Citation
A descriptive view book in colors reproducing from actual photographs the most prominent views on the Denver and Salt Lake Railroad

Material Information

Title:
A descriptive view book in colors reproducing from actual photographs the most prominent views on the Denver and Salt Lake Railroad
Alternate Title:
Over the Rockies to the top of the world on the Denver & Salt Lake Railroad
Creator:
Barkalow Bros. News Co.
Place of Publication:
Omaha, Neb.
Publisher:
Barkalow Bros. News Co.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
[61] p. : 30 col. pl. ; 20 1/2 x 26 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Colorado -- Pictorial works
Rocky Mountains -- Pictorial works
Copeland Railroad Collection
Denver and Salt Lake Railroad Company

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain.

Full Text


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(^Descriptive View Book in Colors reproducing from actual photographs the moSt prominent views on the Denver and Salt Lake Railroad. (AVoffat Road)
PUBLISHED BY
BARKALOW BROS. CO. OMAHA, NEB.


TUNNELS Nos. 2. 3 AND 4 FROM RAINBOW CUT.
y^T this point the road is just beginning to enter the mountains. Some ideas of the many obstacles that the engineers have had to deal with is given by the picture on the opposite page.




BULL GULCH AND TUNNEL No. 3.
^^LSO distant view of the Plains on the right. Few railroads in the World have encountered the engineering obstacles which have been overcome in the construction of the Moffat Road. Many miles of the roadbed is laid on solid roch and in many places large portions of the mountains were removed to make a pathway for the trains.


BULL GULCH AND TUNNEL NO. 3.


THE GIANT PALISADE.
^^most impressive view exhibiting stupendous and extraordinary rock formations, of exceptional interest is the wide view of plain and peaks seen from the train as it begins at this point its climb to the Summit of the Great Divide.


the giant palisade.


GRAND VIEW OF THE PLAINS FROM TUNNEL No. 7.
^^magnificent view of the mountains over-looking the great plains dotted with streams, lakes and small towns. In this highly varified atmosphere these clear views cover distances of about 60 miles to the East. The railroad distance is about 26 miles from Denver. The altitude is 7,040 feet above the level of the sea.




ELDORADO SPRINGS FROM SCENIC.
'J^WENTY-SEVEN miles from Denver at your right and looking down from an elevation of seven thousand feet is the bewitching little Summer Village and Resort of Eldorado Springs. Its popularity is due to its nearness to Denver, and its fame to the many thousand summer visitors and picnickers each season.


ELDORADO SPRINGS FROM SCENIC.


LOOKING DOWN FROM TUNNEL No. 27 INTO BOULDER CANON.
'TfHE Silvery Stream of South Boulder Creek lends additional enjoyment to the tourist as the waters rushing and tumbling flow from huge banks of snow near the Crest of the Continent to the plains 30 miles from their source.


looking down from
tunnel no. N into SO BOULDER canon






THE SPHINX HEAD ROCK.
TAT AT U RE guarded the entrance to Boulder Park, 47 miles from Denver, with a mountain of granite on the upper and outer edge of which as a silent sentinel she placed a Sphinx Head. A Tunnel through the mountain of granite was the key that unlocked the beauties of Boulder Park to the public.


the sphinx HEAD rock.


PANORAMIC VIEW OF BOULDER PARK.
/JrHE marvel among the many scenic attractions of this famous railroad. In the foreground is Tolland, 47 miles from Denver and at an altitude of 8,889 feet and Boulder Lake. In the background is the Giants Stepladder the most wonderful climb made by any standard gauge railroad in the world.



PANORAMIC VIEW OF BOULDER PARK.


BIRDS EYE VIEW OF BOULDER PARK FROM THE MOUNTAIN SIDE ABOVE TOLLAND.
'T'HIS point is 50 miles from Denver and at an elevation of 9,000 feet. The railroad on this side of the Park makes three long loops about the mountain, each successive loop above the other, and until at last Boulder Park appears and seen through a telescope reversed.




YANKEE DOODLE LAKE.
A/f ORE than ten thousand feet above the level of the 1 1 sea and sixty miles from Denver, with its surroundings vesture of beautiful snow, nestles this lovely lahe of unfathomed depth, whose clear, flashing waters of emerald green charm the delightful vision of all beholders. The glittering rails of this marvelous standard gauge railway almost circle it as with ribbons of steel; and just beyond is its best beloved companion and neighbor, Dixie Lahe and then-THE CREST OF THE CONTINENT.


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DIXIE LAKE.
^~^NLY one mile beyond YANKEE DOODLE, yet one ^ hundred and sixty feet farther heavenward, is clear, charming little DIXIE. Its name breathes of a sunny southland, and nestling here in its western mountain home, it would, if it could, smile bach at the many friendly southern eyes beaming upon its shining surface during each summer-time. From the high, rocky perch above, the more daring summer girl waves triumphant greeting to her friends at the margin of the lovely lakelet below. Needle Eye Tunnel in the distance.
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ROLLINS PASS.
jDOPULARLY known as Corona. This is the highest point reached by a standard gauge railroad in this country. It is 65 miles by rail from Denver, and at an elevation of 11,660 feet above Sea Level. This is the objective point of thousands of Tourists each season. It is indeed a unique sight to see hundreds of Tourists on an August day either reveling admist the snow or gathering wild flowers which grow profusely at this elevation.





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co
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j-age railroad .ue level of the sea. er -.tion is 64 miles. Withi as climbed skyward at each dis^


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SUMMIT OF THE CONTINENTAL DIVIDE.


A VIEW FROM THE TOP OF THE WORLD.
pROM this point one can see for miles in all directions and gives one an excellent idea of the manner in which this wonderful Railroad winds in and out, and threads its way thru canons and over mountains in order to reach the Crest of the Continent. In the foreground below this wonderful rock formation is Smith Lake.




W/HPM F PERPETI->AL SNOW
W hen you leave Denver durin. in tk- ln f,Ur hours time you can bL ,Ummer months
neat'??*6* pkce ^e^.^wi"*8now^
U.660 feet above the level of ,he,now "ever leave,.




ANOTHER LITTLE GLIMPSE OF SNOW.
TOURING the hot months of July and August it seems almost unbelievable that snow-banhs can be found anywhere within the State, but relief from the Summers Sun can be found at this place but a few hours ride from Denver.
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THE TOP OF AN AVALANCHE AT CORONA.
HTHIS is the Tourists delight. On the hottest days of summer hundreds of Tourists visit this point, snowball, tahe and have taken pictures, climb to higher elevations and gather wild flowers which seem to spring from the earth through the banks of snow. This picture was taken July 28th, 1912.



THB TOP F THE avalanche corona.


A FEW VIEWS OF THE RESTAURANT AT CORONA.
JN the Dining Room, Rest and Shelter Pavilion at Corona delicious meals or lunches are served at popular prices to the Tourists making the trip to Corona, The Top O the World. This building is 65 miles from Denver and at an elevation of 11,660 feet. It is known as the only high class Dining Pavilion located at this elevation in the World.


A FEW VIEWS OF THE RESTAURANT AT CORONA.


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s,a$:>


A STORMY DAY ON ROLLINS PASS.


WORLD RENOWNED LOOP ON DENVER AND SALT LAKE RAILROAD.
'T'HE location is virtually upon the very summit of the CONTINENTAL DIVIDE. There are other loops on other lines, but none lihe this. Below is shown the trach alignment and a view of the situation and surroundings.


WORLD RENOWNED LOOP ON DENVER AND SALT LAKE RAILROAD.


GRAND LAKE.
^^.RAND LAKE is the largest and most beautiful body of water in Colorado. Its length is two and one-half miles, and width two miles. The surroundings of mountains and forests are simply ideal. Many beautiful cottages and several hotels are already there. Annual regattas are held, a glimpse of one being shown in the lower picture. Sir Thomas Lipton is taking an active interest in the regattas, indicating their high order. The time is not very far distant when Grand Lake will become one of the most popular, as by nature it is the most charming summer resort in the UNITED STATES.


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BYERS CANON.
'J^HERE are many canons traversed by railways in the Rocky Mountains, but there is not one whose beautiful impressive grandeur equals this. It has everything, river, forest, gigantic rugged walls of rock; and that a standard gauge railway found its way thru it is simply a glorious tribute to the amazing skill of the American engineer when at his best. Location just west from Hot Sulphur Springs.


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GORE CANON.
JN rugged grandeur this famous canon far surpasses any other in the world traversed by a standard gauge railroad. The waters of the Grand River rush and tumble thru, and its majestic walls of granite rise often to the dizzy height of sheer two thousand feet. Its wonderful lights and shadows, and the wild majesty of its constantly shifting scenic glories, distinguish it as one of the greatest among many wonders of this remarkable railway


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gore canon.


ROCK CREEK CANON.
(^)NE hundred and sixty miles from Denver. In this Canon is located the longest and highest bridge on this railroad, in many places the rails are laid .on shelves of roch that have been apparently carved from the solid walls.




TUNNELS Nos. 35, 36 AND 37 IN GORE CANON,
JhNGINEERS overcame enormous difficulties by cutting tunnels through these solid roch barriers. The Grand River rushes and tumbles through this Canon as it seeks its outlet in the Gulf of California a thousand miles away.





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THE EXTINCT VOLCANO.
QEOLOGISTS tell us that this was probably a very lively bit of ground at one time. On the right can be seen farms and farm dwellings, showing that the farmers at least has little fear of any eruption or any activity on the part of this volcano.
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the extinct volcano.


TRAPPERS LAKE.
^ANE hundred and eighty-five miles by rail to Yampa, then by pack horses twenty-five miles to the Lake, which lies on the western side of the famous Flat Top Mountains, the home of both large and small game, and where without a doubt the trout fishing is the best in this western country. Trappers Lake is famed throughout the States for its wonderful scenery by those who have been fortunate enough to have enjoyed its wildness and grandeur.


trappers lake.


' MAR VINE LAKE.
JN the White River National Forest Reserve, one hundred and eighty five miles by rail to Yampa on The Denver and Salt Lahe Railroad, then by pack horses thirty three miles into the' heart of a most wild and rugged country that abounds in wild game to the delight of the Sportsman or lover of Nature in its primitive State.
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STEAMBOAT SPRINGS.
/TTHE metropolis of northwestern Colorado, the center of a country rich in coal and metals, hay, grain and cattle, lumber and mill products and last but not least, its one hundred and fifty different mineral springs challenge the waters of the Worlds most famous resorts.
Steamboat Springs is two hundred and fourteen miles by rail from Denver on The Denver & Salt Lake Railroad, its elevation being sixty-six hundred feet above sea level.


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