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Uptown neighborhood plan, 1986

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Title:
Uptown neighborhood plan, 1986
Creator:
Community Planning and Development, City and County of Denver
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
City and County of Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English

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Subjects / Keywords:
Neighborhood plans
Community planning
City planning
Spatial Coverage:
Denver -- Uptown

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Full Text
UPTOWN
NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
DENVER PLANNING AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT
AUGUST 1986


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UPTOWN NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
tabu: of contents
INTRODUCTION
A- This Plan is an Update of the IS30
Neighborhood Plan
B. Objectives for this Plan
G. Process of Developing this Plan
SETTING FOR UPTOWN
A. Location
B. Strong Edges
C. Districts
D. Existing Character
1. Residents
2. Transportation
3. Sous ing
4. Land Use and Zoning
5. Crime Statistics
Page
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III. HISTORY OF UPTOWN
IV KEY UPTOWN PLANNING OPPORTUNITIES
A. Momentum
B. Shared Vision
C. Proven Interest
D. Vacant and Redevelopable Parcels
E. Architecturally and Historically Significant Building
F. Excellent Location
G. Unique Urban Design Potentials Created by its Street System
V. KEY UPTOWN PLANNING ISSUES
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A.
B.
C.
D.
E.
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G.
Negative Public Image 16
The Current Zoning Is Structured in a Way
as to Preclude the Creation of a
Mixed Use Neighborhood with a Strang
Residential Base 17
The Most Effective Way to Create the Mixed Use
Neighborhood 17
Land Use Trends have Destabilized Uptown as a
Residential Neighborhood 18
No Mechanisms for Achieving the Desired
Urban Design Concepts for Uptown IS
No Clear- Definition of the Role and Character
of the Streets in the Neighborhood 19
Limited Housing Options 19
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VI.
VII.
VIII.
IX.
H. Economic Development Could Either Benefit or
Harm the Neighborhood
THE VISION FOR UPTOWN
A. Urban Village
B. Districts
C. Common Framework
D. Distinction from Downtown
E. Livability
F. Economic vitality
G. Diversity
RECOMMENDATIONS FOR UPTOWN
A. Land Use and Zoning
1. Housing
2. Zoning R-4
3. Zoning B-2, B-3, and B-4
4. Districts
5. Administrative Policies and Procedures
6. Retail
7. Image
8. Historic Preservation
B. Transportation
C. Urban Design
D. Parks
E. Security
F. Economic Development
PRIORITY ACTION SUMMARY
A. Demonstration Area
B. Districts
C. Economic Development
D. Housing
E. Image
F. Mixed Land Use
G. Offices
H. Parks
I. Retail Uses
J. Security
K. Transportation
L. Urban Design
M. Zoning
APPENDICES
A. REPORT ON THE CHARETTE
B. DRAFT WORK PROGRAM FOR 16TH AVENUE
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I. INTRODUCTION
A. THIS PLAN IS AN UPDATE OF THE 1980 NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
This plan updates the neighborhood plan adopted in 1980 for
North Capitol Hill and City Park West, now collectively
known as Uptown. The 1980 neighborhood plan needed revision
because the conditions in the neighborhood have changed
since the plan was developed and because the programs for
implementing the plan and the organizations involved in the
implementation have evolved significantly since 1980.
This and all other neighborhood ,plans are consistent with
and supplemental to the City's Comprehensive Plan. The
Comprehensive Plan presents a Citywide perspective, while
each neighborhood plan provides more specific guidance both
for the allocation of City resources and for the location
and design of private development.
B. OBJECTIVES FOR THIS PLAN
The City's primary objectives for planning in the study area
include:
1. ECONOMIC REVITALIZATION: increasing the momentum for
revitalization of economic activity in the neighborhoods
surrounding Downtown, in Downtown, and the rest of the City.
2. STABILIZATION AND REVITALIZATION OF NEIGHBORHOODS:
providing neighborhoods which attract permanent residents,
employees, and businesses.
3. REINFORCEMENT OF DIVERSITY: reinforcing and expanding
the current neighborhood diversity, which encompasses a wide
variety of ages, lifestyles, economic circumstances, ethnic
groups, and family types.
C. PROCESS OF DEVELOPING THE PLAN
The plan was developed under the sponsorship of the Denver
Planning Office with the participation of the people of
Uptown. The Plan incorporates work developed in meetings of
the Amenities Task Force,, sponsored by the Capitol Community
Development Corporation; through the Capitol Hill / East
Colfax / Uptown Charette, sponsored by the Denver Department
of Public Works and the Denver Planning Office; and in
meetings specifically directed toward the neighborhood plan,
sponsored by the Denver Planning Office. Neighborhood
organizations provided essential coordination and resources.
These organizations include: Denver's Uptown-on-the-Hill,
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Capitol Community Development Corporation, Capitol Hill
United Neighborhoods (CHUN), Coifax-on-the-Hill, North
Capitol Hill Development Corporation, and the Organization
for Midtown Neighborhood Improvement (OMNI).
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UPTOWN NEIGHBORHOOD
LOCATION MAP
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if
II. SETTING FOR UPTOWN
A. LOCATION
Uptown is between Downtown and City Park and adjacent to
Capitol Hill. It has within walking distance the greatest
concentration of employees in the City, the largest retail
shopping district, the cultural center for the region, the
highest concentration of residents, and two of the City's
largest and finest parks.
B. STRONG EDGES
Uptown has relatively strong edges which help to define the
neighborhood. The official boundaries of the neighborhood
are Broadway on the west, Colfax on the south, York on the
east, and 2oth/Downing/23rd Avenue on the north. The
western edge is enhanced by a change in the topography and
two heavily traveled streets, Broadway and Lincoln. Colfax
acts as both a boundary and a connection between Uptown and
Capitol Hill/Cheesman Park to the south. York Street and
City Park on the east create the strongest edge. The
northwestern boundary along 20th Avenue works both visually
and psychologically. Only Downing/23rd Avenue creates a
weak boundary, with similar uses and conditions on both
sides of the imaginary line.
c. DISTRICTS
Within its boundaries, Uptown has districts with distinct
characteristics and the potential for further enhancing the
urban form by setting individual standards for building
height, density, land uses, and design.
1. Downtown Extended: Broadway to Sherman
Downtown Extended has the character, intensity, and types of
uses found in the Downtown, but has a north/south street
grid which is distinct from the diagonal grid on which most
of Downtown is located.
2. The Western Front: Sherman to Logan/Pennsvlvania
The Western Front functions as a transition from Downtown
into the rest of the neighborhood. It includes offices,
.some retail, and residential uses. It is influenced by
historic churches, the State Capitol and office buildings,
and low to mid-rise apartments.
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3. The Village; Locran/Pennsvlvania to Park Avenue
The Village is less intensely developed and includes more
residential structures than are found in either "Downtown
Extended" or "The Western Front."
4. Citv Park West: Park Avenue to York
City Park West has a residential character which
accommodates office and limited retail uses, as well as
housing.
5. Hospitals
The Hospital District provides support services for the five
hospitals and provides buffers for the housing adjacent to
its boundaries.
6. Midtown
Midtown is primarily a single family residential area north
and east of the hospitals.
D. EXISTING CHARACTER
The majority of information in this section is derived from
the 1980 U.S. Census and, therefore, does not reflect the
substantial redevelopment which has occurred in the last six
years. Where they are available, 1985 figures have been
used to provide as up to date analysis as possible.
1. Residents
o DECLINING POPULATION: Between 1950 and 1985, Uptown
experienced a 59% decrease in its population, dropping from
21,300 in 1950 to an estimated 8,700 in 1985, a loss of
approximately 12,600 people. This loss was the greatest in
the western end of the neighborhood, but was more evenly
distributed than might be apparent from visual
observations. The drop in population was most dramatic
between 1950 and 1970, but even between 1970 and 1985, the
neighborhood lost approximately 33% of its population,
dropping from 13,000 to an estimated 8,700.
o SMALLER HOUSEHOLDS: There were fewer people in the
average household in Uptown than in the average household in
Denver as a whole, although the gap narrowed as the average
number of people in each household in the City decreased
faster than it did for each household in the neighborhood.
The size of households increased from west to east across
the neighborhood, ranging from estimates of 1.52 person per
household to 2.02 persons, with a Citywide estimate for 1985
of 2.33.
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o lower incomes: Median household income was far below
that for the City and dropped dramatically between 1970 and
1980. This drop occurred throughout the neighborhood.
Median household income for the City dropped from $16,420 to
$15,507, while median household income in the neighborhood
census tracts dropped from $11,240 to $6,061 in tract 26.01,
$10,191 to $6,758 in tract 26.02, $10,603 to $9,578 in
31.01, and $11,477 to $7,237 in 31.02. The per capita
income was also below that for the City, but in all cases
but one increased between 1970 and 1980.
o HIGHER UNEMPLOYMENT: The civilian unemployment rate in
Uptown was far greater than the Citywide rate in 1980, as it
also was in 1970. While the 1980 Citywide rate was 5.0%,
the four census tracts in Uptown recorded 9.25% (26.01),
9.87% (26.02), 8.19% (31.01), and 9.69% (31.02).
o FEWER FAMILIES: Families comprised a far smaller
percentage of all the households in Uptown than in the City
as a whole, averaging 27% of all the households in Uptown
and 56% in the City in 1980.
o FEWER MARRIED COUPLES: The percentage of families that
are comprised of "married couples" has historically been
smaller in Uptown than Citywide. In 1980, the comparison
was 53% in Uptown versus 77% Citywide.
o MORE PEOPLE OVER 65: In 1980, 19% of the people in
Uptown were over 65, compared to 13% in the City.
o MORE MALES: Males have comprised a larger percentage of
the total population. Of those males, fewer have been
married, more have been single, more have been separated,
and more have been divorced than in the City as a whole.
o FEWER FEMALES: Consequently, Uptown has had a smaller
percentage of females. Of those females, fewer have been
married, more have been single, more have been separated,
and more have been divorced that in the City as a whole.
o MORE EQUAL DISTRIBUTION OF BLACKS AND WHITES: In 1980,
Uptown had a more equal distribution of blacks and whites
than the City as a whole, although there were still
distinctions among areas within the neighborhood. 59% of
Uptown's population was white, and 29% black, while 75% of
the City's population was white and 12% black. Other ethnic
designations were similar to Citywide percentages.
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O FEWER SCHOOL-AGE CHILDREN AND ADULTS ENROLLED IN SCHOOL:
In 1980, only 14% of the population in Uptown was 3 years
old and older and enrolled in school. The comparable
percentage for the City was 23%. This percentage was lower
in the western end of the neighborhood than in the east,
ranging from 5% (26.01), to 11% (26.02), 29% (31.01), and
18% (31.02).
o FEWER HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES: 74.7% of City residents
over 18 were high school graduates in 1980, while
percentages of Uptown residents who were graduates ranged
between 58.9% and 65.7% for the four census tracts.
o MORE MOBILE RESIDENTS: The City has a relatively mobile
population, with only 44% of its residents who are older
than five living in the same residence that they were in
five years earlier. Uptown has an even more mobile
population, with only 29% of its residents living in the
same residence that they were in five years earlier. The
years of comparison were 1980 and 1975.
O MORE NEW RESIDENTS FROM OUTSIDE DENVER: 24% of the
neighborhood residents had moved from a different
metropolitan area. The figure for the city was 14%.
O MORE NEW RESIDENTS FROM SMALLER CITIES AND RURAL AREAS:
30% of the residents of Uptown had moved from an area which
was not defined as a metropolitan area, versus 18% of all
City residents.
2. Transportation
o HIGH TRAFFIC VOLUMES: One way streets carry a high
volume of traffic through the neighborhood, with the highest
volumes being on those streets closest to Downtown. Traffic
counts in 1981 show the east/west streets carrying over
60.000 vehicles per day and the north/south streets almost
75.000 vehicles per day. For comparison, the highest
traffic on Colorado Boulevard during the same period was
approximately 56,000 vehicles per day between Cherry Creek
Drive and Exposition. Lincoln and Broadway combined carried
58.000 vehicles per day at 8th Avenue. The highest traffic
volumes for each street were Colfax: 23,000; 16th: 6,100;
17th: 15,300; 18th: 14,700; and 20th:5,900; Grant: 9,800;
Logan: 7,200; Washington: 6,400; Clarkson: 6,700; Ogden:
6,100; Downing: 6,300; York: 11,300; Josephine: 11,200; and
Park Avenue: 10,000.
O FEWER PEOPLE WHO DROVE A PRIVATE VEHICLE TO WORK: 36% of
neighborhood residents drove a private vehicle either alone
or as part of a car pool. The comparative figure for the
entire City was 60%.
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o TWICE AS MANY PEOPLE WHO TOOK THE BUS TO WORK: 22% of
the neighborhood residents rode the bus to work, versus 10%
of all City residents.
O THREE TIMES AS MANY PEOPLE WHO WALKED TO WORK: 24% of
Uptown residents walked to work on a regular basis, while
only 7%-of all City residents walked.
3. Housing
O ONE SIXTH THE NUMBER OF RESIDENTS WHO OWNED THEIR HOMES:
Only 8% of Uptown homes were occupied by their owners,
versus 47% of all Denver homes.
O MORE RESIDENTS WHO RENTED THEIR HOMES: 77% of
neighborhood homes were rented, compared to 46% of all
Denver homes.
O TWICE THE NUMBER OF VACANT HOMES: 15% of all Uptown
homes were vacant, versus 7% of all Denver homes.
o HIGHER MORTGAGE PAYMENTS: The median mortgage payments
for homes in Uptown were higher in 1980 than they were for
the city as a whole ($425 for 26.02, $368 for 31.01, and
$620 for 31.02 versus a Citywide median of $379).
o LOWER GROSS RENTS: Despite higher mortgage payments,
median gross rents in 1980 in Uptown were lower than they
were for the City as a whole ($144 for 26.01, $152 for
26.02, $225 for 31.01, and $169 for 31.02 versus a Citywide
median of $241).
4. Land Use and Zoning
o HIGH PERCENTAGE OF NON-RESIDENTIAL LAND USE: In 1985, 58%
of the acreage in Uptown was devoted to non-residential land
uses, 38% was residential, and 4% was vacant. These
percentages varied greatly by census tract, but only tract
31.01 had a higher percentage of residential land uses than
of non-residential land uses.
o OLD STRUCTURES: In 1985, the majority of buildings in
Uptown had been built prior to 1939. In areas zoned R-4,
for example, 69% of the structures had been built prior to
1939, with 35% predating 1900 and 34% having been built
between 1900 and 1939. The areas which were exceptions to
this were those zoned B-3 and B-5.
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o EXISTING SQUARE FOOTAGE FAR BELOW THAT ALLOWED BY THE
CURRENT ZONING: In 1985, Uptown had approximately
19,500,000 square feet of residential and non-residential
structures. Of those, approximately 8,000,000 square feet
was located in the B-5 zone in the extension of Downtown
into the neighborhood. With the existing zoning in the
neighborhood, Uptown has the potential to have approximately
64,000,000 square feet of structures, an increase of
approximately 44,500,000 square feet and more than 3 times
the current square footage. By comparison, there was
approximately 45,000,000 square feet of floor area in all
the buildings in Downtown Denver in 1985. The highest
absorption rate for office space ever recorded in Downtown
Denver was 2.63 million square feet in 1983. By 1985, the
absorption rate had fallen to 544,000 square feet per year
for the entire Downtown.
o EXISTING FLOOR AREA RATIO FAR BELOW THAT ALLOWED BY THE
CURRENT ZONING: The current Floor Area Ratio (FAR) for the
neighborhood as a whole is 1.25:1. That means that the
average property owner has erected a structure which has
1.25 times the square footage of the lot on which she
constructed the building. The potential FAR for the
neighborhood as a whole, including a variety of zoning
districts and allowable densities, is 4.12:1. The majority
of the land in the neighborhood is zoned R-4, which allows a
4:1 FAR, but the west end is zoned B-5, which provides
conditions under which a structure can have up to a 17:1
FAR. As a result, census tract 26.01 has a potential FAR of
7.4:1.
O HIGHER DENSITY ON THE WEST END OF THE NEIGHBORHOOD: The
existing FAR varies widely through the neighborhood, with
the highest in the west end of the neighborhood, where the
. FAR is 3.25:1. Existing FAR's for the other census tracts
include: 0.67:1 for tract 26.02, 0.60:1 for tract 31.01, and
0.73:1 for tract 31.02.
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5
Crime Statistics
All statistics are Per 1000 residents in 1984
North CaDitol Hill citv Park west
crimes Ranh Crimes Rank
Total crimes 319.4 5 277.1 7
Homicide Offenses .4 9 .3 13
Robberies 24.2 1 14.7 4
Race Offenses 9.1 1 6.1 4
Aeraravated Assaults 12.7 6 9.0 9
Larcenies 107.7 6 98.2 7
Arsons 4.8 1 2.2 13
Burclaries 58.0 45 130.8 8
Auto Thefts 20.1 8 20.0 9
Other Crimes 107.2 3 63.8 8
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ITT. HISTORY OF UPTOWN
Uptown experienced a transition from a neighborhood of
fashion to one which was shunned because of its image.
Recent changes in the neighborhood are helping it to
overcome that negative image.
Private ownership in the area now known as Uptown began when
Ne-sho-wa, a Delaware Indian who in return for fighting for
the United States in the 1837 war against the Seminole
Indians, was awarded a 160 acre tract of land. Ne-sho-wa's
daughter later sold the land for $100 to Albert Clements.
Uptown, east to High Street, was part of the city of Denver
as established by the Territorial Session Laws of 1864. As
Denver's population and wealth boomed as a result of the
discovery of gold and silver in the mountains, the City
filled up and out, and wealthier Denverites, tiring of the
pollution and the activity in the city, began moving to the
suburbs on the hill to the east.
In 1868, Henry Brown subdivided his homestead that ran from
Broadway to Grant Street and from 11th Avenue to 20th
Avenue. As an impetus for development of his subdivision,
Brown donated land at Broadway and Colfax for the State
Capitol. Known as Brown's Bluff, the area became the
fashionable neighborhood for Denver.
As the City grew, development of the area continued
eastward, and in 1883, the remainder of the neighborhood
became a part of the City under the Territorial Session Laws
of 1883. By 1887, the entire North Capitol Hill
neighborhood was platted and development was occurring in
new additions.
The additions in Uptown were known for their amenities,
including views of the City. The Park Avenue Addition, for
example, boasted parkways along 17th, Colfax, and Park
Avenues and Downing. The neighborhood also had the
advantages of easy access to the tramway and direct access
to the City Ditch, which meandered through the neighborhood,
insuring adequate water supplies for landscaping.
Uptown quickly established itself as a fine, stable
residential neighborhood. Most of the multi-storied homes
were constructed of stone or masonry and were grouped in
imposing stretches of four to ten houses. In 1887, the
section of the Park Avenue Addition which is bounded by
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Clarkson, Emerson, 16th, and 17th, was resubdivided as
Swallows Resubdivision. Swallow Hill, named for Hanna
Swallow, a prominent real estate developer, still contains
excellent examples of historic Victorian, primarily Queen
Anne, houses.
Although growth slowed following the Depression of 1893, the
area was well developed by the turn of the century. While
residences were concentrated west of Clarkson, homes were
found all the way to York.
Uptown was bounded on the south by what was at one time
Denvers most prominent residential street, East Colfax
Avenue. East Colfax formed a bridge to Capitol Hill, with
little distinction between the two neighborhoods. The
development of East Colfax was stimulated by a contract a
real estate developer made with the local horse-car monopoly
to build an extension of Colfax from Emerson to York Street;
real estate developers then bought house sites along the
route.
During the early years of this century, several changes
occurred in the character of Uptown. The first apartments
in the City were constructed in the area despite stiff
opposition to these 'tenements;' critics responded by
nicknaming the area flanking Colfax "Flatberg." Health
facilities attracted to Denver by its pure air were
established in the neighborhood; by 1905, Saint Luke's and
Saint Joseph's hospitals were prominent facilities. As the
automobile brought increased traffic and shopping into
Uptown, Colfax became the primary automobile arterial
through east Denver to ever more distant suburbs. The
increased exposure resulted in the transformation in the
character and use of the Avenue from residential to
commercial. In 1929, the first master plan for the City
described a large part of East Colfax Avenue as a commercial
strip.
The population transformation from affluent White,
predominantly Anglo-Saxon to more transient minority and
ethnic newcomers began in 1930. The Great Depression
caused many families to move to smaller homes and large
mansions were subdivided, a trend which continued for more
than 30 years. The neighborhood also began to attract Irish
Catholics and Jews. In 1948, when the restrictive covenants
that governed the neighborhood were declared illegal, Blacks
and Hispanics also began to settle in the area.
During the 1960's and 1970's the residential base of the
neighborhood suffered the greatest decline; the number of
residential units decreased by almost half. Unlike Capitol
Hill, which experienced an apartment renaissance of sorts in
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the 1960's and 70's, North Capitol Hill became more
institutional and commercial. By the late 1970's and early
1980's, the residential base of the neighborhood had been
entirely transformed; few single family homes remained and
the large renter population was more transient and far
poorer than the rest of Denver.
In 1980, the City adopted a neighborhood plan for North
Capitol Hill and City Park West which served as the basis
for this plan. The planning process leading to the 1980
plan helped the City and the people of the neighborhood
focus on issues and provided an opportunity for diverse
interest groups to begin working together.
In the early 1980's the .trend began to change so that by
1986 the neighborhood had developed a momentum which was
attracting national attention. The redevelopment of Uptown
was creating an inviting inner-city neighborhood with a
compatible mixture of uses and a strong core of leaders.
Uptown had developed strong neighborhood organizations which
represented coalitions of the diverse interests and which
provided leadership for the neighborhood renaissance. These
organizations worked to initiate and support redevelopment
projects, to target the sources of crime in the
neighborhood, and to create public relations programs which
helped change people's perception of the neighborhood.
Uptown began attracting developers with a vision of the
neighborhood's potential for residential, retail, and office
uses. These developers joined forces with the neighbprhood
organizations to help achieve their common vision for
Uptown.
The City began targeting its resources to Uptown, helping to
initiate projects such as Uptown Village, a mixed-use
project with 411 housing units; increased police protection;
and streetscape improvements to East Colfax. The City
initiated this plan in recognition of the momentum in the
neighborhood and its desire to reinforce that momentum.
These changes are helping complete Uptown's transition back
to a healthy and inviting neighborhood, a neighborhood of
fashion.
note; material in this section was developed in part from
the NORTH CAPITOL HILL STUDY, prepared for the Capitol
Community Development Corporation and United Bank of Denver,
N.A., copyrighted April 1985.
14


IV. KEY UPTOWN PLANNING OPPORTUNITIES
Uptown has assets which can be built upon to help it achieve
its goals:
A. Foremost among these is the MOMENTUM which the people of
the neighborhood have generated.
B. The development of quality projects and the creation of
well organized and effective' neighborhood organizations have
fostered a SHARED VISION for the neighborhood.
C. Design and development professionals and neighborhood
financial institutions have proven their commitment to this
shared vision by committing time and money to its
implementation. This PROVEN INTEREST has, in turn,
intensified the momentum.
D. In addition, the neighborhood has large quantities of
VACANT AND REDEVELOPABLE PARCELS,
E. many ARCHITECTURALLY AND HISTORICALLY SIGNIFICANT
BUILDINGS,
F. an EXCELLENT LOCATION,
G. and UNIQUE URBAN DESIGN POTENTIALS CREATED BY ITS STREET
SYSTEM.
15


V. KEY UPTOWN PLANNING ISSUES
The key planning issues which have been identified for
Uptown include:
A. The neighborhood has a NEGATIVE PUBLIC IMAGE which
prevents people from investing, shopping, and living in the
area.
B. THE CURRENT R-4 ZONING IS STRUCTURED IN SUCH A WAY AS TO
PROVIDE INCENTIVES FOR OFFICE USE OVER RESIDENTIAL USE.
C. There is A LACK OF CONSENSUS ON WHAT WILL BE THE MOST
EFFECTIVE WAY TO CREATE THE MIXED USE NEIGHBORHOOD which is
commonly desired.
D. LAND USE ACTIONS OVER THE LAST 20 YEARS, MARKET
CONDITIONS, AND CITY POLICIES AND PROCEDURES HAVE
DESTABILIZED UPTOWN AS A RESIDENTIAL NEIGHBORHOOD.
E. There are NO MECHANISMS FOR ACHIEVING THE DESIRED URBAN
DESIGN CONCEPTS FOR UPTOWN.
F. There is NO CLEAR DEFINITION OF THE ROLE AND CHARACTER
OF THE STREETS IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD.
G. Uptown provides LIMITED HOUSING OPTIONS, with few
opportunities for owner-occupied housing and a limited range
of housing types and amenities.
- SKETCH OF PARKING LOT AND TRASH -
Elements of each of these planning issues include:
A. ISSUES: NEGATIVE PUBLIC IMAGE
This image is based on the real problems with which the
neighborhood must deal, including:
o CRIME: the number and types of crimes committed in the
area
o VACANT LOTS: the prevalence in the neighborhood of vacant
lots and of abandoned and poorly landscaped and maintained
properties, including parking lots
o TRASH: in public rights-of-way, including alleys and bus
stops, and in vacant lots.
16


B. ISSUES; LIABILITIES OF THE CURRENT ZONING
o DISINCENTIVES FOR HODSING DEVELOPMENT: The R-4 zone,
which covers most of the neighborhood, includes
disincentives for housing development and encourages land
values which are more appropriate for offices than for
residential uses. Housing developments, for example, are
required to provide open space, while office developments
are not.
o DOWNTOWN-TYPE INTENSITY: The R-4 zone also provides the
potential for downtown-type development (including a 4:1
floor area ratio) throughout the neighborhood, from Broadway
to York, without recognizing the transitions in existing and
potential character and uses between areas in the
neighborhood.
o SPECULATION AND DEMOLITION: This potential for Downtown-
type intensity has encouraged speculation and demolition and
has turned the western edge of Uptown into a parking
reservoir for Downtown offices.
o PARKING LOTS: These problems are further aggravated by a
provision in the existing zoning which allows parking lots
in Uptown to 'serve any other use by right permitted in the
district', allowing the parking lots in Uptown to provide
parking for office uses located Downtown.
o LITTLE DESIGN GUIDANCE: Neither the R-4 zone nor the
business zone districts in Uptown provide mechanisms for
reviewing the design of new development or redevelopment
projects for their compatibility with surrounding uses and
the existing and desired character of the neighborhood.
o INAPPROPRIATE LAND USES: The B-3 and B-4 zoning
districts allow uses which are inconsistent with the
existing and potential character of the neighborhood. For
example, both districts allow drive-through and fast food
businesses, which, unless carefully designed, are generally
incompatible with the character of Uptown. Additionally,
the B-4 district allows billboards, which are in all cases
incompatible with the neighborhood character.
C. ISSUES: THE MOST EFFECTIVE WAY TO CREATE A MIKED USE
NEIGHBORHOOD
These issues raise the questions of the most effective way
to create a mixed use neighborhood which will include
residential, retail, and office uses and of the appropriate
mixture, location and density of those uses:
17


o STERILE DEVELOPMENTS: Unless these questions are
answered, it is feared that redevelopment, rather than
reinforcing the area as a neighborhood, will create large,
sterile developments which are out of scale with the
neighborhood, do not provide for a diverse market, and do
not provide the housing necessary both to support
neighborhood retail and to create 24-hour activity.
o ENHANCING THE MOMENTUM: One of the most significant and
difficult challenges, therefore, is how to best meet
everyone's needs and create the desired mixed-use
neighborhood with a strong residential base, while capturing
and enhancing the momentum for redevelopment.
D- issues: instability
In order to deal with the issue of the most effective way to
create the desired mixed-use neighborhood, consideration
must be given to the trends which destabilize Uptown as a
residential neighborhood and discourage long-term residency:
o LOSS OF RESIDENTIAL CHARACTER: Key among these trends
has been the loss of the neighborhood's residential
character, as housing has been demolished or converted to
commercial, retail, and office uses and residents have left.
O SCARCITY OF NEIGHBORHOOD-SERVING RETAIL: Adding to this
is the apparent scarcity of neighborhood-serving retail.
Even though many of these uses do exist within the
neighborhood, there is a perception that they are scarce or
inaccessible.
o DEFINITION OF MARKET: If the residential character is to
be re-established and there is to be a perception of
neighborhood-serving retail uses, then the potential and
appropriate housing and retail markets need to be defined
for the neighborhood.
o EXPANSION OF EMPLOYMENT: Similarly, the locations where
the expansion of employment is appropriate and those where
conflicts will occur must be identified
E. ISSUES: URBAN DESIGN
As part of recreating the residential character, a series of
issues regarding the urban design in the neighborhood must
be addressed:
o LACK OF PARKS: Uptown is perceived as having neither
parks of its own nor good access to nearby parks. Even
though City Park is adjacent to the neighborhood, it is
designed as a regional park, does not provide neighborhood
IS


facilities, and has poor pedestrian access. As a result,
the neighborhood does not have a feeling of ownership of the
park.
o HISTORIC PRESERVATION: There is no assurance that
historic and significant structures will be preserved.
o INCOMPATIBLE SCALE: The appropriate scale for new
development in each section of the neighborhood needs to be
determined. This is particularly important since the
existing floor area ratio of the buildings in the
neighborhood is far below that which is allowed by the
current zoning. The current Floor Area Ratio (FAR) for the
neighborhood as a whole is 1.25:1. The potential FAR for
the neighborhood as a whole, including a variety of zoning
districts and allowable densities, is 4.12:1. (see the
discussion on page 10).
o NO DESIGN GUIDANCE: There should be agreement over the
extent to which design guidance would be applied to new
development and redevelopment and the best method for
implementing that guidance.
F. ISSUES: STREETS
Closely linked to the urban design issues are a series of
street issues:
o ROLE AND CHARACTER: There is a need to clearly define
the role and character of each of the streets and to develop
a program which will help build upon that role. As part of
that definition, some streets need to be designated as
pedestrian ways.
o TRAFFIC VOLUME: Once that role is defined within the
context of the entire neighborhood, a clearer perspective
can be gained on the most efficient way to deal with the
high volume of traffic through the neighborhood and the high
percentage of streets in the neighborhood which are
currently one way.
G. ISSUES: HOUSING
o DEMOLITION AND CONVERSION: The continuing demolition and
office conversion of existing housing limit the housing
options for anyone wishing to live in Uptown.
o LIMITED MIXTURE: Furthermore, the housing which does
exist provides a limited mixture of housing types and
ownership/renter patterns.
19


o FEW NEW PROJECTS: After years of work by the
neighborhood and the City, new housing is only now beginning
to be constructed.
o NEED TO MARKET UPTOWN AS A RESIDENTIAL NEIGHBORHOOD: For
Uptown to be successful in attracting new housing and
permanent residents, it must be both reinforced as a
residential neighborhood with additional services and
amenities and marketed as a desirable place to live.
O DIFFICULTY OF PROVIDING NEW LOW INCOME HOUSING: Even as
new housing is developed, the diversity of people is
threatened because of the difficulty of providing new low
income housing.
O POORLY MANAGED APARTMENT BUILDINGS: Existing low income
housing may be in one of the poorly managed apartment
buildings in the neighborhood, limiting its ability to serve
the needs of both the residents and the neighborhood and to
improve the image of Uptown as a desirable residential
neighborhood.
H. ISSUES: ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
As an economic development program is established for
Uptown, it must answer the following questions:
o RETAIL: What are the extent, type, and configuration of
retail development which would be most economically viable
in the neighborhood?
o RETAIL EXPANSION: How can the retail market for the
neighborhood be expanded?
o EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES: What are the type and extent
of employment opportunities which should be available in the
neighborhood?
O UNSKILLED AND SEMI-SKILLED EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES:
How can the neighborhood best meet its need to maintain and
build upon the unskilled and semi-skilled employment
opportunities which are currently available in the
neighborhood with the hospitals, the restaurants, and the
other retail uses?
o NEIGHBORHOOD HOSPITALS: What should be the approach to
dealing with the economic health and the aging facilities of
neighborhood hospitals and the resulting potential for their
closing?
20


VI. THE VISION FOR UPTOWN
The vision for Uptown has the following themes:
o URBAN VILLAGE: emphasizing the potential of Uptown to
redevelop as an urban village, providing a living, working,
shopping, and recreational environment for a wide variety of
people.
o DISTRICTS: building on the existing differentiation in
the neighborhood, emphasizing the distinct character of each
district by providing unique:
- building densities
- mixtures of land uses
o COMMON FRAMEWORK: linking each district with a common
design framework based on the historic character of the
neighborhood and providing a cohesive visual image which
gives the impression of historical continuity and
permanence.
o DISTINCTION FROM DOWNTOWN-: enhancing the distinctions
from Downtown by providing a greater mixture of land uses at
a lower intensity and with a far greater emphasis on housing
and historic continuity.
o LIVABILITY: building on the potential for Uptown to
provide an inviting, safe, and comfortable urban living
environment for individuals and families of diverse ages,
incomes, and ethnic backgrounds.
o ECONOMIC VITALITY: reinforcing the momentum of
redevelopment in the neighborhood and strengthening the
employment and retail bases.
o DIVERSITY: as redevelopment of the neighborhood
proceeds, promoting and encouraging the rich mix and
diversity of age, ethnicity and income of residents as
valued characteristics of Uptown.
21


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TRANSPORTATION CORRIDOR
AUTO ORIENTED COMMERCIAL -
LANDSCAPE RECOMMENDATIONS
21c


VII. RECOMMENDATIONS FOR UPTOWN
A. LAND USE AND ZONING
PREFACE
For many years the vision for Uptown has been the creation
of a stable and inviting neighborhood with both a mixture of
residential, office, and retail land uses and a diversity of
incomes and life styles. Instead of attaining this vision,
Uptown has experienced a destabilizing inflation of land
values which has resulted in the demolition of many
buildings and their replacement by surface parking lots.
The neighborhood population has decreased from over 21,000
in 1950 to less than 9,000 in 1985 as housing has been
demolished or converted to office. The remaining housing
provides only a limited mixture of housing types and housing
costs. The high cost of land in the neighborhood, coupled
with the high cost of construction and a weakened market,
makes it extremely difficult to provide new housing,
particularly low income housing. When new buildings are
constructed, there is no assurance that they will be
compatible with their neighboring land-uses or with the
character of the neighborhood.
1. HOUSING/RECOMMENDATIONS:
Because of the large tracts of land in the neighborhood and
its proximity to services Uptown has great potential for
providing a substantial number of new housing units in an
inviting setting with minimal disruption to existing
residents and to the character of the neighborhood.
Additional housing is important to retail uses both Downtown
and within the neighborhood as a source of customers, and
therefore, revenue. Since retail growth is viewed as key to
the economic health of Denver, the retention and development
of housing in Uptown is critical to the health of the City.
To achieve this, a combination of actions must be directed
to two areas: 1) stabilizing the housing environment and 2)
providing incentives for housing. Concepts for
consideration include:
A. MAINTAIN AND RETAIN EXISTING HOUSING:
o FACILITATE HOME IMPROVEMENTS: Retain and expand the
existing low-interest loan programs for single and multiple-
family home improvements. Public funds should be leveraged
with private dollars.
22


o ENFORCE CODES: Enforce existing City health and safety
codes. Since code enforcement is and, due to budgetary
limitations, will remain on a complaint basis,
responsibility for initiating the enforcement process will
belong to individuals and organizations within the
neighborhood. The responsibility for enforcement belongs to
the City.
O PROVIDE INCENTIVES FOR RETAINING HOUSING: Consider
alternative methods for preserving existing housing and
housing structures. Methods might include incentives such
as freezing property taxes for housing rehabilitation,
development revenue bonds for housing rehabilitation, a
demolition tax, a land use tax, or a neighborhood housing
trust fund.
B. CONSTRUCT NEW HOUSING:
o INITIATE FAST TRACE REVIEW: Institute a fast track
review for housing projects in the neighborhood.
o provide CONSTRUCTION LOANS: Create a revolving fund
for short-term low-interest construction loans in order to
lower the cost of constructing housing.
> *
C. PROVIDE A BROAD MIXTURE OF HOUSING TYPES AND
OWNERSHIP/RENTER PATTERNS:
o EXPAND THE MORTGAGE BOND PROGRAM: Expand the City's
current Mortgage Bond Program to include greater
participation for condominium and single family owners.
o ENCOURAGE HOME OWNERSHIP: A major goal of the plan is to
encourage owner occupancy in the neighborhood.
2. ZONING R-4/RECOMMENDATIONS:
The R-4 zone district covers most of the area between
Broadway and York, Colfax and 20th. The original intent of
this zone district was to create a mixed-use neighborhood
very similar to that described in this Plan. However, this
has not occurred. The neighborhood has experienced the
development of office uses, including the conversion of
houses to offices, but it has not had the development of
mixed-use projects nor of housing to the extent necessary to
create a strong residential base for a mixed-use
neighborhood.
The existing R-4 zoning designation assumes that the same
conditions and potentials extend across the entire
neighborhood, and in response to that, applies the same land
use and design standards to the entire neighborhood. One of
23


the problems with this results from the fact that, because
of the intensity of development allowed in the R-4 District,
Uptown has been considered an extension of Downtown. This
has created a situation where the value of a parcel is
influenced by the redevelopment potential of the land rather
than by the value of the structures on the land.
In order to recognize and reinforce the distinctions between
Uptown and Downtown and among the areas within Uptown, the
Plan proposes establishing a process in which the residents
and property owners work with the City in reviewing how to
better achieve the' land use vision for the neighborhood. At
this time, however, there is not a consensus in the
neighborhood on changing the R-4 zoning. This effort would
consider and address the following:
A. REINFORCE DISTINCTIONS BETWEEN UPTOWN AND DOWNTOWN;
Recognize and reinforce the distinctions between Uptown and
Downtown in bulk, height, land use mixture, setbacks,
landscaping, and other design considerations.
B. REINFORCE THE DISTINCTIONS AMONG THE DISTRICTS:
Recognize and reinforce the distinctions among the districts
within Uptown, providing for variations in the mixture and
intensity of land uses and in the allowable heights and
densities, while creating neighborhood continuity.
C. ENCOURAGE MIXED USE PROJECTS:
Evaluate how to allow greater use of retail in office,
residential, and office/residential projects where
appropriate.
D. ENCOURAGE HOUSING!
Evaluate the issue of how to achieve housing as part of new
office developments and to limit office conversions at the
expense of housing in select areas.
E. ELIMINATE DISINCENTIVES:
Eliminate the disincentives for housing development and the
incentives for office development.
E. BALANCE INCENTIVES FOR HOUSING AND OFFICE USES:
Balance incentives for housing and other uses, including the
requirements for providing open space, to assure that the
residential character of the area is preserved and enhanced.
24


G. CONSIDER ESTABLISHING A SPECIAL REVIEW PROCESS:
Consider establishing a special review process to provide
flexibility in the development of uses throughout the
neighborhood.
g. REDUCE PARKING REQUIREMENTS FOR RESIDENTIAL USES:
In recognition of the proximity of the neighborhood to the
Downtown employment center and of the availability of public
transit, the parking requirements for residential uses
should be reduced from the current requirement of 1.5
parking spaces per dwelling unit to 1/2 to 1 space per unit,
depending on occupancy.
I. CONSIDER REMOVING COMMERCIAL PARKING AS A ttSE-BY-
right;
Consider replacing the use by right of both commercial
parking and accessory parking with use by special review
process in order to assure that parking in Uptown primarily
serves the land uses in the neighborhood.
J. EXPEND THE IiANDSCAPTNG REQUIREMENTS t
Expand the current landscaping ordinance for surface parking
lots to include provisions for interior landscaping.
K. ENCOURAGE DESIGN REVIEWi
Encourage neighborhood design review processes in areas
where property owners and residents feel they are
appropriate..
L. CONSIDER ALTERNATIVE FUNDTNG SOURCES FOR PARKS:
Consider alternative methods for funding neighborhood parks,
including the potential for establishing a neighborhood
parks trust fund which would acquire and maintain park space
in Uptown and which could generate funds by establishing a
fee which would be paid by new development and which would
be a percentage of the total project cost.
3. ZONING B-2. B-3 AND B-4/RECOMMENDATIONS;
Areas at the southern edge, along Colfax, and within the
neighborhood are zoned for business uses, with B-2, B-3, and
B-4 zoning. These areas include the majority of retail uses
in the neighborhood and are the areas within which new
retail uses should be concentrated. B-2, B-3, and B-4,
however, do have several provisions which are incompatible
25



with the character of Uptown and which may necessitate
amendments to the current zoning ordinance.
A. RETAIN THE CURRENT BUSINESS ZONE BOUNDARIES:
Maintain the same boundaries for the B-2, B-3,and B-4 zone
districts in order to encourage concentration of retail and
commercial uses.
B. CONSIDER CREATING A SPECIAL ZONE DISTRICT OVERLAY;
Consider instituting a special district overlay for the B-2,
B-3, and B-4 zone districts as the mechanism for eliminating
the provisions within these districts which are incompatible
with the character of Uptown and creating mechanisms which
will help achieve the goals of this plan.
G. ENCOURAGE DESIGN REVTEW;
Encourage design review for retail and commercial uses
within the B-2, B-3, and B-4 zoning districts in Uptown
where neighborhood property owners and residents feel they
are appropriate..
D. ELIMINATE BILLBOARDS;
Eliminate the potential of any billboards, either on-premise
or off-premise, and provide an amortization schedule as just
compensation for the removal of existing billboards.
E. PROHIBIT DRIVE-THROUGHS:
Prohibit new drive-through businesses.
V. REQUIRE LANDSCAPING:
Establish landscaping and streetscaping provisions for all
't' uses.
\
4. DISTRICTS / RECOMMENDATIONS!
In response to the size and diversity of the neighborhood,
establish and give special planning attention to districts
which recognize and build upon the distinctions among the
various areas. Several of the streets in the neighborhood
are unique enough in character that they ought to be built
upon and are, therefore, included in this section.
A. BROADWAY TO LINCOLN/SHERMAN;
Already a part of Downtown, and zoned B-5, its primary land
use is office.
\
26



o EMPHASIZE THE TRANSITION: The design of streetscape
improvements in this district should be the same as for the
improvements in the adjoining districts in Uptown so that it
is emphasized as a transitional area between Downtown and
Uptown.
O RETAIN THE DISTINCTION BETWEEN DOWNTOWN AND UPTOWN:
The boundaries of the B-5 zone and of the mountain view
preservation area should not be moved any further east.
o EMPHASIZE DESIGN: The primary emphasis in this
district should be on streetscape, design guidelines, and
building setbacks and scale.
B. LINCOLN/SHERMAN TO LOGAN/PENNSYLVANTA:
Zoned R-4 and primarily office land uses, with high density
residential uses and a cap placed on the building height by
the Mountain View Ordinance.
o ENCOURAGE COMPATIBILITY: Encourage the compatibility
of new development with the existing character of this
district and with its potential to function a transitional
area between Downtown and the rest of the neighborhood.
o CONSTRUCT GATEWAYS: Gateways into the neighborhood
should be constructed at points of transition, at the top of
the rise. These should be at the intersections of Sherman
Street with 16th, 17th, and 18th Avenues.
o EMPHASIZE DESIGN: The emphasis should be on
streetscape, design guidelines, and building setback and
scale.
o ENCOURAGE HOUSING: Efforts should be directed toward
enhancing the mixture of land uses with additional high
density housing.
O REINFORCE SHERMAN AS A CENTER OF GOVERNMENTAL ACTIVITY
IN COLORADO: Sherman Street is a center of governmental
activity. This use is reflected in the monumental character
of the architecture and of the streetscape. The design of
public and private improvements along Sherman should enhance
that character by:
retaining the current width of the street
retaining the predominant building setback
- continuing the streetscape which predominates in the
1500 and 1600 blocks
- retaining the current architectural patterns, such as
raised entrances.
27


- on the northern side of 20th Avenue at its intersection
with Sherman, echoing the southern termination of the street
at the Capitol with an important public space which will act
as a forecourt for a residential structure in Clements
- incorporating building materials which are consistent
with the character in the 1500 and 1600 blocks
C. LOG AN/PENNSYLVANIA TO P ARK AVENUE:
This district is beyond the limits of the downtown-type
office uses and is currently home to low density office,
residential, and retail land uses. Zoned R-4, the area is
heavily impacted by surface parking lots.
o ENCOURAGE HOUSING: Housing should have a larger share
of the total mixture of land use.
o ENCOURAGE RENOVATION: Older structures should be
preserved and renovated for office/residential use.
o ENCOURAGE COMPATIBILITY: Encourage the compatibility
of new development with the existing and potential character
and density of uses within the district.
o CONVERT OGDEN AND DOWNING: Proceed with the
conversion of Ogden and Downing Streets from one-way streets
into two way streets, as recommended by the One-Way Street
Study.
D. PARR AVENUE:
Provides needed open space for the neighborhood. Generally
zoned R-4, current land uses along the avenue are a mixture
of low to moderate density residential, office, and retail.
As they are currently configured, the parks do not provide
the full sense of visual relief or recreational opportunity
of which they are capable.
o CONSTRUCT GATEWAYS: Gateways into the neighborhood
should be constructed at the intersections of Park Avenue
with Colfax and 20th Avenues.
o ENCOURAGE RESIDENTIAL USES: Encourage the development
of new residential uses and the preservation of existing
residential uses along Park Avenue.
o ENCOURAGE SUPPORT SERVICES: Limited retail and other
commercial uses will be encouraged in order to provide
active use of the parks, to create street activity, and to
serve the community. These retail and commercial uses
should be concentrated at the intersections of Park Avenue
with Colfax, 17th, 18th, and 20th Avenues.
28


o IMPROVE THE PARKS: The parks along Park Avenue should
be improved to increase their visual impact and their
utility, to provide an incentive for housing development in
the neighborhood, to increase the sense of neighborhood
ownership, and to reinforce the parks. A formal planting
plan should be instituted to recreate the initial design of
individual squares at each intersection, each with a
separate identity.
o CONSIDER PRIVATE USE OF THE PARKS: The City Should
consider waiving the on-site open space requirement for
residential projects in lieu of improvements to open space
along Park Avenue, if those improvements are accepted by the
Director of Planning as consistent with the policies for the
Park Avenue streetscape and parks and as equal in dollar
value to the required open space.
O ENCOURAGE BUILDINGS TO ORIENT TO PARKS: Land uses
adjoining the parks along Park Avenue should be encouraged
to open onto and make active use of these parks in order to
provide additional activity. Buildings along Park Avenue
should align with the north/south and east/west streets.
O ENCOURAGE HISTORIC PRESERVATION: Historic,
contributing, and significant structures along Park Avenue
should be identified and preserved. The density from these
may be transferred as unused development rights to
properties immediately contiguous to the boundaries of the
Park Avenue District if the base allowable floor area ratio
in these contiguous areas is lowered from the current 4:1
ratio to a ratio more compatible with the existing
character. Office uses may be used as an incentive for
preserving historic and significant structures.
o DISCOURAGE AUTOMOBILE-ORIENTED USES: There should be
no new automobile-oriented retail or commercial uses along
Park Avenue, including no drive-through uses, surface
parking lots, or parking structures.
E. PARK AVENUE TO YORK:
This district is currently zoned R-4 and has a mixture of
low density office, residential, and retail land uses. The
character of the area remains largely residential although
many of the older homes have been converted to office uses.
o ENCOURAGE HOUSING: Efforts should be directed toward
retaining the residential character, and increasing both the
number of residential units and the percentage of total land
uses which are residential.
29


o ENCOURAGE COMPATIBILITY: Encourage the compatibility
of new development with the residential character of this
district and encourage a balanced mixture of land uses.
?. hospitals:
Between 18th and 21st Avenues, from Pennsylvania to the
alley between High and Race Street, medical-related uses,
and generally zoned R-3 and R-4.
o RETAIN BOUNDARIES: The district and its uses should be
contained within the current boundaries.
o ENCOURAGE COMPATIBILITY: The design of the uses within
this district should be compatible with the surrounding
areas.
o BUFFER EDGES: Edges of the district should be buffered
with landscaping and a reduction in density to protect the
surrounding residential land uses.
O ENCOURAGE SHARED PARKING AND PARKING STRUCTURES:
Whenever possible, parking should be provided in structures
and should be shared among the large institutions and
facilities, such as hospitals and City Park.
o IMPROVE LIGHTING: Pedestrian lighting should be
provided to improve security, comfort, and aesthetics.
o ENCOURAGE HOUSING: The city, the hospitals, and the
neighborhood should work together to provide hospital-
related housing.
o RESTRICT SERVICE ACCESS: Whenever possible, service
access should avoid residential streets.
o CONSIDER R-S ZONING: Study and consider implementing
revisions in the zoning ordinance needed to create R-5 or
other hospital zoning which would be appropriate for the
medical institutions located in Uptown.
G. MIDTOWN:
Primarily a single family residential area north and east of
the hospitals and generally zoned R-2 and R-3.
o PROTECT RESIDENTIAL USES: No expansion of hospital,
retail, or other commercial uses should be permitted north
of 21st Avenue or east of High Street.
O EMPHASIZE NEIGHBORHOOD RETAIL ON 22ND: 22nd Avenue
should be a neighborhood-serving retail area.
30


O RESOLVE THE NON-CONFORMING STATUS OF USES ALONG 22ND:
Currently, all the retail uses along 22nd Avenue are non-
conforming uses within the R-2, R-3, and R-4 Zone Districts.
The residents and property owners in the area surrounding
the retail uses along 22nd Avenue should work with the
retail business owners to determine the future of this
business district. If the uses in this area are to expand
and improve, the area must be rezoned to accommodate retail
uses.
O MAKE CITY PARTICIPATION CONTINGENT UPON THE EXISTENCE
OF AN ACTIVE CRIME PREVENTION PROGRAM: Rezoning of any
parcels along 22nd Avenue and the provision of any public
financial assistance to the businesses along 22nd Avenue
should be contingent upon the business owners, property
owners, and residents in the area initiating a program to
identify and eliminate the sources of crime in the
neighborhood, similar to the program on East Colfax.
o REVITALIZE NEIGHBORHOOD BUSINESS: If a Strong
coalition of business owners and of neighborhood residents .
and property owners can be formed and if the crime problems
in the area are addressed, then the City should consider
designating this area as a Neighborhood Business
Revitalization Area in order to help generate programs and
funding for private and public improvements.
H. RECOMMENDATIONS FOR STREETS WHICH CROSS DISTRICT
BOUNDARIES t
I. COLFAX AVENUE:
The main retail area for both Uptown and Capitol Hill,
Colfax generally is zoned B-4 and .provides both neighborhood
and destination retail uses. The street functions as a
barrier between the neighborhoods.
o ENCOURAGE DIFFERENTIATION: Build on the existing
differentiation in the neighborhood and apply a common
framework to reinforce the three distinct activity types on
the street:
- Village Centers: Village centers are those areas which
are more oriented to pedestrians and which should be
encouraged to develop their distinct design character and to
attract uses which will serve both neighborhood residents-
and a regional market. Two village centers are located east
of Pennsylvania Street: Park Avenue Village and York Street
Village.
31


- Auto-Oriented Centers: Automobile-oriented centers
connect the Village centers east of Pennsylvania and should
be provided with streetscape treatments which will create a
sense of continuity for the diverse setbacks, site layouts,
building materials, and land uses which comprise these
areas.
Capitol Complex-Colfax: The area from Pennsylvania to
Broadway should continue to be oriented to the State Capitol
District and should have character and land uses which
enhance that orientation and the surrounding residential
neighborhood..
O REINFORCE COLFAX AS MAIN STREET: Colfax should be
reinforced as the Main Street for Uptown, Capitol Hill, and
Cheesman Park neighborhoods, functioning as the main
neighborhood retail street and a common focus for the
adjoining neighborhoods.
O ENCOURAGE BOTH NEIGHBORHOOD AND DESTINATION RETAIL:
Colfax should be both a neighborhood-serving and destination
retail street.
o ENTERTAIN AUTOMOBILE-ORIENTED USES: Colfax is the only
street in Uptown which should be encouraged to have
automobile-oriented, drive-through, and larger scale retail
uses, such as grocery stores, automobile service stations
and repair shops, home improvement centers, large liquor
outlets, etc.
O IMPLEMENT THE CHARETTE REPORT: See the East Colfax
Charette Report in the Appendix for a complete description
of the definition of role and character for East Colfax.
o DESIGNATE FOR NEIGHBORHOOD BUSINESS REVITALIZATION:
Colfax Avenue should be designated as a neighborhood
business revitalization area and for the related funding
programs.
2. 16TH AVENUE;
Although primarily zoned R-4 and accommodating residential
and office uses as well as surface parking lots, 16th Avenue
retains the character of a residential street. 16th serves
as a connection into the neighborhood for pedestrians,
bicyclists, and runners.
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o ENHANCE THE RESIDENTIAL CHARACTER: 16th Avenue should
have a residential character in order to encourage
additional residential uses in the neighborhood. To help
accommodate this, new uses along 16th should be primarily
residential. Any office structures along 16th should be
designed with a residential character and should include
some residential uses. Any problems with City regulations
or procedures which discourage this should be reviewed.
o IMPROVE AS A LINEAR PARK: 16th Avenue should be
designed, improved, and maintained as a linear park,
connecting Downtown to city Park; act as a spine for
connecting open space linkages; responding to the demand for
jogging, walking, and bicycling facilities; and providing an
incentive and a focus for housing development in the
neighborhood.
O CONSIDER 16TH AS AN EXTENSION OP THE 16TH STREET MALL:
Improvements to 16th Avenue between Broadway and the
Esplanade at City Park should retain the pedestrian
character and orientation of the 16th Street Mall and allow
16th Avenue to act as an extension of the mall into the
neighborhood.
o TARGET FUNDING MECHANISMS: Funding mechanisms such as
the formation of a special improvement district and of a
maintenance district should be given top priority for
design, construction, and maintenance of the improvements to
16th Avenue.
o DISCOURAGE RETAIL: There should be little or no retail
activity on 16th Avenue so that retail uses can be
concentrated on Colfax and 17th Avenues and 16th Avenue can
retain its residential character.
o EMPHASIZE SOLAR ACCESS: Design guidelines for 16th
Avenue should emphasize solar access to uses on the street.
Concepts might include emphasizing and protecting pedestrian
and outdoor uses on the north side of the street by widening
the sidewalk on the north side of the street to better
accommodate pedestrians and joggers, shifting the street to
the south side of the public right-of-way, encouraging
deciduous trees on the south side of the northern sidewalk,
limiting the height of buildings on the south side of 16th
to two stories at their northern edge, and providing spaces
for outdoor activities on the north side of the street.
33


3.
17TH AVENUE:
B-2, B-3, B-4, and R-4 zone districts help define distinct
subdistricts along 17th, which alternately accommodate
retail, residential, and office uses. 17th is rapidly
redeveloping with new restaurant, other retail, and
residential/retail projects.
o CONCENTRATE USES: The areas of retail concentration on
17th Avenue should be separated by areas of residential and
office uses.
o REINFORCE THREE DISTRICTS: 17th Avenue should have
three retail districts which are consistent with the current
zoning:
- Sherman to Clarkson
- Ogden/Downing to Humboldt/Lafayette
- Vine to York
Within these retail districts, developments should be
encouraged to be mixed use projects with residential and
office uses.
Outside of these area, retail uses should be provided only
in conjunction with residential units and only to the extent
that they comprise a minor percentage of the gross square
footage of each project.
o IMPROVE PEDESTRIAN CHARACTER: In order to help
distinguish 17th Avenue from Colfax Avenue and to help
reinforce the urban residential character of the
neighborhood, uses along 17th should be pedestrian-oriented.
The formulation of design guidelines for 17th should be
encouraged to include provisions such as:
- building placement as close as possible to front
property lines
- discouragement of large setbacks in front of buildings
except when such setbacks shall be used for outdoor retail,
activities or exclusively for landscaping.
no parking in front of buildings.
discouragement of parking on the sides of buildings
when such parking will be visible from 17th.
- encouragement of parking behind buildings.
- discouragement of drive-through restaurants or banks,
landscaping of all public rights-of-way and building
setbacks.
- encouragement for including outdoor retail activities.
- encouragement for buildings to be designed with a scale
and materials consistent with the urban residential
character of the neighborhood.
34


- encouragement for storefront windows to allow for
viewing of indoor retail activities from the street.
o RETAIN THE PATTERN OP THE CURRENT ZONING: The B-2, B-
3. and B-4 zone districts provide desirable distinctions
among the various retail areas along 17th Avenue and should
be retained. A special zone district overlay should be
created to help make the zoning more compatible with the
goals of the neighborhood (see Section A.3. of the plan for
details). The residential/mixed use zoning should also be
retained to help encourage the concentration of retail uses
along 17th and to help retain the mixed-use character of
17th Avenue. This zone district should also be amended to
make it more compatible with the goals of this plan.
4. 18TH AVENUE:
B-2, B-3, B-4, and R-4 zoning help create a diversity of
character and land uses along 18th Avenue, which
accommodates residential, office, medical, and retail uses.
o IMPROVE PEDESTRIAN CHARACTER: Uses along 18th Avenue
should be pedestrian-oriented. (See the same recommendation
for 17th Avenue).
O HOSPITAL SUPPORT AND DESTINATION RETAIL: East 18th
Avenue should provide hospital-support retail, neighborhood
retail, housing, and some Downtown-support uses.
5. 19TH / 20TH AVENUES:
Zoned R-4 and B-4, 19th and 20th are both one way streets
with office, medical, retail, and residential uses. 19th
dead ends at Ogden and 20th changes to a two-way street at
Clarkson. 20th provides a critical transition between
Uptown and the Clements Historic District.
o STUDY CONVERSION TO TWO-WAY STREETS: Review the
potential of converting both 19th and 20th from one-way
streets to two-way streets.
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o EMPHASIZE COMPATIBILITY ALONG 20TH AVENTJE: 20th Avenue
is currently a mixture of institutional, retail, and
residential uses. The scale is generally compatible with
the uses adjoining to the north. The street provides a
critical transition between Uptown and Clements Historic
District, as well as the San Rafael district of the Five
Points neighborhood. Density, scale, height, and bulk
should be lower than the uses to the south in order to be
compatible with these adjoining districts. Building height
should step down from 19th to 20th. Land uses facing 20th
should be residential, although ground floor uses could be
retail.
6. 13TH AND 14TH AVENUES:
Zoned primarily R-3, with pockets of B-2 and R-4 zoning,
these streets are principally residential but include some
neighborhood-oriented retail uses and offices. The high
volumes of traffic, coupled with a narrow public right-of-
way, negatively impact the quality of the streets for both
residential and retail uses. This volume of traffic also
reinforces 13th and 14th as boundaries between Capitol Hill,
Colfax, and Uptown. Because one of the overriding goals of
planning for these neighborhoods is to improve the linkages
between them, 13th and 14th were included in discussions of
the East Colfax Charette and the Uptown Neighborhood Plan.
O CONSIDER WIDENING THE SIDEWALKS ON 13TH: Review the
option of removing one lane of traffic on 13th Avenue from
Franklin to Logan in order to widen the sidewalks and allow
for streetscaping without significantly disrupting the flow
of traffic.
o ENCOURAGE STREETSCAPING: Streetscaping should be
encouraged to help mitigate the impacts of automobile
traffic and to help reinforce the importance of pedestrians
by softening the streetscape and adding pedestrian
amenities.
O IMPROVE PEDESTRIAN CHARACTER: Uses along 13th and 14th
should be pedestrian-oriented. (See the detailed
recommendation for 17th Avenue) .
S. ADMINISTRATIVE POLICIES AND PROCEDURES/
RECOMMENDATIONS:
Some city administrative policies treat Uptown and other
mixed use neighborhoods more as commercial neighborhoods
than as residential neighborhoods. Trash collection, for
example, can occur at earlier hours in a mixed use
neighborhood, creating potential hardships for residents.
36


O PROVIDE CITY SERVICES SO AS TO ENHANCE THE RESIDENTIAL
CHARACTER: The provision of City services should be at a.
level which will meet the needs of an intensely developed
mixed use neighborhood, but primary concern should be given
to providing services in a manner which enhances the
residential character of the neighborhood. Trash
collection, for example, should be provided during the same
daytime hours it is provided in single family residential
neighborhoods.
O AMEND THE BUILDING CODE TO ENCOURAGE MIXED USES:
Building code provisions should be changed to facilitate the
mixture of uses in individual buildings and projects.
O AMEND THE BUILDING CODE TO ENCOURAGE REHABILITATION:
Building code provisions should be changed to facilitate the
rehabilitation of older buildings.
o SIMPLIFY THE PUD (PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT) PROCESS:
So that through its simplicity and short time frame it is
viewed as a desirable process for initiating development,
while providing for neighborhood review.
6. RETAIL / RECOMMENDATIONS:
Retail uses in Uptown will be most successful if they are
concentrated where they are most visible, have the best
access, and can develop unique identities.
o CONCENTRATE RETAIL USES ON EAST/WEST STREETS: Retail
uses should be concentrated on the most heavily travelled
east/west streets: Colfax, 17th, and 18th Avenues. Small
pockets of retail could also be on 19th Avenue from
Pennsylvania to Pearl; 20th Avenue from Broadway to
Clarkson; Park Avenue at the intersections with Colfax and
17th, 13th, and 20th Avenues; and 22nd Avenue from Downing
to Gilpin. No retail should be located on 16th Avenue.
o CONCENTRATE RETAIL USES AROUND BUSINESS ZONING
DISTRICTS: Retail uses should be concentrated around
present retail development.
7. IMAGE / RECOMMENDATIONS:
Uptown suffers from a negative public image which, while
based on the real problems with which the neighborhood must
deal, exaggerates the problems and does not acknowledge the
improvements which are being made in the neighborhood.
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o MAINTAIN AN INVENTORY: Continue inventorying sources
of crime? poorly maintained vacant lots, vacant and
abandoned buildings, and parking lots; and sites which need
landscaping.
o USE THE AVAILABLE TOOLS: Target City regulatory,
enforcement and financial programs to eradicate the sources
of crime? to improve poorly maintained vacant lots, vacant
and abandoned buildings, and parking lots; and to improve
sites which need landscaping.
o continue the PUBLIC relations program: Support an on-
going public relations program to inform the public of
changes in the neighborhood and of the additional assets of
Uptown in order to attract residents, developers, and
shoppers.
o ELIMINATE TRASH: Explore ways to reduce litter and to
remove litter in vacant lots and in public rights-of-way,
including streets and alleys.
8. HISTORIC PRESERVATION / RECOMMENDATIONS:
North Capitol Hill and City Park West both have rich
histories and a legacy of many architecturally and
historically significant buildings. Since these historic
structures help create a distinctive character for Uptown,
their preservation is essential to the ability of the
neighborhood to redevelop as a mixed use neighborhood with a
unique urban character.
O EMPHASIZE HISTORIC PRESERVATION: Because of the
contribution of the historic and architecturally interesting
buildings to the historic fabric, and, therefore, to the
unique character and redevelopment potential of Uptown,
their preservation should assume top priority in reviewing
development proposals, proposing capital improvements, and
allocating funding.
o INITIATE AN HISTORIC SURVEY: To aid in the
identification and preservation of historic, significant,
and contributing buildings, an update of the Historic
Building Survey has been initiated for Uptown.
o PROPOSE HISTORIC DISTRICTS: Swallow Hill is being
reviewed for submission as a proposed historic district.
Other areas in the neighborhood, such as the area along York
and Gaylord, also should be reviewed for potential historic
district designation.
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o EXPAND UPON THE HISTORIC RESIDENTIAL CHARACTER: The
historic residential, commercial, and institutional
character of the neighborhood should provide the basis for
both public and private streetscape improvements.
Consistent with this, streetscape design guidelines should
include:
wide building setbacks
- a landscaped planting strip along all property lines
which abut street rights-of-way
- flagstone or flagstone colored sidewalks
granite curbs, where feasible
o CONSIDER THE TRANSFER OF DEVELOPMENT RIGHTS (TOR'S): A
program should be considered for the transfer of development
rights from historic districts within Uptown to properties
within adjacent areas of the neighborhood. This would
necessitate a revision to the allowable floor area ratios,
perhaps providing a lower base figure in adjacent areas with
the potential for bonuses from TDR's.
o PRESERVE TEMPLE EMANUEL: Preserve, operate, and
maintain Temple Emanuel as a cultural asset for the
neighborhood.
o EXPLORE PRESERVATION STRATEGIES: Explore additional
interim preservation strategies for historically significant
structures.
B. TRANSPORTATION / RECOMMENDATIONS:
Because of its proximity to Downtown; the demograhics of its
residents; the density of its housing; the availability of
sidewalks, excellent bus service, and bicycle lanes; and its
proximity to parks and parkways, Uptown's transportation
issues and recommendations emphasize not only automobiles,
but also pedestrians, public transit, bicycles, and runners.
According to 1981 traffic counts, north / south streets in
Uptown carried almost 75,000 vehicles per day and east /
west streets carried over 60,000 vehicles per day.
According to the 1980 census, Uptown had twice the city
average for people who took the bus to work and three times
the City average for people who walked to work. Sixteenth
Avenue has become a major connection for pedestrians,
runners, and bicycles.
1. INCREASE TRANSIT RIDERSHIP / RECOMMENDATIONS:
o ENCOURAGE BUS TRANSFERS: Continue one hour, same
direction, bus transfers on East Colfax.
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o EXPAND EXPRESS BUS SERVICE: Maintain express service
on East Colfax.
o IMPROVE TRANSIT STOPS: RTD is currently improving
stops for the 15 LTD. Streetscape improvements throughout
the neighborhood should include better siting and design of
bus stops.
2. INCREASE BICYCLE RIDERSHTP / RECOMMENDATIONS!
o PROVIDE BICYCLE RACKS: Design guidelines for Uptown
and for east Colfax should include the provision of
standardized bicycle racks both as part of streetscape
improvements and of new developments and redevelopments.
3. INCREASE PEDESTRIAN TRAFFIC / RECOMMENDATIONS?
Improvements to the east/west streets should emphasize
increasing the comfort and enjoyment of pedestrians.
Priority should be given to pedestrian improvements along
Colfax and 16th Avenues. Specifically:
o ENPORCE PEDESTRIAN RIGHT-OP-WAY: Enforce Denver laws
which give pedestrians the right-of-way over automobiles,
educate the public to these laws, and institute significant
fines for violations.
o EMPHASIZE PEDESTRIAN STREETS: Identify Sherman,
Pennsylvania, Emerson, and Franklin as north/south
pedestrian linkages into the neighborhoods. Make
improvements which will encourage pedestrians to use these
streets.
4. ADD TRAFFIC IMPROVEMENTS / RECOMMENDATIONS:
o IMPROVE TRAFFIC FLOW: study and make improvements
which will improve the flow of automobile, pedestrian, and
bicycle traffic on and across Colfax, 13th, 16th, 17th, and
Park Avenues and Sherman Street. Pedestrian improvements
should include marked crosswalks and signs warning drivers
to yield to pedestrians and to keep crosswalks clear for
joggers and pedestrians.
5. RESTRUCTURE PARKING:
o ESTABLISH PARKING DISTRICTS: Investigate the
feasibility of establishing parking districts for East
Colfax and East 17th Avenue as a means for providing
centralized parking which is readily visible and accessible,
which is commonly owned, which can be located to minimize
possible disruptions to the surrounding land uses, and which
40


can be managed to best meet the needs of the businesses,
residents, and visitors to area facilities and institutions.
o RETAIN ON-STREET PARKING: Whenever possible, on-street
parking should be retained as the parking which is most
readily visible to customers and which helps retain the
neighborhood quality of the streets by buffering the
sidewalks from the flow of traffic.
o BUFFER PARKING STRUCTURES: Where appropriate, parking
structures which adjoin retail streets should be required to
have ground level retail fronting on these streets.
o INSTITUTE PARKING PERMITS: Residential parking
priority permits should be studied for potential
implementation and areas which are limited to short-term
parking should be expanded to discourage all day parking by
Downtown office workers.
o RETAIN LOADING ZONES: Loading zones should be retained
in the retail areas.
C. URBAN DESIGN / RECOMMENDATIONS:
Urban design recommendations are essential to the
implementation of the goals for Uptown because they help
respond to the most critical issues facing the neighborhood:
image, livability, and compatibility of land uses.
1. PROVIDE DESIGN GUIDANCE / RECOMMENDATIONS:
O ENCOURAGE THE DEVELOPMENT OF URBAN DESIGN GUIDELINES:
The neighborhood and the City should work together to
develop urban design guidelines which will encourage
compatibility of a mixture of uses within the neighborhood
and within individual developments. Development along the
boundaries between districts and between neighborhoods
should be compatible, though distinct from, the character of
the development in the adjoining district or neighborhood.
2. DISTINGUISH UPTOWN FROM SURROUNDING NEIGHBORHOODS /
RECOMMENDATIONS:
o PROVIDE GATEWAYS: Included within the streetscape
improvements should be gateways at points of entry into the
neighborhood. Key points of entry are delineated in Section
a.4., Districts.
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o BUILD UPON THE TRADITIONAL ORIENTATION OF BUILDINGS:
To maintain an important design characteristic of the
neighborhood and to help define the role of each of the
streets, more intense development is recommended on the
east/west streets and less intense development on the
north/south streets. Exceptions to this would be
appropriate for the retention of less intense historic,
contributing, and significant structures on east/west
streets, to protect solar access to east/west streets, and
to protect the pedestrian scale of east/west streets.
o IMPROVE THE STREETSCAPE: Streetscape improvements,
including street lighting, planting, and signage should be
designed to help distinguish the neighborhood, the districts
within the neighborhood, and the role of each street. As
such, elements of continuity, such as street lights, will
link the entire neighborhood, while other elements will help
distinguish Park Avenue, 16th, 17th, Colfax, and Sherman.
o BUILD UPON THE MOUNTAIN VIEW AND ABUNDANCE OF SUNSHINE:
Mountain views and the abundance of sunshine are two
characteristics which help distinguish Denver from other
cities. To help enhance these distinctions:
- the Mountain View Ordinance will be consistently
enforced.
sidewalk cafes, sidewalk vendors and other creative use
of the public right-of-way will be encouraged through
revisions to the existing zoning code and administrative
changes to the rules for revocable permits to use public
rights-of-way.
3. IMPROVE THE LINEAGES BETWEEN THE DISTRICTS AND BETWEEN
THE FOCAL POINTS BOTH WITHIN AND OUTSIDE THE NEIGHBORHOOD /
RECOMMENDATIONS:
o provide PEDESTRIAN LINEAGES: The interrelationships
among the neighborhood districts and between Uptown and its
adjoining neighborhoods will be improved by providing a
series of physical, visual, and psychological linkages.
These linkages should connect focal points, such as City
Park, Cheesman Park, Clements Park, and the Civic Center.
They should take the form of pedestrian linkages, as
outlined in the Transportation section, B. Neighborhood
linkages should be connected with those in other
neighborhoods in order to create a larger pedestrian
network.
42


4.
TMPROVE THE IMAGE OF PARKING LOTS I
Consider programs which will help improve the image, safety,
and function on parking lots by improving the lighting,
maintenance, and landscaping of the existing and future
lots.
P- PARRS / RECOMMENDATIONS;
Uptown is perceived as having neither parks of its own nor
good access to either City Park or Cheesman Park. The only
public parks which do exist in the neighborhood, those along
Park Avenue, are not of a sufficient size nor designed to
function as active paries which can meet the recreational
needs of the neighborhood.
1. IMPROVE EXISTING PARKS / RECOMMENDATIONS:
O REVIEW THE POTENTIAL FOR CITY PARK TO BETTER SERVE THE
NEIGHBORHOOD: The proposed City Park Master Plan should
include consideration of the perimeter of the park for
improvements which would allow it to function as a
neighborhood park for the eastern end of Uptown, as well as
for the other surrounding neighborhoods.
O INCREASE THE UTILITY OF PARK AVENUE AS A LINEAR PARK:
The sense of neighborhood ownership of the squares along
Park Avenue should be reinforced, perhaps with low
decorative fencing of each park. Either installation of a
landscaped median or extension of the parks into the
existing right-of-way should be considered as a means for
softening the impact of the street and improving the
perception of Park Avenue as a linear park. The unique
identity of each of the squares should be recreated with a
formal landscaping plan and by reinstituting the names
originally given to each square. For further details see
Section A.4., Districts.
2. IMPROVE THE LINKAGES / RECOMMENDATIONS:
O IMPROVE THE LINKAGE TO CITY PARK: Installing
landscaping and other pedestrian treatments on 16th and 17th
Avenues will help improve the linkage between Uptown and
City Park. The key to an improved linkage, however, may be
providing better pedestrian crossings of York Street. These
crossings could be improved by designating crosswalks with
paint or a change in pavement; by providing uniform
streetscape improvements, including pedestrian lighting, on
both sides of the streets; or by installing pedestrian-
activated traffic signals.
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O IMPROVE THE LINEAGE TO CHEESMAN PARK: Installing
uniform pedestrian treatments, including pedestrian
lighting, along Franklin Street south of Colfax, and along
Park Avenue will connect into 16th and 17th Avenues and will
help improve the linkage between Uptown and Cheesman Park.
3. DEVELOP INTERIM PARKS / RECOMMENDATIONS:
o VACANT LOTS: Improving vacant lots as interim parks
will eliminate visual blight and provide desirable park
space.
4. CONSIDER ACQUIRING NEW PARKS AND RECREATION FACILITIES
/ RECOMMENDATIONS:
O REVIEW THE FEASIBILITY OF NEW PARKS IN CITY PARK WEST:
If it is determined in the process of developing the city
Park Master Plan that the Park cannot function as a
neighborhood park for the surrounding neighborhoods while
continuing to function as a regional park, then new
neighborhood parks should be developed in the eastern end of
Uptown. Any new parks should provide facilities
specifically directed to the elderly and families with
children, at a minimum providing benches and playgrounds.
O REVIEW THE FEASIBILITY OF NEW PARKS IN NORTH CAPITOL
HILL: Access from the western end of the neighborhood
access to Cheesman and City Paries is more difficult. New
paries could be either public or private, should be related
to the linkages along 16th and 17th Avenues and should be
large enough to have a significant impact on the
neighborhood. The cost of maintenance of these parks should
be a major consideration.
o PROVIDE RECREATIONAL FACILITIES: Work with the Denver
Public Schools to open the recreational facilities at East
High School for use by the neighborhood. Use agreements for
school facilities should include provisions for improvement
and maintenance of the facilities.
E. SECURITY / RECOMMENDATIONS;
The recommendations below will require the cooperation of a
coalition of neighborhood residents, business owners,
property owners, and City departments. It will also require
the institution of design guidelines for new construction of
private and public structures. To this end:
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1.
TARGET THE SOURCES OF CRIME / RECOMMENDATIONS:
o MONITOR BARS: Neighborhood organizations should
continue working with the city to monitor bars and other
potential sources of crime.
O ENCOURAGE BETTER MANAGEMENT OF RENTAL HOUSING:
Neighborhood organizations should continue working with the
City to monitor the management of rental housing by
monitoring crime statistics for individual buildings and
building code and fire code violations, and then working
with the building managers and owners to improve the
management of these buildings.
o LIMIT THE NUMBER OF ABANDONED BUILDINGS AND VACANT
LOTS: Neighborhood organizations should continue working
with the City to limit the number of abandoned buildings and
vacant lots and to improve the maintenance of buildings
which are abandoned and of lots which are vacant.
2. ENCOURAGE PROGRAMS WHICH WILL HELP ERADICATE CRIME /
RECOMMENDATIONS:
o ENCOURAGE PUBLIC EDUCATION: Programs should be
provided to educate the public to security issues and
programs.
o ENCOURAGE POLICE PRESSURE: Police should continue to
apply pressure to neighborhood buildings and businesses
which have illegal activities.
o APPLY PRESSURE TO LANDLORDS: Peer and public pressure
should be applied to landlords to manage their buildings in
a manner which will discourage illegal and anti-social
activities. Apartment owners should be encouraged to
provide on-site property managers.
o APPLY PRESSURE TO BUSINESSES: Police and peer pressure
should be applied to businesses which serve problem people
to eliminate the products and services which serve as
attractions.
o ACQUIRE TROUBLESOME BUILDINGS: The programs and
authority of the City and the Denver Urban Renewal Authority
(DURA) should be used to purchase or, if necessary, to
condemn buildings on which public and private efforts have
failed to encourage the property owner to repair and
rehabilitate.
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3.
INCREASE THE SENSE OF OWNERSHIP / RECOMMENDATIONS:
o INSTITUTE NEIGHBORHOOD WATCH: Neighborhood
organizations should work with the Denver Police Department
to promote both the residential and commercial Neighborhood
Watch programs throughout Uptown.
4. FACILITATE NEIGHBORHOOD SURVEILLANCE / RECOMMENDATIONS:
o ENCOURAGE TWENTY-FOUR HOUR ACTIVITY: The zoning in the
neighborhood will be revised to provide incentives for mixed
use development as a generator of twenty-four hour activity.
5. DEVELOP URBAN DESIGN GUIDELINES / RECOMMENDATIONS:
O INCREASE THE SENSE OF NEIGHBORHOOD OWNERSHIP: New
housing and all other new development should be designed to
increase the sense of ownership of streets and of the
neighborhood as a whole. To help accomplish this,
individual housing units and offices should open directly to
the street, overlook the street, and have individual yard
space.
o ENCOURAGE SURVEILLANCE OF THE STREETS: All development
should be designed to overlook the street in order to
facilitate surveillance.
o ENCOURAGE surveillance OF BUILDINGS: Conversely, all
development should be designed to facilitate surveillance
from the street. This should include the provision of
pedestrian lighting in public areas such as parking lots.
F. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT / RECOMMENDATIONS:
Private economic development in Uptown and the potential for
building upon the potential for public / private financial
cooperation was a motivation for the Planning Office in
initiating a neighborhood planning effort.
o ENCOURAGE NEW BUSINESS: Encourage entrepreneurship and
small business and service activity by individuals; generate
jobs and help small firms to expand. Target Skyline funds
for a public/private loan pool for new businesses.
o IMPROVE EXISTING BUSINESS: Preserve and improve
existing commercial areas in preference to creating new
business districts or expanding existing areas.
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o ENCOURAGE EMPLOYMENT DIVERSITY: Encourage a diversity
of employment for the widest possible range of skills. Help
retain and expand existing sources of unskilled and semi-
skilled employment such as the hospitals and restaurants.
o STUDY SALES TAX GENERATION: Initiate a study of the
sales tax generated in the neighborhood as baseline data for
evaluating changes resulting from neighborhood and city
actions.
o IDENTIFY THE EXISTING MARXET: Identify and tap the
existing retail market.
O EVALUATE THE POTENTIAL FOR A NEW BUSINESS INCUBATOR:
Evaluate the potential for a business incubator in the
neighborhood which might specialize in new medical-related
businesses.
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VIII. PRIORITY ACTION SUMMARY
PROGRAM___________________________________RESPONSIBLE PARTIES
A. DEMONSTRATION AREA
COORDINATE ALL PUBLIC PROJECTS IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD SO THAT,
AS MUCH AS IS FEASIBLE, THEY WILL FOCUS ON A DEMONSTRATION
AREA WHICH IS CENTERED ON THE VILLAGE CENTER AT PARK AVENUE
AND WHICH EXTENDS FROM 13TH TO 17TH AVENUES.
* PLANNING OFFICE
PUBLIC WORKS
ECONOMIC
DEVELOPMENT
AGENCY
COMMUNITY
DEVELOPMENT
AGENCY
DENVER
HOUSING
AUTHORITY
DENVER
URBAN
RENEWAL
AGENCY
B. DISTRICTS
1. CONSIDER AMENDING THE CURRENT ZONING TO RECOGNIZE AND
REINFORCE THE SPECIAL CHARACTER OF EACH OF THE DISTRICTS IN
UPTOWN.
* IMPLEMENTATION
TASK FORCE
PLANNING OFFICE
ZONING
48


PROGRAM
RESPONSIBLE PARTIES
2. ESTABLISH VILLAGE CENTERS ON COLFAX AVENUE AT PARK
AVENUE AND YORK STREET: design, fund, build, and maintain
the public and private improvements which will distinguish
the village centers.
a. DEVELOP DESIGN IMPLEMENTATION PLANS AND FINANCING
PLANS
* - PUBLIC WORKS
PLANNING OFFICE
* - PROPERTY OWNERS
b. FORM IMPROVEMENT DISTRICTS
* - PUBLIC WORKS
PLANNING OFFICE
* - PROPERTY OWNERS
C. FORM MAINTENANCE DISTRICTS
* - PROPERTY OWNERS
* - PUBLIC WORKS
PLANNING OFFICE
C. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
1. TARGET SKYLINE FUNDS TO A REVOLVING LOAN FUND FOR NEW
BUSINESSES IN UPTOWN. POOL THE AVAILABLE PUBLIC FUNDS WITH
PRIVATE DOLLARS.
* - MAYOR'S OFFICE
PLANNING OFFICE
ECONOMIC
DEVELOPMENT
AGENCY
2. EVALUATE THE POTENTIAL FOR A BUSINESS INCUBATOR IN THE
NEIGHBORHOOD WHICH MIGHT SPECIALIZE IN NEW MEDICAL-RELATED
BUSINESSES.
* - ECONOMIC
DEVELOPMENT
AGENCY
49


PROGRAM
RESPONSIBLE PARTIES
3. INITIATE A STUDY OF THE SALES TAX GENERATED IN THE
NEIGHBORHOOD AS A BASELINE FOR EVALUATION OF CHANGES
RESULTING FROM NEIGHBORHOOD AND CITY ACTIONS
* BUDGET AND
MANAGEMENT
D. HOUSING
1. ESTABLISH A REHABILITATION TASK FORCE TO EVALUATE THE
CITY BUILDING CODE AND TO RECOMMEND CHANGES TO THE CODE AND
CITY PROCEDURES WHICH WILL FACILITATE THE RENOVATION OF
HOUSING.
. * PLANNING OFFICE
COALITION
2. TARGET SKYLINE FUNDS TO A REVOLVING LOAN FUND FOR NEW
AND REHABILITATED HOUSING IN UPTOWN.
* - MAYOR'S OFFICE
PLANNING OFFICE
3. TARGET THE NEIGHBORHOOD FOR HOUSING MAINTENANCE,
REHABILITATION, AND NEW CONSTRUCTION PROGRAMS.
* - DENVER HOUSING
'AUTHORITY
COMMUNITY
DEVELOPMENT
AGENCY
DENVER
URBAN
RENEWAL
AUTHORITY
4. ESTABLISH A NEIGHBORHOOD HOUSING TASK FORCE WHICH WILL
IDENTIFY CURRENT HOUSING PROBLEMS AND ESTABLISH PROGRAMS FOR
DEALING WITH THEM.
* PLANNING OFFICE
COALITION
50


PROGRAM
RESPONSIBLE PARTIES
S. CONSIDER AMENDING THE CURRENT ZONING TO PROVIDE
INCENTIVES FOR HOUSING.
* - IMPLEMENTATION
TASK FORCE
PLANNING OFFICE
ZONING
6. RETAIN AND EXPAND THE EXISTING LOW INTEREST LOAN
PROGRAMS FOR SINGLE AND MULTIPLE FAMILY HOME IMPROVEMENTS.
* - PLANNING OFFICE
7. DEVELOP INCENTIVES FOR RETAINING HOUSING.
* - CITY COUNCIL
PLANNING OFFICE
PUBLIC WORKS
8. INITIATE CITY ENFORCEMENT OF HEALTH AND SAFETY CODES.
* - COALITION
9. CONSIDER INITIATING A FAST-TRACK REVIEW PROCESS FOR
HOUSING PROJECTS IN UPTOWN AND OTHER INNER-CITY
NEIGHBORHOODS.
* PLANNING OFFICE
ZONING
10. CREATE A REVOLVING FUND FOR SHORT-TERM LOW-INTEREST
CONSTRUCTION LOANS.
* PLANNING OFFICE
11. EXPAND THE CITY'S MORTGAGE BOND PROGRAM TO INCLUDE
GREATER PARTICIPATION FOR CONDOMINIUM AND SINGLE-FAMILY
OWNERS.
* CITY COUNCIL
PLANNING COUNCIL
51


PROGRAM
RESPONSIBLE PARTIES
E. IMAGE
1. IDENTITY THE POSITIVE AND NEGATIVE ASPECTS OF THE
NEIGHBORHOOD.
* - COALITION
PLANNING OFFICE
2. ESTABLISH ON-GOING MECHANISMS FOR MAKING POSITIVE
CHANGES AND ELIMINATING NEGATIVE ASPECTS.
* - COALITION
PLANNING OFFICE
3. INITIATE AN ON-GOING PUBLIC RELATIONS PROGRAM TO INFORM
THE PUBLIC OF THE MECHANISMS FOR CHANGE, THE RESULTING
CHANGES, AND THE ADDITIONAL ASSETS OF UPTOWN
* - COALITION
F. MIKED LAND USES
1. ENCOURAGE THE DEVELOPMENT OF URBAN DESIGN GUIDELINES FOR
COMPATIBILITY OF USES WITHIN THE NEIGHBORHOOD AND WITHIN
INDIVIDUAL DEVELOPMENTS
* DESIGN GUIDELINE
TASK FORCE
PLANNING OFFICE
2. CONSIDER AMENDING THE ZONING TO ENCOURAGE A MIXTURE OF
USES, A CONCENTRATION OF USES IN ORDER TO CREATE AREAS WITH
DISTINCT CHARACTER, AND HOUSING AS THE LARGEST COMPONENT OF
THE MIXTURE OF USES
* IMPLEMENTATION
TASK FORCE
ZONING
ADMINISTRATION
PLANNING OFFICE
52


PROGRAM
RESPONSIBLE PARTIES
3. APPOINT A TASK PORCE TO REVIEW THE CITY'S BUILDING CODE
AND INITIATE CHANGES WHICH WILL FACILITATE MIXED USE
PROJECTS.
* - MAYORS OFFICE
PLANNING OFFICE
4. EVALUATE THE PROVISION OF CITY SERVICES FOR THEIR
ABILITY TO MEET THE NEEDS OF A MIXED USE NEIGHBORHOOD, WITH
AN OVERRIDING CONCERN FOR THEIR COMPATIBILITY WITH THE
RESIDENTIAL CHARACTER OF THE NEIGHBORHOOD.
* - PUBLIC WORKS
COALITION
PLANNING OFFICE
G. OFFICES
1. ENCOURAGE THE DEVELOPMENT OF URBAN DESIGN GUIDELINES FOR
THE COMPATIBILITY OF OFFICES WITH THE RESIDENTIAL CHARACTER
OF THE NEIGHBORHOOD.
* DESIGN GUIDELINE
TASK FORCE
PLANNING OFFICE
2. CONSIDER AMENDING THE CURRENT ZONING CODE TO ALLOW
RETAIL IN OFFICE, RESIDENTIAL, AND OFFICE/RESIDENTIAL
PROJECTS WHERE APPROPRIATE AND ON A SPECIAL REVIEW BASIS.
* IMPLEMENTATION
TASK FORCE
ZONING
ADMINISTRATION
PLANNING OFFICE


PROGRAM
RESPONSIBLE PARTIES
3. CONSIDER AMENDING THE CURRENT ZONING TO PROVIDE A
SPECIAL REVIEW PROCESS FOR ALL PROPOSED OFFICE USES
* IMPLEMENTATION
TASK FORCE
PLANNING OFFICE
H. PARKS
I. IMPROVE CITY PARK TO INCREASE ITS ABILITY TO SERVE AS A
NEIGHBORHOOD PARK FOR THE SURROUNDING NEIGHBORHOODS, AS WELL
AS A PARK WHICH SERVICES THE ENTIRE METROPOLITAN AREA
* PARKS DEPARTMENT
COALITION
2. IMPROVE THE LINKAGES TO CITY PARK AND TO CHEESMAN PARK
ALONG 16TH AVENUE, 17TH AVENUE, PARK AVENUE, FRANKLIN
STREET, THE ESPLANADE, AND ACROSS YORK STREET
* - PUBLIC WORKS
PARKS DEPARTMENT
PLANNING OFFICE
COALITION
3. IMPROVE 16TH AVENUE AS A LINEAR PARK CONNECTING DOWNTOWN
TO CITY PARK
a. ESTABLISH A 16TH AVENUE TASK FORCE
* - PLANNING OFFICE
PUBLIC WORKS
PARKS DEPARTMENT
COALITION
b. DEVELOP DESIGN IMPLEMENTATION PLANS AND FINANCING
* PLANS
* 16TH AVENUE TASK
FORCE
54


PROGRAM
RESPONSIBLE PARTIES
FORM IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT(S)
* PUBLIC WORKS
16TH AVENUE TASK
FORCE
PROPERTY OWNERS
d. FORM MAINTENANCE DISTRICT(S)
* - PUBLIC WORKS
16TH AVENUE TASK
FORCE
PROPERTY OWNERS
4. IMPROVE THE PARKS ALONG PARK AVENUE, IN CONJUNCTION WITH
STREETSCAPE IMPROVEMENTS
a. DEVELOP DESIGN IMPLEMENTATION PLANS AND FINANCING
PLANS
* - PARKS DEPARTMENT
PUBLIC WORKS
PLANNING OFFICE
COALITION
b. FORM IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT (S)
c. FORM MAINTENANCE DISTRICT(S)
* PUBLIC WORKS
PLANNING OFFICE
PROPERTY OWNERS
COALITION
* PUBLIC WORKS
PLANNING OFFICE
PROPERTY OWNERS
COALITION
55


PROGRAM
RESPONSIBLE PARTIES
S. DEVELOP INTERIM PARKS ON VACANT LOTS
* COALITION
6. ACQUIRE NEW NEIGHBORHOOD PARKS
* COALITION
PARKS DEPARTMENT
PLANNING OFFICE
7. CONSIDER AMENDING THE ZONING TO REQUIRE THE PROVISION OF
PUBLIC PARK SPACE IN NEW DEVELOPMENTS, OR FEES IN LIEU OF
THE ACTUAL PROVISION OF PARK SPACE
* - IMPLEMENTATION
TASK FORCE
ZONING
ADMINISTRATION
PLANNING OFFICE
3. PROVIDE RECREATIONAL FACILITIES FOR UPTOWN
* - PARKS DEPARTMENT
DENVER PUBLIC
SCHOOLS
COALITION
I. RETAIL USES
1. APPLY FOR NEIGHBORHOOD BUSINESS REVITALIZATION AREA
(NBR) DESIGNATION FOR EAST COLFAX.
* CCLFAX-ON-THE-HILL
PLANNING OFFICE
ECONOMIC
DEVELOPMENT
AGENCY
56


PROGRAM
RESPONSIBLE PARTIES
*
2. MAKE STREETSCAPE IMPROVEMENTS WHICH WILL ENHANCE THE
IMAGE OP THE RETAIL AREAS.
* COALITION
PUBLIC WORKS
PLANNING OFFICE
3. CONSIDER AMENDING THE ZONING TO ALLOW MORE FLEXIBLE
PROVISION OF RETAIL USES IN MIXED RESIDENTIAL/RETAIL
PROJECTS.
* IMPLEMENTATION TASK
FORCE
PLANNING OFFICE
4. ENCOURAGE THE DEVELOPMENT OF URBAN DESIGN GUIDELINES FOR
THE CREATION OF A DISTINCT IDENTITY FOR EACH RETAIL AREA.
' * DESIGN GUIDELINE
TASK FORCE
COALITION
J. SECURITY
1. FORM A COALITION create a coalition of neighborhood
organizations and interests to coordinate efforts with
police to identify the sources of crime and to implement
programs which will eradicate crime.
* - NBRHD. GROUPS
2. PARTICIPATE WITH POLICE cooperate with the police to
locate and eradicate the sources of crime.
* - COALITION
3. IDENTIFY THE SOURCES OF CRIME identify and target the
sources of crime
* - POLICE
COALITION
57


PROGRAM
RESPONSIBLE PARTIES
4. EDUCATE THE PUBLIC provide programs which will educate
the public to security issues and programs.
* - POLICE
COALITION
5. APPLY POLICE PRESSURE continue police pressure on
areas buildings, and businesses with illegal activities.
* - POLICE
6. APPLY PRESSURE TO LANDLORDS provide peer and public
pressure to landlords to manage their buildings in a manner
which will discourage illegal and anti-social activities.
Apartment owners should be encouraged to provide on-site
property managers.
* - POLICE
COALITION
7. APPLY PRESSURE TO BUSINESSES provide police and peer
pressure on businesses which serve problem people to
eliminate attractions, products, and services which attract
them.
* - POLICE
COALITION
8. APPLY PRESSURE TO AGENCIES apply public pressure to
public and publicly funded agencies such as mental health
association, H.U.D. and community corrections agencies, to
assure that their facilities do not compromise neighborhood
safety or the viability of the neighborhood.
* COALITION
CITY
9. ACQUIRE TROUBLESOME BUILDINGS use the programs and
authority of the City and the Denver Urban Renewal Authority
(DURA) to purchase or, if necessary, to condemn buildings on
which public and private efforts have failed to encourage
the property owner to repair and rehabilitate.
* - CITY
COALITION


PROGRAM
RESPONSIBLE PARTIES
10. ENCOURAGE THE DEVELOPMENT OP URBAN DESIGN GUIDELINES -
encourage new developments to overlook the street in order
to facilitate surveillance, to facilitate surveillance from
the street, and to create a sense of ownership of the
neighborhood and each public space.
* DESIGN GUIDELINE
TASK FORCE
K. TRANSPORTATION
1. MONITOR THE CHANGES IN TRAFFIC VOLUME:
* - PUBLIC WORKS
PLANNING OFFICE
2. STUDY AND MAKE IMPROVEMENTS WHICH WILL IMPROVE THE FLOW
OF AUTOMOBILE, PEDESTRIAN, AND BICYCLE TRAFFIC ON AND ACROSS
COLFAX, 13TH, 16TH, 17TH, AND PARK AVENUES:
a. DEVELOP DETAILED PROTOTYPE STREETSCAPE TREATMENTS:
* - PUBLIC WORKS
PLANNING OFFICE
COALITION
COLORADO
DEPARTMENT OF
HIGHWAYS
RTD
b. DEVELOP AND SECURE FUNDING FOR STREETSCAPE
TREATMENTS:
* PUBLIC WORKS
ECONOMIC
DEVELOPMENT
AGENCY
59


PROGRAM
RESPONSIBLE PARTIES
PLANNING OFFICE
PROPERTY OWNERS
COLORADO
DEPARTMENT OF
HIGHWAYS
- RTD
c. EVALUATE AND SELECT A FINAL DESIGN AND DEVELOP A
STAGED IMPLEMENTATION PLAN:
* - PUBLIC WORKS
* - PLANNING OFFICE
PROPERTY OWNERS
COLORADO
DEPARTMENT OF
HIGHWAYS
RTD
3 PARKING :
a. ESTABLISH PARKING DISTRICTS
* - COALITION
PUBLIC WORKS
PLANNING OFFICE
U. RETAIN ON-STREET PARKING
* - COALITION
C. CONSIDER REDUCING THE PARKING RATIO THROUGH CHANGES TO
THE ZONING
* - IMPLEMENTATION
TASK FORCE
PUBLIC WORKS
PLANNING OFFICE
60


PROGRAM
RESPONSIBLE PARTIES
d. CONSIDER ELIMINATING COMMERCIAL PARKING AS A USE-BY-
RIGHT IN THE R-4 ZONE.
* - IMPLEMENTATION
TASK FORCE
PLANNING OFFICE
e. ENFORCE AND EXTEND THE CURRENT LANDSCAPING ORDINANCE
TO INCLUDE PROVISIONS FOR INTERIOR LANDSCAPING
* - COALITION
URBAN DESIGN
TASK FORCE
PLANNING OFFICE
f. REQUIRE PARKING STRUCTURES WHICH ADJOIN RETAIL STREETS
TO HAVE GROUND LEVEL RETAIL FRONTING ON STREETS
* - IMPLEMENTATION
TASK FORCE
URBAN DESIGN
TASX FORCE
PLANNING OFFICE
g. INSTITUTE RESIDENTIAL PARKING PRIORITY PERMITS AND
EXPAND SHORT-TERM PARKING TO DISCOURAGE ALL DAY
DOWNTOWN OFFICE PARKING
* PUBLIC WORKS
h. MAINTAIN LOADING ZONES IN RETAIL AREAS
* PUBLIC WORKS
4. TRANSIT:
61


PROGRAM___________________________________RESPONSIBLE PARTIES
a. FINALIZE AND IMPLEMENT IS LTD TRANSFER STATION STOPS
ON COLFAX AVENUE:
* - RTD
- PUBLIC WORKS
- PROPERTY OWNERS
b. CONTINUE 1 HOUR, SAME DIRECTION BUS TRANSFERS ON
COLFAX AVENUE:
* - RTD
c. MAINTAIN PURE EXPRESS SERVICE ON COLFAX AVENUE:
* - RTD
d. MAKE STREETSCAPE IMPROVEMENTS WHICH WILL INCLUDE
BETTER SITING AND DESIGN OF BUS STOPS THROUGHOUT THE
NEIGHBORHOOD.
* - PUBLIC WORKS
RTD
COALITION
5. PEDESTRIANS
a. ENFORCE DENVER LAWS WHICH GIVE PEDESTRIANS THE RIGHT-
OF-WAY OVER AUTOMOBILES, EDUCATE THE PUBLIC TO THESE
LAWS AND INSTITUTE SIGNIFICANT FINES FOR VIOLATIONS
* POLICE DEPARTMENT
b. IDENTIFY PEDESTRIAN LINKAGES NORTH AND SOUTH INTO THE
NEIGHBORHOODS. THIS SHOULD INCLUDE SHERMAN,
PENNSYLVANIA, EMERSON, AND FRANKLIN STREETS. PROVIDE
STREETSCAPE IMPROVEMENTS WHICH WILL ENCOURAGE
PEDESTRIANS TO THESE STREETS.
* PUBLIC WORKS
PLANNING OFFICE
62


PROGRAM
RESPONSIBLE PARTIES
6. BICYCLES
a. PROVIDE IMPROVED MAINTENANCE ON BICYCLE PATHS,
REMOVING GRAVEL AND OTHER DEBRIS WITH A REGULARLY
SCHEDULED MAINTENANCE PROGRAM.
* - PUBLIC WORKS
b. INCREASE THE SIGNAGE FOR THE BICYCLE SYSTEM.
* - PUBLIC WORKS
c. ADD NORTH/SOUTH CONNECTIONS TO THE BICYCLE SYSTEM.
* - PUBLIC WORKS
7. JOGGERS
ADD AND WIDEN SIDEWALKS AND OTHER STREETSCAPE IMPROVEMENTS
TO ACCOMMODATE JOGGING LOOPS ON 16TH/PARK/FRANKLIN/CHEESMAN,
16TH,ESPLANADE/CITY PARK, AND 16TH/PARKS/20TH/SHERMAN.
* - PUBLIC WORKS
PARKS
PLANNING OFFICE
8. 13TH AVENUE:
a. DEVELOP DETAILED PLAN FOR REBUILDING:
* - PUBLIC WORKS
* - PLANNING OFFICE
b. SEEK PRIVATE FUNDING MATCH:
* - PUBLIC WORKS
* - PLANNING OFFICE
PROPERTY OWNERS
63


PROGRAM
RESPONSIBLE PARTIES
9. 1STH AVENUE
RESTRICT I6TH AVENUE TO LOCAL AUTOMOBILE TRAFFIC AND IMPROVE
THE PEDESTRIAN, JOGGING, AND BICYCLE FACILITIES.
- PUBLIC WORKS
PARKS
COALITION
PROPERTY OWNERS
PLANNING OFFICE
10. 19TH/20TH AVENUES
STUDY THE CONVERSION OF 19TH AND 20TH AVENUES TO TWO WAY
TRAFFIC.
* PUBLIC WORKS
11. OGDEN/DOWNING STREETS
CONTINUE WITH THE CONVERSION TO TWO WAY TRAFFIC.
* - PUBLIC WORKS
12. SHERMAN
a. LEAVE SHERMAN AS A TWO WAY STREET WITH ON-STREET
PARKING.
* - PUBLIC WORKS
b. INITIATE STREETSCAPE IMPROVEMENTS WHICH WILL IMPROVE
THE PEDESTRIAN QUALITY OF THE STREET.
* - PUBLIC WORKS
STATE
4


PROGRAM
RESPONSIBLE PARTIES
L. URBAN DESIGN
1. ENCOURAGE THE ESTABLISHMENT OP AN URBAN DESIGN TASK
FORCE WHICH WILL DEVELOP DESIGN GUIDELINES FOR UPTOWN
* - PLANNING OFFICE
COALITION
2. CONSTRUCT PUBLIC AND PRIVATE AMENITIES AND IMPROVEMENTS
a. DEVELOP DESIGN IMPLEMENTATION PLANS AND FINANCING
PLANS
* - PLANNING OFFICE
PUBLIC WORKS
COALITION
b. FORM IMPROVEMENT DISTRICTS
* - PUBLIC WORKS
COALITION
PROPERTY OWNERS
C. FORM MAINTENANCE DISTRICTS
* - PUBLIC WORKS
COALITION
PROPERTY OWNERS
2. PRESERVE HISTORIC AND OTHER SIGNIFICANT STRUCTURES
65


PROGRAM
RESPONSIBLE PARTIES
a. INVENTORY HISTORIC AND OTHER SIGNIFICANT
STRUCTURES
* PLANNING OFFICE
HISTORIC DENVER
COLORADO
HISTORICAL
SOCIETY
b. ESTABLISH HISTORIC DISTRICTS
* PLANNING OFFICE
HISTORIC DENVER
COALITION
PROPERTY OWNERS
C. CONSIDER AMENDING THE ZONING TO INCLUDE
PRESERVATION MECHANISMS, SUCH AS A MERGED ZONE LOT
PROCEDURE AND THE TRANSFER OF DEVELOPMENT RIGHTS
WITHIN SELECTED AREAS
* IMPLEMENTATION
TASK FORCE
PLANNING OFFICE
d. LOBBY FOR FEDERAL AND STATE PRESERVATION TAX
INCENTIVES
* CITY LOBBYIST
COALITION
8. PRESERVE, OPERATE, AND MAINTAIN TEMPLE
EMANUEL AS A CULTURAL EVENTS CENTER
* PEARL STREET
TEMPLE EMANUEL
FOUNDATION
66


tf
PROGRAM________________________________ RESPONSIBLE PARTIES
PLANNING OFFICE
DENVER HOUSING
AUTHORITY
CITY COUNCIL
MAYOR'S OFFICE
COMMUNITY
DEVELOPMENT
AGENCY
ECONOMIC
DEVELOPMENT
AGENCY
DENVER URBAN
RENEWAL
AUTHORITY
COALITION
3. ENCOURAGE THE DEVELOPMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION OF DESIGN
GUIDELINES SPECIFICALLY CREATED FOR UPTOWN
* - DESIGN
GUIDELINE
TASK FORCE
PLANNING OFFICE
4. ENCOURAGE THE ESTABLISHMENT OF A DESIGN REVIEW PROCESS
* - PLANNING OFFICE
COALITION
5. CONSIDER AMENDING THE ZONING TO INCLUDE DESIGN REVIEW
* IMPLEMENTATION
TASK FORCE
PLANNING OFFICE
67


PROGRAM
RESPONSIBLE PARTIES
6. REVISE THE PROCEDURES FOR ISSUING REVOCABLE PERMITS TO
ENCOURAGE THE USE OF PUBLIC RIGHTS-OF-WAY FOR PUBLIC AND
SEMI-PUBLIC OUTDOOR USES.
* PUBLIC WORKS
7. ESTABLISH NEIGHBORHOOD GATEWAYS ON EAST COLFAX, 16TH,
17TH, 13TH, AND PARK AVENUES:
DEVELOP DESIGN IMPLEMENTATION FLANS AND FINANCING
' PLANS
o lighting:
o art:
o' street furniture:
o sidewalk extension:
* PUBLIC WORKS
PLANNING OFFICE
STATE
PROPERTY OWNERS
PROPERTY OWNERS
8. SEEK TO DEVELOP THE SITE AT THE NORTHERN END OF SHERMAN
STREET FOR A VISUAL TERMINUS. THE SITE SHOULD BE DEVELOPED
AS AN IMPORTANT PUBLIC SPACE WHICH WILL ACT AS A FORECOURT
FOR A HIGH DENSITY HOUSING PROJECT DESIGNED FOR
COMPATIBILITY WITH THE CLEMENTS HISTORIC DISTRICT.
* DENVER URBAN
RENEWAL AUTHORITY
DENVER HOUSING
AUTHORITY
M. ZONING
PLANNING OFFICE
1. ESTABLISH AN IMPLEMENTATION TASK FORCE WHICH WILL MAKE
RECOMMENDATIONS ON FURTHER IMPLEMENTATION OF THE PLAN.
* PLANNING OFFICE
COALITION
68


IX. APPENDICES
A. REPORT ON THE CHARETTE
INTRODUCTION
1. A CHARETTE IS A WORKSHOP
A charette is a workshop which expends over several days,
has a closely defined purpose, an at its last public
meeting, presents a report on its consclusions.
2. THE CHARETTE WAS HELD ON SEPTEMBER 3. 4. AND 5
The charette was held on September 3, 4, and 5, at the
Temple Center, 16th and Pearl. A team of specialists in
marketing, planning, public finance, public infrastructure,
transportation, and urban design directed the process.
3. SPONSORSHIP
The Charette was sponsored by the DENVER DEPARTMENT OF
PUBLIC WORKS and the DENVER PLANNING OFFICE. Additional
support was provided by United Bank of Denver. Coordination
was provided by Capitol Hill United Neighbors (CHUN),
Colfax-on-the-Hill, and Denver's Uptown-on-the-Hill
Association.
4. CHARGE
The City's charge to the Charette was to DEVELOP policies
AND A STRATEGIC PLAN which would accommodate the
transportation needs of East Colfax, while enhancing the
revitalization of the commercial uses along East Colfax and
of the adjoining neighborhoods. These policies and
strategies are to serve as a model for other commercial
strips which adjoin residential neighborhoods and which
serve as major traffic arteries.
5. SUMMARY OF KEY RECOMMENDATIONS
o TRANSPORTATION: Despite the heavy traffic through the
neighborhood, the design of the streets can be improved so
that they will efficiently carry automobiles, while at the
same time providing a comfortable and inviting environment
for pedestrians. Emphasis will be placed on PEDESTRIAN
IMPROVEMENTS.
o REVITALIZATION OF COMMERCIAL USES: The commercial uses
in the neighborhood will best be served by REINFORCING THE
EXISTING DIVERSITY OF BOTH THE DESIGN CHARACTER AND THE TYPE
OF BUSINESSES. There are two main types of businesses,
69


those businesses which are oriented more to pedestrians and
those which are oriented more to automobiles. This
distinction results in a diversity of design, character, and
of comfort level for pedestrians. Discernable patterns
should be reinforced by establishing VILLAGE CENTERS, the
areas which contain the businesses which are oriented more
to pedestrians. These centers will be encouraged to develop
their distinct design character and to attract uses which
will serve both neighborhood residents and a regional
market. One of these village centers will serve as the
focus of a DEMONSTRATION AREA,, which will extend north and
south into the neighborhoods and link the residential and
retail uses. It will also create linkages between the
neighborhoods and serve as a target area for City
assistance. The programs and momentum established in the
demonstration area can then be extended into the surrounding
areas, possibly initiating a second target area. Eventually
these programs could extend throughout the entire
neighborhood. Those areas containing businesses which are
oriented more to automobiles should be heavily landscaped.
The landscaping should include a row of trees along the
street, which will help lead the eye to the mature trees in
the adjoining residential area and, therefore, help visually
link Colfax and the neighborhoods,. The landscaping will
also help provide an attractive environment for pedestrians.
o REVITALIZATION OF ADJOINING NEIGHBORHOODS: The
revitalization of the adjoining neighborhoods is, in part,
dependent upon the revitalization of East Colfax, and vice
versa. For East Colfax to meet its full potential as a
retail area, it must be bordered by healthy residential
neighborhood. While Capitol Hill is a healthy residential
neighborhood, it must be protected. Uptown, on the other
hand, has lost much of its housing and must be
re-established as a stable residential neighborhood. A
major effort must be made to develop new HOUSING in Uptown
and to protect existing housing in both neighborhoods.
Efforts at providing new housing will be concentrated in the
DEMONSTRATION AREA.
5. MOTIVATION
The motivation for the charette was to build upon the:
o MOMENTUM: the current momentum in the neighborhood,
generated by:
- NEW BUSINESSES
- NEW DEVELOPMENTS
- REDEVELOPMENTS
70


NEIGHBORHOOD ORGANIZATIONS
o POTENTIAL FOR REINFORCING MOMENTUM: coordination of
public and private efforts will help reinforce the current
momentum
o NEW AWARENESS: there is a new awareness on the part of
both the public and private sectors as to the potentials of
the neighborhood, the need for defining areawide issues and
for developing coordinated solutions to those issues, and
the advantages of joint cooperation and commitments
o CLEAN-UP OF CRIME: the neighborhood organizations have
been extremely effective at identifying many of the sources
of crime and working with the City to eliminate them
o PRIVATE EFFORT: private planning projects have laid the
groundwork for a neighborhood-wide land use, transportation,
and urban design charette. These planning efforts include:
- RNL STUDY: an urban design study which developed
streetscape and facade treatments for East Colfax, funded by
Colfax-on-the-Hill, with assistance from the city's Economic
Development Agency
- LARRY LEVI STUDY: a land use study for East Colfax,
funded by United Bank's Capitol Development Corporation
- CAPITOL DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION: a series of amenities
studies, providing neighborhood leadership for 16th Avenue
improvements, streetscape improvements on 17th Avenue, the
development of parks and interim paries, and the improvement
of the transportation and parking system in the neighborhood
6. SETTING
The setting with which the charette dealt was:
o COLFAX CORRIDOR: the focus of the charette was East
Colfax, its functioning as a retail street and as an
arterial, and its relationship to the surrounding
neighborhoods. As such, the boundaries for the study were
from 12th Avenue to 20th Avenue and from Broadway to Clayton
o "MAIN STREET: Colfax is the "Main Street" for the
surrounding neighborhoods. One of the goals of the charette
was to finds ways for Colfax to improve its functioning as a
Main Street
71


o CHARACTER: the character of East Colfax can he described
as:
- COMMERCIAL STRIP: Colfax is a commercial strip, the
market for which is diverse, serving the following markets:
a. pass through, depending on the through traffic on
Colfax and the surrounding arterial streets
b. neighborhood, serving the residents of the
adjoining neighborhoods
c. community-wide, providing services beyond the
adjoining neighborhoods to the entire metropolitan area
d. unique regional, serving as a unique urban street
with a regional reputation
a. local employees, providing services for employees
who work both in adjoining neighborhoods and in Downtown
- TRANSIT CORRIDOR: East Colfax has the heaviest bus
ridership of any corridor in the metropolitan area
- CRITICAL LINK: Colfax provides a critical
transportation and commercial linkage for the surrounding
neighborhoods and for Downtown
7. OBJECTIVES
The primary objectives for planning in the study area
include:
o ECONOMIC REVITALIZATION: increasing the revitalization of
economic activity along East Colfax and in the adjoining
neighborhoods
o STABILIZATION AND REVITALIZATION OF NEIGHBORHOODS:
providing neighborhoods which attract permanent residents,
employees, and businesses
o REINFORCEMENT OF DIVERSITY: reinforcing and expanding the
current neighborhood diversity, which encompasses a wide
variety of ages, lifestyles, economic circumstances, ethnic
groups, and family types
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COLFAX
1. VISION
The vision for East Colfax and the neighborhood has two
themes:
o EXISTING DIFFERENTIATION: building on the existing
differentiation in the neighborhood, emphasizing the
distinct character of each activity center by providing
unique:
- DESIGN GUIDELINES
- PEDESTRIAN TREATMENT
- TRAFFIC TREATMENT
- MERCHANTS ASSOCIATIONS
o COMMON FRAMEWORX: linking each activity center by a
common design framework and, by this, to the surrounding
neighborhoods
The results of building on the existing differentiation in
the neighborhood and of applying a common framework is to
recognize and reinforce:
o THREE DISTINCT ACTIVITY TYPES:
- VILLAGE CENTERS: there are two village centers east of
Pennsylvania Street:
a. Park Avenue village
b. York Street Village
- AUTO-ORIENTED CENTERS: auto-oriented centers connect
the Village Centers east of Pennsylvania Street
- CAPITOL COMPLEX-COLFAX: west of Pennsylvania, East
Colfax takes on a character and uses which are oriented to
the Capitol Complex
2. EXISTING CHARACTER
Colfax is now characterized by:
o DIVERSITY: a diversity of land uses; markets? building
age, setbacks, height, bulk, and materials; architectural
styles; and degree of orientation to automobiles and
pedestrians
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o IDENTIFIABLE CLUSTERS OF ACTIVITY: which are centered at:
- COLFAX AT PARK AVENUE:
- COLFAX AT YORK STREET:
These activity clusters are characterized by:
- PEDESTRIAN ORIENTATION, with buildings at the right-
of-way line
- REHABILITATION ACTIVITY
- NEIGHBORHOOD-SERVING BUSINESSES, which also serve a
larger area
o AUTOMOBILE ORIENTED AREAS: between the activity clusters
are areas oriented to automobiles, with:
- PARKING in front of the businesses
- UNFRIENDLY character and design for pedestrians
o DIVISION IN CHARACTER AND USE: the key division is that
between an area with the character of Downtown and one with
the character of an urban neighborhood. Separating these
clusters of activity are areas which are auto-oriented
- WEST OF PENNSYLVANIA: CAPITOL COMPLEX-COLFAX: this
area has:
a. orientation to the Capitol Complex and residences,
with uses which provide services for State employees,
persons having business with the State, and residents.
b. large land assemblages resulting from land
speculation
c. concentration of parking lots, again resulting
from land speculation
- EAST OF PENNSYLVANIA: URBAN NEIGHBORHOOD:
characterized by:
a. commercial redevelopment on Colfax
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b. stronger residential character
c. lower land prices
d. less speculation
e. smaller assemblages
f. more feeling of neighborhood
3. COLFAX VILLAGE CENTERS
Two village centers have been identified for this section of
East Colfax, one at York and a second at Park Avenue. For
each of them to achieve their potential as a center of
activity along East Colfax, they should emphasize the
following:
o DISTINCTIONS: reinforce the characteristics which
distinguish them, such as architectural style and land uses
o UNIQUE NAMES: emphasize a unique name for each area, such
as Village Park, Park Village, or York Village
o BUILDING ALONG THE RIGHT-OP-WAY: many of the buildings in
these areas are built along the public right-of-way. This
pattern should be reinforced
o ARCHITECTURAL CHARACTER: renovations and new buildings
should emphasize the architectural character of existing
buildings
o PEDESTRIAN PLOW: improvements to the public right-of-way
should enhance the pedestrian flow. These include:
- INTERSECTION CURB EXTENSIONS
- TRAPPIC ISLANDS
- STREETSCAPING
o SHARED PARKING: shared parking will allow for more
efficient use of land, easier access to parking, financial
savings for property owners and businesses, and better
landscaping and buffering for compatibility with the
adjoining neighborhoods
o BUFFERS AND LINKS TO RESIDENTIAL AREAS: to maximize the
compatibility with surrounding areas and thus encourage
healthier residential neighborhoods as a market for retail
uses on Colfax, and to encourage residents within those
neighborhoods to use East Colfax as their neighborhood
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< retail center, all uses along Colfax and all support uses
behind East Colfax, such as parking, must be well buffered
with landscaping, berms, and fencing. Additionally,
adjoining uses should be protected from incompatible
lighting and odors. Landscaped buffers should be tied into
the residential streetscaping which will help link the
neighborhoods to Colfax. The residential streetscape
pattern of landscaped parking strips should be extended
along the side streets to East Coif sue. Retail uses should
face only onto Colfax, and should not extend around the
corner onto the side streets.
O DESTINATION AND REGIONAL SPECIALTY USES: uses within the
activity centers should attract both neighborhood residents
and a regional market
o MERCHANT PROMOTIONS: Promotions for businesses within
each activity center should stress the UNIQUE NAME for that
center and could be done jointly, perhaps through a
MERCHANTS ASSOCIATION which is unique to that activity
center
4. AUTO-ORIENTED COMMERCIAL
To reinforce the auto-oriented centers as a key and
compatible element of both East Colfax and the adjoining
neighborhoods, emphasize:
o LINKS BETWEEN VILLAGE CENTERS: the auto-oriented
commercial areas serve as linkages between the village
centers. Their streetscape should emphasize this linkage
o GREENERY ALONG RIGHT-OF-WAY: the streetscape of the
public right-of-way along Colfax should provide significant
landscaping, including a consistent tree canopy which will
serve as:
- LINKAGE AND CONTINUITY: a strong visual and
psychological linkage between the village centers and design
continuity for all of East Colfax
- PEDESTRIAN AMENITY: adding to the comfort and
enjoyment of pedestrians along East Colfax by softening the
street and providing shade and a sense of enclosure
- LINKAGE TO RESIDENTIAL AREAS: helping to visually link
East Colfax to the adjoining residential neighborhoods,
which have large trees visible from Colfax through the deep
setbacks and parking lots of the automobile-oriented uses
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5. DOWNTOWN COLFAX
Recognize and reinforce the connection into Downtown by:
o ENTRANCE TO downtown: reflecting the entrance which
Colfax historically has provided to Downtown
o TRANSITION TO downtown: reinforcing the change in
character and use which occurs between Pennsylvania and
Clarkson.
o "GATEWAY TO DOWNTOWN": building a physical gateway or
market at Pennsylvania to mark the "gateway to downtown"
TRANSPORTATION
1. CORRIDOR
o TRAFFIC COUNT: there are approximately 90,000 cars a day
in the study corridor on 13th, 14th, Colfax, 17th, and 18th.
This traffic must remain in the corridor. Significantly, it
is more traffic than 1-70 carries
o TRANSIT COUNT: East Colfax has more transit use than any
other street in the metropolitan area
o TRANSFERS: major transit transfers occur at York and
Ogden
o CAPACITY AND SPEEDS: capacity and travel speeds are
adequate
O RELATIONSHIP OF DESIGN TO CAPACITY: it is possible to
modify the physical design of Colfax to accommodate the land
use and urban design needs without affecting the capacity of
the street
o TRAFFIC PROJECTIONS: future travel remains within
available capacity
o OPTIONS ON 13TH: option is to remove one lane on 13th,
from Franklin to Logan in order to widen the sidewalks and
allow for streetscaping, without significantly disrupting
the flow of traffic
o AUTO TRAVEL DEMAND: the demand for auto travel within the
corridor can be controlled to some degree by:
- PARKING POLICY AND SUPPLY: controlling the supply of
parking through policy and development regulations
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- TRANSIT USE: meeting the goal of 20% of the trips in
the corridor being on public transit
2. PEDESTRIAN TREATMENT
In order to raise the level of comfort and enjoyment for
pedestrians on Colfax and, thereby, increase the number of
pedestrians, improvements should be made to the pedestrian
treatments along the street. These include:
o NARROWED STREET CROSSINGS: narrowing the width of street
which has to be crossed at any one time with:
SIDEWALK EXTENSIONS: at intersections, extending the
sidewalks farther into the street, providing not only for a
narrowed street, but also for additional landscaping
- MEDIANS: where necessary, providing landscaped medians
which will provide a refuge for pedestrians. The
landscaping in the medians should not detract from the view
to the west of the Capitol and the mountains
- MIDBLOCK CROSSWALKS: where possible and necessary,
providing midblock extensions of the sidewalk and crosswalks
can effect safe*pedestrian crossings
o WIDENED AND IMPROVED SIDEWALKS: depending on specific
building setbacks, street width, and public right-of-way
width, widening and improving some sidewalks can benefit
pedestrians
o DOUBLE-HEADED METERS: providing double-headed meters will
allow additional space between cars and will help simplify
the streetscape
o PEDESTRIAN LIGHTING:in addition to the overhead lighting
which is required for automobile traffic and for crime
prevention, installing smaller-scale pedestrian lighting,
similar to that in Larimer Square, on the 16th Street Mall,
on 17th Avenue, or in front of the Colonnade Building, will
provide a pedestrian scale, comfort, and excitement to the
streetscape
o PEDESTRIAN RIGHT-OF-WAY: lobbying for stronger laws to
give pedestrians priority over automobiles. Once in place,
these laws would have to be stringently enforced in order to
educate local drivers to the rights of pedestrians
o PEDESTRIAN STOP LIGHTS: stop lights, including pedestrian
activated lights, are often the least satisfactory, and in
many cases least safe, of the potential pedestrian
improvements. They should be used only when absolutely
78


necessary, and then, only in conjunction with other more
effective pedestrian treatments
3. VILLAGE CENTER TREATMENT
Each village center should have programs and improvements
which will help emphasize its unique character and will
attract pedestrian and retail activity:
o INTERSECTION DESIGN: improving spaces in the center of
the street and intersection with unique design treatments
o TRANSIT 'ONE HOUR PASS": providing transfers, or passes,
for the 15 and 15 LTD bus which would allow riders to get
off the bus, shop for an hour, and then get back on a bus
for a continuation of their trip or for a return trip
o TRANSIT STOP: improving transit stop siting, design, and
operation. RTD is currently improving the stops for the 15
LTD
o PARKING DISTRICTS: creating a parking district for each
village center in order for the businesses in the center to
have better control of parking rates and hours; to help
consolidate and finance parking facilities, including
parking structures; and to allow better advertising and
access to parking facilities
NEIGHBORHOOD LIVABILITY
If the area is to function as a neighborhood, then it must
be able to attract permanent residents
1. TRENDS
The trends in the neighborhood demonstrate a marked decrease
in its livability
o LOSS 07 HOUSING: there was a 43% decrease in housing
units in North Capitol Hill between 1970 and 1985, a loss of
1803 units. Significant, although smaller, losses also
occurred in City Park West. Housing in Capitol Hill has
been more stable
This loss of housing has been the result of a change in land
use patterns, resulting appreciation of property values,
speculation on the potential for a continuing rise in
values, demolition of housing in response to the
speculation, a rise in the level of crime as a result of the
loss of residents and the change in land use, and a loss of
more residents as a result of the change in the character of
the neighborhoods and the rise in crime
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GOALS
2 .
Overriding goals for the livability of the neighborhoods
include:
o STRONG RESIDENTIAL BASE: strengthening the residential
base of the neighborhoods in order to enhance neighborhood
stability, safety, and character and to provide a permanent
and ready market for neighborhood and Downtown retail
o DIVERSE RESIDENTIAL BASE: diversifying the residential
base in order to diversify and strengthen the neighborhood
by providing a mixture of ownership/rental types, building
types, building age, and housing costs
o NEIGHBORHOODS DISTINCT PROM downtown: reinforcing the
neighborhoods as distinct from, rather than extensions of,
Downtown
In order to accomplish these goals for neighborhood
livability, four areas of consideration must be addressed:
O PUBLIC SAFETY AND MAINTENANCE
o LAND USE
o SCALE AND BULK
o DISTRICTS
3. RATIONALE
The rationale for the proposed program and policies for
reinforcing the residential element of the neighborhoods
and, thus, their livability includes both citywide and
neighborhood concerns:
o CITYWIDE:
a. HOUSING IN THE CITY: fulfilling the need for housing
in the inner city
b. HOUSING IN CLOSE PROXIMITY TO DOWNTOWN: providing
housing in proximity to Downtown, where there is the
greatest concentration of services and amenities, and where
housing can help eliminate a need to travel by auto
O NEIGHBORHOOD:
a. INCREASE IN SAFETY BY INCREASING NUMBER OF PEOPLE ON
THE STREET: increasing the housing in the neighborhood will
80


result in more activity in the neighborhood and bore people
observing that activity. The rise in the level of activity
and of observation will improve the degree of safety
b. INCREASE IN RETAIL BASE: increasing the number and
diversity of housing units and, therefore, of people will
increase and strengthen the retail market
4. PUBLIC SAFETY AND MAINTENANCE
The first area of consideration in re-establishing a strong
residential base for the mixture of uses in the
neighborhoods is improving public safety and maintenance:
o REALITY AND IMAGE OF SAFETY:
- HOUSING BASE OF PROBLEM POPULATION: providing better
management or acquiring poorly managed apartment buildings
will eliminate a source of criminal activity
- INCREASED STREET ACTIVITY: increasing the number and
diversity of people working and shopping in the neighborhood
will help squeeze out the anti-social street activity
5. LAND USE
The second area of consideration in re-establishing a strong
residential base for the mixture of uses in the
neighborhoods is encouraging the appropriate mixture,
density, character, and location of land uses:
O RESIDENTIAL USES AS FOCUS OF DEVELOPMENT: development
and redevelopment primarily focusing on providing a
diversity of types and prices of housing units
o LOCATIONAL ADVANTAGES: building upon the locational
advantages of living close to Downtown and to work, and
thus, creating an urban neighborhood
o EXISTING INFRASTRUCTURE: building upon the advantages of
having the needed infrastructure already in place
o OBSERVATION: designing and building new housing so that
residents can observe street activity on a 24 hour basis,
thus helping to make the area lively and safe
o RESIDENTIAL INFILL: taking advantage of vacant land for
residential infill to help tie together the existing
residential areas, creating pockets of solid residential
character each of which includes a minimum of 200 housing
units
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o CONCENTRATION of RETAIL USES: concentrating retail uses
in existing business zones will help to strengthen the
existing retail areas and to create areas with distinct
retail and residential character. The neighborhoods have a
surplus of parcels already zoned for business
o SUPPORT SERVICES: reinforcing services needed by
residential uses with commercial and retail uses in the
neighborhood
o HISTORIC DISTRICT: designating Swallow Hill and the area
immediately surrounding it as an historic district
(generally, Washington to Downing and Colfax to 18th)
o PRESERVATION OF HISTORIC HOUSES: allowing a mixture of
office and residential uses in historic and other
significant houses will help preserve them and the historic
residential character which they create for the
neighborhood. This may also serve to preserve these houses
for a time when the residential market in the neighborhood
has been re-established and they are returned to residential
uses. At this time, each house should retain at least one
housing unit
o PARKS: supplementing and improving neighborhood access to
and use of existing parks, since the lack of neighborhood
parks is one of the characteristic of the neighborhood which
weakens its residential character and its attraction to
potential residents
6. SCALE AND BULK
The third area of consideration in re-establishing a strong
residential base is establishing an appropriate pattern of
scale and bulk for new development:
o COMPATIBILITY OF SCALE: looking to existing development
patterns within each block and district to establish a
compatible scale for new development
o COMPATIBILITY OF BULK: looking to existing development
patterns within each block and district to establish a
compatible bulk for new development
7. DISTRICTS
The fourth area of consideration in re-establishing a strong
residential base is creating districts within the
neighborhood, each of which can have its own distinct sense
of identity, character, pattern of land uses, scale, and
bulk. Each of these should build upon existing conditions
and potentials. Several of the streets in the neighborhood
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have enough character and potential that they can be
considered districts. Neighborhood districts which require
special planning attention include:
o BROADWAY TO SHERMAN: already a part of Downtown, its
primary land use is office. The streetscape should be a
part of the neighborhood, with a gateway at the transition
between Downtown and the neighborhood, where the street grid
changes and the land rises
o SHERMAN TO PENNSYLVANIA: primarily office land uses, with
high density residential uses and a cap placed on the
building height by the Mountain View Preservation ordinance
o PENNSYLVANIA TO PARK AVENUE: emphasis shifts to
residential uses as the larger share of the mixture, with
preservation of older structures and a lower intensity for
the scale and bulk of uses
o PARK AVENUE TO YORK: retention of the residential
character, with a lower scale and residential office
conversions which preserve the historic character
o HOSPITALS: between 13th and 20th, Pennsylvania to High,
contains hospitals and hospital-related uses. Preserve the
boundaries and emphasize design which is compatible with the
surrounding areas. Provide hospital-related housing of
moderate to high density
o PARK AVENUE: provides needed open space for the
neighborhood. Neighborhood ownership of the parks should be
reinforced, perhaps with decorative fencing of each park.
Parks should be improved with formal landscaping. Land uses
should be primarily residential, serving as a focus for
additional residential development in the neighborhood.
Office uses may be used as an incentive for preserving
historic and significant structures and retail uses may
increase public use of parks, with special attention paid to
the intersections with Colfax, 17th, andi 20th. Gateways may
also be provided at these locations. Density may be higher
than in areas immediately surrounding the street
o 16TH AVENUE: the current residential character of the
street allows 16th to serve as an anchor for additional
residential development in the neighborhood. The street may
also serve as a linear park connecting Downtown with city
Park. Uses should be primarily residential, but office uses
may help preserve historic and other significant structures
o 20th AVENUE: should provide a crucial transition between
Uptown and the Clements and San Rafael districts of the 5
Points neighborhood. Density, scale, height, and bulk
83


should be lower than the uses to the south in order to be
compatible with these districts. Residential uses should
face onto 20th
IMPLEMENTATION
Implementation programs for the concepts developed in the
charette can be divided into three categories: (1) SOCIAL
AND NEIGHBORHOOD CLEANUP ISSUES, (2) COLFAX COMMERCIAL
REVITALIZATION, and (3) RESIDENTIAL REINFORCEMENT AND MARKET
AUGMENTATION:
1. SOCIAL AND NEIGHBORHOOD CLEANUP ISSUES
Resolving social and neighborhood cleanup issues will
require cooperation of both the public and private sectors,
including:
o POLICE PRESSURE: continuing police pressure on areas with
undesirable activities
o LOCAL PARTICIPATION WITH POLICE: cooperating with the
police to locate and eradicate the sources of crime
o DESIGN OF SPACES: designing public and semi-public spaces
so as to eliminate the potential congregation points of
undesirable street activity
o PRESSURE ON BUSINESSES: providing peer pressure on
businesses which serve problem people to eliminate
attractions, products, and services which attract them
o PRESSURE ON LANDLORDS: providing peer and public pressure
on landlords to manage their buildings in a manner which
will discourage illegal and anti-social activities
o ENFORCEMENT OF CODES: enforcing the City's building,
health, and safety codes through a joint public and private
effort, with private sector assistance in monitoring and
reporting violations and public sector enforcement
o ACQUISITION OF PROBLEM BUILDINGS: condemning or otherwise
obtaining problem buildings whose owners do not cooperate in
complying with codes and in crime prevention
O PREVENTION OF OVER-CONCENTRATION OF GROUP HOMES AND
SHELTERS: supporting existing group homes and shelters,
while avoiding locating additional facilities in the
neighborhood
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2
COLFAX COMMERCIAL REVITALIZATION.
#
Commercial revitalization of Colfax has two major elements
PUBLIC IMPROVEMENTS and BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT:
o PUBLIC IMPROVEMENTS: the following questions must be
addressed regarding public improvements:
- WHAT: what improvements should be considered?
WHERE: where should these be located?
- WHEN: When should they be constructed? Can they be
phased?
DESIGN: What is their design? How is it coordinated
along Colfax and with improvements on 13th, 14th, 16th,
17th, and Park Avenues?
- COST: What is the cost, how is that phased, and what
are the financing mechanisms?
- PUBLIC FINANCING AND MAINTENANCE: potential sources
for public financing of design, construction, and
maintenance for the public improvements include:
a. local improvement district
b. metropolitan district
c. City's capital improvement program
d. Community Development Block Grant
e. maintenance district
f. state Highway Department
g. Regional Transportation District
- PRIVATE FINANCING AND MAINTENANCE: potential sources
for private financing of design, construction, and
maintenance of public improvements include:
a. private investment
b. individual maintenance with peer pressure
c. mutual maintenance agreements among businesses
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o BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT: the following questions' should be
answered as the initial stage in the program for business
development:
- MARKET ANALYSIS: what is the potential market for
businesses? How can this market best be captured? What
does this market dictate in terms of the selection of
specific businesses and improvements?
- PROMOTION: how can the neighborhood best market itself
both:
a. to customers
b. to investors and new businesses
- DEVELOPER ORIENTATION: how can the neighborhood best
orient developers with the potentials of the neighborhood,
the current momentum in the neighborhood, and the design and
land use guidelines for the neighborhood?
- FINANCIAL INCENTIVES: which combination of the
following or other financial incentives is most appropriate
for new business and how can neighborhood participation in
each be increased? What strings should be attached to these
financial incentives which will help achieve the
neighborhood and City goals:
a. SBA loams
b. development revenue bonds
c. Urban Development Action Grants
d. CHFA commercial loan program
e. bank participation/commitment program
- STREAMLINED DEVELOPMENT REVIEW PROCESS: how can the
development review process be streamlined to provide
incentives for business development, while assuring
achievement of neighborhood and City goals?
3. RESIDENTIAL REINFORCEMENT AND MARKET AUGMENTATION
Augmenting and reinforcing the market for residential uses
will require consideration of:
o POSSIBLE CHANGES TO DEVELOPMENT REGULATIONS: including:
- REDUCED PARKING REQUIREMENTS FOR RESIDENTIAL USES:
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- REMOVAL OF PARKING AS A USE BY RIGHT:
- REMOVAL OF BONUSES, PREFERENCES, AND INCENTIVES FOR
OFFICE USES:
- REVISIONS TO BUILDING CODE WHICH WOULD FACILITATE
MIXED RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL USES:
- ALLOWING RETAIL IN CONJUCTION WITH RESIDENTIAL USES
ON A SPECIAL REVIEW BASIS:
- ALLOWING OFFICE ONLY BY SPECIAL REVIEW IN SELECTED
AREAS:
o CREATION OF HISTORIC DISTRICTS: creating historic
districts as an incentive for preservation and a recognition
of the historic character of the neighborhood
o PROVIDING CITY FINANCIAL INCENTIVES: potentially
including:
- CONSTRUCTION LOANS:
- DISCOUNTED INTEREST:
- SHARED RISK WITH LENDERS:
o REHABILITATION PROGRAMS: expanding rehabilitation
programs for single family and multiple family housing,
including both owner-occupied and rental units
O ENCOURAGEMENT FOR OWNERS TO PROVIDE ON-SITE PROPERTY
MANAGERS AND TO TAKE RESPONSIBILITY FOR PROPERTY AND
TENANTS: providing both peer and public pressures
O WORKING WITH THE NEIGHBORHOOD TO DEVELOP REGULATORY
CHANGES: sharing the responsibility for developing
programs which will assure the development of new housing
and the retention of existing housing, which will be
acceptable to both the public sector and the private sector,
and which are financially feasible
A. DEMONSTRATION PROJECT
A demonstration program should be established which have the
following characteristics:
o SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO REDEVELOPMENT OF ONE
CONCENTRATED AREA: selecting one area for attention
87


o EMPHASIS PLACED ON EXISTING STRENGTHS: picking an area
for its potential to show quick results because of the
momentum which already exists in the area and the strong
potential of the area to redevelop consistent with the
neighborhood and City goals
o SUCCESS EXTENDED TO ADJOINING AREAS, RESULTING IN
GREATER SUCCESS: providing for expansion of the program
to adjoining areas, eventually to the entire neighborhood
o FOCUS ON THE INTERDEPENDENCE OF COMMERCIAL AND
RESIDENTIAL USES; ADDRESSED AS A UNIT: working toward
both commercial revitalization and re-establishment of the
residential base, character, and attraction of the
neighborhood
o TWO OR MORE AREAS IDENTIFIED, EACH: consistent with the
study completed by RNL for Coifax-on-the-Hill, identify the
areas which have the following characteristics:
- A SECTION OF COLFAX: preferably selecting an area
identified as a village center
- TWO BLOCKS NORTH AND SOUTH INTO THE NEIGHBORHOODS:
. extending the demonstration area into the neighborhoods so
as to include the residential uses and to create the
linkages between the neighborhoods
- WITH EXISTING MOMENTUM: evaluating the existing
momentum and the potential for extending that momentum
- WITH GOOD REDEVELOPMENT POTENTIAL: looking for a
strong historic character and parcels which can be
redeveloped while retaining that character
o COMMITMENT OF PROPERTY OWNERS AND MERCHANTS: selecting
the area where the property owners and merchants are most
willing to commit money and time to the demonstration
program
O LEVERAGING OF PUBLIC FUNDS WITH PRIVATE DOLLARS:
evaluating the potential for each of the areas to leverage
public funds with private dollars and giving consideration
to that leveraging as an indication of commitment
o TARGETING OF CITY ASSISTANCE: directing City services and
financial incentives to the demonstration area
o PRIORITY FOR CITY PROGRAMS: directing City programs, such
as capital improvements programs, to the demonstration area
88


o COMBINING OF FINANCIAL PROGRAMS: combining public and
private financial programs
o POTENTIAL FOR ASSISTANCE FROM DURA IN ASSEMBLING
PROGRAMS: considering abilities of Denver Urban Renewal
Authority to use its special administrative powers to
assemble diverse programs under a single entity
o POTENTIAL TAX INCREMENT DISTRICT: reviewing the current
value of property in the demonstration area, the potential
for an increase in that value, and the potential advantages
and disadvantages of creating a tax increment district to
help finance public improvements
o "FAST TRACK" APPROVALS: reviewing the potential for a
simplified and faster approval process for development
projects within the demonstration area as an incentive for
that development
o PUBLIC IMPROVEMENTS AS FIRST PHASE: providing public
improvements as incentives for the initial private
investment. Further public investment should be contingent
upon the neighborhood and the City successfully developing
and implementing mechanisms for assuring the development of
new housing and the retention of existing housing
o CONCENTRATING EFFORTS FOR LAW ENFORCEMENT: targeting the
demonstation area for crime prevention
3. TEAM
O MARKET ANALYSIS:
PLANNING:
Lee Sammons
Hammer, Siler, George Associates
Bill Lamont
Denver Planning and Development Office
Director
O PUBLIC FINANCE:
Jim Murray
Denver Budget and Management Office
Director of Finance
PUBLIC INFRASTRUCTURE: Ruth Rodriguez
Denver Department of Public Works
Executive Deputy Manager
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o TRANSPORTATION: Tony Gomez-Ibanez Harvard Graduate School of Design Cambridge, Massachusetts Professor Gary Kruger Boeing Computer Services Seattle, .Washington Manager of Transportation Systems Consulting
O URBAN DESIGN: John Kriken Skidmore, Owings, Merril San Francisco, California Urban Planner / General Partner Ron straka benver Planning and Development Office Deputy Director of Planning and Development for Urban Design
4. RESOURCE TEAM
The Resource Team provided background information and staff
support to the Team. Members included:
O CITY COUNCIL: Hiawatha Davis Council Member District 8 Cathy Donohue Council Member District 10 Jennifer Macy Council Aide District 10
O MARKET ANALYSIS: Kathy o*Ray Denver Economic Development Office Economic Development Specialist
o planning: Steve Gordon Denver Planning Office Housing Planner Maggie Sperling Denver Planning Office Deputy Director for Neighborhood Planning
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O PUBLIC FINANCEz
o TRANSPORTATION:
Dennis Swain
Denver Planning Office
Neighborhood Planner
Liz Orr
Office of Policy Analysis
Management Analyst
Dave Baskett
Regional Transportation District
Assistant Director for Planning and
Development
Tom Bastien
Regional Transportation District
Board Member
Dick Bauman
Regional Transportation District
Director of Transit System Planning
and Development
Dick Brasher
Colorado Department of Highways
District 6 Engineer *
Jack Bruce
Denver Public Works Engineering
City Engineer
Jennifer Finch
Colorado Department of Highways
Senior Transportation Specialist
Joanne Goldcamp
Regional Transportation District
Service Planner
Howard McCann
Denver Public Works Operations
Division
Deputy Manager
Jack McCroskey
Regional Transportation
Board Member
Dennis Royer
Denver Public Works Transportation
Division
Acting Director of Traffic Engineering
91


David Williams
Denver Planning Office
Transportation Planner
o URBAN DESIGN Paul David Sebnert
Denver Planning Office
Urban Designer
*
92


B
DRAFT WORK PROGRAM FOR 16TH AVENUE
PROGRAM ELEMENT_______RESPONSIBLE PARTY________TIME FRAME
ONE TASK FORCE
Establish a task force which will:
o involve the neighborhood and other key parties
- neighborhood organizations:
Uptown-on-the-Hill
Colfax-on-the-Hill
CHUN
OMNI
North Capitol Hill Development Corporation
- neighborhood property owners
- neighborhood residents
- hospitals
- YMCA
- Denver Partnership
- City:
Denver Planning Office
Public Works Department
Traffic Engineering
Parks Department
- City Council representatives:
Hiawatha Davis
Cathy Donohue
Bob Crider
Cathy Reynolds
o determine the issues and concerns
o establish the boundaries of the study area
o provide technical assistance, including
solicitation of volunteer and pro bono assistance
o determine the options to be explored
o create a support base
TWO THE CONCEPT FOR 16TH AVENUE
A. Revise draft
B. Circulate for comment by task force
C. Revise draft subject to comments
D. Distribute the revised draft for endorsement by the
task force


Full Text

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u p T OWN NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN DENVER PLANNING AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT AUGUST 1986

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S/04/86 Ul'TOWN NEIGHBORHOOD PUN OF INTRODUCTION A. This Plan is an O;date of 1980 Plan B. Objectives for this Plan c. Process of Developing this Plan ::c::. SETTING FOR GPTmili A. Location B. Strong Edges c Districts D. Existing Character 1. Residents 2. Transportation J. Housing 4. Land Use and Zoning 5. crime statistics HISTORY OF !V KEY PLANNING OPPORTUNl;'I'IES A. MomentUl!l B. Shared Vision c. Proven Interest D. Vacant and Redevelopable Parcels E. Architecturally and nistorically Significant Building F. Excellent Location G. Unique Urban Design Potentials Created by its Street System V. KZY UP'I'OWN PLANNING ISSUES Page J J J 5 5 5 6 6 a 9 9 ll 12 15 15 15 13 13 15 A. Negative Public Image 16 B. The CUrrent Zoning Is Structured in a Way as to Preclude the Creation of a Mixed Use Neighborhood with a Strong Residential Base 17 c. The Most Effective Way to Create the Mixed Use Neighborhood 17 D. Land Use Trends have Destabilized Uptown as a Residential Neighborhood 18 E. No Mechanisms for Achieving the Desired Urban Design Concepts :or Uptown 18 F. No Clear Definition of the Role and Character of the Streets in the N'eighborhood 19 G. Limited Housing Options 19 1

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H. Economic Development could Either Benefit or Harm the Neighborhood 20 VI THE VISION FOR UPTOWN A. Urban Village B. Districts c. Common Framework D. Distinction from Downtown E. Livability F Economic Vitality G. Diversity VII. RECOMMENDATIONS FOR UPTOWN 21 21 21 21 21 21 21 A. Land Use and Zoning 22 1. Housing 22 2. Zoning -R-4 23 3. Zoning -B-2, B-3, and B-4 25 4. Districts 26 5. Administrative Policies and.Procedures 36 6. Retail 37 7. Image 37 8. Historic Preservation 38 B. Transportation 39 c Urban Design 41 o. Parks 43 E. Security .. 44 F. Economic Development 46 VIII. PRIORITY ACTION SUMMARY A. Demonstration Area B. Districts c. Economic Development D. Housing E. Image F Mixed Land Use G. Offices H Parks I. Retail Uses J Security K. Transportation L. Urban Design M. Zoninq IX APPENDICES A. REPORT ON THE CHARETTE B. DRAFT WORK PROGRAM FOR 16TH AVENUE 2 48 48 49 50 52 52 53 54 56 57 59 65 68 69 93

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I. A. PLAN IS AN UPDATE OF THE 1980 NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN This plan updates the neighborhood plan adopted in 1980 for North Capitol Hill and City Park West, now collectively known as Uptown. The 1980 neighborhood plan needed revision because the conditions in the neighborhood .have changed since the plan was developed and because the programs for implementing the plan and the organizations involved in the implementation have evolved significantly since 1980. This and all other neighborhood,plans are consistent with and supplemental to the City's Comprehensive Plan. The comprehensive Plan presents a Citywide perspective, while each neighborhood plan provides more specific guidance both for the allocation of City resources and for the location and design of private development. B. FOR THIS PLAN The City's primary objectives for planning in the study area include: 1. ECONOMIC REVITALIZATION: increasing the momentum for revitalization of economic activity in the neighborhoods surrounding Downtown, in Downtown, and the rest of the City. 2. STABILIZATION AND OF NEIGHBORHOODS: providing neighborhoods which attract permanent residents, employees, and businesses. 3. REINFORCEMENT OF DIVERSITY: reinforcing and expanding the current neighborhood diversity, which encompasses a wide variety of ages, lifestyles, economic circumstances, ethnic groups, and family types. c. PROCESS OF DEVELOPING THE PLAN The plan was developed under the sponsorship of the Denver Planning Office with the participation of the people of Uptown. The Plan incorporates work developed in meetings of the Amenities Task Force,. sponsored by the capitol Community Development Corporation; through the Capitol Hill 1 East Colfax I Uptown Charette, sponsored by the Denver Department of Public Works and the Denver Planning Office; and in meetings specifically directed toward the neighborhood plan, sponsored by the Denver Planning Office. Neighborhood organizations provided essential coordination and resources. These include: Denver's Uptown-on-the-Hill, 3

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,._ ''-Capitol community Development Corporation, Capitol Hill United Neighborhoods (CHUN), Colfax-on-the-Hill, North Capitol Hill Development Corporation, and the Organization for Midtown Neighborhood Improvement (OMNI) 4

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. I I I I -If : ---------r----COUII"" I I I CAUM 1 I UPTO\iVN NEIGHBORHOOD LOCATION MAP 4a

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II. FOR UPTOWN A. LOCATION Uptown is between Downtown and City Park and adjacent to Capitol Hill. It has within walking distance the greatest concentration of employees in the City, the largest retail shopping district, the cultural center for the region, the highest concentration of residents, and two of the City's largest and finest parks. B. STRONG EDGES Uptown has relatively strong edges which help to define the neighborhood. The official boundaries of the neighborhood are Broadway on the west, Colfax on the south, York on the east, and 20th/Downing/23rd Avenue on the north. The western edge is enhanced by a change in the topography and two heavily traveled streets, Broadway and Lincoln. Colfax acts as both a boundary and a connection between Uptown and capitol Park to the south. York Street and City Park on the east create the strongest edge. The northwestern boundary along 20th Avenue works both visually and psychologically. Only Downing/23rd Avenue creates a weak boundary, with similar uses and conditions on both sides of the imaginary line. C. PISTRICTS Within its boundaries, Uptown has districts with distinct characteristics and the potential for further enhancing the urban form by setting individual standards for building height, density, land uses, and design. 1. Downtown Extended: Broadway to Sherman Downtown Extended has the character, intensity, and types of uses found in the Downtown, but has a north/south street grid which is distinct from the diagonal grid on which most of Downtown is located. 2. The Western Front: Sherman to Logan/Pennsylvania The Western Front functions as a transition from Downtown into the rest of the neighborhood. It includes offices, some retail, and residential uses. It is influenced by historic churches, the State Capitol and office buildings, and low to mid-rise apartments. 5

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3. The Village: Logan/Pennsylvania to Park Avenue The Village is less intensely developed and includes more residential structures than are found in either "Downtown Extended" or "The Western Front. 4. city Park West: Park Avenue to York City Park West has a residential character which accommodates office and limited retail uses, as well as housing. s. Hospitals The Hospital District provides support services for the five hospitals and provides buffers for the housing adjacent to its .boundaries. 6. Midtown Midtown is primarily a single family residential area north and east of the hospitals. O. EXISTlNG CHARACTER The majority of information in this section is derived from the 1980 u.s. Census and, therefore, does not reflect the substantial redevelopment which has occurred in the last six years. Where they are available, 1985 figures have been used to provide as up to date analysis as possible. 1. Residents o DECLINING POPULATION: Between 1950 and 1985, Uptown experienced a 59% decrease in its population, dropping from 21,300 in 1950 to an estimated 8,700 in 1985, a loss of approximately 12,600 people. This loss was the greatest in the western end of the neighborhood, .but was more evenly distributed than might be apparent from visual observations. The drop in population was most dramatic between 1950 and 1970, but even between 1970 and 1985, the neighborhood lost approximately 33% of its population, dropping from 13,000 to an estimated 8,700. o SMALLER. HOUSEHOLDS: There were fewer people in the average household in Uptown .than in the average household in Denver as a whole, although the gap narrowed as the average number of people in each household in the city decreased faster than it did for each household in the neighborhood. The size of households increased from west to east across the neighborhood, ranging from estimates of 1.52 person per household to 2.02 persons, with a Citywide estimate for 1985 of 2.33. 6

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f AI ee / RJ :.\ :; [ 1: I r f' rrrp I II I i1"9c I ,_ d 11 1' H A I A I Cfff f'#l( Cillf Park R-3 r i : foil At. 1 113Ut ..,.. I t:r -----A 1 Choeaman Park

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" o LOWER INCOMES: Median household income was far below that for the City and dropped dramatically between 1970 and 1980. This drop occurred throughout the neighborhood. Median household income for the City dropped !rom $16,420 to $15,507, while median household income in the neighborhood census tracts dropped !rom $11,240 to $6,061 in tract 26.01, $10,191 to $6,758 in tract 26.02, $10,603 to $9,578 in 31.01, and $11,477 to $7,237 in 31.02. The per capita income was also below that !or the City, but in all cases but one increased between 1970 and 1980. o KIGBER UNEMPLOYMENT: The civilian unemployment rate in Uptown was far greater than the Citywide rate in 1980, as it also was in 1970. While the 1980 Citywide rate was 5. o %, the four census tracts in Uptown recorded 9.25% (26.01), 9.87% (26.02), 8.19% (31.01), and 9 .69% (31.02). o FEWER FAMILIES: Families comprised a tar smaller percentage of all the households in Uptown than in the City as a whole, averaginq 27% of all the households in Uptown and 56% in the City in 1980. o FEWER MAlUUED COUPLES: The percentaqe of families that are comprised of "married couples" has historically been smaller in Uptown than Citywide. In 1980, comparison was 53% in Uptown versus 77% Citywide. o MORE PEOPLE OVER 65: In 1980, 19% o! the people in Uptown were over 65, compared to 13% in the City. o MORE MALES: Males have comprised a larger percentage of the total population. Of those males, fewer have been married, more have been sinqle, more have been separated, and more have been divorced than in the City as a whole. o FEWER FEMALES: Consequently, Uptown has had a smaller percentage o! females. O! those females, fewer have been married, more have been single, more have been separated, and more have been divorced that in the City as a whole. o MORE EQUAL OF BLACXS AND WHITES: In 1980, Uptown had a more equal distribution of blacks and whites than the City as a whole, although there were still distinctions amonq areas within the neighborhood. 59% of Uptown's population was white, and 29% black, while 75% of the city's population was white and 12% black. Other ethnic desiqnations were similar to Citywide percentages. 7

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o FEWER SCHOOL-AGE CHILDREN AND ADULTS ENROLLED IN SCHOOL: In 1980, only 14% of thepopulation in Uptown was 3 years old and older and enrolled in school. The comparable percentage for the City was 23%. This percentage was lower in the western end of the neighborhood than in the east, ranging from 5% (26.01), to 11% (26.02), 29% (31.01), and 18% (31.02). o FEWER HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES: 74.7% of City residents over 18 were high school graduates in 1980, while percentages of Uptown residents who were graduates ranged between 58.9% and 65.7% for the four census tracts. o MORE MOBILE RESIDENTS: The City has a relatively mobile population, with only 44% of its residents who are older than five living in the same residence that they were in five years earlier. Uptown has an even more mobile population, with only 29% of its residents living in the same residence that they were in five years earlier. The years of comparison were 1980 and 1975. o MORE NEW RESIDENTS FROM OUTSIDE DENVER: 24% of the neighborhood residents had moved from a different metropolitan area. The figure for the City was 14%. o MORE NEW RESIDENTS FROM SMALLER CITIES AND RURAL AREAS: 30% of the residents of Uptown had moved from an area which was not defined as a metropolitan area, versus 18% of all City residents. 2. Transportation o HIGH TRAFFIC VOLUMES: One way streets carry a high volume of traffic through the neighborhood, with the highest volumes being on those streets closest to Downtown. Traffic counts in 1981 show the east/west streets carrying over 60,000 vehicles per day and the north/south streets almost 75,000 vehicles per day. For comparison, the highest traffic on Colorado Boulevard during the same period was approximately 56,000 vehicles per day between Cherry Creek Drive and Exposition. Lincoln and Broadway combined carried 58,000 vehicles per day at 8th Avenue. The highest traffic volumes for each street were Colfax: 23,000; 16th: 6,100: 17th: 15,300; 18th: 14,700; and 20th:5,900; Grant: 9,800: Logan: 7,200; Washinqton: 6,400; Clarkson: 6,700: Ogden: 6,100; Downing: 6,300; York: 11,300; Josephine: 11,200: and Park Avenue: 10,000. o FEWER PEOPLE WHO DROVE A PRIVATE VEHICLE TO WORK: neighborhood residents drove a private vehicle either or as part of a car pool. The comparative figure for entire City was 60%. 8 36% of alone the

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o TWICE AS MANY PEOPLE WHO TOOK THE BUS TO WORK: 22% of the neighborhood residents rode the bus to work, versus 10% of all city residents. o THREE TIMES AS MANY PEOPLE WHO WALKED TO WORK: 24% of Uptown residents walked to work on a reqular basis, while only 7%.of all City residents walked. 3. Housing o ONE SIXTH TEE NUMBER OP RESIDENTS WHO OWNED THEIR HOMES: Only 8% of Uptown homes were occupied by their owners, versus 47% of all Denver homes. o MORE RESIDENTS WHO RENTED THEIR HOMES: 77% of neighborhood homes were rented, compared to 46% of all Denver homes. o TWICE THE NUMBER OP VACANT HOMES: 15% of all Uptown homes were vacant, versus 7% of all Denver homes. o HIGHER MORTGAGE PAYMENTS: The median mortgage payments for homes in Uptown were higher in 1980 than they were for the City.as a whole ($425 for 26.02, $368 for 31.01, and $620 for 31.02 versus a Citywide median of $379). o LOWER GROSS RENTS: Despite higher mortgage payments, median gross rents in 1980 in Uptown were lower than they were for the City as a whole ($144 for 26.01, $152 for 26.02, $225 for 31.01, and $169 for 31.02 versus a Citywide median of $241) 1. Land Use and Zoning o HIGH PERCENTAGE OF NON-RESIDENTIAL LAND USE: In 1985, 58% of the acreage in Uptown was devoted to non-residential land uses, 38% was residential, and 4% was vacant. These percentages varied greatly by census tract, but only tract 31.01 had a higher percentage of residential land uses than of non-residential land uses. o OLD STRUCTURES: In 1985, the majority of buildings in Uptown had been built prior to 1939. In areas zoned R-4, for example, 69% of the structures had been built prior to 1939, with 35% predating 1900 and 34% having been built between 1900 and 1939. The areas which were exceptions to this were those zoned B-3 and B-5. 9

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o EXISTING SQUARE FOOTAGE FAR BELOW THAT ALLOwED BY THE CURRENT ZONING: In 1985, Uptown had approximately 19,500,000 square feet of residential and non-residential structures. Of those, approximately 8,000,000 square feet was located in the B-5 zone in the extension of Downtown into the neighborhood. With the existing zoning in the neighborhood, Uptown has the potential to have approximately 64,000,000 square feet of structures, an increase of approximately 44,500,000 square feet and more than 3 times the current square footage. By comparison, there was approximately 45,000,000 square feet of floor area in all the buildings in Downtown Denver in 1985. The highest absorption rate for office space ever recorded in Downtown Denver was 2.63 million square feet in 1983. By 1985, the absorption rate had fallen to 544,000 square feet per year for the entire Downtown. o EXISTING FLOOR AREA RATIO FAR BELOW THAT ALLOWED BY THE CURRENT ZONING: The current Floor Area Ratio (FAR) for the neighborhood as a whole is 1.25:1. That means the average property owner has erected a structure which has 1.25 times the square footage of the lot on which she constructed the building. The potential FAR for the neighborhood as a whole, including a variety of zoning districts and allowable densities, is 4.12:1. The majority of the land in the neighborhood is zoned R-4, which allows a 4:1 FAR, but the west end is zoned B-5, which provides conditions under which a structure can have up to a 17:1 FAR. As a result, census tract 26.01 has a potential FAR of 7.4:1. o HIGHER DENSITY ON THE WEST END OF THE NEIGR130RHOOD: The existing FAR varies widely through the neighborhood, with the highest in the west end of the neighborhood, where the FAR is 3.25:1. Existing FAR's for the other census tracts include: 0.67:1 for tract 26.02, 0.60:1 for tract 31.01, and 0.73:1 for tract 31.02. 10

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s. crime statistics All statistics are Per 1000 residents in 1984 North capitol Hill city Park West Crimes Rank crimes Rank 'l'ojcaJa 7 "' 9 13 Rgbbe;:;i.es 24.2 "'' 4 Rpe g:;:gnses 9.1 6.1 4 Ag:gravted Assaults 12.7 6 2 9 ;r..a.:cen;i.el 107.7 6 28.2 7 A&:IODS 418 2.2 13 58.0 45 8 Au;o 20.1 8 zo.o 9 1Q7.2 63.8 8 ll

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III. HISTORY OF UPTOWN Uptown experienced a transition from a neighborhood of fashion to one which was shunned because of its image. Recent changes in the neighborhood are helping it to overcome that negative image. Private ownership in the area now known as Uptown began when Ne-sho-wa, a Delaware Indian who in return for fighting for the United States in the 1837 war against the Seminole Indians, was awarded a 160 acre tract of land. Ne-sho-wa's daughter later sold the land for $100 to Albert Clements. Uptown, east to High Street, was part of the city of Denver as established by the Territorial Session Laws of 1864 As Denver's population and wealth boomed as a result of the discovery of gold and silver in the mountains, the City filled up and out, and wealthier Denverites, tiring of the pollution and the activityin the City, began moving to the suburbs on the hill to the east. In 1868, Henry Brown subdivided his homestead that ran from Broadway to Grant Street and from 11th Avenue to 20th Avenue. As an impetus for development of his subdivision, Brown donated land at Broadway and Colfax for the State Capitol. Known as Brown's Bluff, the area became the fashionable neighborhood for Denver. As the city grew, development of the area continued eastward, and in 1883, the remainder of the neighborhood became a part of the City under the Territorial Session Laws of 1883. By 1887, the entire North Capitol Hill neighborhood was platted and development was occurring in new additions. The additions in Uptown were known for their amenities, including views of the City. The Park Avenue Addition, for example, boasted parkways along 17th, colfax, and Park Avenues and Downing. The neighborhood also had the advantages of easy access to the tramway and direct access to the City Ditch, which meandered through the neighborhood, insuring adequate water supplies for landscaping. Uptown quickly established itself as a fine, stable residential neighborhood. Most of the multi-storied homes were constructed of stone or masonry and were grouped in imposing stretches of four to ten houses. In 1887, the section of the Park Avenue Addition which is bounded by 12

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Clarkson, Emerson, 16th, and 17th, was resubdivided as swallow's Resubdivision. swallow Hill, named for Hanna swallow, a prominent real estate developer, still contains excellent examples of historic Victorian, primarily Queen Anne, houses. Although growth slowed following the Depression of 1893, the area was well developed by the turn of the century. While residences were concentrated west of Clarkson, homes were found all the way to York. Uptown was bounded. on the south by what was at one time Denver's most prominent residential street, East Colfax Avenue. East Colfax formed a bridge to Capitol Hill, with little distinction between the two neighborhoods. The development of East Colfax was stimulated by a contract a real estate developer made with the local horse-car monopoly to build an extension of Colfax from Emerson to York real estate developers then bought house sites along the route. During the early years of this century, several changes occurred in the character of Uptown. The first apartments in the City were constructed in the area despite stiff oppositioR to these 'tenements;' critics responded by nicknaming the area flanking Colfax "Flatberg. Health facilities attracted to Denver by its pure air were established in the by 1905, Saint Luke's and Saint Joseph's hospitals were prominent facilities. As the automobile brought increased traffic and shopping into Uptown, Colfax became the primary automobile arterial through east Denver to ever more distant suburbs. The increased exposure resulted in the transformation in the character and use of the Avenue from residential to commercial. In 1929, the first master plan for the City described a large part of East Colfax Avenue as a commercial strip. The population transformation from affluent White, predominantly Anglo-Saxon to more transient minority and ethnic newcomers began in 1930. The Great Depression caused many families to move to smaller homes and large mansions were subdivided, a trend which continued for more than 30 years. The neighborhood also began to attract Irish catholics and Jews. In 1948, when the restrictive covenants that governed the neighborhood were declared illegal, Blacks and Hispanics also began to settle in the area. During the 1960's and 1970's the residential base of the neighborhood suffered the greatest decline; the number of residential units decreased by almost half. Unlike Capitol Hill, which experienced an apartment renaissance of sorts in 13

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the 1960's and 70's, North CapitoFHill became more institutional and commercial. By the late 1970's and early 1980's, the residential base of the neighborhood had been entirely transformed; few single family homes remained and the large renter population was more transient and far poorer than the rest of Denver. In 1980, the City adopted a neighborhood plan for North capitol Hill and City Park West which served as the basis for this plan. The planning process leading to the 1980 plan helped the City and the people of the neighborhood focus on issues and provided an opportunity for diverse interest groups to begin working In the early 1980's the began to change so that by 1986 the neighborhood had developed a momentum which was attracting national attention. The redevelopment of Uptown was creating an inviting inner-city neighborhood with a compatible mixture of uses and a strong core of leaders. Uptown had developed strong neighborhood organizations which represented coalitions of the diverse interests and which provided leadership for the neighborhood renaissance. These organizations worked to initiate and support redevelopment projects, to target the sources of crime in the neighborhood, and to create public relations programs which helped change people's perception of the neighborhood. Uptown began attracting developers with a vision of the neighborhood's potential for residential, retail, and office uses. These developers joined forces with the neighb9rhood organizations to help achieve their common vision for Uptown. The city began targeting its resources to Uptown, helping to initiate projects such as Uptown Village, a mixed-use project with 411 housing units; increased police protection; and streetscape improvements to East Colfax. The City initiated this plan in recognition of the momentum in the neighborhood and its desire to reinforce that momentum. These changes are helping complete Uptown's transition back to a healthy and inviting neighborhood, a neighborhood of fashion. note: material in this section was developed in part from the NORTH CAPITOL HILL STUDY, prepared for the Capitol community Development Corporation and United Bank of Denver, N.A., copyrighted April 1985. 14

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IV. KEY UPTOWN PLANNING OPPORTUNITIES Uptown has assets which can be built upon to help it achieve its goals: A. Foremost among these is the MOMENTUM which the people of the neighborhood have generated. -B. The development of quality projects and the creation of well organized and effective neighborhood organizations have fostered a SHARED VISION for the neighborhood. c. Design and development professionals and neighborhood financial institutions have proven their commitment to this shared vision by committing time and money to its implementation. This PROVEN INTEREST has, in turn, intensified the momentum. D. In addition, the neighborhood has large quantities of VACANT AND REDEVELOPABLE PARCELS E. many ARCHITECTURALLY AND HISTORICALLY SIGNIFICANT BUILDINGS, F. an EXCELLENT LOCATION, G. and UNIQUE URBAN DESIGN POTENTIALS CREATED BY ITS STREET SYSTEM. 15

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V. KEY UPTOWN PLANNING ISSUES The key planning issues which have been identified for Uptown include: A. The neighborhood has a NEGATIVE PUBLIC IMAGE which prevents people from investing, shopping, and living in the area. B. THE CURRENT R-4 ZONING IS STRUCTURED IN SUCH A WAY AS TO PROVIDE INCENTIVES FOR OFFICE USE OVER RESIDENTIAL USE. C. There is A LACK OF CONSENSUS ON WHAT WILL BE THE MOST EFFECTIVE WAY TO CREATE THE MIXED USE NEIGHBORHOOD which is commonly desired. D. LANP USE ACTIONS OVER THE LAST 20 YEARS, MARKET CONDITIONS, AND CITY POLICIES AND PROCEDURES HAVE DESTABILIZED UPTOWN AS A RESIDENTIAL NEIGHBORHOOD. E. There are NO MECHANISMS FOR ACHIEVING THE DES IRED URBAN DESIGN CONCEPTS FOR UPTOWN. F. There is NO CLEAR DEFINITION OF THE ROLE AND CHARACTER OF THE STREETS IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD. G. Uptown provides LIMITED HOUSING OPTIONS, with few opportunities for owner-occupied housing and a limited range of housing types and amenities. SKETCH OF PARKING LOT AND TRASH -Elements of each of these planning issues include: A. ISSUES: NEGATIVE PUBLIC IMAGE This image is based on the real problems with which the neighborhood must deal, including: o CRIME: the number and types of crimes committed in the area o LOTS: the prevalence in the neighborhood of vacant lots and of abandoned and poorly landscaped and maintained properties, including parking lots o TRASH: in public rights-of-way, including alleys and bus stops, and in vacant lots. 16

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B. ISSUES: LIABILITIES OF THE CURRENT ZONING o DISINCENTIVES FOR HOUSING DEVELOPMENT: The R-4 zone, which covers most of the neighborhood, includes disincentives for housing development and encourages land values which are more appropriate for offices than for residential uses. Housing developments, for example, are required to provide open space, while office developments are not. o DOWNTOWN-TYPE INTENSITY: The R-4 zone also provides the potential for downtown-type development (including a 4:1 floor area ratio) throughout the neighborhood, from Broadway to York, without recognizing the transitions in existing and potential character and uses between areas in the neighborhood. o SPECULATION AND DEMOLITION: This potential for Downtown type intensity has encouraged speculation and demolition and has turned the western edge of Uptown into a parking reservoir for Downtown offices. o PARXING LOTS: These problems are further aggravated by a provision in the existing zoning which allows parking lots in Uptown to serve any other use by right permitted in the district', allowing the parking lots in Uptown to provide parking for office_uses located Downtown. o LITTLE DESIGN GUIDANCE: Neither the R-4 zone nor the business zone districts in Uptown provide mechanisms for reviewing the design of new development or redevelopment projects for their compatibility with surrounding uses and the existing and desired character of the neighborhood. o INAPPROPRIATE LAND USES: The B-3 and B-4 zoning districts allow uses which are inconsistent with the existing and potential character of the neighborhood. For example, both districts allow drive-through and fast food businesses, which, unless carefully designed, are generally incompatible with the character of Uptown. Additionally, the B-4 district allows billboards, which are in all cases incompatible with the neighborhood character. C. ISSUES: THE MOST EfFECTIVE WAY TO CREATE A MIXED USE NEIGHBORHOOD These issues raise the questions of the most effective way to create a mixed use neighborhood which will include residential, retail, and office uses and of the appropriate mixture, location and density of those uses: 17

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o STERILE DEVELOPMENTS: Unless these questions are answered, it is feared that redevelopment, rather than reinforcing the area as a neighborhood, will create large, sterile developments which are out of scale with the neighborhood, do not provide for a diverse market, and do not provide the housing necessary both to support neighborhood retail and to create 24-hour activity. o ENHANCING '1'liE MOMENTUM: one of the most significant and difficult challenges, therefore, is how to best meet everyone's needs and create the desired mixed-use neighborhood with a strong residential base, while capturing and enhancing the momentum for redevelopment. p. ISSUES: INSTABILITY .In order to deal with the issue of the most effective way to create the desired mixed-use neighborhood, consideration must be given to the trends which destabilize Uptown as a residential neighborhood and discourage long-term residency: o OF RESIDENTIAL CHARACTER: Key among these trends has been the loss of the neighborhood's residential character, as housing has been demolished or converted to commercial, retail, and office uses and residents have left. o SCARCITY OF NEIGHBORHOOD-SERVING RETAIL: Adding to this is the apparent scarcity of neighborhood-serving retail. Even though many of these uses do exist within the neighborhood, there is a perception that they are scarce or inaccessible. o DEFINITION OF MARKET: If the residential character is to be re-established and there is to be a perception of neighborhood-serving retail uses, then the potential and appropriate housing and retail markets need to be defined for the neighborhood. o EXPANSION OF EMPLOYMENT: Similarly, the locations where the expansion of employment is appropriate and those where conflicts will occur must be identified E. ISSUES: URBAN PESlGN As part of recreating the residential character, a series of issues regarding the urban design in the neighborhood must be addressed: o LACK OF PARKS: Uptown is perceived as having neither parks of its own nor good access to nearby parks. Even though City Park is adjacent to the neighborhood, it is designed as a regional park, does not provide neighborhood 18

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facilities, and has poor pedestrian access. As result, the does not have a feeling of ownership of the park. o There is no that historic and significant structures will be preserved. o INCOMPATIELE SCALE: The appropriate scale for new development in each section of the needs to be determined. This is particularly important since the existing floor area ratio of the buildings in the is far below that which is allowed by the current zoning. The current Floor Area Ratio (FAR) for the neighborhood as a whole is 1.25:1. The potential FAR for the neighborhood as a whole, including a variety of zoning districts and allowable densities, is 4.12:1. (see the discussion on page 10). o NO GUIDANCE: There should be agreement over the extent to which design guidance would be applied to new development and redevelopment and the best method for implementing that guidance. F. ISSVES: STBEETS Closely linked to the urban design issues are a series of street issues: o ROLE AND.CHARACTER: There is a need to clearly define the role and character of each of the streets and to develop a program which will help build upon that role. As part of that definition, some streets need to be designated as pedestrian ways. o TRAFFIC VOLUME: once that role is defined within the context of the entire a clearer perspective can be gained on the most efficient way to deal with the high volume of traffic through the neighborhood and the high percentage of streets in the neighborhood which are currently one way G. ISSUES: HOUSING o AND The continuing demolition and office conversion of existing housing limit the housing options for anyone wishing to live in Uptown. o LIMITED MIXTURE: Furthermore, the housing which does exist provides a limited mixture of housing types and ownership/renter patterns. 19

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o FEW NEW PROJECTS: After years of work by the neighborhood and the City, new housing is only now beginning to be constructed. o NEED TO MARKET UPTOWN AS A RESIDENTIAL NEIGHBORHOOD: For Uptown to be successful in attracting new housing and permanent residents, it must be both reinforced as a residential neighborhood with additional services and amenities and marketed as a desirable place to live. o DIFFICULTY OF PROVIDING NEW LOW INCOME HOUSING: Even as new housing is developed, the diversity of people is threatened because of the difficulty of providing new low income housing. o POORLY MANAGED APARTMENT BUILDINGS: Existing low income housing may be in one of the poorly managed apartment buildings in the neighborhood, limiting its ability to serve the needs of both the residents and the neighborhood and to improve the image of Uptown as a desirable residential neighborhood. H. ISSU)S: ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT As an economic development program is established for Uptown, it must answer the following questions: o RETAIL: What are the extent, type, and configuration of retail development which would be most economically viable in the neighborhood? o RETAIL EXPANSION: How can the retail market for the neighborhood be expanded? o EMPLOYMENT OPPOR'l'lJ'NI'l'IES: What are the type and extent of employment opportunities which should be available in the neighborhood? o UNSKILLED AND SEMI-SKILLED EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES: How can the neighborhood best meet its need to maintain and build upon the unskilled and semi-skilled employment opportunities which are currently available in the neighborhood with the hospitals, the restaurants, and the other retail uses? o NEIGHBORHOOD HOSPITALS: What should be the approach to dealing with the economic health and the aging facilities of neighborhood hospitals and the resulting potential for their closing? 20

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VI. THE VISION FOR UPTOWN The vision for Uptown has the following themes: o ORBAN VILLAGE: emphasizing the potential of Uptown to redevelop as an urban village, providing a living, working, shopping, and recreational environment for a wide variety of people. o DISTRICTS: building on the existing differentiation in the neighborhood, emphasizing the distinct character of each district by providing unique: building densities mixtures of land uses o COMMON FRAMEWORK: linking each district with a common design framework based on the historic character of the neighborhood and providing a cohesive visual image which gives the impression of historical continuity and permanence. o DISTINCTION FROM DOWNTOWN-: enhancing the distinctions from Downtown by providing a greater mixture of land uses at a lower intensity and with a far greater emphasis on housing and historic continuity. o building on the potential for Uptown to provide an inviting, safe, and comfortable urban living environment for individuals and families of diverse ages, incomes, and ethnic backgrounds. o ECONOMIC VITALITY: reinforcing the momentum of redevelopment in the neighborhood and strengthening the employment and retail bases. o DIVERSITY: as redevelopment of the neighborhood proceeds, promoting and encouraging the rich mix and diversity of age, ethnicity and income of residents as valued characteristics of Uptown. 21

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PARK AVENUE VILLAGE CENTERS PARK AV UE NEIGHBORHOOD OPEN SPACE HOSPITAL DISTRICT PROVIDE BUFFERS TO RESIDENTIAL AREAS. 2lb NEIGHBORHOOD VILLAGE IDENTITY COLFAX DIVERSITYPEDESTRIAN AND AUTO ACCESS NEIGHBORHOOD /VILLAGE CENTER AUTO ACCESS COMMERCIAL ..

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VILLAGE CENTERS AND NEIGHBORHOOD CONNECTIONS DOWNTOWN-COLFAX IDENTITY TRANSPORTATION CORRIDOR TYPICAL SIDEWALK IMPROVEMENTS 10 CV'tNe. iet!fdl, : .. ::<_'::: .. .:. .. : .:.:_-._';:: ." AUTO ORIENTED COMMERCIAL LANDSCAPE RECOMMENDATIONS 2lc

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VI:t. RECOMMENDATIONS FOR UPTOWN A. LAND USE AND ZONING PREFACE For many years the vision for Uptown has been the creation of a stable and inviting neighborhood with both a mixture of residential, otfice, and retail land uses and a diversity of incomes and life styles. Instead of attaining this vision, Uptown has experienced a destabilizing inflation of land values which has resulted in the demolition of many buildings and their by surface parking lots. The neighborhood population has decreased from over 21,000 in 1950 to less than 9,000 in 1985 as housing has been demolished or converted to office. The remaining housing provides only a limited mixture of housing types and housing costs. The high cost of land in the neighborhood, coupled with the high cost ot construction and a weakened market, makes it extremely difticult to provide new housing, particularly low income housing. When new buildings are constructed, there is no assurance that they will be compatible with their neighboring land uses or wo!.th the character of the neighborhood. l. HOUSING/RECOMMENDATIONS: Because of the large tracts of land in the neighborhood and its proximity to services Uptown has great potential for providing a substantial number of new housing units in an inviting setting with minimal disruption to existing residents and to the character of the neighborhood. Additional housing is important to retail uses both Downtown and within the neighborhood as a source of customers, and therefore, revenue. Since retail growth is viewed as key to the economic health of Denver, the retention and development of housing in Uptown is critical to the health of the City. To achieve this, a combination of to two areas: l) stabilizing the providing incentives for housing. consideration include: actions must be directed housing environment and 2) Concepts for A. MAINTAIN AND RETAIN EXISTING HOUSING: o FACILITATE HOME IMPROVEMENTS: Retain and expand the existing low-interest loan programs tor single and multiplefamily home improvements. Public funds should be leveraged with private dollars. 22

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o ENFORCE CODES: Enforce existing City health and safety codes. Since code enforcement is and, due to budgetary limitations, will remain on a complaint basis, responsibility for initiating the enforcement process will belong to individuals and organizations within the neighborhood. The responsibility for enforcement belongs to the City. o INCENTrvES FOR RETAINING HOUSING: Consider alternative methods for preserving existing housing and housing structures. Methods might include incentives such as freezing property taxes for housing rehabilitation, development revenue bonds for housing rehabilitation, a demolition tax, a land use tax, or a neighborhood housing trust fund. B. CONSTRUCT NJW HOUSING: o INITIATE FAST TRACX REVl:EW: Institute a fast track review for housing projects in the neighborhood. o PROVIDE CONSTRUCTION LOANS: Create a revolving fund for short-term low-interest construction loans in order to lower the cost of constructing housing. -. c. PROVIDE A BROAQ MIXTURE OP HOUSING TYPES AND O!NERSHIP/RENTER PATTERNS: o EXPAND THE MORTGAGE BOND PROGRAM: Expand the City's current Mortgage Bond Program to include greater participation for condominium and single family owners. o ENCOURAGE HOME OWNERSHIP: A major goal of the plan is to encourage owner occupancy in the neighborhood. 2. ZONING R-4/RECOHMENPATIONS: The R-4 zone district.covers most of the area between Broadway and York, Colfax and 20th. The original intent of this zone district was to create a mixed-use neighborhood very similar to that described in this Plan. However, this has not occurred. The neighborhood has experienced the development of office uses, including the conversion of houses to offices, but it has not had the development of mixed-use projects nor of housing to the extent necessary to create a strong residential base for a mixed-use neighborhood The existing R-4 zoning designation assumes that the same conditions and potentials extend across the entire neighborhood, and in response to that, applies the same land use and design standards to the entire neighborhood. One of 23

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the problems with this results from the fact that, because of the intensity of development allowed in the R-4 District, Uptown has been considered an extension of Downtown. This has created a situation where the value of a parcel is influenced by the redevelopment potential of the land rather than by the value of the structures on the land. In order to recognize and reinforce the distinctions between Uptown and Downtown and among the areas within Uptown, the Plan proposes establishing a process in which the residents and property owners work with the City in reviewing how to better achieve the land use vision for the neighborhood. At. this time, however, there is not a consensus in the neighborhood on changing the R-4 zoning. This effort would consider and address the following: A. BETWEEN UPTOWN AND DOWNTOWN: Recognize and reinforce the distinctions between Uptown and Downtown in bulk, height, land use mixture, setbacks, c-J landscaping, and other design considerations. r' B. REINfORCE THE AHONG TRE Recognize and reinforce the distinctions among the districts within Uptown, providing for variations in the mixture and intensity of land uses and in the allowable heights and densities, while creating neighborhood continuity. C. ENCOURAGE MIXED USE PROJECTS: Evaluate how to allow greater use of retail in office, residential, and office/residential projects where appropriate. D. ENCOqRAGE HOUSING: Evaluate the issue of how to achieve housing as part of new office developments and to limit office conversions at the expense of housing in select areas. E. ELIMINATE DISINCENTIVES: Eliminate the disincentives for housing development and the incentives for office development. P. BALANCE INCENTiVES FOR HOUSING AND OFFICE USES: Balance incentives for housing and other uses, including the requirements for providing open space, to assure that the residential character of the area is preserved and enhanced 24

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, I G. CONSIDER ESTABLISHING A SPECIAL REVIEW PROCESS: consider establishing a special review process to provide flexibility in the development of uses throughout the neighborhood. H. REDUCE PARKING REQUIREMENTS FOR RESIDENTIAL USES: In recognition of the proximity of the neighborhood to the Downtown employment center and of the availability of public transit, the parking requirements for residential uses should be reduced from the current requirement of 1 5 parking spaces per dwelling unit to l/2 to l space per unit, depending on occupancy. I. CONSIDER BEMOVING COMMERCIAL PARKING AS A USE-BY RIGHT: Consider replacing the use by right of both commercial parking and accessory parking with use by special review process in order to assure that parking in Uptown primarily serves the land uses in the neighborhood. J, EXPAND THE LANI)SCAPING REOUIREHENTS: Expand the current landscaping ordinance for surface parking lots to include provisions for interior landscaping. K. ENCOURAGE DESIGN REVJEW: Encourage neighborhood design review processes in areas where property owners and residents feel they are appropriate L. CONSIDER ALTERNATIVE FUNDING SOURCES FOR PARKS: consider alternative methods for funding neighborhood parks, including the potential for establishing a neighborhood parks trust fund which would acquire and maintain park space in Uptown and which could generate funds by establishing a fee which would be paid by new development and which would be a percentage of the total project cost. 3. ZONJNGB-2, B-3 AND B-4/RECOMHENDATIONS: Areas at the southern edge, along Colfax, and within the neighborhood are zoned for business uses, with B-2, B-3, and B-4 zoning. These areas include the majority of retail uses in the neighborhood and are the areas within which new retail uses should be concentrated. B-2, B-3, and however, do have several provisions which are incompatible 25

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. with the character of Uptown and which may necessitate amendments :to the current zoning ordinance. A. RETAIN THE CURRENT BUSINESS ZONE BOUNDARIES: Maintain the same boundaries for the B-2, B-3,and B-4 zone districts in order to encourage concentration of retail and commercial uses. B. CONSzDEn CREATING A SPECIAL ZONE DXSTRICT OVERLAY: consider instituting a special district overlay for the B-2, B-3, and B-4 zone districts as the mechanism for eliminating the provisions within these districts which are incompatible with the character of Uptown and creating mechanisms which will help achieve the goals of this plan. C. ENCOURAGE DESIGN Encourage design review for retail and commercial uses within the B-2, B-3, and B-4 zoning districts in Uptown where neighborhood property owners and residents feel they are appropriate .. p. Eliminate the potential of any billboards, either on-premise or off-premise, and provide an amortization schedule as just compensation for the removal of existing billboards. E. PROHIBIT DRIVE-TRROUGHS: Prohibit new drive-through businesses. F. BEOUXRE LANQSCAPING: Establish landscaping and streetscaping provisions for all uses. 4. DISTRICTS I RECOMMENPATlONS: In response to the size and diversity of the neighborhood, establish and give special planning attention to districts which recognize and build upon the distinctions among the various areas. Several of the streets in the neighborhood are unique enough in character that they ought to be built upon and are, therefore, included in this section. A. BROADWAY TO LINCOLN/SHERMAN: Already a part of Downtown, and zoned B-5, its primary land use is office. 26

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,.. o EMPHASIZE THE TRANSITION: The design of streetscape improvements in this district should be the same as for the improvements in the adjoining districts in Uptown so that it is emphasized as a transitional area between Downtown and Uptown. o RETAIN THE DISTINCTION BETWEEN DOWNTOWN AND UPTOWN: The boundaries of the B-5 zone and of the mountain view preservation area should not be moved any further east. o EMPHASIZE DESIGN: The primary emphasis in this district be on streetscape, design guidelines, and building setbacks and scale. B. LtNCOLH/SHERMAN TO LQGAH/PEHNSXLVANIA: Zoned R-4 and primarily office land uses, with high density residential uses and a cap placed on the building height by the Mountain View Ordinance. o ENCOtTRAGE COMPATiliiLJ:TY: the compatibility of new development with the existing character of this district and with its potential to function a transitional area between Downtown and the rest of the neighborhood. o CONSTRUCT GATEWAYS: Gateways into the neighborhood should be constructed at points of transition, at the top of the rise. These should be at the intersections of Sherman Street with 16th, 17th, and 18th Avenues. o EMPHASIZE DESIGN: The emphasis should be on streetscape, design guidelines, and building setback and scale. o ENCOURAGE HOUSING: Efforts should be directed toward enhancing the mixture of land uses with additional high density housing. o REJ:NFORCE SHERMAN AS A CENTER OP GOVERNMENTAL ACTIVITY IN COLORADO: Sherman Street is a center of governmental activity. This use is reflected in the monumental character of the architecture and of the streetscape. The design of public and private improvements along Sherman should enhance that character by: retaining the current width of the street retaining the predominant building setback continuing the streetscape which predominates in the 1500 and 1600 blocks retaining the current architectural patterns, such as raised entrances. 27

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on the northern side of 20th Avenue at its intersection with Sherman, echoing the southern termination of the street at the Capitol with an important public space which will act as a forecourt for a residential structure in Clements incorporating building materials which are consistent with the character in the lSOO and l600 blocks c. TO PARX AVENUE: This district is beyond the limits of the downtown-type office uses and is. currently home to low density office, residential, and retail land uses. Zoned R-4, the area is heavily impacted by surface parking lots. o ENCOURAGE ROUSZNG: Housing should have a larger share of the total mixture of land use. o ENCOURAGE Older structures should be preservedand renovated for office/residential use. o ENCOURAGE COMPATZBZLZTY: Encourage the compatibility of new development with the existing and potential character and density of uses within the.district. o CONVERT OGDEN AND DOWNING: Proceed with the conversion of Ogden and Downing streets from one-way streets into two way streets, as recommended by the One-Way Street study. o. PABX AYEflOE: Provides needed open space for the neighborhood. Generally zoned R-4, current land uses along the avenue are a mixture of low to moderate density residential, office, and retail. As they are currently configured, the parks do not provide the full sense of visual relief or recreational opportunity of which they are capable. o CONSTRUCT GATEWAYS: Gateways into the neighborhood should be constructed at the intersectiQns of Park Avenue with colfax and 20th Avenues. o ENCOURAGE USES: Encourage the development of new residential uses and the preservation of existing residential uses along Park Avenue. o ENCOURAGE SERVXCES: Limited retail and other commercial uses will be encouraged in order to provide active use of the parks, to create street activity, and to serve the community. These retail and commercial uses should be concentrated at the intersections of Park Avenue with Colfax, 17th, lSth, and 20th Avenues. 28

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o IMPROVE THE PA.RXS: The parks .'along Park Avenue should be improved to increase their visual impact and their utility, to provide an incentive for housing development in the neighborhood, to increase the sense of neighborhood ownership, and to reinforce the parks. A formal planting plan should be instituted to recreate the initial design of individual squares at each intersection, each with a separate identity. o CONSIDER PRIVATE USE OF TEE PARKS: The City should consider waiving the on-site open space requirement for residential projects in lieu of improvements to open space along Park Avenue, if those improvements are accepted by the Director of Planning as consistent with the policies for the Park Avenue streetscape and parks and as equal in dollar value to the required open space. o ENCOURAGE BUILDINGS TO ORIENT TO PARXS: Land uses adjoining the parks along Park Avenue should be encouraged to open onto and make active use of these parks in order to provide additional activity. Buildings along Park Avenue should align with the northjsouth and eastjwest streets. o ENCOURAGE HISTORIC PRESERVATION: Historic, contributing, and significant structures along Park Avenue should be identified and preserved. The density from these may be transferred as unused development rights to properties immediately contiguous to the boundaries of the Park Avenue District if the base allowable floor area ratio in these contiguous areas is lowered from the current 4:1 ratio to a ratio more compatible with the existing character. Office uses may be used as an incentive for preserving historic and significant structures. o DISCOURAGE AUTOMOBILE-ORIENTED USES: There should be no new automobile-oriented retail or commercial uses along Park Avenue, including no drive-through uses, surface parking lots, or parking structures. E. PARK A VENUE TO YORK: This district is currently zoned R-4 and has a mixture of low density office, residential, and retail land uses. The character of the area remains largely residential although many of the older homes have been converted to office uses. o ENCOURAGE HOUSING: Efforts should be directed toward retaining the residential character, and increasing both the number of residential units and the percentage of total land uses which are residential. 29

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o ENCOURAGE COMPATiniLZTY: Encourage the compatibility of new development with the residential character of this district and encourage a balanced mixture of land uses. F. HOSPITALS: Between 18th and 21st Avenues, from Pennsylvania to the alley between High and Race Street, medical-related uses, and generally zoned R-3 and R-4. o RETAIN BOUNDARIES: The district and its uses should be contained within the current boundaries. o ENCOURAGE COMPATIBILITY: The design of the uses within this district should be compatible with the surrounding areas. o BUFFER EDGES: Edges of the district should be buffered with landscaping and a reduction in density to protect the surrounding residential land uses. o ENCOURAGE SHARED PARKING AND PARKING STRUCTURES: Whenever possible, parking should be provided in structures and should be shared among the large institutions and facilities, such as hospitals and City Park. o LIGHTING: Pedestrian lighting should be provided to improve security, comfort, and aesthetics. o ENCOURAGE ROUSING: The City, the hospitals, and the neighborhood should work together to provide hospitalrelated housing. o R.ESTRZC'l' SERVl:CE ACCESS: Whenever possible, service access should avoid residential streets. o CONSIDER R-5 ZONING: study and consider implementing revisions in the zoning ordinance needed to create R-5 or other hospital zoning which would be appropriate the medical institutions located in Uptown. G. MIDTOWN: Primarily a single family residential area north and east of the hospitals and generally zoned R-2 and R-3. o PROTECT RESIDENTIAL USES: No expansion of hospital, retail, or other commercial uses should be permitted north of 21st Avenue or east of High Street. o EMPHASIZE NEIGK'BORHOOD RETAIL ON 22ND: 22nd Avenue should be a neighborhood-serving retail area. 30

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o RESOLVE THE NON-CONFORMING STATUS OF USES ALONG 22ND: currently, all the retail uses along 22nd Avenue are nonconforming uses within the R-2, R-3, and R-4 Zone Districts. The residents and property owners in the area surrounding the retail uses along 22nd Avenue should work with the retail business owners to determine the future of this business district. It the uses in this area are to expand and improve, the area must be rezoned to accommodate retail uses. o MAXE CITY PARTICIPATION CONTINGENT UPON TBE EXISTENCE OF AN ACTIVE CRIME PREVENTION PROGRAM: Rezoning of any parcels along 22nd Avenue and the provision of any public financial assistance the businesses along 22nd Avenue should be contingent upon the business owners, property owners, and residents in the area initiating a program to identify and eliminate the sources of crime in the neighborhood, similar to the program on East Colfax. o REVITALIZE NEIGHBORHOOD BUSINESS: If a strong coalition of business owners and of neighborhood residents and property owners can be formed and if the crime problems in the area are addressed, then the City should consider designating this area as a Neighborhood Business Revitalization Area in order to help generate programs and funding for private and public improvements. H. RECOMMENDATIONS FOR STREETS WHICH CROSS DISTRICT BOUNDARIES: l. COLFAX AVENUE: The main retail area for both Uptown and Capitol Hill, Colfax generally is zoned B-4 and.provides both neighborhood and destination retail uses. The street fUnctions as a barrier between the neighborhoods. o ENC9URAGE DIFFERENTIATION: Build on the existing differentiation in the neighborhood and apply a common framework to reinforce the three distinct activity types on the street: Village Centers: village centers are those areas which are more oriented to pedestrians and which should be encouraged to develop their distinct design character and to attract uses which will serve both neighborhood residents and a regional market. Two village centers are located east of Pennsylvania Street: Park Avenue Village and York Street Village. 31

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Auto-oriented centers: Automobile-oriented centers connect the Village centers east of Pennsylvania and should be provided with streetscape treatments which will create a sense of continuity !or the diverse setbacks, site layouts, building materials, and land uses which comprise these areas. Capitol Complex-colfax: The area from Pennsylvania to Broadway should continue to be oriented to the State capitol District and should have character and land uses which enhance that orientation and the surrounding residential neighborhood o REJ:NFORCE COLFAX AS MAJ:N Colfax should be reinforced as the Main Street !or Uptown, Capitol Hill, and Cheesman Park neighborhoods, functioning as the main neighborhood retail street and a common focus for the adjoining neighborhoods. o ENCOURAGE BOTH NEJ:GBEORHOOD AND DES'rrNA'rJ:ON RETAJ:L: colfax should be both a neighborhood-serving and destination retail street. o ENTERTAIN AUTOMOBJ:LE-ORJ:ENTED USES: Colfax is the only street in Uptown which should ba encouraged to have automobile-oriented, drive-through, and larger scale retail uses, such as grocery stores, automobile service stations and repair shops, home improvement centers, large liquor outlets, etc. o IMPLEMEN'r TliE Cl!ARE'rTE REPOR'r: See the East Colfax Charette Report in the Appendix for a complete description of the definition of role and character for East Colfax. o OESJ:GNATE FOR NEJ:GBEORHOOD BUSJ:NESS REVJ:TALJ:ZATJ:ON: Colfax Avenue should be designated as a neighborhood business revitalization area and for the related funding proqra.ms. 2. 16TH AVENUJ: Although primarily zoned R-4 and accommodating residential and office uses as well as surface parking lots, 16th Avenue retains the character of a residential street. 16th serves as a connection into the neighborhood for pedestrians, bicyclists, and runners. 32

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o ENHANCE THE RESIDENTIAL CHARACTER: 16th Avenue should have a residential character in order to encourage additional residential uses in the neighborhood. To help accommodate this, new uses along 16th should be primarily residential. Any office structures along 16th should be designed with a residential character and should include some residential uses. Any problems with City regulations or procedures which discourage this should be reviewed. o IMPROVE AS A LINEAR PAR.X: 16th Avenue should be designed, improved, and maintained as a linear park, connecting Downtown to City Park; act as a spine for connecting open space linkages; responding to the demand for jogging, walking, and bicycling facilities; and providing an incentive and a focus for housing development in the neighborhood. o CONSIDER 16TH AS AN EXTENSION OF THE 16TH STREET MALL: Improvements to 16th Avenue between Broadway and the Esplanade at City Park should retain the pedestrian character and orientation of the 16th Street Mall and allow 16th Avenue to act as an extension of the mall into the neighborhood. o TARGET F'O"NDING MECHANISMS: Funding mechanisms such as the formation of a special improvement district and of a maintenance district should be given top priority for design, construction, and maintenance of the improvements to 16th Avenue. o DISCOURAGE RETAIL: There should be little or no retail activity on 16th Avenue so that retail uses can be concentrated on Colfax and 17th Avenues and 16th Avenue can retain its residential character. o EMPRASI2E SOLAR ACCESS: Design guidelines for 16th Avenue should emphasize solar access to uses on the street. concepts might include emphasizing and protecting pedestrian and outdoor uses on the north side of the street by widening the sidewalk on the north side of the street to better accommodate pedestrians and joggers, shifting the street to the south side of the public right-of-way, encouraging deciduous trees on the south side of the northern sidewalk, limiting the height of buildings on the south side of 16th to two stories at their northern edge, and providing spaces for outdoor activities on the north side of the street. 33

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3. 17TH AVENUE: B-2, B-3, B-4, and R-4 zone districts help define distinct subdistricts along 17th, which alternately accommodate retail, residential, and office uses. 17th is rapidly redeveloping with new restaurant, other retail, and residential/retail projects. o USES: The areas of retail concentration on 17th Avenue should be separated.by areas of residential and office uses. o REXNFORCE THREE DISTRXCTS: 17th Avenue should have three retail districts which are consistent with the current zoning: Sherman to Clarkson Ogden/Downing to Humboldt/Lafayette Vine to York Within these retail districts, developments should be encouraged to be mixed use projects with residential and office uses. outside of these area, retail uses should be provided only in conjunction with residential units and only to the extent that they comprise a minor percentage of the gross square footage of each project. o PEDESTRIAN CHARACTER: In order to help distinquish 17th Avenue from Colfax Avenue and to help reinforce the urban residential character of the neighborhood, uses along 17th should be pedestrian-oriented. The formulation of desiqn guidelines for 17th should be encouraged to include provisions such as: building placement as close as possible to front property lines discouragement of large setbacks in t=ont of buildings except when such setbacks shall be used for outdoor activities or exclusively for landscaping. no parking in front of buildings. discouragement of parking on the sides of buildings when such parking will be visible from 17th. encouragement of parking behind buildings. discouragement of drive-through restaurants or banks. landscaping of all public rights-of-way and building setbacks. encouragement for including outdoor retail activities. encouragement for buildings to be designed with a scale and materials consistent with the urban residential character of the neighborhood. 34

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I encouragement for storefront windows to allow for viewing of indoorretail activities from the street. o RETAZN TEE PATTERN OF THE CURRENT ZONZNG: The B-2, B3, and B-4 zone districts provide desirable distinctions among the various retail areas along 17th Avenue and should be retained. A special zone district overlay should be created to help make the zoning more compatible with the goals of the neighborhood (see Section A.3. of the plan for details). The residential/mixed use zoning should also be retained to help encourage the concentration of retail uses along 17th and to help retain the mixed-use character of 17th Avenue. This zone district should also be amended to make it more compatible with the goals of this plan. 4. 18TH AVENUE: B-2, B-3, B-4, and R-4 zoning help create a diversity of character and land uses along lSth Avenue, which accommodates residential, office, medical, and retail uses. o IMPROVE PEDESTRIAN CHARACTER: Uses along 18th Avenue should be pedestrian-oriented. (See the same recommendation for l7th Avenue). o KOSPZTAL SOPPORT AND DESTINATION RETAIL: East 18th Avenue should provide hospital-support retail, neighborhood retail, housing, and some Downtown-support uses. 5. 19TH I 20TH AVENUES: Zoned R-4 and B-4, 19th and ioth are both one way streets with office, medical, retail, and residential uses. 19th dead ends at Ogden and 20th changes to a two-way street at Clarkson. 20th provides a critical transition between Uptown and the Clements Historic District. o STUDY CONVERSION TO TWO-WAY STREETS: Review the potential of converting both 19th and 20th from one-way streets to two-way streets. 35

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... ''-o EMPHASIZE COMPATil3ILITY ALONG 20TH AVENUE: 20th Avenue is currently a mixture of institutional, retail, and residential uses. The scale is generally compatible with the uses adjoininq to the north. The street provides a critical transition between Uptown and Clements Historic District, as well as the San Rafael district of the Five Points neighborhood. Density, scale, height, and bulk should be lower than the uses. to the south in order to be compatible with these adjoining districts. Building height should step down from 19th to 20th. Land uses facing 20th should be residential, although ground floor uses could be retail. 6. 13TH AND liTH AVENUES: Zoned primarily R-3, with pockets of B-2 and R-4 zoning, these streets are principally residential but include some neighborhood-oriented retail uses and offices. The high volumes of traffic, coupled with a narrow public right-ofway, negatively impact the quality of the streets for both residential and retail uses. This volume of traffic also reinforces 13th and 14th as boundaries between Capitol Hill, Colfax, and Uptown. Because one of the overriding goals of planning for these neighborhoods is to improve the linkages between them, 13th and 14th ware included in discussions of the East Colfax Charette and the Uptown Neighborhood Plan. o CONSIDER THE SIDEWALKS ON 13TH: Review the option of removing one lane of traffic on 13th Avenue from Franklin to Logan in order to widen the sidewalks and allow for streetscapinq without significantly disruptinq the flow of traffic. o ENCOURAGE STREETSCAPING: Streetscaping should be encouraged to help mitigate the impacts of automobile traffic and to help reinforce the importance of pedestrians by softening the streetscape and adding pedestrian amenities. o IMPROVE CHARACTER: Uses along 13th and 14th should be pedestrian-oriented. (See the detailed recommendation for 17th Avenue). 5. ADMINISTRATIVE POLICIES AND PROCEDURES/ RECOMMENDATIONS: some city administrative policies treat Uptown and other mixed use neighborhoods more as commercial neighborhoods than as residential Trash collection, for example, can occur at earlier hours in a mixed use neighborhood, creating potential hardships for residents. 36

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o SO AS TO ENHANCE THE CHARACTER: The provision of City services should be at a level which will meet the needs of an intensely developed mixed use neighborhood, but primary concern should be given to providing services in a manner which enhances the residential character of the neighborhood. Trash collection, for example, should be provided during the same daytime hours it is provided in single family residential neighborhoods. o AMEND TBE CODE TO ENCOURAGE MIXED USES: Building code provisions should be changed to facilitate the mixture of uses in individual buildings and projects. o AMEND THE BUILDING CODE TO ENqOURAGE REHABILITATION: Building code provisions should be changed to facilitate the rehabilitation of older buildings. o SIMPLIFY THE POD (PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT) PROCESS: so that through its simplicity and short time frame it is viewed as a desirable process for initiating development, while providing for neighborhood review. 6. RE1AIL I RECOMMENDATIONS: Retail uses in Uptown will be most successful if they are concentrated where they are most visible, have the best access, and can develop unique identities. o CONCENTRATE RETAIL USES ON EAST/WEST STREETS: Retail uses should be concentrated on the most heavily travelled east/west streets: Colfax, 17th, and 18th Avenues. Small pockets of retail could also be on 19th Avenue from Pennsylvania to Pearl; 20th Avenue from Broadway to Clarkson; Park Avenue at the intersections with Colfax and 17th, 18th, and 20th Avenues; and 22nd Avenue from Downing to Gilpin. No retail should be located on 16th Avenue. o CONCENTRATE RETAIL USES AROUND BUSINESS DISTRICTS: Retail uses should be concentrated around present retail development. 7. IMAGE I Uptown suffers from a negative public image which, while based on the real problems with which the neighborhood must deal, exaggerates the problems and does not acknowledge the improvements which are being made in the neighborhood. 37

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o MAINTAIN AN INVENTORY: Continue inventorying sources of crime; poorly maintained vacant lots, vacant and abandoned buildings, and parking lots; and sites which need landscaping. o USE THE AVAILABLE TOOLS: Target City regulatory, enforcement and financial programs to eradicate the sources of crime; to improve poorly maintained vacant lots, vacant and abandoned buildings, and parking lots; and to improve sites which need landscaping. o CONTINUE THE PUBLIC RELATIONS PROGRAM: Support an ongoing public relations program to inform the public of changes in the neighborhood and of the additional assets of Uptown in order to attract residents, developers, and shoppers. o TRASR: Explore ways to reduce litter and to remove litter in vacant lots and in public rights-of-way, including streets and alleys. a. HISTORIC PRESERVATION I RECOMMENQATIONS: North Capitol Hill and City Park West both have rich histories and a legacy of many architecturally and historically significant buildings. Since these historic structures help create a distinctive character for Uptown, their preservation is essential to the ability of the neighborhood to redevelop as a mixed use neighborhood with a unique urban character. O EMPHASIZE HISTORIC PRESERVATION: Because of the contribution of the historic and architecturally interesting buildings to the historic fabric, and, therefore, to the unique character and redevelopment potential of Uptown, their preservation should assume top priority in reviewing development proposals, proposing capital improvements, and allocating funding. o INITXATE AN HISTORIC SURVEY: To aid in the identification and preservation of historic, significant, and contributing buildings, an update of the Historic Building survey has been initiated for Uptown. o PROPOSE HISTORIC DISTRICTS: Swallow -Hill is being reviewed for submission as a proposed historic district. Other areas in the neighborhood, such as the area along York and Gaylord, also should be reviewed for potential historic district designation. 38

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... o EXPAND UPON THE HISTORIC RESIDENTIAL CHARACTER: The historic residential, commercial, and institut"ional character of the neighborhood should provide the basis for both public and private streetscape improvements. Consistent with this, streetscape design guidelines should include: wide building setbacks a landscaped planting strip along all property lines which abut street rights-of-way flagstone or flagstone colored sidewalks granite curbs, where feasible o CONSIDER TD TRANSFER OF DEVELOPMENT RIGR'l'S (TDR' S): A program should be considered for the transfer of development rights from historic districts within Uptown to properties within adjacent areas of the neighborhood. This would necessitate a revision to the allowable floor area ratios, perhaps providing a lower base figure in adjacent areas with the potential for bonuses from TOR's. o PRESERVE TEMPLE EMANUEL: Preserve, operate, and maintain Temple Emanuel as a cultural asset for the neighborhood. o EXPLORE PRESERVATION STRATEGIES: Explore additional interim preservation strategies for historically significant structures. B. TRANSPORTATION I RECOMMENDATIONS: Because of its proximity to the demograhics of its residents; the density of its housing; the availability of sidewalks, excellent bus service, and bicycle lanes; and its proximity to parks and parkways, Uptown's transportation issues and recommendations emphasize not only automobiles, but also pedestrians, public transit, bicycles, and runners. According to l9Sl traffic counts, north 1 south streets in Uptown carried almost 75,000 vehicles per day and east 1 west streets carried over 60,000 vehicles per day. According to the 1980 census, Uptown had twice the City average for people who took the bus to work and three times the City average for people who walked to work. Sixteenth Avenue has become a major connection for pedestrians, runners, and bicycles. 1. INCREASE TRANSIT RIDERSHIP I RECOMMENDATIONS: o ENCOURAGE BUS TRANSFERS: Continue one hour, same direction, bus transfers on East Colfax.

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o EXPAND EXPRESS BUS SERVICE: Maintain express service on East Colfax. o r.MPROVE TRANSIT STOPS: RTD is currently improving stops for the 15 LTD. Streetscape improvements throughout the neighborhood should include better siting and design of bus stops. 2. INCREASE BICYCLE RIDERSHIP I RECOMMENDATIONS: o PROVIDE BICYCLE RACXS: Design guidelines for Uptown and for east Colfax should include the provision of standardized bicycle racks both as part of streetscape improvements and of new developments and redevelopments. 3. INCREASE PEDESTRIAN TRAFFIC I RECOMMENDATIONSl Improvements to the eastjwest streets should emphasize increasing the comfort and enjoyment of pedestrians. Priority should be given to pedestrian improvements along Colfax and 16th Avenues. Specifically: o ENFORCE PEDESTRIAN RIGHT-OF-WAY: Enforce Denver laws which give pedestrians the right-of-way over automobiles, educate the public to these laws, and institute significant fines for violations. o EMPHASIZE PEDESTRIAN STREETS: Identify Sherman, Pennsylvania, Emerson, and Franklin as north/south pedestrian linkages into the neighborhoods. Make improvements which will encourage pedestrians to use these streets. 4. ADD TRAPliC IMPROVEMENTS I RECOMMENDATIONS: o rMPROVE TRAFFIC FLOW: Study and make improvements which will improve the flow of automobile, pedestrian, and bicycle traffic on and across Colfax, 13th, 16th, 17th, and Park Avenues and Sherman Street. Pedestrian improvements should include marked crosswalks and signs warning drivers to yield to pedestrians and to keep crosswalks clear for joggers and pedestrians. 5. RESTRUCTURE PARXING: o ESTABLISH PARKING DISTRICTS: Investigate the feasibility of establishing parking districts for East Colfax and East 17th Avenue as a means for providing centralized parking which is readily visible and accessible, which is commonly owned, which can be located to minimize possible disruptions to the surrounding land uses, and which 40

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can be managed to best meet the needs of the businesses, residents, and visitors to area facilities and institutions. o RETAIN ON-STREET PARKING: Whenever possible, on-street parking should be retained as the parking which is most readily visible to customers and which helps retain the neighborhood quality of the streets by buffering the sidewalks from the flow of traffic. o BUFFER PARXING STRUCTURES: Where appropriate, parking structures which adjoin retail streets should be required to have ground level retail fronting on these streets. o INSTXTUTE PARKING PERMITS: Residential parking priority permits should be studied for potential implementation and areas which are limited to short-term parking should be expandedto discourage all day parking by Downtown office workers. o RETAXN LOADXNG ZONES: Loading zones should be retained in the retail areas. C. ORBAN DESIGN I RECOMMENDATIONS: Urban desiqn recommendations are essential to the implementation of the goals for Uptown because they help respond to the most critical issues facing the neighborhood: image, livability, and compatibility of land uses. l. PROVIDE DESIGN GUIDANCE I RECOMMENDATIONS: o ENCOURAGE THE DEVELOPMENT OP ORBAN DESIGN GUIDELINES: The neighborhood and the City should work together to develop urban desiqn guidelines which will encourage compatibility of a mixture of uses within the neighborhood and within individual developments. Development along the boundaries between districts and between neighborhoods should be compatible, though distinct from, the character of the development in the adjoining district or neighborhood. 2. DISTINGUISH UPTOWN FROM SURROUNDING NEIGHBORHOODS I RECOMHENDATIONS: o PROVIDE GATEWAYS: Included within thestreetscape improvements should be gateways at points of entry into the neighborhood. Key points of entry are delineated in Section a.4., Districts. 41

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o BUILD UPON THE TRADITIONAL ORIENTATION OF BUILDINGS: To maintain an important design characteristic of the neighborhood and to help define the role of each of the streets, more intense development is recommended on east;west streets and less intense development on the north/south streets. Exceptions to this would be appropriate for the retention of less intense historic, contributing, and significant structures on east;west streets, to protect solar access to east;west streets, and to protect the pedestrian east;west streets. o THE STREETSCAPE: Streetscape improvements, including street lighting, planting, and signage should be designed to help distinguish the neighborhood, the districts within the neighborhood, and the role of each street. As such, elements of continuity, such as street lights, will link the entire neighborhood, while other elements will help distinguish Park Avenue, 16th, 17th, Colfax, and Sherman. o BUILD UPON TRE MOON'l'AIN VIEW AND ABUNDANCE OF SUNSHINE: Mountain views and the abundance of sunshine are two characteristics which help distinguish Denver from other cities. To help enhance these distinctions: the Mountain View Ordinance will be consistently enforced. sidewalk cafes, sidewalk vendors and other creative use of the public right-of-way will be encouraged through revisions to the existing zoning code and administrative changes to the rules for revocable permits to use public rights-of-way. 3 IMPROVJ; THE LilflQ\GJ!S BETWEEN Tm; DIS'l'EICTS AND BETWEEN THE FOCAL POINTS BOTH WITHIN AND OUTSIDE THE HEIGRBORHOOD I RECOMMENDATIONS: o PROVIDE PEDESTRIAN LINKAGES: The interrelationships among the neighborhood districts and between Uptown and its adjoining neighborhoods will be improved by providing a series of physical, visual, and psychological linkages. These linkages should connect focal points, such as City Park, Cheesman Park, Clements Park, and the Civic center. They should take the form of pedestrian linkages, as outlined in the Transportation section, B. Neighborhood linkages should be connected with those in other neighborhoods in order to create a pedestrian network. 42

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4. IMPROVE TRE IMAGE OF PARKING LOTS: Consider programs which will the image, safety, and function on parking lots by the lighting, maintenance, and landscaping of the existing and future lots. D. PARKS I BECOMMENPATIONS: Uptown is perceived as having neither parks of its own nor good access to either City Park or Cheesman Park. The only public parks which do exist in the neighborhood, those along Park Avenue, are not of a sufficient size nor designed to function as active parks which can meet the recreational needs of the neighborhood. 1. IMPROVE EXlSTING PARKS I RECOMMENDATIONS: o REVIEW TliE POTENTZAL FOR CI'l'Y PARK TO BET'l'ER SERVE THE NEIGHBORHOOD: The proposed City Park Master Plan should include consideration of the perimeter of the park for improvements which would allow it to function as a neighborhood park for the eastern end of Uptown, as well as for the other surrounding neighborhoods. o INCREASE 'I'1IE trriLITY OF PARX AVENtTE AS A LINEAR PARK: The sense of neighborhood ownership of the squares along Park Avenue should be reinforced, perhaps with low decorative fencing of each park. Either installation of a landscaped median or extension of the parks into the existing right-of-way should be considered as a means for softening the impact of the street and improving the perception of Park Avenue as a linear park. The unique identity of each of the squares should be recreated with a formal landscaping plan and by reinstituting the names originally given to each square. For further details see Section A.4., Districts. 2. IMPROVE TRE LINKAGES I RECOMMENDATIONS: o IMPROVE TRE LINKAGE TO CI'l'Y PARK: Installing landscaping and other pedestrian treatments on 16th and 17th Avenues will help improve the linkage between Uptown and City Park. The key to an improved linkage, however, may be providing better pedestrian crossings of York Street. These crossings could be improved by designating crosswalks with paint or a change in pavement; by providing uniform streetscape improvements, including pedestrian lighting, on both sides of the streets; or by installing pedestrianactivated traffic signals. 43

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o IMPROVE THE TO CHEESMAN PARK: Installing uniform pedestrian treatments, including pedestrian lighting, along Franklin street south of Colfax, and along Park Avenue will connect into 16th and 17th Avenues and will help improve the linkage between Uptown and Cheesman Park. 3. DEVELOP INTERIM PARKS I RECOMMENDATIONS: o LOTS: Improving vacant lots as interim parks will eliminate visual blight and provide desirable park space. 4. CONSIDER ACQUIRING NEW PARKS ANO RECREAT+ON FACILITIES I RECOMHENQATJONS: o REVIEW THE FEASIILITY OF NEW PARKS IN CITY PARK WEST: I! it is determined in the process of developing the City Park Master Plan that the Park cannot function as a neighborhood park for the surrounding neighborhoods while continuing to function as a regional park, then new neighborhood parks should be developed in the-eastern end of Uptown. Any new parks should provide facilities specifically directed to the elderly and families with children, at a minimum providing benches and playgrounds. o THE FEASIILITY OF NEW PARKS IN NORTE CAPITOL KILL: Access from the western end of the neighborhood access to Cheesman and City Parks is more difficult. New parks could be either public or private, should be related to the linkages along 16th and 17th Avenues and should be .large enough to have a significant impact on the neighborhood. The cost of maintenance of these parks should be a major consideration. o PROVIDE RECREATIONAL FACILITIES: Work with the Denver PUblic Schools to open the recreational facilities at East High School for use by the neighborhood. Use agreements for school facilities should include provisions for improvement and maintenance of the facilities. E. SECURITY I RECOMMENPATIONS: The recommendations below will require the cooperation of a coalition of neighborhood residents, business owners, property owners, and City departments. It will also require the institution of design guidelines for new construction of private and public structures. To this end: 44

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1-''-..... l. TARGET THE SOURCES OF CRIME I RECOMMENDATIONS: o BARS: Neighborhood organizations should continue working with the City to monitor bars and other potential sources of crime. o ENCOURAGE BETTER MANAGEMENT OF RENTAL ROUSING: Neighborhood organizations should continue working with the City to monitor the management of rental housing by monitoring crime statistics for individual buildings and building code and fire code violations, and then working with the building managers and owners to improve the management of these buildings. o LDUT THE NOMBER OF ABANDONED BUILDINGS AND VACANT LOTS: Neighborhood organizations should continue working with the City to limit the number of abandoned buildings and vacant lots and to improve the maintenance of buildings which are abandoned and of lots which are vacant. 2. ENCOURAGE PROGRAMS WH+CR WILL RELP ERAPICATE CRIME I RECOMMENDATIONS: o ENCOURAGE PUBLIC EDUCATION: Programs should be provided to educate the public to security issues and programs. o ENCOURAGE POLICE PRESSURE: Police should continue to apply pressure to neighborhood buildings and businesses which have illegal activities. o APPLY PRESSURE TO LANDLORDS: Peer and public pressure should be applied to landlords to manage their buildings in a manner which will discourage illegal and anti-social activities. Apartment owners should be encouraged to provide on-site property managers. o APPLY PRESSURE BUSINESSES: Police and peer pressure should be applied to businesses which serve problem people to eliminate the products and services which serve as attractions. o ACQUIRE TROUBLESOME BUILDINGS: The programs and authority of the City and the Denver Urban Renewal Authority (DURA) should be used to purchase or, if necessary, to condemn buildings on which public and private efforts have failed to encourage the property owner to repair and rehab il ita te. 45

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,.. '-.,.. 3 INCREASE THE SENSE OF OWNERSHIP I RECOMMENDATIONS: o INSTITUTE NEIGDORROOD WATCll: Neighborhood organizations should work with t h e Denver Police to promote both residential and commercial Neighborhood Watch programs throughout Uptown. 4. FACILITATE NEIGHORHOOD SURVEILLANCE I RECOMMENDATIONS: o ENCOURAGE TWElrrY-FOtlR ROOR ACTr7ZTY: The zoning in the neighborhood will be revised to provide incentives for mixed use development as a generator of twenty-four hour activity. 5. DEVELOP URBAN DESIGN GUIDELINES I RECOHMENPATIONS: o INCREASE Tm: SENSE OF NEIGRBORROOD OWNEltSRIP: New housing and all other new development should be designed to increase the sense of ownership of streets and of the neighborhood as a whole. To help accomplish this, individual housing units and offices should open directly t o the street, overlook the and have individual yard space. o ENCOURAGE SURVEILLANCE OF TKE STREETS: development should be designed to overlook the street in order to facilitate surveillance. o ENCOURAGE SURVEILLANCE OF BUILDINGS: Conversely, all development should be designed to facilitate surveillance from the street. This should include the provision of pedestrian lighting in public areas such as parking lots. r. ECONOMIC DEYELOPMEHT I RECOMMENDATIONS: Private economic development in Uptown and the potential for building upon the potential for public 1 private financial cooperation was a motivation for the Planning Office in initiating a neighborhood planning effort. o ENCOURAGE NEW BUSINESS: Encourage entrepreneurship and small business and service activity by individuals; generate jobs and help small firms to expand. Target Skyline funds for a public/private loan pool for new businesses. o IMPROVE EXISTING BUSINESS: Preserve and improve existing commercial areas in preference to creating new business d istricts or expanding existing areas. 46

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o ENCOURAGE EMPLOYMENT DIVERSITY : Encourage a diversity of employment for the widest possible range of skills. Help retain and expand existing sources of unskilled and semiskilled employment such as the hospitals and restaurants. o STUDY SALES TAX GENERATION: Initiate a study of the sales tax generated in the neighborhood as baseline data for evaluating changes resulting from neighborhood and City actions. o IDENTIFY THE EXISTING MARXET: Identify and tap the existing retail market. o EVALUATE TEE POTENTIAL FOR A NEW BUSINESS INCUBATOR: Evaluate the potential for a business incubator in the neighborhood which might specialize in new medical-related businesses. 47

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VIli PRIORITY ACTION SUMMARY PROGRAM RESPONSIBLE PARTIES A. DEMONSTRATION AREA ALL PUBLIC PROJECTS IN TBE NEIGHBORHOOD SO AS Mt1Clt AS IS FEASIBLE, Tm:Y WILL FOCOS ON A AREA WRICl! IS CENTERED ON THE VJ:LLAGE CENTER PARX AVENUE AND WRICl! EXTENDS FROM l3Tli TO l7Tli AVENUES. B. piSTRIC'l'S PLANNING OFFICE PUBLIC WORXS ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AGENCY COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT AGENCY DENVER HOUSING AO'l'RORITY DENVER tnmAN RENEWAL AGENCY l. CONSIDER AMENDING Tm: CURRENT ZONING TO RECOGNIZE AND REINFORCE THE SPECIAL CHARACTER OP EACH OP TEE DISTRICTS IN OPTOWN. 48 IMPLEMENTATION TASX FORCE PLANNJ:NG OFFICE ZONING ,..

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PROGRAM RESPONSIBLE PARTIES 2 ESTABLISH VILLAGE CENTERS ON COLFAX A VENUE AT PARK AVENUE AND YORX STREET: design, fund, build, and maintain the public and private improvements which will distinguish the village centers. a. DEVELOP DESIGN PLANS AND FINANCING PLANS PUBLIC WORKS PLANNl:NG OFFICE PROPERTY OWNERS b. FORM IMPROVEMENT DISTRICTS PUBLIC WORXS PLANNING OFFICE PROPERTY OWNERS c. FORM MAZNTENANCE DISTRICTS PROPERTY OWNERS PUBLIC WORXS PLANNl:NG OFFICE C. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 1. TARGET SKYLINE FUNDS TO A REVOLVING LOAN FUND FOR NEW BUSINESSES IN UPTOWN. POOL Tm:: AVAILABLE PUBLIC FONDS WITli PRIVATE DOLLARS. MAYOR'S OFFICE PLANNING OFFICE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AGENCY 2. EVALUATE THE POTENTIAL FOR A BUSINESS INCUBATOR IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD WHICH MIGHT SPECIALIZE IN NEW MEDICAL-RELATED BUSINESSES. 49 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AGENCY

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?ROGRAM 3 I:NJ:'l'IATE A ST'ODY OF TRE SALES TAX GENERATED IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD AS A BASELINE FOR EVALUATION OF CHANGES RESULTING FROM NEIGRBORROOD AND CITY ACTIONS p. HOUSING BUDGET AND MANAGEMENT 1. ESTABLISH A RERABILITA'l'ION TASK FORCE TO EVALUATE THE CITY BOILDING CODE AND TO RECOMMEND CHANGES TO THE CODE AND CITY PROCEDURES WHICK WILL FACILITATE THE RENOVATION OF ROOSiltG. PLANNING OFFICE COALITION 2. TARGET SKYLINE FUNDS TO A REVOLVING LOAN FUND FOR NEW AND REHABILITATED ROUSING IN UPTOWN. MAYOR'S OFFICE PLANNING OFFICE 3 TARGET TRE NEIGHBORHOOD FOR ROUSING MAIN'n:NANCE, REHABILITATION, AND NEW CONSTRUCTION PROGRAMS. DENVER ROUSING I AUTXORJ:'l'Y COMMO'NI'l'Y DEVELOPMENT AGENCY DENVER URBAN RENEWAL AO'I'RORITY 4. ESTABLISH A NEIGHBORHOOD HOUSING TASK FORCE WHICK WILL IDENTIFY CURRENT HOUSING PROBLEMS AND ESTABLISH PROGRAMS FOR DEALING WI'l'X TREK. PLANNING OFFICE COALITION 50

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' ........ PROGRAM RESPONSIBLE PARTIES S. CONSIDER AMENDING THE CURRENT ZONING TO PROVIDE INCENTIVES FOR HOUSING. IMPLEMENTATION TASK FORCE PLANNING OFFICE ZONJ:NG 6. RETAJ:N AND EXPAND TRE EXJ:STING LOW INTEREST LOAN PROGRAMS FOR SJ:NGLE AND MULTIPLE FAMJ:LY HOME IMPROVEMENTS. PLANNING OFFICE 7. DEVELOP INCENTIVES FOR RETAINJ:NG HOUSING. CITY COUNCIL PLANNING OFFJ:CE PtmLIC WORKS 8. INJ:TrATE CJ:TY ENFORCEMENT OF HEALTH AND SAFETY CODES. COALITION 9. CONSIDER INJ:TIATING A FAST-TRACK REVIEW PROCESS FOR HOUSING PROJECTS IN UPTOWN AND OTHER INNER-CITY NEIGliBORROOOS. PLANNING OFFICE ZONING lO. CREATE A FUND FOR SHORT-TERM LOW-INTEREST CONSTRUCTJ:ON LOANS. PLANNING OFFICE ll. EXPAND TKE CITY'S MORTGAGE BONO PROGRAM TO INCLUDE GREATER PARTICIPATION FOR CONDOMINIUM AND SINGLE-FAMILY OWNERS. -CITY COUNCIL PLANNING COUNCIL 51

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PROGRAM RESPONSIBLE PARTIES E. l. IDENTIFY THE POSITIVE AND NEGATIVE ASPECTS OF TRE NEIGHBORHOOD. COALITION PLANNING OFFICE 2. ESTABLISH ON-GOING MECHANISMS FOR MAltiNG POSITIVE CHANGES AND ELIMINATING NEGATIVE ASPECTS. COALITION PLANNING OFFICE 3. INITIATE AN ON-GOING PUBLIC RELATIONS PROGRAM TO INFORM TEE PUBLIC OF THE MECHANISMS FOR CHANGE, THE RESULTING CHANGES, AND THE ADDITIONAL ASSETS OF UPTOWN COALITION F. MIXED LAND USES l. ENCOURAGE THE DEVELOPMENT OF ORBAN DESIGN GUIDELINES FOR COMPATIBILITY OF USES WITHIN THE NEIGHBORHOOD AND WITHIN INDIVIDUAL DEVELOPMENTS DESIGN GUIDELINE TASK FORCE PLANNING OFFICE 2. CONSIDER AMENDING THE ZONING TO ENCOURAGE A MIXTURE OF USES, A CONCENTRATION OF USES IN ORDER TO CREATE AREAS WITH DISTINCT CHARACTER, AND HOUSING AS THE LARGEST COMPONENT OF THE MIXTURE OF USES 52 'IMPLEMENTATION TASK FORCE ZONING ADMINISTRATION PLANNING OFFICE

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PROGRAM RESPONSIBLE PARTIES 3. APPOINT A TASK FORCE TO REVIEW THE CITY'S BUILDING CODE AND INITIATE CHANGES WHICR WILL FACILITATE MIXED OSE PROJECTS. MAYOR'S OFFICE PLANNING OFFICE 4. EVALUATE THE PROVISION OF CITY SERVICES FOR THEIR ABILITY TO MEET THE NEEDS OF A MIXED USE NEIGHBORHOOD, WITH AN OVERRIDING CONCERN FOR THEIR COMPATIBILITY WITH THE RESIDENTIAL CRAUCTER OP THE NEIGlmORl:IOOD. PU13LIC WORKS COALITION PLANNING OFFICE G. OFFICES 1. ENCOURAGE THE DEVELOPMENT OF URBAN DESIGN GUIDELINES FOR THE COMPATIBILITY OP OFFICES WITH TEE CHARACTER OF THE NEIGRBORHOOD. DESIGN GUIDELINE TASK.FORCE PLANNING OFFICE 2. CONSIDER AMENDING THE ZONING CODE TO ALLOW RETAIL IN OFFICE, RESIDENTIAL, AND OFFICE/RESIDENTIAL PROJECTS WHERE APPROPRIATE AND ON A SPECIAL BASIS. 53 IMPLEMENTATION TASK FORCE ZONING ADMINISTRATION PLANNING OFFICE

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PROGRAM RESPONSIBLE PARTIES 3. CONSIDER AMENDING THE CURRENT ZONING TO PROVIDE A SPECIAL REVIEW PROCESS FOR ALL PROPOSED OFFICE USES H. 1'1\RKS IMPLEMENTAT!ON TASK FORCE PLANNING OFFICE l. IMPROVE CITY PARK TO INCREASE ITS ABILITY TO SERVE AS A NEIGHBORHOOD PARK FOR THE SURROUNDING NEIGHBORHOODS, AS WELL AS A PARK WHICH SERVICES THE ENTIRE METROPOLITAN AREA PARKS DEPARTMENT COALITION 2. IMPROVE THE LINKAGES TO CITY PARK AND TO CHEESMAN Pl\RK ALONG l6TR AVENUE, 17TH AVENUE, PARK AVENUE, FRANKLIN STREET, THE ESPLANADE, AND ACROSS YORK STREET PUBLIC WORKS PARKS DEPARTMENT PLANNING OFFICE COALITION 3 IMPROVE l6TR A VENUE AS A LINEAR PARK CONNECTING DOWNTOWN TO CITY PARK a. ESTABLISH A l6TR AVENUE TASK FORCE PLANNING OFFICE PUBLIC WORXS PARKS DEPART!o!ENT COALITION b. DEVELOP DESIGN IMPLEMENTATION PLANS AND FINANCING PLANS 54 16TH TASX FORCE

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. .._-PROGRAM c. FORM IMPROVEMENT OISTRICT(S) d. FORM MAINTENANCE DISTRICT(S) RESPONSIBLE PARTIES PUBLIC WORKS l6TH AVENUE TASK FORCE PROPERTY OWNERS PUBLIC WORKS l6. '1'll AVENUE TASK FORCE PROPERTY OWNERS .f.. IMPROVE 'l'RE PAlUtS ALONG PAlUt AVENUE, IN CONJUNCTION WITH STREETSCAPE IMPROVEMENTS a. DEVELOP DESIGN IMPLEMENTATION PLANS AND FINANCING PLANS PARKS DEPARTMENT PUBLIC WORKS PLANNING OFFICE COALITION b. FORM OISTRICT(S) PUBLIC WORKS PLANNING OFFICE PROPERTY OWNERS COALITION c. FORM MAINTENANCE OISTRICT(S) P'Ol3LIC WORKS PLANNING OFFICE PROPERTY OWNERS COALITION 55

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PROGRAM RESPONSIBLE PARTIES 5. DEVELOP INTERL"i PARKS ON VACANT LOTS -COALITION 6. ACQUIRE NEW NEIGHBORHOOD PARKS -COALITION PARKS DEPARTMENT PLANNING OFFICE 7. CONSIDER AMENDING THE ZONING TO REQUIRE THE PROVISION OF PUBLIC PARK SPACE IN NEW DEVELOPMENTS, OR FEES IN LIEU OF THE ACTUAL PROVISION OF PARK SPACE IMPLEMENTATION TASX FORCE ZONING ADMINISTltATION PLANNING OFl'ICE B. PROVIDE RECREATIONAL TACILITIES FOR UPTOWN I. RETAIL USES PARXS DEPARTMENT DENVER PUBLIC SCROOLS COALITION APPLY FOR NEIGHBORHOOD BUSINESS REVITALIZATION AREA (NER) DESIGNATION FOR EAST COLFAX. 56 COLFAX-ON-THE-HILL PLANNING ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AGENCY

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PROGRAM RESPONSIBLE PARTIES 2. MAKE STREETSCAPE IMPROVEMENTS WlUCR WILL ENHANCE TRE IMAGE OF TRE RETAIL AREAS. COALITION POBLIC WORKS PLANNING OFFICE 3. CONSIDER AMENDING THE ZONING TO ALLOW MORE FLEXIBLE OF RE'l'AZL USES IN MIXED RESIDENTIAL/RETAIL PROJECTS. TASK FORCE PLANNING OFFICE 4. ENCOO'RAGE 'l'liE DEVELOPMENT OF URBAN DESIGN GUIDELINES FOR 'l'BE CREATION OF A DISTINCT IDENTITY FOR EACR RETAIL AREA. J. SECURITY DESIGN GUIDELINE TASX FORCE COALITION 1. FORM A COALITION -create a coalition of neighborhood organizations and interests to coordinate efforts with police to identify the sources of crime and to implement programs which will eradicate crime. NBRHD. GROUPS 2. PARTICIPATE WITH POLICE -cooperate with the police to locate and eradicate the sources of crime. COALITION 3. IDENTIFY THE SOURCES OF CRIME -identify and target the sources of crillle POLICE COALITION 57

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PROGRAM RESPONSIBLE PARTIES 4. EDOCATE THE PUBLIC provide programs which will educate the public to security issues and programs. POLICE COALI'riON s. APPLY POLICE PRESSURE -continue police pressure on areas buildings, and businesses with illegal activities. POLICE 6. APPLY PRESSURE TO LANDLORDS -provide peer and public pressure to landlords to manage their buildings in a manner which will discourage illegal and anti-social activities. owners should be encouraged to provide on-site managers. POLICE COALI'riON 7. APPLY PRESSURE TO BUSINESSES -provide and peer pressure on businesses which serve problem people to eliminate attractions, products, and services which attract them. POLICE COALZTJ:ON a. APPLY PRESSURE TO AGENCIES -apply public pressure to public and publicly funded agencies such as mental health association, H.O.D. and community corrections agencies, to assure that their facilities do not compromise neighborhood safety or the viability of the neighborhood. COALITION CITY 9. ACQUIRE TROUBLESOME BUILDINGS -use the programs and authority of the City and the Denver Urban Renewal Authority (DURA) to purchase or, if necessary, to condemn buildings on which public and private efforts have failed to encourage the property owner to repair and rehabilitate. CI'rY COALITION 58

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PROGRAM RESPONSIBLE PARTIES 10. ENCOURAGE THE DEVELOPMENT OF ORBAN DESIGN GUIDELINES -encourage new developments to overlook the street in order to facilitate surveillance, to facilitate surveillance from the street, and to _create a sense of ownership of the neighborhood and each public space. X. TRANSPORTATION DESIGN GUIDELINE TASX FORCE 1. MONITOR THE CHANGES IN TRAFFIC VOLUME: PtmL%C WORKS PLANNING OFFICE _2 S'l'UDY AND MAXE IMPROVEMENTS Wli%CR WILL IMPROVE TEE FLOW OP AUTOMOBILE, PEDESTRIAN, AND BICYCLE TRAFFIC ON AND ACROSS COLFAX, l3'l'K, l6TR, l7'l'll, AND PARX AVENUES: a. DEVELOP DETAILED PROTOTYPE STREETSCAPE TREATMENTS: PtmUC WORKS PLANNDlG OFFICE COALIT%0N COLORADO DEPARTMENT OF HIGHWAYS RTD b. DEVELOP AND SECURE FUNDING FOR STREETSCAPE TREATMENTS : 59 PtmLIC WORXS ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AGENCY

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PROGRAM RESPONSIBLE PARTIES PLANNING OFFICE PROPER'rY OWNERS COLORADO DEPARTMENT OF HIGHWAYS RTD c. EV1LUATE AND SELECT A FINAL DESIGN AND DEVELOP A STAGED IMPLEMENTATION PLAN: 3. PAIUC:NG: a. ESTABLISH DISTRICTS ].). RETAIN ON-S'rltEET PARKING P'Ol3LIC WORKS PLANNING OFFICE PROPERTY OWNERS COLORADO DEPARTMENT OF BIGRWAYS R'l'D COALITION P'Ol3LIC WORKS PLANNING OFFICE COALITION c. CONSIDER REDUCING THE PARKING RATIO TKROOGK CHANGES TO TliE ZONING 60 IMPLEMENTATION TASK FORCE PtJBLIC WORKS PLANNING OFFICE

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PROGRAM RESPONSIBLE PARTIES d. CONSIDER ELIMINATING COMMERCIAL PARKING AS A USE-BY IN THE R-4 ZONE. IMPLEMENTATION TASK FORCE PLANNING OFFICE a. ENFORCE AND Erl'END 'l'ltE CURRENT LANDSCAPING ORDINANCE INCLUDE PROVISIONS FOR INTERIOR LANDSCAPING COALITION ORBAN DESIGN TASK FORCE PLANNING OFFICE !. REQUIRE PARKING STRUCTURES WEICH ADJOIN RETAIL STREETS TO HAVE GROUND LEVEL RETAIL FRONTING ON STREETS IMPLEMENTATION TASK FORCE ORBAN DESIGN TASK FORCE PLANNING OFFICE q. RESIDENTIAL PARKING PRIORITY PERMITS AND EXPAND SHORT-TERM PARKING TO DISCOURAGE ALL DAY DOWNTOWN OFFICE PARKING PUBLIC WORKS h. MAINTAIN LOADING ZONES IN RETAIL AREAS PUBLIC WORKS 4. 61

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. PROGRAM RESPONSIBLE PARTIES a. FINALIZE AND IMPLEMENT lS LTD TRANSFER STATION STOPS ON COLFAX AVENUE: RTD PtTBLIC WORKS PROPERTY OWNERS b. CONTINUE l HOUR, SAME DIRECTION BUS TRANSFERS ON COLFAX A VENUE: RTD c. MAINTAIN PURE EXl'RESS SERVICE ON COLFAX A VENUE: RTD d. MAD STREETS CAPE IMPROVEMENTS WHICR WJ:LL INCLUDE BETTER SITING AND DESIGN OF BUS STOPS TRROOGROUT THE NEIGRBORROOD. PtTBLIC WORKS RTD COALITION S. PEDESTRIANS a. ENFORCE DENVER LAWS WKICR GIVE PEDESTRIANS TliE RIGRTOVER AUTOMOBILES, EDUCATE THE PUBLIC TO TRESE LAWS AND INSTITUTE SIGNIFICANT FINES FOR VIOLATIONS POLICE DEPARTMENT b. IDENTIJ'Y PEDESTRIAN LINRAGES NOR'l'R AND SOU'l'R INTO TRE NEIGHBORHOODS. 'l'RIS SROOLD INCLUDE SHERMAN, PENNSYLVANIA, EMERSON, AND FRANKLIN STREETS. PROVIDE STREETSCAPE IMPROVEMENTS WHICH WILL ENCOURAGE PEDESTRIANS TO TRESE STREETS. PUBLIC WORKS PLANNING OFFICE 62

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PROGRAM RESPONSIBLE PARTIES 6. BICYCLES a. PROVIDE IMPROVED MAINTENANCE ON BICYCLE PATHS, REMOVING GRAVEL AND OTRER DEBRIS WITR A REGULARLY SCHEDULED MAINTENANCE PROGRAM. PUBLIC WORXS b. THE SIGNAGE FOR THE BICYCLE SYSTEM. PUBLIC WORXS c. ADD NORTR/SOUTR CONNECTIONS TO THE BICYCLE SYSTEM. PUBLIC WORXS 7. JOGGERS ADD AND WIDEN SIDEWALXS AND OTHER STREETSCAPE IMPROVEMENTS TO ACCOMMODATE JOGGING LOOPS ON l6TR/PARX/FRANKLIN/CREESMAN, 16TR,ESPLANADE/CITY PARX, AND l6TR/PARXS/20TR/SBERMAN. PlmUC WORXS PARXS PLANNING OFFICE 8. l.3TR AVENUE: a. DEVELOP DETAILED PLAN FOR REBUILDING: PUBLIC WORXS PLANNING OFFICE b. SEEX PRIVATE FUNDING MATCH: PUBLIC WORXS PLANNING OFFICE PROPERTY OWNERS 63

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PROGRAM RESPONSIBLE PARTIES 9 l6TR AVENUE RESTRICT l6TH AVENUE TO LOCAL AUTOMOBILE TRAFFIC AND TRE PEDESTRIAN, JOGGING, AND BICYCLE FACILITIES. PUBLIC WORKS PARKS COALITION PROPERTY OWNERS PLANNING OFFICE lO. l9TR/20TR AVENUES STUDY TliE CONVERSION Oi' l9'rl! AND 20TH AVENUES TO TWO WAY TRAFi'IC. PUBLIC WORKS 11. OGDEN/DOWNING STREETS CONTINUE WITR THE CONVERSION TO TWO WAY TRAFFIC. PUBLIC WORKS 12. SHERMAN a. LEAVE SRERMAN AS A -TWO WAY STREET inTR ON-STREET PARKING. PUBLIC WORXS b. STREE'l'SCAPE IMPROVEMENTS WliiCll WILL IMPROVE TEE PEDESTRIAN QUALITY OF THE STREET. PUBLIC WORKS STATE 64

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PROGRAM RESPONSIBLE PARTIES L. URBAN DESIGN ENCOURAGE THE ESTABLISHMENT OF AN URBAN DESIGN TASX FORCE WHICH WILL DEVELOP DESIGN GUIDELINES FOR OPTOWN PLANNING OFFICE COALITION 2. CONSTRUCT PUBLIC AND PRIVATE AMENITIES AND. IM:ROVEMENTS a. DEVELOP DESIGN PLANS AND FINANCING PLANS PLANNING OFFICE PUBLIC WORXS COALITION b. FORM DISTRICTS PlmLIC WORXS COALITION PROPERTY OWNERS c. FORM MAINTENANCE DISTRICTS PlmLIC WORXS COALITION PROPERTY OWNERS 2. PRESERVE HISTORIC AND OTHER SIGNIFICANT STRUCTURES 65

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PROGRAM a. RESPONSIBLE PARTIES INVENTORY HISTORIC AND OTHER SIGNIFICANT STROCTORES PLANNING OFFICE R:ISTORIC DENVER COLORADO RISTOR:ICAL SOC:IETY b. ESTABL:ISR HISTORIC D:ISTR:ICTS PLANNING OFFICE HISTORIC DENVER COAL:IT:ION PROPERTY OWNERS c. CONS:IDER AMENDING THE ZON:ING TO INCLUDE PRESERVAT:ION MECRAN:ISMS, SOCll AS A MERGED ZONE LOT PROCEDURE AND TBE TRANSFER OF DEVELOPMENT R:IGRTS WITX:IN SELECTED AREAS IMPLEMENTATION TASK FORCE PLAmnNG OFFICE d. LOBBY FOR FEDERAL AND STATE TAX -CITY LOBBYIST COALITION e. PRESERVE, OPERATE, AND MA:INTA:IN TEMPLE EMANUEL AS A COLTORAL EVENTS CENTER 66 PEARL STREET TEMPLE EMANUEL FOONDATION

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PROGRAM RESPONSIBLE PARTIES PLANNING OFFICE DENVER HOUSING AUTHORITY CITY COUNCIL MAYOR'S OFFICE COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT AGENCY ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AGENCY DENVER ORBAN RENEWAL AUTHORITY COALITION 3 ENCOURAGE 'l'HE DEVELOPMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION OF DESIGN GUIDELINES SPECIFICALLY CREATED FOR UPTOWN DESIGN GUIDELINE TASX FORCE PLANNING OFFICE 4. ENCOURAGE THE ESTABLISHMENT OF A DESIGN PROCESS PLANNING OFFICE COALITION S CONSIDER AMENDING THE ZONING TO INCLUDE DESIGN REVIEW 67 IMPLEMENTATION TASK FORCE PLANNING OFFICE

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. PROGRAM RESPONSIBLE PARTIES 6 THE FOR ISSUING REVOCABLE PERMITS TO ENCOURAGE TRE USE OF PUBLIC RIGHTS-OF-WAY FOR PUBLIC AND SEMI-PUBLIC OUTDOOR USES. PUELIC WORKS 7 ESTABLISH NEIGHBORHOOD GATEWAYS ON EAST COLFAX, 16TH, l7TR, lS'rlt, AND PAIUt AVENUES: DEVELOP DESIGN IMPLEMENTATION PLANS AND FINANCING 0 liqhti.nq: PtmLIC WORRS PLANNING OFFICE o art: STATE o street furniture: PROPERTY OWNERS o sidewalk extension: PROPERTY OWNERS 8. SEEX TO DEVELOP THE SI'l'E AT THE NOR'l'liERN END OF SHERMAN STREET FOR A VISUAL TERMINUS. THE SITE SHOULD BE DEVELOPED AS AN IMPORTANT PUBLIC SPACE WHICH WILL ACT AS A FORECOORT FOR A HIGH DENSITY HOUSING PROJECT DESIGNED FOR COMPATiniLI'l'Y WITH TEE CLEMENTS HISTORIC DISTRICT. M. ZONING DENVER ORnAN RENEWAL AUTHORITY DENVER HOUSING AOTRORITY PLANNING OFFICE l. ESTABLISH AN IMPLEMENTATION TASK FORCE WRICH WILL MAKE RECOMMENDATIONS ON FURTHER IMPLEMENTATION OF THE PLAN. PLANNING OFFICE COALITION 68

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I IX. APPEND:ICES A. REPORT ON THE CHARETTE INTRODUCTION l. A CHARETTE IS A WORRSHOP A charette is a workshop which extends over several days, has a closely defined purpose, an at its last public meeting, presents a report on its consclusions. 2 THE CHARETTE WAS BELD ON SEPTEMBER 3 4 AND 5 The charette was held on September 3, 4, and s, at the Temple center, 16th and Pearl. A team of specialists in marketing, planning, public finance, publicinfrastructure, transportation, and urban design directed the process. 3. SPONSORSHIP The Charette was sponsored by the DENVER OF POL:IC WORXS and the DENVER PLANNING OFFICE. Additional support was provided by United Bank of Denver. Coordination was provided by Capitol Hill United Neighbors (CHON), Colfax-on-the-Hill, and Denver's Uptown-on-the-Hill Association. 4. CQRGE The City's charge to the Charette was to DEVELOP POLICIES AND A STRATEGIC PLAN which would accommodate the transportation needs of East Colfax, while enhancing the revitalization of the commercial uses along East Colfax and of the adjoining neighborhoods. These policies and strategies are to serve as a model for other commercial strips which adjoin residential neighborhoods and which serve as major traffic arteries. S. StzMMARY OP IgfY RECOMMENDATIONS o TRANSPORTATION: Despite the heavy traffic through the neighborhood, the design of the streets can be improved so that they will efficiently carry automobiles, while at the same time providing a comfortable and inviting environment for pedestrians. Emphasis will be placed on PEDESTRIAN o REVITALIZATION OF COMMERCIAL USES: The commercial uses in the neighborhood will best be served by REINFORCING THE EXISTING DIVERSITY OF BOTH THE DESIGN CHARACTER AND THE TYPE OF BUSINESSES. There are two main types of businesses, 69

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those businesses which are oriented more to pedestrians and those which are oriented more to automobiles. This distinction results in a diversity of design, character, and of comfort level for pedestrians. Discernable patterns should be reinforced by establishing VILLAGE CENTERS, the areas which contain the businesses which are oriented more to pedestrians. These centers will be encouraged to develop their distinct design character and to attract uses which will serve both neighborhood residents and a regional market. One of these village centers will serve as the focus of a .DEMONSTRATION AREA,. which will extend north and south into the neighborhoods and link the residential and retail uses. It will also create linkages between the neighborhoods and serve as a tarqet area for City assistance. The programs and momentum established in the demonstration area can then be extended into the surrounding areas, possibly initiating a second target area. Eventually these programs could extend throughout the entire neighborhood. Those areas containing businesses which are oriented more to automobiles should be heavily landscaped. The landscaping should include a row of trees along the street, which will help lead the eye to the mature trees in the adjoining residential area and, therefore, help visually link Colfax and the neighborhoods,. The landscaping will also help provide an attractive environment forpedestrians. o REVZ'l'ALIZA'l'ION OP ADJOINING NEIGKBORHOODS: The revitalization of the adjoining neighborhoods is, in part, dependent upon the revitalization of East Colfax, and vice versa. For East Colfax to meet its full potential as a retail area, it must be bordered by healthy residential neighborhood. While capitol Hill is a healthy residential neighborhood, it must be protected. Uptown, on the other hand, has lost much of its housing and must be re-established as a stable residential neighborhood. A major effort must be made to develop new HOUSING in Uptown and to protect existing housing in both neighborhoods. Efforts at providing new housing will be concentrated in the DEMONSTRATION AREA. 5. MOTIV1\TION The motivation for the charette was to build upon the: o MOMENT'OM: the current momentum in the neighborhood, generated by: NEW BUSINESSES NEW DEVELOPMENTS REDEVELOPMENTS 70

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NEIGHBORHOOD ORGANIZATIONS o FOR REINFORCING MOMENTUM: coordination of public and private efforts will help reinforce the current momentum -o NEW AWARENESS: there is a new awareness on the part of both the public and private sectors as to the potentials of the neighborhood, the need for defining areawide issues and for developing coordinated solutions to those issues, and the advantages of joint cooperation and commitments o CLEAN-UP OP CRIME: the neighborhood organizations have been extremely effective at identifying many of the sources of crime and working with the City to eliminate them o EFFORT: private planning projects have laid the groundwork for a neighborhood-wide land use, transportation, and urban design charette. These planning efforts include: RNL STUDY: an urban design study which developed streetscape and facade treatments for East Colfax, funded by colfax-on-the-Hill, with assistance from the City's Economic Development Agency LARRY LEVI S'l'ODY: a land use study for East colfax, funded by United Bank's Capitol Development Corporation CAPITOL DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION: a series of amenities studies, providing neighborhood leadership for 16th Avenue improvements, streetscape improvements on 17th Avenue, the development of parks and interilD. parks, and the improvement of the transportation and parking system in the neighborhood 6. SETTING The setting with which the charette dealt was: o COLFAX CORRIDOR: the focus of the charette was East colfax, its functioning as a retail street and as an arterial, and its relationship to the surrounding neighborhoods. As such, the boundaries for the study were from 12th Avenue to 20th Avenue and from Broadway to Clayton o "MAIN STREET": Colfax is the "Main Street" for the surrounding neighborhoods. One of the goals of the charette was to finds ways for Colfax to improve its functioning as a Main Street 71

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o CHARACTER: the character of East Colfax can Qe described as: COMMERCIAL STRIP: Colfax is a commercial strip, the market for which is diverse, serving the following markets: a. pass through, depending on the through traffic on Colfax and the surrounding arterial streets b. neighborhood, serving the residents of the adjoining neighborhoods c. community-wide, providing services beyond the adjoining neighborhoods to the entire metropolitan area 4. unique regional, serving as a unique urban street with a regional reputation local employees, providing services for employees who work both in adjoining neighborhoods and in Downtown TRANSIT CORRIDOR: East Colfax has the heaviest bus ridership of any corridor in the metropolitan area CRITICAL LINK: Colfax provides a critical transportation and commercial linkage for the surrounding neighborhoods and for Downtown 7 OBJECTIVES The primary objectives for planning in the study area include: o ECONOMIC REVITALIZATION: increasing the revitalization of economic activity along East Colfax and in the adjoining neighborhoods o STABILIZATION AND REVITALIZATION OF NEIGHBORHOODS: providing neighborhoods which attract permanent residents, employees, and businesses o REINFORCEMENT OF DrvERSITY: reinforcing and expanding the current neighborhood diversity, which encompasses a wide variety of ages, lifestyles, economic circumstances, ethnic groups, and family types 72

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.,_-COLFAX l. VYSION The vision for East Colfax and the neighborhood has two themes: o EXISTING buildinq on the existing differentiation in the neighborhood, emphasizinq the distinct character of each activity center by providing unique: DESIGN GUIDELINES PEDESTlUAN MERCHANTS o COMMON FRAMEWORK: linking each activity center by a common design framework and, by this, to the surrounding neighborhoods The results of buildinq on the existing differentiation in the neighborhood and of applyinq a common framework is to recognize and reinforce: o THREE DISTINCT TYPES: CENTERS: there are two villaqe centers east of Pennsylvania Street: a. Park Avenue Village b. York street Village ACTO-ORIENTED CENTERS: auto-oriented centers connect the Village Centers east of Pennsylvania Street CAPITOL COMPLEX-COLFAX: west of Pennsylvania, East Colfax takes on a character and uses which are oriented to the capitol Complex 2 EXISTING CHARACTER Colfax is now characterized by: o a diversity of land uses; markets; building aqe, setbacks, height, bulk, and materials; architectural styles; and degree of orientation to automobiles and pedestrians 73

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o IDENTIFIABLE CLUSTERS OF ACTrviTY: which are centered at: COLFAX AT PARK AVENUE: COLFAX AT YORK STREET: These activity clusters are characterized by: PEDESTRrAN ORIENTATION, with buildings at the rightof-way line REHABILITATION ACTr7ITY NEIGHBORHOOD-SERVING BOSINESSES, which also serve a larqer area o AUTOMOBILE ORIENTED AREAS: between the activity clusters are areas oriented to automobiles, with: in trent of the businesses UNFRIENDLY character and desiqn for pedestrians o Dr7ISION IN CHARACTER AND USE: the key division is that between an area with the character ot Downtown and one with the character of an urban neighborhood. Separating these clusters of activity are areas which are auto-oriented WEST OJ' PENNSYLVANIA: CAPITOL COMPLEX-COLFAX: this area has: a. orientation to the Capitol Complex and residences, with uses which provide services for State employees, persons havinq business with the State, and residents. b. large land assemblages resulting from land speculation c. concentration parking lots, aqain resulting from land speculation EAST OF PENNSYLVANIA: URBAN NEIGHBORHOOD: characterized by: a. commercial redevelopment on Colfax 74

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b. stronger residential character c. lower land prices d. less speculation e. smaller assemblages f. more feeling of neighborhood 3 COLFAX Vl:LLAGE CEN'l'ERS Two village centers have been identified for this section of East Colfax, one at York and a second at Park Avenue. For each of them to achieve their potential as a center of activity along East Colfax, they should emphasize the following: o DISTINCTIONS: reinforce the characteristics which distinquish them, such as architectural style and land uses o UNXQOB NAMES: emphasize a unique name for each area, such as Village Park, Park Village, or York Village o BtJILDDlG ALONG TEE many of the buildings in these areas are built along the public right-of-way. This pattern should be reinforced o ARCHZTECTURAL CHARACTER: renovations and new buildings should emphasize the architectural character of existing buildings o PEDESTRIAN PLOW: improvements to the public right-of-way should enhance the pedestrian flow. These include: CURB EXTENSIONS TllAJ'FIC ISLANDS STlU!ETSCAPING o SHARED PARKING: shared parking will allow fer more efficient use of land, easier access to parking, financial savings for property owners and businesses, and better landscaping and buffering for compatibility with the adjoining neighborhoods o BUFFERS AND LINXS TO RESIDENTIAL AREAS: to maximize the compatibility with surrounding areas and thus encourage healthier residential neighborhoods as a market for retail uses on Colfax, and to encourage residents within those neighborhoods to use East Colfax as their neighborhood 75

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retail center, all uses along Colfax and all uses behind East Colfax, such as parking, must be well buffered with landscaping, berms, and fencing. Additionally, adjoining uses should be protected from incompatible lighting and odors. Landscaped buffers should be tied into the residential streetscaping which will help link the neighborhoods to Colfax. The residential streetscape pattern of landscaped parking strips should be extended along the side streets to East Colfax. Retail uses should face only onto Colfax, and should not extend around the corner onto the side streets. o AND SPECIALTY USES: uses within the activity centers should attract both neighborhood residents and a regional market o MERCHANT Promotions for businesses within each activity center should stress the UNIQUE NAME for that center and could be done jointly, perhaps through a MERCHANTS ASSOCIATION which is unique to that activity center 4. To reinforce the auto-oriented centers as a key and compatible element of both East Colfax and the adjoining neighborhoods, emphasize: o BETWEEN CENTERS: the auto-oriented commercial areas serve as linkages between the village centers. Their streetscape should emphasize this linkage o GREENERY ALONG the streetscape of the public right-of-way along Colfax should provide significant landscaping, including a consistent tree canopy which will serve as: AND a strong visual and psychological linkage between the village centers and design continuity for all of East Colfax PEDESTRIAN adding to the comfort and enjoyment of pedestrians along East Colfax by softening the street and providing shade and a sense of enclosure TO AREAS: helping to visually link East Colfax to the adjoining residential neighborhoods, which have large trees visible from Colfax through the deep setbacks and parking lots of the automobile-oriented uses 76

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5 DOWNTOWN COLFAX Recognize and reinforce the connection into Downtown by: o TO DOWNTOWN: reflecting entrance which Colfax historically has provided to Downtown o TO DOWNTOWN: reinforcing the change in character and use which occurs between Pennsylvania and Clarkson. o "GATEWAY TO DOWNTOWN": building a physical gateway or market at Pennsylvania to mark the "gateway to downtown" TRANSPORTATION 1. COBRIDOR o TRAFFIC COUNT: there are approximately 90,000 cars a day the study corridor on 13th, 14th, Colfax, 17th, and 18th. This traffic must remain in the corridor. Significantly, it is more traffic than I-70 carries o TRANSIT COUNT: East Colfax has more transit use than any other street in the metrspolitan area o TRANSFERS: major transit transfers occur at York and Ogden o CAPACITY AND SPEEDS: capacity and travel speeds are adequate o RELATIONSHIP OP DESIGN TO CAPACITY: it is possible to modify the physical design of Colfax to accommodate the land use and urban design needs without affecting the capacity of the street o TRAFFIC PROJECTIONS: future travel remains within available capacity o OPTIONS ON 13TH: option is to remove one lane on 13th, from Franklin to Logan in order to widen the sidewalks and allow for streetscaping, without significantly disrupting the flow of traffic o AUTO TRAVEL DEMAND: the demand for auto travel within the corridor can be to some degree by: POLICY AND SUPPLY: controlling the supply of parking through policy and development regulations 77

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TRANSIT OSE: meeting the goal of 20% of the trips in the corridor being on public transit 2. PEDESTRIAN TREATMENT In order to raise the level of comfort and enjoyment for pedestrians on Colfax and, thereby, increase the number of pedestrians, improvements should be made to the pedestrian treatments along the street. These include: o NARROWED STREET CRoss INGS: narrowing the width of street which has to be crossed at any one time with: SIDEWALX EXTENSIONS: at intersections, extending the sidewalks farther into the street, providing not only for a narrowed but also for additional landscaping MEDIANS: where necessary, providing landscaped medians which will provide a refuge for pedestrians. The landscaping in the medians should not detract from the view to the west ot the Capitol and the mountains MIDBLOCX CROSSWALXS: where possible and necessary, providing midblock extensions of the sidewalk and crosswalks can effect safe-pedestrian crossings o WIDENED AND IMPROVED SIDEWALXS: depending on specific building setbacks, street width, and public right-of-way width, widening and improving some sidewalks can benefit pedestrians o DOUBLE-BEADED providing double-headed meters will allow additional space between cars and will help simplify the streetscape o LIGHTING:in addition to the overhead lighting which is required for automobile traffic and for crime prevention, installing smaller-scale pedestrian lighting, similar to that in Larimer square, on the 16th Street Mall, on 17th Avenue, or in front of the Colonnade Building, will provide a pedestrian scale, comfort, and excitement to the streetscape o PEDESTRIAN RIGHT-OF-WAY: lobbying for stronger laws to give pedestrians priority over automobiles. Once in place, these laws would have to be stringently enforced in order to educate local drivers to the rights of pedestrians o PEDESTRIAN STOP LIGHTS: stop lights, including pedestrian activated lights,. are often the least satisfactory, and in many cases least safe, of the potential pedestrian improvements. They should be used only when absolutely 78

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necessary, and then, only in conjunction with other more effective pedestrian treatments 3 VILLAGE CENTER TREATMENT Each village center should have programs and improvements which will help emphasize its unique character and will attract pedestrian and retail activity: o INTERSECTION DESIGN: improving spaces in the center of the street and intersection with unique design treatments o 'rRANSI'l' "ONE HOUR PAssu: providing transfers, or for the 15 and 15 LTD bus which would allow riders to get off the bus, shop for an hour, and then get back on a bus for a continuation of their trip or for a return trip o 'rRANSI'l' STOP: improving transit stop siting, design, and operation. RTD is currently improving the stops for the 15 LTD o PARKING creating a parking district for each village center in order for the businesses in the center to have better control of parking rates and hours; to help consolidate and finance parking facilities, including parking structures; and to allow better advertising and access to parking facilities NEIGHBORHOOD LIVABILITY If the area is to function as a neighborhood, then it must be able to attract permanent residents 1. TRENDS The trends in the neighborhood demonstrate a marked decrease in its livability o LOSS HOUSING: there was a 43% decrease in housing units in North Capitol Hill between 1970 and 1985, a loss of 1803 units. Significant, although smaller, losses also occurred in City Park West. Housing in Capitol Hill has been more stable This loss of housing has been the result of a change in land use patterns, resulting appreciation of property values, speculation on the potential for a continuing rise in values, demolition of housing in response to the speculation, a rise in the level of crime as a result of the loss of residents and the change in land use, and a loss of more residents as a result of the change in the character of the neighborhoods and the rise in crime 79

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2. GOALS overriding goals for the livability of the neighborhoods include: o STRONG RESIDENTIAL BASE: strengthening the residential base of the neighborhoods in order to enhance neighborhood stability, safety, and character and to provide a permanent and ready market for neighborhood and Downtown retail o DIVERSE RESIDENTIAL BASE: diversifying the residential base in order to diversify and strengthen the neighborhood by providing a mixture of ownership/rental types, building types, building age, and housing costs o NEIGHBORHOODS DISTINCT FROM DOWNTOWN: reinforcing the neighborhoods as distinct from, rather than extensions of, Downtown In order to accomplish these goals for neighborhood livability, four areas of consideration must be addressed: o PUBLIC SAFETY AND MAINTENANCE o LAND USE o SCALE AND BULlt o DISTRICTS 3. RATIONALE The rationale for the proposed program and policies for reinforcing the residential element of the neighborhoods and, thus, their livability includes both citywide and neighborhood concerns: o CITYWIDE: a. HOUSING IN TEE CITY: fulfilling the need for housing in the inner city HOUSING IN CLOSE PROXIMITY TO DOWNTOWN: providing housing in proximity to Downtown, where there is the greatest concentration of services and amenities, and where housing canhelp eliminate a need to travel by auto o NEIGHBORHOOD: a. INCREASE IN SAFETY BY INCREASING NUMBER OF PEOPLE ON THE STREET: increasing the housing in the neighborhood will 80

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result in more activity in the neighborhood and more people observing that activity. The rise in level of activity and of observation will improve the degree of safety INCREASE IN BASE: increasing the number and diversity of housing units and, therefore, of people will increase and strengthen the retail market 4 PUBLiC SAFETY AND MAIN'l'ENA.NCE The first area of consideration in re-establishing a strong residential base for the mixture of uses in the neighborhoods isimproving public safety and maintenance: o REALITY AND IHAGE Of HOUSING BASE OF PROBLEM providing better management or acquiring poorly managed apartment buildings will eliminate a source of criminal activity INCREASED STREET increasing the number and diversity of people working and shopping in the neighborhood will help squeeze out the anti-social street activity s. LAND USE The second area of consideration in re-establishing a strong residential base for the mixture of uses in the neighborhoods is encouraging the appropriate mixture, density, character, and location of land uses: o RESIDENTXAL USES AS FOCUS OP DEVELOPMENT: development and redevelopment primarily focusing on providing a diversity of types and prices of housing units o ADV1NTAGES: building upon the locational advantages of living close to Downtown and to work, and thus, creating an urban neighborhood o EXXSTZNG INfRASTRUCTURE: building upon the advantages of having the needed infrastructure already in place o designing and building new housing so that residents can observe street activity on a 24 hour basis, thus helping to make the area lively and safe o RESIDENTIAL INFILL: taking advantage of vacant land for residential infill to help tie together the existing residential areas, creating pockets of solid residential character each of which includes a minimum of 200 housing units 81

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' o CONCENTRATJ:ON OF RETAJ:L OSES: concentrating uses in existing business zones will help to strengthen the existing retail areas and to create areas with distinct retail and residential character. The neighborhoods have a surplus of parcels already zoned for business o SUPPORT reinforcing services needed by residential uses with commercial and retail uses in the neighborhood o HJ:STORJ:C DISTRJ:CT: designating Swallow Hill and the area immediately surrounding it as an historic.district (generally, Washington to Downing and Colfax to 18th) o PRESERVATION OF HISTORIC HOOSES: allowing a mixture of office and residential uses in historic and other significant houses will help preserve them and the historic residential character which they create for the neighborhood. This may also serve to preserve these houses for a time when the residential market in the neighborhood has been re-established and they are returned to residential uses. At this time, house should retain at least one housing unit o PARXS: supplementing and improving neighborhood access to and use of existing parks, since the lack of neighborhood parks is one of the characteristic of the neighborhood which weakens its residential character and its attraction to potential residents 6. SCALE AND BULX The third area of consideration in re-establishing a strong residential base is establishing an appropriate pattern of scale and bulk for new development: o COMPATIILJ:TY OF SCALE: looking to existing development patterns within each block and district to establish a compatible scale for new development o COMPATIILITY OF BOLX: looking to existing development patterns within each block and district to establish a compatible bulk for new development 7. DISTRICTS The fourth area of consideration in re-establishing a strong residential base is creating districts within the neighborhood, each of which can have its own distinct sense of identity, character, pattern of land uses, scale, and bulk. Each of these should build upon existing conditions and potentials. Several of the streets in the neighborhood 82

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--have enough character and potential that they can be considered districts. Neighborhood districts which require special planning attention include: o BROADWAY TO SHERMAN: already a part of Downtown, its primary land use is office. The streetscape should be a part of the neighborhood, with a gateway at the transition between Downtown and the neighborhood, where the street grid changes and the land rises o SHERMAN TO primarily office land uses, with high density residential uses and a cap placed on the building height by the Mountain View Preservation Ordinance o TO PARK AVENUE: emphasis shifts to residential uses as the larger share of the mixture, with preservation of older structures and a lower intensity for the scale and bulk of uses o PARK AVENUE TO YORK: retention of the residential character, with a lower scale and residential office conversions which preserve the historic character o KOSPXTALS: between 18th and 20th, Pennsylvania to High, contains hospitals and hospital-related uses. Preserve the boundaries and emphasize desiqn which is compatible with the surrounding areas. Provide hospital-related housing of moderate to high density o PARK AVENUE: provides needed open space for the neighborhood. Neighborhood ownership of the parks should be reinforced, perhaps with decorative fencing of each park. Parks should be improved with formal landscaping. Land uses should be primarily residential, serving as a focus for additional residential development in the neighborhood. Office uses may be used as an incentive for preserving historic and significant structures and retail uses may increase public use of parks, with attention paid to the intersections with Colfax, 17th, and 20th. Gateways may also be provided at these locations. Density may be higher than in areas immediately surrounding the street o 16TH AVENUE: the current residential character of the street allows 16th to serve as an anchor for additional residential development in the neighborhood. The street may also serve as a linear park connecting Downtown with City Park. Uses should be primarily residential, but office uses may help preserve historic and other significant structures o 20th AVENUE: should provide a crucial transition between Uptown and the Clements and San Rafael districts of the 5 Points neighborhood. Density, scale, height, and bulk 83

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should be lower than the uses to the south in order to be compatible with these districts. Residential uses should face onto 20th IMPLEMENTATION Implementation programs for the concepts developed in the charette can be divided into three categories: (1) SOCIAL AND NEIGHBORHOOD CLEANUP ISSUES, (2) COLFAX COMMERCIAL REVITALIZATION, and (3) RESIDENTIAL REINFORCEMENT AND MARKET AUGMENTATION: 1. SOCrAL AND NEIGHBORHOOD CLEANUP ISSUES Resolving social and neighborhood cleanup issues will require cooperation of both the public and private sectors, including: o POLICE PRESSURE: continuing police pressure on areas with undesirable activities o LOCAL PARTICIPATION WITH POLICE: cooperating with the police to locate and eradicate the sources of crime o DESIGN OP SPACES: and semi-public spaces so as to eliminate the potential congregation points of undesirable street activity o PRESSURE ON BUSINESSES: providing peer pressure on businesses which serve problem people to eliminate attractions, products, and services which attract them o PRESSURE ON LANDLORDS: providing peer and public pressure on landlords to manage their buildings in a manner which will discourage illegal and anti-social activities o ENFORCEMENT OF CODES: enforcing the City's building, health, and safety codes through a joint public and private effort, with private sector assistance in monitoring and reporting violations and public sector enforcement o ACQUISITION OP PROBLEM BUILDINGS: condemning or otherwise obtaining problem buildings whose owners do not cooperate in complying with codes and in crime prevention o PREVENTION OF OVER-CONCENTRATION OF GROUP HOMES AND SHELTERS: supporting existing group homes and shelters, while avoiding locating additional facilities in the neighborhood 84

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2. COLFAX COMMERCIAL REVITALIZATION Commercial revitalization of Colfax has two major elements: PUBLIC IMPROVEMENTS and BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT: o PUBLIC the following questions must be addressed regarding public improvements: what improvements should be considered? WHERE: where should these be located? WHEN: When.should they be constructed? Can they be phased? DESIGN: What is their design? How is it coordinated along Colfax and with improvements on 13th, 14th, l6.th, 17th, and Park Avenues? cosT: What is the cost, how is that phased, and what arethe financing mechanisms? PUBLIC FINANCING AND MAINTENANCE: potential sources for public financing of design, construction, and maintenance for the public improvements include: a. local improvement district b. metropolitan district c. Citys capital improvement program d. community Development Block Grant e. maintenance district f. state Highway Department q. Reqional Transportation District FINANCING AND MAINTENANCE: potential sources for private financing of design, construction, and maintenance of public improvements include: a. private investment b. individual maintenance with peer pressure c. mutual maintenance agreements among businesses 85

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o BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT: the following questions should be answered as the initial stage in the program for business development: MARKET ANALYSIS: what is the potential market for businesses? How can this market best be captured? What does this market dictate in terms of the selection of specific businesses and improvements? PROMOTION: how can the neighborhood best market itself both: a. to customers to investors and new businesses DEVELOPER ORIENTATION: how can the neighborhood best orient developers with the potentials of the neighborhood, the current momentum in the neighborhood, and the design and land use guidelines for the neighborhood? PINANCrAL INCENTIVES: which combination of the following or other financial incentives is most appropriate for new business and how can neighborhood participation in each be increased? What strings should be attached to these financial incentives which will help achieve the neighborhood and City goals: a. SBA loans b. development revenue bonds c. Development Action Grants d. CHFA commercial loan program e. bank participation/commitment program STREAMLINED DEVELOPMENT REVIEW PROCESS: how can the development review process be streamlined to provide incentives for business development, while assuring achievement of neighborhood and City goals? 3 RES"IDENTrAL RE"INFORCE.MEN'l' AND MARKET AUGMENTATION Augmenting and reinforcing the market for residential uses will require consideration of: o POSSIBLE CHANGES TO DEVELOPMENT REGULATIONS: including: REDUCED PARKING REQUIREMENTS FOR RESIDENTIAL USES: 86

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REMOVAL OF PARiaNG AS A USE BY RIGHT: REMOVAL OF BONUSES PREFERENCES AND INCENTIVES FOR OFFICE USES: REVISIONS TO BUILDING CODE WHICH WOULD FACILITATE MIXED RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL USES: ALLOWING RETAIL IN CONJUCTION WITH RESIDENTIAL USES ON A SPECIAL REVIEW BASIS: ALLOWING OFFICE ONLY BY SPECIAL REVIEW IN SELECTED AREAS: o CREATION OF HISTORIC DISTRICTS: creating historic districts as an incentive for preservation and a recognition of the historic character of the neighborhood o PROVIDING CITY FINANCIAL INCENTIVES: potentially including: CONSTRUCTION LOANS: DISCOUNTED INTEREST: SHAIU:D RISK WITH LENDERS: o REHABILITATION PROGRAMS: expanding rehabilitation programs for single family and multiple family housing, including both owner-occupied and rental units o ENCOURAGEMENT FOR OWNERS TO PROVIDE. ON-SITE PROPERTY MANAGERS AND TO TAKERESPONSIBILITY FOR PROPERTY AND TENANTS: providing both peer and public pressures o WITH THE NEIGHBORHOOD TO DEVELOP REGULATORY CHANGES: sharing the responsibility for developing programs which will assure the development of new housing and the retention of existing housing, which will be acceptable to both the public sector and the private sector, and which are financially feasible 4 DEMONS'ritATION PROJEC'l' A demonstration program should be established which have the following characteristics: o SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO REDEVELOPMENT OF ONE CONCENTRATED AREA: selecting one area for attention 87

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o EMPHASIS ON EXISTING STRENGTHS: picking an area for its potential to show quick results because of the momentum which already exists in the area and the strong potential of the area to redevelop consistent with the neighborhood and City goals o SUCCESS EXTENDED TO ADJOINING AREAS, RESULTING IN GREATER SUCCESS: providing for expansion of the program to adjoining areas, eventually to the entire neighborhood o FOCUS ON THE INTERDEPENDENCE OF COMMERCIAL AND RESIDENTIAL USES; ADDRESSED AS A UNIT: working toward. both commercial revitalization and re-establishment of the residential base, character, and attraction of the neighborhood o TWO OR MORE AREAS IDENTIFIED, EACH: consistent with the study completed by RNL for Colfax-on-the-Hill, identify the areas which have the following characteristics: A SECTION OF COLFAX: preferably selecting an area identified as a village center TWO BLOCKS NORTH AND SOUTH INTO THE NEIGHBORHOODS : extending the demonstration area into the neighborhoods so as to include the residential uses and to create the linkages between the neighborhoods WITH EXISTING MOMENTUM : evaluating the existing momentum and the potential for extending that momentum WITH GOOD REDEVELOPMENT POTENTIAL: looking for a strong historic character and parcels which can be redeveloped while retaining that character o COMMITMENT OF PROPERTY OWNERS AND MERCHANTS: selecting the area where the property owners and merchants are most willing to commit money and time to the demonstration program o LEVERAGING OF PUBLIC FONDS WITH PRIVATE DOLLARS: evaluating the potential for each of the areas to leverage public funds with private dollars and giving consideration to that leveraging as an indication of commitment o TARGETING OF CITY ASSISTANCE: directing City services and financial incentives to the demonstration area o PRIORITY FOR CITY PROGRAMS: directing City programs, such as capital improvements programs, to the demonstration area 88

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o COMBINING OF FINANCIAL PROGRAMS: combining public and private financial programs o POTENTIAL FOR ASSISTANCE FROM DURA IN ASSEMBLING PROGRAMS: considering abilities of Denver Urban Renewal Authority to use its special administrative powers to assemble diverse programs under a single entity o POTENTIAL TAX INCREMENT DISTRICT: reviewing the current value of property in the demonstration area, the potential for an increase in that value, and the potential advantages and disadvantages of. cre.ating a tax increment district to help finance public improvements o "FAST TRACX" APPROVALS: reviewing the potential for a simplified and faster approval process for development projects within the demonstration area as an incentive for that development o PUBLIC IMPROVEMENTS AS FIRST PHASE: providing public improvements as incentives for the initial private investment. Further public investment should be contingent upon the neighborhood and the City successfully developing and implementing mechanisms for assuring the development of new housing and the retention of existing housing o CONCENTRATING EFFORTS FOR LAW ENFORCEMENT: targeting the demonstation area for crime prevention 3. TE?.M o ANALYSIS: Lee Sammons Hammer, Siler, George Associates o PLANNXNG: Bill Lamont Denver Planning and Development Office Director o PUBLIC FINANCE: Jim Murray Denver Budget and Management Office Director of Finance o PUBLIC INFRASTRUCTURE: Ruth Rodriquez Denver Department of Public Works Executive Deputy Manager 89

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o TRANSPORTATION: o tnmAN DESIGN: 4. RESOURCE TEAM Tony Gomez-Ibanez Harvard Graduate School of Design Cambridge, Massachusetts Professor Gary KrUger Boeing Computer Services seattle, _Washinqton Manager of Transportation Systems Consulting John Itrikan Skidmore, Owings, Merril san Francisco, California Urban Planner I General Partner ROD Straka Denver Planning and Development Office Deputy Director of Planning and Development for Urban Design The Resource Team provided background information and staff support to the Team. Members included: o CITY COONCIL: Hiawatha Davis council Member District 8 Cathy Donohue Council Member District 10 Jennifer Macy council Aide District 10 o MARKET ANALYSIS: Kathy ORay Denver Economic Development Office Economic Development Specialist o PLANNING: stave Gordon Denver Planning Office Housing Planner Maggie Sperling Denver Planning Office Deputy Director for Neighborhood Planning 90

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o PUBLIC FINANCE: o TRANSPORTATION: Dennis swain Denver Planning Office Planner Liz orr Office of Policy Analysis Management Analyst Dave Baskett Regional Transportation District Assistant Director for Planning and Development Tom Bastian Regional Transportation District Board Member Dick Bauman Regional Transportation District Director of Transit System Planning and Development Dick Brasher Colorado Department of Highways District 6 Engineer Jack Bruce Denver Public Works -Engineering City Engineer Jennifer Pinch Colorado Department of Highways Senior Transportation Specialist Joanna Goldcamp Regional Transportation District Service Planner Howard McCann Denver Public Works -Operations Division Deputy Manager Jack McCroskey Regional Transportation Board Member Dennis Royer Denver Public Works -Transportation Division Acting Director of Traffic Engineering 9l

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o URBAN DESIGN David Williams Denver Planning Office Transportation Planner Paul David Sehnert Denver Planning Office Urban Desiqner 92

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B. DRAFT WORK PROGRAM FOR l6TH AVENUE PROGRAM ELEMENT RESPONSIBLE PARTY TIME FRAME ONE TASK FORCE Establish a task force which will: o involve the neighborhood and other key parties --neighborhood organizations: Uptown-on-the-Hill Colfax-on-the-Hill CHON OMNI North Capitol Hill Development Corporation neighborhood property owners neighborhood residents -hospitals -YMCA -Denver Partnership -City: Denver Planning Office PUblic Works Department Traffic Engineering Parks Departlnent -City Council representatives: Hiawatha Davis cathy Donohue Bob Crider Cathy Reynolds o determine the issues and concerns o establish the boundaries of the study area o provide technical assistance, including solicitation of volunteer and pro bono assistance o determine the options to be explored o create a support base TWO THE CONCEPT FOR 16TH AVENUE A. Revise draft B. circulate for comment by task force c. Revise draft subject to comments D. Distribute the revised draft for endorsement by the task force 93

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THBEE DATA A. Existing framework for the study area B. s imilar projects which can serve as models c. Existing conditions for the corridor: o Land use, quantified and mapped o ownership o Zoning o Hard and soft buildings and uses o Floor area ratio o Height o Setbacks o Materials o Building footprints o Building aspect o Building entrances o Streetscape: curb cuts, trees, lights, utilities, siqnage, drainage improvements o Right-of-way width o Pavement width o Sidewalk location and width o Parking: location, number of spaces (on and off street) o Bus routeso Traffic: volumes and points of conflict: automobile -pedestrian jogger/runner -bicycle o Hospital emergency routes o Fire emergency routes o Other key origins and destinations which affect traffic patterns o Historic and significant buildings, groups, and sites o Development proposals within the planning area o Plans and development proposals which might have an impact on the corridor: Downtown -17th Avenue Colfax Avenue -Civic Center -Park Avenue o Existing nodes of street activity FOUR ISSUES AND Analysis and review of the data 94

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-FIVE FRAMEWORK Development of goals, policies, and objectives which will provide the framework for developing design options and reviewing programs for their success in achieving those goals srx DESIGN OPTIONS Develop alternatives for: A. Circulation options: o Access o Extent of pedestrianization o Linkages o Vehicular circulation routes and-classification B. Development options: o Phasing: -the geographic extent of improvements -the level of improvements o Cost: how much -who pays o The extent; design, and location of housing o The extent, design, and location of office o The extent, design, and location of retail o Streetscape design c. Improvement options o Maintenance options o Zoning revisions SEVEN PttBLIC REVIEW OF ALTERNATIVES A. Task Force B. City c. City Council representatives D. Public Meetings E. Planning Board F. Mayor1s Advisory Council G. City Council EIGHT DECISION / SELECTION OF PROGRAM -NINE IMPLEMENTATION OF TBE FINANCING PROGRAM 95

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........ TEN DESIGN ENGINEERING ELEVEN CONSTRUCTION TWELVE MONITORING / MAINTENANCE 96