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Hampden South neighborhood plan

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Hampden South neighborhood plan
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City and County of Denver
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Denver, CO
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City and County of Denver
Publication Date:
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English

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Auraria Library
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HAMPDEN SOUTH
NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN


HAMPDEN SOUTH NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
INTRODUCTION
The proposed plan for Hampden South will include an
area bounded on the north by Hampden Avenue; on the
east by South Boston Street, the Potomac Freeway
(1-225) and Yosemite Street; on the south by Belleview
Avenue, and on the west by the Valley Highway (1-25).
The neighborhood encompasses 1,846 acres.
The intensive neighborhood planning procedure began
in March, 1974, when Board members of Homeowners
associations formed anadvisory committee to act as
formal resident input toward development of the
neighborhood plan through a series of meetings. This
advisory group discussed planning, land use, transpor-
tation, public facilities, and general socio-economic
problems.
After initial preparation of the proposed plan, a larger
meeting was held to present the plan to the residents
generally. The plan was revised to reflect changes
suggested by the larger body before presentation to
the Denver Planning Board for adoption.
Detailed information about socio-economic charac-
teristics, land use and zoning, public facilities,
transportation and other detailed background informa-
tion upon which the plan is based may be obtained from
the Denver Planning Office.
The Hampden South neighborhood plan consists of
this text and an accompanying map entitled Hampden
South Neighborhood Plan.
PURPOSE
Objectives of the Plan
1. To coordinate the development of the Hampden
South neighborhood with that of other parts of the
City as set forth by the Comprehensive Plan and
with the Metropolitan Area.
2. To provide a guide to the orderly and balanced
development of the neighborhood, designating and
generally locating land uses and public facilities in
quantities and at densities which will accommodate
population and activities projected to full plan
development.
3. To encourage the preservation and enhancement of
the residential character of the neighborhood.
4. To make provision for housing of such types, sizes
and densities as are required to satisfy the varying
needs and desires of all economic segments of the
neighborhood, giving special consideration to the
elderly and lower income families.
5. To promote the economic health and convenience
of the neighborhood through:
A. The allocation and distribution of commercial
lands for retail and service facilities in quan-
tities and patterns based on accepted planning
standards and principles.
B. Provision for places of employment within the
neighborhood, and for transportation facilities
serving places of employment in adjacent areas
of the City.
6. To provide a circulation system coordinated with
land uses and densities and adequate to accommo-
date necessary movements, including the expan-
sion and improvement of public transportation ser-
vice including rapid transit; the increase of off-
street parking facilities; the elimination of on-street
parking on major arterials; and the development of
bicycle routes as well as pedestrian paths.
7. To improve the aesthetic environment of the
neighborhood through the development and ap-
plication of appropriate design criteria.
8. To provide a basis for the location and program-
ming of public services and utilities and to coordi-
nate the phasing of public facilities with private
development.
1


Use of the Plan
The purpose of the plan is to provide an official guide
to the future development of the neighborhood for use
by the Denver Planning Office, the Denver Planning
Board, the Mayor, the City Council, and other con-
cerned governmental agencies, residents, property
owners and businessmen of the neighborhood, and pri-
vate organizations concerned with planning and
neighborhood improvement. The plan also provides an
official reference to be used in connection with their
actions on various city development matters as re-
quired by law.
The plan is intended to promote an arrangement of land
use, circulation and services which will encourage and
contribute to the economic, social and physical health,
safety, welfare, and convenience of the neighborhood
within the larger framework of the City. It is also in-
tended to guide development and change of the
neighborhood to meet existing and anticipated needs
and conditions; contribute to a healthy and pleasant
environment; balance growth and stability; reflect
economic potentialities and limitations, land develop-
ment and other trends; and protect investment to the
extent reasonable and feasible.
The Plan proposes approximate locations, configura-
tions, and intensities of various land uses, internal cir-
culation and community facilities. Development may
vary slightly from the plan provided that the total area
of each type land use, the land use intensities, and the
physical relationships among the various land uses are
not altered. Development should not be allowed which
is inconsistent with the intent and purpose of the plan.
The Plan is not an official zone district map and as a
guide, does not imply an implicit right to a particular
zone or to the land uses permitted therein. Changes of
zone are considered under a specific procedure
established under the City and County of Denver
Municipal Code, subject to various requirements set
forth therein, including consideration of their relation
to and effect upon the Comprehensive Plan of the City
and hence this Neighborhood Plan.
This Plan is subject to review and amendment in the
manner prescribed by law to reflect changes in cir-
cumstances.
HISTORY
Originally, the Hampden South neighborhood was part
of the vast land holdings of Rufus Clark, better known
to contemporary 1860 Denverites as Potato Clark.
Homesteading 160 acres in July of 18.59 including
Overland Park, he amassed a fortune by raising
potatoes which he sold for 35 cents a pound up to
1867. During these years he purchased land in the
Denver area reaching a total of 20,000 acres. One
large tract of over 15,000 acres was located 7 1/2
miles southeast of Denver which he finally sold to an
English concern for colonization. This area, because of
Clarks original ownership was thereafter called Clark
Colony. No actual colonization took place other than
platting, which accounts for the existing street design
south of I-225.
The neighborhood was annexed to the City and County
of Denver as predominately undeveloped land, through
a series of 11 annexations between 1962 and 1972.
This accounted for 20% of the Citys physical growth
during the decade.
DESCRIPTION
Hampden South is developing at an accelerating rate
particularly since 1970. Because of this pace of
development, statistics have been calculated based on
actual count of housing units. 1960 Census information
is not available and 1970 statisticsjor the area are not
comparable for meaningful analysis, but are referred to
as a general guide.
Hampden South is Southeast Denvers largest
neighborhood in physical size (1,846 acres).
The neighborhood has experienced a dramatically
rapid rate of development, especially since 1970. Less
than half of the neighborhood is devoted to single-unit
residential use, with the predominant multi-unit con-
struction continuing at a record pace into 1973. An ac-
tive and vital private market has kept Hampden South
among the most desirable neighborhoods of the City.
Population
Population growth began in the mid-sixties and
reached 5,961 by 1970. During the next three years,
the population almost doubled to an estimated 10,980.
Population density has correspondingly increased
from 3.1 to 5.9 people per gross acre.
The newness of the residential development is il-
lustrated by the fact that well over 80% of neighbor-
hood residents have less than five years tenure in the
neighborhood. The reported median family income in
1970 was $14,922, well above the $9,654 city-wide
median. Slightly less than 3% of the reported incomes
were below $4,000 annually.
Housing
Dwelling unit increase within the neighborhood
reflects the record construction pace of the early 70s.
In 1970, there were 875 single-units and 824 multi-
units; these figures surged to 1,600 and 3,168 respec-


tively by 1973. Of the 1,699 total housing units in
1970, 84% were owner-occupied. The real estate
market in recent years has seen an increasing demand
for townhouse condominiums. Of the 3,168 existing
units, approximately one-third of the multi-units are
this type of development. Dwelling unit density (hous-
ing units per acre) increased from 3.6 to 8.7 for land
presently used for residential purposes and from 1.0 to
5.1 for all land residential^ zoned.
The average valuation of single-unit dwellings was
reported as $38,950 in 1970 (86% over $25,000)
which ranked Hampden South as the third highest
among the Citys 73 neighborhoods when compared to
the City average of $19,500.
Land Use
Land use and zoning comparisons indicate that 52% of
the neighborhood is zoned for single-unit dwellings
with slightly more than 35% actually designated for this
use. The difference is accounted for by schools and
parks as well as freeway right-of-way being included
in this zone classification. Multi-unit zoning classifica-
tions represent 16% of the neighborhood with about
one third of that actually developed by 1973.
Commercial development currently exists primarily
along the Hampden Avenue strip occupying approx-
imately 4% of the neighborhood, compared to 25% of
the neighborhood zoned commercial (primarily in the
still-developing DenverTechnologicalCenter).AIthough
at present no industrial uses exist in the neighborhood,
4% of the neighborhood is zoned for light industry in
the southwest corner of the neighborhood, in the
Denver Technological Center.
Community Facilities
Hampden South contains three officially designated
neighborhood parks: Southmoor Park (northwest),
Eastmoor Park (west central), and Rosamond Park
(central). These parks total 49 acres with an additional
32 acres of land along Goldsmith Gulch. Southmoor
Park contains two softball-baseball backstops, a
multi-purpose playground, a junior football field, picnic
facilities and a hike-bike trail. Rosamond Park is in the
process of development during 1 974, while Eastmoor
Park is not presently funded for development.
Goldsmith Gulch is programmed for future develop-
ment.
Samuels Elementary School opened late in 1973 with
an enrollment of 806 students which is about 94%
capacity. There are presently two undeveloped school
sites in the neighborhood, one in the northwest area
and one in the southeast area. Junior high school stu-
dents are bused to Cole Junior High located at 32nd
Avenue and Humboldt Street. High school students at-
tend Thomas Jefferson at South Holly Street at Jeffer-
son Avenue.
Circulation
Street classification based on existing use, includes
four arterial streets: Hampden Avenue, South Yosemite
Street, Belleview Avenue, and Quincy Avenue. Existing
collector streets are: South Tamarac Street between
Hampden and Quincy, Mansfield-Princeton Avenues
between Yosemite and Eastmoor Drive, and South
Monaco Street Parkway from Mansfield to Hampden.
Local street design ranges from radial to curvilinear to
cul-de-sac.
Bus service is available on South Monaco Street south
to Mansfield and east to Yosemite on Route 4 and
Route 31X south on Yosemite to Belleview.
Pedestrian and bicycle paths exist in Southmoor Park,
along Princeton Avenue and are under construction in
Rosamond Park.
ANALYSIS
Presently Hampden South is almost 50% developed
and contains 1,887 detached single-unit and 3,375 at-
tached multi-unit residences which reflect recent
market demands for housing. Since 1970, a very low
vacancy rate in single-unit dwellings, coupled with the
traditionally high desirability of southeast Denver has
caused housing values to remain high.
However, there are problems. These problems and
needs of the residents must be examined prior to ex-
pressing ideas and means to implement solutions that
will guide Hampden South into a continuously suc-
cessful future.
Land Use and Zoning Problems
Hampden South, a developing neighborhood, suffers
more from the impact of new land uses rather than
changes of land use or zoning.
More than 90% of the neighborhood was annexed to
the City between 1962 and 1964. Generally, the exist-
ing zoning was granted at the time of annexation. To-
day, some 750 acres of the neighborhoods 1,400
developable acres are still vacant although zoned for
more than 10 years.
As of January, 1973, 730 acres were zoned for single-
unit housing with about one-third still undeveloped,
while of the 183 acres zoned for medium density multi-
units, 1 24 acres remain undeveloped.
This situation has led to the significant increase
in the number of housing units counted in 1974


(5,262) as compared to the 1970 U.S. Census (1,699).
If development of the neighborhood occurs at the max-
imum allowable density under current zoning, the total
number of housing units would exceed 11,000. If
development was to occur at the maximum allowable
density, the resulting overall residential density would
be 17.4 housing units per residential acre, which is
more than triple the existing 5.6.
GROWTH POTENTIAL
RESIDENTIAL CATEGORY CURRENT MAXIMUM OPTIMUM
HOUSING UNITS POP- ULATION HOUSING UNITS POP- ULATION HOUSING UNITS POP- ULATION
SINGLE UNITS 1887 5800 2298 7100 2500 7800
MULTI- UNITS LOW DENSITY 1218 2300 1290 2450 1406 2700
MEDIUM DENSITY 2157 5000 4408 8400 3500 6600
HIGH DENSITY 0 0 3429 6500 1200 2300
TOTALS 5262 13100 11425 24450 8606 19400
The Denver Technological Center, within the Denver
City Limits, occupies 270 acres of the neighborhood. It
is designated as an Activity Center, which is a pre-
dominantly non-residential area of limited size which
includes a relatively high intensity and diversity of ur-
ban activity. The area is distinguished by the wide
variety of goods and services it provides on a neigh-
borhood, community and regional basis. Approximately
1,500 housing units are projected for the area with 280
of these as medium density. Total developed floor area
is projected at 11,450,000 as compared to 22,801 ,-
000 square feet developed in the Central Business
District (CBD) of Denver.
LAND USE COMPARISON
1970
Environment
Hampden Souths hillside location overlooks the
Denver Valley from an elevation of 5,650 feet above
sea-level (at Union Avenue and South Yosemite Street)
some 520 feet above Denvers lowest point and some
40 feet higher than the tallest building in the Central
Business District.
Rolling hills and panoramic views contribute to the
desirability of Hampden South. Subdivision design,
being of recent vintage, takes advantage of topogra-
phy with many curvilinear streets and cul-de-sacs.
The neighborhood is bisected by Goldsmith Gulch, a
major southeast drainage basin. The Gulch is under
study for extension of the Gulch Plan Ordinance Area
for flood control.
Bentonite soil conditions necessitate special con-
struction considerations for home building.
Public Facilities
Samuels Elementary School was recently opened with
a capacity to serve 855 students on a 9.5 acre site.
Two existing school sites of 6.4 and 9 acres are
available to be used as the need arises. Estimates of
2,600 elementary pupils eventually in Hampden South
would require three elementary schools with
capacities of 855 each. Therefore, the sites in thq
neighborhood are available although the site at
Monaco and Magnolia Way is 2 to 3 acres too small ac-
cording to public facilities standards.
Funding has been appropriated for development of
Goldsmith Gulch and extension of the hike-bike path
north from Rosamond Park.
The neighborhood contains one developed park
(Southmoor), one under development (Rosemond) and
one yet to be developed (Eastmoor).
The existing park land of 64 acres is inadequate to
serve the projected population of 19,400. According
to standards, (10 acres of Park per 1000 people) the
need would be for about 1 94 acres.
Fire protection is adequately provided to the portion of
the neighborhood north of I-225, by Station 22 at
Monaco and Ithaca Place. Presently this station serves
a 10 square mile area, but should be relieved of some
responsibility, especially in Virginia Village by con-
struction of a new facility there. Development of the
Tech Center will probably need a station located either
in or near it.
Police protection for the neighborhood is provided by
the District 3 Police Headquarters. Being ranked 30
among Denvers 73 neighborhoods in incidence of
crime, primarily burglary, suggests the need for more
adequate protection. Development of the Tech Center
will probably require more protection.
4


JU _J
Residential
The soundness of the neighborhood is re-
flected by the relative scarcity of problems.
Citizens have acted as a vital force in devel-
oping and maintaining the neighborhood with-
out special public funded programs,apart from
normal expenditures to insure adequate City
facilities and service. The Plan and the recom-
mendations which follow are designed to encour-
age and reinforce continuing private development
complimentary to the vitality of Hampden South.
Single and multi-unit housing should be available to all
persons regardless of social, economic or ethnic
backgrounds. Low and moderate income housing is
needed throughout the City and is especially lacking in
the Southeast. The Plan thus encourages provision of
low and moderate income housing for low-income
families and elderly within the neighborhood on a dis-
persed site basis. The Citys Housing Allocation Plan
now under development encourages development of
up to 100 housing units for elderly and low-income
within the neighborhood with the possibility of funding
from the Housing Bond monies available and participa-
tion by the private sector.
It is recommended that a precise determination be
made of the availability of land, land cost, construction
economies, and provision of services for these units to
be provided within the Activity Center.
The Plan recommends an optimum residential ac-
comodation of approximately 19,400 residents. Of this
EXISTING CONDITIONS JANUARY
Urtal 7,600 wuuld reside in single-units on 60S acres
designated as tow density on the Plan. The remaining
11,600 residents would occupy multi-units on 229
acres of various densities as designated on the Plan
and the following chart.
Due to graphic limitations certain areas of Hampden
South are recommended for more specific densities
and housing types than can be shown on the Plan. The
following map indicates these areas.
The Plan recommends landscaping of parking lots and
set-backs be encouraged and enforced where applica-
ble.
The Plan designates 113 acres of commercial and rel-
ated parking uses.
The Plan designates 86 acres for retail use with com-
munity access primarily by mass transit or automobile.
Neighborhood convenience shopping areas should
have access primarily from the neighborhood with en-
couragement given to pedestrians and bicyclists.
The Tech Center, designated as an Activity Center, is
planned to provide some 11.5 million square feet of
retail, office, industrial, residential and public-semi-
public uses on some 270 acres within the City limits.
Industrial
It is not the purpose of this Plan to determine specific
standards for industrial development other than to
recommend that no encroachment occurs into residen-
tial areas and that adequate off-street parking is pro-
vided for employees. All parking and loading areas
should be buffered with landscaped setbacks and/or
walls and fences. Industrial development should not be
allowed where street capacity is inadequate.
developed with an undecided priority. Funding has
been approved for extension of the hike-bike path
from Rosamond Park north to Bible Park. Goldsmith
Gulch (32 acres) is to be developed as a gulch flood
control linear park including a hike-bike path, south
to Belleview Avenue. The total park land now under
development amounts to 64 acres and falls more
than 130 acres short of supplying the needs of the
projected population of the neighborhood.
Therefore the following recommendations are shown
on the Plan:
1. Expand and develop Rosamond Park to 39
acres.
2. Expand, designate, and develop Goldsmith
Gulch to 37 acres.
3. Develop Eastmoor Park.
4. Acquire additional park land in the northeast
corner of the neighborhood.
The City and County of Denver should exercise the
powers granted by State Statute which allows coun-
ties the power to require portions of the gross
acreage of subdivisions developed in Denver for
public purposes or cash in lieu of land.
5. All designated park lands and open space
should be zoned 0-1 including the Public Ser-
vice Company land and freeway rights-of-way.
Commercial
This plan recommends that no further commercial
development be allowed into the single-family resi-
dential areas. Toward this goal, current zoning should
be strictly retained. Also, adequate off-street parking
sould be provided for shoppers and employees. Alt
parking should be buffered from residential areas with
landscaped setbacks and/or walls and fences. The
commercial areas designated on this Plan, when fully
developed, will be adequate in quantity and size to
serve the optimum population.
The commercial locations and intensities shown on the
Plan map are predicated upon full development of ar-
terial and collector streets. In no case should any in-
tensity increase be allowed in areas currently zoned
for commercial use unless it is determined that the ar-
terials and collector streets in the general area of the
property involved are adequate to serve the additional
traffic generated.
The Plan recommends no additional land be desig-
nated for commercial uses.
Recommended industrial uses include clean and quiet
research laboratories, technical services, and limited
wholesaling, housed in attractive structures and sur-
rounded by considerable amounts of park-like open
landscaped areas in keeping with the character of the
existing development in the Tech Center, south of
Belleview Avenue.
The Plan recommends that landscaping of parking lots
and set-backs be encouraged and enforced where ap-
plicable.
Parks and Recreation
Public parks and open space should be developed ac-
cording to the following standards:
10 acres of park land per 1,000 people.
Southmoor Park (16.9 acres) is developed and in-
cludes hike-bike paths, picnic facilities, a tot lot and
an informal ballfield. Rosamond Park (19.4 acres) is
being developed at the present time with generally
the same development, but will also include tennis
courts. Eastmoor Park (12.6 acres) is totally un-
Public Schools
Site sizes for school buildings should provide space
for play equipment, play fields, all-weather areas, off-
street parking, service access to the buildings, and ap-
propriate landscaping.
Elementary school facilities should be augmented by
construction of an additional elementary school as
soon as possible to keep pace with increasing needs.
A third elementary school site at Wabash and Union
should be dedicated as a future 9 acre site and
programmed for construction.
The Plan recommends these school sites to be more
appropriately zoned to R-5.
Library
The Hampden Heights Branch Library under construc-
tion north of the neighborhood should adequately
serve Hampden South.
Fire and Police Protection
Fire Station No 22 should adequately serve the north-
ern portion of the neighborhood, but as the Tech
Center develops, the intensity of development will de-
mand a station in or near the Activity Center.
The Plan recommends a combined fire and police dis-
trict station site be acquired in or near the center of the
Tech Center.
Institutions
The Plan recommends that R-5 zoning be applied to all
institutions within the Hampden South neighborhood.
Circulation
Programming of street improvements should be fully
coordinated with development and redevelopment of
private properties to higher intensities as allowed by
the Plan in order to accommodate increased traffic
volumes.
Design characteristics which give streets identity,
such as curves and topographical differences should
be emphasized by landscaping and other appropriate
features.
Through traffic should be discouraged from the interior
of the neighborhood to the peripheral arterials.
Collector streets should be developed as shown on
the Plan map to improve neighborhood access to
traffic corridors and shopping areas.
It is strongly urged that a determined effort be made to
de-emphasize South Monaco Street Parkway in terms
of traffic-carrying capacity.
The Plan recommends that South Yosemite receive im-
mediate priority for design and construction as an ade-
quate arterial to meet the present over capacity de-
mand for projected needs.
The Plan recommends adequate design and control
devices at South Tamarac Drive and Hampden to dis-
courage through traffic south of Hampden.
The Plan recommends vacation of Oxford Drive south
of Princeton Avenue.
The Plan recommends the following streets as collec-
tors:
Monaco-Princeton-Eastmoor-Union as a collector
from Hampden to Yosemite.
Mansfield-Rosemary Way from Monaco to Tamarac.
Princeton-Mansfield from Eastmoor Drive to
Yosemite.
Quincy from Yosemite to Tamarac.
South Boston Street from Hampden to Oxford Drive.
Oxford Drive from South Boston to South Yosemite.
Public Transit
Public transit and other transportation modes not en-
vironmentally degrading should be emphasized:
as an alternative to automobile commuting to';
downtown Denver. Implementation of a Mass
Transit System should be followed with a local
service minibus route feeding the neighborhood sta-
tions. Construction of major arterials should also be
studied for possibility of designs which allow ex-
clusive bus lanes to transport increasing numbers of
commuters more effectively. To further the viability of
public transit, it is urged that parking reservoirs be lo-
cated along the arterials to offer the continuously in-
creasing number of home-to-work communters an
alternative to automobile commuting.
The Plan recommends a Transit stop at Jefferson Ave.
at I-25. The existing parking lots at the theater and ice
rink could be utilized for weekday parking without con-
flict to the primarily night-time use.
The Plan also recommends a stop between i-25 and
Belleview Avenue to serve the projected activity
center.
Walkways and Bike Paths
Pedestrians and bicyclists should be encouraged to
circulate freely within the neighborhood and construc-
tion of bikeways as shown on the Plan map should
receive immediate attention.
Existing rights-of-ways should also be developed with
landscaped pedestrian-bicycle paths as shown on the
Plan map. (All bicycle path development as shown on
the Plan is part of citywide Bicycle Plan). Public Ser-
vice Company of Colorado should be encouraged to
coordinate a long-range plan with the City for burying
high-tension power lines.
SUMMARY
Following is a summary of recommendations reflected
in the Hampden South Neighborhood Plan (not in order
of priority) which will lead to solutions for immediate
problems and also provide for longer range planning
changes for inclusion in the Comprehensive Plan for
Denver.
Short-Range Priority (0-5 Years)
8 Encourage cooperation between adjacent jurisdic-
tions and Denver.
8 Provide 100 dwelling units for low to moderate in-
come or elderly families.
8 Rezone parks and open space to 0-1 and schools
and institutions to R-5 to reflect actual use.
8 Develop hike-bike paths.
8 Acquire additional park land.
8 Construct South Yosemite Street as major arterial.
8 Construct Quincy to i-25 access ramps.
8 Add selected collector street designations.
8 Vacate a portion of Oxford Drive.
8 Encourage exclusive bus lanes as designated by the
Regional Transportation District.
8 De-emphasize South Monaco Street Parkway as a
traffic carrier.
8 Construct Quincy-Tamarac (south of Quincy) as ma-
jor arterial.
8 Provide an adequate intersection at Hampden and
Tamarac.
Long-Range Priority
8 Determine location of two neighborhood Transit
stops.
8 Acquire additional 80 acres for parks and open
space.
8 Develop park land.
8 Provide police/fire station in Denver Tech Activity
Center.
8 De-emphasize South Monaco Street Parkway as a
traffic carrier.
HAMPDEN SOUTH NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN



MAYOR OF DENVER
Honorable William H. McNichols, Jr.
DENVER CITY COUNCIL
Robert Koch, President
Linden Slue
Edward F. Burke, Jr.
Elvin R. Caldwell
Eugene L. DiManna
Paul A. Hentzell
Irving S. Hook
Kenneth M. Macintosh
James J. Nolan
Larry: J. Perry
WilliamR. Roberts
J. Ivanhoe Rosenberg
L. Don Wyman
DENVER PLANNING BOARD
Philip Milstein, Chariman
Linden Blue--
Harold V. Cook
Stephen P. Grogan
Martin C. Kelly
Msgr. Edward A. Leyden
James B. Kenney, Jr.
Mrs. Mary Lou Madrigal
Mrs. Marie K. Rock
DENVER PLANNING OFFICE
Alan L. Canter, Director
Robert A. Damerau, Assistant Director
A. Gordon Appell, Planning Coordinator
AREA PLANNING DIVISION
Jay Geiger, Chief
REPORT RESEARCH AND AUTHOR
Gerald L. Andolsek
Neighborhood Plans Section
REPORT GRAPHICS
Ken Barkema
Manuel Maestas
REPORT TYPISTS
Mary Lou Montoya
Linda Flaherty
APPROVED: DENVER PLANNING BOARD
AUG. 7, 1974
The preparation of this report was financed in
part through a grant from the Department of
Housing and Urban Development under con-
tract no. CPA-CO-0800-011 7.



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HAMPDEN SOUTH NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN INTRODUCTION The proposed plan for Hampden South will include an area bounded on the north by Hampden Avenue ; on the east by South Boston Street the Potomac Freeway (1-225) and Yosemite Street ; on the south by Belleview Avenue, and on the west by the Valley Highway (1-25) The neighborhood encompasses 1 ,846 acres. The intensive nei ghborhood planning procedure began in March 1 97 4 when Board members of Homeowner s associations formed anr advisory committee to act as formal resident input toward development of the neighborhood plan through a series of meetings This advisory group discussed planning land use, transpor tation public facilities and general socio-economic problems. After initial preparation of the proposed plan a larger meeting was held to present the plan to the residents generally. The plan was revised to reflect changes suggested by the larger body before presentation to the Denver Planning Board for adoption Detailed information about socio-economic characteristics, land use and zoning public facilities, transportation and other detailed background informa tion upon which the plan is based may be obtained from the Denver Planning Office The Hampden South neighborhood plan consists of this text and an accompanying map entitled "Hampden South Neighborhood Plan ." PURPOSE Objectives of the Plan 1. To coordinate the development of the Hampden South neighborhood with that of other parts of the City as set forth by the Comprehensive Plan and with the Metropolitan Area 2 To provide a guide to the orderly and balanced development of the neighborhood, designating and generally locating land uses and public facilities in quantities and at densities which will accommodate population and activities projected to full plan development. 3 To encourage the preservation and enhancement of the residential character of the neighborhood 4. To make provision for housi n g of such types, sizes and densities as are required to satisfy the varying needs and desires of all economic segments of the neighborhood, giving special consideration to the elderly and lower income families. 5. To promote the economic health and convenience of the nei ghborhood through: A. The allocation and distribution of commercial lands for r etail and service facilities in quantities and patterns based on accepted planning standards and principles B Provision for places of employment within the neighborhood, and for transportation facilities serving places of employment in adjacent areas of the City 6. To provide a circulation system coordinated with land uses and densities and adequate to accommo date necessary movements, including the expan sion and improvement of public transportation ser vice including rapid transit; the increase of off street parking facilities ; the elimination of on-street parking on major arterials ; and the development of bicycle routes as well as pedestrian paths. 7 To improve the aesthetic environment of the neighborhood through the development and ap plication of appropriate design criteria 8 To provide a basis for the location and program ming of public services and utilities and to coordinate the phasing of public facilities with private development.

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Use of the Plan The purpose of the plan is to provide an official guide to the future development of the neighborhood for use by the Denver Planning Office the Denver Planning Board the Mayor, the City Council, and other con cerned governmental agencies residents property owners and businessmen of the neighborhood and private organizations concerned with planning and nei ghborhood improvement. The plan also provides an official reference to be used in connection with their actions on var i ous city development matters as re quired by law The plan is intended to promote an arrangement of land use, circulation and services which will encourage and contribute to the economic social and physical health safety, we l fare and convenience of the nei ghborhood within the larger framework of the City. It is also in tended to guide development and change of the neighborhood to meet existing and anticipated needs and conditions; contribute to a healthy and pleasant environment; balance growth and stability; reflect economic potentialities and limitations, land develop ment and other trends ; and protect investment to the extent reasonable and feasible The Plan proposes approximate locations, configura tions and intensities of various land uses, internal cir culation and community facilities Development may vary slightly from the plan provided that the total area of each type land use, the land use intensities, and the physical relationships among the various land uses are not altered Development should not be allowed which is inconsistent with the intent and purpose of the plan The Plan is not an official zone district map and as a guide does not imply an implicit right to a particular zone or to the land uses permitted therein Changes of zone are cons i dered under a specific procedure established under the City and County of Denver Municipal Code subject to various requirements set forth therein, including cons i derat ion of their relation to and effect upon the Comprehensive Plan of the City and hence this Neighborhood Plan This Plan is subject to review and amendment in the manner prescribed by law to reflect changes in circumstances HISTORY Originally the Hampden South nei ghborhood was part of the vast land holdings of Rufus Clark, better knqwn to contemporary 1860 Denverites as "Potato Clark ." Homesteading 160 acres in July of 18p9 including Overland Park he amassed a fortune by raising potatoes which he sold for 35 cents a pound up to 1867. During these years he purchased land in the Denver area reaching a total of 20,000 acres One large tract of over 1 5 ,000 acres was located 7 1 / 2 miles southeast of Denver which he finally sold to an English concern for colonization This area because of Clark s original ownership was thereafter called Clark Colony ." No actual colonization took place other than platting which accounts for the existing street design south of 1-225 The neighborhood was annexed to the City and County of Denver as predominately undeveloped land through a series of 11 annexations between 1962 and 1 972 This accounted for 20 % of the City s physical growth during the decade. DESCRIPTION Hampden South is developing at an accelerating rate particularly since 1970. Because of this pace of development, statistics have been calculated based on actual count of housing units 1960 Census information is not available and 1970 statisticsJ or the area are not comparable for meaningful analysis but are referred to as a general guide Hampden South is Southeast Denver' s largest neighborhood in physical size (1 ,846 acres) The neighborhood has experienced a dramat i cally rapid rate of development especially since 1970. Less than half of the neighborhood is devoted to single-unit residential use, with the predominant multi-unit con struction continuing at a record pace into 1973. An active and vital private market has kept Hampden South among the most desirable neighborhoods of the City. Population Population growth began in the mid-sixties and reached 5,961 by 1970. During the next three years, the population almost doubled to an estimated 1 0 ,980. Population density has correspondingly increased from 3 1 to 5 9 people per gross acre The newness of the residential development is illustrated by the fact th at well over 80% of neighbor hood residents have less than five years tenure in the neighborhood The reported median family income in 1970 was $14, 922 well above the $9,654 city-wide median Sl i ghtly less than 3 % of the reported incomes were below $4,000 annually Housing Dwelling uni t increase within the neighborhood reflects the record construction pace of the early 70' s In 1970, there were 875 single-units and 824 multi units ; these figures surged to 1 ,600 and 3 ,168 respec-

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II 1 I !; I I' f tively by 1973. Of the 1 ,699 total housing units in 1970, 84% were owner-occupied. The real estate market in recent years has seen an increasing demand for townhouse condominiums. Of the 3,168 existing units, approximately one-third of the multi-units are this type of development. Dwelling unit density (hous ing units per acre) increased from 3 6 to 8 7 for land presently used for residential purposes and from 1 0 to 5.1 for all land residentially zoned The average valuation of single-unit dwellings was reported as $38,950 in 1 970 (86% ov er $25,000) which ranked Hampden South as the third highest among the City's 73 neighborhoods when compared to the City average of $19,500. Land Use Land use and zoning comparisons indicate that 52% of the neighborhood is zoned for single-unit dwellings with slightly more than 35% actually designated for this use. The difference is accounted for by schools and parks as well as freeway being included in this zone classification. Multi-unit zoning classifications represent 16% of the neighborhood with about one third of that actually developed by 1973. Commercial development currently exists primarily along the Hampden Avenue strip occupyi ng approx imately 4% of the neighborhood, compared to 25% of the neighborhood zoned commercial (primarily in the sti 11-developing Denver Techno log leal Center).Aithough at present no industrial uses exist in the neighborhood, 4% of the neighb0rhood is zoned for light industry in the southwest corner of the neighborhood in the Denver Technological Center. Community Facilities Hampden South contains three officially designated neighborhood parks : Southmoor Park (northwest), Eastmoor Park (west central), and Rosamond Park (central). These parks total 49 acres with an additional 32 acres of land afong Goldsmith Gulch Southmoor Park contains two softball-baseball backstops, a multi-purpose playground, a junior football field, picnic facilities and a hike-bike trail. Rosamond Park is in the process of development during 197 4, while Eastmoor Park is not presently funded for development. Goldsmith Gulch is programmed for future develop ment. Samuels Elementary School opened late in 1973 with an enr ollment of 806 students which is about 94% capacity. There are presently two undeveloped school sites in the neighborhood, one in the northwest area and one in the southeast area Junior high school stu dents are bused to Cole Junior High located at 32nd Avenue and Humboldt Street. High school stbldents attend Thomas Jefferson at South Holly Street at Jeffer son Avenue. Circulation Street classification based on existing use includes four arterial streets: Hampden Avenue South Yosemite Street, Belleview Avenue, and Quincy Avenue Existing collector streets are : South Tamarac Street between Hampden and Quincy, Mansfield-Princeton Avenues between Yosemite and Eastmoor Drive, and South Monaco Street Parkway from Mansfield to Hampden. Local street design ranges from radial to curvilinear to cul-de-sac. Bus service is available on South Monaco Street south to Mansfield and east to Yosemite on Route 4 and Route 31 X south on Yosemite to Belleview. Pedestrian and bicycle paths exist in Southmoor Park, along Princeton Avenue and are under construction in Rosamond Park. ANALYSIS Presently Hampden South is almost 50% developed and contains 1 ,887 detached single unit and 3,375 at tached multi-unit residences which reflect recent market demands for housing Since 1970, a very low vacancy rate in single-unit dwellings, coupled with the traditionally high des-irability of southeast Denver has caused housing va!ues to remain high However, there are problems These problems and needs of the residents must be examined prior to ex pressing ideas and means to implement solutions that will guide Hampden South into a continuously suc cessful future Land Use and Zoning Problems Hampden South, a developing neighborhood, suffers more from the impact of new land uses rather than changes of land use or zoning. More than 90% of the neighborhood was annexed to the City between 1962 and 1964. Generally, the existing zoning was granted at the time of annexation. Today, some 750 acres of the neighborhood s 1 ,400 developable acres are still vacant although zoned for more than 1 0 years As of January 1973, 730 acres were zoned for single unit housing with about one-third still undeveloped, while of the 183 acres zoned for medium density multi units, 1 24 acres remain undeveloped This situation has led to the significant increase in the number of housing units counted in 197 4

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(5,262) as compared to the 1970 U.S. Census (1,699). If development of the neighborhood occurs at the max imum allowable density undercurrent zoning, the total number of housing units would exceed 11 ,000. If development was to occur at the maximum allowable density, the resulting overall residential density would be 17.4 housing units per residential acre, which is more than triple the existing 5.6. GROWTH POTENTIAL RESIDENTIAL CURRENT MAXIMUM OPTIMUM CATEGORY HOUSING POP-HOUSING POP HOUSING POP-UNITS ULATION UNITS ULATION UNITS ULATION SINGLE UNITS 1887 5800 2298 7100 2500 (800 LOW 1218 2300 1290 2450 1406 2700 DENSITY MULTI MEDIUM 5000 4408 8400 3500 6600 UNITS DENSITY 2157 HIGH 0 0 3429 6500 1200 2300 DENSITY TOTALS 5262 13100 11425 24450 8606 19400 The Denver Technological Center, within the Denver City Limits, occupies 270 acres of the neighborhood. It is designated as an Activity Center, which is a pre dominantly non-residential area of limited size which includes a relatively high intensity and diversity of ur ban activity. The area is distinguished by the wide variety of goods and services it provides on a neigh borhood, community and regional basis Approximately 1 ,500 housing units are projected for the area with 280 of these as medium density. Total developed floor area is projected at 11 ,450,000 as compared to 22,801 ,000 square feet developed in the Central Business District (CBD) of Denver. LAND USE COMPARISON 1970 DENVER TECHNOLOGICAL CENTER AND DENVER CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT DTC CBD Environment Hampden South' s hillside location overlooks the Denver Valley from an elevation of 5,650 feet above sea-level (at Union Avenue and South Yosemite Street) some 520 feet above Denver s lowest point and some 40 feet higher than the tallest building in the Central Business District. Rolling hills and panoramic views contribute to the desirability of Hampden South. Subdivision design, being of recent vintage, takes advantage of topography with many curvilinear streets and cui-de-sacs. The neighborhood is bisected by Goldsmith Gulch, a major southeast drainage basin The Gulch is under study for extension of the Gulch Plan Ordinance Area for flood control. Bentonite soi I conditions necessitate special construction considerations for home building Public Facilities Samuels Elementary School was recently opened with a capacity to serve 855 students on a 9.5 acre site. Two existing school sites of 6.4 and 9 acres are available to be used as the need arises. Estimates of 2,600 elementary pupils eventually in Hampden South would require three elementary schools with capacities of 855 each. Therefore, the sites in neighborhood are available although the site at Monaco and Magnolia Way is 2 to 3 acres too small according to public facilities standards. Funding has been appropriated for development of Goldsmith Gulch and extension of the hike-bike path north from Rosamond Park The neighborhood contains one developed park (Southmoor), one under development (Rosemond) and one yet to be developed (Eastmoor). The existing park land of 64 acres is inadequate to serve the projected population of 1 9,400. According to standards, (1 0 acres of Park per 1000 people) the need would be for about 1 94 acres. Fire protection is adequately provided to the portion of the neighborhood north of 1-225 by Station 22 at Monaco and Ithaca Place Presently this station serves a 10 square mile area, but should be relieved of some responsibility, especially in Virginia Village by construction of a new facility there Development of the Tech Center will probably need a station located either in or near it. Pol ice protection for the neighborhood is provided by the District 3 Police Headquarters Being ranked 30 among Denver s 73 neighborhoods in incidence of crime, primarily burglary, suggests the need for more adequate protection. Development of the Tech Center will probably require more protection.

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RECOMMENDATIONS Residential The soundness of the neighborhood is re flected by the relative scarcity of problems. Citizens have acted as a vital force in devel oping and maintaining the neighborhood without special public funded programs, apart from normal expenditures to insure adequate City facilities and service. The Plan and the recom mendations which follow are designed to encourage and reinforce continuing private development complimentary to the vitality of Hampden South. Single and multi-unit housing should be available to all persons regardless of social, economic or ethnic backgrounds. Low and moderate income housing is needed throughout the City and is especially lacking in the Southeast The Plan thus encourages provision of low and moderate income housing for low-income f a milies and elderly within the neighborhood on a dispersed site basis. The City s Housing Allocation Plan now under development encourages development of up to 1 00 housing units for elderly and low-income within the neighborhood with the possibility of funding from the Housing Bond monies available and participation by the private sector. It is recommended that a precise determination be made of the availability of land, land cost, construction economies, and provision of services for these units to be provided within the Activity Center. The Plan recommends an optimum residential accomodation of approximately 19,400 residents. Of this \u\a\ 7 ,BOO wuul<.l reside in single-units on 600 acres designated as low density on the Plan. The remaining 11 ,600 residents would occupy multi-units on 229 acres of various densities as designated on the Plan and the following chart. Due to graphic limitations certain areas of Hampden South are recommended for more specific densities and housing types than can be shown on the Plan. The following map indicates these areas 0 0 0 RECOMMENDED DENSIIY units per acre ) Commercial This plan recommends that no further commercial development be allowed into the single-family resi dential areas. Toward this goal current zoning should be strictly retained. Also, adequate off-street parking sould be provided for shoppers and employees. All parking should be buffered from residential areas with landscaped setbacks and /or walls and fences. The commercial areas designated on this Plan, when fully developed will be adequate in quantity and size to serve the optimum population. The commercial locations and intensities shown on the Plan map are predicated upon full development of ar terial and collector streets. In no case should any in tensity increase be allowed in areas currently zohed for commercial use unless it is determined that the ar terials and collector streets in the general area of the property involved are adequate to serve the additional traffic generated. The Plan recommends no additional land be designated for commercial uses. EXISTING The Plan recommends landscaping of parking lots and set-backs be encouraged and enforced where applica ble. The Plan designates 11 3 acres of commercial and rel ated parking uses. The Plan designates 86 acres for retail use with community access primarily by mass transit or automobile. Neighborhood convenience shopping areas should have access primarily from the neighborhood with en couragement given to pedestrians and bicyclists. The Tech Center, designated as an Activity Center, is planned to provide some 11.5 million square feet of retail, office, industrial, residential and public-semi public uses on some 270 acres within the City limits. Industrial It is not the purpose of this Plan to determine specific standards for industrial development other than to recommend that no encroachment occurs into residen tial areas and that adequate off-street parking is provided for employees All parking and loading areas should be buffered with landscaped setbacks and /or walls and fences. Industrial development should not be allowed where street capacity is inadequate Recommended industrial uses include clean and quiet research laboratories, technical services, and limited wholesaling, housed in attractive structures and sur rounded by considerable amounts of park-like open landscaped areas in keeping with the character of the existing development in the Tech Center, south of Belleview Avenue The Plan recommends that landscaping of parking lots and set-backs be encouraged and enforced where ap plicable. Parks and Recreation Public parks and open space should be developed according to the following standards: 1 0 acres of park land per 1 ,000 people. Southmoor Park (16.9 acres) is developed and in cludes hike-bike paths, picnic facilities, a tot lot and an informal ballfield Rosamond Park (19.4 acres) is being developed at the present time with generally the same development but will also include tennis courts. Eastmoor Park (12 6 acres) is totally unctONDITIONS JANUARY 1974 I developed with an undecided priority. Funding has been approved for extension of the hike-bike path from Rosamond Park north to Bible Park. Goldsmith Gulch (32 acres) is to be developed as a gulch flood control linear park including a hike-bike path south to Belleview Avenue The total park land now under development amounts to 64 acres and falls more than 130 acres short of supplying the needs of the projected population of the neighborhood. Therefore the following recommendations are shown on the Plan : 1 E x pand and develop Rosamond Park to 39 acres. 2. Expand, designate, and develop Goldsmith Gulch to 37 acres. 3. Develop Eastmoor Park 4. Acquire additional park land in the northeast corner of the neighborhood. The City and County of Denver should exercise the powers granted by State Statute which allows coun ties the power to require portions of the gross acreage of subdivisions developed in Denver for public purposes or cash in lieu of land 5. All designated park lands and open space should be zoned 0-1 including the Public Ser vice Company land and freeway rights-of-way. Public Schools Site sizes for school buildings should provide space for play equipment play fields all-weather areas, off street parking service access to the buildings and ap propriate landscaping Elementary school facilities should be augmented b y construction of an additional elementary school as soon as possible to keep pace with increasing needs. A third elementary school site at Wabash and Union should be dedicated as a future 9 acre site and programmed for construction. The Plan recommends these school sites to be more appropriately zoned to R-5 Library The Hampden Heights Branch Library under construction north of the neighborhood should adequately serve Hampden South. Fire and Police Protection Fire Station No 22should adequately serve the north ern portion of the neighborhood, but as the Tech Center develops, the intensity of development will de mand a station in or near the Activity Center. The Plan recommends a combined fire and police district station site be acquired in or near the center of the Tech Center. Institutions The Plan recommends that R-5 zoning be applied to all in:>titutions within the Hampden South neighborhood. Circulation Programming of street improvements should be fully coordinated with development and redevelopment of private properties to higher intensities as allowed by the Plan in order to accommodate increased traffic volumes Design characteristics which give streets identity, such as curves and topographical differences should be emphasized by landscaping and other appropriate features. Through traffic should be discouraged from the interior of the neighborhood to the peripheral arterials. Collector streets should be developed as shown on the Plan map to improve neighborhood access to traffic corridors and shopping areas. It is strongly urged that a determined effort be made to de-emphasize South Monaco Street Parkway in terms of traffic-carrying capacity. The Plan recommends that South Yosemite receive im mediate priority for design and construction as an ade quate arterial to meet the present over capacity de mand for projected needs. The Plan recommends adequate design and control devices at South Tamarac Drive and Hampden to discourage through traffic south of Hampden. The Plan recommends vacation of Oxford Drive south of Princeton Avenue. The Plan recommends the following streets as collec tors: 0 500 1.000 bl+'j'i SCALE RESIDENTIAL SINGLE UNIT c=::J LOW D E NSIT Y MULTI-UNIT c=::J LOW D E N SITY c:::J MEDIUM DENS ITY MIXED INT E NS IVE M ULTIPLE USES BUSINESS OFFICE RETAIL TRANS., COMM., UTIL. T R ANS. COMM .. U T ILITIES c:::=:J PARKING PUBLIC AND SEMI PUBLIC ll!ll\ill!lll SCHOO LS. HOSPITA LS C H URCHES. ETC OPEN SPACE c=::J VACA N T c=::J N O N PUB LIC ACCESS OPE N SPACE c::::::::;] PUBLIC ACCESS PARKS AND RECREATI O N SERVICES F FIRE STATIO N P POLICE STATI ON RTDSTATIO N
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MAYOR OF DENVER Honorable William H McNichols Jr. DENVER CITY COUNCIL Robert Koch President Linden Blue Edward F. Burke Jr. Elvin R. Caldwell Eugene L DiManna Paul A Hentzell Irving S. Hook Kenneth M Macintosh'' James J. Nolan Larry J. Perry William R. Roberts J. Ivanhoe Rosenberg L Don Wyman DENVER PLANNING BOARD Phi lip Milstein Chariman Linden Blue\ Harold V. Cook Stephen P Grogan Martin C Kelly Msgr Edward A Leyden James B. Kenney Jr Mrs Mary Lou Madrigal Mrs. Marie K Rock DENVER PLANNING OFFICE Alan L Canter Director Robert A. Damerau Assistant Director A. Gordon Appell, Planning Coordinator AREA PLANNING DIVISION Jay Geiger Chief REPORT RESEARCH AND AUTHOR Gerald L. Andolsek Neighborhood Plans Section REPORT GRAPHICS Ken Barkema Manuel Maestas REPORT TYPISTS Mary Lou Montoya Linda Flaherty APPROVED: DENVER PLANNING BOARD AUG. 7,1974 The preparation of this report was financed in part through a grant from the Department of Housing and Urban Development under contract no. CPA-C0-0800-011 7.