Citation
Park Hill neighborhood plan

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Title:
Park Hill neighborhood plan
Creator:
Community Planning and Development, City and County of Denver
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
City and County of Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
City planning
Neighborhood plans
Community planning
Spatial Coverage:
Denver -- Park Hill

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Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Preface
The Purpose of the Plan.................................................2
Priority Planning Issues................................................3
Plan Implementation and Action Agenda...................................3
Neighborhood Description................................................4
Introduction
Map Park Hill Neighborhood............................................6
Neighborhood Location...................................................7
Park Hill Vision for the Future.........................................7
Neighborhood History....................................................7
Key Abbreviations Used in Action Chart Implementation...................9
Environment
Goal...................................................................11
Objectives.............................................................11
Action Recommendations.................................................11
Action Chart...........................................................12
Traffic and Transportation
Overview...............................................................16
Mass Transit...........................................................16
Bike Routes............................................................17
Issues.................................................................17
Goals..................................................................17
Action Recommendations.................................................18
Action Chart...........................................................19
Map Street Classifications and Traffic Volumes.......................24
Parks, Recreation, Open Spaces, and Trails
Goals..................................................................26
Action Recommendations.................................................26
Action Chart...........................................................27


Land Use
Overview.................................................................30
Residential Land Uses....................................................30
Special Residential Land Uses............................................30
Commercial Land Uses.....................................................31
VacantlLand .............................................................31
Parks and Open Space.....................................................31
Schools..................................................................31
Goals....................................................................31
Action Recomendations....................................................32
Action Chart.............................................................33
Map Land Use...........................................................37
Urban Design
Overview.................................................................39
Goals....................................................................39
Action Recomendations....................................................40
Action Chart.............................................................41
Public Safety
Overview.................................................................45
Goals....................................................................45
Objectives...............................................................45
Action Recomendations....................................................46
Action Chart.............................................................47


TABLE OF CONTENTS
Business and Economic Development
Overview.................................................................51
Colfax Ave. Business Corridor.........................................51
Colorado Boulevard Business Corridor..................................51
Neighborhood Shopping Nodes...........................................52
Quebec St. Hotel Corridor.............................................52
Industrial Corridor...................................................53
Issues and Goals.........................................................53
Colfax Ave. Business Corridor.........................................53
Colorado Boulevard Business Corridor..................................54
Neighborhood Shopping Nodes...........................................54
Quebec St. Hotel Corridor.............................................54
Industrial Corridor...................................................54
Action Recomendations....................................................54
Action Chart.............................................................55
Human Relations and Community Services
Goals....................................................................59
Plan Implementation and Action Agenda....................................59
Action Recomendations....................................................59
Action Chart.............................................................60
Education
Overview.................................................................63
Goals....................................................................63
Priority Recomendations..................................................64
Action Recomendations....................................................64
Action Chart.............................................................65
Community Coordination
Overview.................................................................68
Goals....................................................................68
Objectives...............................................................68
Action Recomendations....................................................69
Action Chart.............................................................70
IV


PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
Dahlia and Holley Shopping Center Redevelopment
Action Recomendations....................................................73
Action Chart.............................................................74
Neighborhood Commercial Shopping Nodes...................................78
Commercial Development...................................................78
Sidewalks................................................................79
Youth Meeting Outcomes
Overview.................................................................80
Education................................................................82
Public Safety............................................................84
Appendix A: Park HiU Urban Design Guidelines
Residential Areas........................................................87
Neighborhood Commercial Nodes............................................87
Colfax Commercial Development............................................88
Industrial Areas.........................................................89
Sidewalks................................................................89
Appendix B: Zone District Descriptions and Definitions
Descriptions and Definitions.............................................90
Appendix C: Assessment
Summary..................................................................100
Demographics.............................................................104
Education and Schools....................................................107
Economic and Employment Characteristics..................................Ill
Land Use and Zoning......................................................114
Housing..................................................................120
Streets,Traffic and Public Transportation................................123
Infrastructure...........................................................127
Public Safety............................................................130
Community Facilities.....................................................132
Acknowledgements...............................................................137




PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
PREFACE
...there has to be someone who is willing to do it, who is willing to take whatever risks
are required. I don't think it can be done with money alone. The person has to be
dedicated to the task. There has to be some other motivation.
Cesar Chavez


PREFACE
THE PURPOSE OF THE PLAN
The Park Hill Plan has been years in the making. It represents the collective vision of community
members for the future of the Park Hill community, the goals for fulfilling that vision and the specific
actions that should be taken to realize these goals. This plan is the result of countless hours of work by
more than 100 community members in collaboration with representatives of the City and County of
Denvers Community Planning and Development Agency and other city departments. This plan will serve
as a road map to guide the people of Park Hill as they walk together at the beginning of the 21st century.
This plan also identifies the extensive and rich resources within Park Hill:people resources (our principal
asset); the organizations dedicated to empowering community members; faith communities; human capital
services, recreation programs and educational institutions
The plan serves as an official guide for the community and the rest of the city as to how Park Hill
envisions community-building, the neighborhood's physical and economic development, the delivery of
services, and the overall improvement of the Park Hill community. The plan, approved by Denvers City
Council, serves as a guide for making decisions about the neighborhood. It is the responsibility of the
neighborhood organizations and assigned city staff to prioritize recommendations as time, energy and
resources allow. Denvers Comprehensive Plan 2000 is the foundation for the Park Hill Neighborhood Plan
and all official plans of the City. As adopted, the Park Hill Neighborhood Plan becomes an amendment to
the Denver Comprehensive Plan. Representatives of all City departments are to use this plan to guide
policy recommendations and decisions.
This plan is intended to promote patterns of desired neighborhood change, urban design, housing
development and preservation, business development, traffic flow and safety and other public services, all
of which contribute to the economic, social, and physical health, safety and welfare of the people who live
and work in Park Hill.
This plan is not an official zone map nor does it imply or deny any implicit rights to a particular zone.
Zone changes that may be proposed as part of this or any plan, must be initiated and adopted under
separate procedures established by the City and County of Denver Municipal Code.
2


PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
p Priority Planning Issues
The residents, business people, representatives of community-based organizations and city departments
who helped shape the vision for Park Hill and this plan see tremendous potential as the Park Hill
Neighborhood builds on its assets and opportunities. As a result of numerous planning meetings, the
Park Hill Neighborhood Plan identifies, places high priority and addresses the following issues that are
crucial to the future of the community.
P Environment
P Transportation
P Urban Design
P Public Safety
P Land use and Zoning
P Business and Economic Development
P Human Relations, Community Services and Coordination
P Education
P Parks, Recreation, Open Spaces and Trails
p Plan Implementation and Actinn Agenda
Each of the ten major policy areas of the plan (environment, transportation, parks and open space, land
use and zoning, urban design, public safety, business and economic development, human relations and
community services, education and community coordination) has an action agenda section that lists the
specific actions to be taken, the general time frames for carrying out the actions, and what organizations
and/or city departments should provide the resources to carry out the action items. The planning group
selected three action items from each policy area as top priorities for implementation.
3


PREFACE
t Neighborhood Description
Park Hill is a traditional city neighborhood with a small-town atmosphere. Here people of diverse
cultures, ages, races, and economic backgrounds share a sense of community. The community is
characterized by large residential and industrial areas and smaller commercial areas. Major facilities in the
neighborhood include: the Park Hill Golf Course, several neighborhood shopping areas at 35th Avenue
and Dahlia Street, 33rd Avenue and Holly Street, 23rd Avenue and Dexter Street, 22nd Avenue and Kearney
Street, 23rd and Oneida and a large industrial area that extends north from 38th Avenue to the City line.
There are also five public elementary schools, one elementary charter school, one middle school and
numerous faith institutions serving a wide range of faiths and denominations. The residential areas Park
Hill of the community are south of 38th Avenue and east of Colorado Blvd. Immediately adjacent to Park
Hill is City Park, which houses the Denver Museum of Nature and Science and the Denver Zoo. Both of
these institutions impact the quality of life in Park Hill.
The neighborhood possesses many assets including a large stock of generally well maintained homes,
excellent access to major transportation services and corridors, downtown Denver, and entertainment
facilities, and three major parkways; 17th Avenue, Martin Luther King Blvd. Parkway and Monaco Parkway.
There are two neighborhood organizations that serve Park Hill- Greater Park Hill Community, Inc. (GPHC)
and Park Hill for Safe Neighborhoods. GPHC publishes a monthly newspaper,The Greater Park Hill News.


INTRODUCTION


h Park Hill Neighborhood Map


PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
h Neighborhood Location
The Park Hill neighborhood is bounded on the west by Colorado Boulevard, on the north by the City
limits, on the east by Quebec Street and on the south by Colfax Avenue.
The Park Hill Vision for the Fotore
Park Hill vision for the future is to preserve and enhance the positive qualities that make the
neighborhood a unique place to live, work, learn, and play.
h Preserve and continue to build on the image of a vibrant community that celebrates diversity of
people in ages, income, ethnic and cultural heritage.
h Create linkages to the future residential and business development in the new Stapleton
community to enhance the economic and social impacts on Park Hill.
h Create partnerships that involve residents, community based organizations, businesses, Denver
City Government, Denver Public Schools, Stapleton Development Corporation and Forest City
(developers of Stapleton).
h Preserve and continue to build on the beautiful architecture, urban design, tree-lined streets and
parkways with lively pedestrian-oriented commercial areas, positive, safe and usable parks, and
open space for meeting places and recreational activities.
h Create a universally safe neighborhood that builds on a strong sense of pride, communication
and cooperation among all neighbors.
h Continue to build a sustainable neighborhood that values quality of life, environment and
talented people.
h Park Hill is home to a diversity of
faith-based commooities
h Attract high quality new businesses, retain and expand existing businesses that provide quality
services, employment opportunities and character to the neighborhood.
h Neighborhood History
Park Hills colorful history began in 1886, when Baron Eugene Von Winkler bought and began to plat
what eventually was called the finest square mile of real estate west of the Mississippi, displacing the
prairie dogs, rattlesnakes, and farms with fine homes. A steam railroad and trolley lines made this


INTRODUCTION
residential area accessible to downtown. And the nearness of City Park gave Park Hill residents the
feeling of both a suburb and a city.
The 1920s to the 1930s saw the next building boom in Park Hill while the propeller-driven planes
landing and taking off at Stapleton Airport hardly impacted the neighborhood. Residents were and are
attracted to Park Hill because of the Museum of Nature and Science, the Denver Zoo, its proximity to
hospitals and downtown, and the wide variety of housing styles from Tudors, Queen Annes, Bungalows,
to Denver Squares.
After World War II, during the third growth and settlement wave, more modern homes were built for
military veterans, and airline stewardesses and machinists who were employed at nearby Stapleton
Airport and businesses. Located in the northern area of Park Hill (north of 26th Avenue, many of these
newer residences were single family ranch style homes built for first time homebuyers, and low-rise
apartment buildings.
Greater Park Hill is an idea and a vision, as well as a place. The vision during the last 40 years has been
to create a community where people of different racial, ethnic, economic and cultural backgrounds
would live and work peaceably together to build a stronger neighborhood. Park Hill, which is often
called the conscience of the city, has created an intentionally multi-racial and multi-cultural community,
whose inclusionary example has influenced the human relations climate of Denver and the whole state
of Colorado. Park Hill has become nationally known for its progressive efforts at promoting cultural and
economic diversity. This is a legacy of which the neighborhood is proud.
8


PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
KEY TO ABBREVIATIONS OSED IN ACTION CHART IMPLEMENTORS
BAs..................................Business Associations
CPDA.................................Community Planning and Development Agency
H&NDS ...............................Housing & Neighborhood Development Services
NIS..................................Neighborhood Inspection Services
ZA ..................................Zoning Administration
CC ..................................Community Corrections
CBOs ................................Community-Based Organizations
DPD..................................Denver Police Department
DAs ................................District Attorneys Office
DURA.................................Denver Urban and Renewal Authority
DP&R.................................Denver Parks and Recreation
MOED ................................Mayors Office of Economic Development
MOET.................................Mayors Office of Employment and Training
NOs .................................Neighborhood Organizations
PW...................................PubUc Works
PW-TE ...............................Public Works-Transportation Engineering
PHBSO................................Park Hill Business Support Office
SDC .................................Stapleton Development Corporation
SW...................................Solid Waste


ENVIRONMENT
ENVIRONMENT
Whatever is flexible and flowing will tend to grow,
whatever is rigid and blocked will wither and die.
Tao Te Ching
10


PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
h Goal
Through neighborhood advocacy and stewardship, the residents and property owners of Park Hill
wish to maintain and protect the built and natural features of the community including trees, parks
and open space, and parkways. To encourage residents and businesses to preserve and enhance the
physical environment of their neighborhood through education, self-help activities and standards set
in local ordinances.
h Objectives
1 Develop a partnership with and mechanisms for regular contact with the City Foresters office
to insure that the maintenance and replacement programs for trees in parks and parkways
continue to be adequate.
2 Develop mechanisms to safeguard, clean up, and restore the air, water and soils of Park Hill.
3 Improve the environmental quality of the industrial corridor.
The action recommendations have been divided into on-going, short term and long term. On-going
recommendations can be started immediately and continue. Short-term recommendations can be started
immediately with limited resources or no money. Long-term recommendations will take longer to
accomplish and will require funding.
The action items relating to the environment that the planning group selected as its top priorities are
as follows (in cases where more than three items appear, there was a tie for one of the positions):
h Action Recommendations
1.1-18 Perform an inventory of brownfields and contaminated businesses in Park Hill. Explore
opportunities to mitigate these sites through clean up, rehabilitation and/or redevelopment.
2. EG Conduct a major clean up of all quadrants in the neighborhood twice a year through the Keep
Denver Beautiful campaign.
2. E21 Track complaints about Section 8 landlords and facilities and mitigate these issues.
3. E8 Identify the top 25 blighted properties two times a year in an effort to bring them into
compliance with relevant codes.
"if
%

> The new Skyland Recreation Center
n


ENVIRONMENT ACTION CHART
# Actions Ongoing Immediately Short Term Long Term Implemented
El Develop a public relations effort and pamphlet to encourage residents and businesses to plant and maintain trees. Neighborhood Organizations (NOs), Businesses, Denver Parks and Recreation
E2 Obtain funds for the planting of more trees. NOs and Businesses
E3 Encourage participation in arbor day celebrations and the Denver Digs Trees program. NOs, Businesses, Community, Denver Parks and Recreation
E4 Educate and encourage residents to participate in the Leaf Drop and Tree-cycle Programs. NOs, Community, Businesses and Property owners, DP&R
Eli Continue to provide and encourage participation in the Citywide waste and recycling education Programs. NOs, Businesses, Community, Public Works-Solid Waste.
EB Conduct a major clean-up of all quadrants in the neighborhood once a year through Keep Denver Beautiful campaign. NOs, BA, CC, Community, Public Works, H&NDS
E7 Host Neighborhood Ambassador Program training seminars two times a year Neighborhood Organizations, CPDA, H&NDS
E8 Identify the top 25 blighted properties two times a year in an effort to bring them into compliance with relevant codes. Neighborhood Organizations, NIS
E9 Develop a Knock and Talk program to educate residents and businesses on city ordinances and code violations for interior and exterior property maintenance to encourage them to correct infractions. NOs, NIS, Denver Police, Land Owners
12


PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
* Actions Ongoing Immediately Short Term Long Term Implementers
E10 Periodically publish in neighborhood newsletters and newspaper descriptions of zoning use and code maintenance regulations, and phone numbers and web-addresses for assistance. Neighborhood Organizations, Schools and Community- Based Organizations
Ell Encourage participation in the Adopt-A-Stop program. NOs, BOs, RTD, Public Woks-Solid Waste
E12 Contact City, State and Federal agencies for educational information on air, water and soil quality. Neighborhood Organizations
E13 Educate and encourage residents to participate in the Leaf Drop and Tree-cycle Programs. NOs, Community, Businesses and Property owners.
E14 Receive biennial reports from Denver Environmental Health Agency on existing conditions of air, water and soil. Work with the agency to mitigate any issues that may impact the community. Neighborhood Organizations, Denver Environmental Health agency
E15 Educate and inform residents when to participate in the large item pick up. Public Works-Solid Waste, Neighborhood Organizations
E16 Create and enhance buffer zones between industrial and residential areas of the community. This may include landscaping, setbacks and uses. NOs, Businesses, CPDA-Zoning Administration
E17 Educate and inform residents and mitigate lead paint use in residential dwellings. NOs, CPDA-H&NDS
13


ENVIRONMENT ACTION CHART
# Actions Ongoing Immediately Short Term Long Term Implementers
E18 Perform an inventory of brownfields and contaminated businesses in Park Hill. Explore opportunities to mitigate these sites through clean up, rehabilitation and/or redevelopment. NOs, Federal Environmental Protection Agency, DEHA, MOED
E19 Collect and track the Environmental Protection Agency Toxic Release Inventory. NOs
E20 Educate and inform neighborhood on zoning ordinance and issues. CPDA-Zoning Administration
E21 Track complaints about Section 8 landlords and facilities and mitigate these issues. NOs and Denver Housing Authority.
E22 Identify and collaborate with environmental groups. NOs
14


PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
TRAFFIC AND
TRANSPORTATION
There is more to life than increasing speed.
Mohandas K. Gandhi
15


TRAFFIC AND TRANSPORTATION
OVERVIEW
U / s. . Park Hill residents have several modes of transportation at their disposal. The primary mode of transportation is the automobile followed by bus service, pedestrian and bicycle paths and future commuter rail. There are three designations used by the City in classifying streets: arterial, collectors, and
local streets. h Arterial streets have the function of permitting rapid and relatively unimpeded traffic movement through the city and serving as a primary link between communities and major land use elements. A number of major arterials are designed as state highways. Arterials
h Through traffic on should be encouraged to stay on Quebec St., an arterial street. typically carry a range of volumes from 10,000 vehicles per day to 50,000 vehicles per day. Arterial streets in Park Hill include; Colorado Boulevard, Smith Road, Colfax Avenue, Quebec Street, Martin Luther King Boulevard Parkway, Monaco Street Parkway, 23rd Avenue, Montview Boulevard and 17th Avenue Parkway. h Collector streets have the function of collecting and distributing traffic having an origin or destination between arterial and local streets within the community, and linking neighborhood residential areas, shopping and service facilities, and employment areas. Collectors typically carry a range from 3,000 vehicles per day to 12,000 vehicles per day. Collector streets in Park Hill include; 48th Avenue, 38th Avenue, 35th Avenue, 34th Avenue, Dahlia Street (MLK to City limits), Holly Street (MLK to 48th Avenue) and 26thAvenue. h Local streets have the function of providing direct access to adjacent properties.They carry low volumes of traffic typically from 300 vehicles per day up to 1,500 vehicles per day with an origin or destination within the neighborhood. h Mass Transit Park Hill is served by several Regional Transportation District Routes. Routes 15,20,28,38,40,43,44,65 and 105. These routes provide for adequate neighborhood geographic coverage based on walking distance to bus stops. However, there are too few East and West routes (15,20,28,38, and 44) for such a large residential oriented neighborhood.
16


PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
> Bike Routes
Park Hill neighborhood is served by the citywide bikeway system. Grid route #D4 runs east and west
along 38th Avenue, #D6 runs east and west along 29th Avenue, #D8 runs east and west along Montview
Boulevard, D#15 runs north and south from Colfax Avenue and Cherry Street jogging over to Montview
Boulevard onto Dahlia Street to the city limits and D#17 runs north and south along Leyden Street.
k Issues
Based on the 1999 projected traffic counts, the cumulative volume of all arterial and collector streets
traveling east-west between Colfax Avenue and 1-70 will carry in excess of 100,000 vehicles per day.
The amount of traffic generated by non-residents in the neighborhood is undetermined at this time. A
citywide land use and transportation plan will soon be undertaken that will help determine how much
traffic is passing through Park Hill as opposed to the traffic that is generated by residents and
businesses that are a part of the neighborhood. The results of this study will help in identifying some
type of traffic mitigation or calming strategies through enforcement, education and engineering.
> Traffic on Quebec St., looking south
Parking overflow continues to be a major problem due to large volumes of traffic and inadequate off-
street parking at City Park.
Motorists and other commercial drivers do not comply with speed limits. Holly Street north of Martin
Luther King Boulevard is treated as a speedway even though there are stop signs at 35th, 36th and 38th
Avenues. The one and two-way streets below MLK function as a chute through the neighborhood,
making 17th Avenue, Montview Boulevard, 23rd Avenue, 26th Avenue, and Martin Luther King Boulevard
dangerous crossings for pedestrians and bicyclists.
A conflict exists between the need to maintain and improve the residential integrity of the one and two-
way arterial and collector streets versus the demands of an ever-increasing level of traffic.
h Goals
Improve traffic control and anticipate and meet the expanding mobility needs of residents, businesses
and visitors. Through this we can create a safe and efficient transportation network that meets the
needs of the neighborhood, emphasizing a safe and improved environment for transit users,
pedestrians, and bicyclists.
17


TRAFFIC AND TRANSPORTATION
Protect and maintain the quality of life enjoyed by residents of Park Hill, especially those on arterial and
collector streets, by enforcing speed limits, improving road conditions, addressing aesthetic issues and the
appropriate timing of maintenance and repair operations.
Action Recommendations
The action recommendations have been divided into on-going, short term and long term. On-going
recommendations can be started immediately and continue. Short-term recommendations can be started
immediately with limited resources or no money. Long-term recommendations will take longer to
accomplish and will require funding.
> Future Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd.
beutificatiun site
The neighborhood selected three projects from each policy area as top priorities for implementation.
1. T-4 Enhance the use of alternative modes (walking, bicycling and transit) through the following:
Improvement of landscaping along arterial and collector street right of ways, Installation of city
standard bicycle racks in neighborhood commercial areas, Construction of city standard
sidewalks along arterial and collector street with pedestrian ramps and intersections, and
Enhance shelters, benches, for hard surface waiting areas at bus stops so they become assets to
the neighborhood.
2. T-14 Collaborate with the City and County of Denver on the Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway
beautification project. Elements that should be included are replacing advertising benches
with bowery green benches, picnic tables, and trash receptacles. Enhance landscaping and
tree planting.
3. T-3 Mitigate impacts from traffic on residential neighborhood and adjacent land uses, with
emphasis on reducing East/West traffic through the neighborhood and maintaining the
character of streets that have been designated as Denver Landmarks and are listed in the
National Register Historic places.
18


PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
* Actions Ongoing Immediately Short Term Long Term Implementers
T1 Conduct a complete traffic and speed study of the neighborhood. Emphasis given to the origin and destination of traffic. Included should be projections of the impacts of future development at Stapleton, Lowry and Fitzsimmons. Public Works-Transportation
T2 Enforce existing parking limits in the Neighborhood. Work With police and Parking Management to enhance this service, especially for City Park uses. Parking Management, NOs, Denver Police
T3 Mitigate impacts from traffic on residential neighborhood and adjacent land uses, with emphasis upon reducing East/West traffic through the neighborhood and maintaining the character of streets that have received National Register Historic designation. Public Works-Transportation
T4 Enhance the use of alternative modes (walking, bicycling, and transit) through the following: A Improve landscaping along arterial/collector street rights-of-ways, Public Works, Transportation CPDA Denver Parks and Recreation and RTD
A Installation of city standard bicycle racks in neighborhood commercial areas,
A Construction of city standard sidewalks along arterial/collector streets (with pedestrian ramps at intersections),
A Enhance shelters, benches for hard surface waiting areas at bus stops.
19


TRAFFIC AND TRANSPORTATION ACTION CHART
# Actions Ongoing Immediately Short Term Long Term Implementers
T5 Evaluate existing traffic signage, signal timing and related traffic controls to discourage excessive speed and cut-through traffic on local Streets. Department of PW-TE
T6 Enhance the residential and pedestrian environment, where appropriate consider physically or visually narrowing local and collector streets, or additional stop signs where the Citys criteria can be met. Public Works-Transportation
T7 Stripe crosswalks at all four-way intersections where there is a high incidence of vehicles running stop signs or a high rate of documented accidents. Public Works-Transportation and Street Maintenance
T8 Identify and replace street name and parking signs that are faded or outdated. NOs, Public Works -Street Transportation
T9 Identify unimproved or unpaved alleys in the neighborhood to be improved or paved. NOs, Public Works -Street Transportation
T10 Create safe school zones through: A Replacing outdated School Zones signs with the new fluorescent yellow/green signs. NOs, Public Works Street Transportation, Denver Public Schools
A Posting signs doubling the speed fine in school areas.
A Working with and empowering the schools to meet the safety needs of their students
A Working with the schools to landscape and beautify their sites.
20


PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
* Actions Ongoing Immediately Short Term Long Term Implementers
Til Notify police of speeding. Neighborhood Organizations and Community
T12 Support and implement the best solutions for reducing speeding on streets and alleys. These might include: Police Department NOs, Public Works-Street Transportation
1 Reduced speed limits,
1 Neck downs or bulb outs of street intersections,
1 Off peak parking lanes on arterials.
T13 Work with RTD to consider circulator routes within the neighborhood that connect with the North and South routes, including but not limited to residential, commercial and the future Stapleton development. NOs and RTD, Community
T14 Collaborate with the City and County of Denver on the Martin Luther King, Jr. Parkway Beautification Project. Elements that should be included are replacing existing advertising bus benches with bowery green benches, picnic tables, and trash receptacles. Enhance landscaping and increase tree planting. Denver Parks and Recreation, Public Works- Transportation Planning, CPDA, NOs and Community
T15 Reduce the amount of truck traffic in the residential areas for existing and new development by posting signage that limits the number of tons for commercial trucks. Notify chronic offenders and post their names in the neighborhood newspaper. Public Works, Traffic Engineering, CPDA-NIS, NOs, BAs and Community
21


TRAFFIC AND TRANSPORTATION ACTION CHART
# Actions Ongoing Immediately Short Term Long Term Implemented
TIB Identify and prioritize school zones and other high pedestrian activity areas that should be considered for designation as Safety Zones. PW-TE, NOs
T17 Discourage the widening of Martin Luther King Boulevard Parkway. Divert traffic onto Smith Road. NOs, Public Works- Transportation Planning, CPDA
T18 Reduce speeding traffic through the neighborhood to a level consistent with posted speed limits and compatible with the neighborhoods land uses to preserve the residential quality of life. Denver Police Department, PW-TE
T19 Reconstruct and improve streets to adequately support traffic weight and volumes and enhance maintenance, sanding, and sweeping practices. Public Works-Street Maintenance,Traffic and Transportation Divisions
T20 Linkage between the residential and new Stapleton development. If Quebec Street is widened to four lanes in any area between ColfaxAvenue and 1-70, its improvements through the Park Hill neighborhood should be accomplished with adequate provisions for street right-of-way, landscaped medians, building setbacks, constructing detached sidewalks, new streetscapes and landscape design treatments. Public Works Transportation, Stapleton Development Corp. and Property Owners
T21 Work with Denver Police Department to purchase a speed trailer for the District 2 Station. Denver Police Department and NOs
22


PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
# Actions Ongoing Immediately Short Term Long Term Implemented
T22 Increase the use of photo radar throughout the neighborhood. 1 1 NOs and DPD
T23 Study the intersection at 23rd Avenue and Colorado Blvd. for turn signal or turn lane. 1 Public Works, Transportation Engineering, Parks and Recreation
T24 Encourage enforcement, education and engineering in order to reduce speed and make streets more neighborhood friendly through: P Notifying police of speeders and give specific information as possible P Expanding the use of speed trailers P Increased use of photo radar P Support of Drive Smart Program with Police Department P Citizen awareness through education 1 1 Denver Police Department, PW-TE, NOs, Community
23


TRAFFIC AND TRANSPORTATION
> Street Classification and Traffic Volumes Map
24


PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
PARKS, OPEN SPACE,
AND TRAILS
If you live on this land, and you have ancestors sleeping in this land, I believe that
makes you a native to this land. It has nothing to do with the color of your skin. I was
not raised to look at people racially. What I was taught is that were flowers in the
Great Spirits garden. We share a common root, and the root is Mother Earth.
Oh Shinnah
25


PARKS, OPEN SPACE, AND TRAILS
> Goals
Acquire, extend, improve, and maintain parks, public open space and parkways in the neighborhood to
meet the needs of increasing population and to support recreational opportunities. Provide improved
and extended bike and jogging paths to and within parks, open space and parkways and integrate
changes with planning for Stapleton. Insure preservation of current built and natural areas.
Action Recommendations
The neighborhood selected three projects from each policy area as top priorities for implementation.
1. P-14 Encourage businesses along 38th Avenue to contribute to a greenway concept and improved
buffer yard to screen residential from industrial uses.
2. P-G Develop a trail on Monaco Parkway from Colfax Avenue to Sand Creek through natural paths
and walkways.
3. P-9 Plant more flower beds along Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway, City of Axum Park, and other open
space and recreation areas in Park Hill.
The action recommendations have been divided into on-going, short term and long term. On-going
recommendations can be started immediately and continue. Short-term recommendations can be started
immediately with limited resources or no money. Long-term recommendations will take longer to
accomplish and will require funding.
26


PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
* Actions Ongoing Immediately Short Term Long Term Implemented
PI Identify open space suitable for use as parks such as unimproved rights of way. And privately owned land for small neighborhood parks. NOs, Denver Parks and Recreation, Landowners
P2 Post signs with directions to parks and trails systems. NOs, DP&R,PW- Street Transportation
P3 Prepare brochures on parks and recreational facilities in and adjacent to the neighborhood and publicize them in newspapers and newsletters. NOs, Denver Parks and Recreation
P4 Monitor the condition of existing parks and take action to repair and maintain their physical condition. NOs, Denver Parks and Recreation
P5 Develop a replanting plan for trees and other vegetation in parks and open space. NOs, Denver Parks and Recreation, Community
PB Develop a trail on Monaco Parkway from Colfax to Sand Creek through natural paths and walkways. Denver Parks and Recreation, Department of Public Safety, Community
P7 Create and conduct educational programs to inform residents about trees, other plants, and urban wildlife in Park Hill. Denver Parks and Recreation, NOs, Denver Public Schools
P8 Develop programs for various age groups that are not geared toward competitive sports. Denver Parks and Recreation, Community
P9 Plant more flower beds along Martin Luther King Blvd., City of Axum Park and other open space and recreation areas in Park Hill. Denver Parks and Recreation, Community
27


PARKS, OPEN SPACE AND TRAILS ACTION CHART
# Actions Ongoing Immediately Short Term Long Term Implementers
P10 Eliminate and construct concrete pads to install federal green bus benches (bowery style) and trash receptacles along Martin Luther King Blvd. Denver Parks and Recreation, RTD
P11 Hang colorful banners from poles along Martin Luther King Boulevard. Denver Parks and Recreation, Public Works, NOs, Community
P12 Relocate from city park or construct a new Martin Luther King Jr. statue along Martin Luther King Boulevard Parkway Denver Parks and Recreation, Community
P13 Continue to develop Smiley Middle School as usable public open space. Denver Public Schools, Denver Parks and Recreation
P14 Encourage businesses along 38th Avenue to contribute to a greenway concept and improved the buffer area to screen residential from industrial uses. CPDA, DP&R, Businesses and Landowners
P15 Develop more community participation programs that include community gardens, tree and flower planting and yard maintenance. Denver Parks and Recreation, Landowners, NOs, and Community
28


PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
LAND USE AND ZONING
Never doubt that a small group of committed citizens can change the world.
Indeed, its the only thing that has.
Margaret Meade
29


LAND USE AND ZONING
> Residential land use
OVERVIEW
Park Hill has approximately 3,021 acres of land and the primary land use is residential. Approximately
66% of Park Hills area is occupied by residential properties. The next most dominant land use
combined is industrial/commercial, occupying approximately 18% of the land. Public/quasi-public use
is 9%, and transportation and utilities occupies 5% of the total land. The major zoning classifications
are R-0, R-2 and 1-2.
The neighborhood is predominantly residential with commercial uses located along Colfax Avenue,
Colorado Boulevard, and six neighborhood commercial nodes at 35th and Dahlia Street, 33rd and
Holly Street, 28th and Fairfax Street, 23rd and Oneida Street, 23rd and Kearney Street and 23rd and
Dexter Street.
> Elm St. Apartments
The zone districts specifically applicable to Park Hill are R-0, R-2, R-2-A, R-3, R-4, R-5, B-l, B-2, B-3, B-A-3 and
B-4,1-0,1-1, and 1-2,0-1, P-1 and PUD and are shown on the attached map at the end of this chapter.Their
general purposes, descriptions and key regulations are provided in Appendix B.
A Residential Land Uses
Sixty-six percent of Park Hill is zoned residential. The R-0 zone between 16th Avenue and to Martin
Luther King Boulevard, is a stable residential area.
The medium density residential area, zoned R-2, has developed almost identically to the R-0 zone district
from Martin Luther King Boulevard to 38th Avenue. Higher density residential areas, zoned R-3 and R-4
are along Quebec Street from 17thAvenue to 38thAvenue. However, commercial uses exist throughout
the neighborhood such as 22nd and Kearney Street. Park Hill has developed a housing density mix that
accommodates a variety of lifestyles and displays a diverse urban fabric.
A Special Residential Land Uses
The neighborhood presently accommodates five group homes, two adult correctional facilities and one
transitional special care home within its boundaries.These facilities are located in the residential and
industrial areas of the neighborhood. A recent city ordinance now limits, in an area, the location of these
facilities based on their proximity to each other.
30


PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
h Commercial Land Uses
Commercial uses, zoned B-4, are concentrated along the East Colfax Avenue, along with three areas of P-
1, parking for businesses. Six smaller nodes of commercial uses, zoned B-2, are located at 22nd and
Oneida Street, 23rd and Kearney Street, 28th and Fairfax Street, 28th and Colorado Boulevard, to Martin
Luther King Boulevard. Businesses in these areas provide services to the surrounding neighborhood.
There are three areas zoned B-3 (shopping center districts) located at 33rd and Dahlia Street, 33rd and
Holly Street and at Colorado Boulevard and Smith Road.
p Vacant Land
There are approximately 91 acres of vacant land in the neighborhood. The Cook-Inlet property at
Colorado Blvd. and Smith Road and several other parcels of land have a high potential for development.
pParks and Open Space
Park Hill has several neighborhood parks, City of Axum, located at Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard and
Cherry Street, Ferguson Park at 23rd Avenue and Dexter Street, Martin Luther King Park at 38th Avenue
and Newport Street, Milan Park at Martin Luther King Boulevard and Quebec Street and Fred Thomas
Park at 26th Avenue and Quebec Street. The Park Hill Golf Course is located east of Colorado Boulevard,
from 35th Avenue to Smith Road. Denver City Park is located west of Colorado Blvd. between 17th and
26th Avenues, and includes the City Park Golf Course between 23rd and 26thAvenues. Martin Luther
King Boulevard, Monaco Street and Seventeenth Avenue Parkways provide additional green space and
their medians are frequently used for jogging, walking and other recreational activities.
p Schools
Starting with the 1997-1998 school year, nearly all Denver Public Schools once again became Future Sight Uf 125 new Single-family
neighborhood schools. Park Hill has six elementary schools and one middle school that serve residents humes at 35th and Dahlia
of Park Hill. The elementary schools are Hallet Elementary located at 2950 Jasmine Street, Park School of
International Studies at 5050 E. 19thAvenue, Phillips Elementary at 6550 E. 21st Avenue, Smith
Renaissance School of the Arts at 3590 Jasmine Street and Stedman Elementary at 2940 Dexter Street;
Smiley Middle School is located at 2540 Holly Street.
There is no public high school in the neighborhood. The majority of Park Hill students attend East High
School at 1545 Detroit Street and George Washington High School at 655 South Monaco Street. Some
attend Manuel High School at 1700 E. 28th Avenue.
31


LAND USE AND ZONING
Park Hill has various private schools including Blessed Sacrament Catholic School located at 1973 Elm
Street, Union Baptist Church Excel Institute at 3200 Dahlia Street, The Odyssey Charter School at 19th
and Elm Street, and the University of Denver Park Hill Campus, which includes the law school and
Houston fine arts center, is located at 7039 E. 18th Avenue. The Denver University facilities will be
relocating outside of the neighborhood and will be replaced by Johnson and Wales University and the
new Denver Public High School for the Performing Arts.
> Goals
0 Maintain the existing integrity of the residential character of Park Hill. Assure that continued
growth and development in Park Hill results in a balanced and compatible mix of housing
types and densities.
0 Oppose industrial expansion outside the areas currently zoned for industrial uses north of
38th Avenue, from Colorado Boulevard to Quebec Street. Explore opportunities for live/work.
) Minimize the visual impacts and create an improved buffer area between the industrial,
commercial and residential areas.
> Maintain and enhance the small-scale neighborhood character of the business areas and foster
the development of Main Street type imagery.
) Preserve the existing parks and open space within the neighborhood.
) Preserve the areas of historical significance through historic districts or
historic landmark designation.
> Maintain and enhance the viability of residential and commercial land uses
on Colorado Boulevard.
> Identify and change non-conforming land uses in the neighborhood.
32


PARK HILL NEIGH
t Action Recommendations
The action recommendations have been divided into on-going, short term and long term. On-going
recommendations can be started immediately and continue. Short-term recommendations can be started
immediately with limited resources or no money. Long-term recommendations will take longer to
accomplish and will require funding.
The neighborhood selected three projects from each policy area as top priorities for implementation.
1. LZ-10 Notify and participate in the redevelopment of the Dahlia and Holly shopping centers. Work
with landowners and the city on any rezoning proposals and related site plan issues.
2. LZ-8 Encourage enforcement of city ordinance requirements for absentee landlords to have an agent
registered with the Assessment Division. As a part of that effort, the name and addresses of
owners and agents listed by the assessors records should be corrected.
3. LZ-3 Create and maintain a mix of housing types and sizes that are attractive and affordable to a
diversity of ages, incomes, household types, sizes, cultural and ethnic backgrounds.
3. LZ-1 Encourage the citywide dispersal of group homes and subsidized housing.
BORHOOD PLAN
h New town homes at 34th and Grape St.
33
-UJ


LAND USE AND ZONING ACTION CHART
# Actions Ongoing Immediately Short Term Long Term Implementers
LZ1 Encourage the city-wide dispersal of Group homes and subsidized housing. Denver Comprehensive Plan, CPDA-ZA
LZ2 Contain all industrial development and related uses to and within currently zoned industrial districts only. Oppose additional industrial zoning and related uses including parking in adjacent residential areas. Eliminate non-conforming industrial and parking uses. Industrial Users, NOs, Parking Management, CPDA-ZA
LZ3 Create and maintain a mix of housing types that are attractive and affordable to a diversity of ages, incomes, household types, sizes and cultural backgrounds. CPDA, NOs, Housing Developers
LZ4 Enhance the standing neighborhood zoning committee to monitor, review and make recommendations on all reviews that include neighborhood notification. NOs, Community
LZ5 Initiate zoning amendments and policies to protect the single-family residential character in Park Hill. Specifically: identify and extend R-2 zoning to those Areas zoned R-3 that currently meet R-2 criteria. Similarly, consider rezoning The Park Hill campus of DU from R-3 to R- 5 or a similar zone. CPDA-ZA, NOs
LZG Monitor all zone change requests adjacent to the neighborhood in the Stapleton site. NOs, CPDA, Community
34


PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
* Actions Ongoing Immediately Short Term Long Term Implementers
ill Assure compatibility of land uses and create connections between future Stapleton Development and Park Hill. New development should be evaluated for how it compliments existing land uses in the neighborhood. NOs, CPDA, Stapleton Development Corporation
LZ8 Encourage enforcement of City ordinance requirements for absentee landlords to have an agent registered with the Assessment Division. As part of that effort, the name and addresses of the owners and agents listed by the Assessors records should be corrected. Assessment Division, CPDA-NIS, and NOs
LZ10 Participate in the redevelopment of the Dahlia and Holly Shopping Centers. Work with the landowners and city on any rezoning proposals and related site plan issues. NOs, Businesses, DURA and CPDA-H&NDS
LZ11 Participate in a citywide update of regulations for home occupation businesses. CPDA- Zoning Administration, NOs
LZ12 Encourage participation in the citywide Land use and Transportation plan. NOs, CPDA
LZ13 Provide for an attractive and harmonious transition between different land uses and developments. NOs, CPDA, Private Sector
LZ14 Encourage retailers and commercial property owners to form business associations. PHBSO, NOs, Businesses
35


LAND USE AND ZONING ACTION CHART
# Actions Ongoing Immediately Short Term Long Term Implementers
LZ15 The neighborhood should have an active role in the redevelopment and ongoing operations of business areas. There should be widespread notification and participation of potential land use and zoning changes. NOs, Businesses, Public and Private Sector
LZ16 Changes to existing parks and open space should be decided in a neighborhood forum. NOs, DP&R, CPDA
LZ17 Review existing business uses and zoning along Colorado Blvd.And East Colfax Avenue as well as within the neighborhood for compatibility of the allowed business uses with the adjoining and nearby residential uses. Propose zoning and other regulatory changes that would address the issues of compatibility. CPDA, NOs, and Businesses
LZ18 Identify areas with non-conforming, but desired uses, and initiate zone map or language amendments that would allow the desired uses. Include amendments conditions and waivers, or other provisions, in the zone changes to help assure compatibility with surrounding residential areas. NOs, Businesses and CPDA
LZ20 Link residents and landowners to home improvement programs. CPDA-H&NDS, DURA, NOs and Community
LZ21 Explore opportunities to develop live/work in the industrial areas. Emphasis should be given to areas where the industrial and residential border each other. CPDA, Landowners
LZ22 Identify opportunities for homeownership and to develop senior housing. CPDA-HANDS, NOs, Non-profits, Private Sector
36


PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
P Park
Hill Land Use Map
$
OCTOBER 1999
37


URBAN DESIGN
URBAN DESIGN
Ifyou foolishly ignore beauty, youll soon find yourself without it.
Your life will be impoverished. But if you wisely invest in beauty,
it will remain with you aU the days of your life
Frank Lloyd Wright
38


PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
OVERVIEW
Park Hills residential qualities and sense of community are expressed by the neighborhood street image.
The older homes, variety of housing stock, neighborhood commercial services, mature street trees,
parkways, detached sidewalks, tree lawns and front porch detailing all contribute to the communitys
unique character and pedestrian friendly environment.
Park Hill enjoys a diverse mix of retail businesses with more than 250 local businesses and institutions.
The businesses are primarily small, storefront operations in small retail strips. These businesses have
special problems, opportunities and constraints.
a
A
"A
r¥
jmmn
r-w (K1..-
The Park Hill neighborhood is almost fully developed with the exception of the Cook-Inlet property at
Smith Road and Colorado Boulevard and several vacant lots. As development occurs, it is important that
changes in appearance remain consistent and complement the existing neighborhood character. We
must also look for opportunities to enhance and upgrade areas of the neighborhood.
> Goals
To promote and enhance the existing neighborhood character and preserve the small town atmosphere
and historic sense of the community for future generations to enjoy and respect. To preserve and
maintain a high standard for parks, open space, boulevards, parkways, streetscaping, traffic circulation,
and to pursue opportunities to create historic districts within Park Hill. To require high standards for the
built environment that includes residences, commercial and industrial properties, parks and other
institutional settings.
> Classic examples of good design creating
a livable and walkable community
39


URBAN
> New and old unified by architecture that
blends with the existina neinhbnrhnnd
Public spaces benefit from good urban design,
such as at 23rd and Kearney
DESIGN
h Action Recommendations
The action recommendations have been divided into on-going, short term and long term. On-going
recommendations can be started immediately and continue. Short-term recommendations can be started
immediately with limited resources or no money. Long-term recommendations will take longer to
accomplish and will require funding.
The neighborhood selected three projects from each policy area as top priorities for implementation.
1. UD-2 Educate residents, businesses and developers about the neighborhood voluntary
design guidelines. (see Appendix A)
2. UD-8 Develop and apply a process for neighborhood review of projects pertaining to parks and open
space, boulevards, parkways, streetscaping, traffic circulation, special improvements and historic
districts within Park Hill as they pertain to the neighborhood's urban design.
2. UD-13 Work with Stapleton Development Corporation (SDC) and Forest City to insure good
connections between Park Hill and new developments at Stapleton.
3. UD-14 Work with SDC and Transportation Engineering to mitigate the impacts on the neighborhood for
the future expansion of Quebec Street.
40


PARK H 1 L L NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
# Actions Ongoing Immediately Short Term Long Term Implementers
UD1 Educate and inform residents and developers about the City and County of Denvers Residential Advisory Standards and Guidelines for Home Renovations. 1 1 NOs, CPDA, Landowners and Community
UD2 Educate residents, businesses and developers about the Neighborhood Voluntary Design Guidelines. (see Appendix A) h Apply guidelines as building changes occur through zone change, variance and permitting processes. h Provide technical assistance upon request to property owners or developers during the design phase of their projects. For Park Hill Neighborhood Shopping nodes h The enhancement of the street imagery and making these areas a pedestrian destination. h Through specific street landscaping, furnishings, lighting, and brick paved intersections, create a high degree of visual interest that includes individual pockets of pedestrian & neighborhood friendly activity centers. Human scale and inviting spaces. A Storefronts and signs should be subordinate to and integrated with each building facade and choice of materials and detailing should be compatible with well designed and maintained adjacent structures. 1 1 Neighborhood & Businesses Organizations, CPDA, Landowners, Community
41


URBAN DESIGN ACTION CHART
# Actions Ongoing Immediately Short Term Long Term Implementers
UD3 Execute a Historic Preservation survey. NOs and CPDA-Historic Preservation
UD4 Explore possibilities of a Historic District. NOs, CPDA, Landowners
UD5 Create and reinforce buffers along the neighborhood edges and between residential and commercial and/or industrial areas. CPDA, PW-Traffic and Transportation
UDG Require landscaped buffer in parking areas within the neighborhood. CPDA, PW-Traffic and Transportation
UD7 Explore the creation of cul-de-sac parking on Colfax. CPDA, PW-Traffic and Transportation
UD8 Develop and apply a process for neighborhood review of significant projects pertaining to parks & open space, boulevards, parkways, streetscaping, traffic circulation, special improvements and historic districts within Park Hill boundaries as they pertain to the neighborhoods urban design. NOs, CPDA, Parks & Recreation, Public Works
UD9 Evaluate existing plans for Colorado Boulevard and Colfax Avenue Corridor for streetscape and parking improvements, buffering of residential and non- residential uses. Study current conditions and recommend modifications necessary to address neighborhood concerns. CPDA, Public Works, Transportation Engineering, Mayors Office of Economic Development, NOs & BAs
UD10 Remove all billboards and discourage any new billboard sites in the neighborhood. CPDA-NIS, Neighborhood and Business Organizations
42


PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
* Actions Ongoing Immediately Short Term Long Term Implementers
UD11 Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway: Remove all advertising bus benches and replace with Bowery Style Benches and trash receptacles. RTD, Denver Parks and Recreation, CPDA, NOs
UD12 City Park District: New structures and expansion of facilities should take into account landscaping, parking, vehicular and pedestrian access to reduce negative impacts on the adjacent neighborhoods. Denver Parks and Recreation, Neighborhood Organizations
UD13 Work with Stapleton Development Corporation and Forest City to insure good connections and development between Park Hill and the new Stapleton development. CPDA, Stapleton Development Corp., Forest City, NOs and Community
UD14 Work with Stapleton Development Corp. and Transportation Engineering to mitigate the impacts on the neighborhood for the future expansion of Quebec Street Stapleton Development Corp., Forest City, Public Works-Transportation Engineering, NOs
UD15 Work with Development Review section of CPDA to minimize the visual impacts and create an improved buffer area between industrial and residential uses. Community Planning and Development Agency and NOs
43


PUBLIC SAFETY
PUBLIC SAFETY
Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter.
Martin Luther King Jr.
44


PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
OVERVIEW
Public safety is as much about encouraging the desirable uses of a place as it is about discouraging
undesirable or criminal uses. A lower crime rate is both a cause and an effect of a good quality of life in
our community. Park Hill struggles with vandalism, graffiti, alley and mid-block street lighting,
unreported crimes, drug and gang presence and disturbances. More importantly, a lack of
interest/involvement by some property owners and managers, especially, absentee owners and managers
has a direct impact in the overall quality of life in the neighborhood.
b Goals
Reduce crime in Park Hill so residents feel safe in their homes, on neighborhood streets and
in their open spaces.
o Objectives
1 Encourage better communication between youths, parents, schools and
police in the neighborhood.
2 Rid the neighborhood of drug houses and gangs.
3 Support efforts made by the city, property owners, residents and neighborhood organizations
of Park Hill to reduce crime.
4 Ensure the safety of the more vulnerable members of the communitychildren and the elderly.
5 Improve lighting on neighborhood streets, alleys and open spaces.
G Explore ways for those convicted of crimes to do community service work that benefits the
community.
7 Improve security for single family and multi-family residents.
8 Improve security in retail areas by encouraging pedestrian traffic.
45


PUBLIC SAFETY
h Action Recommendations
h The Park Hill Neighborhood Plan
Public Safety committee at work
The action recommendations have been divided into on-going, short term and long term. On-going
recommendations can be started immediately and continue. Short-term recommendations can be started
immediately with limited resources or no money. Long-term recommendations will take longer to
accomplish and will require funding.
The neighborhood selected three projects from each policy area as top priorities for implementation.
1. PS-14 Identify and inventory the problem areas, such as apartment buildings and businesses having
frequent reports of crimes. Work with owners, managers and other city agencies to deal with
such concerns. Encourage 100% participation of all apartment managers to participate in the
Police Departments Management Training Program.
2. PS-10 Control criminal activities in alleys behind commercial and residential areas.
3. PS-12 Achieve 100% participation of all blocks in the Neighborhood Watch Program.
3. PS-3 Improve lighting on streets, in alleys and open spaces, (locations will be determined by
surveying the neighborhood)
46


PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
* Actions Ongoing Immediately Short Term Long Term Implementers
PS1 Initiate the Hot Spot program to rid the neighborhood of drugs, gangs and illegal activity. CPDA-H&NDS, NOs, BAs and Community
PS2 Follow up on closures of drug houses to make sure that they are not reestablished. DPD, NOs, Community
PS3 Improve lighting on streets, alleys and open spaces (locations to be determined by surveying the neighborhood). Public Service, Public Works, CPDA-H&NDS, NOs and Community
PS4 Provide assistance for citizen patrols being established by Park Hill neighborhood organizations. NOs, BAs, CPDA-H&NDS, DPD
PS5 Provide a safe walking environment along retail streets by implementing activities or programs (Business Block Watch). Neighborhood and Business Organizations
PS6 Support the success of individual shops. Encourage and recruit new businesses in empty storefronts. NO, BA, MOED, PHBSO
PS7 Design and maintain security in parks and open space by increasing bike patrols, lighting, and reducing unsafe spaces. DPD, NO, DP&R, CPDA
PS8 Encourage periodic organized activities in parks and open spaces such as picnics, parties and community gatherings. NOs and Community
PS9 Control drug dealing activity and car prowls. DPD, NO and BA
PS10 Control criminal activities in alleys behind commercial and residential areas. DPD, NOs, BAs and Community
47


PUBLIC SAFETY ACTION CHART
# Actions Ongoing Immediately Short Term Long Term Implementers
PS11 Establish or enhance any existing volunteer committees that deal with crime & safety issues. The committee will keep residents informed about crime problems & perform other related task. NOs and Community
PS12 Achieve 100% participation of all blocks in the Neighborhood Watch Program. NOs and Community
PS13 Network with city, police officials and other community based organizations to learn about current resources and programs available to residents, and lobby the city for support deemed appropriate for improved safety in the Park Hill. Neighborhood and Business Organizations
PS14 Identify & inventory the problem areas, such as apartment buildings & businesses having frequent reports of crimes.Work with owners, managers, and city agencies to deal with such concerns. Encourage 100% participation by all apartment managers in the Police Department Management Training Program. NOs, DPD, CPDA
PS15 Provide neighborhood with current crime statistics. Denver Police Department
PS16 Identify and develop effective programs with Denver Partners Against Graffiti to prevent graffiti and vandalism. NOs, PW and Community
PS17 Develop effective communication with all businesses in Park Hill regarding crime and safety issues. Neighborhood and Business Organizations
48


PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
* Actions Ongoing Immediately Short Term Long Term Implementers
PS18 Collaborate with Denver Police on the relocation of the District 2 Sub-station NOs, DPD CPDA-H&NDS, Asset Management.
PS19 Implement and partner with the District Attorneys restorative justice program. NOs, DAs, CPDA-H&NDS, Community, DPS
PS20 Leave porch lights on during night hours. Community
49


BUSINESS AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
BUSINESS AND ECONOMIC
DEVELOPMENT
Success usually comes to those who are too busy to be looking for it
Henry David Thoreau
50


PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
OVERVIEW
Commercial and Industrial uses comprise 18% of the area of the Park Hill Neighborhood. This plan
groups the commercial areas into nodes and corridors for clarity of definition. Although not a part of
Park Hill neighborhood, and not included in the 18% figure above, the south side of East Colfax Avenue
between Colorado Blvd. and Quebec Street and the west side of Colorado Boulevard is included in its
narrative and recommendations.
b Colfax Avenue Business Corridor [Sub-area 1j
Sub-area 1 is comprised of the East Colfax corridor from Colorado Boulevard to Quebec Street. Colfax
Avenue is in many ways the Main Street of not only the neighborhood but also of Denvers
metropolitan region. Stretching from the foothills of Golden to the high plains of Adams and Arapahoe
County on the east, Colfax Avenue is the longest commercial street in the United States. It is also U.S.
Route 40 which was the principle highway link between Denver and Kansas City until the construction
of Interstate Highway 70. From east to west, Colfax Avenue functions as a type of linear mall for
shopping and services.
Merchants and residents along the Colfax Corridor struggle with a negative image caused by the
generally-held, largely false perception that the area is one of prostitution and high crime. Denver,
Lakewood, and Aurora are continuing efforts to make Colfax a safe and attractive place through law
enforcement, streetscape beautification projects, economic development strategies, and a new Life
Begins on U.S. 40 promotional campaign. The Avenue is lined with many established businesses and
institutions such as Hub Cap Annie, Bank Western, Mataam Fez Moroccan Food Restaurant and
Colortyme which serve people from the entire metropolitan area. Other services provided to the public
are auto dealerships, video rentals, banking, beauty and barber shops, and other specialized services.
Reasonable rental rates and land prices have also made this business district an attractive location for
new businesses.
b Colorado Boulevard Business Corridor [Sub-area 2j
This is a small business area with residential and open space along the east side of Colorado Boulevard
between Colfax Avenue and Smith Road which serves not only the neighborhood but the regional area
as well.This area is zoned for business use, B-2 and PUD, and lower density residential R-0 and R-2 zones.
51


BUSINESS AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
b Local businesses at 28th and Fairfax
Hornes Catering, Park Hill Golf Course Jackson Construction and Lefty Martin Appliances, are a few of
the established businesses in the area. The Cook-Inlet Property at Colorado Boulevard and Smith Road
is vacant.
h Neighborhood Shopping Nodes [Sub-area 3j
Six neighborhood shopping nodes with the following examples of established businesses and services;
h Oneida Park Business District located at 22nd and Oneida Street (Supreme Style Barber Shop,
Emmas Beauty Salon, Dr. Daddios Kitchen on Wheels)
h Kearney Business District-23rd and Kearney Street (Dardanos Gymnastics, Park Hill Barber Shop,
Eipha Beauty Supply and Salon)
h Fairfax Business District -28th and Fairfax (Greater Park Hill Office, NAACP A&A Fish
Market & Restaurant)
h 23rd and Dexter Business District23rd and Dexter Street (Councilwoman Happy Haynes
District Office,The Cherry Tomato Restaurant, Spinellis Market and Deli, Park Hill Bookstore).
There are three shopping center districts containing the following established businesses and services;
h Dahlia Shopping Center located at 33rd and Dahlia (Park Hill Health Center, Spiral Education
Foundation (Park Hill For Safe Neighborhoods and Northeast Denver Business Support offices,
Stanley's Hair Shop, B-Unique T-shirts)
b The Horizon at 33rd and Holly
h Holly Shopping Center-33rd and Holly (Hope Communities, U.S. Postal Service, Park Hill
Detailing Shop, Neds Food Market, Easyway Cleaners).
h Cook-Inlet Property located at Colorado Blvd. and Smith Road (vacant).
h Quebec Street Hotel Corridor [Sub-area 4j
There are many Hotels along Quebec Street from Martin Luther King Boulevard to Smith Road that serve
the metropolitan area. These hotels include the Doubletree, Radisson, and Red Lion Inn.
52


PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
b Industrial Corridor [Sub-area 5j
The industrial corridor of Park Hill is bounded by 38th Avenue on the south, City limits on the north,
Colorado Boulevard on the west and Quebec Street on the east. 1-70 serves as a buffer and
transportation link for the industrial uses. This section of Park Hill has many strengths such as
employment opportunities, start-up business potential and many other economic opportunities that
can be tapped into by the people of Park Hill. There are also weaknesses such as a lack of buffering
between the industrial and residential areas, blighted areas, heavy truck traffic, undersized streets
incompatibility of uses.
b Issues/Goals
The major goal of economic development is to sustain the Park Hill Neighborhood by attracting,
stimulating and preserving businesses that serve and employ neighborhood residents. The purpose of
business and economic development is to ensure the stability of the businesses in the Neighborhood
Shopping Nodes and to promote the health of those enterprises along the Colfax Avenue and Colorado
Boulevard Corridors. Mapping out the assets will be a first step to promote a better relationship and
collaboration between the industrial and residential sectors of Park Hill.
At issue is the relationship between residential areas and commercial areas. Economically enhanced
neighborhoods will offer a significant contribution to the welfare of commercial ventures which, in turn,
help to maintain the neighborhood. Park Hill neighbors are concerned about the large number of vacant
buildings and vacant lots within business zones and the need to find suitable tenants for those
properties, to redevelop them, and prevent further deterioration. This redevelopment requires a
cooperative effort by community organizations (often with financial assistance from government
programs), Park Hill neighbors, and the newly created Northeast Denver Business Support Office
(PHBSO). PHBSO was crated in 1999 to stimulate business development and organization and to inform
and make available a wide range of economic resources.
The following are goals for the business areas within Park Hill:
b Colfax Avenue Business Corridor [Sub-area 1j
Create a stable, safe, attractive, well-lit retail street with a mix of offices, neighborhood businesses, and
destination businesses that attract customers from out of the geographic area and with anchor tenants to
increase activity and uses for other businesses.
53


BUSINESS AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
> A variety of goods and services are
available at the Dahlia Shopping Center
> Colorado Boulevard Business Corridor [Sub-area 2)
Encourage stable, attractive commercial uses that serve the community and the neighborhood that do not
detract from the residential character of the neighborhood.
h Neighborhood Shopping Nodes [Sub-area 3j
Maintain the quiet, charming, low-traffic and pedestrian oriented character of businesses, with an
emphasis on services and retail establishments that serve as amenities to Park Hill residents, such as drug
stores, restaurants, hardware stores, laundries, office supplies stores and grocery stores.
h Quebec Street Corridor [Sub-area 4j
Maintain the viability of this important corridor that will link Park Hill and the future Stapleton
development, and create a safe, attractive buffer area between the uses.
h Industrial Corridor [Sub-area 5j
Create a stable, safe, attractive, buffer area between the industrial and residential uses in the
neighborhood. Educate and encourage stable, attractive and safe uses that serve the community through
employment opportunities and business creation. Retain and expand businesses that do not detract from
the residential character of the neighborhood.
h Action Becommendations
The action recommendations have been divided into on-going, short term and long term. On-going
recommendations can be started immediately and continue. Short-term recommendations can be started
immediately with limited resources or no money. Long-term recommendations will take longer to
accomplish and will require funding.
The neighborhood selected three projects from each policy area as top priorities for implementation.
1. BE-1 Continue to reinforce and enhance the design and physical redevelopment options for the Dahlia
and Holly Shopping Centers.
2. BEB Collaborate with public and private sectors to establish programs in the neighborhood to
provide employment and training, internships and entrepreneurial opportunities to residents of
Park Hill.
3. BE-22 Create a youth entry program and business incubator.
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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
* Actions Bngoing Immediately Short Term Long Term Implementors
BE1 Continue to reinforce and enhance the design and physical redevelopment options for the Dahlia and Holly Shopping Centers. NOs, Businesses, CPDA-H&NDS, Residents, Private Sector, Landowners, DURA
BE2 Market the shopping center nodes and corridor identities as a positive shopping environment to residents and adjacent neighborhoods Business Owners, Neighborhood and Business Associations, CPDA-H&NDS PHBSO
BE3 Create and enhance a main street theme for each shopping center node in Park Hill. PHBSO, CPDA-Urban Design, Businesses
BE4 Inventory and evaluate vacant properties within the business corridors and nodes in order to recruit business development. Neighborhood and Businesses Associations, PHBSO
BE5 Develop vacant land in a way that is compatible with the character and density of the surrounding businesses and neighborhoods. Property Owners, CPDA
BEB Create a business improvement district in Park Hill business sub-areas. CPDA-H&NDS, MOED, PHBSO, Businesses
BE7 Economic Development-Apply to become a Neighborhood Business Revitalization District (NBR) in order to participate in federal economic program granted through Mayors Office of Economic Development. Business Associations, Mayors Office of Economic Development, CPDA-H&NDS, PHBSO
BE8 Monitor and rid the business areas of any illegal activities and business related crime in the neighborhood. PHBSO, BAs, DPD, Community
55


BUSINESS AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ACTION CHART
# Actions Bngoing Immediately Short Term Long Term Implementors
BE9 Collaborate with public and private sectors to establish programs in the neighborhood to provide employment and training, internships and entrepreneurial opportunities to residents of Park Hill. PHBSO, CPDA-H&NDS, Businesses, NOs, MOET, MOED
BE10 Encourage shared parking between retail establishments. BAs, NOs, CPDA-ZA
BE11 Aesthetics: Support pedestrian oriented sidewalks, streetscapes, lighting, human scale facade improvements, trees, flowers, human scale development and other aesthetic enhancements that are appropriate for business sub-areas. Business Associations, Neighborhood Organizations, CPDA
BE12 Encourage an end to vandalism and removal of graffiti and trash by residents and business owners in Park Hill. BAs, NOs, NIS, Community, Public Works- Keep Denver Beautiful
BE13 Encourage establishment of a Park Hill home business service center (technology services, computer repair, sales of office supplies, business incubator spaces, answering services, etc.). Business Associations, MOED, MOET, and NOs, PHBSO, CPDA-H&NDS
BE14 Encourage work close to home. Establish a satellite employment office in Park Hill. List all employment openings including business opportunities in homes, and business districts such as Stapleton, Dahlia and Holly and the 1-70 industrial business corridor. Business Associations, MOET, Park Hill Business Support Office, NOs, Community-Based Organizations, Community
BE15 Establish a Park Hill employment web site. Park Hill Business Support Office
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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
* Actions Bngoing Immediately Short Term Long Term Implementors
BE16 Establish a jobs available page in Park Hill newspapers and newsletters BAs, PHBSO, NOs, Community- Based Organizations
BE17 Mitigate visual impacts and create an inviting buffer area between the industrial and residential areas. NOs, Businesses, CPDA
BE18 Inform property owners and assist them in maintaining and restoring historic buildings. CPDA and Businesses
BE1S Seek to fill identified market gaps. Work with commercial property owners and business organizations to attract desired businesses. BA, CPDA-H&NDS, MOED, Businesses
BE2B Encourage businesses and industrial areas to form organizations/associations to promote, employ and market businesses in the area. PHBSO and Businesses, MOED
BE21 Internal and external business node audit/survey to determine the best use model. Identify business mix effectiveness, client base, and consolidation possibilities. PHBSO
BE22 Create a youth employment entry program and business incubator. PHBSO, DPS, MOET, Denver University
BE23 Establish cultural dollar daysto support business nodes. PHBSO, Businesses, Community
BE24 Expand the Park Hill Home Tour to include businesses. PHBSO, NOs, Businesses
BE25 Develop the Park Hill Business Support Office to become a Community Development Corporation or non-profit 501(c)(3). PHBSO, CPDA-H&NDS, Community
BE2B Create a Park Hill Business and Services Directory. PHBSO, CPDA-H&NDS, Communitv, Private Sector
57


HUMAN RELATIONS AND COMMUNITY SERVICES
HUMAN RELATIONS AND
COMMUNITY SERVICES
We cannot seek achievement for ourselves and forget about progress
and prosperity for our community...Our ambitions must be broad
enough to include the aspirations and needs of others, for their sakes
and for our own.
Cesar Chavez
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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
OVERVIEW
The primary thrust of the human relations and community service delivery action plan is to build on the
present network of service providers by filling identified gaps in the system, and building effective
partnerships between organizations. We will continue to look for opportunities to overcome the
geographical divisions and recognize, celebrate and encourage appreciation of diversity.
p Goals
Improve and maintain the quality of life for the whole community by providing services that build
community, create connections across generations, and are respectful of all. Maintain and improve
diversity as key to achieving peace and prosperity in Park Hill. Develop a guide that identifies and
explains outreach, information and local services that are provided. Establish and maintain a variety of
organizations that help to create an environment that is sustainable and stable.
p Plan Implementation and Action Agenda
The neighborhood selected three projects from each policy area as top priorities for implementation.
1. HRCS-7 Develop a neighborhood web-site for community news.
2. HRCS-10 Work with tenants in subsidized housing to help them become more active and a part of their
neighborhood.
3. HRCS-13 Re-establish community social events such as coffees, block parties, national night out and
holiday parties.
p Actinn Recnmmendatinns
- 'HMKlUhALTlUHtwmu;
1
P Park Hill Family Health Center
The action recommendations have been divided into on-going, short term and long term. On-going
recommendations can be started immediately and continue. Short-term recommendations can be started
immediately with limited resources or no money. Long-term recommendations will take longer to
accomplish and will require funding.
59


HUMAN RELATIONS AND COMMUNITY SERVICES ACTION CHART
# Actions Ongoing Immediately Short Term Long Term Implementors
HRCS1 Identify and develop a directory that identifies a full continuum of services that addresses important functions of the community. NOs, CBOs, BAs, Foundations, PHBSO, CPDA-H&NDS, Private Sector
HRCS2 Identify organizations that respond to emergencies (e.g. emergency food, shelter, and related services). NOs, CBOs, Community
HRCS3 Identify organizations that assist to help meet the basic needs (services anyone may need at a particular stage of life: childcare, drop-in centers for youth, outreach to persons with mental illness, home chore or congregate meals for senior citizens, home health care for people who are convalescing or who have disabilities). NOs, CBOs, Community
HRCS4 Identify and develop human resources for job training, conflict resolution, language classes, and a volunteer bank. NOs, CBOs, PHBSO, CPDA-H&NDS
HRCS5 Identify the community programs and services that are provided by the faith communities in Park Hill. NOs, Religious Institutions, Community
HRCSB Identify community programs and services that are provided by the schools in Park Hill NOs, CBOs, DPS
HRCS7 Develop a neighborhood web site for community news and services. NOs, BAs, PHBSO, CPDA-H&NDS
HRCSR Create a brochure to educate & inform existing and future residents of the value, diversity and quality of life in Park Hill that has been achieved over many years. NOs, Community, BAs
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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
# Actions Ongoing Immediately Short Term Long Term Implementors
HRCS9 Secure a commitment and cooperation from Denver Health and Hospitals regarding the Park Hill Health Station. This should include services and complete medical staff (including physicians and mental health professionals) that reflects the diversity of the neighborhood population. Denver Health, Hospitals, NOs and BAs
HRCS10 Work with tenants in subsidized housing to help them become more active and a part of their neighborhood. CBOs, NOs
HRCS11 Establish a community welcoming committee to greet new residents and businesses. Involve them and educate them about the history of the neighborhood to discourage geographical separation. NOs, BAs
HRCS12 Organize an annual celebration that brings residents, businesses and other community stakeholders together. NOs, CBOs, BAs
HRCS13 Re-establish community social events such as coffees, block parties (National Night Out) and holiday parties. NOs, CBOs, BAs
HRCS14 Work with Community Voices to inform, educate and recruit new patients to the Park Hill Family Health Center DHH, CPDA-H&NDS, Businesses, NOs and Community
HRCS15 Create a Historic Neighborhood Diary of the people & places of Park Hill. NOs, BAs, CPDA-H&NDS, Foundations, Private Sector
HRCS16 Establish a human services steering committee to coordinate and encourage partnerships and sharing of resources, such as facilities and eauioment. NOs, BAs, CBOs, Department of Health Services
61


EDUCATION
EDUCATION
If there is no struggle, there is no progress
Frederick Douglass
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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
OVERVIEW
Schools are faced with increasing cultural diversity and the need for before and after school programs to
accommodate working parents. Schools in Park Hill are challenged by an ever-widening range of
educational and family needs, inadequate resources and transportation, large classroom size, diversity of
abilities and learning styles, and socio-economic disparities. There is a critical need for a clear plan and
strategies to address the myriad of issues impacting our schools and communities.
> Goals
All students in Park Hill have the opportunity to succeed regardless of ethnicity, differing abilities, social
or economic differences. The culture of our schools must include:
0 A place where academic achievement is the highest priority.
0 A place where individual growth is recognized and encouraged.
0 A place where children are ready to learn when they enter school and ready to
succeed when they graduate
0 A place where we learn to respect ourselves and one another
0 A place where success is measured by individual growth, in addition to school
and district-wide performance
>A place where equitable, not equal funding is distributed according to need
>A place where English language acquisition is available to all community members
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EDUCATION
h Priority Recommendations:
1. ED-1 Establish and enhance programs in neighborhood schools within Park Hill that provide a variety
of activities and services before and after school and during summer breaks.
2. ED-6 Explore options to open and operate a campus for free life time learning opportunities
in Park Hill.
3. ED-10 Create opportunities to enhance professional development of teaching staff in Park Hill schools.
Look for opportunities to enhance staff development.
3. ED-5 Develop outreach avenues to increase parent/teacher/community involvement.
1 Action Recommendations
The action recommendations have been divided into on-going, short term and long term. On-going
recommendations can be started immediately and continue. Short-term recommendations can be started
immediately with limited resources or no money. Long-term recommendations will take longer to
accomplish and will require funding.
II
II
*
Pauline Robinson Branch Library
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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
* Actions Ongoing Immediately Short Term Long Term Implementers
EDI Establish and enhance programs in neighborhood schools within Park Hill that provide a variety of activities and services before and after school and during summer breaks. Denver Public Schools, NOs, Community, Private Sector
ED2 Work with Stapleton Redevelopment Corp. and DPS on the proposed middle and high schools at Stapleton. NOs, Community
ED3 Explore an opportunity to create a Career Education Center East at the University of Denver Law campus. Denver Public Schools, University of Denver, Community
ED4 Work with DPS and the community to enact reforms and policy changes. Better utilize resources to support and maintain schools affecting charter and magnet schools in Park Hill. Denver Public Schools, Community
ED5 Develop outreach avenues to increase parent/teacher/community involvement. Denver Public Schools, Community, NOs
ED6 Explore options to open and operate a campus for free life time learning opportunities in Park Hill. DPS, Colorado State Department of Education, Private Sector
ED7 Utilize local media to inform residents about changes in Park Hill Schools, i.e. 1 Charter Schools 2 After school program collaboration Local Media, NOs, DPS, Faith Based Community
3 Increase services of neighborhood retired educators and residents.
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EDUCATION ACTION CHART
# Actions Ongoing Immediately Short Term Long Term Implementers
ED8 Explore opportunities to create a better learning environment. Access existing resources from city agencies and community-based organizations. Denver Public Schools, NOs, Mayors Office of Education and Children
ED9 Collaborate and identify 70 High School students in the neighborhood to work with DPS and MOET in the School to Career programs. Denver Public Schools, MOET, NOs, Private Sector
ED10 Create opportunities to enhance professional development of teaching staff in Park Hill schools. Look for opportunities to enhance staff development. Denver Public Schools, Park Hill Parents
ED11 Support existing neighborhood center at Smiley Middle School and explore avenues for growth and stability of students, adults and professionals. DPS, NOs, Parents and Youth, Private Sector
ED12 Support programs, such as Summer Scholars, that work with students to improve literacy skills. DPS, NOs, Parents and Youth, Private Sector
ED13 Increase life-long learning opportunities and experiences between youth and adults. DPS and Community
ED14 Continue to enhance the business and school partnerships. DPS, Private Schools and Community, Private Sector
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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
COMMUNITY
COORDINATION
Community Coordination, Communication, and Participation in Decision
Making for Plan Implementation and Redevelopment Activities.
And so, my fellow Americans, ask not what your country
can do for you; ask what you can do for your country.
John F. Kennedy
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COMMUNITY COORDINATION
h School Board member Beooie Milloer
facilitating the edocation committee
OVERVIEW
After adoption as a supplement to Denvers Comprehensive Plan, the Park Hill Neighborhood Plan will be
implemented. This will occur through the on-going, short and long-range actions of neighbors,
businesses, and the city working in partnership to achieve the stated vision and goals of the
neighborhood.
hGoals
In implementing this plan, Park Hill residents, businesses, community-based organizations, and public and
private sectors will establish communication and participation procedures that are open and equitable to
all members of the community.
h Objectives
1 Establish a representative body that can participate in decision making processes for the
community as a whole.
2 Explore the need for an arm of neighborhood organizations, businesses and residents through a
Community Development Corporation that can engage in redevelopment activities, such as land
acquisition and assembly, funding, facilitating development partnerships, project development,
and management.
h The Environmental committee
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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
The neighborhood selected three projects from each policy area as top priorities for implementation.
1. CC-4 Require that the representative body/steering committee make decisions in an open manner,
incorporating the input of local citizens and interest groups. Hold a semi-annual meeting to
share accomplishments and develop goals and objectives.
2. CC-3 Create a Park Hill plan steering committee that will include representatives from key
organizations and the community at-large to implement this plan.
3. CC-8 Establish a youth council that functions as a full partner in community decision making
activities.
3.CC-6 Work with community-based organizations to apply for non-profit status to apply for grants and
loans for funding activities in the neighborhood.
Action Recommendations
The action recommendations have been divided into on-going, short term and long term. On-going
recommendations can be started immediately and continue. Short-term recommendations can be started
immediately with limited resources or no money. Long-term recommendations will take longer to
accomplish and will require funding.
> Prioritizing the Plan
69


COMMUNITY COORDINATION ACTION CHART
# Actions Ongoing Immediately Short Term Long Term Implementers
CC1 Build on communication and participation of the community to implement this plan. NOs, BAs, CPDA-H&NDS, Planning Services
CC2 Incorporate established and new organizations in the implementation of plan. NOs, BAs, Community
CC3 Create a Park Hill plan steering committee that will include representatives from key organizations and the community at large to implement this plan. NOs, BAs, CPDA-H&NDS, Planning Services
CC4 Require that the representative body or steering committee make decisions in an open manner, incorporating the input of local citizens and interests groups. Hold a semi-annual meeting to share accomplishments and develop goals and objectives. NOs, BAs, CBOs, CPDA
CC5 Establish a process for participating in key planning activities, including the neighborhood plan, comprehensive plan, capitol improvements and project reviews. NO, BA, CPDA
CC6 Work with community-based organizations to apply for non-profit status to apply for grants and loans for funding activities in the neighborhood. Community-Based Organizations, CPDA-H&NDS, Foundations, Private Sector
CC7 Create a resource directory for community-based organizations to notify residents and stakeholders of issues impacting the neighborhood. NOs and Businesses
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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
* Actions Ongoing Immediately Short Term Long Term Implementers
CC8 Establish a youth council that functions as a full partner in community decision making activities. Neighborhood Organizations, Community
CC9 Work with the city agencies and city council offices to track the process and coordinate city resources to implement the goals and actions for the Park Hill plan. NOs, BAs, CPDA and City Council
CC10 Explore opportunities to create a Community Development Corporation. NOs, BAs, CPDA-H&NDS, Foundations, Community, PHBSO
71


DAHLIA AND HOLLY SHOPPING CENTER REDEVELOPMENT
DAHLIA AND HOLLY
SHOPPING CENTER
REDEVELOPMENT
Addendum for Commercial Development at the Dahlia and Dolly Shopping Center Dedevelopment
72


PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
t Action Recommendations
These action recommendations and other elements from the existing plan that the community, city
and public and private sectors could use as a foundation for the redevelopment of the Dahlia and
Holly shopping centers. Design input, regulatory guarantees, community communication and
development/construction management and marketing are some of the categories of tasks needed
to run on parallel tracks and be coordinated for the implementation and future redevelopment of
these shopping centers.
.IT.' :
- Y i-
Dahlia Shopping Center
h Holly Square Shopping Center
73


DAHLIA AND HOLLY SHOPPING CENTER REDEVELOPMENT ACTION CHART
# Actions Ongoing Immediately Short Term Long Term Implementers
BE1 Continue to reinforce and enhance the design and physical redevelopment options for the Dahlia and Holly Shopping Centers. NOs, Businesses, HAND, DURA, Residents, Private Sector
BE2 Market the shopping center nodes and corridor identities as a positive shopping environments to residents and adjacent neighborhoods. Business Owners, Neighborhood Business Associations
BE3 Create and enhance a main street theme for each shopping center node in Park Hill. PHBSO, CPDA-Urban Design, Businesses
BE5 Develop vacant land in a way that is compatible with the character and density of the surrounding businesses and neighborhoods. Property Owners, CPDA
BE11 Aesthetics; Support pedestrian oriented streetscapes, lighting, facade improvements, trees, flowers, and other aesthetic enhancements that are appropriate for business sub-areas. Business Associations, Neighborhood Organizations, CPDA
LZ13 Provide for an attractive and harmonious transition between different land uses. NOs, CPDA, Private Sector
LZ15 The neighborhood should have an active role in the redevelopment and ongoing operations of business areas. There should be widespread notification and participation of potential changes. NOs, Businesses, Public and Private Sectors
LZ1G Changes to existing parks and open space should be decided in a neighborhood forum. NOs, DP&R, CPDA
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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
* Actions Ongoing Immediately Short Term Long Term Implementers
LZ17 Review existing uses and zoning along Colorado Blvd. and East Colfax Avenue as well as within the neighborhood for compatibility of the allowed business uses wit the adjoining and nearby residential uses. Propose zoning and other regulatory changes that would address the issues of compatibility. CPDA, NOs, and Businesses
LZ18 Identify areas with non-conforming, but desired uses and initiate zone map or language amendments that would allow the desired uses. Include in the amendment conditions and waivers or other provisions that would help assure compatibility with surrounding residential areas. NOs, Businesses and CPDA
LZ20 Notify and participate in the Redevelopment of the Dahlia and Holly Shopping Centers. Work with the Landowners and City on any rezoning Proposals and related site plan issues. NOs, Businesses, DURA and CPDA
75


DAHLIA AND HOLLY SHOPPING CENTER REDEVELOPMENT ACTION CHART
# Actions Ongoing Immediately Short Term Long Term Implementers
UD2
Educate residents, businesses and developers on
the NeighborhoodVoluntary Design Guidelines
(see Appendix A)
Neighborhood & Businesses
Organizations, CPDA
> Apply guidelines as building changes occur,
through zone change, variance and
permitting processes.
> Provide technical assistance upon request to
property owners or developers during the
design phase of their projects.
Park Hill Neighborhood Shopping nodes
h The enhancement of the street imagery and
making these areas a pedestrian destination
should be a high priority.
> Through specific street landscaping, furnishings,
lighting, and brick paved intersections, we can
create individual pockets of pedestrian &
neighborhood friendly activity centers.
> Create a high degree of visual interest,
pleasing scale and inviting spaces.
> Storefronts and signs should be subordinate to
and integrated with each building facade and
choice of materials and detailing should be
compatible with the adjacent structures.
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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
* Actions Ongoing Immediately Short Term Long Term Implementers
UD5 Create and reinforce buffers along the and reinforce buffers along the neighborhood borders and between residential to commercial and industrial areas. CPDA, PWr Traffic and Transportation Division
UDG Encourage landscaped buffers of parking areas within the neighborhood. CPDA, P\C Traffic and Transportation Division
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DAHLIA AND HOLLY SHOPPING CENTER REDEVELOPMENT
p Neighborhood Commercial Nodes
P New buildings or redevelopment projects in the commercial nodes shall include
ground level street oriented retail and service space.
P Parking in retail nodes should be located at the rear and/or to one side of the building
(away from the street). This will minimize gaps in the continuous building wall of the block.
P Use durable materials that complement Denvers tradition as a brick and masonry city; limit
building facade materials to masonry, brick, brick veneer, stone, or stucco. Synthetic materials,
which imitate natural or traditional materials, should be avoided.
P Public plazas should include trees, grass, flower beds, walkways, benches,
and other pedestrian amenities,
P Create street level interest by requiring active ground floor uses with store
windows facing plaza or street.
P Tree plantings and solid screening fences should separate business-zoned areas from residential.
P Develop special street signage to emphasize neighborhood plazas.
P Incorporate signage that is convenient and usable by motorists and pedestrians and is
complementary to the character of the corridor and individual building architecture.
pCommercial Development
P Site and building design shall: reinforce traditional street oriented development patterns,
setbacks, and build-to lines, provide a consistent edge to the public street and sidewalk space in
order to provide pedestrian scale and to encourage pedestrian-oriented activity;
P Provide visual interest and human scale through the use of prominent windows and operable
entries at the street facing facades, varied forms, materials, detail, and color;
P Provide convenient pedestrian access from the public right-of-way to the project and utilize
pedestrian-friendly site and building design;
78


PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
k Minimize the presence of parking areas, parking structures, residential garages along the street
edge to limit the conflicts with desired pedestrian activity as well as negative visual impacts of
parked autos on the corridor;
k All development shall provide a landscaped buffer (minimum 20 feet) between any adjacent
residential development. The buffer shall contain not less than one tree per 40 linear feet of
zone lot frontage and at least one tree and ten shrubs or a combination of trees and shrubs per
six hundred square feet of landscaped area. All landscaping shall be irrigated.
k Fences on industrial sites which front residential areas shall be constructed with high quality
materials. Chain link and razor wire fencing should not be used.
k Sidewalks
k All new development or redevelopment shall incorporate a five-foot detached sidewalk and
(minimum) eight-foot tree lawn with trees spaced 35 feet apart.
k Dahlia Square has been targeted for
redevelopment
79


APPENDICES
APPENDICES
86


PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
APPENDIX A
b Park Hill Urban Design Guidelines
These guidelines are provided as recommendations to property owners to serve as a tool in maintaining
and enhancing the existing neighborhood character. They are not proposed as an overlay district, nor as
a covenant, nor to replace existing zoning laws.
b Residential Areas
b Where alleys exist, all garage access should be limited to alley access. To preserve the
pedestrian friendliness of the neighborhood the blocks should not be cut up with vehicular
driveways. Garage access shall be from the rear of the site where alleys are present.
b Were alleys do not exist, front loaded garages should be recessed a minimum of five feet from the
front facade of the buildings and shall not be more than 55% of the length of the front facade
b New construction should respect the Denver tradition of masonry construction. A minimum of
75% of the street facing facade shall be constructed with brick. The brick facade should wrap
around the side elevations for a minimum of 12 feet for mid- block residential units and for the
entire length of the side street facade on a corner lot. New construction should utilize alleys.
b Neighborhood Commercial Nndes
b New buildings or redevelopment projects in the commercial nodes must include ground level
street oriented retail and service space.
b Parking in retail nodes should be located at the rear and/or to one side of the building (away
from the street). This will minimize gaps in the continuous building wall of the block.
b Use durable materials that complement Denvers tradition as a brick and masonry city; limit the
building facade materials to masonry, brick, brick veneer, stone, or stucco. Synthetic materials
which imitate natural or traditional materials should be avoided.
b Public plazas must include trees, grass, flower beds, walkways, benches, and other pedestrian
amenities that the Denver Streetscapes manual supports.
87


APPENDICES
P Create street level interest by requiring active ground floor uses with store windows
facing plaza or street.
P Tree plantings and solid screening fences should separate business zoned areas from residential.
P Develop special street signage to emphasis neighborhood plazas.
P Incorporate signage that is convenient and usable by motorist and pedestrians and is
complementary to the character of the corridor and individual building architecture.
p Colfax Commercial Development
Site and building design shall:
P reinforce traditional street oriented development patterns, setbacks, and build-to lines, provide a
consistent edge to the public street and sidewalk space in order to provide pedestrian scale and
to encourage pedestrian-oriented activity;
P provide visual interest and human scale through the use of prominent windows and operable
entries at the street facing facades, varied forms, materials, detail, and color;
P provide convenient pedestrian access from the public right-of-way to the project and shall utilize
pedestrian-friendly site and building design;
P minimize the presence of parking areas, parking structures, residential garages along the street
edge to limit the conflicts with desired pedestrian activity as well as negative visual impacts of
parked autos on the corridor;
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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
k Industrial Areas
k All industrial development shall provide a landscaped buffer (minimum 20 feet) between any
adjacent residential development. The buffer shall contain not less than one tree per 35 linear
feet of zone lot frontage and at least one tree and ten shrubs or a combination of trees and
shrubs per six hundred square feet of landscaped area. If the buffer is on the backside it must
include a row of closely spaced evergreens. All landscaping shall be irrigated.
k Fences on industrial sites which front residential areas shall be constructed with high quality
materials (see illustration) Chain link and razor wire fencing should not be used.
kSidewalks
k All new development or redevelopment shall incorporate a five-foot detached sidewalk and
(minimum) eight-foot treelawn with trees spaced 35 feet apart.
89


APPENDICES
ZONE DISTRICTS GENERAL DESCRIPTIONS
Residential and Institutinnal Znne Districts
R-S-2 Single-Unit Detached Dwellings, Rural Density: Minimum of one acre of land required for each
dwelling unit. Home occupations are prohibited. Density -1 dwelling unit/acre.
R-S-4 Single-Unit Detached Dwellings, Suburban Density: Minimum of 12,000 square feet of land
required for each dwelling unit. Home occupations are prohibited. Density = 3.6 dwelling
units/acre.
R-X Attached or Clustered Single-Unit Dwellings, Low Density: Development plan must be approved
by City Council. Home occupations are prohibited. Minimum of 7,500 square feet of land area
required for each dwelling unit. Density = 5.8 dwelling units/acre.
R-D Single-Unit Detached Dwellings, Low Density: Foster family care and day care allowed as home
occupations by permit. Minimum of 6,000 square feet of land required for each dwelling unit.
Density = 7.3 dwelling units/acre.
R-1 Single-Unit Detached Dwellings, Low Density: Same as R-0 except that other additional home
occupations and room-renting to one or two persons are allowed upon application and issuance
of a permit. Density = 7.3 dwelling units/acre.
R-2 Multi-Unit Dwellings, Low Density:Typically duplexes and triplexes. Home occupations are
allowed by permit. Minimum of 6,000 square feet of land required for each duplex structure with
an additional 3,000 square feet required for every unit over 2. Density = 14.5 dwelling units/acre.
R-2-A Multi-Unit Dwellings, Medium Density: 2,000 square feet of land required for each dwelling
unit unless site plan is submitted under the Planned Building Group (PBG) provisions, in
which case 1,500 square feet of land is required for each unit. Home occupations are allowed
by permit. Density = 21.8 dwelling units/acre (29 unit/acre under PBG, depending on open-
space requirements).
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R-3-X Multi-Unit Dwellings, Medium DensityiThis is a medium density district intended to encourage new
residential development. Building size is controlled by bulk standards and open space requirements.
Building floor area cannot exceed 2 times the site area. Maximum lot coverage is 40%.
R-3 Multi-Unit Dwellings, High Density: Building size is controlled by bulk standards, off-street
parking and open space requirements. Building floor area cannot exceed 3 times the site area.
Maximum density is determined by the size of the units and the factors mentioned above.
R-4 Multi-Unit Dwellings and/or Offices, High Density: The purpose of this district is to provide a
location for high density residential and intensive office development. Building size is controlled
by bulk standards, off-street parking and open space requirements.Allows hotel or motel uses
and limited accessory retail shopping. Building floor area cannot exceed 4 times the site area.
R-4-X High Density Office, Multiple Unit with Special Review Zone District:This district allows most
of the same uses as the R-4 zone district; however, parking lots, nursing homes and
neighborhood service uses are conditional uses.The basic maximum floor area to lot area
ratio is 4:1 and may reach 5:1 by meeting specific criteria. Undeveloped floor area may be
transferred under special circumstances.
R-5 Institutional District:Allows colleges, schools, churches and other institutional uses. Maximum lot
coverage is 60% of the zone lot. Building height is controlled by bulk standards.
Rusiness Zone Districts
R-1 Limited Office District: This district provides office space for services related to dental and
medical care and for office-type services, often for residents of nearby residential areas.The
district is characterized by a low-volume of direct daily customer contact.This district is
characteristically small in size and is situated near major hospitals or between large business
areas and residential areas.The district regulations establish standards comparable to those of
the low density residential districts, resulting in similar building bulk and retaining the low
concentration of pedestrian and vehicular traffic. Building height is controlled by bulk standards
and open space requirements. Building floor area cannot exceed the site area.
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APPENDICES
B-A-1 Arterial Office and Multi-Unit Dwellings District:Allows banks, offices, clinics, institutions,
churches, multi-unit residences and office service uses. Requires 100 feet of arterial street
frontage. Maximum lot coverage is 30%. Building floor area cannot exceed 2 times the site area.
Building height is controlled by bulk standards. Maximum residential density is determined by
the size of the units and the factors mentioned above.Arterial setback areas are required for
landscaping.
B-2 Neighborhood Business District:This district provides for the retailing of commodities classed as
convenience goods, and the furnishing of certain personal services, to satisfy the daily and
weekly household or personal needs of the residents of surrounding residential neighborhoods.
This district is located on collector streets, characteristically is small in size, usually is entirely
surrounded by residential districts and is located at a convenient walking distance from the
residential districts it is designed to serve.The district regulations establish standards comparable
to those of low density residential districts, resulting in similar standards. Building floor area
cannot exceed the site area.
B-A-2 Arterial Service District:This district is intended as a tourist oriented area, allowing restaurants
and hotels or motels with accessory automobile service stations. Requires 100 feet of arterial
street frontage. Zone lot coverage not to exceed 30%. Building height is controlled by bulk
standards. Front setback areas are required for landscaping.
B-3 Shopping Center District: This district is primarily to provide the retailing of most commodities
and the furnishing of certain personal services, satisfying all household and personal needs of the
residents of surrounding residential communities.This district is normally located on major
arterial or collector streets at or near the intersection with another major arterial or collector
street so that is has good vehicular accessibility.This district is characteristically large, usually is
entirely surrounded by residential districts, and is located a convenient driving distance from the
residential districts it is designed to serve.The district regulations establish standards comparable
to those of low density residential districts, resulting in similar building bulk on smaller parcels
and retaining a low concentration of vehicular traffic. Building height is controlled by bulk
standards and open space requirements. Building floor area cannot exceed the site area.
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B-A-3 Arterial General Business District: This district is designed to accommodate uses that are
oriented toward the motorist and residents of nearby neighborhoods. Included among such uses
are bowling alleys, theaters, nightclubs, drive-in restaurants and service stations. Setback areas are
required for landscaping. Ground coverage by buildings cannot exceed 30% of the site. Building
height is controlled by bulk standards.
B-4 General Business District: This district is intended to provide for and encourage appropriate
commercial uses adjacent to arterial streets, which are normally transit routes. Uses include a
wide variety of consumer and business services and retail establishments that serve other
business activities, and local transit-dependent residents within the district as well as residents
throughout the city. The regulations generally allow a moderate intensity of use and
concentration for the purpose of achieving compatibility between the wide variety of uses
permitted in the district. Building height is not controlled by bulk standards unless there is a
property line to property line abutment with a residential use. Building floor area cannot exceed
twice the site area.
B-A-4 Automobile Sales and Service District: This district provides an area designed particularly for the
special needs and characteristics of auto, boat and recreational vehicle sales and service
activities.The city's Comprehensive Plan encourages the establishment of this district in
concentrated centers rather than in a linear arrangement along arterials. Ground coverage by
structures cannot exceed 60% of the site area. Building height is controlled by bulk standards.
B-5 Central Business District: Permits businesses, office and light-industrial uses along with
residential and educational uses. Maximum floor area cannot exceed 10 times the site area, plus
floor area premiums for the development of plazas, arcades and atriums. Off-street parking is not
required. Building height is not controlled except for Federal Aviation Administration restrictions.
Ground level retail uses are encouraged along the 16th Street Mall area.
B-7 Historic Business District: This district is intended to preserve and improve older structures that are
architecturally and/or historically significant. Allows light-industry, general retail, wholesale, offices
and residential uses. Building floor area cannot exceed 2 times the site area; however, with
premiums the floor area can be increased to 4 times the site area.Additional floor area is allowed
with the development of residential units, underground parking or retail uses at the street level.
Refer to Ordinance #109 Series of 1988, regarding design guidelines and height limitations.
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APPENDICES
B-8 Intensive General Business/High Density Residential District: This district, primarily for activity
centers, provides the concentration of retailing, personal and business services, as well as
residential and cultural uses at a necessary intensity to efficiently be served by mass transit
facilities.The regulations are designed to permit a highly concentrated, intense development of
the enumerated facilities, limited by standards designed to provide light and air for street
exposures of buildings in the district. Building floor area cannot exceed 4 times the site area plus
floor area premiums for the development of plazas, arcades, or the provision of low-level light
areas. Building height is not controlled by bulk standards.
B-8-A Arapahoe Square Zone District:This is a mixed use zone district located in the Arapahoe Square
(bounded by 20th Street, Larimer Street, Park Avenue West and Curtis Street) that encourages
pedestrian activity areas and related uses while making auto related uses and other more intense
uses conditional uses subject to design review. Housing, the arts, child care facilities and
preservation of historic buildings are favored uses in this area and subject to generous floor area
premiums above the basic 4:1 F.A.R.
B-8-G Golden Triangle Zone District: This is a mixed use zone district located in the Golden Triangle
(bounded by Speer Blvd., Lincoln Street, and Colfax Avenue) that encourages pedestrian
activity areas and related uses while making auto related uses and other more intense uses
conditional uses subject to design review. Housing, the arts, child care facilities and
preservation of historic buildings are favored uses in this area and subject to generous floor
area premiums above the basic 4:1 F.A.R.
Industrial Zone Districts
1-0 Light Industrial/Office District: This district is intended to be an employment area containing
offices, and light industrial uses which are generally compatible with residential uses. 1-0 zoned
areas are designed to serve as a buffer between residential areas and more intensive industrial
areas. Bulk plane, setback and landscaping standards apply in this district. Building floor area
cannot exceed 50% of the site area; however, office floor area may equal site area. Some uses are
conditional uses.
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M General Industrial District: This district is intended to be an employment area containing
industrial uses which are generally more intensive than those permitted in the 1-0 zone. Bulk
plane, setback and landscape standards apply in this district. Building floor area cannot exceed
twice the site area. Some uses are conditional uses.
1-2 Heavy Industrial District: This district is intended to be an employment area containing uses
which are generally more intensive than that permitted in either of the other two industrial
zones. Bulk plane, setback and landscape standards apply in this district. Building area cannot
exceed twice the site area. Some uses are conditional uses.
Mixed-Use Zone Districts
C-MU-10 Commercial Mixed-Use District: The C-MU-10 district is the most restrictive of the commercial
mixed-use districts, with the shortest list of allowed uses. It includes commercial uses
appropriate for high-visibility locations such as employment centers and the intersections of
arterial streets.The purpose of the district is to concentrate higher intensity commercial uses,
spatially define streets, encourage higher site standards, and create a more attractive pedestrian
environment. Uses incompatible with this purpose, such as auto-related uses, industrial uses, and
single unit dwellings, are not allowed. Although residential uses are permitted in the C-MU
districts, it is expected that residential uses shall be responsible for buffering themselves from
nonresidential uses that may locate on adjacent property.
C-MU-20 Commercial Mixed-Use DistrictThe C-MU-20 district provides for a mix of commercial, residential,
and industrial uses along or near arterials or other high traffic streets. Site and building design will
be of a quality that enhances the character of the streets. A wide range of commercial and
residential uses are allowed, along with limited industrial uses.Although residential uses are
permitted in the C-MU districts, it is expected that residential uses shall be responsible for
buffering themselves from nonresidential uses that may locate on adjacent property.
C-MU-30 Commercial Mixed-Use District: The C-MU-30 district provides for a wide range of commercial,
office, retail, industrial, and residential uses that allow property owners the flexibility to respond
to the long-term evolution of development trends. Although residential uses are permitted in the
C-MU districts, it is expected that residential uses shall be responsible for buffering themselves
from nonresidential uses that may locate on adjacent property.
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APPENDICES
R-MU-20 Residential Mixed-Use District:The R-MU-20 district is primarily residential, allowing either single
or multiple-unit dwellings. Along heavily traveled streets, development may be either residential
or mixed-use, combining residential with neighborhood-serving retail, office, or service uses. No
maximum residential density is prescribed; instead, the scale of buildings is determined by bulk
plane, maximum height, setbacks, open space requirements, and parking ratios.The intent is to
encourage a full range of housing types, including affordable housing.
R-MU-30 Residential Mixed-Use District:The R-MU-30 district is a primarily residential district allowing
higher density multiple unit dwellings of a density appropriate to the center-city and other
activity centers such as light rail transit stations. Supporting commercial development, such as
consumer retail and service uses and small-scale office uses, is encouraged to create a truly
mixed-use environment. No maximum residential density is prescribed. Instead, maximum
height, setbacks, and open space requirements determine the scale of buildings.
Hpen Space/Agricultural Zone District
D-1 Open Space District:Allows airports, recreational uses, parks, cemeteries, reservoirs, community
correctional facilities, and other public and semi-public uses housed in buildings. Setback
requirements apply to the location of structures.
OS-1 Open Space District:The OS-1 district is intended for publicly and privately owned parks, open
space, natural habitats, golf courses, and a limited range of other uses, such as public recreation
centers and concessions, that may enhance the use and enjoyment of open space.
D-2 Open Space/Agricultural District:Allows large tracts of open land utilized for agriculture or
ranching activities, airports and under special conditions, oil and gas production.
Parking Zone District
P-1 Off-Street Parking District:Allows parking lots and structures. Bulk and setback regulations apply
to structures.This zone is intended to provide needed business parking without the expansion of
the business zone; e.g. a buffer between business and residential uses. Requires visual barriers
adjacent to residential uses.
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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
Planned Unit Development
PUD Planned Unit Development: PUD is a form of development generally characterized by a unified site
design for clustering buildings and providing common open-space, density increases, and a mix of
building types and land uses.The process involves site plan review, during which the city agencies and
neighborhood residents have considerable input in determining the nature of the development. In effect,
any PUD is a specific zone district for a specific area, including precise regulations written by the
applicant, and when approved by City Council, is enforced by the city. It allows maximum flexibility
during the planning stage and maximum assurance that exactly what is proposed will be developed.
Platte River Valley Zone District
PRV Platte River Valley Zone District: This district is intended to promote and encourage diversified
land uses and to integrate the district's unique geographic location and setting, amenities of view,
transportation linkages and open space.A variety of land uses are permitted to facilitate new
development, allow for the reuse of eligible historic structures and to complement development in
adjacent neighborhoods and downtown. New residential development and open-space is encouraged.
Regulatory flexibility is provided to facilitate development responsive to current and future market
conditions, and to encourage creativity in the development of the Platte River Valley. Subarea
boundaries are delineated on the PRV zoning map.A subarea plan, including preliminary design
guidelines, is required for all or part of the subarea to be used as a framework for private and public
development projects. Rules and criteria adopted by the Planning Board govern the content and
requirements of subarea plans. Plans for any given subarea must conform with the subarea zoning
standards enacted by City Council.
Cherry Creek North Zone District
CCN Cherry Creek North: Uses are similar to the B-3 district except that residential development is not
permitted on the ground floor of any building. Proposed developments are reviewed by the CCN Design
Advisory Board (DAB) for compliance with the CCN district guidelines.The goals of the district are to
encourage a mixture of uses and to encourage low-scale, small lot development that reinforces and
enhances the eclectic urban character of the area. Floor area premiums are available for open space and
underground parking. Off-street parking requirements for retail uses is reduced and ground level
residential development is not allowed.
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APPENDICES
Hospitals Zone District
H-l-A, H-l-B, H-2 Hospital Zone Districts:The H-l-A and H-l-B districts are intended to promote and
encourage the maintenance and concentration of existing and proposed healthcare facilities and their
related uses.The H-l-A and H-l-B districts are intended to contain the principal structures and related
facilities of each healthcare institution. The H-2 district is intended to contain the peripheral area of each
healthcare facility where there is abutment or close proximity to non-healthcare uses.
The H-l-A district generally corresponds to the R-3 zone district as to permitted structures and to the R-4
zone district as to permitted uses.The H-l-B district generally corresponds to the R-5 zone district for
both permitted uses and structures.The H-2 zone district generally corresponds to the R-5 zone district
for both permitted uses and structures with additional landscaping and buffering required.
Gateway Airport Zone District
Gateway Airport Gateway Zone District: The airport gateway is intended to provide a wide variety of
compatible uses. A mix of residential, business, hotel and high technology based industry is permitted.
The streets design is a neo-traditional grid system. Development will be guided by development and
special review.This is the first district to include environmental controls in the zoning ordinance.
Overlay Zone District
OD Overlay Zone District:These districts overlay existing standard zone districts.They are generally
more restrictive than the underlying zone and control dimensional and operational requirements of uses,
but do not add uses to the underlying zone. Please refer to the zoning ordinance for the specific
requirements of each overlay zone.
S-T-Z Zooe District
S-T-Z Stapleton Transitional Zone District: This district is a transitional zone limited to the old
Stapleton Airport site. This zone district provides for the interim use of the Stapleton airport site
preceding redevelopment.
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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
APPENDIX G: ASSESSMENT
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APPENDICES
USE OF ASSESSMENT
This assessment provides background information to help residents in forming a more complete picture of
their neighborhood and in choosing which issues to address.This baseline assessment has been prepared
so that it can be easily refined and expanded once the new census information is available.
SUMMARY
t Where is the neighborhood located?
Census tracts 41.01,41.02,41.03,41.04,42.01,42.02 in Park Hill is bounded by City limits on the north,
Quebec Street on the east, Colfax Avenue on the south and Colorado Boulevard on the west. The
neighborhood is located within the boundaries of City Council Districts 8 and 11.
h Popolation Characteristics
The population of the neighborhood grown steadily from 24,822 residents in 1990 to 26,645 residents in
1998. In 1998, the percentage of children and youth was larger than the city average, and the percentage
of residents age 18 or older was smaller than the city average.The age distribution of Park Hill in 1990
was as follows: 8% were under of 5 years of age, 22% were between 5 to 18 years of age, 60% were
between 19 to 64 years of age, and 10% were 65 and older. The neighborhoods minority population
according to the 1990 U.S. Census Bureau, 60% of Park Hills population were Black, 34% were White, 4%
were Hispanic and 2% were others.
t Education and Schools
Starting with the 1997-1998 school year, nearly all Denver Public Schools became neighborhood schools.
Park Hill has several schools that serve residents in the neighborhood. Elementary Schools include Hallet
Elementary located at 2950 Jasmine St., Park Hill Elementary, at 5050 E. 19th Avenue, Phillips Elementary, at
6550 E. 21st Avenue, Smith Elementary, at 3590 Jasmine Street and Stedman Elementary at 2940 Dexter St.
Smiley Middle School, at 2540 Holly St. Park of Park Hill students attend Gove Middle School, 4050 East
l4thAvenue. There is no Public High in the neighborhood.
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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN

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TABLE OF CONTENTSPrefaceThe Purpose of the Plan. . . . . . . . . . 2 Priority Planning Issues. . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Plan Implementation and Action Agenda. . . . . . . . . 3 Neighborhood Description. . . . . . . . . . . . 4IntroductionMap Park Hill Neighborhood. . . . . . . . . . . 6 Neighborhood Location. . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Park Hill Vision for the Future. . . . . . . . . . . 7 Neighborhood History. . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Key Abbreviations Used in Action Chart Implementation. . . . . . 9EnvironmentGoal. . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Objectives. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Action Recommendations. . . . . . . . . 11 Action Chart. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12Traffic and TransportationOverview. . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Mass Transit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Bike Routes. . . . . . . . . . . 17 Issues. . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Goals. . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Action Recommendations. . . . . . . . . 18 Action Chart. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Map Street Classifications and Traffic Volumes. . . . . . 24Parks, Recreation, Open Spaces, and TrailsGoals. . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Action Recommendations. . . . . . . . . 26 Action Chart. . . . . . . . . . . 27 TABLE OF CONTENTS ii

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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLANLand UseOverview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Residential Land Uses. . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Special Residential Land Uses. . . . . . . . . . . 30 Commercial Land Uses. . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Vacantl Land . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Parks and Open Space. . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Schools. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Goals. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Action Recomendations. . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Action Chart. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Map Land Use. . . . . . . . . . . . . 37Urban DesignOverview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Goals. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Action Recomendations. . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Action Chart. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41Public SafetyOverview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Goals. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Objectives. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Action Recomendations. . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Action Chart. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 iii

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TABLE OF CONTENTSBusiness and Economic DevelopmentOverview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Colfax Ave.Business Corridor. . . . . . . . . . 51 Colorado Boulevard Business Corridor. . . . . . . . . 51 Neighborhood Shopping Nodes. . . . . . . . . . 52 Quebec St.Hotel Corridor. . . . . . . . . . . 52 Industrial Corridor. . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Issues and Goals. . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Colfax Ave.Business Corridor. . . . . . . . . . 53 Colorado Boulevard Business Corridor. . . . . . . . . 54 Neighborhood Shopping Nodes. . . . . . . . . . 54 Quebec St.Hotel Corridor. . . . . . . . . . . 54 Industrial Corridor. . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Action Recomendations. . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Action Chart. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55Human Relations and Community ServicesGoals. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Plan Implementation and Action Agenda. . . . . . . . . 59 Action Recomendations. . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Action Chart. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60EducationOverview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Goals. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Priority Recomendations. . . . . . . . . . . . 64 Action Recomendations. . . . . . . . . . . . 64 Action Chart. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65Community CoordinationOverview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 Goals. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 Objectives. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 Action Recomendations. . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Action Chart. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 iv

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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLANDahlia and Holley Shopping Center RedevelopmentAction Recomendations. . . . . . . . . . . . 73 Action Chart. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 Neighborhood Commercial Shopping Nodes. . . . . . . . 78 Commercial Development. . . . . . . . . . . 78 Sidewalks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79Youth Meeting OutcomesOverview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Education. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 Public Safety. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84Appendix A: Park Hill Urban Design GuidelinesResidential Areas. . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 Neighborhood Commercial Nodes. . . . . . . . . . 87 Colfax Commercial Development. . . . . . . . . . 88 Industrial Areas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 Sidewalks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89Appendix B: Zone District Descriptions and DefinitionsDescriptions and Definitions. . . . . . . . . . . 90Appendix C: AssessmentSummary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 Demographics. . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 Education and Schools. . . . . . . . . . . . 107 Economic and Employment Characteristics. . . . . . . . 111 Land Use and Zoning. . . . . . . . . . . . 114 Housing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120 Streets,Traffic and Public Transportation. . . . . . . . . 123 Infrastructure. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127 Public Safety. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130 Community Facilities. . . . . . . . . . . . 132 Acknowledgements . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137 v

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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN"...there has to be someone who is willing to do it, who is willing to take whatever risks are required. I don't think it can be done with money alone. The person has to be dedicated to the task. There has to be some other motivation." Cesar Chavez 1 PREFACE

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PREFACETHE PURPOSE OF THE PLANThe Park Hill Plan has been years in the making.It represents the collective vision of community members for the future of the Park Hill community,the goals for fulfilling that vision and the specific actions that should be taken to realize these goals.This plan is the result of countless hours of work by more than 100 community members in collaboration with representatives of the City and County of Denver s Community Planning and Development Agency and other city departments.This plan will serve as a road map to guide the people of Park Hill as they walk together at the beginning of the 21st century. This plan also identifies the extensive and rich resources within Park Hill: people resources (our principal asset);the organizations dedicated to empowering community members;faith communities;human capital services,recreation programs and educational institutions The plan serves as an official guide for the community and the rest of the city as to how Park Hill envisions community-building,the neighborhood's physical and economic development,the delivery of services,and the overall improvement of the Park Hill community.The plan,approved by Denver s City Council,serves as a guide for making decisions about the neighborhood.It is the responsibility of the neighborhood organizations and assigned city staff to prioritize recommendations as time,energy and resources allow.Denver s Comprehensive Plan 2000 is the foundation for the Park Hill Neighborhood Plan and all official plans of the City.As adopted,the Park Hill Neighborhood Plan becomes an amendment to the Denver Comprehensive Plan.Representatives of all City departments are to use this plan to guide policy recommendations and decisions. This plan is intended to promote patterns of desired neighborhood change,urban design,housing development and preservation,business development,traffic flow and safety and other public services,all of which contribute to the economic,social,and physical health,safety and welfare of the people who live and work in Park Hill. This plan is not an official zone map nor does it imply or deny any implicit rights to a particular zone. Zone changes that may be proposed as part of this or any plan,must be initiated and adopted under separate procedures established by the City and County of Denver Municipal Code. 2

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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Priority Planning Issues The residents,business people,representatives of community-based organizations and city departments who helped shape the vision for Park Hill and this plan see tremendous potential as the Park Hill Neighborhood builds on its assets and opportunities.As a result of numerous planning meetings,the Park Hill Neighborhood Plan identifies,places high priority and addresses the following issues that are crucial to the future of the community. Environment Transportation Urban Design Public Safety Land use and Zoning Business and Economic Development Human Relations,Community Services and Coordination Education Parks,Recreation,Open Spaces and Trails Plan Implementation and Action Agenda Each of the ten major policy areas of the plan (environment,transportation,parks and open space,land use and zoning,urban design,public safety,business and economic development,human relations and community services,education and community coordination) has an action agenda section that lists the specific actions to be taken,the general time frames for carrying out the actions,and what organizations and/or city departments should provide the resources to carry out the action items.The planning group selected three action items from each policy area as top priorities for implementation. 3

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PREFACE Neighborhood Description Park Hill is a traditional city neighborhood with a small-town atmosphere.Here people of diverse cultures,ages,races,and economic backgrounds share a sense of community.The community is characterized by large residential and industrial areas and smaller commercial areas.Major facilities in the neighborhood include:the Park Hill Golf Course,several neighborhood shopping areas at 35th Avenue and Dahlia Street,33rd Avenue and Holly Street,23rd Avenue and Dexter Street,22nd Avenue and Kearney Street,23rd and Oneida and a large industrial area that extends north from 38th Avenue to the City line. There are also five public elementary schools,one elementary charter school,one middle school and numerous faith institutions serving a wide range of faiths and denominations.The residential areas Park Hill of the community are south of 38th Avenue and east of Colorado Blvd.Immediately adjacent to Park Hill is City Park,which houses the Denver Museum of Nature and Science and the Denver Zoo.Both of these institutions impact the quality of life in Park Hill. The neighborhood possesses many assets including a large stock of generally well maintained homes, excellent access to major transportation services and corridors,downtown Denver,and entertainment facilities,and three major parkways;17th Avenue,Martin Luther King Blvd.Parkway and Monaco Parkway. There are two neighborhood organizations that serve Park Hill-Greater Park Hill Community,Inc.(GPHC) and Park Hill for Safe Neighborhoods.GPHC publishes a monthly newspaper,The Greater Park Hill News. 4

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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 5 INTRODUCTION

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INTRODUCTION 6 Interstate 70 38th Ave. Smith Rd. 35th Ave. 34th Ave. Martin Luther King Blvd. 23rd Ave. Montview Blvd. 26th Ave. 17th Ave. Pkwy. Colfax Ave. 48th Ave.Colorado Blvd. Dahlia St. Elm St. Holly St. Monaco St. Pkwy. Quebec St.28th Ave. 52nd Ave. N Park Hill Neighborhood Map

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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Neighborhood Location The Park Hill neighborhood is bounded on the west by Colorado Boulevard,on the north by the City limits,on the east by Quebec Street and on the south by Colfax Avenue. The Park Hill Vision for the Future Park Hill vision for the future is to preserve and enhance the positive qualities that make the neighborhood a unique place to live,work,learn,and play. Preserve and continue to build on the image of a vibrant community that celebrates diversity of people in ages,income,ethnic and cultural heritage. Create linkages to the future residential and business development in the new Stapleton community to enhance the economic and social impacts on Park Hill. Create partnerships that involve residents,community based organizations,businesses,Denver City Government,Denver Public Schools,Stapleton Development Corporation and Forest City (developers of Stapleton). Preserve and continue to build on the beautiful architecture,urban design,tree-lined streets and parkways with lively pedestrian-oriented commercial areas,positive,safe and usable parks,and open space for meeting places and recreational activities. Create a universally safe neighborhood that builds on a strong sense of pride,communication and cooperation among all neighbors. Continue to build a sustainable neighborhood that values quality of life,environment and talented people. Attract high quality new businesses,retain and expand existing businesses that provide quality services,employment opportunities and character to the neighborhood. Neighborhood History Park Hill's colorful history began in 1886,when Baron Eugene Von Winkler bought and began to plat what eventually was called "the finest square mile of real estate west of the Mississippi,"displacing the prairie dogs,rattlesnakes,and farms with fine homes.A steam railroad and trolley lines made this 7 Park Hill is home to a diversity of faith-based communities

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INTRODUCTIONresidential area accessible to downtown.And the nearness of City Park gave Park Hill residents the feeling of both a suburb and a city. The 1920s to the 1930s saw the next building boom in Park Hill -while the propeller-driven planes landing and taking off at Stapleton Airport hardly impacted the neighborhood.Residents were and are attracted to Park Hill because of the Museum of Nature and Science,the Denver Zoo,its proximity to hospitals and downtown,and the wide variety of housing styles from Tudors,Queen Anne s,Bungalows, to Denver Squares. After World War II,during the third growth and settlement wave,more modern homes were built for military veterans,and airline stewardesses and machinists who were employed at nearby Stapleton Airport and businesses.Located in the northern area of Park Hill (north of 26th Avenue,many of these newer residences were single family ranch style homes built for first time homebuyers,and low-rise apartment buildings. Greater Park Hill is an idea and a vision,as well as a place.The vision during the last 40 years has been to create a community where people of different racial,ethnic,economic and cultural backgrounds would live and work peaceably together to build a stronger neighborhood.Park Hill,which is often called the conscience of the city,has created an intentionally multi-racial and multi-cultural community, whose inclusionary example has influenced the human relations climate of Denver and the whole state of Colorado.Park Hill has become nationally known for its progressive efforts at promoting cultural and economic diversity.This is a legacy of which the neighborhood is proud. 8

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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLANKEY TO ABBREVIATIONS USED IN ACTION CHART IMPLEMENTORSBAs . . . . . . . .Business Associations CPDA . . . . . . .Community Planning and Development Agency H&NDS . . . . . . .Housing & Neighborhood Development Services NIS . . . . . . . .Neighborhood Inspection Services ZA . . . . . . . .Zoning Administration CC . . . . . . . .Community Corrections CBOs . . . . . . .Community-Based Organizations DPD . . . . . . . .Denver Police Department DA s . . . . . . . .District Attorney s Office DURA . . . . . . .Denver Urban and Renewal Authority DP&R . . . . . . .Denver Parks and Recreation MOED . . . . . . .Mayor s Office of Economic Development MOET . . . . . . .Mayor s Office of Employment and Training NOs . . . . . . . .Neighborhood Organizations PW . . . . . . . .Public Works PW-TE . . . . . . .Public Works-Transportation Engineering PHBSO . . . . . . .Park Hill Business Support Office SDC . . . . . . . .Stapleton Development Corporation SW . . . . . . . .Solid Waste 9

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ENVIRONMENT 10 ENVIRONMENT "Whatever is flexible and flowing will tend to grow, whatever is rigid and blocked will wither and die." Tao Te Ching

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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Goal Through neighborhood advocacy and stewardship,the residents and property owners of Park Hill wish to maintain and protect the built and natural features of the community including trees,parks and open space,and parkways.To encourage residents and businesses to preserve and enhance the physical environment of their neighborhood through education,self-help activities and standards set in local ordinances. Objectives 1 Develop a partnership with and mechanisms for regular contact with the City Forester's office to insure that the maintenance and replacement programs for trees in parks and parkways continue to be adequate. 2 Develop mechanisms to safeguard,clean up,and restore the air,water and soils of Park Hill. 3 Improve the environmental quality of the industrial corridor. The action recommendations have been divided into on-going,short term and long term.On-going recommendations can be started immediately and continue.Short-term recommendations can be started immediately with limited resources or no money.Long-term recommendations will take longer to accomplish and will require funding. The action items relating to the environment that the planning group selected as its top priorities are as follows (in cases where more than three items appear,there was a tie for one of the positions): Action Recommendations 1. E-18 Perform an inventory of brownfields and contaminated businesses in Park Hill.Explore opportunities to mitigate these sites through clean up,rehabilitation and/or redevelopment. 2. E6 Conduct a major clean up of all quadrants in the neighborhood twice a year through the Keep Denver Beautiful campaign. 2. E21 Track complaints about Section 8 landlords and facilities and mitigate these issues. 3. E8 Identify the top 25 blighted properties two times a year in an effort to bring them into compliance with relevant codes. 11 The new Skyland Recreation Center

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ENVIRONMENT ACTION CHART 12 #ActionsOngoingImmediatelyShort TermLong TermImplementers E1 Develop a public relations effort and pamphlet to Neighborhood Organizations encourage residents and businesses to plant and (NOs),Businesses,Denver maintain trees. Parks and Recreation E2 Obtain funds for the planting of more trees. NOs and Businesses E3 Encourage participation in arbor day celebrations NOs,Businesses, and the Denver Digs Trees program. Community,Denver Parks and Recreation E4 Educate and encourage residents to participate in NOs,Community, the Leaf Drop and Tree-cycle Programs. Businesses and Property owners,DP&R E5 Continue to provide and encourage participation NOs,Businesses, in the Citywide waste and recycling education Community, Programs. Public Works-Solid Waste. E6 Conduct a major clean-up of all quadrants in the NOs,BA,CC,Community, neighborhood once a year through Keep Denver Public Works,H&NDS Beautiful campaign. E7 Host Neighborhood Ambassador Program Neighborhood Organizations, training seminars two times a year CPDA,H&NDS E8 Identify the top 25 blighted properties two times Neighborhood a year in an effort to bring them into compliance Or ganizations,NIS with relevant codes. E9 Develop a Knock and Talk program to educate NOs,NIS, residents and businesses on city ordinances and Denver Police, code violations for interior and exterior property Land Owners maintenance to encourage them to correct infractions.

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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 13 #ActionsOngoingImmediatelyShort TermLong TermImplementers E10 Periodically publish in neighborhood newsletters Neighborhood Organizations, and newspaper descriptions of zoning use and Schools and Communitycode maintenance regulations,and phone numbers Based Organizations and web-addresses for assistance. E11 Encourage participation in the NOs,BOs,RTD, Adopt-A-Stop program. Public Woks-Solid Waste E12 Contact City,State and Federal agencies for Neighborhood Organizations educational information on air,water and soil quality. E13 Educate and encourage residents to participate in NOs,Community, the Leaf Drop and Tree-cycle Programs. Businesses and Property owners. E14 Receive biennial reports from Denver Neighborhood Organizations, Environmental Health Agency on existing Denver Environmental conditions of air,water and soil.Work with the Health agency agency to mitigate any issues that may impact the community. E15 Educate and inform residents when to participate Public Works-Solid Waste, in the large item pick up. Neighborhood Organizations E16 Create and enhance buffer zones between industrial NOs,Businesses, and residential areas of the community.This mayCPDA-Zoning Administration include landscaping,setbacks and uses. E17 Educate and inform residents and mitigate NOs,CPDA-H&NDS lead paint use in residential dwellings.

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ENVIRONMENT ACTION CHART 14 #ActionsOngoingImmediatelyShort TermLong TermImplementers E18 Perform an inventory of brownfields and NOs,Federal Environmental contaminated businesses in Park Hill. Protection Agency,DEHA, Explore opportunities to mitigate these sites MOED through clean up,rehabilitation and/or redevelopment. E19 Collect and track the Environmental Protection NOs Agency Toxic Release Inventory. E20 Educate and inform neighborhood on zoning CPDA-Zoning Administration ordinance and issues. E21 Track complaints about Section 8 landlords and NOs and Denver facilities and mitigate these issues. Housing Authority. E22 Identify and collaborate with environmental groups. NOs

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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 15 TRAFFIC AND TRANSPORTATION "There is more to life than increasing speed." Mohandas K. Gandhi

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TRAFFIC AND TRANSPORTATIONOVERVIEWPark Hill residents have several modes of transportation at their disposal.The primary mode of transportation is the automobile followed by bus service,pedestrian and bicycle paths and future commuter rail.There are three designations used by the City in classifying streets:arterial,collectors,and local streets. Arterial streets have the function of permitting rapid and relatively unimpeded traffic movement through the city and serving as a primary link between communities and major land use elements.A number of major arterials are designed as state highways.Arterials typically carry a range of volumes from 10,000 vehicles per day to 50,000 vehicles per day. Arterial streets in Park Hill include;Colorado Boulevard,Smith Road,Colfax Avenue,Quebec Street,Martin Luther King Boulevard Parkway,Monaco Street Parkway,23rd Avenue,Montview Boulevard and 17th Avenue Parkway. Collector streets have the function of collecting and distributing traffic having an origin or destination between arterial and local streets within the community,and linking neighborhood residential areas,shopping and service facilities,and employment areas.Collectors typically carry a range from 3,000 vehicles per day to 12,000 vehicles per day.Collector streets in Park Hill include;48th Avenue,38th Avenue,35th Avenue,34th Avenue,Dahlia Street (MLK to City limits), Holly Street (MLK to 48th Avenue) and 26th Avenue. Local streets have the function of providing direct access to adjacent properties.They carry low volumes of traffic typically from 300 vehicles per day up to 1,500 vehicles per day with an origin or destination within the neighborhood. Mass Transit Park Hill is served by several Regional Transportation District Routes.Routes 15,20,28,38,40,43,44,65 and 105.These routes provide for adequate neighborhood geographic coverage based on walking distance to bus stops.However,there are too few East and West routes (15,20,28,38,and 44) for such a large residential oriented neighborhood. 16 Through traffic on should be encouraged to stay on Quebec St., an arterial street.

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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Bike Routes Park Hill neighborhood is served by the citywide bikeway system.Grid route #D4 runs east and west along 38th Avenue,#D6 runs east and west along 29th Avenue,#D8 runs east and west along Montview Boulevard,D#15 runs north and south from Colfax Avenue and Cherry Street jogging over to Montview Boulevard onto Dahlia Street to the city limits and D#17 runs north and south along Leyden Street. Issues Based on the 1999 projected traffic counts,the cumulative volume of all arterial and collector streets traveling east-west between Colfax Avenue and I-70 will carry in excess of 100,000 vehicles per day. The amount of traffic generated by non-residents in the neighborhood is undetermined at this time.A citywide land use and transportation plan will soon be undertaken that will help determine how much traffic is "passing through"Park Hill as opposed to the traffic that is generated by residents and businesses that are a part of the neighborhood.The results of this study will help in identifying some type of traffic mitigation or calming strategies through enforcement,education and engineering. Parking overflow continues to be a major problem due to large volumes of traffic and inadequate offstreet parking at City Park. Motorists and other commercial drivers do not comply with speed limits.Holly Street north of Martin Luther King Boulevard is treated as a speedway even though there are stop signs at 35th,36th and 38th Avenues.The one and two-way streets below MLK function as a chute through the neighborhood, making 17th Avenue,Montview Boulevard,23rd Avenue,26th Avenue,and Martin Luther King Boulevard dangerous crossings for pedestrians and bicyclists. A conflict exists between the need to maintain and improve the residential integrity of the one and twoway arterial and collector streets versus the demands of an ever-increasing level of traffic. Goals Improve traffic control and anticipate and meet the expanding mobility needs of residents,businesses and visitors.Through this we can create a safe and efficient transportation network that meets the needs of the neighborhood,emphasizing a safe and improved environment for transit users, pedestrians,and bicyclists. 17 Traffic on Quebec St., looking south

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TRAFFIC AND TRANSPORTATIONProtect and maintain the quality of life enjoyed by residents of Park Hill,especially those on arterial and collector streets,by enforcing speed limits,improving road conditions,addressing aesthetic issues and the appropriate timing of maintenance and repair operations. Action Recommendations The action recommendations have been divided into on-going,short term and long term.On-going recommendations can be started immediately and continue.Short-term recommendations can be started immediately with limited resources or no money.Long-term recommendations will take longer to accomplish and will require funding. The neighborhood selected three projects from each policy area as top priorities for implementation. 1. T-4 Enhance the use of alternative modes (walking,bicycling and transit) through the following: Improvement of landscaping along arterial and collector street right of ways,Installation of city standard bicycle racks in neighborhood commercial areas,Construction of city standard sidewalks along arterial and collector street with pedestrian ramps and intersections,and Enhance shelters,benches,for hard surface waiting areas at bus stops so they become assets to the neighborhood. 2. T-14 Collaborate with the City and County of Denver on the Martin Luther King Jr.Parkway beautification project.Elements that should be included are replacing advertising benches with bowery green benches,picnic tables,and trash receptacles.Enhance landscaping and tree planting. 3. T-3 Mitigate impacts from traffic on residential neighborhood and adjacent land uses,with emphasis on reducing East/West traffic through the neighborhood and maintaining the character of streets that have been designated as Denver Landmarks and are listed in the National Register Historic places. 18 Future Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd. beutification site

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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 19 #ActionsOngoingImmediatelyShort TermLong TermImplementers T1 Conduct a complete traffic and speed study of the Public Works-Transportation neighborhood.Emphasis given to the origin and destination of traffic.Included should be projections of the impacts of future development at Stapleton, Lowry and Fitzsimmons. T2 Enforce existing parking limits in the Neighborhood. Parking Management, Work With police and Parking Management to NOs,Denver Police enhance this service,especially for City Park uses. T3 Mitigate impacts from traffic on residential Public Works-Transportation neighborhood and adjacent land uses,with emphasis upon reducing East/West traffic through the neighborhood and maintaining the character of streets that have received National Register Historic designation. T4 Enhance the use of alternative modes (walking, Public Works,Transportation bicycling,and transit) through the following: CPDA ,Denver Parks and Improve landscaping along arterial/collector street rights-of-ways, Installation of city standard bicycle racks in neighborhood commercial areas, Construction of city standard sidewalks along arterial/collector streets (with pedestrian ramps at intersections), Enhance shelters,benches for hard surface waiting areas at bus stops. Recreation and RTD

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TRAFFIC AND TRANSPORTATION ACTION CHART 20 #ActionsOngoingImmediatelyShort TermLong TermImplementers T5 Evaluate existing traffic signage,signal timing and Department of PW-TE related traffic controls to discourage excessive speed and cut-through traffic on local Streets. T6 Enhance the residential and pedestrian environment, Public Works-Transportation where appropriate consider physically or visually narrowing local and collector streets, or additional stop signs where the City s criteria can be met. T7 Stripe crosswalks at all four-way intersections Public Works-Transportation where there is a high incidence of vehicles running and Street Maintenance stop signs or a high rate of documented accidents. T8 Identify and replace street name and parking signs NOs,Public Works Street that are faded or outdated. Transportation T9 Identify unimproved or unpaved alleys in the NOs,Public Works Street neighborhood to be improved or paved. Transportation T10 Create safe school zones through: Replacing outdated School Zones signs with the new fluorescent yellow/green signs. Posting signs doubling the speed fine in school areas. Working with and empowering the schools to meet the safety needs of their students Working with the schools to landscape and beautify their sites. NOs,Public Works Street Transportation, Denver Public Schools

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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 21 #ActionsOngoingImmediatelyShort TermLong TermImplementers T11 Notify police of speeding. Neighborhood Organizations and Community T12 Support and implement the best solutions for Police Department reducing speeding on streets and alleys. NOs,Public Works-Street These might include: Transportation Reduced speed limits, Neck downs or bulb outs of street intersections, Off peak parking lanes on arterials. T13 Work with RTD to consider circulator routes within NOs and RTD, the neighborhood that connect with the North and Community South routes,including but not limited to residential, commercial and the future Stapleton development. T14 Collaborate with the City and County of Denver on Denver Parks and the Martin Luther King,Jr.Parkway Beautification Recreation,Public WorksProject.Elements that should be included are Transportation Planning, replacing existing advertising bus benches with CPDA,NOs and Community bowery green benches,picnic tables,and trash receptacles.Enhance landscaping and increase tree planting. T15 Reduce the amount of truck traffic in the residential Public Works,Traffic areas for existing and new development by posting Engineering,CPDA-NIS, signage that limits the number of tons for NOs,BAs and Community commercial trucks.Notify chronic offenders and post their names in the neighborhood newspaper.

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TRAFFIC AND TRANSPORTATION ACTION CHART 22 #ActionsOngoingImmediatelyShort TermLong TermImplementers T16 Identify and prioritize school zones and other high PW-TE,NOs pedestrian activity areas that should be considered for designation as Safety Zones. T17 Discourage the widening of Martin Luther King NOs,Public WorksBoulevard Parkway.Divert traffic onto Smith Road.Transportation Planning, CPDA T18 Reduce speeding traffic through the neighborhood Denver Police Department, to a level consistent with posted speed limits and PW-TE compatible with the neighborhood s land uses to preserve the residential quality of life. T19 Reconstruct and improve streets to adequately Public Works-Street support traffic weight and volumes and enhance Maintenance,Traffic and maintenance,sanding,and sweeping practices.Transportation Divisions T20 Linkage between the residential and new Stapleton Public Works Transportation, development.If Quebec Street is widened to fourStapleton Development lanes in any area between Colfax Avenue and I-70,Corp.and Property Owners its improvements through the Park Hill neighborhood should be accomplished with adequate provisions for street right-of-way,landscaped medians,building setbacks,constructing detached sidewalks,new streetscapes and landscape design treatments. T21 Work with Denver Police Department to purchase a Denver Police Department speed trailer for the District 2 Station. and NOs

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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 23 #ActionsOngoingImmediatelyShort TermLong TermImplementers T22 Increase the use of photo radar throughout NOs and DPD the neighborhood. T23 Study the intersection at 23rd Avenue and Public Works, Colorado Blvd.for turn signal or turn lane. Transportation Engineering, Parks and Recreation T24 Encourage enforcement,education and engineering Denver Police Department, in order to reduce speed and make streets more PW-TE,NOs,Community neighborhood friendly through: Notifying police of speeders and give specific information as possible Expanding the use of speed trailers Increased use of photo radar Support of Drive Smart Program with Police Department Citizen awareness through education

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TRAFFIC AND TRANSPORTATION 24 Martin Luther King Blvd. 23rd Ave. Montview Blvd. 26th Ave. 38th Ave. 48th Ave. Smith Rd. Interstate 70 35th Ave. 34th Ave.Dahlia St. Elm St. Colorado Blvd. Quebec St. Monaco St. Pkwy. Holly St.17th Ave. Pkwy. Colfax Ave. 36,700 38,600 20,600 61,000 2,500 6,250 24,500 2,100 7,800 3,200 36,000 28,500 29,500 NFreeway Arterial Collector 7,800Traffic volumes Street Classification and Traffic Volumes Map

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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 25 PARKS, OPEN SPACE, AND TRAILS "If you live on this land, and you have ancestors sleeping in this land, I believe that makes you a native to this land. It has nothing to do with the color of your skin. I was not raised to look at people racially. What I was taught is that we're flowers in the Great Spirit's garden. We share a common root, and the root is Mother Earth." Oh Shinnah

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PARKS, OPEN SPACE, AND TRAILS Goals Acquire,extend,improve,and maintain parks,public open space and parkways in the neighborhood to meet the needs of increasing population and to support recreational opportunities.Provide improved and extended bike and jogging paths to and within parks,open space and parkways and integrate changes with planning for Stapleton.Insure preservation of current built and natural areas. Action Recommendations The neighborhood selected three projects from each policy area as "top priorities"for implementation. 1. P-14 Encourage businesses along 38th Avenue to contribute to a greenway concept and improved buffer yard to screen residential from industrial uses. 2. P-6 Develop a trail on Monaco Parkway from Colfax Avenue to Sand Creek through natural paths and walkways. 3. P-9 Plant more flower beds along Martin Luther King Jr.Parkway,City of Axum Park,and other open space and recreation areas in Park Hill. The action recommendations have been divided into on-going,short term and long term.On-going recommendations can be started immediately and continue.Short-term recommendations can be started immediately with limited resources or no money.Long-term recommendations will take longer to accomplish and will require funding. 26 Thomas Earnest McClain Park City of Axum Park Park Hill Golf Course

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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 27 #ActionsOngoingImmediatelyShort TermLong TermImplementers P1 Identify open space suitable for use as parks such NOs,Denver Parks and as unimproved rights of way.And privately owned Recreation,Landowners land for small neighborhood parks. P2 Post signs with directions to parks and trails systems. NOs,DP&R,PWStreet Transportation P3 Prepare brochures on parks and recreational NOs,Denver Parks and facilities in and adjacent to the neighborhood and Recreation publicize them in newspapers and newsletters. P4 Monitor the condition of existing parks and NOs,Denver Parks and take action to repair and maintain their Recreation physical condition. P5 Develop a replanting plan for trees and other NOs,Denver Parks and vegetation in parks and open space. Recreation,Community P6 Develop a trail on Monaco Parkway from Colfax to Denver Parks and Recreation, Sand Creek through natural paths and walkways.Department of Public Safety, Community P7 Create and conduct educational programs to inform Denver Parks and Recreation, residents about trees,other plants,and urban NOs,Denver Public Schools wildlife in Park Hill. P8 Develop programs for various age groups that Denver Parks and Recreation, are not geared toward competitive sports. Community P9 Plant more flower beds along Martin Luther King Denver Parks and Recreation, Blvd.,City of Axum Park and other open space and Community recreation areas in Park Hill.

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PARKS, OPEN SPACE AND TRAILS ACTION CHART 28 #ActionsOngoingImmediatelyShort TermLong TermImplementers P10 Eliminate and construct concrete pads to install Denver Parks and Recreation, federal green bus benches ( bowery style ) andRTD trash receptacles along Martin Luther King Blvd. P11 Hang colorful banners from poles along Denver Parks and Recreation, Martin Luther King Boulevard. Public Works,NOs, Community P12 Relocate from city park or construct a new Denver Parks and Recreation, Martin Luther King Jr.statue along Martin Luther Community King Boulevard Parkway P13 Continue to develop Smiley Middle School as Denver Public Schools, usable public open space. Denver Parks and Recreation P14 Encourage businesses along 38th Avenue to CPDA,DP&R,Businesses contribute to a greenway concept and improved and Landowners the buffer area to screen residential from industrial uses. P15 Develop more community participation programs Denver Parks and Recreation, that include community gardens,tree and flower Landowners,NOs,and planting and yard maintenance. Community

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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 29 LAND USE AND ZONING "Never doubt that a small group of committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it's the only thing that has." Margaret Meade

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LAND USE AND ZONINGOVERVIEWPark Hill has approximately 3,021 acres of land and the primary land use is residential.Approximately 66% of Park Hill's area is occupied by residential properties.The next most dominant land use combined is industrial/commercial,occupying approximately 18% of the land.Public/quasi-public use is 9%,and transportation and utilities occupies 5% of the total land.The major zoning classifications are R-0,R-2 and I-2. The neighborhood is predominantly residential with commercial uses located along Colfax Avenue, Colorado Boulevard,and six neighborhood commercial nodes at 35th and Dahlia Street,33rd and Holly Street,28th and Fairfax Street,23rd and Oneida Street,23rd and Kearney Street and 23rd and Dexter Street. The zone districts specifically applicable to Park Hill are R-0,R-2,R-2-A,R-3,R-4,R-5,B-1,B-2,B-3,B-A-3 and B-4,I-0,I-1,and I-2,O-1,P-1 and PUD and are shown on the attached map at the end of this chapter.Their general purposes,descriptions and key regulations are provided in Appendix B. Residential Land Uses Sixty-six percent of Park Hill is zoned residential.The R-0 zone between 16th Avenue and to Martin Luther King Boulevard,is a stable residential area. The medium density residential area,zoned R-2,has developed almost identically to the R-0 zone district from Martin Luther King Boulevard to 38th Avenue.Higher density residential areas,zoned R-3 and R-4 are along Quebec Street from 17th Avenue to 38th Avenue.However,commercial uses exist throughout the neighborhood such as 22nd and Kearney Street.Park Hill has developed a housing density mix that accommodates a variety of lifestyles and displays a diverse urban fabric. Special Residential Land Uses The neighborhood presently accommodates five group homes,two adult correctional facilities and one transitional special care home within its boundaries.These facilities are located in the residential and industrial areas of the neighborhood.A recent city ordinance now limits,in an area,the location of these facilities based on their proximity to each other. 30 Residential land use Elm St. Apartments

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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Commercial Land Uses Commercial uses,zoned B-4,are concentrated along the East Colfax Avenue,along with three areas of P1,parking for businesses.Six smaller nodes of commercial uses,zoned B-2,are located at 22nd and Oneida Street,23rd and Kearney Street,28th and Fairfax Street,28th and Colorado Boulevard.to Martin Luther King Boulevard.Businesses in these areas provide services to the surrounding neighborhood. There are three areas zoned B-3 (shopping center districts) located at 33rd and Dahlia Street,33rd and Holly Street and at Colorado Boulevard and Smith Road. Vacant Land There are approximately 91 acres of vacant land in the neighborhood.The Cook-Inlet property at Colorado Blvd.and Smith Road and several other parcels of land have a high potential for development. Parks and Open Space Park Hill has several neighborhood parks,City of Axum,located at Martin Luther King Jr.Boulevard and Cherry Street,Ferguson Park at 23rd Avenue and Dexter Street,Martin Luther King Park at 38th Avenue and Newport Street,Milan Park at Martin Luther King Boulevard and Quebec Street and Fred Thomas Park at 26th Avenue and Quebec Street.The Park Hill Golf Course is located east of Colorado Boulevard. from 35th Avenue to Smith Road.Denver City Park is located west of Colorado Blvd.between 17th and 26th Avenues,and includes the City Park Golf Course between 23rd and 26th Avenues.Martin Luther King Boulevard,Monaco Street and Seventeenth Avenue Parkways provide additional green space and their medians are frequently used for jogging,walking and other recreational activities. Schools Starting with the 1997-1998 school year,nearly all Denver Public Schools once again became neighborhood schools. Park Hill has six elementary schools and one middle school that serve residents of Park Hill.The elementary schools are Hallet Elementary located at 2950 Jasmine Street,Park School of International Studies at 5050 E.19th Avenue,Phillips Elementary at 6550 E.21st Avenue,Smith Renaissance School of the Arts at 3590 Jasmine Street and Stedman Elementary at 2940 Dexter Street; Smiley Middle School is located at 2540 Holly Street. There is no public high school in the neighborhood.The majority of Park Hill students attend East High School at 1545 Detroit Street and George Washington High School at 655 South Monaco Street.Some attend Manuel High School at 1700 E.28th Avenue. 31 Industrial land use Future sight of 125 new single-family homes at 35th and Dahlia

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LAND USE AND ZONINGPark Hill has various private schools including Blessed Sacrament Catholic School located at 1973 Elm Street,Union Baptist Church Excel Institute at 3200 Dahlia Street,The Odyssey Charter School at 19th and Elm Street,and the University of Denver Park Hill Campus,which includes the law school and Houston fine arts center,is located at 7039 E.18th Avenue.The Denver University facilities will be relocating outside of the neighborhood and will be replaced by Johnson and Wales University and the new Denver Public High School for the Performing Arts. Goals Maintain the existing integrity of the residential character of Park Hill.Assure that continued growth and development in Park Hill results in a balanced and compatible mix of housing types and densities. Oppose industrial expansion outside the areas currently zoned for industrial uses north of 38th Avenue,from Colorado Boulevard to Quebec Street.Explore opportunities for live/work. Minimize the visual impacts and create an improved buffer area between the industrial, commercial and residential areas. Maintain and enhance the small-scale neighborhood character of the business areas and foster the development of Main Street type imagery. Preserve the existing parks and open space within the neighborhood. Preserve the areas of historical significance through historic districts or historic landmark designation. Maintain and enhance the viability of residential and commercial land uses on Colorado Boulevard. Identify and change non-conforming land uses in the neighborhood. 32 Mixed Use zoning at 23rd and Dexter

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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Action Recommendations The action recommendations have been divided into on-going,short term and long term.On-going recommendations can be started immediately and continue.Short-term recommendations can be started immediately with limited resources or no money.Long-term recommendations will take longer to accomplish and will require funding. The neighborhood selected three projects from each policy area as top priorities for implementation. 1. LZ-10 Notify and participate in the redevelopment of the Dahlia and Holly shopping centers.Work with landowners and the city on any rezoning proposals and related site plan issues. 2. LZ-8 Encourage enforcement of city ordinance requirements for absentee landlords to have an agent registered with the Assessment Division.As a part of that effort,the name and addresses of owners and agents listed by the assessor s records should be corrected. 3. LZ-3 Create and maintain a mix of housing types and sizes that are attractive and affordable to a diversity of ages,incomes,household types,sizes,cultural and ethnic backgrounds. 3. LZ-1 Encourage the citywide dispersal of group homes and subsidized housing. 33 New town homes at 34th and Grape St.

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LAND USE AND ZONING ACTION CHART 34 #ActionsOngoingImmediatelyShort TermLong TermImplementers LZ1 Encourage the city-wide dispersal of Group homes Denver Comprehensive and subsidized housing. Plan,CPDA-ZA LZ2 Contain all industrial development and related uses Industrial Users,NOs, to and within currently zoned industrial districts Parking Management, only.Oppose additional industrial zoning and CPDA-ZA related uses including parking in adjacent residential areas.Eliminate non-conforming industrial and parking uses. LZ3 Create and maintain a mix of housing types that are CPDA,NOs,Housing attractive and affordable to a diversity of ages,Developers incomes,household types,sizes and cultural backgrounds. LZ4 Enhance the standing neighborhood zoning NOs,Community committee to monitor,review and make recommendations on all reviews that include neighborhood notification. LZ5 Initiate zoning amendments and policies to protect CPDA-ZA,NOs the single-family residential character in Park Hill. Specifically:identify and extend R-2 zoning to those Areas zoned R-3 that currently meet R-2 criteria. Similarly,consider rezoning The Park Hill campus of DU from R-3 to R5 or a similar zone. LZ6 Monitor all zone change requests adjacent to the NOs,CPDA,Community neighborhood in the Stapleton site.

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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 35 #ActionsOngoingImmediatelyShort TermLong TermImplementers LZ7 Assure compatibility of land uses and create NOs,CPDA, connections between future Stapleton Stapleton Development Development and Park Hill.New development Corporation should be evaluated for how it compliments existing land uses in the neighborhood. LZ8 Encourage enforcement of City ordinance Assessment Division, requirements for absentee landlords to have an CPDA-NIS,and NOs agent registered with the Assessment Division. As part of that effort,the name and addresses of the owners and agents listed by the Assessor s records should be corrected. LZ10 Participate in the redevelopment of the Dahlia and NOs,Businesses, Holly Shopping Centers.Work with the landownersDURA and CPDA-H&NDS and city on any rezoning proposals and related site plan issues. LZ11 Participate in a citywide update of regulations for CPDAZoning home occupation businesses. Administration,NOs LZ12 Encourage participation in the citywide Land use NOs,CPDA and Transportation plan. LZ13 Provide for an attractive and harmonious transition NOs,CPDA, between different land uses and developments.Private Sector LZ14 Encourage retailers and commercial property PHBSO,NOs,Businesses owners to form business associations.

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LAND USE AND ZONING ACTION CHART 36 #ActionsOngoingImmediatelyShort TermLong TermImplementers LZ15 The neighborhood should have an active role in the NOs,Businesses, redevelopment and ongoing operations of business Public and Private Sector areas.There should be widespread notification and participation of potential land use and zoning changes. LZ16 Changes to existing parks and open space should NOs,DP&R,CPDA be decided in a neighborhood forum. LZ17 Review existing business uses and zoning along CPDA,NOs,and Businesses Colorado Blvd.And East Colfax Avenue as well as within the neighborhood for compatibility of the allowed business uses with the adjoining and nearby residential uses.Propose zoning and other regulatory changes that would address the issues of compatibility. LZ18 Identify areas with non-conforming,but desired NOs,Businesses and CPDA uses,and initiate zone map or language amendments that would allow the desired uses.Include amendments conditions and waivers,or other provisions,in the zone changes to help assure compatibility with surrounding residential areas. LZ20 Link residents and landowners to home CPDA-H&NDS,DURA, improvement programs. NOs and Community LZ21 Explore opportunities to develop live/work in the CPDA,Landowners industrial areas.Emphasis should be given to areas where the industrial and residential border each other. LZ22 Identify opportunities for homeownership and to CPDA-HANDS,NOs, develop senior housing. Non-profits,Private Sector

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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 37 R-4 R-0 R-2R-0R-0R-0 R-2 R-2 B-2I-2 I-2 I-1 I-0B-3O-1 1-0 B-3PUD PUD B-2 B-2 B-2R-2R-2R-2-A R-2-A B-1 B-3 B-2 B-2 R-4 R-4 R-4R-3B-2 P-1 P-1 B-4 B-1 B-A-3 B-4 B-4 B-4 B-4 R-5 R-3 P-1 PUD B-1 OCTOBER 1999 Interstate 70 38th Ave. Smith Rd. 35th Ave. 34th Ave. Martin Luther King Blvd. 23rd Ave. Montview Blvd. 26th Ave. 17th Ave. Pkwy. Colfax Ave. 48th Ave.Colorado Blvd. Dahlia St. Elm St. Holly St. Monaco St. Pkwy. Quebec St.28th Ave. 52nd Ave. N Park Hill Land Use Map 0-1 I-0 I-1 I-2 B-1 B-2 B-1 B-A-3 R-0 R-2 R-2-A R-3 PUD R-4 P-1

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URBAN DESIGN 38 URBAN DESIGN "If you foolishly ignore beauty, you'll soon find yourself without it. Your life will be impoverished. But if you wisely invest in beauty, it will remain with you all the days of your life" Frank Lloyd Wright

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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLANOVERVIEWPark Hill's residential qualities and sense of community are expressed by the neighborhood street image. The older homes,variety of housing stock,neighborhood commercial services,mature street trees, parkways,detached sidewalks,tree lawns and front porch detailing all contribute to the community's unique character and "pedestrian friendly"environment. Park Hill enjoys a diverse mix of retail businesses with more than 250 local businesses and institutions. The businesses are primarily small,storefront operations in small retail strips.These businesses have special problems,opportunities and constraints. The Park Hill neighborhood is almost fully developed with the exception of the Cook-Inlet property at Smith Road and Colorado Boulevard and several vacant lots.As development occurs,it is important that changes in appearance remain consistent and complement the existing neighborhood character.We must also look for opportunities to enhance and upgrade areas of the neighborhood. Goals To promote and enhance the existing neighborhood character and preserve the small town atmosphere and historic sense of the community for future generations to enjoy and respect.To preserve and maintain a high standard for parks,open space,boulevards,parkways,streetscaping,traffic circulation, and to pursue opportunities to create historic districts within Park Hill.To require high standards for the built environment that includes residences,commercial and industrial properties,parks and other institutional settings. 39 Classic examples of good design creating a livable and walkable community

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URBAN DESIGN Action Recommendations The action recommendations have been divided into on-going,short term and long term.On-going recommendations can be started immediately and continue.Short-term recommendations can be started immediately with limited resources or no money.Long-term recommendations will take longer to accomplish and will require funding. The neighborhood selected three projects from each policy area as top priorities for implementation. 1. UD-2 Educate residents,businesses and developers about the neighborhood voluntary design guidelines. (see Appendix A) 2. UD-8 Develop and apply a process for neighborhood review of projects pertaining to parks and open space,boulevards,parkways,streetscaping,traffic circulation,special improvements and historic districts within Park Hill as they pertain to the neighborhood's urban design. 2. UD-13 Work with Stapleton Development Corporation (SDC) and Forest City to insure good connections between Park Hill and new developments at Stapleton. 3. UD-14 Work with SDC and Transportation Engineering to mitigate the impacts on the neighborhood for the future expansion of Quebec Street. 40 New and old unified by architecture that blends with the existing neighborhood Public spaces benefit from good urban design, such as at 23rd and Kearney

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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 41 #ActionsOngoingImmediatelyShort TermLong TermImplementers UD1 Educate and inform residents and developers about NOs,CPDA,Landowners the City and County of Denver s Residential and Community Advisory Standards and Guidelines for Home Renovations. UD2 Educate residents,businesses and developers about Neighborhood & Businesses the Neighborhood Voluntary Design Guidelines. Organizations,CPDA, (see Appendix A) Landowners,Community Apply guidelines as building changes occur through zone change,variance and permitting processes. Provide technical assistance upon request to property owners or developers during the design phase of their projects. For Park Hill Neighborhood Shopping nodes The enhancement of the street imagery and making these areas a pedestrian destination. Through specific street landscaping,furnishings, lighting,and brick paved intersections,create a high degree of visual interest that includes individual pockets of pedestrian & neighborhood friendly activity centers.Human scale and inviting spaces. Storefronts and signs should be subordinate to and integrated with each building fa  ade and choice of materials and detailing should be compatible with well designed and maintained adjacent structures.

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URBAN DESIGN ACTION CHART 42 #ActionsOngoingImmediatelyShort TermLong TermImplementers UD3 Execute a Historic Preservation survey. NOs and CPDA-Historic Preservation UD4 Explore possibilities of a Historic District. NOs,CPDA,Landowners UD5 Create and reinforce buffers along the neighborhood CPDA,PWTraffic and edges and between residential and commercial Transportation and/or industrial areas. UD6 Require landscaped buffer in parking areas within CPDA,PWTraffic and the neighborhood. Transportation UD7 Explore the creation of cul-de-sac parking on Colfax. CPDA,PWTraffic and Transportation UD8 Develop and apply a process for neighborhood NOs,CPDA,Parks & review of significant projects pertaining to parks & Recreation,Public Works open space,boulevards,parkways,streetscaping, traffic circulation,special improvements and historic districts within Park Hill boundaries as they pertain to the neighborhood s urban design. UD9 Evaluate existing plans for Colorado Boulevard and CPDA,Public Works, Colfax Avenue Corridor for streetscape and parking Transportation Engineering, improvements,buffering of residential and non-Mayor s Office of Economic residential uses.Study current conditions and Development,NOs & BAs recommend modifications necessary to address neighborhood concerns. UD10 Remove all billboards and discourage any new CPDA-NIS,Neighborhood billboard sites in the neighborhood. and Business Organizations

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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 43 #ActionsOngoingImmediatelyShort TermLong TermImplementers UD11 Martin Luther King Jr.Parkway:Remove all RTD,Denver Parks and advertising bus benches and replace with BoweryRecreation,CPDA,NOs Style Benches and trash receptacles. UD12 City Park District:New structures and expansion Denver Parks and Recreation, of facilities should take into account landscaping, Neighborhood Organizations parking,vehicular and pedestrian access to reduce negative impacts on the adjacent neighborhoods. UD13 Work with Stapleton Development Corporation CPDA,Stapleton and Forest City to insure good connections and Development Corp.,Forest development between Park Hill and the new City,NOs and Community Stapleton development. UD14 Work with Stapleton Development Corp.and Stapleton Development Transportation Engineering to mitigate the impacts Corp.,Forest City,Public on the neighborhood for the future expansion of Works-Transportation Quebec Street Engineering,NOs UD15 Work with Development Review section of Community Planning and CPDA to minimize the visual impacts and createDevelopment Agency an improved buffer area between industrial and and NOs residential uses.

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PUBLIC SAFETY 44 PUBLIC SAFETY "Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter." Martin Luther King Jr.

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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLANOVERVIEWPublic safety is as much about encouraging the desirable uses of a place as it is about discouraging undesirable or criminal uses.A lower crime rate is both a cause and an effect of a good quality of life in our community.Park Hill struggles with vandalism,graffiti,alley and mid-block street lighting, unreported crimes,drug and gang presence and disturbances.More importantly,a lack of interest/involvement by some property owners and managers,especially,absentee owners and managers has a direct impact in the overall quality of life in the neighborhood. Goals Reduce crime in Park Hill so residents feel safe in their homes,on neighborhood streets and in their open spaces. Objectives 1 Encourage better communication between youths,parents,schools and police in the neighborhood. 2 Rid the neighborhood of drug houses and gangs. 3 Support efforts made by the city,property owners,residents and neighborhood organizations of Park Hill to reduce crime. 4 Ensure the safety of the more vulnerable members of the communitychildren and the elderly. 5 Improve lighting on neighborhood streets,alleys and open spaces. 6 Explore ways for those convicted of crimes to do community service work that benefits the community. 7 Improve security for single family and multi-family residents. 8 Improve security in retail areas by encouraging pedestrian traffic. 45 District 2 Denver Police Officers

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PUBLIC SAFETY Action Recommendations The action recommendations have been divided into on-going,short term and long term.On-going recommendations can be started immediately and continue.Short-term recommendations can be started immediately with limited resources or no money.Long-term recommendations will take longer to accomplish and will require funding. The neighborhood selected three projects from each policy area as top priorities for implementation. 1. PS-14 Identify and inventory the problem areas,such as apartment buildings and businesses having frequent reports of crimes.Work with owners,managers and other city agencies to deal with such concerns.Encourage 100% participation of all apartment managers to participate in the Police Departments Management Training Program. 2.PS-10 Control criminal activities in alleys behind commercial and residential areas. 3. PS-12 Achieve 100% participation of all blocks in the Neighborhood Watch Program. 3. PS-3 Improve lighting on streets,in alleys and open spaces.(locations will be determined by surveying the neighborhood) 46 The Park Hill Neighborhood Plan Public Safety committee at work

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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 47 #ActionsOngoingImmediatelyShort TermLong TermImplementers PS1 Initiate the Hot Spot program to rid the CPDA-H&NDS,NOs,BAs neighborhood of drugs,gangs and illegal activity.and Community PS2 Follow up on closures of drug houses to make DPD,NOs,Community sure that they are not reestablished. PS3 Improve lighting on streets,alleys and open spaces Public Service,Public Works, (locations to be determined by surveying the CPDA-H&NDS,NOs neighborhood). and Community PS4 Provide assistance for citizen patrols being NOs,BAs,CPDA-H&NDS, established by Park Hill neighborhood organizations.DPD PS5 Provide a safe walking environment along retail Neighborhood and Business streets by implementing activities or programs Organizations (Business Block Watch). PS6 Support the success of individual shops.Encourage NO,BA,MOED,PHBSO and recruit new businesses in empty storefronts. PS7 Design and maintain security in parks and open DPD,NO,DP&R,CPDA space by increasing bike patrols,lighting,and reducing unsafe spaces. PS8 Encourage periodic organized activities in parks NOs and Community and open spaces such as picnics,parties and community gatherings. PS9 Control drug dealing activity and car prowls. DPD,NO and BA PS10 Control criminal activities in alleys behind DPD,NOs,BAs commercial and residential areas. and Community

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PUBLIC SAFETY ACTION CHART 48 #ActionsOngoingImmediatelyShort TermLong TermImplementers PS11 Establish or enhance any existing volunteer NOs and Community committees that deal with crime & safety issues. The committee will keep residents informed about crime problems & perform other related task. PS12 Achieve 100% participation of all blocks in the NOs and Community Neighborhood Watch Program. PS13 Network with city,police officials and other Neighborhood and community based organizations to learn about Business Organizations current resources and programs available to residents,and lobby the city for support deemed appropriate for improved safety in the Park Hill. PS14 Identify & inventory the problem areas,such as NOs,DPD,CPDA apartment buildings & businesses having frequent reports of crimes.Work with owners,managers,and city agencies to deal with such concerns.Encourage 100% participation by all apartment managers in the Police Department Management Training Program. PS15 Provide neighborhood with current crime statistics. Denver Police Department PS16 Identify and develop effective programs with NOs,PW and Community Denver Partners Against Graffiti to prevent graffiti and vandalism. PS17 Develop effective communication with all businesses Neighborhood and in Park Hill regarding crime and safety issues. Business Organizations

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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 49 #ActionsOngoingImmediatelyShort TermLong TermImplementers PS18 Collaborate with Denver Police on the relocation NOs,DPD CPDA-H&NDS, of the District 2 Sub-station Asset Management. PS19 Implement and partner with the District Attorney s NOs,DA s,CPDA-H&NDS, restorative justice program. Community,DPS PS20 Leave porch lights on during night hours. Community

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BUSINESS AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 50 BUSINESS AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT "Success usually comes to those who are too busy to be looking for it" Henry David Thoreau

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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLANOVERVIEWCommercial and Industrial uses comprise 18% of the area of the Park Hill Neighborhood.This plan groups the commercial areas into nodes and corridors for clarity of definition.Although not a part of Park Hill neighborhood,and not included in the 18% figure above,the south side of East Colfax Avenue between Colorado Blvd.and Quebec Street and the west side of Colorado Boulevard is included in its narrative and recommendations. Colfax Avenue Business Corridor (Sub-area 1) Sub-area 1 is comprised of the East Colfax corridor from Colorado Boulevard to Quebec Street.Colfax Avenue is in many ways the "Main Street"of not only the neighborhood but also of Denver's metropolitan region.Stretching from the foothills of Golden to the high plains of Adams and Arapahoe County on the east,Colfax Avenue is the longest commercial street in the United States.It is also U.S. Route 40 which was the principle highway link between Denver and Kansas City until the construction of Interstate Highway 70.From east to west,Colfax Avenue functions as a type of linear mall for shopping and services. Merchants and residents along the Colfax Corridor struggle with a negative image caused by the generally-held,largely false perception that the area is one of prostitution and high crime.Denver, Lakewood,and Aurora are continuing efforts to make Colfax a safe and attractive place through law enforcement,streetscape "beautification"projects,economic development strategies,and a new "Life Begins on U.S.40"promotional campaign.The Avenue is lined with many established businesses and institutions such as Hub Cap Annie,Bank Western,Mataam Fez Moroccan Food Restaurant and Colortyme which serve people from the entire metropolitan area.Other services provided to the public are auto dealerships,video rentals,banking,beauty and barber shops,and other specialized services. Reasonable rental rates and land prices have also made this business district an attractive location for new businesses. Colorado Boulevard Business Corridor (Sub-area 2) This is a small business area with residential and open space along the east side of Colorado Boulevard between Colfax Avenue and Smith Road which serves not only the neighborhood but the regional area as well.This area is zoned for business use,B-2 and PUD,and lower density residential R-0 and R-2 zones. 51 Park Hill is home to many small businesses

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BUSINESS AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENTHornes Catering,Park Hill Golf Course,Jackson Construction and Lefty Martin Appliances,are a few of the established businesses in the area.The Cook-Inlet Property at Colorado Boulevard and Smith Road is vacant. Neighborhood Shopping Nodes (Sub-area 3) Six neighborhood shopping nodes with the following examples of established businesses and services; Oneida Park Business District located at 22nd and Oneida Street (Supreme Style Barber Shop, Emma s Beauty Salon,Dr.Daddios Kitchen on Wheels) Kearney Business District--23rd and Kearney Street (Dardano s Gymnastics,Park Hill Barber Shop, Eipha Beauty Supply and Salon) Fairfax Business District --28th and Fairfax (Greater Park Hill Office,NAACP,A&A Fish Market & Restaurant) 23rd and Dexter Business District 23rd and Dexter Street (Councilwoman Happy Haynes District Office,The Cherry Tomato Restaurant,Spinelli s Market and Deli,Park Hill Bookstore). There are three shopping center districts containing the following established businesses and services; Dahlia Shopping Center located at 33rd and Dahlia (Park Hill Health Center,Spiral Education Foundation (Park Hill For Safe Neighborhoods and Northeast Denver Business Support offices, Stanley's Hair Shop,B-Unique T-shirts) Holly Shopping Center--33rd and Holly (Hope Communities,U.S.Postal Service,Park Hill Detailing Shop,Ned s Food Market,Easyway Cleaners). Cook-Inlet Property located at Colorado Blvd.and Smith Road (vacant). Quebec Street Hotel Corridor (Sub-area 4) There are many Hotels along Quebec Street from Martin Luther King Boulevard to Smith Road that serve the metropolitan area.These hotels include the Doubletree,Radisson,and Red Lion Inn. 52 Local businesses at 28th and Fairfax The Horizon at 33rd and Holly

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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Industrial Corridor (Sub-area 5) The industrial corridor of Park Hill is bounded by 38th Avenue on the south,City limits on the north, Colorado Boulevard on the west and Quebec Street on the east.I-70 serves as a buffer and transportation link for the industrial uses.This section of Park Hill has many strengths such as employment opportunities,start-up business potential and many other economic opportunities that can be tapped into by the people of Park Hill.There are also weaknesses such as a lack of buffering between the industrial and residential areas,blighted areas,heavy truck traffic,undersized streets incompatibility of uses. Issues/Goals The major goal of economic development is to sustain the Park Hill Neighborhood by attracting, stimulating and preserving businesses that serve and employ neighborhood residents.The purpose of business and economic development is to ensure the stability of the businesses in the Neighborhood Shopping Nodes and to promote the health of those enterprises along the Colfax Avenue and Colorado Boulevard Corridors.Mapping out the assets will be a first step to promote a better relationship and collaboration between the industrial and residential sectors of Park Hill. At issue is the relationship between residential areas and commercial areas.Economically enhanced neighborhoods will offer a significant contribution to the welfare of commercial ventures which,in turn, help to maintain the neighborhood.Park Hill neighbors are concerned about the large number of vacant buildings and vacant lots within business zones and the need to find suitable tenants for those properties,to redevelop them,and prevent further deterioration.This redevelopment requires a cooperative effort by community organizations (often with financial assistance from government programs),Park Hill neighbors,and the newly created Northeast Denver Business Support Office (PHBSO).PHBSO was crated in 1999 to stimulate business development and organization and to inform and make available a wide range of economic resources. The following are goals for the business areas within Park Hill: Colfax Avenue Business Corridor (Sub-area 1) Create a stable,safe,attractive,well-lit retail street with a mix of offices,neighborhood businesses,and destination businesses that attract customers from out of the geographic area and with anchor tenants to increase activity and uses for other businesses. 53 Holly Shopping Center

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BUSINESS AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Colorado Boulevard Business Corridor (Sub-area 2) Encourage stable,attractive commercial uses that serve the community and the neighborhood that do not detract from the residential character of the neighborhood. Neighborhood Shopping Nodes (Sub-area 3) Maintain the quiet,charming,low-traffic and pedestrian oriented character of businesses,with an emphasis on services and retail establishments that serve as amenities to Park Hill residents,such as drug stores,restaurants,hardware stores,laundries,office supplies stores and grocery stores. Quebec Street Corridor (Sub-area 4) Maintain the viability of this important corridor that will link Park Hill and the future Stapleton development,and create a safe,attractive buffer area between the uses. Industrial Corridor (Sub-area 5) Create a stable,safe,attractive,buffer area between the industrial and residential uses in the neighborhood.Educate and encourage stable,attractive and safe uses that serve the community through employment opportunities and business creation.Retain and expand businesses that do not detract from the residential character of the neighborhood. Action Recommendations The action recommendations have been divided into on-going,short term and long term.On-going recommendations can be started immediately and continue.Short-term recommendations can be started immediately with limited resources or no money.Long-term recommendations will take longer to accomplish and will require funding. The neighborhood selected three projects from each policy area as top priorities for implementation. 1. BE-1 Continue to reinforce and enhance the design and physical redevelopment options for the Dahlia and Holly Shopping Centers. 2. BE9 Collaborate with public and private sectors to establish programs in the neighborhood to provide employment and training,internships and entrepreneurial opportunities to residents of Park Hill. 3. BE-22 Create a youth entry program and business incubator. 54 A variety of goods and services are available at the Dahlia Shopping Center

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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 55 #ActionsOngoingImmediatelyShort TermLong TermImplementers BE1 Continue to reinforce and enhance the design and NOs,Businesses, physical redevelopment options for the Dahlia and CPDA-H&NDS, Holly Shopping Centers. Residents,Private Sector, Landowners,DURA BE2 Market the shopping center nodes and corridor Business Owners, identities as a positive shopping environment to Neighborhood and Business residents and adjacent neighborhoods Associations,CPDA-H&NDS PHBSO BE3 Create and enhance a main street theme for each PHBSO,CPDA-Urban Design, shopping center node in Park Hill. Businesses BE4 Inventory and evaluate vacant properties within Neighborhood and the business corridors and nodes in order to recruit Businesses Associations, business development. PHBSO BE5 Develop vacant land in a way that is compatible Property Owners,CPDA with the character and density of the surrounding businesses and neighborhoods. BE6 Create a business improvement district in Park Hill CPDA-H&NDS,MOED, business sub-areas. PHBSO,Businesses BE7 Economic Development--Apply to become a Business Associations, Neighborhood Business Revitalization District Mayor s Office of Economic (NBR) in order to participate in federal economic Dev elopment,CPDA-H&NDS, program granted through Mayor s Office of PHBSO Economic Development. BE8 Monitor and rid the business areas of any illegal PHBSO,BAs,DPD, activities and business related crime in the Community neighborhood.

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BUSINESS AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ACTION CHART 56 #ActionsOngoingImmediatelyShort TermLong TermImplementers BE9 Collaborate with public and private sectors to PHBSO,CPDA-H&NDS, establish programs in the neighborhood to provide Businesses,NOs, employment and training,internships and MOET,MOED entrepreneurial opportunities to residents of Park Hill. BE10 Encourage shared parking between B As,NOs,CPDA-ZA retail establishments. BE11 Aesthetics:Support pedestrian oriented sidewalks, Business Associations, streetscapes,lighting,human scale fa  ade Neighborhood Organizations, improvements,trees,flowers,human scale CPDA development and other aesthetic enhancements that are appropriate for business sub-areas. BE12 Encourage an end to vandalism and removal of BAs,NOs,NIS, graffiti and trash by residents and business ownersCommunity,Public Worksin Park Hill. Keep Denver Beautiful BE13 Encourage establishment of a Park Hill home Business Associations, business service center (technology services, MOED,MOET,and NOs, computer repair,sales of office supplies,businessPHBSO,CPDA-H&NDS incubator spaces,answering services,etc.). BE14 Encourage work close to home.Establish a satellite Business Associations, employment office in Park Hill.List all employmentMOET,Park Hill Business openings including business opportunities in homes, Support Office,NOs, and business districts such as Stapleton,Dahlia and Community-Based Holly and the I-70 industrial business corridor.Organizations,Community BE15 Establish a Park Hill employment web site. Park Hill Business Support Office

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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 57 #ActionsOngoingImmediatelyShort TermLong TermImplementers BE16 Establish a jobs available page in Park Hill BAs,PHBSO,NOs,Communitynewspapers and newsletters Based Organizations BE17 Mitigate visual impacts and create an inviting buffer NOs,Businesses,CPDA area between the industrial and residential areas. BE18 Inform property owners and assist them in CPDA and Businesses maintaining and restoring historic buildings. BE19 Seek to fill identified market gaps.Work with BA,CPDA-H&NDS,MOED, commercial property owners and business Businesses organizations to attract desired businesses. BE20 Encourage businesses and industrial areas to form PHBSO and Businesses, organizations/associations to promote,employ andMOED market businesses in the area. BE21 Internal and external business node audit/survey PHBSO to determine the best use model.Identify business mix effectiveness,client base,and consolidation possibilities. BE22 Create a youth employment entry program and PHBSO,DPS,MOET, business incubator. Denver University BE23 Establish cultural dollar days to support business nodes. PHBSO,Businesses,Community BE24 Expand the Park Hill Home Tour to include businesses. PHBSO,NOs,Businesses BE25 Develop the Park Hill Business Support Office to PHBSO,CPDA-H&NDS, become a Community Development Corporation Community or non-profit 501(c)(3). BE26 Create a Park Hill Business and Services Directory. PHBSO,CPDA-H&NDS, Community,Private Sector

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HUMAN RELATIONS AND COMMUNITY SERVICES 58 HUMAN RELATIONS AND COMMUNITY SERVICES "We cannot seek achievement for ourselves and forget about progress and prosperity for our community...Our ambitions must be broad enough to include the aspirations and needs of others, for their sakes and for our own." Cesar Chavez

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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLANOVERVIEWThe primary thrust of the human relations and community service delivery action plan is to build on the present network of service providers by filling identified "gaps"in the system,and building effective partnerships between organizations.We will continue to look for opportunities to overcome the geographical divisions and recognize,celebrate and encourage appreciation of diversity. Goals Improve and maintain the quality of life for the whole community by providing services that build community,create connections across generations,and are respectful of all.Maintain and improve diversity as key to achieving peace and prosperity in Park Hill.Develop a guide that identifies and explains outreach,information and local services that are provided.Establish and maintain a variety of organizations that help to create an environment that is sustainable and stable. Plan Implementation and Action Agenda The neighborhood selected three projects from each policy area as top priorities for implementation. 1. HRCS-7 Develop a neighborhood web-site for community news. 2. HRCS-10 Work with tenants in subsidized housing to help them become more active and a part of their neighborhood. 3. HRCS-13 Re-establish community social events such as coffees,block parties,national night out and holiday parties. Action Recommendations The action recommendations have been divided into on-going,short term and long term.On-going recommendations can be started immediately and continue.Short-term recommendations can be started immediately with limited resources or no money.Long-term recommendations will take longer to accomplish and will require funding. 59 Park Hill Family Health Center Shaka's Place

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HUMAN RELATIONS AND COMMUNITY SERVICES ACTION CHART 60 #ActionsOngoingImmediatelyShort TermLong TermImplementers HRCS1 Identify and develop a directory that identifies a NOs,CBOs,BAs,Foundations, full continuum of services that addresses PHBSO,CPDA-H&NDS, important functions of the community. Private Sector HRCS2 Identify organizations that respond to emergencies NOs,CBOs,Community (e.g.emergency food,shelter,and related services). HRCS3 Identify organizations that assist to help meet the NOs,CBOs,Community basic needs (services anyone may need at a particular stage of life:childcare,drop-in centers for youth,outreach to persons with mental illness, home chore or congregate meals for senior citizens,home health care for people who are convalescing or who have disabilities). HRCS4 Identify and develop human resources for job NOs,CBOs,PHBSO, training,conflict resolution,language classes,andCPDA-H&NDS a volunteer bank HRCS5 Identify the community programs and services NOs,Religious Institutions, that are provided by the faith communities Community in Park Hill. HRCS6 Identify community programs and services that NOs,CBOs,DPS are provided by the schools in Park Hill HRCS7 Develop a neighborhood web site for community NOs,BAs,PHBSO, news and services. CPDA-H&NDS HRCS8 Create a brochure to educate & inform existing NOs,Community,BAs and future residents of the value,diversity and quality of life in Park Hill that has been achieved over many years.

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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 61 #ActionsOngoingImmediatelyShort TermLong TermImplementers HRCS9 Secure a commitment and cooperation from Denver Health,Hospitals, Denver Health and Hospitals regarding the Park Hill NOs and BAs Health Station.This should include services and complete medical staff (including physicians and mental health professionals) that reflects the diversity of the neighborhood population. HRCS10 Work with tenants in subsidized housing to help CBOs,NOs them become more active and a part of their neighborhood. HRCS11 Establish a community welcoming committee to NOs,BAs greet new residents and businesses.Involve them and educate them about the history of the neighborhood to discourage geographical separation. HRCS12 Organize an annual celebration that brings NOs,CBOs,BAs residents,businesses and other community stakeholders together. HRCS13 Re-establish community social events such as NOs,CBOs,BAs coffees,block parties (National Night Out) and holiday parties. HRCS14 Work with Community Voices to inform,educate DHH,CPDA-H&NDS, and recruit new patients to the Park Hill Family Businesses,NOs and Health Center Community HRCS15 Create a Historic Neighborhood Diary of the NOs,BAs,CPDA-H&NDS, people & places of Park Hill. Foundations,Private Sector HRCS16Establish a human services steering committee to NOs,BAs,CBOs,Departmentcoordinate and encourage partnerships and sharing of Health Servicesof resources,such as facilities and equipment.

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EDUCATION 62 EDUCATION "If there is no struggle, there is no progress" Frederick Douglass

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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLANOVERVIEWSchools are faced with increasing cultural diversity and the need for before and after school programs to accommodate working parents.Schools in Park Hill are challenged by an ever-widening range of educational and family needs,inadequate resources and transportation,large classroom size,diversity of abilities and learning styles,and socio-economic disparities.There is a critical need for a clear plan and strategies to address the myriad of issues impacting our schools and communities. Goals All students in Park Hill have the opportunity to succeed regardless of ethnicity,differing abilities,social or economic differences.The culture of our schools must include: A place where academic achievement is the highest priority. A place where individual growth is recognized and encouraged. A place where children are ready to learn when they enter school and ready to succeed when they graduate A place where we learn to respect ourselves and one another A place where success is measured by individual growth,in addition to school and district-wide performance A place where equitable,not equal funding is distributed according to need A place where English language acquisition is available to all community members 63 Smiley Middle School Park Hill Elementary School

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EDUCATION Priority Recommendations: 1. ED-1 Establish and enhance programs in neighborhood schools within Park Hill that provide a variety of activities and services before and after school and during summer breaks. 2. ED-6 Explore options to open and operate a campus for free life time learning opportunities in Park Hill. 3. ED-10 Create opportunities to enhance professional development of teaching staff in Park Hill schools. Look for opportunities to enhance staff development. 3. ED-5 Develop outreach avenues to increase parent/teacher/community involvement. Action Recommendations The action recommendations have been divided into on-going,short term and long term.On-going recommendations can be started immediately and continue.Short-term recommendations can be started immediately with limited resources or no money.Long-term recommendations will take longer to accomplish and will require funding. 64 Blessed Sacrament School Pauline Robinson Branch Library

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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 65 #ActionsOngoingImmediatelyShort TermLong TermImplementers ED1 Establish and enhance programs in neighborhood Denver Public Schools, schools within Park Hill that provide a variety of NOs, Community, activities and services before and after school and Private Sector during summer breaks. ED2 Work with Stapleton Redevelopment Corp.and NOs,Community DPS on the proposed middle and high schools at Stapleton. ED3 Explore an opportunity to create a Career Denver Public Schools, Education Center East at the University of University of Denver, Denver Law campus. Community ED4 Work with DPS and the community to enact reforms Denver Public Schools, and policy changes.Better utilize resources to Community support and maintain schools affecting charter and magnet schools in Park Hill. ED5 Develop outreach avenues to increase Denver Public Schools, parent/teacher/community involvement. Community,NOs ED6 Explore options to open and operate a campus for DPS,Colorado State free life time learning opportunities in Park Hill.Department of Education, Private Sector ED7 Utilize local media to inform residents about Local Media,NOs,DPS, changes in Park Hill Schools.i.e. Faith Based Community 1 Charter Schools 2 After school program collaboration 3 Increase services of neighborhood retired educators and residents.

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EDUCATION ACTION CHART 66 #ActionsOngoingImmediatelyShort TermLong TermImplementers ED8 Explore opportunities to create a better learning Denver Public Schools, environment.Access existing resources from city NOs,Mayor's Office of agencies and community-based organizations. Education and Children ED9 Collaborate and identify 70 High School students in Denver Public Schools, the neighborhood to work with DPS and MOET in MOET,NOs,Private Sector the School to Career programs. ED10 Create opportunities to enhance professional Denver Public Schools, development of teaching staff in Park Hill schools.Park Hill Parents Look for opportunities to enhance staff development. ED11 Support existing neighborhood center at Smiley DPS,NOs,Parents Middle School and explore avenues for growth and and Youth,Private Sector stability of students,adults and professionals. ED12 Support programs,such as Summer Scholars,that DPS,NOs,Parents work with students to improve literacy skills. and Youth,Private Sector ED13 Increase life-long learning opportunities and DPS and Community experiences between youth and adults. ED14 Continue to enhance the business and DPS,Private Schools school partnerships. and Community, Private Sector

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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 67 COMMUNITY COORDINATION "And so, my fellow Americans, ask not what your country can do for you; ask what you can do for your country. John F. Kennedy Community Coordination, Communication, and Participation in Decision Making for Plan Implementation and Redevelopment Activities.

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COMMUNITY COORDINATIONOVERVIEWAfter adoption as a supplement to Denver's Comprehensive Plan,the Park Hill Neighborhood Plan will be implemented.This will occur through the on-going,short and long-range actions of neighbors, businesses,and the city working in partnership to achieve the stated vision and goals of the neighborhood. Goals In implementing this plan,Park Hill residents,businesses,community-based organizations,and public and private sectors will establish communication and participation procedures that are open and equitable to all members of the community. Objectives 1 Establish a representative body that can participate in decision making processes for the community as a whole. 2 Explore the need for an arm of neighborhood organizations,businesses and residents through a Community Development Corporation that can engage in redevelopment activities,such as land acquisition and assembly,funding,facilitating development partnerships,project development, and management. 68 School Board member Bennie Millner facilitating the education committee The Environmental committee

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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLANThe neighborhood selected three projects from each policy area as top priorities for implementation. 1. CC-4 Require that the representative body/steering committee make decisions in an open manner, incorporating the input of local citizens and interest groups.Hold a semi-annual meeting to share accomplishments and develop goals and objectives. 2. CC-3 Create a Park Hill plan steering committee that will include representatives from key organizations and the community at-large to implement this plan. 3. CC-8 Establish a youth council that functions as a full partner in community decision making activities. 3. CC-6 Work with community-based organizations to apply for non-profit status to apply for grants and loans for funding activities in the neighborhood. Action Recommendations The action recommendations have been divided into on-going,short term and long term.On-going recommendations can be started immediately and continue.Short-term recommendations can be started immediately with limited resources or no money.Long-term recommendations will take longer to accomplish and will require funding. 69 The Park Hill Neighborhood Plan workshop Prioritizing the Plan

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COMMUNITY COORDINATION ACTION CHART 70 #ActionsOngoingImmediatelyShort TermLong TermImplementers CC1 Build on communication and participation of the NOs,BAs,CPDA-H&NDS, community to implement this plan. Planning Services CC2 Incorporate established and new organizations in NOs,BAs,Community the implementation of plan. CC3 Create a Park Hill plan steering committee that will NOs,BAs,CPDA-H&NDS, include representatives from key organizations and Planning Services the community at large to implement this plan. CC4 Require that the representative body or steering NOs,BAs,CBOs,CPDA committee make decisions in an open manner, incorporating the input of local citizens and interests groups.Hold a semi-annual meeting to share accomplishments and develop goals and objectives. CC5 Establish a process for participating in key planning NO,BA,CPDA activities,including the neighborhood plan, comprehensive plan,capitol improvements and project reviews. CC6 Work with community-based organizations to apply Community-Based for non-profit status to apply for grants and loansOrganizations, for funding activities in the neighborhood. CPDA-H&NDS, Foundations,Private Sector CC7 Create a resource directory for community-based NOs and Businesses organizations to notify residents and stakeholders of issues impacting the neighborhood.

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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 71 #ActionsOngoingImmediatelyShort TermLong TermImplementers CC8 Establish a youth council that functions as a full Neighborhood Organizations, partner in community decision making activities.Community CC9 Work with the city agencies and city council NOs,BAs,CPDA and offices to track the process and coordinate city City Council resources to implement the goals and actions for the Park Hill plan. CC10 Explore opportunities to create a NOs,BAs,CPDA-H&NDS, Community Development Corporation. Foundations,Community, PHBSO

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DAHLIA AND HOLLY SHOPPING CENTER REDEVELOPMENT 72 DAHLIA AND HOLLY SHOPPING CENTER REDEVELOPMENT Addendum for Commercial Development at the Dahlia and Holly Shopping Center Redevelopment

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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Action Recommendations These action recommendations and other elements from the existing plan that the community,city and public and private sectors could use as a foundation for the redevelopment of the Dahlia and Holly shopping centers.Design input,regulatory guarantees,community communication and development/construction management and marketing are some of the categories of tasks needed to run on parallel tracks and be coordinated for the implementation and future redevelopment of these shopping centers. 73 Dahlia Shopping Center Holly Square Shopping Center

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DAHLIA AND HOLLY SHOPPING CENTER REDEVELOPMENT ACTION CHART 74 #ActionsOngoingImmediatelyShort TermLong TermImplementers BE1 Continue to reinforce and enhance the design and NOs,Businesses,HAND, physical redevelopment options for the Dahlia and DURA,Residents, Holly Shopping Centers. Private Sector BE2 Market the shopping center nodes and corridor Business Owners, identities as a positive shopping environments toNeighborhood Business residents and adjacent neighborhoods. Associations BE3 Create and enhance a "main street theme"for each PHBSO,CPDA-Urban shopping center node in Park Hill. Design,Businesses BE5 Develop vacant land in a way that is compatible Property Owners,CPDA with the character and density of the surrounding businesses and neighborhoods. BE11 Aesthetics;Support pedestrian oriented streetscapes, Business Associations, lighting,fa  ade improvements,trees,flowers,and Neighborhood Organizations, other aesthetic enhancements that are appropriate CPDA for business sub-areas. LZ13 Provide for an attractive and harmonious transition NOs,CPDA,Private Sector between different land uses. LZ15 The neighborhood should have an active role in the NOs,Businesses,Public and redevelopment and ongoing operations of business Private Sectors areas.There should be widespread notification and participation of potential changes. LZ16 Changes to existing parks and open space should NOs,DP&R,CPDA be decided in a neighborhood forum.

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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 75 #ActionsOngoingImmediatelyShort TermLong TermImplementers LZ17 Review existing uses and zoning along Colorado CPDA,NOs,and Businesses Blvd.and East Colfax Avenue as well as within the neighborhood for compatibility of the allowed business uses wit the adjoining and nearby residential uses.Propose zoning and other regulatory changes that would address the issues of compatibility. LZ18 Identify areas with non-conforming,but desired uses NOs,Businesses and CPDA and initiate zone map or language amendments that would allow the desired uses.Include in the amendment conditions and waivers or other provisions that would help assure compatibility with surrounding residential areas. LZ20 Notify and participate in the Redevelopment of the NOs,Businesses,DURA Dahlia and Holly Shopping Centers.Work with theand CPDA Landowners and City on any rezoning Proposals and related site plan issues.

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DAHLIA AND HOLLY SHOPPING CENTER REDEVELOPMENT ACTION CHART 76 #ActionsOngoingImmediatelyShort TermLong TermImplementers UD2 Educate residents,businesses and developers on Neighborhood & Businesses the Neighborhood Voluntary Design Guidelines. Organizations,CPDA (see Appendix A) Apply guidelines as building changes occur, through zone change,variance and permitting processes. Provide technical assistance upon request to property owners or developers during the design phase of their projects. Park Hill Neighborhood Shopping nodes The enhancement of the street imagery and making these areas a pedestrian destination should be a high priority. Through specific street landscaping,furnishings, lighting,and brick paved intersections,we can create individual pockets of pedestrian & neighborhood friendly activity centers. Create a high degree of visual interest, pleasing scale and inviting spaces. Storefronts and signs should be subordinate to and integrated with each building fa  ade and choice of materials and detailing should be compatible with the adjacent structures.

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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 77 #ActionsOngoingImmediatelyShort TermLong TermImplementers UD5 Create and reinforce buffers along the CPDA,PW,Traffic and and reinforce buffers along the Transportation Division neighborhood borders and between residential to commercial and industrial areas. UD6 Encourage landscaped buffers of parking areas CPDA,PW,Traffic and within the neighborhood. Transportation Division

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DAHLIA AND HOLLY SHOPPING CENTER REDEVELOPMENT Neighborhood Commercial Nodes New buildings or redevelopment projects in the commercial nodes shall include ground level street oriented retail and service space. Parking in retail nodes should be located at the rear and/or to one side of the building (away from the street).This will minimize gaps in the continuous building wall of the block. Use durable materials that complement Denver s tradition as a brick and masonry city;limit building fa  ade materials to masonry,brick,brick veneer,stone,or stucco.Synthetic materials, which imitate natural or traditional materials,should be avoided. Public plazas should include trees,grass,flower beds,walkways,benches, and other pedestrian amenities, Create street level interest by requiring active ground floor uses with store windows facing plaza or street. Tree plantings and solid screening fences should separate business-zoned areas from residential. Develop special street signage to emphasize neighborhood plazas. Incorporate signage that is convenient and usable by motorists and pedestrians and is complementary to the character of the corridor and individual building architecture. Commercial Development Site and building design shall:reinforce traditional street oriented development patterns, setbacks,and build-to lines,provide a consistent edge to the public street and sidewalk space in order to provide pedestrian scale and to encourage pedestrian-oriented activity; Provide visual interest and human scale through the use of prominent windows and operable entries at the street facing facades,varied forms,materials,detail,and color; Provide convenient pedestrian access from the public right-of-way to the project and utilize pedestrian-friendly site and building design; 78

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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Minimize the presence of parking areas,parking structures,residential garages along the street edge to limit the conflicts with desired pedestrian activity as well as negative visual impacts of parked autos on the corridor; All development shall provide a landscaped buffer (minimum 20 feet) between any adjacent residential development.The buffer shall contain not less than one tree per 40 linear feet of zone lot frontage and at least one tree and ten shrubs or a combination of trees and shrubs per six hundred square feet of landscaped area.All landscaping shall be irrigated. Fences on industrial sites which front residential areas shall be constructed with high quality materials.Chain link and razor wire fencing should not be used. Sidewalks All new development or redevelopment shall incorporate a five-foot detached sidewalk and (minimum) eight-foot tree lawn with trees spaced 35 feet apart. 79 Dahlia Square has been targeted for redevelopment

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APPENDICES 86 APPENDICES

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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLANAPPENDIX A Park Hill Urban Design Guidelines These guidelines are provided as recommendations to property owners to serve as a tool in maintaining and enhancing the existing neighborhood character.They are not proposed as an overlay district,nor as a covenant,nor to replace existing zoning laws. Residential Areas Where alleys exist,all garage access should be limited to alley access.To preserve the "pedestrian friendliness"of the neighborhood the blocks should not be cut up with vehicular driveways.Garage access shall be from the rear of the site where alleys are present. Were alleys do not exist,front loaded garages should be recessed a minimum of five feet from the front facade of the buildings and shall not be more than 55% of the length of the front facade New construction should respect the Denver tradition of masonry construction.A minimum of 75% of the street facing facade shall be constructed with brick.The brick facade should wrap around the side elevations for a minimum of 12 feet for midblock residential units and for the entire length of the side street facade on a corner lot.New construction should utilize alleys. Neighborhood Commercial Nodes New buildings or redevelopment projects in the commercial nodes must include ground level street oriented retail and service space. Parking in retail nodes should be located at the rear and/or to one side of the building (away from the street).This will minimize gaps in the continuous building wall of the block. Use durable materials that complement Denver s tradition as a brick and masonry city;limit the building fa  ade materials to masonry,brick,brick veneer,stone,or stucco.Synthetic materials which imitate natural or traditional materials should be avoided. Public plazas must include trees,grass,flower beds,walkways,benches,and other pedestrian amenities that the Denver Streetscapes manual supports. 87

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APPENDICES Create street level interest by requiring active ground floor uses with store windows facing plaza or street. Tree plantings and solid screening fences should separate business zoned areas from residential. Develop special street signage to emphasis neighborhood plazas. Incorporate signage that is convenient and usable by motorist and pedestrians and is complementary to the character of the corridor and individual building architecture. Colfax Commercial Development Site and building design shall: reinforce traditional street oriented development patterns,setbacks,and build-to lines,provide a consistent edge to the public street and sidewalk space in order to provide pedestrian scale and to encourage pedestrian-oriented activity; provide visual interest and human scale through the use of prominent windows and operable entries at the street facing facades,varied forms,materials,detail,and color; provide convenient pedestrian access from the public right-of-way to the project and shall utilize pedestrian-friendly site and building design; minimize the presence of parking areas,parking structures,residential garages along the street edge to limit the conflicts with desired pedestrian activity as well as negative visual impacts of parked autos on the corridor; 88

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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Industrial Areas All industrial development shall provide a landscaped buffer (minimum 20 feet) between any adjacent residential development.The buffer shall contain not less than one tree per 35 linear feet of zone lot frontage and at least one tree and ten shrubs or a combination of trees and shrubs per six hundred square feet of landscaped area.If the buffer is on the backside it must include a row of closely spaced evergreens.All landscaping shall be irrigated. Fences on industrial sites which front residential areas shall be constructed with high quality materials (see illustration) Chain link and razor wire fencing should not be used. Sidewalks All new development or redevelopment shall incorporate a five-foot detached sidewalk and (minimum) eight-foot treelawn with trees spaced 35 feet apart. 89

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APPENDICES 90 ZONE DISTRICTS GENERAL DESCRIPTIONSResidential and Institutional Zone Districts R-S-2 Single-Unit Detached Dwellings,Rural Density:Minimum of one acre of land required for each dwelling unit.Home occupations are prohibited.Density 1 dwelling unit/acre. R-S-4 Single-Unit Detached Dwellings,Suburban Density:Minimum of 12,000 square feet of land required for each dwelling unit.Home occupations are prohibited.Density = 3.6 dwelling units/acre. R-X Attached or Clustered Single-Unit Dwellings,Low Density:Development plan must be approved by City Council.Home occupations are prohibited.Minimum of 7,500 square feet of land area required for each dwelling unit.Density = 5.8 dwelling units/acre. R-0 Single-Unit Detached Dwellings,Low Density:Foster family care and day care allowed as home occupations by permit.Minimum of 6,000 square feet of land required for each dwelling unit. Density = 7.3 dwelling units/acre. R-1 Single-Unit Detached Dwellings,Low Density:Same as R-0 except that other additional home occupations and room-renting to one or two persons are allowed upon application and issuance of a permit.Density = 7.3 dwelling units/acre. R-2 Multi-Unit Dwellings,Low Density:Typically duplexes and triplexes.Home occupations are allowed by permit.Minimum of 6,000 square feet of land required for each duplex structure with an additional 3,000 square feet required for every unit over 2.Density = 14.5 dwelling units/acre. R-2-A Multi-Unit Dwellings,Medium Density:2,000 square feet of land required for each dwelling unit unless site plan is submitted under the Planned Building Group (PBG) provisions,in which case 1,500 square feet of land is required for each unit.Home occupations are allowed by permit.Density = 21.8 dwelling units/acre (29 unit/acre under PBG,depending on openspace requirements).

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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLANR-3-X Multi-Unit Dwellings,Medium Density:This is a medium density district intended to encourage new residential development.Building size is controlled by bulk standards and open space requirements. Building floor area cannot exceed 2 times the site area.Maximum lot coverage is 40%. R-3 Multi-Unit Dwellings,High Density:Building size is controlled by bulk standards,off-street parking and open space requirements.Building floor area cannot exceed 3 times the site area. Maximum density is determined by the size of the units and the factors mentioned above. R-4 Multi-Unit Dwellings and/or Offices,High Density:The purpose of this district is to provide a location for high density residential and intensive office development.Building size is controlled by bulk standards,off-street parking and open space requirements.Allows hotel or motel uses and limited accessory retail shopping.Building floor area cannot exceed 4 times the site area. R-4-X High Density Office,Multiple Unit with Special Review Zone District:This district allows most of the same uses as the R-4 zone district;however,parking lots,nursing homes and neighborhood service uses are conditional uses.The basic maximum floor area to lot area ratio is 4:1 and may reach 5:1 by meeting specific criteria.Undeveloped floor area may be transferred under special circumstances. R-5 Institutional District:Allows colleges,schools,churches and other institutional uses.Maximum lot coverage is 60% of the zone lot.Building height is controlled by bulk standards. Business Zone Districts B-1 Limited Office District:This district provides office space for services related to dental and medical care and for office-type services,often for residents of nearby residential areas.The district is characterized by a low-volume of direct daily customer contact.This district is characteristically small in size and is situated near major hospitals or between large business areas and residential areas.The district regulations establish standards comparable to those of the low density residential districts,resulting in similar building bulk and retaining the low concentration of pedestrian and vehicular traffic.Building height is controlled by bulk standards and open space requirements.Building floor area cannot exceed the site area. 91

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APPENDICESB-A-1 Arterial Office and Multi-Unit Dwellings District:Allows banks,offices,clinics,institutions, churches,multi-unit residences and office service uses.Requires 100 feet of arterial street frontage.Maximum lot coverage is 30%.Building floor area cannot exceed 2 times the site area. Building height is controlled by bulk standards.Maximum residential density is determined by the size of the units and the factors mentioned above.Arterial setback areas are required for landscaping. B-2 Neighborhood Business District:This district provides for the retailing of commodities classed as convenience goods, and the furnishing of certain personal services,to satisfy the daily and weekly household or personal needs of the residents of surrounding residential neighborhoods. This district is located on collector streets,characteristically is small in size,usually is entirely surrounded by residential districts and is located at a convenient walking distance from the residential districts it is designed to serve.The district regulations establish standards comparable to those of low density residential districts,resulting in similar standards.Building floor area cannot exceed the site area. B-A-2 Arterial Service District:This district is intended as a tourist oriented area,allowing restaurants and hotels or motels with accessory automobile service stations.Requires 100 feet of arterial street frontage.Zone lot coverage not to exceed 30%.Building height is controlled by bulk standards.Front setback areas are required for landscaping. B-3 Shopping Center District:This district is primarily to provide the retailing of most commodities and the furnishing of certain personal services,satisfying all household and personal needs of the residents of surrounding residential communities.This district is normally located on major arterial or collector streets at or near the intersection with another major arterial or collector street so that is has good vehicular accessibility.This district is characteristically large,usually is entirely surrounded by residential districts,and is located a convenient driving distance from the residential districts it is designed to serve.The district regulations establish standards comparable to those of low density residential districts,resulting in similar building bulk on smaller parcels and retaining a low concentration of vehicular traffic.Building height is controlled by bulk standards and open space requirements.Building floor area cannot exceed the site area. 92

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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLANB-A-3 Arterial General Business District:This district is designed to accommodate uses that are oriented toward the motorist and residents of nearby neighborhoods.Included among such uses are bowling alleys,theaters,nightclubs,drive-in restaurants and service stations.Setback areas are required for landscaping.Ground coverage by buildings cannot exceed 30% of the site.Building height is controlled by bulk standards. B-4 General Business District:This district is intended to provide for and encourage appropriate commercial uses adjacent to arterial streets,which are normally transit routes.Uses include a wide variety of consumer and business services and retail establishments that serve other business activities,and local transit-dependent residents within the district as well as residents throughout the city.The regulations generally allow a moderate intensity of use and concentration for the purpose of achieving compatibility between the wide variety of uses permitted in the district.Building height is not controlled by bulk standards unless there is a property line to property line abutment with a residential use.Building floor area cannot exceed twice the site area. B-A-4 Automobile Sales and Service District:This district provides an area designed particularly for the special needs and characteristics of auto,boat and recreational vehicle sales and service activities.The city's Comprehensive Plan encourages the establishment of this district in concentrated centers rather than in a linear arrangement along arterials.Ground coverage by structures cannot exceed 60% of the site area.Building height is controlled by bulk standards. B-5 Central Business District:Permits businesses,office and light-industrial uses along with residential and educational uses.Maximum floor area cannot exceed 10 times the site area,plus floor area premiums for the development of plazas,arcades and atriums.Off-street parking is not required.Building height is not controlled except for Federal Aviation Administration restrictions. Ground level retail uses are encouraged along the 16th Street Mall area. B-7 Historic Business District:This district is intended to preserve and improve older structures that are architecturally and/or historically significant.Allows light-industry,general retail,wholesale,offices and residential uses.Building floor area cannot exceed 2 times the site area;however,with premiums the floor area can be increased to 4 times the site area.Additional floor area is allowed with the development of residential units,underground parking or retail uses at the street level. Refer to Ordinance #109 Series of 1988,regarding design guidelines and height limitations. 93

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APPENDICESB-8 Intensive General Business/High Density Residential District:This district,primarily for activity centers,provides the concentration of retailing,personal and business services,as well as residential and cultural uses at a necessary intensity to efficiently be served by mass transit facilities.The regulations are designed to permit a highly concentrated,intense development of the enumerated facilities,limited by standards designed to provide light and air for street exposures of buildings in the district.Building floor area cannot exceed 4 times the site area plus floor area premiums for the development of plazas,arcades,or the provision of low-level light areas.Building height is not controlled by bulk standards. B-8-A Arapahoe Square Zone District:This is a mixed use zone district located in the Arapahoe Square (bounded by 20th Street,Larimer Street,Park Avenue West and Curtis Street) that encourages pedestrian activity areas and related uses while making auto related uses and other more intense uses conditional uses subject to design review.Housing,the arts,child care facilities and preservation of historic buildings are favored uses in this area and subject to generous floor area premiums above the basic 4:1 F.A.R. B-8-G Golden Triangle Zone District:This is a mixed use zone district located in the Golden Triangle (bounded by Speer Blvd.,Lincoln Street,and Colfax Avenue) that encourages pedestrian activity areas and related uses while making auto related uses and other more intense uses conditional uses subject to design review.Housing,the arts,child care facilities and preservation of historic buildings are favored uses in this area and subject to generous floor area premiums above the basic 4:1 F.A.R. Industrial Zone Districts I-0 Light Industrial/Office District:This district is intended to be an employment area containing offices,and light industrial uses which are generally compatible with residential uses.I-0 zoned areas are designed to serve as a buffer between residential areas and more intensive industrial areas.Bulk plane,setback and landscaping standards apply in this district.Building floor area cannot exceed 50% of the site area;however,office floor area may equal site area.Some uses are conditional uses. 94

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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLANI-1 General Industrial District:This district is intended to be an employment area containing industrial uses which are generally more intensive than those permitted in the I-0 zone.Bulk plane,setback and landscape standards apply in this district.Building floor area cannot exceed twice the site area.Some uses are conditional uses. I-2 Heavy Industrial District:This district is intended to be an employment area containing uses which are generally more intensive than that permitted in either of the other two industrial zones.Bulk plane,setback and landscape standards apply in this district.Building area cannot exceed twice the site area.Some uses are conditional uses. Mixed-Use Zone Districts C-MU-10 Commercial Mixed-Use District:The C-MU-10 district is the most restrictive of the commercial mixed-use districts,with the shortest list of allowed uses.It includes commercial uses appropriate for high-visibility locations such as employment centers and the intersections of arterial streets.The purpose of the district is to concentrate higher intensity commercial uses, spatially define streets,encourage higher site standards,and create a more attractive pedestrian environment.Uses incompatible with this purpose,such as auto-related uses,industrial uses,and single unit dwellings,are not allowed.Although residential uses are permitted in the C-MU districts,it is expected that residential uses shall be responsible for buffering themselves from nonresidential uses that may locate on adjacent property. C-MU-20 Commercial Mixed-Use District:The C-MU-20 district provides for a mix of commercial,residential, and industrial uses along or near arterials or other high traffic streets.Site and building design will be of a quality that enhances the character of the streets.A wide range of commercial and residential uses are allowed,along with limited industrial uses.Although residential uses are permitted in the C-MU districts,it is expected that residential uses shall be responsible for buffering themselves from nonresidential uses that may locate on adjacent property. C-MU-30 Commercial Mixed-Use District:The C-MU-30 district provides for a wide range of commercial, office,retail,industrial,and residential uses that allow property owners the flexibility to respond to the long-term evolution of development trends.Although residential uses are permitted in the C-MU districts,it is expected that residential uses shall be responsible for buffering themselves from nonresidential uses that may locate on adjacent property. 95

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APPENDICESR-MU-20 Residential Mixed-Use District:The R-MU-20 district is primarily residential,allowing either single or multiple-unit dwellings.Along heavily traveled streets,development may be either residential or mixed-use,combining residential with neighborhood-serving retail,office,or service uses.No maximum residential density is prescribed;instead,the scale of buildings is determined by bulk plane,maximum height,setbacks,open space requirements,and parking ratios.The intent is to encourage a full range of housing types,including affordable housing. R-MU-30 Residential Mixed-Use District:The R-MU-30 district is a primarily residential district allowing higher density multiple unit dwellings of a density appropriate to the center-city and other activity centers such as light rail transit stations.Supporting commercial development,such as consumer retail and service uses and small-scale office uses,is encouraged to create a truly mixed-use environment.No maximum residential density is prescribed.Instead,maximum height,setbacks,and open space requirements determine the scale of buildings. Open Space/Agricultural Zone District O-1 Open Space District:Allows airports,recreational uses,parks,cemeteries,reservoirs,community correctional facilities,and other public and semi-public uses housed in buildings.Setback requirements apply to the location of structures. OS-1 Open Space District:The OS-1 district is intended for publicly and privately owned parks,open space,natural habitats,golf courses,and a limited range of other uses,such as public recreation centers and concessions,that may enhance the use and enjoyment of open space. O-2 Open Space/Agricultural District:Allows large tracts of open land utilized for agriculture or ranching activities,airports and under special conditions,oil and gas production. Parking Zone District P-1 Off-Street Parking District:Allows parking lots and structures.Bulk and setback regulations apply to structures.This zone is intended to provide needed business parking without the expansion of the business zone;e.g.a buffer between business and residential uses.Requires visual barriers adjacent to residential uses. 96

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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLANPlanned Unit Development PUD Planned Unit Development:PUD is a form of development generally characterized by a unified site design for clustering buildings and providing common open-space,density increases,and a mix of building types and land uses.The process involves site plan review,during which the city agencies and neighborhood residents have considerable input in determining the nature of the development.In effect, any PUD is a specific zone district for a specific area,including precise regulations written by the applicant,and when approved by City Council,is enforced by the city.It allows maximum flexibility during the planning stage and maximum assurance that exactly what is proposed will be developed. Platte River Valley Zone District PRV Platte River Valley Zone District:This district is intended to promote and encourage diversified land uses and to integrate the district's unique geographic location and setting,amenities of view, transportation linkages and open space.A variety of land uses are permitted to facilitate new development,allow for the reuse of eligible historic structures and to complement development in adjacent neighborhoods and downtown.New residential development and open-space is encouraged. Regulatory flexibility is provided to facilitate development responsive to current and future market conditions,and to encourage creativity in the development of the Platte River Valley.Subarea boundaries are delineated on the PRV zoning map.A subarea plan,including preliminary design guidelines,is required for all or part of the subarea to be used as a framework for private and public development projects.Rules and criteria adopted by the Planning Board govern the content and requirements of subarea plans.Plans for any given subarea must conform with the subarea zoning standards enacted by City Council. Cherry Creek North Zone District CCN Cherry Creek North:Uses are similar to the B-3 district except that residential development is not permitted on the ground floor of any building.Proposed developments are reviewed by the CCN Design Advisory Board (DAB) for compliance with the CCN district guidelines.The goals of the district are to encourage a mixture of uses and to encourage low-scale,small lot development that reinforces and enhances the eclectic urban character of the area.Floor area premiums are available for open space and underground parking.Off-street parking requirements for retail uses is reduced and ground level residential development is not allowed. 97

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APPENDICES 98 Hospitals Zone District H-1-A,H-1-B,H-2 Hospital Zone Districts:The H-1-A and H-1-B districts are intended to promote and encourage the maintenance and concentration of existing and proposed healthcare facilities and their related uses.The H-1-A and H-1-B districts are intended to contain the principal structures and related facilities of each healthcare institution.The H-2 district is intended to contain the peripheral area of each healthcare facility where there is abutment or close proximity to non-healthcare uses. The H-1-A district generally corresponds to the R-3 zone district as to permitted structures and to the R-4 zone district as to permitted uses.The H-1-B district generally corresponds to the R-5 zone district for both permitted uses and structures.The H-2 zone district generally corresponds to the R-5 zone district for both permitted uses and structures with additional landscaping and buffering required. Gateway Airport Zone District Gateway Airport Gateway Zone District:The airport gateway is intended to provide a wide variety of compatible uses.A mix of residential,business,hotel and high technology based industry is permitted. The streets design is a neo-traditional grid system.Development will be guided by development and special review.This is the first district to include environmental controls in the zoning ordinance. Overlay Zone District OD Overlay Zone District:These districts overlay existing standard zone districts.They are generally more restrictive than the underlying zone and control dimensional and operational requirements of uses, but do not add uses to the underlying zone.Please refer to the zoning ordinance for the specific requirements of each overlay zone. S-T-Z Zone District S-T-Z Stapleton Transitional Zone District:This district is a transitional zone limited to the old Stapleton Airport site.This zone district provides for the interim use of the Stapleton airport site preceding redevelopment.

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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 99 APPENDIXC: ASSESSMENT

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APPENDICESUSE OF ASSESSMENTThis assessment provides background information to help residents in forming a more complete picture of their neighborhood and in choosing which issues to address.This baseline assessment has been prepared so that it can be easily refined and expanded once the new census information is available.SUMMARY Where is the neighborhood located? Census tracts 41.01,41.02,41.03,41.04,42.01,42.02 in Park Hill is bounded by City limits on the north, Quebec Street on the east,Colfax Avenue on the south and Colorado Boulevard on the west.The neighborhood is located within the boundaries of City Council Districts 8 and 11. Population Characteristics The population of the neighborhood grown steadily from 24,822 residents in 1990 to 26,645 residents in 1998.In 1998,the percentage of children and youth was larger than the city average,and the percentage of resident's age 18 or older was smaller than the city average.The age distribution of Park Hill in 1990 was as follows:8% were under of 5 years of age,22% were between 5 to 18 years of age,60% were between 19 to 64 years of age,and 10% were 65 and older.The neighborhood's minority population according to the 1990 U.S.Census Bureau,60% of Park Hill's population were Black,34% were White,4% were Hispanic and 2% were others. Education and Schools Starting with the 1997-1998 school year,nearly all Denver Public Schools became neighborhood schools. Park Hill has several schools that serve residents in the neighborhood.Elementary Schools include Hallet Elementary located at 2950 Jasmine St.,Park Hill Elementary,at 5050 E.19th Avenue,Phillips Elementary,at 6550 E.21st Avenue,Smith Elementary,at 3590 Jasmine Street and Stedman Elementary at 2940 Dexter St. Smiley Middle School,at 2540 Holly St.Park of Park Hill students attend Gove Middle School,4050 East 14th Avenue.There is no Public High in the neighborhood. 100

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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLANThe majority of Park Hill students attend Manuel High School,at 1700 E.28th Avenue and East High School at 1545 Detroit Street,and some attend George Washington High School at 655 South Monaco Street. Park Hill has various private school institutions.Blessed Sacrament School located at 1973 Elm St.,Union Baptist Church Excel Institute located at 3200 Dahlia St.The Denver University Law School,Park Hill Campus,located at 7039 E.18th Avenue will be replaced by Johnson and Wales University and the new Denver Public High School for the Performing Arts.The percentage of high school graduates in the neighborhood (83%) was above the city average (79%) in 1990. Income Characteristics In 1990,the neighborhood s average household income ($43,303) compared favorably to the City of Denver ($33,983).At that time,the percentage of the population living below the poverty threshold (15.5%) was less than the city average (17%).However,in Census Tracts 4101 and 4102 the percentage of the population living below the poverty threshold was 27.4% and children below the poverty threshold was 41.6%.The neighborhood s unemployment rate of 9% was higher than the 1990 city average (7%). Land use and Zoning The majority of the neighborhood consists of single-family residences zoned R-O and R-2.Commercial shopping centers exist at the 34th Avenue and Dahlia Street,34th Street and Holly Street as well as at the northeast corner of Colorado Boulevard and Smith Road.There are several other small neighborhood serving retail centers. Property Maintenance and Zoning Violations The Neighborhood Inspection Services Division has surveyed the neighborhood for zoning and property maintenance violations in October 1999.In particular,the following conditions were surveyed in the residential,commercial and industrial areas:vacant property,alleys,home and yard maintenance, roof conditions,graffiti vandalism,fence conditions,abandoned or inoperable vehicles,and illegal parking,illegal signs,unpaved surfaces,screening and buffering. 101

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APPENDICES Housing characteristics Park Hill has experienced a stable but slight increase in housing units over the last 30 years.The neighborhood had 10,381 housing units in 1960,10,387 in 1970,10,480 in 1980,10,556 in 1990,and an estimated 10,571 in 1998.The average sales price of a house in 1998 was $150,352 or $126 per square foot compared to 172,731 or $129 per square foot in Denver.The housing in Park Hill is very diverse with 70% built before 1940 in Census Tracts 42.01 and 42.02,36% in Census Tracts 41.03 and 41.04 and 2% in Census Tracts 41.01 and 41.02.Compared to 30% built before 1940 in Denver.In 1996,6 housing units were recorded boarded up.Thirty-three percent of the housing units in Park Hill are renter occupied,less than the citywide rental average of 51%. In terms of housing affordability,40% of Park Hill residents pay over 35% of their income for rent vs.32% of Denver renters and 19% of Park Hill homeowners pay under 35% of their income for their housing compared to 16% of Denver homebuyers.In 1990,61% of the residents lived in the same home for at least 5 years compared to 46% in all of Denver. Streets and Traffic The neighborhood and City will work to identify issues related to infrastructure and street maintenance in the neighborhood provided by Public Works--Street Transportation Division of the City and County of Denver and other local governments entities. Water and Sewer The city s water and sanitary sewer systems serve all homes. Police Service The neighborhood is served by Police District 2,located at 3555 Colorado Boulevard.The neighborhood s crime rate has decreased by 3% over the past three years.Calls for police service in the neighborhood were below the city average in 1997.At that time,the crime rate for domestic violence was almost 50% above the city average while the crime rate for drug crimes was almost 43% below the city average.Crime rates for robbery and gang related crimes were 29% and 36% below the city averages, respectively.All other crime rates were closer to the 1997 city averages.There are several block watch groups actively working in the neighborhood. 102

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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Fire Service The neighborhood is served by Fire Station #10 at 3200 Steele Street,#14 at 1426 Oneida Street and #26 at 7045 East 38th.Fire response times in the neighborhood were lower than the city average in 1997.At that time,calls for fire and/or emergency medical service were above the city average. Parks, Recreation and Library Park Hill has several neighborhood parks,Clayton Park,located at M.L.King Blvd.& Cherry St.,Ferguson Park,at 23rd Avenue and Dexter St.,Martin Luther King Park at 38th Avenue and Newport St.,Milan Park, at Martin Luther King and Quebec St.,Fred Thomas Park,at 26th Avenue and Quebec St.and Denver City Park is located West of Colorado Blvd.from 17th to 26th Avenues.There are several recreation centers and programs that serve the residents of Park Hill,as well as,others who do not reside in this community. These include Martin Luther King Recreation Center located at 3880 Newport St.,Skyland Recreation Center at 3334 Holly St.,Park Hill Golf Course and the City Park Golf Course.A variety of recreational and educational programs is offered at these facilities.The neighborhood is served by the Park Hill Branch Library,located at 4705 Montview Boulevard and Dahlia Branch Library at 3380 Dahlia Street. Community Assets The Park Hill Health Station,located at 3401 Elm Street.In addition,a broad range of services is available to neighborhood residents through a variety of providers. Public Transportation The Bus service in Park Hill is extensive with service available on most major in minor arterial streets,with Colfax and Colorado Boulevard carrying more than 300 buses per day.There is proposal on the table for a commuter rail line that will connect the community from Union Station Downtown to Denver International Airport. Where is the Neighborhood Located? The neighborhood is bounded by City limits on the north,Quebec Street on the east,Colfax Avenue on the south and Colorado Boulevard on the west.The neighborhood is located within the boundaries of City Council Districts 8 and 11. Have there been any special or specific plans prepared for the neighborhood in the past? There have not been any special or specific plans prepared for the neighborhood.The community is presently preparing a neighborhood plan for Park Hill. 103

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APPENDICES 104 DEMOGRAPHICS

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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 105 Household Composition 1990 (Figure 1)DEMOGRAPHICSUnless otherwise noted,the information found in this section is based on data from the 1990 United States Census and the City and County of Denver Neighborhood Profiles 1997 Special Census.The neighborhood is located within census tracts 41.01,41.02,41.03,41.04,42.01 and 42.02.SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS Is the neighborhood gaining or losing population and households? Prior to 1990,the population of the neighborhood had been decreasing (see Table 1).The neighborhood population in 1980 was 29,391 persons,decreasing to 24,822 persons in 1990,then an increase of 26,645 persons in 1998. The household size in the neighborhood had decreased between 1980 and 1990.There were 2.86 persons per household in the neighborhood in 1980 and 2.54 households in 1990. Table 1: Population and Households 198019901998Change 1980-90Change 1990-98 Population 29,39124,82226,645-4,580+1823Source: US Census and Denver Census Tract Profiles How does the household composition in the neighborhood compare to that in the city? The percentage of married couples with children in the neighborhood in 1990 was 58%,below when compared to the rest of the city at 65%.Female headed household with children in 1990 was 37%, higher when compared to the rest of the city at 29%.(see Figure 1). 10% 0 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% Married With Children Female Head of Household With Children Park Hill (left) City-wide (right)

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10% 0 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% Park Hill (left) <5 yrs.5-18 yrs.19-64 yrs.>64 yrs. City-wide (right) APPENDICES How does the age composition in the neighborhood compare to that in the city? The neighborhood s percentage of children under the age of 5 in 1990 was 8% compared to the City average of 7%.Neighborhood residents between the ages of 5 to 18 were 21% compared to the City average of 16%.Neighborhood residents between the ages of 19 to 64 was 61% compared to the City average at 63% and population for 65 years or older was 11% compared to the City average of 14%.At that time,the percentages of children and youth in the neighborhood were larger than the city averages of 7% and 16%,respectively.The 19 to 64, "" 65 years or older age groups were smaller than the city averages of 63% and 14%,respectively. What is the ethnic distribution of the population in the neighborhood? How has it changed over time relative to the change in the city? The percentage of ethnic distribution in the neighborhood has relatively been stable from 1980 to 1990. In 1990,the ethnic distribution of the neighborhood s population was as follows:White 34%;Black 60%; Hispanic 4%;and Other Minority 2%.The neighborhood s minority population (66%) was larger than the 1990 city average of 38% 106 Age Distribution 1990 (Figure 2) 10% 0 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% Park HillCity-Wide White (1) Black (2) Hispanic (3)Other (4) 1 1 2 2 3 3 4 4 Ethnic Distribution (Figure 3)

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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 107 EDUCATION AND SCHOOLS

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APPENDICES How do the neighborhood's educational attainment rates compare to the city's educational attainment rates? The percentage of adult residents in the neighborhood with no diploma is 18%.High School graduate or + is 82% and the percentage College Graduate or + is 31%.In comparison to the Citywide educational attainment rate of 21% that have no diploma,79% that have a High School Diploma or + and 29% that are College Graduate or +. However,in Census tract 41.01--33% of the residents have no diploma that is higher than the neighborhood and citywide average.67% are high school graduate or + that is below the neighborhood and citywide average. Which elementary schools serve the neighborhood? Starting with the 1997-1998 school year,nearly all Denver Public Schools became neighborhood schools. Park Hill has several schools that serve residents and individuals outside to the community. Elementary Schools include Hallet Elementary located at 2950 Jasmine St.,Park Hill Elementary,at 5050 E. 19th Avenue,Phillips Elementary,at 6550 E.21st Avenue,Smith Elementary,at 3590 Jasmine Street and Stedman Elementary at 2940 Dexter St.There is one middle school,Smiley Middle School,at 2540 Holly St.Presently there is no Public High school serving Park Hill students. The majority of Park Hill students attend Manuel High School,at 1700 E.28th Avenue and East High School at 1545 Detroit Street,and some attend George Washington High School at 655 South Monaco Street. Park Hill has various Private School Institutions that serve residents individuals outside of the community. Blessed Sacrament School located at 1973 Elm St.,Union Baptist Church Excel Institute located at 3200 Dahlia St.,and Denver University Law School,Park Hill Campus,located at 7039 E.18th Avenue. How do the test scores of these schools compare to state scores? Students in the fourth and seventh grades were tested through the Colorado Statewide Assessment Program.The Results for 1997,1998 and 1999 are reported in terms of the statewide percentile rank achieved in the subject areas of reading and writing (see Table 2).The corresponding school scores for 1997 and 1998 are provided for comparison purposes. 108

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Elementary Schools Table 2 indicates that the 1999 test scores for fourth grade students at Hallet,Park Hill,Phillips,Smith and Stedman Elementary Schools were below the state average in reading and writing. Smiley Middle School As indicated in Table 2,the 1999 test scores for seventh grade students at Smiley was below the state average in reading and writing. Table 2: Colorado Statewide Assessment Program Hallett ElementaryDenverColorado 19971998199919991999 Prof/AdvProf/AdvProf/AdvProf/AdvProf/Adv Grade 4 Reading1639203159 Writing1311141634 Park Hill ElementaryDenverColorado 19971998199919991999 Prof/AdvProf/AdvProf/AdvProf/AdvProf/Adv Grade 4 Reading4948563159 Writing2530331634 Phillips ElementaryDenverColorado 19971998199919991999 Prof/AdvProf/AdvProf/AdvProf/AdvProf/Adv Grade 4 Reading3331123159 Writing131231634 PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 109

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Smith ElementaryDenverColorado 19971998199919991999 Prof/AdvProf/AdvProf/AdvProf/AdvProf/Adv Grade 4 Reading1211123159 Writing3151634 Stedman ElementaryDenverColorado 19971998199919991999 Prof/AdvProf/AdvProf/AdvProf/AdvProf/Adv Grade 4 Reading3629293159 Writing619141634 Smiley Middle SchoolDenverColorado 19971998199919991999 Prof/AdvProf/AdvProf/AdvProf/AdvProf/Adv Grade 7 Reading 233159 Writing 131634 Legend Prof/Adv = Proficient or Advanced = Information UnvailableAPPENDICES 110

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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 111 ECONOMIC AND EMPLOYMENT CHARACTERISTICS

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APPENDICES How does the average household income of the neighborhood compare to that of the city? How has that percentage changed from 1980 to 1990? Average household incomes in the neighborhood increased from $22,042 in 1980 to $40,132 in 1990 to $44,028 estimated income in 1998.The neighborhood s average household income higher than the 1990 city average ($33,983) and lower than the estimated 1998 city average ($47,305). What is the distribution of major income groupings in the neighborhood? In 1990,24% of the households in the neighborhood earned less than $15,000 per year;48% earned between $15,000 and $49,999;21% earned between $50,000 and $99,999;7% earned $100,000 or more (see Figure 5).72% of the neighborhood s households earned between $15,000 and $49,999 per year. The mean household income for the city is $33,983. What percentage of persons in the neighborhood are below the poverty threshold as defined by the census? How does this compare to the city? As defined by the US Census,the poverty threshold for persons in poverty was 16% in 1990.This percentage was slightly less than the 1990 city average of 17%.However,persons in poverty in Census Tract 41.01 was 35% with Children in Poverty at 52% in 1990.This was twice the amount of the city average. How does the percentage of unemployed persons in the neighborhood compare to the city? The neighborhood had an unemployment rate of 9% in 1993,which was above the city s unemployment rate of 7%. 112 Income Groupings (Figure 5) 10% 0 20% 30% 40% 50% <$15,000$15,000$49,999 $50,000$99,999 $100,000+

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What types of jobs are in the industries of retail, transportation, communications and utilities and services? 1996 % of 1996 % oftransport, public utility1996 % of retail trade jobs& communications jobsservice jobs South Park Hill 40.41.848.60 North Park Hill 15.42.364.00 Northeast Park Hill 5.424.842.10 Total Park Hill 20.49.651.57 Denver 13.58.541.10Source: Colorado Department of Labor and Employment PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 113

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APPENDICES 114 LAND USE AND ZONING

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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN What is the existing land use in the neighborhood? Park Hill has approximately 3,021 acres and the primary land use is residential,in fact 66% of Park Hill has a residential land use.The next most dominant land use is industrial and commercial use with 18% of the land use.Next is public-quasi-public use with 9% of the land use followed by transportation and utilities with 5% of the land use.The majority zoning is R-O,R-2 and I-2. The neighborhood is predominantly residential with commercial uses along Colfax Avenue,Colorado Boulevard,and five neighborhood commercial nodes on 33rd and Dahlia Street,33rd and Holly Street, 28th and Fairfax Street,23rd and Oneida Street,23rd and Kearney Street and 23rd and Dexter Street. The zone districts specifically applicable to Park Hill are R-0,R-2,R-2-A,R-3,R-4,R-5,B-1,B-2,B-3,B-A-3 and B-4,I-0,I-1,and I-2,O-1,P-1 and PUD. Residential Land Uses The Park Hill neighborhood is 66% zoned for residential.The R-0 zone between 16th Avenue and to Martin Luther King Boulevard,is a stable residential area.The medium density residential area,zoned R-2, has developed almost identically to the R-O zone district.Higher density residential areas,zoned R-3 and R-4 are along Quebec Street from 17th Avenue to 38th Avenue.However,commercial uses exist today. Park Hill has developed a housing density mix that accommodates a variety of lifestyles and displays a diverse urban fabric. Are there any zoning or property maintenance problems in the neighborhood? The Neighborhood Inspection Services Division surveyed the neighborhood for zoning and property maintenance violations in October 1999.In particular,the following conditions were noted in the residential,commercial and industrial areas:vacant property,home and yard maintenance,paint and roof conditions,graffiti,fence conditions,abandoned or inoperable vehicles,illegal parking,illegal signs, unpaved surfaces,and screening and buffering. 115

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APPENDICESThe results of the sample survey indicate that properties had the following code enforcement violations in the neighborhood: Residential: Yards with trash and unattended vegetation Vacant and derelict buildings Alleys not maintained with uncontained trash,waste material and weed Unpaved alleys Junk yards Vacant lots with uncontained trash,waste materials,and weeds over 6" in height. Storage of miscellaneous debris Storage of construction material and equipment. Inoperable,dismantled or wrecked vehicles Interior household furniture and appliances stored outside Unpaved/off street parking Boats and Trailers parked or stored on street Recreation Vehicles over 22 parked in a residential area Shed or storage buildings into side setback Truck tractors and semi-trailers parked in residential areas Boat/Trailer parked in front setback areas and parked or stored on street Sheds erected without permits or built into the side setbacks 116

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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Fences erected without permits and illegal materials Dilapidated fences Too many dogs and cats Commercial vehicles and dump trucks parked in residential areas Graffiti Damaged roofs and gutters Broken windows and screens Commercial Trash dumpsters unemptied Standing water and grading problems in parking lots Signs advertising uses that are non-existent Portable signs Landscaping Fa  ade and exterior improvements needed Uncontained trash Vacant lots not maintained Auto repair shops not maintaining landscaping and proper screening Indefinite storage of vehicles Furniture outdoor display and sales Weeds in Right-of-way 117

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APPENDICES Failure to maintain off-street parking areas,unpaved surfaces Industrial Trash and weeds Unscreened storage Unsurfaced parking for industrial uses Screening fences adjacent to residential Buffering 118

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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 119 R-4 R-0 R-2R-0R-0R-0 R-2 R-2 B-2I-2 I-2 I-1 I-0B-3O-1 1-0 B-3PUD PUD B-2 B-2 B-2R-2R-2R-2-A R-2-A B-1 B-3 B-2 B-2 R-4 R-4 R-4R-3B-2 P-1 P-1 B-4 B-1 B-A-3 B-4 B-4 B-4 B-4 R-5 R-3 P-1 PUD B-1 OCTOBER 1999 Interstate 70 38th Ave. Smith Rd. 35th Ave. 34th Ave. Martin Luther King Blvd. 23rd Ave. Montview Blvd. 26th Ave. 17th Ave. Pkwy. Colfax Ave. 48th Ave.Colorado Blvd. Dahlia St. Elm St. Holly St. Monaco St. Pkwy. Quebec St.28th Ave. 52nd Ave. N Existing Land Use Map 0-1 I-0 I-1 I-2 B-1 B-2 B-1 B-A-3 R-0 R-2 R-2-A R-3 PUD R-4 P-1

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APPENDICES 120 HOUSING

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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 121 Unless otherwise noted,the information found in this section is based on data from the 1980 and 1990 United States Census and the City & County of Denver Census Tract Profiles.Data from census tracts 41.01,41.02,41.03,41.04,42.01 and 42.02 was used to make general observations about the neighborhood s housing characteristics. Have the number and type of housing units in the neighborhood changed since 1980? Park Hill has experienced a stable but slight increase in housing units over the last 30 years.The neighborhood had 10,381 housing units in 1960,10,387 in 1970,10,480 in 1980,10,556 in 1990,and an estimated 10,561 in 1995. Table 4: Number of Housing Units Year198019901998 Total Housing Units 10,48010,55610,571Source: 1980, 1990 and 1998 Denver Census Tract Profiles What is the age of housing units in the neighborhood compared to the city? The housing in Park Hill is very diverse with 70% built before 1940 in census tracts 42.01 and 42.02 South Park Hill,36% in census tracts 41.03 and 41.04 and 2% in census tracts 41.01 and 41.02. Compared to 30% built before 1940 in Denver. How do the average home values and rents of the neighborhood compare to those of the city? How have they changed comparatively since 1994? The average sales price of a house in 1994 was $95,276 or $78 per square foot compared to 113,975 or $91 per square foot in Denver.In 1998 the average sales price of a house was $150,352 or $126 per square foot compared to 172,731 or $129 per square foot in Denver. In terms of housing affordability,40% of Park Hill residents pay over 35% of their income for rent vs.32% of Denver renters and 19% of Park Hill homeowners pay under 35% of their income for their housing compared to 16% of Denver homebuyers.In 1990,61% of the residents lived in the same home for at least 5 years compared to 46% in all of Denver. Park Hill is home to a great diversity of housing types

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APPENDICESAverage home values in the neighborhood increased from $47,554 in 1980 to $56,168 in 1990.During this time period,rents in the neighborhood increased from $325 to $455.Average rent for the city in 1990 was $394.Despite these increases,neighborhood home values remained below the 1990 city averages of $89,678. How do the percentages of owner-occupied and renter-occupied units in the neighborhood compare to those of the city? How have they changed since 1980? The percentage of owner-occupied units in the neighborhood declined from 76% in 1980 to 74% in 1995 (see Figure 6).During this time period,the percentage of owner-occupied units in the city s housing stock declined from 60% to 55%.Thus,the percentage of owner-occupied units in the neighborhood was above the city average in 1995. The percentage of renter occupied units increased from 24% in 1980 to 26% in 1995.In the city as a whole,45% percent of all units are renter occupied.However,that includes apartments.All of the renter occupied units in the neighborhood are single family homes.The 26% rental units are higher than the city average of 19% for renter occupied single family homes.Thirty-three percent of the housing units in Park Hill are renter occupied,less than the citywide rental average of 51%. What percentage of the housing units in the neighborhood were reported as vacant? In 1996,13 housing units were recorded boarded up and in 1998,six housing units were recorded boarded up. What percentage of the residents have lived in the neighborhood for 10 or more years? In 1990,approximately 25% of the residents had lived in the neighborhood for 10 or more years.This percentage was slightly less than the city average of 26%. 122 Housing Occupancy 10% 0 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 198019901995 Park Hill Owner-Occupied Properties (1) Park Hill Renter-Occupied Properties (2) City-Wide Owner-Occupied Properties (3) City-Wide Renter-Occupied Properties (4) 1 1 1 2 2 2 3 3 3 4 4 4

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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 123 STREETS, TRAFFIC, AND PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION

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APPENDICESSTREET CLASSIFICATIONSI-70 is the only interstate that passes through the neighborhood.Arterial streets that run East and West are Smith Road,Martin Luther King Boulevard,23rd Avenue,Montview Boulevard,17th Avenue Parkway and Colfax Avenue.Arterial streets that run north and south are Colorado Boulevard,Monaco Street Parkway and Quebec Street.Collector Streets are 26th Avenue,34th Avenue,35th Avenue,38th Avenue, 48th Avenue,Dahlia and Holly Streets.TRAFFIC PATTERNS AND VOLUMES Are there any traffic problems in the neighborhood? The Street Transportation Division is not aware of any traffic problems in the neighborhood.Traffic volumes are depicted on the map provided on page 28. Are there any streets experiencing traffic volumes that exceed capacity in the neighborhood or the bordering areas? The Street Transportation Division is not aware of any streets within the neighborhood that exceed capacity.However,the maximum amount of traffic that a street can handle (capacity) is often different than the amount of traffic that concerns residents and impacts the residential quality of life. Are there any documented levels of cut-through traffic in the neighborhood? The Street Transportation Division is not aware of any cut through traffic in the neighborhood. Are there any documented levels of heavy truck and/or commercial traffic in the neighborhood? The Street Transportation Division has not documented any unusual levels of truck and/or commercial traffic within the neighborhood.However,when the Neighborhood Inspection Services Division surveyed the area in October 1999 there were heavy trucks and commercial vehicles parked in the neighborhood. Is there a residential parking program in effect or proposed in the neighborhood? There is two-hour limited parking on 19th and Fairfax. 124 Through traffic on should be encouraged to stay on Quebec St., an arterial street.

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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLANPUBLIC TRANSPORTATION Which transit routes serve the neighborhood? Park Hill is served by several Regional Transportation District Routes.Routes 15,20,28,38,40,43,44,65 and 105.These routes provide for adequate neighborhood geographic coverage based on walking distance to bus stops.However,there are few East and West routes (15,20,28,38,and 44) for such a large residential oriented neighborhood. 125

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APPENDICES 126 Traffic volumes and street classifications Martin Luther King Blvd. 23rd Ave. Montview Blvd. 26th Ave. 38th Ave. 48th Ave. Smith Rd. Interstate 70 35th Ave. 34th Ave.Dahlia St. Elm St. Colorado Blvd. Quebec St. Monaco St. Pkwy. Holly St.17th Ave. Pkwy. Colfax Ave. 36,700 38,600 20,600 61,000 2,500 6,250 24,500 2,100 7,800 3,200 36,000 28,500 29,500 NFreeway Arterial Collector 7,800Traffic volumes

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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 127 INFRASTRUCTURE

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APPENDICESSTREETS, SIDEWALKS, AND ALLEYS Are there any unpaved streets in the neighborhood? There are no unpaved streets in the neighborhood. Are there any alleys in the neighborhood? Yes.Alley conditions were included as part of the survey conducted by the Neighborhood Inspection Services Division.This survey indicated there are several unpaved alleys in the neighborhood and alleys that had moderate amounts of vegetation or trash in October 1999.There are approximately five alleys unimproved. What is the general condition of the street pavement in each of the neighborhoods? Please refer to the attached map and list for the 2000 street maintenance work program.Streets with deficient pavements are scheduled for a maintenance treatment (mill and overlay,chipseal,crackseal), dependant on the type of deficiency and budgetary constraints. Does the neighborhood have adequate street lighting? There needs to be a survey or audit in the neighborhood to identify areas where additional streetlights are needed. The typical spacing between street lights in older areas of the City such as Park Hill is 300 feet or one street light at each public street intersection whichever distance works out to be the lesser spacing apart. Residents will have to be willing to grant Public Service Company an overhead electric easement from the alley or rear of their property if a new pole is required in order to install a new street light in their block.That can frequently be a stumbling block to installing additional streetlights in established areas. Public Service Company would be the one to prepare an inventory of existing street light locations for Park Hill.Public Service Company can provide the location of existing streetlights and any proposed locations for additional lighting. Are there any issues related to the facilities and services provided by the Street Transportation Division not addressed above that are a problem in the neighborhood? There are a significant number of faded and/or vandalized traffic signs in these four neighborhoods.Stop 128

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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLANSigns seem to be the favorite target for vandals and taggers.Parking Signs and Street Name Signs are generally just faded and in need of replacement.This would be a good time to replace the Street Name Signs in these neighborhoods since we have recently redone our Street Name Sign standards which now specify larger,more legible copy with more durable sign face sheeting and a much higher level of reflectivity to make them easier to read at night.Street Name Signs is one of may elements in the neighborhood that will improve the quality of life for residents because they will improve emergency vehicle response time and are easier to read.Any existing School Zones in these four neighborhoods that have not yet been upgraded to the new Florescent Yellow Green signs that the City began using in 1998 should be scheduled for sign replacement.WATER What is the availability of water within the neighborhood? According to the Water Services Department,water is available from mains in streets and/or alleys throughout the neighborhood. Are there any recent Capital Improvement Programs (CIP) water main projects within the neighborhood? There are no recent CIP water main projects within the neighborhood.SANITARY SEWER What is the availability of sanitary sewers within the neighborhood? According to the Wastewater Engineering Division,sanitary sewer lines are available in streets and/or alleys throughout the neighborhood.STORM DRAINAGE Are you aware of any unique storm drainage issues not addressed above that are a problem in the neighborhood? There are no unique storm drainage issues within the neighborhood. 129

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APPENDICES 130 PUBLIC SAFETY

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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLANPOLICE PROTECTION Which police precinct serves the neighborhood? Police District #4 serves the neighborhood,located at 3555 Colorado Boulevard. Have crime rates for the neighborhood been increasing or decreasing over the past three years? The neighborhood will be divided into three different census tracts (41.01 and 41.02,41.03 and 41.04, 42.01 and 42.02) to correspond to the crime rankings for Denver Statistical Neighborhoods by rate.The crime rate rank for census tracts 41.01 and 41.02 has decreased from a rank of 10 to 15 from 1997 to 1998.The total number of crimes committed in the census tracts was 912 in 1997 to 775 in 1998.The crime rate rank for census tracts 41.03 and 41.04 has slightly decreased from a rank of 62 to 63 from 1997 to 1998.The total number of crimes committed in the census tracts was 490 in 1997 to 437 in 1998.The crime rate rank for census tracts 42.01 and 42.02 has increased from a rank of 50 to 46 from 1997 to 1998.The total number of crimes committed in the census tracts was 567 in 1997 and 535 in 1998. Have any crime prevention programs been established in the neighborhood? The neighborhood watch program has been active for several years.FIRE PROTECTION Which fire station serves the neighborhood? The neighborhood is served by Denver Fire Stations District #26 at 7045 E.38th,District #14 at 1426 Oneida St.,and District #10 at 3200 Steele St. Are there any water pressure problems in providing fire service to the neighborhood? The Fire Department is not aware of any water pressure or supply problems. 131

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APPENDICES 132 COMMUNITY FACILITIES

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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLANPARKS, RECREATION AND LIRARY Which neighborhood parks serve the neighborhood? The neighborhood is served by several neighborhood parks,City of Axum Park,located at M.L.King Blvd. & Cherry St.,Ferguson Park,at 23rd Avenue and Dexter St.,Martin Luther King Park at 38th Avenue and Newport St.,Milan Park,at Martin Luther King and Quebec and Fred Thomas Park,at 26th Avenue and Quebec St.Denver City Park is located West of Colorado Blvd.from 17th to 26th Avenues. What types of recreation programs are provided at these Parks? The Parks provide outdoor games such as basketball,tennis and football.Also included are sports leagues;a teen room;special classes;summer,after school and drop in recreation programs;senior programs,special events and field trips. What is the nearest recreation centers to the neighborhood? There are several recreation centers and programs that serve the residents of Park Hill,as well as,others who do not reside in this community.These include Martin Luther King Recreation Center located at 3880 Newport St.,Skyland Recreation Center at 3334 Holly St.,Park Hill Golf Course and the City Park Golf Course. What types of services are available at the recreation centers? The centers provide recreational activities and comprehensive sports programs for all ages.Organized programs are offered to ages three to seniors. Which library serves the neighborhood? Park Hill has Denver Public Library Service from the Dahlia Branch Library,located at 3380 Dahlia Street and the Park Hill Branch Library,located at 4705 Montview Boulevard.The libraries serve as a community center and gathering place for many civic and local residents,associations and institutions. 133

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APPENDICES 134 HUMAN SERVICES AND DEVELOPMENT What is the nearest human service center to the neighborhood? The Park Hill Center,located at 3376 Dahlia Street.(Dahlia Shopping Center) What types of services are available at human services center? The following programs share this facility:Denver Department of Human Services,Park Hill Business Support Office,Park Hill for Safe Neighborhoods,Spiral Education Foundation,The Mayor s Office of Economic Development,Employment and Training:One Stop Career Center and the City and County of Denver s Community Planning Development Agency. Are there any specific services for youth, elderly or the disadvantaged in the neighborhood? The agencies mentioned above provide services for youth,elderly and the disadvantaged. What other facilities service the neighborhood? Park Hill Health Station located at 3401 Elm Street.Outpatient neighborhood health clinic for all ages. Are there any outreach services available in the neighborhood? There are limited services offered through various agencies.A comprehensive list will be developed through the action recommendations of the Park Hill plan. What is the comparison of school age children and the senior population in Park Hill and the City and County of Denver? 19981998 Children% of Children1998 % of 65+ PopulationUnder 18of Population65+of Population South Park Hill 8,9752,79631.15%8269.21% North Park Hill 10,3003,20531.12%1,0119.81% Northeast Park Hill 7,3702,42132.85%6308.55% Total Park Hill 26,6458,42131.61%2,4679.26% Denver 501,700136,99527.31%62,18812.40%Source:Denver Regional Council of Governments

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How are the Children in Park Hill and their well-being compared to the City and County of Denver? Indicators featured in the tables below will demonstrate this. 1990 % births to1997 % births toTeen birth rate per teen mothers (<18)teen mothers (<18)1000 teens: decrease 90-99South Park Hill 3.5< 3-42.0 North Park Hill 5.73.5-59.5 Northeast Park Hill 13.19.5-59.8 Total Park Hill 7.4-53.8 Denver 6.26.8-1.7Sources:Denver Regional Council of Governments,Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment1997 percent 1990-1997 percent unwed birthschange in unwed births South Park Hill 26.8-42.0 North Park Hill 52.4-8.3 Northeast Park Hill 67.2-17.4 Total Park Hill 48.8-22.6 Denver 36.3-1.7Sources:Denver Regional Council of Governments,Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment1998 percent children1998 percent (<18) on Medicaidchildren on TANF South Park Hill 4.80.6 North Park Hill 18.03.2 Northeast Park Hill 31.45.7 Total Park Hill 18.11.0 Denver 17.92.2Sources:Department of Human Services,1990 US Census PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 135

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Martin Luther King Blvd. 23rd Ave. Montview Blvd. 26th Ave. 38th Ave. 48th Ave. Smith Rd. Interstate 70 35th Ave. 34th Ave.Dahlia St. Elm St. Colorado Blvd. Quebec St. Holly St.17th Ave. Pkwy. Colfax Ave. Park Hill For Safe Neighborhood, Inc. Beacon Club, Inc. Ivy St. Neighborhood Association Northeast Park Hill Coalition Citizens for a Residential Quebec Greater Park Hill Community, Inc. Monaco St. Pkwy. Neighborhood Organization Map APPENDICES How many registered neighborhood organizations are there in the neighborhood? There are three;Park Hill for Safe Neighborhoods,Greater Park Hill Community,Inc.and The Beacon Club,Inc.The boundaries of these organizations are shown on the map below. 136

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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 137 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTSMayor of DenverHonorable Wellington E. WebbDenver Planning BoardWilliam H.Hornby Jan Belle Pat Cortez Daniel Guimond Terrance Ware Cyrus Hackstaff III Mark Johnson Joyce Oberfield Michael Dino Dr.Robert Wright Park Hill Plan Operational TeamHon.Allegra Happy Haynes Betty Bailey Darrell Barnes Jean Clack Lillie Fuller Ghana Kaulius Ralph Martinez Bettie Shaw Cecelia Underhill Community Planning and Development Agency (CPDA)Jennifer Moulton,Director of CPDA Ralph Martinez,Project Director Ellen Ittelson,Planning Services Director Dennis Swain,Senior City Planner Janell Flaig,Senior City Planner Doug Wheeler,Senior City Planner Julius Zsako,Director of Communications Jim Ottenstein,Graphics Julie Connor,Graphics Ken Barkema,Graphics Carolyn Erickson,Administration Harriet Hogue,City Park Administrator Steve Turner,Urban Design Chris Coble,Office of Neighborhood Response Brian Mitchell,Transportation Engineering Terry Rosapep,Transportation Planning Captain Marco Vasquez,District 2 Police Helen Kuykendall,Denver Parks and Recreation DedicationThe Park Hill Neighborhood Plan is dedicated to the memories of the Honorable Hiawatha Davis and Bea Branscombe.

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APPENDICES 138 Park Hill Plan Subcommittees and Planning Meeting ParticipantsHon.Elbra Wedgeworth Bea Branscombe Hon.Hiawatha Davis Bennie Milliner Art Branscombe Walt Beckert Dan Shannon Lawrence Lewis Arthur Rosenblum Patricia Mutch Palecia Lewis Scott McDonough Donna Bank Bill Bell Lil Bracken Jim Bracken Teri O Sullivan Roz Wheeler-Bell Ronnye Ross Vera Knight Emily Porch Frank McLaughlin Karen Saliman Cheryl Spector Nancy VanBurgel LaVon Moore Scott Thomas Arnie Walker Patrick Caldwell Bo Frazier Marjorie Gilbert Jane Schum Bev Frazier Anette Walker Jean Jackson Marcie Moore Gantz Harry Freeman Patty Paul Tom Jensen Odell Holleman Rev.Tom Korsen Jo Mosby Gerie Grimes Helen Douglas Pat Clarke Phyllis Fields Bernice Watts Curtis Simmons Jack Farrar Sharon Faragalla Lyle Hansen Gladys Bates Ann Long Bud Hawkins Sandra Bridges Jackie Emmons Karen O Keefe Cecilia Porch Wesley Bettis Tom Gleason Wilma McCloud Pamela Moore Joan Wallach Joe Passmore

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PARK HILL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 139 Park Hill Plan Subcommittees and Planning Meeting Participants (continued)Capt.Mike O Neil Lt.Mike Calo Officer Roni Bruce Officer Tracy Love Loretta Stephens Gregory Rasheed Jim Raughton Garland Jones Jim Mair John Coverty Sally Williams Jose Jurado Nick Walker David Taylor University of Colorado at Denver Department of Urban and Regional PlanningYouth Meeting ParticipantsHal Anderson Lauren Boych Angelo Edwards Antonio Edwards Laurel Gegner Tim Gemperline Cierra Hammond Mackenzie Jacobs Alex McKenyn Laine McKenzie Shalese Sanchez Andrew Skram John Staley A very special thank you is extended to all others who participated in the formation of the Park Hill Neighborhood Plan. The Park Hill Neighborhood Plan was adopted by the Denver City Council on October 16,2000. Approved by the Denver Planning Board September 6,2000.