Citation
The River North greenway master plan

Material Information

Title:
The River North greenway master plan
Creator:
Department of Parks and Recreation, City and County of Denver
The Greenway Foundation
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
City and County of Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Parks
Park planning
Landscape architecture
Spatial Coverage:
Denver -- River North

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text


cmct ^otwfcf /S

OFFICE OF THE MAYOR
CITY AND COUNTY BUILDING
DENVER, COLORADO 8)202-5390
TELEPHONE; m-Sb~~9C m'/TTD: 72P-Sf)5~901G
March 13.2005
Dear leaders:
The City and County ofDenver is committed to sustainability, a value that is
demonstrated by my administration and incorporated into adopted plans, policies and
resource management decisions. This plan, the River North Greenway Master Plan
represents the renewal of a commitment to sustainability related to the Denvers primary
waterway, the South Platte River.
This River North Green way Master Plan lays a foundation in- furthering the
transformation of the River corridor as a valuable environmental and recreational amenity
for the benefit of Denvers residents and visitors. It is a document which synthesizes the
best ideas from citizens and stakeholders into a vision that the City can strive for with the
same passion as we have in the Central Platte Valley, an area that has transformed from
an eyesore into one of the most popular public places in Denver white serving as an
economic stimulus for development and redevelopment.
The synergy between environmental health and economic benefit has been demonstrated
time and again, and there is no doubt that a healthy river corridor will translate fo
multifaceted city-wide gains in quality of life and economic success. We look forward to
the mplemenlattoti of this exciting plan.
This document is
(printed on 30% post
consumer fiber by
weight
Page 2 of 44


I
.1*.
4 ^,4^>K .'i
I f^ublic Service (3.ompaniJ Substation
at \ 7tb ^jixeet and the South f latte f^iver
.*1^ 4^
r*-T^.

-f>+\ <.
; r-
>.J0
^K-
!'y.' ,y.-. ^ : '<-,0-
ln June of 1974, the City and County of Denver and the Greenway Foundation joined forces with a shared dedication to initiate the
transformation of the South Platte River from a polluted eyesore into a valuable environmental and recreational amenity. Fifteen
months later, as part of a Labor Day Weekend celebration, the initial phase of Confluence Park was dedicated. In addition, several
miles of multi-use recreational trails were opened to the public and numerous projects were initiated to remove tons of debris from
the River resulting in the Identification and elimination of over 200 known sources of pollution into the South Platte.
This deliberate transformation of the River from eyesore and dumping ground to celebrated public space has paid many dividends
to the City including providing the stimulus for the redevelopment of Lower Downtown where residential and commercial develop-
ment have since flourished. Lower downtown now enjoys one of the highest land values in the State.
The Idea that people and businesses want to be located adjacent to an attractive, healthy and vibrant urban waterway is nothing
new. Cities across the country have reinvested in public infrastructure along their urban waterways with new parks, open spaces,
and greenway corridors acting as the central unifying theme in their successful redevelopment. To put it another way, Cities have
long realized that "Green = Green" that investment in these well planned urban parks and open spaces attracts high quality de-
velopment that in turn improves a city's quality of life for its citizens and makes it a more attractive place for future investment.
Most importantly for Denver, however, is thatthe high quality redevelopment of Denver's most important natural asset, the South
Platte River, ts a key component of Denver's effort to create a sustainable city where people want to live, work and play in an urban
environment.
i

This River North Greenway Master Plan seeks to continue the great success of public investment along the South Platte in order to
realize the many benefits of a healthy, connected, and attractive urban waterway.
ZOOS ^onRuence f*ark ( J.J Oark)
Page 3 of 44



A* f*urpose and Mission of the Pan
Purpose
Over tie last 34 years, the approximate three miles of the South
Platte liver in northern Denver, most recently known as liver
North (RIND), has not been the subject of any comprehensive
park anti recreation planning effort,. .until now!
'' 1y, over the past decade a renaissance has taken
South Platte River particularly focused in the Cen-
Valicy, adjacent to Downtown Denver. The continued
River and its surrounding area has begun to
O. Denver Parks and Recreation Department in
h the Greenway Foundation have once again ini-
ip to create the RINO Greenway Master Plan.
Ian will establish a new, contemporary vision for RINO
veil as recommend development, financial and regulatory
ines for parks, recreational and environmental enhance-
, expanded public open space and improved water quality
5 River's channel.
t is the first of two Master
ling efforts that are focused upon analyzing and planning
ire of the eleven miles of South Platte River Corridor
eriver. The UNO Greenway Master Plan includes the
River between 20th Street and the northern boundary
l County of Denver. A second Master Planning
i (RfSO) Greenway Master Plan, will
lining eight miles of the South Platte River
t the southern boundary of the City and County
- River North Greenway Master Plan
"2,2009
Mission
The mission of the RINO Greenway Master Plan is to initiate
an on-going collaborative effort between citizens, prop-
erty owners, Denver City agencies, the Greenway Founda-
tion and numerous other public and private organizations
committed to a naturally healthy and prosperous South
Platte River.
The City and County of Denver and the Greenway Founda-
tion will continue their historic partnership in champion-
ing the South Platte River. This partnership will result in the
identification of partnerships and funding opportunities;
planning, design and analysis of the River's environmental
systems; and the construction of publicly accessible park,
open space and River corridor infrastructure and amenities.
These improvements will enhance the quality of urban liv-
ing along and adjacent to the South Platte by connecting
children, adults and families with the healing and positive
influence of nature.
£> Cjoals
7. Create a River-focused urban environment that is healthy,
habitable and connected,
2. Promote ecosystem restoration through sustainable
natural systems design. Goals for improved water quality,
habitat creation and River stability will all be achieved.
3. Build on the current success and activity along the
central South Platte River Valley by creating new diversified
activity centers along the RINO Greenway Corridor.
4. Create a parks/open space oriented model for urban living
that reflects the history of Denver and the River North area
in particular.
5. Enhance the safety of the River corridor and the surround-
ing area.
6. Utilize existing and proposed parks as the organizing ele-
ments that create a sense of place and a community focal
point, which will in turn increase property values, economic
vitality and development opportunities along adjacent trans-
portation corridors.
7. Create a regional gateway to downtown Denver along
with a series of neighborhood gateways that reflect the
unique character of each.
8. Establish the RINO Greenway Corridor as a destination
point for entertainment, recreation, commercial and
ft Connect neighborhoods by providing access to local
businesses and entertainment venues and creating links to
adjacent communities and regional trail corridors.
See Chapter 2 for an explanation of how this plan was devel-
oped with stakeholder and public involvement
y-|g,^y





(2.. l~he [\iver North (_i reenwaij V,5lon

*s ..
J 4
.<-'V vA T ^ ,r>.V*Ti
ENHANCED 1-25
UNDERPASS
Cac=:(^>
IMPROVEMENTS
KEY LOCAL
DESTINATIONS
KEY REGIONAL
DESTINATIONS
^ STR EET GATEWAY
RIVER GATEWAY
GREEN STREET
CONNECTION
OoO$ PROPOSED PEDESTRIAN
CONNECTION
EXIS7ING CONCRETE
TRAIL
RIVER NORTH GREENWAY VISION
,3
-
J£
The Riyef North Gfeen\N(iy M&STer Pfao
April 2,2009
Page 5 of 44


Denver's Department of Community Planning and Devel-
opment estimates that by the year 2035, the population
within the RING area south of 1-70 will increase to over
10,500 residents, minimum, and potentially to over 20,000
residents. If the predicted trend of increased urban living
occurs, the higher projection of 20,000 residents, approxi-
mately Twenty times the number of current residents, Is a
much more likely result.
There is a need to continue public investment in the Rivet
*" 'M-ess the inevitable changes caused by the forecasted
- " Part development. The impact to the River's charac-
: r : ,1th and stability must be addressed. Additionally,
; : ,. -Tog the necessary open space, parks and related
: ,:es will be a huge burden if not properly planned
:r v -.-ice, However, this investment should not be
. , : as merely a reaction to development pressure, but
s a major opportunity for Denver to continue the
: ", tnce of the South Platte River Corridor. There is no
. : proof of the benefits of investing in the River than
sissance of the Central Platte River Valley adjacent
: *r Downtown Denver. Over the last three decades,
mately 80 million dollars has been invested in the
environmental and recreational infrastructure of the South
....... Hiverartd its tributaries. This investment has been
: d from numerous sources of public and private
basea support. The Greenway Foundation reports that this
investment has contributed, in great part, to the 5 billion
......-.of economic expansion within the Valley, encom-
passing a variety of development improvements including
: ttal retail, commercial, entertainment and sports
v : ; rejects (see the appendix for a more detailed break
ciown of this investment Summary).
: ural progression of development beyond the Gen-
try i Platte Valley calls for the creation of places for people
work and play along the River, Denver can build on
- id and continue to embrace the River by strategi-
cal iv planning for an interconnected, well planned, and
visusny attractive use of River frontage, thereby ensuring
- : lest and best use of the real estate adjacent to the
r latte River Corridor within RINO.
T1 Pi P i
| he f Inn nine | rame.wonc
The vision developed as a part of the River North Green-
way Master Plan defines three distinct planning areas:
Urban Greenway Corridor (20th Street to 38th Street!
Entertainment District (38th Street to 1-70)
North Platte Valley Regional Park {I/O to North City
Limits)
Urban -Grew-v/ay Cr.rfkkM- land list* adjacent 10 I his
reach of the South Platte River between 20th Street and
38th Avenue is characterized by existing and proposed
dense urban development and two neighborhood parks
along a narrow greenway corridor, The area is home to
a burgeoning arts community, which lias given a new
identity to this part of town. The vision for this section is
a narrow greenway feel, punctuated by two or three small
neighborhood parks (both planned and existing), some
consolidated detention facilities also utilized for public
open space, and privately owned and developed plazas
and open spaces fronting the River. Important planning
issues in this section include keeping a publicly acces
sible edge along the entire stretch of the river, widening
the public edge, primarily by moving Arklns and Ringsby
roadways away from the River to the extent practicable,
and adding a trail along the west side of the River with a
connecting pedestrian bridge to the east side of the River.
kThis planning area includes Globeville landing
Park, an existing park, and the Denver Coliseum, managed
by Denver's Theaters and Arenas. Much of the area in this
section between the River and the Denver Coliseum is an
tnvironmental Protection Agency it PA I designated Super
Fund clean-up site. Coordination between the Denver
Coliseum, neighborhoods, Environmental Protection
Agency, City and County of Denver, and the Greenway
Foundation could yield an exciting, vibrant amenity for
this area of Denver. I his plan envisions the Entertainment
District to include a planned commuter rail station near
the Coliseum, improved connections to the greenway,
new or improved amenities in the park, a parking garage
to service the Coliseum, and the transit station, storm wa-
lk Greenway Master Plan
ter detention and wetland filtration pond, and the poten-
tial renovation or reinvention of the Denver Coliseum to
include an outdoor concert venue.
HvfUi fk,:!!..:: V,::k>::v Kw komk k-ifk This planning area
includes an existing park, Northside Park, as weil as the
Heron Pond natural area. In addition to improvements
to Northside Park, the River North Greenway Master Plan
envisions a new Regional Park along the banks of trie River
between 1-70 and the northern boundary of the City and
County of Denver, the Regional Park would function as the
northern anchor and terminus of the South Platte River
Greenway as well as the River Gateway into Denver, The
North Platte Valley Regional Park complex would include
a new park located on the east bank of the River, a con-
nection to Northside Park, Heron Park Natural Aiea and a
link between the Globeville and Swarrsea/Elyria neighbor-
hoods. New amenities on the east side of the River could
include a side channel for whitewater recreation, water fil-
tration, riparian vegetation, wildlife habitat, and extensive
riverbank improvements, West bank improvements include
a gateway park and bicycle and pedestrian bridge that
connects neighborhoods and the west and east portions
of the Regional Park,
, |\ecommendatfons
The planning process, including public and stakeholder
input plus the identification and analysis of existing condi-
tions, resulted in the following six general recommenda
tions for the River North Greenway Master Plan, A more
detailed discussion on each recommendation is included
in Chapter 4, Refer to the recommendation maps on page
5 and 6 along with typical sections on page 7 and 8.The
perspectives on pages 1 and 4 are an artist rendering of
how these recommendations will look.
River Health River channel improvements
should increase the stability, health, sustain-
ability and accessibility of the South Platte
Lay back the existing bank slope and increase tire
width of the emergent flood bench thereby improv-
ing the riverbanks, water quality and riparian habitat,
while also reducing damage from flooding.


Create a riparian buffer between development and
the River to increase pervious land outside of the 100-
year flood plain, capture stormwater runoff, and
improve water quality, riparian vegetation, and wild
life habitat and recreation opportunities.
Create and consolidate open air stormwater detention
facilities to reduce flooding, provide wetlands for wild-
life habitat and stormwater filtration, and recreation
opportunities.
Realign and daylight existing storm sewer outfalls to
flow within the emergent flood bench to create water
quality wetland filtration basins, riparian vegetation
and wildlife habitat.
Combine in channel water quality improvements such
as drop structures, with recreational boating opportu-
nities,
Tran spur to lion end iiniiindyj Existing roadways
are located adjacent and parallel to the South Platte
River, restricting the possibility of initiating River and
greenway improvements and acting as physical harri-
ers for safe bicycle and pedestrian access to the River,
Realign and/or reconfigure Arkins Court and Ringsby
Court away from the riverbank wherever possible to
provide land to layback bank slopes, increase? the width
of the emergent flood bench, increase or create ripar-
ian buffers, improve wildlife habitat, increase visibility
and public access to the River, and provide recreational
opportunities.
Improve safe access along and over Washington Street
and Brighton Boulevard by improving or adding
signalized crosswalks at key intersections, improving
or adding sidewalks that run adjacent to the roadways
and lateral "Green Street" bicycle and pedestrian paths
between the roadway and River.
Develop distinctive Road Gateway features at key
intersections that function with corresponding River
Gateways to Improve visibility, way finding, and safe
access to the River, Refer to the Vision Plan on Page 2,
Maintain a Public River Edge throughout the South
Platte River Corridor. Roads, trails and promenades
will provide the separation between public and pri-
vate areas.
L'ubik Opt::!! ip.:!!.!::!, Existing flltCl pfO-
posed parks and public open spaces should grow rec
reation opportunities within the River North Greenway
as the population and recreation demand increases.
Re-energize existing parks by improving and adding
amenities that meet user needs.
Meet additional recreational and cultural needs
by including park and public open space amenities
that reflect diverse cultural and local neighborhood
needs that can be expressed through art, architec-
ture, and landscape improvements,
Provide Pocket Parks such as the area near 38th
and Chestnut throughout the urban reach of
River North that is integral with the River North
Greenway through parkland acquisition or collabora-
ting with property owners,
Collaborate with the burgeoning River North Art
Community by incorporating public art into the River
North Green way and parks.
Create a vibrant River North Entertainment District
through park and public open space improvements
including a connection between the Denver Coliseum
venue, proposed RID Rail Station, Globeville Landing
Park and the River.
Create a North Platte Valley Regional Park (NPVRP)
by incorporating the existing North Side Park and
Heron Natural Area with the proposed park located
on a portion of the National Western Stock Show and
creating a strong east-west neighborhood connection
with a bicycle and pedestrian bridge. The NPVRP will
function as a regional park anchor and gateway for the
River North Greenway as well as complement the
existing complex of parks located in the Central Platte
Valley. The NPVRP will increase the vitality and use of
the North River Greenway and provide an incentive
for future economic redevelopment of the area east of
the park.
The graphics in this plan showing the National West-
ern Open Space and the North Platte Valley Regional
Park are conceptual, The exact area of the proposed
North Platte Valley Regional Park will be determined
through subsequent planning efforts taking into con-
sideration the future needs of the National Western
Stock Show.
} i I .
Coordinate with the River Side Cemetery for im-
provements to provide bicycle and pedestrian access
into the property from the River North Greenway.
Develop an interactive Education Sign System that
interprets the cultural and ecological history of River
North.
Meet additional recreational and cultural needs by
including park and public open space amenities that
reflect diverse cultural and local neighborhood needs
that can be expressed through art, architecture, and
Ian d sea pe irn provemert t s.
I Multi-Use Trails and River North Connections -
Multi-use trails should improve safe access to the River
North Greenway from neighborhoods and business
districts. Trails should incorporate "green" design and
best management principles that reduce storm water
runoff into the River.
Develop River Gateways at strategic locations along
the River North Greenway to improve Greenway ac-
cess and visibility and reinforce the River's ser.se of
arrival and sense of place. Refer to the Vision Plan
Page 2.
* Regulatory Actions The City and County of C
should implement a variety of regulatory measures to
improve and preserve the River's health.
Establish South Platte River Greenway
mittee. Their role would be to review and advise
implementation plan proposals.
Establish conservation easements as a vi
proach to riparian setbacks to preserve lands :
cent to the River that increase vegetation, t
habitat and pervious landscapes.
Institute zoning setback standard
the top of the riverbank.
Construe! ___; -Jl, -I.--
and west banks of the River that fill in missing Green-
way trail segments and provide safe lateral connec-
tions from the River North Greenway to neighbor-
hoods.
Provide multi-modal, alternative transportation op-
portunities by completing multi-use trail connections
from the River North Greenway to proposed RTD Rail
Stations and key destinations such as downtown
Denver, the Denver Coliseum, National Western Stock
Show, and businesses adjacent to the River.
Establish a development fee for land acquisition and
capital improvements along the River North Green-
way.
Provide incentives to dedicate land and provide
funding for consolidated stormwater detention, open
space and water qualify features.
Page 7 of 44


\ccoiTimcnoa lions jviap
fart. E>oun.f.^ $coneJ Omcrcte
r X'sting SO- C_or>c- TW S^etTree
====== froposrv. :i>- £ oc 1 rail
Nafoe Vegetation Je
VPRv-
^rnafflcmal j ree# CfiMan*ooi/W§t
> y> Rip.*.. 5ft, .. .:
sc*LEi**ar-tr
Page 8 of 44


Page 9 of 44


11 xisting
Page 10 of 44


5 ic ctions -.Section C~
Existing
GRILAT LAWN LROMLNADf.
PLAZA
AA ,\
aaa i n fi Avn-
Ka r K
L5
ittat
P:

Page 11 of 44
8


(Jnapter Z: [ he process
/^knowledge merits
John Hit ken loo per Mayor of Denver
Jeanne Robb Council President District JO
Rick Garcia District 1
Jeanne Faatz District 2
Paul D. Lopez District 3
Peggy Lehmann District 4
Marcia Johnson District 5
Charlie Brown District 6
Chris Nevitt District "I
Carla Madison Districts
Judy Montero District 9
Jeanne Robb President District 10
Michael Hancock District 11
Carol Boigon At Large
Doug Ltnkhart At Large
Bernie Sharp
Noel Copeland
Edward Done
Sharon Elfenbein
Alexis Holcfman
Dave Robinson
Heidi G. Loshbaugh
Florence Navarro
Richard L Ott
Keith Pryor
Kathy Sandoval
Elbe Gray Horn
Dianne Trtiwe
Darrell Watson
Michael Fox
parks and Jk acre a Lion
Kevin Patterson Manager of Parks and Recreation
Scott Robson Deputy Manager, Parks & Planning
Gordon Robertson Director, Parks Planning
Devon Buckeis River North Greenway Project Manager,
Senior City Planner
Michelle A. Madrid-Montoya Marketing and Communica-
tions
Bar Chadwick Special Project Coordinator
James Busby Project Manager for Neighborhood Revital-
ization
Stacey L. Eriksen Brownfields Coordinator, Greer. Housing
d ommi inittj {' l.inrintz, nod J devcdopmenr
Steve Gordon Development & Planning Supervisor
Deirdre Oss Senior City Planner
Gideon Berger Senior City Planner
Lesley Chen intern
Pubi:c VVoAs
Brain Mitchell Director,Transportation Engineering Ser-
vices
Joe Gerdts Engineer, Development Engineering Services
Marco Cabanillas, P.E, Engineer, Development Engineer-
ing Services
Frank Kemme Senior Engineer, Wastewater
Janice Finch Principal Planner, Policy and Planning
Asset Manae,ement
Steve Wirth Senior Real Property Agent
Jon Novitk Environmental Scientist II
Green [ rail: \_) c nver
Donna Pacetti Mayor's Office
Gonsulttints
The Greenway Foundation Project Management
Merle D. Grimes, LLC Planning Team Project Leader
CDM Water Quality and Hydrology
Capitol Representatives Public and Stakeholder Input
Process and Implementation

This Plan could not have been possible without the in-
volvement, engagement and vision at numerous stake-
holders within and outside of the River North area. A list of
those attending and participating in the public meetings
as well as numerous additional interactions with staff and
consultants is contained in the Appendix section or this
masterplan.
A special thank you to Dolly Kelley and her family for host-
ing two River North Greertway Master Plan public infor-
mation meetings at their business, Muneca's Restaurant
located at 4500 Washington Street, on Tuesday, July 9th
and Tuesday, August 19th. We appreciate their generos-
ity in making their restaurant and its facilities available for
both meetings.
Community Planning Services, LLC Planning Support
and Mapping
McLaughlin Water Design Group- Civil Engineering
Trust for Public Land Land Acquisition Issues
THK Associates, Inc. Urban Design/Planning/Graphics
The Cole Company Design and Graphics


i;
1
...jbt"
i (Jbtectives 'I
r". : :..->
i!

r
^*
Reco m m enda t ions
m
m....-...-
-^i#
Final Master Plan
.Mw3fe>u
The planning process for the River North Greenway Master
Plan involved a coordinated effort between the City and
County of Denver Parks and Recreation Planning Depart-
ment, the Green way Foundation, a project Steering Com-
mittee, property and business owners and local citizens.
Numerous meetings with stakeholders were conducted in-
cluding property owners, developers, businesses, RID, City
of Denver departments, civic organizations and others with
an interest in the River North area. In addition, a stakeholder
roundtable/workshop was conducted early in the process
with the goal of identifying corridor issues, needs and a
vision for the River North Green way. The community was
invited to hear a brief presentation about the River North
Greenway on two occasions during the planning process.
Each meeting included a workshop where participants were
encouraged to provide important existing conditions in-
formation to planning team members as well as their ideas
and vision for improvements to the River North Greenway.
In addition, the River North Greenway planning effort was
coordinated with other planning projects that were simul-
taneously underway including the RecjionalTransportation
District (RID) has I racks and Commuter Rail Maintenance
Facility Plans, the Brighton Boulevard Right of Way Design
Guidelines Plan and the City of Denver, River North Gen-
era! Development Plan. The planning team also reviewed
existing master planning efforts such, as the Globevilie and
Elyria/Swansea Neighborhood Plans,
A Summary of Public Input was developed and it is in-
cluded in the appendix. Comments were recorded on the
base maps for each of three River North Greenway sections
including North, Middle and South- during the workshop
portion of Public Meeting Number One on July 3, 2008 and
Public Meeting Number I wo on August 19, 2008, In ad-
dition, a user survey was distributed to attendees at the July
meeting. The results of that survey are also included in the
appendix.
The project began with the identification of Project Goals
and Vision for the River North Greenway, The goats and vision
were further refined as input from the Steering Committee,
stakeholders and citizens was received. Understanding of the
existing conditions of the River North Greenway corridor was
f-Qpip|tchp>.H rhrvTi inh nuiw-rAtic cii** \ncifc anrl Hicrr iccirmc
with variv.:-, \ :
reviewo : i ; tv ;-c
the exist:-:': :> : :' ':::: : :
es that rt c :
gjSSBH/IB
: : : " h
Planning Principles were thus generated through workshops
with the Steering Committee that would provide planning
guidance for the specific recommendations resulting from the
master plan, Finally, a series of specific recommendations and
an implementation strategy were identified that would achieve
the Project Vision and Goals for tire River North Greenway.
A more detailed discussion on existing conditions, analysis,
recommendations and implementation follow in Chapter 3
and 4.
Page 13 of 44


Objectives were developed early in the process with exten-
sive input from City and Community stakeholders. They
were based on the mission and goals (see Chapter 11 es-
tablished for the project. The objectives were grouped into
three main areas of emphasis* healthy, habitable and
(.'..I ::: \ SO/
;: US'S f!\;
* Use man-made and natural technology to enable natural
systems to:
Stabilize and sustain the River bed and banks
Clean and revitalize the River water, bed and banks
Capture stormwater and improve the quality of storm-
water drainage
Create and enhance natural beauty
Identify appropriate passive and active recreation op-
portune ies
Identify appropriate open space opportunities
i iskme
Use the revitalized river eco-system and adjacent open
space to:
Encourage active and passive recreation with the
River
Enhance sense of community and heritage
Encourage learning and respect for the environment
Create ecological buffers between development and
the river
Improve the quality of human life and wildlife
Support appropriate riverside and neighborhood
development
1, /'I;.'};:";.
Create integral links:
Between people and the River
Between natural and developed open space along
the River corridor
Between riverside development, open space and the
River
Between people and Denver's heritage with the out-
doors
Between Denver residents and visitors
Between Denver's past, present and future
To realize the objective of a healthy, habitable, connected
River, the following planning principles were developed to
guide all planning and design decisions.
New open space (whether natural or developed) shall
enhance the quality of both the natural systems of
the River and the human activities of its users.
Interventions taken upon the River, its bed and banks
shall emphasize the connection of surrounding eco-
systems, development and neighborhoods.
Development along the River shall respect and en-
hance the river ecosystem and encourage appropriate
human activities that sustain the overall health of the
River.
Development in the River corridor area will incor-
porate and enhance Denver's cultural heritage and
sense of community for neighborhoods adjacent to
the River.
Development along the River shall respect the River
in proximity, scale, design and function.
The River corridor should encourage both longitu-
dinal connection and lateral porosity into neigh-
borhoods to create a sense of connectivity that is
through, across, and with the River,
Platte Kiver at uiooevtne Lanaini
'age 14 of 44


Map 3.1
MSSHBORMOODS
***. i iiViaSwfln&aa
6Wili
W7a
Preepad
Central Retts Valley
LMO OWNERSHIP ALOMS THE RIVER CORRIDOR
| | City and County of Darner |..| Railroads
rn gioTpffieTd Ssm"public i~~i *m
I Regional Transportation District f.[ Private Ownership
Land Fills
Page 15 of 44


istingConditions (continued)
Identification and analysis of existing conditions resulted in
an understanding of issues, challenges and specific planning
recommendations within the River North Greenway study
area. For analysis purposes, existing conditions were orga-
nized into nine categories including;
River North Greenway Identity
Land Use and Ownership
Barriers to River North Greenway Access
Transportation and Roadways
Gateways and Entry
Bicycle and Pedestrian Connections to
Neighborhoods
Parks, Public Open Space and Trails
liver Stability Design
a part of analyzing the existing conditions, planning and
.sign opportunities become readily apparent, They are
maintenance yards and major highways and bridge viaducts
heavily influence the character and identity of the South M&p 3,4
Platte River within the River North corridor.
Because of barriers such as roadways and the railroad, the
River is disconnected from neighborhoods and does not re-
flect the cultural heritage of citizens who live in the comma
nities nearest to the River. Persons entering Denver from the
north along the River will observe an area that is commercial
and industrial in nature.
fufittttf if shei
go Farmers I
Denver ciffzi
Notional We,
mghterhouse
st Place, Toda
est know the*
Stock Show c
, stockyards and the Denar
y, it is likely that most metr
ireo as the location of the
nd the Denver Coliseum,
Both venues have a commercial feel to them, especially
terstate 70 bridge viaduct runs adjacent to at
since i
in-bet
earn
e two Tact
ties. This area could be thought
Railroad Bridge north of City of
4: Cuernavac a Park
The River North reach of the South Platte River is visually
dominated by commercial and light industrial enterprises
including abandoned buildings and vacant lots. In addi-
tion, transportation related uses including railroads, the RID
reputation as an art district that is known among artists as
::n ? u r c. ;
All of these uses have encroached on the South Platte River
resulting in the channelization and narrowing of the River-
banks, removal of the natural sinuosity and native vegetation
of the River, and increased sedimentation and decreased
water quality from urban runoff. Currently, the South Platte
River would best be described as unnatural and industrial in
character.
A summary of existing conditions that impact River's identity
include:
I ack of neighborhood and cultural identity with the
River because of physical barriers such as roadways and
railroads that inhibit connectivity.
Commercial and light industrial use as well as highways
and railroads dominate the visual character of the cor-
ridor.
The River is unnatural in character and function, ex-
emplified by a narrow corridor with steep slopes and
straightened alignment (channelized River corridor),
poor water quality and diminished wildlife habitat.
As noted in 2003 River North Plan,'' I he natural state of
the South Platte River has been eroded in places and in
some cases current uses do riot lake advantage ol the

Mr.mi 3
ywjtSijg
SV ! 1
Opportunities
Water and
WATER QUALITY
1 EmsKmg Parks
Maio- aiiktiTO
L
rorerrfpci hanKM! siKiCtt
H# Psimitiit fer


proximity to the River, taking away from the enjoyment
of this open space,"
The 2003 plan also notes that within the River corridor,
"The current zoning does not allow some appropriate
uses such as increased open space and mixed-use resi-
dential, allows other inappropriate uses such as indus-
trial, and does not provide appropriate development
and design standards for new development."
Land Use and Ownership
Land ownership patterns along the River North Greenway
reveal a mixture of public and private ownership. Approxi-
mately 117 parcels of land touch the banks of the River (Refer
to Map 3.1). Of that number, the City and County of Denver
owns 40 parcels and another 8 parcels are owned by other
public entities such as the Regional Transportation District,
the Colorado Department of Transportation and the State of
Colorado. Railroads, which have a long history following wa-
terways, own another 21 parcels of land touching the River.



Redevelopment is
into the River North
aemtm aev&opfneftts
constructed Taxi
OfiHorpO maTKml
of development
but has not yet
environmental potential
New develop
space, trails t
Green way. Si
quality from;
pated. The ty
in the RINO n
found impact
and its imam
Taxi Mixed Use
The South Platte River acts both as a "unifying element" and
a "barrier" to the six neighborhoods along the River cor-
ridor. The River currently acts as a barrier to the Globeville
and Elyrla/Swansea neighborhoods north of I-70 but has the
potential to be the unifying element for the emerging River
North neighborhood. New and vital neighborhoods are
emerging along the River adjacent to downtown, in large part
because of the parks that have been built there. Residential
developments in River North such as Taxi are already creating
new and vital mini neighborhoods. These developments and
more to follow have the potential to act as a focal point for
these areas as well.
Although perceived as stable, the confined nature of the
floodplain and resulting higher velocities and flows are ex-
pected to scour the channel bed, bars and banks, potentially
disrupting any structural integrity that may exist in the chan-
nel (Refer to Map 3.4).
The entire reach of the South Platte River within the City of
Denver has been straightened and realigned, resulting in a
narrow and deep flood channel with little or no emergent
H
Page 17 of 44


floodplain bench. Much of the River's stabilization improve-
ments occurred in the 1920'$ and included lining the banks of
the River with rock riprap and concrete rubble. The Riverbank is
too steep with a slope ratio of 1.5:1 to 2:1.The Urban Drainage
and Flood control District Design Manual recommends 3:1 to
4:1 Riverbank slopes. In some locations the riprap protecting
the Riverbank has slumped into the River and Riverbank ero-
sion is occurring. However, the steep banks make access into
the River by maintenance equipment very difficult. Therefore
sustainability of the River, especially during emergencies is at
risk. The channel exhibits little or no diversity, with few riffles
or pools, and a River bed that is relatively flat across the width.
An analysis of shear stresses for the 100-year flow of approxi-
mately 21,700 cubic feet per second, which is close to bankfuil,
predicts stresses in the 1.5 to 2,0 pounds per square foot range,
flow depths of 10 to 15 feet and velocities of 8 to 10 feet per
second. Except for the channel bed degradation that occurred
during 1995, the River North reach of the River is relatively
stable. However, because the channel is confined there Is a
continuing threat of bank erosion at bankfuil flows.
The last major flood exceeding a 100-year flood stage on the
South Piatte River occurred in 1965. It is unclear how the River
would react to another major flood in the future, especially
when factoring that the volume of storm water run-off into the
River has increased as pervious surfaces have increased due
to continued growth and development in the Metro Denver
region. Because the River channel >s confined, these is a con
tinning risk of bank erosion.
Recent fitipr^veitienfs to the Riverbank resulted in ths 100-
ytar flood being contained within the banks of the River
throughout the entire reach of River North. Section A in
Chapter 1 depicts a typical crass-sectional view of existing
conditions at the City of Cuernavaca Park, neat the upstream
end of the study area. Further downstream near 31st Street
(Refer to Section 8 in Chapter 1 j, the River is even more
constrained because of the proximity of Ringsby and
Arkins Courts. The sanitary sewer pipes along the east
bank result in steep channel banks through this reach.
The existing levee an the west side of the River near 48th
Avenue and the partially exposed sanitary sewer pipe
on the east bank north of Globeville Landing Park (Refer
to Section C in Chapter 1) continue to confine the South
Platte River through the River North reach.
Unstable river bank
* Vvotc.r k^yalifij
Urban activities in the Denver metropolitan area
have resulted in poor water quality that has adversely
impacted aquatic habitat and recreational use of the
South Platte River. Currently, 13 storm sewer outfalls,
draining approximately 20 total square miles of the
urban tributary area, discharge urban runoff into the
River within the River North reach. Additional storm
sewer outfalls and urban runoff are expected with new
developments. Sanitary sewers adjacent to the River
have the potential for exfiltration. Although no leak-
age has ever been identified, the risk exists for damage
to exposed sections of the pipelines during high flow
events HRefer to Map 3.1i.
Suckers, a family offish that is tolerant of degraded
water-quality conditions, dominate fish communities in
the River. The United States geological Service BUSES
South Platte River National 13a teriuality Assessment
Program BN* ABBUSHS Circular 1167, published
1998B has indicated that common carp and white suck
er tissue samples taken in the River contained PCBs and
chlordane. NAEB A sampling by the USiS has identi-
fied the presence of pesticides, with one health advi-
sory exceedance for Diazanon.Bolatile organic com-
pounds, including Benzene, Mji§§^P|f} fJfElpfwere found


in a large majority of alluvia! aquifer well samples.
Instances were recorded of drinking water standards
exceedances for benzene and PCL Nutrients, including
nitrates, ammonia and phosphorous, were identified
during sampling, although no exceedances of USEPA
drinking-water standards were identified. However, the
NAWQA study concluded that South Platte River water
quality conditions through the metropolitan Denver
reach were only moderately degraded.
Although previously listed as impaired water for E. coli
and nitrate, Segment 14 of the South Platte River, of
which the RINO reach is a part, has been delisted and
is no longer considered impaired. City and County of
Denver water quality monitoring of Segment 14 in
2007 indicates all constituents are within applicable
standards except for E. coli and fecal coliform. City and
County of Denver water quality monitoring at sampling
sites N38 (38th Street) and N46 (46th Street) in the
RINO reach indicate that most sampling event concen-
trations lie close to the geometric means for Segment
14. Spring through fall exceedances of E. coli and fecal
coliform standards occurred at both monitoring sites.
Winter chloride exceedances at these two sampling
sites occurred in January and February coinciding with
the application of deicing salts on roadways. Isolated
single event exceedances of the selenium (N38-Janu-
ary acute) and manganese (N46 January/February
chronic) also occurred in the RINO reach. Cadmium
contamination is considered an issue downstream of
the Burlington Ditch diversion; however, sampling in
the RINO reach by the City and County of Denver indi-
cates no elevated levels in surface water or sediment.
Past construction within and adjacent to the River
channel upstream of the RINO reach have contributed
to high sediment loads that have been deposited in,
and are slowly migrating through, the reach. In addi-
tion, suspended sediment loading also occurs at storm
drain outfalls due to the lack of erosion and sediment
control BMPs at construction sites and general urban
stormwater runoff characteristics in the tributary
watersheds.The buildup of sediment in the RINO reach
is due to backwater conditions resulting from a low
channel gradient and the Burlington Ditch diversion.
The combination of sediment influx and shallow flow
as welt as poor physical habitat diversity has resulted
in limited aquatic species populations and recreational
opportunities.
It may be possible to improve the River's water qual-
ity through naturally occurring biological and physical
processes such as whitewater features and provide
recreational and aesthetic improvements by 1) taking
advantage of existing infrastructure and 2) combin-
ing passive instream water treatment and recreational
improvements.
FI
tivlty
er
Arkins and Ringsby Court are located along the east and
west banks of the South Platte River between North Den-
argo and 38th Street. hey create both a visual and physi-
cal edge to the River (Refer to Maps 3.9, 3,10 & 3,11), With
tfieir current alignment, both roadways prohibit greenway
and River habitat expansion or laying back the Riverbanks
ir. order to improve River's stability. As discussed in the
previous section regarding barriers, existing transportation
corridors such as Interstate 23, interstate /0, Brighton Bou-
levard and Washington Street as well as railroads all have
a major impact on safe access and the visual character of
River North Greenway.
i
Several planning efforts are being conducted within
the City and County of Denver that may have an im-
pact on transportation within the River North Green-
way area. These efforts include the RTD FastTracks
Plan, RTD Maintenance Facility Plan, Brighton Corridor
Right-of-Way Design Guidelines and General Develop-
ment Plan efforts for several private properties located
adjacent to the South Platte River.
The RTD FastTracks planning effort involves the po-
tential for a new rail stations to be located along and
adjacent to the east bank of the River in the Globev-
ille Landing Park and National Western Stock Show
areas. At the conclusion of the River North Greenway
Master Plan, discussions regarding the potential
realignment of Ringsby Court had not been finalized.
IfRingsby Court is relocated off of the banks of the
River, an opportunity to use the former roadway to
expand green space and improve the River's health
and visual character will be possible. Other develop-
mentplanning e fforts have promoted the relocation
of Arkins Court off of the banks of the South Platte
River. Several alignment configuration options for
Arkins Court are being considered and are identified
on Map 4.6. Relocation of Arkins Court would pro-
vide valuable land within the abandoned roadway to
expand and improve the River's stability, health and
W'n./CJ W fliV
Farks, f ail'llic Oprtn '"7p a c.cs
ih tee parks currently exist on the River North reach of the
South Platte River including the City of Cuernavaca Park,
Globeville Landing Park and Northside Park (Refer to Maps
4,4,4.5 &4.7). A concrete multi-use trail runs parallel to the
River over the entire distance of River North. The trail is pri-
marily located on the east side of the River up to Globeville
Landing Park, where it crosses over to the west side of the
River and continues to Denver's northern city limit. The
trail connects all three parks and the Adams County South
Platte River Greenway to the north.
The City m ; :! :
both the .. -- :
aryoftb :
pedestri.- :: :
the Park i ; .
River nun:
Trail onC q
River at < 1 -U ::'-
Interstat . '
nectiom .:
west of I :
Several bicycle and pedestrian bridges provide for con-
nections across the River at the maintenance facility for
Denver Parks and Denver Public Works, Globeville Landing
Park and north of Northside Park, A trail connection on
the west Riverbank between the bridge adjacent to the
maintenance facility and City of Cuernavaca Park does not
currently exist.
Page 19 of 44


_,- # Aj0rix' *^*N|*-*-~*y#***~*
perceived the parks as unsafe due tc
of visibility. It was generally felt by either
he
along
i South Platte River Greenway. The Park Is adjacent
to the parking area for the Denver Coliseum, designated as

*.#...
North Side Park
*
Riverside Cemetery
One of Denver's oldest cemetery's, Riverside Cemetery is
located at Denver's northern city limit and a portion of
the Cemetery is within the City and County of Denver. The
majority of the Cemetery is located in Adams County. The
cemetery is not currently accessible from the Greenway
Trail.
Because of urban encroachment, there is not sufficient
available space for the expansion of the greenway, existing
parks, public open space and ecological buffer zones on
either the west or east edges of the Rive:. The River North
Greenway Master Plan did not involve a recreational needs
analysis to determine the need for additional parks, open
space and recreational facilities now and in the future.
However, it should be noted that additional open space
immediately adjacent to the River is necessary for: improv-
ing the water quality; laying back of the bank slopes to
improve visibility; accessibility and River stability; provid-
ing areas to detain and filter storm water run-off before it
enters the River; removal of impervious soils that increase
storm water run-off; and creation of riparian buffer zones
to increase and protect valuable habitat.
Community meetings revealed that the community did
not use the three existing parks on a regular basis be-
cause they wgfs not accessible from thefc nefahborhoods
contain amenities that they would use. in addition, citi-
Arkins Court
The lack of safe, lateral connections between neighborhoods,
business districts and the River North Greenway was a major
issue expressed during the public input process. The most
common cause of unsafe access from neighborhoods in-
cluded passage over North Washington Street, North Brighton
Boulevard, Interstate 25 and the railroad. In addition, streets
that extend perpendicular to the South Platte River do not
have adequate sidewalks, facilities for cyclists or signalized
crosswalks.
W
. wpr
Arklrts Court
Access to the South Platte River is made more difficult
and less safe due to physical barriers such as major high-
ways. roadways, railroads and the lack of existing bicycle
and pedestrian facilities such as lateral connector trails,
sidewalks and signalized crosswalks (Refer to Map 3.2),
In addition, the River acts as a barrier between neighbor-
hoods and businesses that are located on either side
of the River, Specific barriers to safe access to the River
North Creenvvay include;
- Railroads and railroad yards
- Brighton Boulevard
North Washington Street
interstate 70
Interstate 25
River channel geometry
Cjatewarjs and J_ntrtj yfdM* Vision f Ian
on fa ex* l)
The South Platte River and River North Greenway are
entrance locations into the City of Denver from Adams
County. However, it is difficult to differentiate separate
identifies, and a sense of arrival or entry between Den-
ver and Adams County because no entrance features or
a system for way finding exists along the South Platte
River, Washington Boulevard or Brighton Boulevard, the
three major access points from the north along or near
the South Platte River.
Additionally, thousands of automobile commuters
:V / V: :K/:i 20 bf 44 : ;:V: ^


§v
River North Greenway Master Plan recommendations are
based on master plan goals and objectives, analysis of
existing conditions; sound planning principles, and input
from citizens, stakeholders, and a technical advisory com-
mittee.
# River Health
The health of the South Platte River has been severely
degraded over many decades. This Master Plan recom-
mends actions that will restore the River to a healthier,
more stable condition that support both human and
wildlife activities.
Sections A through D in Chapter 1 display compo-
nents of recommended riverbank improvements in
the River North Greenway. Urban Drainage and Flood
Control District recommends the construction of natu-
rally vegetated rivei banks at a 3:1 slope. An irrigated
turf grass riverbank should be constructed at a 4:1
slope. Where obstacles such as utilities or lark of avail-
able land are constraints, a system of terraced walls
can be incorporated into the riverbank to improve
the side slope to 1.5:1. However, the walls should be
designed to increase pervious surface and must allow
for maintenance and public access to tire River and
Greenway.
Provide vegetated, emergent benches on either side
of the River channel in order to improve water quality.
reduce flow velocities and improve wildlife habitat.
These benches should range in width between 35 feet
(minimum) and 65 feet or greater (desirable). A mini-
mum of 65 feet will be required if stormwater wetland
filtration systems are included within the emergent
bench to improve water quality and reduce flow ve-
locities. A minimum emergent bench width of 35 feet
is required for maintenance access.
Restore a riparian buffer where feasible to provide
wildlife habitat and improved water quality. The ripar-
ian buffer should be comprised of native tree species
and/or pervious surfaces such as vegetation or pervi
otis paving that should extend laterally from the top
of the bank fora minimum width of 50 feet, or a more
desirable width of 100 feet or greater.
In their 2008 stormwater detention study, Merrick En-
gineering indicates a need for approximately 33 acre-
feet of detention for flood control within the River
North Greenway planning boundary at build-out. In
addition, the City and die Urban Drainage and Flood
Control District recognized the benefits of consolida-
tion of stormwater detention facilities into a few larger
detention ponds as opposed to many smaller ponds.
Combining smaller stormwater facilities into larger
stormwater facilities provides the opportunity to cre-
ate an attractive amenity for recreational and passive
open space uses. In order to achieve this goal, ad-
ditional open space lands will need to be acquired in
order to accommodate 33 acre-feet of storage. Several
sites have been identified as potential stormwater de-
tention sites including the Denver Coliseum Area and
Chestnut Open Spaces (Refer to Maps 4.5 and 4.6). In
addition to stormwater detention, the facilities should
include wetland filtration for water quality improve-
ments. wildlife habitat and recreational amenities.
This consolidated detention would also benefit new
development through efficient use of land.
Stormwater best management practices (detention
basins, bio-filters, hydrodynamic devices, media filters,
retention ponds, wetland basins, wetland channels,
grass swales, grass buffers, rain gardens, and pervious
materials) should be encouraged in order to protect
and improve water quality.
Water quality improvements to the South Platte River
can be accomplished through several methods. Day-
lighting of existing storm sewers located in Globeville
Landing Park and along 36th Street would allow for
oxygenation and wetland filtration of stormwater be-
fore it is discharged into the River (See Figures 4.3 and
4.4). Stormwater detention ponds should incorporate
wetlands to filter out pollutants, as well as providing
aesthetic recreation and wildlife benefits. The emer-
gent bench should be widened on both sides of the
River to provide increased vegetation to shade and
cool the River's water temperature; to reduce flood ve-
locities through additional friction; to allow space for
stormwater wetland filtration and to facilitate channel
maintenance. To compliment and increase the effec-
tiveness of the wetland filtration areas, they will be
located so stormwater outfalls will spilt out up stream
of these features. The incorporation of adjacent lands
buffering the River should be pursued in order to in-
crease pervious land to reduce stormwater run-off and
groundwater recharge
Water quality and recreational improvements should
take advantage of the energy currently dissipated by
six conventional cirop structures within the Rivet North
reach. Whenever feasible, water quality improvement
features should be combined with in-channei recre-
ational projects since their design is similar In scope.
Whitewater injects important oxygen into the water
that will improve water quality through naturally
occurring biological processes as well as providing
features for recreations! boating.
Water quality could also be enhanced by taking advan-
tage of an existing gravity pipeline which runs parallel
to the South Platte River (the Farmers and Gardeners
Ditch). Using this pipeline, water could be re-circulated
back upstream to enhance water quality. The potential
of (he Farmers and Gardeners Ditch, will be explored in
greater depth as part of the future River South Green-
way Master Plan (RISC)).
; j JCyr
Maintain a Public River Edge throughout the South
Platte River Corridor. Roads, trails and promenades
will provide the separation between public and pri-
vate areas.
Page 21 of 44


Map 4,1 Water and Water (Jualitt|
SOUTH SEGMENT
City of Cuernavaca Park to 31st Street
Recommendations
WA TER and WA TER QUALITY
Exwn§ smmiwsw Outfits
% PropOMdtn
s.
are located downstream of t outfall aid the size of each
and widen ate to t* determined on a case by case basis).
* III
IIIII alBIllli'
Ringsby Court should be
moved away from thee River
where ever possible. Exact
Location to be determined


i** ** *- #JI1 . ^



lap
NORTH SEGMENT
/- 70 to North City Limits
Recommendations
WA TER and WA TER QUALITY
m
% Proposed in-Channtf Stormwater Wetland Rltnion Area*
"hfisfi iiffas- wi cnrf.rsJi-ram of ttvj outfall and the stee of each
area fengtn a^d wcm are-to Da CEtarremad on a case by case basis)
fcxwting Parka
Proposed Public Open Space
Deveki^-ej U;- faim.il and informal
fSp '.-oo-ipiplo dwcripbcfi for irvjtvlduol proposed parks)
Proposed Riparian Buffer, wittHIfi Corridor
and River Bank Improvements
Lards obtained and preserved as a naiura!
hpar-an buffer fxljacer-t to the South Pla:i I
passive recootdn. f'aS. ecological education,
and wHiSife bb.1sls.
. . Potential Areas for River Bank Gnstfng improvements
Reduce to4:1 Slope Ratro
Petantia* Areas for Rrvttr Bank Grading improvement
Terrace Wail Opportunity
21
Jr ' t
r' 4 j /yy I f X/s
KEY MAP


sportaiaon and Roadways
The City and County of Denver is currently evaluat-
ing transportation options on both sides of the River
within the River North study area. This Master Plan
will provide guidance and rationale for future trans-
portation decisions as they affect the South Platte
River and River North Greenway. Current and future
transportation planning should coordinate transpor-
tation improvements on Washington Street, Brighton
Boulevard and others as appropriate to ensure ade-
quate access and linkages with the Greenway corridor.
Additionally, transportation planning should coordi-
nate location of a transit station to ensure connections
with the Greenway corridor, as well as ensure that easy
access and linkages are created to new and existing
developments from the Greenway corridor to the
River North study area. Finally, transportation plan-
ning should convert, where feasible, and/or remove
City roads/rights-of-way located adjacent to the River
into pervious open space and parks.
/'\rkins (_,ourt and Kingsbt) (k__t>urt
Arkins and Ringsby Courts should be relocated or
moved away from the River wherever feasible while
maintaining parallel through streets and/or local
access between 31st and 38th streets (See Sections
A & B). Realignment of the roadways will provide ad-
ditional land for laying back the riverbanks to make
them more stable and accessible. This will also pro-
vide space for water quality improvements such as
wetland filtration, riparian buffers to expand impervi-
ous surfaces, and the protection of wildlife habitat.
Map 4.6 identifies several proposed street configura-
tions that would allow these benefits to be realized
while still maintaining a viable street network.
WrushniSl:on,Streel:d,d5n-ht on [bou-
levard
(Refer to the Vision Plan on Page2).
Improve bicycle and pedestrian access along and
over Washington Street and Brighton Boulevard. Both
roadways are in close proximity to the South Platte
River and function as a barrier to safe pedestrian and
bicycle access to the River from neighborhoods and
places of business. Improvements to these roadways
should include crosswalks to maximize safety, gate-
way features and wider sidewalks (8-foot minimum
width) at selected intersections and along the length
of the roadway (Refer to the Illustrative Maps on
Pages 5 and 8). Crosswalks should include a signal
ized pedestrian phase, distinctive and accessible
crosswalk pavement, and gateway features such as
signage, art, landscaping and architectural features.
The gateway intersection will give motorists, bicy-
clists and pedestrians clear and safe passage to the
River North Greenway.
4 IP arks and f ubitc Open P3paces
(Refer to the Illustrative Maps on Pages 5 & 6)
Park and public open space opportunities need to be
expanded to keep pace with the projected population
increases in the River North corridor. (See population
growth projections in the Appendix). The City and
County of Denver, the Greenway Foundation, develop-
ers and other partners should work cooperatively to
expand existing parks and acquire new land for park
and open space purposes. This Plan encompasses a
wide range of potential park and open space oppor-
tunities, from small private plazas to large regional
destination parks.
As the City pursues park and open spate funding, it
will look to the development community to assist in
funding these improvements.
(Refer to the Illustrative Maps on Pages 5 & 6)
Re-energize the existing patks (City of Cuernavaca
Park, Globeville Landing Park, Northside Park and
Heron Pond Natural Area) by improving and adding
amenities that meet user needs and reflect cultural
identity (Refer to Maps 4.4,4.5 and 4.7). Citizens
should be fully engaged in the planning process in
order to ensure that community expression, identity
and 'fingerprints" are included in each park design.
This coordinated effort will foster increased park use
and stewardship.
P roposed f arks and f ubiic Op e n
Space
(Refer to the Illustrative Maps on Pages 5 & 6)
As mentioned in the Existing Conditions section, the
acquisition of additional public open space located
adjacent to the River is required to improve River sta-
bility, water quality, habitat buffers, and recreational
opportunities. Four potential areas for new park and
open space in River North include areas in the vicinity
of 38th Street and Chestnut Place, the Denver Colise-
um, the National Western Stock Show, and Riverside
Cemetery (Refer to Maps 4.5 and 4.7).
The proposed Chestnut Open Space is approximately
2.6 acres in size and is at a location desirable for both
passive recreational use and stormwater detention.
The program for this area should include neighbor-
hood recreational amenities such as seating, shade
structures and other passive amenities. Additionally,
should detention be deemed appropriate at this loca-
tion, it should be designed as an additional amenity
to the open spate.
The proposed Coliseum Open Space creates an op-
portunity to provide new and complementary ameni-
ties adjacent to both Globeville Landing Park and
the Denver Coliseum (See Section C), In addition, the
approximately 16-acre site is large enough to provide
significant stormwater and wetland filtration of an
existing stormwater pipe that outfalls unfiltered into
the Rivet at Globeville Landing Park. Improvements
should include removal of the existing parking areas
and other impervious surfaces, creating a stronger
connection between the Denver Coliseum and River


Map 4.4
SOUTH SEGMENT
City of Cuernavaca Park to 31st Street
Recommendations
OPEN SPACE, PARKS
and TRAILS
itta
C'l'lJ informal --o-rea^an wd socialization.
ccnol-rte dsscripbon for ii -viduu! proposed parksi
Proposed Riparian Buffer, Wildlife Corridor
and Rivor Bank improvements
-.antis oomlncc &ne preserve*! as r> natural open space
ip.i*ri lii/w a-.ljai-.epi In !h* Sonih DloKrt R-v*! Um*
oas'iive recreaiiori. ?iyi:s. orfcg-cal aoucefcri wafer
anowlaWa habitats.
i PrepQMd BwCiiiwy
Acscss to the vet is provi
with a nurnbarof teafurBS i
'amps 'ri -rails and iw. rvr; lanrfsr.npr'g. seating arw
rash ri)a.'p:sicl(-, d::yc> racks anoaraas. safety ana sacunty.
Exiting South Plstt* Graonw#y TiwJ
Proposed South P'itta Growwny Trail Expansion
Proposed GreongtroiSE Connections
Sals hfcyt-ie and pfcdesirain ixfi/veclions l-> r.e'ghborhoods iw adding
new eonnactiana ana improve existing comeeticns on trails, ^bridges,
sideways a-kt ssjoaired inteitheclon-
Pmpomti Sidewnika Minimum 8 feot Wide
A# Proposed RTD FasTVscks North Moira and
w taut Commuter Rail Line
:-h-e:: proposed Alternative Pasffcocfcs Stations
PropoMd Roadway AianrnentB
/ % / Otnargo Street Anernataw
A/ Arki'is Co-Jit Ait"rr:a:;v>; A1
yfty? Arkins Court Attwnalive *te
Atkina Gout Alternant *Rf
Jf#
*. £ Proposed Roadway Access Gateways
Prov-do nrainss O' these key .rtfreeir-tr-s In ;>nro..nv:
Lnat the South piste Hr.er Grasnway s tocsted a few
Page 26 of 44





Detailed Recommendations (continued)
North Greenway, In addition, a multi-modal connec-
tion to the proposed RTD Rail Station via an exten-
sion of the Greenway trail should be completed. The
door uses such as an outdoor concert venue and/or
farmers market that would further enhance this area
ip 4.6 Xroposed Roadway Alignment
... i?
t l £, fP*- -1 '*
of River North as the RING Entertainment District. The
recommended improvements are consistent with
potential plans for the reinvention of the Denver Coli-
seum by Denver Theaters and Arenas Department, as
well as comments received from citizens in the public
planning process.
Lands within or adjacent to the National Western com-
plex provide the opportunity for a large-scale open
space. This opportunity should be explored jointly with
National Western Stock Show officials as they consider
plans for their future. The proposed open space should
be planned and designed in concert with the anticipat-
ed high density, mixed-use development. Recreational
opportunities to consider include off-channel white-
water boating, multi-use and soft surface hiking trails,
plazas, public art and promenades {See Section D).
The graphics in this plan showing the National Western
Open Space and the North Platte Valley Regional Park
are conceptual.The exact area of the proposed North
Platte Valley Regional Park will be determined through
subsequent planning efforts taking into consideration
the future needs of the National Western Stock Show.
The Riverside Cemetery provides an opportunity to
protect and preserve an historic resource, as well as ap-
proximately 79 acres of existing open space. It is recom-
mended that a not-for-profit organization be engaged
to manage and coordinate improvements with the City
and County of Denver and Adams County. Potential
uses include multi-use and soft surface hiking trails and
historic interpretive signage.
4 MuItAJ se ] rails and t\iver l\|ortrt
id' jreenwaij (d.onnections
(Refer to the Illustrative Maps on Pages 5 & 6).
Multi-use trails will make the River North Greenway more
accessible to key destinations such as neighborhoods, parks,
and business districts. Construction of a new, multi-use trail
is recommended on the west side of the South Platte River
between the City of Cuernavaca Park and Globeville Landing
Park. The proposed trail will connect with the existing pe-
destrian bridge at the maintenance facility for Denver Public
Works and Denver Parks and Recreation located adjacent
to Park Avenue and the River, and continue downstream
to the existing Greenway trail as it crosses over the River at
Globeville Landing Park {Refer to Maps 4.4,4.5 and 4.7). A new
multi-use trail is recommended for the east side of the River
between Globeville Landing Park and the existing Greenway
trail at Race Court.
Lateral connections extending from the east side of the River
are proposed at Prospect Park, Denargo Street, 29th Street,
31 st Street, 36th Street, 38th Street, East 46th Street, East 47th
Street, and Race Street. Grade separated crossing of the rail-
road tracks at 31st and 36th streets should be provided in
order to access the eastern neighborhoods and downtown
Denver. The existing railroad underpass and sidewalk con-
nection to the River along 38th Street should be widened
to a minimum width of eight feet to safely accommodate
both cyclists and pedestrians as part of future roadway im-
provements to the underpass. A multi-use trail connection
between Globeville Landing Park, the proposed RTD o-
muter Rail Station and Denver Coliseum is also proposed.
Lateral connections extending from the west side of the
River include 36th Street, East 45th Street, East 50th Street
and East 51st Street.The inclusion of these proposed
multi-use trail segments would allow the River North
Greenway to be more safely accessible to users and in-
crease recreation and alternative transportation opportu-
nities for the neighborhoods west of Washington Street.
All future multi-use trails should incorporate green" design
principles including bioswales, landscaping and pervious
surfaces wherever possible {Refer to Figure 4,3). Where
existing stormwater pipes are removed in favor of open,
stormwater channels, multi-use trails and landscapi should
be incorporated into the design Refer to Figure 4.4).
The 36th Street connection proposed between Walnut
Street on the east side of the railroad tracks and the River
North Greenway is proposed as an enhanced streetscape
with street trees, widened sidewalks and a pedestrian
bridge over the River (Refer to Map 4.5 and Figure 4.5 &
4.6). The bridge would enhance the River Gateway pro-
posed for this location as well as establish a sense of arrival
and sense of place for the Greenway and the mixed use
developments on the west side of the River.
Gateways (Refer to the Vision Plan on Page 2).
Incorporate River Gateways at strategic locations
along the River North Greenway to provide the user
with easily recognizable locations to access the River,
provide an exciting sense of arrival and reinforce the
River's sense of place. Figures 4,1 and 4.2 are exam-
ples of potential River Gateways. Gateway features
within the Urban Reach of the River North Greenway
between 29th Street and 38th Street could have an in-
dustrial art theme to reinforce the industrial history of
River North while reflecting the emerging River North
Art Community. The gateway bridge connecting 36th
Street to Ringsby Court should establish a sense of
arrival and sense of place for the River North Green-
way in addition to complementing the proposed 36th
Page 28 of 44


NORTH SEGMENT
l- 70 to North City Limits
Recommendations
OPEN SPACE, PARKS
and TRAILS
I...I KSIISIIpSinformalr*errt:ionandtkxftfeation.
(Sea compiats doscfiptiai for indrviduai proposed pats)
fiuffai? ^nflidtSfe-Corridor
Lands obtained and ptesatved as a natural own mace connector and
riparian buffer adjacent to the South Rafts River. Uses would inctude:
pesawe1 ecreation, trail, aoofoQica) education, water Qualify fiftration
"-y rl WfJwWfi f%WrW wsfBWSf
&\f> Access to fog river Is provided by a Gateway that would be developed
with a number of featurea that would indtife; access by stop andfor
ramps to trails and the nver: tandflcaptrijj; seating araas with baches,
hash "nceptec:eR. bicycle racks and other tvm sfi;ng3 lighting ter
ambiance, safety and security.
RvistiRi South Platte Gmmmf Trail
Proponed Smith Ptolte Grosnway Trail Expansion
%£%, Proposed Srmenstreet Ceniwstk
SsT# Weyeta and pedeatram eonnicftofts
new connections and improve existing eo
sidewalks and signalized interaaecbons.
A# PnpnadlRDFn'naefcilioriliNMrasid
fT East Commuter Rail Line
Propose Atteraaihw PasTrufes Stations
m. ---a m. 1-------------
rfoposw nwwwsjr fmgmwmm
.A/ Denargo Sheet ABemalivas
/ Attire Good Alternative #1
Mara Court Alternative #3
A biv ; gj,!!5^f*
mat in# South wierev- Page 29 of 44
16


Street bicycle and pedestrian trail connection.
To accomplish the goals of this plan, the City and County of
Denver should implement regulatory measures to improve
the health and vitality of the South Platte River. Based
on review of other jurisdictions including Massachusetts,
Figure 4.2 River ( jatewau
identified that would benefit the South Platte River. These
practices include:
Create a South Platte River Greenway Advisory Com-
mittee. comprised of the Manager or his/her designee
of DPR, PW, CPD, EH, and representatives for various
stakeholder groups. They would meet on a semi-
annual basis to review* and advise on implementation
plan progress. They would also develop new imple-
mentation steps as needed.
I his is a voluntary approach to riparian setbacks
where the City and County of Denver can work with
willing landowners and nonprofit conservation orga-
nizations to acquire the development rights to key
corridor. Denver should seek a minimum of 50 feet for
each easement and encourage the reestablishment of
riparian habitat where appropriate.
Zonintt /Ref brick .Ztandarb
In order to establish a viable public edge along Den-
ver's major urban drainageway, a minimum setback
requirement from the top of the bank of at least
SO feet is recommended. This will ensure adequate
space for trail connections and Greenway amenities.
See perspective sketch of the River on pages 1 and 4.
All surfaces within this setback should be pervious.
* {development { ee
The City and County of Denver should explore the use
of a Parks and Recreation development fee, similar to
the fee assessed in the City's Gateway District, to assist
with the acquisition and construction of new park and
open space projects,
, a
T" r L -4- 1 Jp-
j§
i
Page 30 of 44


Page 31 of 44


w>>=; j.oundatlon Letter
THE GREENWAY FOUNDATION
Planning, Building. Protecting and Enhancing Communities, ParKS, Trails and Waterways
Since 1974
CHAIRMAN
-S.il-.'.-
VICE CHAIRMAN
Kiu Utdbli iy
Bi! Avt-r-y
J-i-i B' i:ye-.
3ar C-hadwick
: .-nyF i;r
Uekor/n BtFeH
J-:nr.
Cyr 'J'i-i
Givy Flrofn
.i Scndj.vn:
:-'r-iT:r 7nr 1 r:
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
On behalf of the Board of Directors of the Greenway Foundation, it is my pleasure to
present the River North Greenway Master Plan,
Over the last three decades, the Greenway Foundation has enjoyed a positive and
productive partnership with numerous local, regional, state and federal agencies, none
more significant and longstanding than with the City and County of Denver, in particu-
lar the Department of Parks and Recreation.
The Greenway Foundation's history with the area ofthe South Platte River contained
within the River North Greenway Master Plan began in 1975 with the reclamation of
a former landfill dumpsite into Globeville Landing Park as well as with the construc-
tion ofthe multi-use trail between Confluence Park and Globeville Landing. Since that
initial effort more than 30 years ago, the Foundation has continued to interact with
the City to maximize the environmental and recreational potential and opportunities
within this section ofthe South Platte River Watershed,
SPECIAL EVENTS
COORDINATOR
Si iXiimnlx:-
In early 2008, the Foundation entered into a contract with the City and County of
Denver's Parks and Recreation Department to oversee the creation of the River North
Green way Master Plan with a strong emphasis on the creation of a plan based on direct
interaction with numerous public and private stakeholders. From the onset of this
endeavor, the Foundation has aimed to deliver a Plan that has a strong likelihood of
being implemented.
It is the hope ofthe Foundation that the experiences, processes and lessons learned in
the creation ofthe Plan will be put to use in similar master planning efforts for other
areas ofthe River and that, as has been the case for over three decades, the City and
the Foundation can join forces to find the needed resources to ensure the visions and
goals contained in the Plan become a reality.
Sincerely;
Jeff Shoemaker
Executive Director
A river is more than an amenity, it is a treasure" Justice WM. D Douglas
5290 arc Btwl, Bute I'-,--. .j '.if'-;' i
Page 32.df^T?T7;


(tint to
Globeville is a physical and visual gateway into
Denver because of its location, higher eleva-
tion compared to Denver downtown and great
views to the south. The River North Greenway
needs to enhance this natural advantage,
Need a welcome sign along Washington Street
identifying the Globeville Neighborhood.
Need to develop economic opportunities.
Transportation and Bicycle and Pedestrian Ac-
cess
Need safe bicycle and pedestrian access across
Washington Street to the Greenway such as sig-
nalized crosswalk at 51st Avenue, 49th Avenue,
East Elgin Place, 47th Avenue and East 45th Av-
enue.
Need safe bicycle and pedestrian access be-
tween the River North Greenway and Argo Park
along East 47th Avenue.
Need safe bicycle and pedestrian access to fu-
ture RTD fight rail stations.
South Platte River
Better fish habitat and fishing access.
Night lighting.
Northside l Heron Pond Parks
Safety/Security
Need more people using park
Unsafe, lots of drug activity in park
Night lighting
Too many transients on the River and in the
Parks
Desirable Recreation Facilities
Artificial Skiing and Ski Jump
Recreation Center with indoor swimming pool
Water Park
Basketball courts
Skate Park
Golf Course (9-hole, par 3)
Riverside Cemetery
Desirable Recreation Facilities
Botanic Garden
History Museum
National Western Stock Show Property
Desirable Recreation Facilities
WhiteWater Boating
Other Activities
Festivals
Farmers / Flea Market
Hotel
Denver Coliseum
Need a new (bigger and better) concert venue
Globeville Landing Park
Needs to be updated with new amenities such
as a picnic shelter, playground and river access.
General
Greenway improvements should be sustain-
able (solar, water conservation, micro enter-
prise zones).
* Community supported agriculture/gardens
and year-round greenhouse.
Remove the concrete batch plant.
* Need more variety.
South Platte River
Need to celebrate wildlife.
Improve signage to explain exiting parks along
the River.
Transportation and Bicycle and Pedestrian Ac-
cess
Need safe bicycle and pedestrian connections
from the Highlands area to the Greenway.
* Need safe bicycle and pedestrian access from
Inca/East 38th Avenue area to the Greenway.
Need additional safe bicycle arid pedestrian
access (such as a bridge) over 1-25 and the
Railroad to the Greenway.
Need signs on the trail in the Confluence Park
to Commons Park area identifying that there
is a northern reach of the Green way.
Arkins Court should not be vacated. If Arkins
Court is vacated the developer will have a pri-
vate riverfront.
Arkins Court is dangerous due to speeding
cars.
Need safe bicycle and pedestrian access to fu-
ture RTD light rail stations.
RTD Yards
RTD should move the Commuter Rail Mainte-
nance Facility.
Parks and Public Open Space
Need a large open space / park in this reach.
Need additional small pocket parks instead of
larger parks.
Need a community recreation center in this
reach.
Opportunity for a large park located on the
Coors Field parking lot adjacent to the railroad
lines. Also includes a bicycle and pedestrian
connection over the railroad to the Greenway
on 31st Street.
Need for safe bicycle and pedestrian access
over the railroad lines and I-25 extending from
31 st Street.
Need safe bicycle and pedestrian access
along the 36th Street alignment between the
Globevilleand Elyria/Swansea Neighborhoods
including bicycle and pedestrian bridges over
the railroad lines, i-25, and the River,
Storm Water and Water iualt y
Day light existing storm water pipe that is lo-
cated along the 36th Street alignment
Divert/relocate the 36th Street storm water
system into a new detention/wetland filtra-
tion pond located on Coliseum Parking lot lo-
cated just east of Globeville Landing Park.
Transportation and Bicycle and Pedestrian Access
Need for better access to the Greenway from 20th
Street.
Need a new road between North Broadway and Ar-
kins Court.
Need a no leash trail from City of Cuernavaca Park
arid the RTD Yards.
Vacate Ringsby Court.
Parks and Public Open Space
New for a new park (possibly a dog park) and riv-
erbank improvements north of City of Cuernavaca
Park (area between the railroad tracks).
Need for a riverfront park on the RTD Yards land.
Need a new park near the intersection of 20th
Street and North Inca Street.
The following comments were recorded on the
base maps and meeting notes for the entire proj-
ect study area during the 'workshop portion of the
Stakeholder Roundtable Meeting (May 16, 2008),
One on One Stakeholder Meetings {April, 2008
through August 8, 2008) and the City Stakeholder
Meeting (April 18, 2008).
Create a unique identity or personality for this section
of the River.
Impose height limitations on buildings adjacent to
the River.
Enhance and improve the economic vitality of Riv-
er North.
Neighborhoods should have a fingerprint on
Greenway improvements in their area
Page 33 of 44
(jet-


Keep some parts of the River "wild and natural"
in appearance.
Improve the stability of the River.
Create water features (e.g. fountains) in urban
section of River North Greenway planning
area.
i O d>> \ y
*

J to many individual detention sites,
trove the overall water quality of the
Use green" design concepts (i.e., geothermal
and solar).
and Public Open Space
Need more open space and park lands.
Create destinations and places.
Parks should be like emerald strands linked by
the River,
Northernmost section of the River (north of
1-70) should be wild and natural in character.
* Park use should become part of Riverside Cem-
while respecting the cemetery's historic
acter,
munity gardens should be created, includ-
preservation of open space for future gar-
dening close to residential communities.
Urban greenhouses/agricultural site: model
space for education, markets and health.
* Create urban fishery.
* Create tiring of park areas into urban, natural,
very natural and wetland areas.
River Stability and Design
* Unofficial setback of 150 feet from centerline of
River Is not adequate for river stability or health
or to make the River a valuable amenity.
The River North Greenway Master Plan
April 2,2009
":\is
Access
Need better pedestrian and bicycle access to
the River.
Need to connect people to the River.
Need more bicycle/pedestrian bridges.
Improve connection between neighborhoods
and the River.
Improve connections to transit locations.
Recreation
Create more soft surface trails for hiking and
create separate, safe trails for different uses.
Improve water recreation.
Add a dog park along the river.
Add a year-round community gardens with
greenhouses.
The Greenway should provide multiple recre-
ational opportunities.
Education
Preserve the industrial history of the River North
corridor,
Create learning landscape that involves the
schools, the City and the Greenway Founda-
tion.
MB
Safety
Need to improve safety.
Keep the river and riverbanks clean.
Create a place where more people will use the
Greenway.
Too many transients on the River.
Roadways
Vacation and/or moving Ringsby and Arkins
Courts away from the river is a positive idea.
Transportation
Improve connections between neighborhoods
and transit stations.
Extend the 16th Street shuttle to the River.
implementation and Maintenance
Creation of a Special Improvement and Mainte-
nance District is a positive idea.
identify and foster partnerships to fund and
implement the master plan.
Keep the River and Greenway cleaner.
Involve homeless in implementation.
Work with Excel, RTD and other institutions
to coordinate utilities placement and mainte-
nance.
Economic
Create new economic opportunities along the
River corridor for nearby residents.
Develop Farmers Market.
Encourage affordable housing near the River
corridor.
Page 34 of 44


O Denver (Community D^veiopme
2008 Estimate based on Assessor's Data
2008 industrial Zoning Underutilized Parcels
Zone District Square Feat Underutilized Acreage
[i 2 : 3 035 441" -i-4.^CiLa'iC v,i uc i-n;: 'n-vcT'ca? v,i >.,c > -xKj dgoo'o foci
|i-"..............:................I":85"i78'.i'^t.......................TdS?l
62.50
2035 Estimate Existing Zoning Capacity Build Out
Zone District Nuir-ber of Parcels Total Acreage Approx. Dwci;>ng units/acrc (DUA) HU Vacancy Rate (DRCOG) tsi Vacant HH PPHH (DRCOG) Total Pod
l-i 342 284 ttj 0! 2 3.65% j 0 0 2rL U
i-2 130 Mi. Hi Of ol 3.65% I 0 0 Lei, ?j
R-MU-30 34 29 08; 501 1.454 3.65% 53 1,40' 2 Cl: 3 656;
n;f> 23 17 c'-:-l 7RI 1.040 3.65% j 49 .7V7 ?Fi: 7 385;
C-ttU-30 9 17 fCf: 501 852 3 65% 1 31 52' 2 6U 2 '42!
B 4 y 5 2: j 301 ' bO 65 3 j d 50 2.;l: :.k;
R-2 2 ' ,02j 14.2! 14 3.65% j 1 1.4 2rl: 36;
c-vu- it:- U 4-:; 50! 24 ; 63'.. j 1 23 2 f 1: 6-;
R-2-A 1 0751 28! 3.65% I 0 4 2 6 i: 1 -;
Rsr
10.533
2035 Estimates - DRCOG (TAZ)
TAZ 2035 HH Capacity Persons Per HH (DRCOG) Tola! Population
- 1200 2 6'j 3. '32 As; cum -CiT. cn TOFC
500 2ET; t 305 As, n TQn mu- *: 4:'S i'4CUi
7 ? r. i 15 Oh vrr Col.v.mt
40217 51 i|V; -Vi -ix-sJf'.ivlCRMr
2? 2.bl j V'J fee r--,v
i'j'2' Ark
4-3220 &C0 2 6'! 2.C-&8 Modtl-, nccOi/f'b:'c (o' Cl c No onoo"icoc
J22o 2000 2 6' j 5.220 L'-u-y-cj Mu-Kc*l - 20x0 DU
TOTAL 5785 ?R'; 15,599!
2035 Estimate - Rezoned Capacity Build Out
Zone Oislncl Acreage Approx. Dwelling units'acre ( HU Vacancy Kate (DRCOG) tst. Vacant HH PPHH IU l otai Pep.
inc.i?:ra: n 6-lU 62.50 37 25 2.93 5 i'4i 3i:ii 2t' '.or1.*;
PUD 20 38 2.'31 3 85T sol 2 1:>* 2 o' 5.485:
B 4 5 20 50 j '52 3.65 V 6j 153 2 2' 352:
R f-.-U 30 23 C8 501 *454 3.051c 5S| 1.401 2 0' 3 655:
R-2-A ' j 23; 4 2.6'j'c ol 4 2 6' 'lj
R- ? 1.02 14 2i 14 8 65:.: 1 "4 2 o' 5T:
C-MU-30 17.03 o>; tt2 3 Ob-:.- :\:l 821 2 -i' '3 142:
r; fv-u io 048 501 24 .I.S'-tt 1] 20 2 7-' till
20,451
Q^outh | latte |\jver/ | ributaries
Invest
South Platte River Greenwav
South Platte River/Tributaries Investment Summary
FUNDING COORDINATED BY THE GREENWAV FOUNDATION
($35 MILLION)
FEDERAL GOVT. REVENUES (1974-present)
STATE GOVT. REVENUES (lS74-prsent)
LOCAL GOVT. REVENUES (1974 piesent)
PRIVATE REVENUES (1974 present)
. FOUNDATIONS - $10 MILLION
. CORP mO. - SB MILLION
- $ 4.S MILLION
5 6.0 MILLION
- 5 6.5 MILLION
- $18.0 MILLION
FUNDING COORDINATED 3Y THE C&C OF DENVER & THE GREENWAY FOUNDATION)
($45 MILLION)
DENVER REVENUES - S 23 MILLION
. WINTER PARK FUNDS $15 MILLION
. OTHER CAPITAL FUNDS $ 8 MILLION
STATE REVENUES
FEDERAL REVENUES
GREAT OUTDOORS COLORADO
URBAN DRAINAGE & FLOOD CONTROL DISTRICT
TRILLIUM CORPORATION
- $ 1 MILLION
- $ 7 MILLION
- $ 7 MILLION
- $ 5 MILLION
$ 2 MILLION
CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY $5 BILLION
ENTERTAINMENT, CULTURAL AND RETAIL DEVELOPMENT
(SI BILLION )
COORS FIELD
PEPSI CEN 1LR
INVESCO FIELD
R.E.I.
ELITCH GARDENS
DOWNTOWN DENVER AQUARIUM
CHILDREN'S MUSEUM
- S 220 MILLION
- S 175 MILLION
- S 340 MILLION
- S 35 MILLION
- $ 110 MILLION
S 105 MILLION
- $ 15 MILlION
RESIDENTIAL, COMMERICAL & RETAIL DEVELOPMENT
(5 4 BILLION)
Page 35 of 44


.DM Memo (j/31/06) River North O
CDM
Memorandum
To; Devon Buckets, Denver Parks & Recreation Department
Prom: Ted Johnson, CDM
Travis Bogan, CDM
Copy; Jeff Shoemaker, Greenway Foundation
Merle Grimes, Merle D. Grimes. LLC
Tim Wuhtgenant The Trust for Public Land
Wade Shelton The Trust for Public Land
Marge Price Capitol Representatives
David Hewlett Capitol Representatives
Date: July 31. 2008
Subject: River North Corridor of the South Platte River Task 8 Baseline
Environmental Issues and Needs
This memorandum provides, an overview assessment (has identities. e>. aluates, and provides
i e* ummendiiiions to prole, l and enhance cvbliiiu aquulk habitat. ur-inr; inHinnahim
compiled from previous work in the Hir er North rea,. h of lire Sooth Platte River (Ih-No), No
in-rh. or work w,w peilormed as a part or litis ussessnienL Htv.tiie ureas ol consideration
include:
Water quality
1,'lianiK'i sLibiht)
Hood plum duration-, tics
His ie.itiirr
In addilion, this memo identities nossiblr opportunilies for aroperative incorporation of
habitat imprtn ejtieuts and Cretan, ements into existiru and preprised river corridor facilities.
Hii- menu ink buries summaries ol studies cosnpieieri u ithm KiNo, opportunities and
challenges. and reoaniniendatioris for preserving and enhancing existing habitat. Following
OSXFT Tsir 0 wns mn 11|
RiNoTask8
July 31,2008
Page 2
are summaries of the impacts of each of the areas of consideration on river habitat in the RiNo
reach.
Water Quality
The qua!tty of South Platte River flows are affected by land use practices, including:
m Applkalien ol fcr|ili/.ei>. pesl iades and herbicides
bedanonl irom uin onJroiled cons I rut Uon dies and Creels
Spillage Irum industrial ai d comrnerciu: 1 acuities
;.--e at -morin iirains for d Coosa I at wasle producK
m Migration ti juels and solvents into the river channel \ la alluvial aqukers
Sampling I.n the USCS has identified the presence of pesticides, w kh one health advison
vweedatke ior kha/anuii. Voluble organic compounds, including LVn/ene. M IBLund PCM
were found in n large majoritv of alluvial aquifnv ell samples. Instances vm'i\ recorded drinking water srand.irds exceedances for hm/eno and PI h. \ikrienK including, r-g.r.ili-%
ammonia and phosphorous, were Identified during sampling, although no exceedance^ of
USj/A diEnkuignwtfiu stnndunis here iden.lihrd t.Lhl IS 1SMH).
I*ish and aquatic habitat is- thi South Platte Rb.or h.u u been _I looted by urban acb\ k;e-. in the
Idem er metropolitan area. i'/h communities in the river are dominated bv suckers, a. farni.lv
ol :isb ll;,!I i> tulerani el tlegi adod waSer'-qualiU 1 oinlilions. ('05mnon 1 arp and while sm ktn
tissue samples taken in the river contained PCBs and chiordane. Channel modifications for
ilend ;onlro: and Kmk MaPil/al ion iu i Th-m is C reck and !he Soldh Pi,she Rhe> inn ieM;Iled
in high suspended-sediment concern Ira lions anti degraded hahkat 201 bituic comrnunitics.
I\spik' rhese nep.fdce edei Is el snlvm land isr on !i-i; communities and IiubiluU an index ol
Biotic Intvgntv de*. eloped tor fish c ommumtie*- in the South Platte Kh er Basin a*- a too! to
,i-,*-ev'S the eioUigk al health ol su emin ewe5". I In* haCn lodiuHeu waler quuhb mu td/nt is
were o;il\ moderatehc degraded i PF/Kj.
Channel Stability
I he l/Km Dyaina-.;e and Flood Control Dislrk! lias estahh-hed a series r.f peruuineni. ern-x-*-
sections along the Su'utH Plalle River rrom I6b:i| Avenue i.Bascane fwiad} lo C-470, 'Ihe I )islricl
surv ovs each ^ ro-s--ectien v-x an annual hasc- tc> a-sk'^-s tb-.inges in -channel gonnK'frv. At ll' te-
la vi-ar mlervals, I he- fh strict publishes n gix'moroliic assi.-ssment ot the m i-r channel the last
beiuj; -n I(C!i| t. hg lies asses-meni include-' three .ross-^s.diais in the RiKo I'eavh.:
'C, at river station ill/- 10, oo^th ol I-7D
DRAFT TaiN 8 rtieim agC7311] lb
Page 36 of 44


RiNo Task 8
Inly 31,2008
Page 3
at river station I 138-+--HI south at ">Kth Str'cr;
'>4, at river station I 17U 8ii. located south i i I s[ Sg eel
Ali throe vrus-~sei lions exhibit stable honks composed of cokesn e fill m,-ferial, -mall riprap
and concrete nibble at the base, transitioning to small trees and grass at the lop of the
embankment. Although comadered stable, the hanks are over-steepened to ne.iro ortical for :5
to Id ieel and confined hv streets and aumneivial properties. Channel bars iwed by ronsdng
waieriewl are i.oniitiai: through the reach as are intermittent piece*- oi riprap and concrete
nibble Hint are exposed daring low IT nv. I'hc channel wa- con-ndered --table prior > bDA but
degraded hv 0.5 to 1.5 feel heUveen I'D 5 and I ddh. due lo an extended period ef high spring
ranott tiou ~. The bed, t onmnsed prminrib, or i. ohble, i-- tlaf and i nvervd w stli .in 'urban
veneer', consisting of a ki'rer *7 aigae and tine black organic sediment that coals the bed
m.eerini. At on*s--ssliim 5?. Hie main- current impinged on the wesf bank, hut w a-- not
obsen able in the other Uvo sections. Lrosion of a o-foot high channel bar was observed to be
on-going. Thi-- reach of Hie ri\ er was t lessiHeP js "urban, n I Hr the following < banu'teristics:
1 he river has been straightened and realigned, exhibiting a sinuosilv of 'LiV
m The Oood channel is nanow and deep
C hannei bars are exposed onl*. during low flow period-, w ith heigh'- ol I lo 2 lee!.
Riparian vegetation is sporadic
'I hi' river is i unLried In development .uni in-; hides I ill ie or rm remnant i Suod plain
The channel exhibits little or i ;o stTiictnnil diver-il \, with levs riLle1- < >r pools and a bed ll-at
is rdativelv flat am oss the width,
w i iianne! bed material is a mixhiie oi <. ohhie. cum rule rubble and riprap.
'I he thalweg is approximated- (1.5 to L3 -eef beiow die average bed elevation
Channel ton widths range from Hit' in Dm led
n A!though o\ cr-stecpencd banks are ivlativch stable, exhibiting intermittent areas o-; minor
erosion.
F\i apt rer the < hnnnel Ins: degradation that iv erred during T)' '5, the RiNe rein k of the rh ni-
ls relatively stable. 1 However, because the channel isconkned there is a continuing risk oi
bank erosion at b.mklnll dows. An a nab. sis ol dieui stresses lei I he 1C H S-% -ear t low ot
approxunauTi 21,7li0 cts, which dose to Kink full, pi edict- slres-e- m the 1 5 to 2.0 pounds
DR*r r mh 3 rarro 060731 t; :b ttoc
Riiko task 8
(uly 2*1. 2008
Cage 4
per square loot range, : low depths of J (t U> 15 tcel and vetoc it Aw ol 8 lo ft) led per M'Cond.
*\ ell-armored embar-xmenis '.an withstand stub -tress, but a c< -hble channel bed nil!
mobilize and rnuv degrade, as happened in J 'bps. Although concrete rubble and riprap are
apparent along ihe nver bank--, thi-armoring is not commaon-; and ha-, not been maintained
over the \ ear-. Local bank scour could lead to lateral migration and uniiermining tf the batik
in areas when- armo: ing is not lonilnuou- As tile channel narrow, deep and Commed,
widening vfaring flood flows nuv occur.
Floodplain Characteristics
A idooii lic./urd Area 1 )c-lir.ecdiori (H l.\t)) of the South Plccle River throughout metro Demur
n as conducted in the mid-kWhs il'DhCn 1!,85a;- that predicts a hMl-% ear flood plain iargeis
limitiKsI lo the rh er ch.mnei, will'i a minor west bank overtlon <*-l Mill Avemii' and a major
west bank overflow dtmm-fi'eam ot -17th A\ cHiue. easi bank tn tad lows wta-e pivdicued in
file Ri\o re*.kh o-lakon tilfrfi-*-UO U;1225+UO) duo to the Hugh enibankmenis. bitu.e the
publication of the FT I AD, the west bank overflows have been mitigated hv tlie coast ruction of
a kv<'tl siian ami reconsl; uction of Hu- dowre-Oveni Burliagtim i >ih h di'version s|risi fure.
During the 11HD-v ear flood, FT I AD predh ted channel vehiotirs rniigi- from b to i-f (eel per
second. With cimlinement til the west bank iverflows, the-e \ eh'Ctlies aie expected lo
increase. IVcaii-e the *|H0-ye,ir fioed is kirgch (.oriliiieti to the- tharn.ek the extent ot the
floodplain i- ccin-idered flootiwav. I he DU-vear I'UkkI i- pivd-cted fi> be appi'oximaleb ld-15
feet deep, roughlv c*^responding to the heigh.t of the thanrel banks.
I >ur the *. onfine-d uatuiv ot tlu' I u KHlpiahx ar.J nxuHing 11iy;11 velcn :'*,k--r high flows aiv
expected to scour the ch-;mr>el ixxl, bars and banks, -disrupting any structural diversify that
may exist in the baniH'i. Sum*' -rructure, such as elianni'l h.sr-, u-i'd reesrahiish tlov.s
subside, but a slruciuralJy diverse channel comprised <-( gix>d aquatic habitat thai can susiam
nali\'e Iisli -pixies. mai roim-i'idehrale .mj pkm; popnl.dions, will he dillk ul! to i'--iahlish and
maintain.
Recreation
The Urban Drainage and 1'inod C'nntrot Di-trick ;n cooperation with ihedfx and C'ountv of
Dei net. del eloped a ninjai di auiageiwu plan for thebouil: ITadi.' Ruvr m KHb. i lu-, plan
includes rven v-linnal omponent ih.ii idenlifsi's a \ arlel,' of ri\ urine laciiities -mvh as hnat
lmi.hns, ;mpi o\ ed laiuKeaping. en)iaikci.l v\ ikilile habitat, and a low l low channel to allow
sufficient depth is ir boating 1 km ever, this plan pvovii has Irtle or no -detail rer these facilities
and is i ecu set I primerev on river corridor tr.'ulx and paiks iL-DlT'D LKbbi.
few, d ,-m\. (.>! lhe-tJ Uk ill lies tune been io-islriii Leu or implemented, except I or the psiiks and
trail svstem. Due m hu;h. nearh' I'l-rfical c-miiankment--, the river ivmains large)v
distil line!, led from ip. s;irroundings. Cdommeruial, industrial and Iron-port.ition land u'-cs
Page 37 of 44


RiiNo Task 8
Juis* 31. 30-S
Pa^t* 5
adjacent to Hie river ch.mis'l a!-n pr'Sent m Impeck merit to the implementation of both
rtf realkm.tl and hookat enhanrenu-uts.
Major Drainageway Planning
A? menliened above, the i., IJI-T_'D ,rui I.kiner developed e Major i>ram,-ige's a' Plan for the
South Pi at re His er in the siud- I9g(i litis plan is a- dr\olojx*d in two phases-
Phase A consisting -;if background intrarmotion nod the -development and analysis of
aJlemahwsfUDlVt) P>81>
Pha-e Ri nosi-hug u! Preiumnays f-'nginrering I\'s>gn {V nlumo I) (l :I >H.T> ptKibi and rho
Rt-x realism Plan (Volume II) ;U;)R..D 1 l-'H:5ej
'I he Ihvlirninarv hneineenns: Design jnckiac-s a number of riwinuuendulions lor the lb No
reach, such os:
Regi,tdmg banks lo a 31 l: l V -sdr-lope
m Rebuilding ho dues to mi reuse hs dt auhe openings
Remove abandoned rn K-dng-,
1 hose ivcomrnendnkoRs occur ho lose l-7b and were imended hi relieve the predicted uv-st
bank lluixlmg. Msnh oi this work has been -liporsededl b\ the ii-x nrislrui I km ol the
Rurlington Hihb diversion -trueh.ire. No rsxrommendotii'ns are made ir. the report. for the
iv Mans iinprosoineulh bas e beer- intpiotnenied on the river upsiri'am ol 2tHh- Avenue,
including boating a mew tic-4- such a4- knvak slalom course- and claries. channel siabilrU
in it hires sm h as grade control edgo wetlands fPliaum, et ah 1998). Mans' oi tbe-e improvements serve a dual purpose in that
ihev add -mirliiral diver-bbc lo I he channel ard prnv ids' habited for aquatic specie-. sucluis
pools, rikies and proleclu'e cover.
Recommendations
I m pros ements that pros ide multiple benefits [tv hiding aquatic and riparian habitat
tmlroin.emenls dial have been implemented up-meam ul ZUlh As ewao should be conlinued
through die RiNo ivarh. iis.-se irnprovemonls include:
Providing grade cnntm; to countered potential channel bed degradation that mav occur
during extended pel ;ods ol high llusv. The grade eonlrol -.iructures cun also provide
RiNo Task 8
July 31,2008
Page 6
recreational opportunities for boating and fishing, and simulate habitat structures such as
riffles and pools
Regrade over steepened banks to reduce potential de sfabilbution during high flms- events
and prsis itle npai i.m uikI ris er edge hebiiol .uh! proles iis e tos er JTr aquatir spesies.
hnpros i'- storm sirain i>iitlaib to rsvluie Jhe hitroskis iion oi urban polhrlanls into ris or iknv,
particularis during loo llmv periods when concentrations can present toxic levels to
ipUirla vsbdhie. improvements should oiclude diking be*>im ami se-dnneiil trap- ro
nximv floss ins pad and su^pendi-d solkh- ansi i isersilge svetlansi ireatmient. in asirlihon,
debris and r-edimeiil \.,nature cab. h h-asir; inserts shouk! be considered ler aoxw of i>envtT
thnt an- tributary to the RiXo reach.
Devekin a low flow channel that meanders belween point bars and. provides a rifile-pooi
sejaonring, oliminctiog tin' "tint sbanns1! boil sri's'-syslinn ctnsl prodding kit roasesi
stredirral dtversits- for -aquatic species.
Ssn nodal s s hen mob tlovs ii ig I vhioti the | ;oinl h.ii'4- a.nil ass, k i, lies I ss ilh *-k>rr;i slruifi ou! lalh
shixild also be con^idi'-ied. Purlng loss iTns->, ihest channel- can as as hackcs au*r wetland
pucK llcil pun ide i el up,in lo rialise tisb ^pidj's and ma; roinvorlehialos. Dnr'inr. tiigji
I'kiw-. I he-. asT a> cons i-s am. e channi-ls.
* Increase svi.kidv vegetation along the channel banks vs ilh a taiuipv lliat s*s erhang- the kns
f hive iiic.ojk'i to pros iik' --hade an^l pmtrcb\ s' c-e-s-'-.
Includs' "snag" sirmiurs's in the low l:u rltanns'l anil along, the banks ih.it also provide
rel agsi aiul prolix uvo un er. I he^e slry. It: it4- s tin i on^isi ol ;c >ck a ml bs'e limlu aiul
tnmks that are tethereif together and anchored to the river bed ssi thrv romain ir. pi ace
during high floss's.
Implementation of all those recommendations mas- be difficult given the des ekipmenf plans
ar.it existing land use in the RiXo reach. I he cs?nfined nature s'f the channel, resulting foam
urh,mi/afior-, pre-rnfs ti iiighiy ds u-amic situation ^kiriiyi; high flows with potenti-al to scour
structure and diversits from ihs' channel at regular inters ais. I knss'ver. successful precedence
exist in the improwmenfs that has e been inmlemenfed tipstre.vm of 2dfh Avtmue To
stivcessJ Lilly implement :mpros ements i elated to geomorphic stabilit'-. of the channel,
enhanced habitat and recreational opps ""trinities, and pros id mg flood corn ova nee c-apacdr, it
v\ ;Ii be necesmrs to olvasn tTie cooislinaUxl suppiwt isf the general public as svell as the mar>v
g'-n;rps and organiyaianis that hsnv- a stake in I be RiXn area
VS ills the pas: smoxso4- on the South Platte River in Dem er. levs prop be i.rm anme th.al a
health', ns er become- an a-s^'t for the adjacent areas. A:i allractoe river ens u-onuk'nt acts as a
draf r imk a w*o odovji t) tb.mc
Page 38 of 44


RiNo Task 8
July 31, 2008
Page 7
magne', drew tmi users to ur- urea that hw.yhD common. nil corn. or ns
fewer mainlenance challenges and redures risk to puhi ic health and
.oorJ mated r-UikuhidiJer group acting in Hie best mimesis ot ike i m
impro\ emen.k is less of a challenge.
. A heallhv riser jn>euls
welfare. With a
*r, providing 1m id mg lor
DRAFT a mnmo?5i (i mu;
KiNo i ask 8
!ul\ :vi, 2008
Page 8
References
VnrCn KA',_ f.eomorphie A-xi-.sim'iit at Purveyed Cmss-SvHons, South Platte Ri\ er, R\
Miduiei A. Stevens, lor l he Li ban IJrjjnage and Hood Comm! District. lune. -946
L PI Cl > 108->a. South. Pintle River FJf>nl Hazard Area PeiirwMtinjg Por.ver Metropolitan
Area Irom Sand Creek lu cWord Avenue. 13)- W right Water engineers, inc. lea the Urban
Drainage and ] loed Contiv.l District. September. 1 9SS
UDFCD JOSab. South Pintle River Major lUainagcwav Puraning, ChaUleal Lbm io
baseline Rode. PWwe S, S ulume 1. Prelim inn rv Pnghuvring Dv-ign. Bv Wright Water
rngir.eers. inc. for the Urban Drainage and IT m.>0 k on {mi PislricL \m ember, IkgS.
L Dl CD kkCv. South Platte lover VI,per Draanagow u\ Planning. ChallVki Dam to
Pasoiine Road. Phase 8, Volume 11 Kenrent ion Plan. Bv Wright Water engineers fne. for
Hu.- Urban Drainage and Flood C lorarol Pistrk L ban emlvr. 1983.
i PI CD 1984 Siiikb dial to ki\ ei Maior Drainages n\ Planning ChaltVId Dam to Baseline
Road Phase A Bv Wright Water T"ngineers, lnr. for the Likin Drainage and flood
Control District. August, 1084
Ptlaum. et a;, i WS. ''Rehabditating Denver^ South [latte River to Improve I lahitvk and
hriling"; Bv John Pliny m and Brian kokied. \K langkh n Wnler Lnejmsos and. Ben
Urhonas. Urban Drainage and I land Conus.1 Dtslrici. lov rbe ASCI. Wetlands 1998
Pnginoering Approacho-- to ls- Restoratioi i Conterencv.
LSt,-S IS98. W aler Quality In the South Piatle Kiwi Bado. Colorado. Nebraska. and
U vomin1992-93. By Kevin f. Denneiiv, David VV. 1 ilice, Calhv XI. l are, Shnron L. Qj,
Peter B. \K Mahon, Breton \V. Bruce, Robert A Kimbrough. and Janet S. Heinv. U.s.
CwolegW-.l Sin vy CiwuLir No. 1 i W.
$6
Page 39 of 44


t=
Ur
mat
p=
ndation
am
iati
ESTIMATE OF EXISTING and BUILDOUT POPULATION
Neighborhoods and Traffic Analysis Zones Adjacent to the South Platte River
DRCOG TAZ Cole Ne-ahDO't 2005 Estimate cod Buildout Projection Increase (Doorcase) DRCOG 2005 TAZ Estimate e Nc-iof-bcr^o-x Boltdtoul Projection Increase (Decrease)
4;V/29 ',0.14 5 967 4 383 4923 6 %3l
-C227J 3.038 3 361 27-6: 492226 2 uSG 4 29C 2 '54
S.flWcra* 5.220 9 528 4,11:5 492336 3 423 3 392
El>?i;i STA'iibon Ndaclionoud --92146 - 092 7-16i
-22040 -18 ;85: 492156 3'-: 25C 50}
V4C * t-n. ?< 492166 22 !
422060 38 4' :?; --92176 24 -44 '20
422070 2.776 2 £7*5 132 Suttaiai 2.727 9 26? 5 046
(, 0 l 5 Hnt- am r.e gitorhc.cd
422060 0T3 3'24 2.851 --9"2'6 4 533 0 755 1 525
42211*0 4.003 * 080 23 49'226 4 752 2 345 1 z/t
4J21W -57 4 47? *4*.: 49 "23:. fi 16}
422120 0 14-8 -'-9-286 5 023 4 527 1 514
422120 S 207 202 49'296 582 5225 4 943
'3 430 7,342 49* 301 21-1 8 !249,
Rve Portls Nd i honuoc Sut',c/,d 12.553 1-3 8 >0 6 3*7
422120 -28 - '24 Urio**' StFitiop Neichlxrnoscl
__i hoc 6 9 4b 6 4-8 4-23r * 25 ro-3j
422260 j'8 152, 4*26/2 ' ciC 88 ;'22i
422270 002 * '85 696* 4-2372 31 !*90l
__i .'22 2 ?80 2 75 4-?R;X h> 58 c.9!
422260 398 3 33y 8.446 4*23--';: &2 *C1 3;1>
i 442 - 42a. 98/ 4*23tfc '82 I-961
4222*10 MS 174. 4*263- 80 ?;a *-3
422220 339 2*1 ;7*8: 4*2382 45 '8 :26>
i C28 y' <1-7. 4-2682 53 2-^ '20
422260 /S3 -10? 39 4** 238- *TS *0
422460 .'02 * 086 176, 4*238;: 4 3 £8 5
422410 70b 636- 4-2606 45 2 850
422420 4f>2 :?6, 4-2106 595 ; -.24 1,835
422400 002 /. 4*21 *C r 3 - 892 1 6'4
422440 68 027 341 4-212' 'Bo rs2i
422460 M3 369 4-/12? -44 2-6
422470 22 37 ;85: 4'2122 -44 -S3
4'2010 441 3 41-5 2 9?7 4-2124 52 2? vti
4** 202** 07 ;s; 4-?1?;: 54 33
4*2022 225 182: 4*225' 53 56 [?*
4'2u:r 14 9' 4-2252 291 220
4-2002 34 i-??52 84 -51 127
4*2003 34 **6 i'2254 £1 20*i
4* 2U04 3-3 35 4-2253 94 £4 ,501
4-2003 33 65 34 4*2250 8.3 -3 ,>01
4'2000 32 64 32 i'2257 52 52}
33 4' 3 4'226' 52 ~u< 36
33 33 ---2262 73 53 f'.3i
4*2000 33 4-2232 7' 5? .14;,
5' 4*3. 4-2264 7S &
4' 20--2 22 *5 tc ---2265 74 -5-7 33
4* 2043 38 144 136- 4-2266 7 k 224 '02
-**54 43 4-2-42' 72* *5 ,3b
4'20--5 37 233 ---2422 7A 25-2 '83
4*2040 38 13 :25: 4-2422 75 75)
4'204: 3-8 186 161 4* 24/4 74 ,'b
4*204a 40 6 4-/425 72 520 453
4*2049 6* ?3 22 4-2426 74 .74}
$./D h:ffi: 12.795 33*68 ' 0260 Sut-taiui 4-?/* -5 9% 6 308
Gm 7cfa.* 44,824 92,386 47.512
IMPORTANT NOTES TO THE RING POPULATION ESTIMATES
The following factors were used in generating the estimates of population in the area adjacent to the South Platte River:
1. The neighborhoods adjacent to the South Platte River north of the City of Cuernavaca Park to the northern
boundaries of the City and County of Denver are taken from the City's Neighborhood Boundary Map.
2. The Denver Regional Council of Governments (DRCOG) Traffic Analysis Zones (TAZ's) were used to subdivide
the overall area into smaller geographic areas. There are 102 TAZs which comprise the 6 neighborhoods
adjacent to the South Platte River.
3. in the DRCOG regional transportation planning efforts there are estimates of population and households for the
Year 2005. Those estimates were used as the base year for the data shown in the table showing the results of the
projections.
4. The Buildout Projections were generated in a "bottoms-up" process whereby each parcel was evaluated as to its
potential for redevelopment and redevelopment Tire City assessors file which is attached as an attribute to the
GIS parcel tile was used to identity existing land and zoning associated with each property,
5. Tire land Use Concept delineation of "Blueprint Denver'1 was used as the basis for assigning whelher an area
within a neighborhood was subject to change. The following assumptions were used in assigning a different use
or density of development:
Alt existing single family residential uses in the Land Use Concept areas designated as "industrial" arid
'Entertainment" were eliminated,
Vacant lands and those used for surface parking in the "Downtown". Mixed Use". "Town Center'' and Transit
Oriented Development" area were assigned as high density residential uses either at a density of 30 or 50
units per acre.
Single family homes that were built more than 100 years ago were assigned an "Urban Residential" use at a
density of 14.5 units per acre in alt areas subject to change
Vacant parcels in areas designated as No Change" were assigned the current zoning on the property.
i. A vacancy factor of 3.5% was applied to all existing and new housing units
7, The average household size varied by T'AZ. based on factors used in the DRCOG estimates.
8. There is no time frame associated with the Buildout estimates.
Page 40 of 44


i
Page 41 of 44


AfJitiyw.Arm* hi,?? PvfHiUitfon
E\timatns and Projections
in the RiNO A res
$
NORTH
January 1Z 2008 Not to Scale
Page 42 of 44


F*


Page 43 of 44


Page 44 of 44


Full Text

PAGE 2

' Table of The River North Master Flan Chapter 1 :The River North Master Flan A. F urpose and Mission ot the Flan ____ _5. Goals 1 C. The River North Vision 2 D. The flan ; L Recommendations ; F. Recommendations Map& T I Secctions_5 Chapter 2: The F rocess ___________ 9 A. Acknowledgements 9 .5. The Flanning F rocess 1 o C. 11 D. Flanning F rinciples 1 1 Chapter ;: Existing Conditions _________ 12 Chapter+: Detailed Recommendations ______ 1 Matrix Separate Covertl Appendix ________________ 29 March 1 3 2009 Dear Readers: OFFICE OF THE MAYOR CITY Al\"D COUNTY BUrL D IN G DI:NVER, COLORADO 80202 5390 TELE P HONE o n(}-865-9000 FAX: no.S659040 TTY /TTDo n0-8659010 The City and County of Denver is committed to sustainab i lity, a va lue that is demonstrated by m y administrat ion and i ncorporated into adopted plans, policies and resource management decisions. This plan, the River North Green way Master P lan represents the rene wal of a commitment to sustainability related t o the Denver's primary waterway the South Platte River, This River North G reenway Master Plan l ays a foundation for furthering the transformation of the River corridor as a valuable environmental and recreational amenity for the benefit of Denver's residents and vis itors. It is a document which synthesizes the best ideas fr o m citizens and stakeholders into a vision that the C i t y can strive for with the same passion as we have in the Central Pla tte Valley, an area that has transformed from an eyesore into one of the most popular public places in Denver while serving as an economic sti mulus for development and redevelopment. The synergy between env i ronmental hea lt h and economic benefit has been demonstrated time and again, and there is no doubt tha t a heal thy river corridor will translate to multifaceted city-wide gains in quality oflife and economic success. We look forward to the impl emen tation of this exciting plan. This docu m ent i s printed on 30 % post consumer fibe r by weig h t

PAGE 3

I 9 7+ F ublic Service Com pan!!_ Substation at I 5th Street and the South ria tte R. iver In June of 1974, the City and County of Denver and the Greenway Foundation joined forces with a shared dedication to initiate the transformation of the South Platte River from a polluted eyesore into a valuable environmental and recreational amenity. Fifteen months later, as part of a labor Day Weekend celebration, the initial phase of Confluence Park was dedicated. In addition, several miles of multi-use recreational trails were opened to the public and numerous projects were initiated to remove tons of debris from the River resulting in the identification and elimination of over 200 known sources of pollution into the South Platte. This deliberate transformation of the River from eyesore and dumping ground to celebrated public space has paid many dividends to the City Including providing the stimulus for the redevelopment of lower Downtown where residential and commercial develop ment have since flourished. lower downtown now enjoys one of the highest land values in the State. The idea that people and businesses want to be located adjacent to an attract ive, healthy and vibrant urban waterway is nothing new. Cities across the country have reinvested in public infrastructure along their urban waterways with new parks, open spaces, and greenway corridors acting as the central unifying theme in their successful redevelopment. To put it another way, Cities have long realized that "Green that investment in these well planned urban parks and open spaces attracts high quality de velopment that in turn improves a city's quality of life for its citizens and makes it a more attractive place for future investment. Most importantly for Denver, however, is that the high quality redevelopment of Denver's most important natural asset, the South Platte River, is a key component of Denver' s effort to create a sustainable city where people want to live, work and play in an urban environment. This River North Greenway Master Plan seeks to continue the great success of public Investment along the South Platte in order to realize the many benefits of a healthy, connected, and attractive u .rban waterway. Renewing Our Vision ... 2008 ConHuence F ark. ( j.j Clark.)

PAGE 4

Chapter 1: The fZiver North Master flan A f urpose and Mission ot the flan Purpose Over the last 34 years, the approximate three miles of the Sout h Platte River in northern D e n ver, most recently known as River North (RINO), ha s not been the s ubject of any comprehensive park and recreation planning effort ... until now! More recently over the past d ecade a renaissance has taken place on the South Platte River particularly focused in the Cen tral Platte Valley, adjacen t to Downtown D e nver. The contmucd evolution of the River and its s urrounding area has begun to spread into R!NO. Den ver Park s and Recreation Departme_nt _in_ conjunction with the Greenway Foundation have once agam 1111-liated a partnership to create th e R!NO Greenway Master Pl an. The Plan will establish a new, contemporary vision for R!NO as weB as recommend development, financial and regulatory guidelines for park s, recreational and environmental ments expanded public open space and improved water quality within the River's channel. Mission The mission ofthe RINO Greenway Master P lan is to initiate an on-going collaborative effort between citizens, prop erty owners, Denver City agencies, the Greenway Founda tion and numerous other public and private organizations committed to a naturally healthy and prosperous South Platte R i ver. The City and County of Denver and the Greenway Founda tion will continue their historic partnership in champion ing the South Platte River. This partnership will result in the identification of partnerships and funding opportunities; planning, design and anal ysis of the River's environmental systems; and the construction of publicly accessible open space and Rive r corridor infrastructure and amen1t1es. These improvements will enhance the quality of urban liv ing along and adjacent to the South Platte by connecting child ren, adults and families with the healing and positive influence of nature. !).Goals 1. Create a River focused urban environment that is healthy, habitable and connected. 2 Promote ecosystem restoration through sustainable natural systems design. Goals for improved water quality, habitat creation and River stability will all be achieved. 3. Build on the current success and activity along the central South Platte River Valley by creating new diversified activity centers along the RINO Greenway Corridor. 4. Create a parks/open space oriented model for urban living that reflects the history of Denver and the River North area in particular. s. Enhance the safety of the River corridor and the surround ing area. 6. Utilize existing and proposed parks as the organizing ele ments that create a sense of place and a community focal point, which will in turn increase property values, economic vitality and development opportunities along adjacent trans portation corridors. 1. Create a regional gateway to downtown Denver along with a series of neighborhood gateways that reflect the unique character of each. 8. Establish the RINO Greenway Corridor as a destination point for entertainment, recreation, commercial and residential amenities. 9. Connect neighborhoods by providing access to local businesses and entertainment venues and creating links to adjacent communities and regional trail corridors. See Chapter 2 for an explanation of how this plan was devel oped with stakeholder and public involvement. The RlNO Greenway Master Plan is the first of two Master Planning efforts that arc focused upon analyzing and planning the future of the eleven miles of South Platte River Corridor through Den ver. The RINO Greenway Ma ster Plan includes th e area of the Ri ver between 20th Street and the northern boundary of th e City and County o f Denver A second Master effort the River South (RJSO) Greenway Master Plan, wil l focus'on the remaining eigh t miles of the South Platte River corridor between the sou thern boundary of the City and County of Denver and 20th St. f erspective of new development integrated with an enhanced river corridor The River North Greenway Master Plan Apri/2, 2009

PAGE 5

C l he R1ve r N orth Greenwaq V1s1on ENHANCED 1 UNDERPASS KEY LOCAL OESTINA TlONS KEY REGIONAL DESTINATIONS hC1"'-.... '0 STREETGATEWAY '"' 'f}RIVERGATEWAY GREN STREET CONNECTION oq PROPOSEO PEDESTRIAN CONNECTION EXISTING CONCRETE TRAIL C) N o rth SUFFER POTENTIAl. COMMUTER RAil STAT10N --)) RIO COMMUTER RAIL POTENTIAL SIREElSCAPE IMPROVEMENTS POTENTIAL MIXED USE AREAS P-"RK RIVER NORTH GREENWAY VISION -----f roject Area Tile River North Gre
PAGE 6

D. The Flan Denver's Department o f Community Planning and Devel opment estimates that by the year 2035, the population within the RINO area south of 1 -70 will increase to ove r 10 ,500 residents, minimum, and potent ia lly to ove r 20,000 residents. If the predicted trend o f in creased urban li ving occurs, the higher projection of 20,000 resid ents, approxi mately twenty times the number of cu rrent residents, is a much more likely resu lt. There is a n eed to continue publi c inv estmen t in the River to address the inevitable cha nge s caused by the f orecaste d ne w urba n development. The impa c t to the River's cha r acter, health and stability mus t be addressed. Additionally, providing the necessary open s pa ce, parks and related amenities will be a huge burden if not properly planned in advance. However, this investment should not be viewed as merely a reaction to development pressure, but rather as a major opportunity for Denver t o conti nue the renaissance of the South Platte River Corrid o r T here i s no greater proof of the benefits of in vesting in the Rive r than the r e nai ssance of the Central Platt e River Valley adjacen t to Lower Downtown Denver. Over the last three decades, approximately 80 milli on dollars ha s been inv ested in t he environmental and recreational infrastructure of the South Platt e River and its tributaries. This investment has b een obtained from numerous sources o f public and priva t e based support. Th e Greenway Foundation reports that t h is investment ha s contributed, i n great part, to the 5 billion dollars of econo mi c expansion within the Valley, encom passing a variety of developmen t impr ovemen t s includin g residential, retail, commer c i a l entertainment and s p orts arena projects (see the append ix f or a more detailed break down of this Investment Summary). The natural progression of development beyond the Cen tral Platte Valley calls for the creation of places for people to live, work and play along the River. Denver can build on this trend a nd continue to embr ace the River by strategi cally planning for an interconnected, well planned, and visually attractive use of River frontage, the reby ensur i ng the highest and best use of the real estate adjacent to the South Platte River Corrido r within RINO. The Flalll"ling Framework The River Nor t h Greenway Master Plan Apri/2 2009 J The v isi on developed as a part of the River North Greenway Master Plan d efi nes three distinct planning areas: Urban Greenway Corridor (20th Street to 38th Stree t ) Entertainment District (38th Street to 1 -70) North Platte Vall ey Regional Park (1-70 to North City Limits) Urban Greenway Corridor Land use adjacent to this reach of t he South Platte River between 20 t h Street and 38th Avenue i s character i zed by ex i st i ng and proposed dense urban development and two neighborhood parks along a narrow greenway corridor. The area is home to a burgeoning arts community, which has given a new identity to this part of town. The vision for this section is a narrow greenway feel, punctuated by two o r three sma ll neighborhood parks ( both planned and exist i ng), some co n solidated detention facilities a lso utilized for public open space, a nd private ly owned and deve l oped p lazas and open spaces fronting the River. Important pla nn i ng issue s in t hi s section include keeping a publ i cly acces s ible edge along the entire stre t ch of the r iver, widen in g the public edge, prima rily by movin g Ark ins and Ringsby roadways away from the River to t h e extent practicable, and adding a trail along the west side o f the River wit h a connecting pedestrian bridge to t h e east sid e of the River. Denver Coliseum / National Western Entertainment Area -This planning a r ea includes Globeville Landing Park, an existing park, and the Denver Coliseum, managed by Denve r's Theaters and A renas. Much of the area i n this section between the River and the Denver Col iseum i s an Envi ronm e ntal Protection Agency (EPA) desi g nated Super Fund clean-up site. Coordination between the De nver Coliseum neighborhoods, E nv ironmenta l Protection Agency, City and County o f Denver, and the G ree nway Foundation could yield an e xciti ng, v ibrant amenity for this area of De n ver. This plan envisions the Entertainment District to i n clud e a planned commuter r a il station near the Col iseum, improved connections to the greenway new or improved amen i t i es in the park, a parking garage to serv i ce the Col i seum and the transit station, storm wa-ter detention and wetland filtration pond, and t he pot en tial renovat ion or reinvention of the Denver Col iseum to include a n outdoor concert venue. North Platte Valley Regional Park-Thi s planning a rea includes a n existing park, Northside Park, as well as t h e Heron Pond natural area. I n additi o n to impr ovemen t s to Norths id e Park t he River North Greenway Master Plan envisions a new Regiona l Park a long t he banks of the R i ver between 1 -70 and the northern bou nda r y of the City and Coun t y of De n ve r The Regi o na l Park would functi on as the northern anchor and terminus of the South Platte R i ver Greenway as well as the R iver Gateway into Denver The North Platte Valley Regional Park compl e x would i nclude a new park l ocated on the east bank of the River, a con nection to Northside Park, Heron Park N atura l Area and a link between the G l obeville and Swan sea/Elyria neig h bor hoods. New amen ities on the east side of t h e River cou ld include a s id e channel for whit ewater recreation, water fil tratio n riparian vegetation, wildlife habitat and extens ive riverbank improvements West bank impr ovements i nclude a gateway park and bicycle and pedestrian bridge that connects neighborhoods and t h e west and east portions ofthe Regional Park. !Ianning Framework E_. R..ecommendations T h e p lanning p rocess, i n clud i ng public and s ta keho lder input p l us the identificat ion and analys i s of existing conditions, resulted in t h e fol lowing six general recommendations for the R iver North Greenway Master P l an. A more detailed discussion on each recommendat i on i s i ncluded in Chapter 4. Refer to the recommen dation maps on page 5 and 6 along with typical sections on page 7 and 8. T he pe r spectives o n pages 1 and 4 are an artist rendering of how t hese reco m mendations w i ll l ook. River Health River channel improvements should increase the stability, health, sustain ability and accessibility of the South Platte River Lay back the ex i st i ng bank s lope and i ncrease the width of t he emergent flood bench thereby improving the rive rbanks, water quality and ripar ian habitat, whi le a lso reducing damage from flo oding. ... flatte 1\eg ;onal f ark LE..GE.ND 50Uf11l'LA T Tl: RNU L.Xl5T ING r ARKS rROrOSED r ARKS

PAGE 7

Create a riparian buffer between development and the River to increase pervious land outside of the 100year flood plain, capture stormwater runoff, and improve water quality, riparian vegetation, and wildlife habitat and recreation opportunities. Create and consolidate open-air stormwater detention facilities to reduce flooding, provide wetlands for wildlife habitat and stormwater filtration, and recreation opportunities. Realign and daylight existing storm sewe r outfalls to flow within the emergent flood bench to create water quality wetland filtration basins, riparian vegetation and wildlife habitat. Combine in-channel water quality improvements such as drop structures, with recreational boating opportunities. Transportation and Roadways -Existing roadways are located adjacent and parallel to the South Platte River, restricting the possibility of initiating River and greenway improvements and acting as physical barri ers for safe bicycle and pedestrian access to the River. Realign and/or reconfigure Arkins Court and Ringsby Court away from the riverbank wherever possible to provide land to layback bank slopes, increase the width of the emergent flood bench, increase or create ripar ian buffers, improve wildlife habitat, increase visibility and public access to the River, and provide recreational opportunities. Improve safe access along and over Washington Street and Brighton Boulevard by improving or adding signalized crosswalks at key intersections, improving or adding sidewalks that run adjacent to the roadways and lateral "Gr een Street" bicycle and pedestrian paths between the roadway and River. Develop distinctive Road Gateway features at key intersections that function with corresponding River Gateways to improve visibility, way finding, and safe access to the River. Refer to the Vision Plan on Page 2. Public River Edge Maintain a Public River Edge throughout the South Platte River Corridor. Roads, trails and promenades w ill provide the separation between public and pri vate areas. Parks and Public Open Spaces-Existing and pro posed parks and public open spaces should grow rec reation opportunities within the River North Greenway as the population and recreation demand increases. Re-energize existing parks by improving and adding amenities that meet user needs. Meet additional recreational and cultural needs by including park and public open space amenities that reflect diverse cultura l and local neighborhood needs that can be exp r essed through art, architec ture, and landscape improvements. Provide Pocket Parks such as the area near 38th and Chestnut throughout the urban reach of River North that i s integral with the River North Greenway through parkland acquis ition or collabora ting with property owners. Collaborate with the burgeoning River North Art Community by incorporating public art into the River North Greenway and parks. Create a vibrant River North Entertainment District through park and public open space improvements includi ng a connection between the Denver Coliseum venue, proposed RTD Rail Station, Globeville Land ing Park and the River. Create a North Platte Valley Regional Park (NPVRP) by incorporating the existing North Side Park and Heron Natural Area with the proposed park located on a portion of the National Western Stock Show and creating a strong east-west neighborhood connection with a bicycle and pedestrian bridge. The NPVRP will function as a regional park anchor and gateway for the River North Greenway as wel l as complement the existing complex of parks located in the Central Platte Valley. The NPVRP will increase the v itality and use of the North River Greenway and provide an incentive for future economic redevelopment of the area east of the park. The graphics in this plan showing the National West ern Open Space and the North Platte Valley Regional Park are conceptual. The exact area of the proposed North Platte Valley Regional Park will be determined through subsequent planning efforts taking into con sideration the future needs of the National Western Stock Show. Coordinate with the River Side Cemetery for improvements to provide bicycle and pedestrian access into the property from the R iver North Greenway. Develop an interactive Education Sign System that interprets the cu l tura l and eco l ogical history of River North. Meet additional recreational and cultural needs by in cluding park and public open space ameniti es that reflect diverse cu l tura l and local neighborhood needs that can be expressed through art, architecture, and landscape im provements. Multi-Use Trails and River North Connections Multi-use trails should improve safe access to the R iver North Greenway from neighbor h oods and business districts. Trails should incorporate green design and best management principles that reduce storm water runoff into the River. f\iver Construc t new multi-use Greenway trails on the east and west banks of the River that fill in missing Greenway trail segments and provide safe lateral connec tions from the Rive r North Greenway to neighbor hoods. Provide multi-modal, alternative transportation opportunities by completing mul ti-use trail connections from the River North Greenway to proposed RTD Rail Stations and key destinations such as downtown Denver, the Denver Coliseum, National Western Stock Show, and businesses adjacent to the R iver. Deve lo p R iver Gateways at strategic l ocations a long the River North Greenway to improve Green w a y access and v i sib i lity and reinfo rce the River's sense of arrival and sense of p l ace. Refer to the Visi on Plan on Page 2. Regulatory Actions-T he City and County of Denve r shou l d implement a var iety of regulatory measures to improve and preserve the River's health. Establish South Platte R ive r Greenway Advi sory Com mittee. Their ro le would be to review and advise on implementation p l an proposals. Establish conse rvati on easements as a voluntary approach to riparian setbacks to preserve l ands adjacent to the River that increase vegetat i on, wildlife habitat and perv i ous landsca pes. I n stitute zoning setback standard for measuring from the top of the riverbank. Establish a development fee for land acquisition and capital i mprovements a long the River North Green way. Provide i ncent i ves to ded icate land and provide funding for consolidated stormwater detention, open space and water qua lity feat ures. The River North Greenway Master Plan Apri/2, 2009 +

PAGE 8

.. f Recommendations Map South Reach f n>po..d 0' Cone. T ,.;I Nativ e Vegetation =Communit.Y Garde n NORTH SCALE1"=400'.{)" ---The River North Greenway Master Plan Apri/2, 2009 5 Ornamental T rc e s R etaining Wall W etland/Water Fiftration r ond '0' Riparian f)uffer Consc:rvation E.asc:ment Sconod Concre te ,5tree t r noea i FlazaA= W' Ovdook CJ Cottonw<><>
PAGE 9

r otential RTD ,A.1temative. North Reach I The River North Greenway Master Plan Apri/2, 2009 6

PAGE 10

T _ypical Sections-Section A Existing R.TDFAR.KING froposed RIFARIAN r I'>UFrLR_ wALK ( 101 1 0 The River North Greenway Master Plan April2, 2009 7 C.HANNL.Ll':>OTTOM AFFI\OXIMATC. LOCATION OF FROFC.RTY LINL. AFTL.R ROAD I S Al':>ANDONL.D -----------8'WALK I I::_M RGcNT )0' l )O' C.YFRCSS/ DE.NARGO ) MIXED USt .. Section!) Existing 30' O sANrrARY srwus ARKINS COURT ROAD

PAGE 11

T _ypical Sections -Section C E..xisting _j '1;" R I VCR LANDI N G FARK. FLAYGKOUND 150 S TORMWATLK FARK. I N G RIVE.R SCA T ING WALL DC. TC.NTION CARAGC. h ..m t J LVAILD 5At\IYARY AMrt 1n-t li_A rr_R RAJLll"E. SFWLK COLIS CUM ....-: -f. COLISL.UM fARK.ING .# ./ v 11 rr ..,. "'!" Section D E..xisting IO' TRA I L I 0 TRAI LS RIVE.R Froposed WARE.H OUSE. 51KE/FE.DE.S T R I AN 5R IDGE. VAKIE.S OVE.RFLOW F ARKI N G The River North Greenway Master Plan April 2, 2009 8

PAGE 12

A Acknowledgements and Denver John Hicken looperMayor of Denver Council Jeanne RobbCouncil President District 10 Rick Garcia-District 1 Jeanne Faatz District 2 Paul D. Lopez-District 3 Peggy Lehmann District 4 Marcia Johnson-District 5 Charlie Brown District 6 Chris Nevitt-District 7 Carla Madison District 8 Judy Montero-District 9 Jeanne Robb President District 10 Michael Hancock-District 11 Carol Boigon -At Large Doug Linkhart-At Large f ark and recreation 5oard Bernie Sharp Noel Copeland Edward Done Sharon Elfenbein Alexis Holdman Dave Robinson Heidi G. Loshbaugh Florence Navarro Richard L. Ott Keith Pryor Kathy Sandoval Ellie Gray Horn Dianne Truwe Darrell Watson Michael Fox The River North Greenway Master Plan Apri/2, 2009 9 f arks and Recreation Kevin Patterson Manager of Parks and Recreation Scott Robson-Deputy Manager, Parks & Planning Gordon Robertson Director, Parks Planning Devon Buckels River North Greenway Project Manager, Senior City Planner Michelle A. Madrid-Montoya-Marketing and Communica tions QHice of E_conomic Development Bar Chadwick-Special Project Coordinator James BusbyProject Manager for Neighborhood Revital ization Stacey L. EriksenBrownfields Coordinator, Green Housing flanning and Development Steve Gordon-Development & Planning Supervisor Deirdre OssSenior City Planner Gideon BergerSenior City Planner Lesley Chen-Intern fublic Works Brain Mitchell Director, Transportation Engineering Ser vices Joe Cordts Engineer, Development Engineering Services Marco Cabanillas, P.E.Engineer, Development Engineering Services Frank Kemme-Senior Engineer, Wastewater Janice F i nch Principal Planner, Policy and Planning Asset Management Steve Wirth-Senior Real Property Agent E_nvironmental Health Jon Novick-Environmental Scientist II Green f rint Denver Donna Pacetti Mayor's Office Consultants The Greenway Foundation Project Management Merle D. Grimes, LLCPlanning Team Project Leader CDMWater Quality and Hydrology Capitol Representatives Public and Stakeholder Input Process and Implementation -.. Community Planning Services, LLC-Planning Support and Mapping Mclaughlin Water Design GroupCivil Engineering Trust for Public Land Land Acquisition Issues THK Associates, Inc.Urban Design/Planning/Graphics The Cole Company Design and Graphics Stakeholders This Plan could not have been possible without the in volvement, engagement and vision of numerous stake holders within and outside of the River North area. A list of those attending and participating in the public meetings as well as numerous additional interactions with staff and consultants is contained in the Appendix section of this master plan. A special thank you to Dolly Kelley and her family for hosting two River North Greenway Master Plan public information meetings at their business, Muiieca's Restaurant located at 4500 Washington Street, on Tuesday, July 9th and Tuesday, August 19th. We appreciate their generosity in making their restaurant and its facilities available for both meetings. Looking north from 29th Street Bri dge. Sed iment i ssues in ch a nnel.

PAGE 13

5. The f'lanning f' recess f'lanning f' recess Summary The planning process for the River North Greenway Master Plan involved a coordinated effort between the City and County of Denver Parks and Recreation Planning Department, the Greenway Foundation, a project Steering Com mittee, property and business owners and local citizens. Numerous meetings with stakeholders were conducted in cluding property owners, developers, businesses, RTD, City of Denver departments, civic organizations and others with an interest in the River North area. In addition, a stakeholder roundtable/workshop was conducted early in the process with the goal of identifying corridor issues, needs and a vision for the River North Greenway. The community was invited to hear a brief presentation about the River North Greenway on two occasions during the planning process. Each meeting included a workshop where participants were encouraged to provide important existing conditions in formation to planning team members as well as their ideas and vision for improvements to the River North Greenway. In addition, the River North Greenway planning effort was coordinated with other planning projects that were simul taneously underway including the Regional Transportation District (RTD) FasTracks and Commuter Rail Maintenance Facility Plans, the Brighton Boulevard Right-of-Way Design Guidelines Plan and the City of Denver, River North Gen eral Development Plan. The planning team also reviewed existing master planning efforts such as the Globeville and Elyria/Swansea Neighborhood Plans. A "Summary of Public Input" was developed and it is in cluded in the appendix. Comments were recorded on the base maps for each of three River North Greenway sections including North, Middle and South during the workshop portion of Public Meeting Number One on July 8, 2008 and Public Meeting Number Two on August 19, 2008. In addition, a user survey was distributed to attendees at the July meeting. The results of that survey are also included in the appendix. The project began with the identification of Project Goals and Vision for the River North Greenway. The goals and vision were further refined as input from the Steering Committee, stakeholders and citizens was received. Understanding of the existing conditions of the River North Greenway corridor was accomplished through numerous site visits and discussions with various city agencies, stakeholders and citizens as well as review of completed and current planning efforts. Analysis of the existing conditions identified specific issues and challeng es that need to be met in order to solidify project goals. Planning Principles were thus generated through workshops with the Steering Committee that would provide planning guidance for the specific recommendations resulting from the master plan. Finally, a series of specific recommendations and an implementation strategy were identified that would achieve the Project Vision and Goals for the River North Greenway. A more detailed discussion on existing conditions, analysis, recommendations and implementation follow in Chapter 3 and4. The River North Greenway Master Plan April 2 2009 10

PAGE 14

C. Objectives were developed early in the process with exten sive input from City and Community stakeholders. They were based on the mission and goals (see Chapter 1) es tablished for the project. The objectives were grouped into three main areas of emphasis, healthy, habitable and connectivity. Healthy Use man-made and natural technology to enable natural systems to: Stabilize and sustain the River bed and banks Clean and revitalize the River water, bed and banks Capture stormwater and improve the quality of stormwater drainage Create and enhance natural beauty Identify appropriate passive and active recreation opportunities Identify appropriate open space opportunities Habitab l e Use the revitalized river eco-system and adjacent open space to: Encourage active and passive recreation with the River Enhance sense of community and heritage Encourage learning and respect for the environment Create ecological buffers between development and the river Improve the quality of human life and wildlife Support appropriate riverside and neighborhood development Connected Create integral links: Between people and the River Between natural and developed open space along the River corridor Between riverside development, open space and the River Between people and Denver's heritage with the outdoors Between Denver residents and visitors Between Denver's past, present and future The River Nor t h Greenway Master Plan Apri/2, 2009 1 1 D !Ianning J rinciples To realize the objective of a healthy, habitable, connected River, the following planning principles were developed to guide all planning and design decisions. New open space (whether natural or developed) shall enhance the quality of both the natural systems of the River and the human act i vities of its users. Interventions taken upon the River, its bed and banks shall emphasize the connection of surrounding eco systems, development and neighborhoods. Development along the River shall respect and en hance the river ecosystem and encourage appropriate human activities that sustain the overall health of the River. Development in the River corridor area will incor porate and enhance Denver's cultural heritage and sense of community for neighborhoods adjacent to the River. Development along the River shall respect the River in proximity, scale, design and function. The River corridor should encourage both longitudinal connection and lateral porosity into neigh borhoods to create a sense of connectivity that is through, across, and with the River. View looking north at abandoned stock yard bridge at the National Western Stock Show

PAGE 15

Chapter ): E_xisting Conditions Map3.1 NEIGHBORHOODS Elyria/Swansea Globeville Central Platte Val l ey RiverNorth Generalized Existing Conditions -LAND and DEVELOPMENT D Existing Parks N South Platte Greenway Trail N On-Street Bike Route New, Emerging and Announceaoevelopment N o rt h -Major Buildings LAND OWNERSHIP ALONG TliE RIVER CORRIDOR D City and County o f Denver D Railroads D Semi-Public D National Western D Regional Transportation District D Private Ownership Map 3 3 \' ) Generalized Existing Conditions WATER and WATER QUALITY D Existing Parks -Major Bui l d i ngs D Stonmwater Outfalls ..... / Sanitary Sewer Depth : Less T han 5' Channel Bank Stability Concerns N ort h Land Fills The River North Greenway Master Plan Apri/2,2009 12

PAGE 16

E_xisting Conditions (continued) Identification and analysis of existing conditions resulted in an understanding of issues, challenges and specific planning recommendations within the River North Green w ay study area. For analysis purposes, existing conditions were orga nized into nine categories including: River North Greenway Identity Land Use and Ownership Barriers to River North Greenway Access Transportation and Roadways Gateways and Entry Bicycle and Pedestrian Connections to Neighborhoods Parks, Public Open Space and Trails River Stability Design Water Quality As a part of analyzing the existing conditions, planning and design opportunities become readily apparent. They are identified in green italic Railroad Bridge north of City of Cuernavac a Park f\.iver North Greenwa!J ]dentit!J The River North reach ofthe South Platte River is visually dominated by commercial and light industrial enterprises including abandoned buildings and vacant lots. In addi tion, transportation related uses including railroads, the RTD The River Nor t h Greenway Master Plan Apri/2, 2009 1 maintenance yards and major highways and bridge viaducts heavily influence the character and identity of the South Platte River within the River North corridor. Because of barriers such as roadways and the railroad the River is disconnected from neighborhoods and does notreflect the cultural heritage of citizens who live in the commu nities nearest to the River. Persons entering Denver from the north along the River will observe an area that is commercial and industrial in nature. Historically the South Platte River in this reach also contained a sheep slaughterhouse stockyards and the Denargo Farmers Market Place Today it is likely that most metro Denver citizen s best know the area as the location of the National Western Stock Show and the Denver Coliseum. Both venues have a commercial feel to them, especially since the Interstate 70 bridge viaduct runs adjacent to and in-between the two facilities. This area could be thought of as the entertainment district of RINO. Recently, the River North area has begun to develop a reputation as an art district that is known among artists as the RIND Art District. All of these uses have encroached on the South Platte River resulting in the channelization and narrowing of the River banks, removal of the natural sinuosity a n d native vegetation of the River, and increased sedimentation and decreased water quality from urban runoff. Currently, t h e South Platte River would best be described as unnatural and industrial in character. A summary of existing conditions that impact River's identity include: Lack of neighborhood and cultural identity with t h e River because of physical barr iers such as roadways and railroads that inhibit connectivity. Commercial and light industrial use as well as highways and railroads dominate the visual character of the cor ridor. The River is unnatural in character and function ex emplified by a narrow corridor with steep slopes and straightened alignment (channelized River corridor), poor water quality and diminished wildlife habitat. As noted in 2003 River North Plan, The natural state of the South Platte River has been eroded in places and in some cases current uses do not take advantage of the Map 3.4 ........ _,.. lf Mll4.wl! I i I ; HI !!I ;t N o rth Opportunities WATER and WATER QUALITY D Existing Parks MaiCI! Buildings Pot ential Bankfull Bench P otent ial Ban k R.GQtadlnq N o Potentoal for Bank Regardi11g

PAGE 17

Map 3.5 'So. I -; .. Opportunities ,, LANDand ..._ ,. DEVELOPMENT ... ...... proximity to t h e River, taking away from the enjoyment of this open space:' The 2003 plan a l so notes that w ithin the River corridor, The current zoning does not allow some appropr i ate uses such as increased open space and mixed-use resi dential, allows other inappropriate uses such as indus tria l and does not provide appropriate deve lopment and design standards for new deve lopment:' Land Use and Ownership Land ownership patterns a l ong the Rive r North Greenway reveal a mixture of public and private ownership. Approxi mately 117 parcels of land touch the banks of the River ( Refer to Map 3.1 ). Of that number, the City and County of Denver owns 40 parcels and another 8 parcels are owned by other public entities such as the Regiona l Transportation Distr i ct, the Colorado Department ofTran sportation and the State of Col orado. Railroads, whi ch have a l ong h istory fol lowing wa terways, own another 21 parcels of land touching the River. Taxi Mixed Use The South Platte River acts bot h as a "unifying element" and a barrier" to the six neighborhoods along the R i ver corr i dor. The River curren t ly acts as a barrier to the Globeville and Elyri a/Swansea neighborhoods north of 1 -70 bu t has the potentia l to be the u nifying element for the emerging River North neighborhood. New and vital neighborhoods are emerg ing along the R iver adjacent to downtown, in l arge part because of the parks that have been bui l t t here. Residential developments in River North such as Taxi are already c r eating new and v i ta l mini neighborhoods. Th ese deve l opments and more to follow have the potenti al to act as a foca l point for these areas as well. Redevelopment is migrating out of the Central Platte Valley into the River North Area. There are a variety of new resi dential developments in the Prospect neighborhood which have spurred movement northward to include the recently constructed Taxi development and that of the announced Denargo Market and Beleza projects. There is a momentum of development that has followed the South Platte River but has not yet taken full advantage of the recreational and environmental potential of the R i ver. New development will increase demands for parks, open space, trails and recreation amenities along the River North Greenway. Significant potential impacts to the River s water quality from future high-density development are anticipated. The type and character of new developments allowed in the RINO reach of the South Platte River will have a pro found impact on the identity of the River North Greenway and its image as a gateway into Denver from the north Ringsby Court f\.iver Health A lthough perceived as stable, the confined nature of t h e floodplain and r esulting higher velocities and flows a r e ex pected to scour the c hann el bed, bars and banks potenti al l y d i srupt ing a n y structu r a l integrity that m ay ex i st i n the chan ne l (Refer to Map 3.4). T he entire reach of the South Platte River within the C ity of Denver has bee n straightened and real igne d, resulting in a narrow and deep flood channe l with l ittle o r no emergent The River North Greenway Master Plan Apri/2, 2009 1+

PAGE 18

Map 3.2 J The River North Greenway Moster Plan Apri/2, 2009 15 BARRIERS TO RIVER NORTH GREENWAY ACCESS EJ
PAGE 19

in a large majority of alluvial aquifer well samples. Instances were recorded of drinking water standards exceedances for benzene and PCE. Nutrients, including nitrates, ammonia and phosphorous, were identified during sampling, although no exceedances of USEPA drinking-water standards were identified. However, the NAWQA study concluded that South Platte River water quality conditions through the metropolitan Denver reach were only moderately degraded. Although previously listed as impaired water for E. coli and nitrate, Segment 14 of the South Platte River, of which the RINO reach is a part, has been delisted and is no longer considered impaired. City and County of Denver water quality monitoring of Segment 14 in 2007 indicates all constituents are within applicable standards except for E. coli and fecal coliform. City and County of Denver water quality monitoring at sampling sites N38 (38th Street) and N46 (46th Street) in the RINO reach indicate that most sampling event concen trations lie close to the geometric means for Segment 14. Spring through fall exceedances of E. coli and fecal coliform standards occurred at both monitoring sites. Winter chloride exceedances at these two sampling sites occurred in January and February coinciding with the application of deicing salts on roadways. Isolated single event exceedances of the selenium (N38-January acute) and manganese (N46 January/February chronic) also occurred in the RINO reach. Cadmium contamination is considered an issue downstream of the Burlington Ditch diversion; however, sampling in the RINO reach by the City and County of Denver indicates no elevated levels in surface water or sediment. Past construction within and adjacent to the River channel upstream of the RINO reach have contributed to high sediment loads that have been deposited in, and are slowly migrating through, the reach. In addition, suspended sediment loading also occurs at storm drain outfalls due to the lack of erosion and sediment control BMPs at construction sites and general urban stormwater runoff characteristics in the tributary watersheds. The buildup of sediment in the RINO reach is due to backwater conditions resulting from a low channel gradient and the Burlington Ditch diversion. The combination of sediment influx and shallow flow as well as poor physical habitat diversity has resulted in limited aquatic species populations and recreational opportunities. It may be possible to improve the River's water qual ity through naturally occurring biological and physical processes such as whitewater features and provide recreational and aesthetic improvements by 1) taking advantage of existing infrastructure and 2 ) combining passive instream water treatment and recreational improvements. Recommended Improvements to the 1\.iver channel include: Increased Depth: Lowers temperature to create a healthier biological system Increased Detention Time: Provides time for increased biological activity Aeration : Provides oxygen for in creased biological activity Over-bank Filtration : Improves both in-River and tributary flows Transportation and Arkins and Ringsby Court are located along the east and west banks of the South Platte River between North Denargo and 38th Street. They create both a visual and physi cal edge to the River (Refer to Maps 3.9, 3.10 & 3.11 ). With their current alignment, both roadways prohibit greenway and River habitat expansion or laying back the Riverbanks in order to improve River's stability. As discussed in the previous section regarding barriers existing transportation corridors such as Interstate 25, Interstate 70 Brighton Bou levard and Washington Street as well as railroads all have a major impact on safe access and the visual character of River North Greenway. RTD Maintenance Facility Several planning efforts are being conducted within the City and County of Denver that may have an impact on transportation within t h e River North Greenway area. These efforts include the RTD FastTracks Plan R T D Maintenance Facility Plan, Brighton Corridor Right-of-Way Design Guidelines and General Develop ment Plan efforts for several p r ivate properties located adjacent to the South Platte River. The RTD Fast Tracks planning effort involves the potential for a new rail stations to be located along and adjacent to the east bank of the River in the Globev il/e Landing Park and National Western Stock Show areas. At the conclusion of the River North Greenway Master Plan, discussions regarding the potential realignment of Ringsby Court had not been finalized. If Ringsby Court is relocated off of the banks of the River, an opportunity to use the former roadway to expand green space and improve the River s health and visual character will be possible. Other development planning efforts have promoted the relocation of Arkins Court off of the banks of the South Platte River Several alignment configuration options for Arkins Court are being considered and are identified on Map 4 6. Relocation of Ark ins Court would provide valuable land within the abandoned roadway to expand and improve the River's stability health and visual character. farks, fublic Open Spaces Three parks currently exist on the Rive r North r each of the South Platte River including the City of Cuernavaca Park, Globeville Landing Park a n d Northside Park (Refer to Maps 4.4, 4.5 & 4.7 ) A concrete multi-use trail r u ns parallel to the River over the entire distance of River North The tra i l is p ri marily located on the east side of the River up to Globev i lle Landing Park where i t crosses over to the west side of the River and continues to Denver's northern city limit. The trail connects all t h ree parks a n d the Adams Cou nty South Platte River Greenway to the north. Several bicycle and pedestrian bridges provide for connections across the River at the maintenance facility for Denver Parks and Denve r Public Wo rks, Globeville Landi n g Park and north of Northside Park. A trail co nnection on the west Riverbank between the bridge adjacent to the maintena n ce facilit y and City of Cuernavaca Park does not currently exist. The City of Cuernavaca Park is a relative l y new park located on both t h e east a n d west s ide o f t h e Riv e r a t the south boundary of the River North Greenway. A loop trail, incl uding two pedestrian bri dges t hat cross o v e r t h e River is located w i t hin the Park but this loop trail does not connect to the Sout h Platte R iver multi-use trail. To access the park from t h e G r eenway T r ai l on the east s ide o f the River t h e user m u s t cross over the R iver at Commons Park to the south. A connection u n derneath Interstate 25 extends west from the park. Th i s i s the o nly connection to the River North Gree nway f rom the neighborhoods west of Interstate 25. The Denver Coliseum View from Globeville Landing Park The River North Greenway Master Plan Apri/2, 2009 16

PAGE 20

Globeville Landing Park is one of the oldest parks along Denver's South Platte River Greenway. The Park is adjacent to the parking area for the Denver Coliseum designated as a Super Fund Clean up site by the Environmental Protection Agency. Future mitigation of the Super fund site and possible improvements to the Denver Coliseum will provide an opportunity to expand and connect the River North Greenway and Globeville Landing Park with the Denver Coliseum venue. North Side Park Northside Park Northside Park and Heron Pond Natural Area are located at the northern border of the City and County of Denver on T h e River Nor t h Greenway Mast e r Plan Apri/2, 2009 1 7 the west side of the River. Northside Park is the former site of Denver s sewage treatment plant. Remnants of the plant have been preserved as part of the park's design. The park is large enough to contain practice sport fields Heron Pond Natural Area is located and connected with Northside Park The pond contains riparian vegetation and wetlands that support a variety of birds. A soft sur face hiking path provides access to the Pond. Riverside Cemetery O n e o f De n ve r's o ldest ce m e t e r y's, R i ve r side Cem ete r y i s l oca t ed a t D enver's n o r t h e rn ci t y limit and a portion of the Cem ete r y i s w ithi n the City a n d Coun t y o f D enve r Th e m a j ority o f the Ceme t ery i s l ocated in A d ams County. The ceme t e r y i s n o t currently accessib l e f ro m t h e Gr eenway T rail. Because of urba n enc r oac hment, there is n o t sufficient ava ilabl e space for the expa n sion o f the gree n way, exis t i n g parks, pu b l ic o p e n space and ecological buffe r z on es on e i t h e r the wes t or e a s t edges of the R iver. T h e R ive r North Gree nway Mas ter Plan d i d n o t invol ve a r ec reatio nal n eeds a n alys i s t o determine the need for add i tiona l pa rks, o p en s p ace and r ec r e a t i o nal faci lities now a n d i n the futu r e. H oweve r it s hould b e noted t hat a dditional o p e n space imm edia t e l y ad j acent t o the River i s necessary for : improvin g t h e wa ter qua l i t y; l ay in g b ac k o f t h e bank s l opes to improv e v i s i bil ity; access i bi lity and R iver stabil i ty; p r ovi d in g a reas to d e t ai n a n d fi lter storm wa t e r run-off b e fore i t ente r s the R iver; remova l o f impe r v i ous so il s tha t i n c r ease s torm wa t e r r u n-off; and crea tion of r ipari an buffe r zones t o i n c r ease a n d prot ect v alua b l e habit a t Community meetings revealed that the community did not use the three existing parks on a regular basis because they were not accessible from their neighborhoods anddidnot contain amenities that they would use. In addition citi-zens perceived the parks as unsafe due to crime and a lack of visibility It was generally felt by citizens that more active use and residential development of the River North reach would increase visibility and safe use of the parks and River. Arkins Court Multi-Use Trails and 1\.iver North Greenwa:J Connections T he lack of safe, l a t era l connections between neighborhoods, busi ness distric t s and the R iver Nort h Greenway was a ma j o r i ssue expressed duri n g the publi c i nput process The m os t common cause of unsafe a ccess f rom neighborhood s i n clude d p a ssage over North Washi ngton S t reet, North Br ighton B ou l eva r d, I nter sta t e 25 and the rai lroad. In addition, stree t s that ex t end pe rpendicu lar to the South P l atte R ive r do not ha ve adequate s i dewalks, f ac il i t ies for cyc li sts or signal i ze d crosswalks. Arkins Court 5arriers to 1\.iver North Greenwa:J Ac cess Access to the South Platte R i ve r i s ma d e more d i fficult a n d less safe d u e t o p h ys i c al barr i e r s such as major h ighways roadways, railr oads and the l ack o f exi st ing b i cycle and p edestria n fac i l i t ies suc h as l atera l co nnector tra i ls sidewalks and s i gna l ized crosswa lks ( R e f e r to Map 3.2). I n a ddition, the R i ver ac t s as a barr ier between neighbor hood s and busi nesses that are located on e i t her side of the River Specific ba r riers to safe access to t h e R i ver North Gree n way include: Rai lroads and rai l road yards Brighton Bou l evard N o rth Washington St r eet Int erstate 70 Inte r state 25 R i ver chan n e l geom e try Gatewa:JS and E_ntr:J (5ee Vision flan on fage l) The South P latte R ive r a n d River North Gr eenway a r e entra n ce locations into the C ity of Denve r f rom Adams County. H owever i t i s d i fficul t to d i ffere n t i ate sepa r ate identities, a n d a sense o f arri va l or entry between Den ver and A d ams Coun t y because no entrance features o r a system for w a y fi nding exists along the Sou t h P l atte Rive r Wash i ngton Bou l evard or Brigh ton Bo ul eva r d t h e t h r ee ma jor access point s f rom the north along or n ear the South Platte River. Additionally thousands of automobile commuters utilize North Brighton Boulevard and North Washing-

PAGE 21

ton Street each day without any recognition that the South Platte River is only a few blocks away. The City and County of Denver is in the process of completing right-of-way design guidelines for the Brighton Boulevard corridor. Coordination of planning efforts between the River North Greenway and Brighton Boulevard Plans should result in planning proposals and design guidelines that will: Increase public awareness of the River and greenway amenities Create a sense of entry and identity for the City of Denver and the River North Greenway Provide safe bicycle and pedestrian access within the River North Greenway study area 1-25 Northwest Connection Typical RTD Station at Auraria Campus Chapter+: Detailed Recommendations River North Greenway Master Plan recommendations are based on master plan goals and objectives, analysis of existing conditions; sound planning principles, and input from citizens, stakeholders, and a technical advisory committee. R.lver Health The health of the South Platte River has been severely degraded over many decades. This Master Plan recom mends actions that will restore the River to a healthier more stable condition that support both human and wildlife activities. Riverbank (Refer to the Illustra tive Maps on f ages 5 & 6) Sections A through Din Chapter 1 display components of recommended riverbank improvements in the River North Greenway. Urban Drainage and Flood Control District recommends the construction of natu rally vegetated riverbanks at a 3:1 slope. An irrigated turf grass riverbank shou ld be constructed at a 4:1 slope. Where obstacles such as utilities or lack of avail able land are constraints, a system of terraced walls can be incorporated into the riverbank to improve the side slope to 1.5:1. However, the walls should be designed to increase pervious surface and must allow for maintenance and public access to the River and Greenway. E_mergent 5enches Provide vegetated, emergent benches on either side of the River channel in order to improve water quality, reduce flow velocities and improve wildlife habitat. These benches should range in width between 35 feet (minimum) and 65 feet or greater (desirable). A minimum of 65 feet will be required if stormwater wetland filtration systems are i ncluded within the emergent bench to improve water quality and reduce flow velocities. A m i nimum emergent bench width of 35 feet is required for maintenance access. Riparian 5ui+er Resto re a riparian buffer where feasible to provide wildlife habitat and improved water quality. The r ipa r ian buffer should be comprised of native tree species and/or pervious surfaces such as vegetation or pervi ous paving that should extend laterally from the top of the bank for a minimum width of 50 feet, or a more desirable width of 100 feet or greater. Stormwater Detention In their 2008 stormwater detention study, Merrick En gineering indicates a need for approximately 33 acre feet of detention for flood control within the River North Greenway planning boundary at build-out. I n addition, the City and the Urban Drainage and Flood Control District recognized the benefits of consolidation of stormwater detention facilities into a few larger detention ponds as opposed to many smaller ponds. Combining smaller stormwater facilities into larger stormwater facilities provides the opportunity to cre ate an attractive amenity for recreational and passive open space uses. In order to achieve this goal, ad ditional open space lands will need to be acquired in order to accommodate 33 acre-feet of storage. Several sites have been identified as potential stormwater detention sites including the Denver Coliseum Area and Chestnut Open Spaces (Refer to Maps 4.5 and 4.6). In addition to stormwater detention, the facilities should include wetland filtration for water quality improve ments, wildlife habitat and re creat ional amenities. This consolidated detention would also benefit new development through efficient use of land. Water Qual Stormwater best management practices (detention basins, bio-filters, hydrodynamic devices, media filters retention ponds, wetland basins, wetland channels, grass swales, grass buffers rain gardens, and pervious materials) should be encouraged in order to protect and improve water quality. Water quality improvements to the South Platte River can be accomplished through several methods. Day lighti ng of existing storm sewers located in Globeville Landing Park and along 36th Street would allow for oxygenation and wetland filtration of stormwater be fore it is discharged into the River (See Figures 4.3 and 4.4). Stormwater detention ponds should incorporate wetlands to filter out pollutants, as well as providing aesthetic recreation and wildlife benefits. The emergent bench should be widened on both sides of the River to provide increased vegetation to shade and cool the River's water temperature; to reduce flood ve locities through additional f ric tion; to allow space for stormwater wetland filtration and to facilitate channel maintenance. To compliment and increase the effec tiveness of the wetland filtration areas, they will be located so stormwater outfalls will spill out up stream of these features. The incorporation of adjacent lands buffering the River should be pursued in order to increase pervious land to reduce stormwater run-off and groundwater recharge. Water quality and recreational improvements should take advantage of the energy currently dissipated by six conventional drop structures within the River North reach. Whenever feasible, water quality improvement features should be combined with in-channel recre ational projects since their design is similar in scope. Whitewater injects important oxygen into the water that will improve water qual ity through naturally occurring biological processes as well as providing features for recreational boating. Water quality could also be enhanced by taking advan tage of an existing gravity pipeline which runs parallel to the South Platte River (the Farmers and Gardeners Ditch). Using this pipeline, water could be re-circulated back upstream to enhance water quality. The potential of the Farmers and Gardeners Ditch will be explored in greater depth as part of the future River South Green way Master Plan (RISO). r ubllc R.lver E_dge Maintain a Public River Edge throughout the South Platte River Corridor. Roads, trails and promenades will provide the separation between public and pri vate areas. The River Nor t h Greenway Ma s ter Plan Apri/2, 2009 18

PAGE 22

The River North Greenway Master Plan Apri/2, 2009 19 Map 4.1 SOUTH SEGMENT City of Cuernavaca Park to 31st Street Recommendations WATER and WATER QUALITY 0 Existing Stonnwatt< Outfaii s (Ire Proposed l n.Channel Stormwater Wetland Flhration Areas D D These areas ar e located downs tream of the ou tfa ll and the size of each area OenQth and width are t o bedetennined on a case by case basis). Exlst1ng P arks Proposed Public Op.n Space Developed areas for formal and informal recrea t ion and socia l ization. (See CCJr11)1et e description for individual proposed parb) Proposed Riparian Buffer, Wil dlife Corridor and R tvet Bank lmptovements passive recreation, trails. ecotogtcal education, water quahty filtration and wil d life habitats P otential Areas for River B ank Grad i ng Improvements Red uce to 4:1 S l ope Ratio P otential Area s for River Bank Gradlng I mprovements TetTace W a ll Opportunity NOTE: The river channel and edge are i n public ownership and shall remain so as development occurs in adjacent properties. .. I!J/ II NORTH Scal e : 1 = 1 000' 0 500 1000 F

PAGE 23

Map 4.2 Water and Water Qual MIDDLE SEGMENT 31st Street to 170 Recommendations WATER and WATER QUALITY D EDstfng Stonnwater Outfall$ (lf'e PropoHd In-Channel Stormwater Wetland Attratloo Arus D D These are bcated downs t ream of the outfal l and the size of each area (length and width are to be determined on a case by case basis). Exlstfng Partts (See desaiption fOf' i ndividu al proposed parks) Con1dot P
PAGE 24

The River North Greenwoy Master Plan Apri/2, 2009 21 Map 4.3 Water and WaterQualit_y NORTH SEGMENT 170 to North City Limits Recommendations WATER and WATER QUALITY 0 Existing Stonnwatar Otrtfall s Propoood In-Channel Stormwater Wet lllnd Fillration Arus D D These areas are located downstream of the outfall and the size of each area (length and width are to be on a case by case basis). Existing Parks Proposed Public Open Space Developed areas f or formal and informal r ecr eation and socia l ization (See complete descrlption for l ndNidua l proposed parks) Proposed Riparia n Buffer, W U dlife Con1dor and River Bank I mprovements passive recreation trai ls, ecologica l education water quality filtration and wild life habitat s. Potentia l Areas fof River Bank Grad ing I mprovements Reduce to 4:1 Slope Ratio Pot ential Areas for River Bank Grad ing Improvements T errace W all Opportunity NORTH Scale: 1000' Feet e:: ::7 I E51STAVE 1 / WSOTHAVE E49THAI r ESOTHAVE z NOTE: The river channel and edge are in public ownership and shall remain so as development occurs in ad jacen t properties. E45THAV E National Western E47TH AVE E48THAVE z

PAGE 25

Detailed Recommendations (continued) Transportation and Roadwa_ys The City and County of Denver is currently evaluating transportation options on both sides of the River within the River North study area. This Master Plan will provide guidance and rationale for future transportation decisions as they affect the South Platte River and River North Greenway. Current and future transportation planning should coordinate transportation improvements on Washington Street, Brighton Boulevard and others as appropriate to ensure adequate access and linkages with the Greenway corridor. Additionally, transportation planning should coordi nate location of a transit station to ensure connections with the Greenway corridor, as well as ensure that easy access and linkages are created to new and existing developments from the Greenway corridor to the River North study area. Finally, transportation plan ning should convert where feasible, and /or remove City roads / rights-of-way located adjacent to the River into pervious open space and parks. Arbns Court and R.mgsby Court Arkins and Ringsby Courts should be relocated or moved away from the River wherever feasible while maintaining parallel through streets and/or local access between 31st and 38th streets (See Sections A & B). Realignment of the roadways will provide ad ditional land for laying back the riverbanks to make them more stable and accessible. This will also provide space for water quality improvements such as wetland filtration, riparian buffers to expand impervi ous surfaces, and the protection of wildlife habitat. Map 4.6 identifies several proposed street configurations that would allow these benefits to be realized while still maintaining a viable street network. Washington Street and f::>righton 5oulevard ( Refer to the Vision Plan on Page2). Improve bicycle and pedestrian access along and over Washington Street and Brighton Boulevard. Both roadways are in close proximity to the South Platte River and function as a barrier to safe pedestrian and bicycle access to the River from neighborhoods and places of business. Improvements to these roadways should include crosswalks to maximize safety, gate -way features and wider sidewalks (8-foot minimum width) at selected intersections and along the length of the roadway (Refer to the Illustrative Maps on Pages 5 and 6). Crosswalks should include a signal ized pedestrian phase, distinctive and accessible crosswalk pavement, and gateway features such as signage, art, landscaping and architectural features. The gateway intersection will give motorists, bicy clists and pedestrians clear and safe passage to the River North Greenway. r a rks a nd F ublic Open Spaces (Refer to the Illustrative Maps on Pages 5 & 6) Park and public open space opportunities need to be expanded to keep pace with the projected population increases in the River North corridor. (See population growth projections in the Appendix). The City and County of Denver, the Greenway Foundation, developers and other partners should work cooperatively to expand existing parks and acquire new land for park and open space purposes. This Plan encompasses a wide range of potential park and open space oppor tunities, from small private plazas to large regional destination parks. As the City pursues park and open space funding, it will look to the development community to assist in funding these improvements. LXI sting r arks (Refer to the Illustrative Maps on Pages 5 & 6) Reenergize the existing parks (City of Cuernavaca Park, Globeville Landing Park, Northside Park and Heron Pond Natural Area) by improving and adding amenities that meet user needs and reflect cultural identity ( Refer to Maps 4.4 4.5 and 4.7). Citizens should be fully engaged in the planning process in order to ensure that community expression identity and fingerprints are included in each park design. This coordinated effort will foster increased park use and stewardship. f reposed f arks and f ublic Open Space (Refer to the Illustrative Maps on Pages 5 & 6) As mentioned in the Existing Conditions section, the acquisition of additional public open space located adjacent to the River is required to improve River sta bility, water quality habitat buffers and recreational opportunities. Four potential areas for new park and open space in River North include areas in the vicinity of 38th Street and Chestnut Place, the Denver Colise um, the National Western Stock Show and Riverside Cemetery (Refer to Maps 4.5 and 4.7). The proposed Chestnut Open Space is approximately 2.6 acres in size and is at a location desirable for both passive recreational use and stormwater detention. The program for this area should include neighborhood recreational amenities such as seating, shade structures and other passive amenities. Additionally, should detention be deemed appropriate at this loca -Figure 4.1 River Gatewa_y tion, it should be designed as an additional amenity to the open space. The proposed Coliseum Open Space creates an opportunity to provide new and complementary ameni ties adjacent to both Globeville Landing Park and the Denver Coliseum (See Section C). In addition, the approximately 16-acre site is large enough to provide significant stormwater and wetland filtration of an existing stormwater pipe that outfalls unfiltered into the River at Globeville Landing Park. Improvements should include removal of the existing parking areas and other impervious surfaces, creating a stronger connection between the Denver Coliseum and River The River North Greenway Master Plan April 2, 2009 22

PAGE 26

Detailed Recommendations (continued) The River North Greenway Moster Plan Apri/2, 2009 Map 4 4 Open Space, F arks and Trails SOUTH SEGMENT City of Cuernavaca Park to 3J.st Street R ecommendations OPEN SPACE, PARKS and TRAILS \'-._, Greentntet Connedlon Safe bicycle a n d pedestrai n connect ions t o ne!9hbo rhoods by add ing new oonllltdions Bnd=e existing connec!Jons on trails, bridges, sidewalks and signal l nteresections. N OTE: The river channel and edge are #t:f PropoMd Sidewalks MinimumS feet Wide Proposed RTD Fat Tracks North Metro and # Y East Commuter Rail Une P ropoMd Artematlve FuTracks Stations PropoMd Roadway Alignrntnta N Oenargo Street Alternat i ves N AOOAS Court Alternative #1 N Arilins Court Alternative #2 Mlns Court Alternative #3 in public ownersh i p and shal l remain so as occurs i n adjacent propert 1es. Propoeed R oadway AooeM Gateways NORTH Scale: 1 = 1 000' Feel

PAGE 27

Detailed Recommendations (continued) Map 4.5 Open Space, r arks and Trails MIDDLE SEGMENT 31st Street to 1 -70 Recommendations OPEN SPACE, PARKS and TRAILS Existing Pafb z "' i ?< .... E45THAVE E44TH A VE NORTH Scal e : 1 """ 1000 0 500 1000 Feet The River North Greenway Master Plan April 2, 2009 2+

PAGE 28

Detailed Recommendations (continued) Lands within or adjacent to the National Western com plex provide the opportunity for a large-scale open space. This opportunity should be explored jointly with National Western Stock Show officials as they consider plans for their future. The proposed open space should be planned and designed in concert with the anticipat ed high density, mixed-use development. Recreational opportunities to consider include off-channel whitewater boating, multi-use and soft surface hiking trails, plazas, public art and promenades (See Section D). North Greenway. In addition, a multi-modal connection to the proposed RTD Rail Station via an exten sion of the Greenway trail should be completed. The proposed Coliseum Open Space would include outdoor uses such as an outdoor concert venue and/or farmers market that would further enhance this area Map 4.6 r roposed R.oadwatl Alignment ffi E45THAVE z ,.. NORlH &aw.MT6 i Ill .... E44TlfAVE z "0 !!l of River North as the RINO Entertainment District. The recommended improvements are consistent with potential plans for the reinvention of the Denver Coli seum by Denver Theaters and Arenas Department, as well as comments received from citizens in the public planning process. Proposed Roadway Alignments ...,,, ...... _.....,.,.. ---Milma.tlZDrlhri! 'Prt"'** The graphics in this plan showing the National Western Open Space and the North Platte Valley Regional Park are conceptual. The exact area of the proposed North Platte Valley Regional Park will be determined through subsequent planning efforts taking into consideration the future needs of the National Western Stock Show. The Riverside Cemetery provides an opportunity to protect and preserve an historic resource, as well asap proximately 79 acres of existing open space. It is recommended that a not-for-profit organization be engaged to manage and coordinate improvements with the City and County of Denver and Adams County. Potential uses include multi-use and soft surface hiking trails and historic interpretive signage. Multi-Use Trails and 1\iver North Greenwatl Connections (Refer to the Illustrative Maps on Pages 5 & 6). Multi-use trails will make the River North Greenway more accessible to key destinations such as neighborhoods, parks, and business districts. Construction of a new, multi-use trail is recommended on the west side of the South Platte River between the City of Cuernavaca Park and Globeville Landing Park. The proposed trail will connect with the existing pe destrian bridge at the maintenance facility for Denver Public Works and Denver Parks and Recreation located adjacent to Park Avenue and the River, and continue downstream to the existing Greenway trail as it crosses over the River at Globeville Landing Park (Refer to Maps 4.4, 4.5 and 4.7). A new multi-use trail is recommended for the east side of the River between Globeville Landing Park and the existing Greenway trail at Race Court. Apri/2, 2009 Lateral connections extending from the east side of the River are proposed at Prospect Park, Denargo Street, 29th Street, 31st Street, 36th Street, 38th Street, East 46th Street, East 47th Street, and Race Street. Grade separated crossing of the rail25 road tracks at 31st and 36th streets should be provided in order to access the eastern neighborhoods and downtown Denver. The existing railroad underpass and sidewalk con nection to the River along 38th Street should be widened to a minimum width of eight feet to safely accommodate both cyclists and pedestrians as part of future roadway improvements to the underpass. A multi-use trail connection between Globeville Landing Park, the proposed RTD Comuter Rail Station and Denver Coliseum is also proposed. Lateral connections extending from the west side of the River include 36th Street, East 45th Street, East 50th Street and East 51st Street. The inclusion of these proposed multi-use trail segments would allow the River North Greenway to be more safely accessible to users and increase recreation and alternative transportation opportunities for the neighborhoods west of Washington Street. All future multi-use trails should incorporate"green" design principles including bioswales, landscaping and pervious surfaces wherever possible (Refer to Figure 4.3). Where existing stormwater pipes are removed in favor of open, stormwater channels, multi-use trails and landscapi should be incorporated into the design Refer to Figure 4.4}. The 36th Street connection proposed between Walnut Street on the east side of the railroad tracks and the River North Greenway is proposed as an enhanced streetscape with street trees, widened sidewalks and a pedestrian bridge over the River (Refer to Map 4.5 and Figure 4.5 & 4.6). The bridge would enhance the River Gateway pro posed for this location as well as establish a sense of arrival and sense of place for the Greenway and the mixed use developments on the west side of the River. Gateways (Refer to the Vision Plan on Page 2). Incorporate River Gateways at strategic locations along the River North Greenway to provide the user with easily recognizable locations to access the River, provide an exciting sense of arrival and reinforce the River's sense of place. Figures 4.1 and 4.2 are exam ples of potential River Gateways. Gateway features within the Urban Reach of the River North Greenway between 29th Street and 38th Street could have an in dustrial art theme to reinforce the industrial history of River North while reflecting the emerging River North Art Community. The gateway bridge connecting 36th Street to Ringsby Court should establish a sense of arrival and sense of place for the River North Green way in addition to complementing the proposed 36th

PAGE 29

Map 4.7 Open Space, F arks and Trails NORTH SEGMENT /-70 to North C ity Limits Recommendations OPEN SPACE, PARKS and TRAILS Proposed Alternative FalrKks Stations PropoMd Roadway AJign ment. N Oerwgo Street Alternatives N Mtins Court Al1emative #1 N Arkins Court Anemative #2 Mins Court Al1emative #3 Proposed Roadway Accen Gateways NORTH Scal e: 1 = 1 000' 0 500 1000 Feet I ----, f E51S TAVE; i National Western z E49THAVE E48THAVE z "' 0 ,. !!l The River North Greenway Master Plan Apri/2, 2009 26

PAGE 30

Street bicycle and pedestrian trail connection. Recommendations To accomplish the goals of this plan, the City and County of Denver should implement regulatory measures to improve the health and vitality of the South Platte River. Based on review of other jurisdictions including Massachusetts, Figure 4.2River North Carolina and South Carolina, as well as the cities of Portland, Chicago, and Milwaukee, best practices were identified that would benefit the South Platte River. These practices include: Create an Committee Create a South Platte River Greenway Advisory Com mittee, comprised of the Manager or his/her designee of DPR, PW, CPO, EH, and representatives for various stakeholder groups. They would meet on a semi annual basis to review and advise on implementation plan progress. They would also develop new imple mentation steps as needed. The R i ver Nort h Greenway Mast e r Plan Apri/2, 2009 27 Riparian I)uf-f-er Conservation E_asements This is a voluntary approach to riparian setbacks where the City and County of Denver can work with willing landowners and nonprofit conservation orga nizations to acquire the development rights to key riparian buffer areas and restore them as needed to improve water quality within the South Platte River corridor. Denver should seek a minimum of SO feet for each easement and encourage the reestablishment of riparian habitat where appropriate. Zoning Setback Standard In order to establish a viable public edge along Den ver's major urban drainageway, a minimum setback requirement from the top of the bank of at least 50 feet is recommended. This will ensure adequate space for trail connections and Greenway amenities. See perspective sketch of the River on pages 1 and 4. All surfaces within this setback should be pervious. Development Fee The City and County of Denver should explore the use of a Parks and Recreation development fee, similar to the fee assessed in the City's Gateway District, to assist with the acquisition and construction of new park and open space projects. Figure 4.4Open Stormwater Channel and Lateral T rai l Connection I Figure 4.3"Green" Lateral Multi-use Trail Connection

PAGE 31

Figure 4 .5-f edestrian flaza I)ridge Figure 4.6-f edestrian flaza I)ridge The River North Greenway Master Plan April 2, 2009 28

PAGE 32

Appendix Implementation Matrix (Under Separate Cover) The River North Greenway Master Plan Apri/2, 2009 29 A. Greenwa_y foundation Letter CHAIRMAN J oe Shoema ker VICE CHAIRMAN K i p Stastny Bi ll Avery J on Bridges Bar Chadwick Larry E l r o d D e b o r a h Gerard John Moran Cynthi a N a ge l G ary Ro ffe P a ula Sa n dov a l Peter Van Arsd ale EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Jeff Shoemake r SPECIAL EVENTS COORDINATOR Cindy S hoemaker 9 -THE GREENWAY FOUNDATION P l anning, Buildi n g, Protecti n g and E nhancing Co m muni t i es, Parks Tra ils a n d Waterway s S ince 1974 On behalf of the Board of Directors of the Greenway Foundation i t i s my pleasure to present the R iver North Gree nway Maste r Plan. Over the last three decades, the G r eenway Foundat i o n has enjoyed a positive and p r oductive partnership with numerous loca l regional. state and federal agencies none more s ignifi can t and longstanding than with the City and County of Denver, in part i cu l ar the Department of Parks and Recreat i on. The Greenway Fou ndation s hi story with t h e area of the South Platte R i ver contained withi n the River North Greenway Master P l an began in 1975 w ith the reclamat i o n of a forme r landfill dumpsite into Globevi ll e Land i n g Park as well as w ith t he const r uction of t he mult i -use trail betwee n Conflue n ce Park and Globev i lle Landing Since that i nitial effort mor e than 30 years ago the Foundatio n has continued to inter act with the City to maxim iz e t h e env i ronmenta l and r ecreational potentia l and opportuniti es within this sect i on of t he South P latte River Wate r shed. I n ear l y 2008, the Foundat ion ent ered into a contract with the City and Cou nty of De nv er's Parks and Recreation Department to oversee the c r eation of the River North Greenway Mas ter P lan with a strong emphas i s o n the creat ion of a plan based on direct i nteraction with numerous publ ic and private stakeholders From the onse t ofth i s endeavor, the Foundation has aimed to deliver a Plan that has a strong li k e l ihoo d of bei ng implemented. It is the hope o f t h e Foundation that the exper i ences processes and l essons learned i n the creation of the Plan will be put to use in similar master planning effo r ts for other areas of the River and that, as has been the case for over three decades, t h e City and the Foundation can join forces to find t he needed resour ces to ens u re the visi ons a n d goals conta ined in the Plan become a reality. Sinc erely ; Jeff Shoemaker Executive Di r ecto r "A river i s more than an amenity, it i s a treasure" J ustic e WM. 0 D ougl as The Greenway Foundation is supported i n part by the Scientific and Cultural F acilities District as well 5299 DTC B lvd Suite 710, Greenwood Vi ll a g e CXJ 80111 303.455. 7109 FAX. 303.455.7234 WWIN.greenwayfoundation.org as a gift from the Estate of Robert V. and B i l lie Mae Behrent

PAGE 33

5. ot f ublic Input I. Northern !\.each (North Cit_L:J limit to Globevi!le Landing f ark) General Globeville is a physical and visual gateway into Denver because of its location, higher elevation compared to Denver downtown and great views to the south. The River North Greenway needs to enhance this natural advantage. Need a welcome sign along Washington Street identifying the Globeville Neighborhood. Need to develop economic opportunities. Transportation and Bicycle and Pedestrian Access Need safe bicycle and pedestrian access across Washington Street to the Greenway such as sig nalized crosswalk at 51st Avenue, 49th Avenue, East Elgin Place 47th Avenue and East 45th Avenue. Need safe bicycle and pedestrian access be tween the River North Greenway and Argo Park 2. along East 47th Avenue. Need safe bicycle and pedestrian access to fu ture RTD light rail stations. South Platte River Better fish habitat and fishing access. Night lighting. Northside I Heron Pond Parks Safety/Security Need more people using park Unsafe, lots of drug activity in park Night lighting Too many transients on the River and in the Parks Desirable Recreation Facilities Artificial Skiing and Ski Jump Recreation Center with indoor swimming pool Water Park Basketball courts Skate Park Golf Course (9-hole, par 3) Riverside Cemetery Desirable Recreation Facilities Botanic Garden History Museum National Western Stock Show Property Desirable Recreation Facilities White Water Boating Other Activities Festivals Farmers I Flea Market Hotel Denver Coliseum Need a new (bigger and better) concert venue Globeville Landing Park Needs to be updated with new amenities such as a picnic shelter, playground and river access. Middle !\.each (Giobevi!le Landing f ark to North Denargo Street) General Greenway improvements should be sustain able (solar, water conservation, micro enter prise zones). Community supported agriculture/gardens and year-round greenhouse. Remove the concrete batch plant. Need more variety. South Platte River Need to celebrate wildlife. Improve signage to explain exiting parks along the River. Transportation and Bicycle and Pedestrian Access Need safe bicycle and pedestrian connections from the Highlands area to the Greenway. Need safe bicycle and pedestrian access from Inca/East 38th Avenue area to the Greenway. Need additional safe bicycle and pedestrian access (such as a bridge) over 1-25 and the Railroad to the Greenway. Need signs on the trail in the Confluence Park to Commons Park area identifying that there is a northern reach of the Greenway. Arkins Court should not be vacated. If Arkins Court is vacated the developer will have a pri vate riverfront. Arkins Court is dangerous due to speeding cars. Need safe bicycle and pedestrian access tofuture RTD light rail stations. RTDYards RTD should move the Commuter Rail Mainte nance Facility. Parks and Public Open Space Need a large open space I park in this reach. Need additional small pocket parks instead of larger parks. Need a community recreation center in this reach. Opportunity for a large park located on the Coors Field parking lot adjacent to the railroad lines. Also includes a bicycle and pedestrian connection over the railroad to the Greenway on 31st Street. Need for safe bicycle and pedestrian access overt he railroad lines and 1-25 extending from 31st Street. Need safe bicycle and pedestrian access along the 36th Street alignment between the Globevilleand Elyria/Swansea Neighborhoods including bicycle and pedestrian bridges over the railroad lines, 1-25, and the River. Storm Water and Water t8lualit y Day light existing storm water pipe that is lo cated along the 36th Street alignment. Divert/relocate the 36th Street storm water system into a new detention/wetland filtration pond located on Coliseum Parking lot lo cated just east of Globeville Landing Park. ). South !\.each (29th Street to 2oth Street) Transportation and Bicycle and Pedestrian Access Need for better access to the Greenway from 20th Street. Need a new road between North Broadway and Ar kins Court. Need a no leash trail from City of Cuernavaca Park and the RTD Yards. Vacate Ringsby Court. Parks and Public Open Space New for a new park (possibly a dog park) and riv erbank improvements north of City of Cuernavaca Park (area between the railroad tracks). Need for a riverfront park on the RTD Yards land Need a new park near the intersection of 20th Street and North Inca Street. The following comments were recorded on the base maps and meeting notes for the entire proj ect study area during the workshop portion of the Stakeholder Roundtable Meeting (May 16, 2008), One on One Stakeholder Meetings (April, 2008 through August 8, 2008) and the City Stakeholder Meeting (Aprill8, 2008). General flanning/Surve_L:j 1\.esults Create a unique identity or personality for this section of the River. Impose height limitations on buildings adjacent to the River. Enhance and improve the economic vitality of Riv er North. Neighborhoods should have a fingerprint on Greenway improvements in their area The River North Greenway Master Plan Apri/2, 2009

PAGE 34

Water Quality Need to consolidate storm water site detention as opposed to many individual detention sites. Need to improve the overall water quality of the River. Use "green" design concepts (i.e., geothermal and solar). Parks and Public Open Space Need more open space and park lands. Create destinations and places. Parks should be like emerald strands linked by the River. Northernmost section of the River (north of 1-70) should be wild and natural in character. Park use should become part of Riverside Cem etery while respecting the cemetery's historic character. Community gardens should be created, includ ing preservation of open space for future gar dening close to residential communities. Urban greenhouses/agricultural site: model space for education, markets and health Create urban fishery. Create tiring of park areas into urban, natural, very natural and wetland areas. River Stability and Design Unofficial setback of 150 feet from centerline of River is not adequate for river stability or health or to make the River a valuable amenity. The River North Greenway Master Plan Apri/2,2009 1 Keep some parts of the River"wild and natural" in appearance. Improve the stability of the River. Create water features (e.g. fountains) in urban section of River North Greenway planning area. Access Need better pedestrian and bicycle access to the River. Need to connect people to the River. Need more bicycle/pedestrian bridges. Improve connection between neighborhoods and the River. Improve connections to transit locations. Recreation Create more soft surface trails for hiking and create separate, safe trails for different uses. Improve water recreation Add a dog park along the river. Add a year-round community gardens with green houses. The Greenway should provide multiple recre ational opportunities. Education Preserve the industrial history of the River North corridor. Create learning landscape that involves the schools, the City and the Greenway Founda tion. Safety Need to improve safety. Keep the river and riverbanks clean. Create a place where more people will use the Greenway. Too many transients on the River. Roadways Vacation and/or moving Ringsby and Arkins Courts away from the river is a positive idea. Transportation Improve connections between neighborhoods and transit stations. Extend the 16th Street shuttle to the River. Implementation and Maintenance Creation of a Special Improvement and Mainte nance District is a positive idea. Identify and foster partnerships to fund and implement the master plan. Keep the River and Greenway cleaner. Involve homeless in implementation. Work with Excel, RTD and other institutions to coordinate utilities placement and mainte nance. Economic Create new economic opportunities along the River corridor for nearby residents. Develop Farmer's Market. Encourage affordable housing near the River corridor.

PAGE 35

C Denver Communit_y Development Department 20) 5 F opulation E_stimates 2008 Estimate based on Assessor's Data HU Vacancy Rate (ORCOG) Est. Vacant HH Persons Per HH (ORCOG) Total Po p. 338 3.65 % 1 2 326 2.6 1 850 &tstKJ on AsSE!S$01"$ Data alon6 -did not with n e w DRCOG Census Tract 2007 Es timates H U Vac HH Avg_HH_ S ize HH_Pop GQ Total Po Census Tract: p 0803100 1 600 2 329 3 .65% 2 244 2.61 5855 471 6 326 Most res ident i al located in t h t s tract 08031003500 1 886 5.25% 1 787 4 04 7 2 1 8 0 7 2 1 8 0803100 1 500 1084 6.27% 1 0 1 6 3 .72 3 783 36 3 819 0803100360 1 1,794 6.35% 1 680 3 58 6 0 1 9 22 6 04 1 all Tracts cover much more area than j u st River North, so can'l total T ra ct data to g e t rotal population. 2008 Industrial Zoning Underutilized P a rcels Zone District Square Feet Underutilized Acreage 1-2 3 663 935 .44 44.20 L and value> Improvemen t v alue > 4 ,000 sq u a r e fe et. 1-1 2 182 1'6 .67 18.30 62.50 2035 Estimate-Existing Zoning Capacity Build Out Zone District Number of Parcels Tota l Acreage Approx. Dwelling units/acre (OUA) HU Vacancy Rate (DRCOG) Est. Vacant HH PPHH (ORCOG) Total Po 1-1 342 284.04 0 0 3 65% 0 0 2 6 1 0 1 180 246 44 0 0 3 65% 0 0 2 6 1 0 R-MU-30 34 29. 08 50 1 454 3 .65% 53 1 401 2 6 1 3 656 PUO 23 17 95 75 1 346 3 .65% 49 1 297 261 3.385 C-MU-30 9 17 03 50 852 3 65% 3 1 821 2 6 1 2 1 42 B 4 3 1 5.20 30 156 3 65 % 6 150 2 6 1 392 R 2 2 1 .02 14.2 1 4 3 65 % 1 1 4 2 .61 36 C -MU-10 1 048 50 24 3.65 % 1 23 2 6 1 6 1 R 2 A 1 0.1 5 28 4 3 65% 0 4 2 6 1 1 1 850 10,533 2035 Estimates DRCOG (TAZ) TA2 2035 HH Capacity Persons Per HH (ORCOG) Total Population 402 1 1 1 200 2 6 1 3 132 Assuming TOO on TOFC 402 1 2 500 2 6 1 1 ,305 Assuming TOO arou nd 40th/40th 402 1 3 7 2 6 1 18 Denver Coliseum 40217 5 1 2.6 1 133 Tax i s ite and CRMF 402 1 8 27 2.6 1 70 Too low 402 1 9 1 200 2.6 1 3 132 Too High Inc l uding Curtis Park 40220 800 2.6 1 2 088 Most l y accou nt ing for Col e N e i ghborhood 40228 2000 2.6 1 5 2 2 0 Denargo Market Prposed 2000 DU TOTAL 5785 2 6 1 1 5,099 2035 Estimate Rezoned Capacity Build Out Zone District Acreage Approx Dwelling units/acre HU Vacanc y Rate (ORCOG) Est. Vacant HH PPHH (OTotal Pop. l ndustnal to MU 62.50 50 3 125 365% 1 1 4 3011 2.6 1 7 859 PUD 29.08 75 2 181 3 65% 80 2 1 0 1 2.6 1 5485 B-4 5.20 30 156 3 .65% 6 150 2 .6 1 392 R MU-30 29. 08 50 1 454 3.65% 53 1 40 1 2 6 1 3656 R -2-A 0 15 28 4 3.65% 0 4 2 6 1 1 1 R-2 1.02 1 4 2 14 3.65% 1 14 2 6 1 36 CMU-30 17. 03 50 852 3.65 % 3 1 82 1 2 6 1 2 142 CMU1 0 0 48 50 24 3.65% 1 23 2 6 1 6 1 850 20,491 D. South Flatte f\iver /Tributaries Investment Summar_y South Platte River Greenway South Platte River/Tributaries Investment Summary SOUTH PLATTE RIVER/TRIBUTARIES$80 MILLION FUNDING COORDINATED B Y THE GREENWAY FO UNDATION ($35 M ILLION) FEDERAL GOVT. REV EN UES ( 1974-present) STATE GOVT. REVENUES (1974-present) LOCAL GOVT. REV ENUES (1974-present) PRIVATE REVENUES (1974 -present) FOUNDATIONS CORP. /IND. $10 MILLION $8 MILLION $ 4.5 MILLION $ 6.0 M I LLION $ 6.5 MILLION $18.0 M I LLION FUNDING COORDINATED BY THE C&C OF D ENVER & THE GREENWA Y FOUNDATION) ($45 M ILLION ) DENVER REVENUES WINTER PARK FUNDS OTHER CAPITAL FUNDS STATE REVENUES F EDERAL REVENUES GREAT OUTDOORS COLORADO $15 MILLION $ 8 MILLION URBAN DRAINAGE & FLOOD CONTROL DISTRICT TRILLIUM CORPORATION $ 23 MILLION $ 1 MILLION $ 7 MILLION $ 7 MILLION -$ 5 MILLION -$ 2 MILLION CENTRAL PLATTE VALLEY-$5 BILLION ENTERTAINMENT, CULTURAL AND RETAIL DEVELOPMENT (Sl BILLION ) COORS FIELD PEPSI CENTER I NVESCO AELD R.E.J. ELITCH GARDENS DOWNTOWN DENVE R AQUARIUM CHILDREN'S MUSEU M $ 220 M I LLION $ 175 M I LLION $ 340 M ILLION $ 35 MILLION $ 110 MILLION $ 105 MILLION $ 15 MILLION RESIDENTIAL COMMER I(AL & RETAIL DEVELOPMENT ( $ 4 BILLIO N ) The River North Greenway Master Plan Apri/2, 2009 )2

PAGE 36

E_. CDM Memo (J/? l/08) Kiver North CorridorI)aseline E_nvironmentallssues and Needs Memorandum To: Devon Buckels Denver Parks & Recreation Department From: Copy: Date: Ted Johnson COM Travis Bogan COM Jeff Shoemaker Greenway Foundation Merle Grimes Merle D. Grimes, LLC Tim Wohlgenant-The Trust for Public Land Wade Shelton The Trust for Public Land Marge Price Capitol Representatives David Howlett Capitol Representatives July 31, 2008 Subject: River North Corridor of the South Platte River Task 8-Baseline Environmental Issues and Needs This m e moran dum p ro v ides a n over v iew assess ment tha t ident ifies, eva lu ates, and provides recommendation s to p rotect and enh a nce e xi sti n g aquatic h a b itat, u sing i n formation compile d f rom p rev i o u s work i n th e R iver Nort h reac h of the South Platte R iver ( R iNo). No i n-river w o r k was perfor m ed as a p a r t of t his assess m ent. Specific a reas of consi d e ration include : Water qual i ty Channe l stabil i ty F loo d p l a i n cha r ac t eris ti cs R ec r ea tion In a d d i tio n t hi s memo id en t ifies p ossible opportunit ies for cooperative incorporatio n of h abitat i m provements and e nhancements i n t o exis t ing and proposed r iver corrido r facilities. This me m o i ncl udes s u m m aries of studi es completed w ithin RiNo, opportunities and c h alle n ges, and reco mmendations for preserving and enhancing existing habitat. Follow ing DRAFT T ask8memo 0807 3 1 lb.doc The River North Greenway Master Plan Apri/2, 2009 JJ RiNoTask8 july 3 1 2008 Page2 a r e summaries of the impacts of eac h of the areas of co nsiderat ion on river habitat in the RiNo reach. Water Quality The q u al i ty of South Pla tt e R i ver f lows a r e affected by lan d use p racti ces, incl u d in g : Appli ca tion of fer t ilizers, pesticides and herbi c ides Sedi ment f r o m uncon tr olle d co n s t ructio n s i tes a n d s t reet s Spillage from indus t rial and commer cia l f acili t ies Use of storm drains fo r disposal of wast e product s Mig r a ti o n of f u els a n d solvents i n t o t h e r ive r c h annel via a ll uvial aquifer s Sampl ing by the USGS has id e ntif ied th e p rese n ce of pes t icides, w i t h one health advisory exceedance fo r Diazanon. Vola t i l e organic compounds, includi n g Benzene, MTB E and P C E were found in a large m ajor i ty of a ll uvial a qui fer well samples. Insta nces wer e recorded o f drinkin g water standa rds exceeda n ces fo r benzene a n d P CE. Nutri e n ts, includin g n itr a t es, amm onia and p hosphorou s were ident i f ied d u ri n g sam p l i n g, a lthough n o ex ceedances of USEPA drinking-water s tandards were ident ified (USGS 1 998) Fis h and aquati c h abi t a t i n th e South Platte River have been a f fected by u r ba n acti vities i n th e Denver m etropolit a n area. Fi s h commu nities in t h e river arc dominated by suckers, a fanlily of fis h that is tolerant o f degraded water -qual ity co n d i tions Common ca r p and w hit e sucker t iss u e samples take n in th e river contained P CBs and c hlord a n e Channel modi fica t i ons f o r f lood control and bank s tabi l i za t ion i n C herr y Creek a n d t h e So u t h P latte R iver have resu l ted i n hi g h s uspend e d -sed iment conce n trations a n d degraded h abitat for bi o ti c co mmunities. Desp i te t hese negati ve effects of urban land use on f ish communities and habi tat, an Index of Biotic I n t egrity deve loped for f i s h communi tie s i n the So uth Platte River Basin as a tool t o asses s the ecolog i cal h e a lth of streams across th e b asi n indicated wa t e r q u ali t y co n ditions were o nl y moderately degraded (1998). Channe l Stability The U rban Dr a i nage a n d F l ood Con t rol Di s t r i c t has establ is hed a series of p e rmanent c ross sections along the South Platte River f rom 168 Avenue (Baseline Road ) t o C-470 The D i s t r ict surveys each cross-sectio n on an annua l basis t o assess cha n ges in c hann e l geometry. A t 1 0 to 1 5 year intervals, the District publis h es a geomorpllic assessmen t o f t h e river c ha n n el, the last being in 1996 (UDFCD, 1996). T h is assessment i ncludes three cross-sections in the RiNo reach: 32, a t river s t atio n 1 1 02+40, nor th of 1-70 DRAFT T 8 $ k 8memo080 7 3 1 ij tbOOc

PAGE 37

E... CDM Memo ( 7/? 1/08) fZiver North CorridorI)aseline E..nvironmentallssues and Needs ( continued) RiNoTask8 July 31, 2008 Page3 33, a t river s tation 1138 + 40, south o f 38th Street 34, a t r i ver s t a tio n 11 70+80, loca ted south of 31st Street All three c ro ss-sectio n s exh ibit stab l e bank s composed of coh esive fill materi al, small riprap and concrete rubble at the ba se, transitioning to small trees and grass at the top of the embankment. Although considered s table the banks are over-steepened to n ear-ve rti ca l for 5 to 1 0 feet and confined by streets and commercial properties. Channel bars used by roosting waterfowl a r e common through the reach as are intermittent pieces of rip rap and concrete rubble that are exposed during low flow. The c hannel was considered stabl e prior t o 1995, but degraded by 0.5 t o 1. 5 feet between 1995 and 1996, due to an extended period o f hig h spring runoff flows. The bed, compri sed primaril y of cobb l e, is flat and covered with an "urban veneer", consisting of a layer of algae and f in e black organic sedi m ent t hat coats t h e bed material. At c r oss-sec t ion 32, the main current impinged on th e west bank, but was not observable in the other two sections Eros ion of a 6 foot high channel bar was o b serve d t o be on-going Thi s reach of th e river was classified as "urban", with the f ollowing characteristics : The river has been s trai ghte ned and realigned, exh ibitin g a sinuos it y of 1.09 The flood channel i s narrow and deep Channel bars are exposed onl y d urin g low f low periods, with h e ights of 1 to 2 feet. Riparian vegetation is s poradic The river i s confined by development and includes littl e or no remnan t floodplain The channel exhibits little o r no s tr uc tural diversity, with few ri ffl es o r pools and a bed that is relat ively flat across the width. Channel bed materi a l is a mix ture of cobble, concrete rubble and riprap. The thalweg is approximately 0.5 to 1.5 feet below the average bed e le vation. Channel top widths range from 100 to 200 feet A lthough over-steepened, b anks are relatively s tabl e, ex hibitin g intermittent areas of minor erosion Except for the channel bed d egradation that occurred during 1995, the RiN o reach of the r i ver is relatively s table. H owever, because th e channe l is confined there i s a continuing risk of bank erosion at ban kfull flows. An a nalysi s of shea r stresses for t h e JOO-yea r flow of approxima tely 21,700 cfs, whic h is close to bankfull, predicts str esses in the 1.5 t o 2.0 pounds DRAFT Ta s k 8 memo06073 1 tj tb.doc RiNo Task 8 july 3 1 2 008 Page4 per square foot range, flow depth s of 10 to 15 feet and vel oc i t ies of 8 to 1 0 feet per second. Well-armored embankments can w ithstand such stress, but a cobble channel bed will mobilize and ma y degrade, as happened in 1995. Although concret e rubble and riprap a re apparent a lon g the river banks, the armoring is n o t continuous and has not been maintained ove r th e yeers l oca l bank scou r cou ld lead to I MPra l mie ration a n d undermining of th e hank in areas where armoring is not con t inuous. As th e channel is narrow, deep and confined, widenin g during flood flows may occur F loodplai n C har acte ri s tic s A Flood Hazard Area Delineation (FHAD) of the South P latte River throughout metr o Denver was conducted in the m id-1980's (UDFCD 1985a) that predicts a 100yea r floodplain largely confined to the river channel, with a minor west bank overflow a t 44th Avenue and a m ajo r west bank overflow downstream of 47th Avenue. No east bank ove rflows wer e predicted in the RiNo reach (station 1066+00 to 1225+00) due to the high embankments. Since the publica t i o n of the FHAD, the wes t bank overflows have been mit igated by t h e construct i o n of a levc>e system and rec onstruction of the downstream Burlington Ditch diversion structure. During the JOO-year flood, FHAD predic t e d channel velocities range from 6 to 14 feet per second W ith confinement of the west bank overflows, these velocities a rc expected to increase. Because the 100-year flood is l argely confine d t o the c h annel, the extent of the floodpla in i s consi d ered flood way. The 1 00-year flood is predicted to be approximately 10-15 feet deep, roughly correspond ing t o the height o f the c hannel banks. Due to the confined nature of the floodplain and resulting high velocit i es, high flows are expected to scou r the channel bed, bars and banks, disrupting any structural diversity that may e x ist in the channel. Some structure, such a s channel b ars, will reestab li s h as flows subs ide, but a s tructurall y diverse chmmcl comprised o f goo d aquatic habitat tha t can sustain native fish speci es, macroinvertebrate and plant populations, will be difficult to establ ish and m ai ntain. Re c r e ation The Urban Drainage an d Flood Co ntrol District, in cooperation w ith the Ci t y and Count y of Denve r, developed a major drain ageway pla n for the South P latte River in 1985. This plan includes a recreational c omponent that id e ntifies a variety of riverine facilities such as boat landings, improved landscaping, enhanced wildlife habitat, and a low flow charmel to allow s uffi c ient depth for boating. However, this plan provi d es li t t le o r no detail for these facilities and is focused primarily on river corridor tr ails and parks (UDFC D 198 5b) Few, if any, of these facilities have been con structed o r implemented, e xcept fo r th e parks a nd trail system. Due to hi gh, nearly verti ca l embankment s, the river remains largely d i scon n ected f r o m its s urroundings. Commercial, industria l and transportation land u ses DfW'T T"" """"'080731 North Greenway Master Plan Apri/2, 2009 ?+

PAGE 38

.. .. .. E... CDM Memo ( 7/; 1/08) f\.iver North Corridor5aseline E..nvi ronmentallssues and Needs (continued) RiNoTaskS Jul y 31, 2008 Page5 adjacent to the river channel also present an impediment to the implementation of both recreational and habitat enhancements. Major Drainageway Planning As mentioned above, the UDFCD and Denver developed a Major Drainageway Plan for the South P latte River in the mid-1980's. This plan was developed in two phases: Phase A consisting of ba ckground information and the development and analysis of alternatives (UDFCD 1984) Phase B consisting of Preliminary Engineering Design (Volume I) (UDFCD 1985b) and the Recreation Plan (Volume II) (UDFCD 1985c) The Preliminary Engineering Design includes a number of recommendations for th e RiNo reach, such as: Regrading banks to a 3 H: 1 V sideslope Rebuilding bridges to increase hydraulic openings Remove abandoned cross ings These recommendations occur be low l-70 and were intended to relieve the predicted west bank flooding Much of this work has been superseded b y the reconstruct ion of the Burlington Ditch diversion structUl"e. No recomme!-dations are made in the report for the reach from 20th Street to 1 70, as the 100-year flow was a lready confined to the channel. Many improvements have been i mplemented on the river upslTeam of 20th Avenue, including boating amenities such as kayak slalom courses and chutes, channel stability structures such as grade control structures and spur dikes, such river edge wetlands (Pflaum, e t al. 1998). Many of these improvements serve a dual purpose in that they add structural diversit y to the charu1e l and provide habitat for aquatic species, such as pools, riffles and protective cover. Recommendations Improvements that provide multiple benefits, including aquatic and riparian habitat enhancements, that have been implemented upstream of 20th Avenue should be continued through the RiNo r each. These improvements include: Providing grade control to counteract potentia l channel bed degradation that may occur during extended period s of high flow. The grade control structures can also provide The River North Greenway Master Plan Apri/2, 2009 DRAFT Task 8 memo 080 7 3 1 q tb. doc ;; RiNoTaskS July 31,2008 Page 6 recreational opportunities for boating and fishing, and simulate habitat structures such as riffles and pools Regrade over-steepened bank s to reduce pot ential de-stabilization during high flow events and provide riparian and river edge habitat and protective cover for aquatic species Improve storm drain outfalls to reduce the introduction of urban pollutants into river flow, particularly during low flow periods when concentrations can present t oxic l evels to aquatic wildlife. Improvements should include stilling basins and sediment t raps to reduce flow impact and suspended solids and river edge wetland treatment. In addition, debris and sediment capture catch basin inserts should be considered for areas of Denver that are t ributar y to the RiNo reach. Develop a low flow channel that meanders between point bars and provides a riffle-pool sequencing, eliminating the "flat" channel bed cross-section and providing in creased structural diversity for aquatic species Secondary channels flowing beh ind the point bars and associated with storm drain outfalls should also be considered. During low flows, these channels can act as backwater wetland pools that provide refugia for native fish species and macroinvertebrates. During high flows they act as conveyance channels. Increase woody vegetation along the channel banks with a canopy that overhangs the low flow channel to provide shade and protective cover. Include "snag" structures in the low flow channel and a l o n g the banks that also provide refugia and protective cover. These structures ca n consist of rock and tree limbs and trunks that are tethered together and anchored to the river bed so they remain in place during high flows. Impl ementation of all these recommendations may be difficult given the development plans and existing land use in the RiNo reach. The confined nature of the c h annel, resulting from urbaniz ation, presents a highly dynamic situation during high flows with potential to scour structure and divers ity from t h e channel at regular interval s However, successfu l precedence exist in the improvements that have been implemented upstream of 20th Avenue. To successfully implement improvements related to geomorphic stabil it y of the channel, enhanced habitat and recreational opportunities, and providing flood conveyance capacity, it will be necessary to obta in the coordinated support of th e general public as well as th e man y groups and organizations that have a stake in the RiNo area With the past successes on the South Platte River in Denver, few people can argue that a healthy river lx_>comes an asset for th e adjacent areas. An attract ive riv e r environment act s as a DRAFT Task 8 memo 080731 tj tb.doc

PAGE 39

E_. CDM Memo (7/? 1/08) f\iver North Corridor_E>aseline E_nvironmentallssues and Needs (continued) RiNoTask 8 july 31, 2008 Page 7 magnet, draw i ng users t o an area t h at benefits commercial concerns A healthy river presents fewer maintenance c h allenges and reduc es risk to public heal t h and wel fare. Wit h a coordinated stakeholder group actin g in the best inter ests of the river, providing funding for improvements is less of a challenge. OR.AFT T&sk 8 memo080731 tj ttl c1oc R iNoTask8 july 31,2008 PageS References UDFCD 1996. Geomorphic Assessment at Surveyed Cross-Sections, South Platte River. By Michael A Stevens. For the Urban Drainage and Flood Control Dis trict June, 1996 UDFCD 1985a. South Platt e R iver F lood Ha>..ard Area Delineation Denver Me t ropolitan Area from Sand Creek t o Oxford Avenue. By Wright Water Engineers, Inc. For the Urban Drai nage and Flood Control D i s tri ct. September, 1985 UDFC D 1985b South Platte River Major D ra inagewa y P lannin g, C h atfie l d Dam to Baseline Road, Phase B, Vo lume I, Preliminary En gineer ing Desi gn. B y Wrigh t Water Eng in eers, I nc. For th e Urban Drainage a n d Flood Contr ol D istri c t. November, 1 985 UDFCD 1985c. South Platte River Major Dra inageway Planning, C h atfie l d Dam to Baseline Road, Phase B, Volu m e II, Recreat io n Plan B y Wright Wate r Enginee rs, I nc. For the Urban Drainage and F lood Control D istrict. November, 1985. UDFCD 1984. South Platte River Major Drainageway Plarming, Chatfield Dam to Bas eline Road, Ph ase A; B y Wright Water Engi neers, I nc. For the Urb a n Drai nage and F l ood Control District August, 1984. Pflaum e t at. 1 998. "Reh abilita ting Denver's South Platte River t o Improve Ha bitat and Boating"; By john Pflaum and Brian K o l stad, Mclaughlin Water Engi neers and, Ben U r bonas, Urban Drainage and Flood Cont r ol D i strict. For the ASC E Wet landsl998 Engineerin g Approaches to E cosystem R estora t ion Wetlands E n gi n eering and River Restoration Conference. USGS 1998. Wa ter Qualit y in the South Platte R iver Basin, Col o rado, Nebraska and Wyoming, 1992-95 B y Kevin F Dennehy, David W. Lit k e, Cathy M Tate, S haron L. Qi, Peter B. M cMahon, Br e ton W. Bruce, Robert A K i mbr ough, and janet S H einy U.S G"ulugica l Survoey Circular No. 1167. DRAFT Task 8 memo 080731 lb doc The River North Greenway Master Plan Apri/2, 2009 )6

PAGE 40

.. -F Greenway Foundation T earnEsti mate of Existing and 5uildout F opulation The River North Greenway Master Plan Apri/2, 2009 ;J ES TI MA T E OF EX I STING and B UI LDO U T P OPULA TION Nei ghborhoods and T raffic Analysis Z ones Adjacent to the South Platte River 12-JarHJ9 DRCOG TAZ 2005 Buildout Increase Estimate Projection (Decrease) E lyria-Swansea N e ighbomood 402040 118 3a (80) 402050 1,140 1,213 73 402060 36 -41 77 402070 2,776 2 ,878 102 402080 0 0 0 402090 573 3,124 2 ,551 402100 1,663 1,686 23 402110 37 4,477 4,440 402120 0 148 148 402130 5 207 202 Subtotal 6 ,348 13,730 7 .382 F ive Points N e hbomood 402180 128 1,252 1,124 402190 556 6 ,975 6 ,419 402260 578 426 (152) 402270 602 1,198 596 402280 722 2 ,898 2,176 402290 399 3 ,839 3 ,440 402300 442 1,424 982 402310 816 642 (174) 402320 889 810 (79) 402330 628 5 1 1 117 402390 263 3 0 2 39 402400 1,762 1,586 176 402410 1,236 706 530 402420 452 426 26 402430 662 445 217 402440 86 627 541 402450 573 942 369 402470 122 37 ( 85) 4 12010 441 3,418 2 ,977 4 12021 67 358 291 4 12022 225 43 (182) 4 12031 114 91 23 4 12032 34 1 2 22 4 12033 34 53 1 9 4 12034 33 66 33 4 12035 33 6 7 34 4 12036 32 64 32 4 12037 33 41 8 4 12038 33 63 30 4 12039 33 48 1 5 4 12041 464 51 (413) 4 12042 22 15 (7) 4 12043 38 1 44 106 4 12044 40 60 20 4 12045 37 240 203 4 12046 38 1 3 (25) 4 12047 39 1 90 151 4 12048 40 0 40 4 12049 5 1 73 22 Subtotal 1 2 ,796 30,156 1 7 ,380 DRCOG TAZ 2005 Buildou t Increase Estimate P rojection (Decrease) Globevill e Nei hbomood 402010 13 0 13 402020 2 ,096 4,290 2,194 402030 117 3 ,480 3 .383 402140 1 ,139 1,093 46 402150 3 1 0 260 (50) 402160 28 0 28 402170 24 144 120 Subtotal 3,727 9,267 5 .540 H ighland Neighbomood 401210 4,233 5,755 1 ,522 401220 4 ,752 3.345 (1.407) 401270 6 0 6 401280 3 ,023 4,537 1,514 401290 282 5.225 4.943 401300 257 8 (249) Subtotal 1 2 ,553 1 8 ,870 6,31 7 Union Station Neighbomood 4 12071 176 23 ( 153) 4 12072 160 38 (122) 4 12073 1 6 1 31 ( 130) 4 12074 167 98 (69) 4 1 2 075 162 1 0 1 (61 ) 4 12076 166 0 (166) 4 12081 85 228 143 4 1 2 082 43 1 8 (25) 4 12083 53 249 196 4 1 2 064 42 103 6 1 4 12085 43 48 5 4 12090 658 3 458 2 .800 4 1 2 100 299 2,134 1 ,835 4 1 2 1 1 0 2 1 8 1,892 1,674 4 1 2 121 182 0 182 4 1 2 122 58 144 86 4 12123 56 144 88 4 1 2 124 58 37 2 1 4 1 2 125 56 94 38 4 12251 63 56 (7) 4 12252 6 1 291 230 4 12253 64 1 9 1 127 412254 7 1 41 (30) 4 12255 94 44 (50) 4 12256 63 43 20 412257 52 0 (52) 4 12261 68 103 35 4 12262 73 60 (13) 4 12263 7 1 57 (14) 4 12264 7 1 75 4 4 12265 74 157 83 4 12266 72 234 162 4 12421 72 1 5 (57) 4 12422 70 253 183 412423 75 0 (75) 4 12424 74 0 (74) 4 12425 72 525 453 4 12426 74 0 74 Subtotal 4,177 1 0 ,985 6,808 Grand Total 44,824 92,336 47,512 IMPORTANT NOTES TO THE RINO POPULATION ESTIMATES The following facto rs were used in generating the estimates of population in the area adjacen t to t h e South Platte River: 1. T he n eighborhoods ad j acent to the South Platte River n orth of the Ci t y of Cuernavaca Park to th e northern bounda r ie s of the C ity and County of Denver are taken from t h e City's Ne i ghborhood Bou ndary Map. 2. T he Denver Regional Counci l of Governments (DRCOG ) Tra ffic A nal ysis Zones (TAZ s) were used to subdivide the overal l a rea into sma ller geograph i c areas There are 102 TAZ s wh i ch comp r ise the 6 ne i ghborhoods adjacent to the South Platte River 3. In the DRCOG regional transpo rtation planning efforts there are estimates of popu l ation and house h o lds for the Year 2005. T h ose estimates were used as the base year for t he data shown i n t h e tab l e show i ng t h e results of the projections. 4. T h e Bui l dout Projections were generated i n a "bottomsu p" process whereby each parce l was eva l ua ted as to its' potential for r edevelopment and redeve lopment The City assessors fi l e which is attached as an att r i bu t e to the GIS parce l fi le was used to id entify existing land and zon i n g associated with each p r operty. 5. T he Land Us e Concept delinea t ion of "B l ueprint Denver" was used as the bas i s fo r assigni n g w h ether an a rea within a neig hbo r hood was subject t o change. T he following ass u mptions were used in assigning a d i ff eren t use or density of development: All ex i sting single famil y residentia l uses i n t h e La nd Use Concept areas designated as Industr i a l" and "Enterta inm ent" were el imi nated Vacant l ands and those u sed for surface parking in t he "Dow nto w n", Mixed Use ", Town Center" a n d Transit Oriented Development" area were assigned as h igh density residen t ial uses e i ther a t a den s i ty of 30 or 50 unit s per acre. Single f ami l y homes that were built more than 100 yea r s ago were assigned an Urban Residential use at a density of 14 5 un its per acre in all areas subject to change Vacant pa r ce l s i n areas designated as "No Change we r e assigned the cur ren t zon i ng on the property 6. A vacancy factor o f 3 5% was applied to a ll exist i ng and new housing un it s. 7. The average household size var i ed by TAZ based on facto r s used in the DRCOG est i mates. 8. T h e r e is no t ime frame associated w it h the Bu il dout est imates

PAGE 41

F. Greenwa_y Foundation T earnEstimate of E._xisting and 5uildout F opulation (continued) Analysis Area For Population Estimates and Projections in the RINO Area ,....----, Neighborhoods A}acent to the L...--..J South Platte River South Platte River Existing Parks January 12 2008 NORTH Not to Scale The River North Greenway Master Plan April 2, 2009

PAGE 42

Greenway Foundation T earnE_st i mate otCxisting and 5uildout F opulation (conti nued) The River Nor t h Greenway Master Plan Apri/2, 2009 ;9 ,....._,. .. -Analysis Area For Population Estimates and Projections in the RIND Area r------1 Traffic A nalysis Zones in L...--...J the South Platte R iver Area South Platte R iver Existing Parl
PAGE 43

f. Greenwa_y Foundation T earnE_stimate of E_xisting and l)uildout f opulation (continued) Analysis Area For Population Esti mates and Project i ons in the RINO Area Estimate of Population Traffic Analys i s Zones2005 Each Dot Represents 10 People NOTE: T h e program that shows the distribution of populat ion places Dots 1 n a random manner w i thin each Traffi c A n a l ysis Zone T here are no populations in parl
PAGE 44

. .. G r eenway Foundation T earnEstimate of existing anci 5uildout F opulation (continued) The River North Greenway Master Plan Apri/2, 2009 +1 Analys i s Area For Population Estimates and Projections in the RINO Area Buildout Population Estimates Traffic Analysis Zones Each Dot Represents 10 People NOTE: The program that shows the d istri bution of popu l ation places Dots in a random manner within each Traffic Analysis Zone. T here are no popu lati ons in parks highway corridors, in the South Pl atte R1ver o r in rail r oad yards (1\ South Platte River \A) Existing Parks N O R T H January 12 2008 Not to Scale