Citation
Shoreline landing

Material Information

Title:
Shoreline landing
Creator:
Thomas, David ( author )
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
1 electronic file (65, [12] leaves illustrations, maps, plans) : ;

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Condominiums -- Designs and plans -- Colorado -- Shadow Mountain Lake ( lcsh )
Condominiums ( fast )
Colorado -- Shadow Mountain Lake ( fast )
Genre:
Designs and plans. ( fast )
bibliography ( marcgt )
theses ( marcgt )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Designs and plans ( fast )

Notes

Thesis:
Thesis (M.A.)--University of Colorado at Denver, 1980.
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references (leaf 65).
System Details:
System requirements: Adobe Reader.
General Note:
Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for a Master's degree in Architecture, College of Design and Planning.
Statement of Responsibility:
David Thomas.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
on10141 ( NOTIS )
1014182986 ( OCLC )
on1014182986

Full Text
-THom^s
ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN
AURARIA LIBRARY
shoreline lending


ARCHIVES ~ B.vid Thomas
Thesis Proposal Denver
University of Colorado at Denver
A72
1930
'56

December, 1980


This project is dedicated to EDITH HANNINGTON WARD, whose spirit and love for the Grand Lake area has been a major inspiration.


ADVISORS:
G. K. Vetter
Graduate School of Design & Planning University of Colorado Denver, Colorado
Dan Wilhelm Wickliff & Company 5975 So. Syracuse Englewood, Colorado
William Bruno SheldenHein Associates 11059 E. Bethany Drive Aurora, Colorado
Ralph G. Mock
Chen & Associates, Inc.
96 S. Zuni Denver, Colorado
Michael Madden URS Gcnpany 3955 E. Exposition Denver, Colorado
Kendra anith Proland, Ltd.
7200 E. Dry Creek Road Englewood, Colorado
Anna Marie Oscarson Graland Country Day School 30 Birch Street Denver, Colorado


CONTENTS
Page
PROJECT DESCRIPTION 1
GRAND LAKE HISTORY 3
SHADCW MOUNTAIN LAKE HISTORY 11
SITE HISTORY 13
GOALS AND OBJECTIVES 15
LOCATION 17
ACCESS 18
CIRCULATION 20
PRESENT CONDITIONS 22
VIEWS 24
TOPOGRAPHY 26
VEGETATION 28
CLIMATE 30
CLIMATIC DATA 33
ENERGY SYSTEMS: SOLAR 34
GEOLOGY 41
SUBSOIL CONDITIONS 42
GEOLOGIC RECOMMENDATIONS 44
PROBABLE FOUNDATION TYPE 46
SITE GRADING 47
UTILITIES 49
ZONING 51
-i-


SUMMARY: SITE ANALYSIS 52 MARKET STUDY 55 PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT 57 DEVELOPERS PROGRAM 59 BIBLIOGRAPHY 65
-ii-


PROJECT DESCRIPTION:
The project is located in a meadow in the northeast shore of Shadow Mountain Lake in Grand County, Colorado. The site consists of 25 acres, and represents a large portion of the ranaining developable land on the lake. Other assets of this property include direct access to Shadow Mountain Lake, good solar access, good views, and a proximity to the town of Grand Lake.
The present owner of this property is a developer who has already platted the land into two filings, one for single family dwellings, the other to include townhouses and condominiums, for a total of 97 units.
I propose to accept the developer's plan as filed, lasing his experts' recommendations for the filings, but I intend to use the southern 18.05 acres and to site and design my own buildings to include the townhouses and the condominiums, for a total of 78 units.
The developer has allotted for 24 townhouse units near the waterfront, and these are to be of premium quality. The condominium units numbering 54 would occur on the back of the site and appeal to a more general market. I intend to include energy-consciousness in my design, not only in siting, but in the units themselves. The site itself is in rather poor condition as a result of the previous owners, and needs careful consideration.
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GRAND LAKE HISTORY:
The Middle Park area of Colorado which includes Granby, Grand Lake and the land in between, was hunted by tribes of Indians prior to the middle of the 1800's. There was an abundant supply of animals to support these different tribes of Indians who would camp on the shores of Grand Lake, while fishing and hunting this untamed wilderness.
Grand Lake in 1885 Chubb homesite.
Not all of these tribes intermingled well. A rock outcropping above what is now Shadow Mountain Lake served as a lookout to protect tribes using the Grand Lake area frcm other tribes who might be approaching. The view frcm "Scout Rock" (to the immediate north of the site) encompassed the entire Shadow Mountain drainage basin to the south, as well as the Arapahoe National Forest and the Never Summer Range to the north. The Indians in the area at that time were the Utes, Cheyennes, and Arapahoes.
-3-


Once, during a fierce battle between two of these tribes, the Ute women and children were placed on a raft and sent out into Grand Lake for their protection. The raft overturned, killing all aboard. This event led to naming the lake Spirit Lake (later changed to Grand Lake) Consequently, the Indians ceased to use this area, for they feared it was haunted.
White trappers had been using this area up to this time. Upon the Indians desertion of the Spirit Lake area, white trappers moved in and began to extensively hunt. By 1850-1860, these trappers were building simple one-room log cabins and staying all year. Prior to this time the nomadic Indian tribes would move to areas that had less severe winters than this particular site does. Only with sturdy cabins and large supplies of food and fuel oould a man make it in the colder months.
-4-


The excellent hunting and incredible beauty of the area began to attract people from other parts of the state and even parts of the country. Despite the two-day rail and wagon trip from Denver, people began to make the journey. Visitors in the late 1880's camped on the beaches or stayed in log hotels that were springing up in the area. Other services such as a post office, stores, and schools also appeared. The once meager year-around population was beginning to increase. The harsh winters were still a major deterrent to a healthy year-around oorrmunity.
-5-


Mining developed in the area north of what was then referred to as Grand Lake. These deposits, located in what is now Rocky Mountain National Park, were meager, but several small towns appeared and disappeared in these areas. Grand Lake served as a supply hub for these smaller towns, and at one time was the county seat of Grand County.
Around the turn of the century seme of the more prosperous adventurers arrived in the Grand Lake area. These people built large, elegant log lodges which included separate buildings for their boats. Unlike the one-rocm log cabins and salt boxes that preceded them, these summer homes had elaborate appointments such as large stone fireplaces, and mullioned windows with panoramic views. These buildings were examples of fine craftsmanship even down to the detailed carvings over fireplaces or custan-made furniture. The most elaborate and prestigious home had (and still has) a four-seater outhouse.
-6-


7-


People now considered the Grand Lake area as a summer resort. More of the lake shore was becaning lined with large summer hemes. The log lodges of the 1900's were mimicked by wood-framed buildings with split log siding in the late 30's and 40's. The townspeople who resided in the area all year lived in smaller, much simpler wood frame buildings generally not on the lake front. The summer trade started in June and ended in September. When the tourists would stop coming in the fall, most of the businesses had to close. The winter months were very lean, and year-around residents had to maintain simple existences in order to survive.
In the 50's and early 60's many different styles appeared ranging from the basic box with a pitched roof to ranch style dwellings. These houses were covered with milled shaven pine-siding to give the appearance of shaven logs. Stain or paint was applied to these, introducing the first variation from natural timber-colored buildings. Owners of the older buildings responded by applying stain to their trim.
The 60's and 70's introduced the ski-house style to the area. This was the emergence of a four season use consideration. More attention was give to energy use and efficiency, and the designs began to reflect it. New styles appeared (or just variations of the old). Milled structural log homes were and still are being built. Also becaning popular were bold forms of wood frame construction, which were clad in diagonal cedar siding, thermal windows, standing metal seam roofs and natural colors.
-8-


Also in this period much renovation was occurring. Older homes were being brought up to date with new siding, decks, windows and, especially, colors. What had previously been summer cottages were now becoming winter hemes as well.
There is no set style in the area. Design has come all the way from basic shelter, to complete year-around comfort, with examples of both still evident. Energy has become a major consideration since most of these hemes are vacation hones and must fit into tighter and tighter budgets. Now, any residential unit in the area must be available year-around in order to justify the ever-increasing economic burden.
Grand Lake is still a summer resort town, and is still faced with tough winter-time economics. Though the summer poplulation is well over 1000 people in the area, the winter population drops to about 250. The townspeople are attempting to bolster their economy with winter-related activities such as snow^nobiling, cross-country skiing, and ice skating.
A proposal has been presented to the county and Arapahoe National Forest for a ski area northwest of Grand Lake. The area called Bowen Mountain has faced much opposition from Federal authorities, but is being supported by the locals.
Should the Bowen Mountain ski area materialize, the Grand Lake area would experience a tremendous bocm for its economy. Even if the ski area does not develop, the current trends for cross-country skiing and snow-mobiling will continue to aid the area. The adjacency of Rocky Mountain National Park makes this area very attractive to outdoor sportsmen, and the addition of quality housing will certainly help too.
-9-


10-


SHADCW MOUNTAIN LAKE HISTORY:
Prior to 1948, the meadow west of Grand Lake was settled by ranchers. The Colorado River, which originated in Grand Lake flowed through this meadow, promoting a healthy ranching trade. However, the eastern slope of Colorado was in need of more irrigation water. In 1948, the U.S. Government, in conjunction with the State of Colorado, constructed the Colorado-Big Thompson Irrigation Project, which involved the construction of Granby and Shadow Mountain dams, and the creation of Granby and Shadow Mountain lakes. The dams store water and direct it to the Alva B. Adams Tunnel at the east end of Grand Lake, where it passes under the Continental Divide to Estes Park. Frcm Estes, the water travels down the Big Thompson Canyon to help irrigate the arid eastern plains of (Colorado.
The meadow where Shadow Mountain Lake is now was a gentle valley with a slight slope. At its fullest point, Shadow Mountain Lake is only approximately 12 feet deep. Most of the lake is quite shallow and is rapidly filling with silt and sediment deposits. Because of its shallow character, Shadow Mountain Lake is highly susceptible to contamination. The antiquated sanitary systans in the area are filtering into the water, causing incredible algae growth and much alarm for local residents and users. This problan led to the formation of the Tri-Lakes Sanitation District which, when completed in 1982, will collect all waste frcm all of the users in the tri-lakes district and treat it in a location not in danger of infiltrating the water.
-11-


All three lakes now draw more tourists in the area than Grand Lake
alone ever did. Most of the summer users are involved either directly or indirectly with boating. Grand Lake is considered a "private" lake and supports a large fleet of boats with permanent docking facilities. Shadow Mountain Lake has a larger surface area of water than Grand Lake (over twice as much) and allows more boating activity. However, more than half of the shoreline of Shadow Mountain lake is federally controlled, and does not allow permanent docking facilities. This provides a nice, undisturbed setting for users, but prohibits all but temporary boat moorings.
The site covered by this report is one of the last remaining parcels of open, undeveloped land on either Shadow Mountain Lake or Grand Lake. Its value both aesthetically and economically requires careful consideration before development can occur.
-12-


SITE HISTORY:
The site has had a succession of owners with varying intentions over the past 20 years. Prior to 1960, the land was left untouched and was virtually ignored. In the early 60's a ski area was proposed, and much timber was cleared frcm the site. This proposal met much opposition frcm the local residents and especially the adjacent landowners.
The financing and the opposition finally stopped the project, and the land was offered for sale.
It was purchased by Ron Hull in the late 60's to serve as a water ski show area. More timber was cleared and bleachers were constructed facing the cove on which the site is located, (see LAND USE MAP) This operation lasted two years and folded. The land was then offered for sale as was.
Ralph Johnson purchased the defunct water ski show site complete with bleachers and reviewing stand. He platted the land for single family hone sites and a large resort lodge. Johnson was responsible for the vast amounts of timber that were cleared and the roads which were cut into the face of Shadow Mountain. His financing fell through after considerable damage had been done to the site. By this time the site was suffering from severe erosion and major microclimatic changes.
Ron Hull and Thur Oscar son purchased the site from Johnson in 1976, intending to construct condominiums instead of the lodge. Shortly after, Hull dropped out and Oscar son put the land up for sale again.
-13-


The land was purchased by Dan Wilhelm in 1978, who wisely hired an architect and engineering firm to review and hopefully rehabilitate the damage to the site, and to develop a residential cannunity to integrate with the surroundings. Presently the site has tvro plats, one of which is in the process of being filed with the county. The local residents and the county are enthused with the sensitivity of this project and are likely to endorse its efforts.
The adjacent landowners, many of whan are third and fourth generation, have witnessed the progressive deterioration of this site, and are understandably anxious to have the site used constructively. They vould like to see the area reconditioned and sensitively controlled so that their own property and peace of mind are not in jeopardy. The general consensus is that the Wilhelm plan is aimed in the right direction.
-14-


GOALS AND OBJECTIVES:
The goals of this project can be split to the personal level and a more general level. At the personal level, I want to deal with a problan
that has a real program and a real site. I feel that this will help
give me insight into the profession that I am entering. With this particular project, I want to help rehabilitate the site and create a good quality living environment. Presently the site is an eyesore, stripped of its vegetation, and out of character with its surroundings.
It needs thoughtful planning to facilitate constructive use.
Generally, the Grand Lake area needs more good quality year-around housing to supplonent local businesses. In contrast to many of the
sunmer home sites which are inaccessible in the winter, this site has
good all-weather access, and is located close to the town of Grand Lake. The town is attempting to create a year-around resort, and the addition of 97 units of housing would certainly help, (see MARKET STUDY)
By rehabilitating the site and providing good quality housing, both the town of Grand Lake and the landowners adjacent to the site would be appeased.
-15-


EXISTING) C0NPftlCN5


LOCATION:
Part of the NE-1/4 NE-1/4 Section 7, Township 3 North,
Range 75 West, 6th Principal Meridian, County of Grand, State of Colorado.
The site is a 25 acre parcel located on the northeast shore of Shadow Mountain Lake in Grand County, Colorado. It is adjacent to (west of) both the town of Grand Lake and Lake itself. The site was once part of a larger meadow now covered by the waters of Shadow Mountain Lake, (see HISTORY) The rest of the east shore to the south of the site is owned and operated by the United States Department of the Interior.
This area which includes most of Shadow Mountain (frcm which the lake derived its name) and is entitled the Shadow Mountain National Recreation Area, is public land and accessible through the site.
The Grand Lake area serves as the west entrance to Rocky Mountain National Park. Grand Lake provides many services for park visitors.
-17-


ACCESS: (see ACCESS MAP)
Fran Denver, the site can be reached via 1-70 to U.S. 40 over Berthoud Pass to Granby. Fran Granby north on U.S. 34 to Grand Lake. Once in Grand Lake take Grand Avenue .5 miles to Vine Street and turn right. Right again on Cairns Avenue .4 miles to Jerico Road. Left on Jerico Road (across the channel connecting Grand Lake to Shadow Mountain Lake) approximately .2 miles to the site.
-18-


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CIRCULATION:
Major circulation on the site is marked by a. vehicular access road from the north, which ties into Jerico Road at about the north/
south midline of the site, and again on the boundary between Filing 1
and Filing 2. Jerico Road is a private dead end road that provides access to the homes in the south shore of Grand Lake.
A secondary path used mainly by horses and pedestrian s follows the lake front and provides access to Shadow Mountain National Recreational Area just south of the site. Other smaller paths criss-cross the site from east to west.
There is an abandoned logging road at the south end of the site that was cut into a steep grade at the base of Shadow Mountain.
This road was poorly executed and is in need of regrading to alle-
viate erosion. Circulation on and through the site is best illustrated by the CIRCULATION MAP that follows.
-20-



apcuLAnoN
-01 _


PRESENT CONDITIONS: (see PRESENT CONDITIONS MAP)
At the present time the site is littered with remnants and traces of previous owners. A flat portion of the north 6.67 acres is presently being used by Grand Lake Log Hemes as an assembly spot for their products. There are still remnants of the abandoned water ski show arena (see SITE HISTORY), which include footings from the bleachers and a small storage building. There are several camp sites scattered along the waterfront and atop the small hill adjacent to the lake. Most of the indigenous lodge pole pines are still intact.
The south 18.05 acres has been virtually stipped of its original plant material. What was once a small forest of aspen, pine and spruce trees is now an open meadow littered with stumps. The south end of this area which is part of the base of Shadow Mountain is scarred by a road cut. (see GEOLOGY) The shoreline is eroding and being stabilized by large rock and soil deposits from the Tri-Lakes Sanitation District Project, (see HISTORY) This area is also littered with camp sites.
The shoreline is a popular public fishing spot. The site also provides access for pedestrians and horses to the Shadow Mountain National Recreation Area land just to the south.
The cove of Shadow Mountain Lake on which this site fronts is quite shallow, and is virtually inaccessible to all but small man-powered boats. This bay used to be accessible to all boats, but is rapidly silting in.
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VIEWS:
The views frcm this site are good in all directions, but are especially spectacular to the west ranging frcm SSW to NNW. The site affords unobstructed views of Shadow Mountain Lake to the west, and panoramic views of the surrounding mountains from SSW to the Never Summer Range and the National Park to the NNW. These views are best illustrated by the VIEWS MAP that follows.
-24-


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-25-


TOPOGRAPHY:
The topography at the site is varied, ranging from flat to very steep. A steep valley side, with slopes frcm 30 percent to 70 percent, trends east-west and occupies the southern part of the site. The valley side gives way to gentler hummocky terrain resulting from glacial deposition in the northern part of the parcel.
No large drainage ways cross through the property, although a small draw runs east-west through the central part of the site. This drainage way has relatively small up-slope basin and there is no evidence of runoff.
Several logging roads have been blazed through the property and scane timber has been harvested frcm the steep valley side of the southern part of the parcel. Seme of the fill placed during road construction is slumping at the shoulder and sliding downhill as a result of improper placement and poor drainage.
-26-




VEGETATION:
The natural vegetation on the site consists primarily of conifers with a brushy understory. Vegetation is more dense along the steep valley site in the southern part of the site than it is in the hiitmocky topography to the north where small aspen, cedar and isolated conifers grow. Marsh grasses grow along the western part of the draw that passes through the central part of the site, (see VEGETATION MAP)
-28-


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CLIMATE:
The region has a semi-arid climate. The U.S. Weather Bureau records from Grand Lake indicate a mean annual temperature of 35 F. with mean daily maximum and minimum temperatures for July of 75F. and 42F.
January mean daily maximum and minimum tenperatures are 20F. and 0F.
The mean annual precipitation is about 17 inches with peaks occurring during the spring and sunmer. Total mean annual snowfall is about 128 inches. (see CLIMATE DATA that follows)
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CLIMATIC DATA
The following data was compiled by the National Weather Bureau for the Grand Lake area:
Tanperature:
J F M A M J J A S 0 N
min. .7 2.0 7.5 20.2 29.3 36.0 41.7 41.2 33.1 25.0 15.4
max. 26.6 29.9 35.7 46.9 58.8 68.3 74.7 72.2 65.7 55.2 39.7
Precipitation:
1.10 .83 1.07 1.08 1.34 1.40 1.46 1.80 1.27 .86 00
Mean Snow:
16.1 14.2 15.9 11.0 3.9 0 0 0 2.8 4.9 9.0
-33-


ENERGY SYSTEMS: SOLAR
In order to achieve high energy efficiency for the units on the site, a survey of passive systems will be necessary. Choosing the best system will depend on specific siting of units and development of floor plans.
The investigation will include only direct and indirect passive systans in conjunction with solar angles. Actual siting will occur within the developer's intended boundaries, but may orient differently than he desired.
SUN CHART:
AVERAGE SOLAR RADIATION BTU/day-sq. ft.
Grand Lake, Colorado J 735 J 2103.3
Iat. 40'15' F 1135.4 A 1708.5
Appendix F p. 366 M 1579.3 S 1715.8
A 1876.7 0 1212.2
M 1974.9 N 775.6
J 2369.7 D 660.5
-34-


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GEOLOGY:
Almost all of the site is underlain by glacially deposited soil with the exception of a small alluvial soil deposit in the central part of the site and a few isolated bedrock outcrops. The glacial deposits consist of lateral and recessional moraines. Both deposits are made up of from 20 percent to 30 percent rounded cobbles and boulders in a silty sand matrix. Seme boulders are as large as 20 feet in maximum dimension. The mean boulder diameter is about two to three feet. The lateral moraine occurs along the steep valley side at the southern part of the site. These soils are of variable thickness and sane bedrock outcrops were observed. The recessional moraine which produces the hummocky topography in the northern part of the site has a greater thickness and should extend below all foundation depths. An alluvial soil occurs in the draw passing through the central part of the site. The sandy silt alluvial soils are thin, frcm two to three feet thick, younger, and overlie typical glacial soils. A two foot thick organic clay topsoil has developed at the surface of the alluvial deposit. This topsoil also occurs on sane of the glacial deposits near the toe of the steep valley side.
Two snail bedrock outcrops occur along the steep valley side. The rock is a Precambrian age gneiss. The intact rock is very hard although it is generally cut by moderately to closely spaced joints.
-41-


SUBSOIL CONDITIONS:
Four general types of soils were encountered on the site. All of the soils encountered with the exception of the organic clay topsoil have similar engineering characteristics. Swell consolidation tests indicate that these soils are nonexpansive. The soils will consolidate moderately when wetted and loaded. Gradation analysis of samples taken fran the site show that all soils encountered at the site with the exception of the organic clay topsoils range fran very sandy silts to silty sand with scattered gravel, cobbles and boulders throughout the soil. Mean boulder diameter is two to three feet and rocks of this size are expected to be encountered in all excavations at the site. Sane boulders are as large as 20 feet in maximum dimension.
The ground water depth in the test holes was erratic with shallow water tables occurring in the south and southwestern parts of the site. In general, shallow ground water tables are expected to be encountered in the western part of the alluvial soil deposit, and along with the lateral moraine underlying the deep valley side in the southern part of the site.
-42-


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-43- 1


GEOLOGIC RECOMMENDATIONS:
Development in the southeast portion of the site where the steep slopes exist should be avoided. The cost and potential problems, including slope instability, would be major problems to overccme during design and construction. These steep slopes have a mantle of glacial moraine which is stable at the present time but could became unstable if cut and not properly retained. If development in this area is felt necessary, it is recommended that careful investigation of the proposals and a more detailed investigation be conducted.
-44-




PROBABLE FOUNDATION TYPE:
Based on soils tests, it appears that spread footings will be feasible for all foundations placed on the subsoils at the site. Footings will also be a feasible foundation system for foundations placed on carefully compacted fill. In areas where the gneiss bedrock is encountered at foundation elevations, bearing wall can be placed directly on the rock. Subdrains around buildings will be necessary in areas where the ground water is shallow or where bedrock is shallow.
-46-


SITE GRADING:
Cuts: Cuts should be kept to a minimum, particularly in areas of steep slopes (slopes greater than 25 percent). All cuts should be no deeper than 10 feet and no steeper than 2:1. Steeper cuts may be feasible although we recommend that they be studied on an individual basis. If ground water or seepage is encountered in cut slopes or develops after construction, then the likelihood of slope failure is increased.
Fills: Like cuts, fills should be kept to a minimum on the steep slopes. Fill slopes should be no steeper than 2:1 and the ground surface underlying the fill should be properly prepared. Vegetation and organic topsoil should be stripped, fills placed on the steeper slopes should be keyed into the slope, and all fill should be properly compacted when placed. It is particularly important that the compaction of fill under structures be carefully supervised by a soil engineer to insure that proper compaction is achieved. The on-site soils will be suitable for fill, although cobbles and boulders larger than eight inches should be removed before the fill is placed. Care should be taken to insure that fills do not obstruct natural drainages, and that all fills are properly drained. If seepage is encountered in areas where fill is to be placed, adequate drainage facilities should be provided.
-47-




UTILITIES:
All major utilities pass to the east of the site along Jerioo Road fran Lake Front Drive. At present, there is no winter water service south of the channel connecting Shadow Mountain Lake to Grand Lake. The power lines follow the Jerico Road-Lake Front Drive easement. The sewer is being installed along the same easement, but will also follow Jerioo Road to the west up to where the main site access point fran Jerico Road is (see UTILITY MAP) .
-49-


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ZONING:
The property is currently zoned T-l which is a tourist zone allowing any number of uses. The first filing will shortly be changed to R-l single family zoning. The second filing will remain T-l until it has been filed.
-51-


SUMMARY: SITE ANALYSIS
The site is located in Grand County .5 miles from the town of Grand Lake and adjacent to (west of) Grand Lake itself. The Grand Lake area is adjacent to Rocky Mountain National Park and provides services to park visitors, as well as its own visitors. The area is easily accessible via U.S. 40 to U.S. 34.
The site being considered is scarred by previous owners' attempts to develop it. It is in need of landscape rehabilitation. The views from the site to the west are spectacular, encompassing the entire western range of Arapahoe National Forest including the Never Summer Range, and parts of Rocky Mountain National Park.
The site has slopes ranging from flat to very steep. The terrain is generally rocky, but also hutmocky. The original forest was stripped from the site, leaving grasses and young aspens.
The prevailing breezes range from southwest in the sunnier, to northwest in the winter and tend to be strong. The annual precipitation generally is moderate, but snowfall tends to be rather large. The site has good solar access, despite the presence of Shadow Mountain to the south. The soils are sturdy enough to permit spread footing foundations.
This parcel is one of the last remaining pieces of undeveloped shoreline on either Grand Lake or Shadow Mountain Lake. The present owner is proposing a 97 unit residential community entitled Shoreline Landing to include townhanes, condominiums and single family homes.
The site is west of an established summer home community consisting
-52-


of a mixture of fine older log and newer frame homes. The local real estate market appears ripe for a well planned residential community.
-53-




MARKED STUDY:
The escalation in the value of real estate in Denver has carried over to Colorado in general. Mountain property that affords good views, natural surroundings, adjacency to necessary amenities and especially access to recretation areas.
The Grand Lake area is no exception. Improved lake front property that sold for $150.00 per front foot in 1969 now brings almost $1000.00 per front foot. Unimproved land sold in 1969 at about $100.00 per front foot now brings approximately $600.00 per front foot. These figures are based on actual recorded sales of lake front property within the past 11 years. This represents an inflation rate of about 600 percent over 10 years or about 60 percent per year.
Many of the lake front hemes on Grand Lake and Shadow Mountain Lake are owned by direct descendants of the original owners. Sane homes on Grand Lake have remained in the same family for as many as four generations. Therefore, this creates a closed ccnmunity with an extremely tight market. Because of the tremendous amenities that accompany lake front property, it is in high demand, and has high market value.
Most of the available lots on both Grand lake and Shadow Mountain lake have been built on. Any parcel of land available for building, on either lake, has tremendous market value if handled well. Planning, design and construction must be of excellent quality in order to justify the price that would have to be asked for such property. These factors tend towards high density for a good payoff, if qualify is to be compromised.
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For the site on Shadow Mountain lake, Dan Wilhelm is proposing 97 units, which brings the density to 3.9 units per acre, far below what is allowable in an T-l zone. This will require an excellent project to make the payoff.
By offering three types of bousing, and appealing to three types of buyers, the owner has further broadened his projects marketability. The trend in housing is for high energy efficiency, which if anphasized, could significantly boost the projects appeal.
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PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT:
Based on the facts accumulated on this site concerning its history and present state, I have chosen to accept the program as outlined by the owner, Dan Wilhelm. His attempt to appeal to three different market levels (single family, multi-family oondaniniums and multi-family town-houses) has merit, judging frcm the market demands in the Grand Lake area.
I will site and design the 24 townhouses, based on Wilhelm's plats in conjunction with good solar orientation. Because these units are slated to be closest to the lake shore, they are highly susceptible to the chilling winter winds. This factor along with solar orientation will help determine siting and building design.
The 54 condominium units slated for the southeast part of the site are closer to the trees on a steeper grade and will be less affected by the winds. But solar access will be much harder to achieve.
Parking and driveways for both groups must be provided, while still allowing for ccnrnunity open space. The soil excavated frcm these buildings could be used to help stabilize the eroding shoreline. Retention ponds will probably have to be constructed to help stablize drainage and erosion, (see GEOLOGY)
The areas around the buildings will have to be revegetated with native plant materials. Any unstable slopes (see GEOLOGY) will have to be regraded. Generally, the entire site will have to be cleared of the
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rsimants of the previous owners (see PRESENT CONDITION) and revegetated. Public use of this land will have to be limited to certain controllable areas. Parts of the site with severe problems will have to be isolated until stability is achieved, (see SITE PROPOSAL)
Access to Shadow Mountain National Recreation Area will have to be provided through the site. Access to the waterfront must be available to condominium owners as well as townbouse owners.
The buildings thenselves must comply with the general aesthetics of the area. Wood frame construction must be used in all highly visible areas. Other types of construction may be utilized in less visible areas. Different energy systems must be explored to determine which are best suited for each type of unit.
The townhouses must be luxury-oriented with features expected in a unit fronting a lake. The appeal must include the family mrket (see MARKET STUDY) as well as the singles and couples market. These units must include two to three bedrooms, all utilities and elegant living/ entertaining spaces (see following TABLE). The allowable square footage should range frcm 1800-2400 square feet per unit.
The condominiums have a much broader market appeal. While not fronting on the lake, they will have lake access, and provide the same breakdown of unit size as the townhouses (see following TABLE). These units will generally be smaller, ranging frcm 1500-2100 square feet.
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DEVELOPERS PROGRAM
Building Parking & Driveway Open Space Total Number Units Units Acre
Single Family 4.59 2.00 1.48 6.1 19 2.4
Condominium .58 1.40 2.27 3.75 54 14.4
Townbomes .74 .86 1.54 3.14 24 7.6
Open Space 9.76 9.76
Totals 5.91 3.86 14.95 24.72 97 3.9
Townhcmes Condominiums
% No. Sq. Ft. % No. Sq. Ft.
1 Bedrocm 25 6 1800 25 13 1500
2 Bedroom 50 12 2100 50 28 1800
3 Bedrocm 25 6 2400 25 13 2100
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BIBLIOGRAPHY
Cairns, Mary Lyons. Grand Lake in the Olden Days. Denver, CO; The World Press, Inc., 1971.
Chen & Associates, Inc. Preliminary Engineering Geology and Subsoil Investigation for a 30 Acre Parcel. Denver, 00, Septanber 18,
1975.
Department of Energy. The Passive Solar Design Awards. Washington,
D.C., D.O.E. 1979.
Mazria, Edward. The Passive Solar Energy Book. Emmaus, PA. Rodale Press, 1979.
Pena, William, William Cardell and John Focke. Problem Seeking. Boston. Cathers Books International, 1977.
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SITE PLAN
SHORELINE LANDING
THESIS1 DAVID THOMAS
MAY 8,1981
SCALE I SO
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SITE SECTION DD r-io-
SITE SECTION AA r-20
SHORELINE LANDING
THESS: CAVID THOMAS
A r~
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FRAMING
SHORELINE LANDING
THESIS1 DAVID THOMAS
MAY 8,1981
SCALE % I
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44
NORTH ELEVATION
THREE BEDROOM
TWO BEDROOM
TWO BEDROOM
ONE BEDROOM
SECTION CCI
SHORELINE LANDING
THESIS DAVID THOMAS
MAY 8,1981
SCALE' Mi*-r


THREE BEDROOM
TWO BEDROOM
TWO BEDROOM
ONE BEDROOM
LEVEL ONE
SHORELINE LANDING
THESIS: DAVID THOMAS
MAY 8. 1981
SCALE A-l (T)
ro


THREE BEDROOM
TWO BEDROOM
LEVEL TWO
SHORELINE LANDING
THESIS DAVID THOMAS
MAY 8,1981
SCALE '/V- I' (T)


THREE DEDROOM
LEVEL THREE
SHORELINE LANDING
THESIS'- DAVID THOMAS
may a 19a
SCALE w-r
0


THREE BEDROOM
TWO BEDROOM
SHORELINE LANDING
THESIS1 DAVID THOMAS
MAY 8.1981
SCALE 'V- T
0


THREE BEDROOM
TWO BEDROOM
LEVEL FIVE
SHOREUNE LANDING
THESIS- DAVID THOMAS
MAY 8,1981
SCALE' 'A'-I'


ONE BEDROOM
SHOREUNE LANDING
THESIS DAVID THOMAS
MAY 8,1981
SCALE- 'A1 = I


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