND VISION STATEMENT The name Overland suggests a closeness to the land which is exemplified by the neighborhood's country atmosphere in the middle of a busy city. The South Platte River is a prominent and daily reminder to the neighborhood of this quiet, pastoral scene. Access to the river is available via bike paths and pedestrian walkways through the expansive tree-lined green belt. Improvement of the physical environment has created a reduction of noise pollution, visual pollution and air pollution. The stable residential area has related well to the business community so a sense of harmony and unity is present. South Broadway has been reclaimed as a bustling business area. Traffic has been separated from the residential neighborhood which is well lit, and pedestrian friendly. The City has helped to establish neighborhood facilities and services; (ie ... senior center, walk-in schools, churches, and mass transit). One sees a revitalized, clean, industrial area. All of this is highlighted by concerned, hardworking people. It is a neighborhood that knows its history and appreciates it. The neighborhood association underscores and provides a foundation for cooperating, caring, stable and supportive neighborliness. This diversity and homogeneous nature is celebrated in annual fairs and gatherings. 3

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n. INTRODUCTION A. Location and Description The Overland Neighborhood is located on the southern boundary of Denver. It is influenced by several major thoroughfares. The neighborhood is bounded on the north by Mississippi, on the south by Yale, on the west by the South Platte River, and on the east by South Broadway. Overland is approximately 724 acres in size. Existing residential land uses are located in three small enclaves separated by Evans and Santa Fe Drive and surrounded by either industrial, business or park uses. Each enclave has its own identity within the Overland neighborhood. The neighborhood is identified by the Overland Golf Course located on the northwest side. Overland has about 155 acres of developed park land in addition to a 2 1!2 mile greenway stretch along the South Platte River. Neighborhood retail uses have been maintained on Broadway. The largest land use for the neighborhood is the industrial area. Industrial uses are located on the northeast side of the neighborhood and along the railroad tracks to the southern boundary. B. Planning Process Early in 1991, residents and board members of the Overland Neighborhood Association asked Councilman Dave Doering for assistance in preparing a neighborhood plan. The request came because of concerns about transportation, zoning and the quality of life in the neighborhood. A large community meeting was held in July 1991 at which time a Neighborhood Steering Committee of Overland residents and business people was organized. City Councilman Dave Doering and Planning and Community Development staff provided technical assistance to develop the plan. Input was solicited, received and prioritized as to what the planning effort should address. The steering committee met with Planning and Community Development staff and determined the time frame for the plan process, which was structured from the beginning to expedite its work. The Steering Committee focused on five neighborhood issues identified at the meeting: 1) Traffic and Transportation; 2) Neighborhood Facilities; 3) Neighborhood Environment; 4) Housing; and 5) Parks and Recreation. Youth/Gangs, Land Use/ZOning, and Economic Development were other identified issues and they are also addressed in the plan. The Steering Committee sponsored a second general meeting with the neighborhood in January 1992. The meeting purpose was to discuss their findings and recommendations at mid-point through the planning process. A special effort to gather input from the industrial and commercial area businesses was initiated during the month of March 1992. Since half of the land use in the Overland Neighborhood is industrial and commercial it was concluded that their input was essential for the development of the Plan. The Steering Committee formed a special task force. The task force interviewed approximately 30 area businesses. The Commercial/Industrial area business concerns have been incorporated into the Overland Neighborhood Plan. 5

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C. Organization of the Plan The Overland Neighborhood Plan begins with a Vision Statement developed by residents concerned for the future of their community. This is followed by a brief history of the neighborhood and a demographic and socio-economic profile of its people. The body of the plan then covers both the focus areas and the remaining sections. A brief overview and analysis of existing conditions for each focus area is followed by the issues and action recommendations to address those issues. D. UseofthePlan The plan serves an an official city guide to the physical development and improvement of the neighborhood. A city-approved plan serves as a guide for making decisions about the neighborhood. It is the responsibility of the neighborhood organization(s) and assigned city staff to prioritize recommendations as time, energy and resources allow. The plan becomes an official amendment to the City's Comprehensive Plan. City departments use the plan to guide recommendations and decisions based on consensus prioritization between appropriate City departments and the neighborhood organization(s). This plan is not an official zone map nor does it imply or deny any implicit rights to a particular zone. Zone changes that may be proposed by property owners as part of any plan must be initiated under a separate procedure established by the City and County of Denver Municipal Code. This plan is intended to promote patterns of desired neighborhood improvements, urban design, housing, business types, traffic and public services which encourage and contribute to the economic, social, and physical health, safety and welfare of the people who live and work in Overland. 6

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m. HISTORY Overland is rich in history*. Denver's first white settlement was organized in a 12 square block area of the present Overland Neighborhood. The settlement was called Montana City in 1857. The area was bounded by West Evans Avenue on the north, West lliff on the south, the South Platte River on the west and the Santa Fe Railroad tracks on the east. It is now commemorated by Frontier Park on South Fox Street The site was abandoned and the people moved to Auraria in 1859 on the bank of the mouth of Cherry Creek which became Denver a year later. In 1859, Rufus H. (Potato) Oark homesteaded the area that is now known as the Overland Golf Course (approximately 160 acres in total). He operated a "Potato" farm from 1863 through 1873. Just south of his farm was Jim Beckworth's farm. In 1883, the promoters of Denver Circle Railroad bought the land and built a race track. They changed the name to Jewell Park after Ex-Governor Charles A. Jewell of Connecticut, a stockholder in the railroad and park. James A. Fleming was instrumental in organizing the town of South Denver in 1886 which was bounded by West Alameda Avenue on the nortli (then the Denver southern boundary), Jewell Avenue on the south, South Platte River on the west, and South Colorado Blvd. on the east. This entire area was annexed to Denver eight years later in 1894. In 1887, the park was sold to a group of Denver men looking for a site for their country club. The park was so far out in the country that they named the park, Overland Park. It was Henry Wolcott who eventually bought up all shares of the holding corporation. Wolcott's claim to fame was his introduction of the game of golf to Denver. In 1896 Wolcott developed a nine-hole course circling the Overland Park Race Track. Wolcott also rented the tracks, the links, and the clubhouse to organizations (ie ... the Overland Park Racing Association, Overland Park Riding and Driving Club, and the Overland Park Club). In 1901 the Overland Country Oub was incorporated into the Denver Country Oub. The Denver Country Club did not renew its lease at Overland Park at the end of 1902. Instead, The Denver Country Oub bought land along Cherry Creek, at their present site above Downing Street. In 1919, the City and County of Denver started to buy land for a park. It rented the race track and made a camp for motorists. In 1930, Denver opened a nine-hole Overland Golf Course and expanded it to eighteen holes in 1957. *Denver in Slices by Louisa Ward Arps provided much of the historical information. Special thanks to Albert W. Scarffe, the Denver Public Library, Western History Department and the Colorado Historic Society for assistance on the historical information. 7

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IV. DEMOGRAPHIC AND SOCIO-ECONOMIC PROFILE A. Population and Housing Units Population trends between 1950 and 1990 in Overland show a 49.8% loss in population. The largest loss occurred between 1970 and 1980 when approximately 1190 people moved due to expansion of Santa Fe Drive by the Colorado Department of Transportation, as well as the expansion of business and industrial uses. There was a 33.2% loss in housing units between 1970 and 1990. Overland's 1990 housing units totaled 931 housing units, a loss of 462 units from 1970. 4000 3600 3200 2800 2400 2000 1600 Population 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 B. Employment and Income 800 Housing Units 1000 1200 1400 Employment is a socio-economic indicator which provides an understanding of an area's ability to sustain itself. Overland provides employment related to commercial or industrial uses. Retail is located along the Broadway business corridor. Wholesale, manufacturing and warehouse businesses are located along the railroad, which cuts diagonally through the neighborhood. The northeast portion of the neighborhood is predominantly industrial and commercial development with single-family enclaves scattered in three areas. The neighborhood's median household income and personal income is a common measure of its relative economic condition. A comparison of 1979 and 1989 median household incomes adjusted for inflation (made by the Denver Planning and Community Development Office) shows a loss of median household income for the neighborllood, but less of a loss than for the city as a whole. In 1979 the median household income was $20,548 and in 1989 that amount dropped to $20,202. This was a 1.7% drop for the neighborhood; the city dropped 3.4% during this same period. Table 1 below compares the changes that occurred between 1979 and 1989: Overland City ofDenver Table 1: Median household income (in 1989 dollars). 1979 1989 %Change 1979-1989 $20,548 $25,988 $20,202 $25,106 -1.7% -3.4% The median household income estimates for the Overland Neighborhood are substantially below the citywide figure of$25,106. 9

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Overland's 1990 per capita income was estimated to be $10,498 compared to the citywide estimate of $15,590. Table 2: Employment in the Overland Neighborhood by Industry, 1983 and 1988: 1983 1988 Industry Jobs % oftotal Jobs % oftotal Agriculture 2 0.1 20 0.6 Mining 0 0.0 6 0.2 Construction 558 24.4 394 11.3 Transportation 183 8.0 81 2.3 Manufacturing 639 28.0 960 27.5 Wholesaling 206 9.0 505 14.5 Retailing 84 3.7 703 20.1 Finance, Real 28 1.2 88 2.5 Estate, Ins. 84 3.7 703 20.1 Finance, Real 28 1.2 88 2.5 Estate, Ins. Services 473 20.7 632 18.1 Government 15 0.6 10 0.2 Other* 105 4.6 98 2.8 Total 2283 100.0 3492 100.0 Source: Denver Regional Council of Government *Includes self-employed, unpaid family and domestic workers. Percentages may not sum to 100% due to rounding. This table reveals that between 1983 and 1988 there were increases in wholesaling and retailing jobs while declines occurred in the construction and transportation jobs. 10

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v. LAND USE AND ZONING A. General The neighborhood includes a mixture of industrial, commercial, park and residential land uses. The largest land use category is industrial. The second largest is parks and recreation. Located on the western edge of the neighborhood are the Overland Golf Course, Frontier Park and the Platte River Greenway. Between 1970 and 1990, the number of dwelling units dropped 33% and vacant land increased. BMW's Carpet and Warehouse expansion at the southwest comer of Evans and Broadway is the most recent zone change to occur in the neighborhood. The EMW Planned Unit Development (PUD) encompasses a total project area of 3.45 acres. This expansion does not cross streets, but is contained within one block, one-half of which was formerly residential. While this might be considered an encroachment of business into residential areas in the strictest sense, the impact is mitigated by the proposed landscape buffer and screen on the western boundary. B. Neighborhood Character The Platte River Greenway runs the entire length of the neighborhood's western boundary and contributes significantly to its character, uniqueness and potential. The natural character of this river corridor is a major asset to the neighborhood as well as the city in general. The corridor contains a major city-wide water fowl area and walking, running and cycling opportunities are present on the bike path. It provides a wildlife experience and observation opportunity and has the potential for educational uses as well. The neighborhood is divided into five major components: * Open space and parks include the Overland Golf Course, Overland Lake, Frontier Park, Pasquinel 's Landing and the Platte River Greenway. Railroad and Transportation Corridor of South Santa Fe/Evans overpass and interchange. South Broadway Business Corridor Industrial Area Residential Area Parks and open space are a major asset of the neighborhood and give it a distinctive character. The Platte River Greenway with its natural character and water fowl habitat gives the open space its special quality. One important goal is to expand the Platte River Greenway in its natural state. 11

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C. Residential Land Uses The single-family residential areas zoned R-1 & R-2 allow single-family residences and duplexes and abut 0-1, 1-0, 1-1, 1-2, B-4, B-2 and PUD zones. Residential land uses in Overland make up approximately 19% of the land use in the neighborhood. Residents generally take pride in the upkeep of their homes in the residential areas. Single-family enclaves are scattered in three areas. For this study these three sub-areas are described individually. Refer to the map at the end of the Urban Design chapter for a graphic illustration. Residential Subgroup "A" Area "A" is located south of the Overland Golf Course in anR-1 zone. The Golf Course, Santa Fe Drive and Evans Avenue isolate this 6 1/2 square block area of single-family residences from the rest of the neighborhood. Residential Subgroup "B" Boundaries for Area "B" are Evans Avenue to the north, Santa Fe Drive to the east, South Platte River Drive to the west, and the city limits on the south. The separation between area "A" and "B" causes some difficulty in maintaining a connection between both sub-group areas. The only pedestrian access from Area "A" to Area "B" is through an underpass provided by the Evans' Bridge or the South Platte River Greenway. Area "B" is also zoned R-1 with primarily single-family residences. There are 207 residential properties located in areas "A" "and "B" combined. Residential Subgroup "C" Area "C" is located on the east side of Santa Fe Drive and borders Englewood's northern boundary on the south, the Broadway business district borders on the east, and industrial land uses on the north. The residential use in Area "C" has developed at a lower than R-2 density. North of Evans Avenue is a small pocket of single-family units surrounded by industrial uses. Area "C" has 423 residential properties, 90% of which are singlefamily residences. D. Industrial Land Uses Industrial land uses comprise 42% of the total land area. There are 226 acres zoned for industrial uses, located diagonally north to south along the railroad. The bulk of the industrial uses are concentrated in the northeast half of the neighborhood. E. Commercial (Retail) Land Uses Commercial (retail) land uses are located along Broadway and the northern portion of South Santa Fe Drive within the Overland boundaries. Commercial land uses make up 8% of the total land area. F. Vacant Land There are 16 acres (2%) of vacant land scattered throughout the neighborhood. The majority is located in the industrial/ commercial zone areas. 12

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G. Parks and Open Space Open space and parks are a major contributor to the quality of the neighborhood. Thirty percent (30%) of the land area is dedicated to parks and open space. A total of 163 acres are zoned for parlc and open space uses. The Overland Golf Course is .a large open space serving the neighborhood and the city. It is considered a landmark for the neighborhood and the district. H. Land Use and Zoning Action Recommendations Action Recommendation LZ-1 Encourage property owners in residential areas to invest time and necessary resources on the beautification of their neighborhood. LZ-2 Encourage commercial and industrial businesses to invest in beauti-fication programs for their own businesses and also invest in neighborhood clean-up programs. LZ-3 Develop the remaining vacant land in a manner that is compatible with the land use character and density of surrounding land uses and existing zoning. LZ-4 Enforce the placement of landscaping and buffers where industrial development abuts residentially zoned properties as required by the revised industrial zoning regulations (Ordinance #22, 1991) Implementing Groups Neighborhood Organization Zoning Administration Neighborllood Support Services Keep Denver Beautiful Denver Department of Health and Hospitals (Animal Control) Office of Citizen Response City Councilperson Mayor's Office ofEconomic Development Denver Planning and Community Development Keep Denver Beautiful Public & Private Developers Planning and Community Development Office Zoning Administration Planning and Community Development Office Zoning Administration 13

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EXISTING ZONING R-1 Single-Unit Detached Dwellings, Low Density. Density =7.3 dwelling units/acre. R-2 Multi-Unit Dwellings, Low Density. Densitv=14.5 dwelling units/acre. 8-4 Gene: Jusiness District. This district is intended to provide for and encourage appropriate commercial uses adjacent to arterial streets, which are normally transit routes, and abutting residential districts. Building floor area cannot exceed twice the site area. 1-0 Light Industrial District. A transitional district between intensive Industrial and residential districts. Allows limited manufacturing, wholesale and retail activities, offices and motels. 1-1 General Industrial District. Allows many manufacturing, warehousing and wholesaling activities, along with limited retail and service uses for the benefit of area employees. Building floor area cannot exceed 2 times the site area. 1-2 Heavy Industrial District. Allows all manufacturing, warehousing, wholesaling and mineral extraction activities. Limited retail and service uses for the benefit of area employees are permitted. 0-1 Open Use District. allows airports, recreational uses, parks, cemeteries, reservoirs, community correctional facilities and other public and semi-public uses housed in buildings. PUD Planned Unit Development. PUD is a form of development generally characterized by a unified site design for clustering buildings and providing common open-space, density increases, and a mix of building types and land uses. It allows maximum flexibility during the planning stage and maximum assurance that exactly what is proposed will be developed. L [) f Missisaippi Ave, rEt: I Arizon. Ave. Arkan.aa Ave. 0 O'IOILAND GOLf' COURSE 14 0 100'200' 400' 1100'

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VI. TRAFFIC AND TRANSPORTATION Traffic and Transportation was selected as the number one focus issue by the Steering Committee. In its recent history, the Overland Neighborhood has had to accommodate through traffic flow with the widening of Santa Fe Drive, the widening of the Broadway and Evans A venue intersection and the new construction of the Evans/Santa Fe Drive overpass. Transportation modes consist of streets and highways, bus service, hike-bike trails, and railroads. This section will identify the issues and provide recommendations. A. Streets and Highways The City and County of Denver defmes four categories of streets for the purpose of describing and planning streets and highways. The criteria used for classification includes function, access, width, volume of traffic and signalization. Freeways have the function of permitting traffic to flow rapidly and unimpeded through and around the metropolitan area (i.e ... Interstate 25). Freeways typically carry over 100,000 vehicles per day. There are no freeways in Overland. Arterials have the function of permitting rapid and relatively unimpeded traffic movement through the city and serving as a primary link between communities and major land use elements. Some arterials, such as Evans Avenue and Santa Fe Drive (U.S. 85), are also state highways. Arterials typically carry up to 50,000 vehicles per day (i.e ... Santa Fe Drive, Evans Avenue, Broadway, Yale Avenue, and Mississippi Avenue). Collector streets have the function of collecting and distributing traffic having an origin or destination between arterial and local streets within the community, and linking neighborhood residential areas, local and community shopping and service facilities, and employment areas. Collectors typically carry up to 15,000 vehicles per day (i.e ... South Platte River Drive). Local streets have the function of providing direct access to adjacent properties. They carry low volumes of traffic (less than 5000 vehicles per day) with an origin or destination within the neighborhood (see map at the end of the chapter for local street identification). 2. Truck Traffic, Movement and Designated Truck Routes The only official designated truck routes are for hazardous material. Santa Fe Drive, Broadway and Evans are so designated. The plan recommends that truck traffic from Broadway either tum on Evans or use Yale Avenue to get to the businesses on Delaware. In the past, Iliff Avenue has been used as a truck route by the industrial area businesses along Delaware. The truck route preferred by the residents in this immediate area is Yale Avenue. B. Mass Transit Overland is served by several Regional Transportation District Routes. Routes 0, 11, 14, 19, 21, and 27 provide for southbound and northbound movement along Broadway. Routes 11 and 14 provide east/west movement on Mississippi and routes 19 and 21 provide east/west movement on Evans A venue. Route 27 15

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goes eastbound on Yale Avenue. Routes 14; 19 and 27 are operated by private carriers. (Refer to map at the end of chapter). Light rail is Denver's modem version of yesteryear streetcars. The Metro area's first light rail project will be the Metro Area Connection (MAC) which will extend from just south of Broadway/1-25 through downtown to the Five Points Neighborhood. The Overland Neighborhood will be connected to MAC by the proposed Southwest Corridor. The Southwest Corridor has been determined by the RTD and DR COG Boards to be the region's designated priority corridor after the MAC. First steps to obtain federal funding are underway. A "transit envelope" has already been reserved along Santa Fe Drive in the Southwest Corridor leading to its designation as the region's next priority corridor. The neighborhood encourages noise buffering through landscaping and fencing between the railroad right-of-way and the adjacent businesses and residents. C. Linkages/Pedestrian Routes/Hike-Bike Routes Linkages for pedestrians and bicyclists are a challenge in the development of this plan. In reviewing the need to gain pedestrian access from the residential sub-area "C" across the Santa Fe Drive corridor to the Platte River Greenway, the neighborhood is confronted with traffic obstacles. The Evans Avenue overpass provides the only pedestrian access between the east and west side of the neighborhood, yet it does not provide safe pedestrian access. During the winter months scheduled maintenance is needed; the narrow walkway is covered with snow, making it difficult for elderly and young children to cross. Methods need to be explored to make the Evans overpass more pedestrian friendly. Recommendation T-6 suggests a possible solution to the immediate problem. There are two existing hike-bike trails in the neighborhood. The first one is located along the South Platte River Greenway and provides access to Downtown Denver and Littleton. The other trail is located north/south along Cherokee Street and then east on lliff A venue towards the Rosedale neighborhood and the University of Denver. A new bike/pedestrian bridge and off-street bikeway is being designed along Florida Avenue to provide an extension of Sanderson Gulch Trail as part of the Ruby Hill/Washington Park Bond Project The Mississippi A venue bridge over the Platte River is currently being rebuilt to better accommodate bicyclists and pedestrians. Residents, pedestrians and cyclists will fmd a pleasant route to the east across Broadway along this designated bicycle route. The stoplight at lliff makes this a safer route. Three blocks east on lliff is the connection to Harvard Gulch Park. 16

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D. Traffic And Transportation Action Recommendations Action Recommendations T-1 Study the possibility of improving the safety of pedestrians crossing the street at two locations: 1) Harvard Avenue and Bannock Street and 2) Warren Avenue and Bannock Street. T-2 Study the possibility of converting Asbury A venue into a truck route between Broadway and Delaware Street. Traffic controls should be modified on this section of Asbury A venue to encourage the smooth flow of truck traffic along the street. T-3 Enforce the existing speed limits on Evans Avenue. T -4 Study methods of improving vehicular access out of and into the neighborhood at the intersection of Bannock and Evans. Also address methods to improve pedestrian crossing at Evans and Bannock. (Improved traffic control could include installation of a traffic signal.) T5 Propose wording change of traffic sign at Broadway and iliff A venue to: "No tum on red when pedestrian and children present." T -6 Enhance the pedestrian connection between the east side and the west side of the neighborhood. Explore ways to provide a safe and attractive pedestrian connection along Evans A venue across Santa Fe Drive. Implementing Group Dept. of Public Works, Traffic Engineering Dept. of Public Works, Traffic Engineering Denver Police Department Dept. of Public Works, Transportation Engineering Dept. of Public Works Transportation Planning and Traffic Engineering Dept. ofPublic Works Transportation Planning and Traffic Engineering Colorado Department of Transportation 17

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Maintenance Issues: T -7 Request that street cleaners throw salt and sand on sidewalks during winter stonn periods along the Evans viaduct and Mississippi bridge and/or clean snow from walkways in order to make the overpass safer for pedestrians. Regional Transportation District Issues: T -8 Explore the possibility of relocating the bus stop on the NW comer of Broadway and Evans Avenue to the NE comer of Acoma Street and Evans Avenue. T -9 Explore the possibility of acquiring the "Bundy's" property for a major bus transfer facility & Evans A venue expansion. T -10 Support light rail in the southwest corridor and promote neighborhood access to it. Railroad Traffic Issues: T -11 To buffer sound on the east side of the railroad tracks, request that a fence be placed between the railroads and the residential area. T -12 Request crossing gates at railroad tracks underneath Evans A venue and west side of Delaware Street. Street and Alley Closures: T -13 Study the possibility of closing South Platte River Drive along Frontier Park and moving the traffic over to the west side of the river. Dept. of Public Works, Street Maintenance Division Dept. of Public Works, Transportation Planning and Traffic Engineering, Regional Transportation District Regional Transportation District Dept. of Public Works, Transportation Planning and Traffic Engineering Neighborhood Organization Regional Transportation District Neighborhood Organization Railroad Companies Dept. of Public Works Neighborhood Organization Railroad Companies Dept of Public Works, Transportation Planning, Traffic Engineering, Parks and Recreation, Planning and Community Development and Neighborhood Organization 18

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Truck Routes: T -14 Review the need to limit truck access south of Evans A venue. Post and enforce the truck route for the neighborhood going from Broadway to Yale Avenue to Delaware Street. Parking: T-15 Study the possibility of limited 1-2 hour parking on Acoma Street and Delaware Street between the residences and businesses. Bike Paths: T-16 Study the possi-bility of adding off-street and/ or on-street bike access from Acoma Street onto Iowa A venue over to the Overland Golf Course and the Platte River bike-hike path. Denver Police Department, Dept. of Public Works, Traffic Engineering Dept. of Public Works Neighborhood Organization Parking Management Neighborhood Organization Dept. of Public Works Bicycle Advisory Committee 19

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STREET CLASSIFICATIONS ARTERIALCOLLECTOR-OVEALAND GOLF COURSE 20 Awe. EB i"1..n.J o 100'200' '100' oo

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ALLEY & STREET PROPOSED NEW ALLEYS, STREETS, CURBS & GUTTERS MAINTENANCE OF EXISTING ALLEYS & STREETS 21 $ 0100'200' 400' .00'

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BIKE ROUTES ---{----EXISTING/PROPOSED SOUTH BROADWAY EAST MISSISSIPPI 14* WEST FLORIDA 19* WEST JEWELL 21 EAST EVANS 27* YALE CROSSTOWN OPERATED BY PRIVATE CARRIERS ::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: LIGHT RAIL (PROPOSED) SOUTHWEST CORRIDOR 0 ) 22

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VII. HOUSING Overland's housing stock decreased by 33.2% from 1970 to 1990. A positive side to neighborhood improvement can be seen in the increasing ratio of owner-occupied units to renter-occuplied units as shown below: A. Existing Housing Stock Over 50% of the existing housing structures were constructed before 1940. The average age of the housing stock is 60 years. Overland's housing stock is predominantly single-family, owner-occupied, modestly valued, and in good condition. 1l:t Owner Occupied a Renter Occupied B. Housing Action Recommendations Action Recommendations H -1 Continue to secure hous'ipg rehabilitation and improvement assistance loans (e.g. Single Family Rehabilitation, Rental Rehab, Emergency Home Repair, Caretakers, etc.) for owner and renter occupied housing units where needed. H-2 Address the vacant housing and structurally unsafe housing problems through enforcement of the abandoned and vacant housing ordinance, the zoning ordinance, and other available means. H3 Encourage maintenance and upkeep of exterior grounds in the residential area of the neighborhood. H-4 Study the feasibility of relocating homes scheduled for demolition from business and industrial zones to vacant lots in the Overland Neighborhood. H-5 Encourage home ownership by providing information on the availability of financing to renters of single family homes. Implementing groups N eighbmhood Organization Denver Urban Renewal Authority Planning and Community Development Office Neighborhood Organization Building Department City Attorney Dept. of Public Works, Neighborhood Support Services Division and Zoning Administration Dept. of Public Works, Neighborhood Support Services and Zoning Administration Planning and Community Development Office Denver Urban Renewal Authority Neighborhood Organizations Private Industry Planning and Community Development Office and Neighborhood Organization 23

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VIII. URBAN DESIGN A. The Role of Urban Design Urban design is how a city or neighborhood is put together, how it looks, feels and functions. It involves deliberate actions to create a physical environment that meets social, economic, functional, environmental and aesthetic objectives. It can create a neighborhood's awareness of its unique and important role within the city. Where urban design has occurred, the citizens continually value the result, sometimes not exactly knowing why they like an area or why the area holds attraction. Good urban design preserves the qualities of a neighborhood by considering changes and structuring them so that they enhance these qualities rather than detract from them. It develops a clear neighborhood character that people can recognize, understand, be proud of and remember. Urban design's framework considers the physical structure of neighborhood elements (ie ... streets, pathways, spaces, views, buildings, focal points, and landmarks). B. Landmarks The Overland Golf Course is a major landmark and recreational resource in the neighborhood. It is clearly visible from many areas of the neighborhood as well as the South Santa Fe transportation corridor. The John Collins United Methodist Church, located at the southeast corner of lliff and Bannock, is the most significant building considered to be a landmark. The property was donated to the church by United States Senator Wolcott of Colorado. The main sanctuary was constructed in 1900 at a cost of $6,000.00. This well-maintained church is of appropriate scale to the single-family neighborhood and makes a strong, simple and fmely detailed architectural statement. The stone bell tower topped with a white wooden belfry completes an architectural composition which says this is a community and spiritual gathering place. The interior sanctuary space is nearly square in plan and graciously tall, capped by the gabled roof forms. This elegant worship space has the feeling of a large chapel and is the reason many couples even from outside the neighborhood have chosen to celebrate their marriage vows there. 25

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C. Views The neighborhood has three important views. All of them are views located within the neighborhood looking through it to the downtown skyline. These views serve as orientation reference points and connect the neighbothood within a citywide context. The view at the South Platte River and West Jewell Avenue looking north along the Platte is the most significant view. The reflection of the downtown skyline in the waters of the river make this a powerful experience. Locating a pedestrian bridge at this site will make the view an even more dramatic experience. The bridge needs to be wide enough to accommodate pedestrians, cyclists and viewers. Views looking north on Bannock and north on Acoma between Wesley and Warren reveal the downtown skyline. D. Streetscaping The residential area provides the best opportunity for streetscaping other than the South Broadway business corridor. Residential sub-area "C" has the best potential in making an immediate visual impact. There are tree lawns throughout this area which can sustain healthy tree growth, yet many tree lawns have few or no trees. The street quality improves where there are rows of mature trees and this is apparent within the neighborhood. (For a visual reference of the area refer to Overland Issues, Opportunities and Recommendations Map at the end of this chapter). E. Edges An opportunity exists along the greenway to unify dissimilar edges and uses such as industrial, retail and open parking lots. Utilizing street trees and other streetscaping to screen parking lots and industrial uses is one idea for building continuity along the edge. Attention should be given to the edge between the commercial retail on Broadway and adjacent residential area. There is an opportunity for streetscaping, primarily trees and parking lot screening to buffer, the dissimilar land uses. F. Pedestrian Bridges The three pedestrian bridges proposed for crossing the South Platte River will provide increased mobility across the river. The bridges will allow both people from within and outside the neighborhood to have access to both sides of the river. This arrangement will provide for a variety of "look" walks along the river and increase the opportunity to experience the river. The bridge at Jewell Avenue will give residents comfortable access to active recreational uses within Ruby Hill Park. The bridge at Harvard Gulch Park is located at the southwestern tip of the neighborhood. This bridge will provide access west through the pleasant linear Harvard Gulch Park all the way to Federal Boulevard. 26

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G. Urban Design Action Recommendations Action Recommendations UD-1 Implement street tree planting programs in commercial areas (ie ... Broadway Business District and residential sub-areas "A" through "C") UD-2 Maintain and enhance the views within the river corridor, the strongest view is looking north over the river toward downtown where West Jewell Avenue ends by the river edge. Build a pedestrian/bike bridge at Jewell A venue over the South Platte River. UD-3 Create an entry/welcoming area to the Greenway and Overland Golf Course Park. Develop adequate parking and acquire land as required to create an entry to this area. UD-4 Maintain, improve and create buffering of the South Santa Fe transportation corridor. (ie.. noise mitigation with walls and related landscape design). UD-5 Develop a linear park-like environment on the residential side of the sound wall within state-owned land (housing sub-areas A & B). This park should explore low maintenance xeriscape landscaping to reduce maintenance demands. Landscaping should include large trees because they contribute significantly to buffering noise and air pollution. Implementing Groups Denver Planning and Community Development Office Department of Parks and Recreation Neighborhood Organization Department of Public Works Department of Parks and Recreation Denver Planning and Community Development Office Department of Parks and Recreation Greenway Foundation Department of Public Works Denver Planning and Community Development Office Department of Public Works, Traffic and Transportation Railroad Companies Colorado Department of Transportation Denver Planning and Community Development Office Neighborhood Organization Department of Parks and Recreation 27

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UD-6 Initiate a corridor study along Broadway which will identify and define sub-districts, address land use and zoning problems, marketing, urban design and transportation. The urban design component should establish a thematic character with a complementary package of streetscape elements. Include a coordinated signage program and guidelines for business improvements, modifications and developments. UD-7 Park features such as the Overland Pond Park are encouraged along the full length of the river corridor. Other examples include, but are not limited to, an educational walk, handicap accessible fishing dock and ecological zones. UD-8 Develop three pedestrian bridges along the South Plate River at Florida Avenue, Jewell Avenue, and across from Harvard Gulch Park. Denver Planning and Community Development Office Mayor's Office of Economic Development Department of Public Works Planning and Development Greenway Foundation Department of Parks and Recreation Planning and Development Greenway Foundation Department of Parks and Recreation 28

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IX. A. Parks and Open Space NEIGHBORHOOD FACILITIES AND NEIGHBORHOOD IMPROVEMENTS Overland's history begins with parks and open space areas. Located in Overland are the Overland Pond Educational Park and Golf Course, Overland Lake (leased for commercial use), Frontier Park, Pasquinel's Landing and a 2 l/2 mile stretch of the Platte River Greenway. Overland Pond Educational Park and Golf Course The Overland Pond Educational Park is one of two Denver parks that feature natural wild grasses in addition to Kentucky blue grass and has been designed to feature the trees, shrubs, flowers and grasses of five of Colorado's ecological zones .A wheelchair-accessible nature trail winds its way through the park, accenting several signs describing the various planting areas. A fishing area doubling as a small outdoor classroom borders the pond in the center of the park. The Overland Golf Course was initially privately developed as a race track and later developed into a golf course. In 1930, Denver opened a nine-hole golf course; the course was expanded to eighteen holes in 1957. Overland Golf Course consists of 134 Acres of park developed land. Overland Lake, located north of the golf course on Florida A venue and Platte River, is leased as a commercial use. Frontier Park Located on both sides of the Platte River and connected by a wooden pedestrian bridge, this historic park features a mining shack and other related equipment that are replicas of such facilities used during Colorado's gold rush era. Pasquinel 's Landing Named for the character in James Michener's best-seller Centennial, this park features a playground structure that serves the neighborhood as well as the Greenway, and ties into the south end of Overland Golf Course. Ruby Hill Park Ruby Hill Park is a favorite picnic spot which provides swimming facilities for adults and children during the summer. Although this park is not located in the Overland neighborhood, it warrants mentioning because of its proximity to the neighborhood and the proposed recommendation to install a pedestrian bridge over the South Platte River between Overland Park Golf Course and Ruby Hill. South Platte River Greenway The Platte River is the most significant natural amenity for the Overland Neighborhood; it provides access to the Greenway and 17 other park amenities where people can bicycle, jog, picnic, walk, fish, boat, rollerskate, commute or just look at the beautiful downtown skyline. 29

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B. Storm and Sanitary Sewers Stonn sewers are a problem during the winter months wherever streets and alleys are unpaved. The Wastewater Management Division of the Department of Public Works installed a stonn drainage system in 1989 that appears to work as long as the water flows from streets and alleys. The Department recognizes the need to clean the storm drainage inlets when conditions warrant. The sanitary sewer system is in good condition. C. Police Protection and Crime Overland is served by Police District Station #4 located at 2100 S. Clay Street. The Overland neighborhood ranked 12th of the 68 neighborhoods in the 1990 Neighborhood Crime Rankings for total offenses by crime rate. A concern raised during the planning process was the possibility of increased gang activity in the Overland Neighborhorhood arising from concentrated police efforts to eliminate gang activity from boardering neighborhoods. The Neighborhood Organization presently meets on a regular basis with Police District 4, Community Relation Officers. This plan encourages the continued efforts to educate both Officers and Community regarding crime issues. D. Fire Protection The Overland neighborhood is served by Fire Station #16, located at 1601 S. Ogden Street and #23, located at 850 So. Federal Blvd. E. Schools No schools are located in Overland. Children from the neighborhood attend elementary, middle school, and senior high school in adjacent neighborhoods or paired elementary schools as follows: Fairview Elementary at 2715 W. 11th Avenue, Rosedale Elementary at 2330 S. Shennan Street, Grant Middle School at 1751 S. Washington Street, and South High School at 1700 Louisiana Avenue. F. Recreation Center The nearest recreation center is located 1/2 mile outside of the neighborhood's eastern boundary at 2318 S. Washington Street. Harvard Gulch Recreation Center will have a new swimming pool in 1993. G. Neighborhood Facilities and Neighborhood Improvements Action Recommendations Action Recommendations NFI-1 Clean stonn drainage sewer inlets when conditions warrant. NFI-2 Install dumpsters in paved alleys north of Evans Avenue and west of Broadway. Implementing Groups Dept. ofPublic Works Wastewater Manaagement Division Dept. of Public Works 30

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NFI-3 Study the possibility of naturally integrating Rosedale Elementary School to provide a walk-in school. NFI-4 Encourage participation in the residential street beautification programs provided by the City for trees, sidewalk, handicapped ramps, and entrywalk:s (eg ... Acoma Street between Iliff Avenue & Wesley Avenue). NFI-5 Enforce vandalism and trash dumping violations by outside parties. NFI -6 Replace floppy plastic lids on trash dumpsters with more durable plastic material. NFI-7 Improve the physical appearance of the neighborhood by removing graffiti, trash, dead vegetation, and junk cars; and by buffering junk yards from adjacent, residentially-zoned properties. NFI-8 Provide funding for a picnic area and/or play area in Frontier Park. NFI-9 Provide funding for a picnic area in Pasquinel Park. NFI-10 Defme the street edge along the river corridor with curb & gutter on both sides of the street. NFI -11 Provide a pedestrian bridge connection over the South Platte River between Ruby Hill Park and Overland Golf Course. Denver Planning and Community Development Office Neighborhood Organization Denver Public Schools Denver Planning and Community Development Office Dept. of Public Works, Neighborhood Support Services Neighborhood Organization Dept. of Public Works, Neighborhood Support Services Dept. of Public Works, Neighborhood Support Services Neighborhood Organization Keep Denver Beautiful Zoning Administration Department of Parks and Recreation Department of Parks and Recreation Dept. ofPublic Works Department of Parks and Recreation Department of Parks and Recreation The Greenway Foundation 31

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NFI-12 Encourage neighborhood residents to become aware of available programs to pay for street and/or alley improvement assessments for low-to-moderate income homeowners. N:FI -13 Pave, resurface and improve the alleys and streets listed in appendix "A" at the end of this report. NFI-14 Continue to promote relations between Police, neighborhood businesses and residents with regard to education on crime concerns. Denver Planning and Community Development Neighborhood Organization Department of Public Works Police Department Neighborhood Organization Business Organization 32

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LeGEND PLI'rTIE RltiER GREENWAY 1 ;;: if OEN!IER R4RK5 I I H n IJIJ I--MAJOR 5mf'U5/ARTf!Al? 1!1!1JRTANT V!cW<:i LANDMARKS ReSIDENT?Al -a?MMBZC!AL-!NOC15TRJAL-: / -0,1-1 r-z Ne/6HBORHOOD ltX/NDARY BICYCL !?O!J!J:; EX/5T!NGjFifOft?St
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X. ENVIRONMENT This section presents environmental topics and issues such as topography, flood plain, pollution, and energy and resource conservation. A. Topography and Flood Plain The lowest elevation point of the neighborhood is the South Platte River as shown on the topographic map. It slopes upwards towards the southeast portion of the neighborhood. The Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM) shows the Overland Golf Course and much of the Overland Neighborhood located in the flood plain area. B. Residential Environment The residential environment consists mostly of single-family residences with duplexes and multifamily units randomly dispersed throughout the neighborhood. Residents take pride in the upkeep and maintenance of their properties, although litter and dirt from the pass-through traffic tend to overwhelm the neighborhood. C. Pollution Much of the air and noise pollution in the neighborhood comes from automobile traffic that goes through the neighborhood. The Colorado Department of Transportation has provided noise barrier fences along South Santa Fe Drive. There are large sections of state-owned vacant land on the west side of South Santa Fe Drive. The plan encourages planting and maintaining large trees in the state-owned vacant land. Trees would provide a noise buffer as well as help with the air pollution problem in the neighborhood. The Shattuck Chemical Company, located at 1805 South Bannock, is a part of the Denver Radium Superfund site. EPA and the Colorado Department of Health have conducted thorough studies of the Shattuck site to determine the extent of contamination and to evaluate various cleanup alternatives. The perferred alternative for cleanup of the Shattuck Chemical Company is for the excavation of contaminated soils and off-site disposal. D. Energy and Resource Conservation The neighborhood is interested in conserving energy and resources as well as recycling. 35

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E. Environment Action Recommendation Action Recommendation E-1 Reduce the air pollution impact in Overland by supporting city and state air pollution control measures, including biking, car pooling, public transit, street sweeping, and wood burning restrictions. E-2 Clean up, as necessary, the ground contamination in any identified sites (ie ... Shattuck Chemical Company). E-3 Although stabilization of the Shattuck Chemical Company site was the selected remedy, this plan necessitates the excavation and removal of the identified site contamination for the purpose of potential land redevelopment. E-4 Support neighborhood energy conservation programs. Promote energy conservation in residential and non-residential structures as follows: -evaluate heating and cooling alternatives -encourage energy audits and inventorying building characteristics -promote retrofitting of existing buildings and provide consumer protection information on energy matters. E-5 Support and participate in neighborhood and city programs in recycling non-renewable resources (e.g. aluminum, glass, paper, plastics, oil, etc.) for the benefit of the neighborhood and city. E-6 Screen and "kid-proof' industrial/ commercial trash dumpsters which are visible from adjacent residential areas. Implementing Groups Neighborhood Residents Employers Regional Transportation District U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Dept. ofPublic Works U.S. Enviornmental Protection Agency Neighborhood Organization Shattuck Chemical Company Public Service Co. Dept. ofPublic Works Denver Recycles Business Owners Residents 36

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XI. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT A. Overview of Existing Conditions Commercial and industrial businesses make up 50% of the land uses in the neighborhood. The businesses in Overland are an important source of employment for the neighborhood as well as the city. Commercial and industrial businesses have been grouped into sections/corridors to best define the areas. The commercial business corridor on Broadway and the industrial area along Santa Fe and the railroad tracks are grouped into four sub-areas (referenced in the Urban Design pull-out map). Broadway is the dividing line between the Overland Neighborhood, Platt Park and Rosedale Neighborhoods. This plan looks at both sides of Broadway in making its recommendations. Business/Commercial Sub-area I Sub-area I, known to the neighborhood as Antique Row, is a quaint, thriving business community that specializes in the sale of antiques. Antique Row has a clear metro-wide identity and an international clientele. The boundaries for Antique Row are Broadway between Mississippi A venue and Iowa A venue. The pride displayed by merchants on Antique Row in maintaining their businesses create the type of impression the neighborhood would like to see develop along the entire Broadway corridor. Business/Commercial Sub-area II Sub-area TI boundaries are from Iowa A venue to Yale Avenue. This area has good access from Evans onto Broadway. Neighborhood serving restaurants range from national chain restaurants to family-owned businesses. Long-term independent businesses have survived the flood of 1965 and the tornado of 1988. Like many of Denver's business strip developments, this area has attracted used car lot dealers and absentee landowners because of high volumes of traffic and inexpensive land costs. Prostitution, and drug and gang activities have developed along the corridor, partly due to its proximity with the Denver/Englewood border. Several bars that promote anti-social activity in and around their establishments present another troubling factor. BMW Furniture, Bundy's Restuarant, Onofrio's Piano, Bill's Collectables, and Revival Record are a few of the businesses that have been in operation for over 20 years. Some of the newer businesses are Alexandra's Car Wash, Premier Furniture, Paula's TI Mexican Restaurant, 7-11, Eurolite, and Performance Cycle's. The neighborhood encourages these types of businesses to remain and continue on the Broadway business corridor. Although there is a major concern with regard to expansion into the residential area, the 39

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business community as well as the residential community would like to have a sub-area study developed for the Broadway business corridor and the industrial area north of Evans in order to identify and define sub-districts, and address land use and zoning problems, marketing, urban design and transportation. In addition, the study should establish a thematic character with a complementary package of streetscape elements. Business/Industrial Sub-area ill Sub-area III boundaries are Mississippi on the north, Evans Avenue on the south, South Platte River and Santa Fe Drive on the west, and Acoma on the east This area is predominantly industrial. Much of the vacant land available in the neighborhood is located in Sub-area III. There is a lot of potential for business growth in this area without impacting the existing residential community. Newer businesses have moved into the area in the past 5 years such as Clinic Care, Desk Inc., McDonald's, and Mile High Cable Vision. The older businesses that have been able to survive through many changes are construction service oriented businesses such as Flanigan's, General Welding, Tools Unlimited and Kroonenberg Lumber Company; mixed with such businesses as the Breakfast King, Pet City, and Sachs-Lawlor. There is some potential for higher density residential and mixed-use development in Sub-area III once light rail comes into this section of the neighborhood. Gates Rubber Company holds a large assemblage of land in Sub-area III which is presently leased to smaller businesses in the area. Although their five-year plan does not call for any major redevelopment, the potential is there for long range future planning. Business/Industrial Sub-area IV Sub-area IV boundaries are Evans A venue on the north, Delaware Street on the east, Yale A venue on the south, and South Platte River Drive on the west A large industrial park runs between South Platte River Drive and South Santa Fe Drive. The industrial uses located along Delaware Street are the neighborhood's major concern. Although the need to work and live together is the neighborhood's goal, the expansion of businesses into the residential community has made it difficult for residences to remain in the area. Unfortunately, some of the business uses are higher density than the zoning allows as they have been grandfathered in as an allowable use. There is a need to make this area pedestrian friendly by installing curbs and sidewalks. Parking for employees and customers is essential to maintain good neighbor relations. These businesses are also well established wholesale operations that have been in the neighborhood for years. Truck traffic and resistance to neighborhood street improvements are the biggest debates between the businesses and the residences in this area. Long term stable businesses in this area include Barton, Denver Pottery, Martin Manufacturing and Katzke Paper. Some of the newer businesses include Bob's Towing, Signs, Inc., and Statewide Wholesale. The steering committee felt strongly that although the Overland Golf Course is not in an industrial zone, it is a business and should be included in the Market/Urban Design Sub-area Study proposed in this plan. It needs to be included as a viable business venture within the neighborhood. 40

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B. Economic Development Action Recommendations Action Recommendations ED-1 Support the development of a neighborhood business organization for the business community. ED-2 Support the expansion and redevelopment of Antique Row on South Broadway. ED-3 Encourage an integrated business signage program for the Broadway business corridor. ED-4 Support joint marketing efforts within the business community. ED-5 Secure funding for an Urban Design Corridor Study for the Broadway Business Corridor. ED-6 Promote a summer employment program for youth in the neighborhood as a "joint" effort between businesses and residents. Implementing Groups Business/Property Owners Mayor's Office of Economic Development Denver Planning and Community Development Office Business/Property Owners Mayor's Office of Economic Development Denver Planning and Community Development Office Business/Property Owners Zoning Administration Mayor's Office of Economic Development Business/Property Owners Mayor's Office of Economic Development Business/Property Owners Mayor's Office of Economic Development Denver Planning and Community Development Office Neighborhood Organization Business/Property Owners 41

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XII. IMPLEMENTATION A. Means of Plan Implementation The adopted Overland Neighborhood Plan will serve as an official guide to the physical development of the neighborhood. It becomes an official amendment to the City's Comprehensive Plan. It is the responsibility of residents, property owners, the Overland Neighborhood Association, various city officials and elected officials to implement the plan. The plan is only worth the time, energy and resources given to implement it. The plan serves as a guide for making decisions about the neighborhood. City departments use the plan to guide recommendations and decisions on the neighborhood's priorities for desired improvements, urban design, housing, business types, traffic, and public services which encourage and contribute to the economic, social, and physical health, safety and welfare of the people who live and work in Overland. Some of the action recommendations that are presented at the end of each chapter are simple, require no financial resources, and can be accomplished in a matter of months. Others are more difficult and require years and a lot of money to complete. There are also recommendations that require study and more discussion before they can be started and accomplished. B. Human Resources of Plan Implementation This plan represents many hours of volunteered time to walk and drive through the neighborhood, interview businesses and meet with concern citizens of Overland in order to develop action recommendations. YOU, the concerned citizen, and all of US, the community, working together can make this plan successful. Your involvement in the community and working with elected officials can make these recommendations a reality. A suggested recommendation for plan implementation is an annual and/or bi-annuallist of priorities developed between the neighborhood organization, concerned citizen's and the city based on the neighborhood plan's action recommendations. The Denver Planning and Community Development Office has assigned a neighborhood planner to provide technical assistance for the implementation of the plan. The neighborhood planner acts as a liaison between residents, neighborhood organizations and the City Administration. The City and County of Denver is a ll!ajor player in the plan's implementation. Once adopted the plan will help influence city policies, programs, and decisions that will be crucial in implementing the action recommendations. The staff of the Planning and Community Development Office and the many other city agencies listed will work with the neighborhood to explain the plan proposals to the Denver Planning Board, City Council, and all relevant city decision-making bodies. In addition to the plan's guidance, city staff will be available to assist the neighborhood to influence the city decisions and actions on zoning requests; the evaluation of public and private development proposals; Capital Improvement Program (CIP), Community Development Block Grant (CDBG), and other funding requests; and regulatory ordinances. 43

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C. lmplementationAction Recommendations Action Recommendations I -1 Monitor and update the plan as needed. 1-2 Request funding through the Capital Improvement Budget, Community Development and other funding resources to implement the plan. Implementing Groups Neighborhood Residents Denver Planning and Community Development Office Neighborhood Residents and Businesses Denver Planning and Community Development Office 44

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APPENDIX II A II Overland Neighborhood Alley and Street Paving Recommendations NORTH/SOUTH STREETSACOMA STREET. 1. On Acoma at Florida Florida A venue needs to be resurfaced or completed. 2. Between Mexico & Iowa -needs curb, gutter & walks. 3. Mexico Streetneeds gutter, curb & walks on both sides. 4. Between Colorado Avenue & Asbury Avenueneeds curb, gutter & sidewalks. 5. Northwest corner of Acoma Street & Warren Avenuecurb repair. 1. At Asbury needs gutters at intersection NORTH/SOUTH STREETS-DELAWARE STREET 1. Between Yale & Evans A venues entire street is paved, needs curb, gutter & walks must accommodate business parking. NORTH/SOUTH STREETSSOUTH PLATTE RIVER DRIVE 1. Between Mississippi & Yale Avenuesneeds curb, gutter on pavement. 2. Between Evans & Yale A venues cul-de-sac South Platte River Drive. NORTH/SOUTH ALLEYS -BETWEEN BROADWAY & ACOMA STREET 1. Beginning at Yale Avenue to Warren Avenue -patch potholes. 2. Between Asbury, Jewell & Colorado Avenuesresurface alley. 3. Between Colorado & Iowa Avenues sewer has been installed, resurface alley. 4. Between Iowa & Florida Avenuesfill potholes. NORTH/SOUTH ALLEYS -BETWEEN ACOMA & BANNOCK STREETS 1. Between lliff & Warren A venues fill potholes. 2. Between Warren & Evans Avenuespave alley. 3. Between Asbury & Jewell Avenuespave "L" shaped alley. 4. Between Jewell & Colorado Avenuespave alley. 5. Between Colorado & Mexico Avenuespave alley. 45

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NORTH/SOUTH ALLEYS -BETWEEN BANNOCK AND CHEROKEE STREETS. 1. Between Mississippi & Louisiana Avenuespave alley. 2. Between Arkansas & Florida Avenuespave alley. 3. Between Wesley & Harvard Avenuespave alley. 4. Between Evans & Warren Avenuespave alley. NORTH/SOUTH ALLEYS -BETWEEN CHEROKEE & DELAWARE STREETS 1. Between Florida & Arkansas A venues fill potholes. 2. Between Arkansas & Mississippi A venues alleys are closed -gates. 3. Between Evans and Yale A venues pave alley. NORTH/SOUTH ALLEYSBETWEEN ELATI AND FOX STREETS 1. Between Jewell & Asbury Avenuespave alley. NORTH/SOUTH ALLEYSBETWEEN FOX AND GALAPAGO STREETS 1. Between Jewell & Harvard Avenuespave alleys. NORTH/SOUTH ALLEYSBETWEEN GALAPAGO & HURON STREETS 1. Between Jewell & Evans A venues pave alleys. 2. Between Evans & Harvard abuts Frontier Park -needs improvement to be an amenity for park. EAST/WEST STREETS 1. Jewell Avenue needs improvement at Acoma Street. 2. Pave Vassar A venue from Cherokee Street to Delaware Street. 3. Harvard Avenue, Wesley Avenue,'Uiff Avenue-Between Cherokee Street and Delaware Street-needs paving, curb, gutter & walks. 4. lliff & Warren Streets West of Delaware needs to be improved and create a cul-de-sac. 5. Jewell Avenue between Santa Fe Drive and Huron Street -pave street include curbs and gutters. 6. Asbury A venue between Huron Street and Golf Course needs curbs and gutters. 46