Citation
Representative women of Colorado

Material Information

Title:
Representative women of Colorado a pictorial collection of the women of Colorado who have attained prominence in the social, political, professional, pioneer and club life of the state
Creator:
Semple, James Alexander
Place of Publication:
Denver, Colo
Publisher:
J.A. Semple
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
289 pages : frontispiece, illustrations, portraits ;

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Women -- Biography ( lcsh )
Women ( fast )
Biography -- Colorado ( lcsh )
Colorado ( fast )
Genre:
Biography. ( fast )
collective biography ( marcgt )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Biography ( fast )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
J.A. Semple.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
04097649 ( OCLC )
ocm04097649
Classification:
CT3266 .C6 S4 ( lcc )
920.7 ( ddc )

Auraria Membership

Aggregations:
Literature Collections

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[Second Edition]



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THIS book is devotedly dedicated to my
beloved wife, Zola, wbo during her brief
stay on earth was an inspiration to all who
knew her, and whose rare judgment and
untiring interest made possible from its incep-
tion this recognition of the noble womanhood
of our state.

Author and Compiler


"5>


'I^,&pro$e,n{a'(i\)e '~yfc'rrve-n
Jor clc)q
c/Cysicioriei?co)7q.c^5ott of*Tftom&?p
y> rominOTice, in U & SOC-yci?
po?y jorofassioTin?
yy?oncQsy~ <%?2
of
&
TulhAvJ 2y
ofamQS ffhjc'cinder T'r'&s-y ~$JejCanJ^uDysXyrvo (So.
'De,->xiJe.y'. (9o')or'a.9o
7971


Press of
The Williamson-Haffner Company
Denver, Colorado


Publishers Note
' I ''HE compiler o£ tkis volume desires
to express kis gratitude to tke Press
tkrougkout tke State and to tke prominent
men and women wko kave assisted kim ky
contributing to its accompliskment, and wko
by tkeir generous efforts kave enabled kim
to present a more comprekensive view of
tke individuality and activities of Colorado
women.


Explanatory
TrHDR the most satisfactory arrangement
of the photographic reproductions in the
compilation of this work, the author had in
mind the ultimate pleasure of all the sub-
scribers. To this end it was imperatively
necessary to observe two salient features:
first, the size and location of the cities rep-
resented, and, second, the alphabetical order
and size of the engravings, Therefore, it
will be noted that the volume is divided
into six sections, each comprising the photo-
graphs from that particular locality.


[R. James Alexander Semple,
president of The Alexander
Art Publishing Company, has
prepared, with uncommon
care as well as artistic photo-
graphic felicity, the following
admirable series of the Repre-
sentative Women of Colorado.
I have been requested to write the pref-
ace, introduction, or opening pages of the
alluring volume. The task is pleasurable,
and, under the circumstances, not in any
way difficult.
It is timely and commendable that a
book of this character should be given to
the country. The women of Colorado
hold an unique position before the world.
They have the ballot, a privilege denied
their sisters of most other states and other
lands. That they have exerted the unusual
power of suffrage with marked intelligence,
wisdom, and tact, is best demonstrated by
the steady, healthful growth in population,
in material prosperity, and aesthetic uplift,
that today characterizes the commonwealth.


'T'HEY talk about a womans sphere
As though it had a limit;
Theres not a place in earth or heaven
Theres not a task to mankind given,
There s not a blessing or a woe,
Theres not a whisper, yes or no,
Theres not a life, or death, or birth,
That has a feathers-weight of worth,
Without a woman in it.


ally, would be as incomplete as a statue of
Polyphemus deprived of his single eye.
What is true of the world is true of the
state, and for that reason, it seems to me,
the maker of this book has undertaken a
grateful and graceful task when he presents
in composite, concrete, and individual form,
the gentle faces of those who have done so
much to make Colorado keep step to the
advanced march of civilized progress.
This pictorial rather than literary enter-
prise, I am happy to say, has the signed
favor and approval of the most prominent
and notable men in the community, who
have cordially encouraged the publisher
to the successful completion of his labors.
This is well. The test of civilization is the
estimate of women, and while the brain
woman may never interest us as the heart
woman, for the reason that her whole life
is a history of the affections, the fact
remains that she has the same human rights
as manthe inalienable right to life, liberty,
and the pursuit of happiness. These she
acquires with less restriction under the tur-
quoise skies of Colorado than elsewhere,
and for that reason reaches her destiny
quicker.
77V>2>-


In no other part of the world is woman
so important a factor, in town and country,
state and nation, as in the Rocky Mountain
West. Here, she truly and naturally devel-
ops, politically, mentally, socially. Here,
her genius, her taste, her perception, her
tenacity, her intuitive grace, her romance
even, has ample opportunity to express
itself, finding its logical fruition in the
great field of Life.
George Eliot declared that the happiest
women, like the happiest nations, have no
history, which is true. The compiler of
this volume, therefore, makes no attempt
at biographical sketches, but presents sim-
ply the attractive portraits of the Represen-
tative Women of Colorado, many of whom,
however, have writ their names large in
the quiet history of the state.
Many, too, have attained eminence in
art, music, literature, and statecraft, as well
as the hundreds of good women whose
domain has been essentially the home, the
foundation of society, the genesis of all
things beautifully human.
Lord Bacon said but the truth when he
remarked that the pictures of the world,
without the pictures of the women especi-


Denver




*v-*>' ^



MRS. N. P. HILL
(Nee Alice Hale)
DENVER
Came to Colorado in 1868, and immediately became the center of hospitality in
Gilpin County, where her husbands smelter was located. Moved to Denver in
1878, and became a forc^ in every charitable and social uplift. Charter member
Woman's Club, President Denver Free Kindergarten Association for nine years,
during its entire history. Eight years President of Y. W. C. A. and raised larger
part of money for site and construction of its present home. Represented Colo-
rado as Vice-Pegent of Mt. Vernon Association from 1889 until her death in 190S.
Her social gifts were notable, and were called forth during her husbands career
as Senator in Washington. Her broad sympathies endeared her to a host of
people.


MRS. E. M. AMMONS
DENVER
W ife of the present Governor of Colorado. Essentially a home woman.
She is a Denver girl, having resided in the city and vicinity for thirty-five
years. Her unassuming, cordial manner and her devotion to home, hus-
band and children have endeared her to Denver citizens whether or not
they have the privilege of her personal acquaintance.
16


MRS. ELI M. ASHLEY
DENVER
Denver resident since 1861. Active worker in the campaign for equal
suffrage in 1893. One of the founders of Orphans Home, and Senate Bill
No. 1 of Tenth General Assembly establishing State Home for Dependent
Children. Charter member of Fortnightly Club, Deutsche Damen, Womans
Club, First President of Colorado Federation of Womens Clubs, member
D. A. R., Vice-President of Board of Lady Managers of Worlds Columbian
Exposition.
17


MRS. DEWEY C. BAILEY
DENVER
A very prominent club woman of Denver, whose philanthropic interests are
widespread. Mrs. Bailey is a woman of uncommon executive ability and
her remarkabe popularity among the women with whom she is associated
has been shown in the fact that she has held the position of President of
the Denver Womans Club for four terms.
18


MRS. JAMES BELFORD
DENVER
One of Colorados best known temperance, educational and philanthropic
workers; a leader in the W. C. T. U.; a member of the Board of Directors,
State Teachers College, for five years, and, for three years, of State Board
of Charities and Corrections at the time the Girls Industrial School and
State Home for Dependent Children were created; present member Board
of Directors, State Agricultural College.
19



e'jo'res&rt

- V*

I
MARGARET B. BERGER
DENVEIt
The mother oi a prominent family. Well known as a former member of
the Auxiliary Hoard of St. Lukes Hospital and as a prominent member of
St. Johns Church. She came to Denver in 1869 and has taken great in-
terest in the philanthropic work of the city.


^
MRS. HENRY M. BLACKMER
DENVER
A charming woman. Mrs. Blackmer belongs to the leading fashionable cir-
cle of Denvers society life. She is also prominently associated with the
social life of New York.
21


MARY C. C. BRADFORD
DENVER
State Superintendent of Public Instruction, and Past President, Colorado
Federation of Womens Clubs. A dominating influence in philanthropic,
club, political, and educational lines for twenty years. As teacher, lecturer,
writer, school, and club official, she has a national reputation. An eloquent
speaker, a forceful writer, and a public official reflecting credit upon the
women of Colorado.
22


MRS. J. FITZ. BRIND
(E. M.)
DENVER
The Past President of the Old Ladies Home and the Denver Orphans
Home. The first woman on the Executive Board of the Denver Organized
Charities. A member of the Ladies Auxiliary Board of Mercy Hospital.
One of the best known philanthropists in Denver and recognized for her
artistic temperament and business ability.
23


REVEREND NONA L. BROOKS
DENVER
Born in Louisville, Kentucky, of Virginian and New England ancestry.
Graduate Charleston College, West Virginia; student of Wellesley. Mem*
ber of Womans Club and Womans Press Club. Identified with philan-
thropic, educational, and religious work. An organizer of the Divine Sci-
ence movement and Pastor of its First Church. Prominent in New
Thought field. Ex-President of Denver Philosophic Society; for six years
Secretary of the Colorado Prison Association.
24


MRS. JANE C. BROWN
(Mrs. Henry C. Brown)
DENVER
A relative of Governor Crane, Massachusetts, and descendant of Sir Hugh
Thompson. Mrs. Brown and family came to Colorado in 1S60. One of
the founders of the Denver Orphans Home, and for years among its most
liberal contributors. In early days a strong supporter of the Methodist
Church. Mr. Brown donated the site UDOn which is erected the State
Capitol Building, and built for his wife the Brown Palace Hotel.
25


MRS. J. J. BROWN
DENVER
A woman of tremendous executive ability; particularly noted for her rare
bravery at the eventful time of the Titanic disaster. She is a woman of
large philanthropic interests and meets every request for aid with generous
response. She is socially a favorite, and is known in the social circles of
the large cities in America.
20


MRS. J. SIDNEY BROWN
DENVER
University of Wisconsin Alumna. Teacher in Denver twelve years. Prom-
inent in church, club, and social life. Member D. of R., the Collegiate
Alumni Association; President Fortnightly Club; Chairman Field Commit-
tee, Colorado Federation of Womens Clubs, and on Honor Roll of General
Federation Endowment Fund. President, J. S. Brown & Bro. Mercantile
Company. Proud mother, devoted to her home and family.


MRS. MAY BUTLER BROWN
DENVER
A pioneer in her own right: said to be the first white girl born in Denver.
October 15. 1800; her birth-place was on Larimer street, between Four-
teenth and Fifteenth streets. Her parents came from South Wales and
crossed the Atlantic in a sailing vessel in 1856. Mrs. Brown is a mem-
ber of the Womans Club and of the Pioneer Ladies Aid Society, of which
she is a Past President.
28


ALICE H. BROWNLEE
DENVER
Board of Lady Managers from State of Washington of Worlds Columbian
Exposition in Chicago. A great lover of art and is surrounded by one of
the greatest collections of pictures this side of Chicago, being the proud
possessor of old masters. Largely interested in Western Metals Company.
This company holds all the patents for the chlorination treatment of ores
which cannot be handled by any other method.
29


MRS. WM. N. BYERS
DENVER
Was Elizabeth M. Sumner, whose Colonial ancestors took an active part
in the Revolution and War of 1812. She has been closely associated with
charitable, church, patriotic, and educational work, being a member of the
Official Board of Denver University for years. A charter member of Wom-
ans Club and Woman's Press Club, and founder of the E. M. Byers Home
for Boys. Has contributed liberally to churches and charitable institutions.
30


MRS. GEORGE HORACE CAMPBELL
DENVER
Mrs. Lillian E. Campbel and family, consisting of Mr. Clarence G. Camp-
bell, Mrs. Cheney R. Baker, and Miss Marjorie Campbell, are all prominent
socially. Although great devotees of travel, they are thoroughly identified
with the charitable and progressive interests of Denver. Mrs. Campbell
is notable for her business ability, being actively engaged with her son in
managing the extensive interests of the Knight-Campbell Music Company.
SI


MARGARET PATTERSON CAMPBELL
(Mrs. Richard C. Campbell)
DENVER
A well-known church, educational, and philanthropic worker, who is an
alumna of East Denver High School, and Bryn Mawr College, and a charter
member of the Colorado Branch of the Association of Collegiate Alumnae,
and of the Womans Club. Mrs. Campbell is a member of many literary
clubs, among them the Fortnightly, Deutsche Damen, Monday, Womans
Press, and the Drama League of America.
32


MRS. JOHN F. CAMPION
DENVER
A very beautiful woman, a gracious hostess of many brilliant social func-
tions, and a fine mother, whose charming personality has made her well
beloved, both in her beautiful home and in social life. Mrs. Campion is
very benevolent and there are few large charitable enterprises in Colorado
in which she is not a prominent factor.
33


4.
* 4...

MRS. EDWARD PRENTISS COSTIGAN
DENVER
President \\ Omans Club of Denver, President Denver Oracled Union of Sun-
day School Teachers. She is a noted Sunday School worker, teacher, and
lecturer, both :n and out of Colorado. Among Mrs. C'ostigans accom-
plishments, her art of story-telling is especially remarkable. She is a
valued member of the Colorado Congress of Mothers.
34


MRS. MARTHA HITTSON CRANMER
DENVER
A woman of gracious and charming manner. Prominent in the social,
political, and civic life of Denver. Earnest and enthusiastic in ail philan-
thropic work. A valued and active member of State Board of Pardons;
also of the Territorial Daughters, Womans Press Club, and Daughters of
the Confederacy. Her husband was a successful business man of Denver
in the early history of the state.
35


MRS. LUCIUS MONTROSE CUTHBERT
(Gertrude Hill)
DENVER
Youngest child of the late Senator Nathaniel P. Hill; was born in Colo-
rado. Since girlhood Mrs. Cuthbert has been interested in philanthropic
and social welfare activities. Director of Childrens Hospital Association,
the Denver Orphans Home, the Y. W. C. A. These organizations espe-
cially enlist her sympathy and support. Mrs. Cuthbert has three daugh-
tersCharlotte Alice Berger, by a previous marriage; Gertrude and Alice
Middleton Cuthbert.
36


MRS. SARAH S. PLATT DECKER
DENVER
First President of the Womans dub of Denver. Her winning personality,
her wit and wisdom gave her national fame as an orator and leader. Four
efficient years as President of the National Federation of Womens Clubs
were followed by seven years as a member of the State Board of Charities
and Corrections, for five of which she was its President, being later ap-
pointed the first woman on the Civil Service Commission of Colorado.
37


MRS. ANNA M. DeREMER
DENVER
A noble and beautiful woman of unusual force and executive power, who
takes special interest in the irrigation projects of Colorado. While she is
a highly educated woman, and has directed many enterprises, her greatest
interest has been for her splendid family. Mrs. DeRemer is a native of
the state.


o


6
MRS. JOSEPHINE BEEMER DEXTER
DENVER
A recognized leader of Dramatic Art in Denver, with almost phenomenal
success as a reader of classic lore. An artist of national note pays her
this glowing tribute: Truly the Scott Siddons of Classic Denver in ar-
tistic interpretation. Of gracious and dignified presence, brilliant men-
tal equipment, and rare personal charm, she has figured prominently in
the club, social, and philanthropic life of the Western Metropolis.


MRS. JACOB DOWNING
(Caroline Eudora Rosecrans)
DENVER
First member Ladies Relief Society, now Old Ladies Home. Past Presi-
dent Ladies Auxiliary to G. A, R. Past President of Pioneer Ladies Aid
Society; benefactor of Denver Orphans Home; a generous giver to the
Colorado Womens College, Childrens Hospital, Public Library, and
founder of the Jacob Downing Home for the Aged, with perpetual endow-
ment of $1,200 yearly. Member of Woman's Club and member Womans
Press Club. Highly talented as artist, musician, and poet.


MRS. S. F. DUTTON
DENVER
An attractive personality; well known for her charming hospitality and
delightful manner. She is not only gifted in the art of managing social
affairs, but has that inestimable talent for managing business, which is
characteristic of few women. Mrs. Dutton is the mother of two beautiful
daughters.
41


MAUDE FEALY
DENVER
One of Americas leading actresses, who has been on the stage since a
child. A co-star with Gillette, Hilliard, Collier, Goodwin, and Willard,
she won many triumphs. In succeeding Ellen Terry with Sir Henry Irving
in London, she was even more successful than in this country. For sev-
eral years she has toured with her own company. Came to Colorado when
a child.
4 2


ELLEN J. FOOTE
(Nee Ellen Jackson)
DENVER
Born in England, reared and educated in New York. Assistant Principal
in Girls School, Beirut, Syria, for fifteen years. Compiled and published
a Natural Philosophy in Arabic, which is used in all Academic Schools in
Syria and Egypt. Returned to America in 1884; married and came to
Denver, where she has lived since. Charter member of Y. 'W. C. A., and
twenty years its Superintendent.
43


NETTIE K. GRAVETT
DENVER
State Librarian until called to a larger work in Ohio. Educated in Fair-
field Union Academy and Oxford College. Active in club life, having held
many important offices. Member of D. A. 1L, Equal Suffrage Association.
Colorado Library Association, and the A. L. A. The State Library of Ohio
sent her to Europe to study methods and conditions of library work
abroad.
44


MRS. HELEN LORING GRENFELL
DENVER
Whose work in educational, sociological, and political lines has been
unique and far reaching in influence. State Superintendent Public Instruc-
tion three successive terms. Inaugurated reforms in management of State
school lands which doubled the income derived from them. Lectured for
equal suffrage throughout the country. First woman Penitentiary Com-
missioner. Member Society Mayflower Descendants, Womans Club, life
member State Teachers Association. Resident of Colorado since child-
hood. Declared by a former Governor to be the best state official Colo-
rado ever had.
45


MATILDA HAFFNER
DENVER
A native of Pennsylvania, who has been a Coloradoan twenty-two years.
Next to her home and children, philanthropies, art, and music are her chief
interests.
4f>


ffd
&y>r'ese.n
MRS. ADELAIDE REYNOLDS HALDEMAN
DENVER
Editor, writer, humanitarian. An organizer and Past Vice-President, Chil-
drens Hospital. A promoter Municipal Lodging House and Representative
of The League of American Chivalry, protective guild for business girls.
As Director and Press Chairman in Womans Club and Womans Press
Club, a versatile writer of international reputation; editor Modern World,
Business Womans magazines, and Club Womans Record, her influ-
ence extends to tne boundaries of womans work.


MRS. CHARLES BOWEN HAMILTON
DENVER
Socially prominent, and also finds time for innumerable good works not
included in her labors for St. Marks Church. As Director of St. Mar-
garets Guild, she is one of its most zealous supporters; she is also a
loyal supporter of the Woman's Club, the Neighborhood House, and the
Day Nursery.
48




ANTOINETTE ARNOLD HAWLEY
DENVER
Colorado's great temperance leader. President Womans Christian Tem-
perance Union, 1899-1904. Honorary Life President. Nominated for
Mayor, Prohibition ticket, Denver, 1900. Editor State W. C. T. U. Mes-
senger. State lecturer. Magazine writer. Author of Crusade Glory
Song, sung in every state. Valued member of Womans Press Club,
Womans Public Service League, Womans Club, Equal Suffrage Associa-
tion, D. A. R., Plymouth Congregational Church. Toured the world when
seventy-one.
49


MRS. THOMAS H. HERBERT
DENVER
A prominent business woman of Denver, who, since her husbands death,
has successfully managed the large catering establishment bearing his
name. She has been active in various lines of charitable work. Member
of Womans Club and Sacred Heart Aid Society and is well known socially.


MRS. ALICE POLK HILL
DENVER
One of the organizers of the Womans Club, and Denver Womans Press
Club. The founder of the Round Table Club, of which she has been the
able and gracious President for many years. Was the one woman, with
twenty men, who wrote the charter for the City and County of Denver.
She has written a book on pioneer life in Colorado and is compiling an-
other.
51


MRS. CRAWFORD HILD
DENVER
Famous as a social leader of Denver and of the entire Rocky Mountain
region. Descended from a prominent Tennessee family. Her charming
personality combines the grace of the South with the vigor of the West.
Mrs. Hill was presented at the Court of King Edward VII. She is the
exponent of the steadily increasing elegance of Colorados well-bred and
well-educated women.
52


MRS. E. ELLA B. JEROME
DENVER
President Young- Womans Christian Association, member State Board
Colonial Dames, Honorary State Regent New Jersey National Society
Daughters of the American Revolution. State President Colorado Na-
tional Society of Daughters of Founders and Patriots of America.
53


LILLIAN HARTMAN JOHNSON
DENVER
Daughter of pioneers prominent in Southwestern Colorado. Published the
Colorado Magazine, and, through its columns, advocated high ideals for
the woman citizen and fought for her recognition in all fields of public
work, and the establishment of a womans party. Has devoted her talents
as a public speaker to reform movements in politics. Secretary City Civil
Service Commission. Viee-President Colorado Equal Suffrage Association.
54


MRS. JAMES W. KELLEY
(Eselyn Brown)
DENVER
One of Colorados leading woman writers and public speakers. Interested
in all public questions, which she discusses ably in print and on the plat-
form. A deep student of social and economic subjects. President Denver
Womans Press Club, 1913-14. Before her marriage, had a brilliant career
in journalism, her writings being marked by a sparkling piquancy seldom
equaled in this country.
55


omen o.
'cy+ac'o
MRS. FRANKLIN PRICE KNOTT
(Nee Isabel Hill)
DENVER
Eldest daughter of the late Senator N. P. Ilill. Charter member of Wom-
an's Club of Denver; charter member and President for nine years of Tues-
day Musical Club. One of the organizers and Treasurer for nine years of
Denver Free Kindergarten Association. Spends most of her time with her
artist husband in travel, but is very active in social and charitable mat-
ters when residing in Denver.
5fi


MRS. ALMA V. LAFFERTY
DENVER
Successful legislator, lecturer, and impresario. Fluent and convincing
speaker. Made her debut as legislator in 1908. Re-elected in 1910.
Early recognized as a leader. Chairman of Committee on Education. Mem-
ber of Committees on Appropriations, Judiciary, and State Institutions.
Called Mother of Eight Hour Law for Women. Chairman Womans Na-
tional Democratic Organization for Colorado. Served on Hoard City Chari-
ties and Corrections. Generally known as the woman who does things.
57


MISS GAIL LAUGHLIN, B.A., LL.B.
DENVER
Alumna of Wellesley College and of Cornell University Law School. Mem-
ber of New York and Colorado Bar, President of the Womans Public Serv-
ice League, member of the State Board of Pardons, and Womans Club;
she also finds time to write on public questions.
58


MRS. MARY ELITCH LONG
DENVER
The founder and proprietor of the famous pleasure resort, Elitchs Gardens.
It has a distinctive character of refinement, and is known all over the
United States. First woman to manage successfully a zoo, and for years
the owner and manager of one of the best known summer stock theaters.
Has endeared herself to the public throus-h her kindly and considerate in-
terest in little children, and in the unfortunate.
59


T''
MRS. JESSE F. MCDONALD
DENVER
The wife of a former Governor of Colorado, who has identified herself with
the social, political, and club life of the state. Mrs. McDonald has a large
number of friends in Colorado, where she has lived for many years. She
is a charming hostess and always interested in philanthropic work and pub-
lic spirited movements which make for the betterment of the state.
60


IDA KRUSE McFARLANE
(Mrs. Frederick)
DENVER
Graduate of Vassar College. Public lecturer on literature and art. Pro-
fessor of English at the University of Denver. Has held many positions of
honor and trust.
61


MRS. JOHN LLOYD McNEIL
DENVER
Served as President Denver Orphans Home, Denver Fortnightly Club; first
Treasurer Womans Club of Denver; Colorado Commissioner to Atlanta Ex-
position; member State Commission to mark Santa Fe Trail in Colorado;
held office of State Regent, Daughters American Revolution; Chairman
Emergency Committee, Soldiers Aid Society Spanish-American War;
Chairman Committee securing first appropriation State Library.
62


ELLIS MEREDITH
DENVER
Author and journalist. Born in Montana. Special writer Rocky Mountain
News. 1889-1903. Active in Colorado suffrage campaign. Life member
N. A. \V. Suffrage Association. Vice-Chairman Democratic State Central
Committee, 1904-OS. Elected Election Commissioner, 1910; first woman
elected to office in Denver. Charter member Womans Club. Author. The
Master Knot, Under the Harrow, Heart of My Heart. Married Henry
H. Clement, 1913.
63


TP
KATHARINE GRAFTON PATTERSON
(Mrs. Thomas M. Patterson)
DENVER
As an organizer of the Central Christian Church, the Y. W. C. A., the Den-
ver Orphans Home, and the Womans Club, Mrs. Patterson was prominent
in religious, charitable, and social affairs. She was for several terms Presi-
dent of the Colorado Equal Suffrage Association, and an effective worker
in gaining the vote for women. Through the Womans Club she advanced
the idea of artistic schoolroom decoration.
61


MRS. GENEVIEVE CHANDLER PHIPPS
DENVER
A renowned beauty, whose graciousness, courtesy and generosity are well
known. Mrs. Phipps has been identified with the philanthropic work of
the state and has been for years one of the leaders of Denver society.
She is much sought after socially as a very brilliant conversationalist, be-
ing widely read and having traveled much.
65


MRS. VERNER Z. REED
DKNVKR
A society woman. She is very much admired by a large circle of ac-
quaintances.


HELEN RING ROBINSON
DENVER
Educator, writer, politician, and lecturer of national prominence, this re-
markable woman still finds time for the fine art of domesticity. Mrs.
Robinson enjoys the distinction of being the first woman State Senator in
Colorado.
67


KATE RUSSELL
DENVER
A well-known newspaper woman, who has been a Denver resident for many
years. She was, formerly, Society Editor of The News, and is at present
special writer for Denver papers. Mrs. Russell is a member of the Why
Club and a Past President of the Womans Press Club.
68



MRS. JAMES HEINER SEMPLE
DENVER
Came to Colorado in 1881. Her father was a distinguished attorney and
one of the largest individual land owners of Louisiana, and represented
that state at the Paris Exposition. A Daughter of the Confederacy, being
a kinswoman of the late President Jefferson Davis. A descendant of the
House of Stuart, and closely related to Baroness von Stocki of Berlin.
Alumna of Wolfe Hall. My dear mother.J. A. Semple.
69


MISS VICTORIA EUGENIA SEMPLE
DENYHR
A daughter of the Confederacy, related to ex*President James Ruehanan.
Miss Semple is a descendant of Colonial and Revolutionary ancestry; an
extensive traveler; a member, since its reorganization, of St. Margarets
Guild. St. Marks Episcopal Church; was educated in the schools of Den-
ver; sister of the compiler of this volume.
TO


MRS. JOHN F. SHAFROTH
DENVER
One of the most popular of Colorados many brilliant and accomplished
women. The wife of one of Colorados most prominent citizens, who has
represented the state as Governor and as United States Senator. A woman
of distinctive charm and graciousness, who is sought after in both social
and club life. A member of the Round Table, Mittwoch. and Monday Lit-
erary Clubs. An ideal mother and is justly proud of her fine sons.
71


MISS HATTIE LOUISE SIMS
DENVER
Received her musical education from Madame Viardot-Garcia in Paris, and
the great Maestro Lamperti in Italy. She was soloist for the Worcester
Music Festivals, the Handel and Hayden, Boston Symphony, and also for
the Philharmonic, Oratorio, and other New York societies. In Denver, she
was prominently known as conductor of the Tuesday Musical Club, and is
the leading teacher of singing in this city.
72


MRS. EBEN SMITH
DENVER
Came to Colorado in 1860. With her husband she crossed the plains nine
times before the railroad was built. They resided many years in Central
City, Boulder, and Leadville, where Mr. Smith engaged in mining. Eighteen
years ago she came to Denver and engaged in charitable work: The Old
Ladies Home, Childrens Hospital, Home for the Aged Poor, and private
charities. Died December 26, 1909.
73


MRS. LOUIE F. SPRATLEN
DKXVKR
A beautiful matron, of whom Colorado is proud. Posed as Queen Louise
of Prussia after ihe famous portrait by Grassi that hangs in the Hohen-
zollern Museum of Berlin. She is called the most beautiful woman in
Colorado. A woman of the rarest tact and grace of manner, as well as
the possessor of wonderful loveliness. She suggests the famous Circassian
beauties in her melting, dark eyes, her vivid coloring, and her hair of
purple-black shadows.
74


ELLEN TERRY STRONG
DENVER
By her fa'th, loyalty and self-denial, she assisted her father to success in
the famous Sunnyside Mines. Business men have recognized her as an
equal and she is often spoken of as a born financier. Whi.e she makes
Denver her home, her heart is in the mountains.


MRS. HENRY M. TELLER
DENVER
Mrs. Teller went as a bride to Central City in 1S02. In 1S76 she ac-
companied her husband, ex-Senator Teller, to Washington where she spent
most of the time until his retirement. Active in several charities, she
was especially interested in the Woman's Home Missionary Society of the
Methodist Church.
70


MRS. JOSEPH ADDISON THATCHER
DENVER
Mrs. Thatcher came from St. Louis to Central City, Colorado, in 1S65.
and was married the same year to Joseph A. Thatcher, now one of Den-
vers most prominent bankers. She was a charter member of Womans
Club, and St. Lukes Hospital Board. On Board of Young- Woman's Chris-
tian Association, and West Central Territorial Committee.


MRS. J. F. VAILE
DENVER
As Miss Anna Louise Wolcott she has been, for many years, one of the
prominent educators of the state. Founded, and has since conducted, the
Miss Wolcott School for Girls in Denver. A Regent of the State Univer-
sity since 1910; she is also one of the Board of Managers of the Ameri-
can School of Archaeology, at Santa Fe, New Mexico. In January, 1913,
she married Mr. Joel F. Yaile.
78


FRANCES BELFORD WAYNE
DENVER
A native of Colorado, who has been a special newspaper writer for eight
years. Her girlhood was spent in Washington, while her father was Con-
gressman. For a year she was Dramatic Critic for the Chicago Exam-
iner and is at present a writer for the Kansas City Post and Denver
Post. She is a member of the Woman's Press Club.
79


MRS. JULIA VON DKR LIETH WELLES
DENVER
Widely known for benevolence. A member of First Charter Convention.
City and County of Denver. A charter member of the Womans Club, and
her plans, for raising the money on bonds to build the Womans Club
House, wen* accepted. Organized the Young Ladies Clio Club. Valued
member of Denver Woman's Dress Club and President of Colorado Travel-
ing Library Commission at time of death.
SO


MRS. FRANK B. WHIPPLE
(Nee Rebecca Archer)
DENVER
A prominent member of the social life of this city. Daughter of James
Archer, President of the Denver Gas Company and the Denver Water Com-
pany until his death, in 1882. Mrs. Whipple is on the Board of Directors
of the Young Womens Christian Association and the St. Lukes Hospital,
and is the President of the Denver Dumb Friends League.
81


MRS. JAMES DAY WHITMORE
(Annie Goodell)
DENVER
President of tho Woman's Club, 1S99-1904, and the C'oorado Federation
of Womens Clubs, 1906-03. Seven years Chairman of the Philanthropic
Committee of the Woman's Club. Vice-Chairman, in 1912, of the Repub-
lican State Central Committee, and Director of the Womans Hureau of
the Republican National Committee for Colorado. Wyoming, Idaho, and
I tah. in 1912. Member of the D. A. R., Colonial Dames, and Mayflower
Descendants.
82


ELLA S. WILLIAMS
(Mrs. James Williams)
DENVER
Resident of Colorado since 1884 and a leading factor in establishing its
most important lines of philanthropic work. Has been President of the
Old Ladies Home, Childrens Hospital, and of the State Board of Charities
and Corrections. Founder and life President of the Jacob Downing Home
for the Aged. Through her efforts the State Home for Mental Defectives
was established. Member Colorado Chapter, D. A. R., and Mayflower So-
ciety.
88


MRS. HARRY M. WILLIAMSON
DENVER
Belongs to one of the older Denver families. Daughter of Dr. ami Mrs.
J. B. Cory, sister of Mrs. E. 1\ C'ostigan and Mrs. J. B. Stott. Mrs.
Williamson is prominent socially and in church circles. An enthusiastic
member of the Mothers Congress, to which she rightfully belongs, because
her chief interest and pleasure is in her home and in her family of beau-
tiful children.
Si


HELEN MARSH WIXSON
DENVER
Best known through her excellent achievement as State Superintendent of
Public Instruction, and in the Womans Club of which she was a charter
member. Mrs. Wixson has been actively engaged in philanthropic, educa-
tional, and literary work for many years, and is widely and favorably
known as a newspaper and magazine writer. She was for five years the
President of the Denver Womans Press Club.
85


FRONA ABBOTT, M.D.
DENVER
A popular and successful physician of
Denver. Member Countv Hospital Staff.
Expert microscopist, having held profes-
sorship in Histology and Pathology sev-
eral years. Completing the Classical
Course in the State Normal, Oneonta.
N. V., taught History and English in
Woodside. Long Island. High School, un-
til entering medical college.
THEODOSIA G. AMMONS
DENVER
Club worker, educator, and lecturer; born
in North Carolina, in 1S61. Educated,
and afterwards taught, in Denver Public
Schools. Prominent in Equal Suffrage
movement. Established Domestic Sci-
ence Department in Agricultural College,
in 1895. Head of Department, exten-
sive lecturer, and Dean of Women until
her death, in 1907.
86


MRS. JAMES RAE ARNEILL
(Sara Hyatt TaylorJ
DENVER
Alumna, Packer Institute, Brooklyn, N.
Y., and the Comnock School of Expres-
sion. Actively interested in the National
Congress of Mothers and several charita-
ble boards. Member of the Monday Lit-
erary Club, Government Science Club,
the Drama League, Colorado Chapter of
D. A. R., and the Colorado Equal Suf-
frage Association.
MARY H. BARKER BATES, M.D.
DENVER
A highly cultured woman, recognized as
one of the states leaders in philanthropic,
educational, and club work. Ex-member
of Denvers Board of Education; ex-Vice-
President Colorados State Medical So-
ciety; Colorados delegate to Pan-Ameri-
can Medical Congress. Member of So-
ciety Descendants of the Mavfiower, and
D. R.
87



*
DR. JENETT3 H. BOLLES
DENVER
Degrees: li.S.. Kansas University; M.A..
Denver University; D.O., American School
ot' Osteopathy. Pioneer osteopathist of
Colorado. Member Association of Col-
legiate Alumnae, D. A. R., Woman's
Club, Clio Club; Chairman Hygiene Com-
mittee, Congress of Mothers; Local, State
and National Osteopathic Associations,
President C. O. A.
MRS. KATE C. BROWN
DENVER
A pioneer and a most gracious and moth-
erly woman, dignified in spirit ami very
modest. She has a splendid knowledge
of books. For many years was Chaplain
in the Daughters of the American Revo-
lution. In her Chapter she was the only
one entered under a general.


MRS. NEWTON E. BARKALOW
DENVER
Ail enthusiastic philanthropic worker,
prominently identified with the Social
Center and Day Nursery Association, and
the Ladies Aid Society of St. Lukes
Hospital. Mrs. Rarkalow is a member
of the D. A. 1L. and the Mothers Con-
gress.
MRS. O. M. CARTER
DENVER
There is no beauty more glorious than
character, and in this is she rich in-
deed. Of a deeply religious nature, for
forty-two years she has given much time
to church and charitable work. An art-
ist of marked ability, and author of a
book, entitled Prophecies Relating to
Christ.
89


MRS. EMILY LOCKE CAMERON
DENVER
A charming woman of modest, retiring
manner, beloved bv many friends; com-
ing before the public only in the capacity
of Christian Science Practitioner, which
she has been for twenty years. She was
reader in the old church of the denom-
ination and later reader for three years
in the new church.
MRS. MARY TALBOT CAMPBELL
DENVER
A musician and club woman, whose lit-
erary heritage from her mother. Mrs. S.
Maria Talbot, is shown in fiction, appear-
ing in such magazines as the Century,
''McClures, the American, etc. 1-rom
her best known stories we select The
\pple of Discord and A Celestial Gar-
ment.
90


MRS. CHARLES T. CARNAHAN
DENVER
Daughter of Eben Smith, well-known pio-
neer and mining man. Born in Central
City and has lived most of the time in
Colorado, although educated in eastern
schools. Has traveled extensively at home
and abroad. Mrs. Carnahan is carrying
on many of her mothers charities.
MRS. SUSIE D. CARSTARPHEN
DENVER
Came to Colorado in 1886. Charter
member of the Scio Club. Joined the
Womans Club in 1899, and the Clio
Club in 1900. Is interested in Keramic
Art. Member of United Daughters of the
Confederacy.
91


MRS. STANLEY MEARS CASPAR
DENVER
Member and Past President State Hoard
Charities and Corrections. A founder of
Colorado -Society Colonial Dames. State
Regent Daughters of Revo'ution, member
U of Archaeological Institute, the Colorado
Cliff Dwellings Association, Artists.
Twenty-second Avenue Study, Woman's
Press, and Monday Literary Clubs, ami
active in many charities.
ELIZABETH CASSIDY. M.D.
DENVER
Graduated from Knox College, Galesburg.
111., and the Northwestern University
Womens Medical College. Chicago, III.
Assistant City and County Physician.
1909-10. First woman elected as a mem-
ber of the Board of County Commission-
ers, City and County of Denver, 1911.
Member of the State Hoard of Charities
and Corrections.
92


:E
&'py%e.s&yt
GxtiO* TKr
(yo)oy>£i^Q
DR. ESTHER SANDERS CHERRY
DENVER
Vice-Chairman Social Science Depart-
ment, Womans Club of Denver; member
of Daughters of American Revolution,
Womans Press Club, and other organiza-
tions. A talented musician and success-
ful lecturer on musical history, the great
symphonies, grand opera, and other mu-
sical subjects.
MRS. W. E. COLLETT
DENVER
As Secretary of the Colorado Prison As-
sociation, she assists more paroled pris-
oners to start life anew than does the
executive officer of any similar organiza-
tion in the United States.
93


INDIANA SOPRIS CUSHMAN
DENVER
Caine to Denver in I860, with parents.
Captain and Mrs. Richard Sopris. First
woman to open private school, May 7.
1860. Was active in Sunday School and
church work. Married Samuel Cushman,
1866. Resident of Central City many
years. Was pioneer of Deadwood, South
Dakota, 1S7S. Returned to Denver in
1903.
MRS. GEORGE T. CLARK
DENVER
A pioneer of Colorado and a resident of
Denver since 1S60. Her husband was
the Boy Mayor of Denver in 1865;
was one of the founders, and the first
cashier, of the First National Bank.
Mrs. Clark was a social leader in tb
early days.
94


MISS EMILY ZENE CRAIG
DENVER
A.B. and A.M., University of Colorado;
alumna, University of Chicago; active
worker in various clubs; several years a
teacher of English in the West Side High
School; well known for her interest in
her boys and girls, and her ability to
win and to hold their confidence and af-
fection.
JEANNE DeMARE
DENVER
Founder and first President of Quinzaine
Club, and one of the organizers of the
Wednesday Music Party; first President
of the Government Science Club; mem-
ber of City Federation, American Music
and Art Society, Social Center and
Day Nursery Association. Municipal Art
League, and Drama League.
95


MRS. CAROLINE BLAIR DOWNING
DENVER
A pioneer in the domestic science work
of Colorado, helping to form the first
school. The Colorado School of Domes-
tic Science, in which she was Secretary
and then teacher. Pratt graduate. Mem-
ber of Womans Club, and Round Table,
of which she was Secretary.
MRS. WILLIAM G. FISHER
DENVER
A resident of Denver since 1S73. Wife
of one of the founders of the Daniels &
Eisher Stores. A member of the Fort-
nightly Club; the Hoard of the National
Young Woman's Christian Association,
and the first President of the Denver As-
sociation.
9d


*
FANNIE D. WALTHALL HARDIN
DENVER
Widow of Lieut. George H. Hardin. An
active member of Pioneer Society, W. R.
C., Daughters of 1812, Eastern Star Re-
lief Board, and one of the founders of
the Industrial School for Girls. Secured
the appropriation to build cottages for
soldiers wives at Monte Vista Home.
Active and successful in many undertak-
ings.
MISS AGNES MARTYN HART
DENVER
An accomplished artist, she is the con-
tralto soloist at St. Johns Cathedral.
Miss Hart is actively interested in the
religious and philanthropic life of Den-
ver, and of the state. Widely known a*
an evangelical speaker and biblical in-
structor.
97


MRS. SUSAN MOFFETT HAYWARD
DEXVKK
Well known socially and a faithful worker
of Episcopal Church in early days. Char-
ter member of Womans C.ub. Member
of City Improvement Society. For five
years was President of the Clio Club.
First graduate of the Colorado College
of Divine Science and an eminent Few
Thought writer.
MRS. E. P. HERSHEY
DENVEH
The wife of one of Denvers most promi-
nent physicians, and. herself, a woman of
unusual brilliancy ami cleverness. Mrs.
llershey has a wonderful fund of hutnor.
She has executhe ability, which has
helped make successful many of the big
philanthropic movements of the city.