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Freedom to live anywhere

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Title:
Freedom to live anywhere
Creator:
Denver Coordinating Council for Education and Research in Human Relations
Branscombe, Arthur
Steinhauser, Sheldon
Jacobs, Lula W.
Place of Publication:
Denver, Colo.
Publisher:
Denver Coordinating Council for Education and Research in Human Relations
Publication Date:

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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THE DENVER COORDINATING COUNCIL
FOR EDUCATION AND RESEARCH
IN HUMAN RELATIONS
is pleased to present
NO. 1, PAMPHLET SERIES
THE COUNCIL dedicates this pamphlet to better understanding
among the citizens of Denver.
Mrs. Philip Frieder, President
1963-1964
THE DENVER COORDINATING COUNCIL FOR EDUCATION AND RESEARCH
IN HUMAN RELATIONS serves as the citizen-arm of the Commission on Com-
munity Relations. It is composed of two delegates from each of some 100 com-
munity organizations and agencies.


11 lustrations
LULA W. JACOBS
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
TEXT: Mr. Arthur Branseombe, Mr. Sheldon Steinhauser, Mrs. Kenneth Whiting
EDITING: Mrs. Philip Frieder, Mrs. Harold Jacobs
LAYOUT: Mr. Dieter Sebastian, Central Services, City and County of Denver
CONSULTATIVE SERVICES Commission on Community Relations:
Richard E. Young, Chairman
Staff Members
Mrs. Helen L. Peterson, Mrs. Rachel B. Noel, George Roybal


QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS ABOUT FAIR HOUSING
Fellow Citizens:
The Denver Coordinating Council far Education and Research in Human Rela-
tions is composed of Denver citizens who are dedicated to the proposition that all
men are created equal and should be treated accordingly.
In this booklet, "Freedom to Live Anywhere", the Council has prepared a
series of questions and answers about fair housing. 1 commend this booklet to your
attention.
Council members and all those who have assisted the Council in preparing
this booklet are to be commended. Education is the foundation on which we must
build our program of human relations. This pamphlet will be of continuing value in
furtherance of this work.
A
o~hn L Jixnnjuq*
Tom Currigan y
MAYOR /J
INTRODUCTION
It is a truism that cities are made up of groups of neighborhoods -
and neighborhoods are composed of people. We all want our neighbor-
hoods to be good neighborhoods our neighbors to be good neighbors.
Good neighbors include people of all races and creeds, all ethnic groups.
And all have theright to equal access to good housing to decent homes
in good neighborhoods. The term FAIR HOUSING means just this: the
opportunity to buy a home in the neighborhood of one's choice.
In our country we have a commitment to equality of opportunity in
every realm of our national life. But the word commitment implies much
more than silent affirmation; commitment requires each of us to speak up
for equal rights, equal opportunity and personal dignity. It requires us
to speak up against prejudice and hatred, myths, and stereotypes. It is
up to each citizen to let his voice be heard in the neighborhood, in the
school, and among his friends. If we are silent or indifferent when we
should speak out, we are really consenting to prejudice and discrimina-
tion. As responsible citizens however, we have an obligation to know
the facts before we speak. In this publication, the Denver Coordinating
Council for Education and Research in Human Relations has attempted
to set forth the facts on Fair Housing in a simple, usable format.
3


Answer:
0 IS
Answer:
111 hat do we 77ie£l72,by
Fair housing simply means that everyone should be per-
mitted to buy or rent and occupy housing of his choice, where-
ever it may be located, if he can afford it, regardless of his
race, creed, color, national origin or ancestry.
There is also a moral basis for fair housing. What is moral
and right is also inherent in what is fair. An inter-faith group
of Denver religious leaders called together by Mayor Currigan
in 1964, issued a Statement of Conscience which says: The
conscience of the nation is on trial. The heart of the race ques-
tion is moral and religious. It concerns the rights of man. Dis-
crimination on the basis of race cannot be reconciled with the
truth that God has created all men with equal rights and equal
dignity.
The Colorado Fair Housing Act of 1959 makes fair housing
a public policy. It puts the authority of the state squarely be-
hind the principle of equal opportunity in housing for all Colorado
citizens. It provides an orderly method for making effective the
constitutional property rights of all Americans to own and oc-
cupy housing of their choice. It helps to prevent injustice and
plays an important part in the educational process. Although
the State of Colorado recognizes it has a responsibility in the
area of fair housing, long tedious investigations, negotiations,
and court cases are discouraging to persons who really need
immediate housing.
4


^
j 111 hat does the Colorado fair Housing Law provide ?
Answer: Colorados Fair Housing Law forbids discrimination or
segregation in housing because of a persons race, color, reli-
gion, ancestry, national origin or sex. The law applies to the
sale, rental and financing of homes and apartments, land for
housing and public housing projects.
The practices of owners, real estate agents, builders and
mortgage lenders are covered by law.
The law applies both to outright denial of housing oppor-
tunities because of race, religion or national origin, and to the
use of any devious means to discourage or frustrate minority
group persons seeking to rent or buy an apartment or house.
Housing advertisements in newspapers may not state any
restrictions as to the race, religion or national origin of persons
who may be interested in such facilities.
It is unlawful for anyone to ask or to keep any record of
the race, religion or national origin of persons who are seeking
or applying for housing.
The law also forbids harassment or intimidation of home
owners, renters, purchasers or their agents because of race,
religion or national origin.
If one minority moves into a new neighborhood,
wont there be a flood of others?
Answer: There cant possibly be unless there is precipitous exodus
(panic selling) of white families from the neighborhood. If whites
stay put and an open housing market develops, minority families
with the whole housing market to choose from will inevitably
be widely distributed. Since Negroes, for example, constitute
only about 7 per cent of Denver's population, they would be-
come quite inconspicuous in an open housing market.
5


A oonT minoRuy groups ujrnt to live rmong
w their ouin?
Answer: Minority group families are as varied in their needs and
desires as those of any group. Like all families, they want a
comfortable home, adequate public services, safe neighborhoods
with places for children to play and develop normally. High
concentration of minority families is the result of long years
of systematic exclusion from other areas. The 1963NEWSWEEK
Poll shows that 66% of Negroes in northern cities preferred to
live in integrated neighborhoods. Increasing Spanish-American
dispersal also supports this fact.
Probably all minority group families would agree, that re-
gardless of where they choose to live, they want to feel free to
live anywhere they can afford. It is unjust for any one segment
of the population to deny that freedom of choice to any other
group.
IT SEEMS THAT NEIGHBORHOODS AND BUILD-
INGS WHERE MINORITIES LIVE BECOME OVER-
CROWDED AND RUN-DOWN. WON'T THAT HAPPEN
WHEREVER THEY LIVE?
Answer: All studies reveal that minority homeowners maintain their
property at least as well as their neighbors. Minority families
have the same interest and incentive to protect their property
investment as do their neighbors. A study by the National As-
sociation of Real Estate Boards in a survey of local boards in
18 cities found that in answer to the question, How well do
Negroes take care of their property? 13 cities reported: As
well as whites, if in good repair. Too often in areas where
low income families rent, landlords do not keep the property in
good repair.
Drive through the Clayton Park area (north of City Park),
which js predominantly Negro, or northern Park Hill which has
many Negro families and try to pick out which homes are oc-
cupied by Negro families and which by others. Youll find you
cant tell by the way the homes are kept up.
6


DEflVER?
o LUHflT IS THE H0USII1G
DISTRIBUTION AND CONCENTRATION OF
MINORITY FAMILY POPULATION
DENVER
PLANNING OFFICE
0 1 2
1 _ i
SCALE
6 7
__1_______l
L E S
7


o
Answer:
Answer:
ISN'T IT TRUE THAT
THE ENTRY OF MINORITY
FAMILIES INTO A NEW
NEIGHBORHOOD CAUSES
PROPERTY VALUES TO
DECLINE?
No. Arrival of minority families in a previously all-white
neighborhood need not cause any changes in property values
unless the white residents panic and place their homes on the
market en masse. Some Negro and Spanish-American families
have lived in many areas of Denver for years, outside the tradi-
tional ghetto, without disturbance to the neighbors or adverse
effect on property values. Economist Luigi Lorentos study of
more than 10,000 real estate transactions (in three cities, over
a period of five years) revealed prices remained stable or went
up in 85% of the sales investigated.
Mg
dont I have the right to choose
hbors and tenants?
my
own
Yes. You certainly have the right to live in the neighbor-
hood of your choice. But this right is not limited to white per-
sons only. This, the law makes clear, is a right of all citizens.
Actually, when does anyone choose his specific neighbors?
You didnt select your neighbors. You dont veto would-be pur-
chasers who are members of the majority. How can you claim
the right to do so with minorities?
8


A landlord has the right to set standards of occupancy and
to try to insure that a prospective tenant will respect the rights
of others. But he does not have the right to restrict his selec-
tion of tenants on the basis of race, color, creed or national
origin.

m Doesn t the Colorado Fair Housing Act then, take
away the property rights of an owner?
Answer: An owner, in disposing of his property, still has the right
to take the best offer avai lable and in an open housing market,
there would be more offers than are available now. What the
Fair Housing Act does is affirm that buyers, too, have rights;
that if a buyer or renter has the money and income to meet the
owners terms, he cannot be denied an opportunity to buy or
rent the housing of his choice because of such extraneous fac-
tors as race, creed or national origin.
9


WHERE CAN I GET ADDITIONAL INFORMATION AND
REFERENCE MATERIALS ON FAIR HOUSING?
FILMS
AVAILABLE FROM
All The Way Home Anti-Discrimination Commission
The Burden of Truth "
Crisis in Levittown Anti-Defamation League
The Good Neighbors "
To Find A Home "
READING SUGGESTIONS
About Fair Housing:
Colorado Anti-Discrimination Commission, 1525 Sherman St.,
Denver, Colorado 80203. Free pamphlet.
American Race Relations Today:
Studies of the problems Beyond Desegregation. Anchor Books,
Doubleday and Company, Inc., Garden City, New York (95$)
Civil Rights and Minorities:
Paul Hartman, Anti-Defamation League (50$)
Discrimination in Housing:
A Handbook of Facts Eunice and George Grier, ADL, (50$)
Homes and Community:
American Friends Service Committee, 160 North 15th Street,
Philadelphia 2, Pa. Free pamphlet.
Housing:
1961 Commission on Civil Rights Report. Government Printing
Office, Washington 25, D.C. or free from your congressman.
Inconsistencies in Attitudes Toward Negro Housing:
Arnold M. Rose, Anti-Defamation League reprint from Social
Problems (15$)
Property Values and Race:
Luigi Laurenti, University of California Press, 1960 ($6.00)
Residential Integration and Property Values:
Erdman Palmore and John Howe, Anti-Defamation League re-
print from Social Problems (10$)
Social and Educational Problems, Rural and Urban Mexican American
Youth:
Summary of Proceedings of the Southwest Conference (1963)
Los Angeles, Occidental College; Rosenberg Foundation.
10


The Myths of Racial Integration:
Naomi Levine, American Jewish Congress, 15 E. 84th Street,
New York 28, N. Y.
U. S. Department of Labor:
Income, Education and Unemployment in Denver (Information on
population dispersal).
What You Can Do About Racial Prejudice In Housing:
Unitarian-Universalist Association, 25 Beacon St., Boston 8,
Mass. (504)
Where Shall We Live?
Report of the Commission on Race and Housing, University of
California Press, Berkeley 4, Calif.
RESOURCE AGENCIES
Anti-Defamation League
Colorado Anti-Discrimination Commission
Coordinating Council
CORE
Denver Commission on Community Relations
Denver Council of Churches
Fair Housing Council of Metropolitan Denver
NAACP
NCCJ
Park Hill Action Committee
Urban League
Urban Renewal Authority
11