Citation
North Denver neighborhood, Denver, Colorado

Material Information

Title:
North Denver neighborhood, Denver, Colorado
Creator:
Foster, Carl E
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
127 leaves : illustrations, charts, facsimiles, maps ; 28 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
City planning -- Colorado -- Denver ( lcsh )
City planning -- Colorado ( lcsh )
City planning -- North Denver (Denver, Colo.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
theses ( marcgt )
non-fiction ( marcgt )

Notes

General Note:
Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for a Master's degree in Planning and Community Development, College of Design and Planning.
Statement of Responsibility:
Carl E. Foster.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
09904872 ( OCLC )
ocm09904872
Classification:
LD1190.A78 1980 .F67885 ( lcc )

Full Text
ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN
AURARIA LIBRARY
CARL E. FOSTER UPCD 792
SUMMER, 1980


NORTH DENVER NEIGHBORHOOD DENVER, COLORADO
1980
I . Introduction 1-2
I I . Problem Statement 3
III. Background North Denver 4-7
IV. Importance/Objective/Hypothesis 8
V. Part One Neighborhood Forms and ?-13
T rends
1. Soviet Union 9
2. China 9-10
3. The West 10-11
4. United States 11-12
5. Summary 13
VI. Part Two Data Collection of North
Denver 14-89
1. District 9 Planning Board 15-19
2. Community Attitudes and Housing
Survey-North Denver 20-34
3. Summary-Colloquium 35-65
VII. Part Three Mapping Techniques to
Increase Neighborhood Awareness 66-89
1. Overview of the Process to
Investigate a Man-Built Community 67-82
2. Summary-North Denver Neighborhood
Map 83-89
VIII. Part Four Legal Recources 90-96
1. Referendum 91
2. Initiative 91
3. Recall 92
4. Summary 9B)
. IX.
IX. Final Solution 97-127


1
INTRODUCTION
This report deals with housing problems and planning in a city neighborhood North Denver Neighborhood, Denver, Colorado. The report aims at replying to the need for neighborhood planning in accordance to the values shared by the neighborhood, and also in accordance with city directives to meet anticipated change. The report will focus upon affordable housing for moderate and low income families and will end with the first step of a prototypical process, that should result with a design created by those that will live in them. In the creation of housing, community development should function to: "establish neighborhood development, conduct research on growth and development of the neighborhood, make neighborhood development programs, develop neighborhood participation and acceptance of planning, provide technical services within the neighborhood, coordinate development action affecting city growth, and administer land use controls."1
"Community development attempts to strengthen the power structure on a horizontal axis and tend to operate as systems."2 The concept of community development in the context of this writing is to stimulate personal involvement and interaction in the community. The objective is to create a more cooperative housing relationship for people living in the neighborhood.
Part one of this report investigates a few of the foreign forms of neighborhood composition and reports on some of the trends in American urban communities. It ends with a brief summary of demands for improvement shared by most Americans.
1 UPCD 500, Fundamentals of Planning/Community Development, class lecture, February 6, 1978.
2
Ibid.


2
Part two analyzes two ways of information gathering; data collected via a group organization and community attitude surveys via a group with small financial resources. The summary is an example of such information in the form of a colloquium questionnaire. The purpose of the colloquium is to inform a small neighborhood group about planning issues in North Denver.
Part three outlines a process by the U. S. Forest Service for a neighborhood workshop to investigate a man-built community. The summary to part three is a map that was designed to facilitate the recording of graphic information, and five examples of its use.
Part four outlines the legal resources available to a community group in lobbying to create new law or change an ordinance. The summary shows that a small neighborhood group may not have the political clout to initiate change.
The final report recommendation suggests a method whereby a neighborhood group formed by individuals may improve their family environment. The first step towards such improvement is the seeking of funds for the purchase of real estate from an agency within the city. Once land has been purchased by a neighborhood non-profit organization, the pool of prospective home owners may contact, through community participation, licensed professionals who will design the environment of the owners' choosing.


PROBLEM STATEMENT
If effective input into the planning process of the North Denver Neighbor hood is minimal, then specific housing programs selected for certain income groups may not respond to the needs of the affected groups and may cause citizens to initiate a new planning process for implementing specific housing decisions, often not in accord with general policy of the city.


4
BACKGROUND NORTH DENVER
The nineteenth century was an era of exploration and settlement of new land in the American West. The western pioneering effort was motivated by the quest of easy riches and strongly directed towards the rich Colorado Territory which flamed eastern newspapers to write stories about gold nuggets and silver sidewalks. The urgent fervor for wealth was the reason for a continuous white migration. Although Denver City lacked the large gold strikes, it did satisfy the need for settlement and did become a major trade center. In Denver's early days it was the pioneer link to civilization.
As Denver grew in population. North Denver, then filled with "interweaving 1
old cowpaths" and paths made by "cowboys going home from saloons, became the new location for residential land use. The people's vision for North Denver was a perfect residential Eden on the barren hilly land west of the South Platte River. The people of North Denver were proud of their quiet clean atmosphere, their clean water, and their town laws which dictated a clean moral life. North Denverites bragged of its beauty and its panoramic view high above the pandemonium in Denver City.
In 1 859, North Denver (Highland), Auraria, and Denver City merged into a new formation and became Denver. From then on, the uncontrolled expansion of the city gradually but progressively created and helped foster all the hazards associated with a poorer life in an unhealthy environment. Industry
^Ruth Eloise Wiberg, Rediscovering Northwest Denver (Boulder, Colorado: Pruett Publishing Company, 1 976), p. 51.
21 bid.


5
began to encroach into residential areas, population expanded, clean water became increasingly sparce, and the once proud people of North Denver complained about the decay of the quality of family life.
It was not until the early 1960's that Denver city government began a comprehensive program to combat the destructive forces of unplanned development. During the 1970's the city of Denver, aided financially by the federal government and in collaboration with the Denver Planning Office (D. P. 0.), developed a strategy to analyze the city's problems, resources, and recommendations for purposeful, directed change. Out of this cooperative effort, the Denver Comprehensive Plan was developed.
In 1 975, after continued citizen feedback and the constant need to update the comprehensive plan, D. P. O. formed neighborhood advisory planning teams whose purpose was to draw Official Neighborhood Plans. After a year of community participation in this project of guiding neighborhood development over the next five years, the Neighborhood Plans were given to the mayor, city council, and to the people of Denver. The Neighborhood Plans focused their attention on selected issues, recorded detailed information, and summarized the recommended ways for correct implementation of the plans for each of the neighborhoods analyzed (see page 7 for Statistical Planning Units).
At the time of this writing, citizen criticism of the Denver Comprehensive Plan stems from the citizens' belief that it lacks social planning, effective implementation programs, and adequate community participation in the planning process. Further dissatisfaction is evidenced by the growing number of neighborhood organizations to meeth the shortcomings of the plan.


6
Although these accusations may have a strong element of truth, it is also the case that the neighborhood planning process recorded invaluable data, identified problems needing immediate action, and succeeded in reaching many other objectives. The D. P. O. did provide Denver with a stronger foundation from which to initiate and implement purposed change.


^ North Denver
STATISTICAL PLANNING UNITS
Source:
Denver Planning Office


8
IMPORTANCE
If further actions by governmental agencies do not increase effective community participation in the decision making process to create better housing, then ad hoc neighborhood groups may strengthen and cause crescive change by the damage of dwelling units in which they live. The cumulative effects of such community deterioration can be extremely grave on an individual as well as a collective scale for the community itself as well as for others around it. It is, therefore, of paramount urgency to stem the damage before it results in irreversible problems.
OBJECTIVE
The fundamental objective of this report is to recommend an efficatious way for getting a large number of people involved in community planning for the creation of a better home environment of their own choosing.
HYPOTHESIS
If neighborhood people can be personally stimulated to work towards these goals within established social procedures, then the optimal solution of the housing problem, in accord with individual needs of the community, will occur more rapidly.


9
PART ONE
NEIGHBORHOOD FORMS AND TRENDS Soviet Union
Planning objectives in the U. S. S. R. group neighborhoods around urban services and use the concept of microdistrict as the planning tool.^ To date, however, microdistricts have rarely succeeded. Citing Soviet references, American planners observe that the microdistrict has done little to promote social interaction. American planners also report, "Soviet attempts to organize the city life into a series of decentralized neighborhood units have failed because they 'contradict' the very nature of the city with its basic tendencies of urbanization which require greater, rather than less, mobility."2
China
The key organizing principle of current Chinese city planning is to plan neighborhoods around places of employment and focus urban form to promote social interaction. Planning directives that characterize the urban Chinese aim at allowing neighborhoods to function as a political organization of self-sufficient units within the city. The city is simply an urban form without
1 Larry Sawers, "Urban Planning in the Soviet Union," Monthly Review, March 28, 1 977.
2Michael Frolic, "The Soviet City," The Town Planning Review, XXXIV No. 4, January, 1964, p. 301.


10
dominant centers or sharp separations between different types of land uses (e.g., industrial, commercial, or residential). Imposing development of selected areas detracts from the goal of the neighborhood to be a self-sufficient unit. ^
Current critique of Chinese neighborhoods by western planners claims that because of the powerful horizontal" community power-structure, the people seldom travel about the city. And because of the lack of travel, the city street network is rapidly decaying. The Chinese ideal of integrating production and community is not feasible in capitalist cities because the Chinese political organization tends to eliminate divisions of labor. In China the revolutionary committees are charged with overseeing both the factory and surrounding neighborhoods.
The West
The Chinese were not the first to try to eliminate the contradiction between town and countryside. An initial attempt came from Ebenezar Howard, who in the 1880's advocated the industrialization of the countryside, agricultural-izing the city and limiting the flow of population into larger cities.4 Also during the 1880's, Patriot Geedis experimented with the integration of physical planning with social and economic improvements. In spite of these efforts, however, what influenced the development of urban structure in capitalist
^Committee of Concerned Asian Scholars, China: Inside the Peoples Republic (New York: Bantam, 1 972).
4
UPCD 500, Fundamentals of Planning/Community Development, class lecture, February 6, 1 978.


11
societies was the goal of efficiency that characterizes intense economic activity. And economic efficiency requires a highly differentiated geography in its land use.
United States
As Neal Peirce has said, "The trends of American urban communities are from neighborhood power groups to activist neighborhoods seeking solutions for social problems that central government no longer seems able to control."5 The forms this popular democracy will take during the 1 980's will probably be a concomitant of the destructive forces of the 1960's and 1 970's. Neighborhood groups that began by opposing intruding urban industry, poorly planned highways, red-lining by local banks and insurance companies to name but a few of the factors contributing to the deterioration of communities will, in the attempt to improve their neighborhood environment, increase their subversive action against private interests. To date, progressive neighborhoods like North Denver have rallied their energies around service providers and to some extent have formed themselves into mini-governments. Mini-governments can be examplified by:
neighborhood crime prevention
' neighborhood watch patrols
building mini-parks
rehabilitating housing
^Neal Peirce, "Evolution of Neighborhood Power," The Peirce Column, The Denver Post, January, 1 980.


12
Service providers can be examplified by :
tree planting
urban gardening
* people festivals social services for the elderly
block clean-up
trash removal
health care
day-care centers
In opposition to neighborhood activists, groups are forces that inhibit neighborhood action that by-pass city hall, e.g., grant funding from sources outside city directives. City actions policy is against duplication of programs, lack of coordinated resources, and neighborhood displacement of the poor. When the environment is improved by housing for the more affluent which exclude the poor, new low-income housing results in energy-wasteful sprawl development. The advantages accruing to individuals from such affluent housing developments conflict with general neighborhood objectives and with state and national directives. But the strength of neighborhood power lies in its diversity and local self-reliance, not in overreaching into national politics.
"Problems which are confronted on the community level simply are not solvable on that level, i.e., problems of the larger society of which the community is a part."6
6UPCD 600, Social Policy Analysis, class lecture, spring, 1 979.


Summary
Soviet planning allows operating efficiency but does not promote social interaction, and a series of decentralized neighborhood units requires greater mobility.
Chinese neighborhoods are so generic in neighborhood composition that people seldom travel about.
Capitalist urban form, because of the goal of efficiency, encourages specialization of land use.
Ideologies not withstanding, Americans demand improvement in the home
environment.


14
PART TWO
DATA COLLECTION OF NORTH DENVER
There have been many neighborhood organizations established in North Denver. Some have completed their goal and disbanded, others have failed, and now only a few remain growing in strength. One example of a typical growing neighborhood organization in North Denver is the Councilmanic District 9. District 9 area covers a population of over 100,000 (including Highland and Sunnyside) and began in the early spring of 1977. District 9 was initially formed to voice dissatisfaction with the draft of the revised Denver Comprehensive Plan, and shortly after, a committee platform for the citizens of District 9 was constituted. The committee and its citizen membership voted unanimously for the following issues:
against neighborhood reactive planning
for greater neighborhood input into the planning process
for development of District 9 planning criteria
The planning criteria that the committee completed in late summer 1977, "Revised District 9 Planning Proposals," (p.p. 15-19) attests to the fact that a good number of people participated in the planning process. And it also shows that the great quantity of data gathered by the group was recorded and analyzed by a few extremely energetic/motivated individuals. The revised report clearly recommends the hiring of an advocate planner and staff.


15
REVISED
DISTRICT 9 PLANNING PROPOSALS*
TRANSPORTATION
Traffic should be directed around neighborhood boundaries.
A neighborhood impact statement should precede all transportation changes.
Emphasis should be placed on public transportation, with a de-emphasis on the private automobile.
Inter- and intra-neighborhood public transportation routes should be established.
There should be no relocation of main line railroads to the west side of the Platte River.
A heavy traffic study should be done for District 9.
All existing one-way streets should be eliminated.
No service roads should be built along l-25.
Existing ordinances should be enforced, especially the ones on trucks and speeding.
Consideration, such as paths and walks, must be made for pedestrians.
The fire and police departments and the railroads should develop a plan of action to deal with accidents involving hazardous materials. This plan must be revealed to neighborhood groups.
Traffic from eliminated one-ways should be relocated on the edges of the neighborhoods.
Transportation should be made accessible to the aged and disabled.
Students need transportation to the new campus of Community College North in Broomfield.
Heavy traffic between 38th and 42nd on Osage.
HOUSING
There shall be no increase in public housing in District 9.
Public housing should be transferred to private ownership via a holding corporation.
Public housing needs more rehabilitation.
A solution must be found for abandoned, boarded up buildings.
*District 9 Planning Board, August 13, 1977.


16
HOUSING (continued)
' A housing court should be established.
Housing rehabilitation should be encouraged. Provide sensitive housing code inspections.
LAND USE
Minimum open space requirements for each inhabitant should be established.
Industry should be buffered from residential areas.
A plan for industrial redevelopment should be drawn up and implemented in order that it may be possible for people to continue to live and work in District 9.
Abandoned industrial land should be recaptured for a good solid use, either private or public.
Residential areas should be protected from further encroachment by industry.
Proliferation of liquor and cabaret licenses in residential areas must be prevented.
Compatible neighborhood businesses should be encouraged; incompatible ones, discouraged.
Flood plain this is a big problem which must be addressed.
Any authority with the power of eminent domain should pay relocation expenses.
A river authority should be created to deal with the Platte River and land surrounding it.
A neighborhood impact statement should be written and presented to the affected neighborhoods while public facility is still in the planning stage, before any construction starts.
' Evaluate the channelization of natural waterways.
ZONING
Down-zoning of over-zoned areas should be encouraged.
The zoning law should be updated and streamlined.
Some mechanism should be developed to suspend zoning for a specific period
of time to allow people to determine what they want to do in their neighborhoods.
Height controls should be established throughout the district.
' Meetings of two or more people on zoning should be open to the public.
Structures in 100 year flood plain should be studied.


17
ENVIRONMENT
District 9 is an environmental disaster, e.g. air, odor, noise.
Hazardous materials travel through the District with no plans in case of accidents.
Sirens of emergency vehicles are a nuisance.
Police helicopter light is an intrusion on our privacy.
Kids play outside in some areas until 2 a.m., creating lots of noise.
Inadequate law enforcement seen to be responsible.
Must change leaders to get better enforcement.
EPA should be requested to measure air pollution in the neighborhoods; this should be followed up by implementing a program to improve air quality.
Certain environmental standards should apply uniformly throughout District 9; all District 9 neighborhoods can help the impacted neighborhoods.
Elyria has a gas company which emits a smelly flame.
Vasquez Blvd. bad from point of view of noise and pollution.
Other sources of noise: taxi horns and fireworks.
Roaming dogs create problems, overturn garbage cans.
Landscaping needed between Vasquez and Washington on 1-70.
Bushes obstruct view at some intersections.
SOCIAL SERVICES
Services should be centralized in North Denver, so people can get immediate relief, not just referrals. There should be one multi-purpose center so people won't have to go out of the District for treatment or assistance.
Social services funds should be allocated on a neighborhood per capita income basis.
Emergency housing should be readily available.
Multi-purpose building doesn't allow for change easily.
State law forbids allocation of social services money to districts.
Swansea and Elyria have poor bus service.
Social services such as food stamps and welfare should be set up in neighborhoods.
Agencies need direction from the community; they should discuss and respond to the needs of the community.
The District planning board should discuss this.
Tremendous overlap in services.
Agency buildings are ugly; people should be involved in their design.
Pilot project involving dumpsters for trash pick-up mentioned.


18
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT/JOBS
This is a matter of special interest to each neighborhood.
Manny Martinez can put people present on mailing list to receive economic development information.
Permanent jobs needed.
OPEN DISCLOSURE OF PUBLIC FINANCIAL DEALINGS
There should be a Sunshine Law for all public expenditures an open disclosure of costs and benefits to the city and District 9 who pays and who profits.
Don't use methods that hide costs and benefits.
Don't use finance schemes which disguise benefits to developers.
COMPOSITION OF DENVER PLANNING BOARD
It must contain neighborhood representatives, one from each district.
Mayor must appoint someone from District 9 to fill the next vacancy.
Ordinance regulating appointment of Planning Board members must be changed to guarantee neighborhood representation.
NEIGHBORHOOD PLANS
There should be peer evaluation of neighborhood plans throughout District 9 neighborhoods before the plan is sent to DPO for acceptance.
Contiguous neighborhoods should be involved in peer evaluation processes even though they are not in District 9.
DPO should furnish a planner to the neighborhood if the neighborhood requests one.
There are resources other than the DPO, e.g. other neighborhood groups, public and private sources.
The city-wide Comprehensive Plan should be reflective of the individual neighborhood plans.
Neighborhood plans should be developed for all District 9 neighborhoods as soon as possible.


DISTRICT 9 PLANNING BOARD
' It should include representative of each neighborhood in District 9.
' Each neighborhood shall decide how to choose its representative(s).
It should deal with District 9 problems, and propose and implement solution to these problems.
It should study, update, and review plans and incorporate new ideas.
It should develop expertise in order to be able to respond to requests from neighborhood organizations.
District 9 should hire its own advocate planner and a staff. These people will stay on top of the plan and help implement it. Fund raising, matching grants may be used to hire these people.
The advocate planner and staff would answer to District 9 Planning Board.
The staff would be recruited from neighborhood people, either full-time or part-time, paid or volunteer.
The advocate planner need not live in District 9.
The burden is on the neighborhood people to initiate implementation.
District 9 may develop task forces based on specialties, past experience, major concerns, etc. Different neighborhoods may choose to tackle different issues.
OTHER
' Government programs put in West Denver; undue concentration; they should be distributed throughout the city.
' Dog leash law should be enforced.


516 HOUSEHOLDS SURVEYED 43% RETURN RATE
COMMUNITY ATTITUDES AND SOUSING SURVEY NORTE DENVER
20
This survey is being conducted by North. Denver Workshop at the request of Highland Neighborhood Housing Services and Del Norte Neighborhood Development Corporation. They 'Jill use the information gathered to learn mare about your neighborhood concerns and to learn more about specific housing problems. They will adjust their programs to better meet thise needs and to develop new ones. Information will be available for all other groups and results will be presented at the Town Meeting, Saturday, April 26, at llorthside Community Center.
Please attend.
You can be sure that while your particular answers are important and will count, they will be kept strictly confidential. The survey will never be related to you personally.
We request that this questionnaire be completed by the Head of Household for your whole family. When you have completed the questionnaire, please put it by your front door so that it can easily be seen. The volunteer who delivered it twill pick it up in 2 hours.
This survey is meant to add to the 1980 U.S. Census. The U.S. Census is very important for providing services and money to North Denver, so please complete it also when it arrives.
If ycu have any cuestior.3 about this survey, at 477-4774.
please call North Denver Workshop
Si usted necesita ayuda en dando su respuesta, por favor de llamar a 477-4774.


response/
percent
21
I. YOU AND YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD
1. What do you like best about day to day life in North Denver? (Circle
One)
72 32.4 a. Community is close to everything
13 in 4 D. Good neiahbors
10 4.5 C. Close friends
10 in st d. Good place to bring up children
23 10.4 e. More economical to live in North Denver
29 13.1 J. Close to employment
12 rj- in S Nothing
20 9.0 h. Other (tlease. ears lain)
8 3.6 No response
2. Do you feel your neighbors ere friends? (Circle One)
26 56.8 Yes
57 25.7 b. Unsure
29 13.1 c. No
3 1.4 No response
3. J. 3 your neighborhood improving or going dovnhill? (Circle One)
41 18.5 a. Definitely improving
77 34.7 b. Staying the seme
67 30.2 c. Going dovnhill
25 11.3 * a. Not sure
A Do you vent to continue to live in your neighborhood? (Circle One)
36 61.3 a. Yes
41 18.5 Unsure
31 14.0 No (Please ess lain)
7 3.2 No response


i cspunse/
percent
5. A. Do you hear about day-to-day incidents in your neighborhood? (births, marriages, vandalism, etc.) (Circle One)
87 39.2 a. Yes
27 12.2 b. Unsure
96 43.2 c. No
5 2.3 3. No response Do you hear about organized events and activi
97 43.7 a. Yes
14 6.3 b. Unsure
98 44.1 c. No
6 2.7 No response
o If yes on question 5 A or 5 3, where does ucur in (Circle One or More)
52 23.4 a. Media (radio, TV, newspapers)
4 1.8 b. Politicians
1 0.4 c. Government emolcvees
37 16.7 d. Community organizations
5 2.3 e. Place of emoloument
72 32.4 j Other people in your neighborhood
13 5.9 5- Cther (Please eat lain)
7. Do you go to community or church social concerns i
25 11.3 a. Often ( 2 times a month or more)
47 21.2 b. Once-in-awhile (Less than 2 times a month)
137 61.7 c. Not at all
6 2.7 No response
3. Do you think community or crunch social concerns i dene? (Circle One)
70 31.5 a* Yes
103 46.4 Unsure
33 14.9 c. No
9 4.1 No response
One)


response/
percent
23
5. If you could change anything in North Denver, what things would
you chance to make North Denver c better place to live?
(List in order of importance) 23 Item Response
1st Choice 1. Trash -
2. Youth
2nd Choice 3. Other
3rd Choice 4. 5. Housing Conditions Crime
fa. Services
7. Shopping
13.0
13.0
12.0 11.2
6.0
6.0
6.0
II. SOUSING IN NORTH DENVER
10. How long have you lived at t\
41 18.5 a. Less than 1 year
61 27.5 b. 1 to 3 years
42 18.9 c. 4 to 10 years
69 31.1 d. Over 10 veers
2 0.9 No response
11. Where did you live before?
83 37.4 a. North Denver
90 40.5 b. Somewhere else in Denver
18 8.1 c. Elsewhere in Colorado
13 5. 9 d. Lived here all my life
6 2.3 e. Outside county
5 2.3 12. Sow No response long ao you pvan zo stay
18 8.1 w Less than 1 year
23 10.4 O 1 to 5 years
74 33.3 Over 5 years
95 42.8 A w Not sure
(Circle One)
o\o o'.o o\ o\ o\ o\<> o\


response/
percent
24
23. For what reasons would you leave your present heme? (Circle One cr More)
22 9.9 a. Rising cost of home upkeep (repairsj utilities)
12 5.4 b. Rising cost of property taxes
22 9.9 c. Offered a larae amount of money by someone to buy your home
(if homeowner)
41 18.5 d. If property is sold by landlord (if renter)
46 20.7 e. Rising cost of rent (if renter)
49 22.1 f- Neighborhood is undesirable (Flease exolain)
42 19.0 G- Other (Flease exolain)
14. What type of duelling do you live in? (Circle One)
115 51.8 a. Sinale family home w w>
41 18.5 b. Duplex
39 17.6 c. Multi-family building
11 5.0 d. Other (Flease exolain)
9 4.0 No response
15. In what condition is ucur housing?
107 48.2 a. Good
79 35.6 0. Fair
17 7.7 0. Poor -
7 3.2 d. Not Sure
5 2.3 No response
1 S. Do you rent or do you awn your heme?
105 47.3 a. Rent
55 24.8 D % Buying
45 20.3 0 Ownno mortgage
10 4.5 No response


response/
percent
25
RENTERS: Answer question 17j skip question IS.
HOMEOWNERS/BUYERS: Skip question 17} answer question 18.
REUTERS:
17. A. If this property were sold or rale into condominiums, 'would you be interested in buying it? (Circle One)
17 16.2 a. Yes
16 15.2 b. Unsure
73 69.5 c. liO
3. If no3 why not? (Circle One)
15 14.3 a. Can. 't afford mortgage
19 18.1 b. Cor. 'i afford downpayment
23 21.9 c. 1Jot interested in awr.irg
19 18.1 d. Other (Please ear lain)
C. Sow well does your landlord take care of the bui living in? (Circle One) Idina uou are
33 31.4 a. Good
43 41.0 b. Fair
24 22.9 <% Poor
5. 4.8 d. Unsure
D. What is your monthly rent, including utilities? (Circle One)
13 12.4 a. $ 1 $100
37 35.2 b. $101 $200
40 38.1 c. $201 $300
10 9.5 $301 $400
3 2.9 ^ , $401 or above
T y* *-> w' w cue Sticn 13j. go to question 13.


response/
percent
26
EOMEOWUERS/BUYERS:
18. A. What is the structural condition of your horra? (Circle One)
35 35.0 a. Very good
43 43.0 b. Sound, in need of minor repairs (costing less than $300)
22 22.0 c. Deterioratedin need of major repairsj (costing more than $300)
d. Other (Please explain)
3. Have you made any major repairs or improvements (costing more than $300) to your property in the last 5 years? (Circle One)
70 70.0 a. les
7 7.0 b. Unsure
26 26.0 c. Do (go to question 18 D.)
C. If yes to 18 3, how did you pay for the repairs? (Circle One)
4 4.0 a. Second mortgage
8 8.0 b. Some improvement loan
36 36.0 c. Personal savings or personal loan
19 19.0 d. Used own labor
5 5.0 e. Other (Please explain)
17 17.0 D. a. What additional improvements would you line to have done? (Circle On or Mere) Rewiring
36 36.0 D. Weatherizing
21 21.0 C. Plumbing
33 33.0 d. General inside repairs
36 36.0 e. General outside repairs
28 28.0 £ Roofing
34 34.0 a Painting
2 2.0 Facilities for handicapped
20 20.0 i. Rone of the above


response/
percent
27
HOMEOWNERS/BUYERS:
18. E. What is your monthly housing cos utilities? (Circle One) >t, including mor tgage and
13 13.0 a. $ 0 $100 d. $301 $400 21 21.0
10 10.0 b. $101 $200 e. $401 $500 12 12.0
21 21.0 c. $201 $300 f. $501 or above 10 10.0
III. YOU AND YOUR HOUSEHOLD
19. If you are employed, what is t he location of your job? (Ci tcZb One)
16 7.2 a. A.t home
29 13.1 b. llorth Denver
68 30.6 c. City and County of Denver (noz including North Denver)
29 13.1 d. Suburbs of Denver
23 10.4 e. Other (Please explain)
50 22.5 No response
20. What best describes your occupation or employment status? (Circle One)
8 3.6 a. Teacher h. Service worker (waiter3 nurses aid,
1.4 housekeeper, etc.) 9 4.1
4 b. Sales
i. Student 2 0.9
40 18.0 c. Laborer J. Homemaker 6 2.7
23 10.4 d. Clerical
k. Retired 19 8.6
25 11.3 3. Foreman/Skilled craftsman 1. Unemployed 2 0. 9
20 9.0 Professional m. Disabled 7 3.2
12 5.4 c. Administrater/Managerial n. Other (Please ext lain)


response/
percent
28
21. }/ha i is your total family yearly income? (Circle One)
41 18.5 a. Less than $4,999 d. $20,000 to $29j999 16 7.2
44 19.8 b. $5,000 to $9,999 e. $20,000 to $29,999 8 3.6
70 31.5 c. $10,000 to $19,999 f. $40,000 or above 0 0.0
36 16.2 22. How No response many persons are in your household? (Circle One)
34 15.3 a. 1 person
64 28.8 b. 2 veovle to
93 41.9 c. 2 to 5 people
13 5.9 d. S to 7 people
1 0.5 e. More than 7 people
22. Is the head of household: (Circle One)
61 27.5 c. female
120 54.1 * D. male
20 9.0 C. does not apply
24. What tc.cz ot ethnic group do you consider you ana your family members of? (Circle as Many as Apply) to be
99 44.6 a. White/Anglo
104 46.8 b. Hispanic or Mexican. American
2 0.9 c. Native American Indian
7 3.2 d. Black
1 0.5 e. Asian-American
1 0.5 % m * Scuzheasi-Asian
2 0.9 Ct Other (-lease earolain)


29
STUDIO II SURVEY1
The revealing insights that came from the North Denver Neighborhood Survey (p.p. 20-28 ) lack statistical validity. Out of a neighborhood population of 21,000, 222 household questionnaires were returned, representing less than a 2% sample. However, as a training tool used by the graduate school, the survey was an excellent success, as can be seen in the Studio II report. Studio II findings roughly indicate the following.
North Denver is close to everything.
North Denver needs better housing conditions and more youth crime control.
Most people plan to stay in the North Denver Neighborhood.
Average income $10,000 to $25,000.
Population is approximately 56% Spanish surname and 43% Anglo.
Neighborhood is predominately Hispanic.
Hispanic residents hear about neighborhood events faster than Anglos.
Surveyed resident Anglos lived longer in North Denver than did Hispanics.
Local perception by the people living in the neighborhood is that it is remaining the same.
Average rental unit cost is $300 $400.
An increasing need for low-income housing was felt to be present.
1UPCD 600, spring 1980.


30
Church social concerns have a low rating.
Majority of people live in single family homes.
Additional home improvement funds are needed.
Majority heads of households are males.
The Studion II Survey began with a firm policy for reaching goals, purpose, and methods (memo, p. 32). What was planned by the studio was a survey of 780 out of 7,600 households to get the 5% sample needed for statistical validity.* The money needed to conduct a survey of 600 to 900 households in North Denver was estimated at $3,500. The cost of the survey follows:
Printing survey
(survey and results) $1000
T ranscribing
(focused group sessions) 350
Postage for mailback 480
Key punching survey
(est. 150 hrs. @ $8) 1170
Consulting fees
(test for construct validity)
(translation Spanish/English) 500
$3500
*Sixteenth census (1940)
An analysis of the statistics based on the tabulations of the 5% sample of the population for items that were obtained also for the total population indicates that in 95% of the cases the sample statistics differ from the complete census statistics:
by less than 5% of all numbers of 10,000 or more by less than 10% for numbers between 5,000 and 10,000 by less than 20% for numbers between 2,000 and 5,000
' Produce the greatest possible usefulness for the money expended.


31
The money needed for the survey was to come from the Denver Community Development Agency. C. D. A. in the end wouldn not fund the survey because it lacked the detail that should be used to compile a grant request (total cost of the Studio II Survey was approximately $300). It is a dilemma, if you can't write a grant, you won't know how to build the house. Hopefully in the next survey that may be conducted in North Denver, the grant request for funding a questionnaire might include the "Factors Affecting a Survey," (pp. 33-34 ).


MEMO*
32
Purpose
To conduct an information gathering survey of 600 to 700 households covering the areas designated as the Highland and Sunnyside Neighborhoods.
To assist the Denver Planning Office by up-dating information contained in neighborhood plans completed October 20, 1976 and to include current data from social and economic analysis.
To assist neighborhood organizations such as NHS, Del Norte, and to gain the needed up-dated information for neighborhood requests for block grant and other activites.
The intent of the propsed survey is to draw from information obtained from prior surveys, to prevent duplication of information, and to focus on current issues facing the neighborhoods.
Method
An integrated research program designed to give an empirical evaluation in many fields of inquiry and under a variety of conditions needed to aid decisions in planning.
The survey will be drawn from approximately a +5% sample of a combined neighborhood population of 21,229 containing 7,865 total housing units. (Figures based on current Denver Planning Office estimates of "Population and Housing Units.")
Beginning with base information obtained by prior planning studies, focussed group interviews will be conducted to develop significant insights into predispositions held by the neighborhoods. It is believed that the technique will provide better qualitative information about basic predispositions and social influences of the target area and that it will lead to an in-depth analysis at some of the basic motivations and attitudes involved at present.
Focussed group interviews containing 5 to 6 persons each are intended to permit the comparison of several alternative creative approaches against a set of qualitative criteria and become the subject matter of the survey questionnaire.
After base data has been compiled and the questionnaire designed, a control group will be sued to determine imperfections in the survey to allow a good statistical projection of the test results.
Deadline April 26, 1 980
* To Eric Glunt from C. Foster, February 2, 1980.


33
FACTORS AFFECTING A SURVEY*
1. Variability in response.
2. Differences between kinds and degrees of canvase.
A. mail, telephone, direct interview
B. intensive vs. extensive interviews
C. long vs. short schedules
D. check block vs. response
E. correspondence panel and key reporters
3. Bias and variation arising from interviewer.
4. Bias of auspices.
5. Imperfections in the design of questionnaire and tabulation plans.
A. lack of clarity in definitions; ambiguity; varing meanings of same word
to different groups of people; eliciting an answer liable to misinterpretation
B. omitting questions that would be illuminating to the interpretation of other questions
C. emotionally toned words; leading questions; limiting response to a pattern
D. failing to perceive what tabulations would most be significant
E. encouraging nonresponse through formidable appearance
6. Changes that take place in the universe before tabulations are available.
7. Bias arising from nonresponse (including omissions).
8. Bias arising from late reports.
9. Bias arising from an unrepresentative selection of data for the survey or of the period covered.
10. Bias arising from an unrepresentation selection of respondents.
11. Sampling errors and biases.
12. Processing errors (coding, editing, calculating, tabulating, tallying, posting, and consolidating).
13. Errors in interpretation
A. bias arising from bad curve fitting; wrong weighting; in correcting adjusting
*
Hiram C. Barksdale and William M. Weilbacher, Marketing Research Selected Readings With Analytical Commentaries (New York: The Ronald Press Co., 1 966), p. 408.


34
B. misunderstanding the questionnaire; failure to take account of the respondents' difficulties (often through inadequate presentation of data); misunderstanding the method of collection and nature of the data
C. personal bias in interpretation


35
Summary
What information data one gleaned from neighborhood planning results in a catalog for the people. At any one given location a D. P. O. neighborhood plan has recorded that planning concerns for that particular location.
The following colloquium questionnaire* (pp. 38 -65) is composed with available information and direct observations of Sunnyside and Highland Neighborhood. The colloquium is a technique to educate and train planning concerns in North Denver. And with the aid of the computer, a vast amount of responses can be cross-tabulated and analyzed. Personal involvement may be quantified and related to the pressure points of neighborhood needs.
* An 8-14 people response group per 3 hours for fill-in time. See pp. 36-37 that outline "The Group Depth Interviews."


36
THE CROUP DEPTH INTERVIEW*
Croup
A group is a number of interacting individuals having a community of interests.
Interaction
In the group situation a person is asked an opinion about something.
' The group setting causes the opinions of each person to be considered in group discussion.
' It is the interviewers responsibility to stimulate the group members to interact with each other rather than with him.
Community of Interest
A number of individuals may be very different in origin, religion, political, etc., but if they share a common identity relevant to the discussion, a group can form.
Information Elicited by Groups
Interaction among group members stimulates new ideas and the group as a whole is given the opportunity to react to it and indicate its interest to the group.
' Behavior, when accompanied by indications of anxiety, suggests a particular idea has provoked sufficient psychic discomfort and threat as to require its rigorous avoidance in open discussion.
*AIfred E. Goldman, "The Group Depth Interview," Journal of Marketing Research Association, XXXI, July, 1962, p.p. 61-68.


37
Reactions to a new idea may also demonstrate the opportunity to observe directly the group process, ie., attitudes toward something is reflected in the way they behaved toward eacy other in the group.
The process of decision is exposed in the sharing of experiences, rumors, and anecdotes that go on in a group discussion about a product, person, or event.
Flexibility or rigidity with which an opinion is held is better exposed in a group setting than in an individual interview.
The group setting offers some idea of the dynamics of opinion, its interaction and modification, and its intensity and resistance to change. Discussion in a peer group often provokes considerably greater spontaneity and candor than can be expected in an individual interview.
The group provides support to its members in the expression of anxiety provoking or socially unpopular ideas.
The group setting is emotionally provocative in a way that an individual interview cannot be.
By virtue of the interaction and common relevant interests of its members, the group offers more and qualitatively different information that can be obtained from the sum of its individual human parts.


COLLOQUIUM
38
NORTH DENVER NEIGHBORHOOD March, 1980
1. 1. --- TRUE "Highland/Sunnyside Neighborhoods supply
2. --- FALSE the area with predominantly medium priced
3. --- UNKNOWN housing."
2. Neighborhood issues:
rank order of importance on a scale from 1 to 4
4. 1 very important
5. 2 important some housing is blighted
6. 3 unimportant
7. 4 very unimportant
8. 1 very important
9. 2 important members of the old community
10. 3 unimportant are moving out
11. 4 very unimportant
12. 1 very important
13. 2 important commercial spot zoning
14. 3 unimportant
15. 4 very unimportant
16. 1 very important
17. 2 important neighborhood leadership
18. 3 unimportant
19. 4 very unimportant
20. Comments
Residents are moving out and are being replaced by:
check one or more or none
21. low income
22. middle income white
23. elderly
24. minority families
25. Other


39
4. Issues important to the neighborhood:
rank order of importance on a scale from 1 to 4
26. ---- 1 - very important
27. ---- 2 - important
28. ---- 3 - unimportant
29. ---- 4 - very unimportant
30. ---- 1 - very important
31. ---- 2 - important
32. ---- 3 - unimportant
33. ---- 4 - very unimportant
34. ---- 1 - very important
35. ---- 2 - important
36. ---- 3 - unimportant
37. ---- 4 - very unimportant
38. ---- 1 - very important
39. ---- 2 - important
40. ---- 3 - unimportant
41. ---- 4 - very unimportant
42. Comments
43. TRUE "Pecos St. in Sunnyside was once
44. FALSE occupied by orchards, small truck
45. UNKNOWN farms, and undeveloped land."
46. TRUE "The northeast corner of
47. FALSE Sunnyside was once called
48. UNKNOWN the 'Town of Argo1."
7. rank order of importance on a scale of 1 to 4
49. 1 - very important
50. 2 - important coordinate redevelopment with
51. 3 - unimportant adjacent neighborhoods
52. 4 - very unimportant
53. 1 - very important
54. 2 - important commercial use in different
55. 3 - unimportant neighborhood sections
56. 4 - very unimportant
57. 1 - very important
58. 2 - important redevelop and maintain existing
59. 3 - unimportant residential character
60. 4 - very unimportant
land use
public facilities
transportation
new development


40
61. 1 very important
62. 2 important encourage preservation
63. 3 unimportant of historic structures
64. 4 very unimportant
65. 1 very important
66. 2 important encourage single-family
67. 3 unimportant home ownership
68. 4 very unimportant
69. 1 very important
70. 2 important encourage ethnic
71 . 3 unimportant diversity
72. 4 very unimportant
73. 1 very important
74. 2 important encourage economic
75. 3 unimportant diversity
76. 4 very unimportant
77. 1 very important
78. 2 important improve neighborhood
79. 3 unimportant environment
80. 4 very unimportant
81. 1 very important
82. 2 important improve auto traffic
83. 3 unimportant movement
84. 4 very unimportant
85. 1 very important
86. 2 important improve public
87. 3 unimportant transportation
88. " 4 very unimportant
89. 1 very important
90. 2 important improve non-automobile
91. 3 unimportant mobility
92. 4 very unimportant
93. 1 very important
94. 2 important encourage and rejuvenate
95. 3 unimportant neighborhood business areas
96. 4 very unimportant
97. Other
98. _______ YES Should this area be mostly
99. NO residential land use?
100. UNSURE


41
9. Where is the center of your neighborhood?
101.
10. 102. TRUE "Commercial and industrial land use
103. FALSE is not in the best interest of the
104. UNSURE neighborhood."
11. 105. TRUE "Over zoning has created land speculation
106. FALSE
107. -r UNSURE f
12. 108. TRUE "Renter occupied apartments
109. FALSE deteriorate the neighborhood."
110. UNSURE
13. rank order of importance on a scale from 1 to 4
The land use needs within the neighborhood:
111. 1 very important
112. 2 important industrial
113. 3 unimportant
114. 4 very unimportant
It
115. ---- 1
116. --- 2
117. ----- 3
118. ----- 4
very important important unimportant very unimportant
commercial
119. 1 - very important
120. 2 - important
121. 3 - unimportant
122. 4 - very unimportant
123. 1 - very important
124. 2 - important
125. 3 - unimportant
126. 4 - very unimportant
single-family
multi-family
127. ---- 1
128. --- 2
129. ----- 3
130. ----- 4
very important important unimportant very unimportant
131. ---- 1
132. ----- 2
133. ----- 3
134. ----- 4
very important important unimportant very unimportant
135. Other
parking lot
vacant lot


42
14. Carriage lots should be used for? check one or more or none
136. ---
137. ---
138. ---
139. ---
140. ---
141. ---
parking lots
city garbage pick-up points houses
neighborhood gardens (community garden plots) mini parks
economic coops (neighborhood business)
142. Other
15. How are the housing values changing in your neighborhood?
143. --- rising
144. ---- remaining the same
145. --- lowering
16.
146. --- YES
147. --- NO
148. --- DON'T CARE
Would you like to have information about employment in real estate?
17. I would like to have more information about: check one or more or none
149. 150. 151. 152. Federal Housing Administration (FHA) Veteran's Administration (VA) Housing and Community Development Act of 1974 Other housing programs and mortgage lenders
153. 154. 155. YES NO UNSURE Do you want to move out of your present residence?
156. 157. YES NO Did you know about the housing program-Federally Assisted Conservation Encouragement?
20. What causes deterioration of the neighborhood?
rank order of importance on a scale from 1 to 4
158. 1 - very important
159. 2 - important renter turnover
160. 3 - unimportant
161. 4 - very unimportant
162. 1 - very important
163. 2 - important ethnic shifts
164. 3 - unimportant
165. 4 - very unimportant


43
166. ---- 1
167. ---- 2
168. ----- 3
169. ----- 4
very important important unimportant very unimportant
170. ---- 1
171. ----- 2
172. ----- 3
173. ----- 4
very important important unimportant very unimportant
174. ---- 1
175. ----- 2
176. ----- 3
177. ----- 4
very important important unimportant very unimportant
178. Comments
economic shifts
commercial zoning
one-way streets
21. Is the following information useful to you?
HIGHWAY USE CLASSIFICATIONS
Local Streets carry less than 2,000 vehicles per day Collector Streets carry 5, 000 to 12,000 vehicles per day Arterial Streets carry 17,500 to 35,000 vehicles per day Freeways greater than 35, 000 vehicles per day
179. YES
180. NO
22. 181. YES Do you know what redlining means?
182. NO
23. Would you like more information about:
check one or more or none
183. ---
184. ---
185. ---
186. ---
187. ---
188. ---
Denver Urban Renewal Authority (DURA)
Denver Housing Authority (DHA)
Neighborhood Housing Service (NHS)
Community Renewal Program (CRP)
North Denver Workshop (NDW)
Del Norte Neighborhood Development Corporation
189. Comments
24. Which items in the following list will better residential areas? check one or more or none
190. increase public programs
191. increase private investment
192. increase owner occupancy
193. increase city services
194. support Northside Community Center


44
195. ---
196. ---
197. ---
198. ---
support La Casa de Salute Health Station construction of the Platte River Creenway remodel North High School support Medical Health Center
199. Other
25. The Denver Landmark Commission has designated the following structures as having historic importance:
which of the following have you been to?
200. ----
201. ----
202. ----
203. ---
204. ---
205. ---
206. ---
207. ----
Asbury Methodist Church (2205 W. 30^ Ave.)
Hugh MacKay House (3359 Alcott St.)
Saint Elizabeth's Retreat (W. 32nd Ave. & Eliot St.) Forney Museum (15th St. & Platte St.)
Columbian Elementary School Smedley Elementary School Horace Mann Junior High School Way of the Cross Church
208. Other
26. Vehicular traffic (trucks, buses, automobiles) has changed in volume on all streets in the neighborhood.
rank order of importance on a scale from 1 to 4 the following streets that should be studied in detail:
209. 1 - very important
210. 2 - important
211. 3 - unimportant
212. 4 - very unimportant
213. 1 - very important
214. 2 - important
215. 3 - unimportant
216. 4 - very unimportant
217. 1 - very important
218. 2 - important
219. 3 - unimportant
220. 4 - very unimportant
221. 1 - very important
222. 2 - important
223. 3 - unimportant
224. 4 - very unimportant
traffic volume on Zuni St.
traffic volume on Tejon St.
east-west one-way streets
W. 33rd Ave., one-way street


45
225. 1 - very important
226. 2 - important
227. 3 - unimportant
228. 4 - very unimportant
229. 1 - very important
230. 2 - important
231. 3 - unimportant
232. 4 - very unimportant
233. 1 - very important
234. 2 - important
235. 3 - unimportant
236. 4 - very unimportant
W. 34t*"> Ave., one-way street
morning peak traffic use on W. 29th Ave. by Valdez Elementary School
Pecos St., one-way street
237. ---- 1
238. ---- 2
239. ---- 3
240. ---- 4
very important important unimportant very unimportant
Osage St., one-way street
241. Other
27. 242. -- YES
243. --- NO
244. ----- UNSURE
Should there be more landscaping along streets where possible?
28. Is the following information useful to you?
TRUCK USE CLASSIFICATIONS #1 Truck Route all trucks
#2 Truck Route all trucks except explosive cargo #3 Truck Route only trucks less than 7,000 lbs. empty weight
245. YES
246. NO
29. 247. TRUE "Renters move more often
248. FALSE than home owners."
249. UNSURE
30. 250. TRUE "Landlords who do not take proper care of
251. FALSE their rental units often set the stage for
252. UNSURE rapid deterioration of the neighborhood housing stock."


46
What background are you from?
253. Italian
254. English
255. Anglo
256. Irish
257. Swedish
258. Mexican-American
259. Spanish-American
260. German
261. Other
rank order of importance on a scale from 1 to 4
Causing problems along Pecos St . from W. 38th Ave. to W. 39th Ave.:
262. 1 very important
263. 2 important vacant lots
264. 3 unimportant
265. 4 very unimportant
266. 1 very important
267. 2 important abandoned houses
268. 3 unimportant
269. 4 very unimportant
270. 1 very important
271. 2 important business development
272. 3 unimportant
273. 4 very unimportant
274. Other
rank order of importance on a scale from 1 to 4
Causing problems along W. 44th Ave. from Zuni St. to Tejon St.:
275. 1 very important
276. 2 important residential use
277. 3 unimportant
278. 4 very unimportant
279. 1 very important
280. 2 important business use
281. 3 unimportant
282. 4 very unimportant
283. 1 very important
284. 2 important non-conforming industrial use
285. 3 unimportant
286. 4 very unimportant
287. Other


47
34. rank order of importance on a scale from 1 to 4
The causes of problems at the city block bounded by W. 46th Ave., Navajo St., W. 44th Ave., Pecos St. :
288. 1 very important
289. 2 important vacant lots
290. 3 unimportant
291 . 4 very unimportant
292. 1 very important
293. 2 important deteriorating houses
294. 3 unimportant
295. 4 very unimportant
296. 1 very important
297. 2 important pressure to rezone to industrial
298. 3 unimportant
299. 4 very unimportant
300. Other
301. YES Do you think Zuni St. will become a
302. NO major access route to the Central
303. UNSURE Business District (CBD)?
rank order of importance on a scale from 1 to 4
The viaducts that bring problems into the neighborhood:
304. 1 very important 1 5th st. Viaduct
305. 2 important
306. 3 unimportant
307. 4 very unimportant
308. 1 very important 16*h St. Viaduct
309. 2 important
310. 3 unimportant
311. 4 very unimportant
312. 1 very important 20th St. Viaduct
313. 2 important
314. 3 unimportant
315. 4 very unimportant
316. Other


48
37. rank order of importance on a scale from 1 to 4
The issues caused by increasing traffic:
317.
318.
319.
320.
1 - very important
2 - important
3 - unimportant
4 - very unimportant
321. ---- 1 - very important
322. ---- 2 - important
323. ---- 3 - unimportant
324. ---- 4 - very unimportant
325. --- 1 - very important
326. ---- 2 - important
327. ---- 3 - unimportant
328. ---- 4 - very unimportant
329. Other
pollution
deterioration of residential properties
commercial land use
38. 330. --- YES
331. --- NO
332. ----- UNSURE
Do you think that Tejon St. should remain two-way traffic?
39. 333. --- YES
334. --- NO
335. ----- UNSURE
Should Tejon St. be used to concentrate the traffic between Highland and Sunnyside Neighborhoods?
40. What planned changes do you know of in or in the vicinity of the neighborhood? check one or more or none
336. --- Burlington Northern Development
337. --- 16th St. Mall
338. --- Market/Blake arterial
339. Other _______________________________________________________
41. If W. 33rd Ave. and W. 35*^ Ave. become two-way streets, which of the
following would be true?
340. TRUE "interrupt traffic"
341. FALSE
342. UNSURE
343. TRUE "reduce vehicle speed
344. FALSE
345. UNSURE
346. TRUE "improve convenience'
347. FALSE
348. UNSURE


49
349. 350. 351. TRUE FALSE UNSURE "shorten travel distance"
352. 353. 354. TRUE FALSE UNSURE "increase commercial development"
42. 355. 356. 357. TRUE FALSE UNKNOWN "W. 29th Ave. links Speer Boulevard with Federal Boulevard Federal Boulevard with the 1 5*h St. Viaduct and the Viaduct with the Central Business District (CBD)."
43. 358. 359. 360. TRUE FALSE UNSURE "Increasing traffic on Speer Boulevard coming from the neighborhood should decrease traffic on 29*^ Ave."
44. 361. 362. FOR AGAINST New service roads for the Valley Highway through the neighborhood.
45. 363. 364. 365. YES NO UNSURE Should the impacts from the road viaduct system be studied in detail?
46. 366. 367. 368. YES NO UNSURE Should there be a tri-party organization -Denver/Highland/Sunny side?
47. Which items in the following check one or more or none list do you feel are beyond your control?
369. 370. 371. 372. 373. minimize the impacts from I-25 lessen noise in the neighborhood decrease exhaust pollution from cars decrease traffic in the neighborhood minimize the impacts from 1-70
00 cr 374. 375. TRUE FALSE "Too many trucks drive through the neighborhood."
49. 376. 377. 378. TRUE FALSE UNSURE "Truck use is not justified use in residential areas."
50. 379. 380. 381. TRUE FALSE UNKNOWN "Trucks use only the peripheral routes around the neighborhood." (Speer Blvd., Federal Blvd.,
1-70, Valley Highway)


50
51. Which of the following streets should be only a #3 truck route? (trucks less than 7,0u0 lb. empty weight)
check one or more or none
382. - W. 35th Ave.
383. Zuni St.
384. Tejon St.
385. Boulder St.
386. Umatilla St.
387. Comments
52. Which places in the following list have you been to? check one or more or none
388. ---
389. ---
390. ---
391. ---
392. ---
393. ---
394. ---
395. ---
396. ---
397. ---
398. ---
399. ---
400. ---
401. ---
402. ---
403. ---
Neighborhood House Church of God (W. 43rC* Ave. & Lipan St.)
Faith Lutheran Church
Smedley Elementary School
Valdez Elementary School (W. 29th Ave.)
Bryant-Webster School (W. 36th Ave. from Shoshone to Quivas)
North High School
Jesus Center (3600 Zuni St.)
Northside Community Center (3551 Pecos St.)
Metropolitan Youth Center
Mile High Day Care Association
Ashland Recreation Center (2960 Fife Court)
Woodbury Library
St. Catherines (4200 Federal Blvd.)
Columbian Elementary School
Horace Mann Junior High School
Servicio de La Raza (W. 38th Ave. £ Mariposa St.)
404. Comments
53. rank order of importance on a scale from 1 to 4
Schools should have (other than educational facilities) :
405. 1 - very important
406. 2 - important parking lots
407. 3 - unimportant
408. 4 - very unimportant
409. 1 - very important
410. 2 - important football field
411. 3 - unimportant
412. 4 - very unimportant
413. 1 - very important
414. 2 - important baseball field
415. 3 - unimportant
416. 4 - very unimportant


51
417.
418.
419.
420.
1 - very important
2 - important
3 - unimportant
4 - very unimportant
421. ---- 1 - very important
422. ---- 2 - important
423. ---- 3 - unimportant
424. ---- 4 - very unimportant
425. ---- 1
426. ---- 2
427. ----- 3
428. ---- 4
very important important unimportant very unimportant
429. ---- 1
430. ---- 2
431. ---- 3
432. ----- 4
very important important unimportant very unimportant
433. ---- 1 - very important
434. ---- 2 - important
435. ---- 3 - unimportant
436. ---- 4 - very unimportant
437. ---- 1 - very important
438. ---- 2 - important
439. ---- 3 - unimportant
440. ---- 4 - very unimportant
441.
442.
443.
444.
445. Other
1 - very important
2 - important
3 - unimportant
4 - very unimportant
basketball court
tennis court
auditorium
landscaping
additional land
indoor swimming pool
soccer field
54. Which of the following neighborhood parks have you been to?
check one or more or none
446. -- Columbus Park (La Raza Park)
447. -- Hirshorn Park (Erie St. & Lipan St.)
448. -- Bernabe "Indio" Franco Park (W. 37th Ave. & Lipan St.)
449. -- Chaffee Park
450. -- Ciancio Park
451. -- McDonough Park
452. Other


52
55. 453. YES Should Hirshorn Park expand
454. NO along Boulder St. ?
455. UNSURE
56. 456. YES Should "Indio" expand along
457. NO W. 37th Ave. & Kalamath St.?
458. UNSURE
Fire Station #7 (W. 38th Ave. 8 Vallejo St.) serves the area in which
you live.
57. 459. YES Did you ever call for the Fire Department
460. NO because of a problem at home?
58. 461. YES Does the fire station respond
462. NO quickly? (less than 6 min.)
59. 463. YES Do you think the fire station
464. NO facility is adequate?
60. 465. TRUE "Stress and chaos of poverty causes
466. FALSE more persons to commit crimes."
467. UNSURE
61. 468. Comments
Police Station #1 (W. 22nd Ave. & Decatur St.) serves the area in
which you live - precincts 106, 109, 110, 113.
62. 469. - YES Have you ever called the police
470. - NO because of a problem at home?
63. 471. - YES Does the police respond
472. - NO quickly? (less than 6 min.)
64. 473. - YES Do you think the police
474. - NO protection is adequate?
65. 475. Comments

66. 476. - YES Do you think the neighborhood
477. - NO should have more children
478. - UNSURE day care centers?


53
67. Which children day care centers have you used? check one or more or none
479. -- Chapel Day Care Center (All Saints Church)
480. -- Mile High Day Care Program (Community Center)
481. -- Other day care homes in the neighborhood
68. 482. ------ YES
483. ---- NO
Have you ever bought groceries at "La Tienda"? (W. 35th Ave. S Mariposa St.)
69. Which places in the following list have you ever dealt with? check one or more or none
484. La Case de Salute 485. Northwest Mental Health Facility 486. Nursing homes 487. North Denver Workshop
488. Comments
70. 489. YES 490. NO Do you have any information concerning the Senior Citizen hiqh-rise? (Alcott St. between W. 38th Ave. S W. 39th Ave.)
71. 491. YES 492. NO 493. UNSURE Should there be a stronger neighborhood action for more tree planting?
72. Vacant lots in the neighborhood should be used for: check one or more or none
494. --- parking lots
495. --- garbage pick-up stations
496. --- neighborhood gardens
497. --- mini parks
498. --- economic coops (neighborhood business)
499. Other
73. 500. -- YES Do you think the Platte
501. -- NO River Greenway is needed?
502. -- UNSURE
74. Which items in the following list do you think the Platte River Greenway should have?
check one or more or none
503.
504.
505.
parks
picnic areas boating facilities


506. --- 10 miles of hike/bicycle trails
507. --- outdoor amphitheater
508. --- waterfront plaza
509. Other
What causes problems in the neighborhood?
rank order of importance on a scale from 1 to 4
510. 1 - very important
511. 2 - important
512. 3 - unimportant
513. 4 - very unimportant
514. 1 - very important
515. 2 - important
516. 3 - unimportant
517. 4 - very unimportant
518. 1 - very important
519. 2 - important
520. 3 - unimportant
521. 4 - very unimportant
522. 1 - very important
523. 2 - important
524. 3 - unimportant
525. 4 - very unimportant
526. 1 - very important
527. 2 - important
528. 3 - unimportant
529. 4 - very unimportant
530. 1 - very important
531. 2 - important
532. 3 - unimportant
533. 4 - very unimportant
percentage of minority families
blue-collar workers
persons below poverty income levels
percentage of families receiving public assistance
female-headed households
households without automobiles
534. Other
535. -- TRUE
536. -- FALSE
537. -- UNSURE
"The cost of maintenance for rental units is detrimental to the overall housing conditions in the neighborhood."
538. -- TRUE
539. -- FALSE
540. -- UNSURE
"Financial institutions in the neighborhood are a sign of a healthy neighborhood."


55
78. Which items in the following list would better the housing conditions in the neighborhood?
check one or more or none
541. ---
542. ---
543. ---
544. ---
545. ---
546. ---
547. ---
improve housing code enforcement, ie., houses, yards, unkempt conditions, etc. improve external appearance of houses provide rehabilitation loans
provide grants to elderly/fixed income/low income families acquisition/rehabilitation/resale of house structures 80% Rule (80% of the homes on any given block must be single-family dwellings) change zoning from R-2 to R-1
548. Comments ______________________________________________________
79. Which items in the following list of mortgage lenders have you had direct contact with?
check one or more or none
549. -- Loan to Lenders
550. -- Lenders Mortgage Corporation
551. -- Shared Risk Pool
552. Other _________________________________________________________
80. 553. --- YES Do you want information about the
554. -- NO Denver Landmark Preservation
555. -- DON'T CARE Ordinance?
81. The number of net land acres in Sunnyside is estimated to be 623 acres, (net land = total land area minus streets, sidewalks, alleys, etc.)
Do you agree?
556. more
557. about
558. less
82. 559. YES Should industrial areas have
560. NO landscape buffers?
561. UNSURE
83. 562. YES Should there be an I-76
563. NO interchange at Pecos St.?
564. UNKNOWN (proposal)


56
84. Which places should a neighborhood bicycle route go?
check one or more or none-
565. Rocky Mountain Lake
566. Sloan Lake
567. Berkeley Lake
568. Platte River Creenway
569. North Hiah School
570. Central Business District (CBD)
571. Other
85. The neighborhood needs a better circulator bus system. Which items in the following list concern you?
check one or more or none-
572. employment centers
573. education centers
574. shopping centers
575. health centers
576. cultural centers
577. recreation centers
578. Other
86. 579. YES Should Columbus Park be
580. NO renamed La Raza Park?
581. DON'T CARE
87. 27 acres of park (about 3 square blocks) is desirable to serve each 1,000
people. Does this standard seem correct for your neighborhood?
582. more
583. about
584. less
88. 585. TRUE "There is poor access to parks
586. FALSE in the neighborhood."
89. 587. TRUE "There should be more parks on the
588. FALSE eastern boundary of the neighborhood."
589. UNSURE
90. rank order of importance on a scale from 1 to 4
What parks should have:
590. --- 1 very important
591. --- 2 important parking lots
592. --- 3 unimportant
593. --- 4 very unimportant


57
594. 1 very important
595. 2 important football field
596. 3 unimportant
597. 4 very unimportant
598. 1 very important
599. 2 important baseball filed
600. 3 unimportant
601. 4 very unimportant
602. 1 very important
603. 2 important basketball court
604. 3 unimportant
605. 4 very unimportant
606. 1 very important
607. 2 important tennis court
608. 3 unimportant
609. 4 very unimportant
610. 1 very important
611. 2 important landscaping
612. 3 unimportant
613. 4 very unimportant
614. 1 very important
615. 2 important children playground
616. 3 unimportant
617. 4 very unimportant
618. 1 very important
619. 2 important indoor swimming pool
620. 3 unimportant
621. 4 very unimportant
622. 1 very important
623. 2 important soccer field
624. 3 unimportant
625. 4 very unimportant
626. Other
91. Which items in the following list have you had direct contact with? check one or more or none
627. -- Aztlan Recreation Center
628. -- North Denver Recreation Center
629. -- Twilighter Club
630. -- Denver Catholic Community Services, Inc.
631. -- Senior Center (38*^ Ave. & Alcott St.)
632. Comments ___________________________________


58
92. 633. YES Should Horace Mann Junior Hiqh
634. NO School be renovated and aquire
635. UNSURE more additional land?
93. 636. YES Should Columbia Elementary
637. NO School be replaced?
638. UNSURE
94. 639. YES Wfould you like to have information about the
640. NO neighborhood bookmobile operated by
641. DON'T CARE Woodbury Library? (W. 32nc* Ave. S Federal Blvd
95. 642. TRUE "The bookmobile does not
643. FALSE come often enough."
644. UNKNOWN
96. 645. TRUE "When the bookmobile is in the neighborhood,
646. FALSE it is not at a convenient time."
647. UNKNOWN
97. How many churches do you think is in your neighborhood?
648. more than 16
649. 1 0 to 15
650. less than 1 0
98. 651 . YES Do you think that your neighborhood
652. NO has serious crime problems?
99. 653. YES Is your neighborhood patrolled enough?
654. NO
655. UNKNOWN
100. Should there be more information given to the public about: check one or more or none
656. ---
657. ---
658. ---
659. ---
660. ---
661. ----
educational and recreational youth programs
immigration services
home visiting services
assistance to alcholics and their families
assistance for drug rehabilitation
mental health programs
662. Other


59
101.
102.
103.
104.
105.
106.
107.
108.
Does your neighborhood environment have: check one or more or none--
663. well-maintained homes
664. well-maintained businesses
665. attractive parks
666. well-kept lawns
667. Comments
668. YES 1 Are there places in the
669. NO neiahborhood with
670. UNKNOWN drainage problems?
671. YES Would you like to have information concerning
672. NO Denver's Special Improvement Districts?
673. YES Do the industrial areas in
674. NO Globeville cause problems
675. UNSURE in your neighborhood?
Which of the following routes that are classified collector streets (5,000
to 12,000 vehicles per day) should be changed to local streets (less than
2,000 vehicles per day)?
check one or more or none-
676. W. 47th Ave. from Pecos St. to Jason St.
677. Jason St. from W. 47th Ave. to W. 45th Ave.
678. W. 45th Ave. from Jason St. to Inca St.
679. W. 45th Ave. from Inca St. South
680. YES Should the street network be
681. NO studied in detail to discourage
682. UNSURE the division of neighborhoods?
Which of the following routes should be changed from one-way to
two-way streets?
check i one or more or none-
683. Osage St. from W. 38th Ave. to W. 44th Ave.
684. Pecos St. from 1-70 to W. 38th Ave.
685. Other
686. YES Should there be a better access
687. NO between Aztlan Recreation Center
688. UNSURE and the Quigg Newton Senior Center?


60
109. 689. YES Should more structures in the neighborhood
690. NO be given the designation, "Denver
691. UNSURE Landmark"?
110. 692. YES Should mid-block lighting be
693. NO used on W. 39*h Ave. between
694. UNSURE Pecos St. 5 Quivas St.?
111. 695. YES Should there be more streetlights
696. NO in the neighborhood?
697. Where
112. Current government statistics show the following information for
Highland Neighborhood . Do you agree?
698. greater than 3,930 total housing units
699. about
700. less than
701. greater than 2.6 people per household
702. about
703. less than
704. greater than 9, 950 population
705. about
706. less than
707. Comments
113. Current government statistics show the following information for Sunnyside
Neighborhood. Do you agree?
708. greater than 3,935 total housing units
709. about
710. less than
711. greater than 2.9 people per household
712. about
713. less than
714. greater than 11,279 population
715. about
716. less than
717. Comments
114. 718. YES Do you think that there is enough
719. NO floor space per person in your
household ?


61
115. 720. YES Would you like more information
721. NO on legal aid services?
116. 722. YES Would you subscribe to community
723. NO newsletters that report neighborhood
information ?
117. Would you like more information about:
check one or more or none
724. --- social security
725. --- food assistance
726. --- work incentive
727. --- medical assistance
728. --- housing assistance
729. Other ________________________________________
118. The following needs better public service attention: check one or more or none
730. --- trash disposal
731. --- snow removal
732. --- street maintenance
733. Other
119. 734. YES Should there be a neighborhood
735. NO planning board?
736. UNSURE
120. 737. YES Should there be better enforcement
738. NO of animal controls?
739. UNSURE
121. 740. YES Should there be police security
741. NO at neighborhood parks?
742. UNSURE
122. What is your present housing situation?
743. --- renter
744. --- owner
745. Other


62
123. What are your monthly payments for housing?
746. ---
747. ---
748. ---
749. ---
750. ---
751. ---
less than $50 $50 to $99 $100 to $149 $150 to $199 $200 to $249 $250 or more
124. How long have you and your household members lived here?
752. -- less than one year
753. -- 1 3 years
754. -- 3 5 years
755. -- 5 10 years
756. -- more than 10 years
125. What was your reason for staying or moving to Sunnyside S Highland Neighborhoods ?
757. --- housing prices
758. --- family ties
759. --- jobs
760. --- lower taxes
761. Other _______________________________________________________
126. Which of the following describes your living and working situation?
762. --- live and work in the neighborhood
763. --- live in the neighborhood and retired or unemployed
764. --- live in the neighborhood and work elsewhere
127. What type residence do you live in?
765. --- single-family
766. --- duplex
767. --- apartment
768. --- room
769. Other _________________________________________
128. How well does your present home meet your needs?
770. --- very well
771. --- well
772. --- fairly well
773. --- poorly
774. --- not at all


63
129. What is your present occupation?
775. --- retired
776. --- laborer
777. --- homemaker
778. --- foreman/skilled craftsman
779. --- assembly line worker
780. --- machine operator
781. --- clerical
782. --- disabled
783. --- owner/manager/executive
784. --- sales
785. --- professional/technical
786. --- student
787. ----- unemployed
788. --- teacher
789. Other _______________________________________________
130. What means of transportation do you use to get to work? check one or more or none
790. --- automobile
791. --- bus
792. --- carpool
793. --- walk
794. Other _______________________________________________
131. How many automobiles does the entire family own?
795. --- 0
796. --- 1
797. --- 2
798. --- 3 or more
132. How many people live in your household?
799. --- 1
800. --- 2
801. --- 3
802. --- 4
803. --- more than 4


64
133.
134.
135.
136.
What are the sources of income in your household?
804. --- retirement
805. --- salary
806. --- social security
807. --- wage
808. --- self-employment
809. --- public assistance
810. --- independent income
811. Other ____________________
What is your combined family income per year?
812. --- 0 $3,999
813. --- $4,000 $5,999
814. --- $6,000 $7,999
815. --- $8,000 $9,999
816. --- $10,000 $14,999
817. --- more than $15,000
What is your marital status?
818. --- single
819. --- married
820. --- separated
821. --- divorced
822. --- widowed
What is the highest level of formal education that you have completed?
823. no school
824. less than 8 years
825. 8 through 11
826. high school diploma
827. some college
828. college degree
829. vocational/technical school
830. YES Would you like to become
831. NO involved in neighborhood
832. UNSURE planning?
137.


65
138. 833. Comments:


66
PART THREE
MAPPING TECHNIQUES TO INCREASE NEIGHBORHOOD AWARENESS
In the spirit of Kevin Lynch who divided the city form into five cata-gorical images; 1. paths that direct movement, 2. edges that break continuity, i.e., edge elements, 3. districts that can be identified from the inside and the outside, 4. nodes that are strategic spots or cores in a city, and
5. landmarks that are defined as physical objects, 1 the U. S. Forest Service has developed a method and theme of operation to investigate a man-built community.
The ten stages listed by the Forest Service (p. 67 ) and the process outlining a prototypical methodology (pp. 6882 ) serve to involve people into group participation. By the use of a workshop, neighborhood members may begin to visualize the problems of their community. When a problem becomes a statement, the solution is half solved.
^evin Lynch, The Image of the City (Cambridge, Massachusetts: M. I. T. Press, 1975).


67
OVERVIEW OF THE PROCESS TO INVESTIGATE A MAN BUILT COMMUNITY*
1. Becoming familiar with the community.
identify land areas and patterns
2. Identify and focusing on land use patterns to investigate.
overview of community, constructing a three-stage data collecting chart
3. Identifying and analyzing the topic under investigation.
data that is observable, collectible, and recordable
use of three-stage data collecting charts to analyze investigation
construct data-collecting and recording devise use in investigation
develop a procedure to test the investigation process
4. Conducting the investigation.
testing process
modifications in the procedures
data collecting tools, etc.
5. Preparing and reporting investigation.
process description
flow chart flexibility for modifications
6. Analyzing facotrs and alternatives to their present conditions.
list factors that contribute to problem
brainstorming how changes would affect the problem
7. Developing action planning to bring about improvement or solution to the environment investigated.
project feasibility
action plan to implement solution
8. Communicating feelings, awareness, and values.
9. Identifying a community using themes.
10. Summarizing the investigation of the workshop gathering.
*U. S. Forest Service, Investigating Your Environmental Series (Portland, Oregon: 1975).


I. BECOMING FAMILIAR WITH THE COMMUNITY
68
Questions and Discussions
1. "What are some major land use categories found in most communities?
(List on board e.g., commercial, residential, recreation, in industrial, etc.)
2. Pass out map of local community being studied. Have each group locate the major land use categories they can think of on the map with marking pens, etc.
^Discussion Skills
Accepting
Supporting
II.
IDENTIFYING AND FOCUSING ON LAND USE PATTERNS, INTERRELATIONSHIPS
1. "After looking at your map and locating the land uses on it, what can you say about the pattern of land use in your community?" List on board.
2. "We want to find out more about the different land use categories in this area."
3. "One tool that can help us is to construct a 3-stage data collecting chart."
4. "We want to do one with you as a sample."
Accepting Supporting Time to think
NOTE: (Pick a subject other than a land use category listed on the board to illustrate the use of the chart.)
5. a."Let's pick transportation as the topic to be investigated."
(Write transportation at the top of chart.)
b. "The first column is labeled, 'What We Wane to Find Out1
about the topic."(Write that at far left on board and ask for group responses.)
c. "The second column is labeled, 'How to Collect* information
about the item listed in Column 1"(write that heading next to column 1 and ask for group responses. Ask for ways to collect information on the first 4 to 5 items in Column 1, one at a time, then ask, "Are there any additional ways you can think of to collect the information in Column #1?"
d. "The third column is labeled, 'How to Record' the information we are
going to collect. (Write that heading next to Column 2 and ask for group responses. Just ask for general ways to record the information for any item).
Accepting Supporting Time to think
NOTE: Here is what the sample chart might look like after doing it with the total group.
SAMPLE 3-Staga Data Collecting Chart
Subject: Transportation
Column 1 Column 2 Column 3
What We Want to Find Out How to Collect How to Record
Location of major arterials Observation Graphs
Kinds of transportation Interview people Statistics
What is needed Existing studies Pictures
How much is available Count II of cases Film
Accessibility of terminals at certain place Tape recorders
Land topography Count types of Questionnaire
Is it working vehicles Map
What is being used now Tables
Crovth pattern
Traffic flow pattern
Peak traffic needs
Attitude of People


69
Question and Discussions
1. "What might be the benefits of analyzing a land use, or topic Accepting
this way before going out to do an investigation about it?" Supporting (e.g: It's easier to see all the parts of the topic. ~
- Analyzing it breaks it down into manageable parts to study.
- You realize that problems aren't as simple as they seem.)
Here are two additional options to consider instead of investigating land use categories in II B depending upon the objectives of your plan.
Option 1 If your objective is to investigate environmental factors, then use this question after II 1. "What are some factors that might affect the quality of the environment of the area on this map and in what ways will they affect the environment?" (List on chart.)
Option 2 If your objective is to investigate a potential or existing problem then ask this question after II 1, "What are some problems that might be created by the pattern, of the land use in your community?"
III. IDENTIFYING AND ANALYZING THE TOPIC FOR YOUR INVESTIGATION Questions and Discussions
1. Describe the area that the group is going to investigate and have each person draw that area on his map.
Criteria for the facilitator to use in identifying an area to investigate.
1. Within walking distance in the time segment allotted (3 hours of field investigation.)
2. Have a variety of land use categories.
3. Have example of changing land use.
4. Should be interesting to study.
2. Split class into appropriate number of study teams, (groups of 4-5) and have them pick a land use category. (Make sure all land uses have been taken.)
Have study teams identify the land use category they are going to investigate in the designated area and fill out Column 1 of the 3-stage chart in Task A. (10 minutes)
3.


70
TASK A 3-Stage Data Collecting and Analyzing Chart Working in your group fill out the land uae category and column 1 of the chart below. Land Use Category
Column 1 What we want to find out about our land use category in the area Column 2 How to collect the Information Column 3 How to Record the Information
1 1 J
4. "Identify one or two items from Column 1 of your chart that you want to find out more about from actual observations in the area to be investigated and construct a data collecting and recording device to use in collecting and recording your observations. The items you select must deal with data that is observable, collectible, and recordable in your area during the actual field investigation and within the time constraints. Filling out Columns 2-3 may help in your planning."
5. Have sample data collecting and.recording charts to hang up as sample displa;
-------- rtrsz^^r^~VTTST.rc~~
Vie of s VA P£c>PlZsaj Air
SUJ/M IVAM. K ere. J AST£ R S £-<71 *- 7W2. /i -x* 3 / 3o
5 Vo So iCf I O
Vo-* j o 1 2. 5 >/ £ (c

L£ce*>o
X Fi Ac ^
I V'SUtPl* **'<
Fi^stvj
6. When they are about through making their data collecting chart, tell them to develop a plan of action to investigate their part of the environment using the data collecting and recording devices and in the -allotted field time. (Consider dividing responsibilities for collecting and recording information, who goes where, other tools needed, etc.)


71
7. After 10 minutes into the planning, put up and read the following sign.
Planning for an Investigation
Usually, the problems that people have are 1) deciding what to do, 2) narrow*-lng down the scope of the topic to something specific enough to actually investigate. HAS YOUR GROUP EXPERIENCED THIS?
8. Before going out to do the investigation, have each group make a short presentation to describe the procedures and display the recording devices to be used in the investigation. If you have a large class have groups pair up and critique each others plans instead of each small group presenting it to total group.
9. Just before dismissing the groups to do the field investigation, put up the following chart.
This Session is all About Learning How to Prepare for an Investigation
Today the procedures are more important than the content. The idea is to try out your data-collectir.g and recording methods.
It may be necessary to modify your investigation procedures as you become involved in your task.
V. CONDUCTING THE INVESTIGATION V.
Tell group: "You now have (3) hours to do your field work. Be back
here at .______(time). You will have 1 hour to prepare a 5-10 minute
report about your investigation. Instructions for the report will be posted when you return."
V. PREPARING AND REPORTING ON THE INVESTIGATION
Have following instructions up as groups come back so they have some guidelines for their presentation.
Instructions for the Presentation
1. Describe your task.
2. Report on what you did, how you did it, and what it meant.
3. Describe how you modified your procedure, methods, recording devices, etc.
4. Use more than one person as spokesman.
5. Use visual displays.
6. Limit report to 5-10 minutes.
7. This is a report about the investigation process and not the content or solutions to problems unless it relates to the process.
8. Do not report on all the minute details.
Questions and Discussions
1. Each group gives their presentation. Stick to time limits and to the process of the investigation.
2. "What problems did you encounter in your investigation?"
3. "What is the next thing to do with all this information?"


72
VI. ANALYZING FACTORS AND ALTERNATIVES TO THEIR PRESENT CONDITIONS Questions and Discussion
1. "What are the basic functions of your study area?"
2. "What are some of the needs of the area?"
3. "What impact does your survey area have on the management of
your community?"
4. "What examples are there in your area that:
illustrate the past, typify the present, indicate the future?"
5. "What interrelationships can we identify in the area investigated
based on your field observations (residential to business, past use to present use, business district to transportation routes, etc.)
6. "How do these things above affect the function of the community?
(Vacancies affect appearance, business taking over community, apts. affect community spirit, etc.)"
7. "Select one issue, concern, or problem that you identified in your
investigation. Using TASK B, list, and analyze as many factors you can identify."
Clarifying
Extending
Lifting
Time to Think
Refocusing
TASK R ANALYZING FACTORS AND ALTERNATIVES TO PRESENT CONDITIONS
(TASK B la designed to brainstorm all possible alternatives.) List the factors contributing to the Issue. Take each factor and usk: "How can we change tills factor (eliminate, modify, substitute) to bring about a chango In the Issue?" Consider all alternatives, no matter how silly they may seem.
FACTOK MOW IT CONTRIBUTES TO ALTERNATIVES TO ITS PRESENT CONDITION THE PROBLEM OR ISSUE Select one or more alternatives below
and Jescrlbe how the factor might be changed.
(Elimination Modification Substitution)
DESCRIBE HOW THE CHANGE WILL EFFECT THE PROBLEM OR ISSUE
Example; Traffic Management
Width of Cause traffic Jam Put in walking
stree tn or bicycle
paths
Eliminate car traffic, cause changes In working-social patterns
One-way streets
Ease congestion because of one-way flow
Everyone Cause traffic Jam
start and
quit work
at same
time
Mass transit
Adjust starting, closing, working hours
Minimize number of vehicles, no congestion, less air pollution, etc.
Spread out traffic over a longer period of time
Describe the alternative or combination of alternatives that might bring about an improvement or solution to the quality of the environment investigated. Clve reasons for your choices.
After you have analyzed the factors in TASK B, then go on to TASK C.


73
VII. DEVELOPING AN ACTION PLAN TO BRING ABOUT AN IMPROVEMENT OR SOLUTION TO AN ISSUE OR CONCERN JUST INVESTIGATED.
Select one of the alternatives from TASK B. Write it in TASK C under suggested solution and complete the task. This can help you determine if your solution is feasible or not and what course of action you plan to take for its implementation.
TASK C DEVELOPING ACTION PLANNING TO BRING ABOUT AN IMPROVEMENT OR SOLUTION TO THE ENVIRONMENT
INVESTIGATED
Select one of Che solutions suggested by your group In TASK B. Write it below under "Suggested
Solution" Complete the rest of the chart.
ACTION PIANNINC FOR PROBLEM SOLVING
SUGGESTED TYPE ACTION NECESSARY IDENTIFY CHANCE IMPLEMENTATION EVALUATION METHODS-
SOLUTION TO IMPLEMENT THE AGENTS WHO COULD STEPS TO PROBLEM HOW WILL YOU FOLLOW
SOLUTION HELP IMPLEMENT THE SOLUTION UP AND EVALUATE THE
SOLUTION EFFECTIVENESS OP YOUR ACTION7

(Write In Technological Individual (What must be
solution What kinds of tech- What kinds of done?in what
suggested by nologlcal action things could be order?when?
your group would be necessary In Tsak D) to Implement this done through indI vidual Steps Target Date 1. 2.
Idea? action?
Social Groups 3.
What kinds of social What kinds of things
action would be could be done by/
necessary to lmple- through groups?
nent this Idea? Informal Formal (organl-
rations)
Political Agencies
What kinds of political What kinds of
action would be necea- things could be done
sary to implement this Idea? by/through agencies?
Questions and Discussion
1. Have group give reports on TASK C.
2. "What are your recommendations for meeting future needs in
this area?"
3. "If you were the city planning commission, what guidelines
would you develop for consideration of future developments in this area?"
Clarifying Extending Time to Think


7 4
VIII.
IX.
COMMUNICATING FEELINGS, AWARENESS, AND VALUES
TASK D
Describe your part in implementing the action plan in TASK C as a member of a community action group,
as a part of the political decisionmaking process in your community.
Question and Discussion
1. Discuss individual comments.
2. "What type of community action can we take to identify and motivate
people to collect, interpret data, arrive at alternative solutions and take intelligent action to decide on the best solution consistent with the needs of the environment and society?"
IDENTIFYING A COMMUNITY USING THEMES
We have just investigated a community environment using a topical approach of land use categories.
Another way to identify and investigate a district or community is by looking at themes. Themes can become one way to identify and define an area to investigate.
Have each person describe in writing the four items below for their own community or neighborhood.
a. "Describe where your neighborhood is."
b. "How do you get inco your neighborhood?"
c. "What are some outstanding feacure3 of your neighborhood?"
d. "The central part of your neighborhood?" 1
Questions and Discussion
1. One set of themes include: (Have these themes & their definition on a chart.)
Pathways Line of movement (walks, bus routes, streets).
Nodes Small area of intensive focus where an observer may enter and feel a sense of belonging, safe, enclosed, (small park, courtyard, intersection, intimate shopping center).
Edges Linear breaks in continuity (freeway, river, edge of hills).
Landmarks Identifiable object or reference point (high rise building, fountain).
2. Now have each person identify which description of their community was a pathway, node, landmark, or edge.
3. If possible have a short (10-15 slides) slide presentation on examples of the themes from different scales and perspective.
"What are some themes in the area we studied yesterday?"
4.


75
5. "We want to study an area using the thematic approach, and the categories of pathways, nodes, edges, landmarks." Assign an area to each group; could lie the same area or new areas. Pass out TASK E approx. 1 hr. in the field.
TASK Z
Identify and analyze the themes in your assigned area. Describe in writing, sketch, or take pictures of the themes in the area. Analyze its problem and potential in the chart below.
Pathways Line of movement (walks, bus routes, streets).
Nodes Small area of intensive focus where an observer may enter and feel a sense of belonging, safe, enclosed,
(small park, courtyard, intersection, intimate shopping center).
Edges Linear breaks in continuity (freeway, river, edge of hills).
Landmarks Identifiable object or reference point (high rise building, fountain).
Dse the following chart:
THEME IT PROBLEMS TO
ITEM ILLUSTRATES COMMUNITY POTENTIAL TO COMMUNITY
6. Groups share results.
7. Some reasons for identifying themes include: (Have on chart)
1. If community has only one theme it is often a blah or boring environment.
2. If themes are varied and strong then you can have a strong exciting community environment.
3. If an area is dying out you might create nodes, points of interest, pathways, etc. to strengthen the themes in ways that contribute to the live-ability of the community.
4. You can identify a community or neighborhood by themes.
8. "Lets make a comparison of the two methods (thematic topical) of looking at an area, and relate to each other. Select 4-6 items in an area studied and describe them in thematic and topic terms: (For example)
Item Theme Topic
Park Node Recreation
Major Street Pathway Transportation


X. SUMMARIZING THE INVESTIGATION
76
1. "What procedures did we use in our investigation today?"
2. "What did we find out about the environment in our study?"
3. "How will this process help you when you have students
or community groups investigate things?" things?"
4. "How can we summarize our discussion and investigation?"
5. You may want participants to evaluate the session by writing how they felt about this session.
XI. SOME OBJECTIVES
Behavioral Outcomes In Knowledge
As a result of these activities, you should be able to:
Identify at least five different land use categories in an urban environment. Name and describe 3 themes often found in committees.
Construct a data collecting and recording tool for some part of an urban environment for data that is observable, collectable, and recordable.
Describe a procedure to use in initiating an urban environmental investigation.
Identify at least three component parts of an urban environment.
Describe four interrelationships that exist between component parts of the environment.
Behavioral Outcomes In Feelings, Awareness, Values, and Action
As a result of these activities, you should be able to:
Analyze factors and alternative solutions to present condition in an. environment.
Identify forces and change agents that can be u3ed for or against the improved liveability of the area.
Describe what you can do to become involved in community action programs of identifying and suggesting solutions to local environmental problems.
Describe how you and the community people can become involved in affecting the local political decisionmaking process through environmental urban investigations.
Describe 3 ways that themes can improve the liveability of a community.
Lifting Time to Thin Summarizing
XII. EQUIPMENT NEEDED
Maps of the urban area to be investigated Blackboard or newsprint easel Magic markers or chalk Paper and pencils
This lesson plan was developed for use in environmental workshops in June 1972 and revised in 1973, 1975. The people who developed and revised this plan Include: Charline & Ernie McDonald, Anne Heisler, Portland, Oregon.
The tasks and discussion topics in this lesson are designed so that many can be done individually or in combination depending upon the facilitators objectives and time constraints. *
* The discussion skills listed are examples of those necessary to carry out the lesson. Additional information on discussion skills are in the Lesson Plan for Developing Environmental Investigations in this series.


77
The information and procedures under the five following topics; Land Use Survey, Environmental Assets and Liabilities Survey, Community Facilities and Services Survey, Social Survey, and Micro-Urban Investigations are included to give additional ideas and considerations in developing the different components of a community survey.
UND USE SURVEY
1. Inventory and plot on map
liae cha major uses of land In the are*.
Croup cheat uaes Into appropriate categories.
Label the categories.
Develop a legend for plotting this data on the map.
2. Additional Information
DEVISE TOUR OWN METHODS TO COLLECT AND RECORD THIS DATA.
SUBMIT THE METHODS AND THE DATA, IN WRITING, TO YOUR CROUP LEADER AT THE END OP THE SESSION.
Hov does aach land use affect Che other land uses of the area?
What problem* exist because of certain land uses?
What land uae problems in this area are related to regional (Portland metropolitan area) environmental problems?
V things are being done to the land that are compatible with: ne characteristics cf the land?
_ the needs of the people?
Which land uses are changing?
What proposed projects could affect land use patterns in this area?
JOTE: The above questions are designed to help you look for significant relationships between things in the environment. Time may not allow you to investigate all of the suggestions. Therefore, you will have to decide which things are most significant in the time allowed. Please feel free to add to the list, throw It awav and start all over, etc.
Something to think about
For each of the land uses you investigate, ask yourself:
Is It in & good location to serve its purpose?
What does it do to the environment?
What kind of an environment does it have?
ENVIRONMENTAL ASSETS AND LIABILITIES SURVEY
1. Inventory and plot on map
List the environmental assets of the area, (physical and visual)
Examples:
historic landmarks, visual impact structures, natural features, aesthetically pjeaslng entrances, etc.
List Che environmental liabilities of Che area (phyaical and visual)
Lxa trpias:
conflicting land uses, high traffic streets, residential overcrowding, poor peving, curbs, sidewalks, adverse natural features, sameness of environment, etc.
Croup the environmental assets and liabilities into appropriate categoric! Label Che categories.
Develop a legend for plotting this data on Che map.
2. Additional information
DEVISE YOUR WN METHODS TO COLLECT AND RECORD THIS DATA.
SUBMIT THE METHODS AND THE DATA, IN WRITING, TO YOUR CRCU? LEADER AT THE END OF TK.r. SESSION.
Bow do the environmental assets affect the rest of the area? (be specific
How do the environmental liabilities affect the rest of the area? (be epee
Which environmental assets have potential for serving as building blocks t improving the liveability of this area?
What problems exiat because of adverse environmental factora in the area?
What environmental problems in this area are related to regional (Portland metropolitan area) environmental problems?
What proposed projects could affect environmental assets and liabilities in this area?
NOTE: The above questions are designed to help you look for significant
relationships between chings in the environment. Time cay not alio1 you to investigate all of the suggestions. Therefore, vou will have to decide which chings are cost Significant in chc time allows Please feel free to add to the list, throw it away and start all over, etc.
Somethlr.,-. to think about
For each of the environmental assets *Dd liabilities you investigate, ask yourself:
Is it in a good location to serve Its purpose?
What does it do to the environment?
What kind of an environment doo3 it have?
3. Summary questions on environmental asset? and liabilities
See questions and discussions after TASK D.


COMMUNITY FACILITIES AND SERVICES SURVEY
SOCIAL SURVEY
Inventory and plot or. map
Liat tha cosnunlty facilities and aervicea In chit area.
Croup Cheat facilities and aervicea Into appropriate categorlea.
Label Che categories.
Develop a legend for plotting thia data on the map.
Additional Information
DEVISE YOUR OWN METHODS TO COLLECT AND RECORD THIS DATA.
SUBMIT THE METHODS AND THE DATA, IN VRITtNC, TO YOUR CROUP LEADER AT THE END OF THE SESSION.
Lite the ueer groupe for each category In #1.
What raasona can you give for the locations of each of the cocminicy facilities and services you listed in #1?
What needs of the people are being et by these facilities and services?
What naeda are nct^ being aet by existing facilities and aervicea?
What probieoa are associated with the quantity and quality of cceanunity facilities and services in this area?
Which of these problems are related to regional (Portland aetropolitan araa) anvironmencal problems?
What proposed projects could affect Che use and effectiveness of community facilities and services in this area?
NOTE: The above questions are designed to help you look for significant relationship* between things In the environment. Time may not allow you to investigate all of the suggestions. Therefore, vou vi11 have to decide which things are most significant in rhe time allowed. Please feel free to add to cnc list, enrow it away and start all over, etc.
Something to think about
For each of Che community facilities and services you investigate, ask yourself:
Is it in a good location to serve its purpose?
What docs It do to the environment?
What kind of an environment does it have?
1. Inventory and plot on map
Collect information about Che population characteristics of the area.
Aga, income, education, size of families, renters-ovners, length of residence, ate.
Develop a legend for plotting this data on tha map.
2. Additional Information
DEVISE YOUR OUT.' METHODS TO COLLECT AND RECORD THIS DATA.
SUBMIT TRE METHODS AND THE DATA, IN WRITING, TO TOUR GROUP LEADER AT THE END OF THE SESSION.
What needs of the residents are Dec by living In this area?
What social problems exist in Che area?
Which problems associated with this area are related to regional (Portlaz aetropolitan area) environmental problems?
What changing conditions in the area are creating problems for its reaid
What proposed projects could:
affect the life-style of people in this area?
lead to a cr.ange in the population characteristics of this area?
What are che attitude* of the people in thia area toward: governmental and private services citizen needs
overall quality of life in the area? (See attached opinion poll) (questionnaire)
NOTE: The above questions are designed to help you look for significant relationships between things in che environment. Time may not al] you to investigate all of the suggestions. Therefore, vou will ha to decide wnlch things are most significant in the time allowed. Please feel free to add to the list, throw It away and start all over, etc.
MICRO-URBAN INVESTIGATIONS
In addition to major component parts or categories of an urban environment, chare are many opportunities for small individual environmental Investigations.
Investigations of this nature should be developed in writing along the same procedures as in this Lasson Plan.
^r* *re some suggeatad micro-urban environmental inveacigationa:
1. Correlation of observable weather conditions to air pollution index.
2. Correlation of man-made sounds to noise pollution.
3. Effect of signs and billboards on aight pollution.
4. Effect of architecture on aesthetics.
5. Impact of local shopping center on community.
6. Supermarket Survey (packaging, buying habits).
7. Interpreting the man-made landscape using architectural styles, etc.
8. Observe and record life in a park.
9. Under what conditions can plant life live in a blacktop environment.
10. Determine the different responses of water holding capacity and runoff tc different types of man-made surfaces.
11. Environment of a city tree.
12. Determine what is ir. a city block.
13. Noise pollution (determine wnere noises occur most frequently and determine city noises which can be reduced to minimize noise pollution).
14. Inventory and classify historic structures within the central business district of your noroetovn and determine necessities for their protection.
15. Identifying factors and developing tools to help in recording and interpreting air pollution indexes in the local community.


79
TASK A 3-Stage Data Collecting and Analyzing Chart Working in your group fill out the land use category and column 1 of the chart below. Land Use Category
Column 1 Column 2 Column 3
What we want to find out How to collect How to Record
about our land use the Information the Information
category in the area



TASK B ANALYZING FACTORS AND ALTERNATIVES TO PRESENT CONDITIONS
(TASK B is designed to brainstorm all possible alternatives.) List the factors contributing to the issue. Take each factor and ask: "How can we change this factor (eliminate, modify, substitute) to bring about a change in the issue?" Consider all alternatives, no matter how silly they may seem.
FACTOR HOW IT CONTRIBUTES TO THE PROBLEM OR ISSUE ALTERNATIVES TO ITS PRESENT CONDITION Select one or more alternatives below and describe how the factor might be changed. (Elimination Modification Substitution) DESCRIBE HOW THE CHANGE WILL EFFECT THE PROBLEM OR ISSUE
Example: Traffic Management
Width of streets Cause traffic jam Put in walking or bicycle paths Eliminate car traffic, cause changes in working-social patterns
One-way streets Ease congestion because of one-way flow
Mass transit Minimize number of vehicles, no congestion, less air pollution, etc.
Everyone start and quit work at same time Cause traffic jam Adjust starting, closing, working hours Spread out traffic over a longer period of time
Describe the alternative or combination of alternatives that might bring about an quality of the environment investigated. Give reasons for your choices. improvement or solution to the
After you have analyzed the factors in TASK B, then go on to TASK C.


TASK C DEVELOPING ACTION PLANNING TO BRING ABOUT AN IMPROVEMENT OR SOLUTION TO THE ENVIRONMENT INVESTIGATED
Select one of the solutions suggested by your group in TASK B. Write it below under "Suggested Solution" Complete the rest of the chart.
ACTION PLANNING FOR PROBLEM SOLVING
SUGGESTED SOLUTION TYPE ACTION NECESSARY TO IMPLEMENT THE SOLUTION IDENTIFY CHANGE AGENTS WHO COULD HELP IMPLEMENT THE SOLUTION IMPLEMENTATION STEPS TO PROBLEM SOLUTION EVALUATION METHODS-HOW WILL YOU FOLLOW UP AND EVALUATE THE EFFECTIVENESS OF YOUR ACTION?

(Write in solution suggested by your group in Task D) Technological What kinds of technological action would be necessary to implement this idea? Individual What kinds of things could be done through individual action? (What must be done?in what order?when? Steps Target Date 1. 2.
Social What kinds of social action would be necessary to implement this idea? Groups What kinds of things could be done by/ through groups? Informal Formal (organizations) 3.
Political What kinds of political action would be necessary to implement this idea? Agencies What kinds of things could be done by/through agencies?


82
TASK E
Identify and analyze the themes in your assigned area. Describe in writing, sketch, or take pictures of the themes in the area. Analyze its problem and potential in the chart below.
Pathways Line of movement (walks, bus routes, streets).
Nodes Small area of intensive focus where an observer may enter and feel a sense of belonging, safe, enclosed,
(small park, courtyard, intersection, intimate shopping center).
Edges Linear breaks in continuity (freeway, river, edge of hills).
Landmarks Identifiable object or reference point (high rise building, fountain).
Use the following chart:
THEME IT PROBLEMS TO
ITEM ILLUSTRATES COMMUNITY POTENTIAL TO COMMUNITY


83
Summary
* Designing of a map providing a graphic tool for marking locations on a neighborhood scale.
The following map (p. 84) drawn for North Denver, should allow mapping techniques to aid for recording of training and information. (See pp. 85-89 for simple examples.)


DIRECTION


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SUNNYSIDE / HIGHLAND NEIGHBORHOODS -STATISTICAL DIVISIONS-
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SUNNYSIOE / HIGHLAND NEIGHBORHOODS -STATISTICAL DIVISIONS-
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NORTH DENVER NEIGHBORHOOD


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PART FOUR
LEGAL RECOURCES
A mayor-council form of government was approved by the citizens of Denver in 1904, (present city organization, p.93 ). Denver's charter outlines in detail what its executive and legislative arms are permitted to do within the municipal government, (Denver Government, p. 94). The structure of Denver's charter provides for a non-partisian administration with no party affiliations on the ballot in municipal elections. The charter also defines in detail qualifications of officials, terms of office, method of election, and the powers delegated. Changes to the charter, municipal elections, petitions, franchises, initiatives, referenda, and other facts concerning city government may be found in the "Bill to Ordinance," p. 95.
The last major change in Denver government was the Speer Amendment which in 1916 made the city's mayor one of the most powerful city officials in the U S A.
Since 1951, by state law, city council has been permitted to submit amendment proposals to the electorate. In 1 976, an amendment was approved by the voters enabling the city council to submit amendment proposals not subject to mayoral veto.
Through the authority given by the city charter, the powers of the electorate (citizens with voting status) can legally participate in city government. They can:


91
1. Express opinions on issues to public officials.
2. Testify at public hearings.
3. Lobby special interests to influence legislators.
4. Be appointed to committees, commissions, and boards.
5. Work as volunteers for certain city facilities.
The formal powers of the electorate granted by the city charter are:^
1. Referendum
The power of the electorate to force a popular vote on an ordinance passed by city council. It requires a petition of qualified electors representing 15% of the last preceding total number of votes cast for mayor, and must be filed within thirty days after the effective date of the ordinance. If the ordinance is not repealed, the council must call an election within thirty days after the petition is filed.
2. Initiative
Initiative is the power of the electorate to initiate charter amendments or ordinances, including those requesting a special election. This also requires a petition of qualified electors representing at least 5% of the last preceding vote for mayor. An ordinance or charter amendment proposed in this manner must be approved without alteration by council, and if vetoed by the mayor, passed over his veto, and referred to the voters at an election sixty days after the petition is filed.
1The Denver League of Women Voters, Know Your Denver Government (Denver, Colorado: City and County of Denver, 1979), p. 7.


92
3. Recall
Any elected officer is subject to recall after six months in office. A committee of three persons must sponsor the recall petitions. To force a recall election, petitions must contain signatures of qualified voters equal to 25% of the vote cast for all candidates for that office at the election, either citywide or within a council district, in which the officer was elected, depending on the office involved. The petitions must be filed with the clerk of the council within 90 days after they were officially initiated, and the council must call an election not less than 60 nor more than 90 days after filing. At a recall election the incumbent's name must be on the ballot; other nominations may be made as at a regular election, and should the incumbent fail to receive the greatest number of votes, he or she is removed from office and replaced by the candidate receiving the greatest number of votes.


ORGANIZATION OF DENVER GOVERNMENT
93
LEGISLATIVE
BRANCH
CITY
COUNCIL
BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT ZONING
EXECUTIVE INDEPENDENT
BRANCH AGENCIES
JUDICIAL
BRANCH
I
MAYOR
DEPARTMENTS UNDER THE MAYOR
AGENCIES UNDER THE MAYOR
ELECTION
COMMISSION
AUDITOR
SCHOOL
BOARD
DISTRICT
COURT
PROBATE
COURT
JUVENILE
COURT
JUVENILE
HALL
Source: Denver League of Women Voters
JURY COMMISSIONER


Source: Denver League of Women Voters
CITY AND COUNTY OF DENVER GOVERNMENT
CITY COUNCIL
PEOPLE OF DENVER
INDEPENDENT AGENCIES
DENVER ART MUSEUM
NATURAL HISTORY MUSEUM
DE NV E R PUBl 1C l IBRARY
CAREER SERVICE AUTHORITY
Personnel Recruitment Training Testing Job Audits
DLNVER HOUSING AUTHORITY Low Income Housing Units
DENVER URBAN RENEWAL AUTHORITY
L and Condemnation
Renewal ol Depreciated Areas
DENVER OPPORTUNITY
OEO War on Poverty
BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS
ART MUSEUM BOARD Operate Denver An Museum
LIBRARY COMMISSION Operate Den Public Libraries
BOARD OE ADJUST. ZONING Hears Zoning Appeal Cases
PLANNING BOARD
Comprehensive City Plan Oversees Physical Development ol City
COMM COMMUNITY RELATIONS
Review SlaH Reports Hearings on Disturbances
MAYOR AGENCIES UNDER THE MAYOR


PARKS ADVISORY BOARD Paiks Planning
HEALTH AND HOSPITAL BOARD
Approve H & H Appomlmenl^ Oversee Department Operations
CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION
Police & Fue Recruitment Testing & Records
SOCIAL SERVICES ADVISORY BOARD
Planning
COMMISSION ON YOUTH
Advise and Counsel
CAREER SERVICE BOARD
Sel Personnel Policies Hear G'tevance Appeals
BD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS
Compiehensive Water Planning
. JL
NATURAL HISTORY BOARD
Operate Natural History Museum
ELECTION COMMISSION
DISTRICT ATTORNEY
EXCISE AND LICENSES
Business & L iquor L icense Weights and Measures
BUDGE 1 AND MANAGE ME NT
Prepare and administer Mayor s Budget
Management and Urban Research
ZONING ADMINISTRATION
Zoning Enforcement Zoning Amendments Process Zoning Appeals
DATA SERVICES
Computer Hardware EDP System Designs
RISK MANAGEMENT
City wide Accident & Workmen s Comp Programs Negotiate City insurance Coverage
Employee s accident health and tile programs
OFFICE OF POLICY ANALYSIS
Community Development Research and Legislative Liaison
OFFICE OF CITIZEN RESPONSE
Complaints and Suggestions from Citizens
PL ANNING OFFICE
Comprehensive City Plan Planned Building Groups Operational Planning
CITY ATTORNEY
Represents City m Court Legal Advice lo Mayor L egal Advice lo Council
COUNTY COURT
Trallic Fines Ordinance Violations Revised Municipal Code
COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANT ADMINISTRATION
Housing Public Facilities Environmental Review
COMMUNITY RELATIONS
Investigate Community Disturbances Race Relations Consulting
EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS
Maintain Shelters Mamlam Emergency Plans Stale CD Liaison Education and Training
COMMISSION ON YOUTH
Youth AMairs and Activities
CLERK AND RECORDER Marriage Licenses Administration A Legal Records
MANPOWER
Federal Employment Programs
I,.....~.....................................i
DEPARTMENT OF PARKS AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HOSPITALS DEPARTMENT OF SAFETY DEPUTY MAYOR
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS
FUNCTIONS PERFORMED FUNCTIONS PERFORMED FUNCTIONS PERFORMED FUNCTIONS PERFORMED
Development and Maintenance - City Paiks - Recreation Centers - Swimming Pools - Goll Courses Mountain Parks Cily Zoo Botanical Gardens Mile High Stadium Courtly Agenl s OHice Recreational Programs Cily Forester Coronet s Ollice Operation ol - Denver General Hospital - Neighborhood Health Program - Alcoholic Program Dog Pound Menial Health Clinics - Well Baby Climes - Pharmacy - Visiting Nurse Program E nvironmental Health - Contagious Disease Control - Epidemic Control -- Air Pollution Control - Health Inspections Fire Department Fire Prevention Programs Arson Invesligations Fire Alarm Headquariers Resuscitation Fire Fighting Pol-ce Department Crime Investigations Vice Control Community Relations Store Front Centers Precinct & Trallic Control Cily Jail Under sher ill County Jail Service ol Court Papers 911 System Transportation Services Stapleton loll A.rport Trattic Engineering Street Maintenance Street Lighting Trash Collection Sewage System Maintenance Design & Construction Engineering Land Ollice Building Department Building Permits Inspections -- Contractor Licensing Motor Vehicle Parking System
11 t
DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SERVICES DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE DEPARTMENT OF GENERAL SERVICES
FUNCTIONS PERFORMED FUNCTIONS PERFORMED FUNCTIONS PERFORMED
Child Welfare Assessment ol Properly Value Centralized Purchasing
Adoption Services Collection ol Properly Taxes Maintenance ol
Food Stamps Collection ot Sales J Use Taxes - Public Ollice Bldgs
Day Care Collection ol Head Tax - Theater
Aid lo Blind issuance ol Motor Vehicle Plates - Auditorium
General Medical Assistance Treasurer Arenas
Aid lo Needy Disabled Coliseum
Aid lo Dependent Children (AFDCl Commission on Aging Commission on Disabled Denve. Board lor Menially Convention Center Internal Office Services Payment ol Utilities
Retarded
Senior Citizens Out mg Program Senior Services Inc
LO
pr


HOW A BILL BECOMES AN ORDINANCE
Bill Initiated by
Council Committee or Councilman or Administration
I
Mayor-Council Meeting (Tuesday morning)
I
City Attorney (Preparation)
I
Filed in Council Office (by Thursday 2:00 P.M.)
1
Council Meeting (Monday Evening)
1st Reading
l
Killed* Passed and Ordered Published
95
Amended* and Ordered Published as Amended*
Killed*
Vetoes
I
Council Meeting (Monday evening)
Published (normally Friday)
I
Council Meeting 2nd Reading
Passed'
MAYOR
Killed* Passed**---------------
Published Becomes Law (normally Friday)
7 votes required to pass, defeat, or amend a Bill (both readings).
10 votes required to override Mayors veto.
Amended* and Amendment
Ordered Published'
I
Council Meeting 2nd Reading of Amended Bill
Killed* Passed* Amended'
Fails to Sign (within 5 days) '
Source: Denver League of Women Voters
I


Summary
Leaders will dampen open conflict and seek compromise.
Retain the auspice of a combined organization that represents a voting power greater than the petition needed to initiate charter amendments or ordinances.
Lobby for zoning and policy changes of the administration.


FINAL SOLUTION
The solution to the problem statement is to ultimately build clustered middle and lower income housing. The final solution to this report was to write the grant (pp. 98-126) to request the funds needed to purchase a land parcel for $65,000. If and when and in what modification will such a grant be approved, the first stage of a new era of cooperation will begin. Within two years after the allocation of the funds, housing could be designed and built for and owned by those who would live in them, in a continuous cooperative development. And it will perpetuate further neighborhood participation through its upkeep.


PROPOSAL TO
CDA
SUBMITTED FOR
Del Norte Neighborhood Corporation 3401 Pecos St.
Denver, Colorado 8021 1 (303) 444-4774
Contact: Ramona Elizalde-Hohl
FOR
Land Acquisition A Grant for $65,000
PROJECT
Del Norte Rowhouse Site
April, 1980
Prepared by C. Foster