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Condition of Hispanics in America today

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Title:
Condition of Hispanics in America today
Creator:
U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C.
Publisher:
U.S. G.P.O.
Publication Date:
Physical Description:
28 p. : col. ill. ; 22 x 28 cm.

Notes

General Note:
Presented at the hearings of the Subcommittee on Census and Population, House Committee on Post Office and Civil Service

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Full Text
r ^
Condition of
Hispanics in
America Today
L J
Presented at the Hearings
of the Subcommittee on Census and Population,
House Committee on Post Office and Civil Service
U.S. Department of Commerce
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS


Condition of
Hispanics
U.S. Department of Commerce
Malcolm Baldrige, Secretary
Clarence J. Brown, Deputy Secretary
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS
C.L. Kincannon,
Deputy Director
/W


2
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS
C.L. Kincannon, Deputy Director
William P. Butz, Associate Director
for Demographic Fields
Steve Tupper, Assistant Director for
Communications
POPULATION DIVISION
Roger A. Herriot, Chief
Acknowledgements
Principal staff members responsible for the content
of the report were Edward W. Fernandez, Chief, Ethnic
and Spanish Statistics Branch, Population Division,
Carmen DeNavas-Sammarco, and Arthur R. Cresce.
Primary direction and review were provided by
Nampeo R. McKenney, Assistant Chief (Ethnic and
Racial Statistics Program Areas), Population Division.
Valuable assistance was provided by Ruth Wolff,
Linda P. Chase, and Regina C. Burnette.
For sale by Superintendent of Documents,
U.S. Government Printing Office
Washington, D.C. 20402
Introduction
This report (text and charts) was originally prepared as
testimony by C. Louis Kincannon, Acting Director, Bureau
of the Census, U.S. Department of Commerce, for Hearings of
the Subcommittee on Census and Population of the House
Committee on Post Office and Civil Service. The hearings were
held September 13, 1983.
The Census Bureau has produced a wealth of
statistics on the Hispanic population from the 1980 census
and current surveys. A list of data products, at the end of this
report, shows the volume and scope of these statistics. Using
data extracted from these sources, this document presents a
statistical overview of the current conditions of Hispanics,
as well as major demographic changes during the last decade.
More detailed information appears in the census products.
The Hispanic community is a young, diverse, and dynamic
population that is experiencing rapid growth. The diversity is
exhibited in the distinct communities of Mexican, Puerto Rican,
Cuban, and other Spanish origin* groups. The rapid growth
has had an effect upon a number of areas, which are noted in
this report. During the last decade, the Hispanic population
experienced progress in only some social and
economic areas.
* "Spanish origin" and "Hispanic" are used interchangeably in this report.


Condition of Hispanics in America Today
3
CHART 1.
Spanish Origin Population
Millions
18
16
14
12
I I
-
14.6 I I I
9.1 I I I I I
I I I I I I
1970 1980
*Based on provisional independent estimates.
1983'
1990
The Census Bureau reported 9 million Hispanics in 1970 and 14.6 million Hispanics
in 1980. Hispanics constituted 6.4 percent of the total population of the United
States in 1980. The Bureau estimates that there were about 15.9 million Hispanics in
March 1983.
Well over half, or about 9 million, of all Hispanics in 1980 were of Mexican
origin; 2 million were of Puerto Rican origin; under 1 million were of Cuban origin;
and 3 million were of Other Spanish origin.
CHART 2.
Questions on Spanish Origin or Descent
1980 Census
(100-Percent Basis)
7. Is this person of Spanish/Hispanic O No (not Spanish/Hispanic)
O Yes, Mexican, Mexican-Amer., Chicano
Fill one circle. O Yes, Puerto Rican
O Yes, Cuban
O Yes, other Spanish/Hispanic
The 1980 census information on the Hispanic population comes from answers to a
question on Spanish origin, based on self-identification, that was asked of everyone
in the Nation. Specifically, persons were counted as Hispanics if they answered that
they were of Mexican, Mexican-American,or Chicano;Puerto Rican;Cuban; or Other
Spanish origin. Persons in the Other Spanish category included those from Spain, the
Spanish-speaking countries of Central or South America, or persons identifying gen-
erally as Spanish, Spanish-American, Hispano, Latino, etc. The Census Bureau con-
sulted extensively with the Census Advisory Committee on the Spanish Origin Pop-
ulation for the 1980 Census on the development of this question, as well as on other
census plans pertinent to the Hispanic community.
1970 Census
(5-Percent Basis)
13b. Is this persons origin or descent (Fill one circle)
O Mexican O Central or South American
O Puerto Rican O Other Spanish
O Cuban O No, none of these


4
Condition of Hispanics in> America Today
CHART 3.
Population Growth
(Percent Change 1970 to 1980)
93%
Spanish Origin Rican Origin Spanish Spanish
Origin Origin Origin Origin
The 14.6 million Hispanics represented a 61-percent increase since 1970. Compared
to the 9-percent growth for non-Hispanics, the proportionate increase for Hispanics is
enormous. This growth resulted in part from high fertility and substantial immigra-
tion from Mexico, Cuba, and other Central and South American countries. But other
factors contributing to the large increase were overall improvements in the 1980
census, better coverage of the population, improved question design, and an effective
public relations campaign by the Census Bureau with the assistance of national and
community ethnic groups. These efforts undoubtedly contributed to the higher count
in 1980.
All of the Hispanic groups contributed to this substantial growth during the
1970s. The Mexican origin population, which is by far the largest Hispanic group,
grew by 93 percent during the decade; both Puerto Ricans and Cubans grew by
more than 40 percent, persons of Other Spanish origin by 19 percent.
CHART 4.
Distribution of the Spanish
Population by State: 1980
Although the growth of the Hispanic population was widespread, in 1980 most His-
panics (60 percent) were still concentrated in the five Southwestern States of
Arizona, California, Colorado, New Mexico, and Texas. What is most dramatic is
that both California and Texas, which had in 1970 the first and second largest His-
panic populations, increased their share of this population. By 1980, over 50 per-
cent of all Hispanics in the Nation resided in those two States. Outside of the South-
west, sizable concentrations of Hispanics were found in New York, Florida, and
Illinois.
When looking at the separate Hispanic groups, different concentrations and geo-
graphic distributions can be noted. Although Mexicans are still largely concentrated
in the Southwest, they became more widely dispersed during the 1970s. By 1980,
six States outside the SouthwestIllinois, Michigan, Washington, Florida, Indiana,
and Ohioeach had more than 50,000 persons of Mexican origin. Puerto Ricans
moved from New York, which is still the major port of entry for this group, to other
States in the Northeast and North Central regions. Unlike the Mexicans and Puerto
Ricans, the concentration of Cubans in Florida increased so that in 1980 more than
one-half of the Nation's Cubans resided in that State.
Base
Total persons of Spanish Origin in the United States.


Condition of Hispanics in America Today
5
CHART 5.
Percent Spanish of Total Population by Area
37%
States Mexico fornia York of the U.S.
Because of the substantial growth of Hispanics, they constituted a larger proportion
6.4 percentof the national population in 1980 than the 4.5 percent in 1970. The
Hispanic proportion of the population also increased in each of the States with major
concentrations of Hispanics. By 1980, Hispanics were more than one-third of the
total population in New Mexico, about one-fifth in Texas and California; and about
one-tenth or more in four other StatesArizona, Colorado, Florida, and New York.
CHART 6.
Metropolitan-Nonmetropolitan
Residence: 1980
Metropolitan Nonmetropolitan
Spanish Origin
Not of Spanish Origin
Hispanics are largely metropolitan dwellers. And they were more likely than non-
Hispanics to live in central cities. For instance, in 1980, one-half of all Hispanics re-
sided in the central cities of metropolitan areas compared with slightly less than
one-third of non-Hispanics.
Not only did most Hispanics live in the metropolitan areas, but they were
heavily concentrated in the largest areasthose of 1 million or more persons. Puerto
Ricans and Cubans were more likely to live in the largest metropolitan areas (73 and
83 percent, respectively) than Mexican origin persons (55 percent).
Base Total persons of Spanish origin or not of Spanish origin.


6
Condition of Hispanics in America Today
CHART7.
Age: 1980
70 Years Old
and Over
60 to 69 Years
50 to 59 Years
40 to 49 Years
30 to 39 Years
13.6%
113.9%
H Spanish Origin
Not of Spanish
Origin
20 to 29 Years
10 to 19 Years
0 to 9 Years
I 20.3%
17.9%
I 21.1%
17.1%
| 21.9%
14.1%
Hispanics, generally, are a youthful population. Looking at the age chart, one can see
much larger proportions of Hispanics than non-Hispanics in the younger age groups;
more than 20 percent of Hispanics were under 10 years old in 1980 compared to 14
percent of non-Hispanics. Conversely, Hispanics have lower proportions in the older
age groups; for example, only 3 percent of all Hispanics were 70 years old and over,
less than one-half the proportion for non-Hispanics. In 1980, the median age of His-
panics was only 23 years, compared to 31 for non-Hispanics. The younger Hispanic
population is in part a result of higher fertility levels.
Interestingly enough, there are some significant differences among the Hispanic
groups. The Cubans are the oldest group with a median age of 38 years, topping that
for non-Hispanics; but Puerto Rican and Mexican origin persons are extremely young
populations with median ages of about 22 years. The higher median age for Cubans
compared to other groups reflects, mainly, the older ages of Cuban immigrants.
Base Total population of Spanish origin or not of Spanish origin.
CHART 8.
Percent of Families with
Own Children
Average Number of
Own Children in Families
1970 1980
Base Families of Spanish origin or not of
Spanish origin.
2 7 l | Spanish Origin
I Not of
Spanish Origin
2.3 2.3
1970 1980
BaseFamilies of Spanish origin or not of Spanish
origin with own children.
Hispanic families were more likely than non-Hispanic families to have children. In
1980, two-thirds of Hispanic families contained children compared to one-half of
non-Hispanic families. Both groups showed declines from 1970.
Because of higher fertility levels, the average number of children in families was
larger among Hispanics than non-Hispanics in 19802.3 compared to 1.9 own children,
respectively. The averages decreased for both groups since 1970, but the decline was
less for Hispanics.


Condition of Hispanics in America Today
7
CHART 9.
Families Maintained by Women
Percent of Families
23%
Spanish Origin
1970 1980 1983
Not of Spanish Origin
Base Total number of families of Spanish origin or not of Spanish origin.
Similar to the trend fdr the rest of the Nation, the percentage of Hispanic families
maintained by women moved upward in recent years. By 1983, 23 percent of His-
panic families were maintained by women, a higher percent than the corresponding
figure for non-Hispanic families; 15 percent.
Among Hispanic families, the proportion maintained by women was noticeably
higher for Puerto Ricansabout 40 percentthan for other Hispanic groups.
CHART 10.
Educational Attainment
(Persons 25 to 34 Years Old)
Spanish Origin
Percent of High School
Graduates1 i
i
1970 40% 5% 45%

1983 48% 10%

Four Years of High School or
1 to 3 Years of College
Four or More
Years of College
Not of Spanish Origin
1970
57%
1983
63%
It is most encouraging to observe the marked improvement in the educational attain-
ment level of young Hispanics. In 1983, 58 percent of young Hispanic adults (25 to
34 years old) were high school graduates, compared to only 45 percent in 1970. This
improvement also appears in the proportions of college graduates, which was 10 per-
cent in 1983 but only 5 percent in 1970.
Despite these gains, Hispanics have not reached the level of non-Hispanics. In
1983, 88 percent of young non-Hispanic adults were high school graduates and 25
percent had completed 4 years or more of college.
There are striking differences in educational attainment between young adults
of selected Hispanic origin groups. Seventy-one percent of Cubans were high school
graduates compared to 53 percent of Mexican and 55 percent of Puerto Rican origin
persons.
Base Total persons of Spanish origin or not of Spanish origin 25 to 34 years old.


8
Condition of Hispanics in America Today
CHART 11.
Language Spoken at Home: 1980
(Persons 3 Years Old and Over in the United States)
Speak English
Spanish Language
Spoken at Home
The 1980 census included a question on language spoken in the home. Of the non-
English languages, Spanish was reported most frequently. Over 11 million persons, or
5 percent, reported that they spoke Spanish in the home. Of these Spanish speakers,
about one-fourth reported that they did not speak English well or at all.
CHART 12.
Legal Immigration by Area of Origin
Millions
5 i
Other
Asia
| | Mexico and
Latin America
3
2
1
0
1951-1960
24%
1961-1970 1971-1980
As noted previously, part of the substantial growth of the Hispanic population in the
United States is a result of the very large increase in immigration from Spanish-
speaking countries, particularly Mexico. During the 1970s, about 650,000 legal immi-
grants of Mexican origin came to the United States.
Source: U S. Department of Justice, Immigration and Naturalization Service.


Condition of Hispanics in America Today
9
CHART 13.
Area of Birth of Undocumented
Aliens* Counted in the 1980 Census
(Estimates)
Number
America
12% 12%
Europe Asia Other
*The estimate of the undocumented alien population was derived using the 1980 census count
of aliens and Immigration and Naturalization Service data on legal aliens in the United States
Recently completed research estimates that the census counted about 2 million un-
documented aliens. Mexico contributed over 45 percent, or over 900,000 persons.
No other individual country contributed so many. The remainder of Latin America
and the Caribbean area accounted for 23 percent of the undocumented aliens in the
Nation, about 480,000 persons.
CHART 14.
Percent Spanish Foreign Born: 1980
61%
As a result of the large flow of immigrants, about one-third of the Hispanic popula-
tion in the United States in 1980 was foreign born. Florida contained the highest
proportion61 percent. This is not surprising because of the large number of Cubans
who came to the United States in the 1960s.
Among the States with the largest Hispanic populations, California and Illinois
each ranked second, with 37 percent foreign born. Surprisingly, in Texas, whose
border is a major source of entry for Mexican immigrants, only 19 percent were
foreign born. Furthermore, New Mexico, which had the highest proportion of His-
panics in its population, had only a very small proportion foreign born (6 percent).
Both Texas and New Mexico contain large numbers of indigenous Hispanics.
United Florida California Illinois New Texas Arizona Colorado New Remainder
States York Mexico of the U S.
Base Total Spanish origin population in each area.


10
Condition, of Hispanics in America Today
CHART 15.
Voting and Registration
Spanish Origin
1972
1976
1980
44%
H Registered
Voted
Base Persons 18 years old and over of Spanish origin or not of Spanish origin.
In the last two Presidential elections, the registration levels and voting participation
of Hispanics were lower than in 1972. In the last Presidential election, 36 percent of
Hispanics 18 years old and over reported that they had registered; only 30 percent
voted. In each election, the voter-registration and participation rates were lower for
Hispanics than for non-Hispanics. The substantially lower rates of Hispanics are partly
the result of the relatively higher and growing proportion of foreign born among
Hispanics.
CHART 16.
Percent of Households
Owner or Renter Occupied: 1980
Owner Occupied
Home ownership is relatively low among Hispanics. In 1980, less than half of His-
panic households lived in homes they owned compared to two-thirds for the non-
Hispanic households.
In looking at the individual Hispanic groups, home ownership rates in 1980
were much higher for Mexican and Cuban origin persons (49 and 44 percent, respec-
tively) than for those of Puerto Rican origin (21 percent). The high proportion of
Puerto Rican households that were renter-occupied (79 percent) reflects in part their
very high concentration in central cities of metropolitan areas and their lower income
levels.
The 1980 home ownership rate for Hispanic households showed no improvement
over 1970 despite gains by Cuban and Puerto Rican households because the home
ownership rate for Mexican origin households declined.
includes Other Spanish" not shown separately.
Base Total all housing units with householders of respective origins.


Condition of Hispanics in America Today
11
CHART 17.
Labor Force Participation Rates of Women
(Annual Averages)
49%
53%
1973 1982
Not of Spanish Origin
Base Total women 16 years old and over of Spanish origin or not of Spanish origin.
The proportion of Hispanic women in the labor force jumped from 41 percent in
1973 to 49 percent in 1982. This increase for Hispanic women is consistent with the
trend for non-Hispanic women. By contrast, the proportion of Hispanic men in the
civilian labor force in 1982 showed no significant change from the 1973 level.
CHART 18.
Unemployment Rates
(Annual Averages)
Percent
Since 1973, when annual data on the unemployment of Hispanics first became avail-
able, Hispanic unemployment rates have been consistently higher than those for non-
Hispanics. In 1982, as well as in 1973, the Hispanic unemployment rate was about one
and one-half times that of non-Hispanics.
The unemployment situation for Hispanics reflected the changing economic
conditions of the Nation. The jobless rates of Hispanics climbed during the recession
of 1973-75 and then showed a significant downward movement until the end of the
decade. However, during the 1979 to 1982 period, their unemployment rate climbed
again and grew from 8.3 percent to 13.8 percent. The particularly marked increase
from 1981 to 1982 in the unemployment rate of Hispanics resulted from the most
recent recession, which also caused a rise in the rate for non-Hispanic persons.
Base Persons of Spanish origin or not of Spanish origin 16 years old and over
in the civilian labor force.


12
Condition of Hispanics in America Today
CHART 19.
Occupation Distribution: 1982
Operatives
Clerical Workers
Service Workers
Craft Workers
Professional and
Technical Workers
Laborers
Management
Farm Laborers
] 7%
17%
Sales Workers
Private Household
Workers
Farmers
19%
112%
117%
115%
13%
; ii3%
M2%
117%
23%
12%
I I Spanish Origin
Not of Spanish
Origin
Base Persons of Spanish origin or not of Spanish origin 16 years old and over,
employed in the civilian labor force.
Note: Based on 1970 occupation classifications.
Occupation statistics paint different portraits for Hispanic and non-Hispanic persons.
In 1982, about one-fourth of Hispanics were in operative occupations, such as manu-
facturing machine operators, service station attendants, and truck drivers. This was
about twice the proportion for non-Hispanics. Although 9 percent of Hispanics were
employed as professional and technical workers, almost double that proportion of
non-Hispanics were employed in these jobs. Furthermore, employed Hispanics were
less likely to be working as managers and administrators than were non-Hispanics.
CHART 20.
Hispanic~Owned Firms by Industry: 1977
Percent of All Firms
All Hispanic-
Owned Firms
Construction
Manufacturing
Transportation
and Public Utilities
Wholesale and
Retail Trade
Finance, Insurance,
and Real Estate
Firms Owned by
Hispanics: 1972 and 1977
A glimpse at data on businesses shows that there were 219,000 Hispanic-owned firms
in 1977, compared to 117,000 in 1972. Although part of the increase can be attrib-
uted to expanded coverage of businesses, the actual gain by Hispanic firms was rather
impressive.
In 1977, Hispanic firms accounted for 2 percent of the 10 million firms in this
country. For each industry, the proportion of Hispanic firms was also small, each be-
low 3 percent.
Services


Condition of Hispanics in America Today
13
CHART 21.
Median Family Income in 1982
Spanish Origin Rican Origin Spanish Spanish
Origin Origin Origin Origin
On average, the income levels of Hispanic families were lower than those for non-
Hispanic families. The median money income of Hispanic families in 1982 was about
$16,000 compared with a median of about $24,000 for non-Hispanic families.
Looking at the figures in more detail, one can see substantial differences in family in-
come among the Hispanicgroups. Puerto Rican families had the lowest median family
income of about $11,000 in 1982. The median cash income of Mexican origin families
was about $16,000; Cuban and Other 3panish origin families had the highest median
incomes of about $19,000.
The cash income levels of families may be related to a number of factors, such
as number of workers in the family, educational attainment levels, and composition
of the family. The proportion of Puerto Rican families with no workers was much
higher than for other Hispanic groups. In addition, the educational attainment levels
of Puerto Ricans were relatively low. These are some of the factors which contribute
to the lower incomes of Puerto Rican families.
The money income figures do not reflect the fact that many families receive
part of their income in a non money form, such as Medicare benefits or employer
contributions to health and pension programs. Noncash benefits intended for the
low-income population are discussed later in this report.
CHART 22.
Median Family Money Income
(In 1982 Dollars)
Family Income
Overall, the changes during the last 10 years in the income and poverty levels of His-
panics were not encouraging. From 1972 to the mid-1970s, the median cash income
of Hispanic families generally moved downward. Gains during the latter half of the
1970 decade offset the earlier decline. In the most recent period, 1979 to 1982,
Hispanic families experienced a substantial decrease of about 14 percent in real
median family income.
During the last 10 years, the median cash income of non-Hispanic families
showed the same general pattern of changes as that for Hispanic families.


14
Condition of Hispanics in America Today
CHART 23.
Poverty Rates of Persons
29.9%
| | Spanish Origin
IMEIffH Total Persons
22.8%
21.8%
1972
1979
1982
Base Total, all persons or persons of Spanish origin for whom poverty
status is determined.
The proportion of Hispanic persons below the poverty level in 1982 was very high
about 30 percentand represented a sharp increase over the 1979 rate, 22 percent.
The recent recession and associated rise in unemployment contributed to the increase
in the poverty rate. The 1982 proportion was also much higher than the 1972 rate.
The poverty rates for Hispanics have been consistently higher than those for
the total population throughout these years.
CHART 24.
Poverty Rates for Households: 1979
20.9%
Spanish Origin Households
Based on Money Income Only
Counting Noncash Benefits
at Market Value*
12.1%
All Households
includes food stamps, free or reduced-price school lunches, public housing,
medicaid, and medicare.
Base-Total Spanish origin households or all households.
During the past decade, there has been a rapid growth in public programs that pro-
vide food, housing, and medical assistance to the poor. While these benefits have in-
creased enormously over the past 10-12 years, their value is not counted as income
for purposes of measuring the number of households with incomes below the poverty
level. A study conducted by the Bureau shows that inclusion of the market value of
food stamps, public housing, free and reduced-price lunches, Medicaid, and Medicare
would have reduced the percentage of all poor households from 12 percent to about
7 percent in 1979. The comparable reduction for Hispanic households was from 21
percent to 11 percent.


Condition of Hispanics in America Today
15
CHART 25.
Percent of Households Receiving
Specified Noncash Benefits: 1982
With the exception of public housing, a much higher proportion of Hispanic than all
households in 1982 received noncash benefits intended for the low-income popula-
tion. Of Hispanic households, for example, about 19 percent received food stamps
and 45 percent contained children receiving free or reduced-price school lunches.
44.5%
I I Spanish Households
All Households
Food Stamps Free or Reduced- Public or Other Medicaid
Price School Subsidized
Lunches Rental Housing
BaseTotal Spanish origin households or all households.
SUMMARY
In summary, the statistical portrait of Hispanics in the United States, presented
by the latest decennial census and current surveys,shows a fast-growing, young,active,
and diverse population closing some gaps in social and economic status with the over-
all population. In areas such as education, labor force participation, and business
ownership, Hispanics have shown improvements. On the other hand, unemployment
and poverty rates have risen, and cash income levels have fallen in recent years. The
Census Bureau intends to continue the collection, analysis, and publication of statis-
tical information to provide up-to-date information on Hispanics.


16
Condition of Hispanics in America Today
Source and Reliability of the Data
Sources of the Data. This chart book includes data from the Bureau of the Census and
the United States Department of Justice, Immigration and Naturalization Service. The
Census Bureau data, which cover a wide range of topics, were collected primarily in
the 1980 Census of Population and in the monthly Current Population Survey (CPS).
In order to obtain more reliable data for the Spanish origin population, starting
in March 1973 the CPS sample was enlarged to include all households from the pre-
vious November sample which contained at least one person of Spanish origin. This
resulted in almost doubling the number of sample persons of Spanish origin.
The estimation procedure used for the monthly CPS data involved the inflation
or weighted sample results to independent estimates of the civilian noninstitutional
population of the United States by age, race, and sex. These independent estimates
are based on statistics from decennial censuses; statistics on births, deaths, immigra-
tion, and emigration; and statistics on the strength of the Armed Forces. The estima-
tion procedure used for 1981 through 1983 data appearing in this chart book utilized
independent estimates based on the 1980 Decennial Census; 1971 through 1979 data
utilized independent estimates based on the 1970 Decennial Census. This change in
independent estimates had relatively little impact on summary measures such as
means, medians, and percent distribution, but did have a significant impact on levels.
For example, use of the 1980 based population controls resulted in about a 2-percent
increase in the civilian noninstitutional population and in the number of families and
households. Thus, estimates of levels for 1980 and later will differ from those for
earlier years by more than what could be attributed to actual changes in the popula-
tion. These differences could be disproportionately greater for certain population
subgroups than for the total population.
Questions on age, sex, and race were asked of all persons in the 1980 census
and are 100-percent count tabulations with limited edit and review procedures per-
formed.
In the 1980 census, persons of Spanish origin or descent were those who classi-
fied themselves in one of the specific Spanish origin categories listed on the question-
naireMexican, Puerto Rican, or Cubanas well as those who indicated that they
were of other Spanish/Hispanic origin. Persons reporting "other Spanish/Hispanic"
origin were those whose origins are from Spain or the Spanish-speaking countries of
Central or South America, or Spanish origin persons identifying themselves generally
as Spanish, Spanish American, Hispano, Latino, etc. Persons of Spanish origin may be
of any race. Families were classified by the Spanish origin of the householder. Persons
of more than one origin who were in doubt as to how to report a specific origin were
classified according to the origin of the person's mother. If a single origin was not
provided for the persons mother, the first reported origin of the person was used.
In the CPS, persons of Spanish origin were identified by a question that asked
for self-identification of the person's origin or descent. Respondents were asked to
select their origin (and the origin of other household members) from a "flash-card"
listing ethnic origins. Persons of Spanish origin, in particular, were those who indi-
cated that their origin was Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central or South American,
or some other Spanish origin.
Reliability of the Estimates. Since the CPS estimates were based on a sample, they
may differ somewhat from the figures that would have been obtained if a complete
census had been taken using the same questionnaires, instructions, and enumerators.
There are two types of errors possible in an estimate based on a sample: survey
sampling and nonsampling. The standard errors provided for the CPS data obtained
from the Current Population Reports cited in the index primarily indicate the magni-
tude of the sampling errors.
Nonsampling Variability. Nonsampling errors can be attributed to many sources, e.g.,
inability to obtain information about all cases in the sample, definitional difficulties,
differences in the interpretation of questions, inability or unwillingness to provide
correct information on the part of respondents, inability to recall information, errors
made in collection such as in recording or coding the data, errors made in processing
the data, errors made in estimating values for missing data, and failure to represent all
units within the sample (undercoverage).


Index of Census Bureau Reports
Containing Data on Persons of Spanish Origin
17
to prepare a separate subject report focusing on persons of
Spanish origin and persons of Spanish surname in the
REPORTS AND COMPUTER TAPE FILES United States.
FROM THE 1980 CENSUS OF POPULATION AND HOUSING
WHICH CONTAIN SPANISH ORIGIN DATA 1980 Census Housing Reports, Volumes I Through V, Containing Spanish Origin Data
REPORTS NOW AVAILABLE
1980 Census Volume I and II Population Reports Containing Spanish Origin Data
HC80-1-A General Housing Characteristics
Reports available for the United States, each State, the
District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the outlying areas.
REPORTS NOW AVAILABLE
PC80-1-B General Population Characteristics
Reports available for the United States, each State, the
District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the outlying areas.
HC80-1-B Detailed Housing Characteristics
Reports are presently being released on a state-by-state
flow basis. Reports are being prepared for the United
States, each State, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico,
and the outlying areas.
PC80-1-C General Social and Economic Characteristics
Reports are presently being released on a state-by-state
flow basis. Reports are being prepared for the United States,
each State, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the
outlying areas.
REPORTS PLANNED FOR PUBLICATION
To be issued: PC80-1-D Detailed Population Characteristics
beginning
Fall 1983 Reports will be prepared for the United States, each State,
the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the outlying areas.
REPORTS PLANNED FOR PUBLICATION
To be issued: HC80-2
beginning
Fall 1983
Metropolitan Housing Characteristics
Reports will be prepared for the United States, each State,
each Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area, the District
of Columbia, and Puerto Rico.
To be issued: HC80-3 Subject Reports
beginning
late 1983 Each of the reports in this volume focuses on a particular
subject. Plans for these reports are currently being
developed. Selected subject reports will contain data
on the Spanish origin population.
To be issued: PC80-2 Subject Reports
beginning
late 1983 Each of the reports in this volume focuses on a particular
subject. Selected subject reports will contain data on the
Spanish origin population. In addition, tentative plans are
To be issued: HC80-4
Fall 1983
To be issued: HC80-5
Fall 1983
Components of Inventory Change
Residential Finance


18
1980 Census Supplementary Reports Containing Spanish Origin Data
Series PC80-S1, PHC80-S1, and PHC80-S2
Population Reports Series PC80-S1
1 Age, Sex, Race, and Spanish Origin of the Population by Regions,
Divisions, and States: 1980
5 Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas and Standard Consolidated
Statistical Areas: 1980
7 Persons of Spanish Origin by State: 1980
8 Detailed Occupation and Years of School Completed by Age, for the
Civilian Labor Force by Sex, Race, and Spanish Origin: 1980
Joint Population and Housing Reports
PHC80-S1-1 Provisional Estimates of Social, Economic, and Housing
Characteri sties
PHC80-S2 Advance Estimates of Social, Economic, and Housing
Characteristics. Reports are available for each State
and the District of Columbia.
Index
1980 Census Joint Population and Housing Reports Containing Spanish Origin Data
Series PHC80
REPORTS NOW AVAILABLE
PHC80-V Final Population and Housing Unit Counts
PHC80-1 Presents provisional Spanish origin population counts. Reports are available for the United States and each State. Block Statistics This set of reports consists of 375 sets of microfiche (no printed reports), and includes a report for each Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area (SMSA), showing blocked areas within the SMSA; a report for each State and for Puerto Rico, showing blocked areas outside SMSAs; and a U.S. Summary report which is an index to the set. In addition to microfiche, printed detailed maps showing the blocks covered by the particular report are available.
PHC80-2 Census Tracts
Reports are presently being released on a flow basis.
One report will be prepared for each SMSA, as well as
one for most States and Puerto Rico covering the tracted
areas outside SMSAs (designated selected areas).
PHC80-3 Summary Characteristics for Governmental Units and
PHC80-4 Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas There is one report for each State, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. Congressional Districts of the 98th Congress Reports are available for each State and the District of Columbia.
PHC80-SP-1 Neighborhood Statistics Program Reports are presently being released on a flow basis. A report will be prepared for each State and the District of Columbia.


1980 Census Computer Tape Files Containing Spanish Origin Data
COMPUTER TAPE FILES NOW AVAILABLE
STF 1 Summary Tape File 1 Summary 100-percent characteristics are shown for the United States, regions, divisions, States, SCSAs, SMSAs, urbanized areas, congressional districts, counties, county subdivisions, places, census tracts, enumeration districts in unblocked areas, and blocks and block groups in blocked areas.
STF 2 Summary Tape File 2 Detailed 100-percent characteristics are shown for the United States, regions, divisions, States, SCSAs, SMSAs, urbanized areas, counties, county subdivisions, places of 1,000 or more inhabitants, and census tracts.
STF 3 Summary Tape File 3 Summary sample characteristics are shown for the United States, regions, divisions, States, SCSAs, SMSAs, urbanized areas, congressional districts, counties, county subdivisions, places, census tracts, block groups and enumeration districts.
STF 1 Summary Tape File 4 More detailed sample characteristics are shown for the United States, regions, divisions, States, SCSAs, SMSAs, urbanized areas, counties, county subdivisions, places of 2,500 or more inhabitants, and census tracts.
P.L. 94-171 Computer Tape File prepared in accordance with Public Law 94-171. The files are issued on a State-by-State basis and are tabulated for the following levels of geography as applicable: States, counties, county subdivisions, incorporated places, census tracts, blocks and block groups in blocked areas, and enumeration districts in unblocked areas. For States participating in the voluntary program to define election precincts in conjunction with the Census Bureau, the data are also tabulated for election precincts.
Index
19
COMPUTER TAPE FILES NOW AVAILABLE (continued)
Census/EEO
Special File
This file provides sample census data with specified
relevance to Equal Employment Opportunity and affirmative
action uses.
Data are provided for all counties, SMSAs, and for places
with a population of 50,000 or more.
Public-Use
Microdata
Samples
There are three mutually exclusive samples: the A sample
including 5 percent of all persons and housing units, and
the B and C samples each including 1 percent of all persons
and housing units. States and most large SMSAs will be
identifiable on one or more of the files. Microdata files
allow the user to prepare customized tabulations.
COMPUTER TAPE FILES PLANNED FOR RELEASE
To be issued: STF 5 Summary Tape File 5
beginning
Fall 1983 Will provide detailed cross-tabulations of sample
characteristics for the United States, States, SMSAs,
counties and cities of 50,000 or more inhabitants, central
cities of SMSAs, and towns or townships of 50,000 or
more inhabitants.


20
CURRENT POPULATION REPORTS
WHICH CONTAIN
SPANISH ORIGIN DATA
U.S. Bureau of the Census, Current Population Survey Reports
Series P-20 Population Characteristics
ALL SPANISH REPORTS
P-20
No.
361 Persons of Spanish (Advance Report) Origin in the United States: March 1980
354 Persons of Spanish Origin in the United States: March 1979
347 Persons of Spanish (Advance Report) Origin in the United States: March 1979
339 Persons of Spanish Origin in the United States: March 1978
329 Persons of Spanish Origin in the United States: March 1977
328 Persons of Spanish (Advance Report) Origin in the United States: March 1978
317 Persons of Spanish (Advance Report) Origin in the United States: March 1977
310 Persons of Spanish Origin in the United States: March 1976
302 Persons of Spanish (Advance Report) Origin in the United States: March 1976
290 Persons of Spanish Origin i n the United States: March 1975
283 Persons of Spanish (Advance Report) Origin i n the United States: March 1975
ALL SPANISH REPORTS (continued)
P-20 No.
280 Persons of Spanish Origin in the United States: March 1974
267 Persons of Spanish Origin (Advance Report) in the United States: March 1974
264 Persons of Spanish Origin in the United States: March 1973
259 Persons of Spanish Origin (Advance Report) in the United States: March 1973
250 Persons of Spanish Origin and 1971 in the United States: March 1972
238 Selected Characteristics of Persons and Puerto Rican, and Other Spanish Origin: Families of Mexican, March 1972
224 Selected Characteristics of Persons and Puerto Rican, and Other Spanish Origin: Families of Mexican, March 1971
213 Persons of Spanish Origin in the United States: November 1969
EDUCATIONAL CHARACTERISTICS
P-20
No.
373 School EnrollmentSocial and Economic Characteristics of
Students: October 1981 (Advance Report)
362 School EnrollmentSocial and Economic Characteristics of
Students: October 1980 (Advance Report)
360 School EnrollmentSocial and Economic Characteristics of
Students: October 1979
356 Educational Attainment in the United States: March 1979
and 1978
355 School EnrollmentSocial and Economic Characteristics of
Students: October 1979 (Advance Report)
351 Major Field of Study of College Students: October 1978
346 School EnrollmentSocial and Economic Characteristics of
Students: October 1978
343 Vocational School Experience: October 1976
342 Travel to School: October 1978
337 Relative Progress of Children in School: 1976


EDUCATIONAL CHARACTERISTICS (continued)
P-20
No.
335
333
321
319
314
309
303
299
298
295
294
289
286
284
281
278
2 74
272
260
257
School Enrollment--Social and Economic Characteristics of
Students: October 1978 (Advance Report)
School EnrollmentSocial and Economic Characteristics of
Students: October 1977
School Enrollment--Social and Economic Characteristics of
Students: October 1977 (Advance Report)
School Enrollment--Social and Economic Characteristics of
Students: October 1976
Educational Attainment in the United States: March 1977
and 1976
School EnrollmentSocial and Economic Characteristics of
Students: October 1976 (Advance Report)
School EnrollmentSocial and Economic Characteristics of
Students: October 1975
College Plans of High School Seniors: October 1975
Daytime Care of Children: October 1974 and February 1975
Educational Attainment in the United States: March 1975
School Enrollment--Social and Economic Characteristics of
Students: October 1975 (Advance Report)
Major Field of Study of College Students: October 1974
School EnrollmentSocial and Economic Characteristics of
Students: October 1974
College Plans of High School Seniors: October 1974
Income and Expenses of Students Enrolled in Postsecondary
Schools: October 1973
School Enrollment--Social and Economic Characteristics of
Students: October 1974
Educational Attainment in the United States: March 1973
and 1974
Social and Economic Characteristics of Students: October 1973
Social and Economic Characteristics of Students: October 1972
Undergraduate Enrollment in 2-Year and 4-Year Colleges:
October 1972
220
Ethnic Origin and Educational Attainment: November 1969
Index
21
U.S. Bureau of the Census, Current Population Survey Reports
Series P-20 Population Characteristics
FERTILITY
P-20
No.
379 Ferti1i ty of Ameri can Women: June 1982 (Advance Report)
378 Fertility of American Women: June 1981
375 Ferti1ity of American Women: June 1980
369 Fertility of American Women: June 1981 (Advance Report)
364 Fertility of American Women: June 1980 (Advance Report)
358 Fertility of American Women: June 1979
341 Ferti1ity of American Women: June 1978
330 Ferti1ity of American Women: June 1978 (Advance Report)
325 Fertility of American Women: June 1977
316 Fertility of Ameri can Women: June 1977 (Advance Report)
315 Trends in Childspaci nc i: June 1975
308 Fertility of Ameri can Women: June 1976
301 Fertility of Ameri can Women: June 1975
288 Fertility History and Prospects of American Women: June
277 Fertility Expectations of American Women : June 1974
269 Prospect for American Fertility: June 1974
265 Fertility Expectati ons of American Women : June 1973
254 Birth Expectations of American i Wives: June 1973
226 Fertility Variations by Ethnic : Origin: November 1969


22
U.S. Bureau of the Census, Current Population Survey Reports
Series P-20 Population Characteristics
P-20
No.
381
371
366
352
345
340
327
326
313
311
HOUSEHOLDS AND FAMILIES
Household and Family Characteristics: March
Household and Family Characteristics: March
Household and Family Characteristics: March
Household and Family Characteristics: March
Households and Families by Type: March 1979
Household and Family Characteristics: March
Households and Families by Type: March 1978
Household and Family Characteristics: March
Households and Families by Type: March 1977
Household and Family Characteristics: March
1982
1981
1980
1979
(Advance Report)
1978
(Advance Report)
1977
(Advance Report)
1976
P-20
No,
380
372
365
349
338
323
312
306
297
MARITAL STATUS AND LIVING ARRANGEMENTS
Marital Status and Living Arrangements: March 1982
Marital Status and Living Arrangements: March 1981
Marital Status and Living Arrangements: March 1980
Marital Status and Living Arrangements: March 1979
Marital Status and Living Arrangements: March 1978
Marital Status and Living Arrangements: March 1977
Marriage, Divorce, Widowhood, and Remarriage by Family
Characteristics: June 1975
Marital Status and Living Arrangements: March 1976
Number, Timing, and Duration of Marriages and Divorces
in the United States: June 1975
Index
U.S. Bureau of the Census, Current Population Survey Reports
Series P-20 Population Characteristics
MIGRATION
P-20
No.
377 Geographical Mobi1i ty: March 1980 to March 1981
368 Geographical Mobi1i ty: March 1975 to March 1980
353 Geographical Mobili ty: March 1975 to March 1979
331 Geographical Mobi1ity: March 1975 to March 1978
320 Geographi cal Mobility: March 1975 to March 1977
305 Geographi cal Mobi1ity: March 1975 to March 1976
POPULATION PROFILE
P-20
No.
374 Population Profi 1 e of the United States: 1981
363 Populati on Profi1e of the Uni ted States: 1980
350 Populati on Profi 1 e of the United States: 1979
336 Population Profi1e of the United States: 1978
334 Demographic :, Social , and Economic Profile of States
324 Population Profi1e of the United States: 1977
307 Populati on Profi1e of the United States: 1976
292 Population Profi1e of the United States: 1975
279 Population Profi1e of the United States: 1974
Spring 1976


U.S. Bureau of the Census, Current Population Survey Reports
Series P-20 Population Characteristics
P-20
No.
Press
(CB83
370
359
344
332
322
304
293
275
253
P-60
No.
140
138
137
136
VOTING
Release Nearly Half of Voting-Age Population Went to the Polls
63) in November 1982, Census Bureau Reports
Voting and Registration in the Election of November 1980
Voting and Registration in the Election of November 1980
(Advance Report)
Voting and Registration in the Election of November 1978
Voting and Registration in the Election of November 1978
(Advance Report)
Voting and Registration in the Election of November 1976
Voter Participation in November 1976 (Advance Report)
Voting and Registration in the Election of November 1974
Voter Participation in November 1974
Voting and Registration in the Election of November 1972
U.S. Bureau of the Census, Current Population Survey Reports
Series P-60 Consumer Income
INCOME AND POVERTY STATUS
Money Income and Poverty Status of Families and Persons in the
United States: 1982 (Advance data from the March 1983
Current Population Survey)
Characteristics of the Population Below the Poverty Level: 1981
Money Income of Households, Families, and Persons in the
United States: 1981
Characteristics of Households and Persons Receiving Selected
Noncash Benefits: 1981
INCOME AND POVERTY STATUS (continued)
Characteristics of Households Receiving Selected Noncash
Benefits: 1981 (Advance data from the March 1982 Current
Population Survey)
Money Income and Poverty Status of Families and Persons in the
United States: 1981 (Advance data from the March 1982 Current
Population Survey)
Characteristics of the Population Below the Poverty Level: 1980
Money Income of Households, Families, and Persons in the
United States: 1980
Characteristics of Households and Persons Receiving Selected
Noncash Benefits: 1980 (With comparable data for 1979)
Characteristics of the Population Below the Poverty Level: 1979
Money Income of Families and Persons in the United States: 1979
Characteristics of Households Receiving Noncash Benefits: 1980
Money Income and Poverty Status of Families and Persons in the
United States: 1980 (Advance Report)
Money Income of Households in the United States: 1979
Money Income and Poverty Status of Families and Persons in the
United States: 1979
Characteristics of the Population Below the Poverty Level: 1978
Money Income of Families and Persons in the United States: 1978
Money Income in 1978 of Households in the United States
Money Income and Poverty Status of Families and Persons in the
United States: 1978 (Advance Report)
Characteristics of the Population Below the Poverty Level: 1977
Money Income in 1977 of Families and Persons in the United States
Money Income in 1977 of Households in the United States
Money Income and Poverty Status of Families and Persons in the
United States: 1977 (Advance Report)
Characteristics of the Population Below the Poverty Level: 1976
Money Income in 1976 of Families and Persons in the United States


24
Index
P-60
No.
113
112
111
no
109
108
107
106
105
104
103
102
99
98
94
91
INCOME AND POVERTY STATUS (continued)
Money Income and Poverty Status in 1975 of Families and Persons
in the United States and the West Region, by Divisions and States
(Spring 1976 Survey of Income and Education)
Money Income and Poverty Status in 1975 of Families and Persons
in the United States and the South Region, by Divisions and
States (Spring 1976 Survey of Income and Education)
Money Income and Poverty Status in 1975 of Families and Persons
in the United States and the North Central Region, by Divisions
and States (Spring 1976 Survey of Income and Education)
Money Income and Poverty Status in 1975 of Families and Persons
in the United States and the Northeast Region, by Divisions
and States (Spring 1976 Survey of Income and Education)
Household Money Income in 1976 and Selected Social and Economic
Characteristics of Households
Household Money Income in 1975, by Housing Tenure and Residence,
for the United States, Regions, Divisions, and States (Spring
1976 Survey of Income and Education)
Money Income and Poverty Status of Families and Persons in the
United States: 1976 (Advance Report)
Characteristics of the Population Below the Poverty Level: 1975
Money Income in 1975 of Families and Persons in the United States
Household Money Income in 1975 and Selected Social and Economic
Characteristics of Households
Money Income and Poverty Status of Families and Persons in the
United States: 1975 and 1974 Revisions
Characteristics of the Population Below the Poverty Level: 1974
Money Income and Poverty Status of Families and Persons in the
United States: 1974 (Advance Report)
Characteristics of the Low-Income Population: 1973
Characteristics of the Low-Income Population: 1973 (Advance Report)
Characteristics of the Low-Income Population:
1972
U.S. Bureau of the Census, Current Population Reports
Series P-25 Population Estimates and Projections
P-25
No.
917
916
879
732
627
626
Preliminary Estimates of the Population of the United States,
by Age, Sex, and Race: 1970 to 1981
Projections of the Population of Voting Age for States:
November 1982
Projections of the Population of Voting Age for States:
November 1980
Projections of the Population of Voting Age for States:
November 1978
Language Minority, Illiteracy, and Voting Data Used in Making
Determinations for the Voting Rights Act Amendments of 1975
(Public Law 94-73)
Projections of the Population of Voting Age for States:
November 1976


U.S. Bureau of the Census, Current Population Reports
Series P-28 Special Censuses
P-28
No.
1567
1566
1556
1551
P-23
No.
127
126
125
124
122
121
120
119
Special Census of Lower Manhattan, New York City, New York:
September 26, 1978
Special Census of La Plata and Montezuma Counties, Colorado:
April 4, 1978
1976 Census of Camden, New Jersey: September 14, 1976
1976 Census of Travis County, Texas: April 20, 1976
U.S. Bureau of the Census, Current Population Reports
Series P-23 Special Studies
Labor Force Status and Other Characteristics of Persons With
Work Disability: 1982
Estimating After-Tax Money Income Distributions Using Data
From the March Current Population Survey
Selected Characteristics of Persons in Social Science and
Psychology: 1978
Child Support and Alimony: 1981 (Advance Report)
The Journey to Work in the United States: 1979
Private School Enrollment, Tuition, and Enrollment Trends:
October 1979
Selected Characteristics of Persons in Mathematical Specialties
1978
Selected Characteristics of Persons in Environmental Science:
1978
Wage and Salary Data From the Income Survey Development Program
1979 (Preliminary Data for Interview Period One)
118
Series P-23 Special StudiesContinued
Ancestry and Language in the United States: November 1979
Characteristics of American Children and Youth: 1980
Selected Characteristics of Persons in Life Science: 1978
Child Support and Alimony: 1978
Social and Economic Characteristics of Americans During Midlife
Characteristics of Households and Persons Receiving Noncash
Benefits: 1979
Selected Characteristics of Persons in Physical Science: 1978
Families Maintained by Female Householders: 1970-79
Child Support and Alimony: 1978 (Advance Report)
Nonvoting Americans
A Statistical Portrait of Women in the United States: 1978
Social and Economic Characteristics of the Older Population: 1978
Divorce, Child Custody,, and Child Support
Coverage of the Hispanic Population of the United States in
the 1970 Census
Perspectives on American Husbands and Wives
Social and Economic Characteristics of the Metropolitan and
Nonmetropolitan Population: 1977 to 1970
Registration and Voting in November 1976Jurisdictions Covered
by the Voting Rights Act Amendments of 1975
Perspectives on American Fertility


26
P-23
No.
66
63
61
60
59
58
57
55
51
50
49
P-27
No.
55
54
53
52
Series P-23 Special StudiesContinued
Characteristics of American Children and Youth: 1976
Premarital Fertility
Characteristics of Households Purchasing Foodstamps
Language Usage in the United States: duly 1975
Demographic Aspects of Aging and the Older Population in the
United States
A Statistical Portrait of Women in the U. S.
Social and Economic Characteristics of the Older Population 1974
Social and Economic Characteristics of the Metropolitan and
Nonmetropolitan Population: 1974 and 1970
Characteristics of American Youth: 1974
Female Family Heads
Population of the United States Trends and Prospects: 1950-1990
S. Bureau of the Census, Current Population Survey Reports
Series P-27 Farm Population
Farm Population of the United States: 1981
Farm Population of the United States: 1980
Farm Population of the United States: 1979
Farm Population of the United States: 1978
Farm Population of the United States:
51
1977
Index
REPORTS FROM THE
ANNUAL HOUSING SURVEY
WHICH CONTAIN SPANISH ORIGIN DATA
U.S. Bureau of the Census, Annual Housing Survey Reports
Series H-150 Housing Characteristics for the United States and Regions
Part
A General Housing Characteristics: Annual report 1973 1981
B Indicators of Housing and Neighborhood Quality:
Annual report 1973 1977
B Indicators of Housing and Neighborhood Quality by Financial
Characteristics: Annual reports 1978 1981
C Financial Characteristics of the Housing Inventory:
Annual reports 1973 1981
D Housing Characteristics of Recent Movers: Annual reports 1973 1981
E Urban and Rural Housing Characteristics: Annual reports 1974 1981
F Financial Characteristics by Indicators of Housing and
Neighborhood Quality: Annual reports 1973 1977 (Published
in 1973 as Series H-151-73, No. 1)
F Energy-Related Housing Characteristics: Annual reports 1978 1981


U.S. Bureau of the Census, Annual Housing Survey Reports
Series H-170, Housing Characteristics for Selected Metropolitan Areas
This series of reports presents statistics on housing and household
characteristics from the Annual Housing Survey for selected standard
metropolitan statistical areas (SMSAs). The SMSA surveys are conducted
in 60 selected SMSAs which are divided into 4 groups of 15 each, with
each group interviewed every 4 years.
A separate report is issued for each of the 60 SMSAs (48 of the reports
contain data for households of Spanish origin). Each report consists of
5 parts. Part A presents statistics on general housing characteristics,
part B on indicators of housing and neighborhood quality, part C on
financial characteristics, part 0 on recent mover households, and part F
on financial characteristics cross-classified by indicators of housing
and neighborhood quality.
Reports Containing Spanish Origin Data
H-170
No.
2 Anaheim-Santa Ana-Garden Grove, California: 1974, 1977
3 Boston, Massachusetts: 1974, 1977
4 Dallas, Texas: 1974, 1977
5 Detroit, Michigan: 1977
6 Fort Worth, Texas: 1974, 1977
7 Los Angeles-Long Beach, California: 1974, 1977
10 Newark, New Jersey: 1974, 1977
11 Orlando, Florida: 1974, 1977
12 Phoenix, Arizona: 1974, 1977
14 Saginaw, Michigan: 1974, 1977
15 Salt Lake City, Utah: 1974, 1977
17 Tacoma, Washington: 1977
18 Washington, D.C.-MD-VA: 1974, 1977
19 Wichita, Kansas: 1974, 1977
20 Madison, Wisconsin: 1977
21 Atlanta, Georgia: 1975, 1978
Index
27
H-170
No.
22
24
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
44
45
46
47
48
49
51
53
54
55
56
58
59
60
Chicago, Illinois: 1975, 1979
Colorado Springs, Colorado: 1975, 1978
Hartford, Connecticut: 1975, 1979
Kansas City, Missouri-Kansas: 1975, 1978
Miami, Florida: 1975, 1979
Milwaukee, Wisconsin: 1975, 1979
New Orleans, Louisiana: 1975, 1978
Newport News-Hampton, Virginia: 1975, 1978
Paterson-Clifton-Passaic, New Jersey: 1975, 1978
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania-New Jersey: 1975, 1978
Portland, Oregon-Washington: 1975, 1979
Rochester, New York: 1975, 1978
San Antonio, Texas: 1975, 1978
San Bernardino-Riverside-Ontario, California: 1975, 1978
San Diego, California: 1975, 1978
San Francisco-Oakland, California: 1975, 1978
Springfield-Chicopee-Holyoke, Massachusetts-Connecticut: 1975, 1978
A11entown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pennsylvania, New Jersey: 1976
Buffalo, New York: 1976, 1979
Cleveland, Ohio: 1976, 1979
Denver, Colorado: 1976, 1979
Grand Rapids, Michigan: 1976
Honolulu, Hawaii: 1976, 1979
Houston, Texas: 1976, 1979
Las Vegas, Nevada: 1976, 1979
New York, New York: 1976
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma: 1976
Omaha, Nebraska-Iowa: 1976, 1979
Providence-Pawtucket-Warwick, Rhode Island-Massachusetts: 1976
Sacramento, California: 1976
St. Louis, Missouri-Illinois: 1976
Seattle-Everett, Washington: 1976, 1979


28
REPORTS FROM THE
SURVEY OF MINORITY-OWNED BUSINESSES
WHICH CONTAIN SPANISH ORIGIN DATA
U.S. Bureau of the Census, Survey of Minority-Owned Businesses
MB77-2 Minority-Owned Businesses Spanish Origin: 1977
MB72-2 Minority-Owned Businesses-Spanish Origin: 1972
MB-1 Minority-Owned Businesses: 1969
Index


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