Citation
Shore Park recreation facilities

Material Information

Title:
Shore Park recreation facilities
Creator:
Johnson, James Gilbert
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
15, [7] leaves : maps, color photographs, plans ; 22 x 36 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Recreation areas -- Planning -- Colorado -- Denver ( lcsh )
Recreation areas -- Planning ( fast )
Colorado -- Denver ( fast )
Genre:
bibliography ( marcgt )
theses ( marcgt )
non-fiction ( marcgt )

Notes

Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
General Note:
Cover title.
General Note:
Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree, Master of Architecture, College of Design and Planning.
Statement of Responsibility:
James Gilbert Johnson.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
10058091 ( OCLC )
ocm10058091
Classification:
LD1190.A72 1978 .J5377 ( lcc )

Full Text
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B ARCHIVES
118 ARCH STUDENT PAPER
ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN
AURARfA LIBRARY


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Thesis: "a position or proposition that, a person advances and offers to maintain
by argument" .
Webster
philosophy
problem statement
background and importance
objectives, hypothesis, parameters
synthesis
program
site information
site analysis
functional relationships
site plan
floor plans
sections, elevations
perspective views


'Truth is Life"
In its simple form, this statement seemed to affect the inner-most thread of my existence with deep meaning as I saw it inscribed above the mantel on a recent visit to the Frank Lloyd Wright home in Oak Park.1 As I contemplate an approach to my Masters thesis in architecture, I see a need for truth, and I see a need for a thoroughly comprehensive culmination of my six years of formal education in design. Troughout my education, I have developed certain convictions whose summary I feel is an important precedent to the further development of this thesis. After all, I must first try to define my convictions if I am to remain true to them.
To begin with basics, the following are two words that are used commonly in architecture*.
Art "human ingenuity in adapting natural
things to man's use..........a personal,
unanalyzable creative power" 2
Function "the action for which a person or
thing is specially fitted......or for which
a thing exists.... used to contribute to the ~ development or maintenance of a larger whole"*5
The many variables considered by a human scale design process such as architecture are related in a very rich sense, in that one is dependent upon another and they all contribute to a coherent whole, if the solution is to be optimally effective.
Nature radiates with a coherent sense that all of her elements are working together harmoniously.


The real beauty of nature is its ability to advantageously integrate variable elements toward the betterment of the whole, as described here:
"There is a direct relationship between the richness of a community and its stability.
The more niches there are in a community,
The more interactions are possible, and the greater will be the ability of the community to compensate for environmental stress; hence, the community stability will also be greater." 4
Theoretically, if men were to match the design talents of nature, then the more variables in the design problem, the greater the potential stability and effective functioning for the intended use.
Man has the ability to do this with his intuitive and creative talents. It requires a thorough knowledge of all the variables involved and their respctive requirements and attributes. The rich interaction found in nature can exist in a design solution if all the elements are known to each other and they all take advantage of the others to form a mutually cohesive whole.
The accomplishment of thisend in architectural terms is suggested:
'The search for realization is an effort to understand the required form so fully that there is no bnger a rift between its functional separation and the shape it takes. 5
Architecture differs from building. Both change the original face of the earth. But the earth in her virgin state is beautiful. When we replace nature, we must be careful; because building may have continuity in uniformity, but architecture has continuity in diversity, and it must have precedent over mere building if we are to go on replacing nature or manipulating it toward human needs.
It is important that architecture respond to the fundamental needs of man, because it is experienced so actively. No other art form offers the challenge that is the responsibility of the architect:
"a building is a meaningless abstraction when it is not considered along with people's expectations about it"6
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"The task of the architect.......is to help
man to find an existential foothold by concretizing his images and dreams."7
Such objectives are clearly never reached untill a building has been in use for a period of time long enough to be sure that it interacts advantageously with all of the variables within its environmental context, to foster a regenerative whole.
"a congruent environmental response is not a 'package plan'. It is instead a plan that uses the behaviors of the future inhabitants as the imperatives of design."**
Now that I have expoused those convictions as a philisophical basis of both life and architecture (the two are really inseparable), the specific problem at hand will serve as an example of my thesis.
1 951 Chicago Avenue, Oak Park, Illinois
2 Websters Seventh Collegiate Dectionary
3 Ibid.
4 W. B. Clapham, Jr. Natural Ecosystems
5 Christopher Alexander, Notes on the Synthesis of Form
6 Robert Sommer, Design Awareness
7 Christian Noberg-Shultz, Existence, Space, and Architecture
8 Constance Perin, With Man in Mind
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PROBLEM STATEMENT
The problem deals with the advantage of community living. Man lives in closely-knit civilization settings because he needs other people, for growth and fulfillment through social interaction.
Recreation is one such common need that can be satisfied at the community level through the common pool of taxation revenues.
The City and County of Denver actively provides and maintains recreation facilities within the city limits, for use by its taxpayers.
"the Denver Park system will continue to meet the demands of her citizens with an outstanding and progressive program of park and recreational facilities. "1
The need exists for one such facility in the southeast part of Denver near Parker Road and Havana Street. The 9.5 acre site serves as a link between Babi-Yar Park and the Cherry Creek valley open space corridor, and a setting for the approximately 32,000 square feet recreation facility that I offer as my thesis project.
VICINITY MAP
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BACKGROUND
Denver's park system began with a donation to the City of 7 acres in 1868, only ten years after the Gold Rush had begun to bring miners and settlers to the confluence of Cherry Creek and the Platte River.
The City grew rapidly with miners who found their fortunes and returned to the comforts of the city, and the homesteaders attracted by the land available for their families. With the growth came the need for more park lands. In 1913, the city passed a $2.5 million bond issue that helped to really get the park system on its feet.
Today the City and County of Denver Park system encompasses 3600 acres in over 150 city parks, 77 miles of parkways, and 13,500 acres of mountain parks. The city parks have 40 miles of bicycle trails with an additional 16 miles along city thoroughfares. There are six eighteen -hole golf courses, 31 recreation centers, and 19 swimming pools.
By the year 2000, the density of population in the metropolitan area is expected to reach 524 persons per square mile. Population densities in this regionhave increased by eight to 12 times faster than
state population densities during the 55 years between 1920 and 1975. This trend is projected to continue for the next 25 years.
IMPORTANCE
"The function of making accessible locally the various institutional facilities for daily living needs is, from the ecological standpoint, the chief reason for the existence of the communty."?
The comprehensive recreational program affords people of all ages, backgrounds, and interests the opportunity to engage in a variety of activites with the help of trained leaders and under conditions that assume maximum enjoyment and benefits. However, recreation is essentially a kind of experience rather than a set of specific activities.
Common recognition amoung recreation professionals sets the following as the "services provided" by a community facility: physical health, creativity, social interaction, supplementary education, family solidarity, and an alternative to delinquency. The general objectives of a typical program are:
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1) to encourage creativity and discovery
2) to help achieve a sense of mastery over oneself and one's environment
3) provide a context for achievement and satisfaction through participation
4) to allow for pleasure and enjoyment of oneself and fulfillment through group social encounters
Psychological research in the field shows that people's expectations about recreation are founded in basic human nature:
1) people expect recreation programs to happen at specifically designated places, and they come physically and psychologically prepared.
2) there are expectations of traditions and general rules to be followed
3) environments set a mood for having fun, they inspire an individual to excel or take risks
4) people respect an environment in which they feel they have a stake, or own part of
5) any change of environment can give a lift to the program
6) recreation programs need a space/structural identity to foster enthusiasm
1 Denver Parks, Department of Parks and Recreation, Joe Cianio Jr., manager
2 Roland C. Warren, The Community in America Sources*.
1 Buchner, Charles A. and Buchner, Richard D. Recreation for Today's Society, copywright 1974 by Prentice-Hall I nc.
2 Theibert, Richard P. and Ezersky, Eugene M.
Facilities in Sports and Physical Education copywright 1976 by the C. V. Mosby Co.
3 Tillman, Albert A. The Program Book For Recreation Professionals, copywright 1973 by the author
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OBJECTIVES
1) To provide for the highest degree of OBSERVATION of all activities as an inherent quality of experiencing the building.
2) To provide a TRANSITION from culture to nature and from outdoor to indoor to outdoor, such that the building serves as a L INK.
3) To COMPLIMENT the natural character of the site by using its inherent assets toward the best accomodation of various programmatic needs:
a) functional relationships
b) relation to societal scale
c) thermal integrity
d) elevation diversities
4) To provide the greatest DIVERSITY of activities in such a manner that they are richly related; that one is dependent upon another and they all contribute to a coherent whole.
HYPOTHESIS
If the greatest diversity of activities can be provided in a manner that they are optimally related in terms of the parameters, then the present and future needs of the community can be satisfied.
PARAMETERS
The following is a list of evaluation criteria by which each activity will be weighed against each parameter.
They are listed in order of importance.
A) Use of Equipment
This parameter is a measure of the degree of flexibility of the sport as controlled by the necessary equipment used.
3 fixed equipment
4 fixed, with movement around equipment 3 moveable specific equipment
2 free equipment that moves around 1 no equipment required
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B) Human Scale
This parameter is simply a measure of the particular scale that the activity responds to, assuming that the larger the scale, the higher degree of architectural constraint.
5 natural environment
4 social environment
3 movement
2 body
1 hand
C) Social Context
All activities are social in nature, the design objective is to promote socialbility, therefore privacy is not considered a constraint, rather the highest degree of spectator intrique.
5 organized active
4 formal competition
3 casual passive viewing
2 common interest groups I individual w/o spectators
D) Climatic Context
This parameter relates to the degree of exposure to the natural elements that an activity can withstand.
5 requires complete protection
4 seasonally indoor, feasibly outdoor
3 adaptable to either
2 seasonally outdoor, feasibly indoor
1 requires complete exposure
E) Area Requirements
This parameter is simply the area required to carry out the activity as established by conventional standards.
F) Visual Awareness
The degree to which the activity allows time for, or can be improved with a view of its context, or other activities.
5 extraverted, passive
4 individual freeform
3 50% active; 50% waiting for teammate
2 occasional viewing away
1 introverted, attention demanding
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G) Degree of Solar Exposure
This parameter concerns itself with the need for and relationship of an activity with direct sunlight.
5 requires maximum
4 favorably exposed
3 fixed north-south alignment
2 favors artificial light (constant)
1 glare prohibited, or requires protection
H) Vertical Movement (Slope)
This relates to the degree of vertical mobility achieved during the activity.
5 flat
3 medium
1 relatively high
I) Use of Water
This parameter assumes that those activities that share water requirements represent a requirement for functional adjacency.
3 adjacency to lockerooms/showers
4 water supply as part of an activity 3 sanitation restrooms
2 drinking water
1 occaisional wet maintenance
J) Requirement for Environmental Control This parameter relates to the need for extracting heat and moisture generated by the activity.
5 Heavy workout 580Btuh (Sensible) 870Bt uh
4 Moderate dancing 305 545
3 Walking; light work 260 260
2 Moderately active 240 200
1 Seated at rest 225 105
K) Overhead Clearance Height
Relates to established standards and comfortable interior proportions.
5 open
4 24' 0"
3 16'-0"
2 81 0"
1 not applicable
L) Degree of Maintenance
Degree of difficulty or relative frequency required for the use of skilled operators of power equipment, ranging to simple routine procedures.
5 carpeted and rubber matt areas
4 wet cleanup; sanitation; disinfectant 3 restocking consumable items
2 materials treatment 1 light routine dusting, etc.
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M) Requirement for Light Amount of illumination need at task.
5 80 100 4 60 80 3 40 60 2 20 40 1 5-20
footcandles
fc.
fc
fc
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In order to objectively evaluate each activity for each of the aforementioned parameters, local professionals were consulted. The decision was made not to interview potential users in the district, because of the possibility that their expectations may be lifted for a facility that, in reality, may not be constructed for several years.
To do this, the following directors and their respective facilities were visited:
Shelly Gorman
Washington Park Recreation Center
Lorrie Werner
Cook Park Recreation Center
Don Bruning
Eisenhower Park Recreation Center
Clyde Hendricks
Berkely Park Recreation Center
George Synder
Harvey Park Recreation Center
Rod Whitlock Recreation Supervisor Department of Parks and Recreation
In addition to these sources, two advisors of whom I am much appreciative are*.
John Dillavou, Landscape Architect Department of Parks and Recreation City and County of Denver
Mark Applebaum, Architect Seracuse, Lawler, and Partners Denver, Colorado
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90ft. x 7.5ft. 4 2 3 3 2 5 4 3 2 2 2 3 ARCHERY
15sq. ft./person 2 1 2 1 2 5 2 2 3 3 1 3 BACKGAMMON
20ft. x 44ft. 2 2 4 4 3 5 1 2 3 3 3 3 BADMITTON
350ft. x 350ft. 2 1 5 3 3 5 4 2 1 5 4 4 BASEBALL
50ft. x 94ft. 2 2 4 5 5 3 1 1 4 5 4 4 BASKETBALL
linear 1 1 5 4 1 3 4 4 1 2 5 2 BICYCLING
5ft. x 9ft. 2 3 2 2 2 5 2 4 5 3 2 4 BILLIARDS
24ft. x 24ft. 5 4 2 5 5 5 2 1 5 4 3 5 BOXING
120ft. x 9ft. 1 1 3 4 2 3 4 3 2 4 3 4 BROAD JUMP
15sq. ft. /person 4 4 2 1 4 5 1 4 5 2 1 4 CERAMICS
20sq. ft. /person 2 1 2 1 2 5 2 3 3 3 1 3 CHECKERS/CHESS
N/A 1 1 1 3 1 1 4 4 1 1 3 1 CLIMBING
20sq. ft./person 2 4 5 5 4 5 2 2 5 1 1 5 COOKING
50ft. x 95ft. 1 1 5 2 2 5 4 3 1 3 2 3 CROQUET
25sq. ft. /person 1 3 3 4 3 3 2 2 2 2 3 2 DANCING
24ft. x 35ft. 2 5 4 3 4 1 3 3 3 3 2 5 DIVING
60ft. length 1 1 5 4 2 5 2 4 1 2 2 2 DISCUS
15sq. ft./person 4 3 2 1 1 5 1 4 3 2 1 2 DRAWING
20sq. ft./person 1 2 3 5 3 1 1 2 3 1 2 1 EXCERCISES
55ft. x 8ft. 2 2 3 4 3 5 1 1 4 4 3 2 FENCING
60sq.ft./game 1 1 2 3 3 5 4 3 2 2 2 4 FOURSQUARE
35sq. ft. /game 2 2 2 3 2 5 2 1 5 3 1 5 FOOSBALL
160ft. x 330ft. 2 1 5 5 5 5 3 2 1 5 4 4 FOOTBALL
90ft. x 120ft. 2 4 4 4 5 3 1 3 5 4 3 3 GYMNASTICS
20ft. x 40ft. 2 4 4 5 5 3 1 1 3 3 3 5 HANDBALL
50ft. x 55ft. 1 1 5 3 3 3 1 3 1 4 3 3 HIGH JUMP
linear 1 1 5 4 2 1 1 4 1 2 5 1 HIKING
85ft. x 200ft. 2 3 4 4 5 5 1 2 3 5 4 5 HOCKEY
60sq.ft./game 1 1 2 3 2 5 1 4 3 2 3 4 HOPSCOTCH
50ft. x 10ft. 1 1 5 2 2 5 3 3 1 2 2 3 HORSESHOES
85ft. x 200ft. 1 3 4 3 4 5 1 4 3 3 3 5 ICE SKATING
15sq. ft./person 4 3 2 1 4 5 1 4 5 2 1 4 JEWELRY
linear 1 1 3 5 2 3 5 4 3 1 5 1 JOGGING
25ft. x 25ft. 5 4 3 4 3 5 1 2 5 2 3 4 JUDO/ KARATE
225ft. x 360ft. 2 1 5 5 2 5 3 2 1 5 4 5 LACROSE
15sq. ft./person 4 3 2 1 2 5 1 4 5 1 1 4 LEATHERWORK
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15sq. ft. /person 4 3 2 1 4 5 1 4 5 2 1 4 MOSAICS
15sq. ft. /person 4 3 2 1 4 5 1 4 3 1 1 4 PAINTING
15sq. ft./person 4 3 2 1 2 5 1 4 5 1 1 4 PAPERCRAFT
25sq. ft./person 1 2 3 3 3 3 4 4 1 5 5 4 PLAYGROUND
142ft. x 14ft. 1 2 5 3 2 5 1 3 1 3 3 3 POLE VAULT
20ft. x 40ft. 2 4 4 5 5 3 1 1 5 3 3 5 RACQUETBALL
1 2 3 3 2 1 1 4 3 3 5 2 ROLLER SKATING
lOsq. ft./person 1 1 3 5 2 3 1 4 3 2 2 1 ROPE JUMPING
15sq. ft./person 4 4 2 1 4 5 1 4 5 1 1 2 SCULPTURE
15sq. ft./person 4 3 2 1 2 5 1 4 5 1 1 5 SEWING
60ft. length 1 1 5 3 2 5 1 3 1 2 2 2 SHOTPUT
52ft. x 6ft. 2 2 3 3 2 5 3 3 2 3 2 5 SHUFFLEBOARD
linear 1 1 3 3 2 1 1 4 2 3 5 2 SKATEBOARD
linear 1 2 5 4 1 1 1 3 1 3 5 2 SLEDDING
225ft. x 360ft. 1 1 5 5 5 5 3 2 1 5 4 4 SOCCER
210ft. x 210ft. 1 1 5 3 5 5 4 2 1 5 4 4 SOFTBALL
25sq. ft./person 1 4 5 5 5 3 5 5 1 2 5 1 SUNBATHING
25ft. x 45ft. 2 4 4 5 5 3 1 1 5 3 3 5 SQUASH
50ft. x 25mtrs. 2 5 4 3 5 3 4 2 3 5 3 5 SWIMMING
5ft. x 9ft. 2 2 2 3 3 5 2 2 4 3 2 4 TABLE TENNIS
270ft. x 600ft. 2 2 4 5 5 3 1 3 3 4 5 4 TRACK
20ft. x 20ft. 2 1 3 3 2 3 4 2 1 2 2 4 TETHERBALL
60ft. x 120ft. 2 5 5 5 3 3 3 2 3 4 3 5 TENNIS
30ft. x 60ft. 1 2 4 4 3 3 3 2 3 3 4 3 VOLLEYBALL
15sq. ft./person 4 3 2 1 2 5 1 4 4 1 1 2 WEAVING
20sq. ft. /person 2 4 2 5 5 5 1 4 5 1 2 4 WEIGHTLIFTING
25sq. ft./person 2 4 2 2 4 5 1 3 3 1 2 5 WHIRLPOOL
15sq. ft./person 4 3 2 1 3 5 1 4 5 1 5 4 WOODWORKING
20sq. ft./person 1 5 4 2 4 3 4 4 2 3 2 5 WADING
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The matrix just shown is really just a very close study of the nature of the problem as seen through the eyes of the particular parameters that I feel are most appropriate to the solution. By virtue of deriving the matrix, and studying the problem in the last few months, I now hypothesize that the program that follows is optimum.
CONCEPT
An integration of the ability to OBSERVE all the activities while providing a TRANSITIONAL link from culture to nature, and from work and routine, to recreation and freedom.
PROGRAM
50 parking spaces located such that no one space is further than 350 feet from the main entry
Six Outdoor tennis courts (60'x 120')-fenced, lighted, and accessible from either parking or the building
Two combination softball/ baseball fields w/backstops
One combination soccer, lacrose, and football field: accessible from lockerooms and for spectators
Three Outdoor shuffleboard courts w/ seating and shade protection
One Outdoor combination field for: croquet, volleyball, badmitton, horseshoes, archery, and track and field events (60 feet x 95 feet)
One Outdoor combination surface for foursquare, hopscotch, and tetherball (350 square feet)
One Outdoor playground w/ swingsets, slides, and other equipment totalling 500 square feet
50ft. x 94ft. Gymnasium 4700sq.ft.
w/ circulation = 10' ends, 5' sides 1940
Six 20ft. x 40ft. Handball/ Racquetball Courts 4800
25 Meter Swimming Fbol 3690
(Six 7' lanes) w/ two one meter diving
boards, and 8ft. wide perimeter deck 2290


Sunbathing deck 800 sq. ft.
Two Lockerrooms, each containing 18 shower heads, 4 toilets, 4 lavatories 2500
Wet Crafts Rooms 1000
Dry Crafts Rooms 1000
Kiln, drying, and supply room 250
Game Room for table tennis, billiards, and foosball 900
Weightlifting room w/ fixed and moveable equipment 750
Multi-Purpose room w/ kitchen facilities and multiply divisible potential 1400
TOTAL
26020 square feet
Ancillary Requirements
Janitorial Supply Closets w/ slopsinks @ each level 350 sq.ft.
Equipment room for pool 400
Storage 1200
Mechanical Equipment 2400
Staff Lounge and locker facilities, director's office, control desks 430
Restrooms available to general public, 3 toilets and 2 lavatories each 225
Total Ancillary Total Ancillary plus Activities Add 10% circulation 5000 sq. ft. 31,020 3100
GRAND TOTAL
34,120 square feet


SITE INFORMATION
The 9.5 acre site lies 600 feet west of Havana street, with its northern border on the southern R. 0. W. of East Yale Avenue, which serves as the primary vehicular access.
The primary visual consideration on the site is that of the strong, valley bottom natural character. Large Cottonwood trees and a highly percolative sandy soil give evidence to the nearby Cherry Creek, situated 1500 feet to the southeast. The flowline of Cherry Creek is approximately 12 feet below the low point on the site. The entire area is protected by the dam upstream, so there is no floodplain restriction.
A combination of steep and gentle slopes characterize the diverse topography that varies 30 feet vertically across the 9.5 acres. Vegetation is Primarily an arid character with yucca, cactus, tumbleweed, and the like.
A large plateau running parrellel to the eastern border of the site screens traffic noise from Havana street.
The site serves as an excellent link to the Cherry Creek valley and its bicycle path that links this site into the overall park network via the highline canal. On the east, land is zoned BA4, permitting sales of vehicles, boats, trailers, and eating places. The western neighbor is medium density residential, and is partially occupied.
Utilities located in or near East Yale Avenue offer: 65-78 psi available water pressure: 7500 cubic feet/ hour of natural gas upon a probable wait of 16 months from time of application: adequately low 8" sanitary sewer to allow drainage from any point on the site: telephone and electric service.
Zoning regulations require a 20 feet setback on all sides, maximum fence height of 72", and one parking space per 600 square feet of building. The Denver Building Code applies. See next two pages for a more detailed site analysis.
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SHORE PARK RECREATIONAL FACILITY
JAMES GILBERT JOHNSON MASTER S THESIS MAY 1978
COLLEGE OF ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER


SHORE PARK RECREATIONAL
JAMES GILBERT JOHNSON
MASTERS THESIS
FACILITY
MAY 1978
COLLEGE OF ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN
UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER


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SHORE PARK RECREATIONAL FACILITY
JAMES GILBERT JOHNSON MASTERS THESIS MAY 1978
COLLEGE OF ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER





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SHORE PARK RECREATIONAL
JAMES GILBERT JOHNSON
MASTERS THESIS
FACILITY
MAY 1978
COLLEGE OF ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN
UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER