Citation
Basalt South, a planned unit development, Basalt, Colorado

Material Information

Title:
Basalt South, a planned unit development, Basalt, Colorado proposal, analysis, program, and solution
Creator:
Edwards, David C
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
68 leaves : illustrations, maps ; 22 x 28 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Condominiums -- Designs and plans -- Colorado -- Basalt ( lcsh )
Real estate development -- Colorado -- Basalt ( lcsh )
Condominiums ( fast )
Real estate development ( fast )
Colorado -- Basalt ( fast )
Genre:
Designs and plans. ( fast )
bibliography ( marcgt )
theses ( marcgt )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Designs and plans ( fast )

Notes

Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references (leaves 44-45).
General Note:
Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree, Master of Architecture, College of Design and Planning.
Statement of Responsibility:
prepared by David C. Edwards.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
09508145 ( OCLC )
ocm09508145
Classification:
LD1190.A72 1979 .E38 ( lcc )

Full Text
BASALT SOUTH
a planned unit development

A+P
I LD
1190 A72 1979 E38
david c. edwards
decernber, 1979
30 AHCH student PAPER 130


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BASALT SOUTH
a planned unit development
BASALT, COLORADO
PROPOSAL, ANALYSIS, PROGRAM, ATO SOLUTION
MASTERS THESIS ARCHITECTURE ?12 GRADUATE PROGRAM IN ARCHITECTURE COLLEGE OF ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN UNIVERSITY 0!* COLORADO AT DENVER
PRESENTED TOt
THE THESIS COMMITTEE
DECEMBER 10, 1979
PREPARED BY1
DA I ID C. EDWARDS


Table of Contents
THE PROBLEM
Problem......................................1
Issues Addressed.............................1
Goals........................................1
Scope........................................2
Approach Proposed............................2
Personal Goals...............................3
Product......................................3
Thesis Advisory Board........................3
THE ANALYSIS
Project Location.............................k
Regional Map.................................5
Introduction............................... 6
Breif History of Basalt......................8
Aspen Impact................................10
Present Situation in Basalt.................13
Regional Transportation. .................15
THE SITE
Site Overview...............................16
Land Use Map (A)............................17
I.and Use Map (B)...........................18
Topographical Plan........................ 19
Pedestrian Circulation......................20
Pedestrian Circulation Plan.................21
Vehicular Circulation..................... 22
Vehicular Circulation Plan..................23
Road Design.................................2k


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Drainage Management..........................25
Drainage Management Plan.....................27
Irrigation Mater.............................28
Landscaping..................................29
Views and Vistas.............................30
Historic Influences..........................31
Adjacent Land Owners.........................32
Amenities....................................33
Services.....................................35
Miscellaneous Utilities......................37
CHE PROGRAM
Problem Statement............................38
Townhouse Program............................39
Acknowledgements.............................42
Thesis Preparation Journal..................4-3
Bibliography.................................44
Footnotes.....................................4 5
Appendix.....................................46
THE SOLUTION
Taster planning..............................47
Townhouses...................................48
Garden Apartment.............................50


THE PROBLEM


Problem
Issues Addressed
Goals
The Basalt South Project is an 82 acre planned urban development in Basalt, Colorado. 1he development includes a maximum of 404 housing units, a large commercial development, recreational facilities and developed outdoor areas. It is my intension to study indepth the townhouses which are to be provided in this development, The unit designs and surrounding outdoor areas would be designed within the guidelines set forth by the Design Workshop Inc. of Aspen,Colorado (Development master planners), and Basalt South Development Corporation.
There are a number of issues which will be addressed in this thesis. On the larger scale concepts of community, security, and livability will be studied. Circulation both vehicular and pedestrial will be studied on a large scale as well as in the immediate proximety of the units to be designed. More specific issues to be addressed in the actual design of the units will be energy conservation and possible solar applications, the possibility pf a modular construction system, and a cost analysis of construction costs. The concept of the transition of stages, from the small scale to the large scale will also be dealt with.
The major goal of this thesis is to develop typical unit designs for the townhouses within the development, in relation to their immediate surroundings, the total development,

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Scope
Approach Proposed
and the town of Basalt. A second goal is to study the concept of energy conservation in design. i'he concept of regional design will also be dealt with along with other issues stated previously.
This thesis is not intended to be a study of large scale urban planning. Rather, a study of the dwelling units and their surrounding areas in relation to the overall development, working within the guidelines set forth by the Design Workshop Inc. I intend to develop unit designs, including exterior areas, interior layouts, structural, mechanical and electrical schematics, including cost estimates for each unit type.
Assumptions are as follows:
1. That the latest plat proposal for the Basalt South Development will be final.
2. That the vehicular and pedestrial circulation systems within the development will remain as proposed.
3. That the requirements for the townhouses will be a true assessment of the market's desires and needs in housing at the present time.
The approach which I plan to follow is identical to that which is being done in the feild with the development of the project.
The Design Workshop Inc. was commisioned by the developer to design the master planning and set forth guidelines for the 82 acre development of Basalt South. The developer is presently in contact with a second architectural firm which will actually design the living units within the-guidelines previously
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Personal Goals
Product
Thesis Advisory Board
set forth. It is my intention to take on the role of the second architectural firm, dealing with the units and surrounding areas.
From this thesis project I hope to gain a better understanding of the various types and alternatives of residential living enviroments. I also hope to increase my knowledge of energy conservation and possible solar application in housing design, along with the exploration of a possible rnodulax' construction system.
The product of this thesis will consist of:
A verbal presentation, drawings, model(s), and a text including} thesis proposal, thesis preparation and thesis presentation reproductions.
G.K. Vetter
B. Kindig
C. G. Long
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THE ANALYSIS


Project Location
Basalt is located in the Roaring Fork Valley-on the border of Eagle and Pitkin Counties approximately 1.50 miles west south-west of Denver. Colorado. It is situated at approximately 39 North latitude and 106 longitude at an elevation of 6,625 ft. above sea level, i'he present population of the town of Basalt and surrounding area is approximately 850.
Basalt is easily reached from Denver by travelling West on Interstate Highway ?0 to Glen-wood Springs, and then south on Colorado 82 for 2k miles to Basalt.


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BOULDER


INTRODUCTION
Basalt South is a proposed residential and commercial planned unit development to be located in the incorporated undeveloped portion of Basalt surrounding the High School and boardering Hwy. 82. The project as proposed, is to include a range of housing types including relatively high density apartments and medium density townhouses and patio homes and a commercial shopping center, all to be serviced by underground water, sewer and public utilities.
Access to the project will be along a primary road connecting with Hwy. 82- south of the High School. A five acre park in the northern portion of the project is proposed to be dedicated to the Town of Basalt. The strategic location of the park will provide open space and a recreation focus for the citizens of Basalt.
The shopping center is proposed south of the High School. As envisioned, it will be connected to the town of Basalt and the residential areas within the project via a linked open space western, allowing convenient and attractive pedestrian access to the center, thereby minimizing shopper traffic generation. The highest residential densities of the project are located adjacent to the shopping center, transitioning to lower densities to the north to be consistent with existing development. A combination of the park, the open space trail easements, outdoor use areas, and private common open
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space, significantly exceeds the 25% City open space requirement .*
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Breif History of Basalt
The name given to the first settlement was Frying Pan Junction because of its location at the junction of the Roaring Fork and Frying Pan Rivers. The origional settlement was created in about 1882 to house and entertain the men working the charcoal ovens built in the same year.
The ovens produced charchol which was packed on mules to the smelters in Aspen and Leadville. The usefulness of the ovens faded when the railroad reached Aspen and it became more economical for Aspen to obtain coke from Cardiff and up the Crystal River.
Seven years later the name of the settlement was changed to Aspen Junction. A descripyion of the town in 1887 is as follows?
"A little town started up last summer within a half-mile of our ranch. It was really a railroad camp. In about three weeks there were a boarding house, a little store, a resturant or tv/o, and fifteen saloons."'
The post office in Aspen Junction was established on February 13, 1890. The name of the settlement was changed from Aspen Junction to Basalt on June 19, 1895, to avoid confusion of mail with Grand Junction.
The town of Basalt was incorporated August 26,
1901. The population of the town remained fairly consistent from 1900 to i960. As the
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railroad workers began to move out motels, gas stations and shops began to move in and began to provide for the increasing tourist industry. Real estate, tourism, some farming along with ranching make up the major economic base of the Basalt area today.
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Aspen Impact
Basalt Colorado is located approximately 18 miles north of Aspen. The fact that Basalt is located in relitively close proximity to Aspen has produced a situation which is occuring in several small towns in the area, (Snowmass, Carbondale, and El Jebel). Due to the extremeiy inflated real estate prices in Aspen a large portion of the Aspen work force is unable to find affordable housing in the area. Thus they are forced to move to neighbouring communities and commute up to as much as ^5 miles to Aspen daily.
The extremely high land and housing costs in the Aspen area are a direct result of the Pitkin County and Aspen Controlled Growth Program. With only a limited number of building permits issued per year, and the high demand for housing, existing residences and undeveloped land has skyrocketted in value, well above the average income earner's range. Even though the cost of real estate in Aspen is extremely high there is not a shortage of buyers. However most of the buyers of the high priced real estate are foreigners and are purchasing second homes.
The strong desire to live in Aspen is due to the location,(There are several excellant ski areas in the immediate area) the climate, the well, developed commercialism, and the aura of exclusiveness that seems to be present in the town.
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A Fifth Avenue address is pricy. no mutter where the Fifth Avenue is. A two-bed room, one-bathroom unit (7JU square feet) in these condominiums could be purchased for a mere $39,900 in 1974. Even with no improvements, its cost in early 1979 was $120,000. The unitwith new furnishingsis now listed at $160,000.
"\
The prime residential area in Aspen is Red Mountain, where this stunning home is located. Red Mountain offers sun (all sues face south), a view of Aspen Mountain, and proximity to town. The house at the top of Red Mountain is currently availablefor $7R5.000-but one could Jind a $245,000 bargain halfway down the slope.
Dick Fitzgerald came to Aspen nineteen years ago because, he says, Aspen was a place where with a little bit of money and determination you could start your own business. He started Fitzgerald Keal Instate; now be shakes bis head when he talks about what's happening to his business in Aspen. People say it cant go any higher, but I dont know. I just bought a piece of property I could have bought back in 1968 for eighteen hundred dollars. I paid a hundred and fifteen thousand and I got a good huy.
Fitzgerald has seen property in Aspen jump anywhere from 20 to 100 percent in one year. Two years ago, a two bedroom, two bathroom condominium he listed jumped from $50,000 to $96,000 in six months. Today that same unit sells for $170,000. It used to be, says Fitzgerald, that people would only buy places on the mountain. Now they will buy anywhere, anything, for any price. And you would be amazed at the number of people who pay cash. lie just sold a house in Snowmass (10,000 square feet, with a swim
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Chic or shack? This house with its sloping roof is essentially one large room. Located on four acres of land in Woody Creek (about twenty minutes from Aspen), it sold for $67,000 in 1975. Minor improvements were made, and it was resold in the spring of 1978 for $175,000 a mere $108,000 increase.
tiling pool in (he middle) for $1.8 million; a three-bedroom, three-bathroom Aspen Club condominium (2,400 square feet) for $525,000; a one-bedroom condominium at The Gant for $250,000; a studio at Aspen Square for $150,000.
Fitzgerald has on the market a little house (1,725 square feet) on Red Mountain for $325,000; a house in Starwood (this exclusive neighborhood of some seventy houses has its own guard and gate to keep out the riffraff) for $750,000; a three-bedroom, (hree-bath-
This ticky-tacky house in Aspen's west end sold for $65,000 in 1973. By 1975, it was worth $88.000, and in 1977, it became a ticky-tacky duplexthe ticky half selling for $130,000, the tacky halffor only $115,000. Today, it would cost an investor $350,000 for both ticky-tacky halves.
room house (8,000 square feet) at Ruttermilk for $850,000; a small house (with forty-two acres) in Woody Greek for $680,000; a house on Red Mountain for $625,000; a house in downtown Aspen on three acres for $1.2 million.
It should be pointed out that most of these outrageously priced places are being sold as second homes and that, increasingly, it is not Americans who are investing in booming Aspen real estate but Europeans, Mexicans, Australians, South Americans, and Arabs.
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Present Situation in Basalt
Basalt is located in Eagle County, who's commissioners have an entirely different attitude towards development than that of Pitkin County. Eagle County's attitude is to accept and promote as much development as possible, perhaps a little to readily for their own benifit. In the past several years there has not been a great deal of construction of residential developments in the Basalt area. However the demand has been steadily increasing as the population of Basalt grows. At present there are a number of mobile home parks in the immediate area. They have grown in size with the increasing population and have become a definite entity within the community of Basalt. Recenty there has been residential construction to the North-east of the town center,(Riverside Meadows) which is directly North of the Basalt South Planned Unit Development.
The site of the 82 acre Basalt South Project is bisected by the county line between Eagle and Pitkin Counties. After lengthy legal proceedings the Town of Basalt managed to annex the required land from Pitkin County in July of 197^. Once the required land was annexed, the Basalt administrators adopted a policy of Planned Unit Development Regulations to apply to the 82 acre site. L'he Planned Unit Development process was chosen as an alternative to the traditional Sub-division process of zoning and development. In this process there is an enormous up front capital cost, (which must be paid by the developer) of design and research to prepare the required submittal to the city.


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i'his process is more costly to the developer than the regular Sub-division process. The submission is then subject to review by the Planning and Zoning Comrnision and the Town Board of Trustees, where it is either accepted of rejected. Subsequently the 82 acre site has been sold several times from developer to developer since 197^* The latest submission by the Basalt South Development Company was accepted by the Town of Basalt in the Spring of 1979.
At the present time site construction has begun. The placement of sewer and water lines, utilities, and the grading of major roads are in progress.


Regional Transportation
At the present there is a proposal for the widening and improvement of highway 82 running between Glenwood Springs and Aspen. It is proposed that the highway be expanded to two lanes divided in each direction, from the existing two lane highway. It would cross the Roaring Fork River north of Basalt and run down the west side of the valley. The general consensis in Basalt is in approval of this improvement, since the existing road to Aspen carries a great deal of traffic and can be extremely trecherous. A few lives have been lost on the road in the past several winters, The residents of.Aspen on the other hand feel this would be a detriment to their community, cused by a speculated enormous increase in traffic flow and people. They have also shared their concern for the enviroment backed by John Denver (resident of Aspen). The citizens of Aspen also have the support of the Pitkin County Commissioners who feel the improvements would be in contradiction to their controlled growth program.
It has been predicted that if the improvement of highway 82 does take place the improvements are likely to stop at or shortly after it reaches the Pitkin County line, south of Basalt.
The commuting work force to Aspen does have an alternative rather than automobile transportation. The Pitkin County Bus System runs several times a day between Glenwood Springs and Aspen, making stops at the communities along the way.
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THE SITE


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Site Overview
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i'he Basalt South Project is located to the immediate South-east of the town of Basalt.
I'he major commercial area in the town is located along Midland Avenue and in an area between Midland Avenue and Highway 82. I'he Elementary and High Schools are located to the East of the site. North of the site is Riverside Meadows, a relitively new single family housing development. ihe land to the South of the site boardered by Highway 82 is designated in the town Master Plan for the direction of future commercial and residential growth.
At the present time there are several businesses and houses located South of the site along H ighway 82.


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100'
300'

600'
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LAND USE
A
B
C
D
E
F
OPE-N SPACE PATIO HOMES TOWNHOUSE APARTMENT AMENITY CENTER COMMERCIAL
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A
BAP*GEL *T Z?> UKUTO.
PARACEL5 \9 UW\TG
PARCEL *e. PAPACE-L* 7
B\ UKHTO MAX. 81 LIMITS MAX.

PARSC-EL IO 108- UM1TO MA X.
PARC E L. ^
1 AMENITY CENTER
2 GARDEN APTS
_3 TOWNHOUSES
4 TOWNHOU5ES
_5 TOWNHOUSE >
.6 TOWNHOUSES
7 TOWNHOUSE S
8 TOWNHOUSES
9 TOWNHOUSES
JO GRPiDEN AFTS-J I hU Si DEN jOT COM M LOT I COMMERCIAL L0T2 COMMERCIAL
LAND USE
O 100 300*

600'
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Pedestrian Circulation
The pedestrian open space system provides the skeleton around which the project is structured. As envisioned, all the residents of the project will be able to walk or cycle to all portions of the site and important areas within the community with little or no interference with vehicular traffic. A walking, jogging trail will be provided which completely circumscribes the residential area and connects the park (to be dedicated to the Town) the High School, the Middle School, and the Elementary School for convenient, safe accessability for all residents. In addition, the open space pathway system connects schools, the park, and the commercial area, unobstructed by roads. This park/open space core provides not only a tremendous amenity for the residents of the project, but an increasingly valuable open space resource for the community as Basalt expands and develops in the future. The open space corridors designated in the Basalt South plan also connect to properties to the east and south, providing the opportunity for future development to establish pedestrian and open space links to all the important core facilities of the community including the shopping center, the schools, and the park. In addition to the dedicated park and open space easements, each of the residential parcels will be provided with common open space at or in excess of 25% for the future enjoyment of residents and the visual enhancement of the project?



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Vehicular Circulation
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Primary vehicular access to the project is along a major thoroughfare which connects with Hwy. 82 running through the entire project and terminating at the boundary on the north. Secondary
roads link all residential and commercial areas of the project to this thoroughfare.
Access to this roadway is limited with very little residential frontage on the road, and noi commercial frontage. i'his road would be a boulevard as it passes through the commercial area with extensive mounding and landscaping along its edges to provide a gracious entrance to the residential area and to partially screen the shopping center parking lots from the motorist's view.
Secondary access to the shopping center is provided along the northern border of the commercial property serving primarily as access to the High School and the fire station."11




Road Design
The major access route to this commercial/ residential development will be via State Highway 82 and Roaring Fork DriVe. To provide a safe and efficient connection of these roads, a lighted intersection with acceleration and deceleration lanes and left-hand turn storage pocket will be constructed. It is anticipated that the 35 M.P.H. speed limit thru town will be extended east to the intersection with Roaring Fork Drive.
Within the Subdivision four roads will be dedicated to the town. One, the gravel road previously built along the western .edge of the project to service the High School, has already been dedicated to the public.
Roaring Fork Drive, Kiln Court, and Mountain Court will be designed and constructed to current town standards by the developer.
Interior auto courts and parking areas will not be dedicated or maintained by the town. However, the auto courts will be constructed with the same quality as the dedicated roads.
Pedestrian trails within the project will alleviate the need for sidewalks along the roads. Concrete walkways are planned around parking areas to give channelized access to commercial and multi-family buildings to prevent damage to the landscape.*
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Drainage Management
"\
The proposed drainage plan will foloww the historical drainage patterns as much as possible. Since the Town of Basalt presently has no storm drainage system, a detention-storage system is planned, using a design criteria for the 100 year 2 hour duration rainstorm. l'he difference between the historic and developed runoff will be detained or stored. This water will be allowed to settle, and then slowly drained by historic waste ditches to the Frying Pan and Roaring Fork Rivers.
The project can be broken into two main areas, the Roaring Fork drainage and the frying Pan drainage. i'his present pattern will be kept intact. Basic criteria for drainage will be based on the Urban Storm Drainage Criteria Manual published by the Denver Regional Council of Governments. The off-site drainage entering the site comes from an 80 (plus or minus) acre basin of the project. The major part of the flow from this basin will be intercepted via a grass lined channel along the easterly edge of the project and conveyed to the storm sewers underneath Highway 82.
A minor portion of this flow will be intercepted by the John Ruedi Irrigation Ditch and conveyed to the Frying Pan River via the historic waste ditch thru. Jessie Arbaney and Kathryn Long's property, under Cottonwood Drive, and finally to sheet flow into the Filing Pan River.
On-site drainage will be handled by roadside ditches, valley gutters, culverts, and grass-lined ditches. Specific overflow points will
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be provided along the irrigation ditches to control ditch overtopping to storage areas. Parking lots and open spaces will be used as much as possible to store drainage water during major storms. No roof top storage is planned for buildings in the project
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Irrigation Water
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Basalt South has adjudicated water rights in two irrigation ditches: The John Reudi Ditch with headgate located on the Roaring Fork River, and the L & A Ditch with headgate located on the Frying Pan River. The developer has requested that irrigation water and not treated water from the municipal water system be used within the project for decorative and irrigation purposes, and the recommendations in the Water Rights Report for the Town of Basalt prepared by Wright Water Engineers,
March 5 1976 be followed .*
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Landscaping
The developer intends to landscape common areas and roadsides within the development.
The Homeowners Association and/or the Metropolitan District will maintain the amenity for the development's residents.
An intregal part of this landscape plan is the assumption that irrigation water will be available and utilized.
All interior landscaping will be the responsibility of the developer of that individual parcel.
At the present time the site has nd vegetation higher than approximately four feet. It is covered mainly with grasses and several shrubs A-


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Views and Vistas
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Phe 82 acre site is located to the South-east of the town and is surrounded with an excellent panoramic view of the rising hills, mountains and the Roaring Fork Valley. Phe view to the North is up the Roaring Fork Valley with the Mountains in the distance. Po the East and South of the site the mountains rise very quickly. The view to the West is one across the valley rloor to the mountains on the opposite side.
Phe site receives a large amount of sun which is a base for a pleasant living environment and provides the potential for passive and active solar energy to be incorporated into the design of the living units.
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Historic Influences
V
A
Perhaps the most significant historiacl elements in Basalt are the charcoal ovens which were built in 1892, and are still standing today. These monuments of the past, remind the town of Basalt of its origins and it's base for growth. The charcoal ovens are located on the Northern edge of the Basalt South Project site and will be incorporated into a municipal park to be developed in that area. Another element of the past which still remains is the 'Half-way House constructed in the late 1800's. t'his was used by travellers and railroad men when Basalt was still basically a tent community. It was constructed out of heavy timbers with a sod roof, and remains in good condition for it's age today. The 'Half-way House' is located to the Northwest of the site, along the Frying Pan River.
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Adjacent Land Owners
Adjacent Property Owners
Thunder River Realty Co.
PO Box 1052
Basalt, Colorado 81621
Kathryn M. Long
200 Cottonwood Drive
Basalt, Colorado 81621
Roaring Fork School District RE-1
1405 Grand Avenue
Glenwood Springs, Colorado 81601
Mr. Guido E. Meyer
6137 Hwy. 82
Basalt, Colorado 81621
Mrs. Fredrick Arbaney 250 Cottonwood Lane Basalt, Colorado 81621
Mrs. Jessie Arbaney 200 Cottonwood Drive Basalt, Colorado 81621
Mr. R.J. Smith
PO Box 10^-5
Basalt, Colorado 81621
Mrs. Francis Hinman Estate c/o Carole Romberg 9670 Allison Way Bloomfield, Colorado 80020*


Amenities
A
The predominate amenities for the Basalt South project are the close proximity to existing community facilities (schools, shopping, etc.) and the physical setting of the site on a gently sloping meadow with superb sun exposure and magnificant views in virtually all directions.
The on site amenities provided by the development are specifically designed to reinforce, connect and expand on these two major elements* First is the location and design of the shopping center surrounding a sunny open court with the natural- elements of the valley (water, vegetation, and sunshine) incorporated into the area. Walking accessability to these facilities along pleasant, landscaped pedestrian corridors will be a delightful experience and a rare one given the normal development pattern in other communities in the valley. Immediate, safe and convenient access is also provided to the schools and to the park with little or no interference with the automobile.
A recreation facility designed to serve the project residents, composed of a swimming pool, tennis courts, a community recreation building and other facilities is proposed only a short distance from the commercial area and will provide an identifiable and readily accessible leisure time focus for the project. Adjacent to this facility, and connecting all the major elements of the project, is a jogging/walking/
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A
bike path located in the landscaped open space easement. Additionally, the irrigation water that will be available to the project will be routed along these corridors providing the sight and sound of water and an irrigation supply for the open space corridors. Finally, a more subtle aspect of the amenity package is the overall planning and design of facilities to maximize the benifits of the sun and the magnificant views inherent on the property.*
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Services
The following is a tentative assignment of responsibilities for delivery of services.
Fire District
-Fire protection
Town of Basalt
-Police
-Road maintenance (dedicated roads only)
-Other normal services not assumed by the Metro district and/or Homeowner's Associations
Public utilities
-Gas
-Electricity -Phone -Cable TV
Metro district and/or Homeowners Associations
-Trash removal (pending Town's assumption of same)
-Street and parking maintenance (undedicated areas I
-Irrigation and ditch maintenance
-Open space and trails maintenance
-Covenants enforcement
-Water service*
-Sanitation service*
-Drainage structures maintenance
^Assumes establishment of metropolitan water and/ or sanitation district. In the absence of the
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formation of such a metropolitan district, sewer services would be provided by the Basalt Sanitation District and water services would be provided by the Pown of Basalt .*
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Miscellaneous Utilities
Electric Power
The propsed electric power service to the development will be via a new underground electric power distribution system. The existing overhead lines which parallel old Weidman Lane and Highway 82 will be removed.
telephone and Cable TV
New telephone and cable TV lines are to be installed underground within the utility easements provided by the developer. The existing overhead telephone line which crosses the northern portion of the development and cable TV line parallel with Highway 82 are to be removed.
Natural Gas
Rocky Mountain Natural Gas has recommended that an underground gas main be extended along the westerly side of Roaring Fork Drive from the existing high pressure gas main along Highway82. A pressure reducing station will be required at this connection.
The company envisions no restrictions or moratorium on new gas line hookups
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Problem Statement
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The developers of the Basalt South Project wish to provide several alternatives of living environments to the buyers. One of the alternatives is the townhouses. A number of the parcels of land in the total 82 acre site have been designated for townhouse development. It is the intent that the townhouses not necessarily be low-cost since the market desired is the average to slightly above average income earning couples with one or two children. Because of rising energy costs it is desired that the units be designed in harmony with the environment, not in contrast. The final goal is to provide a pleasant and enjoyable living environment -interior and exterior- for the residents of each townhouse.
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Townhouse Program
fownhouses are single family attached dwellings; that is, adjacent units share a common wall.
The townhouse homes should be arranged to derive the maximum solar and privacy benefits on the exterior and interiors of each unit.
In addition, the common wall configuration provides additional energy conservation with fewer exterior walls and a narrower building.
The possibility of removing parking from the units should be explored. Clustering the t parking may provide a more economical land use plan. Because the units are typically smaller than the patio houses, residents have fewer children and a lower parking ratio is therefore achievable. A parking ratio of 2-2^ cars per unit is sufficient.
fownhouses are necessarily two or more floors (because of the reduced width of the house.)
For this reason, the developer has proposed a height variance in the townhouse parcels to permit three story buildings up to 35 feet in height. Densities in the townhouse areas will range from 8-15 units per acre and lot sizes will range from 16' to 2k* wide by UO' to 80' in depthi
The townhouses to be provided are two and three bedroom units in the ratio of three to one.
That is, for every 3 two bedroom units, 1 three bedroom unit will be provided. That is an estimation of the market basically due to the fact that the buyers will have only one or two children.
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The land use planning of each townhouse parcel should provide a transition of spaces. (Open public areas, semi-public, semiprivate and private exterior areas for each unit). The design of the exterior spaces of each parcel should provide for a pedestrian linkage to the greenway pedestrian system encompassing the 82 acre site and tieing the site with the town, schools, parks, and existing commercial facilities.
The exterior site planning should provide for ease of circulation, both pedestrian and vehicular and avoid major conflicts of the two. The site planning should also be energy conscious, acheived through building orientations berming, vegitation and other methods.
Several designs of two bedroom
units are necessary to provide options to the buyers. The different unit designs should be interwoven among one another.
It is desired that the parcels of townhouses reflect a feeling of community and continuity, through site planning and the exterior designs of the units themselves.
Lhe interior of the units should be designed with an ease of circulation with a minimum amount of space dedicated to circulation.
It is desired to have rooms designed to allow for the flexibility of furniture arrangements. The interior of the units should be co-ordinated with the exterior to allow for proper solar exposure, natural ventilation and, visual and physical access from interior to the exterior. It is desired that the interior spaces contain some form of visual interest through massing or volume changes from space to space. An example of this would be a cathedral ceiling in the livingroom.
M_____________________________________________J


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v
Since the project is located in a mountain community in Colorado it is desired that some amount of regionalistic influences be incorporated into the designs of the units.
The major spaces to be provided within the units are as follows:
Bedrooms (2or3)
Baths lj to 2)
Kitchen
Dining Room
Living Room
Storage Spaces
Partial or full basement
Total square footage will range from 1,000 to 1,300 sq. ft.
Additional Considerations:
Decks and patios (Balconies)
Exterior storage spaces Private exterior area Attached or detached parking Minimum of exterior maintenence Energy conservation Fireplaces Shelter entrance
41


r
Acknowledgements
V
"\
I would like to gratefully acknowledge the following persons who have provided their assistance to me in collecting data and information related to this project.
Mr. David Slemon of Slemon, Mazza & Lasalle Representing the Basalt Development Company
Mr. Roger Burkart and Mr. Don Ensin of the Design Workshop, Inc.
Mr. Mike Fuller and Mr. Bill Hofman, Graduate Architecture Students, University of Colorado at Denver
Prof. H.H. Smith and Prof. D. Schler, University of Colorado at Denver
i.'heir effort in making information available and providing their time to me is greatly appreciated.
k2


Thesis Preparations
Journal
June
July
July
July
Aug.
Aug.
26 Meeting with Herb Smith (Backgrounf information)
5 - Telephone conversation with Bill
Hoffman UCD landscape student-Kellog foundation- Colorado Mountain College Carbondale
6 - Telephone conversation with Don
Ensin Architect with Design Workshop Inc., Aspen, Colorado.
9 Meeting with Mike Puller and Bill Hofman, Colorado Mountain College
Meeting with Don Ensin and Roger Burkart Design Workshop Inc.
Aspen, Colorado
- Site visit Basalt Colorado
5 Telephone conversation with David Slemon Partner of Slemon, Mazza and Lasalle attorneys, representing Basalt Development Company. Aspen, Colorado
8 Meeting with David Slemon. Discussed project background and developer's concepts of the projects goals and direction.
'+3


Bibliography
Clifford, p. and Smith, J.M. Aspen/ Dreams and Dilemma. the Swallow Press Inc.; Chicago, Illinois 1970.
Danielson, C.L. and Danielson R.W. Basalt: Colorado Midland Town. Pruett Publishing Co.; Boulder, Colorado 1971.
Vallely, Jean The Ski Bum As An Endangered Species Esquire.; March, 1979*
Slemon, David, Basalt South Planned Unit Development Preliminary Plat Submission. Submitted to Basalt Planning and Zoning Commission, and the town of Basalt Board of trustees. April 11, 1979.
Basalt Zoning Code, Basalt, Colorado. April, 1976.


r
Footnotes
1.
2.
*
k5
Danielson, C.L. and Danielson R.W. Basalt: Colorado Midland Jown. Pruett Publishing Co.; Boulder, Colorado 1971. p.3
Vallely, Jean fhe Ski Bum As An Endangered Species. Esquire.; March, 1979. p
Editted from 'Basalt South Planned Unit Development Preliminary Plat Submission'


Appendix


Patio House Program
fhe patio house concept is a simple one, dating back to prehistoric times. fhe fundamental notion is to locate the living areas (both indoor and outdoor), off the house to the south with major glass areas and openings along the south wall. fhe intent is to maximize the warming advantages of the sun during the winter, thus conserving energy. fhe houses are built on relatively small lots with a private outdoor patio area on the south enclosed for privacy. Particular attention and control is given to architectural and landscaping design to insure a pleasurable indoor and -outdoor living area. Deciduous trees planted in the patio provide summer shade while allowing sun penetration in the winter. Southern patio orientation plus extensive enclosure, extends the usable outdoor season as a month on each end of the summer due to favorable sun exposure and the exclusion of winds. Additional benefits realized through patio house development are reduced costs to homeowners for site development and yard maintenance. Each patio house will be supplied with a 2-car garage or car port and a 20 foot garage apron allowing for h off-street parking spaces per dwelling unit. Phis configuration allows for reduced street size because no on-street parking is necessary.
fhe need for southern exposure coupled with the small size of lot typically dictate a


r
v
noth-south, east-west orientation of property lines and access streets. The patio house lots range in size from 50' x 80' to 60' x 100' yeilding a gross density of from 4 to 7 units per acre.*-
J


Apartment Program
Apartment configuration, building design, density and number of dwelling units can be defined only by specific design of each parcel. These elements will be precisely defined at the final plat submission stage along with parking configuration and ratios and preliminary architectural design.
The developer has requested permission to condominumize the apartment dwellings to enable home ownership in this configuration. Also, the developer has proposed a height variance to 35 feet in the apartment parcels to permit three story buildings in order to achieve a more efficient development pattern.*


Commercial Program
A
The market demand for retail commercial space in the Basalt region has been carefully researched to determine the size and character of the commercial facilities. Based on this research, a shopping center appears to be viable which falls within the parameters established by previous approvals for the Basalt South project(180,000 square feet). However, the demand for retail commercial space is not as large or as rapid a pace as the demand for residential units. As a result, residential unit demand will to some degree dictate development of the commercial portions of the project.
As envisioned, the commercial facilities will be clustered around a town square open space which is linked to the remainder of the property, the schools, the park, and downtown Basalt via a pedestrian open space system. Access roads and parking are located on the opposite side of the buildings form the town square.
Uses envisioned, for the commercial area include convenient shopping (grocery stores, liquor stores, etc.): comparative shopping (apparel, furniture, gifts and books, etc.): and other uses pemitted under current commercial zoning. Envisioned are health care facilities, nursing or old folks home, atheletic club, restaurants and bars, theater, hotel or motel facilities, etc. Additionally, a new fire station site at the northwest corner of the property adjacent to Hwy. 82 and a regional bus stop and postal facility


r
\
immediately accessable to the town square
and conveniently accessable from the residential
areas will be constructed.*
J
V


LATITUDE N35 li LONGITUDE *106 50
ASPEN, CO ELEVATION 79? 0
CLIMATOLOGICAL SUMMARY
MEANS AND E XT II £ ME S POP PERIOD 1951-1973
TEMPERATURE ( *F) j PRECIPITATION TOTALS (INCHES)
MEANS EXTREMES MEAN NUMBER OF DAYS ' SNOW. SLEET MEAN NUMBER OF DAYS
MONTH MAX MIN. H MAXIMUM MON 1 111.Y _ ib ib X
l>AII V MAXI MCA 5 if f £! ! Is > u. < > 2 H s v. Lb g§ tc < > < 'si 1 3 < £ s z z3 < P V. u.' et 1! < c £ Z < u. 2 Ei a: C U 5 i || sc < > s z < 2 s < ib' > Z ri $ £ > < 5 5 | 5 z 1 1 -
IAN 3*. . 7.5 ?c.t 5! 3 -33 62 12 c 13 31 e 1.62 4.40 |57 1*20 69 27 23.9 71.5 57 46.0 57 26 6 0 0
fee 27.2 n 23.5 60* i.2 12 -3C 1 0 7 * * 1 A3 3.0*162 .70 162 17 21.1 39.0(62 65.0 57)01 6 0 0
MAR A?.* 15.3 26.9 70* |59 |22 -14 65 3 0 5 31 3 1.63 5.34 65 2.67 160 14 22.2 76.5 65 56.0 65 25 6 1 0
ATM 24.4 36.5 73 |6 |Z2 -i 73 6 0 0 27 0 1.76 3.45 60 1*22 57 07 13.6 36.0 70 61.0 65 02 5 1 0
MAY 32,1 46.1 60* 163 122 62 i 0 0 IS 0 1.50 3.32 57 1.36 57 09 3.0 1 4 0 61 6.0 57 109 * 1 0
ji-n : 73.A 36.9 56.1 9? J54 123 23 73)19 c 0 0 1.21 3.77 69 1.26 (69 26 .3 3.3 '* 2.0 73103 4 0 0
JULY 79.6 <*4.6 62.2 90* (72 *30 31 55 6 0 0 0 0 1.61 2.30 66 .76 64 24 .0 5 0 0
AUG 77.4 43.6 6C.5 9? i69 j 9 26 te 2* 0 c 0 0 2.00 4.36 64 1.29 64 05 .0 6 1 0
SEPT [ 69.9 36.2 52.1 67 j.O i 3 13* 11 0 0 7 0 1.65 5.60 61 1.26 61 24 2.6 27.0 61 7.0 71 17 * 1 0
OCT 29.7 26.1 43.9 76* jtl I 1 6* 31 0 0 24 0 1.60 4.53 169 1.13 (63 31 6.1 35.6 69 9.0 69 16 4 1 0
NON 44.0 17.0 30.5 .6* Ns In -19 55 16 0 4 29 2 1.56 2.93 64 .7|55 15 19.3 37.5 64 21.0 55 15 5 0 0
DEC j 3*. .6 6.6 21.6 59 iss in -19 61 12 0 13 31 6 1.65 6.75 51 2.06 66 106 26.2 58.3 51 42.0 51 31 6 1 0
YEAR 1 JLU 25.6 *-6 33 JUN 154 !23 -33 JAK 63112 0 ** 226 ,9.6* SEP 5.80161 MAR 2.67 |60 14 136.3 MAR 7fe.5|65 MAR 56.0|65 ill i_iL 7 Li
ALSO ON EARLIER DATES
FRIEZE probabilities
PROBABILITY OF LATER DATE IN SPRING (MO/DA) THAN INDICATED
TEMP .10 .20 .30 .40 .50 .60 .70 .80 .90
32 6/26 6/21 6/16 6/15 6/13 6/10 6/ 7 6/ 4 5/30
28 6/14 6/ 6 6/ 4 6/ 1 5/26 3/25 5/21 5/17 5/11
24 6/ 4 3/28 5/23 5/19 5/15 5/11 5/ 7 5/ 2 4/25
20 5/20 5/13 5/ 6 5/ 4 5/ 1 4/27 4/23 4/18 4/11
16 5/ 8 5/ 2 4/27 4/23 4/19 4/15 4/11 4/ 7 3/31
0/ 0 PROBABILITY OF : OCCURRENCE of threshold temp IS less than indicated PROBABILITY
PROBABILITY OF earlier DATE IN FALL (MO/DA) THAN INDICATED
TEMP .10 .20 .30 .40 .50 .60 .70 .80 .90
32 8/ 4 8/14 ' 8/21 0/27 9/ 1 9/ 7 9/12 9/19 9/29
26 9/ 7 9/12 9/16 9/19 9/22 9/25 9/29 10/ 2 10/ 6
24 9/20 9/25 9/29 10/ 2 10/ 5 10/ 6 10/11 10/15 10/20
20 9/29 10/ 5 10/10 10/ 14 10/18 10/22 10/26 10/30 11/ 6
16 10/ 3 10/10 10/15 10/20 10/24 10/26 11/ 1 11/ 6 11/13
0/ 0 PROBABILITY OF 1 OCCURRENCE OF threshold temp IS LESS THAN INDICATED PROBABILITY
PROBABILITY OF LPNGE* THAN INDICATED FREEZE FREE PERIOD (DAYS)
TEMP .10 .20 .30 .40 .50 .60 .70 .80 .90
32 114 102 94 B6 80 73 66 57 46
26 145 135 126 122 116 111 105 98 6 B
24 172 162 154 146 142 137 130 123 113
2C 195 186 180 175 170 164 159 153 144
16 212 203 197 192 187 1B2 176 170 162
PRECIPITATION wI TH PROBABILITY EQUAL OR LESS Than
LVL JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC
0.05 0 4 £ 0.49 0.62 0.54 0.53 0.16 0.46 o.e5 0.22 0.19 0.79 0.45
C.10 0.63 C.62 0.75 0.70 0.67 o.2e 0.59 1.07 0.35 0.46 0.92 0.62
0.20 0.66 C.E1 1.04 0.95 0.67 c.45 0.76 1.31 0.56 C.7* 1.10 0.89
0.30 1.06 C 9 6 1.25 1.17 1.04 0.62 0.95 1.51 0.61 0.97 1.25 1.13
0.40 1.25 1.14 1.45 1.37 1.20 0.75 1.11 1.70 1.05 1.19 1.36 1.36
0.50 1.45 1.3C 1.66 1.36 1.37 0.96 1.27 1.89 1.32 1.41 1.51 1.61
0.60 1.6e 1.49 1.90 1.82 1.55 1.2C 1.46 2.09 1.63 1.66 1.66 1.90
0.70 1.93 1.66 2.15 2.06 1.75 1.47 1.66 2.33 2. DC 1.95 1.62 2.22
0.80 2.25 1.94 2.47 2.42 2.Cl 1.82 1.92 2.62 2.51 2.32 2.02 2.64
0.90 2.El 2.36 3.04 3.01 2.45 2.43 2.37 3.06 3.37 2.95 2.32 3.36
0.95 3.24 2.71 3.46 3.46 2.76 2.97 2.71 3.46 4.14 3.46 2.59 3.95
MEDIAN PRECIPITATION AMOUNTS (0.50 PROBABILITY LEVEL) IN THIS TABLE DIFFER FROM THE MEANS SHOWN IN THE ABOVE TABLE BECAUSE OF THE METHOD USED IN MAKING THE COMPUTATIONS. THESE VALUES WERE DETERMINED FROM. THE INCOMPLETE GAMMA DISTRIBUTION WHOSE CURVE HAS BEEN FOUND TO GIVE EEST FITS TO PRECIPITATION CLIMATOLOGICAL SERIES.


V* STATION! JAN 05 0370 FEB MAR APR MAY MAX JUN TEMP JUL AUC SEP OCT NOV DEC ANNUAL
51 32.7 38.3 40.9 50.5 63.4 68.3 80.2 74.9m 71.3 55.8m 42.2 31.3 54.2M
52 33.9M 33.6 37.OM 54.OM 62.0 75.6M 77.5 74.7M 71.8M 64.7 40.6 33.9m 34.9M
53 39.1 36.0 43.3 4 8.8M 58.4 76.2 79.5 76.7 74.4 61.1 47.6 35.1 36.4M
5* 42.5 64.7 40.6 59.0 66.1 76.0 81.4 78.3 69.2 60.5 49.6 35.6 58.6
55 32.1 31.9 41.1 51.6 62.1 70. C 80.5 76.3 73.8 61.2 45.1 37.9 55.5
56 38.7 33.0 44.2 52.3 66.5 76.8 76.2M 75.3 75.1 62.4 37.9 33.9 56.2H
57 30.7 62.2 41.8 47.2 56.6 69.3 76.0 76.0 69.1 57.1 37.6 37.2 53.4
58 33.5 60.1 39.1 47.5 66.5M 75.1 78.0 81.2 71.6 61.4 46.6 43.6 57.OM
59 60.2 36.7 4C.9 55.7 64.5 76.9 79.5 76.7 67.7 56.5 47.9 *2.4 57.8
60 35.OM 32.6 45.9 58.4 64.7 76.5 81.6M 80.5 73.1 59.2 47.4 38.1 57.7M
61 38.1 60.3 45.2 50.9 65.2 76.5 79.7 78.5 62.2 59.0 42.7 32.0 55.9
62 32.6 62.1 42.2 58.6 63.4 73.2 77.8 78.3 70.6 61.9 47.4 37.6 57.1
63 29.3 60.3 41.5 53.6 65.7 72.8 62.9 75.0 74.2 66.1 47.3 34.4 56.9
6* 28.6 30.1 36.1 49.7 64.0 71.9 82.6 74.7 69.2 63.2 42.0 32.4 53.7
65 33.7 36.1 35.3 52.6 61.9 70.3 77,4 74.0 62.1 64.2 46.2 36.8 54.2
66 31.2 32.6 47.4 55.6 66.9 73.6 81.6 78,7 72.7 58.5 48.4 31.3 56.5
67 33.0 37.5 48.7 54.8 59.9 69.1 79.6 78.1 71.2 61.8 47.0 30.5 55.9
69 36.1 37.5 44.1 47.1 61.2 75.5 78.8 72.2 67.7 61.3 38.8 31.7 54,2
69 37.6 36.6 38.9 57.7 68.2M 68.2 80.4 81.8 69.9 48.9m 42.1 35.5 55.5M
70 31.9 61.5 39.7 46.3 65.3 72.9M 79.9 80.2 66,7 51.9 42.4 34.4 34,4
7; 33.1 34.8 42.2 54.2 60.8 75.6 60.7 80.AM 68.0 58.2 42.3 28.5 54,9-
72 32.5 39.3 49.1 54.2 64.7 75.1 80.8 77. BM 68.0 55.8m 36.4 29.0 53.2-
73 3C.2 37.6 42.2m 46.2 62.6 71.5 76,5 77.5 66.2 62.3 46.9 32.3 54,5
Sum 786.7 854.6 975.4 1206.5 ' 1460.6 1687.1 1831.1 1779.8 1607.8 1373.0 1012.4 795.4 1280.6
YR STATION! JAN 03 0370 FEB MA* APR MAY MIN JUN TEMP JUL AUC SEP OCT NOV DEC ANNUA.
51 6.1 9.5 16.7 24.9 33.1 34.7 43.5 42.2M 33.5 27.OM 12.6 7.6 24.3M
52 6.4M 3.7m 8.7m 26.OM 34.1 39.7M 43.7 43.3m 36.5M 26.5 11.9 4.4M 23.7M
53 14.3 5.9 17.2 22.5M 29.7 40.6 45.5 43.5 35.6 28.0 19.5 7.0 25.1-
54 11.6 16.7 17.0 28.7 33.8 37.4 46.9 42.1 38.1M 29.2 19.2 3.4 27.1M
53 2.7 -.9 11.0 19.6 30.3 34.6 42.6 43.4 34.9 24.8 14.7 13.5 22.6
56 14.7 2.9 12.0 25.3 34.7 40.6 41.9M 38.7 36.8 29.1 1C.0 4.8 24.3M
57 6.5 15.9 16.1 24.6 31.5 37.A 44,4 43.9 34.1 30.9 14.9 8.5 25.9
58 3.1 15.8 14.4 23.1 32.7M 40.3 42.7 44.5 37,7 27.5 16.0 11.0 25,7M
39 6.1 11.9 15.0 23.3 31.5 42.0 42.7 43.6 34.6 24.7 14.8 9.5 25.0
60 5 6M 3.7 17.3 24.8 31.3 38.1 44.5M 43.9 39.1 28.6 17.3 6.6 25.2M
61 5.0 12.1 19.2 24.5 33.3 40.5 44.1 46.0 33.3 26.2 14.1 5.2 25.3
62 1.5 14.8 10.6 26.6 30.5 37.7 42.3 40.5 35.2 29.6 22.8 13.5 25.5
63 3.5 15.9 17.0 27.0 35.7 37.3 44,6 45.5 40.4 32.8 16.2 7.6 27.1
64 2.2 1.2 8.0 22.6 32.6 36.6 47,6 42.6 37.0 30.1 18.9 10.5 24.3
65 14.C 10.0 13.1 26.6 33.4 40.0 47,0 44,4 36.7 29.7 * 22.2 12.0 27.4
66 3.4 5.1 16.2 24.3 33.8 38.9 46,4 41.3 35.8 27.0 21.7 7.3 - 25.1
67 10.3 10.2 23.1 25.9 31.8 38.5 46.2 42.7 36.7 28.3 19.6 6.1 26.6
68 7.5 14.3 15.2 21.1 31.7 38.7 45.5 *2.5 34.3 29.3 45.9 6.6 25.4
69 13.3 9.8 11.9 27.4 36.3M 37.6 47.2 47.1 38.7 25.OM 13.9 12.0 26.7M
70 9.6 14.4 15.2 19.5 32.2 39.BM 45.4 45.5 35.3 23.9 21.3 11.4 26.1M
71 11.1 10.3 14.6 25.6 31.8 40.2 46.0 44.9M 33.2 27.5 16.9 6.1 25.9M
72 7.8 13.6 22.9 26.8 32.2 41.7 45.3 45.1m 38.9 32.3m 14.1 6.0 27.2M
73 5.8 6.8 16.9M 20.6 33.3 38.8 44.9 44.9 37.1 29.0 21.1 10.0 25,8M
SUM 172.3 223.6 351.3 561.7 751.3 893.7 1030.9 1002.8 833.5 647.0 391.6 198.6 588.2
YR STATION! JAN 05 0370 FEB MAR APR MAY AVERAGE TEMPERATURE JUN JUL AUC SEP OCT NOV DEC ANNUAL
51 19.4 23.9 28.* 37.7 46.3 51.5 61.9 58.6M 52.4 *1.4M 27.- 19.5 39,2M
52 20.2M 18.7m 22.9m 40.OM 48.1 57.7M 60.6 59.OM 5-.2M 45.6 26.3 19,2m 39. AM
53 26.8 21.0 30.3 35.7M 44.1 58.4 62.5 60.1 55.0 44.6 33.6 21.1 *1.1M
5. 27.1 30.7 28.8 43.9 50.0 56.7 6*.2 60.6 53.7M 44.9 34.4 19.5 -2.9M
55 17.4 15.5 26.1 35.6 46.2 52.3 61.6 60,9 54,4 43.0 29.9 25.7 39.1
56 26.7 18.0 28.1 38.8 50.6 58.7 60.1M 57.0 56.0 45.8 24.0 19.4 40.3M
5* 18.6 29.1 30.0 35.9 44.2 53.4 60.2 60,0 51.6 --.0 26.3 22.9 39.7
58 18.3 28.0 26.8 35.3 49.6M 57.7 60,4 62.9 5-.7 -4.5 31.3 27.3 -1,4M
59 23.2 24.3 32.0 39.5 47.9 59.5 61,1 6u, 2 51.2 40.6 31.4 26.0 4* ,4
60 20.3M 18.1 31.6 41.6 48.0 57.3 63.1M 62.2 56.1 *3.9 32.- 23.4 41. >M
61 21.6 26.2 32.2 37.7 49.3 58.5 61.9 62.3 47.8 -2.6 28.4 18.6 40.6
62 17.1 28.5 28.- 42.7 47,0 55.5 60.1 59.4 52.9 45.8 35.1 25.6 *1.3
63 16.4 28.1 29.3 40.3 50,7 55.1 63.8 60.3 57.3 49.5 32.3 21.0 42.1
6- 15.5 15.7 22.1 36.3 -8,3 55.3 65,1 58.7 53.1 46.7 30.5 21.5 39.1
65 23.9 23.1 24,2 39.6 47.7 55.2 62.2 59. Z 49.4 47.0 34.2 24.4 40.3
66 17.3 18.8 31.8 *0.0 50,4 56.4 64,0 60,0 54.3 42.8 35.1 19.3 40.9
67 21.7 23.9 35.9 40.** *5.9 53.E 62.9 60,4 54.0 45.1 33.3 19.3 -1.4
66 20.8 25.9 2.7 34.1 46.5 57.1 62.2 57.4 51.0 45.3 27.- 20.2 39.3
69 25.6 23.1 25.4 42.6 52.3M 52.5 63.8 64.5 54.3 37.0m 23.0 23.6 4 1. 1M
*0 2C.8 28.0 27.5 32.9 -8.8 56. AM 62.7 62.9 51.0 37.9 31.9 22.9 40,3M
7; 22.1 22.6 28.4 39.9 -6.3 57.9 63.4 62.7M 50.6 42.9 29.6 18.3 -0.4M
72 2C.2 26.5 36.0 -0.5 -8,5 58.4 63.1 61.5m 53.5 44.1M 25.3 IT.5 41.3M
*3 18.3 22.2 29.6M 33.4 -8.1 55.2 60.7 61.2 52.7 45,7 3-.0 21.2 40.2M
Sum 479.0 539.9 663.9 88*.. - 1106.6 1290.5 U31.6 1392.0 1221.2 1010.7 702.6 6 fe 935.3
-ONTMLY normals OF TEMPERATURE* prec: IPIT AT I On AND MEATING AND COOLING DECREE Days 119-1.70)
JAN MAP APR MAY JUN JUL AUC SEP OCT NOV DEC ANN
EmPERATuRE 20.1 23.0 28.1 38.6 47.9 55,4 61.8 60. 1 53.5 -3.9 30.8 22.3 40.5
PRECIPITATION 1.74 1.55 1.90 1.84 1.37 1.31 1.42 1.89 1.50 1.37 1*53 1.55 19.25
-EATING degree PAY 1392 1176 1144 792 530 291 113 161 3-5 654 1026 132- 89-8
CODLING DEGREE Day 0 0 0 0 C 0 13 9 9 0 0 0 22


STATION:
05 0370
total precipitation
YR JAN FEE MA APR MAY JUS JU1 AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC ANNJA k
51 2.61 1.37 1.3* 2.33 1.65 1.14 1.11 2.16 1.26 2.00 1.22 4.75 23.at
52 2.3a 1 7 2.18 .70 1.33 .62 1.73 2.78 .90 .00 1.62 .63 16.30
53 1.11 .96 2.09 1.53 1.80 .72 1 7a l.*7 . 1* 1.13 1.40 1.25 15.36
5a 1,08 .31 1.16 1.15 1.32 .29 1.17 1.60 2.*5 2.0- 1.40 .85 15.oa
55 .63 1.7a 1.2a .3e 1.27 .91 1.65 2.07 .25 1.07 2.60 .59 14, y
56 1.9C 1.66 .70 1.35 .73 .55 1.66 . y* .21 .71 1.59 1.55 13.36
57 a .aC .ae 1.6* 2.*0 3.32 1.65 1.55 1.90 .46 1 C 3 1.52 . 9a 21.53
58 1.07 1.76 1.2* 1.55 ,aa 1.05 .1* .67 1,0* Be 1.25 .95 12.22
59 1.68 1 ,aa 2.05 2. 1 2.56 1.72 1.95 2.6* 3.20 1.77 .63 .43 22.70
60 1 a 2 2.62 *.P 62 1 .** .57 1.52 1.56 1.19 l.*7 1.72 1.46 2C.04
61 .25 1.70 1.92 2.52 2.29 .08 1.11 1.57 5.80 3.44 1.90 1.86 24,4fe
62 2.23 3.0a 1.06 2.93 2.00 .33 .63 1.03 .66 1.14 .83 .72 16.82
63 1.60 1.27 1.9* .71 .66 2.29 63 3.25 .98 1.93 .89 1.01 17.3 6
6a 1.36 1.3a 2.53 1.65 1.33 2.25 1.41 *.3E 1.06 .47 2.93 3,82 2a.52
65 1.77 1.05 5.3a 1.16 1.1* 1.55 1.9C 1.76 3.6a .21 2.91 1.71 24.14
66 .73 : .75 .52 2.11 1.02 1.05 2.30 1.75 .7* 2.13 1.46 3.99 18.55D
67 .95 2.00 1.27 1.21 1.52 1.55 2.C7 1.56 1.41 1.31 1.52 2.16 lfc.55
66 .97 1.98 1.02 3.a5 1.52 * 3C 1.61 3.3a 1.06 1.24 1.62 1.25 19,86
69 3.e5 .79 1.16 .76 l.*0 3.77 1.49 1.53 1.78 4.53 1.03 2.05 24.14
70 1.55 .82 1.93 3.a2 .44 1.47 1.60 2.53 3.3a 2.40 1.63 1.5* 22.67
71 1,26 2.13 2.35 1.30 1.15 .23 .67 2.03 1.63 2.15 1.66 3.25 2C.24
72 1.37 .72 1.5a 2.2G 1.02 1.26 .31 1.65 2.62 2.82 1.23 2.86 19.80
73 1.22 .870 1.6a 2.70 3.0C 2.3C 2.0* 1.11 1.55 .87 1.56 2.56 21.740
SUM 37.36 32.99 *2.07 *C.5a 34.4a 27.85 32.41 *5.91 36.00 36.T7 36.32 *2.62 447.26
STATION: 05 0370 total Snowfall
season JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC JAN PEE MAP. APR MAY jUN SEASON
50-51 39.9 23.0 20.* 15.0 1.9 .0
51-52 .C .0 .0 10.5 17.2 58.3 27.8 16.9 26.? 6.7 .0 .0 167.7
52-53 .0 .0 .0 .0 18.9 11.6 22.9 10.5 22.5 10.6 2.0 .0 100.4
53-5* .0 .0 .0 2.0 16.1 22.0 13.5 2.0 6.C .0 1.5 .0 65.1
5a-55 C .0 .0 .0 14.0 6.5 14.0 36.0 22. C 10. C .0 .0 102.5
55-56 .0 .C .0 7.0E 31.0 6.9 30.0 30.5 8.5 6.0 .0 .0 121.9E
56-57 ,c .0 .0 4.C 26.2 26.C 71.5 5.0 15.5 25.0 6.0 0 181.5
57-56 0 .0 .0 .0 21.5 2C.C 21.C 31.0 19.0 11.0 .0 .0 122.5
58-59 .0 .0 .0 T 16.0 19.C 33.5 20.0 13.CE 3.5E 0 .0 105.OE
59-60 .0 .0 1C.0 23.0 13.C 1C.2 21.2 35.5 24.0 1.0 4.0 .0 1*1.9
60-61 .0 .0 .0 8.0 13.C 21. C 5.M 26.0 23.0 21. C 14.0 .0 131.0
61-62 c .0 27. C 16.0 26.5 29.5 23." 39.0 16.0 19.5 2.5 T 201.0
62-63 .0 .0 .0 T 11.0 10.5 22.5 16,0 27.0 4.0 .0 .0 91.0
63-6* .0 .0 .0 5.0 12.5 la.5 21.5 22.5 38.0 10.5 5.0 1.0 130.5
64-65 ,c .0 .0 5.0 37.5 47.0 32.0 19.5 76.5 10.0 2.0 .0 229.5
65-66 .0 .0 7.0 T 22.5 15.7 11.3 15.5 7.3 23.0 5.5 .0 107.fi
66-67 0 .0 .0 11.5 16.5 3G.1 14.8 31.2 9 u 11.0 2.3 .0 126.4
67-68 .0 .0 .0 6.0 19.5 3*.2 19.1 26.1 1 5 31.1 6.3 .0 156.8
68-69 .0 .0 T 5.6 2*.9 18.C 43. G 10.4 1*.0 6.5 .0 2.3 124.7
69-70 .0 .0 .0 35.6 9.3 23.7 18.2 11.6 26.1 36.0 2.5 .0 165.7
70-71 .0 .0 8.1 20.1 16.3 22.7 10.2 26.6 20.9 17.0 3.4 .0 157.3
71-72 .0 .0 6.8 10.4 23.7 36.1 12.2 1*.0 20,2 10.0 1 .0 .0 136.5
72-73 .0 .0 .0 6.7 14.5 36.3 19.4 12.0 26.7 24.6 4.2 3.5 1*9.9
73-74 .0 .0 .0 6.5 20.2 32.0
SUM .0 .0 58.4 186.9 444.6 556.0 549.5 465.0 510.5 313.2 69.1 6.8 3019.6
e amount is wholly dr partly estimated.
T TRACE/ AN amount TOD SMALL TO MEASURE,
M ONE OR MORE DAYS OF RECORD MlSSINGj IF AVERAGE VALUE IS ENTERED/ LESS THAN \n DAYS RECORD IS MISSING.
d water equivalent of snowfall wholly or partly estimated.
Saif Price 15 cer.cs per copy. Checks anc aonev orders should be mad* payable to Department of Ccrmerce KOAA. Remittances and correspondence regarding this publication should be sent tc: National Climatic Center, Federal Building, Asheville, N. C. 28803.
USCOMM-NOAA-ASHEVILLE
'^6-191*


____,e 4 ... iolo. w>uion ano intensify; Solar rteci Gem l-actors11 for 40 Deg North Latitude
Del* Solar Solar Position Direct Normo/ Irrcdiotion, j 2 .oh, ;q // 1 Solar He cl Gen Fzziori, Stub.. tq ft Soiar Tint PM.
! Ttrr* j AM. 1 Ait. Azimuth N Si E SE sw W NW Mo r.
Zn 11 3 8.1 55.3 141 5 17 111 133 73 5 5 5 13 4
9 15.5 44.0 238 11 12 :m 234 150 13 11 11 54 3
10 23.8 30.9 274 IS 16 123 341 213 51 16 16 96 2
11 25.4 16.0 2SS 18 18 61 222 244 118 16 18 123 1
12 30.0 0 0 253 19 19 20 179 254 1 79 20 39 : 23 12
r.2; l uiv totals Da 03 44a suJ 615 -. 1 5a 5a 2 5j
.'CD 11 7 4 .j xi is i". "TT au 1 1 3 0
8 14.8 219 10 50 :S3 159 94 10 10 10 43 4
9 24.3 49.7 271 16 22 185 24 5 157 17 16 16 98 3
10 22.1 35.4 293 20 21 142 247 203 38 20 20 143 2
11 3T.3 18.6 303 23 71 219 331 103 ID 23 171 1
1 12 35.2 C 0 306 24 24 25 170 24! 170 25 24 :so is
Ha ii -av Tota i s 61 144 iU j C3 5 612 250 < 61 bi 54c
Kir i Ow 2 1 4 X 6 a j 163 XwS 6 a 6 *0 5
S 22.5 69.6 250 15 91 218 211 73 15 IS 15 65 4
9 22.8 57.3 2S1 21 46 203 236 129 21 21 21 143 3
10 41 .5 41.9 297 25 25 153 329 171 23 25 25 185 2
11 47.7 22.6 304 23 28 /o 198 197 77 28 28 1
12 50.0 CO 305 23 23 30 4 5 206 14 5 30 23 223 12
r.21: Ca v .otais i 12 jiO £>4r 1100 5a2 ** 0 112 ii 2 .64
6 7.4 ac .a ea a i2 03 52 5 4 4 4 XX 6
7 18.9 Sr.5 207 16 141 201 143 16 14 14 14 61 5
s 30.3 79.3 253 22 128 235 189 41 21 21 21 124 4
9 41.3 67.2 275 26 80 203 204 63 25 26 26 177 3
10 51.2 51 4 285 30 37 153 194 121 32 30 30 218 3
11 55.7 29.2 292 33 34 81 161 146 ef 33 33 244 1
12 61.5 0.0 294 33 33 35 108 155 109 35 33 12
z2 i: Das- lozals i 55 50.- 569 1003 459 146 141
K1J ll D x .a I u 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7
6 UL 7 105.6 143 25 128 141 71 10 10 10 10 30 6
7 24.0 95.6 216 28 165 209 131 20 18 18 13 87 5
8 35.4 87.2 249 27 149 22: 164 29 25 25 25 146 4
9 45. S 75.0 267 31 105 157 175 S3 30 30 30 195 3
10 57.5 60.9 277 34 54 143 163 63 35 34 34 234 3
ii 66.2 37.1 282 36 36 81 130 105 42 36 36 258 1
12 70.0 0.0 284 37 37 40 82 112 62 40 *7 2:5 12
nai: Dav iOiaxs 2u3 543 10.2 6.4 3 DO Ia4 1/1 170 i0a3
J-* 2i 5 4.2 irn 21 10 21 20 6 1 1 1 1 2 7
6 14.8 10S.4 154 47 142 151 70 12 12 12 29 6
7 26.0 95.7 215 37 172 207 132 21 20 20 20 97 3
8 37.4 90.7 246 29 156 215 152 29 26 26 26 153 4
9 48.3 8C.2 262 33 113 192 161 45 31 31 31 201 3
10 59.3 65.8 272 35 62 145 148 69 35 35 35 237 2
11 69.2 41.9 276 37 <0 80 116 as 41 37 37 2S0 1
12 73.5 0.0 273 38 38 41 71 95 71 41 33 257 12
naif Day 7c*.a Is 242 714 T7T5 610 311 ir. 181 180 "TUl
Jux7 3 73 rm 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 7
6 13.1 106.1 137 37 125 137 68 10 10 10 10 31 6
7 24.3 97.2 208 30 163 204 127 20 19 19 19 S3 5
8 35.3 87.8 241 23 148 216 160 29 26 25 26 143 4
9 47.2 76.7 259 32 106 194 170 52 31 31 31 194 3
10 57.9 61.7 259 35 56 146 159 80 36 33 35 231 2
11 65.7 37.9 274 37 39 81 127 102 42 37 37 255 1
12 70.5 0.0 276 38 38 41 80 109 80 41 38 262 12
Half Dav Totals ZTi 545 58? 650 347 197 1/7 11 c 1C 7-1
i.; "I o 7.a 777S OJ i2 6/ 02 4a 5 3 5 11 6
7 19.3 90.0 191 17 135 191 123 17 15 15 IS 62 i
8 30.7 79.9 236 23 126 216 ISO 40 22 22 22 122 4
9 41.3 67 9 259 23 82 197 196 79 28 28 28 174 3
10 51.7 52.1 271 32 40 149 187 116 34 32 32 213 2
ii 59.3 29.7 277 34 35 81 156 140 52 34 34 228 1
12 52.3 0.0 279 35 35 33 105 149 105 38 35 247 12
Half Dav Tola]s 151 503 926 561 471 154 153 945
Sep 21 7 "TT4 oJT2 T73 a 64 146 nr- 21 i 8 0 1
8 22.5 69.6 230 16 S7 205 199 71 16 16 16 62 *
9 32.8 57.3 263 22 47 195 22S 124 23 22 22 138 3
10 41.6 41.9 279 26 28 148 221 165 30 25 26 180 2
11 47.7 22.6 287 29 29 77 192 191 77 23 29 205 1
12 50.0 0.0 290 30 30 32 14! 200 141 32 30 215 12
Kalf Dav" iotais lie 30D b03 1045 672 221 117 IT 5 .3a
Oct 21 7 4.0 72.3 46 1 :o 45 41 12 1 1 1 j 5
8 15.0 61 .9 203 10 49 173 187 S3 10 10 10 43 4
9 24.5 49.8 :s7 17 23 180 235 151 18 17 17 96 3
10 32.4 35.6 280 21 22 139 233 196 38 21 21 140 2
11 37.5 18.7 290 23 23 70 212 224 100 23 23 167 1
12 39.5 0 9 293 24 24 26 165 234 163 26 24 177 12
.-.all Day Totals n id CIO Cii 1 o5 2 fa 64 S3 535
>0v 21 a a.2 55.4 136 5 17 107 12a 5 5 5 14 4
9 17.0 44.1 222 12 13 151 219 156 13 12 12 54 3
ro 24.0 31.0 257 16 16 122 237 209 50 16 16 96 2
11 28.6 16.1 233 19 19 61 219 240 116 19 19 123 1
12 30.2 0.0 287 19 19 21 176 250 175 21 19 132 12
Ual! Uay mtals 61 71 442 t>64 .ad *67 62 6 1 a 53 1
Oec 21 3 5.5 51.0 5a 2 7 67 63 4a 3 2 2 6 *
9 14.0 41 .9 217 9 10 135 205 131 12 9 9 39 3
10 20.7 29.4 261 14 14 113 232 210 55 14 14 77 J
11 25.0 15.2 279 16 16 56 217 242 120 16 16 103 1
12 26 6 0.0 234 17 17 18 177 253 177 . 19 17 113 12
ITalf Cay tota I a " 45 ' w 360 631 .HI 273 50 49 252 4
. Jf V SV s SE t SE HOR. 1 ^-P M.
Total ular heat fains for f>S (i in.) chert rImss. Bawd on u yrounv! reiWtanre of 0.20 and value* in i tb'ea 1 nnj 9.
CD
\
I


THE SOLUTION


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MASTERPLANNING
After analysis of the Master Plan established by the Design Workshop Inc., it was concluded that a better mix of housing types was desirable. By moving away from the original rigid site planning, townhouses were mixed with the apartment units to achieve a stronger sence of community.
The park was relocated to a more central location on the site. By relocating the park it will be used to a higher degree since it is in closer proximity to the higher density residential areas. It also acts as a buffer or transition space between the residential and commercial areas.
The residential development on the 82 acre site includes: 136 townhouses; 180 apartment units; ( at an average density of 12.8 units/acre) and 70 single family patio homes,(at an average density of 6 units/acre).
The commercial development is as follows:
Consumer Goods Shopping...48,000 sq. ft.
Comparative Shopping ...A8,000 sq. ft.
Office Space ...30,000 sq. ft.
Barking Approx. 950 stalls


r
TOWNHOUSES
In the design of the two bedroom townhouses one of the basic determinants was the fact that the townhouses were to be situated in four directions on the site, (north, south, east, and west). Therefore four prototypical unit desires were applied in the site planning. Each unit specifically designed for it's orientation on the site.
A modular construction system is easily applied to the townhouses. A system of constructing the townhouses in two sections (l2'x30')f and moving them to the site is possible. An alternative of developing a modular wall panel system is also possible.
The exterior of the townhouses are set up in such a way that it is a reversal of traditional planning. In this design the front of the units become a semi-private space, similar in use to a traditional backyard. The rear of the units become a more semi-private, to semi-, public space, fronting onto the pedestrian system, similar to a traditional front poarch.
The decks on the exterior of the units are incorporated into the overall planning of the units to create an


r
i
interior/exterior relationship. The configuration of t! decks also allows for varying degrees of privacy on the exterior.
e
In the design of the townbouses a sence of entry is achieved through material and level changes, along with an increase in the volume of space. Flexibility of furniture arrangements and a minimum amount of space dedicated to circulation are also incorporated into the units.
Regionalism is brought into the design of the units through the use of metal roofs and ceder siding.
Townhouse Unit Townhouse Unit Townhouse Unit Townhouse Unit
A.. , ...1332 sq.
3. , . ..1200 sq.
C. ., . ..1200 sq.
D. , . ..1176 sq.
f t. Approx. f t. Approx. f t. Approx. f t. Approx.
Cost $60,000 Cost $51* ,000 Cost $511,000 Cost $53,000


GARDEN APARTMENTS
In the design of the Garden Apartments there were three major objectives, (l) to respond to the site,
(2) to create a sence of entry, (3) to relate in scale to the townhouses.
In response to the sloping site the floor levels are -staggered one-half level. This allows for a ground floor apartment on each side of the building, and a reduction in building height.
The offset floor levels also creates visual interest in the design of the interior courtyard. The courtyard which is lit by clerestory glazing creates a sence of entry and acts as a transition space in the apartment design.
The mass of the building is broken down through the east and west facades moving in and out and the use of several root planes. To relate the Garden Apartment to the townhouses, similar materials are used; metal roofs,
3" vertical coder siding and whitorock stucco.
A variety of apartment sizes are provided within the building:
50


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Unit A Unit B Unit G Unit D
51
500 sq. ft. £00 sq f t. 550 sq. ft. 65O sq. f t.
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