Citation
Whittier neighborhood plan

Material Information

Title:
Whittier neighborhood plan
Creator:
Raughton, Jim L.
Place of Publication:
Denver, Co
Publisher:
City and County of Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Neighborhood plans
Community planning
City planning
Spatial Coverage:
Denver -- Whittier

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Full Text

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Councilwoman
Elbra
Wedgeworth
District 8
Councilwoman
lj)*'_y.;* . Elbra Wedgeworth Di*imrrOimr: 32N(} Downing Slneet Unit C Dt*nvtrr Colorado W12 (a >umi n i'i y June 15, 2000 Dear Friends, As the elected representative of Council District 8,1 am proud to submit this letter of support for the Whittier Neighborhood Association Neighborhood Plan.
H|IRt,1IF SlTVKVS
Wirk- ,ind \n -nhio The neighborhood plan is a dream come true for many residents, because residents are committed for Whittier to provide a wonderful living environment for everyone.
IVrviwvt wl It is very important to residents to share in the growth and resources of our various community programs, business, churches, libraries, schools, city agencies, etc.
^KShl The Whittier Neighborhood Plan is the road map to their future
development. 1 give this plan my full support. Sincerely, du.- Councilwoman Elbra Wedgeworth District 8
WWiv.dtnvprgov.org


Table of Contents
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS ' ii
nsrmoDucnoN i
INSIDE THE 3
WIfflTlER NEIGHBORHOOD
PlanningProcess 5
Priority Issues for Whittier 5
Use of Plan 6
Location and Description 6
Demographic Analyses 7
Existing Land Use and Zoning !3
History of Whittier Neighborhood 16
The Whittier Vision for the Future 20
PRIORITY ISSUES FOR WHITHER 24
Introduction to Priorities 25
Land Use and Zoning 26
Urban Design and Historic Preservation 32
Education 42
Public Safety and Health 49
Community Services 54
Parks and Open Space 57
Economic Development-Employment 64
Traffic andTransportation 67
Environment 74
Community Coordination 77
SOURCES 80
APPENDICES 81
A The Piton Foundation 81
Neighborhood Facts 1999:
The Status of Denver Neighborhoods
B Healthy Communities, Healthy Denver 85
A report by the Denver Health Benchmarking Project
C Goals: Public Safety 95
Police Department
Fire Department
Sheriff Department
Table of Contents
i


Acknowledgments
This plan was prepared with the dedicated support and help of:
SUSTANIIAL FUNDING PRINTING
The Denver Foundation * Funded by Wells Fargo Rank
LEADERSHIP & ADVOC ACY FOR THE WHITTIER NEIGHBORHOOD
Ms. Elbra Wedgeworth, Councilperson for District 8, Denver
LEADERSHIP AND EDITING OF TEXT
Mr. Darrell Watson Mr. John Jones Mr. Valter Pinto
Ms. Shawn Sowden Ms. Monique Lavato Mr. GasparTerrana
Mr. Stephen Savageau Mr. Barry Scharoff Mrs. Michelle Allen
Mr. Roland Schwann Ms. Susan Banning Mr. Samuel Bishop
Ms. Allison Cantrall Mr. Tom Morris Ms. Jessica Cioci
Mrs. Lisa Schwarm Mr.DeanPunke Mrs. Sherry Culbertson
Ms. Holly Bateman Mr. Jim Considine Ms. Leah Dawson
Mrs. Megan Weeks * Mrs. Debra S. Clayton-Ivery Ms. Michelle Katyryniuk
Ms. Sheelagh Young * Mr. Phil Normand Mr. Philip Lucks
Ms. Lydia Allbright * Mrs. Pat Dubrava Ms. Kathryn Richardson
Mr.JoeMauro Ms. Bridget Brophy Ms. Leanne Sweeney
Mr.NickEhdahl * Ms. Kelly West Ms. Kathryn Walke
Mr. Rich Cantrall Mr. Bob Eugeni Mr. Joshua White
Mr. Ottawa Harris * Mr. Les Grant Ms. Vanee Srikijkarn
Mr. Ted Thomas Ms. Valerie McGee Ms. Bethany Feeley
Ms. Savannah Brown Mrs. Diana Hammer Mr. Bill Stow
HISTORICAL RESEARCH AND EDITING Ms. Darrow Flodges
DESIGN, EDITING AND LAYOUT Ms. Beth Foster
MAP GRAPHICS Mr. Ben Robbins
PHOTOS Mr. Max Geimer
Acknowledgments
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Public and Nonprofit Agency Editing and Insight
DENVER PLANNING OFFICE
Ms. Ellen Ittelson, Planning Program Manager
Mr. David Becker, Senior City Planner
Ms. Sue Keister, Preservation Assistant
HOUSING AND NEIGHBORHOOD DEVELOPMENT SERVICES
Mr. Ralph Martinez, Senior City Planner
Mr. Ernest Hughes, Enterprise Community Coordinator
DENVER PARKS & RECREATION
Ms. Helen Kuyendall, Landscape Architect
Ms. Jill Kotewicz, Parks Planner
DENVER PUBLIC LIBRARY
Mr. Bruce Hanson, Western History Librarian
Mrs. Sondra Harris, Ford Warren Branch Manager
DENVER PUBLIC SAFETY
Aristedes Zavaras, Manager of Public Safety
Stephen F. Browne, Deputy Manager of Safety
Captain Mike ONeill, District 2
Mr. Jim Mair, Community Resource Officer, District 2
DENVER PUBLIC WORKS
Ms. Stephanie Foote, Manager of Public Works
Ms. Kathy Donohue, Special Projects
Mr. Dennis Royer, Director, Program Development
Mr. Glen Blackbora, Transportation Engineer
Mr. James MacKay, Bicycle and Pedestrian Planner
DENVER CAREER SERVICE AUTHORITY
Mr. Jim Yearby, Director
1*1
Acknowledgments


Public and Nonprofit Agency Editing and Insight (continued)
PlTONFOUNDATtON
Mr. Matthew Hamilton, Research Associate
UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO SENIOR PLANNING STUDIO
Dr. Dwayne C. Nuzum, Professor
COLORADO HISTORICAL SOCIETY
Mr. Dale Heckendorm, Preservation Planner
Ms. Moya Hansen, Curator of Decorative and Fine Art
Acknowledgments
iv


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Jim Raughton and Elbra Wedgeworth at
neighborhood planning meeting
This neighborhood plan was developed to serve as the basis for public discussion and citizen input concerning the
future of the Whittier neighborhood. It is not intended to be final or complete in every detail. Future plans
covering additional details will evolve from the process as more information becomes available and citizen com-
ments are heard.
Whittiers first subdivision, the Case Addition, was filed just after the Civil War in 1868, making the neighborhood
132 years old. It is a neighborhood that has been racially mixed for over 100 years. Yet the history of the neigh-
borhood and its importance within the city remains largely undocumented and unrecognized. If history is the light
that we shine into the darkness of the past, then Denvers history and its preoccupation with Anglo-American
contributions is distorted by the lack of recognition of African-American contributions. Numerous recommenda-
tions during the past 15 years by professional historians to recognize the history of the Whittier neighborhood
have gone unheeded.
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In his novel 1984, George Orwell asserted: Who controls the past controls the future. This neighborhood plan
uses the past in order to shape the future. In so doing, it helps preserve a significant part of the history of
Denvers first century. At the same time, it should be regarded as the beginning of a continuing effort to reach
decisions and resolve difficulties that remain a part of the neighborhood today.
This plan reflects on problems that are elusive and will require time and leadership at all levels, from citizens to
public officials. The neighborhood plan is a partnership that unites the City of Denver and the Whittier neighbor-
hood in establishing goals, identifying issues, and testing alternative means of achieving objectives. This plan has
created forums in which people have been able to initiate rather than react to change.
The accomplishments of the planning process have been many. In addition to the specific goals and objectives
identified in the plan, many specific programs are currently underway based on the identified goals. At the same
time, participation in neighborhood meetings has increased, and paid membership in the Whittier Neighborhood
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Executive Summary
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Victorian house In Whittier
The people of Whittier should expect that planning for their neighborhood will be three-dimensionalthat it will
consider not only the functional requirements of a citys agencies, but also the social costs of meeting those needs and
the environmental impacts on the quality of life within their neighborhood. There cannot be a single document that
fully outlines both the needs of the residents and those of city agencies. However, in order to contribute to both the
health and welfare of Whittier residents, this plan serves as an outline to promote desired patterns of neighborhood
design, traffic, housing, and public services, and other priorities as expressed by the neighborhood.
While residents in any neighborhood find it easy to identify an aspect of their community that needs improvement,
and these concerns may serve an important purpose in establishing a consensus among that neighborhoods
residents, this plan intends to go beyond concerns to address specific positive actions in which the residents can
participate. To this end, the plan includes a series of Action Charts that are intended to be a continuing resource
for the community to identify and act upon emerging opportunities in the Whittier neighborhood.
One of the many challenges of developing a plan for the Whittier neighborhood is that many of its characteristics are
similar to those in contiguous neighborhoods, including education, transportation, code enforcement, and city park
development. As in the example of City Park and City Park Golf Course planning and redevelopment, all the
neighborhoods surrounding this open space share a common interest in the intensity of use planned for this city-wide
facility. In some cases it is appropriate that Whittier coordinate its planning with these adjacent neighborhoods.
A family walk
There are no easy or quick answers to issues confronting the Whittier neighborhood. At the same time, there is no
reason to believe that the full constructive potential of the neighborhood cannot be achieved. Residents, commu-
nity-based organizations, and city representatives who contributed to this plan see tremendous potential as the
Whittier neighborhood pursues its vision for the future.
When asked What do you like about Whittier neighborhood?, neighbors identified human scale; vitality; location;
mass transit; diversity; cosmopolitan small-town atmosphere; pedestrian orientation; history; architecture; friendly
people; and access to City Park, the Zoo, and downtown.
To the question What do you dislike about Whittier? neighbor responses included: lack of planning, lack of security,
lack of educational opportunity, speeding traffic, noise, poor alley sanitation, and inadequate street lighting.
Conflicting opinions and goals within the neighborhood are part of the tension that makes Whittier a dynamic
community. For Whittier to achieve its full potential as a model neighborhood, these varied attitudes must be
blended into a harmonious whole. Although every need cannot be met, there are several areas that can be trans-
lated from ideas into opportunities for the entire neighborhood.
Inside the Whittier Neighborhood
4


Whittier Neighborhood Association meeting
Leadership on priority Issues
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Planning Process
Beginning in November 1999, residents and neighborhood leaders met to identify elements of the plan and issues
to be addressed, outline goals, and create a common vision for Whittiers future. In cooperation with community
leadership, a series of community meetings were hosted by the Whittier Neighborhood Association. Each neigh-
borhood meeting focused on specific issues of concern. After each meeting, a revised draft was presented to
neighborhood leaders and individuals who expressed interest in the expanding topics. A total of 16 drafts were
presented to the neighborhood.
Priority Issues for Whittier
Diversity
Land Use & Zoning
Urban Design & Historic Preservation
Education
Public Safety
Community Services
Parks & Open Space
Economic Development-Employment
Traffic and Transportation
Environment
Community Coordination
These meetings allowed individuals to share their hopes and concerns about the neighborhood in a comfortable
environment conducive to problem solving. Revisions were made based on comments from Whittier residents
and City of Denver representatives. The highest priorities within the plan were identified by the Whittier Neigh-
borhood Association at their June 21,2000 meeting. These highest priorities are summarized on pages 21-23.
Inside the Whittier Neighborhood
5


Italianate detail
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Use of the Plan
This plan is a product of neighborhood leadership and funding provided by the Denver Foundation, It has been
prepared in the belief that an effective planning process can both increase participation in the neighborhood and
influence the continuing planning programs of private, municipal, non-profit, and regional organizations. It is
intended to give the strongest possible voice to the existing residents of the neighborhood, in the belief that their
interests may be congruent with the enlightened interests of city and regional agencies.
It is understood the plan is an advisory document designed to facilitate effective decision-making processes. It is
intended to advise decision-makers including the Mayor, City Council, the Denver Planning Board, various city
departments, private investors, and business leaders on the values and views of the residents of Whittier.
While this plan was prepared in cooperation with the Denver Planning Office and is consistent with the form
suggested by that office and the new Denver Comprehensive Phm 2000, it will not become an official document until it
is adopted by the City Council as part of the citys comprehensive plan. It is the responsibility of the Whittier
Neighborhood Association and its residents to prioritize goals and work to create an optimum future for the
neighborhood.
Location and Description
Whittier is bound by Downing Street on the west, Martin Luther King Boulevard on the north, York Street on the
east, and 23rd Avenue on the south. It is often depicted on maps of the city as square, although its actual dimensions
are rectangular. Arterial streets and parks create strong boundary edges on the north, east, and west sides. Along its
south edge, Whittier merges with City Park West, separated only by 23rd Avenue (see map on p. 29).
The neighborhood, primarily residential, is comprised of single-family dwellings and low-density multi-family units.
Whittiers housing stock and residential character are two of the neighborhoods many assets. Much of the hous-
ing represents examples of Denvers finest architectural development, with the average age of homes approaching
100 years. The area contains 99 residential blocks, approximately 359 acres, 4,350 residents and 2,163 housing
units. Property owners and long-term residents, in an act of faith in the future of the community, continue to
make tremendous efforts to maintain their houses and upgrade the neighborhood. Evidence of this pride can be
seen in the attractive, well-kept lawns and many large mature trees that make this neighborhood one of the most
visually appealing in the city. All of the recommendations in this study support the community vision of maintain-
ing the quality of residential living and diversity of people residing in the neighborhood.
Inside the Whittier Neighborhood
6


Downing Street is lined by residential and business structures. This narrow strip along the western edge of the
neighborhood also includes several vacant, developable parcels of land that will be significant in determining the
eventual character of that portion of the neighborhood.
Nonconforming business uses are scattered in nodes throughout the residential brick bungalows, Denver Squares,
and Victorian homes. These commercial uses will be key to the quality of life in the near future in that they can be
attractive corner stores accessible by foot or bicycle, supplementin g the residential character of the neighborhood.
Among the most distinctive features of the neighborhood are its churches, public schools, and parks. These uses
contribute significantly to the overall quality of the residential environment and are a key factor for the future of
the neighborhood.
Neighborhood planning meeting
Demographic Analyses
Most of the information in this section is derived from the 1990 U.S. Census and Neighborhood Facts 1999, a report
compiled by the Piton Foundation. Specific data for neighborhood demographics based on the 2000 census will be
available in 2002; that information will be used to update the Denver Neighborhood Profiles (www.piton.org/db).
The current Piton profile is attached as the Appendix to this report.
The Whittier neighborhood is a prime example of a community that has experienced dramatic change in its ethnic
makeup. Over the past decade, Whittiers demographics have undergone a transition with Latino and Anglo
residents growing in number while the African-American population figure declines. The influx of ethnic groups
has not been evenly distributed throughout the neighborhood. The Latino population has increased most dramati-
cally in the northernmost section, occupying many rental units available in that portion of the neighborhood. The
central and southern portions of the neighborhood have seen substantial Anglo in-migration.
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The City of Denver has enjoyed steady economic growth over the past decade. Job growth, personal income, and
housing costs are all increasing and are considered key measures of the Denver economy. Denver stands out
nationally in terms of job growth and reduction of welfare rolls, a remarkable accomplishment given the fact that
the nations economy is also prospering. These positive factors are reflected in the increasing housing prices and
higher average incomes of the Whittier neighborhood, but there are areas of concern.
While recent job growth is good news for the city, the Whittier neighborhood has had a net loss of jobs, declining
from 897 jobs to 689, a 23.2% loss. This is a direct product of the increasing reinforcement of the residential
Inside the Whittier Neighborhood
7


Child Care Co-op
character of the neighborhood. Entry-level jobs are also in short supply. Of the 689 jobs within the Whittier
neighborhood, 32.1% (220 jobs) are classified as entry-level. Entry-level positions are needed to provide access to
employment for residents. (1) Efforts to involve the small businesses within the neighborhood in the planning
process and the Whittier Neighborhood Association were not successful. Several goals of this plan focus on including
these employers in the neighborhood.
Shortage of Child Care
Another growing problem in the neighborhood is a shortage of child care. The Piton Foundation reports 388
State of Colorado-licensed child care slots in Whittier. While it is impossible to report the exact number of pre-
school-age children in the neighborhood, there are some indicators.
Volunteer mother providing care
In 1998 there were reported to be 1,672 children under the age of 18 living in Whittier. That same year, 1,063
Whittier children were enrolled in Denver Public Schools, leaving a difference of 609 children. The total number
of births in Whittier in 1997 was 105, a number that appears to be steadily increasing. The number of children
receiving Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) in Whittier was reported as 348 in 1998. Families
throughout the neighborhood report the need for child care, especially for their youngest children. (2)
Increasing Cost of Housing
The selling price of an average home in Whittier has increased from $96,303 in 1997 to $165,882 in May 2000. The
strong housing market has threatened many older residents as their property taxes have increased significantly.
Multiple Listing Source Data on Average Selling Prices and
Average Listing Price in the Whittier Neighborhood
1997 1998 1999 2000 (through May)
Selling Price $96,303 $111,723 $124,712 $165,882
Listing Price $97,891 $113,920 $125,977 $170,807
As housing prices soar, pressure on property owners of Section 8 housing and rentals in general to sell their rental
units is increasing. This has significantly increased rents in the neighborhood. Denver was reported to have a
40.4% increase in average rents from 1993 to 1999. (3)
Inside the Whittier Neighborhood
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Denver Square In Whittier
Population
While Denver has increased in population,
Whittier has experienced a decline in population
over the last fifty years. There are currently
4,350 individuals living in Whittier compared to
9,160 in 1950, a 52% decline.
During the past ten years, the population has sta-
bilized at a level slightly above 4,300 residents.
Children currently represent a significant number
of residents (1,672), with 36% of the population
being under the age of 18. (4)
Housing
The number of housing units in Whittier is
2,163; that number has declined by 22% since
1950, from 2,792 units.
It should be noted that the number of housing
units has stablized over the past twenty years.
A review of the population and housing statis-
tics indicates that Whittiers average household
size is 2.0, compared to 2.2 for Denver.
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^ j Inside the Whittier Neighborhood
1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 1998 2000
YEAR
Sources: US. Census, 1950-1990; Denver Planning Office 1998;
and Piton Foundation Forecast 2000
1950 1980 1970 1980 1990 1998 2000
YEAR
Sources: US. Census, 1950-1990; Denver Planning Office 1998;
and Piton Foundation Forecast 2000
9


Shortage of Affordable Housing
While the increase in housing values in Whittier has been a source of pride for many homeowners, it has come
with a down side. The elderly and the poor have felt the already serious shortage of affordable housing.
Architect leads housing discussion
Maintaining a fair share of affordable housing for people who work in the city is a priority in order to promote
diversity within the neighborhood. The Center for Affordable Housing at the University of Colorado at Denver
has reported that many low-income families are paying more than 50% of their income for rent in Denver. There
are currently 310 housing units within Whittier (representing 14% of Whittiers total housing units) supported by
Section 8. Residents typically pay rent at a fixed 30% of their incomes, with the federal department of Housing
and Urban Development paying the owners the difference between that and market value. (5)
The Whittier neighborhood supports the City and County of Denvers efforts to include low-income housing in all
major residential developments including Stapleton, Lowry, the Central Platte Valley, and the Golden Triangle.
The Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000 suggests there are threshhold preconditions to support residential vitality of
the city. Among these conditions is creating a clean and safe environment where home buyers can be confident
that their property values are secure. Whittier seeks to create these conditions to enhance its residential character.
Affordable housing also supports residential vitality by encouraging public employeesincluding firefighters,
police, and teachersto purchase homes in Whittier.
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Inside the Whittier Neighborhood
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Crime Rates
Residents have expressed concerns about issues such as
illegal-drug sales and alcohol-related offenses. Neigh-
borhood crime statistics show Whittier at 117.3 crimes
per 1,000 residents, with a 9.8% decline in the crime
rate from 1990 to 1999. Whittier has the 16th highest
overall crime rate out of 72 Denver neighborhoods.
The Total Offenses table on the right shows the
crimes by type. The majority of crimes committed in
Whittier are burglaries, larcenies, and auto thefts. The
chart below indicates the continuing decline in overall
reported offenses between 1995 and 1999. (6)
DENVER POLICE DEPARTMENT
1999 STATISTICAL REPORT
{per 1,000 population)
TOTAL OFFENSES Whittier Neighborhood
Homicides .02
Sexual Assaults 1,7
Aggravated Assaults 8.5
Robbery 4.4
Petty and Grand Larceny 21.2
Auto Theft 15.0
Arson 1.4
Ail Other 42.0
Source: Denver Department of Safety
These rates are based on 1998 crimes and 1990 census population
figures.
WHITTIER NEIGHBORHOOD
REPORTED OFFENSES Average Number of Reported
S YEAR TREND Offenses Per Yea r 542.4
1995 1996 1997 1998 1999
Source: Denver Department of Safety
Inside the Whittier Neighborhood
11


New home based on Denver Square design
Since 1991, the Piton Foundation has compiled data that depict Denver neighborhoods5 well-being, including
Whittier. Attached as the Appendix are the key statistics about Whittier. A review of these charts shows Whittier
as a neighborhood in which conditions have markedly improved over the past decade. Population is stable, average
household income is up, and property values have increased. The number of people on welfare has decreased, the
crime rate has dropped, and births to teens are down.
In Jantiary of 2000, the Denver Health Benehmarh Proj ect released a report establishing a neighborhood-based
profile of health-related indicators for 11 neighborhoods including Whittier. The Benchmark Project was the first
City-sponsored initiative to identify health issues in the aggregate of the Empowerment Zone neighborhoods.
Specific data are not available on individual neighborhoods; however, the aggregate data do provide insight into
health needs of inner city neighborhoods and are attached as an appendix.
While the statistics present an overall picture of improving conditions within Whittier, they do not portray the full
picture. There remain negative influences on the neighborhood like abandoned houses, non-conforming commer-
cial uses, liquor stores, and community correction facilities. The Piton Foundation describes many of these ele-
ments as risk factors for neighborhoods.
WHITTIER LAND USE CHART
Total Area 359 acres
Streets and Alleys 138 acres %
Usable Area 221 acres 100%
Residential Uses 168 acres 76%
Single Family Uses 120 acres 54%
Mufti Family Uses 48 acres 22%
Parks 14 acres 6%
Public Schools and related uses 30 acres 13%
Business 2 acres 1%
Other 7 acres 4%
Inside the Whittier Neighborhood
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Existing Land Use and Zoning
More than 76% of the Whittier neighborhood is residential. Fifty-four percent of the residential acreage contains
single-family homes; 22% of the area is duplex and low-density residential. Nineteen percent of the neighborhood
is comprised primarily of public schools and parks. The combination of residential uses and complementary
public uses represent 95% of the neighborhood.
The Whittier neighborhood is a distinct area within the region that surrounds City Park on the eastern edge of
downtown Denver. It is of walkable size, with the majority of its community facilities within 10 to 15 minutes
walking distance for the residents. Land use and zoning issues are closely related to maintaining the residential
character of the neighborhood. The maintenance of a strong, diverse, low-density residential neighborhood is the
central concern of many issues raised by residents.
The western edge of the Whittier neighborhood is bordered by B4 zoning, allowing an extensive mix of commer-
cial uses. The majority of business uses exist on the Downing frontage north of 27th Avenue. Downing, as well as
the other transportation corridors delineating Whittier, not only defines the edge of the neighborhood but also
gives it a distinct character. The residential character, the pedestrian orientation, and the historic quality of the
neighborhood must be reflected in the redevelopment of Downing Street (see map on p. 29).
Neighborhood retail
Commercial buildings are also scattered throughout the neighborhood, particularly along the three streetcar lines
that once extended through the area on 23rd, 25th and 28th avenues. These uses were concentrated around
historic trolley stops rather than extending the length of streets. Most of them were originally small groceries,
pharmacies, and candy stores that served neighborhood residents. In most cases, they continue to operate as
marginal retail establishments.
Whittier is bound by major streets, connecting it to other residential communities, employment, commercial
centers, and community facilities. Within the geographic center of the neighborhood, there is a core of public-use
facilities including Manual High School, Ford-Warren library, Red Shield Community Center, Thunderbolt Com-
munity Park, and Fuller Park. These public and quasi-public spaces are complemented by a number of additional
uses that serve the residential neighborhood including: Whittier Elementary School, Loyola Parochial School,
George Morrison Park, Williams Park, and Douglas Park.
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Inside the Whittier Neighborhood


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Contiguous to the Whittier neighborhood, but not included within its boundaries, are a number of public and
quasi-public facilities including Cole Middle School, Mitchell Elementary School, Community College of Denver
Tech Center, Wyatt Edison Charter School, and Annunciation Parochial School.
Mission design
Gothic design
Regional facilities contiguous to the Whittier neighborhood include City Park Golf Course and City Park (including
the Denver Zoo and Denver Museum of Nature and Science). The Gilliam Juvenile Hall (the citys juvenile deten-
tion facility), located at 2844 Downing Street, provides aid, assistance, and encouragement to youth ages 6 to 18
in protective custody.
Churches
There are ten churches located in the Whittier neighborhood. They are among the most distinctive features in the
neighborhood. Many of these institutions extend their mission to include community services enhancing the neigh-
borhood. They are:
Antioch Baptist Church
2500 Lafayette Street Activities: Mens brotherhood, womens mission programs, youth activities.
Church of the Holy Redeemer
2552 Williams Street Adult education.
Jubilee Community Church / Neighborhood Ministries
2959 Franklin Street After-school programs for children ages 9 to 18 for homework help
and educational games; Mothers of Preschoolers program.
Mt. Carmel Community Baptist Church
2575 Vine Street Bible Study, after-school tutoring program.
New Hope Church of God in Christ
1710 East 25,h Street
New Life in Christ Family Worship Center
3037 Williams Street
St. Ignatius Loyola Catholic Church
2305 Gaylord Street Loyola Parochial School, youth activities.
Inside the Whittier Neighborhood
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St. Stephens Missionary Baptist Church
3125 Humboldt Street Tutorial program for youth.
The Salvation Army, Red Shield Corps, Community Center
2915 High Street Senior Program: exercise programs, health clinic, shopping, and movies.
After School Program for Youth: recreation center activities, homework help,
performing arts, field trips, and games.
The Unified Body of Christ
3010 High Street
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Loyola Elementary School
Schools
While there are three schools within the neighborhood (Manual High School, Whittier Elementary School, and
Loyola Elementary Parochial School), Whittier is adversely affected by DPS-assigned attendance boundaries.
Whittier children are assigned to four elementary schools, three middle schools, and two high schools (see maps on
pp. 40-41). This arbitrary division of the neighborhood requires even the youngest students to cross high traffic
volume streets and reduces opportunities for neighbors to work together to strengthen the relationship of the
neighborhood to their schools.
The Middle schools that serve Whittier include:
Cole Middle School....located at 3240 Humboldt Street.
Gove Middle School ....located at 4050 E. 14th Avenue.
Morey Middle School ....located at 840 E. 14th Avenue.
The Elementary Schools that serve Whittier include:
Whittier Elementary School ....located at 2480 Downing Street.
Gilpin Elementary School ....located at 2949 California Street.
Columbine Elementary School ....located at 2925 W. 40th Avenue.
Mitchell Elementary School ....located at 1350 E. 33rd Avenue.
Loyola Elementary School... .located at 24th and Gaylord is within Whittier and is a parochial school supported by
the St. Ignatius Loyola Catholic Church.
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Inside the Whittier Neighborhood
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History of Whittier Neighborhood
Several independent consultants and historians have recognized Whittier as a historically significant portion of
Denvers past:
In June 1974, the Colorado Historical Society identified homes and structures of architectural significance
constructed in early Denver throughout the city, including Whittier.
In 1983, historian Barbara Norgren identified 190 neighborhood features including buildings that might qualify
the Whittier neighborhood as eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places. Fourteen structures
were identified in the report as eligible for the National Register of Historic Places. In 1995, the report was revised
by the Colorado Historical Society deleting several northern blocks of the neighborhood.
In January 1995, the City of Denver Landmark Preservation Commission and the Office of Planning and
Community Development issued a report on Whittier prepared by R. Laurie Simmons and Thomas H. Simmons,
Front Range Research Associates. This report offered a comprehensive history of the neighborhood and recom-
mended a High-Williams Street Historic District (see map on p, 17).
John Greenleaf Whittier
Neighborhood gardens
Whittier School, and later the Whittier neighborhood, were named after John Greenleaf Whittier (1807-1892), the
abolitionist Civil War poet. Among his poems are:
Voices of Freedom -1846
Songs of Labor -1850
In War Times 1864
The Moral Warfare -1838
Massachusetts to Virginia -1843
His poems attacked the injustices of slavery while condemning the hypocrisy of a nation that was founded on
ideals of freedom but allowed slavery.
Born in Massachusetts and largely self-educated, as a young poet Whittier contributed to the abolitionist newspa-
per The Free Press. As a religious man of the Quaker faith, he was deeply concerned about social welfare. For
more than 30 years, he devoted himself to the abolition of slavery in the United States. He served in the Massa-
chusetts legislature and was a founder of both the Liberty Party in 1839 and the Republican Party in 1854.(7)
The values and example of John Greenleaf Whittier have lived on in this community.
Inside the Whittier Neighborhood
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1983 Proposed
National Register of
Historic Places
Source; Colorado Historical Society
! 1995Revised National j
J Register of Historic j
| Places Recommendation j
Source: Dewar Neighborhood History Pm/ect
Denver Landmarks
2330 Downing Street
2501 High Street
2932 Lafayette Street
Source: Denver landmark Commissbn
Historic Designation
Inside the Whittier Neighborhood
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Whittier Early Development
The Whittier neighborhood subdivisions were developed in the period after the Civil War. In the 1870s, a real-
estate boom occurred in anticipation of the citys connection with the transcontinental railroad. This boom was
heightened by the discovery of silver. As anticipated by the developers of the early subdivisions, the railroad
extensions to Denver included the Kansas Pacific Railroad on the 40th Avenue alignment north of Whittier.
Development of homes in Whittier followed in the 1880s and 1890s. The majority of homes were built for middle-
income Anglo-American citizens. Many of the large Victorian homes were built by Denver business owners.
Residents included carpenters, bricklayers, and metal workers, artisans who contributed to many of the architectural
details found in the smaller homes. By 1893, the Whittier neighborhood housed 24 African-American families
close to the rail line. Their primary occupation was as porters working for the Kansas Pacific. (8)
Whittier: A History of Racism, Segregation, and Integration
Whittier has not been adequately recognized for its unique history of race relations within the City of Denver.
While portions of that history are infamous, they should not be forgotten.
Beginning with the integration of the neighborhood over 100 years ago, the history of segregation and integration
has played out decade by decade. In the 1920s, Denvers Mayor Ben Stapleton, Denver City Attorney Rice Means,
and Colorado Governor Clarence Morley were supported by the Ku Klux Klan. Denvers chapter of the Klan
boasted 17,000 members. The Denver Klan chapter nicknamed itself the Denver Doers Club in order to mask
its true racism. It supported the establishment of a color line limiting African-American citizens to an area north
of 23rd Avenue. The color line moved from west to east year after year, standing for an extended period between
High and Race streets. When Walter Chapman, a African-American postman, challenged the color line by moving
to 2112 Gilpin, a bomb exploded in his front yard. He moved out. Another brave African-American, Charles
Starr, moved inonly to have the house bombed again. Claude DePriest, a black fireman, purchased a home at
2649 Gaylord. He was warned, If you continue at your present address, you do so at your own peril. After that
and other confrontations, DePriest moved. (9) This significant history of race relations should be preserved for
generations to come in order not to lose sight of the reality of residential segregation in our citys history.
More than a hundred years have passed since the first African-Americans moved into the northwest corner of
Whittier. They confronted systematic racism as they pursued their lives in Denver. Yet today these individual heroics
are hardly recognized. Despite a hundred years of individual integrity by both African- and Anglo-Americans, the
history has become almost lost; the issues of integration worked through in the Whittier neighborhood are more
Inside the Whittier Neighborhood
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remote today because It is a neighborhood that is open to all. Individuals and families of diverse backgrounds work
and live together, creating a healthy residential environment.
This would not be a matter for regret if the battle of integration had been won-if the individual heroism of the
last century had established, once and for all, that respect for individuals was based on their character rather than
the color of their skin. As late as March 22,1950, a Japanese-American war veteran and his family were barred
from moving into their Denver home at 2718 Gaylord by a restrictive covenant (10). What has happened is that
much of the history of racism, segregation, and integration has been unrecorded by our common history. Those
residents of Whittier who recall the early history in Denver are rapidly being lost as they enter the eighth and
ninth decades of their lives. It is the business of the Whittier neighborhood to persuade the city that the history
left in individual hearts and minds is not enough. What is required is a recognition of the historic role Whittier
has played in a century of segregation and integration.
Inside the Whittier Neighborhood
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The Whittier Vision for the Future
The Whittier neighborhood is unique. A mix of single-family and low-density multi-family housing complemented
by parks, schools, and churches makes Whittier a model low-density neighborhood in Denver. Located between
downtown Denver and City Park Golf Course, the neighborhood is the home of one of the citys most diverse set
of lifestyles and populations. The neighborhood houses elderly, young, single, married, African-American, Asian,
Hispanic, Anglo, gay, and lesbian. As the site of many significant events in the history of integration of the
community, Whittier is a truly historic neighborhood.
Whittier residents overall vision for the future is to reinforce an inviting, well-maintained, safe, and comfortable
residential environment for families.
The following positive qualities guide the Whittier Neighborhood vision of the future:
1. Diversity The rich mixture of ethnicity, age, and lifestyle will be encouraged and supported as a valued
characteristic of the Whittier neighborhood.
2. Cultural History It is important that the history of segregation and integration not be forgotten. Whittier
represents a potential living history of the City of Denver.
3. Historic Character Historically and architecturally significant homes, churches, businesses, and streetscapes
will be preserved. In creating a healthy model for an integrated community, the historic nature of the neigh-
borhood will be highlighted. The design of new development and remodeling will be encouraged to be com-
patible with the existing historic fabric of the neighborhood as a low-density residential community.
4. Education The importance of education to the future of the Whittier neighborhood cannot be overstated.
With 36% of the residents under 18 years of age, education is key to their future. Creating partnerships that
involve residents, businesses, community-based organizations, Denver city government, and Denver Public
Schools will be indispensable to this future.
5. Public Safety Universal safety builds a sense of pride, communication, and cooperation among neighbors.
The Denver Police and Denver Fire Department will be central features in all planning decisions.
6. City Agencies The Whittier Neighborhood Association must work cooperatively with city government to re-
assess standards of service including park maintenance, neighborhood and alley inspection, and trash collection.
Inside the Whittier Neighborhood
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The plan was developed as a product of the leadership of Councilperson Elbra Wedgeworth and the Whittier
Neighborhood Association Board of Directors with the participation of the residents of Whittier. The plan incorpo-
rated work developed in meetings and individual efforts of many citizens and public officials. In total, 85 individu-
als provided written input and comments to the draft documents. In addition to the written input, in excess of 200
individuals participated in meetings focused on the plan. These meetings culminated on June 21,2000 with over 80
individuals in attendance prioritizing the Action Projects from the Priority Issues. The highest priorities were
selected as first steps for implementing the plan.
The specific priorities selected in each category were:
1. Land Use and Zoning
LZ2Encourage and support residential development of vacant land that reflects existing design of the
neighborhood
L26Encourage the designation of historic districts and individual structures.
L29Support a variety of housing types, including low-income housing, that are compatible with residential
character of the neighborhood.
2. Urban Design and Historic Preservation
UD2Rename Whittier Neighborhood Association Historic Whittier Square.
UD6Encourage the redevelopment of commercial sites to compatible retail services.
UD11Encourage infill development that reflects New Urbanism design including front porches, Denver
Square scale, and high level of craftsmanship.
3. Education
EDIEncourage the development of a Learning Center at Manual High School including Community
College of Denver.
ED3Encourage all residentsincluding those who are not parentsto participate in school issues.
ED8Establish mentorship programs to create contact with youth in the neighborhood throughout their
academic careers.
Inside the Whittier Neighborhood
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4. Public Safety and Health
PS 1Establish Neighborhood Watch programs on majority of blocks.
PS6Work with the Denver Police Department District 2 to establish an effective police-community rela-
tions program.
PS8Inventory risk factors such as apartment buildings, businesses, and alleys for frequent crime reports.
5. Community Service
CS1Identify site of Neighborhood Center, secure funding from City of Denver.
CS3Develop human services, e.g., job training, language classes, and recreation.
CS6Establish planning steering committee for Neighborhood Plan implementation.
CS7Work with City Council representative to track the implementation of the Neighborhood Plan.
6. Parks and Open Space
PIImprove Fuller Park to enhance.
P5Expand use Glenarm Recreation Faculty by Whittier residents.
P9Monitor conditions of parks, reporting regularly to the Denver Parks Department.
PI 1Develop visual and pedestrian linkages between parks and historic walks.
7. Economic Development
ElInventory and evaluate vacant properties in order to recruit neighborhood businesses.
E2Encourage joint development of an education center at Manual High School in cooperation with Com-
munity College of Denver.
E5Cooperate in youth employment programs an business incubators for entry-level employment.
E6Encourage businesses to participate in the Whittier Neighborhood Association to promote local use of
businesses.
Inside the Whittier Neighborhood
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8. Traffic and Transportation
TlEncourage walking, bicycling, and mass-transit use,
T5Notify police of speeding traffic; support reduced speed.
T6Evaluate existing traffic signage for more stop signs to discourage cut-through traffic,
9. Environment
E2Identify up to 10 problem properties each month to bring into code compliance.
E4Encourage residents to participate in recycling and conservation programs.
E5Apply for grants to obtain trees.
10. Community Coordination
CC2Create committee activities focused on the Neighborhood Plan Action Charts.
CC5Create block activities through grants and city cooperation.
In addition to selecting highest priorities, all action recommendations have been designated ongoing, immediate,
short-term, or long-term. Ongoing recommendations may be started immediately and can continue on. Immedi-
ate recommendations should be started now. Short-term recommendations can be started with little or no money.
Long-term recommendations will take longer to accomplish and will require coordination with funding agencies.
Inside the Whittier Neighborhood
23


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Whittier Neighborhood Association meeting
Introduction to Priorities
The process used in developing this plan included interviews with residents and community leaders from the
neighborhood and planning forums on a number of topics. In all of the meetings there existed a sincere sense of
hope and optimism about the future of the neighborhood. It is clear that living in Whittier is special, and it is
obvious that residents are looking for ways to strengthen and support the lives of all who live in the neighborhood.
The issues related to diversity permeated every meeting of the planning process. There exists within the neighbor-
hood a profound desire for improved opportunity for every resident. It springs from a hope that Whittier can
move toward a culture where individuals are what matter and ethnicity is not the priority. The concerns about
maintaining a diverse community are reflected in subtle ways in the priority sets related to education, land use and
zoning, public safety, historic preservation, and parks.
Romanesque detail
The purpose of this neighborhood plan has grown beyond the simple listing of assets and issues to a frank
discussion of issues related to diversity as a priority, a subject that is seldom discussed in neighborhood plans.
Virtually every priority issue list of actions includes the implied, if not explicit, question of how much does the
City of Denver seek to join Whittier in supporting neighborhood diversity. The plan, because it originated from
the neighborhood, enjoys sufficient editorial independence to include goals that call attention to some dissident
issues. This process of goal-setting, in itself, is a hopeful sign of what may be possible in future neighborhood
plans. It will, however, not succeed if the dialogue is not joined by the citys leadership.
Today, Whittier is a neighborhood in which residents take enormous pride, precisely because of its history of
inclusion, tolerance, and pluralism. Obviously, Whittier has not found the solutions to all the issues of racism that
have divided our society. The truth remains that the multiple races living together in Whittier have conflicting
memories of the past, but at the same time they have, through this planning process, expressed common goals and
actions for their shared future.
It is appropriate that the northern edge of Whittier is defined by Martin Luther King Boulevard. Dr. Kings
crusade to extend Americas constitutional covenant to all citizens is alive in Whittier today. The fabric of our
cultural history should not be woven from a single-colored thread; a truer history will be written as a rich blend of
colors. In fact, much of our citys history reflects a subtleif not invisible neglect of the African-American
contributions to our shared history. Whittier is a significant part of that history and should be seen as a living
classroom. Many of the actions suggested would move Whittierand the City of Denverto the recognition of
that history.
Priority Issues: INTRODUCTION TO PRIORITIES
25


Neighborhood retail
Mother and daughter vote
Priority Issue: Land Use and Zoning
Neighborhood land use and zoning issues are closely related to maintaining Whittiers residential character. The
maintenance of a strong, diverse, low-density residential neighborhood is the central goal raised by residents.
More than 76% of the Whittier neighborhood is residential. The balance of the neighborhood is primarily schools
and parks. The combination of residential uses and complementary public use represents 95% of the
neighborhoods land use.
The western edge of the Whittier neighborhood is bordered by B4 zoning. This allows an extensive mix of
commercial and high-density residential uses. The majority of business uses exist on the Downing frontage north
of 27th Avenue. The urban design character of Downing is viewed by residents as in need of improvement.
Expansions of streetscaping projects, design of buildings and facades, landscaping, and parking are mentioned as
specific concerns and requiring attention and improvement. Downing and the other transportation corridors
defining Whittier should be viewed as gateways to the neighborhood. They not only define the edge of the neigh-
borhood, but also give definition to the character of Whittier. The values of the community must be expressed at
its gateways. The residential character, the pedestrian orientation, and historic quality of the neighborhood must
be reflected in the redevelopment along Downing. The gateway design concept is of special note in the light-rail
access that extends to the existing station at 30th and Downing. Not only does this station provide direct light-rail
access to downtown, it also defines the character of the Whittier neighborhood for all who ride the light rail
through this station. In the foreseeable future, the station will be a stop on the connection of light rail to the
proposed air train that will run to Denver International Airport. Downing will increasingly define the view of
the Whittier neighborhood in the years to come. Other gateways to the Whittier Neighborhood include 23 rd and
Downing, Martin Luther King and Downing, Martin Luther King and York, 26th and York, and 23rd and York.
Commercial buildings are also scattered throughout the neighborhood, particularly along the three streetcar lines
that once extended through Whittier. These uses are concentrated around historic trolley stops rather than extend-
ing the length of streets. Most of them were small groceries, pharmacies, and candy stores that served the neigh-
borhood residents. In most cases, they continue to operate as marginal retail establishments. Residents note a lack
of compatibility between existing businesses and residential uses. In particular, a lack of concern for appearance
and maintenance, as well as lack of buffering landscaping, were noted problems.
Adjacent to Whittier are a number of sites of concern to neighbors. Chief among these are the service station at 26th
and York; City Park Golf Course Club House at 25th and York; and the 23rd and York access to City Park and the
Zoo. Proposed design and zoning changes of these locations are a concern to the Whittier neighborhood.
Priority Issues: LAND USE AND ZONING-
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As one looks in all directions from the Whittier neighborhood, there are major development and redevelopment
plans. The renewal of the Cole neighborhood, the extension of the light rail on Downing to the proposed air train,
the redevelopment of Curtis Park neighborhood, the major investments in the Uptown neighborhood, and the
redevelopment of the City Park Golf Course Club House are but a few examples. In order to maintain a quality
residential environment within Whittier, the neighborhood must be vigilant to the unintended effect of the
massive public and private investments that are occuring around Whittier. The elimination of low-cost housing in
Uptown and Curtis Park could create pressure on the housing available in Whittier. Park design could either
encourage bicycle use or discourage it. The placement of group homes in Whittier and adjacent neighborhoods
has altered the residential character of several blocks. The opportunity exists in Whittier to become a primary
advocate for residential lifestyle within the inner city.
27
Priority Issues: LAND USE AND ZONING


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Whittier Zoning Map
Priority Issues: Land Use and Zoning
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Commercial
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Recreation
Priority Issues: LAND USE AND ZONING
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Goals: Land Use and Zoning
The Whittier Neighborhood is almost fully developed with the exception of several vacant lots. As changes
occur, it is important that additions to the neighborhood complement the the existing neighborhood character.
The eixsting residential integrity includes an inviting, safe, and comfortable low-density living environment for all
residents.
1. To maintain the existing residential integrity of the Whittier neighborhood, building an inviting, safe, comfort-
able low-density environment for all residents.
2. To emphasize the potential of Whittier to provide a residential environment for a wide variety of people,
3. To maintain the historic character of the neighborhood and encourage the development of housing that
provides a cohesive visual image of the history.
4. To preserve areas of historical significance through historic districts, individual landmark designation, and
voluntary design standards, (see "Urban Design and Historic Preservation u)
5.
To mitigate the impacts of non-conforming commercial uses to their adjacent residential neighbors by encour-
aging renovation.
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Reviewing the plan
6. To oppose proposed rezoning and changes in use that convert existing residential use to high density residen-
tial or commercial uses.
7. To encourage home ownership by expanding use of Mortgage Bond Programs for first-time homeowners and
current renters.
8. To encourage neighborhood design review of all new developments, both public and private.
9. To support placing group homes and facilities throughout the city through the City of Denver review process.
10. To establish ongoing relationships between existing group homes and the neighborhood organization.
11. To establish ongoing relationships with business uses within Whittier and encourage their participation in the
Whittier Neighborhood Association.
Priority Issues: LAND USE AND ZONING
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Action Chart: Land Use and Zoning
TIME
# ACTIONS Ongoing Immediately Short Term Long Term Implemented
PROJECTS
LZi Retain R2 zoning and land use as residential X Neighborhood, Planning Office
*LZ2 Encourage and support residential development of vacant land that reflects existing design of the neighborhood X Neighborhood, Planning Office
LZ3 Encourage effective use and redevelopment of underutilized commercial facilities X Neighborhood, Planning Office
LZ4 Oppose the expansion of commercial zones into existing residential zones X Neighborhood, Planning Office
LZ5 Encourage the city-wide dispersal of group homes X Neighborhood, City Council
*LZ6 Pursue the designation of historic districts and individual structures X Neighborhood, Planning Office
LZ7 Encourage development of commercial zoning north of 26th and Downing as neighborhood retail X Neighborhood, Planning Office
LZ8 Support programs that encourage home ownership X Neighborhood
LZ9 Support a variety of housing types, including low-income housing, that are compatible with the residential character of the neighborhood X - Neighborhood
LZ10 Support the dtyspoHcy of an equitable cfcmbutfon of low- income housmginalLDenver neighborhoods X Neighborhood, Planning Office
LZll Support enforcement of absentee landlords to have agents registered with the Assessment Office X Neighborhood, Assessment Office
^Selected as the neighborhoods highest priorities on June 21,2000
Priority Issues: LAND USE AND ZONING
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Priority Issue: Urban Design
and Historic Preservation
A Queen Anne design
The name Whittier is historic. It was selected to honor the nineteenth-century abolitionist poet John Greenleaf
Whittier. The name was first used for the Whittier School in the southwest corner of the neighborhood. Given
the fact that this neighborhood has been racially integrated since 1895, it makes the name most appropriate as
indicative of the role the neighborhood has played in the history of the City of Denver.
The Whittier street pattern follows a historic design of nearly square blocks typical of the 1860s and 1870s
subdivisions. These blocks compose the relatively square area of the Whittier neighborhood. Whittier is one of
Denvers oldest residential neighborhoods and includes the first annexation to the original City of Denver in
1874.
The developers of Whittier were among Denvers earliest citizens. These pioneers played vigorous roles during
the formation of the city as leaders in agriculture, mining, railroading, education, manufacturing, retailing, and
government. Among these leaders were:
A.B. Case, one of the first settlers in Denver in 1859, was a founder of the University of Denver and a
prominent figure in the reform movement in city government. The Case Addition, filed in 1868, was the first
subdivision platted in Whittier.
Jacob W. Downing came to Colorado in 1860 to practice law in Denver. During the Civil War, Downing was
a captain in the Colorado Union Volunteers that defeated the confederacy at the Battle of Glorietta Pass,
New Mexico. Downing was known as a father of the city park system, promoting the development of City
Park. The Downing Addition, platted in 1869, is the largest subdivision in Whittier.
Adolph Schinner was a Prussian immigrant who came to Denver in 1860. He annexed the first addition to
the new City of Denver. He also opened the citys first bakery. He was a member of the State Legislature,
founder of The Colorado Herald newspaper, and member of the first school board.
George McCullough came to Denver in 1872. He had previously been in the wholesale grocery business
and had unsuccessfully explored for oil in Ohio.
Priority Issues: URBAN DESIGN AND HISTORIC PRESERVATION 32


Archie C. Fisk moved to Denver after serving in the Union army fighting at Bull Run, Antietam, and
Vicksburg, among others.
Robert H, MeMann relocated to Denver in 1876. He operated an insurance and brokerage firm before
establishing a loan company.
William Clayton came to Denver in 1860. In 1868, he was elected Mayor of Denver. George W. Clayton was
an early member of the Denver City Council, as well as the Union Water Company and First National Bank.
In 1872 the McCullough Addition added eight acres to the Whittier neighborhood. An advertisement described
the neighborhood as beautifully located overlooking the city with glorious view of the mountains. In an 1880
description of Denver, W.H. Vickers described the McCulloughs Addition to Whittier as one of the most
attractive and desirable portions of the city for residences, lying high, dry and commanding an extensive and
enchanting view of the Rocky Mountains. (11)
While many early residents were Anglo-Americans of middle and upper-middle class, African-American residents
integrated the neighborhood in the 1890s while working for the Kansas Pacific Railroad, which ran north of the
Whittier neighborhood. By 1893, two dozen African-American families lived in northwest Whittier. (12)
Whittiers historic qualities and residential character are cornerstones to the sense of community within the
neighborhood. The older homes, higher level of craftsmanship, common areas, front-porch designs, mature street
trees, and city services combine to make Whittier a potential model of New Urbanism in Denver.
The Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000 comments on the importance of neighborhood:
Our homes are our refuge. For many residents, our home lives extend onto the front porch, down
the street, and around the corner. Many residents feel a much stronger bond with their neighborhoods
than with the city. (13)
The Whittier neighborhood embraces this value and encourages residents to participate in block activities.
For most Denverites, the residential neighborhood provides the major environmental experience. Many older Whittier
residents recall vividly and often nostalgically the Whittier of their childhood. Despite the history of segregation
and the color line that divided Whittier, their childhoods were associated with early experiences of friendship,
marriage, and all the intimate community activities that lend deep emotional significance to the neighborhood.
Priority Issues: URBAN DESIGN AND HISTORIC PRESERVATION _33


The Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000 acknowledges
Denvers identity as a city is shaped largely by the diversity and evolution of its architectural
and landscape styles. Fortunately, some of the architectural heritage of every era remains as
part of our civic treasury. But historic preservation has not always been a guiding principle in
the citys development. (14)
As previously noted, on three occasions the historic significance of Whittier has been acknowledged with little
response from the city:
In June 1974, the Colorado Historical Society identified structures in Whittier as historically significant.
* In 1983, the Colorado Historical Society identified 190 neighborhood features that qualify the Whittier
neighborhood as eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places.
Looking to the future
In January 1995, the City of Denver Landmark Preservation Commission and the Office of Planning and
Community Development issued a report prepared by Front Range Associates identifying a potential historic
district on High and Williams streets.
Unmentioned in the Front Range Associates report was the significant history of race relations. The creation of a
historic district on High Street and adjacent streets would preserve the unique residential quality of the neighbor-
hood and also preserve for generations to come the reality of segregation in our citys history. The High Street
alley was the color line that separated the city into black and white neighborhoods. (15)
To date, Denver has failed to recognize and designate many significant historical and cultural sites in Whittier. An
urgent need exists to preserve that portion of Denvers history as it relates to segregation and integration of the
city. Our city, which has always looked toward the future, also has a valuable heritage, which should be protected
for future generations. It is a primary goal of this plan to coordinate neighborhood and community leadership in
designating eligible districts and structures in the Whittier neighborhood.
Priority Issues: URBAN DESIGN AND HISTORIC PRESERVATION
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Potential Denver
Landmarks
See list of potential
individually eligible
Denver landmarks,
page 31
Potential Denver Landmarks
Source: Neighborhood History Project
Priority Issues: URBAN DESIGN AND HISTORIC PRESERVATION
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*
Denver Neighborhood History Project 1993-94
w Potential Denver Landmar Structures Whittier Neighborhood
4
STREET ADDRESS HISTORIC NAME
E 23rd Avenue and York Street St. Ignatius Loyola Church
4 1811-15 E 23 rd Avenue
4 1917 E 23rd Avenue
4 1941 E 23 rd Avenue
4 2217-19 E 24th Avenue Atkins, Samuel W.
4 1601-15 E 25th Avenue Cooke, James, Terrace
1739 E 29th Avenue Neef, Max, House
2330 Downing Street Holmes, Clarence F. Jr., House
4 2316 Franklin Street
4 2401 Franklin Street
4 2841 Franklin Street
4 2928 Franklin Street
gk 2329 Gaylord Street Webb, Wellington and Wilma, House
2401 Gaylord Street Fowler, Addison J., House
4 2539 Gilpin Street Benton House
4 2549 Gilpin Street Ingalls House
4 2557 Gilpin Street
4 2558 Gilpin Street Morrison, George, Sr., House
4 2311 High Street Ryan House
2339-43 High Street
4 2520 High Street Biegel House
4 2352 Humboldt Street
4 2356 Humboldt Street Cooper House
4 2707 Humboldt Street Armstrong House
4 2715 Humboldt Street Dunbar House
4 2320 Lafayette Street Everett House
2448 Lafayette Street Cousins, Charles L., House
4 2610 Lafayette Street
4 2652 Lafayette Street Lamb House
4 2829 Lafayette Street Zint House
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4 Priority Issues: URBAN DESIGN AND HISTORIC PRESERVATION


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Denver Neighborhood History Project 1993-94
Potential Denver Landmarks Whittier Neighborhood
(continued)
STREET ADDRESS
2301 Marion Street
2538 Marion Street
2323-29 Race Street
2330-32 Race Street
2401 Race Street
2337 Vine Street
2361 Vine Street
2300 Williams Street
2426 Williams Street
2552 Williams Street
2732 Williams Street
HIS TORIC NAME
McClain, T. Ernest, House
Goodnow Double House
McCloud, Burnis, House
Double House
Gorham House
Sechrist House
Holy Redeemer Church
Timpte House
Historic Qumo Anne residence
Priority Issues: URBAN DESIGN AND HISTORIC PRESERVATION
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A Queen Anne duplex
Recommendations for neighborhood and city cooperation to preserve the historic character of Whittier:
The historic Color Line that stood longest on High Street should be designated by establishing the High
Street Historic District and placing a marker in Thunderbolt Park, where High Street terminates at 30th
Avenue.
Oral histories should be conducted by the Whittier Neighborhood Association and preserved about the
neighborhood and its role in the citys history at Ford-Warren Library, which is located at 28th Avenue and
High Street.
Individual houses should be designated, recognizing their historic residents including artisans, political leaders,
jazz performers, and community leaders.
* Pursue the designation of the Whittier neighborhood on the National Register of Historic Places.
(see map, page 17)
Pursue the recommendation that the High and Williams area should be designated a Denver Landmark District.
(see map,page 17)
Establish historic walks through the Whittier neighborhood marking and describing historic sites.
Urban Design
The Whittier neighborhood offers a unique design opportunity. The character of the homes, the neighborhood
feeling, and the proximity of parks contribute to increasing property values as individuals renovate their homes.
The goal of the neighborhood should be to support the Denver Planning Office brochure to encourage voluntary
standards for home renovation. These guidelines provide a means of protecting Whittiers historic character while
allowing investment in the neighborhood.
Ensuring high standards for the residential environment is the purpose of the following urban design recommen-
dations. Through effective design, the existing neighborhood character and sense of community can be enhanced.
While the Whittier neighborhood is fully developed (with the exception of several isolated residential lots and the
commercial sites facing Downing), substantial renovation of homes is occurring throughout the neighborhood.
The Denver Planning Office has pointed out that a well-designed renovation that respects the original design of the
house and takes advantage of relationships with neighboring housing can substantially enhance the neighborhood.
Priority Issues: URBAN DESIGN AND HISTORIC PRESERVATION
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The primary residential zone in Whittier, R2, includes requirements for property line setbacks, open space, height
of structures, and the bulk plane. These requirements define the size, shape, and limit of construction on each
home.
Other design considerations should include:
Materials: The original exterior materials should be used whenever possible. Repair should be done
wherever possible rather than covering with a new finish material.
Roof Form: The shape and slope of a structures roof is an important element in defining the architectural
statement. Maintaining the pitch of a roof on all additions will enhance the value of the property.
Mass: The shape of a structure should be added to in such a way as to ensure a complementary mass to
the existing structure.
Windows and Doors: The size, shape, and placement of windows and doors should be similar to the
original in all additions. Avoid placing horizontal windows in a building that has vertical openings.
Details and Ornamentation: Original ornamentation on a structure should be reproduced on additions
to the structure.
Whittier provides amenities and character that are increasingly understood and valued. Thorough
respect for the unique qualities of the neighborhood remodeling can contribute to Whittiers already excep-
tional qualities.
Individual Input
Priority Issues: URBAN DESIGN AND HISTORIC PRESERVATION
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Gods: UrbanDesignandHistorkPreservatkm
Through neighborhood advocacy and adoption of this plan, the Whittier Neighborhood Association intends to
provide guidance to residents and private and public sector developments. Encouraging residents, public agen-
cies, and businesses to enhance their physical facilities is a key of this plan.
1. To advocate for historic preservation of the existing neighborhood character.
2. To preserve the historic sense of the community for future generations.
3. To establish high standards for parks and streetscaping, as they pertain to the neighborhood urban design.
4. To encourage the designation of individual historic structures within the neighborhood, (seepp. 36-37)
5. To encourage the designation of a historic district within the neighborhood, (seep. 17)
6. To pursue the listing of the neighborhood on the National Register of Historic Places, (seep. 17)
7. To pursue voluntary standards and guidelines for home renovation, (seep. 39)
8. To rename neighborhood association Historic Whittier Square.
Priority Issues: URBAN DESIGN AND HISTORIC PRESERVATION
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Action Chart Urban Design and Historic Preservation
TIME
# ACTIONS Ongoing Immediately Short Term Long Term Implemented
PROJECTS
UD1 Support efforts to educate Whittier residents on the importance of local history X Neighborhood
njm Rename Whittier Neighborhood Association Historic Whittier Square X Neighborhood
UD3 Apply for registration of the entire neighborhood on the National Register of Historic Places X Neighborhood
UD4 Apply for Landmark District for a portion of the neighborhood X Neighborhood
UD5 Encourage eligible individual property owners to pursue Denver Landmark Designation X Neighborhood
"-UD6 Encourage the redevelopment of commercial sites to compatible retail services X Neighborhood
UD7 Pursue recognition of the historic role of colorline in citys history (Whittier as a living classroom) X Neighborhood
UD8 Preserve sandstone sidewalks. Encourage street lighting for pedestrians X Neighborhood
UD9 Commemorate historic events and individuals through history projects (including oral histories) X Neighborhood, Colorado Historical Society
UD10 Identify innovative ways to reflect and celebrate Whittier history in parks design and use X Neighborhood, Denver Parks
"UD11 Encourage infill development that reflects New Urbanism design including front porches, Denver Square scale, and high level of craftsmanship X Neighborhood, Denver Planning Office
" Selected as the neighborhoods highest priorities on June 21,2000
Priority Issues: URBAN DESIGN AND HISTORIC PRESERVATION


Priority Issue: Education
Whittier neighborhoods concerns and hopes turn on the education of its children. Over 1,400 residents36% of
Whittiers total populationare under 18 years old. People are concerned about their schools but have difficulty
communicating their concerns as a neighborhood due to attendance boundaries dividing the area between four
elementary schools and three middle schools. The process of drawing attendance boundaries has also required
children to cross high-volume streets to attend their assigned elementary schools.
A new school day
While all of the schools serving Whittier have developed strategies to improve the educational achievement of their
students, specifically to improve literacy as a basic structure for future education, they are all confronting substantial
challenges. The best hope for the future is the direct involvement of parents in the education of children of the
neighborhood.
In the 1997-98 school year Denver schools were released from the court-ordered bussing of 25 years. In the
process of drawing attendance areas, the Denver School Board elected to concentrate the most serious education
issues in the Manual High School attendance area. The combination of neighborhoods that compose the atten-
dance area form a wedge shape beginning at 23rd Avenue on the south, extending to a line a mile west of 1-25; to
Colorado Boulevard on the east; and to the Denver city limit (52nd Avenue) on the north.
Manual High School is going through a dramatic change in an attempt to address an entirely ne w set of student
needs. Manual recognizes that the success of its restructuring will be dependent on the degree to which it involves
the Whittier neighborhood as well as all the other neighborhoods that make up its new attendance area. To ad-
dress this, Manual has an extensive bilingual program intended to reach students from immigrant families (Mexico
and Central America) who are just learning the English language.
There were 209 students from Whittier attending Manual High School, constituting 20% of the student body in
the 1999-2000 school year. All Manual juniors choose one of four Programs of Excellence as their focus for their
junior and senior years. In addition to required core classes, students focus on either Math, Science & Medicine;
Arts, Humanities & Communication; Cultural Studies, Law & Government Systems; or Business & Entrepreneur-
ship. These programs are supported by Employer Advisory Councils as well as a School Advisory Council made
up of parents from the Manual attendance area.
*
Priority Issues: EDUCATION
42


All Manual students, starting with the Class of 2001, will be involved in at least 60 hours of volunteer work in the
community (service learning) in order to graduate. Manuals Night School offers an alternative evening schedule for
dropouts 16 to 21 years old to earn their high school diplomas and find jobs.
The conversion of Manual High School to a neighborhood school could create a stronger sense of community. It
will serve to remind all residents of their common goals of rearing and educating children while creating a gather-
ing place for neighbors and friends. Manual can become the neighborhood facility used by the greatest number of
residents for the widest variety of purposes. In addition to its high-school education function, Manual could
become a year-round activity center for sporting events, recreation, meetings, child care, and adult education.
The Denver Public Schools administration proposal to allow Manual High School and three feeder schools to
convert to charters may accomplish many of these goals. At the same time, it is difficult to envision the transition
without substantial resources to match the issues confronted within the attendance area created by the Denver
School Board. The opportunity to develop a magnet program or charter school is an option that should be con-
sidered for the future of education in Whittier.
Neighborhood Schools
Denvers elementary and middle schools have considerable flexibility to shape their learning environment to best
meet the needs of each of their student bodies. They pride themselves in being built on a collection of dynamic
opportunities for parents, the community, and most of all the students. (16)
Whittier neighborhood elementary and middle schools are well into the process of redefining themselves as
schools that meet the needs of their students. This process is guided by the Denver School Board, Denver Public
Schools Administration, and school-based collaborative decision-making teams. The shaping of safe walking
zones for children and the creation of programs that sharpen focus by bearing down on areas of academic
concern are appropriate concerns of Whittier residents. Parents and residents must be involved in the future of
the neighborhood through involvement with its schools.
Parents need not accept the districts fragmentation of the Whittier neighborhood by attendance areas. It is clear
in the districts policies that parents may change schools to match their childrens needs with appropriate program-
ming within the school. It is also advisable to look at the distances traveled and high-volume streets crossed by
children in some attendance areas. Special care should be taken for elementary school students required to cross
Priority Issues: EDUCATION
43


Downing Street on the west and York Street on the east. The districts open enrollment period is in January and
February of each year.
Denver has also authorized four charter schools, one of which is located immediately north of Whittier: Wyatt-
Edison Charter, at 3620 Franklin Street. Wyatt-Edison has a comprehensive academic program for kindergarten
through seventh grade. Students focus on fundamentals of reading and mathematics. The program features an
eight-hour school day with support of computer technology.
Whittiers parents have significant responsibility to identify the appropriate school within Denver Public Schools,
While the assigned neighborhood school may have appropriate programming, optional schools should be consid-
ered that help children avoid crossing high-volume streets and utilize focused programs and extended days.
Loyola Elementary
The Middle schools that serve Whittier include:
Cole Middle School....located at 3240 Humboldt Street.
Gove Middle School... .located at 4050 E. 14th Avenue.
Morey Middle School. ...located at 840 E. 14th Avenue.
The Elementary Schools that serve Whittier include:
Whittier Elementary School ....located at 2480 Downing Street.
Gilpin Elementary School ....located at 2949 California Street.
Columbine Elementary School ....located at 2925 W. 40Ul Avenue.
Mitchell Elementary School ....located at 1350 E. 33rd Avenue.
Loyola Elementary School... .located at 24th and Gaylord is within Whittier and is a parochial school supported by
the St. Ignatius Loyola Catholic Church.
The Whittier neighborhood is a crossroads of educational options at the elementary and middle-school grades.
The attendance areas that divide Whittier among two high schools, three middle schools and four elementary
schools do not provide optimum service to Whittier families. Many elementary school students are required to
cross high-volume streets with traffic exceeding 18,000 cars per day. By working with the school district, the
number of students served by schools in closer proximity or within the neighborhood can be increased.
Priority Issues: EDUCATION
44


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Attendance Areas

Elementary School Attendance Areas Source: Denver Public Schools
Priority Issues: EDUCATION
45


Middle School
Attendance Areas
Middle School Attendance Areas
Source; Denver Public Schools
Priority Issues: EDUCATION
46


Gods: Education
In implementing this plan, establish communication with public and private schools to improve the quality of
education available to all children of Whittier. The following specific goals and action items are intended to
ensure a neighborhood distribution to a future of quality education.
1. To provide a neighborhood educational environment where academic achievement is the highest priority.
2. To encourage the Denver School Board to review the current attendance areas and revise the boundary lines,
reducing the number of of children required to cross high traffic-volume streets.
3. To encourage the Denver School Board to create a community school facility at Manual High School, includ-
ing adult education, recreation, and day care programs.
4. To encourage Denver School Board to develop joint programs with local colleges and universities for college-
bound students at Manual High School.
5. To establish mentorship program with Whittier Elementary,
6. To support individual students with academic scholarships funded by the neighborhood.
Priority Issues: Education
47


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Action Chan:Education
TIME
# ACTIONS Ongoing Immediately Short Term Long Term Implemented
PROJECTS
*ED1 Encourage the development of a Learning Center at Manual High School including Community College of Denver X Neighborhood, Denver Public Schools
ED2 Encourage the development of technical education options at Manual High School X Neighborhood, Denver Public Schools
*ED3 Encourage all residentsincluding those who are not parentsto participate in school issues X Neighborhood, Denver Public Schools
ED4 Encourage school district to provide funding at schools appropriate to education issues within the attendance area X Neighborhood, Denver Public Schools
EDS Open school facilities for greater community use. Expand the community school concept for all schools X Neighborhood, Denver Public Schools
ED6 Explore charter school and magnet school options at all Whittier Neighborhood Schools X Neighborhood, Denver Public Schools
ED7 Encourage community service and outreach programs to connect students, parents and schools to the Whittier neighborhood X Neighborhood, Denver Public Schools
*ED8 Establish mentorship programs to create contact with youth in the neighborhood throughout their academic careers X Neighborhood, Denver Public Schools
4
^Selected as the neighborhoods highest priorities on June 21,2000
Priority Issues: EDUCATION
48


Priority Issue: Public Safety and Health
Police Protection
The issue of crime in the neighborhood and the publics perception of crime reflects the communitys attitude
towards Whittier. While the neighborhood and the District 2 office of the police department have a good working
relationship, crime prevention would benefit from a stronger police presence in the neighborhood. The most
effective step to curb and reduce crime in Whittier has been the establishment of programs encouraging effective
police/neighborhood relations. Neighborhood Watch programs have been successful in parts of Whittier. Addi-
tional blocks are urged to work with the District 2 police department to establish active programs.
Whittier is located in Police District 2, which includes northeast Denver. The District 2 police station is located
east of Whittier at 3555 Colorado Blvd. According to the Denver Police Department, the 1999 rate of crimes
against persons and property for each 1,000 people in Whittier was 75,25. This number is down by 7.9% as
compared to 1990.
The Denver Department of Public Safety, which includes the Denver Police, Fire, and Sheriffs departments, is
committed to neighborhood safety through partnership, prevention, and problem-solving. The recommendations
in this plan emphasize building positive relationships with the Department of Public Safety to partner against
crime and improve the quality of life for the citizens of the Whittier neighborhood. The plan envisions neighbors
and officials of the City working together to identify problems of mutual concern. The focus of the relationship
between the neighborhood and the Department of Public Safety must emphasize youth in many of the partner-
ships. Existing programs such as Weed and Seed, Safe Havens, Victim Assistance Unit, Domestic Violence Unit,
HUD Drug Elimination Project, Citizen Academy, and Volunteers in Policing are programs designed to create a
sense of safety for the Whittier neighborhood. The Denver Department of Public Safety has provided substantial
support to the Whittier Neighborhood Plan, including providing Mission Statements and programs available to the
neighborhood (see Appendix C).
Physical Health
Because of the pauciety of health data and indicators at the neighborhood level, in 1998 Denver Health Medical
Center established an advisory committee to develop health profiles and indicators for the Denver Enterprise
Priority Issues: PUBLIC SAFETY AND HEALTH
49


%%*%****
Communitys 11 neighborhoodsCole, Five Points, Globeville, Highland, Auraria/Lincoln Park, Sun Valley,
Valverde, Clayton, Whittier, Skyland, and Westwood.
Because the number of events reported on public health documents for each neighborhood can be very small, a
clearer picture emerges of the health differences between the Enterprise Community and the rest of Denver when
all of the EC neighborhoods are grouped together for analysis.
Residents from the Enterprise Community have a higher percentage of their deaths occurring due to certain
causes than is true for the rest of Denver. The EC has a higher percentage of deaths than the remainder of
Denver due to homicide (3.1% vs. 1.2%), infant mortality (2.9% vs. 1.3%), liver disease (1.2% vs. 0.6%), child
mortality (0.8% vs. 0.5%), diabetes (2.7% vs. 1.7%), motor vehicle accidents (2.1% vs. 1.6%), and firearms (2.7%
vs. 1.9%). Conversely, the EC neighborhoods have a lower percentage of their total deaths compared to the rest
of Denver due to heart disease (20.9% vs. 23.4%), stroke (5.2% vs. 5.9%), suicide (1.4% vs. 2.2%), and HIV
(1.9% vs. 3.4%).
Between 1993 and 1997, residents of the EC neighborhoods had a greater percentage of their births associated
with problems than did the residents of the remaining Denver neighborhoods. During this time period, an average
of 23% of all births in the EC were to teens and 51% to unmarried women compared to 14% to teens and 35% to
unmarried women in the rest of Denver. In addition, 12% of the EC babies were low birth-weight compared to
10% low birth-weight babies in the rest of Denver.
Two other measures using birth and death data are good indicators of the health of a community: leading causes
of death and average age of death. Heart disease, cancer, and stroke are the leading causes of death (greatest
frequency) in the EC and the remainder of Denver. The average age of death from all causes and for the leading
causes is younger in the EC than in the rest of Denver. Between 1993-1997, the average age of death in the EC
from all causes was 64.2 years compared to 70.1 years in the remainder of Denver.
The Mayor recently received and endorsed the recommendations in the report, Healthy Communities, Healthy Denver,
of the Denver Health Benchmarking Project in the summer of 2000. The second phase of that project got
underway in late October. The specific action steps need to be determined but may include expanding the project
city wide from the Enterprise Community neighborhoods, working with the EC neighborhoods to address priority
health needs, expanding data collection and analysis efforts, identifying additional benchmarks and indicators, and
institutionalizing the health benchmarking project within the city government.
Priority Issues: PUBLIC SAFETY AND HEALTH
50


Fire Protection
The Whittier neighborhood is served by Fire Station #3, located at 2500 Washington in the adjacent neighbor-
hood west of Downing. Elderly and low-income residents can receive smoke alarms by applying to the fire
station at no cost by contacting the Fire Department Education program at 303-286-4966.
Priority Issues: PUBLIC SAFETY AND HEALTH
51


Gods: Public Safety and Hedth
Public safety is the desired effect of a good quality of life in our neighborhood. Improving the quality of life for
the whole neighborhood through building connections with public safety agencies will be achieved through the
following:
1. Continue to reduce crime and perception of crime to a level where residents feel safe in their homes, parks, and
on the streets.
2. Improve security for residents in their homes through information and education provided in Whittier Neigh-
borhood Association meetings.
3. Improve pedestrian lighting in parks, near schools, and on neighborhood streets.
4. Provide a regular forum on safety for the more vulnerable members of the community: disabled, elderly, and
children.
5. Support efforts to establish Neighborhood Watch programs.
6. Support efforts to identify problem addresses.
7. Support a stronger police presence, including bicycle patrols and extended tours of duty to promote officers
familiarity with residents.
8. Support improved communication among youths, parents, schools, and police in the neighborhood.
9. Support Denver Health Medican Centers efforts to provide health information within the neighborhood.
Priority Issues: PUBLIC SAFETY AND HEALTH
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Action Chart: Public Safety and Health
TIME
# ACTIONS Ongoing Immediately Short Term Long Term Implementors
PROJECTS
*PS1 Establish Neighborhood Watch programs on majority of blocks X Neighborhood, Denver Police
PS2 Report problem addresses to District 2 police X Neighborhood, Denver Pohce
PS3 Improve street lighting; encourage neighbors to keep porch lights on every evening X Neighborhood, Denver Police
PS4 Design and maintain parks to optimize security X Neighborhood, Parks Department
PS5 Encourage organized activities in parks X Neighborhood
*PS6 Work with the Denver Pohce Department District 2 to establish an effective police/ community relations program X Neighborhood, Denver Pohce
PS7 Control criminal activity in all locations including alleys X Neighborhood, Denver Pohce
*PS8 Inventory risk factors such as apartment budd- ings, businesses, and alleys with frequent crime reports X Neighborhood, Denver Pohce
PS9 Develop effective programs to cooperate with Denver Partners Against Grafitti X Neighborhood, Public Works
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^ ^Selected as the neighborhoods highest priorities on June 21,2000
*
%
Priority Issues: PUBLIC SAFETY AND HEALTH
53


Priority Issue: Community Services
With its unique location, demographics, and history, the neighborhood has developed a distinctive set of condi-
tions and issues that contribute to the definition of community needs in Whittier.
Whittier is home to several social services facilities, including Gilliam Juvenile Hall and group homes. The concen-
tration of facilities focused on delinquency may become a self-fulfilling prophecy; the more facilities of this type
provided within the neighborhood, the more the neighborhood is associated with the underlying issues. The
concern of residents is that group home facilities will be over-concentrated in Whittier based on the proximity to
the Gilliam Juvenile Hall.
Ford-Warren Library
The Ford-Warren Branch Library located at 28th Avenue and High Street has 38,000 volumes with a circulation
approaching 100,000 books annually. The librarys location near Manual High School, Red Shield Center, and
Fuller Park make it an ideal facility for civic and neighborhood meetings. It provides free access to the Internet and
could be the center of neighborhood activities in conjunction with the proposed community center.
The Whittier Neighborhood Association has been awarded $318,000 by the City of Denver for a neighborhood
community center. Its design and location will be a key element in the future of the neighborhood. By placing
this new facility in the complex defined by Manual High School, Fuller Park, Ford-Warren Library, Red Shield
Community Center, and Thunderbolt Park, a campus of recreational, cultural, and educational facilities could be
created.
A number of community services are provided by nonprofit organizations and churches in the neighborhood.
These services represent a significant resource that has not been fully utilized due to a lack of information regard-
ing the support provided. Identification and listing of these services are key to their expanded use. Several meth-
ods have been suggested for the listing of these services, including a neighborhood Web site.
In January 2000, the Center for Human Investment Policy, University of Colorado at Denver, completed the
Healthy Communities Denver Health Benchmarking Project. This report included the Whittier neighborhood.
The reports summary is attached as Appendix B.
Priority Issues: COMMUNITY SERVICES
54


Goak: Community Services
To improve communication within the neighborhood while enhancing the quality of life for the whole community
through services, establish a Web site for continuing outreach and information about services.
1. To improve the quality of life for all who live in Whittier by filling gaps in services and building effective
partnerships.
2. To implement the Neighborhood Center currently budgeted at $318,000.
3. To implement the Whittier Neighborhood Plan and support city projects that support the plan.
4. To develop a neighborhood Web site to enhance communication.
Priority Issues: COMMUNITY SERVICES
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Action Chart: Community Services
TIME
# ACTIONS Ongoing Immediately Short Term Long Term Implementers
PROJECTS
*CS1 Identify site for Neighborhood Center; secure funding from City of Denver X Neighborhood, City of Denver
CS2 Create contact list for emergency servicesfood, shelter, and medical careand make available on Web site X Neighborhood, Nonprofit Organizations
*CS3 Develop human servicese.g., job training, language classes, and recreation X Neighborhood, Denver Public Schools, CCD
CS4 Work with churches to identify community services provided X Neighborhood, Churches
CSS Develop memorandum of understanding with other neighborhood groups and community- based organizations X Neighborhood
*CS6 Establish Planning Steering Committee for Neighborhood Plan implementation X Neighborhood, Denver Planning Office
*CS7 Work with City Council representative to track the implementation of the Neighborhood Plan X Neighborhood
CS8 Support process of project reviews with city agencies - X Neighborhood
CS9 Work with tenants to assist in making multifamily housing a more active part members of the Whittier Neighborhood Association X Neighborhood
CS10 Develop a neighborhood Web site listing services X Neighborhood
^Selected as the neighborhoods highest priorities on June 21,2000
Priority Issues: COMMUNITY SERVICES
56


Priority Issue: Parks and Open Space
The Whittier neighborhood is fortunate to have five parks within its boundary and City Park an d the City Park
Golf Course along its eastern border. The greenspace, along with the large number of mature trees, enriches the
historic qualities of the neighborhood. Both Fuller Park and City Park, two of the oldest parks in the city, reflect
the legacy of Denvers early leaders and builders who left the city a system of well-designed parks and parkways, as
well as a tradition of excellence in urban design and architecture. The intention of this plan is to sustain this legacy
and rehabilitate Whittiers parks into places that celebrate its history. The focus of these efforts is to reflect
Whittiers history and the diversity of its residents and provide functional, safe, attractive recreational features
through quality park designs.
The neighborhood planning process revealed the areas cultural values and suggested steps to honor their signifi-
cance. These values and historical associations such as the commemoration of historical events or significant
people are the unifying theme for the parks in the neighborhood. Reflecting the historic connections in the parks
would establish a distinctive identity for each park. Each park would also complement the others in the community
with a diverse range of activities and facilities.
All but one of the parks were named after a person who contributed significantly to the history of the city or the
history relevant to the cultural themes represented in the neighborhood. Each park should, in future develop-
ment, include educational exhibits to explain the significance of the person the park was named after.
Fuller Park
29th & Williams The planning process identified Fuller Park as an important potential focal point in neighborhood
that should be upgraded to reflect its key role in the community.
Ux Denver ComprdoensivePlan 2000identifies afixalpoint as any easily recognized amenity that help ovate and define a
nd^xdmdim^e
The park is the second oldest park in the city, donated on November 8th, 1879, by Horace Fuller. The Denver
Urban Renewal Authority expanded the park in the 1970s with the acquisition of three acres. Today, Fuller Park
has fallen in disrepair and generally compares unfavorably to other Denver parks. Maintenance funding has not
kept up with the parks needs and has been a continuing source of concern for residents.
Priority Issues: PARKS AND OPEN SPACE
57


Currently, plans are underway by the Denver Department of Parks and Recreation to redesign and upgrade Fuller
Park. The vision for the parks future is to create a community square for neighborhood events and activities and
develop high quality recreational facilities that meet the needs of the neighborhood. A park shelter and outdoor
event area, restrooms, picnic areas, and play structures will be incorporated in the design. A strong architectural
theme for the new park structures will create a distinctive park identity. The park structures would reflect the
architectural detailing of the historic houses surrounding the park. A kiosk structure would be included in the
park redevelopment for community postings and maps, and could also contain information on the history of the
neighborhood.
To strengthen the relationship of the park to the community, connections could be created between Manual High
School and the neighborhood through formal and informal programs and facilities. Opportunities such as devel-
oping outdoor classrooms, summer recreation programs, outdoor performance areas for school bands, and other
activities could be planned to establish a stronger connection to the park. Projects such as an Adopt-a-Park
program could be developed to involve the community in park clean-up and planting improvements. Arts in the
Parks is another program that could be developed to offer cultural opportunities for Whittier residents,
Williams Park
30th & Lafayette Williams Park was developed in the 1970s by the Denver Urban Renewal program. It was named
after Dr. Daniel Hale Williams (1856-1931).
Dr. Daniel Hale Williams was a pioneer surgeon who in 1893 performed the first open-heart surgery. In 1891 he
founded the Provident Hospital and Medical Center in Chicago, the oldest freestanding African-American owned
hospital in the United States. Dr. Williams was the only African-American in a group of 100 charter members of
the American College of Surgeons in 1913. He founded and became the first vice-president of the National Medi-
cal Association.
The park offers a playground, basketball courts, and picnic sites. Current park improvements include upgrading
the asphalt basketball court with concrete paving and eliminating an asphalt-paved area to convert more of the
park into greenspace. Also, while the playground is relatively new and serves children 4 to 10 years old, it does
not meet current Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) standards. The playground should be upgraded to meet
these standards. To commemorate Dr. Williams, an outdoor educational exhibit should be installed with bio-
graphical information on his historical significance.
Priority Issues: PARKS AND OPEN SPACE
58


Douglass Park
30th & Franklin Douglass Park was developed in the same era as Williams Park and provides another playground
within two blocks of Williams and Thunderbolt parks. The playground is over 20 years old, and most of the
equipment is unsafe by todays standards. The park was named for abolitionist orator Frederick Douglass.
Frederick Douglass has been called the father of the civil rights movement. He rose through determination, bril-
liance, and eloquence to shape the American nation. He was an abolitionist, human rights and womens rights
activist, orator, author, journalist, publisher, and social reformer. Committed to freedom, Douglass dedicated his
life to achieving justice for all Americans, in particular African-Americans, women, and minority groups. He envi-
sioned America as an inclusive nation strengthened by diversity and free of discrimination.
Two of Douglass sons lived in Denver and helped promote education for African-Americans. To connect the
park to its historical associations to Douglass, African-American themes would be integrated in the redevelopment
plans. The goal for upgrading the park is to develop a tot play area for children six years of age and under. This
age group is not well served by the existing playgrounds in the community. Images from African-American folk
tales could be integrated into the playground to reflect the oral traditions of African-American cultural heritage.
In addition, outdoor educational exhibits could be situated in the park to inform residents of the historic themes
Douglass represents.
Thunderbolt Park
30th and High The infrastructure of Thunderbolt is fairly elaborate and in good condition with concrete walks,
brick seatwalls, and ornamental fencing. Existing play equipment is outdated, however, and should be replaced to
bring the park up to quality design standards. The park offers opportunities for developing an area for educational
displays. It is ideally located to interpret the history of racial integration in the neighborhood. High Street, which
terminates at the park, was historically known as the color line in the community.
There is interest in re-naming the park after a significant historic figure to be consistent with the other park names
in the neighborhood. One idea is to name the park after Dr. Clarence Holmes Jr. Dr. Holmes, a dentist, lived in
the neighborhood at 2330 Downing. He became known as the father of integration in Colorado because of his
leadership and contributions to the civil rights movement.
Priority Issues: PARKS AND OPEN SPACE
59


Morrison Park
Morrison Park extends along five blocks of Martin Luther King Jr, Blvd between High and Lafayette streets. The
park was named after George Morrison Sr., (1891-1974) an early pioneer in jazz music who lived in Denver.
Morrison played violin in vaudeville, wrote music published by W.C. Handy, made recordings for Columbia
Records, and did a command performance for the King and Queen of England with his orchestra. Even though
Morrison was internationally recognized for his outstanding talent (Fritz Kreisler, the famed violinist, praised
Morrisons musicianship and promoted his career), he couldnt play for the Denver Symphony Orchestra because
he was black. However, he formed his own orchestra performing popular music and played with such notables as
Duke Ellington and Count Basie. He also taught violin in his Whittier home to children who could not afford
music lessons. He also helped launch the careers of other notable jazz musicians such as Paul White.
The linear park is connected with a meandering pedestrian path through its lawns and trees. Several picnic sites are
scattered along the way. There are no other formal recreational facilities in the park. Humboldt, Franklin, Gilpin,
and Williams end in cul-de-sacs at the park. One concept for this park is to incorporate sculptures or educational
exhibits at the terminus of the cul-de-sacs representing neighborhood cultural themes. An exhibit commemorat-
ing George Morrison Sr. and his contributions to the city would be appropriate. Flower beds would also be in-
cluded as part of the commemorative display. This would be particularly appropriate at Gilpin, where a focal
feature could be visually connected with the architectural features proposed for Fuller Park. The entire length of
the walkway is in very poor condition and needs replacement. An idea for the new walkway is to incorporate
quotes from Martin Luther King Jr. and/or quotes from George Morrisons songs in the pavement.
Recreation Centers
The Red Shield Community Center, located at 2915 High Street and operated by the Salvation Army, is the only
community recreation facility in the Whittier neighborhood. It offers recreational programs for residents ages 7
and older. While this facility is centrally located within Whittier, utilization is limited by hours of operation and
funding.
Two city recreation centers are located in adjacent neighborhoods: St. Charles is located at 3777 Lafayette Street,
and Glenarm Recreation Center is located at 2800 Glenarm Place. The Glenarm Place center houses a weight
room and an indoor pool.
Priority Issues: PARKS AND OPEN SPACE
60


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Priority Issues: PARKS AND OPEN SPACE
61


Goals: Parks and Open Space
Improve and maintain parks in the neighborhood to meet the needs of residents and to support enhanced recre-
ation opportunities. To provide improved bike and pedestrian links between existing parks and schools.
1. Design programs that will enhance the neighborhoods use of its parks.
2. Work with the Parks and Recreation Department to re-assess design and connections between existing
landmarks.
3. Improve public awareness of recreational facilities.
4. Connect bicycle access, parks, schools, recreation, and the libraries in an integrated parks and open space
plan.
5. Monitor condition of parks and open space and take action to improve facilities.
6. Cooperate in the redesign of Fuller Park to a true neighborhood facility and town square.
7. Adopt Fuller Park as the Whittier Town Square, providing annual improvements from the neighborhood.
8. Institute appropriate land use control for all parks and cultural institutions to assure parking requirements
associated with use.
9. Highlight Whittiers history through historic signage and markers in parks.
Priority Issues: PARKS AND OPEN SPACE
62


4 Action Chart:Parks and Open Space
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^ Priority Issues: PARKS AND OPEN SPACE
TIME
# ACTIONS Ongoing Immediately Short Term Long Term Implementers
PROJECTS
;:-p| Improve Fuller Park to enhance its ability to serve as a neighborhood park X Neighborhood, Denver Parks Dept.
P2 Improve the linkage between Fuller Park and nearby small parks X Neighborhood, Public Works
P3 Explore joint use agreement for parks with Whittier Elementary and Manual High School X Neighborhood, Denver Parks Dept.
P4 Explore expanded use of Red Shield Center recreation programs X Neighborhood, Red Shield Community Center
*P5 Expand use of Glenarm Recreation Facility by Whittier residents X Neighborhood, Denver Parks Dept.
P6 Improve signage for parks and bike routes X Neighborhood, Public Works, Denver Park Dept.
P7 Prepare brochure on parks and recreation facilities X Neighborhood
P8 Encourage shared use of school grounds and parks X Neighborhood, DPS, Denver Parks Dept.
*P9 Monitor condition of parks, reporting regularly to the Denver Parks Department X Neighborhood
*P10 Develop visual and pedestrian linkages between parks and historic walks X Neighborhood, Denver Parks Dept.
^Selected as the neighborhoods highest priorities on June 21,2000
63


Neighborhood deli and market
Priority Issue: Economic Development -Employment
Although the 2000 U.S. Census has not been completed, it will undoubtedly show the employment picture for
Whittier has changed dramatically. As the neighborhoods residential character has stabilized, the number of jobs
within the neighborhood have fallen by 23% from 1990 to 1996. This trend will likely continue through the year
2000. At the same time, the Denver economy has prospered at an unprecedented rate. (16)
In the new economy based on information and technology, the Whittier neighborhood has an economic interest in
assisting all of its residents in refining their technical and computer skills. As the Denver economy continues to
prosper, one irrefutable rule appears clear: The future workplace will require workers ready with technical skills.
Whittier must continue to work with Manual High School, the Community College of Denver, and the City of
Denver in removing obstacles for careers in technical fields. This includes persuading students and the community
that well-paying careers are available for those who focus their talents on programs that can be made available in
the neighborhood. The booming economy and desperate need among Denver employers for skilled workers
should be the driving force pushing Whittiers youth, unemployed, and under-employed toward training for
rewarding careers.
The City of Denver, represented by the Career Service Authority, has expressed a willingness to partner with the
Whittier neighborhood to address the need for an increased number of job candidates. The Career Service Au-
thority has several programs that are now underutilized. The citys Apprenticeship Program, Career Service Train-
ing Program, and Intern Program all have potential for helping the city meet its labor needs while providing oppor-
tunities for city agencies to reach out to residents. These targeted programs could be utilized as follows:
Apprenticeship Program: This program provides an opportunity for employees to attend school part time
while working in a trade such as carpentry, electrical, plumbing, and related trades work. Denvers Education
Refund program provides up to $2,000 annually for employees completing course requirements for journey-
level completion and certification in one of the trade areas. In addition to the educational assistance provided
to our apprentice population, the city anticipates growth in all trade job categories over the next few years.
Participants in this program increase their opportunity for permanent appointments.
Internship Program: This program has achieved success over the years, yet it is not utilized to its highest
potential. Internships provide college-level students part-time work opportunities, usually in the same career
discipline that the student is preparing for through training.
64
Priority Issues: ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Employment


Career Service Training Program: This program was a model in the late 1970s for increasing participation
inthe city workforce on a noncompetitive basis. Although there are specific program guidelines, Whittier
residents may meet the requirements for entry into city employment via this training program.
Through these programs and cooperation with Manual High School and the Neighborhood Association, the
Career Service Authority can create employment opportunities closer to the neighborhood.
A number of vacant commercial properties and non-conforming commercial properties are located within the
Whittier neighborhood. Development and expansion of these properties could enhance the retail services pro-
vided to residents while improving entry-level employment opportunities.
Gods:EjoorimikDevdopmerit-Employme^
The major goals of economic development is to sustain the Whittier neighborhood by stimulating employment
opportunities for neighborhood residents. The purpose of the following objectives is to create model programs
for employment.
1. Pursue cooperative agreements with the City of Denver Career Service Authority to encourage employment
opportunities for Whittier residents.
2. Pursue cooperation between Manual High School and Whittier for community service employment for students.
3. Encourage existing businesses to employ local residents.
4. Encourage retail services in existing non-conforming commercial buildings.
5. Support the development of education and training programs of Whittier residents to qualify them for em-
ployment.
Priority Issues: ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Employment
65


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Action ChmtEamomkLkvdopmmt^-Empbymmt
TIME
# ACTIONS Ongoing Immediately Short Term Long Term Implemented
PROJECTS
*E1 Inventory and evaluate vacant properties in order to recruit neighborhood businesses X Neighborhood
*E2 Encourage joint development of an education center at Manual High School in cooperation with Community College of Denver X Neighborhood, Denver Public Schools, CCD
E3 Encourage cooperative development of a City of Denver Career Service Center in the neighborhood X Neighborhood, Career Service Authority
E4 Pursue grants to provide educational training programs and employment opportunities in the neighborhood X Neighborhood
*E5 Cooperate in youth employment programs and business incubators for entry-level employment X Neighborhood
*E6 Encourage businesses to participate in Whittier Neighborhood Association to promote local use of businesses X Neighborhood
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^ ^Selected as the neighborhoods highest priorities on June 21,2000
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Priority Issues: ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Employment
66


Priority Issue: Traffic and Transportation
Streets are our most comprehensive system of transportation and the citys most land-intensive and expensive
public investment. It is reasonable to expect them to be safe, convenient, and attractive for pedestrians and bicy-
clists, as well as motorists. Our streets should be designed to encourage alternatives to driving including walking,
biking, and bus service. This means controlling traffic speed and adding stop signs, bike lanes, cross walks, pedes-
trian lighting, and signage.
Traffic speed is a safety issue for all citizens in Whittier, especially for children walking and playing in the neigh-
borhood. Speeding cars are a threat that diminishes the residential character of the neighborhood. The number
of children required to cross the high-volume streets of York, Downing, and Martin Luther King to attend their
assigned elementary schools is an ongoing concern for Whittier families. (See maps on p. 45 andp. 70)
From an overall transportation planning aspect, the Whittier neighborhood has a fairly desirable street system,
since the major traffic carriers are on the periphery of the neighborhood, namely Downing on the West, York on
the east, Martin Luther King/31st Avenue on the north and 23rd on the south. Only 29th Avenue introduces
traffic into the neighborhood due to its connection to Welton Street ending the downtown grid. There are no
major north-south roadways channelling traffic into the interior of the neighborhood. Capacity limitations on
Downing and 23rd and the lack of continuity for York to the north and 23rd to the west limit traffic volumes
both adjacent to and entering the neighborhood. From an overall traffic perspective, Whittier is protected from
the normal impacts of traffic, particularly one located fairly close to the central business district.
Mass Transit (see map onp. 68)
Whittier is served by bus routes and has access on its western edge to light rail at Downing Street and 30th
Avenue. This service is eventually planned to extend north on Downing and connect to the air train, which will
run to D.I.A. Bus service includes two north-south routes, #12 on Downing Street and #24 on York Street.
East-West routes include #43 on Martin Luther King Boulevard; #32 on 23rd Avenue; and #28 extending east
from Downing to Williams, south to 28th and then east. The Cultural Connection trolley links downtown and
City Park arts facilities with a stop at 23rd and York. The neighborhood is not well served by mass transit on the
south side. Currently Route 28 has been suggested for cancellation by RTD.
Priority Issues: TRAFFIC AND TRANSPORTATION
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RTD Bus Routes Source: RTD
Priority Issues: TRAFFIC AND TRANSPORTATION
68


Kxlsthiji Bike Routes
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Proposed Bike Routes
<-----------------
Priority Issues: TRAFFIC AND TRANSPORTATION
69


4
4 Traffic Volume Date
* A 8,200 1979
* 4 4 B 8,050 1979
7,355 1997
4 C 11,600 1979
4 14,694 1997
4 4 4 D 6,400 1979
7,500 1998
4 E 15,100 1979
4 17,333 1997
4 4 F 5,600 1979
4 G 6,750 1979
4 4 4 H 5,700 1979
10,200 1991
4 1 5,050 1979
4 4,597 1991
4 J 3,824 1979
4 3,650 1996
*
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*
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Whittier Traffic Volumes Source: Denver Public Works

Priority Issues: TRAFFIC AND TRANSPORTATION 70


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Bike Routes (see map onp. 69)
Whittier is included in the city-wide bikeway system. The present bike routes include D6 on 29th Avenue east and
west, D8 on 22nd Avenue from Downing to High Street, then south to 21st running east and west, and Dll on
Franklin and Lafayette north and south.
As a whole, Whittier lacks a completely interconnected network of designated bicycle paths and lanes. The
Traffic and Transportation recommendations suggest an improved network including connections to schools,
parks, and other adjacent bike routes in City Park. Additional bike routes could include Martin Luther King Blvd.
from High Street to Lafayette within Morrison Park; High Street south to 24th then east to Loyola school at
Gaylord; Lafayette to 28th Avenue.
In many locations, bicycle paths could be included in the design of the neighborhood parks, thereby increasing
park useage. Bike racks should be installed at all all schools, parks, public buildings, and commercial buildings.
Traffic Volumes (see map on p. 70)
Automobile traffic volumes have remained relatively stable over the past decade. This stability is due in part to the
neighborhoods stable population and increasing utilization of mass transit. The primary concern is speeding
traffic in and around the neighborhood. Every effort must be made by the residents to secure the cooperation of
the Police and Traffic Engineering departments in slowing traffic throughout the neighborhood. Areas where cut-
through traffic and speeding traffic is an issue should be identified for monitoring efforts by the Traffic Engineers
or Police Department. Additional stop signs may not be the best solution to slow traffic.
Pedestrian
As a whole, the neighborhood enjoys an interconnected network of pedestrian walks. This network could be
improved by enhancing the crosswalks adjacent to schools, libraries, and parks. Crosswalk design should include
redesigned intersections restricting the street cross section and shortening the crosswalks. Clear pedestrian walk-
ways connect the neighborhoods five parks. This pedestrian loop could include historic markers and exercise
facilities within the parks. Ramps at every corner will improve handicap access and encourage parents with strollers
to use sidewalks. Ramps at all arterial and collector street intersections should be prioritized. Local residential
street intersections should be installed where there are individuals with disabilities or services provided for
individuals with disabilities.
Priority Issues: TRAFFIC AND TRANSPORTATION
71


Gods: Traffic and Transportation
To improve traffic control to create a safe and efficient transportation system that encourages pedestrian and
bicycle usage while supporting mass transit options.
1. Encourage walking, biking, and mass-transit use by providing clearly marked, safe, convenient pedestrian and
bicycle connections.
2. Reduce traffic speeds on neighborhood streets to posted speed limits.
3. Increase safe and efficient bicycle connections throughout the neighborhood with an emphasis on access to
mass transit, schools, libraries, and parks.
Priority Issues: TRAFFIC AND TRANSPORTATION
72



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Action Chart: Traffic and Transportation
#
ACTIONS
PROJECTS
Ongoing
*T1
T2
T3
T4
Encourage walking, bicycling and mass-transit me
Work with schools to encourage programs for
walking and bicycling to schools
Expand neighborhood bike route system________
Create designated walkways connecting parks
and historic sites
X
X
X.
X
TIME
Immediately
Short Term
Long Term
Implemented
Neighborhood, RTD, Public Works
Neighborhood, DPS
Neighborhood, Public Works
Neighborhood, Denver Parks Dept.
*T5
*T6
T7
T8
Notify police of speeding traffic;
support reduced speed
Evaluate existing traffic signage for more stop
signs to discourage cut-through traffic__
Develop crosswalks and 4-way stops
Street by Street recommendations:
X
X
X
X
Neighborhood, Denver Police
Neighborhood, Public Works
Neighborhood, Public Works
Neighborhood, Public Works
l. Sidewalk ramps at intersections on major arterial streets
and collector streets and at special-needs intersections.
2. 4-way stops recommended for intersections where grade
changes in street shorten line of sight, e.g., 25th at High
to 25th at Gaylord and 26th to 29th and Williams to
Humboldt,
3. Create safe school zones in coorperation with Traffic
Engineering Department to slow traffic:
a. MLK Blvd. from High to Lafayette
b. Downing, 24* Am to 25* Am
c. 25* Are, Lafayette to Downing
A 25* Ave. and York to Gaylord
4. Cooperate with City and County of Denver on the Martin Luther
King Beautification Project
5. Allow left turns from York St. at MLK Blvd.
Selected as the neighborhoods highest priorities on June 21,2000
Priority Issues: TRAFFIC AND TRANSPORTATION 73


Priority Issue: Neighborhood Environment
The overall residential neighborhood environment in Whittier is good, although conditions vary widely from block
to block. There are many architecturally interesting homes (including potential Denver Landmarks). The lawns are
well maintained with many mature street trees that enhance the appearance of the neighborhood. This plan
recognizes the need for continued improvements in the residential environment. Park improvements are needed
along with an expansion of designated bike routes. The replacement of aging trees, along with aggressive code
enforcement and improved trash collection, are essential to supporting the residential environment.
Through neighborhood vigilance, the quality of the residential environment can be improved. The process
of education, self-help activities, and the application of existing ordinances will maintain and protect Whittiers
environment. Current residents are able and willing to identify issues related to Section 8 housing neglect and code
enforcement issues. Regular identification of these issues is the key to improving code compliance.
Describing Whittiers unique situation relative to an environmental issue is difficult. It is appropriate to recognize
that Whittier shares environmental issues with other neighborhoods. Whittier residents must take advantage of
services and programs that are available to the city at large.
A recent example of environmental issues are the 70 homes targeted for renovation in the Whittier and Cole
neighborhoods that contain lead-based paint. The Northeast Denver Housing Centers Healthy Homes Initiative
has secured a $1 million HUD grant to assist families in removing lead-based paint. The Whittier neighborhoods
cooperation in city and federal programs of this type will support low-income residents who want to remain in the
neighborhood.
Through advocacy and identification of problem areas, the residents of Whittier wish to maintain and protect the
neighborhoods natural features including trees, parks, and open space.
Priority Issues: NEIGHBORHOOD ENVIRONMENT
74


Gxds:Nd$borhoodEnvironment
Through neighborhood advocacy, encourage residents and businesses to maintain and enhance the environment
of the Whittier neighborhood. The following specific activities by the Whittier Neighborhood Association are
intended to initiate improvements to the physical environment.
1. Participate in city programs in recycling, conservation, and environmental abatement
2. Encourage tree planting by residents, businesses, and city agencies.
3. Improve the physical appearance of the neighborhood by supporting code enforcement including clean-up of
alleys, non-conforming commercial uses, and vacant lots.
4. Improve and maintain schools and parks within the neighborhood
5. Develop a mechanism for regularly reporting to city agencies about environmental issues within the
neighborhood, including Section 8 housing complaints.
6. Establish a neighborhood Environment and Beautification Task Force to implement the Whittier Neighbor-
hood Plan.
Priority Issues: NEIGHBORHOOD ENVIRONMENT
75


4 AakmQmiftNd^hmhood
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TIME
# ACTIONS Ongoing Immediately Short Term Long Term Implemented
PROJECTS
El Enforce existing codes and ordinances by identify- ing locations of violators and reporting to the City X Neighborhood Zoning Administration
*E2 Identify top 10 problem properties each month to bring into code compliance X Neighborhood, Neighborhood Inspection Service
E3 Conduct clean-up in neighborhood twice a year X Neighborhood, Public Works
*E4 Encourage residents to participate in recycling and conservation programs X Neighborhood, Public Works
*E5 Apply for grants to obtain trees X Neighborhood, Denver Digs Trees
E6 Create Web site indicating resources for environmental clean-up X Neighborhood
E7 Track federal clean-up of lead paint, contami- nated soil, and Section 8 housing complaints X Neighborhood, HUD, EPA, Denver Housing
" Selected as the neighborhoods highest priorities on June 21,2000
Priority Issues: NEIGHBORHOOD ENVIRONMENT
76


Priority Issue: Community Coordination
(Call to Action)
The Whittier Neighborhood Plan is intended to be a document used to identify evolving issues. Its implementa-
tion will be a joint effort by the neighborhood in cooperation with the appropriate agencies and organizations.
Realizing the opportunities that are ahead, it will require active participation by the residents of the community.
Neighborhood meeting
Increasingly, Whittier has the opportunity to become an even better place to live and raise a family. The Commu-
nity Resource Center, which was part of the 1998 bond issue, is but one step toward that future.
The work of planners, public agencies, and political leaders can help lay the foundations for improvement, but
ultimately a neighborhoods quality depends on the activities and attitudes of its residents. Pride in Whittier is
evident in its trees, lawns, and homes. It is a predominant purpose of this plan to foster pride of residents in
Whittier and responsibility for its maintenance and enhancement.
Focus on (he future based on our past
The planning process to date has resulted in a significant increase in membership in the Whittier Neighborhood
Association. The implementation of the planning Action Charts can be a catalyst for increasing membership as
others become aware of the activity.
Many of the neighborhood issues of concern have focused on non-conforming uses, multi-family complexes, and
illegal activities. Improving communication with local businesses and the multi-family property owners can en-
hance services while improving the quality of the neighborhood.
Several current initiatives have shown the potential of projects that enhance the quality of the residential environ-
ment. Chief among these have been the Community Day activities, arts programs, and coordination at the block
level.
Awareness of the effectiveness of the neighborhood association will grow through the use of press conferences,
marketing plans, and the development of a neighborhood Web site.
Priority Issues: COMMUNITY COORDINATION (CALL TO ACTION)
77


Goals: Community Coordination (Call to Action)
While implementing this plan, enhance membership, communication, and participation of all residents and busi-
nesses within the Whittier neighborhood.
1. To implement the elements of this plan by enhancing communication and participation in the Whittier Neigh-
borhood Association.
2. To tell the story of the neighborhood through the use of a marketing plan, press conferences, and a Web site.
3. To enhance membership and participation in the Whittier Neighborhood Association by focusing on support
of elderly residents, youth, and action items identified in the Whittier Neighborhood Plan.
Board members at neighborhood meeting
Priority Issues: COMMUNITY COORDINATION (CALL TO ACTION)
78


% % c
Action Chart: Community Coordination: Call to Action
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TIME
# ACTIONS Ongoing Immediately Short Term Long Term Implemented
PROJECTS
CGI Expand membership of and participation in the Whittier Neighborhood Association X Neighborhood
*CC2 Create committee activities focused on the Neighborhood Plan Action Charts X Neighborhood
CO Create opportunities for businesses to be mem- bers of the Whittier Neighborhood Association X Neighborhood
CO Expand Community Day to include entertain- ment, arts projects, and neighborhood history X Neighborhood
*CC5 Create block activities through grants and city- cooperation X Neighborhood
CC6 Identify block and area captains within the neigh- borhood to coordinate neighborhood participation X Neighborhood
07 Cooperate in community nights at public schools X Neighborhood
CCS Develop a marketing plan and funding strategy X Neighborhood
CC9 Develop a neighborhood Web site with information on all committee projects X Neighborhood
CC10 Coordinate action items in the neighborhood plan with committees within the WWA X Neighborhood
^Selected as the neighborhoods highest priorities on June 21,2000
4
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Priority Issues: COMMUNITY COORDINATION (CALL TO ACTION)
79


Sources
ThefiMowingmd notes correspond to number notes in the text
1 Neighborhood Facts 1999: The Status of Denver Neighborhoods, a report by the Piton Foundation
2 ibid
3 Housing in Denver: Problems, Needs and Opportunities, Center for Affordable Housing and Educational
Opportunity 2000
4 Neighborhood Facts 1999: The Status of Denver Neighborhoods, a report by the Piton Foundation
5 Homing in Denver: Problems, Needs and Opportunities, Center for Affordable Housing and Educational
Opportunity 2000
6 Reported Offenses and Calls for Services in the Whittier Neighborhood, 4/28/00, City and County of
Denver, Department of Safety
7 Funk & Wagnalls New Encyclopedia, Volume 27
8 Denver Neighborhood History Project, Simmons and Simmons, 1993-94
9 Age o/Jim Crow, Atkins
10 Ihe Denver Post, March 22,2000
11 Denver Neighborhood History Project, Simmons and Simmons, 1993-94
12 ibid
13 Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000: A Vision for Denver and Its People
14 ibid
15 Oral History: Interviews with Mr. Zelle Berenbaum, Colorado Historical Society
16 Choices Neighborhood Schools, Denver Public Schools Public Information Office
17 Neighborhood Facts 1999: The Status of Denver Neighborhoods, a report by the Piton Foundation
Sources
80


Neighborhood Summary for Whittier
from Neighborhood Facts 1999; The Status of Denver Neighborhoods, a report by the Piton Foundation
INDICATOR WHITTIER DENVER YEAR
Demographic
Population 4601.0 501700.0 1998
# children <18 1672.3 136995.0 1998
# elderly 65 + 567.3 62188.0 1998
% births African-American 32.4 11.0 1997
% births Latino 60.0 45.8 1997
% births non-Latino White 5.7 38.9 1997
Teen (15-19) birth rate 201.5 95.1 1997
% of births to unwed mothers 54.3 36.3 1997
% children living with single parents 40.1 30.2 1990
% population African American 75.9 12.5 1990
% population American Indian 0.8 1990
% population Pacific Islander -- 2.1 1990
% population Latino 14.9 22.8 1990
% population non-Latino White 9.2 61.6 1990
Households 1771.0 225025.0 1998
Total births 105.0 8651.0 1997
Housing
# housing units 2212.0 253240.0 1998
% households living at current address < 1 year 21.1 29.1 1990
% housing units built before 1940 68.7 25.7 1990
% owner-occupied housing units 51.2 49.2 1990
% renters paying more than 30% of income on housing 58.2 38.6 1990
Average home sale price 106414.1 172730.8 1998
& housing publicly subsidized 14.6 6.6 1999
Appendix A
81


Neighborhood Summary for Whittier from Neighborhood Facts 1999: The Status of Denver Neighborhoods, a report by the Piton Foundation INDICATOR WHITTIER DENVER YEAR
Economic
% persons on public assistance 12.5 4.6 1998
% children (< 18) on TANF 20.8 8.0 1998
# licensed child care slots 388.0 23451.0 1998
% children < 12 in subsidized child care 17.4 9.2 1998
% DPS children receiving free school lunch 73.7 56.5 1998
% children (< 18) in poverty 61.4 27.4 1990
% persons in poverty 42.1 17.1 1990
% service jobs 79.1 41.1 1996
Total jobs 689.0 426778.0 1996
Average annual wage 22927.0 31449.0 1996
Average household income 31135.0 42426.0 1995
Education
Denver Public School enrollment 1063.0 58118.0 1998
% DPS African-American students 61.3 21.3 1998
% DPS Latino students 30.2 49.4 1998
% DPS non-Latino White students 7.3 24.5 1998
% births to women w/ < 12th grade education 14.3 6.8 1997
% students not English proficient 16.0 19.1 1998
% students reading in lowest quartile on ITBS (score < 25) 48.8 38.1 1997
% students reading in top quartile on ITBS (score 75+) 7.9 16,6 1997
% 9-12 graders who graduated 14.4 15.1 1997
Drop-outs as %9-12 graders 5.2 4.7 1997
Appendix A
82


Neighborhood Summary for Whittier
from Neighborhood Facts 1999: The Status of Denver Neighborhoods, a report by the Piton Foundation
INDICATOR WHITTIER DENVER YEAR
Health
% births to women entering prenatal care in 1st trimester 70.5 75.6 1997
% children (< 18) on Medicaid 43.2 17.9 1998
Low birthweight rate 4.8 10.2 1997
Safety
% property crimes 48.6 58.6 1998
Crime rate per 1,000 persons 108.7 82.3 1998
Burglary crime rate per 1,000 households 45.2 26.1 1998
Violent crime rate per 1,000 persons 9.3 5.4 1998
Confirmed child abuse & neglect rate 12.0 5.7 1998
Technical and Source Notes
1. No data are provided for any indicator with fewer than 3 events except for data provided by the Colorado Department of Human
Services (child abuse 8c neglect rate, public assistance, Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) and Medicaid), for which
no data are provided if fewer than 5 events.
2. All 1990 data are from the U.S. Census.
3. With the exception of the 1990 data, the number of children and elderly are based on a formula using population estimates from
the Colorado Department of Local Affairs, the Denver Regional Coundl of Governments (DRCOG), and the U.S. Census. Most
recent population data are from DRCOG.
4. All birth data are provided by the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, which specifically disclaims responsi-
bility for any analyses, interpretations, or conclusions it has not provided. The teen birth rate is computed as the number of births
to females ages 15-19 per 1,000 females of the same age in the general population. Low birth weight is calculated as the number
of babies born at less than 5.5 pounds per 100 live births. The total number of births for Denver differs from that reported as the
county of residence. Births are included only if the home address is physically located in Denver.
Appendix A
83


Neighborhood Summary for Whittier
from "Neighborhood Facts 1999: The Status of Denver Neighborhoods, a report by the Piton Foundation
Technical and Source Notes (continued)
5. Average home sales price is calculated by the Denver Planning Office from data provided by the Denver Assessors Office.
6. Publicly subsidized housing is provided by the Denver Housing Authority (DHA), U.S. Department of Housing and Urban
Development (HUD), and Colorado Housing Finance Authority and includes all DHA, HUD, Section 8 and Low Income Housing
Tax Credit assisted units.
7. Average household income (except 1990), total jobs and average annual wage are provided by DRCOG. Total jobs represent jobs
located in the neighborhood regardless of whether the jobs are held by residents of the same neighborhood. Average annual wage
represents total wages in those jobs divided by the total number of employees.
8. Licensed child care slots, subsidized child care, and confirmed incidents of child abuse and neglect are provided by the Colorado
Department of Human Services. Subsidized child care represents the number of children whose child care is partially or wholly
publicly subsidized as a percent of all children 0-12 years of age. The child abuse and neglect rate is the number of confirmed
child victims of abuse or neglect per 1,000 children (< 18).
9. Persons on public assistance, children and adults on TANF and children on Medicaid are provided by the Denver Department of
Social Services through 1997. Beginning in 1998, these data are provided by the Colorado Department of Human Services. Public
assistance includes cash assistance such as TANF (changed from AFDC in 1997), Old Age Pension, and Aid to Needy Disabled.
10. All public education data are provided by the Denver Public Schools. Both drop-outs and graduates are computed as the number
of drop-outs or graduates divided into the total number of students grades 9-12 residing in the same neighborhood. Drop-out and
graduation rates reported by the school district are not calculated in the same way and should not be used for comparison. Stu-
dents taking the Iowa Test of Basic Skills (TIBS) are compared to tested students nationally. Scores above or below the national
mean of 50 reflect the percentage of students who tested better or worse than the national average. The percent of students
receiving free school lunches is calculated by dividing the number of students grades K-12 receiving free lunches in total student
enrollment grades 1-12 (note: because some kindergartners receive free lunches but are not included in the enrollment data for
grades 1-12, the percent of students receiving free school lunches may exceed 100% in some neighborhoods). To qualify for the
federal Free School Lunch Program, family income cannot exceed 130% of federal poverty guidelines.
11. Crime data are provided by the Denver Department of Safety. Violent crimes include all homicides, aggravated assaults, rapes and
robberies (thefts against a person by force or threat of force).
Appendix A
84


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Healthy Communities, Healthy Denver
A Report by the Denver Health Benchmarking Project
Prepared by the Center for Human Investment Policy, Graduate School of Public Affairs/University of Colorado at Denver. January 2000
IV. Reviewing the Facts: Demographics, Deaths, Births,
and Health
EC end Denver' Demographic Differences
In 1998. the total population of the EC was 61.998 or 12 percent of the population of the
City and County of Denver; the child population of 1he EC pos I6 percent of the City's
total However children madE up over half (55.5%) of the ECs population compared to
only 27 percent of Denver's
Children h Perciirt of Population total population. (Figure 1}
According fa ThePifon
Foundation, the ethnic makeup
of the EC neighborhoods is
becoming increasingly latino
Changes m demographics such
os these have an impact an the
woy human services ere
delivered
Dwrvw and
EC

CtlMwi j Adutta
f tEurc life T if -r, fvs.nc.iti-.fct
EC Prosit* for Pewarty: 18
trover
WhfJer
We&t#ood HP
VfiVfrd* P
S^iarvf p
SunVale* HP
Nbbndi P
Gtebevue -P
Fw Pot* -P
Cote p
Clayton p
Ay-aria* liocaln Pi* P
0
Individual EC neighborhoods
differed from each other and
from Denver on o variety of
ft el I-being indicators, from
economic to educational to
safety. Although Denvers
economic boom has boosted family income
over the lest decode, the eleven EC
neighborhoods Auraria/tincoln Pork,
Clayton, Cole, Five Points, Globeville,
Highlands, SunVdley, Sky lend, Valverde,
Westwood, and Whittier remain among
Denvers poorest neighborhoods14 (Figures
I 2.3.4)
In the EC. from 66 to 95 percent
of all DPS students participated In
the free lunch program an
important indicator of poverty os
ti
% on Msdtcaid [ ] % free lunch
Flpurt 2 s ouicr The 1itcn lourdution, rrapMc Cat'.cr t'w
Human ImrUnicriT Policy, UtIMiSfA
Appendix B
85


Healthy Communities, Healthy Denver
A Report by the Denver Health Benchmarking Project
Prepared by the Center for Human Investment Policy, Graduate School of Public AffairsAJnivershy of Colorado at Denver. January 2000
compared to o aly m4c 56 percent
Average household income in the CC ($25,294)'' ts much lower than the overage
Household income in Denver The average household income for the EC
neighborhoods ranged from $!3, B79 (SunVoIley) to $31,135 (Whittier), as
compared to $42 426 for Denver :<
Although only one in tight (12%) of the City's residents lived in the EC, one in three
(33V-) of Denvers children ord adults cm TANF (Temporary Assistance for Needy
Families) were EC residents
While jobs expanded m Denver from 1990 ta 1996 (there was an 8 4 \% positive
change in total jobs) in the EC total jobs dropped (-6 1 % change in total jobs).
1C St-l#c|*d tdueal tonal SullitSe* 109?

Cl/*m i-
%
junJer.bt read ngtfl top quarts on ITUS
t iSudenB. saad'i^i in kweil quarts on [TBS
birth* (o c'21h buJ& ^fluoausm
i I>.f T't. -.1 . i'nM-i vs.ls'i I- 1 U n%!i'
pi in.-.. (ru,M>\
EC SH*t ivd Crlwi* Statistic* t?9f
r-< vc.' r
~ . .. .
WrffACS't! mmmmm - ---a*.
V ri vr-Ut 1111 . -. :
. -
; V.-. -
1 . 7;
c.-.-reviiii? r -.1 ; -
I Celt- > 1 1 . * ........ ... __
L
Ara' a Ur-ton Pi.'* re 70 4y >.<
VD
11 p.\-oVinl enmo
W.scpe'ly errme
|iS:mk4. -,n i ll-tf ]Vi E .T..s. yr erljr. Cc''t(" :-'t I #<
U -l C 1 I'lt.H'. 1 C|l ^VA
Appendix B
86


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Healthy Communities, Healthy Denver
A Report by the Denver Health Benchmarking Project
Prepared by the Center for Human Investment Policy, Graduate School of Public Affairs/University of Colorado at Denver. January 2000
£C ond Denver: DeotH Comes Differently
While the three leodrng causes of death heart disease, cancer, and stroke (table l)
were the same in the EC? the rest of Denver, and in Colorado from 1993 to 1997, there
were notable differences between the EC. Denver, and Colorado as to the average age of
death (table I), both for the leading cause or any cause
Table 1: Leading Causes cl Death; Denver EC. Remaining Denver, Colorado
1903-^007 ________________________________________
Enterprise Community Denver Remaining Colorado
* of I deaths I rank n of deaths rank # of deaths ronk
Heort blseose 101 1 1025 1 6420 1
Cancer 90 2 895 2 5454 2
Stroke 25 3 256 3 1600 3
Unintended Injuries (non-metor vehicle) 22 4 139 6 760 E.
Lung Disease 20 5 252 4 15B3 4
Homicide 15 6 69 10 209 13
Infant Mortality H 7 56 12 35? 11
Diabetes 13 B 73 Q 633 8
Firearms 13 8 84 8 467 9
Motor Vehicle 10 10 69 10 657 6
"" HIV 9 11 150 5 406 10
Swcide 7 12 98 7 646 7
Liver Disease 6 13 28 13 318 12
Child Mortality 4 14 20 14 | 177 H
Tal.fr h>< ;.nv CllHI! Vital SutKtK* Di-nvun
Appendix B
87


Healthy Communities, Healthy Denver
A Report by the Denver Health Benchmarking Project
Prepared by the Center for Human Investment Policy, Graduate School of Public Affairs/Univereity of Colorado at Denver, January 2000
EC residents hod a greater percentage of deaths occurr-ng due to homicide, infant
mortality, liver disease, child mortality, diabetes, motor vehicle accidents, and firearms
than was true in the rest of Denver
Another way to display this information is in figure 5 While the EC made up only ten
percent of Denver s population, the amount of deaths in the EC from homicides was more
than twenty percent of all homicides that occurred in Denver from 1993 to 1997.
Comparison ol EC & Denver: Population & Homicides
1993-1997
l $ St < !>PIil S rf.it Mati't'C* l Appendix B
88


Healthy Communities, Healthy Denver
A Report by the Denver Health Benchmarking Project
Prepared by the Center for Human Investment Policy, Graduate School of Public Affairs/University of Colorado at Denver. January2000
Conversely, the EC neighborhoods had a louver percentage of their deaths due to heart
disease, stroke, suicide and HIV than was irm for the rest of Denver, Homicides and
deaths from HIV represent q greeter percentage of oil deaths in the rest of Denver from
1993 to 1997 than was true for the state of Colorado. (Table 2)
Age ftange Enterprise Community Denver Remaining Colorado "
Vears n of e verts %* n of events % n of events %
TOTAL DEATHS * all 483 1007; 4375 100?. 24898 100%
Homicide E5 - 15 3.1. 69 1 2 2C9 00
Ififon! Mortality * \ 14 2 9 56 1 3 352 14
liver Disease 55 6 12 2B 06 - 318 3
Child Mortality 1 H 4 08 20 C 5 177 07
Dabetes 5S- 13 2.7 73 l 7 533 2J
Motor Vehicle 15* 10 Z 1 69 u 6b? 26
Firearm 15 * 13 2 7 84 L9 467 1 9
Cardiovascular (Heart) Disease 55 * 101 20,9 1025 73 4 6420 258
Cerebrovascular Disease Stroke 55 * 25 5 2 256 5.9 16C0 6 4
Suicide 15 * 7 1,4 96 22 646 26
HIV 25 54 9 1.9 160 3.4 406 16
CDPHL Vil.il MaitsEu*. hnmm
Tbc iir'.n',- j.'i 1 kv.ih- jvetvr-i'U't'1 nf it'.ilb'' t Ole I to tbt -.!.! n-.imr' tu <( di.iiG ir. ihv IPCJ coinlinc
tu'-ybi erh\K 'cnuirf.Hts: i icmrt : funds i without ii_c IT >u i.'bl otltoudk i sr,d all of ( -dorado f iraibdmg He;
* Ijv t hruff .itritciujl l' f^iiftcTKTs ,n.! fi -t 1'rtO-l ^>7 Sr.c :*Uhi)C-
K
Appendix B
89


Healthy Communities, Healthy Denver
A Report by the Denver Health Benchmarking Project
Prepared by the Center for Human Investment Policy, Graduate School of Public Affairs/University of Colorado at Denver. J anuary2000
table 3a and 3b'. Avera je Age of Death, EC and Denver, l
3 G Average e§ of death
EC Community Denver Remaining
Number of Deaths 2413 21B7B
All Causes*1 64.2 7G.1
3b Leading Causes of Death
Heart Disease 72.9 77 3
Cancer 69 1 71.0
Stroke 75.0 79 b
! ahlr ta, 1: l 'u' tru ir-i.im ik.tih-
!h< 1/
Uwii ( I >1[ !f A !(,> Dr.:-UMl
r Jnp-'r r
Averaga Ag of Death, EC and Oanvar: 1963-1Mr
EC residents generally died at younger ages (Table Bo.) The disparity between the EC
neighborhoods ond remaining Denver become even more apparent looking at the average age
of death overall and for the three leading causes of death (Table 3b). When all deaths
were considered (including infant deaths
which occur disproportionately ?n the EC
neighborhoods), EC residents did not live as
long (on average) as residents in other beaver
neighborhoods. While the three leading
causes of death occurred predominately in
older persons, EC residents who died of heart
attack, cancer or strokes wore younger on
average than the Denver residents who died
of those causes. (Figured). While some of
these differences amounted to only four or
five years, those early deaths translate into
missmg a wedding anniversary, crying at a
grandchild's wedding, or tickling a great
grandchild.
m n . TCI t?.3 ?2. . ti- lt,t m 7i
#p .
!- . r ' 1 '
JM .. i* If
! - r- i - 1 . H |. i i1
20 i i .
i . v . 1 i ,
0 Jk . i i i Ji
AM Giuhi H*rt DMmim Cinen StroM
1 iciurfc
l mr: U Hwnar
EC Community
t I li'lM
:"!nr;d P-4k v i
! in is'un.
niSI'A
Appendix B
90


*
I <§
§
s
+
: 4
: 4
: i#
Healthy Communities, Healthy Denver
A Report by the Denver Health Benchmarking Project
Prepared by the Center for Human Investment Policy, Graduate School of Public Affairs/University of Colorado at Denver. J anuary2000
EC and Denver: Different Circumstances of Birth
Residents of the EC hed a greater percentage of their births associated with health or
social issues than did residents of the remaining Denver neighborhoods, In each of these
indicators, the remaining Denver neighborhoods had o higher percentage cf births
associated with these concerns than did Colorado os a whole These issues included births
to teens, births to unmarried women, and babies born a! 5.5 pounds or less (low
birthweight ) for these data there were sufficient events to compare the individual EC
neighborhoods
During 1993-1997. about one out of every four
births in the EC (an average of 23%) was to a
teenage girl less than 19 years old, contrasted
with one in seven (14%) in the rest of Denver and
one m eight births in Colorado (Table A ond
Figure 7)
Birth* la Tnm Psrctnl of Mi Births:
EC, Dsnvar, Cok>r 100 .,j i M2|
*0 - i. ,
so 40 - tOM[ j : .! 1 i 1 !
20 [ Tean Blithe i
0 f NenTsan Birth* 1
Em*rp<-ta* CommuhFly (elo>cta
llRUF*"'- .'.Fn f nrm \l,.l SM1U V' I Kvs-1;. ,11.
Urlll" : T IClKf, IfAc-K-iCn! rriMfSi'A
Appendix B
91


Healthy Communities, Healthy Denver
A Report by the Denver Health Benchmarking Project
Prepared by the Center for Human Investment Policy, Graduate School of Public Affairs/University of Colorado at Denver. January 2000
Table 4. Hearth PtofiSc Denver Enterprise Community five Year Averages 1393-1997
Age Enterprise Community Denver Remaining Colorado **
Benge * of events % # of events X # of events %
TOTAL BIRTHS * K'j'f 7499 ox. &4310 ICO'-'
Teen Birth ;;.T 338 r 3049 HO 6462 \l 0
Births to Unmarried Mom (i) > Lb** Birth Weight (under 5j pounds) tom )tc 11b 744 9,9 4613 0 h
Uhk 4 ..hi l'^~ Me S*... Ml it.i' id-.*
Every ether birth (50.9%) in the EC from 1993-199? wos to an unmarried mother, as
contrasted one m three births (34.9%) m the remaining Denver neighborhoods, and
one m four (24,9%) m Colorado. (Table 4 and Ftgure 8)
hHdron of singly mothers are 5 times
Css likely to be poor than children living
in 2-parent families.
K-iU Mdi.t' huki. lo.-s Itu; s uUiM.lt-
{ lnidsen-< .impMyn
Birth* K> Unroarrtad Woinn Percent of Ari Blrthli
EC, Denver, end Colorado 19*2-1*57
' to* 2820 | 13**3
%
*M!T
_....... I
\ *878 .
?S ;
Birthls to unmarried f
Birth* to married? ;
Entarpri** Cofnmun%
I imnt JW-'X [Mia rnllir,Vital St,i1imcsUivMor!
p r>mct ll! lh,ir,.-s Hni'C), UT>
Appendix B
92


Healthy Communities, Healthy Denver
A Report by the Denver Health Benchmarking Project
Prepared by the Center for Human Investment Policy, Graduate School of Public Affairs/University of Colorado at Denver. January 2000
Unwed Births as Percent of AH fiirthi, EC and ttarnwr;
* ies i is* m si at if i1 Hi
%
tit
i3S 44,4 1

44l
in
U. 3
-4*1
'
Caytofl ft** Po'm MSUrd Ssybtyj Wus^oaJ Dww
Ajrkn* Lira* SwVtlWy Vi**^ VttOflNt
However, individual EC
neighborhoods proved to have
different profiles depending on
the health issue. As shown in
Figure 9, the percent of births
to unwed mothers os a percent
of oil births differed
dramatically in individual EC
neighborhoods
tieurt V t 5 HII \ K..-J S' < Mon, y,.I caller :* Hirr-iu;
kr.CM'M.-U Hbo, ilM'V i 1 1>
Low Birthwvifiht Rats: EC, Dtnvtr, Colorado
ac Compared to Healthy People 2000 Goal
12 "- -
EC
Low birth weight occurred disproportionately in
the EC as compared to the rest of Denver,
Colorado and notional health goals (Figure 10)
Eleven percent (11.6%) of babies born in the EC
from 1993-1997 weighed less than 5.5 pounds,
while in the remaining Denver neighborhoods. 9 9
percent were born at low birth weight Since
Colorado's low birfhweight rate is one of the
highest in the country, the rate m the EC is
particularly troublesome.
Denver
| Colorado
# Ham Why People 2&0O Goal
I (RUM 10 '2,1,, ' . \ If.;1 Uj\s*U-,V yntf..,
I ciii'1 ft' Hunu.: Policy, GSfA I't'D
Whdc this report was not able to analyze
data concerning racial and ethnic disparities an hedth for the EC neighborhoods, it is
irr,portent to rcolizc that such disparities exist Low birthweight rates ore a perfect
example. In 1998 in Denver county 15.3 percent of births to African American women were
low weight (under 2500 grams) and 8.2 percent of births to white/Hispanic women were
ho average hospital cos is. lor a low birth
Tvt-i;iht hoty are 10 limes the cost of prrsnalal
coir. Ur to 40 % ol bades born at low birth
weight epeeersce learning difficulties.
£" KihsCcumt' Quick Fad. Tr< GcHraric
Children's Gampuiijn
Appendix B
93


Full Text

PAGE 1

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PAGE 2

.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ... "Never doubt that a small group of thoughtfol, committxxlcitizens can change the world indeed, it's the only thing that ever has. -Margaret Mead

PAGE 3

... Councilwoman Elbra Wedgeworth l'u!>hc Wrk-.tnd \oili'Tl;t;, .. <...to"!, .ml '""IIJ, .,,., lnltrn,ll02(15 Phonf': JliJ-2Yil-7Ml hn: 11JJ-291Pl7!6 As the elected representative of Council District 8, I am proud to submit this letter of support for the Whittier Neighborhood Association Neighborhood Plan. The neighborhood plan ls a dream come true for many residents, because residents are committed for Whittier to provide a wonderful living environment for everyone. It is very important to residents to share in the growth and resources of our various community programs. business, churches, libraries, schools, city agencies, etc. The Whittier Neighborhood Plan is the road map to their future development. I give this plan my full support. Sincerely, .----Councilwoman Elbra Wedgeworth District 8

PAGE 4

Table of Contents ACKNOWLEDGMENTS ii INIRODUCTION 1 INSIDE THE 3 WIDTDERNEIGHBORHOOD 0 Planning Process 5 0 Priority Issues for Whittier 5 0 Use of Plan 6 0 Location and Description 6 0 Demographic Analyses 7 0 Existing Land Use and Zoning 13 0 HistotyofWhittier Neighborhood 16 0 The Whittier Vision for the Future 20 PRIORITY ISSUES FOR WIDTDER 24 0 Introduction to Priorities 25 0 Land Use and Zoning 26 0 Urban Design and Historic Preservation 32 0 Education 42 0 Public Safety and Health 49 0 Community Services 54 0 Parks and Open Space 57 0 Econontic DevelopmentEmployment 64 .. 0 67 0 Environment 74 0 Community Coordination 77 .. SOURCES 80 APPENDICES 81 A The Piton Foundation 81 .. NeighborhoodFacts 1999: .. The Status of Denver Neighborhoods B Healthy Connnunities, Healthy Denver 85 A report by the Denver Health Benchmarking Project .. C Goals: Public Safety 95 .. Police Departtnent .. Fire Departtnent Sheriff Department .. .. I Table of Contents i I ....

PAGE 5

.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. -Acknowledgments This plan was prepared with the dedicated support and help of: PRINTING SUSTANTIALFUNDING The Denver Foundation Funded by Wells Fargo Bank LEADERSHIP &ADVOCACY FOR THE WHITTIER NEIGHBORHOOD Ms. Elbra Wedgeworth, Council person for District 8, Denver LEADERSHIP AND EDITING OF TEXT Mr. Darrell Watson Mr.JohnJones Ms. Shawn Sowden Ms. Monique Lavato Mr. Stephen Savageau Mr. Barry Scharoff Mr.RolandSchwarm Ms. Susan Banning Ms. Allison Cantrall Mr. TomMorris Mrs. Lisa Schwarm Mr. Dean Punke Ms. Holly Bateman Mr.JimConsidine Mrs. Megan Weeks Mrs. Debra S. Clayton-Ivery Ms. Sheelagh Young Mr. Phil Normand Ms.LydiaAllbright Mrs. Pat Dubrava Mr.JoeMauro Ms. Bridget Brophy Mr.NickEhdahl Ms. Kelly West Mr. Rich Cantrall Mr. Bob Eugeni Mr. Ottawa Harris Mr. Les Grant Mr. Ted Thomas Ms. Valerie McGee Ms. Savannah Brown Mrs. Diana Hammer HISTORICAL RESEARCH AND EDITING Ms. Darrow Hodges DESIGN, EDITING AND LAYOUT Ms. Beth Foster MAP GRAPHICS Mr. Ben Robbins PHOTOS Mr. Max Geimer I Acknowledgments Mr. V alter Pinto Mr. Gaspar Terrana Mrs. Michelle Allen Mr. Samuel Bishop Ms. Jessica Cioci Mrs. Sherry Culbertson Ms. Leah Dawson Ms. Michelle Katyryniuk Mr. Philip Lucks Ms. Kathryn Richardson Ms. Leanne Sweeney Ms. Kathryn Walke Mr. Joshua White Ms. VaneeSrikijkarn Ms. Bethany Feeley Mr. Bill Stow

PAGE 6

.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. Public and Nonprofit Agency Editing and Insight DENVER PLANNING OFFICE Ms. Ellen lttelson, Planning Program Manager Mr. David Becker, Senior City Planner Ms. Sue Keister, Preservation Assistant HOUSING AND NEIGHBORHOOD DEVELOPMENT SERVICES Mr. Ralph Martinez, Senior City Planner Mr. Ernest Hughes, Enterprise Community Coordinator DENVER PARKS &RECREATION Ms. Helen Kuyendall, Landscape Architect Ms. Jill Kotewicz, Parks Planner DENVERPUBUCLIBRARY Mr. Bruce Hanson, Western History Librarian Mrs. Sondra Harris, Ford Warren Branch Manager DENVERPUBUC SAFETY Aristedes Zavaras, Manager of Public Safety Stephen F. Browne, Deputy Manager of Safety Captain Mike O'Neill, District 2 Mr.JimMair, Community Resource Officer, District 2 DENVERPUBUCWORKS Ms. Stephanie Foote, Manager of Public Works Ms. Kathy Donohue, Special Projects Mr. Dennis Royer, Director, Program Development Mr. Glen Blackborn, Transportation Engineer Mr. James MacKay, Bicycle and Pedestrian Planner DENVER CAREER SERVICE AUTHORITY Mr. Jim Yearby, Director I Acknowledgments

PAGE 7

.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. Public and Nonprofit Agency Editing and Insight (continued) PITONFOUNDATION Mr. Matthew Hamilton, Research Associate UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO SENIOR PLANNING STUDIO Dr. Dwayne C. Nuzum, Professor COLORADO HISTORICAL SOCIETY Mr. Dale Heckendorm, Preservation Planner Ms. Moya Hansen, Curator of Decorative and Fine Art I Acknowledgments ivl

PAGE 8

"' ,, ,,., "' 'r' [ t t--_;' n C">'I ii : _n !1 ; '' ____ l.l _j .. tli! : j;: .-..1 u 1(, 1 I r\!l I 1-D ,lc '' i! : .;, ,, tl i -----' i_ i.iEORGt; W)RRISON f't,f1K i :__ _: ::1 ,, :.:, '' f--r' "' ., ,, LJ ., :" r \ I, 1 ;l i'[J I I'' ,, ll r! .,, c::::J 1:

PAGE 9

.. .. .. .. .. Jim Raughton and Elbra Wedgeworth at neighborhood planning meeting .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. -This neighborhood plan was developed to serve as the basis for public discussion and citizen input concerning the future of the Whittier neighborhood. It is not intended to be final or complete in every detail. Future plans covering additional details will evolve from the process as more information becomes available and citizen comments are heard Whittier's first subdivision, the Case Addition, was filed just after the Civil War in 1868, making the neighborhood 132 years old. It is a neighborhood that has been racially mixed for over 100 years. Yet the history of the neighborhood and its importance within the city remains largely undocumented and unrecognized. If history is the light that we shine into the darkness of the past, then Denver's history and its preoccupation with Anglo-American contributions is distorted by the lack of recognition of African-American contributions. Numerous recommenda tions during the past 15 years by professional historians to recognize the history of the Whittier neighborhood have gone unheeded In his nove11984, George Orwell asserted: "Who controls the past controls the future." This neighborhood plan uses the past in order to shape the future. In so doing, it helps preserve a significant part of the history of Denver's first century. At the same time, it should be regarded as the beginning of a continuing effort to reach decisions and resolve difficulties that remain a part of the neighborhood today This plan reflects on problems that are elusive and will require time and leadership at all levels, from citizens to public officials. The neighborhood plan is a partnership that unites the City of Denver and the Whittier neighbor hood in establishing goals, identifying issues, and testing alternative means of achieving objectives. This plan has created forums in which people have been able to initiate rather than react to change The accomplishments of the planning process have been many. In addition to the specific goals and objectives identified in the plan, many specific programs are currently underway based on the identified goals. At the same time, participation in neighborhood meetings has increased, and paid membership in the Whittier Neighborhood Association has doubled, ... /. (/.. / Ji Raughton, Ph.D J ne28,2000 J Executive Summary

PAGE 10

.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. : ,-, I\. ,;J, iJi .. .. ,. 'I 1 1 !I I '., > I I J,;jt ,-ii-i I J' 1 nil fS: I i jl! 1: g, \l /1 !"' I '1.'1 I 'LJ," I bC"::.l. n :-1 r-, II L: ____ I I ro I ;-_ 1 c-_-, ::c I lC.{ '"1 l:C-'1' u r:t,, t.l,, r:-1, t.<' ,l:r ,,

PAGE 11

.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. Victorian house In Whittier A family walk The people of Whittier should expect that planning for their neighborhood will be three-dimensional-that it will consider not only the functional requirements of a city's agencies, but also the social costs of meeting those needs and the environmental impacts on the quality of life within their neighborhood. There cannot be a single document that fully outlines both the needs of the residents and those of city agencies. However, in order to contribute to both the health and welfare of Whittier residents, this plan serves as an outline to promote desired patterns of neighborhood design, traffic, housing, and public services, and other priorities as expressed by the neighborhood While residents in any neighborhood find it easy to identify an aspect of their community that needs improvement, and these concerns may serve an important purpose in establishing a consensus among that neighborhood's residents, this plan intends to go beyond concerns to address specific positive actions in which the residents can participate. To this end, the plan includes a series of" Action Charts" that ate intended to be a continuing resource for the community to identify and act upon emerging opportunities in the Whittier neighborhood One of the many challenges of developing a plan for the Whittier neighborhood is that many of its characteristics are similar to those in contiguous neighborhoods, including education, transportation, code enforcement, and city park development. As in the example of City Park and City Park Golf Course planning and redevelopment, all the neighborhoods surrounding this open space share a common interest in the intensity of use planned for this city-wide facility. In some cases it is appropriate that Whittier coordinate its planning with these adjacent neighborhoods There are no easy or quick answers to issues confronting the Whittier neighborhood. At the same time, there is no reason to believe that the full constructive potential of the neighborhood cannot be achieved. Residents, commu nity-based organizations, and city representatives who contributed to this plan see tremendous potential as the Whittier neighborhood pursues its vision for the future When asked "What do you like about Whittier neighborhood?," neighbors identified human scale; vitality; location; mass transit; diversity; cosmopolitan small-town atmosphere; pedestrian orientation; history; architec"ture; friendly people; and access to City Park, the Zoo, and downtown To the question "What do you dislike about Whittier?" neighbor responses included: lack of planning, lack of security, lack of educational opportunity, speeding traffic, noise, poor alley sanitation, and inadequate street lighting Conflicting opinions and goals within the neighborhood are part of the tension that makes Whittier a dynamic community. For Whittier to achieve its full potential as a model neighborhood, these varied attitudes must be blended into a harmonious whole. Although every need cannot be met, there are several areas that can be trans lated from ideas into opportunities for the entire neighborhood I Inside the Whittier Neighborhood

PAGE 12

.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. Whittier Neighborhood Association meeting Leadership on priority Issues Planning Process Beginning in November 1999, residents and neighborhood leaders met to identify elements of the plan and issues to be addressed, outline goals, and create a common vision for Whittier's future. In cooperation with community leadership, a series of community meetings were hosted by the Whittier Neighborhood Association. Each neighborhood meeting focused on specific issues of concern. After each meeting, a revised draft was presented to neighborhood leaders and individuals who expressed interest in the expanding topics. A total of 16 drafts were presented to the neighborhood Priority Issues for Whittier Diversity Land Use & Zoning Urban Design & Historic Preservation Education Public Safety CommunityServices Parks & Open Space Economic Development-Employment Traffic and Transportation Environment Community Coort!ination These meetings allowed individuals to share their hopes and concerns about the neighborhood in a comfortable environment conducive to problem solving. Revisions were made based on comments from Whittier residents and City of Denver representatives. The highest priorities within the plan were identified by the Whittier Neighborhood Association at their June 21, 2000 meeting. These highest priorities are summarized on pages 21-23 I Inside the Whittier Neighborhood

PAGE 13

.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ltallanate detail Use of the Plan This plan is a product of neighborhood leadership and funding provided by the Denver Foundation. It has been prepared in the belief that an effective planning process can both increase participation in the neighborhood and influence the continuing planning programs of private, municipal, non-profit, and regional organizations. It is intended to give the strongest possible voice to the existing residents of the neighborhood, in the belief that their interests may be congruent with the enlightened interests of city and regional agencies It is understood the plan is an advisory document designed to facilitate effective decision-making processes. It is intended to advise decision-makers including the Mayor, City Council, the Denver Planning Board, various city departments, private investors, and business leaders on the values and views of the residents of Whittier While this plan was prepared in cooperation with the Denver Planning Office and is consistent with the form suggested by that office and the new Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000, it will not become an official document until it is adopted by the City Council as part of the city's comprehensive plan. It is the responsibility ofthe Whittier Neighborhood Association and its residents to prioritize goals and work to create an optimum future for the neighborhood Location and Description Whittier is bound by Downing Street on the west, Martin Luther King Boulevard on the north, York Street on the east, and 23rd Avenue on the south. It is often depicted on maps ofthe city as square, although its actual dimensions are rectangular. Arterial streets and parks create strong boundary edges on the north, east, and west sides. Along its south edge, Whittier merges with City Park West, separated only by 23rd Avenue (see map on p. 29) The neighborhood, primarily residential, is comprised of single-family dwellings and low-density multi-family units Whittier's housing stock and residential character are two of the neighborhood's many assets. Much of the hous ing represents examples of Denver's finest architectural development, with the average age of homes approaching 100 years. The area contains 99 residential blocks, approximately 359 acres, 4,350 residents and 2,163 housing units. Property owners and long-term residents, in an act of faith in the future of the community, continue to make tremendous efforts to maintain their houses and upgrade the neighborhood. Evidence of this pride can be seen in the attractive, well-kept lawns and many large mature trees that make this neighborhood one of the most visually appealing in the city. All of the recommendations in this study support the community vision of maintain ing the quality of residential living and diversity of people residing in the neighborhood __ _______________________________________ ]O

PAGE 14

.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ... ... .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. Neighborhood planning meeting Downing Street is lined by residential and business structures. This narrow strip along the western edge of the neighborhood also includes several vacant, developable parcels of land that will be significant in determining the eventual character of that portion of the neighborhood Nonconforming business uses are scattered in nodes throughout the residential brick bungalows, Denver Squares, and Victorian homes. These commercial uses will be key to the quality of life in the near future in that they can be attractive corner stores accessible by foot or bicycle, supplementing the residential character of the neighborhood Among the most distinctive features of the neighborhood are its churches, public schools, and parks. These uses contribute significantly to the overall quality of the residential environment and are a key factor for the future of the neighborhood Demographic Analyses Most ofthe information in this section is derived from the 1990 U.S. Census and Neighborhood Facts 1999, a report compiled by the Piton Foundation. Specific data for neighborhood demographics based on the 2000 census will be available in 2002; that information will be used to update the Denver Neighborhood Profiles (www.piton.org/ db) The current Piton profile is attached as the Appendix to this report The Whittier neighborhood is a prime example of a community that has experienced dramatic change in its ethnic makeup. Overthe past decade, Whittier's demographics have undergone a transition with Latino and Anglo residents growing in number while the African-American population figure declines. The influx of ethnic groups has not been evenly distributed throughout the neighborhood. The Latino population has increased most dramati cally in the northernmost section, occupying many rental units available in that portion of the neighborhood. The central and southern portions of the neighborhood have seen substantial Anglo in-migration The City of Denver has enjoyed steady economic growth over the past decade. Job growth, personal income, and housing costs are all increasing and are considered key measures of the Denver economy. Denver stands out nationally in terms of job growth and reduction of welfare rolls, a remarkable accomplishment given the fact that the nation's economy is also prospering. These positive factors are reflected in the increasing housing prices and higher average incomes of the Whittier neighborhood, but there are areas of concern While recent job growth is good news for the city, the Whittier neighborhood has had a net loss of jobs, declining from 897 jobs to 689, a 23.2% loss. This is a direct product of the increasing reinforcement of the residential j Inside the Whittier Neighborhood

PAGE 15

.. .. .. .. .. .. .. Child Care Co-op .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 4 Volunteer mother providing care .. .. .. .... character of the neighborhood. Entry-level jobs are also in short supply. Of the 689 jobs within the Whittier neighborhood, 32.1% (220 jobs) are classified as entry-level. Entry-level positions are needed to provide access to employment for residents. (1) Efforts to involve the small businesses within the neighborhood in the planning process and the Whittier Neighborhood Association were not successful. Several goals of this plan focus on including these employers in the neighborhood Shortage of Child Care Another growing problem in the neighborhood is a shortage of child care. The Piton Foundation reports 388 State of Colorado-licensed child care slots in Whittier. While it is impossible to report the exact number of pre school-age children in the neighborhood, there are some indicators In 1998 there were reported to be 1,672 children under the age of 18living in Whittier. That same year, 1,063 Whittier children were enrolled in Denver Public Schools, leaving a difference of 609 children. The total number of births in Whittier in 1997 was 105, a number that appears to be steadily increasing. The number of children receiving Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (T ANF) in Whittier was reported as 348 in 1998. Families throughout the neighborhood report the need for child care, especially for their youngest children. (2) Increasing Cost of Housing The selling price of an average home in Whittier has increased from $96,303 in 1997 to $165,882 in May 2000. The strong housing market has threatened many older residents as their property taxes have increased significantly Multiple Listing Source Data on Average Selling Prices and Average Listing Price in the Whittier Neighborhood Selling Price Listing Price 1997 $96,303 $97,891 1998 $111,723 $113,920 1999 $124,712 $125,977 2000 (through May) $165,882 $170,807 As housing prices soar, pressure on property owners of Section 8 housing and rentals in general to sell their rental units is increasing. This has significantly increased rents in the neighborhood. Denver was reported to have a 40.4% increase in average rents from 1993 to 1999. (3) I Inside the Whittier Neighborhood sl

PAGE 16

,. ,. ,. ,. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. Denver Square In Whittier .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. Population While Denver has increased in population, Whittier has experienced a decline in population over the last fifty years. There are currently 4,3 50 individuals living in Whittier compared to 9,160 in 1950, a 52% decline. During the past ten years, the population has sta bilized at a level slightly above 4,300 residents Children currently represent a significant number of residents (1,672), with 36% of the population being under the age of 18. (4) Housing The number of housing units in Whittier is 2,163; that number has declined by 22% since 1950, from 2,792 units It should be noted that the number of housing units has stablized over the past twenty years. A review of the population and housing statis tics indicates that Whittier's average household size is 2.0, compared to 2.2 for Denver I Inside the Whittier Neighborhood 10000 8000 z 0 6944 j::: 6000 s ::l 4000 D.. 0 D.. 2000 .-0 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 YEAR SourCes: U.S. Census, 1950-1990; Denver Planning Office 1998; and Piton Foundation Forecast 2000 3000 Ul 2800 ._2792 I-z 2735 ::l 2600 Cl z 2475 iii 2400 ::l ??10 ?216 0 ::t: 2200 2000 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 YEAR Sources: U.S. Census, 1950-1990; DenverP/anmng Office 1998; and Piton Foundation Forecast 2000 ---1998 2000 .?212 2163 1998 2000

PAGE 17

.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ... Architect leads housing discussion Shortage of Affordable Housing While the increase in housing values in Whittier has been a source of pride for many homeowners, it has come with a down side. The elderly and the poor have felt the already serious shortage of affordable housing Maintaining a fair share of affordable housing for people who work in the city is a priority in order to promote diversity within the neighborhood. The Center for Affordable Housing at the University of Colorado at Denver has reported that many low-income families are paying more than 50% of their income for rent in Denver. There are currently 310 housing units within Whittier (representing 14% of Whittier's total housing units) supported by "Section 8." Residents typically pay rent at a fixed 30% of their incomes, with the federal department of Housing and Urban Development paying the owners the difference between that and market value.(S) The Whittier neighborhood supports the City and County of Denver's efforts to include low-income housing in all major residential developments including Stapleton, Lowry, the Central Platte Valley, and the Golden Triangle The Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000 suggests there are "threshhold preconditions" to support residential vitality of the city. Among these conditions is creating a clean and safe environment where home buyers can be confident that their property values are secure. Whittier seeks to create these conditions to enhance its residential character Affordable housing also supports residential vitality by encouraging public employees-including firefighters, police, and teachers-to purchase homes in Whittier I Inside the Whittier Neighborhood to 1

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.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 4 Neighborhood leadership .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. -Crime Rates Residents have expressed concerns about issues such as illegal-drug sales and alcohol-related offenses. Neighborhood crime statistics show Whittier at 117.3 crimes per 1,000 residents, with a 9.8% decline in the crime rate from 1990 to 1999. Whittier has the 16th highest overall crime rate out of 72 Denver neighborhoods. The "Total Offenses" table on the right shows the crimes by type. The majority of crimes committed in Whittier are burglaries, larcenies, and auto thefts. The chart below indicates the continuing decline in overall reported offenses between 1995 and 1999. (6) WHITIIER NEIGHBORHOOD DENVER POLICE DEPARTMENT 1999 STATISTICAL REPORT (per 1,000 population) TOTAL OFFENSESWhittier Neighborhood Homicides .02 Sexual Assaults 1.7 Aggravated Assaults 8.5 Robbery 4.4 Petty and Grand Larceny 21.2 Auto Theft 15.0 Arson 1.4 All Other 42.0 Source: Denver Department of Safety These rates are based on 1998 crimes and 1990 census population figures REPORTED OFFENSES Average Number of Reported 5 YEAR TREND Offenses Per Year= 542.4 600 i500 l5 400 'I; 300 i 200 100 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Source: Denver Department of Safety I Inside the Whittier Neighborhood 11

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.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. -New home based on Denver Square design Since 1991, the Piton Foundation has compiled data that depict Denver neighborhoods' well-being, including Whittier. Attached as the Appendix are the key statistics about Whittier. A review of these charts shows Whittier as a neighborhood in which conditions have markedly improved over the past decade. Population is stable, average household income is up, and property values have increased. The number of people on welfare has decreased, the crime rate has dropped, and births to teens are down InJ anuary of 2000, the Denver Health Benchmarh Project released a report establishing a neighborhood-based profile of health-related indicators for 11 neighborhoods including Whittier. The Benchmark Project was the first City-sponsored initiative to identify health issues in the aggregate of the Empowerment Zone neighborhoods. Specific data are not available on individual neighborhoods; however, the aggregate data do provide insight into health needs of inner city neighborhoods and are attached as an appendix While the statistics present an overall picture of improving conditions within Whittier, they do not portray the full picture. There remain negative influences on the neighborhood like abandoned houses, non-conforming commer cial uses, liquor stores, and community correction facilities. The Piton Foundation describes many of these elements as "risk factors" for neighborhoods WHITTIER LAND USE CHART Total Area Streets and Alleys Usable Area Residential Uses Single Family Uses Mufti Family Uses Parks Public Schools and related uses Business Other 359 acres 138 acres 221 acres 168 acres 120 acres 48 acres 14acres 30 acres 2 acres 7 acres % 100% 76% 54% 22% 6% 13% 1% 4% I ______________________________________ u]

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.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .... Neighborhood retail Existing Land Use and Zoning More than 76% of the Whittier neighborhood is residential. Fifty-four percent of the residential acreage contains single-family homes; 22% of the area is duplex and low-density residential. Nineteen percent of the neighborhood is comprised primarily of public schools and parks. The combination of residential uses and complementary public uses represent 95% of the neighborhood The Whittier neighborhood is a distinct area within the region that surrounds City Park on the eastern edge of downtown Denver. It is of walkable size, with the majority of its community facilities within 10 to 15 minutes walking distance for the residents. Land use and zoning issues are closely related to maintaining the residential character of the neighborhood. The maintenance of a strong, diverse, low-density residential neighborhood is the central concern of many issues raised by residents The western edge of the Whittier neighborhood is bordered by B4 zoning, allowing an extensive mix of commer cial uses. The majority of business uses exist on the Downing frontage north of 27th Avenue. Downing, as well as the other transportation corridors delineating Whittier, not only defines the edge of the neighborhood but also gives it a distinct character. The residential character, the pedestrian orientation, and the historic quality of the neighborhood must be reflected in the redevelopment of Downing Street (see map on p. 29) Commercial buildings are also scattered throughout the neighborhood, particularly along the three streetcar lines that once extended through the area on 23rd, 25th and 28th avenues. These uses were concentrated around historic trolley stops rather than extending the length of streets. Most of them were originally small groceries, pharmacies, and candy stores that served neighborhood residents. In most cases, they continue to operate as marginal retail establishments Whittier is bound by major streets, connecting it to other residential communities, employment, commercial centers, and community facilities. Within the geographic center of the neighborhood, there is a core of public-use facilities including Manual High School, Ford-Warren Library, Red Shield Community Center, Thunderbolt Com munity Park, and Fuller Park. These public and quasi-public spaces are complemented by a number of additional uses that serve the residential neighborhood including: Whittier Elementary School, Loyola Parochial School, George Morrison Park, Williams Park, and Douglas Park. I Inside the Whittier Neighborhood

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.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. -Mission design Gothic design Contiguous to the Whittier neighborhood, but not included within its boundaries, are a number of public and quasi-public facilities including Cole Middle School, Mitchell Elementary School, Community College of Denver Tech Center, Wyatt Edison Charter and Annunciation Parochial School. Regional facilities contiguous to the Whittier neighborhood include City Park Golf Course and City Park (including the Denver Zoo and Denver Museum of Nature and Science). The Gilliam Juvenile Hall (the city's juvenile deten tion facility), located at 2844 Downing Street, provides aid, assistance, and encouragement to youth ages 6 to 18 in protective custody Churches There are ten churches located in the Whittier neighborhood. They are among the most distinctive features in the neighborhood. Many of these institutions extend their mission to include community services enhancing the neigh borhood. They are: Antioch Baptist Church 2500 Lafayette Street Activities: Men's brotherhood, women's mission programs, youth activities. Church of the Holy Redeemer 2552 Williams Street Adult education Jubilee Community Church I Neighborhood Ministries 2959 Franklin Street After-school programs for children ages 9 to 18 for homework help and educational games; Mothers of Preschoolers program Mt. Carmel Community Baptist Church 2575 Vine Street Bible Study, after-school tutoring program New Hope Church of God in Christ 1710 East 2S'h Street New Life in Christ Family Worship Center 3037Williams Street St. Ignatius Loyola Catholic Church 2305 Gaylord Street Loyola Parochial School, youth activities. I Inside the Whittier Neighborhood

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.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ,. ,. ... .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. Loyola Elementary School St. Stephens Missionary Baptist Church 3125 Humboldt Street Tutorial program for youth The Salvation Army, Red Shield Corps, Community Center 2915 High Street Senior Program: exercise programs, health clinic, shopping, and movies The Unified Body of Christ 3010 High Street Schools After School Program for Youth: recreation center activities, homework help, performing arts, field trips, and games While there are three schools within the neighborhood (Manual High School, Whittier Elementary School, and Loyola Elementary Parochial School), Whittier is adversely affected by DPS-assigned attendance boundaries. Whittier children are assigned to four elementary schools, three middle schools, and two high schools (see maps on pp. 40-41). This arbitrary division of the neighborhood requires even the youngest students to cross high traffic volume streets and reduces opportunities for neighbors to work together to strengthen the relationship of the neighborhood to their schools. The Middle schools that serve Whittier include: Cole Middle School... .located at 3240 Humboldt Street. Gove Middle School.. .located at 4050 E. 14'h A venue Morey Middle School ... .located at 840 E. 14'h Avenue The Elementary Schools that serve Whittier include: Whittier Elementary School ... .located at 2480 Downing Street Gilpin Elementary School ... .located at 2949 California Street. Columbine Elementary School ... .located at 2925 W. 40'h Avenue. Mitchell Elementary School ... .located at 1350 E. 33m Avenue Loyola Elementary School ... .located at 24'h and Gaylord is within Whittier and is a parochial school supported by the St. Ignatius Loyola Catholic Church I Inside the Whittier Neighborhood

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.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. lit Neighborhood gardens .. .. -History of Whittier Neighborhood Several independent consultants and historians have recognized Whittier as a historically significant portion of Denver's past: In June 197 4, the Colorado Historical Society identified homes and structures of architectural significance constructed in early Denver throughout the city, including Whittier In. 1983, historian Barbara Norgren identified 190 neighborhood features including buildings that might qualify the Whittier neighborhood as eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places. Fourteen structures were identified in the report as eligible for the National Register of Historic Places. In 1995, the report was revised by the Colorado Historical Society deleting several northern blocks of the neighborhood InJ anuary 1995, the City of Denver Landmark Preservation Commission and the Office of Planning and Community Development issued a report on Whittier prepared by R. Laurie Simmons and Thomas H. Simmons, Front Range Research Associates. This report offered a comprehensive history of the neighborhood and recommended a HighWilliams Street Historic District (see map on p. 17) John Greenleaf Whittier Whittier School, and later the Whittier neighborhood, were named after John Greenleaf Whittier (1807 -1892), the abolitionist Civil War poet. Among his poems are: "Voices of Freedom" -1846 "Songs of Labor" 1850 "In WarTimes" -1864 "The Moral Warfare" -1838 "Massachusetts to Virginia" 184 3 His poems attacked the injustices of slavery while condemning the hypocrisy of a nation that was founded on ideals of freedom but allowed slavery Born in Massachusetts and largely self-educated, as a young poet Whittier contributed to the abolitionist newspaper The Free Press. As a religious man of the Quaker faith, he was deeply concerned about social welfare. For more than 30 years, he devoted himself to the abolition of slavery in the United States. He served in the Massa chusetts legislature and was a founder of both the Liberty Party in 1839 and the Republican Party in 1854.(7) The values and example of John Greenleaf Whittier have lived on in this community I Inside the Whittier Neighborhood

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.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. -1983 PnlpoS('() NatloDlll Register of Jlistorlc: l'laclos Source. Colorado H1stonca/ Society I Register of Historic Places Recommendation j --------------Sourr..'e: Colorado Histories/ Society Source: Denver Neighborhood History Project Dennr Landmarks 2330 Downing Street 2501 High Street 2932 Lafayette Street Source: Denver Landmark Commission I Historic Designation I Inside the Whittier Neighborhood

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' .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ,. .. .. .. .. -Whittier Early Development The Whittier neighborhood subdivisions were developed in the period after the Civil War. In the 1870s, a real estate boom occurred in anticipation of the city's connection with the transcontinental railroad. This boom was heightened by the discovery of silver. As anticipated by the developers of the early subdivisions, the railroad extensions to Denver included the Kansas Pacific Railroad on the 40th Avenue alignment north of Whittier. Development of homes in Whittier followed in the 1880s and 1890s. The majority of homes were built for middle income Anglo-American citizens. Many of the large Victorian homes were built by Denver business owners Residents included carpenters, bricklayers, and metal workers, artisans who contributed to many of the architectural details found in the smaller homes. By 1893, the Whittier neighborhood housed 24 African-American families close to the rail line. Their primary occupation was as porters working for the Kansas Pacific. (8) Whittier: A History of Racism, Segregation, and Integration Whittier has not been adequately recognized for its unique history of race relations within the City of Denver While portions of that history are infamous, they should not be forgotten Beginning with the integration of the neighborhood over 100 years ago, the history of segregation and integration has played out decade by decade. In the 1920s, Denver's Mayor Ben Stapleton, Denver City Attorney Rice Means, and Colorado Governor Clarence Morley were supported by the Ku Klux Klan. Denver's chapter of the Klan boasted 17,000 members. The Denver Klan chapter nicknamed itself the "Denver Doers Club" in order to mask its true racism. It supported the establishment of a color line limiting African-American citizens to an area north of 23rd Avenue. The color line moved from west to east year after year, standing for an extended period between High and Race streets. When Walter Chapman, a African-American postman, challenged the color line by moving to 2112 Gilpin, a bomb exploded in his front yard. He moved out. Another brave African-American, Charles Starr, moved in-only to have the house bombed again. Claude DePriest, a black fireman, purchased a home at 2649 Gaylord. He was warned, "If you continue at your present address, you do so at your own peril." After that and other confrontations, DePriest moved. (9) This significant history of race relations should be preserved for generations to come in order not to lose sight of the reality of residential segregation in our city's history More than a hundred years have passed since the first African-Americans moved into the northwest corner of Whittier. They confronted systematic racism as they pursued their lives in Denver. Yet today these individual heroics are hardly recognized. Despite a hundred years of individual integrity by both Africanand Anglo-Americans, the history has become almost lost; the issues of integration worked through in the Whittier neighborhood are more I Inside the Whittier Neighborhood tsl

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.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. -remote today because it is a neighborhood that is open to all. Individuals and families of diverse backgrounds work and live together, creating a healthy residential environment This would not be a matter for regret if the battle of integration had been won-if the individual heroism of the last century had established, once and for all, that respect for individuals was based on their character rather than the color of their skin. As late as March 22, 1950, a Japanese-American war veteran and his family were barred from moving into their Denver home at 2718 Gaylord by a restrictive covenant (10). What has happened is that much of the history of racism, segregation, and integration has been unrecorded by our common history. Those residents of Whittier who recall the early history in Denver are rapidly being lost as they enter the eighth and ninth decades of their lives. It is the business of the Whittier neighborhood to persuade the city that the history left in individual hearts and minds is not enough. What is required is a recognition of the historic role Whittier has played in a century of segregation and integration I Inside the Whittier Neighborhood

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.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. -High Street family The Whittier Vision for the Future The Whittier neighborhood is unique. A mix of single-family and low-density multi-family housing complemented by parks, schools, and churches makes Whittier a model low-density neighborhood in Denver. Located between downtown Denver and City Park Golf Course, the neighborhood is the home of one of the city's most diverse set oflifestyles and populations. The neighborhood houses elderly, young, single, married, African-American, Asian, Hispanic, Anglo, gay, and lesbian. As the site of many significant events in the history of integration of the community, Whittier is a truly historic neighborhood Whittier residents' overall vision for the future is to reinforce an inviting, well-maintained, safe, and comf01table residential environment for families The following positive qualities guide the Whittier Neighborhood vision of the future: 1. Diversity-The rich mixture of ethnicity, age, and lifestyle will be encouraged and supported as a valued characteristic of the Whittier neighborhood 2. Cultural History-It is important that the history of segregation and integration not be forgotten. Whittier represents a potential living history of the City of Denver 3. Historic Character-Historically and architecturally significant homes, churches, businesses, and streetscapes will be preserved. In creating a healthy model for an integrated community, the historic nature of the neigh borhood will be highlighted. The design of new development and remodeling will be encouraged to be com patible with the existing historic fabric of the neighborhood as a low-density residential community 4. Education-The importance of education to the future of the Whittier neighborhood cannot be overstated With 36% of the residents under 18 years of age, education is key to their future. Creating partnerships that involve residents, businesses, community-based organizations, Denver city government, and Denver Public Schools will be indispensable to this future 5. Public Safety-Universal safety builds a sense of pride, communication, and cooperation among neighbors The Denver Police and Denver Fire Department will be central features in all planning decisions 6. City Agencies-The Whittier Neighborhood Association must work cooperatively with city government tore assess standards of service including park maintenance, neighborhood and alley inspection, and trash collection I Inside the Whittier Neighborhood

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.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. The plan was developed as a product of the leadership of Councilperson Elbra Wedgeworth and the Whittier Neighborhood Association Board of Directors with the participation of the residents of Whittier. The plan incorpo rated work developed in meetings and individual efforts of many citizens and public officials. In total, 85 individu als provided written input and comments to the draft documents. In addition to the written input, in excess of 200 individuals participated in meetings focused on the plan. These meetings culminated on June 21, 2000 with over 80 individuals in attendance prioritizing the "Action Projects" from the Priority Issues. The highest priorities were selected as first steps for implementing the plan The specific priorities selected in each category were: 1. Land Use and Zoning LZ2-Encourage and support residential development of vacant land that reflects existing design of the neighborhood. L26-Encourage the designation of historic districts and individual structures L29-Support a variety of housing types, including low-income housing, that are compatible with residential character of the neighborhood 2. Urban Design and Historic Preservation UD2-Rename Whittier Neighborhood Association "Historic Whittier Square." UD6-Encourage the redevelopment of commercial sites to compatible retail services UD 11-Encourage infill development that reflects New Urbanism design including front porches, Denver Square scale, and high level of craftsmanship 3. Education ED1-Encourage the development of a Learning Center at Manual High School including Community College of Denver ED3-Encourage all residents-including those who are not parents-to participate in school issues ED8-Establish mentorship programs to create contact with youth in the neighborhood throughout their academic careers I Inside the Whittier Neighborhood 21

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.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 4. Public Safety and Health PS !-Establish Neighborhood Watch programs on majority of blocks PS6-Work with the Denver Police Department District 2 to establish an effective police-community rela tions program. PSS-Inventory risk factors such as apartment buildings, businesses, and alleys for frequent crime reports 5. Community Service CSl-Identify site of Neighborhood Center, secure funding from City of Denver CS3-Develop human services, e.g., job training, language classes, and recreation CS6-Establish planning steering committee for Neighborhood Plan implementation CS7-Work with City Council representative to track the implementation of the Neighborhood Plan 6. Parks and Open Space Pi-Improve Fuller Park to enhance PS-Expand use Glenarm Recreation Faculty by Whittier residents P9-Monitor conditions of parks, reporting regularly to the Denver Parks Department PH-Develop visual and pedestrian linkages between parks and historic walks 7. Economic Development E1-Inventory and evaluate vacant properties in order to recruit neighborhood businesses E2-Encourage joint development of an education center at Manual High School in cooperation with Com munity College of Denver ES-Cooperate in youth employment programs an business incubators for entry-level employment E6-Encourage businesses to participate in the Whittier Neighborhood Association to promote local use of businesses I Inside the Whittier Neighborhood

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.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. -8. Traffic and Transportation Tl-Encourage walking, bicycling, and mass-transit use TS-N otify police of speeding traffic; support reduced speed T6-Evaluate existing traffic signage for more stop signs to discourage cut-through traffic 9. Environment E2-Identify up to 10 problem properties each month to bring into code compliance E4Encourage residents to participate in recycling and conservation programs ES-Apply for grants to obtain trees 10. Community Coordination CC2-Create committee activities focused on the Neighborhood Plan Action Charts CCS-Create block activities through grants and city cooperation In addition to selecting highest priorities, all action recommendations have been designated ongoing, immediate, short-term, or long-term. Ongoing recommendations may be started immediately and can continue on. Immedi ate recommendations should be started now. Short-term recommendations can be started with little or no money Long-term recommendations will take longer to accomplish and will require coordination with funding agencies I Inside the Whittier Neighborhood

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.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ;,8, : r-sj:\ I H n '. o-p t; !i ,. ,4 '\ t ... :j :.:..1 t I '"1 I f', J l -..l '. ,, I II I ..[;J .' 1 n ll 'q'!; '' i I I ,, L> i : [1 '" !'"" ,. ,_. '. ., __ : I "-- '-' ;,j c:1J t; u l:ll] n r-[;.11 i t .. [) [.1 t.: L, Ll '--'-' r:l,, c_:.:; :_; ,' "' ::_l :u .. ,_:;,, Cl t_::_: 'i "i_:.J I n' i Ll u t-;-o t::l t:1 ,\] i i"l r.:::-1 j lr;l ll n I'Ul.'_[!l f'r..r: .. : ,, u I rJ I I ,1 CJ ': ,, I C.l t=-1 t I : ,, ,, .--, '" lp I] rill '' ., '-'! ., Cl n r: .. ,. ; ' ' .. u i [.' '" r l-, "' ,,, Ji r l

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if if .. .. .. .. Whittier Neighborhood Association meeting .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. -Romanesque detail Introduction to Priorities The process used in developing this plan included interviews with residents and community leaders from the neighborhood and planning forums on a number of topics. In all of the meetings there existed a sincere sense of hope and optimism about the future of the neighborhood. It is clear that living in Whittier is special, and it is obvious that residents are looking for ways to strengthen and support the lives of all who live in the neighborhood The issues related to diversity permeated every meeting of the planning process. There exists within the neighborhood a profound desire for improved opportunity for every resident. It springs from a hope that Whittier can move toward a culture where individuals are what matter and ethniciry is not the priority. The concerns about maintaining a diverse community are reflected in subtle ways in the priority sets related to education, land use and zoning, public safety, historic preservation, and parks The purpose of this neighborhood plan has grown beyond the simple listing of "assets and issues" to a frank discussion of issues related to diversity as a priority, a subject that is seldom discussed in neighborhood plans Virtually every priority issue list of "actions" includes the implied, if not explicit, question of how much does the City of Denver seek to join Whittier in supporting neighborhood diversity. The plan, because it originated from the neighborhood, enjoys sufficient editorial independence to include goals that call attention to some dissident issues. This process of goal-setting, in itself, is a hopeful sign of what may be possible in future neighborhood plans. It will, however, not succeed if the dialogue is not joined by the city's leadership Today, Whittier is a neighborhood in which residents take enormous pride, precisely because of its history of inclusion, tolerance, and pluralism. Obviously, Whittier has not found the solutions to all the issues of racism that have divided our society. The truth remains that the multiple races living together in Whittier have conflicting memories of the past, but at the same time they have, through this planning process, expressed common goals and actions for their shared future It is appropriate that the northern edge of Whittier is defined by Martin Luther King Boulevard. Dr. King's crusade to extend America's constitutional covenant to all citizens is alive in Whittier today. The fabric of our cultural history should not be woven from a single-colored thread; a truer history will be written as a rich blend of colors. In fact, much of our city's history reflects a subtle-if not invisible-neglect of the African-American contributions to our shared history._ Whittier is a significant part of that history and should be seen as a living classroom. Many of the actions suggested would move Whittier-and the City of Denver-to the recognition of that history I Priority Issues: INTRODUCTION TO PRIORITIES

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.. .. .. .. -.. -.. .. -.. .. .. .. .. .. .. Neighborhood retail It Mother and daughter vote .. .. .. .. .. .. Priority Issue: Land Use and Zoning Neighborhood land use and zoning issues are closely related to maintaining Whittier's residential character. The maintenance of a strong, diverse, low-density residential neighborhood is the central goal raised by residents. More than 76% of the Whittier neighborhood is residential. The balance of the neighborhood is primarily schools and parks. The combination of residential uses and complementary public use represents 95% of the neighborhood's land use. The western edge of the Whittier neighborhood is bordered by B4 zoning. This allows an extensive mix of commercial and high-density residential uses. The majority of business uses exist on the Downing frontage north of 27'h Avenue. The urban design character of Downing is viewed by residents as in need of improvement. Expansions of streetscaping projects, design of buildings and facades, landscaping, and parking are mentioned as specific concerns and requiring attention and improvement. Downing and the other transportation corridors defining Whittier should be viewed as gateways to the neighborhood. They not only define the edge of the neighborhood, but also give definition to the character of Whittier. The values of the community must be expressed at its gateways. The residential character, the pedestrian orientation, and historic quality of the neighborhood must be reflected in the redevelopment along Downing. The gateway design concept is of special note in the light-rail access that extends to the existing station at 3Q'h and Downing. Not only does this station provide direct light-rail access to downtown, it also defines the character of the Whittier neighborhood for all who ride the light rail through this station. In the foreseeable future, the station will be a stop on the connection of light rail to the proposed "air train" that will run to Denver International Airport. Downing will increasingly define the view of the Whittier neighborhood in the years to come. Other gateways to the Whittier Neighborhood include 23rd and Downing, Martin Luther King and Downing, Martin Luther King andY ark, 26th andY ark, and 23rd andY ark Commercial buildings are also scattered throughout the neighborhood, particularly along the three streetcar lines that once extended through Whittier. These uses are concentrated around historic trolley stops rather than extend ing the length of streets. Most of them were small groceries, pharmacies, and candy stores that served the neighborhood residents. In most cases, they continue to operate as marginal retail establishments. Residents note a lack of compatibility between existing businesses and residential uses. In particular, a lack of concern for appearance and maintenance, as well as lack of buffering landscaping, were noted problems Adjacent to Whittier are a number of sites of concern to neighbors. Chief among these are the service station at 26'h andY ark; City Park Golf Course Club House at 25'h andY ark; and the 23n1 andY ork access to City Park and the Zoo. Proposed design and zoning changes of these locations are a concern to the Whittier neighborhood \ Priority Issues: LAND USE AND ZONING

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.. .. .. ,. ,. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ... The process Is working I As one looks in all directions from the Whittier neighborhood, there are major development and redevelopment plans. The renewal of the Cole neighborhood, the extension of the light rail on Downing to the proposed air train, the redevelopment of Curtis Park neighborhood, the major investments in the Uptown neighborhood, and the redevelopment of the City Park Golf Course Club House are but a few examples. In order to maintain a quality residential environment within Whittier, the neighborhood must be vigilant to the unintended effect of the massive public and private investments that are occuring around Whittier. The elimination of low-cost housing in Uptown and Curtis Park could create pressure on the housing available in Whinier. Park design could either encourage bicycle use or discourage it. The placement of group homes in Whittier and adjacent neighborhoods has altered the residential character of several blocks. The opportunity exists in Whittier to become a primary advocate for residential lifestyle within the inner city __ D_U __ SE __ A_N_D __ Z_O_N_I_N_G ___________________________

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.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. Whittier Zonin!! f1,.1ap Priority Issues: Land Use and Zoning

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.. " .. .. .. .. lilt .. .. .. ., .. .. .. .. .. .. ... ... -0 ....... J Schools (Libmy) 2:::::>-01-yt Commercial I Current Land Use J Priority Issues: LAND USE AND ZONING

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.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. I Reviewing the plan Goals: Land Use and Zoning The Whittier Neighborhood is almost fully developed with the exception of several vacant lots. As changes occur, it is important that additions to the neighborhood complement the the existing neighborhood character. The eixsting residential integrity includes an inviting, safe, and comfortable low-density living environment for all residents 1. 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 To maintain the existing residential integrity of the Whittier neighborhood, building an inviting, safe, comfort able low-density environment for all residents To emphasize the potential of Whittier to provide a residential environment for a wide variety of people. To maintain the historic character of the neighborhood and encourage the development of housing that provides a cohesive visual image of the history To preserve areas of historical significance through historic districts, individual landmark designation, and voluntary design standards. (see "Urban Design and Historic Preservation) To mitigate the impacts of non-conforming commercial uses to their adjacent residential neighbors by encour aging renovation To oppose proposed rezoning and changes in use that convert existing residential use to high density residen tial or commercial uses To encourage home ownership by expanding use of Mortgage Bond Programs for first-time homeowners and current renters To encourage neighborhood design review of all new developments, both public and private. To support placing group homes and facilities throughout the city through the City of Denver review process. 10. To establish ongoing relationships between existing group homes and the neighborhood organization 11. To establish ongoing relationships with business uses within Whittier and encourage their participation in the Whittier Neighborhood Association ('-P_r_io_r_it..:cy_I_ss_u_e_s:_L_A_N_D_U_S_E_A_N_D_Z_O_N_I_N_G ______________

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.. Action Chart: Land Use and Zoning .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. # IZ1 ''LZ2 LZ3 LZ4 LZS ''LZ6 LZ7 LZS ''LZ9 IZ10 IZ11 ACTIONS PROJECTS Retain R2 zoning and land use as residential Encourage and support residential development of vacant land that reflects existing design of the neighborhood Encourage effective use and redevelopment of underutilized commercial facilities Oppose the expansion of commercial zones into existing residential zones Encourage the city-wide dispersal of group homes Pursue the designation of historic districts and individual structures Encourage development of commercial zoning north of 26th and Downing as neighborhood retail Support programs that encourage home ownership Support a variety of housing types, including low-income housing, that are compatible with the residential character of the neighborhood Support the city's policy of an equitable distribution of lowincome housing in all Denver neighbothoods Support enforcement of absentee landlords to have agents registered with the Assessment Office Ongoing X X X X X X X .. ''Selected as the neighborhood's highest priorities on June 21,2000 .. .. I Priority Issues: LAND USE AND ZONING TIME --Immediately Short Term Long Term lmplementers Neighborhood, Planning Office Neighborhood, Planning Office X X Neighborhood, Planning Office X Neighborhood, Planning Office Neighborhood, City Council Neighborhood, Planning Office X Neighborhood, Planning Office Neighborhood Neighborhood Neighborhood, Planning Office Neighborhood, Assessment Office 311

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.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. A Queen Anne design .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .... Priority Issue: Urban Design and Historic Preservation The name Whittier is historic. It was selected to honor the nineteenth-century abolitionist poet John Greenleaf Whittier. The name was first used for the Whittier School in the southwest corner of the neighborhood. Given the fact that this neighborhood has been racially integrated since 1895, it makes the name most appropriate as indicative of the role the neighborhood has played in the history of the City of Denver The Whittier street pattern follows a historic design of nearly square blocks typical of the 1860s and 1870s subdivisions. These blocks compose the relatively square area of the Whittier neighborhood. Whittier is one of Denver's oldest residential neighborhoods and includes the first annexation to the original City of Denver in 1874. The developers of Whittier were among Denver's earliest citizens. These pioneers played vigorous roles during the formation of the city as leaders in agriculture, mining, railroading, education, manufacturing, retailing, and government. Among these leaders were: A.B. Case, one of the first settlers in Denver in 1859, was a founder of the University of Denver and a prominent figure in the reform movement in city government. The Case Addition, filed in 1868, was the first subdivision platted in Whittier Jacob W. Downing came to Colorado in 1860 to practice law in Denver. During the Civil War, Downing was a captain in the Colorado Union Volunteers that defeated the confederacy at the Battle of Glorietta Pass, New Mexico. Downing was known as a "father of the city park system," promoting the development of City Park. The Downing Addition, platted in 1869, is the largest subdivision in Whittier Adolph Schinner was a Prussian immigrant who came to Denver in 1860. He annexed the first addition to the new City of Denver. He also opened the city's first bakery. He was a member of the State Legislature, founder of The Colorado Herald newspaper, and member of the first school board George McCullough came to Denver in 1872. He had previously been in the wholesale grocery business and had unsuccessfully explored for oil in Ohio [Priority Issues: URBAN DESIGN AND HISTORIC PRESERVATION

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.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ... Archie C. Fisk moved to Denver after serving in the Union army fighting at Bull Run, Antietam, and Vicksburg, among others Robert H. McMann relocated to Denver in 1876. He operated an insurance and brokerage firm before establishing a loan company William Clayton came to Denver in 1860. In 1868, he was elected Mayor of Denver. George W. Clayton was an early member of the Denver City Council, as well as the Union Water Company and First National Bank. In 1872 the McCullough Addition added eight acres to the Whittier neighborhood. An advertisement described the neighborhood as "beautifully located overlooking the city with glorious view of the mountains." In an 1880 description of Denver, W.H. Vickers described the McCullough's Addition to Whittier as "one of the most attractive and desirable portions of the city for residences, lying high, dry and commanding an extensive and enchanting view of the Rocky Mountains." (11) While many early residents were Anglo-Americans of middle and upper-middle class, African-American residents integrated the neighborhood in the 1890s while working for the Kansas Pacific Railroad, which ran north of the Whittier neighborhood. By 1893, two dozen African-American families lived in northwest Whittier. (12) Whittier's historic qualities and residential character are cornerstones to the sense of community within the neighborhood. The older homes, higher level of craftsmanship, common areas, front-porch designs, mature street trees, and city services combine to make Whittier a potential model of "New Urbanism" in Denver. The Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000 comments on the importance of neighborhood: Our homes are our refuge. For many residents, our home lives extend onto the front porch, down the street, and around the corner. Many residents feel a much stronger bond with their neighborhoods than with the city. ( 13) The Whittier neighborhood embraces this value and encourages residents to participate in block activities For most Denverites, the residential neighborhood provides the major environmental experience. Many older Whittier residents recall vividly and often nostalgically the Whittier of their childhood. Despite the history of segregation and the color line that divided Whittier, their childhoods were associated with early experiences of friendship, marriage, and all the intimate community activities that lend deep emotional significance to the neighborhood I Priority Issues: URBAN DESIGN AND HISTORIC PRESERVATION

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.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. -Looking to the future The Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000 acknowledges Denver's identity as a city is shaped largely by the diversity and evolution of its architectural and landscape styles. Fortunately, some of the architectural heritage of every era remains as part of our civic treasury. But historic preservation has not always been a guiding principle in the city's development. (14) As previously noted, on three occasions the historic significance of Whittier has been acknowledged with little response from the city: In June 197 4, the Colorado Historical Society identified structures in Whittier as historically significant In 1983, the Colorado Historical Society identified 190 neighborhood features that qualify the Whittier neighborhood as eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places In January 1995, the City of Denver Landmark Preservation Commission and the Office of Planning and Community Development issued a report prepared by Front Range Associates identifying a potential historic clistrict on High and Williams streets Unmentioned in the Front Range Associates report was the significant history of race relations. The creation of a historic clistrict on High Street and adjacent streets would preserve the unique residential quality of the neighbor hood and also preserve for generations to come the reality of segregation in our city's history. The High Street alley was the color line that separated the city into black and white neighborhoods. (15) To date, Denver has failed to recognize and designate many significant historical and cultural sites in Whittier. An urgent need exists to preserve that portion of Denver's history as it relates to segregation and integration of the city. Our city, which has always looked toward the future, also has a valuable heritage, which should be protected for future generations. It is a primary goal of this plan to coordinate neighborhood and community leadership in designating eligible clistricts and structures in the Whittier neighborhood @ority Issues: URBAN DESIGN AND HISTORIC PRESERVATION

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.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. -..A. Landmarks See list of potential individually eligible Denver landmarks, page 31 Potcntiul Dcnwr Lnndmurks Source: Ne/ghbor#Jood History Project I Priority Issues: URBAN DESIGN AND HISTORIC PRESERVATION 351

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.. Denver Neighborhood History Project 1993-94 if Potential Denver Landmar Structures -Whittier Neighborhood .. .. STREET ADDRESS HISTORIC NAME E 23rd Avenue andY ork Street St. Ignatius Loyola Church .. 1811-15 E 23rdAvenue .. 1917 E23rdAvenue .. 1941 E 23rd A venue .. 2217-19 E24thAvenue Atkins, Samuel W. .. 1601-15 E25thAvenue Cooke, James, Terrace .. 1739 E29thAvenue Nee, Max, House 2330 Downing Street Holmes, Clarence F.,Jr., House .. 2316 Franklin Street .. 2401 Franklin Street .. 2841 Franklin Street .. 2928 Franklin Street .. 2329 Gaylord Street Webb, Wellington and Wilma, House 2401 Gaylord Street Fowler, AddisonJ., House .. 2539 Gilpin Street Benton House .. 2549 Gilpin Street Ingalls House .. 2557 Gilpin Street .. 2558 Gilpin Street Morrison, George, Sr., House ... 2311 High Street Ryan House .. 2339-43 High Street 2520 High Street Biegel House .. 2352 Humboldt Street .. 2356 Humboldt Street Cooper House .. 2707 Humboldt Street Armstrong House .. 2715 Humboldt Street Dunbar House 2320 Lafayette Street Everett House .. 2448 Lafayette Street Cousins, Charles L., House .. 2610 Lafayette Street .. 2652 Lafayette Street Lamb House .. 2829 Lafayette Street ZintHouse .. .. I Priority Issues: URBAN DESIGN AND HISTORIC PRESERVATION 361 ..

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.. .. .. .. .. .. ... .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. Denver Neighborhood History Project 1993-94 Potential Denver LandmarksWhittier Neighborhood (continued) STREET ADDRESS 2301 Marion Street 2538 Marion Street 2323-29 Race Street 2330-32 Race Street 2401 Race Street 2337 Vine Street 2361 Vine Street 2300 Williams Street 2426 Williams Street 2552 Williams Street 2732 Williams Street Historic Queen Anne residence HISTORIC NAME McClain, T. Ernest, House Goodnow Double House McCloud, Burnis, House Double House Gorham House Sechrist House Holy Redeemer Church Timpte House I Priority Issues: URBAN DESIGN AND HISTORIC PRESERVATION

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.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. -A Queen Anne duplex Recommendations for neighborhood and city cooperation to preserve the historic character of Whittier: The historic "Color Line" that stood longest on High Street should be designated by establishing the High Street Historic District and placing a marker in Thunderbolt Park, where High Street terminates at 3Q'h Avenue Oral histories should be conducted by the Whittier Neighborhood Association and preserved about the neighborhood and its role in the city's history at Ford-Warren Library, which is located at 28'h Avenue and High Street Individual houses should be designated, recognizing their historic residents including artisans, political leaders, jazz performers, and community leaders Pursue the designation of the Whittier neighborhood on the National Register of Historic Places (see map, page 17} Pursue the recommendation that the High and Williams area should be designated a Denver Landmark District (see map, page 17} Establish historic walks through the Whittier neighborhood marking and describing historic sites Urban Design The Whittier neighborhood offers a unique design opportunity. The character of the homes, the neighborhood feeling, and the proximity of parks contribute to increasing property values as individuals renovate their homes The goal of the neighborhood should be to support the Denver Planning Office brochure to encourage voluntary standards for home renovation. These guidelines provide a means of protecting Whittier's historic character while allowing investment in the neighborhood Ensuring high standards for the residential environment is the purpose of the following urban design recommen dations. Through effective design, the existing neighborhood character and sense of community can be enhanced While the Whittier neighborhood is fully developed (with the exception of several isolated residential lots and the commercial sites facing Downing), substantial renovation of homes is occurring throughout the neighborhood The Denver Planning Office has pointed out that a well-designed renovation that respects the original design of the house and takes advantage of relationships with neighboring housing can substantially enhance the neighborhood j Priority Issues: URBAN DESIGN AND HISTORIC PRESERVATION 38]

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._ .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. -Individual Input The primary residential zone in Whittier, R2, includes requirements for property line setbacks, open space, height of structures, and the bulk plane. These requirements define the size, shape, and limit of construction on each home Other design considerations should include: Materials: The original exterior materials should be used whenever possible. Repair should be done wherever possible rather than covering with a new finish material Roof Form: The shape and slope of a structure's roof is an important element in defining the architectural statement. Maintaining the pitch of a roof on all additions will enhance the value of the property Mass: The shape of a structure should be added to in such a way as to ensure a complementary mass to the existing structure Windows and Doors: The size, shape, and placement of windows and doors should be similar to the original in all additions. Avoid placing horizontal windows in a building that has vertical openings Details and Ornamentation: Original ornamentation on a structure should be reproduced on additions to the structure Whittier provides amenities and character that are increasingly understood and valued. Thorough respect for the unique qualities of the neighborhood remodeling can contribute to Whittier's already excep tional qualities I Priority Issues: URBAN DESIGN AND HISTORIC PRESERVATION

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.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. Goals: UrbanDesignandHistoricPreservation Through neighborhood advocacy and adoption of this plan, the Whittier Neighborhood Association intends to provide guidance to residents and private and public sector developments. Encouraging residents, public agen cies, and businesses to enhance their physical facilities is a key of this plan 1. To advocate for historic preservation of the existing neighborhood character 2. To preserve the historic sense of the community for future generations 3. To establish high standards for parks and streetscaping, as they pertain to the neighborhood urban design 4. To encourage the designation of individual historic structures within the neighborhood. (seepp. 36-37} 5. To encourage the designation of a historic district within the neighborhood. {seep. 17} 6. To pursue the listing of the neighborhood on theN ational Register of Historic Places. (seep. 17} 7. To pursue voluntary standards and guidelines for home renovation. (seep. 39} 8. To rename neighborhood association "Historic Whittier Square." I Priority Issues: URBAN DESIGN AND HISTORIC PRESERVATION

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: Action Chart: UrbanDesignandHistoricPreservation .. .. TIME .. # ACTIONS Ongoing Immediately Short Term .. .. .. .. .. ... .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. UDl UD3 UD4 UDS ''"UD6 UD7 UD8 UD9 UD10 ''UDU PROJECTS Support efforts to educate Whittier residents on the importance of local history Rename Whittier Neighborhood Association "Historic Whittier Square" Apply for registration of the entire neighborhood on the National Register of Historic Places Apply for Landmark District for a portion of the neighborhood Encourage eligible individual property owners to X pursue Denver Landmark Designation Encourage the redevelopment of commercial sites to compatible retail services Pursue recognition of the historic role of colorline X in city's history (Whittier as a living classroom) Preserve sandstone sidewalks. Encourage street X lighting for pedestrians Commemorate historic events and individuals through history projects (including oral histories) Identify innovative ways to reflect and celebrate X Whittier history in parks design and use Encourage infill development that reflects New X Urbanism design including front porches, Denver Square scale, and high level of craftsmanship .. ''"Selected as the neighborhood's highest priorities on June 21, 2000 X X -X .. .. I Priority Issues: URBAN DESIGN AND HISTORIC PRESERVATION -X X Long Term lmplementers Neighborhood Neighborhood Neighborhood Neighborhood Neighborhood X Neighborhood Neighborhood -Neighborhood Neighborhood, Colorado Historical Society Neighborhood, Denver Parks Neighborhood, Denver Planning Office 4tl

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.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. A new school day .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. -Priority Issue: Education Whittier neighborhood's concerns and hopes turn on the education of its children. Over 1,400 residents-36% of Whittier's total population-are under 18 years old. People are concerned about their schools but have difficulty communicating their concerns as a neighborhood due to attendance boundaries dividing the area between four elementary schools and three middle schools. The process of drawing attendance boundaries has also required children to cross high-volume streets to attend their assigned elementary schools While all of the schools serving Whittier have developed strategies to improve the educational achievement of their students, specifically to improve literacy as a basic structure for future education, they are all confronting substantial challenges. The best hope for the future is the direct involvement of parents in the education of children of the neighborhood. In the 1997-98 school year Denver schools were released from the court-ordered bussing of 25 years. In the process of drawing attendance areas, the Denver School Board elected to concentrate the most serious education issues in the Manual High School attendance area. The combination of neighborhoods that compose the atten dance area form a wedge shape beginning at 23'd Avenue on the south, extending to a line a mile west of I-25; to Colorado Boulevard on the east; and to the Denver city limit (52nd Avenue) on the north Manual High School is going through a dramatic change in an attempt to address an entirely new set of student needs. Manual recognizes that the success of its restructuring will be dependent on the degree to which it involves the Whittier neighborhood as well as all the other neighborhoods that make up its new attendance area. To ad dress this, Manual has an extensive bilingual program intended to reach students from immigrant families (Mexico and Central America) who are just learning the English language There were 209 students from Whittier attending Manual High School, constituting 20% of the student body in the 1999-2000 school year. All Manual juniors choose one of four Programs of Excellence as their focus for their junior and senior years. In addition to required core classes, students focus on either Math, Science & Medicine; Arts, Humanities & Communication; Cultural Studies, Law & Government Systems; or Business & Entrepreneur ship. These programs are supported by Employer Advisory Councils as well as a School Advisory Council made up of parents from the Manual attendance area __ A_T_IO __ N _____________________________________ 42]

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.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ... .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ... Manual High School All Manual students, starting with the Class of 2001, will be involved in at least 60 hours of volunteer work in the community (service learning) in order to graduate. Manual's Night School offers an alternative evening schedule for dropouts 16 to 21 years old to earn their high school diplomas and find jobs The conversion of Manual High School to a neighborhood school could create a stronger sense of community. It will serve to remind all residents of their common goals of rearing and educating children while creating a gather ing place for neighbors and friends. Manual can become the neighborhood facility used by the greatest number of residents for the widest variety of purposes. In addition to its high-school education function, Manual could become a year-round activity center for sporting events, recreation, meetings, child care, and adult education The Denver Public Schools administration proposal to allow Manual High School and three feeder schools to convert to charters may accomplish many of these goals. At the same time, it is difficult to envision the transition without substantial resources to match the issues confronted within the attendance area created by the Denver School Board. The opportunity to develop a magnet program or charter school is an option that should be con sidered for the future of education in Whittier Neighborhood Schools Denver's elementary and middle schools have considerable flexibility to shape their learning environment to best meet the needs of each of their student bodies. They pride themselves in being built on a "collection of dynamic opportunities for parents, the community, and most of all the students." (16) Whittier neighborhood elementary and middle schools are well into the process of redefining themselves as schools that meet the needs of their students. This process is guided by the Denver School Board, Denver Public Schools Administration, and school-based collaborative decision-making teams. The shaping of safe "walking zones" for children and the creation of programs that sharpen focus by bearing down on areas of academic concern are appropriate concerns of Whittier residents. Parents and residents must be involved in the future of the neighborhood through involvement with its schools Parents need not accept the district's fragmentation of the Whittier neighborhood by attendance areas. It is clear in the district's policies that parents may change schools to match their children's needs with appropriate program ming within the school. It is also advisable to look at the distances traveled and high-volume streets crossed by children in some attendance areas. Special care should be taken for elementary school students required to cross I Priority Issues: EDUCATION 43

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.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. Downing Street on the west and York Street on the east. The district's open enrollment period is in January and February of each year Denver has also authorized four charter schools, one of which is located immediately north of Whittier: Wyatt Edison Charter, at 3620 Franklin Street. Wyatt-Edison has a comprehensive academic program for kindergarten through seventh grade. Students focus on fundamentals of reading and mathematics. The program features an eight-hour school day with support of computer technology Whittier's parents have significant responsibility to identify the appropriate school within Denver Public Schools While the assigned neighborhood school may have appropriate programming, optional schools should be consid ered that help children avoid crossing high-volume streets and utilize focused programs and extended days The Middle schools that serve Whittier include: Cole Middle School.. .. located at 3240 Humboldt Street Gove Middle School .... located at 4050 E. 14'h Avenue. Morey Middle School .... located at 840 E. 14'h Avenue The Elementary Schools that serve Whittier include: Whittier Elementary School .... located at 2480 Downing Street Gilpin Elementary School .... located at 2949 California Street Columbine Elementary School .... located at 2925 W. 40'h Avenue. Mitchell Elementary School .... located at 1350 E. 33ro Avenue Loyola Elementary School .... located at 24th and Gaylord is within Whittier and is a parochial school supported by the St. Ignatius Loyola Catholic Church The Whittier neighborhood is a crossroads of educational options at the elementary and middle-school grades The attendance areas that divide Whittier among two high schools, three middle schools and four elementary schools do not provide optimum service to Whittier families. Many elementary school students are required to cross high-volume streets with traffic exceeding 18,000 cars per day. By working with the school district, the number of students served by schools in closer proximity or within the neighborhood can be increased I Priority Issues: EDUCATION

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.. .. .. , .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. Elcmrnt:tl")' Slhool Attendance Ana\ I Priority Issues: EDUCATION Source. Denver Public Schools

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.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ; .. .. .. .. .. -Middle School Attendance Areas Middle School Attendance Areas I Priority Issues: EDUCATION Source: Denver Public Schools

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.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. Goals: Education In implementing this plan, establish communication with public and private schools to improve the quality of education available to all children of Whittier. The following specific goals and action items are intended to ensure a neighborhood distribution to a future of quality education 1. To provide a neighborhood educational environment where academic achievement is the highest priority 2. To encourage the Denver School Board to review the current attendance areas and revise the boundary lines, reducing the number of of children required to cross high traffic-volume streets 3. To encourage the Denver School Board to create a community school facility at Manual High School, includ ing adult education, recreation, and day care programs 4. To encourage Denver School Board to develop joint programs with local colleges and universities for collegebound students at Manual High School. 5. To establish mentorship program with Whittier Elementary 6. To support individual students with academic scholarships funded by the neighborhood j Priority Issues: Education

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: Action Chart: Education # ACTIONS Ongoing PROJECTS fEDl Encourage the development of a Learning Center at Manual High School including Community College of Denver ED2 Encourage the development of technical education options at Manual High School fED3 Encourage all residents-including those who are X not parents-to participate in school issues ED4 Encourage school district to provide funding at schools appropriate to education issues within the attendance area ED5 Open school facilities for greater community use. Expand the community school concept for all schools ED6 Explore charter school and magnet school options at all Whittier Neighborhood Schools ED7 Encourage community service and outreach programs to connect students, parents and X schools to the Whittier neighborhood fED8 Establish mentorship programs to create contact with youth in the neighborhood throughout their X academic careers .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. fSelected as the neighborhood's highest priorities on June 21,2000 I Priority Issues: EDUCATION TIME Immediately Short Term Long Term lmplementers Neighborhood, X Denver Public Schools X Neighborhood, Denver Public Schools Neighborhood, Denver Public Schools Neighborhood, X Denver Public Schools X Neighborhood, Denver Public Schools X Neighborhood, Denver Public Schools Neighborhood, Denver Public Schools Neighborhood, Denver Public Schools

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.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. -Priority Issue: Public Safety and Health Police Protection The issue of crime in the neighborhood and the public's perception of crime reflects the community's attitude towards Whittier. While the neighborhood and the District 2 office of the police department have a good working relationship, crime prevention would benefit from a stronger police presence in the neighborhood. The most effective step to curb and reduce crime in Whittier has been the establishment of programs encouraging effective police/neighborhood relations. Neighborhood Watch programs have been successful in parts of Whinier. Addi tional blocks are urged to work with the District 2 police department to establish active programs Whittier is located in Police District 2, which includes northeast Denver. The District 2 police station is located east of Whittier at 3555 Colorado Blvd. According to the Denver Police Department, the 1999 rate of crimes against persons and property for each 1,000 people in Whittier was 75,25. This number is down by 7.9% as compared to 1990 The Denver Department of Public Safety, which includes the Denver Police, Fire, and Sheriffs departments, is committed to neighborhood safety through partnership, prevention, and problem-solving. The recommendations in this plan emphasize building positive relationships with the Department of Public Safety to partner against crime and improve the quality of life for the citizens of the Whittier neighborhood. The plan envisions neighbors and officials of the City working together to identify problems of mutual concern. The focus of the relationship between the neighborhood and the Department of Public Safety must emphasize youth in many of the partner ships. Existing programs such as Weed and Seed, Safe Havens, Victim Assistance Unit, Domestic Violence Unit, HUD Drug Elimination Project, Citizen Academy, and Volunteers in Policing are programs designed to create a sense of safety for the Whittier neighborhood. The Denver Department of Public Safety has provided substantial support to the Whittier Neighborhood Plan, including providing Mission Statements and programs available to the neighborhood (see Appendix C) Physical Health Because of the pauciety of health data and indicators at the neighborhood level, in 1998 Denver Health Medical Center established an advisory committee to develop health profiles and indicators for the Denver Enterprise I Priority Issues: PUBLIC SAFETY AND HEALTH

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-.. rf .. .. ,; ,; .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. Community's 11 neighborhoods-Cole, Five Points, Globeville, Highland, Auraria!Lincoln Park, Sun Valley, Valverde, Clayton, Whittier, Skyland, and Westwood. Because the number of events reported on public health documents for each neighborhood can be very small, a clearer picture emerges of the health differences between the Enterprise Community and the rest of Denver when all of the EC neighborhoods are grouped together for analysis. Residents from the Enterprise Community have a higher percentage of their deaths occurring due to certain causes than is true for the rest of Denver. The EC has a higher percentage of deaths than the remainder of Denver due to homicide (3.1% vs. 1.2%), infant mortality (2.9% vs. 1.3%), liver disease (1.2% vs. 0.6%), child mortality (0.8% vs. 0.5%), diabetes (2.7% vs. 1.7%), motor vehicle accidents (2.1% vs. 1.6%), and firearms (2.7% vs. 1.9%). Conversely, the EC neighborhoods have a lower percentage of their total deaths compared to the rest of Denver due to heart disease (20.9% vs. 23.4%), stroke (5.2% vs. 5.9%), suicide (1.4% vs. 2.2%), and HIV (1.9% vs. 3.4%) Between 1993 and 1997, residents of the EC neighborhoods had a greater percentage of their births associated with problems than did the residents of the remaining Denver neighborhoods. During this time period, an average of 23% of all births in the EC were to teens and 51% to unmarried women compared to 14% to teens and 35% to unmarried women in the rest of Denver. In addition, 12% of the EC babies were low birth-weight compared to 10% low birth-weight babies in the rest of Denver Two other measures using birth and death data are good indicators of the health of a community: leading causes of death and average age of death. Heart disease, cancer, and stroke are the leading causes of death (greatest frequency) in the EC and the remainder of Denver. The average age of death from all causes and for the leading causes is younger in the EC than in the rest of Denver. Between 1993-1997, the average age of death in the EC from all causes was 64.2 years compared to 70.1 years in the remainder of Denver. The Mayor recently received and endorsed the recommendations in the report, Healthy Communities, Healthy Denver, of the Denver Health Benchmarking Project in the summer of 2000. The second phase of that project got underway in late October. The specific action steps need to be determined but may include expanding the project citywide from the Enterprise Community neighborhoods, working with the EC neighborhoods to address priority health needs, expanding data collection and analysis efforts, identifying additional benchmarks and indicators, and institutionalizing the health benchmarking project within the city government I Priority Issues: PUBLIC SAFETY AND HEALTH so 1

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4 4 .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. "' "' "' "' "' "' "' .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. Fire Protection The Whittier neighborhood is served by Fire Station #3, located at 2500 Washington in the adjacent neighborhood west of Downing. Elderly and low-income residents can receive smoke alarms by applying to the fire station at no cost by contacting the Fire Department Education program at 303-286-4966 I Priority Issues: PUBLIC SAFETY AND HEALTH 51 I

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.. .. ., .. -Goals: Public Safety and Health Public safety is the desired effect of a good quality of life in our neighborhood. Improving the quality of life for the whole neighborhood through building connections with public safety agencies will be achieved through the following: 1. Continue to reduce crime and perception of crime to a level where residents feel safe in their homes, parks, and on the streets 2. Improve security for residents in their homes through information and education provided in Whittier Neigh borhood Association meetings 3. Improve pedestrian lighting in parks, near schools, and on neighborhood streets. 4. Provide a regular forum on safety for the more vulnerable members of the community: disabled, elderly, and children 5. Support efforts to establish Neighborhood Watch programs 6. Support efforts to identify problem addresses 7. Support a stronger police presence, including bicycle patrols and extended tours of duty to promote officers' familiarity with residents 8. Support improved communication among youths, parents, schools, and police in the neighborhood. 9. Support Denver Health Medican Center's efforts to provide health information within the neighborhood I Priority Issues: PUBLIC SAFETY AND HEALTH

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.. Action Chart: Public Safety and Health .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 4 .. # PS2 PS3 PS4 PS5 PS7 PS9 ACTIONS Ongoing PROJECTS Establish Neighborhood Watch programs on X majority of blocks Report problem addresses to District 2 police X Improve street lighting; encourage neighbors to X keep porch lights on every evening Design and maintain parks to optimize security Encourage organized activities in parks Work with the Denver Police Department District 2 to establish an effective police/ X community relations program Control criminal activity in all locations including X alleys Inventory risk factors such as apartment buildings, businesses, and alleys with frequent crime X reports Develop effective programs to cooperate with X Denver Partners Against Grafitti as the neighborhood's highest priorities on June 21,2000 .. I Priority Issues: PUBLIC SAFETY AND HEALTH TIME Immediately Short Term Long Term lmplementers Neighborhood, Denver Police Neighborhood, Denver Police Neighborhood, Denver Police X Neighborhood, Parks Department X Neighborhood Neighborhood, Denver Police Neighborhood, Denver Police Neighborhood, Denver Police Neighborhood, Public Works

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.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. Ford-Warren Library .. .. .. .. .. Priority Issue: Community Services With its unique location, demographics, and history, the neighborhood has developed a distinctive set of condi tions and issues that contribute to the definition of community needs in Whittier Whittier is home to several social services facilities, including Gilliam Juvenile Hall and group homes. The concen tration of facilities focused on delinquency may become a self-fulfilling prophecy; the more facilities of this type provided within the neighborhood, the more the neighborhood is associated with the underlying issues. The concern of residents is that group home facilities will be over-concentrated in Whittier based on the proximity to the Gilliam Juvenile Hall The Ford-Warren Branch Library located at 28'h Avenue and High Street has 38,000 volumes with a circulation approaching 100,000 books annually. The library's location near Manual High School, Red Shield Center, and Fuller Park make it an ideal facility for civic and neighborhood meetings. It provides free access to the Internet and could be the center of neighborhood activities in conjunction with the proposed community center The Whittier Neighborhood Association has been awarded $318,000 by the City of Denver for a neighborhood community center. Its design and location will be a key element in the future of the neighborhood. By placing this new facility in the complex defined by Manual High School, Fuller Park, Ford-Warren Library, Red Shield Community Center, and Thunderbolt Park, a "campus" of recreational, cultural, and educational facilities could be created A number of community services are provided by nonprofit organizations and churches in the neighborhood These services represent a significant resource that has not been fully utilized due to a lack of information regard ing the support provided. Identification and listing of these services are key to their expanded use. Several meth ods have been suggested for the listing of these services, including a neighborhood Web site In January 2000, the Center for Human Investment Policy, University of Colorado at Denver, completed the "Healthy Communities" Denver Health Benchmarking Project. This report included the Whittier neighborhood The report's summary is attached as Appendix B j __ O_M_M __ UN __ I_TY __ S_E_R_V_I_C_E_S ___________________________ si]

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.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ... .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .... Goals: Community Services To improve communication within the neighborhood while enhancing the quality of life for the whole community through services, establish a Web site for continuing outreach and information about services 1. To improve the quality of life for all who live in Whittier by filling gaps in services and building effective partnerships 2. To implement the Neighborhood Center currently budgeted at $318,000 3. To implement the Whittier Neighborhood Plan and support city projects that support the plan 4. To develop a neighborhood Web site to enhance communication I Priority Issues: COMMUNITY SERVICES ssl

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.. ., Action Chart Community Services ., ., ., ri fll ri ri ri .; .; ri "' .. ... .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. # fCSl CS2 CS4 css fCS6 fCS7 CS8 CS9 CS10 ACTIONS PROJECTS Identify site for Neighborhood Center; secure funding from City of Denver Create contact list for emergency services-food, shelter, and medical care-and make available on Website Develop human services-e.g., job training, language classes, and recreation Work with churches to identify community services provided Develop memorandum of understanding with other neighborhood groups and communitybased organizations Establish Planning Steering Committee for Neighborhood Plan implementation Work with City Council representative to track the implementation of the Neighborhood Plan Support process of project reviews with city agencies Work with tenants to assist in making multifanilly housing a more active part members of the Whittier Neighborhood Association Develop a neighborhood Web site listing services Ongoing X X X X X X X X .. fSelected as the neighborhood's highest priorities on June 21,2000 .. .. I Priority Issues: COMMUNITY SERVICES .... TIME Immediately Short Term Long Term lmplementers X Neighborhood, City of Denver X Neighborhood, Nonprofit Organizations Neighborhood, Denver Public Schools, CCD Neighborhood, Churches Neighborhood Neighborhood, Denver Planning Office Neighborhood Neighborhood Neighborhood Neighborhood

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.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 4 Whittier playground and historic gate .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ... Priority Issue: Parks and Open Space The Whittier neighborhood is fortunate to have five parks within its boundary and City Park and the City Park Golf Course along its eastern border. The greenspace, along with the large number of mature trees, enriches the historic qualities of the neighborhood. Both Fuller Park and City Park, two of the oldest parks in the city, reflect the legacy of Denver's early leaders and builders who left the city a system of well-designed parks and parkways, as well as a tradition of excellence in urban design and architecture. The intention of this plan is to sustain this legacy and rehabilitate Whittier's parks into places that celebrate its history. The focus of these efforts is to reflect Whittier's history and the diversity of its residents and provide functional, safe, attractive recreational features through quality park designs The neighborhood planning process revealed the area's cultural values and suggested steps to honor their signifi cance. These values and historical associations such a5 the commemoration of historical events or significant people are the unifying theme for the parks in the neighborhood. Reflecting the historic connections in the parks would establish a distinctive identity for each park. Each park would also complement the others in the community with a diverse range of activities and facilities All but one of the parks were named after a person who contributed significantly to the history of the city or the history relevant to the cultural themes represented in the neighborhood. Each park should, in future develop ment, include educational exhibits to explain the significance of the person the park was named after. Fuller Park 29th & Williams-The planning process identified Fuller Park as an important potential focal point in neighborhood that should be upgraded to reflect its key role in the community 1he Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000 identifies a fixd pointtJS arry easily rerognizedameniJ:y that helps create and define a The park is the second oldest park in the city, donated on November 8'h, 1879, by Horace Fuller. The Denver Urban Renewal Authority expanded the park in the 1970s with the acquisition of three acres. Today, Fuller Park has fallen in disrepair and generally compares unfavorably to other Denver parks. Maintenance funding has not kept up with the park's needs and has been a continuing source of concern for residents I Priority Issues: PARKS AND OPEN_S_P_A_C_E ______________ 5___,71

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.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 4 "' .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. -Currently, plans are underway by the Denver Department of Parks and Recreation to redesign and upgrade Fuller Park. The vision for the park's future is to create a community square for neighborhood events and activities and develop high quality recreational facilities that meet the needs of the neighborhood. A park shelter and outdoor event area, restrooms, picnic areas, and play structures will be incorporated in the design. A strong architectural theme for the new park structures will create a distinctive park identity. The park structures would reflect the architectural detailing of the historic houses surrounding the park. A kiosk structure would be included in the park redevelopment for community postings and maps, and could also contain information on the history of the neighborhood To strengthen the relationship ofthe park to the community, connections could be created between Manual High School and the neighborhood through formal and informal programs and facilities. Opportunities such as devel oping outdoor classrooms, summer recreation programs, outdoor performance areas for school bands, and other activities could be planned to establish a stronger connection to the park. Projects such as an "Adopt-a-Park" program could be developed to involve the community in park clean-up and planting improvements. "Arts in the Parks" is another program that could be developed to offer cultural opportunities for Whittier residents Williams Park 30'h & LafayetteWilliams Park was developed in the 1970s by the Denver Urban Renewal program. It was named after Dr. Daniel Hale Williams (1856-1931) Dr. Daniel Hale Williams was a pioneer surgeon who in 1893 performed the first open-heart surgery. In 1891 he founded the Provident Hospital and Medical Center in Chicago, the oldest freestanding African-American owned hospital in the United States. Dr. Williams was the only African-American in a group of 100 charter members of the American College of Surgeons in 1913. He founded and became the first vice-president of the National Medi cal Association The park offers a playground, basketball courts, and picnic sites. Current park improvements include upgrading the asphalt basketball court with concrete paving and eliminating an asphalt-paved area to convert more of the park into greenspace. Also, while the playground is relatively new and serves children 4 to 10 years old, it does not meet current Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) standards. The playground should be upgraded to meet these standards. To commemorate Dr. Williams, an outdoor educational exhibit should be installed with bio graphical information on his historical significance I Priority Issues: PARKS AND OPEN SPACE ssl

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.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. Douglass Park 3Q'h & Franklin-Douglass Park was developed in the same era as Williams Park and provides another playground within two blocks of Williams and Thunderbolt parks. The playground is over 20 years old, and most of the equipment is unsafe by today's standards. The park was named for abolitionist orator Frederick Douglass Frederick Douglass has been called the father of the civil rights movement. He rose through determination, bril liance, and eloquence to shape the American nation. He was an abolitionist, human rights and women's rights activist, orator, author, journalist, publisher, and social reformer. Committed to freedom, Douglass dedicated his life to achieving justice for all Americans, in particular AfricanAmericans, women, and minority groups. He envi sioned America as an inclusive nation strengthened by diversity and free of discrimination Two of Douglass' sons lived in Denver and helped promote education for African-Americans. To connect the park to its historical associations to Douglass, African-American themes would be integrated in the redevelopment plans. The goal for upgrading the park is to develop a tot play area for children six years of age and under. This age group is not well served by the existing playgrounds in the community. Images from African-American folk tales could be integrated into the playground to reflect the oral traditions of African-American cultural heritage In addition, outdoor educational exhibits could be situated in the park to inform residents of the historic themes Douglass represents Thunderbolt Park 30th and High-The infrastructure of Thunderbolt is fairly elaborate and in good condition with concrete walks, brick seatwalls, and ornamental fencing. Existing play equipment is outdated, however, and should be replaced to bring the park up to quality design standards. The park offers opportunities for developing an area for educational displays. It is ideally located to interpret the history of racial integration in the neighborhood. High Street, which terminates at the park, was historically known as the "color line" in the community There is interest in re-naming the park after a significant historic figure to be consistent with the other park names in the neighborhood. One idea is to name the park after Dr. Clarence Holmes Jr. Dr. Holmes, a dentist, lived in the neighborhood at 2330 Downing. He became known as the "father of integration in Colorado" because of his leadership and contributions to the civil rights movement I Priority Issues: PARKS AND OPEN SPACE

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.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ... Morrison Park Morrison Park extends along five blocks of Martin Luther KingJ r. Blvd between High and Lafayette streets. The park was named after George Morrison Sr., (1891-197 4) an early pioneer in jazz music who lived in Denver. Morrison played violin in vaudeville, wrote music published by W.C. Handy, made recordings for Columbia Records, and did a command performance for the King and Queen of England with his orchestra. Even though Morrison was internationally recognized for his outstanding talent (Fritz Kreisler, the famed violinist, praised Morrison's musicianship and promoted his career), he couldn't play forthe Denver Symphony Orchestra because he was black. However, he formed his own orchestra performing popular music and played with such notables as Duke Ellington and Count Basie. He also taught violin in his Whittier home to children who could not afford music lessons. He also helped launch the careers of other notable jazz musicians such as Paul White The linear park is connected with a meandering pedestrian path through its lawns and trees. Several picnic sites are scattered along the way. There are no other formal recreational facilities in the park. Humboldt, Franklin, Gilpin, and Williams end in cui-de-sacs at the park. One concept for this park is to incorporate sculptures or educational exhibits at the terminus of the cui-de-sacs representing neighborhood cultural themes. An exhibit commemorat ing George Morrison Sr. and his contributions to the city would be appropriate. Flower beds would also be in cluded as part of the commemorative display. This would be particularly appropriate at Gilpin, where a focal feature could be visually connected with the architectural features proposed for Fuller Park. The entire length of the walkway is in very poor condition and needs replacement. An idea for the new walkway is to incorporate quotes from Martin Luther King Jr. and/ or quotes from George Morrison's songs in the pavement Recreation Centers The Red Shield Community Center, located at 2915 High Street and operated by the Salvation Army, is the only community recreation facility in the Whittier neighborhood. It offers recreational programs for residents ages 7 and older. While this facility is centrally located within Whittier, utilization is limited by hours of operation and funding Two city recreation centers are located in adjacent neighborhoods: St. Charles is located at 3777 Lafayette Street, and Glenarm Recreation Center is located at 2800 Glenarm Place. The Glenarm Place center houses a weight room and an indoor pool. I Priority Issues: PARKS AND OPEN SPACE

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.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ,-------------------------------------------WHITTIER PARKS MAP Commcmomte George Morrison and jazz music Replace asphalt walks with concrete Add puhlic art feature at Oil pin tcnninus Commcmomtc Dr. Daniell laic Willimns Replace Basketball Court Upgmde playgmund to meet ADA standunls Commcmomtc Frederick Dougla .. ">s Playground upgrade for tots (6 years ami under) to address needs of surrounding day care centers GILPIN STREETSCAPE IMPROVEMENTS' Trct'S. benches, new curbs. street lighting FULLER PARK Rchahilitate playground fur older children (6+ years tlld) Neg:hborhood Amenities: "town square'' and shelter. kiosk. paths Replace Daskctball Court Replace Restroom<> THUNDERBOLT PARK Needs play equipment Commemorate Neighborhood history Interpret the "color line" with educntion.d exhibits Not on park land [Priority Issues: PARKS AND OPEN SPACE 61

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.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ... Goals: Parks and Open Space Improve and maintain parks in the neighborhood to meet the needs of residents and to support enhanced recre ation opportunities. To provide improved bike and pedestrian links between existing parks and schools 1. Design programs that will enhance the neighborhood's use of its parks. 2. Work with the Parks and Recreation Department to re-assess design and connections between existing landmarks. 3. Improve public awareness of recreational facilities 4. Connect bicycle access, parks, schools, recreation, and the libraries in an integrated parks and open space plan. 5. Monitor condition of parks and open space and take action to improve facilities 6. Cooperate in the redesign of Fuller Park to a true neighborhood facility and town square 7. Adopt Fuller Park as the Whittier Town Square, providing annual improvements from the neighborhood 8. Institute appropriate land use control for all parks and cultural institutions to assure parking requirements associated with use 9. Highlight Whittier's history through historic signage and markers in parks I Priority Issues: PARKS AND OPEN SPACE

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Action Chart: Parks and Open Space ri ri ri ., ., ., .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ... # ACTIONS Ongoing PROJECTS ''Pl Improve Fuller Park to enhance its ability to serve as a neighborhood park P2 Improve the linkage between Fuller Park and nearby small parks P3 Explore joint use agreement for parks with Whittier Elementary and Manual High School P4 Explore expanded use of Red Shield Center recreation programs ''PS Expand use of Glenarm Recreation Facility by Whittier residents P6 Improve signage for parks and bike routes P7 Prepare brochure on parks and recreation facilities P8 Encourage shared use of school grounds and parks :p9 Monitor condition of parks, reporting regularly X to the Denver Parks Department '-P10 Develop visual and pedestrian linkages between parks and historic walks ''Selected as the neighborhood's highest priorities on June 21,2000 I Priority Issues: PARKS AND OPEN SPACE TIME Immediately Short Term Long Term lmplementers X Neighborhood, Denver Parks Dept. X Neighborhood, Public Works X Neighborhood, Denver Parks Dept. X Neighborhood, Red Shield Community Center X Neighborhood, Denver Parks Dept. X Neighborhood, Public Works, Denver Park Dept X Neighborhood X Neighborhood, DPS, Denver Parks Dept Neighborhood X Neighborhood, Denver Parks Dept.

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.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. -Neighborhood dell and market Priority Issue: Economic Development -Employment Although the 2000 U.S. Census has not been completed, it will undoubtedly show the employment picture for Whittier has changed dramatically. As the neighborhood's residential character has stabilized, the number of jobs within the neighborhood have fallen by 23% from 1990 to 1996. This trend will likely continue through the year 2000. At the same time, the Denver economy has prospered at an unprecedented rate. (16) In the new economy based on information and technology, the Whittier neighborhood has an economic interest in assisting all of its residents in refining their technical and computer skills. As the Denver economy continues to prosper, one irrefutable rule appears clear: The future workplace will require workers ready with technical skills Whittier must continue to work with Manual High School, the Community College of Denver, and the City of Denver in removing obstacles for careers in technical fields. This includes persuading students and the community that well-paying careers are available for those who focus their talents on programs that can be made available in the neighborhood. The booming economy and desperate need among Denver employers for skilled workers should be the driving force pushing Whittier's youth, unemployed, and under-employed toward training for rewarding careers The City of Denver, represented by the Career Service Authority, has expressed a willingness to partner with the Whittier neighborhood to address the need for an increased number of job candidates. The Career Service Authority has several programs that are now underutilized. The city's Apprenticeship Program, Career Service Train ing Program, and Intern Program all have potential for helping the city meet its labor needs while providing oppor tunities for city agencies to reach out to residents. These targeted programs could be utilized as follows: Apprenticeship Program: This program provides an opportunity for employees to attend school part time while working in a trade such as carpentry, electrical, plumbing, and related trades work. Denver's Education Refund program provides up to $2,000 annually for employees completing course requirements for journey level completion and certification in one of the trade areas. In addition to the educational assistance provided to our apprentice population, the city anticipates growth in all trade job categories over the next few years. Participants in this program increase their opportunity for permanent appointments Internship Program: This program has achieved success over the years, yet it is not utilized to its highest potential. Internships provide college-level students part-time work opportunities, usually in the same career discipline that the student is preparing for through training I Priority Issues: ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Employment 64]

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.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ... Career Service Training Program: This program was a model in the late 1970s for increasing participation in the city workforce on a noncompetitive basis. Although there are specific program guidelines, Whittier residents may meet the requirements for entry into city employment via this training program Through these programs and cooperation with Manual High School and the Neighborhood Association, the Career Service Authority can create employment opportunities closer to the neighborhood A number of vacant commercial properties and non-conforming commercial properties are located within the Whittier neighborhood. Development and expansion of these properties could enhance the retail services pro vided to residents while improving entry-level employment opportunities Goals:EconomicDeoc/opment-Emplayment The major goals of economic development is to sustain the Whittier neighborhood by stimulating employment opportunities for neighborhood residents. The purpose of the following objectives is to create model programs for employment 1. Pursue cooperative agreements with the City of Denver Career Service Authority to encourage employment opportunities for Whittier residents 2. Pursue cooperation between Manual High School and Whittier for community service employment for students 3. Encourage existing businesses to employ local residents 4. Encourage retail services in existing non-conforming commercial buildings 5. Support the development of education and training programs of Whittier residents to qualify them for em ployment \ Priority Issues: ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Employment

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.. Action Chart:Economic/Jevelopment-Emplayment .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ,.. .. .. # *E2 E3 E4 :-E6 ACTIONS Ongoing PROJECTS Inventory and evaluate vacant properties in order to recruit neighborhood businesses Encourage joint development of an education center at Manual High School in cooperation with Community College of Denver Encourage cooperative development of a City of Denver Career Service Center in the neighborhood Pursue grants to provide educational training X programs and employment opportunities in the neighborhood Cooperate in youth employment programs and business incubators for entry-level employment Encourage businesses to participate in Whittier Neighborhood Association to promote local use X of businesses 1 :-selected as the neighborhood's highest priorities on June 21,2000 TIME Immediately Short Term X X .. .. .. .. I Priority Issues: ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Employment -Long Term lmplementers Neighborhood Neighborhood, Denver Public Schools, CCD Neighborhood, X Career Service Authority Neighborhood X Neighborhood Neighborhood

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Priority Issue: Traffic and Transportation Streets are our most comprehensive system of transportation and the city's most land-intensive and expensive public investment. It is reasonable to expect them to be safe, convenient, and attractive for pedestrians and bicy clists, as well as motorists. Our streets should be designed to encourage alternatives to driving including walking, biking, and bus service. This means controlling traffic speed and adding stop signs, bike lanes, cross walks, pedes trian lighting, and signage. Traffic speed is a safety issue for all citizens in Whittier, especially for children walking and playing in the neigh borhood. Speeding cars are a threat that diminishes the residential character of the neighborhood. The number of children required to cross the high-volume streets of York, Downing, and Martin Luther King to attend their assigned elementary schools is an ongoing concern for Whittier families. (See maps on p. 4 5 and p. 70.} From an overall transportation planning aspect, the Whittier neighborhood has a fairly desirable street system, since the major traffic carriers are on the periphery of the neighborhood, namely Downing on the West, York on the east, Martin Luther King/31st A venue on the north and 23rd on the south. Only 29th Avenue introduces traffic into the neighborhood due to its connection to Welton Street ending the downtown grid. There are no major north-south roadways channelling traffic into the interior of the neighborhood. Capacity limitations on Downing and 23rd and the lack of continuity for Y ark to the north and 23rd to the west limit traffic volumes both adjacent to and entering the neighborhood. From an overall traffic perspective, Whittier is protected from the normal impacts of traffic, particularly one located fairly close to the central business district. Mass Transit {see map on p. 68) Whittier is served by bus routes and has access on its western edge to light rail at Downing Street and 30th Avenue. This service is eventually planned to extend north on Downing and connect to the "air train," which will run to D.I.A. Bus service includes two north-south routes, #12 on Downing Street and #24 on York Street. East-West routes include #43 on Martin Luther King Boulevard; #32 on 23rd Avenue; and #28 extending east from Downing to Williams, south to 28th and then east. The Cultural Connection trolley links downtown and City Park arts facilities with a stop at 23rd andY ork. The neighborhood is not well served by mass transit on the south side. Currently Route 28 has been suggested for cancellation by R TD. I Priority Issues: TRAFFIC AND TRANSPORTATION

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4 rl rl rl rl rl rl rl .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ... Bus Routes ----l'r--RTD Bus Routes J Priority Issues: TRAFFIC AND TRANSPORTATION

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.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 06 l'npo,;ed Routt 4----t> 011 Bike I Priority Issues: TRAFFIC AND TRANSPORTATION

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.. .. Traffic Volume Date .. .. A 8,200 1979 .. .. B 8,050 1979 7,355 1997 .. .. c 11,600 1979 .. 14,694 1997 .. D 6,400 1979 .. 7,500 1998 .. .. E 15,100 1979 .. 17,333 1997 .. F 5,600 1979 .. .. G 6,750 1979 .. H 5,700 1979 .. 10,200 1991 .. .. I 5,050 1979 .. 4,597 1991 .. J 3,824 1979 .. 3,650 1996 .. .. .. .. .. Whittier Traffic Volumes Source: Denver Public Works .. .. I Priority Issues: TRAFFIC AND TRANSPORTATION -

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"' .. .. .. .. ... .. .. .. 4 .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. Bike Routes (see map on p. 69} Whittier is included in the city-wide bikeway system. The present bike routes include D6 on 29th Avenue east and west, DB on 22nd Avenue from Downing to High Street, then south to 21" running east and west, and D 11 on Franklin and Lafayette north and south. As a whole, Whittier lacks a completely interconnected network of designated bicycle paths and lanes. The Traffic and Transportation recommendations suggest an improved network including connections to schools, parks, and other adjacent bike routes in City Park. Additional bike routes could include Martin Luther King Blvd from High Street to Lafayette within Morrison Park; High Street south to 24th then east to Loyola school at Gaylord; Lafayette to 28th Avenue In many locations, bicycle paths could be included in the design of the neighborhood parks, thereby increasing park useage. Bike racks should be installed at all all schools, parks, public buildings, and commercial buildings Traffic Volumes (see map on p. 70} Automobile traffic volumes have remained relatively stable over the past decade. This stability is due in part to the neighborhood's stable population and increasing utilization of mass transit. The primary concern is speeding traffic in and around the neighborhood. Every effort must be made by the residents to secure the cooperation of the Police and Traffic Engineering departments in slowing traffic throughout the neighborhood. Areas where cutthrough traffic and speeding traffic is an issue should be identified for monitoring efforts by the Traffic Engineers or Police Department. Additional stop signs may not be the best solution to slow traffic Pedestrian As a whole, the neighborhood enjoys an interconnected network of pedestrian walks. This network could be improved by enhancing the crosswalks adjacent to schools, libraries, and parks. Crosswalk design should include redesigned intersections restricting the street cross section and shortening the crosswalks. Clear pedestrian walk ways connect the neighborhood's five parks. This pedestrian loop could include historic markers and exercise facilities within the parks. Ramps at every corner will improve handicap access and encourage parents with strollers to use sidewalks. Ramps at all arterial and collector street intersections should be prioritized. Local residential street intersections should be installed where there are individuals with disabilities or services provided for individuals with disabilities I Priority Issues: TRAFFIC AND TRANSPORTATION nl

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.. .. .. ... .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. Goals: Traffic and Transportation To improve traffic control to create a safe and efficient transportation system that encourages pedestrian and bicycle usage while supporting mass transit options. 1. Encourage walking, biking, and mass-transit use by providing clearly marked, safe, convenient pedestrian and bicycle connections. 2. Reduce traffic speeds on neighborhood streets to posted speed limits 3. Increase safe and efficient bicycle connections throughout the neighborhood with an emphasis on access to mass transit, schools, libraries, and parks I Priority Issues: TRAFFIC AND TRANSPORTATION

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.; Action Chart: Traffic and Transportation .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. # ACTIONS Ongoing PROJECTS "'ft Encourage walking, bicycling and mass-transit use X T2 Work with schools to encourage programs for X walking and bicycling to schools T3 Expand neighborhood bike route system X T4 Create designated walkways connecting parks X and historic sites :Ts Notify police of speeding traffic; X support reduced speed ''T6 Evaluate existing traffic signage for more stop signs to discourage cut -through traffic X T7 Develop crosswalks and 4-way stops T8 Street by Street recommendations: I. Sidewalk ramps at intersections on major arterial streets and collector streets and at special-needs intersections 2 4-way stops recommended for intersections where grade changes in street shorten line of sight, e.g., 25th at High to 25th at Gaylord and 26th to 29th and Williams to Humboldt 3. Create safe school wnes in coorperation with Traffic Engineering Department to slow traffic: a. MLK Blvd. from High to Lafayette b. Downing, 24'h Ave. to 25m Ave. c. 25"' Ave., Lafayette to Downing d. 25"' Ave. and York to Gaylord 4. Cooperate with City and County of Denver on the Marcin Luther King Beautification Project 5 Allow le& tums from York St. atMLK Blvd. ''Selected as the netghborhood's htghest pnonttes on June 21,2000 I Prioritylssues:TRAFFICANDTRANSPORTATION TIME Immediately Short Term long Term lmplementers Neighborhood, RID, Public Works Neighborhood, DPS Neighborhood, Public Works Neighborhood, Denver Parks Dept Neighborhood, Denver Police Neighborhood, Public Works X Neighborhood, Public Works X Neighborhood, Public Works

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.. ... tl A VIctorian house .. .. .. ,. .. .. .. .. .. .. : .. ... .. .. .... Priority Issue: Neighborhood Environtnent The overall residential neighborhood environment in Whittier is good, although conditions vary widely from block to block. There are many architecturally interesting homes (including potential Denver Landmarks). The lawns are well maintained with many mature street trees that enhance the appearance of the neighborhood. This plan recognizes the need for continued improvements in the residential environment. Park improvements are needed along with an expansion of designated bike routes. The replacement of aging trees, along with aggressive code enforcement and improved trash collection, are essential to supporting the residential environment Through neighborhood vigilance, the quality of the residential environment can be improved. The process of education, self-help activities, and the application of existing ordinances will maintain and protect Whinier's environment. Current residents are able and willing to identify issnes related to Section 8 housing neglect and code enforcement issnes. Regular identification of these issues is the key to improving code compliance Describing Whittier's unique situation relative to an environmental issne is difficult. It is appropriate to recognize that Whittier shares environmental issues with other neighborhoods. Whittier residents must take advantage of services and programs that are available to the city at large. A recent example of environmental issues are the 70 homes targeted for renovation in the Whittier and Cole neighborhoods that contain lead-based paint. The Northeast Denver Housing Center's Healthy Homes Initiative has secured a $1 million HUD grant to assist families in removing lead-based paint. The Whittier neighborhood's cooperation in city and federal programs of this type will support low-income residents who want to remain in the neighborhood Through advocacy and identification of problem areas, the residents of Whittier wish to maintain and protect the neighborhood's natural features including trees, parks, and open space I Priority Issues: NEIGHBORHOOD ENVIRONMENT 74]

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.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. Goals: Neighborhood Environment Through neighborhood advocacy, encourage residents and businesses to maintain and enhance the environment of the Whittier neighborhood. The following specific activities by the Whittier Neighborhood Association are intended to initiate improvements to the physical environment 1. Participate in city programs in recycling, conservation, and environmental abatement 2. Encourage tree planting by residents, businesses, and city agencies 3. Improve the physical appearance of the neighborhood by supporting code enforcement including clean-up of alleys, non-conforming commercial uses, and vacant lots 4. Improve and maintain schools and parks within the neighborhood 5. Develop a mechanism for regularly reporting to city agencies about environmental issues within the neighborhood, including Section 8 housing complaints 6. Establish a neighborhood Environment and Beautification Task Force to implement the Whittier Neighbor hood Plan I Priority Issues: NEIGHBORHOOD ENVIRONMENT

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Action dart Neighborhood Environment .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ., ., ., rl .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. # ACTIONS Ongoing PROJECTS El Enforce existing codes and ordinances by identify-X ing locations of violators and reporting to the City *E2 Identify top 10 problem properties each month X to bring into code compliance E3 Conduct clean-up in neighborhood twice a year X ''E4 Encourage residents to participate in recycling X and conservation programs ''ES Apply for grants to obtain trees E6 Create Web site indicating resources for environmental clean-up E7 Track federal clean-up oflead paint, contami-X nated soil, and Section 8 housing complaints :-selected as the neighborhood's highest priorities on June 21,2000 .. J Priority Issues: NEIGHBORHOOD ENVIRONMENT .. TIME Immediately Short Term Long Term lmplementers Neighborhood Zoning Administration Neighborhood, Neighborhood Inspection Service Neighborhood, Public Works Neighborhood, Public Works X Neighborhood, Denver Digs Trees X Neighborhood Neighborhood, HUD, EPA, Denver Housing

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.. .. .. .. .. Neighborhood meeting .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ... .. Focus on the future based on our past Priority Issue: Community Coordination (Call to Action) The Whittier Neighborhood Plan is intended to be a document used to identify evolving issues. Its implementation will be a joint effort by the neighborhood in cooperation with the appropriate agencies and organizations. Realizing the opportunities that are ahead, it will require active participation by the residents of the community Increasingly, Whittier has the opportunity to become an even better place to live and raise a family. The Community Resource Center, which was part of the 1998 bond issue, is but one step toward that future The work of planners, public agencies, and political leaders can help lay the foundations for improvement, but ultimately a neighborhood's quality depends on the activities and attitudes of its residents. Pride in Whittier is evident in its trees, lawns, and homes. It is a predominant purpose of this plan to foster pride of residents in Whittier and responsibility for its maintenance and enhancement The planning process to date has resulted in a significant increase in membership in the Whittier Neighborhood Association. The implementation of the planning "Action Charts" can be a catalyst for increasing membership as others become aware of the activity Many of the neighborhood issues of concern have focused on non-conforming uses, multi-family complexes, and illegal activities. Improving communication with local businesses and the multi-family property owners can en hance services while improving the quality of the neighborhood Several current initiatives have shown the potential of projects that enhance the quality of the residential environ ment. Chief among these have been the Community Day activities, arts programs, and coordination at the block level. Awareness of the effectiveness of the neighborhood association will grow through the use of press conferences, marketing plans, and the development of a neighborhood Web site [Pfl'-P_r_io_ri_,ty,_I_ss_u_es_:_C_O_M_M_UN_I_TY_C_O_O_RD __ ___ 77]

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Goals: Community Coordination(Call to Action) While implementing this plan, enhance membership, communication, and participation of all residents and busi nesses within the Whittier neighborhood. 1. To implement the elements of this plan by enhancing communication and participation in the Whittier Neighborhood Association. 2. To tell the story of the neighborhood through the use of a marketing plan, press conferences, and a Web site. 3. To enhance membership and participation in the Whittier Neighborhood Association by focusing on support of elderly residents, youth, and action items identified in the Whittier Neighborhood Plan. Board members at neighborhood meeting I Priority Issues: COMMUNITY COORDINATION (CALL TO ACTION)

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, ., Action Chart: Community Coordination: Call to Action ., ,; .. ., ., ,; ,; .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. TIME # ACTIONS Ongoing Immediately Short Term PROJECTS m Expand membership of and participation in the X Whittier Neighborhood Association ''CC2 Create committee activities focused on the X Neighborhood Plan Action Charts CC3 Create opportunities for businesses to be mem-X hers of the Whittier Neighborhood Association
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Sources 1he follawmgend notes com:spond to number notes in the text. 1 "Neighborhood Facts 1999: The Status of Denver Neighborhoods," a report by the Piton Foundation 2 ibid 3 "Housing in Denver: Problems, Needs and Opportunities," Centerfor Affordable Housing and Educational Opportunity 2000 4 "Neighborhood Facts 1999: The Status of Denver Neighborhoods," a report by the Piton Foundation 5 "Housing in Denver: Problems, Needs and Opportunities," Center for Affordable Housing and Educational Opportunity 2000 6 "Reported Offenses and Calls for Services in the Whittier Neighborhood," 4/28/00, City and County of Denver, Department of Safety 7 Funk& Wagndl'sNewEncyclopedUt, Volume27 8 Denver Neighborhood History Project, Simmons and Simmons, 1993-94 9 Ageof]im Crow, Atkins 10 The Denver Post, March 22, 2000 11 Denver Neighborhood History Project, Simmons and Simmons, 1993-94 12 ibid 13 "Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000: A Vision for Denver and Its People" 14 ibid 15 "Oral History: Interviews with Mr. Zelle Berenbaum," Colorado Historical Society 16 "Choices Neighborhood Schools," Denver Public Schools Public Information Office 17 "Neighborhood Facts 1999: The Status of Denver Neighborhoods," a report by the Piton Foundation I Sources so 1

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.. Neighborhood Summary for Whittier .. .. from "Neighborhood Facts 1999: The Status of Denver Neighborhoods," a report by the Piton Foundation .. .. INDICATOR WHITTIER DENVER YEAR .. Demographic .. Population 4601.0 501700.0 1998 .. #children < 18 1672.3 136995.0 1998 .. # elderly 65 + 567.3 62188.0 1998 .. %births African-American 32.4 11.0 1997 4 %births Latino 60.0 45.8 1997 .. %births nonLatino White 5.7 38.9 1997 .. Teen (15-19) birth rate 201.5 95.1 1997 % of births to unwed mothers 54.3 36.3 1997 .. % children living with single parents 40.1 30.2 1990 .. %population African American 75.9 12.5 1990 .. %population American Indian 0.8 1990 .. %population Pacific Islander 2.1 1990 .. %population Latino 14.9 22.8 1990 %population nonLatino White 9.2 61.6 1990 .. Households 1771.0 225025.0 1998 .. Total births 105.0 8651.0 1997 .. .. Housing .. # housing units 2212.0 253240.0 1998 .. %households living at current address < 1 year 21.1 29.1 1990 % housing units built before 1940 68.7 25.7 1990 .. % owner-occupied housing units 51.2 49.2 1990 .. % renters paying more than 30% of income on housing 58.2 38.6 1990 .. Average home sale price 106414.1 172730.8 1998 .. & housing publicly subsidized 14.6 6.6 1999 .. .. .. I Appendix A stl -

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.. Neighborhood Summary for Whittier .. .. from "Neighborhood Facts 1999: The Status of Denver Neighborhoods," a report by the Piton Foundation .. 4 INDICATOR WHITTIER DENVER YEAR .. Economic 4 %persons on public assistance 12.5 4.6 1998 4 %children ( < 18) on T ANF 20.8 8.0 1998 4 #licensed child care slots 388.0 23451.0 1998 .. %children < 12 in subsidized child care 17.4 9.2 1998 .. % DPS children receiving free school lunch 73.7 56.5 1998 .. %children ( < 18) in poverty 61.4 27.4 1990 %persons in poverty 42.1 17.1 1990 % service jobs 79.1 41.1 1996 Total jobs 689.0 426778.0 1996 Average annual wage 22927.0 31449.0 1996 Average household income 31135.0 42426.0 1995 .. Education Denver Public School enrollment 1063.0 58118.0 1998 % DPS African-American students 61.3 21.3 1998 % DPS Latino students 30.2 49.4 1998 % DPS non-Latino White students 7.3 24.5 1998 %births to women w I< 12th grade education 14.3 6.8 1997 %students not English proficient 16.0 19.1 1998 %students reading in lowest quartile on ITBS (score < 25) 48.8 38.1 1997 .. % students reading in top quartile on ITBS (score 75 +) 7.9 16.6 1997 .. %9-12 graders who graduated 14.4 15.1 1997 .. Drop-outs as %9-12 graders 5.2 4.7 1997 .. .. .. .. ... I AppendixA 821 -

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.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. -Neighborhood Summary for Whittier from "Neighborhood Facts 1999: The Status of Denver Neighborhoods," a report by the Piton Foundation INDICATOR WHITTIER DENVER YEAR Health %births to women entering prenatal care in 1st trimester 70.5 75.6 1997 %children ( < 18) on Medicaid 43.2 17.9 1998 Low birthweight rate 4.8 10.2 1997 Safety %property crimes 48.6 58.6 1998 Crime rate per 1,000 persons 108.7 82.3 1998 Burglary crime rate per 1,000 households 45.2 26.1 1998 Violent crime rate per 1,000 persons 9.3 5.4 1998 Confirmed child abuse & neglect rate 12.0 5.7 1998 Technical and Source Notes 1. No data are provided for aoy indicator with fewer than 3 events except for data provided by the Colorado Department ofHumao Services (child abuse & neglect rate, public assistaoce, Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (fANF) and Medicaid), for which no data are provided if fewer than 5 events 2. All1990 data are from the U.S. Census 3. With the exception of the 1990 data, the number of children aod elderly are based on a formula using population estimates from the Colorado Department of Local Affairs, the Denver Regional Council of Governments (DR COG), aod the U.S. Census. Most recent population data are from DR COG 4. All birth data are provided by the Colorado Department of Public Health aodEnvironment, which specifically disclaims responsi bility for any aoalyses, interpretations, or conclusions it has not provided. The teen birth rate is computed as the number of births to females ages 15-19 per 1,000 females ofthe same age in the general population. Low birth weight is calculated as the number of babies born at less than 5.5 pounds per 100 live births. The total number of births for Denver differs from that reported as the county of residence. Births are included only if the home address is physically located in Denver I AppendixA

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.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ... Neighborhood Summary for Whittier from ''Neighborhood Facts 1999: The Status of Denver Neighborhoods," a report by the Piton Foundation Technical and Source Notes (continued) 5. Average home sales price is calculated by the Denver Planning Office from data provided by the Denver Assessor's Office 6. Publicly subsidized housing is provided by the Denver Housing Authority (DHA), U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), and Colorado Housing Finance Authority and includes all DHA, HUD, Section 8 and Low Income Housing T .X Credit assisted units 7. Average household income (except 1990), total jobs and average annual wage are provided by DR COG. Total jobs represent jobs located in the neighborhood regardless of whetherthe jobs are held by residents of the same neighborhood. Average annual wage represents total wages in those jobs divided by the total number of employees 8. Licensed child care slots, subsidized child care, and conftrmed incidents of child abuse and neglect are provided by the Colorado Department of Human Services. Subsidized child care represents the number of children whose child care is partially or wholly publicly subsidized as a percent of all children 0-12 years of age. The child abuse and neglect rate is the number of confirmed child victims of abuse or neglect per 1,000 children ( < 18) 9. Persons on public assistance, children and adults on TANF and children on Medicaid are provided by the Denver Department of Social Services through 1997. Beginning in 1998, these data are provided by the Colorado Department of Human Services. Public assistance includes cash assistance such as T ANF (changed from AFDC in 1997), Old Age Pension, and Aid to Needy Disabled 10. All public education data are provided by the Denver Public Schools. Both drop-outs and graduates are computed as the number of drop-outs or graduates divided into the total number of students grades 9-12 residing in the same neighborhood. Drop-out and graduation rates reported by the school district are not calculated in the same way and should not be used for comparison. Stu dents taking the Iowa Test of Basic Skills (ITBS) are compared to tested students nationally. Scores above or below the national mean of 50 reflect the percentage of students who tested better or worse than the national average. The percent of students receiving free school lunches is calculated by dividing the number of students grades K-12 receiving free lunches in total student enrollment grades 1-12 (note: because some kindergartners receive free lunches but are not included in the enrollment data for grades 1-12, the percent of students receiving free school lunches may exceed 100% in some neighborhoods). To qualify for the federal Free School Lunch Program, family income cannot exceed 130% of federal poverty guidelines 11. Crime data are provided by the Denver Department of Safety. Violent crimes include all homicides, aggravated assaults, rapes and robberies (thefts against a person by force or threat of force) I Appendix A 84

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.. .. ,; .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. Healthy Communities, Healthy Denver A Report by the Denver Health Benchmarking Project Prepared by the Center for Human Investment Policy, Graduate School of Public Affairs/University of Colorado at Denver. January 2000 IV. Reviewing the Facts: Demographics. Deaths, Births, and Health EC ond Denver: In 1998. the tot.ol populot1on of the. [C wcs 61.998 or l2 pe.rceflt of the populat1on of Hn: City and (cunty of Ccrwer; the child popu!oion of the EC was 16 percent of the C.ty's lola! !-lcwcve.r ci-]ildrtul .,-,odr: up c..cr half (55.57o) of the ECs compared to Chlldrtn Ptre.nl of Populallan \:-' Chlldrtn EC Prolltt for Poverty: 1998 .. ..... -=== ,...-_ Highl.lrld1 Glcbev.ll!l Colo Cla)'Mn I'.JorW' llrM!n Pan: EC %on Medicaid \l %free lunch l The hwn t'nr !'ohcy, l '('I) liS!' ... Appendix B "' onlt 27 p:rc:ent of Denver's total ropulatlon. (fgure 1) According to The Pit
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Healthy Communities, Healthy Denver A Report by the Denver Health Benchmarking Project Prepared by the Center for Human Investment Policy, Graduate School of Public Affairs!Unive,..ity of Colorado at Denver. Januaty 2000 A."(;..ngc rncomc m th.: EC ($25.294f os much than thf. "'ccn1c n lhe ovcrogc oncom for the EC rortgcd from $!3. 879 (SunVollc)) to .$31)35 (Whrtticr). as co,.,..rr>rcd to $42.426 for AliiKugfl one in trght of !he Coty's l;vcd ""'the EC one in three (33',q of Denver s chddren onrl cdwlts on T ANF (Tcmporory Assostonce for Needy fmr,hcs) were EC residents V/h!c JObs orondcd m Denver 1990 to 1996 (there wns on 8 4 posive change in te'tal JCbs) rn thc EC total jobs drrrpEd ( I cflcmgc m total jobs) rc ln r"'' Nd ng ill 10!> quart.io> on 11'11$ II. '>\ >!udent. in iooOI on IHIS booli>O IO
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,. ,. ,. ,. ,. ,. ,. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ... Healthy Communities, Healthy Denver A Report by the Denver Health Benchmarking Project Prepared by the Centerfor Human Investment Policy, Graduate School of Public Affairs/University of Colorado at Denver. January 2000 EC and Denver: Death Comes Differently While the three leod1ng causes of deathheart disease. cancer. ond strol. 1C
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.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. -Healthy Communities, Healthy Denver A Report by the Denver Health Benchmarking Project Prepared by the Center for Human Investment Policy, Graduate School of Public Affairs/University of Colorado at Denver. January 2000 EC residents had a greater pe.rccntoge of deaths occurring due to homicide, infant mortality, lrvcr drsease. chdd mortality, diabetes. mo1or vf:hide accrdents, and firearms than was true in the rest of Denver Another way to display this informotion is in Frgurc 5 While the EC made up only ten percent of Denver's populotron. the amount of deaths in the EC from homicrdes was more than twenty percent of all homicrdes that occurred In Denver from 1993 to 1997 Comparison of EC & Denver: Population & Homicides 1993 0 p Appendix B 88

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if if if if .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. Healthy Communities, Healthy Denver A Report by the Denver Health Benchmarking Project Prepared by the Center for Human Investment Policy, Graduate School of Public Affairs/Univen;ity of Colorado at Denver. January 2000 Conversely. the EC ndghborhocds had a !ewer percentage of their deaths due. to heart d1sease stroke suicide and HIV than was true for the rest of Denver. Homicides and deaths from Hfv represent a greaterpercentage of all deaths in the rest of Dr;nYer from 1993 to 1997 than was true for the stat!". of Colorado_ (Table 2) la!J!e YP.ar Averil Ago: benver Celor1 1th-c: 1'-,-I '" E."!d ,,, h"uJ 1 ,:.-.d ;,I: to] ( -\r;oJp itr I h''' r I 1 ";,., .. ; ,-, n:rr '"' ''""'"I I 'I'J' o ... : cc.rr ,,-, .! ''' I ')' r,, ,. 'ra "' Clol)'<'' Appendix B 89

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.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .... Healthy Communities, Healthy Denver A Report by the Denver Health Benchmarking Project Prepared by the Center for Human Investment Policy, Graduate School ofPublic Affairs/University of Colorado at Denver. J anuaty 2000 and Def"!ver..t.AI I Causes: 1993-1997 3a oge of e-EC Denver Remaining Community Number of Deaths 2413 21878 1----All Coust:s"' 64.2 70 I 3b L!!oding Cousu of Dt:oth Heart Diseon 72_9 773 Conr;l!'r 691 710 c-Stroke 75.0 796 l>hlr loo' I :ilrl< \ "''', I [\l'lli. '. "' '-o.ou;t'.' ]>, .. -an EC residents generally died at younger ages (Table 3a_) The dtsparity between the EC nerghborhoods and remaining become even more apparent lool<.mg at fhr_ overage age of death overall and for the three leading causes of death (lablc 3b)_ When all deaths were considered (including infant deaths whch occur dispr-oportionately m the EC neighborhoods). EC residents did not hve as long (on overage) as residents in other Dcnve.r neghborhoods. Whr!e the thrce leading causes of death occurred predominately in older per sons, EC residents who died of heart aHacl<, toncer or strokes were younger on overage than the Denver residents who died of those tauses. (figure 6)_ While some of these dif f crcnccs amounted to only four or fve years. those early deaths translate mta missng o wedding anniversary_ cryng at o grandcllild"s wedding. or tickling a great grandchild Appendix B Av11111111 AIJII of P..tth, EC tnd O.nv11r: 1993 fU "' l'o:i 1U _n_ !l.f ... I ;., i i i I I i ' i .j Haar101o_. AIICu ... ,.""". EC Communpty ] 0 11 "'' o ( ilj'jli \ -L ,' IIH !''"d/'111{ I,.,.,.,''" 11\.:nr 1\<"ir.tt:,: !''"",! < 11<;qA 90

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Healthy Communities, Healthy Denver A Report by the Denver Health Benchmarking Project Prepared by the Center for Human Investment Policy, Graduate School ofPublic Affoo/University of Colorado at Denver. J anuaty 2000 EC and Denver: Different Circumstances of Birth Pcsdcnts of the EC hod a grcah.:r percentage of their btrths assocotcd wi1h 11calth or soriof ssucs than did of the rcmotnino Denver neighborhoods, In each of these ondrcotors. the rrrno1ning Denver neighborhoods hod a h1gher pern>.ntogc of births nssocatcd with these concerns than did Colorado as a whole. These issues included births to Teens. brths to unmarried women_ and bobcs born at 55 pounds or less (low birthwcight) Ftw data thcrc were suffk1cnt Clients to compare the EC neighborhoods Durmg 1993-1997_ about one out of every four loori hs in the EC (on O>eoagc of 23"/,) was to a tunogc girl less than 19 years old, (Ontrosted wofh one 1n (14':"o) in the rest of Denver and one 111 eight b1rths on Colorado (Tobie 4 and Fogure 7) Appendix B >OO .. .. ,, .. Birth In T,.n n Prunl o! All Births: EC, O.nnr, Colondo: 1993!117 TIMin Blrthl NonTMn81rt,. Oonor "'' 11!'111 \ t l Si;cl'" lh;, '''." '"' l <''<'" t 11-n:o. '"'''"""" Pn'" 1, t '(']' 91

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.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .... Healthy Communities, Healthy Denver A Report by the Denver Health Benchmarking Project Prepared by the Center for Human Investment Policy, Graduate School of Public Affairs/University of Colorado at Denver. January 2000 Oenv<>r EniCipriM! 1993 1997 P."mninir>y Colorodc !lang 11 of # cf '-. -, I n-c-1c'r.9 !HI 120 I ---:__-+---+---+ Birlh to Mom l T,od< (),!.!ten'-I _,.,-,r:J'n Appendix B B1rtlll 10 Unmarried Women P11n:en1 ol "II Blrllll: EC, Oenvr,llld Colo110do 1111-1997 % to unlnarrfed 8irtiJI; to married I' 1 5t'Jt''n-: [1.11.! 1'1\l']lf, \ >tol lll'l''''n I" 1 .. r
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.. .. .. .. rtl ., .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ... Healthy Communities, Healthy Denver A Report bythe Denver Health Benchmarking Project Prepared by the Center for Human Investment Policy, Graduate School of Public Affairs/University of Colorado at Denver. January 2000 u ..... d Bi..thl "" Prnnt of -"'II Birth5, EC ami bt:nwr: 100 4S s5i j5i :!:it .5kl-tn % C:>!too'1 FMI Po'110 Syi>N:I Wt<"'wl De''''" mdividuol EC neighborhoods proved 1o hove d1ffe1en1 prof1les depcnd1ng on the health ISSue_ As shown 1n f1gure 9. the percent of births to unwed mothers as o percent of all births differed drornatically in individual EC neighborhoods """"""' i.J...am Pollo S""Vtlloy Vof;-d.ii1MH :J'!I! lt<.,J" '"''"''''''"''"1"'-'11 lco1 low Btrthwelghl Rte: EC, Denver, Colorado ac Compared to H .. hhy P111ople 2000 Goal 12 11,6-10 %. I If."" 1(0 ,_ EC 'l,: HulthV P11opl 200(1 Goal ':n'!il \ ... ''""" 1 Til 1'"'1' Low birth weight occurred disproportionately in the EC os compar-ed to the rest of Den11er Colorado od notional health goals (Figure 10) Eleven percent (11.6%) of babies born m tne EC fn1m 1993-1997 wctghed less than 5.5 pounds, while in the remaining Denver neighborhoods. 9 9 percent were born of low birth weight. Sm::e Colorado's low birthweight ratc is one of the highest in the country, tile raft: in the EC is particularly troublesome. hc .lo'!'lil[JIJ 1<)1 a tow birth T v.tcnJ!il are 10 tw cost or r1crlatal r.Mt Ur tc-40 tJI born at ioN tmm w:qht 1 --:Eftcnce learnmo c'lff
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.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. Healthy Communities, Healthy Denver A Report by the Denver Health Benchmarking Project Prepared by the Centerfor Human Investment Policy, Graduate School of Public Affairs/University of Colorado at Denver. January 2000 low birth weight 17 The.slmcnl P<\hcy, UCD'GSl'A Appendix B NolBW [j LBW 11 CUP tiL. Vual Soamnc Dov..,un, g"'l'hr Come. for Humon lnve
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.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. -Goals: Public Safety Police Department Mission Statement: The mission of the Denver Police Department is to apply its knowledge, skills, and resources to foster an environment where all people live safely and without fear The following programs implemented by the DPD to build positive relationships with the community are available to the citizens of the Cole/Whittier neighborhood: Partnerships Triad Citizens Academy Citizens Aluruni Group Volunteers in Policing CadetProgram Christmas Crusade for Childten Prevention Community Resource Officers Officers in High Schools NeighborhoodWatch Crime Stoppers Weapons Watch YouthBoxingPrograrn Problem Solving Neighborhood Police Officers Landlord/Tenant Training Victim Assistant Unit Horticultural Horizons DayCamp T rafficSafety Program Weed and Seed Partnership Teams Safe Havens Drug Elimination Victim's Assistance Unit Domestic Violence Unit FrontRangersCycleClub Photo Radat Speed Monitoring Trailers Denver Junior Police Band Youth Academy PAL DrugCourt "The Blue and You" HotSpots lrnpactTeams For more specific information on services provided bytheDPD, contact your Police District Two Community Resources Officers at 303-331-4070 I AppendixC

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.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. I .. .. .. .. .. .. .. Goals: Public Safety Fire Department Mission Statement: Our goal is to limit loss of life, injury, and property damage by providing tbe best public education on fire safety educational services, frre protection, and other fire department services in the most cost effective manner. The following public education programs designed to meet the ftre department goal are available to the Whittier neighborhood community: School-Based Programs Puppets and Clown Shows (geared toward pre-school through grade-school children) Learn Not to Bum (geared toward pre-school through 2nd-grade children) FireSafetyTrailer(allages) Businesses Extinguisher Classes Fire Warden Fire Drills Care Businesses General Fire Safety Seniors and People with Disabilities Neighborhood/Denver HousingAutboriry/Home Owners Assoc. Parent and Adult Juvenile Firesetters Career Days Safety Booths Alternative Learning Centers Miscellaneous Programs Special Events Smoke Detector Program Please contact Lt. Levi Ortiz, District Representative for Whittier Statistical Neighborhood, at 303-28M930 for further information I AppendixC 96]

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,. ,j ,j ,j ,j ,j rti rti rti rti ,j ,j ,j ,. fi .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .... Goals: Public Safety Sheriff Department The Denver Sheriff Department is committed to Restorative Justice and Community Service. The listed projects are highlights of effons where offenders give back to the community under the supervision and guidance by the Denver SheriffDepartment. Juvenile Offender and Graffiti Removal Program Cleanup of city streets and property Community projects-urban gardens Graffitiremovalandcleanup Mountain Parks Program (Community Service) Cleaning and maintenance of Denver City & Mountain Parks State Highways Cleanup Food Bank of the Rockies Weed and Seed Program Weekend Work Program Denver Drug and County Court Community Service C'lienyCreek Cleanup PlatteRiverCleanup Victim Information System Snow removal and lawn care for handicapped and elderly StateTruancyProgram Hope Day Care Centerplaygronnd maintenance Keep Denver Beautiful 9-Health Fair setup Food basket preparation and distribution at Thanksgiving and Christmas for elderly and underprivileged Cleanup of public buildings throughout Denver Cleanup of parks and city buildings When an inmate is transferred or released, the VINE system shecks a list of registered victims and automatically places calls to tbe telephone numbers that are registered for that particular inmate Denver Sheriff Employee Volunteer Programs Denver SheriffDeparttnent Mounted Unit Speaker'sForum ChristmasCrusade Safe Kids Coalition Community Event Day Community Halloween Haunted House and Breakfast with Santa Cop Please contact Mr. Fred Oliva, Director of Corrections/Undersheriff, at 720.913-3873 for further information I AppendixC