Citation
The module study of the automated office

Material Information

Title:
The module study of the automated office interior design of a bank
Creator:
Peng, Kuei-Chao
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
101, [1] leaves : illustrations, plans ; 28 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Bank buildings -- Designs and plans ( lcsh )
Bank buildings ( fast )
Genre:
Designs and plans. ( fast )
bibliography ( marcgt )
theses ( marcgt )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Designs and plans ( fast )

Notes

Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
General Note:
Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree, Master of Architecture, College of Architecture and Planning ; Department of Architecture
Statement of Responsibility:
Kuei-Chao Peng.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
24236055 ( OCLC )
ocm24236055
Classification:
LD1190.A72 1990m .P46 ( lcc )

Full Text
THE MODULE STUDY
OF
THE AUTOMATED OFFICE
INTERIOR DESIGN OF A BANK
PRESENTED BY
KUEI-CHAO PENG
SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE AND PLANNING
UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER
SPRING, 1990


THESIS TOPIC THE MODULE STUDY OF THE AUTOMATED OFFICE
INTREIOR DESIGN OF A BANK
PRESENTED BY
DEPARTMENT
ACADEMIC YEAR
Kuei-Chao Peng
Architecture
Spring, 1990
Accepted by School of Architecture and Planning University of
Colorado at Denver in partial fulfillment of the requirements
for Thesis Research and Programming..............Spring, 1990
Present to
Thesis Committee
Committee adviser
Professor. Soontorn Boonyatikarn
Committee adviser
Professor. Robert W. Kindig


CONTENTS
I. MODULE STUDY
A. Preface ............................................(1 )
B. Basic Factors
Human dimensions ...................................(4)
Seating dimensions and other factors ..............(5)
Worksurface dimensions .............................(8)
Storage ...........................................(10)
Light and glare ...................................(12)
Privacy/acoustical screening .................(14)
Wire management ...................................(16)
Evaluating the workstation:seventeen criteria ....(17)
C. Designing for the Future
Trend in the workplace ..........................(22)
Trend in hardware ...............................(24)
Trend in software ...............................(27)
Trend in furnishing .............................(27)
Trend in communications .........................(28)
D. Case Studies .......................................(29)
II. BANK DESIGN ...........................................(33)
III. ADVANCE STUDY ABOUT AutoCAD
A. How to Make a Macro Menu ...........................(39)
B. Program of TestlO.mnu
(42)


PREFACE
This project deals with the first and smallest unit of analysis
the individual worker, in the office. The term individual means a
person who works in an organization,analytically separate from his
or her social context. Besides the ambient environment,perhaps the
most important part of the work place for the individual comprises
his or her work-station.
THE INDIVIDUAL AND THE WORK-STATION
An understanding of the relationship between a worker and his or
her work-station is complicated by the variety of work-stations
and their many possibilities for influence, and the variety of
workers and jobs. One way of viewing the relationship is as a man-
machine system.
Variety in work-station and workers:
In offices,perhaps the only safe generalization about workstations
is that most office workers spend most of their time seated before
horizontal work surfaces.For these people the work-station usually
includes a chair and a table or desk, the equipment installed in
work-stations ranges from typwriters to telephones to computers.
"The relationship between the persion and the work-station depends
on a long list of concerns: the variety of components of worksta-
tions; the many important details of each components; the differ-
ences among jobs in the importance of the components; the way the
individual actually uses the work-station; the fit between the
dimensions of the work-station and the dimensions and capacities
of the worker's body; and the worker's training and ability."
(Sundstrom, 1986)
The man-machine system:
One useful way of thinking about the relationship between the in-
dividual and the work-station treats it as a system. Human factors
psychologists have traditionally referred to the man-machine sys-
tem, which consists of people in concert with technology. Usually
the system consists of a machine and an individual operator. The
worker receives inputs from displays of information, which can be
visual, auditory, tactile, thermal,or some combination."The worker
considers the information, makes disions, and manipulates the con-
trols accordingly. The machine produces output, which is usually
subject to the worker's scrutiny. The machine and its output pro-
vide information (feedback), which allows the worker to adjust the
controls to achieve or maintain a desired effect. "(Sundstrom. 1986)
The worker's performance and satisfaction with a work-station may
also depend on his or her attitudes,which in turn may hinge on the
(1)


i
degree to which its discomforts seem inevitable. For example, an
office worker whose video-display unit lacks adequate contrast for
visibility may experience neck pain, eyestrain, and fatigue.If the
worker sees the discomfort as avoidable, because a manager has
failed to have a defective unit repaired or replaced,the dissatis-
faction may be magnified.
So,the man-machine system emphasizes the dynamic interplay between
operator and machine. It suggests that the worker's satisfaction
may depend on the design of controls and displays and on associ-
ated comfort or fatigue.
r
i
Support for the preson and the task:
The individual's relationship with the work-station is a funtion
not only of machinery and equipment, but of the support the work-
station gives the person's body and work. Specifically, the work-
provides places to stand, sit, or lean; it often includes work-
surfaces on which to support the things involved in the job and
provides places to store and gain access to materials, supplies,
tools, and references. All these supportive elements of the work-
station have the potential to influence the worker's satisfaction
and performance.
The work-station literally supports the worker's body. For those
who spend most of their time seated at a desk, a key component of
the work-station is the chair.For those who stand,a floormat,foot-
rest,or footstool may make the difference between comfort and dis-
comfort. Some jobs call for small hand movements done most easily
when the arms are supported. For any work-station, an important
element is the amount of floorspace in which the worker can move
freely without interfering with co-workers.
Many office workers use horizontal work-surfaces.They sit at desks
or tables. These surfaces vary in size, shape, and height form the
floor. The work-surface supports the individual in his or her task
by providing a place to put things while working on them. The most
easily usable work-surface is within the worker's reach.
The work-station also provides accessible storage for things the
individual uses often, particularly tools, supplies, material, and
references.Ideally,the things used most often are closest at hand.
Potential influences of work-stations on satisfaction and perform-
ance :
The individual's satisfaction with a work-station probably depends
on the absence of discomfort created by it. A work-station that
necessitates tiring postures,awkward body positions,or long reach-
es may creat discomfort. Similarly, a work-station that fails to
support the task or its materials or that requires needless effort
to retrieve tools and supplies may cause discomfort. All of this
may contribute to the worker's dissatisfaction.
Because of its potenttial to creat dissatisfaction through discom-
fort, the work-station seems to qualify as a dissatifier. This
term was introduced in Herzberg's theory on job satisfaction. In
9
(2)


the theory, physical working conditions fell into the category of
job factors that can contribute to dissatisfation by failing to
meet the worker's needs. However, they only lead to indifference
when adequate.
The possibility for a work-station to contribute to dissatisfac-
tion is limited by adaptation. After working for awhile even in an
ill-suited work-station, an individual may change habits to accom-
modate the work-station. Heavily burdened muscles may strengthen
with usejunaccustomed postures may become commonplace;long reaches
may become practiced and habitual. Such adaptation may represent a
conscious attempt to make the best of the situation, or an uncon-
scious adjustment. Either way, an uncomfortable work-station may
creat less and less discomfort and dissaisfaction as time passes.
The work-station may be important for the individual's performance
because of its relevance to economy of effort. To the extent that
the work-station minimizes the necessity of efforts perpheral to
the job and economizes to on effort required for the central
tasks, the worker can work at maximum efficiecy.
In brief, the work-station supports the person through places to
sit, stand, or lean. It supports the task through work-surfaces,
and through storage of supplies, tools, materials, and references.
These elements may contribute to dissatisfaction by creating dis-
comfort, although workers may adapt over time. They can aid per-
formance by economizing on effort.
(3)


B. BASIC FACTORS
HUMAN DIMENSIONS
Reaching distances
Sitting height Sitting plan dimensions
(Source: "Arclii tec tual Graphic Standards. 1981.
7th ed.. S.Y.. John Wiley K Sons. Inc..p.4-5.1
(4)


SEATING DIMENSIONS AND OTHER FACTORS
(Source: li >rjna. Louis. l')84.'"V Meo Displav Tetninal Workstation
Ergonomics." OH: OCLC Online Computer Libiary Center. Inc.)
1. Ease of adjustments:
The various ranges of adjustability discussed in the remainder
of this section are nearly useless if adjustments are not quick
and simple to make, perferably from the seated position.Pneuma-
tic adjustment mechanisms serve well for this purposejpush but-
torn controls and levers are also easy to use. Regular equipment
maintenance should be performed to ensure that all adjustment
mechanisms work properly.
2. Seat height:
Proper seat height allows the seated operator's thighs to be re-
latively horizontal,the lower legs vertical,and the feet planted
firmly on the ground or a footstool. If the seat is too height,
it will cut circulation in the legs.If too low,it will cause the
operator to slump forward, creating stress on the spinal column.
Seat height must be adjustable to accommendate operators.The hu-
man engineering literature recommends that seat height be adjust-
able within a range 15 to 21 inches from the floor.
3. Seat pan tilt:
The seat pan( the protion the user sits on )should be either ho-
rizontal or tilt backwards up to 8 degrees from the horizontal
to shiftthe upper body weight and allow the torso to rest fully
against the seat back. Shifting the body weight reduces pressure
on the spinal column and muscles of the back and eliminates the
constant effort required to keep from sliding off.
4. Recline angle:
This is the angle between the seat pan and the backrest;it inter-
acts with the seat pan tilt to enhance comfort. An acceptable
range of recline angles is from 95 to 112 degrees (or,similarly,
from 5 to 22 degrees back from the vertical.)
5. Seat pan width:
Pan width sould accommodate relatively board hip breadth. Recom-
mended minimums range from 15.75 to 19 inches, but approximately
18 inches sould be ample for most people. This particular dimen-
sion of the seat interacts with the leg area width of the work-
(5)


station itse1f.affecting the operator's ability to move the seat
in and out and swivel its position to accommodate the work flow.
The dimensions of both the chair and the leg area width of the
workstation must be keep in mind when considering either.
6. Seat pan depth:
This dimension should always be less than the distance between
the back of the buttocks and the inside of the calf to prevent
the seat edge from cutting into the back of the calf. A pan
depth between 13 and 16 inches will accommodate most people.
7. Seat pan contour:
The front of the seat pan should be contoured to aviod a sharp
edge which could cut into the backs of things. Bucket-type seats
should be avioded since they restrict the periodic adjestments
in sitting position needed ofr comfort over an extended period.
8. Backrest height:
The backrest should be set to provide support for the lower
region of the back. The height should be adjestable within a
range of about 4 to 9.5 inches ( the distance between the seat
pan and the portion of the backrest whichk provides lower back
suport ). A full, nonadjustable backrest is also acceptable if
it is contoured to provide lower back support.
9. Backrest width:
The backrest should be between 12.5 and 19 inches wide to allow
for elbow clearance.
10. Armrests:
Armrest, if present, should not restrict the operator's movement
or ability to move the seat sufficiently close to the work-
surfaces. A recommended distance between armrests is 19 inches,
slibghtly greater than the width of the seat pan. Armrests
height should be between 7 to 9 inches from the seat and the
rests should be 2.5 to 3.5 inches wide and padded for comfort.
11. Seat padding:
(6)


Padding is quite important for comfort since a seat which is too
hard induces excessive presure on the buttocks and impedes
circulation. However, when the seat is too soft, the operator
tends to float and expends extra effort in maintaining a
given a sitting position. One way adequate padding can be
achieved is by providing 1.5 inches of medium foam padding over
0.5 inch of firm closed-cell padding.
12. Upholstery:
Nonslip fabrics should be used to prevent sliding; upholstery
material should also be porous to conduct heat away from the
contact areas between the chair and the operator.
13. Stability:
A five-prong base as wide as the seat pan helps provide
stability and preventchairs from tipping over.
14. Mobility:
Seats should swivel to facilitate lateral movement. Chairs
should have casters to afford easy movement. Hard casters are
suitable for carpeted floors and soft casters workbest on hard
surfaces.
15. Footrests:
Short operators may need footrests to maintain a proper sitting
position while work with nonadjustable workstation surfaces. A
footrest should be solid, adjustable, and large enough to allow
shifts in foot position.
(Source: Tijerina, Louis. 1984. "Video Display Teminal
Workstation Ergonomics," Colunbus, OH, p.5)
(7)


V.ORKSURFACE DIMENSIONS
(Source: T i jer i r.A. Lou is. 1 ^84 ,' \ iiioo Display Ft*i jli na 1 Workstation
Ergonomics OH; OCLO Online Computer Library Center, Inc.i
1. Keyboard height:
The height of the keyboard, measured from the floor to the home
row (the "asdf'row of a standard keyboard), in combination with
seating height, crucially determines the amount of static load
on the arm, neck, and shoulder muscles-load which can result in
pain and fatigue.This load is reduced when the operator's upper
arms are hanging nearly verticaland the forearms nearly hori-
zontal. To promote this ideal position, the keyboard height
should be adjustable within a range of 23.5 to 30.5 inches.
However,if a fixed keyboard height must be imposed,the home row
should be approximately 29.5 inches from the floor. Further
height adjustments must then be made in the operator's seating.
2. Leg area height:
Adjustments made to keyboard height necessarily constrain the
leg room areabelow the keyboard, so the two interact. Again,the
dimensions of both must be kept in mind when considering either.
If a nonadjustable worksurface must be used a compromise be-
tween an acceptable keyboard height and sufficient leg room can
usually be achieved if the free space between the desk's under-
surface and the floor is about 25.5 to 27 inches. The center
drawer of a desk may often be removed to provide adequate clear-
ance .
3. VDT display height:
The operator's normal line of sight is typically 10 to 15 de-
grees below the horizontal eye level. To ease neck strain and
promote visibi1ity,the display sould be within a 30 degree cone
lowered 10 degrees from the horizontal. If the display height
cannot be adjusted, then a height about 36.4 inches ( measured
from screen center to floor ) is preferred.
4. Viewing distance:
To reduce visual fatigue, a viewing distance of 14 to 20 inches
is recommended.
5. Functional reach:
The distance between a comfortably seated operator's shoulders
(8)


and display controls in front of the operator sould be no more
than 28 inches. Reference manuals and support equipment sould
also be within this reach.
6. Leg area width:
To afford easy movement in and around the workstation and allow
for unobstructed turning,the width of the workplace sould be at
least 31.5 inches. As previously noted,this dimension interacts
with the width of the seat itself, and the two sould be consi-
dered in relation to each other.
7. Leg area depth:
A minimum of 25 to 27.5 inches, measured from the front edge of
the leg area opening of the workstation to the rear interior of
the that opening, will allow sufficient room for shifts in foot
position.
(Source: Tijerina. I,oui s 1984. "Video Display Terminal
Workstation Ergonomics." Columbus, OH, P.6)
(9)


STORAGE
Information Storage
1. Paper-Based Filing:
This involves manual filing of conventional paper output,
including letter-, legal-, or nonstandard-size paper into
standard legal- and letter-size filing cabinets.
Paper: a printer paper: ll"xl5"
9"xl5"
1l"xl3"
ll"x 9"
b conventional paper:8 l/2"xll"--(letter)
8 1/2"x14"---(legal)
c.card: aperture,standrd size, 3 l/4"x7 3/8
with a 2" window, keyboard and magnetic
2. Computer-Based Filing:
This involves the direct entry and retention of informa-
tion in computer memory or the transfer of this informa-
tion onto magnetic or optical storage media, stored in
tape reels, cartridges, or cassette holders. Floppy or
flexible magnetic disks are stored in paper sleeves.while
optical or Winchester discs and hard disks are stored in
plastic or hard composition housings. These storage media
are typically filed in separate trays that can be slipped
inside lateral or pedestal file drawers, placed on shelv-
ing units, or stored within special media drawers and ca-
binets.
Computer:
a. magnetic tape: 7", 8", 10 1/2", 15" diameter
b. floppy disks: 3 1/2", 5 1/4", 8"
c. winchester discs: 5 1/2", 8", 14" diameter
d. optical disks: 5", 12" diameter
3. Micrographic-Based Filing:
Microforms include roll film and microfilm sheets called
" fiche." They are stored in protective housings such as
paper jackets,plastic sleeves, aperture cards, cartridges
and cassettes .
Microfiche:
/ microfiche sheets: 4"x6" standard sheets
(10)


General Storage
Like their conventional couterparts, general storage items
include personal effects books, ashtrays, purses, and so
on and support items such as tools, pencils, reference
materials,and small mechines like calculators and cassette
recorders. General storage requirements are not typically
affected when electronic equipment is added to the work-
station .
1. Conventional Components:
General storage components typically include wall-hung or
free-standing shelving and overfile units, desk pedestal
drawers, standard- and lateral-sized files, or storage/
wardrobe units.
2. System Storage Components:
These include shelving units, either open or enclosed by
retractable doors, that are attached to supporting panels
or poles located above the work surface. Free-standing
storage/closet units, attached or free-standing pedestral
drawers, and lateral file banks at either the workstation
or a central location provide additional systems storage
options.
(ID


LIGHT AND GLARE
Glare, a visual condition produced by brightness in the filed
of vision significantly greater than to which the eye is ad-
apted. causes discomfort and/or reduced visibi1ity.In general,
two categories of glare sources may be distiguished.
Direct glare: It is cause by bright light sources directly in
the field of vision.
Reflected glare: It is caused by bright reflections from po-
lished or glossy surface.
Whatever its source or effect on visual performance, glare can
lead to reduced productivity and place undue stress on the
user. For these reasons,some suggestions are cite in the list.
Direct glare:
1. Avoid bright light sources within 40 to 60 degrees of the
center of the field of vision.
2. Provide side lighting to reduce direct glare.
3. Arrange the workstation so that operators do not look al-
ternately from light to dark places.
4. Provide all light fixtures with shields. f*
5. Reduce the brightness of light fixtures.
6. Use indirect lighting.
7. Select light fixtures with low discomfort glare ratings.
Reflected glare:
1. Use surfaces that diffuse light.
2. Keep the intensity of light fixtures at a reasonably low
3. Use diffuse light shields, indirect lighting to control
sources of reflection glare.
4. Position the workstation in relation to the light sources.
5. Use several low-intensity light sources instead of one high-
intensity source.
Task Lighting
Advantages:
1 Place light where needed.
(12)


2. Can eliminate glare through adjustment of some
tures.
3. Allows personal coni-Fo^r^of^the environment through
ments of task lighting.
Disadvantages: 2*
/ It is difficult to integrate with conventional furnishings.
Note: Task lighting must be directed from the sides of the in-
dividual or the work surface to prevent veiling reflec-
tions .
task fix-
ad just-
(13)


PRIVACY/ACOUSTI CAL SCREENING
Many electronic tasks require intense concentration,creative
thinking, and confidentiality, such as telephoning and con-
ferencing The most disturbing sources of noise in the office
are apparently not necessarily the loudest, includeing con-
versations by co-workers,sounds made by office equipment and
passing motor passing. Most studies that explored sources of
noise found conversations by co-workers a major annoyance.
Privacy usually means unwanted observation, audition, dis-
traction, or interruption. Among the resources for privacy
in a workstation is physical enclosure of workplace.
Achieving optimum privacy in the workstation depends upon
several factors:
1. Planning concept: semi-enclosure for a single workstation.
2. Masking sound: panels, to effectively reduce the ambient
noise level,must be engineered to block direct sound tran-
smissions .
3. Workstation constuction and materials: acoustical panels
and screens. Depending upon the specific task requirements
and equipment in the workstation, acoustic panels are the
most flexible and effective means of achieving visual and
audible privacy. Straight or curved,the acoustic screen or
panelcan be a free-standing boundary between workstations.
Panel construction should incorporate sound-absorbent
fabric that sheathes a core of fiberglass or similar sound-
entraping material.This type of construction reduces sound
reflections and prevents sound transmission.
Characteristics of Acoustic Panels:
The more sophisticated panels are designed to absorb the
high-frequency sounds of human speech that are considered
the most disturbing.Low-frequency sounds are intentionally
freed to mask overall transmission of noise. It is gene-
rally recommended that acoustic panels should be a minimun
of 60" high for effective, sound-dampening performance.
Additional Benefits:
In addition to providing privacy,acoustic screens have the
following adventages:
(14)


1. Height flexibility:
Structural support panels typically range from a low
height, barely above a 30" standard desk surface, to
about 75" high. Experience dictates a height of between
53" to 65" as practical for user comfort. If the work-
station occupant can be see comfortably over the panels
when standing,this will prevent a feeling of isolation.
Yet, when the worker is seated, the higher panel pro-
motes a feeling of security against unnecessary inter-
ruptions and traffic distractions.
2. Storage expansion:
In most furniture systems acoustic support panels can
be fitted with storage and filing units above and below
the work surface height.
3. Spatial definition:
Screens and support panel systems contribute to spatial
definition and perspective within the office. A key ele-
ment to successful layout design lies in the logical
distribution and variation in panel height throughout an
office space. The monotony of uniform height panels can
disorient, confuse, and destroy the content of form and
color in design. Variation can be exciting and provide
direction, vistas, and visual clues within the interior
space.
(15)


I
WIRE MANAGEMENT
Hanging and floor-massing wires, cords, and cables can be
dangerous as well as visually unsightly. Some of the more
typical methods by which wires are concealed and threaded
from the equipment to the power source include:
1.Small openings in the work surface. Wires drop beneath the
surface, but often hang loosely.
2. Hollow furniture components, such as desk legs and panels.
3. Channels or tubes secured to the underside of the work
surface through which wires are threaded to the power
source.
4. Baseboard raceways in systems furniture support panels.
Acceptable furniture systems provide raceways that are di-
vided into compartments separating electronic and commu-
nications wiring and cabling.
5. Electrical connections and receptacle outlets for both com-
munications and power delivery are also included.
(16)


EVALUATING THE WORKSTATION: SEVENTEEN CRITERIA
1. Adjustability
a. It allow for horizontal change.
b. It allow for vertical change. (That is chairs,work surfaces,
filing, and storage components can be raised or lowered to
accommodate a range of body dimensions.)
c. These components allow for changing postures.
2. Flexibility
a. Components are mechanically simple.
b. They are easy to dismount and reassemble.
c. This change can be accomplished without elaborate or special
tools .
d. The opreator can easily adjust or change the workplace, that
is, rearrange equipment or change the position of the VDT.
3. Simplicity
/ Functional requirments can be satisfied with a minimum of
components .
4. Movability
/ The workstation can be easily moved without total disas-
sembly.
5. Ease of Reach and Movement
a. Control devices ( such as knobs, buttons, communication de-
vices, on/off power switch )are easily accessible.
b. They are safely accessible.
c. They are easliy upgraded without inconvenience to hand, arm
or body position.
d. Only minimal movement is required to reach primary as well
as secondary work surface zones.
e. A footrest is provided or available.
f. If so, it is easily adjustable in height and inclination and
it is long enough to allow for comfortable use.
Note-.Accessibility implies that all equipment and task-related
materials are within the normal reach of the operator and
do not require excessive movement of the body.
(17)


6. Ease of View
a. Primary equipment, such as video display, keyboard, and im-
mideate reference materials, car be comfortably viewed with-
out interference from other equipment or objects.
b. It is necessary to see any area of the office outside the
immediate workstation.
c. If so,clear or glazed panels are available among workstation
components.
7. Ease of Access
a. There is adequate clearance betwween stations for easy ac-
cess to the work surfaces.
b. Any leg or post supports prevent freedom of movement be-
tween work surfaces.
c. The underside of the work surface allows sufficient hieght
and depth for adequate thigh and leg clearance.
d. Chairs have casters.
Note:Changing positions relieves muscular tension, pressure
points,and prevents fatigue buildup.The need for postural
adjustments can occur as frequently as every six to eight
minutes.
8. Storage
/ Adequate storage and filing components are available for re-
cording media, manuals, documents, personal items,and so on.
9. Stability
a. Materials and construction are designed to withstand heavy
equipment loads.
b. Surfaces adequately are supported to prevent sagging and de-
flection .
c. Filing pedestals are constructed to prevent tipping forward
when loaded drawers are extended to a full open position.
d. Terminal tables and printer stands are substantial enough to
support the weight of the equipment.They can be moved easily
without the threat of tipping forward.
10. Maintenance
a. The work surfaces depth meets recommended allowances for
equipment ventilation.
(18)


b.Acoustic panels are easily replaced in the field in the case
of damage.
e.Materials and finishes are easily cleaned.
d. Materials are not easily chipped, stained, or scuffed.
e. The workstation components can be easily moved for under-
floor maintenance requirements.
11. Health/Safety
a. Workstation components are designed to conceal exposed cables
and electrical wires.
b. Work surface edges are protectd against chipping, cracking,
peeling, or pulling away from the structure with extended
wear.
c. Components strucurally and dimensionally are stable to pre-
vent lateral stress and materials failure.
d. Chairs are fitted with five-prong instead of four-prong bases
for added stablity.
Note:Exposed cables and dangling electrical wires contribute
to tripping hazards. Conductive feet or casters on furni-
ture help prevent static electricity discharge to person-
nel and equipment.
12. Personal Identification
a. The workstation allows a certain amount of personalization
and display surfaces.
b. There is task lighting can be adjusted.
Note:Studies have found that there is a relationship between
the basic human need for defining boundaries and having
personal control, on the one hand, and work satisfaction
on the other. Therefore the design of the workstation is
very important. The ability to adjust components, person-
alize work surfaces, and exercise some physical contral
over lighting quality or air supply encourages fellings
of well being, security, and motivation.
13. Privacy
a. The workstation requires acoustical privacy.
b. The workstation requires visual privacy.
c. With what frequency is acoustical and/or visual privacy re-
quired?
d. Does the frequency justify the cost of panels?
e. Acoustic panels and materials have appropriate STC and NRC
ratings.
(19)


Note:Acoustical control prevents distracting noise and permits
speech privacy. Spatial control prevents visual and phy-
sical intrusions. By providing vistas, it also prevents
the occupant from feeling spatially either isolated or
crowded. Acoustic panels of varying heights allow for vi-
sual intrest and spatial control throughout a space.Large
number of same-height panels contribute to a "cattle pen"
effect.
14. Materials and Finishes
a. The work surface can prevent glare.
b. Materials and finishes durable and easily cleaned.
c. They will not scratch,crack, peel, burn, fade,or tear easily
d. Surface materials are easily repaired and/or replaced in the
field.
e. Chair coverings are designed for operator comfort.
f. Material meet all code standards.
NoterUpholstery coverings should provide a certain amount of
resistance to stabilize the body in the seated position.
A textured or slightly napped surface is preferable to a
slick or hard surface, which is characteristic of some
vinyls. However, fabric weaves that are too tight or
sprayed with certain latex backing materials are somewhat
rigid. This creates inflexibilty in the fabric, which can
impede postural changes and shifting, leading to uneven
distribution of body weight and pressure spots. Woven
covering should allow for air circulation over skin sur-
faces. Leather and vinyl tend to retain body heat.
15. Wire Management/Power Distribution
a. Workstation components have special channels or troughs
through which cables and wires can be threaded and thereby
concealed.
b. They have built-in power distribution capabilties. At least
two receptacle outlets per workstation.
c. Circuitry sufficient to support all required equipment.
d. The furniture system links easily to building power supply
points: perimeter walls, floor, ceiling, columns.
16. Task Lighting
a.The workstation provides additional lighting at the work sur-
face .
b The lighting is adjustable.
(20)


e.It prevents direct reflections onto the display screen, key-
board, or work surface.
17. User Education
/ Once criteria for workstation design have been developed,
there is a program to acquaint the user with the capacities
of the workstation and to educate him/her in its proper use.
Note:Regardless of how carefully a criterion is developed, it
is useless without the proper education of the end user.
(21)


C. DESIGNING FOR THE FUTURE
A basic checklist ot considerations that will enable yOU to
better design for future developments should include:
1. Remember that electronic equipment will most likely be
added, changed, and modified through the future life of the
office .
2. Consider the applications of human engineering features in
the design of workstation components and chairs correct
dimensions, comfort/support features, safty.
3. Adding future equipment can produce visual problems in the
workstation if furnishings cannont expand or retrofit
smoothly.
Following are some of the more prominent technological trends
and product developments that we preceive as having the great-
est impact on the future office stucture. These include the
categrories of hardware, software, furnishings, communications
and the workplace in general.
Trend in the Workplace
1.The gradual decline in the use of paper:
This is accompanied by the rise of micrographic, magnetic
disk, and optical disk storage media and electronic stroage/
retrieval systems. Paper output is predicted to actually
rise for some time in the future as electronic copiers,type-
writers, word processors, and data processing equipment con-
tribute a 20 percent annual growth rate in the use of paper
throughout the United States today." This statistic, however
is expected to change as electronic filing systems are in-
creasingly implemented throughtout the workplace. Continued
developments in magnetic and optical disk storage media, mi-
crofilms,and network commuincation systems will contribut to
a decrease in paper-based, manual filing systems.Refinements
in computer-aided-retrieval systems of microfilmed docuemnts
will expedite filing, storage, retrieval,and distribution of
information. As a fast, labor and time-saving,and economical
alternative to paper-based information systems,micrographics
technolog will be a major catalyst to the paperless office
of the future.
(22)


Paper usage
/ The Gradual Decline
in the Use of Paper
/ Integration
I
|
j
I
/
Automation
1980 1989
oo
rH
/ Centralized vs. Decentralized
Equipment
Centrailized operations:
data and word processing
Decentrailized operations:
data and word processing
1980 1989
(Source:Pulgram, William L.,1984,"Designing the Automated 0ffice:A Guide
for Architects. Interior Designers. Space Planners, and Facility
Managers."N.Y.:the Khiteny Library of Design)
(23)


2. Integrat ion:
The office of the future will be an integrated environment
of word processors, personal computers, telephones, micro-
graphic equipment.optical character readers,facsimile equip-
ment, electronic mail applications, voice forward and store
systems. All eventually will be interconnected and communi-
cate with each through local area or remote networking and
telecommunications technologies. The office of the future
will be not only a workplace of labar- and time-saving de-
vices and efficient, automated activities, but one in which
the ways we work and our thought processes are restructure
to maximize the capabilitys of the equipment.
3.The office:centralized and decentralized locations:
Many office boundaries are gradually dissolving. Computer
terminals (leg-tops) are now in the home, in the car, and at
smaller distributed office locations. Telephone, satellite,
and microwave transmission networks that carry voice, data,
and video information will further enable many employees to
work outside the central office.The miniaturization and pro-
tability of equipment and continued developments in tele-
commuting equipment,such as communicating word processors,
protable two-way radios, radio paging systems, and the com-
puter briefcase,are redefining the boundaries of the"office"
to include any and all locations that can be linked by tele-
phone wires, cables, or telecommunications technology.
Trend in Hardware
One of the major catalysts to change in the office, hardware
developments will continue to strongly influence and shape
environmental and furnishings design. In perspective, the
following trends all support a general simplification of
technology for the end user. We observe, however, that while
the user-friendly product grows smaller, easier to use, to
understand, and to carry and requires fewer environmental
controls, its capabilities and program applications are
growing.
1. Miniaturization and portability:
Equipment is getting smaller (with leg-top computers,optical
character readers, plotters, FAX machines), quieter, cooler,
cheaper, less energy consumptive,and more portable while ex-
panding in memory capacity and ability to excute more com-
prehensive software programs that include data, text, and
graphics.
(24)


2. Wires and cables:
Fewer and smaller wires/cables will be entering the work-
station. Further developments in flat wire, interface, op-
tical fiber, and networking technologies will continue this
trend.
3. Flat screen technology:
Flat screen displays are expected to become more prevalent
in the future, displacing the bulky CRT monitor and freeing
up the work surface space.
4.Executive workstation:
The dream of the future, these multifuntional centers are
predicted to integrate all the diverse office services and
equipment into one, compact, easy-to-use package. A single
video screen will have the capability to display electronic
mail, graphics, data, text as well as functioning in a tele-
conferencing mode. The keyboard will direct all the func-
tions, and the workstation's memory will allow it to operate
in many capacities. Without leaving the workstation, the ex-
cutive can access electronic files and data banks; generate
and integrate text, data, and graphics; revise the results;
output in hardcopy or microfilm form; transfer the informa-
tion thruogh eletronic mail services; or save and file it
eletronically on magnetic tape, disk, film, or optical disk
storage media.
Further developments are projected to include sophistcated
voice-activated applications that display whole symbols re-
presentative of the desired funtions, such as file folders
for the electronic filing system.
The executive workstation will exemplify the true office of
the future in capsule form.
5.Intel1igent telephones:
The continued integration of the microprocessor will enable
the telephone to serve as an intelligent terminal. Text,data
graphics, and pictures may be automatically received and
display on monitor.
(25)


/ Flat Screen Technology
Flat screen

1980 1989
Typical VDT
/ Speech Recognition
Influence of electronic
/ Decreasing Storage
Requirements
1980 1989
I Source:Pulgram, William L1984,"Designing the Automated Office:A Guide
for Architects. Interior Designers. Space Planners, and Facility
Managers,"N.Y.:the Whiteny Library of Design)
(26)


Trernd in Software
/ Speech recognition:
A revolutionary trend in information manipulation, speech
recognition is a significant development in both software
and hardward design. Input and output functions generate and
execute data applications through a menu of commands that
the user programs into computer.Information can be recalled,
filed, transfered, and manipulated with voice-commands.These
applications will possibly create new and different types of
acoustical concerns.
Trend in Furnishings
Despite miniaturization, protability, and the decreasing
operating requirements of equipment in the environment, the
productive relationship between people and automated machnies
will continue to depend heavily upon appropriate furnishings
design. With user comfort,furnishings must strike a critical
balance between the sometimes stressful automated task and
technophobic fears, on the one hand, and effective product-
ivity and positive acceptance of technolog, on the other.
1.Decreasing storage requirements:
Physical space requirements for paper storage and filing are
expected to decrease substantially in the future as optical
and magnetic disk technology and microfilm media are in-
creasingly used to record, store, transmit, and retrieve in-
formation .
2.The worksurface:
As equipment decreases in size, the oversized work surface
dimensions of certain furnishing components, such as the 120
and 90 degrees corner units, will no longer be necessary.
Adjustability is expected to remain an important requirement
3.Manufacturers:
Equipment manufacturers will increasingly enter the fur-
nishings market. As equipment continues to be miniaturized
and to be developed toward comprehensive multifuntional work-
stations, manufactures are expected to design and to inte-
grate their equipment into more specialized workstation
furniture.
(27)


Trend in Communications
Lightwave technology and fiber optic cables, satellite and
microwave transmission, data and word processing, graphics,
video, and voice are combined into a truly integrated in-
formationprocessing system for office. Indeed, we will ex-
perience a gradual coming together of people/machines and
information services in an ever-expanding network of com-
munication systems and products.
1.Technology advancements:
As improvements continue in fiber optic cables,sattelite and
microwave transmissions, and telephone networks, our tradi-
tional communication methods are changing.
Fiber optic technology continues to improve the speed, dis-
tance, quality and quantity of information transfer.
Digital telephone networks will carry voices, data,and video
over optical fibers, and satellite links. This allows commu-
nication between people as well as electronic equipment.
2. Networking:
The integration of all office electronic equipment ----- word
processors, computers, FAX,and so on ---- is considered to be
the real technology issue of the 1990s. Networking will sub-
stantially reduce the number of wires and cables that are
currently required for data and communications distribution.
(28)


D. CASE STUDIES
In this part presents some conjecture highlighting the work-
stations of the future.
By comparison, on these case studies features specific ex-
amples of workstation projects that show their individual
solutions to the requirements of the electronic-support en-
vironment. What will the office of the future look like? An
endless sea of standardized look-like workstations? What is
the impact of technology on office workers and what values
should workstations design reflect? These questions may have
some answers.
1.A Research Study by Interior Design Students at Syraccuse
University:
According to their interview with sociologists,psychologists,
facility managers and office workers,too much time and money
are being spent on upper managment while the general office
gives little consideration to office workers as human beings.
In large corporations, employees need for privacy and better
working conditions.
*
" Alternate research workstation where an employee could
relax and do research in an isolated comfortable setting.
Sometimes, management is conditioned to believing that the
office is a cost center whose costs must be cut despite
office productivity research to the contrary. At the same
time there is a dictum working against satisfaction and com-
fort. If it's fun, itcan't work.". So, workstations design
not only for comfort, but also for efficiency.

"alternate research workstation" THE WORKSTATION'S PLAN
by Kelly Austin (Source:Wagner, Michael. 1988. "Design Education."
Interiors,(February),p.149)
(29)


I
I
12. Workstat ions Design of the Future Using Fiber-Optic Tech-
nology by Cranbrook Academy of Art Team Up with NYNEX
I Fiber-optics,compared to the more conventional cable systems
now used in most offices, permits communications of far
greater quantities of information and at higher speeds and
I resolution. Since, it is likely that fiber-optics will even-
tually replace conventional systems, the goal of NYNEX and
other network is find out what the new technology might look
like in an office workstation.
These designs provide a glimpse into the way that the revo-
lutionary technology may transform not only the office envi-
ronment, but the very way we work.
(30)


A workstation for an
international journalist
designed by Carol Lach
and Brian Kritzman
(Source:Wagner. Michael.1988."Design Trend."
Interiors.(June),p.150-153)
(31)


/ A Design Compitition Focusing on 1000 Panel System by
CorryHiebert
A portable, self-contained, highly personalized workstation,
100 square-foot office module providing round-the-clock ca-
pability. It functions in any interior space where portabi-
lity and flexibility are needed.
In this case, miniaturization and portability of equipments,
consideration of human being, are important guidance tor de-
signing future workstation.
A CORNER OF THE WORKSTATION
(Source: Jackson. Paula Rice. 1 '187 "Of f ice of
the Future."Interiors,(June).p.186)
FLOOR PLAN
(32)


II. BANK DESIGN
This portion is presented my bank office design through
module study.
From previous study, I decided to use six-foot module
as a single unit workstation, then divided it into two-foot
module to suit for ceiling grid and floor tile grid.
All graphics is drawn by computers. There are presented
as follow:
(33)


PLAN WITH FURNITURE


PERSPECTIVE OF TOP VIEW
(35)
"Wfffl


vunr from office entry to customer service
I
*v
PERSPECTIVE OP OFFICE
(36)


(37)



Y
\
vnnr from office to president office
ZZL
pekspbctivi or loan omci
(38)


III. ADVANCE STUDY ABOUT AutoCAD
This portion I study about AutoLisp, then modified the
menu for my own use.
A. HOW TO MAKE A MACRO MENU
TEST10.MNU is organized by devices and menu pages. The
menu devices available to user in AutoCAD are the screen,
tablet, buttons, pull-down ( or pop-up ), icon, and auxiliary
devices. The buttons menu assigns macros mouse or digitizer
puck buttons. User can define pull-down and icon menus with
Release 9, Release 10, and later versions of AutoCAD.
This study I edit macros to Pull-Down Menus, Pull-downs
are best for single-shot operations and settings.particularly
transparent settings, because the menu disappears as soon as
it is selected or as soon as any other action is taken.
Now, let's go to [Draw] in Pull-Down Menu. It will be
shown you many drawing tools in the Draw Screen. There are
[Facility], [Index],[Furniture], [TS], [TREE],[CAR],[PEOPLE],
[Line], [Arc], [Circle], [Polyline], [3D Polyline], [Insert],
[Dtext], [Hatch...], [3D Construction...].
Then go to [TS] command, you can see the icon menus of
[TS], Icon menus use groups of AutoCAD Slides as graphic
labels. Icon menus have the adventage of showing pictures to
help user choose menu items. User have seen this type of menu
in AutoCAD's use of the hatch and text icon menus.
(39)


An ICON menu is written just like any other pull-down
menu except for its lables. You need to load the device with
a $I=pagename and then display it with $I=*. However, icons
use the lable [] differently. Icon lables supply AutoCAD with
the name of the slide to show in the box. Each lable corre-
sponds to one box on the screen.These boxes are automatically
arranged in groups of 4, 9, or 16.If the label is in the form
slidename, then the named slide from the name library is dis-
played as an icon.
If user put a space as the first character in the label,
AutoCAD treats it like an ordinary label. AutoCAD displays
any lable text in that item's screen box instead of a slide.
User can use this lable technique to show a MORE to the user,
guiding access to additional pages of icons.Try out the hatch
icon menu, then examine its code.
The macros following the icon menu labels work just as
you would except them to. The [Next] line is an example of
using a text label in an icon screen. The [MORE] macro loads
the second menu to the ***ICON device, then display it.
So, user can choose a workstation on the icon screen.Then
insert it in the drawing as a block. As insert command, user
can change size of blocks to suit for the user need.
(40)


PULL-DOWN MENU OF [TS]
(41)


B. PROGRAM OF TESTIO.MNU
TEST 1 O M N IJ
***BUTTONS
$pl=*
B
"0
"D
"E
a rjp
***AUX1
$pl=*
~C*C
"'B
"0
~G
"D
"E
~T
***popi
[Tools]
[OSNAP]~CX$pl= $pl=* OSNAP \
[CENter]CENTER
[ENDpoint]ENDPOINT
[INSert]INSERT
[INTersection]INTERSECTION
[MIDpoint]MIDPOINT
[NEArest]NEAREST
[N0De]N0DE
[PERpendicular]PERPENDICULAR
[QUAdrant]QUADRANT
[QUICK,]QUICK,~Z $pl=*
[TANgent]TANGENT
NONE
r--]
[FILTERS...]$pl=filters $pl=*
[Cancel TC~C
[U]"C"CU
[RedorCXREDO
[List]List
**fiIters
[Filters]
[.X ].X
[.Y ].Y
[.Z ].Z
[.XY ].XY
[.XZ ].XZ
[.YZ ].YZ
[TOOLS...]$pl= $pl=*
***P0P2


[Draw]
[Facility]"c''c''p$i=FAC $i=*
[Index],'c''c~p$i=IND $i=*
[Furniture]"c"c"p$i=FUR $i=*
[TS]"'c'vc~p$i=TS $i=*
[TREE]~c"c"p$i=TREE $i=*
[CAR]"c"c'p$i=CAR $i=*
[PEOPLE]''c~c~p$i=PEOPLE $i=*
[Line]*~C~C$S=X $s=line line
[Arc]*C'sC$S=X $s=poparc arc
[Circle]**C~C$S=X $s=popcircl circle
[Polyline]*''C*C$S=X $s=pline pline
[3D Polyline]*~C~C$S=X $S=3dpoly 3dpoly
[InsertJ^C^Csetyar attdia 1 $S=X $s=insert insert
[Dtext]*~CTC$S=X $s=Dtext Dtext
[Hatch...]~(TC$i=hatchl $i=*
[3D Construction...]$i=3dobjects $i=*
***P0P3
[Modify]
[Erase]*~CCerase si auto
[Move]*"'C''C$S=X $s=move move si auto
[Copy]*'CX$S=X $s=copy copy si auto
[Properties]*~C'vC$S=X $S=chprop chprop si auto
[Break]**C~C$S=X $S=break break
[Fillet]*"C~C$S=X $S=fillet fillet
[Mirror]*''C'T$S=X $S=mirror mirror auto
[Trim]*~C~C$S=X $s=trim trim auto
[Extend]*''C',C$S=X $s=extend extend auto
[Stretch]*AC~C$S=X $s=stretch stretch crossing
[Edit Polylines]*X~C"P+
(defun m:p(/ m:pa m:pb)(while (null (setq m:pa (car (entsel +
"Select Polyline: ")))))(menucmd "S=X")(if (= (setq m:pb (cdr +
(assoc 70 (entget m:pa)))) nil)(progn (menucmd "S=P0")(menucmd "P3=PL"));+
(progn (setq m:pb (/ m:pb 2))(if (>= m:pb 8)(progn (menucmd "S=P16")+
(menucmd "P3=PM"))(if(< m:pb 4)(progn(menucmd "S=P0")(menucmd "P3=PL"))+
(progn(menucmd "S=P8")(menucmd "P3=PL"))))))(menucmd "P3=*");+
(command "PEDIT" m:pa pause)(menucmd "p3=pop3")(setq *error* m:err m:err nil)+
(princ))(defun perror (msg)(menucmd "p3=pop3")+
(setq *error* m:err m:err nil)(princ))(defun CiPEDITM (/ m:err);+
(setq m:err *error* *error* perror)(m:p)(princ))(princ) PEDITM *P
**PL
[Polyline]
[Set Spline Fit Options...]$i=pli $i=*
**p^
[Polymesh]
[Set Smooth Fit Options...]$i=pmi $i=*
***P0P4
[Display]
[Redraw]redraw
ri
(43)


[Zoom Window]'zoom w
[Zoom Previous]'zoom p
[Zoom All]'zoom a
[Zoom Dynamic]'zoom d
r]
[Pan]'pan
[Dview Options... ]'(TC$i=dviewi $i=*
[Vpoint 3D...r(TC$S=X $S=VP0INT3D $i=3dviews $i=*
r]
[Plan View (UCS) TC^Cplan;;
[Plan View (World)l^C^Cplan wo
r 1
[Set Viewports...]*(TC$S=X $S=vports $i=vporti $i=*
***P0P5
[Settings]
[UCS Presets...]~(TC$S=X $S=ucsl $i=ucs $i=*
[UCS Dialogue...]~C~C$S=X $s=ucsl dducs
[UCS Previous TC^CUCS P
r1
[Drawing Aids...]'ddrmodes
[Entity Creation...]'ddemodes
[Modify Layer...]'ddlmodes
***P0P6
[Options]
[Ashade...]~P(progn(setq m:err *error*)(princ))(defun *error* (msg)+
(setq *error* m:err m:err nil)(prompt "Function cancelled. ")(princ))+
(cond ((null C:SCENE)(vmon)(if (/= nil (findfile "ashade.lsp"));+
(progn (terpri)(prompt "Please wait... Loading ashade. ")(load "ashade")+
(menuemd "I=AS")(menuemd "I=*")(setq *error* m:err m:err nil))(progn (terpri);+
(prompt "The file 'Ashade.lsp' was not found in your current search directories")+
(terpri)(prompt "Check your AutoShade Manual for installation instructions.");+
(setq *error* m:err m:err nil)(princ))))+
(T (setq *error* m:err m:err nil)(menucmd "I=AS")(menuemd "I=*")(princ))) ~P
[Fonts...]"C"C$i=fontsl $i=*
***P0P7
[File ]
[Save ]~C~CSave;
[End ]~C~Cend
[Quit ]"C,'C$S=X $s=quit quit
r ]
[Plot l^CCplot
[ Print ] X~Cprplot
***icon
**PLI
[Set Polyline Spline Curve Fit Options]
facad(plq)]'setvar splinetype 5
[acad(plc)]'setvar splinetype 6
[ Set SPLINESEGS]setvar splinesegs \
[ Exit]$p3=pop3


**PMI
[Set Polymesh Surface Fit Options]
[acad(pmq)]'setvar surf type 5
[acad(pmc)]'setvar surftype 6
[acad(pmb)]'setvar surftype 8
[ Exit]$p3=pop3
**as
[Select Ashade Command]
[acad(camera)]ACAC$S=X $S=CAMERA camera \\\$i=as $i
[acad(point)]ACAC$S=X $S=LIGHTS LIGHT \p \$i=as $i=
[acad(directed)]"C"C$S=X $S=LIGHTS LIGHT \d \\$i=as
[acad(scene)]ACAC$S=X $S=ACTION scene
[acad(filmroll)rCAC$S=X $S=ACTION filmroll
[ Exit]AcAc
**FAC
[Select Facility Pattern]
[fac(to32)]AcAclayer S to insert to32
[fac(toi)] delayer s to insert toi
[fac(to31)]AcAclayer s to insert to31
[fac(bidet)]delayer s to insert bidet
[fac(toi$)]AcAclayer s to insert toi$
[fac(to21)]AcAclayer s to insert to21
[fac(st$)]AcAclayer s to insert st$
[fac(lto01)]AcAclayer s to insert ItoOl
[fac(bath)]AcAclayer s to insert bath
[fac(hb)]AcAclayer s to insert hb
[fac(toll)]AcAclayer s to insert toll
[fac(cc)]AcAclayer s to insert cc
[fac(kit264)]AcAclayer s eq insert kit264
[fac(kit216)]AcAclayer s eq insert kit216
[fac(kitl44)]AcAclayer s eq insert kitl44
[ Exit]AcAc
**IND
[Select Index Pattern]
[ind(mslOO)]AcAcinsert mslOO
[ind(msendlOO)]AcAcinsert msendlOO
[ind(msarwlOO)]AcAcinsert msarwlOO
[ind(dtl1100)]AcAcinsert dtlllOO
[ind(elemark)]AcAcinsert elemark
[ind(finil)]AcAcinsert finl
[ind(fini2)]AcAcinsert fin2
[ind(stc)]AcAcinsert stc
[ind(nor)]AcAcinsert nor
[ind(pl)]AcAcinsert pi
[ind(ps)]AcAcinsert ps
[ Exit]AcAc
**FUR
[Select Furniture Pattern]
[fur(tea)]AcAcinsert tea
[fur(cor)]AcAcinsert cor


[fur(sof-l)]''c"cinsert sof-1
[fur(sof-2)] Reinsert sof-2
[fur(sof-3)]"c'cinsert sof-3
[fur(din6)]"c*cinsert din6
[fur(din$6)] Reinsert din$6
[fur(dinlO)] Reinsert dinlO
[fur(dinl2$)I'c^cinsert dinl2$
[fur(din4)]~c~cinsert din4
[fur(d-bed)],'c^cinsert d-bed
[ fur (d-bed$)] Reinsert d-bed$
[fur(s-bed)]*c*cinsert s-bed
[fur(s-bed$) ] Reinsert s-bed$
[fur(lelev)] Reinsert lelev
[ Exit]
[Select TS Pattern]
[TAB-1] Reinsert tab-1
[TAB-2] Reinsert tab-2
[TAB-3] Reinsert tab-3
[TAB-4]'Reinsert tab-4
[TAB-5]~c~cinsert tab-5
[TAB-6]Ac~cinsert tab-6
[TAB-7] Reinsert tab-7
[ EXIT]
**TREE
[Select Tree Pattern]
[tree( tree-1)] Reinsert tree-1
[tree(tree-2) ]'Reinsert tree-2
[ tree( tree-3) ]'Reinsert tree-3
[tree(tree-4)]^ccinsert tree-4
[ tree( tree-5) ] Reinsert tree-5
[tree(tree-6) ]Reinsert tree-6
[tree(tree-7)]Ac"cinsert tree-7
[tree(tree-11)]Ac*cinsert tree-11
[tree( tree-12)] Reinsert tree-12
[tree(tree-13)j"Reinsert tree-13
[tree(tree-14)]Reinsert tree-14
[tree(tree-15)]"c"cinsert tree-15
[tree(tree-1e)j^c^cinsert tree-le
[ tree( tree-2e) ] Reinsert tree-2e
[tree(tree-3e)]"c^cinsert tree-3e
[ EXITKc'c
**CAR
[Select Car Pattern]
[car(car) Kc^cinsert car
[car(car-ef)]"c"cinsert car-ef
[carCcar-eslj^c'cinsert car-es
[ EXIT]Ac*c
**PEOPLE


[Select People Pattern]
[man(man)]"c"cinsert man
[man(woman)]"c"cinsert woman
[ EXIT]"c"c
**ucs
[User Coordinate System Presets]
[ Set to World]"C"Cucs world
[acad(left)]"c"cucs 3p \@0,-l,0 @0,0,1
[ Set to Screen]"C"Cucs view
[acad(top)]"c"cues 3p \@1,0,0 @0,1,0
[acad(front)]"c"cucs 3p \@1,0,0 @0,0,1
[acad(bottom)]"c"cucs 3p \@1,0,0 @0,-l,0
[acad(back)]"c"cues 3p \@-l,0,0 @0,0,1
[acad(right)]"c"cucs 3p \@0,1,0 @0,0,1
[ Exit]"c"c
**3DViews
[Select View Direction]
[acad(ul)]"C"CVP0INT R;<<135;
[acad( 1)]"C"CVP0INT R;180;
[acad(ll)]"C"CVPOINT R;<<225;
[acad(user)]$I=*
[acad(u)]"C"CVP0INT R;<<90;
[acad(p)]"C"Cvpoint 0,0,1
[acad(lo)]"C"CVP0INT R;270;
[acad(user)]$I=*
[acad(ur)]"C"CVP0INT R;<<45;
[acad(r)]"C"CVP0INT R;0;
[acad(lr)]"C"CVP0INT R;<<315;
[acad(user)]$I=*
[acad(t)]VP0INT;;
[acad(h)]$S=X $S=HIDE
[ Exit]"c"c
**dviewi
[DVIEW Options]
[acad(dvca)]"C"C$S=X $S=DVIEW select;\dview;p;;ca;\\;
[acad(dvzo)]"C"C$S=X $S=DVIEW select;\dview;p;;z;\;
[acad(dvpa)]"C"C$S=X $S=DVIEW select;\dview;p;;pa;\\;
[ Cancel]
**3D0bjects
[3D Objects and 3D Surface Commands]
[acad(box3d)]"C"C"P(progn(setq m:err *error*)(prinl))+
(defun m:13d ()(cond ((null C:B0X)(vmon)(if (/= nil (findfile "3d.lsp"))+
(progn (terpri)(prompt "Please wait... Loading 3D Objects. ");+
(load "3d")(menucmd "S=X")(menucmd "S=3D2")(princ))(progn (terpri)(prompt +
"The file '3d.lsp' was not found in your current search path directories. ")(terpri);+
(prompt "Check installation of the 'Support Files' diskette #x and try again.")+
(47)


(princ))))(T (princ)))(cond ((not (null C:BOX))(C:BOX))(T (princ))))+
(defun *error* (msg)(menucmd "S=X")(menucmd "S=S")(setq *error* m:err m:err nil);+
(prinl))(m:13d) ~P
[acad(wedge)],'C"C"P(progn(setq m:err *error*)(princ));+
(defun m:13d ()(cond ((null C:BOX)(vmon)(if (/= nil (findfile "3d.lsp"))+
(progn (terpri)(prompt "Please wait... Loading 3D Objects. "); +
(load "3d")(menucmd "S=X")(menucmd "S=3D2")(princ))(progn (terpri)(prompt +
"The file '3d.lsp' was not found in your current search path directories. ")(terpri);+
(prompt "Check installation of the 'Support Files' diskette #x and try again.")+
(princ))))(T (princ)))(cond ((not (null C:WEDGE))(C:WEDGE))(T (princ))))+
(defun *error* (msg)(menucmd "S=X")(menucmd "S=S");+
(setq *error* m:err m:err nil)(prinl))(m:13d) ^P
[acad(rev)]AC'vC$S=X $S=3D revsurf
[acad(surftabl)]'setvar surftabl \$I=*
[acad(pyramid)KC~CP(progn(setq m:err *error*)(princ))+
(defun m:13d ()(cond ((null C:BOX)(vmon)(if (/= nil (findfile "3d.lsp"))+
(progn (terpri)(prompt "Please wait... Loading 3D Objects. ");+
(load "3d")(menucmd "S=X")(menucmd "S=3D2")(princ))(progn (terpri)(prompt +
"The file '3d.lsp' was not found in your current search path directories. ")(terpri);+
(prompt "Check installation of the 'Support Files' diskette #x and try again.")+
(princ))))(T (princ)))(cond ((not (null C:PYRAMID))(C:PYRAMID))(T (princ))))+
(defun *error* (msg)(menucmd "S=X")(menucmd "S=S");+
(setq *error* m:err m:err nil)(prinl))(m:13d) "P
[acad(cone)]"C"C"P(progn(setq m:err *error*)(princ));+
(defun m:13d ()(cond ((null C:BOX)(vmon)(if (/= nil (findfile "3d.lsp"))+
(progn (terpri)(prompt "Please wait... Loading 3D Objects. ");+
(load "3d")(menucmd "S=X")(menucmd "S=3D2")(princ))(progn (terpri)(prompt +
"The file '3d.lsp' was not found in your current search path directories. ")(terpri);+
(prompt "Check installation of the 'Support Files' diskette #x and try again.")+
(princ))))(T (princ)))(cond ((not (null C:CONE))(C:CONE))(T (princ))))+
(defun *error* (msg)(menucmd "S=X")(menucmd "S=S");+
(setq *error* m:err m:err nil)(prinl))(m:13d) *P
[acad(rul)]AC"C$S=X $S=3D rulesurf
[acad(surftab2)]'setvar surftab2 \$I=*
[acad(dome)]^CAC^P(progn(setq m:err *error*)(princ));+
(defun m:13d ()(cond ((null C:BOX)(vmon)(if (/= nil (findfile "3d.lsp"))+
(progn (terpri)(prompt "Please wait... Loading 3D Objects. ");+
(load "3d")(menucmd "S=X")(menucmd "S=3D2")(princ))(progn (terpri)(prompt +
"The file v3d.lsp* was not found in your current search path directories. ")(terpri);+
(prompt "Check installation of the 'Support Files' diskette #x and try again.")+
(princ))))(T (princ)))(cond ((not (null C:DOME))(C:DOME))(T (princ))))+
(defun *error* (msg)(menucmd "S=X")(menucmd "S=S");+
(setq *error* m:err m:err nil)(prinl))(m:13d) AP
[acad(dish)]',C'C/'P (progn(setq m:err *error*)(princ)); +
(defun m:13d ()(cond ((null C:BOX)(vmon)(if (/= nil (findfile "3d.lsp"))+
(progn (terpri)(prompt "Please wait... Loading 3D Objects. ");+
(load "3d")(menucmd "S=X")(menucmd "S=3D2")(princ))(progn (terpri)(prompt +
"The file '3d.lsp' was not found in your current search path directories. ")(terpri);+
(prompt "Check installation of the 'Support Files' diskette #x and try again.")+
(princ))))(T (princ)))(cond ((not (null C:DISH))(C:DISH))(T (princ))))+
(defun *error* (msg)(menucmd "S=X")(menucmd "S=S");+
(setq *error* m:err m:err nil)(prinl))(m:13d) "P
[acad(edg)]^C^C$S=X $S=3D edgesurf
[acad(user)]$I=*
7
(48)


[acad(sphere)]*(T(TP(progn(setq m:err *error*)(princ));+
(defun m:13d ()(cond ((null C:BOX)(vmon)(if (/= nil (findfile "3d.lsp"))+
(progn (terpri)(prompt "Please wait... Loading 3D Objects. "); +
(load "3d")(menucmd "S=X")(menucmd "S=3D2")(princ))(progn (terpri)(prompt +
"The file v3d.lsp' was not found in your current search path directories. ")(terpri);+
(prompt "Check installation of the 'Support Files' diskette #x and try again.")+
(princ))))(T (princ)))(cond ((not (null C:SPHERE))(C:SPHERE))(T (princ))))+
(defun *error* (msg)(menucmd "S=X")(menucmd "S=S");+
(setq *error* m:err m:err nil)(prinl))(m:13d) "P
[acad(torus)]*C/'C*P(progn(setq m:err *error*)(princ));+
(defun m:13d ()(cond ((null C:BOX)(vmon)(if (/= nil (findfile "3d.lsp"))+
(progn (terpri)(prompt "Please wait... Loading 3D Objects. ");+
(load "3d")(menucmd "S=X")(menucmd "S=3D2"))(progn (terpri)(prompt +
"The file '3d.lsp' was not found in your current search path directories. ")(terpri);+
(prompt "Check installation of the 'Support Files' diskette #x and try again.")+
(princ))))(T (princ)))(cond ((not (null C:TORUS))(C:TORUS))(T (princ))))+
(defun *error* (msg)(menucmd "S=X")(menucmd "S=S");+
(setq *error* m:err m:err nil)(prinl))(m:13d) *P
[acad(tab) ]*C,'C$S=X $S=3D tabsurf
[ Exit]"c~c
**fontsl
[Select Text Font]
[acad(romans)]~c~cstyle romans romans
[acad(romanc)]*c~cstyle romanc romanc
[acad(italicc)],'c"cstyle italicc italicc
[acad(romand) ]"c"cstyle roaiand romand
[acad(romant)]~c~cstyle romant romant
[acad(italict)Kc'cstyle italict italict
[acad(monotxt)] Restyle monotxt monotxt
[ Next]$i=fonts2 $i=*
[ ExitJ^c^c
**fonts2
[Select Text Font]
[acad(gothice)]~c~cstyle gothice gothice
[acad(greeks)],'c"cstyle greeks greeks
[acad( scripts IKc'cstyle scripts scripts
[acad(gothicg)]"c"cstyle gothicg gothicg
[acad(greekc)]"c'cstyle greekc greekc
[acadfscriptclJ^c^cstyle scriptc scriptc
[acad(gothici)]"c"cstyle gothici gothici
[ Next]$i=fonts3 $i=*
[ Exitj^c^c
**fonts3
[Select Text Font]
[acad(syastro)]~c~cstyle syastro syastro
facad(symath)]*c~cstyle symath symath
[acad(s5Tnusic)]''c*cstyle symusic symusic
[acad(symap)],'c"cstyle symap symap
[acad(symeteo)]*c~cstyle symeteo symeteo
[acad(txt)]~c''cstyle txt txt
[acad(user)]
(49)


[ Begining]$i=fontsl $i=*
[ Exitl'c'c
**hatchl
[Select Hatch Pattern]
[ Previous/User]^c^chatch
[acad(ansi31)]*c~chatch ansi31
[acad(ansi32)]"c/'chatch ansi32
[acad(ansi34)J^c^chatch ansi34
[acad(ansi35)Kc~chatch ansi35
[acadfansiSSlKc^chatch ansi33
[acad(ansi36)]*c*chatch ansi36
[acad(ansi37)]/'c~chatch ansi37
[acad(ansi38)Kc^chatch ansi38
[acad(box)]',c'chatch box
[acad(brass)]c^chatch brass
[acad(brick)]~c~chatch brick
[acad(clay)J^c^chatch clay
[acad(cork)]Ac~chatch cork
[ Next]$i=hatch2 $i=*
[ ExitTc^c
**hatch2
[Select Hatch Pattern]
[acad(cross)J^c^chatch cross
[acad(dash)]~c~chatch dash
[acad(dolmit) ]''c''chatch dolmit
[acad(dots)]~c~chatch dots
[acad(earth)]Ac*chatch earth
[acadCescher)]*^chatch escher
[acad(flex)]"c"chatch flex
[acad(grass)]~c/'chatch grass
[acad(grate) ]Tc*chatch grate
[acad(hex)]~c~chatch hex
[acad(honey)]* c *chatch honey
[acad(hound)]*c"chatch hound
[acad(insul)]"'c''chatch insul
[acad(line)]~c~chatch line
[ Next]$i=hatch3 $i=*
[ ExitTc^c
**hatch3
[Select Hatch Pattern]
[acad(mudst)]~c~chatch mudst
[acad(net)]"c"'chatch net
[acad(net3)]'"c'chatch net3
[acadCplastlKc'chatch plast
[acad(plasti)]"c"chatch plasti
[acad(sacncr)]/sc~chatch sacncr
[acad(square)J^c'1 chatch square
[acad(stars)]Ac'chatch stars
[acad(steel)]"c"chatch steel
[acad(swamp)]^c^chatch swamp
[acad(trans)]~c~chatch trans


[acad(triang)]~c"chatch triang
[acad(zigzag)]~c~chatch zigzag
[acad(angle)J'c'chatch angle
[ Beginning]$i=hatchl $i=*
[ Exit]~c"c
**vporti
[Viewport Settings (Current is dominant)]
[acad(vpl)rC*CVPORTS;SI
[acad(vp3v) T C ~CVPORTS;SI;;3;v
[acad(vp3h)]"CACVPORTS;SI;;3;h
[acad(vp4)rC*CVP0RTS;SI; ;4
[acad(vp2v) ] XXVPORTS;SI;; 2; v
[acad(vp3r)rCXVPORTS;SI; ;3;r
[acad(vp31)]"C'CVPORTS;SI;;3;1
[acad(vp41)]AC"C"PVPORTS;SI;;2;;(setvar "CVPORT" (1- (getvar"CVPORT")>);;2;;+
;J;;(- (getvar "CVPORT") 2) (setvar "CVPORT" (- (getvar "CVPORT") 2));;3;h;+
(setvar "CVPORT" (- (getvar "CVPORT") 3))(princ) AP
[acad(vp2h)]"C'CVPORTS;SI;;2;h
[acad(vp3a)]"CXVPORTS;SI; ;3;a;
[acad(vp3b)]/'C~CVPORTS;SI;;3;b;
[acad(vp4r)]"C'C"PVP0RTS;SI;;2;;;2;;;j;(l- (getvar "CVPORT"));+
(- (getvar "CVPORT") 3);;3;h;(setvar "CVPORT" (- (getvar "CVPORT") 3))(princ) P
[ Join Viewports]"C"CVPORTS;J
[ Restore Saved]*C~CVPORTS;R;
[ List Saved]"C~CVPORTS;?;
[ Exit]
***SCREEN
**g
[AutoCAD]-'C''C$S=X $S=S $P1=P0P1 $P3=P0P3
[* *]$S=OSNAPB
[Setup]''C'X'vP(progn(prompt "Loading setup... ")(load "setup")) /'P$S=X $S=UNITS
[BLOCKS]$S=X $S=BL
[DIM:]$S=X $S=DIM ~C~CDIM
[DISPLAY]$S=X $S=DS
[DRAW]$S=X $S=DR
[EDIT]$S=X $S=ED
[INQUIRY]$S=X $S=INQ
[LAYER:]$S=X $S=LAYER "C^CLAYER
[SETTINGS]$S=X $S=SET
[PLOT]$S=X $S=PLOT
[UCS:]$S=X $S=UCS1 "C'CUCS
[UTILITY]$S=X $S=UT
[3D]$S=X $S=3D
[ASHADE:]AC"C"P(progn(setq m:err *error*)(prinl))(defun *error* (msg)+
(setq *error* m:err m:err nil)(princ "Function cancelled. "))(cond ((null C:SCENE)(vmon)+
(if (/= nil (findfile "ashade.lsp"))(progn (terpri);+
(prompt "Please wait... Loading ashade. ")(load "ashade")+
(menucmd "S=X")(menucmd "S=ASHADE")(setq *error* m:err m:err nil))(progn (terpri);+
(prompt "The file Ashade.lsp1 was not found in your current search directories")+
(terpri)(prompt "Check your AutoShade Manual for installation instructions.");+
(setq *error* m:err m:err nil)(princ))))+
(T (setq *error* m:err m:err nil)(menucmd "S=X")(menucmd S=ASHADE")(princ))) P
(51)


[SAVE:r(T CSAVE
[ WALL ] X$S=X $S=WALL
[-RM/Cel-]X$S=X $S=RM
[ -DR/Wdw- ] X$S=X $S=DOR
[-Nte/Dt-] X$S=X $S=NOTE
**X 3
[__LAST__]$S= $S=
[ DRAW ]XX$S=X $S=DR
[ EDIT ]XX$S=X $S=ED
**BL 3
[ATTDEF:]$S=X $S=ATTDEF XX ATTDEF
[BASE:JXXBASE
[BLOCK:]$S=X $S=BLOCK XXBLOCK
[INSERT:]$S=X $S=INSERT XXINSERT
[MINSERT:]$S=X $S=MINSERT XXMINSERT
[WBLOCK:]$S=X $S=WBLOCK XXWBLOCK
**DS 3
[ATTDISP:]$S=X $S=ATTDISP XXATTDISP
[DVIEW:]$S=X $S=DVIEW XXDVIEW
[PAN:]PAN
[PLAN:]$S=X $S=PLAN XXPLAN
[REDRAW:]REDRAW
[REDRALL:]REDRAWALL
[ REGEN: ] XXREGEN
[REGNALL: ] X ^ CREGENALL
[ RGNAUTO: ] $S=X $S=RGNAUTO XXREGENAUTO
[VIEW:]$S=X $S=VIEW VIEW
[VIEWRES:]$S=X $S=VIEWRES XXVIEWRES
[VPOINT:]$S=X $S=VPOINT XXVFOINT
[ZOOM:]$S=X $S=ZOOM ZOOM
**DR 3
[ARC]$S=X $S=ARC
[ATTDEF: ]$S=X $S=ATTDEF XXATTDEF
[CIRCLE]$S=X $S=CIRCLE
[DONUT: ]XXDONUT
[DTEXT: ]$S=X $S=DTEXT XXDTEXT
[ELLIPSE:]$S=X $S=ELLIPSE X"CELLIPSE
[HATCH: ]$S=X $S=HATCH XXHATCH
[INSERT:]$S=X $S=INSERT XXINSERT


[LINE:]$S=X $S=LINE ACACLINE
[MINSERT: ]$S=X $S=MINSERT ACACMINSERT
[OFFSET:]$S=X $S=OFFSET "(TCOFFSET
[PLINE:]$S=X $S=PLINE ACACPLINE
[next]$S=X $S=DR2
**DR2 3
[POINT:]$S=X $S=POINT ACACPOINT
[POLYGON:]$S=X $S=POLYGON ACACPOLYGON
[SHAPE:]$S=X $S=SHAPE ACACSHAPE
[SKETCH:]$S=X $S=SKETCH ACACSKETCH
[SOLID: ]$S=X $S=SOLID ACACSOLID
[TEXT:]$S=X $S=TEXT ACACTEXT
[TRACE:]$S=X $S=TRACE ACACTRACE
[3DLINE:]$S=X $S=3DLINE ACAC3DLINE
[3DFACE:]$S=X $S=3DFACE ACAC3DFACE
[3D]$S=X $S=3D
[previous]$S=X $S=DR
[__LAST__]$S= $S=
**ED 3
[ARRAY:]$S=X $S=ARRAY AC~CARRAY
[ATTEDIT: ]$S=X $S=ATTEDIT "CCATTEDIT
[DDATTE: rC~CDDATTE
[BREAK: ]$S=X $S=BREAK "CCBREAK
[CHAMFER:]$S=X $S=CHAMFER ACACCHAMFER
[CHANGE:]$S=X $S=CHANGE "C'CCHANGE
[CHPROP: ]$S=X $S=CHPROP ACACCHPROP
[COPY:]$S=X $S=COPY ACACCOPY
[DIVIDE:]$S=X $S=DIVIDE ACACDIVIDE
[ERASE:]$S=X $S=ERASE ACACERASE
[EXPLODE:]ACA CEXPLODE
[EXTEND:]$S=X $S=EXTEND ACACEXTEND
[next]$S=X $S=ED2
**ED2 3
[FILLET:]$S=X $S=FILLET ACACFILLET
[MEASURE:]$S=X $S=MEASURE ACACMEASURE
[MIRROR:]$S=X $S=MIRROR ACACMIRROR
[MOVE:]$S=X $S=MOVE ACACMOVE
[OFFSET:]$S=X $S=OFFSET ACACOFFSET
[PEDIT:]ACACAP(defun m:p(/ m:pa m:pb)(while (null (setq m:pa (car (entsel +
"Select Polyline: ")))))(menucmd "S=X")(if (= (setq m:pb (cdr +
(assoc 70 (entget m:pa)))) nil)(progn (menucmd "S=P0")(menucmd "P3=PL"));+
(progn (setq m:pb (/ m:pb 2))(if (>= m:pb 8)(progn (menucmd "S=P16")+
(menucmd "P3=PM"))(if(< m:pb 4)(progn(menucmd "S=P0")(menucmd "P3=PL"))+
(progn(menucmd "S=P8")(menucmd "P3=PL"))))))(menucmd "P3=*");+
(command "PEDIT" m:pa pause)(menucmd "p3=pop3")(setq *error* m:err m:err nil)+
(princ))(defun perror (msg)(menucmd "p3=pop3")+
(setq *error* m:err m:err nil)(princ))(defun C:PEDITM (/ m:err);+
(setq m:err *error* *error* perror)(m:p)(princ))(princ) PEDITM AP
(53)
I


[ROTATE:]$S=X $S=ROTATE "C'CROTATE
[SELECT:]$S=X $S=SELECT ~C~CSELECT
[SCALE:]$S=X $S=SCALE ~C~CSCALE
[STRETCH:]$S=X $S=STRETCH "C^CSTRETCH C
[TRIM:]$S=X $S=TRIM "C'CTRIM
[UNDO:]$S=X $S=UNDO "C'CUNDO
[previous]$S=X $S=ED
**INQ 5
[AREA:]$S=X $S=AREA "C'CAREA
[DBLIST:]ACDBLIST
[DIST:]X"CDIST
[HELP:]'HELP
[ID:]$S=X $S=ID *C"CID
[LIST:]$S=X $S=LIST CYCLIST
[STATUS: TCXSTATUS
[TIME:J^C^CTIME
**SET 3
[DDEMODES]'DDEMODES
[DDRMODES]'DDRMODES
[--------]
[APERTUR:]$S=X $S=APERTURE "C'CAPERTURE
[AXIS:]$S=X $S=AXIS C'CAXIS
[BLIPS:]$S=X $S=BLIPMODE "C'CBLIPMODE
[COLOR:]$S=X $S=COLOR "C^CCOLOR
[DRAGMOD:]$S=X $S=DRAGMODE ~C~CDRAGMODE
[ELEV:]$S=X $S=ELEV "C'CELEV
[GRID:]$S=X $S=GRID "C'CGRID
[HANDLES: ]$S=X $S=IIANDLES ~C"CHANDLES
[LINETYP:]$S=X $S=LINETYPE "C'CLINETYPE
[LIMITS:]$S=X $S=LIMITS "C'CLIMITS
[next]$S=X $S=SET2
**SET2 3
[ LTSCALE: ] X'CLTSCALE
[OSNAP:]$S=X $S=OSNAPC "C^COSNAP
[QTEXT:]$S=X $S=QTEXT "C'CQTEXT
[SETVAR:]$S=X $S=SETVAR 'SETVAR
[SNAP:]$S=X $S=SNAP "C'CSNAP
[STYLE:]$S=X $S=STYLE "C'CSTYLE
[TABLET:]$S=X $S=TABLET "C'CTABLET
[UCS:]$S=X $S=UCS1 ~C~CUCS
[UCSICON:]$S=X $S=UCSICON *C~CUCSICON
[UNITS:rCUNITS
[VPORTS: ]$S=X $S=VPORTS "CXYPORTS
[previous]$S=X $S=SET
**PLOT 3
[ C D]
[ H E]
[ 0 V]
(54)


t 0
[ S
[ E
I]
C]
E]
[PLOTTER]"C"CPLOT
[PRINTER]"C"CPRPLOT
**UT 3
[ATTEXT: ]$S=X $S=ATTEXT "C"CATTEXT
[DXF/DXB]$S=X $S=DXF
[FILES:]"C"CFILES
[IGES]$S=X $S=IGES
[MENU:]$S=X $S=CHTEMP "C"CMENU
[PURGE:]$S=X $S=PURGE PURGE
[RENAME:]$S=X $S=RENAME ~C"CRENAME
[SCRIPT:]$S=X $S=SCRIPT "C"CSCRIPT
[SLIDES]$S=X $S=SLIDES
[External]$S=X $S=EXCOMDS
[Commands]$S=X $S=EXCOMDS
[END]$S=X $S=END
[QUIT]$S=X $S=QUIT
**OSNAPB 3
[CENter]CENTER $S=
[ENDpoint]ENDPOINT $S=
[INSert]INSERT $S=
[INTersec]INTERSEC $S=
[MIDpoint]MIDPOINT $S=
[NEArest]NEAREST $S=
[NODe]NODE $S=
[PERpend]PERPEND $S=
[QUAdrant]QUADRANT $S=
[QUICK,]QUICK,"Z
[TANgent]TANGENT $S=
[NONE]NONE $S=
[CANCEL: ]"C"C$S=
[U:]"C"CU $S=
[REDO:]"C"CREDO $S=
[REDRAW:]'REDRAW $S=
['SETVAR]$S= 'SETVAR
[_LAST__]$S=
**BLOCK 3
[BLOCK:]"C"CBLOCK
?
Window
Last
Previous
Crossing
Remove
Add
(55)
r


Yes
[oops rcr coops
**INSERT 3
[ INSERT: ] "CTINSERT
?
[*]*\
corner
xyz
drag
Scale
Xscale
Yscale
Zscale
Rotate
**WBLOCK 3
[WBLOCK: TCXWBLOCK
[blank];
Window
Last
Previous
Crossing
Remove
Add
Undo
**MINSERT 3
[MINSERT: TCXMINSERT
?
corner
xyz
drag
**DIM 3
[DIM:]"C"CDIM
[DIM1:J'C'XDIMl
[LINEAR]$S=X $S=DIMLINEAR
[angular]ANG
[diametr]DIAM
[radius]RAD
[center]CENTER
[leader]LEADER
[Dim Vars]$S=X $S=VAR1
[redraw]REDRAW
[status]STAT
undo
style
[EXIT]EXIT;$S=X $S=S
[next]$S=X $S=FORMAT
**DIMLINEAR 3
(56)
r


[DIM:rc~CDIM
t DIM 1: ] "(TCDIM1
[horiz]HOR
[vrtical]VERT
[alignedJALI
[rotated]ROT
[baselin]~(TCdim BASE
[continu]*C~Cdim CONT
[previous]$S=X $S=DIM
**ATTDEF 3
[ ATTDEF: ] 'C^CATTDEF
Invis
Constant
Verify
[Preset]P
Aligned
[Centered]C
Fit
Middle
Right
Style
**LAYER 3
[DDLMODES]1DDLMODES
[LAYER:]~C~CLAYER
[?]? *
Make
Set
New
ON
OFF
[Color]COLOR $S=X $S=LACOLOR \$S=X $S=LAYER
[Chroma]"C^CVSLIDE chroma
[ Restore]REDRAW
[Ltype]LTYPE $S=X $S=LALT \$S=X $S=LAYER
Freeze
Thaw
**LACOLOR 3
[COLOR]
[red]RED
[yellow]YELLOW
[green]GREEN
[cyan]CYAN
[blue]BLUE
[magenta]MAGENTA
[white]WHITE
(57)


**LALT 3
[LINETYPE]
[contin.]CONTINUOUS
[dashed]DASHED
[hiddenJHIDDEN
[center]CENTER
[phantom]PHANTOM
[dot]DOT
[dashdot]dashdot
[border]border
[dividejdivide
**ZOOM 3
[ZOOM:]ZOOM
All
[Center]C
[Dynamic]D
Extents
Left
Previous
Window
Yes
No
**ATTDISP 3
[ATTDISP:]~C~CATTDISP
Normal
ON
OFF
**DVIEW 3
[DVIEW:]"C"CDview
Window
Last
Previous
Crossing
Remove
Add
[By LayerKP(progn(setq l(getstring (strcat "Layer name: <" (getvar "clayer") "> ")))+
(if (= 1 "")(setq s(ssget "X" (list(cons 8 (getvar "clayer")))))+
(setq s(ssget "X" (list(cons 8 1)))))) ~P
[--------]
[Shoebox: TCCDVIEW;;
[ Dview ]$S=X $S=DVIEW1
(58)
1


[Options]$S=X $S=DVIEW1
**DVIEW1 3
Points
Camera
Target
Distance
Twist
Pan
Zoom
[ClipJClip $S=X $S=DVIEW2
OFF
Hide
Undo
[Exit]Exit $S=X $S=S
**DVIEW2 3
[Back]Back $S=X $S=BACK
[Front]Front $S=X $S=FRONT
[Off]0ff $S=X $S=DVIEW1
**BACK 3
[ back]
[clipping]
[0N]0n $S=X $S=DVIEW1
[OFFJOff $S=X $S=DVIEW1
**FR0NT 3
[ front]
[clipping]
[ONJOn $S=X $S=DVIEW1
[OFF]Off $S=X $S=DVIEW1
[Eye]Eye $S=X $S=DVIEW1
**RGNAUTO 3
[ RGNAUTO: ] 'XXREGENAUTO
[ON]On $S=X $S=DS
[OFFJOff $S=X $S=DS
**VIEW 3
[VIEW:]'VIEW
[Delete]Delete;
[Restore]Restore;
[Save]Save;
[Window]Window;
**VPORTS 3
[VPORTS:]AC"CVPORTS
Save
Restore
Delete
Join
Single


7
[2]2 $S=X $S=VP2
[3j3 $S=X $S=VP3
4
**VP2 3
[HorizontJH $S=X $S=VPORTS
[Vertical]V $S=X $S=VPORTS
**VP3 3
[HorizontJH $S=X $S=VPORTS
[Vertical]V $S=X $S=VPORTS
[Above]A $S=X $S=VPORTS
[Below]B $S=X $S=VPORTS
[Left]L $S=X $S=VPORTS
[Right]R $S=X $S=VPORTS
**LINE 3
[LINE:]~C~CLINE
[continueI'C'CLINE;;
close
undo
x
y
.z
xy
.xz
yz
**3D 2
[EDGSURF:rC^CEDGESURF
[REVSURF: rCXREVSURF
[ RULSURF: ] ~C"CRULESURF
[TABSURF:rC'CTABSURF
[Surftbl:]'SETVAR SURFTAB1
[Surftb2:]'SETVAR SURFTAB2
[3DFACE:]$S=X $S=3DFACE ~C~C3DFACE
[3DMESH: rC"C3DMESH
[3DP0LY:]$S=X $S=3DP0LY *C*C3DP0LY
[ 3d ]"C"C"P(progn(setq m:err *error*)(princ))+
(defun m:13d ()(cond ((null C:BOX)(vmon)(if (/= nil (findfile "3d.lsp"))+
(progn (terpri)(prompt "Please wait... Loading 3D Objects. ");+
(load "3d")(menucmd "S=X")(menucmd "S=3D2")(princ))(progn (terpri)(prompt +
"The file v3d.lsp' was not found in your current search path directories. ")(terpri);+
(prompt "Check installation of the 'Support Files' diskette #x and try again.")+
(princ))))(T (princ))))(defun *error* (msg)(menucmd "S=X")(menucmd "S=S");+
(setq *error* m:err m:err nil)(prinl))(m:13d) AP
[objects]AC*CAP(progn(setq m:err *error*)(princ))+
(defun m:13d ()(cond ((null C:BOX)(vmon)(if (/= nil (findfile "3d.lsp"))+
(progn (terpri)(prompt "Please wait... Loading 3D Objects. ");+
(60)
7


(load "3d")(menucmd "S=X")(menucmd "S=3D2")(princ))(progn (terpri)(prompt +
"The file '3d.lsp' was not found in your current search path directories. ")(terpri);
(prompt "Check installation of the 'Support Files' diskette #x and try again.")+
(princ))))(T (princ))))(defun *error* (msg)(menucmd "S=X")(menucmd "S=S");+
(setq *error* m:err m:err nil)(prinl))(m:13d) ~P
**3D2 3
Box
Cone
Dish
Dome
Pyramid
Sphere
Torus
Wedge
**ELEVTHK 3
[ELEV:J^C^CELEV
[CHANGE: TC'CCHANGE
Window
Last
Previous
Crossing
Remove
Add
Undo
[ElevJPROP E
[Thick]PROP T
**HIDE 3
[HIDE ?]
[ YES ]T CHIDE
[N0]$S= $S=
**VPOINT 3
[VPOINT:]~C~CVPOINT
rotate
[axes];
[planjnone 0,0,1
[HIDE:]$S=X $S=HIDE
**VP0INT3D 3
[Angle ]~C~CVP0INT R;;
[from XY rC'CVPOINT R;;
[Plane ]~C*CVP0INT R;;
[ +80 ]<<80
[ +60 ]<<60
[ +45 ]45
[ +30 ]30
[ +10 ]10
[ 0 ]<<0.0000001
[ -10 ]350
[ -30 ]<<330


[ -45 ]<<315
[ -60 ]300
[ -80 ]<<280
**PLINE 3
[PLINE:]"C"CPLINE
[Arc]ARC $S=X $S=PARC
Close
Halfwid
Length
Undo
Width
[FILL ON]'SETVAR FILLMODE 1
[FILL OFF]'SETVAR FILLMODE 0
**PARC 3
[POLYARC]
[angle]$S=X $S=PARCANG A
[CEnter]$S=X $S=PARCEN CE
[tanDir]DIR \DRAG
[Radius]$S=X $S=PARCRAD R
[2nd PT]S \DRAG
[CLose]$S=X $S=PLINE CLOSE
undo
[contline]$S=X $S=PLINE L
[PLINE:]$S=X $S=PLINE "C'CPLINE
**PARCANG 3
[ANGLE]
[center]C drag $S=X $S=PARC
[radius]R \ $S=X $S=PARC
[drag]drag \ $S=X $S=PARC
**PARCEN 3
[CENTER]
[angle]A drag $S=X $S=PARC
[length]L drag $S=X $S=PARC
[drag]drag \ $S=X $S=PARC
**PARCRAD 3
[RADIUS]
[angle]A \drag $S=X $S=PARC
[dragjdrag \ $S=X $S=PARC
**OFFSET 3
[OFFSET: KC^COFFSET
Through
[last];
**ARC 3
[ARC]
(62)
I


[3-point:]*C"CARC \\DRAG
[S,C,E:]~C*CARC \C \DRAG
[S,C,A:rC*CARC \C \A DRAG
[S,C,L:]~C*CARC \C \L DRAG
[S,E,A: ]X~CARC \E \A
[S,E,R:]X"CARC \E \R
[S,E,D:]~C~CARC \E \D DRAG
[C,S,E:r(TCARC C \\DRAG
[C,S,A:]C"CARC C \\A DRAG
[C,S,L:rC~CARC C \\L DRAG
[CONTIN:]"C"CARC ;DRAG
**popARC 3
[ARC]
[3-point:]*ACACARC \\DRAG
[S,C,E:J*ACACARC \C \DRAG
[S,C,A:]*~C*CARC \C \A DRAG
[S,C,L:]*AC~CARC \C \L DRAG
[S,E,A:]*~C~CARC \E \A
[S,E,R:]**CACARC \E \R
[S,E,D:]*~C*CARC \E \D DRAG
[C,S,E: ]*"C/'CARC C \\DRAG
[C,S,A:]*"C"CARC C \\A DRAG
[C,S,L:]**C~CARC C \\L DRAG
[CONTIN: KC'XARC ;DRAG
**CIRCLE 3
[CIRCLE]
[CEN,RAD:rCXCIRCLE \DRAG
[CEN.DIA:]~C~CCIRCLE \D
[2 POINT: rC'CCIRCLE 2P \DRAG
[3 POINT:PC'CCIRCLE 3P \\DRAG
[TTR:rC~CCIRCLE TTR
**popCIRCL 3
[CIRCLE]
[CEN.RAD:]*AC"CCIRCLE \DRAG
[CEN.DIA:]*^C"CCIRCLE \D
[2 POINT:]*~C~CCIRCLE 2P \DRAG
[3 POINT: ]*"C/>CCIRCLE 3P \\DRAG
[TTR:]*~C*CCIRCLE TTR
**ASHADE 3
[LIGHTS:]~C"C$S=X $S=LIGHTS LIGHT
[CAMERA:]~C*C$S=X $S=CAMERA CAMERA
[ACTION]*C*C$S=X $S=ACTION
**LIGHTS 3
[LIGHT:]~C~CLIGHT
[Point]p
[Directed]d
[Filters]
.x
(63)


y
.z
xy
.xz
yz
[CAMERA:r(TC$S=X $S=CAMERA CAMERA
[ACTION]$S=X $S=ACTION
**CAMERA 3
[CAMERA: TC'CCAMERA
[Filters]
.x
y
.z
xy
.xz
yz
[LIGHTS:]*C*C$S=X $S=LIGHTS LIGHT
[ACTION]$S=X $S=ACTION
**ACTION 3
[ACTION]
[ SCENE: ] '"C^CSCENE
[FLMROLL: TC^CFILMROLL
[LIGHTS: ]X"C$S=X $S=LIGHTS LIGHT
[ CAMERA: ] AC'VC$S=X $S=CAMERA CAMERA
**ELLIPSE 3
[ELLIPSE: TC^CELLIPSE
[Center]C
Rotation
Iso
Diameter
**POLYGON 3
[POLYGON:]~C~CPOLYGON
Edge
[I-scribe]I
[C-scribe]C
**SHAPE 3
(64)


[SHAPE: ]*(TCSHAPE
[LOAD: TCTCLOAD
?
**SKETCH 3
[SKETCH:]"C'CSKETCH
Connect
Erase
Record
[eXit]x
Quit
[------1
[SKPOLY:]'SETVAR SKPOLY 1
[SKLINE:]'SETVAR SKPOLY 0
[------]
**SOLID 3
[SOLID: TC'CSOLID
[FILL ON]'SETVAR FILLMODE 1
[FILL OFF]'SETVAR FILLMODE 0
**TRACE 3
[TRACE: TCXTRACE
[FILL ON]'SETVAR FILLMODE 1
[FILL OFF]'SETVAR FILLMODE 0
**POINT 3
[POINT: TCXPOINT
.x
y
.z
xy
.xz
yz
[Complex]
[Points]
[example:]~C~CVSLIDE points
[remove]~C"CREDRAW
[example:]*C~CREDRAW
[Pdmode:rC~CSETVAR PDMODE
[Pdsize:]"C"CSETVAR PDSIZE
**HATCH 3
[HATCH:]~C~CHATCH
?
u
u,o
u, i
Yes
(65)


Window
Last
Previous
Crossing
Remove
Add
Undo
**3DLINE 3
[3DLINE:rC~C3DLINE
[continuerC"C3DLINE;;
close
undo
.x
y
.z
.xy
.xz
.yz
**3DFAf;F 3
[3DFACE: rC"C3DFACE
.x
y
.z
xy
.xz
yz
**3DP0LY 3
13DP0LY:]~CAC3DP0LY
Close
Undo
.x
y
Z
.xy
.xz
yz
**ID 3
[ID:rCCID
.x
y
.z
xy
.xz
yz
**LIMITS 3
[LIMITS: KC^CLIMITS
ON
OFF
(66)


**UCS1 3
[UCS:rCTCUCS
Del
World
[Previous]Prev
Restore
Save
[RENAME:]~C~CRename UCS
?
[Follow:]'SETVAR UCSFOLLOW
[next]$S=X $S=UCS2
**UCS2 3
[UCS:]$S=X $S=UCS1 "CACUCS
Origin
Zaxis
3point
X
Y
Z
View
Entity
[previous]$S=X $S=UCS1
**UCSIC0N 3
[UCSICON:]~C~CUCSICON
ON
OFF
All
Origin
Noorigin
**PLAN 3
[PLAN: rCXPLAN
UCS
World
[Follow:]'SETVAR UCSFOLLOW
**LIST 3
[LIST:]"CYCLIST
Window
Last
Previous
Crossing
Remove


Add
Undo
**AREA 3
[AREA: ]*(TCAREA
Entity
Add
Subtract
**TEXT 3
[TEXT: r(TCTEXT
[ DTEXT: ] '(TCDTEXT
aligned
[centeredjC
fit
middle
right
style
[STYLE:]$S=X $S=STYLE "(TCSTYLE
**TEXTSET 5
[DTEXT]$S=X $S=DTEXT ~(TC$T4=DTEXT1 $T4=DTEXT2
[REG.TEXT]$S=X $S=TEXT *C~C$T4=TEXT1 $T4=TEXT2
[STYLE:]$S=X $S=STYLE "C^CSTYLE
**STYLE 3
[STYLE: ]~(TCSTYLE
?
[Fonts]$S=X $S=F1
Yes
No
[DTEXT:]$S=X $S=DTEXT "C^CDTEXT
[TEXT:]$S=X $S=TEXT "C^CTEXT
**F1 3
Cyrillic
Cyriltlc
Greekc
Greeks
Gothice
Gothicg
Gothici
Italicc
Italict
Romanc
Romand
Romans
(68)
n


[next]$S=X $S=F2
[STYLMNU]$S=X $S=STYLE
**F2 3
Romant
Scriptc
Scripts
Syastro
Symap
Symath
Symeteo
Symusic
Solid
[previous]$S=X $S=F1
[STYLMNU]$S=X $S=STYLE
**DTEXT 3
[DTEXT:]*C~CDTEXT
[ TEXT: ] '(TCTEXT
[centered]C
right
aligned
middle
fit
style
[STYLE:]$S=X $S=STYLE "(TCSTYLE
**AXIS 3
[AXIS:]*CTCAXIS
[axs=snap]SNAP
ON
OFF
Aspect
**BLIPMODE 3
[BLIPS:TCTCBLIPMODE
ON
OFF
**END 3
END ?
[YesTCTCEND
[No]$S=X $S=S
**QUIT 3
[QUIT:] Acquit


[Yes]Y
[No]n $S=X $S=S
**VAR1 3
[dimalt]$S=X $S=OF DIMALT \
[dimaltdJDIMALTD \
[dimaltf]DIMALTF \
[dimapost]DIMAPOST \
[dimaso]$S=X $S=OF DIMASO \
[dimaszJDIMASZ \
[--------]
[dimb!k]DIMBLK \
[dimblkl]DIMBLK1 \
[dimblk2]DIMBLK2 \
[dimcen]DIMCEN \
[dimdle]DIMDLE \
[dirndli]DIMDLI \
[dimexeJDIMEXE \
[next]$S=X $S=VAR2
[DIMMENU]$S=X $S=DIM
**VAR2 3
[dimexo]DIMEXO \
[dimlfac]DIMLFAC \
[dimlim]$S=X $S=OF DIMLIM \
[dimpostJDIMPOST \
[dimrnd]DIMRND \
[dimsah]$S=X $S=OF DIMSAH \
[dimscaleJDIMSCALE \
[dimsel]$S=X $S=OF DIMSE1 \
[dimse2]$S=X $S=OF DIMSE2 \
[dimsho]$S=X $S=OF DIMSHO \
[dimsoxd]$S=X $S=OF DIMSOXD \
[dimtad]$S=X $S=OF DIMTAD \
[dimtih]$S=X $S=OF DIMTIH \
[dimtix]$S=X $S=OF DIMTIX \
[previous]$S=X $S=VAR1
[next]$S=X $S=VAR3
[DIMMENU]$S=X $S=DIM
**VAR3 3
[dimtm]DIMTM \
[dimtof1]$S=X $S=OF DIMTOFL \
[dimtoh]$S=X $S=OF DIMTOH \
[dimtol]$S=X $S=OF DIMTOL \
fdimtp]DIMTP \
[dimtsz]DIMTSZ \
[dimtvpJDIMTVP \
[dimtxt]DIMTXT \
[dimzin]$S=X $S=DIMZIN DIMZIN \


[previous]$S=X $S=VAR2
[DIMMENU]$S=X $S=DIM
**0F 3
[0N]$S= $S= ON
[OFF]$S= $S= OFF
**DIMZIN 4
[ New]
[ Dimzin]
[ Value]
[0] $S= $S= 0
[1] $s= $s= 1
[2] $S= $S= 2
[3] $S= $S= 3
**FORMAT 3
[DIM:]*C*CDIM
[DIM1:]"C"CDIM1
[HOMETEXT]$S=X $S=HOMETEXT HOMETEXT
[UPDATE]$S=X $S=UPDATE UPDATE
[NEWTEXT]$S=X $S=NEWTEXT NEWTEXT
[DIMMENU]$S=X $S=DIM
**HOMETEXT 3
[DIM:]ACACDIM
[DIM1:]"C"CDIM1
HOMETEXT
Window
Last
Previous
Crossing
Remove
Add
Undo
**UPDATE 3
[DIM:]*C~CDIM
[DIM1:]"C"CDIM1


UPDATE
Window
Last
Previous
Crossing
Remove
Add
Undo
**NEWTEXT 3
[DIM:]~C"CDIM
[DIM1:J^C^CDIMI
[NEWTEXT]NEWTEXT
Window
Last
Previous
Crossing
Remove
Add
Undo
**LINETYPE 3
[LINETYP:TC^CLINETYPE
Create
Load
[Set]S $S=X $S=CHLT \$S=X $S=LINETYPE
Yes
No
**LIMITS 3
[LIMITS: KCTLIMITS
On
Off
**SNAP 3
[SNAP:TC~CSNAP
ON
OFF
[Aspect]$S=X ASPECT
[Rotate]$S=X ROTATE
[Style]S $S=X $S=SNAPSTYLE
**SNAPSTYLE 11
Iso
Standard
**TABLET 3
[TABLET: TC^CTABLET
cal
[config]CFG 4 25 9 11 9 9 13 25 7 Y
[re-cfg]CFG 4 Y 25 9 11 9 9 13 25 7 Y


ON
OFF
Yes
No
**OSNAPC 3
[OSNAP: PC'COSNAP
[CENter]CENTER\
[ENDpoint]ENDPOINT\
[INSert]INSERT\
[INTersec]INTERSEC\
[MIDpoint]MIDPOINT\
[NEAres t]NEAREST\
[NODe]NODE\
[PERpend]PERPEND\
[QUAdrant]QUADRANT\
[TANgent]TANGENT\
[NONEPCXOSNAP NONE $S= $S=
[Quick,] QUICK PZ
[,]A
**DRAGMODE 3
[DRAGMODE P C ~ CDRAGMODE
[ON]ON $S=X $S=S
[OFF]OFF $S=X $S=S
[Auto]A $S=X $S=S
**ELEV 3
[ELEV: PCACELEV
**GRID 3
[GRID: PCXGRID
[grd=snap]SNAP
ON
OFF
Aspect
**HANDLES 3
[HANDLES:]*C~CHANDLES
[0N]0N
[DESTROY]DESTROY
**SETVAR 3
[SETVAR:PC'CSETVAR
?
[SETVAR]'SETVAR
**QTEXT 3
[QTEXT: PCXQTEXT
ON
OFF
[REGEN:]REGEN
**VIEWRES 3
(73)


[VIEWRES: rCXVIEWRES
No
Yes
100
500
[RGNAUTO:J^C'CREGENAUTO
**APERTURE 3
[APERTUR:]SETVAR APERTURE
[PICKBOX:]'SETVAR PICKBOX
[1] $S= $S= 1
[2] $S= $S= 2
[3] $S= $S= 3
[4] $S= $S= 4
[5] $S= $S= 5
[6] $S= $S= 6
[7] $S= $S= 7
[8] $S= $S= 8
[9] $S= $S= 9
[10] $S= $S= 10
[15]$S= $S= 15
**ARRAY 3
[ARRAY:]ACACARRAY
Window
Last
Previous
Crossing
Remove
Add
Undo
Rectang
Polar
Yes
No
**R0TATE 3
[ROTATE:]ACACR0TATE
Window
Last
Previous
Crossing
Remove
Add
Undo
Referenc
**SELECT 3
[SELECT:]ACACSELECT
>>
(74)


Window
Last
Previous
Crossing
Remove
Add
Undo
**SCALE 3
[SCALE:]~C~CSCALE
Window
Last
Previous
Crossing
Remove
Add
Undo
Referenc
**BREAK 3
[BREAK: rC'CBREAK
First
&
**BREAK2P 3
[BREAK: TC'CBREAK \F
**BREAKSPL 3
[BREAK: TC^CBREAK \F \@
**MOVE 3
[MOVE: rC'CMOVE
Window
Last
Previous
Crossing
Remove
Add
Undo
**COPY 3
[COPY:]~CACCOPY
Window
Last
Previous
Crossing
Remove
Add
Undo
Multiple
**UNDO 3
[UNDO:KC'CUNDO
[Back irC~CUNDO 1
(75)
u


Auto
Back
End
Group
Mark
[Control]$S=X $S=UNDOC Control
Yes
No
[REDO:]REDO
**UNDOC 11
All
None
One
**ERASE 3
[ERASE: KC'CERASE
Window
Last
Previous
Crossing
Remove
Add
Undo
[OOPS:] SCOOPS
**P0 3
[PEDIT:]AC~C~P(defun m:p(/ m:pa m:pb)(while (null (setq m:pa (car (entsel +
"Select Polyline: ")))))(menucmd "S=X")(if (= (setq m:pb (cdr +
(assoc 70 (entget m:pa)))> nil)(progn (menucmd "S=P0")(menucmd "P3=PL"));+
(progn (setq m:pb (/ m:pb 2))(if (>= m:pb 8)(progn (menucmd "S=P16")+
(menucmd "P3=PM"))(if(< m:pb 4)(progn(menucmd "S=P0")(menucmd "P3=PL"))+
(progn(menucmd "S=P8")(menucmd "P3=PL"))))))(menucmd "P3=*");+
(command "PEDIT" m:pa pause)(menucmd "p3=pop3")(setq *error* m:err m:err nil)+
(princ))(defun perror (msg)(menucmd "p3=pop3")+
(setq *error* m:err m:err nil)(princ))(defun C:PEDITM (/ m:err);+
(setq m:err *error* *error* perror)(m:p)(princ))(princ) PEDITM AP
Last
Yes
No
Close
Open
Join
Width
[Ed Vrtx]E $S=X $S=PVERTED
[Fit Curv]Fit
Spline
Decurve
[Undo]U
[eXit]''c^c$S=X $S=S
**P8 3
(76)


[PEDIT:pCTCTPCdefun m:p(/ m:pa m:pb)(while (null (setq m:pa (car (entsel +
"Select Polyline: ")))))(menucmd "S=X")(if (= (setq m:pb (cdr +
(assoc 70 (entget m:pa)))) nil)(progn (menucmd "S=P0")(menucmd "P3=PL"));+
(progn (setq m:pb (/ m:pb 2))(if (>= m:pb 8)(progn (menucmd "S=P16")+
(menucmd "P3=PM"))(if(< m:pb 4)(progn(menucmd "S=P0")(menucmd "P3=PL"))+
(progn(menucmd "S=P8")(menucmd "P3=PL"))))))(menucmd "P3=*");+
(command "PEDIT" m:pa pause)(menucmd "p3=pop3")(setq *error* m:err m:err nil)+
(princ))(defun perror (msg)(menucmd "p3=pop3")+
(setq *error* m:err m:err nil)(princ))(defun C:PEDITM (/ m:err);+
(setq m:err *error* *error* perror)(m:p)(princ))(princ) PEDITM ~P
Last
Close
Open
[Ed VrtxJE $S=X $S=3DPVERTED
Spline
Decurve
[Undo]U
[eXit]X"C$S=X $S=S
**P16 3
[PEDIT:]*C''CAP(defun m:p(/ m:pa m:pb)(while (null (setq m:pa (car (entsel +
"Select Polyline: ")))))(menucmd "S=X")(if (= (setq m:pb (cdr +
(assoc 70 (entget m:pa)))) nil)(progn (menucmd "S=P0")(menucmd "P3=PL"));+
(progn (setq m:pb (/ m:pb 2))(if (>= m:pb 8)(progn (menucmd "S=P16")+
(menucmd "P3=PM"))(if(< m:pb 4)(progn(menucmd "S=P0")(menucmd "P3=PL"))+
(progn(menucmd "S=P8")(menucmd "P3=PL"))))))(menucmd "P3=*");+
(command "PEDIT" m:pa pause)(menucmd "p3=pop3")(setq *error* m:err m:err nil)+
(princ))(defun perror (msg)(menucmd "p3=pop3")+
(setq *error* m:err m:err nil)(princ))(defun C:PEDITM (/ m:err);+
(setq m:err *error* *error* perror)(m:p)(princ))(princ) PEDITM *P
[Ed Vrtx]E $S=X $S=3DMVERTED
Smooth
Desmooth
[McloseJM
[NcloseJN
[Mopen]M
[Nopen]N
[UDensity]1SETVAR SURFU
[VDensity]1SETVAR SURFV
[UndoJU
[eXit]'sC~C$S=X $S=S
**PVERTED 3
[ED VRTX]
Next
Previous
Break
Insert
Move
Straight


Width
Tangent
Go
Regen
[Undo]X U $S=X $S=PO
[eXit]X $S=X $S=PO
**3DPVERTED 3
[ED VRTX]
Next
Previous
Break
Insert
Move
Regen
Straight
[eXit]X $S=X $S=P8
**3DMVERTED 3
[ED VRTX]
Next
Previous
Left
Right
Up
Down
Move
Regen
[eXit]X $S=X $S=P16
**TRIM 3
[TRIM:]"C"CTRIM
Window
Last
Previous
Crossing
Remove
Add
Undo
**ATTEXT 3
[ATTEXT:]"C'CATTEXT
CDF
SDF
DXF
ENTITIES
Window
Last
Previous
Crossing
Remove
Add
Undo
(78)


**SLIDES 3
[MSLIDE: TC^CMSLIDE
Yes
No
[VSLIDE:]~C"CVSLIDE
**SCRIPT 3
[SCRIPT: rC'CSCRIPT
[DELAY: TC'CDELAY
[RESUME: TC'CRESUME
[RSCRIPT:J^C^CRSCRIPT
**PURGE 3
[PURGE:]PURGE
Blocks
LAyers
LTypes
Styles
All
Yes
No
**RENAME 3
[RENAME:KC'CRENAME
Block
LAyer
LType
Style
View
UCS
**DXF 3
[DXFIN:]^C^CDXFIN
[DXFOUT:]^C^CDXFOUT
16
Entities
Window
Last
Previous
Crossing
Remove
Add
Undo
[DXBIN:]"C^CDXBIN
**IGES 3
[IGESIN:rC~CIGESIN
[IGESOUT:]"C^CIGESOUT
**EXTEND 3
[ EXTEND: ]" C'' CEXTEND
(79)


Window
Last
Previous
Crossing
Remove
Add
Undo
[SELECT:]"C"CSELECT
[ZOOM W:]1 ZOOM W
**STRETCH 3
[STRETCH:]"C"CSTRETCH C
Window
Last
Previous
Crossing
Remove
Add
Undo
**MIRROR 3
[MIRROR: ]"C"CMIRROR
Window
Last
Previous
Crossing
Remove
Add
Undo
Yes
No
**FILLET0 3
[FILLET:0]"FILLET R 0;;
[polyline]P
**FILLET 3
[FILLET:]"C"CFILLET
[radius]R \FILLET
[radius 0]R 0 FILLET
polyline
**CHAMFER 3
[CHAMFER:]"C"CCHAMFER
[distance]D \\CHAMFER
[dist = 0]D 0 0 CHAMFER
polyline
**DIVIDE 3
[DIVIDE: rC"CDIVIDE
Block
Yes


No
**MEASURE 3
[MEASURE:]CCMEASURE
Block
Yes
No
**CHANGE 3
[CHANGE: TC'CCHANGE
Window
Last
Previous
Crossing
Remove
Add
Undo
[Color]PROP COLOR $S=X $S=CHCOLOR \ $S=X $S=CHANGE
[Chroma]~C ~CVSLIDE chroma
[ Restore]"C'CREDRAW
[Elev]PROP ELEV
[LAyer]PROP LAYER
[LType]PROP LT $S=X $S=CHLT \$S=X $S=CHANGE
[Thicknes]PROP THICKNESS
**CHPROP 3
[CHPROP: TC'CCHPROP
Window
Last
Previous
Crossing
[Color]PROP COLOR $S=X $S=CHCOLOR \$S=X $S=CHPROP
[ChromaTC^CVSLIDE chroma
[ Restore]"C'CREDRAW
[LAyer]PROP LAYER
[LTypeJPROP LT $S=X $S=CHLT \$S=X $S=CHPROP
[Thicknes]PROP THICKNESS
**CHCOLOR 3
COLOR
[bylayer]BYLAYER
[byblock]BYBLOCK
[red]RED
[yellow]YELLOW
[green]GREEN
[cyan]CYAN
[blue]BLUE
[magenta]MAGENTA
[white]WHITE


**CHLT 3
LTYPE
[bylayer]BYLAYER
[ byblock ] BYBLOCK
[contin.]CONTINUOUS
[dashed]DASHED
[hidden]HIDDEN
[center]CENTER
[phantom]PHANTOM
[dot]DOT
[dashdot]DASHDOT
[border]BORDER
**COLOR 3
[COLOR:J^C^CCOLOR
bylayer
byblock
red
yellow
green
cyan
blue
magenta
white
[ChromaKC^CVSLIDE chroma
[ Restore]"C'CREDRAW
**ATTEDIT 3
[ATTEDIT:rC~CATTEDIT
Window
Last
Previous
Crossing
Remove
Add
Undo
[Value]Value $S=X $S=ATTEDIT2
Position
Height
Angle
Style
Layer
[Color] $S=X $S=ATTC0L0R C
Next
[_LAST__]$S= $S=
**ATTEDIT2 3
[Change]Change $S=X $S=ATTEDIT
[Replace]Replace $S=X $S=ATTEDIT
>/
(82)


**ATTCOLOR 3
[COLOR]
[red]RED $S= $S=
[yellow]YELLOW $S= $S=
[green]GREEN $S= $S=
[cyan]CYAN $S= $S=
[blue]BLUE $S= $S=
[magenta]MAGENTA $S= $S
[white]WHITE $S= $S=
**UNITS 2
[UNIT ]
[TYPE ]
[scientfc]1;
[decimal ]2;
[enginrng]3;
[archtect]4;
[metric ]5;
**U1 2
[Scientfc]
[Scale ]
[4 TIMES ]4.0;
[2 TIMES ]2.0;
[FULL ] 1.0;
[HALF ]0.5;
[QUARTER ]0.25;
[OTHER rporp
**U2 2
[Decimal ]


[Scale
1
[4 TIMES ]4.0;
[2 TIMES 12.0;
[FULL 11.0;
[HALF ]0.5;
[QUARTER 10.25;
[OTHER rrorp
**U3 2
[Enginrng] [Scale ]
[1"=10' [1"=20' 1120.0; J240.0;
[1"=30' [1"=40' 1360.0; ]480.0;
[1"=50' [1"=60 1600.0; J720.0;
[1"=80' [1"=100' 1960.0; 11200.0;
[OTHER rrorp
**U4 2
[Archtect]
[1/40"=1'J480.0; [1/20"=1'J240.0; [1/I6"=r 1192.0; [ 1/8"=1'J96.0; [ 1/4"=1'J48.0;
[ 1/2"=1'J24.0; [ 3/4"=r ]16.0; [ l"=r 112.0; [ 3"=1']4.0;
(84)
*


[ 6"=1']2.0;
[ FULL ]1.0;
[OTHER...]~PO;~P
**U5 2
[Metric ]
[ 1 :5000 ]5000.0;
[ 1 : 2000 ]2000.0;
[ 1 : 1000 ]1000.0;
[ 1 :500 ]500.0;
[ 1 :200 ]200.0;
[ 1 : 100 ]100.0;
[ 1 :75 ]75.0;
[ 1 :50 ] 50.0;
[ 1 :20 ]20.0;
[ 1 : 10 ]10.0;
[ 1 :5 ]5.0;
[ FULL ] 1.0;
[OTHER... rporp
**ENGLISH 2
[Horizntl]
[ Sheet ]
[ Size ]
[A-8.5x11]11.0 8.5;
[B- 11x17]17.0 11.0;
[C- 22x34]34.0 22.0;
[ 18x24]24.0 18.0;
[D- 24X36]36.0 24.0;
[ 30x42]42.0 30.0;
[E- 36x42]42.0 36.0;
[OTHER...]"P0 0;~P
[VERTCAL>]$S=X $S=ENGVERT
**ENGVERT 2
[Vertical]
[ Sheet ]
[ Size ]
(85)
-u


[A-8.5x11]8.5 11.0;
[B- 11x17]11.0 17.0
[C- 22x34]22.0 34.0
[ 18x24]18.0 24.0
[D- 24X36]24.0 36.0
[ 30x42]30.0 42.0
[E- 36x42]36.0 42.0
[OTHER.. .TPO OTP
[HORZNTL>]$S=X $S=ENGLISH
**METRIC 2
[Horizntl]
[ Sheet ]
[ Size ]
[1189x841]1189.0 841.0;
[1000x707]1000.0 707.0;
[ 841x594]841.0 594.0;
[ 594x420]594.0 420.0;
[ 420x297]420.0 297.0;
[ 297x210]297.0 210.0;
[OTHER.. -TPO OrP
[VERTCAL>]$S=X $S=METRIOVERT
**METRICVERT 2
[Vertical]
[ Sheet ]
[ Size ]
[1189x841]841.0 1189.0;
[1000x707]707.0 1000.0;
[ 841x594]594.0 841.0;
[ 594x420]420.0 594.0;
[ 420x297]297.0 420.0;
[ 297x210]210.0 297.0;
[OTHER... ]*P0 OTP
[HORZNTL>]$S=X $S=METRIC
(86)


**CHTEMP 3
[Cha.ige ]
[Template]
[Arch...]/aec/a/m/aec-a
[Mech...]/aec/m/m/aec-m
**EXCOMDS 3
[CATALOG]CATALOG
[DEL:]DEL
[DIR:]DIR
[EDIT:]EDIT
[SH:]SH
[SHELL:]SHELL
[TYPE:]TYPE
***TABLET1
[ A1 ]
[A-2]
[ A3 ]
[A-4]
[ A5 ]
[A-6]
[ A7 ]
[A-8]
[ A9 ]
[A10]
[ A11 ]
[A12]
[A13]
[A-14]
[A-15]
[A16]
[ A 17]
[A18]
[A19]
[A-20]
[A21]
[A-22]
[A-23]
[A-24]
[A25]
[ B1 ]
[B-2]
[ B3 ]
[ B4]
[B-5]
[B-6]
[ B7 ]
[ B8 ]
[B-9]
[B10]
[B11 ]
[B-12]
t B13]
[B14]
(87)


[B15]
[B-16]
t B17]
[B-18]
[B-19]
[B-20]
[B-21]
[B-22]
[B-23]
[B-24]
[B25]
[C-l]
[ C2 ]
[C-3]
[C-4]
t C5 ]
[C-6]
[C-7]
[ C8 ]
[ C9 ]
[C-10]
[C-11]
[C12]
t C13]
[C-14]
[C-l5]
[C-l6]
[C17]
[C-18]
[C19]
[C-20]
[C21 ]
[C22 3
[C23]
[C-24]
[C-25]
[I>~1]
[ D 2 ]
[ D3]
[B-4]
[D-5]
[D-6]
[D-7]
[D-8]
[D-9]
[D 10]
[ D11]
[ D12 ]
[D-13]
[D-14]
[ D15 ]
[D16]
[D-17]
[D18]
(88)


[D-19]
£ D20 ]
tD-21]
[D22 j
£ D23 J
[D-24]
[D-25]
£ E1 ]
£ E2 ]
[E-3]
[E-4]
[E-5]
[E-6]
£ E7 ]
[E-8]
[E-9]
[E-10]
[E-l1]
£ E12]
[E13]
[E-14]
[E15]
£ E16]
[E-17]
[E-18]
[E-l9]
[E-20]
[E-21]
[E22]
[E-23]
[E-24]
£ E25]
[F-l]
[F-2]
[F-3]
£ F4 ]
£ F5 ]
[F-6]
[F-7]
[F8 ]
[F-9]
[F-10]
[F-l 1 ]
[F-l2]
[F13]
[F-14]
[F-15]
[F-l6]
[F-17]
£ F181
[F19]
[F-20]
[F21]
[F-22]
(89)


L F23]
IF-24]
[F25]
[G-l]
[G-2]
[G-3]
[G-4]
[G-5]
tG-6]
[ G7 ]
[G-8]
[G-9]
[G-10]
[G-l 1 ]
[G-12]
C G133
[G-14]
[G-15]
[G-16]
[G17]
[G18]
[G-19]
[G-20]
[G21]
[G22]
[G-23]
[G-24]
[G25]
[ H1 ]
[ H2]
[H-3]
[ H4 ]
[H-5]
[H-6]
[H-7]
[H-8]
[ H9 ]
[H10]
[H11]
[H-12]
t H13]
[H-14]
[H15]
[H16]
[H17]
[H18]
[H-19]
[H20]
[H21]
[H-22]
[H-23]
[H-24]
[H-25]
(90)
'.O


***TABLET2
$S=X $S=HIDE
$S=X $S=VPOINT VPOINT;;
$S=X $S=ELEVTHK
$S=X $S=UCS1 ~C~CUCS
~C~CUCS;PREV
"C"CUCS;V
9
~0
$S=X $S=ZOOM ZOOM W
$S=X $S=LINE X'1 CLINE
REDRAW
[VPOINT ]~CXVPOINT R;135;$S=X $S=VP0INT3D
[VPT rearrCXVPOINT R;90;$S=X $S=VP0INT3D
[VPOINT KCXVPOINT R;45;$S=X $S=VP0INT3D
$S=X $S=UCS1 X'CUCS
XXUCS;;
'CXPLANjW
o
$S=X $S=ZOOM ZOOM W
$S=X $S=PLINE "CXPLINE
REDRAW
[VPT leftTCXVPOINT R;180;$S=X $S=VP0INT3D
[VPT plan]AC'Cvpoint 0,0,1
[VPT rigtrC'CVPOINT R;0;$S=X $S=VPOINT3D
$S=X $S=DVIEW "CXDVIEW
$S=X $S=DVIEW ~CXSELECT;\DVIEW;P;;CA;\\;
$S=X $S=DVIEW XX$S=X $S=DVIEW1 DVIEW;;


D
$S=X $S=ZOOM 'ZOOM D
$S=X $S=ARC "C~CARC
'REDRAW
[VPOINT rtTCVPOINT R;<<225;$S=X $S=VPOINT3D
[VPT frnt]"C~CVPOINT R;270;$S=X $S=VPOINT3D
[VPOINT ]~CACVPOINT R;<<315;$S=X-£S*VFGTnT3D
$S=X $S=DVIEW "C'CDVIEW
$S=X $S=DVIEW *CACSELECT;\DVIEW;P;;Z;\;
$S=X $S=DVIEW "C"CSELECT;\DVIEW;P;;PA;\\;
:Q
$S=X $S=ZOOM ZOOM A
$S=X $S=CIRCLE "C'CCIRCLE
'REDRAW
"C*CAP(progn(setq m:err *error*)(prinl))(defun *error* (msg)+
(setq *error* m:err m:err nil)(prompt "Function cancelled. "))(cond ((null C:LIGHT)(vmon)+
(if (/= nil (findfile "ashade.lsp"))(progn (terpri);+
(prompt "Please wait... Loading ashade. ")(load "ashade")+
(menucmd "S=X")(menucmd "S=LIGHT")(setq *error* m:err m:err nil))(progn (terpri);+
(prompt "The file 'Ashade.lsp' was not found in your current search directories")+
(terpri)(prompt "Check your AutoShade Manual for installation instructions.");+
(setq *error* m:err m:err nil)(princ))))+
(T (setq *error* m:err m:err nil)(menucmd "S=X")(menucmd "S=LIGHT")(princ)));+
(cond ((not(null C:LIGHT))(C:LIGHT))) ~P
''C~CAP(progn(setq m:err *error*)(prinl))(defun *error* (msg)+
(setq *error* m:err m:err nil)(prompt "Function cancelled. "))(cond ((null C:CAMERA)(vmon)+
(if (/= nil (findfile "ashade.lsp"))(progn (terpri);+
(prompt "Please wait... Loading ashade. ")(load "ashade")+
(menucmd "S=X")(menucmd "S=CAMERA")(setq *error* m:err m:err nil))(progn (terpri);+
(prompt "The file Ashade.lsp was not found in your current search directories")+
(terpri)(prompt "Check your AutoShade Manual for installation instructions.");+
(setq *error* m:err m:err nil)(princ))))+
(T (setq *error* m:err m:err nil)(menucmd "S=X")(menucmd "S=CAMERA")(princ)));+
(cond ((not(null C:CAMERA))(C:CAMERA))) AP
ACACAP(progn(setq m:err *error*)(prinl))(defun *error* (msg)+
(setq *error* m:err m:err nil)(prompt "Function cancelled. "))(cond ((null C:LIGHT)(vmon)+
(if (/= nil (findfile "ashade.lsp"))(progn (terpri);+
(prompt "Please wait... Loading ashade. ")(load "ashade")+
(menucmd "S=X")(menucmd "S=ACTION")(setq *error* m:err m:err nil))(progn (terpri);+
(prompt "The file Ashade.lsp was not found in your current search directories")+
(terpri)(prompt "Check your AutoShade Manual for installation instructions.");+
(setq *error* m:err m:err nil)(princ))))+
(T (setq *error* m:err m:err nil)(menucmd "S=X")(menucmd S=ACTION")(princ))) AP
$S=X $S=3D "C^CRULESURF
$S=X $S=3D ACACREVSURF
$S=X $S=3D AC"C3DFACE
GRAPHSCR
$S=X $S=ZOOM ZOOM P
$S=X $S=ELLIPSE "C^CELLIPSE
REDRAW
$S=X $S=VPORTS "C'CVPORTS
$S=X $S=VPORTS ^C'CYPORTS;JOIN
(92)


(TCVPORTSiOFF
$S=X $S=3D "CTCEDGESURF
$S=X $S=3D "(TCTABSURF
$S=X $S=3D "C"C3DP0LY
*E
$S=X $S=ZOOM 'ZOOM E
$S=X $S=POLYGON "C'CPOLYGON
'REDRAW
$S=X $S=ZOOM 'ZOOM
$S=X $S=POINT "C'CPOINT
'REDRAW
$S=X $S=BLOCK "C'CBLOCK
$S=X $S=INSERT "(TCINSERT
$S=X $S=ATTDEF "C'CATTDEF
$S=X $S=LAYER "(TCLAYER
$S=X $S=LAYER "(TCLAYER
"B
$S=X $S=PAN 'PAN
"CTCDONUT
'REDRAW
$S=X $S=WBLOCK "(TCWBLOCK
$S=X $S=MINSERT "(TCMINSERT
$S=X $S=ATTDEF "(TCATTDEF
$S=X $S=LAYER "(TCLAYER ? *
"(TCLAYER S \;
J
"B
$S=X $S=DS
$S=X $S=DR
'REDRAW
***TABLET3
<<135
<<135
<<90
<<90
<<45
<<45


<<180
<<180
<\
<\
<<0
0
<<225
<<225
<<270
<<270
<<315
% <<315
9 9 "H

1


"H
7/8\
7/8\
/16\
/16\
/32\
/32\
l/2\
l/2\
5/8\
5/8\
3/4\
3/4\
l/8\
l/8\
l/4\
l/4\
3/8\
3/8\
(94)




"(TCTIME
$S=X $S=ID ~C~CID
'C'CSTATUS
$S=X $S=LIST "CYCLIST
'HELP
'HELP
$S=X $S=DTEXT "C'CDTEXT
$S=X $S=DTEXT "(TCDTEXT C
$S=X $S=DTEXT "C'CDTEXT R
^C'XOSNAP NONE
CENTER
ENDPOINT
INSERT
INTERSEC
MIDPOINT
NEAREST
NODE
PERPEND
QUADRANT
TANGENT
VcSAVE
^C'CSAVE
'C'CDBLIST
$S=X $S=AREA "C'CAREA
"CCDIST
$S=X $S=LIST "CYCLIST
'HELP


HELP
9
$S=X $S=DTEXT ACACDTEXT A
$S=X $S=DTEXT "CCDTEXT M
$S=X $S=DTEXT ACACDTEXT F
ACAC
ACAC
ACACU
ACACREDO
MULTIPLE
WINDOW
LAST
PREVIOUS
CROSSING
REMOVE
ADD
$S=X $S=END "C'CEND
$S=X $S=QUIT "ACQUIT
ACACFILES
ACACFILES
ACACDIM1 STATUS
$S=X $S=VAR1 ACACDIM
UNDO
REDRAW
EXIT;$S=X $S=S
EXIT;$S=X $S=S
$S=X $S=TEXTSET
$S=X $S=SNAP ACACSNAP


Full Text