Citation
Mesa Valley state office center, Grand Junction, Colorado

Material Information

Title:
Mesa Valley state office center, Grand Junction, Colorado
Creator:
Worrell, Paul T
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
124 unnumbered leaves : illustrations, maps, plans ; 28 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Public buildings -- Designs and plans -- Colorado -- Grand Junction ( lcsh )
Office buildings -- Designs and plans -- Colorado -- Grand Junction ( lcsh )
Office buildings ( fast )
Public buildings ( fast )
Colorado -- Grand Junction ( fast )
Genre:
Designs and plans. ( fast )
theses ( marcgt )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Designs and plans ( fast )

Notes

General Note:
Cover title.
General Note:
Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for a Master's degree in Architecture, College of Design and Planning.
Statement of Responsibility:
[Paul T. Worrell].

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
09029962 ( OCLC )
ocm09029962
Classification:
LD1190.A72 1980 .W67 ( lcc )

Full Text


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THESIS PROJECT FAliL 1980
f
Paul T. Worrell


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
To Lori for all of her love,joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness and self-control during the past months and years.


Table of Contents
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS .................................. 1
PROPOSAL .................................. 2
Verbal
The Questionnaire/lnterview
Site Selection
Schedule
OBJECTIVES .........................................3
Spatial
Physical
Social
Biological
Economical
Political
FACTS/SITE ANALYSIS ................................4
Spatial
Prosimity maps Land use
Vehicular Circulation Pedestrian Circulation Views Photos Physical Climate
Topography/Hydrology
Soils
Biological Vegetation Human Factors
CONCEPTS ............................................5
Matrix
Spatial Organization Conceptual Master Plans
NEEDS ...............................................6
Building Code Checklist Zoning Code Checklist Space standards & allocations Program Development
APPENDIX ...........................................7
Questionnaire used Case study


proposal


PROPOSAL
The thesis project that will he undertaken is the Mesa Valley Governmental Office Center, located in Grand Junction, Colorado, The majority of the building will be used and owned by the state, with the city and county potentially lease-purchasing some space in the building.
There is now approsimately 30*000 square feet of leased state office space scattered around the city of Grand Junction that is presently in use. There is a projected increase in personnel due to the rapid growth of the western slope area.
The Downtown Development Authority of Grand Junction has spearheaded the project to put together a package before the next session of the legislature to gain funds for the project.
There has been approximately three months of participation in this project already, through the Colldge of Environmental Design and the Kellogg Foundation and Mesa College. The participation has been that of developing a survey instrument and conducting a survey to obtain the necessary information from the agencies that would use the building. (See the questionnaire/interview)
An issue that will be looked at on the project during the site selection process (now in progress) is that of land economics versus proximity advantages, and interagency relationship priorities and community reinforcement. There are many political persuassions as to where the location of the project should be, with the state 'preferring less costly


land ( outside the downtown area) and the city leaning to the downtown area, closer to the city and county existing operations. The issue of site selection will be briefly discussed following this proposala
There are a couple of major programmatic issues that will be addressed. They are the interrelationships between the state, county and city governmental operations and the inter-agency relationships within each of these individual governmental entities.
Some of the design issues to be addressed are building effeciency, energy effeciency (conservation and solar) and the integration of an institutional office complex into the character of existing'architecture and cityscape in Grand Junction.
Some of the goals and objectives of the thesis project will be:
a.) to help the city and county in obtaining needed funds for the project for future commitments from the state? b?) to help all three governmental entities see a successful solution tothe project and some of the potential alternatives?
c. ) design a successful energy effecient
project for today to exemplify the importance of governments leading the way in energy conscious design of our built environment;
d. *) accomodate any flexibility and expansion-
ability.'
These goals are not in any order of priority.


The approximate gross area of the project is 50,000 to 80,000 square feet. The state will be relocating approximately 40,000 to 50,000 square feet, while the city and oounty together will be using 10,000 to 20,000 square feet8 Other possible users, such as quasi-public, nonprofit organizations and other public service types could be an additional 10,000 to 15000 square feet.
Things that I expect to get from the thesis ares
a. ) a participation in the public admin
istration's attitudes and procedures in architectural problems;
b. ) the parallel design of an actual
architectural problem;
c. ) involvement and participation in the
rapid growth of the largest city on the western slope of Colorado;
d. ) a learning experience in the information-
gathering and programming procedures that is involved in such a project.
The approach proposed for the programming aspect of this project will follow the Problem Seeking method of programming written by William Pena.
The approach is as follows:
1. ) Goal setting what the client want to
acheive and why.
2. ) Collect and analyze facts
3'.") Uncover and test concepts- programmatic
concepts that relate to performance problems
4.) Determine needs- Distinguish needs from
wants in space


5o) State the problem- an explicit statement of an architectural problem which is the starting point for design
6.) Schematic desi:gn
The final product of the thesis will be an architectural design solution for the Grand Junction Governmental office Complex. It will be presented graphically in both two and three dimensions with a programmatic booklet stating the program procedures, the problem(s), and the graphic and verbal solution to the problem.
The Selected Advisory Board that has been selected but not totally confirmed are:
a. ) John Prosser (preparation instructor),
follow-up advisor, has the expertise in city hall planning and design;
b. ) Gary Long Director of College of
Environmental Design, expertise in environmental systems;
c. )Dr. Davis Holder- expertise in structural
systems;
d. ) Skip Grkovic Director of Downtown
Development Authority of Grand Junction-


expertise in planning and Grand Junction city characteristics;
e) Greg Eranta architect / SERI expertise in large scale commercial solar applications, both passive and active.


THE QUESTIONNAIRE / INTERVIEW
The participation has been that of developing a survey instrument to obtain information from the agencies that might use the building. The questionnaire^ main incentive was to:
a. ) determine the city/county/state agencies that
would be better accomodated in a consolidated governmental complex.
b. ) determine the interagency relationships and
agency-to-public relationships.
c. ) determine area parameters and other programmatic
quantatative information.
The outline followed for the production of the questionnaire was from an architectural viewpoint rather than a political or sociological viewpoint. The interviews have been carried out by students and faculty of the College of Behavioral" Studies at Mesa College.
The questionnaire/interview method of information gathering is one that must be looked at in the right perspective
It is not a foolproof method to obtain consistant information, especially when there is a variety of interviewers.' However, the people in charge of the actual information gathering process are excellent educators and very experienced in the questionnaire/ interviewing method of information gathering.
To obtain the necessary information for an architectural program there are two alternatives to choose from:
1.) to say all or most information gathered is
inconsistant and probably in error, therefore, adjust information at you own discretion for a more consistance and accurate form of information."


2 o) to say all or most of the information gathered is consistant and probably correct in most cases, therefore, no ma.jor adjustments at your own discretion, except for very obvious errors.
The alternative chosen for this project is alternative #2, This was chosen due to the fact that, after seeing the answered questionnairs, the overall conclusion was that they were very well monitored by the interviewers and consistantly and seriously answered by the respondents.


SITE SELECTION
A. ) Problems
Economics versus proximity advantages Interagency relationships' priority Community reinforcement
Public Transportation and central location
B. ) Places potential location
Mall Area
1. " (Advantage) Less expensive land; possible
$4 to $7 square foot cheaper.
2. (Disadvantage) Distance from city/county/ federal agencies
3* (Disadvantage) Not centrally located for public and private use
4, ) (Disadvantage) Less helpfull to Grand Junction
in their downtown redevelopment
Horizon Drive
1*) (Advantage) Closer to private commercial areas 2.') (Advantage) Less expensive land; possible $3 to $6 square foot cheaper 3Y) (Disadvantage) Distance from existing govemraenta operations
4v) (Disadvantage) Not centrally located for public u
5. ) (Disadvantage) Less helpful to the redevelopment
of downtown.
Downtown Area
1) (Advantage) Proximity to existing governmental operations
2. ) (Advantage) Centrally located for public use
and transportation
3) (Advantage) Help downtown in redevelopment 4.) (Disadvantage) Land cost more expensive Clifton Area
1*) (Advantage) Less expensive land 2".) (Disadvantage) Distance to existing governmental operations
3. ') (Disadvantage) More industrial land zoning Co') Preference
For this thesis project the downtown area has been chosen for the site, due to the central, public location, community reinforcement for redeveloping downtown and the close proximity to existing federal, county and city governmental operations. The relationships between state, city and county agencies and state-public relationships have proven throught the interviewing process that the close proximity between state, county and city is preferable. It should be said that the Downtown Development Authority, Kellogg Foundation and possibly the College of Environmental Design will be involved in a more extensive site study program later in the year."


objectives


DESIGN OBJECTIVESEnvironmental and Projected
Reason Undertaken: *To consolidate govern-
mental agencies To help establish the public/govemmental anchor downtown in assisting Grand Junction in their redevelopment
Responce to
Environment: *Orientation to existing
governmental uses
Federal/County/C1ty Keep to smaller, pedestrian scale
Energy Conservation
SPATIAL
Views:
Expansion/
Flexibility:
Circulation:
Open Space:
Identify and maximize
Planned future expansion
Some internal flexibility of use
Autominimize vehicle impact, possible common use parking for other governmental employees and handicapped public
Pedestrianclarity, control point (lobby) and service processional movement
Optimum15 to 25%
PHYSICAL
Climate: *Maximize use of available
sun
Minimize effect of winter winds
Stabilize temperature and moisture for human protection and comfort
Energy: Minimize fossil fuel use


Environmental
Control Systems:
Natural Lighting:
Structure:
SOCIAL
Psychological Environment to Achieve:
Promotion of Certain Activities and Quality Level:
Maintain Individual Identy:
Interaction/Privacy Priorities:
Effective Flow of People and Things
Establish and control humidity, MRT and Temperature Temperatureoptimum 65-80
Reduce enery load More comfort to human physiology
Expressive, human scale,
Grand Junction character
Public Building/Orientation/ Entrance/Welcome statement
Public interaction and use Semi-publicinteraction between agencies Privateprivate and controlled interaction/ security
Plaza/ small group interaction
Pedestrian scale of forms and spaces
Progression of space public/semi-private/ semipublic
General interaction of people priority over full provacy
Sequential flowplanned encounters
Separated flowpedestrian/ auto planned non-encounters Mixed flowhigh public space, chance and planned encounters


BIOLOGICAL
Human Factors: Handicapped: Vegetation:
ECONOMICS
Priority of Life Cycle:
Minimize maintenance and operational cost:
POLITICAL
See Dreyfuss Chart
Access for all
Use of full-potential of acclimated types Non-existing
Operational'over initial cost
Natural lighting Coolingpossible solar active system
Heatingsolar passive and conventional methods Wateractive and conventional use of highly durable and protective materials
Successful consolidation of state' agencies already located in Grand Junction Accomodating a mixture of city and county agencies that might lease-purchase space


site analysis


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Local Climatological Data
Annual Summary With Comparative Data
1979
GRAND JUNCTION, COLORADO
.... 11 n.... - 1 ""
Narrative Climatological Summary 4
Located in a large mountain valley, the Junction of the Colorado and Gunnison rivers, on the vest slope of the Rockies, Grand Junction has a climate marked by the wide seasonal range usual to interior localities at this latitude. Thanks, however, to the protective topography of the vicinity, sudden and severe weather changes are very infrequent. Elevation of the valley floor ranges from 4,400 to 4,800 feet above sea level, with mountains on all sides at distances of from 10 to 60 miles, reaching heights of 9,000 to over 12,000 feet. ~ * ,. * ' .
This mountain valley location, with attendant "valley breezes" provides protection from spring and fall frosts, resulting in a growing season averaging 191 days in the city of Grand Junction. This value varies considerably in theioutlylng districts, is about the same in the upper valley around Palisade, and 3 to 4 weeks shorter near the river vest of Grand Junction, where the "valley breeze" ia leas effective. Farming areas located on-mesas also enjoy longer frost-free seasons than adjacent lower lying ground where cool air tends to collect at night; this effect is more noticeable in the vest, or lower portion of the valley. The growing season is sufficiently long to permit growth commercially of almost all fruits except citrus varieties. Summer graslng of cattle and sheep on nearby mountain ranges ia extensive; foundation herds are-wintered in the valley and there is some winter feeding of fat cattle and sheep. -j _{ ; ,Â¥ < t
' T T..... ; -* The Interior, continental location, ringed by mountains on all aides, results in quite low precipitation in all seasons. Consequently, agriculture is dependent on Irrigation, for which an adequate supply of water has been available from mountain snows and rains.
Summer rains occur chiefly as scattered light showers from thunderstorms which develop over nearby mountains. Vinter snows are fairly frequent, but mostly light and-quickly melt off. Even the Infrequent snows of from 4 to 8 inchea, which are heavy for this locality, seldom remain on the ground for prolonged periods. Blizzard conditions in the valley are extremely rare.
Temperatures at Grand Junction have ranged from 105* to -23*, but readings of 100* or higher are infrequent, and about one-third of the winters have no readings below zero.
Suaster days with maximum temperatures in the middle and low 90's and minima in the low
60's are common. Relative V. dity is very low during the summer, with values close to such other dry localiti southern parts of New Mexico and Arizona. Spells of cold
winter weather are some .olonged due to cold a:r becoming trap: :n the valley.
Winds are usually very 1 ... during the coldest weather. Changes in ...ter are generally
gradual, and abrupt changes are much less frequent than in eastern Colorado. "Cold Waves" are rare. Sunny days predominate in all seasons.
Flying weather conditions are generally favorable for operation of light airplanes, with visibilities of 20 miles or more' and ceilings of 5,000 feet or higher prevailing approximately 95 percent of the time. Gusty surface winds are rather frequent in the spring and early summer. The prevailing wind is from the east-southeast due to the "valley breeze" effects, but the strongest winds are usually from the south and southwest, and are associated with thunderstorms or with pre-frontal weather.
PjO O NATIONAL OCEANIC AND / ENVIRONMENTAL DATA AND / NATIONAL CLIMATIC CENTER
I Iwdwl ATMDSPHFRIC ADMINISTRATION / INPDRMAT1CN SFPV/IPP / ACUCVIlie hi r
HvCMuj.;t'!cu| t>$rs


Meteorological Data For The Current Year
Station ofcahG JUNCTION, COLOHAOO yACKER MELO Standard time ueed MOUNTAIN Latitud. jv* 07' N longltuda !0, W U Elevation (ground) MO Y* 1*79

Month Temperature F dayt 6 *F n*ei mXVMt pi tat ion In inctwe Relative humidity, pet. Wind i! S jl; {( Number o* deyt Average tat.on preeaure mb
Average* Eitremet Bate 1 Him nt Snow, toe pallets 1 05 1 11 (Local ? 17 time 1 21 Reaultam I If Faatatt mile Su***w to at neat J u A 9 I! II | £ Temperature F
h I* 11 Maximum Minimum
E .1 si J 11 j 1 r a & i ? i r 5 | j i; 1 ! h 1 5 I 11 If i I 6 J If 1 (b) hi hi hi n Elev 6859 teet m.s.1.
ji* 25.2 7.9 16.6 VO IS - 10 n 1*95 c 1.16 0.19 12-ii 18.7 *.* 12 60 12 75 63 U! 0.7 2.6 2* N 29 IS 7 6 1 22 15 9 0 1 0 27 11 9 852.7
MB JJ..1 11.8 21.5 V 1 15 - 7 5 1 IS* Of 0.6 1 0.26 21-2V 9.6 V 7 21-2* 67 71 75 V 0* 0.5 2.5 19 y IV 56 .C s 7 16 9 1 0 1 0 11 26 1 51.7
*** SO.S 11 7 VI. 1 66 21 16 V 712 c 2.02 o sa 10-31 3. v J. J 31 60 56 55 76 01 1 .* 7.6 26 5 w 29 v 7 6.7 * V 16 10 1 0 0 0 0 IT 0 51.1
kPQ tv 7 V0.2 52.5 11 16 2 7 >TI 6 0.62 0.11 9 1 C 1 1 0.9 1 60 35 11 51 I* 1 .0 6.7 16 Sy 17 6* 5. A 1J S 12 V 0 0 1 0 0 7 0
ravt 72. J ve .2 60. 1 87 3 J2 1 1 192 52 l.*S 0.65 6 1.0 5.0 68 62 IT! 56 11 l .* 9.6 VI y 6 6 1 T 5. 1C 6 1 1 7 1 2 0 0 0 1 0 669.6
JUK 86.1 SS.9 71.0 IOC 2 v *L> ,V 17 225 0.76 0.66 7-8 0.0 0.0 6* 26 2Q| 33 15 3.5 9.8 V0 y 10 76 1. 1 6 5 3 0 2 0 17 0 0 0
96.2 63.1 76. 7 101 1t 9 0 v 2 6 0.06 0.0* 6 0.0 0.0 6 8 26 19| 30 16 3.6 9.7 56 sc 1 76 V 1 I s 11 3 1 0 6 0 25 0 0 0 51.0
a uG 88.1 60.8 7 V 6 102 > >1 2 1 110 0.6 1 0.27 19-20 0.0 0.0 50 lv 2? V0 l* 1.5 9.1 10 sc 10 6 6 *. IS 5 11 7 0 V 0 17 0 0 0 852.6
SLP at. 7 57.1 72.0 V5 7 hi U 0 215 0.01 0.01 10 0.0 0.0 16 21 16 25 11 2.7 9.2 10 NC 11 68 2 * 1 5 V 3 1 0 ? 0 11 0 0 0
OCT 72.3 VS .5 58.9 85 7 let it 209 27 0.25 0.21 20-21 0.0 0.0 V 6 29 25 37 12 1.9 6.6 IV sy 20 7 v v. v | IV 9 8 2 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 52.7
NOV U.i 21. C 11.2 56 V do 9 v 5 0 1.02 0. V7 19-20 8.2 v. 7 19 70 55 51 66 10 1.7 6.9 19 w 9 5 v 12 5 13 6 2 0 V 0 26
DEC 36. S 17.2 26.9 V5 9 la ? 1175 0 0.27 0.11 27-28 3.5 1.7 22-21 80 65 70 61 06 2.S 6.2 17 NC 1! 59 6 8 1 9 6 IV 5 2 0 1 0 5 31 0 58.5
AUb .V nay MAY HAV 1
vtau 62.6 18.7 50.6 102 5 6117 1261 6.90 0. vs 8 *9.5 5.0 8 62 65 *2 SI 12 1.7 7.6 61 6 61 .7| 1 IW 12 116 72 16 17 16 70 50 163 10 652.9
t DA1A CORKLCTED AFTER PUBLICATION Tilfc MONTHLY ISSUE.
Normals, Means, And Extremes
i Temperature* *F Normal ('agree dayt Bata 66 *F Precipitation in mebat Relative humidity pet. Wmd wAe 1 \ w ii Mean number of dayt Average nation preeaure mb.
Normal Extreme* Water equivalent Snow, lot pellet i 05 II 1 11 cal 1 17 dm 1 21 ) If li Fatted Sunrita to tuneet 1 I b 1* i! | £ h t* I! Tampere Me*. turee *F Min
A si il i 1! > 11 i > I s ! li 1 > 11 1 > 1 > li 1 li 1 If i 1 1 II I (hi hi li hi n Elev. 9ie feet Nil.
(a) 13 35 31 31 IS is S3 - 16 16 16 16 S3 15 1) I 11 31 13 S3 S3 33 33 II S3 16 14 14 16 7
J 36.7 16.5 26.6 60 1971 -23 1 v6 1 1190 0 0.6V 2 v 6 1957 T 1961 0 .6* 1986 IS. 7 1987 9.1 1987 78 67 66 77 5.6 ESC 56 t 1950 59 6.2 9 7 15 7 3 9 1 0 19 31 5 989.6
f 6 .0 21.2 13.6 66 197c -IV 1951 6 79 0 0.61 1.16 1**6 T 1972 0 .53 1960 18.6 1968 1.6 19*8 70 82 66 65 6.6 ESI 56 M 1967 66 6.2 6 6 16 4 1 9 2 0 2 24 1 51.6
H 52.6 29.6 61.2 61 1971 5 19*6 7 36 0 0.76 2.01 1979 0.02 1972 0 .18 1969 16.9 1966 6.) 1966 60 60 16 51 8.3 CSC 65 S 1956 66 6.0 9 IV 7 1 1 1 0 e 1* 0 68.9
A 66.6 16.6 51.7 15 196V 1 1 1975 *0* 0 0.79 1.95 1965 0.06 1956 1 .31 1965 16.1 1975 6.9 1975 56 16 27 65 9.6 CSC 59 N l5 67 5.9 6 10 12 4 a 2 a 0 0
N 75.6 66.5 62.2 95 1956 26 1970 113 v 7 0.61 I.T9 1957 I 1970 0 .7* 1973 8.0 197* 8.0 1979 80 29 2 3 lv 9.6 CSC 65 N6 1966 71 8.6 10 1 1 10 a 9 2 0 1 0 69.3
J 65.9 56.6 71.3 103 1971 IV 1 V 76 20 209 0.18 1.07 1969 T 1961 1 .87 1969 o.o 0.0 6 V 25 19 IS 9.8 ESC 66 S 1981 19 1.9 15 10 5 6 0 8 0 IS 0 0 0 51 .2
J 91.1 69.2 76.7 105 197a V 6 l v t a 0 *25 0.66 1.51 197V 0.01 1972 1 .62 1976 0.0 0.0 V 7 26 21 15 9.3 ISC 86 S( 1951 16 6.2 16 12 5 8 0 9 0 24 0 0 0 53.0
A 69.1 61.6 75.V 103 1 96 V v 3 1S.8 0 322 1.05 1 6 1957 o.ov 1916 1 .21 195) 0.0 0.0 69 11 22 16 9.0 C JC 86 a i9*r 75 6.1 16 1 J i 7 0 7 0 20 0 0 0 53.0
S 81.3 51.0 67.2 96 19/7 .9 1976 60 126 0.6V 2.12 196$ T 1953 1 .35 1965 3.1 1965 3.1 1965 so 12 25 V0 9.0 fit 61 * 1 6 6 T 79 1.5 17 6 5 5 a 8 0 5 0 a 0 51.6
0 67.9 61.9 5 V 9 66 1965 1 t 1975 32V 1 1 0.91 1.65 1972 0.00 1912 1 .26 1987 6.1 1975 6.1 1975 55 17 12 V 6 1.9 ESC 61 N* 1 5* 76 6.1 15 8 a 1 a 0 0 V 0 56.2
N 50.9 26.6 19.6 75 19/7 1 9 76 756 0 0.61 1.69 1 95 V o.ov 1976 0 .82 1976 12.1 1*66 9.6 1*56 66 5 1 *6 66 6.6 ESC 86 Na 1 *5* 61 I.S 11 * 1 1 S 1 a 1 0 1 21 a 86.1
0 59.6 19.6 29.5 tv 1971 it 1 V 76 1 101 0 14.7 1967 4.0 1947 76 62 61 76 5.8 CSE 96 NN 1951 60 8.6 10 7 16 5 2 e 7 0 9 10 2 55.2
jut JAN AU8 OCT JUN JAN JAN AIN
TR oS.I 60.2 52.7 105 1976 It 1 V6 5 5605 1 1*0 8.vi I.V6 1917 0.00 1952 1 .17 1969 11. 1987 9.1 1981 59 6 1 15 51 8.1 ESC 66 S l51 TO 5.1 160 106 119 70 9 31 66 26 116 7 12.5
J
Moans and txtraaai above are froa oxiatln; and canpxrable Annual titraaai have baan exceeded at other altaa in the
locality as follows! Matin, uu monthly precipitation 3.71 in heptenber 1896; aaxiaua precipitation in 24 hours 2.50 in October 1908j aaxiaua snowfall in ia hours 17.0 in November 1919.
(a) Length of record, /tars, through tha currant year unless otherwise noted, based on January data
(b) 70* and above at Alaskan stations.
* Less than one half.
T Trace.
N068MLS Based oa record for the 1941-1970 period.
DATE Of AN EXTRLNE The aost recent In cases of Multiple occurrence.
PREVAILING NINO DIRECT!* Record through 1963.
NINO DIRECTION Numerals Indicate tens of degrees clockwise free true north. 00 Indicates cala.
FASTEST MILE NINO Speed Is fastest observed 1-Minute value Me the direction Is In tees ef degrees.



*T-1 > i..iM-i'**.
Ml ii IJ *-__________-
Average Temperature
Ymt Jan Fob Kr Apr an Jun. i Ally Aug [ S.pt 1 Oct Nov Ow [Annual
IMO at.* !>.. *7.3 5*.* *7.a 76.* 60.6 77.* *7.9 ?*.o 36.0 34.0 51.3
Mai 32.0 3 6.5 **.2 *9.2 *3.5 i*.2 77.a 75.* *3.4 52.4 *1.0 1*.9 53.4
M*2 2*. it. b J*. 2 5*. 1 *0.* 72.0 79.* 7i.9 *7.1 55.1 a?.* sa.7 51.2
Mai 32.2 36.6 ?.* *C. 3 *1.3 70.* 79.9 75.0 *9.4 5*.* *1.3 33.8 55.2
Mas 25.1 3a.6 ao.a *6.0 *2.2 *9.5 77.* 7 *. * *9.3 36.4 *1.1 12.2 53.0
Mas 32.0 36.6 *2.1 *7.6 *3.* 64.6 76.5 76.2 *6.0 54.2 3$. 6 IS.5 82.7
IMt 2*. 1 33.i *5.6 57.* 5*.* 7*. * 79.9 7S.6 6T.7 9.* 37.9 32.7 S3.*
Ma7 22.01 3* 0 **.2 51.0 i* 3 **.* 76.* 7a. c 70.0 56.5 3*.5 26.6 52.2
Mas 2 S. * 33.2 35.* 52.* *3.* *9.6 77.1 7*.* *9.6 3*.* 32.1 26.4 51.2
Mae l*. 23.3 *2.* 5*. 1 *1.0 69.0 77.? 75.5 *7.* 51.1 a.a 29.* 50.9
MSB 23.1 3a. J a 1. J 52.* 5* 1 70.8 7e. 9 73.7 66.2 W0.7 *1.6 JS.a 52.6
MSI 2S. 3 30.7 *1 .0 51.7 *2.1 *6.0 79.* 73.9 *6.3 52.* 36.2 23.0 50.6
Msa ?*.* 31.a 36.a 5 J. 1 *2.6 7 3 31 7 7.3 7*,* *6.6 37. * 15.6 26.0 52.1
MS 3 31.5 31.1 *3.1 a*. 3 5*. 3 7*.C 79.3 72.6 *9.2 54.9 *?.* 27.) 52.9
MSa 32.7 ao.7 aC.O 5*.* k 71.1 79.9 7*.5 *7.1 35.0 *2.* 26.1 54.3
MSS 23.* 21.S IS. 5 .... 60.* *9.* 79.9 76.C 69.9 65.9 35.1 IS.6 51.2
MS* 3*.7 so.* *2.3 52.* **.5 75.* 77.1 73.5 70.6 54.3 16.3 2*.9 53.3
M57 25.0 31.0 3.2 *6.9 3*.8 *9.7 7*.l 12.e *5.2 3*.3 16.3 34.5 50.9
MSS 2*.* J*.* 0.2 9.2 *5.4 75.5 76.0 76.* *7.2 53.1 *0.4 35.6 54.7
MS* 2* 35.7 *1.3 52.* *2.9 75.7 79.5 75.3 *4.6 52.* 36.1 32.2 51.3
M*0 2*.* 29 2. * *1.* 79.6 79.5 76.6 *9.2 sa.o 1.5 30.0 53.2
Mil 2*.a 37.1 *2.* 50. 3 *3.0 7*.2 76.9 76.2 56.9 52.9 37.9 23.1 52.2
Mi? 22.* 37.9 J# .* 55.5 *1.7 71.3 7*.9 75.9 fc 7 * 5*.* *6.1 29.1 13.2
(Mil 12.1 36.* al.* 31.1 **.3 71.* 79.6 73.* *9.6 *1.3 a* .0 27.1 53.1
Mia 2 5.5 2*.5 37.0 50. 3 *2.3 70.2 61. 3 76.1 *.* 56.0 36.1 30.* 51.9
MiS 32. J 32.9 *0.* .... 70.3 76.9 76.* *3.4 56.1 *6.3 Slot 54.1
Mi* ?a.S 30.* **.l 53.* .... 72.0 60.9 77 0 *9.1 56.S *1.9 29. S 56.1
Mi* 21.* li.a 1.1 51.* 5*.5 *6.6 77.7 7*.2 *7.5 55.3 1.0 It.3 52.0
M*0 IS.a 3 .0 *3.6 a. 3 5* 1 72.* 76.0 TO. J **.2 51.* 36.0 22.7 St. 1
Mi* 11.5 13.* 36.1 53. **.* *7.7 60. 3 79.5 *9.3 *7.4 39.2 12.7 53.1
1*7.0 2*.I 0.9 39.6 as.* .... 71.* 7f 1 76.7 6.l *6.6 *1.0 11.9 52.9
1*71 27.7 3* l *1 .1 52.2 *0.1 7* 1 60.2 76.5 *3.2 52.3 36.4 2S.9 52.1
M72 30.0 3*.* a*.a 53. 3 *3.1 7*. 3 0.2 77.1 *6.1 5*.0 37.1 22.7 53.6
M7I 11.5 2*. 1 2.1 *6. 1 *1.5 70.3 76.1 77.a *8.7 36.4 *1.2 30.1 51.0
l*7i 1*. M.* *6.2 51.0 *5.0 7*.9 78.3 75.4 **.* 36.2 19.6 27.1 51.4
M7S 20.0 33.0 *1.0 a.* 57.1 *7.5 76.3 75. *7.1 53.5 36.2 27.9 50.2
M7* 21.7 38.2 36.7 .... *1.6 70.9 79.* 75.3 *6.9 51.2 39.1 27.6 51.9
M77 25.* 37.1 *0.6 5*.* *3.7 79.1 0.2 76.3 70.2 56.2 *0.3 13.3 55.2
Ml 2*.a 3*.* a* 7 52.3 56.* 73.0 76.* 7*.5 *5.7 54.7 0.2 16.0 52.0
1*7* tcoao 1*.* 23.5 *1.1 52. S *0.3 71.0 71.7 7*.6 72.0 56.9 33.2 26.9 50.t
c 25. a 33.3 *2.7 52.2 *1.* 71.9 76. 3 7S * *4.9 5*. 3 39.6 2*. * 52.4
n*i J*.0 3.9 5*.* *5.0 75.3 66.5 92.a 69.1 60.4 67.3 51.3 36.* 45.0
M* 1S.1 22.7 30.* 3*.* *6.3 57.2 6*.? *2.0 53.1 *1.2 21.3 16.2 *0.1
Heating Degree Days
Sum July Ao( ** Oct Nov Dm Jm FA Mm Apr May Jun* ToUi
1959-60 0 p 1 36 366 *01 1007 11*3 1026 697 359 15* 0 5753
>9*0-41 0 a 17 5 J* *9* 107 7 1099 77* *9* 1* 127 2 574*
19*1-6? - 0 0 1 * 3*7 609 129 3 1295 75? M 26* Ml 16 5980
19*2-*J 0 0 19 255 *2C 109* 1*13 733 706 11 32 3 55 31
1963-** 0 2 1*5 *2* l 1 * 1220 1022 6* l 17 14* 16 5**7
1964-45 0 2 19 2 M *00 1C6 7 100* 93 756 33* 15* 6 5762
19*5-6* 0 0 136 209 9* 94 0 1 ?* *59 562 317 59 * 990
1946-67 0 2 1* 25* *26 109 7 126* 795 536 39* 213 21 5195
19*7-46 0 0 21 52C 71* 1 2 15)2 *05 6*6 55? 216 2* *763
19*6-49 0 12 a* 3*6 6C* 1 30? 1125 87* 12* ! 52 3 5791
19*9-70 0 0 20 5*5 76* *9 5 1100 *71 772 54* 115 19 5565
1970-71 0 0 93 95 7ia 1019 1152 56 73* 376 162 5*29
1971-72 0 0 1 J* 3*9 792 120* 107* 613 3*3 3** 139 0 5*5*
1972-73 0 0 31 335 6 32 1 30) 1*51 99* 705 *19 1 J9 *9 65* J
1973-7* 0 0 72 2** 706 1075 1*87 126C 513 15 b* 32 569*
1976-75 0 0 *0 26* 75* 11*7 1367 SMI 73* 551 2*9 51 *111
1975-7* 0 0 15 356 56 11*1 1335 775 07 3*4 122 25 56*2
1976-77 0 0 l 21 7*9 1 15 3 12*7 775 7*1 250 9* 0 5511
1977-76 0 1 1 7 21* 73* 975 1096 5? 5*1 573 210 9 30*4
1976-79 9 6 95 313 737 1510 ia*3 115* 732 377 M2 IT **
1979-60 0 3 0 ?U9 9*5 1175
Coding Degree Days
Year Jan FA Mm Apr ;M*r->ui July j AuiSmk -l M* j Dtcl Total
19*9 0 0 d 3 104 12* 61 *56 156 0 0 1329
1970 0 3 c c * u. *2 *30 72 0 0 17*9
MTl 0 O u r 34 ?* 9 25 6 ) 0 0 1313
I6TJ 0 r c e IS 222 10 393 101 6 J 3 11*7
1975 0 0 0 0 9 13) M 126 106 9 0 9 10O*
197* 0 n 0 0 32 195 **Q 32* 191 0 0 0 111*
1977 0 0 c 14 *0 29 77 ?C 180 10 0 0 1597
1979 0 6 52 225 26 310 215 27 0 0 12*3
Precipitation
Ymt Jan FA Mm Apr May Juna Ju*y Aug 8*pt Nov Dae Annual
I960 1.43 1.0* o.tt 0.9* T 0.07 0.4* 0.21 2.35 l.ai o.ts 1.07 10.90
19*1 0.77 0.93 1.70 1.31 1.03 0.76 0.15 1.51 2.90 2.73 0.24 0 *9 14.74
19*2 0.M 1.17 0. 54 1.2* 0.15 0.01 1.15 0.6* 3.41 0.53 9.13 o.ot 6.4*
19*3 0.15 a.*2 1.53 0.20 1.0* 0.77 3.0* 1.96 0.31 0.44 0.29 0.2* 7.SO
19*a 0.27 0.61 0.66 1.47 0.5* 0.5* 0.75 0.13 T 0.80 0.9* 0.2* 7.16
19*5 0.2* 0.83 0.64 1.25 0. 5 1.32 0. *0 1.43 0. 10 0.71 0.24 0.53 8.06
19*6 0.23 0.31 0.29 9.61 1.25 0.07 0.35 1.66 0.12 0.42 1.46 0.60 6.11
19*7 0.*0 0.11 0.60 0.5* 0.*1 1.38 0.0* 1.27 0.26 1.9 6 0.69 O.a* 6.27
19*6 o.so 1.86 1.5* 0.** 0.27 0.6* 0.66 1.76 0. *4 0.57 0.70 0.TQ 10.01
19*9 1.33 0.*0 1.75 0.7* 0.7* 0.53 0.*1 0.32 1.72 0.72 0.15 0.31 9.42
1950 l.ao 0. 7 0.42 0.5* 0. * 0.01 1.00 0.21 1.05 T 0.32 0.30 4.16
1951 0.76 0.03 0.25 O.S* 0.4* 0.26 0.1* 1.16 0.32 1.27 0.28 1.69 6.*2
1952 O.a* 0.36 0. 70 0.57 0.** 0.2* 0.2* 1.25 0. 39 0.00 0.5? 0.5* 5.61
1951 0.53 0.1* 1.20 0.71 0 2 0.17 0. M 2.61 T !.* 1.22 0.3* 9.23
195* 0.18 0.27 0.67 0.52 0.5* 0.3* 0.*0 0.59 2.51 0.63 1.69 0.3* 9.32
1955 0.41 1.05 0.17 1.11 1.30 0.2* O.a* 0.65 0.36 0.02 0.3* O.lt 6.75
M56 1.07 0.70 0.07 0.2* 0.2* 0.30 0.53 3.0* 0.01 0.5 0.16 0.*7 *.*1
1957 2.** 0.43 0. 73 1 5 r 1.7* 0.41 0.57 3.* 3.0* 2.2* 1.15 0. 3 15.69
M56 0.55 0.70 3. 6* 0.06 0.1* 0.7* 0.0* 0. 70 1.3* 0.33 0.52 0.11 6.SI
1959 0.34 0.90 0. 1C 0. 5 0.3* O.C* 0.06 3.96 3.62 0.66 0.50 Q.66 6.21
1940 0.11 1.24 1.0* 0.7* 0.35 0.17 0.13 0 7 0. *5 0. * 0.39 0.70 6.2*
1941 T 0.18 1. a 7 0.65 1.11 T 0.03 1.63 2.22 0.70 0.6* 0.43 9.*6
1942 0.3* 1.0* 0. a 7 0.2M 0 7 0.1 7 0.1c 0.06 0.15 l. l O.a* 0.3* 3.3* 4.02
19*3 0 *9 C. 55 0.12 C.Jl 0.61 0. 3 l 75 0.*? 0.60 0.36 0 5 7.32
196* 0 7 O.C? 0.70 1.37 0.*l C 16 0. 5 1.16 C. 36 T 1.05 0.53 *.*
M45 0.44 0.9* > 1.35 ;. ti 0.** 3.67 2.52 l.*0 0.6? 0.7* M.l*
194* 0.65 0. * O.C* 0.6 3 .11 £> li .1! 0.52 0.26 1.23 O.a? 1.76 7.52
1**7 0.25 0.22 0. if 0.06 1 52 4** O.S* 3. 37 3.*3 0.33 1.1* 7.48
M** 0.26 l i 1 0. * 0.6 7 1 H J ?* .. * 1 .37 0.07 0.9* 3.*? 0. a 7 7.a*
19*9 1.03 C.*0 3.67 C.13 * 2 jr 0.21 C.68 l.as 2.01 0 5 0.!* 10. :i
1970 0.5? 0.05 1.75 0.7* 0.60 0.** 0.78 1.56 0.5* 0.3* 6.30
1971 0.1* 0.13 0.32 0.*2 ] .10 0.03 0.15 1.0? 0.56 1.13 0.5* 0 7 4.30
197? 0.20 T O.C? 0.11 0.** 3.6* 0.0! 0.2* C. 72 3.*5 0.6* a. 7* 7.33
197) 9.79 0.12 0.45 0.66 1.45 0 7 O.S? 0.6? 0.33 0.20 0.61 0.6? 7.9*
197* 1.20 o.*o 0.*1 1.03 C.01 0.1* 1.53 0.*8 0.36 0.72 1.16 0.12 6.20
1975 0.51 0.*9 1.7* 1.16 1.23 0.43 1.39 0.0* 0.1* 0.65 0.39 0.50 16
197* 0.11 0.61 0.75 o.*o l.*9 0.1* 0.20 0.31 0.4? 0.12 0.0* 0.01 5.27
1977 0.37 0.06 0. 50 0.5* 0.5* 0.0* 0.6* O.S* 0.52 0.50 0.70 0.3* 5.44
M 7* 1.0* 0.6* 1.1* 1.1* 0.55 0.01 0.2? 0.5* O.a* 0.03 0.4? 1.30 7.69
1979 1.3* 0.43 2.02 0 .*2 1.48 0.78 0.06 0.61 0.01 0.25 1.02 0.27 6.90
rcoao
MEAN 0.60 0.58 0.76 . 0.7* 0.7* 0.** 0.60 1.02 0.66 0.66 0.40 0.5* *.**
Snowfall
Saaaon j Juif Aug SaptjOct Nov Dm JSO FA Mm Apr May Juua tam
19a0-al 0.0 0.0 O.Oi O.C 3.6 .a 7.2 1 0.4 0.9 0.0 0.0 21.2
19*1-4? 0.0 0.0 0.0 O.Q 2.2 3.2 2.0 8.4 J.7 9.0 T 0.0 M.S
M*2*1 c.o n.o 0.0 O.C T 0.2 0.6 l.a 4.4 T T 0.0 4.0
19* 3-** 0.0 0.0 0.0 T T 3. 3 3.0 a. J *. T T 0.0 17.5
Maa-aS 0.0 0.0 a.a 0.0 T 0.4 2.6 0.2 0.6 4.4 T 0.0 11.1
1945-44 0.0 0.0 (i.a 0.0 l.a 3.5 1.4 3.5 T 0.0 0.2 0.0 12.5
1 9*4-* 7 0.0 0.0 0. j o.n 2.5 a. 1 5.2 1.0 1 3 T 0.0 O.C M.l
19*7-46 0.0 O.C 0.0 0.0 7.1 *. 1 5.* 16.4 la. 1 0.0 0.0 50.1
l*a*-*4 3.0 c.o o.a T 7.2 *.* 16.2 5.0 11 .a T 0.0 0.0 51.0
19*9-50 0.0 9.0 0.0 T T 3.0 19.5 T 2.2 T 7 0.0 2*.7
19*0-51 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 f 2.4 1C.1 10.0 1.6 0.2 T 0.0 2*.7
1951-52 0.0 0.0 J.O T 1.7 6. 3 1.9 .5 4.4 0.0 0.0 0.3 23.3
1952-53 0.0 0.0 0.0 O.C 3.6 7.2 .2 l.a 6.7 ?.* T 0.0 2?.4
1953-5* c.o 0.0 3.0 T 3.3 3.4 3.C 1.0 3.1 0.0 0.0 c.o 14.3
1956-55 0.0 3.0 0.0 0.0 1.7 1.5 4.1 1 *. 9 2.0 5.5 T 0.0 34.9
M5S-5* 0.0 9.0 U.O T 4.7 1.5 3.2 4.3 2.8 T 0.0 0.0 21.2
1456-5? 0.0 9.0 o.a l.M 2.3 *. 33.7 0.3 2.7 1.6 0.0 0.0 4.0
1457-56 -.0 3.0 0.0 o.p 3.9 . * *.? 7.2 1 . T 0.0 0.0 10.7
M58-S4 0.0 0.0 0.0 o.r 3.2 1.1 .5 3.4 0.1 T 0.0 0.0 15.5
1454-60 3.0 3.0 o.u 0.0 0.3 *.* 2.3 13.6 5.4 1 T 0.0 20.4
1960-61 3.0 0.0 0.0 0.3 2.2 1.1 T 1.2 7.6 0.4 0.0 0.0 12.9
16*1-? .* j. :. 1 1 a.* .1 l.a 1 * a.u 4.0 > .4
14*2-43 c.o 0.0 O.C n.c 3.3 *.4 17.7 0.2 j 0.2 c.o U.O 10.4
l4* 3-4* 3.0 c.o 3.0 u.c T 7.0 .0 3. 6.0 0.4 T 0.0 21.0
14**-6? c.o 0.0 0.0 O.C 12.1 3.0 5.9 7.5 3.6 0.2 * 0.0 12.5
M*5-** 3.0 0.0 3 .1 0.9 2.6 3.5 11.0 5.* 0. 3 0.* f >.0 29.4
1466-47 c.o 3.0 u.o 1 .* .2 *. 1 2.4 T 0.2 O.a T 4.0 16.*
1*47-66 3.3 o.n J.O 3.5 16. 7 3.7 0.4 U. 3 9.4 T u.o ?*.?
M 8 6 0. J c.r 3.3 0.3 c.: * ).* 3.8 9.5 T c.o 26.7
1*6 7C O.C i.e O.U 0.* 5.2 T li.a 1.2 c.o 0.0 1*.?
M?y-7l 0.0 O.C 3. C 3 1 . 3.2 IrSl 0.2 1.1 T 0.0 13.2
1*71-7? 0.0 o.r c.c C S.v 1 .a T C.O 7 0.0 c.o 16.6
1*7?-7) c.o c.o o.u 7 1. 1 9. - 12.8 1.2 1.3 2.0 T 0.0 la.O
1*7J-T* u.o 9.3 0.0 C.O 5.7 1 7.0 ?. 1 .2 0.0 0.0 37.1
I*?*-?? 3.0 0.0 0. J T 0. 1 * 6 7.4 ? .* 1* 3 1.3 0.0 *1.4
1475-7* 0.0 O.C u.o 6.1 3.4 7.2 1.7 .C *.* 0.2 0.0 u.o 29.9
1476-7T u.o 0.0 0.0 C.C T 0. 1 *.2 T 2. J 1.7 c.o 0.0 6.1
1477-76 0.0 0.0 O.u T 3.3 2.5 12.0 2.5 0.4 T T 0.0 2C.9
1476-79 1979-60 u.C 0.0 0.0 O.C O.C o.u O.C 0.0 2.4 6.2 11.6 3.5 16.7 4.6 3.4 1 1 5.0 c.o 52.5
EC060
e *4 u.o 0.0 0.1 0.4 3.2 5.6 6.0 .3 .2 1.2 0.2 3.0 27.4
# Indicates a station move or relocation of instruments. See StatLon Location table.
Record mean values above are means through the current year for the period beginning in if*2 £2* temperature and precipirat ion, 1947 for snowfall. Data are from Cooperative and City Office location through March 16, 1946 and from Airport locations thereafter.


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BUILDING CODE CHECKLIST
sheet 1
PROJECT NAME AND NUMBER DATE
^7TAT£ 4 mental. aliolst *jx\
LOCATION
Jusbr^M u).
USE .
APMiNem^nve cFrvue
PREPARED BY PHONE
f^UL k/^^^LL
BUILDING CODE FIRE ZONE
Ut5C hll
BUILDING OFFICIAL CONSULTED PHONE
Total Floor Area- Estimated Single Floor Area-Estimated
Actual Floor Areas
CHAPTER 5 GENERAL REQUIREMENTS
A3 AssovUh
Occupancy Type g 7 _________TYPES OF CONSTRUCTION
Basic Allowable Area (Table 5-C) 1- Ff2-. UlMi wm-Uc II FP- n iwa 13,5 ha 1 utej!7+ar Y 1-UK P.5DO
Increase for Fire Zone 3 1- -
Increase for Separations (7,3 or'all jsid<= 1 is)
Increase for Fire Extinguisher System ? i I 1 j s t ? 5
Total Allowable Area (One Floor) j & i 1 J i B?* 1
!
Total Allowable
MAXIMUM
ALLOWABLE Stories
BUILDING
HEIGHT feet
Increase for Fire Sprinklers
1-Ftt TYPES OF CONSTRUCTION
L UaIiVwv 1 iz I 2 \ z
1 \0O j (o^D

<7
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BUILDING CODE CHECKLIST
Sheet 2
SEPARATIONS BETWEEN OCCUPANCIES
MA
FIRE RESISTANCE OF EXTERIOR WALLS (TYPE IV & V CONSTRUCTION)
I 2o 9
UBC
OPENINGS IN EXTERIOR WALLS (TYPE IV & V CONSTRUCTION) |
Klc+ pgvwMe* Uss =3 ^yokttXcA Uss -tVam (
CHAPTERS 6-15 REQUIREMENTS OF OCCUPANCIES
SANITATION BOILER ROOMS
CHAPTER 16 RESTRICTIONS IN FIRE ZONES


BUILDING CODE CHECKLIST
Sheet 3
CHAPTER 17-22 REQUIREMENTS FOR CONSTRUCTION
Fire Resistive Requirements
'T^Uc M*. n-A)
^_________________________ 1R2. TTFP tg tug.
EXTERIOR BEARING WALLS 4 4. 4 4
INTERIOR BEARING WALLS ? z l 1
EXTERIOR NON BEARING WALLS 4 4 4
STRUCTURAL FRAME 3 z l l~UT-
PERMANENT PARTITIONS i 1 l
VERTICAL OPENINGS ) 2 2 1 1
FLOORS 2 Z ftT
ROOFS 7. i 1 to-f
EXTERIOR DOORS AND WINDOWS
PROJECTIONS FROM BUILDING


BUILDING CODE C HECK LIST
Sheet 4
j floor Area Sq. Ft. Sq. Ft. Person NO. Persons Add' 1 Loads Total Load /Floor Exits Rea. /Floor Width of Exits Floor Width of Stairs
1 i i i


| .
! X l \
|
; 1 1 1
Total No. P< arsons
***Occupant Load 50
Main Exit Size (if required)
No. Exits required Total bldg. ^ > 3 ^cp£-
Per Floor ^ 1
Arrangement of Exits
Distance to Exits
\*0 w/j Sft
quired) . / ft
Total bldg. ^ ~7 3 \0O^/^\^CYi [4
\ c\l / f"r>
Exit Doors
siuvs<
qt
LP'
0
C a£')V**Jh
Zc Ul
Width and Height Width
mm. .1
max.
3
Height
\do/% muc,! SWiv^ ia dp V'*V


BUILDING CODE CHECKLIST
Sheet 5
CHAPTER 33 (Con't)
CORRIDORS
Width 4411
Dead End Corridor Limit ^Q
Fire Resistance
Openings
STAIRS
^o> \]^Y
CLi
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3

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1 ll |
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lo" ov yv\p
Rise and Run
Distance Between Landings Stairway to Roof Fire Resistance
Smoke Proof Enclosure Required
\z
SPECIAL PROVISIONS


ZONING ORDINANCE CHECKLIST
Sheet 1
PROJECT NAME {j f&AO JUsblOl^
CCbAfrJSK
LOCATION .
Cfi^xo auJcivoJ, .
USE
PREPARED BY Q^{
ZONING ORDINANCE ^ I ZONING OFFICIAL CONSULTED ZONE CLASSIFICATION
YARD REQUIREMENTS FRONT JsJy^
SIDE
REAR
SIDE

o U>-f Uas
ALLOWABLE PROJECTIONS INTO SETBACK
PHONE
BULK OF STRUCTURES


ZONING ORDINANCE CHECKLIST
Sheet 2
MAX. ALLOWABLE HEIGHT STORIES (jfe FEET
ALL0WAL3E FLOOR AREA
OPEN SPACE REQUIRED
OFF STREET PARKING REQUIRED
OFF STREET LOADING REQUIRED
i /z.ge> pf1 0r6-F.A
^OjOoo-f ^ Z4o
SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS of CONSIDERATIONS


SPACE STANDARDS f or
OFFICE AND OFFICE-RELATED USES
E PERSONNEL WORK SPACES Allowable Square Feet
Classif ication Actual Access Total i PsMSe
Administrative 80 15 95 U
Specialized 52 8 60 gv
Clerical 36 8 44 *=£>
Secretarial 56 12 68 -75
initions:
Office Personnel Work Space Space to accommodate individual office personnel in each of the four classifications.
Administrative Personnel such as engineers, project directors, accountants, planners, supervisory analysts, etc., whose work involves regular and heavy visitor traffic. Allowable Square Feet will accommodate: one desk with chair, two visitor chairs, one file cabinet, and one bookcase.
Specialized Personnel such as computor programmers, non-supervisory analysts, auditors, social workers, case aides, etc., whose work involves occasional and light visitor traffic. Allowable Square*Teet will accommodate: one* clesk with chair, one visitor chair, and one file cabinet or bookcase.
Clerical Support Personnel who do not perform extensive or regular typing duties. Allowable Square Feet will accommodate one desk or_ work table and one chair.
Secretarial Support Personnel who perform extensive typing duties on a regular
basis. Allowable Square Feet will accommodate one secretarial L-shaped desk and chair.
o
All office personnel should be included in these four classifications. Do not include any personnel whose work stations are in non-office type of spaces such as libraries, reproduction rooms, storage rooms/areas, large filing areas, mail rooms, ADP equipment rooms, etc.
SR SPACE REQUIREMENTS ^PTION AREA
inition: Area to accommodate visitors for short waiting periods.
v^MSERENCE AREA Allowable Square Feet
Capacity Actual Access Total
4-6 100 20 120
8-12 200 20 220
14-16 225 30 255
18-24 400 40 440
26-30 480 40 520
31+ (520, plus 20 for eac]
in excess of 30)
inition: Area for use by varying number of persons to confer around a table with some
degree of privacy.
r
Accommodation for conference table and chairs is not included within Allowable Sq. Ft. for Administrative or Specialized Personnel Work Spaces. Such conference accommodations should be Included in this category of Other Space Requirements.
Allowable Square Feet 13.33 sq. ft. for each sea
ice of State Planning and Budgeting
October 1975


'"TNG ROOM
Capacity
30-36
37+
Allowable Square Feet Actual Access Total 480 40 520
(520, plus 13.33 for each seat in excess of 36)
inition: Room for use by varying number of persons who are seated but not tables.
CIALIZED ROOM/AREA
inition: Space to accommodate a specialized function not included within any of the
preceding space categories, such as: library, reproduction room, storage room/area, large filing area, mail room, AUP equipment room, guest office, interview cubicle, etc.
is: 1. Storage room/area located away from office space (e.g., in sub-basement) must
be identified separately from storage room/area located within or in immediate proximity to office space.
2. Allowable Square Feet for each Specialized Room/Area must be worked out with State Buildings Division.
ETIONAL STANDARD EQUIPMENT Allowabl e Square Feet
Equipment Item Actual Access Total
A^erox (reproduction) Machine 32 12 44
jouble Pedestal Desk w/Chair 36 8 44
£ Single Pedestal Desk w/Chair 29 8 37
p.Credenza 21 3 24
E.Table. Wall Positioned w/Chair 36 8 44
p. Table, Conference Positioned w/Chairs 44 50 94
6. Moveable Stand 6 6 12
H Arm Chair 6 6 12
l.Side Chair . 6 6 12
j^File, Standard 6. 3 9
ji.File, Legal 8 3 11
bAFile, Legal, Side Access 11 4 15
H-Bookcase 8 4 12
^.Storage Cabinet 10 4 14
7. Storage Shelving 10 4 14
^Roller Shelf Unit 11 4 15
P-Power Shelf File 45 12 57
U.Coa track 15 5 20
inition: Justified equipment items which do not fit within the Allowable Square Feet
for the Office Personnel Work Spaces or within the Allowable Square Feet for
Reception Areas, Conference Areas, Meeting Rooms, or Specialized Rooms/Ar eas.


Program Coding
Office Space: A Administrative
P Specialized S Secretarial C Clerical
Equipment/Work space r
(See standard equip 0' on State Standards List on previous page)
Records/Files: " " "
Specialized Activities:
(See specialized room/area on previous page)
Conference: 4-7 15/mth
(capacity) (usage)
(See conference area of Standards)
Reception:
(See Standards List)


DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH
Environmental Services
Office Space A 6 @ 115 = 690 s of 0
P -13 @ 80 = 104-0
S 3 @ 75 = 225
1955
Equipment/Work Space D 1 @ 2b
E 5 @ 44
F 4- 9 94.
J 1 9 20
Computer 1 @ 50 690
Records/Files K 2 @ 9
L 4- @ 12
N 6 @ 12
Uranium Mill Tailings 60 sf
Facilities & Source
Records 55
Micro-film Files 4-0
Maps & Plates 20
Documents (Library) 150 b63
Storage Samplings 60 sf
Office Supplies 90
Special Activities Lab-Radiation
Measurement 4-20 sf
Lab-Biochemical 800 1220
Conference Capacity
4- 7 - 15/mth
8 -12 - 4-/mth
25 -30 - l/mth
Shared
2 9 120 sf 24-0
1 9 220 220
Reception (Shared) 4- seats @ 13o3 sf 60sf 60
4-938


DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH
Handicapped Childrens Program
Office Space P 3 @ 115 = 3^5sf S 2 @ 75 = 150 C 2 @ 50 = 100 395 595
Equipment/Work Space D 1 0 24 E-l@44 F 1 @ 94 G 3 12 J 1 0 20 198
Records/Files Medical Records 20 Office Files 20 L 3 @ 12 _J6 76
Storage Office Supplies 30 0 1 0 14 P 4 @ 14 S 2 0 12 U 4 0 15 1B5 184
Special Activities Testing Audio-Visual 150 150
Conference Capacity (shared) 4-7 2mth 812 3mth
Reception (Shared) 4 seats @ 133 60 60 1263


PUBLIC DEFENDER
Office Space A 6 115 = 690
P 1 80 a 80
S 2 @ 75 3 920
Equipment/Workspace D 1 24 ss 24
G 3 36 = 108
132 132
Files/Records L 5 @ 11 s 55 55
Storage P 5 @ 14 a 70
(Boxes) 4 50 sf 120
Conference 4 7 seats 5mth 120 sf
(Could be shared) 120
6 seats @ 13*3 = 80 80
(Can not be shared) -----
Reception
1427


EMPLOYMENT SERVICES
OfficeSpace A - b @ 115 = 460
P -2b @ 80 =1920
S - b @ 75 = 300
26M 2680
Equipment/Work Space A - 2 @ = 88
E - 8 @ 44 = 352
F - b @ 94 = 376
G -15 @ 12 = 180
J - b @ 20 = 80
1076 1076
Records/Files 7 @ 12
K @ 84
Closet files 250
~y& 33b
Storage ? 0 4 @ 14 = 56
P 6 @ lb = 84
S -paper 100
27fo 24-0
Miscellaneous 1000
Conference 17 24 Imth @ 440
(Can be shared) shared
Reception 75 seats @ 13.3 = 1000 1000
6330


LABOR & EMPLOYMENT (Division of Employment & Training
Western Slope Regional Administration Office)
Office Space A 10 @ 115 1150 S 1 @ 80 = 80 C 2 @ 50 = 100
T5W 1330
Equipment/Work Space A 2 @ 44 = 88 D 2 @ 24 = 48 E 4 @ 44 = 176
F 3 A 94 = 282 G 3 @ 12 = 36
J 2 @ 20 = 40
6?0 670
Files/Records K 21 @ 12 = 252
Reports & Correspondence 70 322
Storage S 1 @ 14 = 20
0 1 @ 12 = 12 32
Miscellaneous Refrigerator 30 sf
150 180
Conference 8 12 l/mth @ 220 17 24 l/mth @ 255
(Should be shared)
Reception (Could be shared)
2372


DEPARTMENT OF LOCAL AFFAIRS
Office Space
Equipment/W ork
Records/Files
Storage
Conference
Reception
Area
A - 1 115 : = 115
P -22 @ 80 < *1760
S - 2 @ 75 ! = 1-50
C - 1 @ 50 = = 50
5075 2075
A - 2 @ kk = 88
D - 6 @ 2k = 144
E - 5 @ kk = 220
F - 1 @ 9I4, = 9k
G - 2 @ 12 = 2k
J - 2 @ 20 = ko
m 610
K - 1 @ 9 = 9
L -12 @ 11 = 132 PT lkl
(Most files in individual offices or
Stationary 12 File Folders Tablets 2
Paper,supplies20 mailing 6
Â¥ 2 @ Ik = 28'
S 2 @ 12 = 2k 9^"
4- 7 12/mth @ 120 8 -12 2/mth @ 220 13 -16 Vmth @ 255 17 -2^ Vmth @ 4$0 (Share larger conferences) 1 @ 220
4 @ 13.3
96
220
50
3192
sj


WATER CONSERVATION BOARD (Fieldwork)
Office A
Equipment/Workspace C
D
(Drafting) E J
Storage P
S
(Map File) V
2 @ 115 = 230
1 @ 37 = 37
1 @ 24 = 24
1 @ 44 = 44
1 @ 20 = 20
123
6 @ 14 = 84
1 @ 12 = 12
1 @ 30 = 30
123
Conference
Reception
4 7 l/mth Shared Shared or not needed
230
125
126
481


REVENUE
District Tax Office
Office Space
Equipment/Workspace
Records/Files
Conference
Reception
A - 1 @ 115 = 115
P - 3 @ 80 = 240
S - 3 @ 75 = 225
"3Bo 580
A 1 @ 44 = 44 D 1 @ 24 = 24 E 3 @ 44 =132 F 1 @ 9^ = 94 G 5 @ 12 = 60 1-25 @12 =300 J 2 @ 20 = 40
3W 694
K - 12 @ 11 = 132
0 - 3 @ 14 = 42
P _ 8 @ 14 = 112
286 286
Can be shared with other
revenue departments
4 7 4/mth 120
8 -12 4/mth 220
can be shared
20 25 @ 13.3 = 330 sf jm
2230


REVENUE
Drivers License (Public use) Office Space
Equipment/Vorkspace
Storage
Records/Files
Special
Conference
Reception
3 @ 115 = 3^5
2 @ 75 = 150
6 @ 50 = 300
755 795
E - 2 @ kk = 88
F - 5 @ 9k =470
J - 3 @ 20 = 60
618
0 - 2 @ Ik = 28
P - 3 @ lk = k2
70
K - 8 @ 9 = 72 72
Interview Room @ 120 120
Oral Test
Share with other revenue offices
8 12 2/mth
16 @ 13.33 = 200 200
1875


TAXPAYERS ASSISTANCE
(privacy for taxpayers is
Office Space
Equipment/Workspace
Records/Files/Storage
Reception
essential)
P 2 160
A 1 (Shared)
Micro-film reader, shared
General Tax Information K 20 Tax Forms 20'
Â¥o
10 @ 13.3
(During income tax returns) Could share
160
^0
130
330


DEPARTMENT OF PERSONNEL
(Link with Western Slope Labor & Employment )
Office Space A 2 @ 115 = 220 P 2 @ 80 = 160 c i @ 50 = 5Q Wo Jj40
Equipment/Workspace F 2 @ 9^ = 188 G 1 @ 12 = 12 I ^ @ 12 = ^8 WE 2^8
Records/Files (For staff only) Exams (L) 4-0 Completed Application ^-0 Application 4-0 TW 120
Storage Office Supplies 100 100
Special Activities Testing- Conference Space 220 (Could be shared) 220
Conference 8 12 3/mth Same as testing room
Reception Can be shared with others ^ seats @ 133 = 55 sf 55
1183


CIVIL RIGHTS COMMISSION
Office Space A 1 @ 115 = H5 P 2 @ 80 = 160 C 1 @ 50 = 5Q S 1 @ 75 = 75 4oo 400
Equipment/Workspace A 1 @ 44 = bb E 1 @ bb = bb F 1 @ 9b = 9b G 1 @ 12 = 12 J 1 @ 12 = 12 206 206
Records/Files Client Records 18 Resource Info. 50 Past Client Records 20 100 100
Storage Forms 25 Supplies 25 3o 50
Conference b 7 daily @ 120 8- 12 12/mth @ 220 Needs access to larger shared conferences Conference room @ 220 220
Reception 8 @ 13.3 HO (Possibly shared) 110
1100


VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION
(Branch of Social Services, Relates to Employment Service)
Office Space A 3 @ 115 = 345 P 9 @ 80 = 720 S 5 @ 75 = 375 l44o 1440
E qui pme nt/W ork s pa c e A i @ 44 = 44 E 2 @ 44 = 88 F 1 @ 94 = 94 J 2 @ 20 = 40 266 266
Records/Files/Storage K-17 @ 11 = 18? N-16 0 12 192 01 7 @ 12 = 84 -1Z3 463
Special Activities Interviewing 450 4-50
Conference 4-7 7/mth @ 120 (Can be shared)6 120
Reception (Can be shared) 10 @ 13.33 =130 130
2869


ADULT PAROLE
Office Space A 2 @ 115 = 230 P 6 @ 80 = 430 S 2 @ 75 = 150 C 4 @ 50 =? 200 1050 1060
Equi pme nt/Workspace A 1 @ 44 = 44 D 2 @ 24 = 48 F 1 @ 94 = 94 G 6 @ 12 = 72 J 1 @ 20 = 20 275 275
Records/Files Parolee L 6 @ 9 = 54 Office L 6 @ 9 = 54 Other 1 6 @ 9 = 54 Duplicate =120 25T" 282
Storage Forms 280 Office Supplies 120 400 400
Special Activities Interview @ 120 120
Conference (Shared Space) 8 12 2/mth 13 16 3/mth 17 24 2/mth
Reception 12 @ 13.33 = 160 160
2300


DIVISION OF YOUTH SERVICES
(Relate to Employment Services)
Office Space A 2 @ 115 230 P 8 @ 80 = 640 S 2 @ 75 = 150 1020 1020
Equi pment/W ork spa c e A 1 g W = 44 D 4 @ 24 = 96 F 3 @ 94 = 202 G 3 @ 12 = 36 458
Records/Files L 8 @ 11 = 88 88
Storage 0 4 @ 14 = 56 S 2 @ 12 = 24 So 80
Special Activities Counseling 120 sf 120
Conference (Share possibly with Vocational Rehabilitation, Employment Services, etc) 8 12 2/mth 13- 16 3/mth
Reception (Can not be shared) 8 @ 13.3 = HO 110
1876


PARKS & RECREATION
(Public counter for selling) (Expansion ability)
Office Space A 8 @ 115 = 920 P 22@ 80 =1760 S 5 @ 75 = 375 C 1 @ 50 = 50 3105 3105
Equipment/Workspace A_l@Jj4 = i44 D 2 @ 2b = 4-8 E 1 @ = 44 p 1 (§ 9A4. = 94 G 1 @ 12 = 12 J 1 @ 20 = 20 252 262
Records/Files K 3 @ 9 = 27 L 5 @11 = 55 0-2 @1^ = 28 P 2 @lb = 28 TJ5 1^0
Storage Supplies 0 2 @ 14 = 28 S 2 @ 12 = 2b 5? 52
Special Activities Library 150 150
Conference (Could be shared) 17 2b Vmth bbo
Reception (Could be shared) 8 @ 13.33 110
^259


MOTOR VEHICLE DEPARTMENT (County)
Office Space
E qui pment/W ork space
Records/Files
Storage
Reception
A 3 @ 115 - 3^5
p 4 & 80 = 320 <
S 2 @ 75 = 150
C 28@ 50 =1400
2215
E 2 @ 44 = 88
G 6 @ 12 = 72
J 2 @ 20 = 40
loo 200
Registration Lie, Place 1876
Shelves 216
License Permits Tabs 42
P 2 Titles @ 14- 28
K 2 @ 9 18
2180 2180
Office Supplies Lie* Plates Titles Forms
(P) 20
(P) 350 (P) 15
(P) 120
505
(Over-the-counter)
Lines
15 seats @ 13*3 200
505
200
5300


TRI-RIVER AREA EXTENSION (County)
Office Space A 1 @ 115 P 7 @ 80 S 5 @ 75 = 115 = 560. = VA
1050 1050
Equipment/Workspace D 5 @ 24 E 3 @ 44 F 1 @ 94 G 1 § 12 = 120 = 132 = 94 = 12 ~1W 358
Records/Files Administrative L 3 @ 11 = 33 4-H Q 4 @ 15 = 60 K 25 @ 9 -225 318 318
Storage Supplies Reference Bulletins Clerical Equipment 70 sf 100 100 125 r 395
Special Activities Printing & Workroom 300 Ki^henfffomemaker) 6§8- 980
Conference 18 20 440 20 50 Shared 440
Reception 6 @ 13.33 80 80
3621


AUDITORIUM (public and agency use)
Seating Capacity: 200 (permanant) 2700
Lobby (partially shared w/ bldg, lobby) 300
Office 200
Support
* storage/maint./operation 500
' audio visual 100 600
4100


SOLUTION


Mesa Valley State Office Center
Grand Junction, Colorado Fall 1980 Thesis P. Worrell


DRIVERS LICENSE & MOTOR VEHICLES

FLOOR PLAN KEY
Offices Administrative - A
Specialized 0
Work Area. Clerical - CW
Conference -C
Storage / Files -s
Maintenance - M
Mesa Valley
Grand Junction, Colorado
FIRST FLOOR
2 5 K 20
State Office Center
Fall 1980 Thesis P. Worrell


FLOOR PLAN KEY
Offices Administrative -A
Specialized -o
Work Area. Clerical -CW
Conference -c
Storage / Files -S
Maintenance -M
SECOND FLOOR
Mesa Valley State Office Center
Grand Junction, Colorado
Fall 1980 Thesis P Worrell


FLOOR PLAN KEY
Offices: Administrative - A
Specialized -0
Work Area. Clerical -cw
Conference -c
Storage / Files -s
Maintenance -M
THIRD FLOOR
2 5 to 20
Mesa Valley State Office Center
Grand Junction, Colorado Fall 1980 Thesis P. Worrell


FLOOR PLAN KEY
Offices Administrative -A
Specialized -o
Work Area. Clerical -cw
Conference -c
Storage / Files -s
Maintenance -M
FOURTH FLOOR
^Hkj
Mesa Valley State Office
Grand Junction, Colorado
Center
Fall 1980 Thesis P. Worrell


FLOOR PLAN KEY
Offices- Administrative -A
Specialized -o
Work Area. Clerical -cw
Conference -c
Storage / Files -s
Maintenance -M
FIFTH FLOOR
IflJLJ--- '
Mesa Valley State Office Center
Grand Junction, Colorado Fall 1980 Thesis P. Worrell


5=3 JZZ r==f

:_1ra3 3E3: L t
i
T- :n_E' LI ! n i i
7vf
11 i ii L * MX
.4..

13_____________
ffTOHEHEBBaHTO
B5HI
7~T\
fiBEBEEfl


r
EBEEH
:
Bt
JJ
SOUTH ELEVATION
Mesa Valley State Office Center
Grand Junction, Colorado Fall 1980 Thesis P. Worrell


Mesa Valley State Office Center
Grand Junction, Colorado Fall 1980 Thesis P. Worrell


SECTION
b-b
Mesa Valley State Office Center
Grand Junction, Colorado Fall 1980 Thesis P. Worrell


STRUCTURE
Mesa Valley State
Grand Junction, Colorado
Office Center
Fall 1980 Thesis P. Worrell


COOLING TOWER
EXHAUST AIR
H W STORAGE
RA BLDG CHASE --------OA ECONOMIZER
BLDG CORE SINGLE DUCT COOL AIR
'V'-'V
EXTERIOR ZONES VAR VOL REHEAT
INTERIOR ZONES VARIABLE VOL
hot zone
cool^ -----1
1_ <-
warm plenum


PLENUM SCHEMATICS
MECHANICAL SYSTEMS
ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS
DAY LIGHT/SUN CONTROL
Mesa Valley State Office Center
Grand Junction, Colorado
Fall 1980 Thesis P. Worrell




QUESTIONNAIRE
State/County/City: _____________________ Department/Agency: _______________________
Name of Respondent: ____________________ Title: ___________________________________
Telephone: _____________________________ Interviewer: _____________________________
**************
A. GENERAL
A. Please supply an organizational chart or table for your department/agency.
B. Please provide a description of your current and projected staff according to job classification and number of persons. This information should be consistent with the following: (1) positions presently authorized for your operation, and (2) positions allocated but not currently filled. Estimate your staff needs for 1985-90.
Summarize job classifications according to the following code: (A) = Administrative, (P) = Specialized, (C) = Clerical, (S) = Secretarial, (N) = Non-Office personnel. See attached sheet for definitions of these categories.
Classification Number of Persons 1980 Number of Persons 1985 Number of Persons 1990 Code
















-2-
Classification Number of Persons 1980 Number of Persons 1985 Number of Persons 1990 Code