Citation
Program for Kustermannblock, Munich, West Germany

Material Information

Title:
Program for Kustermannblock, Munich, West Germany
Creator:
Naujokaitis, Linas
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
99 unnumbered leaves : illustrations, charts, map, plans ; 28 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Building sites -- Germany -- Munich ( lcsh )
Department stores -- Designs and plans -- Germany -- Munich ( lcsh )
Office buildings -- Designs and plans -- Germany -- Munich ( lcsh )
Hotels -- Designs and plans -- Germany -- Munich ( lcsh )
Building sites ( fast )
Department stores ( fast )
Hotels ( fast )
Office buildings ( fast )
Germany -- Munich ( fast )
Genre:
Designs and plans. ( fast )
theses ( marcgt )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Designs and plans ( fast )

Notes

General Note:
Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree, Master of Architecture, College of Design and Planning.
Statement of Responsibility:
Linas Naujokaitis.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
09250297 ( OCLC )
ocm09250297
Classification:
LD1190.A72 1979 .N38 ( lcc )

Full Text

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PROGRAM FOR KUSTERMANNJBLOCK MUNICH, WEST GERMANY
School of Environmental Design University of Colorado Denver, Colorado Linas Naujokaitis 1979


introduction


Munich originated as a Benedectine Monastary on the Tegernsee at about 750 A.D.
Due to an impulse, Guelph Duke Henry the Lion in 1157i destroyed the Isar River bridge of the Bishop of Freising and thus routed the salt trade from Salzburg over his bridge "bei den Munichen" (near the monks). Emperor Friedrich Barbarossa confirmed to the settlement Mdnchen the market and coinage right in 1158.
Munich's subsequent history was influenced by two important factors! the increase in the flow of trade to Europe and the succession of Otto von Wittelsbach to the Bavarian duchy in 1180. For over 700 years the Wittelsbach family was closely connected to the city's fate.
The structural foundations of the present old city were laid by Emperor Ludwig the Bavarian in the early 14th century after a disastrous fire in 1327* He erected a second city wall and rebuilt and expanded the town to the size at which it remained until the end of the 18th century. Remains of the wall are the Karlstor, Sendlinger Tor, and Isartor.
Under the elector Maximilian I (1597-1851)* Munich increased in wealth and size and saw the flowering of its Renaissance architecture. The Thirty Years' War, however, intervened. Munich was occupied by the Swedes under Gustavus Adolphus in 1632 and two years later a plague killed one-third of its population of 20,000.
Ludwig I, king of Bavaria from 1825 to 1848 planned and created modern Munich.


His architects established in their public buildings the style of Romantic Classicism, which is still characteristic of the city.
The 19th century was Munich's greatest period of growth and development. In the early part of the century Munich admitted Protestants to citizenship for the first time. By 1854 the population was 100,000 and by 1900, Munich had 500*000 inhabitants. Munich's cultural importance was enhanced when Ludwig II, by his championing of Richard Wagner, revived its fame as a city of music and the stage.
The rule of the Wittelsbach family ended with the abdication of Ludwig III in 1918. After World War I, Munich was the scene of intense revolutionary fighting, especially
in 1919 when the RSterepublik (Socialist Republic of Workers' and Soldiers' Councils)
\
was proclaimed. More significantly, the city witnessed the political activity of Adolph Hitler and the National Socialists in the 1920's.
In World War II, Munich suffered from 66 Allied bombing raids, with 43% of its buildings destroyed.
The old town of Munich,situated where the medieval trade routes crossed at the Marienplatz, is now a major business and commercial center. Among the architectural monuments that still stand are the Frauenkirche (1468-88) Munich's cathedral whose cupola capped towers are a city landmark and the old town hall (1470-80) in the Marienplatz. Nearby, the Peterskirche (H69), Munich's oldest church, which was completely destroyed in World War II, has been rebuilt almost in its original form.


Munich is situated in Upper Bavaria at an elevation of 530 meters. It is 50 km north of the edge of the alps and 110 km east-southeast of Augsburg. The city area covers 311 square km, extending 21 km from north to south and 27 km from west to east. The Isar River flows through the middle of the city.
Munich's population in 1970 was 1,300,000, 11$ of whom were non German. The metropolitan region, with an additional 1^0 communities, has 1,800,000 inhabitants. The population increases annually by 30,000, mostly by immigration. This trend is explained by the changes in economic structure by the Federal German Government, which has made Munich an important center of trade.
Munich's main industries include the manufacture of precision instruments and of optical and electrical appliances. Several major firms, including BMW and Siemans AG have their headquarters here. The brewing industry is traditional in Munich with about 88,000,000 gallons being produced annually. Also important is the production of foods, cosmetics, clothing, books, and films. Several large banking houses are located here as is one of the largest wholesale markets in Europe for produce. Tourism and the hotel business are important in Munich because of the number of trade fairs, exhibitions, and congresses. This was given prominence in the city's preparation for the 1972 Olympic
Game s.


PROBLEM STATEMENT i
"Kus t ermannblock"
The Kustermannblock is a mixed use urban design project in downtown Munich. The site is set between the Viktualienmarkt, the citys main outdoor market, and the Rindermarkt, an ancient livestock market, presently a park. The adjacency of the site to these two important historic and commercial areas and its proximity to the main shopping and pedestrian areas of downtown Munich makes the site an important one in the overall cityscape.
ISSUES i
The development scheme calls for; 5000 sq. meters Kustermann Department Store,
7000 sq. meters speculative office space,
an 80 room hotel,
and a passage through the block.
A turn of the century, neo-Renaissance building, which is presently part of the Kustermann*s store, is on the site. This building was one of the few buildings left standing in this part of Munich after the war and as such is protected by the Bavarian Land Office for Preservation of Historic Monuments. At the very least, the facade (which faces Viktualienmarkt) may not be altered in any way.
The heights of the existing buildings are limited to 25 meters to retain the dominance of the existing Gothic and Romanesque towers in the immediate vicinity.


Parking is an open question. There is a parking lot directly adjacent to Rinder-markt and an additional parking structure is planned adjacent to the Stadtmuseum. Some parking is desirable,however, for hotel guests.
GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
This is an interesting and complex urban design project. It is an important project for this area because of the commercial, historic, and cityscape aspects. The key to the success of this project is the passage.
The motif of the passage is an important one in downtown Munich. Competition is stiff. There are already two passages on the same block. The attractiveness and performance of the passage will enhance the success of the department store, the rentability of the office space, and the attractiveness of the hotel. This implies that the two termini of the passage, at Viktualienmarkt and Rindermarkt, are as important as the interior.
The hotel is intended to be of medium class expense, but since the site is somewhat exclusive, the option exists to make it a luxury class hotel with the expected amenities... restaurants, lounge, banquet rooms, etc. Munich is an important tourist, business, and convention city and is presently in need of more hotel rooms. Although part of the complex, the hotel should be separate for security reasons.


The office space is intended to be speculative. Anything from small professional offices to moderate size business concerns are expected to locate here.
The department store is simply a large retail space which also should be separated from the other functions of the complex. The store should be on as few levels as possible and have intimate access to delivery and storage facilities. Since the Kustermann concern is the motivating force behind this project and since the store has occupied a prominent site on Viktualienmarkt for the past 90 years, Kustermann's will remain on Viktualienmarkt in the present development.
The existence of the neo-Renaissance building adds the dimension of fitting it in, both functionally and formally.
This area of Munich was extensively bombed during World War II. The major historic buildings were restored or rebuilt. The others were were hastily built in the 1950's and I960's. These buildings, although visually complacent individually, make a very appealing ensenble. Munich has always benn a conservative town and this conservatism is surely reflected in the city's predominately bland architecture. However, since the 1972 Olympic Gamces, this architectural manifestation is changing. For 1972, Munich established an underground mass transit system, developed an extensive pedestrian area (both under and aboveground), and had buildings like Frei Otto's and Gunter Benischs Olympic Complex and Schwanzer's BMW Building go up.
This project is an opportunity to bring something new and exciting to a vital down-
town area.


SCOPE/LIMITS OF THE PROBLEM:
The project will remain within the limits of the site, with an emphasis on responding to the various site factors involved. As much as possible, the Bavarian building codes and regulations will be followed. The scope of the project will be limited to the design of the passage and hotel in detail. The other functions will be massed and designed schematically.
PERSONAL GOALSi
This project is a very typical problem in today's architecture. The list of constraints is considerable and the different functional requirements on a difficult site are complex.
This project deals with many of the problems that I have had to deal with in school so far. The aspects of site context, historic buildings, functions on a difficult site, interior and exterior design have many times been treated separately in different design projects. Here, they are all in the same project. Herein also lies a goodly challenge. For me, this is a perfect project... all the different aspects are appealling, fun, and difficult.
Also, one of the abilities of an architect should be to function successfully in different environments and cultures.


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Aerial Vie/v of Munich Looking North


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SITE CONSIDERATIONS j
The site is situated on a block between Rindermarkt, Viktualienmarkt, Rosental-strasse, and Im Talstrasse. Its adjacency to Viktualienmarkt and its close proximity to the main pedestrian area makes it a prime commercial zone. However, with the ped-estrianization of the street through Viktualienmarkt, the only street intersecting the pedestrian zone is immediately to the north of the site. In addition, the traffic ring that encircles the "old town" is immediately to the south of Viktualienmarkt.
This is an advantage in that the car access to the hotel can be accommodated on the southern edge of the site without seriously impeding the pedestrian traffic. It also means that the site is bounded both by heavy car traffic and by heavy pedestrian-only traffic.
There is a streetcar line going through Viktualienmarkt with a stop at the southwestern edge of the market. There is also a subway station at Marienplatz, directly to the north of the site.
Special consideration is given to the passage entrance on the Viktualienmarkt frontage. It should not interfere with potential entrances to the other functions, nor be in the immediate vicinity of the passage to the north of the site.
Munich's is a cool,damp climate. Extremes of temperature are rare, but precipitation is frequent with summer being the wettest season. Solar impact is considerable with the site's large southern exposure. Consideration of the impact will have to be


given to location of areas that could be sensitive to large heat loads, such as large glass areas associated with retail and lobby areas. The orientation does allow for the possibility of natural light into each space (a requirement under German code).
About ^0% of Munich's citizens own cars; and of the ^03*330 registered motor vehicles in the city (as of 1977), 91^ of them are privately owned passenger cars. To get cars off the streets, the city has constructed a number of parking lots and garages. There are (as of 1977) 13*000 parking spaces in this area of Munich, distributed among parking lots and underground and aboveground garages. There is a garage planned to the southwest of the site near the Stadtmuseum.


MUNICH WEATHER DATA
TEMPERATURE- DEG. C
Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
ELEVATION- 527 M. LATITUDE 48 08 N LONGITUDE- 11 42 E
PRECIPITATION- MM.
Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul AugSep Oct Nov Dec


NMARKT


Solar Angles 48' N Latitude
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Original Kustermann Store


Original Viktualienmarkt Facade
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Original Rjndermarkt Facade








Existing Viktualienmarkt Facade




KUSTERMANN'S s
The Kustermann Department Store has been on its present site since the 1890's. The Viktualienmarkt facade and structure of the neo-Renaissance building are all that remain of the original store. It would be appropriate to retain this building as part of the department store. The store itself should be just a large retail space on as few levels as possible. There should be major entrances from Viktualienmarkt and from Rindermarkt as well as a possible entrance from the passage. Adequate display area should be provided on all frontages. The store should have access to delivery and storage areas.




OFFICESi
The design of the office space is limited by the German regulation of having natural light in every work space. This limits the depth of an office to about seven meters from core wall to window (including corridor). The offices are intended to accommodate everything from medium-size business concerns to small professional offices. The typical building modules are 85 cm., 1 meter, and 1.20 meters.
Having operable windows in the offices could preclude the need for mechanical ventilation and air conditioning.




THE PASSAGE:
According to Johann Geist, in his book Passagen..., the definition of the 19th century passage is as follows (liberally translated):
The word "passage characterizes a connection between two busy streets...a shortcut through a block which is covered by a glass roof. Both sides of this connection are bordered with a sequence of shops. Subordinate to this, upper stories can be filled with more shops, offices, workshops, or living units. The passage is an organizational form of the retail trade. It resulted from a public demand on the private sector to lighten traffic, form easier connections, afford protection from the weather, and have areas exclusively reserved for the pedestrian.
The passage is an example of land speculation. Its success is wholly dependent on a cohesive urban design. It can only exist in the main shopping area of a city and only when connected with two large and busy streets.
The passage is always in an unconnected building with a specific ground floor. The visionary element of the passage is the passage space a specific inner space related to a specific outer space...a penetration of the outer to the inner and vice versa. The passage space should distinguish itself from the street so that it is evident that the passage excludes everyone except the pedestrian. This is done by altering the exterior facade at the entrance, having the protection of a glass roof, and having a symmetrical facade on the interior. The three elements...glass roof, symmetrical facades, and different levels, are in all existing and borderline examples of the passage building type.
The previous abstract pretty adequately describes the situation of the Kustermann passage. There are several major questions that have to be resolved successfully: nature of the entrances, extent of traffic, nature of traffic, store design, location of the level change, nature of the level change, connections, amenities, flooring, interior facades, and the design of the glass roof.


CROSS SECTION TYPES


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ENTRANCE:
The entrance typifies the passage and as such should be conspicuous. It should be clearly defined and provide a good view of the interior. Entrance doors should probably be excluded since energy saving advantages would be offset by their inconvenience due to the expected volume of through-traffic in the passage.
EXTENT OF TRAFFIC:
The passage is a main circulation route for those pedestrians wishing only to breeze through. It is also a main circulation for those shopping, working in the different functions that border the passage, and for those that simply wish to linger in the space. Anticipated heavy traffic in the morning and in the evening should be considered along with a desire to make the space as intimate as possible. The passage should be wide enough to accommodate the traffic and yet should be narrow enough to be personal. Side niches and courts should be provided for those who wish to linger. Typical widths of passages are from 7 to 20 meters.
CHANGE OF LEVEL:
There is a 3*5 meter elevation differential going from Rindermarkt to Viktualien-markt. Since the Rindermarkt frontage is only 22 meters, a reasonable place for the level change should either be on the Viktualienmarkt frontage (107 meters) or in the interior somewhere. For ease, escalators should be used, supplemented by either stairs or a ramp to handle peak traffic flow.


STORE DESIGN:
Stores try to be unique and appealling to their customers. The location of a store in the passage will already have a powerful effect on its potential success. It is possible to subordinate exterior uniqueness to an architecturally cohesive facade.
Problems that need to be planned for are? display of merchandise, housing and protection of the merchandise, space for store traffic, and storage of stock not immediately on display.
As this is not a totally retail oriented complex, the possibility of having a second level of shops should be carefully considered. The shops on the main shopping level could have second levels, connected by an interior stair.
CONNECTIONS:
The possibility exists of having entrances from the passage into the hotel, the department store, and the office complex. These connections should be conspicuous and yet not interfere with the major through circulation.
AMENITIES:
The option of having the passage weave through niches or courts leads to the possibility of supplying street furniture and landscaping. An outdoor cafe would be desirable, either run on its own or in conjunction with the hotel.


FLOORING:
The floor covering should combine the characteristics of attractiveness, durability, ease of maintenance and safety. It should contrast with the sidewalk paving on the frontages and be compatible with interior floor finishes (of the shops) and with the stairs and escalators involved with the change of level.
LIGHTING:
The glass roof should take careof most of the general lighting during the day. Additional general lighting, for nighttime and on cloudy days could be overhead lighting in conjunction with the glass roofing. Careful use of specific lighting should be used to emphasize merchandise display and the potential entrances to the other functions.


Viktualienmarkt
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GENERAL DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS:
In general a hotel is divided into six main categories; public, concession, subrental, food and beverage service, guest rooms, and general service. The major groups into which these fit are the "back of the house", which is the part of the hotel that the guest should never see. This includes all services that are provided the guest in one way or another. This is the area in which the staff operates preferably unseen.
The "front of the house" is that area which is open to the guests or the public.
At this point the few contacts between the guests and staff occur.
In a small hotel the staff to guest ratio would be approximately 0.8:1. Separation of staff and guest circulation is a major goal in the design of an efficient hotel.
The standards used for this hotel are for a deluxe, city center hotel. The anticipated major guest transportation would be either car or taxi.


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SPACE REQUIREMENTS:
Space
Number of rooms Elevators Guest Service Main lobby Front desk
Administration (manager,reservation, accounting,cashier,etc)
Rental space Banquet rooms Conference rooms Dining room and coffee shop Lounge and bar Specialty restaurant Kitchen, storage, and staff Public circulation space Public cloakrooms, restrooms
Mechanical rooms
or Number
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93 sq. m 20 sq. m 180 sq. m 70 sq. m ^00 sq. m 200 sq. m 160 sq. m 300 sq. m 93 sq. m 37 sq. m 130 sq. m


Space Area
Storage areas(general,furniture, baggage.records,stationery)
Workshops and maintenance
Receiving areas(checking office, garbage storage, freight elevator)
Housekeeping, uniform storage, linen room, valet facilities
Employee facilities(lockers.restrooms, lounge, personnel, timekeeping, payroll)
Circulation within service area
Guestrooms(private bath and entrance)
Single
Double
Circulation space(elevators,stairs, corridors, maids rooms)
or number
100 sq. m 37 sq. m
65 sq. m
93 sq. m
115 sq. m
93 sq. m.
20 sq. m 37 sq. m
900 sq. m


PORTE COCHERE:
The main entrance to the hotel should be located at a point that is easily visible to passing motorists and should have immediate access from the major east-west circulation. Since the major entrance is adjacent to a pedestrian area, the location of the driveway, turnaround, and parking entrance should be carefully selected so as not to interfere with pedestrian or traffic circulation.
Parking should be located so as to create a circular type circulation into and out of the parking area. A guest should be able to drop off a passenger and enter the parking structure without entering another circulation. Also he should be able to exit the parking area and pick up a passenger at the entrance without entering another circulation .
A normal porte cochere on the pedestrian frontage is not feasible because it would obstruct a public footway. A canopy, however, will provide a measure of shelter from
wind and rain.


BAGGAGE HANDLING AREA:
The main baggage handling area originates at the main entry to the hotel and terminates at the guests' room. Since a possible long circulation from the point of vehicular drop-off exists, it would be desirable to have a porters' station at this point. The baggage must travel from the entry to the elevators without crossing any major circulation. This can be handled in several ways. A baggage room can be provided where baggage could be temporarily stored and taken to the rooms at a later time, or a special entrance can be provided for the baggage. Both of these depend greatly on their success by virtue of the trust guests have in the hotel and its staff. To facilitate the handling of baggage, the outside porters'should be in visual contact with the elevators, desk, and entrance.


ENTRANCE :
The appearance presented by the main entrance and its approach is important since it tends to typify the hotel. The entrance is the first impression a guest gets of the interior space and should open vistas for him immediately upon entering.
Beyond the psychological impact the entrance can have, there are practical considerations that must be resolved. The entrance should provide some sort of protection for guests getting in and out of their cars or taxis. This can be accomplished by a canopy.
Air-lock type doors should be provided for the conservation of energy and protection from drafts. This type entry also provides a place for guests to wait for transportation with full view of the driveway. This area should be designed for handicapped access. The transition space should have a highly wear resistant surface so as to prevent the interior floor finishes from becoming abnormally worn by dirt brought in from the outside.


DESK AND RECEPTION AREA:
The major consideration of the desk is its location. It should be immediately visible upon entry into the hotel and be adjacent to the elevators. In a hotel of this size, the auxiliary functions of reception and information could be handled at the same place. Other functions include mail and key handling, greeting of guests, and verification of vacant rooms in the hotel.
Departing guests will also pay their bill in this area. This will normally be handled in a more private area adjacent to the desk.
The security involved in handling mail and keys will require a key clerk whose responsibility is to make sure keys are not given to unauthorized persons
A safe should be provided for the guests valuables. This will also be located in a private area and will have safe deposit boxes similar to those in a bank.


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CONDITION USE OF SPACE
FUNCTIONAL DATA
PSYCHOLOGICAL DATA
Types of activity
Frequency of use
Approximate time of use
Normal anticipated occupant load
Guest registration,Information,
Mail, Key control.Telephones, Safe, Room call service, Package storage Continuous-with peak probably occur-ing in connection with airline and train schedules.
Continuous with peak at morning and evening.
Variable
Capacity occupant load DEFINITION OF SPACE
Functional and perceptual designation
Public or private
Community or resident
Focal or supportive
Large or small
Open or closed
Flexible or fixed
Public
Central focus of lobby Small relative to lobby space Open and extremely' visible Fixed


PROGRAM DATA FOR Desk
PROJECT -Viktualienmarkt Hotel SOURCE
DATE
CONDITION
DEFINITION OF SPACE(CONT.) Subdivided
ACCESS AND CIRCULATION
FUNCTIONAL DATA
Subdivision between cashier, general office personnel, and reception, informat i on,re s e rvat i on.
PSYCHOLOGICAL DATA
Access control requirements
Acceptable methods of access control
Access to all but a few spaces to be totally restricted.
Physical barriers.
Required access to other spaces
Required circulation within space
Requires access to service elevators and all departments of the hotel.
Minimal requiring only access to all parts of counter and occasional1 circulation to general office space.
SECURITY
Security for whom or what
Potential problems to be alleviated
Acceptable methods of providing security
Practical expectations
Security required for key handling and mail
Miust not enable keys to get into wrong hands
Keys and mail to be kept behind desk and controlled by clerks
Difficult to totally control key dispersion by present acceptable means.


PROGRAM DATA FOR -Desk__________PROJECT-Viktualienmarkt Hotel SOURCE
CONDITION
SUPERVISION
Supervision of whom or what
By whom
For what purpose
Acceptable supervision techniques
MAINTENANCE
Maintained by whom and when
FUNCTIONAL DATA
Supervision of baggage, incoming and outgoing mail and porters.
To be supervised by head clerk
Maintenance of order
Verbal communication
PSYCHOLOGICAL DATA
Requirements for maintenance equipment
Appropriate finishes SAFETY
DATE
Special safety measures required


PROGRAM DATA FOR- Desk
PROJECT-Viktualienmarkt Hotel SOURCE
DATE
CONDITION FUNCTIONAL DATA
COMFORT AND QUALITY
Material,color.texture.quality Floor
Walls
Ceiling
Lighting
Visual and acoustic requirements
Hearing and ventilation reqd
Natural ventilation req'd
Type of exposure to exterior
Natural lighting reqd
Hours of direct sunlight into space
Views to outdoors
Near and/or distant
Access to outdoor space
Type of outdoor space
Resilient,longwearing material
Hard wearing material to resist abrasion.
Some form of accoustic damping. Both task and general required.
Some accoustic privacy required.
To conform to code requirements.
To conform to code requirements.
None required.
None required.
As much as possible into interior and desk area.
View to Viktualienmarkt and car access.
Only through main entrance.
PSYCHOLOGICAL DATA
Materials to be colorful so as to gain attention of people in vicinity and to call attention to the function of the space.


£§OGRAM DATA FOR- Desk
PROJECT-viktualienmarkt Hotel SOURCE
DATE
CONDITION
COMFORT AND QUALITY(CONT.) Views to interior spaces
FUNCTIONAL DAT;
PSYCHOLOGICAL DATA
View of main entrance and elevators required.
FURNITURE AND EQUIPMENT
Inventory of specific types and quantities of furniture.equip., mechanical and electrical fixtures req'd
Fixed or movable
Flexibility
Anthropometric considerations STORAGE
Minimal furniture... some stools for employees, equipment to include computer terminal files and telephones
Fixed
None required.
Sufficient space for several persons to conduct business at desk s imultane ously.
Supportive storage req'd Size,shape,capacity
SPACE RELATIONSHIPS
Storage for stationery and supplies
Size and shape variable, capacity approx. 1^- sq. m.
Other spaces with which there
Direct and open connection to lobby
is a primary relationship req'd
Other spaces with which there is a distinct secondary
\
Hotel offiqes.particularly cashiers and accounting


LOBBY:
The lobby can have great publicity value for the hotel due to its view from Viktual-ienmarkt and the street. This value.however, can be a detriment to the privacy of the guests. This aspect should be carefully considered before deciding on the type of glazing to be employed. The lobby can serve a dual function.Since it will be a large space, it has the possibility of becoming an exhibition space.
The lobby will be adjacent to some retail space in addition to hotel services. Since the hotel is in the midst of a retail area, this space will be a kiosk selling newspapers, tobacco, candy, and the like for the convenience of the guests.


ROGRAM DATA FOR- Lobby
PROJECT-Viktualienmarkt Hotel SOURCE
DATE
CONDITION
USE OF SPACE
Types of activity
Frequency of use
Approximate time of use
Normal anticipated occupant load
Capacity occupant load
DEFINITION OF SPACE
Functional and perceptual designation
Public or private
Community or resident
Focal or supportive
Large or small
Open or closed
Flexible or fixed
FUNCTIONAL DATA
Guest registration, kiosk, lounge, exhibition, general circulation to all parts of the hotel.
Continuous.
100
Several hundred
PSYCHOLOGICAL DATA
Large space should have at least a ceiling height of 1^-2 stories to aleviate a cavern-type atmosphere.
Public.
Focal point of circulation.
Large
Open as much as possible,some securi areas required within the space
Flexibility required for kiosk and
ty


PROGRAM DATA FOR- Lobby PROJECT" Viktualienmarkt Hotel SOURCE
CONDITION
DEFINITION OF SPACE(CONT.) Subdivided
ACCESS AND CIRCULATION
FUNCTIONAL DATA
PSYCHOLOGICAL DATA
Only a few required...desk area, hotel offices, kiosk
Access control requirements
No control required for public access
Acceptable methods of access control
Required access to other spaces
Required circulation within space
Access required to all major parts or hotel that are normally used by guests or public
Circulation to be open within space
SECURITY
Security for whom or what
Potential problems to be alleviated
Acceptable methods of providing security
Security required for desk area and retail space
See desk area See desk area
DATE
Practical expectations


-PROGRAM DATA FOR- Lobby
PROJECT-Viktualienmarkt Hotel SOURCE
CONDITION
SUPERVISION
Supervision of whom or what
By whom
For what purpose
Acceptable supervision techniques
MAINTENANCE
Maintained by whom and when
Requirements for maintenance equipment
Appropriate finishes
SAFETY
FUNCTIONAL DATA
Supervision of space by desk clerks and bell captain for guests entering and leaving Desk clerks and bell captain
Greeting of guests and handling of luggage. Prevention of non-payment of bill
Visual
Maintained by housekeeping staff.
Small storage area for janatorial supplies
Easily maintained durable finishes required.
PSYCHOLOGICAL DATA
DATE
Special safety measures required


PROGRAM DATA FOR-Lobby
PROJECT-Viktualienmarkt Hotel SOURCE
DATE
CONDITION
FUNCTIONAL DATA
PSYCHOLOGICAL DATA
COMFORT AND QUALITY
Material,color.texture,quality Floor
Walls
Ceiling
Lighting
Durable and high quality with minimal maintenance
Durable with textural quality
General low level lighting, incorporated with ceiling
Visual and acoustic requirements
Hearing and ventilation req'd
Natural ventilation req'd
Type of exposure to exterior
Natural lighting req?d
Hours of direct sunlight into space
Views to outdoors
Near and/or distant
Access to outdoor space
Type of outdoor space
Z --^ --- ^---
Visual access required to elevator:;, exits,and desk.Accoustical treatment should dissipate noise created by crowds.
No special requirements.
Exterior exposure required at exit:; only.
Minimal.Should be limited to areas where glare will not interfere with main circulation paths
View to Viktualienmarkt and possibly to the passage.
Fassage and Viktualienmarkt Direct and visible.


f^OGRAM DATA FOR Lobby
PROJECT-Viktualienmarkt Hotel SOURCE
DATE
CONDITION FUNCTIONAL DATA PSYCHOLOGICAL DTA
COMFORT AND QUALITY(CONT.)
Views to interior spaces
FURNITURE AND EQUIPMENT
Inventory of specific types and quantities of furniture,equip., mechanical and electrical fixtures req'd
Fixed or movable
Flexibility
Anthropometric considerations STORAGE
Supportive storage req'd Size,shape,capacity
SPACE RELATIONSHIPS
Other spaces with which there is a primary relationship req'd
Views required to all major circulation and to any special activi ties
Chairs, sofas, and coffee tables. Staffiseating and writing tables.
Moveable.
Flexibility required.
Vertical transportation, kiosk, and restaurants/lounge.
Other spaces with which there is a distinct secondary


HOTEL OFFICES:
The hotel offices are usually divided into three departments with some overlap in responsibility and service. The front of the house will include the cashier who will be responsibile for the payment of bills. The guests will have access to the cashiers' area. The reception desk will be the major contact between the staff and guests. The reservations department will handle all future bookings. This office has very little contact with the guests except in the case of error. Housekeeping has control over the maids and porter/concierge staff. The only public access required for this office will be for job interviews. Banquet sales is responsible for arrangements pertaining to large meetings and banquets and should be situated closely to these spaces.
The back of the house will include all the services that pertain to the internal functioning of the hotel. These persons will have no contact with the guests. The steward's department is responsible for the ordering of supplies for the normal operation of the hotel. The food and beverage department is responsible for ordering and maintaining an inventory of the food and liquor on hand.
Control is excercised by the accounting department which is ultimately responsible for the cash flow within the hotel.


PROGRAM DATA FOR-Hotel Offices PROJECT-Viktualienmarkt HotelSOURCE
DATE
CONDITION
USE OF SPACE
Types of activity
Frequency of use
Approximate time of use
Normal anticipated occupant load
Capacity occupant load
DEFINITION OF SPACE
Functional and perceptual designation
Public or private
Community or resident
Focal or supportive
Large or small
Open or closed
FUNCTIONAL DATA
PSYCHOLOGICAL DATA
General business of hotel...banquet sales.bookeeping,cashier.reception, reservations.housekeeping.
Daily during business hours
Normal use will be from 730-5*30.
5-7 persons
Same as above
Private with the exception of the cashier's office and the reception area.
Supportive
Small relative to adjoining spaces.
Slosed to lobby area but open internally.
Office space to be flexible.
Flexible or fixed


PROGRAM DATA FOR-Hotel Offices PROJECT-Viktualienmarkt Hotel SOURCE
CONDITION
DEFINITION OF SPACE(CONT.)
Subdivided
ACCESS AND CIRCULATION
Access control requirements
Acceptable methods of access control
Required access to other spaces
Required circulation within space
SECURITY
Security for whom or what
Potential problems to be alleviated
Acceptable methods of providing security
FUNCTIONAL DATA
Subdivided into approx. 10 sq. m areas
Access restricted to employees.
Access restricted to back of house.
Access required to lobby area and back of house
Easy circulation between offices and reception area v
Security control over records and safe .
Must control access to areas handling cash and collection of cash from various parts of the hotel.
Keyed access to area and routing of cash flow through back of house.
PSYCHOLOGICAL DATA
DATE
Practical expectations


PROGRAM DATA FOR- Hotel Offices PROJECT-Viktualienmarkt Hotel SOURCE
DATE
CONDITION
SUPERVISION
Supervision of whom or what By whom
For what purpose
Acceptable supervision techniques
MAINTENANCE
Maintained by whom and when
Requirements for maintenance equipment
Appropriate finishes SAFETY
FUNCTIONAL DATA
PSYCHOLOGICAL DATA
Supervision of guests entering or leaving.
Desk clerks
Control of keys, cash, and mail. Visual.
Housekeeping staff, at off peak hours.
Storage of supplies to be in back of house.
Durable.abrasion resistant, easily maintained.
Special safety measures required


PROGRAM DATA FOR-Hotel Offices PROJECT-viktualienmarkt Hotel SOURCE
CONDITION FUNCTIONAL DATA PSYCHOLOGICAL DATA
COMFORT AND QUALITY
Material,color.texture.quality Floor
Walls
Ceiling
Lighting
Visual and acoustic requirements Hearing and ventilation req'd
Resilient finish;low key.
Standard height with good accous tic properties.
General and task lighting required.
No special requirements.
Natural ventilation req'd
Type of exposure to exterior
Natural lighting reqd
Hours of direct sunlight into space
Exterior exposure desirable.
Permanent work stations require natural lighting.
Views to outdoors
Near and/or distant
Access to outdoor space
Type of outdoor space
DATE
- /*


£§OGRAM DATA FOR-Hotel Offices PROJECT-Viktualienmarkt Hotel SOURCE
DATE
CONDITION
COMFORT AND QUALITY(CONT.)
Views to interior spaces
FURNITURE AND EQUIPMENT
Inventory of specific types and quantities of furniture,equip., mechanical and electrical v.. fixtures req'd
Fixed or movable
Flexibility
Anthropometric considerations
STORAGE
Supportive storage req'd Size.shape.capacity
SPACE RELATIONSHIPS
Other spaces with which there is a primary relationship req'd
Other spaces with which there is a distinct secondary
FUNCTIONAL DATA
Views to lobby from some offices for control purposes.
Standard office furnishings;desk, chairs, and file for each office. Additional space for computer term u inal in bookeeping and reservations offices.
Moveable.
Flexible.
PSYCHOLOGICAL DATA
Storage required for stationery and office supplies.Immediate storage should be minimal;major storage to be on service floor.
Lobby and back of house
Service floor.


BAR AND LOUNGE:
The lounge and bar must be within the same space to be revenue earning. A lounge that is purely a seating area becomes a wasted space that a hotel cannot afford. The lounge area could be made to cater to special events or offer entertainment. The area should accommodate approximately 200 persons. Since this will be the largest bar facility in the hotel, it will be necessary for this area to also service the banquet rooms and room service.


PROGRAM DATA FOR-Bar and Lounge PROJECT-Viktualienmarkt Hotel SOURCE
DATE
CONDITION
USE OF SPACE
Types of activity
Frequency of use
Approximate time of use
Normal anticipated occupant load
Capacity occupant load
DEFINITION OF SPACE
Functional and perceptual designation
Public or private
Community or resident
Focal or supportive
Large or small
Open or closed
FUNCTIONAL DATA
PSYCHOLOGICAL DATA
General gathering place for hotel guests and public.
Most frequent use at end of the business day.
Same as above.
200 persons
Same as above.
Semi-private space should be divided into smaller,more intimate areas.
Should form a focal point for small gatherings.
Small,relative to adjacent spaces.
Relatively open with some closed spaces.
Flexible or fixed
Flexible.


PROGRAM DATA FOR-Bar and LoungePROJECT-Viktualienmarkt Hotel SOURCE
DATE
CONDITION
FUNCTIONAL DATA
DEFINITION OF SPACE(CONT.)
Subdivided
PSYCHOLOGICAL DATA
ACCESS AND CIRCULATION
Access control requirements Control required for bar and liquor
storage
Acceptable methods of access control
Required access to other spaces
Required circulation within space
SECURITY
Security for whom or what
Potential problems to be alleviated
Keyed access.
Access to storage spaces required.
General circulation for customers and staff. v
Security required for liquor storage Access by unauthorized persons.
Acceptable methods of providing security
Keyed access.
Practical expectations


PROGRAM DATA FOR-Bar and Lounge PROJECT-vi ktna 1 i pnmnrkt Hnt.pl SOURCE
CONDITION
SUPERVISION
FUNCTIONAL DATA
PSYCHOLOGICAL DATA
Supervision of whom or what
By whom
For what purpose
Acceptable supervision techniques
MAINTENANCE
Maintained by whom and when
Requirements for maintenance equipment
Appropriate finishes
SAFETY
Special safety measures required
Staff waiting on customers, Liquor
Bartender and steward. Adequate service of guests. Visual or verbal.
Maintenance of liquor supplies by steward. Bar by bartender.
Maintenance equipment to be located in back of house.
Water and burn resistant. Alcohol resistance desirable.
Non-slip floor behind bar.
DATE


PROGRAM DATA FOR-Bar and Lounge PROJECT -Viktualienmarkt Hotel SOURCE
DATE
CONDITION FUNCTIONAL DATA
COMFORT AND QUALITY
PSYCHOLOGICAL DATA
Material,color.texture.quality
Floor
Walls
Ceiling
Lighting
Visual and acoustic requirements
Hearing and ventilation req'd
Natural ventilation req'd
Type of exposure to exterior
Natural lighting reqd
Hours of direct sunlight into space
Easily cleaned.colorful.high quality.
Heavily textured;colorful Textured for accoustics.
Low level oriented to seating aress track lighting for flexibility.
Visual privacy for some areas, accoustics required to eliminate cross talk.
No special heating requirements. Sufficient ventilation to eliminate smoke from area.
None required.
Possible exposure to passage.
Views to outdoors
Near and/or distant
Access to outdoor space
Type of outdoor space
r\ J __


^OGRAM DATA FOR-Bar and Lounge PROJECT -Viktualienmarkt Hotel SOURCE
DATE
CONDITION FUNCTIONAL DATA
COMFORT AND QUALITY(CONT .)
Views to interior spaces
Possible views to lobby
PSYCHOLOGICAL DATA
FURNITURE AND EQUIPMENT
Inventory of specific types and quantities of furniture.equip., mechanical and electrical v. fixtures req'd
Fixed or movable
Flexibility
Anthropometric considerations STORAGE
Seating for 200 persons with tablep divided between 2,^,and 8 persons per.
Movable
Flexibility for decor change.
Supportive storage req'd Size.shape.capacity
SPACE RELATIONSHIPS
Other spaces with which there is a primary relationship req'd
Other spaces with which there is a distinct secondary
Storage for glasses,ice.wineracks, cigarettes.beer.
Lobby and banquet rooms.
Guest floors and exterior.


MAIN DINING ROOM AND COFFEE SHOP*
The main dining room will be the largest dining facility in the hotel. It will cater to both guests and the public. Access to the room should be both from the hotel and from the exterior to prevent the public from crossing the circulation of the hotel guests. The dining room should accommodate 300 people. V.
Since the space is so large and will probably not be used to maximum capacity at all times of the day, some method of dividing the room should be considered. The divisions should not affect the circulation of the waiters. The main kitchen should be in direct contact with the dining room without imposing its noise or odors.
In addition to the dining room area there should be a foyer for waiting customers. This could be shared with the lounge.
The coffee shop is to be adjacent to the main dining room and kitchen. This will enable the service of food directly from the kitchen and eliminate the need for a separate kitchen. When located next to the dining room there is the ability to seat the coffee shop overflow in the dining room.


PROGRAM DATA FOR-Dining Room
PROJECT-Viktualienmarkt Hotel SOURCE
DATE
CONDITION
USE OF SPACE
Types of activity
Frequency of use
Approximate time of use
Normal anticipated occupant load
Capacity occupant load
DEFINITION OF SPACE
Functional and perceptual designation
Public or private
Community or resident
Focal or supportive
Large or small
Open or closed
FUNCTIONAL DATA
PSYCHOLOGICAL DATA
Dining and entertainment.
Three times a day at meal times, however, the total area would be diminished by partitions twice a day.
3-4 hours per meal.
200 persons
300 persons
Public
Focal at certain times of the day.
Large to handle hotel guests and others in the complex.
Open with the exception of several private areas within the space. Flexible.
Flpvible or fixed


PROGRAM DATA FOR-Dining Room PROJECT-Viktualienmarkt Hotel SOURCE
CONDITION
DEFINITION OF SPACE (CONT.)
Subdivided
ACCESS AND CIRCULATION
Access control requirements
Acceptable methods of access control
Required access to other spaces
Required circulation within space
SECURITY
Security for whom or what
Potential problems to be alleviated
Acceptable methods of providing security
FUNCTIONAL DATA
One main access to control flow of patrons
Head waiter.
Direct access to kitchen and storage
General open circulation.
PSYCHOLOGICAL DATA
DATE
Practical expectations


PROGRAM DATA FOR-Dining Room PRQJECT-Viktualienmarkt Hotel SOURCE
DATE
CONDITION
SUPERVISION
FUNCTIONAL DATA
PSYCHOLOGICAL DATA
Supervision of whom or what By whom
For what purpose
Acceptable supervision techniques >
Waiters and guests Head waiter.
Control of seating and service. Verbal.
MAINTENANCE
Maintained by whom and when
Houskeeping staff at off hours.
Requirements for maintenance equipment
Maintenance equipment to be stored in back of house.
Appropriate finishes
SAFETY
Special safety measures required


PROGRAM DATA FOR-Dining Room
PROJECT-viktualienmarkt Hotel SOURCE
DATE
CONDITION
FUNCTIONAL DATA
PSYCHOLOGICAL DATA
COMFORT AND QUALITY
Material,color,texture.quality Floor
Walls
Ceiling
Lighting
Visual and acoustic requirements Hearing and ventilation req'd Natural ventilation req'd Type of exposure to exterior
Easily cleaned carpetting.
Scuff resistant with chair rail
Good accoustic properties to prevent cross talk
Low level to enhance atmosphere anc give some feeling of privacy.
Pleasant surroundings with minimal amount of lighting
No special heating requirements, sufficient ventilation to remove
smoke.
None required.
Not needed
Natural lighting req!d
N.A.
Hours of direct sunlight into space
Views to outdoors
Near and/or distant
Access to outdoor space
Type of outdoor space
Possible views to Viktualienmarkt and passage.


PROGRAM DATA FOR-Dining Room PROJECT -Viktualienmarkt Hotel SOURCE
DATE
CONI IT I ON
COMFORT AND QUALITY (CONT .) Views to interior spaces FURNITURE AND EQUIPMENT
FUNCTIONAL DATA
To be held down to a minimum.
PSYCHOLOGICAL DATA
Inventory of specific types and quantities of furniture,equip., mechanical and electrical y. u. fixtures req'd
Fixed or movable
Flexibility
Anthropometric considerations STORAGE
Supportive storage req'd Size,shape,capacity
SPACE RELATIONSHIPS
Modular tables to seat 2,^,6,or 8 persons.
Movable
Flexibility required for large groups.
Linen storage.
Sufficient capacity for one day's meals with direct access to additioi al storage on service floor.
Other spaces with which there is a primary relationship req'd
Guest floors, public spaces, exterior.
Other spaces with which there
is a distinct secondary


ROGRAM DATA FOR-Coffee Shop
PROJECT-Viktualienmarkt Hotel SOURCE
DATE
CONDITION
USE OF SPACE
Types of activity
Frequency of use
Approximate time of use
Normal anticipated occupant load
Capacity occupant load
DEFINITION OF SPACE
Functional and perceptual designation
Public or private
Community or resident
Focal or supportive
Large or small
Open or closed
Flexible or fixed
FUNCTIONAL DATA
PSYCHOLOGICAL DATA
Dining
IViajor use occurs once a day. 3-^ hrs. per meal 100 persons
150 persons Public
Supportive
Small
Open
Fixed


PROGRAM DATA FOR -Coffee Shop PROJECT--Viktualienmarkt Hotel SOURCE
DATE
CONDITION
FUNCTIONAL DATA
DEFINITION OF SPACE(CONT.)
PSYCHOLOGICAL DATA
Subdivided
ACCESS AND CIRCULATION
Access control requirements
Acceptable methods of access control
Required access to other spaces
Required circulation within space
SECURITY
Security for whom or what
Potential problems to be alleviated
Acceptable methods of providing security
Practical expectations
None
Access to main dining room and kitchen.
General.


PROGRAM DATA FOR-Coffee Shop PROJECT-Viktualienmarkt Hotel SOURCE
CONDITION FUNCTIONAL DATA
COMFORT AND QUALITY
Material,color,texture.quality Floor
Walls
Ceiling
Lighting
Durable.easily cleaned. Same as above
General
Visual and acoustic requirements
Hearing and ventilation reqd
Natural ventilation req'd
Type of exposure to exterior
Natural lighting req!d
Hours of direct sunlight into space
Views to outdoors
Near and/or distant
Access to outdoor space
Type of outdoor space
No special requirements. Same as above.
N.A.
N.A.
N.A.
PSYCHOLOGICAL DATA
DATE
r> s ,


£§OGRAM DATA FOR-Coffee Shop PROJECT-Viktualienmarkt Hotel SOURCE
CONDITION COMFORT AND QUALITY(CONT.)
Views to interior spaces
FURNITURE AND EQUIPMENT
Inventory of specific types and quantities of furniture,equip., mechanical and electrical v.. fixtures reqd
Fixed or movable
Flexibility
Anthropometric considerations STORAGE
Supportive storage req'd Size.shape.capacity
SPACE RELATIONSHIPS
Other spaces with which there is a primary relationship req'd
Other spaces with which there
is a distinct secondary
FUNCTIONAL DATA
PSYCHOLOGICAL DATA
View to lobby and main dining room desirable.
Adequate seating for 150 persons Service counter
Fixed.
No flexibility required.
All supportive storage to be in kitchen.
Kitchen and main dining room.
Lobby or main circulation.
DATE


KITCHENS:
The design of the kitchen is best left to a kitchen engineer, but the architect should have some familiarity with the requirements of the space so as to provide adequate area and services. The location of the kitchen be as close to the dining room that it serves as possible and preferably on the same floor. The kitchen requires large amounts of various types. This includes dry storage, liquor storage, and cold storage for meat, fish and fowl.
Within the kitchen will be a smaller work area that is dedicated to producing the bake goods for the hotel's restaurants.


KEY:
------- Personnel
....... Cooked food
--- Service to Restaurant
/\/Wv\ Food flow
TYPICAL KITCHEN LAYOUT:


FUNCTION ROOMS:
The function rooms (meeting, conference, banquet, and private dining rooms) will vary in capacity from approximately 10-400 persons. The use of the rooms will vary from day to day, so they should all be divisible and as flexibile as possible. The smaller meeting rooms will double as private dining areas and should,therefore, be as close to a kitchen or to vertical transportation as possible. The larger rooms will be used for small banquets, meetings, or exhibitions.


GUEST ROOMSi
The guest rooms are the most important part of the hotel and the one item most likely to determine whither guests will return. The comfort and quietness of this area is of the utmost importance to the guest. The efficiency of room service and how much the guest feels at home are also important considerations. The proportion of single rooms, double rooms and suites are important to the economic survival of the hotel. In most hotels there is a move to flexibility in accommodations. Rooms are of standard size with twin beds so that they can be used as singles or doubles. The other alternatives are combination rooms that have a standard bed and a h'ideabed-type couch which serves as a second bed,and interconnecting rooms which require double doors for sound isolation.
The suites are the most luxurious accommodations that are provided. They are usually twice the size of a typical room and have a definite separation between the living and bedroom space.
There is a possibility of balconies for the guest rooms. These are an amenity which is to be considered in light of their cost and the problems they create. The associated problems are those of security, wind, waterproofing and safety.


The corridors leading to the guest rooms are also an important factor. There is a choice of single or double loaded corridors. The single loaded corridor has the advantages of allowing natural light into the space and of short duct runs and natural ventilation. The double loaded corridor does not provide these amenities but does save 20% of the area at a cost reduction of 10-15$.
The length of the corridor is an important consideration for the psychological impact on people walking to their rooms. There should be an attempt to modulate the walls, ceiling and lighting so that the corridor has some interest. The maximum accepted length of a corridor is 50 meters to the elevator excluding fire stairs. Corridors longer than 25 meters will cause criticism.
A maid can service approximately 6 luxury rooms per shift. Therefore the number of rooms per floor should be designed to be a multiple of this number.


PROGRAM DATA FOR -Guest Rooms
PROJECT-Viktualienmarkt HotelSOURCE
DATE
CONDITION
USE OF SPACE
Types of activity
Frequency of use
Approximate time of use
Normal anticipated occupant load
Capacity occupant load
DEFINITION OF SPACE
Functional and perceptual designation
Public or private
Community or resident
Focal or supportive
Large or small
Open or closed
Flexible or fixed
FUNCTIONAL DATA
Rooms for guests and suites to accommodate small meetings.
Daily
2k hrs. per day 2-k persons
2-k persons
Private
Focal
Small
Closed
Fixed
PSYCHOLOGICAL DAI\
Room must be attractive and have a character that will make people want to return to the hotel.


PROGRAM DATA FOR-Guest Rooms PROJECT -Viktualienmarkt Hotel SOURCE
DATE
CONDITION
DEFINITION OF SPACE(CONT.)
Subdivided
ACCESS AND CIRCULATION
Access control requirements
Acceptable methods of access control
Required access to other spaces
Required circulation within space
SECURITY
Security for whom or what
Potential problems to be alleviated
Acceptable methods of providing security
Practical expectations
FUNCTIONAL DATA
Exist as subdivided spaces that can be expanded as the need arises.
Access by guedts and housekeeping staff only.
Keyed access.
Access to all other parts of the ho
Security to guests and their possessions.
Theft.
Proper key distribution,
PSYCHOLOGICAL DATA
el


PROGRAM DATA FOR -Guest rooms PROJECT-Viktualienmarkt Hotel SOURCE
DATE
CONDITION
SUPERVISION
FUNCTIONAL DATA
Supervision of whom or what
By whom
PSYCHOLOGICAL DATA
For what purpose
Acceptable supervision techniques
MAINTENANCE
Maintained by whom and when
Requirements for maintenance equipment
Appropriate finishes
SAFETY
Maintenance provided by housekeeping; staff. .
Maids on each floor.
Special safety measures required


PROGRAM DATA FOR- Guest Rooms PROJECT-Viktualienmarkt Hotel SOURCE
DATE
CONDITION
COMFORT AND QUALITY
Material,color,texture.quality Floor
Walls
Ceiling
Lighting
Visual and acoustic requirements Hearing and ventilation req'd Natural ventilation req'd
FUNCTIONAL DATA
Guest rooms are the center of the hotel's financial support and should therefore he of the highest quality materials and finishes. They shoulc be decorated in good taste.
Ventilation should be controlled within each room.
PSYCHOLOGICAL DATA
Type of exposure to exterior Natural lighting req!d
Windows with appropriate views to be provided. Operable sash desirable .
Hours of direct sunlight into space
Views to outdoors
Near and/or distant Possible view include Viktualien-
markt and the passage.
Access to outdoor space
Type of outdoor space
- e


SERVICE ROOMS s
The service rooms provide the support which maintains the hotel. Within this category are the engineering department which has the function of maintenance the environmental controls and general hotel maintenance.This department will employ approximately 6-10 people. There is a need for visual access from any office to the environmental controls. In addition there is a need for communication between all the employees and document storage.
The maintenance shop performs repairs of hotel furnishings and equipment. This area requires workbenches, a work area, temporary furniture storage and a security area for the storage of paint, spare parts, and electrical equipment. A major consideration in the location of this area is the noise that will be generated.
In conjunction with the loading dock, there must be a method of checking shipments and of controlling possible theft by the hotel's employees.


LAUNDRY AND LINEN ROOMSt
The laundry and main linen storage will be located on the service floor. The control and issue of linen will be under the direction of the housekeeping department. Linen will be issued from the main storage to smaller individual storage in the maid's room on each floor.
A valet service is to be provided which will require a method of storage and delivery from the guest rooms to the laundry.
The laundry area will require storage for 3 days' linen. Storage for uniforms, towels, and carts is also required. The linen chutes from the various floors must terminate at this location. Work space is required for repair and storage.







; / %
ZONING REQUIREMENTS:
1. This area of Munich is zoned for high density commercial, retail, and residential use.
2. All wastes which might cause dust, fire, or rodent infestation shall be stored in closed containers in a 2 hr. fire resistent, ventilated enclosure.
3. Pickups and deliveries shall be concluded before the commencement of the business day (700 A.M.).
4. Maximum gross floor area is 4.2 times the area of the lot (4.2 x 5010 sq. meters). This is excluding any mechanical floors or underground parking structures.
5. Maximum building height is 25 meters measured from the existing grade.
6. Utilities are located in the midpoints of Rindermarkt and the former Viktualien-markt 'streets.
7. City produced steam is available for the heating and cooling of living and work
spaces.


BUILDING CODES:
Occupancy Assembly rooms
Garages
Stores,offices, restaurants Hotels, apartments
Occupancy Separation
Garage
Assembly rooms 3 hr.
Garage
Stores, offices, etc.
Fire Resistance of ext, walls 2 hr. less than 6.5 m
1 hr. elsewhere
2 hr. less than 6.5 m
1 hr. elsewhere
2 hr. less than 6.5 m
1 hr. elsewhere
2 hr. less than 6.5 m 1 hr, elsewhere
Offices, etc.
1 hr.
3 hr.
Openings in ext, walls Not permitted less than 2 m Protected less than 6.5 m Not permitted less than 2 m Protected less than 6.5 m Not permitted less than 2 m Protected less than 6.5 m Not permitted less than 1 m Protected less than 6.5 m
Hotel 1 hr.
3 hr.
1 hr.


Requirements for assembly rooms greater than 300 people occupancy
Access to street required Main entrance to be on this access Sprinkler system required Ventilation
15 cc/minute fresh air 45 cc/minute per occupant


Exit requirements
Min. 2 exits if occupant load in excess of
sq. m/occupant
Retail stores
Ground floor 50 2.7
Upper floors 10 4.5
Offices 30 9
Assembly areas 50 .7
Conference rooms 50 1.35
Dining rooms 50 1.35
Parking 30 18
Hotel 10 18
Kitchen 30 18
Locker rooms 30 4.5
Mechanical rooms 30 27
Occupant load 500-999 minimum of 3 exits required Occupant load 1000 or more minimum ^ exits required Width of exits= occupant load/ 50* Minimum 1.2 meters


Fire stairs and corridors
3 hr. fire resistance required Vestibule 1.2 m x 2 m required
1 air change per minute with exhaust 150$ of supply Distance to exits
30 meters max., ^0 m if sprinkled All fire exits must exit onto a street.







BIBLIOGRAPHY:
Aloi, Giampiero, Hotel Motel, 1970 by Ulrico Hoepli, Milano.
Arens, Hans, Einladung nach Mttnchen, 1968 by Albert Langen, Georg Mdller Verlag GMBH, Mtinchen.Wien.
Bayerische Bauordung, 1973*
Callender, J.H. ed., Time Saver Standards: A Handbook of Architectural Design, 1966 by McGraw Hill, New York.
Fernandez, Jose, The Specialty Shop, 1955 by Architectural Book Publishing Co.,Inc.,
New York.
Geist, Johann Friedrich, Passagen, ein Bautyp des 19- Jahrhunderts, 1969 by Prestel-Verlag, Mtinchen.
Koch, Alexander, Hotelbauten,1958 by Alexander Koch GMBH, Stuttgart.
Lawson, Fred, Hotels.Motels and Condominiums: Design, Planning and Maintenance, 1976 by Architectural Press Ltd., London.
Longo, Gianni and Brambilla, Roberto, For Pedestrians Only, 1977 by Whitney Library of Design, New York.
Nagel,S. and Linke, S. ed., Hotel und Restaurant Bauten, 1970 by Bertelsman Fachverlag, Ltlbeck.
Pena, William, Problem Solving, 1977 by Cahner Books International, Boston.
Fames, Louis, Planning Stores That Pay, 19^8 by F.W. Dodge Corp.,
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