Citation
River North plan

Material Information

Title:
River North plan
Creator:
Community Planning and Development, City and County of Denver
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
City and County of Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
City planning
Community planning
Neighborhood plans
Spatial Coverage:
Denver -- River North

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Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Full Text
RIVER NORTH PLAN
RIVER NORTH PLAN
BRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40TH AND 40th TOD


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
CKNOWLEDGEMENTS
City Cbuncil
Cathy Reynolds Council President,
At Large
Susan Barnes-Gelt At Large
Dennis Gallagher District 1
Ted Hackworth District 2
Ramona Martinez District 3
Joyce Foster District 4
Polly Flobeck District 5
Charlie Brown District 6
Kathleen MacKenzie District 7
Elbra Wedgeworth District 8
Debbie Ortega District 9
Ed Thomas District 10
Happy Haynes District 11
Planning Board
William H. Hornby Chair
Jan Marie Belle
Frederick Corn
Pat Cortez
Daniel Guimond
Mark Johnson
Barbara Kelley
Joyce Oberfeld
Bruce ODonnell
Jim Raughton
Robert Wright
City and County of Denver
Wellington E. Webb Mayor
Jennifer Moulton Director, Cormunity
Planning and Development
Ellen Ittelson Deputy Director for Planning
Services
Steve Gordon Development Program
Manager and Project Manager
Catherine Cox Senior City Planner and
Assistant Project Manager
MarkNajarian Senior Engineer
Michael Anderson Engineer
Leslie Dp stein Urban Design Architect
Randy Schnicker Engineering Supervisor
Brian Mitchell Senior Traffic Operations
Engineer
Mike Gill Senior Signal Engineer
Dave Weaver Engineering Supervisor
Janice Finch Senior City Planner
Tad Bowman Facility Nfenager for the
Denver Coliseum
Cindy Bosco Environmental Scientist
Ruth Murayama Landscape Architect
Supervisor
Gayle Weinstein City Naturalist
Susan Baird Senior Landscape Architect
Bar Chadwick South Platte Initiative
Director
Ned Burke Economic Development
Specialist
Julie Connor Graphic Design
Eric McClelland GES
Dan Michael Graphic Design
Phil Plienis Senior City Planner
Dave Becker Senior City Planner
Other Agencies
Marianne LeClair Denver Urban Renewal
Authority
Mike Turner Regional Transportation
District
Chris Quinn Regional Transportation
District
Sharon Dpp Colorado Department of
Transportation
Consultants
Carter:: Burgess, Inc.
Leland Consulting Group
Stakeholders
TDs Plan could not have been accomplished
without the participation and commitment of
multiple stakeholders. A list of those who
attended public meetings and partidpated in
the plan process is in the Technical Appendix.
BLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:


RIVER NORTH PLAN

Stable of contents
Executive Summary 1
Plan Purpose Mid Process 7
Location 8
Purpose of the Plan 9
Plan Process 12
Previous Plans and Studies 15
History 21
Vision 5
Existing Conditions Mid Projections 9
Zoning 30
Land Use 32
Housing 35
Economic Activity 36
Mobility 40
Environmental Conditions 51
Infrastructure 52
Human Services and Demographics 56
Framework Plan 57
General Framework 58
Corridors 61
Districts 70
Economic Activity ..................................................................78
BRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40TH AND 40th TOD


TABLE OF
CONTENTS
list of Maps
Blueprint Denver Areas of Change....................17
Blueprint Denver Plan Map excerpt...................10
Existing Lane Geometry and Level of Service.........42
Existing Traffic Counts.............................41
Future Lane Geometry and Level of Service...........49
Future Traffic Counts...............................50
Land Use............................................33
Land Use Concept....................................61
Major Traffic Generators............................44
Pedestrian and Bicycle Facilities...................46
Plan Framework.......................................5
Platte Changing Shape...............................23
Potential TODs .....................................71
South Platte River Corridor Profiles................67
Storm Sewer Drainage Basins.........................54
Underutilized Land..................................34
Zoning..............................................31
Implementation 81
Land Use and Zoning 83
Transportation 86
Pedestrian and Bicycle Connections 87
Urban Design 88
Economic Activity 89
Environmental Conditions 92
Legacies 93
Housing 94
Corridors 95
Districts 99
Implementation Matrix 102
Appendix W
Glossary of Terms and Acronyms 108
Guiding Principles for Areas of Stability and Change 110
Comprehensive Plan 2000 policies 112
Methodology 114
Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats (SWOT) Technical Appendix (not adopted) 117
iv
BLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:


RIVER NORTH PLAN
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
BRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40TH AND 40th TOD


EXECUTIVE
Brighton connects to downtown via Broadway
Platte Biver Trail and Giobevilie landing Park
Denargo Market as it exists today
2
SUMMARY
The area covered in the River North Plan, or the Plan, is generality located northeast of downtown Denver between
Park Avenue West and Interstate 70 (1-70) and its interchange with Brighton Boulevard. This area has enormous
potential to create a unique community that will take its position among Denvers great places. Its past as a mixed-
use area provides guidance on how to re-establish a mixture of uses to maximi2e its potential while continuing to
serve as a home to many existing businesses.
The plan framework consists of two north-south corridors and one east-west corridor connecting three districts,
four neighborhoods and downtown Denver. The next two paragraphs describe the corridors and the districts.
The recent replacement of the Broadway viaduct on the south end of the corridor and the improvements to the I-
70 interchange on the north have improved the connection between 1-70 and downtown. The Brighton Boulevard
corridor can become an attractive gateway to Downtown Denver from 1-70 and the North Denver neighborhoods
and is in a position to benefit from and serve the growing downtown market. The South Platte River corridor
presents a natural open space area that includes a bicycle trail and Giobevilie Landing Park. The river corridor has
the opportunity to provide a setting for a mile long residential and mixed-use area with river front access. These two
corridors connect two major districts and an events district. A third corridor is 38th Street. Given the restricted
access from the west to the east created by the two railroad lines that run through the area and the South Platte
River, 38th Street is a critical connection. It runs under the railroad tracks and over a bridge that crosses the South
Platte River, thereby, connecting the segments of the study area to each other and to Brighton Boulevard.
The Denargo Market district is adjacent to downtown and has access from the Central Business District (CBD)
via Broadway but also to the Central Platte Valley via Delgany Street. Its placement along the South Platte River
and proximity to downtown provides an opportunity to create an exciting mixed-use area with its own identity.
RTDs FasTracks Vision Plan calls for a rapid transit station in the vicinity of where 40th Avenue and 40th Street
come together creating the opportunity to establish a 40th and 40th Transit Oriented Development district. If
implemented, the FasTracks Vision Plan calls for rapid transit service between Union Station and Denver
International Airport (DIA), to Thornton along the North Metro Line, and to downtown via an extension of the
light rail line that runs along Welton Street and that now ends at 30th Street and Downing Street. River North is
conveniently located between downtown and DIA and will be connected to both through transit and roads. New
employers and new residents will be attracted to convenient access to downtown, Stapleton and DIA. The
Events District includes the National Western Stock Show, the Denver Coliseum, and the Forney Transportation
Museum and attracts visitors from all over the world.
At the same time, River North already is the home to several large employers and to many long-time businesses.
BLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:


RIVER
These businesses provide considerable employment and serve local businesses as well as the Rocky Mountain
Region. Most of these businesses are an asset to the area and to the city. The retention of some of the unique
industrial buildings will assure that the character of River North is maintained and will continue to foster an arts-
related community.
Brighton Boulevard is part of the downtown grid and was named Wewatta Street until the late 1920s. It was
separated from downtown until Broadway was extended and a viaduct built over the railroad yards. There was a
considerable residential community along Brighton Boulevard and in other portions of the area as well as a variety
of businesses that served local residents. This demonstrates one of the purposes of the Plan, which is to restore
the historic, mixed-use character of the area. This is reinforced by Blueprint Denver: An Integrated Land
Use and Transportation Plan that characteri2es this area as an Area of Change. Areas of Change are areas
that can accommodate growth because of the opportunity to create mixed-use development in conjunction with
exceptional transportation access. This plan provides a framework and establishes implementation strategies that
will direct future growth and redevelopment in a coordinated manner to River North. This plan is intended to
promote River North by providing information about the area to existing businesses and landowners and to
developers to help facilitate expansion and redevelopment. Whenever possible, this information will be updated
annually and made available by updating the technical appendix.
Almost all of the area is 2oned either 1-1 or 1-2 which allows for a wide range of industrial uses. The primary land
uses are warehousing and railroads. Other prevalent uses are RTD and bottling and distribution. Nine percent of
the land is vacant and a considerable amount of the land is underutili2ed. There are only 79 residential structures
within the Plans area.
An analysis of demographic and market conditions was undertaken. The results of this analysis led to the
identification of potential land uses that could locate in River North. Over a twenty-year time frame, it is
conceivable that over 1,500 dwelling units could be added, 350,000 square feet of retail development, 650,000
square feet of industrial development, and 1,800,000 square feet of office space. These conservative estimates of
development were used to project future traffic. Traffic moves reasonably well at the present time. Based on a
projected general increase in traffic and increases from new development, it is expected that several intersections will
be operating at less than optimum levels of service. Intersections that may need attention include 38th Street and
Brighton Boulevard, 38th Street and Walnut, and 31st Street and Brighton.
River North was once home to a variety of industrial uses and landfills that have created a variety of environmental
problems. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has agreed to provide funding to test soil conditions
BRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40TH AND 40th TOD
NORTH PLAN
Heading downtown on Brighton Boulevard
Drive Train industries employs 180 people
warehousing is the predominant use
3


EXECUTIVE
SUMMARY
and groundwater in several locations within the Plans Area.
Infrastructure issues include the poor condition of several streets, drainage problems, and above grade utilities.
Several storm water basins run through this area and studies are underway for several of these basins.
Goals and objectives have been identified for River North as a whole and also for the three corridors and three
districts. In addition, actions have been identified that can lead to the implementation of this plan. Some of the
primary ones are (1) identifying a cross section for Brighton Boulevard that identifies the characteristics for a
rebuilt street, (2) re2oning portions of the area to mixed-use 2one districts, (3) addressing the inadequacy of 38th
Street for traffic, pedestrians and bicyclists, (4) master planning and establishing General Development Plans for
the Denargo Market area and the 40th and 40th Transit Oriented Development area, (5) improving pedestrian and
bicycle connections throughout the area, (6) addressing traffic and transit needs and taking advantage of land use
opportunities as part of the 1-70 East Corridor process, (7) enhancing the South Platte River corridor, (8)
promoting economic activity, (9) creating a variety of housing options including affordable housing, and (10)
addressing environmental problems.
This plan was developed with considerable public input and with considerable assistance from several city
department partners and other agency partners.
Many of the streets are in poor condition
4
BLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:


RIVER NORTH
PLAN
Plan Framework
BRIGHTON BOULEVARD/401
AND 4 0 T
TOD
5


6
BLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:


RIVER NORTH PLAN
PLAN PURPOSE AND
PROCESS
BRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40TH AND 40th TOD
7


PLAN PURPOSE AND PROCESS
ROGATION
The River North Plan study area is in North Denver just northeast of downtown. Project boundaries are
generally between Park Avenue West on the south and 1-70 to the north and between the Burlington Northern
tracks on the west and the Union Pacific tracks and York Street on the east.
8
BLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:


Purpose of the plan
Most of River North is designated an Area of Change in Blueprint Denver, Denvers land use and transportation
plan. Areas of Change are areas that can accommodate growth because of the opportunity to create mixed-use
development in conjunction with exceptional transportation. Thus the primary purpose of the River North Plan is
to promote the area, identify appropriate locations for growth, establish a multi-modal transportation system and
provide a regulatory environment that makes mixed-use development possible. RTDs FasTracks Vision Plan
includes a rapid transit station in the vicinity of 40th Avenue and 40th Street. The Plan establishes goals and
objectives and implementation steps that will be taken into consideration during the 1-70 East Corridor
Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) process. The River North Plan identifies two primary districts, the 40th and
40th Transit Oriented Development (TOD) district and the Denargo Market district, and two transportation
corridors, Brighton Boulevard and the South Platte River. It addresses how these areas connect and can reinforce
each other to create a fantastic place. It also identifies 38th Street as a major connector given that 38th Street not
only crosses the South Platte River but also goes under the Burlington Northern and Union Pacific Railroad Tracks.
There are several reasons why the River North Plan should be developed at this time. (1) The southern portion of
the Plans area is immediately adjacent to new development in the Ball Park and Prospect neighborhoods and with
the Denargo Market close by, this is a logical location for new development. (2) There are several vacant and
underutili2ed sites on Brighton Boulevard that are on the real estate market. (3) It is important to determine the
ultimate cross section for Brighton Boulevard so that potential developers can plan accordingly. The cross section
includes lane widths, curb and gutter placement, sidewalks and other amenities. (4) Several new residential projects
are in process or being planned including 241 apartments being developed by JPI at 29th Street and Brighton
Boulevard, a 75-unit condominium project near 31st Street and Brighton Boulevard, a mixed-use development at the
Taxi site on Ringsby Court, and a multi-phase project in the Rock Drill site at 39th Street and Williams Street. In
addition, several major improvements have been made to commercial properties as well as to the National Western
Stock Show. (5) In addition to private reinvestment, several major public investments have recently been made. The
major transportation and access improvements include the replacement of the Broadway viaduct, the Brighton
Boulevard and Washington Street interchanges with 1-70, and the replacement of the railroad bridge over
BRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40TH AND 40th TOD
JPI is constructing 241 apartment units along
Brighton Boulevard
New housing in Ballpark neighborhood,
adjacent to Biver North's southern boundary


PLAN PURPOSE AND PROCESS
Blueprint Denver Plan Map excerpt
Brighton Corridor Plan Boundary
Areas of Change
Downtown
Transit Oriented Development
Mixed Use
Regional Center
Town Center
Urban Residential
Single Family Duplex
Single Family Residential
Commercial Corridor
Neighborhood Center
Pedestrian Shopping District
Campus
Entertainment, Cultural, Exhibition
Park
Open Space Limited
Employment
Industrial
DIA
Golf Course
10
BLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:


RIVER NORTH
PLAN
Washington Street and widening it to four lanes. The city has recently made significant improvements to the
Denver Coliseum and built a new Fire House #9 at 44th Street and Brighton Boulevard.
The River North Plan establishes long-range goals and objectives for the redevelopment of the Brighton Boulevard
corridor and TOD area with strong connections to multiple modes of transportation. It provides a framework and
establishes implementation strategies that will direct future growth and redevelopment in a coordinated manner. The
Plan is primarily a vision for land use, transportation and urban design. The Plan provides a community and city-
approved guide to the acceptable future redevelopment in the corridors and districts. It is intended for use by
Community Planning and Development, the Department of Public Works, the Department of Parks and Recreation,
other city agencies, the Denver Planning Board, the Mayor, City Council, other public agencies such as the Colorado
Department of Transportation, the Regional Transportation District, the Denver Regional Council of Government,
and quasi-public agencies, neighborhood associations, business people, property owners, residents, and private
organi2ations concerned with planning, development and neighborhood improvement.
The former Rock Drill building has been
adaptively re-used for condominiums
The Plan is intended to promote patterns of land use, urban form, circulation and services that contribute to the
economic, social and physical health, safety and welfare of the people who live and work in the area. Corridor and
district plans address issues and opportunities at a scale that is more refined and more responsive to specific needs
than the Citys Comprehensive Plan 2000 (Plan 2000) and Blueprint Denver. It provides more specific
guidance for the allocation of city resources and for the location and design of private development. This plan
serves as a supplement to Plan 2000.
Since this is a plan for Areas of Change, as designated in Blueprint Denver (and as shown in the Blueprint
Denver Plan Map excerpt), this plan emphasi2es providing adequate direction for potential developers. It also
provides, either in the text or extensive appendices, detailed information on existing conditions, future travel
demand estimates, and a market analysis of the demand for new development. The availability of this information
may foster interest in the area and may expedite redevelopment.
The Plan is not an official 2one map, nor does it create or deny any rights. Zone changes that may be proposed as
part of any development must be initiated under a separate procedure established under the Revised Municipal
Code.
BRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40TH AND 40th TOD
11


PLAN PURPOSE AND PROCESS
12
DWan process
The River North Plan is the result of an aggressive and intensive effort by the City and County of Denver and
stakeholders. Blueprint Denver identified several Areas of Change where growth should be directed.
Community Planning and Development (CPD) determined that the study area was among the highest priority Areas
of Change and initiated a planning process as an outgrowth of Blueprint Denver. The Community Planning and
Development staff, consultants and staff from other city agencies facilitated the Planning process, were responsible
for reviewing the Plan concepts for consistency with citywide policies, and identified and analy2ed the existing
conditions in the corridor. These conditions were presented to the public. The public analy2ed the Strengths,
Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats (located in the Appendix) within the River North Area, which formed the
basis for establishing a vision, formulating goals and objectives, and developing detailed recommendations.
The River North Plan is a combination of a corridor plan and a district plan as opposed to a neighborhood plan, all
of which are categori2ed as Small Area Plans. The River North Areas boundaries include portions of four
neighborhoods: Five Points, Globeville, Cole and Elyria-Swansea. However, none of the residentially 2oned
portions of these neighborhoods are included in the River North Plan boundaries. As a corridor and district plan,
the approach has been modified to facilitate a very open and participatory process. Anyone was encouraged to
attend any meeting instead of designating a steering committee or other established body. Many stakeholders
representing a wide variety of perspectives and a broad range of the community participated in the planning
process, providing critical comment and direction. The primary mechanisms for citi2en input are described below.
I As part of Blueprint Denver, a 40th and 40th TOD small area workshop was held in the Spring of 2001
as well as an Elyria-Swansea small area workshop in the fall. In each case thousands of post cards were
mailed to residents of these areas. The results of these processes were incorporated as a starting point for the
River North Plan. In addition, each person who attended these meetings was placed on the Plans mailing list.
| A forum was held for commercial real estate agents, developers and landowners in July, 2002,
to confirm and assess the interest to redevelop the River North Area. About 50 people were invited and
the 20 who attended and others who expressed an interest were added to the Plans mailing list.
BLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:


RIVER NORTH PLAN
| Representatives of all nearby registered neighborhood organi2ations were added to the mailing list and invited
to attend meetings.
| A series of public meetings were held to undertake a SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and
threats) analysis, help identify proposed land uses for sub-areas, confirm goals and objectives for sub-areas,
refine the vision statement, and create an ideal Brighton Boulevard corridor cross-section. Meetings were held
within the River North Plan boundaries. Meetings were advertised by mailings to businesses in the corridor,
contacts gathered at a commercial realtors forum, to the Elyria-Swansea Community Economic Development
Coalition, to the Elyria-Swansea Business Association mailing list and by walking the corridor and distributing
meeting notices by hand.
| Community Planning and Development staff also conducted many one-on-one meetings with property
owners and community activists in the River North Area.
) An insert was included in the Cross Community Coalitions newsletter in Spanish and English providing an
overview of the Planning effort. This newsletter is circulated to 2,700 households.
| Planning staff attended an Elyria-Swansea Business Association meeting and made a follow-up presentation
to the Association with detailed information on 2oning and legal nonconforming uses.
| Given that it can be difficult to get participation from some segments of the community, planning staff
attended several regularly scheduled community meetings to inform them of the River North Plan and to
obtain input.
In addition to the public participation process, the Plan was also shaped through:
) Briefings held with city council members.
) Community Planning and Development staff review and discussions.
Stakeholders and the project team discuss
the Plan at a meeting held at the Coliseum
BRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40TH AND 40th TOD
13


PLAN PURPOSE AND PROCESS
As a part of City Councils adoption of the Plan as a supplement to Plan 2000, the Plan document was further
refined through:
| Denvers Interagency Plan Review Committee standards of completeness, presentation, and consistency with
Plan 2000 and Blueprint Denver.
) Denver Planning Board informational session and public hearing.
I City Council committee and final action.
The interaction between the multiple city agencies, other public agencies and the general public has been extensive.
Many of the Plan implementation strategies and priorities will require continued public involvement and
partnerships between property owners, businesses, neighborhoods, city agencies and other public agencies and
private individuals and organi2ations.
Project Partners
Many project partners helped create and validate the River North Plan. The project partners demonstrate a unique
commitment of time and resources by many diverse agencies. Several City departments collaborated on the Plan
including, Community Planning and Development, Public Works, Parks and Recreation, the Mayors Office of
Economic Development and International Trade, Environmental Health and the Denver Urban Renewal Authority
(DURA). There was also participation from the Regional Transportation District (RTD) and the Colorado
Department of Transportation (CDOT). The strong interest and participation by city and other agencies bodes well
for implementing the Plan expeditiously. The involvement of property owners, businesses and developers assures
both realism and a bold vision of what the area can become.
14
BLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:


RIVER NORTH PLAN
Previous plans and studies
The land use, transportation and urban design vision is portrayed in this River North Plan. It takes into
consideration recommendations from earlier plans. Previously adopted planning documents that are relevant to the
River North Area are:
I Swansea/Elyria Neighborhood Plan, City & County of Denver, 1983
I Swansea/Elyria Charrette Report, City & County of Denver, 1989
I Historic Resources Survey Report, Broadway Viaduct Replacement Project, 1995
I Northeast Downtown Plan, City & County of Denver, 1995
I East Corridor Major Investment Study, Denver Regional Council of Governments (DRCOG), 1997
I FasTracks Vision Plan, RTD, 2002
I Cole Planning Report, City & County of Denver, 1998
| A Vision for Brighton Corridor, 2000
) North Metro Transportation Study, RTD, 2001
| Blueprint Denver: An Integrated Land Use and Transportation Plan, City & County of Denver, 2002
| 40th Avenue Corridor Infrastructure Improvement Study, City & County of Denver, July 2002
I Bicycle Master Plan Update, City & County of Denver, 2002
| Denver Parks and Recreations Game Plan, City & County of Denver, 2002
| South Platte River Long Range Framework Management Plan, City & County of Denver, 2000
These documents have been reviewed and relevant material has been taken into consideration in the development
of the Plan. In particular, it should be noted that the 1997 East Corridor Major Investment Study (MIS)
recommended a commuter rail line between Denver Union Station and DIA with the 40th Avenue and 40th
Street station site and 400 structured parking spaces identified. It also recommended an extension of the existing
D light rail line from the 30th and Downing station to the proposed 40th and 40th TOD site. This
recommendation was incorporated into the existing FasTracks Vision Plan that was adopted by the RTD Board
of Directors on December 17, 2002. Their adoption was subject to the final results of the 1-70 East Corridor
Environmental Impact Statement.
BRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40TH AND 40th TOD
15


PLAN PURPOSE AND
PROCESS
Blueprint
Denver
Brighton Boulevard is designated an Area of
Change in Blueprint Denver
Relationship to Citywide Plans
All neighborhood and small area plans are expected to comply with the citywide policies contained in Denvers Plan
2 0 0 0 and Blueprint Denver: An Integrated Land Use and Transportation Plan. The River North
Plan is the first small area plan pursued since the adoption of Blueprint Denver. This Plan implements several
policies from these two previous plans. (The relevant policies from Plan 2000 are listed in the Appendix.)
Blueprint Denver
Blueprint Denver is a citywide plan that outlines Denvers growth management and development strategy.
Blueprint Denver divides the city into Areas of Change, where reinvestment and redevelopment is desirable, and
Areas of Stability, where the existing land use and character should be maintained and enhanced. Mixed-use is a
major theme of Blueprint Denver and of this plan. It is not a new idea and in fact was the prevalent pattern in
River North. Mixed use refers to districts and centers where residential, retail and commercial uses are intertwined.
Returning to communities where people can walk or take transit for their daily errands, or drive with shorter and
fewer car trips provides choices that have a beneficial impact throughout Denver and the region. Blu^rint
Denver identifies guiding principles for Areas of Change as well as design factors that need to be addressed in
mixed-use areas. These are provided in the Appendix.
River North includes three Areas of Change:
) Brighton Boulevard incorporates one to two blocks on either side of Brighton Boulevard from downtown to
1-70. While many of the warehouses will remain for many years, a considerable amount of vacant and
underutili2ed land makes this an area suitable for redevelopment and the creation of a mixed-use area.
Brighton Boulevard is a gateway to downtown and offers a great opportunity for services, neighborhood
serving retail and a variety of other uses.
) The proposed 40th and 40th rapid transit station provides an exciting opportunity for transit-oriented
development with a mix of high-density housing, retail, office and other employment. This proposed station
is contingent upon voter approval of the FasTracks Vision Plan. If the Union Pacific Intermodal facility
relocates, the opportunity is greatly increased. The relocation would free up close to fifty acres of land
adjacent to the station area, prime for high-density redevelopment.
16
BLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:


RIVER NORTH PLAN
C*
Blueprint Denver Areas nf Change
EEFIERED N EARK/
HEHLASIDS
NORTHEAST
DOW NTOW N
W EST38IH
AVENUE
DOWNTOWN
W EST COLFAX''
W EST TRAN SIT
O RENTED
DEVELOEM ENT
ALM EDA
TOW N CENTER
MORRBDN
ROAD
Areas fchange
Areas fStabili ty
BRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40TH
AND 4 0 T" TOD
17
TOW ER


PLAN PURPOSE AND
PROCESS
North industrial Area of Change
) The North Industrial Area is adjacent to the River North Plan boundaries and includes much of the industrial
portion of the Elyria-Swansea neighborhood and a portion of the Globeville neighborhood.
Neighborhoods on the perimeter of River North such as Cole and Clayton, offer an opportunity for infill
development that focuses on residential projects on vacant and underutili2ed parcels.
Blueprint Denver also places emphasis on linking land use and transportation, reinforcing that cities are
combinations of places to live, work and play and the means to get to those places. The Plan reinforces the Citys
goal of accommodating a wide variety of transportation options, including cars, transit, walking and biking.
Relationship to Other Plans
Several planning processes are underway that are briefly described below. The relationship to the River North Plan
is also described.
1-70 East Corridor Environmental Impact Statement (EIS)
I The Regional Transportation District (RTD), the Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT), and the
City and County of Denver began an environmental impact statement in 2003 that will look at transportation
alternatives for the 1-70 East Corridor. The EIS will identify a preferred alternative for the East Corridor.
CDOT, RTD, and Denver signed an intergovernmental agreement that specified that the scope of the 1-70
East Corridor EIS shall utilize those alternatives identified in the 1-70 Major Impact Study (MIS) but that
additional reasonable alternatives shall not be foreclosed in the process.
I The East Corridor MIS (1997) included among other recommendations a station in the vicinity of 40th and
40th to serve a commuter rail line from Union Station to DIA and a light rail extension of the existing D
line from the 30th and Downing station to the proposed 40th and 40th TOD site.
| All of the objectives, goals, and recommendations for siting the 40th and 40th station proposal are contingent
upon the outcome of the final EIS.
18
BLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:


RIVER NORTH PLAN
Regional Transportation District, FasTracks Vision Plan
FasTracks is RTDs plan to build-out the regional rapid transit system. The RTD plan entails an increase to the .6%
regional sales tax to execute the FasTracks Plan. Several components of FasTracks affect the River North Plan:
| A continuation of the existing D light rail line along Downing Street to the proposed 40th Avenue and 40th
Street rapid transit station.
| Implementation of the 1-70 East Corridor with rapid transit service to DIA from Union Station.
| Implementation of the North Metro rapid transit line.
| Enhanced and redeployed bus network.
| Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) solutions.
Denver Onion Station Master Plan, EIS and Preliminary Engineering
The Union Station Master Plan entails redeveloping and preserving Denvers historic Union Station and 18 acres of
surrounding land. Union Station will be transformed into a transportation and retail hub serving the needs of
residents, tourists and commuters. The Union Station Master Plan process includes some very specific steps,
including an environmental impact statement, preliminary engineering and obtaining the necessary land use and
2oning permits, and ensuring community involvement.
I Two rapid transit lines will originate at Union Station and have stops at the 40th and 40th station area the
1-70 East Corridor with service to DIA and the North Metro line that continues to Thornton.
Downtown Multi-modal Access Plan
The Downtown Multi-modal Access Plan (DMAP) is a detailed, comprehensive plan for vehicular, pedestrian,
bicycle and rail access into and throughout Downtown Denver over the next 20-25 years. The Plan will consider
long-term land use planning, infrastructure improvements, and streetscape elements that are needed to ensure
quality connections between Downtown and its adjacent neighborhoods.
) Multi-modal connections from downtown along Brighton Boulevard will be identified.
1-70, subject of the 1-70 East Corridor EIS
BRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40TH AND 40th TOD
19


PLAN PURPOSE AND PROCESS
The Pedestrian Master Plan
The Pedestrian Master Plan provides a strategy for improving and maintaining Denvers pedestrian facilities for the
next 20 years. Pedestrian improvements will be selected from both a scoring system developed by the Plan
development team and input from area residents and attendees at public meetings. The Plan will also contain new
policies to improve Denvers pedestrian facilities by helping city agencies better coordinate with each other, fostering
partnerships with the city and other groups, and identifying steady funding sources for sidewalks, intersections, trails
and other facilities.
DRCOG Metro Vision and Urban Centers
Metro Vision 2020 is a plan developed by the Denver Regional Council of Governments (DRCOG) for the region.
Among other core elements, it identifies urban centers as a means to mix uses and increase densities in locations
that are well served by transit. In 2002, DROG requested jurisdictions to submit areas that meet criteria being
developed to update Metro Vision 2020 to 2030.
I The Denargo Market area and the 40th and 40th TOD were submitted to test preliminary criteria.
) The successful implementation of the River North Plan is not only consistent with but will help achieve the
goals of Metro Vision 2020.
20
BLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:


HISTORY
BRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40TH AND


HISTORY
ironton School was reused then demolished

Broadway viaduct, circa 1930
The history of the River North Area has been greatly influenced by the South Platte River and the railroads. The
maps on the opposite page show that the old river channel and the railroad yards effectively cut off the Plans area
from downtown Denver. Thus the River North Area evolved as its own community with a mixture of uses
including a significant residential community, industrial uses that provided jobs to the residents, stores and services
that provided for the needs of the residents, and other uses. Establishing a new channel for the river and
constructing the Broadway viaduct over the railroad yards created a connection to downtown and contributed to a
change in the character of the area over several decades to a largely industrial and commercial area.
Because the area was cutoff from downtown, there was considerable vacant land even by the late 1920s. The
Denargo Market area was vacant and parts of it used as a landfill. In 1892, a sewer line was constructed that
emptied into the swamp that was present in the Denargo Market area which also explains why this area was vacant.
In 1895, the South Platte River channel was improved, the swampy area was filled, and the sewer line was extended
to the north. The area west of the South Platte River was vacant. There was a considerable amount of vacant land
in the Brighton Corridor until reaching 35th Street where housing was the predominant use to the north. The area
north of the Union Pacific Intermodal facility was mostly vacant with a few scattered homes and businesses.
The street known today as Brighton Boulevard was developed on the downtown grid system in the late 1800s, but it
was separated from downtown by railroad yards. Brighton Boulevard was once Wewatta Street (and Drive Way even
earlier as shown on the historic maps) from the railroad yards north of downtown up to what is now 1-70 and then
was Gilpin Street up to 49th Avenue. It then followed the Burlington Northern tracks toward Brighton, Colorado,
the county seat for Adams County. The name Brighton is an emulation of Brighton, Massachusetts and Brighton,
England. Wewatta Street was named Brighton Boulevard after 1924 when Broadway was extended from 20th Street
and the Broadway viaduct was built over the railroad yards. The Tramway map from 1933 shows that the area
historically has been served by transit.
A study of the Sanborn maps and reverse directories indicates that over time, residential uses have been replaced
with industrial uses. Focusing in on Brighton Boulevard itself, a researched directory for 1893 showed 157 people
living along it with most living between 34th Street and 40th Street with another concentration on the 4200 block.
A 1924 reverse directory still showed primarily residential uses on Wewatta (now Brighton) from 34th Street to 40th
Street. By 1931, uses along what was now called Brighton Road or Brighton Boulevard had become much more
mixed in nature. For example, the 3400 block had Longero Boiler and Sheet Iron Works and the Banner Iron &
Wire Works Company. The 1939 directory showed a continuation of this trend but also showed a thriving Denargo
Market. There were twenty-seven businesses listed at the Denargo Market selling or distributing an array of food
products. Businesses that supported the residents were common in 1947 such as John Marr Grocery Co., Dale
22
BLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:


RIVER NORTH
PLAN
Platte Changing Shape and Brightnn Changing Names
Robinson Atlas 1887
Northwestern Terminal
Railway Co. map -1915
Tramway Corporation route map 1933
BRIGHTON BOULEVARD/401
AND 4 0 T
TOD
23


H I S
Gardner Denver, a manufacturing operation
Gardner Denver also called Rock Drill
The Drannan Sand and Gravel Company
24
TORY
Campbell Filling Station, Soda Bar Creamery, Morrison Drugs, and Paul R. Isaacson, physician. There was still a
considerable mixture of uses including homes into the 1950s. By 1953, the Pepsi-Cola Bottling Company of
Denver had opened at 38th Street and Brighton Boulevard. Today, Brighton Boulevard is regarded as an industrial
corridor and as a secret route, known primarily by cab drivers, into Downtown Denver from 1-70.
Looking at the Plans area in its entirety, the primary businesses were mining and railroads with supporting
businesses and businesses that took advantage of the numerous rail lines and spurs. Auto related uses such as the
Dryfoot Rubber Company that sold tire chains and auto accessories and several gas stations were also prevalent.
There were also a variety of residential uses including single family homes, hotels and boarding homes that provided
housing for workers and their families. For instance the block from 39th Street to 40th Street and from Wynkoop
to Wewatta had 32 homes. The Ironton School was located at 36th Street and Delgany Street. In the area east of
the UP lines between 38th Avenue and 40th Avenue there were many homes, hotels, and businesses serving the
residents including a barber, a bakery, and a cobbler. The main employer seems to have been the Gardner Denver
Company, which manufactured rock drills. The hotels included the Eureka Hotel, the Burleigh Hotel and the Park
Hotel and most likely targeted railroad workers.
In terms of industrial uses, some of the earliest industrial uses, which were scattered in the area, included the S.H.
Supply Company on 31st and Wynkoop Street, the National Fuse Powder Company on the corner of 38th and
Delgany Street, the Railway Steel Spring Company on York Street north of 40th Avenue, and the Omaha-Grant
Smelter in the vicinity of the Denver Coliseum parking lot. The buildings used by the Omaha-Grant Smelter were
torn down by the early 1900s but its influence lives on as a Superfund site. Other industrial uses were scattered
throughout much of the study area. An idea of the nature of the industrial conditions is provided by a description
of the S.H. Supply Company which stated that one man lives on the premises, heat is provided by stoves, electric
lighting is present, water comes from a well but there is no hose.
BLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:


VISION
RIVER NORTH PLAN
BRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40TH AND 40th TOD
25


V I s
Colorado Diesel Multiple unite (DMUi,
a possible rail technology for this corridor
I O N
This section is intended to describe what the Plans area would be like in the future if the River North Plan is
implemented. This vision is dependent on the occurrence of several events including implementation of the
FasTracks Vision Plan.
River North projects an image of a place with its own unique identity. It has the excitement of LoDo but has a
more eclectic mixture of residents and businesses due to its much more affordable prices. It is a thriving area that
has successfully merged mixed uses with multiple modes of transportation. Brighton Boulevard is the gateway into
Downtown for residents living along the east corridor and for visitors arriving at DIA. Convenient access is
provided for vehicles via 1-70 to Brighton Boulevard as well as by rapid transit from DIA to Union Station and to
downtown. Rail service is available to Thornton via the North Metro Line. Access is also provided for pedestrians
and bicyclists along the Platte River trail to downtown and to the regional bike trail system. This green connection
has been greatly enhanced and is busy with bicycle and pedestrian activity for recreation and commuting.
Brighton Boulevard is an attractive street that balances the need for access to Downtown Denver at moderate
speeds and the needs of a wide array of new and long-standing businesses to access Brighton as well as provide
parking for visitors. The addition of sidewalks and street trees has transformed Brighton into a pedestrian friendly
and more visually appealing corridor. This access by car, the new access by rapid transit and the improved
pedestrian and bicycle access has enhanced the Events Area that is anchored by the National Western Stock Show,
the Denver Coliseum, and the Forney Museum.
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BLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:


RIVER NORTH PLAN
This outstanding access and new and improved multi-modal connections within the area and to surrounding
neighborhoods has spawned a wide variety of new development that fits well with many longstanding businesses. A
synergy has been created between businesses adding to the appeal of the area. Many entrepreneurs and artists have
chosen to locate in this area.
Denargo Market has re-generated itself into a marketplace that includes residential development along the river and
a variety of retail and downtown supporting uses.
The South Platte River has become even more of an amenity by restoring its natural environment and adding open
space along Arkins Court. Connections to it have been added and improved including along 38th and 31st Streets
and by a pedestrian bridge in between. Water quality enhancement has been incorporated into the open space in
order to improve the quality of the water flowing into the river. The enhanced river has fostered significant new
residential and other development that takes advantage of, and adds to, the environment by creating an attractive
/wf-d-E-p^ Wi*
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The rapid transit station in the vicinity of 40th Street and 40th Avenue has developed into a vibrant transit
oriented area. The most intensive new development has been incorporated into the station and provides services
for travelers who are transferring between lines as well as those who are beginning or ending their trips at the
station. The station efficiently accommodates bus routes, circulator buses serving the surrounding neighborhoods
of Cole, Elyria-Swansea, and Globeville, and cars dropping off passengers. A pedestrian and bicycle friendly
BRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40TH AND 40th TOD
13*


VISION
facility connects the areas on both sides of the railroad tracks which enables it to serve development and the
Events Area. The development in and near the station includes multi-tenant office buildings, a large housing
component, single tenant buildings, and retail that serves not only passengers and the new development but the
surrounding neighborhoods as well. Businesses and residents love the convenience of being between downtown
and DIA and connected to each by rapid transit. The access to jobs within this area and the improved access to
jobs because of the transit has reduced the unemployment rate in north Denver neighborhoods and increased the
income of many households.
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BLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE


RIVER NORTH PLAN
EXISTING CONDITIONS
AND PDOJECTIONS
BRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40TH AND 40th TOD
29


EXISTING CONDITIO
The location of a rezoning from industrial
to R-MU-30 along Brighton
30
S AND PROJECTIONS
RONING
The current 2oning is primarily industrial with 95% of the land 2oned either 1-1 or 1-2. The 1-2 land is somewhat
less prevalent than the land that is 2oned 1-1 and is primarily concentrated south of 35th Street between the South
Platte River and the Union Pacific (UP) Railroad Tracks and the UP Inter-modal facility which is located between
40th and 43rd Avenue between Franklin Street and York Street. The 1-2 2one district allows manufacturing and
heavy industrial uses while the 1-1 2one district is somewhat more restrictive. Two recent re2onings include a PUD
at 29th Street and Brighton Boulevard to make way for 241 apartments and 31st Street and Brighton Boulevard,
which was 2oned, to R-MU-30. There is also some B-4 2oned land along Downing and Marion Street north of
37 th Avenue.
BLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:


RIVER
NORTH PLAN
Zoning
BRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40TH AND 40th TOD
31


EXISTING CONDITIO
warehousing is about 31% of the Plans area
RTD facility on Ringsby Court
:
_________________l_______.______________________i____r.'-ti
Giobeuilie landing Park adjacent to Pepsi
32
NS AND PROJECTIONS
Pi A N D USE
The predominant industrial uses are warehouses, railroad tracks and yards, and factory/food processing. Together
these utilize 60% of the land. There is also a significant amount of auto related uses. Other significant facilities are
the Denver Coliseum and the RTD facilities. About 9% of the land is vacant.
There are two parks within the Plan boundaries, Globeville Landing Park and St. Charles Place Park. Globeville
Landing Park is along the South Platte River Trail and south of the Denver Coliseum parking lot. St. Charles Park
is in the Cole neighborhood.
Much of the land is underutilized. An examination of the ratio of the Assessors market improvements value to the
land value shows that over 25% of the parcels have a ratio of less than 1.0 indicating that the land is worth more
than the buildings. In addition, the average floor area ratio, the ratio between the building square footage and the
land square footage, is only 0.25, a further indication of underutilization.
Land Use Parcels Acres Percent
Railroad Property 51 131.95 21 4 o
Misc Warehouse 109 131.82 21 4 o
RTD 6 59.19 9.6%
Vacant 154 55.36 9.0%
Bottling & Distribution 8 50.39 8.2%
Factory 24 48.26 7.8%
Auto Service 37 35.05 5.7%
Theater 1 30.40 4.9%
Surfacing 43 21.35 3.5%
Other/in transition 20 15.47 2.5%
Office 14 13.33 2.2%
Residential 78 9.40 1.5%
Food Processing 6 7.06 1.1%
Restaurant/Retail 13 3.93 0.6%
Misc. Civic 4 2.71 0.4%
TOTAL 568 615j69 100.0%
BLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:


RIVER
NORTH PLAN
Land Use
BRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40TH AND 40th TOD
33


EXISTING CONDITIONS AND PROJECTIONS
Underutilized Land
44TH
Underutilized Land
(Improvement Value / Land Value)
No Data
These numbers represent
the ratio between the
Assessors Improvement
Value and the Land Value.
Values less than one
indicate that the land is worth
more than the improvements.
34
BLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:


RIVER NORTH PLAN
Ph 0 U SIN G
There are 74 single-family structures and five other residential structures within River North none of which are
2oned for residential use. Some of the residential structures appear to be utili2ed for commercial purposes.
Most of these were constructed before 1900 and preceded the city 2oning ordinance. Thus, these dwelling units
are nonconforming uses. Under the current 2oning, these homes cannot be expanded. Historically, there were
many more residential structures but through the years most of them have been replaced with industrial or
commercial structures as a result of the industrial 2oning.
One of 79 residential structures in River North
BRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40TH AND 40th TOD
35


EXISTING CONDITIONS AND PROJECTIONS
CONOMIC ACTIVITY
Construction is nearing completion on the
l-70/Brighton intersection, an "euent" that
is likely to stimulate deueiopment
An analysis of demographic and market characteristics has been undertaken for River North. The analysis provides
an indication of overall trends and economic health that may affect future development and redevelopment efforts.
The results of this analysis identifies potential land uses which could locate within the study area, as well as
establishes a context for parallel and future planning efforts. Estimates of development demand by land use and
location within the study area provide the foundation from which traffic estimates have been prepared. The
estimates point toward the need for infrastructure improvements.
The following discussion presents: an explanation of the methodology used to quantify demand; the impact of
select events on the forecasts; a summary of future growth by land use; and a distribution scenario for uses and
products within the study area. A more detailed version that principally includes more information on the
methodology can be found in the Appendix. A full economic report can be found in the Technical Appendix.
Methodology
Looking to the experience of similar markets within the Denver metropolitan area which have revitali2ed over the
past decade, as well as the vision for Brighton Boulevard expressed in Blueprint Denver, principle future land
uses identified for analysis included: housing; commercial retail space; industrial flex and research and development;
and commercial office space.
In order to quantify estimates of demand by land use, trade areas were defined based on a consideration of several
factors. Within each trade area, baseline estimates were prepared and later adjusted based on consideration of
potential events. See the Appendix for more information on the methodology.
Events Matrix
Critical to interpreting the study areas future competitive position for development growth is an
36
BLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:


RIVER NORTH
PLAN
understanding of potential events which could impact the character and quantity of select land uses as
reflected in absorption activity and project values. Events, which were considered, include: (1) completion or
introduction of major improvement projects (infrastructure); (2) new development and redevelopment projects
(development); and, (3) completion of land use and capital planning documents (planning).
For the purpose of this analysis, infrastructure events were considered to have an impact when money had been
committed or construction had begun. Development events were considered to have a significant impact as they
essentially served to prove-up the market. Planning events were not considered to have any immediate impact in
and of itself. Finally, it was assumed that regulatory changes would be made to accommodate the vision of the
Plan. The discussion, which follows, presents the demand estimates prepared for each land use category and
adjusted to reflect the potential impact of the identified events at select intervals over a twenty-year period.
Demand by Land Use
Residential Demand
There is market support for nearly 900 single family attached units and 675 multifamily units to the year 2022.
While the study area does not have available land 2oned to accommodate this level of development, the assumption
is new development, redevelopment, mixed-use and adaptive reuse projects would occur throughout the study area
within a supportive regulatory environment. Residential products in the River North Area will offer a more
affordable housing alternative to lower downtown and the Central Platte Valley. Future projects will benefit from
improvements to the South Platte River corridor and integration into the existing neighborhood framework. The
South Platte River frontage is a valuable amenity for residential development on both sides of the river.

jpi is a major new residential development,
an "event" that is also likely to stimulate
additional development
Retail Demand
There is market support for approximately 300,000 to 400,000 square feet of new retail space in the study area to
the year 2022. Retail market opportunities, or niches, which will emerge in the study area over the next twenty years
include: service retail in mixed-use developments (such as the transit-oriented development sub area);
neighborhood-serving centers in residential areas; adaptive reuse of older industrial facilities transitioning to meet
changing markets; and, events products in support of mass attraction destination facilities including the Denver
Coliseum and the National Western Stock Show.
Office Demand
There is market support for more than 1.7 million square feet of new office space in the study area through the year
BRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40TH AND 40th TOD
37


EXISTING CONDITIONS AND PROJECTIONS
2022. Office market opportunities will include both Class A and Class B, as well as corporate owner/user space.
Class A and corporate opportunities will likely occur within the influence area of the potential future rail station and
residential mixed-use sub area located adjacent to downtown. Opportunities for Class B local service office space
will likely occur throughout the study area as freestanding products or within a mixed environment. Office space
will gradually replace industrial space as the dominant employment product.
Industrial Danand
There is market support for approximately 500,000 to 750,000 square feet of new (and replacement) industrial space
in the study area to the year 2022. Industrial market opportunities, or niches, which the study area will be well
positioned to take advantage of include: development of flex, research and development space; and owner-
occupied facilities who consider access to the region through multiple modes of transportation an asset for which
they are willing to pay a premium. Therefore, while industrial land uses will continue to have a presence in the study
area, warehouse and distribution products will shift toward higher value flex space, research and development and
owner-occupied products.
38
200307 2008-12 2013-17 2018-22
Residential Ownership (units) 130 185 270 305
Residential Rental (units) 185 175 160 155
Retail (square feet) 56,000 77,000 105,000 117,500
Industrial Flex/R&D (square feet) 132,500 104,500 35,500 0
Industrial Owner-Occupied (square feet) 199,000 156,600 53,000 0
Office (square feet) 65,000 243,500 580,000 970,000
SDurce: Leland Cbnsulting Group and City & Cbunty of Denver. Kbte: 1 Figures rounded.
The figures presented above represent conservative estimates of demand by land use within the area over a 20-year
period.
Geographical Land Use Distribution
As described in a subsequent section, there are portions of the study area, which offer unique conditions supportive
of select land uses. For the City and County of Denver and River North stakeholders to successfully capitate on
BLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:


RIVER NORTH PLAN
opportunities presented by the diversity of the corridor, public investment and reinvestment should be focused and
targeted. Specifically, efforts should reflect the theme, or vision, for the land use area, thus supporting that private
investment which can most effectively leverage public initiatives. The table summari2ing demand shows that there is
the ability to capture considerable economic activity over the next 20 years. Although a formal cost benefit analysis
has not been undertaken, public investments will result in significant additional tax revenues from future
development.
The proposed distribution of land uses by area is presented in the table below:
Residential Mixed-Use TOD River Corridor Mixed-Use Commercial Mixed-Use Industrial Ralston/JR Industrial Coke Industrial Pepsi Events
Residential Ownership 45% 28% 23% 0% 2% 2% 0% 0%
Residential Rental 39% 42% 10% 0% 4% 5% 0% 0%
Retail 40% 35% 10% 15% 0% 0% 0% 10%
Industrial Flex/R&D 10% 15% 5% 10% 33% 25% 2% 0%
Industrial Owner-Occupied 0% 0% 0% 15% 48% 35% 2% 0%
Office 30% 50% 5% 5% 5% 5% 0% 0%
Source: Leland Cbnsulting Group and City & County of Denver.
Notes: 1 Assumes that the grocery store in Denargo Market aomes on line in the 2008 to 2012 time period. 2 Assumes the bulk of the development in
the TDD Sub area aomes on line during the 2013 to 2022 time frame. 3 Because of currently office vacancy rates, there is little office development during
the initial five years with it growing at a substantial rate in later time periods. 4 Because of anticipated substantial increases in land values as the station
becomes reality, the bulk of industrial development will occur in the early tine period. 5 This table does not represent ultimate build out but only
development through 2022 based on conservative assumptions.
BRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40TH AND 40th TOD
39


EXISTING CONDITIONS AND PROJECTIONS
^MOBILITY
Existing Traffic Levels
As part of the existing conditions assessment for the River North Plan, traffic levels in the study area were
evaluated.
Traffic counts were performed at key locations in the project area as part of the planning effort. Daily volumes in
the study area ranged from 14,000 vehicles per day (vpd) to 16,000 vpd along Brighton Boulevard and 16,000 vpd
to 18,000 vpd along 38th Street. Volumes at other locations in the study area were generally below 10,000 vpd.
Peak hour turning volumes were also collected at key intersections. The traffic volume details are in the Technical
Appendix.
Based on the turning volumes collected at key intersections, capacity analyses were conducted in the study area. The
analyses result in a level of service (LOS) that ranges from level of service A (minimal delay and conflicts) to level
of service F (significant delays and congestion). LOS between A and D is considered acceptable in urban settings,
including the Brighton area. LOS results are shown on page 42.
The intersections analy2ed generally operated at LOS C or better in both peak periods. The only exception was the
1-70 north ramps / 46th Avenue at Brighton Boulevard, which operated at LOS D. These results are considered
acceptable.
Existing RoacUray Conditions
The roadways in the study area were reviewed to determine the conditions of the pavement and other roadway
amenities. These roadways are generally older facilities, having been built along with the older industrial and
commercial uses in the area. The following general observations were made:
I Due to the age of the facilities and changes in engineering design over the years, many of the streets do not
meet current roadway standards.
40
BLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:


RIVER NORTH
PLAN
Existing Traffic Counts
Legend
Intersections Analyzed
xxx/xxx AM/PM Peak Hour Traffic Counts
xxxx
xxxx
Existing Average Dally Traffic
Brighton Boulevard/40th &40th TOD
Small Area Plan Study Area
N
BRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40TH AND 40th TOD
41


EXISTING CONDITIONS AND PROJECTIONS
Existing Lane Geometry and Level nf Service
Legend
x/x
i
Intersections Analyzed
AM/PM Peak Hour Level of Service
Indicates Signalized Intersection
Brighton Boulevard/40th & 40th TOD
Small Area Plan Study Area
Note:
Signal timings provided by the City and County
of Denver were used for Level of Service
analysis at signalized Intersections.
N
42
BLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:


RIVER
| The majority of the roadways are lacking design elements considered desirable in Blueprint Denver.
Missing amenities include curb and gutter, sidewalks, medians (where appropriate), streetscaping (including
tree lawns and amenity 2ones, where appropriate), bike lanes (where appropriate), and pedestrian amenities.
I Utilities in River North are typically above ground
| Many roadway drainage systems are non-existent or inadequate, leading to ponding, run-off issues with
adjacent parcels, and water quality concerns.
Existing RcxKlway Classifications
The City has developed roadway functional classifications to help define roadway operations provided for various
facilities. As part of Blueprint Denver, a classification system was developed that looks at a streets function as
well as the type of land use that it is serving. At the present time, Brighton Boulevard, 38th Street, and 40th Avenue
are classified as Mixed Use Arterials. Arkins Court is classified as a residential collector and Blake Street and Walnut
Street are classified as Residential Arterials. All other streets are classified as local streets.
Existing Local Access and Circulation
The roadway network in River North provides for access to each of the various parcels. The amount of access
(number of driveways) varies based on the land use of the parcel.
Access throughout the Plans area was reviewed. Brighton Boulevard has areas where access is relatively controlled
(one or two driveways per block) and other areas where there is no curb and gutter to define driveways (free access)
Due to the nature of the adjacent land uses and the underpass at the railroad tracks, 38th Street typically has fewer
access points. Denargo Market and the warehousing areas between Brighton Boulevard and the railroad are areas
with little or no access control. There is typically more access control in the TOD area and the area west of
Brighton Boulevard and north of 31st Street.
There are several major trucking facilities in the study area. The Union Pacific Inter-modal facility north of 40th
Avenue is the largest truck trip generator in the study area. The Pepsi Cola bottling and distribution facility at the
northwest corner of Brighton and 38th is the next largest. Other major truck facilities include Coca Cola at York
and 38th, Ralston Purina at Race and 44th, and the Denargo Market
BRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40TH AND 40th TOD
Access along Brighton is not controlled
38th Street looking towards the rail tracks
Pepsi-Coia takes up 8 blocks along Brighton
43


EXISTING CONDITIONS AND PROJECTIONS
44
BLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:


RIVER
complex along Delgany and Denargo Streets. The RTD bus maintenance facility at 31st Street west of the Platte
River is another major generator, as illustrated on the Major Traffic Generators map.
Vehicular, pedestrian, and bicycle circulation in River North is difficult due to several factors. Several linear features
divide the study area, including the Platte River (with only two auto crossings and a third pedestrian crossing) and
the Union Pacific Railroad tracks (with only one crossing in the study area). The Burlington Northern and Santa Fe
railroad yards that form the west edge of the study area are only crossed by the Park Avenue Viaduct (south of the
study area) and 38th Street / Washington Street. Although 1-70 cuts across the northern section of the study area, it
is not as significant a barrier since Brighton Boulevard, 44th Avenue, and York Street cross under the roadway in the
short segment of 1-70 evaluated. There are many large parcels of land that would normally include streets in a grid
system. These include Pepsi (eight square blocks), the Union Pacific Intermodal facility (over twenty square blocks),
and the Denver Coliseum (five square blocks).
Circulation is also affected by roadway condition. Many streets in the study area are in poor condition, with uneven
surfaces and intersections that cannot accommodate truck turns. These include portions of Wynkoop Street,
Denargo Street, 43rd Avenue, 44th Avenue, and streets between 43rd and 44th Avenues in River North.
Existing Alternative Modes
Transit service consists of several local or limited routes, which operate mainly to connect the study area to
Downtown, Stapleton, DIA and west Denver. Transit routes and current ridership are shown in the Technical
Appendix. Bus service frequencies are particularly low on Brighton due to the lack of major origins or destinations
for transit riders. Transit ridership is highest on routes serving the existing residential neighborhoods outside the
study area. The #48 bus is an example of the value of maintaining the existing modes of travel. It is used by
employees in River North and is a great connection from downtown and Commerce City to access both the South
Platte River amenities and the Events District.
As illustrated in the Pedestrian and Bike Facilities map, River North is characteri2ed by a lack of sidewalks creating a
difficult environment for pedestrians. The Platte River Greenway serves as a major amenity for bikes connecting the
area to the Central Platte Valley, the Southwest and South Metro Area and the Cherry Creek Trail. A planned
improvement along 38th
BRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40TH AND 40th TOD
There are no sidewalks along 40th Avenue
Platte River Greenway: an incredible
amenity and green connection


EXISTING CONDITIONS AND PROJECTIONS
46
BLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:


RIVER
Street between Walnut and the Platte River will improve bike connections in the study area, but this improvement is
constrained by the existing railroad structure over 38th Street.
Future Traffic Demand
Based on the existing traffic volumes collected in the study area and projected land uses, future volumes were
developed. These volumes are based on background traffic growth (growth that is anticipated to occur with or
without the Plan actions) and traffic volumes that would be generated due to new development based on the market
demand forecasts. For details on this process, refer to the Appendix. The results of this process are 2025-year
traffic volumes, which represent an increase of between 2% and 3% per year, depending on the specific location in
the study area.
Future daily volumes in the study area range from 20,000 vpd to 23,000 vpd along Brighton Boulevard and 25,000
vpd to 27,000 vpd along 38th Street. Volumes at other locations in the study area remained generally below 10,000
vpd. The exception to this was the significant growth along Blake, Walnut, and 40th Avenue in the TOD area. Peak
hour turning volumes were also developed at key intersections. Future traffic volume details are shown in the
Future Traffic Counts and Future Lane Geometry and Level of Service maps.
Based on the future turning volumes projected at key intersections, capacity analyses were conducted in the study
area. The intersections analy2ed generally operated at LOS C or better in both peak periods. The exceptions
include:
I The 1-70 north ramps / 46th Avenue at Brighton Boulevard continued to operate at LOS D. No changes are
anticipated at this location as part of the River North Plan.
I The 38th Street at Brighton Boulevard intersection operated at LOS D in the PM.
| The 38th Street at Walnut / Marion intersection will operate at LOS E in the AM and LOS F in the PM.
This intersection is in the TOD area and needs to be addressed.
I The 29th Street at Brighton Boulevard intersection operated at LOS E in the AM. The PM operations were
acceptable at LOS C. This intersection is not signaled. It is anticipated that either a signal at this location or
the extension of Delgany Street to Brighton Boulevard will address this issue. Either of these measures
should be addressed as part of the Denargo Market redevelopment plan.
BRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40TH AND 40th TOD
38th Street, especially the railroad tracks
underpass, is difficult for pedestrians and
bicycles to nauigate


EXISTING CONDITIO
Future increases in traffic will lead to a poor
level of service at 38th Street and walnut
S AND PROJECTIONS
Future Alternative Modes
The framework for alternative transportation modes in the Brighton Boulevard and 40th and 40th TOD area will be
shaped by RTDs FasTracks Vision Plan previously discussed on page 19.
The proposed 40th and 40th Station is identified in FasTracks as a focal point for transportation connections
between alternative modes in the study area. Local buses serving the surrounding neighborhoods will connect to
the regional rapid transit system at this location. Bike and pedestrian connectivity to and from the station will be
important to ensure maximum utili2ation of the station and the creation of a true transportation hub for the area.
As a part of the River North Plan, two alternative station platform options were evaluated to determine overall
impacts to traffic, development, and access. Information on this analysis is provided in the Technical Appendix.
The ultimate design and location of the station, if selected, will be determined during the environmental impact
statement process for the 1-70 East Corridor. The 1-70 East Corridor EIS process will consider all options and will
have extensive opportunities for public input.
The bike and pedestrian framework for the Brighton Boulevard and 40th and 40th TOD area relies on extensive
improvements to bike and pedestrian connections to and from the South Platte River, along Brighton Boulevard
and connections to and from the 40th and 40th Station. Improvements to the east-west connection from
Washington to 38th Street, to Walnut Street and then east on 40th Avenue is also of great importance. Improving
pedestrian and bike connectivity will be fundamental to achieving the ultimate vision of creating a vibrant, mixed-
use area.
BLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:


RIVER
NORTH PLAN
Future Lane Geometry and Level nf Service
Legend
x/x
i
Intersections Analyzed
AM/PM Peak Hour Level of Service
Indicates Signalized Intersection
Brighton Boulevard/40th & 40th TOD
Small Area Plan Study Area
Notes:
1. Existing laneage was used for level of service
analysis.
2. Signal timings were optimized for future volume
T
BRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40TH AND 40th TOD
49


EXISTING CONDITIONS AND PROJECTIONS
Future Traffic Cnunts
50
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RIVER NORTH PLAN

^ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS
Environmental conditions of concern in the Brighton Boulevard area include (1) portions of the Vasque2
Boulevard/Interstate-70 (VBI70) Superfund Site, (2) junk yards, (3) historic landfills, (4) industrial operations
including auto repair and manufacturing, (5) Leaking Underground Storage Tanks (LUSTs), and (6) historical
operations such as a tannery, foundries, iron works, paint manufacturing, wood processing and former gasoline
stations.
Historic operations within the Brighton Corridor include the former Omaha-Grant smelter. Designated as
Operable Unit 2 of the VBI70 Superfund site by the EPA, this former smelter produced lead during the end of
the 19th century. Lead and arsenic are believed to be potential contaminants associated with the operation, although
no formal investigation has occurred to date. Isolated investigations in and adjacent to the smelter site have
detected some elevated lead concentrations in the subsurface soils, primarily associated with black slag particles.
The nature of the concerns with environmental conditions is described in the Technical Appendix.
EPA has committed targeted Brownfield environmental assessment resources to assist the City to obtain a better
understanding of the environmental impacts in the area. EPA will conduct subsurface environmental investigations
during the summer and fall of 2003 to collect soil and groundwater data. This will enable a determination to be
made of the levels of cleanup needed in association with infrastructure and other neighborhood improvements.
The investigation will target key locations in public rights of way and along the South Platte River from
approximately 60 different locations. Final results and a summary report are anticipated in early 2004.
Land from the former Omaha-Grant Smelter
located near the Coliseum parking lot is
a Superfund site
BRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40TH AND 40th TOD
51


EXISTING CONDITIONS AND PROJECTIONS
40th Avenue and drainage needs have been
studied recently
^INFRASTRUCTURE
A considerable amount of public investment has occurred or is under construction in the Plans area. The following
sections describe the sanitary sewer system and the storm drain system.
Sanitary Sewer System in River North
The majority of the sanitary sewers within River North are owned and maintained by the City and County of
Denver. There are also a few private sanitary sewers which discharge flow into the Citys system. At the present
time, no deficiencies or needed improvements in the City and County of Denvers sanitary sewer collection system
have been identified within River North.
The Delgany Interceptor System (System) is located along the east side of the South Platte River between Cherry
Creek and 51st Avenue. The Metropolitan Reclamation District operates it. The Delgany Interceptor System
consists of the Delgany Common sewer, which was constructed in three stages between 1892 and 1937, and the
Delgany Interceptor, the construction of which began in 1979, parallel and adjacent to the Delgany Common
Sewer. In the River North study area, the Delgany Interceptor System, i.e., both the Delgany Common Sewer and
the Delgany Interceptor, lie within the Arkins Court right-of-way.
A recent report by the Metropolitan Reclamation District states that the tributary area served by the two sewers
comprising the System is approximately 47 square miles (30,000 acres) and is about 90 percent developed. Flow
analyses indicate that, at present, peak flows are below the System capacity. The report also states that the Delgany
Interceptor is considered to be in good condition with adequate capacity. No improvements to the Delgany
Interceptor are recommended. On the other hand, the Delgany Common Sewer, the older of the two parallel
sewers has numerous deficiencies throughout its length. These include adverse grades, corrosion, sedimentation,
physical problems, and flow control deficiencies.
52
BLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:


RIVER NORTH PLAN
Development and redevelopment projects within River North resulting in an increase in population will be required
to conduct an analysis of the development impacts on the City and County of Denvers existing sanitary sewers.
Development generating more wastewater beyond that planned for the system will be required to improve the
collection system to convey the additional flows that the change in use will generate.
Storm Drain System in River North
The City and County of Denver designs storm drains to collect and convey runoff from a two-year frequency
storm in residential areas and a five-year frequency storm in commercial areas. Excess runoff is conveyed over
land in the streets. This is called the level of service. Storms greater than a 2-year recurrence frequency in the
large watersheds draining to and through the River North Area will generate significant amounts of runoff
flowing in the streets leading to and through the area. The Plan area also contains areas lacking improved streets,
streets without curb and gutter and, therefore, do not provide effective drainage. Additionally, some structures
are located within located topographic depressions, or sumps.
A total of six drainage basins contribute storm runoff to the South Platte River through River North. Four major
drainage basins cross the River North Area on the east side of the South Platte River, and two drainage basins cross
the Plans area on the west side of the South Platte River. The storm drains in the River North Area on the east side
of the South Platte River collect runoff from a total of over 15 square miles (over 650,000 acres), including storm
runoff that is generated within River North. The existing storm drain facilities are very old, and many do not meet
current City and County of Denver drainage criteria.
In 1989, the City and County of Denver developed and adopted a Storm Drainage Master Plan. This plan
identified several needed drainage improvements that lie within River North and are described in detail in the
Technical Appendix.
The total cost of the recommended drainage improvements in 40th Avenue from the South Platte River to Steele
Street is estimated to be between $18 million and $26 million depending on the selected alternative. The portion
from the South Platte River to York Street is within River North and constitutes approximately 70% of the length
of the total project. The portion within River North consists of larger storm drain facilities and would require
easements to cross private lands and railroad property, so the project cost within the Plans area could approach
90% of the total project cost.
BRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40TH AND 40th TOD

53


EXISTING CONDITIONS AND PROJECTIONS
Storm Sewer Drainage Basins
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Storm Basins
Metro Sanitary Sewer Outfall
I Proposed Drain: 1989 Storm Drainage Masterplan
I Proposed Drain: 40th Ave. Corridor
Infrastructure Improvement Study, July 2002
Brighton Study Area
Complaint locations
L^lI Flood Plain
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54
BLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:


RIVER
Two drainage, engineering firms have been retained to study the four drainage basins on the east side of the South
Platte River. These studies are currently underway. As part of these efforts, drainage complaints received since 1990
are being reviewed, hydrology for the storm drainage systems will be prepared, and needed improvements identified.
The Storm Sewer Drainage Basins map shows the drainage improvements identified within the River North Plan
from the 1989 Denver Storm Drainage Master Plan and the 40th Avenue Corridor Infrastructure Study. There are
few drainage complaints in the area. Those that exist are attributed to a lack of street improvements such as a street
cross-section with a crown and curb and gutter to convey storm runoff outside the travel lanes; buildings and
parking lots in located depressions; and storm drains which are overloaded in all but the minor 2-year frequency
storm event.
No properties within River North are located in a federally designated floodplain.
Legacies and Community Facilities
There are no designated historic districts or structures. There are some structures within River North that are
significant. They include the building that houses Drive Train Industries and that used to be the John Deere Plow
Company. In addition, the Rock Drill building is unique architecturally and dates back to the early 1900s. The
Coliseum, which was built in the early 1950s, is representative of an architectural style prevalent in other places in
the country for similar facilities. The South Platte River is a key Denver legacy and runs throughout the study area.
The Long Range Framework Plan calls for maintaining and enhancing this stretch of the river as a natural area.
In addition to the Denver Coliseum, community facilities include a new fire station at 44th Street and Brighton
Boulevard, a Police Department maintenance facility at 35th Street and Arkins Court, and an RTD facility in the
vicinity of Ringsby Court and 31st Street. The St. Charles Recreation Center and St. Charles Place Park are within
the Plans area at 38th Avenue and Marion Street. Globeville Landing Park is immediately south and west of the
Denver Coliseum parking lot.
BRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40TH AND 40th TOD
The Rock Drill building is an example of a
noteworthy building
The natural state of the South Platte River
should be enhanced


EXISTING CONDITIONS AND PROJECTIONS
Ph U M A N SERVICES AND DEMOGRAPHICS
There are only 79 residential structures and few of these are being used to house people. Because these residences
are scattered in several different places in the Plan boundaries and are in several different census block groups, it is
not possible to provide demographic information on residents of this area. It is estimated that less than 200 people
live within the study boundary. The Salvation Army Crossroads Shelter provides shelter for up to 329 persons in
the winter and provides a variety of human services. In addition, other organi2ations provide help for the residents
including the Cross Community Coalition, which is located at 46th Avenue and Josephine Street.
56
BLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:


RIVER NORTH PLAN
FRAMEWORK PLAN
BRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40TH AND 40th TOD
57


FRAMEWORK PLAN
Plan Framework Map (from page 51
Much of the land in the River North Area is
underutilized
General framework
This chapter describes the framework for River North. This area is an amalgamation of portions of four
neighborhoods, Five Points, Swansea-Elyria, Cole, and Globeville. The framework consists of two north-south
corridors and one east-west corridor that connect three districts within River North, four neighborhoods, and
downtown Denver.
The Brighton Boulevard corridor can become an attractive gateway to downtown Denver from 1-70 and the North
Denver neighborhoods and is in a position to benefit from and serve the growing downtown market. The South
Platte River corridor presents a natural open space area that includes a bicycle trail and Globeville Landing Park.
The river corridor has the opportunity to provide a setting for a mile long residential and mixed-use area with river
front access. A third corridor is 38th Street. Given the restricted access from the west to the east created by the two
railroad lines that run through the area and the South Platte River, 38th Street is a critical connection. It runs under
the railroad tracks and over a bridge that crosses the South Platte River, thereby, connecting the segments of the
study area, including the 40th and 40th TOD area, to each other and to Brighton Boulevard.
These three corridors connect two major districts and an events district. The districts consist of two major
redevelopment opportunities, the 40th and 40th TOD area and the Denargo Market area. An Events District has
also been identified. Globeville and Elyria-Swansea are somewhat isolated from the rest of the city and can benefit
from the improved connections identified in the River North Plan.
58
Issues
| Much of the land in the study area is currently underutili2ed.
k Redevelopment has started to occur but there is no overall land use and transportation plan in place to guide
future redevelopment.
k The current 2oning does not allow some appropriate uses, allows other inappropriate uses, and does not
provide appropriate development and design standards for new development.
k Wayfinding and directional signage is lacking.______________________________________________________
BLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:


RIVER NORTH
PLAN
| Current infrastructure does not support existing significant land uses and amenities, does not attract new
development, and along with the unkempt appearance of some outdoor storage areas and some buildings
provides a poor image for the area.
Opportunities
| If RTDs FasTracks Vision Plan is approved by voters and subject to the results of the Final 1-70 East
Corridor EIS, a major opportunity exists to create an exceptional Transit Oriented Development; its prime
location between downtown and DIA with rapid transit connections to each creates numerous and exciting
opportunities for new development.
I The twin north-south corridors, with Brighton Boulevard providing primarily vehicular access between 1-70
and downtown and the South Platte River providing a linear open space amenity with pedestrian and regional
bicycle access, create exciting development and open space opportunities.
I There are many thriving businesses and interesting buildings within the area.
Goals
| Maintain viable existing businesses in such a way that they are compatible with new development and new
development is compatible with them.
) Create opportunities for employees of current and future employers to live within the study boundaries and
seek to connect residents of adjacent neighborhoods with jobs within the Plans boundaries.
| Build upon the unique land uses that exist and identify redevelopment sites and opportunities that foster the
creation of a compatible mix of uses.
I Develop a cross section for Brighton Boulevard and identify key visible locations for architectural and
landscape improvements to create a gateway from 1-70 and the north Denver neighborhoods to Downtown.
The gateway features should be built around a theme.
I Establish a unique Transit Oriented Development in the vicinity of the proposed 40th and 40th station in
which the station is incorporated into the development and facilitate the redevelopment of the Denargo
Market area into an exciting mixed-use community.
Outdoor storage provides a poor image of
River North aod the gateway to Dowotowo
BRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40TH AND 40th TOD
59


F R A M E W
The South Platte River Corridor can attract
residential mixed-use development
A planned mixed-use development along
Ringsby Court and the South Platte River
60
RK PLAN
) Attract new development along the South Platte River, especially new residential development that takes
advantage of the river and enhances it as an open space corridor.
) By adding new development to the current uses and structures, create a unique environment both in terms of
an eclectic mix of uses and exciting, innovative architecture.
) Improve and create new connections within the River North Area, to downtown, and to nearby
neighborhoods especially improved pedestrian and bicycle connections.
The Plan calls for the creation of a dynamic and compatible mixture of uses that serves and takes advantage of
proximity to downtown, access to 1-70, and the proposed rapid transit station in the vicinity of 40th Avenue and
40th Street. The Plan calls for creating attractive vehicular and pedestrian friendly connections within River North
and to the surrounding neighborhoods and downtown. The mixtures of uses varies throughout the area and are
placed in six areas which are described in the Land Use Concept Map and in the appropriate corridor and district
descriptions.
BLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:


RIVER NORTH
PLAN
BRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40TH AND 40th TOD
61


FRAMEWORK PLAN
An unsafe and poorly lit bike connection
along 46th Auenue
0 R R I D 0 R S
There are three corridors, as illustrated in the Plan Framework map on page 5, which define the urban form of the
Plan boundaries, Brighton Boulevard, the South Platte River, and 38th Street. Issues, opportunities, and goals
related to transportation and circulation generally are described first before discussing them specifically for each
corridor.
Safe and conuenient bike access, such as
fixing this missing bicycle link along 38th
Street, is recommended by the Plan
Traffic currently operates at acceptable levels of service, but as a result of a combination of added traffic from new
development and general traffic growth metro-wide (resulting in a total of about 2 to 3 percent annual growth) the
level of service will worsen. Deteriorating and substandard infrastructure (i.e., curb, gutter, sidewalk, pavement, and
drainage conditions) will need to be improved as redevelopment happens to reali2e the vision for a well-connected
and attractive area. The bike and pedestrian framework for River North relies on extensive improvements to bike
and pedestrian connections to and from the South Platte River, along Brighton Boulevard and connections to and
from the 40th and 40th Station. Improving pedestrian and bike connectivity will be fundamental to achieving the
ultimate vision of creating a vibrant, mixed-use area.
Issues
) Some intersections will operate at unacceptable vehicular levels of service due to growth in development from
both inside and outside River North.
) Most streets have deficiencies due to a lack of sidewalks, poor pavement condition, lack of curb and gutter, or
poor drainage.
) High levels of truck activity as well as buses accessing the RTD bus facility impact traffic operations within
the area.
62
) The study area typically does not delineate right-of-way from private frontage allowing parking and loading in
a chaotic manner that makes it difficult for pedestrians and bicyclists.
) Bus stops lack space for waiting, boarding, and unboarding passengers.
t The Bicycle Master Plan identifies two critical missing links in the bicycle system in the River North Area at
BLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:


RIVER NORTH PLAN
46th Avenue near the National Western Stock Show and 38th Street east of Brighton Boulevard.
| Turning movements in combination with lack of curb and gutter and cross walks present an unsafe as well as
an unfriendly pedestrian and bike environment.
| Inadequate pedestrian infrastructure is one of a number of factors that discourages private investment for
redevelopment.
Opportunities
| The 1-70 East Corridor EIS process as well as the potential for the funding of RTDs FasTracks Vision Plan
represent opportunities for advancing and implementing transportation improvements.
Goals
| Balance the need to maintain the level of service for traffic operations with the need to encourage
redevelopment.
| Improve roadway infrastructure (i.e., curb, gutter, sidewalk, pavement and drainage) as redevelopment
happens.
I Provide guidance for transit access and circulation for the 1-70 East Corridor EIS process and any future
planning and design associated with RTDs FasTracks Vison Plan.
I Create a framework that accommodates both pedestrians and bicyclists on all public right-of-ways.
| Enhance connections by adding trees, tree lawns, on-street parking and pedestrian scale lighting along streets.
| Connect key destinations including the South Platte River Trail, Denargo Market, Swansea-Elyria, Globeville,
Upper Larimer, the Central Platte Valley, the Denver Coliseum, the Stock Show and the proposed 40th and
40th rapid transit station.
| Assure that pedestrians and bicyclists have good access to bus service and the proposed rapid transit station.
I Wherever possible, restore the grid system to promote access.
Brave bicyclists crossing Brighton Boulevard
on 38th Street
BRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40TH AND 40th TOD
63


F R A M E W
A rendering of what Brighton Boulevard
could look like in the future
F
Undesignated right-of-way allows for
haphazard service activities and diminishes
the character and safety of Brighton
RK PLAN
Brighton Boulevard Corrida*
The Brighton Boulevard corridor is principally an arterial in terms of its function and needs to provide mobility
between Interstate 70 and downtown. However, it also needs to provide access to existing and new businesses. The
concept for Brighton Boulevard is to create a mixed-use street as new land uses develop in response to the Plans
vision. Brighton Boulevard is the front door to the River North Area and provides the first impression of the area
and also to downtown. Outsiders judge the health and vitality of not only the Plan area but the surrounding
neighborhoods by what they see on Brighton Boulevard.
The area on either side of Brighton Boulevard from 31st Street to 38th Street is identified on the Land Use
Concept Map as a Commercial Mixed-Use Area. A mix of business uses especially retail and office uses but
including some auto oriented uses and some industrial uses is envisioned but in such a way that the buildings are
oriented to Brighton Boulevard which would become a mixed-use street. Examples of potential uses include retail-
wholesale showrooms, a destination restaurant-entertainment complex, a grocery anchored neighborhood shopping
center, and convenience retail.
Issues
k Brighton Boulevard provides a poor image of the River North Area,
k Limiting 80 foot right-of-way.
k Undesignated right-of-way allowing service and loading activities that diminish the overall character and safe
circulation.
k The boulevard lacks curb, gutter, and sidewalk,
k Poor drainage.
k The reconstruction of Brighton Boulevard with an ideal 96 foot cross section may impact current access and
may impact businesses.
k The mixture of uses is not balanced and fails to provide sufficient retail.
k The industrial 2oning mandates a 20 foot setback along Brighton Boulevard that may not be the appropriate
setback for new development.
Opportunities
k The replacement of the Broadway viaduct with an underpass and the improvements to the Brighton
Boulevard/I-70 interchange have created the ability to easily access 1-70 and to connect River North with
BLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:


RIVER NORTH
PLAN
downtown via Broadway which continues on to the southern end of the metropolitan area.
| An improved street with sidewalks and curb and gutter may attract considerable new investment along
Brighton Boulevard including a mix of uses.
Goals
| Maintain sufficient roadway capacity to serve future demand but balance it with the needs of a mixed-use
corridor that includes sidewalks and other pedestrian amenities.
| Provide adequate parking for employees and visitors and provide adequate loading facilities in a manner that
does not significantly impede traffic flows.
| Improve the ability of pedestrians and bicyclists to travel safely along Brighton, to cross Brighton to access
bus service and other uses, and to access the South Platte River.
I Establish a new cross section that enhances the overall character of the corridor and promotes new
investment and new development while retaining the economic viability of existing businesses and treating
property owners fairly.
| Assure that new development relates properly to the new, Brighton cross-section.
| Assure that the new Brighton cross section does not negatively impact adjacent areas including Brighton
Boulevard north of 1-70.
South Platte River Corrida*
The South Platte River corridor runs from the southern to the northern boundary of the River North Area. It is a
major amenity as well as an opportunity to promote redevelopment. The South Platte River must be protected and
enhanced as a citywide amenity, an amenity for River North and an amenity for the surrounding neighborhoods.
development could take advantage of and
enhance the South Platte River Corridor
Current industrial uses may choose to
relocate in the future
The area called the River Corridor Mixed-Use Area on the Land Use Concept Map runs on both sides of the South
Platte River to 38th Street on the north. Uses are primarily industrial. When existing industrial businesses cease
operations or relocate they should not be replaced with other industrial uses. New uses should be mixed and should
be uses that can take advantage of the river frontage.
Issues
) The natural state of the South Platte River has been eroded in places such as on the
west side of Arkins Court.
BRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40TH AND 40th TOD
65


FRAMEWORK PLAN
| In some cases, current uses do not take advantage of the proximity to the river and are unsightly taking away
from the enjoyment of this open space.
| Ringsby Court has only a 50 foot right-of-way of which nearly 50% consists of the west bank of the South
Platte River making it difficult to provide sidewalks and other pedestrian amenities.
Opportunities
I The addition of open space along the river in conjunction with new development and in conjunction with
drainage improvements.
) The vacation of Arkins Court in some locations making way for new development with a direct connection
to the river and the addition of open space.
Part of the 50-foot Ringsby Court right-of-way
is taken up by the bank of the river making it
difficult to provide sidewalks and other
amenities
Goals
) Create urban design guidelines to ensure architecturally high-quality development that respects the vision of
the South Platte River corridor as an open space corridor,
I Develop Design Guidelines that include criteria for height, scale, building massing and architectural
detailing. Design Guidelines objectives should include maintaining the view to the river corridor,
encouraging construction that is low to medium in height, (not more than 55 feet) and creating pedestrian
friendly architecture that incorporates ground floor windows, direct entrances from buildings to the
street, and human-scaled facades.
I Create an open space corridor along Arkins Court by setting new construction back from the sidewalk
(approximately 10 feet). The setback should be heavily landscaped to visually relate to the river corridor
) Utilize street and right-of-way design appropriate for residential local streets to create an environment on the
east side of Arkins Court that fosters new development, especially residential development.
I Provide sufficient vehicular access (two lanes of traffic) to accommodate the largely local traffic on Arkins
Court.
I Provide curbs and gutters on both sides of Arkins Court to define the street edge and prevent erosion.
I Provide on street parking on the east side of Arkins Court to separate pedestrians from the traffic and
provide parking for visitors.
I Provide a tree lawn and a sidewalk on the east side of Arkins Court.
I Ensure that storm water quality enhancements are built in such a way that they become open space
amenities for the community and the South Platte River corridor.
I Close, shift or realign portions of Arkins Court to the extent that it will enhance development
66
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RIVER NORTH PLAN
South Platte River Corridor Profiles
DiMmOQ Vertical naggamtlQn 1.0 X
BRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40TH AND 40
TOD
67


F R A M E W
The natural state of the Platte River has been
eroded in places, but could be significantly
enhanced as redevelopment occurs
68
RK PLAN
opportunities and increase open space so long as vehicular access to land uses is maintained.
I Provide lighting to support vehicular and pedestrian traffic while maintaining sensitivity to the wildlife that
inhabits the river corridor.
I Provide under grounding of overhead utilities.
I To the extent possible, detain and/or treat storm water before it reaches the South Platte River.
) Create a pedestrian friendly environment and streetscape to encourage people to walk to nearby destinations
I Improve pedestrian access in a variety of ways including adding sidewalks.
I Provide additional pedestrian connections as needed to the South Platte River Trail. However, this access
should not be designed in a way that encourages people to interact directly with the water flowing in the
South Platte River.
I Access to the South Platte River Trail and Globeville Landing Park should be improved from within the
Plans Area and from surrounding neighborhoods. Access should be improved along 38th Street including
from the proposed 40th and 40th Transit Station. Access from the South Platte River to and along 31st
Street, should be improved. The possibility of connecting the South Platte River Trail to Mesti2o Curtis
Park should be explored. However, it would require access across the railroad track and the Rockies
Parking Lot. (It is understood that this will require PUC approval and purchase and/or easements on
privately held land.)
) Maintain and enhance the South Platte River as a natural area.
I Enhance the South Platte River as a natural area, which may entail the provision of buffer 2ones to protect
the natural ecosystem from adjacent development.
I Provide opportunities for end-of pipe storm water quality enhancement along the South Platte River.
Ensure that these become an asset to the natural river corridor.
I Increase the amount of open-space to serve the changing community including natural areas and private
open space.
) Arkins Court and Ringsby Court should primarily provide access to uses along them and should be classified
as local streets. Traffic generated by RTD, Federal Express and others should continue to primarily use 31st
Street to reach Brighton Boulevard.
38th Street Corridor
The 38th Street corridor is defined as a corridor that includes 38th Street, Walnut Street and 40th Avenue creating
continuous east-west access through the River North Area. 38th Street connects the Globeville neighborhood and
BLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:


RIVER
Washington Street on the west, goes under the Burlington Northern Railroad tracks, across the South Platte River,
intersects with Brighton Boulevard, goes under the Union Pacific Railroad tracks and then ends at an intersection
with Walnut Street and Marion Street. Walnut Street connects directly to 40th Avenue which goes east to Colorado
Boulevard. It connects segments of the Plans area including the 40th and 40th TOD area to each other and to
Brighton Boulevard.
The Land Use Concept map illustrates three areas as Industrial Mixed-Use Areas. This corridor connects two of
them directly and the third area via York Street. The uses would be predominantly industrial but other uses
including artist studios, research and development, and a variety of office uses could develop over time.
Issues
I 38st Street is only two lanes under the UP Railroad tracks and may not provide sufficient capacity given the
anticipated increase in traffic.
I 38th Street does not provide a satisfactory route for pedestrians and bicyclists from the proposed 40th and
40th station and TOD to Brighton Boulevard, the South Platte River, and to Globeville via Washington Street.
Opportunities
I The viaduct under the Burlington Northern and Santa Fe Railroad tracks is being expanded to four lanes and
sidewalks are being added.
I 38th Street provides full east-west access within the River North Area.
Goals
| Improve 38th Street so that it can operate like a true multi-modal street accommodating bikes, pedestrians,
transit and autos
I Provide sufficient capacity on 38th Street for vehicular traffic.
I Attract uses over time that create more employment and are designed to be better neighbors.
BRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40TH AND 40th TOD
Low impact industrial uses like this high
tech company could locate in River North
in the future
One lane in each direction on 38th Street
under the union Pacific railroad bridge may
not provide sufficient capacity for car traffic


FRAMEWORK PLAN
after development
These parking lots are within the TOD area
and could be redeveloped
[Districts
The 40th and 40th TOD and the Denargo Market districts provide opportunities for intensive mixed-use
development. The 40th and 40th TOD district will be oriented to the proposed station while the Denargo Market
district will be oriented to downtown.
4()th and 4()th TOD District
The proposed 40th and 40th TOD district presents a great opportunity for transit oriented development in North
Denver by linking redevelopment opportunities with a potentially expanding rapid transit system. This connection
between land use and transportation reinforces the key concepts in Blueprint Denver and Plan 2000.
Compact development around rapid transit stations and other permanent transit facilities is a key concept of Plan
2 0 0 0 and Blueprint Denver.
Fundamentally, TOD is a collection of intense uses that promote the use of transit and walking or biking. Dense
office and residential uses are the mainstay of transit-oriented development; residents and workers regularly use
transit instead of cars to get to work or home. Critical to their success as communities and as transportation
solutions is a supporting mix of retail, entertainment, and services that allow residents and workers to obtain many
daily needs on foot, rather than by car. Transit-oriented developments are organi2ed within an easy walking distance
of the station or other facility, typically a one-quarter to one-third mile radius.
TOD enhances local planning efforts, balances redevelopment with quality of life and economic development, and
reinforces regional growth management. TOD increases the concentration of uses in appropriate locations (such as
Areas of Change) in order to take development pressure off other areas that are inappropriate for development
(such as Areas of Stability).
70
The TOD district is shown in the Land Use Concept Map as TOD Mixed-Use. The uses include intensive office
and residential uses along with supporting retail oriented to the proposed 40th and 40th station. The station ideally
would be incorporated within the development. Other development would be placed along direct pedestrian
connections to the station. In addition to residential, office, and retail development, this area could include research
BLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:


RIVER NORTH
PLAN
Potential TODs
This station
diagram is
intended to
show one
potential
conf iguration
for a possible
rapid tansit
station. The
1-70 East
Corridor EIS
will look at all
reasonable
alternatives.
BRIGHTON BOULEVARD/401
AND 4 0 T
TOD
71


FRAMEWORK PLAN
warehouse on about 10 acres within the TOD
area could redevelop as River North
euolues and transit is introduced
land just south of the proposed 40th and
40th rapid transit station
and development and corporate office headquarters in addition to multi-tenant buildings.
Issues
) Transit options are limited to bus service of varying frequency.
) Globeville, Elyria and Swansea are somewhat isolated communities with a large number of transit dependent
people.
Opportunities
I RTDs FasTrack Vision Plan calls for a station in the vicinity of 40th and 40th that would serve in excess of
5,000 passengers a day and provide service to Union Station, Stapleton and DIA on the East Corridor, to
downtown via an extension of the light rail line that runs along Welton Street and now terminates at 30th and
Downing Street, and the North Metro Line which would provide service to Thornton. It is anticipated that
around 40,000 passengers per day would be passing through the station to another destination.
0 If the Union Pacific Railroad chooses to move its intermodal facility to the east, over 40 acres immediately
adjacent to the 40th and 40th station may become available for Transit Oriented Development.
) The potential for the location of a future mass transit station within River North will support a higher density
and a dynamic mix of uses.
Goals
) Provide adequate parking in the most appropriate form while maximi2ing development opportunities.
I Encourage the development of shared parking, preferably in structures, which serve multiple land uses.
I Provide adequate transit parking at the 40th and 40th station to serve transit riders, but do not provide an
over abundance of parking so that the 40th and 40th station becomes a large satellite parking lot for
Downtown and DIA and inhibits redevelopment.
I Provide on-street parking where possible, on any new or reconstructed public or private streets, within the
40th and 40th TOD area.
I Reduce the need for parking through a variety of mechanisms, including through the use of travel demand
management (TDM) measures such as employer-sponsored ECO passes, to create incentives for future
employees and residents in the 40th and 40th TOD district to use transit.
72
0 Provide direct and pleasant multi-modal connections that facilitates development within a half-mile radius of
the station and that enables residents and businesses in surrounding neighborhoods to access transit and the
BLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:


RIVER
development area.
I Provide better access to transit by improving pedestrian connections in the vicinity of the proposed 40th
and 40th station including by installing sidewalks on facilities that currently have none, by providing
signage to direct people to the station, and by providing safe pedestrian crossing at high traffic
intersections.
I Work with RTD to determine how improved bus service, including the provision of circulator buses, to
the proposed 40th and 40th station can meet the needs of the surrounding neighborhoods including Cole,
Globeville, Five Points, Clayton, Elyria and Swansea.
I Provide improved bike and pedestrian access from the proposed 40th and 40th station to: the Platte River
Greenway and Brighton Boulevard via 38th Street; the west side of the tracks connecting to Brighton
Boulevard northwest of 38th Street; and to the National Western Stock Show Complex and the Denver
Coliseum through bus circulator shuttles, and improved pedestrian connections along 38th Street and
Brighton.
I Require the planning and development of a grid street system within the UP Inter-modal yard when
and/or if that area redevelops.
I Provide infrastructure that supports multi-modal access to the transit station and makes private development
feasible.
I Accommodate any area-wide or sub-regional utility improvements such as potential drainage, storm water
and sanitary improvements as well us the under grounding of any existing overhead utilities as a part of
any redevelopment of the proposed 40th and 40th TOD district.
I Work with the Union Pacific Railroad to determine railroad track configurations that balance the
preservation of future UP train operations with allowing for maximum redevelopment of the UP site and
accommodating passenger rail service.
| Create a compact, mixed-use, pedestrian-friendly transit oriented development (TOD).
I Encourage a compatible mix of uses within the potential 40th and 40th TOD district including residential,
retail, office, industrial, and civic uses.
BRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40TH AND 40th TOD
The Union Pacific inter-modal facility
occupies ouer 40 acres
Sidewalks are needed to provide better
access to the proposed rapid transit station


FRAMEWORK PLAN
I Provide a range of housing options (including workforce housing) in terms of type and si2e including both
for sale and rental.
I Promote the development of affordable housing in the TOD district that not only complies with Denvers
Inclusionary Housing Ordinance but also provides housing to households earning less than 60% and less
than 50% of the Area Median Income.
I Provide housing to persons who are transit dependent especially persons who have physical disabilities.
I Maximi2e the opportunity for TOD by siting the rail station in the best location for TOD while meeting
RTDs basic operational requirements for trains and buses and by considering the development of grade-
separated connections between modes (buses, trains, and vehicles).
I Compliment the proposed rail station with convenience retail directly adjacent to the station tailored to
serve the transit passengers transferring modes at the station.
I Provide easy access to the retail from the surrounding neighborhoods and encourage retail uses that fulfill
their needs.
I Provide the maximum viable density for new development on land that is within a quarter mile of the
station area.
| Insure that urban design reinforces the pedestrian oriented and transit-supportive character of the station area
and creates a friendly and useable public space.
I Utili2e trees, pedestrian lighting, wide sidewalks and other urban design elements to create a pedestrian-
friendly environment that fosters considerable street level activity.
I Work with RTD to develop a unique design for the rail station and make the platform area a significant
public space.
I Develop urban design standards and guidelines for new development that:
- require facades on parking structures facing public right of way to accommodate pedestrian-active uses
on the ground level.
- encourage the design of buildings that take advantage of the unique parcel configurations in the area
south of 40th Avenue.
- require appropriate massing, scale, building heights and building si2e for new development the
highest density development should occur near the rail station.
- encourage street oriented building placement and architectural variation.
I Facilitate partnerships between agencies, property owners, and developers to plan for, design coherently, and
share the cost of infrastructure.
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RIVER NORTH PLAN
Denargo Market Area
This district is located between Broadway/Brighton Boulevard and the South Platte River and between Park Avenue
and 31st Street. It is described in the Land Use Concept Map as a Residential/Mixed Use area. This area includes
land closest to downtown, primarily the Denargo Market area. Within this area, residential uses would be the
predominant use along the river with some neighborhood serving retail and office uses as well. Larger scale retail
(but not conventional big box retail), especially a festival marketplace concept, is envisioned in the Denargo Market,
which would serve downtown, River North and nearby neighborhoods. Office uses and downtown support services
are appropriate as well.
Issues
I There are multiple owners of land (although there is an 18 acre assemblage) making it difficult to establish a
master plan, seek 2oning for the entire area, and establish a General Development Plan.
I Utilities and infrastructure including storm drainage and streets are in poor condition.
Deigany street provides access to the
Central Platte valley from the
Denargo Market area
Opportunities
) It has access from the CBD and Lower Downtown via Broadway and Brighton Boulevard and from the
Central Platte Valley via Deigany Street.
) It has over 1,500 feet of river frontage and the potential of locating new development immediately adjacent
to the river and creating additional open space.
) The Denargo Market area offers the potential for a significant mixed-use development with destination
commercial uses, anchored by housing, and benefiting from its relationship to the river corridor and
downtown.
Goals
) Adequate parking should be efficiently provided in the most appropriate form while maximi2ing development
opportunities.
I Encourage the private development of shared parking, preferably in structures, which serve multiple land
uses.
I Provide on-street parking where possible, on any new or reconstructed public or private streets within the
area.
) Provide direct and pleasant multi-modal connections to residents and businesses in surrounding
BRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40TH AND 40th TOD
75


FRAMEWORK PLAN
of river frontage
The Denargo Market is adjacent to downtown
neighborhoods to access the development area and residents and businesses to access downtown, the South
Platte River, and Brighton Boulevard.
I Work with RTD to consider connecting Denargo Market to all parts of downtown through circulator bus
service.
I Provide pedestrian and bicycle access to Brighton Boulevard, the South Platte River bike trail, and Delgany
Street.
) Provide infrastructure that makes private development feasible.
I Accommodate any area-wide or sub-regional utility improvements.
I Accommodate all necessary water, storm water and sanitary utilities as a part of the reconstruction of any
streets within the area.
I Connect Delgany Street directly to Brighton Boulevard.
I Address infrastructure and utility issues for the entire area in order to create an attractive and consistent
environment for new development and in order to reduce their costs.
) Create a compact, mixed-use, pedestrian-friendly development.
I Encourage a mix of uses including residential, retail, and office uses.
I Provide a range of housing options (including workforce housing) in terms of type and si2e including both
for sale and rental and promote the development of affordable housing that at a minimum complies with
Denvers Inclusionary Housing Ordinance .
I Provide housing along the South Platte River.
) Insure that urban design reinforces the pedestrian oriented and transit-supportive character of the area and
creates friendly and useable public spaces.
I Utilize trees, pedestrian lighting, wide sidewalks and other urban design elements to create a more
pedestrian-friendly environment that fosters considerable street level activity.
I Develop urban design standards and guidelines for new development that:
- require facades on parking structures facing public right of way to accommodate pedestrian-active uses
on the ground level;
- require appropriate massing, scale, building heights and building si2e for new development with height
limits along the South Platte River; and
- encourage street oriented building placement and architectural variation.
) Facilitate partnerships between agencies, property owners, surrounding communities and developers to plan
for, design, and share the cost of infrastructure.
76
BLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:


RIVER NORTH
PLAN
Events District
This district is comprised of the Denver Coliseum, the Forney Museum, and the National Western Stock Show
(NWSS). Although most of the land holdings and main events venues are not included within the study area, access
to the NWSS and its influence on land uses with the Plan boundary need to be considered.
Issues
I Events at these facilities can create traffic and parking problems for nearby businesses and residents.
Opportunities
| The National Western Stock Show and other venues may have spin off opportunities to create year round
economic activity.
Goal
| Take advantage of the opportunities presented by these venues in a manner that is sensitive to the needs of
the surrounding businesses and neighborhoods.
BRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40TH AND 40th TOD
77


FRAMEWORK PLAN
This concrete plant is an allowed use under
the existing industrial zoning
^ECONOMIC ACTIVITY
Blueprint Denver identifies River North as an Area of Change, which means that growth should be directed to
this part of the city. Based on market analyses completed in conjunction with the corridor plan, a considerable level
of development and redevelopment could occur if select regulatory, financial, physical and market issues are
addressed.
Issues
) The current industrial 2oning classifications that dominate the corridor, 1-1 and 1-2, do not allow residential
development and only limited retail uses, thereby constraining the ability of the market to respond to demand
that exists for these and other non-industrial uses.
78
) 1-2 2oning allows new, and expansion of existing, industrial uses that are not necessarily compatible with
many of the proposed uses identified for the corridor, and were 1-2 2oning to continue, could potentially
reduce future investment in the area.
) Displacement of existing industrial properties due to changing market conditions may require relocation to a
site outside the area given the limited inventory of attainable properties.
) The infrastructure in many locations within the corridor is in poor condition, creating limitations (i.e.,
drainage systems) that will require attention prior to any significant level of new investment.
) The current physical cross-section of the corridor, with inconsistent sidewalk improvements and non-
identifiable parking, does not promote either a commercial environment, or pedestrian traffic.
| Neighborhoods that are located adjacent to, and in the vicinity of the corridor, will require stronger multi-
modal connections in order to be truly supportive of future retail.
I Given the limited inventory of quality building stock, there are few opportunities for adaptive reuse.
) The demographic profile of the existing resident population, in combination with the areas proximity to other
significant and competitive infill areas (i.e., Lower Downtown, Stapleton) currently limits the potential to
attract significant commercial development (i.e., grocery store).___________________________________
BLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:


RIVER NORTH
PLAN
I Services for the neighborhoods located adjacent to the corridor are limited, forcing residents to drive outside
the area.
Opportunities
I There are several si2able parcels of land, including many that are vacant or underutili2ed, thus limiting the
need for significant land assemblages.
| Destination uses, which anchor the area including the Denver Coliseum and Stock Show Pavilion, draw
visitors to River North and provide the catalyst for supportive commercial development that could also
benefit the neighborhood.
I The presence of various art production operators offers the potential for a marketable anchor in a newly
redeveloping urban neighborhood and supports the introduction of housing on the corridor in the form of
live/work projects.
I There is a rapidly growing residential market downtown, as well as underserved neighborhoods, creating the
demand for additional goods and services through the introduction of new, retail and service operators.
Goals
I Provide jobs for both neighborhood residents as well as employees from outside the neighborhood that use
the transportation infrastructure by promoting a diverse industrial and commercial base.
I Facilitate future business retention and attraction by providing appropriate economic incentives for new
development, redevelopment, and smaller/local businesses within River North and by providing public
amenities, services and infrastructure improvements.
I Create funding mechanisms that can capitate on future revenue generated in the area and provide incentives
that are based on the level of benefit to the city.
| Encourage the retention and expansion of existing retailers, and the addition of new ones, particularly in
strategic locations such as in the vicinity of the Denver Coliseum, by providing a sufficient supply of
appropriately 2oned sites designated for commercial uses in accordance with the Plan.
I Retain and attract artists interested in maintaining a presence in the area through implementation of
appropriate financial programs and techniques.
A large vacant, for sale land holding
along Brighton Boulevard
Art galleries and art studios are ideal uses
to retain and incorporate into any
redveiopment
) Encourage land uses that effectively increase the day- and night-time population of the area providing the
impetus for future commercial development.
BRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40TH AND 40
TOD


FRAMEWORK PLAN
The Ballpark lofts at 25th and Market, south
of the Plans area, is an example of a rental
product for River North
) Balance buffers and connections between residential neighborhoods and commercial uses through the use of
organi2ational mechanisms including business improvement districts and parking districts.
L_3_______________________
vacant ground at 38th Street and Brighton is
ideal for redevelopment
BLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:


RIVER NORTH PLAN
IMPLEMENTATION
BRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40TH AND 40th TOD
81


IMPLEMENTATION
The previous chapters identified the goals and objectives for the corridors, districts, and the study area as a whole.
This chapter identifies the specific actions that need to be taken in order to implement the River North Plan. It also
indicates which parties are responsible for implementing them and the approximate time frame in which the actions
should be initiated.
Several important characteristics of the River North Plan and small area plans in general should be noted.
First, plans themselves are advisory in nature, provide guidance to City decisions, and are not regulatory tools. Plans
provide a vision, which is a collective picture of a desired future and a roadmap for achieving that vision. They
provide the legal basis for the preparation of regulatory tools. Generally, entire plans are not implemented quickly,
but require a number of years to achieve the vision. Rather, plans are implemented incrementally with the vision
and goals providing common direction to a multitude of public and private undertakings. Despite these limitations,
plans have proved to have a substantial influence on the development of a plan area. Plan 2000 requires that
new development and redevelopment in River North be in conformance with plan goals and policies, as well as with
Citywide plans, and adopted rules and regulations. Developers are expected to meet with neighborhood associations
and with adjacent property owners to discuss their development and re2oning proposals
Second, the adoption of this Plan does not change the 2oning. However, 2oning is the primary land use regulatory
mechanism, and is, thus, an important tool for implementing small area plans. Throughout the Citys 2oning
process, neighborhood associations and individual citi2ens are provided opportunities to provide feedback on the
development proposals and whether they meet plan goals and policies. Traffic impacts, the proposed density of the
project, the mix of land uses, and design considerations will be taken into account during the process.
Finally, the adoption of this Plan does not automatically provide funding for operational improvements or capital
projects for multi-modal transportation facilities roadway, bus, bicycle and pedestrian or for other
infrastructure systems such as storm drainage facilities. Obviously, public funding resources are limited. Capital
projects, such as street improvements, can be funded by the City through its capital improvements program, by
property owners through special taxation districts, or by private developers as development occurs. Funding
availability, timing, and the necessary public land are constraints to achieving the Plans vision and goals with regard
to capital improvements.
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BLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:


RIVER NORTH PLAN
Pi A N D USE AND ZONING
The River North Plan, an outgrowth of Blueprint Denver, is intended to improve the mixed-use character of the
Plans area. The River North Area has been divided into five primary land-use areas (see Land Use Concept map)
each emphasi2ing a different mix of uses. Zone changes should be initiated or supported that encourage mixed-use
development in each of these Land Use Areas. The ability to retain and expand art related uses should be
considered when re2onings are undertaken. In addition, an Events Area has been identified which includes the
Forney Museum, the Denver Coliseum, and the National Western Stock Show (NWSS).
It is important to note that adoption of this plan by the Denver City Council does not change the 2oning. In some
portions of the River North Area, re2oning of multiple parcels is recommended. In such cases, a process needs to
be initiated by the city or by property owners that would consider which mixed-use 2one district (or districts) is
most appropriate, the boundaries of the area to be re2oned, and other details of the re2oning. An application
would then be submitted to the city for a 2oning change. This request for a change in 2oning would follow the
normal re2oning process and would require notice and a public hearing before consideration by City Council. Any
uses that are not allowed under the new 2oning would become legal nonconforming uses meaning that these uses
would be allowed to continue so long as they stayed in operation, were maintained, and otherwise met the
requirements of the Denver Zoning Code.
The recommended conceptual land uses and timing for each of the five primary Land Use Areas are described
below:
Coimiierical Mixed-Use
Re2one the area along Brighton Boulevard designated as commercial mixed-use to a Commercial Mixed-Use 2one
district. New development and redevelopment that includes heavy industrial uses is discouraged. A process should
begin, after this plan has been approved by City Council, to fine tune the boundaries and evaluate alternative 2one
districts. Property owners, business owners, and other interested parties should be included. A decision should be
made whether the city or landowners should initiate the re2oning. Prior to the initiation of this effort, CPD should
BRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40TH AND 40th TOD
83


IMPLEMENTATION
undertake an analysis of the existing uses and whether these uses are allowed under the various commercial mixed-
use 2ones.
Responsibility City and County of Denver, property owners and businesses, neighborhoods
Timing 2003 2004
Residential Mixed-Use
Re2one the residential mixed-use area, which includes Denargo Market, to Residential Mixed-Use 2oning,
Commercial Mixed-Use 2oning or a combination of both of them. New heavy industrial uses are discouraged in
this area. Mechanisms for retaining art related uses should be pursued. A master planning process should be
undertaken for the Denargo Market area. The process would look at appropriate development, a general site plan,
and appropriate 2oning among other topics. After a re2oning, a General Development Plan needs to be formulated
that would identify local street locations, assure a mix of uses, identify locations for open space, and address other
issues identified in the Denargo Market section.
Responsibility City and County of Denver, property owners, businesses and neighborhoods
Timing 2004 or when the major property owners have completed a master planning process
Transit Mixed-Use
Re2one the TOD district to a Transit Mixed-Use 2one district in the immediate vicinity of the station and consider
transit mixed-use or other mixed-use 2one districts for other land up to half mile from the station. After re2oning, a
General Development Plan (GDP) needs to be created and approved by the Planning Board to identify a circulation
system, identify how utilities would be provided including storm water, the provision of open space, and how
improvements would be financed. Design Guidelines should also be written and adopted by the Planning Board.
Responsibility City and County of Denver, property owners, businesses, Cole, Elyria and Swansea
neighborhoods in consultation with RTD
Timing Upon the completion of the 1-70 East Corridor EIS and based upon decisions on
technologies and the station location, a process should be initiated to re2one land near the
station. Other factors that will affect the timing are whether the RTD FasTracks Vision
Plan is approved by the voters and whether the Union Pacific decides to relocate their
inter-modal facility.
Industrial Mixed-Use
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BLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:


RIVER NORTH PLAN
To the extent that there is a reason to re2one the land within these areas, commercial mixed-use 2oning should be
given strong consideration. New heavy industrial uses are discouraged. Re2oning should generally be considered on
a parcel-by-parcel basis or when property owners jointly request a change in 2oning. Residential mixed-use 2one
districts may be appropriate for larger sites.
Responsibility property owners
Timino as market conditions warrant
River Corridor Mixed-Use
When an existing industrial use ceases operations, it should not be replaced with another industrial use. Zoning
should be put in place that assures uses with appropriate design guidelines that take advantage of the proximity to
the South Platte River. Both residential and commercial mixed-use 2one districts should be considered. A height
limit of 55 feet should be imposed on property fronting the river and a bulk plane established that permits taller
buildings as the distance from the river increases.
Responsibility Community Planning and Development (CPD), property owners, neighborhoods
Timing as industrial users cease operations
BRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40TH AND 40th TOD
85


IMPLEMENTATION
See the corridor section for Brighton Boulevard and 38th Street.
Improve streets used for local circulation parallel to or intersecting Brighton Boulevard including Wynkoop, Wa2ee,
redevelopment within the study area and serves adjacent local neighborhoods.
Responsibility RTD, Public Works, CPD, neighborhoods
Timing 2003 2006
Work with RTD, CDOT, and other City agencies to ensure that the Downtown Multi-modal Access Plan (DMAP)
and the Pedestrian Master Plan address how to enhance transit, bike, pedestrian, and auto connections between
Downtown and River North corridors and districts.
Responsibility Public Works, CPD, RTD, CDOT
Timing 2003 2004
This local street needs improuements and
should be brought to current standards
when redeuelopment occurs
Delgany, Chestnut, 35th Street, 36th Street, and 40th Street as redevelopment occurs to bring them up to roadway
standards. Curb and gutter, drainage (if necessary), sidewalks, signage and pavement should all be improved to city
standards.
Responsibility property owners, developers, Public Works
Timing as redevelopment occurs over the next several years
Work with RTD during the 1-70 East Corridor EIS to develop a plan for transit and mobility that serves the
BLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:


RIVER NORTH
PLAN
Pedestrian and dicycle connections
Complete the major missing links in the recently adopted Bicycle Master Plan;
) 46th Avenue from the South Platte River to the National Western Stock Show complex on route D-2 as
described in the Bicycle Master Plan, and
I 38th Street from Walnut to Brighton Boulevard as described in the Bicycle Master Plan
Responsibility Public Works
Timing 2003 2012
Explore options for creating a pedestrian and bicycle crossing of the UP tracks at 31st Street to connect Upper
Larimer and Curtis Park to the South Platte River trail.
Responsibility CPD, Public Works
Timing 2005
Re-evaluate the current bike route system in North Central Denver during the 1-70 East EIS process in order to
take advantage of any proposed rapid transit or bus transit alternative considered. Suggested improvements to
consider are accommodating bicycles along 40th Avenue between Steele and Franklin and providing a grade
separated pedestrian/bike connection over the UP Railroad tracks from the potential 40th and 40th station area to a
location between 38th and 44th along Brighton Boulevard. Pedestrian and bicycle access should be provided to
residents and employees of Elyria-Swansea, Globeville, and Cole. These improvements may require amending the
current Bicycle Master Plan.
Responsibility 1-70 East Corridor EIS, Public Works, CPD, neighborhoods
Timing 2003 2008
46th Avenue bike route under 1-70
38th Street is a missing bike link
31st Street looking over the UP tracks
BRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40TH AND 40th TOD
87


IMPLEMENTATION
An urban design feature marking the
entrance to downtown Denuer
An example of wayfinding signage
Pll R B A N DESIGN
Develop an identity for Brighton Boulevard that provides a gateway character to downtown from 1-70 and a
gateway from downtown to North Denver. Consider the use of monuments, signage, urban design features, and a
name change for the corridor that will assist with marketing the area.
Responsibility CPD, Public Works, consultants designing Brighton Boulevard improvements, the
Downtown Denver Partnership, North Central Denver neighborhoods
Timing in conjunction with designing the Brighton Boulevard improvements.
Develop an improved way-finding system for the South Platte River Trail, the Coliseum, the Forney Museum, the
National Western Stock Show, and other major attractions. The way-finding system should include colorful signage
and/or landscaping to improve local connections to major attractions as well as help to enhance the character within
the study area.
Responsibility National Western Stock Show, the Coliseum, Platte River Greenway Foundation, Forney
Museum, CPD, Public Works
Timing develop plan in conjunction with design for Brighton Boulevard improvements and major
private redevelopment.
Develop design guidelines for each area within the Plan boundary that is re2oned to a mixed-use 2one district.
These detailed design guidelines will be developed upon re2onings to mixed-use 2one districts. They will become
part of rules and regulations upon adoption by the Planning Director through the Planning Board.
Responsibility CPD Urban Design, Planning Board, Planning Director, residents and owners of property
in land use areas
Timing immediately following the re2oning of land use areas.
BLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:


RIVER
^ECONOMIC ACTIVITY
Provide detailed information on the area in the Technical Appendix, update this information annually and
disseminate it to entities including the Downtown Denver Partnership, the Mayors Office of Economic
Development and International Trade (MOED-IT), the Denver Urban Renewal Authority (DURA), real estate
brokers, developers and others.
Responsibility CPD, Environmental Health, Public Works
Timino annually
Take advantage of opportunities created by the Denver Coliseum, the National Western Stock Show (NWSS) and
its facilities, and the Forney Museum by
| promoting new development north of 1-70 and east of Brighton Boulevard that would serve events as well as
neighborhood and other residents.
Responsibility MOED-IT, CPD, NWSS, Denver Theatres and Arenas
Timino 2004 and ongoing
I provide easier access through enhanced signage, improved pedestrian connections (i.e. adding sidewalks and
lighting along Brighton Boulevard), and explore additional access for the Forney Museum.
Responsibility Public Works, CPD, Forney Museum
Timing access for the Forney Museum should be explored in conjunction with planning for the
Coliseum, open space north of Globeville Landing Park, and storm water planning
| explore opportunities for creating year round activity associated with the NWSS.
Responsibility nwss, moed-it
Timing 2003,2004 and ongoing
BRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40TH AND 40th TOD
The National western Stock Show provides
economic development opportunitites
Forney Museum of Transportation access
necessitates crossing railroad tracks


I M P L E M E
Several buildings along Brighton could relate
better to the proposed cross section
^______________________________
Formation of urban renewal districts may
help areas like Denargo Market redevelop
N T A T I O N
Encourage and support demonstration development projects within each of the districts.
Develop model pro formas.
Responsibility economic consultant, CPD, MOED-IT, H&NDS
Timing pro formas in 2003, and ongoing as development opportunities arise
Explore the establishment of a facade maintenance program using low interest loans and grants (local, state,
federal), focusing on improvements that better relates the buildings to the proposed cross section for Brighton
Boulevard.
Respnnsibility moed-it, cpd, businesses
Timing 2004
Utilize available financial incentives to facilitate Brownfield redevelopment.
Respnnsibility MOED-IT, Environmental Health, CPD
Timing ongoing
Initiate an education process and solicit interest in the establishment of one or more improvement districts to
finance public infrastructure, common spaces, waterway redevelopment, marketing, cleanliness and safety programs
and for a maintenance district to maintain improvements.
Responsibility Elyria-Swansea Business Association, property owners, CPD, Public Works
Timing 2004
Work with DURA to determine (if and when) the establishment of an urban renewal district might be feasible in
selected areas. Potential areas are the Denargo Market district and the 40th and 40th TOD district. Slum and Blight
studies should be selectively initiated.
Responsibility DURA, CPD, developers
Timing upon completion of or as part of a master planning process for the Denargo Market and
after the 1-70 Corridor East EIS has been completed for the TOD district
Explore the establishment of a program to assist with the retention and/or relocation of businesses impacted by
reinvestment within the corridor.
Respnnsibility moed-it
Timing 2004
BLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:


RIVER NORTH PLAN
Among the Areas of Change identified by Blueprint Denver is the North Industrial Area. Some of this area is
included in the study area for this plan and the balance includes much of the industrial portion of the Elyria-
Swansea neighborhood and a portion of the Globeville neighborhood. These industrial areas surround stable
residential areas that need some reinvestment and are affected by some of the industrial uses. Buffering the
residential areas from the industrial areas is needed. This area includes some large employers as well as considerable
land used for truck parking and storage. Much of the industrial area should be improved to serve industry better
and to attract new businesses that provide jobs for nearby residents. Finally, some of the industrial area should be
considered for commercial development that would provide needed shopping for residents. After completion of
this plan, a district plan for the North Industrial Area should be undertaken and/or a plan for the Elyria-Swansea
neighborhood. It should consider the continuing need to address environmental problems. The plan for the North
Washington area should be completed and implemented.
Responsibility CPD, MOED-IT, North Industrial Area property owners and businesses, Environmental
Health, Elyria-Swansea and Globeville residents and neighborhood and business
associations
Timing 2004 2006
The interface between residential and
industrial uses needs to be improued
in the North industrial Area
BRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40TH AND 40th TOD
91


IMPLEMENTATION
lf ^ __,__________:_ ________________
Cleaning up properties will improve the
Brighton Boulevard image
^ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS
Work with the businesses to develop a voluntary cleanup plan for Brighton Boulevard to make it a more pleasant
environment through cleaning out material that is not needed, screening, fayade improvements, landscaping and
other measures.
Responsibility property owners, Elyria-Swansea Business Association, CPD, Neighborhood Inspection
Services
Timing 2004
Provide detailed information on environmental conditions within the River North Area in the Technical Appendix.
Update this information annually and disseminate it to a variety of interested parties in order to expedite the
predevelopment process by potentially reducing the due diligence time frame.
Respnnsibility Environmental Health, CPD
Timing annually
Provide information on funding sources for cleaning up environmental contamination and pursue funding for
cleanup of public sites and to obtain better information on the extent of contamination.
Responsibility Environmental Health, MOED-IT
Timing 2003 and ongoing
92
BLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:


RIVER
^LEGACIES
Preserve some of the older homes, some of the industrial buildings (especially the Drive Train fayade, the Rock
Drill building, and others), and some commercial buildings in order to represent the historical mix of uses that have
occurred over time.
Responsibility property owners and developers
Timing ongoing
Undertake a study of which buildings contribute the most based on their historic uses or structural type.
Responsibility CPD
Timing 2004 2005
Enhance the South Platte River as a natural area.
Responsibility Parks and Recreation, Greenway Foundation
Timing 2004 2006
BRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40TH AND 40th TOD
The former Rock Drill building and site are
being redeueloped into condominiums
The South Platte River retains a natural feel
and should be more accessible for recreation


IMPLEMENTATION
Adaptive re-use of old structures can
create housing
Ph 0 U SIN G
Concentrate new housing in the Denargo Market area, along the South Platte River, and in the vicinity of the
proposed 40th and 40th station. Residential in other locations including along Brighton Boulevard, especially artists
studios, may be appropriate. Encourage the inclusion of a variety of types, prices and si2es in order to
accommodate a broad range of households including households who work within the Plans area. The
Inclusionary Housing Ordinance requires housing developers to provide moderately priced units for those earning
over 60% of the Area Median Family Income. However, resources need to be made available to develop housing
for households, including families, earning less than 60% and less than 50% of the Area Median Family Income.
Make available Private Activity Bonds (PAB) from Denvers allocation to develop mixed-income, mixed-use
developments. Developers should seek 9% Low Income Housing Tax Credit allocations from the Colorado
Housing and Finance Authority and allocations from the regional TOD PAB Pool. Other resources, including
CDBG and HOME funds, should be made available to projects that meet the needs described above. Determine
the market for housing for those who are transit dependent especially for persons who have physical disabilities.
Seek to include such units in a variety of projects and seek out funding to assist in the production or subsidi2ation
of such units, especially near the 40th and 40th station.
Responsibility CPD, H&NDS, developers both for profit and nonprofit
Timing ongoing
94
BLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:


RIVER NORTH
PLAN
R I D 0 R S
\
Brighton Boulevard Corridor
Brighton Boulevard should be rebuilt using a 96 foot wide cross section. The illustrations on the following page
depict the desired 96 foot cross section. The desired cross section assumes curb and gutter will be added on
both sides. The parallel parking lane and sidewalk or amenity 2one on the east side can be built as
redevelopment occurs on land that is dedicated to the city. Prior to redevelopment, the possibility of protecting
businesses that are in close proximity to the existing 80 foot right-of-way by squee2ing down the lane widths to
provide a clear 2one of at least 5 feet adjacent to the existing property line should be explored. Generally, at
intersections bulb-outs should be included in order to reduce the crossing distances for pedestrians. At a later
date if the uses change significantly, a raised median could be constructed and the lane widths reduced.
However, any median improvements will need to address the effects of storm water overflow drainage from
upper drainage areas. Funding could come from a variety of sources including an improvement district, federal
funds, a city bond issue, dedication of right-of-way, Transportation Improvement Program (TIP), improvements
undertaken at the time of redevelopment, the Capital Improvements Program and others. Preliminary Design
should be undertaken in the near future in order to make it possible for developers to be able to build their
improvements within the Right-of-Way with a reasonable expectation that it will work upon completion of the
rebuilding of Brighton Boulevard. As Brighton Boulevard is reconstructed, all reasonable efforts should be
made to mitigate and minimi2e the impacts associated with any right-of-way take for the road.
Responsibility Public Works, Private Property Owners
Timing Regulation adopting the cross section immediately after adoption of the Plan by the
Manager of Public Works, pursue funding in 2003 and 2004 for the preliminary design and
complete preliminary design in 2005, place the rebuilding of Brighton Boulevard on lists of
projects such as Capital Improvements and TIP, and pursue the formation of a local
improvement district in 2003 to 2005
Hu it
- 1 -
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Develop an access management plan to consolidate access points along Brighton Boulevard between 31st and 44th
BRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40TH AND 40th TOD
95


IMPLEMENTATION
.1
Brighton Boulevard at 38th Street as it looks
today
Streets.
Responsibility Public Works
Timing prior to the final engineering of Brighton Boulevard
Establish development standards in rules and regulations and/or as part of the re2oning. For example, new
development should be adjacent to the sidewalk.
Responsibility CPD
Timing 2003 2004
Place utilities underground as appropriate and when funding becomes available.
Responsibility Xcel Energy, other utility companies, Public Works
Timing as redevelopment occurs and/or at the time that Brighton Boulevard is reconstructed
After studying operational issues, place a stoplight in the vicinity of 35th Street in order to improve the ability to
safely cross the street.
Responsibility Public Works
Timing when traffic warrants it or when Brighton Boulevard is reconstructed, whichever comes
earlier
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96
BLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:


Full Text

PAGE 1

BRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40THAND 40TH TOD RIVER NORTH PLAN lRIVER NORTH PLANlJUNE 2003

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ii ACKNOWLEDGEMENTSBLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:wACKNOWLEDGEMENTSCity CouncilCathy ReynoldsCouncil President, At LargeSusan Barnes-GeltAt LargeDennis GallagherDistrict 1Ted HackworthDistrict 2Ramona MartinezDistrict 3Joyce FosterDistrict 4Polly FlobeckDistrict 5Charlie BrownDistrict 6Kathleen MacKenzieDistrict 7Elbra WedgeworthDistrict 8Debbie OrtegaDistrict 9Ed ThomasDistrict 10Happy HaynesDistrict 11Planning BoardWilliam H.HornbyChairJ an Marie Belle Frederick Corn Pa t Cor tez Daniel Guimond Mark Johnson Barbar a K elle y Joyce Oberfeld Bruce ODonnell Jim Raughton R obert WrightCity and County of DenverWellington E.Webb MayorJennifer Moulton Director, Community Planning and DevelopmentEllen Ittelson Deputy Director for Planning ServicesSteve Gordon Development Program Manager and Project ManagerCatherine Co x Senior City Planner and Assistant Project ManagerMark Najarian Senior EngineerMichael Anderson EngineerLeslie Lipstein Urban Design ArchitectRandy Schnicker Engineering SupervisorBrian Mitc hell Senior Traffic Operations EngineerMike Gill Senior Signal EngineerDave Weaver Engineering SupervisorJanice Finch Senior City PlannerT ad Bowman Facility Manager for the Denver ColiseumCindy Bosco Environmental ScientistR uth Mur a yama Landscape Architect SupervisorGayle W einstein City NaturalistSusan Baird Senior Landscape ArchitectBar Chad wick South Platte Initiative DirectorNed Burke Economic Development SpecialistJ ulie Connor Graphic DesignEric McClelland GISDan Michael Graphic DesignPhil Plienis Senior City PlannerDa v e Bec kerSenior City PlannerOther AgenciesMarianne LeClair Denver Urban Renewal AuthorityMike Turner Regional Transportation DistrictChris Quinn Regional Transportation DistrictSharon Lipp Colorado Department of TransportationConsultantsCarter ::Burgess,Inc. Leland Consulting GroupStakeholdersThis Plan could not have been accomplished without the participation and commitment of multiple stakeholders.A list ofthose who attended public meetings and participated in the plan process is in the Technical Appendix.

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iii RIVER NORTH PLANBRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40THAND 40TH TODwTABLE OF CONTENTS Executive Summary 1 Plan Purpose and Process 7Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Purpose ofthe Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Plan Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Pr e vious Plans and Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 History 21 V ision 25 Existing Conditions and Pr ojections 29Zoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Land Use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Housing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Economic Activity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Mobility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Environmental Conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Infrastructure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Human Services and Demographics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 F ramework Plan 57General Framework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Corridors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Districts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Economic Activity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78

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iv TABLE OF CONTENTSBLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE: Implementation 81Land Use and Zoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 Pedestrian and Bicycle Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 Urban Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 Economic Activity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 Environmental Conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 Legacies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 Housing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 Corridors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 Districts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 Implementation Matrix. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 Appendix 107Glossary ofTerms and Acronyms. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 Guiding Principles f or Areas ofStability and Change. . . . . . . . . . . . 110 Comprehensi v e Plan 2000 policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112 Methodology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 Strengths,Weaknesses,Opportunities and Threats (SWOT). . . . . . . . . . 117 Technical Appendix (not adopted) List ofMapsBlueprint Denver Areas ofChange. . . . . 17 Blueprint Denver Plan Map excerpt. . . . . 10 Existing Lane Geometry and Level ofService. . 42 Existing Traffic Counts. . . . . . . 41 Futur e Lane Geometry and Le vel ofService. . . 49 Future Traffic Counts. . . . . . . . 50 Land Use. . . . . . . . . . 33 Land Use Conce pt . . . . . . . 61 Major Traffic Generators. . . . . . . 44 P edestrian and Bic y cle Facilities. . . . . . 46 Plan Framework. . . . . . . . . 5 Platte Changing Shape . . . . . . . 23 P otential T ODs . . . . . . . . 71 South Platte River Corridor Profiles. . . . . 67 Stor m Se wer Drainage Basins. . . . . . 54 Underutilized Land. . . . . . . . 34 Zoning. . . . . . . . . . . 31

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1 RIVER NORTH PLANBRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40THAND 40TH TODlEXECUTIVE SUMMARYl

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2 EXECUTIVE SUMMARYBLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:The area covered in the River North Plan,or the Plan,is generallly located northeast ofdowntown Denver between Park Avenue West and Interstate 70 (I-70) and its interchange with Brighton Boulevard.This area has enormous potential to create a unique community that will take its position among Denvers great places.Its past as a mixeduse area provides guidance on how to re-establish a mixture ofuses to maximize its potential while continuing to serve as a home to many existing businesses. T he plan framework consists oftwo northsouth corridors and one eastwest corridor connecting three districts, four neighborhoods and downtown Denver.The next two paragraphs describe the corridors and the districts. The recent replacement ofthe Broadway viaduct on the south end ofthe corridor and the improvements to the I70 interchange on the north have improved the connection between I-70 and downtown.The Brighton Boulevard corridor can become an attractive gateway to Downtown Denver from I-70 and the North Denver neighborhoods and is in a position to benefit from and serve the growing downtown market.The South Platte River corridor presents a natural open space area that includes a bicycle trail and Globeville Landing Park.The river corridor has the opportunity to pr o vide a setting for a mile long residential and mixed-use area with river front access.These two corridors connect two major districts and an events district.A third corridor is 38th Street.Given the restricted access from the west to the east created by the two railroad lines that run through the area and the South Platte Ri v er 38th Street is a critical connection.It runs under the railroad tracks and over a bridge that crosses the South Platte River,thereby,connecting the segments ofthe study area to each other and to Brighton Boulevard. The Denargo Market district is adjacent to downtown and has access from the Central Business District (CBD) via Broadway but also to the Central Platte Valley via Delgany Street.Its placement along the South Platte River and proximity to downtown provides an opportunity to create an exciting mixed-use area with its own identity. R TD s F asTrac ks Vision Plan calls for a rapid transit station in the vicinity ofwhere 40th Avenue and 40th Street come together cr eating the opportunity to establish a 40th and 40th Transit Oriented Development district.If implemented, the FasTracks Vision Plan calls for rapid transit service between Union Station and Denver International Airpor t (DIA),to Thornton along the North Metro Line,and to downtown via an extension ofthe light rail line that runs along Welton Street and that now ends at 30th Street and Downing Street.River North is con veniently located between downtown and DIA and will be connected to both through transit and roads.New employers and new residents will be attracted to convenient access to downtown,Stapleton and DIA.The Events District includes the National Western Stock Show,the Denver Coliseum,and the Forney Transportation Museum and attracts visitors from all over the world. At the same time,River North already is the home to several large employers and to many long-time businesses.Brighton connects to downtown via Broadway Platte River Trail and Globeville Landing Park Denargo Market as it exists today

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3 RIVER NORTH PLANBRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40THAND 40TH TODThese businesses provide considerable employment and serve local businesses as well as the Rocky Mountain Region.Most ofthese businesses are an asset to the area and to the city.The retention ofsome ofthe unique industrial buildings will assure that the character ofRiver North is maintained and will continue to foster an artsrelated community. Brighton Boulevard is part ofthe downtown grid and was named Wewatta Street until the late 1920s.It was se parated from downtown until Broadway was extended and a viaduct built over the railroad yards.There was a considerable residential community along Brighton Boulevard and in other portions ofthe area as well as a variety of businesses that served local residents.This demonstrates one ofthe purposes ofthe Plan,which is to restore the historic,mixed-use character ofthe area.This is reinforced by Blueprint Denver:An Integrated Land Use and Transportation Plan tha t characterizes this area as an Area ofChange.Areas ofChange are areas tha t can accommodate growth because ofthe opportunity to create mixed-use development in conjunction with exceptional transportation access.This plan provides a framework and establishes implementation strategies that will direct future growth and redevelopment in a coordinated manner to River North.This plan is intended to promote River North by providing information about the area to existing businesses and landowners and to developers to help facilitate expansion and redevelopment.Whenever possible,this information will be updated annually and made available by updating the technical appendix. Almost all ofthe area is zoned either I-1 or I-2 which allows for a wide range ofindustrial uses.The primary land uses are warehousing and railroads.Other prevalent uses are RTD and bottling and distribution.Nine percent of the land is vacant and a consider ab le amount ofthe land is underutilized.There are only 79 residential structures within the Plans area. An analysis of demo gra phic and market conditions was undertaken.The results ofthis analysis led to the identifica tion ofpotential land uses that could locate in Ri v er Nor th.Ov er a twenty-year time frame,it is concei vable that over 1,500 dwelling units could be added,350,000 square feet ofretail development,650,000 squar e feet ofindustrial de v elopment,and 1,800,000 square feet ofoffice space.These conservative estimates of de v elopment w er e used to project future tr af fic.Traffic moves reasonably well at the present time.Based on a projected general increase in traffic and increases from new development,it is expected that several intersections will be oper a ting at less than optimum levels ofservice.Intersections that may need attention include 38th Street and Brighton Boulevard,38th Street and Walnut,and 31st Street and Brighton. River North was once home to a variety ofindustrial uses and landfills that have created a variety ofenvironmental problems.The U.S.Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has agreed to provide funding to test soil conditionsHeading downtown on Brighton Boulevard Drive Train Industries employs 180 people Warehousing is the predominant use

PAGE 8

4 EXECUTIVE SUMMARYBLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:and groundwater in several locations within the Plans Area. Infrastructure issues include the poor condition ofseveral streets,drainage problems,and above grade utilities. Several storm water basins run through this area and studies are underway for several ofthese basins. Goals and objectives have been identified for River North as a whole and also for the three corridors and three districts.In addition,actions have been identified that can lead to the implementation ofthis plan.Some ofthe primary ones are (1) identifying a cross section for Brighton Boulevard that identifies the characteristics for a rebuilt street,(2) rezoning portions ofthe area to mixed-use zone districts,(3) addressing the inadequacy of38th Street for traffic,pedestrians and bicyclists,(4) master planning and establishing General Development Plans for the Denargo Market area and the 40th and 40th Transit Oriented Development area,(5) improving pedestrian and bicycle connections throughout the area,(6) addressing traffic and transit needs and taking advantage ofland use opportunities as part ofthe I-70 East Corridor process,(7) enhancing the South Platte River corridor,(8) promoting economic activity,(9) creating a variety ofhousing options including affordable housing,and (10) addr essing en vir onmental pr oblems. This plan was developed with considerable public input and with considerable assistance from several city department partners and other agency partners.This land is currently vacant 38th Street, Walnut and Marion intersection Many of the streets are in poor condition

PAGE 9

5RIVER NORTH PLAN Plan Framework BRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40THAND 40TH TOD

PAGE 10

6 BLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:

PAGE 11

7 RIVER NORTH PLANBRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40THAND 40TH TODlPLAN PURPOSE AND PROCESSl

PAGE 12

8 PLAN PURPOSE AND PROCESSBLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:wLOCATIONThe River North Plan study area is in North Denver just northeast ofdowntown.Project boundaries are generally between Park Avenue West on the south and I-70 to the north and between the Burlington Northern tracks on the west and the Union Pacific tracks and York Street on the east.

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9 RIVER NORTH PLANBRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40THAND 40TH TODwPURPOSE OF THE PLANMost ofRiver North is designated an Area ofChange in Blueprint Denver ,Denvers land use and transportation plan. Areas ofChange are areas that can accommodate growth because ofthe opportunity to create mixed-use development in conjunction with exceptional transportation.Thus the primary purpose ofthe River North Plan is to promote the area,identify appropriate locations for growth,establish a multi-modal transportation system and provide a regulatory environment that makes mixed-use development possible.RTDs FasTracks Vision Plan includes a rapid transit station in the vicinity of40th Avenue and 40th Street.The Plan establishes goals and objecti v es and implementation steps that will be taken into consideration during the I-70 East Corridor Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) process.The River North Plan identifies two primary districts,the 40th and 40th T ransit Oriented Development (TOD) district and the Denargo Market district,and two transportation corridor s, Brighton Boule v ard and the South Platte River.It addresses how these areas connect and can reinforce each other to create a fantastic place.It also identifies 38th Street as a major connector given that 38th Street not onl y crosses the South Platte River but also goes under the Burlington Northern and Union Pacific Railroad Tracks. There are several reasons why the River North Plan should be developed at this time.(1) The southern portion of the Plans area is immediately adjacent to new development in the Ball Park and Prospect neighborhoods and with the Denargo Market close by,this is a logical location for new development.(2) There are several vacant and underutilized sites on Brighton Boulevard that are on the real estate market.(3) It is important to determine the ultima te cross section for Brighton Boulevard so that potential developers can plan accordingly.The cross section inc ludes lane widths curb and gutter placement, side w alks and other amenities.(4) Several new residential projects are in process or being planned including 241 a par tments being de v eloped by JPI at 29th Street and Brighton Boule vard,a 75-unit condominium project near 31st Street and Brighton Boulevard,a mixed-use development at the T axi site on Ringsby Cour t, and a multi-phase project in the Rock Drill site at 39th Street and Williams Street.In addition,several major improvements have been made to commercial properties as well as to the National Western Stock Show.(5) In addition to private reinvestment,several major public investments have recently been made.The major transportation and access improvements include the replacement ofthe Broadway viaduct,the Brighton Boulevard and Washington Street interchanges with I-70,and the replacement ofthe railroad bridge overJPI is constructing 241 apartment units along Brighton Boulevard New housing in Ballpark neighborhood, adjacent to River North's southern boundary

PAGE 14

10PLAN PURPOSE AND PROCESS %n% "n#tntttf&tn '(tt )tftnt "%tnt *)ttnf +ftb&f,rft( +ftb&f,)ttnf &&t-f .t*tnt $ttn+n-n &r /ntn&tn0rfnrf0/(*n $ #t+-t&nt /&f,&tn 2rnf 3frt tt n$fr, Blueprint Denver Plan Map excerptBLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:

PAGE 15

11 RIVER NORTH PLANBRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40THAND 40TH TODWashington Street and widening it to four lanes.The city has recently made significant improvements to the Denver Coliseum and built a new Fire House #9 at 44th Street and Brighton Boulevard. The River North Plan establishes long-range goals and objectives for the redevelopment ofthe Brighton Boulevard corridor and TOD area with strong connections to multiple modes oftransportation.It provides a framework and esta blishes implementation strategies that will direct future growth and redevelopment in a coordinated manner.The Plan is primarily a vision for land use,transportation and urban design.The Plan provides a community and cityapproved guide to the acceptable future redevelopment in the corridors and districts.It is intended for use by Comm unity Planning and Development,the Department ofPublic Works,the Department ofParks and Recreation, other city agencies,the Denver Planning Board,the Mayor,City Council,other public agencies such as the Colorado De partment ofTransportation,the Regional Transportation District,the Denver Regional Council ofGovernment, and quasi-public agencies,neighborhood associations,business people,property owners,residents,and private organizations concerned with planning,development and neighborhood improvement. T he Plan is intended to promote pa tter ns ofland use,urban form,circulation and services that contribute to the economic,social and physical health,safety and welfare ofthe people who live and work in the area.Corridor and district plans address issues and opportunities at a scale that is more refined and more responsive to specific needs than the City s Comprehensive Plan 2000 ( Plan 2000) and Blueprint Denver It pr o vides more specific guidance f or the allocation ofcity resources and for the location and design ofprivate development.This plan serves as a supplement to Plan 2000 Since this is a plan f or Areas ofChange,as designated in Blueprint Denver (and as shown in the Blueprint Den v er Plan Ma p excerpt),this plan emphasizes providing adequate direction for potential developers.It also pro vides either in the text or extensive appendices,detailed information on existing conditions,future travel demand estima tes and a mar k et analysis ofthe demand for new development.The availability ofthis information ma y foster interest in the area and may expedite redevelopment. The Plan is not an official zone map,nor does it create or deny any rights.Zone changes that may be proposed as part ofany development must be initiated under a separate procedure established under the Revised Municipal Code .The former Rock Drill building has been adaptively re-used for condominiums

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12 PLAN PURPOSE AND PROCESSBLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:wPLAN PROCESSThe River North Plan is the result ofan aggressive and intensive effort by the City and County ofDenver and stakeholders. Blueprint Denver identified several Areas ofChange where growth should be directed. Comm unity Planning and Development (CPD) determined that the study area was among the highest priority Areas ofChange and initiated a planning process as an outgrowth of Blueprint Denver .The Community Planning and De velopment staff,consultants and stafffrom other city agencies facilitated the Planning process,were responsible for reviewing the Plan concepts for consistency with citywide policies,and identified and analyzed the existing conditions in the cor ridor .T hese conditions w er e presented to the public.The public analyzed the Strengths, Weaknesses,Opportunities and Threats (located in the Appendix) within the River North Area,which formed the basis for establishing a vision,formulating goals and objectives,and developing detailed recommendations. The River North Plan is a combination ofa corridor plan and a district plan as opposed to a neighborhood plan,all ofwhich are categorized as Small Area Plans.The River North Areas boundaries include portions offour neighborhoods:Five Points,Globeville,Cole and Elyria-Swansea.However,none ofthe residentially zoned portions ofthese neighborhoods are included in the River North Plan boundaries.As a corridor and district plan, the approach has been modified to facilitate a very open and participatory process.Anyone was encouraged to attend any meeting instead ofdesignating a steering committee or other established body.Many stakeholders representing a wide variety ofperspectives and a broad range ofthe community participated in the planning process ,providing critical comment and direction.The primary mechanisms for citizen input are described below. w As part of Blueprint Denver a 40th and 40th TOD small area workshop was held in the Spring of2001 as well as an Elyria-Swansea small area workshop in the fall.In each case thousands ofpost cards were mailed to residents ofthese areas.The results ofthese processes were incorporated as a starting point for the River North Plan.In addition,each person who attended these meetings was placed on the Plans mailing list. w A forum was held for commercial real estate agents,developers and landowners in July,2002, to confir m and assess the interest to redevelop the River North Area.About 50 people were invited and the 20 who attended and others who expressed an interest were added to the Plans mailing list.

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13 RIVER NORTH PLANBRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40THAND 40TH TODw Representatives ofall nearby registered neighborhood organizations were added to the mailing list and invited to attend meetings w A series ofpublic meetings were held to undertake a SWOT (strengths,weaknesses,opportunities and threats) analysis ,help identify proposed land uses for sub-areas,confirm goals and objectives for sub-areas, refine the vision statement,and create an ideal Brighton Boulevard corridor cross-section.Meetings were held within the River North Plan boundaries.Meetings were advertised by mailings to businesses in the corridor, contacts gathered at a commercial realtors forum,to the Elyria-Swansea Community Economic Development Coalition,to the Elyria-Swansea Business Association mailing list and by walking the corridor and distributing meeting notices by hand. w Community Planning and Development staffalso conducted many one-on-one meetings with property o wners and community activists in the River North Area. w An insert was included in the Cross Community Coalitions newsletter in Spanish and English providing an o verview ofthe Planning effort.This newsletter is circulated to 2,700 households. w Planning staf f attended an El yria-Swansea Business Association meeting and made a follow-up presentation to the Association with detailed information on zoning and legal nonconforming uses. w Gi v en that it can be difficult to g et participation from some segments ofthe community,planning staff attended several regularly scheduled community meetings to inform them ofthe River North Plan and to obtain input. In addition to the public par ticipa tion pr ocess the Plan was also shaped thr ough: w Briefings held with city council members. w Comm unity Planning and Dev elopment staffreview and discussions.River North Plan presentation to Globeville senior lunch Stakeholders and the project team discuss the Plan at a meeting held at the Coliseum

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14 PLAN PURPOSE AND PROCESSBLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:As a part ofCity Councils adoption ofthe Plan as a supplement to Plan 2000 ,the Plan document was further refined thr ough: w Denvers Interagency Plan Review Committee standards ofcompleteness,presentation,and consistency with Plan 2000 and Blueprint Denver w Denver Planning Board informational session and public hearing. w City Council committee and final action. T he interaction between the multiple city agencies,other public agencies and the general public has been extensive. Many ofthe Plan implementation strategies and priorities will require continued public involvement and partnerships between property owners,businesses,neighborhoods,city agencies and other public agencies and private individuals and organizations.Pr oject P ar tner sMany project partners helped create and validate the River North Plan.The project partners demonstrate a unique commitment oftime and resources by many diverse agencies.Several City departments collaborated on the Plan including Comm unity Planning and Development,Public Works,Parks and Recreation,the Mayors Office of Economic Development and International Trade,Environmental Health and the Denver Urban Renewal Authority (DURA). There was also participation from the Regional Transportation District (RTD) and the Colorado Depar tment of T ransportation (CDOT).The strong interest and participation by city and other agencies bodes well for implementing the Plan expeditiously.The involvement ofproperty owners,businesses and developers assures both realism and a bold vision ofwhat the area can become.

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15 RIVER NORTH PLANBRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40THAND 40TH TODwPREVIOUS PLANS AND STUDIESThe land use,transportation and urban design vision is portrayed in this River North Plan.It takes into consideration recommendations from earlier plans.Previously adopted planning documents that are relevant to the River North Area are: w Swansea/Elyria Neighborhood Plan,City & County ofDenver,1983 w Swansea/Elyria Charrette Report,City & County ofDenver,1989 w Historic Resources Survey Report,Broadway Viaduct Replacement Project,1995 w Northeast Downtown Plan,City & County ofDenver,1995 w East Corridor Major Investment Study,Denver Regional Council ofGovernments (DRCOG),1997 w FasTracks Vision Plan,RTD,2002 w Cole Planning R e por t, City & County ofDenver,1998 w A Vision for Brighton Corridor,2000 w North Metro Transportation Study,RTD,2001 w Blue print Denv er:An Integrated Land Use and Transportation Plan,City & County ofDenver,2002 w 40th Avenue Corridor Infrastructure Improvement Study,City & County ofDenver,July 2002 w Bicycle Master Plan Update,City & County ofDenver,2002 w Den ver Parks and Recreations Game Plan,City & County ofDenver,2002 w South Platte River Long Range Framework Management Plan,City & County ofDenver,2000 These documents have been re viewed and relevant material has been taken into consideration in the development ofthe Plan.In particular,it should be noted that the 1997 East Corridor Major Investment Study (MIS) recommended a commuter rail line between Denver Union Station and DIA with the 40th Avenue and 40th Street station site and 400 structured parking spaces identified.It also recommended an extension ofthe existing Dlight rail line from the 30th and Downing station to the proposed 40th and 40th TOD site.This recommendation was incorporated into the existing FasTracks Vision Plan that was adopted by the RTD Board ofDirectors on December 17,2002.Their adoption was subject to the final results ofthe I-70 East Corridor Environmental Impact Statement.

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16 PLAN PURPOSE AND PROCESSBLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:Relationship to Citywide PlansAll neighborhood and small area plans are expected to comply with the citywide policies contained in Denvers Plan 2000 and Blueprint Denver: An Integrated Land Use and Transportation Plan .The River North Plan is the fir st small area plan pursued since the adoption of Blueprint Denver .This Plan implements several policies from these tw o previous plans.(The relevant policies from Plan 2000 are listed in the Appendix.)Blueprint DenverBlueprint Denver is a citywide plan that outlines Denvers growth management and development strategy. Blueprint Denver divides the city into Areas ofChange,where reinvestment and redevelopment is desirable,and Ar eas ofStability,where the existing land use and character should be maintained and enhanced.Mixed-use is a major theme of Blueprint Denver and ofthis plan.It is not a new idea and in fact was the prevalent pattern in Ri ver North.Mixed use refers to districts and centers where residential,retail and commercial uses are intertwined. Returning to communities where people can walk or take transit for their daily errands,or drive with shorter and few er car trips provides choices that have a beneficial impact throughout Denver and the region. Blueprint Denver identifies guiding principles f or Areas of Chang e as well as design f actors that need to be addressed in mixed-use areas.These are provided in the Appendix. River North includes three Areas ofChange: w Brighton Boulevard incorporates one to two blocks on either side ofBrighton Boulevard from downtown to I-70. W hile many ofthe warehouses will remain for many years,a considerable amount ofvacant and underutiliz ed land makes this an area suitable for redevelopment and the creation ofa mixed-use area. Brighton Boulevard is a gateway to downtown and offers a great opportunity for services,neighborhood serving retail and a variety ofother uses. w T he proposed 40th and 40th rapid transit station provides an exciting opportunity for transit-oriented development with a mix ofhigh-density housing,retail,office and other employment.This proposed station is contingent upon voter approval ofthe FasTracks Vision Plan.Ifthe Union Pacific Intermodal facility relocates,the opportunity is greatly increased.The relocation would free up close to fifty acres ofland adjacent to the station area,prime for high-density redevelopment.Brighton Boulevard is designated an Area of Change in Blueprint Denver

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17RIVER NORTH PLAN Blueprint Denver Areas of Change BRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40THAND 40TH TOD

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18 PLAN PURPOSE AND PROCESSBLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:w The North Industrial Area is adjacent to the River North Plan boundaries and includes much ofthe industrial por tion ofthe Elyria-Swansea neighborhood and a portion ofthe Globeville neighborhood. Neighborhoods on the perimeter ofRiver North such as Cole and Clayton,offer an opportunity for infill development that focuses on residential projects on vacant and underutilized parcels. Blueprint Denver also places emphasis on linking land use and transportation,reinforcing that cities are combina tions ofplaces to live,work and play and the means to get to those places.The Plan reinforces the Citys goal ofaccommodating a wide variety oftransportation options,including cars,transit,walking and biking.Relationship to Other PlansSeveral planning processes are underway that are briefly described below.The relationship to the River North Plan is also described.I-70 East Corridor Environmental Impact Statement (EIS)w The Regional Transportation District (RTD),the Colorado Department ofTransportation (CDOT),and the City and County of Den v er began an environmental impact statement in 2003 that will look at transportation alternatives for the I-70 East Corridor.The EIS will identify a preferred alternative for the East Corridor. CDOT,RTD,and Denver signed an intergovernmental agreement that specified that the scope ofthe I-70 East Corridor EIS shall utilize those alternatives identified in the I-70 Major Impact Study (MIS) but that additional reasonable alternatives shall not be foreclosed in the process. w T he East Corridor MIS (1997) included among other r ecommenda tions a station in the vicinity of 40th and 40th to ser v e a commuter rail line from Union Station to DIA and a light rail extension ofthe existing D line from the 30th and Downing station to the proposed 40th and 40th TOD site. w All ofthe objectiv es,goals,and recommendations for siting the 40th and 40th station proposal are contingent upon the outcome ofthe final EIS .40th and 40th Area of Change North Industrial Area of Change

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19 RIVER NORTH PLANBRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40THAND 40TH TODRegional Transportation District, FasTracks Vision PlanFasTracks is RTDs plan to build-out the regional rapid transit system.The RTD plan entails an increase to the .6% regional sales tax to execute the FasTracks Plan.Several components ofFasTracks affect the River North Plan: w A continuation ofthe existing Dlight rail line along Downing Street to the proposed 40th Avenue and 40th Street r apid transit station. w Implementation ofthe I-70 East Corridor with rapid transit service to DIA from Union Station. w Implementation ofthe North Metro rapid transit line. w Enhanced and rede ployed bus network. w Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) solutions.Denver Union Station Master Plan, EIS and Preliminary EngineeringThe Union Station Master Plan entails redeveloping and preserving Denvers historic Union Station and 18 acres of surrounding land.Union Station will be transformed into a transportation and retail hub serving the needs of residents,tourists and commuters.The Union Station Master Plan process includes some very specific steps, including an environmental impact statement,preliminary engineering and obtaining the necessary land use and zoning permits,and ensuring community involvement. w Two rapid transit lines will originate at Union Station and have stops at the 40th and 40th station area the I-70 East Cor ridor with service to DIA and the North Metro line that continues to Thornton.Downtown Multi-modal Access PlanThe Downtown Multi-modal Access Plan (DMAP) is a detailed,comprehensive plan for vehicular,pedestrian, bic yc le and rail access into and throughout Downtown Denver over the next 20-25 years.The Plan will consider long-ter m land use planning infrastructur e improvements,and streetscape elements that are needed to ensure quality connections between Downtown and its adjacent neighborhoods. w Multi-modal connections from do wntown along Brighton Boulevard will be identified.I-70, subject of the I-70 East Corridor EIS FasTracks build-out map

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20 PLAN PURPOSE AND PROCESSBLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:The Pedestrian Master PlanThe Pedestrian Master Plan provides a strategy for improving and maintaining Denvers pedestrian facilities for the next 20 years.Pedestrian improvements will be selected from both a scoring system developed by the Plan development team and input from area residents and attendees at public meetings.The Plan will also contain new policies to improve Denvers pedestrian facilities by helping city agencies better coordinate with each other,fostering partnerships with the city and other groups,and identifying steady funding sources for sidewalks,intersections,trails and other facilities.DRCOG Metro Vision and Urban CentersMetro Vision 2020 is a plan developed by the Denver Regional Council ofGovernments (DRCOG) for the region. Among other core elements,it identifies urban centers as a means to mix uses and increase densities in locations that are well served by transit.In 2002,DROG requested jurisdictions to submit areas that meet criteria being developed to update Metro Vision 2020 to 2030. w The Denargo Market area and the 40th and 40th TOD were submitted to test preliminary criteria. w The successful implementation ofthe River North Plan is not only consistent with but will help achieve the g oals ofMetro Vision 2020.

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21 RIVER NORTH PLANBRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40THAND 40TH TODlHISTORYl

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22 HISTORYBLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:The history ofthe River North Area has been greatly influenced by the South Platte River and the railroads.The maps on the opposite page show that the old river channel and the railroad yards effectively cut offthe Plans area from downtown Denver.Thus the River North Area evolved as its own community with a mixture ofuses including a significant residential community,industrial uses that provided jobs to the residents,stores and services that provided for the needs ofthe residents,and other uses.Establishing a new channel for the river and constructing the Broadway viaduct over the railroad yards created a connection to downtown and contributed to a change in the character ofthe area over several decades to a largely industrial and commercial area. Because the area was cutofffrom downtown,there was considerable vacant land even by the late 1920s.The Denargo Market area was vacant and parts ofit used as a landfill.In 1892,a sewer line was constructed that emptied into the swamp that was present in the Denargo Market area which also explains why this area was vacant. In 1895,the South Platte River channel was improved,the swampy area was filled,and the sewer line was extended to the north.The area west ofthe South Platte River was vacant.There was a considerable amount ofvacant land in the Brighton Corridor until reaching 35th Street where housing was the predominant use to the north.The area north ofthe Union Pacific Intermodal facility was mostly vacant with a few scattered homes and businesses. T he street known today as Brighton Boulevard was developed on the downtown grid system in the late 1800s,but it w as se para ted from downtown by railroad yards.Brighton Boulevard was once Wewatta Street (and Drive Way even earlier as shown on the historic maps) from the railroad yards north ofdowntown up to what is now I-70 and then was Gilpin Street up to 49th Avenue.It then followed the Burlington Northern tracks toward Brighton,Colorado, the county seat f or Adams County.The name Brighton is an emulation ofBrighton,Massachusetts and Brighton, England.Wewatta Street was named Brighton Boulevard after 1924 when Broadway was extended from 20th Street and the Broadway viaduct was built over the railroad yards.The Tramway map from 1933 shows that the area historicall y has been ser v ed by transit. A study ofthe Sanborn maps and reverse directories indicates that over time,residential uses have been replaced with industrial uses .F ocusing in on Brighton Boule v ard itself,a researched directory for 1893 showed 157 people li ving along it with most living between 34th Street and 40th Street with another concentr a tion on the 4200 b lock. A 1924 reverse directory still showed primarily residential uses on Wewatta (now Brighton) from 34th Street to 40th Street. By 1931,uses along what was now called Brighton Road or Brighton Boulevard had become much more mixed in nature.For example,the 3400 block had Longero Boiler and Sheet Iron Works and the Banner Iron & Wire Works Company.The 1939 directory showed a continuation ofthis trend but also showed a thriving Denargo Market.There were twenty-seven businesses listed at the Denargo Market selling or distributing an array offood products.Businesses that supported the residents were common in 1947 such as John Marr Grocery Co.,DaleIronton School was reused then demolished Railroad yards and viaduct, circa 1920 Broadway viaduct, circa 1930

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23RIVER NORTH PLANPlatte Changing Shape and Brighton Changing Names BRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40THAND 40TH TOD Robinson Atlas 1887 Northwestern Terminal Railway Co. map 1915 Tramway Corporation route map 1933DriveWayWewatta Brighton

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24 HISTORYBLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:Campbell Filling Station,Soda Bar Creamery,Morrison Drugs,and Paul R.Isaacson,physician.There was still a considerable mixture ofuses including homes into the 1950s.By 1953,the Pepsi-Cola Bottling Company of Denver had opened at 38th Street and Brighton Boulevard.Today,Brighton Boulevard is regarded as an industrial corridor and as a secret route,known primarily by cab drivers,into Downtown Denver from I-70. Looking at the Plans area in its entirety,the primary businesses were mining and railroads with supporting b usinesses and businesses that took advantage ofthe numerous rail lines and spurs.Auto related uses such as the Dryfoot Rubber Company that sold tire chains and auto accessories and several gas stations were also prevalent. T here were also a variety ofresidential uses including single family homes,hotels and boarding homes that provided housing for workers and their families.For instance the block from 39th Street to 40th Street and from Wynkoop to Wewatta had 32 homes.The Ironton School was located at 36th Street and Delgany Street.In the area east of the UP lines between 38th Avenue and 40th Avenue there were many homes,hotels,and businesses serving the residents including a barber,a bakery,and a cobbler.The main employer seems to have been the Gardner Denver Company,which manufactured rock drills.The hotels included the Eureka Hotel,the Burleigh Hotel and the Park Hotel and most likely targeted railroad workers. In terms ofindustrial uses,some ofthe earliest industrial uses,which were scattered in the area,included the S.H. Suppl y Company on 31st and W ynk oop Street,the National Fuse Powder Company on the corner of38th and Delgany Street,the Railway Steel Spring Company on York Street north of40th Avenue,and the Omaha-Grant Smelter in the vicinity ofthe Denver Coliseum parking lot.The buildings used by the Omaha-Grant Smelter were tor n down by the early 1900s but its influence lives on as a Superfund site.Other industrial uses were scattered throughout much ofthe study area.An idea ofthe nature ofthe industrial conditions is provided by a description ofthe S.H.Supply Company which stated that one man lives on the premises,heat is provided by stoves,electric lighting is pr esent, w ater comes from a well but there is no hose.Gardner Denver, a manufacturing operation Gardner Denver also called Rock Drill The Brannan Sand and Gravel Company

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25 RIVER NORTH PLANBRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40THAND 40TH TODlVISIONl

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26 VISIONBLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:This section is intended to describe what the Plans area would be like in the future ifthe River North Plan is implemented.This vision is dependent on the occurrence ofseveral events including implementation ofthe FasTracks Vision Plan. River North projects an image ofa place with its own unique identity.It has the excitement ofLoDo but has a more eclectic mixture ofresidents and businesses due to its much more affordable prices.It is a thriving area that has successfully merged mixed uses with multiple modes oftransportation.Brighton Boulevard is the gateway into Downtown for residents living along the east corridor and for visitors arriving at DIA.Convenient access is provided for vehicles via I-70 to Brighton Boulevard as well as by rapid transit from DIA to Union Station and to downtown.Rail service is available to Thornton via the North Metro Line.Access is also provided for pedestrians and bicyclists along the Platte River trail to downtown and to the regional bike trail system.This green connection has been greatly enhanced and is busy with bicycle and pedestrian activity for recreation and commuting. Brighton Boulevard is an attractive street that balances the need for access to Downtown Denver at moderate speeds and the needs ofa wide ar ra y of ne w and long-standing businesses to access Brighton as well as provide parking for visitors.The addition ofsidewalks and street trees has transformed Brighton into a pedestrian friendly and more visually appealing corridor.This access by car,the new access by rapid transit and the improved pedestrian and bic yc le access has enhanced the Ev ents Area that is anchored by the National Western Stock Show, the Denver Coliseum,and the Forney Museum. Colorado Diesel Multiple Unite (DMU), a possible rail technology for this corridor

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27 RIVER NORTH PLANBRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40THAND 40TH TODThis outstanding access and new and improved multi-modal connections within the area and to surrounding neighborhoods has spawned a wide variety ofnew development that fits well with many longstanding businesses.A synergy has been created between businesses adding to the appeal ofthe area.Many entrepreneurs and artists have chosen to locate in this area. Denar go Market has re-generated itselfinto a marketplace that includes residential development along the river and a variety ofretail and downtown supporting uses. The South Platte River has become even more ofan amenity by restoring its natural environment and adding open space along Arkins Court.Connections to it have been added and improved including along 38th and 31st Streets and by a pedestrian bridge in between.Water quality enhancement has been incorporated into the open space in order to improve the quality ofthe water flowing into the river.The enhanced river has fostered significant new residential and other development that takes advantage of,and adds to,the environment by creating an attractive edge. T he rapid transit station in the vicinity of40th Street and 40th Avenue has developed into a vibrant transit oriented area.The most intensive new development has been incorporated into the station and provides services for travelers who are transferring between lines as well as those who are beginning or ending their trips at the station.The station efficiently accommodates bus routes,circulator buses serving the surrounding neighborhoods ofCole,Elyria-Swansea,and Globeville,and cars dropping offpassengers.A pedestrian and bicycle friendly

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28 VISIONBLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:facility connects the areas on both sides ofthe railroad tracks which enables it to serve development and the Events Area.The development in and near the station includes multi-tenant office buildings,a large housing component,single tenant buildings,and retail that serves not only passengers and the new development but the surrounding neighborhoods as well.Businesses and residents love the convenience ofbeing between downtown and DIA and connected to each by rapid transit.The access to jobs within this area and the improved access to jobs because ofthe transit has reduced the unemployment rate in north Denver neighborhoods and increased the income ofmany households.

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29 RIVER NORTH PLANBRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40THAND 40TH TODlEXISTING CONDITIONS AND PROJECTIONSl

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30 EXISTING CONDITIONS AND PROJECTIONSBLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:wZONINGThe current zoning is primarily industrial with 95% ofthe land zoned either I-1 or I-2.The I-2 land is somewhat less prevalent than the land that is zoned I-1 and is primarily concentrated south of35th Street between the South Platte River and the Union Pacific (UP) Railroad Tracks and the UP Inter-modal facility which is located between 40th and 43rd Avenue between Franklin Street and York Street.The I-2 zone district allows manufacturing and heavy industrial uses while the I-1 zone district is somewhat more restrictive.Two recent rezonings include a PUD at 29th Street and Brighton Boulevard to make way for 241 apartments and 31st Street and Brighton Boulevard, w hic h was z oned, to R-MU-30. T here is also some B-4 zoned land along Downing and Marion Street north of 37th Avenue.The location of a rezoning from industrial to R-MU-30 along Brighton

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31RIVER NORTH PLAN Zoning BRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40THAND 40TH TOD

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32 EXISTING CONDITIONS AND PROJECTIONSBLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:wLAND USEThe predominant industrial uses are warehouses,railroad tracks and yards,and factory/food processing.Together these utilize 60% ofthe land.There is also a significant amount ofauto related uses.Other significant facilities are the Denver Coliseum and the RTD facilities.About 9% ofthe land is vacant. There are two parks within the Plan boundaries,Globeville Landing Park and St.Charles Place Park.Globeville Landing Park is along the South Platte River Trail and south ofthe Denver Coliseum parking lot.St.Charles Park is in the Cole neighborhood. Much ofthe land is underutilized.An examination ofthe ratio ofthe Assessors market improvements value to the land value shows that over 25% ofthe parcels have a ratio ofless than 1.0 indicating that the land is worth more than the buildings.In addition,the average floor area ratio,the ratio between the building square footage and the land square footage,is only 0.25,a further indication ofunderutilization. Land Use ParcelsAcresPercent R ailroad Property 51131.9521.4% Misc.Warehouse 109131.8221.4% RTD 659.199.6% Vacant 15455.369.0% Bottling & Distribution 850.398.2% F actory 2448.267.8% A uto Ser vice 3735.055.7% T heater 1 30.404.9% Surfacing 4321.353.5% Other/in tr ansition 2015.472.5% Office 1413.332.2% Residential 789.401.5% Food Processing 6 7.061.1% Restaurant/Retail 133.930.6% Misc Civic 4 2.710.4% TOTAL 568615.69100.0%Warehousing is about 31% of the Plans area RTD facility on Ringsby Court Globeville Landing Park adjacent to Pepsi

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33RIVER NORTH PLAN Land Use BRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40THAND 40TH TOD

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34EXISTING CONDITIONS AND PROJECTIONS Underutilized LandBLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:

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35 RIVER NORTH PLANBRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40THAND 40TH TODwHOUSINGThere are 74 single-family structures and five other residential structures within River North none ofwhich are zoned for residential use.Some ofthe residential structures appear to be utilized for commercial purposes. Most ofthese were constructed before 1900 and preceded the city zoning ordinance.Thus,these dwelling units are nonconforming uses.Under the current zoning,these homes cannot be expanded.Historically,there were many more residential structures but through the years most ofthem have been replaced with industrial or commercial structures as a result ofthe industrial zoning.One of 79 residential structures in River North

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36 EXISTING CONDITIONS AND PROJECTIONSBLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:wECONOMIC ACTIVITYAn analysis ofdemographic and market characteristics has been undertaken for River North.The analysis provides an indication ofoverall trends and economic health that may affect future development and redevelopment efforts. The results ofthis analysis identifies potential land uses which could locate within the study area,as well as establishes a context for parallel and future planning efforts.Estimates ofdevelopment demand by land use and location within the study area provide the foundation from which traffic estimates have been prepared.The estimates point toward the need for infrastructure improvements. The following discussion presents:an explanation ofthe methodology used to quantify demand;the impact of select events on the forecasts;a summary offuture growth by land use;and a distribution scenario for uses and products within the study area.A more detailed version that principally includes more information on the methodology can be found in the Appendix.A full economic report can be found in the Technical Appendix.MethodologyLooking to the experience ofsimilar markets within the Denver metropolitan area which have revitalized over the past decade,as well as the vision for Brighton Boulevard expressed in Blueprint Denver ,principle future land uses identified f or analysis included:housing;commercial retail space;industrial flex and research and development; and commercial office space. In order to quantify estimates ofdemand by land use,trade areas were defined based on a consideration ofseveral f actors.Within each trade area,baseline estimates were prepared and later adjusted based on consideration of potential events.See the Appendix for more information on the methodology.Events MatrixCritical to interpreting the study areas future competitive position for development growth is an Construction is nearing completion on the I-70/Brighton intersection, an event that is likely to stimulate development

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37 RIVER NORTH PLANBRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40THAND 40TH TODunderstanding ofpotential eventswhich could impact the character and quantity ofselect land uses as reflected in absorption activity and project values.Events,which were considered,include:(1) completion or introduction ofmajor improvement projects (infrastructure);(2) new development and redevelopment projects (development);and,(3) completion ofland use and capital planning documents (planning). F or the purpose ofthis analysis,infrastructure events were considered to have an impact when money had been committed or construction had begun.Development events were considered to have a significant impact as they essentially served to prove-upthe market.Planning events were not considered to have any immediate impact in and ofitself.Finally,it was assumed that regulatory changes would be made to accommodate the vision ofthe Plan.The discussion,which follows,presents the demand estimates prepared for each land use category and adjusted to reflect the potential impact ofthe identified events at select intervals over a twenty-year period.Demand by Land UseResidential DemandThere is market support for nearly 900 single family attached units and 675 multifamily units to the year 2022. W hile the study area does not have available land zoned to accommodate this level ofdevelopment,the assumption is new de v elopment, r edevelopment,mixed-use and adaptive reuse projects would occur throughout the study area within a supportive regulatory environment.Residential products in the River North Area will offer a more affordable housing alternative to lower downtown and the Central Platte Valley.Future projects will benefit from impr ov ements to the South Platte River corridor and integration into the existing neighborhood framework.The South Platte River frontage is a valuable amenity for residential development on both sides ofthe river.Retail DemandThere is market support for approximately 300,000 to 400,000 square feet ofnew retail space in the study area to the year 2022.Retail market opportunities,or niches,which will emerge in the study area over the next twenty years include: service retail in mixed-use developments (such as the transit-oriented development sub area); neighborhood-ser ving centers in residential ar eas;ada ptive reuse ofolder industrial facilities transitioning to meet c hanging markets;and,events products in support ofmass attraction destination facilities including the Denver Coliseum and the National Western Stock Show.Office DemandThere is market support for more than 1.7 million square feet ofnew office space in the study area through the yearJPI is a major new residential development, an event that is also likely to stimulate additional development

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38 EXISTING CONDITIONS AND PROJECTIONSBLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:2022.Office market opportunities will include both Class A and Class B,as well as corporate owner/user space. Class A and corporate opportunities will likely occur within the influence area ofthe potential future rail station and residential mixed-use sub area located adjacent to downtown.Opportunities for Class B local service office space will likely occur throughout the study area as freestanding products or within a mixed environment.Office space will gradually replace industrial space as the dominant employment product.Industrial DemandThere is market support for approximately 500,000 to 750,000 square feet ofnew (and replacement) industrial space in the study area to the year 2022.Industrial market opportunities,or niches,which the study area will be well positioned to take advantage ofinclude:development offlex,research and development space;and owneroccupied facilities who consider access to the region through multiple modes oftransportation an asset for which they are willing to pay a premium.Therefore,while industrial land uses will continue to have a presence in the study area,warehouse and distribution products will shift toward higher value flex space,research and development and owner-occupied products. 2003-07 2008-12 2013-17 2018-22 Residential Ownership (units) 130 185 270 305 Residential Rental (units) 185 175 160 155 R etail (square feet) 56,000 77,000 105,000117,500 Industrial Flex/R&D (square feet) 132,500104,500 35,500 0 Industrial Owner-Occupied (square f eet)199,000156,600 53,000 0 Office (square feet) 65,000243,500580,000970,000Source:Leland Consulting Group and City & County of Denver. Note:1 Figures rounded.The figures presented above represent conservative estimates ofdemand by land use within the area over a 20-year period.Geographical Land Use DistributionAs described in a subsequent section,there are portions ofthe study area,which offer unique conditions supportive ofselect land uses.For the City and County ofDenver and River North stakeholders to successfully capitalize onA high tech firm along Brighton Boulevard

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39 RIVER NORTH PLANBRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40THAND 40TH TODopportunities presented by the diversity ofthe corridor,public investment and reinvestment should be focused and targeted.Specifically,efforts should reflect the theme,or vision,for the land use area,thus supporting that private investment which can most effectively leverage public initiatives.The table summarizing demand shows that there is the ability to capture considerable economic activity over the next 20 years.Although a formal cost benefit analysis has not been undertaken,public investments will result in significant additional tax revenues from future development. The proposed distribution ofland uses by area is presented in the table below:Residential River CorridorCommercialIndustrialIndustrialIndustrial Mixed-UseTODMixed-UseMixed-UseRalston/JRCokePepsiEventsR esidential Ownership45%28%23%0%2%2%0%0% Residential Rental39%42%10%0%4%5%0%0% R etail 40%35%10%15%0%0%0%10% Industrial Flex/R&D10%15%5%10%33%25%2%0% Industrial Owner-Occupied0%0%0%15%48%35%2%0% Office 30%50%5%5%5%5%0%0%Source:Leland Consulting Group and City & County of Denver. Notes: 1 Assumes that the grocery store in Denargo Market comes on line in the 2008 to 2012 time period. 2 Assumes the bulk of the development in the TOD Sub area comes on line during the 2013 to 2022 time frame. 3 Because of currently office vacancy rates, there is little office development during the initial five years with it growing at a substantial rate in later time periods. 4 Because of anticipated substantial increases in land values as the station becomes reality, the bulk of industrial development will occur in the early time period. 5 This table does not represent ultimate build out but only development through 2022 based on conservative assumptions.

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40 EXISTING CONDITIONS AND PROJECTIONSBLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:wMOBILITYExisting Traffic LevelsAs part ofthe existing conditions assessment for the River North Plan,traffic levels in the study area were evaluated. Traffic counts were performed at key locations in the project area as part ofthe planning effort.Daily volumes in the study area ranged from 14,000 vehicles per day (vpd) to 16,000 vpd along Brighton Boulevard and 16,000 vpd to 18,000 vpd along 38th Street.Volumes at other locations in the study area were generally below 10,000 vpd. Peak hour turning volumes were also collected at key intersections.The traffic volume details are in the Technical Appendix. Based on the turning volumes collected at key intersections,capacity analyses were conducted in the study area.The anal yses result in a level ofservice (LOS) that ranges from level ofservice A (minimal delay and conflicts) to level ofser vice F (significant delays and cong estion). LOS between A and D is considered acceptable in urban settings, including the Brighton area.LOS results are shown on page 42. The intersections analyzed generally operated at LOS C or better in both peak periods.The only exception was the I-70 north ramps / 46th Avenue at Brighton Boulevard,which operated at LOS D.These results are considered acceptable.Existing Roadway ConditionsT he roadways in the study area were reviewed to determine the conditions ofthe pavement and other roadway amenities .These roadways are generally older facilities,having been built along with the older industrial and commercial uses in the area.The following general observations were made: w Due to the a g e ofthe facilities and c hang es in engineering design ov er the years,many ofthe streets do not meet cur r ent roadway standards.One of many streets not meeting roadway standards

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41RIVER NORTH PLAN Existing Traffic Counts BRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40THAND 40TH TOD

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42EXISTING CONDITIONS AND PROJECTIONS Existing Lane Geometry and Level of ServiceBLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:

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43 RIVER NORTH PLANBRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40THAND 40TH TODw The majority ofthe roadways are lacking design elements considered desirable in Blueprint Denver Missing amenities inc lude curb and gutter,sidewalks,medians (where appropriate),streetscaping (including tree lawns and amenity zones,where appropriate),bike lanes (where appropriate),and pedestrian amenities. w Utilities in River North are typically above ground w Many roadway drainage systems are non-existent or inadequate,leading to ponding,run-offissues with adjacent parcels,and water quality concerns.Existing Roadway ClassificationsThe City has developed roadway functional classifications to help define roadway operations provided for various facilities.As part of Blueprint Denver, a classification system was developed that looks at a streets function as w ell as the type ofland use that it is serving.At the present time,Brighton Boulevard,38th Street,and 40th Avenue are classified as Mixed Use Arterials.Arkins Court is classified as a residential collector and Blake Street and Walnut Street are classified as Residential Arterials.All other streets are classified as local streets.Existing Local Access and Cir cula tionThe roadway network in River North provides for access to each ofthe various parcels.The amount ofaccess (n umber ofdriveways) varies based on the land use ofthe parcel. Access throughout the Plans area was reviewed.Brighton Boulevard has areas where access is relatively controlled (one or two driveways per block) and other areas where there is no curb and gutter to define driveways (free access). Due to the na tur e ofthe adjacent land uses and the underpass at the railroad tracks,38th Street typically has fewer access points Denar g o Mark et and the w arehousing areas between Brighton Boulevard and the railroad are areas with little or no access control.There is typically more access control in the TOD area and the area west of Brighton Boule v ard and north of31st Street. There are several major trucking facilities in the study area.The Union Pacific Inter-modal facility north of40th Avenue is the largest truck trip generator in the study area.The Pepsi Cola bottling and distribution facility at the nor thwest corner ofBrighton and 38th is the next largest.Other major truck facilities include Coca Cola at York and 38th,Ralston Purina at Race and 44th,and the Denargo Market Access along Brighton is not controlled 38th Street looking towards the rail tracks Pepsi-Cola takes up 8 blocks along Brighton

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44EXISTING CONDITIONS AND PROJECTIONS Major Traffic GeneratorsBLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:

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45 RIVER NORTH PLANBRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40THAND 40TH TODcomplex along Delgany and Denargo Streets.The RTD bus maintenance facility at 31st Street west ofthe Platte River is another major generator,as illustrated on the Major Traffic Generators map. Vehicular,pedestrian,and bicycle circulation in River North is difficult due to several factors.Several linear features divide the study area,including the Platte River (with only two auto crossings and a third pedestrian crossing) and the Union Pacific Railroad tracks (with only one crossing in the study area).The Burlington Northern and Santa Fe r ailroad yards that form the west edge ofthe study area are only crossed by the Park Avenue Viaduct (south ofthe study area) and 38th Street / Washington Street.Although I-70 cuts across the northern section ofthe study area,it is not as significant a barrier since Brighton Boulevard,44th Avenue,and York Street cross under the roadway in the short segment ofI-70 evaluated.There are many large parcels ofland that would normally include streets in a grid system. These include Pepsi (eight square blocks),the Union Pacific Intermodal facility (over twenty square blocks), and the Denver Coliseum (five square blocks). Circulation is also affected by roadway condition.Many streets in the study area are in poor condition,with uneven surf aces and intersections that cannot accommodate tr uc k turns.These include portions ofWynkoop Street, Denargo Street,43rd Avenue,44th Avenue,and streets between 43rd and 44th Avenues in River North.Existing Alter native ModesTransit service consists ofseveral local or limited routes,which operate mainly to connect the study area to Downtown,Stapleton,DIA and west Denver.Transit routes and current ridership are shown in the Technical A ppendix.Bus service frequencies are particularly low on Brighton due to the lack ofmajor origins or destinations for transit riders.Transit ridership is highest on routes serving the existing residential neighborhoods outside the study area.The #48 bus is an example ofthe value ofmaintaining the existing modes oftravel.It is used by employees in River North and is a great connection from downtown and Commerce City to access both the South Platte River amenities and the Events District. As illustr a ted in the Pedestrian and Bike Facilities map,River North is characterized by a lack ofsidewalks creating a dif ficult en vir onment for pedestrians The Platte River Greenway serves as a major amenity for bikes connecting the area to the Central Platte Valley,the Southwest and South Metro Area and the Cherry Creek Trail.A planned impr ovement along 38th There are no sidewalks along 40th Avenue Platte River Greenway: an incredible amenity and green connection

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46EXISTING CONDITIONS AND PROJECTIONS Pedestrian and Bicycle FacilitiesBLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:

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47 RIVER NORTH PLANBRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40THAND 40TH TODStreet between Walnut and the Platte River will improve bike connections in the study area,but this improvement is constrained by the existing railroad structure over 38th Street.Future Traffic DemandBased on the existing traffic volumes collected in the study area and projected land uses,future volumes were developed.These volumes are based on background traffic growth (growth that is anticipated to occur with or without the Plan actions) and traffic volumes that would be generated due to new development based on the market demand forecasts.For details on this process,refer to the Appendix.The results ofthis process are 2025-year traffic volumes,which represent an increase ofbetween 2% and 3% per year,depending on the specific location in the study area. Future daily volumes in the study area range from 20,000 vpd to 23,000 vpd along Brighton Boulevard and 25,000 vpd to 27,000 vpd along 38th Street.Volumes at other locations in the study area remained generally below 10,000 vpd.The exception to this was the significant growth along Blake,Walnut,and 40th Avenue in the TOD area.Peak hour turning volumes were also developed at key intersections.Future traffic volume details are shown in the Future Traffic Counts and Future Lane Geometry and Level ofService maps. Based on the future turning volumes projected at key intersections,capacity analyses were conducted in the study area.The intersections analyzed generally operated at LOS C or better in both peak periods.The exceptions include: w The I-70 north ramps / 46th Avenue at Brighton Boulevard continued to operate at LOS D.No changes are anticipa ted at this loca tion as part ofthe River North Plan. w T he 38th Street at Brighton Boule vard intersection operated at LOS D in the PM. w The 38th Street at Walnut / Marion intersection will operate at LOS E in the AM and LOS F in the PM. T his intersection is in the TOD area and needs to be addressed. w T he 29th Street at Brighton Boule v ard intersection operated a t LOS E in the AM.The PM operations were acce ptable at LOS C.This intersection is not signalized.It is anticipated that either a signal at this location or the extension of Delg any Street to Brighton Boulevard will address this issue.Either ofthese measures should be addressed as part ofthe Denargo Market redevelopment plan.38th Street, especially the railroad tracks underpass, is difficult for pedestrians and bicycles to navigate

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48 EXISTING CONDITIONS AND PROJECTIONSBLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:Future Alternative ModesThe framework for alternative transportation modes in the Brighton Boulevard and 40th and 40th TOD area will be shaped by RTDs FasTracks Vision Plan previously discussed on page 19. The proposed 40th and 40th Station is identified in FasTracks as a focal point for transportation connections between alternative modes in the study area.Local buses serving the surrounding neighborhoods will connect to the regional rapid transit system at this location.Bike and pedestrian connectivity to and from the station will be important to ensure maximum utilization ofthe station and the creation ofa true transportation hub for the area. As a part ofthe River North Plan,two alternative station platform options were evaluated to determine overall impacts to traffic,development,and access.Information on this analysis is provided in the Technical Appendix. The ultimate design and location ofthe station,ifselected,will be determined during the environmental impact statement process for the I-70 East Corridor.The I-70 East Corridor EIS process will consider all options and will have extensive opportunities for public input. T he bike and pedestrian fr ame w ork for the Brighton Boulevard and 40th and 40th TOD area relies on extensive improvements to bike and pedestrian connections to and from the South Platte River,along Brighton Boulevard and connections to and from the 40th and 40th Station.Improvements to the east-west connection from W ashington to 38th Str eet,to W aln ut Street and then east on 40th Avenue is also ofgreat importance.Improving pedestrian and bike connectivity will be fundamental to achieving the ultimate vision ofcreating a vibrant,mixeduse ar ea.Future increases in traffic will lead to a poor level of service at 38th Street and Walnut

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49RIVER NORTH PLAN Future Lane Geometry and Level of Service BRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40THAND 40TH TOD

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50EXISTING CONDITIONS AND PROJECTIONS Future Traffic CountsBLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:

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51 RIVER NORTH PLANBRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40THAND 40TH TODwENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONSEnvironmental conditions ofconcern in the Brighton Boulevard area include (1) portions ofthe Vasquez Boulevard/Interstate-70 (VBI70) Superfund Site,(2) junk yards,(3) historic landfills,(4) industrial operations including auto repair and manufacturing,(5) Leaking Underground Storage Tanks (LUSTs),and (6) historical operations such as a tannery,foundries,iron works,paint manufacturing,wood processing and former gasoline stations. Historic operations within the Brighton Corridor include the former Omaha-Grant smelter.Designated as Operable Unit 2ofthe VBI70 Superfund site by the EPA,this former smelter produced lead during the end of the 19th century.Lead and arsenic are believed to be potential contaminants associated with the operation,although no formal investigation has occurred to date.Isolated investigations in and adjacent to the smelter site have detected some elevated lead concentrations in the subsurface soils,primarily associated with black slag particles. The nature ofthe concerns with environmental conditions is described in the Technical Appendix. EPA has committed targeted Brownfield environmental assessment resources to assist the City to obtain a better under standing ofthe environmental impacts in the area.EPA will conduct subsurface environmental investigations during the summer and fall of2003 to collect soil and g r oundwater data.This will enable a determination to be made ofthe levels ofcleanup needed in association with infrastructure and other neighborhood improvements. The investigation will target key locations in public rights ofway and along the South Platte River from a ppro ximately 60 different locations.Final results and a summary report are anticipated in early 2004.Workers producing ingots at the Omaha-Grant Smelter, circa 1900 Land from the former Omaha-Grant Smelter located near the Coliseum parking lot is a Superfund site

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52 EXISTING CONDITIONS AND PROJECTIONSBLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:wINFRASTRUCTUREA considerable amount ofpublic investment has occurred or is under construction in the Plans area.The following sections describe the sanitary sewer system and the storm drain system.Sanitary Sewer System in River NorthThe majority ofthe sanitary sewers within River North are owned and maintained by the City and County of Denver.There are also a few private sanitary sewers which discharge flow into the Citys system.At the present time,no deficiencies or needed improvements in the City and County ofDenvers sanitary sewer collection system have been identified within River North. T he Delg any Inter ce ptor System (System) is located along the east side ofthe South Platte River between Cherry Creek and 51st Avenue.The Metropolitan Reclamation District operates it.The Delgany Interceptor System consists ofthe Delgany Common sewer,which was constructed in three stages between 1892 and 1937,and the Delgany Inter ceptor ,the construction ofwhich began in 1979,parallel and adjacent to the Delgany Common Sewer.In the River North study area,the Delgany Interceptor System,i.e.,both the Delgany Common Sewer and the Delgany Interceptor,lie within the Arkins Court right-of-way. A recent report by the Metropolitan Reclamation District states that the tributary area served by the two sewers comprising the System is approximately 47 square miles (30,000 acres) and is about 90 percent developed.Flow anal yses indicate tha t, a t present,peak flows are below the System capacity.The report also states that the Delgany Interce ptor is considered to be in good condition with adequate ca pacity No impr o vements to the Delgany Inter ceptor are recommended.On the other hand,the Delgany Common Sewer,the older ofthe two parallel se w er s has numerous deficiencies throughout its length.These include adverse grades,corrosion,sedimentation, physical problems,and flow control deficiencies.40th Avenue and drainage needs have been studied recently

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53 RIVER NORTH PLANBRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40THAND 40TH TODDevelopment and redevelopment projects within River North resulting in an increase in population will be required to conduct an analysis ofthe development impacts on the City and County ofDenvers existing sanitary sewers. Development generating more wastewater beyond that planned for the system will be required to improve the collection system to convey the additional flows that the change in use will generate.Storm Drain System in River NorthThe City and County ofDenver designs storm drains to collect and convey runofffrom a two-year frequency storm in residential areas and a five-year frequency storm in commercial areas.Excess runoffis conveyed over land in the streets.This is called the level ofservice.Storms greater than a 2-year recurrence frequency in the large watersheds draining to and through the River North Area will generate significant amounts ofrunoff flowing in the streets leading to and through the area.The Plan area also contains areas lacking improved streets, streets without curb and gutter and,therefore,do not provide effective drainage.Additionally,some structures are located within localized topographic depressions,or sumps. A total ofsix drainage basins contribute storm runoffto the South Platte River through River North.Four major drainage basins cross the River North Area on the east side ofthe South Platte River,and two drainage basins cross the Plans area on the west side ofthe South Platte River.The storm drains in the River North Area on the east side of the South Platte River collect runofffrom a total ofover 15 square miles (over 650,000 acres),including storm runoffthat is generated within River North.The existing storm drain facilities are very old,and many do not meet current City and County ofDenver drainage criteria. In 1989,the City and County ofDenver developed and adopted a Storm Drainage Master Plan.This plan identified several needed drainage improvements that lie within River North and are described in detail in the Technical Appendix. The total cost ofthe recommended drainage improvements in 40th Avenue from the South Platte River to Steele Str eet is estimated to be between $18 million and $26 million depending on the selected alternative.The portion fr om the South Platte Ri v er to Y ork Street is within River North and constitutes approximately 70% ofthe length of the total project.The portion within River North consists oflarger storm drain facilities and would require easements to cross private lands and railroad property,so the project cost within the Plans area could approach 90% ofthe total project cost.

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54EXISTING CONDITIONS AND PROJECTIONS Storm Sewer Drainage BasinsBLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:

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55 RIVER NORTH PLANBRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40THAND 40TH TODTwo drainage,engineering firms have been retained to study the four drainage basins on the east side ofthe South Platte River.These studies are currently underway.As part ofthese efforts,drainage complaints received since 1990 are being reviewed,hydrology for the storm drainage systems will be prepared,and needed improvements identified. The Storm Sewer Drainage Basins map shows the drainage improvements identified within the River North Plan fr om the 1989 Denver Storm Drainage Master Plan and the 40th Avenue Corridor Infrastructure Study.There are f ew drainage complaints in the area.Those that exist are attributed to a lack ofstreet improvements such as a street cross-section with a crown and curb and gutter to convey storm runoffoutside the travel lanes;buildings and parking lots in localized depressions;and storm drains which are overloaded in all but the minor 2-year frequency storm event. No properties within River North are located in a federally designated floodplain.Legacies and Community FacilitiesThere are no designated historic districts or structures.There are some structures within River North that are significant.They include the building that houses Drive Train Industries and that used to be the John Deere Plow Company.In addition,the Rock Drill building is unique architecturally and dates back to the early 1900s.The Coliseum, w hich was built in the early 1950s,is representative ofan architectural style prevalent in other places in the country for similar facilities.The South Platte River is a key Denver legacy and runs throughout the study area. The Long Range Framework Plan calls for maintaining and enhancing this stretch ofthe river as a natural area. In addition to the Denver Coliseum,community facilities include a new fire station at 44th Street and Brighton Boulevard,a Police Department maintenance facility at 35th Street and Arkins Court,and an RTD facility in the vicinity of Ringsb y Court and 31st Street.The St.Charles Recreation Center and St.Charles Place Park are within the Plans area at 38th Avenue and Marion Street.Globeville Landing Park is immediately south and west ofthe Denver Coliseum parking lot.The Rock Drill building is an example of a noteworthy building The natural state of the South Platte River should be enhanced

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56 EXISTING CONDITIONS AND PROJECTIONSBLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:wHUMAN SERVICES AND DEMOGRAPHICSThere are only 79 residential structures and few ofthese are being used to house people.Because these residences are scattered in several different places in the Plan boundaries and are in several different census block groups,it is not possible to provide demographic information on residents ofthis area.It is estimated that less than 200 people live within the study boundary.The Salvation Army Crossroads Shelter provides shelter for up to 329 persons in the winter and provides a variety ofhuman services.In addition,other organizations provide help for the residents including the Cross Community Coalition,which is located at 46th Avenue and Josephine Street.A house in the River North Area

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57 RIVER NORTH PLANBRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40THAND 40TH TODlFRAMEWORK PLANl

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58 FRAMEWORK PLANBLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:wGENERAL FRAMEWORKThis chapter describes the framework for River North.This area is an amalgamation ofportions offour neighborhoods,Five Points,Swansea-Elyria,Cole,and Globeville.The framework consists oftwo north-south corridors and one east-west corridor that connect three districts within River North,four neighborhoods,and downtown Denver. The Brighton Boulevard corridor can become an attractive gateway to downtown Denver from I-70 and the North Denver neighborhoods and is in a position to benefit from and serve the growing downtown market.The South Platte River corridor presents a natural open space area that includes a bicycle trail and Globeville Landing Park. The river corridor has the opportunity to provide a setting for a mile long residential and mixed-use area with river front access.A third corridor is 38th Street.Given the restricted access from the west to the east created by the two railroad lines that run through the area and the South Platte River,38th Street is a critical connection.It runs under the railroad tracks and over a bridge that crosses the South Platte River,thereby,connecting the segments ofthe study area,including the 40th and 40th TOD area,to each other and to Brighton Boulevard. These three corridors connect two major districts and an events district.The districts consist oftwo major redevelopment opportunities,the 40th and 40th TOD area and the Denargo Market area.An Events District has also been identified.Globeville and Elyria-Swansea are somewhat isolated from the rest ofthe city and can benefit from the improved connections identified in the River North Plan.Issuesw Much ofthe land in the study area is currently underutilized. w R ede v elopment has started to occur b ut there is no overall land use and transportation plan in place to guide future redevelopment. w The current zoning does not allow some appropriate uses,allows other inappropriate uses,and does not pr ovide appropriate development and design standards for new development. w Wayfinding and directional signage is lacking.Plan Framework Map (from page 5) Much of the land in the River North Area is underutilized

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59 RIVER NORTH PLANBRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40THAND 40TH TODw Current infrastructure does not support existing significant land uses and amenities,does not attract new dev elopment,and along with the unkempt appearance ofsome outdoor storage areas and some buildings provides a poor image for the area.Opportunitiesw IfRTDs FasTracks Vision Plan is approved by voters and subject to the results ofthe Final I-70 East Cor ridor EIS,a major opportunity exists to create an exceptional Transit Oriented Development;its prime location between downtown and DIA with rapid transit connections to each creates numerous and exciting opportunities for new development. w The twin north-south corridors,with Brighton Boulevard providing primarily vehicular access between I-70 and do wntown and the South Platte River providing a linear open space amenity with pedestrian and regional bicycle access,create exciting development and open space opportunities. w There are many thriving businesses and interesting buildings within the area.Goalsw Maintain via b le e xisting businesses in such a way that they are compatible with new development and new development is compatible with them. w Create opportunities for employees ofcurrent and future employers to live within the study boundaries and seek to connect residents of adjacent neighborhoods with jobs within the Plans boundaries. w Build upon the unique land uses that exist and identify redevelopment sites and opportunities that foster the crea tion ofa compa tible mix ofuses. w Develop a cross section for Brighton Boulevard and identify key visible locations for architectural and landscape impr ovements to create a gateway from I-70 and the north Denver neighborhoods to Downtown. The gateway features should be built around a theme. w Esta blish a unique Transit Oriented Development in the vicinity ofthe proposed 40th and 40th station in w hic h the station is incorporated into the development and facilitate the redevelopment ofthe Denargo Market area into an exciting mixed-use community.Outdoor storage provides a poor image of River North and the gateway to Downtown There are many thriving businesses in the River North Area

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60 FRAMEWORK PLANBLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:w Attract new development along the South Platte River,especially new residential development that takes adv antage ofthe river and enhances it as an open space corridor. w By adding new development to the current uses and structures,create a unique environment both in terms of an eclectic mix of uses and exciting,innovative architecture. w Improve and create new connections within the River North Area,to downtown,and to nearby neighborhoods especially impro ved pedestrian and bicycle connections. The Plan calls for the creation ofa dynamic and compatible mixture ofuses that serves and takes advantage of proximity to downtown,access to I-70,and the proposed rapid transit station in the vicinity of40th Avenue and 40th Street.The Plan calls for creating attractive vehicular and pedestrian friendly connections within River North and to the surrounding neighborhoods and downtown.The mixtures ofuses varies throughout the area and are placed in six areas which are described in the Land Use Concept Map and in the appropriate corridor and district descriptions .The South Platte River Corridor can attract residential mixed-use development A planned mixed-use development along Ringsby Court and the South Platte River

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61RIVER NORTH PLAN Land Use Concept BRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40THAND 40TH TOD

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62 FRAMEWORK PLANBLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:wCORRIDORSThere are three corridors,as illustrated in the Plan Framework map on page 5,which define the urban form ofthe Plan boundaries,Brighton Boulevard,the South Platte River,and 38th Street.Issues,opportunities,and goals related to transportation and circulation generally are described first before discussing them specifically for each corridor. Traffic currently operates at acceptable levels ofservice,but as a result ofa combination ofadded traffic from new development and general traffic growth metro-wide (resulting in a total ofabout 2 to 3 percent annual growth) the level ofservice will worsen.Deteriorating and substandard infrastructure (i.e.,curb,gutter,sidewalk,pavement,and drainage conditions) will need to be improved as redevelopment happens to realize the vision for a well-connected and attractive area.The bike and pedestrian framework for River North relies on extensive improvements to bike and pedestrian connections to and from the South Platte River,along Brighton Boulevard and connections to and from the 40th and 40th Station.Improving pedestrian and bike connectivity will be fundamental to achieving the ultimate vision ofcreating a vibrant,mixed-use area.Issuesw Some intersections will operate at unacceptable vehicular levels ofservice due to growth in development from both inside and outside Ri ver North. w Most streets have deficiencies due to a lack ofsidewalks,poor pavement condition,lack ofcurb and gutter,or poor dr aina g e. w High levels oftruck activity as well as buses accessing the RTD bus facility impact traffic operations within the ar ea. w The study area typically does not delineate right-of-way from private frontage allowing parking and loading in a c haotic manner that makes it difficult for pedestrians and bicyclists. w Bus stops lack space for waiting,boarding,and unboarding passengers. w The Bicycle Master Plan identifies two critical missing links in the bicycle system in the River North Area atAn unsafe and poorly lit bike connection along 46th Avenue Safe and convenient bike access, such as fixing this missing bicycle link along 38th Street, is recommended by the Plan

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63 RIVER NORTH PLANBRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40THAND 40TH TOD46th Avenue near the National Western Stock Show and 38th Street east ofBrighton Boulevard. w Turning movements in combination with lack ofcurb and gutter and cross walks present an unsafe as well as an unfriendl y pedestrian and bike environment. w Inadequate pedestrian infrastructure is one ofa number offactors that discourages private investment for r ede velopment.Opportunitiesw T he I-70 East Cor ridor EIS process as well as the potential for the funding ofRTDs FasTracks Vision Plan represent opportunities for advancing and implementing transportation improvements.Goalsw Balance the need to maintain the level ofservice for traffic operations with the need to encourage rede velopment. w Improve roadway infrastructure (i.e.,curb,gutter,sidewalk,pavement and drainage) as redevelopment ha ppens. w Pr o vide guidance for transit access and circulation f or the I-70 East Corridor EIS process and any future planning and design associated with RTDs FasTracks Vison Plan. w Create a framework that accommodates both pedestrians and bicyclists on all public right-of-ways. w Enhance connections by adding trees,tree lawns,on-street parking and pedestrian scale lighting along streets. w Connect key destinations including the South Platte River Trail,Denargo Market,Swansea-Elyria,Globeville, Upper Larimer the Central Platte Valley,the Denver Coliseum,the Stock Show and the proposed 40th and 40th rapid transit station. w Assure that pedestrians and bicyclists have good access to bus service and the proposed rapid transit station. w W her ev er possib le ,r estore the g rid system to promote access.Brave bicyclists crossing Brighton Boulevard on 38th Street

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64 FRAMEWORK PLANBLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:Brighton Boulevard CorridorThe Brighton Boulevard corridor is principally an arterial in terms ofits function and needs to provide mobility between Interstate 70 and downtown.However,it also needs to provide access to existing and new businesses.The concept for Brighton Boulevard is to create a mixed-use street as new land uses develop in response to the Plans vision.Brighton Boulevard is the front door to the River North Area and provides the first impression ofthe area and also to downtown.Outsiders judge the health and vitality ofnot only the Plan area but the surrounding neighborhoods by what they see on Brighton Boulevard. T he area on either side ofBrighton Boulevard from 31st Street to 38th Street is identified on the Land Use Concept Map as a Commercial Mixed-Use Area.A mix ofbusiness uses especially retail and office uses but inc luding some auto oriented uses and some industrial uses is envisioned but in such a way that the buildings are oriented to Brighton Boulevard which would become a mixed-use street.Examples ofpotential uses include retailwholesale showrooms,a destination restaurant-entertainment complex,a grocery anchored neighborhood shopping center,and convenience retail.Issuesw Brighton Boulevard provides a poor image ofthe River North Area. w Limiting 80 foot right-of-w ay. w Undesignated right-of-way allowing service and loading activities that diminish the overall character and safe circulation. w T he boulevard lacks curb,gutter,and sidewalk. w Poor drainage. w T he reconstruction ofBrighton Boulevard with an ideal 96 foot cross section may impact current access and may impact businesses. w T he mixture ofuses is not balanced and fails to pr o vide suf ficient retail. w The industrial zoning mandates a 20 foot setback along Brighton Boulevard that may not be the appropriate setbac k for new de velopment.Opportunitiesw T he replacement ofthe Broadway viaduct with an underpass and the improvements to the Brighton Boulevard/I-70 interchange have created the ability to easily access I-70 and to connect River North withA rendering of what Brighton Boulevard could look like in the future Undesignated right-of-way allows for haphazard service activities and diminishes the character and safety of Brighton

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65 RIVER NORTH PLANBRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40THAND 40TH TODdowntown via Broadway which continues on to the southern end ofthe metropolitan area. w An improved street with sidewalks and curb and gutter may attract considerable new investment along Brighton Boulev ard including a mix ofuses.Goalsw Maintain sufficient roadway capacity to serve future demand but balance it with the needs ofa mixed-use cor ridor that includes sidewalks and other pedestrian amenities. w Pr ovide adequate parking for employees and visitors and provide adequate loading facilities in a manner that does not significantly impede traffic flows. w Improve the ability ofpedestrians and bicyclists to travel safely along Brighton,to cross Brighton to access bus ser vice and other uses,and to access the South Platte River. w Establish a new cross section that enhances the overall character ofthe corridor and promotes new in v estment and new de v elopment while retaining the economic via bility ofexisting businesses and treating property owners fairly. w Assure that new development relates properly to the new,Brighton cross-section. w Assur e that the ne w Brighton cross section does not negatively impact adjacent areas including Brighton Boulevard north ofI-70.South Platte River CorridorThe South Platte River corridor runs from the southern to the northern boundary ofthe River North Area.It is a major amenity as well as an opportunity to promote redevelopment.The South Platte River must be protected and enhanced as a citywide amenity,an amenity for River North and an amenity for the surrounding neighborhoods. T he area called the Ri v er Corridor Mixed-Use Area on the Land Use Concept Map runs on both sides ofthe South Pla tte Ri v er to 38th Street on the nor th. Uses are primarily industrial.When existing industrial businesses cease oper ations or relocate they should not be replaced with other industrial uses.New uses should be mixed and should be uses that can take advantage ofthe river frontage.Issuesw The natural state ofthe South Platte River has been eroded in places such as on the w est side ofArkins Court.A rendering of how residential mixed-use development could take advantage of and enhance the SouthPlatte River Corridor Current industrial uses may choose to relocate in the future

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66 FRAMEWORK PLANBLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:w In some cases,current uses do not take advantage ofthe proximity to the river and are unsightly taking away from the enjo yment ofthis open space. w Ringsby Court has only a 50 foot right-of-way ofwhich nearly 50% consists ofthe west bank ofthe South Platte Ri ver making it difficult to provide sidewalks and other pedestrian amenities.Opportunitiesw The addition ofopen space along the river in conjunction with new development and in conjunction with dra inage improvements. w The vacation ofArkins Court in some locations making way for new development with a direct connection to the ri ver and the addition ofopen space.Goalsw Create urban design guidelines to ensure architecturally high-quality development that respects the vision of the South Pla tte River corridor as an open space corridor,zDevelop Design Guidelines that include criteria for height,scale,building massing and architectural detailing Design Guidelines objectives should include maintaining the view to the river corridor, encouraging construction that is low to medium in height,(not more than 55 feet) and creating pedestrian friendlyarchitecture that incorporates ground floor windows,direct entrances from buildings to the str eet,and human-scaled facades.zCreate an open space corridor along Arkins Court by setting new construction back from the sidewalk (approximately 10 feet).The setback should be heavily landscaped to visually relate to the river corridor w Utiliz e street and right-of-w a y design a ppropria te for residential local streets to cr eate an environment on the east side of Arkins Court that fosters new development,especially residential development.zPr o vide sufficient vehicular access (two lanes oftraffic) to accommodate the largely local traffic on Arkins Court.zProvide curbs and gutters on both sides ofArkins Court to define the street edge and prevent erosion.zPr o vide on street parking on the east side ofArkins Court to separate pedestrians from the traffic and provide parking for visitors.zProvide a tree lawn and a sidewalk on the east side ofArkins Court.zEnsure that storm water quality enhancements are built in such a way that they become open space amenities for the community and the South Platte River corridor.zClose,shift or realign portions ofArkins Court to the extent that it will enhance developmentUnsightly uses diminish the enjoyment of the river Part of the 50-foot Ringsby Court right-of-way is taken up by the bank of the river making it difficult to provide sidewalks and other amenities

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67RIVER NORTH PLAN South Platte River Corridor Profiles BRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40THAND 40TH TOD

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68 FRAMEWORK PLANBLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:opportunities and increase open space so long as vehicular access to land uses is maintained.zProvide lighting to support vehicular and pedestrian traffic while maintaining sensitivity to the wildlife that inhabits the river corridor.zProvide under grounding ofoverhead utilities.zTo the extent possible,detain and/or treat storm water before it reaches the South Platte River. w Create a pedestrian friendly environment and streetscape to encourage people to walk to nearby destinationszImprove pedestrian access in a variety ofways including adding sidewalks.zProvide additional pedestrian connections as needed to the South Platte River Trail.However,this access should not be designed in a way that encourages people to interact directly with the water flowing in the South Platte River.zAccess to the South Platte River Trail and Globeville Landing Park should be improved from within the Plans Area and from surrounding neighborhoods.Access should be improved along 38th Street including from the proposed 40th and 40th Transit Station.Access from the South Platte River to and along 31st Street. should be impr ov ed. The possibility ofconnecting the South Platte River Trail to Mestizo Curtis Park should be explored.However,it would require access across the railroad track and the Rockies P arking Lot.(It is understood that this will require PUC approval and purchase and/or easements on pri va tel y held land.) w Maintain and enhance the South Platte River as a natural area.zEnhance the South Platte River as a natural area,which may entail the provision ofbuffer zones to protect the natural ecosystem from adjacent development.zProvide opportunities for end-ofpipe storm water quality enhancement along the South Platte River. Ensure that these become an asset to the natural river corridor.zIncrease the amount ofopen-space to serve the changing community including natural areas and private open space. w Arkins Court and Ringsby Court should primarily pro vide access to uses along them and should be classified as local str eets .Tr af fic g ener ated by RTD,Federal Express and others should continue to primarily use 31st Str eet to reach Brighton Boulevard.38th Street CorridorT he 38th Street corridor is defined as a corridor that includes 38th Street,Walnut Street and 40th Avenue creating continuous east-west access through the River North Area.38th Street connects the Globeville neighborhood andThe natural state of the Platte River has been eroded in places, but could be significantly enhanced as redevelopment occurs

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69 RIVER NORTH PLANBRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40THAND 40TH TODWashington Street on the west,goes under the Burlington Northern Railroad tracks,across the South Platte River, intersects with Brighton Boulevard,goes under the Union Pacific Railroad tracks and then ends at an intersection with Walnut Street and Marion Street.Walnut Street connects directly to 40th Avenue which goes east to Colorado Boulevard.It connects segments ofthe Plans area including the 40th and 40th TOD area to each other and to Brighton Boulevard. T he Land Use Concept map illustrates three areas as Industrial Mixed-Use Areas.This corridor connects two of them directly and the third area via York Street.The uses would be predominantly industrial but other uses inc luding artist studios,research and development,and a variety ofoffice uses could develop over time.Issuesw 38st Street is onl y two lanes under the UP Railroad tracks and may not provide sufficient capacity given the anticipated increase in traffic. w 38th Street does not provide a satisfactory route for pedestrians and bicyclists from the proposed 40th and 40th sta tion and TOD to Brighton Boulevard,the South Platte River,and to Globeville via Washington Street.Opportunitiesw T he viaduct under the Bur lington Northern and Santa Fe Railroad tracks is being expanded to four lanes and sidewalks are being added. w 38th Street pr o vides full eastwest access within the Ri ver North Area.Goalsw Impr ov e 38th Str eet so that it can operate like a true multi-modal street accommodating bikes,pedestrians, transit and autos w Provide sufficient capacity on 38th Street for vehicular traffic. w Attr act uses o v er time that cr ea te more employment and are designed to be better neighbor s.Low impact industrial uses like this high tech company could locate in River North in the future One lane in each direction on 38th Street under the Union Pacific railroad bridge may not provide sufficient capacity for car traffic

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70 FRAMEWORK PLANBLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:wDISTRICTSThe 40th and 40th TOD and the Denargo Market districts provide opportunities for intensive mixed-use development.The 40th and 40th TOD district will be oriented to the proposed station while the Denargo Market district will be oriented to downtown.40th and 40th TOD DistrictThe proposed 40th and 40th TOD district presents a great opportunity for transit oriented development in North Denver by linking redevelopment opportunities with a potentially expanding rapid transit system.This connection between land use and transportation reinforces the key concepts in Blueprint Denver and Plan 2000 Compact dev elopment around rapid transit stations and other permanent transit facilities is a key concept of Plan 2000 and Blueprint Denver Fundamentall y ,TOD is a collection ofintense uses that promote the use oftransit and walking or biking.Dense of fice and residential uses are the mainstay oftransit-oriented development;residents and workers regularly use transit instead ofcars to get to work or home.Critical to their success as communities and as transportation solutions is a supporting mix ofretail,entertainment,and services that allow residents and workers to obtain many dail y needs on f oot, r ather than by car.Transit-oriented developments are organized within an easy walking distance ofthe station or other facility,typically a one-quarter to one-third mile radius. T OD enhances local planning ef f orts balances redevelopment with quality oflife and economic development,and r einforces r e gional g ro wth mana g ement.TOD increases the concentration ofuses in appropriate locations (such as Areas ofChange) in order to take development pressure offother areas that are inappropriate for development (suc h as Areas of Stability). The TOD district is shown in the Land Use Concept Map as TOD Mixed-Use.The uses include intensive office and residential uses along with supporting retail oriented to the proposed 40th and 40th sta tion. T he station ideally w ould be incor porated within the development.Other development would be placed along direct pedestrian connections to the station.In addition to residential,office,and retail development,this area could include researchA rendering of what 40th and 40th could be after development These parking lots are within the TOD area and could be redeveloped

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71RIVER NORTH PLAN Potential TODsThis station diagram is intended to show one potential configuration for a possible rapid tansit station.The I -70 East Corridor EIS will look at all reasonable alternatives. BRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40THAND 40TH TOD

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72 FRAMEWORK PLANBLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:and development and corporate office headquarters in addition to multi-tenant buildings.Issuesw Transit options are limited to bus service ofvarying frequency. w Globeville,Elyria and Swansea are somewhat isolated communities with a large number oftransit dependent people .Opportunitiesw RTDs FasTrack Vision Plan calls for a station in the vicinity of40th and 40th that would serve in excess of 5,000 passeng ers a day and provide service to Union Station,Stapleton and DIA on the East Corridor,to downtown via an extension ofthe light rail line that runs along Welton Street and now terminates at 30th and Downing Street,and the North Metro Line which would provide service to Thornton.It is anticipated that around 40,000 passengers per day would be passing through the station to another destination. w Ifthe Union Pacific Railroad chooses to move its intermodal facility to the east,over 40 acres immediately adjacent to the 40th and 40th sta tion may become available for Transit Oriented Development. w The potential for the location ofa future mass transit station within River North will support a higher density and a dynamic mix of uses.Goalsw Provide adequate parking in the most appropriate form while maximizing development opportunities.zEncour a ge the development ofshared parking,preferably in structures,which serve multiple land uses.zPr o vide adequate transit parking at the 40th and 40th station to serve transit riders,but do not provide an ov er a b undance of parking so that the 40th and 40th station becomes a large satellite parking lot for Do wntown and DIA and inhibits redevelopment.zPr o vide on-street parking where possible,on any new or reconstructed public or private streets,within the 40th and 40th T OD ar ea.zR educe the need for parking through a variety ofmechanisms,including through the use oftravel demand mana g ement (TDM) measures such as employer-sponsored ECO passes,to create incentives for future employees and residents in the 40th and 40th TOD district to use transit. w Pr ovide direct and pleasant multi-modal connections that facilitates development within a half-mile radius of the station and that enables residents and businesses in surrounding neighborhoods to access transit and theWarehouse on about 10 acres within the TOD area could redevelop as River North evolves and transit is introduced Land just south of the proposed 40th and 40th rapid transit station

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73 RIVER NORTH PLANBRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40THAND 40TH TODdevelopment area.zProvide better access to transit by improving pedestrian connections in the vicinity ofthe proposed 40th and 40th station including by installing sidewalks on facilities that currently have none,by providing signage to direct people to the station,and by providing safe pedestrian crossing at high traffic intersections.zWork with RTD to determine how improved bus service,including the provision ofcirculator buses,to the proposed 40th and 40th station can meet the needs ofthe surrounding neighborhoods including Cole, Globeville,Five Points,Clayton,Elyria and Swansea.zProvide improved bike and pedestrian access from the proposed 40th and 40th station to:the Platte River Greenway and Brighton Boulevard via 38th Street;the west side ofthe tracks connecting to Brighton Boulevard northwest of38th Street;and to the National Western Stock Show Complex and the Denver Coliseum through bus circulator shuttles,and improved pedestrian connections along 38th Street and Brighton.zRequire the planning and development ofa grid street system within the UP Inter-modal yard when and/or ifthat area redevelops. w Pr ovide infrastructure that supports multi-modal access to the transit station and makes private development f easible .zAccommodate any area-wide or sub-regional utility improvements such as potential drainage,storm water and sanitary improvements as well us the under grounding ofany existing overhead utilities as a part of any r ede v elopment ofthe proposed 40th and 40th TOD district.zWork with the Union Pacific Railroad to determine railroad track configurations that balance the preservation offuture UP train operations with allowing for maximum redevelopment ofthe UP site and accommoda ting passenger rail service. w Create a compact,mixed-use,pedestrian-friendly transit oriented development (TOD).zEncourage a compatible mix ofuses within the potential 40th and 40th TOD district including residential, retail,office,industrial,and civic uses.The Union Pacific Inter-modal facility occupies over 40 acres Sidewalks are needed to provide better access to the proposed rapid transit station

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74 FRAMEWORK PLANBLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:zProvide a range ofhousing options (including workforce housing) in terms oftype and size including both for sale and rental.zPromote the development ofaffordable housing in the TOD district that not only complies with Denvers Inclusionary Housing Ordinance but also provides housing to households earning less than 60% and less than 50% ofthe Area Median Income.zProvide housing to persons who are transit dependent especially persons who have physical disabilities.zMaximize the opportunity for TOD by siting the rail station in the best location for TOD while meeting RTDs basic operational requirements for trains and buses and by considering the development ofgradeseparated connections between modes (buses,trains,and vehicles).zCompliment the proposed rail station with convenience retail directly adjacent to the station tailored to serve the transit passengers transferring modes at the station.zProvide easy access to the retail from the surrounding neighborhoods and encourage retail uses that fulfill their needs.zProvide the maximum viable density for new development on land that is within a quarter mile ofthe station area. w Insur e that urban design r einforces the pedestrian oriented and tr ansit-supportive character ofthe station area and creates a friendly and useable public space.zUtiliz e trees,pedestrian lighting,wide sidewalks and other urban design elements to create a pedestrianfriendl y en vir onment that fosters considerable street level activity.zWork with RTD to develop a unique design for the rail station and make the platform area a significant public space.zDe v elop urban design standards and guidelines for new development that: require facades on parking structures facing public right ofway to accommodate pedestrian-active uses on the ground level. encour age the design ofbuildings that take advantage ofthe unique parcel configurations in the area south of 40th Av enue require appropriate massing,scale,building heights and building size for new development the highest density development should occur near the rail station. encour a ge street oriented building placement and architectural variation. w F acilita te par tner ships between ag encies,property owners,and developers to plan for,design coherently,and shar e the cost of infrastructure.

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75 RIVER NORTH PLANBRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40THAND 40TH TODDenargo Market AreaThis district is located between Broadway/Brighton Boulevard and the South Platte River and between Park Avenue and 31st Street.It is described in the Land Use Concept Map as a Residential/Mixed Use area.This area includes land closest to downtown,primarily the Denargo Market area.Within this area,residential uses would be the predominant use along the river with some neighborhood serving retail and office uses as well.Larger scale retail (but not conventional big box retail),especially a festival marketplace concept,is envisioned in the Denargo Market, which would serve downtown,River North and nearby neighborhoods.Office uses and downtown support services are appropriate as well.Issuesw There are multiple owners ofland (although there is an 18 acre assemblage) making it difficult to establish a master plan, seek zoning for the entire area,and establish a General Development Plan. w Utilities and infrastructure including storm drainage and streets are in poor condition.Opportunitiesw It has access from the CBD and Lower Downtown via Broadway and Brighton Boulevard and from the Central Platte Valley via Delgany Street. w It has over 1,500 feet ofriver frontage and the potential oflocating new development immediately adjacent to the ri ver and creating additional open space. w T he Denar g o Mark et area off ers the potential for a significant mixed-use development with destination commercial uses,anchored by housing,and benefiting from its relationship to the river corridor and downtown.Goalsw Adequate parking should be efficiently provided in the most appropriate form while maximizing development opportunities .zEncourage the private development ofshared parking,preferably in structures,which serve multiple land uses .zPr ovide on-street parking where possible,on any new or reconstructed public or private streets within the area. w Provide direct and pleasant multi-modal connections to residents and businesses in surroundingDelgany Street provides access to the Central Platte Valley from the Denargo Market area

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76 FRAMEWORK PLANBLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:neighborhoods to access the development area and residents and businesses to access downtown,the South Platte River,and Brighton Boulevard.zWork with RTD to consider connecting Denargo Market to all parts ofdowntown through circulator bus service.zProvide pedestrian and bicycle access to Brighton Boulevard,the South Platte River bike trail,and Delgany Street. w Provide infrastructure that makes private development feasible.zAccommodate any area-wide or sub-regional utility improvements.zAccommodate all necessary water,storm water and sanitary utilities as a part ofthe reconstruction ofany streets within the area.zConnect Delgany Street directly to Brighton Boulevard.zAddress infrastructure and utility issues for the entire area in order to create an attractive and consistent environment for new development and in order to reduce their costs. w Create a compact,mixed-use,pedestrian-friendly development.zEncourage a mix ofuses including residential,retail,and office uses.zProvide a range ofhousing options (including workforce housing) in terms oftype and size including both f or sale and rental and promote the development ofaffordable housing that at a minimum complies with Denvers Inclusionary Housing Ordinance .zProvide housing along the South Platte River. w Insure that urban design reinforces the pedestrian oriented and transit-supportive character ofthe area and crea tes friendl y and useable public spaces.zUtiliz e tr ees pedestrian lighting wide sidewalks and other urban design elements to create a more pedestrian-friendl y en vir onment that f oster s consider ab le street level activity.zDe velop urban design standards and guidelines for new development that: r equir e facades on parking structures facing public right ofway to accommodate pedestrian-active uses on the g r ound le v el; require appropriate massing,scale,building heights and building size for new development with height limits along the South Platte Ri v er;and encourage street oriented building placement and architectural variation. w F acilitate partnerships between agencies,property owners,surrounding communities and developers to plan for,design,and share the cost ofinfrastructure.The Denargo Market area has over 1,500' of river frontage The Denargo Market is adjacent to downtown

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77 RIVER NORTH PLANBRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40THAND 40TH TODEvents DistrictThis district is comprised ofthe Denver Coliseum,the Forney Museum,and the National Western Stock Show (NWSS).Although most ofthe land holdings and main events venues are not included within the study area,access to the NWSS and its influence on land uses with the Plan boundary need to be considered.Issuesw Events at these facilities can create traffic and parking problems for nearby businesses and residents.Opportunitiesw The National Western Stock Show and other venues may have spin offopportunities to create year round economic acti vity.Goalw T ak e advantage ofthe opportunities presented by these venues in a manner that is sensitive to the needs of the sur r ounding businesses and neighborhoods .The Forney Transportation Museum The Denver Coliseum is in the Events District

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78 FRAMEWORK PLANBLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:wECONOMIC ACTIVITYBlueprint Denver identifies River North as an Area ofChange,which means that growth should be directed to this par t ofthe city.Based on market analyses completed in conjunction with the corridor plan,a considerable level ofdevelopment and redevelopment could occur ifselect regulatory,financial,physical and market issues are addressed.Issuesw T he cur r ent industrial zoning c lassifica tions that dominate the cor ridor,I-1 and I-2,do not allow residential development and only limited retail uses,thereby constraining the ability ofthe market to respond to demand tha t exists for these and other non-industrial uses. w I-2 zoning allows new ,and expansion ofexisting,industrial uses that are not necessarily compatible with many ofthe proposed uses identified for the corridor,and were I-2 zoning to continue,could potentially reduce future investment in the area. w Displacement ofexisting industrial properties due to changing market conditions may require relocation to a site outside the ar ea given the limited inventory ofattainable properties. w T he infr astructur e in many locations within the cor ridor is in poor condition,creating limitations (i.e., drainage systems) that will require attention prior to any significant level ofnew investment. w The current physical cross-section ofthe corridor,with inconsistent sidewalk improvements and nonidentifia ble parking, does not promote either a commercial environment,or pedestrian traffic. w Neighborhoods that are located adjacent to ,and in the vicinity ofthe corridor,will require stronger multimodal connections in order to be tr ul y supportive offuture retail. w Given the limited inventory ofquality building stock,there are few opportunities for adaptive reuse. w T he demo gra phic profile ofthe e xisting resident population,in combination with the areas proximity to other significant and competiti v e infill areas (i.e.,Lower Downtown,Stapleton) currently limits the potential to attract significant commercial development (i.e.,grocery store).This concrete plant is an allowed use under the existing industrial zoning

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79 RIVER NORTH PLANBRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40THAND 40TH TODw Services for the neighborhoods located adjacent to the corridor are limited,forcing residents to drive outside the area.Opportunitiesw There are several sizable parcels ofland,including many that are vacant or underutilized,thus limiting the need f or significant land assemblages. w Destination uses,which anchor the area including the Denver Coliseum and Stock Show Pavilion,draw visitors to Ri ver North and provide the catalyst for supportive commercial development that could also benefit the neighborhood. w The presence ofvarious art production operators offers the potential for a marketable anchor in a newly rede veloping urban neighborhood and supports the introduction ofhousing on the corridor in the form of live/work projects. w There is a rapidly growing residential market downtown,as well as underserved neighborhoods,creating the demand for ad ditional goods and services through the introduction ofnew,retail and service operators.Goalsw Provide jobs for both neighborhood residents as well as employees from outside the neighborhood that use the tr ansportation infrastructure by promoting a diverse industrial and commercial base. w Facilitate future business retention and attraction by providing appropriate economic incentives for new dev elopment,redevelopment,and smaller/local businesses within River North and by providing public amenities ser vices and infrastructure improvements. w Create funding mechanisms that can capitalize on future revenue generated in the area and provide incentives that are based on the le vel ofbenefit to the city. w Encour ag e the retention and expansion of e xisting r etailer s ,and the addition ofnew ones,particularly in str ategic locations such as in the vicinity ofthe Denver Coliseum,by providing a sufficient supply of a ppropria tely zoned sites designated for commercial uses in accordance with the Plan. w R etain and a ttr act ar tists interested in maintaining a presence in the area through implementation of appropriate financial programs and techniques. w Encour a ge land uses that effectively increase the dayand night-time population ofthe area providing the impetus for future commercial development.A large vacant, for sale land holding along Brighton Boulevard Art galleries and art studios are ideal uses to retain and incorporate into any redvelopment

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80 FRAMEWORK PLANBLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:w Balance buffers and connections between residential neighborhoods and commercial uses through the use of or ganizational mechanisms including business improvement districts and parking districts.The Ballpark Lofts at 25th and Market, south of the Plans area, is an example of a rental product for River North Vacant ground at 38th Street and Brighton is ideal for redevelopment

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81 RIVER NORTH PLANBRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40THAND 40TH TODlIMPLEMENTATIONl

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82 IMPLEMENTATIONBLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:The previous chapters identified the goals and objectives for the corridors,districts,and the study area as a whole. This chapter identifies the specific actions that need to be taken in order to implement the River North Plan.It also indicates which parties are responsible for implementing them and the approximate time frame in which the actions should be initiated. Se veral important characteristics ofthe River North Plan and small area plans in general should be noted. First,plans themselves are advisory in nature,provide guidance to City decisions,and are not regulatory tools.Plans provide a vision,which is a collective picture ofa desired future and a roadmap for achieving that vision.They provide the legal basis for the preparation ofregulatory tools.Generally,entire plans are not implemented quickly, but require a number ofyears to achieve the vision.Rather,plans are implemented incrementally with the vision and goals providing common direction to a multitude ofpublic and private undertakings.Despite these limitations, plans have proved to have a substantial influence on the development ofa plan area. Plan 2000 requires that new de velopment and redevelopment in River North be in conformance with plan goals and policies,as well as with Citywide plans and adopted rules and r e gula tions.Developers are expected to meet with neighborhood associations and with adjacent property owners to discuss their development and rezoning proposals Second,the adoption ofthis Plan does not change the zoning.However,zoning is the primary land use regulatory mec hanism,and is,thus,an important tool for implementing small area plans.Throughout the Citys zoning process,neighborhood associations and individual citizens are provided opportunities to provide feedback on the development proposals and whether they meet plan goals and policies.Traffic impacts,the proposed density ofthe project,the mix ofland uses,and design considerations will be taken into account during the process. Finally,the adoption ofthis Plan does not automatically provide funding for operational improvements or capital projects for multi-modal transportation facilities roadway,bus,bicycle and pedestrian or for other infrastructure systems such as storm drainage facilities.Obviously,public funding resources are limited.Capital projects,such as street improvements,can be funded by the City through its capital improvements program,by property owners through special taxation districts,or by private developers as development occurs.Funding availability,timing,and the necessary public land are constraints to achieving the Plans vision and goals with regard to capital improvements.

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83 RIVER NORTH PLANBRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40THAND 40TH TODwLAND USE AND ZONINGThe River North Plan,an outgrowth of Blueprint Denver ,is intended to improve the mixed-use character ofthe Plan s area.The River North Area has been divided into five primary land-use areas (see Land Use Concept map) each emphasizing a different mix ofuses.Zone changes should be initiated or supported that encourage mixed-use development in each ofthese Land Use Areas.The ability to retain and expand art related uses should be considered when rezonings are undertaken.In addition,an Events Area has been identified which includes the Forney Museum,the Denver Coliseum,and the National Western Stock Show (NWSS). It is important to note that adoption ofthis plan by the Denver City Council does not change the zoning.In some portions ofthe River North Area,rezoning ofmultiple parcels is recommended.In such cases,a process needs to be initiated by the city or by property owners that would consider which mixed-use zone district (or districts) is most appropriate,the boundaries ofthe area to be rezoned,and other details ofthe rezoning.An application would then be submitted to the city for a zoning change.This request for a change in zoning would follow the normal rezoning process and would require notice and a public hearing before consideration by City Council.Any uses that are not allowed under the new zoning would become legal nonconforming uses meaning that these uses would be allowed to continue so long as they stayed in operation,were maintained,and otherwise met the requirements ofthe Denver Zoning Code. The recommended conceptual land uses and timing for each ofthe five primary Land Use Areas are described below:Commerical Mix ed-UseRez one the area along Brighton Boulevard designated as commercial mixed-use to a Commercial Mixed-Use zone district.New development and redevelopment that includes heavy industrial uses is discouraged.A process should begin,after this plan has been approved by City Council,to fine tune the boundaries and evaluate alternative zone districts.Property owners,business owners,and other interested parties should be included.A decision should be made whether the city or landowners should initiate the rezoning.Prior to the initiation ofthis effort,CPD should

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84 IMPLEMENTATIONBLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:undertake an analysis ofthe existing uses and whether these uses are allowed under the various commercial mixeduse zones.ResponsibilityCity and County ofDenver,property owners and businesses,neighborhoodsTiming2003 2004Residential Mixed-UseR ezone the residential mixed-use area,which includes Denargo Market,to Residential Mixed-Use zoning, Commercial Mixed-Use zoning or a combination ofboth ofthem.New heavy industrial uses are discouraged in this area.Mechanisms for retaining art related uses should be pursued.A master planning process should be under taken for the Denargo Market area.The process would look at appropriate development,a general site plan, and appropriate zoning among other topics.After a rezoning,a General Development Plan needs to be formulated tha t would identify local street locations,assure a mix ofuses,identify locations for open space,and address other issues identified in the Denargo Market section.ResponsibilityCity and County ofDenver,property owners,businesses and neighborhoodsTiming2004 or when the major property owners have completed a master planning processTr ansit Mix ed-UseRezone the TOD district to a Transit Mixed-Use zone district in the immediate vicinity ofthe station and consider transit mixed-use or other mixed-use zone districts for other land up to halfmile from the station.After rezoning,a Gener al De v elopment Plan (GDP) needs to be created and approved by the Planning Board to identify a circulation system,identify how utilities would be provided including storm water,the provision ofopen space,and how improvements would be financed.Design Guidelines should also be written and adopted by the Planning Board.ResponsibilityCity and County ofDenver,property owners,businesses,Cole,Elyria and Swansea neighborhoods in consultation with RTDTimingUpon the completion ofthe I-70 East Corridor EIS and based upon decisions on technologies and the station location,a process should be initiated to rezone land near the sta tion.Other factors that will affect the timing are whether the RTD FasTracks Vision Plan is approved by the voters and whether the Union Pacific decides to relocate their inter -modal facility.Industrial Mixed-Use

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85 RIVER NORTH PLANBRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40THAND 40TH TODTo the extent that there is a reason to rezone the land within these areas,commercial mixed-use zoning should be given strong consideration.New heavy industrial uses are discouraged.Rezoning should generally be considered on a parcel-by-parcel basis or when property owners jointly request a change in zoning.Residential mixed-use zone districts may be appropriate for larger sites.Responsibilityproperty ownersTimingas market conditions warrantRiver Corridor Mixed-UseWhen an existing industrial use ceases operations,it should not be replaced with another industrial use.Zoning should be put in place that assures uses with appropriate design guidelines that take advantage ofthe proximity to the South Platte River.Both residential and commercial mixed-use zone districts should be considered.A height limit of55 feet should be imposed on property fronting the river and a bulk plane established that permits taller buildings as the distance from the river increases.ResponsibilityCommunity Planning and Development (CPD),property owners,neighborhoodsTimingas industrial users cease operations

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86 IMPLEMENTATIONBLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:wTRANSPORTATIONSee the corridor section for Brighton Boulevard and 38th Street. Improve streets used for local circulation parallel to or intersecting Brighton Boulevard including Wynkoop,Wazee, Delgany,Chestnut,35th Street,36th Street,and 40th Street as redevelopment occurs to bring them up to roadway standards.Curb and gutter,drainage (ifnecessary),sidewalks,signage and pavement should all be improved to city standards.Responsibilityproperty owners,developers,Public WorksT imingas r ede v elopment occurs over the next several years Work with RTD during the I-70 East Corridor EIS to develop a plan for transit and mobility that serves the redevelopment within the study area and serves adjacent local neighborhoods.ResponsibilityRTD,Public Works,CPD,neighborhoodsT iming2003 2006 W ork with RTD,CDOT,and other City agencies to ensure that the Downtown Multi-modal Access Plan (DMAP) and the Pedestrian Master Plan address how to enhance transit,bike,pedestrian,and auto connections between Downtown and River North corridors and districts.ResponsibilityPublic Works,CPD,RTD,CDOTT iming2003 2004This local street needs improvements and should be brought to current standards when redevelopment occurs

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87 RIVER NORTH PLANBRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40THAND 40TH TODwPEDESTRIAN AND BICYCLE CONNECTIONSComplete the major missing links in the recently adopted Bicycle Master Plan; w 46th Avenue from the South Platte River to the National Western Stock Show complex on route D-2 as described in the Bic ycle Master Plan,and w 38th Street from Walnut to Brighton Boulevard as described in the Bicycle Master PlanResponsibilityPublic WorksTiming2003 2012 Explore options for creating a pedestrian and bicycle crossing ofthe UP tracks at 31st Street to connect Upper Larimer and Curtis P ark to the South Platte Ri v er trail.ResponsibilityCPD,Public WorksT iming2005 R e-evaluate the current bike route system in North Central Denver during the I-70 East EIS process in order to tak e ad v anta g e ofany proposed rapid transit or bus transit alternative considered.Suggested improvements to consider are accommodating bicycles along 40th Avenue between Steele and Franklin and providing a grade separated pedestrian/bike connection over the UP Railroad tracks from the potential 40th and 40th station area to a loca tion between 38th and 44th along Brighton Boule v ard.Pedestrian and bicycle access should be provided to residents and employees ofElyria-Swansea,Globeville,and Cole.These improvements may require amending the current Bicycle Master Plan.ResponsibilityI-70 East Corridor EIS,Public Works,CPD,neighborhoodsTiming2003 200846th Avenue bike route under I-70 38th Street is a missing bike link 31st Street looking over the UP tracks

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88 IMPLEMENTATIONBLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:wURBAN DESIGNDevelop an identity for Brighton Boulevard that provides a gateway character to downtown from I-70 and a gateway from downtown to North Denver.Consider the use ofmonuments,signage,urban design features,and a name change for the corridor that will assist with marketing the area.ResponsibilityCPD,Public Works,consultants designing Brighton Boulevard improvements,the Downtown Denver Partnership,North Central Denver neighborhoodsTimingin conjunction with designing the Brighton Boulevard improvements. De v elop an improved way-finding system for the South Platte River Trail,the Coliseum,the Forney Museum,the National W ester n Stock Show,and other major attractions.The way-finding system should include colorful signage and/or landscaping to improve local connections to major attractions as well as help to enhance the character within the study ar ea.ResponsibilityNational Western Stock Show,the Coliseum,Platte River Greenway Foundation,Forney Museum,CPD,Public WorksT imingde v elop plan in conjunction with design for Brighton Boulevard improvements and major private redevelopment. De v elop design guidelines for each area within the Plan boundary that is rezoned to a mixed-use zone district. These detailed design guidelines will be developed upon rezonings to mixed-use zone districts.They will become part ofrules and regulations upon adoption by the Planning Director through the Planning Board.ResponsibilityCPD Urban Design,Planning Board,Planning Director,residents and owners ofproperty in land use areasTimingimmediately following the rezoning ofland use areas.An urban design feature marking the entrance to downtown Denver An example of wayfinding signage

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89 RIVER NORTH PLANBRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40THAND 40TH TODwECONOMIC ACTIVITYProvide detailed information on the area in the Technical Appendix,update this information annually and disseminate it to entities including the Downtown Denver Partnership,the Mayors Office ofEconomic Development and International Trade (MOED-IT),the Denver Urban Renewal Authority (DURA),real estate brokers,developers and others.ResponsibilityCPD,Environmental Health,Public Works Timingannually T ak e advantage ofopportunities created by the Denver Coliseum,the National Western Stock Show (NWSS) and its f acilities and the F orne y Museum by w promoting new development north ofI-70 and east ofBrighton Boulevard that would serve events as well as neighborhood and other r esidents .ResponsibilityMOED-IT,CPD,NWSS,Denver Theatres and ArenasTiming2004 and ongoing w pro vide easier access thr ough enhanced signage,improved pedestrian connections (i.e.adding sidewalks and lighting along Brighton Boulevard),and explore additional access for the Forney Museum.ResponsibilityPublic Works,CPD,Forney MuseumTimingaccess for the Forney Museum should be explored in conjunction with planning for the Coliseum, open space north of Globe ville Landing P ark,and storm water planning w e xplore opportunities for cr ea ting year round activity associated with the NWSS .ResponsibilityNWSS MOED-ITTiming2003,2004 and ongoingThe National Western Stock Show provides economic development opportunitites Forney Museum of Transportation access necessitates crossing railroad tracks

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90 IMPLEMENTATIONBLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:Encourage and support demonstration development projects within each ofthe districts. Develop model pro formas.Responsibilityeconomic consultant,CPD,MOED-IT,H&NDSTimingpro formas in 2003,and ongoing as development opportunities arise Explore the establishment ofa faade maintenance program using low interest loans and grants (local,state, federal),focusing on improvements that better relates the buildings to the proposed cross section for Brighton Boulevard.ResponsibilityMOED-IT,CPD,businessesTiming2004 Utilize available financial incentives to facilitate Brownfield redevelopment.ResponsibilityMOED-IT,Environmental Health,CPDT imingongoing Initiate an education process and solicit interest in the establishment ofone or more improvement districts to finance public infrastructure,common spaces,waterway redevelopment,marketing,cleanliness and safety programs and for a maintenance district to maintain improvements.ResponsibilityElyria-Sw ansea Business Associa tion,property owners,CPD,Public WorksTiming2004 Work with DURA to determine (ifand when) the establishment ofan urban renewal district might be feasible in selected ar eas .P otential areas are the Denar g o Mark et district and the 40th and 40th TOD district.Slum and Blight studies should be selecti v ely initiated.ResponsibilityDURA,CPD,developersTimingupon completion ofor as part ofa master planning process for the Denargo Market and after the I-70 Corridor East EIS has been completed for the TOD district Explore the establishment ofa program to assist with the retention and/or relocation ofbusinesses impacted by r ein v estment within the corridor.ResponsibilityMOED-ITTiming2004Several buildings along Brighton could relate better to the proposed cross section Formation of urban renewal districts may help areas like Denargo Market redevelop

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91 RIVER NORTH PLANBRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40THAND 40TH TODAmong the Areas ofChange identified by Blueprint Denver is the North Industrial Area.Some ofthis area is included in the stud y area for this plan and the balance includes much ofthe industrial portion ofthe ElyriaSwansea neighborhood and a portion ofthe Globeville neighborhood.These industrial areas surround stable residential areas that need some reinvestment and are affected by some ofthe industrial uses.Buffering the residential areas from the industrial areas is needed.This area includes some large employers as well as considerable land used for truck parking and storage.Much ofthe industrial area should be improved to serve industry better and to attract new businesses that provide jobs for nearby residents.Finally,some ofthe industrial area should be considered for commercial development that would provide needed shopping for residents.After completion of this plan,a district plan for the North Industrial Area should be undertaken and/or a plan for the Elyria-Swansea neighborhood.It should consider the continuing need to address environmental problems.The plan for the North Washington area should be completed and implemented.ResponsibilityCPD,MOED-IT,North Industrial Area property owners and businesses,Environmental Health,Elyria-Swansea and Globeville residents and neighborhood and business associationsT iming2004 2006The interface between residential and industrial uses needs to be improved in the North Industrial Area

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92 IMPLEMENTATIONBLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:wENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONSWork with the businesses to develop a voluntary cleanup plan for Brighton Boulevard to make it a more pleasant environment through cleaning out material that is not needed,screening,faade improvements,landscaping and other measures.Responsibilityproperty owners,Elyria-Swansea Business Association,CPD,Neighborhood Inspection ServicesTiming2004 Pr o vide detailed information on environmental conditions within the River North Area in the Technical Appendix. Update this inf ormation ann uall y and disseminate it to a variety ofinterested parties in order to expedite the predevelopment process by potentially reducing the due diligence time frame.ResponsibilityEnvir onmental Health, CPDTimingannually Pr o vide inf ormation on funding sources for cleaning up environmental contamination and pursue funding for cleanup ofpublic sites and to obtain better information on the extent ofcontamination.ResponsibilityEnvir onmental Health,MOED-ITTiming2003 and ongoingCleaning up properties will improve the Brighton Boulevard image

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93 RIVER NORTH PLANBRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40THAND 40TH TODwLEGACIESPreserve some ofthe older homes,some ofthe industrial buildings (especially the Drive Train faade,the Rock Drill building,and others),and some commercial buildings in order to represent the historical mix ofuses that have occurred over time.Responsibilityproperty owners and developersTimingongoing Undertake a study ofwhich buildings contribute the most based on their historic uses or structural type.ResponsibilityCPDTiming2004 2005 Enhance the South Platte Ri v er as a na tur al ar ea.ResponsibilityParks and Recreation,Greenway FoundationT iming2004 2006The former Rock Drill building and site are being redeveloped into condominiums The South Platte River retains a natural feel and should be more accessible for recreation

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94 IMPLEMENTATIONBLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:wHOUSINGConcentrate new housing in the Denargo Market area,along the South Platte River,and in the vicinity ofthe proposed 40th and 40th station.Residential in other locations including along Brighton Boulevard,especially artists studios,may be appropriate.Encourage the inclusion ofa variety oftypes,prices and sizes in order to accommodate a broad range ofhouseholds including households who work within the Plans area.The Inclusionary Housing Ordinance requires housing developers to provide moderately priced units for those earning over 60% ofthe Area Median Family Income.However,resources need to be made available to develop housing f or households inc luding f amilies earning less than 60% and less than 50% ofthe Area Median Family Income. Make available Private Activity Bonds (PAB) from Denvers allocation to develop mixed-income,mixed-use de v elopments.Developers should seek 9% Low Income Housing Tax Credit allocations from the Colorado Housing and Finance A uthority and allocations from the r e gional TOD PAB Pool.Other resources,including CDBG and HOME funds,should be made available to projects that meet the needs described above.Determine the market for housing for those who are transit dependent especially for persons who have physical disabilities. Seek to include such units in a variety of projects and seek out funding to assist in the production or subsidization ofsuch units,especially near the 40th and 40th station.ResponsibilityCPD H&NDS,developers both for profit and nonprofitTimingongoingJPI apartments could provide a catalyst for more housing Adaptive re-use of old structures can create housing

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95 RIVER NORTH PLANBRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40THAND 40TH TODwCORRIDORSBrighton Boulevard CorridorBrighton Boulevard should be rebuilt using a 96 foot wide cross section.The illustrations on the following page depict the desired 96 foot cross section.The desired cross section assumes curb and gutter will be added on both sides.The parallel parking lane and sidewalk or amenity zone on the east side can be built as redevelopment occurs on land that is dedicated to the city.Prior to redevelopment,the possibility ofprotecting businesses that are in close proximity to the existing 80 foot right-of-way by squeezing down the lane widths to provide a clear zone ofat least 5 feet adjacent to the existing property line should be explored.Generally,at intersections bulb-outs should be included in order to reduce the crossing distances for pedestrians.At a later date ifthe uses change significantly,a raised median could be constructed and the lane widths reduced. However,any median improvements will need to address the effects ofstorm water overflow drainage from upper drainage areas.Funding could come from a variety ofsources including an improvement district,federal funds,a city bond issue,dedication ofright-of-way,Transportation Improvement Program (TIP),improvements undertaken at the time ofredevelopment,the Capital Improvements Program and others.Preliminary Design should be undertaken in the near future in order to make it possible for developers to be able to build their improvements within the Right-of-Way with a reasonable expectation that it will work upon completion ofthe rebuilding ofBrighton Boulevard.As Brighton Boulevard is reconstructed,all reasonable efforts should be made to mitig a te and minimize the impacts associated with any right-of-way take for the road.ResponsibilityPublic Works,Private Property OwnersTimingRegulation adopting the cross section immediately after adoption ofthe Plan by the Manag er ofPublic Works,pursue funding in 2003 and 2004 for the preliminary design and complete preliminary design in 2005,place the rebuilding ofBrighton Boulevard on lists of projects such as Capital Improvements and TIP,and pursue the formation ofa local improvement district in 2003 to 2005 Develop an access management plan to consolidate access points along Brighton Boulevard between 31st and 44th

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96 IMPLEMENTATIONBLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:Streets.ResponsibilityPublic WorksTimingprior to the final engineering ofBrighton Boulevard Establish development standards in rules and regulations and/or as part ofthe rezoning.For example,new development should be adjacent to the sidewalk.ResponsibilityCPDTiming2003 2004 Place utilities underground as appropriate and when funding becomes available.ResponsibilityXcel Energy,other utility companies,Public WorksTimingas redevelopment occurs and/or at the time that Brighton Boulevard is reconstructed After studying operational issues,place a stoplight in the vicinity of35th Street in order to improve the ability to safely cross the street.ResponsibilityPublic W orksTimingwhen traffic warrants it or when Brighton Boulevard is reconstructed,whichever comes earlier Brighton Boulevard at 38th Street as it looks today

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97 RIVER NORTH PLANBRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40THAND 40TH TODSouth Platte River Corridor (including Arkins Court and Ringsby Court)The basic cross section for Arkins Court should include a sidewalk,tree lawn,parking lane,two travel lanes,and curb and gutter.The sidewalk,tree lawn,and parking lane should be on the eastern side ofthe street.This new cross section may need to be officially recognized by the adoption ofa regulation by the Manager ofPublic Works.The classification ofthe street should be changed from a collector to a local street.Responsibilitydevelopers,Public Works,CPDTimingin sections as redevelopment is proposed or at the time a special improvement district is formed Close the portion ofArkins Court from 35th Street to 38th Street in order to increase the amount ofopen space and to make it possible for development between Chestnut Street and Arkins Court to be oriented directly to the river with access offofChestnut Street.Responsibilitydevelopers,Public Works,CPDTimingupon proposed redevelopment Expand open space along the South Platte River including the creation ofopen space in conjunction with providing opportunities to achieve water quality enhancements related to storm water drainage and in conjunction with new dev elopment. Identify specific locations and designs as part ofthe basin plans that are in process or that may be conducted in the future.R estor e and enhance the natural state ofthe South Platte River.ResponsibilityP arks and Recreation,Public Works,property owners,developersTimingongoing The convergence of Arkins and Chestnut shows how the closing of Arkins Court north of 35th could provide development opportunities

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98 IMPLEMENTATIONBLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:Ifthe five owners are interested in pursuing it,Perkins could be extended from 31st Street to 38th Street along the Burlington Northern railroad tracks to free up land along the South Platte River for development.Placing an unpaved path part way down the bank ofthe river should be explored as well as adding an attached sidewalk on the west side ofRingsby Court.Responsibilityproperty owners,Parks and RecreationTiming2003 2004 Consider adding a bridge for pedestrians and bicycles across the South Platte River between 31st and 38th Street.ResponsibilityParks and Recreation,Greenway FoundationTimingwhen major redevelopment occurs along Ringsby Court38th Street CorridorStudy the adequacy of38th Street to accommodate pedestrian and bike access under the RR tracks,to handle the future traffic especially the additional traffic anticipated from the opening ofa transit station in the vicinity of40th and 40th,and help connect the T OD area,which is divided by the railroad tracks.The I-70 East Corridor EIS process should address impacts to 38th Street associated with any reasonable transportation alternative (regardless which transportation mode) considered as part ofthe study.In particular,the impact associated with any reasonable transpor tation alternative on the intersection of38th Street,Walnut,and Marion should be addressed.The traffic study conducted in conjunction with this plan indicates that 38th Street will need to be widened to four lanes. Working closely with Denver,solutions to these issues should be considered in the EIS including a cross section for 38th Street as well as a plan for funding these improvements.ResponsibilityI-70 East Corridor EIS consultants; CDO T,R TD,City and County ofDenverT iming2003 to 2006Storm water flowing into the South Platte River can create opportunities for more open space and amenities 38th Street will likely need significant improvements, such as curbs, gutters and sidewalks

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99 RIVER NORTH PLANBRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40THAND 40TH TODwDISTRICTS40th and 40th Transit Oriented Development (TOD)The following actions are dependent on the FasTracks Vision Plan being approved by the voters.However,even ifFasTracks is not approved,a rail line from Union Station to DIA may be built within the next twenty years. Furthermore,even ifthe rail line is not pursued in the near future,the UP Inter-modal facility may relocate creating a significant development opportunity.Most ofthese actions are applicable under any ofthese scenarios but they will need to be revisited periodically depending on the timing ofevents. Develop a station area plan for the proposed 40th and 40th rapid transit station.Determine the best possible site for the rapid transit station that maximizes the opportunity for TOD and meets RTDs basic operational r equir ements for trains and buses.Explore circulator and shuttle systems for the surrounding neighborhoods and the Events District.Develop a unique design for the rail station and make the platform area a significant public space.ResponsibilityCPD,Public Works,RTD,property owners,Cole,Elyria and Swansea neighborhoodsTimingin conjunction with the EIS from 2003 to 2005 and undertake a district plan after the I-70 East Corridor EIS is completed to provide more details Develop an overall parking management plan that addresses the parking fee structure,opportunities for shared and str uctured parking,targeted users,entity responsible for parking management,and other issues that impact parking operations in the proposed 40th and 40th station area.ResponsibilityPublic W orks CPD ,R TD,property ownersT imingin conjunction with the station planThe vicinity of 40th Street and 40th Avenue, is a potential rapid transit station location

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100 IMPLEMENTATIONBLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:Provide improved pedestrian access to the proposed 40th and 40th station.Improve existing or construct new sidewalks on the following facilities:40th Avenue,39th Avenue,Blake Street,Walnut Street,and 38th Street.ResponsibilityPublic Works,RTD,property ownersTimingcompleted no later than the construction ofthe station and in conjunction with redevelopment prior to the completion ofthe station Improve 38th Street so that it operates more like a multi-modal street improvements should include wider sidewalks,a bike facility,and potential capacity improvements.In the event that the I-70 East Corridor EIS selected alternative necessitates an improvement to the railroad bridge over 38th Street,all ofthese improvements should be coordinated.ResponsibilityCity and County ofDenver,RTD,Union Pacific,property ownersTimingConduct preliminary design following the completion ofthe East Corridor EIS,2005 2006;construct improvements in 2008 or beyondDenar g o Mar ketDevelop a Master Plan for the Denargo Market area that includes an appropriate mix ofresidential,retail,and office development along with downtown serving businesses and explores the opportunity to develop a festival mark etplace.An appropriate combination ofcommercial mixed-use and residential mixed-use zoning should be identified.New heavy industrial uses are discouraged.The Master Plan would identify and respond conceptually to traffic and circulation,utilities especially storm water,environmental cleanup,and open space especially in relation to the South Platte River.Responsibilityproper ty o wner s, property owners consultants,CPD,Public Works,Parks and Recreation, Envir onmental HealthT iming2004 Initiate a rezoning consistent with the Master Plan.Responsibilityproper ty o wner s or cityTiming2005The Denargo Market area

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101 RIVER NORTH PLANBRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40THAND 40TH TODInitiate a process to establish a General Development Plan for this area that would address an appropriate street and circulation system,describe street cross sections,establish a mechanism to assure an appropriate mix ofuses, provide a general site plan including identifying the relation ofthe proposed development to the South Platte River, identify the location ofpublic and private open space,address in a common fashion the storm water detention and water quality issues,and address other infrastructure issues in a common manner.A specific right-of-way and cross section should be established for an extension ofDelgany Street connecting to Brighton Boulevard.Responsibilityproperty owners,CPD,Public WorksTiming2006 Develop specific design guidelines.This would address a variety ofissues including placement ofbuildings in relation to the street,setbacks and height.Limiting the height ofresidential buildings and other development along the South Platte River to no more than 55 feet should be addressed in the design guidelines.ResponsibilityCPD Urban DesignT iming2006 Explore options for financing infrastructure through special districts and other financing mechanisms.Explore the potential for establishing an urban renewal area and using Tax Increment Financing.ResponsibilityPublic Works,DURA,CPDTiming2006Events DistrictContinue working with the neighborhoods and businesses to enhance the existing events traffic management plan f or the Denver Coliseum and NWSS.ResponsibilityPublic W orks ,Theatres and Arenas,NWSST imingongoing Consider opportunities to work with the NWSS to pursue needed improvements and expansion based on its feasibility study.ResponsibilityNWSS City and County ofDenver,neighborhoods,and nearby businessesTiming2003 and ongoingThe Denargo Market Area's proximity to Downtown could lead to substantial new development

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102 BLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:IMPLEMENTATION

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103RIVER NORTH PLAN BRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40THAND 40TH TOD

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104IMPLEMENTATION BLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:

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105RIVER NORTH PLAN BRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40THAND 40TH TOD

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106 BLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:

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107 RIVER NORTH PLANBRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40THAND 40TH TOD lAPPENDIXl

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108 BLUEPRINT DENVER AREA OF CHANGE:APPENDIX: GLOSSARYwGLOSSARY OF TERMS AND ACRONYMSAdaptive Re-UseConversion ofa building to accommodate a new use,usually different than its original use.Attainable HousingOr affordable housing,including rental and ownership housing products priced such that residents in a market,and within a limited income-range,can afford them.Blueprint DenverDenvers integrated land use and transportation plan that was adopted as a supplement to Comprehensive Plan 2000BIDBusiness Improvement DistrictCBDCentral Business DistrictCDOTColorado Department ofTransportationCPDComm unity Planning and De v elopmentDestination UsesReal estate land uses and products that draw patrons and visitors from beyond the trade area and immediate neighborhood.DIADen v er International AirportDMAPDownto wn Multi-modal Access PlanDRCOGDenver Regional Council ofGovernmentsDURADen ver Urban Renewal AuthorityDUSDen v er Union Sta tionEISEnvironmental Impact StatementEmployment-SupportiveGener ally office or industrial products which house primary employment tenants and users.Products EPAUnited States Environmental Protection AgencyEventsActions (planning development,infrastructure) initiated by the private and/or public sector which have an impact on the rate and character ofdevelopment in a market area.FasT racks Vision PlanT he RTD plan to build-out the rapid transit system by asking the voters in 2004 to increase the .6% sales tax.Flex SpaceA building or facility that is designed to be flexible enough to accommodate (most frequently) either an industrial or office use .This type ofspace is generally characterized by large uninterrupted spaces and rarely more than one story.Freestanding RetailCommer cial retail tenants (uses) that occupy their own structure,rather than occupying space in a multi-tenant building.GDPGeneral Development PlanH&NDSHousing and Neighborhood Development ServicesInfill DevelopmentDevelopment or redevelopment that occurs within the built environmentrather than on vacant land on the fringe ofa city.Infill development happens most often in a citys central core,as well as in a metro area inner-ring suburbs.

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109 RIVER NORTH PLANBRIGHTON BOULEVARD/40THAND 40TH TOD ITSIntelligent Transportation SystemsLOSTraffic level ofserviceLow-IntensityIndustrial product types with limited outdoor storage or emitting conditions that could potentiallyIndustrialimpact surrounding or adjacent land uses.LRTLight Rail TransitMISMajor Investment StudyMixed-UseMore than one land use either verticallyor horizontally-integrated into the same project.MOED/ITMayors Office ofEconomic Development and International TradeNeighborhood-Serving Commercial retail centers with tenants who cater to the needs ofarea residentsCenters(which travel there by foot,bike,vehicle or public transportation).NWSSNational Western Stock ShowOwner-OccupiedA building that is owned and occupied by the same individual or entity.Facilities PedestrianA neighborhood or commercial area designed to facilitate pedestrian movement and accomplishedEnvironmentsthrough both the physical realm and business climate.Plan 2000The Denver Comprehensive Plan,2000ProductsReal estate product types in the general land use categories ofresidential,retail,office,industrial and lodging.For example, whereas residential is a land use category,townhomes and condominiums are products.PWPublic WorksRTDRe gional Tr anspor tation DistrictTODTransit-Oriented DevelopmentT rade AreaT hat area ofgeography within which a project will compete with other similar developments and from which the project will draw the majority ofits users,residents or tenants.vpdtr affic volumes per dayZoning Acronyms:PUDPlanned Unit De velopmentI-1 and I-2Industrial zone districtsCMU 10 and 20Commercial Mixed-Use zone districtsRMU 20 and 30Residential Mixed-Use zone districtsTMUT ransit Mixed-Use zone districts

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110 APPENDIX: GUIDING PRINCIPLES FROM BLUEPRINT DENVERBL UEPRINT DENVER AREA OF C HANGE:Every project or plan needing City approval be it a small area plan,rezoning or site development plan is expected to contrib ute to achieving the Blueprint Denver vision for land use and transportation and the overall Plan 2000 vision ofsustaining Denvers quality oflife.These guiding principles summarize the fundamental concepts ofBlueprint Denver.The overall concept ofBlueprint Denver implementation is to create as many effective tools as possible at the city-wide level.Similar problems should have similar solutions regardless ofthe location.Small area plans will be the primary mechanism for compiling a set of implementation strategies tailored to the specific conditions and vision ofan ar ea. T his will all take time Many questions have arisen about the effectiveness ofBlueprint Denver between the time ofadoption and implementation.Projects will surface that need an immediate response from the City and citizens in the affected neighborhood.The concepts in Blueprint Denver provide considerable guidance for projects and situations that arise during this period between plan adoption and implementation.The following are guiding principles to achieve the land use and transpor tation vision ofBlueprint Denver and Denver Comprehensi v e Plan 2000.Areas ofStabilityw R espect valued de velopment patterns w Relationship ofthe building to the street w Location ofgarage,driveway,and parking w Front yard landscaping w Building scale w Roofshape w Durability ofmaterials w Respect valued attributes ofarea w Diversity ofhousing types and prices w Neighborhood-serving retail and services w Existing buildings,especially those adding distinctive c haracter and identity w Matur e landsca ping w Existing circulation (streets,alleys,sidewalks) w Significant views from public places w Parks and parkways w Respect adjoining property w Light, air and pri v acy w F encing w Orientation to the street w Alignment ofbuildings along street w Night lighting w Expand transportation choice w Pedestrian safety and comfort w Access to transit w Str eet system contin uity w Minimiz e traffic impacts on neighborhood streets w Lo w er traffic speed w Less cut-through tr affic w Not solving one problem only to crea te another w Respect environmental quality w Tree canopy w Permeable open space w Parks and parkways wGUIDING PRINCIPLES FOR AREAS OF STABILITY AND CHANGE

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111 RIVER NORTH PLANBRIGHT ON B OULEVARD/40THAND 40TH T ODAreas ofChangew Contribute to urban design vision w Orientation to the street w Alignment ofbuildings along street w Location ofgarage,driveway,and parking w Front yard landscaping w Building scale w Roofshape w Durability ofmaterials w T ransition to adjacent areas ,especially Areas ofStability w Respect valued attributes ofarea w Existing buildings,especially those adding distinctive c har acter and identity w Economic generators w Diversity ofhousing types and prices w Mature landscaping w Significant views from public places w P arks and par kw a ys w Contribute to economic vision w Balance ofuses w Tr ansportation access w Economic opportunity w Expand transportation choice w Pedestrian/bicyclist safety and comfort w Links between modes (pedestrian, bicycle,transit) w Access to tr ansit w Str eet system continuity (str eets, alleys,sidewalks,bikeways) w Tr ansit rider ship w Shared parking solutions w Improve environmental quality w Tr ee canopy w Permeable open space w Parks and parkways w Site lighting w Noise,vibration,and odor mitigation

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112 APPENDIX: PLAN 2000 POLICIESBL UEPRINT DENVER AREA OF C HANGE:All neighborhood and small area plans are expected to comply with the citywide policies contained in Denvers Comprehensive Plan 2000 and Blueprint Denver:An Integrated Land Use and Transportation Plan.The Brighton Plan is the first small area plan pursued since the adoption ofBlueprint Denver.The Brighton Plan implements the following policies from the Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000:Comm unica tion and P artnershipsw Engage property owners,businesses and organizations (business and neighborhood) in collabor ative efforts to share information,explore creative ideas and plan for the future.Land Use and Transportationw Encour age a mixture ofuses that assure the availability of services and amenities for the surrounding neighborhood. w Mixed-use and residential developments should be wellser ved by public transportation and should be in close proximity to employment centers,amenities and retail. w Acti vity areas should provide housing as one ofthe mixtur e ofuses so as to pr o vide the population base to support non-residential activities and minimize growth in auto use,air quality,and energy use. w Impr ove access to employment and activity centers in a manner consistent with commitments to provide a full r ang e oftravel modes and to protect living quality and promote good urban design. w Land use patter ns and zoning must support effective public rapid transit,an efficient roadway system and alternative transportation modes. w It is incumbent upon an applicant proposing a zone change to demonstr ate consistency with the Brighton Plan and to be aware ofany non-conforming uses or structures that may result from a zoning change.Transit,Mobility and Parkingw Side w alks and facilities for pedestrians ar e integral components ofthe transportation system.New roads and transit facilities must be designed to include pedestrian facilities and when existing arterials are reconstructed they should be furnished with sidewalks and pedestrian access to neighborhoods w Encour ag e the shared and str uctur ed parking where ver possible. w Local streets not designated as collectors must serve neighborhood purposes and through traffic m ust be diverted from these streets whenever possible. w Provide safe and convenient access to existing businesses and new de velopments.Urban Designw Develop and maintain a well-designed urban environment, pr omoting the use ofdesigns and materials that reflect the communitys unique industrial character. wCOMPREHENSIVE PLAN 2000 POLICIES

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113 RIVER NORTH PLANBRIGHT ON B OULEVARD/40THAND 40TH T ODw All projects must be built to the highest urban design standards .New facilities must make a positive design contribution to the neighborhood and include facilities for bicycles,sidewalks,trees,medians,lighting,and other highquality physical design features. w The location and design ofpublic facilities and utilities, including utility rights of way,should be subject to design review to encourage compatibility with surrounding residential areas.Housingw Encourage and attract a mix ofhousing type,for sale and rental units and accommoda te a mix ofincomes. w Encourage the preservation and modernization ofexisting housing stoc k in adjacent,established neighborhoods and prevent the encroachment ofnew development into adjacent residential areas. w Improvements in the condition ofdwelling units and nonresidential b uildings to bring them into conformance with code r equir ements should be enf orced to impr o ve living conditions and remove blighting influences from neighborhoods.Economic Activityw Existing businesses should be r etained and supported with a ppropriate access and parking. w Economic de v elopment pr o g rams should emphasize r etention and expansion of e xisting businesses as well as attracting new businesses. w Commercial development must be compatible in operation and design with r edev elopment. w Off-street parking facilities should be landscaped,designed and located in a manner tha t minimizes disruption and inconvenience to adjacent residential properties and streets. w Deteriorated and declining businesses should be revitalized b y rehabilitation or replacement with more appropriate uses. w Adjacent residential areas should be protected from the acti vities ofshopping areas by adequate buffering and by ensuring adequate off-street parking and circulation is provided. w Strip commercial and big box development in new areas should be discour aged. w Streetscaping and street amenities should be installed in new commer cial areas.Neighborhoodsw Transitions to existing w The character ofstable residential neighborhoods should be preser ved.Requests for rezonings on the periphery of stable residential neighborhoods must be evaluated to ensure that long-term stability is not threatened and the rezoning is compatible.

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114 APPENDIX: METHODOLOGYBL UEPRINT DENVER AREA OF C HANGE:Market AnalysisIn completing the market analysis for the Brighton Corridor, Leland Consulting Group obtained and analyzed secondary market and economic information to supplement primary data obtained through meetings and interviews with city staff,local real estate professionals,property owners,project managers and other experts on local and r e gional market conditions.Summary conclusions from this work are discussed in the pages which follow.The detailed market report is presented in the appendix. The content ofthe detailed market report includes:a review of market supply conditions,demand estimates for select land uses, identification ofeventswhich could potentially impact redevelopment in the corridor,and summary findings from financial analyses ofpotential new development and redevelopment projects.Looking to the experience ofsimilar markets within the Denver metropolitan area which have re vitaliz ed over the past decade,as well as the vision for Brighton Boule v ard e xpressed in Blueprint Denver,principle future land uses identified for analysis included:housing,commercial retail, commercial office,and industrial space.Supply ConditionsThe analysis ofsupply conditions for each ofthe land uses included a review ofthe current operating performance ofrental housing projects,for-sale attached projects (both new construction and redevelopment),neighborhood-serving retail including grocery stor es,as well as office and industrial projects.Additional consideration was given to known planned and under construction projects and their potential impact on future supply conditions.Demand AnalysisThe presence and performance ofprojects within these competitive locations provided direction for identification ofthe trade area from which the Brighton Corridor would compete for new development.Other factors which influenced the trade area definition included the presence ofphysical and psychological bar riers (both real and perceived),consumer spending patterns, historical de v elopment trends,and preliminary demographic profile information.Given the range ofland uses analyzed,and complexity ofmarket forces,which affect investment decisions,a different trade area was identified for each product type.Upon identification ofthe trade areas,demand analyses were completed for each land use for the years 2002 to 2022.A description ofthe methodolo g y used for these land use or product types is described as f ollows .R esidential:Futur e demand for housing is dri v en by an incr ease in the population base among income-qualified households already e xisting in the market or trade area.Specifically,growth in total households in the trade area are adjusted to that portion of households whose income level would be sufficient to afford housing at various payment levels.These income-qualified households are then further reduced to those who would most likely be attracted to select housing products to arrive at potential household-generated demand for new rental and ownership units. wMETHODOLOGY

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115 RIVER NORTH PLANBRIGHT ON B OULEVARD/40THAND 40TH T ODRetail:Demand for new commercial development is estimated two ways by analyzing current consumer expenditures by trade area residents and growing these figures by a factor equivalent to household growth;and,identifying the total square feet current expenditures can support and comparing these estimates to the existing amount ofcommercial square footage in the trade area.In addition to support from new households,trade area resident expenditures support a greater amount ofcommercial space than exists in an area when residents make a significant portion of consumer purchases outside the trade area.This represents an opportunity for new development to accommodate this demand. F or the purpose ofthis analysis,demand for commercial space was primarily based on growth in new households within the trade area.Of fice:Demand for office and industrial space is primarily based on g ro wth in new jobs across select industry groups and turnover in the market.In the detailed market analysis,employment growth forecasts from the Denver Regional Council ofGovernments (DRCOG) were converted into an annual demand projection for new office and industrial space in the trade area.The conversion is based on the application ofpenetration rates,which effectively isola te support for specific products based on emplo yment category.The second source ofdemand for office and industrial development is due to turnover occurring in the market.To project demand from turnover,the analysis uses estimates of e xisting square f oota ge in the trade area multiplied by an annual turnover rate.Events MatrixExperience has pr ov en that new de v elopment and redevelopment in an infill sub-market or neighborhood can be significantly impacted by certain events,the result ofwhich is reflected in a bsor ption activity and value.Critical to interpreting the study areas future competitive position for development growth is an understanding ofthose potential eventswhich could impact the value,character and quantity of future land uses within the Brighton Corridor.Events which were identified include (1) introduction ofmajor improvement projects (infrastructure);(2) new development and redevelopment projects (development);and,(3) completion ofland use and capital planning documents (planning). Each event,depending on the type and its timing,was determined to have a positive,negative,or no impact on the percent oftrade area market share captured by land uses within the corridor.For the purpose ofthis analysis,infrastructure events were considered to have an impact when money has bee committed or construction had begun.Development events were considered to have a significant impact as they essentially served to prove-upthe market.Planning events were not considered to have any immediate impact in and ofitself.Finally it was assumed that regulatory c hang es would be made to accommodate the vision ofthe Plan. The detailed market analysis presents the baseline demand estimates prepared for each land use category,as well as adjusted estimated reflective ofthe potential impact ofthe identified events at select intervals over a twenty-year period.Financial AnalysisT he final analysis completed for the study included preparation of several development proformas designed to quantify the potential impact ofselect factors including land use mix,density,parking requirements and others,on the economic performance offuture projects (new development and redevelopment) in the corridor. T he results ofthis analysis informed the recommended elements of the implementation str a tegy and identified tools for re vitalization.Tr affic AnalysisThe following documents the methodology used for the traffic anal ysis for the plan. Methodolo gy for data collection,traffic forecasting,and level-of-service analysis are described.Additional detailed inf ormation is included in the Technical Appendix that is a separate document not to be adopted with the plan.

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116 APPENDIX: METHODOLOGYBL UEPRINT DENVER AREA OF C HANGE:Data CollectionTraffic counts were collected from existing sources and out in the field.Historical 24-hour traffic counts were collected from the City Traffic Engineering Department.These counts were focused on Brighton, York and 38th Street dating from 1990 to 2000. Additional counts from the 40th Avenue Corridor Infrastructure Improvement Study (2002) were utilized for 40th Avenue east of F ranklin Street. Ne w 24-hour and intersection turn movement counts were taken at several intersections including: w Brighton / 29th w Brighton / 31st w Brighton / 38th w Brighton / 44th w Brighton/I-70 Interchange (north and south ramps) w Blake / Downing w 38th / Walnut / Marion w Walnut / Franklin w 40th / F r anklin Da ta from the Den ver Regional Council ofGovernments (DR COG) r e gional model were collected.This information included population and employment forecasts by traffic analysis zone (TAZ) for the study area,2025 traffic forecasts for the study area,and trip generation information for TAZs within the study area. Ad ditional data was collected on roadway geometry at key intersections within the study area as well as traffic signal timing information for existing signals within the study area.Traffic ForecastsTraffic forecasts were developed for 2025 using a variety of sources.Background traffic,or traffic growth that is expected to occur without new development or redevelopment was estimated based on historical growth rates using city traffic count information and traffic growth data from the DRCOG regional model. Land use forecasts (based on the market analysis described elsewhere) were used as the basis for the trip generation for new development and redevelopment.Traffic from new development and redevelopment within the study area was calculated using the Institute ofTransportation Engineers (ITE) Trip Generation Manual,6th Edition..The Manual provides rates that relate the amount ofdevelopment (square footage,number ofunits,etc.) to the number oftrips expected to travel to and from that development. New traffic from development within the study area was distrib uted based on existing traffic patterns in the study area and lo gical tr a vel patterns to and from major destinations outside of the study area. Based on the background growth (from historical and DRCOG data) and the anticipated study area development / redevelopment, both daily and peak hour volumes were calculated or future years. The resulting traffic growth ranged from 1.5% per year to 2.5% per year over various parts ofthe study area.Level of Service AnalysisUsing the data outlined a bo v e,existing and future year capacity analyses were conducted in the study area.These analyses were performed using nationally accepted methodologies outlined in the Transportation Research Boards Highway Capacity Manual (HCM). The analyses result in a level ofservice (LOS) that ranges from level ofservice A (minimal delay and conflicts) to level of service F (significant delays and congestion).The results ofthese anal yses are presented elsewhere in the Plan.

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117 RIVER NORTH PLANBRIGHT ON B OULEVARD/40THAND 40TH T ODStrengths:Location and Accessw Good location w Gateway to Downtown w Good external access I-70 and I-25;Downtown w Proximity to Downtown w Sta ging area for do wnto wnRecent infrastructure improvementsw Infrastructure improvements at two ends;BroadwayBrighton and Fir e Station creating a dumbbell effectExisting employment base and business climatew Existing and future new development across the tracks on Blak e/Walnut,etc. w J obs/Emplo yment Base w Broadband Cable Access w Business synerg y (i.e.wrecking yards are conveniently loca ted for businesses who obtain parts in them) w Diversity ofuses and eclectic character w A cool placeAmenitiesw River as an amenity w Historic Denarg o MarketWeaknesses:Internal circulation in the study area/traffic congestion problemsw Not pedestrian friendly no sidewalks w Bicycle access poor within study area and to Platte River trail w Dead-end r oads w Tr ain crossings lots ofsitting at cr ossings w Train tracks,Platte River,I-70 are barriers w Connections to future light rail station are poor. w Bottlenec ks at many loca tions so people avoid area especially: 40th/Blake/Lawrence/Downing 38th & Washington River/Ringsby Ct. Brighton & 38th Downing & 38th w Connectivity missing between 40th and Brighton,across railr oad tracks,and with surrounding neighborhoods w Congestion at MousetrapEnvironmental/aesthetic problemsw Envir onmental problems and odor s (Purina,National Byproducts),8" sewer line,River w Concr ete ba tc h plant w North Washington is a mess w Dirty railroads do not maintain land and it is a no mans land w Noisy trains,tractors,UP Intermodal,buses,and trucks wSTRENGTHS, WEAKNESSES, OPPORTUNITIES AND THREATS (SWOT)

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118 APPENDIX: SWOTBL UEPRINT DENVER AREA OF C HANGE:w Disorganized w Uses with outdoor storage w Amount ofcommercial truck traffic w National Western complex has the appearance ofbeing under used and blighted w Land within the 100 year flood plain (actually very little land is within the f lood plain)Right-of-way limitations and poor road conditionsw Limited right-of-way on Brighton Blvd. w Not enough parking for existing businesses to be able to widen Brighton w Poor road conditions (especially 40th Avenue) w Underpass at 38th StreetOther weaknessesw Coliseum losing events to the Pepsi Center w No g r ocery storeOpportunities:Land available for development and redevelopmentw River development w 550+ acres (but 130+ acres is for railroad uses) w Chea per land w V acant land including sizea ble assemblages w Underde v eloped and underutiliz ed land w Subar ea west of Ri v er access to riv er with potential for office and live/work units facing River w Stock ofhistoric and other buildings that can be sa v ed/reused w Potential move ofthe UP Intermodal facilityMarket opportunitiesw Commercial (neighborhood serving) for Downtown and g reater area around Brighton study area w Increase in market for retail based on an anticipated incr ease of 5000 more residents (assuming 20 to 60 dwelling units per acre) w Staging area for Downtown w Coliseum and National W estern Stock Show visitors and spinoffbusiness w Potential for rail station that is a major transfer between three lines w New businesses that want to have good access to both Do wntown and DIA w Good balance ofuses and opportunities for an even br oader spectrum ofuses w Gateway to DenverTransportation Improvementsw Improved access potentially provided by new rapid transit lines and enhanced bus ser vice w Potential transit lines and station and ability to serve Nor theast Den ver w R educed heavy train traffic and movement ofthe UP Inter modal f acilityAbility to create unique area where a variety of land uses co-existw Sensiti vity to existing uses and c haracter w Balance between industry and redevelopment make compatible w T he vision ofthe Brighton Small Area Plan w Denargo Market which reinforces the history ofthe area w Industrial businessesMiscellaneous opportunitiesw Purina and concrete batch plant moving (Are they moving or it w ould create an opportunity ifthey did?) w Still need rail to ser v e local businesses like P e psi

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119 RIVER NORTH PLANBRIGHT ON B OULEVARD/40THAND 40TH T ODThreats:Insufficient market demandw May not have enough people to support the commercial and g rocery store development for 10 or 15 years w People may be shifting to commercial areas at Stapleton for their shoppingEnvironmental problems will not be addressed and will inhibit redevelopmentw Environmental contamination w Problems and poor existing conditions w W idening I-70 will pa ve over everything w Spillover impacts (noise after hours,traffic) from new business uses to adjacent r esidential development ifmixeduse is allowed w Increased industrial usesTrafficw Brighton may become a Throughwaywith high speed traf fic betw een I-70 and Downtown (not just a Gateway) w Additional traffic may contribute to existing bottlenecks w hich could be exacerbated ifa RTD park-n-ride is located at the transit stationMajor improvements will not take place or not take place soon enoughw Length oftime for CDOT/R TD EIS without guidance for existing development w Rail to airport wont be built soon enoughPlans for Area will be ignoredw Not having a plan between Broadway/Brighton impr o vements and I-70 and Brighton intersections that have been improved -development will occur without the plan w EIS may ignore this PlanInfrastructure needs may be too costly or difficult to addressw Increased demand on city services and infrastructure w Difficulty ofimproving connectivity because ofproblems of crossing the r ailroad tracks as well as Rockies parking, Platte River and others w Cost ofproviding infrastructureRegulatory climate will not be appropriate to implement the planw Rezoning will too strictly limit uses w That residential will not be a part ofallowed uses in mixeduse areas and housing will be lost in the ar eaMiscellaneous threatsw Drainage issues and 4sewer line w Railroad yards remain w Economics and affordability