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Sheridan station area plan

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Title:
Sheridan station area plan
Creator:
Community Planning and Development, City and County of Denver
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
City and County of Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English

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Subjects / Keywords:
Transit oriented development
Public transit

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Full Text
Sheridan
DENVER
THE MILE HIGH CITY
Community
Planning &
Development
Adopted June 8,2009
Station Area Plan
i




Sheridan Station Area Plan
Table of Contents
Executive Summary i
Introduction 1
Vision and Goals 9
The Plan Concept 15
Land Use and Urban Design 16
Circulation and Mobility Plan 25
Parking 30
Economic Opportunity 32
Implementation and Next Steps 35
Supporting Documentation 43
The Community 44
Public Engagement 56
Relevant Plans 62
Acknowledgements
67




Sheridan Station Area Plan Executive Summary
i


Sheridan Station Area Plan Executive Summary
Introduction
The FasTracks transit corridors are a source of pride and ex-
citement for neighborhoods and businesses in Denver. Op-
portunities for changes to land use, design and mobility exist
at each new station. Through the planning process, commu-
nity members worked together with the station area planning
team to articulate these opportunities and craft strategies to
achieve the communitys vision.
The Sheridan light rail station will be located on RTDs West
Corridor light rail line in Takewood Gulch near the intersec-
tion of 12th Avenue and Sheridan Boulevard. The station
lies at the boundary between the City of Takewood and the
City and County of Denver. The West Corridor will link
Takewood and Jefferson County with Downtown Denver
and tie into the future FasTracks system of rapid transit cor-
ridors. The station platform is planned to be located under a
newly constructed Sheridan Boulevard bridge adjacent to an


Sheridan Station Area Plan Executive Summary
800 space park-n-Ride structure at 10th Avenue and Sheri-
dan. Both the new bridge and park-n-Ride will be built as
part of FasTracks.
The Sheridan Station Area Plan articulates near and long-term
goals, issues, and recommendations for the future. The plan
provides a guide to determine appropriate development, in-
cluding recommendations for land-use patterns, urban design,
circulation, and infrastructure. The Denver Comprehensive Plan
2000, Blueprint Denver, and other adopted city-wide plans form
the basis for recommendations contained in the Sheridan Station
Area Plan.
The Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000, Blueprint Denver, and other
adopted city-wide plans form the basis for recommendations contained
in the Sheridan Station Area Plan.
Vision and Goals
Transit-oriented development is a mix of uses at various
densities within a 10-minute walk, or about a half-mile, of a
transit stop. TOD integrates transit into neighborhoods and
creates lively and vital communities.
From discussions with the public and through a series of
meetings with the city and other constituents in the station
area, the following goals were established for the plan:
Create strong pedestrian connections between the
light rail station and Colfax Avenue along Sheridan
Boulevard.
Protect and enhance the existing residential
neighborhoods around the station by providing
infrastructure improvements and new uses
to increase the number of people living near the
station and support new convenience retail uses.
Incorporate Takewood Dry Gulch into the station
design and bring new uses to its edge that will
increase the number of people along the park and
create a safer park environment.
Create a safe and convenient pedestrian environ-
ment in the station area by improving access along
and across Sheridan Boulevard from 6th Avenue to
17th Avenue.
Develop a station identity that reflects the best
aspects of the surrounding neighborhoods and the
Takewood Dry Gulch amenity.
Provide pedestrian-priority solutions that increase
safety at key streets and intersections.
These goals formed the basis of the specific land use con-
cepts and recommendations of the plan.
Illustrative concepts were used to convey the vision and goals as they
apply to the plan area.


Sheridan Station Area Plan Executive Summary
The Plan: Land Use and Urban Design
The future land use plan for the Sheridan Station was devel-
oped with the community at two public workshops. The plan
includes the following priorities:
Colfax Avenue: the Sheridan Station Area should
support redevelopment of Colfax Avenue.
Takewood Dry Gulch: Takewood Dry Gulch is the
main amenity of the area: new uses should front
onto the gulch to increase access and visibility.
Sheridan Boulevard from 6th Avenue to
17th Avenue: Sheridan Boulevard is the main north/
south connector for both pedestrians and vehicles.
10th Avenue and Sheridan park-n-Ride facility: the
new park-n-Ride facility provides an opportunity
to create a linkage between development and
the station.
Mixed income and market rate housing:
new housing developed in the station area needs to
include a mix of housing types and incomes.
Coordination: close coordination with the City of
Takewood in planning for future development and
infrastructure improvements.
The Plan: Circulation and Mobility
The circulation plan identifies the key connections for
vehicles, pedestrians and bicycles throughout the station area.
Streets that should be priorities for pedestrian improvements
include:
Sheridan Boulevard, the key north/south arterial.
Colfax Avenue, the primary east/west arterial.
10th and 14th Avenues, the main east/west collector
streets around the station.
Other key elements of the circulation plan:
Creation of a continuous 11th Avenue on the south
side of Takewood Gulch and 12th Avenue on the
north side of Takewood Gulch on the east side of
Sheridan to improve park access and visibility and to
help organize development.
A new intersection and 13th Avenue connection at
Sheridan Boulevard to provide safer and more direct
access to the neighborhoods.
The land use and urban design section of the plan contains descriptions and images of the type of TOD appropriate for the Sheridan Station
IV


Sheridan Station Area Plan Executive Summary
Section #1-1 Oth Avenue Mixed Use Cross Section
Cross sections are shown to reflect existing
lane-width standards of the Denver Fire
Department and Public Works. These stan-
dards may change prior to implementation
as a result of future discussions concerning
multi-modal design goals identified
in Blueprint Denver and the Strategic
Transportation Plan.
68'ROW
Illustrative cross sections tied to section lines on the concept plan map show how streets and buildings will interact
V


Sheridan Station Area Plan Executive Summary
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Sheridan Land Use and Urban Design Concept
Proposed Land Use
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Existing Plans and Zoning
Area Features
Mixed Use Lakewood Station Plan V\£st Corridor Light Rail Line
Light Rail Station
Station Residential m Existing Main Street Zoning MS-1 Denver / Lakewood Boundary
Townhouse Residential Existing Main Street Zoning MS-2 RTD Parking Structure
Parks, Open Space and Drainageways m Existing Main Street Zoning MS-3 Active building st neet frontage Section Lines
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DENVER
VI


Sheridan Station Area Plan Executive Summary
Proposed Land Use
Mixed Use
Station Residential
Townhouse Residential
Parks, Open Space
and Drainageways
Sheridan Circulation Concept
ir
Existing Plans and Zoning

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m
IZ3
Lakewood Station Plan
Existing Main Street Zoning
MS-1
Existing Main Street Zoning
MS-2
Existing Main Street Zoning
MS-3
Area Features
DENVER
V\£st Corridor Light Rail Line
Light Rail Station
Pedestrian Imp rovements
Major arterial
Pedestrian Priority Street
Collector
Denver / Lakewood Boundary
New Local Street or Connection
Recreational Tail / BikeWiy
Pedestrian Bridge
Signalized Intersection
^ RTD Parking Structure
KD-
Bus Routes
On-street bike routes
VII


Sheridan Station Area Plan Executive Summary
Implementation and Next Steps
The implementation plan for the Sheridan Station is in-
tended to lay out the framework to enable development and
infrastructure consistent with the plan. The Sheridan imple-
mentation plan covers a series of actions:
Specific recommendations
Strategies for implementation
Implementation timing
Citywide TOD implementation evaluation
Specific recommendations are listed in tables in the implemen-
tation section.
The most immediate steps include plan adoption followed by
rezonings that provide the regulatory framework to implement
the recommendations. Rezonings should occur within the
context and timeframe of Denvers zoning code update. It is
anticipated that new zone districts will be available under the
updated code that will be suited to the unique development
character of station areas.
Another immediate step includes the scoping of infrastruc-
ture projects and the identification of potential funding
sources to implement the infrastructure needed in the station
area. These infrastructure improvements should be pursued
through both public-private partnerships between the city,
businesses, landowners and the development community as
well as public-public partnerships between local, regional,
state and federal agencies.
Improving the pedestrian environment along Sheridan Boulevard is a
top priority for implementing the plan vision
First Tier Implementation Recommendations
and Timing
It is important for the city to make the Sheridan Station
development ready. Development ready includes:
Getting new zoning in place
Identifying an implementation toolbox both
financial and regulatory
Putting in place the partnerships with other City
departments, Takewood, CDOT and RTD
Moving forward with a jointly lead and defined
project for the park-n-Ride with RTD, the City of
Denver and private and public input.
Timeframe: Short -now to mid 2013 (opening of
West Corridor)
VIII


Sheridan Station Area Plan Introduction
1


Sheridan Station Area Plan Introduction
The West Corridor and Sheridan Station
The Sheridan Station is one of 57 new transit stations to be
added as part of the FasTracks program, and one of 11 on
the West Corridor Light Rail project. The Sheridan Sta-
tion is located at approximately 12th Avenue and Sheridan
Boulevard along Lakewood Gulch. With the exception of a
few areas, Sheridan Boulevard forms the boundary between
the city and County of Denver and the City of Lakewood in
Jefferson County. The light rail line will pass under Sheridan
Boulevard and the station platform will be located directly
beneath Sheridan with access to the platform from each side
of Sheridan.
The station area extends from approximately 8th Avenue
to Colfax Avenue along Sheridan Boulevard. The station is
one of four stations in Denver on the West Corridor Light
Rail line. The area has been identified by the Denver Transit-
Oriented Development Strategic Plan as an urban neighbor-
hood station, with residential and local-serving retail uses.
Northwest
Corridor
US36BRT
Corridor
North Metro
Corrfdor
East
Corridor
Southeast
Corridor
Final alignment and technology
to be determined during the
environmental study process
The Sheridan Station is one of 11 new stations being constructed as part of the West Corridor. The West Corridor light rail will connect west Denver
neighborhoods with employment centers in Jefferson County, downtown Denver and the FasTracks corridors Unking the entire region.
2


Sheridan Station Area Plan Introduction
Purpose of the Plan
The Sheridan Station Area Plan articulates near and long-
term goals, issues, and recommendations for future develop-
ment. The plan provides a guide to determine appropriate
development, including recommendations for land-use pat-
terns, urban design, circulation, and infrastructure. The Den-
ver Comprehensive Plan 2000, Blueprint Denver, and other adopted
city-wide plans such as the Pedestrian Master Plan and parks
Game Plan form the basis for recommendations contained in
the Sheridan Station Area Plan. The plan also examined the ad-
opted West Colfax Plan and Villa Park Neighborhood Plans. Once
adopted, the Sheridan Station Area Plan will serve as a supple-
ment to the Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000. The plan is not an
official zoning map, nor does it create or deny any rights.
Property owners, elected officials, neighborhood organiza-
tions and city departments will use the Sheridan Station Area
Plan for many purposes over its lifespan. The following is
a description of the primary uses of the plan ranging from
general goals to implementation.
Data Resource: The plan offers data on existing
conditions for the planning area in an easy-to-
reference document.
planning area over the coming years as it relates to
land use, urban design and mobility.
Zoning Amendments: The plan does not convey or
deny any zoning entitlement but is an essential
evaluation tool used in proposed zoning changes.
Capital Improvements: A plan can provide the
justification for the allocation of funding from the
citys capital improvement budget and other sources.
Funding and Partnership Opportunities:
Implementation of plans requires a collaborative
effort between neighborhoods, businesses, elected
officials, city departments and neighboring
jurisdictions. This plan identifies and supports
partnerships and resource leveraging efforts.
Reference for Target City-Wide Plans: The station
area plan may include analysis that can inform other
larger city-wide plans. The analysis and recommen-
dations included here should be considered in the
future development of the StrategicParkingPlan and
updates to Blueprint Denver.
The Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000, Blueprint Denver, and other
adopted city-wide plans form the basis for recommendations contained
in the Sheridan Station Area Plan.
Blueprint
Denver
Land tsse find
Reinvestment Guidance: The plan guides public and
private decisionmaking and investment in the
3


Sheridan Station Area Plan Introduction
Plan Process
Station Area Context
The planning, design, construction and opening of the
expanded FasTracks transit corridors are a source of pride
and excitement for neighborhoods and businesses in Denver.
Opportunities for changes to land use, design and mobility
exist at each new station in Denver. Over a course of ap-
proximately eighteen months, community members worked
together with city staff and the station area planning team
to articulate these opportunities, develop a vision and craft
strategies to achieve the vision.
These community members represented businesses, devel-
opers and residents in the area. The planning area (within
Council Districts 1 and 3) contains part of the Villa Park
and West Colfax neighborhoods. In addition, the process
involved collaboration between the City and County of
Denver, RTD and the City of Takewood. Regular public
meetings shaped plan contents and concepts were reviewed
before City Council, agency staff and the Denver Planning
Board. The overall process included the following steps:
Existing conditions analysis
Draft vision and key objectives
Identify opportunities and constraints
Public visioning workshop
Develop and analyze plan alternatives
Technical review of plan concepts
Alternative concepts public workshop
Develop preferred plan alternative with public input
Draft station area concept plan
Public open house to present draft station area plan
Plan refinements
Planning Board review and approval
Plan adoption by City Council
The Sheridan Station Area includes portions of the West Col-
fax and Villa Park neighborhoods in Denver and the Molholm
neighborhood in Takewood. The Takewood portion of the
station area has been addressed in the Sheridan Boulevard Station
Area Plan, adopted by the City of Takewood in November of
2006. All references to the station area in this plan refer to the
area located within the City and County of Denver within 1/2
mile of the station, unless otherwise noted.
Existing Land Use and Zoning
The current residential land use in the Sheridan Station Area is
a mixture of single-family and low-rise multi-family residential
with some higher-density apartment buildings. Approximately
86 percent of the land area is zoned R-2, R-2-A, R-3 or R-4.
These zone districts all allow multi-unit dwellings. Only about
12 percent of the 1/2 mile station area is zoned for com-
mercial or main street commercial mixed-use development
-concentrated along Colfax Avenue and the intersection of
10th Avenue and Sheridan.
0


Land Use by Parcel
Office
HI Retail
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Industrial
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Surface Parking
Parking structure
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Lipht Rail Station
Buffer of Station
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$ Light Rail Alignment
Co inly Boundary
City of Lakewood
: Jefferson County
Sheridan Station Area Existing Land Use
4


Sheridan Station Area Plan Introduction
Population and Housing
According to 2008 data from the City and County of Den-
ver, the station area within Denver contains 2,068 housing
units with a population of 5,368 residents. The average
household size was 3.09 persons per household. The station
area average household income of $40,619 is slightly lower
than the city-wide average of $49,373. The average sales
price for single family homes in the station area was $185,397
in 2006; for condominiums it was $127,500.
Retail and Commercial
Neighborhood services, such as grocery stores and other
retail services, are limited within the station area. The closest
major grocery and department store shopping is located in
the City of Edgewater at 18th Avenue and Sheridan Boule-
vard, approximately one mile from the station. Colfax Av-
enue is a historic commercial corridor that has been targeted
for retail development in the West Colfax Plan. Currently, West
Colfax Avenue has many auto-oriented retail uses and motels
but is envisioned to become an active, pedestrian shopping
environment. Strip retail is located on the southeast and
southwest corners of the 10th Avenue and Sheridan Boule-
vard intersection.
Schools and Public Facilities
Cowell Elementary School is located within the 1/2 mile
station area at 10th Avenue and Vrain Street. In addition,
the Beth Jacobs High School is located northeast of the the
proposed station at 14th Avenue, with a dormitory located
near the light rail station. Beth Jacobs High School is a private,
all-girls religious school.
No recreation facilities, libraries, fire stations, police stations,
or post offices are located with the 1/2 mile station area. St.
Anthonys Hospital is located approximately one-mile to the
northeast of the station. However, the hospital is closing in
mid-2010 and will be moving to a new facility at the Denver
Federal Center in Takewood. Efforts are underway to plan for
the redevelopment of the site.
Parks and Open Space
Takewood Gulch is the principal defining open space fea-
ture in the station area. It is considered an important rec-
reational amenity by the surrounding neighborhoods. Most
of the undeveloped area along the Takewood Dry Gulch is
owned by the City and County of Denver and will become
dedicated parkland following the completion of the West
Corridor project.
To the northwest of the station, Mountair Park in the City
of Takewood contains outdoor recreational facilities and
ball fields.
Lakewood Gulch is an important neighborhood amenity
5


Sheridan Station Area Plan Introduction
Transportation
The station area is dominated by Sheridan Boulevard (Colo-
rado State Highway 95), a five-lane regional arterial with a
continuous center turn-lane. The posted speed limit is 35
miles-per-hour. Sheridan Boulevard lacks sidewalks on one
or both sides of the street in many sections. Key signalized
intersections along Sheridan Boulevard include 10th Avenue,
14th Avenue and W Colfax Avenue. Colfax Avenue is also US
Highway 40 with a posted speed limit of 30 miles-per-hour.
The remaining streets surrounding the station area are gener-
ally built on the Denver grid system. However, along the edge
of Takewood Gulch, many streets do not connect and the
street grids are off-set creating difficult intersections. In addi-
tion, 13th Avenue does not connect between Sheridan Bou-
levard and Yates Street and between Vrain and Wolf streets
further to the east. Alleys provide vehicle and loading access to
most residential and commercial properties.
The station area includes three RTD bus routes:
Route 51 along Sheridan Boulevard
Routes 16 and 16T (limited) along West
Colfax Avenue
Route 9 along 10th Avenue
Station Area Bus Service 2006
Source: RTD 2006 Service Standards Analysis
Route Weekday Peak Frequency Total Boardings 2006
51 30 min 834,535
16 15 min 1,859,751
16L 15 min 629,175
9 30 min 323,677
Bus stops for route 51 include stops at 10th and Sheridan
and 12th and Sheridan. Bus stops in the station area are
marked by signs but many stops lack benches, shelter or
route and schedule information.
The Takewood Dry Gulch Trail, Denver bicycle route D-10,
is the primary off-street bicycle and pedestrian path in the vi-
cinity of the station. The east-west path parallels the railroad
line through the station area and will connect underneath
the new Sheridan Boulevard bridge being constructed as
part of the West Corridor light rail project. The Denver Bipcle
Master Plan Update (2001) recommends a future off-street trail
connection along Takewood Gulch to Martinez Park, located
southeast of the station at 9th and Raleigh Street. In addi-
There are many problems with the existing condition of Sheridan
Boulevard including poor pedestrian conditions.
6


Sheridan Station Area Plan Introduction
Sheridan Station Area Bicycle and Transit Routes
7


Sheridan Station Area Plan Introduction
tion, The D-12 bicycle route is an on-street bicycle route that
runs along 10th Avenue through the station area.
Most of the existing sidewalks in the station area are narrow
in width. Attached three-foot sidewalks predominate in most
of the residential and commercial areas. The Denver Pedestrian
Master Plan (2004) calls for a minimum 13-foot pedestrian
area along streets. The pedestrian area typically consists of
a five-foot detached sidewalk and an eight-foot tree lawn.
Along transit corridors and busy commercial streets, a mini-
mum 16 foot pedestrian zone is recommended.
With the exception of Sheridan Boulevard, most other
streets allow on-street parking. On-street parking is allowed
only during limited hours on Colfax Avenue. In addition,
most businesses and residential properties provide their own
off-street parking.
Sheridan Boulevard, showing a section with a 3'attached sidewalk.
8


Sheridan Station Area Plan Vision and Goals
9


Sheridan Station Area Plan Vision and Goals
Vision Statement
The Sheridan Station will develop over the coming decades
into the vibrant center of a diverse, transit-supportive and
economically sustainable urban neighborhood. Residents
of all ages, incomes and backgrounds will be drawn to the
convenience and amenities of this location.
Improved sidewalks will tie the light rail station with Main
Street development on Colfax Avenue a short distance to
the north. Development of new housing along Sheridan
Boulevard and Lakewood Gulch will allow more people to
live near the light rail connecting them to jobs in downtown
Denver and Lakewoods Federal Center. The increased
population base will support a variety of new neighborhood
retail services near the station and on Colfax Avenue includ-
ing food stores, dry cleaners, hardware stores, restaurants and
child care centers.
Sheridan Boulevard will be transformed by new development
and improvements coordinated between Denver, the City
of Lakewood and the Colorado Department of Transporta-
tion. Buildings on both sides of Sheridan will complement
the street and the transit station thanks to the close coordi-
nation and cooperation between the cities of Denver and
Lakewood. Pedestrian improvements on Sheridan will make
walking to the station easy and convenient from the neigh-
borhoods to the south and the north.
Improvements to the street grid along the edge of Lakewood
Gulch will allow new buildings to face the park and bring
more visibility and activity to this neighborhood amenity.
Parents will be able to watch their children play in the park
from their front windows, doors and balconies. People from
across Denver and Lakewood will use the parks regional
bicycle trail for both transportation and recreation.
10th Avenue will remain an important connection for
neighborhoods to the east and west, allowing residents to
conveniently walk or bicycle to the station. A new street con-
nection at 13th Avenue will also help to improve access to
Sheridan Boulevard for nearby residents.
New development will be high-quality and architecturally
interesting with ground floors and building entrances that
open onto the sidewalk, creating a feeling of inclusiveness
and activity. Buildings will be of a scale that helps create a
sense of enclosure and safety for pedestrians as they walk
to their destinations. More intense development will be
centered along Sheridan Boulevard, Colfax Avenue and the
Lakewood Gulch corridor, transitioning to quieter, interior
urban neighborhoods to the northwest and southwest of
the station.
The 800 space RTD park-n-Ride will be designed to en-
courage activity near the intersection of 10th and Sheridan.
Opportunities to integrate transit supportive and civic uses
with the parking structure will provide a catalyst for change
in the area.
Although this is a vision for the future, it shows what can
be achieved through coordinated change and investment in
transit. To achieve this vision, cooperation between Denver,
Lakewood and their regional partners will be necessary to
guide the incremental change. Creating a vision is an impor-
tant first step in identifying goals and methods to achieve
them. This vision should guide the future of the area and
direct positive change as it occurs over time.
Foundation of TOD Principles
Developing the communitys vision began with the under-
lying principles of transit-oriented development. Transit-
oriented development is a mix of uses at various densities
within a half-mile radius, or walking distance, of a transit
stop. TOD should create specific areas that integrate transit
into neighborhoods and help support lively, walkable and
vital communities.
The TOD Strategic Plan defines TOD in Denver and es-
tablishes strategies for implementation. In order to succeed,
TOD should address these five guiding principles.
Place-making: Create safe, comfortable, varied and
attractive station areas with a distinct identity.
10


Sheridan Station Area Plan Vision and Goals
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11


Sheridan Station Area Plan Vision and Goals
Rich Mix of Choices: Provide housing,
employment, transportation and shopping choices
for people of all ages, household types, incomes
and lifestyles.
Location Efficiency: Place homes, jobs, shopping,
entertainment, parks and other amenities close to
the station to promote walking, biking and
transit use.
Value Capture: Encourage all stakeholders
residents, business owners, RTD and the city to
take full economic advantage of the amenity
of enhanced transit services.
Portal to the Region: Understand and maximize
the stations role as an entry to the regional transit
network and as a safe pleasant and private place
to live.
Opportunities and Constraints
The Sheridan Station has excellent potential for future devel-
opment because of the strong existing neighborhood base in
the surrounding area, the proximity of Lakewood Dry Gulch
and the recreational and green space opportunities it brings,
the desirability of parcels close to the station for redevelop-
ment near the light rail line, beautiful views to the mountains
and downtown along Lakewood Dry Gulch, and consistent
access from both Sheridan Boulevard and Colfax Avenue.
The City of Lakewood has also planned and rezoned to
the west of the station area to allow for transit related uses
and higher density with the potential to spur development
around the station.
One of the biggest constraints in the study area is the condi-
tion of Sheridan Boulevard with its inadequate sidewalks
and heavy traffic flow. This street is currently a barrier to
pedestrians because of the limited opportunities to cross,
particularly near the station. While the new light rail station
location will help to solve some of these issues, the street
will remain a challenge for pedestrians. The changing condi-
tions highlight the need to create a safer pedestrian environ-
ment while preserving the functionality of the roadway for
through traffic.
Another constraint that currently exists is the limited oppor-
tunity for joint development with RTDs planned 800 space
parking structure. RTDs current enabling legislation limits
the types of uses that RTD can jointly develop on property
that it owns. This use restriction currently makes it difficult
to pursue mixed-use joint development on RTD property. A
change in state legislation would be required to make pos-
sible many of the mixed-use, joint development goals that
the plan identifies for the parking structure.
Community Needs and Desires
The community around the Sheridan Station includes an
active and involved group of citizens. The registered neigh-
borhood organizations include the Villa Park Neighborhood
Association and the Sloans Lake Citizens Group. They have
been involved in the West Colfax Area Plan, the St. Anthonys
Hospital Redevelopment Plan, the West Corridor Environmental
Impact Statement process, and the Main Street Zoning for
West Colfax Avenue. Because of these previous planning
efforts, many citizens are well informed and involved in land
use and planning issues in the neighborhood. Many of these
same citizens have attended the design workshops and focus
groups for the Sheridan Station. With this input, plans have
been developed that reflect the vision and desires of the
neighborhoods that surround the station.
Above, above right: The community played an active role in the planning
process.
12


Sheridan Station Area Plan Vision and Goals
Sheridan Station Goals
From discussions with the public and through a series of
meetings with the city and other constituents around the
station, the following goals were established to develop the
concept plan:
Create strong pedestrian connections between the
light rail station and Colfax Avenue along Sheridan
Boulevard.
Create a safe and convenient pedestrian environ-
ment in the station area by improving access along
and across Sheridan Boulevard from 6th Avenue to
17th Avenue and across Sheridan Boulevard.
Protect and enhance the existing residential
neighborhoods around the station by providing
infrastructure improvements.
Encourage new development near the station that
will increase the population base and support
neighborhood retail uses.
Incorporate Lakewood Dry Gulch into the station
design and bring new uses to its edge that will
increase the number of people along the park and
create a safer park environment.
Develop a station identity within the corridor that
reflects the surrounding neighborhoods.
Enhance pedestrian connections in all directions.
Provide pedestrian-priority solutions that increase
the safety at key streets and intersections.
Design solutions to provide eyes on the park
-more visibility of the park so park users feel safe.
Opportunities for new development should increase
housing supply and diversity and preserve affordable
housing stock in the area.
These goals form the basis for the land use, urban design
and mobility concepts presented in this plan. They also guide
the implementation recommendations intended to make the
plan vision a reality. These goals form the basis for the land
use, urban design and mobility concepts presented in this
plan. They also guide the implementation recommendations
intended to make the plan vision a reality.
13


Sheridan Station Area Plan Vision and Goals
14


Sheridan Station Area Plan -The Plan Concept
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15


Sheridan Station Area Plan The Plan Concept
Land Use and Urban Design
The land use plan for the Sheridan Station was developed
with the community at two public workshops with ad-
ditional input gathered through small group meetings and
stakeholder interviews. The plan reflects the desires of the
community and the goals for the project. The station area
should support commercial development along Colfax Av-
enue and use of the light rail by focusing denser residential
development opportunities in the station area. While Colfax
Avenue will be the focus, the highest densities near the sta-
tion are planned around the intersection of 10th Avenue and
Sheridan Boulevard. The separation of commercial uses on
Colfax Avenue from the station and the impact of Takewood
Dry Gulch on neighborhood connectivity both increase
the importance of rebuilding Sheridan Boulevard as a more
walkable and pedestrian friendly street. New residential
development should be placed along Takewood Dry Gulch,
with the highest densities along the gulch, transitioning to
lower densities adjacent to the interior neighborhoods.
The plan includes the following priorities:
Colfax Avenue: the Sheridan Station Area should
support the Colfax Avenue redevelopment.
Lakewood Dry Gulch: Lakewood Dry Gulch is the
main amenity of the area. New uses should front
onto the gulch.
Sheridan Boulevard from 6th Avenue to
17th Avenue: Sheridan Boulevard should be the
main north/south connector for both pedestrians
and vehicles and should support new residential and
mixed-use development.
10th Avenue and Sheridan park-n-Ride facility:
the new park-n-Ride facility provides an opportunity
to create a linkage between development and
the station.
Mixed income and market rate housing: the new
housing that is provided in the station area needs to
include a mix of housing types and incomes.
Close coordination with the City of Lakewood in
the development around the station and for
Sheridan Boulevard improvements.
The following pages contain descriptions of the land use
concept components. Section lines on the land use concept
map correspond to the street cross section views.
Land Use Plan Components
Mixed Use Development (4-7 Stories)
The mixed use areas contain the highest-intensity of use
and are located directly adjacent to the light rail station
focused around the intersection of 10th Avenue and Sheri-
dan Boulevard. The intent is to provide active ground-floor
uses, such as retail, and encourage higher density residential
or employment uses in the upper levels directly around the
station. South of Lakewood Gulch, mixed-use development
of 4-7 stories could develop from Sheridan Boulevard east to
Xavier Street. East of Xavier, lower density urban residential
is planned between Xavier and Wolff streets.
Station Residential (3-5 Stories)
Station residential uses are focused along the north side
of Lakewood Dry Gulch and will provide the eyes on the
park that were desired by the community. This area would
be residential without any retail or commercial uses on the
ground floors due to the location and limited frontage and
access for those types of uses.
Townhouse Residential (2-3 Stories)
The urban residential uses are intended to be a transition use
between the higher densities around the station and Lake-
wood Dry Gulch and the existing neighborhoods. These
uses should be predominantly townhouses with tuck-under
parking behind the units, or some other type of attached unit
with parking accessed from an alley.
16


Sheridan Station Area Plan -The Plan Concept
Existing Urban Neighborhood Areas
The areas outside the colored portions of the map should re-
tain their existing character as urban neighborhoods through
reinvestment. These urban neighborhood areas were defined
in the 2006 West Colfax Plan as consisting of a range of de-
velopment intensities with housing options appropriate for
a central city location including single-family houses, carriage
houses, duplexes, apartments, townhomes, row houses and
condominiums.
City of Lakewood Zoning
Through a separate planning process in 2006 and 2007, the
City of Lakewood developed a land use plan and new zoning
for property within their jurisdiction on the west side of Sheri-
dan. The Lakewood plan calls for higher density around the
station with their station core located at the southwest corner
of Sheridan Boulevard and 10th Avenue. Lakewood proposes
commercial uses along the west side of Sheridan, with me-
dium and lower density residential to the west to Depew Street
that transition in size and scale to the existing neighborhood.
Lakewood Dry Gulch
Lakewood Dry Gulch is the primary physical asset of the sta-
tion area and the community. It is currently open space owned
by the City and County of Denver and should be changed to
a city park designation once the West Corridor Line opens
in 2013. Improvements in the gulch should include trails and
additional landscape and pedestrian improvements such as
pedestrian crossings, signage, and lighting where required and
as identified in the Lakewood Dry Gulch Park Concept Plan. The
gulch is located at a low point in the station area, with slopes
to the north and south. This creates views of the mountains
and downtown from the perimeter of the gulch. Residen-
tial development along 11th and 12th Avenues should take
advantage of the topography and views provided by the gulch.
These streets will provide better access and visibility to this
currently hidden asset.
RTD Light Rail Station and park n-Ride
The new light rail station on the West Corridor will be
located between 11th Avenue and 12th Avenue, directly adja-
cent to the north side of Lakewood Dry Gulch. The station
platform will be below a new bridge at Sheridan Boulevard
(part of the FasTracks project). Access to the platform will
be located on each side of Sheridan via stairs and elevators.
A small plaza will be built with the station below the new
Sheridan Boulevard bridge. The parking structure for the
park-n-Ride will be located on the south side of Lakewood
Dry Gulch, west of Sheridan Boulevard and north of 10th
Avenue. The parking structure will be accessed from both
Sheridan Boulevard and 10th Avenue connecting to the light
rail platform under Sheridan Boulevard and will include
approximately 800 parking spaces. RTD is issuing an RFP
for a private partner in a joint development project that will
encourage ancillary development within the parking structure
that is within the constraints of RTDs enabling legislation.
Station-oriented convenience retail or a civic use is envi-
sioned along the first floor to wrap the parking structure
to promote street activity on 10th Avenue and Ames Street.
West Colfax Avenue
A plan for West Colfax Avenue was adopted by the Denver
City Council in 2006, followed by legislative rezoning of
parcels to Main Street zoning in 2007. The plan recom-
mends mixed-use development with buildings oriented to the
sidewalk. The intensity of the Main Street zoning categories
differ along Colfax Avenue through the station vicinity, with
the greatest intensity (MS-3) at the Colfax and Sheridan
intersection. The Colfax corridor should contain some of
the most intense retail and employment uses in the station
area, complementing potential new development opportuni-
ties directly adjacent to the station. Tying Colfax Avenue to
the station area will be of critical importance to support the
development goals of the plan.
17


Sheridan Station Area Plan The Plan Concept
Sheridan Land Use and Urban Design Concept
Proposed Land Use Existing Plans and Zoning Area Features
Mixed Use Station Residential m Lakewood Station Plan Existing Main Street Zoning MS-1 T V\£st Corridor Light Rail Line Light Rail Station Denver / Lakewood Boundary
Townhouse Residential Existing Main Street Zoning MS-2 o RTD Parking Structure
if > j-'j Parks, Open Space and Drainageways m Existing Main Street Zoning MS-3 Active building st reet frontage Section Lines w DENVER
18


Sheridan Station Area Plan -The Plan Concept
Section #1 10th Avenue Mixed Use Cross Section
Cross sections are shown to reflect existing
lane-width standards of the Denver Fire
Department and Public Works. These stan-
dards may change prior to implementation
as a result of future discussions concerning
multi-modal design goals identified
in Blueprint Denver and the Strategic
Transportation Plan.
68'ROW
19


Sheridan Station Area Plan The Plan Concept
60'ROW
Section #2 -11th Avenue Park Corridor Looking West
Cross sections are shown
to reflect existing lane-
width standards of the
Denver Fire Department
and Public Works. These
standards may change
prior to implementation
as a result of future
discussions concerning L-
multi-modal design goals
identified in Blueprint
Denver and the Strategic
Transportation Plan.
Cross sections are shown to reflect existing lane-width
standards of the Denver Fire Department and Public
Works. These standards may change prior to imple-
mentation as a result of future discussions concerning
multi-modal design goals identified in Blueprint Denver
and the Strategic Transportation Plan.
Section #3 Sheridan Cross Section
20


Sheridan Station Area Plan -The Plan Concept
Sheridan Station Area Development Summary
Note: The development program is based on a market analysis (BBPC Market Study 2007) and represents anticipated develop-
ment through the year 2030. The actual amount of development may be more or less than shown below. Future development
projections assume an average unit si2e of approximately 1,200 sf, average household si2e of approximately 3, and an average
of approximately 300 sf per employee and a residential vacancy rate of 5.7 percent.
Total Estimate
Residential square feet 3,223,500
Retail square feet 206,000
Offices square feet 215,000
Housing Units 2,550
Population 7,650
Employees 1,400
Transit-oriented development examples of a scale appropriate for the
Sheridan Station
21


Sheridan Station Area Plan The Plan Concept
Urban Design Plan Components
This section addresses the physical appearance and form
of station area development identified in the land use plan.
This perspective is drawn from street-level views of primary
streets in the station area. This section addresses how the
uses will physically fit together and within the larger neigh-
borhood to create a pedestrian-scaled environment for new
development around the station.
Build-To Lines and Set-Back Ranges
Build-to lines and set-back limits are tools that help address
the way buildings and front entrances connect to the side-
walk. The first-floor uses surrounding the intersection at 10th
Avenue and Sheridan are intended to be active retail or com-
mercial. This presence should include frontages and building
facades that extend to the right-of-way with minimal setbacks.
The frontages on 10th Avenue extending east and west of this
intersection should be similar in form to create a common
zone so that the buildings work together to define the street
space. Set-backs of ten feet or less are recommended on 10th
Avenue between Xavier and Sheridan, and between Sheridan
and the parking structure and mixed uses west of Sheridan.
These streets should include eight-foot tree lawns and five-
foot sidewalks or a continuous 13-foot sidewalk to create
desirable space for the pedestrian. Where the concept plan
calls for multiple-family residential uses, buildings should be
set-back between 0 and 12 feet from the street right-of-way.
The privately-owned set-back areas will be reserved for an
amenity zone, where building walk-ups, landscaping and patio
uses should be encouraged.
Parking
RTD will be constructing a large parking structure on the
northwest corner of 10th Avenue and Sheridan Boulevard
that will provide parking for users of the light rail system.
Surface parking and structures should be located behind
buildings along the 10th Avenue mixed use corridor. If a
parking garage is built along 10th Avenue, it should include
active ground floor uses and should adhere to the guidelines
set by the form and massing section. Architecture and wrap-
ping of the parking structure should hide the parking from
pedestrians on all street faces and the Lakewood Gulch.
Form and Massing
Form and massing refer to the overall bulk, shape, and
structure of a project or projects. The form and massing
of new development in the Sheridan Station Area should
relate to the existing scale of development on existing blocks
where they adjoin. When possible, architectural elements in
new buildings should complement and draw from positive
examples found in existing buildings in the immediate neigh-
borhood. The massing of buildings within the station area
should strive to create street-building proportions that create
a comfortably scaled pedestrian environment. In general, the
proportion of street width to building height should be 3:2.
This ratio will help to create a section that encloses the pub-
lic space and gives it a human scale. Below is the suggested
street width to building height proportion for prominent
streets within the conceptual plan. Notice that as the street
width increases the building height grows.
Access to sunlight along 10th Avenue will help to create an
inviting urban environment, especially in the short days of
winter. One option to help the larger buildings fit into the
neighborhood is to step back or vary upper stories above
the 53 recommended building height. These step backs and
variations will help ensure that the street and surrounding
uses receive natural light.
Recommended
Building Height
Street Street Width to Cornice
10th Avenue between 80' 53'
Xavier and Benton
Ames Street Between 60' 40'
Dry Gulch and 10th
Zenobia between Colfax 60' 40
and 12th Avenue
Yates between 11th and 12th 60' 40'
Differences in massing and form create a hierarchal order in
which more important streets in the development have taller
structures and a slightly wider right-of-way. Priority streets
such as 10th Avenue within the concept plan should strive
to create an urban environment that provides the pedestrian
with a sense of place and activity. The smaller widths for
ROWs and elements such as private landscaping, porches
22


Sheridan Station Area Plan -The Plan Concept
and stoops in residential areas notify the pedestrian of a less
active place with a more residential character.
Active Edges
The intent of this plan is to create a seamless connection to
the neighborhoodto enliven, complement and relate to the
neighborhood. North of Lakewood Gulch, Yates and 13th
Avenue serve as the transitional streets between the proposed
town homes of 2-3 stories and the existing single-family
neighborhoods. South of the gulch, 10th Avenue and Zenobia
Street form the edge of the proposed station redevelopment.
It is important that the urban form and architecture of new
residential development does not turn its back on the exist-
ing single-family residential, and that the scale responds to
the existing street scale. To ensure opportunities for active,
ground-floor uses such as retail, ground floor ceiling heights
in new buildings should be no lower than 14 feet. Where new
densities and land uses are suggested, the transition to the
existing neighborhood should be actuated at the alley. When
transitions are created across the street, the neighboring forms
should be within a reasonable scale of each other. Where new
streets and street alignments are created they should connect
to the existing Denver grid. By creating connections to the ex-
isting street network, the station area will reinforce pedestrian
access and connections to the surrounding neighborhood.
Required Building Entries
Primary entrances to residences and businesses should be
located on active street edges (sidewalks) to promote pedes-
trian activity at street level. Entrances to the residential units
along Sheridan should be offset from the sidewalk through
stoops and porches. This creates a private porch area while
maintaining a desirable pedestrian scale and appropriate
transition from the public realm to the private. Alleys should
provide vehicular access to new developments in the area,
following existing norms already established within the
neighborhood. Rear-loaded residential structures will also
frame a street environment that values the pedestrian by
allowing for interesting landscapes and architectural forms.
Where street access for garages is the only option, side drive-
ways with rear garages should be encouraged.
Architectural Character
The architecture of new development should include du-
rable, high-quality materials. Materials should include stone,
brick, or other sustainable materials which are in the tradition
of Denver neighborhoods. Diversity in architectural forms
is important for creating an interesting urban environment.
However, the orientation of these structures to the public
realm should be consistent and follow the directives set by
the massing, entry, and build-to sections. Where a mixed-
use pedestrian-scaled street is planned, a substantial level of
building transparency should be encouraged. Windows and
entrances invite the pedestrian to explore the street, creating
interest and street activity.
Open Space Systems
Lakewood Dry Gulch divides the station area into two sec-
tions; north and south. The station area plan recommends that
11th and 12th Avenues continue along the open space cor-
ridor. New development, which will be positioned with front
doors facing Lakewood Dry Gulch, will help activate the park.
This development will frame the green corridor and provide
more security to users of the amenity. Both 11th and 12th
Avenues should be constructed to similar standards set forth
by the City of Denvers Department of Public Works for local
streets and should provide detached sidewalks, street parking
and a build-to line of six feet. Detached sidewalks and street
amenities should occur on the park side of these streets.
Streetscape and Gateway Features
Streets should have detached sidewalks and tree lawns to
create a more active and safe street environment for the
pedestrian. Areas with very high pedestrian activity, such as
commercial areas, may require a continuous attached side-
walk with trees in grates. Buildings will front the pedestrian
priority streets to create a more intimate pedestrian experi-
ence. Gateways providing a sense of arrival to the TOD dis-
trict are proposed at the intersection of Sheridan and Colfax
and the intersection of 10th Avenue and Sheridan, both of
which will be higher in density than surrounding uses. The
presence of these two station book-ends, approximately a
half-mile apart, will signal to the pedestrian and motorist that
they are entering a unique area within the larger neighbor-
23


Sheridan Station Area Plan The Plan Concept
hood. Streets should create qualities that engage the eyes,
such as regular landscape forms and public amenities.
Public art is proposed along Sheridan Boulevard north and
south of the station as a means of slowing traffic and an-
nouncing the station. Signage is also recommended within
Lakewood Dry Gulch to announce the presence of the sta-
tion to bicyclists, pedestrians and open space users.
Street cross sections should be based upon approved city
standards outlined in Rules and Regulations for Standard Rdght-of-
Way Cross Sections and Utility locations. New streets within the
station area should reinforce the existing City of Denver grid
system, helping to create more logical and direct vehicular
and pedestrian wayfinding in and out of the station area.
Residential Scale Urban Design
-60'Right of Way
- 8'Tree Lawn
- Cornice to Achieve Building Height
-Transparent Surfaces at Street Level
- Alley Loaded Auto Access (Attached or Detached)
- 5' Detached Walks
-On Street Parking
-6'Amenity Zone
-Unit Access on Street
Sheridan Boulevard Urban Design
-110'Right of Way
- 12'Tree Lawn
-Transparent Surfaces at Street Level
- Parking Facilities at Rear of Structures
- 8'Detached Walks
-10'Amenity Zone
- Unit Access on Street
-Varied Cornice Heights
- Active Ground Floor Use
- Pedestrian Amenities
- Pedestrian Scale Light Fixtures
Mixed Use Scale Urban Design
- 80'Right of Way
- 8'Tree Lawn
- Corner Building Architectural Elements
-Transparent Surfaces at Street Level
- Parking Facilities at Rear of Structures
-5'Detached Walks
- On Street Parking
- Unit Access on Street
- Stepped Back Upper Floors
- Active Ground Floor Uses
- Pedestrian Amenities
- Pedestrian Scale Light Fixtures
24


Sheridan Station Area Plan -The Plan Concept
Circulation and Mobility Plan
The circulation plan identifies the key connections for
vehicles, pedestrians and bicycles throughout the station
area. The streets and intersections with the highest intensi-
ties of land use require the most attention. Colfax Avenue
and Sheridan Boulevard are the major arterials in the station
area. 10th and 14th Avenues serve as east/west collector
streets around the station. New local street connections are
proposed along the edge of Takewood Gulch to complete
the street grid and provide more access and activity along the
parks edge. Cross sections for the street types can be found
in the urban design section.
Current conditions on Sheridan Boulevard
Colfax Avenue
Colfax Avenue is the primary east/west arterial in the area
and is located approximately three blocks north of the sta-
tion. Colfax Avenue is also a CDOT facility designated U.S.
Highway 40. Colfax Avenue carries approximately 35,000
vehicles per day. The right-of-way for West Colfax near
Sheridan varies between 80 and 90 feet in most places. The
current cross section includes four through-lanes and a cen-
ter turn-lane. The south side of Colfax has on-street parking
and on the north side there is a part time parking lane that
converts to a drive lane in the afternoon peak travel time.
The West Colfax Plan identifies Colfax Avenue as a pedes-
trian priority street with mixed land uses. According to the
West Colfax Plan, the desired future cross section for Colfax
would include a 16 foot pedestrian zone with sidewalks and
street trees and on-street parking on both sides of the street.
---------
I----------
16'
8 11'
11'
16
11 11 8
16
25


Sheridan Station Area Plan The Plan Concept
Sheridan Boulevard
Sheridan Boulevard is the key north/south arterial and
is currently four lanes with a continuous center turn lane
and some attached sidewalks in a 70 existing right-of-way.
Sheridan Boulevard carries approximately 40,000 to 50,000
vehicles per day. Sheridan is a Colorado Department of
Transportation (CDOT) facility designated State Highway
95. Because of its important role in connecting the station
to Colfax Avenue, Sheridan should be a priority street for
pedestrian improvements.
At this time, the City and County of Denver and the City of
Lakewood intend to maintain Sheridan Boulevard with four-
lanes of through traffic. Sidewalk improvements should be
added to the existing street by providing a 10 foot pedestrian
zone within the 70 foot right-of-way. Pedestrian improve-
ments should stretch from 6th Avenue (north of the highway
interchange) all the way north to 17th Avenue. Over the long
term, the total right-of-way for Sheridan Boulevard would
need to increase from 70 to 110 to meet Denvers standard
cross section for a four-lane arterial street. However, Sheri-
dan should first be examined as part of a joint corridor study
between the City of Lakewood, City and County of Denver,
and the Colorado Department of Transportation.
Sheridan Boulevard cross sections for both the existing 70' right-of-way and desired i i O'right-of-way
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26


Sheridan Station Area Plan -The Plan Concept
10th Avenue and 14th Avenue
10th and 14th Avenues serve as east/west collector streets
around the station with on-street parking and detached side-
walks. These streets intersect with and will have signalized
intersections at Sheridan Boulevard. These streets will be key
to linking neighborhood residents with the station and are
also designated as pedestrian priority streets in the plan.
The intersection at 10th Avenue and Sheridan Boulevard
should be improved with wide sidewalks, crosswalks and pe-
destrian signals to allow pedestrians to cross safely. The four
blocks that surround the intersection will be concentrated
with higher density uses, including Takewoods proposed
station core area at the southwest corner of 10th Avenue and
Sheridan Boulevard.
New Streets
Currently, 11th Avenue and 12th Avenue do not exist adja-
cent to Takewood Dry Gulch. A key element of this plan
is to build these local streets to provide better access to Take-
wood Dry Gulch and frontage for new residential develop-
ment that will bring more activity and visibility to the park.
The proposed cross sections for 11th and 12th Avenues would
include onstreet parking on the side of the street with build-
ings and parking bulb-ins between the street trees along the
park edge. This will allow for the required 25 feet of clearance
for fire vehicles on streets with higher density development.
The alignment for a new 12th Avenue would follow the align-
ment of the existing Wells Place between Utica and Zenobia.
11th Avenue would be at the same alignment as the existing
11th Avenue and run between a new Wolff Street and a Zeno-
bia Street connection north of 10th Avenue.
A new intersection is proposed at 13th Avenue and Sheridan
Boulevard to provide more direct access into the neighbor-
hoods. This access will provide the necessary circulation
(ingress and egress) for the residential units along Sheridan
Boulevard and will also provide better access to the north
side of Takewood Gulch. Right-of-way acquisitions and
improvements will need to be made to 13th Avenue between
Sheridan Boulevard and Zenobia Street, Zenobia Street to
Yates Street, and Winona Street to Vrain Street to complete
13th Avenue as a through street.
Other Local Streets
Other local streets in the area include the north/south streets
of Zenobia, Yates, Xavier, Wolff, Winona, Vrain, Utica and
Tennyson. These streets are primarily residential streets with
detached sidewalks. These streets should be designed to slow
down traffic where possible to provide a safer, more com-
fortable pedestrian environment and strong connections to
the light rail station. The other east/west Avenues include
8th, 9th, and 13th Avenues. These streets do not have houses
that front onto them.
Bus Connections
There are currently four bus routes that serve the Sheridan
Station Area. The east/west routes are the 9 on 10th Avenue
and the 16 and 16L (limited) on West Colfax Avenue. The
primary north/south bus route is the 51, which runs on
Sheridan Boulevard. These routes will stay in place once the
West Corridor light rail is operational. Currently, RTD has
no plans to increase bus service in the area but may examine
future service increases following the opening of the West
Corridor. Buses will stop on the new Sheridan Bridge with
passengers accessing the station below the bridge using stairs
and elevators.
27


Sheridan Station Area Plan The Plan Concept
Bicycle Improvements
The Lakewood Dry Gulch regional bike trail (D-10) extends
from the South Platte River trail to the Lakewood city limits.
This trail provides an east-west pedestrian/bicycle corridor
through the station area. Three pedestrian bridges, consistent
with the City and County of Denvers Parks Game Plan, are
proposed across Lakewood Gulch at Yates, Wolff and Ten-
nyson streets. These pedestrian bridges, along with pedes-
trian improvements extending north and south from these
streets, will serve to knit the two neighborhoods together.
Wolff Street serves as a neighborhood bicycle route be-
tween 10th Avenue and Sloans Lake Park. Tennyson Street
should also serve the north/south bicycle movements and
this street should be designated as a neighborhood bicycle
route in the future.
The on-street bicycle trail on 10th Avenue (D-12) will remain
with the proposed improvements to the area. The proposed
cross section on page 19 shows shared bicycle indicators or
sharrows for the traffic lanes on this route.
Access to the light rail station will be via stairs and elevators
to the station located directly below Sheridan Boulevard.
These improvements will be on both sides of the street.
Pedestrian and bicycle connections will also be provided
directly from the Lakewood Dry Gulch trail to the station
platform and plaza below Sheridan Boulevard.
28


Sheridan Station Area Plan -The Plan Concept

-* ...wjmAvyk^v
8S#T fT 0&
Proposed Land Use
Mixed Use
Station Residential
Townhouse Residential
Parks, Open Space
and Drainageways
Sheridan Circulation Concept
Existing Plans and Zoning

Lakewood Station Plan
m
m
za
Existing Main Street Zoning
MS-1
Existing Main Street Zoning
MS-2
Existing Main Street Zoning
MS-3
Area Features
V\£st Corridor Light Rail Line
Light Rail Station
Pedestrian Imp rovements
Major arterial
Pedestrian Priority Street
Collector
Denver / Lakewood Boundary
H
BB^
DENVER
New Local Street or Connection
Recreational Trail / BikeWiy
Pedestrian Bridge
Signalized Intersection
^ RXD Parking Structure
K> Bus Routes
- On-street bike routes
29


Sheridan Station Area Plan The Plan Concept
Parking
Parking and Development Capacity
The economic success of TOD projects requires sufficient
parking. But just as too little parking will create economic
problems, so will too many spaces. Since Denvers TOD
policy seeks to maximize the number of units around its
stations and maximize those units affordability, it will be
important to ensure parking does not consume too much of
the buildable square footage in TOD projects.
Parking and Walkability
Walkability is a key measurement of the quality of public
space. In addition, ridership at rail stations increases as the
quality of the pedestrian environment improves in the sta-
tion area. Research findings have shown that transit com-
mute shares increase with pedestrian-oriented design of
neighborhoods around rail stops. For these reasons, it is im-
portant that the design of parking not create barriers real
or perceived to pedestrians. Denver has already established
design guidelines for parking downtown and on main streets,
such as Colfax Avenue, requiring that parking structures have
active ground floor uses rather than blank walls or surface
parking lots along streets.
Parking and Trip Generation
Properly managed and located parking can lower automobile
usage. In auto-dependent areas, the size of different land
uses is the best predictor of automobile traffic. Where there
are transportation choices, however, automobile trip rates be-
come highly variable. In these locations, parking supply is a
more effective predictor of auto trips, provided this supply is
properly managed to ensure adequate availability at all times.
In such locations, more parking means more traffic.
Parking as an Economic Asset, Not an End in Itself
The high prices people pay to park in Tower Downtown are
a testament to the value of parking near mixed-use, compact
and pedestrian-oriented development. But not all spaces
have the same value. In all mixed-use districts, some parking
spaces are more desirable than others. Left to market forces,
the more desirable spaces would command higher prices and
vice versa. When parking is underpriced, the city incurs all
the burden of operating and maintaining it while incurring
reduced financial benefits of controlling it. More important-
ly, underpriced parking reduces customer convenience, with
the best spaces quickly filled by the lucky few. While under-
priced parking results in direct loss of revenue to the city, the
indirect costs are even higher if shoppers and developers are
deterred by a lack of convenient parking.
In Denver, most on-street metered parking currently costs $1
an hour, regardless of location or demand patterns. In high-
demand areas, the result is that parking utilization regularly
exceeds 95 percent, resulting in added search traffic and cus-
tomer inconvenience. This in turn leads to poorer business
performance and greater traffic congestion and pollution.
New Approaches to Parking
Historically, solving the parking problem almost always
meant increasing supply. But planners have begun to ac-
knowledge that there are many different types of parking
problems, and many different solutions. The majority of
30


Sheridan Station Area Plan -The Plan Concept
the parking for transit at the station area will be provided
through a 800 car parking structure at the northwest corner
of 10th Avenue and Sheridan Boulevard. The parking in
this facility will be a mix of parking for the transit users and
parking for the mixed used development within the parking
structure itself. This parking structure should be wrapped
with development to provide an active frontage on the facil-
ity. Parking for local retail uses that front onto 10th Avenue
will need to be conveniently located either within the park-
ing structure or along the street. The details of this facility
will need to be coordinated with the City of Denver as RTD
examines its options.
The amount of parking required for new development is
currently determined by the City of Denver Zoning Code
depending on the use. Parking at the Sheridan Station could
be reduced however, depending on the tenant mix, the qual-
ity and accessibility of the local transit (bus, light rail, bicycle
and pedestrian), trip reduction requirements or incentives,
mode split calculations, residential demographics, site condi-
tions and other local factors. Surface parking lots should be
avoided within the station planning area. One of the many
benefits of transit in this area is the potential to reduce the
amount of parking for new development because of its close
proximity to transit and the possibility of shared parking op-
portunities presented by the new RTD park-n-Ride.
After the opening of the West Corridor in mid 2013, park-
ing within the area will need to be reviewed and monitored
to assess the impact of the station. Further parking regula-
tions within the neighborhood may need to be implemented.
These regulations may include maximum parking dura-
tions in some areas or the development of a shared parking
program for the park-n-Ride facility. Other tools for parking
implementation should include:
Unbundling of parking, particularly for residential
useshaving parking sold or rented separately from
the housing unit
Real time parking information systems
Placement of driveways and curb cuts to
access parking
Parking signage and way-finding
Vehicle trip reduction incentives (Ecopass. etc)
Additional study will be required to determine how the vari-
ous TOD parking strategies outlined in this station area plan
may be implemented. This should be done in conjunction
with a broader city-wide analysis of parking.
31


Sheridan Station Area Plan The Plan Concept
Economic Opportunity
FasTracks brings to the Denver region an unprecedented
opportunity to promote and facilitate transit-oriented higher
density, mixed-use residential and commercial development.
To identify, leverage, and maximize these opportunities, the
city commissioned a TOD Economic Analysis and Market Study
completed by BBPC. The primary goal of the TOD Economic
Analysis and Market Study was to provide the city with an as-
sessment of TOD potential at the regional, corridor, and
station area levels through analysis of short- and long-term
demand (e.g. demand in 2015 and 2030). Conducted in coor-
dination with station area planning efforts, the market study
helped to better align station area plans with existing and
future market realities and dynamics. The overall objectives
of the TOD Economic Analysis and Market Study were to forge
a better understanding of the economic context in which
the city may plan for TOD, and to develop specific recom-
mendations regarding the amount, type, mix, and intensity of
uses appropriate for selected station areas.
Existing Market Conditions
The Sheridan Station Area occupies a unique position at the
border of two jurisdictions Denver and Takewood. The sta-
tion area features residential neighborhoods and the Take-
wood Gulch open space, part of a future regional trail and
park system. Residents of this station area can walk to some
retail goods and services along Colfax, which is located just
north of the station site.
The Sheridan Station Area has a larger household size com-
pared to that of the city and the region. Residents outnum-
ber jobs at a scale of nearly 4 to 1. Station Area household
income is lower than that of the city and one-and-a-half
times lower than the region. It is primarily a Hispanic
neighborhood with a higher percentage of residents engaged
in blue collar occupations than the average for the city or
region, and has a higher than average unemployment rate.
The majority of built space in the Sheridan Station Area is
residential. Commercial uses include approximately 100,000
square feet of retail space, the majority of which is clustered
along Colfax Avenue. The retail vacancy rate for this station
area as of the first quarter of 2007 was 11 percent. Office
space is relatively limited in the station area, with less than
15,000 square feet of class B and C office space. Though
office space is limited, it experiences 100 percent occupancy.
More information on existing demographics and land uses
for the Sheridan Station Area can be found in the Commu-
nity section in the supporting documentation of the plan.
Future Market Demand
The Sheridan Station Area is envisioned to expand its exist-
ing housing stock and become a distinctive mixed-income
neighborhood with pedestrian-friendly retail streets (Main
Streets) over the long-term. As part of the trend toward a
mixed-use and mixed-income neighborhood, private invest-
ment will likely drive increased construction of additional
housing and retail services near the station adding more
people and jobs while allowing existing residents to benefit
from the new station area amenities.
The addition of new residential units will support the intro-
duction of new community-serving retail focused along West
Colfax Avenue and near the intersection of 10th Avenue
and Sheridan. This area of West Colfax may find precedent
in the successful revitalization of sections of East Colfax
Avenue. Future retail expansion efforts should conform to
the targeted Main Street character for Colfax Avenue, and
should be encouraged through investment in improved pe-
destrian and transportation linkages between the station and
Colfax. New development could pay homage to the areas
ethnic diversity and historical past. New, small-format ethnic
food stores could develop near the station area along Colfax
Avenue and Sheridan Boulevard, and community service and
office employers could enhance employment opportunities
and job training possibilities in the community. Further, joint
development opportunities involving the stations park-n-
Ride could expand the station core development area identi-
fied for mixed-use commercial development in the City of
Takewoods station area plan.
Three redevelopment scenarios have been projected for pos-
sible net new development in the 1/2 mile radius around the
platform based on current market trends and land capacity.
The first two scenarios, modest and moderate, are based
32


Sheridan Station Area Plan -The Plan Concept
on projected market conditions over the next 15-20 years
and call for 1.2 to 1.5 million square feet of development.
The third, maximum capacity, is based on land capacity and
identified an additional 1.9 million square feet of potential
development if all underutilized sites were redeveloped to
their maximum allowable square footage. As shown in the
chart below, there is projected to be more demand for office
than would be available under current zoning capacity.
Future redevelopment
scenarios-Net square
feet of development Residential Office Retail
Capacity 1,390,000 210,000 320,000
Modest 850,000 200,000 100,000
Moderate 1,000,000 320,000 150,000
Source: BBPC Market Study, 2007
Economic Development Strategies
Below are possible economic development strategies and
tools for the Sheridan Station Area. Development efforts will
require the involvement of many agencies within the City
and County of Denver as well as coordination and coopera-
tion with developers, land owners and businesses. Several
strategies are complementary to specific projects already
planned or proposed for implementation by the citys Public
Works Department. As the city moves forward with imple-
mentation of station area plans, an inter-departmental TOD
team approach will continue to be used. Identified strategies
are outlined below:
Housing and Housing Affordability
Preserve current housing affordability in the area.
Because of the Sheridan Stations location almost
equidistant between two major employment hubs
downtown Denver to the east, and the Federal
Center and new St. Anthonys Hospital in Takewood
to the westthis station area is potentially well
positioned to cater to the residential needs of em-
ployees working in these two employment centers.
Using appropriate resources and incentives,
maximize mixed income multi-family development
in proximity to the station.
With the current neighborhoods economic profile,
promoting the area for more market-rate housing
will add increased community amenities, safety, and
future economic growth and stability to the area.
Strategic and Catalytic Projects
The four corners of 10th and Sheridan are of
strategic importance to the redevelopment of the
area. Projects on these cornersparticularly
the commercial / retail elementswill help to spur
further area revitalization and therefore should be
the first redevelopment pursued.
Seek to have development at 10th and Sheridan
share parking with the future RTD park-n-Ride
garage, especially commercial uses with high
off-peak customer traffic (e.g, evening traffic
such as food and beverage establishments, movie
theaters, etc.).
Desired land uses as well as buildings should be
encouraged through regulation, and through public-
private partnerships.
Coordination
Coordinate economic development activities
with Takewood.
Coordinate with the Department of Public Works
to use future public infrastructure investment to
leverage private sector investment.
Employment and Commercial Development
Business retention in the area as well as new
company growth and job creation are significant
objectives for the city. At the Sheridan station more
employment opportunities should be promoted.
Due to the affordability of land in this area there is
a potential market for Class B and B+ office space
to be incorporated in future development offering
an alternative to more expensive office markets
closer to downtown.
33


Sheridan Station Area Plan The Plan Concept
Ensure commercial uses at or around the station
area are neighborhood oriented and compliment
rather than compete with commercial uses along
Colfax through targeted incentives, business
marketing and land use regulation.
A strong connection between the Sheridan Station
and Colfax is important for promoting the economic
viability and growth of Colfax business
development under West Colfaxs new Main
Street Zoning.
34


Sheridan Station Area Plan Implementation and Next Steps
Implementation
and Next Steps

35


Sheridan Station Area Plan Implementation and Next Steps
Implementation at the Sheridan Station
The purpose of this section is two fold: first, to define an
implementation framework for the Sheridan Station, and
second to suggest a strategic approach for considering
implementation of transit-oriented development (TOD) in
the City of Denver. Transforming Denvers transit stations
into vital dynamic TODs will not happen over night. Areas
as diverse as Washington, DC, San Francisco and Portland
with noted TOD programs still have uneven results between
stations after two decades of effort. The market, planning,
infrastructure, community and political readiness of Denvers
existing and future FasTracks stations can be expected to
vary considerably. Understanding that not all stations will be
ripe for attention at any one time is an important consider-
ation when implementing a citywide strategy. Consequently,
an important step in realizing the transformation of Den-
vers station areas into dynamic, vital TODs will be for the
city to establish where it will place its attention and emphasis.
The implementation plan for the Sheridan Station is intend-
ed to lay out the framework to enable development of TOD
consistent with the plan. The Sheridan implementation plan
covers a series of actions:
Specific recommendations
Strategies for implementation
Implementation timing
Citywide TOD implementation evaluation
To aid the City of Denver and its partners in completing an
assessment of the station area, each station should be evalu-
ated in relation to how they measure against the following
seven TOD success factors:
Implementation Continuum. Development of TOD at
stations requires a series of actions over a period of time
ranging from initial planning, to making targeted invest-
ments, to putting the full range of necessary tools and lead-
ership in place to achieve TOD. Knowing where a station is
on the development continuum will help in targeting what
kind of assistance may be required at any one time.
Cost Benefit Payback. Ensure that the limited funds avail-
able for public investment in infrastructure and economic
development are targeted to those station areas where they
can leverage the most private investment and create the most
successful examples of TOD.
Development Ready. To what extent has the public sector taken
the necessary steps to make the station area development ready?
Current Trends. What are existing real estate market
dynamics for potential TOD in a particular station area? Is
the market already starting to deliver development products
that can be considered TOD friendly? In other words, is
development occurring of moderate to higher density in
relation to past patterns of development? Do new develop-
ments have:
A mix of land uses, horizontally or vertically mixed
Compact pedestrian-oriented design and
streetscapes
Building design and orientation to the street to allow
easy pedestrian and transit access
A reduction in parking in relation to conventional
development
A fine-grained connected street pattern
A system of parks and open spaces
36


Sheridan Station Area Plan Implementation and Next Steps
Developer Interest in TOD. To what extent is there dem-
onstrated developer interest in the station area? Are there
TOD friendly development activities in the station area?
Are parcels of land being sold or optioned for development?
Are privately led master planning or plan changes underway?
Are local officials getting inquiries about the station area?
Ability to nudge. In a nudge station a series of factors
supportive of achieving the development of TOD appear to
be in place. To what extent can a strategic investment of time
and energy by the public sector help nudge the station area
to the next level of activity and achieve TOD?
Leadership is in place. A lesson learned repeatedly is that
the single most significant factor is whether a project is fun-
damentally viableregardless of the presence of transit. No
development is going to occur just because a station goes in if
there is not a market to support it. A transit station does not
create the market or make an uneconomical project viable.
Land Use, Urban Design and Mobility
Recommendations and Implementation Strategies
The specific land use and urban design recommendations
followed by the mobility and infrastructure recommen-
dations are listed on the following pages. Details on the
implementation strategy, timeframe and responsibility can be
found in the table.
Implementation is the result of market, planning and community readiness
37


Sheridan Station Area Plan Implementation and Next Steps
Land Use and Urban Design
Recommendation Implementation Strategy Timeframe Responsibility
LU 1-Colfax Avenue as Main Street Tie the station area to Colfax Avenue redevelopment through better pedestrian connections. Ensure new residential and employment opportunities near the station complement the Colfax Avenue redevelopment goals. Direct new, larger format retail to Colfax Avenue while allowing smaller-scale, convenience retail near the station at 10th and Sheridan through targeting of business incentives and zoning regulations. Short to Medium CPD, Public Works, OED
LU 2-Mixed-Use Review and test existing zone districts to assess appropriate zoning language (mixed-use) for map amendment. If no existing district can be identified, develop new TOD district language to adopt that addresses density and form requirements. Work with new zoning code update revisions to mixed use zone districts. Medium CPD, Public Works, City of Lakewood Planning Department
LU 3-Leverage Light Rail Investment The West Corridor Light Rail is the most significant public infra- structure investment to occur in the vicinity of Sheridan Boulevard and Colfax Avenue.This transportation access and public infra- structure improvements should be leveraged through additional public infrastructure investment,and changes in zoning and develop- ment incentives to attract private investment in housing, employment, commercial amenities and additional infrastructure. Short to Long CPD, OED, DURA
LU 4-Housing Incentives Encourage mixed income and market rate housing development near the station to achieve a diverse range of housing prices. Use city housing incentives such as revenue bonds and Community Development Block Grants to promote mixed income housing. Medium to Long CPD, OED
LU 5-Community Partnerships for Housing Establish private public partnerships with both non-profit community organizations, community development corporations (CDCs), and for-profit development companies to preserve housing affordability in the area. Medium to Long CPD, OED, Enterprise Community Partners, Newsed, Private Developers
LU 6-Active Ground Floor Uses The form of the public realm and view from Sheridan Boulevard onto 10th Avenue will be the foundation to promote activation of 10th Avenue. Active retail uses will support the form. Particular attention should be paid to the urban design of 10th Avenue from Sheridan Boulevard to Ames Street, and be coordinated with the City of Lakewood. Medium to Long CPD, City of Lakewood
LU 7-Development along the Sheridan Corridor Reorient vehicular access of parcels aligning Sheridan Boulevard to alley side as redevelopment occurs. Ensure new development dedicates a 16 foot minimum pedestrian zone suitable for enhanced transit corridors. Medium to Long CPD, Public Works, CDOT, Land Owners, Developers
LU 8-Coordination with Lakewood Coordinate with the City of Lakewood for development efforts, track developer proposals, and work on transitional issues in the area. Provide coordinated infrastructure improvements and urban design standards for Sheridan Boulevard and 10th Avenue to creating a cohesive look and feel around the station area. Short to Long OED, City of Lakewood
38


Sheridan Station Area Plan Implementation and Next Steps
Recommendation Implementation Strategy Timeframe Responsibility
LU 9-Shared and Structured Parking The City of Denver needs to work closely with RTD and the developer selection process at the parking structure to leverage the parking structure as a catalyst project to help realize the implementation of the station area plan. Review parking language in applicable zoning to ensure maximization of shared and structured parking opportunities. Short to Medium C PD, RTD
LU 10-Beth Jacob High School Beth Jacob School has some unique religious requirements that need to be maintained.The city should establish regular contact with Beth Jacob School to ensure their requirements are being met. Short to Long CPD, Beth Jacob High School
LU 11-Leverage Lakewood Dry Gulch as an Amenity The city will need to coordinate closely with RTD as the new West Corridor line is being constructed through the park and to ensure that the pedestrian crossings being planned are implemented.The gulch should be dedicated as an official City of Denver park when the light rail construction is complete.The city should also implement the improvements identified in the park master plan. Key pedestrian connections that facilitate access to the station and north-south connections across the park should be in place prior to the opening of the light rail line in mid 2013. Short to Medium Public Works, Parks, CPD, RTD
LU 12-Joint Development as Catalyst The City should participate as an equal partner with RTD in the definition of a development prog ram, and in the developer selection process for the joint development RFP to realize the type of devel- opment proposed to ensure it meets the goals of this plan and the TOD Strategic Plan. Short CPD,OED, RTD, Private Developers
LU 13-Active Community Engagement Continue to use existing neighborhood communications, meetings and city processes to keep the community updated on the station area implementation. Ongoing All City Agencies
LU 14-Station Core and Targeted Development Areas It will be critical that the areas of new development directly around the station have active ground floor uses that help to activate the street and pedestrian environment. Building heights in the area should range from 2-7 stories. Zoning for this area should support this recommendation by requiring building entrances that face the street, minimum transparency requirements for the building facade, pedestrian scaled architectural elements and building heights and setbacks that reinforce the scale of development for the area. Short CPD
LU 15- Neighborhood Transitions New development should step down at the transitions to the existing R-2 urban neighborhoods. Maximum building height in the R-2 is 35 feet, but the majority of the existing structures are one to two stories. Use bulk plane and step-downs to provide transitions to existing urban neighborhoods. Medium to Long CPD, Developers
LU 16Bring Buildings to the Sidewalk Setbacks should be addressed as part of the zoning code, however, articulation of outdoor seating areas, public-private transition zones, fencing, architectural fenestration, etc. should be further defined as a follow-up item through the new zone districts created as part of the zoning code update. Medium to Long CPD, Developers
39


Sheridan Station Area Plan Implementation and Next Steps
Mobility and Infrastructure
Recommendation Implementation Strategy Timeframe Responsibility
Ml 1-Pedestrian Routes to School Prioritize pedestrian routes to the station, schools, and other community gathering points for capital infrastructure improvements. Priority streets include 10th Avenue and Sheridan Boulevard. Short to Medium Public Works, Parks, CPD, RTD
Ml 2-Landscaped Median on Sheridan Boulevard The cities of Denver and Lakewood have expressed a strong desire to keep Sheridan Boulevard in its current 4 drive lane configuration and redesign the center turn lane as a landscaped median with left turn pockets. Both cities will need to coordinate with CDOT and DRCOG to ensure regional plans reflect the four-lane arterial configuration. Short to Long Public Works, CPD, City of Lakewood, CDOT, DRCOG
Ml 3-Sheridan Boulevard Corridor Study The cities and CDOT should collaborate and co-fund a study to develop a recommended configuration and the design speed of Sheridan Boulevard. Make a specific recommendation to revise the DRCOG 2035 plan for this street. Short to Long Public Works, CPD, City of Lakewood, CDOT, DRCOG
Ml 4-Restore Street Grid To fully implement the plan, the street grid needs to be complete in the area. In some areas, right-of-way will need to be obtained to establish 11th, 12th and 13th Streets.The streetscape improvements for at least V2 the street can be part of redevelopment activities by developers along 11 th and 12th Avenues. Improvements along 13th Avenue may take longer due to the smaller parcel size and the location of the connections in the existing urban neighborhood. Capital funds for ROW acquisition should be identified and prioritized in the capital improvement program budget. Medium to Long CPD, Public Works, private developers
Ml 5-Street Frontages along Park Create two great streets that front the north and south sides of Lakewood Dry Gulch Park.These streets should be local in nature and respond to the context of the greenway. Streetscape may vary on each side of the street.These improvements will need to be coordinated with the private developers that build the future residential uses that front these streets. Some public land and existing right-of-way may be available for portions of the park roads. Funding sources for 11 th and 12th avenue extensions will have to be identified. Medium to Long Public Works, Private Developers
Ml 6-Trail Crossings of the Gulch Both Wolff Street and Tennyson Street should be dedicated neighborhood bike routes and the Bicycle Master Plan should be amended to show this revision.These connections should also improve the pedestrian environment along these roadways for pedestrians traveling to and from the Colfax Avenue corridor (shopping, schools, etc), Sloan's Lake, or Lakewood Gulch to the south Short CPD, Public Works, Denver Bicycle Coordinator
Ml 7-10th Avenue Bicycle Improvements As new development occurs on 10th Avenue, new bicycle improve- ments need to be installed when the street is rebuilt. Bicycle improvements along 10th Avenue should include the addition of shared bicycle route indicators to the traffic lanes ("sharrows") and installation of sidewalk bicycle racks. Medium to Long CPD, Public Works, Denver Bicycle Coordinator, City of Lakewood
40


Sheridan Station Area Plan Implementation and Next Steps
Recommendation Implementation Strategy Timeframe Responsibility
Ml 8-Lakewood Gulch Trail The trail connection from downtown Denver to Lakewood along Lakewood Dry Gulch is an important regional access route. Regional funding should be pursued to study trail continuity to the west of the station. Ensure bicycle connections are present to the Sheridan Station platform and under Sheridan Boulevard. Short to Medium City of Lakewood, DRCOG, Denver Bicycle Coordinator, CPD, Public Works
Ml 9-Sheridan Boulevard Pedestrian Infrastructure Pedestrian improvements should be complete along Sheridan prior to the opening of the West Corridor in mid 201 3. The improvements not provided by FasTracks will need to be funded separately through City of Denver CIP or other funding mechanism. Short CPD, Public Works, City of Lakewood, RTD, CDOT, DRCOG
Ml 1 O-American with Disabilities All new construction must abide by the current code. The city should look at alternate funding mechanisms to make improvements to existing conditions that are sub-standard, particularly around the light rail station where pedestrian access is critical. Short CPD, Public Works, Denver Commission on Disabilities
Ml 1 1-Completion of a Continuous 1 3th Avenue East of Sheridan Create a 1 3th Avenue connection between Sheridan and Yates streets and Wolff and Vrain streets. Identify right-of-way and construction costs. Medium to Long Public Works, CDOT
Ml 1 2-Water Quality The amount of land required for on-site detention and water quality for new development could be substantial. The city should look for ways to help new development to provide sub regional basins that all new development in the area can share. Explore opportunities to utilize the Lakewood Dry Gulch for storm water quality, retention and detention. Detention facilities can often be designed for multiple functions in park space to create amenities for park users. New facilities should serve multiple buildings and be designed in such a way as to appear "park-like." Medium to Long CPD, Public Works, Parks, Urban Drainage, Developers
41


Sheridan Station Area Plan Implementation and Next Steps
Implementation Next Steps and Timing
The tables on the preceding pages outline important steps
and the timeline for implementing the recommendations of
the Sheridan Station Area Plan. Development of new infra-
structure and changes brought through new development
may take many years to be fully achieved. The plan and regu-
latory framework represent the first step in this process.
The most immediate steps include plan adoption followed by
rezonings that implement the recommendations. Rezonings
should occur within the context and timeframe of Denvers
zoning code update. It is anticipated that new zone districts
will be available that will be suited to the unique develop-
ment character for station areas.
Another immediate step includes the scoping of infrastruc-
ture projects and the identification of potential funding
sources to implement the infrastructure needed in the station
area. These infrastructure improvements should be pursued
through both public-private partnerships between the city
and the business and development community as well as
public-public partnerships between local, regional, state and
federal agencies.
First Tier Implementation Recommendations
and Timing
It is important for the city to make the Sheridan Station
development ready. Development ready includes:
Getting new zoning in place
Identifying an implementation toolbox both
financial and regulatory
Putting in place the partnerships with other City
departments, Takewood, CDOT and RTD
Moving forward with a jointly lead and defined
project for the Park-n-Ride with RTD, the City of
Denver and private and public input.
Timeframe: Short -now to mid 2013 (opening of
West Corridor)
42


Sheridan Station Area Plan Supporting Documentation
43


Sheridan Station Area Plan Supporting Documentation
The Community
Study Area Location and Overview
The Sheridan Station is one of 57 new transit stations to be
added as part of the FasTracks program, and one of eight on
the West Corridor Light Rail project. The station is located
in the West Corridor at Sheridan Boulevard and approxi-
mately 12th Avenue. Sheridan Boulevard forms the boundary
between Denver and Lakewood, with some variation to the
west side of Sheridan immediately north of 10th Avenue.
The station area extends from approximately 8th Avenue to
Colfax Avenue along Sheridan Boulevard.
The station is one of four stations in Denver on the West
Corridor Light Rail line. The area has been identified by the
Denver Transit-Oriented Development Strategic Plan as an urban

_____________^
-q V--,.g
..kf
Sheridan Station Area
| ^ | Light Rail Station Aerial Photo: 2006
l. L -4 Light Rail Alignment
ft ~A Buffer of Station
n 1/4 and 1/2 mile
County Boundary
44


Sheridan Station Area Plan Supporting Documentation
neighborhood station, with residential and local-serving re-
tail uses around the station. The light rail line will pass under
Sheridan Boulevard and the station platform will be located
directly beneath Sheridan with access to the platform from
each side of Sheridan.
Population and Housing Characteristics
The station area includes portions of two Denver neigh-
borhoods: West Colfax on the north side of the Takewood
Gulch and Villa Park on the south side of Takewood Gulch.
After declines in the 1980s and early 1990s these two neigh-
borhoods are once again beginning to experience significant
growth. Both neighborhoods are primarily Tatino in their
ethnic makeup.
According to 2008 data from the City of Denver, the sta-
tion area contains 2,068 housing units with a population of
5,368 residents. The average household size was 3.09 persons
per household. The station area average household income
of $40,619 is lower than that of the city-wide average of
$49,373. The average sales price for single-family homes in
the station area was $185,397 in 2006; for condominiums it
was $127,500. The station area is mostly composed of rent-
ers living in multi-family housing. Only 23 percent of the
housing units in the station area are owner occupied and only
24 percent of the housing units in the station area are single
family homes.
Total Poulation 5,368
Group Quarters Population 0
Residential Population 5,368
Total Housing Units 2,068
Group Quarters Units 0
Residential Units 2,068
Vacancy Rate (residential units only) 16%
# Persons per Household (residential units only) 3.09
% Housing Units Owner Occupied 23%
800
700
600
500
2
o
.£

V)
3
O
Z
*= 400
.Q
E
300-
200-
100-
Household Income
West Colfax and Villa Park Neighborhoods (2007)
West Colfax
Villa Park
11
I
I
fc
<515,000 515,000- 525,000- 535,000- 550,000- 575,000- 5100,000- 5150,000- 5250,000- >5500,000
525,000 535,000 550,000 575,000 5100,000 5150,000 5250,000 55 00,000
Income Range
Source: Claritas,2007 (estimate)
Total Housing Units
Villa Park and West Colfax Neighborhoods (1950-2007)
Source: U.S. Census (1950-2000); Denver CPD (2007)
45


Sheridan Station Area Plan Supporting Documentation
Housing Type Distribution (2008)
Sheridan Station Area
Mixed Multi-Family Multi-Family Multi-Family Single-Family
Use Fligh Rise Mid Rise Low Rise
Housing Type
Source: Assessors Data,CPD
Sheridan Station Area
Neighborhood Age Distribution (2007)
100%
80%
70%
o
3
.Q
50%
w 40%
<
30%
20%
10%
8% 7%
60% 60%





23%
21%

10% 10%
West Colfax
Year
Villa Park
65+
18 to 64
5 to 17
<5
Source: Claritas
Total Population (1950-2007)
Villa Park and West Colfax Neighborhoods
46


Sheridan Station Area Plan Supporting Documentation
Population by Race and Ethnicity
Villa Park and West Colfax Neighborhood (2000)
Villa Park Neighborhood West Colfax Neighborhood
Naitive American
Asian/Pacific Islander
Non-Latino White
Latino
African American
Other Race
2 or More Races
Births by Ethnicity
West Colfax Neighborhood (1996-2006)
i/i
GO
V*-
0
01
to
+-*
c
u
Q.
100%
90%
80%
70%
60%
50%
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%
1.3%
1996
2.05% 2.00%
2.05% 14.37% 21.2%
2000 2006
Year
Naitive American
Asian/Pacific Islander
Non-Latino White
Latino
African American
Source:CDPHE via Piton Foundation (2007)
47


Sheridan Station Area Plan Supporting Documentation
Sheridan Station Zoning and Land Use
There are currently 11 zone districts in the Sheridan Station
Area Only about 12 percent of the 1/2 mile station area is
zoned for commercial or main street commercial mixed-use
development -concentrated along Colfax Avenue and the
intersection of 10th Avenue and Sheridan.
Approximately 86 percent of the land area is zoned R-2, R-
2-A, R-3 or R-4. These zone districts all allow multi-unit dwell-
ings. Approximately 75 percent of the station area is zoned
R-2, which allows multi-unit dwellings generally in the form of
duplexes and triplexes. No portion of the station area is zoned
exclusively for single-family residential development.
The current residential land use in the Sheridan Station
Area is a mixture of single-family and low-rise multi-family
residential with some higher-density apartment buildings.
Approximately 38 percent of the land area is public or quasi-
public comprising such uses as street right-of-way and pub-
licly owned park or open space. Only 4 percent of the land is
vacant or counts surface parking as an independent use.
Sheridan Station Area
Land Use Distribution (2008)
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Single ROW
Family
Multi- Parks, Retail Vacant Public/ Comm- Multi- Surface Office Multi- Mixed
Family Open Quasi- ercial Family Parking Family Use
Low Space Public Mid- High-
Rise Rise Rise
Land Use
48


Sheridan Station Area Plan Supporting Documentation
Sheridan Station Existing Land Use
Existing Development along Sheridan Boulevard
49


Sheridan Station Area Plan Supporting Documentation
Sheridan Station Existing Zoning
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City of Lakewood
Jefferson County
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50


Sheridan Station Area Plan Supporting Documentation
Distribution of Denver Zoning Districts
Sheridan Station Area (2008) Zoning District Acres Percent
B-1 0.3 0.1%
B-2 5.2 2.1%
MS-2 14.1 5.7%
MS-3 10.6 4.3%
0-1 2.4 1.0%
PUD 1.6 0.6%
R-2 184.0 74.3%
R-2-A 23.8 9.6%
R-3 1.0 0.4%
R-4 2.9 1.2%
R-5 1.6 0.6%
Total Acres 247.5
Existing Zone Districts
The following are descriptions of the existing zone districts
in the Sheridan Station Area:
Business and Mixed Use Districts
B-l Limited Office District: This district provides office
space for services related to dental and medical care and for
office-type services, often for residents of nearby residential
areas. The district is characterized by a low volume of direct
daily customer contact. This district is characteristically small
in size and is situated near major hospitals or between large
business areas and residential areas. The district regulations
establish standards comparable to those of the low density
residential districts, resulting in similar building bulk and
retaining the low concentration of pedestrian and vehicular
traffic. Building height is controlled by bulk standards and
open space requirements. Building floor cannot exceed the
site area.
B-2 Neighborhood Business District: This district pro-
vides for the retailing of commodities classified as con-
venience goods and the furnishing of certain personal
services to satisfy the daily and weekly household or personal
needs of residents of surrounding residential neighbor-
hoods. This district is located on collector streets, charac-
teristically is small in size, usually is entirely surrounded by
residential districts and is located at a convenient walking
distance from the residential districts it is designed to serve.
The district regulations establish standards comparable to
those of low density residential districts. Building floor can-
not exceed the site area.
MS-2 Main Street District: The Main Street zone districts
were developed to facilitate the communitys sustainable
development vision for integrating land use with transporta-
tion, and to promote a broad mix of land uses in building
forms that shape a Main Street pattern that is pedestrian and
transit-oriented. MS-2 applies to sections of main streets
in close proximity to medium density residential areas with
structures of two or more stories. MS-2 has build-to require-
ments for street frontages, a minimum height limit of 24
feet and a maximum height limit of 65 feet, and residential
protection upper story setbacks.
MS-3 Main Street District: MS-3 applies to the high-
est intensity section of main streets within 600 feet of the
intersection of enhanced transit corridors within one mile
of downtown Denver. MS-3 has build-to requirements for
street frontages, a minimum height of 24 feet and a maxi-
mum height limit of 100 feet and residential protection up-
per story setbacks.
Residential Districts
R-2 Multi-Unit Dwellings, Low Density: Typically
duplexes and triplexes. Home occupations are allowed by
permit. Minimum of 6,000 square feet of land required for
each duplex structure with an additional 3,000 square feet
required for every unit over 2.
R-2-A Multi-Unit Dwellings, Medium Density: 2,000
square feet of land required for each dwelling unit unless site
plan is submitted under planned building group (PBG) pro-
visions, in which case 1,500 square feet of land is required
for each unit. Home occupations are allowed by permit.
51


Sheridan Station Area Plan Supporting Documentation
R-3 Multi-Unit Dwellings, High Density: Building size
is controlled by bulk standards, off-street parking and open
space requirements. Building floor area cannot exceed three
times the site area.
R-4 Multi-Unit Dwellings and/or Offices, High Den-
sity: The purpose of this district is to provide a location for
high-density residential and intensive office development.
Building size is controlled by bulk standards, off street park-
ing and open space requirements. Allows hotel or motel uses
and limited accessory retail shopping. Building floor cannot
exceed four times the site area.
R-5 Institutional District: Allows colleges, schools, church-
es and other institutional uses. Maximum lot coverage is 60
percent of the zone lot. Building height is controlled by bulk
standards.
Other Districts
0-1 Open Space District: Allows airports, recreation
uses, parks, cemeteries, reservoirs, community correctional
facilities, and other public and semi-public uses housed in
buildings. Setback requirements apply to the location of
structures.
PUD Planned Unit Development District: The PUD
district is an alternative to conventional land use regulations,
combining use, density and site plan considerations into a
single process. The PUD district is specifically intended to
encourage diversification in the use of land and flexibility in
site design with respect to spacing, heights and setbacks of
buildings, densities, open space and circulation elements; in-
novation in residential development that results in the avail-
ability of adequate housing opportunities for varying income
levels; more efficient use of land and energy through smaller
utility and circulation networks; pedestrian considerations;
and development patterns in harmony with nearby areas and
with the goals and objectives of the comprehensive plan for
the city.
Sheridan Station Blueprint Denver Land Uses
Blueprint Denver identifies a core area to the south of the sta-
tion as transit oriented development. This transit oriented
development is concentrated around the intersection of 10th
Avenue and Sheridan. Along the edge of Takewood Gulch,
Blueprint Denver shows areas of urban residential transition-
ing to single-family duplex and single-family residential in the
neighborhoods to the northeast and southeast of the station.
The area along Colfax Avenue is shown as a mixed-use area
of change.
Blueprint Denver identifies several goals for the areas surround-
ing rail transit stations. These goals include:
A balanced mix of uses.
Compact mid- to high-density development.
Reduced emphasis on auto parking.
Attractive multi-story buildings.
A variety of housing types and prices.
Access to open space and recreation amenities.
A high degree of connectivity between the station
area and surrounding neighborhoods.
52


Sheridan Station Area Plan Supporting Documentation
Sheridan Station Blueprint Denver Land Uses
Concept Land Use
| | Single Family Residential
| | Single Family Duplex
[ 1 Urban Residential
| | Pedestrian Shopping District
| | Mixed Use
Transit Oriented Development
Park
f Area of Change
0 Light Rail Station
f'm* i Buffer of Station
/ 1/4 and 1/2 mile
[ t f- P j Light Rail Alignment
m
County Boundary
City of Lakewood
Jefferson County
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9TH AVE 3: £
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7THAVE
§
6THAVE
53


Sheridan Station Area Plan Supporting Documentation
Transportation
The station area is dominated by Sheridan Boulevard, a
five-lane regional arterial and Colorado State Highway. The
posted speed limit is 35 miles-per-hour. Sheridan Boulevard
lacks sidewalks on one or both sides of the street in many
sections. Key signalized intersections along Sheridan Boule-
vard include 10th Avenue, 14th Avenue and Colfax Avenue.
Colfax Avenue is also a State Highway with a posted speed
limit of 30 miles-per-hour.
70th Avenue and Sheridan Boulevard Looking North
The remaining streets surrounding the station area are gener-
ally built on the Denver grid system. However, along the
edge of Takewood Gulch, many streets do not connect and
the street grids are off-set creating difficult intersections. In
addition, 13th Avenue does not connect through between
Sheridan Boulevard and Yates Street or between Wolff and
Vrain streets. Alleys provide vehicle and loading access to
most residential and commercial properties.
The station area includes three RTD bus routes:
Route 51 along Sheridan Boulevard
Routes 16 and 16 limited along West Colfax Avenue
Route 9 along 10th Avenue
Bus stops for route 51 include stops at 10th and Sheridan
and 12th and Sheridan. Bus stops in the station area are
marked by signs but many stops lack seating, shelter or route
and schedule information.
The Takewood Dry Gulch Trail, Denver bicycle route D-10,
is the primary off-street bicycle and pedestrian path in the
vicinity of the station. The path parallels the railroad line
east-west through the station area. The Denver Bicjck Master
Plan Update (2001) recommends a future off-street trail con-
nection along Takewood Gulch to Martinez Park, located
southeast of the station at 9th and Raleigh Street. In addi-
tion, the D-12 bicycle route is an on-street bicycle route that
runs along 10th Avenue through the station area.
Most of the existing sidewalks in the station area are narrow
in width. Attached three-foot sidewalks predominate in most
of the residential and commercial areas. The Denver Pedestrian
Master Plan (2004) calls for a minimum 13-foot pedestrian
area along streets. The pedestrian area typically consists of
a five-foot detached sidewalk and an eight-foot tree lawn.
Along transit corridors and busy commercial streets, a mini-
mum 16-foot pedestrian zone is recommended.
With the exception of Sheridan Boulevard, most streets, in-
cluding Colfax Avenue, allow on-street parking. In addition,
most businesses and residential properties provide their own
off-street parking.
Station Area Bus Service 2006
Source: RTD 2006 Service Standards Analysis
Route Weekday Peak Frequency Total Boardings 2006
51 30 min 834,535
16 15 min 1,859,751
16L 15 min 629,175
9 30 min 323,677
54


Sheridan Station Area Plan Supporting Documentation
Sheridan Station Area Bicycle and Transit Routes
Light Rail Station Bike Route
/"*% Buffer of Station ^ J 1/4 and 1/2 wile Bike Trail
_ Local Bus Route
\ | | | Light Rail Alignment County Boundary Bus Stops ^ >1
-
55


Sheridan Station Area Plan Supporting Documentation
Public Engagement
The goal of the outreach process was to provide a fair, open
and effective process for engaging the community in the
development of the plan for the Sheridan Station Area. The
outreach objectives included:
Receive meaningful and useful input from residents
and community interests
Directly engage a broad representation of residents
and community interests by using several different
methods of community outreach
Ensure openness in communication of all aspects
of the plan and make relevant information freely
available
Ensure fairness in consideration of all opinions and
ideas from community members and interest groups
within the context of City and regional objectives
and the framework of the planning process
Three public workshops and two focus groups were held
as part the public involvement process. These hands on,
interactive meetings included a brief presentation on project
issues and process followed by interactive sessions aimed at
soliciting input. The public meetings occurred at the follow-
ing project milestones:
Plan visioning
Development of alternative concepts
Plan recommendations and implementation
In addition, planning staff attended numerous meetings with
stakeholders throughout the process, including presentations
to registered neighborhood organizations, business associa-
tions and other interest groups.
56


Sheridan Station Area Plan Supporting Documentation
Outreach Methods
In the community
City staff provided meeting notices and copies of informa-
tional material to the registered neighborhood organizations,
business organizations and and City Council offices in the
Sheridan area. City staff also provided notification through
an initial mailing to all property owners within V2 mile of
the station, flyers at the elementary schools in the station
area, presentations to interest groups, postings on the citys
website, and direct contact to plan participants via email and
phone calls.
In the region
City staff sent meeting notices and copies of informational
material to neighboring jurisdictions and our regional part-
ners including:
The Denver Regional Council of Governments
The Regional Transportation District
The Colorado Department of Transportation
The City of Takewood
Denver Public Schools
Denver Public Tibraries
In the media
City staff provided press releases concerning the project and
public meetings to the Rocky Mountain News, the Denver
Post and community newspapers.
57


Sheridan Station Area Plan Supporting Documentation
Public Meetings
Sheridan Visioning Focus Group, February 13, 2007
St. Anthonys Central Hospital Discussion of
opportunities, constraints, examples, and vision for
future. 7 attendees.
Sheridan Visioning Workshop, February 21,
St. Anthonys Central Hospital Discussion
of opportunities, constraints, examples, and vision
for future. 34 attendees.
Sheridan Alternatives Focus Group, May 3, 2007
St. Anthonys Central Hospital Evaluation of
elements of three alternatives based on vision and
goals. 9 attendees.
Sheridan Alternatives Public Workshop, May 22,
2007, Denver Human Services Building- Evaluation
of elements of three alternatives based on vision
and goals. 22 attendees.
Sheridan Plan Recommendations Public Meeting,
November 27, 2007, St. Anthonys Central Hospital-
Discussion of draft plan concept and recommenda-
tions to achieve plan vision. 27 attendees.
Additional Group Meetings and Presentations:
Villa Park Neighborhood Association, Wednesday,
June 27, 2007
Villa Park Neighborhood Association, Tuesday,
July 17, 2007
Sloans Lake Neighborhood Association, Wednesday,
July 11,2007
West Colfax Business Improvement District,
Thursday, July 19, 2007
West Colfax Business Improvement District,
Thursday, October 11, 2007
Planning Board, Tuesday, February 6, 2007
Apartment Association of Metro Denver,
Wednesday, March 21, 2007
Metro Board of Realtors, Friday, December 7, 2007
Workshop Summaries
Visioning Workshop
The Sheridan Station Visioning Workshop was held February
21st, 2007. Thirty four members of the public were in at-
tendance. Tom Hoagland of the City and County of Denver
provided opening remarks. Rob Smetana provided a summa-
ry of the City of Lakewoods station area plan for Sheridan.
Gideon Berger with RTD provided a summary of RTDs
FasTracks planning efforts. David Starnes of BBP provided
information regarding market analysis for the Denver sta-
tion areas. GB Arrington of PB PlaceMaking provided an
overview of transit-oriented development. The full presenta-
tion was available on the City and County of Denver website
(www.denvergov.org/tod). Following the presentation, the at-
tendees were divided into small groups with a facilitator and
notetaker at each table. The following summarizes the notes
from each groups discussion:
Group #1
Improve Sheridan (all the way from Colfax to 6th)
with better sidewalks, lighting, street trees, and active
retail frontages.
Maintain the existing neighborhoods behind
Sheridan to the NV( NE, and SE.
Target new mixed-use development in two primary
areas: at 10th Avenue and along Sheridan.
Development should be in the range of 2-3 stories.
Improve/maintain park.
More neighborhood serving retail uses (barber,
restaurant, neighborhood grocery) are needed
along Sheridan.
Create a mixed-use development at the stations
park-n-Ride.
58


Sheridan Station Area Plan Supporting Documentation
Group #2
Improve Sheridan (from Colfax to 6th) with better
sidewalks, lighting, street trees, etc.
Elevate Sheridan over the rail to better connect the
park below.
Improve park with better amenities and
maintenance.
Encourage quality redevelopment of run down
properties along Sheridan.
Improve intersection of Sheridan and 10th with
better lighting, signals, red light cameras, pedestrian
crossings.
Improve shopping center on the SW comer of
Sheridan and 10th.
Include active uses as part of any parking structure
at the station.
Include bike parking at the station.
Group #3
Need additional community services (community
center, library, police station).
Need street improvements streetscaping sidewalks.
Safety in park- maintenance in park.
Beautify Lakewood Gulch.
More density west of Sheridan at 10th should blend
into the neighborhood.
Preservation of view.
Mixed-use/residential near station. No more than
3-5 stories.
Mixed-use near 10th should blend into
neighborhood.
Group #4
Redefine 10th as a safe pedestrian street with wide
sidewalks, lighting, and the addition of a bicycle
route.
Designate office as the land use behind the
park-n-Ride.
Include a youth center and library as part of the
park-n-Ride facility.
Create two community gathering places within the
park on the east side of Sheridan, at points where
two proposed pedestrian connections would knit the
north and south neighborhoods together.
Preserve the residential character of the NE and
SE neighborhoods.
Promote mixed-use and retail along Colfax.
Group #5
Calm traffic on Sheridan from Colfax to 6th, and
improve with streetscaping.
Improve and maintain park with better lighting.
Encourage quality redevelopment along Sheridan.
Improve intersection at Sheridan and 10th -
perceived high rate of accidents.
Create mixed-use on the SW and SE corners of
Sheridan and 10th, with a good transition to the
adjacent neighborhoods.
Include an active frontage, with coffee shops and
restaurants, along Sheridan as part of any parking
structure at the station.
Create a plaza between the station and the
parking area.
Preserve single-family neighborhoods.
Create connectivity between parks and trails
in the area.
Promote mixed-use and retail at the intersection of
Sheridan and Colfax need a grocery store!
Protect views to downtown.
59


Sheridan Station Area Plan Supporting Documentation
Alternatives Workshop
The Sheridan Station Alternatives Workshop was held on
May 22, 2007. Twenty-two persons were in attendance. Tom
Hoaglund of the City and County of Denver provided
opening remarks. GB Arrington of PB Placemaking gave an
overview of the two concepts developed for the station area
to-date, based on public feedback and design. These con-
cepts are referred to as crash test dummies becasue they
represent different land use scenarios that are not designed
to survive on their own. The purpose of this workshop was
to evaluate each of these concepts in small groups and to
modify them to form a desired land use scenario.
Public comments/questions
Development next to the park should not detract
from views that surrounding homes have to
the park.
How will pedestrians access the park? There will be
elevators on both sides of the park.
Next steps
Following the workshop, the City and design team worked to-
gether to create a recommended TOD concept for the station.
This concept incorporated the public feedback heard to-date.
The recommended concept was presented for public feedback
at an open house in the fall. The full presentation was made
available on the City and County of Denver website.
Sheridan Summary of Group Comments
Clear preference for residential along Sheridan
between Takewood Gulch and 14th Avenue, with
potential for limited ground floor retail.
Create eyes on the park by facing residential onto
Takewood Gulch.
Encourage high density residential with mixed-use in
the station area.
Develop a bicycle and pedestrian framework that
connects north/south (across Takewood Gulch) and
east/west (across Sheridan).
Group 1
Used People by the Park alternative as the base.
Stress residential character on Sheridan with mixed
use on ground floor.
10th Avenue intersection needs improvement-
critical.
Connect into neighborhood with walkable streets
and great streetscapes.
Need for pedestrian friendliness along Sheridan.
Face residential onto the park.
Emphasize bike connections.
Group 2
Preferred Teople by the Park alternative.
Encourage residential along Sheridan (high-density).
Create focal point at the station as part of the bridge
design. Make the bridge open.
Create an inspiring place.
Make it an attraction.
Build a plaza at the mixed-use area just north of
the station.
Draft an IGA between Denver and Takewood for
redevelopment and park improvements to
implement revenue sharing.
Need for pedestrian connections across the Gulch.
Transition residential from high to low to the
neighborhoods through alley or street differentiators
(street preferred).
No detailed discussion on the 10th Avenue
intersection, but the group agreed that redevelop-
ment should happen there and that this intersection
must be improved to provide for the parking
planned in the area.
60


Sheridan Station Area Plan Supporting Documentation
Main Street
5heridan Station


Denver Main Street Zoning-J
Denver Main Street Zoning-?
Denver M*n Street Zoning-1
Commercial Mein SirMi
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better street conditions end
connectivity to north and
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Into Labewood.
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Sheridan Station


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Denver Main Street Zoning-3
Diiivii Main Sin-i-t 7nnirn|-?
Denver Main Street Zoning t
Commercial Main Street
Mixed Use Ret-Hi Node
High Density (40 60 dufeti
Medium Density (25-40 du/tci
LowDensrfy {12-24 du/ac)
Ovif
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Petk-Mii.in Budge
Pedewrian/Blke Connection
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RTD Sturctured Parking with
mixed-use node.
(ULi|ur Ar teii.il with
Improvements to the
IH-dr-sttUn environment and
tranvt *im
CoBoctoi with Improvements
to the pedestrian environment,
Neighborhood pedestrian
priority street. Creating
better street condlions and
connectivity to north and A
south wig bod roods.
Bike Connective extended
into Lakewood.
FwpoudLflht
61


Sheridan Station Area Plan Supporting Documentation
Group 3
Need strong bike and pedestrian connections along
the Gulch.
Build ground floor retail along Sheridan (north
of station) make the zoning flexible to accom-
modate residential and commercial/retail make the
zoning flexible to accommodate residential and
commercial/retail.
Encourage live/work spaces along Sheridan.
Create a walkable neighborhood.
Focus development at the station.
Residential stepped back -dense along Sheridan
and then transition to lower densities in the
neighborhood.
Relevant Plans
The Sheridan Station Area Plan builds upon a solid foundation
of existing documents and guiding principles. This section
provides a review of the applicable content of adopted city-
wide plans. The Sheridan Station Area Plan provides specific rec-
ommendations for the planning area that, in case of conflict,
supersede general recommendations from existing plans.
Comprehensive Plan, 2000
The City Council adopted Denver Comprehensive Plan in 2000.
Plan 2000 provides the planning and policy framework for
development of Denvers human and physical environment.
The key subjects of Plan 2000 that relate to this Station Plan
are land use, mobility, legacies, and housing.
Land Use: Land use recommendations promote
new investment that accommodates new residents,
improves economic vitality and enhances the citys
aesthetics and livability. In addition, Plan 2000
supports sustainable development patterns by
promoting walking, biking and transit use.
Mobility: Plan 2000 emphasizes planning for
multiple modes of transportation walking, biking,
transit and cars. Key concepts include expanding
mobility choices for commuters and regional
cooperation in transit system planning. Plan 2000
also promotes compact, mixed-use development in
transit rich places (like station areas).
Legacies: Plan 2000 prioritizes planning for park,
open space and recreation systems. Historic building
preservation and respect for traditional patterns of
development in established areas are also key tenets
of Plan 2000. To this end, Plan 2000 places a high
value on maintenance of streets, trails, and parkways
that link destinations within the community. Ensur-
ing that new buildings, infrastructure and open
spaces create attractive, beautiful places is the
foundation of the legacies chapter.
Housing: Plan 2000 recognizes that access to
housing is a basic need for Denver citizens. Thus,
Plan 2000 emphasizes preservation and maintenance
of the existing housing stock and expanding housing
options. Providing a variety of unit types and costs,
in addition to housing development in transit rich
places are fundamental tenets of Plan 2000. This
ensures a sustainable balance of jobs and housing as
the city matures.
The Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000, Blueprint Denver, and other
adopted city-wide plans form the basis for recommendations contained
in the Sheridan Station Area Plan.
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Sheridan Station Area Plan Supporting Documentation
Blueprint Denver: An Integrated Land Use and
Transportation Plan, 2002
Plan 2000 recommended that the city create a plan to inte-
grate land use and transportation planning. Blueprint Denver is
the implementation plan that recognizes this relationship and
describes the building blocks and tools necessary to achieve
the vision outlined in Plan 2000.
Areas of Change and Stability: Blueprint Denver divides the
city into areas of change and areas of stability. Over
time, all areas of the city will fluctuate between change and
stability. The goal for areas of stability is to identify and
maintain the character of an area while accommodating
new development and redevelopment. The goal for areas of
change is to channel growth where it will be beneficial and
can best improve access to jobs, housing and services. Blue-
print Denver describes two types of areas of stability: com-
mitted areas and reinvestment areas. Committed areas are
stable neighborhoods that may benefit from the stabilizing
effects of small, individual lot infill development rather than
large-scale land assembly and redevelopment. Reinvestment
areas are neighborhoods with a character that is desirable to
maintain but would benefit from reinvestment and modest
infill. This reinvestment, however, is more limited in com-
parison to that of areas of change.
Transportation: The transportation component of Bluprint
Denver provides transportation building blocks and tools that
promote multimodal and intermodal connections. Elements
of connection include the street system, bus transit system,
bicycle system, and pedestrian system. These components
must work together to realize the guiding principles of Blue-
print Denver.
Zoning Code Update (in development)
Denver citizens called for reform of the Citys Zoning Code
in the 1989 Comprehensive Plan and again in the Denver Compre-
hensive Plan 2000. Bluprint Denver (2002) provided the vision
and initial strategy to begin this effort.
The current zoning code was established in the 1950s and
assumes an automobile oriented land use development pat-
tern. Further, the complexity of the current zoning code
makes it difficult for property owners to easily identify what
is allowed to be built on a given property. That complexity
can make doing quality development more difficult and raises
the cost of doing business in Denver by requiring lengthy
study of our unique and cumbersome zoning code.
The updated zoning code will better reflect the vision of
BluprintDenverbsj promoting proper development in ar-
eas of change while enhancing neighborhood character in
areas of stability.
Transit Oriented Development Strategic Plan, 2006
The Transit Oriented Development (TOD) Strategic Plan prioritizes
the citys planning and implementation efforts related to the
transit system and station area development.
TOD Defined: The TOD Strategic Plan defines
TOD as development near transit that creates
beautiful, vital, walkable neighborhoods; provides
housing, shopping, and transportation choices;
generates lasting value; and provides access to the
region via transit.
TOD Typologies: The TOD Strategic Plan
establishes TOD typologies for every transit station
in the city. Typologies establish a framework to
distinguish the types of places linked by the transit
system. The typologies frame expectations about the
land use mix and intensity of development at each
of the stations.
The Denver Bicycle Master Plan and the Strategic Transportation Plan
63


Sheridan Station Area Plan Supporting Documentation
Station Area Planning: While providing an
important planning framework, the TOD Strategic
Plan calls for more detailed station area plans. Such
plans offer specific direction for appropriate
development, needed infrastructure investments and
economic development strategies.
Bicycle Master Plan, 2002
In 2002 in response to Plan 2000, the Bicycle Master Plan (2002)
provides a framework for an interconnected bicycle system.
The primary objectives of the Bicycle Master Plan are:
Develop new neighborhood routes that create
connections between the existing bicycle route
system and nearby facilities not currently on a
bicycle route.
Close the gaps in the existing bicycle routes to
complete the bicycle grid route system.
Improve access with bike route and trail signage
around light rail stations to make bicycling and
transit work in a seamless manner.
Support education, enforcement and public policy
for the bicycle system.
Lakewood Dry Gulch Park Concept Plan
The Takewood Dry Gulch Park Concept Plan identifies nine de-
sign principles for the Lakewood Dry Gulch. Several of the
principles relate directly to the station area plan including:
Create a continuous non-motorized trail system
linking the western edge of the park to downtown
Denver.
Provide cross slope linkages that safely connect
key areas.
Provide attractive and distinctive railings and
barriers to ensure park user safety, reduce site
degradation and minimize dumping.
Develop light rail stations that also serve as
community parks with strong linkages to water.
Create a design character that unifies all the stations
along the corridor.
Improve streets, turn-arounds and alleys to meet city
standards, upgrade the area and minimize speeding.
Greenprint Denver, 2006
Greenprint Denver \s> an effort to fully integrate sustainability as
a core value and operating principle in Denver city govern-
ment. The Greenprint Denver action agenda for 2006 charts the
citys course over the next five years. Included in Greenprint
Denver action agenda are specific actions that relate directly to
the citys ambitious station area planning effort. For example,
this plan directs the city to decrease reliance on automo-
biles through public transit use and access, and promote
transit-oriented development, as well as bike and pedestrian
enhancements, and increase by 20% the new development
located within V2 mile of existing transit stations by 2011.
Parks and Recreation Game Plan, 2002
The Game Plan is a master plan for the citys park, open
space and recreation system. A primary principle is to create
greener neighborhoods. Game Plan establishes a street tree
and tree canopy goal of 15-18 percent for the entire city. The
plan also establishes a parkland acreage target of 8-10 acres
per 1,000 residents. Tools to accomplish these goals include
promoting green streets and parkways, which indicate routes
that require greater emphasis and additions to the landscape.
Strategic Transportation Plan, 2006
Denver Public Works drafted the Strategic Tranportation Plan
(STP). The STP will be a primary implementation tool for
Blueprint Denver md Plan 2000. The objective of the STP is to
determine needed transportation investments.
The STP process will (1) provide education concerning
options for transportation alternatives; (2) reach consensus
on transportation strategies along transportation corridors
through a collaborative process; and (3) build stakeholder
support.
The STP represents a new approach to transportation plan-
ning in Denver. Instead of forecasting future auto travel on
Denver streets, the STP will forecast person-trips to evaluate
the magnitude of transportation impacts caused by all types
of travel. This person-trip data provides the ability to plan
for bikes, pedestrians, transit, and street improvements. The
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Sheridan Station Area Plan Supporting Documentation
STP is the first step in identifying the needs for every major
travel corridor in the city. The STP will create concepts for
how to meet transportation needs, including a prioritization
of corridor improvements.
Storm Drainage Master Plan (2005) and
Sanitary Sewer Master Plan, 2006
The Storm Drainage Master Plan and the Sanitary Sewer Master
Plan evaluates adequacy of the existing systems assuming
the future land uses identified in Blueprint Denver. The Storm
Drainage Master Plan determines the amount of impervi-
ousness resulting from future land development and the
subsequent runoff. The Sanitary Sewer Master Plan identifies
needed sanitary sewer improvements to respond to the
forecasted development.
Pedestrian Master Plan, 2004
The Pedestrian Master Plan was written to address the mobility
goals of the Comprehensive Plan and Blueprint Denver. Specifi-
cally, the plan calls for a pedestrian environment that is:
safe from automobiles; encourages barrier free pedestrian
mobility; enables pedestrians to move safely and comfort-
ably between places and destinations; attractive, human scale
and encourages walking; and promotes the role of walking
in maintaining health and preventing disease. To achieve
these goals, the plan calls for land use changes to encourage
walking through mixed-use development patterns. The plan
identifies a minimum 13 foot pedestrian zone on all streets
including an 8 foot tree lawn and a 5 foot sidewalk and a
minimum 16 foot pedestrian zone on most arterial streets.
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Sheridan Station Area Plan Supporting Documentation
66


Sheridan Station Area Plan Acknowledgements
67


Sheridan Station Area Plan Acknowledgements
Mayor John Hickenlooper
Denver City Council
Jeanne Robb, Council President, District 10
Rick Garcia, District 1
Jeanne Faatz, District 2
Paul Lopez, District 3
Peggy Lehmann, District 4
Marcia Johnson, District 5
Charlie Brown, District 6
Chris Nevitt, District 7
Carla Madison, District 8
Judy Montero, District 9
Michael Hancock, District 11
Carol Boigon, At-Large
Doug Linkhart, At-Large
Denver Planning Board
Brad Buchanan, Chair
Laura E. Aldrete
Richard Delanoy
William H. Hornby
AnnaJones
Judith Martinez
Sharon Nunnally
Bruce ODonnell
Karen Perez
Jeffrey Walker
Dave Webster
Denver Community Planning & Development
Peter J. Park, Director
Catherine Cox-Blair, TOD Program Manager
Steve Gordon, Comprehensive Planning Manager
Thomas Hoaglund, Project Manager
Chris Gleissner, Senior City Planner
Barbara Frommell, Senior City Planner
Caryn Wenzara, Senior City Planner
Gideon Berger, Senior City Planner
Steve Nalley, Associate City Planner
Eric McClelland, Senior GIS Analyst
Andrea Santoro, Senior GIS Analyst
Carolyne Janssen, Graphic Design
Jim Ottenstein, Graphic Design
Denver Public Works
Bob Kochaver, FasTracks Liaison
Crissy Fanganello, Manager Public Works Infrastructure and
Programming
Eric Osmundsen, Senior Engineer
Justin Schmitz, Engineer
James Mackay, Bicycle Planning and Cost Estimation
Cynthia Patton, Associate City Planner
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Sheridan Station Area Plan Acknowledgements
Denver Parks & Recreation
Gordon Robertson, Assistant Director
Devon Buckles, Parks Planner
Keith French, Parks Planner
Office of Economic Development
Andre Pettigrew, Executive Director
William Kralovek, Transit Oriented Development
Michael Miera, Housing and Neighborhood Development
Rejean Peeples, Community Development Program Specialist
Denver Urban Renewal Authority
Grant Bennett, Redevelopment Specialist
Regional Transportation District
Bill Sirois, Transit Oriented Development
Dennis Cole, West Corridor Project Manager
City of Lakewood
Roger Wadnal, Economic Planning Manager
Rob Smetana, Principal Planner
Consultant Team:
PB Placemaking, Urban Design Consultant
Fehr and Peers, Transportation Consultant
Navjoy Consulting Services, Traffic Consultant
Hartwig & Associates, Cost Estimating Consultant
Basile Baumann Prost & Associates, Economic Consultant
ArLand
Nelson Nygaard
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Full Text

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Sheridan Station Area Plan Community Planning & DevelopmentAdopted June 8, 2009 SheridanStation Area Plan

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Sheridan Station Area PlanTable of ContentsExecutive Summary i Introduction 1 Vision and Goals 9 The Plan Concept 15 Land Use and Urban Design 16 Circulation and Mobility Plan 25 Parking 30 Economic Opportunity 32 Implementation and Next Steps 35 Supporting Documentation 43 The Community 44 Public Engagement 56 Relevant Plans 62 Acknowledgements 67

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Sheridan Station Area Plan Executive Summaryi Executive Summary

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Sheridan Station Area Plan Executive Summary ii IntroductionThe FasTracks transit corridors are a source of pride and excitement for neighborhoods and businesses in Denver. Opportunities for changes to land use, design and mobility exist at each new station. Through the planning process, community members worked together with the station area planning team to articulate these opportunities and craft strategies to achieve the communitys vision. The Sheridan light rail station will be located on RTDs West Corridor light rail line in Lakewood Gulch near the intersection of 12th Avenue and Sheridan Boulevard. The station lies at the boundary between the City of Lakewood and the City and County of Denver. The West Corridor will link Lakewood and Jefferson County with Downtown Denver and tie into the future FasTracks system of rapid transit corridors. The station platform is planned to be located under a newly constructed Sheridan Boulevard bridge adjacent to an

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Sheridan Station Area Plan Executive Summaryiii The Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000, Blueprint Denver, and other adopted city-wide plans form the basis for recommendations contained in the Sheridan Station Area Plan.800 space park-n-Ride structure at 10th Avenue and Sheridan. Both the new bridge and park-n-Ride will be built as part of FasTracks. The Sheridan Station Area Plan articulates near and long-term goals, issues, and recommendations for the future. The plan provides a guide to determine appropriate development, including recommendations for land-use patterns, urban design, circulation, and infrastructure. The Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000, Blueprint Denver and other adopted city-wide plans form the basis for recommendations contained in the Sheridan Station Area Plan Vision and Goals Transit-oriented development is a mix of uses at various densities within a 10-minute walk, or about a half-mile, of a transit stop. TOD integrates transit into neighborhoods and creates lively and vital communities. From discussions with the public and through a series of meetings with the city and other constituents in the station area, the following goals were established for the plan: Create strong pedestrian connections between the light rail station and Colfax Avenue along Sheridan Boulevard. Protect and enhance the existing residential neighborhoods around the station by providing infrastructure improvements and new uses to increase the number of people living near the Illustrative concepts were used to convey the vision and goals as they apply to the plan area. station and support new convenience retail uses. Incorporate Lakewood Dry Gulch into the station design and bring new uses to its edge that will increase the number of people along the park and create a safer park environment. Create a safe and convenient pedestrian environment in the station area by improving access along and across Sheridan Boulevard from 6th Avenue to 17th Avenue. Develop a station identity that re ects the best aspects of the surrounding neighborhoods and the Lakewood Dry Gulch amenity. Provide pedestrian-priority solutions that increase safety at key streets and intersections. These goals formed the basis of the speci c land use concepts and recommendations of the plan.

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Sheridan Station Area Plan Executive Summary ivThe Plan: Land Use and Urban DesignThe future land use plan for the Sheridan Station was developed with the community at two public workshops. The plan includes the following priorities: Colfax Avenue: the Sheridan Station Area should support redevelopment of Colfax Avenue. Lakewood Dry Gulch: Lakewood Dry Gulch is the main amenity of the area: new uses should front onto the gulch to increase access and visibility. Sheridan Boulevard from 6th Avenue to 17th Avenue: Sheridan Boulevard is the main north/ south connector for both pedestrians and vehicles. 10th Avenue and Sheridan park-n-Ride facility: the new park-n-Ride facility provides an opportunity to create a linkage between development and the station. Mixed income and market rate housing: new housing developed in the station area needs to include a mix of housing types and incomes. Coordination: close coordination with the City of Lakewood in planning for future development and infrastructure improvements. The Plan: Circulation and MobilityThe circulation plan identi es the key connections for vehicles, pedestrians and bicycles throughout the station area. Streets that should be priorities for pedestrian improvements include: Sheridan Boulevard, the key north/south arterial. Colfax Avenue, the primary east/west arterial. 10th and 14th Avenues, the main east/west collector streets around the station. Other key elements of the circulation plan: Creation of a continuous 11th Avenue on the south side of Lakewood Gulch and 12th Avenue on the north side of Lakewood Gulch on the east side of Sheridan to improve park access and visibility and to help organize development. A new intersection and 13th Avenue connection at Sheridan Boulevard to provide safer and more direct access to the neighborhoods.The land use and urban design section of the plan contains descriptions and images of the type of TOD appropriate for the Sheri dan Station

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Sheridan Station Area Plan Executive Summaryv Illustrative cross sections tied to section lines on the concept plan map show how streets and buildings will interact Section #2 12th Avenue Park Corridor Looking West Section #1 10th Avenue Mixed Use Cross SectionCross sections are shown to re ect existing lane-width standards of the Denver Fire Department and Public Works. These standards may change prior to implementation as a result of future discussions concerning multi-modal design goals identi ed in Blueprint Denver and the Strategic Transportation Plan. Cross sections are shown to re ect existing lane-width standards of the Denver Fire Department and Public Works. These standards may change prior to implementation as a result of future discussions concerning multi-modal design goals identi ed in Blueprint Denver and the Strategic Transportation Plan.

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Sheridan Station Area Plan Executive Summary vi SHERIDAN Cowell Elementary SchoolMountair Park T Lakewood Low Density Lakewood Low Density Lakewood Low Density Lakewood Low Density Lakewood High Density Lakewood High Density Lakewood High Density Lakewood High Density Lakewood Medium Density Lakewood Medium Density Lakewood Medium Density Lakewood Medium Density Lakewood Medium Density Lakewood Medium Density La k e w ood Comme r cial Lakewood Commercial La k e w ood Comme r cial Lakewood Commercial La k e w ood High Density Lakewood High Density Lakewood Station Core Lakewood Station Core P 10th Ave Sheridan SheridanColfax Ave Colfax Ave 12th 11th 10th Ave tS aibone Z Y tS seta tS semA Depew St Mixed UseProposed Land Use Existing Plans and ZoningArea FeaturesStation Residential Townhouse Residential W est Corridor Light Rail Line RTD Parking Structure Active building street frontage Section Lines Light Rail Station Parks, Open Space and Drainageways P MS-3 MS-2 MS-2 MS-1 12th Denver / Lakewood Boundary T 1 2 3Sheridan Land Use and Urban Design Concept Existing Main Street Zoning MS-1 Existing Main Street Zoning MS-2 Existing Main Street Zoning MS-3 Urban Neighborhood Urban Neighborhood Urban Neighborhood Urban Neighborhood T Lakewood Station Plan Beth Jacob High School La k e w ood Comme r cial Lakewood Commercial La k e w ood Comme r cial Lakewood Commercial La k e w ood Comme r cial Lakewood Commercial

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Sheridan Station Area Plan Executive Summaryvii SHERIDAN La k e w ood L o w Density Lakewood Low Density La k e w ood L o w Density Lakewood Low Density SheridanColfax Colfax Mixed Use Station Residential Townhouse Residential W est Corridor Light Rail Line Pedestrian Improvements New Local Street or Connection Recreational T rail / Bike W ay Signalized Intersection RTD Parking Structure Bus Routes Major arterial Collector Pedestrian Priority Street On-street bike routes Light Rail Station P Pedestrian Bridge MS-3 MS-2 MS-1 12th M S 2 12h Y tS seta tS semA t S n ot neB t S n ot neB Depew St Depew St P t S aiboneZ P 14th 14th 11th 12th Ave 12th 13th Mountair Park Colfax Ave Sheridan Blvd Sheridan Blvd Colfax Ave 16 9 9 9 16 51 51 T T Sheridan Circulation Concept TDenver / Lakewood Boundary D Dep e S wSt Dep e wSt Cowell Elementary School Existing Main Street Zoning MS-1 Existing Main Street Zoning MS-2 Existing Main Street Zoning MS-3 Lakewood Station Plan Parks, Open Space and Drainageways Beth Jacob High SchoolProposed Land Use Existing Plans and Zoning Area Features Lakewood Medium Density Lakewood Medium Density Lakewood Medium Density Lakewood Medium Density Lakewood High Density Lakewood High Density Lakewood High Density Lakewood High Density Lakewood High Density Lakewood Medium Density Lakewood Medium Density Lakewood Commercial Lakewood Commercial Lakewood Commercial Lakewood Commercial Lakewood Commercial Lakewood Commercial Lakewood Commercial Lakewood Commercial Lakewood Commercial Lakewood Commercial La k e w ood High Density Lakewood High Density Urban Neighborhood Urban Neighborhood Urban Neighborhood Urban NeighborhoodLakewood Station Core Lakewood Station Core

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Sheridan Station Area Plan Executive Summary viiiImplementation and Next StepsThe implementation plan for the Sheridan Station is intended to lay out the framework to enable development and infrastructure consistent with the plan. The Sheridan implementation plan covers a series of actions: Speci c recommendations Strategies for implementation Implementation timing Citywide TOD implementation evaluation Speci c recommendations are listed in tables in the implementation section. The most immediate steps include plan adoption followed by rezonings that provide the regulatory framework to implement the recommendations. Rezonings should occur within the context and timeframe of Denvers zoning code update. It is anticipated that new zone districts will be available under the updated code that will be suited to the unique development character of station areas. Another immediate step includes the scoping of infrastructure projects and the identi cation of potential funding sources to implement the infrastructure needed in the station area. These infrastructure improvements should be pursued through both public-private partnerships between the city, businesses, landowners and the development community as well as public-public partnerships between local, regional, state and federal agencies.Improving the pedestrian environment along Sheridan Boulevard is a top priority for implementing the plan vision First Tier Implementation Recommendations and Timing It is important for the city to make the Sheridan Station development ready. Development ready includes: Getting new zoning in place Identifying an implementation toolbox both nancial and regulatory Putting in place the partnerships with other City departments, Lakewood, CDOT and RTD Moving forward with a jointly lead and de ned project for the park-n-Ride with RTD, the City of Denver and private and public input. Timeframe: Short -now to mid 2013 (opening of West Corridor)

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Sheridan Station Area Plan Introduction1 Introduction

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Sheridan Station Area Plan Introduction 2 The West Corridor and Sheridan StationThe Sheridan Station is one of 57 new transit stations to be added as part of the FasTracks program, and one of 11 on the West Corridor Light Rail project. The Sheridan Station is located at approximately 12th Avenue and Sheridan Boulevard along Lakewood Gulch. With the exception of a few areas, Sheridan Boulevard forms the boundary between the city and County of Denver and the City of Lakewood in Jefferson County. The light rail line will pass under Sheridan Boulevard and the station platform will be located directly beneath Sheridan with access to the platform from each side of Sheridan. The station area extends from approximately 8th Avenue to Colfax Avenue along Sheridan Boulevard. The station is one of four stations in Denver on the West Corridor Light Rail line. The area has been identi ed by the Denver TransitOriented Development Strategic Plan as an urban neighborhood station, with residential and local-serving retail uses.The Sheridan Station is one of 11 new stations being constructed as part of the West Corridor. The West Corridor light rail wi ll connect west Denver neighborhoods with employment centers in Jefferson County, downtown Denver and the FasTracks corridors linking the entire regio n. Union Station Auraria West Red Rocks CC Federal CenterAlameda Ave. 20th Ave.Edgewater Wheat Ridge Golden Morrison Lakewood Englewood Denver North Metro Corridor US 36 BRT Corridor Northwest Corridor Gold Line East Corridor Southeast Corridor Southwest CorridorColfax Ave. 26th Ave. 32nd Ave. 38th Ave. 44th Ave. Mississippi Ave. Florida Ave. Hampden Jewell Ave. Evans Ave. JeCo Government Center Federal Sheridan Garrson Wadsworth Perry Lamar Oak KnoxKipling St. Wadsworth Blvd. Sheridan Blvd. Federal Blvd.Federal Blvd. Sheridan Blvd. Wadsworth Blvd. Kipling St. Broadway Downing St. 285 25 70 70 76 Light Rail Rapid Transit park-n-Ride Station Without ParkingFinal alignment and technology to be determined during the environmental study process N

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Sheridan Station Area Plan Introduction3 The Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000, Blueprint Denver, and other adopted city-wide plans form the basis for recommendations contained in the Sheridan Station Area Plan.Purpose of the PlanThe Sheridan Station Area Plan articulates near and longterm goals, issues, and recommendations for future development. The plan provides a guide to determine appropriate development, including recommendations for land-use patterns, urban design, circulation, and infrastructure. The Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000, Blueprint Denver and other adopted city-wide plans such as the Pedestrian Master Plan and parks Game Plan form the basis for recommendations contained in the Sheridan Station Area Plan The plan also examined the adopted West Colfax Plan and Villa Park Neighborhood Plans. Once adopted, the Sheridan Station Area Plan will serve as a supplement to the Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000 The plan is not an of cial zoning map, nor does it create or deny any rights. Property owners, elected of cials, neighborhood organizations and city departments will use the Sheridan Station Area Plan for many purposes over its lifespan. The following is a description of the primary uses of the plan ranging from general goals to implementation. Data Resource: The plan offers data on existing conditions for the planning area in an easy-toreference document. Reinvestment Guidance: The plan guides public and private decisionmaking and investment in the planning area over the coming years as it relates to land use, urban design and mobility. Zoning Amendments: The plan does not convey or deny any zoning entitlement but is an essential evaluation tool used in proposed zoning changes. Capital Improvements: A plan can provide the justi cation for the allocation of funding from the citys capital improvement budget and other sources. Funding and Partnership Opportunities: Implementation of plans requires a collaborative effort between neighborhoods, businesses, elected of cials, city departments and neighboring jurisdictions. This plan identi es and supports partnerships and resource leveraging efforts. Reference for Larger City-Wide Plans: The station area plan may include analysis that can inform other larger city-wide plans. The analysis and recommendations included here should be considered in the future development of the Strategic Parking Plan and updates to Blueprint Denver. The FasTracks System

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Sheridan Station Area Plan Introduction 4Plan ProcessThe planning, design, construction and opening of the expanded FasTracks transit corridors are a source of pride and excitement for neighborhoods and businesses in Denver. Opportunities for changes to land use, design and mobility exist at each new station in Denver. Over a course of approximately eighteen months, community members worked together with city staff and the station area planning team to articulate these opportunities, develop a vision and craft strategies to achieve the vision. These community members represented businesses, developers and residents in the area. The planning area (within Council Districts 1 and 3) contains part of the Villa Park and West Colfax neighborhoods. In addition, the process involved collaboration between the City and County of Denver, RTD and the City of Lakewood. Regular public meetings shaped plan contents and concepts were reviewed before City Council, agency staff and the Denver Planning Board. The overall process included the following steps: Existing conditions analysis Draft vision and key objectives Identify opportunities and constraints Public visioning workshop Develop and analyze plan alternatives Technical review of plan concepts Alternative concepts public workshop Develop preferred plan alternative with public input Draft station area concept plan Public open house to present draft station area plan Plan re nements Planning Board review and approval Plan adoption by City CouncilStation Area ContextThe Sheridan Station Area includes portions of the West Colfax and Villa Park neighborhoods in Denver and the Molholm neighborhood in Lakewood. The Lakewood portion of the station area has been addressed in the Sheridan Boulevard Station Area Plan adopted by the City of Lakewood in November of 2006. All references to the station area in this plan refer to the area located within the City and County of Denver within 1/2 mile of the station, unless otherwise noted.Existing Land Use and ZoningThe current residential land use in the Sheridan Station Area is a mixture of single-family and low-rise multi-family residential with some higher-density apartment buildings. Approximately 86 percent of the land area is zoned R-2, R-2-A, R-3 or R-4. These zone districts all allow multi-unit dwellings. Only about 12 percent of the 1/2 mile station area is zoned for commercial or main street commercial mixed-use development -concentrated along Colfax Avenue and the intersection of 10th Avenue and Sheridan.Sheridan Station Area Existing Land Use

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Sheridan Station Area Plan Introduction5Population and HousingAccording to 2008 data from the City and County of Denver, the station area within Denver contains 2,068 housing units with a population of 5,368 residents. The average household size was 3.09 persons per household. The station area average household income of $40,619 is slightly lower than the city-wide average of $49,373. The average sales price for single family homes in the station area was $185,397 in 2006; for condominiums it was $127,500.Retail and CommercialNeighborhood services, such as grocery stores and other retail services, are limited within the station area. The closest major grocery and department store shopping is located in the City of Edgewater at 18th Avenue and Sheridan Boulevard, approximately one mile from the station. Colfax Avenue is a historic commercial corridor that has been targeted for retail development in the West Colfax Plan Currently, West Colfax Avenue has many auto-oriented retail uses and motels but is envisioned to become an active, pedestrian shopping environment. Strip retail is located on the southeast and southwest corners of the 10th Avenue and Sheridan Boulevard intersection.Schools and Public FacilitiesCowell Elementary School is located within the 1/2 mile station area at 10th Avenue and Vrain Street. In addition, the Beth Jacobs High School is located northeast of the the proposed station at 14th Avenue, with a dormitory located near the light rail station. Beth Jacobs High School is a private, all-girls religious school. No recreation facilities, libraries, re stations, police stations, or post of ces are located with the 1/2 mile station area. St. Anthonys Hospital is located approximately one-mile to the northeast of the station. However, the hospital is closing in mid-2010 and will be moving to a new facility at the Denver Federal Center in Lakewood. Efforts are underway to plan for the redevelopment of the site.Parks and Open SpaceLakewood Gulch is the principal de ning open space feature in the station area. It is considered an important recreational amenity by the surrounding neighborhoods. Most of the undeveloped area along the Lakewood Dry Gulch is owned by the City and County of Denver and will become dedicated parkland following the completion of the West Corridor project. To the northwest of the station, Mountair Park in the City of Lakewood contains outdoor recreational facilities and ball elds.Lakewood Gulch is an important neighborhood amenity Sheridan Station Area Existing Zoning

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Sheridan Station Area Plan Introduction 6TransportationThe station area is dominated by Sheridan Boulevard (Colorado State Highway 95), a ve-lane regional arterial with a continuous center turn-lane. The posted speed limit is 35 miles-per-hour. Sheridan Boulevard lacks sidewalks on one or both sides of the street in many sections. Key signalized intersections along Sheridan Boulevard include 10th Avenue, 14th Avenue and W. Colfax Avenue. Colfax Avenue is also US Highway 40 with a posted speed limit of 30 miles-per-hour. The remaining streets surrounding the station area are generally built on the Denver grid system. However, along the edge of Lakewood Gulch, many streets do not connect and the street grids are off-set creating dif cult intersections. In addition, 13th Avenue does not connect between Sheridan Boulevard and Yates Street and between Vrain and Wolf streets further to the east. Alleys provide vehicle and loading access to most residential and commercial properties. The station area includes three RTD bus routes: Route 51 along Sheridan Boulevard Routes 16 and 16L (limited) along West Colfax Avenue Route 9 along 10th Avenue There are many problems with the existing condition of Sheridan Boulevard including poor pedestrian conditions. Station Area Bus Service 2006Source: RTD 2006 Service Standards Analysis Weekday Total Peak Boardings Route Frequency 2006 51 30 min 834,535 16 15 min 1,859,751 16L 15 min 629,175 9 30 min 323,677 Bus stops for route 51 include stops at 10th and Sheridan and 12th and Sheridan. Bus stops in the station area are marked by signs but many stops lack benches, shelter or route and schedule information. The Lakewood Dry Gulch Trail, Denver bicycle route D-10, is the primary off-street bicycle and pedestrian path in the vicinity of the station. The east-west path parallels the railroad line through the station area and will connect underneath the new Sheridan Boulevard bridge being constructed as part of the West Corridor light rail project. The Denver Bicycle Master Plan Update (2001) recommends a future off-street trail connection along Lakewood Gulch to Martinez Park, located southeast of the station at 9th and Raleigh Street. In addi-

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Sheridan Station Area Plan Introduction7Sheridan Station Area Bicycle and Transit Routes

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Sheridan Station Area Plan Introduction 8Sheridan Boulevard, showing a section with a 3 attached sidewalk. tion, The D-12 bicycle route is an on-street bicycle route that runs along 10th Avenue through the station area. Most of the existing sidewalks in the station area are narrow in width. Attached three-foot sidewalks predominate in most of the residential and commercial areas. The Denver Pedestrian Master Plan (2004) calls for a minimum 13-foot pedestrian area along streets. The pedestrian area typically consists of a ve-foot detached sidewalk and an eight-foot tree lawn. Along transit corridors and busy commercial streets, a minimum 16 foot pedestrian zone is recommended. With the exception of Sheridan Boulevard, most other streets allow on-street parking. On-street parking is allowed only during limited hours on Colfax Avenue. In addition, most businesses and residential properties provide their own off-street parking.

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Sheridan Station Area Plan Vision and Goals9 Vision & Goals

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Sheridan Station Area Plan Vision and Goals 10Vision StatementThe Sheridan Station will develop over the coming decades into the vibrant center of a diverse, transit-supportive and economically sustainable urban neighborhood. Residents of all ages, incomes and backgrounds will be drawn to the convenience and amenities of this location. Improved sidewalks will tie the light rail station with Main Street development on Colfax Avenue a short distance to the north. Development of new housing along Sheridan Boulevard and Lakewood Gulch will allow more people to live near the light rail connecting them to jobs in downtown Denver and Lakewoods Federal Center. The increased population base will support a variety of new neighborhood retail services near the station and on Colfax Avenue including food stores, dry cleaners, hardware stores, restaurants and child care centers. Sheridan Boulevard will be transformed by new development and improvements coordinated between Denver, the City of Lakewood and the Colorado Department of Transportation. Buildings on both sides of Sheridan will complement the street and the transit station thanks to the close coordination and cooperation between the cities of Denver and Lakewood. Pedestrian improvements on Sheridan will make walking to the station easy and convenient from the neighborhoods to the south and the north. Improvements to the street grid along the edge of Lakewood Gulch will allow new buildings to face the park and bring more visibility and activity to this neighborhood amenity. Parents will be able to watch their children play in the park from their front windows, doors and balconies. People from across Denver and Lakewood will use the parks regional bicycle trail for both transportation and recreation. 10th Avenue will remain an important connection for neighborhoods to the east and west, allowing residents to conveniently walk or bicycle to the station. A new street connection at 13th Avenue will also help to improve access to Sheridan Boulevard for nearby residents. New development will be high-quality and architecturally interesting with ground oors and building entrances that open onto the sidewalk, creating a feeling of inclusiveness and activity. Buildings will be of a scale that helps create a sense of enclosure and safety for pedestrians as they walk to their destinations. More intense development will be centered along Sheridan Boulevard, Colfax Avenue and the Lakewood Gulch corridor, transitioning to quieter, interior urban neighborhoods to the northwest and southwest of the station. The 800 space RTD park-n-Ride will be designed to encourage activity near the intersection of 10th and Sheridan. Opportunities to integrate transit supportive and civic uses with the parking structure will provide a catalyst for change in the area. Although this is a vision for the future, it shows what can be achieved through coordinated change and investment in transit. To achieve this vision, cooperation between Denver, Lakewood and their regional partners will be necessary to guide the incremental change. Creating a vision is an important rst step in identifying goals and methods to achieve them. This vision should guide the future of the area and direct positive change as it occurs over time.Foundation of TOD PrinciplesDeveloping the communitys vision began with the underlying principles of transit-oriented development. Transitoriented development is a mix of uses at various densities within a half-mile radius, or walking distance, of a transit stop. TOD should create speci c areas that integrate transit into neighborhoods and help support lively, walkable and vital communities. The TOD Strategic Plan de nes TOD in Denver and establishes strategies for implementation. In order to succeed, TOD should address these ve guiding principles. Place-making: Create safe, comfortable, varied and attractive station areas with a distinct identity.

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Sheridan Station Area Plan Vision and Goals11

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Sheridan Station Area Plan Vision and Goals 12 Rich Mix of Choices: Provide housing, employment, transportation and shopping choices for people of all ages, household types, incomes and lifestyles. Location Ef ciency: Place homes, jobs, shopping, entertainment, parks and other amenities close to the station to promote walking, biking and transit use. Value Capture: Encourage all stakeholders residents, business owners, RTD and the city to take full economic advantage of the amenity of enhanced transit services. Portal to the Region: Understand and maximize the stations role as an entry to the regional transit network and as a safe pleasant and private place to live. Opportunities and ConstraintsThe Sheridan Station has excellent potential for future development because of the strong existing neighborhood base in the surrounding area, the proximity of Lakewood Dry Gulch and the recreational and green space opportunities it brings, the desirability of parcels close to the station for redevelopment near the light rail line, beautiful views to the mountains and downtown along Lakewood Dry Gulch, and consistent access from both Sheridan Boulevard and Colfax Avenue. The City of Lakewood has also planned and rezoned to the west of the station area to allow for transit related uses and higher density with the potential to spur development around the station. One of the biggest constraints in the study area is the condition of Sheridan Boulevard with its inadequate sidewalks and heavy traf c ow. This street is currently a barrier to pedestrians because of the limited opportunities to cross, particularly near the station. While the new light rail station location will help to solve some of these issues, the street will remain a challenge for pedestrians. The changing conditions highlight the need to create a safer pedestrian environment while preserving the functionality of the roadway for through traf c. Another constraint that currently exists is the limited opportunity for joint development with RTDs planned 800 space parking structure. RTDs current enabling legislation limits the types of uses that RTD can jointly develop on property that it owns. This use restriction currently makes it dif cult to pursue mixed-use joint development on RTD property. A change in state legislation would be required to make possible many of the mixed-use, joint development goals that the plan identi es for the parking structure.Community Needs and DesiresThe community around the Sheridan Station includes an active and involved group of citizens. The registered neighborhood organizations include the Villa Park Neighborhood Association and the Sloans Lake Citizens Group. They have been involved in the West Colfax Area Plan, the St. Anthonys Hospital Redevelopment Plan, the West Corridor Environmental Impact Statement process, and the Main Street Zoning for West Colfax Avenue. Because of these previous planning efforts, many citizens are well informed and involved in land use and planning issues in the neighborhood. Many of these same citizens have attended the design workshops and focus groups for the Sheridan Station. With this input, plans have been developed that re ect the vision and desires of the neighborhoods that surround the station. Above, above right: The community played an active role in the planning process.

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Sheridan Station Area Plan Vision and Goals13Sheridan Station GoalsFrom discussions with the public and through a series of meetings with the city and other constituents around the station, the following goals were established to develop the concept plan: Create strong pedestrian connections between the light rail station and Colfax Avenue along Sheridan Boulevard. Create a safe and convenient pedestrian environment in the station area by improving access along and across Sheridan Boulevard from 6th Avenue to 17th Avenue and across Sheridan Boulevard. Protect and enhance the existing residential neighborhoods around the station by providing infrastructure improvements. Encourage new development near the station that will increase the population base and support neighborhood retail uses. Incorporate Lakewood Dry Gulch into the station design and bring new uses to its edge that will increase the number of people along the park and create a safer park environment. Develop a station identity within the corridor that re ects the surrounding neighborhoods. Enhance pedestrian connections in all directions. Provide pedestrian-priority solutions that increase the safety at key streets and intersections. Design solutions to provide eyes on the park -more visibility of the park so park users feel safe. Opportunities for new development should increase housing supply and diversity and preserve affordable housing stock in the area. These goals form the basis for the land use, urban design and mobility concepts presented in this plan. They also guide the implementation recommendations intended to make the plan vision a reality. These goals form the basis for the land use, urban design and mobility concepts presented in this plan. They also guide the implementation recommendations intended to make the plan vision a reality.

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Sheridan Station Area Plan Vision and Goals 14

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Sheridan Station Area Plan The Plan Concept15 The Plan Concept

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Sheridan Station Area Plan The Plan Concept 16Land Use and Urban DesignThe land use plan for the Sheridan Station was developed with the community at two public workshops with additional input gathered through small group meetings and stakeholder interviews. The plan re ects the desires of the community and the goals for the project. The station area should support commercial development along Colfax Avenue and use of the light rail by focusing denser residential development opportunities in the station area. While Colfax Avenue will be the focus, the highest densities near the station are planned around the intersection of 10th Avenue and Sheridan Boulevard. The separation of commercial uses on Colfax Avenue from the station and the impact of Lakewood Dry Gulch on neighborhood connectivity both increase the importance of rebuilding Sheridan Boulevard as a more walkable and pedestrian friendly street. New residential development should be placed along Lakewood Dry Gulch, with the highest densities along the gulch, transitioning to lower densities adjacent to the interior neighborhoods. The plan includes the following priorities: Colfax Avenue: the Sheridan Station Area should support the Colfax Avenue redevelopment. Lakewood Dry Gulch: Lakewood Dry Gulch is the main amenity of the area. New uses should front onto the gulch. Sheridan Boulevard from 6th Avenue to 17th Avenue: Sheridan Boulevard should be the main north/south connector for both pedestrians and vehicles and should support new residential and mixed-use development. 10th Avenue and Sheridan park-n-Ride facility: the new park-n-Ride facility provides an opportunity to create a linkage between development and the station. Mixed income and market rate housing: the new housing that is provided in the station area needs to include a mix of housing types and incomes. Close coordination with the City of Lakewood in the development around the station and for Sheridan Boulevard improvements. The following pages contain descriptions of the land use concept components. Section lines on the land use concept map correspond to the street cross section views.Land Use Plan ComponentsMixed Use Development (4-7 Stories) The mixed use areas contain the highest-intensity of use and are located directly adjacent to the light rail station focused around the intersection of 10th Avenue and Sheridan Boulevard. The intent is to provide active groundoor uses, such as retail, and encourage higher density residential or employment uses in the upper levels directly around the station. South of Lakewood Gulch, mixed-use development of 4-7 stories could develop from Sheridan Boulevard east to Xavier Street. East of Xavier, lower density urban residential is planned between Xavier and Wolff streets. Station Residential (3-5 Stories) Station residential uses are focused along the north side of Lakewood Dry Gulch and will provide the eyes on the park that were desired by the community. This area would be residential without any retail or commercial uses on the ground oors due to the location and limited frontage and access for those types of uses. Townhouse Residential (2-3 Stories) The urban residential uses are intended to be a transition use between the higher densities around the station and Lakewood Dry Gulch and the existing neighborhoods. These uses should be predominantly townhouses with tuck-under parking behind the units, or some other type of attached unit with parking accessed from an alley.

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Sheridan Station Area Plan The Plan Concept17Existing Urban Neighborhood Areas The areas outside the colored portions of the map should retain their existing character as urban neighborhoods through reinvestment. These urban neighborhood areas were de ned in the 2006 West Colfax Plan as consisting of a range of development intensities with housing options appropriate for a central city location including single-family houses, carriage houses, duplexes, apartments, townhomes, row houses and condominiums. City of Lakewood Zoning Through a separate planning process in 2006 and 2007, the City of Lakewood developed a land use plan and new zoning for property within their jurisdiction on the west side of Sheridan. The Lakewood plan calls for higher density around the station with their station core located at the southwest corner of Sheridan Boulevard and 10th Avenue. Lakewood proposes commercial uses along the west side of Sheridan, with medium and lower density residential to the west to Depew Street that transition in size and scale to the existing neighborhood. Lakewood Dry Gulch Lakewood Dry Gulch is the primary physical asset of the station area and the community. It is currently open space owned by the City and County of Denver and should be changed to a city park designation once the West Corridor Line opens in 2013. Improvements in the gulch should include trails and additional landscape and pedestrian improvements such as pedestrian crossings, signage, and lighting where required and as identi ed in the Lakewood Dry Gulch Park Concept Plan. The gulch is located at a low point in the station area, with slopes to the north and south. This creates views of the mountains and downtown from the perimeter of the gulch. Residential development along 11th and 12th Avenues should take advantage of the topography and views provided by the gulch. These streets will provide better access and visibility to this currently hidden asset. RTD Light Rail Station and park n-Ride The new light rail station on the West Corridor will be located between 11th Avenue and 12th Avenue, directly adjacent to the north side of Lakewood Dry Gulch. The station platform will be below a new bridge at Sheridan Boulevard (part of the FasTracks project). Access to the platform will be located on each side of Sheridan via stairs and elevators. A small plaza will be built with the station below the new Sheridan Boulevard bridge. The parking structure for the park-n-Ride will be located on the south side of Lakewood Dry Gulch, west of Sheridan Boulevard and north of 10th Avenue. The parking structure will be accessed from both Sheridan Boulevard and 10th Avenue connecting to the light rail platform under Sheridan Boulevard and will include approximately 800 parking spaces. RTD is issuing an RFP for a private partner in a joint development project that will encourage ancillary development within the parking structure that is within the constraints of RTDs enabling legislation. Station-oriented convenience retail or a civic use is envisioned along the rst oor to wrap the parking structure to promote street activity on 10th Avenue and Ames Street. West Colfax Avenue A plan for West Colfax Avenue was adopted by the Denver City Council in 2006, followed by legislative rezoning of parcels to Main Street zoning in 2007. The plan recommends mixed-use development with buildings oriented to the sidewalk. The intensity of the Main Street zoning categories differ along Colfax Avenue through the station vicinity, with the greatest intensity (MS-3) at the Colfax and Sheridan intersection. The Colfax corridor should contain some of the most intense retail and employment uses in the station area, complementing potential new development opportunities directly adjacent to the station. Tying Colfax Avenue to the station area will be of critical importance to support the development goals of the plan.

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Sheridan Station Area Plan The Plan Concept 18 SHERIDAN Cowell Elementary SchoolMountair Park T Lakewood Low Density Lakewood Low Density Lakewood Low Density Lakewood Low Density Lakewood High Density Lakewood High Density Lakewood High Density Lakewood High Density Lakewood Medium Density Lakewood Medium Density Lakewood Medium Density Lakewood Medium Density Lakewood Medium Density Lakewood Medium Density La k e w ood Comme r cial Lakewood Commercial La k e w ood Comme r cial Lakewood Commercial La k e w ood High Density Lakewood High Density Lakewood Station Core Lakewood Station Core P 10th Ave Sheridan SheridanColfax Ave Colfax Ave 12th 11th 10th Ave tS a iboneZ Y tS seta tS semA Dep e w St Mixed UseProposed Land Use Existing Plans and ZoningArea FeaturesStation Residential Townhouse Residential W est Corridor Light Rail Line RTD Parking Structure Active building street frontage Section Lines Light Rail Station Parks, Open Space and Drainageways P MS-3 MS-2 MS-2 MS-1 12th Denver / Lakewood Boundary T 1 2 3Sheridan Land Use and Urban Design Concept Existing Main Street Zoning MS-1 Existing Main Street Zoning MS-2 Existing Main Street Zoning MS-3 Urban Neighborhood Urban Neighborhood Urban Neighborhood Urban Neighborhood T Lakewood Station Plan Beth Jacob High School La k e w ood Comme r cial Lakewood Commercial La k e w ood Comme r cial Lakewood Commercial La k e w ood Comme r cial Lakewood Commercial

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Sheridan Station Area Plan The Plan Concept19 Section #1 10th Avenue Mixed Use Cross Section Section #2 12th Avenue Park Corridor Looking WestCross sections are shown to re ect existing lane-width standards of the Denver Fire Department and Public Works. These standards may change prior to implementation as a result of future discussions concerning multi-modal design goals identi ed in Blueprint Denver and the Strategic Transportation Plan. Cross sections are shown to re ect existing lane-width standards of the Denver Fire Department and Public Works. These standards may change prior to implementation as a result of future discussions concerning multi-modal design goals identi ed in Blueprint Denver and the Strategic Transportation Plan.

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Sheridan Station Area Plan The Plan Concept 20 Section #2 11th Avenue Park Corridor Looking West Section #3 Sheridan Cross SectionCross sections are shown to re ect existing lane-width standards of the Denver Fire Department and Public Works. These standards may change prior to implementation as a result of future discussions concerning multi-modal design goals identi ed in Blueprint Denver and the Strategic Transportation Plan. Cross sections are shown to re ect existing lanewidth standards of the Denver Fire Department and Public Works. These standards may change prior to implementation as a result of future discussions concerning multi-modal design goals identi ed in Blueprint Denver and the Strategic Transportation Plan.

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Sheridan Station Area Plan The Plan Concept21Transit-oriented development examples of a scale appropriate for the Sheridan Station S heridan Station Area Development Summary N ote: The development program is based on a market analysis (BBPC Market Study 2007) and represents anticipated developm ent through the year 2030. The actual amount of development may be more or less than shown below. Future development p rojections assume an average unit size of approximately 1,200 sf, average household size of approximately 3, and an average o f approximately 300 sf per employee and a residential vacancy rate of 5.7 percent. Total Estimate Residential square feet 3,223,500 Retail square feet 206,000 O ffices square feet 215,000 Housing Units 2,550 Population 7,650 Employees 1,400

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Sheridan Station Area Plan The Plan Concept 22 Recommended Building Height Street Street Width to Cornice 10th Avenue between 80' 53' Xavier and Benton Ames Street Between 60' 40' Dry Gulch and 10th Zenobia between Colfax 60' 40' and 12th Avenue Yates between 11th and 12th 60 40 Urban Design Plan ComponentsThis section addresses the physical appearance and form of station area development identi ed in the land use plan. This perspective is drawn from street-level views of primary streets in the station area. This section addresses how the uses will physically t together and within the larger neighborhood to create a pedestrian-scaled environment for new development around the station. Build-To Lines and Set-Back Ranges Build-to lines and set-back limits are tools that help address the way buildings and front entrances connect to the sidewalk. The rstoor uses surrounding the intersection at 10th Avenue and Sheridan are intended to be active retail or commercial. This presence should include frontages and building facades that extend to the right-of-way with minimal setbacks. The frontages on 10th Avenue extending east and west of this intersection should be similar in form to create a common zone so that the buildings work together to de ne the street space. Set-backs of ten feet or less are recommended on 10th Avenue between Xavier and Sheridan, and between Sheridan and the parking structure and mixed uses west of Sheridan. These streets should include eight-foot tree lawns and vefoot sidewalks or a continuous 13-foot sidewalk to create desirable space for the pedestrian. Where the concept plan calls for multiple-family residential uses, buildings should be set-back between 0 and 12 feet from the street right-of-way. The privately-owned set-back areas will be reserved for an amenity zone, where building walk-ups, landscaping and patio uses should be encouraged. Parking RTD will be constructing a large parking structure on the northwest corner of 10th Avenue and Sheridan Boulevard that will provide parking for users of the light rail system. Surface parking and structures should be located behind buildings along the 10th Avenue mixed use corridor. If a parking garage is built along 10th Avenue, it should include active ground oor uses and should adhere to the guidelines set by the form and massing section. Architecture and wrapping of the parking structure should hide the parking from pedestrians on all street faces and the Lakewood Gulch. Form and Massing Form and massing refer to the overall bulk, shape, and structure of a project or projects. The form and massing of new development in the Sheridan Station Area should relate to the existing scale of development on existing blocks where they adjoin. When possible, architectural elements in new buildings should complement and draw from positive examples found in existing buildings in the immediate neighborhood. The massing of buildings within the station area should strive to create street-building proportions that create a comfortably scaled pedestrian environment. In general, the proportion of street width to building height should be 3:2. This ratio will help to create a section that encloses the public space and gives it a human scale. Below is the suggested street width to building height proportion for prominent streets within the conceptual plan. Notice that as the street width increases the building height grows. Access to sunlight along 10th Avenue will help to create an inviting urban environment, especially in the short days of winter. One option to help the larger buildings t into the neighborhood is to step back or vary upper stories above the 53 recommended building height. These step backs and variations will help ensure that the street and surrounding uses receive natural light. Differences in massing and form create a hierarchal order in which more important streets in the development have taller structures and a slightly wider right-of-way. Priority streets such as 10th Avenue within the concept plan should strive to create an urban environment that provides the pedestrian with a sense of place and activity. The smaller widths for ROWs and elements such as private landscaping, porches

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Sheridan Station Area Plan The Plan Concept23and stoops in residential areas notify the pedestrian of a less active place with a more residential character. Active Edges The intent of this plan is to create a seamless connection to the neighborhoodto enliven, complement and relate to the neighborhood. North of Lakewood Gulch, Yates and 13th Avenue serve as the transitional streets between the proposed town homes of 2-3 stories and the existing single-family neighborhoods. South of the gulch, 10th Avenue and Zenobia Street form the edge of the proposed station redevelopment. It is important that the urban form and architecture of new residential development does not turn its back on the existing single-family residential, and that the scale responds to the existing street scale. To ensure opportunities for active, groundoor uses such as retail, ground oor ceiling heights in new buildings should be no lower than 14 feet. Where new densities and land uses are suggested, the transition to the existing neighborhood should be actuated at the alley. When transitions are created across the street, the neighboring forms should be within a reasonable scale of each other. Where new streets and street alignments are created they should connect to the existing Denver grid. By creating connections to the existing street network, the station area will reinforce pedestrian access and connections to the surrounding neighborhood. Required Building Entries Primary entrances to residences and businesses should be located on active street edges (sidewalks) to promote pedestrian activity at street level. Entrances to the residential units along Sheridan should be offset from the sidewalk through stoops and porches. This creates a private porch area while maintaining a desirable pedestrian scale and appropriate transition from the public realm to the private. Alleys should provide vehicular access to new developments in the area, following existing norms already established within the neighborhood. Rear-loaded residential structures will also frame a street environment that values the pedestrian by allowing for interesting landscapes and architectural forms. Where street access for garages is the only option, side driveways with rear garages should be encouraged. Architectural Character The architecture of new development should include durable, high-quality materials. Materials should include stone, brick, or other sustainable materials which are in the tradition of Denver neighborhoods. Diversity in architectural forms is important for creating an interesting urban environment. However, the orientation of these structures to the public realm should be consistent and follow the directives set by the massing, entry, and build-to sections. Where a mixeduse pedestrian-scaled street is planned, a substantial level of building transparency should be encouraged. Windows and entrances invite the pedestrian to explore the street, creating interest and street activity. Open Space Systems Lakewood Dry Gulch divides the station area into two sections; north and south. The station area plan recommends that 11th and 12th Avenues continue along the open space corridor. New development, which will be positioned with front doors facing Lakewood Dry Gulch, will help activate the park. This development will frame the green corridor and provide more security to users of the amenity. Both 11th and 12th Avenues should be constructed to similar standards set forth by the City of Denvers Department of Public Works for local streets and should provide detached sidewalks, street parking and a build-to line of six feet. Detached sidewalks and street amenities should occur on the park side of these streets. Streetscape and Gateway Features Streets should have detached sidewalks and tree lawns to create a more active and safe street environment for the pedestrian. Areas with very high pedestrian activity, such as commercial areas, may require a continuous attached sidewalk with trees in grates. Buildings will front the pedestrian priority streets to create a more intimate pedestrian experience. Gateways providing a sense of arrival to the TOD district are proposed at the intersection of Sheridan and Colfax and the intersection of 10th Avenue and Sheridan, both of which will be higher in density than surrounding uses. The presence of these two station book-ends, approximately a half-mile apart, will signal to the pedestrian and motorist that they are entering a unique area within the larger neighbor-

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Sheridan Station Area Plan The Plan Concept 24 hood. Streets should create qualities that engage the eyes, suc h as regular landscape forms and public amenities. Public art is proposed along Sheridan Boulevard north and south of the station as a means of slowing traf c and announcing the station. Signage is also recommended within Lakewood Dry Gulch to announce the presence of the station to bicyclists, pedestrians and open space users. Street cross sections should be based upon approved city standards outlined in Rules and Regulations for Standard Right-ofWay Cross Sections and Utility Locations. New streets within the station area should reinforce the existing City of Denver grid system, helping to create more logical and direct vehicular and pedestrian way nding in and out of the station area.

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Sheridan Station Area Plan The Plan Concept25Circulation and Mobility PlanThe circulation plan identi es the key connections for vehicles, pedestrians and bicycles throughout the station area. The streets and intersections with the highest intensities of land use require the most attention. Colfax Avenue and Sheridan Boulevard are the major arterials in the station area. 10th and 14th Avenues serve as east/west collector streets around the station. New local street connections are proposed along the edge of Lakewood Gulch to complete the street grid and provide more access and activity along the parks edge. Cross sections for the street types can be found in the urban design section. Colfax Avenue Colfax Avenue is the primary east/west arterial in the area and is located approximately three blocks north of the station. Colfax Avenue is also a CDOT facility designated U.S. Highway 40. Colfax Avenue carries approximately 35,000 vehicles per day. The right-of-way for West Colfax near Sheridan varies between 80 and 90 feet in most places. The current cross section includes four through-lanes and a center turn-lane. The south side of Colfax has on-street parking and on the north side there is a part time parking lane that converts to a drive lane in the afternoon peak travel time. The West Colfax Plan identi es Colfax Avenue as a pedestrian priority street with mixed land uses. According to the West Colfax Plan, the desired future cross section for Colfax would include a 16 foot pedestrian zone with sidewalks and street trees and on-street parking on both sides of the street. Current conditions on Sheridan Boulevard

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Sheridan Station Area Plan The Plan Concept 26 Sheridan Boulevard Sheridan Boulev ard is the key north/south arterial and is currently four lanes with a continuous center turn lane and some attached sidewalks in a 70 existing right-of-way. Sheridan Boulevard carries approximately 40,000 to 50,000 vehicles per day. Sheridan is a Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT) facility designated State Highway 95. Because of its important role in connecting the station to Colfax Avenue, Sheridan should be a priority street for pedestrian improvements. At this time, the City and County of Denver and the City of Lakewood intend to maintain Sheridan Boulevard with fourlanes of through traf c. Sidewalk improvements should be added to the existing street by providing a 10 foot pedestrian zone within the 70 foot right-of-way. Pedestrian improvements should stretch from 6th Avenue (north of the highway interchange) all the way north to 17th Avenue. Over the long term, the total right-of-way for Sheridan Boulevard would need to increase from 70 to 110 to meet Denvers standard cross section for a four-lane arterial street. However, Sheridan should rst be examined as part of a joint corridor study between the City of Lakewood, City and County of Denver, and the Colorado Department of Transportation. Sheridan Boulevard cross sections for both the existing 70 right-of-way and desired 110 right-of-way

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Sheridan Station Area Plan The Plan Concept2710th Avenue and 14th Avenue 10th and 14th Avenues serve as east/west collector streets around the station with on-street parking and detached sidewalks. These streets intersect with and will have signalized intersections at Sheridan Boulevard. These streets will be key to linking neighborhood residents with the station and are also designated as pedestrian priority streets in the plan. The intersection at 10th Avenue and Sheridan Boulevard should be improved with wide sidewalks, crosswalks and pedestrian signals to allow pedestrians to cross safely. The four blocks that surround the intersection will be concentrated with higher density uses, including Lakewoods proposed station core area at the southwest corner of 10th Avenue and Sheridan Boulevard. New Streets Currently, 11th Avenue and 12th Avenue do not exist adjacent to Lakewood Dry Gulch. A key element of this plan is to build these local streets to provide better access to Lakewood Dry Gulch and frontage for new residential development that will bring more activity and visibility to the park. The proposed cross sections for 11th and 12th Avenues would include onstreet parking on the side of the street with buildings and parking bulb-ins between the street trees along the park edge. This will allow for the required 25 feet of clearance for re vehicles on streets with higher density development. The alignment for a new 12th Avenue would follow the alignment of the existing Wells Place between Utica and Zenobia. 11th Avenue would be at the same alignment as the existing 11th Avenue and run between a new Wolff Street and a Zenobia Street connection north of 10th Avenue. A new intersection is proposed at 13th Avenue and Sheridan Boulevard to provide more direct access into the neighborhoods. This access will provide the necessary circulation (ingress and egress) for the residential units along Sheridan Boulevard and will also provide better access to the north side of Lakewood Gulch. Right-of-way acquisitions and improvements will need to be made to 13th Avenue between Sheridan Boulevard and Zenobia Street, Zenobia Street to Yates Street, and Winona Street to Vrain Street to complete 13th Avenue as a through street. Other Local Streets Other local streets in the area include the north/south streets of Zenobia, Yates, Xavier, Wolff, Winona, Vrain, Utica and Tennyson. These streets are primarily residential streets with detached sidewalks. These streets should be designed to slow down traf c where possible to provide a safer, more comfortable pedestrian environment and strong connections to the light rail station. The other east/west Avenues include 8th, 9th, and 13th Avenues. These streets do not have houses that front onto them. Bus Connections There are currently four bus routes that serve the Sheridan Station Area. The east/west routes are the 9 on 10th Avenue and the 16 and 16L (limited) on West Colfax Avenue. The primary north/south bus route is the 51, which runs on Sheridan Boulevard. These routes will stay in place once the West Corridor light rail is operational. Currently, RTD has no plans to increase bus service in the area but may examine future service increases following the opening of the West Corridor. Buses will stop on the new Sheridan Bridge with passengers accessing the station below the bridge using stairs and elevators. Local bus service will play an important role in tying the station to surrounding neighborhoods.

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Sheridan Station Area Plan The Plan Concept 28 Bicycle Improvements T he Lakewood Dry Gulch regional bike trail (D-10) extends from the South Platte River trail to the Lakewood city limits. This trail provides an east-west pedestrian/bicycle corridor through the station area. Three pedestrian bridges, consistent with the City and County of Denvers Parks Game Plan are proposed across Lakewood Gulch at Yates, Wolff and Tennyson streets. These pedestrian bridges, along with pedestrian improvements extending north and south from these streets, will serve to knit the two neighborhoods together. Wolff Street serves as a neighborhood bicycle route between 10th Avenue and Sloans Lake Park. Tennyson Street should also serve the north/south bicycle movements and this street should be designated as a neighborhood bicycle route in the future. The on-street bicycle trail on 10th Avenue (D-12) will remain with the proposed improvements to the area. The proposed cross section on page 19 shows shared bicycle indicators or sharrows for the traf c lanes on this route. Access to the light rail station will be via stairs and elevators to the station located directly below Sheridan Boulevard. These improvements will be on both sides of the street. Pedestrian and bicycle connections will also be provided directly from the Lakewood Dry Gulch trail to the station platform and plaza below Sheridan Boulevard. Design of streets should consider all modes of transportation

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Sheridan Station Area Plan The Plan Concept29 SHERIDAN La k e w ood L o w Density Lakewood Low Density La k e w ood L o w Density Lakewood Low Density SheridanColfax Colfax Mixed Use Station Residential Townhouse Residential W est Corridor Light Rail Line Pedestrian Improvements New Local Street or Connection Recreational T rail / Bike W ay Signalized Intersection RTD Parking Structure Bus Routes Major arterial Collector Pedestrian Priority Street On-street bike routes Light Rail Station P Pedestrian Bridge MS-3 MS-2 MS-1 12th M S 2 12h Y t S seta tS semA t S n ot neB t S n ot neB Depew St Depew St P t S aiboneZ P 14th 14th 11th 12th Ave 12th 13th Mountair Park Colfax Ave Sheridan Blvd Sheridan Blvd Colfax Ave 16 9 9 9 16 51 51 T T Sheridan Circulation Concept TDenver / Lakewood Boundary D Dep e S wSt Dep e wSt Cowell Elementary School Existing Main Street Zoning MS-1 Existing Main Street Zoning MS-2 Existing Main Street Zoning MS-3 Lakewood Station Plan Parks, Open Space and Drainageways Beth Jacob High SchoolProposed Land Use Existing Plans and Zoning Area Features Lakewood Medium Density Lakewood Medium Density Lakewood Medium Density Lakewood Medium Density Lakewood High Density Lakewood High Density Lakewood High Density Lakewood High Density Lakewood High Density Lakewood Medium Density Lakewood Medium Density Lakewood Commercial Lakewood Commercial Lakewood Commercial Lakewood Commercial Lakewood Commercial Lakewood Commercial Lakewood Commercial Lakewood Commercial Lakewood Commercial Lakewood Commercial La k e w ood High Density Lakewood High Density Urban Neighborhood Urban Neighborhood Urban Neighborhood Urban NeighborhoodLakewood Station Core Lakewood Station Core

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Sheridan Station Area Plan The Plan Concept 30ParkingParking and Development Capacity The economic success of TOD projects requires suf cient parking. But just as too little parking will create economic problems, so will too many spaces. Since Denvers TOD policy seeks to maximize the number of units around its stations and maximize those units affordability, it will be important to ensure parking does not consume too much of the buildable square footage in TOD projects. Parking and Walkability Walkability is a key measurement of the quality of public space. In addition, ridership at rail stations increases as the quality of the pedestrian environment improves in the station area. Research ndings have shown that transit commute shares increase with pedestrian-oriented design of neighborhoods around rail stops. For these reasons, it is important that the design of parking not create barriers real Belmars Block 7 Studios and Galleries demonstrates a exible approach to activating parking structures or perceived to pedestrians. Denver has already established design guidelines for parking downtown and on main streets, such as Colfax Avenue, requiring that parking structures have active ground oor uses rather than blank walls or surface parking lots along streets. Parking and Trip Generation Properly managed and located parking can lower automobile usage. In auto-dependent areas, the size of different land uses is the best predictor of automobile traf c. Where there are transportation choices, however, automobile trip rates become highly variable. In these locations, parking supply is a more effective predictor of auto trips, provided this supply is properly managed to ensure adequate availability at all times. In such locations, more parking means more traf c. Parking as an Economic Asset, Not an End in Itself The high prices people pay to park in Lower Downtown are a testament to the value of parking near mixed-use, compact and pedestrian-oriented development. But not all spaces have the same value. In all mixed-use districts, some parking spaces are more desirable than others. Left to market forces, the more desirable spaces would command higher prices and vice versa. When parking is underpriced, the city incurs all the burden of operating and maintaining it while incurring reduced nancial bene ts of controlling it. More importantly, underpriced parking reduces customer convenience, with the best spaces quickly lled by the lucky few. While underpriced parking results in direct loss of revenue to the city, the indirect costs are even higher if shoppers and developers are deterred by a lack of convenient parking. In Denver, most on-street metered parking currently costs $1 an hour, regardless of location or demand patterns. In highdemand areas, the result is that parking utilization regularly exceeds 95 percent, resulting in added search traf c and customer inconvenience. This in turn leads to poorer business performance and greater traf c congestion and pollution. New Approaches to Parking Historically, solving the parking problem almost always meant increasing supply. But planners have begun to acknowledge that there are many different types of parking problems, and many different solutions. The majority of

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Sheridan Station Area Plan The Plan Concept31the parking for transit at the station area will be provided through a 800 car parking structure at the northwest corner of 10th Avenue and Sheridan Boulevard. The parking in this facility will be a mix of parking for the transit users and parking for the mixed used development within the parking structure itself. This parking structure should be wrapped with development to provide an active frontage on the facility. Parking for local retail uses that front onto 10th Avenue will need to be conveniently located either within the parking structure or along the street. The details of this facility will need to be coordinated with the City of Denver as RTD examines its options. The amount of parking required for new development is currently determined by the City of Denver Zoning Code depending on the use. Parking at the Sheridan Station could be reduced however, depending on the tenant mix, the quality and accessibility of the local transit (bus, light rail, bicycle and pedestrian), trip reduction requirements or incentives, mode split calculations, residential demographics, site conditions and other local factors. Surface parking lots should be avoided within the station planning area. One of the many bene ts of transit in this area is the potential to reduce the amount of parking for new development because of its close proximity to transit and the possibility of shared parking opportunities presented by the new RTD park-n-Ride. After the opening of the West Corridor in mid 2013, parking within the area will need to be reviewed and monitored to assess the impact of the station. Further parking regulations within the neighborhood may need to be implemented. These regulations may include maximum parking durations in some areas or the development of a shared parking program for the park-n-Ride facility. Other tools for parking implementation should include: Unbundling of parking, particularly for residential useshaving parking sold or rented separately from the housing unit Real time parking information systems Placement of driveways and curb cuts to access parking Parking signage and waynding Vehicle trip reduction incentives (Ecopass. etc) Additional study will be required to deter mine how the various TOD parking strategies outlined in this station area plan may be implemented. This should be done in conjunction with a broader city-wide analysis of parking.Examples of parking signage and waynding

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Sheridan Station Area Plan The Plan Concept 32Economic OpportunityFasTracks brings to the Denver region an unprecedented opportunity to promote and facilitate transit-oriented higher density, mixed-use residential and commercial development. To identify, leverage, and maximize these opportunities, the city commissioned a TOD Economic Analysis and Market Study completed by BBPC. The primary goal of the TOD Economic Analysis and Market Study was to provide the city with an assessment of TOD potential at the regional, corridor, and station area levels through analysis of shortand long-term demand (e.g. demand in 2015 and 2030). Conducted in coordination with station area planning efforts, the market study helped to better align station area plans with existing and future market realities and dynamics. The overall objectives of the TOD Economic Analysis and Market Study were to forge a better understanding of the economic context in which the city may plan for TOD, and to develop speci c recommendations regarding the amount, type, mix, and intensity of uses appropriate for selected station areas. Existing Market Conditions The Sheridan Station Area occupies a unique position at the border of two jurisdictions Denver and Lakewood. The station area features residential neighborhoods and the Lakewood Gulch open space, part of a future regional trail and park system. Residents of this station area can walk to some retail goods and services along Colfax, which is located just north of the station site. The Sheridan Station Area has a larger household size compared to that of the city and the region. Residents outnumber jobs at a scale of nearly 4 to 1. Station Area household income is lower than that of the city and one-and-a-half times lower than the region. It is primarily a Hispanic neighborhood with a higher percentage of residents engaged in blue collar occupations than the average for the city or region, and has a higher than average unemployment rate. The majority of built space in the Sheridan Station Area is residential. Commercial uses include approximately 100,000 square feet of retail space, the majority of which is clustered along Colfax Avenue. The retail vacancy rate for this station area as of the rst quarter of 2007 was 11 percent. Of ce space is relatively limited in the station area, with less than 15,000 square feet of class B and C of ce space. Though of ce space is limited, it experiences 100 percent occupancy. More information on existing demographics and land uses for the Sheridan Station Area can be found in the Community section in the supporting documentation of the plan. Future Market Demand The Sheridan Station Area is envisioned to expand its existing housing stock and become a distinctive mixed-income neighborhood with pedestrian-friendly retail streets (Main Streets) over the long-term. As part of the trend toward a mixed-use and mixed-income neighborhood, private investment will likely drive increased construction of additional housing and retail services near the station adding more people and jobs while allowing existing residents to bene t from the new station area amenities. The addition of new residential units will support the introduction of new community-serving retail focused along West Colfax Avenue and near the intersection of 10th Avenue and Sheridan. This area of West Colfax may nd precedent in the successful revitalization of sections of East Colfax Avenue. Future retail expansion efforts should conform to the targeted Main Street character for Colfax Avenue, and should be encouraged through investment in improved pedestrian and transportation linkages between the station and Colfax. New development could pay homage to the areas ethnic diversity and historical past. New, small-format ethnic food stores could develop near the station area along Colfax Avenue and Sheridan Boulevard, and community service and of ce employers could enhance employment opportunities and job training possibilities in the community. Further, joint development opportunities involving the stations park-nRide could expand the station core development area identied for mixed-use commercial development in the City of Lakewoods station area plan. Three redevelopment scenarios have been projected for possible net new development in the 1/2 mile radius around the platform based on current market trends and land capacity. The rst two scenarios, modest and moderate, are based

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Sheridan Station Area Plan The Plan Concept33on projected market conditions over the next 15-20 years and call for 1.2 to 1.5 million square feet of development. The third, maximum capacity, is based on land capacity and identi ed an additional 1.9 million square feet of potential development if all underutilized sites were redeveloped to their maximum allowable square footage. As shown in the chart below, there is projected to be more demand for of ce than would be available under current zoning capacity. Future redevelopment scenariosNet square feet of development Residential Office Retail Capacity 1,390,000 210,000 320,000 Modest 850,000 200,000 100,000 Moderate 1,000,000 320,000 150,000 Source: BBPC Market Study, 2007 Economic Development StrategiesBelow are possible economic development strategies and tools for the Sheridan Station Area. Development efforts will require the involvement of many agencies within the City and County of Denver as well as coordination and cooperation with developers, land owners and businesses. Several strategies are complementary to speci c projects already planned or proposed for implementation by the citys Public Works Department. As the city moves forward with implementation of station area plans, an inter-departmental TOD team approach will continue to be used. Identi ed strategies are outlined below: Housing and Housing Affordability Preserve current housing affordability in the area. Because of the Sheridan Stations location almost equidistant between two major employment hubs downtown Denver to the east, and the Federal Center and new St. Anthonys Hospital in Lakewood to the westthis station area is potentially well positioned to cater to the residential needs of employees working in these two employment centers. Using appropriate resources and incentives, maximize mixed income multi-family development in proximity to the station. With the current neighborhoods economic pro le promoting the area for more market-rate housing will add increased community amenities, safety, and future economic growth and stability to the area. Strategic and Catalytic Projects The four corners of 10th and Sheridan are of strategic importance to the redevelopment of the area. Projects on these cornersparticularly the commercial / retail elementswill help to spur further area revitalization and therefore should be the rst redevelopment pursued. Seek to have development at 10th and Sheridan share parking with the future RTD park-n-Ride garage, especially commercial uses with high off-peak customer traf c (e.g., evening traf c such as food and beverage establishments, movie theaters, etc.). Desired land uses as well as buildings should be encouraged through regulation, and through publicprivate partnerships. Coordination Coordinate economic development activities with Lakewood. Coordinate with the Department of Public Works to use future public infrastructure investment to leverage private sector investment. Employment and Commercial Development Business retention in the area as well as new company growth and job creation are signi cant objectives for the city. At the Sheridan station more employment opportunities should be promoted. Due to the affordability of land in this area there is a potential market for Class B and B+ of ce space to be incorporated in future development offering an alternative to more expensive of ce markets closer to downtown.

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Sheridan Station Area Plan The Plan Concept 34 Ensure commercial uses at or around the station area are neighborhood oriented and compliment rather than compete with commercial uses along Colfax through targeted incentives, business marketing and land use regulation. A strong connection between the Sheridan Station and Colfax is important for promoting the economic viability and growth of Colfax business development under West Colfaxs new Main Street Zoning.

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Sheridan Station Area Plan Implementation and Next Steps35 Implementation and Next Steps

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Sheridan Station Area Plan Implementation and Next Steps 36Implementation at the Sheridan StationThe purpose of this section is two fold: rst, to de ne an implementation framework for the Sheridan Station, and second to suggest a strategic approach for considering implementation of transit-oriented development (TOD) in the City of Denver. Transforming Denvers transit stations into vital dynamic TODs will not happen over night. Areas as diverse as Washington, DC, San Francisco and Portland with noted TOD programs still have uneven results between stations after two decades of effort. The market, planning, infrastructure, community and political readiness of Denvers existing and future FasTracks stations can be expected to vary considerably. Understanding that not all stations will be ripe for attention at any one time is an important consideration when implementing a citywide strategy. Consequently, an important step in realizing the transformation of Denvers station areas into dynamic, vital TODs will be for the city to establish where it will place its attention and emphasis. The implementation plan for the Sheridan Station is intended to lay out the framework to enable development of TOD consistent with the plan. The Sheridan implementation plan covers a series of actions: Speci c recommendations Strategies for implementation Implementation timing Citywide TOD implementation evaluation To aid the City of Denver and its partners in completing an assessment of the station area, each station should be evaluated in relation to how they measure against the following seven TOD success factors: Implementation Continuum. Development of TOD at stations requires a series of actions over a period of time ranging from initial planning, to making targeted investments, to putting the full range of necessary tools and leadership in place to achieve TOD. Knowing where a station is on the development continuum will help in targeting what kind of assistance may be required at any one time. Cost Bene t Payback. Ensure that the limited funds available for public investment in infrastructure and economic development are targeted to those station areas where they can leverage the most private investment and create the most successful examples of TOD. Development Ready. To what extent has the public sector taken the necessary steps to make the station area development ready? Current Trends. What are existing real estate market dynamics for potential TOD in a particular station area? Is the market already starting to deliver development products that can be considered TOD friendly? In other words, is development occurring of moderate to higher density in relation to past patterns of development? Do new developments have: A mix of land uses, horizontally or vertically mixed Compact pedestrian-oriented design and streetscapes Building design and orientation to the street to allow easy pedestrian and transit access A reduction in parking in relation to conventional development A ne-grained connected street pattern A system of parks and open spaces

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Sheridan Station Area Plan Implementation and Next Steps37Developer Interest in TOD. To what extent is there demonstrated developer interest in the station area? Are there TOD friendly development activities in the station area? Are parcels of land being sold or optioned for development? Are privately led master planning or plan changes underway? Are local of cials getting inquiries about the station area? Ability to nudge. In a nudge station a series of factors supportive of achieving the development of TOD appear to be in place. To what extent can a strategic investment of time and energy by the public sector help nudge the station area to the next level of activity and achieve TOD? Leadership is in place. A lesson learned repeatedly is that the single most signi cant factor is whether a project is fundamentally viableregardless of the presence of transit. No development is going to occur just because a station goes in if there is not a market to support it. A transit station does not create the market or make an uneconomical project viable.Land Use, Urban Design and MobilityRecommendations and Implementation Strategies The speci c land use and urban design recommendations followed by the mobility and infrastructure recommendations are listed on the following pages. Details on the implementation strategy, timeframe and responsibility can be found in the table. Implementation is the result of market, planning and community readiness

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Sheridan Station Area Plan Implementation and Next Steps 38 Recommendation LU 1Colfax Avenue as Main Street LU 2Mixed-Use LU 3Leverage Light Rail Investment LU 4Housing Incentives LU 5Community Partnerships for Housing LU 6Active Ground Floor Uses LU 7Development along the Sheridan Corridor LU 8Coordination with Lakewood Implementation Strategy Tie the station area to Colfax Avenue redevelopment through better pedestrian connections. Ensure new residential and employment opportunities near the station complement the Colfax Avenue redevelopment goals. Direct new, larger format retail to Colfax Avenue while allowing smaller-scale, convenience retail near the station at 10th and Sheridan through targeting of business incentives and zoning regulations. Review and test existing zone districts to assess appropriate zoning language (mixed-use) for map amendment. If no existing district can be identified, develop new TOD district language to adopt that addresses density and form requirements. Work with new zoning code update revisions to mixed use zone districts. The West Corridor Light Rail is the most significant public infrastructure investment to occur in the vicinity of Sheridan Boulevard and Colfax Avenue. This transportation access and public infrastructure improvements should be leveraged through additional public infrastructure investment, and changes in zoning and development incentives to attract private investment in housing, employment, commercial amenities and additional infrastructure. Encourage mixed income and market rate housing development near the station to achieve a diverse range of housing prices. Use city housing incentives such as revenue bonds and Community Development Block Grants to promote mixed income housing. Establish private public partnerships with both non-profit community organizations, community development corporations (CDCs), and for-profit development companies to preserve housing affordability in the area. The form of the public realm and view from Sheridan Boulevard onto 10th Avenue will be the foundation to promote activation of 10th Avenue. Active retail uses will support the form. Particular attention should be paid to the urban design of 10th Avenue from Sheridan Boulevard to Ames Street, and be coordinated with the City of Lakewood. Reorient vehicular access of parcels aligning Sheridan Boulevard to alley side as redevelopment occurs. Ensure new development dedicates a 16 foot minimum pedestrian zone suitable for enhanced transit corridors. Coordinate with the City of Lakewood for development efforts, track developer proposals, and work on transitional issues in the area. Provide coordinated infrastructure improvements and urban design standards for Sheridan Boulevard and 10th Avenue to creating a cohesive look and feel around the station area. Timeframe Short to Medium Medium Short to Long Medium to Long Medium to Long Medium to Long Medium to Long Short to Long Responsibility CPD, Public Works, OED CPD, Public Works, City of Lakewood Planning Department CPD, OED, DURA CPD, OED CPD, OED, Enterprise Community Partners, Newsed, Private Developers CPD, City of Lakewood CPD Public Works, CDOT, Land Owners, Developers OED, City of Lakewood Land Use and Urban Design

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Sheridan Station Area Plan Implementation and Next Steps39 Recommendation LU 9Shared and Structured Parking LU 10Beth Jacob High School LU 11Leverage Lakewood Dry Gulch as an Amenity LU 12Joint Development as Catalyst LU 13Active Community Engagement LU 14Station Core and Targeted Development Areas LU 15 Neighborhood Transitions LU 16Bring Buildings to the Sidewalk Implementation Strategy The City of Denver needs to work closely with RTD and the developer selection process at the parking structure to leverage the parking structure as a catalyst project to help realize the implementation of the station area plan. Review parking language in applicable zoning to ensure maximization of shared and structured parking opportunities. Beth Jacob School has some unique religious requirements that need to be maintained. The city should establish regular contact with Beth Jacob School to ensure their requirements are being met. The city will need to coordinate closely with RTD as the new West Corridor line is being constructed through the park and to ensure that the pedestrian crossings being planned are implemented. The gulch should be dedicated as an official City of Denver park when the light rail construction is complete. The city should also implement the improvements identified in the park master plan. Key pedestrian connections that facilitate access to the station and north-south connections across the park should be in place prior to the opening of the light rail line in mid 2013. The City should participate as an equal partner with RTD in the definition of a development program, and in the developer selection process for the joint development RFP to realize the type of development proposed to ensure it meets the goals of this plan and the TOD Strategic Plan. Continue to use existing neighborhood communications, meetings and city processes to keep the community updated on the station area implementation. It will be critical that the areas of new development directly around the station have active ground floor uses that help to activate the street and pedestrian environment. Building heights in the area should range from 2-7 stories. Zoning for this area should support this recommendation by requiring building entrances that face the street, minimum transparency requirements for the building faade, pedestrian scaled architectural elements and building heights and setbacks that reinforce the scale of development for the area. New development should step down at the transitions to the existing R-2 urban neighborhoods. Maximum building height in the R-2 is 35 feet, but the majority of the existing structures are one to two stories. Use bulk plane and step-downs to provide transitions to existing urban neighborhoods. Setbacks should be addressed as part of the zoning code, however, articulation of outdoor seating areas, public-private transition zones, fencing, architectural fenestration, etc. should be further defined as a follow-up item through the new zone districts created as part of the zoning code update. Timeframe Short to Medium Short to Long Short to Medium Short Ongoing Short Medium to Long Medium to Long Responsibility CPD, RTD CPD, Beth Jacob High School Public Works, Parks, CPD, RTD CPD, OED, RTD, Private Developers All City Agencies CPD CPD, Developers CPD, Developers

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Sheridan Station Area Plan Implementation and Next Steps 40 Recommendation MI 1Pedestrian Routes to School MI 2Landscaped Median on Sheridan Boulevard MI 3Sheridan Boulevard Corridor Study MI 4Restore Street Grid MI 5Street Frontages along Park MI 6Trail Crossings of the Gulch MI 7th Avenue Bicycle Improvements Implementation Strategy Prioritize pedestrian routes to the station, schools, and other community gathering points for capital infrastructure improvements. Priority streets include 10th Avenue and Sheridan Boulevard. The cities of Denver and Lakewood have expressed a strong desire to keep Sheridan Boulevard in its current 4 drive lane configuration and redesign the center turn lane as a landscaped median with left turn pockets. Both cities will need to coordinate with CDOT and DRCOG to ensure regional plans reflect the four-lane arterial configuration. The cities and CDOT should collaborate and co-fund a study to develop a recommended configuration and the design speed of Sheridan Boulevard. Make a specific recommendation to revise the DRCOG 2035 plan for this street. To fully implement the plan, the street grid needs to be complete in the area. In some areas, right-of-way will need to be obtained to establish 11th, 12th and 13th Streets. The streetscape improvements for at least the street can be part of redevelopment activities by developers along 11th and 12th Avenues. Improvements along 13th Avenue may take longer due to the smaller parcel size and the location of the connections in the existing urban neighborhood. Capital funds for ROW acquisition should be identified and prioritized in the capital improvement program budget. Create two great streets that front the north and south sides of Lakewood Dry Gulch Park. These streets should be local in nature and respond to the context of the greenway. Streetscape may vary on each side of the street. These improvements will need to be coordinated with the private developers that build the future residential uses that front these streets. Some public land and existing right-of-way may be available for portions of the park roads. Funding sources for 11th and 12th avenue extensions will have to be identified. Both Wolff Street and Tennyson Street should be dedicated neighborhood bike routes and the Bicycle Master Plan should be amended to show this revision. These connections should also improve the pedestrian environment along these roadways for pedestrians traveling to and from the Colfax Avenue corridor (shopping, schools, etc), Sloans Lake, or Lakewood Gulch to the south As new development occurs on 10th Avenue, new bicycle improvements need to be installed when the street is rebuilt. Bicycle improvements along 10th Avenue should include the addition of shared bicycle route indicators to the traffic lanes (sharrows) and installation of sidewalk bicycle racks. Timeframe Short to Medium Short to Long Short to Long Medium to Long Medium to Long Short Medium to Long Responsibility Public Works, Parks, CPD, RTD Public Works, CPD, City of Lakewood, CDOT, DRCOG Public Works, CPD, City of Lakewood, CDOT, DRCOG CPD, Public Works, private developers Public Works, Private Developers CPD, Public Works, Denver Bicycle Coordinator CPD, Public Works, Denver Bicycle Coordinator, City of Lakewood Mobility and Infrastructure

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Sheridan Station Area Plan Implementation and Next Steps41 Recommendation MI 8Lakewood Gulch Trail MI 9Sheridan Boulevard Pedestrian Infrastructure MI 10American with Disabilities MI 11Completion of a Continuous 13th Avenue East of Sheridan MI 12Water Quality Implementation Strategy The trail connection from downtown Denver to Lakewood along Lakewood Dry Gulch is an important regional access route. Regional funding should be pursued to study trail continuity to the west of the station. Ensure bicycle connections are present to the Sheridan Station platform and under Sheridan Boulevard. Pedestrian improvements should be complete along Sheridan prior to the opening of the West Corridor in mid 2013. The improvements not provided by FasTracks will need to be funded separately through City of Denver CIP or other funding mechanism. All new construction must abide by the current code. The city should look at alternate funding mechanisms to make improvements to existing conditions that are sub-standard, particularly around the light rail station where pedestrian access is critical. Create a 13th Avenue connection between Sheridan and Yates streets and Wolff and Vrain streets. Identify right-of-way and construction costs. The amount of land required for on-site detention and water quality for new development could be substantial. The city should look for ways to help new development to provide sub regional basins that all new development in the area can share. Explore opportunities to utilize the Lakewood Dry Gulch for storm water quality, retention and detention. Detention facilities can often be designed for multiple functions in park space to create amenities for park users. New facilities should serve multiple buildings and be designed in such a way as to appear park-like. Timeframe Short to Medium Short Short Medium to Long Medium to Long Responsibility City of Lakewood, DRCOG, Denver Bicycle Coordinator, CPD, Public Works CPD, Public Works, City of Lakewood, RTD, CDOT, DRCOG CPD, Public Works, Denver Commission on Disabilities Public Works, CDOT CPD, Public Works, Parks, Urban Drainage, Developers

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Sheridan Station Area Plan Implementation and Next Steps 42Implementation Next Steps and TimingThe tables on the preceding pages outline important steps and the timeline for implementing the recommendations of the Sheridan Station Area Plan Development of new infrastructure and changes brought through new development may take many years to be fully achieved. The plan and regulatory framework represent the rst step in this process. The most immediate steps include plan adoption followed by rezonings that implement the recommendations. Rezonings should occur within the context and timeframe of Denvers zoning code update. It is anticipated that new zone districts will be available that will be suited to the unique development character for station areas. Another immediate step includes the scoping of infrastructure projects and the identi cation of potential funding sources to implement the infrastructure needed in the station area. These infrastructure improvements should be pursued through both public-private partnerships between the city and the business and development community as well as public-public partnerships between local, regional, state and federal agencies. First Tier Implementation Recommendations and Timing It is important for the city to make the Sheridan Station development ready. Development ready includes: Getting new zoning in place Identifying an implementation toolbox both nancial and regulatory Putting in place the partnerships with other City departments, Lakewood, CDOT and RTD Moving forward with a jointly lead and de ned project for the Park-n-Ride with RTD, the City of Denver and private and public input. Timeframe: Short -now to mid 2013 (opening of West Corridor)

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Sheridan Station Area Plan Supporting Documentation43 Supporting Documentation

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Sheridan Station Area Plan Supporting Documentation 44 The CommunityStudy Area Location and Overview The Sheridan Station is one of 57 new transit stations to be added as part of the FasTracks program, and one of eight on the West Corridor Light Rail project. The station is located in the West Corridor at Sheridan Boulevard and approximately 12th Avenue. Sheridan Boulevard forms the boundary between Denver and Lakewood, with some variation to the west side of Sheridan immediately north of 10th Avenue. The station area extends from approximately 8th Avenue to Colfax Avenue along Sheridan Boulevard. The station is one of four stations in Denver on the West Corridor Light Rail line. The area has been identi ed by the Denver Transit-Oriented Development Strategic Plan as an urban

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Sheridan Station Area Plan Supporting Documentation45 neighborhood station, with residential and local-serving retail uses around the station. The light rail line will pass under Sheridan Boulevard and the station platform will be located directly beneath Sheridan with access to the platform from each side of Sheridan. Population and Housing Characteristics The station area includes portions of two Denver neighborhoods: West Colfax on the north side of the Lakewood Gulch and Villa Park on the south side of Lakewood Gulch. After declines in the 1980s and early 1990s these two neighborhoods are once again beginning to experience signi cant growth. Both neighborhoods are primarily Latino in their ethnic makeup. According to 2008 data from the City of Denver, the station area contains 2,068 housing units with a population of 5,368 residents. The average household size was 3.09 persons per household. The station area average household income of $40,619 is lower than that of the city-wide average of $49,373. The average sales price for single-family homes in the station area was $185,397 in 2006; for condominiums it was $127,500. The station area is mostly composed of renters living in multi-family housing. Only 23 percent of the housing units in the station area are owner occupied and only 24 percent of the housing units in the station area are single family homes. Total Poulation 5,368 Group Quarters Population 0 Residential Population 5,368 Total Housing Units 2,068 Group Quarters Units 0 Residential Units 2,068 Vacancy Rate (residential units only) 16% # Persons per Household (residential units only) 3.09 % Housing Units Owner Occupied 23% 1950 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 2,500 3,500 3,000 4,500 4,000 1960Total Housing Units 1970 1980 Year 1990West Colfax Villa ParkSource: U.S. Census (1950-2000); Denver CPD (2007) 2000 2007 3,958 3,081 Total Housing Units Villa Park and West Colfax Neighborhoods (1950-2007) <$15,000$15,000$25,000 $25,000$35,000 $35,000$50,000 $50,000$75,000 $75,000$100,000 $100,000$150,000 $150,000$250,000 $250,000$500,000 >$500,0000 100 200 300 500 400 800 600 700Number of HouseholdsIncome RangeSource: Claritas, 2007 (estimate)Household Income West Colfax and Villa Park Neighborhoods (2007)West Colfax Villa Park

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Sheridan Station Area Plan Supporting Documentation 46 Mixed Use2 units (0.1%)0 200 400 600 1000 800 1400 1200 Multi-Family High Rise158 units (7.6%)Multi-Family Mid Rise205 units (9.9%)Multi-Family Low Rise1207 units (58.4%)Single-Family496 units (24%)Number of Units (Percent of Total)Housing TypeSource: Assessors Data, CPDHousing Type Distribution (2008) Sheridan Station Area 1950 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 10,000 8,000 12,000 1960Total Population 1970 1980 1990 West Colfax Villa ParkSource: U.S. Census (1950-2000); Denver CPD (2007) 2000 2007 9,887 11,285 Total Population (1950-2007) Villa Park and West Colfax NeighborhoodsYear 0% 10% 20% 30%West Colfax Villa Park40% 50% 100% 60% 70% 80% 90%Age DistributionSource: ClaritasSheridan Station Area Neighborhood Age Distribution (2007)65+ 18 to 64 5 to 17 <5 Year 21% 60% 8% 10% 23% 60% 7% 10%

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Sheridan Station Area Plan Supporting Documentation47 0% 10% 20% 30% 1996 2000 Year 2006 40% 50% 100% 60% 70% 80% 90%Percentage of BirthsSource: CDPHE via Piton Foundation (2007)Births by Ethnicity West Colfax Neighborhood (1996-2006)Naitive American Asian/Pacific Islander Non-Latino White Latino African American 72.8% 21.2% 3.6% 2.00% 78.89% 14.37% 2.64% 2.05% 2.05% 74.03% 18.18% 2.6% 1.3% 3.46% Population by Race and Ethnicity Villa Park and West Colfax Neighborhood (2000)Naitive American Asian/Pacific Islander Non-Latino White Latino African American Other Race 2 or More Races Villa Park Neighborhood80% <1% <1% <1% <1% 1% 16% West Colfax Neighborhood68% 24% 1% 2% 1% <1% 3%

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Sheridan Station Area Plan Supporting Documentation 48Sheridan Station Zoning and Land UseThere are currently 11 zone districts in the Sheridan Station Area Only about 12 percent of the 1/2 mile station area is zoned for commercial or main street commercial mixed-use development -concentrated along Colfax Avenue and the intersection of 10th Avenue and Sheridan. Approximately 86 percent of the land area is zoned R-2, R2-A, R-3 or R-4. These zone districts all allow multi-unit dwellings. Approximately 75 percent of the station area is zoned R-2, which allows multi-unit dwellings generally in the form of duplexes and triplexes. No portion of the station area is zoned exclusively for single-family residential development. Single Family 0% 5% 10% 15% 25% 20% 30% 35%81.6 acres ROW67.9 acres MultiFamily Low Rise49.2 acres Parks, Open Space22.7 acres Vacant6.7 acres Public/ QuasiPublic5.5 acres Retail7.9 acres Commercial3.4 acres MultiFamily MidRise2 acres Surface Parking1.5 acres Office0.7 acres MultiFamily HighRise0.6 acres Mixed Use0.5 acresPercentage of LandLand UseSheridan Station Area Land Use Distribution (2008) The current residential land use in the Sheridan Station Area is a mixture of single-family and low-rise multi-family residential with some higher-density apartment buildings. Approximately 38 percent of the land area is public or quasipublic comprising such uses as street right-of-way and publicly owned park or open space. Only 4 percent of the land is vacant or counts surface parking as an independent use.

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Sheridan Station Area Plan Supporting Documentation49 Existing Development along Sheridan Boulevard Sheridan Station Existing Land Use

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Sheridan Station Area Plan Supporting Documentation 50 Sheridan Station Existing Zoning

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Sheridan Station Area Plan Supporting Documentation51 Zoning District Acres Percent B-1 0.3 0.1% B-2 5.2 2.1% MS-2 14.1 5.7% MS-3 10.6 4.3% O-1 2.4 1.0% PUD 1.6 0.6% R-2 184.0 74.3% R-2-A 23.8 9.6% R-3 1.0 0.4% R-4 2.9 1.2% R-5 1.6 0.6% Total Acres 247.5 Distribution of Denver Zoning Districts Sheridan Station Area (2008) Existing Zone DistrictsThe following are descriptions of the existing zone districts in the Sheridan Station Area: Business and Mixed Use Districts B-1 Limited Of ce District: This district provides of ce space for services related to dental and medical care and for of ce-type services, often for residents of nearby residential areas. The district is characterized by a low volume of direct daily customer contact. This district is characteristically small in size and is situated near major hospitals or between large business areas and residential areas. The district regulations establish standards comparable to those of the low density residential districts, resulting in similar building bulk and retaining the low concentration of pedestrian and vehicular traf c. Building height is controlled by bulk standards and open space requirements. Building oor cannot exceed the site area. B-2 Neighborhood Business District: This district provides for the retailing of commodities classi ed as convenience goods and the furnishing of certain personal services to satisfy the daily and weekly household or personal needs of residents of surrounding residential neighborhoods. This district is located on collector streets, characteristically is small in size, usually is entirely surrounded by residential districts and is located at a convenient walking distance from the residential districts it is designed to serve. The district regulations establish standards comparable to those of low density residential districts. Building oor cannot exceed the site area. MS-2 Main Street District: The Main Street zone districts were developed to facilitate the communitys sustainable development vision for integrating land use with transportation, and to promote a broad mix of land uses in building forms that shape a Main Street pattern that is pedestrian and transit-oriented. MS-2 applies to sections of main streets in close proximity to medium density residential areas with structures of two or more stories. MS-2 has build-to requirements for street frontages, a minimum height limit of 24 feet and a maximum height limit of 65 feet, and residential protection upper story setbacks. MS-3 Main Street District: MS-3 applies to the highest intensity section of main streets within 600 feet of the intersection of enhanced transit corridors within one mile of downtown Denver. MS-3 has build-to requirements for street frontages, a minimum height of 24 feet and a maximum height limit of 100 feet and residential protection upper story setbacks. Residential Districts R-2 Multi-Unit Dwellings, Low Density: Typically duplexes and triplexes. Home occupations are allowed by permit. Minimum of 6,000 square feet of land required for each duplex structure with an additional 3,000 square feet required for every unit over 2. R-2-A Multi-Unit Dwellings, Medium Density: 2,000 square feet of land required for each dwelling unit unless site plan is submitted under planned building group (PBG) provisions, in which case 1,500 square feet of land is required for each unit. Home occupations are allowed by permit.

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Sheridan Station Area Plan Supporting Documentation 52 R-3 Multi-Unit Dwellings, High Density: Building size is controlled b y bulk standards, off-street parking and open space requirements. Building oor area cannot exceed three times the site area. R-4 Multi-Unit Dwellings and/or Of ces, High Density: The purpose of this district is to provide a location for high-density residential and intensive of ce development. Building size is controlled by bulk standards, off street parking and open space requirements. Allows hotel or motel uses and limited accessory retail shopping. Building oor cannot exceed four times the site area. R-5 Institutional District: Allows colleges, schools, churches and other institutional uses. Maximum lot coverage is 60 percent of the zone lot. Building height is controlled by bulk standards. Other Districts O-1 Open Space District: Allows airports, recreation uses, parks, cemeteries, reservoirs, community correctional facilities, and other public and semi-public uses housed in buildings. Setback requirements apply to the location of structures. PUD Planned Unit Development District: The PUD district is an alternative to conventional land use regulations, combining use, density and site plan considerations into a single process. The PUD district is speci cally intended to encourage diversi cation in the use of land and exibility in site design with respect to spacing, heights and setbacks of buildings, densities, open space and circulation elements; innovation in residential development that results in the availability of adequate housing opportunities for varying income levels; more ef cient use of land and energy through smaller utility and circulation networks; pedestrian considerations; and development patterns in harmony with nearby areas and with the goals and objectives of the comprehensive plan for the city. Sheridan Station Blueprint Denver Land Uses Blueprint Denver identi es a core area to the south of the station as transit oriented development. This transit oriented development is concentrated around the intersection of 10th Avenue and Sheridan. Along the edge of Lakewood Gulch, Blueprint Denver shows areas of urban residential transitioning to single-family duplex and single-family residential in the neighborhoods to the northeast and southeast of the station. The area along Colfax Avenue is shown as a mixed-use area of change. Blueprint Denver identi es several goals for the areas surrounding rail transit stations. These goals include: A balanced mix of uses. Compact midto high-density development. Reduced emphasis on auto parking. Attractive multi-story buildings. A variety of housing types and prices. Access to open space and recreation amenities. A high degree of connectivity between the station area and surrounding neighborhoods.

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Sheridan Station Area Plan Supporting Documentation53 Sheridan Station Blueprint Denver Land Uses

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Sheridan Station Area Plan Supporting Documentation 54TransportationThe station area is dominated by Sheridan Boulevard, a ve-lane regional arterial and Colorado State Highway. The posted speed limit is 35 miles-per-hour. Sheridan Boulevard lacks sidewalks on one or both sides of the street in many sections. Key signalized intersections along Sheridan Boulevard include 10th Avenue, 14th Avenue and Colfax Avenue. Colfax Avenue is also a State Highway with a posted speed limit of 30 miles-per-hour. The remaining streets surrounding the station area are generally built on the Denver grid system. However, along the edge of Lakewood Gulch, many streets do not connect and the street grids are off-set creating dif cult intersections. In addition, 13th Avenue does not connect through between Sheridan Boulevard and Yates Street or between Wolff and Vrain streets. Alleys provide vehicle and loading access to most residential and commercial properties. The station area includes three RTD bus routes: Route 51 along Sheridan Boulevard Routes 16 and 16 limited along West Colfax Avenue Route 9 along 10th Avenue Bus stops for route 51 include stops at 10th and Sheridan and 12th and Sheridan. Bus stops in the station area are marked by signs but many stops lack seating, shelter or route and schedule information. The Lakewood Dry Gulch Trail, Denver bicycle route D-10, is the primary off-street bicycle and pedestrian path in the vicinity of the station. The path parallels the railroad line east-west through the station area. The Denver Bicycle Master Plan Update (2001) recommends a future off-street trail connection along Lakewood Gulch to Martinez Park, located southeast of the station at 9th and Raleigh Street. In addition, the D-12 bicycle route is an on-street bicycle route that runs along 10th Avenue through the station area. Most of the existing sidewalks in the station area are narrow in width. Attached three-foot sidewalks predominate in most of the residential and commercial areas. The Denver Pedestrian Master Plan (2004) calls for a minimum 13-foot pedestrian area along streets. The pedestrian area typically consists of a ve-foot detached sidewalk and an eight-foot tree lawn. Along transit corridors and busy commercial streets, a minimum 16-foot pedestrian zone is recommended. With the exception of Sheridan Boulevard, most streets, including Colfax Avenue, allow on-street parking. In addition, most businesses and residential properties provide their own off-street parking. 10th Avenue and Sheridan Boulevard Looking North Station Area Bus Service 2006Source: RTD 2006 Service Standards Analysis Weekday Total Peak Boardings Route Frequency 2006 51 30 min 834,535 16 15 min 1,859,751 16L 15 min 629,175 9 30 min 323,677

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Sheridan Station Area Plan Supporting Documentation55 Sheridan Station Area Bicycle and Transit Routes

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Sheridan Station Area Plan Supporting Documentation 56Public EngagementThe goal of the outreach process was to provide a fair, open and effective process for engaging the community in the development of the plan for the Sheridan Station Area. The outreach objectives included: Receive meaningful and useful input from residents and community interests Directly engage a broad representation of residents and community interests by using several different methods of community outreach Ensure openness in communication of all aspects of the plan and make relevant information freely available Ensure fairness in consideration of all opinions and ideas from community members and interest groups within the context of City and regional objectives and the framework of the planning process Three public workshops and two focus groups were held as part the public involvement process. These hands on, interactive meetings included a brief presentation on project issues and process followed by interactive sessions aimed at soliciting input. The public meetings occurred at the following project milestones: Plan visioning Development of alternative concepts Plan recommendations and implementation In addition, planning staff attended numerous meetings with stakeholders throughout the process, including presentations to registered neighborhood organizations, business associations and other interest groups.

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Sheridan Station Area Plan Supporting Documentation57Outreach Methods In the community City staff provided meeting notices and copies of informational material to the registered neighborhood organizations, business organizations and and City Council of ces in the Sheridan area. City staff also provided noti cation through an initial mailing to all property owners within mile of the station, yers at the elementary schools in the station area, presentations to interest groups, postings on the citys website, and direct contact to plan participants via email and phone calls. In the region City staff sent meeting notices and copies of informational material to neighboring jurisdictions and our regional partners including: The Denver Regional Council of Governments The Regional Transportation District The Colorado Department of Transportation The City of Lakewood Denver Public Schools Denver Public Libraries In the media City staff provided press releases concerning the project and public meetings to the Rocky Mountain News, the Denver Post and community newspapers.

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Sheridan Station Area Plan Supporting Documentation 58 Public Meetings Sheridan Visioning Focus Group, February 13, 2007 St. Anthonys Central Hospital Discussion of opportunities, constraints, examples, and vision for future. 7 attendees. Sheridan Visioning Workshop, February 21, St. Anthonys Central Hospital Discussion of opportunities, constraints, examples, and vision for future. 34 attendees. Sheridan Alternatives Focus Group, May 3, 2007 St. Anthonys Central Hospital Evaluation of elements of three alternatives based on vision and goals. 9 attendees. Sheridan Alternatives Public Workshop, May 22, 2007, Denver Human Services BuildingEvaluation of elements of three alternatives based on vision and goals. 22 attendees. Sheridan Plan Recommendations Public Meeting, November 27, 2007, St. Anthonys Central HospitalDiscussion of draft plan concept and recommendations to achieve plan vision. 27 attendees. Additional Group Meetings and Presentations: Villa Park Neighborhood Association, Wednesday, June 27, 2007 Villa Park Neighborhood Association, Tuesday, July 17, 2007 Sloans Lake Neighborhood Association, Wednesday, July 11, 2007 West Colfax Business Improvement District, Thursday, July 19, 2007 West Colfax Business Improvement District, Thursday, October 11, 2007 Planning Board, Tuesday, February 6, 2007 Apartment Association of Metro Denver, Wednesday, March 21, 2007 Metro Board of Realtors, Friday, December 7, 2007 Workshop Summaries Visioning Workshop The Sheridan Station Visioning Workshop was held February 21st, 2007. Thirty four members of the public were in attendance. Tom Hoagland of the City and County of Denver provided opening remarks. Rob Smetana provided a summary of the City of Lakewoods station area plan for Sheridan. Gideon Berger with RTD provided a summary of RTDs FasTracks planning efforts. David Starnes of BBP provided information regarding market analysis for the Denver station areas. GB Arrington of PB PlaceMaking provided an overview of transit-oriented development. The full presentation was available on the City and County of Denver website (www.denvergov.org/tod). Following the presentation, the attendees were divided into small groups with a facilitator and notetaker at each table. The following summarizes the notes from each groups discussion: Group #1 Improve Sheridan (all the way from Colfax to 6th) with better sidewalks, lighting, street trees, and active retail frontages. Maintain the existing neighborhoods behind Sheridan to the NW, NE, and SE. Target new mixed-use development in two primary areas: at 10th Avenue and along Sheridan. Development should be in the range of 2-3 stories. Improve/maintain park. More neighborhood serving retail uses (barber, restaurant, neighborhood grocery) are needed along Sheridan. Create a mixed-use development at the stations park-n-Ride.

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Sheridan Station Area Plan Supporting Documentation59Group #2 Improve Sheridan (from Colfax to 6th) with better sidewalks, lighting, street trees, etc. Elevate Sheridan over the rail to better connect the park below. Improve park with better amenities and maintenance. Encourage quality redevelopment of run down properties along Sheridan. Improve intersection of Sheridan and 10th with better lighting, signals, red light cameras, pedestrian crossings. Improve shopping center on the SW corner of Sheridan and 10th. Include active uses as part of any parking structure at the station. Include bike parking at the station. Group #3 Need additional community services (community center, library, police station). Need street improvements streetscaping sidewalks. Safety in parkmaintenance in park. Beautify Lakewood Gulch. More density west of Sheridan at 10th should blend into the neighborhood. Preservation of view. Mixed-use/residential near station. No more than 3-5 stories. Mixed-use near 10th should blend into neighborhood. Group #4 Rede ne 10th as a safe pedestrian street with wide sidewalks, lighting, and the addition of a bicycle route. Designate of ce as the land use behind the park-n-Ride. Include a youth center and library as part of the park-n-Ride facility. Create two community gathering places within the park on the east side of Sheridan, at points where two proposed pedestrian connections would knit the north and south neighborhoods together. Preserve the residential character of the NE and SE neighborhoods. Promote mixed-use and retail along Colfax. Group #5 Calm traf c on Sheridan from Colfax to 6th, and improve with streetscaping. Improve and maintain park with better lighting. Encourage quality redevelopment along Sheridan. Improve intersection at Sheridan and 10th perceived high rate of accidents. Create mixed-use on the SW and SE corners of Sheridan and 10th, with a good transition to the adjacent neighborhoods. Include an active frontage, with coffee shops and restaurants, along Sheridan as part of any parking structure at the station. Create a plaza between the station and the parking area. Preserve single-family neighborhoods. Create connectivity between parks and trails in the area. Promote mixed-use and retail at the intersection of Sheridan and Colfax need a grocery store! Protect views to downtown.

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Sheridan Station Area Plan Supporting Documentation 60 Alternatives Workshop T he Sheridan Station Alternatives Workshop was held on May 22, 2007. Twenty-two persons were in attendance. Tom Hoaglund of the City and County of Denver provided opening remarks. GB Arrington of PB Placemaking gave an overview of the two concepts developed for the station area to-date, based on public feedback and design. These concepts are referred to as crash test dummies becasue they represent different land use scenarios that are not designed to survive on their own. The purpose of this workshop was to evaluate each of these concepts in small groups and to modify them to form a desired land use scenario. Public comments/questions Development next to the park should not detract from views that surrounding homes have to the park. How will pedestrians access the park? There will be elevators on both sides of the park. Next steps Following the workshop, the City and design team worked together to create a recommended TOD concept for the station. This concept incorporated the public feedback heard to-date. The recommended concept was presented for public feedback at an open house in the fall. The full presentation was made available on the City and County of Denver website. Sheridan Summary of Group Comments Clear preference for residential along Sheridan between Lakewood Gulch and 14th Avenue, with potential for limited ground oor retail. Create eyes on the park by facing residential onto Lakewood Gulch. Encourage high density residential with mixed-use in the station area. Develop a bicycle and pedestrian framework that connects north/south (across Lakewood Gulch) and east/west (across Sheridan). Group 1 Used People by the Park alternative as the base. Stress residential character on Sheridan with mixed use on ground oor. 10th Avenue intersection needs improvementcritical. Connect into neighborhood with walkable streets and great streetscapes. Need for pedestrian friendliness along Sheridan. Face residential onto the park. Emphasize bike connections. Group 2 Preferred People by the Park alternative. Encourage residential along Sheridan (high-density). Create focal point at the station as part of the bridge design. Make the bridge open. Create an inspiring place. Make it an attraction. Build a plaza at the mixed-use area just north of the station. Draft an IGA between Denver and Lakewood for redevelopment and park improvements to implement revenue sharing. Need for pedestrian connections across the Gulch. Transition residential from high to low to the neighborhoods through alley or street differentiators (street preferred). No detailed discussion on the 10th Avenue intersection, but the group agreed that redevelopment should happen there and that this intersection must be improved to provide for the parking planned in the area.

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Sheridan Station Area Plan Supporting Documentation 62 Group 3 Need strong bike and pedestrian connections along the Gulch. Build ground oor retail along Sheridan (north of station) make the zoning exible to accommodate residential and commercial/retail make the zoning exible to accommodate residential and commercial/retail. Encourage live/work spaces along Sheridan. Create a walkable neighborhood. Focus development at the station. Residential stepped back -dense along Sheridan and then transition to lower densities in the neighborhood.Relevant PlansThe Sheridan Station Area Plan builds upon a solid foundation of existing documents and guiding principles. This section provides a review of the applicable content of adopted citywide plans. The Sheridan Station Area Plan provides speci c recommendations for the planning area that, in case of con ict, supersede general recommendations from existing plans. Comprehensive Plan, 2000 The City Council adopted Denver Comprehensive Plan in 2000. Plan 2000 provides the planning and policy framework for development of Denvers human and physical environment. The key subjects of Plan 2000 that relate to this Station Plan are land use, mobility, legacies, and housing. Land Use: Land use recommendations promote new investment that accommodates new residents, improves economic vitality and enhances the citys aesthetics and livability. In addition, Plan 2000 supports sustainable development patterns by promoting walking, biking and transit use. Mobility: Plan 2000 emphasizes planning for multiple modes of transportation walking, biking, transit and cars. Key concepts include expanding mobility choices for commuters and regional cooperation in transit system planning. Plan 2000 also promotes compact, mixed-use development in transit rich places (like station areas). Legacies: Plan 2000 prioritizes planning for park, open space and recreation systems. Historic building preservation and respect for traditional patterns of development in established areas are also key tenets of Plan 2000 To this end, Plan 2000 places a high value on maintenance of streets, trails, and parkways that link destinations within the community. Ensuring that new buildings, infrastructure and open spaces create attractive, beautiful places is the foundation of the legacies chapter. Housing: Plan 2000 recognizes that access to housing is a basic need for Denver citizens. Thus, Plan 2000 emphasizes preservation and maintenance of the existing housing stock and expanding housing options. Providing a variety of unit types and costs, in addition to housing development in transit rich places are fundamental tenets of Plan 2000 This ensures a sustainable balance of jobs and housing as the city matures. The Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000, Blueprint Denver, and other adopted city-wide plans form the basis for recommendations contained in the Sheridan Station Area Plan.

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Sheridan Station Area Plan Supporting Documentation63 The Denver Bicycle Master Plan and the Strategic Transportation PlanBlueprint Denver: An Integrated Land Use and Transportation Plan, 2002 Plan 2000 recommended that the city create a plan to integrate land use and transportation planning. Blueprint Denver is the implementation plan that recognizes this relationship and describes the building blocks and tools necessary to achieve the vision outlined in Plan 2000 Areas of Change and Stability: Blueprint Denver divides the city into areas of change and areas of stability. Over time, all areas of the city will uctuate between change and stability. The goal for areas of stability is to identify and maintain the character of an area while accommodating new development and redevelopment. The goal for areas of change is to channel growth where it will be bene cial and can best improve access to jobs, housing and services. Blueprint Denver describes two types of areas of stability: committed areas and reinvestment areas. Committed areas are stable neighborhoods that may bene t from the stabilizing effects of small, individual lot in ll development rather than large-scale land assembly and redevelopment. Reinvestment areas are neighborhoods with a character that is desirable to maintain but would bene t from reinvestment and modest in ll. This reinvestment, however, is more limited in comparison to that of areas of change. Transportation: The transportation component of Blueprint Denver provides transportation building blocks and tools that promote multimodal and intermodal connections. Elements of connection include the street system, bus transit system, bicycle system, and pedestrian system. These components must work together to realize the guiding principles of Blueprint Denver. Zoning Code Update (in development) Denver citizens called for reform of the Citys Zoning Code in the 1989 Comprehensive Plan and again in the Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000 Blueprint Denver (2002) provided the vision and initial strategy to begin this effort. The current zoning code was established in the 1950s and assumes an automobile oriented land use development pattern. Further, the complexity of the current zoning code makes it dif cult for property owners to easily identify what is allowed to be built on a given property. That complexity can make doing quality development more dif cult and raises the cost of doing business in Denver by requiring lengthy study of our unique and cumbersome zoning code. The updated zoning code will better re ect the vision of Blueprint Denver by promoting proper development in areas of change while enhancing neighborhood character in areas of stability. Transit Oriented Development Strategic Plan, 2006 The Transit Oriented Development (TOD) Strategic Plan prioritizes the citys planning and implementation efforts related to the transit system and station area development. TOD De ned: The TOD Strategic Plan de nes TOD as development near transit that creates beautiful, vital, walkable neighborhoods; provides housing, shopping, and transportation choices; generates lasting value; and provides access to the region via transit. TOD Typologies: The TOD Strategic Plan establishes TOD typologies for every transit station in the city. Typologies establish a framework to distinguish the types of places linked by the transit system. The typologies frame expectations about the land use mix and intensity of development at each of the stations.

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Sheridan Station Area Plan Supporting Documentation 64 Station Area Planning: While providing an important planning framework, the TOD Strategic Plan calls for more detailed station area plans. Such plans offer speci c direction for appropriate development, needed infrastructure investments and economic development strategies. Bicycle Master Plan, 2002 In 2002 in response to Plan 2000, the Bicycle Master Plan (2002) provides a framework for an interconnected bicycle system. The primary objectives of the Bicycle Master Plan are: Develop new neighborhood routes that create connections between the existing bicycle route system and nearby facilities not currently on a bicycle route. Close the gaps in the existing bicycle routes to complete the bicycle grid route system. Improve access with bike route and trail signage around light rail stations to make bicycling and transit work in a seamless manner. Support education, enforcement and public policy for the bicycle system. Lakewood Dry Gulch Park Concept Plan The Lakewood Dry Gulch Park Concept Plan identi es nine design principles for the Lakewood Dry Gulch. Several of the principles relate directly to the station area plan including: Create a continuous non-motorized trail system linking the western edge of the park to downtown Denver. Provide cross slope linkages that safely connect key areas. Provide attractive and distinctive railings and barriers to ensure park user safety, reduce site degradation and minimize dumping. Develop light rail stations that also serve as community parks with strong linkages to water. Create a design character that uni es all the stations along the corridor. Improve streets, turn-arounds and alleys to meet city standards, upgrade the area and minimize speeding. Greenprint Denver, 2006 Greenprint Denver is an effort to fully integrate sustainability as a core value and operating principle in Denver city government. The Greenprint Denver action agenda for 2006 charts the citys course over the next ve years. Included in Greenprint Denver action agenda are speci c actions that relate directly to the citys ambitious station area planning effort. For example, this plan directs the city to decrease reliance on automobiles through public transit use and access, and promote transit-oriented development, as well as bike and pedestrian enhancements, and increase by 20% the new development located within mile of existing transit stations by 2011. Parks and Recreation Game Plan, 2002 The Game Plan is a master plan for the citys park, open space and recreation system. A primary principle is to create greener neighborhoods. Game Plan establishes a street tree and tree canopy goal of 15-18 percent for the entire city. The plan also establishes a parkland acreage target of 8-10 acres per 1,000 residents. Tools to accomplish these goals include promoting green streets and parkways, which indicate routes that require greater emphasis and additions to the landscape. Strategic Transportation Plan, 2006 Denver Public Works drafted the Strategic Transportation Plan (STP) The STP will be a primary implementation tool for Blueprint Denver and Plan 2000 The objective of the STP is to determine needed transportation investments. The STP process will (1) provide education concerning options for transportation alternatives; (2) reach consensus on transportation strategies along transportation corridors through a collaborative process; and (3) build stakeholder support. The STP represents a new approach to transportation planning in Denver. Instead of forecasting future auto travel on Denver streets, the STP will forecast person-trips to evaluate the magnitude of transportation impacts caused by all types of travel. This person-trip data provides the ability to plan for bikes, pedestrians, transit, and street improvements. The

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Sheridan Station Area Plan Supporting Documentation65STP is the rst step in identifying the needs for every major travel corridor in the city. The STP will create concepts for how to meet transportation needs, including a prioritization of corridor improvements. Storm Drainage Master Plan (2005) and Sanitary Sewer Master Plan, 2006 The Storm Drainage Master Plan and the Sanitary Sewer Master Plan evaluates adequacy of the existing systems assuming the future land uses identi ed in Blueprint Denver The Storm Drainage Master Plan determines the amount of imperviousness resulting from future land development and the subsequent runoff. The Sanitary Sewer Master Plan identi es needed sanitary sewer improvements to respond to the forecasted development. Pedestrian Master Plan, 2004 The Pedestrian Master Plan was written to address the mobility goals of the Comprehensive Plan and Blueprint Denver Speci cally, the plan calls for a pedestrian environment that is: safe from automobiles; encourages barrier free pedestrian mobility; enables pedestrians to move safely and comfortably between places and destinations; attractive, human scale and encourages walking; and promotes the role of walking in maintaining health and preventing disease. To achieve these goals, the plan calls for land use changes to encourage walking through mixed-use development patterns. The plan identi es a minimum 13 foot pedestrian zone on all streets including an 8 foot tree lawn and a 5 foot sidewalk and a minimum 16 foot pedestrian zone on most arterial streets. Greenprint Denver and the Pedestrian Master Plan

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Sheridan Station Area Plan Acknowledgements67 Acknowledgements

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Sheridan Station Area Plan Acknowledgements 68 Mayor John Hickenlooper Denver City Council Jeanne Robb, Council President, District 10 Rick Garcia, District 1 Jeanne Faatz, District 2 Paul Lopez, District 3 Peggy Lehmann, District 4 Marcia Johnson, District 5 Charlie Brown, District 6 Chris Nevitt, District 7 Carla Madison, District 8 Judy Montero, District 9 Michael Hancock, District 11 Carol Boigon, At-Large Doug Linkhart, At-Large Denver Planning Board Brad Buchanan, Chair Laura E. Aldrete Richard Delanoy William H. Hornby Anna Jones Judith Martinez Sharon Nunnally Bruce ODonnell Karen Perez Jeffrey Walker Dave Webster Denver Community Planning & Development Peter J. Park, Director Catherine Cox-Blair, TOD Program Manager Steve Gordon, Comprehensive Planning Manager Thomas Hoaglund, Project Manager Chris Gleissner, Senior City Planner Barbara Frommell, Senior City Planner Caryn Wenzara, Senior City Planner Gideon Berger, Senior City Planner Steve Nalley, Associate City Planner Eric McClelland, Senior GIS Analyst Andrea Santoro, Senior GIS Analyst Carolyne Janssen, Graphic Design Jim Ottenstein, Graphic Design Denver Public Works Bob Kochaver, FasTracks Liaison Crissy Fanganello, Manager Public Works Infrastructure and Programming Eric Osmundsen, Senior Engineer Justin Schmitz, Engineer James Mackay, Bicycle Planning and Cost Estimation Cynthia Patton, Associate City Planner

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Sheridan Station Area Plan Acknowledgements69 Denver Parks & Recreation Gordon Robertson, Assistant Director Devon Buckles, Parks Planner Keith French, Parks Planner Of ce of Economic Development Andre Pettigrew, Executive Director William Kralovek, Transit Oriented Development Michael Miera, Housing and Neighborhood Development ReJean Peeples, Community Development Program Specialist Denver Urban Renewal Authority Grant Bennett, Redevelopment Specialist Regional Transportation District Bill Sirois, Transit Oriented Development Dennis Cole, West Corridor Project Manager City of Lakewood Roger Wadnal, Economic Planning Manager Rob Smetana, Principal Planner Consultant Team: PB Placemaking, Urban Design Consultant Fehr and Peers, Transportation Consultant Navjoy Consulting Services, Traf c Consultant Hartwig & Associates, Cost Estimating Consultant Basile Baumann Prost & Associates, Economic Consultant ArLand Nelson Nygaard