Citation
Winterun

Material Information

Title:
Winterun condominiums-community center
Uncontrolled:
Condominiums-community center
Creator:
Olason, Mark ( author )
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
1 electronic file (74 unnumbered leaves : ; harts, maps, plans) ;

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Recreation centers -- Designs and plans -- Colorado -- Copper Mountain ( lcsh )
Community centers -- Designs and plans -- Colorado -- Copper Mountain ( lcsh )
Community centers ( fast )
Recreation centers ( fast )
Colorado -- Copper Mountain ( fast )
Genre:
Designs and plans. ( fast )
bibliography ( marcgt )
theses ( marcgt )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Designs and plans ( fast )

Notes

Thesis:
Thesis (M.A.)--University of Colorado at Denver, 1979.
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references (leaf 74).
System Details:
System requirements: Adobe Reader.
General Note:
Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree, Master of Architecture, College of Design and Planning.
Statement of Responsibility:
Mark Olason.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
on10124 ( NOTIS )
1012402929 ( OCLC )
on1012402929

Full Text
Winterun
Colorado


Winterun
t '
Conclominiums/Community Center

Marx Olason Fall 1979
Thesis Preparation


Preface
Background
Program
General
The Site
Climate
Design Guides
Codes
Bibliography
Appendix
General
Design Parameters Soils
Water/Sewer




Preface
This Project is based on an August 1979 request by the Copper Mountain Development Association for submittals of design proposals for a recreation/ community center to be built in the Copper Mountain area. The information contained will serve to guide a design project required for graduation from the University of Colorado's two year Master of Architecture program.
Much of the information contained is in a preliminary form and subject to change and interpretation.




COPPER MOUNTAIN PUD REVIEW ______DECEMBER. 1978_______
BRIEF BACKGROUND OF THE PUD
Work with Summit County on the Copper Mountain PUD began in September of 1969 when CM Associates met informally with the County Commissioners to explain its intent to develop a resort on the property adjacent to U.S. 6 and Colorado 91.
Intensive planning of the area continued over a two year period resulting in the approval of a zoning request for the Copper Mountain PUD by the Regional Planning Commission on October 7, 1971. The Plan was approved by resolution of the Summit County Commissioners on October 18, 1971. A copy of the application upon which the approval was based is attached hereto as Exhibit "R".
OWNERS: 1. Copper Mountain, a Colorado Limited Partnership, was the
owner of record in 1971, and was succeeded in November,
1973 by Copper Mountain, Inc.
Copper Mountain, Inc. a Delaware Corporation, owns approximately 257 acres of the subdivision property. The Corporation's principal office is:
Box 1
Copper Mountain, CO 80443 Telephone: (303) 668-2882
2. Mr. and Mrs. Walter Brennan 15759 Sandtrap Way Morrison, CO 80465
Mr. and Mrs. Brennan own approximately 9.3 acres of property within the subdivision which is leased to the Corporation under a long term ground lease.
3. Mr. Eugene H. Sanders was originally shown as the owner of 10 acres within the original PUD area. This property was subsequently acquired by Copper Mountain, Inc.
4. Several lots within the subdivision are owned by Condominium owners (Lots 1 and 8; portions of lots 7 and 9, Block 2, Filing 2) and lot 4, Filing 3 are being purchased by Club Med.
LAND PLANNERS: Originally: Currently:
Beardsley-Davis Associates Denver, Colorado
Gage Davis & Associates Boulder, Colorado


COLORADO SUBDIVISION DEVELOPERS CERTIFICATE:
No. P 981
LEGAL DESCRIPTION:
A portion of Sections 19, 20, 29, 30, T6S, R78W and part of Section 25, T6S, R79W, 6th principle meridian, County of Summit, State of Colorado.
BREAKDOWN OF APPROVED USES;
900 Condominium Units (3,600 beds)
1,200 Hotel Rooms (2,400 beds)
550 Employee Units 2,650 Total Residential 170,000 Sq. Ft. Commercial
The application as approved by Summit County allowed 6,000 beds together with a number of incidental uses, in the village to accommodate an ultimate vacation and day skier population of 10,000-12,000 skiers per day. The plan provides fot 3,625 cars on the interior and 2,700 cars for day skiers in the east entrance parking lot.
The graphic illustration entitled "Preliminary Master Plan" as noted in introduction to the application was never intended as final definitive document, but as being illustrative of what could be developed.
The content of the application has been agreed to by the County and Copper Mountain and is fixed. Since development of the village is subject to economic and social factors which change with time, Copper Mountain wishes to continue to retain the prerogative of altering the structure and details of the Master Plan (See Exhibit "R").
The ability to make such refinements and adjustments is basic to the concept of the planned unit development process.
DEVELOPMENT GROWTH:
Year
1971
1972
Activity
USFS Permit received. Trail and Lift construction begun.
Zoning approved by County.
Opening of Copper Mountain for business, December 2, 1972. Filing No. 1: Road and Utility Development.
Completion of Lifts and Center facilities.
Condominiums: 2 projects, 182 condominiums, 27 employee units.


Year Activity
- Commercial: 40,877 Sq. Ft.
- Filing No. 2: Road and Utility Development.
- Development of tennis facilities, park and playfield.
1973 - Condominiums: 7 projects, 182 condominiums, 5 employee
units.
1974 - Condominiums: 2 projects, 55 condominiums, 9 employee
units.
1976 - Condominiums: 1 project, 16 condominiums.
1977 Condominiums: 1 project, 7 townhouses, 1 employee unit.
1978 Completion of first nine of eighteen hole golf course.
- Construction of Chapel and Community Center.
- Construction of new shop facilities.
- Condominiums: 1 project, 30 condominiums, 3 employee units. (Under construction 12/31/78)
- Filing No. 3: Road and Utility Development.
Completed to date:
13 projects, 343 condominiums, 45 employee units, 40,877 Sq. Ft. commercial.
Under construction and scheduled for completion in 1979:
Condominiums 3 projects, 75 condominiums, 14 employee units.
Commercial 4,000 Sq. Ft.
Number of Beds: (See EXHIBIT "A" Project Inventory)
Completed to date (343 Condominiums x 4) Under construction (75 Condominiums x 4)
Total Approved Percent Buildout EXISTING LAND USE INFORMATION
1,372
300
1,672
6,000
28Z
See EXHIBIT "B Existing Development Data


FUTURE DEVELOPMENT PLANS
A) The following development is projected to take place in the next 24 month period, assuming a strong economy and continuing good skier attendance.
1) Filing 3, Lot 4 Club Mediterranee. A 245 room year round, international destination hotel. It is proposed that this facility will include housing for up to 160 employees.
2) Filing 3, Lot 10 Copper Mountain Townhouses. 10 to 12 Townhouses.
3) Filing 2, Lots 6/7 Village Center. A proposed complex of commercial, office, condominium, and employee housing designed to provide a visible and active core for the village. First phase of construction will take place on Lot 7 and will include
a condo-hotel operation of approximately 100 rooms in 40 divisible units, commercial space, and a consolidated Copper Mountain office center.
4) 30-50 Room Hotel. Several projects are in the stage of feasibility study. Proposals center on at least three sites within the village.
5) Transportation/Transit Center. In conjunction with the introduction of new village shuttle equipment, the remote parking lots at the east entrance will be utilized and a structure will be constructed to handle ticketing, restrooms, lockers and sheltered waiting areas to serve transient skiers. This will be the first of 2 or 3 such installations.
6) Design for expansion of present 9 hole Golf Course to 18 hole Executive Course and construction of clubhouse and equipment storage area.
B) Trade for U.S.F.S. lands
1) Copper Mountain is pursuing the potential trade of land north of 1-70 for lands south of the fee land.
SKI AREA
A) Last Season Statistics 1) Capacity
(a) Comfortable: Copper Mountain, under full operation, limits ticket sales to approximately 7,000 skiers per day.
(b) Maximum: Current lift capacity can move in excess of 10,000 skiers per hour.
(c) Potential: Design projections and operating experience indicate that when completed, Copper Mountain can accommodate 12,000 skiers per day.


2) Percent of Transient/Destination
i
(a) 45% Transient Skiers.
(b) 55% Destination Skiers.
Approximately one-half of all destination skiers stay in accommodations at Copper Mountain. The majority of the remainder are housed at various locations in Summit County. See EXHIBIT "C" Accommodation Characteristics excerpted from Copper Mountain Skier Survey -1977/1798.
3) Skier Days by Month 1977/1978
November 5,977
December 89,554
January 107,597
February 99,059
March 136,625
April 34,575
1977/78 Season Total 473,387 Skier Days 1976/77 Season Total 269,152 Skier Days 1975/76 Season Total 340,255 Skier Days
4) Problems: None
5) Parking Spaces: The Plan calls for 3,265 parking spaces within the village area, of which 1,610 spaces are to be structured facilities, and the balance of 1,655 spaces to be surface. In addition, another 2,700 spaces are to be established at the eastern perimeter of the village for day skier parking.
Current covered parking space capacity is 310 and limited access condominium lot capacity is 298. Space on interior lots is graded and used as needed according to demand. Total designated temporary lots are adequate to handle 2,000 vehicles.
See EXHIBIT "D" Copper Mountain Condominium Parking Study,
December 27, 1977 February 19, 1978.
Future Plans
Within the next 24 months Lifts "A" and "C-l" (See Exhibit "E", Copper Mountain Master Plan) will be installed, thus expanding trail area on eastern slopes of the Mountain and the beginner area.
An additional Mountain Restaurant with approximately 400 seats is being studied for construction in the "I" and "J" Lift Area. The purpose of this facility will be to provide better service for skiers and alleviate mid-day congestion in base area.


The village shuttle system will be improved and expanded, providing better access to four designated lift staging areas and to disperse traffic.
5. SPECIAL HAPPENINGS
A. The construction of Interstate 70 through the Copper Mountain area resulted in the taking of 27.6 acres of land north of U.S. 6. Copper Mountain, after the 1-70 construction, retained ownership to 26.3 acres, in two parcels, north of 1-70.
The Colorado Highway Department has provided access to the parcel north and west of the interchange from the Colorado 90 off ramp.
In addition, the Highway Department has notified Copper Mountain that if utilities are to be provided to this area by the "open cut" method, it must be done during the summer of 1979 while the west bound lane of 1-70 over Vail Pass is being constructed.
While attempts will continue to be made to trade these parcels to the U.S. Forest Service for land adjacent to the south boundary of Copper Mountains land, there is no guarantee that this can be accomplished. Therefore, permits for construction of a utility corridor from the north parcels to the south parcels will be sought.
B. Copper Mountain is involved in any number of "Special Happenings" each year. These may take the form of such items as:
- St. Louis University Summer Play Series
- CMC courses
- World Cup Races
- Special Olympics
- National Championship Ski Races
- Airline Weeks
- Colorado Philharmonic Presentations
A continuing and ongoing promotional program is pursued to generate the levels of business consistent with the development of the village
6. EMPLOYEES
A. How many employed? In what capacity?
Permanent Full Time Seasonal Part Time
91 272 129
A detailed explanation of job function is attached as EXHIBIT "F" Copper Mountain, Inc. Total Employees as of November 27, 1978. In addition, the businesses in the community employ additional employees


Employee Housing
1. Total number of units 45
2. Ownership Approximately eight of the units are owned by individuals employed at Copper Mountain; nine are owned by various Condominium Associations for their managers and employees, the remainder are owned by private individuals for investment and are rented to employees.
3.
4.
Controlled Rental Rate: $.51/SF/Month $.47/SF/Month
Square Footage: 300 400 4
400 500 2
500 600 10
600 700 17
700 800 5
800 - 1,000 4
1,000 - 1,100 3
Total 45
Furnished
Unfurnished
5. Estimated capacity of existing units: 108 Beds
Units under construction: 33 Beds
6. Occupant Type (Principal Tenant):
Administrators 2
Administrative Staff & Clerical 5
Food Services 3
Village Operations 4
Mountain Operations 6
Property Managers 7
Private Business Employees 7
Misc. 9
Total 45
7. Requirements to Rent: Principal occupant of unit must be employed
by Copper Mountain, Inc., or private business within village, for minimum of at least 30 hours per week during period they are occupying unit.
8. Development Schedule: New employee housing units will be provided
according to a formula determined by planning techniques. Each lot is assigned a specific number of employee units based upon the amount of commercial, hotel, or condominium units to be constructed. Approximately


130 employee units are scheduled for construction as part of projects being planned for the next 24 months. 14 employee units are currently under construction.
7. POPULATION ESTIMATES
A. First and Second Homes Estimates:
Approximately seventy percent of the condominium units at Copper Mountain are owned by residents of Colorado. Approximately sixteen percent of all units are owned by individuals that report addresses within the County.
B. Occupancy Rate of Second Homes, Lodging, and Employee Units:
210 units are included in the Copper Mountain rental pool. Occupancy rates for this group were 68.3% in the winter season of 1977-78 and 11% for the summer season. Total occupancy is higher than this since occupancy nights are only counted when the units are occupied by persons other than the owner.
C. Projections:
The rental pool management estimates winter occupancy will approximate 75%. Summer occupancy will increase in the next five years as year-round facilities and convention activities are established in the village.
8. TRANSPORTATION
A. Inner Area Circulation:
Copper Mountain maintains a village shuttle system which runs within its own transportation easement. Vehicles run on a regular schedule through the village during the ski season. In early 1979, new, more efficient and comfortable equipment with larger capacity will be added. Capital improvement plans for 1979 include the construction of a new transit center in the remote parking area. The system is designed to receive skiers in the east lots and transport them to the four base centers strategically located at the foot of the mountain. The system continues to run after peak periods to handle evening circulation through the village.
B. County Circulation:
1. Ski the Summit Bus Copper Mountain participates in the Ski the Summit Bus System and provides vehicles for its operation which serve the major residential centers of the County. (See EXHIBIT "G" Ski the Summit
Bus Schedule)
2. Employee Bus Service Four schedules are maintained to transport employees from locations within the County and Leadville to Copper Mountain each day during the winter season. (See EXHIBIT "H" Copper Mountain Employee Bus Schedule)


C. "Airport" to County
Copper Mountain assumes that the majority of tourists arriving in the County from the airport in Denver come by rental car or commercial bus. Survey data indicates that 34% of the guests arrive in Colorado by commercial airlines and that approximately 9% of our guests arrive by rental car, while 1% use scheduled buses. (See EXHIBIT "J" Transportation Characteristics). Continental Trailways maintains a depot at the Information Center and provides regularly scheduled service including airport express service.
RECREATION FACILITIES
A. Existing (See EXHIBIT "E" Mountain Master Plan)
Winter 48 Trails
8 Double Chairlifts
82 Acres of Snowmaking on "F" and "G" Lifts
Trails Downhill" 55 miles
Trail Variety: 25% Novice and Beginnner
60% Intermediate 15% Expert
Cross Country Touring: 18 Km.
Summer 6 Championship Tennis Courts 9 Hole Executive Golf Course 2 Volleyball Courts Rugby/Soccer Field Riding Stables Bike Path
B. Future
Winter 9 Additional lifts have been approved in the Mountain Master Plan together with attendant trails.
Summer Approximately 24 Tennis Courts (Indoor and Outdoor)
Completion of 18 Hole Executive Golf Course
Athletic Club To include: swimming, racquet ball, hand
ball, track, gym facilities. This may be accomplished through the Metropolitan District.
C. Various other recreational programs are in existence and planned for the future i.e., tennis and race camps, cross country and touring programs, summer recreational programs such as kayaking, backpacking and fishing tours, men and women's softball leagues, sailing on Lake Dillon, etc.


D. Rates Basic
1) Skiing
Adult Full Day
$ 12.00
Child Full Day
5.00
2) Ski School
All Day Lesson 10:00-3:30
$ 12.00
Half Day Lesson 12:30-3:30
9.00
3) Winter Activities
(See EXHIBIT "J" Winter at the Mountain)
4) Summer Activities
(See EXHIBIT "K" Summer at the Mountain and EXHIBIT "L" Copper Mountain Golf and Racquet Club)
Approximately one third of the PUD is maintained as public open space. Included in this area are the recreation facilities noted in number 9 above. Also included is the stream easement which runs through the village.
Open space on each individual lot is provided and maintained under the Development Guide and Protective Covenants of the PUD.
11. LANDSCAPING
a) Standards
See EXHIBIT "N" Copper Mountain Planning and Architectural Control : CMP AC.
b) Operating Plan
Under an agreement with the U.S.F.S. Copper Mountain transplants specimen stock from trail areas into public areas of the village. Designated locations within the plan are highlighted for development each summer. In 1978 the east entrance and The Center Mall were completed. A landscape planner is employed on the staff to manage these projects. In 1979, the lake areas, east parking lots and Copper Road will be highlighted.
10. OPEN SPACE
a) Public
b) Private


12.
SIGNAGE PROGRAM
Copper Mountain adheres to the Summit County code for street signage, and maintains its own code and implementation procedures for commercial and residential project graphics and sign criteria. (See EXHIBIT "P" Copper Mountain Revised Graphics and Sign Criteria). In 1979 a new program for mountain graphics and signage will be instituted. If successful, it will be reviewed with the County.
13. PARKING
See EXHIBIT "D" Copper Mountain Condominium Parking Study, December 27, 1977 February 19, 1978.
14. PROBLEMS None
15. SPECIAL AREAS Fire Protection:
The Center and Mountain Restaurant are both fully protected by U.L. approved sprinkler systems, as are the enclosed parking areas in the condominiums.
A New Emergency 1, 1,000 GPM Pumper and a LaFrance Pumper are maintained by the Metropolitan District for use in the area.
A professionally trained volunteer fire department, staffed primarily by employees of Copper Mountain, serves the area. Each member of the department is equipped with communications equipment while at the mountain to assure rapid mobilization in the case of a fire.
Maximum distance in developed areas between fire hydrants is approximately 400 feet.
All new construction must conform to the most recent and stringent National Fire Code requirements for its occupancy type.
Water and Sewage Treatment:
Facilities are provided by the Copper Mountain Water and Sanitation District. Design work is currently underway for the expansion of the waste water treatment plant to handle future needs including sludge thickening. It is anticipated that this construction will be completed in 1979.
16. MAPS
Existing and proposed Land Use Plans See EXHIBIT "Q" Copper Mountain Development Status.




Recreation Center
Swimming Pool
Length 75 ft. Apron 8 ft. min. Width 4 lanes Apron 8 ft. min. Storage chlorine
Athletic Facility
2 Handball/Raquetball courts
Weight room/excercise (men)
Weight room/excercise (women)
Locker room/sauna/shower (men)
Locker room/sauna/shower (women)
Golf cart storage (15 carts min.)
Office
Ticket booth (2 booths at 100 sq.ft, ea.) Retail space
100
6385 sq.ft.
1600 sq.ft.
^50 sq.ft. ^50 sq.ft.
600 sq.ft. 500 sq.ft.
750 sq.ft.
200 sq.ft.
200 sq.ft.
1500 sq.ft.
Restaurant
Seating area (18 sq.ft./person) x 100 Bar (15 sq.ft./person) x 50
Kitchen
1800 sq.ft.
750 sq.ft. 1000 sq.ft.
Total Recreation Center = 16,185 sq.ft.


Condominiums
One bedroom unit
Bedroom 120 sq.ft.
Bath i+5 sq.ft.
Living room 168 sq.ft.
Kitchen 80 sq.ft.
Dinette 64 sq.ft.
Deck 32 sq.ft.
Storage ^5 sq.ft.
Halls/etc. 36 sq.ft.
Total 590 sq.ft.
Two bedroom unit
Master bedroom 120 sq.ft.
i Bath 30 sq.ft.
2nd Bedroom 100 sq.ft.
Living room 168 sq.ft.
Kitchen 80 sq.ft.
Dinette 64 sq.ft.
Deck 32 sq.ft.
Storage 50 sq.ft.
Halls/etc. 40 sq.ft.
Total 684 sq.ft.
Parking
1.5 cars/unit = 18 cars x 300 ea.= 5400 sq.ft. Mechanical soace 360 sq.ft.




Swimming Pool
Construction The location of the pool must be on the
ground floor of the facility for structural reasons. The pool may be of poured concrete construction or may be a prefabicated metal unit.
Materials The surface of the pool shell should be of
a light colored easily maintained material.
It should be slightly abrasive to prevent slipping. Wall and deck finishes shall be of masonry, tile or other inert and impervious material and shall be reasonably enduring.
The finish shall be moderately smooth and of a white or light color. The ceiling may be of any construction capable of withstanding high heat and humidity. Glass surfaces must accomodate moisture and fogging.
Equipment Lines shall be painted on the bottom of the
pool surface to provide for racing uses.
Lane ropes shall be provided (with a storage area). A lifeguard chair must be provided for each 2000 sq. ft. of pool surface area. Ladders shall be provided for each 75 feet of pool perimeter.
A one meter diving board shall be provided for use in a diving area of the pool.
A separate 100 sq. ft. chlorine room shall be provided and adequately vented.
Not less than one drinking fountain shall be provided around the pool.
No electrical wiring for lighting or power shall be permitted to pass overhead within 20 feet of the pool surface.
The Space The location and orientation of the pool is an important factor in recreational design. The pool must have direct access to the locker room/shower facilities. A dynamic space (especially in a high snowfall region) can be created by having good visual access to the outside. This orientation also aids ventilation and lighting. Care must be taken, however, to avoid glare across the pool caused by the sun or bright lights.


General
Another desirable feature is to provide a public viewing area above or around the pool so patrons may inspect the facilities at any given time.
The minimum depth of the shallow end of the pool shall be 3*0. The minimum depth of the deep end shall be 8'6". The minimum height of the ceiling over the pool shall be 20'0". The length of the pool shall be 75'0. The width shall be 30'0, An 8'0" minimum skirt is required around the pool.


Locker Rooms
General
Construction -
Materials
Equipment -
Lockers
Capacity and operation of the locker room must be such as to avoid over crowding at times of maximum demand although some over crowded conditions may be more desirable than large or uneconomical facilities. The locker rooms should be centrally located with direct access to the pool and easy access to other facilities.
Resistance to fire and deterioration is especially important. The constant dampness and use of detergents which usually prevails is harmful to many materials. Tile or sealed concrete is most desirable with finishes that are easily maintained. Floors should be pitched to central drains. Minimum 1" hoses should be provided for cleaning purposes.
Materials and finishes that are easily maintained is foremost in locker room design.
Assuming 12 sq. ft. of pool for each person and other facilities at full occupancy, Winterun locker rooms must accomodate a max of 300 persons, 2/3 of these may be assumed to be mens.
1 Shower ea. 40 people 1 Lav. ea. 60 people 1 Toilet ea. 40 women 1 Toilet ea. 60 men 1 Urinal ea. 60 men
Two types of lockers shall be provided. Storage x 12" x 124".
Dressing 12" x 12" x 72".
Each bank of lockers has 18 storage and 6 dressing lockers. 8 banks will be provided in each locker space (Men's and Women's). Other equipment provided may include hair dryers, exercisers, scales and vending machines.


The Space The method of checking clothes must be decided before the layout can be determinded, as the method chosen affects the entire arrangement. Regardless of the system adopted, however, dressing and locke rooms should be arranged to admit maximum sunlight and air in order to maintain clean, sanitary conditions. The locker room space should be easily accessible from the entrance of the recreational facility but care should be taken to prohibit shightlines directly into the dressing areas.
Another desirable feature for the Winterun Recreational Facility is to provide access directly into the facilities restrooms for easy use by skiers and golfers.


Restaurant
General The restaurant facility for Winterun is to be a cafeteria type of operation serving skiers, golfers and those people using the recreation center. The average load of the facility is 100 persons at 18 sq.ft, each. The cafeteria line will serve between ^ and 8 patrons per minute establishing seating requirements of 2^0 to ^80 persons per hour. At an average turnover of 15 minutes, 120 seats maximum are needed.
Kitchen Based on an estimation of ^ sq. ft. of
preparation area per meal, 960 to 1920 sq. ft. of kitchen area will be required at Winterun. Counter height in the kitchen shall be 3^", and aisle widths are 36" for one and ^2" for two workers. Serving areas are set at widths of 1V0" for workers and patrons and average counter lengths are 30 32 feet (min. 20').
Food storage space required for 30 days may be taken as half of the total persons served per day. An average loading dock is 8 ft. deep and 12 ft long.
Refrigerated storage may be estimated at 15 to 20 cu. ft. of storage per 100 meals or .25 to .50 cu. ft. of walk in space per meal. Frozen storage may be .1 to .3 cu. ft. per meal served. Aisles for walk in storage should be ^2".
Miscellaneous kitchen areas include space for washing mobile equipment, space for emergency cleanup equipment and space for major cleaning equipment.
Employee facilities may include a locker and lounge area, toilets, showers, time recording equipment, dressing areas and a separate employee entrance.
Other restaurant facilities include waiting areas, cashiers stations, coat checking and telephones. These areas will be included at Winterun as necessary.
Construction
& Materials Construction techniques of the restaurant
facility must, of course, coincide with code


requirements and methods appropriate for mountain design. Materials used in the restaurant will be subject to unusually high wear from ski boots and abusive "hurry in, hurry out" patrons.
The Space The restaurant space must at all times appear as clean and cheerful with full views of surrounding mountain activities. After a day on the slopes or golf course patrons of Winterun will be in need of a warm and comfortable place to reflect on their recreational experiences.


Bar
The Winterun Bar will be primarily a nightime spot catering to the Copper Mountain Apres Ski crowd.
The bar will be subject to the same physical abuses as the restaurant but should strive to create a pleasant informal atmosphere. The need for views and orientation to the outside is less than the restaurant. The only food served in the bar will be munchies, etc. Storage space will be approximately 100 sq.ft.
Sauna/Hydro Spa
The sauna/hydro spa must be within the locker room spaces to provide direct access by Winterun patrons. The sauna shall be a concrete unit with cedar interior siding. The hydro spa will be of prefabricated construction. Ventilation equipment must be provided to adequately exhaust heat and steam.
Raquetball Courts
The length and width of the raquetball courts shall be 40'0" and 20'0" respectively. The height shall be 20'0". Construction shall be concrete with a wood playing surface. Lighting should be from a non-glare source and must not interfere with the play of the game. Courts should have a close proximity to locker rooms.
Daycare
Space shall be provided to care for the young of visiting skiers and golfers. Emphasis should be placed on safety and enjoyable experiences for the youth.
Office
Office space shall be provided for sale of lift tickets and supervision of the recreation center. The office should have a central location and direct access to the public facilities.


Golf Cart Storage
Winter closure of the Copper Mountain Golf Course necessitates the storage of the facilities golf carts. Space for the storage of at least 15 vehicles and space for repair work shall be provided. Vehicles must have easy access to and from the storage spaces.


Condominiums
General
Construction
The Space
The Winterun Condominium units will be designed to serve a variety of sking parties. Comfort, ease of maintenance and access are major considerations in the condominium design. The condominiums are to be designed as an integral part of the recreation center with common walks, building masses and design features.
Construction techniques and materials will be chosen to "fit" with other existing condominium units and Copper Mountain facilities. Durability to a harsh environment must be considered along with energy conscious design.
The condominium units will include fireplaces, decks, carpeting and other desirable mountain amenities. Views will be an important selling point along with orientation to the sun. The units are planned as a second rather than primary home, A vacation atmosphere will prevail in the design of the condominiums. Care will be taken to provide economy with variety.




EXHIBIT
u
COPPER MOUNTAIN
mountain master plan


^ i'r ,ilfi'.? \

COPPER MOUNTAIN PROPERTIES
Preliminary Site Plan Program Key
g.b. bear{lsl3y associates- planning consultanls
Legend
_ first phase C-7 floors iW- 5 floors I I' 2-4 floors L i- single floor
Juna 23, 1970


i






SUMMARY OF MONIMLY CLIMATIC DATA FUR DILLON PREPAH^D by TMC COLORADO Cl IMA TULOO I ST ot
, JAN
monthly precipitation iinj ave. 1.19
MAX. A.Ob
MIN, .13
MONTHS OF RECORD 47.
GREATEST DAILY HHECIP (IN) AMOUNT ,69
YtAR AND 0AY195627 MONTHS OF RECORD 30.
MONTHLY SNOWFALL (IN) AOE, 22.2
MAX. 59.0
MIN. 2.0
MONTHS OF RECARO 44.
GHTST DEPTH SNUW ON GHND In MON (IN) 22
yEar AnD oxymora MONTHS OF HECORO lb.
NO DAYS PRECIP GTR OH to 0.1 IN AyE. 3.A
MAX. 10
MONTHS OF hec£rA 2J?
NO DAYS PRECIP OTR OR tU 0.5 IN AVL, .1
MAX. I
MIN. 0
MONTHS OF RECORD 24.
NO DAYS PRECIP GTR OR EO 1.0 IN AvE. 0.0
MAX. 0
MIN, 0
MONTHS OF RECORD 24,
NUMbEH OF DAYS WITH HAIL AyE. 0.0
MAX. 0
MIN, 0
MONTHS OF HtCOHD 22.
NO. OF DAYS Mild SNOW ON GROUND AvE. 20.b IGTH OH EO 1 INCH ON GROUND) MAX. 31
months OF MIN, RECORD lb 15.
MONTHLY TO!AL lNO (MILES) AVE. 99.
MAX. 999
MONTHS OF MIN, HECOHO 999 0.
TOTAL PAN EVAPORATION (In) AVE, 99,90
MAX. 99.90
MONTHS OF MIN, RECORD 99.90 0.
E COLORADO LAST DATA
AHTMENT OF ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE, COLORA
FED MAR AMR MAy JUN JuE
1.20 1.72 1. 6.97 A.HI 6.01 3.06 3.10 5.09
.1* .36 .*5 . 19 .13 .53
*7. 47. A/. 47. 47. 47.
7bblbU 30. .HO *97!4. 1 tu 196124 20. 1.20 197609 20. .92 19b316 30. 194985^ 30.
21.9 26.6 20.9 7.5 . .9 0.0
n.3 59.0 55.0 24.5 14.0 0.0
6.3 b. H.O 4$. 0.0 46. 45? W 0,0 4).
34 26 10 6 3 0
76b02. 16. 196527*19620b*1977jb. 197400 29. 30.
'iS 4.7 9 'li 'lo btS
0 1 1 i 0 2
20. 23. 23. 22. 24. 24.
.1 .3 .3 .5 .2 .6
1 1 2 2 2 2
0 0 0 0 0 0
24. 2A. 24. 24. 24. 24.
0.0 0.0 0 .0 0.0 0.0
0 0 I 1 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0
24. 2A. 24. 24. 24. 24.
0.0 0.0 0.0 . ) .7 .7
0 0 0 4 3
0 0 0 0 0 0
22. 22. 22. 22. 22. 22.
22,6 3] 7.5 24 .4 3 .1 I 0.0 0
10 5 0 0 0 0
lb. 1A. 13. 14. 15. 15.
99.9 99,9 999 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9
999 999 999 999 999
999 999 999 999 999 999
0. 0. 0. o. 0. 0.
99.90 99.90 99.90 99.90 99.90 99.90
99,90 99,90 99.90 99.90 99.90 99.90
99.90 99.90 99.90 99.9o 99.90 99.90
0. 0. u. o. 0. 0.
12/197/ SUdSIA TIgn NO. 22bl OlV, 2
STATE UN1V. FT. CULL1NS, CO OOb/3
AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC ANN
1.60 1.27 .97 1.02 1.17 16.60
4.43 4.2b 2.0b 2.0 1 4 ,OA
? 46 0.00 .05 .13 .19
47. 47. 47. 47. 47. 564.
1.27 196007 19bij9* 1.03 196903 .60 195009 1 .22 19b0 0 3
30. 30. *9. 30. 30.
0,0 1.7 7.0 16.6 20.5 145.0
0.0 24.0 44.0 30.0 67.0
0,0 4?. 0.0 46. 0,0 4 7. 0,0 45. a? 540,
0 11 15 11 21
0 196104. 196904 196902* 196927
30. 26. 10. 16. 16.
6,2 lb 'IS 2.9 3.2 3.7 50.6
7 9 9
3 1 0 1 0
23. 24. 22. 24. 2*. 2/6.
.5 .b .1 .0 . 1 3. 1
2 3 1 1 1
0 0 0 0 0
24. 24. 24. 24. 24. 2HH.
. 1 .0 .0 0.0 0.0 .3
1 1 1 0 0
0 0 0 0 0
24. 24. 24. 24. 24. 200.
.5 .7 9 0.0 0.0 2.0
3 4 l 0 0
0 0 0 0 0
22. 22. . 22. 22. 264.
0.0 .3 1.5 "if 26,5 31 124.0
0 2 11
0 0 0 I 13
15. 15. 14. 15. 13. 1 73.
99,9 999 99.9 999 99.9 999 99,9 999 99.9 999
999 999 999 999 999
0. 0. 0. 0. 0. 0.
99.90 99,90 99.90 99.90 99.90
99.90 99.90 99.90 99.90 99,90
99.90 99.90 99.90 99.90 99.90
0. 0. 0. 0. 0. 0.
STATION NUMHERS IN SMP AhE
ISTA 220b
22H6
00
00



SliMM ARY Of MONlHLY CLIMATIC DATA FOR L) ILL ON It ___ __
PfitPAKto br THt COLORADO CLIMATOLOGIST, UtPART MtN T OF ATMGSP"tHIC SCltNCt,
COLORADO
LAST DATA 12/1977
SUUSTATION NO. 2?U1 OlV,
COLORADO STAft UN IV,, H. OuLLlNS, CO OOb/j
JAN Ftb MAR APR MAy JUN JUL AUG StP OCT NOV DEC ANN
MONTHLY mean maaImum TtMP (F) Ayt. max. 32.0 3 a b 39,3 Ab.S 69.7 69. A 7 A b 73.1 6 7 A 67.2 A1.0 3 A A 52.7
A 2.3 A6.0 AS 6 S7.2 6b.S 73.9 00.7 7 7,5 7 A A 67.0 51. b A2. A
months OF HtciHfl 2< .0 A/. 2A.6 A 7 , 30.7 a). Ui? 52.9 A . 63,A A 7 . 70,7 A7 . 60,5 A 7 . 6a?! A6 A Ab. 3<< 1 A 7 . 562.
MONTHLY MtAN MINIMUM TtMP MAX, 0.1 9.6 16.1 23. b 30.3 3a b A2.A A2.3 jo b 29.5 17.1 10.0
MIN. MONTHS OF RECORD -11.2 A / . -10.6 -A,6 A 7 , 9.9 17,5 20,2 32.0 2b.2 22.6 1 A. 6 .2 -5. A
A 7 . A 7. A*. aJ. A7. A/. A>. 95. A7. AT. 562.
MONTHLY MEAN AYtRAbE TtMP (F) AVt. lb.A 17.9 22.9 32.7 A2.3 bo. o 5b. b bA. 1 A 7 7 30.6 26.7 16. A 3b. 1
MAX. 2A ./ 2 b, b 30.2 39.2 A 7.9 bj.b 61.3 66.3 b3.9 A6.6 32.9 23.5
MIN. MONTHS OF HECOH0 6.7 A 7. u. 1 A 6 A). 26.6 A 7 . 45? 51,0 A>. A9,3 A?. A3,6 A 7 . 32,0 <*5. 17,2 A 7 lh? 562. 1
OtGREt I DAYS IdASt 6SF) AVt. MAX, ,3U*$ 129A,7 1A$1 96b.9 l i-*a A29,U 67 0 2b5i? 32a,2 A20 610,1 600 796 3 991 1157.0 1 JA 7 1A3a,510603.9 1539 1
MIN. MONTHS OF RtCORD 12AJ 107b 10 7A 00 7 b26 32b M? 200 32b 661 992 12/9 1
21. 27. 27. 27. 27. 27. 27. 27. 27. 27. 27. 32A,
NO DAYS MAX TEMP GTR OH £0 90F AVt , 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0,0 I
MAX, 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
MONTHS OF HEcibO 29? 29? 29? 29? 29? 29? 0 29. 0 29. 29? 0 29. 29? 29? 3AO.
NO OAYS MAX TtMP LESS OH tu 3if Ayt. MAX. l*il "ll 71l ''I J 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 *? .A 2 M 56.2 1
MIN. MONTHS OF RECORD A 30. 30! 2 30. 0 30. 29? 0 29. 0 29. 29? 0 29. 0 29. 0 30, A 30. 3bA. .1
NO DAYS MIN TtMP LESS OR EU J2F AVt. MAX. 31.0 31 2a^ 30,9 Jl 29.7 30 2U3[ 5.3 lb 223S 29,7 31 29,0 30 31,0 31 29 A 2
MIN. 31 2d 30 2b 23 9 0 0 u 23 20 31 >1
MONTHS OF RECORD 30. 30. 30. 30. 30. 30. 30. 30. 30. 30. 30. 30. 360.
NO DAYS MIN TtMP LtSS OH tU 0 F AVt. lb.6 12.7 12 1 .6 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 .3 *I9 U l35l 56.0
MAX. 26 n 30. 5 0 0 0 0 0 2 |
MIN, MONTHS OF RECORD A 30. i 30. 0 30. 29? 0 29. 0 29. 0 29. 0 29. 0 29. 0 30. 5 30. 3bA,
HIGHEST TEMPtRA1ORE IF) TEMP YtAH AMU DAY] ol 60 62 76 29 07 09 07 oa 1952V2* 65 61
,96312 196211.196325 19A619 196213. 19AA21 193912 193011 1960 0A . 195301 193911 x!
MONTHS OF RECORD A 7 , A7. A7. A/. a 7 . A7. A7. *7. A 7 . Ab. A7. A7.
LOWEST TEMPtRA1 ORE IF) TEMP -AA -AS -3b -23 -8 19A7lP 22 22 7 >0 -36 -31
YtAH ANO 0AYI9c>21 U 19b101 193212 19331 A 19AA0A 193007 19602A 196930 19322b 195117 195006. J
MONTHS OF RtCORD A/. A 7. A7 , A/. *7. A 7 , A7 . A/. A7. A6 , A7. A 7 .
1.1
!
t
4
9




SOLAR ALTITUDE ABOVE HORIZON
90
O o
O
.80
O
O
70
O
SUN GLARE BECOMES VISUAL PROBLEM WITHOUT CAP OR HAT
SUN GLARE BECOMES VISUAL PROBLEM TO CORNER OF EYE WITH PERSONS HEAD TURNED 90 TO SUN
SURFACE REFLECTION BEGINS FOR GAMES REQUIRING DOWNWARD VISION
60 80
SECTION
100 SURFACE
OBSERVATIONS OF DIRECT SUNLIGHT AT VARIOUS ALTITUDES WITH DETRIMENTAL GLARE PROPORTIONAL IN MAGNITUDE TO THE LENGTH OF EACH ARROW.
SOLAR ALTITUDE and SUNLIGHT CLEAR SKY
FIG. 34j.q
36


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I
I
I
I
I
I
Figures 36-55 have been prepared in an attempt to simplify a fairly complex subject. The diagrams allow the designer to graphically analyze the direction and relative intensity of sunlight during the four sports seasons of the year. Each diagram has been adopted from sun-path diagrams published by the Smithsonian Institution (List, pgs 498-502) The reader is directed to that publication for specific information regarding solar movements.
At the risk of over-simplification, the diagrams graphically represent sunlight intensity by the relative length of arrows. The greater an arrow's length, the more detrimental light available. Detrimental light is considered as being present with a solar altitude below 45 per Figure 34. However, such information must be considered gross due to local conditions which may affect glare. For instance, measurements by Lunelund indicate that overcast conditions normally allow about 30% of visible light to reach the earth, but that mountains, atmospheric dust, smog, and water vapor surrounding Los Angeles may allow as much as 67% to be transmitted to this region (Pleijel pg. 19). Thus, regional atmospheric conditions, local topography, and buildings may alter the direction and intensity of sunlight.
Figure 34 indicates the basis underlying the Solar Altitude and Azimuth diagrams. Solar glare begins to enter the eye at about an altitude of 45. With the sun below 45 the glare becomes direct intensity sunlight if one looks towards the solar azimuth. The solar azimuth is considered as the horizontal angle relative to the true north-south axis. Knowledge of both the altitude and the azimuth becomes necessary to locate
Figures 36 through 55 essentially strive to project a three-dimensional phenomenon upon a two-dimensional plane. To an observer, the sky becomes a dome across which the sun moves while standing upon a flat horizontal disk. The sun thus describes imaginary paths across the sky dome relative to seasonal and daily time. (Fig 29)
ngitude and Time It is possible to fix the exact ume of day during which detrimental light occurs, but
a reasonable approximation seems practical for general use. Time is a variable, dependent upon longitudinal location, time zone, and Daylight Savings Time. Frankly, to wade through the computations required to obtain more than an approximation is usually an academic exercise. Figures 36 through 55 may be used directly to approximate glare occurrence. Adding the number of hours from noon until the sun reaches 45 altitude will approximate the hours of detrimental glare. Adding one hour to that figure will correct for Daylight Savings Time. For example, on June 22 at 40N, detrimental glare will begin about 3:15 p.m. standard time and 4:15 p.m. Daylight Savings Time assuming mid-day as 12:00. Due to variations in United States time zone boundaries, which do not necessarily match the solar time zones, there is to about one hour error, plus or minus, by this simple method.
The time at which a specific solar altitude and azimuth angle occur may be determined from the diagrams by the intersection of longitudinal lines with the declination lines. (Fig. 30)
34


If a higher degree of accuracy is required, the designer may use the longitudinal location of the site. If the longitude of the site is known, then the designer need only subtract four minutes from solar time for each degree the site lies west of a central longitude (Fig. 31). The process is reversible if the site is calculated east of a central longitude. Each central longitude line is 15 irom another and equals one hour of solar time; thus each degree is four minutes of time. To correct the diagrams (Figs. 36-55) for your area: iocate a central longitude; relate number of degrees area is, say, east of the central longitude; subtract found number of minutes from 12 o'clock. The resultant is a clock time for the solar zenith. For example, July 22, solar mid-day would occur at 12:40 D.S.T. for a site estimated at 95W longitude and 40*N latitude. (5 x 4 min. = 20 min., sub. from 12:00, zenith = 11:40 + 1 hr. = 12:40) Locating Figure 44, counting and estimating the afternoon hours, gives detrimental light beginning about 3:55 p.m. This time is 20 minutes sooner than estimated by the former method.
There seems little validity in seeking more accuracy than outlined by these two methods. The diagrams are intended as subjective graphic solutions. However, for additional correction factors and a higher degree of longitude/latitude location, refer to Ramsey and Sleeper. Architectural Graphic Standards, fifth edition, pgs 508-509.
Solar Altitude and Azimuth Diagrams The suns altitude may be determined from Figures 36-55 as the intersection of the declination line with the concentric altitude degree tine
The sun's azimuth may be determined as the intersection of decimation lines with the radial degree lines. (Figs. 32-33)
Figures 36 through 55 are intended as simplistic, graphic fools for study puiposes. Using a small scale sketch, the designer may analyze the merits of each possible orientation by rotating the sketch within the center of the circular chart. For instance, by positioning a sketch of a baseball diamond within the circular chart, a designer may study which player position will receive solar light, whether or not the relative intensity is a problem, and what alternative orientation might be suggested. Simultaneous analysis would weigh
topographical form, drainage pattern, etc. The time period during which problems occur may be estimated and weighed. For example, an orientation which allowed early morning direct sunlight to strike the eyes of a right-handed batter might not be a problem if most games are played in the afternoon.
Whether or no! direct sunlight is or is not of detrimental intensity is a design decision. There is no quantitative standard against which the threshold of detrimental light intensity is measured (I E S ). Individuals react differently to solar light, with younger people able to adjust their eyes quickly compared to oider persons. The length of each diagram's arrows indicate only the relative intensity of solar light along one azimuth degree Conditions may require a value to be placed on arrow length to meet regional character and player ages.
Each chart represents one sports season so that the designer might concentrate the analysis during the
Continued pg 51
35


TRUE
NORTH
EVENING
MID DAY
MORNING
PERSONS FACING IN THE DIRECTION OF THE SUNS RAYS WILL EXPERIENCE DIRECT SUNLIGHT PROPORTIONAL IN MAGNITUDE TO THE LENGTH OF ARROW.
CHART CONSIDERS DETRIMENTAL SUNLIGHT OCCURRING WHEN SOLAR ALTITUDE IS BELOW 45.
SOLAR ALTITUDE and AZIMUTH
SOLAR
FALL 40 N FIG. 46
48



TRUE
NORTH
EVENING
MID DAY
MORNING
PERSONS FACING IN THE DIRECTION
OF THE SUNS RAYS WILL EXPERIENCE DIRECT SUNLIGHT PROPORTIONAL IN MAGNITUDE TO THE LENGTH OF
ARROW.
CHART CONSIDERS DETRIMENTAL
SUNLIGHT OCCURRING WHEN SOLAR
ALTITUDE IS BELOW 45.
SOLAR ALTITUDE and AZIMUTH
SOLAR
A


TRUE
NORTH
DEGREES SOLAR ALTITUDE
Iun 22
[mey 21 july 24 moy I oug. 12 \4-rapril 16 [ loug. 28 ^japril 3
"Upt. 10
SOUTH
EVENING
MID DAY
PERSONS FACING IN THE DIRECTION OF THE SUNS RAYS WILL EXPERIENCE DIRECT SUNLIGHT PROPORTIONAL IN MAGNITUDE TO THE LENGTH OF ARROW.
CHART CONSIDERS DETRIMENTAL SUNLIGHT OCCURRING WHEN SOLAR ALTITUDE IS BELOW 45.
MORNING
30o'"k_
SOLAR
TIME

£r_L---r.------
^s4~J) T-------r-Wi \ ;J2>-
4 -
So o''7-*-vrC.'t

90
750 \
J M
SOLAR ALTITUDE and AZIMUTH
SPRING 40 N FIG


TRUE
NORTH
EVENING
MID DAY
MORNING
PERSONS FACING IN THE DIRECTION OF THE SUNS RAYS WILL EXPERIENCE DIRECT SUNLIGHT PROPORTIONAL IN MAGNITUDE TO THE LENGTH OF ARROW.
CHART CONSIDERS DETRIMENTAL SUNLIGHT OCCURRING WHEN SOLAR ALTITUDE IS BELOW 45.
SOLAR ALTITUDE and AZIMUTH
SOLAR
SUMMER 40N FIG. 44
46




DESIGN CRITERIA
1. Purpose and Scope;
The purpose of this section is to regulate and control development of all facilities in order to achieve unified and imaginative designs of all facilities. It is intended to insure the maintenance of the "village theme" and visual identity as discussed in the Preamble. This section sets forth basic requirements for site development and building materials, and designates standards which shall apply to the buildings, supplementary structures, lighting, graphics and signage.
2. Architectural Character:
It is intended that the entire project have a strong and unified identity of contemporary architecture. Thus, the effort to recall architectural forms, colors and materials will be encouraged for all designs. All designs shall
i
be contemporary and are to have the scale and character appropriate for a recreational resort. Permissable styles will reflect an adaptation to the mountainous area, and shall demonstrate an interplay between architecture and environment. Strong interior/exterior relationships are encouraged along with the necessary expressions of


shelter which will he important during the winter months.
As a total recreational resort, Copper Mountain Village will offer year-round facilities, therefore, all designs must he as effective during the summer as well as the winter months. Stylized or period architecture such as the "Swiss Chalet", "French Provincial", "Tudor" and other styles which have an orientation toward the past will not he permitted.
Core Area;
Stronger emphasis will he placed on the unity and compatahility of all facilities in the core area or central village area. This area will contain the highest density and will necessitate very careful coordination between individual building projects.
It is mandatory that all core architectural and landscaping features constitute a theme- setting focal point for Copper Mountain Village. All designs shall be of the highest quality and must have strong and distinctive characteristics. However, all limitations requiring interpretation shall he left to the discretion of the CMPAC Committee. It is intended that these provisions shall insure imaginative and creative development of the core area, and designers will he


encouraged and otherwise assisted by the committee.
4; Building Codest
All buildings shall be designed and constructed observing appropriate building codes and ordinances, including those existing or as may be adopted by Summit County, Colorado. Summit County currently utilizes all volumes of the "Uniform Building Code" as a basis for their building code.
Summit County requires building permits and utilizes inspectors during construction. The developers should anticipate a permit processing period of two to three weeks. The County also requires that all contractors be licensed in the County.
5. Exterior Materials:
Exterior materials and colors will be carefully controlled. It is suggested that developers and architects discuss these matters with the CMPAC Committee at their preliminary meetings.
The use of natural materials with their integrity intact is encouraged. Precast materials will be permitted, provided they are of compatible colors and textures.


Exposed aluminum finishes will not be permitted.
The use of enodized or other corrosion resistant finishes within a range of warm earth tones is recommended. The use of copper or weathering steel ("Cor-Ten") is encouraged. In general, white or very light colors will be discouraged.
The use of tinted glass is encouraged.
Roofs:
As a standard, roof slope shall be 5s12. The use of "cold roofs" is recommended where shingles or built-up roofs are proposed. Pitched roofs, architecturally simple in form, are encouraged. Unsightly devices or mechanical equipment should not penetrate the roof plane unless made integral to the roof design and in a manner acceptable to the CMPAC Committee.
Due to sun exposure and prevailing wind, an east-west orientation of roof ridges should be maintained wherever possible. Should ridges be oriented north and south, consideration must be given to the problem of snow and ice accumulation on east slopes.
Marble chips and other white materials will not be permitted for built-up roofs. The use of copper or "Cor-Ten" steel for roofing is highly recommended.


16. Supplementary Structures:
In general, all supplementary structures should be carefully integrated with primary structures. Where appropriate, the landscaping and planting for each facility shall also be coordinated.
With the exception of the imaginative use of copper and "Cor-Ten" steel, metal buildings, fences and screening will not be permitted. All supplementary construction shall be of highest quality, and should not in any way create the impression that it is temporary or unrelated to the overall village theme. Trash storage areas shall be completely enclosed unless visual control can be effectively achieved by other means. Underground storage of cars for each structure will be encouraged in all cases where practicable. Successful designs for supplementary structures shall recall architectural forms, materials, and colors of the developer's primary structure or structures in each development.
17. Lighting and Illumination:
Each developer is responsible for the design and installation of adequate exterior lighting systems on his site.
Exterior light fixtures and poles shall have non-reflective minimum maintenance finish. Designs


will be contemporary and unobtrusive. Due consideration must be given to snow removal and snow storage when locating light poles and fixtures. Care shall be taken to insure that the selection and location of luminaries shall not constitute a hazard or nuisance (by appearance or brightness) to surrounding properties. All wiring for exterior lighting must be underground.
The creative use of flood lighting and accent lgihting is encouraged to provide the recreational atmosphere desired for the Copper Mountain development. Fixtures located on exterior soffits should be used to illuminate covered areas and building features wherever possible. Floodlights should be so located that snow coverage will not obstruct the light source.
Graphics and Signage:
The unification of all graphics and signs, including the size, shape, color and location, to implement the unity of the "village theme" is an essential aspect of this development. To maintain visual order, all "general" graphic material should utilize either Helvetica Medium or a style compatible therewith.


19. Common Areas and Facilities:
All circulation areas, pedestrian areas, courts, planters, trash disposal units and other street furniture directly related to the overall development (as opposed to individual facilities and intimate sites) are subject to the following guidelines
Circulation Areas In general, sidewalks and other pedestrian circulation areas, contained gravel paths, are subject to review and approval of the CMPAC Committee. Designers should be particularly concerned with pedestrian circulation, and care should be taken to insure that all transitions and intersections are gracefully made. Designs shall sustain movement with careful observation of "lines of desire", assent and descent, and topographical features.
Planters and Street Furniture Shall be integral to the total landscape development plan. Designs shall carefully locate these items and all colors and textures shall be as approved by the CMPAC Committee.
Common Areas Some common areas may cover portions of two or more adjoining lots. Designs for these areas will be coordinated by


Copper Mountain. As a rule, improvements will be installed on one property only. The cost of improvements, will be vorne proportionately by the affected property owners.
TV Prewire:
All buildings shall be prewired for cable TV in order to facilitate hookup. No exterior radio or TV antennas will be permitted.


DEFINITIONS
ARCADE:
BANNERS,PENNANTS "OR BUNTING?
BELT, BOX OR PILLOW SIGN:
CMPAC COMMITTEE: DISPLAY BOX:
FLAG:
FREESTANDING SIGN:
HANGING SIGN:
LIGHTING INDIRECT:
LIGHTING BACK:
A hallway, courtyard, mall or similar area enclosed within a building.
Any announcement device affixed to poles, wires or ropes for the purpose of announcing or promoting community events or activities or for decorat ing.
An internally lighted sign constructed of translucent materials, i.e., typical beer sign.
Copper Mountain Planning and Architectural Control Committee.
A freestanding or wall sign enclosed in glass and appropriate framing for the express purpose of displaying menus, current entertainment, real estate listing or the like.
State, National or Copper Mountain flag.
A single or multi-faced sign structurally separated from a building or other similar structure.
Any sign hanging or suspended from an overhead structure.
A light source separated from and illuminating the sign surface, such as concealed spotlights or similar fixtures.
An indirect source of light which is located behind the sign surface and shielded from the viewer's eyes.
11


MURAL OR SUPER-(jRAPHIC:
OCCUPANCY:
PERSON:
PROJECTING SIGN:
PROPERTY MANAGE-MENT/REAL ESTATE:
REFLECTIVE SURFACE:
RESIDENTIAL NAME-PLATE SIGN:
SIGN:
SIZE ALLOWABLE:
A painted scene, figure, or decorative design so as to enhance the building architecture, not including written trade or place names or advertising messages.
A residence, a business, or a building.
Any person, firm, partnership, association, corporation, company or organization of any kind.
Any sign attached to a building and extending in whole or in part beyond the building perimeter.
A sign attached to a building for the purpose of identifying a broker, agent or company offering units for sale within that building.
Any material or device which has the effect of intensifying reflected light, such as, but not limited to, Scotchlite, Dayglo, glass beads and luminous paint.
A sign for the sole purpose of identifying the inhabitant residing therein, the house, name, or identifying the address of the house.
A surface or space as permitted which attracts the attention, identifies a business or building, conveys a message to any person by means of letters, numbers, figures or other symbols, devices or representat ions.
Maximum height of sign letters and/or the maximum area covered by the exterior limits of the sign.
- 12 -
i


TEMPORARY SITE DEVELOPMENT SIGN:
TRAFFIC CONTROL SIGN:
WALL SIGN:
WINDOW SIGN:
A sign identifying a project under construction including the project name, general contractor, architect and prime real estate agent.
A sign for the purpose of identifying parking areas and directing traffic on private and public property.
A sign attached to the wall of a building or structure with the face of the sign in a plane parallel to the face of the wall.
A sign affixed on the interior surface of a window which is visible from the outside.
13


QXd


Codes/Zoning
Project Winterun Condominiums and Recreation Center
Location Copper Mountain Ski Resort
Applicable Zoning Ordinance
Applicable Building Code Zoning Classification Uniform Building Code (UBC) 18,00 sq.ft./FLR by code 2x18,000 sq.ft, max for multi story
Floor Area Ratio/ Building SQ.ft. Limits Approximately' 24,000 Sq.Ft.
Building Height Limits Stories and Feet Building Set-Back/Y'ard Requirements 4 stories by code.
Minimum Lot Size Requirements 1.68 acres (fiven)
Off Street Parking Requirements None required for Rec. Center (by program) 1.5 Spaces/Unit for Condominium
Screening Requirements None
Driveways and Curb Cut Requirements


Fire Zone Designation
Occupancy Classification Group B Division 2
Construction Type Type 4
Occupancy Separation Requirements 1 Hour
Exterior Wall Fire Ratings 1 Hr., less than 20' from prop. line.
Exterior Wall Openings Not permitted less than 5' Protected less than 20'
Floor Fire Rating 1 Hr.
Roof Fire Rating 1 Hr.
Partition Fire Rating 1 Hr.
Structural Frame Fire Rating 1 Hr.
Max FLR Area/Hgt Unsprinklered Sprinklered 18.000 sq.ft./4 stories 36.000 sq.ft./5 stories
Number of Exits Required 2 (Recreation Center) Min. 2 (Above first floor)
Number of Stairs Required 2 (Above first floor)
Doors Width Requirements 3'0"
Stair Width Requirements 44"
Corridor Width Requirements 44"
Stairway Landing Reqs
44" Width (4'0"max) 12'0" max vert.


Travel Distance/Dead End Corridor Limits 150'/20' max deadend
Door Swing Requirements Swing Direction of exit (50+ persons) 90 degree swing.*'
Stair and Balcony Rail Requirements hj-2" height, 9" max opening
Ramp Requirements Required (Rec. Center) 12% slope
Riser/Tread Limits 4"-7i" rise, 10"+ run.
Vertical Openings Limits and Fire Ratings 1 Hr.
Exit Lighting Requirements At each exit/min. one footcandle
Emergency lighting Req's Exit sign required above each exit
Ceiling Height Minimums 7'-6" min. general 7'-0" min. Kitchen, hall, bath, toilet.
Mezzanine Restrictions None
Furnace and Boiler Room Restrictions One exit required
Chimney Height and Constructions Restrictions Height by building official above 2000 ft. alt. 50 sq.in. flu for masonry (min.)
Light and Ventilation Requirements 1/10 fir area (light) condos 1/20 fir area (vent, openable to ext) condos
Roof Access Requirements Stair to roof req'd over histories


Penthouse Limitations 28' hgt. for tanks, elevators 12* hgt. general Max. 33$ roof area
Sprinkler Requirements Not required
Dry Stankpipe Requirements Not required
Wet Standpipe Requirements Not required
Toilet Room Fixture Requirements Water Closet Handicapped 30"width space 30"door 44" clear each side 3"door 5'0" width 32" min. hgt. grab bars 42" min. length grab bar
Skylight Requirements
Not required




Winterun
CondomWum# and Community Canr Coppar Mountain Colorado




1 8' Sc**




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Bibliography (Sources)
The Nature of Recreation Wurman, Levy, Katz
co. 1972 American Federation of Arts,
New York M.I.T. Press Campbridge Mass.
Principles and Practices of Recreational Service Jay s. Shivers
1967 The MacMillan Co., New York
Snorts Facilities
John M. Roberts Co. 1973
American Society of Landscape Architects
Foundation (Aslaf) McLean, Virginia
Leisure in America: Blessing or Curse James C. Charlesworth Co. 1964
Philadelphia The American Academy of Political and Social Science
The Program Book for Recreation Professionals
Albert Tillman Co. 1973
May Field Publishing Co., Palo Alto, CA.
Time Savers Standards For Architectural Design Data John Hancock Callender McGraw Hill Book Co. 1974
Time Savers Standards For Building Types Joseph DeChira & John Hancock Callender McGrqw Hill Book Co. 1974
Colorado Climate Center Colorado State University Fort Collins, Colorado 80523
Paul Semmer, Recreation Planner Summit County Planning Dept.
County Court House Breckenridge, Colorado 80423
Edward Jereb Architect & Planner AIA 1228 15th Ave.
Denver, CO
Barker, Rinker, Seacat Architects inc.
1770 Blake Denver, Co.
Copper Mountain Real Estate Office Copper Mountain, Colorado