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Valverde neighborhood plan

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Valverde neighborhood plan
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Community Planning and Development, City and County of Denver
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Denver, CO
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City and County of Denver
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English

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Community planning
Neighborhood plans
City planning
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Denver -- Valverde

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Full Text
VALVERDE
NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN

1
PLANNING AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OFFICE
CITY AND COUNTY OF DENVER
MAY 1991


Acknowledgements
Mayor of Denver
Honorable Wellington E. Webb
Denver Planning Board
Ruth Falkenberg, Chair
Debra Gallegos
David Hare
Bernie Jones Philip Milstein James Swanson
Gail Klapper Rick Pederson Robert Wright
Jeanne Labuda Marilyn Stokes
Denver Planning and Community Development Office
Jennifer Moulton, Director of Planning and Development
David Becker, Senior City Planner and Report Author
Ken Barkema, Report Graphics
Karl Haberman, Report Graphics
Mark Hess, Report Graphics
Carolyn Moore, Report Word Processing
Valverde Neighborhood Steering Committee
Our thanks to all of the people who attended our meetings and participated in
creating the Valverde Neighborhood Plan.
Special thanks to Councilwoman Ramona Martinez, Council Aide Marshall Vanderburg,
and the Steering Committee members listed below who gave of their time and talent.
All made special contributions to the preparation of this plan.
Pam Barnabas, Chair Nina Eason Rich Moore Tom Smedley
Ray Ahls Hank Kaan Jean Moore
Bill Eason Bernice Kenderes Lois Padgett
Acknowledgement is also given to former members of the City Administration, Denver
Planning Board, and Denver Planning and Community Development Office who
made the preparation and approval of this plan possible, including Federico Pena,
former Mayor of Denver; Richard Deane, former chair, and Jerome Nagel, John
Maldanado, and Martin Saizall former members of the Denver Planning Board; Frank
Gray, former Director of the Denver Planning and Community Development Office,
Billie Bramhall, former Deputy Director of the Denver Planning and Community
Development Office; and Frances Burg, former word processing specialist in the
Denver Planning and Community Development Office.
The Valverde Neighborhood Plan was approved by the Denver Planning Board
following a public hearing on March 27, 1991. Following a public hearing it was
approved by the Denver City Council on May 13, 1991. It was approved by the
Mayor on May 16, 1991, at which time it became part of the Denver Comprehensive
Plan.


Table of Contents
Page
I. VISION FOR VALVERDES FUTURE............................................................................ 1
II. INTRODUCTION..............................................................................................2
A. Location and Description....................................................................... 2
B. Planning Process................................................................................ 2
C. Organization and Use of the Plan.................................................................3
HI. HISTORY................................................................................................. 4
IV. DEMOGRAPHIC AND SOCIO-ECONOMIC PROFILE...................................................................6
A. Population and Households........................................................................6
B. Employment and Income............................................................................6
V. LAND USE AND ZONING.................................................................................... 9
A. General........................................................................................ 9
B. Residential Land Uses...........................................................................11
1. Residential Subarea I...................................................................... 11
2. Residential Subarea II.......................................................................13
3. Residential Subarea III................................................................... 13
a. Section A................................................................................13
b. Section B.................................................................................15
c. Section C.................................................................................15
C. Industrial Land Uses............................................................................16
D. Vacant Land.....................................................................................17
E. Commercial Land Uses............................................................................17
F. Parks and Open Space............................................................................17
G. Action Recommendations..........................................................................17
VI. TRANSPORTATION.........................................................................................21
A. Streets and Highways............................................................................21
1. Existing Street Classifications and Traffic Volumes..................................... 21
2. Truck Traffic, Movement and Designated Truck Routes..........................................23
3. West Alameda Avenue..........................................................................23
4. West Sixth Avenue Freeway....................................................................25
5. Federal Boulevard............................................................................25
B. Mass Transit................................................................................. 25
1. Bus Routes...................................................................................25
2. Bus Shelters.................................................................................26
C. Hike-Bike Routes................................................................................26
D. Action Recommendations....................................................................... 28
VH. HOUSING.............................................................................................31
A. Existing Housing Stock.....................................................................31
B. Action Recommendations.....................................................................33
VIH. COMMUNITY FACILITIES...............................................................................34
A. Parks and Open Space.......................................................................34
B. Storm and Sanitary Sewers..................................................................35
C. Police Protection and Crime................................................................35
D. Fire Protection............................................................................35
E. Schools....................................................................................35
F. Action Recommendations.....................................................................36
IX. ENVIRONMENT........................................................................................38
A. Topography and Flood Plain.................................................................38
B. Residential Environment....................................................................40
C. Air and Ground Pollution...................................................................40
D. Energy and Resource Conservation...........................................................40
E. Action Recommendations.....................................................................41
X. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT...............................................................................43
A. Overview of Existing Conditions............................................................43
B. Action Recommendations.....................................................................44
XI. IMPLEMENTATION.....................................................................................45
A. Means of Plan Implementation...............................................................45
B. Human Resources of Plan Implementation.....................................................46
C. Action Recommendations.....................................................................47
APPENDIX................................................................................................48


Vision for Valverdes Future
i .
Valverde is a neighborhood rich in history and tradition located on Denvers near westside.
The preferred future of Valverde is to reclaim its namesake of a green valley, and to
improve the over-all quality of life among those who will live and work together in an
attractive, safe, workable environment. Valverde will have reassumed its rightful place within
the city as a neighborhood that is known for its identity and valued for its varied resources
and contributions.
The future of Valverde will emphasize the various quality of life elements that will continue
to make the neighborhood a desirable and attractive place to live and work. The needs of
the people in Valverde will be paramount. Housing will be attractive, affordable, stabilized,
safe, and located in residential areas that are well-served by all necessary public facilities and
services, and protected from environmentally unattractive and unsafe intrusions. West
Alameda Avenue will be a beautiful parkway. Streets and alleys will all be paved and well-
maintained.
Valverde will also continue to be a very important employment area that provides jobs,
income, shopping, and services to the neighborhood. Employment areas, as the residential
areas, will have easy functional access and good circulation, while protecting residential
areas from traffic. Vacant, commercially zoned land will be developed in such a way as to be
sensitive to surrounding uses and will provide employment opportunities to the
neighborhood.
The vision for Valverde includes a clean, attractive, safe and workable physical environment.
A good neighbor policy will enable the residential areas to co-exist with and have a
mutually beneficial relationship with nearby non-residential uses that are clean, safe,
attractive and environmentally sound. The neighborhoods relationship to the Platte River
Valley will be strengthened and enhanced. Landscaping and trees will green-up
the neighborhood. Views of the mountains and downtown will be preserved. Recreational
facilities and services will be available for residents to enjoy.
Valverdes future will also include convenient access to all of the necessary social services
and cultural resourcesschools, health care, child care, etc.that are essential for the
people to live fulfilled, productive lives. The special needs of the young, elderly, and
handicapped are taken into account.
1


I I .
Introduction
1941 aerial view of parts of Valverde and Athmar Park. In the center is the Valverde Elementary School, at the intersection of
West Alameda Avenue and South Tejon Street.
A. Location and Description
Valverde is one of Denvers most diverse yet stable neighborhoods. It is located in Denvers
near westside, just west of the Valley Highway (1-25) and the South Platte River. The neigh-
borhood is bounded on the north by the West Sixth Avenue Freeway, on the south by West
Alameda Avenue, on the west by Federal Boulevard, and on the east by the South Platte River.
The major residential land uses located in the western and southern parts of the neighbor-
hood are generally separated by topography from the industrial and warehousing areas to
the north and east. A key landmark by which the neighborhood is popularly identified is the
Valverde Elementary School, located on West Alameda Avenue at Tejon Street, just east of the
Alameda Shopping Center. Valverde has a large area of modest but well-maintained
housing, with several neighborhood parks. It also has an exceptionally large industrial area
and employment base, containing regional warehouses such as those of King Soopers and
May D & F, and longtime industries such as the General Chemical Company.
B. Planning Process
The Valverde Neighborhood Plan was adopted by the City and County of Denver in 1981
and served well as an official guide to the physical development of the neighborhood for the
past ten years. Because the 1981 Plan had become somewhat dated and some new concerns
had arisen that needed a fresh assessment, the new City Councilwoman of the area requested
the Planning and Community Development Office to undertake a neighborhood planning
process, recruit a neighborhood steering committee of Valverde residents and business-
people, and prepare an updated neighborhood plan for Valverde.
A large community meeting was held at which time the City Councilwoman and the
representatives from the Planning and Community Development Office introduced the
audience to the goal of undertaking a plan update. Input was solicited and received
as to what the planning effort should address. A neighborhood steering committee was
formed, based on volunteers from this meeting and supplemented by other interested
residents and businesspeople. The steering committee met with Planning and Community
Development staff and determined that the plan update process, which was structured from
the beginning to expedite its work, should focus on four priority planning issues: 1) the
2


1951 aeriai view of similar parts of Valverde and Athmar Park as 1941 aerial, plus additional area to the west and south.
Note the amount of new development between 1941 and 1951.
residential land use area bounded by Alameda. Bayaud, Tejon and Raritan; 2) selected
transportation concerns; 3) ways to be effective in organizing the neighborhood on an
ongoing basis to implement this plan, solve problems, and optimize opportunities; and -D
selected housing concerns.
The general process in updating the 1981 Valverde Neighborhood Plan was for the steering
committee and staff to review the former plan, update the information and data base,
analyze new problems and opportunities, and focus on preparing an entirely new set of
action recommendations that would implement the new plan. In addition to the four if:ku'
areas identified above, all remaining areas of the previous plan were reviewed and upd.u-.\i
Several community meetings were held in the neighborhood as a reality check to verm the
steering committees focus and thinking. Various city, state and community agencies and
organizations were consulted for current information and insight into issues under ex.miin
ation and discussion.
C. Organization and Use of the Plan
This plan begins with a brief description of Valverdes vision for its future, its history, and a
demographic and socio-economic profile of its people and economic base. This background
material is then followed by the body of the plan, which covers both the focus areas and the
remaining sections. For each substantive area a brief overview and analysis of existing
conditions and issues is covered and followed by the core of the planthe action
recommendations.
This city-approved plan serves a number of important functions. As part of the citys
Comprehensive Plan, it is the citys official guide to both the short term and long term
physical development for Valverde. As such, it serves as a guide for use by the Planning and
Community Development Office, the Denver Planning Board, the Mayor, City Council, all city
agencies and other governmental agencies, residents, business people, neighborhood and
business organizations, and all others concerned with planning, zoning, development and
neighborhood improvement. This plan is neither an official zone map nor does it imply or
deny any implicit rights to a particular zone. Zone changes that may be proposed by
property owners as part of any plan must be initiated under a separate procedure established
under the City and County of Denver Municipal Code. This plan is intended to promote
patterns of land use, circulation, and public services that contribute to the economic,
social, and physical health, safety, and welfare of the people who live and work in Valverde.
3


iii. History
This important neighborhood landmark was built in the early 1920's as a church. However, it served Valverde in a dual
capacity over the years. As a community center it was known as Valverde Neighborhood House (the cover photo). In April,
1923 the Valverde Presbyterian Church, which was established in 1891, began using the building for religious services and
stayed there until 1957 when they moved to their new building at South Tejon and West Alaska Avenue. The bell on the
church building is from the old Wright Memorial Methodist Church. It was installed on the church building when that
congregation disbanded and joined the Valverde Presbyterians.
The name Valverde means green valley in Spanish. The early settlers saw the beautiful
green area buffering the South Platte River as a valley of flourishing green, natural
vegetation, and trees.
The Valverde neighborhood has some interesting history as recorded in documents in the
Western History Section of the Denver Public Library. According to an article in the Rocky
Mountain News of November 19, 1873, Valverde was the name of the new town laid out on
the line of the Denver and South Park Railroad. Hall's History of the State of Colorado states
that Valverde was platted by Edward A. Reser on July 17, 1882. On June 4, 1888 Judge
George W. Miller appointed four trustees who called an election for July 2, at which time it
was resolved to incorporate while Valverde was still in Arapahoe County. It was described as
one of Denver's suburbs, growing quite rapidly, and the home to a number of manufacturing
establishments. In 1902 the Town of Valverde was dissolved and annexed to the City of
Denver under the Colorado Session Laws of 1893.
4


One important factor in old Valverde was the Yalverde Improvement Association. According
to the Denver Municipal Facts issue of January 13, 1912, the Valverde Improvement
Association was organized on April 10, 1909. Its contributions to Valverde arid a taste of its
civic interests can be understood from this partial exerpt from its 1911 annual report: "This
organization has helped to bring about the West Alameda subway, the new steel bridge, the
tramway extension into Valverde, culverts at street crossings, electric lights all over this
section, electric arc lights where most needed, the improvement of the town hall, a branch
public library, West Bayaud Avenue at the glassworks has been widened, and street signs
have been posted... Other things promised in the future are the grading of streets, more mail
boxes and better mail service, curbing and sidewalks along the more important streets, more
arc lights, removal of telephone and light posts, establishment of a kindergarten, a new grade
school building, a park along the river, a fire station, and the completion of the Denver to
Morrison road and its connection with Alameda Avenue."
Historical development in the neighborhood took place first in the area along Alameda
Avenue and east of Tejon Street. This area formed the nucleus of the old Valverde
community, along with the northeastern part of Athmar Park and the adjacent industrial
areas of the Athmar Park and Sun Valley neighborhoods. Early development also took place
in the northwestern section of the area, which is closely related to the old Barnum
community. In earlier times, Federal Boulevard was narrow, did not carry much traffic, and
did not create the physical and psychological barrier that it does today.
After the turn of the century, development commenced in the area east of Tejon Street, but it
was not until 1915 that substantial constmction activity occurred. During the period from
1915-1929, 29% of the blocks in Valverde developed, and 32% of the blocks developed by
half or more during the period from 1945-1959. The majority of this later development was
concentrated in a subdivision in the southwestern section of the neighborhood.
The industrialization of the area surrounding the river basin started with the selling of the
small truck farms for redevelopment. In this area the small truck farms existed and
flourished. The farmers used their small trucks to take products to the marketplace. The
construction of 1-25 in the mid-1950s and the West Sixth Avenue Freeway in the 1960s had a
major impact on the iridustrialization of the Valverde neighborhood. The highway and
freeway had many interchangeson and off ramps at West Sixth Avenue and Federal
Boulevard, Bryant Street, and West Alameda Avenuethat provided excellent access to the
area. This central location provided an excellent area for redevelopment in the building of
warehouses, offices, and light industrial uses.
A major historic event for Valverde was the severe flood of the South Platte River that Denver
experienced on June 16, 1965. Citywide figures reveal that 1,368 houses sustained damage
estimated at $3,360,000, and 1,164 commercial structures received damage amounting to
$9,844,000. One of the worst hit neighborhoods was Valverde, which suffered approximately
$500,000 worth of property damage. Flooding affected the area from the South Platte River to
approximately Tejon Street, and further north and west. About 324 homes were condemned,
of which 75 housing structures were completely lost. The 1965 flood caused
many people to leave Valverde, especially those who lived east of Tejon Street.
5


Mayor Webb, Councilwoman Martinez and residents at the grand opening of Alameda Foods, an important grocery
shopping facility for the community.
A. Population and Households
Population trends between I960 and 1990 in Valverde show an overall loss of population
and housing units, a decreasing average household size, and an increasing elderly and
minority population. Recently released 1990 census figures indicate that during the 1980s
Valverde lost 317 residents, gained nearly 200 Hispanic residents, and had a net loss of 57
housing units. Valverdes 1990 housing units totaled 1246, yielding an average household size
of 2.46lower than in 1980 but higher than the estimated 1990 citywide average of 2.27.
The Population Chart which follows indicates the loss in total population between I960 and
1990, with an absolute and proportional increase in the minority Hispanic population. The
population and household losses between I960 and 1980 were due primarily to smaller
households, housing conversions to non-residential use, and the after-effects of the 1965
flood. These trends also continued in the 1980s, albeit at a slower rate.
Valverdes Hispanic population has been increasing steadily during the past thirty years and
at a much faster rate than the Hispanic population increase in Denver as a whole. For
example, the Hispanic proportion of Valverdes population increased from only 11% in I960
to 62% in 1990. This compares to the Hispanic proportion of Denvers population increasing
from 9% in I960 to 23% in 1990. Valverdes sharp increase in Hispanic population is
part of a well-established trend of Hispanics moving to west and southwest Denver.
B. Employment and Income
Valverdes economic base and socio-economic conditions can be understood by referring to
several basic economic indicators. Valverde has long been a major area of employment
6


opportunity for residents in and near the neighborhood. Total employment in Valverde, that
is the number of people working in Valverde, regardless of where they live, increased from
4833 in 1983 to 5473 in 1988. This was an increase of 640, or just over 13%, in just five years.
POPULATION 1960-1990

5,000 4,388 1 i 1 13,926 VALVERDE NEIGHBORHOOD
4,000 T ^ 3,381 |
3,000 i 1 > 1 1 > 1 1 > I 1 l 1 1 l
2,000 a**8 1 1,731 """"^,701 i1,897
1,000 480 Ihispanics i i 1 1 l 1 1 1
Il960 Il970 |l980 Il990
SOURCE: I960, 1970, 1980 AND 1990 U.S. CENSUSES
Table 1 identifies the industries in which those jobs are located and compares the changes
that occurred between 1983 and 1988:
Table 1
Total Valverde Employment, By Place of Work, By Industry, 1983 and 1988
Industry 1983 % of total 1988 % of total
Agriculture 2 0.0 10 0.2
Mining 0 0.0 57 1.0
Construction 508 10.5 360 6.6
Transportation 216 4.5 72 1.3
Manufacturing 192 4.0 865 15.8
Wholesaling 906 18.7 1353 24.7
Retailing 1569 32.5 1731 31.6
Finance, Real
Estate, Ins. 0 0.0 23 0.4
Services 1251 25.9 818 15.0
Government 115 2.4 114 2.1
Other 74 1.5 70 1.3
Total 4833 100.0 5473 100.0
Source: Denver Regional Council of Governments
This table reveals that between 1983 and 1988 there were major increases in manufacturing,
wholesaling, and retailing, while declines took place in the services and transportation
industries.
At a more personal level, the neighborhoods median household income and personal
income is a common measure of its relative economic condition. The following Median
Household Income Chart compares 1970-1985 median family income trends in Valverde
and the city as a whole.
7


Median family income estimates for Valverde in 1985 were $13,283 compared to the citywide
figure of $23,546. Despite continual increases in Valverdes family income, it has not kept
pace with the increases shown by the citywide averages. One reason for this is the
relatively large percentage of elderly in Valverde living on fixed income.
Valverdes 1985 per capita income was estimated to be $6,126 compared to the citywide
estimate of $12,088.
MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME 1970-1985
$ 25,000 $23,546
20,000 DENVER ^ ^ *# rnr
15,000 $9,654 ^ ^ ^ - * $15,500 $13,283
10,000 "*693 VALVERDE $10,371
5,000
1970 1 1980 1985
SOURCE: THE 1970 AND 1980 FIGURES ARE FROM THE U.S. CENSUS; THE 1985 ESTIMATES ARE BY THE DENVER
REGIONAL COUNCIL OF GOVERNMENTS.
8


Valverde is a mixed-use neighborhood with substantial residential and business areas. In some parts of the neighborhood
the residences and businesses are adjacent as shown here.
A. General
Valverde is comprised primarily of industrial and single-family residential land uses; however,
there is a fair amount of vacant land and open space. All existing land uses are categorized
by the zone district in which they are located in the following table:
Table 2
Net* Land Use by Zoning Classification (in acres) April, 1986
Existing land Use R-l ZONING DISTRICTS R-2 R-3 0-1 B-4 1-0 1-1 1-2 TOTAL % of TOTAL
Single-unit Residential 70 45 1 0 2 3 0 1 122 25
Multi-unit Residential 3 12 0 0 0 0 0 0 15 3
Industrial 0 1 0 0 8 45 75 72 201 41
Retail 0 0 0 0 13 0 1 0 14 3
Services 0 0 0 0 3 5 0 4 12 3
Vacant 1 5 0 0 1 22 2 24 55 11
Public/Quasi Public 0 2 14 0 0 0 2 0 18 3
Parks & Recreation 0 17 0 13 0 0 0 0 30 6
Transportation, Commun- ications, Utilities 0 0 0 0 1 5 7 9 22 5
Total 74 82 15 13 28 80 87 110 489 100
*Net excludes street and alleys: all figures are rounded to the nearest whole acre. Planned Unit Development: A zoning district totalling less than one acre, includes industrial, single -unit residential and
vacant land uses. Source: Planning and Community Development Office, April 1986.
9


Existing Zoning
R-1 Single-Unit Detached Dwellings, Low Density. Density = 7.3 dwelling units/acre.
R-2 Multi-Unit Dwellings, Low Density. Density -14.5 dwelling units/acre.
R-3 Multi-Unit Dwellings, High Density. Maximum density is not specified and is
determined by the size of the units and the factors mentioned above.
B-4 General Business District This district is intended to provide for and encourage
appropriate commercial uses adjacent to arterial streets, which are normally transit
routes, and abutting residential districts. Building floor area cannot exceed twice the
site area.
1-2 Heavy Industrial District Allows all manufacturing, warehousing, wholesaling and
mineral extraction activities. Limited retail and service uses for the benefit of area
employees are permitted.
0-1 Open Use District Allows airports, recreational uses, parks, cemeteries,
reservoirs, community correctional facilities, and other public and semi-public uses
housed in buildings.
P-1 Off-Street Parking District. Allows parking lots and structures. Bulk and setback
regulations apply to structures. This zone is intended to provide needed business
parking without the expansion of the business zone.
I-O Light Industrial District A transitional district between intensive industrial and
residential districts. Allows limited manufacturing, wholesale and retail activities,
offices, and motels.
1-1 General Industrial District Allows many manufacturing, warehousing, wholesaling
activities, along with limited retail and service uses for the benefit of area employees.
Building floor area cannot exceed 2 times the site area.
PUD Planned Unit Development. PUD is a form of development generally
characterized by a unified site design for clustering buildings and providing common
open-space, density increases, and a mix of building types and land uses. It allows
maximum flexibility during the planning stage and maximum assurance that exactly
what is proposed will be developed.
500 1,000
2,000
10


The distribution of land use has remained fairly constant. However, between 1980 and 1986
industrial land use increased by 27 acres, vacant land decreased by 19 acres and single-
family residential declined by 3 acres. Valverdes land use characteristics are similar to other
older neighborhoods that have been classified as opportunity neighborhoods in the Denver
Comprehensive Plan.
In general, land uses are consistent with the way they are zoned (see Existing Zoning Map
on page 10) with the exception of several acres of residential uses scattered throughout
several non-residential, primarily industrially zoned, districts.
Many of the land uses are separated by natural differences in the topography, such as along
West Second Avenue where residential uses have developed on top of the bluffs and where
industry developed to the east below the bluff, down in the Platte River Valley. This kind of
land use separation is appropriate and should be maintained wherever possible. While the
presence of substantial amounts of industrial and residential land use in close proximity to
each other requires careful and continual attention, the only land use problem addressed by
the neighbofhood steering committee is where that delicate balance has been compromised
in a portion of southeast Valverde. This is one of the primary focus issues addressed in this
plan and will be discussed below.
B. Residential Land Uses
Residential land uses in Valverde make up only 28% of the neighborhoods total net land use
area. Overall, the residential environment is good and there is an interesting mixture of older
and somewhat newer housing. Residents generally take pride in keeping up their homes. A
major asset is that nearly all of Valverdes residents have easy access to at least one of the
neighborhoods five parks. These parks, which total 30 acres, provide residents with open
space and recreational amenities. Another asset to Valverde residents is that most of the
residential areas are close to the neighborhood and regional businesses that serve them.
Residents also have quick vehicular access to other parts of Denver due to the two freeways
and two arterial streets that border the neighborhood.
The residential zoning in Valverde is mostly R-l and R-2, which allows single family
residences and duplexes. There is also a small area of R-3 zoning located in the south central
portion of the neighborhood, which accomodates the only medium density apartment area
(Columbine Homes) in Valverde.
Due to the variety of housing and land use conditions in Valverde, three residential subareas
were examined and will be briefly analyzed below. The Residential Subareas Map on page
12, identifies these subareas.
1. Residential Subarea I
The largest residential subarea in Valverde covers the entire western portion of the
neighborhood. This subarea contains the most stable and least threatened residential
area in Valverde. There are a wide variety of housing types, ages, and conditions here.
With the exception of a few scattered duplexes in the extreme northwest section and along
the western portion of the neighborhood, this area is characterized primarily by single family
residences. Although there are numerous amenities in Subarea I, it does have several land
use concerns that bear close monitoring. First, the commercial properties along Federal
Boulevard and Alameda Avenue have some negative impacts on abutting residential
properties. These commercial properties should be contained within their present
boundaries, face the arterial strip, and be landscaped or buffered to protect the adjacent
residential areas.
n


Residential Subareas
N
0 500 1,000 2,000
12


A second concern is the threat of industrial expansion into the neighborhood. It is important
to keep an appropriate separation between these land uses where possible. For example, the
residential properties located along the bluffs should continue to be maintained away from
the industrial uses located down in the Platte River Valley. An example where the residential
environment might be threatened is the large vacant parcel located at the intersection of
South Decatur Street and West Third Avenue on top of the bluff. This large parcel is owned
by the May Department Stores Company. It is zoned 1-0 for light industry and intrudes west
into the residential area. This parcel would be more suitable for residential development
because it is surrounded on three sides by residential land uses.
A third concern is the northwest portion of this subarea, north of West Second Avenue. This
residential area has several scattered vacant parcels mixed in with houses, some of which are
rundown. The Caretaker Program has worked in this area recently and fixed up numerous
homes along West Short Place. This residential area should continue to receive focused
assistance to upgrade its housing and public improvements.
2. Residential Subarea II
The second residential area in Valverde is bounded by West Bayaud on the north, West
Alameda on the south, South Zuni on the west, and South Tejon on the east. The three main
land uses are a housing complex, West Bar-Val-Wood Park and the West Alameda strip
businesses. The major land use is the Denver Housing Authoritys 200 unit Columbine
Homes complex. The complex occupies almost three full blocks, accommodates approximat-
ely 400 people, and is the only R-3 zoned residential development in Valverde. The apart-
ments and lawns are generally well-maintained and have recently received some improve-
ments to the sidewalks. Needed improvements include re-roofing and replacement of the
cottonwood trees. Given the close access of the park, and lack of industrial proximity to
even pose a threat, the only concern in this subarea is the previously mentioned need to
closely monitor the Alameda commercial strip.
3. Residential Subarea in
This subarea occupies the southeastern portion of the neighborhood. It is the most complex
and challenging residential area in Valverde due to the mixture of residential and non-
residential areas. Various threats make this residential subarea the most unstable of the three
residential areas. First, there is a significant amount of industry either abutting or mixed in
with residential properties. Therefore, the residential properties suffer greater negative
impacts from industrial truck traffic and air and noise pollution than any other residential
subarea. Second, commercial properties border residential properties along the southern
portion of the subarea. Third, there are many vacant parcels scattered throughout Subarea III,
providing an element of instability and uncertainty to the remaining residential properties.
Fourth, many of the residential properties lie within the South Platte River flood plain (see
map in the Environment chapter on page 39). Lastly, many housing structures are in poor
condition due to age, the 1965 flood, and lack of maintenance.
Because of the complexity and importance of site-specific factors in Subarea III, three
sections within this subarea have been identified on the Residential Subarea III Map.
The policy recommendations for future land use for each section are summarized below.
a. Section A
Section A is the most stable residential area within Subarea III. It is predominantly residential
but does contain several vacant parcels and office/warehouse uses. The houses are generally
quite nice, but there are several vacant or unkept residential properties.
13


Subarea 3
Future Policy Recommendations
y
iwa
ARCHER
BAYAUD
PL.
AVE
W.
rznuj J lllll ST
i
MAPLE AVE. *

fig*#* If V
- 7 EE
ALAMEDA
AVE.
I I RESIDENTIAL
14-> >1 PARKS
Y///A COMMERCIAL
INDUSTRIAL
RESIDENTIAL TO NON-RESIDENTIAL
TRANSITION AREA
RAILROAD
LANDSCAPE BUFFERING
SECTION BOUNDARY LINE
0 250 500 1,000
14


The primary policy recommendation for Section A is to maintain the residential character of
this area by maintaining the residential zoning and by improving the housing and public
improvements. Two face blocks have undergone partial non-residential development and/or
non-residential zoning and the remaining residentially zoned properties in these face blocks
will be considered for office/warehouse uses under Planned Unit Development zoning that
will assure appropriate landscaping, buffering, sensitivity to adjoining properties, and over-
all improvement to the neighborhood. Those two face blocks are:
. south face block of Bayaud, between Tejon and Raritan
. south face block of Byers, between Tejon and Raritan
This residential area, given its proximity to adjacent industrial uses, should be strongly
considered as a focus area for concentrated housing and public improvements assistance.
b. Section B
The zoning in Section B includes B-4, 1-0, 1-2, and R-2. It is characterized by extensively
mixed land uses, including single units, light and heavy industry, office and commercial,
numerous scattered vacant uses (all zoned industrial) and Valverde Park. The major problems
stem from severe residential/ non-residential land use conflicts. The main concern is that the
remaining residential structures are mixed in with industry and are suffering negative
impacts. Moreover, industrial development here could also have negative impacts on the
adjacent stable residential portions of Section A.
The long range development for this subarea will be industrial given its industrial zoning
Due to the fact that there is a large amount of vacant industrially zoned land available
throughout Section B, the plan encourages the development of vacant land prior to
additional industrial rezonings that might occur. Also, as industrial development does u la-
place, landscaping and buffering should occur to protect the adjacent properties.
c. Section C
Section C is comprised of two block faces on West Byers Place from South Pecos Street east
to the South Platte River, one-half block north of Alameda Avenue, and the northern block
face along West Byers Place east of South Navajo. Section C is the most threatened area
within Subarea III that includes residentially zoned properties. The zoning includes 1-0 and
R-2. The land uses include residential, industrial and vacant land.
Although each of the three block faces are somewhat different in their zoning and land use
conditions, they are all impacted negatively by the same land use conditions. The future
viability of residentially used and zoned properties is very uncertain. All of the three block
faces are bordered on the north by light industry and on the south by the Alameda Avenue
businesses. In all cases the land use conflicts and conditions are the most severe of any
Valverde residential area. Enclaves of residential properties suffer severe negative impacts of
air and noise pollution from industrially related truck traffic. They are located in the South
Platte River flood plain. A railroad line intersects the area. Finally, many of the residential
structures are deteriorating and there are few if any incentives for renovation under the
circumstances. In sum, these properties will most likely be developed in the future for
industrial purposes.
Valverde residents, together with the City, should negotiate their concerns with public and
private developers of industry and business and encourage them to be sensitive to
surrounding property owners. This is necessary to avoid further non-residential encroach-
ment into residential properties, as well as to consider the eventual removal of some
residential properties in areas clearly moving toward non-residential uses.
15


C. Industrial Land Uses
Valverdes predominant land use is industrial. There are 201 acres zoned for industrial uses,
41% of the net land use of the neighborhood. The strong and growing employment base in
Valverde was previously identified in the neighborhoods demographic and socio-economic
profile. The industrial and commercial areas provide substantial and accessible employment
opportunities for Valverde residents. Being located at the intersection of the West Sixth
Avenue Freeway and Interstate 25 and being close to downtown Denver, Valverde has high
visibility to industrial and office/warehouse users. These locational advantages result in
Valverde having somewhat lower vacancy rates and higher lease rates compared to many
other industrial areas in Denver.
The industrial land use areas are nearly all located in one of the three industrial zones. New
industrial development is likely in Valverde due to the large amount of industrially zoned
vacant land and the reuse of abandoned or under-utilized industrial properties. An example
is the new administrative and operations complex of Denvers Wastewater Management
Division that will be constructed on the former Denver Wood Products site.
Although further industrial development is encouraged as a general city policy, potential
problems should be mitigated before development proceeds. In addition to the buffering an.!
separation requirements mentioned earlier, development in industrial areas pose special
concerns that should be carefully tracked including ground contamination, air and noise
pollution, and manufacturing processes that may present health hazards. Industrial dew! :
ment should also be monitored with the recently enacted industrial zoning regulations m
mind.
Although there is a substantial amount of industrial activity in Valverde, industrial
development is not optimized despite its locational advantages. Industrial development :
evolved piece meal over time with somewhat discontinuous street patterns; vacant and
under-utilized sites exist but with few apparent large assemblages available. An in-depb
study of Valverdes industrial area should be undertaken, preferably in conjunction wiih
other older industrial areas in Denvers southwest quadrant. Such a study could idem it \
industrial redevelopment prospects and strategies for these older areas which are so
important to Denvers economic base.
Valverde is home to King Soopers, one of Denver's most successful companies. Approximately 2000 employees work in the
company's corporate offices, bakery, meat processing plant and general merchandise warehouses.
16


D. Vacant Land
Valverde has 55 acres of vacant land, down from 74 in 1981. Of this total, 48 acres are zoned
industrial. Denvers Comprehensive Plan encourages the complete development of vacant
land and stresses that development should be compatible with adjacent land uses and be
undertaken only after close consultation with affected residents and property owners. This
plan recommends that housing be developed on a prominent vacant industrially zoned site
at West Third Avenue and Decatur Street.
E. Commercial Land Uses
There are 14 acres of retail and 12 acres of service uses in Valverde, the great majority of
which are the B-4 zoned uses located along West Alameda Avenue and Federal Boulevard.
B-4 is a fairly permissive zone because it allows intensive office development and some light
industrial uses. Although the arterial strip businesses do provide some goods and services to
the neighborhood, many of the uses are marginal, transient, and are more orient-ed to the
arterial traveler. Several major vacancies have occurred along Alameda, including a major
grocery store in Alameda Square, and along Federal Boulevard. Efforts should be undertaken
to replace these vacancies with neighborhood serving uses, including a grocery store,
pharmacy, and child care facilities. (Efforts were undertaken since this plan was adopted and
a new grocery store, with pharmacy service, opened in Alameda Square in early 1992).
The arterial strips contain a substantial amount of physical and visual blight. Another
negative physical impact are the business encroachments into Valverdes residential areas
north of Alameda Avenue and east of Federal Boulevard, and the condition of some
of these business properties. Expansion of these business uses into the residential areas
should continue to be discouraged unless expansion is necessary for rehabilitation and
improves the neighborhood.
F. Parks and Open Space
The 30 acres of parks and open space continue to be one of Valverdes greatest assets
because they provide recreational opportunities to residents and employees in the area. The
parks are appropriately spaced throughout the neighborhood. In addition to the recreation
amenities they provide, they also serve as buffer areas between residential and non-
residential properties and between residential areas and various transporation corridors.
Despite the importance of parks and open spaces, there are some opportunities that need to
be addressed. The Denver Comprehensive Plan proposes a regional park along the South
Platte River. The proposed location is general but includes portions of Valverde and several
adjacent neighborhoods along the South Platte River. A regional park would build upon
Valverdes vision of once again becoming its namesake, a green valley. Other needed
improvements include the replacement of old recreation and playground equipment in the
neighborhood parks, and the re-routing of a bike route to Maple Avenue to connect
West Bar-Val-Wood Park with Valverde Park.
17


G. Action Recommendations
General Implementing Groups
LUZ-1 Prevent the expansion of industrial and commerical zone districts into existing residential areas of Valverde unless otherwise specified in this plan. Neighborhood Group City Council Planning & Community Development Office
LUZ-2 Develop the remaining vacant land in a manner that is compatible with the land use character and density of surrounding land uses and achieves city and neighbor- hood goals. Public & Private Developers Planning & Community Development Office
LUZ-3 Discourage the further encroachment into residential areas of the commercial zones along West Alameda Avenue and Federal Boulevard, except to improve the residential desireability of the area. City Council Planning & Community Development Office Neighborhood Group
LUZ-4 Amend the B-4 zone district in the Denver Zoning Ordinance to provide for sufficient buffering and landscaping where non-residen- tial uses abut residential uses. Neighborhood Group City Council Planning & Community Development Office Developers
LUZ-5 Retain vacant residentially zoned land for residential use, except in designated flood plain areas and where recommended in Residential Subarea III. Neighborhood Group City Council
LUZ-6 Upgrade/redevelop vacant and underutilized commercially zoned properties along West Alameda Avenue and Federal Boulevard into neighborhood serving businesses. Public & Private Developers
LUZ-7 Study the industrial areas and identify redevelopment prospects, opportunities, and public/private implementation strategies. Planning & Community Development Office Mayors Office of Economic Development Property Owners
18


LU2-8 Enforce the placement of
landscaping and buffers where
industrial development takes place
adjacent to remaining residentially
zoned properties as required by the
revised industrial zoning regulations
(Ordinance #22, 1991).
Residential Subarea I
LUZ-9 Acquire and develop
residentially the one acre site of
vacant industrially zoned land
owned by May Department Stores
at Decatur St. and W. 3rd Ave.
LUZ-10 Encourage residential
development of vacant land on the
east side of Alcott Street, just
north of West Alameda Avenue.
LUZ-11 Rezone Bamum Park East
from R-2 to 0-1 to reflect existing
land uses.
LUZ-12 Encourage and support
appropriate industrial development
of vacant industrially zoned land
by public and private developers.
Residential Subarea m
Section A
LUZ-13 Retain all residentially
zoned and used land for residential
use but allow the following areas
to transition from residential to
office/warehouse uses if they
submit a Planned Unit Development
rezoning that satisfactorily
addresses neighborhood concerns
with landscaping and buffering,
noise, building scale, height, and
placement, parking, and related
matters: a) the south face block of
Bayaud between Tejon and Raritan;
and b) the south face block of West
Byers Place between Tejon and Raritan
Planning & Community Development Office
Zoning Administration
Neighborhood Group
May Department Stores
Planning & Community Development Office
Housing Groups
Neighborhood Group
Housing Groups
Planning & Community Development Office
Neighborhood Group
Department of Parks & Recreation
Planning & Community Development Office
Planning & Community Development Office
Mayors Office of Economic Development
Denver Community Development Corp.
Neighborhood Group
City Council
Planning & Community Development Office
Zoning Administration
19


Section B
LUZ-14 Encourage the development
of existing vacant industrially
zoned land prior to converting or
demolishing residential structures
for industrial use.
LUZ-15 Allow the systematic and
timely transition to industrial
development of the industrially
zoned but residentially used areas
identified on the Residential
Subarea III Map.
LUZ-16 Rezone Valverde Park from
R-2 to 0-1 to reflect existing
land use.
Section C
LUZ-17 To guide the systematic
and timely residential to
lindustrial transition of the
three residentially zoned enclaves,
the following policies should be
observed during the rezoning and
development process:
a) support appropriate non-residential rezoning that is contiguous on at least two sides
to an existing non-residential zone;
b) encourage rezoning to appropriate non-residential development to take place in at
least one-half block increments so as not to leave isolated housing units;
c) encourage developers to use sensitive relocation methods to relocate displaced residents
to suitable residentially zoned areas; and
d) encourage developers to relocate, as feasible, residential structures to suitable vacant
residentially zoned sites in the neighborhood.
Planning & Community Development Office
Mayors Office of Economic Development
Planning & Community Development Office
Neighborhood Group
Department of Parks & Recreation
Planning & Community Development Office
Neighborhood Group
Planning & Community Development Office
Public & Private Developers
City Council
20


vi Transportation
ffi
^gmnamsmm
; . t'/V'V'*"- '
- .. \? *
n-----y&ztier^'*->*-
.^W. J* J . .. . f

'-X*lfc-',^,L -* *S"r
>w.- ,*
Looking east toward the intersection of West Alameda Avenue and South Federal Boulevard, one of the city's busiest
intersections. The plan recommends that the intersection be re-designed and reconstructed as part of the overall
improvement to West Alameda Avenue.
Valverde is served by a wide variety of transportation facilities and modes that move people,
goods, and services to, from, and through the neighborhood. Alternative transportation
modes include streets and highways, bus service, hike-bike trails, and railroads. Although
generally well-served, transportation was selected as a focus issue by the neighborhood
steering committee in updating the neighborhood plan because of a variety of important
transportation concerns that affect Valverdes residential and business communities.
A. Streets and Highways
t. Existing Street Classifications and Traffic Volumes
The City and County of Denver defines four categories of streets for the purpose of
describing and planning streets and highways. The criteria used for classification includes
function, access, width, volume of traffic, and signalization.
Local streets have the function of providing direct access to adjacent properties and of
carrying low volumes of traffic (less than 5000 vehicles per day) with an origin or destination
within the neighborhood (e.g. South Alcott Street, West Park Place).
Collector streets have the function of collecting and distributing traffic having an origin or
destination between arterial and local streets within the community, and linking
neighborhood residential areas, local and community shopping and service facilities, and
employment areas. Collectors typically carry up to 15,000 vehicles per day (e.g. Tejon Street
and West Second Avenue).
21


Existing Street Classifications
& Daily-Traffic Volumes__________________________
The following map indicates the existing street classification as well as the most recent traffic
volumes that are available.
SOURCE: Colorado Department of Highways and
Denver Transportation Division
FREEWAY
ARTERAL
COLLECTOR
N
0 500 1,000 2,000
22


Arterials have the function of permitting rapid and relatively unimpeded traffic movement
through the city and serving as a primary link between communities and major land use
elements. Some arterials, such as West Alameda Avenue and Federal Boulevard, are also state
highways. Arterials typically carry up to 50,000 vehicles per day.
Freeways have the function of permitting traffic to flow rapidly and unimpeded through and
around the metropolitan area (e.g. West Sixth Avenue and Interstate 25). Freeways typically
carry over 100,000 vehicles per day. The following map indicates the existing street
classification as well as the most recent traffic volumes that are available.
2. Truck Traffic, Movement and Designated Truck Routes
Although traffic volumes are substantial on a number of streets in Valverde, there is a fair
amount of truck traffic that enters and leaves the neighborhood by passing through or close
to residential areas. The impact of truck traffic is a concern to the neighborhood. In addition,
companies using trucks to move goods to and from their facilities have a concern over the
difficulty of truck movement at certain intersections because of inadequate turning radius
and signalization.
Denver has a number of designated truck routes adjacent to and in Valverde that allow truck
traffic. These truck routes are identified on the following map. The map also identifies those
streets which, because of their proximity to the industrial areas and truck traffic, have posted
restrictions to truck traffic. Although the impact of truck traffic has been reduced in recent
years, there continues to be a need to further reduce the impact of truck traffic on residential
areas by more signage of permitted routes and prohibitions. Truck prohibitions are effective
only if they are enforced by the police so residents are advised to notify the police of truck
traffic violations.
To address company concerns about tmck movement, the plan suggests improvements to
the turning radius at specified intersections and several other recommendations to improve
tmck movement into and out of the neighborhood at W. Sixth Avenue and Bryant and at
West Alameda Avenue and South Platte River Drive.
3. West Alameda Avenue
West Alameda Avenue is a major arterial serving Valverde, carrying approximately 30,000
vehicles per day on three westbound lanes and two eastbound lanes. Unfortunately, the
roadway is in poor condition, with deteriorated and uneven pavement and narrow lanes
for the traffic volumes carried. The roadway is unattractive and devoid of any urban design
amenities. Unattractive overhead street lights add to the image of discontinuity on Alameda.
Its functional and visual deficiencies are more readily apparent when compared with
the recent irhprovements to Alameda between Knox Court and Sheridan.
The recommendation in this plan is for the reconstruction of Alameda in a manner that
improves the traffic carrying capacity, accommodates bus service facilities and improvements,
upgrades the urban design character of the roadway environment (through a median and
streetscape improvements, etc.), and accommodates future redevelopment adjacent to the
roadway. This project is a top priority City request to the Colorado Department of
Transportation. Federal Aid Urban Systems (FAUS) funds have been allocated to design an
Alameda/Federal intersection reconstruction and the reconstruction of Alameda from Federal
Boulevard to Knox Court, but neither design money for the rest of this project nor
construction funding for any portion is available at this time.
23


Truck Routes & Posted Restrictions
route approved for all trucks Including those
carrying explosives and flammable liquids
route approved for all trucks except those
though-trucks carrying explosives and
flammable liquids
POSTED RESTRICTIONS
streets posted NO TRUCKS OVER 7000
POUNDS EMPTY WEIGHT" or TRACTOR
TRAILER VEHICLES PROHIBITED
N
e
500 1,000'
2,000'
24


4. West Sixth Avenue Freeway
Increasing traffic volumes, congestion, and a high accident rate on and around the West Sixth
Avenue Freeway/Interstate 25 interchange led the Colorado Department of Transportation
(CDOT) to commission a comprehensive traffic study of that area in order to recommend a
set of traffic improvements to facilitate traffic flow. CDOT selected the consulting firm of
DeLeuw, Gather & Co. to conduct this study. After analyzing traffic projections and examin-
ing alternative traffic plans, the consultants final report, Sixth Avenue/I-25 Interchange
Feasibility Study, was completed in January, 1985. Among its recommendations affecting
Valverde was the suggestion to shift Sixth Avenue access into Valverde from
Bryant to Decatur.
The neighborhood has several concerns that need to be addressed with CDOT on a
continuing basis. While maintenance of adequate access for businesses has been retained,
there is some concern over the impacts on the affected residential area as well as the
efficiency of the traffic flow under the recommended plan. In addition to this issue, the
neighborhood needs to discuss with CDOT how other long range improvement proposals to
West Sixth Avenue and Interstate 25 will affect Valverde before final decisions are made.
5- Federal Boulevard
Federal Boulevard is a major arterial that serves as Valverdes western boundary. It carries
about 35,000 vehicles per day on two northbound and three southbound lanes. Denvers
current long range transportation planning for Federal Boulevard calls for three through lanes
in each direction with a median and turn lanes at intersections. Current City policy to
implement this planning is to acquire additional right-of-way as parcels redevelop. Additional
land would be used temporarily for turn lanes and ultimately for through lanes. Given future
traffic demands, improvements to Federal Boulevard will need to be made to address
many of the same problems facing West Alameda Avenuenarrow lanes, pavement
deterioration, marginal land uses, and lack of aesthetics. As with West Alameda Avenue, the
Federal Boulevard improvements need to include streetscaping to beautify and restore this
old Denver parkway.
The City and County of Denver is currently examining these and related issues (design,
timing, etc) concerning Federal Boulevard and West Alameda Avenue as part of its Southwest
Quadrant Transportation Study. Much analysis and discussion between the City, its
consultants, the Colorado Department of Transportation, affected property owners, and the
neighborhoods must take place before the various interests and needs are evenly balanced,
and equitable decisions are reached on future improvements to Federal Boulevard and West
Alameda Avenue.
B. Mass Transit
1. Bus Routes
The following Regional Transportation District (RTD) bus routes serve the periphery of the
neighborhood: Routes 4 and 9 serve West Alameda down to West Second Avenue. While
these routes give excellent bus service to the periphery of Valverde, the interior of the
neighborhood is left virtually without bus service. This not only affects bus dependent
residents but is an especially overlooked need given the 5500 employees that work in the
neighborhood. Additional support for upgraded bus service are the publicly embraced goals
of energy conservation and reduced air pollution.
25


This plan recommends that improved bus service and ridership be achieved through
incentives and cooperative efforts of the City, RTD, major employers, and neighborhood
residents and employees. Specifically, RTD is requested to study the possibility of
expanding and adding bus service to the interior of Valverde.
2. Bus Shelters
Residents would like RTD to install more bus shelters along the bus routes on West Alameda
Avenue and Federal Boulevard because of the current lack of bus shelters, the substantial
number of transit users, and the perceived transit dependency of the neighborhood.
RTD has established criteria for the location of bus shelters including the volume and nature
of transit ridership as well as having sufficient right-of-way for installation. The plan
recommends specific sites for bus shelters when these criteria are met.
C. Hike-Bike Routes
There are several existing hike-bike routes in Valverde as indicated on the Hike-Bike Routes
Map which follows. Bike routes connect the neighborhood in all directions. The
neighborhood is well-connected to the Platte River Greenway hike-bike trail on the
eastern edge at South Platte River Drive and West Cedar Avenue. The bike routes link
together several of the neighborhood parks.
The plan recommends that the existing bike route connecting West Bar-Val-Wood Park to
Valverde Park be shifted from West Bayaud Avenue to West Maple Avenue because West
Bayaud is also a designated tmck route. To facilitate this recommendation it is necessary u>
pave Maple Avenue between Navajo and Pecos Streets. Additional hike-bike connections or
pedestrian access to the Platte River Greenway would be desirable. Although this is difficult
because of current land use and private ownership patterns, the neighborhood and city
should look for every opportunity to expand bike connections and pedestrian access to the
Greenway.
26


Hike-Bike Routes
PROPOSED
500 1,000
2,000
27


D. Action Recommendations Implementing Groups
T-l To minimize track violations through residential areas, provide better signage of permitted routes and posted restrictions, and police enforcement of track violations. Police Department Department of Public Works
T-2 To facilitate the movement of track traffic, study the need and feasibility of increasing the turn- ing radius during zoning and site plan review at all intersections used by track traffic. Initiate such studies at the following locations: a) the northeast corner of Tejon and Bayaud; b) the north- east corner of Second Avenue and Bryant Street; and c) the south- west corner of Second Avenue and Yuma Street. Department of Public Works Affected Property Owners Major Employers
T-3 Study the possible need to add a left turn signal from southbound South Platte River Drive onto east- bound West Alameda Avenue to facili- tate track use of the designated track route. Department of Public Works Major Employers
T-4 To facilitate the movement of westbound West Sixth Avenue track traffic exiting onto southbound Bryant Street, move the stop line for northbound traffic away from the intersection and, eventually, reconstruct the Bryant Street ramps west at Decatur Street to West Seventh Avenue. Department of Public Works Colorado Department of Transportation
T-5 Reconstruct West Alameda Avenue in concrete from the South Platte River to Knox Court with wider lanes, urban design amenities, streetscape improvements, and a sensitivity to adjacent redevelop- ment opportunities. Department of Public Works Colorado Department of Transportation City Council
T-6 During the reconstruction of West Alameda, work with Public Service Company to underground the utilities between Federal Boulevard and South Platte River Drive. Department of Public Works Public Service Co. Neighborhood Group
28


T-7 Make a request to the Colorado Department of Transportation that their plans, which would shift West Sixth Avenue access into Valverde from Bryant to Decatur and change the eastbound Sixth Avenue to northbound Federal Boulevard movement, be restudied with City officials, affected businesses and residents in view of concerns over impacts on the neighborhood and efficient traffic flow. Neighborhood Groups Colorado Department of Transportation Department of Public Works
T-8 Involve the affected residents, businesses, and elected officials in any improvements to be made to West Sixth Avenue and Interstate 25 as they affect Valverde, including current plans to reconstruct the West Sixth Avenue/Interstate 25 interchange, and long range plans to widen West Sixth Avenue and 1-25. Neighborhood Groups Colorado Department of Transportation Department of Public Works
T-9 Involve the affected property owners, residents, businesses, and elected officials in efforts by the City and State of Colorado to improve Federal Boulevard, taking into account such goals as safe traffic flow, urban design ameni- ties, streetscape improvements, development of adjacent properties, and impacts on residential areas. Department of Public Works Neighborhood Groups Colorado Department of Transportation Planning & Community Development Office
T-10 Improve bus service and ridership useage through incentives and cooperative efforts of the City, the Regional Transpor- tation District (RTD), employers, and neighborhood residents. Planning & Community Development Office RTD Major Employers
T-ll Request that RTD study the following additions to bus service in Valverde: extend the current Route 50 from West Second Avenue to the King Soopers employment area at Tejon and Irvington Place create a new route from the Morrison Road area, east on Alameda to Tejon, north on Tejon through Valverde and then to downtown Denver. Neighborhood Group Major Employers RTD
29


T-12 Request that RTD monitor conditions closely and install bus shelters just as soon as warranted at the following locations: Clay Street and Alameda Avenue, southeast corner (right-of-way is currently insufficient-require ROW if site rezoned) Tejon Street and Alameda Avenue, southeast and northwest corners (RTD says daily ridership insufficient) Pecos Street and Alameda Avenue, southeast corner (RTD says daily ridership is currently insufficient) Irvington Place and Federal Boulevard, northeast corner (RTD says daily ridership is currently insufficient) First Avenue and Federal Boulevard, southwest and northeast corners (RTD says daily ridership is insufficient) Neighborhood Group RTD
T-13 Provide safer hike-bike connection between the Platte River Greenway and West Bar-Val- Wood Park by designating West Maple Ave. rather than West Bayaud Avenue as the official hike-bike route at such time as Maple Avenue is paved between Pecos and Navajo Streets; provide an actual connection between Valverde Park and the Platte River Greenway. Neighborhood Group Department of Public Works Department of Parks & Recreation Platte River Greenway Foundation
T-14 Pave West Maple Avenue between Pecos and Navajo Streets Department of Public Works
30


vii. Housing
A typical Valverde residential area, well-maintained homes with a beautiful view of the downtown skyline.
Valverdes residential areas contain a large and generally stable housing stock. Housing types
vary but they are generally modest, well-maintained single story frame structures, some with
basements. A few structures of masonry construction are mixed in with the frame houses.
Housing was a third focus area examined by the neighborhood steering committee.
A. Existing Housing Stock
Valverdes existing housing stock is predominantly single-unit, owner-occupied, modestly
valued, and in good condition. In 1990, Valverde had 1246 housing units of which 794 were
single units and 452 were multi- units. Most of the multi-units are located in Columbine
Homes, a well-maintained 200 unit public housing complex built in 1956. Valverde has a
much higher percentage of its housing units in single units (64%) than does the city as a
whole (48%).
As the following table indicates, the rate of housing ownership in Valverde has declined
since 1950 and stabilized since I960. This is disappointing in view of widely accepted goals
for increases in home ownership. Valverdes 1990 estimated home ownership rate of 44%
was slightly higher than the 43% citywide rate.
31


Table 3 Valverde Housing Units, By Ownership Status, 1950-1990
1950 I960 1970 1980 1990
Ownership Status # % # % # % # % # %
Owner-occupied 720 76 803 58 681 50 615 47 552 44
Renter-occupied 200 21 534 38 656 48 625 48 568 46
Vacant 27 3 59 4 3 6 2 63 5 126 10
Totals 948 1396 1373 1303 1246
Source: U.S. Census of Housing, 1950, I960, 1970, 1980 and 1990.
Housing value, as indicated by the transaction prices of single family homes, is another way
to measure the trends in housing. The Single Unit Home Prices Chart which follows com-
pares mean transaction prices for Valverde and the city as a whole for the past twenty years.
The chart indicates that single unit home prices have increased substantially in Valverde over
the past twenty years but have not risen as rapidly as the average home prices in Denver as
a whole. This data is an indicator of change in value over time. The method used to
determine which transactions to select was somewhat different in 1986 through 1988 than
prior to 1988. Only one transaction per housing unit is used per year and transactions that
appear to clearly not be arms-length sales are excluded. Consequently, the average trans-
action prices for 1986 to 1988 will tend to be relatively higher than those preceeding 1986
SINGLE UNIT HOME PRICES
$ 100
1970-1988
80 i i i i i i i i 1 1 ICITY AVERAGE
60 i i 1 1 1 1 I 1 1 ^ 1 1 ^ ^ 1 > ^ 1 L-r- ~ ^
40 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i 4^ i I > 1 *
20 1 ^0 s *.**" i ... VALVERDE
0 1 1 I 1 l l i i l l 1 1
(THOUSANDS) I I I I I I i I I I I I I U I T I I
70 72 74 76 78 80 82 84 86 88
Source: Denver Planning and Community Development Office, Land Use File; based on information provided by the Denver Assessor's Office.
The overall condition of housing in the neighborhood varies from good to fair with only a
few areas containing poor or deteriorated housing. The housing on top of the bluff, west of
Zuni Street, is in especially good condition. The winding street pattern starting at Alcott
Street contributes to a healthy environment by providing a psychological and physical effect
of slowing down traffic.
Despite the generally good condition of housing, there are several problems that were iden-
tified. The area north of West Second Avenue in Residential Subarea I continues to need
special housing assistance to address some instances of vacant or deteriorated housing. A
special survey was conducted in Section A of Residential Subarea III. This survey revealed
that its housing, compared to housing in Residential Subarea I, is in somewhat poorer con-
dition, has more vacancies, and is inhabited by a higher proportion of renters and short term
residents.
32


Given these concerns, the plan recommends that these areas of Valverde receive focused
attention with a variety of housing resources and public improvements to combat the
housing deterioration. Specific assistance is suggested to improve both owner-occupied and
renter-occupied housing.
B. Action Recommendations
H-l Continue to secure housing
rehabilitation and improvement
assistance loans (e.g. Single
Family Rehabilitation Program,
Rental Rehab Program, Emergency
Home Repair Program, Caretakers
Program, etc) for owner and renter
occupied housing units where
needed but with particular concen-
tration in the following areas:
- Federal Boulevard to Decatur,
West Short Place to West Second Ave.
- Tejon to Raritan, West Byers Place
to West Bayaud Avenue.
H-2 Address the vacant housing
problems and structurally unsafe
housing problems through
appropriate enforcement of the
- abandoned and vacant housing
ordinance, the zoning ordinance,
and other available means.
H-3 Continue the rehabilitation
of the Columbine Homes (e.g. re-
roofing, replace sidewalks, remove
cottonwood trees and replace with
other trees).
H-4 Build new, affordable housing
at West Third Avenue and Decatur
Street, and other appropriate
sites.
H-5 In conjunction with the Bamum
neighborhood, explore establishing
a voluntary Neighborhood Housing
Services (NHS) Program to stabilize
the housing and residential portions
of Valverde.
H-6 Encourage home ownership by
distributing information on the
availability of financing to
renters of single unit homes.
Implementing Groups
Neighborhood Group
Denver Urban Renewal Authority
Planning & Community Development Office
Neighborhood Group
Building Department
City Attorney
Department of Public Works
Neighborhood Support Service Division
Zoning Administration
Denver Housing Authority
Neighborhood Group
May Department Stores
Housing Groups
Planning & Community Development Office
Neighborhood Group
Bamum NHS
Planning & Community Development Office
Planning & Community Development Office
Denver Urban Renewal Authority
Universal Lending Corp.
33


yiii. Community Facilities
West Bar-Val-Wood Park, located at South Tejon Street and West Cedar Avenue, is an important and heavily used
neighborhood park. Its name is derived from Valverde, the nearby Barnum Neighborhood direcdy to the west, and the old
Denver Wood Products company whose buildings were recently demolished to make way for a new City of Denver Public
Works facility.
A. Parks and Open Space
One of Valverdes greatest assets is its parks and open space areas. Valverde Park, Barnum
Park East/Crow Field, West Bar-Val-Wood Park, and several unnamed mini-parks are located
in Valverde. In addition, Valverde benefits significantly from the Platte River Greenway,
which is on the eastern boundary of the neighborhood.
Valverde Park, containing five acres, is located at West Cedar Avenue and Navajo Street. It is
adjacent to the Platte River Greenway. Valverde Park has a softball field but no bleachers,
playground equipment or picnic tables.
Barnum Park East, containing ten acres, is located at West Fifth Avenue and Federal
Boulevard. Located in Barnum Park East is Crow Field which has a lighted ballfield that is
used both by high school baseball teams for their regular season games and by softball
teams in the summer.
West Bar-Val-Wood Park, containing fourteen acres, is located at West Bayaud Avenue and
Tejon Street. This park has two baseball fields, picnic tables, and a childrens playground.
There is a need to upgrade the parks playground equipment.
The Platte River Greenway abuts Valverde Park at South Platte River Drive and West Cedar
Avenue. The connection between Valverde Park and the Greenway is poorly situated since
bicyclists must either ride along South Platte River Drive (a busy truck route) or double back
to the on-ramp to the Greenway hike-bike trail. Therefore, a connecting hike-bike route link
is proposed through Valverde Park to West Maple Avenue once Maple Avenue is paved.
34


Despite the adequacy of neighborhood parks, Valverde lacks recreational and related
community center facilities and services within the neighborhood. The plan suggests
exploring ways to acquire such a facility, such as the historic Valverde Neighborhood House
building, for, the benefit of Valverde and surrounding neighborhoods.
B. Storm and Sanitary Sewers
The overall condition of sanitary sewers is good. However, there are several areas in
Valverde in which the Denver Department of Public Works Wastewater Management
Division has recognized the need to construct or replace storm and sanitary sewers when
conditions warrant. These improvements are included in the Divisions long range facility
plans for Valverde and are identified in the Action Recommendations which follow.
C. Police Protection and Crime
Valverde is located in Police District #4, which includes southwest Denver and part of west
central Denver. The District 4 Police Station, built in 1987, is located at 2100 S. Clay Street.
The boundaries of Valverde are identical with the boundaries of Police Precinct #412.
According to the Denver Police Department, the 1990 rate of Class I crimes for each 1000
people in Valverde was 162, up from 106 in 1979. The highest number of reported crimes
continues to be burglary, grand larceny, and auto theft. The majority of the reported crimes
took place in the industrial and commercial portions of the neighborhood. Burglary and
street crimes most often occur where businesses and homes are not located close together,
increasing the difficulty of surveillance by residents and police. This is especially true in
portions of Valverde where the land use pattern is so mixed between residences and businesses.
The most effective curb of crime in Denver and throughout the nation has occurred when
effective police/community relations activities are established. Neighborhood crime watch
block programs have been highly successful in Denver and in parts of District #4, including
Valverde. Additional blocks are urged to work with the Police Department to establish the
neighborhood crime watch program for their block.
D. Fire Protection
The Valverde neighborhood is served by Fire Station #20, located at West Fifth Avenue and
Knox Court in the adjacent Barnum neighborhood and by Fire Station #23, located at West
Kentucky Avenue and S. Federal Boulevard.
E. Schools
No schools are located in Valverde. Children from the neighborhood attend elementary,
junior high, and senior high schools in adjacent neighborhoods. Barnum Elementary School
at 85 Hooker Street had an enrollment of 366 in 1990-91. Munroe Elementary School, at 3440
West Virginia Avenue, had 389 students. Valverde Elementary School, a major neighborhood
landmark, is located in the Athmar Park neighborhood on the southside of West Alameda
Avenue at South Tejon Street. The school was constructed in 1924 on a six acre site. It had
an enrollment of 366 students in 1990-91. Rishel Junior High School is located south of and
adjacent to Valverde Elementary School at 451 South Tejon Street. The school was construct-
ed in 1959 on a nine acre site and had a 1990-91 enrollment of 733 students. West and
Abraham Lincoln High Schools serve Valverde. West High School at 951 Elati Street is located
on a thirteen acre site and had a 1990-91 enrollment of 1688 students. Abraham Lincoln
High School at South Federal Boulevard and West Evans Avenue had a 1990-91 enrollment of
1598 students.
35


There was some concern on the steering committee with the need for some of the
neighborhood's elementary school students to cross two busy arterialsFederal and
Alameda. If the neighborhood decides it would like the Denver Public Schools .to consider
changing the elementary school boundaries to alleviate this concern, they should contact the
Denver Public Schools directly and make such a request.
F. Action Recommendations Implementing Groups
CF-1 Repair and upgrade toilet facilities and pave the parking lot at Barnum Park East/Crow Field. Department of Parks & Recreation
CF-2 Repair and upgrade toilet facilities at Valverde Park and West Bar-Val-Wood Park (may involve use of san-o-let enclosures for toilet facilities). Department of Parks & Recreation
CF-3 Upgrade playground equipment in the neighborhood parks. Department of Parks & Recreation
CF-4 Irrigate the greenbelt directly south of the entrance to West Sixth Avenue, between Federal Boulevard and Decatur Street. Department of Parks & Recreation
CF-5 In conformance with the long range plans and policies of the Denver Comprehensive Plan, consider locating a portion of the South Platte River regional park in Valverde. Department of Parks & Recreation Platte River Greenway
CF-6 Identify each park with appropriately designed and located signage. Department of Parks & Recreation
CF-7 Name and sign the mini-park near South Bryant Street and West Ellsworth Avenue. Neighborhood Group Department of Parks & Recreation
CF-8 Name and sign the mini-park at South Pecos Street and West Byers Place. Neighborhood Group Department of Parks & Recreation
CF-9 Explore ways to acquire and rehabilitate the historic Valverde Neighborhood House on West Alameda Avenue for community-wide benefit and reuse. Neighborhood Group Non-Profit Groups Department of Parks & Recreation
36


CF-10 Explore ways to raise
public and private funding to
build and operate a multi-purpose
community center that would provide
needed services to Valverde and
surrounding neighborhoods.
CF-11 Continue to seek assistance
to establish a neighborhood crime
prevention and watch program
(Operation Identification, etc)
on a block by block basis.
CF-12 In conformance with the
long range plans of the Department
of Public Works Wastewater
Management Division, construct
storm sewers in the following
areas as future needs dictate:
W. First Avenue (Clay to Bryant extended);
Bryant Street (First to Second Ave.); and
W. Second Avenue (Bryant to Yuma)
CF-13 In conformance with the
long range plans of the Department
of Public Works Wastewater
Management Division, construct/
upgrade sanitary sewers in the
following areas as capacity needs
are generated:
W. Third Avenue (Federal to Bryant);
W. Cedar Avenue (Federal to Pecos); and
Yuma Street (Second to Fourth Aves.).
CF-14 Explore ways to raise
public and private funding to
rehabilitate the facility owned by
the Denver Alternative Youth
Services Program (DAYS) in order
to provide better social services
to the people of Valverde and
surrounding neighborhoods in the
areas of job training and placement,
drug education, and family support.
Neighborhood Groups
Non-Profit Groups
Department of Parks & Recreation
Neighborhood Group
Denver Police Department
Wastewater Management Division
Wastewater Management Division
Neighborhood Group
Planning & Community Development Office
CDBGs Non-Profit Facility Program
Foundations
Non-Profit Groups
37


ix Environment
The South Platte River and Platte River Greenway/bikepath on the eastern edge of Valverde is an important community rt-
Valverdes physical environment has been partially addressed in the preceeding discussion'
on the neighborhoods land use and circulation patterns and its parks and open spaces. Thi'
chapter focuses upon such environmental topics and issues as topography and flood plain,
physical neighborhood improvements (streets and alleys, etc.), air and ground pollution, and
finally, energy and resource conservation.
A. Topography and Flood Plain
Compared to many Denver neighborhoods, Valverdes topography is interesting and hilly.
The high ground provides vistas of surrounding areas and serves as an excellent buffer
between the light industrial uses and some of the residential areas. In 1990 the Federal
Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), as part of the National Flood Insurance Program,
prepared a revised Flood Insurance Rate Map for the area affected by the flooding of the
South Platte River. The revised flood plain area is identified on the Topography and Flood
Plain Map which follows.
The map identifies the 100 year flood plain for Valverde as well as the topographical contour
lines. It is important that land use controls be used to restrict development within the
designated flood plain areas. The Denver City Council has adopted a Flood Plain Ordinance
that meets federal insurance agency criteria for purposes of flood insurance. The Ordinance
contains regulations to control and severly restrict development in the flood plain. It
identifies certain land uses that are more appropriate for safety purposes within a flood plain.
These land uses include open space, parks, trails, utility corridors, and railroads. For obvious
safety reasons, residential development is usually not permitted.
38


Topography & Flood Plain
FLOOD PLAIN
SOURCE: Federal Emergency Management Agency,
September, 1990
CONTOUR LINE
CONTOUR INTERVALS -10
SOURCE: United States Geological Survey
N
600 1,000
2,000
39


B. Residential Environment
The overall residential neighborhood environment in Valverde is good, although conditions
vary widely. The parks and open spaces have previously been mentioned as a major asset.
There are many nice homes such as the pleasant frame houses that sit on top of the
bluffs along curvilinear streets. The lawns are well maintained and these properties assist in
enhancing the overall appearance and image of the neighborhood. In most cases, the
physical condition of sidewalks, curbs, gutters, streets and alleys are sound. The plan
recognizes the need for continued improvement in the residential environment. Some streets
and alleys need to be paved. More trees are needed. Graffiti needs to be removed from
buildings. Junk cars need to be removed.
C. Air and Ground Pollution
The pollution of air and ground is an environmental concern in Valverde as it is in many
neighborhoods. The existing air (and noise) pollution is a result of the high traffic volumes
on arterial streets and highways that border Valverde (see the traffic volumes map in the
transportation chapter). All of the high vehicle volumes on these roadways contribute to air
pollution by releasing carbon monoxide and other contaminants into the atmosphere. To
assist in the fight against air pollution, Denver area citizens are encouraged by all state and
local officials to carpool and/or to use buses, bicycles or other less polluting and energy
efficient transportation modes whenever possible. In addition, adherence to Denvers wood-
burning ban is an important way to overcome air pollution.
Ground contamination is present in Valverde to a real but undetermined extent. Given that
portions of the neighborhood within or adjacent to the existing industrial area were at one
time used for junkyards or manufacturing processes that were relatively uncontrolled until
recently, it is clear that some ground contamination exists. Known contamination sites
include a small portion of the General Chemical Company site which has been identified by
the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as one of 44 properties scattered
throughout Denver which were contaminated by radioactive residues resulting from the
processing of radium in the early 1900s. The 44 Denver radium site properties are divided
into eleven groups for study and clean-up purposes. The groupings are based on location or
similarity of site characteristics. The General Chemical Company site is scheduled to be
cleaned up by late 1991.
Another ground contamination concern that could affect Valverde is the presence of old
sanitary landfills (dumps). There is a possibility that some of these old landfill sites may be
passive generators of methane gas. If methane gas hazards are identified by future studies,
the new industrial regulations in the Denver Zoning Ordinance will address problem areas
through development controls. Five potential methane hazard areas are located in
Valverde. These sites are located near the intersections of 1) South Tejon and West Cedar; 2)
West Sixth Avenue and Bryant Street; 3) South Platte River Drive and West Bayaud; 4) West
First Avenue and Bryant Street; and 5) West Sixth Avenue and Federal Boulevard.
If, in the unlikely event that these sites are determined to be hazardous, observance of the
ordinance restrictions will be necessary before undertaking excavation and expansion or
construction activities. Clean up of such sites will be important for both neighborhood public
health and economic development reasons.
40


D. Energy and Resource Conservation
A final environmental concern is energy and resource conservation. Although there is a clear
ebb and flow to the nations interest and commitment to energy conservation, the
consequences to the practice or lack of practice of conservation are substantial. Economic
growth, national security, and personal finance are all important reasons to practice
conservation.
Because energy and resource conservation is beneficial to the Valverde resident and business
person, as well as to the city and nation, this plan recommends the continuation of energy
conservation measures such as weatherization of homes and businesses. Recycling of
renewable resources, such as paper, aluminium, glass, oil, etc. is another important way for
individuals to contribute to conservation.
E. Action Recommendations
E-l Enforce the designated 100
year flood plain along the South
Platte River so that land use will
be regulated according to the
existing Denver Flood Plain
Ordinance, and applicable federal
regulations.
E-2 Construct new curbs and
sidewalks at the following locations:
- north and south sides of West
Bayaud Avenue, between South Clay
Street and South Dale Court
- north side of West Byers Place,
between Raritan and Tejon Streets
- east and west side of Raritan
Street, between Alameda and the
alley between Byers Place and
Cedar Avenue
- north side of West Second
Avenue, between Clay Street and
Bryant Street
E-3 Pave the following streets: Department of Public Works
- West Maple Avenue, between
Navajo and Pecos Streets
- West Fourth Avenue, east of
Dale Court
- Dale Court, between West Fifth
Avenue and West Short Place
E-4 Finish the recyled asphalt Department of Public Works
program for alleys in Valverde.
If needed and desired by residents,
establish a special improvement
district to pave alleys and make
other improvements.
Implementing Groups
Zoning Administration
Department of Public Works
Wastewater Management Division
Planning & Community Development Office
41


E-5 Improve the physical appearance of the neighborhood by removing graffiti, removing junk cars, cleaning up trashy areas, and shielding junk yards from adjacent, residentially zoned properties. Keep Denver Beautiful Zoning Administration Residents Employers
E-6 Encourage tree planting by the public and private sectors in the following locations: - Valverde Park - both sides of West Fifth Avenue, between Federal Blvd. and Decatur - other areas as needed/identified Department of Parks & Recreation Neighborhood Group Planning & Community Development Office
E-7 Reduce the air pollution impact in Valverde by supporting city and state air pollution control measures, including biking, carpooling, public transit, street sweeping, and wood burning restrictions. Residents Employers RTD
E-8 Study and clean up, as necessary, the ground contamina- tion in any identified sites U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Department of Public Works
E-9 Support neighborhood energy conservation programs. Promote energy conservation in residential and non-residential structures by: - evaluating heating and cooling alternatives - encouraging energy audits and inventorying building characteristics - promoting retrofitting of existing buildings and providing consumer protection information on energy matters. Westside Energy Co-op Public Service Company
E-10 Support neighborhood and city programs in recycling non- renewable resources (e.g. aluminium, glass, paper, plastics, oil, etc.) for the benefit of the neighborhood and city. Department of Public Works Residents Employers
42


X
E conomic Development
The Denver Community Development Corporation's (DCDC) Park One office wartehouses and showrooms has been at its
West Bayaud Avenue location since the early 1980's, employing approximately 100 people in the center's various businesses.
A. Overview of Existing Conditions
Economic development is an important, although not a top priority goal in Valverde. As
discussed earlier, Valverde is the home of many large and small businesses that employ
about 5500 people. Those businesses are an important source of neighborhood jobs and
income.
Despite the prominent economic base within Valverde, it is important for competitive reasons
for the neighborhood to constantly upgrade its business presence and for residents to
upgrade their job skills. As indicated earlier, Valverdes median household income is below
that of the city average. Increased employment and labor force preparation are important
goals to pursue. Another identified need is to re-attract such neighborhood serving
businesses as a grocery store and pharmacy, whereby residents would have a more
convenient location to shop and would be spending more money in their own neighborhood
to support local businesses.
In pursuing these needs, Valverde has a number of assets and opportunities to undertake
economic development. Access is excellent to and from the entire metropolitan area. There is
a substantial amount of vacant and underutilized land zoned for industrial and business uses.
Major employers in the area are showing a vitality through expansion and investment for the
future. In addition to numerous private investors and developers, the City and County of
Denver and the Denver Community Development Corporation (DCDC) have worked to
stimulate development activity that is compatible with other city and neighborhood goals.
43


B. Action Recommendations Implementing Groups
ED-1 Retain existing businesses and stimulate additional commercial and industrial development and employment opportunities through: the promotion of the City and County of Denver State Enterprise Zone and exploration, with the Mayor's Office of Economic Development, of extending it to the currently undesignated commercial portions of Federal Boulevard (W. Second Avenue to Alameda) and West Alameda (Tejon to Federal Boulevard). the utilization by qualified business people of City and County of Denver small business assistance programs (Revolving Loan Program and technical assistance). Mayors Office of Economic Development Neighborhood Group Public and Private Developers
ED-2 Stimulate additional employment and upgrade labor force skills by encouraging neighborhood residents to work with the City (e.g. Denver Employment and Training Administration, etc.) and local businesses to increase and diversify their employment training and job skills. Denver Employment & Training Admin. Employers
ED-- Work to secure needed neighborhood serving retail goods and services, including a grocery store, pharmacy, and child care. Neighborhood Group Mayors Office of Economic Development Planning & Community Development Office
ED-4 Continue to study the economic development prospects and opportunities of businesses in the area (constantly taking into account new information, such as the Federal/Alameda corridor study report, Westwood Commercial Corri- dor: Market Analysis & Redevelop- ment Strategies), develop and implement realistic and market-based development strategies. Neighborhood Group Mayors Office of Economic Development Planning & Community Development Office
44


x i Implementation
Implementation of the Valverde Neighborhood Plan is well underway. A number of recommendations have already been
carried out, including the installation of curbs and sidewalks, shown here along the north side of West Byers Place, between
Raritan and Tejon Streets.
The principal purpose for preparing this plan is to influence and guide the process of change
in Valverde to better meet the needs of the residents and business people in the neighbor-
hood. This plan represents the concensus of the neighborhood in identifying and analyzing
neighborhood needs, issues, and opportunities.
The heart of this plan is in the specific policy implementation proposals that the neighbor-
hood steering committee, working with the city, has prepared to carry out the plan. These
proposals, termed "Action Recommendations", are presented at the conclusion of each
substantive chapter. The implementation actions vary widely. Some are simple, require
minimal or no financial resources, and can be accomplished rather easily and quickly.
Others are complex, require substantial financial resources, and need further study and
discussion/negotiation before they can be initiated and accomplished.
A. Means of Plan Implementation
The sixty-seven Action Recommendations in this plan constitute an agenda with which to
begin the implementation of this plan. But how do the Action Recommendations get
implemented? Who is responsible to carry them out? The means of implementing this
plan are as numerous as the individual proposals. However, the primary techniques of plan
implementation are the expenditure of public funds, the enactment and enforcement of
public ordinances and regulations, and the use of the plan policies by public bodies (e.g.
City Council, Planning Board, etc.) in making decisions that affect Valverde.
The available funding sources for plan implementation are themselves varied. The citys six
year Capital Improvements Program Plan (CIPP) describes available resources for project
45


funding. Action Recommendations that are appropriate for total or partial CIPP funding
should be placed within the CIPP. Although the competition for the CIPPs limited funds is
severe among Denvers neighborhoods, every effort should be made to place as many
projects as possible within the all important first year of the CIPP, which is the citys Capital
Improvement Budget, because those projects actually receive funding whereas the
projects listed in years two through six are future promises. Another important funding
resource for moderate income neighborhoods such as Valverde is the federal Community
Development Block Grant Program (CDBG) as administered by the city. CDBG is actually
several programs including the Residential Neighborhood Small Projects Program (RNSP),
Commercial Streetscape Program (CSP), the Non-Profit Facility Improvements Program (NFI),
and the Alley and Street Improvement Program. Valverde should actively pursue these CDBG
programs for funding selected projects. Some substantive program areas, such
as transportation and housing, have their own funding sources and these have been listed in
their Action Recommendations. A second means of implementing the Valverde Neighbor-
hood Plan will be through the enactment and enforcement of city ordinances. Certain Action
Recommendations will be carried forward through the application of the Denver Zoning
Ordinance, Vacant and Abandoned Housing Ordinance, and other city, state, and federal
regulations.
Some of the Action Recommendations are statements of public policy and these also serve to
implement the Valverde Neighborhood Plan. For example, there are a number of
recommendations in the land use and zoning chapter that address the future land use and
zoning for Valverde. The enforcement of these policies will be a vital way to maintain and
strengthen the stability of Valverde.
B. Human Resources of Plan Implementation
Regardless of the various plan implementation techniques, the common denominator of all
successful implementation work is people working together. Accompanying each Action
Recommendation is a list of Implementing Groups who are identified as the primary
groups that, because of expertise, authority, and resources, are responsible for carrying out
the Action Recommendation, or for advocating it to those groups with the authority and
resources to carry it out. The two groups that are chiefly responsible for implementation of
this plan are the City and County of Denver and the Valverde neighborhood residents and
business community. They are the major catalysts that will energize and involve a wider
range of other people in public and private organizations to carry out the Action
Recommendations.
The City and County of Denver is a major player in the plans preparation, adoption, and
implementation. Once adopted by the Mayor and City Council, the plan will become part of
the official Denver Comprehensive Plan. As such, it will help to influence city policies,
programs, and decisions that will be crucial in implementing the Action Recommendations.
The staff of the Planning and Community Development Office and the many other city
agencies listed herein will work with the neighborhood to articulate the plan proposals to
the Denver Planning Board, City Council, and all relevant city decision-making bodies. In
addition to the plans guidance, city staff will be available to assist the neighborhood as
Valverde seeks to influence the city decisions and actions on zoning requests, the evaluation
of public and private development proposals, CIPP, CDBG, and other funding requests and
regulatory ordinances.
Although the citys expertise and resources are significant, the primary energy, motivation,
and responsibility for implementing the Valverde Neighborhood Plan must be the people of
Valverde. Strong and ongoing involvement by Valverdes residents and business people will
be necessary to take the leadership in carrying out this plan, to refine it and keep it updated
46


as time goes on, and in branching out to address new neighborhood issues. An ongoing
neighborhood planning and decision-making process needs to be established to spur the
people of Valverde to actively promote the general interests of their neighborhood.
While this may mean organizing from time to time to fight undesirable changes,
neighborhood leaders also need to inspire the neighborhood to be pro-activeto actively
and effectively secure decisions that improve Valverde, and bring it closer to its long range
vision for itself.
Perhaps the most important recommendation of this plan is to establish a neighborhood
organization in Valverde. This proposal stemmed from the steering committees early
identification of the lack of an organized neighborhood group as a top issue to address
in the planning process. There are many reasons why an organized neighborhood group is
needed, many purposes for it to serve, and many activities for it to undertake. In sum,
establishing a neighborhood organization that is registered with the city and is vigilant about
overseeing the plans implementation is the most important proposal for this plan and for
Valverde at this time. Once this is accomplished the neighborhood organization can
broaden its scope and develop its expertise into other areas of service to the people of
Valverde.
C. Action Recommendation
1-1 Establish a registered
neighborhood organization that is
effective in overseeing and
coordinating the implementation
and refinement of this plan
and grows to serve the broader
needs and interests of the
Valverde neighborhood.
1-2 Monitor the current adequacy
of this plan and update it when
needed.
Implementing Groups
Residents
Employers
Neighborhood Group
Planning & Community Development Office
47


Appendix
By Authority
ORDINANCE NO. 326 COUNCIL BILL NO. 305
SERIES OF 1991 COMMITTEE OF REFERENCE:
PARKS, RECREATION
ZONING, PLANNING
A Bill
for an Ordinance Approving a neighborhood plan for the
VALVERDE NEIGHBORHOOD, WHICH PLAN SHALL BECOME A PART OF
THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN FOR THE CITY AND COUNTY OF DENVER
PURSUANT TO THE PROVISIONS OF SECTION 4l-18(c) OF THE REVISED
MUNICIPAL CODE AND OF ORDINANCE NO. 617, SERIES OF 1989.
WHEREAS, pursuant to the provisions of Section 4l-18(c) of the Revised Municipal Code,
and by Ordinance No. 617, Series of 1989, there has been approved a Comprehensive Plan
for the City and County of Denver; and
WHEREAS, said Section of the Revised Municipal Code provides for the amendment of said
Plan; and
WHEREAS, Ordinance No. 617, Series of 1989, provides for the incorporation of Neighbor-
hood Plans into the Comprehensive Plan; and
WHEREAS, as a proposed part of the Comprhensive Plan, the Planning Director has
transmitted to the Mayor and Council for acceptance a proposed neighborhood plan for the
orderly and harmonious development of the Valverde nerighborhood in the City and County
of Denver; and,
WHEREAS, the Mayor has approved the same; and
WHEREAS, the Planning Board has approved the same; and
WHEREAS, the Neighborhood Plan was prepared with significant involvement of the
residents and representatives of the various interest of the Valverde neighborhood and has
been approved by the same; and
WHEREAS, a member of City Council in whose council district the neighborhood plan is
situated has monitored the process whereby said plan was formulated,
Now, Therefore
BE IT ENACTED BY THE COUNCIL OF THE CITY AND COUNTY OF DENVER:
Section 1. That the proposed neighborhood plan for the harmonious development of the
Valverde neighborhood, consisting of a document entitled The Valverde Neighborhood
Plan, filed with the City Clerk, Ex-Officio Clerk of the City and County of Denver, on the
24th day of April, 1991, as City Clerks Filing No. 91-445, is hereby approved as part of the
Comprehensive Plan, pursuant to Section 4l-18(c) of the Revised Municipal Code, and
Ordinance No. 617, Series of 1989.
48


Section 2. That the approval of The Valverde Neighborhood Plan, and of any subsequent
amendment thereto, is intended to establish the same, in conjunction with the Comprehensive
Plan, as the official guide for officials of the City and County of Denver and private citizens
when making decisions affecting the future character of the Valverde neighborhood of the
City and County of Denver; provided, however, that such approval shall not preempt the
decision making powers vested by law or the administrative directive in the Mayor, the
Council or any other official of the City and County of Denver with respect to, but not
limited to, a zoning map amendment, a zoning language amendment, a dedication or
vacation of a street, alley or other public way, a designation of a park, the issuance of a
revocable permit, a conveyance or the acquisition of real property by the City and County
of Denver, of an appropriation for or construction of a capital improvement; and provided,
further, that it is expressly understood that judgement must be exercised in the application of
The Valverde Neighborhood Plan recommendations in the decision making processes of the
Mayor, Council and other officials of the City and County of Denver.
PASSED BY THE COUNCIL MAY 13, 1991
CATHY DONAHUE-PRESIDENT
APPROVED: FEDERICO PENA, MAYOR, MAY 16, 1991
ATTEST: FELICIA MUFTIC CLERK AND RECORDER, EX-OFFICIO CLERK OF THE
CITY AND COUNTY OF DENVER
PUBLISHED IN THE DAILY JOURNAL MAY 3, 1991, MAY 17, 1991
PREPARED BY: ROBERT M. KELLY, ASSISTANT CITY ATTORNEY 4/24/91
REVIEWED BY: GEORGE CERRONE, CITY ATTORNEY 4/26/91
SPONSORED BY COUNCIL MEMBER RAMONA MARTINEZ
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-------------VALVERDE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN PLAl,INING AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OFFICE CITY AND COUNTY OF DENVER MAY 1991

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Mayor of Denver Honorable Wellington E. Webb Denver Plarulin.g Board Ruth Falkenberg, Chair Debra Gallegos David Hare Bernie Jones Gail Klapper Jeanne Labuda Philip Milstein Rick Pederson Marilyn Stokes Denver Planning and Community Development Office Jennifer Moulton, Director of Planning and Development David Becker, Senior City Planner and Report Author Ken Barkema, Report Graphics Karl Haberman, Report Graphics Mark Hess, Report Graphics Carolyn Moore, Report Word Processing Valverde Neighborhood Steering Committee James Swanson Robert Wright Our thanks to all of the people who attended our meetings and participated in creating the Valverde Neighborhood Plan. Special thanks to Councilwoman Ramona Martinez, Council Aide Marshall Vanderburg, and the Steering Committee members listed below who gave of their time and talent. All made special contributions to the preparation of this plan. Pam Barnabas, Chair Ray Ahls Bill Eason Nina Eason Hank Kaan Bernice Kenderes Rich Moore Jean Moore Lois Padgett Tom Smedley Acknowledgement is also given to former members of the City Administration, Denver Planning Board, and Denver Planning and Community Development Office who made the preparation and approval of this plan possible, including Federico Pefia, former Mayor of Denver; Richard Deane, former chair, and Jerome Nagel, John Maldanado, and Martin Saiz--all former members of the Denver Planning Board; Frank Gray, former Director of the Denver Planning and Community Development Office, Billie Bramhall, former Deputy Director of the Denver Planning and Community Development Office; and Frances Burg, former word processing specialist in the Denver Planning and Community Development Office. The Valverde Neighborhood Plan was approved by the Denver Planning Board following a public hearing on March 27, 1991. Following a publichearing it was approved by the Denver City Council on May 13, 1991. It was approved by the Mayor on May 16, 1991, at which time it became part of the Denver Comprehensive Plan.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS Page I. VISION FOR VALVERDE'S FUTURE ............................................................................................................................................. 1 II. INTRODUCTION ........................................................................................................................................................................... 2 A. Location and Description ............................................................................................................................................... 2 B. Planning Process ............................................................................................................................................................. 2 C. Organization and Use of the Plan ................................................................................................................................. 3 m. WSTORY ..................................................................................................... ................................................................................ 4 IV. DEMOGRAPHIC AND SOCIO-ECONOMIC PROFll.E .............................................................................................................. 6 A. Population and Households .......................................................................................................................................... 6 B. Emplo)'IIlent and Income ............................................................................................................................................... 6 V. LAND USE AND ZONING ............................................... .............................................................................................................. 9 A. General ............................................................................................................................................................................ 9 B. Residential Land Uses .................................................................................................................................................. 11 1. Residential Subarea I ............................................................................................................................................... 11 2. Residential Subarea II .............................................................................................................................................. 13 3. Residential Subarea 111. ............................................................................................................................................ 13 a. Section A ............................................................................................................................................................ 13 b. Section B ............................................................................................................................................................ 15 c. Section C ............................................................................................................................................................ 15 C. Industrial Land Uses ..................................................................................................................................................... 16 D. Vacant Land .................................................................................................................................................................. 17 E. Commercial Land Uses ................................................................................................................................................. 17 F. Parks and Open Space ................................................................................................................................................ 17 G. Action Recommendations ............................................................................................................................................ 17 VI. TRANSPOR'L\.TION ................................................................................................................................................................... 21 A. Streets and Highways ................................................................................................................................................... 21 1. Existing Street Classifications and Traffic Volumes ............................................................................................... 21 2. Truck Traffic, Movement and Designated Truck Routes ...................................................................................... 23 3. West Alameda Avenue ............................................................................................................................................ 23 4. West Sixth Avenue Freeway ................................................................................................................................... 25 5. Federal Boulevard .................................................................................................................................................. 25 B. Mass Transit .................................................................................................................................................................. 25 1. Bus Routes .............................................................................................................................................................. 25 2. Bus Shelters ............................................................................................................................................................. 26 C. Hike-Bike Routes .......................................................................................................................................................... 26 D. Action Recommendations ............................................................................................................................................ 28 VII. HOUSING .................................................................................................................................................................................. 31 A. Existing Housing Stock ................................................................................................................................................ 31 B. Action Recommendations ............................................................................................................................................ 33 vm. COMMUNITY FACIUTIES ..................................................................................................................................................... 34 A. Parks and Open Space ................................................................................................................................................. 34 B. Storm and Sanitary Sewers .......................................................................................................................................... 35 C. Police Protection and Crime ........................................................................................................................................ 35 D. Fire Protection .............................................................................................................................................................. 35 E. Schools .......................................................................................................................................................................... 35 F. Action Recommendations ............................................................................................................................................. 36 IX. ENVIRONMENT ......................................................................................................................................................................... 38 A. Topography and Flood Plain ....................................................................................................................................... 38 B. Residential Environment .............................................................................................................................................. 40 C. Air and Ground Pollution ............................................................................................................................................ 40 D. Energy and Resource Conservation ............................................................................................................................ 40 E. Action Recommendations ............................................................................................................................................ 41 X. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT .................................................................................................................................................... 43 A. Overview of Existing Conditions ................................................................................................................................. 43 B. Action Recommendations ............................................................................................................................................ 44 XI. IMPLEMEN'L\.TION ................................................................................................................................................................... 45 A. Means of Plan Implementation .................................................................................................................................... 45 B. Human Resources of Plan Implementation ................................................................................................................ 46 C. Action Recommendations ............................................................................................................................................ 47 APPENDIX ........................................................................................................................................................................................ 48 ii

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I VISION FOR VALVERDE'S FUTURE Valverde is a neighborhood rich in history and tradition located on Denver's near westside. The preferred future of Valverde is to reclaim its namesake of a "green valley," and to improve the over-all quality of life among those who will live and work together in an attractive, safe, workable environment. Valverde will have reassumed its rightful place within the city as a neighborhood that is known for its identity and valued for its varied resources and contributions. The future of Valverde will emphasize the various quality of life elements that will continue to make the neighborhood a desirable and attractive place to live and work. The needs of the people in Valverde will be paramount. Housing will be attractive, affordable, stabilized, safe, and located in residential areas that are well-served by all necessary public facilities and services, and protected from environmentally unattractive and unsafe intrusions. West Alameda Avenue will be a beautiful parkway. Streets and alleys will all be paved and well maintained. Valverde will also continue to be a very important employment area that provides jobs, income, shopping, and services to the neighborhood. Employment areas, as the residential areas, will have easy functional access and good circulation, while protecting residential areas from traffic. Vacant, commercially zoned land will be developed in such a way as to be sensitive to surrounding uses and will provide employment opportunities to the neighborhood. The vision for Valverde includes a clean, attractive, safe and workable physical environment. A "good neighbor" policy will enable the residential areas to co-exist with and have a mutually beneficial relationship with nearby non-residential uses that are clean, safe, attractive and environmentally sound. The neighborhood's relationship to the Platte River Valley will be strengthened and enhanced. Landscaping and trees will "green-up" the neighborhood. Views of the mountains and downtown will be preserved. Recreational facilities and services will be available for residents to enjoy. Valverde's future will also include convenient access to all of the necessary social services and cultural resources-schools, health care, child care, etc.-that are essential for the people to live fulfilled, productive lives. The special needs of the young, elderly, and handicapped are taken into account. 1

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I I INTRODUCTION 1941 aerial view of parts of Valverde and Athmar Park. In the center is the Valverde Elementary School, at the intersection of West Alameda Avenue and South Tejon Street. A. Location and Description Valverde is one of Denver's most diverse yet stable neighborhoods. It is located in Denver's near westside, just west of the Valley Highway CI-25) and the South Platte River. The neighborhood is bounded on the north by the West Sixth Avenue Freeway, on the south by West Alameda Avenue, on the west by Federal Boulevard, and on the east by the South Platte River. The major residential land uses located in the western and southern parts of the neighborhood are generally separated by topography from the industrial and warehousing areas to the north and east. A key landmark by which the neighborhood is popularly identified is the Valverde Elementary School, located on West Alameda Avenue at Tejon Street, just east of the Alameda Shopping Center. Valverde has a large area of modest but well-maintained housing, with several neighborhood parks. It also has an exceptionally large industrial area and employment base, containing regional warehouses such as those of King Soopers and May D & F, and longtime industries such as the General Chemical Company. B. Planning Process The Valverde Neighborhood Plan was adopted by the City and County of Denver in 1981 and served well as an official guide to the physical development of the neighborhood for the past ten years. Because the 1981 Plan had become somewhat dated and some new concerns had arisen that needed a fresh assessment, the new City Councilwoman of the area requested the Planning and Community Development Office to undertake a neighborhood planning process, recruit a neighborhood steering committee of Valverde residents and business people, and prepare an updated neighborhood plan for Valverde. A large community meeting was held at which time the City Councilwoman and the representatives from the Planning and Community Development Office introduced the audience to the goal of undertaking a plan update. Input was solicited and received as to what the planning effort should address. A neighborhood steering committee was formed, based on volunteers from this meeting and supplemented by other interested residents and businesspeople. The steering committee met with Planning and Community Development staff and determined that the plan update process, which was structured from the beginning to expedite its work, should focus on four priority planning issues: 1) the 2

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1951 aerial view of similar parts of Valverde and Athmar Park as 1941 aerial, plus additional area to the west and south. Note the amount of new development between 1941 and 1951. residential land use area bounded by Alameda, Bayaud, Tejon and Raritan; 2) selected transportation concerns; 3) ways to be effective in organizing the neighborhood on an ongoing basis to implement this plan, solve problems, and optimize opportunities; and J l selected housing concerns. l,. i The general process in updating the 1981 Valverde Neighborhood Plan was for the steln:1..: committee and staff to review the former plan, update the information and data base, analyze new problems and opportunities, and focus on preparing an entirely new set (
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I I I HISTORY This important neighborhood landmark was built in the early 1920's as a church. However, it served Valverde in a dual capacity over the years. As a community center it was known as Valverde Neighbmhood House (the cover photo). In April, 1923 the Valverde Presbyterian Church, which was established in 1891, began using the building for religious services and stayed there until 1957 when they moved to their new building at South Tejon and West Alaska Avenue. The bell on the church building is from the old Wright Memorial Methodist Church. It was installed on the church building when that congregation disbanded and joined the Valverde Presbyterians. The name "Valverde" means "green valley" in Spanish. The early settlers saw the beautiful green area buffering the South Platte River as a valley of flourishing green, natural vegetation, and trees. The Valverde neighborhood has some interesting history as recorded in documents in the Western History Section of the Denver Public Library. According to an article in the Rocky Mountain News of November 19, 1873, Valverde was the name of the new town laid out on the line of the Denver and South Park Railroad. Hall's History of the State of Colorado states that Valverde was platted by Edward A. Reser on July 17, 1882. On June 4, 1888 Judge George W. Miller appointed four trustees who called an election for July 2, at which time it was resolved to incorporate while Valverde was still in Arapahoe County. It was described as one of Denver's suburbs, growing quite rapidly, and the home to a number of manufacturing establishments. In 1902 the Town of Valverde was dissolved and annexed to the City of Denver under the Colorado Session Laws of 1893. 4

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One important factor in old Valverde was the Valverde Improvement Association. According to the Denver Municipal Facts issue of January 13, 1912, the Valverde Improvement Association was organized on April 10, 1909. Its contributions to Valverde and a taste of its civic interests can be understood from this partial exerpt from its 1911 annual report: "This organization has helped to bring about the West Alameda subway, the new steel bridge, the tramway extension into Valverde, culverts at street crossings, electric lights all over this section, electric arc lights where most needed, the improvement of the town hall, a branch public library, West Bayaud Avenue at the glassworks has been widened, and street signs have been posted... Other things promised in the future are the grading of streets, more mail boxes and better mail service, curbing and sidewalks along the more important streets, more arc lights, removal of telephone and light posts, establishment of a kindergarten, a new grade school building, a park along the river, a fire station, and the completion of the Denver to Morrison road and its connection with Alameda Avenue." Historical development in the neighborhood took place first in the area along Alameda Avenue and east of Tejon Street. This area formed the nucleus of the old Valverde community, along with the northeastern part of Athmar Park and the adjacent industrial areas of the Athmar Park and Sun Valley neighborhoods. Early development also took place in the northwestern section of the area, which is closely related to the old Barnum community. In earlier times, Federal Boulevard was narrow, did not carry much traffic, and did not create the physical and psychological barrier that it does today. After the turn of the century, development commenced in the area east of Tejon Street, but it was not until 1915 that substantial construction activity occurred. During the period from 1915-1929, 29% of the blocks in Valverde developed, and 32% of the blocks developed by half or more during the period from 1945-1959. The majority of this later development was concentrated in a subdivision in the southwestern section of the neighborhood. The industrialization of the area surrounding the river basin started with the selling of the small truck farms for redevelopment. In this area the small truck farms existed and flourished. The farmers used their small trucks to take products to the marketplace. The construction of 1-25 in the mid-1950's and the West Sixth Avenue Freeway in the 1960's had a major impact on the industrialization of the Valverde neighborhood. The highway and freeway had many interchanges-on and off ramps at West Sixth Avenue and Federal Boulevard, Bryant Street, and West Alameda Avenue-that provided excellent access to the area. This central location provided an excellent area for redevelopment in the building of warehouses, offices, and light industrial uses. A major historic event for Valverde was the severe flood of the South Platte River that Denver experienced on June 16, 1965. Citywide figures reveal that 1,368 houses sustained damage estimated at $3,360,000, and 1,164 commercial structures received damage amounting to $9,844,000. One of the worst hit neighborhoods was Valverde, which suffered approximately $500,000 worth of property damage. Flooding affected the area from the South Platte River to approximately Tejon Street, and further north and west. About 324 homes were condemned, of which 75 housing structures were completely lost. The 1965 flood caused many people to leave Valverde, especially those who lived east of Tejon Street. 5

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IV. DEMOGRAPHIC AND SOCIO-ECONOMIC PROFILE Mayor Webb, Councilwoman Martinez and residents at the grand opening of Alameda Foods, an important grocery shopping facility for the community. A. Population and Households Population trends between 1960 and 1990 in Valverde show an overall loss of population and housing units, a decreasing average household size, and an increasing elderly and minority population. Recently released 1990 census figures indicate that during the 1980's Valverde lost 317 residents, gained nearly 200 Hispanic residents, and had a net loss of 57 housing units. Valverde's 1990 housing units totaled 1246, yielding an average household size of 2.46-lower than in 1980 but higher than the estimated 1990 citywide average of 2.27. The Population Chart which follows indicates the loss in total population between 1960 and 1990, with an absolute and proportional increase in the minority Hispanic population. The population and household losses between 1960 and 1980 were due primarily to smaller households, housing conversions to non-residential use, and the after-effects of the 1965 flood. These trends also continued in the 1980's, albeit at a slower rate. Valverde's Hispanic population has been increasing steadily during the past thirty years and at a much faster rate than the Hispanic population increase in Denver as a whole. For example, the Hispanic proportion of Valverde's population increased from only 11% in 1960 to 62% in 1990. This compares to the Hispanic proportion of Denver's population increasing from 9% in 1960 to 23% in 1990. Valverde's sharp increase in Hispanic population is part of a well-established trend of Hispanics moving to west and southwest Denver. B. Employment and Income Valverde's economic base and socio-economic conditions can be understood by referring to several basic economic indicators. Valverde has long been a major area of employment 6

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opportunity for residents in and near the neighborhood. Total employment in Valverde, that is the number of people working in Valverde, regardless of where they live, increased from 4833 in 1983 to 5473 in 1988. This was an increase of 640, or just over 13%, in just five years. J.>OJ.>UI..A.TION :4,388 I I 5,000 I I I ..... :3,926 VALV,ERDE NEIGHB
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Median family income estimates for Valverde in 1985 were $13,283 compared to the citywide figure of $23,546. Despite continual increases in Valverde's family income, it has not kept pace with the increases shown by the citywide averages. One reason for this is the relatively large percentage of elderly in Valverde living on fixed income. Valverde's 1985 per capita income was estimated to be $6,126 compared to the citywide estimate of $12,088. MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME 1970-1985 $ 25,000 : : : _, $23,546 : : : -.,. : 20,000 I I .,. I : : DENVER : .,_ .,_ : : : __ ,. : 15,000 1 6 : ............... -: i1.L::J,::JVV $13 283 :$9, 54 .......... -; I ___ .......... I t : -..... ..... I ____ ....,..._ I 10,000 -------I $10 371 : i VALVERDE i : 5,000 11970 I 11980 11985 SOURCE: TilE 1970 AND 1980 FIGURES ARE FROM TilE U.S. CENSUS; TilE 1985 ESTIMATES ARE BY TilE DENVER REGIONAL COUNCIL OF GOVERNMENTS. 8

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v. LAND USE AND ZONING Valverde is a mixed-use neighborhood with substantial residential and business areas. In some parts of the neighborhood the residences and businesses are adjacent as shown here. A. General Valverde is comprised primarily of industrial and single-family residential land uses; however, there is a fair amount of vacant land and open space. All existing land uses are categorized by the zone district in which they are located in the following table: Table 2 Net* Land Use by Zoning Classification (in acres) April, 1986 ZONING DISTRICTS %of Existing Land Use R-1 R-2 R-3 0-1 B-4 I-0 I-1 I-2 TOTAL TOTAL Single-unit Residential 70 45 1 0 2 3 0 1 122 25 Multi-unit Residential 3 12 0 0 0 0 0 0 15 3 Industrial 0 1 0 0 8 45 75 72 201 41 Retail 0 0 0 0 13 0 1 0 14 3 Services 0 0 0 0 3 5 0 4 12 3 Vacant 1 5 0 0 1 22 2 24 55 11 Public/Quasi Public 0 2 14 0 0 0 2 0 18 3 Parks & Recreation 0 17 0 13 0 0 0 0 30 6 Transportation, Communications, Utilities 0 0 0 0 1 5 7 9 22 5 Total 74 82 15 13 28 80 87 110 489 100 Net excludes street and alleys: all figures are rounded to the nearest whole acre. Planned Unit Development: A zoning district totalling less than one acre, includes industrial, single-unit residential and vacant land uses. Source: Planning and Community Development Office, April 1986. 9

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EXISTING ZONING R-1 Singi&-Unit Detached Dwellings, Low Density. Density= 7.3 dwelling unitslaae. R-2 Multi-Unit Dwellings, Low Density. Density .5 dwelling unitslacre. R-3 Multi-Unit Dwellings, High Density. Maximum density is not specified and is determined by the size of the units and the factors mentioned above. B-4 General Business District This district is intended to provide lor and encourage appropriate commercial uses adjacent to arterial streets, which are normally transit routes, and abutting residential districts. Building floor area cannot exceed twice the site area. 1-0 Ugh! Industrial District A transitional district between intensive industrial and residential districts. Allows limited manufacturing, wholesale and retail activities, offices, and motels. 1-1 General Industrial District Allows many manufacturing, warehousing, wholesaling activities, along with limited retail and service uses for the benefit of area employees. Building floor area cannot exceed 2 times the site area 1 Heavy Industrial District Allows all manufacturing, warehousing, wholesaling and mineral extraction activities. Umited retail and service uses for the benefit of area employees are permitted. 0.1 Open Use District Allows airports, reaeational uses, parks, cemeteries, reservoirs, community corractionallacilities, and other public and semi-public uses housed in buildings. P-1 Off-Street Parking District. Allows parking lots and structures. Bulk and setback regulations apply to structures. This zone is intended to provide needed business parking without the expansion of the business zone. PUD Planned Unit Development. PUD is a form of development generally characterized by a unified site design lor clustering buildings and providing common open-space, density inaeases, and a mix of building types and land uses. It allows maximum flexibility during the planning stage and maximum assurance that exactly what Is proposed will be developed. N $ 500' 1,000' 10

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The distribution of land use has remained fairly constant. However, between 1980 and 1986 industrial land use increased by 27 acres, vacant land decreased by 19 acres and single family residential declined by 3 acres. Valverde's land use characteristics are similar to other older neighborhoods that have been classified as "opportunity neighborhoods" in the Denver Comprehensive Plan. In general, land uses are consistent with the way they are zoned (see Existing Zoning Map on page 10) with the exception of several acres of residential uses scattered throughout several non-residential, primarily industrially zoned, districts. Many of the land uses are separated by natural differences in the topography, such as along West Second Avenue where residential uses have developed on top of the bluffs and where industry developed to the east below the bluff, down in the Platte River Valley. This kind of land use separation is appropriate and should be maintained wherever possible. While the presence of substantial amounts of industrial and residential land use in close proximity to each other requires careful and continual attention, the only land use problem addressed by the neighbothood steering committee is where that delicate balance has been compromised in a portion of southeast Valverde. This is one of the primary focus issues addressed in this plan and will be discussed below. B. Residential Land Uses Residential land uses in Valverde make up only 28% of the neighborhood's total net land use area. Overall, the residential environment is good and there is an interesting mixture of older and somewhat newer housing. Residents generally take pride in keeping up their homes. A major asset is that nearly all of Valverde's residents have easy access to at least one of the neighborhood's five parks. These parks, which total 30 acres, provide residents with open space and recreational amenities. Another asset to Valverde residents is that most of the residential areas are close to the neighborhood and regional businesses that serve them. Residents also have quick vehicular access to other parts of Denver due to the two freeways and two arterial streets that border the neighborhood. The residential zoning in Valverde is mostly R-1 and R-2, which allows single family residences and duplexes. There is also a small area of R-3 zoning located in the south central portion of the neighborhood, which accomodates the only medium density apartment area (Columbine Homes) in Valverde. Due to the variety of housing and land use conditions in Valverde, three residential subareas were examined and will be briefly analyzed below. The Residential Subareas Map on page 12, identifies these subareas. 1. Residential Subarea I The largest residential subarea in Valverde covers the entire western portion of the neighborhood. This subarea contains the most stable and least threatened residential area in Valverde. There are a wide variety of housing types, ages, and conditions here. With the exception of a few scattered duplexes in the extreme northwest section and along the western portion of the neighborhood, this area is characterized primarily by single family residences. Although there are numerous amenities in Subarea I, it does have several land use concerns that bear close monitoring. First, the commercial properties along Federal Boulevard and Alameda Avenue have some negative impacts on abutting residential properties. These commercial properties should be contained within their present boundaries, face the arterial strip, and be landscaped or buffered to protect the adjacent residential areas. 11

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RESIDENTIAL SUBAREAS I ]' ....------..----' N $ 0 500' 1 ,000' 2,000' 12

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A second concern is the threat of industrial expansion into the neighborhood. It is important to keep an appropriate separation between these land uses where possible. For example, the residential properties located along the bluffs should continue to be maintained away from the industrial uses located down in the Platte River Valley. An example where the residential environment might be threatened is the large vacant parcel located at the intersection of South Decatur Street and West Third Avenue on top of the bluff. This large parcel is owned by the May Department Stores Company. It is zoned 1-0 for light industry and intrudes west into the residential area. This parcel would be more suitable for residential development because it is surrounded on three sides by residential land uses. A third concern is the northwest portion of this subarea, north of West Second Avenue. This residential area has several scattered vacant parcels mixed in with houses, some of which are rundown. The Caretaker Program has worked in this area recently and fixed up numerous homes along West Short Place. This residential area should continue to receive focused assistance to upgrade its housing and public improvements. 2. Residential Subarea II The second residential area in Valverde is bounded by West Bayaud on the north, West Alameda on the south, South Zuni on the west, and South Tejon on the east. The three main land uses are a housing complex, West Bar-Val-Wood Park and the West Alameda strip businesses. The major land use is the Denver Housing Authority's 200 unit Columbine Homes complex. The complex occupies almost three full blocks, accommodates approximat ely 400 people, and is the only R-3 zoned residential development in Valverde. The apart ments and lawns are generally well-maintained and have recently received some improve ments to the sidewalks. Needed improvements include re-roofing and replacement of the cottonwood trees. Given the close access of the park, and lack of industrial proximity to even pose a threat, the only concern in this subarea is the previously mentioned need to closely monitor the Alameda commercial strip. 3. Residential Subarea m This subarea occupies the southeastern portion of the neighborhood. It is the most complex and challenging residential area in Valverde due to the mixture of residential and non residential areas. Various threats make this residential subarea the most unstable of the three residential areas. First, there is a significant amount of industry either abutting or mixed in with residential properties. Therefore, the residential properties suffer greater negative impacts from industrial truck traffic and air and noise pollution than any other residential subarea. Second, commercial properties border residential properties along the southern portion of the subarea. Third, there are many vacant parcels scattered throughout Subarea III, providing an element of instability and uncertainty to the remaining residential properties. Fourth, many of the residential properties lie within the South Platte River flood plain (see map in the Environment chapter on page 39). Lastly, many housing structures are in poor condition due to age, the 1965 flood, and lack of maintenance. Because of the complexity and importance of site-specific factors in Subarea III, three sections within this subarea have been identified on the Residential Subarea III Map. The policy recommendations for future land use for each section are summarized below. a. Section A Section A is the most stable residential area within Subarea III. It is predominantly residential but does contain several vacant parcels and office/warehouse uses. The houses are generally quite nice, but there are several vacant or unkept residential properties. 13

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SUBAREA 3 FUTURE POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS w. RESIDENTIAL (L[] PARKS IZ2Z3 COMMERCIAL (::::::::::::::::1 INDUSTRIAL II RESIDENTIAL TO NON-RESIDENTIAL TRANSITION AREA ....-.-RAILROAD LANDSCAPE BUFFERING SECTION BOUNDARY LINE 14 N $ 0 250' 500' 1,000'

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The primary policy recommendation for Section A is to maintain the residential character of this area by maintaining the residential zoning and by improving the housing and public improvements. Two face blocks have undergone partial non-residential development and/or non-residential zoning and the remaining residentially zoned properties in these face blocks will be considered for office/warehouse uses under Planned Unit Development zoning that will assure appropriate landscaping, buffering, sensitivity to adjoining properties, and over all improvement to the neighborhood. Those two face blocks are: south face block of Bayaud, between Tejon and Raritan south face block of Byers, between Tejon and Raritan This residential area, given its proximity to adjacent industrial uses, should be strongly considered as a focus area for concentrated housing and public improvements assistance. b. Section B The zoning in Section B includes B-4, 1-0, 1-2, and R-2. It is characterized by extensively mixed land uses, including single units, light and heavy industry, office and commercial, numerous scattered vacant uses (all zoned industrial) and Valverde Park. The major problems stem from severe residential/ non-residential land use conflicts. The main concern is that the remaining residential structures are mixed in with industry and are suffering negative impacts. Moreover, industrial development here could also have negative impacts on the adjacent stable residential portions of Section A. The long range development for this subarea will be industrial given its industrial zonmg Due to the fact that there is a large amount of vacant industrially zoned land available throughout Section B, the plan encourages the development of vacant land prior to additional industrial rezonings that might occur. Also, as industrial development does LA place, landscaping and buffering should occur to protect the adjacent properties. c. Section C Section C is comprised of two block faces on West Byers Place from South Pecos Street c.1st to the South Platte River, one-half block north of Alameda Avenue, and the northern block face along West Byers Place east of South Navajo. Section C is the most threatened area within Subarea III that includes residentially zoned properties. The zoning includes I-0 and R-2. The land uses include residential, industrial and vacant land. Although each of the three block faces are somewhat different in their zoning and land use conditions, they are all impacted negatively by the same land use conditions. The future viability of residentially used and zoned properties is very uncertain. All of the three block faces are bordered on the north by light industry and on the south by the Alameda Avenue businesses. In all cases the land use conflicts and conditions are the most severe of any Valverde residential area. Enclaves of residential properties suffer severe negative impacts of air and noise pollution from industrially related truck traffic. They are located in the South Platte River flood plain. A railroad line intersects the area. Finally, many of the residential structures are deteriorating and there are few if any incentives for renovation under the circumstances. In sum, these properties will most likely be developed in the future for industrial purposes. Valverde residents, together with the City, should negotiate their concerns with public and private developers of industry and business and encourage them to be sensitive to surrounding property owners. This is necessary to avoid further non-residential encroach ment into residential properties, as well as to consider the eventual removal of some residential properties in areas clearly moving toward non-residential uses. 15

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C. Industrial Land Uses Valverde's predominant land use is industrial. There are 201 acres zoned for industrial uses, 41 o/o of the net land use of the neighborhood. The strong and growing employment base in Valverde was previously identified in the neighborhood's demographic and socio-economic profile. The industrial and commercial areas provide substantial and accessible employment opportunities for Valverde residents. Being located at the intersection of the West Sixth Avenue Freeway and Interstate 25 and being close to downtown Denver, Valverde has high visibility to industrial and office/warehouse users. These locational advantages result in Valverde having somewhat lower vacancy rates and higher lease rates compared to many other industrial areas in Denver. The industrial land use areas are nearly all located in one of the three industrial zones. New industrial development is likely in Valverde due to the large amount of industrially zoned vacant land and the reuse of abandoned or under-utilized industrial properties. An example is the new administrative and operations complex of Denver's Wastewater Management Division that will be constructed on the former Denver Wood Products site. Although further industrial development is encouraged as a general city policy, potential problems should be mitigated before development proceeds. In addition to the bufferinf.! r1.: separation requirements mentioned earlier, development in industrial areas pose specia 1 concerns that should be carefully tracked including ground contamination, air and noisl pollution, and manufacturing processes that may present health hazards. Industrial den i ment should also be monitored with the recently enacted industrial zoning regulations 1r mind. Although there is a substantial amount of industrial activity in Valverde, industrial development is not optimized despite its locational advantages. Industrial developmen: evolved piece meal over time with somewhat discontinuous street patterns; vacant a nj under-utilized sites exist but with few apparent large assemblages available. An in-dep:: study of Valverde's industrial area should be undertaken, preferably in conjunction with other older industrial areas in Denver's southwest quadrant. Such a study could identi!\ industrial redevelopment prospects and strategies for these older areas which are so important to Denver's economic base. Valverde is home to King Soopers, one of Denver's most successful companies. Approximately 2000 employees work in the company's corporate offices, bakery, meat processing plant and general merchandise warehouses. 16

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D. Vacant Land Valverde has 55 acres of vacant land, down from 74 in 1981. Of this total, 48 acres are zoned industrial. Denver's Comprehensive Plan encourages the complete development of vacant land and stresses that development should be compatible with adjacent land uses and be undertaken only after close consultation with affected residents and property owners. This plan recommends that housing be developed on a prominent vacant industrially zoned site at West Third A venue and Decatur Street. E. Commercial Land Uses There are 14 acres of retail and 12 acres of service uses in Valverde, the great majority of which are the B-4 zoned uses located along West Alameda Avenue and Federal Boulevard. B-4 is a fairly permissive zone because it allows intensive office development and some light industrial uses. Although the arterial strip businesses do provide some goods and services to the neighborhood, many of the uses are marginal, transient, and are more orient-ed to the arterial traveler. Several major vacancies have occurred along Alameda, including a major grocery store in Alameda Square, and along Federal Boulevard. Efforts should be undertaken to replace these vacancies with neighborhood serving uses, including a grocery store, pharmacy, and child care facilities. (Efforts were undertaken since this plan was adopted and a new grocery store, with pharmacy service, opened in Alameda Square in early 1992). The arterial strips contain a substantial amount of physical and visual blight. Another negative physical impact are the business encroachments into Valverde's residential areas north of Alameda Avenue and east of Federal Boulevard, and the condition of some of these business properties. Expansion of these business uses into the residential areas should continue to be discouraged unless expansion is necessary for rehabilitation and improves the neighborhood. F. Parks and Open Space The 30 acres of parks and open space continue to be one of Valverde's greatest assets because they provide recreational opportunities to residents and employees in the area. The parks are appropriately spaced throughout the neighborhood. In addition to the recreation amenities they provide, they also serve as buffer areas between residential and nonresidential properties and between residential areas and various transporation corridors. Despite the importance of parks and open spaces, there are some opportunities that need to be addressed. The Denver Comprehensive Plan proposes a regional park along the South Platte River. The proposed location is general but includes portions of Valverde and several adjacent neighborhoods along the South Platte River. A regional park would build upon Valverde's vision of once again becoming its namesake, a green valley. Other needed improvements include the replacement of old recreation and playground equipment in the neighborhood parks, and the re-routing of a bike route to Maple Avenue to connect West Bar-Val-Wood Park with Valverde Park. 17

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G. Action Recommendations General LUZ-1 Prevent the expansion of industrial and commerical zone districts into existing residential areas of Valverde unless otherwise specified in this plan. LUZ-2 Develop the remaining vacant land in a manner that is compatible with the land use character and density of surrounding land uses and achieves city and neighborhood goals. LUZ-3 Discourage the further encroachment into residential areas of the commercial zones along West Alameda Avenue and Federal Boulevard, except to improve the residential desireability of the area. LUZ-4 Amend the B-4 zone district in the Denver Zoning Ordinance to provide for sufficient buffering and landscaping where non-residen tial uses abut residential uses. LUZ-5 Retain vacant residentially zoned land for residential use, except in designated flood plain areas and where recommended in Residential Subarea III. LUZ-6 Upgrade/redevelop vacant and underutilized commercially zoned properties along West Alameda Avenue and Federal Boulevard into neighborhood serving businesses. LUZ-7 Study the industrial areas and identify redevelopment prospects, opportunities, and public/private implementation strategies. Implementing Groups Neighborhood Group City Council Planning & Community Development Office Public & Private Developers Planning & Community Development Office City Council Planning & Community Development Office Neighborhood Group Neighborhood Group City Council Planning & Community Development Off1ce Developers Neighborhood Group City Council Public & Private Developers Planning & Community Development Office Mayor's Office of Economic Development Property Owners 18

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LUZ-8 Enforce the placement of landscaping and buffers where industrial development takes place adjacent to remaining residentially zoned properties as required by the revised industrial zoning regulations (Ordinance #22, 1991). Residential Subarea I LUZ-9 Acquire and develop residentially the one acre site of vacant industrially zoned land owned by May Department Stores at Decatur St. and W. 3rd Ave. LUZ-10 Encourage residential development of vacant land on the east side of Alcott Street, just north of West Alameda Avenue. LUZ-11 Rezone Barnum Park East from R-2 to 0-1 to reflect existing land uses. LUZ-12 Encourage and support appropriate industrial development of vacant industrially zoned land by public and private developers. Residential Subarea m Section A LUZ-13 Retain all residentially zoned and used land for residential use but allow the following areas to transition from residential to office/warehouse uses if they submit a Planned Unit Development rezoning that satisfactorily addresses neighborhood concerns with landscaping and buffering, noise, building scale, height, and placement, parking, and related matters: a) the south face block of Bayaud between Tejon and Raritan; and b) the south face block of West Byers Place between Tejon and Raritan 19 Planning & Community Development Office Zoning Administration Neighborhood Group May Department Stores Planning & Community Development Office Housing Groups Neighborhood Group Housing Groups Planning & Community Development Office Neighborhood Group Department of Parks & Recreation Planning & Community Development Office Planning & Community Development Office Mayor's Office of Economic Development Denver Community Development Corp. Neighborhood Group City Council Planning & Community Development Office Zoning Administration

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Section B LUZ-14 Encourage the development of existing vacant industrially zoned land priQr to converting or demolishing residential structures for industrial use. LUZ-15 Allow the systematic and timely transition to industrial development of the industrially zoned but residentially used areas identified on the Residential Subarea III Map. LUZ-16 Rezone Valverde Park from R-2 to 0-1 to reflect existing land use. Section C LUZ-17 To guide the systematic and timely residential to !industrial transition of the three residentially zoned enclaves, the following policies should be observed during the rezoning and development process: Planning & Community Development Office Mayor's Office of Economic Development Planning & Community Development Office Neighborhood Group Department of Parks & Recreation Planning & Community Development Office Neighborhood Group Planning & Community Development Offiet: Public & Private Developers City Council a) support appropriate non-residential rezoning that is contiguous on at least two sides to an existing non-residential zone; b) encourage rezoning to appropriate non-residential development to take place in at least one-half block increments so as not to leave isolated housing units; c) encourage developers to use sensitive relocation methods to relocate displaced residents to suitable residentially zoned areas; and d) encourage developers to relocate, as feasible, residential structures to suitable vacant residentially zoned sites in the neighborhood. 20

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V I TRANSPORTATION Looking east toward the intersection of West Alameda Avenue and South Federal Boulevaro, one of the city's busiest intersections. The plan recommends that the intersection be re-designed and reconstructed as part of the overall improvement to West Alameda Avenue. Valverde is served by a wide variety of transportation facilities and modes that move people, goods, and services to, from, and through the neighborhood. Alternative transportation modes include streets and highways, bus service, hike-bike trails, and railroads. Although generally well-served, transportation was selected as a focus issue by the neighborhood steering committee in updating the neighborhood plan because of a variety of important transportation concerns that affect Valverde's residential and business communities. A. Streets and Highways 1. Existing Street Classifications and Traffic Volumes The City and County of Denver defines four categories of streets for the purpose of describing and planning streets and highways. The criteria used for classification includes function, access, width, volume of traffic, and signalization. Local streets have the function of providing direct access to adjacent properties and of carrying low volumes of traffic (less than 5000 vehicles per day) with an origin or destination within the neighborhood (e.g. South Alcott Street, West Park Place). Collector streets have the function of collecting and distributing traffic having an origin or destination between arterial and local streets within the community, and linking neighborhood residential areas, local and community shopping and service facilities, and employment areas. Collectors typically carry up to 15,000 vehicles per day (e.g. Tejon Street and West Second Avenue). 21

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EXISTING & DAILY STREET TRAFFIC CLASSIFICATIONS VOLUMES The following map indicates the existing street classification as well as the most recent traffic volumes that are available. SOURCE: Colorado Department of Highways and Denver Transportation Division 22 --FREEWAY --ARTERAL -COLLECTOR N $ 0 500' 1,000' 2,000'

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Arterials have the function of permitting rapid and relatively unimpeded traffic movement through the city and serving as a primary link between communities and major land use elements. Some arterials, such as West Alameda Avenue and Federal Boulevard, are also state highways. Arterials typically carry up to 50,000 vehicles per day. Freeways have the function of permitting traffic to flow rapidly and unimpeded through and around the metropolitan area (e.g. West Sixth Avenue and Interstate 25). Freeways typically carry over 100,000 vehicles per day. The following map indicates the existing street classification as well as the most recent traffic volumes that are available. 2. Truck Traffic, Movement and Designated Truck Routes Although traffic volumes are substantial on a number of streets in Valverde, there is a fair amount of truck traffic that enters and leaves the neighborhood by passing through or close to residential areas. The impact of truck traffic is a concern to the neighborhood. In addition, companies using trucks to move goods to and from their facilities have a concern over the difficulty of truck movement at certain intersections because of inadequate turning radius and signalization. Denver has a number of designated truck routes adjacent to and in Valverde that allow truck traffic. These truck routes are identified on the following map. The map also identifies those streets which, because of their proximity to the industrial areas and truck traffic, have posted restrictions to truck traffic. Although the impact of truck traffic has been reduced in recent years, there continues to be a need to further reduce the impact of truck traffic on residential areas by more signage of permitted routes and prohibitions. Truck prohibitions are effective only if they are enforced by the police so residents are advised to notify the police of truck traffic violations. To address company concerns about truck movement, the plan suggests improvements to the turning radius at specified intersections and several other recommendations to improve truck movement into and out of the neighborhood at W. Sixth Avenue and Bryant and at West Alameda Avenue and South Platte River Drive. 3. West Alameda Avenue West Alameda Avenue is a major arterial serving Valverde, carrying approximately 30,000 vehicles per day on three westbound lanes and two eastbound lanes. Unfortunately, the roadway is in poor condition, with deteriorated and uneven pavement and narrow lanes for the traffic volumes carried. The roadway is unattractive and devoid of any urban design amenities. Unattractive overhead street lights add to the image of discontinuity on Alameda. Its functional and visual deficiencies are more readily apparent when compared with the recent improvements to Alameda between Knox Court and Sheridan. The recommendation in this plan is for the reconstruction of Alameda in a manner that improves the traffic carrying capacity, accommodates bus service facilities and improvements, upgrades the urban design character of the roadway environment (through a median and streetscape improvements, etc.), and accommodates future redevelopment adjacent to the roadway. This project is a top priority City request to the Colorado Department of Transportation. Federal Aid Urban Systems (FAUS) funds have been allocated to design an Alameda/Federal intersection reconstruction and the reconstruction of Alameda from Federal Boulevard to Knox Court, but neither design money for the rest of this project nor construction funding for any portion is available at this time. 23

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TRUCK ROUTES & W. ALAMEDA AVE. II II II POSTED RESTRICTIONS Study the need to add a left turn signal __, TRUCK ROUTES for all trucks including those carrying explosives and flammable liquids route approved for all trucks except those though-trucks carrying explosives and flammable liquids POSTED RESTRICTIONS streets posted "NO TRUCKS OVER 7000 POUNDS EMPTY WEIGHT" or "TRACTOR TRAILER VEHICLES PROHIBITED" N $ 0 500' 1,000' 2,000' 24

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4. West Sixth Avenue Freeway Increasing traffic volumes, congestion, and a high accident rate on and around the West Sixth Avenue Freeway/Interstate 25 interchange led the Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT) to commission a comprehensive traffic study of that area in order to recommend a set of traffic improvements to facilitate traffic flow. CDOT selected the consulting firm of DeLeuw, Cather & Co. to conduct this study. After analyzing traffic projections and examin ing alternative traffic plans, the consultant's final report, Sixth Avenue/I-25 Interchange Feasibility Study, was completed in January, 1985. Among its recommendations affecting Valverde was the suggestion to shift Sixth Avenue access into Valverde from Bryant to Decatur. The neighborhood has several concerns that need to be addressed with CDOT on a continuing basis. While maintenance of adequate access for businesses has been retained, there is some concern over the impacts on the affected residential area as well as the efficiency of the traffic flow under the recommended plan. In addition to this issue, the neighborhood needs to discuss with CDOT how other long range improvement proposals to West Sixth Avenue and Interstate 25 will affect Valverde before final decisions are made. 5. Federal Boulevard Federal Boulevard is a major arterial that serves as Valverde's western boundary. It carries about 35,000 vehicles per day on two northbound and three southbound lanes. Denver's current long range transportation planning for Federal Boulevard calls for three through lanes in each direction with a median and turn lanes at intersections. Current City policy to implement this planning is to acquire additional right-of-way as parcels redevelop. Additional land would be used temporarily for turn lanes and ultimately for through lanes. Given future traffic demands, improvements to Federal Boulevard will need to be made to address many of the same problems facing West Alameda Avenue-narrow lanes, pavement deterioration, marginal land uses, and lack of aesthetics. As with West Alameda A venue, the Federal Boulevard improvements need to include streetscaping to beautify and restore this old Denver parkway. The City and County of Denver is currently examining these and related issues (design, timing, etc) concerning Federal Boulevard and West Alameda Avenue as part of its Southwest Quadrant Transportation Study. Much analysis and discussion between the City, its consultants, the Colorado Department of Transportation, affected property owners, and the neighborhoods must take place before the various interests and needs are evenly balanced, and equitable decisions are reached on future improvements to Federal Boulevard and West Alameda Avenue. B. Mass Transit 1. Bus Routes The following Regional Transportation District (RTD) bus routes serve the periphery of the neighborhood: Routes 4 and 9 serve West Alameda down to West Second Avenue. While these routes give excellent bus service to the periphery of Valverde, the interior of the neighborhood is left virtually without bus service. This not only affects bus dependent residents but is an especially overlooked need given the 5500 employees that work in the neighborhood. Additional support for upgraded bus service are the publicly embraced goals of energy conservation and reduced air pollution. 25

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This plan recommends that improved bus service and ridership be achieved through incentives and cooperative efforts of the City, RTD, major employers, and neighborhood residents and employees. Specifically, RTD is requested to study the possibility of expanding and adding bus service to the interior of Valverde. 2. Bus Shelters Residents would like RTD to install more bus shelters along the bus routes on West Alameda Avenue and Federal Boulevard because of the current lack of bus shelters, the substantial number of transit users, and the perceived transit dependency of the neighborhood. RTD has established criteria for the location of bus shelters including the volume and nature of transit ridership as well as having sufficient right-of-way for installation. The plan recommends specific sites for bus shelters when these criteria are met. C. Hike-Bike Routes There are several existing hike-bike routes in Valverde as indicated on the Hike-Bike Routes Map which follows. Bike routes connect the neighborhood in all directions. The neighborhood is well-connected to the Platte River Greenway hike-bike trail on the eastern edge at South Platte River Drive and West Cedar Avenue. The bike routes link together several of the neighborhood parks. The plan recommends that the existing bike route connecting West Bar-Val-Wood Park to Valverde Park be shifted from West Bayaud Avenue to West Maple Avenue because West Bayaud is also a designated truck route. To facilitate this recommendation it is necessary to pave Maple Avenue between Navajo and Pecos Streets. Additional hike-bike connections or pedestrian access to the Platte River Greenway would be desirable. Although this is difficult because of current land use and private ownership patterns, the neighborhood and city should look for every opportunity to expand bike connections and pedestrian access to the Greenway. 26

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HIKE-BIKE ROUTES 27 --EXISTING 111111111111111111111111111111 PROPOSED N 0 500' 1,000' 2,000'

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D. Action Recomm.endations T-1 To minimize truck violations through residential areas, provide better signage of permitted routes and posted restrictions, and police enforcement of truck violations. T-2 To facilitate the movement of truck traffic, study the need and feasibility of increasing the turn ing radius during zoning and site plan review at all intersections used by truck traffic. Initiate such studies at the following locations: a) the northeast corner of Tejon and Bayaud; b) the north east corner of Second Avenue and Bryant Street; and c) the south west corner of Second Avenue and Yuma Street. T-3 Study the possible need to add a left turn signal from southbound South Platte River Drive onto eastbound West Alameda Avenue to facili tate truck use of the designated truck route. T -4 To facilitate the movement of westbound West Sixth Avenue truck traffic exiting onto southbound Bryant Street, move the stop line for northbound traffic away from the intersection and, eventually, reconstruct the Bryant Street ramps west at Decatur Street to West Seventh Avenue. T-5 Reconstruct West Alameda Avenue in concrete from the South Platte River to Knox Court with wider lanes, urban design amenities, streetsca pe improvements, and a sensitivity to adjacent redevelop ment opportunities. T-6 During the reconstruction of West Alameda, work with Public Service Company to underground the utilities between Federal Boulevard and South Platte River Drive. Implementing Groups Police Department Department of Public Works Department of Public Works Affected Property Owners Major Employers Department of Public Works Major Employers Department of Public Works Colorado Department of Transportation Department of Public Works Colorado Department of Transportation City Council Department of Public Works Public Service Co. Neighborhood Group 28

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T-7 Make a request to the Colorado Department of Transportation that their plans, which would shift West Sixth Avenue access into Valverde from Bryant to Decatur and change the eastbound Sixth Avenue to northbound Federal Boulevard movement, be restudied with City officials, affected businesses and residents in view of concerns over impacts on the neighborhood and efficient traffic flow. T-8 Involve the affected residents, businesses, and elected officials in any improvements to be made to West Sixth Avenue and Interstate 25 as they affect Valverde, including current plans to reconstruct the West Sixth Avenue/Interstate 25 interchange, and long range plans to widen West Sixth Avenue and 1-25. T -9 Involve the affected property owners, residents, businesses, and elected officials in efforts by the City and State of Colorado to improve Federal Boulevard, taking into account such goals as safe traffic flow, urban design ameni ties, streetscape improvements, development of adjacent properties, and impacts on residential areas. T-10 Improve bus service and ridership useage through incentives and cooperative efforts of the City, the Regional Transportation District (RTD), employers, and neighborhood residents. T -11 Request that RTD study the following additions to bus service in Valverde: extend the current Route 50 from West Second Avenue to the King Soopers employment area at Tejon and Irvington Place create a new route from the Morrison Road area, east on Alameda to Tejon, north on Tejon through Valverde and then to downtown Denver. 29 Neighborhood Groups Colorado Department of Transportation Department of Public Works Neighborhood Groups Colorado Department of Transportation Department of Public Works Department of Public Works Neighborhood Groups Colorado Department of Transportation Planning & Community Development Office Planning & Community Development Office RTD Major Employers Neighborhood Group Major Employers RTD

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T -12 Request that RTD monitor conditions closely and install bus shelters just as soon as warranted at the following locations: Clay Street and Alameda Avenue, southeast corner (right-of-way is currently insufficient-require ROW if site rezoned) Tejon Street and Alameda Avenue, southeast and northwest corners (RTD says daily ridership insufficient) Pecos Street and Alameda Avenue, southeast corner (RTD says daily ridership is currently insufficient) Irvington Place and Federal Boulevard, northeast corner (RTD says daily ridership is currently insufficient) First Avenue and Federal Boulevard, southwest and northeast corners (RTD says daily ridership is insufficient) T-13 Provide safer hike-bike connection between the Platte River Greenway and West Bar-Val Wood Park by designating West Maple Ave. rather than West Bayaud Avenue as the official hike-bike route at such time as Maple Avenue is paved between Pecos and Navajo Streets; provide an actual connection between Valverde Park and the Platte River Greenway. T-14 Pave West Maple Avenue between Pecos and Navajo Streets Neighborhood Group RTD Neighborhood Group Department of Public Works Department of Parks & Recreation Platte River Greenway Foundation Department of Public Works 30

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V I I HOUSING A typical Valverde residential area, well-maintained homes with a beautiful view of the downtown skyline. Valverde's residential areas contain a large and generally stable housing stock. Housing types vary but they are generally modest, well-maintained single story frame structures, some with basements. A few structures of masonry construction are mixed in with the frame houses. Housing was a third focus area examined by the neighborhood steering committee. A. Existing Housing Stock Valverde's existing housing stock is predominantly single-unit, owner-occupied, modestly valued, and in good condition. In 1990, Valverde had 1246 housing units of which 794 were single units and 452 were multiunits. Most of the multi-units are located in Columbine Homes, a well-maintained 200 unit public housing complex built in 1956. Valverde has a much higher percentage of its housing units in single units (64%) than does the city as a whole ( 48%). As the following table indicates, the rate of housing ownership in Valverde has declined since 1950 and stabilized since 1960. This is disappointing in view of widely accepted goals for increases in home ownership. Valverde's 1990 estimated home ownership rate of 44% was slightly higher than the 43% citywide rate. 31

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Table 3 Valverde Housing Units, By Ownership Status, 1950-1990 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 Ownership Status # % # % # % # % # % Owner-occupied 720 76 803 58 681 50 615 47 552 44 Renter-occupied 200 21 534 38 656 48 625 48 568 46 Vacant 27 3 59 4 36 2 63 5 126 10 Totals 948 1396 1373 1303 1246 Source: U.S. Census of Housing, 1950, 1960, 1970, 1980 and 1990. Housing value, as indicated by the transaction prices of single family homes, is another way to measure the trends in housing. The Single Unit Home Prices Chart which follows com pares mean transaction prices for Valverde and the city as a whole for the past twenty years. The chart indicates that single unit home prices have increased substantially in Valverde over the past twenty years but have not risen as rapidly as the average home prices in Denver as a whole. This data is an indicator of change in value over time. The method used to determine which transactions to select was somewhat different in 1986 through 1988 than prior to 1988. Only one transaction per housing unit is used per year and transactions that appear to clearly not be arms-length sales are excluded. Consequently, the average trans action prices for 1986 to 1988 will tend to be relatively higher than those preceeding 19R(J SINGLE UNIT HOME PRICES 1970-1988 $ 100 80 I I I I I I I I I I I I I :CITY AVERAGE: I ....... "'i-"" : I I : I ... I I I flllll" _,. I I I : : .... ..,. .... : : : 60 40 I I "' I I I 1 I I; I I _. ......... -----.-rt-......... I ., I I I 1 : I _..,... _...fll' : I I ... 20 I __ .. .J..a-I I I I I I ---I f//l/l'fllll'r I I I I I : ...... -... --; ...... :... ......... VALVERIDE : : : : 0 :: ............ ,..----; I I I I I I (THOUSANDS) -}O I I -}4 I .;6 I I I I I I Source: Denver Planning and Community Development Office, land Use File; based on information provided by the Denver Assessor's Office. The overall condition of housing in the neighborhood varies from good to fair with only a few areas containing poor or deteriorated housing. The housing on top of the bluff, west of Zuni Street, is in especially good condition. The winding street pattern starting at Alcott Street contributes to a healthy environment by providing a psychological and physical effect of slowing down traffic. Despite the generally good condition of housing, there are several problems that were iden tified. The area north of West Second Avenue in Residential Subarea I continues to need special housing assistance to address some instances of vacant or deteriorated housing. A special survey was conducted in Section A of Residential Subarea III. This survey revealed that its housing, compared to housing in Residential Subarea I, is in somewhat poorer con dition, has more vacancies, and is inhabited by a higher proportion of renters and short term residents. 32

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Given these concerns, the plan recommends that these areas of Valverde receive focused attention with a variety of housing resources and public improvements to combat the housing deterioration. Specific assistance is suggested to improve both owner-occupied and renter-occupied housing. B. Action Recommendations H-1 Continue to secure housing rehabilitation and improvement assistance loans (e.g. Single Family Rehabilitation Program, Rental Rehab Program, Emergency Home Repair Program, Caretakers Program, etc) for owner and renter occupied housing units where needed but with particular concen tration in the following areas: Federal Boulevard to Decatur, West Short Place to West Second Ave. Tejon to Raritan, West Byers Place to West Bayaud Avenue. H-2 Address the vacant housing problems and structurally unsafe housing problems through appropriate enforcement of the -abandoned and vacant housing ordinance, the zoning ordinance, and other available means. H-3 Continue the rehabilitation of the Columbine Homes (e.g. re roofing, replace sidewalks, remove cottonwood trees and replace with other trees). H-4 Build new, affordable housing at West Third Avenue and Decatur Street, and other appropriate sites. H-5 In conjunction with the Barnum neighborhood, explore establishing a voluntary Neighborhood Housing Services (NHS) Program to stabilize the housing and residential portions of Valverde. H-6 Encourage home ownership by distributing information on the availability of financing to renters of single unit homes. 33 Implementing Groups Neighborhood Group Denver Urban Renewal Authority 'Planning & Community Development Office Neighborhood Group Building Department City Attorney Department of Public Works Neighborhood Support Service Division Zoning Administration Denver Housing Authority Neighborhood Group May Department Stores Housing Groups Planning & Community Development Office Neighborhood Group Barnum NHS Planning & Community Development Office Planning & Community Development Office Denver Urban Renewal Authority Universal Lending Corp.

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V I I I COMMUNITY FACILITIES West Bar-Val-Wood Park, located at South Tejon Street and West Cedar Avenue, is an important and heavily used neighborhood park. Its name is derived from Valverde, the nearby Barnum Neighborhood directly to the west, and the old Denver Wood Products company whose buildings were recently demolished to make way for a new City of Denver Public Works facility. A. Parks and Open Space One of Valverde's greatest assets is its parks and open space areas. Valverde Park, Barnum Park East/Crow Field, West Bar-Val-Wood Park, and several unnamed mini-parks are located in Valverde. In addition, Valverde benefits significantly from the Platte River Greenway, which is on the eastern boundary of the neighborhood. Valverde Park, containing five acres, is located at West Cedar Avenue and Navajo Street. It is adjacent to the Platte River Greenway. Valverde Park has a softball field but no bleachers, playground equipment or picnic tables. Barnum Park East, containing ten acres, is located at West Fifth Avenue and Federal Boulevard. Located in Barnum Park East is Crow Field which has a lighted ballfield that is used both by high school baseball teams for their regular season games and by softball teams in the summer. West Bar-Val-Wood Park, containing fourteen acres, is located at West Bayaud Avenue and Tejon Street. This park has two baseball fields, picnic tables, and a children's playground. There is a need to upgrade the park's playground equipment. The Platte River Greenway abuts Valverde Park at South Platte River Drive and West Cedar Avenue. The connection between Valverde Park and the Greenway is poorly situated since bicyclists must either ride along South Platte River Drive (a busy truck route) or double back to the on-ramp to the Greenway hike-bike trail. Therefore, a connecting hike-bike route link is proposed through Valverde Park to West Maple Avenue once Maple Avenue is paved. 34

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Despite the adequacy of neighborhood parks, Valverde lacks recreational and related community center facilities and services within the neighborhood. The plan suggests exploring ways to acquire such a facility, such as the historic Valverde Neighborhood House building, for, the benefit of Valverde and surrounding neighborhoods. B. Storm and Sanitary Sewers The overall condition of sanitary sewers is good. However, there are several areas in Valverde in which the Denver Department of Public Works' Wastewater Management Division has recognized the need to construct or replace storm and sanitary sewers when conditions warrant. These improvements are included in the Division's long range facility plans for Valverde and are identified in the Action Recommendations which follow. C. Police Protection and Crime Valverde is located in Police District #4, which includes southwest Denver and part of west central Denver. The District 4 Police Station, built in 1987, is located at 2100 S. Clay Street. The boundaries of Valverde are identical with the boundaries of Police Precinct #412. According to the Denver Police Department, the 1990 rate of Class I crimes for each 1000 people in Valverde was 162, up from 106 in 1979. The highest number of reported crimes continues to be burglary, grand larceny, and auto theft. The majority of the reported crimes took place in the industrial and commercial portions of the neighborhood. Burglary and street crimes most often occur where businesses and homes are not located close together, increasing the difficulty of surveillance by residents and police. This is especially true in portions of Valverde where the land use pattern is so mixed between residences and businesses. The most effective curb of crime in Denver and throughout the nation has occurred when effective police/community relations activities are established. Neighborhood crime watch block programs have been highly successful in Denver and in parts of District #4, including Valverde. Additional blocks are urged to work with the Police Department to establish the neighborhood crime watch program for their block. D. Fire Protection The Valverde neighborhood is served by Fire Station #20, located at West Fifth Avenue and Knox Court in the adjacent Barnum neighborhood and by Fire Station #23, located at West Kentucky Avenue and S. Federal Boulevard. E. Schools No schools are located in Valverde. Children from the neighborhood attend elementary, junior high, and senior high schools in adjacent neighborhoods. Barnum Elementary School at 85 Hooker Street had an enrollment of 366 in 1990-91. Munroe Elementary School, at 3440 West Virginia Avenue, had 389 students. Valverde Elementary School, a major neighborhood landmark, is located in the Athmar Park neighborhood on the southside of West Alameda Avenue at South Tejon Street. The school was constructed in 1924 on a six acre site. It had an enrollment of 366 students in 1990-91. Rishel Junior High School is located south of and adjacent to Valverde Elementary School at 45i South Tejon Street. The school was constructed in 1959 on a nine acre site and had a 1990-91 enrollment of 733 students. West and Abraham Lincoln High Schools serve Valverde. West High School at 951 Elati Street is located on a thirteen acre site and had a 1990-91 enrollment of 1688 students. Abraham Lincoln High School at South Federal Boulevard and West Evans Avenue had a 1990-91 enrollment of 1598 students. 35

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There was some concern on the steering committee with the need for some of the neighborhood's elementary school students to cross two busy arterials-Federal and Alameda. If the neighborhood decides it would like the Denver Public Schools .to consider changing the elementary school boundaries to alleviate this concern, they should contact the Denver Public Schools directly and make such a request. F. Action Recommendations CF-1 Repair and upgrade toilet facilities and pave the parking lot at Barnum Park East/Crow Field. CF-2 Repair and upgrade toilet facilities at Valverde Park and West Bar-Val-Wood Park (may involve use of san-o-let enclosures for toilet facilities). CF-3 Upgrade playground equipment in the neighborhood parks. CF-4 Irrigate the greenbelt directly south of the entrance to West Sixth Avenue, between Federal Boulevard and Decatur Street. CF-5 In conformance with the long range plans and policies of the Denver Comprehensive Plan, consider locating a portion of the South Platte River regional park in Valverde. CF-6 Identify each park with appropriately designed and located signage. CF-7 Name and sign the mini-park near South Bryant Street and West Ellsworth Avenue. CF-8 Name and sign the mini-park at South Pecos Street and West Byers Place. CF-9 Explore ways to acquire and rehabilitate the historic Valverde Neighborhood House on West Alameda Avenue for community-wide benefit and reuse. Implementing Groups Department of Parks & Recreation Department of Parks & Recreation Department of Parks & Recreation Department of Parks & Recreation Department of Parks & Recreation Platte River Greenway Department of Parks & Recreation Neighborhood Group Department of Parks & Recreation Neighborhood Group Department of Parks & Recreation Neighborhood Group Non-Profit Groups Department of Parks & Recreation 36

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CF-10 Explore ways to raise public and private funding to build and operate a multi-purpose community center that would provide needed services to Valverde and surrounding neighborhoods. CF-11 Continue to seek assistance to establish a neighborhood crime prevention and watch program (Operation Identification, etc) on a block by block basis. CF-12 In conformance with the long range plans of the Department of Public Works' Wastewater Management Division, construct storm sewers in the following areas as future needs dictate: W. First Avenue (Clay to Bryant extended); Bryant Street (First to Second Ave.); and W. Second Avenue (Bryant to Yuma) CF-13 In conformance with the long range plans of the Department of Public Works' Wastewater Management Division, construct/ upgrade sanitary sewers in the following areas as capacity needs are generated: W. Third Avenue (Federal to Bryant); W. Cedar Avenue (Federal to Pecos); and Yuma Street (Second to Fourth Aves.). CF-14 Explore ways to raise public and private funding to rehabilitate the facility owned by the Denver Alternative Youth Services Program (DAYS) in order to provide better social services to the people of Valverde and surrounding neighborhoods in the areas of job training and placement, drug education, and family support. 37 Neighborhood Groups Non-Profit Groups Department of Parks & Recreation Neighborhood Group Denver Police Department Wastewater Management Division Wastewater Management Division Neighborhood Group Planning & Community Development Office CDBG's Non-Profit Facility Program Foundations Non-Profit Groups

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IX. ENVIRONMENT The South Platte River and Platte River Greenway/bikepath on the eastern edge of Valverde is an important communitY rr" Valverde's physical environment has been partially addressed in the preceeding discuss1' n:-.. on the neighborhood's land use and circulation patterns and its parks and open spaces. Tht-.. chapter focuses upon such environmental topics and issues as topography and flood pL1in. physical neighborhood improvements (streets and alleys, etc.), air and ground pollution. and finally, energy and resource conservation. A. Topography and Flood Plain Compared to many Denver neighborhoods, Valverde's topography is interesting and hilly. The high ground provides vistas of surrounding areas and serves as an excellent buffer between the light industrial uses and some of the residential areas. In 1990 the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), as part of the National Flood Insurance Program, prepared a revised Flood Insurance Rate Map for the area affected by the flooding of the South Platte River. The revised flood plain area is identified on the Topography and Flood Plain Map which follows. The map identifies the 100 year flood plain for Valverde as well as the topographical contour lines. It is important that land use controls be used to restrict development within the designated flood plain areas. The Denver City Council has adopted a Flood Plain Ordinance that meets federal insurance agency criteria for purposes of flood insurance. The Ordinance contains regulations to control and severly restrict development in the flood plain. It identifies certain land uses that are more appropriate for safety purposes within a flood plain. These land uses include open space, parks, trails, utility corridors, and railroads. For obvious safety reasons, residential development is usually not permitted. 38

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TOPOGRAPHY & FLOOD PLAIN "'j1 '""' i; I FLOOD PLAIN SOURCE: Federal Emergency Management Agency, September, 1990 CONTOUR LINE CONTOUR INTERVALS -10' SOURCE: United States Geological Survey 39 0 1500' 1,000' N $ 2,000'

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B. Residential Environment The overall residential neighborhood environment in Valverde is good, although conditions vary widely. The parks and open spaces have previously been mentioned as a major asset. There are many nice homes such as the pleasant frame houses that sit on top of the bluffs along curvilinear streets. The lawns are well maintained and these properties assist in enhancing the overall appearance and image of the neighborhood. In most cases, the physical condition of sidewalks, curbs, gutters, streets and alleys are sound. The plan recognizes the need for continued improvement in the residential environment. Some streets and alleys need to be paved. More trees are needed. Graffiti needs to be removed from buildings. Junk cars need to be removed. C. Air and Ground Pollution The pollution of air and ground is an environmental concern in Valverde as it is in many neighborhoods. The existing air (and noise) pollution is a result of the high traffic volumes on arterial streets and highways that border Valverde (see the traffic volumes map in the transportation chapter). All of the high vehicle volumes on these roadways contribute to air pollution by releasing carbon monoxide and other contaminants into the atmosphere. To assist in the fight against air pollution, Denver area citizens are encouraged by all state and local officials to carpool and/or to use buses, bicycles or other less polluting and energy efficient transportation modes whenever possible. In addition, adherence to Denver's woodburning ban is an important way to overcome air pollution. Ground contamination is present in Valverde to a real but undetermined extent. Given that portions of the neighborhood within or adjacent to the existing industrial area were at one time used for junkyards or manufacturing processes that were relatively uncontrolled until recently, it is clear that some ground contamination exists. Known contamination sites include a small portion of the General Chemical Company site which has been identified by the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as one of 44 properties scattered throughout Denver which were contaminated by radioactive residues resulting from the processing of radium in the early 1900's. The 44 Denver radium site properties are divided into eleven groups for study and clean-up purposes. The groupings are based on location or similarity of site characteristics. The General Chemical Company site is scheduled to be cleaned up by late 1991. Another ground contamination concern that could affect Valverde is the presence of old sanitary landfills (dumps). There is a possibility that some of these old landfill sites may be passive generators of methane gas. If methane gas hazards are identified by future studies, the new industrial regulations in the Denver Zoning Ordinance will address problem areas through development controls. Five potential methane hazard areas are located in Valverde. These sites are located near the intersections of 1) South Tejon and West Cedar; 2) West Sixth Avenue and Bryant Street; 3) South Platte River Drive and West Bayaud; 4) West First Avenue and Bryant Street; and 5) West Sixth Avenue and Federal Boulevard. If, in the unlikely event that these sites are determined to be hazardous, observance of the ordinance restrictions will be necessary before undertaking excavation and expansion or construction activities. Clean up of such sites will be important for both neighborhood public health and economic development reasons. 40

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D. Energy and Resource Conservation A final environmental concern is energy and resource conservation. Although there is a clear ebb and flow to the nation's interest and commitment to energy conservation, the consequences to the practice or lack of practice of conservation are substantial. Economic growth, national security, and personal finance are all important reasons to practice conservation. Because energy and resource conservation is beneficial to the Valverde resident and business person, as well as to the city and nation, this plan recommends the continuation of energy conservation measures such as weatherization of homes and businesses. Recycling of renewable resources, such as paper, aluminium, glass, oil, etc. is another important way for individuals to contribute to conservation. E. Action Recommendations E-1 Enforce the designated 100 year flood plain along the South Platte River so that land use will be regulated according to the existing Denver Flood Plain Ordinance, and applicable federal regulations. E-2 Construct new curbs and sidewalks at the following locations: north and south sides of West Bayaud Avenue, between South Clay Street and South Dale Court north side of West Byers Place, between Raritan and Tejon Streets east and west side of Raritan Street, between Alameda and the alley between Byers Place and Cedar Avenue north side of West Second Avenue, between Clay Street and Bryant Street E-3 Pave the following streets: -West Maple Avenue, between Navajo and Pecos Streets -West Fourth Avenue, east of Dale Court Dale Court, between West Fifth Avenue and West Short Place E-4 Finish the recyled asphalt program for alleys in Valverde. If needed and desired by residents, establish a special improvement district to pave alleys and make other improvements. 41 Implementing Groups Zoning Administration Department of Public Works Wastewater Management Division Planning & Community Development Office Department of Public Works Department of Public Works

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E-5 Improve the physical appearance of the neighborhood by removing graffiti, removing junk cars, cleaning up trashy areas, and shielding junk yards from adjacent, residentially zoned properties. E-6 Encourage tree planting by the public and private sectors in the following locations: Valverde Park -both sides of West Fifth Avenue, between Federal Blvd. and Decatur other areas as needed/identified E-7 Reduce the air pollution impact in Valverde by supporting city and state air pollution control measures, including biking, carpooling, public transit, street sweeping, and wood burning restrictions. E-8 Study and clean up, as necessary, the ground contamina tion in any identified sites E-9 Support neighborhood energy conservation programs. Promote energy conservation in residential and non-residential structures by: evaluating heating and cooling alternatives encouraging energy audits and inventorying building characteristics promoting retrofitting of existing buildings and providing consumer protection information on energy matters. E-10 Support neighborhood and city programs in recycling non renewable resources (e.g. aluminium, glass, paper, plastics, oil, etc.) for the benefit of the neighborhood and city. Keep Denver Beautiful Zoning Administration Residents Employers Department of Parks & Recreation Neighborhood Group Planning & Community Development Office Residents Employers RTD U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Department of Public Works Westside Energy Co-op Public Service Company Department of Public Works Residents Employers 42

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X. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT The Denver Community Development Corporation's (DCDC) Park One office wartehouses and showrooms has been at its West Bayaud Avenue location since the early 1980's, employing approximately 100 people in the center's various businesses. A. Overview of Existing Conditions Economic development is an important, although not a top priority goal in Valverde. As discussed earlier, Valverde is the home of many large and small businesses that employ about 5500 people. Those businesses are an important source of neighborhood jobs and income. Despite the prominent economic base within Valverde, it is important for competitive reasons for the neighborhood to constantly upgrade its business presence and for residents to upgrade their job skills. As indicated earlier, Valverde's median household income is below that of the city average. Increased employment and labor force preparation are important goals to pursue. Another identified need is to re-attract such neighborhood serving businesses as a grocery store and pharmacy, whereby residents would have a more convenient location to shop and would be spending more money in their own neighborhood to support local businesses. In pursuing these needs, Valverde has a number of assets and opportunities to undertake economic development. Access is excellent to and from the entire metropolitan area. There is a substantial amount of vacant and underutilized land zoned for industrial and business uses. Major employers in the area are showing a vitality through expansion and investment for the future. In addition to numerous private investors and developers, the City and County of Denver and the Denver Community Development Corporation (DCDC) have worked to stimulate development activity that is compatible with other city and neighborhood goals. 43

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B.ActionReconunendations ED-1 Retain existing businesses and stimulate additional commercial and industrial development and employment opportunities through: the promotion of the City and County of Denver State Enterprise Zone and exploration, with the Mayor's Office of Economic Development, of extending it to the currently undesignated commercial portions of Federal Boulevard (W. Second Avenue to Alameda) and West Alameda (Tejon to Federal Boulevard). the utilization by qualified business people of City and County of Denver small business assistance programs (Revolving Loan Program and technical assistance). ED-2 Stimulate additional employment and upgrade labor force skills by encouraging neighborhood residents to work with the City (e.g. Denver Employment and Training Administration, etc.) and local businesses to increase and diversify their employment training and job skills. ED-;: Work to secure needed neighborhood serving retail goods and services, including a grocery store, pharmacy, and child care. ED-4 Continue to study the economic development prospects and opportunities of businesses in the area (constantly taking into account new information, such as the Federal/ Alameda corridor study report, Westwood Commercial Corri dor: Market Analysis & Redevelop ment Strategies), develop and implement realistic and market-based development strategies. Implementing Groups Mayor's Office of Economic Development Neighborhood Group Public and Private Developers Denver Employment & Training Admin. Employers Neighborhood Group Mayor's Office of Economic Development Planning & Community Development Office Neighborhood Group Mayor's Office of Economic Development Planning & Community Development Office 44

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X I IMPLEMENTATION Implementation of the Valverde Neighborhood Plan is well underway. A number of recommendations have already been carried out, including the installation of curbs and sidewalks, shown here along the north side of West Byers Place, between Raritan and Tejon Streets. The principal purpose for preparing this plan is to influence and guide the process of change in Valverde to better meet the needs of the residents and business people in the neighbor hood. This plan represents the concensus of the neighborhood in identifying and analyzing neighborhood needs, issues, and opportunities. The heart of this plan is in the specific policy implementation proposals that the neighborhood steering committee, working with the city, has prepared to carry out the plan. These proposals, termed "Action Recommendations", are presented at the conclusion of each substantive chapter. The implementation actions vary widely. Some are simple, require minimal or no financial resources, and can be accomplished rather easily and quickly. Others are complex, require substantial financial resources, and need further study and discussion/negotiation before they can be initiated and accomplished. A. Means of Plan Implementation The sixty-seven Action Recommendations in this plan constitute an agenda with which to begin the implementation of this plan. But how do the Action Recommendations get implemented? Who is responsible to carry them out? The means of implementing this plan are as numerous as the individual proposals. However, the primary techniques of plan implementation are the expenditure of public funds, the enactment and enforcement of public ordinances and regulations, and the use of the plan policies by public bodies (e.g. City Council, Planning Board, etc.) in making decisions that affect Valverde. The available funding sources for plan implementation are themselves varied. The city's six year Capital Improvements Program Plan (CIPP) describes available resources for project 45

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funding. Action Recommendations that are appropriate for total or partial CIPP funding should be placed within the CIPP. Although the competition for the CIPP's limited funds is severe among Denver's neighborhoods, every effort should be made to place as many projects as possible within the all important first year of the CIPP, which is the city's Capital Improvement Budget, because those projects actually receive funding whereas the projects listed in years two through six are future promises. Another important funding resource for moderate income neighborhoods such as Valverde is the federal Community Development Block Grant Program (CDBG) as administered by the city. CDBG is actually several programs including the Residential Neighborhood Small Projects Program (RNSP), Commercial Streetscape Program (CSP), the Non-Profit Facility Improvements Program (NFI), and the Alley and Street Improvement Program. Valverde should actively pursue these CDBG programs for funding selected projects. Some substantive program areas, such as transportation and housing, have their own funding sources and these have been listed in their Action Recommendations. A second means of implementing the Valverde Neighborhood Plan will be through the enactment and enforcement of city ordinances. Certain Action Recommendations will be carried forward through the application of the Denver Zoning Ordinance, Vacant and Abandoned Housing Ordinance, and other city, state, and federal regulations. Some of the Action Recommendations are statements of public policy and these also serve to implement the Valverde Neighborhood Plan. For example, there are a number of recommendations in the land use and zoning chapter that address the future land use and zoning for Valverde. The enforcement of these policies will be a vital way to maintain and strengthen the stability of Valverde. B. Human Resources of Plan Implementation Regardless of the various plan implementation techniques, the common denominator of all successful implementation work is people working together. Accompanying each Action Recommendation is a list of "Implementing Groups" who are identified as the primary groups that, because of expertise, authority, and resources, are responsible for carrying out the Action Recommendation, or for advocating it to those groups with the authority and resources to carry it out. The two groups that are chiefly responsible for implementation of this plan are the City and County of Denver and the Valverde neighborhood residents and business community. They are the major catalysts that will energize and involve a wider range of other people in public and private organizations to carry out the Action Recommendations. The City and County of Denver is a major player in the plan's preparation, adoption, and implementation. Once adopted by the Mayor and City Council, the plan will become part of the official Denver Comprehensive Plan. As such, it will help to influence city policies, programs, and decisions that will be crucial in implementing the Action Recommendations. The staff of the Planning and Community Development Office and the many other city agencies listed herein will work with the neighborhood to articulate the plan proposals to the Denver Planning Board, City Council, and all relevant city decision-making bodies. In addition to the plan's guidance, city staff will be available to assist the neighborhood as Valverde seeks to influence the city decisions and actions on zoning requests, the evaluation of public and private development proposals, CIPP, CDBG, and other funding requests and regulatory ordinances. Although the city's expertise and resources are significant, the primary energy, motivation, and responsibility for implementing the Valverde Neighborhood Plan must be the people of Valverde. Strong and ongoing involvement by Valverde's residents and business people will be necessary to take the leadership in carrying out this plan, to refine it and keep it updated 46

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as time goes on, and in branching out to address new neighborhood issues. An ongoing neighborhood planning and decision-making process needs to be established to spur the people of Valverde to actively promote the general interests of their neighborhood. While this may mean organizing from time to time to fight undesirable changes, neighborhood leaders also need to inspire the neighborhood to be pro-active-to actively and effectively secure decisions that improve Valverde, and bring it closer to its long range vision for itself. Perhaps the most important recommendation of this plan is to establish a neighborhood organization in Valverde. This proposal stemmed from the steering committee's early identification of the lack of an organized neighborhood group as a top issue to address in the planning process. There are many reasons why an organized neighborhood group is needed, many purposes for it to serve, and many activities for it to undertake. In sum, establishing a neighborhood organization that is registered with the city and is vigilant about overseeing the plan's implementation is the most important proposal for this plan and for Valverde at this time. Once this is accomplished the neighborhood organization can broaden its scope and develop its expertise into other areas of service to the people of Valverde. C. ActlonReconunendatlon I-1 Establish a registered neighborhood organization that is effective in overseeing and coordinating the implementation and refinement of this plan and grows to serve the broader needs and interests of the Valverde neighborhood. I-2 Monitor the current adequacy of this plan and update it when needed. 47 Implementing Groups Residents Employers Neighborhood Group Planning & Community Development Office

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APPENDIX ORDINANCE NO. 326 SERIES OF 1991 BY AUTHORITY A BILL COUNCIL BILL NO. 305 COMMITTEE OF REFERENCE: PARKS, RECREATION ZONING, PLANNING FOR AN ORDINANCE APPROVING A NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN FOR THE VALVERDE NEIGHBORHOOD, WHICH PLAN SHALL BECOME A PART OF THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN FOR THE CITY AND COUNTY OF DENVER PURSUANT TO THE PROVISIONS OF SECTION 41-18(c) OF THE REVISED MUNICIPAL CODE AND OF ORDINANCE NO. 617, SERIES OF 1989. WHEREAS, pursuant to the provisions of Section 41-18(c) of the Revised Municipal Code, and by Ordinance No. 617, Series of 1989, there has been approved a Comprehensive Plan for the City and County of Denver; and WHEREAS, said Section of the Revised Municipal Code provides for the amendment of said Plan; and WHEREAS, Ordinance No. 617, Series of 1989, provides for the incorporation of "Neighbor hood Plans" into the Comprehensive Plan; and WHEREAS, as a proposed part of the Comprhensive Plan, the Planning Director has transmitted to the Mayor and Council for acceptance a proposed neighborhood plan for the orderly and harmonious development of the Valverde nerighborhood in the City and County of Denver; and WHEREAS, the Mayor has approved the same; and WHEREAS, the Planning Board has approved the same; and WHEREAS, the Neighborhood Plan was prepared with significant involvement of the residents and representatives of the various interest of the Valverde neighborhood and has been approved by the same; and WHEREAS, a member of City Council in whose council district the neighborhood plan is situated has monitored the process whereby said plan was formulated, NOW, THEREFORE BE IT ENACTED BY THE COUNCIL OF THE CITY AND COUNTY OF DENVER: Section 1. That the proposed neighborhood plan for the harmonious development of the Valverde neighborhood, consisting of a document entitled "The Valverde Neighborhood Plan", filed with the City Clerk, Ex-Officio Clerk of the City and County of Denver, on the 24th day of April, 1991, as City Clerk's Filing No. 91-445, is hereby approved as part of the Comprehensive Plan, pursuant to Section 41-18(c) of the Revised Municipal Code, and Ordinance No. 617, Series of 1989. 48

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Section 2. That the approval of The Valverde Neighborhood Plan, and of any subsequent amendment thereto, is intended to establish the same, in conjunction with the Comprehensive Plan, as the official guide for officials of the City and County of Denver and private citizens when making decisions affecting the future character of the Valverde neighborhood of the City and County of Denver; provided, however, that such approval shall not preempt the decision making powers vested by law or the administrative directive in the Mayor, the Council or any other official of the City and County of Denver with respect to, but not limited to, a zoning map amendment, a zoning language amendment, a dedication or vacation of a street, alley or other public way, a designation of a park, the issuance of a revocable permit, a conveyance or the acquisition of real property by the City and County of Denver, of an appropriation for or construction of a capital improvement; and provided, further, that it is expressly understood that judgement must be exercised in the application of The Valverde Neighborhood Plan recommendations in the decision making processes of the Mayor, Council and other officials of the City and County of Denver. PASSED BY THE COUNCIL MAY 13, 1991 CATHY DONAHUE-PRESIDENT APPROVED: FEDERICO PENA, MAYOR, MAY 16, 1991 ATTEST: FELICIA MUFTIC -CLERK AND RECORDER, EX-OFFICIO CLERK OF THE CITY AND COUNTY OF DENVER PUBLISHED IN THE DAILY JOURNAL MAY 3, 1991, MAY 17, 1991 PREPARED BY: REVIEWED BY: ROBERT M. KELLY, ASSISTANT CITY ATTORNEY 4/24/91 GEORGE CERRONE, CITY ATTORNEY 4/26/91 SPONSORED BY COUNCIL MEMBER RAMONA MARTINEZ 49

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